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Sample records for emplaced ophiolitic nappe

  1. Eclogite nappe-stack in the Grivola-Urtier Ophiolites (Southern Aosta Valley, Western Alps)

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    Tartarotti, Paola

    2013-04-01

    In the Western Alpine chain, ophiolites represent a section of the Mesozoic Tethys oceanic lithosphere, involved in subduction during the convergence between the paleo-Africa and paelo-Europe continents during the Cretaceous - Eocene. The Western Alpine ophiolites consist of several tectonic units, the most famous being the Zermatt-Saas and Combin nappes, and other major ophiolite bodies as the Voltri, Monviso, and Rocciavrè that show different rock assemblages and contrasting metamorphic imprints. The Grivola-Urtier (GU) unit is exposed in the southern Aosta Valley, covering an area of about 100 km2; it is tectonically sandwiched between the continentally-derived Pennidic Gran Paradiso Nappe below, and the Austroalpine Mount Emilius klippe above. This unit has been so far considered as part of the Zermatt-Saas nappe extending from the Saas-Fee area (Switzerland) to the Aosta Valley (Italy). The GU unit consists of serpentinized peridotites that include pods and boudinaged layers of eclogitic Fe-metagabbro and trondhjemite, rodingites and chloriteschists transposed in the main foliation together with calcschists and micaschists. All rocks preserve particularly fresh eclogitic mineral assemblages. The contact between the serpentinites and calcshists is marked by a tectonic mélange consisting of mylonitic marble and calcschist with stretched and boudinaged serpentinite blocks. Continentally-derived allochthonous blocks ranging in size from100 meters to meters are also included within the ophiolites. New field, petrographic and geochemical data reveal the complex nature of the fossil Tethyan oceanic lithosphere exposed in the southern Aosta Valley, as well as the extent and size of the continental-oceanic tectonic mélange. The geological setting of the GU unit is here inferred as a key tool for understanding the complex architecture of the ophiolites in the Western Alps.

  2. Ophiolitic detritus in Kimmeridgian resedimented limestones and its provenance from an eroded obducted ophiolitic nappe stack south of the Northern Calcareous Alps (Austria

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    Gawlick Hans-Jürgen

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The causes for the Middle to Late Jurassic tectonic processes in the Northern Calcareous Alps are still controversially discussed. There are several contrasting models for these processes, formerly designated “Jurassic gravitational tectonics”. Whereas in the Dinarides or the Western Carpathians Jurassic ophiolite obduction and a Jurassic mountain building process with nappe thrusting is widely accepted, equivalent processes are still questioned for the Eastern Alps. For the Northern Calcareous Alps, an Early Cretaceous nappe thrusting process is widely favoured instead of a Jurassic one, obviously all other Jurassic features are nearly identical in the Northern Calcareous Alps, the Western Carpathians and the Dinarides. In contrast, the Jurassic basin evolutionary processes, as best documented in the Northern Calcareous Alps, were in recent times adopted to explain the Jurassic tectonic processes in the Carpathians and Dinarides. Whereas in the Western Carpathians Neotethys oceanic material is incorporated in the mélanges and in the Dinarides huge ophiolite nappes are preserved above the Jurassic basin fills and mélanges, Jurassic ophiolites or ophiolitic remains are not clearly documented in the Northern Calcareous Alps. Here we present chrome spinel analyses of ophiolitic detritic material from Kimmeridgian allodapic limestones in the central Northern Calcareous Alps. The Kimmeridgian age is proven by the occurrence of the benthic foraminifera Protopeneroplis striata and Labyrinthina mirabilis, the dasycladalean algae Salpingoporella pygmea, and the alga incertae sedis Pseudolithocodium carpathicum. From the geochemical composition the analysed spinels are pleonastes and show a dominance of Al-chromites (Fe3+–Cr3+–Al3+ diagram. In the Mg/(Mg+ Fe2+ vs. Cr/(Cr+ Al diagram they can be classified as type II ophiolites and in the TiO2 vs. Al2O3 diagram they plot into the SSZ peridotite field. All together this points to a harzburgite

  3. The ophiolite of the Eohellenic nappe in the island of Skyros, Greece: Geotectonic environment of formation and metamorphic conditions inferred by mineralogical and geochemical data

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    Karkalis, Christos; Magganas, Andreas; Koutsovitis, Petros

    2014-05-01

    The island of Skyros is located in the Sporades-Aegean region. It includes an ophiolitic mélange sequence consisting of serpentinites, gabbroic and doleritic rocks, and also lavas which mostly appear in massive form, but in rare cases as deformed pillows. The ophiolitic mélange sequence also includes rodingites, ophicalcites, as well as radiolarites. This formation belongs to the Eohellenic tectonic nappe, which encompasses marbles, sandstones and schists and was emplaced onto the Pelagonian Zone during Early Cretaceous [1, 2]. Serpentinites were most likely formed after serpentinization of harzburgitic protoliths and consist of serpentine, bastite, spinel and magnetite. The chemistry of spinels (TiO2=0.14-0.25 wt.%, Al2O3=35.1-35.21 wt.%, Cr#=37.38-38.87), shows that the harzburgitic protoliths plausibly resemble back-arc basin peridotites [3]. Gabbros and dolerites present mostly subophitic textures, between the hornblende/clinopyroxene and plagioclase grains. Based upon their petrography and on their mineral chemistry hornblendes have been distinguished into magmatic and metamorphic hornblendes, with the first occurring mostly in gabbroic rocks. Magmatic hornblendes exhibit relatively high TiO2 (1.42-1.62 wt.%), Al2O3 (5.11-5.86 wt.%) and Na2O (1.01-1.09 wt.%) contents, with their presence implying that the magma was at least to some degree hydrous. Lavas are tholeiitic basalts with relatively high FeOt≡12 wt.% and low K2O and Th contents, consisting mostly albite, altered clinopyroxene and devitrified glass. Tectonomagmatic discrimination diagrams [4, 5] illustrate that the studied gabbros and lavas of Skyros are most likely associated with SSZ processes. Gabbroic rocks, subvolcanic dolerites and lavas have been subjected to greenschist/subgreenschist metamorphic processes, as confirmed by the presence of secondary amphiboles (metamorphic hornblende, actinolite/tremolite), epidote, pumpellyite and chlorite in all of the studied samples. On the other hand

  4. Alteration, age, and emplacement of the Tangihua Complex ophiolite, New Zealand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicholson, K.N.; Black, P.M.; Picard, C.; Cooper, P.; Hall, C.M.; Itaya, T.

    2007-01-01

    The Tangihua Complex, New Zealand, represents an upper sequence of Late Cretaceous oceanic crustal material: massive basalt flows, pillow lavas, and dolerites. Three phases of alteration are preserved within the complex, each characterised by zeolite precipitation, which correlate to stratigraphic position. The mylonitised sole contains greenschist assemblages (c. 325 degrees C) grading upwards into the initial phase of alteration (250-300 degrees C), and is characterised by actinolite, epidote, albite, and Na-rich zeolites. This phase is cut by lower temperature veins of chlorite-smectite and Ca-rich zeolites. The final alteration phase ( + and Ca 2+ rich minerals, including apophyllite and calcite. Disruption of Ar/Ar spectra around 50 Ma correlate with rifting in the Loyalty Basin and initiation of obduction along the Loyalty-Three Kings Ridge system. We suggest that these events resulted in initial dismemberment, alteration, and movement of the ophiolite, whereas Ar/Ar plateaux at 25-35 Ma correspond to ophiolite emplacement and the last phases of alteration. (author). 49 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs

  5. The Arieseni Nappe, or the Moma and Poiana Nappes?

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    I. Balintoni

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available The Arieseni Nappe was the single tectonic unit of the Biharia Nappe System involving unmetamorphosed, red Permian and metamorphosed, green Permian deposits. Deformational, microscopic and x-Ray diffraction studies, suggest a tectonic relationship between the two sequences. Consequently, the red Permian deposits have been attributed to the Moma Nappe, and the green Permian rocks to the Poiana Nappe. Thus, the Arieseni Nappe disappeared. The thrust between the red Permian and the green Permian deposits realized later during the emplacement of Apusenides, due to an east-verging movement.

  6. From an ocean floor wrench zone origin to transpressional tectonic emplacement of the Sithonia ophiolite, eastern Vardar Suture Zone, northern Greece

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    Bonev, Nikolay; Filipov, Petyo

    2017-12-01

    In the Hellenides of northern Greece, the Sithonia back-arc ophiolite constitute an element of the Vardar suture zone against the Chortiatis island arc magmatic suite, the Melissochori Formation and the Serbo-Macedonian Massif further north at the Mesozoic continental margin of Eurasia. A granodiorite from the Chortiatis island arc magmatic suite crystallized at 160 Ma as derived from new U-Pb zircon geochronology and confirms the end of arc magmatic activity that started at around 173 Ma. Located southerly of the Chortiatis island arc magmatic suite, the Sithonia ophiolite had igneous life from 159 to 149 Ma, and the ophiolite interfinger with clastic-carbonate Kimmeridgian sediments. Magmatic structures (i.e., sheeted dykes) in the ophiolite witness for NE-trending rift axis, while the transform faults and fracture zones sketch NW-SE transcurrent transtension-like propagation of the rift-spreading center at Sithonia that is consistent with a dextral wrench corridor already proposed for the ophiolite origin in the eastern Vardar zone. The tectonic emplacement of the Sithonia ophiolite involved dextral ENE to SE strike-slip sense of shear and SW and NE reverse thrust sense of shear on mostly steep foliation S1, subhorizontal lineation L1 and associated variably inclined F1 fold axes. This structural grain and kinematics are shared by adjacent Chortiatis island arc magmatic suite and the Melissochori Formation. The coexistence of strike-parallel and thrust components of displacement along discrete dextral strike-slip shear zones and internal deformation of the mentioned units is interpreted to result from a bulk dextral transpressive deformation regime developed in greenschist-facies metamorphic conditions. The back-arc ocean floor previous structural architecture with faults and fracture zones where Kimmeridgian sediments deposited in troughs was used by discrete strike-slip shear zones in which these sediments involved, and the shear zones become the sites for

  7. Geochemical and Geophysical Characteristics of the Balud Ophiolitic Complex (BOC, Masbate Island, Philippines: Implications for its Generation, Evolution and Emplacement

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    Pearlyn C. Manalo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the first field, geochemical and geophysical information on the recently recognized Early Cretaceous Balud Ophiolitic Complex (BOC in the island of Masbate in the Central Philippines. Mapping of the western limb of the island revealed that only the upper crustal section of the BOC is exposed in this area. Geochemically, the pillow basalts are characterized by transitional mid-oceanic ridge basalt-island arc tholeiitic compositions. Gravity surveys yielded low Bouguer anomaly values that are consistent with the highly dismembered nature of the BOC. Short wavelength, high amplitude magnetic anomalies registered across the study area are attributed to shallow magnetic sources. This is taken to support the model that the ophiolitic complex occurs as thin crustal slivers that are not deeply-rooted in the mantle. Comparing BOC with other ophiolites in the Central Philippines, such as those in the islands of Sibuyan, Leyte and Bohol, suggests the possibility of a common or contiguous source for similarly-aged and geochemically composed crust-mantle sequences in the region.

  8. From nappe stacking to exhumation: Cretaceous tectonics in the Apuseni Mountains (Romania)

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    Reiser, Martin Kaspar; Schuster, Ralf; Spikings, Richard; Tropper, Peter; Fügenschuh, Bernhard

    2017-03-01

    New Ar-Ar muscovite and Rb-Sr biotite age data in combination with structural analyses from the Apuseni Mountains provide new constraints on the timing and kinematics of deformation during the Cretaceous. Time-temperature paths from the structurally highest basement nappe of the Apuseni Mountains in combination with sedimentary data indicate exhumation and a position close to the surface after the Late Jurassic emplacement of the South Apuseni Ophiolites. Early Cretaceous Ar-Ar muscovite ages from structurally lower parts in the Biharia Nappe System (Dacia Mega-Unit) show cooling from medium-grade conditions. NE-SW-trending stretching lineation and associated kinematic indicators of this deformation phase (D1) are overprinted by top-NW-directed thrusting during D2. An Albian to Turonian age (110-90 Ma) is proposed for the main deformation (D2) that formed the present-day geometry of the nappe stack and led to a pervasive retrograde greenschist-facies overprint. Thermochronological and structural data from the Bihor Unit (Tisza Mega-Unit) allowed to establish E-directed differential exhumation during Early-Late Cretaceous times (D3.1). Brittle detachment faulting (D3.2) and the deposition of syn-extensional sediments indicate general uplift and partial surface exposure during the Late Cretaceous. Brittle conditions persist during the latest Cretaceous compressional overprint (D4).

  9. Geology of the Menderes Massif and the Lycian Nappes South of Denizli, Western Taurides

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    Aral İ. OKAY

    1989-06-01

    Full Text Available Mount Honaz region in the Western Taurides is made up of superimposed several tectonic units. In the west, monotonous green metashales called the Honaz shale occur at the base of the tectonic stack. Honaz shale is tectonically overlain by weakly metamorphosed, massif white limestone, thinly bedded cherty limestone and shale which covers the Mendercs massif. Menderes massif is in turn tectonically overlain by the Sandak complex of the Lycian nappes made up of Mesozoic dolomites and limestones and ophiolite mainly of harzburgite lies oven the Sandak complex. All these tectonic units form an eastward overturned major anticline called the Honaz anticline; a pelagic sedimentary sequence of Late Cretaceous—Middle/Late Eocene age, called the Göbecik Tepe complex, occurs tectonically beneath the overturned limb of the Honaz anticline. The Göbecik Tepe complex constitutes the relative autochthonous in the region of the Mount Honaz. Different tectonic units in the Mount Honaz region show effects of Late Cretaceous, Middle Eocene and Late Eocene/Oligocene tectonics. Obduction of the ophiolite over the Sandak complex probably occurred during the Late Cretaceous, while the age of thrusting of the Sandak complex over the Menderes massif is probably Middle Eocene. Emplacement of these tectonic units over the Göbecik Tepe complex and the formation of the Honaz anticline is of Late Eocene/Oligocene age.

  10. The Armenian and NW Anatolian ophiolites: new insights for the closure of the Tethys domain and obduction onto the South Armenian Block and Anatolian-Tauride Platform before collision through dynamic modeling

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    Hässig, Marc; Rolland, Yann; Sosson, Marc; Hassani, Riad; Topuz, Gultekin; Faruk Çelik, Ömer; Gerbault, Muriel; Galoyan, Ghazar; Müller, Carla; Sahakyan, Lilit; Avagyan, Ara

    2013-04-01

    In the Lesser Caucasus three main domains are distinguished from SW to NE: (1) the South Armenian Block (SAB), a Gondwanian-derived continental terrane; (2) scattered outcrops of ophiolites coming up against the Sevan-Akera suture zone; and (3) the Eurasian plate. The Armenian ophiolites represent remnants of an oceanic domain which disappeared during Eurasia-Arabia convergence. Previous works using geochemical whole-rock analyses, 40Ar/39Ar and paleontological dating have shown that the ophiolite outcrops throughout this area were emplaced during the Late Cretaceous as one non-metamorphic preserved ophiolitic nappe of back-arc origin that formed during Middle to Late Jurassic. From these works, tectonic reconstructions include two clearly identified subductions, one related to the Neotethys subduction beneath the Eurasian margin and another to intra-oceanic subduction responsible for the opening of the back-arc basin corresponding to the ophiolites of the Lesser Caucasus. The analysis of the two stages of metamorphism of the garnet amphibolites of the ophiolite obduction sole at Amasia (M1: HT-LP peak of P = 6-7 kbar and T > 630°C; M2; MP-MT peak at P = 8-10 kbar and T = 600°C) has allowed us to deduce the onset of subduction of the SAB at 90 Ma for this locality, which age coincides with other paleontological ages at the obduction front. A preliminary paleomagnetic survey has also brought quantification to the amount of oceanic domain which disappeared by subduction between the SAB and Eurasia before collision. We propose a dynamic finite element model using ADELI to test the incidence of parameters such as the density of the different domains (or the interval between the densities), closing speed (or speeds if sporadic), the importance and interactions of mantle discontinuities with the subducting lithosphere and set a lithospheric model. Our field observations and analyses are used to validate combinations of factors. The aim is to better qualify the

  11. Multi-scale Onland-Offshore Investigations of the New Caledonia Ophiolite, SW Pacific

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    Clerc, C. N.; Collot, J.; Sevin, B.; Patriat, M.; Etienne, S.; Iseppi, M.; Lesimple, S.; Jeanpert, J.; Mortimer, N. N.; Poli, S.; Pattier, F.; Juan, C.; Robineau, B.; Godard, M.; Cluzel, D.

    2017-12-01

    The Peridotite Nappe of New Caledonia is one of the largest ultramafic ophiolite in the World: it represents about one quarter of the 500 x 80 km island of Grande Terre. This extensive upper mantle unit was tectonically emplaced during the Eocene onto the northeastern edge of Zealandia continent. It is weakly deformed because it was not involved in a collision belt after obduction. A dome-shaped Eocene HP/LT metamorphic complex was exhumed across the fore-arc mantle lithosphere in the northern tip of the island. Post-obduction Miocene to Present coral reefs developed in shallow waters around Grande Terre and surrounding islands. In the perspective of a possible onshore/offshore drilling project (IODP/ICDP), we present recent advances in our understanding of offshore extensions of this ophiolite. To the south of New Caledonia, the offshore continuation of the ultramafic allochthon has been identified by dredges and by its geophysical signature as a continuous linear body that extends over a distance of more than 400 km at about 2000m bsl. Such water depths allow an unprecedented seismic reflection imaging of a drowned and well-preserved ophiolite. Seismic profiles show that the nappe has a flat-top, and is capped by carbonate reefs and dissected by several major normal faults. To the east of this presumed ultramafic body, Felicité Ridge is a 30 km wide, 350 km long, dome-shaped ridge, which may be interpreted as the possible southern extension of the HP/LT metamorphic complex observed onshore. Onshore, several 150 to 200 m long cores were drilled in the ophiolite and airborne electromagnetic allowed high-resolution imaging down to 400 m depth. These recent results allow identification of internal thrusts within the peridotite body and more superficial landslides. The analysis of polyphase fracturation and associated serpentinization brings new constraints on the tectonic evolution of the ophiolite and its subsequent weathering pattern. We integrate these data and

  12. Ophiolite Emplacement and the Effects of the Subduction of the Active Chile Ridge System: Heterogeneous Paleostress Regimes Recorded in the Taitao Ophiolite (Southern Chile Emplazamiento de ofiolitas y los efectos de la subducción de la dorsal activa de Chile: Regímenes heterogéneos de paleostress registrados en la Oflolita Taitao (Sur de Chile

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    Eugenio E Veloso

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The repeated north and southward migration of the Chile Triple junction, offshore the Península de Taitao, is expected to have imposed contrasting stress fields in the forearc for the last 6 Ma because of changes in convergence direction and rate of subducting plates. NNW-SSE to E-W and minor NE-SW striking brittle faults developed in the plutonic units of the Mio-Pliocene Taitao Ophiolite, whereas NNE-SSW and minor NW-SE trending faults developed in its eastern border (Bahía Barrientes fault-zone. These brittle faults are studied to elucídate the style of ophiolite emplacement and the tectonic effects resulting from the alternated migration of the Chile Triple junction in the área. Analyses of heterogeneous fault-slip data on both áreas suggest that faults were activated by different stress fields. Two different compressional stress fields were identified in the plutomc units (A and B, whereas three different stress fields, ranging from compressional to strike-slip, were identified in the BahíaBarrientos fault-zone (C, D and E. Calculated directions of Oj axes for A, C, D and E solutions are mostly E-W trending, roughly similar to the convergence direction of subducting plates, whereas that for B solution is counterclockwise rotated ca. 60° with respect to the previous E-W trend. Brittle structures related to solution B were attributed to an early deformation of the ophiolite, most probably developed shortly after its emplacement {ca. 6 Ma. These structures were further counterclockwise rotated, while new structures (related to solution A developed in the plutomc units in order to absorb the continuous deformation. In the eastern margin of the ophiolite, the stress field divided inte compressional and strike-slip components. During periods of relatively strong compression (fast subduction of the Nazca píate, the fault-zone experienced well defined compressional and strike-slip movements (solutions C and D. In contrast, during periods of

  13. The Katmandu and Gosainkund nappes, central Nepal Himalaya (cartography, structure, metamorphism, geochemistry and radio-chronology)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rai, S.M.

    1998-10-01

    In central Nepal, a multidisciplinary study has been carried out to characterize and distinguish the crystalline nappes of Katmandu and Gosainkund from the Midland formations. Two principal deformations are recorded: one ductile, syn-metamorphic, marked by microstructures (stretching lineation, S-C structures, etc. ), another, post-metamorphic, recorded by an anticline, roughly EW -directed, and by NNE-SSW -directed folds. The syn-metamorphic P-T conditions show differences between Katmandu Crystalline Nappe (900-720 MPa; 700-480 deg C) and Gosainkund Crystalline Nappe (890-580 MPa; 750-590 deg C). They exhibit well preserved inverted metamorphism between the Upper Midland Formations (750 Mpa; 560 deg C) and the Gosainkund Nappe. In central Nepal, the augen gneisses and the 'Lesser Himalayan' Cambro-Ordovician granites bear similar petrographic and geochemical characteristics which suggest a common origin. However, the geological setting and age of the Proterozoic Ulleri augen gneiss rule out correlation with these formations. 40 Ar/ 39 Ar analyses of muscovite, indicate cooling ages younger from south to north: 22 to 13 Ma in the Katmandu Nappe, 16 to 5 Ma in the Gosainkund Nappe, and 12 to 6 Ma in the Midland Formation. The principal points summarized by this study are the following: clear distinction between two nappes marked by their litho-stratigraphy and metamorphism; the ductile movement of MCT in the north of Katmandu is blocked since approximately 25 Ma; the late emplacement and late or common post metamorphic history of the two nappes; but earlier cooling history of the Katmandu nappe; the present uplift of the Katmandu region, underlined by the intense micro-seismicity, concerns indifferently the two nappes that form a single tectonic block at present; the combined uplift of the two nappes is due to the displacement on a ramp of major decollement surface. (author)

  14. The internal structure of eclogite-facies ophiolite complexes: Implications from the Austroalpine outliers within the Zermatt-Saas Zone, Western Alps

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    Weber, Sebastian; Martinez, Raul

    2016-04-01

    The Western Alpine Penninic domain is a classical accretionary prism that formed after the closure of the Penninic oceans in the Paleogene. Continental and oceanic nappes were telescoped into the Western Alpine stack associated with continent-continent collision. Within the Western Alpine geologic framework, the ophiolite nappes of the Zermatt-Saas Zone and the Tsate Unit are the remnants of the southern branch of the Piemonte-Liguria ocean basin. In addition, a series of continental basement slices reported as lower Austroalpine outliers have preserved an eclogitic high-pressure imprint, and are tectonically sandwiched between these oceanic nappes. Since the outliers occur at an unusual intra-ophiolitic setting and show a polymetamorphic character, this group of continental slices is of special importance for understanding the tectono-metamorphic evolution of Western Alps. Recently, more geochronological data from the Austroalpine outliers have become available that make it possible to establish a more complete picture of their complex geological history. The Lu-Hf garnet-whole rock ages for prograde growth of garnet fall into the time interval of 52 to 62 Ma (Weber et al., 2015, Fassmer et al. 2015), but are consistently higher than the Lu-Hf garnet-whole rock ages from several other locations throughout the Zermatt-Saas zone that range from 52 to 38 Ma (Skora et al., 2015). This discrepancy suggests that the Austroalpine outliers may have been subducted earlier than the ophiolites of the Zermatt-Saas Zone and therefore have been tectonically emplaced into their present intra-ophiolite position. This points to the possibility that the Zermatt-Saas Zone consists of tectonic subunits, which reached their respective pressure peaks over a prolonged time period, approximately 10-20 Ma. The pressure-temperature estimates from several members of the Austroalpine outliers indicate a complex distribution of metamorphic peak conditions, without ultrahigh

  15. Age and microfacies of oceanic Upper Triassic radiolarite components from the Middle Jurassic ophiolitic mélange in the Zlatibor Mountains (Inner Dinarides, Serbia and their provenance

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    Gawlick Hans-Jürgen

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Oceanic radiolarite components from the Middle Jurassic ophiolitic mélange between Trnava and Rožanstvo in the Zlatibor Mountains (Dinaridic Ophiolite Belt west of the Drina–Ivanjica unit yield Late Triassic radiolarian ages. The microfacies characteristics of the radiolarites show pure ribbon radiolarites without crinoids or thin-shelled bivalves. Beside their age and the preservation of the radiolarians this points to a deposition of the radiolarites on top of the oceanic crust of the Neo-Tethys, which started to open in the Late Anisian. South of the study area the ophiolitic mélange (Gostilje–Ljubiš–Visoka–Radoševo mélange contains a mixture of blocks of 1 oceanic crust, 2 Middle and Upper Triassic ribbon radiolarites, and 3 open marine limestones from the continental slope. On the basis of this composition we can conclude that the Upper Triassic radiolarite clasts derive either from 1 the younger parts of the sedimentary succession above the oceanic crust near the continental slope or, more convincingly 2 the sedimentary cover of ophiolites in a higher nappe position, because Upper Triassic ribbon radiolarites are only expected in more distal oceanic areas. The ophiolitic mélange in the study area overlies different carbonate blocks of an underlying carbonate-clastic mélange (Sirogojno mélange. We date and describe three localities with different Upper Triassic radiolarite clasts in a mélange, which occurs A on top of Upper Triassic fore-reef to reefal limestones (Dachstein reef, B between an Upper Triassic reefal limestone block and a Lower Carnian reef limestone (Wetterstein reef, and C in fissures of an Upper Triassic lagoonal to back-reef limestone (Dachstein lagoon. The sedimentary features point to a sedimentary and not to a tectonic emplacement of the ophiolitic mélange (= sedimentary mélange filling the rough topography of the topmost carbonate-clastic mélange below. The block spectrum of the underlying and

  16. Age and microfacies of oceanic Upper Triassic radiolarite components from the Middle Jurassic ophiolitic mélange in the Zlatibor Mountains (Inner Dinarides, Serbia) and their provenance

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    Gawlick, Hans-Jürgen; Djerić, Nevenka; Missoni, Sigrid; Bragin, Nikita Yu.; Lein, Richard; Sudar, Milan; Jovanović, Divna

    2017-08-01

    Oceanic radiolarite components from the Middle Jurassic ophiolitic mélange between Trnava and Rožanstvo in the Zlatibor Mountains (Dinaridic Ophiolite Belt) west of the Drina-Ivanjica unit yield Late Triassic radiolarian ages. The microfacies characteristics of the radiolarites show pure ribbon radiolarites without crinoids or thin-shelled bivalves. Beside their age and the preservation of the radiolarians this points to a deposition of the radiolarites on top of the oceanic crust of the Neo-Tethys, which started to open in the Late Anisian. South of the study area the ophiolitic mélange (Gostilje-Ljubiš-Visoka-Radoševo mélange) contains a mixture of blocks of 1) oceanic crust, 2) Middle and Upper Triassic ribbon radiolarites, and 3) open marine limestones from the continental slope. On the basis of this composition we can conclude that the Upper Triassic radiolarite clasts derive either from 1) the younger parts of the sedimentary succession above the oceanic crust near the continental slope or, more convincingly 2) the sedimentary cover of ophiolites in a higher nappe position, because Upper Triassic ribbon radiolarites are only expected in more distal oceanic areas. The ophiolitic mélange in the study area overlies different carbonate blocks of an underlying carbonate-clastic mélange (Sirogojno mélange). We date and describe three localities with different Upper Triassic radiolarite clasts in a mélange, which occurs A) on top of Upper Triassic fore-reef to reefal limestones (Dachstein reef), B) between an Upper Triassic reefal limestone block and a Lower Carnian reef limestone (Wetterstein reef), and C) in fissures of an Upper Triassic lagoonal to back-reef limestone (Dachstein lagoon). The sedimentary features point to a sedimentary and not to a tectonic emplacement of the ophiolitic mélange (= sedimentary mélange) filling the rough topography of the topmost carbonate-clastic mélange below. The block spectrum of the underlying and slightly older

  17. Masirah – the other Oman ophiolite: A better analogue for mid-ocean ridge processes?

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    Hugh Rollinson

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Oman has two ophiolites – the better known late Cretaceous northern Oman (or Semail ophiolite and the lesser known and smaller, Jurassic Masirah ophiolite located on the eastern coast of the country adjacent to the Indian Ocean. A number of geological, geochronological and geochemical lines of evidence strongly suggest that the northern Oman ophiolite did not form at a mid-ocean ridge but rather in a supra-subduction zone setting by fast spreading during subduction initiation. In contrast the Masirah ophiolite is structurally part of a series of ophiolite nappes which are rooted in the Indian Ocean floor. There are significant geochemical differences between the Masirah and northern Oman ophiolites and none of the supra-subduction features typical of the northern Oman ophiolite are found at Masirah. Geochemically Masirah is MORB, although in detail it contains both enriched and depleted MORB reflecting a complex source for the lavas and dykes. The enrichment of this source predates the formation of the ophiolite. The condensed crustal section on Masirah (ca. 2 km contains a very thin gabbro sequence and is thought to reflect its genesis from a cool mantle source associated with the early stages of sea-floor spreading during the early separation of eastern and western Gondwana. These data suggest that the Masirah ophiolite is a suitable analogue for an ophiolite created at a mid-ocean ridge, whereas the northern Oman ophiolite is not. The stratigraphic history of the Masirah ophiolite shows that it remained a part of the oceanic crust for ca. 80 Ma. The chemical variability and enrichment of the Masirah lavas is similar to that found elsewhere in Indian Ocean basalts and may simply reflect a similar provenance rather than a feature fundamental to the formation of the ophiolite.

  18. Emplacement engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, Ernest E [Lawrence Radiation Laboratory, University of California, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1970-05-01

    Emplacement Engineering can be defined as that portion of a nuclear explosive project that is concerned with the emplacement of the explosive. This definition would then include virtually everything except the design and fabrication of the explosive and the post-shot-effects program. For future commercial application, the post-shot-effects program will essentially disappear. This emplacement portion of a nuclear explosive project constitutes a large fraction of the total project cost, but it has largely been overshadowed by the explosive and explosive-effects portions. As we move into commercial applications. Emplacement Engineering must receive more attention from both industry and government. To place emplacement costs in their proper relationship with total projects costs, we have performed a study of commercial underground nuclear explosive applications such as gas stimulation. Although there are many intangibles in such a study, we have been able to at least obtain some feel for the relative fractional costs of the non-explosive costs compared with the explosive costs. This study involved estimating the cost elements for applications using a single explosive at 5,000 ft, 10,000 ft, and 15,000 ft. For each depth, the cost estimates were made for a range of emplacement hole and explosive diameters. Results of these estimates for explosive-related costs, hole-related costs, and total costs are shown for the three depths. Note that the explosive package outside diameter is assumed as 2 inches less than the hole (or casing) inside diameter for all cases. For the 5,000-ft application the explosive-related costs dominate, and of particular importance is the indicated diameter for minimum total cost which occurs at approximately a 17.5-in. hole (15.5-in. explosive). The hole-related costs are in 'the same range as the explosive-related costs for the 10,000-ft application. For this case, the minimum total cost occurs at approximately a 14-in. hole (12-in. explosive

  19. Orogenic, Ophiolitic, and Abyssal Peridotites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodinier, J.-L.; Godard, M.

    2003-12-01

    "Tectonically emplaced" mantle rocks include subcontinental, suboceanic, and subarc mantle rocks that were tectonically exhumed from the upper mantle and occur:(i) as dispersed ultramafic bodies, a few meters to kilometers in size, in suture zones and mountain belts (i.e., the "alpine," or "orogenic" peridotite massifs - De Roever (1957), Thayer (1960), Den Tex (1969));(ii) as the lower ultramafic section of large (tens of kilometers) ophiolite or island arc complexes, obducted on continental margins (e.g., the Oman Ophiolite and the Kohistan Arc Complex - Coleman (1971), Boudier and Coleman (1981), Burg et al. (1998));(iii) exhumed above the sea level in ocean basins (e.g., Zabargad Island in the Red Sea, St. Paul's islets in the Atlantic and Macquarie Island in the southwestern Pacific - Tilley (1947), Melson et al. (1967), Varne and Rubenach (1972), Bonatti et al. (1981)).The "abyssal peridotites" are samples from the oceanic mantle that were dredged on the ocean floor, or recovered from drill cores (e.g., Bonatti et al., 1974; Prinz et al., 1976; Hamlyn and Bonatti, 1980).Altogether, tectonically emplaced and abyssal mantle rocks provide insights into upper mantle compositions and processes that are complementary to the information conveyed by mantle xenoliths (See Chapter 2.05). They provide coverage to vast regions of the Earth's upper mantle that are sparsely sampled by mantle xenoliths, particularly in the ocean basins and beneath passive continental margins, back-arc basins, and oceanic island arcs.Compared with mantle xenoliths, a disadvantage of some tectonically emplaced mantle rocks for representing mantle compositions is that their original geodynamic setting is not exactly known and their significance is sometimes a subject of speculation. For instance, the provenance of orogenic lherzolite massifs (subcontinental lithosphere versus upwelling asthenosphere) is still debated (Menzies and Dupuy, 1991, and references herein), as is the original setting

  20. Fragments of deeper parts of the hanging wall mantle preserved as orogenic peridotites in the central belt of the Seve Nappe Complex, Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clos, Frediano; Gilio, Mattia; van Roermund, Herman L. M.

    2014-04-01

    Formation conditions of olivine microstructures are investigated in the Kittelfjäll spinel peridotite (KSP), a fragment of lithospheric mantle which occurs as an isolated body within high grade metamorphic crustal rocks of the Seve Nappe Complex (SNC), southern Västerbotten, central Sweden. The KSP is an orogenic peridotite containing a well developed penetrative compositional layering, defined by highly depleted dunite with olivine Mg# (100 × Mg/Mg + Fe) of 92.0-93.5 and harzburgite with lower Mg# (91.0-92.5). Dunite is characterized by three contrasting olivine microstructures formed in response to different tectonometamorphic events: Coarse-grained, highly strained olivine porphyroclasts (M1) up to 20 cm long are surrounded by dynamically recrystallized olivine grains (M2) defining a characteristic olivine "foam" microstructure (grain size: 200-2000 μm). An olivine "mortar" (M3) microstructure (10-50 μm) forms a penetrative fabric element only in strongly localized, cm-to-m sized shear zones that crosscut earlier structures/foliations. Olivine fabric analysis in synergy, with mineralogical and chemical analyses, reveals that the KSP body represents old, possibly Archean, sub-continental lithospheric mantle that was crustally emplaced into the Caledonian tectonic edifice from the hanging wall mantle during exhumation of the subducted Seve Nappe Complex (Jämtlandian orogeny ~ 454 Ma). Olivine porphyroclasts (M1) grew at high temperature during dominant isobaric cooling after extensive polybaric melt extraction (> 40%) and subsequent refertilization. The onset of the early Caledonian deformation is interpreted to be related to the crustal emplacement of the KSP during eduction of the SNC. This phase is characterized by the development of the olivine M2 foam microstructure, formed at 650-830 °C/1-2 GPa by dislocation creep processes producing an E-type CPO's by the operation of the [100](001) and subordinate [001](100) slip systems with operating flow stress

  1. Paleocene-Eocene Sediments Interbedded With Volcanics Within the Lycian Nappes: Faralya Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Şenel

    1991-06-01

    Full Text Available The presumably allochthonous structural units in the Southwestern Turkey between the Menderes massif and Beydağları autochthon are known as the Lycian nappes. Some of these units particularly beneath the ophiolite nappe end up with the Faralya formation of Paleocene-Lutetian age. The striking feature of this formation which includes micrite, clayey micrite, claystone, sandstone and conglomerate, is the presence of basic volcanite interbeds of Eocene age, This volcanite bearing formation exhibits a strong similarity to those of the other formations in Southwestern Turkey most of which include similar basic volcanites. Eocene basic volcanites are also known in the Akseki autochthon to the south of Seydişehir (Geyikdağ unit in broad sense. Similar extensive lateral movements (Eocene mountain building processes developed over the Faralya formation are seen over the volcanite bearing formations to the south of Menderes massif as well as to the north of Isparta angle and the Akseki autochthon. These features indicate that the area between the Menderes massif and Akseki autochthon (Geyikdağ unit reflects common basinal characters in terms of depositional conditions, volcanism and the traces of Eocene mountain building process.

  2. Thermo-mechanical models of obduction applied to the Oman ophiolite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibault, Duretz; Philippe, Agard; Philippe, Yamato; Céline, Ducassou; Taras, Gerya; Evguenii, Burov

    2015-04-01

    During obduction regional-scale fragments of oceanic lithosphere (ophiolites) are emplaced somewhat enigmatically on top of lighter continental lithosphere. We herein use two-dimensional thermo-mechanical models to investigate the feasibility and controlling parameters of obduction. The models are designed using available geological data from the Oman (Semail) ophiolite. Initial and boundary conditions are constrained by plate kinematic and geochronological data and modeling results are validated against petrological and structural observations. The reference model consists of three distinct stages: (1) initiation of oceanic subduction initiation away from Arabian margin, (2) emplacement of the Oman Ophiolite atop the Arabian margin, (2) dome-like exhumation of the subducted Arabian margin beneath the overlying ophiolite. A parametric study suggests that 350-400 km of shortening allows to best fit both the peak P-T conditions of the subducted margin (1.5-2.5 GPa / 450-600°C) and the dimensions of the ophiolite (~170 km width), in agreement with previous estimations. Our results further confirm that the locus of obduction initiation is close to the eastern edge of the Arabian margin (~100 km) and indicate that obduction is facilitated by a strong continental basement rheology.

  3. Structural evolution of the Semail Ophiolite metamorphic sole, Wadi Hawasina and Northern Jebel Nakhl Culmination, Oman

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurtado, C.; Bailey, C.; Visokay, L.; Scharf, A.

    2017-12-01

    The Semail ophiolite is the world's largest and best-exposed ophiolite sequence, however the processes associated with both oceanic detachment and later emplacement onto the Arabian continental margin remain enigmatic. This study examines the upper mantle section of the ophiolite, its associated metamorphic sole, and the autochthonous strata beneath the ophiolite at two locations in northern Oman. Our purpose is to understand the structural history of ophiolite emplacement and evaluate the deformation kinematics of faulted and sheared rocks in the metamorphic sole. At Wadi Hawasina, the base of the ophiolite is defined by a 5- to 15-m thick zone of penetratively-serpentinized mylonitic peridotite. Kinematic indicators record top-to-the SW (reverse) sense-of-shear with a triclinic deformation asymmetry. An inverted metamorphic grade is preserved in the 300- to 500-m thick metamorphic sole that is thrust over deep-water sedimentary rocks of the Hawasina Group. The study site near Buwah, in the northern Jebel Nakhl culmination, contains a N-to-S progression of mantle peridotite, metamorphic sole, and underlying Jurassic carbonates. Liswanite crops out in NW-SE trending linear ridges in the peridotite. The metamorphic sole includes well-foliated quartzite, metachert, and amphibolite. Kinematic evidence indicates that the liswanite and a serpentinized mélange experienced top to-the north (normal) sense-of-shear. Two generations of E-W striking, N-dipping normal faults separate the autochthonous sequence from the metamorphic sole, and also cut out significant sections of the metamorphic sole. Fabric analysis reveals that the metamorphic sole experienced flattening strain (K<0.2) that accumulated during pure shear-dominated general shear (Wk<0.4). Normal faulting and extension at the Buwah site indicates that post-ophiolite deformation is significant in the Jebel Akhdar and Jebel Nakhl culminations.

  4. Interpretation of recent gravity profiles over the ophiolite belt, Northern Oman Mountains, United Arab Emirates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khattab, M. M.

    1993-04-01

    The compiled Bouguer gravity anomaly map over parts of the ophiolite rocks of the Northern Oman Mountains suggests the existence of three partially serpentinized nappes: two along the Gulf of Oman coast with axes near Dadnah, near Fujira and the third 17 km SSE of Masafi. Modeling of the subsurface geology, beneath two gravity profiles (Diba-Kalba and Masafi-Fujira), is based on the occurrence (field evidence) of multiphase low-angle thrusting of the members of the Tethyan lithosphere in northern and Oman Mountains. An assumed crustal model at the Arabian continental margin, beneath the Masafi-Fujira profile, is made to explain an intense gravity gradient. Gravity interpretation is not inconsistent with a gliding mechanism for obduction of the ophiolite on this part of the Arabian continental margin.

  5. Thrusting and transpressional shearing in the Pan-African nappe southwest El-Sibai core complex, Central Eastern Desert, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Wahed, Mohamed A. Abd.

    2008-01-01

    The Wadi El-Shush area in the Central Eastern Desert (CED) of Egypt is occupied by the Sibai core complex and its surrounding Pan-African nappe complex. The sequence of metamorphic and structural events in the Sibai core complex and the enveloping Pan-African nappe can be summarized as follows: (1) high temperature metamorphism associated with partial melting of amphibolites and development of gneissic and migmatitic rocks, (2) between 740 and 660 Ma, oblique island arc accretion resulted in Pan-African nappe emplacement and the intrusion of syn-tectonic gneissic tonalite at about 680 ± 10 Ma. The NNW-SSE shortening associated with oblique island arc accretion produced low angle NNW-directed thrusts and open folds in volcaniclastic metasediments, schists and isolated serpentinite masses (Pan-African nappe) and created NNE-trending recumbent folds in syn-tectonic granites. The NNW-SSE shortening has produced imbricate structures and thrust duplexes in the Pan-African nappe, (3) NE-ward thrusting which deformed the Pan-African nappe into SW-dipping imbricate slices. The ENE-WSW compression event has created NE-directed thrusts, folded the NNW-directed thrusts and produced NW-trending major and minor folds in the Pan-African nappe. Prograde metamorphism (480-525 °C at 2-4.5 kbar) was synchronous with thrusting events, (4) retrograde metamorphism during sinistral shearing along NNW- to NW-striking strike-slip shear zones (660-580 Ma), marking the external boundaries of the Sibai core complex and related to the Najd Fault System. Sinistral shearing has produced steeply dipping mylonitic foliation and open plunging folds in the NNW- and NE-ward thrust planes. Presence of retrograde metamorphism supports the slow exhumation of Sibai core complex under brittle-ductile low temperature conditions. Arc-accretion caused thrusting, imbrication and crustal thickening, whereas gravitational collapse of a compressed and thickened lithosphere initiated the sinistral movement

  6. Thermo-mechanical modeling of the obduction process based on the Oman ophiolite case

    OpenAIRE

    Duretz , Thibault; Agard , Philippe; Yamato , Philippe; Ducassou , Céline; Burov , Evgenii ,; Gerya , T. V.

    2016-01-01

    International audience; Obduction emplaces regional-scale fragments of oceanic lithosphere (ophiolites) over continental lithosphere margins of much lower density. For this reason, the mechanisms responsible for obduction remain enigmatic in the framework of plate tectonics. We present two-dimensional (2D) thermo-mechanical models of obduction and investigate possible dynamics and physical controls of this process. Model geometry and boundary conditions are based on available geological and g...

  7. Beginning the Modern Regime of Subduction Tectonics in Neoproterozoic time: Inferences from Ophiolites of the Arabian-Nubian Shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, R.

    2003-04-01

    It is now clear that the motive force for plate tectonics is provided by the sinking of dense lithosphere in subduction zones. Correspondingly, the modern tectonic regime is more aptly called ``subduction tectonics" than plate tectonics, which only describes the way Earth's thermal boundary layer adjusts to subduction. The absence of subduction tectonics on Mars and Venus implies that special circumstances are required for subduction to occur on a silicate planet. This begs the question: When did Earth's oceanic lithosphere cool sufficiently for subduction to began? This must be inferred from indirect lines of evidence; the focus here is on the temporal distribution of ophiolites. Well-preserved ophiolites with ``supra-subduction zone" (SSZ) affinities are increasingly regarded as forming when subduction initiates as a result of lithospheric collapse (± a nudge to get it started), and the formation of ophiolitic lithosphere in evolving forearcs favors their emplacement and preservation. The question now is what percentage of ophiolites with ``supra-subduction zone" (SSZ) chemical signatures formed in forearcs during subduction initiation events? Most of the large, well-preserved ophiolites (e.g., Oman, Cyprus, California, Newfoundland) may have this origin. If so, the distribution in space and time of such ophiolites can be used to identify ``subduction initiation" events, which are important events in the evolution of plate tectonics. Such events first occurred at the end of the Archean (˜2.5Ga) and again in the Paleoproterozoic (˜1.8 Ga), but ophiolites become uncommon after this. Well-preserved ophiolites become abundant in Neoproterozoic time, at about 800±50 Ma. Ophiolites of this age are common and well-preserved in the Arabian-Nubian Shield (ANS) of Egypt, Sudan, Ethiopia, Eritrea, and Saudi Arabia. ANS ophiolites mostly contain spinels with high Cr#, indicating SSZ affinities. Limited trace element data on pillowed lavas supports this interpretation

  8. Geology of the Zambales ophiolite, Luzon, Philippines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossman, D.L.; Castanada, G.C.; Bacuta, G.C.

    1989-01-01

    The Zambales ophiolite of western Luzon, Philippines, exposes a typical succession of basalt flows, diabasic dikes, gabbro and tectonized harzburgite. The age established by limiting strata is late Eocene. Lack of evidence of thrust faulting and the general domal disposition of the lithologie units indicate that the ophiolitic rocks are exposed by uplift. Highly complex internal layered structures within the complex are related to processes developed during formation of the ophiolite and the Zambales ophiolite may be one of the least disturbed (by emplacement) ophiolitic masses known. The exposed mass trends north and the upper surface plunges at low angles (a few degrees) to the north and south. The chemistry and composition of the rocks in the northwest part of the Zambales area (Acoje block) is distinct from that in the southeastern segment (Coto block). The Acoje block, according to Evans (1983) and Hawkins and Evans (1983), resembles (on a chemical basis) arc-tholeiite series rocks from intra-island arcs and the rocks in the Coto block are typical back-arc basin rock series. The present writer believes that the ophiolite composes a single genetic unit and that the changes in composition are the result of changes that took place during the initial formation. The gabbro probably formed below a spreading center in an elongate, in cross section, V-shaped, magma chamber. The gabbro is estimated by the writer to be less than 2 km thick and may be less than 1 km in places. Numerous erosional windows through the gabbro in the northern and eastern side of the Zambales area show that the gabbro remaining in those areas is likely to be only a few hundred meters thick. Harzburgite is exposed to a depth of about 800 m in the Bagsit River area and this may be the deepest part of the ophiolite accessible for study on which there is any control on depth. A transitional zone, about 200 m thick lying between the gabbro and harzburgite, is composed of serpentinized dunite

  9. Compositional diversity in peridotites as result of a multi-process history: The Pacific-derived Santa Elena ophiolite, northwest Costa Rica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escuder-Viruete, Javier; Baumgartner, Peter O.; Castillo-Carrión, Mercedes

    2015-08-01

    The Santa Elena ophiolite (SEO) is an ultramafic nappe of more than 270 km2 overlying a tectonic serpentinite-matrix mélange in northwest Costa Rica. It is mainly composed of Cpx-rich and Cpx-poor harzburgites (~ 2.5 km-thick), with minor lherzolite, dunite and chromitite, as well as intrusive mafic sills and subvertical dikes, which coalesce into an upper Isla Negritos gabbroic sill complex. Minerals and whole-rock features of the Cpx-rich and Cpx-poor harzburgites share features of the abyssal and supra-subduction zone (SSZ) peridotites, respectively. To explain these characteristics two-stages of melting and refertilization processes are required. By means of trace element modeling, the composition of Cpx-rich harzburgites may be reproduced by up to ~ 5-10% melting of a primitive mantle source, and the composition of Cpx-poor harzburgites and dunites by ~ 15-18% melting of an already depleted mantle. Therefore, the Cpx-rich harzburgites can be interpreted as product of first-stage melting and low-degrees of melt-rock interaction in a mid-ocean ridge environment, and the Cpx-poor harzburgites and dunites as the product of second-stage melting and refertilization in a SSZ setting. The mafic sills and the Isla Negrito gabbros are genetically related and can be explained as crystallization from the liquids that were extracted from the lower SSZ mantle levels and emplaced at shallow conditions. The Murciélagos Island basalts are not directly related to the ultramafic and mafic rocks of the SEO. Their E-MORB-like composition is similar to most of the CLIP mafic lavas and suggests a common Caribbean plume-related source. The SEO represents a fragment of Pacific-derived, SSZ oceanic lithosphere emplaced onto the southern North America margin during the late Cretaceous. Because of the predominance of rollback-induced extension during its history, only a limited amount of crustal rocks were formed and preserved in the SEO.

  10. SUBSURFACE EMPLACEMENT TRANSPORTATION SYSTEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, T.; Novotny, R.

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this analysis is to identify issues and criteria that apply to the design of the Subsurface Emplacement Transportation System (SET). The SET consists of the track used by the waste package handling equipment, the conductors and related equipment used to supply electrical power to that equipment, and the instrumentation and controls used to monitor and operate those track and power supply systems. Major considerations of this analysis include: (1) Operational life of the SET; (2) Geometric constraints on the track layout; (3) Operating loads on the track; (4) Environmentally induced loads on the track; (5) Power supply (electrification) requirements; and (6) Instrumentation and control requirements. This analysis will provide the basis for development of the system description document (SDD) for the SET. This analysis also defines the interfaces that need to be considered in the design of the SET. These interfaces include, but are not limited to, the following: (1) Waste handling building; (2) Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) surface site layout; (3) Waste Emplacement System (WES); (4) Waste Retrieval System (WRS); (5) Ground Control System (GCS); (6) Ex-Container System (XCS); (7) Subsurface Electrical Distribution System (SED); (8) MGR Operations Monitoring and Control System (OMC); (9) Subsurface Facility System (SFS); (10) Subsurface Fire Protection System (SFR); (11) Performance Confirmation Emplacement Drift Monitoring System (PCM); and (12) Backfill Emplacement System (BES)

  11. Solar energy emplacement developer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortensen, Michael; Sauls, Bob

    1991-01-01

    A preliminary design was developed for a Lunar Power System (LPS) composed of photovoltaic arrays and microwave reflectors fabricated from lunar materials. The LPS will collect solar energy on the surface of the Moon, transform it into microwave energy, and beam it back to Earth where it will be converted into usable energy. The Solar Energy Emplacement Developer (SEED) proposed will use a similar sort of solar energy collection and dispersement to power the systems that will construct the LPS.

  12. Timing of pyroxenite formation in supra-subduction Josephine Ophiolite, Oregon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hough, T.; Le Roux, V.; Kurz, M. D.

    2017-12-01

    The Josephine ophiolite is a partly dismembered ophiolite located in southern Oregon and northwestern California (USA). It displays a large ( 640 km2) mantle section that is mostly composed of depleted spinel harzburgite and lherzolite re-equilibrated at temperatures of 900 °C. In addition, the peridotite section of the ophiolite contains minor dunites and pyroxenite veins ranging from orthopyroxenites to clinopyroxenites. Using field, petrological and geochemical data, previous studies have shown that the peridotite experienced 10-20% of hydrous flux melting. In addition, clinopyroxene and orthopyroxene in harzburgites show variable degrees of light rare-earth element (LREE) enrichment, which suggests percolation and re-equilibration with small fractions of boninite melt. Overall, the trace element concentrations of pyroxenes indicate that the harzburgites experienced particularly high degrees of melting in the mantle wedge. We collected a number of orthopyroxenite and clinopyroxenite veins in the mantle section of the Josephine Ophiolite. Here we present the major and rare-earth element (REE) contents of pyroxene in 4 orthopyroxenites and 2 clinopyroxenites and calculate the major element and REE closure temperatures for individual veins. We show that individual pyroxenites record drastic variations in their degree of REE depletion, indicating that multiple generations of melts percolated the peridotite. The pyroxenite veins also record higher REE closure temperatures (>1200 ºC) compared to the surrounding peridotite, potentially indicating rapid cooling after emplacement. REE closure temperatures are also higher than major element closure temperatures. In parallel, we analyzed Sr isotopes by MC-ICPMS in pyroxene separates from 4 veins. Results indicate that the maximum age of emplacement of orthopyroxenite veins corresponds to the age of exhumation. Some clinopyroxenites may have formed during earlier melt percolation events. This study supports the idea that

  13. Deformation of the Songshugou ophiolite in the Qinling orogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shengsi; Dong, Yunpeng

    2017-04-01

    The Qinling orogen, middle part of the China Central Orogenic Belt, is well documented that was constructed by multiple convergences and subsequent collisions between the North China and South China Blocks mainly based on geochemistry and geochronology of ophiolites, magmatic rocks as well as sedimentary reconstruction. However, this model is lack of constraints from deformation of subduction/collision. The Songshugou ophiolite outcropped to the north of the Shangdan suture zone represents fragments of oceanic crust and upper mantle. Previous works have revealed that the ophiolite was formed at an ocean ridge and then emplaced in the northern Qinling belt. Hence, deformation of the ophiolite would provide constraints for the rifting and subduction processes. The ophiolite consists chiefly of metamorphosed mafic and ultramafic rocks. The ultramafic rocks contain coarse dunite, dunitic mylonite and harzburgite, with minor diopsidite veins. The mafic rocks are mainly amphibolite, garnet amphibolite and amphibole schist, which are considered to be eclogite facies and retrograde metamorphosed oceanic crust. Amphibole grains in the mafic rocks exhibit a strong shape-preferred orientation parallel to the foliation, which is also parallel to the lithologic contacts between mafic and ultramafic rocks. Electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) analyses show strong olivine crystallographic preferred orientations (CPO) in dunite including A-, B-, and C-types formed by (010)[100], (010)[001] and (100)[001] dislocation slip systems, respectively. A-type CPO suggests high temperature plastic deformation in the upper mantle. In comparison, B-type may be restricted to regions with significantly high water content and high differential stress, and C-type may also be formed in wet condition with lower differential stress. Additionally, the dunite evolved into amphibolite facies metamorphism with mineral assemblages of olivine + talc + anthophyllite. Assuming a pressure of 1.5 GPa

  14. TRANSPORT AND EMPLACEMENT EQUIPMENT DESCRIPTIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The objective and the scope of this document are to list and briefly describe the major mobile equipment necessary for waste package (WP) Transport and Emplacement in the proposed subsurface nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. Primary performance characteristics and some specialized design features of the equipment are explained and summarized in the individual subsections of this document. The Transport and Emplacement equipment described in this document consists of the following: (1) WP Transporter; (2) Reusable Rail Car; (3) Emplacement Gantry; (4) Gantry Carrier; and (5) Transport Locomotive

  15. Vestiges of Submarine Serpentinization Recorded in the Microbiology of Continental Ophiolite Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrenk, M. O.; Sabuda, M.; Brazelton, W. J.; Twing, K. I.

    2017-12-01

    The study of serpentinization-influenced microbial ecosystems at and below the seafloor has accelerated in recent years with multidisciplinary drilling expeditions to the Atlantis Massif (X357), Southwest Indian Ridge (X360) and Mariana Forearc (X366). In parallel, a number of studies have surveyed serpentinizing systems in ophiolite complexes which host a range of geologic histories, geochemical characteristics, fluid pathways, and consequently microbiology. As ophiolite complexes originate as seafloor materials, it is likely that a microbiological record of seafloor serpentinization processes is maintained through the emplacement and weathering of continental serpentinites. This hypothesis was evaluated through a global comparison of continental serpentinite springs and groundwater, ranging from highly brackish (saline) to freshwater. One of the most saline sites, known as the Coast Range Ophiolite Microbial Observatory (CROMO), was used as a point-of-comparison to marine serpentinizing systems, such as the Lost City Hydrothermal Field. Although there was little taxonomic overlap between microbial populations in marine and terrestrial systems, both communities harbored an abundance of genes involved in sulfur metabolism, including sulfide oxidation, thiosulfate disproportionation, and sulfate reduction. The phylogeny of key genes involved in these metabolic processes was evaluated relative to published studies and compared between sites. Together, these data provide insights into both the functioning of microbial communities in modern-day serpentinizing systems, and the transport processes that disperse microorganisms between marine and terrestrial serpentinites.

  16. Construction, emplacement, and retrievability (preclosure)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McClain, W.

    1985-01-01

    Each of the three preclosure subgroups of the Construction, Emplacement, and Retrievability Working Group adopted a six-step approach to identify and assess current needs in geotechnical modeling and characterization. This approach may be summarized as follows: identify phenomena related to emplacement of high-level nuclear wastes, identify types of models which are required to calculate the phenomena, establish the input data needs for the models, assess the current availability of the models, assess the current status of documentation, verification, and validation of the models, and determine the adequacy of instrumentation and measurement techniques to (a) validate the models, where necessary, and (b) obtain input data for design. Systematic application of these six steps leads to the establishment of the research requirements for geotechnical modeling and characterization. A summary of modeling techniques which apply to the three subsequent sections on construction, emplacement, and retrievability is presented. Research needs, which apply to all preclosure activities, are summarized

  17. Tracing alteration of mantle peridotite in the Samail ophiolite using Mg isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Obeso, J. C.; Kelemen, P. B.; Higgins, J. A.

    2017-12-01

    Magnesium is one of the main constituents of mantle peridotite ( 22.8 wt%), which has a homogeneous Mg isotopic composition (d26Mg = -0.25 ± 0.04 ‰ (2 sd) DSM3, Teng et al 2010 GCA). Mg isotopes are used as tracers of continental and oceanic weathering as they exhibit variable degrees of fractionation during alteration depending on the lithology. Here we report some of the first Mg isotopic compositions of the mantle section of the Samail ophiolite in Oman and its alteration products. The mantle section of the ophiolite is composed mainly of depleted harzburgites and dunites with mantle-like d26Mg (-0.25, -0.21 ‰). Mantle peridotite is far from equilibrium in near surface conditions leading to rapid, extensive serpentinization, carbonation and oxidation, as well as other geochemical changes. Our analyzed samples encompass most of the alteration of peridotite products observed in Oman including listvenites (completely carbonated peridotite) near the basal thrust of the ophiolite, massive magnesite veins within peridotite outcrops, and heavily altered harzburgites. Magnesite listvenites have d26Mg slightly below mantle values (-0.33, -0.33‰) while dolomite listvenites are significantly lighter (-1.46, -0.89‰). This suggests that heavy Mg isotopes were removed from the listvenites during ophiolite emplacement. Heavily altered peridotite from Wadi Fins exhibit alteration halos with drastic changes in composition. The most oxidized areas are enriched in Fe and depleted in Mg compared to the cores of the samples. These variations in Mg concentrations are complemented by a shift to heavy Mg isotopic compositions (0.74, 0.86‰), among the heaviest d26Mg values that have been reported in altered peridotite. Potential sinks for light isotopes removed from such alteration zones are massive magnesite veins with very light compositions (-3.39, -3.14‰). The fractionation of Mg isotopes observed in the mantle section of the ophiolite spans more than 50% of the known

  18. Slab and Sediment Melting during Subduction Initiation: Mantle Plagiogranites from the Oman Ophiolite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollinson, H. R.

    2014-12-01

    ophiolite, rather they were derived during subduction by the partial melting of the slab and associated sediment and emplaced into the overlying mantle wedge. Current subduction-initiation models for supra-subduction ophiolites should integrate this process into their thinking.

  19. Tectono-thermal evolution in a region with thin-skinned tectonics: the western nappes in the Cantabrian Zone (Variscan belt of NW Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastida, F.; Brime, C.; García-López, S.; Sarmiento, G. N.

    The palaeotemperature distribution in the transition from diagenesis to metamorphism in the western nappes of the Cantabrian Zone (Somiedo, La Sobia and Aramo Units) are analysed by conodont colour alteration index (CAI) and illite crystallinity (IC). Structural and stratigraphic control in distribution of CAI and IC values is observed. Both CAI and IC value distributions show that anchizonal conditions are reached in the lower part of the Somiedo Unit. A disruption of the thermal trend by basal thrusts is evidenced by CAI and IC values. There is an apparent discrepancy between the IC and CAI values in Carboniferous rocks of the Aramo Unit; the IC has mainly anchizonal values, whereas the CAI has diagenetic values. Discrepant IC values are explained as a feature inherited from the source area. In the Carboniferous rocks of the La Sobia Unit, both IC and CAI indicate diagenetic conditions. The anchimetamorphism predated completion of emplacement of the major nappes; it probably developed previously and/or during the early stages of motion of the units. Temperature probably decreased when the metamorphosed zones of the sheets rose along ramps and were intensely eroded. In the context of the Iberian Variscan belt, influence of tectonic factors on the metamorphism is greater in the internal parts, where the strain and cleavage are always present, than in the external parts (Cantabrian Zone), where brittle deformation and rock translation are dominant, with an increasing role of the burial on the metamorphism.

  20. Sulfide mineralization in ultramafic rocks of the Faryab ophiolite complex, southern Kerman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ali Rajabzadeh

    2015-10-01

    FeO content and temperature of crystallization of clinopyroxene-rich rocks (Talkington et al., 1984; Von Gruenewaldt et al., 1990. Nickel-rich pentlandite is the main sulfide in the Faryab complex. The composition of this is mineral is consistent with the crystallization in an equilibrium condition (Song et al., 2008. The sulfide may have been introduced from external sources during upward movement and emplacement of parent magma. Acknowledgments The authors are grateful to the Research Council of Shiraz University for financially supporting this study. References Edwards, S.J., Pearce, J.A. and Freeman, J., 2002. New insights concerning the influence of water during the formation of podiform chromitite. Geological Society of America, Special Paper, 349 (3 139-147. Evans, A.M., 2000. Ore geology and industrial minerals. An Introduction. Black well Pub, Oxford, London, 389 pp. Naldrett, A.J., 2004. Magmatic Sulfide Deposits: Geology, Geochemistry and Exploration. Springer, New York, 727 pp. Rajabzadeh, M.A., Moosavinasab, Z., 2013. Mineralogy and distribution of Platinum-Group-Minerals (PGM and other solid inclusions in the Faryab ophiolitic chromitites, Southern Iran. Mineralogy and Petrology, 107 (6: 943-962. Song, X., Zhou M., Tao Y., and Xia, J., 2008. Controls on the metal compositions of magmatic sulfide deposits in the Emeishan large igneous province, SW China. Chemical Geology, 253 (1-2: 38-49. Talkington, R.W., Watkinson, D.H, Whittaker P.J., Jones P.C., 1984. Platinum group minerals and other solide inclusions in chromite of ophiolitic complexes: occurrences and petrological significance. Tschermakes Mineralogische und Petrographische Mitteilungen, 32 (4: 285-301. Von Gruenewaldt, G., Dicks, D., Wet J. and Horsch, H., 1990. PGE mineralization in the western sector of the Eastern Bushveld complex. Mineralogy and Petrology, 42 (1: 71-95.

  1. Elements of transport and emplacement system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-02-01

    This report, undertaken to review proposals for transport, handling and emplacement of high-level radioactive wastes in an underground repository, appropriate to the U.K. context, falls under the headings: basic design concepts; waste block size and configuration; self-shielded or partially shielded blocks; concept of emplacement in long boreholes; concept of emplacement in short boreholes; concept of emplacement in tunnels; methods of emplacement; stages of disposal; repository access by adit, incline or shaft; handling techniques within repository; conventional and radiological safety; costs; areas for further research and development. (U.K.)

  2. Complejo Ojosmin: fragment of ophiolite transamazonian

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bossi, J.; Pineyro, D. . Email geologia@fagro.edu.uy

    2004-01-01

    A preliminary geological survey of a previously unknown basic igneous complex in the Padre Alta Terrane (Pat) is presented. We report petrographic, geochemical and stratigraphic data for more than 200 outcrops. Geological evolution of the complex can be described in terms of four main events: (1) formation Pat units around 2000 Ma; (2) granodiorite thrusting onto possible ophiolite ca 1900 Ma ; (3) granophyric magmatism around 1700 Ma(4) intrusion of trachyte dykes. Data available suggest thrusting onto fragment of oceanic crust. Since the described structure presupposes the existence of pre transamazonian continental fragments in the TPA, it is very important to study the area in detail in the future [es

  3. Emplacement Gantry Gap Analysis Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thornley, R.

    2005-01-01

    To date, the project has established important to safety (ITS) performance requirements for structures, systems, and components (SSCs) based on the identification and categorization of event sequences that may result in a radiological release. These performance requirements are defined within the ''Nuclear Safety Design Bases for License Application'' (NSDB) (BSC 2005 [DIRS 171512], Table A-11). Further, SSCs credited with performing safety functions are classified as ITS. In turn, assurance that these SSCs will perform as required is sought through the use of consensus codes and standards. This gap analysis is based on the design completed for license application only. Accordingly, identification of ITS SSCs beyond those defined within the NSDB are based on designs that may be subject to further development during detail design. Furthermore, several design alternatives may still be under consideration to satisfy certain safety functions, and final selection will not be determined until further design development has occurred. Therefore, for completeness, alternative designs currently under consideration will be discussed throughout this study. This gap analysis will evaluate each code and standard identified within the ''Emplacement Gantry ITS Standards Identification Study'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173586]) to ensure each ITS performance requirement is fully satisfied. When a performance requirement is not fully satisfied, a gap is highlighted. This study will identify requirements to supplement or augment the code or standard to meet performance requirements. Further, this gap analysis will identify nonstandard areas of the design that will be subject to a design development plan. Nonstandard components and nonstandard design configurations are defined as areas of the design that do not follow standard industry practices or codes and standards. Whereby, assurance that an SSC will perform as required may not be readily sought though the use of consensus standards. This

  4. Magma emplacement in 3D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorczyk, W.; Vogt, K.

    2017-12-01

    Magma intrusion is a major material transfer process in Earth's continental crust. Yet, the mechanical behavior of the intruding magma and its host are a matter of debate. In this study, we present a series of numerical thermo-mechanical experiments on mafic magma emplacement in 3D.In our model, we place the magmatic source region (40 km diameter) at the base of the mantle lithosphere and connect it to the crust by a 3 km wide channel, which may have evolved at early stages of magmatism during rapid ascent of hot magmatic fluids/melts. Our results demonstrate continental crustal response due to magma intrusion. We observe change in intrusion geometries between dikes, cone-sheets, sills, plutons, ponds, funnels, finger-shaped and stock-like intrusions as well as injection time. The rheology and temperature of the host-rock are the main controlling factors in the transition between these different modes of intrusion. Viscous deformation in the warm and deep crust favours host rock displacement and magma pools along the crust-mantle boundary forming deep-seated plutons or magma ponds in the lower to middle-crust. Brittle deformation in the cool and shallow crust induces cone-shaped fractures in the host rock and enables emplacement of finger- or stock-like intrusions at shallow or intermediate depth. A combination of viscous and brittle deformation forms funnel-shaped intrusions in the middle-crust. Low-density source magma results in T-shaped intrusions in cross-section with magma sheets at the surface.

  5. Ground Control for Emplacement Drifts for LA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Y. Sun

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this calculation is to analyze the stability of repository emplacement drifts during the preclosure period, and to provide a final ground support method for emplacement drifts for the License Application (LA). The scope of the work includes determination of input parameter values and loads, selection of appropriate process and methods for the calculation, application of selected methods, such as empirical or analytical, to the calculation, development and execution of numerical models, and evaluation of results. Results from this calculation are limited to use for design of the emplacement drifts and the final ground support system installed in these drifts. The design of non-emplacement openings and their ground support systems is covered in the ''Ground Control for Non-Emplacement Drifts for LA'' (BSC 2004c)

  6. Petrography and mineral chemistry of wehrlites in contact zone of gabbro intrusions and mantle peridotites of the Naein ophiolite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhad Ghaseminejad

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Geological background Ophiolites have played a major role in our understanding of Earth’s processes ranging from seafloor spreading, melt evolution and magma transport in oceanic spreading centers, and hydrothermal alteration and mineralization of oceanic crust to collision tectonics, mountain building processes, and orogeny. They provide the essential structural, petrological, geochemical, and geochronological evidence to document the evolutionary history of ancient continental margins and ocean basin. Ophiolites include a peridotitic mantle sequence, generally characterized by high-temperature plastic deformation and residual chemistry, and a comagmatic crustal sequence (gabbros, diabase dikes, and submarine basalts, weakly or not deformed. According to this interpretation, ophiolites were allochthonous with respect to their country rocks. They were assembled during a primary accretion stage at an oceanic spreading center, and later tectonically emplaced on a continental margin or island arc (Dilek, 2003. The indigenous dikes of pyroxenites and gabbros that were injected into a melting peridotite, or intrusive dikes of pyroxenite and gabbro that injected when the peridotite was fresh and well below its solidus, are discussed in different ophiolite papers. Pyroxenite formation and contact of gabbro and mantle peridotite are discussed in different articles (Dilek, 2003. When a gabbro intrude a fresh mantle peridotite could not significantly react with it, but if intrusion occurs during the serpentinization, the gabbro will change to rodingite. Geological setting The Naein ophiolitic melanges comprise the following rock units: mantle peridotites (harzburgite, lherzolite, dunite, with associated chromitite, gabbro, pyroxenite, sheeted and swarm dikes, massive basalts, pillow lava, plagiogranite, radiolarian chert, glaubotruncana limestone, rodingite, listvenite, and metamorphic rocks (foliated amphibolitic dike, amphibolite, skarn

  7. Emplacement of Columbia River flood basalt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reidel, Stephen P.

    1998-11-01

    Evidence is examined for the emplacement of the Umatilla, Wilbur Creek, and the Asotin Members of Columbia River Basalt Group. These flows erupted in the eastern part of the Columbia Plateau during the waning phases of volcanism. The Umatilla Member consists of two flows in the Lewiston basin area and southwestern Columbia Plateau. These flows mixed to form one flow in the central Columbia Plateau. The composition of the younger flow is preserved in the center and the composition of the older flow is at the top and bottom. There is a complete gradation between the two. Flows of the Wilbur Creek and Asotin Members erupted individually in the eastern Columbia Plateau and also mixed together in the central Columbia Plateau. Comparison of the emplacement patterns to intraflow structures and textures of the flows suggests that very little time elapsed between eruptions. In addition, the amount of crust that formed on the earlier flows prior to mixing also suggests rapid emplacement. Calculations of volumetric flow rates through constrictions in channels suggest emplacement times of weeks to months under fast laminar flow for all three members. A new model for the emplacement of Columbia River Basalt Group flows is proposed that suggests rapid eruption and emplacement for the main part of the flow and slower emplacement along the margins as the of the flow margin expands.

  8. Wire-rope emplacement of diagnostics systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burden, W.L.

    1982-01-01

    The study reported here was initiated to determine if, with the Cable Downhole System (CDS) currently under development, there is an advantage to using continuous wire rope to lower the emplacement package to the bottom of the hole. A baseline design using two wire ropes as well as several alternatives are discussed in this report. It was concluded that the advantages of the wire-rope emplacement system do not justify the cost of converting to such a system, especially for LLNL's maximum emplacement package weights

  9. Orogen migration and tectonic setting of the Andrelândia Nappe system: An Ediacaran western Gondwana collage, south of São Francisco craton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos Neto, Mario da Costa; Basei, Miguel Angelo Stipp; Assis Janasi, Valdecir de; Moraes, Renato

    2011-12-01

    The southern Brasília Orogen is organized in a pile of nappes that records the Neoproterozoic history of the subduction and collision between passive and active margins, respectively belonging to the São Francisco and Paranapanema Plates. The whole pile of allochthons comprises the rootless Andrelândia Nappe System (the upper kyanite-bearing granulite of Três Pontas-Varginha Nappe, the intermediate high-pressure amphibolite-to eclogite facies of Liberdade Nappe and the lower Andrelândia Nappe) that is located below an Andean-type magmatic arc (Socorro-Guaxupé Nappe) and overrides the Lima Duarte Nappe and the Carrancas Nappe System. The tectonic units of the Andrelândia Nappe System seem to be exotic to the São Francisco Plate. The retroeclogite of the Liberdade Nappe yielded a 670 Ma SHRIMP U-Pb age in zircon, that is interpreted as the age of N-MORB-type basic magmatism. Detrital zircon grains of proximal flysh deposits of wackes in the Andrelândia Nappe present similar ages that reflect the crystallization in its source area. Both, rocks present Nd isotopic juvenile signatures with T DM in the range of 1.4 to 1.1 Ga. Rhyacian orthogneisses occur as slices in the Liberdade Nappe and have Nd isotope signature of juvenile source. The building of the collision pile of the whole system of nappes was diachronic and records a continuous outward migration of the orogen. The main structure is a middle crust-level duplex. The propagation of the structure and the metamorphism advanced progressively from the upper to the lower nappes, as is shown by U-Pb monazite ages in the range of 618-595 Ma for the Andrelândia Nappe System and 590-575 Ma for the Carrancas and Lima Duarte nappes.

  10. Waste package emplacement borehole option study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streeter, W.S.

    1992-03-01

    This study evaluates the cost and thermal effects of various waste package emplacement configurations that differ in emplacement orientation, number of containers per borehole, and standoff distance at the potential Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository. In this study, eight additional alternatives to the vertical and horizontal orientation options presented in the Site Characterization Plan Conceptual Design Report are considered. Typical panel layout configurations based on thermal analysis of the waste and cost estimates for design and construction, operations, and closure and decommissioning were made for each emplacement option. For the thermal analysis average waste 10 years out of reactor and the SIM code were used to determine whether the various configurations temperatures would exceed the design criteria for temperature. This study does not make a recommendation for emplacement configuration, but does provide information for comparison of alternatives

  11. The andean ophiolitic megastructures on the Buga-Buenaventura transverse (Western Cordillera—Valle Colombia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgois, Jacques; Calle, Bernardo; Tournon, Jean; Toussaint, Jean-François

    1982-02-01

    A structural study of the Buga-Buenaventura transverse in the central part of the Western Cordillera of Colombia, has shown the presence of three structural units which, from bottom to top and from west to east, are: the Rio Dagua unit, the Rio Calima unit, and the Loboguerrero window unit. All three units comprise strata between 120 and 80 m.y. old overlying a basement of green rocks showing the characteristics of submarine flows. The Bolivar ultrabasic and basic massif is geographically linked to the Rio Calima unit, in which green rocks predominate, and is separated from it by a tectonic contact. The upper part of the massif, on the other hand, shows high-temperature metamorphic rocks formed during its emplacement. The Rio Dagua unit shows two tectonic phases with isoclinal folding and development of schistosity. The first phase is contemporaneous with low-grade metamorphism equivalent to lower greenschist facies conditions. The Loboguerrero window unit shows a large recumbent fold oriented towards the southeast. Deformation in the Rio Calima unit is weaker and appears to correspond to a higher structural level than in the two other units. As the attitudes of the S1, schistosity in the Rio Dagua unit and of the shear zones located at the green rocks-sediments contact in this same unit are similar to that of the overthrust at the base of the Rio Calima unit, we are led to postulate that the overthrust belongs to the first phase of deformation, as also does the recumbent fold in the Loboguerrero window unit. We are thus led to propose a southeastward direction of emplacement for the nappes in the Western Cordillera of Colombia. In conclusion, the authors extend their observations and propose a new structural interpretation of the "Occidente Colombiano".

  12. Effects of Fault Displacement on Emplacement Drifts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duan, F.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis is to evaluate potential effects of fault displacement on emplacement drifts, including drip shields and waste packages emplaced in emplacement drifts. The output from this analysis not only provides data for the evaluation of long-term drift stability but also supports the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) process model report (PMR) and Disruptive Events Report currently under development. The primary scope of this analysis includes (1) examining fault displacement effects in terms of induced stresses and displacements in the rock mass surrounding an emplacement drift and (2 ) predicting fault displacement effects on the drip shield and waste package. The magnitude of the fault displacement analyzed in this analysis bounds the mean fault displacement corresponding to an annual frequency of exceedance of 10 -5 adopted for the preclosure period of the repository and also supports the postclosure performance assessment. This analysis is performed following the development plan prepared for analyzing effects of fault displacement on emplacement drifts (CRWMS M and O 2000). The analysis will begin with the identification and preparation of requirements, criteria, and inputs. A literature survey on accommodating fault displacements encountered in underground structures such as buried oil and gas pipelines will be conducted. For a given fault displacement, the least favorable scenario in term of the spatial relation of a fault to an emplacement drift is chosen, and the analysis is then performed analytically. Based on the analysis results, conclusions are made regarding the effects and consequences of fault displacement on emplacement drifts. Specifically, the analysis will discuss loads which can be induced by fault displacement on emplacement drifts, drip shield and/or waste packages during the time period of postclosure

  13. Dynamique de la nappe et qualites physico-chimiques des eaux ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    resultat est conforme a celui des cartes piezo- metriques elaborees en 1993 et 2007 [19,20]; done la nappe suit le modele topographique et le lac constitue une zone de convergence des eaux. ©UBMA-2013. 88. F. Zahi et al. L' examen des cartes piezometriques montrent que les parties Sud et Sud-Est du lac Fetzara se.

