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Sample records for emergency room challenges

  1. [Breaking bad news in the emergency room: Suggestions and future challenges].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landa-Ramírez, Edgar; López-Gómez, Antonio; Jiménez-Escobar, Irma; Sánchez-Sosaa Sánchez-Sosaa, Juan José

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe educational programs that reportedly teach how to break bad news in the emergency department. We also suggest some recommendations on how to communicate bad news based on the research of evidence available in the field. The examined evidence points toward six major components with which physicians should familiarize when communicating bad news: 1) doctor-patient empathic communication, 2) establishing a proper space to give the news, 3) identifying characteristics of the person who receives the news, 4) essential aspects for communicating the news; 5) emotional support, and 6) medical and administrative aspects of the encounter. Finally, we point out several limitations in the studies in the field and future challenges identified in the communication of bad news in emergency room facilities. aPrograma.

  2. SCREENING, BRIEF INTERVENTION AND REFERRAL TO TREATMENT (SBIRT) IN A POLISH EMERGENCY ROOM: CHALLENGES IN CULTURAL TRANSLATION OF SBIRT

    OpenAIRE

    Cherpitel, Cheryl J.; Bernstein, Edward; Bernstein, Judith; Moskalewicz, Jacek; Swiatkiewicz, Grazyna

    2009-01-01

    A randomized clinical controlled trial of screening, brief intervention and referral to treatment (SBIRT) for drinking and related problems among at-risk and dependent drinkers, using nurse interventionists, was undertaken in an emergency room (ER) in Sosnowiec, Poland, the first level-one trauma center in that country. This study was the first outside of the U.S. to test protocols developed in a 14-site collaborative SBIRT study. Because Poland has both a pattern of heavy drinking and a high...

  3. SCREENING, BRIEF INTERVENTION AND REFERRAL TO TREATMENT (SBIRT) IN A POLISH EMERGENCY ROOM: CHALLENGES IN CULTURAL TRANSLATION OF SBIRT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherpitel, Cheryl J; Bernstein, Edward; Bernstein, Judith; Moskalewicz, Jacek; Swiatkiewicz, Grazyna

    2009-09-01

    A randomized clinical controlled trial of screening, brief intervention and referral to treatment (SBIRT) for drinking and related problems among at-risk and dependent drinkers, using nurse interventionists, was undertaken in an emergency room (ER) in Sosnowiec, Poland, the first level-one trauma center in that country. This study was the first outside of the U.S. to test protocols developed in a 14-site collaborative SBIRT study. Because Poland has both a pattern of heavy drinking and a highly accessible specialized alcohol treatment system, it offered a key setting for cultural translation of SBIRT to the international context of a new and emerging health care system. It also offered the opportunity to test the effectiveness of SBIRT with both at-risk and dependent drinkers, and to test the feasibility of using ER nursing staff to provide the brief intervention, serving as a potential model for ongoing implementation of SBIRT in ER settings. Findings suggest that the U.S.-based SBIRT protocols can be successfully translated to other cultures, and that nurses can be successfully trained to provide brief intervention for problem drinking in the ER setting.

  4. Web based emergency room PACS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cha, Soon Joo; Cheon, Yong Kyung; Choi, Sung Woo Kim

    2005-01-01

    We wished to develop the web based Picture Archiving and Communication System in the emergency room for early decision making in emergency treatment planning at a full PACS Hospital. The program tools were Microsoft Visual Studio 6.0 - Visual C++ 6.0, and the Microsoft SQL 7.0 under the Microsoft Windows 2000 server operation system. The achievement of images was performed by an auto transport program installed in the ER and the radiology department. The average compression rates were 5:1 for CT and MR, and 20:1 for CR with JPEG 2000 lossy compression. All the images were stored on hard disk for 3 months. The patients' information was displayed for 2 weeks for reducing the security risk. For interdepartmental consultation, patient query by patient hospital number was available. Our Web based ER PACS could be useful system for early decision making for treatment planning in the emergency room because it reduces the risk factors for the security of the Web Paces by using a system independent from PACS in the hospital and minimizing the information patients

  5. [Modified overcrowd index in emergency room].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polanco-González, Carlos; Castañón-González, Jorge Alberto; Buhse, Thomas; Samaniego-Mendoza, José Lino; Arreguín-Nava, Rocío; Villanueva-Martínez, Sebastián

    2013-01-01

    Overcrowd of emergency rooms affects efficiency and quality of medical care. To describe the mathematical-computational system modified overcrowd index which measures in real time and in four levels of warnings (non crowded, crowded, overcrowded and extreme overcrowded) emergency room saturation in a network of hospitals, from only seven simple variables (number of available beds, physicians and nurses, number of patients in the waiting room, in medical consultation and admitted for further evaluation, as well as number of critically ill patients admitted). The modified overcrowd index was exhaustively tested with 245,280 virtual transactions from seven hospitals in an uninterrupted schedule basis simulating hourly surveillance for four years. From 224 episodes of overcrowd, 216 (97%) where correctly identified and verified by the network of hospitals warnings, its time series also provided useful information about available personnel and resource distribution within the hospital network. Modified overcrowd index is an efficient tool detecting emergency room overcrowd outbreaks in a network of hospitals.

  6. Role of Magnetocardiography in Emergency Room

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, H.; Kim, K.; Kim, J. M.; Lee, Y. H.; Kim, T. E.; Lim, H. K.; Park, Y. K. [Biomagnetism Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Y. G.; Chung, N. [Cardiovascular Center, College of Medicine, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-10-15

    In emergency rooms, patients with acute chest pain should be diagnosed as quickly as possible with higher diagnostic accuracy for an appropriate therapy to the patients with acute coronary syndrome or for avoiding unnecessary hospital admissions. At present, electrocardiography(ECG) and biochemical markers are generally used to detect myocardial infarction and coronary angiography is used as a gold standard to reveal the degree of narrowing of coronary artery. Magnetocardiography(MCG) has been proposed as a novel and non-invasive diagnostic tool fur the detection of cardiac electrical abnormality associated with myocardial ischemia. In this study, we examined whether the MCG can be used fur the detection of coronary artery disease(CAD) in patients, who were admitted to the emergency room with acute chest pain. MCG was recorded from 36 patients admitted to the emergency room with suspected acute coronary syndrome. The MCG recordings were obtained using a 64-channel SQUID MCG system in a magnetically shielded room. In result, presence of CAD could be found with a sensitivity of 88.2 % in patients with acute chest pain without 57 elevation in ECG, demonstrating a possible use in the emergency room to screen CAD patients.

  7. Headache in an emergency room in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Bigal

    2000-05-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: When experiencing a headache attack, Brazilian patients usually look for a primary care service, where they are seen by general clinicians. In the town of Ribeirão Preto, these clinicians routinely refer patients to the Emergency Room of the University Hospital. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to evaluate the quality of primary care by analyzing retrospectively the medical records of patients with a complaint of headache seen in this emergency room during the year of 1996. DESIGN: retrospective study. SETTIING: Emergency Room of the Universital Hospital, Ribeirão Preto, São Paulo, reference unit. PARTICIPANTS:1254 patients. The patients who sought the Emergency Room (ER of the University Hospital of Ribeirão Preto, during the year of 1996 with a complaint of headache were studied retrospectively. MAIN MEASUREMENTS: Etiology, age, diagnosis, secondary cause, laboratory tests. RESULTS: Of the 1254 patients seen (61% women, 1190 (94.9% were discharged after the administration of parenteral analgesics before they had spent 12 hours in the room. Only 64 (5.1% patients remained for more than 12 hours. Of the patients who spent less than 12 hours in the room, 71.5% had migraine or tension type headache and did not require subsidiary exams for diagnosis. Of the patients who spent more than 12 hours in the room, 70.3% had secondary headaches. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude the primary care for headache is unsatisfactory in the Ribeirão Preto region. Many patients with primary headache are referred to tertiary care services, indicating the need for the dissemination of the diagnostic criteria of the International Headache Society to general practitioners.

  8. Emergency room management of radiation accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenberg, R.; Mettler, F.A. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Emergency room management of radioactively contaminated patients who have an associated medical injury requiring immediate attention must be handled with care. Radioactive contamination of the skin of a worker is not a medical emergency and is usually dealt with at the plant. Effective preplanning and on-the-scene triage will allow the seriously injured and contaminated patients to get the medical care they need with a minimum of confusion and interference. Immediate medical and surgical priorities always take precedence over radiation injuries and radioactive contamination. Probably the most difficult aspect of emergency management is the rarity of such accidents and hence the unfamiliarity of the medical staff with the appropriate procedures. The authors discuss how the answer to these problems is preplanning, having a simple and workable procedure and finally having 24-h access to experts

  9. Digital image display system for emergency room

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murry, R.C.; Lane, T.J.; Miax, L.S.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports on a digital image display system for the emergency room (ER) in a major trauma hospital. Its objective is to reduce radiographic image delivery time to a busy ER while simultaneously providing a multimodality capability. Image storage, retrieval, and display will also be facilitated with this system. The system's backbone is a token-ring network of RISC and personal computers. The display terminals are higher- function RISC computers with 1,024 2 color or gray-scale monitors. The PCs serve as administrative terminals. Nuclear medicine, CT, MR, and digitized film images are transferred to the image display system

  10. Evaluation of the preparedness of the children's emergency rooms ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-02-09

    Feb 9, 2017 ... SPSS version 21 and is presented as table. Results: All the centres have an emergency room. ... with skills on the use of AED while in 4(44.4%) centres they were skilled on the use of manual ... preparation are key elements to increasing the survival rate of these children presenting to the emergency room.

  11. Firearm Injuries Received in Emergency Room of a Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-05-22

    May 22, 2017 ... the emergency room of Federal Teaching Hospital Abakaliki from January 2005 to. December 2014. Results: There were 214 ... Hospital: Analysis of Pattern, Morbidity, and Mortality. NI Omoke. Original Article ..... rapid evacuation of casualties to hospital emergency room. In this study, there was no ...

  12. Modernizing emergency alerts poses challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Center for Homeland Defense and Security

    2010-01-01

    Center for Homeland Defense and Security, OUT OF THE CLASSROOM Download the paper: Paper: IPAWS (Integrated Public Alert and Warning System)” Modernizing emergency alerts poses challenges Anthony Cox is interested in the next generation of emergency alert systems.Any television viewer...

  13. Challenges and solutions for realistic room simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begault, Durand R.

    2002-05-01

    Virtual room acoustic simulation (auralization) techniques have traditionally focused on answering questions related to speech intelligibility or musical quality, typically in large volumetric spaces. More recently, auralization techniques have been found to be important for the externalization of headphone-reproduced virtual acoustic images. Although externalization can be accomplished using a minimal simulation, data indicate that realistic auralizations need to be responsive to head motion cues for accurate localization. Computational demands increase when providing for the simulation of coupled spaces, small rooms lacking meaningful reverberant decays, or reflective surfaces in outdoor environments. Auditory threshold data for both early reflections and late reverberant energy levels indicate that much of the information captured in acoustical measurements is inaudible, minimizing the intensive computational requirements of real-time auralization systems. Results are presented for early reflection thresholds as a function of azimuth angle, arrival time, and sound-source type, and reverberation thresholds as a function of reverberation time and level within 250-Hz-2-kHz octave bands. Good agreement is found between data obtained in virtual room simulations and those obtained in real rooms, allowing a strategy for minimizing computational requirements of real-time auralization systems.

  14. Measures of Rehospitalization, Emergency Room Visit, and Community Discharge

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Measures of the Rate of Rehospitalization, Emergency Room Visit, and Community Discharge for Medicare Beneficiaries. These rates are based on Medicare claims data.

  15. What Happens in the Emergency Room?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... was 4 years old, he loved to play Batman. He'd put on his Batman pajamas and pretend to fly all over the ... swollen) and he had trouble moving his arm. "Batman," she said, "We're going to the emergency ...

  16. Firearm injuries received in emergency room of a Nigerian Teaching ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The morbidity and mortality associated with civilian firearm injury in developing countries is appreciable. The increasing incidence of gunshot casualties received in hospital emergency rooms is an emerging concern. The aim of this study was to determine the pattern and outcome of firearm injuries in a civilian ...

  17. Predictors of frequent visits to a psychiatric emergency room

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Jørgen; Aagaard, Andreas; Buus, Niels

    2014-01-01

    and social support. RESULTS: The study identified two overall trends of predictors of frequent use of the psychiatric emergency room. High use of psychiatric services: ≥5 visits to the psychiatric emergency room, ≥3 admissions or ≥60 bed days during the year, was and continued to be predictive of high use...... to psychiatric emergency services. OBJECTIVES: To identify predictors of frequent use of a psychiatric emergency room at a Danish University Psychiatric Hospital through a 12-year period (1995-2007) and to speculate on how changes in the mental healthcare services affect predictors of frequent use through time....... DESIGN: A large-scale register based logistic regression analysis combined with a small-scale explorative, interpretative interview study. Register data were drawn from the Danish Central Psychiatric Research Register. Four-year cohorts (1995, 1998, 2001 and 2004) of patients with at least one visit...

  18. [Vertigo and dizziness in the emergency room].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwergal, A; Möhwald, K; Dieterich, M

    2017-06-01

    Vertigo and dizziness are among the most common chief complaints in the emergency department. Etiologies can be categorized into three subgroups: neurootological (vestibular), medical (especially cardiovascular, metabolic), and psychiatric disorders. The diagnostic approach in the emergency department is based on a systematic analysis of case history (type, time course of symptoms, modulating factors, associated symptoms), clinical examination of the vestibular, ocular motor, and cerebellar systems (head impulse test, nystagmus, skew deviation, positioning maneuver, test of gait and stance), as well as a basal monitoring (vital signs, 12-lead ECG, blood tests). For differentiation of peripheral and central etiologies in acute vestibular syndrome, the HINTS exam (head impulse test, nystagmus, test of skew) and examination of smooth pursuit and saccades should be applied. Nonselective use of neuroimaging is not indicated due to a low diagnostic yield. Cranial imaging should be done in the following constellations: (1) detection of focal neurological or central ocular motor and vestibular signs on clinical exam, (2) acute abasia with only minor ocular motor signs, (3) presence of various cardiovascular risk factors, (4) headache of unknown quality as an accompanying symptom. Besides the symptomatic therapy of vertigo and dizziness with antiemetics or analgesics, further diagnostic differentiation is urgent to guide proper treatment. Examples are the acute therapy in cerebral ischemia, the execution of positioning maneuvers in benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, the use of corticosteroids in acute unilateral vestibulopathy, as well as the readjustment of metabolic homeostasis in medical disorders.

  19. Association between air pollution and ischemic cardiovascular emergency room visits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, C.A.; Amador Pereira, L.A.; Souza onceicao, G.M. de; Kishi, H.S.; Milani, Rodolfo; Ferreira Braga, A.L.; Ascimento Saldiva, P.H.

    2003-01-01

    This study observed the relationship between air pollutants and ischemic cardiac diseases such as angina and acute myocardial infarction in a representative cardiovascular center emergency room in Sao Paulo, Brazil. Daily emergency room admissions to the Institute of the Heart of the university of Sao Paulo, as well as data concerning daily air pollutant levels and meteorological variables, were collected from January 1994 to august 1995. Generalized additive Poisson regressions were fitted to the logarithm of the expected values of total emergency room visits due to angina or acute myocardial infarction, controlling for smooth functions of season and weather and indicators for days of the week. All investigated pollutants were positively associated with ischemic cardiovascular disease emergency room visits, and the time lags were relatively short, but only CO presented in effect that was statistically significant. An interquartile range increase n CO was associated with an increase of 6.4% (95% CI: 0.7-12.1) in daily angina or acute myocardial infarction emergency room visits. This result did not change when estimates were done using linear models and natural cubic plines. This study showed that air pollution has a role in cardiovascular morbidity in Sao Paulo, reinforcing the necessity for air pollutant mission-controlling polices in urban areas

  20. Assessing inhalation injury in the emergency room

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanizaki S

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Shinsuke Tanizaki Department of Emergency Medicine, Fukui Prefectural Hospital, Fukui, Japan Abstract: Respiratory tract injuries caused by inhalation of smoke or chemical products are related to significant morbidity and mortality. While many strategies have been built up to manage cutaneous burn injuries, few logical diagnostic strategies for patients with inhalation injuries exist and almost all treatment is supportive. The goals of initial management are to ensure that the airway allows adequate oxygenation and ventilation and to avoid ventilator-induced lung injury and substances that may complicate subsequent care. Intubation should be considered if any of the following signs exist: respiratory distress, stridor, hypoventilation, use of accessory respiratory muscles, blistering or edema of the oropharynx, or deep burns to the face or neck. Any patients suspected to have inhalation injuries should receive a high concentration of supplemental oxygen to quickly reverse hypoxia and to displace carbon monoxide from protein binding sites. Management of carbon monoxide and cyanide exposure in smoke inhalation patients remains controversial. Absolute indications for hyperbaric oxygen therapy do not exist because there is a low correlation between carboxyhemoglobin levels and the severity of the clinical state. A cyanide antidote should be administered when cyanide poisoning is clinically suspected. Although an ideal approach for respiratory support of patients with inhalation injuries do not exist, it is important that they are supported using techniques that do not further exacerbate respiratory failure. A well-organized strategy for patients with inhalation injury is critical to reduce morbidity and mortality. Keywords: inhalation injury, burn, carbon monoxide poisoning, cyanide poisoning

  1. "Boarding" Psychiatric Patients in Emergency Rooms: One Court Says "No More".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appelbaum, Paul S

    2015-07-01

    "Boarding" involuntary psychiatric patients in medical emergency rooms is common in many parts of the United States. The practice, driven by a shortage of alternative resources, including limited inpatient capacity, can result in patients' being held for days without treatment or a hospital room, often in busy corridors or treatment rooms. A recent challenge to this practice led the Washington Supreme Court to declare it illegal and resulted in the appropriation of substantial funding to create new psychiatric beds. Centralized psychiatric crisis services, with appropriate payment models, may offer another approach to reducing the need for holding patients awaiting inpatient admission.

  2. [Spondylocostal dysostosis and acute cholangitis in pediatrics emergency room].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avilés-Martínez, Karla Isis

    Congenital malformations of the chest wall comprise a heterogeneous group of diseases denominated spondylocostal dysostosis. They have in common developmental abnormalities in the morphology of the structures of the chest and vertebrae with a broad characterization: from mild deformity without functional consequences to life-threatening injuries. We present the case of a girl with spondylocostal dysostosis and acute cholangitis. A 13-month-old girl with severe malnutrition, history of hydrocephalus and myelomeningocele at birth was admitted in the emergency pediatric room with fever and progressive respiratory distress. Clinical assessment revealed ribs and vertebral malformations and acute cholangitis. Complex rib abnormalities consist in deformities of the chest wall, which do not have a specific pattern and are extremely rare. When they are associated with myelomeningocele and hydrocephalus they may be considered as autosomal recessive inheritance spondylocostal dysostosis. The diagnosis is established by clinical assessment and X-rays. Spondylocostal dysostosis identification and complications related to their genetic and molecular causes are still a challenge for clinical pediatricians and the multidisciplinary medical team who treats these patients throughout lifetime. Copyright © 2016 Hospital Infantil de México Federico Gómez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  3. Child Abuse: The Value of Systematic Screening at Emergency Rooms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sittig, J.S.

    2015-01-01

    There is no conclusive evidence that diagnostic tools detect physical child abuse among children coming to emergency rooms (ERs), but his evidence is urgently needed because both false-positive and false-negative diagnoses have serious adverse effects. This thesis describes several aspects of the

  4. Pattern of emergency room mortality among road traffic crash victims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babalola, Oladimeji Ranti; Oluwadiya, Kehinde; Vrgoč, Goran; Akpati, Ugochukwu; Sindik, Joško; Čoklo, Miran; Marinović, Marin; Bakota, Bore

    2015-11-01

    Road traffic injuries are a major cause of death in the emergency room. The goal of this study was to highlight the demographic pattern of road traffic-related deaths in the accident and emergency room of a regional trauma centre. This was a 5-year retrospective study in which road traffic-related cases of emergency room mortality between June 2009 and June 2014 were reviewed. A total of 33 road traffic crash-related deaths occurred during this period with a male-to-female ratio of 2.3:1. Most of these patients were pedestrians with severe injuries involving two or more Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) coded regions. The mean time between injury and presentation in the first trauma facility was 112.1 (±55.4)min, and between presentation in the emergency room and death was 410 (±645)min. Mangled lower extremity, bilateral long bone lower limb fractures, pelvic injuries, blunt injuries to the chest and abdomen, and cranial fossae fractures were the common injury pattern. Median ISS and NISS in these patients were 22 (interquartile range [IQR]=11) and 25 (IQR=17), respectively. Severe injuries, delayed presentation, multiple referrals and delayed resuscitative measures contribute to road traffic crash-related mortality. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Evaluation of the preparedness of the children's emergency rooms ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-02-09

    Feb 9, 2017 ... sick children. A significant pro- portion of childhood and under five deaths in tertiary institutions takes place in the CHER. There is thus need for a high level skilled manpower and ... gency care, but none of the nurses in all the centres ..... patient satisfaction, emergency room efficiency, cost- effective care ...

  6. Lived experience of caring for dying patients in emergency room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kongsuwan, Waraporn; Matchim, Yaowarat; Nilmanat, Kittikorn; Locsin, Rozzano C; Tanioka, Tetsuya; Yasuhara, Yuko

    2016-03-01

    Dying often occurs in hospitals and frequently in emergency rooms. Understanding caring for critical and dying patients is necessary for quality nursing. This study described the meaning of nurses' lived experience of caring for critical and dying patients in the emergency rooms. This study was conducted in three emergency rooms of tertiary hospitals in southern Thailand. Twelve nurses met the inclusion criteria: nurses working in emergency room for at least 2 years, and experienced caring for critical and dying patients in an emergency department. Data were collected using in-depth individual interviews. Data transcription and analysis used van Manen's hermeneutic phenomenological approach. Trustworthiness was established following Lincoln and Guba's criteria. Experiences of caring for critical and dying patients revealed four thematic categories: defying death; no time for palliative care; lacking support for family; and privacy for peaceful deaths. These thematic categories reflected van Manen's four lived worlds of body, time, relations and space. The study described the meaning of the experience of caring for critical and dying patients while supporting the development of nursing knowledge for palliative and end-of-life care in emergent settings. Findings of the study influence nursing policies toward enhancing education of nurses regarding palliative and end-of-life care in emergency settings. These findings can also influence the value of caring-healing environments for critical and dying patients and their families. Policies can focus on practice and education of families particularly about end-of-life care for critical and dying patients. © 2016 International Council of Nurses.

  7. Weather conditions influence the number of psychiatric emergency room patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandl, Eva Janina; Lett, Tristram A.; Bakanidze, George; Heinz, Andreas; Bermpohl, Felix; Schouler-Ocak, Meryam

    2017-12-01

    The specific impact of weather factors on psychiatric disorders has been investigated only in few studies with inconsistent results. We hypothesized that meteorological conditions influence the number of cases presenting in a psychiatric emergency room as a measure of mental health conditions. We analyzed the number of patients consulting the emergency room (ER) of a psychiatric hospital in Berlin, Germany, between January 1, 2008, and December 31, 2014. A total of N = 22,672 cases were treated in the ER over the study period. Meteorological data were obtained from a publicly available data base. Due to collinearity among the meteorological variables, we performed a principal component (PC) analysis. Association of PCs with the daily number of patients was analyzed with autoregressive integrated moving average model. Delayed effects were investigated using Granger causal modeling. Daily number of patients in the ER was significantly higher in spring and summer compared to fall and winter (p < 0.001). Three PCs explained 76.8% percent of the variance with PC1 loading mostly on temperature, PC2 on cloudiness and low pressure, and PC3 on windiness. PC1 and PC2 showed strong association with number of patients in the emergency room (p < 0.010) indicating higher patient numbers on warmer and on cloudy days. Further, PC1, PC2, and PC3 predicted the number of patients presenting in the emergency room for up to 7 days (p < 0.050). A secondary analysis revealed that the effect of temperature on number of patients was mostly due to lower patient numbers on cold days. Although replication of our findings is required, our results suggest that weather influences the number of psychiatric patients consulting the emergency room. In particular, our data indicate lower patient numbers during very cold temperatures.

  8. Assessment of acute motor deficit in the pediatric emergency room

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcio Moacyr Vasconcelos

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives: This review article aimed to present a clinical approach, emphasizing the diagnostic investigation, to children and adolescents who present in the emergency room with acute-onset muscle weakness. Sources: A systematic search was performed in PubMed database during April and May 2017, using the following search terms in various combinations: “acute,” “weakness,” “motor deficit,” “flaccid paralysis,” “child,” “pediatric,” and “emergency”. The articles chosen for this review were published over the past ten years, from 1997 through 2017. This study assessed the pediatric age range, from 0 to 18 years. Summary of the data: Acute motor deficit is a fairly common presentation in the pediatric emergency room. Patients may be categorized as having localized or diffuse motor impairment, and a precise description of clinical features is essential in order to allow a complete differential diagnosis. The two most common causes of acute flaccid paralysis in the pediatric emergency room are Guillain-Barré syndrome and transverse myelitis; notwithstanding, other etiologies should be considered, such as acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, infectious myelitis, myasthenia gravis, stroke, alternating hemiplegia of childhood, periodic paralyses, brainstem encephalitis, and functional muscle weakness. Algorithms for acute localized or diffuse weakness investigation in the emergency setting are also presented. Conclusions: The clinical skills to obtain a complete history and to perform a detailed physical examination are emphasized. An organized, logical, and stepwise diagnostic and therapeutic management is essential to eventually restore patient's well-being and full health.

  9. Child abuse inventory at emergency rooms: CHAIN-ER rationale and design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nieuwenhuis Edward ES

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Child abuse and neglect is an important international health problem with unacceptable levels of morbidity and mortality. Although maltreatment as a cause of injury is estimated to be only 1% or less of the injured children attending the emergency room, the consequences of both missed child abuse cases and wrong suspicions are substantial. Therefore, the accuracy of ongoing detection at emergency rooms by health care professionals is highly important. Internationally, several diagnostic instruments or strategies for child abuse detection are used at emergency rooms, but their diagnostic value is still unknown. The aim of the study 'Child Abuse Inventory at Emergency Rooms' (CHAIN-ER is to assess if active structured inquiry by emergency room staff can accurately detect physical maltreatment in children presenting at emergency rooms with physical injury. Methods/design CHAIN-ER is a multi-centre, cross-sectional study with 6 months diagnostic follow-up. Five thousand children aged 0-7 presenting with injury at an emergency room will be included. The index test - the SPUTOVAMO-R questionnaire- is to be tested for its diagnostic value against the decision of an expert panel. All SPUTOVAMO-R positives and a 15% random sample of the SPUTOVAMO-R negatives will undergo the same systematic diagnostic work up, which consists of an adequate history being taken by a pediatrician, inquiry with other health care providers by structured questionnaires in order to obtain child abuse predictors, and by additional follow-up information. Eventually, an expert panel (reference test determines the true presence or absence of child abuse. Discussion CHAIN-ER will determine both positive and negative predictive value of a child abuse detection instrument used in the emergency room. We mention a benefit of the use of an expert panel and of the use of complete data. Conducting a diagnostic accuracy study on a child abuse detection instrument is also

  10. Assessment of abuse-related injuries: a comparative study of forensic physicians, emergency room physicians, emergency room nurses and medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reijnders, Udo J L; Giannakopoulos, Georgios F; de Bruin, Kim H

    2008-01-01

    A comparative study was made investigating whether emergency room physicians, emergency room nurses, forensic physicians, and interns are competent in describing, recognising and determining the possible cause of injuries. The injury assessment scores varied from good--adequate--fail and remained blank in various participant groups. Forensic physicians scored significantly better than emergency room staff and interns in the assessment of abuse-related injuries. There were almost no differences noted between emergency room physicians and emergency room nurses. For the functional group with more or less than 4 to 6 years of experience, no significant differences were noted for scoring good in all 5 cases. The fact that forensic physicians scored better than the emergency room staff is probably explained by the fact that almost all practicing forensic physicians have been officially qualified. Training in this field for all professionals involved in such assessment should be mandatory.

  11. Errors in radiographic recognition in the emergency room

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Britton, C.A.; Cooperstein, L.A.

    1986-01-01

    For 6 months we monitored the frequency and type of errors in radiographic recognition made by radiology residents on call in our emergency room. A relatively low error rate was observed, probably because the authors evaluated cognitive errors only, rather than include those of interpretation. The most common missed finding was a small fracture, particularly on the hands or feet. First-year residents were most likely to make an error, but, interestingly, our survey revealed a small subset of upper-level residents who made a disproportionate number of errors

  12. Coronary Computed Tomography Angiography in the Assessment of Acute Chest Pain in the Emergency Room

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prazeres, Carlos Eduardo Elias dos; Cury, Roberto Caldeira; Carneiro, Adriano Camargo de Castro; Rochitte, Carlos Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    The coronary computed tomography angiography has recently emerged as an accurate diagnostic tool in the evaluation of coronary artery disease, providing diagnostic and prognostic data that correlate directly with the data provided by invasive coronary angiography. The association of recent technological developments has allowed improved temporal resolution and better spatial coverage of the cardiac volume with significant reduction in radiation dose, and with the crucial need for more effective protocols of risk stratification of patients with chest pain in the emergency room, recent evaluation of the computed tomography coronary angiography has been performed in the setting of acute chest pain, as about two thirds of invasive coronary angiographies show no significantly obstructive coronary artery disease. In daily practice, without the use of more efficient technologies, such as coronary angiography by computed tomography, safe and efficient stratification of patients with acute chest pain remains a challenge to the medical team in the emergency room. Recently, several studies, including three randomized trials, showed favorable results with the use of this technology in the emergency department for patients with low to intermediate likelihood of coronary artery disease. In this review, we show data resulting from coronary angiography by computed tomography in risk stratification of patients with chest pain in the emergency room, its diagnostic value, prognosis and cost-effectiveness and a critical analysis of recently published multicenter studies

  13. Self-reported emergency room visits for dental problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiñonez, C

    2011-02-01

    To estimate the prevalence of hospital emergency room visits for dental problems not associated with trauma in Canada, and to explore the characteristics that influence such visits. Data were collected through a cross-sectional and retrospective national telephone interview survey of 1005 Canadians aged 18 years and over using random digit dialling. Participants were asked if they had ever visited a hospital emergency room for a dental problem not associated with trauma. Descriptive and logistic regression analyses were undertaken. A total of 54 people, or 5.4% of the sample reported having to visit an ER in the past for a dental problem not associated with trauma. Income, painful aching in one's mouth in the previous month, and having to spend a day in bed because of a dental problem in the last 2 weeks, appear to be the dominant predictors of this outcome. Access to dental insurance or public care mitigates the use of hospital care for dental problems that are best treated in the dental care setting. © 2009 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  14. Prevalence of otorhinolaryngologic diagnoses in the pediatric emergency room

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Signorelli, Luiz Gabriel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Fever and pain, which are very common in ear, nose, and throat pathologies, are among the most frequent complaints recorded during emergency room pediatric patient treatment. Most of time, the pediatricians are called on to evaluate otorhinolaryngology disorders that requires specialist assessment. Aim: To determine the prevalence of otorhinolaryngologic diagnoses in a pediatric population in a reference hospital in the city of Itatiba, São Paulo. Methods: We evaluated 2,054 pediatric patients (age range, 0-12 years, 11 months in this descriptive, transversal observational (survey study. Data collection was performed by a single observer during 103 night shifts (07:00 p.m. to 07:00 a.m. between January and December 2011, and included documentation of the main diagnosis, and patient age and sex. The ethics committee and research institution approved study. Patients were divided into 2 groups based on diagnosis: Group A otorhinolaryngology disease and Group B included diagnoses not contained in Group A. Results: Of the total enrolled patients, 52.2% corresponded to Group A and 47.8% to Group B; 51.9% were male and 48.1% were female. The average age was 4.5 years (Group A, 3.93 years; Group B, 5.03 years. We compared the prevalence of the diagnostic hypotheses of the 2 groups. Conclusion: A large number of patients sought treatment at pediatric emergency rooms for otorhinolaryngologic diagnoses.

  15. Sedation and analgesia for procedures in the pediatric emergency room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramalho, Carlos Eduardo; Bretas, Pedro Messeder Caldeira; Schvartsman, Claudio; Reis, Amélia Gorete

    Children and adolescents often require sedation and analgesia in emergency situations. With the emergence of new therapeutic options, the obsolescence of others, and recent discoveries regarding already known drugs, it became necessary to review the literature in this area. Non-systematic review in the PubMed database of studies published up to December 2016, including original articles, review articles, systematic reviews, and meta-analyses. References from textbooks, publications from regulatory agencies, and articles cited in reviews and meta-analyses through active search were also included. Based on current literature, the concepts of sedation and analgesia, the necessary care with the patient before, during, and after sedoanalgesia, and indications related to the appropriate choice of drugs according to the procedure to be performed and their safety profiles are presented. The use of sedoanalgesia protocols in procedures in the pediatric emergency room should guide the professional in the choice of medication, the appropriate material, and in the evaluation of discharge criteria, thus assuring quality in care. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  16. Quality of emergency rooms and urgent care services: user satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Cássio de Almeida; Santos, Bruna Tatiane Prates dos; Andrade, Dina Luciana Batista; Barbosa, Francielle Alves; Costa, Fernanda Marques da; Carneiro, Jair Almeida

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the quality of emergency rooms and urgent care services according to the satisfaction of their users. A cross-sectional descriptive study with a quantitative approach. The sample comprised 136 users and was drawn at random. Data collection took place between October and November 2012 using a structured questionnaire. Participants were mostly male (64.7%) aged less than 30 years (55.8%), and the predominant level of education was high school (54.4%). Among the items evaluated, those that were statistically associated with levels of satisfaction with care were waiting time, confidence in the service, model of care, and the reason for seeking care related to acute complaints, cleanliness, and comfortable environment. Accessibility, hospitality, and infrastructure were considered more relevant factors for patient satisfaction than the cure itself.

  17. WATER: EMERGING CHALLENGE FOR INDIA'S BRIGHTEST A ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T. N. Narasimhan

    2009-08-25

    Page 1 of 31. WATER: EMERGING CHALLENGE FOR INDIA'S BRIGHTEST. A Platinum-Jubilee Lecture of Indian Academy of Sciences. T. N. Narasimhan. University of California at Berkeley. Indian Institute of Technology, Chennai. August 25, 2009 ...

  18. Predictors of Frequent Emergency Room Visits among a Homeless Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakarar, Kinna; Morgan, Jake R; Gaeta, Jessie M; Hohl, Carole; Drainoni, Mari-Lynn

    2015-01-01

    Homelessness, HIV, and substance use are interwoven problems. Furthermore, homeless individuals are frequent users of emergency services. The main purpose of this study was to identify risk factors for frequent emergency room (ER) visits and to examine the effects of housing status and HIV serostatus on ER utilization. The second purpose was to identify risk factors for frequent ER visits in patients with a history of illicit drug use. A retrospective analysis was performed on 412 patients enrolled in a Boston-based health care for the homeless program (HCH). This study population was selected as a 2:1 HIV seronegative versus HIV seropositive match based on age, sex, and housing status. A subgroup analysis was performed on 287 patients with history of illicit drug use. Chart data were analyzed to compare demographics, health characteristics, and health service utilization. Results were stratified by housing status. Logistic models using generalized estimating equations were used to predict frequent ER visits. In homeless patients, hepatitis C was the only predictor of frequent ER visits (OR 4.49, phomeless patients. HIV seropositivity did not predict frequent ER visits, likely because HIV seropositive HCH patients are engaged in care. In patients with history of illicit drug use, hepatitis C and mental health disorders predicted frequent ER visits. Supportive housing for patients with mental health disorders and hepatitis C may help prevent unnecessary ER visits in this population.

  19. Successes and Challenges of Emerging Economy Multinationals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Successes and Challenges of Emerging Economy Multinationals investigates a broad variety of cases presenting clear evidence of fast successful internationalization of emerging economy multinationals originating not only from big economic players such as China, India and Russia but also from other...

  20. Challenges of measuring quality in emergency management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynette, Jennifer Elyse

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the challenges and importance of measuring quality within the field of emergency response. Using quality as a standard of measurement to evaluate response efforts of trained personnel in emergency situations is necessary to increase effectiveness in the response phase of an e...... of how it can be measured, defined, perceived, and used to benefit emergency responders and the citizens they strive to protect....

  1. Predictors of Frequent Emergency Room Visits among a Homeless Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakarar, Kinna; Morgan, Jake R.; Gaeta, Jessie M.; Hohl, Carole; Drainoni, Mari-Lynn

    2015-01-01

    Background Homelessness, HIV, and substance use are interwoven problems. Furthermore, homeless individuals are frequent users of emergency services. The main purpose of this study was to identify risk factors for frequent emergency room (ER) visits and to examine the effects of housing status and HIV serostatus on ER utilization. The second purpose was to identify risk factors for frequent ER visits in patients with a history of illicit drug use. Methods A retrospective analysis was performed on 412 patients enrolled in a Boston-based health care for the homeless program (HCH). This study population was selected as a 2:1 HIV seronegative versus HIV seropositive match based on age, sex, and housing status. A subgroup analysis was performed on 287 patients with history of illicit drug use. Chart data were analyzed to compare demographics, health characteristics, and health service utilization. Results were stratified by housing status. Logistic models using generalized estimating equations were used to predict frequent ER visits. Results In homeless patients, hepatitis C was the only predictor of frequent ER visits (OR 4.49, phealth (OR 2.53, 95% CI 1.07–5.95) and hepatitis C (OR 2.85, 95% CI 1.37–5.93) were predictors of frequent ER use. HIV seropositivity did not predict ER use (OR 0.45, 95% CI 0.21 – 0.97). Conclusions In a HCH population, hepatitis C predicted frequent ER visits in homeless patients. HIV seropositivity did not predict frequent ER visits, likely because HIV seropositive HCH patients are engaged in care. In patients with history of illicit drug use, hepatitis C and mental health disorders predicted frequent ER visits. Supportive housing for patients with mental health disorders and hepatitis C may help prevent unnecessary ER visits in this population. PMID:25906394

  2. Predictors of Frequent Emergency Room Visits among a Homeless Population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kinna Thakarar

    Full Text Available Homelessness, HIV, and substance use are interwoven problems. Furthermore, homeless individuals are frequent users of emergency services. The main purpose of this study was to identify risk factors for frequent emergency room (ER visits and to examine the effects of housing status and HIV serostatus on ER utilization. The second purpose was to identify risk factors for frequent ER visits in patients with a history of illicit drug use.A retrospective analysis was performed on 412 patients enrolled in a Boston-based health care for the homeless program (HCH. This study population was selected as a 2:1 HIV seronegative versus HIV seropositive match based on age, sex, and housing status. A subgroup analysis was performed on 287 patients with history of illicit drug use. Chart data were analyzed to compare demographics, health characteristics, and health service utilization. Results were stratified by housing status. Logistic models using generalized estimating equations were used to predict frequent ER visits.In homeless patients, hepatitis C was the only predictor of frequent ER visits (OR 4.49, p<0.01. HIV seropositivity was not predictive of frequent ER visits. In patients with history of illicit drug use, mental health (OR 2.53, 95% CI 1.07-5.95 and hepatitis C (OR 2.85, 95% CI 1.37-5.93 were predictors of frequent ER use. HIV seropositivity did not predict ER use (OR 0.45, 95% CI 0.21 - 0.97.In a HCH population, hepatitis C predicted frequent ER visits in homeless patients. HIV seropositivity did not predict frequent ER visits, likely because HIV seropositive HCH patients are engaged in care. In patients with history of illicit drug use, hepatitis C and mental health disorders predicted frequent ER visits. Supportive housing for patients with mental health disorders and hepatitis C may help prevent unnecessary ER visits in this population.

  3. Emergency room visits for dental problems among working poor Canadians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramraj, Chantel C; Quiñonez, Carlos R

    2013-01-01

    To explore the risk of visiting hospital emergency rooms (ERs) for dental problems not associated with trauma among a sample of working poor Canadians. Data stem from a telephone survey administered between March and August 2007 of working poor Canadians aged 18-64 years. Logistic regressions were employed to determine the predictors of reporting a visit to an ER for dental problems not associated with trauma. Approximately 6.1 percent of the sample reported visiting an ER in the past for a dental problem not associated with trauma. Those who were publicly insured, reported poor oral health, experienced a bed day due to dental pain, had dependent children, were lone parents, had competing needs, a history of receiving welfare, a history of an inability to afford dental care, and a perceived need for dental treatment were all more likely to have reported an ER visit. When adjusting for all variables, having experienced a bed day due to dental pain and a history of an inability to afford dental care were the dominant predictors of this outcome. A higher but not significantly different prevalence of ER visits for dental problems was found among the working poor sample when compared with the general Canadian population (6.1 percent versus 5.4 percent, P > 0.05). Further research is needed in order to provide insight into the reasons why the working poor population is seeking dental care in hospital settings. © 2013 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  4. Frequent visitors at the psychiatric emergency room - A literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Manuela

    2018-03-01

    Frequent visitors at the psychiatric emergency room (PER) constitute a small subgroup of patients, yet they are responsible for a disproportionate number of visits and thus claim considerable resources. Their needs are often left unmet and their repetitive visits reflect their dissatisfaction as well as that of PERs' staff. Motivated by these dilemmas, this study systematically reviews the literature about frequent visitors at PER and seeks to answer two questions: What characterizes frequent visitors at PER in the literature? and What characterizes PER in the literature? Based on 29 studies, this paper offers answers to the two questions based on a strength weakness opportunities and threats (SWOT) analysis. The results of the review and subsequent analysis of the literature revealed the multiplicity and complexity of frequent visitors' characteristics and how they appear to converge. Commonalities were more difficult to identify in PER characteristics. In some cases, this happened because the characteristics were poorly described or were context specific. As a result, it was not easy to compare the studies on PER. Based on SWOT and the findings of the analysis, the paper proposes new venues of research and suggests how the field of mental health might develop by taking into account its opportunities and threats.

  5. Epidemiology of acute organophosphate poisoning in hospital emergency room patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dharmani, Chandrabhan; Jaga, Kushik

    2005-01-01

    Acute organophosphate (OP) poisoning is a major health issue in developing countries. Organophosphate insecticides inhibit cholinesterase (ChE) enzymatic activity, thereby eliciting cholinergic signs and symptoms. Victims of OP poisoning require immediate hospital emergency room (ER) treatment to prevent a fatal outcome. We present an epidemiologic review of acute OP poisoning in hospital ER patients. Areas of interest include countries with acute OP poisoning, nature of exposure, gender and age of patients, clinical cholinergic features, ChE activity, and health outcome, including recovery rate, case fatality rate, and post-ER complications. The review comprises case reports, hospital surveys, and clinical studies on acute OP poisoning. More studies were conducted in developed than in developing countries. Suicidal and occupational OP poisoning in agricultural workers was prevalent in developing countries, whereas accidental OP poisoning was prevalent in developed countries. Healthcare workers in the ER were also affected by OP poisoning. Both males and females were affected. Children accounted for 35% of the OP-poisoned victims. Patients presented with a classic cholinergic syndrome and serum ChE depresssion, with a recovery rate above 90%. Neurologic impairment was the most frequent complication. Preventing environmental OP exposure and increasing the awareness of pesticide toxicity would reduce acute OP poisoning and protect human health.

  6. Modernisation of Radiation Monitoring Room as a Part of Slovenian Emergency Response Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarvari, A.; Mitic, D.

    2003-01-01

    In the year 2002 the Slovenian Nuclear Safety Administration (SNSA) moved to the new premises therefore it had to rearrange some of its rooms for the emergency situation. SNSA does not operate with a dedicated Emergency Response Centre (ERC), instead of it the SNSA has to rearrange the existing rooms in case of an emergency. Modernisation of the equipment, with the help of government of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, for the emergency situation was carried out, especially in the monitoring room. The radiation monitoring system, which is placed in the monitoring room, continuously collects, processes and archives the incoming data of exposure to radiation and meteorological parameters on the Slovenian territory (A model national emergency response plan for radiological accidents, IAEA, Vienna, 1993. IAEA-TECDOC-718). In the emergency situation the monitoring room transforms into the room for the Dose Assessment Group (DAG), which is part of ERC (IAEA emergency response network, IAEA, Vienna, 2000, EPR-ERNET (2000)). The modernisation of monitoring room and within the DAG room with new equipment and its purpose is described in this article. Modernisation of the monitoring room and the room for DAG showed to be inevitably needed. Modernisation of the monitoring room has brought the SNSA a sophisticated and reliable system of controlling the external exposure to radiation on the Slovenian territory. The equipment, especially the equipment for the use in the emergency situation, brought novelties for the Dose Assessment Group. The group has now better and easier control of radiation situation in case of an accident. In overall this modernisation has put the Slovenian Nuclear Safety Administration a step forward in having a dedicated Emergency Response Centre, since it does not need to rearrange the room for the Dose Assessment Group. (author)

  7. Protective benefits of mindfulness in emergency room personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westphal, Maren; Bingisser, Martina-Barbara; Feng, Tianshu; Wall, Melanie; Blakley, Emily; Bingisser, Roland; Kleim, Birgit

    2015-04-01

    Recent meta-analyses have found that mindfulness practice may reduce anxiety and depression in clinical populations and there is growing evidence that mindfulness may also improve well-being and quality of care in health professionals. This study examined whether mindfulness protects against the impact of work-related stress on mental health and burnout in emergency room (ER) nurses. ER nurses (N=50) were recruited from an urban teaching hospital in Switzerland and completed a survey on work-related stressors, mindfulness, burnout, depression, and anxiety. The most frequently reported work-related stressor was interpersonal conflict. Nurses working more consecutive days since last taking time off were at greater risk for depression and those reporting more work-related interpersonal conflicts were at greater risk for burnout. Mindfulness was associated with reduced anxiety, depression, and burnout. Mindfulness was a significant predictor of anxiety, depression, and burnout and moderated the impact of work-related stressors on mental health and burnout. The sample is limited to nurses and results need to be replicated in other groups (e.g., medical staff or ambulance workers). We assessed clinical symptoms with questionnaires and it would be desirable to repeat this assessment with clinical diagnostic interviews. The findings have implications for stress management in ER nurses and health professionals working in comparable settings (e.g., urgent care). The robust associations between mindfulness and multiple indices of psychological well-being suggest that ER staff exposed to high levels of occupational stress may benefit from mindfulness practice to increase resistance to mental health problems and burnout. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. [Systematic detection of physical child abuse at emergency rooms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sittig, J S; Uiterwaal, C S P M; Moons, K G M; Russel, I M B; Nievelstein, R A J; Nieuwenhuis, E E S; van de Putte, E M

    2016-01-01

    The aim of our diagnostic accuracy study Child Abuse Inventory at Emergency Rooms (CHAIN-ER) was to establish whether a widely used checklist accurately detects or excludes physical abuse among children presenting to ERs with physical injury. A large multicentre study with a 6-month follow-up in 4 ERs in The Netherlands. Participants were 4290 children aged 0-7 years, attending the ER because of physical injury. All children were systematically tested with an easy-to-use child abuse checklist (index test). A national expert panel (reference standard) retrospectively assessed all children with positive screens and a 15% random sample of the children with negative screens for physical abuse, using additional information, namely, an injury history taken by a paediatrician, information provided by the general practitioner, youth doctor and social services by structured questionnaires, and 6-month follow-up information. Our main outcome measure was physical child abuse; secondary outcome measure was injury due to neglect and need for help. 4253/4290 (99%) parents agreed to follow-up. At a prevalence of 0.07% (3/4253) for inflicted injury by expert panel decision, the positive predictive value of the checklist was 0.03 (95% CI 0.006 to 0.085), and the negative predictive value 1.0 (0.994 to 1.0). There was 100% (93 to 100) agreement about inflicted injury in children, with positive screens between the expert panel and child abuse experts. Rare cases of inflicted injury among preschool children presenting at ERs for injury are very likely captured by easy-to-use checklists, but at very high false-positive rates. Subsequent assessment by child abuse experts can be safely restricted to children with positive screens at very low risk of missing cases of inflicted injury. Because of the high false positive rate, we do advise careful prior consideration of cost-effectiveness and clinical and societal implications before de novo implementation.

  9. Surgery of the elderly in emergency room mode. Is there a place for laparoscopy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalik, Maciej; Dowgiałło-Wnukiewicz, Natalia; Lech, Paweł; Zacharz, Krzysztof

    2017-06-01

    An important yet difficult problem is qualification for surgery in elderly patients. With age the risk of comorbidities increases - multi-disease syndrome. Elderly patients suffer from frailty syndrome. Many body functions become impaired. All these factors make the elderly patient a major challenge for surgical treatment. Analysis of the possibility of developing the indications and contraindications and the criteria for surgical treatment of the elderly based on our own cases. Discussion whether there is a place for laparoscopy during surgery of the elderly in emergency room (ER) mode. The analysis was performed based on seven cases involving surgical treatment of elderly patients who were admitted to the hospital in emergency room mode. The patients were hospitalized in the General and Minimally Invasive Surgery Clinic in Olsztyn in 2016. Surgical treatment of elderly patients should be planned with multidisciplinary teams. Geriatric surgery centers should be developed to minimize the risk of overzealous treatment and potential complications. Laparoscopy should always be considered in the case of ER procedures or diagnostics. Elderly patients should not be treated as typical adults, but as a separate group of patients requiring special treatment. Due to the existing additional disease in the elderly, the frailty syndrome, any surgical intervention should be minimally invasive. The discussion about therapy should be conducted by a team of specialists from a variety of medical fields.

  10. Subspecialty Emergency Room as Alternative Model for Otolaryngologic Care: Implications for Emergency Health Care Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethi, Rosh K. V.; Kozin, Elliott D.; Remenschneider, Aaron K.; Lee, Daniel J.; Gray, Stacey T.; Shrime, Mark G.; Gliklich, Richard E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose A dedicated otolaryngology emergency room (ER) represents a specialized surgical evaluation and treatment setting that may be an alternative triage pathway for acute otolaryngologic complaints. We aim to characterize practice patterns in this setting and to provide insight into the epidemiology of all-comer, urgent otolaryngologic complaints in the United States. Methods and Methods Electronic medical records were reviewed for all patients who registered for otolaryngologic care and received a diagnosis in the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary ER between January 2011 and September 2013. Descriptive analysis was performed to characterize utilization and diagnostic patterns. Predictors of inpatient admission were identified using multivariable regression. Geocoding analysis was performed to characterize catchment area. Results A total of 12,234 patient visits were evaluated with a mean age of 44.7. Auditory and vestibular problems constituted the most frequent diagnoses (50.0%). The majority of patients were discharged home (92.3%). Forty-three percent of patients underwent a procedure in the ER; the most common procedure was diagnostic nasolaryngoscopy (52%). Predictors of inpatient admission were post-operative complaint (odds ratio [OR] 7.3, p<0.0001), arrival overnight (OR 3.3, p<0.0001), and laryngeal complaint (OR 2.4, p<0.0001). Patients travelled farther for evaluation of hearing loss (11 miles) and less for common diagnoses including impacted cerumen (7.1 miles) (p<0.0001). Conclusion In this report, we investigate practice patterns of a dedicated otolaryngology emergency room to explore an alternative to standard acute otolaryngologic health care delivery mechanisms. We identify key predictors of inpatient admission. This study has implications for emergency health care delivery models. PMID:25106951

  11. Emerging Biometric Modalities: Challenges and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gafurov, Davrondzhon

    Recent advances in sensor technology and wide spread use of various electronics (computers, PDA, mobile phones etc.) provide new opportunities for capturing and analyses of novel physiological and behavioural traits of human beings for biometric authentication. This paper presents an overview of several such types of human characteristics that have been proposed as alternatives to traditional types of biometrics. We refer to these characteristics as emerging biometrics. We survey various types of emerging modalities and techniques, and discuss their pros and cons. Emerging biometrics faces several limitations and challenges which include subject population coverage (focusing mostly on adults); unavailability of benchmark databases; little research with respect to vulnerability/robustness against attacks; and some privacy concerns they may arise. In addition, recognition performance of emerging modalities are generally less accurate compared to the traditional biometrics. Despite all of these emerging biometrics posses their own benefits and advantages compared to traditional biometrics which makes them still attractive for research. First of all, emerging biometrics can always serve as a complementary source for identity information; they can be suitable in applications where traditional biometrics are difficult or impossible to adapt such as continuous or periodic re-verification of the user's identity etc.

  12. Emergency control room design of a nuclear reactor used to produce radioisotope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Isaac J.A.L. dos; Farias, Larissa P. de; Ponte, Luana T.L.; Goncalves, Gabriel L.; Castro, Heraclito M.; Farias, Marcos S.; Carvalho, Paulo V.R. de; Vianna Filho, Alfredo M.V.

    2015-01-01

    A control room is defined as a functional entity with an associated physical structure, where the operators carry out the centralized control, monitoring and administrative responsibilities. Emergency control room acts as an alternative control room for the purpose of shutting down or maintaining the facility in a safe shutdown state when the main control room is uninhabitable. The mission of emergency control room is to provide the resources to bring the plant to a safe shutdown condition after an evacuation of the main control room. An evacuation of the main control room is assumed when there is no possibility to accomplish tasks involved in the shutdown except reactor trip. The purpose of this paper is to present a specific approach for the design of the emergency control room of a nuclear reactor used to produce radioisotope. The approach is based on human factors standards and the participation of a multidisciplinary team in the development phase of the design. Using the information gathered from standards and from the multidisciplinary team a 3D Sketch and a 3D printing of the emergency control room were created. (author)

  13. Emergency control room design of a nuclear reactor used to produce radioisotope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Isaac J.A.L. dos; Farias, Larissa P. de; Ponte, Luana T.L.; Goncalves, Gabriel L.; Castro, Heraclito M.; Farias, Marcos S.; Carvalho, Paulo V.R. de; Vianna Filho, Alfredo M.V., E-mail: luquetti@ien.gov.br [Instituto Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Departamento Engenharia Nuclear

    2015-07-01

    A control room is defined as a functional entity with an associated physical structure, where the operators carry out the centralized control, monitoring and administrative responsibilities. Emergency control room acts as an alternative control room for the purpose of shutting down or maintaining the facility in a safe shutdown state when the main control room is uninhabitable. The mission of emergency control room is to provide the resources to bring the plant to a safe shutdown condition after an evacuation of the main control room. An evacuation of the main control room is assumed when there is no possibility to accomplish tasks involved in the shutdown except reactor trip. The purpose of this paper is to present a specific approach for the design of the emergency control room of a nuclear reactor used to produce radioisotope. The approach is based on human factors standards and the participation of a multidisciplinary team in the development phase of the design. Using the information gathered from standards and from the multidisciplinary team a 3D Sketch and a 3D printing of the emergency control room were created. (author)

  14. Payment segment differences in hospital and physician charges for inpatient and emergency room procedures: cost shifting?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegji, Charles E; Self, Donald R; Self, Robin M

    2010-04-01

    A study of hospital facility and physician charges relative to payments, as affected by source of payment is provided. Charges relative to payment source are studied for both emergency room visits and inpatient hospital stays using the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey for 2003. We present evidence that hospitals are more flexible when billing inpatient stays than emergency room visits, where flexibility is measured in terms of charges relative to expected payments. There was little difference, however, between physician charges relative to payment for inpatient stays and emergency room visits. Finally, we found that ethnicity may have an effect on hospitals' expected payments.

  15. Identification and initial management of intoxication by alcohol and other drugs in the pediatric emergency room

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Gatti Pianca

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To review the screening, diagnosis, evaluation, and treatment of intoxication by alcohol and other drugs in children and adolescents in the emergency scenario. Data source: This was a narrative literature review. Data summary: The detection of this problem in the emergency room can be a challenge, especially when its assessment is not standardized. The intentional and episodic use of large amounts of psychoactive substances by adolescents is a usual occurrence, and unintentional intoxication is more common in children younger than 12 years. The clinical picture in adolescents and children differs from that in adults and some particularities are important in the emergency scenario. After management of the acute condition, interventions targeting the adolescent at risk may be effective. Conclusion: The diagnosis and treatment of intoxication by alcohol and other drugs in adolescents and children in the emergency scenario requires a systematic evaluation of the use of these drugs. There are few specific treatments for intoxication, and the management comprehends support measures and management of related clinical complications.