  14. PGE mineralization and melt composition of chromitites in Proterozoic ophiolite complexes of Eastern Sayan, Southern Siberia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Kiseleva

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The Ospino-Kitoi and Kharanur ultrabasic massifs represent the northern and southern ophiolite branches respectively of the Upper Onot ophiolitic nappe and they are located in the southeastern part of the Eastern Sayan (SEPES ophiolites. Podiform chromitites with PGE mineralization occur as lensoid pods within dunites and rarely in harzburgites or serpentinized peridotites. The chromitites are classified into type I and type II based on their Cr#. Type I (Cr# = 59–85 occurs in both northern and southern branches, whereas type II (Cr# = 76–90 occurs only in the northern branch. PGE contents range from ∑PGE 88–1189 ppb, Pt/Ir 0.04–0.42 to ∑PGE 250–1700 ppb, Pt/Ir 0.03–0.25 for type I chromitites of the northern and southern branches respectively. The type II chromitites of the northern branch have ∑PGE contents higher than that of type I (468–8617 ppb, Pt/Ir 0.1–0.33. Parental melt compositions, in equilibrium with podiform chromitites, are in the range of boninitic melts and vary in Al2O3, TiO2 and FeO/MgO contents from those of type I and type II chromitites. Calculated melt compositions for type I chromitites are (Al2O3melt = 10.6–13.5 wt.%, (TiO2melt = 0.01–0.44 wt.%, (Fe/Mgmelt = 0.42–1.81; those for type II chromitites are: (Al2O3melt = 7.8–10.5 wt.%, (TiO2melt = 0.01–0.25 wt.%, (Fe/Mgmelt = 0.5–2.4. Chromitites are further divided into Os-Ir-Ru (I and Pt-Pd (II based on their PGE patterns. The type I chromitites show only the Os-Ir-Ru pattern whereas type II shows both Os-Ir-Ru and Pt-Pd patterns. PGE mineralization in type I chromitites is represented by the Os-Ir-Ru system, whereas in type II it is represented by the Os-Ir-Ru-Rh-Pt system. These results indicate that chromitites and PGE mineralization in the northern branch formed in a suprasubduction setting from a fluid-rich boninitic melt during active subduction. However, the chromitites and PGE mineralization of the southern

  15. Subduction initiation, recycling of Alboran lower crust, and intracrustal emplacement of subcontinental lithospheric mantle in the Westernmost Mediterranean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varas-Reus, María Isabel; Garrido, Carlos J.; Bosch, Delphine; Marchesi, Claudio; Hidas, Károly; Booth-Rea, Guillermo; Acosta-Vigil, Antonio

    2015-04-01

    Unraveling the tectonic settings and processes involved in the annihilation of subcontinental mantle lithosphere is of paramount importance for our understanding of the endurance of continents through Earth history. Unlike ophiolites -- their oceanic mantle lithosphere counterparts -- the mechanisms of emplacement of the subcontinental mantle lithosphere in orogens is still poorly known. The emplacement of subcontinental lithospheric mantle peridotites is often attributed to extension in rifted passive margins or continental backarc basins, accretionary processes in subduction zones, or some combination of these processes. One of the most prominent features of the westernmost Mediterranean Alpine orogenic arcs is the presence of the largest outcrops worldwide of diamond facies, subcontinental mantle peridotite massifs; unveiling the mechanisms of emplacement of these massifs may provide important clues on processes involved in the destruction of continents. The western Mediterranean underwent a complex Alpine evolution of subduction initiation, slab fragmentation, and rollback within a context of slow convergence of Africa and Europe In the westernmost Mediterranean, the alpine orogeny ends in the Gibraltar tight arc, which is bounded by the Betic, Rif and Tell belts that surround the Alboran and Algero-Balearic basins. The internal units of these belts are mostly constituted of an allochthonous lithospheric domain that collided and overthrusted Mesozoic and Tertiary sedimentary rocks of the Mesozoic-Paleogene, South Iberian and Maghrebian rifted continental paleomargins. Subcontinental lithospheric peridotite massifs are intercalated between polymetamorphic internal units of the Betic (Ronda, Ojen and Carratraca massifs), Rif (Beni Bousera), and Tell belts. In the Betic chain, the internal zones of the allochthonous Alboran domain include, from bottom to top, polymetamorphic rock of the Alpujarride and Malaguide complexes. The Ronda peridotite massif -- the

  16. The NR-radon intensity impact on floral environment around NAPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maury, A.N.; Sharma, M.; Singh, B.; Kumar, R.; Swarup, R.

    2006-01-01

    The nuclear radiation level around Narora Atomic Power Plant (NAPP), District Buladshehar (Uttar Pradesh) has been observed by experimental irradiation of CR-39 plastic track detectors, mounted in a self assembled box installed at height from the ground level 10, 20, 40, 60, 80 and 100 cm. The plants being most sensitive to nuclear radiation, constituting the floral component of bio-diversity, look more frequent and effective means to regulate the nuclear radiation and hence employed as potential alternative to SSNTD, named as BSNTD (the Bio-Species-Nuclear Track Detector) after appropriate calibrations. The five sites selected with similar settings of NR experimental 45 days exposures for Radon alpha, also accompanied by vegetable plants, oil yielding and ornamental plants such as radish, onion, mustard and marigold (under various physical as well as chemical treatments such as magnetic fields, fertilizers) placed at: (1)The open space nearly ∼ 100 meter away from NAPP Reactor Unit No. 1, (2) Village Ratanpur about 10 Km from NAPP, (3) Village Shehdol near Atrauli about 20 Km from NAPP, (4) Kasimpur Thermal power Plant near Aligarh, about 40 Km from NAPP and (5) The D.S. College, Physics research laboratory at Aligarh proper. The isolated and mixed treated plants were grown under controlled favourable conditions and their regular biological growth like total shoot yield, flowers/fruits and seed yield were recorded and these were correlated with the observed radioactive data. The experimental findings seem to match with all these parameters proportionally to CR-39 recording and thus proposing much cheaper Bio-Species Nuclear Track Detection as dynamical physiological changes but not as rigid geometrical damages recorded in SSNTD under cumbersome experimental procedures. The plant growth performance under different environmental conditions such as presence of track elements and heavy metals, our research group had set an unique experimentation relating complex bio

  17. Ground Control for Emplacement Drifts for SR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Y. Sun

    2000-01-01

    This analysis demonstrates that a satisfactory ground control system can be designed for the Yucca Mountain site, and provides the technical basis for the design of ground support systems to be used in repository emplacement and non-emplacement drifts. The repository ground support design was based on analytical methods using acquired computer codes, and focused on the final support systems. A literature review of case histories, including the lessons learned from the design and construction of the ESF, the studies on the seismic damages of underground openings, and the use of rock mass classification systems in the ground support design, was conducted (Sections 6.3.4 and 6.4). This review provided some basis for determining the inputs and methodologies used in this analysis. Stability of the supported and unsupported emplacement and non-emplacement drifts was evaluated in this analysis. The excavation effects (i.e., state of the stress change due to excavation), thermal effects (i.e., due to heat output from waste packages), and seismic effects (i.e., from potential earthquake events) were evaluated, and stress controlled modes of failure were examined for two in situ stress conditions (k 0 =0.3 and 1.0) using rock properties representing rock mass categories of 1 and 5. Variation of rock mass units such as the non-lithophysal (Tptpmn) and lithophysal (Tptpll) was considered in the analysis. The focus was on the non-lithophysal unit because this unit appears to be relatively weaker and has much smaller joint spacing. Therefore, the drift stability and ground support needs were considered to be controlled by the design for this rock unit. The ground support systems for both emplacement and non-emplacement drifts were incorporated into the models to assess their performance under in situ, thermal, and seismic loading conditions. Both continuum and discontinuum modeling approaches were employed in the analyses of the rock mass behavior and in the evaluation of the

  18. Automated emplacement and retrieval of hazardous waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slocum, A.H.; Hou, W.M.

    1987-01-01

    The design of several dedicated machines to perform simple tasks often results in higher system reliability and efficiency than the design of a single, multifunctional machine. Similarly, a reliable system for emplacement and retrieval of nuclear waste can be realized if emplacement/retrieval operations are decomposed into a well-defined series of independent tasks. The basic methodology is to design a system that eliminates contact between the waste package and the vehicle in the event of machine failure. The disabled vehicle can then be withdrawn to a safe location, repaired, and set back to resume normal operation

  19. Accessory minerals of Permian volcanites of South Gemeric Unit and Borka Nappe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smelko, M; Vozarova, A [Comenius University in Bratislava, Faculty of Natural Sciences, Department of Mineralogy and Petrology, 84215 Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2010-04-28

    The goal of this study was to summarize and complete the results from the study of metavolcanites and their accessory minerals (Zircon Zr{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}, Monazite CePO{sub 4} and Xenotime YPO{sub 4}) from the Southern Gemericum Unit and from the Borka Nappe. The acid metavolcanites and their accessory minerals were observed of the modern analytical methods.

  20. Constraints on the depositional age and tectonometamorphic evolution of marbles from the Biharia Nappe System (Apuseni Mountains, Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reiser Martin Kaspar

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Basement rocks from the Biharia Nappe System in the Apuseni Mountains comprise several dolomite and calcite marble sequences or lenses which experienced deformation and metamorphic overprint during the Alpine orogeny. New Sr, O and C-isotope data in combination with considerations from the lithological sequences indicate Middle to Late Triassic deposition of calcite marbles from the Vulturese-Belioara Series (Biharia Nappe s.str.. Ductile deformation and large-scale folding of the siliciclastic and carbonatic lithologies is attributed to NW-directed nappe stacking during late Early Cretaceous times (D2. The studied marble sequences experienced a metamorphic overprint under lower greenschist- facies conditions (316-370 °C based on calcite - dolomite geothermometry during this tectonic event. Other marble sequences from the Biharia Nappe System (i.e. Vidolm and Baia de Arieș nappes show similarities in the stratigraphic sequence and their isotope signature, together with a comparable structural position close to nappe contact. However, the dataset is not concise enough to allow for a definitive attribution of a Mesozoic origin to other marble sequences than the Vulturese-Belioara Series.

  1. An extensive apatite fission-track study throughout the Northern Apennines Nappe belt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbate, E.; Balestrieri, M.L.; Bigazzi, G.; Ventura, B.; Zattin, M.; Zuffa, G.G.

    1999-01-01

    This paper takes into consideration more than 100 apatite fission-track analyses on samples coming from an approximately west-east cross-section throughout the Northern Apennines. This collisional chain is made of structural units and nappes (Ligurian and Tuscan Nappe) accreted to the Adriatic Foreland during the Neogene, which overthrust the Miocene turbiditic successions of the Cervarola and Marnoso-arenacea Formations. Different cooling ages and degrees of annealing delineate different evolution histories for these units. Exhumation of the western outcrops of the Ligurian Nappe can be placed at 8 Ma and follows a first denudation event occurred in Eocene times. Timing of exhumation decreases eastwards. A break in this general trend is shown by the Apuan Alps, that occupy an intermediate position and yielded the youngest cooling ages. In the external part of the Marnoso-arenacea foredeep deposits this tendency could not be tested because total annealing of the apatite system has not been reached. In this case, modeling of data allows evaluating maximum burial temperatures

  2. Tectonics and sedimentation during convergence of the ALCAPA and Tisza-Dacia continental blocks: The Pienide nappe emplacement and its foredeep (N. Romania)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tischler, M.; Matenco, L.C.; Filipescu, S.; Gröger, H.; Wetzel, A.; Fügenschuh, B.

    2008-01-01

    The juxtaposition of the ALCAPA and Tisza-Dacia continental blocks, although one of the key issues in the evolution of the Carpathians, is not well known in terms of associated effects on the sedimentary systems during frontal foreland development. Most of the Contact between ALCAPA and Tisza-Dacia

  3. Origin of Manipur Ophiolite Complex, Indo-Myanmar Range ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    r b

    2017-11-20

    Nov 20, 2017 ... The Manipur. Ophiolite. Complex: Varying degree of serpentinization and relict pyroxenes. 11/20/2017. 13. Page 14. Serpentinization process preserves the protolith elemental signatures. 11/20/2017. 14 ... The range of Nd isotope ratios in the serpentinized peridotites. 11/20/2017. 17. Kingson et al.

  4. Lead isotopic studies of the Samail ophiolite, Oman

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, J.H.; Pallister, J.S.

    1981-04-10

    The isotopic composition of Pb and the concentrations of U, Th, and Pb have been determined for samples from various lithologic units and massive sulfides of the Samail ophiolite. The observed /sup 206/Pb//sup 204/Pb ratios range from 17.90 to 19.06, /sup 207/Pb//sup 204/Pb ratios from 15.43 to 15.63, and /sup 208/Pb//sup 204/Pb from 37.66 to 38.78. In Pb isotopic evolution diagrams, the initial Pb isotopic compositions of most of the samples from the Samail ophiolite plot within the field of oceanic basalt, clearly distinct from island arc data, and define some of the least radiogenic Pb observed from oceanic rocks. Lead data from the Samail are compatible with a model involving magma generation from an oceanic mantle source and formation of the ophiolite at an oceanic spreading center. U--Th--Pb isotopic systematics demonstrate that vertical heterogeneity in the oceanic crust can be created through differential concentration of U, Th, and Pb during crystal fractionation and alteration at, or near, the spreading ridge. Calcite form amygdules in the ophiolite basalt has similar Pb isotopic composition to the igneous rocks, suggesting precipitation of the calcite from seawater which contained Pb derived mostly from the oceanic crust. Lead isotopic data on Fe--Cu sulfides are also similar to the results from the igneous suite suggesting that the source of the sulfides is predominently from the oceanic crust. Lead data from serpentinized peridotite and a galena sample from below the ophiolite suggest that part of the serpentinization process and the formation of galena could involve addition of radiogenic Pb from either a continental source or from oceanic sediments.

  5. Longevity of Emplacement Drift Ground Support Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D.H.Tang

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis is to evaluate the factors affecting the longevity of emplacement drift ground support materials and to develop a basis for the selection of materials for ground support that will function throughout the preclosure period of a potential repository at Yucca Mountain. REV 01 ICN 01 of this analysis is developed in accordance with AP-3.10Q, Analyses and Models, Revision 2, ICN 4, and prepared in accordance with the Technical Work Plan for Subsurface Design Section FY 01 Work Activities (CRWMS M and O 2001a). The objective of this analysis is to update the previous analysis (CRWMS M and O 2000a) to account for related changes in the Ground Control System Description Document (CRWMS M and O 2000b), the Monitored Geologic Repository Project Description Document, which is included in the Requirements and Criteria for Implementing a Repository Design that can be Operated Over a Range of Thermal Modes (BSC 2001), input information, and in environmental conditions, and to provide updated information on candidate ground support materials. Candidate materials for ground support are carbon steel and cement grout. Steel is mainly used for steel sets, lagging, channel, rock bolts, and wire mesh. Cement grout is only considered in the case of grouted rock bolts. Candidate materials for the emplacement drift invert are carbon steel and granular natural material. Materials are evaluated for the repository emplacement drift environment based on the updated thermal loading condition and waste package design. The analysis consists of the following tasks: (1) Identify factors affecting the longevity of ground support materials for use in emplacement drifts. (2) Review existing documents concerning the behavior of candidate ground support materials during the preclosure period. (3) Evaluate impacts of temperature and radiation effects on mechanical and thermal properties of steel. Assess corrosion potential of steel at emplacement drift environment. (4

  6. Emplacement of small and large buffer blocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saari, H.; Nikula, M.; Suikki, M.

    2010-05-01

    The report describes emplacement of a buffer structure encircling a spent fuel canister to be deposited in a vertical hole. The report deals with installability of various size blocks and with an emplacement gear, as well as evaluates the achieved quality of emplacement and the time needed for installing the buffer. Two block assembly of unequal size were chosen for examination. A first option involved small blocks, the use of which resulted in a buffer structure consisting of small sector blocks 200 mm in height. A second option involved large blocks, resulting in a buffer structure which consists of eight blocks. In these tests, the material chosen for both block options was concrete instead of bentonite. The emplacement test was a three-phase process. A first phase included stacking a two meter high buffer structure with small blocks for ensuring the operation of test equipment and blocks. A second phase included installing buffer structures with both block options to a height matching that of a canister-encircling cylindrical component. A third phase included testing also the installability of blocks to be placed above the canister by using small blocks. In emplacement tests, special attention was paid to the installability of blocks as well as to the time required for emplacement. Lifters for both blocks worked well. Due to the mass to be lifted, the lifter for large blocks had a more heavy-duty frame structure (and other lifting gear). The employed lifters were suspended in the tests on a single steel wire rope. Stacking was managed with both block sizes at adequate precision and stacked-up towers were steady. The stacking of large blocks was considerably faster. Therefore it is probably that the overall handling of the large blocks will be more convenient at a final disposal site. From the standpoint of reliability in lifting, the small blocks were safer to install above the canister. In large blocks, there are strict shape-related requirements which are

  7. Endeavor research into evolving paradigms around ophiolites: the case of the oceanic igneous complexes of Costa Rica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarado, Guillermo E.; Denyer, Perci; Gazel, Esteban

    2009-01-01

    Studies on the radiolarite igneous (ophiolitic) complexes were done for more than one century in Costa Rica that range from Jurassic to Eocene. These studies can be grouped in four stages of knowledge: 1) from 1904 to 1957 were recognized the cherts, and the mafic and ultramafic igneous complexes, the first regional maps were done, and the first time were recognized ellipsoidal basalts, now widely known as pillow lavas. 2) From 1958 to 1978 the complexes were seen under the concept of the association of ophiolites (serpentine, gabbro, diabase, basalts, and related rocks) and interpreted the radiolarites as deep-sea sediments. The stage is characterized by the seminal work of Gabriel Dengo and by the first geochemical analyses in the framework of the plate tectonics. 3) A huge amount of geochemical data, paleontological and K/Ar ages were published from 1979 to 1994 and it was the stage of more controversial papers, their interpretation varied for the same locality (i.e. (Nicoya Peninsula) from relative simple stratigraphic model to a very complex nappe slices, and from a simple tectonic evolution (in situ and formed by a mid oceanic ridge volcanism) to a multistage evolution (terrains, and mid oceanic ridge, aseismic ridge, intraplate and island arc volcanism). The situation was similar in the other Costa Rican oceanic complexes. 4) The outlook for 1995 to the present it has been clarified and mutual agreement between the different groups. The stage is characterized by joint collaboration, the use of modern laboratory techniques as Sr, Nd, and Pb isotopes, major, trace and complete rare earth elements. 40A r/ 39 Ar dating, and volcanological criteria, together with detailed field mapping. The main new result of these studies was that the radiolarites (164-84 Ma) in the Nicoya Peninsula were significatively older than the basic igneous rocks (140-84 Ma), indicating a complex magmatic event intruding and erupting into the thick sedimentary sequence. For other areas

  8. Sulphide mineralization and wall-rock alteration in ophiolites and modern oceanic spreading centres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koski, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    Massive and stockwork Fe-Cu-Zn (Cyprus type) sulphide deposits in the upper parts of ophiolite complexes represent hydrothermal mineralization at ancient accretionary plate boundaries. These deposits are probable metallogenic analogues of the polymetallic sulphide deposits recently discovered along modern oceanic spreading centres. Genetic models for these deposits suggest that mineralization results from large-scale circulation of sea-water through basaltic basement along the tectonically active axis of spreading, a zone of high heat flow. The high geothermal gradient above 1 to 2 km deep magma chambers emplaced below the ridge axis drives the convective circulation cell. Cold oxidizing sea-water penetrating the crust on the ridge flanks becomes heated and evolves into a highly reduced somewhat acidic hydrothermal solvent during interaction with basaltic wall-rock. Depending on the temperature and water/rock ratio, this fluid is capable of leaching and transporting iron, manganese, and base metals; dissolved sea-water sulphate is reduced to sulphide. At the ridge axis, the buoyant hydrothermal fluid rises through permeable wall-rocks, and fluid flow may be focussed along deep-seated fractures related to extensional tectonic processes. Metal sulphides are precipitated along channelways as the ascending fluid undergoes adiabatic expansion and then further cooling during mixing with ambient sub-sea-floor water. Vigorous fluid flow results in venting of reduced fluid at the sea-floor/sea-water interface and deposition of massive sulphide. A comparison of sulphide mineralization and wall-rock alteration in ancient and modern spreading centre environments supports this genetic concept. Massive sulphide deposits in ophiolites generally occur in clusters of closely spaced (stacked sequences of pillow basalt and sheet flows, the sea-floor underlying numerous deposits in Guaymas Basin consists of diatomaceous ooze and terrigenous clastic sediment that is intruded by diabase

  9. Clinopyroxenite dykes within a banded unit in the basal mantle section of the northern part of the Oman ophiolite: A record of the latest deep-seated magmatism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishimaru, Satoko; Arai, Shoji; Tamura, Akihiro

    2017-11-01

    We found clinopyroxenite dykes in a banded harzburgite block within the Sumeini area in the uppermost part of the metamorphic sole of the northern part of the Oman ophiolite. The dykes clearly cut the deformational structure of the harzburgite and contain its fragments, indicating dyke formation during obduction of the ophiolite. The Mg# [= Mg / (Mg + total Fe)] of clinopyroxenes in the dykes ranges from 0.81 to 0.91, and increases up to 0.93 proximal to harzburgite fragments. Mantle minerals in the harzburgite fragments were modified chemically through interaction with the magma that formed the dyke, yielding lower clinopyroxene and spinel Mg#, and spinels with higher TiO2 contents than those in the unaltered harzburgite. These geochemical features indicate that the clinopyroxenite dykes are cumulates derived from a relatively deep-seated primitive magma enriched in light rare earth elements (LREE) with an ocean island basalt (OIB)-like affinity, geochemically similar to the V3 lavas of an off-ridge origin. Combining these data with geological observations suggests that the clinopyroxenite dykes represent root system of the V3 lavas. Our analyses of the clinopyroxenite dykes testify to the external nature of the V3 magmas, which was added to the sliced oceanic lithosphere from the outside. It is likely that the V3 magma underwent deep-seated crystallization of clinopyroxene and had limited interaction with mantle peridotite en route to the surface. The mode of occurrence of the Sumeini clinopyroxenites (i.e., emplaced into a banded harzburgite block surrounded by garnet amphibolite) is consistent with the generation of OIB-like magmas (V3 lava) beneath the Oman ophiolite resulting from the break-off of the "subducting slab" and subsequent infiltration of hot asthenospheric mantle. This view is consistent with the limited distribution of V3-related rocks in the Oman ophiolite. The production of such OIB-like magmas during ophiolite obduction is not a rare event

  10. Cryovolcanic Emplacement of Domes on Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quick, Lynnae C.; Glaze, Lori S.; Baloga, Stephen M.

    2016-01-01

    Here we explore the hypothesis that certain domes on Europa may have been produced by the extrusion of viscous cryolavas. A new mathematical method for the emplacement and relaxation of viscous lava domes is presented and applied to putative cryovolcanic domes on Europa. A similarity solution approach is applied to the governing equation for fluid flow in a cylindrical geometry, and dome relaxation is explored assuming a volume of cryolava has been rapidly emplaced onto the surface. Nonphysical sin- gularities inherent in previous models for dome relaxation have been eliminated, and cryolava cooling is represented by a time-variable viscosity. We find that at the onset of relaxation, bulk kinematic viscosities may lie in the range between 10(exp 3) and 10(exp 6) sq m/s, while the actual fluid lava viscosity may be much lower. Plausible relaxation times to form the domes, which are linked to bulk cryolava rheology, are found to range from 3.6 days to 7.5 years. We find that cooling of the cryolava, while dominated by conduction through an icy skin, should not prevent fluids from advancing and relaxing to form domes within the timescales considered. Determining the range of emplacement conditions for putative cryolava domes will shed light on Europa's resurfacing history. In addition, the rheologies and compositions of erupted cryolavas have implications for subsurface cryomagma ascent and local surface stress conditions on Europa.

  11. Longevity of Emplacement Drift Ground Support Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, D.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis is to evaluate the factors affecting the longevity of emplacement drift ground support materials and to develop a basis for selection of materials for ground support that will function throughout the preclosure period. The Development Plan (DP) for this analysis is given in CRWMS M and O (Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Management and Operating Contractor) (1999a). The candidate materials for ground support are steel (carbon steel, ductile cast iron, galvanized steel, and stainless steel, etc.) and cement. Steel will mainly be used for steel sets, lagging, channels, rock bolts, and wire mesh. Cement usage is only considered in the case of grouted rock bolts. The candidate materials for the invert structure are steel and crushed rock ballast. The materials shall be evaluated for the repository emplacement drift environment under a specific thermal loading condition based on the proposed License Application Design Selection (LADS) design. The analysis consists of the following tasks: (1) Identify factors affecting the longevity of ground control materials for use in emplacement drifts. (2) Review existing documents concerning behavior of candidate ground control materials during the preclosure period. The major criteria to be considered for steel are mechanical and thermal properties, and durability, of which corrosion is the most important concern. (3) Evaluate the available results and develop recommendations for material(s) to be used

  12. TBV 361 RESOLUTION ANALYSIS: EMPLACEMENT DRIFT ORIENTATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, M.; Kicker, D.C.; Sellers, M.D.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this To Be Verified/To Be Determined (TBX) resolution analysis is to release ''To Be Verified'' (TBV)-361 related to the emplacement drift orientation. The system design criterion in ''Subsurface Facility System Description Document'' (CRWMS M andO 1998a, p.9) specifies that the emplacement drift orientation relative to the dominant joint orientations should be at least 30 degrees. The specific objectives for this analysis include the following: (1) Collect and evaluate key block data developed for the repository host horizon rock mass. (2) Assess the dominant joint orientations based on available fracture data. (3) Document the maximum block size as a function of drift orientation. (4) Assess the applicability of the drift orientation/joint orientation offset criterion in the ''Subsurface Facility System Description Document'' (CRWMS M andO 1998a, p.9). (5) Consider the effects of seepage on drift orientation. (6) Verify that the viability assessment (VA) drift orientation complies with the drift orientation/joint orientation offset criterion, or provide justifications and make recommendations for modifying the VA emplacement drift layout. In addition to providing direct support to the System Description Document (SDD), the release of TBV-361 will provide support to the Repository Subsurface Design Department. The results from this activity may also provide data and information needs to support the MGR Requirements Department, the MGR Safety Assurance Department, and the Performance Assessment Organization

  13. Mineralogy of Surface Serpentinite Outcrops in the Coast Range Ophiolite: Implications for the Deep Biosphere and Astrobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mccann, A. R.; Cardace, D.; Carnevale, D.; Ehlmann, B. L.

    2011-12-01

    California contains a number of ultramafic (Fe- and Mg rich) rock bodies, including the Coast Range Ophiolite, a block of oceanic crust and upper mantle tectonically emplaced onto land. These ultramafic rocks are primarily composed of olivine and pyroxene, both of which are stable at the high temperatures and pressures in the deep subsurface where they crystallize but become unstable at low temperature and low pressure conditions near the surface. They are highly reduced rocks, creating chemical disequilibria, which can theoretically provide energy to chemoautotrophic organisms. Serpentinization (serpentine-forming) reactions between the rocks and water produce hydrogen molecules, which can be metabolized by diverse organisms. Earth and Mars have shown evidence of similar early geologic histories, possibly with widespread reducing habitable environments (Schulte et al., 2006). Recent data from the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) have shown serpentine-bearing outcrops near Nili Fossae (21 N, 282 W) and elsewhere in Mars' cratered highlands. Serpentine-bearing outcrops are rare, but their presence confirms that such systems involving the aqueous alteration of ultramafic rocks were active in the past (specifically during the Noachian epoch (older than ~3.7 billion years), possibly producing aqueous habitats suitable for chemoautotrophic life (Ehlmann et al., 2010). Remotely sensed data cannot confirm whether there is active serpentinization on Mars, however exposed, presently serpentinizing ultramafics in terrestrial ophiolites such as those of the California Coast Range provide points of comparison for similar Martian rocks. Volume expansion during serpentinization fractures the host rock, exposing new reaction surfaces, allowing further serpentinization. If subsurface liquid water is present on Mars, serpentinization may still be occurring. We will provide x-ray diffraction and petrographic data for surface serpentinites from the Coast

  14. Performance implications of waste package emplacement orientation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilder, D.G.

    1991-05-01

    Emplacement borehole orientation directly impacts many aspects of the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) and interactions with the near field environment. This paper considers the impacts of orientation on the hydrologic portion of the environment and its interactions with the EBS. The hydrologic environment is considered from a conceptual standpoint, the numerical analyses are left for subsequent work. As reported in this paper, several aspects of the hydrological environment are more favorable for long term performance of vertically oriented rather than horizontally oriented Waste Packages. 19 refs., 15 figs

  15. EMPLACEMENT GANTRY ITS STANDARDS IDENTIFICATION STUDY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voegele, M.

    2005-01-01

    To date, the project has established ITS performance requirements for SSCs based on identification and categorization of event sequences that may result in a radiological release. These performance requirements are defined within the NSDB. Further, SSCs credited with performing safe functions are classified as ITS. In turn, perform confirmation for these SSCs is sought through the use of consensus code and standards. The purpose of this study is to identify applicable codes and standards for the WP Emplacement Gantry ITS SSCs. Further, this study will form the basis for selection and the extent of applicability of each code and standard. This study is based on the design development completed for LA only. Accordingly, identification of ITS SSCs beyond those defined within the NSDB are based on designs that may be subject to further development during detail design. Furthermore, several design alternatives may still be under consideration to satisfy certain safety functions, and that final selection will not be determined until further design development has occurred. Therefore, for completeness, throughout this study alternative designs currently under considered will be discussed. Further, the results of this study will be subject to evaluation as part of a follow-on GAP analysis study. Based on the results of this study the GAP analysis will evaluate each code and standard to ensure each ITS performance requirement is fully satisfied. When a performance requirement is not fully satisfied a ''gap'' is highlighted. Thereafter, the study will identify supplemental requirements to augment the code or standard to meet performance requirements. Further, the GAP analysis will identify non-standard areas of the design that will be subject to a Development Plan. Non-standard components and non-standard design configurations are defined as areas of the design that do not follow standard industry practices or codes and standards. Whereby, performance confirmation cannot be

  16. EMPLACEMENT DRIFT ISOLATION DOOR CONTROL SYSTEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    N.T. Raczka

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis is to review and refine key design concepts related to the control system presently under consideration for remotely operating the emplacement drift isolation doors at the potential subsurface nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. This analysis will discuss the key design concepts of the control system that may be utilized for remotely monitoring, opening, and closing the emplacement drift isolation doors. The scope and primary objectives of this analysis are to: (1) Discuss the purpose and function of the isolation doors (Presented in Section 7.1). (2) Review the construction of the isolation door and other physical characteristics of the doors that the control system will interface with (Presented in Section 7.2). (3) Discuss monitoring and controlling the operation of the isolation doors with a digital control system (either a Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) system or a Distributed Control System (DCS)) (Presented in Section 7.3). (4) Discuss how all isolation doors can be monitored and controlled from a subsurface central control center (Presented in Section 7.4). This analysis will focus on the development of input/output (I/O) counts including the types of I/O, redundancy and fault tolerance considerations, and processor requirements for the isolation door control system. Attention will be placed on operability, maintainability, and reliability issues for the system operating in the subsurface environment with exposure to high temperatures and radiation

  17. Multi-stage origin of the Coast Range ophiolite, California: Implications for the life cycle of supra-subduction zone ophiolites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shervais, J.W.; Kimbrough, D.L.; Renne, P.; Hanan, B.B.; Murchey, B.; Snow, C.A.; Zoglman, Schuman M.M.; Beaman, J.

    2004-01-01

    The Coast Range ophiolite of California is one of the most extensive ophiolite terranes in North America, extending over 700 km from the northernmost Sacramento Valley to the southern Transverse Ranges in central California. This ophiolite, and other ophiolite remnants with similar mid-Jurassic ages, represent a major but short-lived episode of oceanic crust formation that affected much of western North America. The history of this ophiolite is important for models of the tectonic evolution of western North America during the Mesozoic, and a range of conflicting interpretations have arisen. Current petrologic, geochemical, stratigraphic, and radiometric age data all favor the interpretation that the Coast Range ophiolite formed to a large extent by rapid extension in the forearc region of a nascent subduction zone. Closer inspection of these data, however, along with detailed studies of field relationships at several locales, show that formation of the ophiolite was more complex, and requires several stages of formation. Our work shows that exposures of the Coast Range ophiolite preserve evidence for four stages of magmatic development. The first three stages represent formation of the ophiolite above a nascent subduction zone. Rocks associated with the first stage include ophiolite layered gabbros, a sheeted complex, and volcanic rocks vith arc tholeiitic or (roore rarely) low-K calc-alkaline affinities. The second stage is characterized by intrusive wehrlite-clinopyroxenite complexes, intrusive gabbros, Cr-rich diorites, and volcanic rocks with high-Ca boninitic or tholeiitic ankaramite affinities. The third stage includes diorite and quartz diorite plutons, felsic dike and sill complexes, and calc-alkaline volcanic rocks. The first three stages of ophiolite formation were terminated by the intrusion of mid-ocean ridge basalt dikes, and the eruption of mid-ocean ridge basalt or ocean-island basalt volcanic suites. We interpret this final magmatic event (MORB

  18. Deep Borehole Emplacement Mode Hazard Analysis Revision 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sevougian, S. David [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-08-07

    This letter report outlines a methodology and provides resource information for the Deep Borehole Emplacement Mode Hazard Analysis (DBEMHA). The main purpose is identify the accident hazards and accident event sequences associated with the two emplacement mode options (wireline or drillstring), to outline a methodology for computing accident probabilities and frequencies, and to point to available databases on the nature and frequency of accidents typically associated with standard borehole drilling and nuclear handling operations. Risk mitigation and prevention measures, which have been incorporated into the two emplacement designs (see Cochran and Hardin 2015), are also discussed. A key intent of this report is to provide background information to brief subject matter experts involved in the Emplacement Mode Design Study. [Note: Revision 0 of this report is concentrated more on the wireline emplacement mode. It is expected that Revision 1 will contain further development of the preliminary fault and event trees for the drill string emplacement mode.

  19. Concept of Operations for Waste Transport, Emplacement, and Retrieval

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raczka, Norman T.

    2001-01-01

    The preparation of this technical report has two objectives. The first objective is to discuss the base case concepts of waste transport, emplacement, and retrieval operations and evaluate these operations relative to a lower-temperature repository design. Aspects of the operations involved in waste transport, emplacement and retrieval may be affected by the lower-temperature operating schemes. This report evaluates the effects the lower-temperature alternatives may have on the operational concepts involved in emplacing and retrieving waste. The second objective is to provide backup material for the design description, in a traceable and defensible format, for Section 2 of the Waste Emplacement/Retrieval System Description Document

  20. Lower Cretaceous Xigaze ophiolites formed in the Gangdese forearc : Evidence from paleomagnetism, sediment provenance, and stratigraphy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, Wentao; van Hinsbergen, Douwe J J; Maffione, Marco; Orme, Devon A.; Dupont-Nivet, Guillaume; Guilmette, Carl; Ding, Lin; Guo, Zhaojie; Kapp, Paul

    2015-01-01

    The India-Asia suture zone of southern Tibet exposes Lower Cretaceous Xigaze ophiolites and radiolarian cherts, and time-equivalent Asian-derived clastic forearc sedimentary rocks (Xigaze Group). These ophiolites have been interpreted to have formed in the forearc of the north-dipping subduction

  1. The Othris Ophiolite, Greece: A snapshot of subduction initiation at a mid-ocean ridge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barth, M.G.; Mason, P.R.D.; Davies, G.R.; Drury, M.R.

    2008-01-01

    The mantle section of the Tethyan-type Othris Ophiolite, Greece, records tectono-magmatic processes characteristic of both mid-ocean ridges and supra-subduction zones. The Othris Ophiolite is a remnant of the Jurassic Neotethys Ocean, which existed between Eurasia and Gondwanaland. Othris

  2. Geology of the Spanish part of the Gavarnie Nappe (Pyrenees) and its underlying sediments near Bielsa (Province of Huesca)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lith, J.G.J. van

    1968-01-01

    A description is given of the stratigraphy and the tectonics of the Spanish part of the Gavarnie nappe and and its underlying sediments near Bielsa. The outlines of the geological map coincide approximately with the frontier of the municipality of Bielsa. This study forms part of geological

  3. UHP metamorphism recorded by kyanite-bearing eclogite in the Seve Nappe Complex of northern Jämtland, Swedish Caledonides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janák, M.; Van Roermund, H.; Majka, J.; Gee, D.

    The first evidence for ultrahigh-pressure (UHP) metamorphism in the Seve Nappe Complex of the Scandinavian Caledonides is recorded by kyanite-bearing eclogite, found in a basic dyke within a garnet peridotite body exposed close to the lake Friningen in northern Jämtland (central Sweden). UHP

  4. 198 Contribution à l'étude de la salinisation de la nappe côtière de ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MB Pro

    La nappe côtière de Foum EL Oued est la principale unité hydrogéologique de la ..... évaporites (NaCl = halite) soit par une contamination à partir d'un biseau salé .... A. HANI and J. MANIA,Tecnología De La Intrusión De Agua De Mar En.

  5. WP EMPLACEMENT CONTROL AND COMMUNICATION EQUIPMENT DESCRIPTIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raczka, N.T.

    1997-01-01

    The objective and scope of this document are to list and briefly describe the major control and communication equipment necessary for waste package emplacement at the proposed nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. Primary performance characteristics and some specialized design features of the required equipment are explained and summarized in the individual subsections of this document. This task was evaluated in accordance with QAP-2-0 and found not to be quality affecting. Therefore, this document was prepared in accordance with NAP-MG-012. The following control and communication equipment are addressed in this document: (1) Programmable Logic Controllers (PLC's); (2) Leaky Feeder Radio Frequency Communication Equipment; (3) Slotted Microwave guide Communication Equipment; (4) Vision Systems; (5) Radio Control Equipment; and (6) Enclosure Cooling Systems

  6. Additive Construction with Mobile Emplacement (ACME)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, John

    2015-01-01

    The Additive Construction with Mobile Emplacement (ACME) project is developing technology to build structures on planetary surfaces using in-situ resources. The project focuses on the construction of both 2D (landing pads, roads, and structure foundations) and 3D (habitats, garages, radiation shelters, and other structures) infrastructure needs for planetary surface missions. The ACME project seeks to raise the Technology Readiness Level (TRL) of two components needed for planetary surface habitation and exploration: 3D additive construction (e.g., contour crafting), and excavation and handling technologies (to effectively and continuously produce in-situ feedstock). Additionally, the ACME project supports the research and development of new materials for planetary surface construction, with the goal of reducing the amount of material to be launched from Earth.

  7. Features and uranium mineralization of Malou thrust nappe structure in Rencha basin of northeast Guangdong

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Shizhu; Zhao Wei; Zheng Mingliang; Chen Zhuhai

    2010-01-01

    Rencha basin was a Cenozoic volcanic fault basin (K 2 -E). Due to strong and frequent tectonic-magmatic activities, especially the late volcanic activities in the region, the acidic volcanic rock was formed which is the host rocks of uranium-molybdenum polymetallic deposit. Malou structural belt is a east-west trending and a long-term tectonic-magmatic activities belt, and is also a linear structure of volcanic eruption. Through recent exploration and study, Malou structure (F 1 )was found to be a thrust nappe structure. In the early stage of evolution, the structure controled the formation of Rencha basin and rock distribution, in the later, it controled the formation of uranium mineralization. Because farely rich orebody has been discovered in some deep part of the structure, large and richer orebody can be predicted in the depth of 500-1500 m. (authors)

  8. An integrated paleomagnetic and magnetic anisotropy study of the Oligocene flysch from the Dukla nappe, Outer Western Carpathians, Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiss Dániel

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The Dukla Nappe belongs to the Outer Western Carpathians, which suffered considerable shortening due to the convergence and collision of the European and African plates. In this paper we present new paleomagnetic and magnetic anisotropy results from the Polish part of the Dukla Nappe, based on 102 individually oriented cores from nine geographically distributed localities. Susceptibility measurements and mineralogy investigations showed that paramagnetic minerals are important contributors to susceptibility anisotropy (AMS. The AMS fabrics are related to deposition/compression (foliation and weak tectonic deformation (lineation. The AARM fabric, that of the ferrimagnetic minerals, seems to be a less sensitive indicator of tectonic deformation than the AMS fabric. The inclination-only test points to the pre-folding age of the remanent magnetizations. Seven localities exhibit CCW rotation, a single one shows CW rotation. The CCW rotated paleomagnetic directions form two groups, one showing large, the other moderate CCW rotation. Previously published paleomagentic directions from the Slovak part of the same nappe exhibit smeared distribution between them. The declination of the overall-mean paleomagnetic direction for the Dukla nappe is similar to those observed in the neighbouring Magura and Silesian nappes, but it is of poorer quality. The AMS lineations at several localities are deviating more to the west from the present north than that of the local tectonic strikes. A possible explanation for this is that the AMS lineations were imprinted first, probably still in the Oligocene, while the sediments were soft (ductile deformation and the folding and tilting took place during the CCW rotation.

  9. An oceanic core complex (OCC) in the Albanian Dinarides? Preliminary paleomagnetic and structural results from the Mirdita Ophiolite (northern Albania)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maffione, M.; Morris, A.; Anderson, M.

    2010-12-01

    Oceanic core complexes (OCCs) are dome-shaped massifs commonly associated with the inside corners of the intersection of transform faults and slow (and ultra-slow) spreading centres. They represent the uplifted footwalls of large-slip oceanic detachment faults (e.g. Cann et al., 1997; Blackman et al., 1998) and are composed of mantle and lower crustal rocks exhumed during fault displacement (Smith et al., 2006, 2008). Recent paleomagnetic studies of core samples from OCCs in the Atlantic Ocean (Morris et al., 2009; MacLeod et al., in prep) have confirmed that footwall sections undergo substantial rotation around (sub-) horizontal axes. These studies, therefore, support “rolling hinge” models for the evolution of OCCs, whereby oceanic detachment faults initiate at a steep angle at depth and then “roll-over” to their present day low angle orientations during unroofing (Buck, 1988; Wernicke & Axen, 1988; Lavier et al., 1999). However, a fully integrated paleomagnetic and structural analysis of this process is hampered by the one-dimensional sampling provided by ocean drilling of OCC footwalls. Therefore, ancient analogues for OCCs in ophiolites are of great interest, as these potentially provide 3-D exposures of these important structures and hence a more complete understanding of footwall strain and kinematics (providing that emplacement-related phases of deformation can be accounted for). Recently, the relationship between outcropping crustal and upper mantle rocks led Tremblay et al. (2009) to propose that an OCC is preserved within the Mirdita ophiolite of the Albanian Dinarides (northern Albania). This is a slice of Jurassic oceanic lithosphere exposed along a N-S corridor which escaped the main late Cenozoic Alpine deformation (Robertson, 2002, 2004; Dilek et al., 2007). Though in the eastern portion of the Mirdita ophiolite a Penrose-type sequence is present, in the western portion mantle rocks are in tectonic contact with upper crustal lithologies

  10. Ground Control for Non-Emplacement Drifts for LA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, D.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this calculation is to analyze the stability of repository non-emplacement drifts during the preclosure period, and to provide a final ground support method for non-emplacement drifts for the License Application (LA). This calculation will provide input for the development of LA documents. The scope of this calculation is limited to the non-emplacement drifts including access mains, ramps, exhaust mains, turnouts, intersections between access mains and turnouts, and intersections between exhaust mains and emplacement drifts, portals, TBM launch chambers, observation drift and test alcove in the performance confirmation (PC) facilities, etc. The calculation is limited to the non-emplacement drifts subjected to a combined loading of in-situ stress, seismic stress, and/or thermal stress. Other effects such as hydrological and chemical effects are not considered in this analysis

  11. Relating rock avalanche morphology to emplacement processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufresne, Anja; Prager, Christoph; Bösmeier, Annette

    2015-04-01

    The morphology, structure and sedimentological characteristics of rock avalanche deposits reflect both internal emplacement processes and external influences, such as runout path characteristics. The latter is mainly predisposed by topography, substrate types, and hydrogeological conditions. Additionally, the geological setting at the source slope controls, e.g. the spatial distribution of accumulated lithologies and hence material property-related changes in morphology, or the maximum clast size and amount of fines of different lithological units. The Holocene Tschirgant rock avalanche (Tyrol, Austria) resulted from failure of an intensely deformed carbonate rock mass on the southeast face of a 2,370-m-high mountain ridge. The initially sliding rock mass rapidly fragmented as it moved towards the floor of the Inn River valley. Part of the 200-250 x 106 m3 (Patzelt 2012) rock avalanche debris collided with and moved around an opposing bedrock ridge and flowed into the Ötz valley, reaching up to 6.3 km from source. Where the Tschirgant rock avalanche spread freely it formed longitudinal ridges aligned along motion direction as well as smaller hummocks. Encountering high topography, it left runup ridges, fallback patterns (i.e. secondary collapse), and compressional morphology (successively elevated, transverse ridges). Further evidence for the mechanical landslide behaviour is given by large volumes of mobilized valley-fill sediments (polymict gravels and sands). These sediments indicate both shearing and compressional faulting within the rock avalanche mass (forming their own morphological units through, e.g. in situ bulldozing or as distinctly different hummocky terrain), but also indicate extension of the spreading landslide mass (i.e. intercalated/injected gravels encountered mainly in morphological depressions between hummocks). Further influences on its morphology are given by the different lithological units. E.g. the transition from massive dolomite

  12. Spring and surface water quality of the Cyprus ophiolites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Neal

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A survey of surface, spring and borehole waters associated with the ophiolite rocks of Cyprus shows five broad water types (1 Mg-HCO3, (2 Na-SO4-Cl-HCO3, (3 Na-Ca-Cl-SO4-OH-CO3, (4 Na-Cl-SO4 and (5 Ca-SO4. The waters represent a progression in chemical reactivity from surface waters that evolve within a groundwater setting due to hydrolysis of the basic/ultrabasic rock as modified by CO2-weathering. An increase in salinity is also observed which is due to mixing with a saline end-member (modified sea-water and dissolution of gypsum/anhydrite. In some cases, the waters have pH values greater than 11. Such high values are associated with low temperature serpentinisation reactions. The system is a net sink for CO2. This feature is related not only to the hydrolysis of the primary minerals in the rock, but also to CaCO3 or Ca-Mg-CO3 solubility controls. Under hyperalkaline conditions, virtually all the carbon dioxide is lost from the water due to the sufficiently high calcium levels and carbonate buffering is then insignificant. Calcium sulphate solubility controls may also be operative when calcium and sulphate concentrations are particularly high. Keywords: Cyprus, Troodos, ophiolite, serpentinisation, spring, stream, water quality, bromide, iodine, boron, trace elements, hyperalkaline.

  13. Review of potential subsurface permeable barrier emplacement and monitoring technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riggsbee, W.H.; Treat, R.L.; Stansfield, H.J.; Schwarz, R.M.; Cantrell, K.J.; Phillips, S.J.

    1994-02-01

    This report focuses on subsurface permeable barrier technologies potentially applicable to existing waste disposal sites. This report describes candidate subsurface permeable barriers, methods for emplacing these barriers, and methods used to monitor the barrier performance. Two types of subsurface barrier systems are described: those that apply to contamination.in the unsaturated zone, and those that apply to groundwater and to mobile contamination near the groundwater table. These barriers may be emplaced either horizontally or vertically depending on waste and site characteristics. Materials for creating permeable subsurface barriers are emplaced using one of three basic methods: injection, in situ mechanical mixing, or excavation-insertion. Injection is the emplacement of dissolved reagents or colloidal suspensions into the soil at elevated pressures. In situ mechanical mixing is the physical blending of the soil and the barrier material underground. Excavation-insertion is the removal of a soil volume and adding barrier materials to the space created. Major vertical barrier emplacement technologies include trenching-backfilling; slurry trenching; and vertical drilling and injection, including boring (earth augering), cable tool drilling, rotary drilling, sonic drilling, jetting methods, injection-mixing in drilled holes, and deep soil mixing. Major horizontal barrier emplacement technologies include horizontal drilling, microtunneling, compaction boring, horizontal emplacement, longwall mining, hydraulic fracturing, and jetting methods

  14. The nappes of the Lepontine dome: the influence of tectonic inheritance on their deformation style

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenker, Filippo Luca; Ambrosi, Christian; Scapozza, Cristian; Czerki, Dorota; Castelletti, Claudio; Maino, Matteo; Gouffon, Yves

    2017-04-01

    The Lepontine dome exposes the tectonostratigraphy of the Central Alps, from bottom-to-top, the subpenninic gneissic nappes of the Leventina, Simano, Adula/Cima-Lunga and Maggia. These units were part of a post-Variscan gneissic crust, which was intensely intruded by several generations of granitoids forming laccoliths and dikes of different shapes and sizes within paragneisses, augengneisses and amphibolites. During the Alpine orogenic cycle this initial and complex geological architecture was reshaped into a fold and thrust belt. We present the effect of these initial rheological anomalies along the Leventina, Simano and Adula/Cima-Lunga units through the geological map of the Osogna sheet (Swiss National Map no. 1293,1:25'000) together with structural and metamorphic data. The geological map shows that the Simano and Adula/Cima-Lunga units have an internal and lateral lithological variation at different scales as illustrated by the geological cross-sections. All lithologies present a penetrative amphibolite-facies foliation, which can vary in intensity among the rock-types. On the foliation plane a mineral and stretching lineation is visible dipping NW or SE, depending on the plane dip direction. The kinematic analysis indicates a top-to-the NW shearing. Despite this consistent structural data showing a regional dominant fabric, the folds (generally with a fold-axis parallel to the lineation) show different styles, depending on the thickness and the rock-type of the folded horizon and matrix, do not form laterally continuous structures and often are not cylindrical. As a consequence, such structures are interpreted as local perturbation rather than structures of regional importance. Furthermore, the Leventina and the Simano boundary is locally incongruent with the tectonic contact of the published maps. The amphibolite and paragneisses, used in the past as nappe divider, result to be deformed magmatic xenoliths. Therefore we present evidence (i) of a bottom

  15. Occurence of a uraniferous-vanadiniferous graphitic phyllite in the Koeli Nappes of the Stekenjokk area, central Swedish Caledonides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundblad, K.; Gee, D.G.

    1985-01-01

    The Cambro-Ordovician alum shales in Scandinavia have anomalously high contents of certain trace elements, among them U, V and Mo, when compared to other black shales in the world. Variations in the contents of these elements within the formation show a clear correlation with the stratigraphy. Investigation of the content of U, V, and Mo in graphitic phyllites of the Stikke Nappe in the Seve-Koeli Nappe Complex of the Stekenjokk area has identified the presence of anomalously high contents of these elements compared to average black shales. The content of these elements in the graphitic phyllites correlates clearly with that found in the Early Ordovician Dictyonema-bearing shales in eastern Troendelag and on the Baltoscandian Platform; it is, therefore, suggested that these metasediments in Stekenjokk are of the same age. (Author)

  16. Sedimentary record of the obduction of the Samail ophiolite in northern Oman: the Muti Formation in the Sail Hatat window

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducassou, Céline; Robin, Cecile; Poujol, Marc; Al-Rahbi, Basim; Estournes, Guilhem

    2016-04-01

    The obduction of the Samail Ophiolite in Oman took place during the Upper Cretaceous. Since then, the northern part of Oman has been relatively preserved from deformation and is therefore one of the best places to study obduction processes. In addition, radiometric data provide good constraints on the timing of obduction from the formation of the metamorphic sole until the exhumation of the high-pressure / low-temperature metamorphic rocks involved in the subduction zone below the oceanic lithosphere. However, the response of the continental margin during the obduction is still poorly constrained. If most of the models suggest the development of a flexural basin and an associated forebulge such as in continental collision, their recognition within the syn-tectonic deposits led to different interpretations. The geometry of the youngest syn-tectonic deposits (Fiqa Formation) is relatively well constrained by sub-surface data that suggest a southward migration of the depocenter and progressive onlaps on the southern margin of the basin. The context of sedimentation of the oldest syn-tectonic deposits (Muti Formation) preserved below the nappes in the Oman Mountains is, however, still poorly understood. The location of the sedimentation area with respect of the forebulge, for instance, remains unclear. In order to acquire better constraints on the record, on the Arabian platform, of first steps of the obduction, the analysis of several sections of the Muti Formation has been performed. We present here our main results for the north-eastern part of the Oman Mountains, in the Sail Hatat window, where the thickest successions have been described in Quryat and Bidbid area, respectively located in the eastern and western part of the Sail Hatat window. Sedimentological and structural analysis have been combined to reconstitute the evolution of depositional environments in areas strongly affected by deformation. In addition, systematic measurements and restoration of

  17. Nornahraun lava morphology and mode of emplacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Gro B. M.; Höskuldsson, Armann; Riishuus, Morten S.; Jónsdóttir, Ingibjörg; Gudmundsson, Magnús T.; Sigmundsson, Freysteinn; Óskarsson, Birgir V.; Drouin, Vincent; Gallagher, Catherine; Askew, Rob; Moreland, William M.; Dürig, Tobias; Dumont, Stephanie; Þórdarson, Þór

    2015-04-01

    The ongoing Nornahraun eruption is the largest effusive eruption in Iceland since the Laki eruption in 1783-84, with an estimated lava volume of ~1.15 km3 covering an area of ~83.4 km2 (as of 5 JAN 2015). The eruption provides an unprecedented opportunity to study i) lava morphologies and their emplacement styles, ii) the transition from from open to closed lava pathways and iii) lava pond formation. Tracking of the lava advancement and morphology has been performed by GPS and GoPro cameras installed in 4×4 vehicles as well as video footage. Complimentary observations have been provided from aircraft platforms and by satellite data. Of particular importance for lava morphology observations are 1-12 m/pixel airborne SAR images (x-band). The Nornahraun flow field comprises a continuum of morphologies from pāhoehoe to 'a'ā, which have varied tem-porally and spatially. At the onset of the eruption 31 AUG, lava flows advanced rapidly (400-800 m/hr) from the 1.5 km long fissure as large slabby pāhoehoe [1-3] sheet lobes, 100-500 m wide and 0.3-1 m thick at the flow fronts. By 1 SEPT, the flows began channeling towards the NE constrained by the older Holuhraun I lava field and the to-pography of flood plain itself. A central open channel developed, feeding a 1-2 km wide active 'a'ā frontal lobe that advanced 1-2 km/day. In addition to its own caterpillar motion, the frontal lobe advanced in a series of 30-50 m long breakouts, predominantly slabby and rubbly pāhoehoe [4,5]. These breakouts had initial velocities of 10-30 m/hr and reached their full length within tens of minutes and subsequently inflated over hours. With the continuous advancement of the 'a'ā flow front, the breakouts were incorporated into the 'a'ā flow fronts and seldom preserved. At the margins of the frontal lava lobe, the breakouts were more sporadic, but predominantly rubbly pāhoehoe and slabby pāhoehoe, as at the flow front. The lava flow advanced ENE into Jökulsá á Fjöllum on 7 SEPT

  18. Rootless tephra stratigraphy and emplacement processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Christopher W.; Fitch, Erin P.; Fagents, Sarah A.; Thordarson, Thorvaldur

    2017-01-01

    Volcanic rootless cones are the products of thermohydraulic explosions involving rapid heat transfer from active lava (fuel) to external sources of water (coolant). Rootless eruptions are attributed to molten fuel-coolant interactions (MFCIs), but previous studies have not performed systematic investigations of rootless tephrostratigraphy and grain-size distributions to establish a baseline for evaluating relationships between environmental factors, MFCI efficiency, fragmentation, and patterns of tephra dispersal. This study examines a 13.55-m-thick vertical section through an archetypal rootless tephra sequence, which includes a rhythmic succession of 28 bed pairs. Each bed pair is interpreted to be the result of a discrete explosion cycle, with fine-grained basal material emplaced dominantly as tephra fall during an energetic opening phase, followed by the deposition of coarser-grained material mainly as ballistic ejecta during a weaker coda phase. Nine additional layers are interleaved throughout the stratigraphy and are interpreted to be dilute pyroclastic density current (PDC) deposits. Overall, the stratigraphy divides into four units: unit 1 contains the largest number of sediment-rich PDC deposits, units 2 and 3 are dominated by a rhythmic succession of bed pairs, and unit 4 includes welded layers. This pattern is consistent with a general decrease in MFCI efficiency due to the depletion of locally available coolant (i.e., groundwater or wet sediments). Changing conduit/vent geometries, mixing conditions, coolant and melt temperatures, and/or coolant impurities may also have affected MFCI efficiency, but the rhythmic nature of the bed pairs implies a periodic explosion process, which can be explained by temporary increases in the water-to-lava mass ratio during cycles of groundwater recharge.

  19. New Paleomagnetic Data From Upper Gabbros Supports Limited Rotation of Central Semail Massif in Oman Ophiolite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horst, A. J.; Sarah, T.; Hartley, E.; Martin, J.

    2017-12-01

    Paleomagnetic data from northern massifs of the Oman ophiolite demonstrate substantial clockwise rotations prior to or during obduction, yet data from southern massifs are recently suggested to be remagnetized during obduction and show subsequent smaller counterclockwise rotations. To better understand paleomagnetic data from the southern massifs, we conducted a detailed paleomagnetic and rock magnetic study of 21 sites in upper gabbros and 5 sites in lower crustal gabbros within the central Semail massif. Samples treated with progressive thermal demagnetization yield interpretable magnetizations with dominant unblocking between 500-580°C that implies characteristic remanent magnetization (ChRM) components carried by low-titanium magnetite and nearly pure magnetite. Rock magnetic and scanning electron microscopy data provide additional support of the carriers of magnetization. ChRMs from sites with samples containing partially-serpentinized olivine are similar to sites with samples lacking olivine, where the carriers appear to be fine magnetite intergrowths in pyroxene. The overall in situ and tilt-corrected mean directions from upper gabbros are distinct from the lower gabbros, from previous data within the massif, and also directions from similar crustal units in adjacent Rustaq and Wadi Tayin massifs. After tilt correction for 10-15° SE dip of the crust-mantle boundary, the mean direction from upper gabbros is nearly coincident with in situ lower gabbros. The tilt-corrected direction from upper gabbros is also consistent with an expected direction from the Late Cretaceous apparent polar wander path for Arabia at the age of crustal accretion ( 95Ma). These results suggest the upper crustal section in Semail has likely only experienced minor tilting since formation and acquisition of magnetization. Due to slow cooling of middle to lower gabbros in fast-spread crust, the lower gabbro sites likely cooled later or after obduction, and thus yield a distinct

  20. PALAEOENVIRONMENTAL INTERPPRETATION OF THE LATE TRIASSIC FRAELE FORMATION (ORTLES NAPPE, AUSTROALPINE DOMAIN, LOMBARDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FABRIZIO BERRA

    1997-03-01

    Full Text Available The Fraele Formation crops out in the Ortles Nappe (upper Valtellina, Northern Italy, structurally part of the Central Austroalpine Domain. It consists of fine siliciclastics alternating with carbonates, mostly limestones,rare dolostones and marls. The formation differs lithologically from the underlying Norian Dolomia del Cristallo because of different paleonvironmental evolution.The change in environmental parameters was controlled mainly by a climatic change to more humid conditions.This favoured on one hand the mobilisation and trasport by rivers of siliciclastic material from the continent to the Tethys gulf,and on the other influenced the sea-water chemistry.Freshwater influxes lowered salinity and inhibited early dolomitisation. Input of low density freshwater resulted in the astablishment of a permanent water mass stratification which influenced the benthic life. This paleoenvironmental reconstruction fits with the sudden clastic input which occurred in several palaeogeographic domains of the western Tethys realm (Austroalpine, Southalpine, Apennine, Hungary, Poland, Slovakia during the Late Norian.  

  1. Neodymium and strontium isotope study of ophiolite and orogenic lherzolite petrogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richard, P.; Allegre, C.J.; Paris-7 Univ., 75

    1980-01-01

    Neodymium isotopic analyses have been measured on nine ophiolites and four orogenic lherzolites. Epsilonsub(Nd) varies from +12 to +3 in the ophiolites and from +18 to +2 in the orogenic lherzolites. The majority of the analyses plot on a epsilonsub(Nd)-epsilonsub(Sr) correlation line as defined by Nd and Sr isotopic analyses of oceanic basalts. However, certain ophiolitic and lherzolitic samples exhibit high 87 Sr/ 86 Sr ratios and as such lie to the right of the correlation line towards seawater compositions. From these data one can postulate several origins for ophiolites including that of mid-ocean ridges and ocean islands. If the orogenic lherzolites are interpreted as representative of the mantle occurring below active ridges a more complex model is required involving mantle heterogeneity and multi-episodic chemical fractionation starting prior to 2 Ga ago. (orig.)

  2. Improvements relating to apparatus for emplacing or replacing a gaiter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chilvers, D.; Morrison, D.M.

    1982-01-01

    The invention relates to apparatus for emplacing or replacing a gaiter of the type which may be used in sealing the hot side of an isolation enclosure which is associated with a master-slave manipulator. (author)

  3. Petrography and mineral chemistry of metamorphosed mantle peridotites of Nain Ophiolite (Central Iran)

    OpenAIRE

    Nargess Shirdashtzadeh; Ghodrat Torabi; Ramin Samadi

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Study of the petrology of the ophiolites as the relics of ancient oceanic lithosphere, is a powerful tool to reconstruct Earth’s history. Mantle peridotites have mostly undergone alteration and serpentinization to some extent. Thus, the relics of metamorphic signatures from the upper mantle and crustal processes from most of the peridotites have been ruined. Several recent papers deal with the mantle peridotites of Nain Ophiolite (e.g. Ghazi et al., 2010). However, no scientif...

  4. Coupling of Oceanic and Continental Crust During Eocene Eclogite-Facies Metamorphism: Evidence From the Monte Rosa Nappe, Western Alps, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapen, T. J.; Johnson, C. M.; Baumgartner, L. P.; Skora, S.; Mahlen, N. J.; Beard, B. L.

    2006-12-01

    Subduction of continental crust to HP-UHP metamorphic conditions requires overcoming density contrasts that are unfavorable to deep burial, whereas exhumation of these rocks can be reasonably explained through buoyancy-assisted transport in the subduction channel to more shallow depths. In the western Alps, both continental and oceanic lithosphere has been subducted to eclogite-facies metamorphic conditions. The burial and exhumation histories of these sections of lithosphere bear directly on the dynamics of subduction and the stacking of units within the subduction channel. We address the burial history of the continental crust with high precision U-Pb rutile and Lu-Hf garnet geochronology of the eclogite-facies Monte Rosa nappe (MR), western Alps, Italy. U-Pb rutile ages from quartz-carbonate-white mica-rutile veins that are hosted within eclogite and schist of the MR, Gressoney Valley, Italy, indicate that it was at eclogite-facies metamorphic conditions at 42.6 +/- 0.6 Ma. The sample area (Indren glacier, Furgg zone; Dal Piaz, 2001) consists of eclogite boudins that are surrounded by micaceous schist. Associated with the eclogite and schist are quartz-carbonate-white mica-rutile veins that formed in tension cracks in the eclogite and along the contact between eclogite and surrounding schist. Intrusion of the veins occurred at eclogite-facies metamorphic conditions (480-570°C, >1.3-1.4 GPa) based on textural relations, oxygen isotope thermometry, and geothermobarometry. Lu-Hf geochronology of garnet from a chloritoid-talc-garnet-phengite-quartz-calcite-pyrite - chalcopyrite bearing boudin within talc-chloritoid whiteschists of the MR, Val d'Ayas, Italy (Chopin and Monie, 1984; Pawlig, 2001) yields an age of 40.54 +/- 0.36 Ma. The talc-chloritoid whiteschists from the area record pressures and temperatures of 1.6-2.4 GPa and 500-530°C (Chopin and Monie, 1984; Le Bayon et al., 2006) indicating near UHP metamorphic conditions. Based on the age, P-T, and textural

  5. Crystallization Temperatures of Lower Crustal Gabbros from the Oman Ophiolite and the Persistence of the 'Mush Zone' at Intermediate/Fast Spreading Ridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanTongeren, J. A.

    2017-12-01

    Oceanic crust is formed when mantle-derived magmas are emplaced at the ridge axis, a zone of intense rifting and extension. Magmas begin to cool and crystallize on-axis, forming what is termed the "Mush Zone", a region of partially molten rocks. Several attempts have been made to understand the nature of the Mush Zone at fast spreading mid-ocean ridges, specifically how much partial melt exists and how far off-axis the Mush Zone extends. Geophysical estimates of P-wave velocity perturbations at the East Pacific Rise show a region of low velocity approximately 1.5-2.5 km off-axis, which can be interpreted to be the result of higher temperature [e.g. Dunn et al., 2000, JGR] or the existence of partial melt. New petrological and geochemical data and methods allow for the calculation of the lateral extent of the Mush Zone in the lower oceanic crust on exposed sections collected from the Oman ophiolite, a paleo-fast/intermediate spreading center. I will present new data quantifying the crystallization temperatures of gabbros from the Wadi Khafifah section of lower oceanic gabbros from the Oman ophiolite. Crystallization temperatures are calculated with the newly developed plagioclase-pyroxene REE thermometer of Sun and Liang [2017, Contrib. Min. Pet.]. There does not appear to be any systematic change in the crystallization temperature of lower crustal gabbros with depth in the crust. In order to quantify the duration of crystallization and the lateral extent of the Mush Zone of the lower crust, crystallization temperatures are paired with estimates of the solidus temperature and cooling rate determined from the same sample, previously constrained by the Ca diffusion in olivine geothermometer/ geospeedometer [e.g. VanTongeren et al., 2008 EPSL]. There is no systematic variation in the closure temperature of Ca in olivine, or the cooling rate to the 800°C isotherm. These results show that gabbros throughout the lower crust of the Oman ophiolite remain in a partially

  6. Four billion years of ophiolites reveal secular trends in oceanic crust formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harald Furnes

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We combine a geological, geochemical and tectonic dataset from 118 ophiolite complexes of the major global Phanerozoic orogenic belts with similar datasets of ophiolites from 111 Precambrian greenstone belts to construct an overview of oceanic crust generation over 4 billion years. Geochemical discrimination systematics built on immobile trace elements reveal that the basaltic units of the Phanerozoic ophiolites are dominantly subduction-related (75%, linked to backarc processes and characterized by a strong MORB component, similar to ophiolites in Precambrian greenstone sequences (85%. The remaining 25% Phanerozoic subduction-unrelated ophiolites are mainly (74% of Mid-Ocean-Ridge type (MORB type, in contrast to the equal proportion of Rift/Continental Margin, Plume, and MORB type ophiolites in the Precambrian greenstone belts. Throughout the Phanerozoic there are large geochemical variations in major and trace elements, but for average element values calculated in 5 bins of 100 million year intervals there are no obvious secular trends. By contrast, basaltic units in the ophiolites of the Precambrian greenstones (calculated in 12 bins of 250 million years intervals, starting in late Paleo- to early Mesoproterozoic (ca. 2.0–1.8 Ga, exhibit an apparent decrease in the average values of incompatible elements such as Ti, P, Zr, Y and Nb, and an increase in the compatible elements Ni and Cr with deeper time to the end of the Archean and into the Hadean. These changes can be attributed to decreasing degrees of partial melting of the upper mantle from Hadean/Archean to Present. The onset of geochemical changes coincide with the timing of detectible changes in the structural architecture of the ophiolites such as greater volumes of gabbro and more common sheeted dyke complexes, and lesser occurrences of ocelli (varioles in the pillow lavas in ophiolites younger than 2 Ga. The global data from the Precambrian ophiolites, representative of nearly 50

  7. Petrology and geochemistry of the high-Cr podiform chromitites of the Köycegiz ophiolite, southwest Turkey: implications for the multi-stage evolution of the oceanic upper mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Fahui; Yang, Jingsui; Dilek, Yildirim; Wang, ChunLian; Hao, Xiaolin; Xu, Xiangzhen; Lian, Dongyang

    2018-03-01

    Ophiolites exposed across the western Tauride belt in Turkey represent tectonically emplaced fragments of oceanic lithosphere obducted onto the continental margin following the closure of the Neotethys Ocean during the Late Cretaceous. The ultramafic massif of Köycegiz, which is located in the ophiolitic belt of southwestern Turkey, is a major source of metallurgical chromitite ore. The massif comprises a base of tectonized harzburgite with minor dunite overlain by a magmatic sequence of wehrlite, pyroxenite, troctolite and gabbro. Only sparse refractory chromitites occur within the harzburgites; in contrast, the upper and middle sections of the peridotite sequence contain abundant metallurgical chromitites. The peridotites record abundant evidence of mantle metasomatism on various scales, as the Fo values of olivine in harzburgite are 90.1-95.4, whereas those in dunite are 90.1-91.8. The compositions of the melts passing through the peridotites changed gradually from arc tholeiite to boninite due to melt-rock reactions, thus producing more Cr-rich chromitites in the upper part of the body. Most of the chromitites have high Cr numbers (77-78), although systematic changes in the compositions of the olivine and chromian spinel occur from the harzburgites to the dunite envelopes to the chromitites, reflecting melt-rock reactions. The calculated ΔlogfO2 (FMQ) values range from - 2.77 to + 1.03 in the chromitites, - 2.73 to -0.01 in the harzburgites, and - 1.65 to + 0.45 in the dunites. All of the available evidence suggests that the Köycegiz ophiolite formed in a supra-subduction zone (SSZ) mantle wedge. These models indicate that the harzburgites represent the products of first-stage melting and low degrees of melt-rock interaction that occurred in a mid-ocean ridge (MOR) environment. In contrast, the chromitites and dunites represent the products of second-stage melting and related refertilization, which occurred in an SSZ environment.

  8. Longevity of Emplacement Drift Ground Support Materials, Rev. 01

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David H. Tang

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis is to evaluate the factors affecting the longevity of emplacement drift ground support materials and to develop a basis for the selection of materials for ground support that will function throughout the preclosure period of a potential repository at Yucca Mountain. The Development Plan (DP) for this analysis is given in Longevity of Emplacement Drift Ground Support Materials (CRWMS M and O 1999a). The objective of this analysis is to update the previous analysis (CRWMS M and O 2000a) to account for related changes in the Ground Control System Description Document (CRWMS M and O 2000b), the Monitored Geologic Repository Project Description Document (CRWMS M and O 1999b), and in environmental conditions, and to provide updated information on candidate ground support materials. Candidate materials for ground support are carbon steel and cement grout. Steel is mainly used for steel sets, lagging, channel, rock bolts, and wire mesh. Cement grout is only considered in the case of grouted rock bolts. Candidate materials for the emplacement drift invert are carbon steel and crushed rock ballast. Materials are evaluated for the repository emplacement drift environment based on the updated thermal loading condition and waste package design. The analysis consists of the following tasks: (1) Identify factors affecting the longevity of ground support materials for use in emplacement drifts; (2) Review existing documents concerning the behavior of candidate ground support materials during the preclosure period; (3) Evaluate impacts of temperature and radiation effects on mechanical and thermal properties of steel. Assess corrosion potential of steel at emplacement drift environment; (4) Evaluate factors affecting longevity of cement grouts for fully grouted rock bolt system. Provide updated information on cement grout mix design for fully grouted rock bolt system; and (5) Evaluate longevity of materials for the emplacement drift invert

  9. Emplacement and stemming of nuclear explosives for Plowshare applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cramer, J.L.

    1970-01-01

    This paper will discuss the various methods used for emplacement and design considerations that must be taken into account when the emplacement and stemming method is selected. The step-by-step field procedure will not be discussed in this paper. The task of emplacing and stemming the nuclear explosive is common to all Plowshare experiments today. All present-day applications of a nuclear explosive for Plowshare experiments require that the detonation take place some distance below the surface of the ground. This is normally done by lowering the explosive into an emplacement hole to a desired depth and then backfilling the hole with a suitable stemming material. At first glance it scenes like a very straightforward, simple task to perform. It would appear to be a task that could become a standard procedure for all experiments; however, this is not the case. In actuality, the emplacement and stemming of a nuclear explosive must almost be a custom design. It varies with the application of the experiment, i.e., cratering or underground engineering. It also varies with the condition of the hole, the available equipment to do the job, the actual purpose of the stemming, possible postshot reentry, hydrology, geology, and future production. A very important item that must always be considered is the protection of the firing and signal cables during the downhole and stemming operation. Each of these things must be considered; ignoring any one of them could jeopardize one of the objectives of the experiment or perhaps even the experiment itself. It should be emphasized that for a multiple-shot program such as would be used to develop a gas field where the geology, depths of burial etc. are the same, the emplacement and stemming operation would be standardized, as would all other parts of the program. However, for individual experiments in totally different areas, complete standardization of the emplacement and stemming is impossible

  10. Emplacement and stemming of nuclear explosives for Plowshare applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cramer, J L [Lawrence Radiation Laboratory, University of California, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1970-05-15

    This paper will discuss the various methods used for emplacement and design considerations that must be taken into account when the emplacement and stemming method is selected. The step-by-step field procedure will not be discussed in this paper. The task of emplacing and stemming the nuclear explosive is common to all Plowshare experiments today. All present-day applications of a nuclear explosive for Plowshare experiments require that the detonation take place some distance below the surface of the ground. This is normally done by lowering the explosive into an emplacement hole to a desired depth and then backfilling the hole with a suitable stemming material. At first glance it scenes like a very straightforward, simple task to perform. It would appear to be a task that could become a standard procedure for all experiments; however, this is not the case. In actuality, the emplacement and stemming of a nuclear explosive must almost be a custom design. It varies with the application of the experiment, i.e., cratering or underground engineering. It also varies with the condition of the hole, the available equipment to do the job, the actual purpose of the stemming, possible postshot reentry, hydrology, geology, and future production. A very important item that must always be considered is the protection of the firing and signal cables during the downhole and stemming operation. Each of these things must be considered; ignoring any one of them could jeopardize one of the objectives of the experiment or perhaps even the experiment itself. It should be emphasized that for a multiple-shot program such as would be used to develop a gas field where the geology, depths of burial etc. are the same, the emplacement and stemming operation would be standardized, as would all other parts of the program. However, for individual experiments in totally different areas, complete standardization of the emplacement and stemming is impossible.

  11. Handling and Emplacement Options for Deep Borehole Disposal Conceptual Design.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cochran, John R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hardin, Ernest [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-07-01

    This report presents conceptual design information for a system to handle and emplace packages containing radioactive waste, in boreholes 16,400 ft deep or possibly deeper. Its intended use is for a design selection study that compares the costs and risks associated with two emplacement methods: drill-string and wireline emplacement. The deep borehole disposal (DBD) concept calls for siting a borehole (or array of boreholes) that penetrate crystalline basement rock to a depth below surface of about 16,400 ft (5 km). Waste packages would be emplaced in the lower 6,560 ft (2 km) of the borehole, with sealing of appropriate portions of the upper 9,840 ft (3 km). A deep borehole field test (DBFT) is planned to test and refine the DBD concept. The DBFT is a scientific and engineering experiment, conducted at full-scale, in-situ, without radioactive waste. Waste handling operations are conceptualized to begin with the onsite receipt of a purpose-built Type B shipping cask, that contains a waste package. Emplacement operations begin when the cask is upended over the borehole, locked to a receiving flange or collar. The scope of emplacement includes activities to lower waste packages to total depth, and to retrieve them back to the surface when necessary for any reason. This report describes three concepts for the handling and emplacement of the waste packages: 1) a concept proposed by Woodward-Clyde Consultants in 1983; 2) an updated version of the 1983 concept developed for the DBFT; and 3) a new concept in which individual waste packages would be lowered to depth using a wireline. The systems described here could be adapted to different waste forms, but for design of waste packaging, handling, and emplacement systems the reference waste forms are DOE-owned high- level waste including Cs/Sr capsules and bulk granular HLW from fuel processing. Handling and Emplacement Options for Deep Borehole Disposal Conceptual Design July 23, 2015 iv ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This report has

  12. Stratigraphic units overlying the Zambales Ophiolite Complex (ZOC) in Luzon, (Philippines): Tectonostratigraphic significance and regional implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queaño, Karlo L.; Dimalanta, Carla B.; Yumul, Graciano P.; Marquez, Edanjarlo J.; Faustino-Eslava, Decibel V.; Suzuki, Shigeyuki; Ishida, Keisuke

    2017-07-01

    The Zambales Ophiolite Complex (ZOC) on the island of Luzon, Philippines is one of the most well-studied crust-mantle sequences in the region. Several massifs comprise the ZOC, one of which is the Coto Block overlain by clastic sedimentary units previously dated as Eocene. Geochronologic studies from diabase, granodiorites and other late-stage magmatic products similarly yielded the same age. Succeeding tectonic models have therefore all been grounded on the assumption that the entire ZOC is Eocene. Recent investigations, however, revealed the presence of chert blocks within the Early to Middle Miocene clastic formation overlying the Acoje Block in the northern part of the ophiolite complex. Radiolarians extracted from the cherts yielded a stratigraphic range that suggests a Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous age. The recognition of a much older age than previously reported of the ZOC warrants a re-examination of its actual distribution and genesis. Correlating with other similarly-aged ophiolites, we suggest defining a western Mesozoic ophiolite belt, largely extending from the west-central portion of the archipelago to the northeastern tip of Luzon island. Tentatively, we attribute the Mesozoic ophiolitic and associated rocks in western Luzon to an arc-continent collision involving the Philippine Mobile Belt and the Palawan Microcontinental Block. In addition, differences in the clastic compositions of the Cenozoic sedimentary formations provide material not only for deciphering the ZOC's unroofing history but also for constraining the timing of province linkage. The intermittent appearance of lithic fragments and detrital minerals from the ophiolite in the units of the Middle Miocene Candelaria Limestone and the Late Miocene to Early Pliocene Sta. Cruz Formation indicates significant but geographically variable contributions from the ophiolite complex. In the northern Zambales Range, the Sta. Cruz Formation caps the Coto Block and the Acoje Block of the ZOC

  13. WIPP waste package testing on simulated DHLW: emplacement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecke, M.A.

    1984-01-01

    Several series of simulated (nonradioactive) defense high-level waste (DHLW) package tests have been emplaced in the WIPP, a research and development facility authorized to demonstrate the safe disposal of defense-related wastes. The primary purpose of these 3-to-7 year duration tests is to evaluate the in situ materials performance of waste package barriers (canisters, overpacks, backfills, and nonradioactive DHLW glass waste form) for possible future application to a licensed waste repository in salt. This paper describes all test materials, instrumentation, and emplacement and testing techniques, and discusses progress of the various tests. These tests are intended to provide information on materials behavior (i.e., corrosion, metallurgical and geochemical alterations, waste form durability, surface interactions, etc.), as well as comparison between several waste package designs, fabrications details, and actual costs. These experiments involve 18 full-size simulated DHLW packages (approximately 3.0 m x 0.6 m diameter) emplaced in vertical boreholes in the salt drift floor. Six of the test packages contain internal electrical heaters (470 W/canister), and were emplace under approximately reference DHLW repository conditions. Twelve other simulated DHLW packages were emplaced under accelerated-aging or overtest conditions, including the artificial introduction of brine, and a thermal loading approximately three to four times higher than reference. Eight of these 12 test packages contain 1500 W/canister electrical heaters; the other four are filled with DHLW glass. 9 refs., 1 fig

  14. Geochemistry and Nd-isotope systematics of chemical and terrigenous sediments from the Dun Mountain Ophiolite, New Zealand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivell, W.J.