  16. Identification and initial management of intoxication by alcohol and other drugs in the pediatric emergency room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pianca, Thiago Gatti; Sordi, Anne Orgle; Hartmann, Thiago Casarin; von Diemen, Lisia

    To review the screening, diagnosis, evaluation, and treatment of intoxication by alcohol and other drugs in children and adolescents in the emergency scenario. This was a narrative literature review. The detection of this problem in the emergency room can be a challenge, especially when its assessment is not standardized. The intentional and episodic use of large amounts of psychoactive substances by adolescents is a usual occurrence, and unintentional intoxication is more common in children younger than 12 years. The clinical picture in adolescents and children differs from that in adults and some particularities are important in the emergency scenario. After management of the acute condition, interventions targeting the adolescent at risk may be effective. The diagnosis and treatment of intoxication by alcohol and other drugs in adolescents and children in the emergency scenario requires a systematic evaluation of the use of these drugs. There are few specific treatments for intoxication, and the management comprehends support measures and management of related clinical complications. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  17. [Emergency Decompressive Craniotomy in the Emergency Room was Effective in Severe Acute Subdural Hematoma Treatment:Two Case Reports].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiomi, Naoto; Echigo, Tadashi; Oka, Hideki; Nozawa, Masahiro; Okada, Michiko; Hiraizumi, Shiho; Kato, Fumitaka; Koseki, Hirokazu; Hashimoto, Yoichi; Hino, Akihiko

    2017-02-01

    The outcome of severe acute subdural hematoma is unfavorable. In particular, patients with levels of consciousness of Glasgow Coma Scale(GCS)3 or 4 tend to be refractory to treatment. Decompressive craniotomy should be promptly performed to remove hematoma. However, if an operating room is not immediately available, emergency burr hole surgery is sometimes performed in the emergency room(primary care room)prior to craniotomy. A previous study has reported that the interval from injury to surgery influences the outcome of severe acute subdural hematoma. Therefore, emergency decompression is important to effectively treat patients with severe acute subdural hematoma. We present the cases of two patients with acute subdural hematomas. In both cases, emergency decompressive craniotomy(hematoma removal after craniotomy and external decompression)was performed in the emergency room of the Emergency and Critical Care Center. In both cases, the surgery was followed by favorable outcomes. Case 1 was a 36-year-old female. The patient's level of consciousness upon arrival was GCS 3. The interval from injury to diagnosis on the basis of CT findings was 75 minutes. Surgery began 20 minutes after diagnosis. Case 2 was a 25-year-old male. The second patient's level of consciousness upon arrival was GCS 4. The interval from injury to diagnosis on the basis of CT findings was 60 minutes. Surgery was begun 40 minutes after diagnosis. In both patients, we observed anisocoria and the loss of the light reflex. However, the postoperative course was favorable, and both patients were discharged. In summary, to treat severe acute subdural hematomas, early emergency decompressive craniotomy is optimal. Emergency decompressive surgery in the emergency room is independent of operating room or staff. Therefore, emergency decompressive craniotomy may improve the outcome of patients with severe acute subdural hematomas.

  18. Comparison of rectal, axillary, tympanic, and temporal artery thermometry in the pediatric emergency room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batra, Prerna; Goyal, Sudhanshu

    2013-01-01

    Accurate measurement of temperature in the emergency room is important for diagnosis as well as investigating a patient. Various noninvasive methods thermometry are available today, but there is no consensus on the most accurate method of thermometry. The present study was conducted to compare different methods of temperature measurement available in the emergency room, that is, rectal, axillary, and temporal artery and tympanic membrane. This was a cross-sectional observational study Fifty febrile and 50 afebrile children aged 2 to 12 years attending the pediatric emergency room of a tertiary care hospital were included. Temperatures were measured using rectal, axillary, tympanic (right and left), and temporal artery thermometers and were compared. All the temperatures correlated well with rectal temperature, with temporal artery temperature showing the best correlation (correlation coefficients, 0.99 in the febrile and 0.91 in the afebrile group). Temporal artery thermometry has the potential to replace rectal thermometry in a busy emergency room setting.

  19. Development, validation and testing of a nursing home to emergency room transfer checklist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Hsiu-Hsin; Tsai, Yun-Fang

    2018-01-01

    To develop and test the feasibility of an instrument to support patients' nursing home to emergency room transfer. Transfers from a nursing home care facility to an acute care facility such as a hospital emergency room are common. However, the prevalence of an information gap for transferring residents' health data to acute care facility is high. An evidence-based transfer instrument, which could fill this gap, is lacking. Development of a nursing home to emergency room transfer checklist, validation of items using the Delphi method and testing the feasibility and benefits of using the nursing home to emergency room transfer checklist. Items were developed based on qualitative data from previous research. Delphi validation, retrospective chart review (baseline data) and a 6-month prospective study design were applied to test the feasibility of using the checklist. Variables for testing the feasibility of the checklist included residents' 30-day readmission rate and length of hospital stay. Development of the nursing home to emergency room transfer checklist resulted in four main parts: (i) demographic data of the nursing home resident; (ii) critical data for nursing home to emergency room transfer; (iii) contact information and (iv) critical data for emergency room to nursing home transfer. Two rounds of Delphi validation resulted in a mean score (standard deviation) ranging from 4.39 (1.13)-4.98 (.15). Time required to complete the checklist was 3-5 min. Use of the nursing home to emergency room transfer checklist resulted in a 30-day readmission rate of 13.4%, which was lower than the baseline rate of 15.9%. The nursing home to emergency room transfer checklist was developed for transferring nursing home residents to an emergency room. The instrument was found to be an effective tool for this process. Use of the nursing home to emergency room transfer checklist for nursing home transfers could fill the information gap that exists when transferring older adults

  20. Suicide Mortality of Suicide Attempt Patients Discharged from Emergency Room, Nonsuicidal Psychiatric Patients Discharged from Emergency Room, Admitted Suicide Attempt Patients, and Admitted Nonsuicidal Psychiatric Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jae W.; Park, Subin; Yi, Ki K.; Hong, Jin P.

    2012-01-01

    The suicide mortality rate and risk factors for suicide completion of patients who presented to an emergency room (ER) for suicide attempt and were discharged without psychiatric admission, patients who presented to an ER for psychiatric problems other than suicide attempt and were discharged without psychiatric admission, psychiatric inpatients…

  1. Concentrating Emergency Rooms: Penny-Wise and Pound-Foolish? : An Empirical Research on Scale Economies and Chain Economies in Emergency Rooms in Dutch Hospitals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blank, J.L.T.; van Hulst, B.L.; Valdmanis, Vivian

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we address the issue of whether it is economically advantageous to concentrate emergency rooms (ERs) in large hospitals. Besides identifying economies of scale of ERs, we also focus on chain economies. The latter term refers to the effects on a hospital's costs of ER patients who also

  2. Concentrating Emergency Rooms: Penny-Wise and Pound-Foolish? An Empirical Research on Scale Economies and Chain Economies in Emergency Rooms in Dutch Hospitals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.L.T. Blank (Jos); B.L. van Hulst (Bart); V.G. Valdmanis (Vivian G.)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper, we address the issue of whether it is economically advantageous to concentrate emergency rooms (ERs) in large hospitals. Besides identifying economies of scale of ERs, we also focus on chain economies. The latter term refers to the effects on a hospital's costs of ER

  3. Weekly pattern of emergency room admissions for peptic ulcers: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Li-Ting; Tsai, Ming-Chieh; Lin, Herng-Ching; Pai, Femi; Lee, Cha-Ze

    2015-03-21

    To investigate variations in the incidence of peptic ulcers (PUs) in Taiwan by day of the week within age subgroups. Ambulatory care data were retrieved from the Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2000. There were 7204 subjects ≥ 18 years-old with an emergency room admission claim for the treatment of PUs, resulting in a total of 9234 emergency room visits for PUs between 2009 and 2011. Data was divided into the seven days of the week and an additional variable for holidays. One-way analysis of variance was used to examine associations among the daily mean number of PU emergency room admissions and holidays/weekends/weekdays. One-way analysis of variance showed that there was a significant difference in emergency room admissions for PUs by the day of the week (P < 0.001), with admission more likely to occur on Sundays or holidays than weekdays within the total and working populations. The weekday patterns of admission were similar for the patients aged 18-64 years and ≥ 65 years of age. Holidays, followed by Sundays, had higher PU admissions than the mean daily PU emergency room admissions. Furthermore, inclusion of only those treated for PUs with hemorrhage or perforation, Sundays and holidays had higher mean emergency room admissions than other days. Inclusion of patients who diagnosed with Helicobacter pylori infection, only holidays had higher mean emergency room admissions than other days. Inclusion of patients who had been prescribed non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for over 30 d, Sundays and holidays had higher mean PU ER admissions than other non-holiday weekdays. There is a higher incidence of emergency room admission for PUs on weekends than on weekdays for the total and working populations.

  4. Nursing staff sizing in the emergency room of a university hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Taís Couto Rego da Paixão; Cássia Regina Vancini Campanharo; Maria Carolina Barbosa Teixeira Lopes; Meiry Fernanda Pinto Okuno; Ruth Ester Assayag Batista

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To verify the adequacy of the professional nursing staff in the emergency room of a university hospital and to evaluate the association between categories of risk classification triage with the Fugulin Patient Classification System. METHOD The classification of patients admitted into the emergency room was performed for 30 consecutive days through the methodology proposed by Gaidzinski for calculating nursing requirements. RESULTS The calculation determines the need for three regist...

  5. Evaluation of the preparedness of the children's emergency rooms ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In all the centres, the CHER had a side laboratory, well stocked emergency drug shelf, pulse oximeters, oxygen cylinders, electrical and manual suction machines, ambu bags and nebulizers. However, none of the centres has functional manual defibrillator or an Automated External Defibrillator (AED). In 5 (55.6%) of the ...

  6. Periorbital swelling in emergency room: Get your eyes in

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SenthilKumaran S

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Facial swelling and eye pain are very common patient complaints in Emergency Departments. Clinical evidence and investigations play a crucial role in making the correct diagnosis which impacts the final disposition and management of the patient. We present a case of a patient who presented with facial swelling and headache.

  7. Nanotechnology risk perceptions and communication: emerging technologies, emerging challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pidgeon, Nick; Harthorn, Barbara; Satterfield, Terre

    2011-11-01

    Nanotechnology involves the fabrication, manipulation, and control of materials at the atomic level and may also bring novel uncertainties and risks. Potential parallels with other controversial technologies mean there is a need to develop a comprehensive understanding of processes of public perception of nanotechnology uncertainties, risks, and benefits, alongside related communication issues. Study of perceptions, at so early a stage in the development trajectory of a technology, is probably unique in the risk perception and communication field. As such it also brings new methodological and conceptual challenges. These include: dealing with the inherent diversity of the nanotechnology field itself; the unfamiliar and intangible nature of the concept, with few analogies to anchor mental models or risk perceptions; and the ethical and value questions underlying many nanotechnology debates. Utilizing the lens of social amplification of risk, and drawing upon the various contributions to this special issue of Risk Analysis on Nanotechnology Risk Perceptions and Communication, nanotechnology may at present be an attenuated hazard. The generic idea of "upstream public engagement" for emerging technologies such as nanotechnology is also discussed, alongside its importance for future work with emerging technologies in the risk communication field. © 2011 Society for Risk Analysis.

  8. A Model for a Level II Emergency Room

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-05-02

    uni t Kramer 6 4) Technologist on call: Radiology, Laboratory, Blood Bank. 5) Trained personnel available to take electrocardiograms on call and...and ICU /CCU on the second floor. Flight medicine which has some collateral roles with the emergency department is located in the south basement and...II I I I I 1 19 [21] ICU /CCU I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 122 121 ICI.L’CCI I _I _I _I _I __I _I I I I I I IEl I I I I I I I 1 __ 12 [23

  9. Zika Virus: Emergence, Phylogenetics, Challenges, and Opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajah, Maaran M; Pardy, Ryan D; Condotta, Stephanie A; Richer, Martin J; Sagan, Selena M

    2016-11-11

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an emerging arthropod-borne pathogen that has recently gained notoriety due to its rapid and ongoing geographic expansion and its novel association with neurological complications. Reports of ZIKV-associated Guillain-Barré syndrome as well as fetal microcephaly place emphasis on the need to develop preventative measures and therapeutics to combat ZIKV infection. Thus, it is imperative that models to study ZIKV replication and pathogenesis and the immune response are developed in conjunction with integrated vector control strategies to mount an efficient response to the pandemic. This paper summarizes the current state of knowledge on ZIKV, including the clinical features, phylogenetic analyses, pathogenesis, and the immune response to infection. Potential challenges in developing diagnostic tools, treatment, and prevention strategies are also discussed.

  10. Biophysics and the Challenges of Emerging Threats

    CERN Document Server

    Puglisi, Joseph D

    2009-01-01

    This volume is a collection of articles from the proceedings of the International School of Structural Biology and Magnetic Resonance 8th Course: Biophysics and the Challenges of Emerging Threats. This NATO Advance Study Institute (ASI) was held in Erice at the Ettore Majorana Foundation and Centre for Scientific Culture on 19 through 30 June 2007. The ASI brought together a diverse group of experts who bridged the fields of virology and biology, biophysics, chemistry and physics. Prominent lecturers and students from around the world representant a total of 24 countries participated in the NATO ASI organized by Professors Joseph Puglisi (Stanford University, USA) and Alexander Arseniev (Moscow, RU). The central hypothesis underlying this ASI was that interdisciplinary research, merging principles of physics, chemistry and biology, can drive new discovery in detecting and fighting bioterrorism agents, lead to cleaner environments, and help propel development in NATO partner countries. The ASI merged the relat...

  11. Different causes of referral to ophthalmology emergency room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Alireza Keshtkar; Bozorgui, Shima; Shahverdi, Nooshin; Ameri, Ahmad; Akbari, Mohammad Reza; Salmasian, Hojat

    2012-01-01

    Eye-related complaints compose approximately 1-6% of complaints of patients referring to general emergency ward around the world. Eye injuries are the most common cause of referral to eye emergency ward. To understand the impact of eye injuries in Iran and to plan preventive strategies, it is important to understand the complete magnitude of the problem with regard to true population-based data and standard reproducible definitions. The main goal of this study was to identify the major causes of referrals to eye emergency ward in patients with eye-related complaints in an eye referral Hospital in Iran. In a cross-sectional study, 3150 patients who referred to Farabi Hospital emergency ward, Tehran, Iran, from January to December 2007 were included in the study and their detailed information were recorded. The patients' demographic data, medical history and final diagnosis were recorded in a questionnaire. The mean age of patients was 33.2±16.8 years and 2380 patients (75.6%) were males. While 299 patients (9.5%) were referred for non-urgent reasons, work-related injuries were the most common cause of referral (955 patients; 30.3%). In patients referred due to trauma (1950 patients), work-related injuries occurred in 955 patients (49%) and occurred accidentally (by chance) in 819 patients (42%). The majority of patients referred with traumatic injuries were males (1708 patients; 87.6% versus 242 patients; 12.4%). The most common etiologies of eye trauma (1950 patients) were metal filings (814 patients; 41.8%), blunt trauma (338 patients; 17.3%), fireworks (236 patients; 12.1%) and sharp objects (222 patients; 11.4%). Globe injury was diagnosed in 1865 patients (95.7%) of trauma cases. In patients referred due to non-traumatic reason (1200 patients), eye infection occurred in 482 patients (40.2%) and 299 patients (24.9%) were referred for non-urgent reasons. There was little difference between the frequency of non-trauma-related problems among genders (672 male

  12. Different causes of referral to ophthalmology emergency room

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Keshtkar Jafari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Eye-related complaints compose approximately 1-6% of complaints of patients referring to general emergency ward around the world. Eye injuries are the most common cause of referral to eye emergency ward. To understand the impact of eye injuries in Iran and to plan preventive strategies, it is important to understand the complete magnitude of the problem with regard to true population-based data and standard reproducible definitions. Aim: The main goal of this study was to identify the major causes of referrals to eye emergency ward in patients with eye-related complaints in an eye referral Hospital in Iran. Settings and Design: In a cross-sectional study, 3150 patients who referred to Farabi Hospital emergency ward, Tehran, Iran, from January to December 2007 were included in the study and their detailed information were recorded. Materials and Methods: The patients′ demographic data, medical history and final diagnosis were recorded in a questionnaire. Results: The mean age of patients was 33.2±16.8 years and 2380 patients (75.6% were males. While 299 patients (9.5% were referred for non-urgent reasons, work-related injuries were the most common cause of referral (955 patients; 30.3%. In patients referred due to trauma (1950 patients, work-related injuries occurred in 955 patients (49% and occurred accidentally (by chance in 819 patients (42%. The majority of patients referred with traumatic injuries were males (1708 patients; 87.6% versus 242 patients; 12.4%. The most common etiologies of eye trauma (1950 patients were metal filings (814 patients; 41.8%, blunt trauma (338 patients; 17.3%, fireworks (236 patients; 12.1% and sharp objects (222 patients; 11.4%. Globe injury was diagnosed in 1865 patients (95.7% of trauma cases. In patients referred due to non-traumatic reason (1200 patients, eye infection occurred in 482 patients (40.2% and 299 patients (24.9% were referred for non-urgent reasons. There was little difference

  13. Natural gas pipelines: emerging market challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smart, A.; Balfe, P

    2001-01-01

    The Australian gas industry has come a long way in recent years. Most of the formerly government owned gas transmission, distribution and retail businesses have been privatised; major utility companies have been fundamentally restructured; the convergence of energy markets has seen many companies stepping outside the boundaries of their traditional businesses; and national competition policy has led to profound changes in the regulatory landscape. Yet despite the magnitude of these changes, it is clear that the journey of competitive reform has a long way to go. The Australian Gas Association's Industry Development Strategy identifies the potential for gas to increase its share of Australia's primary energy market, from around 18 percent at present to 22 percent by 2005, and 28 percent by 2015. Our analysis, using ACIL's Eastern Australian Gas Model, clearly shows that in the absence of major new sources of gas, these challenging targets will not be met and, indeed, there will be an increasing supply shortfall. However, with the emergence of new competitive supply sources such as Papua New Guinea and the Timor Sea, our modelling suggests that most of this demand can be satisfied at prices which will maintain gas' competitiveness in energy markets. Such developments provide both opportunities and challenges for the industry. In particular, they will profoundly affect the owners and operators of transmission pipeline systems. (Authors)

  14. Investigating emergency room service quality using lean manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelhadi, Abdelhakim

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate a lean manufacturing metric called Takt time as a benchmark evaluation measure to evaluate a public hospital's service quality. Lean manufacturing is an established managerial philosophy with a proven track record in industry. A lean metric called Takt time is applied as a measure to compare the relative efficiency between two emergency departments (EDs) belonging to the same public hospital. Outcomes guide managers to improve patient services and increase hospital performances. The patient treatment lead time within the hospital's two EDs (one department serves male and the other female patients) are the study's focus. A lean metric called Takt time is used to find the service's relative efficiency. Findings show that the lean manufacturing metric called Takt time can be used as an effective way to measure service efficiency by analyzing relative efficiency and identifies bottlenecks in different departments providing the same services. The paper presents a new procedure to compare relative efficiency between two EDs. It can be applied to any healthcare facility.

  15. Clinic and Emergency Room Evaluation and Testing of Headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nye, Barbara L; Ward, Thomas N

    2015-10-01

    Evaluation of the headache patient in the outpatient clinic and emergency department (ED) has different focuses and goals. The focus of this paper is to review the evaluation of patients in both settings with mention of evaluation in the pediatric and pregnant patient population.  The patient's history should drive the practitioner's decision and evaluation choices. We review recommendations made by the American Board of Internal Medicine and American Headache Society through the Choosing Wisely Campaign, which has an emphasis on choosing the right imaging modality for the clinical situation and elimination/prevention of medication overuse headache, as well as the US Headache Consortium guidelines for migraine headache. We will also review focusing on ED evaluation of the pediatric patient and pregnant patient presenting with headache. At the end of the review we hope to have provided you with a framework to think about the headache patient and what is the appropriate test in the given clinical setting in order to ensure that the patient gets the right diagnosis and is set on a path to the appropriate management plan. © 2015 American Headache Society.

  16. [Nursing staff sizing in the emergency room of a university hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paixão, Taís Couto Rego da; Campanharo, Cássia Regina Vancini; Lopes, Maria Carolina Barbosa Teixeira; Okuno, Meiry Fernanda Pinto; Batista, Ruth Ester Assayag

    2015-06-01

    To verify the adequacy of the professional nursing staff in the emergency room of a university hospital and to evaluate the association between categories of risk classification triage with the Fugulin Patient Classification System. The classification of patients admitted into the emergency room was performed for 30 consecutive days through the methodology proposed by Gaidzinski for calculating nursing requirements. The calculation determines the need for three registered nurses and four non-registered nursing for each six hour shift. However, only one registered nurse and four non-registered nurse were available per shift. There was no correlation between triage risk classification and classification of care by the Fugulin Patient Classification System. A deficit in professional staff was identified in the emergency room. The specificity of this unit made it difficult to measure. To find the best strategy to do so, further studies should be performed.

  17. Nursing staff sizing in the emergency room of a university hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taís Couto Rego da Paixão

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE To verify the adequacy of the professional nursing staff in the emergency room of a university hospital and to evaluate the association between categories of risk classification triage with the Fugulin Patient Classification System. METHOD The classification of patients admitted into the emergency room was performed for 30 consecutive days through the methodology proposed by Gaidzinski for calculating nursing requirements. RESULTS The calculation determines the need for three registered nurses and four non-registered nursing for each six hour shift. However, only one registered nurse and four non-registered nurse were available per shift. There was no correlation between triage risk classification and classification of care by the Fugulin Patient Classification System. CONCLUSION A deficit in professional staff was identified in the emergency room. The specificity of this unit made it difficult to measure. To find the best strategy to do so, further studies should be performed.

  18. Effect of National Football League games on small animal emergency room caseload.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozanski, Elizabeth A; Rondeau, Mark P; Shaw, Scott P; Rush, John E

    2009-07-01

    To evaluate whether games of popular professional football teams have an effect on small animal emergency room caseload and percentage of dogs and cats that subsequently are hospitalized, are euthanatized, or die following admission to veterinary emergency rooms located within a dedicated fan base. Prospective study. 818 dogs and cats admitted to the emergency room. During the 2007 New England Patriots (NEP) football season, small animal emergency room caseload was recorded for Sunday (4-hour blocks, 8:00 AM until 12:00 midnight) and Monday night (7:00 PM to 11:00 PM). Number of dogs and cats that subsequently were hospitalized, died, or were euthanatized was recorded. Mean game importance rating (GIR) was determined for NEP games (scale, 1 [mild] to 3 [great]). Percentage of dogs and cats admitted from 12:00 noon to 4:00 PM on Sundays during NEP games (mean GIR, 1.7) versus non-NEP games was not different. Mean +/- SD percentage of dogs and cats admitted from 4:00 PM to 8:00 PM on Sundays during NEP games (mean GIR, 2.4) versus non-NEP games was significantly different (18 +/- 5% and 25 +/- 7% of daily caseload, respectively). Percentage of dogs and cats admitted from 8:00 PM to 12:00 midnight on Sundays during NEP games (mean GIR, 2.1) versus non-NEP games was not different. Game type (NEP vs non-NEP) during emergency room admission did not influence whether dogs and cats subsequently were hospitalized, died, or were euthanatized. Professional sporting events may influence veterinary emergency room caseloads.

  19. Lung cancer patients frequently visit the emergency room for cancer-related and -unrelated issues

    OpenAIRE

    KOTAJIMA, FUTOSHI; KOBAYASHI, KUNIHIKO; SAKAGUCHI, HIROZO; NEMOTO, MANABU

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer patients visit the emergency room (ER) for cancer-related and -unrelated reasons more often compared to patients with other types of cancer. This results in increased admissions and deaths in the ER. In this study, we retrospectively reviewed the characteristics of lung cancer patients visiting the ER in order to optimize the utilization of emergency medical services and improve the patients’ quality of life. Lung cancer patients visiting the ER of a single institution over a 2-ye...

  20. Neuroimaging of Patients with Headache in the Emergency Room: A Retrospective Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ibrahim Burak Atci

    2015-03-01

    Conclusion: In the emergency department during evaluation of headache, that should be done first is the exclusion of headaches which is caused by non beningn intracranial patologies. Therefore, from the entrance of the patients evaluated in the emergency room, it is important that they must be directed to rapid diagnosis and treatment with considering the red alert findings. [Cukurova Med J 2015; 40(1.000: 86-90

  1. Therapeutic approach to patients complaining of high blood pressure in a cardiological emergency room

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Gus

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the management of patients complaining of high blood pressure (BP in a cardiological emergency room. METHODS: Patients referred to the cardiological emergency room with the main complaint of high blood pressure were consecutively selected. The prescriptions and the choice of antihypertensive drugs were assessed. The classification of these patients as hypertensive emergencies or pseudoemergencies, according to the physician who provided initial care, was recorded. RESULTS: From a total of 858 patients presenting to the emergency room, 80 (9.3% complained of high BP, and 61 (76.3% received antihypertensive drugs. Sublingual nifedipine was the most commonly used drug (59%. One patient received intravenous medication, one patient was hospitalized and 6 patients (7.5% were classified as hypertensive emergencies or pseudoemergencies. CONCLUSION: High BP could seldom be classified as a hypertensive emergency or pseudoemergency, even though it was a frequent complaint (9.3% of visits. Currently, the therapeutic approach is not recommended, even in specialized clinics.

  2. Anaesthetic challenges in emergency peripartum hysterectomy in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... with 16 emergency peripartum hysterectomies. The incidence of emergency peripartum hysterectomy was 0.23% of all deliveries (2.3/1 000 deliveries). The causes of emergency hysterectomies were ruptured uterus (11 patients or 69%), placenta accreta/morbidly adherent placenta (4 patients or 25%) and uncontrollable ...

  3. Educational paper Detection of child abuse and neglect at the emergency room

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teeuw, Arianne Hélène; Derkx, Bert H. F.; Koster, Willeke A.; van Rijn, Rick R.

    2012-01-01

    The emergency room (ER) represents the main system entry for crises-based health care visits. It is estimated that 2% to 10% of children visiting the ER are victims of child abuse and neglect (CAN). Therefore, ER personnel may be the first hospital contact and opportunity for CAN victims to be

  4. Strategies for preventing excess mortality after discharge from psychiatric emergency room

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Jørgen; Jensen, Mikkel

    2017-01-01

    AbstractPatients with severe mental illness have increased risk for severe physical diseases. In addition, there is evidence that this patient group is less likely to receive standard levels of care for most physical diseases, which may contribute to their shortened life expectancy. Further, illn.......  Keywords: Psychiatric emergency room; Crisis resolution; mortality; severe mental illness...

  5. The treatment of acute soft tissue trauma in Danish emergency rooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannsen, F; Langberg, Henning

    1997-01-01

    Rest, ice, compression, elevation (RICE) is the most recommended treatment for acute traumatic soft tissue injuries. A questionnaire was given to all Danish emergency rooms (n = 5) regarding their routines for acute treatment of ankle sprains and muscle contusions. Complete answers were received ...

  6. The role of perfusion CT in identifying stroke mimics in the emergency room: a case of status epilepticus presenting with perfusion CT alterations

    OpenAIRE

    Guerrero, Waldo R; Dababneh, Haitham; Eisenschenk, Stephan

    2012-01-01

    Emergency medicine physicians are often faced with the challenging task of differentiating true acute ischemic strokes from stroke mimics. We present a case that was initially diagnosed as acute stroke. However, perfusion CT and EEG eventually led to the final diagnosis of status epilepticus. This case further asserts the role of CT perfusion in the evaluation of patients with stroke mimics in the emergency room setting.

  7. Observing the work of an urban safety-net psychiatric emergency room: managing the unmanageable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lincoln, Alisa K; White, Andrew; Aldsworth, Casandra; Johnson, Peggy; Strunin, Lee

    2010-03-01

    Staff in the psychiatric emergency room (PER) have demanding jobs requiring a complex balance between the needs and safety of the individual and the community, systemic resources, and job responsibilities while providing timely, effective care. Little research exists concerning day-to-day work activities of PER staff, their interaction, and their perceptions of their work. This study explored the work of PER staff and the organisational context of the PER work setting. Observations of staff were conducted in the public spaces of a public urban PER using two observational techniques. The first was designed to measure the types of work activities staff engaged in and the time spent in these work activities (work task data). The second technique was the gathering of observational data by a peripheral-member-researcher (participant observation data). Analyses were conducted of both the work task and participant observation data. Results indicate that most PER staff time is spent in administrative and phone tasks, while less than a third is spent on direct clinical work. Four important issues for PER work were identified: a workload that is unmanageable, managing the unmanageable, bogus referrals and dumping and insurance problems. The PER remains the front-line of the medical and social service systems. Work done in these settings is of critical importance; however little attention is paid to the content and nature of the work. Our study demonstrates that staff of the PER face challenges on many levels as they struggle with the task of working with people presenting in psychiatric and social crisis.

  8. The Clinical Course of a Drug-induced Acute Dystonic Reaction in the Emergency Room

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Marano

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute dystonic reactions following the administration of safe, reliable drugs can occur and must be promptly recognized and treated in the emergency room.Phenomenology Shown: The entire clinical course of an acute dystonic reaction due to metoclopramide, from early motor signs to full-blown clinical symptoms and resolution.Educational Value: Providing elements for early recognition of a drug-induced movement disorder phenomenology.   

  9. Emerging Policy Challenges in Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiura, Glenn T.; Parish, Susan L.

    2007-01-01

    The forces shaping intellectual disability policy-making are diverse; while many of the policy issues reviewed in this issue are specific to intellectual disabilities, there are others that transcend disability-specific concerns. Our review is organized around six emerging demographic and socio-cultural trends that may directly and profoundly…

  10. Anaesthetic challenges in emergency peripartum hysterectomy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-09-17

    Sep 17, 2009 ... and colloid availability is often limited. The major cause for emergency peripartum hysterectomy in this study was ruptured uterus, which is avoidable with proper counselling of the patient, especially those with a history of previous Caesarean section. The roles of poverty, poor transport logistics.

  11. Emerging Challenges for Community Colleges. ERIC Digest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuetz, Pam

    This digest is drawn from the spring 2002 issue of New Directions for Community Colleges, titled "Next Steps for the Community College." It summarizes three overlapping challenges facing colleges in the coming decade: educating a more diverse student body, assessing student outcomes, and maintaining the educated workforce needed to meet…

  12. Business coaching: challenges for an emerging industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clegg, S.R.; Rhodes, C.G.; Kornberger, M.; Stilin, R.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose — To identify the distinguishing characteristics and future challenges for the business coaching industry in Australia. Design/methodology/approach — A telephone survey of business coaching firms was used to identify the main structural characteristics of the industry. Structured interviews

  13. Association between underweight and hospitalization, emergency room visits, and mortality among patients in community medical homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahashi PY

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Paul Y Takahashi.1 Jennifer L St Sauver,2 Timothy C Olson,1 Jill M Huber,1 Stephen S Cha,2 Jon O Ebbert11Division of Primary Care Internal Medicine, 2Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USABackground: In older adults, underweight (body mass index [BMI] < 18.5 has been associated with increased mortality. This increased mortality risk may be associated with increased health care utilization. We evaluated the relationship between underweight and hospitalization, emergency room visits, and mortality.Methods: An analysis of a retrospective cohort study was conducted at a multisite academic primary care medical practice in Minnesota. The patients were ≥60 years of age, impaneled within primary care on January 1, 2011, and had a BMI measurement recorded between January 1, 2011, and December 31, 2011. Individuals were excluded if they refused review of their medical record. The primary measurement was BMI, which was categorized as underweight (BMI < 18.5 or normal and obese (BMI ≥ 18.5. The outcomes were hospitalization, emergency room visits, and mortality in the 2011 calendar year. Associations between underweight and each outcome were calculated using logistic regression. Interactions between underweight and gender were assessed in the logistic regression models. The final results were adjusted for age, gender, comorbid health conditions, and single living status.Results: The final cohort included 21,019 patients, of whom 220 (1% were underweight. Underweight patients had a higher likelihood of hospitalization compared with patients with higher BMI (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 1.64; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.21–2.22. Underweight patients were also more likely to visit the emergency room (adjusted OR 1.70; 95% CI 1.28–2.25 or to die (adjusted OR 3.64; 95% CI 2.33–5.69. Men with a BMI < 18.5 compared with those having a BMI ≥ 18.5 had the highest odds of hospitalization (OR 3.45; 95% CI 1.59–7

  14. Challenges During a Chlorine Gas Emergency Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Bryan E; Duncan, Mary Anne; King, Sallyann C; Hunter, Candis; Ruckart, Perri; Orr, Maureen F

    2016-08-01

    A chlorine gas release occurred at a poultry processing plant as a result of an accidental mixing of sodium hypochlorite and an acidic antimicrobial treatment. We evaluated the public health and emergency medical services response and developed and disseminated public health recommendations to limit the impact of future incidents. We conducted key informant interviews with the state health department; local fire, emergency medical services, and police departments; county emergency management; and representatives from area hospitals to understand the response mechanisms employed for this incident. After being exposed to an estimated 40-pound chlorine gas release, 170 workers were triaged on the scene and sent to 5 area hospitals. Each hospital redistributed staff or called in extra staff (eg, physicians, nurses, and respiratory therapists) in response to the event. Interviews with hospital staff emphasized the need for improved communication with responders at the scene of a chemical incident. While responding, hospitals handled the patient surge without outside assistance because of effective planning, training, and drilling. The investigation highlighted that greater interagency communication can play an important role in ensuring that chemical incident patients are managed and treated in a timely manner. (Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2016;10:553-556).

  15. Stroke Education in an Emergency Department Waiting Room: a Comparison of Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Feng Yvonne Chan1

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Since the emergency department (ED waiting room hosts a large, captive audience of patients and visitors, it may be an ideal location for conduct-ing focused stroke education. The aim of this study was to assess the effective-ness of various stroke education methods.Methods: Patients and visitors of an urban ED waiting room were randomized into one of the following groups: video, brochure, one-to-one teaching, combi-nation of these three methods, or control group. We administered a 13-question multiple-choice test to assess stroke knowledge prior to, immediately after, and at 1 month post-education to patients and visitors in the ED waiting room.Results: Of 4 groups receiving education, all significantly improved their test scores immediately post intervention (test scores 9.4±2.5-10.3±2.0, P<0.01. At 1 month, the combination group retained the most knowledge (9.4±2.4 exceed-ing pre-intervention and control scores (both 6.7±2.6, P<0.01.Conclusion: Among the various stroke education methods delivered in the ED waiting room, the combination method resulted in the highest knowledge reten-tion at 1-month post intervention.

  16. Accuracy of Emergency Severity Index, Version 4 in emergency room patients’ classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samad EJ Golzari

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Emergency Severity Index Version 4 (ESI v.4 is a validated triage tool for emergency departments, with an easy training system optimizing the allocation of limitedresources to emergency patients. The present study aimed to determine the outcomes of triagewith ESI v.4 method in all five levels of patients triage in emergency departments. Methods: In this retrospective observational-descriptive study, following the training coursesand implementation of triage with ESI v.4 method, the third quarter of 2008 was randomly selected for study. In this period, all patient files with their codes ending in zero were selectedequaling one-tenth of all files. Triage levels and outcomes were extracted and the obtaineddata from 1309 were expressed using descriptive statistics. Results: The mean age of the patients was 40.73 ± 21.37 years and 59.4% of the subjects weremales. Classification of patients by ESI v.4 level was as the following: 1 (4.0%, 2 (11.6%, 3 (52.8%, 4 (25.5% and 5 (6.1%. Hospitalization rate by ESI v.4 level was as below: 1(80.76%, 2 (23.68%, 3 (25.75%, 4 (11.76% and 5 (14.5%. Conclusion: The rate of hospitalization decreased from ESI level 1 to ESI level 5. Althoughthe findings of this study were in line with the previous reports, some discrepancies indicated the existing inaccuracy in out-patient hospitalization system in the evening and night shiftsand also at stage 5 triage level.

  17. Computational science: Emerging opportunities and challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendrickson, Bruce

    2009-01-01

    In the past two decades, computational methods have emerged as an essential component of the scientific and engineering enterprise. A diverse assortment of scientific applications has been simulated and explored via advanced computational techniques. Computer vendors have built enormous parallel machines to support these activities, and the research community has developed new algorithms and codes, and agreed on standards to facilitate ever more ambitious computations. However, this track record of success will be increasingly hard to sustain in coming years. Power limitations constrain processor clock speeds, so further performance improvements will need to come from ever more parallelism. This higher degree of parallelism will require new thinking about algorithms, programming models, and architectural resilience. Simultaneously, cutting edge science increasingly requires more complex simulations with unstructured and adaptive grids, and multi-scale and multi-physics phenomena. These new codes will push existing parallelization strategies to their limits and beyond. Emerging data-rich scientific applications are also in need of high performance computing, but their complex spatial and temporal data access patterns do not perform well on existing machines. These interacting forces will reshape high performance computing in the coming years.

  18. Contextual Computing: A Bluetooth based approach for tracking healthcare providers in the emergency room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisby, Joshua; Smith, Vernon; Traub, Stephen; Patel, Vimla L

    2017-01-01

    Hospital Emergency Departments (EDs) frequently experience crowding. One of the factors that contributes to this crowding is the "door to doctor time", which is the time from a patient's registration to when the patient is first seen by a physician. This is also one of the Meaningful Use (MU) performance measures that emergency departments report to the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). Current documentation methods for this measure are inaccurate due to the imprecision in manual data collection. We describe a method for automatically (in real time) and more accurately documenting the door to physician time. Using sensor-based technology, the distance between the physician and the computer is calculated by using the single board computers installed in patient rooms that log each time a Bluetooth signal is seen from a device that the physicians carry. This distance is compared automatically with the accepted room radius to determine if the physicians are present in the room at the time logged to provide greater precision. The logged times, accurate to the second, were compared with physicians' handwritten times, showing automatic recordings to be more precise. This real time automatic method will free the physician from extra cognitive load of manually recording data. This method for evaluation of performance is generic and can be used in any other setting outside the ED, and for purposes other than measuring physician time. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Cervical Spine Collar Removal by Emergency Room Nurses: A Quality Improvement Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontaine, Guillaume; Forgione, Massimo; Lusignan, Francis; Lanoue, Marc-André; Drouin, Simon

    2017-08-22

    The Canadian C-Spine Rule (CCR) is a clinical decision aid to facilitate the safe removal of cervical collars in the alert, orientated, low-risk adult trauma patient. Few health care settings have assessed initiatives to train charge nurses to use the CCR. This practice improvement project conducted in a secondary trauma center in Canada aimed to (1) train charge nurses of the emergency room to use the CCR, (2) monitor its use throughout the project period, and (3) compare the assessments of the charge nurses with those of emergency physicians. The project began with the creation of an interdisciplinary team. Clinical guidelines were established by the interdisciplinary project team. Nine charge nurses of the emergency room were then trained to use the CCR (3 on each 8-hour shift). The use of the CCR was monitored throughout the project period, from June 1 to October 5, 2016. The 3 aims of this practice improvement project were attained successfully. Over a 5-month period, 114 patients were assessed with the CCR. Charge nurses removed the cervical collars for 54 of 114 patients (47%). A perfect agreement rate (114 of 114 patients, 100%) was attained between the assessments of the nurses and those of physicians. This project shows that the charge nurses of a secondary trauma center can use the CCR safely on alert, orientated, and low-risk adult trauma patients as demonstrated by the agreement in the assessments of emergency room nurses and physicians. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Waiting room crowding and agitation in a dedicated psychiatric emergency service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Mallakh, Rif S; Whiteley, Amanda; Wozniak, Tanya; Ashby, McCray; Brown, Shawn; Colbert-Trowel, Danya; Pennington, Tammy; Thompson, Michael; Tasnin, Rokeya; Terrell, Christina L

    2012-05-01

    Emergency department crowding is a growing problem that impacts patient care and safety. The effect of crowding has not been examined in emergency psychiatric services. The association between patient census and use of restraints, seclusion, and anti-agitation medications as needed was examined for 1 month. A total of 689 patients were seen in 31 days. The average hourly census was 6.8 ± 2.8 (range 0 to 18). There were 33 incidences of seclusion or restraint and an additional 15 instances of medications administered for agitation. The use of seclusion, restraint, or medication for agitation was significantly associated with census (r2 = 0.3, F = 5.47, P = .036). Crowding in emergency psychiatric waiting rooms may increase the need for seclusion, restraint, or medications for agitation.

  1. An Analysis of the Challenges Facing Emerging Contractors in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    aim of this article is to explore the diffi cult journey which emerging contractors currently undertake through a survey analysis of the industry, and to provide recommendations to overcome these challenges. The survey herein discussed was restricted to emerging contractors in the Nelson Mandela Metropole. African Insight ...

  2. Emergency contraception in Senegal: challenges and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mané, Babacar; Brady, Martha; Ramarao, Saumya; Thiam, Ababacar

    2015-02-01

    This paper highlights lessons from introductory efforts and presents new data on community, provider and key opinion leader perspectives to support expanded use of emergency contraception (EC) in Senegal. The paper draws on four data sources: (i) a literature review; (ii) a secondary analysis of a household survey conducted by the Urban Reproductive Health Initiative; (iii) in-depth interviews with key opinion leaders; and (iv) a quantitative survey of healthcare providers from a range of service delivery points. ANALYSIS OF DATA: Knowledge of EC among women is low in urban areas, with only 20% of women having heard of the method and 4% having ever used it. There were serious gaps in providers' technical knowledge about EC; only 57% knew its mode of action and 34% were aware of the need for timely use (within 120 h). Moreover, nearly half reported reluctance to provide EC to married women and even fewer were willing to provide it to youths, particularly to adolescent girls. Responses from key opinion leaders were mixed, demonstrating ambivalence about EC and how it could be offered. In Senegal, the current positive political climate for family planning provides a good opportunity for strengthening EC programming to address knowledge and attitudinal barriers among providers, key opinion leaders and communities.

  3. Critical analysis of thoracotomies performed in the emergency room in 10 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Beck Guimarães

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To conduct a critical analysis of thoracotomies performed in the emergency rooms.METHODS: We analyzed mortality rates and survival as outcome variables, mechanism of injury, site of injury and anatomic injury as clinical variables, and gender and age as demographic variables of patients undergoing thoracotomy in the emergency room after traumatic injury.RESULTS: Of the 105 patients, 89.5% were male. The average age was 29.2 years. Penetrating trauma accounted for 81% of cases. The most common mechanism of trauma was wound by a firearm projectile (gunshot, in 64.7% of cases. Patients with stab wounds (SW accounted for 16.2% of cases. Overall survival was 4.7%. Survival by gunshot was 1.4%, and by SW, 23.5%. The ERT following blunt trauma showed a 100%mortality.CONCLUSION: The results obtained in the Emergency Hospital of Porto Alegre POA-HPS are similar to those reported in the world literature.

  4. Outcome of burr hole surgery in the emergency room for severe acute subdural hematoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Young-Soo; Hironaka, Yasuhiro; Motoyama, Yasushi; Asai, Hideki; Watanabe, Tomoo; Nishio, Kenji; Nakase, Hiroyuki; Okuchi, Kazuo

    2010-01-01

    We have performed burr hole surgery in the emergency room for severe acute subdural hematoma from April 2007 in twenty five patients. All patients were deep comatose and showed cerebral herniation sign with bilateral pupillary abnormalities. Burr hole surgeries were performed as soon as possible after CT evaluation. Continually decomporresive craiectomies were followed if clinical improvements were achieved and mild baribiturate-moderate hypothermia combined (MB-MH) therapy was induced postoperatively in some cases. The mean average was 65.6 years (range 16-93). The causes of head injuries were traffic accident in 9, fall down in 13 and unknown in 3. The mean Glasgow coma scale (GCS) on admission was 4.4 (range 3-9). The mean time interval from arrival to burr hole surgery was 33.5 minutes (range 21-50 minutes). Decompressive craniectomy was indicated in 14 cases and MB-MH therapy was induced in 13 cases. The overall clinical outcome consisted of good recovery in 3, moderate disability in 2, severe disability in 3, persistent vegetative state in 3 and death in 14. Favorable results can be expected even in patients with serious acute subdural hematoma. Emergent burr hole surgery was effective to decrease intracranial pressure rapidly and to save time. So active burr hole surgery in the emergency room is strongly recommended to all cases of severe acute subdural hematoma. (author)

  5. [Prescription errors in patients admitted to an internal medicine department from the emergency room].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez Paúls, L; González Alvarez, I; Requena Caturla, T; Fernández Capitán, M C

    2006-01-01

    To identify and quantify emergency room prescription errors upon patient admission in an internal medicine unit, assess their severity and causes, and evaluate their potential clinical impact. Discrepancies found between emergency room and internal medicine unit prescriptions were analyzed by 4th-year resident pharmacists. Prescription errors were collected and classified according to their severity and potential morbidity, and a medical analysis of service value was performed according to Overhage's method. Furthermore, pharmacist actions regarding therapeutic regimen optimization are described. Of 177 patients, 50 had prescription errors, for a total of 141 errors. Seven percent of prescriptions had an error. Mean errors per patient amounted to 0.8 (SD 1.51). Most commonly involved medications included anti-asthmatic and anti-infectious agents, and fluid therapy agents. On severity assessment 12.8% were considered severe, and 57.4% were considered significant. The main cause was omission of a needed therapy. Potential pharmacotherapeutic morbidity is related to adverse effects and cardiovascular disease. Medical assessment considered 12% very significant, and 52% significant. Pharmacist actions were directed towards effectiveness improvement in 57% of cases, and safety in 43.2% of cases. Emergency departments, as main entry points for patient admission to hospital, should be considered a priority in prescription quality improvement programs.

  6. Russian electricity reform. Emerging challenges and opportunities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    The Russian Government is pursuing a strategy of very high economic growth, with the objective of doubling gross domestic product in ten years. It recognises the central role the electricity sector has to play to achieve this target and has embarked on a highly ambitious program of electricity reform. If it is to succeed, the reform program will have to create market structures, market rules and a regulatory framework that will foster competitive wholesale and retail electricity markets. At the same time, it will have to deal with sensitive social issues related to tariff rebalancing and the removal of cross subsidies. Only competitive markets based on transparent prices that reflect costs can deliver the efficient, reliable and internationally competitive performance needed to meet the government's economic targets. Such markets are essential to attract new investment that will be required to ensure security of electricity supply after 2010. This book focuses on key aspects of the proposed reform that could have an important bearing on its success. It also raises concerns as to the pace of reform in related areas, such as the need for complementary reforms in the Russian natural gas sector. The IEA commends the Russian Government on its efforts to embrace this electricity reform - a key element critical to meeting the challenges ahead in terms of its economic growth and energy security. 17 figs., 10 tabs., 3 maps.

  7. Prevalence of substance use among trauma patients treated in a Brazilian emergency room

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reis Alessandra Diehl

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Although there is a considerable amount of data in the literature regarding the association between alcohol consumption and injuries treated in emergency rooms, little is known about the relationship between such injury and the use of other substances. The objective of this study was to estimate the prevalence of substance use in patients admitted to the emergency room for non-fatal injuries. METHOD: A prospective cross-sectional study assessing all patients admitted to the emergency room within 6 hours after a non-fatal injury was conducted over a three-month period. The following were used as measures of alcohol and drug use: a standardized World Health Organization questionnaire; a self-administered questionnaire related to drug consumption within the 24 hours preceding contact; the Drug Abuse Screening Test; urine screens for cannabis, cocaine and benzodiazepines; and determination of blood alcohol concentration. Descriptive analyses were performed and the confidence interval used was 95%. RESULTS: A total of 353 patients were included. Cannabis and cocaine screens were conducted for 242 patients and benzodiazepine screens were conducted for 166. Blood alcohol concentrations reached the level of positivity in 11% (n = 39, and 10% (n = 33 presented some degree of intoxication. Among the 242 patients screened, 13.6% (n = 33 tested positive for cannabis, and 3.3% (n = 8 tested positive for cocaine, whereas 4.2% (n = 7 of the 166 patients screened tested positive for benzodiazepines. CONCLUSIONS: Substance use was highly prevalent among these individuals. In this sample, the frequency for the use of cannabis (an illicit drug was comparable to that of alcohol. More studies are needed in order to characterize such use among Brazilians and to develop proper approaches to such cases, with the aim of reducing substance use and its consequences.

  8. Poor Compliance with Sepsis Guidelines in a Tertiary Care Children’s Hospital Emergency Room

    OpenAIRE

    Benjamin Louis Moresco; Benjamin Louis Moresco; Clinton Woosley; Clinton Woosley; Morris Sauter; Utpal Bhalala; Utpal Bhalala

    2018-01-01

    ObjectivesThis study aimed to assess factors related to adherence to the Pediatric Advanced Life Support guidelines for severe sepsis and septic shock in an emergency room (ER) of a tertiary care children’s hospital.MethodsThis was a retrospective, observational study of children (0–18 years old) in The Children’s Hospital of San Antonio ER over 1 year with the International Consensus Definition Codes, version-9 (ICD-9) diagnostic codes for “severe sepsis” and “shocks.” Patients in the adhere...

  9. Hospital hero: a game for reducing stress and anxiety of children while waiting in emergency room

    OpenAIRE

    Tranquada, Sara Patrícia Fernandes

    2014-01-01

    This report tells a story which started as an idea that came to us to fight the battle-cry feeling commonly known as stress and anxiety. Before creating the solution of the idea, we first need to understand the feelings underneath and its effects on our well-being. Throughout the course of our lives, we experience states of weakness and fear. These feelings can arise, for instance, while we are in an emergency room. Needless to say, how much it would have imaginable effects on children,...

  10. Concentrating Emergency Rooms: Penny-Wise and Pound-Foolish? An Empirical Research on Scale Economies and Chain Economies in Emergency Rooms in Dutch Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blank, Jos L T; van Hulst, Bart L; Valdmanis, Vivian G

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, we address the issue of whether it is economically advantageous to concentrate emergency rooms (ERs) in large hospitals. Besides identifying economies of scale of ERs, we also focus on chain economies. The latter term refers to the effects on a hospital's costs of ER patients who also need follow-up inpatient or outpatient hospital care. We show that, for each service examined, product-specific economies of scale prevail indicating that it would be beneficial for hospitals to increase ER services. However, this seems to be inconsistent with the overall diseconomies of scale for the hospital as a whole. This intuitively contradictory result is indicated as the economies of scale paradox. This scale paradox also explains why, in general, hospitals are too large. There are internal (departmental) pressures to expand certain services, such as ER, in order to benefit from the product-specific economies of scale. However, the financial burden of this expansion is borne by the hospital as a whole. The policy implications of the results are that concentrating ERs seems to be advantageous from a product-specific perspective, but is far less advantageous from the hospital perspective. © 2016 The Authors. Health Economics Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. © 2016 The Authors. Health Economics Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Family's presence in the pediatric emergency room: opinion of health's professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francine Fernandes Pires Mekitarian

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To learn the opinion of health professionals regarding the presence of family during pediatric emergency care. Methods: Cross-sectional study, performed with 46 health professionals, members of the medical and nursing team of a pediatric emergency service. The data were collected via the application of a questionnaire composed by variables related to the opinion of professionals about the studied subject, in line with the professional category and the vocational training time, as well as invasive procedures during which the presence of family is authorized by the professionals. Results: The medical staff and the professionals with shorter time after graduation (<10 years were more favorable to the presence of family during emergency procedures. Regarding the complexity of the procedures, the nursing staff proved more favorable to the presence of family during less complex procedures - peripheral venous puncture and fluid sample - whereas the consent of the medical staff was similar, regardless the performed procedure - peripheral venous puncture, fluid sample, intraosseous puncture, tracheal intubation and cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Conclusions: In order to allow the presence of family in the emergency room, it is necessary to sensitize health professionals, especially the nursing staff and the longer-term acting professionals, which are more resistant to allow the family to stay with the child during the emergency care.

  12. Analysis of a Patient Intervention to Reduce Patients Who Leave Without Being Seen in an Ophthalmology-Dedicated Emergency Room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorch, Alice C; Martinez, Maureen; Gardiner, Matthew

    Patients who leave without being seen (LWBS) by a medical provider in emergency care settings are a concern because their urgent complaints remain unaddressed. This study aims to characterize the LWBS population in an ophthalmology-dedicated emergency room and to evaluate an intervention designed to decrease the number of these patients. A program of rounding and patient contact in the waiting room of our emergency room was initiated to this end. A patient database was used retrospectively to review 13,124 charts and collect clinical and demographic data on 71 LWBS patients. The percentage of LWBS patients decreased from 0.74% to 0.33% after the intervention (p = 0.00158). Of the LWBS patients, 27% were seen in an ophthalmology clinic within 2 weeks, and 4% were seen back in the emergency room. Of these patients, 49% had some ophthalmology follow-up after leaving. Among those with follow-up, 14% had concerning pathology. Of all LWBS patients, 63% had a primary care physician. We conclude that frequent rounding in an emergency room waiting room can decrease the number of LWBS patients and as such reduce morbidity. This strategy offers potential to improve healthcare outcomes in emergency settings.

  13. CT Findings of Disease with Elevated Serum D-Dimer Levels in an Emergency Room Setting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Ji Youn; Kwon, Woo Cheol; Kim, Young Ju [Dept. of Radiology, Wonju Christian Hospital, Yensei University Wonju College of Medicine, Wonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-01-15

    Pulmonary embolism and deep vein thrombosis are the leading causes of elevated serum D-dimer levels in the emergency room. Although D-dimer is a useful screening test because of its high sensitivity and negative predictive value, it has a low specificity. In addition, D-dimer can be elevated in various diseases. Therefore, information on the various diseases with elevated D-dimer levels and their radiologic findings may allow for accurate diagnosis and proper management. Herein, we report the CT findings of various diseases with elevated D-dimer levels in an emergency room setting, including an intravascular contrast filling defect with associated findings in a venous thromboembolism, fracture with soft tissue swelling and hematoma formation in a trauma patient, enlargement with contrast enhancement in the infected organ of a patient, coronary artery stenosis with a perfusion defect of the myocardium in a patient with acute myocardial infarction, high density of acute thrombus in a cerebral vessel with a low density of affected brain parenchyma in an acute cerebral infarction, intimal flap with two separated lumens in a case of aortic dissection, organ involvement of malignancy in a cancer patient, and atrophy of a liver with a dilated portal vein and associated findings.

  14. Performing boundary work: The emergence of a new practice in a hybrid operating room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindberg, Kajsa; Walter, Lars; Raviola, Elena

    2017-06-01

    This paper addresses the processes of boundary work, in relation to the introduction of new technology, unfolding during the emergence of new medical practices. Inspired by Gieryn's fluid and practical view of boundaries and boundary work, and by Actor-Network Theory's description of scripting processes, we study the processes of negotiating and (re-)constructing boundaries in order to reveal both the interactions between different kinds of boundary work and their situatedness in the context of the emerging practice. We conducted a longitudinal and qualitative study of a generic Hybrid Operating Room at a Swedish university hospital, where sophisticated imaging devices are combined with open surgery procedures in a single room; consequently, medical requirements regarding radiology, surgery and anesthesia, as well as the specificities of the new technology, all need to be met at the same time. The study shows how the visibility of boundaries is a result of as well as a condition for boundary work, how boundary work is a dynamic and iterative process, and how it unfolds in a recursive relationship between practice and boundaries. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Correlates of Subjective Caregiver Strain in Caregivers of Youth Evaluated in a Pediatric Psychiatric Emergency Room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molteni, Silvia; Carbon, Maren; Lops, Johnny; Soto, Erin C; Cervesi, Chiara; Sheridan, Eva M; Galling, Britta; Saito, Ema; Krakower, Scott; Dicker, Robert; Foley, Carmel; Fornari, Victor; Balottin, Umberto; Correll, Christoph U

    2017-06-01

    Although caregiver burden is relevant to the outcome for psychiatrically ill youth, most studies have focused on caregiver burden in the community or research settings. Therefore, we aimed at evaluating the subjective caregiver strain (SCS) at the time of presentation of youth to a pediatric psychiatric emergency room (PPER), assessing potential correlates to provide leads for improvements in formal support systems. In this retrospective cohort study, the internalized, externalized, and total SCS were assessed in caregivers of youth Caregiver Strain Questionnaire. Sociodemographic and a broad range of clinical data were collected during the PPER visit using a 12-page semistructured institutional evaluation form. The Appropriateness of Pediatric Psychiatric Emergency Room Contact scale, incorporating acuity, severity and harm potential, was used to rate appropriateness of the visit. In caregivers of 444 youth, the internalized SCS was significantly higher than the externalized SCS (p caregivers' perceptions into comprehensive psychiatric assessments. The particularly high strain in caregivers of children with externalizing disorders and in families with low-functioning youth may need to prompt PPER staff to provide efficient information on appropriate treatment options for these children and on support facilities for the parents.

  16. Emergency management of major bleeding in a case of maxillofacial trauma and anticoagulation: utility of prothrombin complex concentrates in the shock room

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Morotti

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Life-threatening bleeding in anticoagulation with Warfarin is an emergency challenging issue. Several approaches are available to treat bleeding in either over-anticoagulation or propeanticoagulation, including vitamin K, fresh frozen plasma and prothrombin complex concentrates (PCC administration. In coexisting trauma-induced bleeding and anticoagulation, reversal of anticoagulation must be a rapid and highly effective procedure. Furthermore the appropriate treatment must be directly available in each shock rooms to guarantee the rapid management of the emergency. PCC require a simple storage, rapid accessibility, fast administration procedures and high effectiveness. Here we report the utility of PCC in management of a craniofacial trauma in proper-anticoagulation.

  17. Focused Cardiac Ultrasound Using a Pocket-Size Device in the Emergency Room

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mancuso, Frederico José Neves, E-mail: frederico.mancuso@grupofleury.com.br [Disciplina de Cardiologia - Escola Paulista de Medicina - Universidade Federal de São Paulo (Unifesp), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Disciplina de Medicina de Urgência - Escola Paulista de Medicina - Universidade Federal de São Paulo (Unifesp), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Siqueira, Vicente Nicoliello; Moisés, Valdir Ambrósio [Disciplina de Cardiologia - Escola Paulista de Medicina - Universidade Federal de São Paulo (Unifesp), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Gois, Aécio Flavio Teixeira [Disciplina de Medicina de Urgência - Escola Paulista de Medicina - Universidade Federal de São Paulo (Unifesp), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Paola, Angelo Amato Vincenzo de; Carvalho, Antonio Carlos Camargo; Campos, Orlando [Disciplina de Cardiologia - Escola Paulista de Medicina - Universidade Federal de São Paulo (Unifesp), São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-12-15

    Cardiovascular urgencies are frequent reasons for seeking medical care. Prompt and accurate medical diagnosis is critical to reduce the morbidity and mortality of these conditions. To evaluate the use of a pocket-size echocardiography in addition to clinical history and physical exam in a tertiary medical emergency care. One hundred adult patients without known cardiac or lung diseases who sought emergency care with cardiac complaints were included. Patients with ischemic changes in the electrocardiography or fever were excluded. A focused echocardiography with GE Vscan equipment was performed after the initial evaluation in the emergency room. Cardiac chambers dimensions, left and right ventricular systolic function, intracardiac flows with color, pericardium, and aorta were evaluated. The mean age was 61 ± 17 years old. The patient complaint was chest pain in 51 patients, dyspnea in 32 patients, arrhythmia to evaluate the left ventricular function in ten patients, hypotension/dizziness in five patients and edema in one patient. In 28 patients, the focused echocardiography allowed to confirm the initial diagnosis: 19 patients with heart failure, five with acute coronary syndrome, two with pulmonary embolism and two patients with cardiac tamponade. In 17 patients, the echocardiography changed the diagnosis: ten with suspicious of heart failure, two with pulmonary embolism suspicious, two with hypotension without cause, one suspicious of acute coronary syndrome, one of cardiac tamponade and one of aortic dissection. The focused echocardiography with pocket-size equipment in the emergency care may allow a prompt diagnosis and, consequently, an earlier initiation of the therapy.

  18. Challenges in designing interactive systems for emergency response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Margit; Kyng, Morten; Nielsen, Esben Toftdahl

    2007-01-01

    and visions as ways to bridge between fieldwork and literature studies on the one hand and the emerging computer based prototypes on the other. Our case concerns design of innovative interactive systems for support in emergency response, including patient identification and monitoring as well as construction......This paper presents research on participatory design of interactive systems for emergency response. We present the work by going through the design method with a focus on the new elements that we developed for the participatory design toolkit, in particular we emphasize the use of challenges...... and maintenance of a situational overview....

  19. [Violent outburst from teenagers in the pediatric emergency room: Complex cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, L; Gras-Le Guen, C; Fleury, J; Caldagues, E; Dreno, L; Picherot, G; Vabres, N

    2017-12-01

    Teenagers admitted to the emergency room for a violent attacks episode are increasingly numerous. The source of agitation is multifactorial for these teenagers, often with a complex course. They jeopardize hospital wards, which are often ill-suited for and overwhelmed during these outbursts. This study aims to identify and describe all the teenagers admitted to the hospital over 1 year for a violent outburst and discuss their management. Retrospective and descriptive study of teenagers admitted to the pediatric emergency department of the Nantes University Hospital for a violent outburst in 2015. During this 1-year study, 99 teenagers out of a total of 182 consultations were admitted for a violent outburst. We noted that 85% of them had a previous history of a violent outburst, 70% of them were seeing a psychologist, and 56% were followed by the child welfare services. Most of the outbursts took place at home and were hetero-aggressive. Upon arrival at the pediatric emergency ward, 90% of the teenagers had calmed down. The mean time spent in the emergency ward was 3h42min. Finally, 31% of the teenagers were hospitalized in the general pediatric unit, 14% in the children's psychiatric department, and 8% in the adult psychiatry ward. We observed a high proportion of complex cases in the teenagers admitted to our emergency department for a violent outburst. These teenagers in distress, with a complex previous history, illustrated the relation between violence against themselves and their own violent behavior toward others. Developing short-stay units for a temporary isolation could be an advantageous multidisciplinary approach to allow somatic, psychological, and social evaluation of these vulnerable patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Impact of visual art on patient behavior in the emergency department waiting room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanda, Upali; Chanaud, Cheryl; Nelson, Michael; Zhu, Xi; Bajema, Robyn; Jansen, Ben H

    2012-07-01

    Wait times have been reported to be one of the most important concerns for people visiting emergency departments (EDs). Affective states significantly impact perception of wait time. There is substantial evidence that art depicting nature reduces stress levels and anxiety, thus potentially impacting the waiting experience. To analyze the effect of visual art depicting nature (still and video) on patients' and visitors' behavior in the ED. A pre-post research design was implemented using systematic behavioral observation of patients and visitors in the ED waiting rooms of two hospitals over a period of 4 months. Thirty hours of data were collected before and after new still and video art was installed at each site. Significant reduction in restlessness, noise level, and people staring at other people in the room was found at both sites. A significant decrease in the number of queries made at the front desk and a significant increase in social interaction were found at one of the sites. Visual art has positive effects on the ED waiting experience. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Practices and Challenges in an Emerging M-Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asiimwe, Edgar Napoleon; Grönlund, Åke; Hatakka, Mathias

    2017-01-01

    This study reports an interpretative case study investigating practices and challenges in an emerging m-learning environment at Makerere University in Uganda. The research was part of the MobiClass pilot project. Data was collected by means of observations and interviews with teachers and various m-learning support staff, including teacher…

  2. Developing Emergency Room Key Performance Indicators: What to Measure and Why Should We Measure It?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalifa, Mohamed; Zabani, Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    Emergency Room (ER) performance has been a timely topic for both healthcare practitioners and researchers. King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center, Saudi Arabia worked on developing a comprehensive set of KPIs to monitor, evaluate and improve the performance of the ER. A combined approach using quantitative and qualitative methods was used to collect and analyze the data. 34 KPIs were developed and sorted into the three components of the ER patient flow model; input, throughput and output. Input indicators included number and acuity of ER patients, patients leaving without being seen and revisit rates. Throughput indicators included number of active ER beds, ratio of ER patients to ER staff and the length of stay including waiting time and treatment time. The turnaround time of supportive services, such as lab, radiology and medications, were also included. Output indicators include boarding time and available hospital beds, ICU beds and patients waiting for admission.

  3. Feelings of nurses in the reception and risk classification evaluation in the emergency room

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andressa Midori Sakai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to reveal feelings of nurses who host with risk assessment and classification in an emergency room of a pubic hospital. Methods: it is a qualitative research approach with 12 nurses interviewed. The data were analyzed, categorized and discussed according to the theoretical framework of work psychodynamics. Results: the nurses expressed feelings of satisfaction in meeting the user needs assistance. They reported feeling as fear, stress and fatigue due to the sharp pace of work, gaps in health care network and situations of violence. They highlighted coping strategies to reduce the burden of this assignment, how to share the completion of the screening with the nursing staff. Conclusion: the host with risk assessment and classification favors the autonomy of nurses and provide greater accountability to this professional users, but the limitations of available resources to solve the complaint of patients generate physical and psychological burden to this worker.

  4. [Medication errors in emergency rooms, intensive care units and pediatric wards].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hsiang-Feng; Yu, Shu; Lan, Ya-Hui; Tang, Fu-In

    2012-04-01

    Medication safety is a major concern worldwide that directly relates to patient care quality and safety. Reducing medication error incidents is a critical medication safety issue. This literature review article summarizes medication error issues related specifically to three hospital units, namely emergency rooms (ERs), intensive care units (ICUs), and pediatric wards. Time constrains, lack of patient history details and the frequent need to use rapid response life-saving medications are key factors behind high ER medication error rates. Patient hypo-responsiveness, complex medication administration and frequent need to use high-alert medications are key factors behind high ICU medication error rates. Medication error in pediatric wards are often linked to errors made by nurses in calculating dosage based on patient body weight. This article summarizes the major types of medication errors reported by these three units in order to increase nurse awareness of medication errors and further encourage nurses to apply proper standard operational procedures to medication administration.

  5. Clinically useful predictors for premature mortality among psychiatric patients visiting a psychiatric emergency room

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Jørgen; Buus, Niels; Wernlund, Andreas Glahn

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to examine changes in the distribution of causes of death and mortality rates among psychiatric patients visiting a psychiatric emergency room (PER), to determine clinically useful predictors for avoiding premature mortality among these patients and to discuss...... linked to the Cause of Death Register and the Central Psychiatric Research Register, and logistic predictor analyses for premature death were performed. RESULTS: The standardised mortality ratio (SMR) of all visitors compared to the general Danish population was approximately 5. Overall, patients...... was the strongest predictor of premature death among visitors to a PER (odds ratio (OR) = 1.8; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.5, 2.2). CONCLUSION: Persons visiting the PER had an increased SMR and substance use disorders were the strongest predictor of premature death within 3 years. However, death caused...

  6. Psychiatric emergency room decision-making, social control and the 'undeserving sick'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lincoln, Alisa

    2006-01-01

    The influence of social factors on involuntary hospitalisation has been an important and controversial area of sociological focus for many years. Traditionally, social control theory has been used to understand disproportionate rates of involuntary hospitalisation among marginalised and powerless groups. However, dramatic changes in the social context of mental healthcare have necessitated a re-examination of the role of social factors in involuntary hospitalisation. In this study 287 psychiatric emergency room visits were examined in order to test hypotheses for understanding social influences on disposition. Little support for the traditional social control hypothesis was found. People from marginalised groups were not disproportionately involuntarily hospitalised, but instead were disproportionately treated and released from the hospital as people's social resources were used to access care rather than to prevent hospitalisation. This study highlights the importance of the historical relevance of our theoretical understanding of the relationship between social factors and involuntary commitment.

  7. Feelings of nurses in the reception and risk classification evaluation in the emergency room

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andressa Midori Sakai

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to reveal feelings of nurses who host with risk assessment and classification in an emergency room of a pubic hospital. Methods: it is a qualitative research approach with 12 nurses interviewed. The data were analyzed, categorized and discussed according to the theoretical framework of work psychodynamics. Results: the nurses expressed feelings of satisfaction in meeting the user needs assistance. They reported feeling as fear, stress and fatigue due to the sharp pace of work, gaps in health care network and situations of violence. They highlighted coping strategies to reduce the burden of this assignment, how to share the completion of the screening with the nursing staff. Conclusion: the host with risk assessment and classification favors the autonomy of nurses and provide greater accountability to this professional users, but the limitations of available resources to solve the complaint of patients generate physical and psychological burden to this worker.

  8. The impact of emergency room utilization by depression patients on medical treatment expense in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun Sook

    2013-10-01

    To investigate the determinants of total medical expense for depression patients admitted through the emergency room (ER). Data were selected from the Korean National Health Insurance sample data for 2009. SPSS version 18 was used for the statistical analysis such as descriptive analysis, correlation analysis, and multiple regression analysis. Data included 1203 cases admitted through the ER with ICD-10 codes (F31-F39). In the multiple regression analysis, significant variables affecting total payment were gender (p < 0.001), age (p < 0.001), main illness (p < 0.001), course of admission to the ER (p < 0.05), and length of stay (p < 0.001). It is necessary to build a long-term program and system for high-risk depression groups.

  9. Injury patterns in polytraumatized children and consequences for the emergency room management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zwingmann, J; Schmal, H; Mehlhorn, A

    2010-01-01

    polytraumatized because of the detected high percentage of head and thorax injuries in polytraumatized children and the needed head surgery. The quickest imaging with a high sensitivity is the whole body CT scan which provides the clinicians with relevant information to initiate life-saving therapy.......INTRODUCTION: The effective initial treatment in the emergency room of polytraumatized children requires a sound knowledge of com- mon injury patterns, incidence, mortality, and consequences. The needed initial radiological imaging remains controversial and should be adapted to the expected injury...... pattern. PATIENTS AND METHODS: In this retrospective study, the injury patterns of 56 polytraumatized paediatric patients (age ≤ 16 years) in the period from December 2001 to May 2009 were evaluated. All children were initially diagnosed with a whole body CT scan. The cause of accident, the localization...

  10. The first hours of traumatic brain injury. Evaluation and management in emergency room

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo René Piñero

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The traumatic brain injury is a common disease worldwide and it represents the leading cause of death and disability in different age groups, with an incidence of particular concern in adolescents and young adults. The Glasgow Coma Scale remains the best method for the initial classification of these patients and to define the route of administration. Since many deaths occur within the first two weeks of the event, it is necessary to optimize the training of health professionals to improve the management of patients with traumatic brain injury and reduce the morbidity and mortality. The primary objective of the first approach is to prevent secondary brain injury and to identify any intracranial lesions that require urgent treatment. The present review aimed to show how to approach to the patients with TBI in Emergency Room.http://dx.doi.org/10.7175/rhc.v5i3.933

  11. Associations among emergency room visits, parenting styles, and psychopathology among pediatric patients with sickle cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latzman, Robert D; Shishido, Yuri; Latzman, Natasha E; Elkin, T David; Majumdar, Suvankar

    2014-10-01

    To examine associations between frequency of emergency room (ER) visits and various parenting styles, both conjointly and interactively, and psychopathological outcomes among pediatric patients with sickle cell disease (SCD). Ninety-eight parents/caregivers of 6- to 18-year-old patients with SCD completed instruments assessing parenting style, child psychopathology, and reported on the frequency of ER visits during the previous year. ER visits were found to significantly explain Withdrawn/Depressed problems and parenting styles were found to incrementally contribute to the explanation of all forms of psychopathology. Further, Permissive parenting was found to explain Rule Breaking Behavior for those patients with low ER visit frequency but not for those with high ER visit frequency. Results of the current study confirm the importance of considering both the frequency of ER visits and parenting style in the explanation of psychopathology among pediatric patients with SCD. Results have important implications for both research and treatment. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Role Allocations and Communications of Operators during Emergency Operation in Advanced Main Control Rooms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, June Seung

    2009-01-01

    The advanced main control room (MCR) in GEN III + nuclear power plants has been designed by adapting modern digital I and C techniques and an advanced man machine interface system (MMIS). Large Display Panels (LDPs) and computer based workstations are installed in the MCR. A Computerized Procedure System (CPS) and Computerized Operation Support System (COSS) with high degrees of automation are supplied to operators. Therefore, it is necessary to set up new operation concepts in advanced MCRs that are different from those applied in conventional MCRs regarding role allocations and communications of operators. The following presents a discussion of the main differences between advanced MCRs and conventional MCRs from the viewpoint of role allocations and communications. Efficient models are then proposed on the basis of a task analysis on a series of emergency operation steps

  13. Focused Cardiac Ultrasound Using a Pocket-Size Device in the Emergency Room

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederico José Neves Mancuso

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cardiovascular urgencies are frequent reasons for seeking medical care. Prompt and accurate medical diagnosis is critical to reduce the morbidity and mortality of these conditions. Objective: To evaluate the use of a pocket-size echocardiography in addition to clinical history and physical exam in a tertiary medical emergency care. Methods: One hundred adult patients without known cardiac or lung diseases who sought emergency care with cardiac complaints were included. Patients with ischemic changes in the electrocardiography or fever were excluded. A focused echocardiography with GE Vscan equipment was performed after the initial evaluation in the emergency room. Cardiac chambers dimensions, left and right ventricular systolic function, intracardiac flows with color, pericardium, and aorta were evaluated. Results: The mean age was 61 ± 17 years old. The patient complaint was chest pain in 51 patients, dyspnea in 32 patients, arrhythmia to evaluate the left ventricular function in ten patients, hypotension/dizziness in five patients and edema in one patient. In 28 patients, the focused echocardiography allowed to confirm the initial diagnosis: 19 patients with heart failure, five with acute coronary syndrome, two with pulmonary embolism and two patients with cardiac tamponade. In 17 patients, the echocardiography changed the diagnosis: ten with suspicious of heart failure, two with pulmonary embolism suspicious, two with hypotension without cause, one suspicious of acute coronary syndrome, one of cardiac tamponade and one of aortic dissection. Conclusion: The focused echocardiography with pocket-size equipment in the emergency care may allow a prompt diagnosis and, consequently, an earlier initiation of the therapy.

  14. Ketogenic Diet Decreases Emergency Room Visits and Hospitalizations Related to Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Husam R. Kayyali

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Approximately, one-third of patients with epilepsy are refractory to pharmacological treatment which mandates extensive medical care and imposes significant economic burden on patients and their societies. This study intends to assess the impact of the treatment with ketogenic diet (KD on reducing seizure-related emergency room visits and hospitalizations in children with refractory epilepsy. Methods. This is a retrospective review of children treated with the KD in one tertiary center. We compared a 12 months’ period prior to KD with 12 months after the diet was started in regard to the number of emergency department (ED visits, hospitalizations, and hospital days as well as their associated charges. Results. 37 patients (57% males were included. Their ages at time of KD initiation were (4.0±2.78 years. Twelve months after the KD initiation, the total number of ED visits was reduced by 36% with a significant decrease of associated charges (p=0.038. The number of hospital admissions was reduced by 40% and the number of hospital days was reduced by 39%. The cumulative charges showed net cost savings after 9 months when compared to the prediet baseline. Conclusion. In children with refractory epilepsy, treatment with the ketogenic diet reduces the number of ED visits and hospitalizations and their corresponding costs.

  15. Ketogenic Diet Decreases Emergency Room Visits and Hospitalizations Related to Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luniova, Anastasia; Abdelmoity, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Background. Approximately, one-third of patients with epilepsy are refractory to pharmacological treatment which mandates extensive medical care and imposes significant economic burden on patients and their societies. This study intends to assess the impact of the treatment with ketogenic diet (KD) on reducing seizure-related emergency room visits and hospitalizations in children with refractory epilepsy. Methods. This is a retrospective review of children treated with the KD in one tertiary center. We compared a 12 months' period prior to KD with 12 months after the diet was started in regard to the number of emergency department (ED) visits, hospitalizations, and hospital days as well as their associated charges. Results. 37 patients (57% males) were included. Their ages at time of KD initiation were (4.0 ± 2.78) years. Twelve months after the KD initiation, the total number of ED visits was reduced by 36% with a significant decrease of associated charges (p = 0.038). The number of hospital admissions was reduced by 40% and the number of hospital days was reduced by 39%. The cumulative charges showed net cost savings after 9 months when compared to the prediet baseline. Conclusion. In children with refractory epilepsy, treatment with the ketogenic diet reduces the number of ED visits and hospitalizations and their corresponding costs. PMID:27752367

  16. ATTENTION TO THE EMERGENCY ROOM WITH EMPHASIS ON PRE-HOSPITAL CARE: INTEGRATIVE REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. S. Santos

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The study aims to identify the factors, which influence positively and negatively the implementation of public policies geared to the needs in scope of mobile, found in the publications of brazilian researchers since the implementation of the National Policy of Attention to the Emergency room in Brazil. This is a study of Integrative Literature Review. Composing the basis of methodology, have been used official documents to guide the findings that comprised the conceptual bases of the study and to guide the Integrative Review were used publications that report on the issue in question respecting all steps of the protocol review. The results show the changes in the organizational structure of the Service Mobile Emergency, given the regionalization as something positive for the growth of this service modality and discuss prematurely early articulation between the sectors that make up the public health system in Brazil. In conclusion, the policies of attention to the urgencies, in particular within mobile, have favored beneficially all of the users who require this type of care, in the meantime, make the necessary reflections about this theme in the attempt of a better understanding of the regionalization process and coordination among the municipalities that will offer the mobile care so as to ensure continuity of care through the mechanisms of reference and counter-reference

  17. Pain in the room of plasters of the traumatology emergency unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inmaculada Aponte Tomillo

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In the emergency department the pain is the symptom more frequent than they undergo the patients, the presence of this one is considered like a useless and unnecessary suffering since it can get to control itself by means of the drug administration. The objective of this study is to know the existence and intensity the pain and if analgesia is administered in the traumatology emergency unit. It has been realised by means of a questionnaire in that picks up the variables: sex, age, diagnosis, pain and administration of analgesia. With respect to the result it exists 39,4% of fractures of radio, followed of 24,2% of fracture of metacarpianos. The pain in the room of plasters: Visual scale Analogical EVA (10 the 15,2% and EVA (7 the 21,2% of the patients. As far as the administration of analgesia to the 59,1% of the patients no was administered to him. In conclusion, the intensity of the pain that undergoes our patients during the manipulation of the fractures is because a percentage very lifted is reduced and immobilized without analgesia administration. This high prevalence of the pain puts in prohibition the welfare quality.

  18. Emerging and Neglected Infectious Diseases: Insights, Advances, and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Israel Nii-Trebi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Infectious diseases are a significant burden on public health and economic stability of societies all over the world. They have for centuries been among the leading causes of death and disability and presented growing challenges to health security and human progress. The threat posed by infectious diseases is further deepened by the continued emergence of new, unrecognized, and old infectious disease epidemics of global impact. Over the past three and half decades at least 30 new infectious agents affecting humans have emerged, most of which are zoonotic and their origins have been shown to correlate significantly with socioeconomic, environmental, and ecological factors. As these factors continue to increase, putting people in increased contact with the disease causing pathogens, there is concern that infectious diseases may continue to present a formidable challenge. Constant awareness and pursuance of effective strategies for controlling infectious diseases and disease emergence thus remain crucial. This review presents current updates on emerging and neglected infectious diseases and highlights the scope, dynamics, and advances in infectious disease management with particular focus on WHO top priority emerging infectious diseases (EIDs and neglected tropical infectious diseases.

  19. Micro- and nanoelectronics emerging device challenges and solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Brozek, Tomasz

    2014-01-01

    Micro- and Nanoelectronics: Emerging Device Challenges and Solutions presents a comprehensive overview of the current state of the art of micro- and nanoelectronics, covering the field from fundamental science and material properties to novel ways of making nanodevices. Containing contributions from experts in both industry and academia, this cutting-edge text:Discusses emerging silicon devices for CMOS technologies, fully depleted device architectures, characteristics, and scalingExplains the specifics of silicon compound devices (SiGe, SiC) and their unique propertiesExplores various options

  20. Novel spintronics devices for memory and logic: prospects and challenges for room temperature all spin computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian-Ping

    An energy efficient memory and logic device for the post-CMOS era has been the goal of a variety of research fields. The limits of scaling, which we expect to reach by the year 2025, demand that future advances in computational power will not be realized from ever-shrinking device sizes, but rather by innovative designs and new materials and physics. Magnetoresistive based devices have been a promising candidate for future integrated magnetic computation because of its unique non-volatility and functionalities. The application of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy for potential STT-RAM application was demonstrated and later has been intensively investigated by both academia and industry groups, but there is no clear path way how scaling will eventually work for both memory and logic applications. One of main reasons is that there is no demonstrated material stack candidate that could lead to a scaling scheme down to sub 10 nm. Another challenge for the usage of magnetoresistive based devices for logic application is its available switching speed and writing energy. Although a good progress has been made to demonstrate the fast switching of a thermally stable magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) down to 165 ps, it is still several times slower than its CMOS counterpart. In this talk, I will review the recent progress by my research group and my C-SPIN colleagues, then discuss the opportunities, challenges and some potential path ways for magnetoresitive based devices for memory and logic applications and their integration for room temperature all spin computing system.

  1. Emerging arboviruses and public health challenges in Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Lima-Camara,Tamara Nunes

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Environmental modification by anthropogenic actions, disordered urban growth, globalization of international exchange and climate change are some factors that help the emergence and dissemination of human infectious diseases transmitted by vectors. This review discusses the recent entry of three arboviruses in Brazil: Chikungunya, West Nile, and Zika virus, focusing on the challenges for the Country’s public health. The Brazilian population is exposed to infections caused by th...

  2. Temperature, hospital admissions and emergency room visits in Lhasa, Tibet: a time-series analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Li; Cirendunzhu; Woodward, Alistair; Dawa; Zhaxisangmu; Chen, Bin; Liu, Qiyong

    2014-08-15

    Tibet of China, with an average altitude of over 4000 m, has experienced noticeable changes in its climate over the last 50 years. The association between temperature and morbidity (most commonly represented by hospital admissions) has been documented mainly in developed countries. Little is known about patterns in China; nor have the health effects of temperature variations been closely studied in highland areas, worldwide. We investigated the temperature-morbidity association in Lhasa, the capital city of Tibet, using sex- and age-specific hospitalizations, excluding those due to external causes. A distributed lag non-linear model (DLNM) was applied to assess the nonlinear and delayed effects of temperature on morbidity (including total emergency room visits, total and cause-specific hospital admissions, sex- and age-specific non-external admissions). High temperatures are associated with increases in morbidity, to a greater extent than low temperatures. Lag effects of high and low temperatures were cause-specific. The relative risks (RR) of high temperature for total emergency room visits and non-external hospitalizations were 1.162 (95% CI: 1.002-1.349) and 1.161 (95% CI: 1.007-1.339) respectively, for lag 0-14 days. The strongest cumulative effect of heat for lag 0-27 days was on admissions for infectious diseases (RR: 2.067, 95% CI: 1.026-4.027). Acute heat effects at lag 0 were related with increases of renal (RR: 1.478, 95% CI: 1.005-2.174) and respiratory diseases (RR: 1.119, 95% CI: 1.010-1.240), whereas immediate cold effects increased admission for digestive diseases (RR: 1.132, 95% CI: 1.002-1.282). Those ≥65 years of age and males were more vulnerable to high temperatures. We provide a first look at the temperature-morbidity relationship in Tibet. Exposure to both hot and cold temperatures resulted in increased admissions to hospital, but the immediate causes varied. We suggest that initiatives should be taken to reduce the adverse effects of

  3. Child Injury in Israel: Emergency Room Visits to a Children's Medical Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Hemmo-Lotem

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The object of this study was to provide data for policy making and prevention program planning in Israel. The study examined all visits to the Department of Emergency Medicine at the Schneider Children's Medical Center in 1996 (41,279 visits in total. Approximately 22.6% of the emergency room patients were admitted following injury. Most (97% were unintentional injury. Approximately 42% of the patients were less than 4 years old and about 20% were 2 years old. In all age groups, the rate of boys was double. Approximately 92% were Jews. Despite this low rate of non-Jewish patients, however, they constituted 20% of later hospitalizations. The main injuries recorded were bruises and wounds from blunt objects, falls, motor vehicle–related accidents, and sport injuries. The most commonly injured body parts were the head and upper and lower limbs. In 82%, medical treatment was reported and 7% were hospitalized. In examining injuries over the year, there were no significant differences between the different months, but there were clusters of injuries around various holidays—bicycle and skateboard accidents at Rosh Hashanah, Yom Kippur, and Succoth; pedestrian accidents around Lag BaOmer; burns on Purim, Hannukkah, and Passover; and accidental poisoning around Passover. The findings gave an indication of the nature of the injured population groups. These data could be useful for prevention strategy, both on the level of physical injury as well as on the level of the times of the year, when the risk was higher. The data collected very strongly raise the urgent need for establishing a national surveillance system, which would allow tracking injury-related data with respect to young people throughout the country.

  4. Cost-Benefit Analysis of an Otolaryngology Emergency Room Using a Contingent Valuation Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naunheim, Matthew R; Kozin, Elliot D; Sethi, Rosh K; Ota, H Gregory; Gray, Stacey T; Shrime, Mark G

    2015-10-01

    Dedicated otolaryngology emergency rooms (ERs) provide a unique mechanism of health care delivery. Relative costs and willingness to pay (WTP) for these services have not been studied. This study aims to provide a cost-benefit analysis of otolaryngology-specific ER care. Cost-benefit analysis based on contingent valuation surveys. An otolaryngology-specific ER in a tertiary care academic medical center. Adult English-speaking patients presenting to an otolaryngology ER were included. WTP questions were used to assess patient valuations of specialty emergency care. Sociodemographic data, income, and self-reported levels of distress were assessed. State-level and institution-specific historical cost data were merged with WTP data within a cost-benefit analysis framework. The response rate was 75.6%, and 199 patients were included in the final analysis. Average WTP for otolaryngology ER services was $319 greater than for a general ER (95% CI: $261 to $377), with a median value of $200. The historical mean cost per visit at a general ER was $575, and mean cost at the specialty ER was $551 (95% CI: $529 to $574). Subtracting incremental cost from incremental WTP yielded a net benefit of $343. Dedicated otolaryngology ER services are valued by patients for acute otolaryngologic problems and have a net benefit of $343 per patient visit. They appear to be a cost-beneficial method for addressing acute otolaryngologic conditions. This study has implications for ER-based otolaryngologic care and direct-to-specialist services. © American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2015.

  5. [Emergency room services utilization in the province of Reggio Emilia: a comparison between immigrants and Italians].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonvicini, Laura; Broccoli, Serena; D'Angelo, Stefania; Candela, Silvia

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study is to compare Italian and immigrant accesses to Emergency Room (ER) Services in the province of Reggio Emilia, with particular attention to time differences and to potentially inappropriate accesses. the database of ER accesses in the province of Reggio Emilia was analyzed for the years 2007- 2010. In the analysis of the resident population all autochthonous citizens and all immigrants from Developed Countries were considered Italians, while citizens from Developing Countries were Immigrants. Temporary Immigrants were those immigrants with residence and citizenship in a Developing Country. A descriptive analysis was conducted using demographic variables related to patients (age, gender, citizenship and residence) and variables related to access (admission emergency codes, cause of admission, hour, day of the week, month and discharge modality). Standardized access Ratios (SRs) were calculated for the resident population, together with 95%Confidence Intervals (95% CI). The SRs were calculated separately for children and for adults. In the years 2007-2010, 562,658 accesses to ER were recorded for Italians, 95,300 accesses for Immigrants and 6,800 for the Temporary Immigrants. Access rates for resident Immigrants were higher than Italian ones. In 2010, the SR for men was 1.24 (95%CI 1.22-1.27) while for women it was 1.18 (95%CI 1.15-1.27). Considering only non-urgent accesses, the SRs were even higher (SR men=1.65, 95% CI 1.58-1.72, women=1.43, 95% CI 1.36-1.50). Similar findings were observed in children. Immigrants access the ER services more than Italians do.They also show more non-urgent accesses in comparison with Italians. This finding is consistent with results of studies conducted in other European countries and it underlines the necessity to reorganize primary care in order to better meet immigrants' needs.

  6. The effect of patient origin and relevance of contact on patient and caregiver satisfaction in the emergency room

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mygind, Anna; Nørredam, Marie Louise; Nielsen, Anette S

    2008-01-01

    AIMS: This study examined (1) whether patient and caregiver satisfaction in the emergency room (ER) varies according to patient origin, and (2) whether relevance of visit can explain any variation. METHODS: Data were obtained from a questionnaire survey of walk-in patients and their caregivers...

  7. Value of systematic detection of physical child abuse at emergency rooms : A cross-sectional diagnostic accuracy study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sittig, Judith S.; Uiterwaal, Cuno S P M; Moons, Karel G M; Russel-Kampschoer, Ingrid M B; Nievelstein, Rutger A J; Nieuwenhuis, Edward E S; Van De Putte, Elise M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of our diagnostic accuracy study Child Abuse Inventory at Emergency Rooms (CHAIN-ER) was to establish whether a widely used checklist accurately detects or excludes physical abuse among children presenting to ERs with physical injury. Design: A large multicentre study with a

  8. [Temperature that modifies the effect of air pollution on emergency room visits for circulatory and respiratory diseases in Beijing, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L L; Zhang, Q; Bai, R H; Mi, B B; Yan, H

    2017-08-10

    Objective: To analyze the temperature modification effect on emergency room visits for circulatory and respiratory diseases caused by air pollution, in Beijing. Methods: Data on both circulatory and respiratory diseases in 2010 and 2011 were collected, Both meteorological and air pollutants related data were obtained from the National Scientific Data Sharing Platform for Population and Health. By using the stratified time-series models, we analyzed the effects of air pollution on emergency room visits for circulatory and respiratory diseases under different temperature zones, from 2010 to 2011, in Beijing. Results: Low temperature (daily average temperatureeffect of air pollution index (API) on emergency room visits for circulatory diseases, Under 10 units of API, the relative risks and confidence interval appeared as 1.067 (1.054-1.080). However, high (daily average temperature between 24.4 ℃ and 28.5 ℃) and extra-high temperature (daily average temperature >28.5 ℃) could enhance the effect of API on emergency room visits for respiratory diseases, Under 10 units of API, the relative risks and confidence interval were 1.021 (1.015-1.028) and 1.006 (1.003-1.008), respectively. Conclusion: Temperature seemed to have modified the association between air pollution and both circulatory and respiratory diseases.

  9. Listening to "How the Patient Presents Herself": A Case Study of a Doctor-Patient Interaction in an Emergency Room

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delbene, Roxana

    2015-01-01

    This is a case-study based on a micro-ethnography analyzing a doctor-patient interaction in an emergency room (ER) in New York City. Drawing on the framework of narrative medicine (Charon, 2006), the study examines how a phenomenological approach to listening to the patient facilitated the patient's narrative orientation not only to relevant…

  10. Avoiding 100 New Power Plants by Increasing Efficiency of Room Air Conditioners in India: Opportunities and Challenges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phadke, Amol; Abhyankar, Nikit; Shah, Nihar

    2014-06-19

    Electricity demand for room ACs is growing very rapidly in emerging economies such as India. We estimate the electricity demand from room ACs in 2030 in India considering factors such as weather and income growth using market data on penetration of ACs in different income classes and climatic regions. We discuss the status of the current standards, labels, and incentive programs to improve the efficiency of room ACs in these markets and assess the potential for further large improvements in efficiency and find that efficiency can be improved by over 40percent cost effectively. The total potential energy savings from Room AC efficiency improvement in India using the best available technology will reach over 118 TWh in 2030; potential peak demand saving is found to be 60 GW by 2030. This is equivalent to avoiding 120 new coal fired power plants of 500 MW each. We discuss policy options to complement, expand and improve the ongoing programs to capture this large potential.

  11. Avoiding 100 new power plants by increasing efficiency of room air conditioners in India: opportunities and challenges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phadke, Amol; Abhyankar, Nikit; Shah, Nihar; [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Environmental Energy Technology Division

    2013-10-15

    Electricity demand for room ACs is growing very rapidly in emerging economies such as India. We estimate the electricity demand from room ACs in 2030 in India considering factors such as weather and income growth using market data on penetration of ACs in different income classes and climatic regions. We discuss the status of the current standards, labels, and incentive programs to improve the efficiency of room ACs in these markets and assess the potential for further large improvements in efficiency and find that efficiency can be improved by over 40% cost effectively. The total potential energy savings from Room AC efficiency improvement in India using the best available technology will reach over 118 TWh in 2030; potential peak demand saving is found to be 60 GW by 2030. This is equivalent to avoiding 120 new coal fired power plants of 500 MW each. We discuss policy options to complement, expand and improve the ongoing programs to capture this large potential.

  12. Impact of a celebrity death on children's injury-related emergency room visits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keays, Glenn; Pless, I B

    2010-01-01

    To determine whether a sharp increase in Emergency Room (ER) visits at the Montreal Children's Hospital (MCH) during the week following the death of Natasha Richardson from a skiing-related head injury was a) statistically significant and b) related to media coverage of the event. We postulated that there would be less coverage in the French media and in centres west of Quebec. We compared the number of visits to the MCH ER for 10 weeks beginning March 5 and recorded the number for head-related injuries. These data were also compared with averages for the MCH for the same weeks in the previous 16 years; with visit figures from Hôpital Ste-Justine (HSJ); and with those from 3 other pediatric hospitals in provinces west of Quebec for the same period. We found a 60% increase in injury visits to the MCH ER compared to the baseline week (p celebrity death may have generated anxiety among parents, prompting those who might not otherwise have sought medical care to bring their children to the ER.

  13. Management of Pediatric Migraine Headache in the Emergency Room and Infusion Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabbouche, Marielle

    2015-01-01

    Migraine is a common disorder that starts at an early age and takes a variable pattern from intermittent to chronic headache with several exacerbations throughout a lifetime. Children and adolescents are significantly affected. If an acute headache is not aborted by outpatient migraine therapy, it often causes severe disability, preventing the child from attending school and social events. Treating the acute severe headache aggressively helps prevent prolonged disability as well as possible chronification. Multiple medications are available, mostly for the outpatient management of an attack and include the use of over-the-counter anti-inflammatory medications as well as prescribed medications in the triptan group. These therapies do sometime fail and the exacerbation can last from days to weeks. If the headache lasts 72 hours or longer it will fall in the category of status migrainosus. Status migrainosus is described as a severe disabling headache lasting 72 hours or more by the ICHD3 criteria. Disability is a major issue in children and adolescents and aggressive acute measures are to be taken to control it as soon as possible. Early aggressive intravenous therapy can be very effective in breaking the attack and allowing the child to be quickly back to normal functioning. This article reviews what is available for the treatment of pediatric primary headaches in the emergency room. © 2015 American Headache Society.

  14. Emergency room volunteer internship: an instrument for quality in medical training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasr, Adonis; Talini, Carolina; Neves, Giana Carolina Strack; Krieger, João Guilherme Cavalcanti; Collaço, Iwan Augusto; Domingos, Micheli Fortunato

    2012-01-01

    To analyze the influence of medical student's voluntary internship at the Emergency Room of the Workers Hospital (ER-HT) in the choice of medical specialty and its importance during graduation. A questionnaire was given to doctors and medical students that performed internships at ER-HT for e" 500 hours, from March 2000 until March 2012. A total of 765 medical students and doctors performed e" 500 hours of practical activities at ER-HT and 390 answered the questionnaire - 37,9% chose surgical specialties and 24,1% clinical. Internship was crucial in choosing a career for 82,3%, and was a positive influence for 83,8%. Regarding the increment in interpersonal relationship, grade e" 8 was given by 61% of the participants for relationship with other professionals, 71% for relationship with colleagues and 63% for relationship with patients. The internship increased self-confidence for 92% and 75% reported an increase in technical knowledge. The training was considered useful and necessary for medical education to 80% of participants. Contribution provided by ER internships is undeniable for medical education and often influences students on choosing their medical specialties. The situations faced by students during these activities enable the development of intelligence in areas other than purely technical, which reflects in their medical practice.

  15. Metabolites in Blood for Prediction of Bacteremic Sepsis in the Emergency Room.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna M Kauppi

    Full Text Available A metabolomics approach for prediction of bacteremic sepsis in patients in the emergency room (ER was investigated. In a prospective study, whole blood samples from 65 patients with bacteremic sepsis and 49 ER controls were compared. The blood samples were analyzed using gas chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Multivariate and logistic regression modeling using metabolites identified by chromatography or using conventional laboratory parameters and clinical scores of infection were employed. A predictive model of bacteremic sepsis with 107 metabolites was developed and validated. The number of metabolites was reduced stepwise until identifying a set of 6 predictive metabolites. A 6-metabolite predictive logistic regression model showed a sensitivity of 0.91(95% CI 0.69-0.99 and a specificity 0.84 (95% CI 0.58-0.94 with an AUC of 0.93 (95% CI 0.89-1.01. Myristic acid was the single most predictive metabolite, with a sensitivity of 1.00 (95% CI 0.85-1.00 and specificity of 0.95 (95% CI 0.74-0.99, and performed better than various combinations of conventional laboratory and clinical parameters. We found that a metabolomics approach for analysis of acute blood samples was useful for identification of patients with bacteremic sepsis. Metabolomics should be further evaluated as a new tool for infection diagnostics.

  16. Otolaryngology-specific emergency room as a model for resident training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethi, Rosh K V; Kozin, Elliott D; Remenschneider, Aaron K; Lee, Daniel J; Gliklich, Richard E; Shrime, Mark G; Gray, Stacey T

    2015-01-01

    There is a paucity of data on junior resident training in common otolaryngology procedures such as ear debridement, nasal and laryngeal endoscopy, epistaxis management, and peritonsillar abscess drainage. These common procedures represent a critical aspect of training and are necessary skills in general otolaryngology practice. We sought to determine how a dedicated otolaryngology emergency room (ER) staffed by junior residents and a supervising attending provides exposure to common otolaryngologic procedures. Retrospective review. Diagnostic and procedural data for all patients examined in the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary ER between January 2011 and September 2013 were evaluated. A total of 12,234 patients were evaluated. A total of 5,673 patients (46.4%) underwent a procedure. Each second-year resident performed over 450 procedures, with the majority seen Monday through Friday (75%). The most common procedures in our study included diagnostic nasolaryngoscopy (52.0%), ear debridement (34.4%), and epistaxis control (7.0%) An otolaryngology-specific ER provides junior residents with significant diagnostic and procedural volume in a concentrated period of time. This study demonstrates utility of a unique surgical education model and provides insight into new avenues of investigation for otolaryngology training. © 2014 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  17. Educational paper: Detection of child abuse and neglect at the emergency room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teeuw, Arianne Hélène; Derkx, Bert H F; Koster, Willeke A; van Rijn, Rick R

    2012-06-01

    The emergency room (ER) represents the main system entry for crises-based health care visits. It is estimated that 2% to 10% of children visiting the ER are victims of child abuse and neglect (CAN). Therefore, ER personnel may be the first hospital contact and opportunity for CAN victims to be recognised. Early diagnosis of CAN is important, as without early identification and intervention, about one in three children will suffer subsequent abuse. This educational paper provides the reader with an up-to-date and in-depth overview of the current screening methods for CAN at the ER. We believe that a combined approach, using a checklist with risk factors for CAN, a structured clinical assessment and inspection of the undressed patient (called 'top-toe' inspection) and a system of standard referral of all children from parents who attend the ER because of alcohol or drugs intoxication, severe psychiatric disorders or with injuries due to intimate partner violence, is the most promising procedure for the early diagnosis of CAN in the ER setting.

  18. Degree of agreement among sepsis diagnosis criteria in adult emergency room patients with infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinto, R.; Chandra, A. T.; Lie, K. C.; Suwarto, S.

    2018-03-01

    The study on the degree of agreement among three established sepsis diagnosis criteria become the necessity to investigate the best sepsis diagnosis criteria in Indonesia further. A cross-sectional study of adult Emergency Room patients hospitalized with a diagnosis of infection in CiptoMangunkusumo Hospital, Indonesia was conducted during March and April 2017. We recorded diagnosis, gender, age, comorbidities, infection source, and origin. Every subject was classified into sepsis and non-sepsis based on 1991, 2001 and sepsis-3 criteria. Raw % and Kappa agreement coefficients (κ) were calculated according to previously established formula to measure the degree of agreement among three diagnostic criteria. As many as 278 subjects were included in this study. The raw % agreement and κ between 1991 and 2001 criteria is 69.07% and 0.34 respectively. The raw % agreement and κ between 2001 and sepsis-3 criteria is 56.12% and 0.15 respectively. The raw % agreement and κ between 1991 and sepsis-3 criteria is 48.19% and -0.02. In conclusions, there is afair agreement between 1991 and 2001 criteria, poor agreement between 2001 and sepsis-3 criteria, and poor disagreement between 1991 and sepsis-3 criteria. This necessitates further Indonesian study of the best diagnosis criteria to diagnose an infected patient with sepsis.

  19. Youth versus adult "weightlifting" injuries presenting to United States emergency rooms: accidental versus nonaccidental injury mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myer, Gregory D; Quatman, Carmen E; Khoury, Jane; Wall, Eric J; Hewett, Timothy E

    2009-10-01

    Resistance training has previously been purported to be unsafe and ineffective in children. The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate resistance training-related injuries presenting to U.S. emergency rooms by age, type, and mechanism of injury. We hypothesized that older athletes would sustain greater percentages of joint sprains and muscle strains, whereas younger athletes would sustain a greater percentage of accidental injuries that would result in an increased percentage of fractures in youths. The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) National Electronic Injury Surveillance System was queried from 2002 to 2005 using the CPSC code for "Weightlifting." Subjects between the ages of 8 and 30 were grouped by age categories 8 to 13 (elementary/middle school age), 14 to 18 (high school), 19 to 22 (college), and 23 to 30 (adult). Injuries were classified as "accidental" if caused by dropped weight or improper equipment use. Multiple logistic regression was used to compare accidental injuries between age groups. The sample consisted of 4,111 patients. Accidental injuries decreased (p 14 to 18 > 19 to 22 years = 23 to 30 years. Conversely, sprain/strain injuries increased in each successive age group (p training-related joint sprains and muscle strains than adults. The majority of youth resistance training injuries are the result of accidents that are potentially preventable with increased supervision and stricter safety guidelines.

  20. Use of the emergency room in Elliot Lake, a rural community of Northern Ontario, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, L; Bombin, M; Chi, F; DeBortoli, T; Long, J

    2004-01-01

    There is ample documentation that use of hospital emergency facilities for reasons other than urgencies/emergencies results in clogged services in many urban centers. However, little has been published about similar misuse of emergency rooms/departments in rural and remote areas, where the situation is usually compounded by a scarcity of healthcare professionals. In Canada there is a shortage of physicians in rural and remote areas as a consequence of misdistribution (most physicians staying in southern urban centers after residence), and there is a chronic misuse of facilities meant for urgencies/emergencies to cope with primary healthcare needs. We address the problem in Elliot Lake, a rural Northern Ontario community of 12,000 people. The economy of Elliot Lake was based on uranium mining until the mid-1990s, when it drastically changed to become a center for affordable retirement and recreational tourism. As a consequence, at the present time the proportion of seniors in Elliot Lake doubles the Canadian average. Our objectives are to elucidate the demographics of emergency room (ER) clients and the effect of the elderly population; the nature of ER use; the perceived level of urgency of clients versus health professionals; and possible alternatives offered to non-urgent/emergency visits. This is the first study of the kind in Northern Ontario, a region the size of France. The study, conducted in July 2001, used a prospective survey, completed by patients and attending clinicians at the time of a patient's presentation to the ER of St Joseph's General Hospital. This hospital is staffed by family physicians, a nurse practitioner, and registered nurses (RNs). The catchment area population (town plus surrounding areas) of the hospital is approximately 18,000 people. ER clients were interviewed verbally, and the attending health professionals responded to written questionnaires. Demographics were recorded (age, sex, employment and marital status), as was each client

  1. Health impact assessment in China: Emergence, progress and challenges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang Zheng, E-mail: huangzhg@mails.tjmu.edu.cn

    2012-01-15

    The values, concepts and approaches of health impact assessment (HIA) were outlined in the Gothenburg consensus paper and some industrialized countries have implemented HIA for many years. HIA has played an important role in environmental protection in China, however, the emergence, progress and challenges of HIA in China have not been well described. In this paper, the evolution of HIA in China was analyzed and the challenges of HIA were presented based on the author's experiences. HIA contributed to decision-making for large capital construction projects, such as the Three Gorges Dam project, in its emergence stage. Increasing attention has been given to HIA in recent years due to supportive policies underpinning development of the draft HIA guidelines in 2008. However enormous challenges lie ahead in ensuring the institutionalization of HIA into project, program and policy decision-making process due to limited scope, immature tools and insufficient professionals in HIA practice. HIA should broaden its horizons by encompassing physical, chemical, biological and socio-economic aspects and constant attempts should be made to integrate HIA into the decision-making process, not only for projects and programs but also for policies as well.

  2. I and C and control room challenges and opportunities for maintaining and modernizing nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naser, J.

    2006-01-01

    Instrumentation and Control (I and C) systems and capabilities affect all areas of plant operation and can profoundly impact plant reliability, efficiency, and operating costs. Nuclear power plants are having problems with aging and obsolete equipment. These problems will get worse as plants age. The longer life resulting from license extension just increases the problems. Work is being done in the industry to optimize or extend the useful life and reliability of existing equipment and systems. However; long-term maintenance of aging and obsolete equipment is often not a viable option and modernization must also be considered. The Electric Power Research Inst. I and C Program has been working with its member utilities and other stakeholders in the nuclear power industry to: 1) enable nuclear power plants to support existing components and systems, 2) make improvements via component upgrades, 3) make system level improvements, and 4) plan for and initiate large scale upgrades to I and C systems and control rooms. Considerable progress has been made in both technical and regulatory areas to enable more cost-effective operation and maintenance and to take advantage of improvements possible with digital technology. However, there are still several challenges that must be addressed and several beneficial opportunities that are possible. Some are these areas are currently being addressed in the EPRI I and C Program. For many of the areas, the issues and solutions apply to new plants as well. (authors)

  3. Moral experience and ethical challenges in an emergency department in Pakistan: emergency physicians' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafar, Waleed

    2015-04-01

    Emergency departments (ED) are often stressful environments posing unique ethical challenges-issues that primarily raise moral rather than clinical concerns-in patient care. Despite this, there are very few reports of what emergency physicians find ethically challenging in their everyday work. Emergency medicine (EM) is a relatively young but rapidly growing specialty that is gaining acceptance worldwide. The aim of this study was to explore the perspectives of EM residents and physicians regarding the common ethical challenges they face during patient care in one of only two academic EM departments in Pakistan. These challenges could then be addressed in residents' training and departmental practice guidelines. A qualitative research design was employed and in-depth interviews were conducted with ED physicians. Participants were encouraged to think of specific examples from their work, to highlight the particular ethical concerns raised and to describe in detail the process by which those concerns were addressed or left unresolved. Transcripts were analysed using grounded theory methods. Thirteen participants were interviewed and they described four key challenges: how to provide highest quality care with limited resources; how to be truthful to patients; what to do when it is not possible to provide or continue treatment to patients; and when (and when not) to offer life-sustaining treatments. Participants' accounts provided important insights into how physicians tried to resolve these challenges in the 'local moral world' of an ED in Pakistan. The study highlights the need for developing systematic and contextually appropriate mechanisms for resolving common ethical challenges in the EDs and for training residents in moral problem solving. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  4. Ramses 2015 - The challenge for the emerging countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montbrial, Thierry de; Moreau Defarges, Philippe; Nicolas, Francoise; Mondon-Navazo, Mathilde; Kastoueva-Jean, Tatiana; Saint-Mezard, Isabelle; Ekman, Alice; Vircoulon, Thierry; Boisseau du Rocher, Sophie; Schmid, Dorothee; Nicouleaud, Francois; Dazi-Heni, Fatiha; Letrilliart, Philippe; Recondo, David; Goussot, Michel; Pertusot, Vivien; Pajon, Celine; Maisonneuve, Cecile; Auge, Benjamin; Seaman, John; Boncourt, Maite de; Aoun, Marie-Claire; Faure, Aurelie; Durand, Etienne de; Niquet, Valerie; Pajon, Celine; Seaman, John; Brustlein, Corentin; Penent, Guilhem; Moulin, Emmanuel; Bertossi, Christophe; Broughton, Emma; Delaplace, Juliette; Tardis, Matthieu; Kastoueva-Jean, Tatiana; Nocetti, Julien; Stark, Hans; Rittelmeyer, Yann-Sven; Tolksdorf, Dominik; Tinguy, Anne de; Schreiber, Thomas; Bauchard, Denis; Hecker, Marc; Mokhefi, Mansouria; Nardon, Laurence; Antil, Alain; Quenot-Suarez, Helene; Vircoulon, Thierry; Letrilliart, Philippe; Joffres, Adeline; Rodriguez, Dario A.; Messerlin, Patrick; Mistral, Jacques; Levy-Lang, Andre; Quatrepoint, Jean-Michel; Charentenay, Pierre de

    2014-01-01

    This annual world report on the economic system and strategies (RAMSES) first proposes a synthesis of 2014 in terms of international relationships. The first part addresses the emerging countries (Brazil, Russia, India, China, South Africa, Indonesia, Turkey, Iran, Saudi Arabia, and Mexico) and the redistribution of world balances (the question of the decline of the USA, Europe in front of emerging countries, Japan in front of China). The contributions of the second part discuss the stakes and challenges between established and emerging powers (energy powers, military powers, economic powers) and the associated issues (geopolitical balance, migrations, cooperation and competition, Internet governance). The contributions of the third part address various European and world issues: EU and Russia, the Ukrainian issue, the presence of China in Eastern Europe, religious and political conflict between Shiites and Sunnis, terrorism, the situation in the Middle-East, crisis in Africa, China in Africa, the end of populist regimes in Cuba, Venezuela and Argentina, the missed emergence of Thailand, the issue of a financial world regulation, the role of the new pope). A chronology, maps and figures are provided

  5. Reticence vs. Responsibility: Why Climate Scientists Sometimes Need to Think Like Emergency Room Doctors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peacock, K.

    2013-12-01

    Hansen (2007), Brysse et al (2012), and Oreskes (2013) have drawn attention to the too-frequent reticence of climate scientists---the unwillingness to err on the side of predicting extreme outcomes or recommend strong action to prevent those outcomes. In Hansen's words, this may hinder 'communication with the public about dangers of global warming' and thereby lessen the chance of effective responses to this urgent threat. Scientists may be reticent about the kinds of extreme outcomes that could occur (ice sheet collapse, oceanic anoxia, killer heat waves, etc.), the probabilities of such outcomes, or the options for preventing or mitigating such outcomes. I will review the reasons, some understandable and some regrettable, for such reticence. (The latter could include the 'seepage' into professional discourse of the often-poisonous atmosphere of climate science denialism; Lewandowsky 2013.) My major aim will be to argue that scientists need a clearly defined ethical framework that coheres with the scientific ethos, and I will suggest that the place to look for such an ethical framework is in the realm of professional ethics. I will review key features of the learned professions such as medicine and engineering, where practitioners (such as emergency room physicians) are necessarily attuned to the imperative of making life-or-death decisions and recommendations in real time, under conditions of uncertainty. I hardly mean to suggest that pure science does not have a professional ethos of its own, but research science as such is not a legally constituted profession (like medicine) and it is focussed on the disinterested search for reliable knowledge above all other goals. Medicine and engineering depend upon and contribute to scientific knowledge but they are aimed at practical ends as well---the welfare of patients or protection of the public as a whole. Also, it is in the nature of engineering and other learned professions that (like pure science) they often

  6. Comparative study on cases of vertigo and dizziness in the emergency room and otorhinolaryngological clinic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsujimoto, Toshiya; Kawashima, Kayoko; Hashimoto, Seiko; Imai, Takao

    2011-01-01

    We recently studied the characteristics of vertigo and dizziness in 197 patients who first visited the emergency room (ER group) and in 288 patients who first visited the otorhinolaryngological clinic of Minoh City Hospital (ENT group) between January 1 and December 31 of 2009. The ER group can be regarded as representing the hyperacute phase and the ENT group as representing the acute to chronic phase. These two groups were completely distinct. We also subdivided these groups into the high risk subgroup (H subgroup) for cases with the underlying diseases of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, cerebrovascular disease and hyperlipidemia, and the normal subgroup (N subgroup).Comparison of the two groups showed that, in the ER group, a significantly larger numbers of patients had symptoms of peripheral vestibular origin except for benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) and Meniere's disease, and a significantly larger number of patients had symptoms of unknown origin in the ENT group. Half of this group may be accounted for by patients with symptoms of peripheral vestibular origin except for BPPV and Meniere's disease in the ER group. In 8 out of 158 patients of the ER group and 1 out of 122 patients of the ENT group, cerebral lesions were not found on CT images but were found with MRI. Careful investigation is necessary in the patients with normal CT findings. Central vestibular lesions were found in 7 out of 197 patients (3.5%) of the ER group and 5 out of 288 patients (1.7%) of the ENT group. The incidence of central lesions tended to be higher in the ER group than in the ENT group. There was no significant difference in the incidence of central lesion among the H and N subgroups of both groups. Careful investigation of the central vestibular lesion is also necessary in the N subgroup. (author)

  7. Weather and emergency room visits for migraine headaches in Ottawa, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villeneuve, P J; Szyszkowicz, M; Stieb, D; Bourque, D A

    2006-01-01

    Self-reported surveys have indicated that weather can trigger migraine headaches. However, to date, we know of no previous study that has examined the relationship between weather and emergency room (ER) visits for this condition. To examine associations between ER visits for migraines and selected meteorological conditions within the 24 hours preceding the visit. A case-crossover design was used to study 4039 visits for migraines (ICD-9: 346) that occurred at an Ottawa hospital between 1993 and 2000. Meteorological conditions were defined using hourly readings from a fixed-site monitoring station. Conditional logistic regression was used to compare the occurrence of meteorological conditions during the 24 hours leading up to the time of the visit to control periods occurring 1 week before and after. Precipitation-related weather events (fog, snow, rain, thunder) were not associated with migraine visits. Similarly, no associations were observed with changes in atmospheric pressure, wind speed, and relative humidity during the 24 hours preceding presentation. No statistically significant differences in the frequency distribution of clusters defined by relative humidity, atmospheric pressure, and temperature were found between case and control intervals. Conversely, a mean wind speed in excess of 19 km per hour was associated with a reduction in ER visits 8 to 12 hours later. Our findings provide little support for the hypothesis that ER visits for migraines are related to weather conditions occurring within the 24 hours preceding presentation. These results should be interpreted cautiously as some comparisons are based on a small number of cases, and ER visits for migraine may represent a highly selective group of patients who suffer from this condition.