    2002-01-01

    . Metalliferous contributions to red and green TA in the overlying terrigenous sedimentary sequence also link these facies to early DMOB back-arc eruptives. The red and green TA pass upwards into ungraded Atomodesmid-bearing grey TA, implying turbidite deposition in a shallowing marine environment. The (mainly andesitic) TA show systematic trends of decreasing Eu/Eu* and ε Nd (T) with increasing Ε-REE, La/Y, Th/Sc, and SiO 2 . Th abundances and Th/Sc ratios (up to 1.6) in the TA are akin to those of calc-alkaline magmas in continental arcs, and are significantly greater than island-arc or ophiolitic volcanics. A narrow range of positive ε Nd (T) values (+0.5 to +2.0) for the TA suggests a young differentiated continental arc source, less dissected than the quartzofeldspathic plutonic provenance for the Torlesse (ε Nd (T) N /Yb N = 2.5-2.8) in the sandstones resemble island-arc tholeiites (IAT). The breccias have low Eu/Eu* (c. 0.72), Ce N /Yb N = 1.6, Th/Sc (0.1-0.2), and Tb N /Yb N c. 1.0, features transitional between the sandstones and DMOB plagiogranites. Importantly, the sandstones and breccias show high positive initial Nd ratios (ε Nd (T) = +5 to +8) akin to values for Brook Street IAT (ε Nd (T) = +9). This implies juvenile (mantle-derived) source rocks for both the mafic and felsic younger terrigenous sediments, compatible with crustal residence (mean provenance) ages less than for the TA. Little continental input is permitted by Nd-isotopic data for these rocks. Whereas the early DMOB pillow basalt - chemical sediment - TA assemblage was emplaced in a back-arc setting, with influx of detritus in part from an active continental margin (possibly within the New England Orogen), the younger DMOB terrigenous sediment association shows a close kinship with bimodal DMOB magmatism related to infant arc volcanic centres in an extensional forearc regime. Turbidite sands and mass-flow deposits were shed into proximal fault-bound basins isolated from continental clastic

  15. Geochronological and geochemical constraints on the origin of the Yunzhug ophiolite in the Shiquanhe-Yunzhug-Namu Tso ophiolite belt, Lhasa Terrane, Tibetan Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yun-Chuan; Xu, Ji-Feng; Chen, Jian-Lin; Wang, Bao-Di; Kang, Zhi-Qiang; Huang, Feng

    2018-02-01

    The formation of the Shiquanhe-Yunzhug-Namu Tso ophiolite mélange zone (SNMZ) within the Lhasa Terrane, Tibetan Plateau, is key to understanding the Mesozoic tectonic evolution of this terrane, which remains controversial. We show that the Yunzhug ophiolite in the central segment of the SNMZ formed at 150 Ma, based on U-Pb dating of zircons from a gabbroic sample in a well-developed sheeted dike complex. Geochemically, these mafic rocks are dominated by E-MORB-type compositions, along with minor amounts of rocks with P-MORB-type compositions. The samples also exhibit high εNd(t) values and lack negative Nb and Ta anomalies. Data for all the samples plot within the MORB array on a Th/Yb-Nb/Yb diagram. Therefore, these mafic rocks most likely formed in either a slow spreading oceanic setting or an embryonic ocean, and not in a back-arc basin as has been previously assumed. Taking into account the regional geology, we propose that the Yunzhug ophiolite is part of a distinct ophiolitic belt and represents material formed in an embryonic ocean within the Lhasa Terrane, which provides new insights into the Jurassic tectonic evolution of the Lhasa Terrane.

  16. The recycling of chromitites in ophiolites from southwestern North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Jiménez, José M.; Camprubí, Antoni; Colás, Vanessa; Griffin, William L.; Proenza, Joaquín A.; O'Reilly, Suzanne Y.; Centeno-García, Elena; García-Casco, Antonio; Belousova, Elena; Talavera, Cristina; Farré-de-Pablo, Júlia; Satsukawa, Takako

    2017-12-01

    Podiform chromitites occur in mantle peridotites of the Late Triassic Puerto Nuevo Ophiolite, Baja California Sur State, Mexico. These are high-Cr chromitites [Cr# (Cr/Cr + Al atomic ratio = 0.61-0.69)] that contain a range of minor- and trace-elements and show whole-rock enrichment in IPGE (Os, Ir, Ru). That are similar to those of high-Cr ophiolitic chromitites crystallised from melts similar to high-Mg island-arc tholeiites (IAT) and boninites in supra-subduction-zone mantle wedges. Crystallisation of these chromitites from S-undersaturated melts is consistent with the presence of abundant inclusions of platinum-group minerals (PGM) such as laurite (RuS2)-erlichmanite (OsS2), osmium and irarsite (IrAsS) in chromite, that yield TMA ≈ TRD model ages peaking at 325 Ma. Thirty-three xenocrystic zircons recovered from mineral concentrates of these chromitites yield ages (2263 ± 44 Ma to 278 ± 4 Ma) and Hf-O compositions [ɛHf(t) = - 18.7 to + 9.1 and 18O values the mantle via subduction. They were captured by the parental melts of the chromitites when the latter formed in a supra-subduction zone mantle wedge polluted with crustal material. In addition, the Puerto Nuevo chromites have clinopyroxene lamellae with preferred crystallographic orientation, which we interpret as evidence that chromitites have experienced high-temperature and ultra high-pressure conditions (the formation of chromitite in the supra-subduction zone mantle wedge underlying the Vizcaino intra-oceanic arc ca. 250 Ma ago, deep-mantle recycling, and subsequent diapiric exhumation in the intra-oceanic basin (the San Hipólito marginal sea) generated during an extensional stage of the Vizcaino intra-oceanic arc ca. 221 Ma ago. The TRD ages at 325 Ma record a partial melting event in the mantle prior to the construction of the Vizcaino intra-oceanic arc, which is probably related to the Permian continental subduction, dated at 311 Ma.

  17. Devonian conodonts from the Foča–Prača Paleozoic complex (Durmitor Nappe, southeastern Bosnia and Herzegovina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan Jurkovšek

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Conodont study of the Crna Rijeka borehole CR-17, positioned in the frontal part of the Durmitor Nappe (Foča – Prača Paleozoic complex, SE Bosnia and Herzegovina is presented. The obtained fauna indicates an Early-Middle Devonian age and due to poor preservation an identification at a generic level is possible only. The recovered conodont elements have a high Color Alteration Index (CAI = 6,5–7 indicating a degree of metamorphism corresponding to a temperature interval from 440 °C to 720 °C.

  18. Sr isotopic tracer study of the Samail ophiolite, Oman

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanphere, M.A.; Coleman, R.G.; Hopson, C.A.

    1981-01-01

    We have measured Rb and Sr concentrations and Sr isotopic compositions in 41 whole-rock samples and 12 mineral separates from units of the Samail ophiolite, including peridotite, gabbro, plagiogranite diabase dikes, and gabbro and websterite dikes within the metamorphic peridotite. Ten samples of cummulate gabbro from the Wadir Kadir section and nine samples from the Wadi Khafifah section have mean 87 Sr/ 86 Sr ratios and standard deviations of 0.70314 +- 0.00030 and 0.70306 +- 0.00034, respectively. The dispersion in Sr isotopic composition may reflect real heterogeneities in the magma source region. The average Sr isotopic composition of cumulate gabbro falls in the range of isotopic compositions of modern midocean ridge basalt. The 87 Sr/ 86 Sr ratios of noncumulate gabbro, plagiogranite, and diabase dikes range from 0.7034 to 0.7047, 0.7038 to 0.7046, and 0.7037 to 0.7061, respectively. These higher 87 Sr/ 86 Sr ratios are due to alteration of initial magmatic compositions by hydrothermal exchange with seawater. Mineral separates from dikes that cut harzburgite tectonite have Sr isotopic compositions which agree with that of cumulate gabbro. These data indicate that the cumulate gabbro and the different dikes were derived from partial melting of source regions that had similar long-term histories and chemical compositions

  19. Permeability of granular beds emplaced in vertical drill holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffiths, S.K.; Morrison, F.A. Jr.

    1979-01-01

    To determine the permeabilities of granular materials emplaced in vertical drill holes used for underground nuclear tests, an experiment at the USDOE Nevada Test Site (NTS) was conducted. As the hole is being filled, falling material increases pressure above and within the granular beds beneath. When the filling operation starts or stops, a transient pressure response occurs within the beds; measurements of this response in beds of various compositions were made. The permeabilities after emplacement were found by matching analytical predictions of the response to these data. This information is useful in assuring the containment of nuclear tests conducted in such drill holes

  20. Potential Hydrogen Yields from Ultramafic Rocks of the Coast Range Ophiolite and Zambales Ophiolite: Inferences from Mössbauer Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stander, A.; Nelms, M.; Wilkinson, K.; Dyar, M. D.; Cardace, D.

    2013-12-01

    The reduced status of mantle rocks is a possible controller and indicator of deep life habitat, due to interactions between water and ultramafic (Fe, Mg-rich) minerals, which, under reducing conditions, can yield copious free hydrogen, which is an energy source for rock-hosted chemosynthetic life. In this work, Mössbauer spectroscopy was used to parameterize the redox status of Fe in altering peridotites of the Coast Range Ophiolite (CRO) in California, USA and Zambales Ophiolite (ZO) in the Philippines. Fe-bearing minerals were identified and data were collected for the percentages of Fe(III)and Fe(II)and bulk Fe concentration. Thin section analysis shows that relict primary olivines and spinels generally constitute a small percentage of the ZO and CRO rock, and given satisfactory estimates of the volume of the ultramafic units of the ZO and CRO, a stoichiometric H2 production can be estimated. In addition, ZO serpentinites are ~63,000 ppm Fe in bulk samples; they contain ~41-58% Fe(III)and ~23-34% Fe(II) in serpentine and relict minerals along with ~8-30% of the total Fe as magnetite. CRO serpentinites are ~42,000 ppm Fe in bulk samples; they contain ~15-50% Fe(III), ~22-88% Fe(II) in serpentine and relict minerals, and ~0-52% of total Fe is in magnetite (Fe(II)Fe(III)2O4). Assuming stoichiometric production of H2, and given the following representation of serpentinization 2(FeO)rock + H2O → (Fe2O3)rock +H2, we calculated the maximum quantity of hydrogen released and yet to be released through the oxidation of Fe(II). Given that relatively high Fe(III)/Fetotal values can imply higher water:rock ratios during rock alteration (Andreani et al., 2013), we can deduce that ZO ultramafics in this study have experienced a net higher water:rock ratio than CRO ultramafics. We compare possible H2 yields and contrast the tectonic and alteration histories of the selected ultramafic units. (M. Andreani, M. Muñoz, C. Marcaillou, A. Delacour, 2013, μXANES study of iron

  1. The geologic character of nappe structure and its relation to uranium mineralization of Xiangshan ore-field in the middle of Jiangxi Province

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Yulong; Yang Song

    2012-01-01

    Started with the spatial distribution of nappe structure, the geologic features are discussed and its effect on uranium mineralization in systematically summarized for Xiangshan ore-field in the middle of Jiangxi Province. The nappe structure not only formed a 'cross-over' lithologic combination which creates a network system which can connect, transport, migrate the mineralized matter, but also formed some close or semi-close geologic setting beneath the nappe which can act as the store ore shield space for the mineralized liquid to form uranium deposit. The mineralization is concentrated at the varied place of occurrences or shape of sub-volcanic rocks and the intersection of concealed overthrust and NE strike basic fractures. (authors)

  2. Diverse P-T paths for the Cycladic ultramafic rock associations: Constraints on their origin, emplacement and exhumation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katzir, Y; Garfunkel, Z; Avigad, D; Matthews, A

    2008-01-01

    Within the Alpine orogen of the Cyclades ultramafic rocks occur in diverse tectonic positions, are associated with a variety of rock sequences and are regionally metamorphosed at variable conditions. Here this diversity is interpreted in terms of variable mechanisms for incorporation of mantle rocks into orogenic belts and used to better constrain spatial heterogeneity of P-T burial and exhumation paths in the Cyclades. The Cycladic Blueschist Unit (CBU) was metamorphosed first at high pressure conditions in the Eocene (M1) and variably overprinted during exhumation in the Early Miocene (M2). On the islands of Syros and Evia the CBU includes relatively thin HP-LT ophiolitic melange intervals hosted by meta-sedimentary sequences. Meta-serpentinites are associated with eclogitized metagabbro and metabasites on Syros, but with epidote blueschists on Evia. Given the wide and comparable geochemical heterogeneity in the Syros and Evian melanges, the Syros metabasites record higher M1 temperatures (450-500 deg. C) relative to their Evian counterparts (400-430 deg. C). The M2 overprint is manifested in Syros by greenschist facies assemblages (∼450 deg. C), whereas pumpellyite-actinolite assemblage (∼350 deg. C) overgrew blueschists in Evia. Within the M2 migmatized leucogneiss core of the Naxos dome (∼700 0 C) meta-peridotite lenses are the sole preservers of pre-M2 history. The Naxos meta-peridotites possess relict mantle assemblage, fertile spinel lherzolite chemical composition and mantle-like oxygen isotope ratios. Thus unlike ophiolite-associated ultramafics in the Cyclades that were serpentinized prior to metamorphism, the Naxos metaperidotites were directly emplaced from the subcontinental mantle into an underthrust continent during collision and HP metamorphism. Ultramafic assemblages constrain M1 temperatures on Naxos to 550-650 0 C. It follows that going southeastwards from Evia through Syros to Naxos progressively deeper levels of the subducted plate are

  3. Strain partitioning in the footwall of the Somiedo Nappe: structural evolution of the Narcea Tectonic Window, NW Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Alonso, Gabriel

    1996-10-01

    The Somiedo Nappe is a major thrust unit in the Cantabrian Zone, the external foreland fold and thrust belt of the North Iberian Variscan orogen. Exposed at the Narcea Tectonic Window are Precambrian rocks below the basal decollement of the Somiedo Nappe, which exhibit a different deformation style than the overlying Paleozoic rocks above the basal decollement. During Variscan deformation, folding and widespread subhorizontal, bedding-parallel decollements were produced in the hanging wall within the Paleozoic rocks. Vertical folding, with related axial-planar cleavage at a high angle to the decollement planes, developed simultaneously in the upper Proterozoic Narcea Slates of the footwall, below the detachment. The relative magnitude of finite strain, measured in the footwall rocks, diminishes towards the foreland. These observations indicate that (1) significant deformation may occur in the footwall of foreland fold and thrust belts, (2) the shortening mechanism in the footwall may be different from that of the hanging wall, and (3) in this particular case, the partitioning of the deformation implies the existence of a deeper, blind decollement surface contemporaneous with the first stages of the foreland development, that does not crop out in the region. This implies a significant shortening in the footwall, which must be taken into account when restoration and balancing of cross-sections is attempted. A sequential diagram of the evolution of the Narcea Tectonic Window with a minimum shortening of 85 km is proposed, explaining the complete Variscan evolution of the foreland to hinterland transition in the North Iberian Variscan orogen.

  4. Effect of repository underground ventilation on emplacement drift temperature control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, H.; Sun, Y.; McKenzie, D.G.; Bhattacharyya, K.K.

    1996-01-01

    The repository advanced conceptual design (ACD) is being conducted by the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System, Management ampersand Operating Contractor. Underground ventilation analyses during ACD have resulted in preliminary ventilation concepts and design methodologies. This paper discusses one of the recent evaluations -- effects of ventilation on emplacement drift temperature management

  5. Salt Repository Project waste emplacement mode decision paper: Revison 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-08-01

    This paper provides a recommendation as to the mode of waste emplacement to be used as the current basis for site characterization activity for the Deaf Smith County, Texas, high level nuclear waste repository site. It also presents a plan for implementing the recommendation so as to provide a high level of confidence in the project's success. Since evaluations of high-level waste disposal in geologic repositories began in the 1950s, most studies emplacement in salt formations employed the vertical orientation for emplacing waste packages in boreholes in the floor of the underground facility. This orientation was used in trials at Project Salt Vault in the 1960s. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) has recently settled on a combination of vertical and horizontal modes for various waste types. This paper analyzes the information available and develops a project position upon which to base current site characterization activities. The position recommended is that the SRP should continue to use the vertical waste emplacement mode as the reference design and to carry the horizontal mode as a ''passive'' alternative. This position was developed based upon the conclusions of a decision analysis, risk assessment, and cost/schedule impact assessment. 52 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  6. A new restoration of the NFP20-East cross section and possible tectonic overpressure in the Penninic Adula Nappe (Central Alps)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleuger, J.; Podladchikov, Y.

    2012-04-01

    The Adula Nappe in the eastern Central Alps is one of the four units in the Alps from which ultrahigh-pressure rocks have been reported. Several very different models for its tectonic history have been published but none of these models is fully satisfactory. In the models of Schmid et al. (1996) and Engi et al. (2001), the main mechanism of exhumation is assumed to be extrusion. The extrusion models require top-to-the-hinterland, i.e. top-to-the-south faulting in the hanging wall of the exhuming nappe for which there is no evidence. Froitzheim et al. (2003) proposed a scenario with two different subduction zones, an internal one in which the South Penninic and Briançonnais domains were subducted, and an external one in which the North Penninc domain and the European margin, including the Adula nappe, were subducted. In this model, the exhumation of the Adula nappe results from the subduction of the overlying sub-Briançonnais and sub-South-Penninic mantle in the internal subduction zone. The Adula nappe would then have been exhumed from below into a top-to-the-north shear zone also affecting the overriding Briançonnais units. The main shortcoming of this model is that otherwise there is little evidence for two Alpine subduction zones. All the models cited above are based on the conversion of peak pressures obtained from geobarometry to depth by assuming lithostatic pressures. This results in a much greater burial depth of the Adula Nappe with respect to the surrounding units which poses major problems when trying to reconcile maximum burial depths of the Penninic nappes with their structural record. We performed a new restoration of the NFP20-East cross section (Schmid et al. 1996) without applying a lithostatic pressure-to-depth conversion but a purely geometrical restoration of deformation events in the Penninic nappe stack. The major constraints on these reconstructions are given by strain estimates for the major deformation phases in the units overlying the

  7. Evaluation of Heterotrophy in in Serpentinite-Associated Waters from the Coast Range Ophiolite, Northern California, USA and the Zambales Ophiolite, Philippines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, T. J.; Arcilla, C. A.; Cardace, D.; Hoehler, T. M.; McCollom, T. M.; Meyer-Dombard, D. R.; Schrenk, M. O.

    2013-12-01

    The deep biosphere in cold, dark sub-seafloor ultramafic rocks (i.e., those rocks rich in Fe and Mg) is stressed by exceedingly high pH, transient, if any, inorganic carbon availability, and little known organic carbon inventories. As a test of heterotrophic carbon use, serpentinite-associated waters (from groundwater sampling wells and associated surface seepages in tectonically uplifted mantle units in ophiolites) were tested for differences with respect to aqueous geochemistry and performance in EcoPlates™ - Biolog Inc. .. This work focuses on two field locations for water sampling: the Coast Range Ophiolite, CA, USA, and the Zambales Ophiolite, Philippines. Characteristics of each sampling site are presented (pH, mineral substrate, Ca2+/Mg2+ ratio, aqueous metal loads, etc.). Complementary EcoPlate™ results [prefabricated 96-well plates, seeded with triplicate experiments for determining microbiological community response to difference organic carbon sources; a triplicate control experiment with just water is built in to the plate also] are also presented. We found that waters from selected California [groundwater wells (7 discrete wells) and related surface seeps (5 hydrologically connected sites)] and Philippines [4 Zambales Ophiolite springs/seepages] sourced in serpentinites were analyzed. EcoPlate™ average well-color development (AWCD), which demonstrates microbial activities averaged per plate (as in Garland and Mills, 1991), differs across sites. Correlations of AWCD with environmental data (such as pH, oxidation-reduction potential or ORP, Ca2+/Mg2+ ratio, and Fe contents) are evaluated. Clarifying the geochemical-biological relationships that bear out in these analyses informs discourse on the energetic limits of life in serpentinizing systems, with relevance to ultramafic-hosted life on continents and in the seabed.

  8. Fragments of deeper parts of the hanging wall mantle preserved as orogenic peridotites in the central belt of the Seve Nappe Complex, Sweden

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clos, F.; Gilio, M.; van Roermund, H.L.M.

    Formation conditions of olivine microstructures are investigated in the Kittelfjäll spinel peridotite (KSP), a fragment of lithospheric mantle which occurs as an isolated body within high grade metamorphic crustal rocks of the Seve Nappe Complex (SNC), southern Västerbotten, central Sweden. The KSP

  9. Investigation into the metamorphic Nappes of the Central Scandinavian Caledonides on the basis of Rb-Sr and K-Ar age determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reymer, A.P.S.

    1979-01-01

    This study concerns age determinations on several rock units of metamorphic nappes in the central Scandinavian Caledonides. Rb-Sr analyses on whole-rocks and minerals (biotite, muscovite/phengite, feldspars, garnet) were made as well as K-Ar determinations on biotite, muscovite/phengite, amphibole and feldspar. (Auth.)

  10. Rooted in two Countries? Migrant Heritage, emplacement and the ‘Canon van Nederland’.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Faassen, M.; Hoekstra, F.G.

    2017-01-01

    Rooted in two Countries? Migrant Heritage, emplacement and the ‘Canon van Nederland’. In the cultural heritage sector theorizing emplacement is considered to be vital for identity: “people need to anchor there identity concretely to a location (emplacement)” (Grever&Van Boxtel, 2014). The question

  11. Petrographical and geochemical properties of plagiogranites and gabbros in Guleman ophiolite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayşe Didem KILIÇ

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Petrographical and geochemical properties of gabbros and plagiogranites of Guleman ophiolite are determined. It was concluded that gabbros can be basic rocks on subduction zone and plagioclase-rich leucocratic rocks (plagiogranite are differentiation products of fractional crystallization of a basic magma in the magma chamber.

  12. Operational considerations in drift emplacement of waste packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benton, H.A.

    1993-01-01

    This paper discusses the operational considerations as well as the advantages and disadvantages of emplacing waste packages in drifts in a repository. The considerations apply particularly to the potential repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste glass at Yucca Mountain, although most of the considerations and the advantages and disadvantages discussed in this paper do not necessarily represent the official views of the DOE or of the Management and Operations Contractor, since most of these considerations are still under active discussion and the final decisions will not be made for some time - perhaps years. This paper describes the issues, suggests some principles upon which decisions should be based, and states some of the most significant advantages and disadvantages of the emplacement modes, and the associated waste package types and thermal loadings

  13. Sediment mechanical response due to emplacement of a waste canister

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karnes, C.H.; Dawson, P.R.; Silva, A.J.; Brown, W.T.

    1980-01-01

    Preliminary studies have been conducted to determine the interaction between a waste canister and seabed sediment during and after emplacement. Empirical and approximate methods for determining the depth reached by a freefall penetrator indicate that a boosted penetrator emplacement method may be necessary. Hole closure is necessary, but has not been verified because calculations and laboratory experiments show sensitivity to boundary conditions which control the degree of dynamic hole closure. Laboratory studies show that closure will take place by creep deformation but closure times in seabed environments are uncertain. For assumed thermomechanical properties of sediments, it is shown that a heat generating waste canister will probably not move a significant distancce during the heat generation period

  14. Fault zone architecture of a major oblique-slip fault in the Rawil depression, Western Helvetic nappes, Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasser, D.; Mancktelow, N. S.

    2009-04-01

    The Helvetic nappes in the Swiss Alps form a classic fold-and-thrust belt related to overall NNW-directed transport. In western Switzerland, the plunge of nappe fold axes and the regional distribution of units define a broad depression, the Rawil depression, between the culminations of Aiguilles Rouge massif to the SW and Aar massif to the NE. A compilation of data from the literature establishes that, in addition to thrusts related to nappe stacking, the Rawil depression is cross-cut by four sets of brittle faults: (1) SW-NE striking normal faults that strike parallel to the regional fold axis trend, (2) NW-SE striking normal faults and joints that strike perpendicular to the regional fold axis trend, and (3) WNW-ESE striking normal plus dextral oblique-slip faults as well as (4) WSW-ENE striking normal plus dextral oblique-slip faults that both strike oblique to the regional fold axis trend. We studied in detail a beautifully exposed fault from set 3, the Rezli fault zone (RFZ) in the central Wildhorn nappe. The RFZ is a shallow to moderately-dipping (ca. 30-60˚) fault zone with an oblique-slip displacement vector, combining both dextral and normal components. It must have formed in approximately this orientation, because the local orientation of fold axes corresponds to the regional one, as does the generally vertical orientation of extensional joints and veins associated with the regional fault set 2. The fault zone crosscuts four different lithologies: limestone, intercalated marl and limestone, marl and sandstone, and it has a maximum horizontal dextral offset component of ~300 m and a maximum vertical normal offset component of ~200 m. Its internal architecture strongly depends on the lithology in which it developed. In the limestone, it consists of veins, stylolites, cataclasites and cemented gouge, in the intercalated marls and limestones of anastomosing shear zones, brittle fractures, veins and folds, in the marls of anastomosing shear zones, pressure

  15. The ophiolitic North Fork terrane in the Salmon River region, central Klamath Mountains, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, C.J.; Irwin, W.P.; Jones, D.L.; Saleeby, J.B.

    1983-01-01

    The North Fork terrane is an assemblage of ophiolitic and other oceanic volcanic and sedimentary rocks that has been internally imbricated and folded. The ophiolitic rocks form a north-trending belt through the central part of the region and consist of a disrupted sequence of homogeneous gabbro, diabase, massive to pillowed basalt, and interleaved tectonitic harzburgite. U-Pb zircon age data on a plagiogranite pod from the gabbroic unit indicate that at least this part of the igneous sequence is late Paleozoic in age.The ophiolitic belt is flanked on either side by mafic volcanic and volcaniclastic rocks, limestone, bedded chert, and argillite. Most of the chert is Triassic, including much of Late Triassic age, but chert with uncertain stratigraphic relations at one locality is Permian. The strata flanking the east side of the ophiolitic belt face eastward, and depositional contacts between units are for the most part preserved. The strata on the west side of the ophiolitic belt are more highly disrupted than those on the east side, contain chert-argillite melange, and have unproven stratigraphic relation to either the ophiolitic rocks or the eastern strata.Rocks of the North Fork terrane do not show widespread evidence of penetrative deformation at elevated temperatures, except an early tectonitic fabric in the harzburgite. Slip-fiber foliation in serpentinite, phacoidal foliation in chert and mafic rocks, scaly foliation in argillite, and mesoscopic folds in bedded chert are consistent with an interpretation of large-scale anti-formal folding of the terrane about a north-south hinge found along the ophiolitic belt, but other structural interpretations are tenable. The age of folding of North Fork rocks is constrained by the involvement of Triassic and younger cherts and crosscutting Late Jurassic plutons. Deformation in the North Fork terrane must have spanned a short period of time because the terrane is bounded structurally above and below by Middle or Late

  16. Wireless Sensor Networks for Detection of IED Emplacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-01

    unclassified Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 Abstract We are investigating the use of wireless nonimaging -sensor...networks for the difficult problem of detection of suspicious behavior related to IED emplacement. Hardware for surveillance by nonimaging -sensor networks...with people crossing a live sensor network. We conclude that nonimaging -sensor networks can detect a variety of suspicious behavior, but

  17. The basal part of the Oman ophiolitic mantle: a fossil Mantle Wedge?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prigent, Cécile; Guillot, Stéphane; Agard, Philippe; Godard, Marguerite; Chauvet, Alain; Dubacq, Benoit; Monié, Patrick; Yamato, Philippe

    2014-05-01

    Although the Oman ophiolite is classically regarded as being the direct analog of oceanic lithosphere created at fast spreading ridges, the geodynamic context of its formation is still highly debated. The other alternative end-member model suggests that this ophiolite entirely formed in a supra-subduction zone setting. Fluids involved in the hydration of the oceanic lithosphere and in the presence of a secondary boninitic and andesitic volcanism may provide a way to discriminate between these two interpretations: are they descending near-axis hydrothermal fluxes (first model) or ascending from a subducting slab (second model)? We herein focus on the base of the ophiolitic mantle in order to characterize the origin of fluids and decipher hydration processes. Samples were taken along hecto- to kilometre-long sections across the basal banded unit directly overlying the amphibolitic/granulitic metamorphic sole. We carried out a petrological, structural and geochemical study on these rocks and their constitutive minerals. Our results show that, unlike the generally refractory character of Oman harzburgites, all the basal mantle rocks display secondary crystallization of clinopyroxene and amphibole through metasomatic processes. The microstructures and the chronology of these secondary mineralizations (clinopyroxene, pargasitic amphibole, antigorite and then lizardite/chrysotile) suggest that these basal rocks have been affected by cooling from mantle temperatures (serpentines (B, Sr, Rb, Ba, As), are consistent with amphibolite-derived fluids (Ishikawa et al., 2005) and cannot be easily explained by other sources. Based on these observations, we propose a geodynamic model in which intense and continuous metasomatism of the cooling base of the ophiolitic mantle is due to the release of fluids coming from the progressive dehydration of underlying amphibolitic rocks. This process is compatible with the progressive subduction of the Arabian margin during the Upper

  18. Reassessment of the origin of the Dun Mountain Ophiolite, New Zealand : Nd-isotopic and geochemical evolution of magma suites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivell, W.J.; McCulloch, M.T.

    2000-01-01

    Magmatic suites with contrasting isotopic and geochemical compositions, sequentially emplaced in different tectonic regimes, comprise the Dun Mountain Ophiolite Belt (DMOB), New Zealand. At D'Urville Island, the northernmost exposure of the DMOB, earliest erupted (stage 1) pillow basalts ε Nd (T) = +6.3 to +7.5, and are incompatible element enriched, like basalts from geochemically anomalous ridge segments. Overlying stage 2 basalts (sheeted flows) show a narrow range of ε Nd (T) = +8.3 + or -0.2, with chemical characteristics of depleted backarc basin basalts. These rocks are intruded by mafic to silicic stage 3 magmas, which have high uniform initial 143 Nd/ 144 Nd ratios (ε Nd (T) = +9.3 + or -0.2) over a wide range of 147 Sm/ 144 Nd values (yielding a precise Early Permian Nd-isotope age of 278 ± 4 Ma (MSWD = 0.48)). Stage 3 magmas show pronounced subduction-related geochemical signatures similar to island arc tholeiites (IAT) from immature arcs. They are closely analogous to some (boninite)-IAT magmas which characterise 'infant arc' eruptive activity in forearc basins of present-day Western Pacific island arc systems. A wide variety of stage 3 magma compositions, ranging from near-primary basaltic dikes (Mg = 74) to extremely fractionated silicic plagiogranites with uniformly very depleted isotopic ratios, is consistent with slow spreading rates which gave rise to polybaric, closed-system fractionation of magmas and periodic chamber abandonment. Some stage 3 rocks with SiO 2 levels in the andesite range have low-TiO 2 contents and high Mg, and may be fractionated equivalents of boninites. High ε Nd (T) values of stage 3 magmas indicate a lack of subducted sediment with inherited crustal residence signatures, and reflect the extent of supra-subduction zone (SSZ) mantle wedge depletion. DMOB stage 3 magmas may represent foreac magmatism that was the precursor to normal subduction-related volcanism established by c. 265 Ma in the Brook Street Arc and derived

  19. Contrasting thermal and melting histories for segments of mantle lithosphere in the Nahlin ophiolite, British Columbia, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGoldrick, Siobhan; Canil, Dante; Zagorevski, Alex

    2018-03-01

    The Permo-Triassic Nahlin ophiolite is the largest and best-preserved ophiolite in the Canadian Cordillera of British Columbia and Yukon, Canada. The ophiolite is well-exposed along its 150 km length with mantle segments divisible into the Hardluck and Menatatuline massifs. Both massifs comprise mostly depleted spinel harzburgite (exchange temperatures in the mantle of the ophiolite also change systematically along strike with the degree of partial melt depletion. The temperatures recorded by REE and Ca-Mg exchange between coexisting pyroxenes require markedly higher peak temperatures and cooling rates for the Menatatuline massif (1250 °C, 0.1-0.01 °C/year) compared to the Hardluck massif (rates controlled by presence or absence of a crustal section above the mantle lithosphere, or by rapid exhumation along a detachment.

  20. A Fragment of Ophiolite Assemblage of Kasargi Lake Area: East-Urals Megazone, Northern Part of the Southern Urals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. E. Saveliev

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The results of study of rocks of ophiolite assemblage exposed on the east coast of Kasargi Lake are presented. The ophiolite assemblage is formed with the serpentinised ultramafic rocks of dunite-harzburgite association, which are residual and the shlirenbanded gabbros with a number of later dikes of diabases and porphiritic gabbros. The chemical content of mafic and ultramafic rocks of Kasargi massif shows that they are likely the equivalent rocks encountered within the backarc spreading ridges.

  1. Thermally-assisted Magma Emplacement Explains Restless Calderas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoruso, A.; Crescentini, L.; D'Antonio, M.; Acocella, V.

    2017-12-01

    Many calderas show repeated unrest over centuries. Though probably induced by magma, this unique behaviour is not understood and its dynamics remains elusive. To better understand these restless calderas, we interpret deformation data and build thermal models of Campi Flegrei, Italy, which is the best-known, yet most dangerous calderas, lying to the west of Naples and restless since the 1950s at least.Our elaboration of the geodetic data indicates that the inflation and deflation of magmatic sources at the same location explain most deformation, at least since the build-up of the last 1538 AD eruption. However, such a repeated magma emplacement requires a persistently hot crust.Our thermal models show that the repeated emplacement was assisted by the thermal anomaly created by magma that was intruded at shallow depth 3 ka before the last eruption and, in turn, contributed to maintain the thermal anomaly itself. This may explain the persistence of the magmatic sources promoting the restless behaviour of the Campi Flegrei caldera; moreover, it explains the crystallization, re-melting and mixing among compositionally distinct magmas recorded in young volcanic rocks.Available information at other calderas highlights similarities to Campi Flegrei, in the pattern and cause of unrest. All monitored restless calderas have either geodetically (Yellowstone, Aira Iwo-Jima, Askja, Fernandina and, partly, Long Valley) or geophysically (Rabaul, Okmok) detected sill-like intrusions inducing repeated unrest. Some calderas (Yellowstone, Long Valley) also show stable deformation pattern, where inflation insists on and mimics the resurgence uplift. The common existence of sill-like sources, also responsible for stable deformation patterns, in restless calderas suggests close similarities to Campi Flegrei. This suggests a wider applicability of our model of thermally-assisted sill emplacement, to be tested by future studies to better understand not only the dynamics of restless

  2. Analogue experiments as benchmarks for models of lava flow emplacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garel, F.; Kaminski, E. C.; Tait, S.; Limare, A.

    2013-12-01

    During an effusive volcanic eruption, the crisis management is mainly based on the prediction of lava flow advance and its velocity. The spreading of a lava flow, seen as a gravity current, depends on its "effective rheology" and on the effusion rate. Fast-computing models have arisen in the past decade in order to predict in near real time lava flow path and rate of advance. This type of model, crucial to mitigate volcanic hazards and organize potential evacuation, has been mainly compared a posteriori to real cases of emplaced lava flows. The input parameters of such simulations applied to natural eruptions, especially effusion rate and topography, are often not known precisely, and are difficult to evaluate after the eruption. It is therefore not straightforward to identify the causes of discrepancies between model outputs and observed lava emplacement, whereas the comparison of models with controlled laboratory experiments appears easier. The challenge for numerical simulations of lava flow emplacement is to model the simultaneous advance and thermal structure of viscous lava flows. To provide original constraints later to be used in benchmark numerical simulations, we have performed lab-scale experiments investigating the cooling of isoviscous gravity currents. The simplest experimental set-up is as follows: silicone oil, whose viscosity, around 5 Pa.s, varies less than a factor of 2 in the temperature range studied, is injected from a point source onto a horizontal plate and spreads axisymmetrically. The oil is injected hot, and progressively cools down to ambient temperature away from the source. Once the flow is developed, it presents a stationary radial thermal structure whose characteristics depend on the input flow rate. In addition to the experimental observations, we have developed in Garel et al., JGR, 2012 a theoretical model confirming the relationship between supply rate, flow advance and stationary surface thermal structure. We also provide

  3. Late Maastrichtian foraminiferids and diatoms from the Polish Carpathians (Ropianka Formation, Skole Nappe): a case study from the Chmielnik-Grabówka composite section

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasiński, M. Adam; Olshtynska, Alexandra; Uchman, Alfred

    2013-12-01

    Gasiński, M.A., Olshtynska, A. and Uchman, A. 2013. Late Maastrichtian foraminiferids and diatoms from the Polish Carpathians (Ropianka Formation, Skole Nappe): a case study from the Chmielnik-Grabowka composite section. Acta Geologica Polonica, 63(4), 515-525. Warszawa. Well-preserved foraminiferids have been found in the Chmielnik-Grabowka section (Skole Nappe, Polish Carpathians). The Abathomphalus mayaroensis (late Maastrichtian) and Racemiguembelina fructicosa (earlylate Maastrichtian) standard planktonic foraminiferal biozones have been recognized, based on the occurrence of their respective index species. Sediments of the R. fructicosa Zone contain diatoms, which are a rare component of Cretaceous flysch microfossil assemblages in the Carpathians. The diatom frustules and some foraminiferid tests are pyritized, probably after burial in the sediment, below the redox boundary or in the oxygen- deficient microenvironment inside the frustules or tests of microfossils; the presence of trace fossils and bioturbational structures in the same bed indicate an oxygenated sea floor.

  4. Pseudo- and real-inverted metamorphism caused by the superposition and extrusion of a stack of nappes: a case study of the Southern Brasília Orogen, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Motta, Rafael Gonçalves; Moraes, Renato

    2017-10-01

    The Southern Brasília Orogen is a Neoproterozoic belt that occurs along the southernmost border of the São Francisco Craton where the Andrelândia Nappe System represents the subducted sedimentary domain and is divided into three allochthonous groups, of which the ages and P-T conditions of metamorphism are studied here. The basal unit, the Andrelândia Nappe, exhibits an inverted metamorphic pattern. The base of the structure, composed of staurolite, garnet, biotite, kyanite, quartz, and muscovite, marks the metamorphic peak, whereas at the top, the association of the metamorphic peak does not contain staurolite. The Liberdade Nappe, the middle unit, presents a normal metamorphic pattern; its base, close to the Andrelândia Nappe, shows paragneiss with evidence of in situ partial melting, and towards the top, coarse-grained staurolite schist is found. The staurolite-out and melt-in isograds are coincident and parallel to the main foliation. Thus, the shear zone that limits the nappes is syn-metamorphic, reheating the underlying Andrelândia Nappe and influencing the establishment of metamorphic inversion. This suggestion is supported by the monazite chemical ages, which indicates that the Andrelândia Nappe metamorphic peak (586 ± 15 Ma) is younger than that of the Liberdade Nappe (622.3 ± 7.6 Ma). The upper unit, the Serra da Natureza Klippe, bears a typical high-pressure granulite mineral assemblage that is composed of kyanite, garnet, K-feldspar, rutile, and leucosome, as well as a metamorphic peak at 604.5 ± 6.1 Ma. This tectonic assembly, with inverted and non-inverted metamorphic patterns and generation of klippen structures, is consistent with exhumation models and a strong indentor located in the lower continental crust.

  5. 87Sr enrichment of ophiolitic sulphide deposits in Cyprus confirms ore formation by circulating seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, H.J.; Spooner, E.T.C.

    1977-01-01

    The hypothesis that seawater was the source of the hydrothermal fluid which formed the Upper Cretaceous ophiolitic cupriferous pyrite ore deposits of the Troodos Massif (Cyprus) has been tested by analysing the strontium isotopic composition of thirteen mineralized samples from four mines. Initial 87 Sr/ 86 Sr ratios range from 0.7052+-0.0001 to 0.7075+-0.00002, the latter value being indistinguishable from that of Upper Cretaceous seawater at 0.7076+-0.0006 (2 sigma). Hence, the mineralized metabasalt samples have been contaminated with 87 Sr, relative to initial magmatic strontium isotope ratios of the Troodos ophiolitic complex (0.70338+-0.00010 to 0.70365+-0.00005). Since seawater was the only source of strontium available during formation of the Troodos Complex which was isotopically relatively enriched in 87 Sr, the data confirm that seawater was the source of the hydrothermal oreforming fluid. (Auth.)

  6. Thermally-assisted Magma Emplacement Explains Restless Calderas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoruso, Antonella; Crescentini, Luca; D'Antonio, Massimo; Acocella, Valerio

    2017-08-11

    Many calderas show repeated unrest over centuries. Though probably induced by magma, this unique behaviour is not understood and its dynamics remains elusive. To better understand these restless calderas, we interpret deformation data and build thermal models of Campi Flegrei caldera, Italy. Campi Flegrei experienced at least 4 major unrest episodes in the last decades. Our results indicate that the inflation and deflation of magmatic sources at the same location explain most deformation, at least since the build-up of the last 1538 AD eruption. However, such a repeated magma emplacement requires a persistently hot crust. Our thermal models show that this repeated emplacement was assisted by the thermal anomaly created by magma that was intruded at shallow depth ~3 ka before the last eruption. This may explain the persistence of the magmatic sources promoting the restless behaviour of the Campi Flegrei caldera; moreover, it explains the crystallization, re-melting and mixing among compositionally distinct magmas recorded in young volcanic rocks. Our model of thermally-assisted unrest may have a wider applicability, possibly explaining also the dynamics of other restless calderas.

  7. Salt Repository emplacement mode evaluation and selection: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-03-01

    This document describes the decision analysis performed to evaluate and compare the emplacement mode for the Salt Repository. The study was commissioned to recommend one emplacement mode to the Salt Repository Project Office using multi-attribute decision analysis. The nature of the decision required analysis of uncertain outcomes and conflicting attributes and offers a high degree of objectivity for these types of decisions since the decision model is structured to allow only the facts to enter into the final decision. The analysis requires an explicit definition of the attributes used to evaluate the alternative (e.g., cost, safety, environmental impact), the definition of a utility function over the attributes which incorporated both risk attitudes and trade-offs between attributes, and the probability distribution over the outcomes that would result from the selection of one alternative over the other. The decision process is described and results are given. A simulation model was developed to evaluate the probability distributions over the attributes. This report documents logic, inputs and results of this model. Final ranking of alternatives is given. Extensive technical backup documentation is included in the appendices to provide the quantitative basis for this decision. 5 refs., 2 figs., 8 tabs

  8. Geochemistry of reduced gas related to serpentinization of the Zambales ophiolite, Philippines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrajano, T.A.; Sturchio, N.C.; Kennedy, B.M.; Lyon, G.L.; Muehlenbachs, K.; Böhlke, J.K.

    1990-01-01

    Methane-hydrogen gas seeps with mantle-like C and noble gas isotopic characteristics issue from partially serpentinized ultramafic rocks in the Zambales ophiolite, Philippines. New measurements of noble gas and 14C isotope abundances, rock/mixed-volatile equilibrium calculations, and previous chemical and isotopic data suggest that these reduced gases are products of periodotite hydration. The gas seeps are produced in rock-dominated zones of serpentinization, and similar gases may be ubiquitous in ultramafic terranes undergoing serpentinization.

  9. Petrology and Rock Magnetism of the peridotites of Pindos Ophiolite (Greece), insights into the serpentinization process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnemains, D.; Carlut, J. H.; Mevel, C.; Andreani, M.; Escartin, J.; Debret, B.

    2015-12-01

    We present a petrological and magnetic study of a suite of serpentinized peridotites from the Pindos ophiolite spanning a wide range in the degree of serpentinization (from ~10 to 100%). The Pindos ophiolite, in Northern Greece, is a portion of Late Triassic oceanic lithosphere obducted during the convergence of the Apulian and Pelagonian micro-continents. This ophiolite is interpreted mainly as the result of a supra-subduction zone spreading process but its complete history remains largely unknown. Therefore, it is not clear when the ultramafic section was exposed to fluid circulation that resulted in its serpentinization. Element partitioning during serpentinization reactions is dependent on parameters such as temperature and water-rock ratio. In particular, they affect the behavior of the iron released by olivine, which can be taken up either by magnetite, serpentine and/or brucite. Analyses of the reaction products are therefore a key to constrain the conditions during the main stage of the alteration. Our study was designed to gain insight on the conditions prevailing during hydration. Our results indicate that even fully serpentinized samples have a very low magnetization and magnetite content. Moreover, microprobe and μXanes results show that serpentine is the main host of iron in the divalent but also trivalent form. These results are compared with a set of data from serpentinized ultramafics sampled from the ocean floors, as well as from various other ophiolites. We suggest that serpentinization at Pindos occurred at relatively low-temperature (less than 200 °C), therefore not at a ridge environment. In addition, we stress that the presence of trivalent iron in serpentine indicates that serpentinization may remain a producer of hydrogen even when very little magnetite is formed.

  10. The ophiolite massif of Kahnuj (western Makran, Southern Iran): new geological and geochronological data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kananian, A.; Juteau, Th.; Bellon, H.; Darvishzadeh, A.; Sabzehi, M.; Whitechurch, H.; Ricou, L.E.

    2001-01-01

    The ophiolite massif of Kahnuj (600 km 2 ) consists, from bottom to top, of layered gabbros, isotropic gabbros and ouralite gabbros, agmatites of dioritic to plagio-granitic composition, a sheeted dyke complex and lastly a basaltic pillow lava unit. Amphiboles from gabbros were dated ( 40 K- 40 Ar ages) between 156 and 139 Ma and the agmatites are nearly contemporaneous. Potassic granitic veins dated at 93-88 Ma are related to the development of the Ganj arc complex. (authors)

  11. Characterization of ophiolites from northern Havana-Matanzas petroleum fields using instrumental neutron activation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montero Cabrera, M.E. E-mail: montero@yakko.cimav.edu.mx; Ortueta Milan, M.; Herrera Peraza, E.F.; Herrera Hernandez, H.; Rodriguez Martinez, N.; Olivares Rieumont, S.; Lopez Reyes, M.C

    2001-01-15

    Concentrations of 16 elements from 14 serpentinitic samples from Basilio and Cantel petroleum fields were obtained by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA): Cr, Co, Ni, La, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Ce Yb, Lu, Rb, Cs, Hf and Th. Relative INAA was performed using certified reference materials and laboratory standards. Average elemental concentrations showed that the ophiolites have a basic character, suggesting the use of a well-logging method designed for volcano-sedimentary petroleum fields.

  12. Characterization of ophiolites from northern Havana-Matanzas petroleum fields using instrumental neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montero Cabrera, M.E.; Ortueta Milan, M.; Herrera Peraza, E.F.; Herrera Hernandez, H.; Rodriguez Martinez, N.; Olivares Rieumont, S.; Lopez Reyes, M.C.

    2001-01-01

    Concentrations of 16 elements from 14 serpentinitic samples from Basilio and Cantel petroleum fields were obtained by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA): Cr, Co, Ni, La, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Ce Yb, Lu, Rb, Cs, Hf and Th. Relative INAA was performed using certified reference materials and laboratory standards. Average elemental concentrations showed that the ophiolites have a basic character, suggesting the use of a well-logging method designed for volcano-sedimentary petroleum fields

  13. Syndeformation Chrome Spinels Inclusions in the Plastically Deformed Olivine Aggregates (Kraka Ophiolites, the Southern Urals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. E. Saveliev

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the results of structural, petrographic, mineralogical and chemical studies of dunite veinlets in spinel peridotite from the Kraka ophiolites. It is demonstrated that plastic deformation of polycrystalline olivine, which form dunite, was accompanied by precipitation of impurities (aluminum and chrome as newly formed chrome spinels. The thinnest acicular inclusions of 0.3-0.5 micron thick are aligned in olivine grains along [010] axis. Bigger elongated irregular chrome spinel grains usually occur along grain and sub-grain olivine boundaries, and, occasionally, inside the grains along [100] axis. Alteration from the fine xenomorphic grains of chrome spinels to the bigger idiomorphic crystals was observed. Analogically to dynamic ageing (dispersion hardening in metals, the structural and chemical alterations in dunites are interpreted as deformation induced segregation of impurities. It is suggested that the euhedral chrome spinel grains typical for ophiolitic dunites were formed by coalescence and spheroidization. This process may be a key factor in the formation of ophiolitic chrome ore deposits.

  14. Results of the radiological survey at the Napp Chemical Company, 199 Main Street, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ076)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Floyd, L.M.; Carrier, R.F.

    1989-11-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, the Napp Chemical Company, 199 Main Street, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ076), was conducted during 1987. Results of the survey demonstrated no radionuclide concentrations in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program criteria. The radionuclide distributions were not significantly different from normal background levels in the northern New Jersey area. 4 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs

  15. Basalts and picrites from a plume-type ophiolite in the South Qilian Accretionary Belt, Qilian Orogen: Accretion of a Cambrian Oceanic Plateau?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuqi; Song, Shuguang; Yang, Liming; Su, Li; Niu, Yaoling; Allen, Mark B.; Xu, Xin

    2017-05-01

    Oceanic plateaus with high-Mg rocks in the present-day oceanic crust have attracted much attention for their proposed mantle-plume origins and abnormally high mantle potential temperatures (Tp). However, equivalent rocks in ancient oceanic environments are usually poorly preserved because of deformation and metamorphism. Here we present petrological, geochronological and geochemical data for pillow lavas from Cambrian ophiolites in the Lajishan and Yongjing regions of the South Qilian Accretionary Belt (SQAB), from the southern part of the Qilian Orogen, northern China. Three rock groups can be identified geochemically: (1) sub-alkaline basalts with enriched mid- ocean ridge basalt (E-MORB) affinity; (2) alkaline basalts with oceanic island basalt (OIB) features, probably derived from partial melting of an enriched mantle source; and (3) picrites with MgO (18-22 wt%). Cr-numbers [Cr# = Cr/(Cr + Al)] of spinels from the picrites suggest 18-21% degree of partial melting at the estimated mantle potential temperature (Tp) of 1489-1600 °C, equivalent to values of Cenozoic Hawaiian picrites (1500-1600 °C). Zircons from one gabbro sample yielded a U-Pb Concordia age of 525 ± 3 Ma, suggesting the oceanic crust formed in the Cambrian. Available evidence suggests that Cambrian mantle plume activity is preserved in the South Qilian Accretionary Belt, and influenced the regional tectonics: "jamming" of the trench by thick oceanic crust explains the emplacement and preservation of the oceanic plateau, and gave rise to the generation of concomitant Ordovician inner-oceanic island arc basalts via re-organisation of the subduction zones in the region.

  16. Magnetic properties of serpentinized peridotites from the Zedong ophiolite, Yarlung-Zangbo suture zone, SE Tibet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Z.; Zheng, J.; Moskowitz, B. M.; Xiong, Q.; Liu, Q.

    2017-12-01

    Serpentinized mantle peridotites are widely supposed to be significant sources of the magnetic, gravity and seismic anomalies in mid-oceanic ridges, forearcs and suture zones. However, the relationship between the magnetic properties of variably serpentinized peridotites and the serpentinization process is still under debate. Ophiolite outcrops commonly comprise peridotites in different stages of serpentinization and these ophiolitic peridotites are ideal to investigate the magnetic signatures of suture zones. The Zedong ophiolite locates in the eastern part of the Yarlung-Zangbo suture zone, SE Tibet (China), and the peridotite massif represents the remnants of the Neo-Tethyan lithospheric mantle. The harzburgite and lherzolite samples show densities between 3.316 and 2.593 g cm-3, and vary from the freshest to >90% serpentinized peridotites. The magnetic susceptibility curves from room temperature to 700ºC mainly show the Curie temperatures of 585ºC for pure magnetite. The low-temperature (20-300 K) demagnetization curves show the Verwey transitions at 115-125 K, suggesting that magnetite is also the dominant remanence-carrying phase. The hysteresis data of the peridotites fall in the region of pseudo-single-domain (PSD) and follow the theoretical trends for mixtures of single domain (SD) and multidomain (MD) magnetite. The first-order reversal curve (FORC) diagrams suggest that the magnetite is dominantly interacting SD + PSD particles for S 40% serpentinized samples. The susceptibility and saturation magnetization of the Zedong peridotites range from 0.9 to 30.8 × 10‒3 (SI) and 14.1 to 1318 × 10‒3 Am2 kg‒1, respectively, and both show consistent trends with increasing degrees of serpentinization. The S serpentinization of ophiolitic peridotites, whereas the S > 40% peridotites have higher susceptibilities of 0.02-0.03 (SI) and fall in the region of abyssal peridotites. Our results suggest that the Zedong ophiolitic peridotites probably experienced a

  17. CLASSIFICATION OF THE MGR WASTE EMPLACEMENT/RETRIEVAL SYSTEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J.A. Ziegler

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis is to document the Quality Assurance (QA) classification of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) waste emplacement/retrieved system structures, systems and components (SSCs) performed by the MGR Preclosure Safety and Systems Engineering Section. This analysis also provides the basis for revision of YMP/90-55Q, Q-List (YMP 2000). The Q-List identifies those MGR SSCs subject to the requirements of DOE/RW-0333P, Quality Assurance Requirements and Description (QARD) (DOE 2000). This QA classification incorporates the current MGR design and the results of the ''Design Basis Event Frequency and Dose Calculation for Site Recommendation'' (CRWMS M andO 2000a). The content and technical approach of this analysis is in accordance with the development plan ''QA Classification of MGR Structures, Systems, and Components'' (CRWMS M andO 1999b)

  18. Remote excavation using the telerobotic small emplacement excavator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, D.H.; Burks, B.L.; Killough, S.M.

    1993-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory is developing remote excavation technologies for the Office of Technology Development, Robotics Technology Development Program. This work is being done to meet the need for remote excavation and removal of radioactive and contaminated buried waste at several DOE sites. System requirements are based on the need to uncover and remove waste from burial sites in a way that does not cause unnecessary personnel exposure or additional environmental contamination. Goals for the current project are to demonstrate dexterous control of a backhoe with force feedback and to implement robotic operations that will improve productivity. The Telerobotic Small Emplacement Excavator is a prototype system that incorporates the needed robotic and telerobotic capabilities on a commercially available platform. The ability to add remote dexterous teleoperation and robotic operating modes is intended to be adaptable to other commercially available excavator systems

  19. Novel Emplacement Device for a Very Deep Borehole Disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Min Soo; Choi, Heui-joo; Lee, Jong Yul [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    There is a worldwide attempt of HLW disposal into a very deep borehole of around 3-5 km depth with the advancement of an underground excavation technology recently. As it goes into deeper underground, the rock becomes more uniform and flawless. And then the underground water circulation system at 3-5 km depth is almost disconnected with near groundwater circulation system. The canister integrity is less important in this very deep borehole disposal system unlike a general geologic disposal system at 500 m. In the deep borehole disposal procedures, one SNF (Spent Nuclear Fuel) assembly is stored in one disposal canister (D30-40cm, H4.7-5.0m), and approximately 10-40 disposal canisters are connected axially, which parade length can leach to around 200m in maximum. The connected canister parade is lowered through a very deep borehole (D40-50cm) by emplacement devices. Therefore the connections between canisters and canister to lowering joint are very important for the safe operation of it. The well-known connection method between canisters is Threaded Coupled Connection method, in which releasing of the connection is almost impossible after thread fastening in the borehole. The novel joint device suggested in this paper can accommodate a canister emplacement and retrieval in the borehole disposal process. The joint can be lowered by bound to a drilling pipe, or high tension cable along 3-5 km distance. This novel device can cope with an accidental event easily without any joint head change. When canisters are damaged or stuck on the borehole wall during their descending, the canisters in trouble can be retrieved simply by the control of a lifting speed.

  20. Comment on "Timing and nature of the Xinlin-Xiguitu Ocean: constraints from ophiolitic gabbros in the northern Great Xing'an Range, eastern Central Asian Orogenic Belt" by Feng et al. (2016)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Dong-Hong

    2017-09-01

    We disagree the transitional supra-subduction zone model of Feng et al. (Int J Earth Sci (Geol Rundsch) 105:491-505, 2016) for the tectonic setting of Jifeng ophiolite suite in NE China. Existence of the komatiite in the Jifeng ophiolite indicates an oceanic plateau environment for this ophiolite suite within the so-called Xinlin-Xiguitu ocean.

  1. The geological and geodynamic condition on the formation of the Dabashan thrust nappe structure: Based on FLAC numerical modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoning Zhang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The Dabashan thrust nappe structure at the southern margin of the Qinling orogenic belt suffered at least two stages of evolution which are Late Triassic plate subduction collisional orogeny between North China block, Qinling micro-plate and Yangtze block followed by intracontinental orogeny since the Meso-Cenozoic. A prominent topography characteristic within the Dabashan area is a southwestward extrusive arc (Bashan Arc fault that is one of key factors to understand the geodynamic condition of the Dabashan thrust nappe structure. In this work, two-dimensional plan-view models are constructed to simulate the collisional and intracontinental orogenic movements, and the factors that may control the formation of the Bashan Arc fault are analysed. The modelling results show that the compressive stress produced by the plates collision along both north and south boundaries is the main driving force. The dextral shearing derived from the inconsistent shape on the block margins is the main controller. Rigid tectonic units such as Bikou and Hanan-Micangshan terranes, Foping and Wudang domes, as well as Shennongjia-Huangling anticline also contribute as “anchor” effects. Additionally, the rheology properties of rock material in the Dabashan area affect the shape of the arc.  Condición geológica y geodinámica para la formación estructural de la falla de cabalgamiento en las montañas Dabashan basada en el modelo numérico del software FLAC  Resumen La estructura de la falla de cabalgamiento de las montañas Dabashan en el margen sur del cinturón orogénico de Qinling sufrió por lo menos dos etapas de evolución, la colisión orogénica del Triásico Superior entre el bloque de la China del Norte, la microplaca de Qinling y el bloque Yangtze, y la orogénesis intracontinental desde el Meso-Cenozoico. Una característica topográfica prominente del área de Dabashan es un arco extrusivo (falla Arco de Bashan hacia el suroeste, que es un

  2. Chromian spinels in highly altered ultramafic rocks from the Sartohay ophiolitic mélange, Xinjiang, NW China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Tian; Zhu, Yongfeng

    2018-06-01

    The Sartohay ophiolitic mélange is located in western Junggar (Xinjiang province, NW China), which is a major component of the core part of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB). Chromian spinels in serpentinite, talc schist, carbonate-talc schist and listwaenite in Sartohay ophiolitic mélange retain primary compositions with Cr# of 0.39-0.65, Mg# = 0.48-0.67, and Fe3+# evolution of chromian spinels in highly altered ultramafic rocks from the Sartohay ophiolitic mélange. Chromian spinels in serpentinite and talc schist were rimmed by Cr-magnetite, which was dissolved completely during transformation from serpentinite/talc schist to listwaenite. Chromian spinels were then transformed into Fe2+-rich chromite in shear zones, which characterized by high fluid/rock ratios. This Fe2+-rich chromite and/or chromian spinels could then be transformed into Fe3+-rich chromite in oxidizing conditions at shallow levels.

  3. The tectonometamorphic evolution of the Apuseni Mountains (Romania): Geodynamic constraints for the evolution of the Alps-Carpathians-Dinaride system of orogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiser, Martin; Schuster, Ralf; Fügenschuh, Bernhard

    2015-04-01

    New structural, thermobarometric and geochronological data allow integrating kinematics, timing and intensity of tectonic phases into a geodynamic model of the Apuseni Mountain, which provides new constraints for the evolution of the Alps-Carpathians-Dinaride system of orogens. Strong differences in terms of deformation directions between Early and Late Cretaceous events provide new constraints on the regional geodynamic evolution during the Cretaceous. Geochronological and structural data evidence a Late Jurassic emplacement of the South Apuseni Ophiolites on top of the Biharia Nappe System (Dacia Mega-Unit), situated in an external position at the European margin. Following the emplacement of the ophiolites, three compressive deformation phases affected the Apuseni Mountains during Alpine orogeny: a) NE-directed in-sequence nappe stacking and regional metamorphic overprinting under amphibolite-facies conditions during the Early Cretaceous ("Austrian Phase"), b) NW-directed thrusting and folding, associated with greenschist-facies overprinting, during the early Late Cretaceous ("Turonian Phase") and c) E-W internal folding together with brittle thrusting during the latest Cretaceous ("Laramian Phase"). Major tectonic unroofing and exhumation at the transition from Early to Late Cretaceous times is documented through new Sm-Nd Grt, Ar-Ar Ms and Rb-Sr Bt ages from the study area and resulted in a complex thermal structure with strong lateral and vertical thermal gradients. Nappe stacking and medium-grade metamorphic overprinting during the Early Cretaceous exhibits striking parallels between the evolution of the Tisza-Dacia Mega-Units and the Austroalpine Nappes (ALCAPA Mega-Unit) and evidences a close connection. However, Late Cretaceous tectonic events in the study area exhibit strong similarities with the Dinarides. Thus, the Apuseni Mountains represent the "missing link" between the Early Cretaceous Meliata subduction (associated with obduction of ophiolites

  4. Paleomagnetic Constraints on the Tectonic History of the Mesozoic Ophiolite and Arc Terranes of Western Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boschman, L.; Van Hinsbergen, D. J. J.; Langereis, C. G.; Molina-Garza, R. S.; Kimbrough, D. L.

    2017-12-01

    The North American Cordillera has been shaped by a long history of accretion of arcs and other buoyant crustal fragments to the western margin of the North American Plate since the Early Mesozoic. Accretion of these terranes resulted from a complex tectonic history interpreted to include episodes of both intra-oceanic subduction within the Panthalassa/Pacific Ocean, as well as continental margin subduction along the western margin of North America. Western Mexico, at the southern end of the Cordillera, contains a Late Cretaceous-present day long-lived continental margin arc, as well as Mesozoic arc and SSZ ophiolite assemblages of which the origin is under debate. Interpretations of the origin of these subduction-related rock assemblages vary from far-travelled exotic intra-oceanic island arc character to autochthonous or parautochthonous extended continental margin origin. We present new paleomagnetic data from four localities: (1) the Norian SSZ Vizcaíno peninsula Ophiolite; (2) its Lower Jurassic sedimentary cover; and (3) Barremian and (4) Aptian sediments derived from the Guerrero arc. The data show that the Mexican ophiolite and arc terranes have a paleolatitudinal plate motion history that is equal to that of the North American continent. This suggests that these rock assemblages were part of the overriding plate and were perhaps only separated from the North American continent by temporal fore- or back-arc spreading. These spreading phases resulted in the temporal existence of tectonic plates between the North American and Farallon Plates, and upon closure of the basins, in the growth of the North American continent without addition of any far-travelled exotic terranes.

  5. Hydrogen Gas from Serpentinite, Ophiolites and the Modern Ocean Floor as a Source of Green Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coveney, R. M.

    2008-12-01

    Hydrogen gas is emitted by springs associated with serpentinites and extensive carbonate deposits in Oman, The Philippines, the USA and other continental locations. The hydrogen springs contain unusually alkaline fluids with pH values between 11 and 12.5. Other workers have described off-ridge submarine springs with comparably alkaline fluid compositions, serpentinite, abundant free hydrogen gas, and associated carbonate edifices such as Lost City on the Atlantis Massif 15 km west of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (D.S. Kelley and associates, Science 2005). The association of hydrogen gas with ultramafites is a consistent one that has been attributed to a redox couple involving oxidation of divalent iron to the trivalent state during serpentinization, although other possibilities exist. Some of the hydrogen springs on land are widespread. For example in Oman dozens of alkaline springs (Neal and Stanger, EPSL 1983) can be found over thousands of sq km of outcropping ophiolite. While the deposits in Oman and the Philippines are well-known to much of the geochemical community, little interest seems to have been displayed toward either the ophiolitic occurrences or the submarine deposits for energy production. This may be a mistake as the showings because they could lead to an important source of green energy. Widespread skepticism currently exists about hydrogen as a primary energy source. It is commonly said that free hydrogen does not occur on earth and that it is therefore necessary to use other sources of energy to produce hydrogen, obviating the general environmental benefit. However the existence of numerous occurrences of hydrogen gas associated with ophiolites and submarine occurrences of hydrogen suggests the likelihood that natural hydrogen gas may be an important source of clean energy for modern society remaining to be tapped. Calculations in progress should establish whether or not this is likely to be the case.

  6. Granite ascent and emplacement during contractional deformation in convergent orogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Michael; Solar, Gary S.

    1998-09-01

    Based on a case study in the Central Maine Belt of west-central Maine, U.S.A., it is proposed that crustal-scale shear zone systems provide an effective focussing mechanism for transfer of granite melt through the crust in convergent orogens. During contractional deformation, flow of melt in crustal materials at depths below the brittle-plastic transition is coupled with plastic deformation of these materials. The flow is driven by pressure gradients generated by buoyancy forces and tectonic stresses. Within the oblique-reverse Central Maine Belt shear zone system, stromatic migmatite and concordant to weakly discordant irregular granite sheets occur in zones of higher strain, which suggests percolative flow of melt to form the migmatite leucosomes and viscous flow of melt channelized in sheet-like bodies, possibly along fractures. Cyclic fluctuations of melt pressure may cause instantaneous changes in the effective permeability of the flow network if self-propagating melt-filled tensile and/or dilatant shear fractures are produced due to melt-enhanced embrittlement. Inhomogeneous migmatite and schlieric granite occur in zones of lower strain, which suggests migration of partially-molten material through these zones en masse by granular flow, and channelized flow of melt carrying entrained residue. Founded on the Central Maine Belt case study, we develop a model of melt extraction and ascent using the driving forces, stress conditions and crustal rheologies in convergent, especially transpressive orogens. Ascent of melt becomes inhibited with decreasing depth as the solidus is approached. For intermediate a(H 2O) muscovite-dehydration melting, the water-saturated solidus occurs between 400 and 200 MPa, near the brittle-plastic transition during high- T-low- P metamorphism, where the balance of forces favors (sub-) horizontal fracture propagation. Emplacement of melt may be accommodated by ductile flow and/or stoping of wall rock, and inflation may be accommodated

  7. Magmatic Diversity of the Wehrlitic Intrusions in the Oceanic Lower Crust of the Northern Oman Ophiolite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, R.; Adachi, Y.; Miyashita, S.

    2014-12-01

    The Oman ophiolite extends along the east coast of Oman, and is the world's largest and best-preserved slice of obducted oceanic lithosphere. The magmatic history of this ophiolite is complex and is generally regarded as having occurred in three stages (MOR magmatism, subduction magmatism and intraplate magmatism). Wehrlitic intrusions constitute an important element of oceanic lower crust of the ophiolite, and numerous intrusions cut gabbro units in the northern Salahi block of this ophiolite. In this study area, we identified two different types of wehrlitic intrusions. One type of the intrusions mainly consists of dunite, plagioclase (Pl) wehrlite and mela-olivine (Ol) gabbro, in which the crystallization sequence is Ol followed by the contemporaneous crystallization of Pl and clinopyroxene (Cpx). This type is called "ordinary" wehrlitic intrusions and has similar mineral compositions to host gabbros (Adachi and Miyashita 2003; Kaneko et al. 2014). Another type of the intrusions is a single intrusion that crops out in an area 250 m × 150 m along Wadi Salahi. This intrusion consists of Pl-free "true" wehrlite, in which the crystallization sequence is Ol and then Cpx. The forsterite contents (Fo%) of Ol from the "ordinary" wehrlitic intrusions and "true" wehrlitic intrusions have ranges of 90.8-87.0 (NiO = 0.36-0.13 wt%) and 84.7 (NiO = 0.31 wt%), respectively. Cr numbers (Cr#) of Cr-spinel from the "true" wehrlitic intrusions show higher Cr# value of 0.85 than those of the "ordinary" wehrlitic intrusions (0.48-0.64). But the former is characterized by very high Fe3+ values (YFe3+ = 0.49-0.68). Kaneko et al. (2014) showed that the "ordinary" ubiquitous type has similar features to MOR magmatism and the depleted type in the Fizh block (Adachi and Miyashita 2003) links to subduction magmatism. These types are distinguished by their mineral chemistries (TiO2 and Na2O contents of Cpx). The TiO2 and Na2O contents of Cpx from the "true" wehrlitic intrusions have 0

  8. Recurrent uranium relocations in distal turbidites emplaced in pelagic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colley, S.; Thomson, J.

    1985-01-01

    The sediments of the Madeira Abyssal Plain, east of Great Meteor Seamount, are dominated by distal turbidite deposition. While the turbidites exhibit a wide compositional range, individual examples can be correlated over a wide area and are relatively homogeneous. Organic C oxidation, by bottom water oxygen, proceeds from the turbidite tops downwards after emplacement in pelagic conditions, and the progress of this oxidation front is marked by a sharp colour contrast in the sediments. In turbidites with Csub(org) > 0.5%, redistribution of authigenic U occurs to form a concentration peak (4 to 9 ppm U), just below the oxidation front or colour change. Several tens μg U/cm 2 may be mobilised, and in all examples studied > 60% of the remobilised U is relocated into the peak. Following burial by subsequent turbidites, such U concentration peaks are persistent as relict indicators of their extinct oxidation fronts for at least 2 x 10 5 years. In the case of thin turbidites where labile Csub(org) is almost exhausted, the U peaks may be located in underlying sedimentary units because of their relationship to the oxidation front. A redox mechanism for U peak formation is suggested from these data rather than a complexation with organic matter. (author)

  9. Emplacement hole drill evaluation and specification study. Volume I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    Results of a conceptual design program are presented for mine floor drilling in preparation for radioactive waste disposal. Two classes of drills can be used to drill emplacement holes in salt. Both are sufficiently rugged and reliable. Raise borers have a higher capital cost and require more modifications, but are more flexible in other applications and require less labor. The life cycle cost for the raise borers and for the auger rigs are about the same, while the life cycle costs of bucket drills are much higher. As long as the hole is 36 inches in diameter or less and 40 feet deep or less in salt, then the auger rig is recommended because of the lower capital cost and lower operating cost. This recommended system represents what is thought to be the best combination of available drill components assembled into a drill rig which will provide at least adequate performance. Furthermore, this drill system can be procured from at least three manufacturers. If the facility criteria change significantly, however, then the drill rig recommendations will have to be reassessed on the merits of the changes. The drill rig manufacturers can be quite flexible in combining components provided the buyer is willing to accept components with which the manufacturer has had experience. If this condition can be met, then most drill rig manufacturers will include the associated design cost as part of the drill cost. If special components are required, however, then the number of manufacturers willing to participate in a procurement may be severely reduced

  10. Characterizing and quantifying superparamagnetic magnetite particles in serpentinized mantle peridotite observed in continental ophiolite complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, E.; Vento, N. F. R.; Tominaga, M.; Beinlich, A.; Einsle, J. F.; Buisman, I.; Ringe, E.; Schrenk, M. O.; Cardace, D.

    2017-12-01

    Serpentinization of mantle peridotite has been recognized as one of the most important energy factories for the deep biosphere. To better evaluate the habitability of the deep biosphere, it is crucial to understand the link between in situ peridotite serpentinization processes and associated magnetite and hydrogen production. Previous efforts in correlating magnetite and hydrogen production during serpentinization processes are based primarily on laboratory experiments and numerical modeling, being challenged to include the contribution of superparamagnetic-sized magnetites (i.e., extremely fine-grained magnetite, petrographically observed as a "pepper flake" like texture in many natural serpentinized rock samples). To better estimate the abundance of superparamagnetic grains, we conducted frequency-dependent susceptibility magnetic measurements at the Institute of Rock Magnetism on naturally serpentinized rock samples from the Coast Range Ophiolite Microbial Observatory (CROMO) in California, USA and the Atlin Ophiolite (British Columbia). In addition, we conducted multiscale EDS phase mapping, BackScattered Electron (BSE) scanning, FIB-nanotomography and STEM-EELS to identify and quantify the superparamagnetic minerals that contribute to the measured magnetic susceptibility signals in our rock samples. Utilizing a multidisciplinary approach, we aim to improve the estimation of hydrogen production based on the abundance of magnetite, that includes the contribution of superparamagnetic particle size magnetite, to ultimately provide a more accurate estimation of bulk deep-biomass hosted by in situ serpentinization processes.

  11. Microbial Community Structure in a Serpentine-Hosted Abiotic Gas Seepage at the Chimaera Ophiolite, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubeck, Anna; Sun, Li; Müller, Bettina; Ivarsson, Magnus; Hosgörmez, Hakan; Özcan, Dogacan; Broman, Curt; Schnürer, Anna

    2017-06-15

    The surface waters at the ultramafic ophiolitic outcrop in Chimaera, Turkey, are characterized by high pH values and high metal levels due to the percolation of fluids through areas of active serpentinization. We describe the influence of the liquid chemistry, mineralogy, and H 2 and CH 4 levels on the bacterial community structure in a semidry, exposed, ultramafic environment. The bacterial and archaeal community structures were monitored using Illumina sequencing targeting the 16S rRNA gene. At all sampling points, four phyla, Proteobacteria , Actinobacteria , Chloroflexi , and Acidobacteria , accounted for the majority of taxa. Members of the Chloroflexi phylum dominated low-diversity sites, whereas Proteobacteria dominated high-diversity sites. Methane, nitrogen, iron, and hydrogen oxidizers were detected as well as archaea and metal-resistant bacteria. IMPORTANCE Our study is a comprehensive microbial investigation of the Chimaera ophiolite. DNA has been extracted from 16 sites in the area and has been studied from microbial and geochemical points of view. We describe a microbial community structure that is dependent on terrestrial, serpentinization-driven abiotic H 2 , which is poorly studied due to the rarity of these environments on Earth. Copyright © 2017 Neubeck et al.

  12. Synthesis of inverse ringwoodite sheds light on the subduction history of Tibetan ophiolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindi, Luca; Griffin, William L; Panero, Wendy R; Sirotkina, Ekaterina; Bobrov, Andrey; Irifune, Tetsuo

    2018-04-03

    Tibetan ophiolites are shallow mantle material and crustal slabs that were subducted as deep as the mantle transition zone, a conclusion supported by the discovery of high-pressure phases like inverse ringwoodite in these sequences. Ringwoodite, Mg 2 SiO 4 , exhibits the normal spinel structure, with Mg in the octahedral A site and Si in the tetrahedral B site. Through A and B site-disorder, the inverse spinel has four-coordinated A cations and the six-coordinated site hosts a mixture of A and B cations. This process affects the density and impedance contrasts across the boundaries in the transition zone and seismic-wave velocities in this portion of the Earth. We report the first synthesis at high pressure (20 GPa) and high temperature (1600 °C) of a Cr-bearing ringwoodite with a completely inverse-spinel structure. Chemical, structural, and computational analysis confirm the stability of inverse ringwoodite and add further constraints to the subduction history of the Luobusa peridotite of the Tibetan ophiolites.

  13. Quantification of Tremolite in Friable Material Coming from Calabrian Ophiolitic Deposits by Infrared Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella Campopiano

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to identify the infrared absorption band suitable for quantifying tremolite in three powdered samples (fine, medium, and large size classes coming from a quarry of ophiolitic friable rocks in the western part of the Calabria region of Italy. Three IR bands were considered: OH stretching band between 3700 and 3650 cm−1, the stretching bands of the Si-O-Si linkage between 1200 and 900 cm−1, and the absorbance band at 756 cm−1 attributable to tremolite. The amount of tremolite in the test samples was quantified by using the curve parameters of the three analytical bands. The quantitative analysis of tremolite using the band due to OH stretchings (3700–3650 cm−1 and the bands attributed to the Si-O-Si stretchings (1200–900 cm−1 showed high values for all test samples. Their use overestimated the tremolite amount because both bands were affected at the interfering mineral silicates such as talc, kaolinite, chlorite, and serpentinites. The abundant presence of antigorite in studied samples mainly in medium size class sample had a key role in our findings. The band at 756 cm−1 was not affected at the interfering minerals and can be used for quantitative analysis of tremolite in sample coming from ophiolitic deposits.

  14. Petrography and mineral chemistry of metamorphosed mantle peridotites of Nain Ophiolite (Central Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nargess Shirdashtzadeh

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Study of the petrology of the ophiolites as the relics of ancient oceanic lithosphere, is a powerful tool to reconstruct Earth’s history. Mantle peridotites have mostly undergone alteration and serpentinization to some extent. Thus, the relics of metamorphic signatures from the upper mantle and crustal processes from most of the peridotites have been ruined. Several recent papers deal with the mantle peridotites of Nain Ophiolite (e.g. Ghazi et al., 2010. However, no scientific work has been carried out on the metamorphosed mantle peridotites. The study area of the Darreh Deh that is located in the east of the Nain Ophiolite, is composed of huge massifs of metamorphosed mantle peridotites (i.e. lherzolite, clinopyroxene-bearing harzburgite, and harzburgite, and small volumes of dunite, characterized by darker color, higher topographic relief, smaller number of basic intrusives, lower serpentinization degree, and amphibolite-facies metamorphism. In this study, the petrography and mineralogy of metamorphosed peridotites in the Darreh Deh has been considered based on geochemical data. Geological Setting The Mesozoic ophiolitic mélange of Nain is located in the west of CEIM, along the Nain-Baft fault. As a part of a metamorphosed oceanic crust, it is mainly composed of harzburgite, lherzolite, dunite and their serpentinized varieties, chromitite, pyroxenite, gabbro, diabasic dike, spilitized pillow lava, plagiogranite, amphibolite, metaperidotites, schist, skarn, marble, rodingite, metachert and listwaenite (Shirdashtzadeh et al., 2010, 2014a, 2014b. Geochemical investigations indicate a suprasubduction zone in the eastern branch of the Neo-Tethys Ocean (Ghasemi and Talbot, 2006; Shirdashtzadeh et al., 2010, 2014a, 2014b. Materials and Methods Chemical analyses of mineral compositions were carried out using a JEOL JXA8800R wavelength-dispersive electron probe micro-analyzer (accelerating voltage of 15 kV and a beam current of 15 n

  15. Conceptual designs of automated systems for underground emplacement and retrieval of nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slocum, A.H.; Hou, W.M.; Park, K.; Hochmuth, C.; Thurston, D.C.

    1987-01-01

    Current designs of underground nuclear waste repositories have not adequately addressed the possibility of automated, unmanned emplacement and retrieval. This report will present design methodologies for development of an automated system for underground emplacement of nuclear waste. By scaling generic issues to different repositories, it is shown that a two vehicle automated waste emplacement/retrieval system can be designed to operate in a fail-safe mode. Evaluation of cost at this time is not possible. Significant gains in worker safety, however, can be realized by minimizing the possibility of human exposure

  16. Calculation of drift seepage for alternative emplacement designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Guomin; Tsang, Chin-Fu; Birkholzer, Jens

    1999-01-01

    The calculations presented in this report are performed to obtain seepage rates into drift and boreholes for two alternative designs of drift and waste emplacement at Yucca Mountain. The two designs are defined according to the Scope of Work 14012021M1, activity 399621, drafted October 6, 1998, and further refined in a conference telephone call on October 13, 1998, between Mark Balady, Jim Blink, Rob Howard and Chin-Fu Tsang. The 2 designs considered are: (1) Design A--Horizontal boreholes 1.0 m in diameter on both sides of the drift, with each borehole 8 m long and inclined to the drift axis by 30 degrees. The pillar between boreholes, measured parallel to the drift axis, is 3.3 m. In the current calculations, a simplified model of an isolated horizontal borehole 8 m long will be simulated. The horizontal borehole will be located in a heterogeneous fracture continuum representing the repository layer. Three different realizations will be taken from the heterogeneous field, representing three different locations in the rock. Seepage for each realization is calculated as a function of the percolation flux. Design B--Vertical boreholes, 1.0 m in diameter and 8.0 m deep, drilled from the bottom of an excavated 8.0 m diameter drift. Again, the drift with the vertical borehole will be assumed to be located in a heterogeneous fracture continuum, representing the rock at the repository horizon. Two realizations are considered, and seepage is calculated for the 8-m drift with and without the vertical 1-m borehole at its bottom

  17. Parameters and criteria influencing the selection of waste emplacement configurations in mined geologic repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bechthold, W.; Closs, K.D.; Papp, R.