  8. Surgical exploration of hand wounds in the emergency room: Preliminary study of 80 personal injury claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouton, J; Houdre, H; Beccari, R; Tarissi, N; Autran, M; Auquit-Auckbur, I

    2016-12-01

    The SHAM Insurance Company in Lyon, France, estimated that inadequate hand wound exploration in the emergency room (ER) accounted for 10% of all ER-related personal injury claims in 2013. The objective of this study was to conduct a critical analysis of 80 claims that were related to hand wound management in the ER and led to compensation by SHAM. Eighty claims filed between 2007 and 2010 were anonymised then included into the study. To be eligible, claims had to be filed with SHAM, related to the ER management of a hand wound in an adult, and closed at the time of the study. Claims related to surgery were excluded. For each claim, we recorded 104 items (e.g., epidemiology, treatments offered, and impact on social and occupational activities) and analysed. Of the 70 patients, 60% were manual workers. The advice of a surgeon was sought in 16% of cases. The most common wound sites were the thumb (33%) and index finger (17%). Among the missed lesions, most involved tendons (74%) or nerves (29%). Many patients had more than one reason for filing a claim. The main reasons were inadequate wound exploration (97%), stiffness (49%), and dysaesthesia (41%). One third of patients were unable to return to their previous job. Mean sick-leave duration was 148 days and mean time from discharge to best outcome was 4.19%. Most claims (79%) were settled directly with the insurance company, 16% after involvement of a public mediator, and 12% in court. The mean compensatory damages award was 4595Euros. Inadequate surgical exploration of hand wounds is common in the ER, carries a risk of lasting and sometimes severe residual impairment, and generates considerable societal costs. IV. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  9. Patient satisfaction, preventive services, and emergency room use among African-Americans with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gary, Tiffany L; Maiese, Eric M; Batts-Turner, Marian; Wang, Nae-Yuh; Brancati, Fredrick L

    2005-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between patient satisfaction and diabetes- related preventive health care and emergency room (ER) use. We studied 542 urban African-Americans with type 2 diabetes aged > or =25 years who were enrolled in a primary carebased intervention trial to improve diabetes control and reduce adverse health events; 73% female, mean age 58 years, 35% had yearly household incomes of Consumer Assessment of Health Plans Survey (CAHPS) and use of diabetes-related preventive health care and ER were assessed by self-report. We then followed participants for 12 months to determine ER use prospectively. In general, participants gave favorable ratings of their care; over 70% reported that they had no problem getting care, over 60% reported the highest ratings on the communication and courtesy domains, and mean ratings (0-10 scale) for personal doctor and overall health care were high (8.8 and 8.4, respectively). Using poisson regression models adjusted for age, education, and self-reported rating of health, several aspects of patient satisfaction were associated with subsequent ER use. Participants who reported that medical staff were usually helpful or that doctors and nurses usually spent enough time were 0.49 and 0.37 times, respectively, less likely to use the ER (all p < 0.05). However, few aspects of patient satisfaction were associated with better preventive services. These data suggest that greater patient satisfaction was associated with lower ER use in urban African-Americans. Whether measures to improve patient satisfaction would reduce ER use requires further prospective study.

  10. Extreme precipitation and emergency room visits for influenza in Massachusetts: a case-crossover analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Genee S; Messier, Kyle P; Crooks, James L; Wade, Timothy J; Lin, Cynthia J; Hilborn, Elizabeth D

    2017-10-17

    Influenza peaks during the wintertime in temperate regions and during the annual rainy season in tropical regions - however reasons for the observed differences in disease ecology are poorly understood. We hypothesize that episodes of extreme precipitation also result in increased influenza in the Northeastern United States, but this association is not readily apparent, as no defined 'rainy season' occurs. Our objective was to evaluate the association between extreme precipitation (≥ 99th percentile) events and risk of emergency room (ER) visit for influenza in Massachusetts during 2002-2008. A case-crossover analysis of extreme precipitation events and influenza ER visits was conducted using hospital administrative data including patient town of residence, date of visit, age, sex, and associated diagnostic codes. Daily precipitation estimates were generated for each town based upon data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for associations between extreme precipitation and ER visits for influenza were estimated using conditional logistic regression. Extreme precipitation events were associated with an OR = 1.23 (95%CI: 1.16, 1.30) for ER visits for influenza at lag days 0-6. There was significant effect modification by race, with the strongest association observed among Blacks (OR = 1.48 (1.30, 1.68)). We observed a positive association between extreme precipitation events and ER visits for influenza, particularly among Blacks. Our results suggest that influenza is associated with extreme precipitation in a temperate area; this association could be a result of disease ecology, behavioral changes such as indoor crowding, or both. Extreme precipitation events are expected to increase in the Northeastern United States as climate change progresses. Additional research exploring the basis of this association can inform potential interventions for extreme weather events and influenza

  11. [Índice de Saturación Modificado y Ambulancias (ISMA): Ambulance assignment and remote Emergency Room Bed Reservation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polanco-González, Carlos; Castañón-González, Jorge Alberto; Villanueva-Martínez, Sebastián; Samaniego-Mendoza, José Lino; Buhse, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    In most places all over the world–including our country–services in emergency rooms are oversaturated. This situation frequently forces the continuously arriving ambulances to be redirected to other medical units, delaying the admission of patients moved and thus adversely affecting their physical condition. To introduce an improvement to the Índicede Saturación Modificado computational system, which monitors the degree of saturation of a network of emergency medical services, to include a network of ambulances, enabling in the system: (i) the effective allocation of ambulances to the site of the accident, or severe clinical event, and (ii) the remote booking of beds in the nearest and least saturated emergency room available. The evaluation and connectivity of the computational improvement to the Índicede Saturación Modificado system was carried out with a computational test verifying these two aspects, using only differences in postal codes, for time measuring. The verification of its sustainability online showed the new Índice de Saturación Modificado y Ambulancias system (ISMA) has a robust structure capable of being adapted to mobile phones, laptops or tablets, and can efficiently administrate: (i) the quantification of excessive demand in the emergency room services of a hospital network, (ii) the allocation of ambulances attending the site of the event or contingency, and (iii) the allocation of ambulances and patients, in the best distance-time conditions, from the site of the accident or clinical event to the nearest and least saturated emergency room service. This administrative management tool is efficient and simple to use, and it optimally relates independent service networks.

  12. Emerging issues, challenges, and changing epidemiology of fungal disease outbreaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedict, Kaitlin; Richardson, Malcolm; Vallabhaneni, Snigdha; Jackson, Brendan R; Chiller, Tom

    2017-12-01

    Several high-profile outbreaks have drawn attention to invasive fungal infections (IFIs) as an increasingly important public health problem. IFI outbreaks are caused by many different fungal pathogens and are associated with numerous settings and sources. In the community, IFI outbreaks often occur among people without predisposing medical conditions and are frequently precipitated by environmental disruption. Health-care-associated IFI outbreaks have been linked to suboptimal hospital environmental conditions, transmission via health-care workers' hands, contaminated medical products, and transplantation of infected organs. Outbreak investigations provide important insights into the epidemiology of IFIs, uncover risk factors for infection, and identify opportunities for preventing similar events in the future. Well recognised challenges with IFI outbreak recognition, response, and prevention include the need for improved rapid diagnostic methods, the absence of routine surveillance for most IFIs, adherence to infection control practices, and health-care provider awareness. Additionally, IFI outbreak investigations have revealed several emerging issues, including new populations at risk because of travel or relocation, occupation, or immunosuppression; fungal pathogens appearing in geographical areas in which they have not been previously recognised; and contaminated compounded medications. This report highlights notable IFI outbreaks in the past decade, with an emphasis on these emerging challenges in the USA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Epidemiological characteristics and diagnostic approach in patients admitted to the emergency room for transient loos of consciousness: Group for Syncope Study in the Emergency Room (GESINUR) study

    OpenAIRE

    Baron Esquivias, Gonzalo; Martínez Alday, Jesús; Martín, Alfonso; Moya, Ángel; García Civera, Roberto; López Chicharro, María Paz; Martín Mendez, María; Archo, Carmen del; Laguna, Pedro

    2010-01-01

    Aims: To assess the clinical presentation and acute management of patients with transient loss of consciousness (T-LOC) in the emergency department (ED). Methods and results: A multi-centre prospective observational study was carried out in 19 Spanish hospitals over 1 month. The patients included were 14 years old and were admitted to the ED because of an episode of T-LOC. Questionnaires and corresponding electrocardiograms (ECGs) were reviewed by a Steering Committee (SC) to unify diagno...

  14. Actinide ion extraction using room temperature ionic liquids: opportunities and challenges for nuclear fuel cycle applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohapatra, Prasanta Kumar

    2017-02-14

    Studies on the extraction of actinide ions from radioactive feeds have great relevance in nuclear fuel cycle activities, mainly in the back end processes focused on reprocessing and waste management. Room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) based diluents are becoming increasingly popular due to factors such as more efficient extraction vis-à-vis molecular diluents, higher metal loading, higher radiation resistance, etc. The fascinating chemistry of the actinide ions in RTIL based solvent systems due to complex extraction mechanisms makes it a challenging area of research. By the suitable tuning of the cationic and anionic parts of the ionic liquids, their physical properties such as density, dielectric constant and viscosity can be changed which are considered key parameters in metal ion extraction. Aqueous solubility of the RTILs, which can lead to significant loss in the solvent inventory, can be avoided by appending the extractant moieties onto the ionic liquid. While the low vapour pressure and non-flammability of the ionic liquids make them appear as 'green' diluents, their aqueous solubility raises concerns of environmental hazards. The present article gives a summary of studies carried out on actinide ion extraction and presents perspectives of its applications in the nuclear fuel cycle. The article discusses various extractants used for actinide ion extraction and at many places, comparison is made vis-à-vis molecular diluents which includes the nature of the extracted species and the mechanism of extraction. Results of studies on rare earth elements are also included in view of their similarities with the trivalent minor actinides.

  15. Focused Cardiac Ultrasound Using a Pocket-Size Device in the Emergency Room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancuso, Frederico José Neves; Siqueira, Vicente Nicoliello; Moisés, Valdir Ambrósio; Gois, Aécio Flavio Teixeira; Paola, Angelo Amato Vincenzo de; Carvalho, Antonio Carlos Camargo; Campos, Orlando

    2014-10-28

    Background: Cardiovascular urgencies are frequent reasons for seeking medical care. Prompt and accurate medical diagnosis is critical to reduce the morbidity and mortality of these conditions. Objective: To evaluate the use of a pocket-size echocardiography in addition to clinical history and physical exam in a tertiary medical emergency care. Methods: One hundred adult patients without known cardiac or lung diseases who sought emergency care with cardiac complaints were included. Patients with ischemic changes in the electrocardiography or fever were excluded. A focused echocardiography with GE Vscan equipment was performed after the initial evaluation in the emergency room. Cardiac chambers dimensions, left and right ventricular systolic function, intracardiac flows with color, pericardium, and aorta were evaluated. Results: The mean age was 61 ± 17 years old. The patient complaint was chest pain in 51 patients, dyspnea in 32 patients, arrhythmia to evaluate the left ventricular function in ten patients, hypotension/dizziness in five patients and edema in one patient. In 28 patients, the focused echocardiography allowed to confirm the initial diagnosis: 19 patients with heart failure, five with acute coronary syndrome, two with pulmonary embolism and two patients with cardiac tamponade. In 17 patients, the echocardiography changed the diagnosis: ten with suspicious of heart failure, two with pulmonary embolism suspicious, two with hypotension without cause, one suspicious of acute coronary syndrome, one of cardiac tamponade and one of aortic dissection. Conclusion: The focused echocardiography with pocket-size equipment in the emergency care may allow a prompt diagnosis and, consequently, an earlier initiation of the therapy.Fundamento: As urgências cardiovasculares são causas importantes de procura por atendimento médico, sendo fundamentais a rapidez e a precisão no diagnóstico para diminuir sua morbimortalidade. Objetivo: Avaliar o uso da ecocardiografia

  16. An Interrupted Time-Series Analysis to Assess Impact of Introduction of Co-Payment on Emergency Room Visits in Cyprus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrou, Panagiotis

    2015-10-01

    A co-payment fee of EUR10 was introduced in Cyprus, in order to cope with overcrowding of emergency room services. The scope of this paper is the assessment of the short-term impact of this measure. We used an interrupted time-series autoregressive integrated moving average model, and we analyzed official data from Cyprus' largest emergency room facility for three years. Co-payment is associated with a 16% statistically significant reduction of emergency room visits. No impact was observed in categories of teenagers, children, infants, and people over 70 years old. Co-payment was proven to be effective in Cyprus' emergency room setting and is expected to lessen congestion in the emergency room. The price insensitivity of people aged over 70 years, teenagers, children and infants, merits additional research for the identification of the underlying reasons.

  17. Prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA among patients visiting the emergency room at a tertiary hospital in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julival Ribeiro

    Full Text Available We surveyed patients seen at the emergency room at a tertiary hospital in Brazil from August to November 1997. All patients' (n = 600 anterior nares were cultured for MRSA; the results were confirmed by oxacillin disk diffusion methods and by detection of the mecA gene with PCR. Bacteria were found in 93.3% (560 of the patients and MRSA in 0.7% (n = 4. One patient had community-acquired MRSA. We concluded that MRSA is uncommon among patients visiting the emergency room. The presence of community-acquired MRSA can lead to serious medical and epidemiological issues, although initial clinical presentation may not differ from that of infections with other staphylococci. The empirical use of vancomycin for suspected community-acquired infections is seldom warranted.

  18. [Neonatological emergencies in delivery room] [Article in Italian] • Il neonatologo ed alcune emergenze in sala parto

    OpenAIRE

    Antonio Boldrini; Rosa Teresa Scaramuzzo

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: In the delivery room the neonatologist may deal with emergencies, not always predictable by pre-natal diagnosis. Among these dangerous situations, we include: i) extremely preterm birth of a newborn very/extremely low birth weight and ii) shoulder dystocia in term newborns. We will discuss in details these two clinical scenarios. Methods: We reviewed the main recent papers about resuscitation of very/extremely low birth weight preterm newborns and about dystocia of shoulder repo...

  19. The emergency room at the Rotunda Hospital: evidence of an improving service over the past 3 years.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Talukdar, S

    2014-12-01

    This is a retrospective review of the Rotunda Hospital Emergency Room (ER) documentation with respect to attendances for a 4-month period (August-November) in both 2009 and 2012. The aim was to quantify the workload and assess the quality of care offered to patients attending the ER over the two time periods and to highlight any improvements in care after changes were implemented following the initial 2009 review.

  20. Antimicrobial Non-Susceptibility of Escherichia coli from Outpatients and Patients Visiting Emergency Rooms in Taiwan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jann-Tay Wang

    Full Text Available Longitudinal nationwide surveillance data on antimicrobial non-susceptibility and prevalence of extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs as well as AmpC β-lactamases producers among Escherichia coli from different sources in the community settings are limited. Such data may impact treatment practice. The present study investigated E. coli from outpatients and patients visiting emergency rooms collected by the Taiwan Surveillance of Antimicrobial Resistance (TSAR program. A total of 3481 E. coli isolates were studied, including 2153 (61.9% from urine and 1125 (32.3% from blood samples. These isolates were collected biennially between 2002 and 2012 from a total of 28 hospitals located in different geographic regions of Taiwan. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC were determined using methods recommended by the Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI. The prevalence and factors associated with the presence of ESBL and AmpC β-lactamase-producers were determined. Significant increases in non-susceptibility to most β-lactams and ciprofloxacin occurred during the study period. By 2012, non-susceptibility to cefotaxime and ciprofloxacin reached 21.1% and 26.9%, respectively. The prevalence of ESBL- and AmpC- producers also increased from 4.0% and 5.3%, respectively, in 2002-2004, to 10.7% for both in 2010-2012 (P < 0.001. The predominant ESBL and AmpC β-lactamase genes were CTX-M and CMY-types, respectively. Non-susceptibility of urine isolates to nitrofurantoin remained at around 8% and to fosfomycin was low (0.7% but to cefazolin (based on the 2014 CLSI urine criteria increased from 11.5% in 2002-2004 to 23.9% in 2010-2012 (P <0.001. Non-susceptibility of isolates from different specimen types was generally similar, but isolates from elderly patients were significantly more resistant to most antimicrobial agents and associated with the presence of ESBL- and AmpC- β-lactamases. An additional concern is that decreased ciprofloxacin

  1. Flooding and emergency room visits for gastrointestinal illness in Massachusetts: a case-crossover study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy J Wade

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Floods and other severe weather events are anticipated to increase as a result of global climate change. Floods can lead to outbreaks of gastroenteritis and other infectious diseases due to disruption of sewage and water infrastructure and impacts on sanitation and hygiene. Floods have also been indirectly associated with outbreaks through population displacement and crowding. METHODS: We conducted a case-crossover study to investigate the association between flooding and emergency room visits for gastrointestinal illness (ER-GI in Massachusetts for the years 2003 through 2007. We obtained ER-GI visits from the State of Massachusetts and records of floods from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association's Storm Events Database. ER-GI visits were considered exposed if a flood occurred in the town of residence within three hazard periods of the visit: 0-4 days; 5-9 days; and 10-14 days. A time-stratified bi-directional design was used for control selection, matching on day of the week with two weeks lead or lag time from the ER-GI visit. Fixed effect logistic regression models were used to estimate the risk of ER-GI visits following the flood. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: A total of 270,457 ER-GI visits and 129 floods occurred in Massachusetts over the study period. Across all counties, flooding was associated with an increased risk for ER-GI in the 0-4 day period after flooding (Odds Ratio: 1.08; 95% Confidence Interval: 1.03-1.12; but not the 5-9 days (Odds Ratio: 0.995; 95% Confidence Interval: 0.955-1.04 or the 10-14 days after (Odds Ratio: 0.966, 95% Confidence Interval: 0.927-1.01. Similar results were observed for different definitions of ER-GI. The effect differed across counties, suggesting local differences in the risk and impact of flooding. Statewide, across the study period, an estimated 7% of ER-GI visits in the 0-4 days after a flood event were attributable to flooding.

  2. Emergency room visits associated with particulate concentration and Asian dust storms in metropolitan Taipei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu-Kai; Chen, Chi-Feng; Yeh, Hui-Chung; Wang, Yu-Chun

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated risks of emergency room visits (ERV) for all causes, circulatory diseases, and respiratory diseases associated with concentrations of particulate matter (PM10 and PM2.5) and Asian dust storms (ADS) from 2000 to 2008 in metropolitan Taipei. Cumulative 4-day (lag 0-3) relative risks (RR) and confidence intervals (CI) of cause-specific ERV associated with daily concentrations of PM10 or PM2.5 and ADS based on study period (ADS frequently inflicted period: 2000-2004 and less-inflicted period: 2005-2008) were estimated using a distributed lag non-linear model with Poisson distribution. Risks associated with ADS-inflicted season (winter and spring), strength (ratio of stations with Pollutant Standard Index above 100 is < 0.5 or ≥ 0.5), and duration (ADS lasting for 1-3 days or ≥ 4 days) were especially evaluated. In non-linear models, an increase in PM10 from 10 μg/m(3) to 50 μg/m(3) was associated with increased risk of ERV for all causes and respiratory disease with cumulative 4- day RR of 1.18 (95% CI: 1.13, 1.24) and 1.37 (95% CI: 1.23, 1.54), respectively. From 2005 to 2008, the cumulative 4-day RR for an ERV related to an increase in PM2.5 from 5 μg/m(3) to 30 μg/m(3) is 1.21 (95% CI: 1.03, 1.41) for respiratory diseases, and 1.15 (95% CI: 1.08, 1.22) for all causes. In comparison with normal days, elevated ERV of all causes and respiratory diseases was also associated with winter ADS (with corresponding RRs of 1.10 (95% CI: 1.07, 1.13) and 1.14 (95% CI: 1.08, 1.21)) and shorter and less area-affected ADS (with corresponding RRs of 1.07 (95% CI: 1.01, 1.10) and 1.09 (95% CI: 1.03, 1.14)) from 2000 to 2004. Results of this study demonstrate that population health risk varies not only with PM concentration, but also with the ADS characteristics.

  3. Poor Compliance with Sepsis Guidelines in a Tertiary Care Children’s Hospital Emergency Room

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    Benjamin Louis Moresco

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available ObjectivesThis study aimed to assess factors related to adherence to the Pediatric Advanced Life Support guidelines for severe sepsis and septic shock in an emergency room (ER of a tertiary care children’s hospital.MethodsThis was a retrospective, observational study of children (0–18 years old in The Children’s Hospital of San Antonio ER over 1 year with the International Consensus Definition Codes, version-9 (ICD-9 diagnostic codes for “severe sepsis” and “shocks.” Patients in the adherent group were those who met all three elements of adherence: (1 rapid vascular access with at most one IV attempt before seeking alternate access (unless already in place, (2 fluids administered within 15 min from sepsis recognition, and (3 antibiotic administration started within 1 h of sepsis recognition. Comparisons between groups with and without sepsis guideline adherence were performed using Student’s t-test (the measurements expressed as median values. The proportions were compared using chi-square test. p-Value ≤0.05 was considered significant.ResultsA total of 43 patients who visited the ER from July 2014 to July 2015 had clinically proven severe sepsis or SS ICD-9 codes. The median age was 5 years. The median triage time, times from triage to vascular access, fluid administration and antibiotic administration were 26, 48.5, 76, and 135 min, respectively. Adherence to vascular access, fluid, and antibiotic administration guidelines was 21, 26, and 34%, respectively. Appropriate fluid bolus (20 ml/kg over 15–20 min was only seen in 6% of patients in the non-adherent group versus 38% in the adherent group (p = 0.01. All of the patients in the non-adherent group used an infusion pump for fluid resuscitation. Hypotension and ≥3 organ dysfunction were more commonly observed in patients in adherent group as compared to patients in non-adherent group (38 vs. 14% p = 0.24; 63 vs. 23% p = 0.03.Conclusion

  4. Air pollution, aeroallergens and admissions to pediatric emergency room for respiratory reasons in Turin, northwestern Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Bono

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Air pollution can cause respiratory symptoms or exacerbate pre-existing respiratory diseases, especially in children. This study looked at the short-term association of air pollution concentrations with Emergency Room (ER admissions for respiratory reasons in pediatric age (0–18 years. Methods Daily number of ER admissions in a children’s Hospital, concentrations of urban-background PM2.5, NO2, O3 and total aeroallergens (Corylaceae, Cupressaceae, Gramineae, Urticaceae, Ambrosia, Betula were collected in Turin, northwestern Italy, for the period 1/08/2008 to 31/12/2010 (883 days. The associations between exposures and ER admissions were estimated, at time lags between 0 and 5 days, using generalized linear Poisson regression models, adjusted for non-meteorological potential confounders. Results In the study period, 21,793 ER admissions were observed, mainly (81 % for upper respiratory tract infections. Median air pollution concentrations were 22.0, 42.5, 34.1 μg/m3 for urban-background PM2.5, NO2, and O3, respectively, and 2.9 grains/m3 for aeroallergens. We found that ER admissions increased by 1.3 % (95 % CI: 0.3-2.2 % five days after a 10 μg/m3 increase in NO2, and by 0.7 % (95 % CI: 0.1-1.2 % one day after a 10 grains/m3 increase in aeroallergens, while they were not associated with PM2.5 concentrations. ER admissions were negatively associated with O3 and aeroallergen concentrations at some time lags, but these association shifted to the null when meteorological confounders were adjusted for in the models. Conclusions Overall, these findings confirm adverse short-term health effects of air pollution on the risk of ER admission in children and encourage a careful management of the urban environment to health protection.

  5. [Fractures of the lower extremity in the emergency room. Analysis of a new immobilization and x-ray splint].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, T M; Kirchhoff, C; Martetschläger, F; Braun, K F; Siebenlist, S; Ganslmeier, A; Stöckle, U; Freude, T

    2013-03-01

    Fractures of the lower extremity are a common reason for presentation to an emergency room. The aim of this study was to evaluate a new immobilization and x-ray splint (Andante®, ForMed) in the emergency room. From April 2010 to August 2010 all patients presenting with a fracture of the lower extremity were included in the study. Pain perception (visual analog scale; VAS) was measured before and after splint application. The handling of the splint during radiography was assessed and the quality of the diagnostic x-ray was evaluated. The study comprised 61 patients. Subjective pain perception was reduced significantly (3.96±1.9 vs. 6.38±2.2; p<0.001). The handling of the splint was graded at 1.73±0.96 (1, very good; 5, poor). There was no difference in the diagnostic quality of the x-rays between the Andante® and the control group; however, significantly poorer results were found for x-rays of ankle fractures (p<0.038). The Andante® splint is a useful tool in the emergency room that combines simple handling and pain relief due to immobilization. However, the quality of the diagnostic x-rays was not better compared with the control group.

  6. Complexities of emergency communication: clinicians' perceptions of communication challenges in a trilingual emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pun, Jack Kh; Chan, Engle Angela; Murray, Kristen A; Slade, Diana; Matthiessen, Christian Mim

    2017-11-01

    To understand the challenges that clinicians face in communicating with patients and other clinicians within a Hong Kong trilingual emergency department. Effective communication has long been recognised as fundamental to the delivery of quality health care, especially in high-risk and time-constrained environments such as emergency departments. The issue of effective communication is particularly relevant in Hong Kong emergency departments, due to the high volume of patients and the linguistic complexity of this healthcare context. In Hong Kong, emergency department clinicians are native speakers of Chinese, but have received their medical training in English. The clinicians read and record virtually all of their medical documentation in English, yet they communicate verbally with patients in Cantonese and Mandarin. In addition, communication between clinicians occurs in spoken Cantonese, mixed with medical English. Thus, medical information is translated numerous times within one patient journey. This complex linguistic environment creates the potential for miscommunication. A mixed-methods design consisting of a quantitative survey with a sequential qualitative interview. Data were collected in a survey from a purposive sample of 58 clinicians and analysed through descriptive statistics. Eighteen of the clinicians were then invited to take part in semi-structured interviews, the data from which were then subjected to a manifest content analysis. Nearly half of the clinicians surveyed believed that medical information may be omitted or altered through repeated translation in a trilingual emergency department. Eighty-three per cent of clinicians stated that there are communication problems at triage. Over 40% said that they have difficulties in documenting medical information. Around 50% believed that long work hours reduced their ability to communicate effectively with patients. In addition, 34% admitted that they rarely or never listen to patients during a

  7. Emerging arboviruses and public health challenges in Brazil

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    Tamara Nunes Lima-Camara

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Environmental modification by anthropogenic actions, disordered urban growth, globalization of international exchange and climate change are some factors that help the emergence and dissemination of human infectious diseases transmitted by vectors. This review discusses the recent entry of three arboviruses in Brazil: Chikungunya, West Nile, and Zika virus, focusing on the challenges for the Country’s public health. The Brazilian population is exposed to infections caused by these three arboviruses widely distributed on the national territory and associated with humans. Without effective vaccine and specific treatment, the maintainance and integration of a continuos entomological and epidemiological surveillance are important so we can set methods to control and prevent these arboviruses in the Country.

  8. Emerging Markets for Renewable Energy Certificates: Opportunities and Challenges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holt, E.; Bird, L.

    2005-01-01

    Renewable energy certificates (RECs) represent the attributes of electricity generated from renewable energy sources. These attributes are unbundled from the physical electricity, and the two products-the attributes embodied in the certificates and the commodity electricity-may be sold or traded separately. RECs are quickly becoming the currency of renewable energy markets because of their flexibility and the fact that they are not subject to the geographic and physical limitations of commodity electricity. RECs are currently used by utilities and marketers to supply renewable energy products to end-use customers as well as to demonstrate compliance with regulatory requirements, such as renewable energy mandates. The purpose of this report is to describe and analyze the emerging market for renewable energy certificates. It describes how RECs are marketed, examines RECs markets including scope and prices, and identifies and describes the key challenges facing the growth and success of RECs markets.

  9. Epidemiological characteristics and diagnostic approach in patients admitted to the emergency room for transient loss of consciousness: Group for Syncope Study in the Emergency Room (GESINUR) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron-Esquivias, Gonzalo; Martínez-Alday, Jesús; Martín, Alfonso; Moya, Angel; García-Civera, Roberto; Paz López-Chicharro, M; Martín-Mendez, María; del Arco, Carmen; Laguna, Pedro

    2010-06-01

    To assess the clinical presentation and acute management of patients with transient loss of consciousness (T-LOC) in the emergency department (ED). A multi-centre prospective observational study was carried out in 19 Spanish hospitals over 1 month. The patients included were > or =14 years old and were admitted to the ED because of an episode of T-LOC. Questionnaires and corresponding electrocardiograms (ECGs) were reviewed by a Steering Committee (SC) to unify diagnostic criteria, evaluate adherence to guidelines, and diagnose correctly the ECGs. We included 1419 patients (prevalence, 1.14%). ECG was performed in 1335 patients (94%) in the ED: 498 (37.3%) ECGs were classified as abnormal. The positive diagnostic yield ranged from 0% for the chest X-ray to 12% for the orthostatic test. In the ED, 1217 (86%) patients received a final diagnosis of syncope, whereas the remaining 202 (14%) were diagnosed of non-syncopal transient loss of consciousness (NST-LOC). After final review by the SC, 1080 patients (76%) were diagnosed of syncope, whereas 339 (24%) were diagnosed of NST-LOC (P Syncope was diagnosed correctly in 84% of patients. Only 25% of patients with T-LOC were admitted to hospitals. Adherence to clinical guidelines for syncope management was low; many diagnostic tests were performed with low diagnostic yield. Important differences were observed between syncope diagnoses at the ED and by SC decision.

  10. Clinical characteristics of adverse reactions to nonionic low osmolality contrast media in patients transferred from the CT room to the emergency room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Sang Ook; Kim, Dae Yong; Sohn, You Dong

    2016-01-01

    Nonionic low osmolality contrast media (LOCMs) are used universally in computed tomography (CT) imaging. Although adverse reactions due to nonionic LOCMs are a common cause of emergency room (ER) admissions, few studies have investigated these adverse reactions. In the present study, we evaluated the characteristics of patients who were transferred from the CT room to the ER due to adverse reactions to contrast media, and we determined the risk factors for severe adverse reactions. A single-center retrospective study was conducted over a 41-month period. Baseline and clinical characteristics were evaluated and analyzed according to moderate and severe severity. In particular, risk factors of severe reactions were determined using logistic regression analysis. In total, 70 patients were admitted to the ER with adverse reactions due to nonionic LOCMs. Of these, 33 developed a moderate reaction, and 37 developed a severe reaction. Compared with the moderate reaction group, the severe reaction group was older, had higher blood pressures, showed more symptoms indicating the cardiovascular and central nervous system, and developed faster reactions to LOCMs. According to the multivariate logistic regression analysis, the age of the patient and time to onset of reaction demonstrated a statistical relationship with severe adverse reactions. In the receiver operating characteristic analysis, the optimal cutoff values for age and time to onset were 60 years and 5 min. In conclusion, clinicians should be attentive to anaphylaxis due to nonionic LOCM, in particular, for elderly patients aged older than 60 years and a time to reaction onset of less than 5 min.

  11. Urban air pollution and emergency room admissions for respiratory symptoms: a case-crossover study in Palermo, Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tramuto, Fabio; Cusimano, Rosanna; Cerame, Giuseppe; Vultaggio, Marcello; Calamusa, Giuseppe; Maida, Carmelo M; Vitale, Francesco

    2011-04-13

    Air pollution from vehicular traffic has been associated with respiratory diseases. In Palermo, the largest metropolitan area in Sicily, urban air pollution is mainly addressed to traffic-related pollution because of lack of industrial settlements, and the presence of a temperate climate that contribute to the limited use of domestic heating plants. This study aimed to investigate the association between traffic-related air pollution and emergency room admissions for acute respiratory symptoms. From January 2004 through December 2007, air pollutant concentrations and emergency room visits were collected for a case-crossover study conducted in Palermo, Sicily. Risk estimates of short-term exposures to particulate matter and gaseous ambient pollutants including carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, and sulfur dioxide were calculated by using a conditional logistic regression analysis. Emergency departments provided data on 48,519 visits for respiratory symptoms. Adjusted case-crossover analyses revealed stronger effects in the warm season for the most part of the pollutants considered, with a positive association for PM10 (odds ratio = 1.039, 95% confidence interval: 1.020 - 1.059), SO2 (OR = 1.068, 95% CI: 1.014 - 1.126), nitrogen dioxide (NO2: OR = 1.043, 95% CI: 1.021 - 1.065), and CO (OR = 1.128, 95% CI: 1.074 - 1.184), especially among females (according to an increase of 10 μg/m3 in PM10, NO2, SO2, and 1 mg/m3 in CO exposure). A positive association was observed either in warm or in cold season only for PM10. Our findings suggest that, in our setting, exposure to ambient levels of air pollution is an important determinant of emergency room (ER) visits for acute respiratory symptoms, particularly during the warm season. ER admittance may be considered a good proxy to evaluate the adverse effects of air pollution on respiratory health.

  12. Urban air pollution and emergency room admissions for respiratory symptoms: a case-crossover study in Palermo, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calamusa Giuseppe

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Air pollution from vehicular traffic has been associated with respiratory diseases. In Palermo, the largest metropolitan area in Sicily, urban air pollution is mainly addressed to traffic-related pollution because of lack of industrial settlements, and the presence of a temperate climate that contribute to the limited use of domestic heating plants. This study aimed to investigate the association between traffic-related air pollution and emergency room admissions for acute respiratory symptoms. Methods From January 2004 through December 2007, air pollutant concentrations and emergency room visits were collected for a case-crossover study conducted in Palermo, Sicily. Risk estimates of short-term exposures to particulate matter and gaseous ambient pollutants including carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, and sulfur dioxide were calculated by using a conditional logistic regression analysis. Results Emergency departments provided data on 48,519 visits for respiratory symptoms. Adjusted case-crossover analyses revealed stronger effects in the warm season for the most part of the pollutants considered, with a positive association for PM10 (odds ratio = 1.039, 95% confidence interval: 1.020 - 1.059, SO2 (OR = 1.068, 95% CI: 1.014 - 1.126, nitrogen dioxide (NO2: OR = 1.043, 95% CI: 1.021 - 1.065, and CO (OR = 1.128, 95% CI: 1.074 - 1.184, especially among females (according to an increase of 10 μg/m3 in PM10, NO2, SO2, and 1 mg/m3 in CO exposure. A positive association was observed either in warm or in cold season only for PM10. Conclusions Our findings suggest that, in our setting, exposure to ambient levels of air pollution is an important determinant of emergency room (ER visits for acute respiratory symptoms, particularly during the warm season. ER admittance may be considered a good proxy to evaluate the adverse effects of air pollution on respiratory health.

  13. Emerging health issues: the widening challenge for population health promotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMichael, Anthony J; Butler, Colin D

    2006-12-01

    The spectrum of tasks for health promotion has widened since the Ottawa Charter was signed. In 1986, infectious diseases still seemed in retreat, the potential extent of HIV/AIDS was unrecognized, the Green Revolution was at its height and global poverty appeared less intractable. Global climate change had not yet emerged as a major threat to development and health. Most economists forecast continuous improvement, and chronic diseases were broadly anticipated as the next major health issue. Today, although many broadly averaged measures of population health have improved, many of the determinants of global health have faltered. Many infectious diseases have emerged; others have unexpectedly reappeared. Reasons include urban crowding, environmental changes, altered sexual relations, intensified food production and increased mobility and trade. Foremost, however, is the persistence of poverty and the exacerbation of regional and global inequality. Life expectancy has unexpectedly declined in several countries. Rather than being a faint echo from an earlier time of hardship, these declines could signify the future. Relatedly, the demographic and epidemiological transitions have faltered. In some regions, declining fertility has overshot that needed for optimal age structure, whereas elsewhere mortality increases have reduced population growth rates, despite continuing high fertility. Few, if any, Millennium Development Goals (MDG), including those for health and sustainability, seem achievable. Policy-makers generally misunderstand the link between environmental sustainability (MDG #7) and health. Many health workers also fail to realize that social cohesion and sustainability--maintenance of the Earth's ecological and geophysical systems--is a necessary basis for health. In sum, these issues present an enormous challenge to health. Health promotion must address population health influences that transcend national boundaries and generations and engage with the

  14. Growth challenges in small manufacturing ventures from emerging economies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turcan, Romeo V.

    2013-01-01

    This is a teaching case study that addresses the issues of emergence, legitimation, growth and internationalization of small manufacturing firms located in remote areas in an emerging economy.......This is a teaching case study that addresses the issues of emergence, legitimation, growth and internationalization of small manufacturing firms located in remote areas in an emerging economy....

  15. Perceptions and Challenges of Using Emergency Triage Assessment Treatment Guideline in Emergency Department at Muhimbili National Hospital, Tanzania

    OpenAIRE

    Safari, Sixtus Ruyumbu

    2012-01-01

    Triage is the process of determining the priority of patients' treatments based on the severity of their conditions. This helps treating patients efficiently when resources are insufficient for all to be treated immediately. Health care providers use ETAT guideline during triaging patients to improve quality of care and reduce morbidity and mortality rates. But the adherence to the guidelines protocol has been a challenge in triage rooms. This paper assessed perspective of HCWs and challenges...

  16. Career Development Awards in Emergency Medicine: Resources and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumma, Bryn E; Chang, Anna Marie; Kea, Bory; Ranney, Megan L

    2017-07-01

    In the United States, emergency medicine (EM) researchers hold proportionately fewer federal career development awards than researchers in other specialties. Others hypothesize that this deficit may partly be attributed to lack of mentors, departmental resources, and qualified applicants. Our objectives were to examine the association between departmental and institutional resources and career development awards and to describe the barriers to conducting research and btaining grants in EM. We conducted an online, cross-sectional survey study of vice chairs for research and research directors at academic emergency departments in the United States in January and February 2016. Participants provided quantitative information regarding their department's demographics, available research resources, number of funded independent investigators, and number of career development awards. They were also asked about the perceived adequacy of departmental and institutional resources and perceived barriers to research and grant success. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and multivariable linear regression, as appropriate. Of 178 eligible participants, 103 (58%) completed the survey. Most departments reported some infrastructure for research and grant submission, including research coordinator(s) (n = 75/99; 76%, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 66%-84%), research associates (69/99; 70%, 95% CI = 60%-79%), and administrative/secretarial research support (79/101; 78%, 95% CI = 69%-86%). The majority of departments (56/103; 49%, 95% CI = 44%-64%) had no R01-funded researchers, and only 15 (15%, 95% CI = 8%-23%) had three or more R01-funded researchers. The most frequently reported challenge to junior faculty applying for grants was low motivation for applying (62/103; 60%, 95% CI = 50%-70%), followed closely by insufficient mentorship (50/103; 49%, 95% CI = 39%-59%) and discouragement from low funding rates (50/103; 49%, 95% CI = 39%-59%). In the multivariable

  17. Emergency room visits for work-related injuries: characteristics and associated factors - capitals and the Federal District, Brazil, 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascarenhas, Márcio Dênis Medeiros; de Freitas, Mariana Gonçalves; Monteiro, Rosane Aparecida; da Silva, Marta Maria Alves; Malta, Deborah Carvalho; Gómez, Carlos Minayo

    2015-03-01

    Work-related injuries, often classified as occupational injuries (OI), stand out among visits due to external causes (accidents and violence) in health services. To describe the characteristics and factors associated with emergency room visits for OI, a cross-sectional study was conducted using data from the Survey of Violence and Injuries in Emergency Services (VIVA Inquérito 2011) in 24 state capitals and the Federal District. The prevalence of treatment for OI and prevalence ratios (PR) with confidence intervals of 95% (95%CI) were calculated. There were 29,463 emergency room visits due to accidental injuries in the population above 18 years of age. The prevalence of OI was 33.4% and was positively and significantly associated with the male gender, age 30-59 years old, industrial workers, agricultural sector or repair and maintenance services. The occurrence of OI was significantly higher in attendance for objects falling on people (PR = 3.37, 95% CI 2.80 to 4.05) and injuries due to perforating object (PR = 3.01, 95% CI 2.50-3.65). The results support the surveillance of external causes and direct public policies to promote occupational health.

  18. Emergency room visits due to external causes and alcohol consumption - Capitals and the Federal District, Brazil, 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcio Dênis Medeiros Mascarenhas

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The study objective was to describe the profile and factors related to alcohol consumption among emergency room visits by external causes. It is a cross-sectional study with data from the Survey of Violence and Injuries in Emergency between September and October 2011, in 24 state capitals and the Federal District. Statistical analysis were performed for all cases treated in selected services, comparing the characteristics of the victims, according to the statement of alcohol consumption. 33,289 visits to emergency rooms by external causes in the population above 18 years of age were included. The prevalence of self-reported statement of alcohol consumption among these services was 14.9% for the 24 capitals and the Federal District, and was significantly higher among visits by violent causes than by accidents. For both accidents and violence the associated causes were victims male, black/brown, less educated, members of specific populations, occurrences on public roads. The results support global discussions on the importance of establishing policies and legal measures to restrict the consumption of alcohol and vehicular direction, control advertising of alcoholic beverages, and laws normalizing the functioning of sales points of alcoholic beverages.

  19. Quality of care using a multidisciplinary team in the emergency room

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Dorthea; Maaløe, Rikke; Jensen, Nanna Martin

    2011-01-01

    Bispebjerg Hospital has implemented a multidisciplinary team reception of critically ill and severely injured patients at the Emergency Department (ED), termed emergency call (EC) and trauma call (TC). The aim of this study was to describe the course, medical treatment and outcome for patients...... received by this multidisciplinary team and to evaluate the quality of acute medical treatment of these patients....

  20. Emerging Challenges in the China-US Strategic Military Relationship

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobson, E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Goldstein, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-05-08

    The Emerging Challenges in the China-­US Strategic Military Relationship workshop, held at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory’s Center for Global Security Research (CGSR) on March 28th and 29th, 2017, sought to identify and explore key factors in the evolving bilateral relationship with an emphasis on security issues. Participants broadly agreed that while the US-­China relationship remains stable, particularly in the nuclear domain, the overall relationship is trending negatively. As the People’s Republic of China (PRC) continues to experience economic and technological growth, its military strength is also increasing. This increase in military strength as well as Chinese actions in the region have led to increasing uneasiness amongst the United States and its allies. At the same time, it appears that China views the downturn in bilateral relations as the fault of the United States; in particular, former President Obama’s rebalance policy, and the discussions of and deployment of the Terminal High Altitude Area Defense (THAAD) system. Concern was expressed regarding the overall stability of the US-­China military relationship, and it was noted that strategic stability is less stable than before due to conventional balance shifts and the increased risks of escalation.

  1. Meeting the challenges of emerging competition in the telecom industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vincent, S.

    1998-01-01

    The nature and pace of change within the Canadian telecommunications industry was discussed. The combined impacts of deregulation, converging technology, cost pressures and increasingly sophisticated markets have demanded huge changes for providers of services. In Canada, deregulation began with select services and broadened to include all major service offerings. The market impact of deregulation has been greater in Canada than in the United States. The state of the telecommunications industry today, and a chronology of how TELUS has responded to deregulation and the steps it has taken to maintain profitability of services was reviewed. The need for regulation that serves to introduce a level playing field to allow players to compete and then disappears, was addressed. The problem of protracted price wars in the long distance market was discussed. The market segmentation efforts underway in the local exchange market for more focus and pricing strategies, and the urgent need for both types of providers to implement profitable pricing and cost control strategies as they expand into additional markets, also received attention. As for the future, the challenge will be to reduce costs and continuously improve service. Benefits to consumers will be assured by competition, and the constantly emerging new technologies

  2. Predicting the success of noninvasive positive pressure ventilation in emergency room for patients with acute heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirakabe, Akihiro; Hata, Noritake; Yokoyama, Shinya; Shinada, Takuro; Kobayashi, Nobuaki; Tomita, Kazunori; Kitamura, Mitsunobu; Nozaki, Ayaka; Tokuyama, Hideo; Asai, Kuniya; Mizuno, Kyoichi

    2011-01-01

    Non-invasive positive pressure ventilation (NPPV) for acute heart failure (AHF) is increasingly used to avoid endotracheal intubation (ETI). We therefore reviewed our experience using respirator management in the emergency room for AHF, and evaluated the predictive factors in the success of NPPV in the emergency room. Three-hundred forty-three patients with AHF were analyzed. The AHF patients were assigned to either BiPAP-Synchrony (B-S; Respironics, Merrysville, PA, USA) period (2005-2007, n = 176) or BiPAP-Vision (B-V; Respironics) period (2008-2010, n = 167). The rate of carperitide use was significantly increased and dopamine use was significantly decreased in the B-V period. The total length of hospital stay was significantly shorter in the B-V period. AHF patients were also assigned to a failed trial of NPPV followed by ETI (NPPV failure group) or an NPPV success group in the emergency room for each period. NPPV was successfully used in 48 cases in the B-S period, and in 111 cases in the B-V period. Fifty-seven ETI patients included 45 direct ETI and 11 NPPV failure cases in the B-S period, and 16 ETI patients included 10 direct ETI and 6 NPPV failure cases in the B-V period. The pH values were significantly lower in the NPPV failure than in the NPPV success for both periods (7.19 ± 0.10 vs. 7.28 ± 0.11, B-S period, p successful estimates of NPPV with a high sensitivity and specificity, and the aortic blood gas level was above 7.03 pH when using the B-V system. Copyright © 2011 Japanese College of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Consequences for overcrowding in the emergency room of a change in bed management policy on available in-hospital beds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claret, Pierre-Géraud; Boudemaghe, Thierry; Bobbia, Xavier; Stowell, Andrew; Miard, Élodie; Sebbane, Mustapha; Landais, Paul; De La Coussaye, Jean-Emmanuel

    2016-09-01

    Objective Emergency rooms play an important role by providing continuous access to healthcare 24 h a day, 7 days a week, but the lack of available hospital beds has become a major difficulty. Changing bed management policy could improve patient flow. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the consequences of a change in patient prioritisation on available beds. Methods The study consisted of a computerised bed management simulation based on day-by-day data collected from 1 to 31 January 2013 in a teaching hospital. Real hospital data were used to power the computer simulation. The scenarios tested were: (1) priority for emergency and surgery; (2) priority for emergency and medicine; (3) priority for planned admissions and surgery; and (4) priority for planned admissions and medicine. The results of these scenarios were compared with each other and to actual data. Results This study included 2347 patients. The scenario that proved to be the least efficient was the one that gave priority to emergency patients presenting with a medical condition. The scenario that exhibited the best efficiency was the one that gave priority to planned admissions and surgery. Conclusions Changing policies for hospital bed management is worth exploring to improve hospital patient flow and length of stay. What is known about the topic? The lack of available hospital beds is a major difficulty in managing patient flow in emergency rooms (ERs). The ER patient flow competes against a flow of planned hospital admissions for the same beds and the lack of a clearly defined policy on either prioritising ER patient flow over planned admissions or vice versa contributes to a disordered system. What does this paper add? We compared several simulated scenarios corresponding to different bed management policies. The scenario that gave priority to planned admissions and surgery gave the most suitable results. What are the implications for practitioners? Postponing scheduled surgical patients

  4. High users of VA emergency room facilities: are outpatients abusing the system or is the system abusing them?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, K C; Dove, H G

    1983-01-01

    A phenomenon well known to emergency room personnel is the high use of ER facilities by a small number of patients. In this study of 335 patients followed in outpatient specialty clinics at a university-affiliated VA medical center, 23% of the patients accounted for 73% of the ER visits. Although some patients may be abusing the system, the problem is difficult to correct because of congressional legislation that deters the VA from providing primary care. Thus, a small subset of patients with chronic medical problems who live close to the hospital are likely to continue to consume a disproportionate amount of ER resources.

  5. Manejo da asma aguda em adultos na sala de emergência: evidências atuais Management of acute asthma in adults in the emergency room: current evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo de Tarso Roth Dalcin

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Asma é uma doença com uma alta prevalência em nosso meio e ao redor do mundo. Embora novas opções terapêuticas tenham sido recentemente desenvolvidas, parece haver um aumento mundial na sua morbidade e mortalidade. Em muitas instituições, as exacerbações asmáticas ainda se constituem em uma emergência médica muito comum. As evidências têm demonstrado que o manejo da asma aguda na sala de emergência concentra decisões cruciais que podem determinar o desfecho desta situação clínica. Nesta revisão, enfocaremos a avaliação e o tratamento do paciente com asma aguda na sala de emergência, descrevendo uma estratégia apropriada para o seu manejo. Serão consideradas as seguintes etapas: diagnóstico, avaliação da gravidade, tratamento, avaliação das complicações, decisão sobre onde se realizará o tratamento adicional e orientações por ocasião da alta da emergência. Espera-se que estas recomendações contribuam para que o médico clínico tome as decisões apropriadas durante o manejo da asma aguda na sala de emergência.Asthma is a disease with high prevalence in our country and worldwide. Although new therapeutic approaches have been developed recently, there seems to be a global increase in morbidity and mortality from asthma. In many institutions, asthma exacerbation is still a common medical emergency. Clinical evidence demonstrates that management of acute asthma in the emergency room entails crucial decisions that could determine the clinical outcome. In this review, the authors focus on assessment and treatment of patients with acute asthma and outline an appropriate management strategy. Diagnosis, severity assessment, treatment, complications, decision about where additional treatment will take place and orientations on discharge from the emergency will be considered. It is expected that these recommendations will help physicians to make the appropriate decisions about care of acute asthma in the emergency

  6. [Implementation of the curriculum for specialist training in Emergency Medicine: room for improval on details].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Driel, A P G Pieter; Alkemade, Annechien J; Maas, Maaike; ter Maaten, Jan C; Schouten, W E M Ineke; Scherpbier, Albert

    2010-01-01

    To investigate what aspects of the new curriculum for specialist training in Emergency Medicine are actually implemented in daily practice. Descriptive study. The curriculum was implemented as a pilot in 4 teaching hospitals, where a total of 32 residents in training in Emergency Medicine and 20 Emergency Medicine Program directors and Emergency physicians were surveyed using a web-based questionnaire querying the use of the different aspects of the curriculum in daily practice. Responses were received from 29 residents in training and 15 program directors and Emergency physicians. Both residents in training and program directors rated the patient mix seen during the training programme adequate to excellent. No great differences were observed in how residents in training, trainers and physicians working in the Emergency Department assessed the curriculum. However, the results showed that the training plan should be discussed explicitly with each residents in training. More attention should be focussed on the Society Awareness, Knowledge and Science and Organisation competencies and the Disability and Dermatology themes. Competence-based assessment methods, such as multi-source feedback, specific to this type of curriculum have not yet been sufficiently implemented. The responses to the questionnaire demonstrated how the curriculum is handled in daily practice and provided information on the progress of the implementation of the curriculum. This will enable focussed feedback to teaching hospitals.

  7. Emerging arboviruses and public health challenges in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima-Camara, Tamara Nunes

    2016-06-27

    Environmental modification by anthropogenic actions, disordered urban growth, globalization of international exchange and climate change are some factors that help the emergence and dissemination of human infectious diseases transmitted by vectors. This review discusses the recent entry of three arboviruses in Brazil: Chikungunya, West Nile, and Zika virus, focusing on the challenges for the Country's public health. The Brazilian population is exposed to infections caused by these three arboviruses widely distributed on the national territory and associated with humans. Without effective vaccine and specific treatment, the maintainance and integration of a continuos entomological and epidemiological surveillance are important so we can set methods to control and prevent these arboviruses in the Country. RESUMO A modificação do ambiente por ações antrópicas, o crescimento urbano desordenado, o processo de globalização do intercâmbio internacional e as mudanças climáticas são alguns fatores que vêm facilitando a emergência e disseminação de doenças infecciosas humanas transmitidas por vetores. Este comentário aborda a recente entrada de três arbovírus no Brasil, Chikungunya (CHIKV), West Nile (WNV) e Zika (ZIKV), com enfoque nos desafios para a Saúde Pública do País. Transmitidos por mosquitos vetores amplamente distribuídos no território nacional e associados ao homem, a população brasileira encontra-se exposta à infecção por esses três arbovírus. Na ausência de vacina eficaz e tratamento específico, são importantes a manutenção e integração de uma vigilância entomológica e epidemiológica contínua, a fim de direcionarmos métodos de controle e prevenção contra essas arboviroses no País.

  8. [Domestic and family violence against women: a case-control study with victims treated in emergency rooms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Leila Posenato; Duarte, Elisabeth Carmen; Freitas, Lúcia Rolim Santana de; Silva, Gabriela Drummond Marques da

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to identify factors associated with treatment of victims of domestic and family violence in emergency rooms in Brazil. This is a case-control study based on the Surveillance System for Violence and Accidents (VIVA), 2011. Women ≥ 18 years who were victims of family and domestic violence were selected as cases and compared to accident victims (controls). Adjusted odds ratios were estimated by unconditional logistic regression. 623 cases and 10,120 controls were included. Risk factors according to the adjusted analysis were younger age (18-29 years), low schooling, lack of paid work, alcohol consumption, having sought treatment in a different health service, and violence on weekends or at night or in the early morning hours. The study concludes that domestic and family violence shows alcohol consumption as a strongly associated factor. Days and hours with the highest ocurrence reveal the need to adjust emergency services to treat victims.

  9. Nuclear emergencies and behavior of the people: a challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardemann, F.; Carle, B.; Charron, S.

    2003-01-01

    , the groups responding positively would also be over 80 %, but the fractions responding because of obligation or because of conviction have similar size. Few people don't have an opinion (less than 10 %); the group saying not wanting to respond is also of the order of a few percent, except for changing food habits, where this rises to 10-12 %. lt is clear that these groups may dramatically perturb emergency actions, or even give rise to an increase of non obeisance by the other people. Suitable information prior to and during crisis periods seems indispensable; an efficient start-up of all plans is essential. Even then, one should be aware that unconformity with expected behaviour will persist, and it should be decided an beforehand whether this will be tolerated (within some limits) or oppressed by all means. The final goal of all emergency actions, both in preparation and during crises, is to protect the population. Whatever the level of competence of experts, advisors, decision makers, and whatever the quality of the emergency staff or their technical equipment, an optimal result can only be obtained with the cooperation of the population itself. lt is reassuring that large majorities of the population seem to agree to the most important countermeasures. However, the signs of a lack of trust in the nuclear technology and the capabilities of the authorities, the poor appreciation of the information obtained so far, the problems related to the availability of stable iodine and the minority stating not to respond to the countermeasures show that the challenge remains. (author)

  10. Analysis of bacterial contamination on surface of general radiography equipment and CT equipment in emergency room of radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Dong Hee; KIm, Hyeong Gyun

    2016-01-01

    We aim to offer basic materials about infection management through conducting bacterial contamination test about general radiography equipment and CT equipment installed in ER of three general hospitals with 100 sickbeds or more located in Gyeongsangbuk-do Province, and suggest management plan. It had been conducted from 1st December 2015 to 31st December, and objects were general radiography equipment and CT equipment of emergency room located in Gyeongsangbuk-do Province. For general radiography equipment, sources were collected from 4 places such as upper side of control box which employees use most, upper side of exposure button, whole upper side of table which is touching part of patient's skin, upper side of stand bucky's grid, and where patients put their jaws on. For CT equipment, sources were collected from 3 places such as upper side of control box which radiography room employees use most, X-ray exposure button, whole upper side of table which is touching part of patient's skin, and gantry inner. Surface contamination strain found at general radiography equipment in emergency room of radiology are Providencia stuartii(25%), Stenotrophomonas maltophilia(18%), Enterobacter cloacae(8%), Pseudomonas species(8%), Staphylococcus epidermidis(8%), Gram negative bacilli(8%), and ungrown bacteria at incubator after 48 hours of incubation (67%) which is the biggest. Most bacteria were found at upper side of stand bucky-grid and stand bucky of radiology's general radiography equipment, and most sources of CT equipment were focused at patient table, which means it is contaminated by patients who have various diseases, and patients who have strains with decreased immunity may get severe diseases. Thus infection prevention should be made through 70% alcohol disinfection at both before test and after test

  11. Analysis of bacterial contamination on surface of general radiography equipment and CT equipment in emergency room of radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Dong Hee; KIm, Hyeong Gyun [Dept. of Radiological Science, Far East University, Eumseong (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    We aim to offer basic materials about infection management through conducting bacterial contamination test about general radiography equipment and CT equipment installed in ER of three general hospitals with 100 sickbeds or more located in Gyeongsangbuk-do Province, and suggest management plan. It had been conducted from 1st December 2015 to 31st December, and objects were general radiography equipment and CT equipment of emergency room located in Gyeongsangbuk-do Province. For general radiography equipment, sources were collected from 4 places such as upper side of control box which employees use most, upper side of exposure button, whole upper side of table which is touching part of patient's skin, upper side of stand bucky's grid, and where patients put their jaws on. For CT equipment, sources were collected from 3 places such as upper side of control box which radiography room employees use most, X-ray exposure button, whole upper side of table which is touching part of patient's skin, and gantry inner. Surface contamination strain found at general radiography equipment in emergency room of radiology are Providencia stuartii(25%), Stenotrophomonas maltophilia(18%), Enterobacter cloacae(8%), Pseudomonas species(8%), Staphylococcus epidermidis(8%), Gram negative bacilli(8%), and ungrown bacteria at incubator after 48 hours of incubation (67%) which is the biggest. Most bacteria were found at upper side of stand bucky-grid and stand bucky of radiology's general radiography equipment, and most sources of CT equipment were focused at patient table, which means it is contaminated by patients who have various diseases, and patients who have strains with decreased immunity may get severe diseases. Thus infection prevention should be made through 70% alcohol disinfection at both before test and after test.

  12. Perceptions on the Impact of a Just-in-Time Room on Trainees and Supervising Physicians in a Pediatric Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Anita A; Uspal, Neil G; Oron, Assaf P; Klein, Eileen J

    2016-12-01

    Just-in-time (JIT) training refers to education occurring immediately prior to clinical encounters. An in situ JIT room in a pediatric emergency department (ED) was created for procedural education. We examined trainee self-reported JIT room use, its impact on trainee self-perception of procedural competence/confidence, and the effect its usage has on the need for intervention by supervising physicians during procedures. Cross-sectional survey study of a convenience sample of residents rotating through the ED and supervising pediatric emergency medicine physicians. Outcomes included JIT room use, trainee procedural confidence, and frequency of supervisor intervention during procedures. Thirty-one of 32 supervising physicians (97%) and 122 of 186 residents (66%) completed the survey, with 71% of trainees reporting improved confidence, and 68% reporting improved procedural skills ( P  JIT room use ( P  = .30, paired difference -0.0 points). Nearly all supervisors reported improved trainee procedural confidence, and 77% reported improved trainee procedural skills after JIT room use ( P  JIT room use, compared with 42% with JIT room use ( P  JIT room led to improved trainee confidence and supervisor reports of less procedural intervention. Although it carries financial and time costs, an in situ JIT room may be important for convenient JIT training.

  13. Identification and initial management of intoxication by alcohol and other drugs in the pediatric emergency room

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Gatti Pianca

    2017-11-01

    Conclusion: The diagnosis and treatment of intoxication by alcohol and other drugs in adolescents and children in the emergency scenario requires a systematic evaluation of the use of these drugs. There are few specific treatments for intoxication, and the management comprehends support measures and management of related clinical complications.

  14. Association between Air Pollution and Emergency Room Visits for Atrial Fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solimini, Angelo G; Renzi, Matteo

    2017-06-20

    Despite the large prevalence in the population, possible factors responsible for the induction of atrial fibrillation (AF) events in susceptible individuals remain incompletely understood. We investigated the association between air pollution levels and emergency department admissions for AF in Rome. We conducted a 14 years' time-series study to evaluate the association between the daily levels of air pollution (particulate matter, PM 10 and PM 2.5 , and nitrogen dioxide, NO₂) and the daily count of emergency accesses for AF (ICD-9 code: 427.31). We applied an over-dispersed conditional Poisson model to analyze the associations at different lags after controlling for time, influenza epidemics, holiday periods, temperature, and relative humidity. Additionally, we evaluated bi-pollutant models by including the other pollutant and the influence of several effect modifiers such as personal characteristics and pre-existing medical conditions. In the period of study, 79,892 individuals were admitted to the emergency departments of Rome hospitals because of AF (on average, 15.6 patients per day: min = 1, max = 36). Air pollution levels were associated with increased AF emergency visits within 24 h of exposure. Effect estimates ranged between 1.4% (0.7-2.3) for a 10 µg/m³ increase of PM 10 to 3% (1.4-4.7) for a 10 µg/m³ increase of PM 2.5 at lag 0-1 day. Those effects were higher in patients ≥75 years for all pollutants, male patients for PM 10 , and female patients for NO₂. The presence of previous cardiovascular conditions, but not other effect modifiers, increase the pollution effects by 5-8% depending on the lag. This study found evidence that air pollution is associated with AF emergency visits in the short term.

  15. The use of a metronome during cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the emergency room of a university hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Botelho,Renata Maria de Oliveira; Campanharo,Cássia Regina Vancini; Lopes,Maria Carolina Barbosa Teixeira; Okuno,Meiry Fernanda Pinto; Góis,Aécio Flávio Teixeira de; Batista,Ruth Ester Assayag

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to compare the rate of return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) and death after cardiac arrest, with and without the use of a metronome during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Method: case-control study nested in a cohort study including 285 adults who experienced cardiac arrest and received CPR in an emergency service. Data were collected using In-hospital Utstein Style. The control group (n=60) was selected by matching patients considering their neurological condit...

  16. Developing a taxonomy of coordination behaviours in nuclear power plant control rooms during emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dunxing; Gao, Qin; Li, Zhizhong; Song, Fei; Ma, Liang

    2017-12-01

    This study aims to develop a taxonomy of coordination behaviours during emergencies in nuclear power plants (NPPs). We summarised basic coordination behaviours from literature in aviation, health care and nuclear field and identified coordination behaviours specific to the nuclear domain by interviewing and surveying control crew operators. The established taxonomy includes 7 workflow stages and 24 basic coordination behaviours. To evaluate the reliability and feasibility of the taxonomy, we analysed 12 videos of operators' training sessions by coding coordination behaviours with the taxonomy and the inter-rater reliability was acceptable. Further analysis of the frequency, the duration and the direction of the coordination behaviours revealed four coordination problems. This taxonomy provides a foundation of systematic observation of coordination behaviours among NPP crews, advances researchers' understanding of the coordination mechanism during emergencies in NPPs and facilitate the possibility to deepen the understanding of the relationships between coordination behaviours and team performance. Practitioner Summary: A taxonomy of coordination behaviours during emergencies in nuclear power plants was developed. Reliability and feasibility of the taxonomy was verified through the analysis of 12 training sessions. The taxonomy can serve as an observation system for analysis of coordination behaviours and help to identify coordination problems of control crews.

  17. Emergency department waiting room stress: can music or aromatherapy improve anxiety scores?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Lydia; Fitzmaurice, Laura

    2008-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of music alone, aromatherapy alone, and music in addition to aromatherapy on anxiety levels of adults accompanying children to a pediatricemergency department waiting area. The study was conducted over 28 consecutive days, assigned to 1 of 4 groups: no intervention, music, aromatherapy, and both music and aromatherapy. Adults accompanying children to the emergency department of an urban pediatric tertiary care referral center were given a survey including a Spielberger state anxiety inventory with additional questions about whether they noticed an aroma or music and if so their response to it. The music was classic ingenre with a tempo of 60 to 70 beats per minute. The aromatherapyused the essential oil Neroli dispersed using 2 aromatherapydiffusers placed in strategic airflow ends of the emergency department. The 1104 surveys were completed. There was a statistically significant decrease in anxietylevel on those days when music was playing (36.3 vs. 39.2; P = 0.017). There was no difference in anxiety levels on those days when aromatherapy was present compared with the nonaromatherapy days (37.3 vs. 38.0; P = 0.347). Music is an easy and useful way to decrease the anxiety of visitors in an emergency department waiting area. Although no difference was detected for the aromatherapy group, this could be because of environmental conditions or imprecise application of the aromatherapy; further study is needed to either prove or disprove its effectiveness in this setting.

  18. EMERGING INFECTIOUS DISEASES. Actions Needed to Address the Challenges of Responding to Zika Virus Disease Outbreaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-01

    EMERGING INFECTIOUS DISEASES Actions Needed to Address the Challenges of Responding to Zika Virus Disease Outbreaks Report to...Congressional Requesters May 2017 GAO-17-445 United States Government Accountability Office United States Government Accountability Office...Highlights of GAO-17-445, a report to congressional requesters. May 2017 EMERGING INFECTIOUS DISEASES Actions Needed to Address the Challenges of

  19. Nitrous oxide administered by the plastic surgeon for repair of facial lacerations in children in the emergency room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Meir, Eran; Zaslansky, Ruth; Regev, Eli; Keidan, Ilan; Orenstein, Arie; Winkler, Eyal

    2006-04-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate a means of providing pain relief during repair of facial lacerations in children in the emergency room. This study was conducted in the emergency room of a tertiary care, university-affiliated hospital. Fifty percent nitrous oxide was administered by the surgeon who sutured the laceration. A nurse monitored the child throughout the procedure. At the end of the procedure, pain scores were evaluated by the surgeon and nurse using the FLACC (face, legs, activity, cry, and consolability) scale, a structured observational-behavioral scale for measurement of pain. Sixty patients between the ages of 1 and 16 years participated in the study. Of these, 15 were sutured using standard care (lidocaine infiltration), and 45 children received nitrous oxide in addition to lidocaine infiltration. Nitrous oxide was administered for an average of 11.9 +/- 5.1 minutes (range, 4 to 30 minutes). Forty-three children recovered to preprocedure activity in less than 1 minute. Two children recovered in less than 3 minutes. Average FLACC scores during infiltration and suturing were significantly lower in the nitrous oxide group compared with controls (infiltration, 1.9 of 10 versus 9.7 of 10; suturing, 2 of 10 versus 8.8 of 10). Forceful restraining was necessary in all the controls, whereas in the nitrous oxide group mild force was required in only 15 percent. Seventy percent of the children receiving nitrous oxide had no side effects. Vomiting and nausea were the most common (17 percent), transient side effects. No respiratory or cardiovascular side effects occurred. Nitrous oxide can be safely administered by plastic surgeons while suturing facial lacerations in the emergency room. The fast onset and rapid recovery characteristics of nitrous oxide provide a convenient environment for performing short surgical procedures. This safe method for provision of analgesia and anxiolysis may be appealing to plastic surgeons for ambulatory procedures (e

  20. [Patient satisfaction when seen in the Emergency room of San Juan de Dios del Aljarafe Hospital (Spain)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz Romero, V; Fajardo Molina, J; García-Garmendia, J L; Cruz Villalón, F; Rodríguez Ortiz, R; Varela Ruiz, F J

    2011-01-01

    To find out the level of satisfaction of patients seen in the Emergency room of the of San Juan de Dios Hospital, Aljarafe; to identify the determining factors and to define the areas that need improvement and reinforcement in order to improve the quality of care. A telephone survey was carried out between July and September, 2008, containing 44 questions, 2 with a closed response, 3 with yes/no answers and the remaining questions scored based on a Likert type scale of 1 (most negative answer) to 5 (most positive answer). Observations were also recorded. Overall satisfaction was 84.7%: 82% would recommend this Emergency room, and 59.6% considered it better than others. The aspects to be emphasised are: respect (97.6%), cleanliness (97.1%) and intimacy (94.6%). Following these were: the doctor's disposition to listen (93.1%); the preparation of the professionals (from 92.3% for the administration professionals to 88.6% for auxiliary nurses); kindness (from 91.8% for doctors to 89.9% for nurses); and the ease of getting orientated (90%). The information given was evaluated positively by 70.3%, and 87% acknowledged understanding this information. However, 52.4% of patients were satisfied with the information given during triage related to the stay in the emergency room, and, 22.3% as regards the probable waiting period. The satisfaction with the waiting between triage and first medical consultation was higher in the one-two-triage patients and was lower in the four-triage ones; in the waiting between first medical consultation and the discharge, the one-triage patients were more satisfied than the rest. Nevertheless, there were no statistically significant differences with satisfaction with the waiting until the triage. The percentages of satisfaction was greater than 80% in 23 of the 34 items, with certain aspects having a satisfaction rate over 90%: respect, cleanliness, the doctor's predisposition to listen, qualification and kindness of the personnel. On the

  1. Emergency room nurses' pathway to turnover intention: a moderated serial mediation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruyneel, Luk; Thoelen, Tom; Adriaenssens, Jef; Sermeus, Walter

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the association between the quality of the work environment, job characteristics, demographic characteristics and a pathway of job satisfaction, emotional exhaustion and turnover intention among nurses in emergency departments and perform subgroup analyses. Turnover intention among nurses is high. Multiple causes have been described, mostly in large studies of nurses working on general wards, often without considering complementarity of conceptual models and showing scant interest in the consistency of associations across subgroups of nurses. Cross-sectional multicentre survey. Convenience sample of 294 nurses in 11 Belgian emergency departments during 2014-2015. Indirect effects in the form of mediation and serial mediation were estimated to assess the association between work environment (Magnet model), job characteristics (Job Demand Control Support model) and turnover intention via job satisfaction and emotional exhaustion. Consistency of these indirect effects across subgroups of nurses was examined using moderated mediation analysis (conditional indirect effects). Several Magnet and Job Demand Control Support dimensions were related to turnover intention, either via job dissatisfaction (mediation) or via job satisfaction and emotional exhaustion (serial mediation). In the case of social support from supervisor, these indirect effects were only significant for female nurses, among whom turnover intention was higher. Last, nurses with more years of experience were less likely to indicate turnover intention. To maximize prevention of turnover intention at emergency departments, interventions could target early career nurses, work environment and job characteristics. Female nurses in particular may also benefit from improved social support from their supervisor. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. The Elephant in the Room: Biomedical Challenges for Long Duration Lunar Habitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, James S.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews 4 biomedical challenges that are involved in long duration lunar habitation: dust, radiation, hypogravity and synergistic effects. The first two of these challenges are reviewed with more in-depth information. The dangers of dust relate to the particle deposition in the lungs. The dangers of radiation are related to the permissible exposure limit (PEL) and the Risk of Exposure Induced Death (REID), a statistical approach pegged to a single radiation effect: Death from cancer directly attributable to the exposure. There has been a realization that radiation is more harmful than predicted. This is demonstrated by showing the change in the recommended career dose limits, have changed between 1989 and 2000.

  3. [Humanized support in emergency: a challenge for nursing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dal Pai, Daiane; Lautert, Liana

    2005-01-01

    This experience report describes the humanized support given by the nurse in the attendance to patients in eminently critical health situation in the Emergency Hospital of Porto Alegre (Brasil). The proposal was based on Jean Watson theory. The experience gave moments for personal and professional self-knowledge, and thoughts concerning the possibilities of construction of interpersonal humanist process in the emergency environment as well. Yet, it was possible to identify some limitations of the theory options referent to its practical applicability.

  4. Management protocols for status epilepticus in the pediatric emergency room: systematic review article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheuk C. Au

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: This systematic review of national or regional guidelines published in English aimed to better understand variance in pre-hospital and emergency department treatment of status epilepticus. Sources: Systematic search of national or regional guidelines (January 2000 to February 2017 contained within PubMed and Google Scholar databases, and article reference lists. The search keywords were status epilepticus, prolonged seizure, treatment, and guideline. Summary of findings: 356 articles were retrieved and 13 were selected according to the inclusion criteria. In all six pre-hospital guidelines, the preferred route of medication administration was to use alternatives to the intravenous route: all recommended buccal and intranasal midazolam; three also recommended intramuscular midazolam, and five recommended using rectal diazepam. All 11 emergency department guidelines described three phases in therapy. Intravenous medication, by phase, was indicated as such: initial phase - ten/11 guidelines recommended lorazepam, and eight/11 recommended diazepam; second phase - most (ten/11 guidelines recommended phenytoin, but other options were phenobarbital (nine/11, valproic acid (six/11, and either fosphenytoin or levetiracetam (each four/11; third phase - four/11 guidelines included the choice of repeating second phase therapy, whereas the other guidelines recommended using a variety of intravenous anesthetic agents (thiopental, midazolam, propofol, and pentobarbital. Conclusions: All of the guidelines share a similar framework for management of status epilepticus. The choice in route of administration and drug type varied across guidelines. Hence, the adoption of a particular guideline should take account of local practice options in health service delivery.

  5. Relationship between Glycemic Levels and Treatment Outcome among Critically Ill Children admitted into Emergency Room in Enugu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uleanya, Nwachinemere Davidson; Aniwada, Elias Chikee; Nwokoye, Ikenna Chidiebele; Ndu, Ikenna Kingsley; Eke, Christopher Bismarck

    2017-05-16

    Critically ill children are those in need of immediate attention on arrival to an emergency room. The importance of glycemic level measurement as well as maintaining the patency of the airway, effective breathing and circulation cannot be overemphasied. It has been highlighted that the peak hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia predict poor prognosis, longer lengths of hospital stay and higher mortality. The study aims to assess the relationship between glycemic level and treatment outcomes as well as length of hospital stay. Analytical cross sectional method was used to study critically ill children aged ≥1 month to ≤10 years admitted into the Children Emergency Room of Enugu State University Teaching Hospital, Enugu. Their admission blood glucose was done. Interviewer administered questionnaire was used to collect information including sociodemographics, duration of hospitalization and outcome of treatment. Data was analysed using SPSS version 20. Chi square, logistic regressions and Kruskal Wallis tests were done as appropriate. A total of 300 patients were recruited. One hundred and seventeen (39%) had hyperglycemia, 62 (20.7%) patients had hypoglycaemia and 121 (40.3%) had euglycemia. Two hundred and fifty two (84%) were discharged while 48 (16%) died. There was significant association between glycemic levels and treatment outcome (p = presentation were about 4.7 times (UOR = 0.21, 95% Cl: 0.08-0.38) and adjusted, about 5 times (AOR = 0.20, 95% CI: 0.09-0.47) less likely to survive compared with those with euglycemia. Although not statistically significant, those with hyperglycemia were about 1.3 times less likely to survive compared with euglycemic children, adjusted and unadjusted (UOR = 0.75, 95% Cl: 0.33-1.68). While both hypo- and hyperglycemia are associated with mortality, hypoglycaemia had a greater effect than hyperglycemia. Glycemic levels significantly affects treatment outcome.

  6. Protocol for bedside laparotomy in trauma and emergency general surgery: a low return to the operating room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Jose J; Mejia, Vicente; Subhawong, Andrea Proctor; Subhawong, Ty; Miller, Richard S; O'Neill, Patrick J; Morris, John A

    2005-11-01

    Bedside laparotomy (BSL) was introduced as a heroic procedure in trauma patients too unstable for safe transport to the operating room (OR). We hypothesize a BSL protocol would maintain patient safety while reducing OR use. Patients were prospectively entered into a BSL protocol from July 2002 to June 2003 and retrospectively reviewed. Protocol indications for BSL were abdominal compartment syndrome, decompensation due to hemorrhage, washout/closure, and sepsis in a patient too unstable for safe transport to the OR. Primary outcomes were mortality, emergent return to OR, and primary fascial closure (PFC). Trauma operating room charges and OR time were analyzed. One hundred thirty-three BSL were performed on 60 patients with an overall mortality of 23.3 per cent (14/60). There was an average of 2.2 BSL per patient (range 1-8). Indications for BSL were 1) explore/washout (n = 100, 75.2%), 2) decompression (n = 14, 10.5%), 3) infection/abscess (n = 12, 9.0%), 4) hemorrhage (n = 7, 5.3%). Five of 133 BSL (5.8%) were emergently returned to the OR because of perforation or compromised bowel. Trauma OR charges were dollar 5,300 per cases with 2.12 hours per cases. The protocol standardized the conduct of BSL procedure to allow for a low return to OR rate of 5.8 per cent and had an overall in-hospital mortality rate of 23.3 per cent. Primary fascial closure of the abdomen had a significantly reduced hospital stay. BSL allowed trauma OR charges of dollar 5,300 per cases with 2.12 hours per cases savings.

  7. Youth Versus Adult “Weightlifting” Injuries Presenting to United States Emergency Rooms: Accidental Versus Nonaccidental Injury Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myer, Gregory D.; Quatman, Carmen E.; Khoury, Jane; Wall, Eric J.; Hewett, Timothy E.

    2014-01-01

    Myer, GD, Quatman, CE, Khoury, J, Wall, EJ, and Hewett, TE. Youth versus adult “weightlifting” injuries presenting to united states emergency rooms: accidental versus nonaccidental injury mechanisms. J Strength Cond Res 23(7): 2054–2060, 2009—Resistance training has previously been purported to be unsafe and ineffective in children. The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate resistance training-related injuries presenting to U.S. emergency rooms by age, type, and mechanism of injury. We hypothesized that older athletes would sustain greater percentages of joint sprains and muscle strains, whereas younger athletes would sustain a greater percentage of accidental injuries that would result in an increased percentage of fractures in youths. The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) National Electronic Injury Surveillance System was queried from 2002 to 2005 using the CPSC code for “Weightlifting.” Subjects between the ages of 8 and 30 were grouped by age categories 8 to 13 (elementary/middle school age), 14 to 18 (high school), 19 to 22 (college), and 23 to 30 (adult). Injuries were classified as “accidental” if caused by dropped weight or improper equipment use. Multiple logistic regression was used to compare accidental injuries between age groups. The sample consisted of 4, 111 patients. Accidental injuries decreased (p 14 to 18 > 19 to 22 years = 23 to 30 years. Conversely, sprain/strain injuries increased in each successive age group (p training-related joint sprains and muscle strains than adults. The majority of youth resistance training injuries are the result of accidents that are potentially preventable with increased supervision and stricter safety guidelines. PMID:19855330

  8. Safety, feasibility, and results of exercise testing for stratifying patients with chest pain in the emergency room

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Machado Macaciel

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess safety, feasibility, and the results of early exercise testing in patients with chest pain admitted to the emergency room of the chest pain unit, in whom acute myocardial infarction and high-risk unstable angina had been ruled out. METHODS: A study including 1060 consecutive patients with chest pain admitted to the emergency room of the chest pain unit was carried out. Of them, 677 (64% patients were eligible for exercise testing, but only 268 (40% underwent the test. RESULTS: The mean age of the patients studied was 51.7±12.1 years, and 188 (70% were males. Twenty-eight (10% patients had a previous history of coronary artery disease, 244 (91% had a normal or unspecific electrocardiogram, and 150 (56% underwent exercise testing within a 12-hour interval. The results of the exercise test in the latter group were as follows: 34 (13% were positive, 191 (71% were negative, and 43 (16% were inconclusive. In the group of patients with a positive exercise test, 21 (62% underwent coronary angiography, 11 underwent angioplasty, and 2 underwent myocardial revascularization. In a univariate analysis, type A/B chest pain (definitely/probably anginal (p<0.0001, previous coronary artery disease (p<0.0001, and route 2 (patients at higher risk correlated with a positive or inconclusive test (p<0.0001. CONCLUSION: In patients with chest pain and in whom acute myocardial infarction and high-risk unstable angina had been ruled out, the exercise test proved to be feasible, safe, and well tolerated.

  9. SCALING AN URBAN EMERGENCY EVACUATION FRAMEWORK: CHALLENGES AND PRACTICES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karthik, Rajasekar [ORNL; Lu, Wei [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Critical infrastructure disruption, caused by severe weather events, natural disasters, terrorist attacks, etc., has significant impacts on urban transportation systems. We built a computational framework to simulate urban transportation systems under critical infrastructure disruption in order to aid real-time emergency evacuation. This framework will use large scale datasets to provide a scalable tool for emergency planning and management. Our framework, World-Wide Emergency Evacuation (WWEE), integrates population distribution and urban infrastructure networks to model travel demand in emergency situations at global level. Also, a computational model of agent-based traffic simulation is used to provide an optimal evacuation plan for traffic operation purpose [1]. In addition, our framework provides a web-based high resolution visualization tool for emergency evacuation modelers and practitioners. We have successfully tested our framework with scenarios in both United States (Alexandria, VA) and Europe (Berlin, Germany) [2]. However, there are still some major drawbacks for scaling this framework to handle big data workloads in real time. On our back-end, lack of proper infrastructure limits us in ability to process large amounts of data, run the simulation efficiently and quickly, and provide fast retrieval and serving of data. On the front-end, the visualization performance of microscopic evacuation results is still not efficient enough due to high volume data communication between server and client. We are addressing these drawbacks by using cloud computing and next-generation web technologies, namely Node.js, NoSQL, WebGL, Open Layers 3 and HTML5 technologies. We will describe briefly about each one and how we are using and leveraging these technologies to provide an efficient tool for emergency management organizations. Our early experimentation demonstrates that using above technologies is a promising approach to build a scalable and high performance urban

  10. Technical and regulatory challenges for digital instrumentation and control and control room systems in nuclear plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torok, R.; Naser, J.; Harris, T.; Keithline, K.

    2006-01-01

    There are several unsettled technical and licensing issues in the areas of instrumentation and control (I and C), human factors, and updated control room designs that need coordinated, proactive industry attention. Some of these issues are already causing protracted regulatory reviews for existing plants, and left untreated, may cause substantial delays and increased costs for new plant combined construction and operating license approvals. Both industry and the NRC will have roles in resolving the key issues and addressing them in future design efforts and regulatory reviews. Where action is needed, the industry will want to minimize costs and risks by defining industry consensus solutions with corresponding technical bases. NEI has formed a working group to coordinate industry efforts and communications with NRC staff. The working group will also help determine priorities and coordinate both new and existing plant resources. EPRI will provide technical input and guidance for the working group. In order to be able to conduct reviews in a timely fashion, the NRC will likely need to enhance and expand staff resources as existing plants are upgraded and new plant reviews become more active. The industry initiative began with a workshop sponsored by EPRI and NEI on March 28-29, 2006, which led to the creation of the NEI working group. The working group has now identified and prioritized important generic issues, established resolution paths and schedules, and identified the roles of various stakeholders including utility companies, EPRI, NEI, vendors and the NRC. Through the course of this initiative I and C issues for both existing and new plants are being addressed. This paper describes the key I and C related technical and regulatory issues and their implications for new and operating plants, and provides a status report on the efforts to resolve them. (authors)

  11. Management protocols for status epilepticus in the pediatric emergency room: systematic review article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Au, Cheuk C; Branco, Ricardo G; Tasker, Robert C

    This systematic review of national or regional guidelines published in English aimed to better understand variance in pre-hospital and emergency department treatment of status epilepticus. Systematic search of national or regional guidelines (January 2000 to February 2017) contained within PubMed and Google Scholar databases, and article reference lists. The search keywords were status epilepticus, prolonged seizure, treatment, and guideline. 356 articles were retrieved and 13 were selected according to the inclusion criteria. In all six pre-hospital guidelines, the preferred route of medication administration was to use alternatives to the intravenous route: all recommended buccal and intranasal midazolam; three also recommended intramuscular midazolam, and five recommended using rectal diazepam. All 11 emergency department guidelines described three phases in therapy. Intravenous medication, by phase, was indicated as such: initial phase - ten/11 guidelines recommended lorazepam, and eight/11 recommended diazepam; second phase - most (ten/11) guidelines recommended phenytoin, but other options were phenobarbital (nine/11), valproic acid (six/11), and either fosphenytoin or levetiracetam (each four/11); third phase - four/11 guidelines included the choice of repeating second phase therapy, whereas the other guidelines recommended using a variety of intravenous anesthetic agents (thiopental, midazolam, propofol, and pentobarbital). All of the guidelines share a similar framework for management of status epilepticus. The choice in route of administration and drug type varied across guidelines. Hence, the adoption of a particular guideline should take account of local practice options in health service delivery. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  12. [Shuttle Challenger disaster: what lessons can be learned for management of patients in the operating room?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suva, Domizio; Poizat, Germain

    2015-02-04

    For many years hospitals have been implementing crew resource management (CRM) programs, inspired by the aviation industry, in order to improve patient safety. However, while contributing to improved patient care, CRM programs are controversial because of their limited impact, a decrease in effectiveness over time, and the underinvestment by some caregivers. By analyzing the space shuttle Challenger accident, the objective of this article is to show the potential impact of the professional culture in decision-making processes. In addition, to present an approach by cultural factors which are an essential complement to current CRM programs in order to enhance the safety of care.

  13. Response surface model predictions of emergence and response to pain in the recovery room: an evaluation of patients emerging from an isoflurane and fentanyl anesthetic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syroid, Noah D.; Johnson, Ken B.; Pace, Nathan L.; Westenskow, Dwayne R.; Tyler, Diane; Brühschwein, Frederike; Albert, Robert W.; Roalstad, Shelly; Costy-Bennett, Samuel; Egan, Talmage D.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Sevoflurane - remifentanil interaction models that predict responsiveness and response to painful stimuli have been evaluated in patients undergoing elective surgery. Preliminary evaluations of model predictions were found to be consistent with observations in patients anesthetized with sevoflurane, remifentanil and fentanyl. The present study explored the feasibility of adapting the predictions of sevoflurane-remifentanil interaction models to an isoflurane-fentanyl anesthetic. We hypothesized that model predictions adapted for isoflurane and fentanyl are consistent with observed patient responses and are similar to the predictions observed in our prior work with sevoflurane-remifentanil/fentanyl anesthetics. Methods Twenty-five patients scheduled for elective surgery received a fentanyl-isoflurane anesthetic. Model predictions of unresponsiveness were recorded at emergence and predictions of a response to noxious stimulus were recorded when patients first required analgesics in the recovery room. Model predictions were compared to observations with graphical and temporal analyses. Results were also compared to our prior predictions following a sevoflurane-remifentanil/fentanyl anesthetic. Results While patients were anesthetized, model predictions indicated a high likelihood that patients would be unresponsive (≥ 99%). Following termination of the anesthetic, model predictions of responsiveness well described the actual fraction of patients observed to be responsive during emergence. Half of the patients awoke within 2 minutes of the 50% model predicted probability of unresponsiveness; 70% awoke within 4 minutes. Similarly, predictions of a response to a noxious stimulus were consistent with the number of patients who required fentanyl in the recovery room. Model predictions following an isoflurane-fentanyl anesthetic were similar to model predictions following a sevoflurane-remifentanil/fentanyl anesthetic. Discussion Results confirmed our study

  14. Reduction in laboratory turnaround time decreases emergency room length of stay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaushik N

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Nitin Kaushik,1 Victor S Khangulov,2 Matthew O’Hara,2 Ramy Arnaout3,4 1Becton, Dickinson and Company, Franklin Lakes, NJ, USA; 2Department of Health Economics and Outcomes Research, Boston Strategic Partners, Inc., Boston, MA, USA; 3Department of Pathology, 4Division of Biomedical Informatics, Department of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA USA Objective: Laboratory tests are an important contributor to treatment decisions in the emergency department (ED. Rapid turnaround of laboratory tests can optimize ED throughout by reducing the length of stay (LOS and improving patient outcomes. Despite evidence supporting the effect of shorter turnaround time (TAT on LOS and outcomes, there is still a lack of large retrospective studies examining these associations. Here, we evaluated the effect of a reduction in laboratory TAT on ED LOS using retrospective analysis of Electronic Health Records (EHR. Materials and methods: Retrospective analysis of ED encounters from a large, US-based, de-identified EHR database and a separate analysis of ED encounters from the EHR of an ED at a top-tier tertiary care center were performed. Additionally, an efficiency model calculating the cumulative potential LOS time savings and resulting financial opportunity due to laboratory TAT reduction was created, assuming other factors affecting LOS are constant. Results: Multivariate regression analysis of patients from the multisite study showed that a 1-minute decrease in laboratory TAT was associated with 0.50 minutes of decrease in LOS. The single-site analysis confirmed our findings from the multisite analysis that a positive correlation between laboratory TAT and ED LOS exists in the ED population as a whole, as well as across different patient acuity levels. In addition, based on the calculations from the efficiency model, for a 5-, 10- and 15-minute TAT reduction, the single-site ED can potentially admit a total of 127, 256 and 386 additional

  15. The use of a metronome during cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the emergency room of a university hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Maria de Oliveira Botelho

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: to compare the rate of return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC and death after cardiac arrest, with and without the use of a metronome during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR. Method: case-control study nested in a cohort study including 285 adults who experienced cardiac arrest and received CPR in an emergency service. Data were collected using In-hospital Utstein Style. The control group (n=60 was selected by matching patients considering their neurological condition before cardiac arrest, the immediate cause, initial arrest rhythm, whether epinephrine was used, and the duration of CPR. The case group (n=51 received conventional CPR guided by a metronome set at 110 beats/min. Chi-square and likelihood ratio were used to compare ROSC rates considering p≤0.05. Results: ROSC occurred in 57.7% of the cases, though 92.8% of these patients died in the following 24 hours. No statistically significant difference was found between groups in regard to ROSC (p=0.2017 or the occurrence of death (p=0.8112. Conclusion: the outcomes of patients after cardiac arrest with and without the use of a metronome during CPR were similar and no differences were found between groups in regard to survival rates and ROSC.

  16. Prognosis of emergency room stabilization of decompensated congestive heart failure with high dose lasix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahboob Pouraghaei

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Congestive heart failure (CHF has become one of the most important health care problems in western countries. This article focuses on the outpatient diagnosis and management of heart failure. We want to compare the outcome of patients who were treated with high dose diuretics in the emergency department (ED without admission with patients who were admitted to hospital for standard treatment. Methods: This was a randomized prospective clinical trial study. The patients who came to the ED from March 20, 2008 up to August 20, 2008 were divided into two groups randomly. The length of ED stay in the experimental group was documented. Also, readmission and mortality in 6 months and satisfaction in both groups were taken into consideration. All data were analyzed using SPSS 15.0. Results: In experimental group, the rate of recurrent admission, expiration, discharge, clinic visit, and clinic admission was 8%, 4%, 29%, 18%, and 0% respectively. On the other hand, in control group it was 16%, 40%, 18%, 22%, and 2% respectively. Additionally, there was a significant difference between these groups (P = 0.00. Conclusion: This study is the first regional prospective trial to comprehensively examine the therapeutic management in patients with CHF. This study, comparing the high dose diuretic efficacy in the decreasing of hospital stay and readmission; and decreasing mortality rate with routine therapy, showed that there was a significant difference between these two strategies in the mortality rate, readmission, and length of hospital stay (P = 0.00.

  17. Hemoperitoneum from Corpus Luteal Cyst Rupture: A Practical Approach in Emergency Room

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Fiaschetti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Corpus luteum cyst rupture with consequent hemoperitoneum is a common disorder in women in their reproductive age. This condition should be promptly recognized and treated because a delayed diagnosis may significantly reduce women’s fertility and intra-abdominal bleeding may be life-threatening. Many imaging modalities play a key role in the diagnosis of acute pelvic pain from gynecological causes. Ultrasound study (USS is usually the first imaging technique for initial evaluation. USS is used to confirm or to exclude the presence of intraperitoneal fluid but it has some limitations in the identification of the bleeding source. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT is the imaging modality which could be used in the acute setting in order to recognize gynecological emergencies and to establish a correct management. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI nowadays is the most useful technique for studying the pelvis but its low availability and the long acquisition time of the images limit its usefulness in characterization of acute gynecological complications. We report a case of a young patient with hemoperitoneum from hemorrhagic corpus luteum correctly identified by transabdominal USS and contrast-enhanced CT.

  18. Trauma and Intentional Injury Characteristics of Pediatric Forensic Cases Applying to Emergency Room

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esin Kalkan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: In this study, we aim to reveal the characteristics of intentional injuries and the trauma profiles in order to prevent injuries in pediatric forensic cases. Material and Method: Forensic cases of patients aged 18 or younger who were admitted into emergency service were analyzed retrospectively in terms of age, gender, type of injury, and etiology of trauma between January 1, 2014 and December 31, 2014. Results: Of the 148 cases, 62(41.9% were female and 86(58.1% male; the mean age was 11.2±0.4. The most common cause of injury was traffic accident (46.6%. The second most common type of injury was intentional injuries (21.6%. The distribution of intentional injury is: beating in 20 cases (13.5%, stab wounds in 7 cases (4.7%, gunshot wounds in 1 case (0.7%, sexual abuse in 1 case (0.7%, and attempted suicide in 3 cases (2%. Eleven (7.4% cases had life-threatening injuries. Discussion: Most injuries are preventable because they are due to traffic accidents. Intentional injuries were more frequent during school age and adolescence. Understanding these findings is very important in developing child safety programs to reduce injuries.

  19. [The Effects of Violence Coping Program Based on Middle-Range Theory of Resilience on Emergency Room Nurses' Resilience, Violence Coping, Nursing Competency and Burnout].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung Min; Sung, Kyung Mi

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a violence coping program (VCP) based on Polk's middle-range theory of resilience on nursing competency, resilience, burnout, and the ability to cope with violence in nurses working in emergency rooms. A quasi-experimental study, with a nonequivalent control group and a pretest-posttest design, was conducted. Participants were 36 nurses who worked in emergency rooms and had experienced violence; 18 nurses from D hospital and 18 nurses from C hospital were assigned to the experimental and control groups, respectively. The experimental group received the VCP twice per week for 8 weeks. Levels of resilience, F=59.41, pnursing competency, F=59.41 pburnout, F=52.74, pburnout and improving resilience, active coping behavior, and nursing competency. Therefore, it would be a useful intervention for improving the quality of nursing care provided in emergency rooms. © 2017 Korean Society of Nursing Science

  20. Challenges for emerging livestock farmers in Limpopo province ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Problems facing the emerging farmers include lack of secure title to the land, lack of investment and working capital and limited access to credit, poor veld condition, highly variable climate, insufficient farm size, inadequate or damaged infrastructure, poor access to extension officers who, in turn, are often overcommitted and ...

  1. Meeting the Challenge of Zoonotic Emerging Infectious Diseases in ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Over one third of the world's EIDs have emerged there, including severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) or bird flu, and the Nipah virus. This grant will allow the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI), in collaboration with research teams from Cambodia, China, ...

  2. Meeting the Challenge of Zoonotic Emerging Infectious Diseases in ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Over one third of the world's EIDs have emerged there, including severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) or bird flu, and the Nipah ... L'Initiative des conseils subventionnaires de la recherche scientifique en Afrique subsaharienne remporte le prix de la diplomatie scientifique.

  3. Standard setting in medical education: fundamental concepts and emerging challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortaz Hejri, Sara; Jalili, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    The process of determining the minimum pass level to separate the competent students from those who do not perform well enough is called standard setting. A large number of methods are widely used to set cut-scores for both written and clinical examinations. There are some challenging issues pertaining to any standard setting procedure. Ignoring these concerns would result in a large dispute regarding the credibility and defensibility of the method. The goal of this review is to provide a basic understanding of the key concepts and challenges in standard setting and to suggest some recommendations to overcome the challenging issues for educators and policymakers who are dealing with decision-making in this field.

  4. Tumor lysis syndrome in the emergency department: challenges and solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ñamendys-Silva SA

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Silvio A Ñamendys-Silva,1,2 Juan M Arredondo-Armenta,1 Erika P Plata-Menchaca,2 Humberto Guevara-García,1 Francisco J García-Guillén,1 Eduardo Rivero-Sigarroa,2 Angel Herrera-Gómez,1 1Department of Critical Care Medicine, Instituto Nacional de Cancerología, 2Department of Critical Care Medicine, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición Salvador Zubirán, Mexico City, Mexico Abstract: Tumor lysis syndrome (TLS is the most common oncologic emergency. It is caused by rapid tumor cell destruction and the resulting nucleic acid degradation during or days after initiation of cytotoxic therapy. Also, a spontaneous form exists. The metabolic abnormalities associated with this syndrome include hyperkalemia, hyperphosphatemia, hypocalcemia, hyperuricemia, and acute kidney injury. These abnormalities can lead to life-threatening complications, such as heart rhythm abnormalities and neurologic manifestations. The emergency management of overt TLS involves proper fluid resuscitation with crystalloids in order to improve the intravascular volume and the urinary output and to increase the renal excretion of potassium, phosphorus, and uric acid. With this therapeutic strategy, prevention of calcium phosphate and uric acid crystal deposition within renal tubules is achieved. Other measures in the management of overt TLS are prescription of hypouricemic agents, renal replacement therapy, and correction of electrolyte imbalances. Hyperkalemia should be treated quickly and aggressively as its presence is the most hazardous acute complication that can cause sudden death from cardiac arrhythmias. Treatment of hypocalcemia is reserved for patients with electrocardiographic changes or symptoms of neuromuscular irritability. In patients who are refractory to medical management of electrolyte abnormalities or with severe cardiac and neurologic manifestations, early dialysis is recommended.Keywords: tumor lysis syndrome, emergency department, emergency

  5. Does use of the recognition of stroke in the emergency room stroke assessment tool enhance stroke recognition by ambulance clinicians?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fothergill, Rachael T; Williams, Julia; Edwards, Melanie J; Russell, Ian T; Gompertz, Patrick

    2013-11-01

    U.K ambulance services assess patients with suspected stroke using the Face Arm Speech Test (FAST). The Recognition Of Stroke In the Emergency Room (ROSIER) tool has been shown superior to the FAST in identifying strokes in emergency departments but has not previously been tested in the ambulance setting. We investigated whether ROSIER use by ambulance clinicians can improve stroke recognition. Ambulance clinicians used the ROSIER in place of the FAST to assess patients with suspected stroke. As the ROSIER includes all FAST elements, we calculated a FAST score from the ROSIER to enable comparisons between the two tools. Ambulance clinicians' provisional stroke diagnoses using the ROSIER and calculated FAST were compared with stroke consultants' diagnosis. We used stepwise logistic regression to compare the contribution of individual ROSIER and FAST items and patient demographics to the prediction of consultants' diagnoses. Sixty-four percent of strokes and 78% of nonstrokes identified by ambulance clinicians using the ROSIER were subsequently confirmed by a stroke consultant. There was no difference in the proportion of strokes correctly detected by the ROSIER or FAST with both displaying excellent levels of sensitivity. The ROSIER detected marginally more nonstroke cases than the FAST, but both demonstrated poor specificity. Facial weakness, arm weakness, seizure activity, age, and sex predicted consultants' diagnosis of stroke. The ROSIER was not better than the FAST for prehospital recognition of stroke. A revised version of the FAST incorporating assessment of seizure activity may improve stroke identification and decision making by ambulance clinicians.

  6. Challenges facing Brazilian economy in the emerging market ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The literature relates to the discussions on the trade relationship and patterns between Brazil as one of the BRICs countries, and Malaysia as one of the developing countries. This paper also reviews expectations for the Brazilian economy in the next few years and what challenges awaits Brazil ahead. The aim of this paper ...

  7. Grand Challenges Emerging Perspectives For Embedded Processing (BRIEFING CHARTS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-06

    nΗy(n) 0 0 11 1 LKL > Virtual Optical Systemi t l ti l tr Post- Processing Co- Optimization Metrics Page 5 PROCESSING GRAND CHALLENGE 1 EO/IR Space...would be pretty shocked by what’s in a showroom now. Camera stores of the future will surprise us just as much.” -Nathan Myhrvold, former CTO of

  8. Overcrowding in the emergency departments: Challenges and opportunities for improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baig, Muhammad Akbar; Mian, Asad; Najeed, Fatima; Shahzad, Hira

    2015-12-01

    With the advent of Emergency Medicine, one can observe an increase in the number of Emergency Departments (ED) across the country. However, most EDs struggle due to an overwhelming number of patients. Overcrowding can lead to delays in patient care. For a city like Karachi which is an active disaster zone, preemptive preparedness is required in the face of terror threats and such overcrowding needs to be decreased to a bare minimum. The most frequent causes of prolonged length of stay (LOS) in the ED include non-availability of in-hospital beds, delays in response to subspecialty consultations and escalating medical expenses. All of these can negatively impact patient care by putting patient safety at risk and patient care in jeopardy. There is an increased risk of unintentional medical errors and a concomitant increase in unwanted lawsuits. A few simple interventions which may help alleviate this situation to some extent have been discussed.

  9. The use of a metronome during cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the emergency room of a university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botelho, Renata Maria de Oliveira; Campanharo, Cássia Regina Vancini; Lopes, Maria Carolina Barbosa Teixeira; Okuno, Meiry Fernanda Pinto; Góis, Aécio Flávio Teixeira de; Batista, Ruth Ester Assayag

    2016-11-21

    to compare the rate of return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) and death after cardiac arrest, with and without the use of a metronome during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). case-control study nested in a cohort study including 285 adults who experienced cardiac arrest and received CPR in an emergency service. Data were collected using In-hospital Utstein Style. The control group (n=60) was selected by matching patients considering their neurological condition before cardiac arrest, the immediate cause, initial arrest rhythm, whether epinephrine was used, and the duration of CPR. The case group (n=51) received conventional CPR guided by a metronome set at 110 beats/min. Chi-square and likelihood ratio were used to compare ROSC rates considering p≤0.05. ROSC occurred in 57.7% of the cases, though 92.8% of these patients died in the following 24 hours. No statistically significant difference was found between groups in regard to ROSC (p=0.2017) or the occurrence of death (p=0.8112). the outcomes of patients after cardiac arrest with and without the use of a metronome during CPR were similar and no differences were found between groups in regard to survival rates and ROSC. comparar a taxa de retorno da circulação espontânea e óbito após parada cardiorrespiratória, com e sem a utilização do metrônomo durante ressuscitação cardiopulmonar. estudo caso-controle aninhado a estudo de coorte, com 285 adultos atendidos em parada cardíaca em um serviço de emergência e submetidos à ressuscitação cardiopulmonar. Os dados foram coletados por meio do In-hospital Utstein Style. O grupo controle (n=60) foi selecionado pelo pareamento dos pacientes considerando-se o estado neurológico pré-parada cardiorrespiratória, causa imediata e ritmo inicial da parada, utilização de epinefrina e duração da ressuscitação. O grupo caso (n=51) foi submetido à ressuscitação cardiopulmonar convencional com a utilização do metrônomo a 110sons/min. Para comparar

  10. Emerging nuclear energy systems: Economic challenge: Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuckolls, J.H.

    1986-01-01

    Future nuclear energy systems may achieve substantially lower energy costs than those of existing fossil energy systems and comparable capital costs. Such low cost nuclear energy would provide a strong economic incentive to minimize the use of fossil fuels. If these low cost nuclear energy systems emerge in the next few decades, 21st century civilization may be able to avert potentially disastrous CO 2 induced global climate changes. 12 refs., 1 fig

  11. [Neonatological emergencies in delivery room] [Article in Italian] • Il neonatologo ed alcune emergenze in sala parto

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Boldrini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In the delivery room the neonatologist may deal with emergencies, not always predictable by pre-natal diagnosis. Among these dangerous situations, we include: i extremely preterm birth of a newborn very/extremely low birth weight and ii shoulder dystocia in term newborns. We will discuss in details these two clinical scenarios. Methods: We reviewed the main recent papers about resuscitation of very/extremely low birth weight preterm newborns and about dystocia of shoulder reported in PubMed database. After that, we compared reported results with practice in our Unit and discussed the topics considering strategies to optimize the results and minimizing possible errors. Discussion and conclusions: In our opinion the optimization of clinical practice in Neonatology should be based on: i national or international recommendations drawn up by commissions or study groups of experts, on the basis of scientific evidence, ii local department protocols, in order to standardize staff interventions within the same unit; iii ongoing training of doctors, nurses and midwives, through simulation sessions and CRM (Crisis Resources Management. As regards shoulder dystocia, The Tuscan Group for Clinical Risk Management drawn a poster to be showed in every delivery room, in order to allow the staff to rapidly remember the correct clinical interventions. On the other hand, as regards ventilatory preterm newborns strategies, the Centro di Formazione e Simulazione NINA is working on a project of a mechatronich simulator for staff training (MERESSINA. Articoli Selezionati del “3° Convegno Pediatrico del Medio Campidano” · Guspini · 25 Maggio 2013 Guest Editor: Roberto Antonucci

  12. Emerging nanomedicine applications and manufacturing: progress and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartain, Felicity; Greco, Francesca; Hill, Kathryn; Rannard, Steve; Owen, Andrew

    2016-03-01

    APS 6th International PharmSci Conference 2015 7-9 September 2015 East Midlands Conference Centre, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK As part of the 6th APS International PharmSci Conference, a nanomedicine session was organised to address challenges and share experiences in this field. Topics ranged from the reporting on latest results and advances in the development of targeted therapeutics to the needs that the community faces in how to progress these exciting proof of concept results into products. Here we provide an overview of the discussion and highlight some of the initiatives that have recently been established to support the translation of nanomedicines into the clinic.

  13. Emerging Environmental and Weather Challenges in Outdoor Sports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franck Brocherie

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Given the climatic changes around the world and the growing outdoor sports participation, existing guidelines and recommendations for exercising in naturally challenging environments such as heat, cold or altitude, exhibit potential shortcomings. Continuous efforts from sport sciences and exercise physiology communities aim at minimizing the risks of environmental-related illnesses during outdoor sports practices. Despite this, the use of simple weather indices does not permit an accurate estimation of the likelihood of facing thermal illnesses. This provides a critical foundation to modify available human comfort modeling and to integrate bio-meteorological data in order to improve the current guidelines. Although it requires further refinement, there is no doubt that standardizing the recently developed Universal Thermal Climate Index approach and its application in the field of sport sciences and exercise physiology may help to improve the appropriateness of the current guidelines for outdoor, recreational and competitive sports participation. This review first summarizes the main environmental-related risk factors that are susceptible to increase with recent climate changes when exercising outside and offers recommendations to combat them appropriately. Secondly, we briefly address the recent development of thermal stress models to assess the thermal comfort and physiological responses when practicing outdoor activities in challenging environments.

  14. Emergence of 3D Printed Dosage Forms: Opportunities and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhnan, Mohamed A; Okwuosa, Tochukwu C; Sadia, Muzna; Wan, Ka-Wai; Ahmed, Waqar; Arafat, Basel

    2016-08-01

    The recent introduction of the first FDA approved 3D-printed drug has fuelled interest in 3D printing technology, which is set to revolutionize healthcare. Since its initial use, this rapid prototyping (RP) technology has evolved to such an extent that it is currently being used in a wide range of applications including in tissue engineering, dentistry, construction, automotive and aerospace. However, in the pharmaceutical industry this technology is still in its infancy and its potential yet to be fully explored. This paper presents various 3D printing technologies such as stereolithographic, powder based, selective laser sintering, fused deposition modelling and semi-solid extrusion 3D printing. It also provides a comprehensive review of previous attempts at using 3D printing technologies on the manufacturing dosage forms with a particular focus on oral tablets. Their advantages particularly with adaptability in the pharmaceutical field have been highlighted, which enables the preparation of dosage forms with complex designs and geometries, multiple actives and tailored release profiles. An insight into the technical challenges facing the different 3D printing technologies such as the formulation and processing parameters is provided. Light is also shed on the different regulatory challenges that need to be overcome for 3D printing to fulfil its real potential in the pharmaceutical industry.

  15. Extra-curricular supervised training at an academic hospital: is 200 hours the threshold for medical students to perform well in an emergency room?

    OpenAIRE

    Abreu-Reis, Phillipe; Oliveira, Guilherme Czelusniak; Curtarelli de Oliveira, Arthur; Sadique, Hammad; Nasr, Adonis; Saavedra Tomasich, Flávio Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Due to high number of jobs in Emergency Medicine (EM) and the lack of specialist to work in this field, recent graduates work in the emergency room straight after medical school. Additional courses on EM are available through Academic Leagues. This organizations offer lectures and supervised extra-curricular practical activities in their teaching university-affiliated hospital. The objectives of the present study are to assess the influence of hours undertaken in the ext...

  16. Digital Microfluidic Biochips: Recent Research and Emerging Challenges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ho, Tsung-Yi; Chakrabarty, Krishnendu; Pop, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Microfluidic biochips are replacing the conventional biochemical analyzers, and are able to integrate on-chip all the basic functions for biochemical analysis. The “digital” microfluidic biochips (DMFBs) are manipulating liquids not as a continuous flow, but as discrete droplets on a two...... of increasing design complexity, computer-aided-design (CAD) tools are being developed for DMFBs. This paper provides an overview of DMFBs and describes emerging CAD tools for the automated synthesis and optimization of DMFB designs, from fluidic-level synthesis and chip-level design to testing. Design...... automations are expected to alleviate the burden of manual optimization of bioassays, time-consuming chip designs, and costly testing and maintenance procedures. With the assistance of CAD tools, users can concentrate on the development and abstraction of nanoscale bioassays while leaving chip optimization...

  17. Evaluation of the Recognition of Stroke in the Emergency Room (ROSIER scale in Chinese patients in Hong Kong.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-lin Jiang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The objective of this study was to determine the performance of the Recognition Of Stroke In the Emergency Room (ROSIER scale in risk-stratifying Chinese patients with suspected stroke in Hong Kong. METHODS: This was a prospective cohort study in an urban academic emergency department (ED over a 7-month period. Patients over 18 years of age with suspected stroke were recruited between June 2011 and December 2011. ROSIER scale assessment was performed in the ED triage area. Logistic regression analysis was used to estimate the impacts of diagnostic variables, including ROSIER scale, past history and ED characteristics. FINDINGS: 715 suspected stroke patients were recruited for assessment, of whom 371 (52% had acute cerebrovascular disease (302 ischaemic strokes, 24 transient ischaemic attacks (TIA, 45 intracerebral haemorrhages, and 344 (48% had other illnesses i.e. stroke mimics. Common stroke mimics were spinal neuropathy, dementia, labyrinthitis and sepsis. The suggested cut-off score of>0 for the ROSIER scale for stroke diagnosis gave a sensitivity of 87% (95%CI 83-90, a specificity of 41% (95%CI 36-47, a positive predictive value of 62% (95%CI 57-66, and a negative predictive value of 75% (95%CI 68-81, and the AUC was 0.723. The overall accuracy at cut off>0 was 65% i.e. (323+141/715. INTERPRETATION: The ROSIER scale was not as effective at differentiating acute stroke from stroke mimics in Chinese patients in Hong Kong as it was in the original studies, primarily due to a much lower specificity. If the ROSIER scale is to be clinically useful in Chinese suspected stroke patients, it requires further refinement.