    1988-01-01

    Reference concepts for repositories in deep geological formations have been developed in several countries. For these concepts, emplacement configurations vary within a wide range that comprises drift emplacement of unshielded or self-shielded packages and horizontal or vertical borehole emplacement. This is caused by different parameters, criteria, and criteria weighting factors. Examples for parameters are the country's nuclear power program and waste management policy, its geological situation, and safety requirements, examples for criteria and repository area requirements, expenditures of mining and drilling, and efforts for emplacement and, if required, retrieval. Due to the variety of these factors and their ranking in different countries, requirements for a safe, dependable and cost-effective disposal of radioactive waste can be met in various ways

  18. Thermal/thermomechanical analyses for the room region with horizontal and vertial modes of emplacement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    Extensive thermal/thermomechanical analyses of the Site Characterization Plan-Conceptual Design at the Deaf Smith county Site, Texas, have been carried out for the room region with horizontal and vertical modes of emplacement. The main purpose of this study is to make a good comparison between these two modes of emplacement in this region. Homogeneous and nonhomogeneous strata under isothermal or transient temperature conditions cases were considered in the analyses. Furthermore, various pillar widths for the vertical mode emplacement were also taken into consideration. Only spent fuel (SF) waste was considered in this study. Finite element method was used throughout the analyses. The thermal responses were evaluated using SPECTROM-41 while the thermomechanical responses were calculated using SPECTROM-32. Thermal and thermomechanical comparisons between the two modes of emplacement for various cases were presented in this paper

  19. Kinematics of Late Cretaceous subduction initiation in the Neo-Tethys Ocean reconstructed from ophiolites of Turkey, Cyprus, and Syria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maffione, Marco; van Hinsbergen, Douwe J. J.; de Gelder, Giovanni I. N. O.; van der Goes, Freek C.; Morris, Antony

    2017-05-01

    Formation of new subduction zones represents one of the cornerstones of plate tectonics, yet both the kinematics and geodynamics governing this process remain enigmatic. A major subduction initiation event occurred in the Late Cretaceous, within the Neo-Tethys Ocean between Gondwana and Eurasia. Suprasubduction zone ophiolites (i.e., emerged fragments of ancient oceanic lithosphere formed at suprasubduction spreading centers) were generated during this subduction event and are today distributed in the eastern Mediterranean region along three E-W trending ophiolitic belts. Several models have been proposed to explain the formation of these ophiolites and the evolution of the associated intra-Neo-Tethyan subduction zone. Here we present new paleospreading directions from six Upper Cretaceous ophiolites of Turkey, Cyprus, and Syria, calculated by using new and published paleomagnetic data from sheeted dyke complexes. Our results show that NNE-SSW subduction zones were formed within the Neo-Tethys during the Late Cretaceous, which we propose were part of a major step-shaped subduction system composed of NNE-SSW and WNW-ESE segments. We infer that this subduction system developed within old (Triassic?) lithosphere, along fracture zones and perpendicular weakness zones, since the Neo-Tethyan spreading ridge formed during Gondwana fragmentation would have already been subducted at the Pontides subduction zone by the Late Cretaceous. Our new results provide an alternative kinematic model of Cretaceous Neo-Tethyan subduction initiation and call for future research on the mechanisms of subduction inception within old (and cold) lithosphere and the formation of metamorphic soles below suprasubduction zone ophiolites in the absence of nearby spreading ridges.

  20. Reduced gas seepages in ophiolitic complexes: Evidences for multiple origins of the H2-CH4-N2 gas mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacquand, Christèle; Deville, Eric; Beaumont, Valérie; Guyot, François; Sissmann, Olivier; Pillot, Daniel; Arcilla, Carlo; Prinzhofer, Alain

    2018-02-01

    This paper proposes a comparative study of reduced gas seepages occurring in ultrabasic to basic rocks outcropping in ophiolitic complexes based on the study of seepages from Oman, the Philippines, Turkey and New Caledonia. This study is based on analyses of the gas chemical composition, noble gases contents, stable isotopes of carbon, hydrogen and nitrogen. These seepages are mostly made of mixtures of three main components which are H2, CH4 and N2 in various proportions. The relative contents of the three main gas components show 4 distinct types of gas mixtures (H2-rich, N2-rich, N2-H2-CH4 and H2-CH4). These types are interpreted as reflecting different zones of gas generation within or below the ophiolitic complexes. In the H2-rich type, associated noble gases display signatures close to the value of air. In addition to the atmospheric component, mantle and crustal contributions are present in the N2-rich, N2-H2-CH4 and H2-CH4 types. H2-bearing gases are either associated with ultra-basic (pH 10-12) spring waters or they seep directly in fracture systems from the ophiolitic rocks. In ophiolitic contexts, ultrabasic rocks provide an adequate environment with available Fe2+ and alkaline conditions that favor H2 production. CH4 is produced either directly by reaction of dissolved CO2 with basic-ultrabasic rocks during the serpentinization process or in a second step by H2-CO2 interaction. H2 is present in the gas when no more carbon is available in the system to generate CH4. The N2-rich type is notably associated with relatively high contents of crustal 4He and in this gas type N2 is interpreted as issued mainly from sediments located below the ophiolitic units.

  1. Mechanisms Of Saucer-Shaped Sill Emplacement: Insight From Experimental Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galland, O.; Planke, S.; Malthe-Sørenssen, A.; Polteau, S.; Svensen, H.; Podladchikov, Y. Y.

    2006-12-01

    It has been recently demonstrated that magma intrusions in sedimentary basins had a strong impact on petroleum systems. Most of these intrusions are sills, and especially saucer-shaped sills. These features can be observed in many sedimentary basins (i.e. the Karoo basin, South Africa; the Norwegian and North Sea; the Tunguska basin, Siberia; the Neuquén basin in Argentina). The occurrence of such features in so various settings suggests that their emplacement results from fundamental processes. However, the mechanisms that govern their formation remain poorly constrained. Experiments were conducted to simulate the emplacement of saucer-shaped magma intrusions in sedimentary basins. The model rock and magma were fine-grained silica flour and molten vegetable oil, respectively. This modeling technique allows simultaneous simulation of magma emplacement and brittle deformation at a basin scale. For our purpose, we performed our experiments without external deformation. During the experiments, the oil was injected horizontally at constant flow rate within the silica flour. Then the oil initially emplaced in a sill, whereas the surface of the model inflated into a smooth dome. Subsequently, the oil propagated upwards along inclined sheets, finally reaching the surface at the edge of the dome. The resulting geometries of the intrusions were saucer-shaped sills. Then the oil solidified, and the model was cut in serial cross-sections through which the structures of the intrusive body and of the overburden can be observed. In order to constraint the processes governing the emplacement of such features, we performed a parametric study based on a set of experiments in which we systematically varied parameters such as the depth of emplacement and the injection flow rate of the oil. Our results showed that saucer diameters are larger at deeper level of emplacement. Opposite trend was obtained with varying injection flow rates. Based on our results, we conducted a detailed

  2. Magnetic properties and emplacement of the Bishop tuff, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, H.C.; MacDonald, W.D.; Gromme, C.S.; Ellwood, B.B.

    1996-01-01

    Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) and characteristic remanence were measured for 45 sites in the 0.76 Ma Bishop tuff, eastern California. Thirty-three sites were sampled in three stratigraphic sections, two in Owens gorge south of Long Valley caldera, and the third in the Adobe lobe north of Long Valley. The remaining 12 sites are widely distributed, but of limited stratigraphic extent. Weakly indurated, highly porous to dense, welded ash-flow tuffs were sampled. Saturation magnetization vs temperature experiments indicate two principal iron oxide phases: low Ti magnetites with 525-570 ??C Curie temperatures, and maghemite with 610??-640??C Curie temperatures. AF demagnetization spectra of isothermal remanent magnetizations are indicative of magnetite/maghemite predominantly in the multidomain to pseudo-single domain size ranges. Remeasurement of AMS after application of saturating direct fields indicates that randomly oriented single-domain grains are also present. The degree of anisotropy is only a few percent, typical of tuffs. The AMS ellipsoids are oblate with Kmin axes normal to subhorizontal foliation and Kmax axes regionally aligned with published source vents. For 12 of 16 locality means, Kmax axes plunge sourceward, confirming previous observations regarding flow sense. Topographic control on flow emplacement is indicated by the distribution of tuff deposits and by flow directions inferred from Kmax axes. Deposition east of the Benton range occurred by flow around the south end of the range and through two gaps (Benton notch and Chidago gap). Flow down Mammoth pass of the Sierra Nevada is also evident. At least some of the Adobe lobe in the northeast flowed around the west end of Glass mountain. Eastward flow directions in the upper Owens gorge and southeast directions in the lower Owens gorge are parallel to the present canyon, suggesting that the present drainage has been established along the pre-Bishop paleodrainage. Characteristic remanence

  3. An optimization procedure for borehole emplacement in fractured media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billaux, D.; Guerin, F.

    1998-01-01

    Specifying the position and orientation of the 'next borehole(s)' in a fractured medium, from prior incomplete knowledge of the fracture field and depending on the objectives assigned to this new borehole(s), is a crucial point in the iterative process of site characterization. The work described here explicitly includes site knowledge and specific objectives in a tractable procedure that checks possible borehole characteristics, and rates all trial boreholes according to their compliance with objectives. The procedure is based on the following ideas : Firstly, the optimization problem is strongly constrained, since feasible borehole head locations and borehole dips are generally limited. Secondly, a borehole is an 'access point' to the fracture network. Finally, when performing a flow or tracer test, the information obtained through the monitoring system will be best if this system detects the largest possible share of the flow induced by the test, and if it cuts the most 'interesting' flow paths. The optimization is carried out in four steps. 1) All possible borehole configurations are defined and stored. Typically, several hundred possible boreholes are created. Existing boreholes are also specified. 2) Stochastic fracture networks reproducing known site characteristics are generated. 3) A purely geometrical rating of all boreholes is used to select the 'geometrically best' boreholes or groups of boreholes. 4) Among the boreholes selected by the geometrical rating, the best one(s) is chosen by simulating the experiment for which it will be used and checking flowrates through possible boreholes. This method is applied to study the emplacement of a set of five monitoring boreholes prior to the sinking of a shaft for a planned underground laboratory in a granite massif in France (Vienne site). Twelve geometrical parameters are considered for each possible borehole. A detailed statistical study helps decide on the shape of a minimization function. This is then used

  4. Comparative Noise Performance of Portable Broadband Sensor Emplacements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweet, Justin; Arias-Dotson, Eliana; Beaudoin, Bruce; Anderson, Kent

    2015-04-01

    IRIS PASSCAL has supported portable broadband seismic experiments for close to 30 years. During that time we have seen a variety of sensor vaults deployed. The vaults deployed fall into two broad categories, a PASSCAL style vault and a Flexible Array style vault. The PASSCAL vault is constructed of materials available in-county and it is the Principle Investigator (PI) who establishes the actual field deployed design. These vaults generally are a large barrel placed in a ~1 m deep hole. A small pier, decoupled from the barrel, is fashioned in the bottom of the vault (either cement, paving stone or tile) for the sensor placement. The sensor is insulated and protected. Finally the vault is sealed and buried under ~30 cm of soil. The Flexible Array vault is provided to PIs by the EarthScope program, offering a uniform portable vault for these deployments. The vault consists of a 30 cm diameter by 0.75 cm tall piece of plastic sewage pipe buried with ~10 cm of pipe above grade. A rubber membrane covers the bottom and cement was poured into the bottom, coupling the pier to the pipe. The vault is sealed and buried under ~30 cm of soil. Cost, logistics, and the availability of materials in-country are usually the deciding factors for PIs when choosing a vault design and frequently trades are made given available resources. Recently a third type of portable broadband installation, direct burial, is being tested. In this case a sensor designed for shallow, direct burial is installed in a ~20 cm diameter by ~1 m deep posthole. Direct burial installation costs are limited to the time and effort required to dig the posthole and emplace the sensor. Our initial analyses suggest that direct burial sensors perform as well and at times better than sensor in vaults on both horizontal and vertical channels across a range of periods (<1 s to 100 s). Moving towards an instrument pool composed entirely of direct burial sensors (some with integrated digitizers) could yield higher

  5. Incipient boninitic arc crust built on denudated mantle: the Khantaishir ophiolite (western Mongolia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianola, Omar; Schmidt, Max W.; Jagoutz, Oliver; Sambuu, Oyungerel

    2017-12-01

    The 570 Ma old Khantaishir ophiolite is built by up to 4 km harzburgitic mantle with abundant pyroxenites and dunites followed by 2 km of hornblende-gabbros and gabbronorites and by a 2.5 km thick volcanic unit composed of a dyke + sill complex capped by pillow lavas and some volcanoclastics. The volcanics are mainly basaltic andesites and andesites (or boninites) with an average of 58.2 ± 1.0 wt% SiO2, X Mg = 0.61 ± 0.03 ( X Mg = molar MgO/(MgO + FeOtot), TiO2 = 0.4 ± 0.1 wt% and CaO = 7.5 ± 0.6 wt% (errors as 2 σ). Normalized trace element patterns show positive anomalies for Pb and Sr, a negative Nb-anomaly, large ion lithophile elements (LILE) concentrations between N- and E-MORB and distinctly depleted HREE. These characteristics indicate that the Khantaishir volcanics were derived from a refractory mantle source modified by a moderate slab-component, similar to boninites erupted along the Izu-Bonin-Mariana subduction system and to the Troodos and Betts Cove ophiolites. Most strikingly and despite almost complete outcrops over 260 km2, there is no remnant of any pre-existing MORB crust, suggesting that the magmatic suite of this ophiolite formed on completely denudated mantle, most likely upon subduction initiation. The architecture of this 4-5 km thick early arc crust resembles oceanic crust formed at mid ocean ridges, but lacks a sheeted dyke complex; volcanic edifices are not observed. Nevertheless, low melting pressures combined with moderate H2O-contents resulted in high-Si primitive melts, in abundant hornblende-gabbros and in a fast enrichment in bulk SiO2. Fractional crystallization modeling starting from the observed primitive melts (56.6 wt% SiO2) suggests that 25 wt% pyroxene + plagioclase fractionation is sufficient to form the average Khantaishir volcanic crust. Most of the fractionation happened in the mantle, the observed pyroxenite lenses and layers in and at the top of the harzburgites account for the required cumulate volumes. Finally

  6. Genesis and transport of hexavalent chromium in the system ophiolitic rocks - groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shchegolikhina, Anastasia; Guadagnini, Laura; Guadagnini, Alberto

    2015-04-01

    Our study aims at contributing to the quantification and characterization of chromium transport processes from host rocks and soil matrices to groundwater. We focus on dissolved hexavalent chromium detected in groundwaters of geological regions with ophiolitic rocks (ophiolites and serpentinites) inclusions due to its critical ecological impact. (Oze et al., 2004). Despite the large number of analyses on the occurrence of high concentrations of hazardous hexavalent chromium ions in natural waters, only few studies were performed with the objective of identifying and investigating the geochemical reactions which could occur in the natural system rock - groundwater - dissolved chromium (Fantoni et al., 2002, Stephen and James, 2004, Lelli et al., 2013). In this context, there is a need for integration of results obtained from diverse studies in various regions and settings to improve our knowledge repository. Our theoretical analyses are grounded and driven by practical scenarios detected in subsurface reservoirs exploited for civil and industrial use located in the Emilia-Romagna region (Italy). Available experimental datasets are complemented with data from other international regional-scale settings (Altay mountains region, Russia). Modeling of chromium transformation and migration particularly includes characterization of the multispecies geochemical system. A key aspect of our study is the analysis of the complex competitive sorption processes governing heavy metal evolution in groundwater. The results of the research allow assessing the critical qualitative features of the mechanisms of hexavalent chromium ion mobilization from host rocks and soils and the ensuing transformation and migration to groundwater under the influence of diverse environmental factors. The study is then complemented by the quantification of the main sources of uncertainty associated with prediction of heavy metal contamination levels in the groundwater system explored. Fantoni, D

  7. A deep hydrothermal fault zone in the lower oceanic crust, Samail ophiolite Oman

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zihlmann, B.; Mueller, S.; Koepke, J.; Teagle, D. A. H.

    2017-12-01

    Hydrothermal circulation is a key process for the exchange of chemical elements between the oceans and the solid Earth and for the extraction of heat from newly accreted crust at mid-ocean ridges. However, due to a dearth of samples from intact oceanic crust, or continuous samples from ophiolites, there remain major short comings in our understanding of hydrothermal circulation in the oceanic crust, especially in the deeper parts. In particular, it is unknown whether fluid recharge and discharge occurs pervasively or if it is mainly channeled within discrete zones such as faults. Here, we present a description of a hydrothermal fault zone that crops out in Wadi Gideah in the layered gabbro section of the Samail ophiolite of Oman. Field observations reveal a one meter thick chlorite-epidote normal fault with disseminated pyrite and chalcopyrite and heavily altered gabbro clasts at its core. In both, the hanging and the footwall the gabbro is altered and abundantly veined with amphibole, epidote, prehnite and zeolite. Whole rock mass balance calculations show enrichments in Fe, Mn, Sc, V, Co, Cu, Rb, Zr, Nb, Th and U and depletions of Si, Ca, Na, Cr, Zn, Sr, Ba and Pb concentrations in the fault rock compared to fresh layered gabbros. Gabbro clasts within the fault zone as well as altered rock from the hanging wall show enrichments in Na, Sc, V, Co, Rb, Zr, Nb and depletion of Cr, Ni, Cu, Zn, Sr and Pb. Strontium isotope whole rock data of the fault rock yield 87Sr/86Sr ratios of 0.7046, which is considerably more radiogenic than fresh layered gabbro from this locality (87Sr/86Sr = 0.7030 - 0.7034), and similar to black smoker hydrothermal signatures based on epidote, measured elsewhere in the ophiolite. Altered gabbro clasts within the fault zone show similar values with 87Sr/86Sr ratios of 0.7045 - 0.7050, whereas hanging wall and foot wall display values only slightly more radiogenic than fresh layered gabbro.The secondary mineral assemblages and strontium isotope

  8. Geochemistry and petrogenesis of serpentinite from the Ingalls ophiolite complex, central Cascades, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, J. H., Jr.; Milliken, S. H.; Zalud, K. M.

    2017-12-01

    The Jurassic Ingalls ophiolite complex is located in the central Cascades, Washington State. This ophiolite predominantly consists of three variably serpentinized mantle units. Serpentinite occurs as massive replacing peridotite, or as highly sheared fault zones cutting other rocks. Mylonitic serpentinite forms a large-scale mélange in the middle of the ophiolite, and is interpreted as a fracture zone. Whole-rock and mineral geochemistry of the massive serpentinite was done to understand the metasomatic process and identify the possible protoliths of these rocks. Whole-rock major and trace elements of the massive serpentinite are similar to modern peridotites. The majority of samples analyzed are strongly serpentinized, while a few were moderately to weakly altered. Ca, Mg, and Al suggest these rocks formed from serpentinized harzburgite and dunite with minor lherzolite. All samples have positive Eu/Eu*. Serpentinites plot in fields defined by modern abyssal and forearc peridotites. Trace elements suggests the protoliths underwent variable amounts of mantel depletion (5-20%). Serpentine and relic igneous minerals were analyzed by EPMA at the Florida Center for Analytical Electron Microscopy. The serpentine dose not chemically display brucite mixing, has minor substitution of Fe, Ni, and Cr for Mg, and minor Al substitution for Si. Bastites have higher Ni than replaced olivine. Mineral chemistry, high LOI, and X-ray diffraction suggest lizardite is the primary serpentine polymorph, with minor chrysotile also occurring. Relic Al-chromite and Cr-spinel commonly have Cr-magnetite rims. These relic cores have little SiO2 and Fe3+, suggesting the spinels are well preserved. Most spinels plot in overlap fields defined by abyssal and arc peridotite, while two samples plot entirely in arc fields. Relic olivine have Fo90 to Fo92 and plot along the mantle array. Relic pyroxene are primarily enstatite, with lesser high-Ca varieties. Relic minerals plot near fields defined by

  9. Effects of interaction between ultramafic tectonite and mafic magma on Nd-Pb-Sr isotopic systems in the Neoproterozoic Chaya Massif, Baikal-Muya ophiolite belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amelin, Yuri V.; Ritsk, Eugeni Yu.; Neymark, Leonid A.

    1997-04-01

    Sm-Nd, Rb-Sr and U-Pb isotopic systems have been studied in minerals and whole rocks of harzburgites and mafic cumulates from the Chaya Massif, Baikal-Muya ophiolite belt, eastern Siberia, in order to determine the relationship between mantle ultramafic and crustal mafic sections. Geological relations in the Chaya Massif indicate that the mafic magmas were emplaced into, and interacted with older solid peridotite. Hand picked, acid-leached, primary rock-forming and accessory minerals (olivine, orthopyroxene, clinopyroxene and plagioclase) from the two harzburgite samples show coherent behavior and yield 147Sm/ 144Nd- 143Nd/ 144Nd and 238U/ 204Pb- 206Pb/ 204Pb mineral isochrons, corresponding to ages of 640 ± 58 Ma (95% confidence level) and 620 ± 71 Ma, respectively. These values are indistinguishable from the crystallization age of the Chaya mafic units of 627 ± 25 Ma (a weighted average of internal isochron Sm-Nd ages of four mafic cumulates). The Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd isotopic systems in the harzburgite whole-rock samples were disturbed by hydrothermal alteration. These alteration-related isotopic shifts mimic the trend of variations in primary isotopic compositions in the mafic sequence, thus emphasizing that isotopic data for ultramafic rocks should be interpreted with great caution. On the basis of initial Sr and Nd values, ultramafic and mafic rocks of the Chaya Massif can be divided into two groups: (1) harzburgites and the lower mafic unit gabbronorites withɛ Nd = +6.6 to +7.1 andɛ Sr = -11 to -16; and (2) websterite of the lower unit and gabbronorites of the upper mafic unit:ɛ Nd = +4.6 to +6.1 andɛ Sr = -8 to -9. Initial Pb isotopic ratios are identical in all rocks studied, with mean values of 206Pb/ 204Pb= 16.994 ± 0.023 and 207Pb/ 204Pb= 15.363 ± 0.015. The similarity of ages and initial isotopic ratios within the first group indicates that the isotopic systems in the pre-existing depleted peridotite were reset by extensive interaction with

  10. Making a report of a short trip in an ophiolitic complex with Google Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubret, Marianne

    2017-04-01

    Plate tectonics is taught in French secondary school (lower and upper-sixth). According to the curriculum, the comprehension of plate-tectonic processes and concepts should be based on field data. For example, the Alpine's ocean history is studied to understand how mountain ranges are formed. In this context, Corsica is a great open-air laboratory, but unfortunately, the traffic conditions are very difficult in the island and despite the short distances, it's almost impossible for teachers to take their students to the remarkable geologic spots. The «défilé de l'Inzecca» is one of them: there you can see a part of the alpine's ophiolitic complex. The aim of this activity is to elaborate a « KMZ folder » in Google Earth as a report of a short trip thanks to the students' data field; it is also the occasion to enrich the Google Earth KMZ folder already available for our teaching.

  11. Geochemical bioenergetics during low-temperature serpentinization: An example from the Samail ophiolite, Sultanate of Oman

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canovas, Peter A.; Hoehler, Tori; Shock, Everett L.

    2017-07-01

    Various classes of microbial and biomolecular evidence from global studies in marine and continental settings are used to identify a set of reactions that appear to support microbial metabolism during serpentinization of ultramafic rocks. Geochemical data from serpentinizing ecosystems in the Samail ophiolite of Oman are used to evaluate the extent of disequilibria that can support this set of microbial metabolisms and to provide a ranking of potential metabolic energy sources in hyperalkaline fluids that are direct products of serpentinization. Results are used to construct hypotheses for how microbial metabolism may be supported in the subsurface for two cases: ecosystems hosted in rocks that have already undergone significant serpentinization and those hosted by deeper, active serpentinization processes.

  12. Mid amphibolite facies metamorphism of harzburgites in the Neoproterozoic Cerro Mantiqueiras Ophiolite, southernmost Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HARTMANN LÉO A.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Valuable information is retrieved from the integrated investigation of the field relationships, microstructure and mineral compositions of harzburgites from the Neoproterozoic Cerro Mantiqueiras Ophiolite. This important tectonic marker of the geological evolution of southernmost Brazilian Shield was thoroughly serpentinized during progressive metamorphism, because the oldest mineral assemblage is: olivine + orthopyroxene + tremolite + chlorite + chromite. This M1 was stabilized in mid amphibolite facies - 550-600ºC as calculated from mineral equilibria. No microstructural (e.g. ductile deformation of olivine or chromite or compositional (e.g. mantle spinel remnant of mantle history was identified. A metamorphic event M2 occurred in the low amphibolite facies along 100 m-wide shear zones, followed by intense serpentinization (M3 and narrow 1-3 m-wide shear zones (M4 containing asbestos.

  13. PALLADIUM, PLATINUM, RHODIUM, RUTHENIUM AND IRIDIUM IN PERIDOTITES AND CHROMITITES FROM OPHIOLITE COMPLEXES IN NEWFOUNDLAND.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Norman J; Talkington, Raymond W.

    1984-01-01

    Samples of spinel lherzolite, harzburgite, dunite, and chromitite from the Bay of Islands, Lewis Hills, Table Mountain, Advocate, North Arm Mountain, White Hills Periodite Point Rousse, Great Bend and Betts Cove ophiolite complexes in Newfoundland were analyzed for the platinum-group elements (PGE) Pd, Pt, Rh, Ru and Ir. The ranges of concentration (in ppb) observed for all rocks are: less than 0. 5 to 77 (Pd), less than 1 to 120 (Pt), less than 0. 5 to 20 (Rh), less than 100 to 250 (Ru) and less than 20 to 83 (Ir). Chondrite-normalized PGE ratios suggest differences between rock types and between complexes. Samples of chromitite and dunite show relative enrichment in Ru and Ir and relative depletion in Pt and Pd.

  14. Mineral compositions of plutonic rocks from the Lewis Hills massif, Bay of Islands ophiolite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Susan E.; Elthon, Don

    1988-01-01

    Mineral compositions of residual and cumulate rocks from the Lewis Hills massif of the Bay of Islands ophiolite complex are reported and interpreted in the context of magnetic processes involved in the geochemical evolution of spatially associated diabase dikes. The mineral compositions reflect greater degrees of partial melting than most abyssal peridotites do and appear to represent the most depleted end of abyssal peridotite compositions. Subsolidus equilibration between Cr-Al spinal and olivine generally has occurred at temperatures of 700 to 900 C. The spinel variations agree with the overall fractionation of basaltic magmas producing spinels with progressively lower Cr numbers. The compositions of clinopyroxenes suggest that the fractionation of two different magma series produced the various cumulate rocks.

  15. Carboniferous and Permian evolutionary records for the Paleo-Tethys Ocean constrained by newly discovered Xiangtaohu ophiolites from central Qiangtang, central Tibet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiu-Zheng; Dong, Yong-Sheng; Wang, Qiang; Dan, Wei; Zhang, Chunfu; Deng, Ming-Rong; Xu, Wang; Xia, Xiao-Ping; Zeng, Ji-Peng; Liang, He

    2016-07-01

    Reconstructing the evolutionary history of the Paleo-Tethys Ocean remains at the center of debates over the linkage between Gondwana dispersion and Asian accretion. Identifying the remnants of oceanic lithosphere (ophiolites) has very important implications for identifying suture zones, unveiling the evolutionary history of fossil oceans, and reconstructing the amalgamation history between different blocks. Here we report newly documented ophiolite suites from the Longmu Co-Shuanghu Suture zone (LSSZ) in the Xiangtaohu area, central Qiangtang block, Tibet. Detailed geological investigations and zircon U-Pb dating reveal that the Xiangtaohu ophiolites are composed of a suite of Permian (281-275 Ma) ophiolites with a nearly complete Penrose sequence and a suite of Early Carboniferous (circa 350 Ma) ophiolite remnants containing only part of the lower oceanic crust. Geochemical and Sr-Nd-O isotopic data show that the Permian and Carboniferous ophiolites in this study were derived from an N-mid-ocean ridge basalts-like mantle source with varied suprasubduction-zone (SSZ) signatures and were characterized by crystallization sequences from wet magmas, suggesting typical SSZ-affinity ophiolites. Permian and Carboniferous SSZ ophiolites in the central Qiangtang provide robust evidence for the existence and evolution of an ancient ocean basin. Combining with previous studies on high-pressure metamorphic rocks and pelagic radiolarian cherts, and with tectonostratigraphic and paleontological data, we support the LSSZ as representing the main suture of the Paleo-Tethys Ocean which probably existed and evolved from Devonian to Triassic. The opening and demise of the Paleo-Tethys Ocean dominated the formation of the major framework for the East and/or Southeast Asia.

  16. Metabolic Potential and Activity in Fluids of the Coast Range Ophiolite Microbial Observatory, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoehler, T.; Som, S.; Schrenk, M.; McCollom, T.; Cardace, D.

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic potential and activity associated with hydrogen and carbon monoxide were characterized in fluids sampled from the the Coast Range Ophiolite Microbial Observatory (CROMO). CROMO consists of two clusters of science-dedicated wells drilled to varying depths up to 35m in the actively serpentinizing, Jurassic-age Coast Range Ophiolite of Northern California, along with a suite of pre-existing monitoring wells at the same site. Consistent with the fluid chemistry observed in other serpentinizing systems, CROMO fluids are highly alkaline, with pH up to 12.5, high in methane, with concentrations up 1600 micromolar, and low in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), with concentrations of 10's to 100's of micromolar. CROMO is conspicuous for fluid H2 concentrations that are consistently sub-micromolar, orders of magnitude lower than is typical of other systems. However, higher H2 concentrations (10's -100's of micromolar) at an earlier stage of fluid chemical evolution are predicted by, or consistent with: thermodynamic models for fluid chemistry based on parent rock composition equivalent to local peridotite and with water:rock ratio constrained by observed pH; the presence of magnetite at several wt% in CROMO drill cores; and concentrations of formate and carbon monoxide that would require elevated H2 if formed in equilibrium with H2 and DIC. Calculated Gibbs energy changes for reaction of H2 and CO in each of several metabolisms, across the range of fluid composition encompassed by the CROMO wells, range from bioenergetically feasible (capable of driving ATP synthesis) to thermodynamically unfavorable. Active consumption relative to killed controls was observed for both CO and H2 during incubation of fluids from the pre-existing monitoring wells; in incubations of freshly cored solids, consumption was only observed in one sample set (corresponding to the lowest pH) out of three. The specific metabolisms by which H2 and CO are consumed remain to be determined.

  17. Early Paleozoic U-Pb age of zircons from meta-granophyres f the Grand-Saint-Bernard nappe (zona interna, Aosta Valley, Italy); Age paleozoique inferieur (U-Pb sur zircon) de metagranophyres de la nappe du Grand-Saint-Bernard (zona interna, Vallee d'Aoste, Italie)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertrand, J.M. [Laboratoire de Geodynamique des Chaines Alpines, LGCA, Campus Scientifique, 73 - Le Bourget-du-Lac (France)

    2000-04-01

    The U-Pb age of a meta-granophyre from the Val de Rhemes (Brianconnais basement of the Aosta valley) of 511{+-}9 Ma suggests that the micaschists which dominate the pre-alpine basement of the Grand-Saint-Bernard Nappe are, in part, of Early Paleozoic age. The Brianconnais domain is characterized by a Cambrian to Ordovician alkalineto sub-alkaline (monzonitic) magmatism, similar in age to orthogneisses known in other parts of the Variscan belt and generally interpreted as related to an extensional event. (authors)

  18. Permian A-type rhyolites of the Muráň Nappe, Inner Western Carpathians, Slovakia: in-situ zircon U-Pb SIMS ages and tectonic setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ondrejka, Martin; Li, Xian-Hua; Vojtko, Rastislav; Putis, Marian; Uher, Pavel; Sobocký, Tomas

    2018-04-01

    Three representative A-type rhyolitic rock samples from the Muráň Nappe of the inferred Silicic Unit of the Inner Western Carpathians (Slovakia) were dated using the high-precision SIMS U-Pb isotope technique on zircons. The geochronological data presented in this paper is the first in-situ isotopic dating of these volcanic rocks. Oscillatory zoned zircon crystals mostly revealed concordant Permian (Guadalupian) ages: 266.6 ± 2.4 Ma in Tisovec-Rejkovo (TIS-1), 263.3 ± 1.9 Ma in Telgárt-Gregová Hill (TEL-1) and 269.5 ± 1.8 Ma in Veľká Stožka-Dudlavka (SD-2) rhyolites. The results indicate that the formation of A-type rhyolites and their plutonic equivalents are connected to magmatic activity during the Permian extensional tectonics and most likely related to the Pangea supercontinent break-up.

  19. Equipment for the emplacement of heat-producing waste in long horizontal boreholes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, K.D.; Scully, L.W.; Fisk, A.; deBakker, P.; Friant, J.; Anderson, A.

    1983-01-01

    Emplacement of heat-producing waste in long horizontal holes may offer several technical and economic advantages over shallow vertical hole emplacement. Less of the host rock suffers damage as a result of drift construction; the heat from the waste can be isolated from the access drifts for long periods of time; and the amount of rock which must be excavated is much less than in traditional disposal scenarios. One of the major reasons that has been used to reject the long hole concept in the past and adhere to the shallow vertical hole concept is the equipment required to drill the holes and to emplace and retrieve the waste. Such equipment does not currently exist. It clearly is more difficult to drill a 600 to 1000 foot horizontal hole, possibly 3 to 4 feet in diameter, and place a canister of waste at the end of it than to drill a 30 foot vertical hole and lower the waste to the bottom. A liner, for emplacement hole stabilization, appears to be feasible by adapting existing technology for concrete slip forming or jacking in a steel liner. The conceptual design of the equipment to drill long horizontal holes, emplace waste and retrieve waste will be discussed. Various options in concept will be presented as well as their advantages and disadvantages. The operating scenario of the selected concept will be described as well as solutions to potential problems encountered

  20. Heat transfer effects in vertically emplaced high level nuclear waste container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moujaes, S.F.; Lei, Y.M.

    1994-01-01

    Modeling free convection heat transfer in a cylindrical annular enclosure is still an active area of research and an important problem to be addressed in the high level nuclear waste repository. For the vertically emplaced waste container, the air gap which is between the container shell and the rock borehole, have an important role of dissipating heat to surrounding rock. These waste containers are vertically emplaced in the borehole 300 meters just below ground, and in a horizontal grid of 30 x 8 meters apart. The borehole will be capped after the container emplacement. The expected initial heat generated is between 3-4.74 kW per container depending on the type of waste. The goal of this study is to use a computer simulation model to find the borehole wall, air-gap and the container outer wall temperature distributions. The borehole wall temperature history has been found in the previous study, and was estimated to reach a maximum temperature of about 218 degrees C after 18 years from the emplacement. The temperature history of the rock surface is then used for the air-gap simulation. The problem includes convection and radiation heat transfer in a vertical enclosure. This paper will present the results of the convection in the air-gap over one thousand years after the containers' emplacement. During this long simulation period it was also observed that a multi-cellular air flow pattern can be generated in the air gap

  1. Equipment for the emplacement of heat-producing waste in long horizontal boreholes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, K.D.; Fisk, A.; Friant, J.; Scully, L.W.

    1983-01-01

    Emplacement of heat-producing waste in long horizontal holes may offer several technical and economic advantages over shallow vertical hole emplacement. Less of the host rock suffers damage as a resul of drift construction; the heat from the waste can be isolated from the access drifts for long periods of time; and the amount of rock which must be excavated is much less than in traditional disposal scenarios. One of the major reasons that has been used to reject the long hole concept in the past and adhere to the shallow vertical hole concept is the equipment required to drill the holes and to emplace and retrieve the waste. Such equipment does not currently exist. It clearly is more difficult to drill a 600 to 100 foot horizontal hole, possibly 3 to 4 feet in diameter, and place a canister of waste at the end of it than to drill a 30 foot vertical hole and lower the waste to the bottom. A liner, for emplacement hole stabilization, appears to be feasible by adapting existing technology for concrete slip forming or jacking in a steel liner. The conceptual design of the equipment to drill long horizontal holes, emplace waste and retrieve waste is discussed. Various options in concept are presented as well as their advantages and disadvantages. The operating scenario of the selected concept is described as well as solutions to potential problems encountered

  2. Plagiogranites as late-stage immiscible liquids in ophiolite and mid-ocean ridge suites - An experimental study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, S.; Rutherford, M. J.

    1979-01-01

    A study of relationships between basic and acidic rocks was made by fractionating primitive basalt at low pressure anhydrous conditions at various fugacities. Fractionally crystallized basalt became increasingly enriched in iron which became silicate liquid immiscible, producing Fe-enriched basaltic and granitic liquids. The latter is similar to plagiogranites found in mid-oceanic rift (MOR) regions, showing that silicate liquid immiscibility could be the petrogenic process which produces plagiogranites in some MOR regions and ophiolites. The major problem in considering plagiogranites as products of silicate liquid immiscibility is absence of any description of the Fe-enriched conjugate liquid in the ophiolite or MOR literature, and the identification of this magma is essential for a definite case of silicate liquid immiscibility.

  3. Serpentinite with and without brucite: A reaction pathway analysis of a natural serpentinite in the Josephine ophiolite, California

    OpenAIRE

    Sonzogni, Yann; Treiman, Allan H.; Schwenzer, Susanne P.

    2017-01-01

    A partially serpentinized peridotite from the Josephine ophiolite has been studied in detail in order to characterize the chemical processes of its serpentinization. The original rock was harzburgite, and its olivine and orthopyroxene are partially replaced by veins and patches of lizardite serpentine and magnetite; brucite and talc are completely absent from the serpentinite, regardless of whether the precursor mineral was olivine or pyroxene. Petrographic and mineral-chemical data suggest a...

  4. Uranium-lead isotopic ages of the Samail ophiolite, Oman, with applicatons to Tethyan ocean ridge tectonics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tilton, G.R.; Hopson, C.A.; Wright, J.E.

    1981-01-01

    Plagiogranites are a minor but widespread component of the Samail ophiolite plutonic member. They crystallized from the most fractionated melts generated by magmatic crystallization and differentiation of a steady state magma chamber beneath the Tethyan spreading ocean ridge, and their ages are thought to mark the time of ocean crust formation. Isotopic U--Pb ages of zircons from 13 plagiogranites collected along a 270-km segment of the Samail ophiolite subparallel to the regional trend of the sheeted dike complex (the former spreading ridge axis direction) define a narrow time interval of 93.5--97.9 m.y., with a pronounced clustering about 95 m.y. The zircon ages of the plagiogranites agree remarkably well with the early Cenomanian to early Turonian biostratigraphic ages of sediments that are intercalated within the ophiolite pillow lavas and that lie just above them (Tippit et al., 1981). The agreement of radiometric and biostratigraphic ages provides strong support for the conclusion that the plagiogranite U--Pb ages closely date the time span of ocean crust formation. No step changes in age patterns are observed along the ridge axis (sheeted dike) direction, suggesting that there are no major internal offsets of the ophiolite by transform or other faults along most of the traverse. One possible exception occurs at the southeastern end of the sampled interval (Ibra area), where a 3 m.y. discontinuity might be caused by an unmapped fault. Assuming that the regional trend of the sheeted dikes (N10 0 --25 0 W) marks the direction of the former spreading ridge axis, the present array of sample localities spans a distance of 130 to 195 km normal to that axis (i.e., in the spreading direction). The data as a whole do not define a clear-cut age trend normal to the spreading axis, but by eliminating samples that may be aberrant due to faulting, the data array suggests a pattern of increasing ages from east to west

  5. Reconstructing Plate Boundaries in the Jurassic Neo-Tethys From the East and West Vardar Ophiolites (Greece and Serbia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maffione, Marco; van Hinsbergen, Douwe J. J.

    2018-03-01

    Jurassic subduction initiation in the Neo-Tethys Ocean eventually led to the collision of the Adria-Africa and Eurasia continents and the formation of an 6,000 km long Alpine orogen spanning from Iberia to Iran. Reconstructing the location and geometry of the plate boundaries of the now disappeared Neo-Tethys during the initial moments of its closure is instrumental to perform more realistic plate reconstructions of this region, of ancient ocean basins in general, and on the process of subduction initiation. Neo-Tethyan relics are preserved in an ophiolite belt distributed above the Dinaric-Hellenic fold-thrust belt. Here we provide the first quantitative constraints on the geometry of the spreading ridges and trenches active in the Jurassic Neo-Tethys using a paleomagnetically based net tectonic rotation analysis of sheeted dykes and dykes from the West and East Vardar Ophiolites of Serbia (Maljen and Ibar) and Greece (Othris, Pindos, Vourinos, and Guevgueli). Based on our results and existing geological evidence, we show that initial Middle Jurassic ( 175 Ma) closure of the western Neo-Tethys was accommodated at a N-S trending, west dipping subduction zone initiated near and parallel to the spreading ridge. The West Vardar Ophiolites formed in the forearc parallel to this new trench. Simultaneously, the East Vardar Ophiolites formed above a second N-S to NW-SE trending subduction zone located close to the European passive margin. We tentatively propose that this second subduction zone had been active since at least the Middle Triassic, simultaneously accommodating the closure of the Paleo-Tethys and the back-arc opening of Neo-Tethys.

  6. Emplacement and retrieval equipment design considerations for a repository in salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nair, B.R.; Bahorich, R.J.

    1987-01-01

    The current design concept for the disposal of nuclear high level waste packages in a repository in salt is based on the emplacement of individual packages in vertical boreholes in the underground mine floor. A key requirement is that the waste packages be capable of being retrieved during the last 26 years of the 76-year repository operating period. The unique design considerations relating to the retrieval of waste packages emplaced in bedded salt are presented in this paper. The information is based on the experience developed during the design of vertical emplacement and retrieval equipment in support of the Sandia Defense High Level Waste experiments at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Also included are the impact of retrievability on the design of the equipment, the special salt cutting technology that was developed for this application, and a description of the equipment

  7. Waste Handling and Emplacement Options for Disposal of Radioactive Waste in Deep Boreholes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cochran, John R.; Hardin, Ernest

    2015-11-01

    Traditional methods cannot be used to handle and emplace radioactive wastes in boreholes up to 16,400 feet (5 km) deep for disposal. This paper describes three systems that can be used for handling and emplacing waste packages in deep borehole: (1) a 2011 reference design that is based on a previous study by Woodward–Clyde in 1983 in which waste packages are assembled into “strings” and lowered using drill pipe; (2) an updated version of the 2011 reference design; and (3) a new concept in which individual waste packages would be lowered to depth using a wireline. Emplacement on coiled tubing was also considered, but not developed in detail. The systems described here are currently designed for U.S. Department of Energy-owned high-level waste (HLW) including the Cesium- 137/Strontium-90 capsules from the Hanford Facility and bulk granular HLW from fuel processing in Idaho.

  8. Heat transfer effects in vertically emplaced high level nuclear waste container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moujaes, S.F.; Lei, Y.M.

    1994-01-01

    Modeling free convection heat transfer in an cylindrical annular enclosure is still an active area of research and an important problem to be addressed in the high level nuclear waste repository. For the vertically emplaced waste container, the air gap which is between the container shell and the rock borehole, have an important role of dissipating heat to surrounding rack. These waste containers are vertically emplaced in the borehole 300 meters below ground, and in a horizontal grid of 30 x 8 meters apart. The borehole will be capped after the container emplacement. The expected initial heat generated is between 3--4.74 kW per container depending on the type of waste. The goal of this study is to use a computer simulation model to find the borehole wall, air-gap and the container outer wall temperature distributions

  9. Waste Handling and Emplacement Options for Disposal of Radioactive Waste in Deep Boreholes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cochran, John R.; Hardin, Ernest

    2015-01-01

    Traditional methods cannot be used to handle and emplace radioactive wastes in boreholes up to 16,400 feet (5 km) deep for disposal. This paper describes three systems that can be used for handling and emplacing waste packages in deep borehole: (1) a 2011 reference design that is based on a previous study by Woodward-Clyde in 1983 in which waste packages are assembled into ''strings'' and lowered using drill pipe; (2) an updated version of the 2011 reference design; and (3) a new concept in which individual waste packages would be lowered to depth using a wireline. Emplacement on coiled tubing was also considered, but not developed in detail. The systems described here are currently designed for U.S. Department of Energy-owned high-level waste (HLW) including the Cesium- 137/Strontium-90 capsules from the Hanford Facility and bulk granular HLW from fuel processing in Idaho.

  10. Eruption and emplacement dynamics of a thick trachytic lava flow of the Sancy volcano (France)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latutrie, Benjamin; Harris, Andrew; Médard, Etienne; Gurioli, Lucia

    2017-01-01

    A 70-m-thick, 2200-m-long (51 × 106 m3) trachytic lava flow unit underlies the Puy de Cliergue (Mt. Dore, France). Excellent exposure along a 400-m-long and 60- to 85-m-high section allows the flow interior to be accessed on two sides of a glacial valley that cuts through the unit. We completed an integrated morphological, structural, textural, and chemical analysis of the unit to gain insights into eruption and flow processes during emplacement of this thick silicic lava flow, so as to elucidate the chamber and flow dynamic processed that operate during the emplacement of such systems. The unit is characterized by an inverse chemical stratification, where there is primitive lava beneath the evolved lava. The interior is plug dominated with a thin basal shear zone overlying a thick basal breccia, with ramping affecting the entire flow thickness. To understand these characteristics, we propose an eruption model that first involves processes operating in the magma chamber whereby a primitive melt is injected into an evolved magma to create a mixed zone at the chamber base. The eruption triggered by this event first emplaced a trachytic dome, into which banded lava from the chamber base was injected. Subsequent endogenous dome growth led to flow down the shallow slope to the east on which the highly viscous (1012 Pa s) coulée was emplaced. The flow likely moved extremely slowly, being emplaced over a period of 4-10 years in a glacial manner, where a thick (>60-m) plug slid over a thin (5-m-thick) basal shear zone. Excellent exposure means that the Puy de Cliergue complex can be viewed as a case type location for understanding and defining the eruption and emplacement of thick, high-viscosity, silicic lava flow systems.

  11. Emplacement time of Salai Patai carbonatite, Malakand, Pakistan, from fission track dating of zircon and apatite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qureshi, A.A.; Khan, H.A.

    1991-01-01

    Based on fission track dating of zircon and apatite, the emplacement history of Salai Patai carbonatite has been traced. It has been estimated that the carbonatite was emplaced along the thrust plane associated with the Indian-Eurasian plate collision during the Oligocene period followed by some thermal/tectonic episode during Early Miocene. This negates the previous proposal that all carbonatites found in Pakistan are a part of a 200 km long alkaline province associated with the rifting of Peshawar Valley during Late Cretaceous or early tertiary. (author)

  12. High level radioactive waste repositories. Task 3. Review of underground handling and emplacement. 1. Executive summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-01-01

    A review is presented of proposals for transport, handling and emplacement of high-level radioactive waste in an underground repository appropriate to the U.K. context, with particular reference to waste block size and configuration; self-shielded or partially-shielded block; stages of disposal; transport by road/rail to repository site; handling techniques within repository; emplacement in vertical holes or horizontal tunnels; repository access by adit, incline or shaft; conventional and radiological safety; costs; and major areas of uncertainty requiring research or development.

  13. Metaultramafic schists and dismembered ophiolites of the Ashe Metamorphic Suite of northwestern North Carolina, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, Loren A.; Merschat, Arthur J.; Vance, R. Kelly

    2016-01-01

    both chemical composition and metamorphic history. Spot sampling of heterolithic MUR bodies does not reveal MUR body character or history or allow ‘type’ designations. We recommend that the subdivision of MUR bodies into ‘types’ be abandoned and that the metasomatic hypothesis be carefully applied. AMS MURs and associated metamafic rocks likely represent fragments of dismembered ophiolites from various ophiolite types.

  14. Iron transformations during low temperature alteration of variably serpentinized rocks from the Samail ophiolite, Oman

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayhew, Lisa E.; Ellison, Eric T.; Miller, Hannah M.; Kelemen, Peter B.; Templeton, Alexis S.

    2018-02-01

    Partially serpentinized peridotites in the Samail ophiolite in the Sultanate of Oman currently undergo low temperature alteration and hydration both at shallow levels, with water recently in contact with the atmosphere, and at depth, with anoxic, reducing fluids. However, it is unclear how changes in the distribution and oxidation state of Fe are driving the production of energy-rich gases such as hydrogen and methane detected in peridotite catchments. We track the Fe transformations in a suite of outcrop samples representing a subset of the spectrum of least to most altered end-members of the Oman peridotites. We use microscale mineralogical and geochemical analyses including QEMSCAN, Raman spectroscopy, synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence (XRF) mapping, and electron microprobe wavelength dispersive spectroscopy. The less-altered peridotites possess a diversity of Fe-bearing phases including relict primary minerals (e.g. olivine, pyroxene, chromite) and secondary phases (e.g. serpentine and brucite). Raman spectroscopy and electron microprobe data (Si/(Mg + Fe)) indicate that much of the serpentine is significantly intergrown with brucite on the sub-micron scale. These data also indicate that the Fe content of the brucite ranges from 10 to 20 wt% FeO. The mineral assemblage of the highly reacted rocks is less diverse, dominated by serpentine and carbonate while olivine and brucite are absent. Magnetite is relatively rare and mainly associated with chromite. Goethite and hematite, both Fe(III)-hydroxides, were also identified in the highly altered rocks. Whole rock chemical analyses reflect these mineralogical differences and show that Fe in the partially serpentinized samples is on average more reduced (∼0.40-0.55 Fe3+/FeTotal) than Fe in the highly reacted rocks (∼0.85-0.90 Fe3+/FeTotal). We propose that olivine, brucite, chromite and, perhaps, serpentine in the less-altered peridotites act as reactive phases during low temperature alteration of the Oman

  15. Mineral textures in Serpentine-hosted Alkaline Springs from the Oman ophiolite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giampouras, Manolis; Garcia-Ruiz, Juan Manuel; Bach, Wolfgang; Garrido, Carlos J.; Los, Karin; Fussmann, Dario; Monien, Monien

    2017-04-01

    Meteoric water infiltration in ultramafic rocks leads to serpentinization and the formation of subaerial, low temperature, hydrothermal alkaline springs. Here, we present a detailed investigation of the mineral precipitation mechanisms and textural features of mineral precipitates, along as the geochemical and hydrological characterization, of two alkaline spring systems in the Semail ophiolite (Nasif and Khafifah sites, Wadi Tayin massif). The main aim of the study is to provide new insights into mineral and textural variations in active, on-land, alkaline vents of the Oman ophiolite. Discharge of circulating fluids forms small-scale, localized hydrological catchments consisting in unevenly interconnected ponds. Three different types of waters can be distinguished within the pond systems: i) Mg-type; alkaline (7.9 11.6), Ca-OH-rich waters; and iii) Mix-type waters arising from the mixing of Mg-type and Ca-type waters (9.6 ponds were carried out by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy and field-emission scanning electron microscopy coupled to dispersive energy spectroscopy (FE-SEM-EDS). Aragonite and calcite are the dominant minerals (95 vol.%) of the total mineralogical index in all sites. Mg-type waters host hydrated magnesium carbonates (nesquehonite) and magnesium hydroxycarbonate hydrates (artinite) due to evaporation. Brucite, hydromagnesite and dypingite presence in Mix-type waters is spatially controlled by the hydrology of the system and is localized around mixing zones between Ca-type with Mg-type waters. Residence time of discharging waters in the ponds before mixing has an impact on fluid chemistry as it influences the equilibration time with the atmosphere. Acicular aragonite is the main textural type in hyper-alkaline Ca-type waters, acting as a substratum for the growth of calcite and brucite crystals. Low crystallinity, dumbbell shaped and double pyramid aragonite dominates in Mix-type water precipitates. Rate of supersaturation is essential

  16. Crustal Accretion at Subduction Initiation Along Izu-Bonin-Mariana Arc and the Link to SSZ Ophiolites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizuka, O.; Tani, K.; Reagan, M. K.; Kanayama, K.; Umino, S.; Harigane, Y.; Sakamoto, I.

    2014-12-01

    The Izu-Bonin-Mariana (IBM) forearc preserves the earliest arc magmatic history from subduction initiation to the establishment of the arc. Recent investigations have established a bottom to top igneous stratigraphy of: 1) mantle peridotite, 2) gabbroic rocks, 3) a sheeted dyke complex, 4) basaltic pillow lavas (forearc basalts: FAB), 5) boninites and magnesian andesites, 6) tholeiites and calcalkaline arc lavas. This stratigraphy has many similarities to supra-subduction zone (SSZ) ophiolites. One of the most important common characteristics between the SSZ ophiolites and the forearc crust is the occurrence of MORB-like basaltic lavas underlying or accompanying boninites and early arc volcanic suites. A key observation from the IBM forearc is that FAB differs from nearby back-arc lavas in chemical characteristics, including a depletion in moderately incompatible elements. This indicates that FAB is not a pre-existing oceanic basement of the arc, but the first magmatic product after subduction initiation. Sheeted dikes of FAB composition imply that this magmatism was associated with seafloor spreading, possibly triggered by onset of slab sinking. Recognition of lavas with transitional geochemical characteristics between the FAB and the boninites strongly implies genetic linkage between these two magma types. The close similarity of the igneous stratigraphy of SSZ ophiolites to the IBM forearc section strongly implies a common magmatic evolutionary path, i.e., decompressional melting of a depleted MORB-type mantle is followed by melting of an even more depleted mantle with the addition of slab-derived fluid/melt to produce boninite magma. Similarity of magmatic process between IBM forearc and Tethyan ophiolites appears to be reflected on common characteristics of upper mantle section. Peridotite from both sections show more depleted characteristics compared to upper mantle rocks from mid-ocean ridges. Age determinations reveal that first magmatism at the IBM arc

  17. Chemistry of chromites from Arroio Grande Ophiolite (Dom Feliciano Belt, Brazil) and their possible connection with the Nama Group (Namibia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Rodrigo Chaves; Koester, Edinei; Porcher, Carla Cristine

    2017-12-01

    The present paper shows a mineral chemistry study in chromites found in serpentine-talc schists of the Arroio Grande Ophiolite, located in the southeastern Dom Feliciano Belt, near the Brazil/Uruguay border. Using electron microscope scanning and electron microprobe techniques, this study found a supra-subduction zone signature in the chromites, together with evidence of metasomatism. It corroborates previous hypothesis that suggested a supra-subduction zone origin for the protoliths of the Arroio Grande meta-igneous rocks and a metasomatic origin for the chromite-bearing magnesian schists. The studied chromites present high Cr# (0.65-0.77) and Fe2+# (0.88-0.95), low MgO (0.85-2.47 wt%) and TiO2 (0.01-0.19 wt%) and anomalous high concentration of ZnO (up to 1.97 wt%). The results were compared with chemical data from detrital chromites from the Schwarzrand and Fish River Subgroups of the Nama Group (Namibia), demonstrating that they are compositionally similar with those found in the latter. These chromites, in turn, are believed to have been derived from the oceanic Marmora Terrane (Gariep Belt) in the west (present-day coordinates). Taking into consideration that oceanic metamafites from both the latter and the Arroio Grande Ophiolite share common bulk-rock geochemical features (in this paper interpreted as fragments of the same paleo-ocean floor - the Marmora back-arc basin), it is possible to raise the hypothesis that detrital material derived from the studied ophiolite might also be found in Nama Group. It is reinforced by the fact that sediments (related to the Pelotas-Aiguá Batholith granitoids) derived from the easternmost Dom Feliciano Belt, i.e. the region where Arroio Grande Ophiolite is located, is found in both Schwarzrand and Fish River Subgroups. Thus, we suggest that Arroio Grande Ophiolite detrital sediments might also have contributed to the Nama Basin infilling during Late Ediacaran-Lower Cambrian.

  18. Controls on rheology of peridotite at a palaeosubduction interface: a transect across the base of the Oman-UAE ophiolite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrose, T. K.; Wallis, D.; Hansen, L. N.; Waters, D. J.; Searle, M. P.

    2017-12-01

    Studies of experimentally deformed rocks and small-scale natural shear zones have demonstrated that volumetrically minor phases can control strain localisation by limiting grain growth and promoting grain-size sensitive deformation mechanisms. Such studies are often used to infer a critical role for minor phases in the development of plate boundaries. However, the role of of minor phases in strain localisation at plate boundaries remains to be tested by direct observation. To test the hypothesis that minor phases control strain localisation at plate boundaries, we conducted microstructural analyses of peridotite samples collected across the base of the Oman-UAE ophiolite. The base of the ophiolite is marked by the Semail thrust, which represents the now exhumed contact between subducted oceanic crust and the overlying mantle wedge. As such, the base of the ophiolite provides the opportunity to directly examine a former plate boundary. Our results demonstrate that the mean olivine grain size is inversely proportional to the abundance of minor phases (primarily pyroxene), consistent with suppression of grain growth by grain-boundary pinning. Our results also reveal that mean olivine grain size is proportional to CPO strength, suggesting that the fraction of strain accommodated by different deformation mechanisms varied spatially. Experimentally-derived flow laws indicate that under the inferred deformation conditions the viscosity of olivine was grain-size sensitive. As such, grain size, and thereby the abundance of minor phases, influenced viscosity during subduction-related deformation along the base of the mantle wedge. We calculate that viscosity and strain rate respectively decrease and increase by approximately an order of magnitude towards the base of the ophiolite. Our data indicate that this rheological weakening was primarily the result of more abundant secondary phases near the base of the ophiolite. Our interpretations are consistent with those of

  19. Ophiolitic basement to the Great Valley forearc basin, California, from seismic and gravity data: Implications for crustal growth at the North American continental margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godfrey, N.J.; Beaudoin, B.C.; Klemperer, S.L.; Levander, A.; Luetgert, J.; Meltzer, A.; Mooney, W.; Tréhu, A.

    1997-01-01

    The nature of the Great Valley basement, whether oceanic or continental, has long been a source of controversy. A velocity model (derived from a 200-km-long east-west reflection-refraction profile collected south of the Mendocino triple junction, northern California, in 1993), further constrained by density and magnetic models, reveals an ophiolite underlying the Great Valley (Great Valley ophiolite), which in turn is underlain by a westward extension of lower-density continental crust (Sierran affinity material). We used an integrated modeling philosophy, first modeling the seismic-refraction data to obtain a final velocity model, and then modeling the long-wavelength features of the gravity data to obtain a final density model that is constrained in the upper crust by our velocity model. The crustal section of Great Valley ophiolite is 7-8 km thick, and the Great Valley ophiolite relict oceanic Moho is at 11-16 km depth. The Great Valley ophiolite does not extend west beneath the Coast Ranges, but only as far as the western margin of the Great Valley, where the 5-7-km-thick Great Valley ophiolite mantle section dips west into the present-day mantle. There are 16-18 km of lower-density Sierran affinity material beneath the Great Valley ophiolite mantle section, such that a second, deeper, "present-day" continental Moho is at about 34 km depth. At mid-crustal depths, the boundary between the eastern extent of the Great Valley ophiolite and the western extent of Sierran affinity material is a near-vertical velocity and density discontinuity about 80 km east of the western margin of the Great Valley. Our model has important implications for crustal growth at the North American continental margin. We suggest that a thick ophiolite sequence was obducted onto continental material, probably during the Jurassic Nevadan orogeny, so that the Great Valley basement is oceanic crust above oceanic mantle vertically stacked above continental crust and continental mantle.

  20. EVALUATION OF RISKS AND WASTE CHARACTERIZATION REQUIREMENTS FOR THE TRANSURANIC WASTE EMPLACED IN WIPP DURING 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Channell, J.K.; Walker, B.A.

    2000-01-01

    Specifically this report: 1. Compares requirements of the WAP that are pertinent from a technical viewpoint with the WIPP pre-Permit waste characterization program, 2. Presents the results of a risk analysis of the currently emplaced wastes. Expected and bounding risks from routine operations and possible accidents are evaluated; and 3. Provides conclusions and recommendations

  1. High-precision 40Ar/39AR age of the gas emplacement into the Songliao Basin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qiu, H.N.; Wu, H.Y.; Yun, Y.B.; Feng, Z.H.; Xu, Y.G.; Mei, L.F.; Wijbrans, J.R.

    2011-01-01

    The problem of determining an exact isotopic age of hydrocarbon emplacement is complex because minerals suitable for dating with common isotopic methods are often lacking in the sedimentary domain. However, the igneous quartz from the Cretaceous volcanic rocks that host the gas reservoir in the

  2. Strike-slip pull-apart process and emplacement of Xiangshan uranium-producing volcanic basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu Aijin; Guo Lingzhi; Shu Liangshu

    2001-01-01

    Xiangshan volcanic basin is one of the famous uranium-producing volcanic basins in China. Emplacement mechanism of Xiangshan uranium-producing volcanic basin is discussed on the basis of the latest research achievements of deep geology in Xiangshan area and the theory of continental dynamics. The study shows that volcanic activity in Xiangshan volcanic basin may be divided into two cycles, and its emplacement is controlled by strike-ship pull-apart process originated from the deep regional faults. Volcanic apparatus in the first cycle was emplaced in EW-trending structure activated by clockwise strike-slipping of NE-trending deep fault, forming the EW-trending fissure-type volcanic effusion belt. Volcanic apparatus in the second cycle was emplaced at junction points of SN-trending pull-apart structure activated by sinistral strike-slipping of NE-trending deep faults and EW-trending basement faults causing the center-type volcanic magma effusion and extrusion. Moreover, the formation mechanism of large-rich uranium deposits is discussed as well

  3. From Embodiment to Emplacement: Re-Thinking Competing Bodies, Senses and Spatialities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pink, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    In this article I discuss how a shift from theories of embodiment to one of emplacement can inform how we understand the performing body in competitive and pedagogical contexts. I argue that recent theoretical advances concerning the senses, human perception and place offer new analytical possibilities for understanding skilled performances and…

  4. Mineral chemistry and geochemistry of ophiolitic metaultramafics from Um Halham and Fawakhir, Central Eastern Desert, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Karim, Abdel-Aal M.; Ali, Shehata; El-Shafei, Shaimaa A.

    2018-03-01

    This study is focused on ophiolitic metaultramafics from Um Halham and Fawakhir, Central Eastern Desert of Egypt. The rocks include serpentinized peridotites, serpentinites together with talc- and quartz-carbonates. The primary spinel relict is Al-chromite [Cr# > 60], which is replaced by Cr-magnetite during metamorphism. The high Cr# of Al-chromites resembles supra-subduction zone (SSZ) peridotites and suggests derivation from the deeper portion of the mantle section with boninitic affinity. These mantle rocks equilibrated with boninitic melt have been generated by high melting degrees. The estimated melting degrees ( 19-24%) lie within the range of SSZ peridotites. The high Cr# of spinel and Fo content of olivine together with the narrow compositional range suggest a mantle residual origin. Serpentinized peridotite and serpentinites have low Al2O3/SiO2 ratios (mostly serpentinization process. Moreover, they have very low Nb, Ta, Zr and Hf concentrations along with sub-chondritic Nb/Ta (0.3-16) and Zr/Hf (mostly 1-20) ratios further confirming that their mantle source was depleted by earlier melting extraction event. The high chondrite normalized (La/Sm)N ratios (average 10) reflect input of subduction-related slab melts/fluids into their mantle source.

  5. Differences in composition of shallow-water marine benthic communities associated with two ophiolitic rock substrata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bavestrello, Giorgio; Bo, Marzia; Betti, Federico; Canessa, Martina; Gaggero, Laura; Rindi, Fabio; Cattaneo-Vietti, Riccardo

    2018-01-01

    On marine rocky shores, several physical, chemical and biological processes operate to maintain the benthic assemblages' heterogeneity, but among the abiotic factors, the composition and texture of the rocky substrata have been only sporadically considered. However, biomineralogical studies have demonstrated an unsuspected ability of the benthic organisms to interact at different levels with rocky substrata. Therefore, the mineralogy of the substratum can affect the structure of benthic communities. To evaluate this hypothesis, the macrobenthic assemblages developed on two different ophiolitic rocks (serpentinites and metagabbros) in contact at a restricted stretch of the western Ligurian Riviera (western Mediterranean Sea), with identical environmental and climatic conditions, were analysed. Samplings were carried out at four bathymetric levels (+1m, 0m, -1m, and -3m respect to the mean sea level) and the analysis of the data evidenced differences in terms of species distribution and percent coverage. Algal communities growing on metagabbros were poorer in species richness and showed a much simpler structure when compared to the assemblages occurring on the serpentinites. The most widely distributed animal organism, the barnacle Chthamalus stellatus, was dominant on serpentinites, and virtually absent on metagabbros. Our results suggest a complex pattern of interactions between lithology and benthic organisms operating through processes of inhibition/facilitation related to the mineral properties of the substratum.

  6. Palladium, platinum, rhodium, iridium and ruthenium in chromite- rich rocks from the Samail ophiolite, Oman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, N.J.; Pallister, J.S.; Brown, M.A.; Smewing, J.D.; Haffty, J.

    1982-01-01

    30 samples of chromitite and chromite-rich rocks from two stratigraphic sections, 250 km apart, through the basal ultramafic member of the Samail ophiolite were spectrographically analysed for platinum-group elements (PGE) and for Co, Cu, Ni and V. These data are reported as are Cr/(Cr + Al), Mg/(Mg + Fe) and wt.% TiO2 for most samples. The chromitite occurs as pods or lenses in rocks of mantle origin or as discontinuous layers at the base of the overlying cumulus sequence. PGE abundances in both sections are similar, with average contents in chromite-rich rocks: Pd 8 ppb, Pt 14 ppb, Rh 6 ppb, Ir 48 ppb and Ru 135 ppb. The PGE data, combined with major-element and petrographic data on the chromitite, suggest: 1) relatively larger Ir and Ru contents and highest total PGE in the middle part of each section; 2) PGE concentrations and ratios do not correlate with coexisting silicate and chromite abundances or chromite compositions; 3) Pd/PGE, on average, increases upward in each section; 4) Samail PGE concentrations, particularly Rh, Pt and Pd, are lower than the average values for chromite-rich rocks in stratiform intrusions. 2) suggests that PGEs occur in discrete alloy or sulphide phases rather than in the major oxides or silicates, and 4) suggests that chromite-rich rocks from the oceanic upper mantle are depleted in PGE with respect to chondrites. L.C.C.

  7. One-carbon (bio ?) Geochemistry in Subsurface Waters of the Serpentinizing Coast Range Ophiolite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoehler, Tori M.; Mccollom, Tom; Schrenk, Matt; Cardace, Dawn

    2011-01-01

    Serpentinization - the aqueous alteration of ultramafic rocks - typically imparts a highly reducing and alkaline character to the reacting fluids. In turn, these can influence the speciation and potential for metabolism of one-carbon compounds in the system. We examined the aqueous geochemistry and assessed the biological potential of one-carbon compounds in the subsurface of the McLaughlin Natural Reserve (Coast Range Ophiolite, California, USA). Fluids from wells sunk at depths of 25-90 meters have pH values ranging from 9.7 to 11.5 and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC concentrations) generally below 60 micromolar. Methane is present at concentrations up to 1.3 millimolar (approximately one-atmosphere saturation), and hydrogen concentrations are below 15 nanomolar, suggesting active consumption of H2 and production of CH4. However, methane production from CO2 is thermodynamically unfavorable under these conditions. Additionally, the speciation of DIC predominantly into carbonate at these high pH values creates a problem of carbon availability for any organisms that require CO2 (or bicarbonate) for catabolism or anabolism. A potential alternative is carbon monoxide, which is present in these waters at concentrations 2000-fold higher than equilibrium with atmospheric CO. CO is utilized in a variety of metabolisms, including methanogenesis, and bioavailability is not adversely affected by pH-dependent speciation (as for DIC). Methanogenesis from CO under in situ conditions is thermodynamically favorable and would satisfy biological energy requirements with respect to both Gibbs Energy yield and power.

  8. Internal structure of the Supragetic Unit basement in the Serbian Carpathians and its significance for the late Early Cretaceous nappe-stacking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krstekanić Nemanja

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Fault-related folds and hanging-wall structures reflect the geometry of the main thrusts in foldthrust belts. The results of the structural analysis of the Supragetic Unit metamorphic basement in eastern Serbia at map-, outcrop- and thin-section scale, and its importance for the late Early Cretaceous nappe-stacking are presented in this paper. The Supragetic Unit metamorphic basement includes various volcano-sedimentary rocks of Ordovician-Silurian protolith age. They were metamorphosed to the low greenschist facies with temperatures reaching 300-350°C and pressure reaching 0.3-0.5 GPa. The microscale studies show that quartz and albite demonstrate dominantly bulging and locally subgrain rotation recrystallisation, while chlorite, sericite and muscovite define spaced to continuous foliation recognised both at the outcrop- and the thin-section-scale. The statistical analysis based on the available map data shows low- to high-angle west-dipping foliation which is interpreted as an indicator of flat-ramp geometry of the Supragetic thrust, rather than east-vergent tight to isoclinal folding. At the thin-section scale ductile to semi-ductile C’-S structures indicate top to ESE thrusting. Subsequent kinking, recognised both at the outcrop- and the thin-section-scale, deform the older foliation. Those kink bands are the result of WNW-ESE to NW-SE compression and could represent the later stage of a continuous deformation event during which C’-S structures were formed. The youngest, brittle deformation is represented by subvertical joints with no offset recognised in thin-sections. The structural characteristics of the Supragetic Unit low-grade metamorphic basement in the studied areas, combined with tectonothermal events recognised elsewhere in Dacia mega-unit, could imply a possible initiation of the late Early Cretaceous nappe-stacking in the ductile to semi-ductile/semi-brittle domain. [Project of the Serbian Ministry of Education, Science and

  9. Elastic properties and seismic anisotropy of the Seve Nappe Complex - Laboratory core measurements from the International Continental Drilling Project COSC-1 well, Åre, Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenning, Q. C.; Almqvist, B. S. G.; Zappone, A. S.

    2015-12-01

    The COSC-1 scientific borehole was drilled in the summer of 2014 to ~2.5 km depth to study the structure and composition of the Middle Allochthon of the Central Scandinavian Caledonides. It crosscuts the amphibolite-grade lower part of the Seve nappe and intersects a mylonite zone in the lower 800 m of the borehole. We selected six core samples representing the primary lithologies in the COSC-1 borehole for laboratory investigation of elastic properties. The cores consisted of two amphibolites with differing grain sizes, a calc-silicate gneiss, a felsic gneiss, a coarse grained amphibole bearing gneiss, and a garnet bearing mylonitic schist from the basal shear zone. Both P- and S-waves were measured at ultrasonic frequency (1 MHz), and room temperature hydrostatic pressure conditions up to 260 MPa. Measurements were made along three mutually perpendicular directions, one perpendicular to foliation and two parallel to the foliation with one aligned with mineral lineation. Vp and Vs, anisotropy, and elastic properties are reported as an extrapolation of the high-pressure portion of the ultrasonic measurements back to the intersection with the zero pressure axis. The Vp and Vs in the direction perpendicular to foliation ranges from 5.51-6.67 km/s and 3.18-4.13 km/s, respectively. In the direction parallel to foliation the Vp and Vs ranges from 6.31-7.25 km/s and 3.52-4.35 km/s, respectively. Vp anisotropy ranges from 3% in the calc-silicate gneiss to 18% in mylonitic schist. Acoustic impedance estimations at lithostatic pressure conditions at base of the borehole (70 MPa) show that acoustic impedance contrast generating reflection coefficients between the basal shear zone and overlying units are significant enough to cause seismic reflections. Above the mylonite zone/shear zone, the reflectivity within the lower Seve nappe is due to the impedance contrast between the felsic gneiss and the amphibolite. This result fits with 3D seismic reflection imaging in the area of

  10. Origin of elevated water levels encountered in Pahute Mesa emplacement boreholes: Preliminary investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brikowski, T.; Chapman, J.; Lyles, B.; Hokett, S.

    1993-11-01

    The presence of standing water well above the predicted water table in emplacement boreholes on Pahute Mesa has been a recurring phenomenon at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). If these levels represent naturally perched aquifers, they may indicate a radionuclide migration hazard. In any case, they can pose engineering problems in the performance of underground nuclear tests. The origin of these elevated waters is uncertain. Large volumes of water are introduced during emplacement drilling, providing ample source for artificially perched water, yet elevated water levels can remain constant for years, suggesting a natural origin instead. In an effort to address the issue of unexpected standing water in emplacement boreholes, three different sites were investigated in Area 19 on Pahute Mesa by Desert Research Institute (DRI) staff from 1990-93. These sites were U-19az, U-19ba, and U-19bh. As of this writing, U-19bh remains available for access; however, nuclear tests were conducted at the former two locations subsequent to this investigations. The experiments are discussed in chronological order. Taken together, the experiments indicate that standing water in Pahute Mesa emplacement holes originates from the drainage of small-volume naturally perched zones. In the final study, the fluids used during drilling of the bottom 100 m of emplacement borehole U-19bh were labeled with a chemical tracer. After hole completion, water level rose in the borehole, while tracer concentration decreased. In fact, total mass of tracer in the borehole remained constant, while water levels rose. After water levels stabilized in this hole, no change in tracer mass was observed over two years, indicating that no movement of water out of the borehole is taking place (as at U- 19ba). Continued labeling tests of standing water are recommended to confirm the conclusions made here, and to establish their validity throughout Pahute Mesa

  11. Buffered and unbuffered dike emplacement on Earth and Venus - Implications for magma reservoir size, depth, and rate of magma replenishment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parfitt, E. A.; Head, J. W., III

    1993-01-01

    Models of the emplacement of lateral dikes from magma chambers under constant (buffered) driving pressure conditions and declining (unbuffered) driving pressure conditions indicate that the two pressure scenarios lead to distinctly different styles of dike emplacement. In the unbuffered case, the lengths and widths of laterally emplaced dikes will be severely limited and the dike lengths will be highly dependent on chamber size; this dependence suggests that average dike length can be used to infer the dimensions of the source magma reservoir. On Earth, the characteristics of many mafic-dike swarms suggest that they were emplaced in buffered conditions (e.g., the Mackenzie dike swarm in Canada and some dikes within the Scottish Tertiary). On Venus, the distinctive radial fractures and graben surrounding circular to oval features and edifices on many size scales and extending for hundreds to over a thousand km are candidates for dike emplacement in buffered conditions.

  12. A stable isotope study of serpentinization in the Fengtien ophiolite, Taiwan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tzen-Fu Yui; Hsueh-Wen Yeh (Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu (USA)); Chihming Wang Lee (National Taiwan Univ. (Taiwan))

    1990-05-01

    Detailed H- and O-isotopic studies of serpentinites of Fengtien ophiolite have been made in order to enhance our knowledge on the process of serpentinization. Pseudomorphic lizardites have {delta}{sup 18}O = +3.6{per thousand} and {delta}D = {minus}48 to {minus}49{per thousand}; bladed-mat and foliated antigorites have {delta}{sup 18}O = +3.5 to +5.8{per thousand} and {delta}D = {minus}45 to {minus}69{per thousand}; slickensided antigorites have {delta}{sup 18}O = +4.1 to +4.9{per thousand} and {delta}D = {minus}46 to {minus}50{per thousand}; picrolites have {delta}{sup 18}O = +4.2 to +4.3{per thousand} and {delta}D = {minus}65 to {minus}67{per thousand}; and slickensided chrysotiles have {delta}{sup 18}O = +4.1 to +4.5{per thousand} and {delta}D = {minus}80{per thousand}. It is suggested that lizardite might have formed in an oceanic environment, whereas antigorite and chrysotile have formed in continental environments. These results depict complicated multiple serpentinization processes. Isotopic temperatures calculated using {delta}{sup 18}O values of coexisting fissure-filling minerals range from 325 to 370{degree}C, which are consistent with those derived from phase equilibria involving serpentines. The narrow range of {delta}{sup 18}O and wide range of {delta}D values for antigorite and chrysotile also demonstrate that water/rock ratios during these serpentinizations should not have been high. These Fengtien serpentines fall outside either of the continental domains described by Wenner and Taylor (1973, 1974); and fall within their oceanic domain. We suggest that the domains proposed by Wenner and Taylor (1973, 1974) should be extended and that the terms, especially the continental antigorite and the continental lizardite-chrysotile, should be purely occurrence-descriptive.

  13. An alkaline spring system within the Del Puerto ophiolite (California USA): A Mars analog site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blank, J.G.; Green, S.; Blake, D.; Valley, J.; Kita, N.; Treiman, A.; Dobson, P.F.

    2008-10-01

    Mars appears to have experienced little compositional differentiation of primitive lithosphere, and thus much of the surface of Mars is covered by mafic lavas. On Earth, mafic and ultramafic rocks present in ophiolites, oceanic crust and upper mantle that have been obducted onto land, are therefore good analogs for Mars. The characteristic mineralogy, aqueous geochemistry, and microbial communities of cold-water alkaline springs associated with these mafic and ultramafic rocks represent a particularly compelling analog for potential life-bearing systems. Serpentinization, the reaction of water with mafic minerals such as olivine and pyroxene, yields fluids with unusual chemistry (Mg-OH and Ca-OH waters with pH values up to {approx}12), as well as heat and hydrogen gas that can sustain subsurface, chemosynthetic ecosystems. The recent observation of seeps from pole-facing crater and canyon walls in the higher Martian latitudes supports the hypothesis that even present conditions might allow for a rockhosted chemosynthetic biosphere in near-surface regions of the Martian crust. The generation of methane within a zone of active serpentinization, through either abiogenic or biogenic processes, could account for the presence of methane detected in the Martian atmosphere. For all of these reasons, studies of terrestrial alkaline springs associated with mafic and ultramafic rocks are particularly timely. This study focuses on the alkaline Adobe Springs, emanating from mafic and ultramafic rocks of the California Coast Range, where a community of novel bacteria is associated with the precipitation of Mg-Ca carbonate cements. The carbonates may serve as a biosignature that could be used in the search for evidence of life on Mars.

  14. Characterizing Dissolved Organic Matter and Metabolites in an Actively Serpentinizing Ophiolite Using Global Metabolomics Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyler, L. M.; Rempfert, K. R.; Kraus, E. A.; Spear, J. R.; Templeton, A. S.; Schrenk, M. O.

    2017-12-01

    Environmental metabolomics is an emerging approach used to study ecosystem properties. Through bioinformatic comparisons to metagenomic data sets, metabolomics can be used to study microbial adaptations and responses to varying environmental conditions. Since the techniques are highly parallel to organic geochemistry approaches, metabolomics can also provide insight into biogeochemical processes. These analyses are a reflection of metabolic potential and intersection with other organisms and environmental components. Here, we used an untargeted metabolomics approach to characterize dissolved organic carbon and aqueous metabolites from groundwater obtained from an actively serpentinizing habitat. Serpentinites are known to support microbial communities that feed off of the products of serpentinization (such as methane and H2 gas), while adapted to harsh environmental conditions such as high pH and low DIC availability. However, the biochemistry of microbial populations that inhabit these environments are understudied and are complicated by overlapping biotic and abiotic processes. The aim of this study was to identify potential sources of carbon in an environment that is depleted of soluble inorganic carbon, and to characterize the flow of metabolites and describe overlapping biogenic and abiogenic processes impacting carbon cycling in serpentinizing rocks. We applied untargeted metabolomics techniques to groundwater taken from a series of wells drilled into the Semail Ophiolite in Oman.. Samples were analyzed via quadrupole time-of-flight liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (QToF-LC/MS/MS). Metabolomes and metagenomic data were imported into Progenesis QI software for statistical analysis and correlation, and metabolic networks constructed using the Genome-Linked Application for Metabolic Maps (GLAMM), a web interface tool. Further multivariate statistical analyses and quality control was performed using EZinfo. Pools of dissolved organic carbon could

  15. Lithological Classification Using Sentinel-2A Data in the Shibanjing Ophiolite Complex in Inner Mongolia, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenyan Ge

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available As a source of data continuity between Landsat and SPOT, Sentinel-2 is an Earth observation mission developed by the European Space Agency (ESA, which acquires 13 bands in the visible and near-infrared (VNIR to shortwave infrared (SWIR range. In this study, a Sentinel-2A imager was utilized to assess its ability to perform lithological classification in the Shibanjing ophiolite complex in Inner Mongolia, China. Five conventional machine learning methods, including artificial neural network (ANN, k-nearest neighbor (k-NN, maximum likelihood classification (MLC, random forest classifier (RFC, and support vector machine (SVM, were compared in order to find an optimal classifier for lithological mapping. The experiment revealed that the MLC method offered the highest overall accuracy. After that, Sentinel-2A image was compared with common multispectral data ASTER and Landsat-8 OLI (operational land imager for lithological mapping using the MLC method. The comparison results showed that the Sentinel-2A imagery yielded a classification accuracy of 74.5%, which was 2.5% and 5.08% higher than those of the ASTER and OLI imagery, respectively, indicating that Sentinel-2A imagery is adequate for lithological discrimination, due to its high spectral resolution in the VNIR to SWIR range. Moreover, different data combinations of Sentinel-2A + ASTER + DEM (digital elevation model and OLI + ASTER + DEM data were tested on lithological mapping using the MLC method. The best mapping result was obtained from Sentinel-2A + ASTER + DEM dataset, demonstrating that OLI can be replaced by Sentinel-2A, which, when combined with ASTER, can achieve sufficient bandpasses for lithological classification.

  16. Geophysical Characterization of Serpentinite Hosted Hydrogeology at the McLaughlin Natural Reserve, Coast Range Ophiolite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Estefania; Tominaga, Masako; Cardace, Dawn; Schrenk, Matthew O.; Hoehler, Tori M.; Kubo, Michael D.; Rucker, Dale F.

    2018-01-01

    Geophysical remote sensing both on land and at sea has emerged as a powerful approach to characterize in situ water-rock interaction processes in time and space. We conducted 2-D Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) surveys to investigate in situ hydrogeological architecture within the Jurassic age tectonic mélange portion of the Coast Range Ophiolite Microbial Observatory (CROMO) during wet and dry seasons, where water-rock interactive processes are thought to facilitate a subsurface biosphere. Integrating survey tracks traversing two previously drilled wells, QV1,1 and CSW1,1 at the CROMO site with wireline and core data, and the Serpentine Valley site, we successfully documented changes in hydrogeologic properties in the CROMO formation, i.e., lateral and vertical distribution of conductive zones and their temporal behavior that are dependent upon seasonal hydrology. Based on the core-log-ERT integration, we propose a hydrogeological architectural model, in which the formation is composed of three distinct aquifer systems: perched serpentinite aquifer without seasonal dependency (shallow system), well-cemented serpentine confining beds with seasonal dependency (intermediate system), serpentinite aquifer (deep system), and the ultramafic basement that acts as a quasi-aquiclude (below the deep system). The stunning contrast between the seasonality in the surface water availability and groundwater storativity in the formation allowed us to locate zones where serpentinite weathering and possibly deeper serpentinization processes might have taken place. We based our findings primarily on lithological composition and the distribution of the conductive formation, our work highlights the link between serpentinite weathering processes and possible sources of water in time and space.

  17. Polymineralic inclusions in mantle chromitites from the Oman ophiolite indicate a highly magnesian parental melt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollinson, Hugh; Mameri, Lucan; Barry, Tiffany

    2018-06-01

    Polymineralic inclusions interpreted as melt inclusions in chromite from the dunitic Moho Transition Zone in the Maqsad area of the Oman ophiolite have been analysed and compositions integrated using a rastering technique on the scanning electron microscope. The inclusions now comprise a range of inter-grown hydrous phases including pargasite, aspidolite, phlogopite and chlorite, indicating that the parental melts were hydrous. Average inclusion compositions for seven samples contain between 23.1 and 26.8 wt% MgO and 1.7-3.6 wt% FeO. Compositions were corrected to allow for the low FeO concentrations using coexisting olivine compositions. These suggest that the primary melt has between 20 and 22 wt% MgO and 7-9.7 wt% FeO and has an affinity with boninitic melts, although the melts have a higher Ti content than most boninites. Average rare earth element concentrations suggest that the melts were derived from a REE depleted mantle source although fluid-mobile trace elements indicate a more enriched source. Given the hydrous nature of the inclusions this enrichment could be fluid driven. An estimate of the melt temperature can be made from the results of homogenisation experiments on these inclusions and suggests 1300 °C, which implies for a harzburgite solidus, relatively shallow melting at depths of <50 km and is consistent with a boninitic origin. The current "basaltic" nature of the chromite host to highly magnesian melt inclusions suggests that the dunitic Moho Transition Zone operated as a reaction filter in which magnesian melts were transformed into basalts by the removal of high magnesian olivines, particularly in areas where the Moho Transition Zone is unusually thick. We propose therefore that podiform mantle chromitites, even those with an apparent MORB-like chemical signature, have crystallised from a highly magnesian parental melt. The data presented here strongly support the view that this took place in a subduction initiation setting.

  18. Seawater Circulation and Thermal Sink at OCEAN Ridges - FIELD Evidence in Oman Ophiolite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolas, A. A.; Boudier, F. I.; Cathles, L. M.; Buck, W. R.; Celerier, B. P.

    2014-12-01

    Exceptionally, the lowermost gabbros in the Oman ophiolite are black and totally fresh, except for minute traces of impregnation by seawater fluids at very high temperature (~1000°C). These black gabbros sharply contrast with normal, whitish gabbros altered down to Low-T~500-350°C. These hydrous alterations are ascribed to an unconventional model of seawater circulation and cooling of the permanent magma chambers of fast spreading ocean ridges. In this model, gabbros issued from the magma chamber cross a ~100 m thick thermal boundary layer (TBL) before reaching a narrow, Low-T high permeability channel where the heated return seawater is flowing towards black smokers and the local gabbros are altered. Uprising mantle diapirs in Oman diverge at ~5 km on each side of the palaeo-ridge axis and feed an overlying magma chamber that closes at this distance from axis. Preservation of black gabbros along the Moho implies that the loop of seawater alteration locally does not reach Moho beyond this ~5km distance (otherwise black gabbros would be altered in whitish gabbros). This defines an internal "thermal sink" within ~5 km to the ridge axis. There, the sink is efficiently cooled by the active hydrothermal convection that is ridge transverse. This has been documented near the Galapagos ridge by marine geophysical data, within the same distance. Beyond this critical distance, the cooling system becomes dominantly conductive and ridge-parallel. The TBL and attached return flow channels must be rising into the overcooled, accreted crust. Beyond the thermal sink, the 500°C isotherm rebounds into the crust. It is only after ~ 1My of crustal drift that this isotherm penetrates into the uppermost mantle in a sustained fashion, developing serpentinites at the expense of peridotites.

  19. Tectonic Evolution of Jabal Tays Ophiolite Complex, Eastern Arabian Shield, Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlHumidan, Saad; Kassem, Osama; Almutairi, Majed; Al-Faifi, Hussain; Kahal, Ali

    2017-04-01

    Microstructural analysis is important for investigation of tectonic evaluation of Jable Tays area. Furthermore, the Jable Tays ophiolite complex is effected by Al Amar -Idsas fault. The nature of the Al Amar-Idsas fault is a part of the Eastern Arabian Shield, which was subjected to multiple interpretations. Through fieldwork investigation, microscopic examination, and microstructural analysis, we aim to understand the evolution and tectonic setting of the Jable Tays area. Finite-strain data displays that the Abt schist, the metavolcanics and the metagranites are highly to moderately deformed. The axial ratios in the XZ section range from 1.40 to 2.20. The long axes of the finite-strain ellipsoids trend NW- SE and W-E in the Jable Tays area while, their short axes are subvertical to subhorizontal foliations. The strain magnitude does not increase towards the tectonic contacts between the Abt schist and metavolcano-sedimentary. While majority of the obtained data indicate a dominant oblate with minor prolate strain symmetries in the Abt schist, metavolcano-sedimentary and metagranites. The strain data also indicate flattening with some constriction. We assume that the Abt schist and the metavolcano-sedimentry rocks have similar deformation behavior. The finite strain in the studied rocks accumulated during the metamorphism that effected by thrusting activity. Based on these results, we finally concluded that the contact between Abt schist and metavolcano-sedimentary rocks were formed during the progressive thrusting under brittle to semi-ductile deformation conditions by simple shear that also involved a component of vertical shortening, causing subhorizontal foliation in Jable Tays area.

  20. From steep feeders to tabular plutons - Emplacement controls of syntectonic granitoid plutons in the Damara Belt, Namibia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Duncan; Kisters, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Granitoid plutons in the deeply eroded south Central Zone of the Damara Belt in Namibia commonly show tabular geometries and pronounced stratigraphic controls on their emplacement. Subhorizontal, sheet-like pluton geometries record emplacement during regional subhorizontal shortening, but the intrusion of spatially and temporally closely-related granitoid plutons at different structural levels and in distinct structural settings suggests independent controls on their levels of emplacement. We describe and evaluate the controls on the loci of the dyke-to-sill transition that initiated the emplacement of three syntectonic (560-530 Ma) plutons in the basement-cover stratigraphy of the Erongo region. Intrusive relationships highlight the significance of (1) rigidity anisotropies associated with competent sedimentary packages or pre-existing subhorizontal granite sheets and (2) rheological anisotropies associated with the presence of thick ductile marble horizons. These mechanical anisotropies may lead to the initial deflection of steep feeder conduits as well as subsequent pluton assembly by the repeated underaccretion of later magma batches. The upward displacement of regional isotherms due to the heat advection associated with granite emplacement is likely to have a profound effect on the mechanical stratification of the upper crust and, consequently, on the level at which granitoid pluton emplacement is initiated. In this way, pluton emplacement at progressively shallower crustal depths may have resulted in the unusually high apparent geothermal gradients recorded in the upper crustal levels of the Damara Belt during its later evolution.

  1. Emplacement technology for the direct disposal of spent fuel into deep vertical boreholes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bollingerfehr, W.; Filbert, W.; Wehrmann, J.

    2008-01-01

    In the early sixties it was decided to investigate salt formations on its suitability to host heat generating radioactive waste in Germany. In the reference repository concept consequently the emplacement of vitrified waste canisters in deep vertical boreholes inside a salt mine was considered whereas spent fuel should be disposed of in self shielding casks (type POLLUX) in horizontal drifts. The POLLUX casks, 65 t heavy carbon steel casks, will be laid down on the floor of a horizontal drift in one of the disposal zones to be constructed in the salt dome at the 870 m level. The space between casks and drift walls will be backfilled with crushed salt. The transport, the handling und the emplacement of POLLUX casks were subject of successfully performed demonstration and in situ tests in the nineties and resulted in an adjustment of the atomic law. The borehole disposal concept comprises the emplacement of unshielded canisters with vitrified HLW in boreholes with a diameter of 60 cm and a depth of up to 300 m. In order to facilitate the fast encapsulation of the waste canister by the host rock (rock salt), no lining of the boreholes is planned. With regard to harmonize and optimize the emplacement technology for both categories of packages (vitrified waste and spent fuel) alternatives were developed. In this context the borehole emplacement technique for consolidated spent fuel as already foreseen for high-level reprocessing waste was reconsidered. This review resulted in the design of a new disposal package, a fuel rod canister (type 'BSK 3'), and an appropriate modified transport and emplacement technology. This concept (called BSK 3-concept) provides the following optimization possibilities: (i) A new steel canister of the same diameter (43 cm) as the standardized HLW canisters applied for high-level waste and compacted technological waste from reprocessing abroad can be filled with fuel rods of 3 PWR or 9 BWR fuel assemblies. (II) The standardized canister

  2. Shapes of Venusian 'pancake' domes imply episodic emplacement and silicic composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Jonathan H.; Bridges, Nathan T.; Grimm, Robert E.

    1993-01-01

    The main evidence available for constraining the composition of the large circular 'pancake' domes on Venus is their gross morphology. Laboratory simulations using polyethylene glycol show that the height to diameter (aspect) ratios of domes of a given total volume depend critically on whether their extrusion was continuous or episodic, with more episodes leading to greater cooling and taller domes. Thus without observations of their emplacement, the compositions of Venusian domes cannot be uniquely constrained by their morphology. However, by considering a population of 51 Venusian domes to represent a sampling of many stages during the growth of domes with comparable histories, and by plotting aspect ratio versus total volume, we find that the shapes of the domes are most consistent with episodic emplacement. On Earth this mode of dome growth is found almost exclusively in lavas of dacite to rhyolite composition, strengthening earlier inferences about the presence of evolved magmas on Venus.

  3. STRUCTURAL CALCULATION OF AN EMPLACEMENT PALLET STATICALLY LOADED BY A WASTE PACKAGE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    S. Mastilovic

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this calculation is to determine the structural response of the emplacement pallet (EP) subjected to static load from the mounted waste package (WP). The scope of this document is limited to reporting the calculation results in terms of stress intensity magnitudes. This calculation is associated with the waste emplacement systems design; calculations are performed by the Waste Package Design group. AP-3.12Q, Revision 0, ICN 0, Calculations, is used to perform the calculation and develop the document. The finite element solutions are performed by using the commercially available ANSYS Version (V) 5.4 finite element code. The results of these calculations are provided in terms of maximum stress intensity magnitudes

  4. Thermal impact of waste emplacement and surface cooling associated with geologic disposal of nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, J.S.Y.; Mangold, D.C.; Spencer, R.K.; Tsang, C.F.

    1982-01-01

    The age of nuclear waste - the length of time between its removal from the reactor cores and its emplacement in a repository - is a significant factor in determining the thermal loading of a repository. The surface cooling period as well as the density and sequence of waste emplacement affects both the near-field repository structure and the far-field geologic environment. To investigate these issues, a comprehensive review was made of the available literature pertaining to thermal effects and thermal properties of mined geologic repositories. This included a careful evaluation of the effects of different surface cooling periods of the wastes, which is important for understanding the optimal thermal loading of a repository. The results led to a clearer understanding of the importance of surface cooling in evaluating the overall thermal effects of a radioactive waste repository. The principal findings from these investigations are summarized in this paper

  5. Uncertainty and sensitivity results for pre-waste-emplacement groundwater travel time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplan, P.G.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper uncertainty and sensitivity analyses for pre-waste-emplacement groundwater travel time conducted. Although preliminary, a numbed of interesting results were obtained. Uncertainty in the ground water travel time statistics, as measured by the coefficient of variation, increases and then decrease as the modeled system transitions from matrix-dominated to fracture-dominated flow. The uncertainty analysis also suggests that the median, as opposed to the mean, may be a better indicator of performance with respect to the regulatory criterion. The sensitivity analysis shows a strong correlation between an effective fracture property, fracture porosity, and failure to meet the regulatory pre-waste-emplacement groundwater travel time criterion of 1,000 years

  6. Far-field thermomechanical response of argillaceous rock to emplacement of a nuclear-waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McVey, D.F.; Thomas, R.K.; Lappin, A.R.

    1980-08-01

    Before heat-producing wastes can be emplaced safely in any argillaceous rock, it will be necessary to understand the far-field thermal and thermomechanical response of this rock to waste emplacement. This report presents the results of a first series of calculations aimed at estimating the far-field response of argillite to waste emplacement. Because the thermal and mechanical properties of argillite are affected by its content of expandable clay, its behavior is briefly compared and contrasted with that of a shale having the same matrix thermal properties, but containing no expandable clay. Under this assumption, modeled temperatures are the same for the two rock types at equivalent power densities and reflect the large dependence of in-situ temperatures on both initial power density and waste type. Thermomechanical calculations indicate that inclusion of contraction behavior of expandable clays in the assumed argillite thermal expansion behavior results, in some cases, in generation of a large zone in and near the repository that has undergone volumetric contraction but is surrounded by uniformly compressive stresses. Information available to date indicates that this contraction would likely result in locally increased fluid permeability and decreased in-situ thermal conductivity, but might well be advantageous as regards radionuclide retention, because of the increased surface area within the contracted zone. Assumption of continuous and positive expansion behavior for the shale eliminates the near-repository contraction and tensional zones, but results in near-surface tensional zones directly above the repository

  7. The role of the geothermal gradient in the emplacement and replenishment of ground ice on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifford, Stephen M.

    1993-01-01

    Knowledge of the mechanisms by which ground ice is emplaced, removed, and potentially replenished, are critical to understanding the climatic and hydrologic behavior of water on Mars, as well as the morphologic evolution of its surface. Because of the strong temperature dependence of the saturated vapor pressure of H2O, the atmospheric emplacement or replenishment of ground ice is prohibited below the depth at which crustal temperatures begin to monotonically increase due to geothermal heating. In contrast, the emplacement and replenishment of ground ice from reservoirs of H2O residing deep within the crust can occur by at least three different thermally-driven processes, involving all three phases of water. In this regard, Clifford has discussed how the presence of a geothermal gradient as small as 15 K/km can give rise to a corresponding vapor pressure gradient sufficient to drive the vertical transport of 1 km of water from a reservoir of ground water at depth to the base of the cryosphere every 10(exp 6) - 10(exp 7) years. This abstract expands on this earlier treatment by considering the influence of thermal gradients on the transport of H2O at temperatures below the freezing point.

  8. Postclosure performance assessment of the SCP [Site Characterization Plan] conceptual design for horizontal emplacement: Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-08-01

    This report is a preliminary postclosure performance assessment of the repository design specified in the Site Characterization Plan Conceptual Design Report (SCP-CDR) for horizontal emplacement of high-level nuclear waste. At the time that these analyses were done, horizontal emplacement was the preferred orientation for the waste packages but vertical emplacement is now the reference design. This assessment consists of (1) a review of the regulatory requirements and strategy to demonstrate compliance with these requirements, (2) an analysis of the performance of the total repository system, (3) an analysis of the thermomechanical behavior of the repository, (4) an analysis of brine mobility in the repository, (5) an analysis of the waste package performance, (6) an analysis of the performance of seals, and (7) comments on the sensitivity of the various performance measures to uncertainties in the data and models. These are preliminary analyses and, in most cases, involve bounding calculations of the repository behavior. They have several purposes including (1) assessing how well this conceptual design ''measures up'' against requirements, (2) gaining experience in implementing the performance assessment strategy and tools and thereby learning where improvements are needed, (3) helping to identify needed data, and (4) helping to indicate required design modifications. 26 refs., 40 figs., 20 tabs

  9. Mechanical degradation of Emplacement Drifts at Yucca Mountain - A Modeling Case Study. Part I: Nonlithophysal Rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    M. Lin; D. Kicker; B. Damjanac; M. Board; M. Karakouzian

    2006-01-01

    This paper outlines rock mechanics investigations associated with mechanical degradation of planned emplacement drifts at Yucca Mountain, which is the designated site for the proposed U.S. high-level nuclear waste repository. The factors leading to drift degradation include stresses from the overburden, stresses induced by the heat released from the emplaced waste, stresses due to seismically related ground motions, and time-dependent strength degradation. The welded tuff emplacement horizon consists of two groups of rock with distinct engineering properties: nonlithophysal units and lithophysal units, based on the relative proportion of lithophysal cavities. The term 'lithophysal' refers to hollow, bubble like cavities in volcanic rock that are surrounded by a porous rim formed by fine-grained alkali feldspar, quartz, and other minerals. Lithophysae are typically a few centimeters to a few decimeters in diameter. Part I of the paper concentrates on the generally hard, strong, and fractured nonlithophysal rock. The degradation behavior of the tunnels in the nonlithophysal rock is controlled by the occurrence of keyblocks. A statistically equivalent fracture model was generated based on extensive underground fracture mapping data from the Exploratory Studies Facility at Yucca Mountain. Three-dimensional distinct block analyses, generated with the fracture patterns randomly selected from the fracture model, were developed with the consideration of in situ, thermal, and seismic loads. In this study, field data, laboratory data, and numerical analyses are well integrated to provide a solution for the unique problem of modeling drift degradation

  10. Subsurface geology of a potential waste emplacement site, Salt Valley Anticline, Grand County, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hite, R.J.

    1977-01-01

    The Salt Valley anticline, which is located about 32 km northeast of Moab, Utah, is perhaps one of the most favorable waste emplacement sites in the Paradox basin. The site, which includes about 7.8 km 2, is highly accessible and is adjacent to a railroad. The anticline is one of a series of northwest-trending salt anticlines lying along the northeast edge of the Paradox basin. These anticlines are cored by evaporites of the Paradox Member of the Hermosa Formation of Middle Pennsylvanian age. The central core of the Salt Valley anticline forms a ridgelike mass of evaporites that has an estimated amplitude of 3,600 m. The evaporite core consists of about 87 percent halite rock, which includes some potash deposits; the remainder is black shale, silty dolomite, and anhydrite. The latter three lithologies are referred to as 'marker beds.' Using geophysical logs from drill holes on the anticline, it is possible to demonstrate that the marker beds are complexly folded and faulted. Available data concerning the geothermal gradient and heatflow at the site indicate that heat from emplaced wastes should be rapidly dissipated. Potentially exploitable resources of potash and petroleum are present at Salt Valley. Development of these resources may conflict with use of the site for waste emplacement.

  11. Subsurface geology of a potential waste emplacement site, Salt Valley Anticline, Grand County, Utah

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hite, R.J.

    1977-01-01

    The Salt Valley anticline, which is located about 32 km northeast of Moab, Utah, is perhaps one of the most favorable waste emplacement sites in the Paradox basin. The site, which includes about 7.8 km 2 , is highly accessible and is adjacent to a railroad. The anticline is one of a series of northwest-trending salt antilcines lying along the northeast edge of the Paradox basin. These anticlines are cored by evaporites of the Paradox Member of the Hermosa Formation of Middle Pennsylvanian age. The central core of the Salt Valley anticline forms a ridgelike mass of evaporites that has an estimated amplitude of 3,600 m. The evaporite core consists of about 87 percent halite rock, which includes some potash deposits; the remainder is black shale, silty dolomite, and anhydrite. The latter three lithologies are referred to as ''marker beds.'' Using geophysical logs from drill holes on the anticline, it is possible to demonstrate that the marker beds are complexly folded and faulted. Available data concerning the geothermal gradient and heatflow at the site indicate that heat from emplaced wastes should be rapidly dissipated. Potentially exploitable resources of potash and petroleum are present at Salt Valley. Development of these resources may conflict with use of the site for waste emplacement

  12. Logistics Modeling of Emplacement Rate and Duration of Operations for Generic Geologic Repository Concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalinina, Elena Arkadievna; Hardin, Ernest

    2015-11-01

    This study identified potential geologic repository concepts for disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and (2) evaluated the achievable repository waste emplacement rate and the time required to complete the disposal for these concepts. Total repository capacity is assumed to be approximately 140,000 MT of spent fuel. The results of this study provide an important input for the rough-order-of-magnitude (ROM) disposal cost analysis. The disposal concepts cover three major categories of host geologic media: crystalline or hard rock, salt, and argillaceous rock. Four waste package sizes are considered: 4PWR/9BWR; 12PWR/21BWR; 21PWR/44BWR, and dual purpose canisters (DPCs). The DPC concepts assume that the existing canisters will be sealed into disposal overpacks for direct disposal. Each concept assumes one of the following emplacement power limits for either emplacement or repository closure: 1.7 kW; 2.2 kW; 5.5 kW; 10 kW; 11.5 kW, and 18 kW.

  13. Logistics Modeling of Emplacement Rate and Duration of Operations for Generic Geologic Repository Concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalinina, Elena Arkadievna; Hardin, Ernest

    2015-01-01

    This study identified potential geologic repository concepts for disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and (2) evaluated the achievable repository waste emplacement rate and the time required to complete the disposal for these concepts. Total repository capacity is assumed to be approximately 140,000 MT of spent fuel. The results of this study provide an important input for the rough-order-of-magnitude (ROM) disposal cost analysis. The disposal concepts cover three major categories of host geologic media: crystalline or hard rock, salt, and argillaceous rock. Four waste package sizes are considered: 4PWR/9BWR; 12PWR/21BWR; 21PWR/44BWR, and dual purpose canisters (DPCs). The DPC concepts assume that the existing canisters will be sealed into disposal overpacks for direct disposal. Each concept assumes one of the following emplacement power limits for either emplacement or repository closure: 1.7 kW; 2.2 kW; 5.5 kW; 10 kW; 11.5 kW, and 18 kW.

  14. Biofilm formation and potential for iron cycling in serpentinization-influenced groundwater of the Zambales and Coast Range ophiolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer-Dombard, D'Arcy R; Casar, Caitlin P; Simon, Alexander G; Cardace, Dawn; Schrenk, Matthew O; Arcilla, Carlo A

    2018-05-01

    Terrestrial serpentinizing systems harbor microbial subsurface life. Passive or active microbially mediated iron transformations at alkaline conditions in deep biosphere serpentinizing ecosystems are understudied. We explore these processes in the Zambales (Philippines) and Coast Range (CA, USA) ophiolites, and associated surface ecosystems by probing the relevance of samples acquired at the surface to in situ, subsurface ecosystems, and the nature of microbe-mineral associations in the subsurface. In this pilot study, we use microcosm experiments and batch culturing directed at iron redox transformations to confirm thermodynamically based predictions that iron transformations may be important in subsurface serpentinizing ecosystems. Biofilms formed on rock cores from the Zambales ophiolite on surface and in-pit associations, confirming that organisms from serpentinizing systems can form biofilms in subsurface environments. Analysis by XPS and FTIR confirmed that enrichment culturing utilizing ferric iron growth substrates produced reduced, magnetic solids containing siderite, spinels, and FeO minerals. Microcosms and enrichment cultures supported organisms whose near relatives participate in iron redox transformations. Further, a potential 'principal' microbial community common to solid samples in serpentinizing systems was identified. These results indicate collectively that iron redox transformations should be more thoroughly and universally considered when assessing the function of terrestrial subsurface ecosystems driven by serpentinization.

  15. Isotopic and trace element constraints on the genesis of a boninitic sequence in the Thetford Mines ophiolitic complex, Quebec, Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olive, V.; Hebert, R.; Loubet, M.

    1997-01-01

    The Mont Ham Massif (part of the Thetford Mines ophiolite, south Quebec) represents a magmatic sequence made up of tholeiitic and boninitic derived products. A geochemical study confirms the multicomponent mixing models that have been classically advanced for the source of boninites, with slab-derived components added to the main refractory harzburgitic peridotite. An isochron diagram of the boninitic rocks is interpreted as a mixing trend between two components: (i) a light rare earth element (LREE) enriched component (A), interpreted as slab-derived fluid-melts equilibrated with sedimentary materials (ε Nd = -3, 147 Sm/ 144 Nd = 0.140), and (ii) a LREE-depleted component (B) (0.21 147 Sm/ 144 Nd Nd = 9). A multicomponent source is also necessary to explain the Nd-isotope and trace element composition of the tholeiites, which are explained by the melting of a more fertile, Iherzolitic mantle and (or) mid-ocean ridge basalt source (component C), characterized by a large-ion lithophile element depicted pattern and an lapetus mantle Nd isotopic composition (ε Nd = 9), mixed in adequate proportions with the two previously infered slab-derived components (A and B). The genesis of the boninites of Mont Ham is not significantly different from those of boninites located in the Pacific. An intraoceanic subduction zone appears to be an appropriate geodynamic environment for the Mont Ham ophiolitic sequence. (author)

  16. Mineralogical assemblages forming at hyperalkaline warm springs hosted on ultramafic rocks: A case study of Oman and Ligurian ophiolites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavagnac, Valérie; Ceuleneer, Georges; Monnin, Christophe; Lansac, Benjamin; Hoareau, Guilhem; Boulart, Cédric

    2013-07-01

    We report on the mineralogical assemblages found in the hyperalkaline springs hosted on Liguria and Oman ophiolites based on exhaustive X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microprobe analyses. In Liguria, hyperalkaline springs produce a thin brownish calcite precipitate that covers the bedrock due to the concomitant atmospheric CO2 uptake and neutralization of the hyperalkaline waters. No brucite and portlandite minerals are observed. The discharge of alkaline waters in Oman ophiolite forms white-orange precipitates. Calcium carbonate minerals (calcite and/or aragonite) are the most abundant and ubiquitous precipitates and are produced by the same mechanism as in Liguria. This process is observed as a thin surface crust made of rhombohedral calcite. Morphological features of aragonite vary from needle-, bouquet-, dumbbell-, spheroidal-like habitus according to the origin of carbon, temperature, and ionic composition of the hyperalkaline springs, and the biochemical and organic compounds. Brucite is observed both at hyperalkaline springs located at the thrust plane and at the paleo-Moho. The varying mixing proportions between the surface runoff waters and the hyperalkaline ones control brucite precipitation. The layered double hydroxide minerals occur solely in the vicinity of hyperalkaline springs emerging within the bedded gabbros. Finally, the dominant mineralogical associations we found in Oman (Ca-bearing carbonates and brucite) in a serpentinizing environment driven by the meteoric waters are surprisingly the same as those observed at the Lost City hydrothermal site in a totally marine environment.

  17. The UHP metamorphic Seve Nappe Complex of the Swedish Caledonides - a new occurrence of the microdiamond-bearing gneisses and their exhumation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klonowska, Iwona; Janák, Marian; Majka, Jarosław; ‎ Froitzheim, Nikolaus; Gee, David G.

    2015-04-01

    The ultra-high pressure metamorphism (UHPM) in the Seve Nappe Complex of the Swedish Caledonides has been recently recognized within several lithologies including gneisses, eclogites and garnet pyroxenites (e.g. Janák et al. 2013, Klonowska et al. 2014a, Majka et al. 2014). Thermodynamic modelling and thermobarometric calculations indicate peak pressure conditions of >3GPa at c. 800-900°C (reaching the diamond stability field) for eclogites and garnet pyroxenites from northern Jämtland (e.g. Klonowska et al. 2014b). In addition to this, the first microdiamonds were found in paragneisses from the Snasahögarna Mt. in central Jämtland (Majka et al. 2014). Here we report a new discovery of microdiamond together with moissanite (SiC) from one of the world's most famous localities for thrusting, Mount Åreskutan, where long transport distances were recognized already in the 19th century (Törnebohm 1888). Garnet porphyroblasts in gneisses from the Åreskutan Mt. contain abundant mineral inclusions, mainly graphite, carbonates and quartz, together with fluid inclusions of CO2 concentrated in swarms. Among these inclusions three microdiamonds were found in two gneiss samples. In one of the samples moissanite was also discovered. Both minerals were identified by micro-Raman spectroscopy. In addition to these 'swarm' inclusions, biotite, kyanite, rutile, feldspars, zircon, monazite, ±phengite, ±muscovite, ±spinel, ±ilmenite, ±apatite occur in garnets. Phase equilibrium modelling for the phengite-bearing gneiss confirms its UHP history at temperatures of c. 800°C. Recent discoveries of UHP metamorphism within the Seve Nappe Complex derived from the Baltican outer margin (part of the Middle Allochthon) challenged us to present a new tectonic model incorporating exhumation of the deeply subducted continental rocks together with mantle lithosphere peridotites. Majka et al. (2014) introduced a new "under-pressure"-driven exhumation mechanism of rocks buried in

  18. Sedimentary processes and architecture of Upper Cretaceous deep-sea channel deposits: a case from the Skole Nappe, Polish Outer Carpathians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łapcik, Piotr

    2018-02-01

    Deep-sea channels are one of the architectonic elements, forming the main conduits for sand and gravel material in the turbidite depositional systems. Deep-sea channel facies are mostly represented by stacking of thick-bedded massive sandstones with abundant coarse-grained material, ripped-up clasts, amalgamation and large scale erosional structures. The Manasterz Quarry of the Ropianka Formation (Upper Cretaceous, Skole Nappe, Carpathians) contains a succession of at least 31 m of thick-bedded high-density turbidites alternated with clast-rich sandy debrites, which are interpreted as axial deposits of a deep-sea channel. The section studied includes 5 or 6 storeys with debrite basal lag deposits covered by amalgamated turbidite fills. The thickness of particular storeys varies from 2.5 to 13 m. Vertical stacking of similar facies through the whole thickness of the section suggest a hierarchically higher channel-fill or a channel complex set, with an aggradation rate higher than its lateral migration. Such channel axis facies cannot aggrade without simultaneous aggradation of levee confinement, which was distinguished in an associated section located to the NW from the Manasterz Quarry. Lateral offset of channel axis facies into channel margin or channel levee facies is estimated at less than 800 m. The Manasterz Quarry section represents mostly the filling and amalgamation stage of channel formation. The described channel architectural elements of the Ropianka Formation are located within the so-called Łańcut Channel Zone, which was previously thought to be Oligocene but may have been present already in the Late Cretaceous.

  19. Retrieval system for emplaced spent unreprocessed fuel (SURF) in salt bed depository. Baseline concept criteria specifications and mechanical failure probabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hudson, E.E.; McCleery, J.E.

    1979-05-01

    One of the integral elements of the Nuclear Waste Management Program is the material handling task of retrieving Canisters containing spent unreprocessed fuel from their emplacement in a deep geologic salt bed Depository. A study of the retrieval concept data base predicated this report. In this report, alternative concepts for the tasks are illustrated and critiqued, a baseline concept in scenario form is derived and basic retrieval subsystem specifications are presented with cyclic failure probabilities predicted. The report is based on the following assumptions: (a) during retrieval, a temporary radiation seal is placed over each Canister emplacement; (b) a sleeve, surrounding the Canister, was initially installed during the original emplacement; (c) the emplacement room's physical and environmental conditions established in this report are maintained while the task is performed

  20. Thermal modeling of pluton emplacement and associated contact metamorphism:Parashi stock emplacement in the Serranía de Jarara (Alta Guajira, Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuluaga C. Carlos A.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available

    In the northernmost portion of the Serrania de Jarara (Alta Guajira, Colombia, low - medium grade metamorphic rocks from the Etpana Metamorphic Suite were thermally affected by emplacement of a small calc-alkaline intrusion (Parashi Stock. Detailed petrographic analysis in collected rock samples across the NE and NW plutonic contacts show occurrences of textural and mineralogical changes in the country rock fabric that evidence contact metamorphism overprinting regional metamorphism of the Etpana Suite. These changes include growth of andalusite (chiastolite, calcic clinopyroxeneand amphibole porphyroblast crosscutting Sn+1 metamorphicfoliation. Hornblende-plagioclase barometry (ca. 3.1 kbar and cooling models for the stock show maximum time temperature evolution in the country rock at the interpreted depth of intrusion (ca. 11 km and help to evaluate the behavior of the country rock with the changing local geotherm.

  1. Enriched and depleted characters of the Amnay Ophiolite upper crustal section and the regionally heterogeneous nature of the South China Sea mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Americus d. C.; Faustino-Eslava, Decibel V.; Yumul, Graciano P.; Dimalanta, Carla B.; Tamayo, Rodolfo A.; Yang, Tsanyao Frank; Zhou, Mei-Fu

    2013-03-01

    The volcanic section of the Middle Oligocene Amnay Ophiolite in Mindoro, Philippines has previously been shown to be of normalmid-oceanic ridge basalt (NMORB) composition. Here we report for the first time an enriched mantle component that is additionally recorded in this crustal section. New whole rock major and trace element data are presented for nine mafic volcanic rocks from a section of the ophiolite that has not been previously examined. These moderately evolved tholeiitic basalts were found to have resulted from the bulk mixing of ˜10% ocean island basalt components with depleted mantle. Drawing together various geochemical characteristics reported for different rock suites taken as representatives of the South China Sea crust, including the enriched MORB (EMORB) and NMORB of the East Taiwan Ophiolite, the NMORB from previous studies of the Amnay Ophiolite and the younger ocean floor eruptives of the Scarborough Seamount-Reed Bank region, a veined mantle model is proposed for the South China Sea mantle. The NMORB magmatic products are suggested to have been derived from the more depleted portions of the mantle whereas the ocean island basalt (OIB) and EMORB-type materials from the mixing of depleted and veined/enriched mantle regions.

  2. Methane Dynamics in a Tropical Serpentinizing Environment: The Santa Elena Ophiolite, Costa Rica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melitza Crespo-Medina

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Uplifted ultramafic rocks represent an important vector for the transfer of carbon and reducing power from the deep subsurface into the biosphere and potentially support microbial life through serpentinization. This process has a strong influence upon the production of hydrogen and methane, which can be subsequently consumed by microbial communities. The Santa Elena Ophiolite (SEO on the northwestern Pacific coast of Costa Rica comprises ~250 km2 of ultramafic rocks and mafic associations. The climatic conditions, consisting of strongly contrasting wet and dry seasons, make the SEO a unique hydrogeological setting, where water-rock reactions are enhanced by large storm events (up to 200 mm in a single storm. Previous work on hyperalkaline spring fluids collected within the SEO has identified the presence of microorganisms potentially involved in hydrogen, methane, and methanol oxidation (such as Hydrogenophaga, Methylobacterium, and Methylibium spp., respectively, as well as the presence of methanogenic Archaea (such as Methanobacterium. Similar organisms have also been documented at other serpentinizing sites, however their functions have not been confirmed. SEO's hyperalkaline springs have elevated methane concentrations, ranging from 145 to 900 μM, in comparison to the background concentrations (<0.3 μM. The presence and potential activity of microorganisms involved in methane cycling in serpentinization-influenced fluids from different sites within the SEO were investigated using molecular, geochemical, and modeling approaches. These results were combined to elucidate the bioenergetically favorable methane production and/or oxidation reactions in this tropical serpentinizing environment. The hyperalkaline springs at SEO contain a greater proportion of Archaea and methanogens than has been detected in any terrestrial serpentinizing system. Archaea involved in methanogenesis and anaerobic methane oxidation accounted from 40 to 90% of total

  3. Paleomagnetism of the Oman Ophiolite: New Results from Oman Drilling Project Cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horst, A. J.; Till, J. L.; Koornneef, L.; Usui, Y.; Kim, H.; Morris, A.

    2017-12-01

    The Oman Drilling Project drilled holes at four sites in a transect through the southern massifs of the Samail ophiolite, and recovered 1500 m of igneous and metamorphic rocks. We focus on three sites from the oceanic crustal section including lower layered gabbros (GT1A), the mid-crustal layered to foliated gabbro transition (GT2A), and the shallower transition from sheeted dikes to varitextured gabbros (GT3A). Detailed core descriptions, analyses, and paleomagnetic measurements, were made on D/V Chikyu from July to September 2017 to utilize the core laboratory facilities similar to IODP expeditions. Shipboard measurements included anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) and alternating field and thermal demagnetization of 597 discrete samples. Sample demagnetization behavior is varied from each of the cores, with some revealing multiple components of magnetization, and others yielding nearly univectorial data. The interpretation of results from the lower crustal cores is complicated by the pervasive presence of secondary magnetite. In almost all samples, a stable component was resolved (interpreted as a characteristic remanent magnetization) after removal of a lower-coercivity or lower unblocking-temperature component. The inclinations of the stable components in the core reference frame are very consistent in Hole GT1A. However, a transition from negative to positive inclinations in GT2A suggests some structural complexity, possibly as a result of intense late faulting activity. Both abrupt and gradual transitions between multiple zones of negative and positive inclinations occur in Hole GT3A. Interpretation and direct comparison of remanence between drill sites is difficult as recovered core pieces currently remain azimuthally unoriented, and GT2A was drilled at a plunge of 60°, whereas GT1A and GT3A were both drilled vertically. Work is ongoing to use borehole imagery to reorient the core pieces and paleomagnetic data into a geographic in situ reference

  4. Active Microbial Sulfate Reduction in Serpentinization Fluids of the Semail Ophiolite in Oman

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glombitza, C.; Rempfert, K. R.; Templeton, A. S.; Hoehler, T. M.

    2017-12-01

    Dissimilatory sulfate reduction (SR) is among the oldest known microbial processes on Earth. It is the predominant anaerobic microbial process in sulfur-rich marine sediments but it also occurs in subsurface lithoautotrophic ecosystems, where it is driven by radiolytically produced H2 and sulfate [1]. Serpentinization is a process by which H2 is generated in a reaction of water with peridotite rock. This abiotic generation of H2 suggests its potential to power life in rocks as a stand-alone process, independent of the photosynthetic biosphere, because the generated H2 is a key energy source for microbial metabolism. This is of particular interest in understanding the role of water-rock reactions in generating habitable conditions on and beyond Earth. Sulfate is plausibly available in several of the water-bearing environments now known beyond Earth, making SR a potentially important metabolism in those systems. Sulfate minerals are abundant on the surface of Mars [2], suggesting that Martian groundwaters may be sulfate-rich. Sulfate is also postulated to be a component of the oceans of Europa and Enceladus [3, 4]. The inferred presence of both sulfate and peridotite rocks in these environments points toward a potential niche for sulfate reducers and highlights the need to understand how and where SR occurs in serpentinizing systems on Earth. We incubated formation fluids sampled from in the Semail Ophiolite in Oman with a 35-S labelled sulfate tracer and determined the rates of in-situ microbial sulfate reduction. The selected fluids represent different environmental conditions, in particular varying substrate concentrations (sulfate, H2 and CH4) and pH (pH 8.4 to pH 11.2). We found active microbial SR at very low rates in almost all fluids, ranging from 2 fmol mL-1 d-1 to 2 pmol mL-1 d-2. Lowest rates were associated with the hyperalkaline fluids (pH > 10), that had also the lowest sulfate concentration (50-90 µmol L-1). In line with previously determined species

  5. Overview of Hole GT2A: Drilling middle gabbro in Wadi Tayin massif, Oman ophiolite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takazawa, E.; Kelemen, P. B.; Teagle, D. A. H.; Coggon, J. A.; Harris, M.; Matter, J. M.; Michibayashi, K.

    2017-12-01

    Hole GT2A (UTM: 40Q 655960.7E / 2529193.5N) was drilled by the Oman Drilling Project (OmDP) into Wadi Gideah of Wadi Tayin massif in the Samail ophiolite, Oman. OmDP is an international collaboration supported by the International Continental Scientific Drilling Program, the Deep Carbon Observatory, NSF, IODP, JAMSTEC, and the European, Japanese, German and Swiss Science Foundations, with in-kind support in Oman from the Ministry of Regional Municipalities and Water Resources, Public Authority of Mining, Sultan Qaboos University, and the German University of Technology. Hole GT2A was diamond cored in 25 Dec 2016 to 18 Jan 2017 to a total depth of 406.77 m. The outer surfaces of the cores were imaged and described on site before being curated, boxed and shipped to the IODP drill ship Chikyu, where they underwent comprehensive visual and instrumental analysis. 33 shipboard scientists were divided into six teams (Igneous, Alteration, Structural, Geochem, Physical Properties, Paleomag) to describe and analyze the cores. Hole GT2A drilled through the transition between foliated and layered gabbro. The transition zone occurs between 50 and 150 m curation corrected depth (CCD). The top 50 m of Hole GT2A is foliated gabbro whereas the bottom 250 m consists of layered gabbro. Brittle fracture is observed throughout the core. Intensity of alteration vein decreases from the top to the bottom of the hole. On the basis of changes in grain size and/or modal abundance and/or appearance/disappearance of igneous primary mineral(s) five lithological units are defined in Hole GT2A (Unit I to V). The uppermost part of Hole GT2A (Unit I) is dominated by fine-grained granular olivine gabbro intercalated with less dominant medium-grained granular olivine gabbro and rare coarse-grained varitextured gabbro. The lower part of the Hole (Units II, III and V) is dominated by medium-grained olivine gabbro, olivine melagabbro and olivine-bearing gabbro. Modally-graded rhythmic layering with

  6. Geochemical characteristics of mafic and ultramafic rocks from the Naga Hills Ophiolite, India: Implications for petrogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajoy Dey

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The Naga Hills Ophiolite (NHO represents one of the fragments of Tethyan oceanic crust in the Himalayan Orogenic system which is exposed in the Phek and Kiphire districts of Nagaland, India. The NHO is composed of partially serpentinized dunite, peridotite, gabbro, basalt, minor plagiogranite, diorite dyke and marine sediments. The basalts are mainly composed of fine grained plagioclase feldspar, clinopyroxene and orthopyroxene and show quenching and variolitic textures. The gabbros are characterized by medium to coarse grained plagioclase, orthopyroxene and clinopyroxene with ophitic to sub-ophitic textures. The ultramafic cumulates are represented by olivine, Cpx and Opx. Geochemically, the basalts and gabbros are sub-alkaline to alkaline and show tholeiitic features. The basalts are characterized by 44.1–45.6 wt.% of SiO2 with 28–38 of Mg#, and the gabbros by 38.7–43.7 wt.% of SiO2, and 26–79 of Mg#. The ultramafic rocks are characterized by 37.4–52.2 wt.% of SiO2, and 80–88 of Mg#. In multi-element diagrams (spidergrams both basalts and gabbros show fractionated trends with strong negative anomalies of Zr, Nb, Sr and a gentle negative anomaly of P. However, the rare earth element (REE plots of the basalts and gabbros show two distinct patterns. The first pattern, represented by light REE (LREE depletion, suggests N-MORB features and can be interpreted as a signature of Paleo-Tethyan oceanic crust. The second pattern, represented by LREE enrichment with negligible negative Eu anomaly, conforms to E-MORB, and may be related to an arc tectonic setting. In V vs. Ti/1000, Cr vs. Y and AFM diagrams, the basalts and gabbros plot within Island Arc Tholeiite (IAT and MORB fields suggesting both ridge and arc related settings. The ultramafic rocks exhibit two distinct patterns both in spidergrams and in REE plots. In the spidergram, one group displays highly enriched pattern, whereas the other group shows near flat pattern compared

  7. Heavy Metal Resistant, Alkalitolerant Bacteria Isolated From Serpentinizing Springs in the Zambales Ophiolite, Philippines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallalar, B.; Meyer-Dombard, D. R.; Cardace, D.; Arcilla, C. A.

    2016-12-01

    Serpentinization involves hydrologic alteration of ultramafic mantle rocks containing olivine and pyroxene to produce serpentine minerals. The fluids resulting from this reaction are reduced, extremely depleted in dissolved inorganic carbon, and are highly alkaline with pH values typically exceeding 10. Major byproducts of the serpentinizing reaction include iron oxides, hydrogen, methane, and small amounts of organic molecules that provide chemosynthetic energy for subsurface microbial communities. In addition, weathering of serpentine rocks often produces fluids and sediments that have elevated concentrations of various toxic heavy metals such as chromium, nickel, cobalt, copper, and zinc. Thus, microorganisms inhabiting these unique ecological niches must be adapted to a variety of physicochemical extremes. The purpose of this study is to isolate bacteria that are capable of withstanding extremely high concentrations of multiple heavy metals from serpentine fluid-associated sediments. Fluid and sediment samples for microbial culturing were collected from Manleluag Spring National Park located on the island of Luzon, Philippines. The area is part of the Zambales ophiolite range, and hosts several serpentinizing fluid seeps. Fluid emanating from the source pool of the spring, designated Manleluag 2 (ML2), has a pH of 10.83 and temperature of 34.4 °C. Luria-Bertani agar medium was supplemented with varying concentrations of five trace elements - Cu, Cr, Co, Ni, and Zn. Environmental samples were spread on each of these media and colony forming units were subsequently chosen for isolation. In all, over 20 isolates were obtained from media with concentrations ranging from 25 mg/L - 400 mg/L of each metal. Taxonomic identity of each isolate was determined using 16S rRNA gene sequences. The isolates were then tested for tolerance to alkaline conditions by altering LB medium to pH values of 8, 9, 10, 11, and 12. The majority of strains exhibit growth at the highest p

  8. Origin of ophiolite complexes related to intra-oceanic subduction initiation: implications of IODP Expedition 352 (Izu-Bonin fore arc)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Alastair; Avery, Aaron; Carvallo, Claire; Christeson, Gail; Ferré, Eric; Kurz, Walter; Kutterolf, Steffen; Morgan, Sally; Pearce, Julian; Reagan, Mark; Sager, William; Shervais, John; Whattam, Scott; International Ocean Discovery Program Expedition 352 (Izu-Bonin-Mariana Fore Arc), the Scientific Party of

    2015-04-01

    Ophiolites, representing oceanic crust exposed on land (by whatever means), are central to the interpretation of many orogenic belts (e.g. E Mediterranean). Based mostly on geochemical evidence, ophiolites are widely interpreted, in many but by no means all cases, as having formed within intra-oceanic settings above subduction zones (e.g. Troodos ophiolite, Cyprus). Following land geological, dredging and submersible studies, fore arcs of the SW Pacific region became recognised as likely settings of supra-subduction zone ophiolite genesis. This hypothesis was tested by recent drilling of the Izu-Bonin fore arc. Four sites were drilled, two on the outer fore arc and two on the upper trench slope. Site survey seismic data, combined with borehole data, indicate that three of the sites are located in fault-controlled sediment ponds that formed in response to dominantly down-to the-west extensional faulting (with hints of preceding top-to-the-east compressional thrusting). The sediments overlying the igneous basement, of maximum Late Eocene to Recent age, document ash and aeolian input, together with mass wasting of the fault-bounded sediment ponds. At the two more trenchward sites (U1440 and U1441), mostly tholeiitic basalts were drilled, including massive and pillowed lavas and hyaloclastite. Geochemically, these extrusives are of near mid-oceanic ridge basalt composition (fore arc basalts). Subtle chemical deviation from normal MORB can be explained by weakly fluid-influenced melting during decompression melting in the earliest stages of supra-subduction zone spreading (not as 'trapped' older MORB). The remaining two sites, c. 6 km to the west (U1439 and U1442), penetrated dominantly high-magnesian andesites, known as boninites, largely as fragmental material. Their formation implies the extraction of highly depleted magmas from previously depleted, refractory upper mantle in a supra-subduction zone setting. Following supra-subduction zone spreading, the active

  9. A middle Permian ophiolite fragment in Late Triassic greenschist- to blueschist-facies rocks in NW Turkey: An earlier pulse of suprasubduction-zone ophiolite formation in the Tethyan belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topuz, Gültekin; Okay, Aral I.; Schwarz, Winfried H.; Sunal, Gürsel; Altherr, Rainer; Kylander-Clark, Andrew R. C.

    2018-02-01

    The Eastern Mediterranean region within the Tethyan belt is characterised by two main pulses of suprasubduction-zone ophiolite formation during the Early-Middle Jurassic and Late Cretaceous. Despite vast exposures of the Permo-Triassic accretionary complexes, related suprasubduction-zone ophiolites and the timing of subduction initiation leading to the formation of Permo-Triassic accretionary complexes are unknown so far. Here we report on a 40 km long and 0.3 to 1.8 km wide metaophiolite fragment within transitional greenschist- to blueschist-facies oceanic rocks from NW Turkey. The metaophiolite fragment is made up mainly of serpentinite and minor dykes or stocks of strongly sheared metagabbro with mineral assemblages involving actinolite/winchite, chlorite, epidote, albite, titanite and phengite. The metagabbro displays (i) variable CaO and MgO contents, (ii) anomalously high Mg# (= 100 ∗ molar MgO/(MgO + FeOtot)) of 75-88, and (iii) positive Eu anomalies, together with low contents of incompatible elements such as Ti, P and Zr, suggesting derivation from former plagioclase cumulates. The serpentinites comprise serpentine, ± chlorite, ± talc, ± calcite and relict Cr-Al spinel surrounded by ferrichromite to magnetite. Relict Cr-Al spinels are characterised by (i) Cr/(Cr + Al) ratios of 0.45-0.56 and Mg/(Mg + Fe2 +) ratio of 0.76-0.22, (ii) variable contents of ZnO and MnO, and (iii) extremely low TiO2 contents. Zn and Mn contents are probably introduced into Cr-Al spinels during greenschist- to blueschist metamorphism. Compositional features of the serpentinite such as (i) Ca- and Al-depleted bulk compositions, (ii) concave U-shaped, chondrite-normalised rare earth element patterns (REE) with enrichment of light and heavy REEs, imply that serpentinites were probably derived from depleted peridotites which were refertilised by light rare earth element enriched melts in a suprasubduction-zone mantle wedge. U-Pb dating on igneous zircons from three metagabbro

  10. The full-scale Emplacement (FE) Experiment at the Mont Terri URL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, H.R.; Weber, H.P.; Koehler, S.; Vogt, T.; Vietor, T.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The Full-Scale Emplacement (FE) Experiment at the Mont Terri underground research laboratory (URL) is a full-scale heater test in a clay-rich formation. It simulates the construction, waste emplacement and backfilling of a spent fuel (SF) / vitrified high-level waste (HLW) repository tunnel as realistically as possible. The entire experiment implementation as well as the post-closure THM(C) evolution will be monitored using several hundred sensors. These are distributed in the host rock in the near- and far-field, the tunnel lining, the engineered barrier system and on the heaters. The aim of this experiment is to investigate HLW repository-induced thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM) coupled effects on the host rock and the validation of existing coupled THM models. A further aim is the verification of the technical feasibility of constructing a 50 m repository section at full scale with all relevant components using standard industrial equipment. Finally, the experiment will demonstrate the canister and buffer emplacement procedures for underground conditions based on the Swiss disposal concept. Experimental layout The FE experiment is based on the Swiss disposal concept for SF / HLW. The 50 m long test gallery, at the end of the former MB test tunnel in the Mont Terri URL, will be realised with a diameter of approx. 3 m. In the experiment gallery, 3 heaters with dimensions similar to those of waste canisters will be emplaced on top of abutments built of bentonite blocks. The remaining space will be backfilled with compacted bentonite pellets. The experiment will be sealed off towards the start niche with a concrete plug holding the buffer in place and reducing air and water fluxes. The first scoping calculations and design modelling for the 'far-field' instrumentation have been completed; these works have been carried out using CodeBRIGHT and the multiphase flow simulator TOUGH2. With an initial heat output of 1500 W

  11. Serpentinization and fluid-rock interaction in Jurassic mafic and ultramafic sea-floor: constraints from Ligurian ophiolite sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Monica; Früh-Green, Gretchen L.; Boschi, Chiara; Schwarzenbach, Esther M.

    2014-05-01

    The Bracco-Levanto ophiolitic complex (Eastern Liguria) represents one of the largest and better-exposed ophiolitic successions in the Northern Apennines. It is considered to be a fragment of heterogeneous Jurassic lithosphere that records tectono-magmatic and alteration histories similar to those documented along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, such as at the 15°20'N area and the Atlantis Massif at 30°N. Structural and petrological studies on these rocks provide constraints on metamorphic/deformation processes during formation and hydrothermal alteration of the Jurassic oceanic lithosphere. We present a petrological and geochemical study of deformation processes and fluid-rock interaction in the Bracco-Levanto ophiolitic complex and compare these to modern oceanic hydrothermal systems, such as the Lost City Hydrothermal Field hosted in ultramafic rocks on the Atlantis Massif. A focus is on investigating mass transfer and fluid flow paths during high and low temperature hydrothermal activity, and on processes leading to hydrothermal carbonate precipitation and the formation of ophicalcites, which are characteristic of the Bracco-Levanto sequences. Major element and mineral compositional data allow us to distinguish a multiphase history of alteration characterized by: (1) widespread SiO2 metasomatism during progressive serpentinization, and (2) multiple phases of veining and carbonate precipitation associated with circulation of seawater and high fluid-rock ratios in the shallow ultramafic-dominated portions of the Jurassic seafloor. We observe regional variations in MgO, SiO2 and Al2O3, suggesting Si-flux towards stratigraphically higher units. In general, the ophicalcites have higher Si, Al and Fe concentrations and lower Mg than the serpentinite basement rocks or serpentinites with minimal carbonate veins. Bulk rock trace element data and Sr isotope ratios indicate seawater reacting with rocks of more mafic composition, then channeled towards stratigraphically higher

  12. Natural analogue studies of bentonite reaction under hyperalkaline conditions. Overview of ongoing work at the Zambales ophiolite, Philippines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, N.; Yanakawa, M.; Arcilla, C.A.; Pascua, C.; Namiki, K.; Sato, T.; Shikazono, N.; Alexander, W.R.

    2011-01-01

    Bentonite is one of the safety-critical components of the engineered barrier system for the disposal concepts developed for many types of radioactive waste. However, bentonite - especially the swelling clay component that contributes to its essential barrier functions - is unstable at high pH. To date, results from laboratory tests on bentonite degradation have been ambiguous as the reaction rates are so slow as to be difficult to observe. As such, a key goal in this project is to examine the reaction of natural bentonites in contact with natural hyperalkaline groundwaters to determine if any long-term alteration of the bentonite occurs. Ophiolites have been identified as sources of hyperalkaline groundwaters that can be considered natural analogues of the leachates produced by some cementitious materials in repositories for radioactive waste. At the Zambales ophiolite in the Philippines, widespread active serpentinisation results in hyperalkaline groundwaters with measured pH values of up to 11.7, falling into the range typical of low-alkali cement porewaters. These cements are presently being developed worldwide to minimise the geochemical perturbations which are expected to result from the use of OPC-based concretes (see Kamei et al., this conference, for details). In particular, it is hoped that the lower pH of the low-alkali cement leachates will reduce, or even avoid entirely, the potential degradation of the bentonite buffer which is expected at the higher pH levels (12.5 and above) common to OPC-based concretes. During recent field campaigns at two sites in the Zambales ophiolite (Mangatarem and Bigbiga), samples of bentonite and the associated hyperalkaline groundwaters have been collected by drilling and trenching. At Mangatarem, qualitative data from a 'fossil' (i.e. no groundwater is currently present) reaction zone indicates some alteration of the bentonite to zeolite, serpentine and CSH phases. Preliminary reaction path modelling suggests that the

  13. Thermal simulation of drift emplacement. Geotechnical and geophysical investigations in and around backfilled galleries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneefub, J.U.; Gommlich, G.E.

    1988-01-01

    The concept for the direct disposal of spent fuel in rock salt foresees the emplacement of large waste canisters on the floor of a disposal gallery. Subsequent to emplacement the drift is backfilled with salt grit. In a demonstration test six cylindrical containments are to be emplaced within distances of 3 m from each other in two parallel galleries of 14 m 2 , separated by a pillar of 10 m thickness. They will be heated up by a power output of approx. 1 kW/m to 200 degree C surface temperature by electrical heaters. The thermal and mechanical response of the salt rock and the backfilling to the artificial heating is to be investigated as follows: (1) measurement of the temperature field at the contained surface, in the backfill and in the rock salt; (2) deformation measurements of the salt rock around the heated drifts; (3) measurements of tunnel convergence in heated and unheated sections; (4) compaction measurements of the backfilling in heated and unheated areas; (5) measurement of rock stresses in areas very close to the galleries; and (6) pressure measurements in the backfilling, between backfilling and rock, and between backfilling and containers. The rock burst monitoring system of the Asse salt mine will be expanded to this special field of the mine to detect seismic events due to thermomechanical effects. Another seismoacoustic system will be installed to observe the compaction of the backfilling. This system must be calibrated for the relation between the density and velocities of seismic waves. It is planned to monitor the density by gamma-gamma log measurements. The changes in overall density during the entire experiment will be observed by gravimeter measurements of high precision

  14. Implementation of the full-scale emplacement (FE) experiment at the Mont Terri rock laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Müller, H.R.; Garitte, B.; Vogt, T.; and others

    2017-04-15

    Opalinus Clay is currently being assessed as the host rock for a deep geological repository for high-level and low- and intermediate-level radioactive wastes in Switzerland. Within this framework, the 'Full-Scale Emplacement' (FE) experiment was initiated at the Mont Terri rock laboratory close to the small town of St-Ursanne in Switzerland. The FE experiment simulates, as realistically as possible, the construction, waste emplacement, backfilling and early post-closure evolution of a spent fuel/vitrified high-level waste disposal tunnel according to the Swiss repository concept. The main aim of this multiple heater test is the investigation of repository-induced thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM) coupled effects on the host rock at this scale and the validation of existing coupled THM models. For this, several hundred sensors were installed in the rock, the tunnel lining, the bentonite buffer, the heaters and the plug. This paper is structured according to the implementation timeline of the FE experiment. It documents relevant details about the instrumentation, the tunnel construction, the production of the bentonite blocks and the highly compacted 'granulated bentonite mixture' (GBM), the development and construction of the prototype 'backfilling machine' (BFM) and its testing for horizontal GBM emplacement. Finally, the plug construction and the start of all 3 heaters (with a thermal output of 1350 Watt each) in February 2015 are briefly described. In this paper, measurement results representative of the different experimental steps are also presented. Tunnel construction aspects are discussed on the basis of tunnel wall displacements, permeability testing and relative humidity measurements around the tunnel. GBM densities achieved with the BFM in the different off-site mock-up tests and, finally, in the FE tunnel are presented. Finally, in situ thermal conductivity and temperature measurements recorded during the first heating months

  15. Emplacement of rock avalanche material across saturated sediments, Southern Alp, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufresne, A.; Davies, T. R.; McSaveney, M. J.

    2012-04-01

    The spreading of material from slope failure events is not only influenced by the volume and nature of the source material and the local topography, but also by the materials encountered in the runout path. In this study, evidence of complex interactions between rock avalanche and sedimentary runout path material were investigated at the 45 x 106 m3 long-runout (L: 4.8 km) Round Top rock avalanche deposit, New Zealand. It was sourced within myolinitic schists of the active strike-slip Alpine Fault. The narrow and in-failure-direction elongate source scarp is deep-seated, indicating slope failure was triggered by strong seismic activity. The most striking morphological deposit features are longitudinal ridges aligned radially to source. Trenching and geophysical surveys show bulldozed and sheared substrate material at ridge termini and laterally displaced sedimentary strata. The substrate failed at a minimum depth of 3 m indicating a ploughing motion of the ridges into the saturated material below. Internal avalanche compression features suggest deceleration behind the bulldozed substrate obstacle. Contorted fabric in material ahead of the ridge document substrate disruption by the overriding avalanche material deposited as the next down-motion hummock. Comparison with rock avalanches of similar volume but different emplacement environments places Round Top between longer runout avalanches emplaced over e.g. playa lake sediments and those with shorter travel distances, whose runout was apparently retarded by topographic obstacles or that entrained high-friction debris. These empirical observations indicate the importance of runout path materials on tentative trends in rock avalanche emplacement dynamics and runout behaviour.

  16. Engineering for a disposal facility using the in-room emplacement method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumgartner, P; Bilinsky, D M; Ates, Y; Read, R S; Crosthwaite, J L; Dixon, D A

    1996-06-01

    This report describes three nuclear fuel waste disposal vaults using the in-room emplacement method. First, a generic disposal vault design is provided which is suitable for a depth range of 500 m to 1000 m in highly stressed, sparsely fractured rock. The design process is described for all components of the system. The generic design is then applied to two different disposal vaults, one at a depth of 750 m in a low hydraulically conductive, sparsely fractured rock mass and another at a depth of 500 m in a higher conductivity, moderately fractured rock mass. In the in-room emplacement method, the disposal containers with used-fuel bundles are emplaced within the confines of the excavated rooms of a disposal vault. The discussion of the disposal-facility design process begins with a detailed description of a copper-shell, packed-particulate disposal container and the factors that influenced its design. The disposal-room generic design is presented including the detailed specifications, the scoping and numerical thermal and thermal mechanical analyses, the backfilling and sealing materials, and the operational processes. One room design is provided that meets all the requirements for a vault depth range of 500 to 1000 m. A disposal-vault layout and the factors that influenced its design are also presented, including materials handling, general logistics, and separation of radiological and nonradiological operations. Modifications to the used-fuel packaging plant for the filling and sealing of the copper-shell, packed-particulate disposal containers and a brief description of the common surface facilities needed by the disposal vault and the packaging plant are provided. The implementation of the disposal facility is outlined, describing the project stages and activities and itemizing a specific plan for each of the project stages: siting, construction, operation; decommissioning; and closure. (author). 72 refs., 15 tabs., 63 figs.

  17. Engineering for a disposal facility using the in-room emplacement method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumgartner, P.; Bilinsky, D.M.; Ates, Y.; Read, R.S.; Crosthwaite, J.L.; Dixon, D.A.

    1996-06-01

    This report describes three nuclear fuel waste disposal vaults using the in-room emplacement method. First, a generic disposal vault design is provided which is suitable for a depth range of 500 m to 1000 m in highly stressed, sparsely fractured rock. The design process is described for all components of the system. The generic design is then applied to two different disposal vaults, one at a depth of 750 m in a low hydraulically conductive, sparsely fractured rock mass and another at a depth of 500 m in a higher conductivity, moderately fractured rock mass. In the in-room emplacement method, the disposal containers with used-fuel bundles are emplaced within the confines of the excavated rooms of a disposal vault. The discussion of the disposal-facility design process begins with a detailed description of a copper-shell, packed-particulate disposal container and the factors that influenced its design. The disposal-room generic design is presented including the detailed specifications, the scoping and numerical thermal and thermal mechanical analyses, the backfilling and sealing materials, and the operational processes. One room design is provided that meets all the requirements for a vault depth range of 500 to 1000 m. A disposal-vault layout and the factors that influenced its design are also presented, including materials handling, general logistics, and separation of radiological and nonradiological operations. Modifications to the used-fuel packaging plant for the filling and sealing of the copper-shell, packed-particulate disposal containers and a brief description of the common surface facilities needed by the disposal vault and the packaging plant are provided. The implementation of the disposal facility is outlined, describing the project stages and activities and itemizing a specific plan for each of the project stages: siting, construction, operation; decommissioning; and closure. (author)

  18. Characteristics and Significance of Magma Emplacement Horizons, Black Sturgeon Sill, Nipigon, Ontario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zieg, M. J.; Hone, S. V.

    2017-12-01

    Spatial scales strongly control the timescales of processes in igneous intrusions, particularly through the thermal evolution of the magma, which in turn governs the evolution of crystallinity, viscosity, and other important physical and chemical properties of the system. In this study, we have collected a highly detailed data set comprising geochemical (bulk rock composition), textural (size and alignment of plagioclase crystals), and mineralogical (modal abundance) profiles through the central portion of the 250 m thick Black Sturgeon diabase sill. In this data, we have identified characteristic signals in texture (soft and somewhat diffuse chills), composition (reversals in differentiation trends), and mineralogy (olivine accumulations), all coinciding and recurring at roughly 10 meter intervals. Based on these signatures, we are able to map out multiple zones representing discrete pulses of magma that were emplaced sequentially as the intrusion was inflated. Simple thermal calculations suggest that each 10 meters of new crystallization would require repose times on the order of 10-100 years. To build up 250 meters of magma at this rate would only require approximately 250-2500 years, significantly less than the thermal lifetime of the entire sill. The soft chills we observe in the Black Sturgeon sill are therefore consistent with a system that remained warm throughout the emplacement process. Successive pulses were injected into partially crystalline mush, rather than pure liquid (which would result in hybridization) or solid (which would produce sharp hard chills). Episodic emplacement is by now widely recognized as a fundamental process in the formation of large felsic magma chambers; our results suggest that this also may be an important consideration in understanding the evolution of smaller mafic intrusions.

  19. Lower Crstal Reflectity bands and Magma Emplacement in Norweigian sea, NE Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, A.; Breivik, A. J.; Mjelde, R.

    2013-12-01

    In this study we present the OBS data collected along seismic profiles in the norweigian sea. The traveltime modelling of the OBS data provides first-hand information about seismic structure of the subsurface. However, waveform modelling is used to further constrain the fine scale structure, velocity constrast and velocity gradients. By forward modelling and inversion of the seismic waveforms, we show that the multiple bands of reflectivity could be due to multiple episodes of magma emplacements that might have frozen in the form of sills. These mafic intrusions probably intruded into the ductile lower crust during the main rifting phase of Europe and Greenland.

  20. A review of the ascent and emplacement of granitoid bodies into the crust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarína Bónová

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper relates to basic information (i.e. mechanical aspects of ascent, indicators faciliting the discriminability of various ascent styles about the models of ascent and emplacement of granitoid bodies, since the purely mechanical aspect of intrusion of magmas is a fascinating subject and it has generated a considerable controversy over many years. Individual models are demonstrated by world-known occurrences and examples from Western Carpathian’s region. The conditions of magma migration are demonstrated as well.

  1. A feasibility study of the disposal of radioactive waste in deep ocean sediments by drilled emplacement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bury, M.R.C.

    1983-08-01

    This report describes the second phase of a study of the feasibility of disposal and isolation of high level radioactive waste in holes drilled deep into the sediments of the ocean. In this phase, work has concentrated on establishing the state of the art of the various operations and developing the design, in particular the drilling operation, the loading of flasks containing waste canisters from supply vessels onto the platform, the handling of radioactive waste on board, and its emplacement into predrilled holes. In addition, an outline design of the offshore platform has been prepared. (author)

  2. The Summer 1997 Eruption at Pillan Patera on Io: Implications for Ultrabasic Lava Flow Emplacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, David A.; Davies, Ashley G.; Keszthelyi, Laszlo P.; Greeley, Ronald

    2001-01-01

    Galileo data and numerical modeling were used to investigate the summer 1977 eruption at Pillan Patera on Io. This event, now defined as "Pillanian" eruption style, included a high-temperature (greater than 1600 C), possible ultrabasic , 140-km-high plume eruption that deposited dark, orthopyroxene-rich pyroclastic material over greater than 125,000 sq km, followed by emplacement of dark flow-like material over greater than 3100 sq km to the north of the caldera. We estimate that the high-temperature, energetic episode of this eruption had a duration of 52 - 167 days between May and September 1997, with peak eruption temperatures around June 28, 1997. Galileo 20 m/pixel images of part of the Pillan flow field show a wide-spread, rough, pitted surface that is unlike any flow surface we have seen before. We suggest that this surface may have resulted from: 1. A fractured lava crust formed during rapid, low-viscosity lava surging, perhaps including turbulent flow emplacement. 2. Disruption of the lava flow by explosive interaction with a volatile-rich substrate. or 3. A combination of 1 and 2 with or without accumulation of pyroclastic material on the surface. Well-developed flow lobes are observed, suggesting that this is a relatively distant part of the flow field.Shadow measurements at flow margins indicate a thickness of-8 - 10 m. We have modeled the emplacement of putative ultrabasic flow from the summer 1997 Pillan eruption using constraints from new Galileo data. Results suggest that either laminar sheet flows or turbulent channelized flows could have traveled 50 - 150 km on a flat, unobstructed surface, which is consistent with the estimated length of the Pillan flow field (approx. 60 km). Our modeling suggests low thermal erosion rates (less than 4.1 m/d), and that the formation of deep (greater than 20 m) erosion channels was unlikely, especially distal to the source. We calculate a volumetric flow rate of approx. 2 - 7 x 10(exp 3)cu m/s, which is greater

  3. Architecture and emplacement of flood basalt flow fields: case studies from the Columbia River Basalt Group, NW USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vye-Brown, C.; Self, S.; Barry, T. L.

    2013-03-01

    The physical features and morphologies of collections of lava bodies emplaced during single eruptions (known as flow fields) can be used to understand flood basalt emplacement mechanisms. Characteristics and internal features of lava lobes and whole flow field morphologies result from the forward propagation, radial spread, and cooling of individual lobes and are used as a tool to understand the architecture of extensive flood basalt lavas. The features of three flood basalt flow fields from the Columbia River Basalt Group are presented, including the Palouse Falls flow field, a small (8,890 km2, ˜190 km3) unit by common flood basalt proportions, and visualized in three dimensions. The architecture of the Palouse Falls flow field is compared to the complex Ginkgo and more extensive Sand Hollow flow fields to investigate the degree to which simple emplacement models represent the style, as well as the spatial and temporal developments, of flow fields. Evidence from each flow field supports emplacement by inflation as the predominant mechanism producing thick lobes. Inflation enables existing lobes to transmit lava to form new lobes, thus extending the advance and spread of lava flow fields. Minimum emplacement timescales calculated for each flow field are 19.3 years for Palouse Falls, 8.3 years for Ginkgo, and 16.9 years for Sand Hollow. Simple flow fields can be traced from vent to distal areas and an emplacement sequence visualized, but those with multiple-layered lobes present a degree of complexity that make lava pathways and emplacement sequences more difficult to identify.

  4. Strongly foliated garnetiferous amphibolite clasts in ophiolitic melanges, Yarlung Zangbo Suture Zone, Tibet; Early Cretaceous disruption of a back-arc basin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilmette, C.; Hebert, R.; Wang, C.; Indares, A. D.; Ullrich, T. D.; Dostal, J.; Bedard, E.

    2007-12-01

    Metre to decameter-size clasts of amphibolite are found embedded in ophiolitic melanges underlying the Yarlung Zangbo Suture Zone Ophiolites, South Tibet, China. These ophiolites and melanges occur at the limit between Indian and Tibetan-derived rocks and represent remnants of an Early Cretaceous intraoceanic supra-subduction zone domain, the Neo-Tethys. In the Saga-Dazuka segment (500 km along-strike), we discovered new occurrences of strongly foliated amphibolites found as clasts in the ophiolitic melange. In garnet-free samples, hornblende is green-blue magnesio-hornblende and cpx is low-Al diopside. In garnet- bearing samples, garnet is almandine with a strong pyrope component (up to 30 mol%) whereas coexisting hornblende is brown Ti-rich tschermakite and clinopyroxene is Al-diopside. Plagioclase composition was ubiquitously shifted to albite during a late metasomatic event. Geochemistry of these rocks indicates that their igneous protoliths crystallized from a slightly differentiated tholeiitic basaltic liquid that did not undergo major fractionation. Trace element patterns reveal geochemical characteristics identical to those of the overlying ophiolitic crust. These are 1) trace element abundances similar to that of N-MORBs or BABBs, 2) a slight depletion of LREE and 3) a moderate to strong Ta-Nb negative anomaly and a slight Ti anomaly. Such characteristics suggest genesis over a spreading center close to a subduction zone, possibly a back-arc basin. Step-heating Ar/Ar plateau ages were obtained from hornblende separates. All ages fall in the range of 123-128 Ma, overlapping the crystallization ages from the overlying ophiolite (126-131 Ma). Pseudosections were built with the THERMOCALC software in the system NCFMASH. Results indicate that the observed assemblage Hb+Pl+Gt+Cpx is stable over a wide range of P-T conditions, between 10-18 kbars and at more than 800°C. Measured mineral modes and solid solution compositions were successfully modeled, indicating

  5. Hydrogen generation during serpentinisation in ophiolite complexes: A comparison of H2-rich gases from Oman, Philippines and Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaumont, Valérie; Vacquand, Christèle; Deville, Eric; Prinzhofer, Alain

    2013-04-01

    H2-rich gas seepages in ultrabasic to basic contexts both in marine and continental environment are by-products of serpentinisation. Hydrothermal systems at MOR expose ultrabasic rocks to thermodynamic conditions favouring oxidation of FeII bearing minerals and water reduction. In continental context such thermodynamic conditions do not exist although active serpentinisation occurs in all known ophiolitic complexes (Barnes et al., 1978; Bruni et al., 2002; Cipolli et al., 2004; Boschetti and Toscani, 2008; Marques et al., 2008). Hyperalkaline springs are reported in these contexts as evidence of this active serpentinisation (Barnes et al., 1967) and are often associated with seepages of reduced gases (Neal and Stanger, 1983; Sano et al., 1993). Dry gas seepages are also observed (Abrajano et al., 1988, 1990; Hosgörmez, 2007; Etiope et al., 2011) Such H2-rich gases from ophiolite complexes were sampled in the Sultanate of Oman, the Philippines and Turkey and were analysed for chemical composition, noble gases contents, stable isotopes of carbon, hydrogen and nitrogen. The conditions for present-day serpentinisation in ophiolites were recognised as low temperature processes in Oman with high rock/water ratios (Neal and Stanger, 1985), while the origin of gases is not as univocal for Philippines and Turkey gas seepages. Although, H2 generation is directly linked with FeII oxidation, different reactions can occur during peridotite hydration (McCollom and Bach, 2009; Marcaillou et al., 2011) and serpentine weathering. Produced H2 can react with carbonate species to produce methane via processes that could be biological or abiotic, while carbon availability depends on water recharge chemistry. In the present study, the geochemical properties of gases sampled from three different ophiolite complexes are compared and provide evidence that weathering reactions producing H2 depend on structural, geological, geomorphologic and hydrological local features. REFERENCES Abrajano

  6. Suprasubduction volcanic rocks of the Char ophiolite belt, East Kazakhstan: new geochemical and first geochronological data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safonova, Inna; Simonov, Vladimir; Seltmann, Reimar; Yamamoto, Shinji; Xiao, Wenjiao

    2016-04-01

    The Char ophiolite belt is located in the western Central Asian Orogenic Belt, a world largest accretionary orogen, which has evolved during more than 800 Ma. The Char belt formed during Kazakhstan - Siberia collision. It has been known for hosting fragments of Late Devonian-Early Carboniferous oceanic crust, MORB, OPB and OIB, of the Paleo-Asian Ocean (Safonova et al., 2012). The Char is surrounded by two Paleozoic island-arc terranes: Zharma-Saur in the west and Rudny Altai in the east, however, until recent times, no island-arc units have been found within it. We were the first to find island-arc units as tectonic sheets occurring adjacent to those consisting of oceanic rocks. In places, island-arc andesites cut oceanic basalts. The Char volcanic and subvolcanic rocks of a probable suprasubduction origin are basalt, microgabbro, dolerite, andesite, tonalite and dacite. The mafic to andesitic volcanics possessing low TiO2 (0.85 wt.%av.) and show MgO vs. major elements crystallization trends suggesting two magma series: tholeiitic and calc-alkaline. The tholeiitic varieties are less enriched in incompatible elements then the calc-alkaline ones. Two samples are high-Mg and low-Ti andesibasalts similar to boninites. The rocks possess moderately LREE enriched rare-earth element patterns and are characterized by negative Nb anomalies present on the multi-element spectra (Nb/Lapm = 0.14-0.47; Nb/Thpm = 0.7-1.6).The distribution of rare-earth elements (La/Smn = 0.8-2.3, Gd/Ybn = 0.7-1.9) and the results of geochemical modeling in the Nb-Yb system suggest high degrees of melting of a depleted harzburgite-bearing mantle source at spinel facies depths. Fractional crystallization of clinopyroxene, plagioclase and opaque minerals also affected the final composition of the volcanic rocks. Clinopyroxene monomineral thermometry indicates crystallization of melts at 1020-1180°C. Melt inclusion composition based numerical calculations show that primary melts were derived at 1350

  7. Unraveling P-T-t-D Evolution of Zermatt-Saas Ophiolites from Valtournanche: from Ocean Opening to Mountain Building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebay, G.; Tiepolo, M.; Zanoni, D.; Langone, A.; Spalla, M. I.