  18. Polypathology, an emerging phenomenon and a challenge for healthcare systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Román, P; Ruiz-Cantero, A

    2017-05-01

    Improvements in living conditions and scientific advances have led to an unprecedented demographic change. The curing of numerous acute diseases and the growing adoption of unhealthy lifestyles have caused a pandemic of cumulative chronic diseases that constitute the leading cause of death worldwide. Currently, the most common situation is the coexistence of multiple chronic diseases (or polypathology). This situation undermines socio-economic development and increases inequality. This results in an overriding need to change the way in which health and disease are addressed. Healthcare systems are not prepared to meet the needs of complex polypathological patients. In this article, we summarise the challenges facing healthcare systems and states, as well as the main recommendations from the organisations responsible for healthcare. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  19. Opportunities and challenges for emerging nuclear power states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nkong-Njock, V.; Facer, R.I.; Boussaha, A.

    2009-01-01

    Energy and reliable access to energy sources are essential to economic and social development and improved quality of life. However, limited access to modern energy still remains one of the major constraints to socio-economic development in many parts in the world. On the other hand, energy production, distribution and consumption may have many adverse effects on the local, regional and global environment including climate change. Production and consumption of fossil fuels constitutes the main source of greenhouse gas emissions (GHGs). Cleaner and affordable energy systems are therefore needed to address all of these effects and to contribute to environmental sustainability. Nuclear power is a proven technology with virtually no greenhouse gas emissions or emission of pollutants, and therefore is expected to play an increasing role in meeting this rapidly growing global requirements for clean and economic electricity. But, it is known that challenges and opportunities are polarities, and as opposite poles of the magnet, they do not exist separately. An opportunity for some can be a challenge for others, or a challenge today can become an opportunity tomorrow. The potential growth of nuclear power has increased, in some quarters, concern that nonproliferation should be given sufficient attention. In particular, since introduction of many new power reactors will require increased uranium enrichment services, with the potential proliferation risk of adding enrichment facilities in new countries. This has urged the international community to strongly support the development of safeguarded and well-regulated nuclear power around the world, with the aim to ensure that nuclear power is deployed through a commitment to the highest possible standards of nuclear safety, security, and non-proliferation. The keys issues and trends for nuclear power expansion include therefore problems related to (i) safety, security and reliability, (ii) public perception and acceptance, (iii

  20. Characteristics, emerging needs, and challenges of transdisciplinary sustainability science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruppert-Winkel, Chantal; Arlinghaus, Robert; Deppisch, Sonja

    2015-01-01

    Transdisciplinary sustainability science (TSS) is a prominent way of scientifically contributing to the solution of sustainability problems. Little is known, however, about the practice of scientists in TSS, especially those early in their career. Our objectives were to identify these practices...... they were addressed. Three major challenges were identified: (1) TSS demands openness to a plurality of research designs, theories, and methods, while also requiring shared, explicit, and recursive use of TSS characteristics; (2) researchers in TSS teams must make decisions about trade-offs between...... achievements of societal and scientific impact, acknowledging that focusing on the time-consuming former aspect is difficult to integrate into a scientific career path; and (3) although generalist researchers are increasingly becoming involved in such TSS research projects, supporting the integration of social...

  1. Mobile Computing: The Emerging Technology, Sensing, Challenges and Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bezboruah, T.

    2010-12-01

    The mobile computing is a computing system in which a computer and all necessary accessories like files and software are taken out to the field. It is a system of computing through which it is being able to use a computing device even when someone being mobile and therefore changing location. The portability is one of the important aspects of mobile computing. The mobile phones are being used to gather scientific data from remote and isolated places that could not be possible to retrieve by other means. The scientists are initiating to use mobile devices and web-based applications to systematically explore interesting scientific aspects of their surroundings, ranging from climate change, environmental pollution to earthquake monitoring. This mobile revolution enables new ideas and innovations to spread out more quickly and efficiently. Here we will discuss in brief about the mobile computing technology, its sensing, challenges and the applications. (author)

  2. Measurement of occupational stress in hospital settings: two validity studies of a measure of self-reported stress in medical emergency rooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, J S; Jones, J W; Lyons, J S; Sixsmith, D; Afficiando, E

    1985-04-01

    The present study details the development of a stress scale for medical personnel. The Medical Personnel Stress Scale is a 48-item subjective stress measure capable of assessing both organizational and individual dimensions of stress. It demonstrated both the ability to discriminate between divergent medical emergency room organizations and to predict self reported on-the-job difficulties.

  3. Epidemiological profile of work-related accidents with biological exposure among medical students in a surgical emergency room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Phillipe Geraldo Teixeira de Abreu; Driessen, Anna Luiza; da Costa, Ana Claudia Brenner Affonso; Nasr, Adonis; Collaço, Iwan Augusto; Tomasich, Flávio Daniel Saavedra

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the accidents with biological material among medical students interning in a trauma emergency room and identify key related situations, attributed causes and prevention. we conducted a study with a quantitative approach. Data were collected through a questionnaire applied via internet, with closed, multiple-choice questions regarding accidents with biological material. The sample comprised 100 students. thirty-two had accidents with biological material. Higher-risk activities were local anesthesia (39.47%), suture (18.42%) and needle recapping (15.79%). The main routes of exposure to biological material were the eyes or mucosa, with 34%, and syringe needle puncture, with 45%. After contamination, only 52% reported the accident to the responsible department. The main causes of accidents and routes of exposure found may be attributed to several factors, such as lack of training and failure to use personal protective equipment. Educational and preventive actions are extremely important to reduce the incidence of accidents with biological materials and improve the conduct of post-exposure. It is important to understand the main causes attributed and situations related, so as general and effective measures can be applied.

  4. Computed tomography angiography of lower extremities in the emergency room for evaluation of patients with gunshot wounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adibi, Ali; Plotnik, Adam N.; Mohajer, Kiyarash; Arellano, Cesar; Ruehm, Stefan G. [University of California, Diagnostic Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiological Sciences, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Krishnam, Mayil S.; Dissanayake, Sumudu [University of California, Cardiovascular and Thoracic Imaging, Department of Radiology, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2014-07-15

    To assess the role of CT angiography in the evaluation of patients with lower extremity gunshot wounds in the emergency room. Eighty patients (73 male, 7 female, mean age 26 years) underwent CT angiography for the evaluation of lower extremity gunshot injuries. Imaging was conducted on the basis of standardized protocols utilizing 16-slice and 64-slice multidetector systems and images were qualitatively graded and assessed for various forms of arterial injury. CT angiography findings indicative of arterial injury were observed in 24 patients (30 %) and a total of 43 arterial injuries were noted; the most common form was focal narrowing/spasm (n = 16, 37.2 %); the most common artery involved was the superficial femoral artery (n = 12, 50 %). In qualitative assessment of images based on a 4-point grading system, both readers considered CT angiography diagnostically excellent (grade 4) in most cases. Surgical findings were consistent with CT angiography and follow-up of patients' medical records showed no arterial injuries in patients with normal findings on initial imaging. Our findings demonstrate that CT angiography is an effective imaging modality for evaluation of lower extremity gunshot wounds and could help limit more invasive procedures such as catheter angiography to a select group of patients. (orig.)

  5. Relationship between physiologic and psychological measures of autonomic activation in operating room teams during a simulated airway emergency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phitayakorn, Roy; Minehart, Rebecca D; Hemingway, Maureen W; Pian-Smith, May C M; Petrusa, Emil

    2015-01-01

    Emotional stability is important for individual and team performance during operating room (OR) emergencies. We compared physiologic and psychological anxiety assessments in OR teams during simulated events. Twenty-two teams participated in a "cannot intubate/cannot ventilate" simulation. Participants completed the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and wore a galvanic skin response (GSR) sensor. Differences in State-Trait Anxiety Inventory scores and GSR levels were analyzed. Anxiety scores were correlated with GSR levels. Resident physicians had significantly higher trait anxiety than the nurses, certified registered nurse anesthetists, and surgical technicians (43.9 ± 9.9 vs 38.3 ± 9.3, P groups showed significant increases in GSR. Psychological and physiologic data did not correlate. Senior practitioners and residents have higher levels of baseline trait anxiety for unclear reasons. Also, OR team training results in physiological signs of anxiety that do not correlate to self-reported psychological measurements. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Effects of Air Pollution on Hospital Emergency Room Visits for Respiratory Diseases: Urban-Suburban Differences in Eastern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Peng; Wang, Xining; Fan, Jiayin; Xiao, Wenxin; Wang, Yan

    2016-03-19

    A study on the relationships between ambient air pollutants (PM2.5, SO₂ and NO₂) and hospital emergency room visits (ERVs) for respiratory diseases from 2013 to 2014 was performed in both urban and suburban areas of Jinan, a heavily air-polluted city in Eastern China. This research was analyzed using generalized additive models (GAM) with Poisson regression, which controls for long-time trends, the "day of the week" effect and meteorological parameters. An increase of 10 μg/m³ in PM2.5, SO₂ and NO₂ corresponded to a 1.4% (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.7%, 2.1%), 1.2% (95% CI: 0.5%, 1.9%), and 2.5% (95%: 0.8%, 4.2%) growth in ERVs for the urban population, respectively, and a 1.5% (95%: 0.4%, 2.6%), 0.8% (95%: -0.7%, 2.3%), and 3.1% (95%: 0.5%, 5.7%) rise in ERVs for the suburban population, respectively. It was found that females were more susceptible than males to air pollution in the urban area when the analysis was stratified by gender, and the reverse result was seen in the suburban area. Our results suggest that the increase in ERVs for respiratory illnesses is linked to the levels of air pollutants in Jinan, and there may be some urban-suburban discrepancies in health outcomes from air pollutant exposure.

  7. Residents with Alzheimer's disease in long-term care facilities in Hong Kong: patterns of hospitalization and emergency room use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Angela Y M; Kwan, C W; Chi, Iris

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the frequency and predictors of hospitalization and emergency room (ER) use among residents with Alzheimer's disease at admission and after 1 year in a long-term care facility. This secondary analysis used data collected with the Chinese version of the Residential Assessment Instrument Minimum Data Set 2.0 during the Hong Kong Longitudinal Study on Long-Term Care Facility Residents. A sample of 169 residents with Alzheimer's disease who were newly admitted between 2005 and 2010 was included in the analysis. Mixed-effects modeling was adopted to assess the associations between risk factors and the frequency of hospitalization and ER use. At admission, 27 (15.98%) respondents had been hospitalized and 19 (11.24%) required ER services during the previous 90 days. At admission, polypharmacy (β = .081, p hospitalization. At 1-year follow-up, cognitive impairment (β = .088, p hospitalization, as well as use of ER services (β = .084, p long-term care residents with Alzheimer's disease.

  8. The 1% of emergency room visits for non-traumatic dental conditions in British Columbia: Misconceptions about the numbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brondani, Mario; Ahmad, Syed H

    2017-09-14

    In Canada, about 1% of all emergency room (ER) visits in a given year are made by patients with a primary diagnosis of a non-traumatic, non-urgent and yet preventable condition, such as tooth decay. This percentage is typically dismissed as irrelevant. Using 2013-2014 British Columbia data on ER use from the Canadian Institute for Health Information, however, we argue that the 1% figure (and its associated cost) has to be considered beyond its percentage value. In 2013-2014 alone, 12 357 non-traumatic dental visits were made to ERs in BC representing 1% of the total number of ER visits at a cost of $154.8 million to the taxpayers (across Canada, all visits to ER cost $1.8 billion/year). But the vast majority of these dental visits are discharged while the oral problem likely persists, hence taxpayer dollars are wasted. The belief that these dental-related ER visits are insignificant within the total cost for the health care system is misleading: treatment is not given, the problem is not resolved, and yet there is a high cost to taxpayers and to the society at large. Public health resources should be reallocated.

  9. Short-term effects of ambient air pollution on emergency room admissions due to cardiovascular causes in Beijing, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yuxia; Zhao, Yuxin; Yang, Sixu; Zhou, Jianding; Xin, Jinyuan; Wang, Shigong; Yang, Dandan

    2017-11-01

    Ambient air pollution has been a major global public health issue. A number of studies have shown various adverse effects of ambient air pollution on cardiovascular diseases. In the current study, we investigated the short-term effects of ambient air pollution on emergency room (ER) admissions due to cardiovascular causes in Beijing from 2009 to 2012 using a time-series analysis. A total of 82430 ER cardiovascular admissions were recorded. Different gender (male and female) and age groups (15yrs ≤ age pollutant model. Three major pollutants (SO 2 , NO 2 and PM 10 ) had lag effects of 0-2 days on cardiovascular ER admissions. The relative risks (95% CI) of per 10 μg/m 3 increase in PM 10 , SO 2 and NO 2 were 1.008 (0.997-1.020), 1.008(0.999-1.018) and 1.014(1.003-1.024), respectively. The effect was more pronounced in age ≥65 and males in Beijing. We also found the stronger acute effects on the elderly and females at lag 0 than on the younger people and males at lag 2. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Severity of acute Zika virus infection: A prospective emergency room surveillance study during the 2015-2016 outbreak in Suriname.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vroon, Pieter; Roosblad, Jimmy; Poese, Fauzia; Wilschut, Jan; Codrington, John; Vreden, Stephen; Zonneveld, Rens

    2017-01-01

    Acute Zika virus (ZIKV) infection is usually mild and self-limiting. Earlier, we reported three cases of fatal acute ZIKV infection in patients without typical signs of ZIKV, but rather with criteria of systemic inflammation response syndrome (SIRS). To follow up these observations, we prospectively included patients at the emergency room with temperature instability and suspected to have acute ZIKV infection, SIRS, or both. A total of 102 patients were included of whom N = 21 (21%) were suspected of acute ZIKV infection, N = 56 (55%) of acute ZIKV infection with SIRS criteria, and N = 25 (24%) of SIRS alone. ZIKV-PCR was positive in N = 21 (20%) patients. Eight (38%) ZIKV-positive patients needed admission to the hospital of whom four (50%) presented with SIRS alone. One ZIKV-positive patient had vascular co-morbidity and died following shock and severe coagulopathy. We confirm the hypothesis that acute ZIKV infection can present atypical and severely with systemic inflammation and have lethal course particularly amongst patients with significant prior disease.

  11. Cortisol at the emergency room rape visit as a predictor of PTSD and depression symptoms over time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Kate; Nugent, Nicole R; Kotte, Amelia; Amstadter, Ananda B; Wang, Sheila; Guille, Constance; Acierno, Ron; Kilpatrick, Dean G; Resnick, Heidi S

    2013-11-01

    Dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, typically reflected by alterations in cortisol responsivity, has been associated with exposure to traumatic events and the development of stress-related disorders such as posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression. Serum cortisol was measured at the time of a post sexual assault medical exam among a sample of 323 female victims of recent sexual assault. Analyses were conducted among 235 participants who provided data regarding history of previous assault as well as PTSD and depression symptoms during at least one of the three follow-ups. Growth curve models suggested that prior history of assault and serum cortisol were positively associated with the intercept and negatively associated with the slope of PTSD and depression symptoms after controlling for covariates. Prior history of assault and serum cortisol also interacted to predict the intercept and slope of PTSD and depression symptoms such that women with a prior history of assault and lower ER cortisol had higher initial symptoms that decreased at a slower rate relative to women without a prior history and those with higher ER cortisol. Prior history of assault was associated with diminished acute cortisol responsivity at the emergency room visit. Prior assault history and cortisol both independently and interactively predicted PTSD and depression symptoms at first follow-up and over the course a 6-month follow-up. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Emergency Room of the Hospital associated with the University of Salerno: acute poisoning registered from April 2009 to September 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. M. Vitola

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available An ever growing number of patients go to the emergency room (ER for toxic exposure to various causal agents. Yet, the actual number of acute poisoning still remains unknown and the epidemic data are only partly available. Cases of acute poisoning in the ER of Salerno Hospital from April 2009 to September 2011 (30 months’ period are reported. Data are divided according to the criteria of gender, age, aetiologic agent, place and reasons of poisoning, and risk evaluation. Out of the total 220,165 patients, the acute poisoning cases were 1,347 (0.61%. Among these, 189 (14.1% patients were admitted to hospital while 3 (0.2% died. Alcool acute poisonings are the most frequent (43.6%, followed by drugs poisonings (30.6%. Acute poisonings are more common among males (59.9% and in people aged 20-50 years. Out of all the acute poisoning cases, 27.8% requested a consult to the Anti-Poisoning Centre. The results aim at contributing to the epidemic research for acute poisoning in ER.

  13. Education about crying in normal infants is associated with a reduction in pediatric emergency room visits for crying complaints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Ronald G; Rajabali, Fahra; Aragon, Melissa; Colbourne, Marg; Brant, Rollin

    2015-05-01

    The primary aim of this study was to determine whether there was any change in visits of 0- to 5-month old infants to the medical emergency room (MER) of a metropolitan pediatric hospital after province-wide implementation of a public health prevention program that teaches new parents about the properties of early crying in normal infants. Free-text descriptions of Presenting Complaint and Final Diagnosis on electronic MER clinic visit files were used to classify infants as cases of infant crying not due to disease. Annual crying case visits as a percent of MER visits were analyzed pre- and post-introduction of the prevention program. Before the program, crying case visits represented 724 of 20,394 MER visits (3.5%). The age-specific pattern of MER visits for crying peaked at 6 weeks and was similar to the previously reported age-specific pattern of amounts of crying in the community. After program implementation, crying cases were reduced by 29.5% (p secondary to a public health program may reduce MER use for crying complaints in the early months of life.

  14. Skeletal muscle proteomics: current approaches, technical challenges and emerging techniques

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ohlendieck, Kay

    2011-02-01

    Abstract Background Skeletal muscle fibres represent one of the most abundant cell types in mammals. Their highly specialised contractile and metabolic functions depend on a large number of membrane-associated proteins with very high molecular masses, proteins with extensive posttranslational modifications and components that exist in highly complex supramolecular structures. This makes it extremely difficult to perform conventional biochemical studies of potential changes in protein clusters during physiological adaptations or pathological processes. Results Skeletal muscle proteomics attempts to establish the global identification and biochemical characterisation of all members of the muscle-associated protein complement. A considerable number of proteomic studies have employed large-scale separation techniques, such as high-resolution two-dimensional gel electrophoresis or liquid chromatography, and combined them with mass spectrometry as the method of choice for high-throughput protein identification. Muscle proteomics has been applied to the comprehensive biochemical profiling of developing, maturing and aging muscle, as well as the analysis of contractile tissues undergoing physiological adaptations seen in disuse atrophy, physical exercise and chronic muscle transformation. Biomedical investigations into proteome-wide alterations in skeletal muscle tissues were also used to establish novel biomarker signatures of neuromuscular disorders. Importantly, mass spectrometric studies have confirmed the enormous complexity of posttranslational modifications in skeletal muscle proteins. Conclusions This review critically examines the scientific impact of modern muscle proteomics and discusses its successful application for a better understanding of muscle biology, but also outlines its technical limitations and emerging techniques to establish new biomarker candidates.

  15. P300 brain computer interface: current challenges and emerging trends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza eFazel-Rezai

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available A brain-computer interface (BCI enables communication without movement based on brain signals measured with electroencephalography (EEG. BCIs usually rely on one of three types of signals: the P300 and other components of the event-related potential (ERP, steady state visual evoked potential (SSVEP, or event related desynchronization (ERD. Although P300 BCIs were introduced over twenty years ago, the past few years have seen a strong increase in P300 BCI research. This closed-loop BCI approach relies on the P300 and other components of the event-related potential (ERP, based on an oddball paradigm presented to the subject. In this paper, we overview the current status of P300 BCI technology, and then discuss new directions: paradigms for eliciting P300s; signal processing methods; applications; and hybrid BCIs. We conclude that P300 BCIs are quite promising, as several emerging directions have not yet been fully explored and could lead to improvements in bit rate, reliability, usability, and flexibility.

  16. Bacteriocins as food preservatives: Challenges and emerging horizons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Eldin Maliyakkal; Jung, Dr Yong-Gyun; Jin, Dr Ying-Yu; Jayabalan, Dr Rasu; Yang, Dr Seung Hwan; Suh, Joo Won

    2017-09-07

    The increasing demand for fresh-like food products and the potential health hazards of chemically preserved and processed food products have led to the advent of alternative technologies for the preservation and maintenance of the freshness of the food products. One such preservation strategy is the usage of bacteriocins or bacteriocins producing starter cultures for the preservation of the intended food matrixes. Bacteriocins are ribosomally synthesized smaller polypeptide molecules that exert antagonistic activity against closely related and unrelated group of bacteria. This review is aimed at bringing to lime light the various class of bacteriocins mainly from gram positive bacteria. The desirable characteristics of the bacteriocins which earn them a place in food preservation technology, the success story of the same in various food systems, the various challenges and the strategies employed to put them to work efficiently in various food systems has been discussed in this review. From the industrial point of view various aspects like the improvement of the producer strains, downstream processing and purification of the bacteriocins and recent trends in engineered bacteriocins has also been briefly discussed in this review.

  17. Challenges and emerging technologies within the field of pediatric actigraphy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara eGalland

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Actigraphy as an objective measure of sleep and wakefulness in infants and children has gained popularity over the last 20 years. However, the field lacks published guidelines for sleep-wake identification within pediatric age groups. The scoring rules vary greatly and although sensitivity (sleep agreement with polysomnography is usually high, a significant limitation remains in relation to specificity (wake agreement. Furthermore, accurate algorithm output and sleep-wake summaries usually require prior entry from daily logs of sleep–wake periods and artefact-related information (e.g. non-wear time, involving significant parent co-operation. Scoring criteria for daytime naps remains an unexplored area. Many of the problems facing accuracy of measurement are inherent within the field of actigraphy itself, particularly where sleep periods containing significant movements are erroneously classified as wake, and within quiet wakefulness when no movements are detected, erroneously classified as sleep. We discuss the challenges of actigraphy for pediatric sleep, briefly describe the technical basis and consider a number of technological approaches that may facilitate improved classification of errors in sleep-wake discrimination.

  18. Challenges and Emerging Technologies within the Field of Pediatric Actigraphy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galland, Barbara; Meredith-Jones, Kim; Terrill, Philip; Taylor, Rachael

    2014-01-01

    Actigraphy as an objective measure of sleep and wakefulness in infants and children has gained popularity over the last 20 years. However, the field lacks published guidelines for sleep–wake identification within pediatric age groups. The scoring rules vary greatly and although sensitivity (sleep agreement with polysomnography) is usually high, a significant limitation remains in relation to specificity (wake agreement). Furthermore, accurate algorithm output and sleep–wake summaries usually require prior entry from daily logs of sleep–wake periods and artifact-related information (e.g., non-wear time), involving significant parent co-operation. Scoring criteria for daytime naps remains an unexplored area. Many of the problems facing accuracy of measurement are inherent within the field of actigraphy itself, particularly where sleep periods containing significant movements are erroneously classified as wake, and within quiet wakefulness when no movements are detected, erroneously classified as sleep. We discuss the challenges of actigraphy for pediatric sleep, briefly describe the technical basis and consider a number of technological approaches that may facilitate improved classification of errors in sleep–wake discrimination. PMID:25191278

  19. Emerging therapies and challenges in spinal muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrar, Michelle A; Park, Susanna B; Vucic, Steve; Carey, Kate A; Turner, Bradley J; Gillingwater, Thomas H; Swoboda, Kathryn J; Kiernan, Matthew C

    2017-03-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a hereditary neurodegenerative disease with severity ranging from progressive infantile paralysis and premature death (type I) to limited motor neuron loss and normal life expectancy (type IV). Without disease-modifying therapies, the impact is profound for patients and their families. Improved understanding of the molecular basis of SMA, disease pathogenesis, natural history, and recognition of the impact of standardized care on outcomes has yielded progress toward the development of novel therapeutic strategies and are summarized. Therapeutic strategies in the pipeline are appraised, ranging from SMN1 gene replacement to modulation of SMN2 encoded transcripts, to neuroprotection, to an expanding repertoire of peripheral targets, including muscle. With the advent of preliminary trial data, it can be reasonably anticipated that the SMA treatment landscape will transform significantly. Advancement in presymptomatic diagnosis and screening programs will be critical, with pilot newborn screening studies underway to facilitate preclinical diagnosis. The development of disease-modifying therapies will necessitate monitoring programs to determine the long-term impact, careful evaluation of combined treatments, and further acceleration of improvements in supportive care. In advance of upcoming clinical trial results, we consider the challenges and controversies related to the implementation of novel therapies for all patients and set the scene as the field prepares to enter an era of novel therapies. Ann Neurol 2017;81:355-368. © 2016 The Authors. Annals of Neurology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Neurological Association.

  20. Capacity building in emerging space nations: Experiences, challenges and benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jason, Susan; da Silva Curiel, Alex; Liddle, Doug; Chizea, Francis; Leloglu, Ugur Murat; Helvaci, Mustafa; Bekhti, Mohammed; Benachir, Djouad; Boland, Lee; Gomes, Luis; Sweeting, Martin

    2010-09-01

    This paper focuses on ways in which space is being used to build capacity in science and technology in order to: Offer increasing support for national and global solutions to current and emerging problems including: how to improve food security; resource management; understanding the impacts of climate change and how to deal with them; improving disaster mitigation, management and response. Support sustainable economic development. We present some of the experiences, lessons learned and benefits gained in capacity building projects undertaken by Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd. and our partners from developing and mature space nations. We focus on the Turkish, Algerian and Nigerian know-how and technology transfer programmes which form part of the first Disaster Monitoring Constellation (DMC) in orbit. From the lessons learned on Surrey's know-how and technology transfer partnership programmes, it is clear that space technology needs to be implemented responsibly as part of a long-term capacity building plan to be a sustainable one. It needs to be supported with appropriate policy and legal frameworks, institutional development, including community participation, human resources development and strengthening of managerial systems. In taking this on board, DMC has resulted in a strong international partnership combining national objectives, humanitarian aid and commerce. The benefits include: Ownership of space-based and supporting ground assets with low capital expenditure that is in line with national budgets of developing nations. Ownership of data and control over data acquisition. More for the money via collaborative consortium. Space related capacity building in organisations and nations with the goal of sustainable development. Opportunities for international collaboration, including disaster management and relief.

  1. Jaundice in the emergency department: meeting the challenges of diagnosis and treatment [digest].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Todd; Wheatley, Matthew; Gupta, Nachi; Nusbaum, Jeffrey

    2018-03-01

    There are approximately 52,000 visits a year to emergency departments for patients presenting with jaundice. While many of these patients will not have immediately life-threatening pathology, it is essential that the emergency clinician understands the pathophysiology of jaundice, as this will guide the appropriate workup to detect critical diagnoses. Patients who present with jaundice could require intravenous antibiotics, emergent surgery, and, in severe cases, organ transplantation. This issue will focus on the challenge of evaluating and treating the jaundiced patient in the ED using the best available evidence from the literature. [Points & Pearls is a digest of Emergency Medicine Practice.].

  2. Executive summary: Education research in emergency medicine-opportunities, challenges, and strategies for success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaMantia, Joseph; Deiorio, Nicole M; Yarris, Lalena M

    2012-12-01

    The 2012 Academic Emergency Medicine (AEM) consensus conference "Education Research In Emergency Medicine: Opportunities, Challenges, and Strategies for Success" convened a diverse group of stakeholders in medical education to target gaps in emergency medicine (EM) education research and identify priorities for future study. A total of 175 registrants collaborated in preparatory and conference-day activities to explore subtopics in educational interventions, learner assessment, faculty development, and research funding and infrastructure. The conference was punctuated by didactic sessions led by key international medical education experts and ended with consensus formation in many domains. This issue of AEM presents the exciting results of this process. © 2012 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  3. The interaction effects of temperature and humidity on emergency room visits for respiratory diseases in Beijing, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Qin; Liu, Hongsheng; Yuan, Xiaoling; Xiao, Yan; Zhang, Xian; Sun, Rongju; Dang, Wei; Zhang, Jianbo; Qin, Yuhong; Men, Baozhong; Zhao, Xiaodong

    2014-11-01

    Few epidemiological studies have been reported as to whether there was any interactive effect between temperature and humidity on respiratory morbidity, especially in Asian countries. The present study used time-series analysis to explore the modification effects of humidity on the association between temperature and emergency room (ER) visits for respiratory, upper respiratory tract infection (URI), pneumonia, and bronchitis in Beijing between 2009 and 2011. Results showed that an obvious joint effect of temperature and humidity was revealed on ER visits for respiratory, URI, pneumonia, and bronchitis. Below temperature threshold, the temperature effect was stronger in low humidity level and presented a trend fall with humidity level increase. The effect estimates per 1 °C increase in temperature in low humidity level were -2.88 % (95 % confidence interval (CI) -3.08, -2.67) for all respiratory, -3.24 % (-3.59, -2.88) for URI, -1.48 % (-1.93, -1.03) for pneumonia, and -3.79 % (-4.37, -3.21) for bronchitis ER visits, respectively. However, above temperature threshold, temperature effect was greater in high humidity level and trending upward with humidity level increasing. In high humidity level, a 1 °C increase in temperature, the effect estimates were 1.84 % (1.55, 2.13) for all respiratory, 1.76 % (1.41, 2.11) for URI, and 7.48 % (4.41, 10.65) for bronchitis ER visits. But, there was no statistically significant for pneumonia. This suggests that the modifying effects of the humidity should be considered when analyzing health impacts of temperature.

  4. Do we still need autopsy in times of modern multislice computed tomography?-Missed diagnoses in the emergency room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Euler, S A; Kastenberger, T; Attal, R; Rieger, M; Blauth, M; Petri, M

    2017-01-01

    In spite of increasing quality of emergency room (ER) assessment in trauma patients and improved accuracy of modern multislice computed tomography (MSCT), the number of potentially missed diagnoses is still controversial. The aim of this study was to compare the initial findings of ER assessment and MSCT to the findings during autopsy in trauma patients not surviving the first 48 h after admission. We hypothesized that autopsy was more accurate than MSCT in diagnosing potentially fatal diagnoses. Between January 2004 and September 2007, all trauma patients undergoing ER treatment in our institution who deceased within 48 h after admission were analyzed regarding diagnoses from initial ER assessment, including MSCT, and diagnoses from autopsy. Data were prospectively collected and retrospectively analyzed. Autopsy reports were compared to diagnoses of ER assessment and MSCT. Missed diagnoses (MD) and missed potentially fatal diagnoses (MPFD) were analyzed. Seventy-three patients with a mean age of 53.2 years were included into the study. Sixty-three percent were male. Autopsy revealed at least one missed diagnosis in 25% of the patients, with the thoracic area accounting for 67% of these. At least one MPFD was found in 4.1% of the patients, all of them being located in the thorax. Total numbers of MD and MPFD were significantly lower for the newer CT generation (64 MSCT, N = 11), compared to older one (4 MSCT, N = 26). As determined by autopsy, modern multislice computed tomography is an accurate method to diagnose injuries. However, 25% of all diagnoses, and 4.1% of potentially fatal diagnoses are still missed in trauma patients, who deceased within the first 48 h after admission. Therefore, autopsy seems to be necessary to determine potentially missed diagnoses for both academic and medicolegal reasons as well as for quality control.

  5. Association between Ambient Air Pollution and Emergency Room Visits for Respiratory Diseases in Spring Dust Storm Season in Lanzhou, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuxia Ma

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Air pollution has become a major global public health problem. A number of studies have confirmed the association between air pollutants and emergency room (ER visits for respiratory diseases in developed countries and some Asian countries, but little evidence has been seen in Western China. This study aims to concentrate on this region. Methods: A time-series analysis was used to examine the specific effects of major air pollutants (PM10, SO2 and NO2 on ER visits for respiratory diseases from 2007 to 2011 in the severely polluted city of Lanzhou. We examined the effects of air pollutants for stratified groups by age and gender, accounting for the modifying effect of dust storms in spring to test the possible interaction. Results: Significant associations were found between outdoor air pollution concentrations and respiratory diseases, as expressed by daily ER visits in Lanzhou in the spring dust season. The association between air pollution and ER visits appeared to be more evident on dust days than non-dust days. Relative risks (RRs and 95% CIs per 10 µg/m3 increase in 3-day PM10 (L3, 5-day SO2 (L5, and the average of current and previous 2-day NO2 (L01 were 1.140 (1.071–1.214, 1.080 (0.967–1.205, and 1.298 (1.158–1.454, respectively, on dust days. More significant associations between PM10, SO2 and NO2 and ER visits were found on dust days for elderly females, elderly males and adult males, respectively. Conclusions: This study strengthens the evidence of dust-exacerbated ER visits for respiratory diseases in Lanzhou.

  6. Association between Ambient Air Pollution and Emergency Room Visits for Respiratory Diseases in Spring Dust Storm Season in Lanzhou, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yuxia; Xiao, Bingshuang; Liu, Chang; Zhao, Yuxin; Zheng, Xiaodong

    2016-06-21

    Air pollution has become a major global public health problem. A number of studies have confirmed the association between air pollutants and emergency room (ER) visits for respiratory diseases in developed countries and some Asian countries, but little evidence has been seen in Western China. This study aims to concentrate on this region. A time-series analysis was used to examine the specific effects of major air pollutants (PM10, SO₂ and NO₂) on ER visits for respiratory diseases from 2007 to 2011 in the severely polluted city of Lanzhou. We examined the effects of air pollutants for stratified groups by age and gender, accounting for the modifying effect of dust storms in spring to test the possible interaction. Significant associations were found between outdoor air pollution concentrations and respiratory diseases, as expressed by daily ER visits in Lanzhou in the spring dust season. The association between air pollution and ER visits appeared to be more evident on dust days than non-dust days. Relative risks (RRs) and 95% CIs per 10 µg/m³ increase in 3-day PM10 (L3), 5-day SO₂ (L5), and the average of current and previous 2-day NO₂ (L01) were 1.140 (1.071-1.214), 1.080 (0.967-1.205), and 1.298 (1.158-1.454), respectively, on dust days. More significant associations between PM10, SO₂ and NO₂ and ER visits were found on dust days for elderly females, elderly males and adult males, respectively. This study strengthens the evidence of dust-exacerbated ER visits for respiratory diseases in Lanzhou.

  7. Current practices in the management of patients with ureteral calculi in the emergency room of a university hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Rojas Claros

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Urinary lithiasis is a common disease. The aim of the present study is to assess the knowledge regarding the diagnosis, treatment and recommendations given to patients with ureteral colic by professionals of an academic hospital. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Sixty-five physicians were interviewed about previous experience with guidelines regarding ureteral colic and how they manage patients with ureteral colic in regards to diagnosis, treatment and the information provided to the patients. RESULTS: Thirty-six percent of the interviewed physicians were surgeons, and 64% were clinicians. Forty-one percent of the physicians reported experience with ureterolithiasis guidelines. Seventy-two percent indicated that they use noncontrast CT scans for the diagnosis of lithiasis. All of the respondents prescribe hydration, primarily for the improvement of stone elimination (39.3%. The average number of drugs used was 3.5. The combination of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and opioids was reported by 54% of the physicians (i.e., 59% of surgeons and 25.6% of clinicians used this combination of drugs (p = 0.014. Only 21.3% prescribe alpha blockers. CONCLUSION: Reported experience with guidelines had little impact on several habitual practices. For example, only 21.3% of the respondents indicated that they prescribed alpha blockers; however, alpha blockers may increase stone elimination by up to 54%. Furthermore, although a meta-analysis demonstrated that hydration had no effect on the transit time of the stone or on the pain, the majority of the physicians reported that they prescribed more than 500 ml of fluid. Dipyrone, hyoscine, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and opioids were identified as the most frequently prescribed drug combination. The information regarding the time for the passage of urinary stones was inconsistent. The development of continuing education programs regarding ureteral colic in the emergency room is necessary.

  8. Current practices in the management of patients with ureteral calculi in the emergency room of a university hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claros, Oliver Rojas; Silva, Carlos Hirokatsu Watanabe; Consolmagno, Horacio; Sakai, Americo Toshiaki; Freddy, Rodrigo; Fugita, Oscar Eduardo Hidetoshi

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Urinary lithiasis is a common disease. The aim of the present study is to assess the knowledge regarding the diagnosis, treatment and recommendations given to patients with ureteral colic by professionals of an academic hospital. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Sixty-five physicians were interviewed about previous experience with guidelines regarding ureteral colic and how they manage patients with ureteral colic in regards to diagnosis, treatment and the information provided to the patients. RESULTS: Thirty-six percent of the interviewed physicians were surgeons, and 64% were clinicians. Forty-one percent of the physicians reported experience with ureterolithiasis guidelines. Seventy-two percent indicated that they use noncontrast CT scans for the diagnosis of lithiasis. All of the respondents prescribe hydration, primarily for the improvement of stone elimination (39.3%). The average number of drugs used was 3.5. The combination of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and opioids was reported by 54% of the physicians (i.e., 59% of surgeons and 25.6% of clinicians used this combination of drugs) (p = 0.014). Only 21.3% prescribe alpha blockers. CONCLUSION: Reported experience with guidelines had little impact on several habitual practices. For example, only 21.3% of the respondents indicated that they prescribed alpha blockers; however, alpha blockers may increase stone elimination by up to 54%. Furthermore, although a meta-analysis demonstrated that hydration had no effect on the transit time of the stone or on the pain, the majority of the physicians reported that they prescribed more than 500 ml of fluid. Dipyrone, hyoscine, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and opioids were identified as the most frequently prescribed drug combination. The information regarding the time for the passage of urinary stones was inconsistent. The development of continuing education programs regarding ureteral colic in the emergency room is necessary. PMID:22666782

  9. Association between birth order and emergency room visits and acute hospital admissions following pediatric vaccination: a self-controlled study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Hawken

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: We investigated the association between a child's birth order and emergency room (ER visits and hospital admissions following 2-,4-,6- and 12-month pediatric vaccinations. METHODS: We included all children born in Ontario between April 1(st, 2006 and March 31(st, 2009 who received a qualifying vaccination. We identified vaccinations, ER visits and admissions using health administrative data housed at the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences. We used the self-controlled case series design to compare the relative incidence (RI of events among 1(st-born and later-born children using relative incidence ratios (RIR. RESULTS: For the 2-month vaccination, the RIR for 1(st-borns versus later-born children was 1.37 (95% CI: 1.19-1.57, which translates to 112 additional events/100,000 vaccinated. For the 4-month vaccination, the RIR for 1(st-borns vs. later-borns was 1.70 (95% CI: 1.45-1.99, representing 157 additional events/100,000 vaccinated. At 6 months, the RIR for 1(st vs. later-borns was 1.27 (95% CI: 1.09-1.48, or 77 excess events/100,000 vaccinated. At the 12-month vaccination, the RIR was 1.11 (95% CI: 1.02-1.21, or 249 excess events/100,000 vaccinated. CONCLUSIONS: Birth order is associated with increased incidence of ER visits and hospitalizations following vaccination in infancy. 1(st-born children had significantly higher relative incidence of events compared to later-born children.

  10. A REVIEW OF EMERGENCY ROOM STUDIES ON ALCOHOL AND INJURIES CONDUCTED IN LATIN AMERICAN AND THE CARIBBEAN REGION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreuccetti, Gabriel; Carvalho, Heraclito B.; Korcha, Rachael; Ye, Yu; Bond, Jason; Cherpitel, Cheryl J.

    2012-01-01

    Issues Alcohol-attributable burden of injury is one of the most serious public health problems in Latin America and the Caribbean region (LAC). Although knowledge on alcohol’s involvement in injuries has progressed along with the implementation of evidenced-based alcohol policies in developed countries, this was not true for the most part of LAC countries for which reducing alcohol-related injuries is an urgent necessity. Approach A systematic review was performed in order to identify the most up-to-date information on alcohol and injuries derived from emergency room (ER) studies conducted in LAC. Key Findings Findings corroborate that alcohol has a high prevalence among injured patients in the ER setting in LAC, with violence-related injuries showing an increased association with alcohol use compared to unintentional injuries. However, a large number of studies did not include all types of injury and the measurement of injury risk associated with alcohol consumption. The amount of alcohol consumed in the event and hazardous drinking patterns seem to be strongly associated with injury occurrence, as well as drinking in public spaces, but a paucity of data relating to social-contextual factors limits the interpretation of the heterogeneity in the magnitude of the association of alcohol and injuries found across studies. Conclusions There is a lack of ER studies able to support strategies to reduce alcohol-related injuries in a region where effective alcohol policies are scant. Future research should focus on understanding how drinking influenced by local contexts and drinking behaviors may affect the risk of injury within each LAC country. PMID:22340601

  11. Effects of Air Pollution on Hospital Emergency Room Visits for Respiratory Diseases: Urban-Suburban Differences in Eastern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Liu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A study on the relationships between ambient air pollutants (PM2.5, SO2 and NO2 and hospital emergency room visits (ERVs for respiratory diseases from 2013 to 2014 was performed in both urban and suburban areas of Jinan, a heavily air-polluted city in Eastern China. This research was analyzed using generalized additive models (GAM with Poisson regression, which controls for long-time trends, the “day of the week” effect and meteorological parameters. An increase of 10 μg/m3 in PM2.5, SO2 and NO2 corresponded to a 1.4% (95% confidence interval (CI: 0.7%, 2.1%, 1.2% (95% CI: 0.5%, 1.9%, and 2.5% (95%: 0.8%, 4.2% growth in ERVs for the urban population, respectively, and a 1.5% (95%: 0.4%, 2.6%, 0.8% (95%: −0.7%, 2.3%, and 3.1% (95%: 0.5%, 5.7% rise in ERVs for the suburban population, respectively. It was found that females were more susceptible than males to air pollution in the urban area when the analysis was stratified by gender, and the reverse result was seen in the suburban area. Our results suggest that the increase in ERVs for respiratory illnesses is linked to the levels of air pollutants in Jinan, and there may be some urban-suburban discrepancies in health outcomes from air pollutant exposure.

  12. The Effect of Continuity of Care on Emergency Room Use for Diabetic Patients Varies by Disease Severity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Hsiang Hsu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although many studies have reported that high-quality continuity of care (COC is associated with improved patient outcomes for patients with diabetes, few studies have investigated whether this positive effect of COC depends on the level of diabetes severity. Methods: A total of 3781 newly diagnosed diabetic patients selected from the 2005 National Health Insurance database were evaluated for the period 2005–2011. Generalized estimating equations combined with negative binomial estimation were used to determine the influence of COC on the overall emergency room (ER use and diabetes mellitus (DM-specific ER use. Analyses were stratified according to diabetes severity (measured using the Diabetes Complications Severity Index [DCSI], comorbidities (measured using the Charlson comorbidity score, and age. Results: COC effects varied according to diabetes severity. Stratified analysis showed that the positive effect of COC on DM-specific ER use was the highest for a DCSI of 0 (least severe, with an incidence rate ratio (IRR of 0.49 (95% CI, 0.41–0.59 in the high-COC group (reference group: low-COC group. Compared with the low-COC group, high-quality COC had a significant beneficial effect on overall ER use in younger patients (IRR 0.51; 95% CI, 0.39–0.66 for the youngest [18–40 years] group, and IRR 0.67; 95% CI, 0.59–0.76 for the oldest [>65 years] group and those with a high number of comorbidities. Conclusions: The positive effects of high-quality COC on the treatment outcomes of patient with diabetes, based on the overall and DM-specific ER use, depends on the level of disease severity. Therefore, providing health education to enhance high-quality COC when the disease severity is low may be critical for ensuring optimal positive effects during diabetes disease progression.

  13. Association between Ambient Air Pollution and Emergency Room Visits for Respiratory Diseases in Spring Dust Storm Season in Lanzhou, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yuxia; Xiao, Bingshuang; Liu, Chang; Zhao, Yuxin; Zheng, Xiaodong

    2016-01-01

    Background: Air pollution has become a major global public health problem. A number of studies have confirmed the association between air pollutants and emergency room (ER) visits for respiratory diseases in developed countries and some Asian countries, but little evidence has been seen in Western China. This study aims to concentrate on this region. Methods: A time-series analysis was used to examine the specific effects of major air pollutants (PM10, SO2 and NO2) on ER visits for respiratory diseases from 2007 to 2011 in the severely polluted city of Lanzhou. We examined the effects of air pollutants for stratified groups by age and gender, accounting for the modifying effect of dust storms in spring to test the possible interaction. Results: Significant associations were found between outdoor air pollution concentrations and respiratory diseases, as expressed by daily ER visits in Lanzhou in the spring dust season. The association between air pollution and ER visits appeared to be more evident on dust days than non-dust days. Relative risks (RRs) and 95% CIs per 10 µg/m3 increase in 3-day PM10 (L3), 5-day SO2 (L5), and the average of current and previous 2-day NO2 (L01) were 1.140 (1.071–1.214), 1.080 (0.967–1.205), and 1.298 (1.158–1.454), respectively, on dust days. More significant associations between PM10, SO2 and NO2 and ER visits were found on dust days for elderly females, elderly males and adult males, respectively. Conclusions: This study strengthens the evidence of dust-exacerbated ER visits for respiratory diseases in Lanzhou. PMID:27338430

  14. Fine Particulate Air Pollution and Hospital Emergency Room Visits for Respiratory Disease in Urban Areas in Beijing, China, in 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qin; Li, Xia; Wang, Shuo; Wang, Chao; Huang, Fangfang; Gao, Qi; Wu, Lijuan; Tao, Lixin; Guo, Jin; Wang, Wei; Guo, Xiuhua

    2016-01-01

    Heavy fine particulate matter (PM2.5) air pollution occurs frequently in China. However, epidemiological research on the association between short-term exposure to PM2.5 pollution and respiratory disease morbidity is still limited. This study aimed to explore the association between PM2.5 pollution and hospital emergency room visits (ERV) for total and cause-specific respiratory diseases in urban areas in Beijing. Daily counts of respiratory ERV from Jan 1 to Dec 31, 2013, were obtained from ten general hospitals located in urban areas in Beijing. Concurrently, data on PM2.5 were collected from the Beijing Environmental Protection Bureau, including 17 ambient air quality monitoring stations. A generalized-additive model was used to explore the respiratory effects of PM2.5, after controlling for confounding variables. Subgroup analyses were also conducted by age and gender. A total of 92,464 respiratory emergency visits were recorded during the study period. The mean daily PM2.5 concentration was 102.1±73.6 μg/m3. Every 10 μg/m3 increase in PM2.5 concentration at lag0 was associated with an increase in ERV, as follows: 0.23% for total respiratory disease (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.11%-0.34%), 0.19% for upper respiratory tract infection (URTI) (95%CI: 0.04%-0.35%), 0.34% for lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) (95%CI: 0.14%-0.53%) and 1.46% for acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) (95%CI: 0.13%-2.79%). The strongest association was identified between AECOPD and PM2.5 concentration at lag0-3 (3.15%, 95%CI: 1.39%-4.91%). The estimated effects were robust after adjusting for SO2, O3, CO and NO2. Females and people 60 years of age and older demonstrated a higher risk of respiratory disease after PM2.5 exposure. PM2.5 was significantly associated with respiratory ERV, particularly for URTI, LRTI and AECOPD in Beijing. The susceptibility to PM2.5 pollution varied by gender and age.

  15. Fine Particulate Air Pollution and Hospital Emergency Room Visits for Respiratory Disease in Urban Areas in Beijing, China, in 2013.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Xu

    Full Text Available Heavy fine particulate matter (PM2.5 air pollution occurs frequently in China. However, epidemiological research on the association between short-term exposure to PM2.5 pollution and respiratory disease morbidity is still limited. This study aimed to explore the association between PM2.5 pollution and hospital emergency room visits (ERV for total and cause-specific respiratory diseases in urban areas in Beijing.Daily counts of respiratory ERV from Jan 1 to Dec 31, 2013, were obtained from ten general hospitals located in urban areas in Beijing. Concurrently, data on PM2.5 were collected from the Beijing Environmental Protection Bureau, including 17 ambient air quality monitoring stations. A generalized-additive model was used to explore the respiratory effects of PM2.5, after controlling for confounding variables. Subgroup analyses were also conducted by age and gender.A total of 92,464 respiratory emergency visits were recorded during the study period. The mean daily PM2.5 concentration was 102.1±73.6 μg/m3. Every 10 μg/m3 increase in PM2.5 concentration at lag0 was associated with an increase in ERV, as follows: 0.23% for total respiratory disease (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.11%-0.34%, 0.19% for upper respiratory tract infection (URTI (95%CI: 0.04%-0.35%, 0.34% for lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI (95%CI: 0.14%-0.53% and 1.46% for acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD (95%CI: 0.13%-2.79%. The strongest association was identified between AECOPD and PM2.5 concentration at lag0-3 (3.15%, 95%CI: 1.39%-4.91%. The estimated effects were robust after adjusting for SO2, O3, CO and NO2. Females and people 60 years of age and older demonstrated a higher risk of respiratory disease after PM2.5 exposure.PM2.5 was significantly associated with respiratory ERV, particularly for URTI, LRTI and AECOPD in Beijing. The susceptibility to PM2.5 pollution varied by gender and age.

  16. Challenges and Solutions for Mapping Innovation in a Large Emerging Economy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rai, Sudhanshu

    this paper is an outcome of my experience as a team member of the Euro-India Innovation mapping project. The project set out to map India’s IT Innovativeness over two years from January 2008-to December 2009. Here I bring to the fore the different methodologies that we reviewed in order...... to implement the innovation mapping project and our realization that each methodology in itself though useful may not be sufficient to address the complexity of the subject matter due to the vastness of India and its emerging nature. I outline some of the challenges faced by us when designing a methodology...... for mapping innovation in a large emerging economy. I discuss some solutions and report on how we solved the problem only to be faced with newer challenges. A methodological design is a challenging endeavor in the normal of time, when it comes to doing the same in a large emerging economy the problems becomes...

  17. Reverberation impairs brainstem temporal representations of voiced vowel sounds: challenging periodicity-tagged segregation of competing speech in rooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark eSayles

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The auditory system typically processes information from concurrently active sound sources (e.g., two voices speaking at once, in the presence of multiple delayed, attenuated and distorted sound-wave reflections (reverberation. Brainstem circuits help segregate these complex acoustic mixtures into auditory objects. Psychophysical studies demonstrate a strong interaction between reverberation and fundamental-frequency (F0 modulation, leading to impaired segregation of competing vowels when segregation is on the basis of F0 differences. Neurophysiological studies of complex-sound segregation have concentrated on sounds with steady F0s, in anechoic environments. However, F0 modulation and reverberation are quasi-ubiquitous.We examine the ability of 129 single units in the ventral cochlear nucleus of the anesthetized guinea pig to segregate the concurrent synthetic vowel sounds /a/ and /i/, based on temporal discharge patterns under closed-field conditions. We address the effects of added real-room reverberation, F0 modulation, and the interaction of these two factors, on brainstem neural segregation of voiced speech sounds. A firing-rate representation of single-vowels’ spectral envelopes is robust to the combination of F0 modulation and reverberation: local firing-rate maxima and minima across the tonotopic array code vowel-formant structure. However, single-vowel F0-related periodicity information in shuffled inter-spike interval distributions is significantly degraded in the combined presence of reverberation and F0 modulation. Hence, segregation of double-vowels’ spectral energy into two streams (corresponding to the two vowels, on the basis of temporal discharge patterns, is impaired by reverberation; specifically when F0 is modulated. All unit types (primary-like, chopper, onset are similarly affected. These results offer neurophysiological insights to perceptual organization of complex acoustic scenes under realistically challenging

  18. Addressing challenges for future strategic-level emergency management: reframing, networking, and capacity-building.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosomworth, Karyn; Owen, Christine; Curnin, Steven

    2017-04-01

    The mounting frequency and intensity of natural hazards, alongside growing interdependencies between social-technical and ecological systems, are placing increased pressure on emergency management. This is particularly true at the strategic level of emergency management, which involves planning for and managing non-routine, high-consequence events. Drawing on the literature, a survey, and interviews and workshops with Australia's senior emergency managers, this paper presents an analysis of five core challenges that these pressures are creating for strategic-level emergency management. It argues that emphasising 'emergency management' as a primary adaptation strategy is a retrograde step that ignores the importance of addressing socio-political drivers of vulnerabilities. Three key suggestions are presented that could assist the country's strategic-level emergency management in tackling these challenges: (i) reframe emergency management as a component of disaster risk reduction rather than them being one and the same; (ii) adopt a network governance approach; and (iii) further develop the capacities of strategic-level emergency managers. © 2017 The Author(s). Disasters © Overseas Development Institute, 2017.

  19. Outcome and predictors for successful resuscitation in the emergency room of adult patients in traumatic cardiorespiratory arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwingmann, J; Lefering, R; Feucht, M; Südkamp, N P; Strohm, P C; Hammer, T

    2016-09-06

    Data of the TraumaRegister DGU® were analyzed to derive survival rates, neurological outcome and prognostic factors of patients who had suffered traumatic cardiac arrest in the early treatment phase. The database of the TraumaRegister DGU® from 2002 to 2013 was analyzed. The main focus of this survey was on different time points of performed resuscitation. Descriptive and multivariate analyses (logistic regression) were performed with the neurological outcome (Glasgow Outcome Scale) and survival rate as the target variable. Patients were classified according to CPR in the prehospital phase and/or in the emergency room (ER). Patients without CA served as a control group. The database does not include patients who required prehospital CPR but did not achieve ROSC. A total of 3052 patients from a total of 38,499 cases had cardiac arrest during the early post-trauma phase and required CPR in the prehospital phase and/or in the ER. After only prehospital resuscitation (n = 944) survival rate was 31.7 %, and 14.7 % had a good/moderate outcome. If CPR was required in the ER only (n = 1197), survival rate was 25.6 %, with a good/moderate outcome in 19.2 % of cases. A total of 4.8 % in the group with preclinical and ER resuscitation survived, and just 2.7 % had a good or moderate outcome. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed the following prognostic factors for survival after traumatic cardiac arrest: prehospital CPR, shock, coagulopathy, thorax drainage, preclinical catecholamines, unconsciousness, and injury severity (Injury Severity Score). With the knowledge that prehospital resuscitated patients who not reached the hospital could not be included, CPR after severe trauma seems to yield a better outcome than most studies have reported, and appears to be more justified than the current guidelines would imply. Preclinical resuscitation is associated with a higher survival rate and better neurological outcome compared with resuscitation in the ER. If

  20. Clinical Predictors for Delayed or Inappropriate Initial Diagnosis of Type A Acute Aortic Dissection in the Emergency Room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Kazuhito; Wake, Minoru; Takahashi, Takanori; Nakazato, Jun; Yagi, Nobuhito; Miyagi, Tadayoshi; Shimotakahara, Junichi; Mototake, Hidemitsu; Tengan, Toshiho; Takara, Tsuyoshi R; Yamaguchi, Yutaka

    2015-01-01

    Initial diagnosis of acute aortic dissection (AAD) in the emergency room (ER) is sometimes difficult or delayed. The aim of this study is to define clinical predictors related to inappropriate or delayed diagnosis of Stanford type A AAD. We conducted a retrospective analysis of 127 consecutive patients with type A AAD who presented to the ER within 12 h of symptom onset (age: 69.0 ± 15.4 years, male/female = 49/78). An inappropriate initial diagnosis (IID) was considered if AAD was not included in the differential diagnosis or if chest computed tomography or echocardiography was not performed as initial imaging tests. Clinical variables were compared between IID and appropriate diagnosis group. The time to final diagnosis (TFD) was also evaluated. Delayed diagnosis (DD) was defined as TFD > third quartile. Clinical factors predicting DD were evaluated in comparison with early diagnosis (defined as TFD within the third quartile). In addition, TFD was compared with respect to each clinical variable using a rank sum test. An IID was determined for 37% of patients. Walk-in (WI) visit to the ER [odds ratio (OR) 2.6, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.01-6.72, P = 0.048] and coronary malperfusion (CM, OR = 6.48, 95% CI = 1.14-36.82, P = 0.035) were predictors for IID. Overall, the median TFD was 1.5 h (first/third quartiles = 0.5/4.0 h). DD (>4.5 h) was observed in 27 cases (21.3%). TFD was significantly longer in WI patients (median and first/third quartiles = 1.0 and 0.5/2.85 h for the ambulance group vs. 3.0 and 1.0/8.0 h for the WI group, respectively; P = 0.003). Multivariate analysis revealed that WI visit was the only predictor for DD (OR = 3.72, 95% CI = 1.39-9.9, P = 0.009). TFD was significantly shorter for appropriate diagnoses than for IIDs (1.0 vs. 6.0 h, respectively; P < 0.0001). WI visit to the ER and CM were predictors for IID, and WI was the only predictor for DD in acute type A AAD in the community hospital.