    2015-12-01

    The Zermatt-Saas (ZS) Zone, formerly part of Tethyan oceanic crust and variously affected by oceanic metamorphism, is now part of the orogenic suture that developed in the Western European Alps during the Alpine subduction and collision. The ZS rocks preserve a dominant HP to UHP metamorphic imprint overprinted by greenschist facies metamorphism. The age of the oceanic protoliths is considered to be middle to upper Jurassic whereas the HP metamorphism is mostly considered to be Eocene. In upper Valtournanche ZS ophiolites, the dominant regional S2 foliation is mapped with spatial continuity in serpentinite, metarodingite and eclogite and is defined by HP/UHP parageneses in all lithotypes. It developed at 2.5 ± 0.3 GPa and 600 ± 20°C during Alpine subduction. S2 foliation of serpentinites wraps rare clinopyroxene and zircon relics. Trace element composition of clinopyroxene suggests that they crystallised from a melt in equilibrium with plagioclase: they most likely represent relicts of gabbroic assemblages. The clinopyroxene porphyroclasts have rims indented within S2 and compositions similar to fine-grained clinopyroxeneII defining S2, suggesting that they recrystallised during Alpine subduction. Zircon cores show, under CL, sector zoning typical of magmatic growth. U-Pb dates suggest their crystallisation during Middle Jurassic. Magmatic cores have thin fringe overgrowths parallel to the S2 foliation. U-Pb concordant analyses on these domains reveal an Upper Cretaceous-Paleocene crystallization most likely representing the HP to UHP Alpine re-equilibration. This suggests that some sections of the ZS have experienced HP to UHP metamorphism earlier than previously thought, opening new interpretative geodynamic scenarios. Remarkably, these new dates are similar to those recorded for the HP re-equilibration in the continental crust of the adjacent Austroalpine units (upper plate of the Alpine subduction system) and to those recorded for prograde metamorphism in

  8. Paleomagnetism of Jurassic radiolarian chert above the Coast Range ophiolite at Stanley Mountain, California, and implications for its paleogeographic origins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagstrum, J.T.; Murchey, B.L.

    1996-01-01

    Upper Jurassic red tuffaceous chert above the Coast Range ophiolite at Stanley Mountain, California (lat 35??N, long 240??E), contains three components of remanent magnetization. The first component (A; removed by ???100-???200 ??C) has a direction near the present-day field for southern California and is probably a recently acquired thermoviscous magnetization. A second component (B; removed between ???100 and ???600 ??C) is identical to that observed by previous workers in samples of underlying pillow basalt and overlying terrigenous sedimentary rocks. This component has constant normal polarity and direction throughout the entire section, although these rocks were deposited during a mixed polarity interval of the geomagnetic field. The B magnetization, therefore, is inferred to be a secondary magnetization acquired during accretion, uplift, or Miocene volcanism prior to regional clockwise rotation. The highest temperature component (C; removed between ???480 and 680 ??C) is of dual polarity and is tentatively interpreted as a primary magnetization, although it fails a reversal test possibly due to contamination by B. Separation of the B and C components is best shown by samples with negative-inclination C directions, and a corrected mean direction using only these samples indicates an initial paleolatitude of 32??N ?? 8??. Paleobiogeographic models relating radiolarian faunal distribution patterns to paleolatitude have apparently been incorrectly calibrated using the overprint B component. Few other paleomagnetic data have been incorporated in these models, and faunal distribution patterns are poorly known and mostly unqualified. The available data, therefore, do not support formation of the Coast Range ophiolite at Stanley Mountain near the paleoequator or accretion at ???10??N paleolatitude, as has been previously suggested based on paleomagnetic data, but indicate deposition near expected paleolatitudes for North America (35??N ?? 4??) during Late Jurassic

  9. The Juchatengo complex: an upper-level ophiolite assemblage of late Paleozoic age in Oaxaca, southern Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grajales-Nishimura, José Manuel; Ramos-Arias, Mario Alfredo; Solari, Luigi; Murillo-Muñetón, Gustavo; Centeno-García, Elena; Schaaf, Peter; Torres-Vargas, Ricardo

    2018-04-01

    The Juchatengo complex (JC) suite is located between the Proterozoic Oaxacan complex to the north and the Xolapa complex to the south, and was amalgamated by late Paleozoic magmatism. It consists of mafic and sedimentary rocks that have oceanic affinities, with internal pseudostratigraphic, structural and metamorphic characteristics, which resemble a typical upper-level ophiolite assemblage. New U-Pb zircon and previous hornblende K-Ar analyses yield ages of ca. 291-313 Ma (U-Pb) for plagiogranites and ca. 282-277 Ma for tonalites intruding the entire sequence, including pelagic sediments at the top, with a maximum deposition age of ca. 278 Ma and noteworthy local provenance. These data constrain the age of the JC to the Late Pennsylvanian-Early Permian period. Hf isotopic analyses obtained from zircons in the JC plagiogranite and tonalite show that they come from a similar primitive mantle source (176Hf/177Hf: 0.282539-0.283091; ƐHf(t): + 3.2 to + 15.0). ƐHf(t) values from near 0 to - 2.8 in the tonalites indicate a contribution from the continental crust. Trace elements and REE patterns in whole rock and zircons point to a primitive mantle source for differentiated mafic, plagiogranite dykes and tonalitic plutons. Geochronological and geochemical data address the generation of new oceanic crust above the subduction zone, probably in a backarc setting. In this tectonic scenario, the JC ophiolite originated due to the convergence of the paleo-Pacific plate below the already integrated Oaxacan and Acatlán complexes in western Pangea. The dextral displacement places the deformation in a transtensional regime during the late Paleozoic age.

  10. Lithofacies of deep marine basalts emplaced on a Jurassic backarc apron, Baja California (Mexico)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Busby-Spera, C.J.

    1987-09-01

    Basalts of the mid-Jurassic Gran Canon Formation, Cedros Island, Mexico, were emplaced on a volcaniclastic apron in a deep marine backarc basin. Elongate pillows and lava tubes, as well as paleocurrent data from the volcaniclastic apron, indicate a southward regional paleoslope away from the island arc source. Basalts emplaced on relatively proximal parts of the apron are nearly entirely pillowed and have thick flow units with mega-pillows. Basalts on distal parts of the apron (about 15 to 20 km down paleo-current) are dominated by pillow fragment breccias (flow foot rubble), and individual lava flows are generally thin, with small pillows, suggesting that the distal ends of lava flows, erupted upslope, are represented. These distal flow fronts, however, are interstratified with features that typically form close to a vent, including thick massive to mega-pillowed lavas and lava tubes up to 8 m in diameter. It is inferred that a fissure (or system of fissures) extended from the arc into the backarc basin, erupting basalt lavas onto both proximal and distal parts of the volcaniclastic apron. Such intraplate volcanism may be common on the hot frontal arc side of backarc basins. 26 references.

  11. Hazard and consequence analysis for waste emplacement at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerstner, D.M.; Clayton, S.G.; Farrell, R.F.; McCormick, J.A.; Ortiz, C.; Standiford, D.L.

    1996-01-01

    The Carlsbad Area Office established and analyzed the safety bases for the design and operations as documented in the WIPP Safety Analysis Report (SAR). Additional independent efforts are currently underway to assess the hazards associated with the long-term (10,000 year) isolation period as required by 40 CFR 191. The structure of the WIPP SAR is unique due to the hazards involved, and the agreement between the State of New Mexico and the DOE regarding SAR content and format. However, the hazards and accident analysis philosophy as contained in DOE-STD-3009-94 was followed as closely as possible, while adhering to state agreements. Hazards associated with WIPP waste receipt, emplacement, and disposal operations were systematically identified using a modified Hazard and Operability Study (HAZOP) technique. The WIPP HAZOP assessed the potential internal, external, and natural phenomena events that can cause the identified hazards to develop into accidents. The hazard assessment identified deviations from the intended design and operation of the waste handling system, analyzed potential accident consequences to the public and workers, estimated likelihood of occurrence, and evaluated associated preventative and mitigative features. It was concluded from the assessment that the proposed WIPP waste emplacement operations and design are sufficient to ensure safety of the public, workers, and environment, over the 35 year disposal phase

  12. Effects of the deviation characteristics of nuclear waste emplacement boreholes on borehole liner stresses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glowka, D.A.

    1990-09-01

    This report investigates the effects of borehole deviation on the useability of lined boreholes for the disposal of high-level nuclear waste at the proposed Yucca Mountain Repository in Nevada. Items that lead to constraints on borehole deviation include excessive stresses that could cause liner failure and possible binding of a waste container inside the liner during waste emplacement and retrieval operations. Liner stress models are developed for two general borehole configurations, one for boreholes drilled with a steerable bit and one for boreholes drilled with a non-steerable bit. Procedures are developed for calculating liner stresses that arise both during insertion of the liner into a borehole and during the thermal expansion process that follows waste emplacement. The effects of borehole curvature on the ability of the waste container to pass freely inside the liner without binding are also examined. Based on the results, specifications on borehole deviation allowances are developed for specific vertical and horizontal borehole configurations of current interest. 11 refs., 22 figs., 4 tabs

  13. Geochronological Constraints on the Exhumation and Emplacement of Subcontinental Lithospheric Mantle Peridotites in the Westernmost Mediterranean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido, Carlos J.; Hidas, Károly; Marchesi, Claudio; Varas-Reus, María Isabel; Booth-Rea, Guillermo

    2017-04-01

    Exhumation of subcontinental mantle peridotite in the Western Mediterranean has been attributed to different tectonic processes including pure extension, transpression, or alternating contractive and extensional processes related with continental subduction followed by extension, before final their contractive intracrustal emplacement. Any model trying to explain the exhumation and emplacement of subcontinental lithospheric mantle peridotites in the westernmost Mediterranean should take into account the available geochronological constraints, as well as the petrological and geochemical processes that lead to internal tectono-magmatic zoning so characteristic of the Betic and Rif orogenic peridotites. Different studies have suggested a Hercynian, Cenozoic-Mesozoic or an Alpine age for the late tectono-magmatic evolution and intra-crustal emplacement of Betic-Rif peridotites. The pervasive presence of Mesozoic U-Pb zircon ages in Ronda UHP and HP garnet pyroxenites does not support a Hercynian age for the intracrustal emplacement of the peridotite. A hyper-extended margin setting for is in good agreement with the Jurassic extensional event that pervasively affected ALKAPECA terrains (i.e. the Alboran, Kabylides, Peloritani, and Calabria domains) in the western Mediterranean due to the opening of the Piemonte-Ligurian Ocean. However, a Jurassic age and a passive margin tectonic setting do not account, among other observations, for the late Miocene thermochronological ages recorded in zircons rims (U-Pb) and garnets (Lu-Hf) in garnet pyroxenites from the Betic-Rif peridotites, the pervasive Miocene resetting of U-Pb zircon and monazite ages in the overlying Jubrique crustal section, the supra-subduction radiogenic signature of late pyroxenite intrusive dikes in the Ronda peridotite, and the arc tholeiitic affinity of late mantle-derived, gabbroic dykes intruding in the Ronda and Ojen plagioclase lherzolites. These data are more consistent with a supra

  14. Subduction initiation and recycling of Alboran domain derived crustal components prior to the intra-crustal emplacement of mantle peridotites in the Westernmost Mediterranean: isotopic evidence from the Ronda peridotite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varas-Reus, María Isabel; Garrido, Carlos J.; Bosch, Delphine; Marchesi, Claudio Claudio; Acosta-Vigil, Antonio; Hidas, Károly; Barich, Amel

    2014-05-01

    -Rif cordillera crustal rocks that might have been potentially subducted beneath the Alborán domain before the emplacement of Ronda peridotites. Isotopic data rules out potential crustal sources coming from pre-early Miocene Flysch Trough sediments and crustal rocks from the Blanca Unit currently underlying peridotite. Crustal rocks from the Jubrique Unit overlying the Ronda peridotite are the only crustal samples that may account for the relatively high 207Pb-208Pb/204Pb and low 206Pb/204Pb characteristic of the crustal contaminant added to the mantle source of late Cr-pyroxenites. These data strongly support Alboran geodynamic models that envisage slab roll-back as the tectonic mechanism responsible for Miocene lithospheric thinning, and provides a scenario where back-arc inversion leading to self-subduction of crustal units at the front of the Alboran wedge. REFERENCES 1. Durand-Delga, M., P. Rossi, P. Olivier, and D. Puglisi, Situation structurale et nature ophiolitique de roches basiques jurassiques associées aux flyschs maghrébins du Rif (Maroc) et de Sicile (Italie). Comptes Rendus de l'Académie des Sciences - Series IIA - Earth and Planetary Science, 2000. 331(1): p. 29-38. 2. Lenoir, X., C. Garrido, J.L. Bodinier, J.M. Dautria, and F. Gervilla, The Recrystallization Front of the Ronda Peridotite: Evidence for Melting and Thermal Erosion of Subcontinental Lithospheric Mantle beneath the Alboran Basin. Journal of Petrology, 2001. 42(1): p. 141-158. 3. Garrido, C.J., F. Gueydan, G. Booth-Rea, J. Precigout, K. Hidas, J.A. Padrón-Navarta, and C. Marchesi, Garnet lherzolite and garnet-spinel mylonite in the Ronda peridotite: Vestiges of Oligocene backarc mantle lithospheric extension in the western Mediterranean. Geology, 2011. 4. Balanyá, J.C., V. García-Dueñas, J.M. Azañón, and M. Sánchez-Gómez, Alternating contractional and extensional events in the Alpujarride nappes of the Alboran Domain (Betics, Gibraltar Arc). Tectonics, 1997. 16(2): p. 226-238. 5. Platt, J

  15. Study on a transportation and emplacement system of pre-assembled EBS module for HLW geological disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Awano, Toshihiko; Kanno, Takeshi; Katsumata, Syunsuke; Kosuge, Kazuhiro

    2009-01-01

    HLW disposal is one of the largest issue to utilize Nuclear power safely. In the past study, the concept, which buffer materials and Overpacked waste were transported into underground respectively, have shown. The concept of pre-assembled engineered barrier has advantage to simplify the logistics and emplacement procedure, however there are difficulties to support heavy weight of pre-assembled package by equipment under the condition of little clearance between tunnel and package. In this study, Combination of air bearing and two degree-of-freedom wheels were suggested for transportation, and air jack was suggested for unloading and emplacement system. Also, whole system for transportation and emplacement procedure was designed, and Scale model test was examined to evaluate the feasibility of these concept and functions. (author)

  16. The Influence of Topography on the Emplacement Dynamics of Martian Lava flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, J.; Fitch, E. P.; Fagents, S. A.

    2017-12-01

    Lava flows on the Martian surface exhibit a diverse array of complex morphologies. Previous emplacement models, based on terrestrial flows, do not fully account for these observed complex morphologies. We assert that the topography encountered by the flow can exert substantial control over the thermal, rheological, and morphological evolution of the flow, and that these effects can be better incorporated into flow models to predict Martian flow morphologies. Our development of an updated model can be used to account for these topographical effects and better constrain flow parameters. The model predicts that a slope break or flow meander induces eddy currents within the flow, resulting in the disruption of the flow surface crust. The exposure of the flow core results in accelerated cooling of the flow and a resultant increase in viscosity, leading to slowing of the flow. A constant source lava flux and a stagnated flow channel would then result in observable morphological changes, such as overflowing of channel levees. We have identified five morphological types of Martian flows, representing a range of effusion rates, eruption durations and topographic settings, which are suitable for application of our model. To characterize flow morphology, we used imaging and topographic data sets to collect data on flow dimensions. For eight large (50 to hundreds of km long) channelized flows in the Tharsis region, we used the MOLA 128 ppd DEM and/or individual MOLA shot points to derive flow cross-sectional thickness profiles, from which we calculated the cross-sectional area of the flow margins adjacent to the main channel. We found that the largest flow margin cross sectional areas (excluding the channel) occur in association with a channel bend, typically near the bend apex. Analysis of high-resolution images indicates that these widened flow margins are the result of repeated overflows of the channel levees and emplacement of short flow lobes adjacent to the main flow. In

  17. Mineral chemistry and petrology of highly magnesian ultramafic cumulates from the Sarve-Abad (Sawlava) ophiolites (Kurdistan, NW Iran): New evidence for boninitic magmatism in intra-oceanic fore-arc setting in the Neo-Tethys between Arabia and Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allahyari, Khalil; Saccani, Emilio; Rahimzadeh, Bahman; Zeda, Ottavia

    2014-01-01

    The Sarve-Abad (Sawlava) ophiolitic complex consists of several tectonically dismembered ophiolitic sequences. They are located along the Main Zagros Thrust Zone, which marks the ophiolitic suture between the Arabian and Sanandaj-Sirjan continental blocks. They represent a portion of the southern Neo-Tethyan oceanic lithosphere, which originally existed between the Arabian (to the south) and Eurasian (to the north) continental margins. The Sarve-Abad ophiolites include cumulitic lherzolites bearing minor dunite and chromitite lenses in places. The main rock-forming minerals in ultramafic cumulates are cumulus olivine and inter-cumulus clinopyroxene and orthopyroxene. Minor (<5%) chromian spinel occurs as both cumulus and inter-cumulus phases.

  18. Eclogitic breccia from the Monviso ophiolite complex: new field and petrographic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locatelli, Michele; Verlaguet, Anne; Federico, Laura; Agard, Philippe

    2015-04-01

    The Monviso meta-ophiolite complex (Northern Italy, Western Alps) represents a coherent portion of oceanic lithosphere metamorphosed under eclogite facies conditions during the Alpine orogeny (2.6 GPa - 550°C, Lago Superiore Unit, Angiboust et al., 2011), and exhibits from bottom to top a thick serpentinite sole locally capped by metasediments, Mg-Al-rich metagabbros, then Fe-Ti-metagabbros capped by metabasalts. This section is disrupted by three main shear zones. Our study focusses on the Lower Shear Zone (LSZ), situated between the serpentinite sole (to the East) and the Mg-metagabbro bodies (to the West), and composed of blocks of both Fe-Ti and Mg-Al metagabbros embedded in a talc and tremolite-rich serpentinite matrix. Among these blocks, some were described as eclogitic breccias and interpreted as the result of a seismic rupture plane (Angiboust et al., 2012). These breccias correspond to blocks of Fe-Ti-metagabbros that were brecciated in eclogitic facies conditions (as attested by the omphacite + garnet ± lawsonite cement of the breccia) in a fluid-rich environment, as suggested by the abundance of lawsonite in the cement. Here we present new field data on the distribution and petrographic characterization of these eclogitic blocks in the LSZ. The aim of this work is twofold: (I) detailed mapping of the eclogitic block distribution along the LSZ, in order to determine precisely the extent and representativity of the breccias and (II) characterization of the brecciated blocks, at the outcrop scale, to explore the brecciation processes and structures. Between Pian del Re and Colle di Luca localities, the occurrence of eclogite blocks is uniform along the strike of the shear-zone, resulting in a 16 km-long belt of outcropping eclogitic bodies embedded in serpentinite matrix. The shear-zone width, by contrast, varies from 1.3 km to 0.8 km. Three types of eclogitic blocks can be distinguished: (1) intact (i.e., not brecciated) blocks of Fe

  19. Plutonic rocks in the Mineoka-Setogawa ophiolitic mélange, central Japan: Fragments of middle to lower crust of the Izu-Bonin-Mariana Arc?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichiyama, Yuji; Ito, Hisatoshi; Hokanishi, Natsumi; Tamura, Akihiro; Arai, Shoji

    2017-06-01

    A Paleogene accretionary complex, the Mineoka-Setogawa Belt, is distributed around the Izu Collision Zone, central Japan. Plutonic rocks of gabbro, diorite and tonalite compositions are included as fragments and dykes in an ophiolitic mélange in this belt. Zircon U-Pb dating of the plutonic rocks indicates that they were formed at ca. 35 Ma simultaneously. These ages are consistent with Eocene-Oligocene tholeiite and calc-alkaline arc magmatism in the Izu-Bonin-Mariana (IBM) Arc and exclude several previous models for the origin of the Mineoka-Setogawa ophiolitic rocks. The geochemical characteristics of these plutonic rocks are similar to those of the Eocene-Oligocene IBM tholeiite and calc-alkaline volcanic rocks as well as to the accreted middle crust of the IBM Arc, the Tanzawa Plutonic Complex. Moreover, their lithology is consistent with those of the middle and lower crust of the IBM Arc estimated from the seismic velocity structure. These lines of evidence strongly indicate that the plutonic rocks in the Mineoka-Setogawa ophiolitic mélange are fragments of the middle to lower crust of the IBM Arc. Additionally, the presence of the Mineoka-Setogawa intermediate to felsic plutonic rocks supports the hypothesis that intermediate magma can form continental crust in intra-oceanic arcs.

  20. Comparison of support vector machine and neutral network classification method in hyperspectral mapping of ophiolite mélanges–A case study of east of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahram Bahrambeygi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Ophiolitic regions are one of the most complex geology settings. Mapping in these parts need broad and precise studies and tools because of the mixture rocks and confusion units. Hyperion hyperspectral sensor data are one of the advanced tools for earth surface mapping that containing rich information of shallow electromagnetic reflection in 242 continuous bands. Because of some contaminated noise in tens of these bands we removed 87 most noisy bands and focused our study on 155 low noisy bands. In present study, tow spectral based classification algorithms of support vector machine and neutral network are compared on hyperion image for classification of cluttered units in an ophiolite set. Study area is Mesina region in collision ophiolitic belt of south east of Iran. In this region for design processing results validation rate, lots of random locations and control points were studied in field scale and were sampled for laboratory surveys. Samples were investigated in microscopic section and by electron microprobe system. Based on laboratory-field studies, the lithology of this area can divided into five general groups: (Melange series, metamorphic units, Oligocene – Miocene to Quaternary volcanic units, lime and flysch units. Based on field-laboratory works, some standard points defined for validate processing results accuracy rate. Therefore, the Support Vector Machine and neutral network method as advanced hyperspectral image processing methods respectively have overall accuracies of 52% and 65%. Consequently the method based neutral network theory for hyperspectral classification have acceptable ratio in separation of blended complicated units.

  1. Structural Analysis of Silicic Lavas Reveals the Importance of Endogenous Flow During Emplacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, G. D.; Martens, A.; Isom, S.; Maxwell, A.; Brown, S. R.

    2017-12-01

    Recent observations of silicic lava flows in Chile strongly suggest sustained, endogeneous flow beneath an insulating carapace, where the flow advances through breakouts at the flow margin. New mapping of vertical exposures around the margin of Obsidian Dome, California, has identified discreet lobe structures in cross-section, suggesting that flow-front breakouts occured there during emplacement. The flow lobes are identified through structural measurements of flow-banding orientation and the stretching directions of vesicles. Newly acquired lidar of the Inyo Domes, including Obsidian Dome, is being analyzed to better understand the patterns of folding on the upper surface of the lavas, and to test for fold vergence patterns that may distinguish between endogenous and exogenous flow.

  2. Technical operations procedure for assembly and emplacement of the soil temperature test--test assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, A.P.

    1978-01-01

    A description is given of the plan for assembly, instrumentation, emplacement, and operational checkout of the soil temperature test assembly and dry well liner. The activities described cover all operations necessary to accomplish the receiving inspection, instrumentation and pre-construction handling of the dry well liner, plus all operations performed with the test article. Actual details of construction work are not covered by this procedure. Each part and/or section of this procedure is a separate function to be accomplished as required by the nature of the operation. The organization of the procedure is not intended to imply a special operational sequence or schedular requirement. Specific procedure operational sections include: receiving inspection; liner assembly operations; construction operations (by others); prepare shield plug; test article assembly and installation; and operational checkout

  3. Pre-Alleghenian (Pennsylvanian-Permian) hydrocarbon emplacement along Ordovician Knox unconformity, eastern Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haynes, F.M.; Kesler, S.E.

    1989-03-01

    Cores taken during exploration for Mississippi Valley-type lead and zinc ores in the Mascot-Jefferson City zinc district of eastern Tennessee commonly contain hydrocarbon residues in carbonate rocks of the Knox Group immediately below the Lower Ordovician Knox unconformity. The location and number of these residue-bearing strata reveal information about the Paleozoic history of hydrocarbon emplacement in the region. Contour maps, generated from nearly 800 holes covering more than 20 km/sup 2/, indicate that zones with elevated organic content in the uppermost 30 m of the Lower Ordovician Mascot Dolomite show a strong spatial correlation with Middle Ordovician paleotopographic highs. These same zones show no spatial association with present-day structural highs, which were formed during Pennsylvanian-Permian Alleghenian tectonism. This suggests that the physical entrapment of hydrocarbons migrating through the upper permeable units of the Mascot must have occurred prior to the principal tectonism of the Alleghenian orogeny. 7 figures, 1 table.

  4. Magnetotelluric Investigations of the Yellowstone Caldera: Understanding the Emplacement of Crustal Magma Bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurrola, R. M.; Neal, B. A.; Bennington, N. L.; Cronin, R.; Fry, B.; Hart, L.; Imamura, N.; Kelbert, A.; Bowles-martinez, E.; Miller, D. J.; Scholz, K. J.; Schultz, A.

    2017-12-01

    Wideband magnetotellurics (MT) presents an ideal method for imaging conductive shallow magma bodies associated with contemporary Yellowstone-Snake River Plain (YSRP) magmatism. Particularly, how do these magma bodies accumulate in the mid to upper crust underlying the Yellowstone Caldera, and furthermore, what role do hydrothermal fluids play in their ascent? During the summer 2017 field season, two field teams from Oregon State University and the University of Wisconsin-Madison installed forty-four wideband MT stations within and around the caldera, and using data slated for joint 3-D inversion with existing seismic data, two 2-D vertical conductivity sections of the crust and upper mantle were constructed. These models, in turn, provide preliminary insight into the emplacement of crustal magma bodies and hydrothermal processes in the YSRP region.

  5. Landsat investigations of the northern Paradox basin, Utah and Colorado: implications for radioactive waste emplacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Jules D.; Simpson, Shirley L.

    1978-01-01

    The first stages of a remote-sensing project on the Paradox basin, part of the USGS (U.S. Geological Survey) radioactive waste-emplacement program, consisted of a review and selection of the best available satellite scanner images to use in geomorphologic and tectonic investigations of the region. High-quality Landsat images in several spectral bands (E-2260-17124 and E-5165-17030), taken under low sun angle October 9 and 10, 1975, were processed via computer for planimetric rectification, histogram analysis, linear transformation of radiance values, and edge enhancement. A lineament map of the northern Paradox basin was subsequently compiled at 1:400,000 using the enhanced Landsat base. Numerous previously unmapped northeast-trending lineaments between the Green River and Yellowcat dome; confirmatory detail on the structural control of major segments of the Colorado, Gunnison, and Dolores Rivers; and new evidence for late Phanerozoic reactivation of Precambrian basement structures are among the new contributions to the tectonics of the region. Lineament trends appear to be compatible with the postulated Colorado lineament zone, with geophysical potential-field anomalies, and with a northeast-trending basement fault pattern. Combined Landsat, geologic, and geophysical field evidence for this interpretation includes the sinuousity of the composite Salt Valley anticline, the transection of the Moab-Spanish Valley anticline on its southeastern end by northeast-striking faults, and possible transection (?) of the Moab diapir. Similarly, northeast-trending lineaments in Cottonwood Canyon and elsewhere are interpreted as manifestations of structures associated with northeasterly trends in the magnetic and gravity fields of the La Sal Mountains region. Other long northwesterly lineaments near the western termination of the Ryan Creek fault zone. may be associated with the fault zone separating the Uncompahgre horst uplift from the Paradox basin. Implications of the

  6. Analysis of thermal-hydrologic-mechanical behavior near an emplacement drift at Yucca Mountain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutqvist, Jonny; Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2002-01-01

    A coupled thermal, hydrologic and mechanical (THM) analysis is conducted to evaluate the impact of coupled THM processes on the performance of a potential nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The analysis considers changes in rock mass porosity, permeability, and capillary pressure caused by rock deformations during drift excavation, as well as those caused by thermo-mechanically induced rock deformations after emplacement of the heat-generating waste. The analysis consists of a detailed calibration of coupled hydraulic-mechanical rock mass properties against field experiments, followed by a prediction of the coupled thermal, hydrologic, and mechanical behavior around a potential repository drift. For the particular problem studied and parameters used, the analysis indicates that the stress-induced permeability changes will be within one order of magnitude and that these permeability changes do not significantly impact the overall flow pattern around the repository drift

  7. Biographical Narratives of Encounter: The Significance of Mobility and Emplacement in Shaping Attitudes towards Difference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadgrove, Joanna

    2014-01-01

    This paper is located within work in urban studies about the significance of contact with difference as a means for reducing prejudice and achieving social change. Recent approaches, influenced by theories of affect, have emphasised non-conscious everyday negotiations of difference in the city. In this paper it is argued that such approaches lose sight of the significance of the subject: of the reflective judgements of ‘others’ made by individuals; of our ability to make decisions around the control of our feelings and identifications; and of the significance of personal pasts and collective histories in shaping the ways we perceive and react to encounters. Rather, this paper uses a biographical approach focusing on interviewees’ narratives of encounter. Through its attention to processes of mobility and emplacement, it contributes to debates about when contact with difference matters by highlighting the importance of everyday social normativities in the production of moral dispositions. PMID:26300566

  8. Waste package transfer, emplacement and retrievability in the French deep geological repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roulet, Alain; Delort, Daniel; Herve, Jean Francois; Bosgiraud, Jean Michel; Guenin, Jean Jacques [Technical Department ANDRA (France)

    2009-06-15

    Safe, reliable and reversible handling of waste is a significant issue related to the design and safety assessment of deep geological repository in France. The first step taken was to study various waste handling solutions. ANDRA also decided to fabricate and demonstrate industrial scale handling equipment for HLW (since 2003) and for ILW-LL wastes (since 2008). We will review the main equipment developed for the transfer process in the repository, for both types of waste, and underline the benefits of developing industrial demonstrators within the framework of international cooperation agreements. Waste retrieval capability will be simultaneously examined. Two types of waste have to be handled underground in Andra's repository. The HLW disposal package for vitrified waste is a 2 ton carbon steel cylindrical canister with a diameter of 600 mm. The weight of ILW-LL concrete disposal packages range from a minimum of 6 tonnes to over 20 tonnes, and their volume from approximately 5 to 10 m3. The underground transfer to the disposal drift requires moving the disposal package within a shielded transfer cask placed on a trailer. Transfer cask design has evolved since 2005, due to optimisation studies and as a result of industrial feedback from SKB. For HLW handling equipment two design options have been studied. In the first solution (Andra's Dossier 2005), the waste package are emplaced, one at a time, in the disposal drift by a pushing robot. Successive steps in design and proto-typing have lead to improve the design of the equipment and to gain confidence. Recently a fully integrated process has been successfully demonstrated, at full scale, (in a 100 m long mock up drift) as part of the EC funded ESDRED Project. This demonstrator is now on display in Andra's Technology Centre at Saudron, near the Bure Underground Laboratory. The second disposal option which has been investigated is based on a concept of utilising an external apparatus to push a row of

  9. The offshore disposal of radioactive waste by drilled emplacement: A feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bury, M.R.C.

    1985-01-01

    This book is a report, based on a study by Taylor Woodrow Construction Limited, on the overall feasibility of the disposal of high-level radioactive waste in boreholes drilled deep into the ocean bed. The work comprises an engineering appraisal of the disposal process with a view to establishing technical and operational feasibility and providing overall cost information to enable an economic assessment to be made. Contents: Summary report; Reference criteria; Drilling operation; Transfer of radioactive waste, personnel and other supplies; Handling of radioactive waste on board; Lowering strings of canisters; Emplacement and backfilling of canisters; Preliminary design of marine platform; Retrieval of flasks or canisters lost or misplaced; Variations to the features of the lowering system; Logistics of the operation; Construction cost estimate; Operational costs; Appendix

  10. Geomorphology of crater and basin deposits - Emplacement of the Fra Mauro formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, R. H.; Oberbeck, V. R.

    1975-01-01

    Characteristics of continuous deposits near lunar craters larger than about 1 km wide are considered, and it is concluded that (1) concentric dunes, radial ridges, and braided lineations result from deposition of the collision products of ejecta from adjacent pairs of similarly oriented secondary-crater chains and are, therefore, concentrations of secondary-crater ejecta; (2) intracrater ridges are produced within preexisting craters surrounding a fresh primary crater by ricocheting and focusing of secondary-crater ejecta from the preexisting craters' walls; and (3) secondary cratering has produced many of the structures of the continuous deposits of relatively small lunar craters and is the dominant process for emplacement of most of the radial facies of the continuous deposits of large lunar craters and basins. The percentages of Imbrium ejecta in deposits and the nature of Imbrium sculpturing are investigated.

  11. Homeless Blogs as Travelogues. Travel as a Struggle for Recognition and Emplacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halina Gąsiorowska

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Applying Clifford’s broad concept of travel, I discuss American homeless blogs as autobiographical travel writing serving the struggle for recognition of the street people. The analysed travelogues are hitchhiker Ruth Rader’s Ruthie in the Sky blog and self-made woman Brianna Karp’s Girl’s Guide to Homelessness – a memoir published on the basis of the blog bearing the same title. In the travelogues I analyse the characteristic features of a personal travel writing: travel of the self, advice for future travelers, geographic information and portrayal of society in which the travel is undertaken. I claim that homeless bloggers recounting their stories of otherness and displacement in the US contribute to (reconstructing American cultural identity their personal Self, just like many other American travelers before. Additionally, homeless blogging about homelessness is shown as the process of emplacement (Casey – the bloggers’ attempt of making themselves at home in the world.

  12. Additive Construction with Mobile Emplacement (ACME) / Automated Construction of Expeditionary Structures (ACES) Materials Delivery System (MDS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, R. P.; Townsend, I. I.; Tamasy, G. J.; Evers, C. J.; Sibille, L. J.; Edmunson, J. E.; Fiske, M. R.; Fikes, J. C.; Case, M.

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of the Automated Construction of Expeditionary Structures, Phase 3 (ACES 3) project is to incorporate the Liquid Goods Delivery System (LGDS) into the Dry Goods Delivery System (DGDS) structure to create an integrated and automated Materials Delivery System (MDS) for 3D printing structures with ordinary Portland cement (OPC) concrete. ACES 3 is a prototype for 3-D printing barracks for soldiers in forward bases, here on Earth. The LGDS supports ACES 3 by storing liquid materials, mixing recipe batches of liquid materials, and working with the Dry Goods Feed System (DGFS) previously developed for ACES 2, combining the materials that are eventually extruded out of the print nozzle. Automated Construction of Expeditionary Structures, Phase 3 (ACES 3) is a project led by the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) and supported by NASA. The equivalent 3D printing system for construction in space is designated Additive Construction with Mobile Emplacement (ACME) by NASA.

  13. Compositionally heterogeneous podiform chromitite in the Shetland Ophiolite Complex (Scotland): Implications for chromitite petrogenesis and late-stage alteration in the upper mantle portion of a supra-subduction zone ophiolite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derbyshire, E. J.; O'Driscoll, B.; Lenaz, D.; Gertisser, R.; Kronz, A.

    2013-03-01

    The mantle sequence of the ~ 492 Ma Shetland Ophiolite Complex (SOC; Scotland) contains abundant compositionally heterogeneous podiform chromitite bodies enclosed in elongate dunite lenses in the vicinity of the petrological Moho. Chromitite petrogenesis and late-stage alteration events recorded in these seams are examined here using petrography, mineral chemistry and crystal structural data. The resistant nature of Cr-spinel to serpentinisation and other late-stage alteration means that primary igneous compositions are preserved in unaltered crystal cores. Chromitite mineralogy and texture from five sampled localities at The Viels, Hagdale, Harold's Grave, Nikka Vord and Cliff reveal significant inter-pod chemical heterogeneity. The Cr-spinel mineral chemistry is consistent with supra-subduction zone melt extraction from the SOC peridotites. The occurrence of chromitite seams in the centres of the dunite lenses combined with variable Cr-spinel compositions at different chromitite seam localities supports a model of chromitite formation from spatially (and temporally?) fluctuating amounts of melt-rock interaction through channelised and/or porous melt flow. Pervasive serpentinisation of the SOC has led to the almost complete replacement of the primary (mantle) silicate mineral assemblages with serpentine (lizardite with minor chrysotile and antigorite). Magmatic sulphide (e.g., pentlandite) in dunite and chromitite is locally converted to reduced Ni-sulphide varieties (e.g., heazlewoodite and millerite). A post-serpentinisation (prograde) oxidisation event is recorded in the extensively altered Cliff chromitite seams in the west of the studied area, where chromitite Cr-spinel is extensively altered to ferritchromit. The ferritchromit may comprise > 50% of the volume of the Cliff Cr-spinels and contain appreciable quantities of 1-2 μm inclusions of sperrylite (PtAs2) and Ni-arsenide, signifying the coeval formation of these minerals with ferritchromit at

  14. Field test demonstration of emplacement feasibility of precompacted clay buffer materials in a granitic medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jorda, M.; Lajudie, A.; Gatabin, C.; Atabek, R.

    1992-01-01

    Field test demonstration of emplacement feasibility of precompacted clay buffer materials in a granitic medium has been successfully carried out in February 1990 at the mining centre of FANAY. SILORD site was selected allowing the drilling through the 'Raise Boring' technique of pits of 30 m depth minimum between two pre-existent galleries. Two pits of 37 m depth were drilled and characterized in detail: mean diameter and vertical deviation measurements, valuation of the surface condition (rugosity) and cracking. The pit which was the most regular was selected for the feasibility test it-self. In parallel, manufacturing and handling techniques for the engineered barrier were improved. The bricks were made from a powdered mixture of clay and 10% sand and formed the barrier which was installed in the pit using iron baskets. The technique used was compacting by uniaxial pressing at 64 MPa. Twenty eight baskets containing the engineered barrier were fabricated at LIBOS (refractory manufactory of CTE Group) and taken to FANAY-SILORD. A maximal diameter of 96.03 cm was determined for the basket passing through (basket height = 1.335 m) and verified by the lowering of basket gauges in the pit. The baskets were stacked up in the pit, without any difficulty, with a mean radial gap of 1.6 cm (for a pit mean diameter of 99.3 cm). Three simulated COGEMA waste containers were then satisfactorily installed. The real volume to be sealed, including residual voids, was estimated at 21.47 m 3 . The engineered barrier weight after emplacement came to 36280 kg leading to a dry density in service, i.e. after the engineered barrier swelling, of 1.69. 30 figs

  15. Emplacement of zero-valent metal for remediation of deep contaminant plumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubble, D.W.; Gillham, R.W.; Cherry, J.A.

    1997-01-01

    Some groundwater plumes containing chlorinated solvent contaminants are found to be so deep that current in situ remediation technologies cannot be economically applied. Also, source zones are often found to be too deep for removal or inaccessible due to surface features. Plumes emanating from these sources require containment or treatment. Containment technologies are available for shallow sites (< 15 m) and are being developed for greater depths. However, it is important to advance the science of reactive treatment - both for cut off of plumes and to contain and treat source zones. Zero-valent metal technology has been used for remediation of solvent plumes at sites in Canada, the UK and at several industrial and military sites in the USA. To date, all of the plumes treated with zero-valent metal (granular iron) have been at depths less than 15 m. This paper gives preliminary results of research into methods to emplace granular iron at depths in the range of 15 to 60 m. The study included review of available and emerging methods of installing barrier or reactive material and the selection, preliminary design and costing of several methods. The design of a treatment system for a 122 m wide PCE plume that, immediately down gradient from its source, extends from a depth of 24 to 37 m below the ground surface is used as a demonstration site. Both Permeable Reactive Wall and Funnel-and-Gate trademark systems were considered. The emplacement methods selected for preliminary design and costing were slurry wall, driven/vibrated beam, deep soil mixing and hydrofracturing injection. For each of these methods, the iron must be slurried for ease of pumping and placement using biodegradable polymer viscosifiers that leave the iron reactive

  16. The Sonju Lake layered intrusion, northeast Minnesota: Internal structure and emplacement history inferred from magnetic fabrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maes, S.M.; Tikoff, B.; Ferre, E.C.; Brown, P.E.; Miller, J.D.

    2007-01-01

    The Sonju Lake intrusion (SLI), in northeastern Minnesota, is a layered mafic complex of Keweenawan age (1096.1 ?? 0.8 Ma) related to the Midcontinent rift. The cumulate paragenesis of the intrusion is recognized as broadly similar to the Skaergaard intrusion, a classic example of closed-system differentiation of a tholeiitic mafic magma. The SLI represents nearly closed-system differentiation through bottom-up fractional crystallization. Geochemical studies have identified the presence of a stratabound, 50-100 m thick zone anomalously enriched in Au + PGE. Similar to the PGE reefs of the Skaergaard intrusion, this PGE-enriched zone is hosted within oxide gabbro cumulates, about two-third of the way up from the base of the intrusion. We present a petrofabric study using the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) to investigate the emplacement and flow patterns within the Sonju Lake intrusion. Petrographic and electron microprobe studies, combined with AMS and hysteresis measurements indicate the primary source of the magnetic signal is pseudo-single domain (PSD) magnetite or titanomagnetite. Low field AMS was measured at 32 sites within the Sonju Lake intrusion, which provided information about primary igneous fabrics. The magnetic fabrics in the layered series of the Sonju Lake intrusion are consistent with sub-horizontal to inclined emplacement of the intrusion and show evidence that the cumulate layers were deposited in a dynamic environment. Well-aligned magnetic lineations, consistently plunging shallowly toward the southwest, indicate the source of the magma is a vertical sill-like feeder, presumably located beneath the Finland granite. The Finland granite acted as a density trap for the Sonju Lake magmas, forcing lateral flow of magma to the northeast. The strongly oblate magnetic shape fabrics indicate the shallowly dipping planar fabrics were enhanced by compaction of the crystal mush. ?? 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Transitions in Lava Emplacement Recorded in the Deccan Traps Sequence (India)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderkluysen, L.; Self, S.; Jay, A. E.; Sheth, H. C.; Clarke, A. B.

    2015-12-01

    Transitions in the style of lava flow emplacement are recognized in the stratigraphic sequence of several mafic large igneous provinces (LIPs), including the Etendeka (Namibia), the Faeroe Islands (North Atlantic LIP), the Ethiopian Traps, and the Deccan Traps (India). These transitions, from units dominated by meter-sized pāhoehoe toes and lobes to those dominated by inflated sheet lobes tens to hundreds of meters in width and meters to tens of meters in height, seems to be a fundamental feature of LIP emplacement. In the Deccan, this volcanological transition is thought to coincide with deeper changes to the volcano-magmatic system expressed, notably, in the trace element and isotopic signature of erupted flows. We investigated this transition in the Deccan Traps by logging eight sequences along the Western Ghats, an escarpment in western India where the Deccan province is thickest and best exposed. The Deccan province, which once covered ~1 million km2 of west-central India, is subdivided in eleven chemo-stratigraphic formations in the type sections of the Western Ghats. Where the lower Deccan formations are exposed, we found that as much as 65% of the exposed thickness (below the Khandala Formation) is made up of sheet lobes, from 40% in the Bhimashankar Formation to 75% in the Thakurvadi Formation. Near the bottom of the sequence, 25% of the Neral Formation is composed of sheet lobes ≥15 m in thickness. On this basis, the traditional view that inflated sheet lobes are an exclusive feature of the upper part of the stratigraphy must be challenged. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain the development of compound flows and inflated sheet lobes, involving one or more of the following factors: underlying slope, varying effusion rate, and source geometry. Analogue experiments are currently under way to test the relative influence of each of these factors in the development of different lava flow morphologies in LIPs.

  18. Emplacement and Deformation of Mesozoic Gabbros of the High Atlas (Morocco): Paleomagnetism and Magnetic Fabrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvín, P.; Ruiz-Martínez, V. C.; Villalaín, J. J.; Casas-Sainz, A. M.; Moussaid, B.

    2017-12-01

    A paleomagnetic and magnetic fabric study is performed in Upper Jurassic gabbros of the central High Atlas (Morocco). These gabbros were emplaced in the core of preexisting structures developed during the extensional stage and linked to basement faults. These structures were reactivated as anticlines during the Cenozoic compressional inversion. Gabbros from 19 out of the 33 sampled sites show a stable characteristic magnetization, carried by magnetite, which has been interpreted as a primary component. This component shows an important dispersion due to postemplacement tectonic movements. The absence of paleoposition markers in these igneous rocks precludes direct restorations. A novel approach analyzing the orientation of the primary magnetization is used here to restore the magmatic bodies and to understand the deformational history recorded by these rocks. Paleomagnetic vectors are distributed along small circles with horizontal axes, indicating horizontal axis rotations of the gabbro bodies. These rotations are higher when the ratio between shales and gabbros in the core of the anticlines increases. Due to the uncertainties inherent to this work (the igneous bodies recording strong rotations), interpretations must be qualitative. The magnetic fabric is carried by ferromagnetic (s.s.) minerals mimicking the magmatic fabric. Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) axes, using the rotation routine inferred from paleomagnetic results, result in more tightly clustered magnetic lineations, which also become horizontal and are considered in terms of magma flow trend during its emplacement: NW-SE (parallel to the general extensional direction) in the western sector and NE-SW (parallel to the main faults) in the easternmost structures.

  19. Mineral chemistry and geothemobarometry of mantle harzburgites in the Eastern Metamorphic Complex of Khoy ophiolite -NW Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morovvat Faridazad

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Khoy ophiolite at the global scale is in the middle part of the Alp-Himalaya orogenic belt and it is extended over 3900 Km2 which indicates remnant Neotethys oceanic lithosphere in the Mesozoic era (Kananian et al., 2010. In this paper, in addition to a review of previous investigations about Khoy ophiolite, we will try to determine the nature and kind of minerals, origin and partial melting rate as well as the equilibrium pressure and temperature of harzburgites from the Eastern Metamorphic Complex of Khoy ophiolite. Materials and methods Thin sections microscopy studies were carried out following field investigations. EPMA analysis was carried out with using a Superprobe JEOL, JXA 8200 Microprobe unit at the state of WDS and under condition of 15kv accelerating voltage, 10nA current beam, 1µm beam diameter and collection of natural and synthetic standards for calibration. Results The study area is located at the NW of Iran and north of the Khoy city in the west Azarbaijan province. This area is part of the ophiolitic complex of NW Iran and belongs to its Eastern Metamorphic Complex. This metamorphic zone has large tectonically segments of the metamorphic ophiolites which mainly include serpentinized peridotites with associated metagabbros. There are three types of peridotitic rocks in this area which are: Lherzolites, harzburgites and dunites. Lherzolites are composed of olivine (60-70%, orthopyroxene (10-30% and clinopyroxene (~10-20% with minor amounts (~2% of Cr-spinel mineral. Harzburgites are composed of olivine (70-80%, orthopyroxene (10-20% and clinopyroxene (~5% with minor amounts (~2% of Cr-spinel mineral. Dunites are composed of olivine (90-95%, orthopyroxene (5-10% with minor amounts (~1-2% of Cr-spinel mineral. Composition range of olivines is between Fo89.46 Fa10.37 to Fo89.86 Fa10.0 as well as NiO content range is 018-046 (wt %. The calculated Mg# of olivines is 0.90 and the composition of olivines in Fo-Fa diagram

  20. Câbles electriques - Calcul du courant admissible - Partie 1: Equations de l'intensité du courant admissible (facteur de charge 100%) et calcul des pertes - Section 2: Facteurs de pertes par courants de Foucault dans les gaines dans le cas de deux circuits disposés en nappe

    CERN Document Server

    International Electrotechnical Commission. Geneva

    1993-01-01

    Câbles electriques - Calcul du courant admissible - Partie 1: Equations de l'intensité du courant admissible (facteur de charge 100%) et calcul des pertes - Section 2: Facteurs de pertes par courants de Foucault dans les gaines dans le cas de deux circuits disposés en nappe

  1. Platinum-Group Minerals and Other Accessory Phases in Chromite Deposits of the Alapaevsk Ophiolite, Central Urals, Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Zaccarini

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available An electron microprobe study has been carried out on platinum-group minerals, accessory phases, and chromite in several chromite deposits of the Alapaevsk ophiolite (Central Urals, Russia namely the Bakanov Kluch, Kurmanovskoe, Lesnoe, 3-d Podyony Rudnik, Bol’shaya Kruglyshka, and Krest deposits. These deposits occur in partially to totally serpentinized peridotites. The microprobe data shows that the chromite composition varies from Cr-rich to Al-rich. Tiny platinum-group minerals (PGM, 1–10 µm in size, have been found in the chromitites. The most abundant PGM is laurite, accompanied by minor cuproiridsite and alloys in the system Os–Ir–Ru. A small grain (about 20 μm was found in the interstitial serpentine of the Bakanov Kluch chromitite, and its calculated stoichiometry corresponds to (Ni,Fe5P. Olivine, occurring in the silicate matrix or included in fresh chromite, has a mantle-compatible composition in terms of major and minor elements. Several inclusions of amphibole, Na-rich phlogopite, and clinopyroxene have been identified. The bimodal Cr–Al composition of chromite probably corresponds to a vertical distribution in the ophiolite sequence, implying formation of Cr-rich chromitites in the deep mantle, and Al-rich chromitites close to the Moho-transition zone, in a supra-subduction setting. The presence of abundant hydrous silicate inclusions, such as amphibole and phlogopite, suggests that the Alapaevsk chromitites crystallized as a result of the interaction between a melt enriched in fluids and peridotites. Laurite and cuproiridsite are considered to be magmatic in origin, i.e., entrapped as solid phases during the crystallization of chromite at high temperatures. The sulfur fugacity was relatively high to allow the precipitation of Ir-bearing sulfides, but below the Os–OsS2 buffer. The alloys in the system Os–Ir–Ru are classified as secondary PGM, i.e., formed at low temperature during the serpentinization process. The

  2. Spinel and plagioclase peridotites of the Nain ophiolite (Central Iran): Evidence for the incipient stage of oceanic basin formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirnia, Tahmineh; Saccani, Emilio; Arai, Shoji

    2018-06-01

    The Nain ophiolites crop out along the western border of the central East Iran Microcontinent (CEIM) and consist of an ophiolitic mélange in which pargasite-bearing spinel and plagioclase mantle lherzolites are largely represented. Whole-rock and mineral chemistry data suggest that these rocks record the complex history of the asthenospheric and lithospheric mantle evolution. The spinel lherzolites have experienced low-degree ( 5%) partial melting and contain clinopyroxenes with positive Eu anomalies (Eu/Eu* = 1.10-1.48) suggesting that the partial melting occurred under oxidized conditions (fayalite-magnetite-quartz -0.8 to +1.3). The pargasite and coexisting clinopyroxene in these rocks are depleted in light rare earth elements (LREE) (mean chondrite-normalized CeN/SmN = 0.045). The depleted chemistry of this amphibole reflects metasomatism during interaction with H2O-rich subalkaline mafic melts, most likely concurrently with or after the partial melting of the spinel lherzolites. The plagioclase lherzolites were subsequently formed by the subsolidus recrystallization of spinel lherzolites under plagioclase facies conditions as a result of mantle uprising, as evidenced by: (1) the development of plagioclase rims around the spinels; (2) plagioclase + orthopyroxene exsolution textures within some clinopyroxene grains; (3) an increase in plagioclase modal content coupled with an increase in modal olivine and a decrease in modal pyroxene and pargasite; (4) coincident decreases in Al, Mg, and Ni, and increases in Cr, Ti, and Fe in spinel, as well as decreases in Al and Ca, and increases in Cr and Ti in pyroxene and pargasite; and (5) the identical whole rock compositions of the spinel and plagioclase lherzolites, which rules out a magmatic origin for the plagioclase in these units. The Nain lherzolites have similar whole-rock and mineral geochemical compositions to subcontinental peridotites that are typically representative of Iberia-type rifted continental margins

  3. Petrogenesis and tectonic implications of gabbro and plagiogranite intrusions in mantle peridotites of the Myitkyina ophiolite, Myanmar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yang; Liu, Chuan-Zhou; Chen, Yi; Guo, Shun; Wang, Jian-Gang; Sein, Kyaing

    2017-07-01

    Centimeter-size intrusions of gabbros and plagiogranites occur in mantle peridotites of the Myitkyina ophiolite, Myanmar. The gabbros mainly consist of plagioclase and clinopyroxene, whereas orthopyroxene occasionally occurs. The plagiogranites are mainly composed of plagioclase, quartz and amphibole, with small amount of accessory minerals, such as zircon, apatite and rutile. Plagioclase in the gabbros varies from andesine to anorthite (An37-91), whereas plagioclase in the plagiogranites is less calcic (An1-40). Clinopyroxene in the gabbros is pervasively altered to hornblende. The gabbros contain 42.97-52.88 wt% SiO2, which show negative correlations with Al2O3, CaO and MgO, but positive correlations with Na2O, P2O5 and TiO2. Microtextural relations reveal the crystallization of clinopyroxene prior to plagioclase in the Myitkyina gabbros. This suggests that the gabbros were crystallized from hydrous melts, which is also supported by the occurrence of orthopyroxene and anorthitic plagioclase in some gabbros. The gabbros have slightly enriched Sr-Nd isotopes, with initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios of 0.703938-0.706609 and εNd(t) values of + 2.4-+7.2, and relatively variable Hf isotopes, with εHf(t) values of + 13.4-+24.9. A subduction component is required to explain the decoupled Nd-Hf isotopes of the gabbros. Binary mixing suggests that addition of ca 2% subducted sediments to a depleted mantle can account for the Nd-Hf decoupling. Therefore, both petrological and geochemical data of the gabbros support that the Myitkyina ophiolite was originated in a supra-subduction zone setting. The plagiogranites have compositions of tonalites and trondhjemites, containing 56.93-77.93 wt% SiO2, 1.27-10.79 wt% Na2O and 0.05-0.71 wt% K2O. They are slightly enriched in LREE over HREE and display positive anomalies in Eu, Zr, Hf but negative Nb anomalies. Very low TiO2 contents (0.03-0.2 wt%) of the plagiogranites suggest that they were not products of fractional crystallization of MORB

  4. Lower crustal section of the Oman Ophiolite drilled in Hole GT1A, ICDP Oman Drilling Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umino, S.; Kelemen, P. B.; Matter, J. M.; Coggon, J. A.; Takazawa, E.; Michibayashi, K.; Teagle, D. A. H.

    2017-12-01

    Hole GT1A (22° 53.535'N, 58° 30.904'E) was drilled by the Oman Drilling Project (OmDP) into GT1A of the Samail ophiolite, Oman. OmDP is an international collaboration supported by the International Continental Scientific Drilling Program, the Deep Carbon Observatory, NSF, IODP, JAMSTEC, and the European, Japanese, German and Swiss Science Foundations, with in-kind support in Oman from the Ministry of Regional Municipalities and Water Resources, Public Authority of Mining, Sultan Qaboos University, and the German University of Technology. Hole GT1A was diamond cored in 22 Jan to 08 Feb 2017 to a total depth of 403.05 m. The outer surfaces of the cores were imaged and described on site before being curated, boxed and shipped to the IODP drill ship Chikyu, where they underwent comprehensive visual and instrumental analysis. Hole GT1A drilled the lower crustal section in the southern Oman Ophiolite and recovered 401.52 m of total cores (99.6% recovery). The main lithology is dominated by olivine gabbro (65.9%), followed in abundance by olivine-bearing gabbro (21.5%) and olivine melagabbro (3.9%). Minor rock types are orthopyroxene-bearing olivine gabbro (2.4%), oxide-bearing olivine gabbro (1.5%), gabbro (1.1%), anorthositic gabbro (1%), troctolitic gabbro (0.8%); orthopyroxene-bearing gabbro (0.5%), gabbronorite (0.3%); and dunite (0.3%). These rocks are divided into Lithologic Unit I to VII at 26.62 m, 88.16 m, 104.72 m, 154.04 m, 215.22 m, 306.94 m in Chikyu Curated Depth in descending order; Unit I and II consist of medium-grained olivine gabbro with lower olivine abundance in Unit II. Unit III is medium-grained olivine melagabbros, marked by an increase in olivine. Unit IV is relatively homogenous medium-grained olivine gabbros with granular textures. Unit V is identified by the appearance of fine-grained gabbros, but the major rocktypes are medium grained olivine gabbros. Unit VI is medium-grained olivine gabbro, marked by appearance of orthopyroxene. Unit VII

  5. Controls on the rheological properties of peridotite at a palaeosubduction interface: A transect across the base of the Oman-UAE ophiolite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrose, Tyler K.; Wallis, David; Hansen, Lars N.; Waters, Dave J.; Searle, Michael P.

    2018-06-01

    Studies of experimentally deformed rocks and small-scale natural shear zones have demonstrated that volumetrically minor phases can control strain localisation by limiting grain growth and promoting grain-size sensitive deformation mechanisms. These small-scale studies are often used to infer a critical role for minor phases in the development of plate boundaries. However, the role of minor phases in strain localisation at an actual plate boundary remains to be tested by direct observation. In order to test the hypothesis that minor phases control strain localisation at plate boundaries, we conducted microstructural analyses of peridotite samples collected along a ∼1 km transect across the base of the Oman-United Arab Emirates (UAE) ophiolite. The base of the ophiolite is marked by the Semail thrust, which represents the now exhumed contact between subducted oceanic crust and the overlying mantle wedge. As such, the base of the ophiolite provides the opportunity to directly examine a former plate boundary. Our results demonstrate that the mean olivine grain size is inversely proportional to the abundance of minor phases (primarily orthopyroxene, as well as clinopyroxene, hornblende, and spinel), consistent with suppression of grain growth by grain-boundary pinning. Our results also reveal that mean olivine grain size is proportional to CPO strength (both of which generally decrease towards the metamorphic sole), suggesting that the fraction of strain produced by different deformation mechanisms varied spatially. Experimentally-derived flow laws indicate that under the inferred deformation conditions, the viscosity of olivine was grain-size sensitive. As such, grain size, and thereby the abundance of minor phases, influenced viscosity during subduction-related deformation along the base of the mantle wedge. We calculate an order of magnitude decrease in the viscosity of olivine towards the base of the ophiolite, which suggests strain was localised near the

  6. Protrusive intrusion, dehydration and polymorphism in minerals as possible reason of seismic activity, relation between ophiolite belts and seismic zonation of the territory of Armenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harutyunyan, A. V.; Petrosyan, H. M.

    2010-05-01

    In the basis of multiple geological and geophysical data, also on the results of investigations seismic and density properties of rocks at high termobaric conditions, we proposed the petrophisical section and model of evolution of Earth crust of the territory of Armenia. On the proposed model the following interrelated problems are debated: forming of ophiolite belts and volcanic centers, genesis of hydrocarbons by organic and inorganic ways, and also reasons of originating of seismic centers. The reasons of originating of seismic centers in different depths of Earth crust, are miscellaneous. According to the model of Earth crust evolution the ophiolite belts are formed due to permanent protrusive intrusion of serpentinized masses from the foot of the crust (35-50km) into upper horizons. It is natural to assume, that the permanent intrusion of serpentinizd masses through deep faults has drastically occurred accompanying with seismic shakings. This process encourages the development of deep faults. The protrusive intrusion of serpentinized masse accompanied with partial dehydration of serpentinites and serpentinized ultrabasites and new mineral formation. The processes was accompanied also with drastic change of seismic waves and volumes up to 30%. Experiments at high termobaric conditions show, that some minerals undergone polymorphous transformations, accompanied with phase change and drastic change of rocks volume. Particularly plastic calcite, included in the composition of metamorphic rocks to run into the cracks expends and diversifies them. The process described cause some general effects similar to those of the process of dilatancy. Therefore, the protrusive intrusion of serpentinized masses into upper horizons, it dehydrations and polymorphous transformations in different minerals, may be cause of geo-dynamic processes at different depths of Earth crust. It may be assumed, that those processes permanently occur nowadays as well. Comparing the maps of

  7. A new method of discriminating different types of post-Archean ophiolitic basalts and their tectonic significance using Th-Nb and Ce-Dy-Yb systematics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilio Saccani

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a new discrimination diagram using absolute measures of Th and Nb is applied to post-Archean ophiolites to best discriminate a large number of different ophiolitic basalts. This diagram was obtained using >2000 known ophiolitic basalts and was tested using ∼560 modern rocks from known tectonic settings. Ten different basaltic varieties from worldwide ophiolitic complexes have been examined. They include two basaltic types that have never been considered before, which are: (1 medium-Ti basalts (MTB generated at nascent forearc settings; (2 a type of mid-ocean ridge basalts showing garnet signature (G-MORB that characterizes Alpine-type (i.e., non volcanic rifted margins and ocean-continent transition zones (OCTZ. In the Th-Nb diagram, basalts generated in oceanic subduction-unrelated settings, rifted margins, and OCTZ can be distinguished from subduction-related basalts with a misclassification rate <1%. This diagram highlights the chemical variation of oceanic, rifted margin, and OCTZ basalts from depleted compositions to progressively more enriched compositions reflecting, in turn, the variance of source composition and degree of melting within the MORB-OIB array. It also highlights the chemical contributions of enriched (OIB-type components to mantle sources. Enrichment of Th relative to Nb is particularly effective for highlighting crustal input via subduction or crustal contamination. Basalts formed at continental margin arcs and island arc with a complex polygenetic crust can be distinguished from those generated in intra-oceanic arcs in supra-subduction zones (SSZ with a misclassification rate <1%. Within the SSZ group, two sub-settings can be recognized with a misclassification rate <0.5%. They are: (1 SSZ influenced by chemical contribution from subduction-derived components (forearc and intra-arc sub-settings characterized by island arc tholeiitic (IAT and boninitic basalts; (2 SSZ with no contribution from subduction

  8. Determination of emplacement mechanism of Zafarghand granitoid Pluton (Southeast of Ardestan by using anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility method (AMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Sadeghian

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Zafarghand granitoid pluton with compositional range from gabbro to granite and early to middle Miocene age cropped out about 35 km of SE Ardestan. This pluton intrudedthe Eocene volcanic and volcanosedimentary rocks of the Urumieh - Dokhtar structuralzone. In this research, for the first time, the emplacement mechanism of Zafarghandgranitoidic pluton method has been investigated using of anisotropy of magneticsusceptibility (AMS. Based on field observations, as well as petrography andinterpretations of magnetic parameters, Zafarghand pluton divided into 5 domains (1A,1B, 2, 3, 4 and 5. Domain 1, in turn, is divided into 1A and 1B. Domains 2 and 4 arelithologically, gabbro to quartzdiorite and have been emplaced first. They have playedas feeder zones. Domains 1A, 1B, 3, and 5 are dominantly granodioritic to graniticcomposition and have been emplaced as a big and low dip magmatic flow (or possibly as a sill. The occurrence of gabbro to quartzdiorite as well as grandiorite, granite andtonalite in the margin borders of the body, are all indication of magma mixing. It isshould be noted that during emplacement of the pluton studied, fractionalcrystallization, magma mixing and crustal contamination contributed to its generationand the evolution as well.

  9. Lack of inhibiting effect of oil emplacement on quartz cementation: Evidence from Cambrian reservoir sandstones, Paleozoic Baltic Basin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molenaar, Nicolaas; Cyziene, Jolanta; Sliaupa, Saulius

    2008-01-01

    Currently, the question of whether or not the presence of oil in sandstone inhibits quartz cementation and preserves porosity is still debated. Data from a number of Cambrian sandstone oil fields and dry fields have been studied to determine the effects of oil emplacement on quartz cementation. T...

  10. Hanford 100-N Area In Situ Apatite and Phosphate Emplacement by Groundwater and Jet Injection: Geochemical and Physical Core Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szecsody, James E.; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.; Williams, Mark D.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Phillips, Jerry L.

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate emplacement of phosphate into subsurface sediments in the Hanford Site 100-N Area by two different technologies: groundwater injection of a Ca-citrate-PO4 solution and water-jet injection of sodium phosphate and/or fish-bone apatite. In situ emplacement of phosphate and apatite adsorbs, then incorporates Sr-90 into the apatite structure by substitution for calcium. Overall, both technologies (groundwater injection of Ca-citrate-PO4) and water-jet injection of sodium phosphate/fish-bone apatite) delivered sufficient phosphate to subsur¬face sediments in the 100-N Area. Over years to decades, additional Sr-90 will incorporate into the apatite precipitate. Therefore, high pressure water jetting is a viable technology to emplace phosphate or apatite in shallow subsurface sediments difficult to emplace by Ca-citrate-PO4 groundwater injections, but further analysis is needed to quantify the relevant areal extent of phosphate deposition (in the 5- to 15-ft distance from injection points) and cause of the high deposition in finer grained sediments.

  11. Granitic magma emplacement and deformation during early-orogenic syn-convergent transtension: The Stare Sedlo complex, Bohemian Massif

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tomek, Filip; Žák, J.; Chadima, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 87, JUL (2015), s. 50-66 ISSN 0264-3707 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) * Bohemian Massif * pluton emplacement * granite * transtension * Variscan orogeny Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 1.926, year: 2015

  12. Circum-Pacific accretion of oceanic terranes to continental blocks: accretion of the Early Permian Dun Mountain ophiolite to the E Gondwana continental margin, South Island, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Alastair

    2016-04-01

    Accretionary orogens, in part, grow as a result of the accretion of oceanic terranes to pre-existing continental blocks, as in the circum-Pacific and central Asian regions. However, the accretionary processes involved remain poorly understood. Here, we consider settings in which oceanic crust formed in a supra-subduction zone setting and later accreted to continental terranes (some, themselves of accretionary origin). Good examples include some Late Cretaceous ophiolites in SE Turkey, the Jurassic Coast Range ophiolite, W USA and the Early Permian Dun Mountain ophiolite of South Island, New Zealand. In the last two cases, the ophiolites are depositionally overlain by coarse clastic sedimentary rocks (e.g. Permian Upukerora Formation of South Island, NZ) that then pass upwards into very thick continental margin fore-arc basin sequences (Great Valley sequence, California; Matai sequence, South Island, NZ). Field observations, together with petrographical and geochemical studies in South Island, NZ, summarised here, provide evidence of terrane accretion processes. In a proposed tectonic model, the Early Permian Dun Mountain ophiolite was created by supra-subduction zone spreading above a W-dipping subduction zone (comparable to the present-day Izu-Bonin arc and fore arc, W Pacific). The SSZ oceanic crust in the New Zealand example is inferred to have included an intra-oceanic magmatic arc, which is no longer exposed (other than within a melange unit in Southland), but which is documented by petrographic and geochemical evidence. An additional subduction zone is likely to have dipped westwards beneath the E Gondwana margin during the Permian. As a result, relatively buoyant Early Permian supra-subduction zone oceanic crust was able to dock with the E Gondwana continental margin, terminating intra-oceanic subduction (although the exact timing is debatable). The amalgamation ('soft collision') was accompanied by crustal extension of the newly accreted oceanic slab, and

  13. Aqueous Geochemical Dynamics at the Coast Range Ophiolite Microbial Observatory and The Case for Subsurface Mixing of Regional Groundwaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardace, D.; Schrenk, M. O.; McCollom, T. M.; Hoehler, T. M.

    2017-12-01

    Serpentinization is the aqueous alteration (or hydration) of olivine and pyroxene minerals in ultramafic rocks, occurring in the seabed and ultramafic units on continents, such as at the Coast Range Ophiolite (CRO) in northern California, USA. Mineral products of serpentinization include serpentine, magnetite, brucite, talc, oxyhydroxides, carbonates, and diverse clay minerals. Such mineral transformations generate extremely high pH solutions with characteristic cation and dissolved metal loads, transmitting CH4, H2, and CO gas mixtures from depth; deep life in ultramafic terrains is thought to be fueled by chemical energy derived from these geochemical reactions. The installation of 8 groundwater monitoring wells in the CRO has allowed frequent monitoring since 2011. Influx of deeply sourced, serpentinization-influenced waters is evidenced by related geochemical shifts (e.g., pH, oxidation-reduction potential), but is apparently mixing with other, regionally important groundwater types. Evaluation salinity loads in concert with other parameters, we model the mixing scenario of this site of ongoing scientific study and experimentation.

  14. Weathering and transport of chromium and nickel from serpentinite in the Coast Range ophiolite to the Sacramento Valley, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Jean M.; Goldhaber, Martin B.; Mills, Christopher T.; Breit, George N.; Hooper, Robert L.; Holloway, JoAnn M.; Diehl, Sharon F.; Ranville, James F.

    2015-01-01

    A soil geochemical study in northern California was done to investigate the role that weathering and transport play in the regional distribution and mobility of geogenic Cr and Ni, which are both potentially toxic and carcinogenic. These elements are enriched in ultramafic rocks (primarily serpentinite) and the soils derived from them (1700–10,000 mg Cr per kg soil and 1300–3900 mg Ni per kg soil) in the Coast Range ophiolite. Chromium and Ni have been transported eastward from the Coast Range into the western Sacramento Valley and as a result, valley soil is enriched in Cr (80–1420 mg kg−1) and Ni (65–224 mg kg−1) compared to median values of U.S. soils of 50 and 15 mg kg−1, respectively. Nickel in ultramafic source rocks and soils is present in serpentine minerals (lizardite, antigorite, and chrysotile) and is more easily weathered compared to Cr, which primarily resides in highly refractory chromite ([Mg,Fe2+][Cr3+,Al,Fe3+]2O4). Although the majority of Cr and Ni in soils are in refractory chromite and serpentine minerals, the etching and dissolution of these minerals, presence of Cr- and Ni-enriched clay minerals and development of nanocrystalline Fe (hydr)oxides is evidence that a significant fractions of these elements have been transferred to potentially more labile phases.

  15. Characteristics and mode of emplacement of gneiss domes and plutonic domes in central-eastern Pyrenees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soula, Jean-Claude

    Gneiss domes and plutonic granitoid domes make up almost 50% of the pre-Hercynian terrains in the Central and Eastern Pyrenees. From a structural study of the shape and internal structure of the domes and of their relationships with the enclosing rocks, it can be shown that both types of domes were emplaced diapirically during the major regional deformation phase and the peak of regional metamorphism. The study also shows that the internal structure, the overall shape and general behaviour relative to the host rocks are similar for plutonic domes and for gneiss domes. This appears to be in good agreement with H. Ramberg's (1967, Gravity Deformation and the Earth's Crust. Academic Press, London; 1970, Model studies in relation to intrusion of plutonic bodies. In: Mechanisms of Igneous Intrusion (edited by Newall, G. & Rast, N.) Geol. J. Spec. Issue2, 261-286.) model studies showing that dome or mushroom-like structures, similar to those observed, develop when there is a small viscosity ratio between the rising body and its enclosing medium. This implies a high crystal content for the granitoid magma. This crystal content has been estimated by (i) calculating the viscosity and density in natural conditions from petrological data for the magma considered as a suspension, using the model and program of J. P. Carron et al. (1978 Bull Soc. géol. Fr.20, 739-744.); (ii) using the recent results of experimental deformation of partially melted granites of I. van der Molen & M. S. Paterson (1979, Contr. Miner. Petrol.70, 299-318.) and (ii) comparing the preceding results with the data obtained by deformation experiments on rocks similar to those enclosing the domes. The minimum crystal content for the development of a dome-like structure has been, thus, estimated to about 70%, i.e. a value very close to that estimated by van der Molen & Paterson (1979) to be the critical value separating the granular framework flow from suspension-like behaviour. The effect of small

  16. Explosive eruptive history of Pantelleria, Italy: Repeated caldera collapse and ignimbrite emplacement at a peralkaline volcano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Nina J.; Rotolo, Silvio G.; Williams, Rebecca; Speranza, Fabio; McIntosh, William C.; Branney, Michael J.; Scaillet, Stéphane

    2018-01-01

    A new, pre-Green Tuff (46 ka) volcanic stratigraphy is presented for the peralkaline Pantelleria Volcano, Italy. New 40Ar/39Ar and paleomagnetic data are combined with detailed field studies to develop a comprehensive stratigraphic reconstruction of the island. We find that the pre-46 ka succession is characterised by eight silica-rich peralkaline (trachyte to pantellerite) ignimbrites, many of which blanketed the entire island. The ignimbrites are typically welded to rheomorphic, and are commonly associated with lithic breccias and/or pumice deposits. They record sustained radial pyroclastic density currents fed by low pyroclastic fountains. The onset of ignimbrite emplacement is typically preceded (more rarely followed) by pumice fallout with limited dispersal, and some eruptions lack any associated pumice fall deposit, suggesting the absence of tall eruption columns. Particular attention is given to the correlation of well-developed lithic breccias in the ignimbrites, interpreted as probable tracers of caldera collapses. They record as many as five caldera collapse events, in contrast to the two events reported to date. Inter-ignimbrite periods are characterised by explosive and effusive eruptions with limited dispersal, such as small pumice cones, as well as pedogenesis. These periods have similar characteristics as the current post-Green Tuff activity on the island, and, while not imminent, it is reasonable to postulate the occurrence of another ignimbrite-forming eruption sometime in the future.

  17. Emplacement of Xenolith Nodules in the Kaupulehu Lava Flow, Hualalai Volcano, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guest, J. E.; Spudis, P. D.; Greeley, R.; Taylor, G. J.; Baloga, S. M.

    1995-01-01

    The basaltic Kaupulehu 1800-1801 lava flow of Hualalai Volcano, Hawaii contains abundant ultramafic xenoliths. Many of these xenoliths occur as bedded layers of semi-rounded nodules, each thinly coated with a veneer (typically 1 mm thick) of lava. The nodule beds are analogous to cobble deposits of fluvial sedimentary systems. Although several mechanisms have been proposed for the formation of the nodule beds, it was found that, at more than one locality, the nodule beds are overbank levee deposits. The geological occurrence of the nodules, certain diagnostic aspects of the flow morphology and consideration of the inferred emplacement process indicate that the Kaupulehu flow had an exceptionally low viscosity on eruption and that the flow of the lava stream was extremely rapid, with flow velocities of at least 10 m/s (more than 40 km/h. This flow is the youngest on Hualalai Volcano and future eruptions of a similar type would pose considerable hazard to life as well as property.

  18. Thermal impact of waste emplacement and surface cooling associated with geologic disposal of nuclear waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, J.S.Y.; Mangold, D.C.; Spencer, R.K.; Tsang, C.F.

    1982-08-01

    The thermal effects associated with the emplacement of aged radioactive wastes in a geologic repository were studied, with emphasis on the following subjects: the waste characteristics, repository structure, and rock properties controlling the thermally induced effects; the current knowledge of the thermal, thermomechanical, and thermohydrologic impacts, determined mainly on the basis of previous studies that assume 10-year-old wastes; the thermal criteria used to determine the repository waste loading densities; and the technical advantages and disadvantages of surface cooling of the wastes prior to disposal as a means of mitigating the thermal impacts. The waste loading densities determined by repository designs for 10-year-old wastes are extended to older wastes using the near-field thermomechanical criteria based on room stability considerations. Also discussed are the effects of long surface cooling periods determined on the basis of far-field thermomechanical and thermohydrologic considerations. The extension of the surface cooling period from 10 years to longer periods can lower the near-field thermal impact but have only modest long-term effects for spent fuel. More significant long-term effects can be achieved by surface cooling of reprocessed high-level waste.

  19. Design of the human computer interface on the telerobotic small emplacement excavator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, D.H.; Killough, S.M.; Burks, B.L.; Draper, J.V.

    1995-01-01

    The small emplacement excavator (SEE) is a ruggedized military vehicle with backhoe and front loader used by the U.S. Army for explosive ordinance disposal (EOD) and general utility excavation activities. This project resulted from a joint need in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for a remote controlled excavator for buried waste operations and the U.S. Department of Defense for remote EOD operations. To evaluate the feasibility of removing personnel from the SEE vehicle during high-risk excavation tasks, a development and demonstration project was initiated. Development of a telerobotic SEE (TSEE) was performed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in a project funded jointly by the U.S. Army and the DOE. The TSEE features teleoperated driving, a telerobotic backhoe with four degrees of freedom, and a teleoperated front loader with two degrees of freedom on the bucket. Remote capabilities include driving (forward, reverse, brake, steering), power takeoff shifting to enable digging modes, deploying stabilizers, excavation, and computer system booting

  20. Thermal impact of waste emplacement and surface cooling associated with geologic disposal of nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, J.S.Y.; Mangold, D.C.; Spencer, R.K.; Tsang, C.F.

    1982-08-01

    The thermal effects associated with the emplacement of aged radioactive wastes in a geologic repository were studied, with emphasis on the following subjects: the waste characteristics, repository structure, and rock properties controlling the thermally induced effects; the current knowledge of the thermal, thermomechanical, and thermohydrologic impacts, determined mainly on the basis of previous studies that assume 10-year-old wastes; the thermal criteria used to determine the repository waste loading densities; and the technical advantages and disadvantages of surface cooling of the wastes prior to disposal as a means of mitigating the thermal impacts. The waste loading densities determined by repository designs for 10-year-old wastes are extended to older wastes using the near-field thermomechanical criteria based on room stability considerations. Also discussed are the effects of long surface cooling periods determined on the basis of far-field thermomechanical and thermohydrologic considerations. The extension of the surface cooling period from 10 years to longer periods can lower the near-field thermal impact but have only modest long-term effects for spent fuel. More significant long-term effects can be achieved by surface cooling of reprocessed high-level waste

  1. Emplacement feasibility of a multi-tier, expanded capacity repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apted, Michael; Kessler, John; Fairhurst, Charles

    2008-01-01

    A geological repository at Yucca Mountain has been proposed for the disposal of spent fuel from the US commercial reactors and other radioactive waste. A legislative capacity of 70,000 MTHM has been set by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, including 63,000 MTHM of commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF), the projected amount of CSNF that will be produced by about 2014. Policy issues remain as to how to handle waste that is generated beyond 2014 from a growing nuclear industry in the US. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is independently evaluating the technical, rather than legislative, limit of CSNF that could be safely disposed at Yucca Mountain. Geological, thermal management, safety and cost factors have been recently evaluated by EPRI (2006; 2007) for grouped emplacement drifts and/or a multi-tier repository. EPRI's evaluation of emplacement feasibility for a multi-tier concept is described here. Expanded capacity concepts as envisioned for Yucca Mountain (EPRI, 2006; 2007) assume excavation of one or two additional levels of drifts parallel to or above and/or below the original drift excavations. For the latter multi-tier concept each 'tier' or 'level' would essentially replicate the original layer with a 30-m separation between tiers. This arrangement essentially doubles or triples the capacity of the repository for a two- or three-tier design, respectively. The main issues that affect the feasibility of expanded capacity design are; (i) ventilation requirements; (ii) radiation hazards; (iii) thermal and thermo-mechanical constraints. (i)Ventilation: The repository design involves waste packages mounted in close proximity to each other in 600-m long drifts that remain open and actively ventilated for at least 50-100 years. Analyses,conservatively assuming that all three repository levels operate simultaneously, indicate no technological obstacles in meeting ventilation requirements for sustained simultaneous operation ba sed on current industrial

  2. Conodont geothermometry in pyroclastic kimberlite: constraints on emplacement temperatures and cooling histories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pell, Jennifer; Russell, James K.; Zhang, Shunxin

    2018-03-01

    Kimberlite pipes from Chidliak, Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada host surface-derived Paleozoic carbonate xenoliths containing conodonts. Conodonts are phosphatic marine microfossils that experience progressive, cumulative and irreversible colour changes upon heating that are experimentally calibrated as a conodont colour alteration index (CAI). CAI values permit us to estimate the temperatures to which conodont-bearing rocks have been heated. Conodonts have been recovered from 118 samples from 89 carbonate xenoliths collected from 12 of the pipes and CAI values within individual carbonate xenoliths show four types of CAI distributions: (1) CAI values that are uniform throughout the xenolith; (2) lower CAIs in core of a xenolith than the rim; (3) CAIs that increase from one side of the xenolith to the other; and, (4) in one xenolith, higher CAIs in the xenolith core than at the rim. We have used thermal models for post-emplacement conductive cooling of kimberlite pipes and synchronous heating of conodont-bearing xenoliths to establish the temperature-time history of individual xenoliths within the kimberlite bodies. Model results suggest that the time-spans for xenoliths to reach the peak temperatures recorded by CAIs varies from hours for the smallest xenoliths to 2 or 3 years for the largest xenoliths. The thermal modelling shows the first three CAI patterns to be consistent with in situ conductive heating of the xenoliths coupled to the cooling host kimberlite. The fourth pattern remains an anomaly.

  3. The age and emplacement of obducted oceanic crust in the Urals from Sm-Nd and Rb-Sr systematics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, R.L.; Wasserburg, G.J.

    1985-01-01

    The Urals contain a 2000 km belt of mafic-ultramafic bodies. The Sm-Nd and Rb-Sr systematics of two of these bodies, the Kempersai Massif in the South Ural Mountains and the Voykar-Syninsky Ophiolite Complex in the Polar Ural Mountains have been examined. These data confirm the hypothesis that these bodies represent fragments of pre-collision oceanic crust and establish constraints on the nature and timing of events in the Uralian Orogeny. Two Kempersai gabbros define Sm-Nd internal isochrons of 397 +- 20 My and 396 +- 33 My with epsilonsub(Nd)(T) = +8.7 -+ 0.6 and +8.4 -+ 1.3, respectively. Whole rock samples of pillow basalt, diabase, gabbros, troctolite, and a metasediment give Sm-Nd values which lie on this isochron indicating that these rocks are genetically related and have an igneous crystallization age of 397 My. Whole rock samples of Voykar-Syninsky diabase, gabbros, and clinopyroxenite give Sm-Nd values which lie on or within proportional 1 epsilon-unit of this isochron indicating an age and epsilonsub(Nd)(T) virtually identical to those of Kempersai. epsilonsub(Nd)(T) for the Kempersai and Voykar-Syninsky mafic samples range from +7.3 to +9.0 with an average value of +8.4. This indicates that the Urals ophiolites are derived from an ancient depleted mantle source and are most plausibly pieces of the oceanic crust and lithosphere. The fact that a metasediment has the same epsilonsub(Nd)(397 My) as the other samples indicates derivation from an oceanic source with negligible continental input. epsilonsub(Nd)(T) for the massifs is proportional 1.5 epsilon-units lower than the average for modern MORBs. (orig./HSI)

  4. Quarter-scale modeling of room convergence effects on CH [contact-handled] TRU drum waste emplacements using WIPP [Waste Isolation Pilot Plant] reference design geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    VandeKraats, J.

    1987-11-01

    This study investigates the effect of horizontal room convergence on CH waste packages emplaced in the WIPP Reference Design geometry (rooms 13 feet high by 33 feet wide, with minus 3/8 inch screened backfill emplaced over and around the waste packages) as a function of time. Based on two tests, predictions were made with regard to full-scale 6-packs emplaced in the Reference Design geometry. These are that load will be transmitted completely through the stack within the first five years after waste emplacement and all drums in all 6-packs will be affected; that virtually all drums will show some deformation eight years after emplacement; that some drums may breach before the eighth year after emplacement has elapsed; and that based on criteria developed during testing, it is predicted that 1% of the drums emplaced will be breached after 8 years and, after 15 years, approximately 12% of the drums are predicted to be breached. 8 refs., 41 figs., 3 tabs

  5. Mineralogy, composition and PGM of chromitites from Pefki, Pindos ophiolite complex (NW Greece): evidence for progressively elevated fAs conditions in the upper mantle sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapsiotis, Argirios; Grammatikopoulos, Tassos A.; Tsikouras, Basilios; Hatzipanagiotou, Konstantin; Zaccarini, Federica; Garuti, Giorgio

    2011-01-01

    The Pindos ophiolite complex, located in the northwestern part of continental Greece, hosts various chromite deposits of both metallurgical (high-Cr) and refractory (high-Al) type. The Pefki chromitites are banded and sub-concordant to the surrounding serpentinized dunites. The Cr# [Cr/(Cr + Al)] of magnesiochromite varies between 0.75 and 0.79. The total PGE grade ranges from 105.9 up to 300.0 ppb. IPGE are higher than PPGE, typical of mantle hosted ophiolitic chromitites. The PGM assemblage in chromitites comprises anduoite, ruarsite, laurite, irarsite, sperrylite, hollingworthite, Os-Ru-Ir alloys including osmium and rutheniridosmine, Ru-bearing oxides, braggite, paolovite, platarsite, cooperite, vysotskite, and palladodymite. Iridarsenite and omeiite were also observed as exsolutions in other PGM. Rare electrum and native Ag are recovered in concentrates. This PGM assemblage is of great petrogenetic importance because it is significantly different from that commonly observed in podiform mantle-hosted and banded crustal-hosted ophiolitic chromitites. PGE chalcogenides of As and S are primary, and possibly crystallized directly from a progressively enriched in As boninitic melt before or during magnesiochromite precipitation. The presence of Ru-bearing oxides implies simultaneous desulfurization and dearsenication processes. Chemically zoned laurite and composite paolovite-electrum intergrowths are indicative of the relatively high mobility of certain PGE at low temperatures under locally oxidizing conditions. The PGM assemblage and chemistry, in conjunction with geological and petrologic data of the studied chromitites, indicate that it is characteristic of chromitites found within or close to the petrologic Moho. Furthermore, the strikingly different PGM assemblages between the high-Cr chromitites within the Pindos massif is suggestive of non-homogeneous group of ores.

  6. Natural flows of H2-rich fluids in the ophiolites of Oman and the Philippines: Tectonic control of migration pathways and associated diagenetic processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deville, E. P.; Prinzhofer, A.; Vacquand, C.; Chavagnac, V.; Monnin, C.; Ceuleneer, G.; Arcilla, C. A.

    2009-12-01

    We compare the geological environments of sites of emission of natural hydrogen in the Oman ophiolite and the Zambales ophiolite (Luzon, Philippines). The genesis of natural H2 results from the interaction between ultrabasic rocks and aqueous solutions circulating in deep fracture networks, by oxidation of metals (Fe2+, Mn2+) and reduction of water, probably under high temperature conditions. This process generates very reducing conditions capable of destabilizing other molecules (notably reduction of deep CO2 being transformed into CH4 by Fisher-Tropsch type reactions). Nitrogen is also commonly associated to the H2-rich fluids. H2 flows are associated with the expulsion of hyperalkaline waters rich in ions OH- and Ca2+ and characterized by high pH (between 11 and 12). Most alkaline springs are found in the vicinity of major faults and/or lithological discontinuities like the basal thrust plane of the ophiolites and the peridotite-gabbro contact (Moho). Within the fracture networks, gas and water separate probably at shallow depth, i.e. close to the top of the upper aquifer level. Locally high flows of gas migrate vertically through fracture pathways and they are able to inflame spontaneously on the surface. Aqueous fluids tends to migrate laterally in the fracture network toward the creeks where most of the hyperalkaline springs are found. This water circulation induces a chain of diagenetic reactions starting in the fracture systems and continuing at the surface where it leads to the precipitation of calcite, aragonite, brucite and more rarely portlandite. This chain of diagenetic reactions is associated with the capture of the atmospheric CO2 during the precipitation of carbonates.

  7. Geology and tectonic magmatic of emplacement of a longitudinal dyke swarm of Nico Perez(Minas) URUGUAY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, P.; Poire, D.; Canalicchio, J.; Garcia Repetto, F.

    2004-01-01

    The Mina Verdun Group (Precambrian) was deposited prior to the subvolcanic emplacement of a longitudinal dyke swarm of basaltic to andesitic composition (Minas Subvolcanic Swarm of the Mina Verdun quarry - Nico Perez Terrane, Minas, Uruguay). The swarm and its country rocks predated a tectono-metamorphic event that produced fragileductile shear zones associated with very low- to low-grade dislocation metamorphism. We interpreted a K-Ar whole rock datum of 485,2 ± 12,5 Ma (andesitic dyke) as a minimum cooling age in relation with late- to post-swarm emplacement deuteric alteration stage. Another K-Ar whole rock datum of 108,5 ± 2,9 Ma on a basaltic dyke was assumed here as a degasification stage, while its geological meaning is still matter of debate. The Minas Subvolcanic Dyke Swarm was intruded at high crustal levels, suggesting that the Minas region was affected by a period of extensional tectonics [es

  8. Preliminary uncertainty analysis of pre-waste-emplacement groundwater travel times for a proposed repository in basalt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clifton, P.M.; Arnett, R.C.

    1984-01-01

    Preliminary uncertainty analyses of pre-waste-emplacement groundwater travel times are presented for a potential high-level nuclear waste repository in the deep basalts beneath the Hanford Site, Washington State. The uncertainty analyses are carried out by means of a Monte Carlo technique, which requires the uncertain inputs to be described as either random variables or spatial stochastic processes. Pre-waste-emplacement groundwater travel times are modeled in a continuous, flat-lying basalt flow top that is assumed to overlie the repository horizon. Two-dimensional, steady state groundwater flow is assumed, and transmissivity, effective thickness, and regional hydraulic gradient are considered as uncertain inputs. Groundwater travel time distributions corresponding to three groundwater models are presented and compared. Limitations of these preliminary simulation results are discussed in detail

  9. The ophiolite massif of Kahnuj (western Makran, Southern Iran): new geological and geochronological data; Le massif ophiolitique de Kahnuj (Makran occidental, Iran meridional): nouvelles donnees geologiques et geochronologiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kananian, A. [University of Tarbiat Modarress, Geological Dept., Faculty of Science, Teheran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Juteau, Th.; Bellon, H. [Universite de Bretagne Occidentale, IUEM, 29 - Brest (France); Darvishzadeh, A. [University of Teheran, Geological Dept., Faculty of Science, Teheran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sabzehi, M. [Geological Survey of Iran, Teheran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Whitechurch, H. [Universite Louis Pasteur, EOST, Institut de Physique du Globe, 67 - Strasbourg (France); Ricou, L.E. [Institut de Physique du Globe, 75 - Paris (France)

    2001-05-01

    The ophiolite massif of Kahnuj (600 km{sup 2}) consists, from bottom to top, of layered gabbros, isotropic gabbros and ouralite gabbros, agmatites of dioritic to plagio-granitic composition, a sheeted dyke complex and lastly a basaltic pillow lava unit. Amphiboles from gabbros were dated ({sup 40}K-{sup 40}Ar ages) between 156 and 139 Ma and the agmatites are nearly contemporaneous. Potassic granitic veins dated at 93-88 Ma are related to the development of the Ganj arc complex. (authors)

  10. Post-magmatic structural evolution of the Troodos Ophiolite Pillow Lavas revealed by microthermometry within vein precipitates, with application to Alpine-Mediterranean supra-subduction zone settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurz, W.; Quandt, D.; Micheuz, P.; Krenn, K.

    2017-12-01

    The Troodos ophiolite, Cyprus, is one of the best preserved ophiolites. Based on geochemical data a supra-subduction zone (SSZ) setting was proposed. Microtextures and fluid inclusions of veins and vesicles within the Pillow Lavas record the post-magmatic structural and geochemical evolution of this SSZ beginning at 75 Ma. Three different vein types from the Upper and Lower Pillow Lavas are distinguished and imply vein precipitation under a dominant extensional regime: (1) syntaxial calcite-, quartz- and zeolite-bearing veins are interpreted as mineralized extension fractures that were pervaded by seawater. This advective fluid flow in an open system changed later into a closed system characterized by geochemical self-organization. (2) Blocky and (3) antitaxial fibrous calcite veins are associated with brecciation due to hydrofracturing and diffusion-crystallization processes, respectively. Based on aqueous fluid inclusion chemistry with seawater salinities in all studied vein types, representative fluid inclusion isochores crossed with calculated litho- and hydrostatic pressure conditions yield mineral precipitation temperatures between 180 and 210 °C, for veins and vesicles hosted in the Upper and Lower Pillow Lavas. This points to a heat source for the circulating seawater and implies that vein and vesicle minerals precipitated shortly after pillow lava crystallization under dominant isobaric cooling conditions. Compared to previous suggestions derived from secondary mineralization a less steep geothermal gradient of 200 °C from the Sheeted Dyke Complex to the Pillow Lavas of the Troodos SSZ is proposed. Further fossil and recent SSZ like the Mirdita ophiolite, Albania, the South-Anatolian ophiolites, Turkey, and the Izu-Bonin fore arc, respectively, reveal similar volcanic sequences. Vein samples recovered during International Ocean Discovery Program expedition 351 and 352 in the Izu-Bonin back and fore arc, respectively, indicate also seawater infiltration

  11. Operational procedures for receiving, packaging, emplacing, and retrieving high-level and transuranic waste in a geologic repository in TUFF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dennis, A.W.; Mulkin, R.

    1984-01-01

    The Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations Project, directed by the Nevada Operations Office of the Department of Energy, is currently developing conceptual designs for a commercial nuclear waste repository. In this paper, the preliminary repository operating plans are identified and the proposed repository waste inventory is discussed. The receipt rates for truck and rail car shipments of waste are determined as are the required repository waste emplacement rates

  12. Emplacement dynamics of phonolite magma into maar-diatreme structures - Correlation of field, thermal modeling and AMS analogue modeling data

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Závada, Prokop; Dědeček, Petr; Mach, K.; Lexa, O.; Potužák, M.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 201, č. 1-4 (2011), s. 210-226 ISSN 0377-0273 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ME09011; GA AV ČR KJB301110703 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30120515 Keywords : phonolite * maar-diatreme * magma emplacement dynamics * thermal modeling * AMS analogue modeling * cavitation Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 1.978, year: 2011

  13. Characterization of Serpentine Samples from the Coast Range Ophiolite Microbial Observatory with μ-FTIR and XRD. ­­

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, A.; Cardace, D.

    2017-12-01

    Serpentinizing systems hold much promise as potentially habitable environments in diverse planetary settings. They involve abundant and simple ingredients (i.e., the mineral olivine, liquid water), support subsurface microbial communities on Earth (Crespo-Medina et al. 2014; Suzuki et al. 2014; Kelley et al. 2005) and are thought to occur elsewhere in our solar system such as Mars (Schulte et al. 2006; Ehlmann et al. 2010)and possibly ocean worlds (Waite et al. 2017; Vance 2009). Although geochemical and microbial data collection continues in serpentinizing systems, the identification and resolution of potential biosignatures in serpentinites are not yet clear. Specifically, the micro-scale mineralogical contexts in which cell fragments or biofilm residues may be formed and preserved is lacking. Here we report preliminary transmission and reflection mode μ-FTIR spectral maps and XRD diffractograms, obtained with instruments relevant to robotic exploration missions (Blake et al. 2012; Igisu et al. 2009; Leroi et al. 2009). Samples analyzed include ultramafic rock and constituent mineral standards (e.g., olivine) and rocks collected from near surface sites associated with the NASA Astrobiology Institute-funded initiative, the Coast Range Ophiolite Microbial Observatory (CROMO), in Lower Lake, CA (Cardace et al. 2013). These new results provide co-registered, complementary data on astrobiologically important rock and mineral phases related to serpentinization (Crespo-Medina et al. 2014; Twing et al. 2017). Future work will leverage this data set in microbial colonization experiments aimed at parsing background organic loads in serpentinites from surficial/fracture-localized modern biofilm signatures.

  14. Compositional Variation of Chrome Spinels in the Ore-bearing Zones of the Kraka Ophiolite and the Chromitite Origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. E. Saveliev

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The article considers a chemical variation of accessory and ore-forming chrome spinels from the Kraka ultramafic massif at the different scales, from the deposit to the thin section. A correlation analysis of compositional and structural features of ultramafic rocks and ores was performed. The ultramafic rocks and chromitites in the studied massif show the distinct deformation structures and tectonite olivine fabric. A typical chemical gap (i.e. Cr#=Cr/(Cr+Al was observed between peridotite, on the one hand, and dunite and chromitite, on the other hand, on the scale of deposits and ore-bearing zones. The location and size of this gap depend on the type of deposit. The gap becomes wider from the disseminated tabular bodies to the typical podiform ones. It has been found that in the thin initial dunite veinlets in peridotite the chrome spinels chemistry changes gradually and there is no Cr# gap between peridotite and dunite. The dunite venlets show a strong olivine fabric, which is an evidence of their high-temperature plastic flow origin. It has been revealed that new chrome spinel grains previously formed as rods or needles and then coarsened. We explained this observation as the result of impurity segregation, coalescence and spheroidization induced by the plastic deformation of olivine. It is inferred that a solid crystal flow is the main requirement for the dunite and chromitite body formation in the Kraka ophiolite massif. In the solid stream, the mineral phase separation takes place. For example, olivine and orthopyroxene grains of parental peridotite separate from one another, and weaker (more mobile olivine grains form dunite bodies in which chromitite appears as a result of impurity segregation.

  15. Characterizing the nature of melt-rock reaction in peridotites from the Santa Elena Ophiolite, NW Costa Rica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, D.; Loocke, M. P.; Snow, J. E.; Gazel, E.

    2017-12-01

    The Santa Elena Ophiolite (SEO), located on the northwestern coast of Costa Rica, consists primarily of preserved oceanic mantle and crustal rocks thrust above an accretionary complex. The SEO is predominantly characterized by mantle peridotites (i.e., primarily spinel lherzolite with minor amounts of harzburgite and dunite) cut and intruded by minor pegmatitic gabbros, layered gabbros, plagiogranites, and doleritic and basaltic dykes. Previous studies have concluded that the complex formed in a suprasubduction zone (SSZ) setting based on the geochemical nature of the layered gabbros and plagiogranites (i.e., depleted LREE and HFSE and enriched LILE and Pb), as well, as the peridotites (i.e., low-TiO2, Zr, and V, and high MgO, Cr, and Ni)(Denyer and Gazel, 2009). Eighteen ultramafic samples collected during the winter 2010/2011 field season (SECR11) exhibit abundant evidence for melt-rock reaction (e.g., disseminated plagioclase and plagioclase-spinel, clinopyroxene-spinel, and plagioclase-clinopyroxene symplectites) and provide a unique opportunity to characterize the textural and chemical nature of melt-rock reaction in the SEO. We present the results of a petrologic investigation (i.e., petrography and electron probe microanalysis) of 28 thin sections (19 spinel lherzolites, of which 14 are plagioclase-bearing, 4 pyroxenite veins, and 5 harzburgites) derived from the SECR11 sample set. The results of this investigation have the potential to better our understanding of the nature of melt generation and migration and melt-rock interaction in the SEO mantle section and shed further light on the complex petrogenetic history of the SEO. Denyer, P., Gazel, E., 2009, Journal of South American Earth Sciences, 28:429-442.

  16. Evaluation of Cr in ophiolite and groundwater and its potential to contaminate the environment in SE of Birjand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Khaledi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The presence of Cr(VI in groundwater resources is governed by pH and Eh of water and its compounds are generally soluble and have more toxicicity and mobility in oxidizing environments. In this article, the Cr concentration in ophiolite units, in sediments, and in groundwater resources, and also its potential to contaminate the environment have been investigated in southeast of Birjand. During sampling, 17 water samples (2 rain water samples and 15 groundwater samples, and 8 sediment samples were collected. The concentrations of cations (major cations and Cr and anions in water samples were measured at Ottawa University, Canada using IC and ICP-AES methods, respectively. Cr concentrations of sediments were measured using XRF, and concentrations of Cr in collected Selective Sequential Extraction (SSE fractions were measured using Atomic Absorption (AA at Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Iran. The average Cr concentrations in sediments and water resources are 627 and 0.026 ppm, respectively. According to the pH of sediments and Eh-pH of water samples, the Cr in water resources is as Cr(VI. Furthermore, the results of SSE show that the majority of Cr was found with residual matter, attached to the iron and manganese oxides, bound to carbonates, organic matter, and the soluble fractions, respectively. The hydrogeochemical properties of water resources show that the average values of EC, TDS and pH are 509 mg/l, 1045 µs/cm and 8.1, respectively, and the concentrations of Cl-, Na+, Mg2+ and SO42- ions are higher than the levels of WHO and Iran National Standard (1053. According to the WQI classification, while 20 percent of the water resources have excellent quality, 53 percent show good quality and 20 percent of water resources are poor in quality.

  17. Subsurface geometry of the San Andreas-Calaveras fault junction: influence of serpentinite and the Coast Range Ophiolite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watt, Janet Tilden; Ponce, David A.; Graymer, Russell W.; Jachens, Robert C.; Simpson, Robert W.

    2014-01-01

    While an enormous amount of research has been focused on trying to understand the geologic history and neotectonics of the San Andreas-Calaveras fault (SAF-CF) junction, fundamental questions concerning fault geometry and mechanisms for slip transfer through the junction remain. We use potential-field, geologic, geodetic, and seismicity data to investigate the 3-D geologic framework of the SAF-CF junction and identify potential slip-transferring structures within the junction. Geophysical evidence suggests that the San Andreas and Calaveras fault zones dip away from each other within the northern portion of the junction, bounding a triangular-shaped wedge of crust in cross section. This wedge changes shape to the south as fault geometries change and fault activity shifts between fault strands, particularly along the Calaveras fault zone (CFZ). Potential-field modeling and relocated seismicity suggest that the Paicines and San Benito strands of the CFZ dip 65° to 70° NE and form the southwest boundary of a folded 1 to 3 km thick tabular body of Coast Range Ophiolite (CRO) within the Vallecitos syncline. We identify and characterize two steeply dipping, seismically active cross structures within the junction that are associated with serpentinite in the subsurface. The architecture of the SAF-CF junction presented in this study may help explain fault-normal motions currently observed in geodetic data and help constrain the seismic hazard. The abundance of serpentinite and related CRO in the subsurface is a significant discovery that not only helps constrain the geometry of structures but may also help explain fault behavior and the tectonic evolution of the SAF-CF junction.

  18. Magnetic fabrics in characterization of magma emplacement and tectonic evolution of the Moyar Shear Zone, South India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Pratheesh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The Moyar Shear Zone (MSZ of the South Indian granulite terrain hosts a prominent syenite pluton (∼560 Ma and associated NW-SE to NE-SW trending mafic dyke swarm (∼65 Ma and 95 Ma. Preliminary magnetic fabric studies in the mafic dykes, using Anisotropy of Magnetic Susceptibly (AMS studies at low-field, indicate successive emplacement and variable magma flow direction. Magnetic lineation and foliation in these dykes are identical to the mesoscopic fabrics in MSZ mylonites, indicating shear zone guided emplacement. Spatial distribution of magnetic lineation in the dykes suggests a common conduit from which the source magma has been migrated. The magnetic foliation trajectories have a sigmoidal shape to the north of the pluton and curve into the MSZ suggesting dextral sense of shear. Identical fabric conditions for magnetic fabrics in the syenite pluton and measured field fabrics in mylonite indicate syntectonic emplacement along the Proterozoic crustal scale dextral shear zone with repeated reactivation history.

  19. Evaluation of the post-emplacement environment of high level radioactive waste packages at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glassley, W.

    1989-01-01

    Evaluation of the post-emplacement environment around high-level radioactive waste containers is required by federal regulations. The information derived from this evaluation will be used to determine the service performance of the waste containers, the chemical and hydrological conditions that may influence radionuclide release and transport if containers are breached, and retrievability of the waste containers prior to closure of the repository. Laboratory studies, numerical simulations, and field experiments and tests are used to provide data necessary for this evaluation. Results obtained to date demonstrate that the post-emplacement environment in the welded tuff at Yucca Mountain, Nevada maintains relatively benign chemical features (i.e., near neutral pH, low concentrations of dissolved species) for most scenarios. The hydrological environment appears to be one of low flow volume and rates for the expected condition of an unsaturated medium. Emplacement borehole stability will be a function of fracture density and orientation, which may be influenced by microcrack development. Field studies and numerical simulations are in progress that will extend the results of laboratory studies to long time periods. The extent to which chemical, hydrological and mechanical processes can be adequately coupled through numerical simulations remains a matter of concern

  20. Granitoid emplacement during syn-convergent transtension: An example from the Huamenlou pluton in North Qinling, central China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Li

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The Huamenlou pluton, is an elongated granite intrusion with high aspect ratio, emplaced within the southern margin of the North Qinling (central China. Here we investigate this pluton through multiple techniques including the fabric study, microstructural observation and zircon geochronology. Our zircon U–Pb data confirm that the granite crystallized at ca. 462 Ma which is consistent with the ages of other linear plutons in North Qinling. Microstructural observations of the Huamenlou granites illustrate that the pluton has undergone superimposed deformation during its emplacement, from magmatic to high-temperature solid state conditions. The internal fabric obtained by anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS and shape preferred orientation (SPO show similar results. The fabrics are relatively concordant and generally vary from NE–SW to NEE–SWW which are roughly oblique to the trend of the pluton elongation and the regional structures. Meanwhile, scalar parameters reflect two completely different strain regimes for the pluton and its host rocks, i.e., the fabrics within host rocks are mainly oblate while the central part of the intrusion displays mainly prolate fabrics. It is inferred that the structural pattern recorded in this pluton was caused by local dextral transtension in consequence of oblique convergence between the South and North China Blocks. We propose that the local transtension in convergence setting probably evolved from vertical extrusion tectonics that provided room for the magma emplacement and imparted prolate fabrics in the Huamenlou pluton.

  1. Paleomagnetism in the Determination of the Emplacement Temperature of Cerro Colorado Tuff Cone, El Pinacate Volcanic Field, Sonora, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez Trejo, A.; Alva-Valdivia, L. M.; Vidal Solano, J. R.; Garcia Amador, B.; Gonzalez-Rangel, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    Cerro Colorado Maar is located at the World Heritage Site, biosphere reserve El Pinacate and Gran Desierto del Altar, at the NNW region of Sonora, Mexico (in El Pinacate Volcanic Field). It is a tuff cone, about 1 km diameter, result of several phreatomagmatic episodes during the late Quaternary. We report paleomagnetic and rock magnetic properties from fusiform volcanic bombs obtained from the borders of Cerro Colorado. This study is based in the thermoremanent magnetization TRM normally acquired by volcanic rocks, which can be used to estimate the emplacement temperature range. We performed the experiments on 20 lithic fragments (10 cm to 20 cm approximately), taking 6-8 paleomagnetic cores from each. Rock magnetic experiments (magnetic susceptibility vs. temperature (k-T), hysteresis curves and FORC analysis, shows that the main magnetic mineral carriers of magnetization are titanomagnetite and titanohematite in different levels of intergrowth. The k-T curves suggest in many cases, only one magnetic phase, but also in other cases a second magnetic phase. Thermal demagnetization was used to demagnetize the specimens in detailed short steps and make a well-defined emplacement temperature determination ranges. We found that temperature emplacement determination range for these two magnetic phases is between 350-450 °C, and 550-580 °C, respectively. These results are consistent with those expected in an eruption of Surtsey type, showing a distinct volcanic activity compared to the other craters from El Pinacate volcanic field.

  2. Transpressional granite-emplacement model: Structural and magnetic study of the Pan-African Bandja granitic pluton (West Cameroon)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandjo, A. F. Yakeu; Njanko, T.; Njonfang, E.; Errami, E.; Rochette, P.; Fozing, E.

    2016-02-01

    The Pan-African NE-SW elongated Bandja granitic pluton, located at the western part of the Pan-African belt in Cameroon, is a K-feldspar megacryst granite. It is emplaced in banded gneiss and its NW border underwent mylonitization. The magmatic foliation shows NE-SW and NNE-SSW strike directions with moderate to strong dip respectively in its northern and central parts. This mostly, ferromagnetic granite displays magnetic fabrics carried by magnetite and characterized by (i) magnetic foliation with best poles at 295/34, 283/33 and 35/59 respectively in its northern, central and southern parts and (ii) a subhorizontal magnetic lineation with best line at 37/8, 191/9 and 267/22 respectively in the northern, central and southern parts. Magnetic lineation shows an `S' shape trend that allows to (1) consider the complete emplacement and deformation of the pluton during the Pan-African D 2 and D 3 events which occurred in the Pan-African belt in Cameroon and (2) reorganize Pan-African ages from Nguiessi Tchakam et al. (1997) compared with those of the other granitic plutons in the belt as: 686 ±17 Ma (Rb/Sr) for D 1 age of metamorphism recorded in gneiss; and the period between 604-557 Ma for D 2-D 3 emplacement and deformation age of the granitic pluton in a dextral ENE-WSW shear movement.

  3. Tracking lava flow emplacement on the east rift zone of Kilauea, Hawai’i with synthetic aperture radar (SAR) coherence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietterich, Hannah R.; Poland, Michael P.; Schmidt, David; Cashman, Katharine V.; Sherrod, David R.; Espinosa, Arkin Tapia

    2012-01-01

    Lava flow mapping is both an essential component of volcano monitoring and a valuable tool for investigating lava flow behavior. Although maps are traditionally created through field surveys, remote sensing allows an extraordinary view of active lava flows while avoiding the difficulties of mapping on location. Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery, in particular, can detect changes in a flow field by comparing two images collected at different times with SAR coherence. New lava flows radically alter the scattering properties of the surface, making the radar signal decorrelated in SAR coherence images. We describe a new technique, SAR Coherence Mapping (SCM), to map lava flows automatically from coherence images independent of look angle or satellite path. We use this approach to map lava flow emplacement during the Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō-Kupaianaha eruption at Kīlauea, Hawai‘i. The resulting flow maps correspond well with field mapping and better resolve the internal structure of surface flows, as well as the locations of active flow paths. However, the SCM technique is only moderately successful at mapping flows that enter vegetation, which is also often decorrelated between successive SAR images. Along with measurements of planform morphology, we are able to show that the length of time a flow stays decorrelated after initial emplacement is linearly related to the flow thickness. Finally, we use interferograms obtained after flow surfaces become correlated to show that persistent decorrelation is caused by post-emplacement flow subsidence.

  4. Observations of obsidian lava flow emplacement at Puyehue-Cordón Caulle, Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuffen, H.; Castro, J. M.; Schipper, C. I.; James, M. R.

    2012-04-01

    The dynamics of obsidian lava flow emplacement remain poorly understood as active obsidian lavas are seldom seen. In contrast with well-documented basaltic lavas, we lack observational data on obsidian flow advance and temporal evolution. The ongoing silicic eruption at Puyehue-Cordón Caulle volcanic complex (PCCVC), southern Chile provides an unprecedented opportunity to witness and study obsidian lava on the move. The eruption, which started explosively on June 4th 2011, has since June 20 generated an active obsidian flow field that remains active at the time of writing (January 2012), with an area of ~6 km2, and estimated volume of ~0.18 km3. We report on observations, imaging and sampling of the north-western lava flow field on January 4th and 10th 2012, when vent activity was characterised by near-continuous ash venting and Vulcanian explosions (Schipper et al, this session) and was simultaneously feeding the advancing obsidian flow (Castro et al, this session). On January 4th the north-western lava flow front was characterised by two dominant facies: predominant rubbly lava approximately 30-40 m thick and mantled by unstable talus aprons, and smoother, thinner lobes of more continuous lava ~50 m in length that extended roughly perpendicular to the overall flow direction, forming lobes that protrude from the flow margin, and lacked talus aprons. The latter lava facies closely resembled squeeze-up structures in basaltic lava flows[1] and appeared to originate from and overlie the talus apron of the rubbly lava. Its upper surface consisted of smooth, gently folded lava domains cut by crevasse-like tension gashes. During ~2 hours of observation the squeeze-up lava lobe was the most frequent location of small-volume rockfalls, which occurred at ~1-10 minute intervals from the flow front and indicated a locus of lava advance. On January 10th the squeeze-up lava lobes had evolved significantly, with disruption and breakage of smooth continuous lava surfaces to form

  5. Eruption and emplacement timescales of ignimbrite super-eruptions from thermo-kinetics of glass shards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan eLavallée

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Super-eruptions generating hundreds of cubic kilometres of pyroclastic density currents are commonly recorded by thick, welded and lava-like ignimbrites. Despite the huge environmental impact inferred for this type of eruption, little is yet known about the timescales of deposition and post-depositional flow. Without these timescales, the critical question of the duration of any environmental impact, and the ensuing gravity of its effects for the Earth system, eludes us. The eruption and welding of ignimbrites requires three transects of the glass transition. Magma needs to: 1 fragment during ascent, 2 liquefy and relax during deposition, agglutination and welding (sintering, and 3 quench by cooling into the glassy state. Here we show that welding is a rapid, syn-depositional process and that the welded ignimbrite sheet may flow for up to a few hours before passing through the glass transition a final time. Geospeedometry reveals that the basal vitrophyre of the Grey’s Landing ignimbrite underwent the glass transition at a rate of ~0.1 °C.min^-1 at 870 °C; that is, 30-180 °C below pre-eruptive geothermometric estimates. Application of a 1-D cooling model constrains the timescale of deposition, agglutination, and welding of the basal vitrophyre to less than 1 hour, and possibly even tens of minutes. Thermo-mechanical iteration of the sintering process indicates an optimal temperature solution for the emplacement of the vitrophyres at 966 °C. The vitrophyres reveal a Newtonian rheology up to 46 MPa, which suggests that the ash particles annealed entirely during welding and that viscous energy dissipation is unlikely from loading conditions alone, unless shear stresses imposed by the overlying ash flow were excessively high and sustained over long distances. The findings underline the value of the term 'lava-like' flow to describe the end rheology of Snake River-type ignimbrites, fully consistent with the typical lithofacies observed.

  6. Processes accompanying of mantle plume emplacement into continental lithosphere: Evidence from NW Arabian plate, Western Syria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharkov, E. V.

    2015-12-01

    Lower crustal xenoliths occurred in the Middle Cretaceous lamprophyre diatremes in Jabel Ansaria (Western Syria) (Sharkov et al., 1992). They are represented mainly garnet granulites and eclogite-like rocks, which underwent by deformations and retrograde metamorphism, and younger fresh pegmatoid garnet-kaersutite-clinopyroxene (Al-Ti augite) rocks; mantle peridotites are absent in these populations. According to mineralogical geothermobarometers, forming of garnet-granulite suite rocks occurred under pressure 13.5-15.4 kbar (depths 45-54 kn) and temperature 965-1115oC. At the same time, among populations of mantle xenoliths in the Late Cenozoic platobasalts of the region, quite the contrary, lower crustal xenoliths are absent, however, predominated spinel lherzolites (fragments of upper cooled rim of a plume head), derived from the close depths (30-40 km: Sharkov, Bogatikov, 2015). From this follows that ancient continental crust was existed here even in the Middle Cretaceous, but in the Late Cenozoic was removed by extended mantle plume head; at that upper sialic crust was not involved in geomechanic processes, because Precambrian metamorphic rocks survived as a basement for Cambrian to Cenozoic sedimentary cover of Arabian platform. In other words, though cardinal rebuilding of deep-seated structure of the region occurred in the Late Cenozoic but it did not affect on the upper shell of the ancient lithosphere. Because composition of mantle xenolithis in basalts is practically similar worldwide, we suggest that deep-seated processes are analogous also. As emplacement of the mantle plume heads accompanied by powerful basaltic magmatism, very likely that range of lower (mafic) continental crust existence is very convenient for extension of plume heads and their adiabatic melting. If such level, because of whatever reasons, was not reached, melting was limited but appeared excess of volatile matters which led to forming of lamprophyre or even kimberlite.

  7. Vertical movement in mare basins: relation to mare emplacement, basin tectonics, and lunar thermal history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solomon, S.C.

    1979-01-01

    The spatial and temporal relationships of linear rilles and mare ridges in the Serenitatis basin region of the moon are explained by a combination of lithospheric flexure in response to basin loading by basalt fill and a time-dependent global stress due to the thermal evolution of the lunar interior. The pertinent tectonic observations are the radial distance of basin concentric rilles or graben from the mare center; the location and orientation of mare ridges, interpreted as compressive features; and the restriction of graben formation to times older than 3.6 +- 0.2 b.y. ago, while ridge formation continued after emplacement of the youngest mare basalt unit (approx.3 b.y. ago). The locations of the graben are consistent with the geometry of the mare basalt load expected from the dimensions of multiring basins for values of the thickness of the elastic lithosphere beneath Serenitatis in the range 25--50 km at 3.6--3.8 b.y. ago. The locations and orientations of mare ridges are consistent with the load inferred from surface mapping and subsurface radar reflections for values of the elastic lithosphere thickness near 100 km at 3.0--3.4 b.y. ago. The thickening of the lithosphere beneath a major basin during the evolution of mare volcanism is thus clearly evident in the tectonics. The cessation of rille formation and the prolonged period of ridge formation are attributed to a change in the global horizontal thermal stress from extension to compression as the moon shifted from net expansion to overall cooling and contraction. Severe limits as placed on the range of possible lunar thermal histories. The zone of horizontal extensional stresses peripheral to mare loads favors the edge of mare basins as the preferred sites for mare basalt magma eruption in the later stages of mare fill, although subsidence may lead to accumulation of such young lavas in basin centers

  8. Structural control on basaltic dike and sill emplacement, Paiute Ridge mafic intrusion complex, southern Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter Krogh, K.E.; Valentine, G.A.

    1996-08-01

    Late Miocene basaltic sills and dikes in the Paiute Ridge area of southern nevada show evidence that their emplacement was structurally controlled. Basaltic dikes in this area formed by dilating pre-existing vertical to steeply E-dipping normal faults. Magma propagation along these faults must have required less energy than the creation of a self-propagated fracture at dike tips and the magma pressure must have been greater than the compressive stress perpendicular to the fault surface. N- to NE-trending en echelon dikes formed locally and are not obviously attached to the three main dikes in the area. The en echelon segments are probably pieces of deeper dikes, which are segmented perhaps as a result of a documented rotation of the regional stresses. Alternatively, changes in orientation of principal stresses in the vicinity of each en echelon dike could have resulted from local loads associated with paleotopographic highs or nearby structures. Sills locally branched off some dikes within 300 m of the paleosurface. These subhorizontal bodies occur consistently in the hanging wall block of the dike-injected faults, and intrude Tertiary tuffs near the Paleozoic-Tertiary contact. The authors suggest that the change in stresses near the earth's surface, the material strength of the tuff and paleozoic rocks, and the Paleozoic bedding dip direction probably controlled the location of sill formation and direction of sill propagation. The two largest sills deflected the overlying tuffs to form lopoliths, indicating that the magma pressure exceeded vertical stresses at that location and that the shallow level and large size of the sills allowed interaction with the free (earth's) surface. 32 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  9. Emplacement and erosive effects of the south Kasei Valles lava on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dundas, Colin M.; Keszthelyi, Laszlo P.

    2014-01-01

    Although it has generally been accepted that the Martian outflow channels were carved by floods of water, observations of large channels on Venus and Mercury demonstrate that lava flows can cause substantial erosion. Recent observations of large lava flows within outflow channels on Mars have revived discussion of the hypothesis that the Martian channels are also produced by lava. An excellent example is found in south Kasei Valles (SKV), where the most recent major event was emplacement of a large lava flow. Calculations using high-resolution Digital Terrain Models (DTMs) demonstrate that this flow was locally turbulent, similar to a previously described flood lava flow in Athabasca Valles. The modeled peak local flux of approximately 106 m3 s−1 was approximately an order of magnitude lower than that in Athabasca, which may be due to distance from the vent. Fluxes close to 107 m3 s−1 are estimated in some reaches but these values are probably records of local surges caused by a dam-breach event within the flow. The SKV lava was locally erosive and likely caused significant (kilometer-scale) headwall retreat at several cataracts with tens to hundreds of meters of relief. However, in other places the net effect of the flow was unambiguously aggradational, and these are more representative of most of the flow. The larger outflow channels have lengths of thousands of kilometers and incision of a kilometer or more. Therefore, lava flows comparable to the SKV flow did not carve the major Martian outflow channels, although the SKV flow was among the largest and highest-flux lava flows known in the Solar System.

  10. The Chimborazo sector collapse and debris avalanche: Deposit characteristics as evidence of emplacement mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Benjamin; van Wyk de Vries, Benjamin; Barba, Diego; Leyrit, Hervé; Robin, Claude; Alcaraz, Samantha; Samaniego, Pablo

    2008-09-01

    Chimborazo is a Late Pleistocene to Holocene stratovolcano located at the southwest end of the main Ecuadorian volcanic arc. It experienced a large sector collapse and debris avalanche (DA) of the initial edifice (CH-I). This left a 4 km wide scar, removing 8.0 ± 0.5 km 3 of the edifice. The debris avalanche deposit (DAD) is abundantly exposed throughout the Riobamba Basin to the Río Chambo, more than 35 km southeast of the volcano. The DAD averages a thickness of 40 m, covers about 280 km 2, and has a volume of > 11 km 3. Two main DAD facies are recognized: block and mixed facies. The block facies is derived predominantly from edifice lava and forms > 80 vol.% of the DAD, with a probable volume increase of 15-25 vol.%. The mixed facies was essentially created by mixing brecciated edifice rock with substratum and is found mainly in distal and marginal areas. The DAD has clear surface ridges and hummocks, and internal structures such as jigsaw cracks, injections, and shear-zone features are widespread. Structures such as stretched blocks along the base contact indicate high basal shear. Substratum incorporation is directly observed at the base and is inferred from the presence of substratum-derived material in the DAD body. Based on the facies and structural interpretation, we propose an emplacement model of a lava-rich avalanche strongly cataclased before and/or during failure initiation. The flow mobilises and incorporates significant substrata (10-14 vol.%) while developing a fine lubricating basal layer. The substrata-dominated mixed facies is transported to the DAD interior and top in dykes invading previously-formed fractures.

  11. Fluid flow and reactive transport around potential nuclear waste emplacement tunnels at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spycher, N.F.; Sonnenthal, E.L.; Apps, J.A.

    2002-01-01

    The evolution of fluid chemistry and mineral alteration around a potential waste emplacement tunnel (drift) is evaluated using numerical modeling. The model considers the flow of water, gas, and heat, plus reactions between minerals, CO 2 gas, and aqueous species, and porosity permeability-capillary pressure coupling for a dual permeability (fractures and matrix) medium. Two possible operating temperature modes are investigated: a ''high-temperature'' case with temperatures exceeding the boiling point of water for several hundred years, and a ''loW--temperature'' case with temperatures remaining below boiling for the entire life of the repository. In both cases, possible seepage waters are characterized by dilute to moderate salinities and mildly alkaline pH values. These trends in fluid composition and mineral alteration are controlled by various coupled mechanisms. For example, upon heating and boiling, CO 2 exsolution from pore waters raises pH and causes calcite precipitation. In condensation zones, this CO 2 redissolves, resulting in a decrease in pH that causes calcite dissolution and enhances feldspar alteration to clays. Heat also enhances dissolution of wallrock minerals leading to elevated silica concentrations. Amorphous silica precipitates through evaporative concentration caused by boiling in the high-temperature case, but does not precipitate in the loW--temperature case. Some alteration of feldspars to clays and zeolites is predicted in the high-temperature case. In both cases, calcite precipitates when percolating waters are heated near the drift. The predicted porosity decrease around drifts in the high-temperature case (several percent of the fracture volume) is larger by at least one order of magnitude than in the low temperature case. Although there are important differences between the two investigated temperature modes in the predicted evolution of fluid compositions and mineral alteration around drifts, these differences are small relative to

  12. Generation and emplacement of fine-grained ejecta in planetary impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghent, R.R.; Gupta, V.; Campbell, B.A.; Ferguson, S.A.; Brown, J.C.W.; Fergason, R.L.; Carter, L.M.

    2010-01-01

    We report here on a survey of distal fine-grained ejecta deposits on the Moon, Mars, and Venus. On all three planets, fine-grained ejecta form circular haloes that extend beyond the continuous ejecta and other types of distal deposits such as run-out lobes or ramparts. Using Earth-based radar images, we find that lunar fine-grained ejecta haloes represent meters-thick deposits with abrupt margins, and are depleted in rocks 1cm in diameter. Martian haloes show low nighttime thermal IR temperatures and thermal inertia, indicating the presence of fine particles estimated to range from ???10??m to 10mm. Using the large sample sizes afforded by global datasets for Venus and Mars, and a complete nearside radar map for the Moon, we establish statistically robust scaling relationships between crater radius R and fine-grained ejecta run-out r for all three planets. On the Moon, ???R-0.18 for craters 5-640km in diameter. For Venus, radar-dark haloes are larger than those on the Moon, but scale as ???R-0.49, consistent with ejecta entrainment in Venus' dense atmosphere. On Mars, fine-ejecta haloes are larger than lunar haloes for a given crater size, indicating entrainment of ejecta by the atmosphere or vaporized subsurface volatiles, but scale as R-0.13, similar to the ballistic lunar scaling. Ejecta suspension in vortices generated by passage of the ejecta curtain is predicted to result in ejecta run-out that scales with crater size as R1/2, and the wind speeds so generated may be insufficient to transport particles at the larger end of the calculated range. The observed scaling and morphology of the low-temperature haloes leads us rather to favor winds generated by early-stage vapor plume expansion as the emplacement mechanism for low-temperature halo materials. ?? 2010 Elsevier Inc.

  13. Using restored cross sections to evaluate magma emplacement, White Horse Mountains, Eastern Nevada, U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marko, Wayne T.; Yoshinobu, Aaron S.

    2011-03-01

    New field observations and cross section restoration from the Jurassic White Horse pluton-host rock system, Goshute Range, eastern Nevada, USA, indicate a sequential variation of host rock rheology attending magma emplacement. The pluton intruded weakly to nondeformed Devonian-Mississippian limestone, argillite and quartzite at shallow crustal levels (ca. 7 km). The contact aureole is well exposed along the southern, eastern and northern margin of the intrusive body and is less than 1 km wide. Rocks outside of the aureole are sub-horizontal and do not contain a penetrative fabric or are gently folded (interlimb angles > 120°) about sub-vertical axial planes. Within the contact aureole, continuous and discontinuous spaced, axial planar foliations and harmonic to disharmonic, tight to isoclinal folds wrap around the eastern margin of the pluton. Folds verge toward and away from the pluton and rim anticlines, synclines, and monoclines with wavelength in excess of 250 m are preserved along the pluton margin. The spatial proximity of these ductile structures to the pluton and the apparent increase in intensity of structure development approaching the pluton is compatible with contraction within the aureole attending pluton emplacement. However, all of the above structures are truncated by the intrusive contact at various scales. Granodioritic dikes ranging in thickness from 1 m up to ˜ 10 m emanate from the intrusion and cut host rock structure at high angles and turn to propagate towards one another, parallel to the pluton margin and host rock anisotropy. Such features are interpreted to reflect the last stages of diking and brittle deformation that modified the pluton contact after emplacement-related folding of the carbonate rocks, but before final solidification of the pluton. Eight serial geologic cross sections were constructed and evaluated to place geometric constraints on the shape and growth of the White Horse intrusion. Based on line-length restoration of

  14. Listwaenite in the Sartohay ophiolitic mélange (Xinjiang, China): A genetic model based on petrology, U-Pb chronology and trace element geochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Tian; Zhu, Yongfeng

    2018-03-01

    Listwaenite lenses in the Sartohay ophiolitic mélange (Xinjiang, China) were formed via reactions between serpentinite and metasomatic fluids. First, serpentinite changed into talc schist via the reaction of serpentine + CO2 → talc + magnesite + H2O. Second, talc schist changed into listwaenite via the reaction of talc + CO2 → magnesite + quartz + H2O. Magnetite was progressively destroyed during transformation from serpentinite to talc schist, and completely consumed in listwaenite. Zircon crystals 30-100 μm long, disseminating in talc schist, undeformed listwaenite and mylonitized listwaenite, coexist with talc, quartz and magnesite, while micron-sized zircon grains (ages (302.9 ± 6.8 Ma, 299.7 ± 5.5 Ma and 296.5 ± 3.5 Ma), and are thought to represent the age of formation of the talc schist and listwaenite. These ages are indistinguishable within errors and suggest a rapid transformation from talc schist to listwaenite. Some zircon rims in samples of the undeformed listwaenite and mylonitized listwaenite give much younger apparent U-Pb ages (280-277 Ma), which could be interpreted as a recrystallization age reflecting late-stage shearing in the Sartohay ophiolitic mélange.

  15. Statistical analysis of the sustained lava dome emplacement and destruction processes at Popocatépetl volcano, Central México

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza-Rosas, Ana Teresa; Gómez-Vázquez, Ángel; De la Cruz-Reyna, Servando

    2017-06-01

    Popocatépetl volcano reawakened in 1994 after nearly 70 years of quiescence. Between 1996 and 2015, a succession of at least 38 lava domes have been irregularly emplaced and destroyed, with each dome reaching particular volumes at specific emplacement rates. The complexity of this sequence is analyzed using statistical methods in an attempt to gain insight into the physics and dynamics of the lava dome emplacement and destruction process and to objectively assess the hazards related to that volcano. The time series of emplacements, dome residences, lava effusion lulls, and emplaced dome volumes and thicknesses are modeled using the simple exponential and Weibull distributions, the compound non-homogeneous generalized Pareto-Poisson process (NHPPP), and the mixture of exponentials distribution (MOED). The statistical analysis reveals that the sequence of dome emplacements is a non-stationary, self-regulating process most likely controlled by the balance between buoyancy-driven magma ascent and volatile exsolution crystallization. This balance has supported the sustained effusive activity for decades and may persist for an undetermined amount of time. However, the eruptive history of Popocatépetl includes major Plinian phases that may have resulted from a breach in that balance. Certain criteria to recognize such breaching conditions are inferred from this statistical analysis.

  16. Clinopyroxenite dikes crosscutting banded peridotites just above the metamorphic sole in the Oman ophiolite: early cumulates from the primary V3 lava

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishimaru, Satoko; Arai, Shoji; Tamura, Akihiro

    2013-04-01

    Oman ophiolite is one of the well-known ophiolites for excellent exposures not only of the mantle section but also of the crustal section including effusive rocks and the underlying metamorphic rocks. In the Oman ophiolite, three types of effusive rocks (V1, V2 and V3 from the lower sequences) are recognized: i.e., V1, MORB-like magma, V2, island-arc type lava, and V3, intra-plate lava (Godard et al., 2003 and references there in). V1 and V2 lavas are dominant (> 95 %) as effusive rocks and have been observed in almost all the blocks of northern part of the Oman ophiolite (Godard et al., 2003), but V3 lava has been reported only from Salahi area (Alabaster et al., 1982). It is clear that there was a time gap of lava eruption between V1-2 and V3 based on the presence of pelagic sediments in between (Godard et al., 2003). In addition, V3 lavas are fed by a series of doleritic dikes crosscutting V2 lava (Alley unit) (Alabaster et al., 1982). We found clinopyroxenite (CPXITE) dikes crosscutting deformation structure of basal peridotites just above the metamorphic sole in Wadi Ash Shiyah. The sole metamorphic rock is garnet amphibolite, which overlies the banded and deformed harzburgite and dunite. The CPXITE is composed of coarse clinopyroxene (CPX) with minor amount of chlorite, garnet (hydrous/anhydrous grossular-andradite) with inclusions of titanite, and serpentine formed at a later low-temperature stage. The width of the CPXITE dikes is 2-5 cm (10 cm at maximum) and the dikes contain small blocks of wall harzburgite. Almost all the silicates are serpentinized in the harzburgite blocks except for some CPX. The Mg# (= Mg/(Mg + Fe) atomic ratio) of the CPX is almost constant (= 0.94-0.95) in the serpentinite blocks but varies within the dikes, highest at the contact with the block (0.94) and decreasing with the distance from the contact to 0.81 (0.85 on average). The contents of Al2O3, Cr2O3, and TiO2 in the CPX of the dikes are 0.5-2.0, 0.2-0.6, and 0

  17. Electrokinetically Emplaced Amendments for Enhanced Bioremediation of Chlorinated Solvents in Clay: a Pilot Field Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Carroll, D. M.; Inglis, A.; Head, N.; Chowdhury, A. I.; Garcia, A. N.; Reynolds, D. A.; Hogberg, D.; Edwards, E.; Lomheim, L.; Austrins, L. M.; Hayman, J.; Auger, M.; Sidebottom, A.; Eimers, J.; Gerhard, J.

    2017-12-01

    Bioremediation is an increasingly popular treatment technology for contaminated sites due to the proven success of biostimulation and bioaugmentation. However, bioremediation, along with other in-situ remediation technologies, faces limitations due to challenges with amendment delivery in low permeability media. Studies have suggested that electrokinetics (EK) can enhance the delivery of amendments in low permeability soils, such as clay. A pilot field trial was conducted to evaluate the potential for electrokinetics to support anaerobic dechlorination in clay by improving the transport of lactate and microorganisms. The study was performed on a former chlorinated solvent production facility in Ontario, Canada. Five transect cells were set up within the contaminated clay test area. Different amendments were injected in three of these cells to test various remediation strategies under the influence of EK. The other two cells were used as controls, one with EK applied and the other with no EK. This study focuses on the cell that applied electrokinetics for lactate emplacement followed by bioremediation (EK-Bio). This cell had an initial single injection of KB-1 bioaugmentation culture (SiREM, Canada) followed by injection of sodium lactate as a biostimulant while direct current was applied for 45 days between two electrodes 3 m apart. EK can enhance lactate migration by electromigration, while microorganisms have the potential to be influenced by electroosmosis of the bulk fluid or by electrophoresis of the charged bacteria themselves. All monitoring well locations in the EK-Bio cell exhibited evidence of successful lactate delivery corresponding to an increase in dissolved organic carbon. Reduction in chlorinated volatile organic compound (cVOC) concentrations, in particular 1,2-dichloroethane (1,2-DCA), were evident in monitoring locations coinciding with significant lactate breakthrough. Further investigation into the influence of EK-Bio on the abundance and

  18. Anatomy of a frozen axial melt lens from a fast-spreading paleo-ridge (Wadi Gideah, Oman ophiolite)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, T.; Koepke, J.; Garbe-Schönberg, C.-D.; Dietrich, M.; Bauer, U.; Wolff, P. E.

    2017-02-01

    At fast-spreading mid-ocean ridges, axial melt lenses (AMLs) sandwiched between the sheeted dyke section and the uppermost gabbros are assumed to be the major magma source of crust formation. Here, we present our results from a field study based on a single outcrop of a frozen AML in the Samail ophiolite in the Sultanate of Oman which presents a whole suite of different lithologies and complex cutting relationships: varitextured gabbro with relics of primitive poikilitic clinopyroxene is intruded by massive quartz diorites and tonalites bearing relics of assimilated sheeted dykes, which in turn are cut by trondhjemite dykes. The whole is cut by basaltic dykes with chilled margins. The geochemical evolutionary trend of the varitextured gabbros, including some of the quartz diorites and tonalites, can be best modelled by fractional crystallisation of an experimental MORB parental melt composition containing 0.4 to 0.8 wt.% H2O. Patchy varitextured gabbros containing domains of primitive poikilitic clinopyroxene and evolved granular networks represent the record of in situ crystallisation. Some quartz diorites, often with xenoliths of sheeted dykes and exceptionally high Al2O3 contents, show a bulk trace element pattern more in accord with melts generated by experimental partial melting of dyke material. Highly evolved, crosscutting trondhjemite dykes show characteristic trace element patterns implying a formation by partial melting of sheeted dykes under lower water activity which is indicated by relatively low Al2O3 contents. The late basaltic dykes with chilled margins crosscutting all other lithologies show a relatively depleted geochemical character with pronounced negative Nb-Ta anomalies implying a genetic relationship to the second phase of magmatic Oman paleo-ridge activity (V2). The field relationships in combination with the petrological/geochemical trends reveal multiple sequences of MORB-type magma cooling (resulting in fractional crystallisation) and re

  19. Precambrian tholeiitic-dacitic rock-suites and Cambrian ultramafic rocks in the Pennine nappe system of the Alps: Evidence from Sm-Nd isotopes and rare earth elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stille, P.; Tatsumoto, M.

    1985-04-01

    Major element, trace element and Sm-Nd isotope analyses were made of polymetamorphic hornblendefelses, plagioclase amphibolites and banded amphibolites from the Berisal complex in the Simplon area (Italy, Switzerland) to determine their age, origin and genetic relationships. In light of major and rare earth element data, the hornblendefelses are inferred to have originally been pyroxene-rich cumulates, the plagioclase amphibolites and the dark layers of the banded amphibolites to have been tholeiitic basalts and the light layers dacites. The Sm-Nd isotope data yield isochron ages of 475±81 Ma for the hornblendefelses, 1,018±59 Ma for the plagioclase amphibolites and 1,071±43 Ma for the banded amphibolites. The 1 Ga magmatic event is the oldest one ever found in the crystalline basement of the Pennine nappes. The Sm -Nd isotope data support the consanguinity of the tholeiitic dark layers and the dacitic light layers of the banded amphibolites with the tholeiitic plagioclase amphibolites and the ultramafic hornblendefelses. The initial ɛ Nd values indicate that all three rock types originated from sources depleted in light rare earth elements. We suggest that plagioclase and banded amphibolites were a Proterozoic tholeiite-dacite sequence that was strongly deformed and flattened during subsequent folding. The hornblendefelses are thought to be Cambrian intrusions of pyroxene-rich material.

  20. Understanding the mechanical coupling between magma emplacement and the resulting deformation: the example of saucer-shaped sills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galland, O.; Neumann, E. R.; Planke, S.

    2009-12-01

    The mechanical coupling between magma intrusions and the surrounding rocks plays a major role in the emplacement of volcanic plumbing systems. The deformation associated with magma emplacement has been widely studied, such as caldera inflation/deflation, volcano deformation during dike intrusion, and doming above laccoliths. However, the feedback processes, i.e. the effect of deformation resulting from intruding magma on the propagation of the intrusion itself, have rarely been studied. Saucer-shaped sills are adequate geological objects to understand such processes. Indeed, observation show that saucer-shaped sills are often associated with dome-like structures affecting the overlying sediments. In addition, there is a clear geometrical relation between the sills and the domes: the dome diameters are almost identical to those of saucers, and the tips of the inclined sheets of saucers are superimposed on the edges of the domes. In this presentation, we report on experimental investigations of the emplacement mechanisms of saucer-shaped sills and associated deformation. The model materials were (1) cohesive fine-grained silica flour, representing brittle crust, and (2) molten low-viscosity oil, representing magma. A weak layer located at the top of the injection inlet simulates strata. The main variable parameter is injection depth. During experiments, the surface of the model is digitalized through a structured light technique based on the moiré projection principle. Such a tool provides topographic maps of the surface of the model and allows a periodic (every 1.5 s) monitoring of the model topography. When the model magma starts intruding, a symmetrical dome rises above the inlet. Subsequently, the dome inflates and widens, and then evolves to a plateau-like feature, with nearly flat upper surface and steep sides. At the end of the experiments, the intruding liquid erupts at the edge of the plateau. The intrusions formed in the experiments are saucer-shaped sills

  1. Constraining Controls on the Emplacement of Long Lava Flows on Earth and Mars Through Modeling in ArcGIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golder, K.; Burr, D. M.; Tran, L.

    2017-12-01

    Regional volcanic processes shaped many planetary surfaces in the Solar System, often through the emplacement of long, voluminous lava flows. Terrestrial examples of this type of lava flow have been used as analogues for extensive martian flows, including those within the circum-Cerberus outflow channels. This analogy is based on similarities in morphology, extent, and inferred eruptive style between terrestrial and martian flows, which raises the question of how these lava flows appear comparable in size and morphology on different planets. The parameters that influence the areal extent of silicate lavas during emplacement may be categorized as either inherent or external to the lava. The inherent parameters include the lava yield strength, density, composition, water content, crystallinity, exsolved gas content, pressure, and temperature. Each inherent parameter affects the overall viscosity of the lava, and for this work can be considered a subset of the viscosity parameter. External parameters include the effusion rate, total erupted volume, regional slope, and gravity. To investigate which parameter(s) may control(s) the development of long lava flows on Mars, we are applying a computational numerical-modelling to reproduce the observed lava flow morphologies. Using a matrix of boundary conditions in the model enables us to investigate the possible range of emplacement conditions that can yield the observed morphologies. We have constructed the basic model framework in Model Builder within ArcMap, including all governing equations and parameters that we seek to test, and initial implementation and calibration has been performed. The base model is currently capable of generating a lava flow that propagates along a pathway governed by the local topography. At AGU, the results of model calibration using the Eldgá and Laki lava flows in Iceland will be presented, along with the application of the model to lava flows within the Cerberus plains on Mars. We then

  2. Emplaced writing figuring as a manifestation of an ecocentric mindset in the narrative art of Petra Müller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Meyer

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The human-earth connection is a sustained theme in Petra Müller’s oeuvre. The article focuses on this connection as reflected in her narrative art, specifically in accounts that have an autobiographical proclivity. The aim of this article is to outline the nature-centred disposition of Müller’s narrative art in a more definite sense. This is achieved by paying attention to the manner in which the author (the ‘I’ in accounts where the narrator can be identified as the author herself becomes part of the natural environment – whether on a sensory, an emotive, or an intellectual level – where she finds herself and the way she responds to it. At the core of the investigation are the ways in which this reactive engagement is manifested in Müller’s prose work by the implied author and the technique ofemplaced writing. Emplaced writing, a concept created by Linda Russo, was integrated by Susan Smith with Lawrence Buell’s concept of emplacement. This term refers to the technique allowing an active awareness of self and the place physically occupied by the author, as well as how that body fits into this place, to find expression. A broader perspective and greater appreciation of Müller’s work are drawn from the insight into how her close coexistence with the earth is reflected in her narrative art by means of the technique of emplaced writing which is explored in this article as it gives voice to a strong ecocentric disposition.

  3. Design management and stress analysis of a circular rock tunnel and emplacement holes for storage of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kandalaft-Ladkany, N.; Wyman, R.V.

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses a critical path method (CPM) diagram and logic net which are used for the design cycle of the rock tunnel system for a high level nuclear waste repository. In the analysis the design tunnel is subjected to pre-existing temperature and overburden loads at time of construction. high thermal stresses develop later due to the long term influx of heat from the canisters stored in vertical emplacement holes. Results indicate that thermal stresses reach a critical level for the rock in the vicinity of the canisters which could lead to local collapse of the rock and damage to the canisters

  4. Pre-waste-emplacement ground-water travel time sensitivity and uncertainty analyses for Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplan, P.G.

    1993-01-01

    Yucca Mountain, Nevada is a potential site for a high-level radioactive-waste repository. Uncertainty and sensitivity analyses were performed to estimate critical factors in the performance of the site with respect to a criterion in terms of pre-waste-emplacement ground-water travel time. The degree of failure in the analytical model to meet the criterion is sensitive to the estimate of fracture porosity in the upper welded unit of the problem domain. Fracture porosity is derived from a number of more fundamental measurements including fracture frequency, fracture orientation, and the moisture-retention characteristic inferred for the fracture domain

  5. Engineered barrier emplacement experiment in Opalinus clay for the disposal of radioactive waste in underground repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayor, J. C.; Garcia-Sineriz, J. L.; Alonso, E.; Alheid, H. J.; Blumbling, P.

    2005-01-01

    exclusively devoted to the GBM: fabrication, emplacement equipments, and hydraulic, mechanical and geophysical (seismic) characterization in conventional laboratory. Chapter 4 refers to the excavation of the experimental drift, and to the geophysical (seismic, electric) and hydrogeological characterization of the near field of the clay rock. Chapter 5 is devoted to the installation of the different in situ test components, systems and instruments. The experimental in situ test results and interpretation is presented in Chapter 6, while their modelling and interpretation is presented in Chapter 7. Chapter 8 includes an assessment of the experiment results and overall conclusions, in relation to the declared project objectives. Chapter 9 consists of a list of references. Although a large number of bibliographic references have been used in this project, each included in the corresponding specific reports, the only references included herein are the specific reports detailing the various tasks performed to date, plus a few other reports considered to be essential. (Author)

  6. Engineered barrier emplacement experiment in opalinus clay for the disposal of radioactive waste in underground repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayor, J. C.; Garcia-Sineriz, J. L.; Alonso, E.; Alheid, H. J.; Blumbling, P.

    2005-01-01

    exclusively devoted to the GBM: fabrication, emplacement equipments, and hydraulic, mechanical and geophysical (seismic) characterization in conventional laboratory. Chapter 4 refers to the excavation of the experimental drift, and to the geophysical (seismic, electric) and hydrogeological characterization of the near field of the clay rock. Chapter 5 is devoted to the installation of the different in situ test components, systems and instruments. The experimental in situ test results and interpretation is presented in Chapter 6, while their modelling and interpretation is presented in Chapter 7. Chapter 8 includes an assessment of the experiment results and overall conclusions, in relation to the declared project objectives. Chapter 9 consists of a list of references. Although a large number of bibliographic references have been used in this project, each included in the corresponding specific reports, the only references included herein are the specific reports detailing the various tasks performed to date, plus a few other reports considered to be essential. (Author)

  7. Petro-structural, geochemical and carbon and oxygen isotopic study on carbonates crosscuting the Oman Ophiolite peridotites: evidence of polygenic CO2 trapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noël, J.; Godard, M.; Martinez, I.; Oliot, E.; Williams, M. J.; Rodriguez, O.; Chaduteau, C.; Gouze, P.

    2017-12-01

    Carbon trapping in ophiolitic peridotites contributes to the global carbon cycle between solid Earth and its outer envelopes (through subduction and/or modern alteration). To investigate this process, we performed petro-structural (microtomography, EBSD, EPMA) and geochemical studies (LA-ICP-MS, carbon and oxygen isotopes on bulk and minerals using SHRIMP) of harzburgites cored in the Oman Ophiolite. Studied harzburgites are highly serpentinized (> 90 %) and crosscut by 3 generations of carbonates (> 20 Vol%) with compositions from calcite to dolomite (Mg/Ca = 0-0.85). Type 1 carbonates are fine penetrative veinlets and mesh core after olivine. They have low REE (e.g., Yb = 0.08-0.23 x CI-chondrite) and negative Ce anomalies. They have δ13CPDB = -15.2 to 1.10‰ and δ18OSMOW = 17.5 to 33.7‰, suggesting precipitation temperatures up to 110°C. Type 2 carbonates are pluri-mm veins bounded by cm-thick serpentinized vein selvages, oriented dominantly parallel to mantle foliation. Dynamic recrystallization is observed, indicating polygenetic formation: well crystallized calcite with REE abundances similar to Type 1 carbonates are locally replaced by small dolomite and calcite grains with higher REE (e.g., Yb = 0.35-1.0 x CI-chondrite) and positive Gd anomaly. Type 2 carbonates have δ13CPDB = -12.6 to -4.1‰ and δ18OSMOW = 25.0 to 32.7‰, suggesting precipitation temperatures from 10 to 60°C. Type 3 carbonates are late pluri-mm to cm veins reactivating Type 2 veins. They consist of small grains of dolomite and calcite with REE abundances similar to recrystallized Type 2 carbonates. Type 3 carbonates have δ13CPDB = -8.3 to -5.8‰ and δ18OSMOW = 28.8 to 32.7‰, suggesting precipitation temperatures 100°C). Formation of carbonate veins (Type 2) indicates localization of fluid flux, while serpentinization remains the dominant alteration process. Low T carbonate veins (Type 3) remain the main flow path through ophiolitic peridotites. Our study suggests that

  8. Peridote-water interaction generating migration pathways of H2-rich fluids in subduction context: Common processes in the ophiolites of Oman, New-Caledonia, Philippines and Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deville, E. P.; Prinzhofer, A.; Pillot, D.; Vacquand, C.; Sissmann, O.

    2010-12-01

    The occurrence of H2 flows which were punctually known notably in the ophiolites of Oman, Zambales (Philippines) and Antalya (Turkey) appears to be a widespread phenomenon in these major peridotite massifs associated with ancient or active subduction processes. Similar H2-rich gas flows have been discovered also in the peridotite of New-Caledonia. H2 concentrations are locally high (commonly 60 to90% in Oman). H2 is frequently degassing in hyperalkaline springs but the highest flows were found directly expelled from fractures in the peridotites. Obviously, within the fracture systems, gas and associated hyperalkaline water separate at shallow depth close to the top of the upper aquifer level. Locally high flows of gas migrate vertically in the fractures, whereas water with degassing H2 tends to migrate laterally in the fracture network toward the creeks where most of the hyperalkaline springs are found. The genesis of natural H2 is interpreted as the result of the interaction, at depth, between ultrabasic mantle rocks in the upper plate and water expelled by the subducted sediments by oxidation of metals (Fe2+, Mn2+) and reduction of water during serpentinisation. CH4 is commonly associated to the H2-rich fluids and it is interpreted as the result of the reduction of available CO2 at depth. N2 is also commonly associated to the H2-rich fluids in the ophiolites, whereas N2 flows (within H2) were found in the subducted sediments (below the sole décollement of the peridotite) where it can be observed (Oman and New-Caledonia). Within the peridotites, the hyperalkaline water is rich in ions OH- and Ca2+ and characterized by high pH (between 11 and 12). Most alkaline springs are found in the vicinity of major faults and/or lithological discontinuities like the basal décollement of the ophiolites and the peridotite-gabbro contact (Moho). This hyperalkaline water migration induces a chain of diagenetic reactions starting at depth within the fracture systems by the

  9. Feasibility studies of air placed techniques as emplacement means of different backfilling materials in underground radioactive waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atabek, R.; Conche, P.; Lajudie, A.; Revertegat, E.

    1992-01-01

    Air placed techniques are likely to be used as emplacement means of different backfilling materials in underground waste repositories. A literature survey of the air placed techniques and equipments leads to the choice of the dry process taking into account the emplacement constraints (distance: 300 m, flow: 10 m 3 /h) and the large variety of materials to be placed. Tests performed in the case of cement-based materials (with and without addition of silica fumes), for different types of cement and as a function of the incidence of the jet, show that it is possible to put in place mortars of good quality. However heterogeneity in the material composition is found when the jet is stopped. This problem may be partly solved by a better automation of the process. Complementary tests, carried out with the preselected clay of Fourges Cahaignes, clearly demonstrate the ability of the air placed technique to put in place pure clay: a dry density of 1.50kg/m 3 is reached in the case of coarse material and for a final water content of 30% (in weight). Feasibility tests performed on clay-sand mixtures are not conclusive due to an unappropriate granulometry distribution of the sand. 11 figs., 9 tabs

  10. The controlling role of positive structures over the metallogenesis and emplacement of inter layer oxidation sandstone type uranium deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu Kangheng; Chen Zuyi

    2010-01-01

    The positive structures in this paper mean the geological structures related to the occurrence of U-metallogenic zones or U-deposit such as anticlines, uplifts and uplifted fault-blocks. Occurrence features of interlayer oxidation sandstone type deposit at the southern margin of Yili basin and southwestern margin of Turpan-Hami basin, the northeastern margin of Jiudong basin illustrate that the sandstone-hosted uranium deposits, the U-mineralized sections and the uranium occurrences are always selectively emplaced on/in positive structures. The reasons for this lie in the formation mechanism of sandstone-hosted U-deposits. The positive structures raised the elevation of ore-hosting sandstone horizon and make it close to ground surface or exposed at the ground surface, which result in the infiltration of uranium and oxygen bearing groundwater from recharge area into host sandstone horizon, and the interlayer oxidation of host sandstone, as well as the dissolution and the migration of uranium in host sandstone, and the reduction mineralization at the oxidation-reduction interface. Sufficient attention should be paid to the controlling role of positive structures over the metallogenesis and emplacement of sandstone-hosted uranium deposits. They could act as an important criterion for recognizing and prognosticating potential uranium mineralized areas in uranium metallogenic zones or uranium-productive sedimentary basins. (authors)

  11. Effects of the deviation characteristics of nuclear waste emplacement boreholes on borehole liner stresses; Yucca Mountain Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glowka, D.A.

    1990-09-01

    This report investigates the effects of borehole deviation on the useability of lined boreholes for the disposal of high-level nuclear waste at the proposed Yucca Mountain Repository in Nevada. Items that lead to constraints on borehole deviation include excessive stresses that could cause liner failure and possible binding of a waste container inside the liner during waste emplacement and retrieval operations. Liner stress models are developed for two general borehole configurations, one for boreholes drilled with a steerable bit and one for boreholes drilled with a non-steerable bit. Procedures are developed for calculating liner stresses that arise both during insertion of the liner into a borehole and during the thermal expansion process that follows waste emplacement. The effects of borehole curvature on the ability of the waste container to pass freely inside the liner without binding are also examined. Based on the results, specifications on borehole deviation allowances are developed for specific vertical and horizontal borehole configurations of current interest. 11 refs., 22 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. Low Amplitude of Geomagnetic Secular Variations Recorded in Traps of the Southern Siberian Platform: Very Fast Emplacement or Regional Remagnetization?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veselovskiy, R. V.; Latyshev, A. V.; Pavlov, V. E.

    2011-12-01

    We have studied the lowest part of the Permo-Triassic Siberian trap sequence which is located in the middle course of the Angara river (Southern Siberia). This sequenced is composed by 200m thick volcanoclastic rocks (tuffs with bombs of different composition) and includes numerous mafic subvolcanic bodies (dykes and sills). Altogether more than 20 sites representing tuffs, bombs, dykes and sills stretched along the valley of the Angara river over the distance more than 30 km have been sampled and studied. Obtained site mean paleomagnetic directions are tightly grouped, showing very lower scatter. Taking into account that amplitude of geomagnetic secular variation at the P-T boundary was about of same order as in Late Cenozoic (Pavlov et al., 2011) this lower scatter can be either a sequence of very fast traps emplacement which could have disastrous environmental impact or a result of subsequent regional remagnetization. The only geological event in the region which seems to be capable to cause this remagnetization is emplacement of Early Triassic sills in nearby areas. In such the case we should expect that mean paleomagnetic directions from these sills will be very close to these ones obtained from site presented in this report. We present results of paleomagnetic studies of these sills and make a choice in favor of one of discussed options. This work was supported by grants NSF EAR 0807585 ("The Siberian Traps and end-Permian extinction") and RFBR 09-05-01180, 10-05-00557.

  13. Contrasting magmatic structures between small plutons and batholiths emplaced at shallow crustal level (Sierras de Córdoba, Argentina)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinotti, Lucio P.; D'Eramo, Fernando J.; Weinberg, Roberto F.; Demartis, Manuel; Tubía, José María; Coniglio, Jorge E.; Radice, Stefania; Maffini, M. Natalia; Aragón, Eugenio

    2016-11-01

    Processes like injection, magma flow and differentiation and influence of the regional strain field are here described and contrasted to shed light on their role in the formation of small plutons and large batholiths their magmatic structures. The final geometric and compositional arrangement of magma bodies are a complex record of their construction and internal flow history. Magma injection, flow and differentiation, as well as regional stresses, all control the internal nature of magma bodies. Large magma bodies emplaced at shallow crustal levels result from the intrusion of multiple magma batches that interact in a variety of ways, depending on internal and external dynamics, and where the early magmatic, growth-related structures are commonly overprinted by subsequent history. In contrast, small plutons emplaced in the brittle-ductile transition more likely preserve growth-related structures, having a relatively simple cooling history and limited internal magma flow. Outcrop-scale magmatic structures in both cases record a rich set of complementary information that can help elucidate their evolution. Large and small granitic bodies of the Sierra Pampeanas preserve excellent exposures of magmatic structures that formed as magmas stepped through different rheological states during pluton growth and solidification. These structures reveal not only the flow pattern inside magma chambers, but also the rheological evolution of magmas in response to temperature evolution.

  14. Geochemical significance of neoproterozoic rasimalai alkali syenite emplaced along Dharmapuri shear zone in the Northern part of Tamil Nadu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thangavel, S.; Balasubramani, S.; Nagaraju, M.; Bhattacharya, D.; Zakaulla, Syed; Rai, A.K.

    2015-01-01

    The Rasimalai alkali syenite complex is emplaced within Peninsular Gneissic complex and spatially associated with NE-SW trending major Dharmapuri shear zone (DSZ) in the northern part of Tamil Nadu. It is surrounded by epidote hornblend egneiss, which is the fenetised product of Charnockite and occurs about 20 km NE of Alangayam in Vellore district. It is mainly comprised of medium to coarse grained grey syenite (albite and orthoclase) and medium to micro grained pink syenite (orthoclase, microcline and perthite) at places porphyritic in nature with hornblende, riebeckitc, aegirine and acmite as accessory minerals. Grey syenite is non radioactive and uranium mineralisation is associated with pink syenite (syngenetic and disseminated type) and quartz-barite veins (hydrothermal type). Hydrothermal activity is manifested in the form of pyrite, chalcopyrite, galena, barite, calcite and calcian-strontianite which occur in the form of disseminations, stringers, lumps, aggregates, veinlets and veins. Presence of high silica (63.14-75.43%) with high field strength elements (U, Th, Nb and Pb) and large ion lithophile elements (Rb, Sr, K, Ba) possibly indicates that Rasimalai alkali syenite is the product of crustal communication and partial melting of protracted emplacement of parental alkali basaltic magma

  15. Engineering studies: high-level radioactive waste repositories task 3 - review of underground handling and emplacement. 1. Executive summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-02-01

    The report reviews proposals for transport, handling and emplacement of high-level radioactive waste in an underground repository with particular reference to: waste block size and configuration; self-shielded or partially-shielded block; stages of disposal; transport by road/rail to repository site; handling techniques within repository; emplacement in vertical holes or horizontal tunnels; repository access by adit, incline or shaft; conventional and radiological safety; costs; and major areas of uncertainty requiring research or development. In carrying out this programme due attention was given to work already carried out both in the U.K. and overseas and where appropriate comparisons with this work have been made to substantiate and explain the observations made in this report. The examination and use of this previous work however has been confined to those proposals which were considered capable of meeting the basic design criterion for a U.K. based repository, that the maximum temperature achieved by the host rock should not exceed 100/sup 0/C.