  1. Clinical Predictors for Delayed or Inappropriate Initial Diagnosis of Type A Acute Aortic Dissection in the Emergency Room.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhito Hirata

    Full Text Available Initial diagnosis of acute aortic dissection (AAD in the emergency room (ER is sometimes difficult or delayed. The aim of this study is to define clinical predictors related to inappropriate or delayed diagnosis of Stanford type A AAD.We conducted a retrospective analysis of 127 consecutive patients with type A AAD who presented to the ER within 12 h of symptom onset (age: 69.0 ± 15.4 years, male/female = 49/78. An inappropriate initial diagnosis (IID was considered if AAD was not included in the differential diagnosis or if chest computed tomography or echocardiography was not performed as initial imaging tests. Clinical variables were compared between IID and appropriate diagnosis group. The time to final diagnosis (TFD was also evaluated. Delayed diagnosis (DD was defined as TFD > third quartile. Clinical factors predicting DD were evaluated in comparison with early diagnosis (defined as TFD within the third quartile. In addition, TFD was compared with respect to each clinical variable using a rank sum test.An IID was determined for 37% of patients. Walk-in (WI visit to the ER [odds ratio (OR 2.6, 95% confidence interval (CI = 1.01-6.72, P = 0.048] and coronary malperfusion (CM, OR = 6.48, 95% CI = 1.14-36.82, P = 0.035 were predictors for IID. Overall, the median TFD was 1.5 h (first/third quartiles = 0.5/4.0 h. DD (>4.5 h was observed in 27 cases (21.3%. TFD was significantly longer in WI patients (median and first/third quartiles = 1.0 and 0.5/2.85 h for the ambulance group vs. 3.0 and 1.0/8.0 h for the WI group, respectively; P = 0.003. Multivariate analysis revealed that WI visit was the only predictor for DD (OR = 3.72, 95% CI = 1.39-9.9, P = 0.009. TFD was significantly shorter for appropriate diagnoses than for IIDs (1.0 vs. 6.0 h, respectively; P < 0.0001.WI visit to the ER and CM were predictors for IID, and WI was the only predictor for DD in acute type A AAD in the community hospital.

  2. Value of systematic detection of physical child abuse at emergency rooms: a cross-sectional diagnostic accuracy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sittig, Judith S; Uiterwaal, Cuno S P M; Moons, Karel G M; Russel, Ingrid M B; Nievelstein, Rutger A J; Nieuwenhuis, Edward E S; van de Putte, Elise M

    2016-03-22

    The aim of our diagnostic accuracy study Child Abuse Inventory at Emergency Rooms (CHAIN-ER) was to establish whether a widely used checklist accurately detects or excludes physical abuse among children presenting to ERs with physical injury. A large multicentre study with a 6-month follow-up. 4 ERs in The Netherlands. 4290 children aged 0-7 years attending the ER because of physical injury. All children were systematically tested with an easy-to-use child abuse checklist (index test). A national expert panel (reference standard) retrospectively assessed all children with positive screens and a 15% random sample of the children with negative screens for physical abuse, using additional information, namely, an injury history taken by a paediatrician, information provided by the general practitioner, youth doctor and social services by structured questionnaires, and 6-month follow-up information. Physical child abuse. Injury due to neglect and need for help. 4253/4290 (99%) parents agreed to follow-up. At a prevalence of 0.07% (3/4253) for inflicted injury by expert panel decision, the positive predictive value of the checklist was 0.03 (95% CI 0.006 to 0.085), and the negative predictive value 1.0 (0.994 to 1.0). There was 100% (93 to 100) agreement about inflicted injury in children, with positive screens between the expert panel and child abuse experts. Rare cases of inflicted injury among preschool children presenting at ERs for injury are very likely captured by easy-to-use checklists, but at very high false-positive rates. Subsequent assessment by child abuse experts can be safely restricted to children with positive screens at very low risk of missing cases of inflicted injury. Because of the high false positive rate, we do advise careful prior consideration of cost-effectiveness and clinical and societal implications before de novo implementation. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence

  3. Association between temperature and emergency room visits for cardiorespiratory diseases, metabolic syndrome-related diseases, and accidents in metropolitan Taipei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu-Chun; Lin, Yu-Kai

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated risks of the emergency room visits (ERV) for cerebrovascular diseases, heart diseases, ischemic heart disease, hypertensive diseases, chronic renal failure (CRF), diabetes mellitus (DM), asthma, chronic airway obstruction not elsewhere classified (CAO), and accidents associated with the ambient temperature from 2000 to 2009 in metropolitan Taipei. The distributed lag non-linear model was used to estimate the cumulative relative risk (RR) and confidence interval (CI) of cause-specific ERV associated with daily temperature from lag 0 to lag 3 after controlling for potential confounders. This study identified that temperatures related to the lowest risk of ERV was 26 °C for cerebrovascular diseases, 18 °C for CRF, DM, and accidents, and 30 °C for hypertensive diseases, asthma, and CAO. These temperatures were used as the reference temperatures to measure RR for the corresponding diseases. A low temperature (14°C) increased the ERV risk for cerebrovascular diseases, hypertensive diseases, and asthma, with respective cumulative 4-day RRs of 1.56 (95% CI: 1.23, 1.97), 1.78 (95% CI: 1.37, 2.34), and 2.93 (95% CI: 1.26, 6.79). The effects were greater on, or after, lag one. At 32°C, the cumulative 4-day RR for ERV was significant for CRF (RR = 2.36; 95% CI: 1.33, 4.19) and accidents (RR = 1.23; 95% CI: 1.14, 1.33) and the highest RR was seen on lag 0 for CRF (RR = 1.69; 95% CI: 1.01, 3.58), DM (RR = 1.69; 95% CI: 1.09, 2.61), and accidents (RR = 1.19; 95% CI: 1.11, 1.27). Higher temperatures are associated with the increased ERV risks for CRF, DM, and accidents and lower temperatures with the increased ERV risks for cerebrovascular diseases, hypertensive diseases, and asthma in the subtropical metropolitan.

  4. Methodology for the identification of the factors that can influence the performance of operators of nuclear power plants control room under emergency situations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paiva, Bernardo Spitz; Santos, Isaac J.A. Luquetti

    2009-01-01

    In order to minimize the human errors of the operators in a nuclear power plan control room, during emergency situations, it has to be considered the factors which affect the human performance. Work situations adequately projected, compatible with the necessities, capacities and human limitations, taking into consideration the factors which affect the operator performance . This paper aims to develop a methodology for identification of the factors affecting the operator performance under emergency situation, using the aspects defined by the human reliability analysis focusing the judgment done by specialists

  5. [An analysis of coping styles and subjective well-being among nurses in the emergency treatment room of grade A tertiary hospitals in a province of China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, C X; Meng, Q B; Yuan, S Y; Tian, Y P; Gao, H B; Yao, D Q

    2017-12-20

    Objective: To investigate the coping styles and subjective well-being of nurses in the emergency treatment room of grade A tertiary hospitals in a province of China, and to explore the relationship between coping styles and subjective well-being. Methods: In January 2016, 189 nurses in the emergency treatment room were selected from 9 grade A tertiary hospitals in a province of China by random sampling. The general data, coping styles, and subjective well-being of these nurses were analyzed using the general questionnaire, coping style questionnaire, and Campbell index of well-being scale, respectively. Results: The total score of subjective well-being of nurses in the emergency treatment room was 7.54, and the subjective well-being was significantly different between the nurses with different professional titles and between those with different education levels ( F =3.46 and 3.47, both P Subjective well-being was positively correlated with problem-solving, help-seeking, and rationalization ( r =0.232, 0.018, and 0.167, all P subjective well-being and coping style vary with different ages, nursing years, professional titles, and education levels, and the subjective well-being is relatively low.

  6. The emergence of enterprise systems management: a challenge to the IS curriculum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Charles; Kræmmergaard, Pernille; Rikhardsson, Pall M.

    2006-01-01

    This paper proposes four cornerstones of a future Information Systems (IS) curriculum. It analyses the challenges of the IS curriculum based on the development of enterprise systems, and further argues that the practice and the research into enterprise systems have progressed to a new stage...... resulting in the emergence of Enterprise Systems Management (ESM). ESM calls for new competences and consequently represents new challenges to the IS curriculum. The paper outlines potential teaching issues and discusses the impact on the IS curriculum. Finally the paper suggests ways of approaching...... the challenges...

  7. Sala de emergência em pediatria: casuística de um hospital universitário Pediatric emergency room: experience at a university hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Gut L. Riccetto

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Descrever a casuística de pacientes pediátricos atendidos em sala de emergência pediátrica de um hospital universitário. MÉTODOS: Estudo retrospectivo descritivo de 1º de janeiro até 31 de dezembro de 2004, com crianças de zero a 14 anos, avaliadas quanto a dados epidemiológicos, hipótese diagnóstica, intubação orotraqueal, óbito, destino e duração da internação. Os pacientes foram divididos em quatro grupos: Não Óbitos; Óbitos 24 horas e transferidos para outros hospitais. RESULTADOS: Foram atendidas 203 crianças; 59,1% meninos; média de idade 3,4 anos; 65% previamente hígidos. O diagnóstico mais freqüente foi insuficiência respiratória (31,1%. Dentre os 22 óbitos, 3,5% ocorreram nas primeiras 24 horas e 7,4% após estas primeiras 24 horas; 172 crianças (84,7% evoluíram para alta após período médio de internação de 19,2 dias. Nove (4,4% foram transferidas para outros hospitais. Das 203 crianças atendidas, 50 (24,6% foram intubadas à admissão e 86 (42,4% necessitaram internação em unidade de terapia intensiva pediátrica. CONCLUSÕES: Os pacientes que evoluíram para óbito precoce eram mais jovens e com diagnóstico de choque. Nos pacientes que evoluíram para óbito após 24 horas do atendimento inicial, predominaram meninas, com doenças prévias e insuficiência respiratória. Aqueles que sobreviveram ao atendimento de emergência eram, em maior freqüência, meninos mais velhos e com doenças respiratórias. Houve necessidade significativa de procedimento invasivo (intubação orotraqueal e internação subseqüente em unidade de terapia intensiva, o que reforça a necessidade de equipamentos adequados e profissionais especializados no setor.OBJECTIVE: Describe the clinical course of pediatric patients treated at a pediatric emergency room in a university hospital. METHODS: This retrospective descriptive study was conducted between January 1st and December 31st, 2004. Data retrieved were

  8. Expected utility value of Tc-99m sestamibi rest gated myocardial perfusion SPECT imaging at the emergency room compared to troponins and non-guided hospitalization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merlano, S.; Rodriguez, E.; Murgueitio, R.

    2006-01-01

    The evaluation of acute chest pain at the emergency room remains a challenge. The expected utility value of the Tc- 99m sestamibi rest gated myocardial perfusion SPECT imaging (rest gated SPECT) in patients with typical or atypical chest pain and normal or non diagnostic electrocardiogram was evaluated. Three decision models were developed. In the first model; Decision Tree-A, non guided hospitalization and rest gated SPECT were analyzed. The second model; Decision Tree -B, analysed Troponins within 0-12 hrs and hospitalization, and the third model, i.e., Decision Tree -C, analyzed Troponins and rest gated SPECT. Patients and outcomes were categorised as follows: 1. High risk patients, those with positive scans who experienced adverse cardiac events (True positive); 2. Patients with positive results who did not have an acute event (False positive); 3. Negative results without an event (True negative); 4. High risk patients hospitalized who did not have acute event (False positive) and 5. Low risk patients with proven acute coronary event (False negative). We incorporated probabilities for measuring the favorable and unfavorable outcomes, using a scale of 0 to 1. Expected utilities were calculated using the software Tree Age through the roll-back method. The overall expected utility of rest gated SPECT to decide hospitalization was 0.79, while the non-guided hospitalization was 0 .45. The highest expected utility encountered was 0.91 for the decision of no hospitalization based on a negative rest perfusion scan result with a favorable outcome. When troponins and hospitalization were compared, the expected utility value observed for troponin was 0.59, greater than that of 0.47 for the symptom based hospitalization. Finally, when the two alternatives troponins and myocardial perfusion imaging were compared, the greatest expected utility value observed was with the nuclear cardiology procedure with an expected utility value of 0.81, as compared to that of 0.60 for the

  9. Information and Communications Technology (ICT) in Nigeria Educational Assessment System--Emerging Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aworanti, Olatunde Awotokun

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines Information and Communications Technology (ICT) in Nigeria educational assessment system with its emerging challenges. This is inevitable following the globalisation trend which has brought drastic changes in the world of technology. The essence of the paper is to describe the present status of ICT in the Nigeria educational…

  10. Consumo de alcohol en la consulta de una sala de emergencia Alcohol consumption in the emergency room

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ethel Alderete

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Se examinaron patrones de consumo de alcohol y alcoholemia en sala de emergencia del hospital público de referencia para traumatismos en la provincia de Jujuy aplicando el Instrumento de Evaluación para los Trastornos Debidos al Consumo de Alcohol, versión corta (AUDIT-C. Se entrevistaron pacientes durante las 24 horas de 4 días (N=500 y se obtuvieron muestras para prueba de alcoholemia en el 84%. El 37% presentaba consumo de riesgo (hombres 50% vs. mujeres 23% y el 29% tenía síntomas de dependencia (hombres 48% vs. mujeres 11%. El 17% de los hombres y el 3% de las mujeres tenían un nivel de alcoholemia igual o mayor a 50 mg/dl. En modelos de regresión logística multivariados la razón de posibilidades para los hombres de ser consumidores de riesgo (OR ajustado 3.2; IC 95% 2.1-5.0, tener síntomas de dependencia (OR ajustado 7.5; IC 95% 4.4-12.7 o niveles elevados de alcoholemia (OR ajustado 8.0; IC 95% 2.2-28.8, fue mayor que para las mujeres. Para ingresos por accidentes, situaciones de violencia o uso de drogas, la razón de posibilidades de ser consumidores de riesgo (OR ajustado 2.4; IC 95% 1.5-3.9, presentar síntomas de dependencia (OR ajustado 2.0; IC 95% 1.2-3.3, o alcoholemia (OR ajustado 7.7; IC 95% 3.0-19.8 fue mayor comparados con ingresos por otras causas. El alcoholismo tiene un impacto significativo en la ocurrencia de lesiones e influye sobre la demanda de atención médica. La implementación de programas de prevención podría ser una herramienta efectiva para reducir el impacto negativo del alcoholismo.We examined patterns of alcohol consumption and blood alcohol levels in emergency room patients. The study was conducted in a public hospital of the province of Jujuy, Argentina. A survey was conducted among all patients during the 24 hours of 4 consecutive days (N=500 using the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test, short version (AUDIT-C. Blood samples were collected in 84% of participants. Results showed that 37

  11. Drivers and challenges for implementing ISO 14001 environmental management systems in an emerging Gulf Arab country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waxin, Marie-France; Knuteson, Sandra L; Bartholomew, Aaron

    2017-11-13

    Worldwide, ISO 14001 certification for organizations has become the norm, but the Arab world accounts for an insignificant portion of all the certified organizations. There is a dearth of research on environmental management systems (EMS) in Arab and emerging countries and in public organizations. The objectives of this research are to: (1) examine the key drivers and challenges related to implementation of ISO 14001 certified EMS in the United Arab Emirates, an emerging Arab country and (2) compare and contrast these drivers and challenges between private and public organizations. We adopt an explorative, qualitative methodology, using semi-structured interviews with environmental managers in 11 organizations (6 private and 5 public) from different industrial sectors. Drivers of EMS certification were mostly similar between private and public organizations, with some differences. Compliance with regulations and standards, and increasing environmental performance were the main drivers for ISO 14001 certification in both private and public organizations. Commitment to sustainability was more important for public organizations. Cost reduction, competitors, leadership commitment and customers' demands were shared drivers, but more stressed by private organizations. Local community and employees' pressures were reported by private organizations only. The challenges to ISO 14001 implementation were similar for private and public organizations. They were: a lack of qualified human resources, practical challenges associated with implementation, a lack of regulations, a lack of support from management, and high costs. Our findings have implications for managers, academics, consultants, and policy makers in the UAE and other emerging markets.

  12. The Emergence of Enterprise Systems Management - A Challenge to the IS Curriculum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Charles; Kræmmergaard, Pernille; Rikhardsson, Pall M.

    This paper proposes four cornerstones of a future Information Systems curriculum. It analyzes the challenges of the IS curriculum based on the development of enterprise systems, and further argues that the practice and the research into enterprise systems have progressed to a new stage resulting...... in the emergence of Enterprise Systems Management (ESM). Enterprise Systems Management calls for new competences and consequently represents new challenges to the IS curriculum. The paper outlines potential teaching issues and discusses the impact on the IS curriculum. Finally the paper suggests ways...

  13. The emergence of enterprise systems management: a challenge to the IS curriculum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Charles; Kræmmergaard, Pernille; Rikhardsson, Pall M.

    2006-01-01

    This paper proposes four cornerstones of a future Information Systems (IS) curriculum. It analyses the challenges of the IS curriculum based on the development of enterprise systems, and further argues that the practice and the research into enterprise systems have progressed to a new stage...... resulting in the emergence of Enterprise Systems Management (ESM). ESM calls for new competences and consequently represents new challenges to the IS curriculum. The paper outlines potential teaching issues and discusses the impact on the IS curriculum. Finally the paper suggests ways of approaching...

  14. The Emergence of Enterprise Systems Management - A Challenge to the IS Curriculum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Charles; Kræmmergaard, Pernille; Rikhardsson, Pall M.

    2005-01-01

    This paper proposes four cornerstones of a future Information Systems curriculum. It analyzes the challenges of the IS curriculum based on the development of enterprise systems, and further argues that the practice and the research into enterprise systems have progressed to a new stage resulting...... in the emergence of Enterprise Systems Management (ESM). Enterprise Systems Management calls for new competences and consequently represents new challenges to the IS curriculum. The paper outlines potential teaching issues and discusses the impact on the IS curriculum. Finally the paper suggests ways...

  15. Rural trauma and emergency medical service challenges in a sample of Western States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, Jolene R; Werner, Susan; Wilson, Susan; Sanddal, Nels; Conditt, Vicki; Sale, Peggy; Mann, Clay; Nemec, Jennie; Jones, Johnathan J; Sandeno, Grace; Hartford, Diane

    2010-01-01

    State trauma system managers from the western region meet annually to identify and address health care issues, particularly those related to trauma care access and delivery. In each of these states, policy makers face a host of convergent problems: declining populations, rapid growth, low incomes, and high poverty rates. Challenges of providing emergency medical services to largely rural states include geographic barriers of vast expanses of unpopulated landmass, provision of services across mountain ranges, volcanoes, and extreme weather conditions, communication challenges due to lack of cell or radio coverage in some areas, and difficulty recruiting and retaining trained personnel.

  16. The emergence of enterprise systems management: a challenge to the IS curriculum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Charles; Kræmmergaard, Pernille; Rikhardsson, Pall M.

    2006-01-01

    resulting in the emergence of Enterprise Systems Management (ESM). ESM calls for new competences and consequently represents new challenges to the IS curriculum. The paper outlines potential teaching issues and discusses the impact on the IS curriculum. Finally the paper suggests ways of approaching......This paper proposes four cornerstones of a future Information Systems (IS) curriculum. It analyses the challenges of the IS curriculum based on the development of enterprise systems, and further argues that the practice and the research into enterprise systems have progressed to a new stage...

  17. Evaluation of acid-base disorders in dogs and cats presenting to an emergency room. Part 2: comparison of anion gap, strong ion gap, and semiquantitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopper, Kate; Epstein, Steven E; Kass, Philip H; Mellema, Matthew S

    2014-01-01

    To compare the diagnostic performance of the anion gap (AG) with 2 physicochemical approaches to identify unmeasured anions. Prospective cohort study. University teaching hospital. Eighty-four dogs and 14 cats presenting to a university teaching hospital emergency room. All dogs and cats in which venous blood samples for acid-base, lactate, and serum biochemical analysis were all collected within 60 minutes of each other, over a 5-month enrollment period. Unmeasured anions were quantified using each of three approaches: the anion gap (AG), strong ion gap (SIG), and a semiquantitative approach (XA). An increased AG metabolic acidosis was evident in 34/98 of cases. The Stewart approach identified an increased SIG acidosis in 49/98 of cases. There was a strong correlation between SIG and AG (r = 0.89; P anions in 68/98 of cases. There was a moderate correlation between AG and XA (r = 0.68; P anions occurred commonly in this sample of small animal emergency room patients and physiochemical approaches identified more animals with unmeasured anions than the traditional AG calculation. Further studies are needed to determine if the results of the physicochemical approach improves clinical management and warrants the associated increases in cost and complexity. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2014.

  18. Conhecimento sobre anticoagulantes orais e seu manejo por médicos de pronto atendimento Emergency-room doctors' knowledge about oral anticoagulants and its management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa Periotto Borlina

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Contexto: Desde sua descoberta, os anticoagulantes orais (AO têm sido cada vez mais estudados e aplicados em diferentes doenças. No entanto, eles apresentam reações medicamentosas com fármacos que trazem riscos ao paciente. Objetivo: Identificar o nível de conhecimento dos médicos plantonistas de pronto atendimento sobre os AO e suas interações, medicamentosas ou não, e verificar se o médico frentista está preparado para integrar o conteúdo teórico com a rotina de urgências. Método: Aplicou-se um questionário a 100 médicos atuantes em pronto atendimentos de dois hospitais públicos e três privados em Curitiba. Visou-se saber se o médico frentista questiona ao paciente sobre o uso de AO. Também, avaliou-se o conhecimento do profissional e seu interesse em saber mais sobre: AO (quais deles conhecia; exames para controle; sinergismo com AO; e manejo das complicações. Resultados: Dos 100 entrevistados, 60% declararam perguntar ao paciente sobre o uso de AO, 81% tinham conhecimento insuficiente a respeito do sinergismo de algumas substâncias apresentadas e os AO, 15% desconheciam qual exame é utilizado para acompanhamento dos pacientes anticoagulados, 50,7% não sabiam os nomes comercias dos AO, 4% desconheciam seu antídoto, e 92% manifestaram interesse em melhorar seus conhecimentos sobre os AO. Conclusão: É BAIXo o número de médicos que atende em pronto atendimentos que conhece sobre os AO e que sabe manejar pacientes anticoagulados. É alta a porcentagem de médicos que não perguntam aos pacientes sobre o uso de AO e que desconhecem princípios do sinergismo medicamentoso, sendo que a maioria se interessou em melhorar seus conhecimentos sobre os anticoagulantes.Background: Since its discovery, oral anticoagulants (OA have been increasingly studied and used to treat different diseases. However, OA may cause adverse drug interactions that bring risks for patients. Objective: To identify the emergency room doctors

  19. Public health challenges and emerging diseases: the case of São Paulo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva Luiz Jacintho da

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The author discusses the challenges posed by emerging infectious diseases in 100 years of public health in the state of São Paulo, Brazil. With an advanced and organized public health system, São Paulo responded to the emergence of infectious diseases by creating research institutions and control programs. The late 19th century witnessed the first modern research institution in microbiology, in response to the bubonic plague. A changing economy led to constant changes in ecosystems. The late 20th century presents a wide array of both emerging and rapidly changing infectious diseases. The present situation calls for creative solutions. Ecosystem analysis and more agile epidemiological surveillance are seen as the best alternatives.

  20. Emerging issues and challenges in conservation of biodiversity in the rangelands of Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jafari Kideghesho

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Tanzania rangelands are a stronghold for biodiversity harbouring a variety of animal and plant species of economic, ecological and socio-cultural importance. Efforts to protect these resources against destruction and loss have involved, among other things, setting aside some tracks of land as protected areas in the form of national parks, nature reserves, game reserves, game controlled and wildlife management areas. However, these areas and adjacent lands have long been subjected to a number of emerging issues and challenges, which complicate their management, thus putting the resources at risk of over exploitation and extinction. These issues and challenges include, among other things, government policies, failure of conservation (as a form of land use to compete effectively with alternative land uses, habitat degradation and blockage of wildlife corridors, overexploitation and illegal resource extraction, wildfires, human population growth, poverty, HIV/AIDS pandemic and human-wildlife conflicts. In this paper, we review the emerging issues and challenges in biodiversity conservation by drawing experience from different parts of Tanzania. The paper is based on the premise that, understanding of the issues and challenges underpinning the rangelands is a crucial step towards setting up of plausible objectives, strategies and plans that will improve and lead to effective management of these areas. We conclude by recommending some proactive measures that may enhance the sustainability of the rangeland resources for the benefit of the current and future generations.

  1. Brief motivational interview and educational brochure in emergency room settings for adolescents and young adults with alcohol-related problems: a randomized single-blind clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segatto, Maria Luiza; Andreoni, Solange; de Souza e Silva, Rebeca; Diehl, Alessandra; Pinsky, Ilana

    2011-09-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of brief motivational interviewing and an educational brochure when delivered in emergency room to reduce alcohol abuse and related problems among adolescents and young adults. A randomized single-blind clinical trial with a three-month follow-up was carried out at three emergency rooms from October 2004 to November 2005; subjects assessed were 16-25 years old treated for alcohol related events up to 6 hours after consumption. Socio-demographic data, quantity, frequency and negative consequences of alcohol consumption, motivation to change habits and future risk perception were evaluated. Statistical analysis was performed on subjects who completed follow-up (completers). ANCOVA model was used to analyze the difference between the intervention groups with statistical significance level α = 5% and confidence interval (CI) of 95%. 186 subjects formed the initial sample, being 175 included and randomized to the educational brochure group (n = 88) or motivational interviewing group (n = 87). Follow-up assessment was performed in 85.2% of the sample. No significant difference between groups was observed. However, significant reductions (p motivational interviewing, educational brochure and nonintervention should be of future interest among Brazilian adolescent populations.

  2. Towards an integrated approach to emergency management: interdisciplinary challenges for research and practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Webersik

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This article presents an interdisciplinary vision for large-scale integrated emergency management that has been inspired by the transition from platform centric to inte-grated operations in the oil and gas fields, which uses remote emergency control centres collaborating virtually with local responders. The article discusses some of the most salient research challenges for integrated emergency management, including the role of mobile technology, human-centred sensing, citizen participation and social media, and the socio-cultural determinants of disaster management. The purpose of this article is to frame an integrated emergency management approach that adopts a multi-disciplinary approach, including human computer interaction, information systems, computer science, development studies and organization science employing different methodologies.Most importantly, we need to better understand the socio-cultural determinants of how people prepare to, respond and perceive disasters, in order to evaluate whether and what kind of information and communication technology (ICT support is appropriate. There is need for more research as to why in some regions local people ignore official orders to evacuate, and rather follow the advice of local leaders, elders or religious leaders. In other instances, disasters are seen as 'acts of God' thus shaping disaster preparedness and response.

  3. Laccases to take on the challenge of emerging organic contaminants in wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasser, Christoph A; Ammann, Erik M; Shahgaldian, Patrick; Corvini, Philippe F-X

    2014-12-01

    The removal of emerging organic contaminants from municipal wastewater poses a major challenge unsatisfactorily addressed by present wastewater treatment processes. Enzyme-catalyzed transformation of emerging organic contaminants (EOC) has been proposed as a possible solution to this major environmental issue more than a decade ago. Especially, laccases gained interest in this context in recent years due to their broad substrate range and since they only need molecular oxygen as a cosubstrate. In order to ensure the stability of the enzymes and allow their retention and reuse, either immobilization or insolubilization of the biocatalysts seems to be the prerequisite for continuous wastewater treatment applications. The present review summarizes the research conducted on EOC transformation with laccases and presents an overview of the possible immobilization techniques. The goal is to assess the state of the art and identify the next necessary steps that have to be undertaken in order to implement laccases as a tertiary wastewater treatment process in sewage treatment plants.

  4. Monitoring techniques for the impact assessment during nuclear and radiological emergencies: current status and the challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pradeepkumar, K.S.; Sharma, D.N.

    2003-01-01

    Preparedness and response capability for Nuclear and Radiological emergencies, existing world over, are mainly based on the requirement of responding to radiation emergency caused by nuclear or radiological accidents. Cosmos satellite accident, plutonium contamination at Polaris, nuclear accidents like Kystium, Windscale, TMI and Chernobyl, radiological accidents at Goiania etc have demonstrated the requirement of improved radiation monitoring techniques. For quick decision making, state of the art monitoring methodology which can support quantitative and qualitative impact assessment is essential. Evaluation of radiological mapping of the area suspected to be contaminated needs ground based as well as aerial based monitoring systems to predict the level of radioactive contamination on ground. This will help in delineating the area and deciding the required countermeasures, based on the quantity and type of radionuclides responsible for it. The response can be successful with the effective use of i) Early Warning System ii) Mobile Monitoring System and iii) Aerial Gamma Spectrometric System. Selection of the monitoring methodology and survey parameters and assessment of situation using available resources etc. are to be optimized depending on the accident scenario. Recently, many countries and agencies like IAEA have expressed the requirement for responding to other types of nuclear/radiological emergencies i.e, man made radiation emergency situations aimed at harming public at large that can also lead to environmental contamination and significant exposure to public. Reports of lost / misplaced / stolen radioactive sources from many countries are alarming as safety and security of these radioactive sources are under challenge. The monitoring methodology has to take into account of the increase in such demands and more periodic monitoring in suspected locations is to be carried out. Detection of orphan sources possible amidst large heap of metallic scraps may pose

  5. Proposed protocol for realization of abdominal CT in patients admitted to the emergency room for trauma in HSJD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quesada Cascante, Lizbeth

    2013-01-01

    A protocol is established for computed tomography in trauma patients treated in emergency of Hospital San Juan de Dios. A literature review is conducted on abdominal CT protocols in specialized databases. The criteria, scanning, parameters and delay time are established for realization of abdominal CT in patients with traumatic emergencies in HSJD. Taking the thickness of the sections, the thickness of the sections in reconstruction, the quantities of contrast and the speed of injection in patients, have been standardized for the realization of abdominal CT in HSJD. Computed tomography should be preferably performed of routine in portal phase and the late from 5 minutes in patients with abdominal trauma, contributing in this phase as much information regarding the extent of abdominal injury [es

  6. Human Rights Education before the Challenges of the Emerging Human Rights of the 21st Century

    OpenAIRE

    Gloria Ramirez

    2006-01-01

    This article examines Human Rights Education vis-a-vis the challenges of the emerging human rights of the 21st century. It discusses the difficult situation of HRE in the uncertain and insecure times of globalization and permanent violence particularly after the September 11 attacks. In spite of these unfavorable circumstances, it can be concluded that HRE has gained ground in the agenda of NGO´s to become a demand formulated hand in hand with the fight for democracy and peace. Due to the fac...

  7. Requirements and Challenges of Location-Based Access Control in Healthcare Emergency Response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vicente, Carmen Ruiz; Kirkpatrick, Michael; Ghinita, Gabriel

    2009-01-01

    Recent advances in positioning and tracking technologies have led to the emergence of novel location-based applications that allow participants to access information relevant to their spatio-temporal context. Traditional access control models, such as role-based access control (RBAC......), are not sufficient to address the new challenges introduced by these location-based applications. Several recent research efforts have enhanced RBAC with spatio-temporal features. Nevertheless, the state-of-the-art does not deal with mobility of both subjects and objects and does not support the utilization...

  8. [Mild head injury in children and adults. Diagnostic challenges in the emergency department].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leidel, B A; Lindner, T; Wolf, S; Bogner, V; Steinbeck, A; Börner, N; Peiser, C; Audebert, H J; Biberthaler, P; Kanz, K-G

    2015-01-01

    Mild head injuries are one of the most frequent reasons for attending emergency departments and are particularly challenging in different ways. While clinically important injuries are infrequent, delayed or missed injuries may lead to fatal consequences. The initial mostly inconspicuous appearance may not reflect the degree of intracranial injury and computed tomography (CT) is necessary to rule out covert injuries. Furthermore, infants and young children with a lack of or rudimentary cognitive and language development are challenging, especially for those examiners not familiar with pediatric care. Established check lists of clinical risk factors for children and adults regarding traumatic brain injuries allow specific and rational decision-making for cranial CT imaging. Clinically important intracranial injuries can be reliably detected and unnecessary radiation exposure avoided at the same time.

  9. [Mild head injury in children and adults: Diagnostic challenges in the emergency department].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leidel, B A; Lindner, T; Wolf, S; Bogner, V; Steinbeck, A; Börner, N; Peiser, C; Audebert, H J; Biberthaler, P; Kanz, K-G

    2015-06-01

    Mild head injuries are one of the most frequent reasons for attending emergency departments and are particularly challenging in different ways. While clinically important injuries are infrequent, delayed or missed injuries may lead to fatal consequences. The initial mostly inconspicuous appearance may not reflect the degree of intracranial injury and computed tomography (CT) is necessary to rule out covert injuries. Furthermore, infants and young children with a lack of or rudimentary cognitive and language development are challenging, especially for those examiners not familiar with pediatric care. Established check lists of clinical risk factors for children and adults regarding traumatic brain injuries allow specific and rational decision-making for cranial CT imaging. Clinically important intracranial injuries can be reliably detected and unnecessary radiation exposure avoided at the same time.

  10. Crisis Resource Management in the Delivery Room: Development of Behavioral Markers for Team Performance in Emergency Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracco, Fabrizio; de Tonetti, Gabriele; Masini, Michele; Passarelli, Marcello; Geretto, Francesca; Celleno, Danilo

    2018-03-03

    Human factors are the most relevant issues contributing to adverse events in obstetrics. Specific training of Crisis Resource Management (CRM) skills (i.e., problem solving and team management, resource allocation, awareness of environment, and dynamic decision-making) is now widespread and is often based on High Fidelity Simulation. In order to be used as a guideline in simulated scenarios, CRM skills need to be mapped to specific and observable behavioral markers. For this purpose, we developed a set of observable behaviors related to the main elements of CRM in the delivery room. The observational tool was then adopted in a two-days seminar on obstetric hemorrhage where teams working in obstetric wards of six Italian hospitals took part in simulations. The tool was used as a guide for the debriefing and as a peer-to-peer feedback. It was then rated for its usefulness in facilitating the reflection upon one's own behavior, its ease of use, and its usefulness for the peer-to-peer feedback. The ratings were positive, with a median of 4 on a 5-point scale. The CRM observational tool has therefore been well-received and presents a promising level of inter-rater agreement. We believe the tool could have value in facilitating debriefing and in the peer-to-peer feedback.

  11. Qualitative Study to Understand Ordering of CT Angiography to Diagnose Pulmonary Embolism in the Emergency Room Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyftopoulos, Soterios; Smith, Silas W; Simon, Emma; Kuznetsova, Masha; Horwitz, Leora I; Makarov, Danil V

    2017-10-19

    To better understand the decision making behind the ordering of CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA) for the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism (PE) in the emergency department. We conducted semistructured interviews with our institution's emergency medicine (EM) providers and radiologists who read CTPAs performed in the emergency department. We employed the Theoretical Domains Framework-a formal, structured approach used to better understand the motivations and beliefs of physicians surrounding a complex medical decision making-to categorize the themes that arose from our interviews. EM providers were identified as the main drivers of CTPA ordering. Both EM and radiologist groups perceived the radiologist's role as more limited. Experience- and gestalt-based heuristics were the most important factors driving this decision and more important, in many cases, than established algorithms for CTPA ordering. There were contrasting views on the value of d-dimer in the suspected PE workup, with EM providers finding this test less useful than radiologists. EM provider and radiologist suggestions for improving the appropriateness of CTPA ordering consisted of making this process more arduous and incorporating d-dimer tests and prediction rules into a decision support tool. EM providers were the main drivers of CTPA ordering, and there was a marginalized role for the radiologist. Experience- and gestalt-based heuristics were the main influencers of CTPA ordering. Our findings suggest that a more nuanced intervention than simply including a d-dimer and a prediction score in each preimaging workup may be necessary to curb overordering of CTPA in patients suspected of PE. Copyright © 2017 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Detection of Ebola Virus RNA through Aerosol Sampling of Animal Biosafety Level 4 Rooms Housing Challenged Nonhuman Primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-02

    rule out fomite nor direct contact during husbandry 6 practices as a possible source of transmission [7, 8]. Aerosol sampling conducted 7 during the...husbandry staff operations to minimize the potential for 7 fomite collection. Both Study I and Study III relied on IM challenges only while Study 8 II...PE. Assessment of the risk of Ebola virus transmission from bodily fluids and fomites . J 18 Infect Dis. 2007;196 Suppl 2:S142-7. 19 7. Jaax N

  13. Endocrine emergencies in critically ill patients: Challenges in diagnosis and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukhminder Jit Singh Bajwa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Endocrine emergencies pose unique challenges for the attending intensivist while managing critically ill patients. Besides taking care of primary disease state, one has to divert an equal attention to the possible associated endocrinopathies also. One of the common reasons for inability to timely diagnose an endocrinal failure in critically ill patients being the dominance of other severe systemic diseases and their clinical presentation. The timely diagnosis and administration of therapeutic interventions for these endocrine disorders can improve the outcome in critically ill patients. The timely diagnosis and administration of timely therapeutics in common endocrine disorders like severe thyroid disease, acute adrenal insufficiency and diabetic ketoacidosis significantly influence the outcome and prognosis. Careful evaluation of clinical history and a high degree of suspicion are the corner stone to diagnose such problems. Aggressive management of the patient is equally important as the complications are devastating and can prove highly fatal. The present article is an attempt to review some of the common endocrine emergencies in intensive care unit and the challenges associated with their diagnosis and management.

  14. Tratamento da cefaléia em uma unidade de emergência da cidade de Ribeirão Preto Headache treatment in an emergency room of the city of Ribeirão Preto, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARCELO EDUARDO BIGAL

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available Cefaléia é dos sintomas mais comuns na prática clínica. Acarreta considerável impacto econômico e sobrecarrega as unidades de emergência. A maioria destas, em nosso país, não dispõe de triptans. O presente estudo analisa o tratamento instituído na Unidade de Emergência do Hospital das Clínicas de Ribeirão Preto. Em 1996, 1254 pacientes foram atendidos com esta queixa e 64 necessitaram de internação. Dos pacientes não internados (NI, 77% apresentavam cefaléias primárias, contra 29,7% dos pacientes internados (I. A percentagem de melhora nos pacientes com migrânea com a dipirona endovenosa foi 83,8%, com o diclofenaco intramuscular 66,7% e com a clorpromazina (endovenosa 81,8%. As percentagens de pacientes com cefaléia do tipo tensional que melhoraram, frente às mesmas drogas foram, respectivamente 77,8%, 80% e 100%. Dos NI 16,3% tiveram melhora sem qualquer tratamento medicamentoso. Concluímos que as drogas utilizadas apresentam perfis semelhantes de eficácia e custo, podendo ser utilizadas em unidades básicas de saúde. O maior inconveniente é a administração parenteral.Headache is one of the most common symptoms observed in clinical practice. It has a considerable economic impact and overburdens emergency rooms. In Brazil, most emergency rooms have no tryptans. The present study analyses the treatment provided by the Emergency Room of the University Hospital of Ribeirão Preto. In 1996, 1254 patients were treated for headache and 64 of them required hospitalization. Of the non-hospitalized (NH patients, 77% had primary headache, as opposed to 29.7% of hospitalized patients. Of the patients with migraine, 83.6% improved with intravenous dipyrone, 66.7% improved with intramuscular diclofenac and 81.8% improved with intravenous chlorpromazine. The percentages of patients with tension-type headache who improved with the same drugs were 77.8%, 80% and 100%, respectively. Among NH patients, 16.3% improved without any

  15. Acute myocardial imaging with TC-99m sestamibi identifies the culprit coronary artery in the emergency room assessment of patients with chest pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stowers, S.A.; Thompson, R.C.; Fulmer, H. [St. Luke`s Hospital, Jacksonville, FL (United States)] [and others

    1994-05-01

    Acute myocardial perfusion scintigraphy significantly increases diagnostic accuracy and provides independent predictive information in emergency room (ER) patients with typical angina and a normal or non-diagnostic ECG. We evaluated the correlation between location of perfusion defect on the acute nuclear perfusion scan and location of coronary arterial narrowing demonstrated by pre-hospital discharge coronary angiography. ER patients (n=150) with typical angina and a normal or non-diagnostic ECG had 10-30 mCi of Tc-99m Sestamibi injected while acutely symptomatic. 11 patients with a normal scan and 33 patients with an abnormal scan (total n=44) underwent pre-hospital discharge coronary angiography. Overall diagnostic accuracy in the detection of any significant ({ge}70%) angiographic stenosis was high (84%, p=.001). The diagnostic accuracy of anterior, lateral, and inferior perfusion abnormalities in the detection of significant stenosis of the left anterior descending (LAD), left circumflex (LCX), and right coronary artery (RCA), respectively was determined.

  16. Challenges facing the veterinary profession in Ireland: 3. emergency and casualty slaughter certification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães-Sant'Ana, Manuel; More, Simon J; Morton, David B; Hanlon, Alison J

    2017-01-01

    Veterinarians are faced with significant conflicts of interest when issuing certificates for the transport and slaughter of acutely injured and casualty livestock. In a recent Policy Delphi study, emergency and casualty slaughter certification was a key concern identified by veterinary professionals in Ireland. In this case study (the third in a series of three resulting from a research workshop exploring challenges facing the veterinary profession in Ireland; the other two case studies investigate clinical veterinary services and the on-farm use of veterinary antimicrobials), we aim to provide a value-based reflection on the constraints and opportunities for best practice in emergency and casualty slaughter certification in Ireland. Using a qualitative focus group approach, this study gathered evidence from relevant stakeholders, namely a representative from the regulatory body, local authority veterinarians with research experience in emergency slaughter, an animal welfare research scientist, official veterinarians from the competent authority, a private veterinary practitioner, and a member of a farming organisation. Results revealed a conflict between the responsibility of private veterinary practitioners (PVPs) to safeguard the welfare of acutely injured bovines on-farm and the client's commercial concerns. As a consequence, some PVPs may feel under pressure to certify, for example, an acutely injured animal for casualty slaughter instead of recommending either on-farm emergency slaughter or disposal by the knackery service. Among Official Veterinarians, there are concerns about the pressure within processing plants to accept acutely injured livestock as casualty animals. Confusion pertaining to legislation and definition of fitness to travel also contribute to these dilemmas. Conflicts of interest arise due to the gap between governance and provision to facilitate on-farm emergency slaughter of livestock. Increased availability and acceptance of on

  17. Emergency room visits for respiratory conditions in children increased after Guagua Pichincha volcanic eruptions in April 2000 in Quito, Ecuador Observational Study: Time Series Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagai Jyotsna S

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study documented elevated rates of emergency room (ER visits for acute upper and lower respiratory infections and asthma-related conditions in the children of Quito, Ecuador associated with the eruption of Guagua Pichincha in April of 2000. Methods We abstracted 5169 (43% females ER records with primary respiratory conditions treated from January 1 – December 27, 2000 and examined the change in pediatric ER visits for respiratory conditions before, during, and after exposure events of April, 2000. We applied a Poisson regression model adapted to time series of cases for three non-overlapping disease categories: acute upper respiratory infection (AURI, acute lower respiratory infection (ALRI, and asthma-related conditions in boys and girls for three age groups: 0–4, 5–9, and 10–15 years. Results At the main pediatric medical facility, the Baca Ortiz Pediatric Hospital, the rate of emergency room (ER visits due to respiratory conditions substantially increased in the three weeks after eruption (RR = 2.22, 95%CI = [1.95, 2.52] and RR = 1.72 95%CI = [1.49, 1.97] for lower and upper respiratory tract infections respectively. The largest impact of eruptions on respiratory distress was observed in children younger than 5 years (RR = 2.21, 95%CI = [1.79, 2.73] and RR = 2.16 95%CI = [1.67, 2.76] in boys and girls respectively. The rate of asthma and asthma-related diagnosis doubled during the period of volcano fumarolic activity (RR = 1.97, 95%CI = [1.19, 3.24]. Overall, 28 days of volcanic activity and ash releases resulted in 345 (95%CI = [241, 460] additional ER visits due to respiratory conditions. Conclusion The study has demonstrated strong relationship between ash exposure and respiratory effects in children.

  18. Integrative Governance of Environmental Water in Australia's Murray-Darling Basin: Evolving Challenges and Emerging Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischoff-Mattson, Zachary; Lynch, Amanda H

    2017-07-01

    Integration, a widely promoted response to the multi-scale complexities of social-environmental sustainability, is diversely and sometimes poorly conceptualized. In this paper we explore integrative governance, which we define as an iterative and contextual process for negotiating and advancing the common interest. We ground this definition in a discussion of institutional factors conditioning integrative governance of environmental water in Australia's Murray-Darling Basin. The Murray-Darling Basin is an iconic system of social-ecological complexity, evocative of large-scale conservation challenges in other developed arid river basins. Our critical assessment of integrative governance practices in that context emerges through analysis of interviews with policy participants and documents pertaining to environmental water management in the tri-state area of southwestern New South Wales, northwestern Victoria, and the South Australian Riverland. We identify four linked challenges: (i) decision support for developing socially robust environmental water management goals, (ii) resource constraints on adaptive practice, (iii) inter-state differences in participatory decision-making and devolution of authority, and (iv) representative inclusion in decision-making. Our appraisal demonstrates these as pivotal challenges for integrative governance in the common interest. We conclude by offering a perspective on the potential for supporting integrative governance through the bridging capacity of Australia's Commonwealth Environmental Water Holder.

  19. Hypoxia Room

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Hypoxia Room is a 8x8x8 ft. clear vinyl plastic and aluminum frame construction enclosure located within USAREIM laboratory 028. The Hypoxia Room (manufactured...

  20. Elevated Steady State WBC and Platelet Counts Are Associated with Frequent Emergency Room Use in Adults with Sickle Cell Anemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanna A Curtis

    Full Text Available Sickle cell anemia has many sequelae that result in emergency department (ED use, but a minority of patients with sickle cell disease are frequent utilizers and make up the majority of ED visits. If patients who are likely to be frequent ED can be identified in steady state, they can be treated with disease modifying agents in an attempt to reduce ED use frequency. We sought to identify steady state markers for frequent ED use.We identified all patients with SS/Sβ0 seen at our facilities in 2012. Health care utilization over the entire year was calculated and ED visit numbers categorized as either 0-1, 2-5, or 6 or more visits a year. Steady state and acutely active laboratory parameters were collected and analyzed using analysis of variance models and odds ratios.432 adult sickle cell patients were identified, ages 18-87, 54% female, and 38% had been prescribed hydroxyurea. Of the 432 patients,192 had 0-1 visits in the year, 144 had 2-5 visits in the year, and 96 had >6 visits for a total of 2259 visits. Those who had >6 visits accounted for 1750 (77% of the total visits for the year. When steady state laboratory markers were examined, each additional 50x10(9/L platelets was associated with 22% greater risk (p 6 ED visits/year. We did not observe a relationship between baseline HbF, LDH or reticulocyte count with >6 ED visits.Patients with elevated white blood cell counts, elevated platelet counts, and low hemoglobin levels exhibited higher risk for frequent ED utilization and could be candidates for early and aggressive therapy with disease modifying agents.

  1. Value of ethyl glucuronide in plasma as a biomarker for recent alcohol consumption in the emergency room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Tim; Helander, Anders; Dahl, Helen; Holzmann, Tilly; Neuner, Bruno; Weiss-Gerlach, Edith; Müller, Christian; Spies, Claudia

    2008-01-01

    This emergency department (ED) study compared the value of plasma ethyl glucuronide (EtG) testing with the information about alcohol consumption obtained using the standard alcohol biomarkers gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT) and carbohydrate-deficient transferring (CDT) and the AUDIT questionnaire. Minimally injured and clinically non-intoxicated male patients (n = 81) admitted to an ED were screened regarding their alcohol consumption, using the computerized AUDIT questionnaire and a paper-and-pencil assessment including the type, amount and time of alcohol intake. Blood samples were collected for determination of ethanol, EtG (LC-MS) and GGT in plasma and %CDT in serum (Axis-Shield %CDT immunoassay). Out of the 81 patients, 23 (28%) were positive (>/=8 points) on the AUDIT questionnaire. Only 3 (4%) showed a detectable ethanol concentration (range 0.01-0.07 g/L) but 31 (38%) showed a detectable EtG (0.16-39.5 mg/L). In four patients, EtG was detectable in plasma for >48 h after estimated completed elimination of ethanol. EtG was not correlated with the long-term biomarkers %CDT or GGT, or the AUDIT results, but with the time since estimated completed ethanol elimination. EtG testing in blood was found useful in the ED as a way to detect recent drinking, even in cases of a negative ethanol test, and to confirm abstinence from alcohol. This sensitive and specific short-term biomarker provides valuable additional information about individual drinking habits and might also be helpful to identify an alcohol hangover.

  2. Syncope and sudden death from the emergency physician’s perspective: is there room for new biomarkers?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossella Marino

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Syncope is a transient loss of consciousness due to temporary global cerebral hypoperfusion characterized by rapid onset, short duration, and spontaneous complete recovery. Syncope represents 1-2% of emergency department (ED visits and is coupled with a high risk for mortality, prolonged hospital admission, and immediate false diagnosis. Many patients who present to the ED with aspecific symptoms are mainly hospitalized because of diagnostic uncertainty. It is always very important to immediately distinguish syncope of cardiac and non-cardiac origins. Cardiac syncope has higher risk for mortality especially for sudden cardiac death, while non-cardiac one shows risk of repeated events of syncope with poor quality of life. Sudden cardiac death is defined as rapid and unexpected natural death due to cardiac etiology. Researchers from the GREAT Network hypothesized to evaluate some novel biomarkers in order to test acute cardiac condition that can suggest the presence of heart structural diseases, heart failure, and electrical disorders. The primary objective of this study is to test the diagnostic performance from patient history, clinical judgment, and novel biomarkers in the diagnosis of cardiac syncope in patients admitted to the ED. The trial is designed as a prospective international multicenter observational study accounting for 730 patients aged over 40 admitted to the ED with syncope within the last 12 h. A multimarker approach combining markers of different origin and mode of relapse, should add diagnostic information to correctly identify the cardiac conditions and to therefore be pertinent in the early diagnosis of cardiac syncope and in the prediction of cardiac events including sudden death. Future data should be needed to confirm the hypothesis presented here.

  3. An assessment of resuscitation quality in the television drama Emergency Room: guideline non-compliance and low-quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation lead to a favorable outcome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkelbein, Jochen; Spelten, Oliver; Marks, Jörg; Hellmich, Martin; Böttiger, Bernd W; Wetsch, Wolfgang A

    2014-08-01

    Two earlier studies found that outcome after cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in the television medical drama Emergency Room (ER) is not realistic. No study has yet evaluated CPR quality in ER. Retrospective analysis of CPR quality in episodes of ER. Three independent board-certified emergency physicians trained in CPR and the American Heart Association (AHA) guidelines reviewed ER episodes in two 5-year time-frames (2001-2005 and 2005-2009). Congruency with the corresponding 2000 and 2005 AHA guidelines was determined for each CPR scene. None. None. To evaluate whether CPR is in agreement with the specific algorithms of the AHA guidelines. Fisher's exact test and Mann-Whitney-U-test were used to evaluate statistical significance (P<0.05). A total of 136 on-screen cardiac arrests occurred in 174 episodes. Trauma was the leading cause of cardiac arrest (56.6%), which was witnessed in 80.1%. Return of spontaneous circulation occurred in 38.2%. Altogether, 19.1% of patients survived until ICU admission, and 5.1% were discharged alive. Only one CPR scene was in agreement with the published AHA guidelines. However, low-quality CPR and non-compliance with the guidelines resulted in favorable outcomes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Emergency Surgery in a Patient with Scleroderma - Anaesthetic Challenges: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teena Bansal Sarla Hooda

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Scleroderma (progressive systemic sclerosis is a multisystem disease involving the skin, airway, musculoskeletal, gastrointestinal, pulmonary, renal and cardiac systems that can pose a significant challenge for the anaesthetist. The multisystem involvement of scleroderma can impact on every aspect of anaesthetic care especially airway management. There are no specific contraindications to the use of any type of anaesthesia, although the selection must be guided by identification of organ dysfunction. The anaesthetist must be aware of the organs involved, the severity of the disease and the associated anaesthetic considerations and potential risks in order to safely & skilfully manage the patient with scleroderma. We hereby present a case report of a patient with scleroderma for emergency orbital decompression because of orbital cellulitis.

  5. Overcrowding in emergency departments: A review of strategies to decrease future challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarmohammadian, Mohammad H; Rezaei, Fatemeh; Haghshenas, Abbas; Tavakoli, Nahid

    2017-01-01

    Emergency departments (EDs) are the most challenging ward with respect to patient delay. The goal of this study is to present strategies that have proven to reduce delay and overcrowding in EDs. In this review article, initial electronic database search resulted in a total of 1006 articles. Thirty articles were included after reviewing full texts. Inclusion criteria were assessments of real patient flows and implementing strategies inside the hospitals. In this study, we discussed strategies of team triage, point-of-care testing, ideal ED patient journey models, streaming, and fast track. Patients might be directed to different streaming channels depending on clinical status and required practitioners. The most comprehensive strategy is ideal ED patient journey models, in which ten interrelated substrategies are provided. ED leaders should apply strategies that provide a continuous care process without deeply depending on external services.

  6. Overcrowding in emergency departments: A review of strategies to decrease future challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarmohammadian, Mohammad H; Rezaei, Fatemeh; Haghshenas, Abbas; Tavakoli, Nahid

    2017-01-01

    Emergency departments (EDs) are the most challenging ward with respect to patient delay. The goal of this study is to present strategies that have proven to reduce delay and overcrowding in EDs. In this review article, initial electronic database search resulted in a total of 1006 articles. Thirty articles were included after reviewing full texts. Inclusion criteria were assessments of real patient flows and implementing strategies inside the hospitals. In this study, we discussed strategies of team triage, point-of-care testing, ideal ED patient journey models, streaming, and fast track. Patients might be directed to different streaming channels depending on clinical status and required practitioners. The most comprehensive strategy is ideal ED patient journey models, in which ten interrelated substrategies are provided. ED leaders should apply strategies that provide a continuous care process without deeply depending on external services. PMID:28413420

  7. Recent developments and emergent challenges in Ecohydrology: Focus on the belowground frontier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackay, D. S.

    2017-12-01

    The broad spectrum of ecohydrology issues touch on many areas of research in hydrology. But what are the emerging themes and challenges that represent the core of ecohydrology as a maturing discipline? To answer this question the ecohydrology lens was applied to manuscripts published in Water Resources Research over period of 2015 through July 2017. The 235 manuscripts retrieved can be broadly grouped into catchment hydrology, riparian-hyporheic-stream processes, critical zone, land-atmosphere exchange, wetlands, and sustainability. Three dominant crosscutting themes (i.e., coevolution, interfaces, and energy exchange) account for more than half the papers retrieved. In the context of ecohydrology, coevolution refers to the development of physical systems in concert with biological systems and their interactions. In an ecohydrology context, interfaces refer to subsurface, and sometime surface connections that influence transport (e.g., solutes concentration-discharge) influenced by vegetative plumbing, ecophysiology, animal behavior, and microbial processes. Energy exchange in ecohydrology connects vegetative processes to movement of water to the atmosphere through evapotranspiration. Across these themes there is emerging theory and methodology that emphasizes the integrated roles of biology and hydrology in the subsurface. In particular, there is a notable surge of interest in the role of plant roots on subsurface processes. But these are hard to observe and remain challenging to model. By adopting principles of coevolution, in particular, significant advances will be made in modeling plant roots and their depths, corroborated with new geophysical and tracer tools, for improving understanding of critical zone development, subsurface flow processes, and land-atmosphere energy exchange.

  8. The elephant in the room (and how to lead it out): In-clinic laboratory quality challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flatland, Bente; Weiser, Glade

    2014-01-01

    Over 30 yr of technological evolution have resulted in sophisticated instrumentation for in-clinic laboratories, yet there is no regulatory oversight of diagnostic testing quality. Long overdue, the veterinary profession must address quality assurance (QA) of diagnostic testing. Each practice must weigh the responsibility for laboratory instrumentation test results that are often a combination of in-clinic and send-out testing. Challenges faced by clinic staff maintaining in-clinic laboratories include lack of training in QA and quality control (QC), lack of emphasis placed on QA/QC by instrument suppliers, QC financial and time costs, and a general lack of laboratory QA/QC support resources in the veterinary community. Possible solutions include increased continuing education opportunities and the provision of guidelines and other resources by national veterinary organizations; specialty certification of veterinary technicians; an increasing role of veterinary clinical pathologists as QA/QC consultants; and development of external quality assessment programs aimed at veterinary practices. The potential exists for animal health companies to lead in this effort by innovating instrument design, providing QC services, and exploiting instrument connectivity to monitor performance. Veterinary laboratory QA/QC is a neglected aspect of the profession. In coming years, veterinarians will hopefully find increased support for this core practice component.