  16. Lithosphere destabilization by melt percolation during pre-oceanic rifting: Evidence from Alpine-Apennine ophiolitic peridotites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccardo, Giovanni; Ranalli, Giorgio

    2017-04-01

    Orogenic peridotites from Alpine-Apennine ophiolite Massifs (Lanzo, Voltri, External and Internal Ligurides, - NW Italy, and Mt. Maggiore - Corsica) derive from the mantle lithosphere of the Ligurian Tethys. Field/structural and petrologic/geochemical studies provide constraints on the evolution of the lithospheric mantle during pre-oceanic passive rifting of the late Jurassic Ligurian Tethys ocean. Continental rifting by far-field tectonic forces induced extension of the lithosphere by means of km-scale extensional shear zones that developed before infiltration of melts from the asthenosphere (Piccardo and Vissers, 2007). After significant thinning of the lithosphere, the passively upwelling asthenosphere underwent spinel-facies decompression melting along the axial zone of the extensional system. Silica-undersaturated melt fractions percolated through the lithospheric mantle via diffuse/focused porous flow and interacted with the host peridotite through pyroxenes-dissolving/olivine-precipitating melt/rock reactions. Pyroxene dissolution and olivine precipitation modified the composition of the primary silica-undersaturated melts into derivative silica-saturated melts, while the host lithospheric spinel lherzolites were transformed into pyroxene-depleted/olivine-enriched reactive spinel harzburgites and dunites. The derivative liquids interacted through olivine-dissolving/orthopyroxene+plagioclase-crystallizing reactions with the host peridotites that were impregnated and refertilized (Piccardo et al., 2015). The saturated melts stagnated and crystallized in the shallow mantle lithosphere (as testified by diffuse interstitial crystallization of euhedral orthopyroxene and anhedral plagioclase) and locally ponded, forming orthopyroxene-rich/olivine-free gabbro-norite pods (Piccardo and Guarnieri, 2011). Reactive and impregnated peridotites are characterized by high equilibration temperatures (up to 1250 °C) even at low pressure, plagioclase-peridotite facies

  17. Geochemistry and jasper beds from the Ordovician Løkken ophiolite, Norway: origin of proximal and distal siliceous exhalites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenne, Tor; Slack, John F.

    2005-01-01

    Stratiform beds of jasper (hematitic chert), composed essentially of SiO2 (69-95 wt %) and Fe2O3 (3-25 wt %), can be traced several kilometers along strike in the Ordovician L??kken ophiolite, Norway. These siliceous beds are closely associated with volcanogenic massive sulfide (VMS) deposits and are interpreted as sea-floor gels that were deposited by fallout from hydrothermal plumes in silica-rich seawater, in which plume-derived Fe oxyhydroxide particles promoted flocculation and rapid settling of large (???200 ??m) colloidal particles of silica-iron oxyhydroxide. Concentrations of chalcophile elements in the jasper beds are at the parts per million level implying that sulfide particle fallout was insignificant and that the Si-Fe gel-forming plumes were mainly derived from intermediate- (100??-250??C) to high-temperature (>250??) white smoker-type vents with high Fe/S ratios. The interpreted setting is similar to that of the Lau basin, where high-temperature (280??-334??C) white smoker venting alternates or overlaps with sulfide mound-forming black smoker venting. Ratios of Al, Sc, Th, Hf, and REE to iron are very low and show that the detrital input was <0.1 percent of the bulk jasper. Most jasper beds are enriched in U, V, P, and Mo relative to the North American Shale Composite, reflecting a predominantly seawater source, whereas REE distribution patterns (positive Eu and negative Ce anomalies) reflect variable mixing of hydrothermal solutions with oxic seawater at dilution ratios of ???102 to 104. Trace element variations in the gel precursor to the jasper are thought to have been controlled by coprecipitation and/or adsorption by Fe oxyhydroxide particles that formed by the oxidation of hydrothermal Fe2+ within the variably seawater-diluted hydrothermal plume(s). Thick jasper layers near the H??ydal VMS orebody show distinct positive As/Fe and Sb/Fe anomalies that are attributed to near-vent rapid settling of Si-Fe particles derived from As- and Sb

  18. The Behaviour of Fe Stable Isotopes Accompanying Fluid Migration in Subducted Serpentinite from the Zermatt-Saas Ophiolite of the Swiss Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inglis, E.; Bouilhol, P.; Burton, K. W.; Debret, B.; Millet, M. A.; Williams, H. M.

    2016-12-01

    During subduction the destabilisation of hydrous serpentine group phases can generate significant fluid fluxes between the subducting slab and the overlying mantle wedge. Despite our knowledge of this, the exact process and nature of the fluids released during serpentinite devolatilisation remain poorly understood. This study presents new field observations alongside petrographic and geochemical data for metamorphic veins and host serpentinite from the Zermatt-Saas ophiolite from the Swiss Alps, which underwent high-pressure metamorphism during the Alpine orogeny. Samples were collected from the serpentinised ultramafic section of the Zermatt-Saas ophiolite, which is mainly comprised of variably foliated and sheared antigorite serpentine. High-pressure metamorphic veins hosted within the antigorite serpentinite, are observed within the least deformed part of the massif, occurring as cm scale laterally continuous channels or mm scale interconnected anastomosing networks. Preliminary high-precision Fe isotope data for the host antigorite serpentine yield a mean δ56Fe value of -0.09‰ ± 0.04‰ (n=3), notably lighter than previously measured Alpine and abyssal serpentinites (Debret et al., 2016). In contrast, samples of cm scale olivine-bearing veins display a mean δ56Fe value of 0.07 ± 0.05‰ (n=3), resolvably heavier than that of the host serpentinite. These preliminary results suggest preferential mobility of isotopically heavy Fe within the vein forming fluids, but at this stage it is unclear if this fluid is related to local devolatilisation of the host serpentinite or input from an external source. Debret et al., 2016. Isotopic evidence for iron mobility during subduction. Geology, v. 44, no. 3, pp. 215 -218.

  19. Transfer of subduction fluids into the deforming mantle wedge during nascent subduction: Evidence from trace elements and boron isotopes (Semail ophiolite, Oman)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prigent, C.; Guillot, S.; Agard, P.; Lemarchand, D.; Soret, M.; Ulrich, M.

    2018-02-01

    The basal part of the Semail ophiolitic mantle was (de)formed at relatively low temperature (LT) directly above the plate interface during "nascent subduction" (the prelude to ophiolite obduction). This subduction-related LT deformation was associated with progressive strain localization and cooling, resulting in the formation of porphyroclastic to ultramylonitic shear zones prior to serpentinization. Using petrological and geochemical analyses (trace elements and B isotopes), we show that these basal peridotites interacted with hydrous fluids percolating by porous flow during mylonitic deformation (from ∼850 down to 650 °C). This process resulted in 1) high-T amphibole crystallization, 2) striking enrichments of minerals in fluid mobile elements (FME; particularly B, Li and Cs with concentrations up to 400 times those of the depleted mantle) and 3) peridotites with an elevated δ11B of up to +25‰. These features indicate that the metasomatic hydrous fluids are most likely derived from the dehydration of subducting crustal amphibolitic materials (i.e., the present-day high-T sole). The rapid decrease in metasomatized peridotite δ11B with increasing distance to the contact with the HT sole (to depleted mantle isotopic values in <1 km) suggests an intense interaction between peridotites and rapid migrating fluids (∼1-25 m.y-1), erasing the initial high-δ11B subduction fluid signature within a short distance. The increase of peridotite δ11B with increasing deformation furthermore indicates that the flow of subduction fluids was progressively channelized in actively deforming shear zones parallel to the contact. Taken together, these results also suggest that the migration of subduction fluids/melts by porous flow through the subsolidus mantle wedge (i.e., above the plate interface at sub-arc depths) is unlikely to be an effective mechanism to transport slab-derived elements to the locus of partial melting in subduction zones.

  20. Pluton emplacement in a releasing bend in a transpressive regime: the arrozal granite in the Paraíba do Sul shear belt, Rio de Janeiro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nummer, Alexis R; Machado, Rômulo; Dehler, Nolan M

    2007-06-01

    The Arrozal Granite, situated in the southwestern region of the State of Rio de Janeiro, has a granitic to granodioritic composition. It contains a strong mylonitic foliation along its border, passing gradually to a well-developed magmatic foliation towards its center. Structural analysis indicates that the Arrozal Granite was emplaced along the Além-Paraíba Shear Zone in a dextral transpressive tectonic regime. A regional shift of the trend along this shear zone from NE-SW to E-W, observed in the area, is interpreted to be casually related to the creation of space for the emplacement of the granite. Our data indicate that releasing bends may have played an important role for space generation during the emplacement of the Arrozal Granite and other plutons.

  1. Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility of silicic rocks from quarries in the vicinity of São Marcos, Rio Grande do Sul, South Brazil: Implications for emplacement mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cañón-Tapia, Edgardo; Raposo, M. Irene B.

    2018-04-01

    The Paraná-Etendeka Large Igneous Province includes acid volcanic rocks that can be found throughout its extension. Several aspects concerning those rocks remain controversial, including their mechanism of emplacement and location of their eruptive sources. Opening of several quarries of dimension stone near the city of Sao Marcos, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, offers a unique opportunity to study in detail the acid products. Here, we present the results of a study of the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) completed in some rocks that had been interpreted as the roots of volcanic conduits. Our results, and reexamination of the textural features of the rocks, lead to a reinterpretation that suggests that these rocks were emplaced subaerially, and involved assimilation and remelting of clastic components of previous products. Due to the inferred conditions of emplacement, it is unlikely that the eruptive vents are located far from the area of study, therefore ruling out the long-travelled nature of these products.

  2. State of the art for fabricating and emplacing concrete containers into large horizontal disposal caverns in the french geological repository - 59267

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosgiraud, Jean-Michel; Guariso, Maurice; Pineau, Francois

    2012-01-01

    The research and development work presented in this paper was initialized by Andra in 2007. The work necessary for manufacturing and testing a full scale demonstrator is presently implemented. The case story is twofold. The first part is related to the initial development of a high performance concrete formulation used for fabricating concrete storage containers (containing Intermediate Level and Long Lived Waste primary canisters) to be stacked and emplaced into 400-m long concrete lined horizontal disposal vaults (also called cavern), excavated in the Callovo-Oxfordian clay host formation at a 550 to 600-m depth, with an inside diameter of approximately 8-m. The fabrication of the concrete boxes is illustrated. The second part presents the outcome at the end of the detailed design phase, for a system which is now being manufactured (for further test and assembly), for the emplacement of the concrete containers inside the vault. The application was engineered for remote emplacing a pile of 2 concrete containers (the containers are preliminarily stacked in a pile of 2, inside a hot cell, thanks to a ground travelling gantry crane). The emplacement process is justified and the related emplacement synoptic is illustrated. The test campaign is scheduled in 2011-2012. The successful completion of the technical trials is mandatory to confirm the mechanical feasibility of remotely emplacing concrete containers into large horizontal disposal caverns over long distances. The later display of the machinery at work in Andra's showroom will be instrumental for the confidence building process involving the various stakeholders concerned by the public enquiry period (mid-2013) preceding the deep geological repository license application (2014-2015). (authors)

  3. Emplacement, petrological and magnetic susceptibility characteristics of diverse magmatic epidote-bearing granitoid rocks in Brazil, Argentina and Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sial, A. N.; Toselli, A. J.; Saavedra, J.; Parada, M. A.; Ferreira, V. P.

    1999-03-01

    Magmatic epidote (mEp)-bearing granitoids from five Neoproterozoic tectonostratigraphic terranes in Northeastern (NE) Brazil, Early Palaeozoic calc-alkalic granitoids in Northwestern (NW) Argentina and from three batholiths in Chile have been studied. The elongated shape of some of these plutons suggests that magmas filled fractures and that dyking was probably the major mechanism of emplacement. Textures reveal that, in many cases, epidote underwent partial dissolution by host magma and, in these cases, may have survived dissolution by relatively rapid upward transport by the host magma. In plutons where such a mechanism is not evident, unevenly distributed epidote at outcrop scale is armoured by biotite or near-solidus K-feldspar aggregates, which probably grew much faster than epidote dissolution, preventing complete resorption of epidote by the melt. Al-in-hornblende barometry indicates that, in most cases, amphibole crystallized at P≥5 kbar. Kyanite-bearing thermal aureoles surrounding plutons that intruded low-grade metamorphic rocks in NE Brazil support pluton emplacement at intermediate to high pressure. mEp show overall chemical variation from 20 to 30 mol% (mole percent) pistacite (Ps) and can be grouped into two compositional ranges: Ps 20-24 and Ps 27-30. The highest Ps contents are in epidotes of plutons in which hornblende solidified under Pcorrosion of individual epidote crystals included in plagioclase in high-K calc-alkalic granitoids in NE Brazil, emplaced at 5-7 kbar pressure, yielded estimates of magma transport rate from 70 to 350 m year -1. Most of these plutons lack Fe-Ti oxide minerals and Fe +3 is mostly associated with the epidote structure. Consequently, magnetic susceptibility (MS) in the Neoproterozoic granitoids in NE Brazil, as well as Early Palaeozoic plutons in Argentina and Late Palaeozoic plutons in Chile, is usually low (3.0×10 -3 SI, typical of magnetite-series granitoids crystallized under higher oxygen fugacity. In NE

  4. Control of Precambrian basement deformation zones on emplacement of the Laramide Boulder batholith and Butte mining district, Montana, United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Byron R.; Hildenbrand, Thomas G.; O'Neill, J. Michael

    2011-01-01

    What are the roles of deep Precambrian basement deformation zones in the localization of subsequent shallow-crustal deformation zones and magmas? The Paleoproterozoic Great Falls tectonic zone and its included Boulder batholith (Montana, United States) provide an opportunity to examine the importance of inherited deformation fabrics in batholith emplacement and the localization of magmatic-hydrothermal mineral deposits. Northeast-trending deformation fabrics predominate in the Great Falls tectonic zone, which formed during the suturing of Paleoproterozoic and Archean cratonic masses approximately 1,800 mega-annum (Ma). Subsequent Mesoproterozoic to Neoproterozoic deformation fabrics trend northwest. Following Paleozoic through Early Cretaceous sedimentation, a Late Cretaceous fold-and-thrust belt with associated strike-slip faulting developed across the region, wherein some Proterozoic faults localized thrust faulting, while others were reactivated as strike-slip faults. The 81- to 76-Ma Boulder batholith was emplaced along the reactivated central Paleoproterozoic suture in the Great Falls tectonic zone. Early-stage Boulder batholith plutons were emplaced concurrent with east-directed thrust faulting and localized primarily by northwest-trending strike-slip and related faults. The late-stage Butte Quartz Monzonite pluton was localized in a northeast-trending pull-apart structure that formed behind the active thrust front and is axially symmetric across the underlying northeast-striking Paleoproterozoic fault zone, interpreted as a crustal suture. The modeling of potential-field geophysical data indicates that pull-apart?stage magmas fed into the structure through two funnel-shaped zones beneath the batholith. Renewed magmatic activity in the southern feeder from 66 to 64 Ma led to the formation of two small porphyry-style copper-molybdenum deposits and ensuing world-class polymetallic copper- and silver-bearing veins in the Butte mining district. Vein orientations

  5. Triassic tholeiitic dolerites («ophites» of the El Grado diapir (Pyrenees, Huesca, Spain: emplacement and composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lago San José, M.

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available Mesozoic dolerites in the south Pyrenean sector of El Grado (Huesca, Spain preserve emplacement structures (fluidity structures at the top and load structures at the base developed during their intrusion into unconsolidated marly-evaporitic Triassic sediments (Keuper facies. By analogy with other dolerites in the south Pyrenean domain, their emplacement age is equivalent to the uppermost Keuper facies terms, but prior to the final Triassic-early Liassic carbonated sediments. Radiometric ages (187-197±7 Ma show that the emplacement occurred during the lower Liassic. The petralogical differentiation from the chilled margin facies to the central facies, and also to the late pegmatitoids, is consistent with that obtained from major elements, trace elements and REE. Their tholeiitic affinity, as defined by their geochemical composition, is equivalent to that of similar racks in the Pyrenean domain. However, the rocks analyzed here, which are located at the external sector of this domain, display a greater petralogical and geochemical differentiation as compared to similar rocks in the central sectors of the Pyrenean domain.Las doleritas mesozoicas del sector surpirenaico de El Grado (Huesca conservan estructuras de emplazamiento (con desarrollo del movimiento de lava fluida al techo y de carga en su base desarrolladas al instruir en los sedimentos margo-evaporíticos en facies Keuper, todavía inconsolidados. Por similitud con otras doleritas del dominio surpirenaico, la edad del emplazamiento es equivalente a la de los términos superiores de la facies Keuper y previa a la sedimentación carbonatada del Trías terminal-Lías inferior. Las determinaciones de edades radiométricas (187-197±7 Ma indican que el emplazamiento debió tener lugar durante el Lías inferior. La diferenciación petralógica, desde la facies del borde enfriado a la central y, también, al posterior diferenciado pegmatoide concuerda con la obtenida con elementos mayores

  6. Distribución óptima de carga en emplazamientos de generadores; Optimal charging distribution in emplacements of generators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio de la Fé Dotres

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Incorporados al Sistema Eletroenergético Nacional funcionan emplazamientos de generación distribuida que representan más del 40 por ciento de la capacidad generadora instalada. Estos grupo utilizan fuel oil o diesel como combustibles por lo que lograr su explotación eficiente constituye una necesidad económica de primer orden. Se propone un instrumento computacional para lograr la mayor eficiencia en el uso del combustible mediante la distribución económica de las cargas y se desarrolla un método de optimización basado en el criterio del costo incremental del combustible para determinar el costo total de la generación del emplazamiento. Empleando un algoritmo genético simple se minimiza la función del costo mediante la asignación de las potencias a generar por cada máquina. Se comprueba la aplicabilidad del método mediante su aplicación a un emplazamiento específico. Por su rapidez y calidad de los resultados el instrumento computacional se recomienda para su explotación en emplazamientos y el despacho.  The emplacements of distributed generation that represent over the 40 percent of the generating installed capability work to the electric national system incorporated. These group Fuel Oil or diesel utilize like fuels for that achieving his efficient exploitation constitutes a need cheap to run first-rate. Distribution cheap to run of loads proposes a computational instrument to achieve the bigger efficiency in the use of intervening fuel itself and a method of optimization based in the opinion of the incremental cost of fuel to determine the total cost of the generation of the emplacement develops. Using a genetic algorithm the assignment of potencies minimizes the show of the intervening cost itself to generate for each machine. His application finds to a specific summons the applicability of the intervening method. For his rapidity and quality of results the computational instrument is recommended to exploitation in

  7. Emplacement controls for the basaltic-andesitic radial dikes of Summer Coon volcano and implications for flank vents at stratovolcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harp, A. G.; Valentine, G. A.

    2018-02-01

    Mafic flank eruptions are common events that pose a serious hazard to the communities and infrastructure often encroaching on the slopes of stratovolcanoes. Flank vent locations are dictated by the propagation path of their feeder dikes. The dikes are commonly thought to propagate either laterally from the central conduit or vertically from a deeper source. However, these interpretations are often based on indirect measurements, such as surface deformation and seismicity at active systems, and several studies at eroded volcanoes indicate the propagation paths may be more complex. We investigated the Oligocene age Summer Coon volcano (Colorado, USA), where erosion has exposed over 700 basaltic-andesitic radial dikes, to constrain the propagation directions, geometries, and spatial distributions of mafic dikes within a stratovolcano. The mean fabric angle of aligned plagioclase crystals was measured in oriented samples from the margins of 77 dikes. Of the 41 dikes with statistically significant flow fabrics, 85% had fabric angles that were inclined—plunging both inward and outward relative to the center of the volcano. After comparing fabric angles to those reported in other studies, we infer that, while most of the dikes with outward-plunging fabrics descended toward the flanks from a source within the edifice and near its axis, dikes with inward-plunging fabrics ascended through the edifice and toward the flanks from a deeper source. A possible control for the inclination of ascending dikes was the ratio between magma overpressure and the normal stress in the host rock. While higher ratios led to high-angle propagation, lower ratios resulted in inclined emplacement. Dikes crop out in higher frequencies within a zone surrounding the volcano axis at 2500 m radial distance from the center and may be the result of ascending dikes, emplaced at similar propagation angles, intersecting the current level of exposure at common distances from the volcano axis. The process

  8. Monte-Carlo based comparison of the personal dose for emplacement scenarios of spent nuclear fuel casks in generic deep geological repositories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suarez, Hector Sauri; Becker, Franz; Metz, Volker [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany). Inst. for Nuclear Waste Disposal (INE); Pang, Bo [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany). Inst. for Nuclear Waste Disposal (INE); Shenzhen Univ. (China). College of Physics and Energy

    2017-06-15

    In the operational phase of a deep geological disposal facility for high-level nuclear waste, the radiation field in the vicinity of a waste cask is influenced by the backscattered radiation of the surrounding walls of the emplacement drift. For a comparison of disposal of spent nuclear fuel in various host rocks, it is of interest to investigate the influence of the surrounding materials on the radiation field and the personal radiation exposure. In this generic study individual dosimetry of personnel involved in emplacement of casks with spent nuclear fuel in drifts in rock salt and in a clay formation was modelled.

  9. Thermal simulation of drift emplacement (TSS): In-situ instrumentation and numerical modeling of stress measurement methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heusermann, S.

    1988-01-01

    In the course of the planned demonstration test Thermal Simulation of Drift Emplacement (TSS) BGR is carrying out in-situ-measurements of rock stresses, rock deformability and permeability of salt rock and backfill material. The following techniques developed and proved by BGR during the last years are planned to be used in the TSS project: overcoring technique, dilatometer technique, hard inclusion technique, slot-cutting techniques, large-flatjack technique, compensation tests in laboratory, vacuum tests, injection tests, and tracer tests. The purpose of measurements is to determine: the initial stress state; stress gradients around test drifts; stress change caused by mining activities, by creep and stress relaxation and by temperature; the in-situ load-deformation behavior of rock salt; the permeability of rock salt around test drifts; the compaction behavior of backfill material; and the load-deformation behavior of rock salt and borehole grout in laboratory tests

  10. Conceptual design of retrieval systems for emplaced transuranic waste containers in a salt bed depository. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fogleman, S.F.

    1980-04-01

    The US Department of Energy and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission have jurisdiction over the nuclear waste management program. Design studies were previously made of proposed repository site configurations for the receiving, processing, and storage of nuclear wastes. However, these studies did not provide operational designs that were suitable for highly reliable TRU retrieval in the deep geologic salt environment for the required 60-year period. The purpose of this report is to develop a conceptual design of a baseline retrieval system for emplaced transuranic waste containers in a salt bed depository. The conceptual design is to serve as a working model for the analysis of the performance available from the current state-of-the-art equipment and systems. Suggested regulations would be based upon the results of the performance analyses

  11. Development and demonstration of prototype transportation equipment for emplacing HL vitrified waste canisters into small diameter bored horizontal disposal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidler, Wolf K.; Bosgiraud, Jean-Michel; Londe, Louis

    2008-01-01

    Over a period of 4 and years the National Radioactive Waste Management Agency (Andra), working with a variety of Contractors mostly specializing in nuclear orientated mechanical applications, successfully designed, fabricated and demonstrated 2 very different prototype high level waste transport systems. The first system, based on air cushion technology, was developed primarily for very heavy loads (17 to 45 tonnes). The results of this work are described in a separate presentation (Paper 21) at this Conference. The second system, developed by Andra within the framework of the ESDRED Project, generally referred to as the 'Pushing Robot System' for vitrified waste canisters, is the subject of this paper. The 'Pushing Robot System' is a part of the French national disposal concept that is described in Andra's 'Dossier 2005'. The latter is a public document that can be viewed on Andra's web site (www.andra.fr). The 'Pushing Robot System' system is designed for the deep geological disposal (in clay formations) of 'C' type vitrified waste canisters. In its entirety the system provides for the transport, emplacement and, if necessary, the retrieval of those canisters. Nothing in the design of the Andra emplacement equipment would preclude its utilization in horizontal openings in other types of geological settings. Over a period of some 8 years Andra has developed the 'Pushing Robot System' in 3 phases. Initially there was only the 'Conceptual Design' (Phase 1) which was incorporated in the Dossier 2005. This was followed by Phase 2 i.e. the design and fabrication of a simplified full scale prototype system henceforth referred to a P1, which includes a Pushing Robot, a Dummy Canister and a Test Bench. P1 details were also incorporated in the Dossier 2005. Finally, during Phase 3, a second more comprehensive full scale prototype system P2 has been designed and is being assembled and tested this month. This system includes a Transport Shuttle, a Transfer Shielding Cask, a

  12. The origin of elevated water levels in emplacement boreholes, Pahute Mesa, Nevada Test Site: A numerical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardner, G.G.; Brikowski, T.H.

    1993-12-01

    The origin of elevated water levels in emplacement boreholes at Pahute Mesa, Nevada Test Site, is uncertain. If the water is from naturally perched aquifers, then presumed ``above water table`` weapons tests may directly impact the groundwater quality. The purpose of this study is to determine the probable source of the elevated water in boreholes by comparing modeled seepage of infiltrated drilling fluids, and the seepage from a simulated naturally perched aquifer with the observed water level history. In the model, large volumes of water are infiltrated, yet return flow of fluids back into the hole stops within three days after the end of drilling and is insufficient to produce observed standing water. Return flow is limited for two reasons: (1) the volume of the saturated rock next to the borehole is small; (2) pressure head gradient direct unsaturated flow away from the borehole. Simulation of seepage from a naturally perched aquifer readily reproduces the observed water levels.

  13. Emplacement model of obsidian-rhyolite magma deduced from complete internal section of the Akaishiyama lava, Shirataki, northern Hokkaido, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, K.; Sano, K.

    2016-12-01

    Simultaneously explosive and effusive eruptions of silicic magmas has shed light on the vesiculation and outgassing history of ascending magmas in the conduit and emplacement model of obsidian-rhyolite lavas (Castro et al., 2014; Shipper et al, 2013). As well as the knowledge of newly erupted products such as 2008-2009 Chaitén and 2011-2012 Cordón Caule eruptions, field and micro-textural evidences of well-exposed internal structure of obsidian-rhyolite lava leads to reveal eruption processes of silicic magmas. The Shirataki monogenetic volcano field, 2.2 million year age, northern Hokkaido, Japan, contains many outcrops of obsidian and vesiculated rhyolite zones (SiO2=76.7-77.4 wt.%). Among their outcrops, Akaishiyama lava shows good exposures of internal sections from the top to the bottom along the Kyukasawa valley with thickness of about 190 meters, showing the symmetrical structure comprising a upper clastic zone (UCZ; 5m thick), an upper dense obsidian zone (UDO; 15m), an upper banded obsidian zone (UBO; 70-80m), a central rhyolite zone (CR; 65m), a lower banded obsidian zone (LBO; 15m), a lower dense obsidian zone (LDO; 20m), and a lower clastic zone (LCZ; 3m). The upper banded obsidian zone is characterized by existence of spherulite concentration layers with tuffisite veins and rhyolite enclaves. Spherulites consisting of albite, cristobalaite and obsidian glass, are clustered in the dense obsidian. Tuffisite veins show brecciated obsidians in tuffaceous matrix, showing an outgassing path during the emplacement of obsidian lava. Perpendicular dip of spherulite parallel rows indicates the banded zone itself was the domain of vent area. From the observation of these occurrences in the internal section and rock texture, we show the qualitative formation model of Shirataki obsidian-rhyolite lava.

  14. Zircon U-Pb geochronology and emplacement history of intrusive rocks in the Ardestan section, central Iran

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarjoughian, F.; Kananian, A.

    2017-11-01

    The Urumieh-Dokhtar Magmatic Arc (UDMA) is part of the Alpine–Himalayan orogenic belt and interpreted to be a subduction-related Andean-type magmatic arc. Along this belt, Eocene volcanics and some gabbroic to granitic bodies crop out. The main rock types of the studied intrusion are granite, granodiorite, and diorite. They have geochemical features typical of magnesian, calc-alkaline, metaluminous to slightly peraluminous granites and I-type intrusive rock that have a strong enrichment in Large-Ion Lithophile (LIL) elements (e.g. Rb, Ba, Sr), and a depletion in High Field Strength (HFS) elements (e.g. Nb, Ti, P), typical of subduction-related magmas. Zircon U-Pb dating was applied to determine the emplacement ages of the different intrusions in the Ardestan area. Among them the Kuh-e Dom diorite is 53.9±0.4Ma old; the Kuh-e Dom granodiorite is 51.10±0.4Ma old; the Mehrabad granodiorite is 36.8±0.5Ma old, the Nasrand granodiorite is 36.5±0.5Ma old, the Zafarghand granodiorite is 24.6±1.0Ma old, and the Feshark granodiorite is 20.5±0.8Ma old. These results delineate more accurately the magmatic evolution related to the Neotethyan subduction from the Lower Eocene to Lower Miocene, and the subsequent Zagros orogeny that resulted from the Arabia-Eurasia collision. The emplacement of these intrusive rocks inside the UDMA, which has a close relationship with the collisional orogeny, is transitional from a subduction-related setting to post-collisional setting in the Ardestan area.

  15. Emplacement of Holocene silicic lava flows and domes at Newberry, South Sister, and Medicine Lake volcanoes, California and Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Jonathan H.; Anderson, Steven W.

    2017-07-19

    This field guide for the International Association of Volcanology and Chemistry of the Earth’s Interior (IAVCEI) Scientific Assembly 2017 focuses on Holocene glassy silicic lava flows and domes on three volcanoes in the Cascade Range in Oregon and California: Newberry, South Sister, and Medicine Lake volcanoes. Although obsidian-rich lava flows have been of interest to geologists, archaeologists, pumice miners, and rock hounds for more than a century, many of their emplacement characteristics had not been scientifically observed until two very recent eruptions in Chile. Even with the new observations, several eruptive processes discussed in this field trip guide can only be inferred from their final products. This makes for lively debates at outcrops, just as there have been in the literature for the past 30 years.Of the three volcanoes discussed in this field guide, one (South Sister) lies along the main axis defined by major peaks of the Cascade Range, whereas the other two lie in extensional tectonic settings east of the axis. These two tectonic environments influence volcano morphology and the magmatic and volcanic processes that form silicic lava flows and domes. The geomorphic and textural features of glass-rich extrusions provide many clues about their emplacement and the magma bodies that fed them.The scope of this field guide does not include a full geologic history or comprehensive explanation of hazards associated with a particular volcano or volcanic field. The geochemistry, petrology, tectonics, and eruption history of Newberry, South Sister, and Medicine Lake volcanic centers have been extensively studied and are discussed on other field excursions. Instead, we seek to explore the structural, textural, and geochemical evolution of well-preserved individual lava flows—the goal is to understand the geologic processes, rather than the development, of a specific volcano.

  16. Zircon U-Pb geochronology and emplacement history of intrusive rocks in the Ardestan section, central Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarjoughian, F.; Kananian, A.

    2017-01-01

    The Urumieh-Dokhtar Magmatic Arc (UDMA) is part of the Alpine–Himalayan orogenic belt and interpreted to be a subduction-related Andean-type magmatic arc. Along this belt, Eocene volcanics and some gabbroic to granitic bodies crop out. The main rock types of the studied intrusion are granite, granodiorite, and diorite. They have geochemical features typical of magnesian, calc-alkaline, metaluminous to slightly peraluminous granites and I-type intrusive rock that have a strong enrichment in Large-Ion Lithophile (LIL) elements (e.g. Rb, Ba, Sr), and a depletion in High Field Strength (HFS) elements (e.g. Nb, Ti, P), typical of subduction-related magmas. Zircon U-Pb dating was applied to determine the emplacement ages of the different intrusions in the Ardestan area. Among them the Kuh-e Dom diorite is 53.9±0.4Ma old; the Kuh-e Dom granodiorite is 51.10±0.4Ma old; the Mehrabad granodiorite is 36.8±0.5Ma old, the Nasrand granodiorite is 36.5±0.5Ma old, the Zafarghand granodiorite is 24.6±1.0Ma old, and the Feshark granodiorite is 20.5±0.8Ma old. These results delineate more accurately the magmatic evolution related to the Neotethyan subduction from the Lower Eocene to Lower Miocene, and the subsequent Zagros orogeny that resulted from the Arabia-Eurasia collision. The emplacement of these intrusive rocks inside the UDMA, which has a close relationship with the collisional orogeny, is transitional from a subduction-related setting to post-collisional setting in the Ardestan area.

  17. Conceptual designs for waste packages for horizontal or vertical emplacement in a repository in salt for reference in the site characterization plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-06-01

    This report includes the options of horizontal and vertical emplacement, the addition of a phased repository, an additional waste form (intact spent fuel), revised geotechnical data appropriate for the Deaf Smith County site, new corrosion data for the container, and new repository design data. The waste package consists of waste form and canister within a thick-walled, low-carbon steel container surrounded by packing. The container is a hollow cylinder with a flat head welded to each end. The design concepts for the waste container or vertical and horizontal emplacement are identical. This report discusses the results of analyses of aspects of the reference waste package concept needing changes because of new data and information believed applicable to the Deaf Smith County site. Included are waste package conceptual designs or (1) the reference defense high-level waste form from the Savannah River Plant; (2) intact spent fuel with our pressurized-water-reactor or nine boiling-water-reactor assemblies per package for emplacement during Phase 1 of repository operation; and (3) spent fuel which has been disassembled and consolidated into a segmented cylindrical canister with rods from either 12 pressurized-water-reactor or 30 boiling-water-reactor assemblies per package for emplacement during Phase 2. 30 refs., 61 figs., 30 tabs

  18. Erratum: Correction to: Emplacement controls for the basaltic-andesitic radial dikes of Summer Coon volcano and implications for flank vents at stratovolcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harp, A. G.; Valentine, G. A.

    2018-06-01

    In the article "Emplacement controls for the basaltic-andesitic radial dikes of Summer Coon volcano and implications for flank vents at stratovolcanoes", the vertical axis for Fig. 8 a was incorrectly labeled (i.e., the value for dikes per km2).

  19. Distribution and PGE mineralization in the formation of chromitite in ophiolite complexes (Ospina-Kitoi Kharanur and ultrabasic massifs of Eastern Sayan, Sousern Siberia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiseleva, Olga; Zhmodik, Sergei

    2015-04-01

    New study of PGE in restitic ultrabasic (Kharanur and Ospin-Kitoi) massifs from North and South branches (Dobretsov et al., 1985) of the ophiolite complexes in south-eastern part of the Eastern Sayan show their presence in chromitites of both branches belonging to the different geodynamic settings. Modern concepts model includes several mechanisms of podiform chromitite origin reflected in the chemistry of Cr-spinels (Arai, Yurimoto, 1994; Ballhaus, 1998; Uysal et al., 2009 et al.): 1) partial melting of upper mantle rocks, 2) mixing of primitive melts with melts enriched in SiO2, 3) melt-rock interaction. We estimated the types of interaction of mafic melts with mantle peridotites, with the formation of chromite bodies. For ore chrome spinelides from northern branch (Al2O3) melt = 8 - 14 wt%, (TiO2) melt = 0 - 0,4 wt%, (Fe/Mg) melt = 0,5 - 2,4; Southern branch (Al2O3) melt = 10 - 13 wt%, (TiO2) melt = 0,1 wt%, (Fe/Mg) melt = 0,3 - 1 (Kiseleva, 2014). There are two types of PGE distribution Os-Ir-Ru (I) and Pt-Pd (II). Type I chromitites (mid-Al#Cr-spinels) revealed only Os-Ir-Ru distributions; type II (low-Al#Cr spinelides) show both Os-Ir-Ru and (Pt-Pd) distributions (Kiseleva et al., 2012, 2014). PGE distribution in ultramafic peridotites and chromitites reflects PGE fractionation during partial melting (Barnes et al., 1985; Rehkämper et al., 1997). Processes bringing to extreme fractionation of PGE, may be associated with fluid-saturated supra subduction environment where melting degree near 20% and above is sufficient for the release of PGE from the mantle source (Dick, Bullen, 1984; Naldrett, 2010). Enrichment in PPGE together with a high content of IPGE in same chromite bodies is attributed to the second step of melting, and formation of S-enriched and saturated in PGE melts (Hamlyn, Keays, 1986; Prichard et al., 1996). For type I chromitites platinum group minerals (PGM) are presented by Os-Ir-Ru system. In type II chromitites PGM are represented by Os

  20. Radioactive waste isolation in salt: Peer review of the Fluor Technology, Inc., report and position paper concerning waste emplacement mode and its effect on repository conceptual design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hambley, D.F.; Russell, J.E.; Whitfield, R.G.

    1987-02-01

    Recommendations for revising the Fluor Technology, Inc., draft position paper entitled Evaluation of Waste Emplacement Mode and the final report entitled Waste Package/Repository Impact Study include: reevaluate the relative rankings for the various emplacement modes; delete the following want objectives: maximize ability to locate the package horizon because sufficient flexibility exists to locate rooms in the relatively clean San Andres Unit 4 Salt and maximize far-field geologic integrity during retrieval because by definition the far field will be unaffected by thermal and stress perturbations caused by remining; give greater emphasis to want objectives regarding cost and use of present technology; delete the following statements from pages 1-1 and 1-2 of the draft position paper: ''No thought or study was given to the impacts of this configuration [vertical emplacement] on repository construction or short and long-term performance of the site'' and ''Subsequent salt repository designs adopted the vertical emplacement configuration as the accepted method without further evaluation.''; delete App. E and lines 8-17 of page 1-4 of the draft position paper because they are inappropriate; adopt a formal decision-analysis procedure for the 17 identified emplacement modes; revise App. F of the impact study to more accurately reflect current technology; consider designing the underground layout to take advantage of stress-relief techniques; consider eliminating reference to fuel assemblies <10 yr ''out-of-reactor''; model the temperature distribution, assuming that the repository is constructed in an infinitely large salt body; state that the results of creep analyses must be considered tentative until they can be validated by in situ measurements; and reevaluate the peak radial stresses on the waste package so that the calculated stress conditions more closely approximate expected in situ conditions

  1. Effects of irregular basement structure on the geometry and emplacement of frontal thrusts and duplexes in the Quebec Appalachians: Interpretations from well and seismic reflection data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantinovskaya, E.; Malo, M.; Badina, F.

    2014-12-01

    Irregular basement geometry may affect thrust propagation in foreland fold-thrust belts creating a perturbation in structural continuity of hydrocarbon fields. Here we investigate how the irregular pattern of normal faults, along with the presence of uplifts and transverse faults in the Grenvillian basement has influenced the geometry and emplacement of frontal thrusts and duplexes in the parautochthonous domain of the southern Quebec Appalachians during the middle-late Ordovician Taconian orogeny. Integration of data from surface geology, wells, and 2D and 3D seismic reflection surveys into a regional-scale structural model is used to reconstruct the 3D geometry and emplacement history of one- and two-horse duplexes in the Joly-Saint-Flavien gas storage area. The normal hinterland to foreland sequence of thrusting in this area is complicated by the differential emplacement of tectonic slices along strike of the orogenic front, starting in the SW and developing subsequently to the NE within each structural level. The shortening related to duplex emplacement decreases laterally over the distance of 20 km from - 49% in the SW (Joly area) to - 31% in the NE (Saint-Flavien area). Duplex emplacement resulted from the differential forward propagation, deflexion and vertical-axis rotation of the roof thrust (Logan's Line), which, in turn, has been induced by the presence of frontal uplift and transverse faults in the basement. The structural-lithological analysis of tectonic slices and restoration of their initial location allows us to consider the lower slice of the Joly duplex as a structural trap comparable to the fractured reservoir in lower Ordovician dolomites of the Saint-Flavien duplex.

  2. An eclogite-bearing continental tectonic slice in the Zermatt-Saas high-pressure ophiolites at Trockener Steg (Zermatt, Swiss Western Alps)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Sebastian; Bucher, Kurt

    2015-09-01

    The Theodul Glacier Unit (TGU) at "Trockener Steg" represents a continental slice, embedded within the ophiolitic Zermatt-Saas Zone. The Zermatt-Saas Zone is the remnant of the Piemonte-Liguria oceanic lithosphere, formed in the middle Jurassic and subducted up to eclogite facies conditions in the Early Tertiary. The close spatial association of the TGU to the Zermatt-Saas Zone permits a comparison of the metamorphic evolution of the units by detailed field mapping and a petrological investigation of eclogites. The eclogites from both tectono-metamorphic units can be clearly distinguished by their textures, mineral assemblages and by mineral and bulk-rock composition. Geothermobarometry and computed assemblage stability diagrams for the TGU eclogites indicate P-T conditions of 2.2 ± 0.1 GPa and 580 ± 50 °C. These derived P-T conditions must be considered as minimum peak metamorphic conditions the rocks achieved during subduction. The P-T data are different from those derived for eclogites of Zermatt-Saas Zone adjacent to the Theodul Glacier Unit, that reached maximal burial depths at 2.3-2.4 GPa and 500 ± 50 °C. While the estimates of the eclogites of Zermatt-Saas Zone are in good agreement with some of the previous studies, the contrasting P-T estimates for the TGU eclogites suggest that the Zermatt-Saas complex must be subdivided into several tectonic subunits. The non-uniform peak conditions over the "Trockener Steg" area and the maximum pressures conditions reported from ultra-high pressure localities within Zermatt-Saas Zone suggest, that individual tectonic slices have been assembled after detachment from the slab at the return-point, i.e. along the exhumation path. Detached packages of rocks may range from small tectonic slices up to several kilometer-sized fragments. The TGU is separated from the surrounding rocks of the ophiolite unit by two major tectonic contacts. In addition, the formation of biotite-rich crusts along the basal contact of the TGU

  3. Structural Characterization of the Foliated-Layered Gabbro Transition in Wadi Tayin of the Samail Ophiolite, Oman; Oman Drilling Project Holes GT1A and GT2A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deans, J. R.; Crispini, L.; Cheadle, M. J.; Harris, M.; Kelemen, P. B.; Teagle, D. A. H.; Matter, J. M.; Takazawa, E.; Coggon, J. A.

    2017-12-01

    Oman Drilling Project Holes GT1A and GT2A were drilled into the Wadi Tayin massif, Samail ophiolite and both recovered ca. 400 m of continuous core through a section of the layered gabbros and the foliated-layered gabbro transition. Hole GT1A is cut by a discrete fault system including localized thin ultracataclastic fault zones. Hole GT2A is cut by a wider zone of brittle deformation and incipient brecciation. Here we report the structural history of the gabbros reflecting formation at the ridge to later obduction. Magmatic and high temperature history- 1) Both cores exhibit a pervasive, commonly well-defined magmatic foliation delineated by plagioclase, olivine and in places clinopyroxene. Minor magmatic deformation is present. 2) The dip of the magmatic foliation varies cyclically, gradually changing dip by 30o from gentle to moderate over a 50 m wavelength. 3) Layering is present throughout both cores, is defined by changes in mode and grain size ranging in thickness from 2 cm to 3 m and is commonly sub-parallel to the foliation. 4) There are no high temperature crystal-plastic shear zones in the core. Key observations include: no simple, systematic shallowing of dip with depth across the foliated-layered gabbro transition and layering is continuous across this transition. Cyclic variation of magmatic foliation dip most likely reflects the process of plate separation at the ridge axis. Near-axis faulting- i) On or near-axis structures consist of epidote-amphibole bearing hydraulic breccias and some zones of intense cataclasis with intensely deformed epidote and seams of clay and chlorite accompanied by syntectonic alteration of the wall rock. Early veins are filled with amphibole, chlorite, epidote, and anhydrite. ii) The deformation ranges from brittle-ductile, causing local deflection of the magmatic foliation, to brittle offset of the foliation and core and mantle structures in anhydrite veins. iii) The prevalent sense of shear is normal and slickenfibers

  4. Tethyan Anhydrite Preserved in the Lower Ocean Crust of the Samail Ophiolite? Evidence from Oman Drilling Project Holes GT1A and 2A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teagle, D. A. H.; Harris, M.; Crispini, L.; Deans, J. R.; Cooper, M. J.; Kelemen, P. B.; Alt, J.; Banerjee, N.; Shanks, W. C., III

    2017-12-01

    Anhydrite is important in mid-ocean ridge hydrothermal systems because of the high concentrations of calcium and sulfate in modern seawater and anhydrite's retrograde solubility. Because anhydrite hosts many powerful tracers of fluid-rock interactions (87Sr/86Sr, δ18O, δ34S, trace elements, fluid inclusions) it is useful for tracing the chemical evolution of hydrothermal recharge fluids and estimating time-integrated fluid fluxes. Anhydrite can form from heated seawater (>100°C), through water-rock reaction, or by mixing of seawater and hydrothermal fluids. Although abundant in active hydrothermal mounds, and predicted to form from downwelling, warming fluids during convection, anhydrite is rare in drill core from seafloor lavas, sheeted dikes and upper gabbros, with only minor amounts in ODP Holes 504B and 1256D. Because anhydrite can dissolve during weathering, its occurrence in ophiolites is unexpected. Instead, gypsum is present in Macquarie Island lavas and Miocene gypsum fills cavities within the Cretaceous Troodos ore deposits. Thus, the occurrence of numerous anhydrite veins in cores from the gabbroic lower crust of the Samail ophiolite in Oman was unanticipated. To our knowledge, anhydrite in Oman gabbros has not been previously reported. Oman Drilling Project Holes GT1A and GT2A were drilled into the Wadi Gideah section of the Wadi Tayin massif. Both recovered 400 m of continuous core from sections of layered gabbros (GT1) and the foliated-layered gabbro transition (GT2). Anhydrite is present throughout both holes, some in vein networks but more commonly as isolated 1-110 mm veins (>60 mm ave). Anhydrite is mostly the sole vein filling but can occur with greenschist minerals such as epidote, quartz, chlorite and prehnite. Anhydrite commonly exhibits prismatic and bladed textures but can also be capriciously microcrystalline. Though definitive cross cutting relationships are elusive, anhydrite veins cut across some greenschist veins. Anhydrite is

  5. Geodynamic interpretation of the 40Ar/39Ar dating of ophiolitic and arc-related mafics and metamafics of the northern part of the Anadyr-Koryak region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palandzhyan, S.A.; Layer, P.W.; Patton, W.W.; Khanchuk, A.I.

    2011-01-01

    Isotope datings of amphibole-bearing mafics and metamafics in the northern part of the Anadyr-Koryak region allow clarification of the time of magmatic and metamorphic processes, which are synchronous with certain stages of the geodynamic development of the northwest segment of the Pacific mobile belt in the Phanerozoic. To define the 40Ar/39Ar age of amphiboles, eight samples of amphibole gabbroids and metamafics were selected during field work from five massifs representing ophiolites and mafic plutons of the island arc. Rocks from terranes of three foldbelts: 1) Pekulnei (Chukotka region), 2) Ust-Belaya (West Koryak region), and 3) the Tamvatnei and El'gevayam subterranes of the Mainits terrane (Koryak-Kamchatka region), were studied. The isotope investigations enabled us to divide the studied amphiboles into two groups varying in rock petrographic features. The first was represented by gabbroids of the Svetlorechensk massif of the Pekulnei Range and by ophiolites of the Tamvatnei Mts.; their magmatic amphiboles show the distribution of argon isotopes in the form of clearly distinguished plateau with an age ranging within 120-129 Ma. The second group includes metamorphic amphiboles of metagabbroids and apogabbro amphibolites of the Ust-Belaya Mts., Pekulnei and Kenkeren ranges (El'gevayam subterranes). Their age spectra show loss of argon and do not provide well defined plateaus the datings obtained for them are interpreted as minimum ages. Dates of amphiboles from the metagabbro of the upper tectonic plate of the Ust-Belaya allochthon points to metamorphism in the suprasubduction environment in the fragment of Late Neoproterozoic oceanic lithosphere in Middle-Late Devonian time, long before the Uda-Murgal island arc system was formed. The amphibolite metamorphism in the dunite-clinopyroxenite-metagabbro Pekulnei sequence was dated to occur at the Permian-Triassic boundary. The age of amphiboles from gabbrodiorites of the Kenkeren Range was dated to be Early

  6. New insights into the timing, triggers and emplacement processes of prodigious submarine landslides in the Nordic Seas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talling, Peter; Pope, Ed; Hunt, James; Allin, Joshua; Cartigny, Matthieu; Long, David; Mozzato, Alessandro; Stanford, Jennifer; Tappin, David; Watts, Camilla

    2015-04-01

    Submarine landslides can generate tsunamis with the potential to cause severe damage. This is illustrated by the huge (> 3,000 cubic km) Storegga landslide offshore Norway that occurred 8,200 years ago, and which produced a tsunami that ran up surrounding coastlines for up to 20m. Here we report on a 1 month research cruise on the RV Pelagia in July 2014 to the Nordic Seas, which collected 88 sediment cores totalling more than 500m, together with over 7,000 square km of swath bathymetry. The overall aim of this research expedition was to better understand the tsunami risk from large submarine landslides in the Nordic Seas. This includes a better understanding of the timing and frequency of submarine landslides, factors that potentially trigger or precondition slope failure, and the manner in which landslides are emplaced. Much of the expedition was then devoted to understanding the age and emplacement mechanism of the ~900 cubic km Traenadjupet landslide, located to the north of the Storegga Slide. This included sampling and mapping of the main Traenadjupet Slide, four lobes froming the distal Traenadjupet Slide deposit. A newly discovered debris flow deposit with large blocks was found to continue from the most westerly of these lobes, and it was mapped to its termination. If the previously established age of ~4ka for the Traenadjupet Slide is correct, then it does not appear to produced a major tsunami (unlike the Storegga Slide). Indeed, the morphology of the Traenadjupet Slide suggests much slower emplacement than the Storegga Slide, which would be consistent with such a lack of major tsunami. Turbidites in cores from the deep-water Lofoten Basin will help to understand the frequency and character of faster moving slope failures around the basin margin. Cores were collected from the Lofoten Contourite Drift located next to the Traenadjupet Slide, and these contouritic sediment may provide a paleoceanographic record that can be compared to slide timing, in order

  7. Proposed shake table studies for NAPP containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akolkar, P.M.; Khuddus, M.A.

    1975-01-01

    The proposal for shake table studies on model of containment structure of Narora Atomic Power Project is discussed. The physical characteristics such as the dimensions, connection details of the containment with the internal structure and the dynamic interaction between the two have been described. The dynamic scale factors obtained through similitude requirements and dimensional analysis have been presented and the modelling aspects and the choice of model material and scale have been discussed. The proposed type of tests, necessary measurement and instrumentation have been mentioned. The limitations imposed by similitude requirements on model studies are brought out and the usefulness of the results of the proposed tests in the dynamic design of the containment have been covered. (author)

  8. Morphodynamics of Travertine Dam/Waterfall Growth due to the Interaction of Biological Activity, Water Flow and Limestone Emplacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi, N.; Parker, G.

    2012-12-01

    Plitvice Lakes in Croatia are characterized by a step-like train of lakes and waterfalls. The waterfalls are located at the crests of naturally-emplaced dams. The top of each dam grows upward at the rate of a few millimeters per year. It is thought that the upward growth of these dams is caused by the interaction of water flow and biological activity, resulting in the precipitation of dissolved limestone. Dam evolution is initiated by the growth of mosses that favor swift, shallow water. Bacteria that inhabit the roots of the moss excrete solid limestone (travertine) from the water. The limestone fossilizes the moss, and then more moss grows on top of the travertine deposit. In this way, the natural dam can grow over to 10 m high, impounding the water behind it to form a lake. We propose a simple model to explain the formation of natural limestone dams by the interaction between water flow and biologically-mediated travertine deposition. We assume for simplicity that light is the only factor determining the growth of moss, which is then colonized by travertine-emplacing bacteria. We also assume that the water is saturated with dissolved limestone, so that the process is not limited by limestone availability. Photosynthesis, and thus the growth rate of moss are crudely approximated as decreasing linearly with depth. We employ the shallow water equations to describe water flow over the dam. In order to obtain a profile of permanent form for a dam migrating upward and downstream at constant speed, we solve the problem in a moving coordinate system. When water flows over the dam, it is accelerated in the streamwise direction, and the water surface forms a backwater curve. The flow regime changes from Froude-subcritical to Froude-supercritical at a point slightly downstream of the crest of the dam. Farther downstream, the flow attains a threshold velocity beyond which moss is detached. This threshold point defines the downstream end of the active part of the dam. The

  9. Thrusting and back-thrusting as post-emplacement kinematics of the Almora klippe: Insights from Low-temperature thermochronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, R. C.; Singh, Paramjeet; Lal, Nand

    2015-06-01

    Crystalline klippen over the Lesser Himalayan Sequence (LHS) in the Kumaon and Garhwal regions of NW-Himalaya, are the representative of southern portion of the Main Central Thrust (MCT) hanging wall. These were tectonically transported over the juxtaposed thrust sheets (Berinag, Tons and Ramgarh) of the LHS zone along the MCT. These klippen comprise of NW-SE trending synformal folded thrust sheet bounded by thrusts in the south and north. In the present study, the exhumation histories of two well-known klippen namely Almora and Baijnath, and the Ramgarh thrust sheet, in the Kumaon and Garhwal regions vis-a-vis Himalayan orogeny have been investigated using Apatite Fission Track (AFT) ages. Along a ~ 60 km long orogen perpendicular transect across the Almora klippe and the Ramgarh thrust sheet, 16 AFT cooling ages from the Almora klippe and 2 from the Ramgarh thrust sheet have been found to range from 3.7 ± 0.8 to 13.2 ± 2.7 Ma, and 6.3 ± 0.8 to 7.2 ± 1.0 Ma respectively. From LHS meta-sedimentary rocks only a single AFT age of 3.6 ± 0.8 Ma could be obtained. Three AFT ages from the Baijnath klippe range between 4.7 ± 0.5 and 6.6 ± 0.8 Ma. AFT ages and exhumation rates of different klippen show a dynamic coupling between tectonic and erosion processes in the Kumaon and Garhwal regions of NW-Himalaya. However, the tectonic processes play a dominant role in controlling the exhumation. Thrusting and back thrusting within the Almora klippe and Ramgarh thrust sheet are the post-emplacement kinematics that controlled the exhumation of the Almora klippe. Combining these results with the already published AFT ages from the crystalline klippen and the Higher Himalayan Crystalline (HHC), the kinematics of emplacement of the klippen over the LHS and exhumation pattern across the MCT in the Kumaon and Garhwal regions of NW-Himalaya have been investigated.

  10. Emplacement Dynamics and Timescale of a Holocene Flow from the Cima Volcanic Field (CA): Insights from Rheology and Morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldati, A.; Beem, J. R.; Gomez, F.; Huntley, J. W.; Robertson, T.; Whittington, A. G.

    2017-12-01

    We present a rheological and morphological study of a Holocene lava flow emitted by a monogenetic cinder cone in the Cima Volcanic Field, eastern California. By combining field observations and experimental results, we reconstructed the few weeks-long emplacement timeline of the Cima flow. Sample textural analyses revealed that the near-vent portion of the flow is significantly more crystalline (fxtal=0.95±0.04) than the main flow body (fxtal=0.66±0.11), which reveals a multi-stage emplacement history. Airborne photogrammetry data were used to generate a digital elevation model, which allowed us to estimate the flow volume. The rheology of Cima lavas was determined experimentally by concentric cylinder viscometry between 1550 °C and 1160 °C, including the first subliquidus rheology measurements for a continental intraplate trachybasaltic lava. The experimentally determined effective viscosity increases from 54 Pa·s to 1,361 Pa·s during cooling from the liquidus ( 1230 ˚C) to 1160 ˚C, where crystal fraction is 0.11. Flow curves fitted to measurements at different strain rates indicate a Herschel-Bulkley rheological behavior, combining shear-thinning with a yield strength negligible at the higher measured temperatures but increasing up to 357±41 Pa at 1160˚C. The lava viscosity over this range is still lower than most basaltic melts, due to the high alkali content of Cima lavas ( 6 wt% Na2O+K2O). We determined that the morphological pahoehoe to `a'ā transition of this trachybasalt occurs at a temperature of 1160±10 ˚C, similar to that observed for Hawaiian tholeiitic lavas, but at higher apparent viscosity values. Monogenetic volcanism in the Western United States is typically characterized by low effusion rates and eruption on sub-horizontal desert plains. Under these low strain-rate conditions, the pahoehoe to `a'ā transition is likely to occur abruptly upon minimal cooling, i.e. very close to the vent, but lava tubes may transport fluid lava to flow

  11. The behavior of iron and zinc stable isotopes accompanying the subduction of mafic oceanic crust: A case study from Western Alpine ophiolites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inglis, Edward C.; Debret, Baptiste; Burton, Kevin W.; Millet, Marc-Alban; Pons, Marie-Laure; Dale, Christopher W.; Bouilhol, Pierre; Cooper, Matthew; Nowell, Geoff M.; McCoy-West, Alex J.; Williams, Helen M.

    2017-07-01

    Arc lavas display elevated Fe3+/ΣFe ratios relative to MORB. One mechanism to explain this is the mobilization and transfer of oxidized or oxidizing components from the subducting slab to the mantle wedge. Here we use iron and zinc isotopes, which are fractionated upon complexation by sulfide, chloride, and carbonate ligands, to remark on the chemistry and oxidation state of fluids released during prograde metamorphism of subducted oceanic crust. We present data for metagabbros and metabasalts from the Chenaillet massif, Queyras complex, and the Zermatt-Saas ophiolite (Western European Alps), which have been metamorphosed at typical subduction zone P-T conditions and preserve their prograde metamorphic history. There is no systematic, detectable fractionation of either Fe or Zn isotopes across metamorphic facies, rather the isotope composition of the eclogites overlaps with published data for MORB. The lack of resolvable Fe isotope fractionation with increasing prograde metamorphism likely reflects the mass balance of the system, and in this scenario Fe mobility is not traceable with Fe isotopes. Given that Zn isotopes are fractionated by S-bearing and C-bearing fluids, this suggests that relatively small amounts of Zn are mobilized from the mafic lithologies in within these types of dehydration fluids. Conversely, metagabbros from the Queyras that are in proximity to metasediments display a significant Fe isotope fractionation. The covariation of δ56Fe of these samples with selected fluid mobile elements suggests the infiltration of sediment derived fluids with an isotopically light signature during subduction.

  12. Geochronological and mineralogical constraints on depth of emplacement and ascencion rates of epidote-bearing magmas from northeastern Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sial, Alcides N.; Vasconcelos, Paulo M.; Ferreira, Valderez P.; Pessoa, Ricardo R.; Brasilino, Roberta G.; Morais Neto, João M.

    2008-10-01

    Calc-alkalic to high-K calc-alkalic granitoid plutons in the Borborema province, northeastern Brazil, have been studied to constrain depth of emplacement by mineralogical and geological methods and to estimate upward magma transport rate based on partial dissolution of magmatic epidote. Laser-probe incremental heating 40Ar/ 39Ar dating of biotite and hornblende single crystals from the Neoproterozoic Tavares and Brejinho high-K calc-alkalic magmatic epidote (mEp)-bearing plutons reveals age differences of around 60 M.y. between these two minerals in each of these two intrusions. These data suggest solidification at relatively great depth followed by prolonged cooling interval between the closure temperatures of biotite and hornblende. Al-in-hornblende barometry indicates that hornblende in several mEp-bearing plutons in the Transversal Domain of the Borborema province solidified at 5 to 7 kbar, whereas in the Seridó and Macururé terranes, solidification pressures range from 3 to 4 kbar. Partial dissolution of epidote indicates very rapid upward transport. Partial corrosion occurred during 15-35 years (Cachoerinha-Salgueiro terrane), 10-30 years (Alto Pajeú), 15 years (Seridó), and 10 years (Macururé) corresponding to upward transport rates of 450-1300, 650-1050, 1200, and 1800 m/year respectively in these four terranes. Rapid upward magma migration in most cases was probably facilitated by diking simultaneous with regional shearing.

  13. Mont Terri Project - Engineered barrier emplacement experiment in Opalinus Clay for the disposal of radioactive waste in underground repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayor, J. C.; Garcia-Sineriz, J.; Alonso, E.; Alheid, H.-J.; Bluemling, P.

    2007-01-01

    The Engineered Barrier (EB) experiment was a full-scale test for the demonstration, in a horizontal drift, of an emplacement technics of the clay barrier, using a granular bentonite material in the upper part of this barrier and bentonite blocks at the bottom. The test has been carried out in a 6 m long section of a niche excavated in Opalinus Clay of the Mont Terri underground laboratory. A steel dummy canister, with the same dimensions and weight as the real reference canisters, was placed on top of a bed of highly compacted bentonite blocks (in turn lying on a concrete bed), and the rest of the clay barrier volume was backfilled with a Granular Bentonite Material (GBM), made of very highly compacted pellets of different sizes. Hydro-mechanical instrumentation and an artificial hydration system (to accelerate the saturation of the clay barrier) were installed, and the test section sealed with a concrete plug. The evolution of the hydro-mechanical parameters along the hydration, both in the barrier and in the clayey rock formation, has been monitored during about 1.5 years, and modelled using the CODE-BRIGHT code. The EB experiment has proved that fully automated production of a Granular Bentonite Material (GBM) is possible and large quantities can be produced in due time in the required quality. Only minor modifications of existing production lines in industry for other applications were necessary to achieve this result. In the EB test section, a dry density of 1.36 g/cm 3 of the emplaced GBM has been obtained. With this value it is estimated that the hydraulic conductivity of this material is lower than 5 x 10 -12 m/s and the swelling pressure is about 1.3 MPa. Even though the EB test section conditions are now not considered as representative of a true demonstration, it is deemed that the model emplacement testing results (dry density of about 1.40 g/cm 3 ) serve well to demonstrate the achievable densities expected in the real world setting. The artificial

  14. Preliminary assessment of the thermal effects of an annular air space surrounding an emplaced nuclear waste canister

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, B.W.

    1979-01-01

    Modeling results have previously shown that the presence of a large air space (e.g., a repository room) within a nuclear waste repository is expected to cause a waste canister's temperature to remain cooler than it would otherwise be. Results presented herein show that an annular air space surrounding the waste canisters can have similar cooling effects under certain prescribable conditions; for a 16 ft x 1 ft diameter canister containing 650 PWR rods which initially generate a total of 4.61 kw, analysis will show that annular air spaces greater than 11 in will permit the canister surface to attain peak temperatures lower than that which would result from a zero-gap/perfect thermal contact. It was determined that the peak radial temperature gradient in the salt varies in proportion to the inverse of the drill hole radius. Thermal radiation is shown to be the dominant mode of heat transfer across an annular air space during the first two years after emplacement. Finally, a methodology is presented which will allow investigators to easily model radiation and convection heat transfer through air spaces by treating the space as a conduction element that possesses non-linear temperature dependent conductivity

  15. Mont Terri Project - Engineered barrier emplacement experiment in Opalinus Clay for the disposal of radioactive waste in underground repositories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayor, J. C. [Empresa Nacional de Residuos Radioactivos SA (ENRESA), Madrid (Spain); Garcia-Sineriz, J. [Asociacion para la Investigacion y Desarollo Industrial de los Recursos Naturales (AITEMIN), Madrid (Spain); Alonso, E. [Centre Internacional de Metodos Numerics en Ingenyeria (CIMNE), Barcelona (Spain); Alheid, H.-J. [Bundesanstalt fuer Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe (BGR), Hannover (Germany); Bluemling, P. [National Cooperative for the Disposal of Radioactive Waste (Nagra), Wettingen (Switzerland)

    2007-07-01

    The Engineered Barrier (EB) experiment was a full-scale test for the demonstration, in a horizontal drift, of an emplacement technics of the clay barrier, using a granular bentonite material in the upper part of this barrier and bentonite blocks at the bottom. The test has been carried out in a 6 m long section of a niche excavated in Opalinus Clay of the Mont Terri underground laboratory. A steel dummy canister, with the same dimensions and weight as the real reference canisters, was placed on top of a bed of highly compacted bentonite blocks (in turn lying on a concrete bed), and the rest of the clay barrier volume was backfilled with a Granular Bentonite Material (GBM), made of very highly compacted pellets of different sizes. Hydro-mechanical instrumentation and an artificial hydration system (to accelerate the saturation of the clay barrier) were installed, and the test section sealed with a concrete plug. The evolution of the hydro-mechanical parameters along the hydration, both in the barrier and in the clayey rock formation, has been monitored during about 1.5 years, and modelled using the CODE-BRIGHT code. The EB experiment has proved that fully automated production of a Granular Bentonite Material (GBM) is possible and large quantities can be produced in due time in the required quality. Only minor modifications of existing production lines in industry for other applications were necessary to achieve this result. In the EB test section, a dry density of 1.36 g/cm{sup 3} of the emplaced GBM has been obtained. With this value it is estimated that the hydraulic conductivity of this material is lower than 5 x 10{sup -12} m/s and the swelling pressure is about 1.3 MPa. Even though the EB test section conditions are now not considered as representative of a true demonstration, it is deemed that the model emplacement testing results (dry density of about 1.40 g/cm{sup 3}) serve well to demonstrate the achievable densities expected in the real world setting. The

  16. Deformation mechanisms accommodating the emplacement of an igneous sill-complex in the Irish sector of the Rockall Basin, offshore NW Ireland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magee, Craig; Jackson, Christopher; Schofield, Nick

    2013-04-01

    Magma intrusion within the subsurface is heavily influenced by the pre-existing architecture of the upper crust and, depending on the emplacement mechanisms, may modify basin structure and fluid flow pathways. Seismic reflection data reveal that intrusive networks predominantly consist of interconnected, saucer-shaped sills that are often associated with dome-shaped 'forced' folds generated by intrusion-induced uplift. Previous studies of intrusion-related forced folds have primarily focused on isolated sills or laccoliths and have shown that the fold amplitude is less than the intrusion thickness, suggesting that additional space-making mechanisms (e.g. grain comminution, fluidization) accompanied emplacement. Furthermore, forced folding is often considered as an instantaneous process over geological time. However, fold growth and the interplay between accompanying ductile and brittle deformation styles remains poorly understood. Here, we use 3D seismic reflection data from the eastern margin of the Irish Rockall Basin, NE Atlantic, to quantitatively study eighty-two igneous intrusions (i.e. saucer-shaped sills and inclined sheets) in order to constrain the emplacement history of a Palaeocene-to-Middle Eocene sill-complex. Emplacement occurred across a Cretaceous clastic-to-marl dominated succession at palaeodepths of limbs. The saucer-shaped sills are characterized by radial magma flow patterns, emanating from the inner sill, distinguished by mapping the long axes of magma lobes and fingers. These magma flow indictors also provide a proxy for intrusion style; i.e. where sills intrude the Lower Cretaceous sandstones, magma propagation was facilitated by brittle fracturing while non-brittle processes (e.g. fluidization) accompanied shallow-level intrusions into the Upper Cretaceous marls. Directly overlying the sill-complex, within the Palaeocene-Mid-Eocene succession, are a series of 22 forced folds that are interpreted to have formed via intrusion-induced uplift

  17. Identification des caractéristiques hydrogéologiques d'un réservoir en nappe aquifère Identification of the Hydrogeological Characteristics of an Aquifer Reservoir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carriere J. F.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Un des problèmes délicats de la reconnaissance d'un réservoir souterrain en nappe aquifère est l'identification de la distribution spatiale des paramètres hydrogéologiques. Une démarche usuelle consiste à interpréter des tests hydrauliques d'interférences ou un historique d'exploitation à l'aide d'un modèle maillé en identifiant les champs de paramètres qui décrivent l'aquifère (perméabilités, paramètres de réalimentation, etc. Cet ajustement doit tenir compte de toutes les sources d'information dont on dispose (tests de puits, connaissance géologique de la formation, etc. . Un programme d'ajustement automatique, répondant à ces critères, a été élaboré par l'Ecole des Mines de Paris et le Gaz de France. II permet d'interpréter les tests d'interférences et les premières injections expérimentales de gaz. Le calcul se déroule selon un processus d'optimisation en trois phases : - estimation géostatistique du champ de paramètres à identifier, à partir de valeurs ponctuelles connues et de valeurs ajustables en un nombre restreint de points choisis, dits pilotes ; - simulation des essais à l'aide d'un modèle monophasique bidimensionnel et comparaison des pressions calculées avec les valeurs mesurées ; - choix, par un algorithme de minimisation, des modifications à apporter aux valeurs des paramètres aux points pilotes. L'application à plusieurs cas réels a montré le grand intérêt de cette méthode. One of the delicate problems in the exploration of an underground aquifer reservoir is the identification of the spatial distribution of the hydrogeological parameters. The standard approach consists in interpreting hydraulic interference tests or the operating history of the formation with the help of a meshed model, by identifying the parameter fields describing the aquifer (permeabilities, feeding parameters, etc. . This approach must take all available information sources into account (well tests

  18. Site characterization plan conceptual design report for a high-level nuclear waste repository in salt, vertical emplacement mode: Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-12-01

    This Conceptual Design Report describes the conceptual design of a high-level nuclear waste repository in salt at a proposed site in Deaf Smith County, Texas. Waste receipt, processing, packing, and other surface facility operations are described. Operations in the shafts underground are described, including waste hoisting, transfer, and vertical emplacement. This report specifically addresses the vertical emplacement mode, the reference design for the repository. Waste retrieval capability is described. The report includes a description of the layout of the surface, shafts, and underground. Major equipment items are identified. The report includes plans for decommissioning and sealing of the facility. The report discusses how the repository will satisfy performance objectives. Chapters are included on basis for design, design analyses, and data requirements for completion of future design efforts. 105 figs., 52 tabs

  19. Retrieval system for emplaced spent unreprocessed fuel (SURF) in salt bed depository: accident event analysis and mechanical failure probabilities. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhaskaran, G.; McCleery, J.E.

    1979-10-01

    This report provides support in developing an accident prediction event tree diagram, with an analysis of the baseline design concept for the retrieval of emplaced spent unreprocessed fuel (SURF) contained in a degraded Canister. The report contains an evaluation check list, accident logic diagrams, accident event tables, fault trees/event trees and discussions of failure probabilities for the following subsystems as potential contributors to a failure: (a) Canister extraction, including the core and ram units; (b) Canister transfer at the hoist area; and (c) Canister hoisting. This report is the second volume of a series. It continues and expands upon the report Retrieval System for Emplaced Spent Unreprocessed Fuel (SURF) in Salt Bed Depository: Baseline Concept Criteria Specifications and Mechanical Failure Probabilities. This report draws upon the baseline conceptual specifications contained in the first report

  20. Site characterization plan conceptual design report for a high-level nuclear waste repository in salt, vertical emplacement mode: Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-12-01

    This Conceptual Design Report describes the conceptual design of a high-level nuclear waste repository in salt at a proposed site in Deaf Smith County, Texas. Waste receipt, processing, packing, and other surface facility operations are described. Operations in the shafts underground are described, including waste hoisting, transfer, and vertical emplacement. This report specifically addresses the vertical emplacement mode, the reference design for the repository. Waste retrieval capability is described. The report includes a description of the layout of the surface, shafts, and underground. Major equipment items are identified. The report includes plans for decommissioning and sealing of the facility. The report discusses how the repository will satisfy performance objectives. Chapters are included on basis for design, design analyses, and data requirements for completion of future design efforts. 105 figs., 52 tabs.

  1. Site characterization plan conceptual design report for a high-level nuclear waste repository in salt, horizontal emplacment mode: Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-12-01

    This Conceptual Design Report describes the conceptual design of a high-level nuclear waste repository in salt at a proposed site in Deaf Smith County, Texas. Waste receipt, processing, packaging, and other surface facility operations are described. Operations in the shafts and underground are described, including waste hoisting, transfer, and horizontal emplacement. This report specifically addresses the horizontal emplacement mode, the passive alternate design for the repository. Waste retrieval capability is described. The report includes a description of the layout of the surface, shafts, and underground. Major equipment items are identified. The report includes plans for decommissioning and sealing of the facility. The report discusses how the repository will satisfy performance objectives. Chapters are included on basis for design, design analyses, and data requirements for completion of future design efforts. 105 figs., 52 tabs

  2. The Jeffers Brook diorite-granodiorite pluton: style of emplacement and role of volatiles at various crustal levels in Avalonian appinites, Canadian Appalachians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pe-Piper, Georgia; Piper, David J. W.

    2018-04-01

    Small appinite plutons ca. 610 Ma outcrop in the peri-Gondwanan Avalon terrane of northern Nova Scotia, with different structural levels exposed. Field mapping shows that the Jeffers Brook pluton is a laccolith emplaced along an upper crustal thrust zone, likely in a dilational jog in a regional dextral strike-slip system. The oldest rocks are probably mafic sills, which heated the area facilitating emplacement of intermediate magmas. Cross-cutting relationships show that both mafic and intermediate magmas were supplied throughout the history of pluton emplacement. The modal composition, mineral chemistry, and bulk chemistry of gabbro, diorite, tonalite, granodiorite, and granite have been studied in the main plutonic phases, dykes, and sills, and mafic microgranular enclaves. As with the type appinites in the Scottish Caledonides, the pluton shows evidence of high water content: the dominance of hornblende, locally within pegmatitic texture; vesicles and irregular felsic patches in enclaves; and late aplite dykes. Analyzed mafic microgranular enclaves are geochemically similar to larger diorite bodies in the pluton. Tonalite-granodiorite is distinct from the diorite in trace-element geochemistry and radiogenic isotopes. Elsewhere to the east, similar rocks of the same age form vertically sheeted complexes in major shear zones; hornblende chemistry shows that they were emplaced at a deeper upper crustal level. This implies that little of the observed geochemical variability in the Jeffers Brook pluton was developed within the pluton. The general requirements to form appinites are proposed to be small magma volumes of subduction-related magmas that reach the upper crust because of continual heating by mafic magmas moving through strike-slip fault pathways and trapping of aqueous fluids rather than venting through volcanic activity.

  3. Geologic-geochemical characteristics of Guidong granitic massif and recognition of geo-tectonic environment at the time of its emplacement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jianhong, Li; Shanyuan, Wei; Mingyue, Feng [Beijing Research Inst. of Uranium Geology, Beijing (China); Liang, Liang [East China Inst. of Technology, Fuzhou (China)

    2004-11-01

    Based on the study of geologic characteristics, such as mineralogic assemblage, structural and textural features of granite of Guidong granitic massif, and by using petrochemical, trace-element and isotopic data, and some petrochemical, trace-element and isotopic diagrams widely applied to the identification of geo-tectonic environments, authors recognize that Guidong granitic massif was emplaced in post-orogenic collision environment. (authors)

  4. Multiphase Structural Evolution of a Continental Margin During Obduction Orogeny: Insights From the Jebel Akhdar Dome, Oman Mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grobe, A.; Virgo, S.; von Hagke, C.; Urai, J. L.; Littke, R.

    2018-03-01

    The structural evolution of the carbonate platform in the footwall of the Semail ophiolite emplaced onto the passive continental margin of Arabia helps to better understand the early stages of obduction-related orogens. These early stages are rarely observable in other orogens as they are mostly overprinted by later mountain building phases. We present an extensive structural analysis of the Jebel Akhdar anticline, the largest tectonic window of the Oman Mountains, and integrate it on different scales. Outcrop observations can be linked to plate motion data, providing an absolute timeframe for structural generations consistent with radiometric dating of veins. Top-to-S overthrusting of the Semail ophiolite and Hawasina nappes onto the carbonate platform during high plate convergence rates between Arabia and Eurasia caused rapid burial and overpressure, generation and migration of hydrocarbons, and bedding-confined veins, but no major deformation in the carbonate platform. At reduced convergence rates, subsequent tectonic thinning of the ophiolite took place above a top-to-NNE, crustal-scale ductile shear zone, deforming existing veins and forming a cleavage in clay-rich layers in early Campanian times. Ongoing extension occurred along normal- to oblique-slip faults, forming horst-graben structures and a precursor of the Jebel Akhdar dome (Campanian to Maastrichtian). This was followed by NE-SW oriented ductile shortening and the formation of the Jebel Akhdar dome, deforming the earlier structures. Thereafter, exhumation was associated with low-angle normal faults on the northern flank of the anticline. We correlate the top-to-NNE crustal-scale shear zone with a similar structure in the Saih Hatat window to develop a unified model of the tectonic evolution of the Oman Mountains.

  5. Conditions for the test emplacement of intermediate-level radioactive wastes in chamber 8a of the 511 m level of the Asse Salt Mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    The Gesellschaft fuer Strahlen- und Umweltforschung mbH (GSF) emplaces intermediate-level radioactive wastes which accumulate in an activity involving the use of radioactive materials that is licensed or reported in the Federal Republic of Germany or which are stored on an interim basis by the appropriate licensing or inspection agencies in chamber 8a of the 511 m level of the Asse Salt Mine in Remlingen near Wolfenbuettel in conjunction with an engineering test program. The type and form of the intermediate-level wastes must conform to certain conditions so that there are no hazards to personnel and the repository during transfer and subsequent storage. It is therefore necessary for the radioactive wastes to be treated and packaged before delivery in such a way that they satisfy the conditions presented in this document. The GSF shall inform the companies and organizations delivering wastes about its experiences with emplacement operations. The Conditions for the Test Emplacement of Intermediate-Level Radioactive Wastes in Chamber 8a of the 511 m Level of the Asse Salt Mine must be adapted to conform to the latest state of science and the art. The GSF must therefore reserve the right to modify the conditions, allowing for an appropriate transition period

  6. ERG [Engineering Review Group] and GRG [Geologic Review Group] review of the horizontal versus vertical modes of waste emplacement at the Deaf Smith County site, Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chytrowski, B.R.

    1988-01-01

    The Engineering Review Group (ERG) and Geologic Review Group (GRG) were established by the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation (ONWI) to help evaluate specific issues in the US Department of Energy's nuclear waste repository program. The December 1985 meeting and the February 1986 meeting dealt with the evaluation of the Fluor Technology, Inc., architect-engineer recommendation of the horizontal mode of waste package emplacement for the Site Characterization Plan Conceptual Design Report (SCP-CDR). The ONWI recommendation regarding horizontal and vertical modes of waste package emplacement and associated studies was reviewed. This report documents the ERG and GRG's comments and recommendations on this subject and ONWI responses to the specific points raised by these groups. The ERG and GRG joint review groups concurred with ONWI recommendations that additional studies are required in order to reach a decision on the method of emplacement to be used. In the opinion of these groups, both methods can be implemented; however, should the decision be reached today the vertical mode would be preferred

  7. Radiometric, magnetic, and gravity study of the Quixadá batholith, central Ceará domain (NE Brazil): evidence for Pan-African/Bra