  9. Emerging bio-ethanol projects in Nigeria. Their opportunities and challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohimain, Elijah I.

    2010-01-01

    Despite being a major petroleum producing and exporting country, Nigeria has for a long time imported refined petroleum products for domestic consumption. The country has recently made an entrance into the bio-energy sector by seeding the market with imported ethanol until enough capability exists for the domestic production of ethanol. The Nigerian Biofuel Policy was released in 2007 calling for the domestic production of bio-ethanol to meet the national demand of 5.14 billion litres/year. Some investors have responded by investing over $3.86 billion for the construction of 19 ethanol bio-refineries, 10,000 units of mini-refineries and feedstock plantations for the production of over 2.66 billion litres of fuel grade ethanol per annum. Also, another 14 new projects are in the offing. Of the 20 pioneer projects, 4 are at the conception phase, 8 are in the planning phase, and 7 are under construction with only 1 operational. The potential benefits of the emerging bio-ethanol projects include investment in the economy, employment, energy security and boost rural infrastructure, while the major challenge is land take (859,561 ha). This is the first time an attempt is been made to document the emerging bio-ethanol projects in Nigeria. (author)

  10. Data Friction Meets Social Friction: Challenges for standardization in emerging fields of geoscience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darch, P. T.

    2017-12-01

    Many interdisciplinary endeavors in the geosciences occur in emergent scientific fields. These fields are often characterized by heterogeneity of methods for production and collection of data, and by data scarcity. This paper presents findings about processes of methods standardization from a long-term case study of an emergent, data-scarce field, the deep subseafloor biosphere. Researchers come from many physical and life science backgrounds to study interactions between microbial life in the seafloor and the physical environment they inhabit. Standardization of methods for collecting data promises multiple benefits to this field, including: Addressing data scarcity through enabling greater data reuse and promoting better interoperability with large scale infrastructures; Fostering stronger collaborative links between researchers distributed across institutions and backgrounds. Ongoing standardization efforts in the field do not only involve scientific judgments about which among a range of methods is most efficient, least biased, or most reliable. Instead, these efforts also encounter multiple difficult social challenges, including: Lack of agreed upon criteria about how to judge competing methods: should efficiency, bias, or reliability take priority?; Lack of resources to carry out the work necessary to determine standards, particularly acute in emergent fields; Concerns that standardization is premature in such a new field, foreclosing the possibility of better methods being developed in the future; Concerns that standardization could prematurely shut down important scientific debates; Concerns among some researchers that their own work may become obsolete should the methods chosen as standard be different from their own. The success of these standardization efforts will depend on addressing both scientific and social dimensions, to ensure widespread acceptance among researchers in the field.

  11. The mixed reality of things: emerging challenges for human-information interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spicer, Ryan P.; Russell, Stephen M.; Rosenberg, Evan Suma

    2017-05-01

    Virtual and mixed reality technology has advanced tremendously over the past several years. This nascent medium has the potential to transform how people communicate over distance, train for unfamiliar tasks, operate in challenging environments, and how they visualize, interact, and make decisions based on complex data. At the same time, the marketplace has experienced a proliferation of network-connected devices and generalized sensors that are becoming increasingly accessible and ubiquitous. As the "Internet of Things" expands to encompass a predicted 50 billion connected devices by 2020, the volume and complexity of information generated in pervasive and virtualized environments will continue to grow exponentially. The convergence of these trends demands a theoretically grounded research agenda that can address emerging challenges for human-information interaction (HII). Virtual and mixed reality environments can provide controlled settings where HII phenomena can be observed and measured, new theories developed, and novel algorithms and interaction techniques evaluated. In this paper, we describe the intersection of pervasive computing with virtual and mixed reality, identify current research gaps and opportunities to advance the fundamental understanding of HII, and discuss implications for the design and development of cyber-human systems for both military and civilian use.

  12. Electronic cigarettes and thirdhand tobacco smoke: two emerging health care challenges for the primary care provider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nidhi Mehrotra

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Ware G Kuschner, Sunayana Reddy, Nidhi Mehrotra, Harman S PaintalDivision of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, CA, USAAbstract: Primary care providers should be aware of two new developments in nicotine addiction and smoking cessation: 1 the emergence of a novel nicotine delivery system known as the electronic (e- cigarette; and 2 new reports of residual environmental nicotine and other biopersistent toxicants found in cigarette smoke, recently described as “thirdhand smoke”. The purpose of this article is to provide a clinician-friendly introduction to these two emerging issues so that clinicians are well prepared to counsel smokers about newly recognized health concerns relevant to tobacco use. E-cigarettes are battery powered devices that convert nicotine into a vapor that can be inhaled. The World Health Organization has termed these devices electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS. The vapors from ENDS are complex mixtures of chemicals, not pure nicotine. It is unknown whether inhalation of the complex mixture of chemicals found in ENDS vapors is safe. There is no evidence that e-cigarettes are effective treatment for nicotine addiction. ENDS are not approved as smoking cessation devices. Primary care givers should anticipate being questioned by patients about the advisability of using e-cigarettes as a smoking cessation device. The term thirdhand smoke first appeared in the medical literature in 2009 when investigators introduced the term to describe residual tobacco smoke contamination that remains after the cigarette is extinguished. Thirdhand smoke is a hazardous exposure resulting from cigarette smoke residue that accumulates in cars, homes, and other indoor spaces. Tobacco-derived toxicants can react to form potent cancer causing compounds. Exposure to thirdhand smoke can occur through the skin, by breathing, and by ingestion long after smoke has cleared from a room

  13. Room Acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuttruff, Heinrich; Mommertz, Eckard

    The traditional task of room acoustics is to create or formulate conditions which ensure the best possible propagation of sound in a room from a sound source to a listener. Thus, objects of room acoustics are in particular assembly halls of all kinds, such as auditoria and lecture halls, conference rooms, theaters, concert halls or churches. Already at this point, it has to be pointed out that these conditions essentially depend on the question if speech or music should be transmitted; in the first case, the criterion for transmission quality is good speech intelligibility, in the other case, however, the success of room-acoustical efforts depends on other factors that cannot be quantified that easily, not least it also depends on the hearing habits of the listeners. In any case, absolutely "good acoustics" of a room do not exist.

  14. One Health approach: A platform for intervention in emerging public health challenges of Kerala state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sukumaran

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The authors, key functionaries in the Kerala state public health system, review the communicable disease scenario of the state for the past 4 years, and in the background of the One Health concept, opines that the re-emerged discipline is perfectly in tune with the current challenges of the state. The unique model of Kerala state is witnessing newer challenges in its public health arena: The rapidly increasing migrant workforce from relatively poorer states of India, rapid urbanization and its consequent stress on public health, unsolved issues of urban waste disposal, reemergence of many communicable diseases like malaria, more so, the falciparum type, emergence of many zoonotic diseases like Lyme disease, scrub typhus, and Kyasanur forest disease etc. Conventional zoonotic infections such as anthrax and brucellosis remain potential threat for human health as well. Rabies continued to cause major concern from mortality point of view, as well as major drainer of state’s budget every year. Leptospirosis has remained major burden among the communicable disease for the past 10 years, and the annual incidence ranged from 2 to 7 per 100,000 population. Having a large section of its people working in various agriculture and animal rearing occupations, the state has all risk factors for propagation of Leptospirosis, but lacks interdisciplinary collaboration in its control and prevention area, the author highlights major avenues for collaboration. Japanese encephalitis appeared as an epidemic in 2011 in two of the southern districts in Kerala, one of the districts being famous tourist spot for both humans, as well as migrant birds. There is ample scope for collaborative research on the source of the virus, and in the subsequent years, the disease had been detected in more districts. Lyme disease was reported for the first time in India, from one of the districts in Kerala, promptly investigated by a joint team from Human Public Health and Veterinary

  15. Application of Emerging Pharmaceutical Technologies for Therapeutic Challenges of Space Exploration Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putcha, Lakshmi

    2011-01-01

    An important requirement of therapeutics for extended duration exploration missions beyond low Earth orbit will be the development of pharmaceutical technologies suitable for sustained and preventive health care in remote and adverse environmental conditions. Availability of sustained, stable and targeted delivery pharmaceuticals for preventive health of major organ systems including gastrointestinal, hepato-renal, musculo-skeletal and immune function are essential to offset adverse effects of space environment beyond low Earth orbit. Specifically, medical needs may include multi-drug combinations for hormone replacement, radiation protection, immune enhancement and organ function restoration. Additionally, extended stability of pharmaceuticals dispensed in space must be also considered in future drug development. Emerging technologies that can deliver stable and multi-therapy pharmaceutical preparations and delivery systems include nanotechnology based drug delivery platforms, targeted-delivery systems in non-oral and non-parenteral formulation matrices. Synthetic nanomaterials designed with molecular precision offer defined structures, electronics, and chemistries to be efficient drug carriers with clear advantages over conventional materials of drug delivery matricies. Nano-carrier materials like the bottle brush polymers may be suitable for systemic delivery of drug cocktails while Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles or (SPIONS) have great potential to serve as carriers for targeted drug delivery to a specific site. These and other emerging concepts of drug delivery and extended shelf-life technologies will be reviewed in light of their application to address health-care challenges of exploration missions. Innovations in alternate treatments for sustained immune enhancement and infection control will be also discussed.

  16. Early effect of American Academy of Pediatrics Urinary Tract Infection Guidelines on radiographic imaging and diagnosis of vesicoureteral reflux in the emergency room setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arlen, Angela M; Merriman, Laura S; Kirsch, Jared M; Leong, Traci; Scherz, Hal C; Smith, Edwin A; Broecker, Bruce H; Kirsch, Andrew J

    2015-05-01

    In 2011 the AAP revised practice parameters on febrile urinary tract infection in infants and children 2 to 24 months old. New imaging recommendations invigorated the ongoing debate regarding the diagnosis and management of vesicoureteral reflux. We compared evaluations in these patients with febrile urinary tract infection before and after guideline publication. During 2 separate 6-month periods 350 patients 2 to 24 months old were evaluated in the emergency room setting. Demographics, urine culture, renal-bladder ultrasound, voiding cystourethrogram and admission status were assessed. A total of 172 patients presented with initial febrile urinary tract infection in 2011, of whom 47 (27.3%) required hospitalization, while 42 of 178 (23.6%) were admitted in 2012. Admission by year did not significantly differ (p = 0.423). After guideline revision 41.2% fewer voiding cystourethrograms were done (72.1% of cases in 2011 vs 30.9% in 2012, p urinary tract infection. We found no relationship between renal-bladder ultrasound and abnormal voiding cystourethrogram, consistent with previous findings that call ultrasound into question as the determinant for additional imaging. Whether forgoing routine voiding cystourethrogram results in increased morbidity is the subject of ongoing study. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Drug use and problem drinking associated with primary care and emergency room utilization in the US general population: data from the 2005 national alcohol survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherpitel, Cheryl J; Ye, Yu

    2008-10-01

    Substance use problems are overrepresented in probability samples of patients in primary care settings including the emergency room (ER) compared to the general population. While large proportions of those with alcohol or drug use disorders are most likely to obtain services for these problems outside the mental health or substance abuse treatment system, accounting, in part, for this overrepresentation, little is known about the association of alcohol misuse or drug use with health services utilization in the general population. The prevalence and predictive value of alcohol misuse and drug use on ER and primary care use was analyzed on 6919 respondents from the 2005 National Alcohol Survey (NAS). Among those reporting an ER visit during the last year, 24% were positive for risky drinking (14+ drinks weekly for men and 7+ for females and/or 5+/4+ in a day in the last 12 months), 8% for problem drinking, 3% for alcohol dependence, and 7% for illicit drug use greater than monthly. Figures for primary care users were, respectively: 24%, 5%, 3%, and 3%. ER users were more likely to be positive for problem drinking and greater than monthly illicit drug use compared to non-ER users, while no significant differences were found in substance use for users and non-users of primary care. In logistic regression controlling for gender, age, and health insurance, problem drinkers were twice as likely as non-problem drinkers (Odds ratio, OR=1.99) (pproblems and for initiating a brief intervention.

  18. The challenges of improving emergency obstetric care in two rural districts in Mali.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otchere, S A; Kayo, A

    2007-11-01

    We describe a collaboration between Save the Children USA, the Averting Maternal Death and Disability (AMDD) program and the Ministry of Health of Mali, to improve the availability, quality and utilization of emergency obstetric care (EmOC) in Yanfolila and Bougouni rural districts in Sikasso Region of Mali. Project planning, interventions and strategies between 2001 and 2004 were aimed at improving the capacity of 2 district hospitals to provide quality EmOC, sensitizing the community as partners to use services and to influence changes in policy at a national level through advocacy efforts. By the end of 2004, despite many health systems' challenges, the 2 hospitals were providing comprehensive EmOC. Providing 24-hour service proved difficult and, though not effectively institutionalized in the 2 hospitals, the UN Process Indicators showed modest improvements in quality and utilization of EmOC. Met need for EmOC increased from 9% in 2001 to 15% in 2004 in Bougouni and from 6% in 2001 to 15% in 2004 in Yanfolila. Case fatality rates declined by 69% (from 7% in 2001 to 2% in 2004) and by 38% (from 8% in 2001 to 5% in 2004) in Bougouni and Yanfolila, respectively. Although useful policy changes were achieved at the national level, more are needed if UN Guidelines are to be met. Availability of more obstetric functions at the community level, and fewer staff transfers are among policy changes needed. Save the Children's project experience showed that it is possible to improve the quality and use of EmOC in hospitals despite challenges; we drew national attention to EmOC as a key strategy in maternal mortality reduction, and raised awareness of the need for improved EmOC services at clinics that are more accessible to the community.

  19. Challenges and Opportunities to Engaging Emergency Medical Service Providers in Substance Use Research: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maragh-Bass, Allysha C; Fields, Julie C; McWilliams, Junette; Knowlton, Amy R

    2017-04-01

    knowledge of substance abuse treatment modalities, and fearing negative repercussions from supervisors and/or patients. Despite reservations, several EMS providers expressed inclination to deliver brief motivational messages to encourage substance-using patients to consider treatment, given adequate training and skill-building. Emergency Medical Service providers may have many demands, including difficult case time/resource limitations. Even so, participants recognized their unique position as first responders to deliver motivational, harm-reduction messages to substance-using patients during transport. With incentivized training, implementing this program could be life- and cost-saving, improving emergency and behavioral health services. Findings will inform future efforts to connect substance users with drug treatment, potentially reducing EMS over-use in Baltimore. Maragh-Bass AC , Fields JC , McWilliams J , Knowlton AR . Challenges and opportunities to engaging Emergency Medical Service providers in substance use research: a qualitative study. Prehosp Disaster Med. 2017;32(2):148-155.

  20. Managing flood risks in the Mekong Delta: How to address emerging challenges under climate change and socioeconomic developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Long Phi; Biesbroek, Robbert; Tri, Van Pham Dang; Kummu, Matti; van Vliet, Michelle T H; Leemans, Rik; Kabat, Pavel; Ludwig, Fulco

    2018-02-24

    Climate change and accelerating socioeconomic developments increasingly challenge flood-risk management in the Vietnamese Mekong River Delta-a typical large, economically dynamic and highly vulnerable delta. This study identifies and addresses the emerging challenges for flood-risk management. Furthermore, we identify and analyse response solutions, focusing on meaningful configurations of the individual solutions and how they can be tailored to specific challenges using expert surveys, content analysis techniques and statistical inferences. Our findings show that the challenges for flood-risk management are diverse, but critical challenges predominantly arise from the current governance and institutional settings. The top-three challenges include weak collaboration, conflicting management objectives and low responsiveness to new issues. We identified 114 reported solutions and developed six flood management strategies that are tailored to specific challenges. We conclude that the current technology-centric flood management approach is insufficient given the rapid socioecological changes. This approach therefore should be adapted towards a more balanced management configuration where technical and infrastructural measures are combined with institutional and governance resolutions. Insights from this study contribute to the emerging repertoire of contemporary flood management solutions, especially through their configurations and tailoring to specific challenges.

  1. Addressing Emerging Risks: Scientific and Regulatory Challenges Associated with Environmentally Persistent Free Radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugas, Tammy R; Lomnicki, Slawomir; Cormier, Stephania A; Dellinger, Barry; Reams, Margaret

    2016-06-08

    Airborne fine and ultrafine particulate matter (PM) are often generated through widely-used thermal processes such as the combustion of fuels or the thermal decomposition of waste. Residents near Superfund sites are exposed to PM through the inhalation of windblown dust, ingestion of soil and sediments, and inhalation of emissions from the on-site thermal treatment of contaminated soils. Epidemiological evidence supports a link between exposure to airborne PM and an increased risk of cardiovascular and pulmonary diseases. It is well-known that during combustion processes, incomplete combustion can lead to the production of organic pollutants that can adsorb to the surface of PM. Recent studies have demonstrated that their interaction with metal centers can lead to the generation of a surface stabilized metal-radical complex capable of redox cycling to produce ROS. Moreover, these free radicals can persist in the environment, hence their designation as Environmentally Persistent Free Radicals (EPFR). EPFR has been demonstrated in both ambient air PM2.5 (diameter < 2.5 µm) and in PM from a variety of combustion sources. Thus, low-temperature, thermal treatment of soils can potentially increase the concentration of EPFR in areas in and around Superfund sites. In this review, we will outline the evidence to date supporting EPFR formation and its environmental significance. Furthermore, we will address the lack of methodologies for specifically addressing its risk assessment and challenges associated with regulating this new, emerging contaminant.

  2. Organic livestock production: an emerging opportunity with new challenges for producers in tropical countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chander, M; Subrahmanyeswari, B; Mukherjee, R; Kumar, S

    2011-12-01

    Agrochemicals, veterinary drugs, antibiotics and improved feeds can increase the food supply while minimising production costs in various livestock production systems around the world. However, these days, quality-conscious consumers are increasingly seeking environmentally safe, chemical-residue-free healthy foods, along with product traceability and a high standard of animal welfare, which organic production methods are said to ensure. Organic production is not only a challenge for producers in developing countries, it offers new export opportunities as well. Organic agriculture is practised by 1.8 million producers in 160 countries, and production of organically grown food continues to increase steadily by 15% per year. Most tropical countries are now exporting organic agricultural products but, apart from organic beef from Brazil and Argentina, organic livestock products are yetto take off. Most trade in organic livestock products is restricted to the European Union and other developed nations. Nevertheless, tropical countries cannot afford to neglect this emerging system of animal production. Organic production is knowledge- and management-intensive. Producers must be well versed in organic production standards, principles and practices, which require a high degree of knowledge and skill. In organic production, it is not simply the final product but the whole production process that must be inspected and approved by the accredited certification bodies. Organic livestock farming is still evolving, and further research is needed to make it sustainable. In this paper, the authors review the prospects of organic animal husbandry and its possible constraints in developing and tropical countries.

  3. Extra-curricular supervised training at an academic hospital: is 200 hours the threshold for medical students to perform well in an emergency room?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu-Reis, Phillipe; Oliveira, Guilherme Czelusniak; Curtarelli de Oliveira, Arthur; Sadique, Hammad; Nasr, Adonis; Saavedra Tomasich, Flávio Daniel

    2012-08-22

    Due to high number of jobs in Emergency Medicine (EM) and the lack of specialist to work in this field, recent graduates work in the emergency room straight after medical school. Additional courses on EM are available through Academic Leagues. This organizations offer lectures and supervised extra-curricular practical activities in their teaching university-affiliated hospital. The objectives of the present study are to assess the influence of hours undertaken in the extra-curricular practical activities on the performance and confidence of students in carrying out the different procedures in the emergency department, and on their own perception of how well they did. Also, to assess the influence the practical activities have on student´s future choice of specialty. A Cross-sectional study conducted by collecting data through a questionnaire. 102 eligible individuals were included and divided into two groups according to the number of extra-curricular hours performed (Group 1- up to 200 hours and Group 2- over 200 hours). Students in Group 2 (over 200 hours) had a greater number of procedures performed on all variables evaluated, in particular, initial patient care (mean 363.8 vs.136.905 in Group 1 - p = 0.001), Simple Sutures (mean of 96.2 vs 33.980 respectively) ( p = 0.00003). To determine patient follow-up by the student, the number of initial patient care was correlated with number of discharge procedures performed (in Group 1, 49.6% of patients were not followed up and discharged by the same students who first talked to them in the hospital. While in Group 2, this value becomes 29.4 % - values for Group 1 - p = 0.011 and Group 2 - p = 0.117). Regarding the influence of the practical extra-curricular activities, 76.5% of the total reported that it had influenced their choice of future specialty. The aptitude, confidence and skill of students are closely linked to the practice time (number of training hours served). Two hundred hours appeared to be a

  4. Extra-curricular supervised training at an academic hospital: is 200 hours the threshold for medical students to perform well in an emergency room?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abreu-Reis Phillipe

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Due to high number of jobs in Emergency Medicine (EM and the lack of specialist to work in this field, recent graduates work in the emergency room straight after medical school. Additional courses on EM are available through Academic Leagues. This organizations offer lectures and supervised extra-curricular practical activities in their teaching university-affiliated hospital. The objectives of the present study are to assess the influence of hours undertaken in the extra-curricular practical activities on the performance and confidence of students in carrying out the different procedures in the emergency department, and on their own perception of how well they did. Also, to assess the influence the practical activities have on student´s future choice of specialty. Methods A Cross-sectional study conducted by collecting data through a questionnaire. 102 eligible individuals were included and divided into two groups according to the number of extra-curricular hours performed (Group 1- up to 200 hours and Group 2- over 200 hours. Results Students in Group 2 (over 200 hours had a greater number of procedures performed on all variables evaluated, in particular, initial patient care (mean 363.8 vs.136.905 in Group 1 - p = 0.001, Simple Sutures (mean of 96.2 vs 33.980 respectively ( p = 0.00003. To determine patient follow-up by the student, the number of initial patient care was correlated with number of discharge procedures performed (in Group 1, 49.6% of patients were not followed up and discharged by the same students who first talked to them in the hospital. While in Group 2, this value becomes 29.4 % - values for Group 1 - p = 0.011 and Group 2 - p = 0.117. Regarding the influence of the practical extra-curricular activities, 76.5% of the total reported that it had influenced their choice of future specialty. Conclusions The aptitude, confidence and skill of students are closely linked to the practice time (number of

  5. An overlook of the new global nuclear scenario and the emergent challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solanilla, Roberto B.A.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to make a short overlook of the world nuclear renaissance and point out some emergent challenges. The presentation covers different subjects in which the nuclear energy shows great advantage to face concerns about climate change, energy demand growth, and relative cost of competing technologies in a global scenario. Additionally nuclear technology can deploy in a middle term an important potential development oriented to improve even more that nuclear design, safety, environment protection, economic and sustainability of the present nuclear reactors generation. The world nuclear energy scenario reveals a renaissance after a long period of lethargy. Now is the focus of considerable attention and debate about the risks and benefits of its expansion. Many countries are again planning ambitious nuclear programs. In the case of Argentina, a decision was taken to end the construction of Atucha 750 MWe power plant (NPP) and to begin the construction of another two NPP in the next decade. In the middle term and expansion of 60 % of the present world nuclear capabilities is foreseen. For the long term there could be much more if today's performance data is maintained or improved. It would require the nuclear industry to return immediately to the most rapid period of growth experienced in the past. The training of the young people is also an important challenge. But some countries are still reluctant due to the adverse local public opinion. In spite of the great accessibility and availability of the NPP confirmed by the global experience of the 350 operating nuclear power plants, the public acceptability is not confirmed. Some sectors of the society -with the support in some case of the media- are against the use of the nuclear energy. In this paper some reasons of the public concerns is explained and actions are mentioned to change its perceptions. At the end, the global society in front of the real means available to fulfill the growing energy

  6. Impact of patient characteristics, education and knowledge on emergency room visits in patients with asthma and COPD: a descriptive and correlative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emtner, Margareta; Hedin, Anna; Andersson, Mikael; Janson, Christer

    2009-09-07

    Asthma and COPD are major health problems and an extensive burden for the patient and the health care system. Patient education has been recommended, but the influence on knowledge and health outcomes is not fully examined. Our aims were to compare patient characteristics, education and knowledge in patients who had an emergency room (ER) visit, to explore factors related to disease knowledge, and to investigate patient characteristics, patient education and knowledge in relation to further ER visits over a 12 month period. Eighty-four patients with asthma and 52 with COPD, who had had an ER visit, were included. They were interviewed by telephone 4 to 6 weeks after the ER visit and followed for a year. Patients with COPD were older, more sedentary, had had more ER visits the previous year, and had more co morbidity than patients with asthma. About 80% of the patients had received information from health professionals or participated in education/rehabilitation, but a minority (knowledge about how to handle the disease was good. Patients with "good knowledge" were younger, were more likely to have asthma diagnose, and had a higher educational background (p education and knowledge between the group with and without further ER visits after adjusting for sex, diagnose, age, and educational background. Patients with asthma had a better self reported knowledge of disease management and were less likely to have new exacerbations than patients with COPD. Reported level of knowledge was, however, in it self not a predictor of exacerbations. This indicates that information is not sufficient to reduce the burden of disease. Patient education focused on self-management and behavioral change should be emphasized.

  7. Gender, Age and Season as Modifiers of the Effects of Diurnal Temperature Range on Emergency Room Admissions for Cause-Specific Cardiovascular Disease among the Elderly in Beijing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan Zheng

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diurnal temperature range (DTR is an important index of climate change and variability. It is also a risk factor affecting human health. However, limited evidence is available to illustrate the effect of DTR modification on cause-specific cardiovascular disease among the elderly. Methods: A semi-parametric generalized additive model (GAM was used to analyze the exposure-effect relationship between DTR and daily emergency room (ER admissions for cause-specific cardiovascular diseases among the elderly from 2009 to 2011 in Beijing. We examined the effects of DTR for stratified groups by gender and age, and examined the effects of DTR in the warm season and cold season for cause-specific cardiovascular diseases. Results: Significant associations were found between DTR and ER admissions for all cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease among elderly males, while DTR was significantly associated with ER admissions for all cardiovascular disease, ischemic heart disease and cerebrovascular disease among elderly females. People aged 75 years and older were more vulnerable to DTR. DTR caused greater adverse effects on both genders in the warm season, whereas the effect estimates on females were higher in cold season than in warm season. Conclusions: A short-term increase of DTR was significantly associated with ER admissions for cause-specific cardiovascular disease among the elderly in Beijing. Gender, age and season may modify the acute health effect of DTR. Some prevention programs that target the high risk subgroups in the elderly for impending large temperature changes may reduce the impact of DTR on people’s health.

  8. The association between diurnal temperature range and emergency room admissions for cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive and genitourinary disease among the elderly: a time series study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Min-zhen; Zheng, Shan; He, Shi-lin; Li, Bei; Teng, Huai-jin; Wang, Shi-gong; Yin, Ling; Shang, Ke-zheng; Li, Tan-shi

    2013-07-01

    To evaluate the short-term effect of diurnal temperature range (DTR) on emergency room (ER) admissions among elderly adults in Beijing. After controlling the long-time and seasonal trend, weather, air pollution and other confounding factors, a semi-parametric generalized additive model (GAM) was used to analyze the exposure-effect relationship between DTR and daily ER admissions among elderly adults with different lag structures from 2009 to 2011 in Beijing. We examined the effects of DTR for stratified groups by age and gender, and conducted the modifying effect of season on DTR to test the possible interaction. Significant associations were found between DTR and four major causes of daily ER admissions among elderly adults in Beijing. A 1 °C increase in the 8-day moving average of DTR (lag 07) corresponded to an increase of 2.08% (95% CI: 0.88%-3.29%) in respiratory ER admissions and 2.14% (95% CI: 0.71%-3.59%) in digestive ER admissions. A 1 °C increase in the 3-day and 6-day moving average of DTR (lag 02 and lag 05) corresponded to a 0.76% (95% CI: 0.07%-1.46%) increase in cardiovascular ER admissions, and 1.81% (95% CI: 0.21%-3.45%) increase in genitourinary ER admissions, respectively. The people aged 75 years and older were associated more strongly with DTR than the 65-74 age group. The modifying effect of season on DTR was observed and it was various in four causes. This study strengthens the evidence that DTR is an independent risk factor for ER admissions among elderly persons. Some prevention programs that target the elderly and other high risk subgroups for impending large temperature changes may reduce the impact of DTR on people's health. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Campylobacter jejuni infection and virulence-associated genes in children with moderate to severe diarrhoea admitted to emergency rooms in northeastern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quetz, Josiane da S; Lima, Ila F N; Havt, Alexandre; Prata, Mara M G; Cavalcante, Paloma A; Medeiros, Pedro H Q S; Cid, David A C; Moraes, Milena L; Rey, Luís Carlos; Soares, Alberto M; Mota, Rosa M S; Weigl, Bernhard H; Guerrant, Richard L; Lima, Aldo A M

    2012-04-01

    Campylobacter is an important cause of foodborne gastroenteritis. We determined the occurrence of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli, using culture-based methods and PCRs targeting virulence-associated genes (VAGs) among children aged ≤14 years who were treated for diarrhoea at emergency rooms in northeastern Brazil. Genomic DNA was extracted directly from stool samples collected from 366 children. A questionnaire was also applied to qualify the clinical conditions presented by each child at the time of admission. C. jejuni and C. coli were detected in 16.4 % (60/366) and 1.4 % (5/366) of the diarrhoeal samples, respectively, by PCR, a much higher proportion than that detected by conventional methods. C. jejuni VAGs were detected in the following proportions of hipO-positive samples: ciaB, 95 % (57/60); dnaJ, 86.7 % (52/60); racR, 98.3 % (59/60); flaA, 80 % (48/60); pldA, 45 % (27/60); cdtABC, 95 % (57/60); and pVir 0 % (0/60). Particular symptoms, such as blood in faeces, vomiting, fever, and/or abdominal pain, were not associated with detection of C. jejuni nor were they associated with any particular VAG or combination of VAGs (P>0.05). C. jejuni and its VAGs were detected in a substantial proportion of the children admitted. Further efforts shall be directed towards elucidating whether these genetic factors or their expressed proteins play a role in Campylobacter pathogenesis.

  10. 26 Protocol for the upcoming study: patient input monitoring of pain in the emergency room: novel electronic log (PIMPERNEL): a randomised controlled trial of an electronic pain score display in adults in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, Hilary; Coats, Timothy

    2017-12-01

    Patient surveys and research have shown that Emergency Department attendees do not receive adequate analgesia. Pain monitoring has not been automated and usually involves a member of staff asking the patient to rate their score with no continuous record, often no specific place to record it and no automated alarm system for scores outside accepted parameters. Few patients have regular monitoring of their pain and our own preliminary research showed that over one week only 58% of patients with moderate to severe pain had a second or subsequent score recorded. A small pain monitoring display has been developed at the University of Leicester and acts as an electronic version of the 11 point numerical rating scale. Data are transmitted to a tablet through a wireless connexion. PIMPERNEL (Patient Input Monitoring of Pain in the Emergency Room: Novel Electronic Log) is a feasibility study testing this for the first time. The primary objective is to determine the feasibility of studying the effect of an electronic pain monitoring display on the pain experienced by emergency care patients. Secondary objectives include determining whether patients use the display, whether pain ratings correlate with routine records, how pain changes over time, whether patients use the display for reasons other than pain, which potential stratification factors may be useful for a subsequent multi-centre study and whether analgesia prescription changes. We will also obtain patient and staff feedback. Adults, initial pain score 5 or more, likely to be staying for at least 2 hours, able to consent and understand English. We aim to recruit 200 patients (100 per arm) from the emergency department at Leicester Royal Infirmary. All patients will use the display. This is a parallel group, two arm superiority trial with a 1:1 allocation ratio. Patients will be randomised to have their pain score on display (intervention) or hidden (control). Blinding is not possible. The display beeps every 15

  11. Creating Engaging Escape Rooms for the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Scott

    2018-01-01

    Escape rooms are "live-action team-based games where players discover clues, solve puzzles, and accomplish tasks in one or more rooms in order to accomplish a specific goal (usually escaping from the room) in a limited amount of time." Escape Rooms are one type of Escape Game, which are narrative-based challenges that use puzzles, tasks,…

  12. Emergency Checklist

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Week National Prescription Drug Take-Back Day Emergency Checklist If someone may have been poisoned, call the ... visit to the emergency room. Below is a checklist to help you in the event of a ...

  13. Emergency medical service systems in Sri Lanka: problems of the past, challenges of the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wimalaratne, Kelum; Lee, Jeong Il; Lee, Kang Hyun; Lee, Hee Young; Lee, Jung Hun; Kang, In Hye

    2017-12-01

    The concept of emergency medical services (EMS) is new to Sri Lanka. This article describes the development, delivery, and future ideas for EMS in Sri Lanka. Sri Lanka also faces frequent natural hazards that justify the establishment of an EMS service. Data and information regarding emergency medical care in Sri Lanka were collected and reviewed from resources including websites and research papers. Currently, there are no qualified emergency medical physicians in Sri Lanka. However, a specialist training program for emergency physicians was initiated in 2012. There is no formal system to train emergency medical technicians (EMTs). Sri Lankans usually use taxies or their private vehicles to get to the hospital in the case of an emergency. All of the hospitals have ambulances that they can use to transport patients between hospitals. Most hospitals have emergency treatment units. Those at larger hospitals tend to be better than those at smaller hospitals. Although there is a disaster management system, it is not focused on emergency medical needs. Many aspects of the EMS system in Sri Lanka need improvement. To start, the emergency telephone number should cover the entire country. Training programs for EMTs should be conducted regularly. In addition, ambulances should be allocated for prehospital care. In the process of these developmental changes, public awareness programs are essential to improve the function of the EMS system. Despite many current shortcomings, Sri Lanka is capable of developing a successful EMS system.

  14. [Hospital emergency room diagnosis of acute appendicitis in patients aged 2 to 20 years: the INFURG-SEMES score from the emergency infections study of the Spanish Society of Emergency Medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altali, Kinda; Ruiz-Artacho, Pedro; Trenchs, Victoria; Martínez Ortiz de Zárate, Mikel; Navarro, Carmen; Fernández, Cristina; Bodas-Pinedo, Andrés; González-Del Castillo, Juan; Martín-Sánchez, Francisco Javier

    2017-07-01

    To develop the INFURG-SEMES scale (based on the emergency infections study of the Spanish Society of Emergency Medicine) using clinical and laboratory data to diagnose acute appendicitis (AA) in patients aged 2 to 20 years who were evaluated in hospital emergency departments and to compare its diagnostic yield to that of the Alvarado score. Prospective observational cohort study enrolling consecutive patients between the ages of 2 and 20 years who came to 4 hospital emergency departments with abdominal pain suggestive of AA and of less than 72 hours' duration. We collected demographic, clinical, analytic (white blood cell count, differential counts, and C-reactive protein [CRP] levels), and radiographic data (ultrasound and/or computed tomography scans). We also recorded surgical data if pertinent. The main outcome was a diagnosis of AA within 14 days of the index visit. We included 331 patients with a mean (SD) age of 11.8 (3.8) years; 175 (52.9%) were male. The final diagnosis was AA in 116 cases (35.0%). The INFURG-SEMES scale included the following predictors: male sex, right quadrant pain (right iliac fossa) on examination, pain on percussion, pain on walking, and elevated neutrophil count and CRP level. The areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves for the INFURG-SEMES scale and the Alvarado score, respectively, were 0.84 (95% CI, 0.79-0.88) and 0.77 (95% CI, 0.72-0.82). The difference was statistically significant (P=.002). The INFURG-SEMES scale may prove useful for diagnosing AA in patients aged between 2 and 20 years evaluated for abdominal pain in hospital emergency departments. The INFURG-SEMES score showed greater discrimination than the Alvarado score.

  15. Vivências em Serviço de Urgências: o papel dos acompanhantes dos doentes Emergency Room: the role of the accompanying person

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Sousa

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available As pessoas que acompanham um utente no serviço de urgência (SU, familiares ou não, são parte integrante da unidade de cuidados. Em Portugal, a prática comum no acompanhamento a adultos é a permanência numa sala de espera exterior. Este estudo exploratório realizado em Portugal procura compreender melhor as vivências em SU dos diversos envolvidos, procurando clarificar o papel dos acompanhantes no serviço de urgência, para reflectir sobre formas de promover a sua participação em todo o processo. Adoptou-se a técnica dos incidentes críticos que foi aplicada por entrevista a 71 indivíduos que representam as diversas partes envolvidas: 2 administrativos (2,8%; 7 médicos (9,9%; 9 auxiliares de acção médica (12,7%; 9 bombeiros (12,7%; 9 utentes (12,7%; 20 enfermeiros (28,2%; 15 acompanhantes (21,1%. Os principais resultados indicam que: i os participantes relatam mais incidentes negativos que positivos (72,9%, associados a comportamentos e atitudes emocionais (tais como, agressividade dos acompanhantes, distância e agressividade dos profissionais e acompanhantes que dificultam a prestação de cuidados; ii os participantes raramente referem insatisfação ou ineficácia dos cuidados e tratamentos (constituem 4,3% dos incidentes; ii os incidentes positivos (17,1% referem-se a profissionais humanos e sensíveis (50% e eficazes (25%. O serviço de urgência constitui uma zona de tempestade emocional e é necessário repensar a forma como o acompanhante dos doentes decorre.Those who accompany a patient in the emergency service, either members of the family or others, are an integral part of the care unit. In Portugal, the usual practice in adults' accompaniment is the permanence in an exterior waiting room. This exploratory study aims at better understanding the emergency service experiences of all those involved, trying to clarify the role of the accompanying person, and reflecting on ways of promoting their participation in the

  16. Frontal lobe ischemic stroke presenting with peripheral type facial palsy: A crucial diagnostic challenge in emergency practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halil Onder

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Here, we illustrate a 69-year old female admitting with weakness on left side of the face who firstly considered peripheral facial palsy in the forefront. However, detailed neurological examination and cranial MRI findings finally yielded the proper diagnosis of right hemisphere ischemic stroke. Via this remarkable presentation, we point out the clinical challenges in evaluation processes of patients with facial palsy in emergency practice and emphasize the importance of detailed examination for the proper diagnosis as well as initiation of appropriate treatment agents without delay. Keywords: Facial paralysis, Stroke, Emergency department, Facial innervation, Pathophysiology

  17. A survey of national physicians working in an active conflict zone: the challenges of emergency medical care in Iraq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, Ross I; Shanovich, Patrick; Shetty, Pranav; Clark, Emma; Aziz, Sharaf; Morton, Melinda; Hasoon, Tariq; Evans, Gerald

    2012-04-01

    There has been limited research on the perspectives and needs of national caregivers when confronted with large-scale societal violence. In Iraq, although the security situation has improved from its nadir in 2006-2007, intermittent bombings, and other hostilities continue. National workers remain the primary health resource for the affected populace. To assess the status and challenges of national physicians working in the Emergency Departments of an active conflict area. This study was a survey of civilian Iraqi doctors working in Emergency Departments (EDs) across Iraq, via a convenience sample of physicians taking the International Medical Corps (IMC) Doctor Course in Emergency Medicine, given in Baghdad from December 2008 through August 2009. The 148 physician respondents came from 11 provinces and over 50 hospitals in Iraq. They described cardiovascular disease, road traffic injuries, and blast and bullet injuries as the main causes of death and reasons for ED utilization. Eighty percent reported having been assaulted by a patient or their family member at least once within the last year; 38% reported they were threatened with a gun. Doctors reported seeing a median of 7.5 patients per hour, with only 19% indicating that their EDs had adequate physician staffing. Only 19% of respondents were aware of an established triage system for their hospital, and only a minority had taken courses covering ACLS- (16%) or ATLS-related (24%) material. Respondents reported a wide diversity of prior training, with only 3% having some type of specialized emergency medicine degree. The results of this study describe some of the challenges faced by national health workers providing emergency care to a violence-stricken populace. Study findings demonstrate high levels of violent behavior directed toward doctors in Iraqi Emergency Departments, as well as staffing shortages and a lack of formal training in emergency medical care.

  18. Effects of immigrant status on Emergency Room (ER) utilisation by children under age one: a population-based study in the province of Reggio Emilia (Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballotari, Paola; D'Angelo, Stefania; Bonvicini, Laura; Broccoli, Serena; Caranci, Nicola; Candela, Silvia; Giorgi Rossi, Paolo

    2013-11-01

    The primary aim of this study was to assess the effect of immigrant status on Emergency Room (ER) utilisation by children under age one, considering all, non-urgent, very urgent, and followed by hospitalisation visits. The second aim was to investigate the role played by mother's educational level in the relationship between citizenship and ER utilisation. The cohort study included all healthy singleton live births in the years 2008-2009 and residing in the province of Reggio Emilia, followed for the first year of life in order to study their ER visits. The outcomes were the ER utilisation rate for all, non-urgent, very urgent, and followed by hospitalisation visits. The main explanatory variable was mother's citizenship. Other covariates were mother's educational level, maternal age, parity, and child gender. Multivariate analyses (negative binomial regression and zero inflated when appropriate) were performed. Adjusted utilisation Rate Ratios (RR) and their 95% Confidence Intervals (95% CI) were calculated. Trend for age in months by citizenship is depicted. There were 3,191 children (36.4%) with at least one ER visit in the first year of life. Adjusted RR show a significantly greater risk of ER visit for immigrants than for Italians: (RR 1.51; 95% CI 1.39-1.63). Immigrants also had a higher risk of non-urgent visits (RR 1.72; 95% CI 1.48-2.00) and for visits followed by hospitalizations (RR 1.58; 95% CI 1.33-1.89). For very urgent visits, the immigrants had a slightly higher risk compared to Italians (RR 1.25; 95% CI 0.98-1.59).The risk of ER visits is higher in the first two months of life (RR(1st vs 3rd-12th) 2.08; 95% CI 1.93-2.24 and RR(2nd vs 3rd-12th) 1.45; 95% CI 1.33-1.58, respectively). Considering all visits, the ER utilisation rate was inversely related with maternal education only for Italians (low educational level 44.0 and high educational level 73.9 for 100 children; p value for trend test higher use of ER services by immigrant children and, to

  19. Prognostic value of blood glucose in emergency room and glycosylated hemoglobin in patients who have suffered an acute cerebro-vascular event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernaga Lorea, Ander; Hernández Morhain, María Cecilia; Ollero García-Agulló, María Dolores; Martínez de Esteban, Juan Pablo; Iriarte Beroiz, Ana; Gállego Culleré, Jaime

    2017-07-07

    Stress hyperglycemia has been associated with a worse prognosis in patients hospitalized in critical care units. The aim of this study is to evaluate the impact of blood glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels on the mortality of patients suffering a acute cerebro-vascular event, and to determine if this relationship depends on the presence of diabetes. A retrospective analysis of 255 patients admitted to the ER for stroke was performed. Venous plasma glucose levels in the emergency room and HbA1c levels within the first 48hours were analyzed. The presence of diabetes was defined in terms of the patients' medical history, as well as their levels of fasting plasma glucose and HbA1c. Mortality was assessed within the first 30 months after the onset of the acute event. 28.2% of patients had diabetes. Higher mortality was observed in patients who had been admitted with plasma glucose levels≥140mg/dl (hazard ratio [HR]=2.22, 95% CI: 1.18-4.16, P=.013) after adjusting for various factors. This relationship was not confirmed in diabetic patients (HR=2.20, 95% CI: 0.66-7.40, P=.201) and was in non-diabetics (HR=2.55, 95% CI: 1.11-5.85, P=.027). In diabetics, HbA1c≥7% was not associated with poor prognosis (HR=0.68, 95% CI: 0.23-1.98, P=.475), whereas non-diabetics with admission levels of HbA1c falling within the pre-diabetes range (5.7% -6.4%) had a higher mortality (HR=2.62, 95% CI: 1.01-6.79, P=.048). Admission hyperglycemia is associated with a worse prognosis in patients without diabetes admitted for stroke, but this relationship was not seen in diabetics. In non-diabetic patients, HbA1c levels in the pre-diabetes range is associated with higher mortality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. The role of income in reducing racial and ethnic disparities in emergency room and urgent care center visits for asthma-United States, 2001-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Huay-Zong; Oraka, Emeka; Mannino, David M

    2011-05-01

    To examine racial/ethnic disparities and associated factors in asthma-related emergency room (ER) and urgent care center (UCC) visits among US adults and determine whether disparities vary across increasing income strata. We analyzed data from 238,678 adult respondents from the 2001 to 2009 National Health Interview Survey and calculated the weighted annual prevalence of an ER/UCC visit for persons with current asthma. We used logistic regression to calculate adjusted odds ratios (AORs) for asthma-related ER/UCC visits by race/ethnicity and income, adjusting for demographics, socioeconomic, and other health-related factors. The average annual prevalence of asthma-related ER/UCC visits among adults with current asthma was highest for Puerto Ricans (24.8%, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 20.3-29.9) followed by non-Hispanic American Indian/Alaskan Natives (22.1%, 95% CI: 14.4-32.4), non-Hispanic blacks (20.4%, 95% CI: 18.5-22.4), other Hispanics (17.3%, 95% CI: 15.0-19.9), Asians (11.0%, 95% CI: 7.8-15.4), and non-Hispanic whites (10.1%, 95% CI: 9.4-10.9). Puerto Ricans (AOR: 2.01; 95% CI: 1.54-2.62), non-Hispanic blacks (AOR: 1.72; 95% CI: 1.46-2.03), and other Hispanics (AOR: 1.55; 95% CI: 1.25-1.92) with current asthma had significantly higher odds of an asthma-related ER/UCC visit than non-Hispanic whites. Lower socioeconomic status, obesity, and serious psychological distress were also associated with higher odds of asthma-related ER/UCC visits. Puerto Ricans with the lowest income (AOR: 3.52; 95% CI: 2.27-5.47), non-Hispanic American Indian/Alaskan Natives with the highest income (AOR: 5.71; 95% CI: 1.48-22.13), and non-Hispanic blacks in every income stratum had significantly higher odds of asthma-related ER/UCC visits compared to non-Hispanic whites in the highest income stratum. Racial/ethnic disparities in asthma-related ER/UCC visits persist after accounting for income and other socioeconomic factors. Further research is needed to identify modifiable risk

  1. Patrón de consumo de alcohol en pacientes captados en salas de urgencias Alcohol consumption patterns in patients attending emergency rooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Luis López-Jiménez

    1998-11-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo. Describir los patrones de consumo de alcohol en personas de 15 años y más, captadas en los servicios de urgencias de ocho hospitales de la Ciudad de México. Material y métodos. La información se obtuvo mediante autorreportes. El levantamiento de los datos se realizó en cada hospital durante una semana completa, las 24 horas del día. Se incluyó a los pacientes que notificaron su consumo en los últimos doce meses. Resultados. De 2 523 individuos entrevistados, 63% informó haber consumido bebidas alcohólicas, entre las que destacan los destilados y la cerveza; 56.8% informó que, al menos una vez durante el último año, se había embriagado. En el patrón de consumo predomina la ingestión de baja frecuencia y alta cantidad (46.9%; sin embargo, se encontraron variaciones por sexo y edad principalmente, y se notificaron problemas asociados. Conclusiones. La descripción de patrones de consumo de alcohol en diferentes grupos poblacionales es relevante en el estudio de problemas personales, familiares y sociales asociados con la ingesta de alcohol.Objective. To describe the alcohol consumption patterns in patients of 15 or more years of age, attending the emergency room of 8 possible hospitals in Mexico City. Material and methods. The information was obtained by self-report. Data were raised at each hospital for one whole week, 24 hours per day. It includes patients who reported alcohol consumption during the 12 months previous to the survey. Results. Of the 2 523 interviewed subjects 63% had ingested alcoholic beverages, in particular, spirits and beer; 58% admitted having been drunk at least once in the past year. The predominating alcohol consumption pattern is low frequency and high quantity (46.9%; however, variations were found according to sex and age and associated problems are reported. Conclusions. The description of alcohol consumption patterns in different population groups is relevant in the study of personal, family

  2. Short-term effects of fine particulate air pollution on cardiovascular hospital emergency room visits: a time-series study in Beijing, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Chang; Breitner, Susanne; Schneider, Alexandra; Liu, Liqun; Franck, Ulrich; Peters, Annette; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2016-05-01

    The link between particulate matter (PM) and cardiovascular morbidity has been investigated in numerous studies. Less evidence exists, however, about how age, gender and season may modify this relationship. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between ambient PM2.5 (PM ≤ 2.5 µm) and daily hospital emergency room visits (ERV) for cardiovascular diseases in Beijing, China. Moreover, potential effect modification by age, gender, season, air mass origin and the specific period with 2008 Beijing Olympic were investigated. Finally, the temporal lag structure of PM2.5 has also been explored. Daily counts of cardiovascular ERV were obtained from the Peking University Third Hospital from January 2007 to December 2008. Concurrently, data on PM2.5, PM10 (PM ≤ 10 µm), nitrogen dioxide and sulfur dioxide concentrations were obtained from monitoring networks and a fixed monitoring station. Poisson regression models adjusting for confounders were used to estimate immediate, delayed and cumulative air pollution effects. The temporal lag structure was also estimated using polynomial distributed lag (PDL) models. We calculated the relative risk (RR) for overall cardiovascular disease ERV as well as for specific causes of disease; and also investigated the potential modifying effect of age, gender, season, air mass origin and the period with 2008 Beijing Olympics. We observed adverse effects of PM2.5 on cardiovascular ERV--an IQR increase (68 μg/m(3)) in PM2.5 was associated with an overall RR of 1.022 (95% CI 0.990-1.057) obtained from PDL model. Strongest effects of PM2.5 on cardiovascular ERV were found for a lag of 7 days; the respective estimate was 1.012 (95% CI 1.002-1.022). The effects were more pronounced in females and in spring. Arrhythmia and cerebrovascular diseases showed a stronger association with PM2.5. We also found stronger PM-effects for stagnant and southern air masses and the period of Olympics modified the air pollution effects. We

  3. The performance of a glucose-ketone meter in the diagnosis of diabetic ketoacidosis in patients with type 2 diabetes in the emergency room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voulgari, Christina; Tentolouris, Nicholas

    2010-07-01

    Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a serious metabolic complication. One of its precipitating causes is insulin omission. DKA requires early diagnosis and strict glucose control, which increases the use of glucose meters in the Emergency Room (ER). We aimed to determine the performance of a glucose-ketone meter in the diagnosis of DKA. From 450 type 2 diabetes mellitus insulin-treated patients attending the ER with a capillary glucose level >13.9 mmol/L, 50 patients (26 men and 24 women, mean age 60.2 +/- 8.2 years) had DKA. Capillary glucose and beta-hydroxybutyrate (beta-OHB) were measured with the Precision-Xtra device (Abbott Laboratories, Abingdon, UK). Serum glucose and biochemical parameters were measured on an automatic analyzer; serum beta-OHB was determined using an enzymatic end-point spectrophotometric method. Urine ketones were determined using a semiquantitative assay (Ketodiastix, Bayer Diagnostics, Stoke Poges, Slough, UK). Serum and capillary beta-OHB values were highly correlated (r = 0.99, P L (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.35-0.95 mmol/L; P = 0.81). Similarly, serum and capillary glucose values were significantly correlated (r = 0.86, P L (95% CI, 0.82-0.93 mmol/L; P = 0.71). Patients with DKA were inadequately treated with insulin and missed clinic appointments: 80% of patients with DKA compared to 20% of patients without DKA. In all cases, DKA was attributed to insulin omission. Capillary ketonemia (beta-OHB >3.0 mmol/L) had the highest performance (sensitivity 99.87%, specificity 92.89%, positive predictive value 92.89%) for the diagnosis of DKA compared with serum ketonemia (sensitivity 90.45%, specificity 88.65%, positive predictive value 87.76%) or ketonuria (sensitivity 89.89%, specificity 52.73%, positive predictive value 41.87%). Implementation of measures such as home glucose and ketone monitoring can possibly decrease the number of hospital admissions due to DKA.

  4. A globalisation challenge: Preventing a clash between the middle classes of the developed and emerging economies

    OpenAIRE

    Ortega, Andrés; Otero-Iglesias, Miguel; Steinberg, Federico

    2017-01-01

    Tension is growing between the interests of the middle classes that are in decline in the mature economies and the rising ones in emerging markets. The aim of the public policies proposed in this paper is to impede such a clash by not threatening de-globalisation, avoiding protectionism, fostering inclusive technological innovation, compensating the losers of globalisation in developed economies and reassuring the winners in emerging economies. It argues that the G20 concept of "inclusive gro...

  5. Memory's Room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carruthers, Mary

    1999-01-01

    Describes the Liberal Arts Studiolo from the Ducal Palace at Guibbio, Italy. Discusses how the room's design and decoration mirrors its educational uses. Notes that the object of education was to provide the young person with a kind of mental library of materials that could be drawn upon quickly. (RS)

  6. The Growth Challenge of Western SMES in Emerging Markets: An Exploratory Framework and Policy Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitja Ruzzier

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we explore the main inhibiting factors associated with the process of entry and escalation of SMES in international markets, with a focus on Emerging Markets. We identify and propose seven main categories of Institutional Voids and three main types of resources that may critically determine SMES’ performances on EMS, namely, internationalization knowledge, social capital resources and marketing capabilities. Institutional Voids and resources are brought together within a conceptual framework suggesting that resource-scarce SMES will hold back in their attempts to commit further to Emerging Markets and will be further dissuaded the higher the Institutional Voids in the market. The paper contributes to the policy literature on SME internationalization by focusing on two areas of public policy action that could have a clear and manifest impact on SMES conduct in Emerging Markets, the first related to the resources available to and exploitable by SMES and the latter associated with Institutional Voids.

  7. Renewable Energies and Sustainable Development: Challenges and Perspectives for Emerging Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiwonghi Bizawu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This article proposes the study of sustainable development in the use of renewable resources by emerging countries. It is noted that the financing of projects and policies related to renewable energy is moving from developed countries to emerging nations. Studies indicate that it will take more targeted investments to fuel production area and power generation, which can set a problem for developing countries, since they do not have sufficient resources to diversify and expand their energy matrixes. The deductive method was adopted based on exploratory research.

  8. International Emergency Psychiatry Challenges: Disaster Medicine, War, Human Trafficking, Displaced Persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaung, Michael; Jani, Suni; Banu, Sophia; Mackey, Joy M

    2017-09-01

    Mental health disorders are a major cause of morbidity and a growing burden in low-income and middle-income countries; but there is little existing literature on the detailed epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment in low-resource settings. Special situations with vulnerable populations, such as those created by international humanitarian emergencies, refugees or internally displaced people, and victims of human trafficking, are increasing in prevalence. These victims are often resettled in developed countries and come to the emergency department seeking care. To better care for these populations, knowledge of specialized psychosocial and cultural considerations should inform the comprehensive psychiatric assessment and treatment plan. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Prevalencia del consumo de drogas en pacientes atendidos en urgencias de adultos Drug consumption prevalence in adult patients attending the emergency room

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    Sofía Piñero-De Fuentes

    1998-05-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo. Conocer la asociación entre consumo de marihuana, cocaína y/o bazuco, y causas de ingreso de pacientes al Hospital Central de Valencia, Venezuela. Material y métodos. Se estudiaron 148 individuos recibidos en el área de urgencias, debido a lesiones por agresión (LA, accidentes de tránsito (AT, accidentes de trabajo (ATB, lesión autoinfringida (LAU e intoxicaciones (INT. Se aplicó un cuestionario y un análisis toxicológicos. Resultados. Se encontró un consumo de drogas, solas y/o asociadas, de 23.6% (13.5% cocaína, 7.4% marihuana y 2.7% ambas. De los pacientes positivos para cocaína, 50% ingresaron por LA; 20% por INT; 10% por LAU; 5% por ATB, y 15% por otras causas. De los positivos para marihuana, 36.4% ingresaron por AT; 27.3% por ATB; 18% por LA; 9.09% por INT, y 9.09% por otros motivos. Los ingresos por LA fueron de 75%, y por ATB, de 25%, para drogas en combinación. El consumo alcohólico asociado a cocaína fue de 50%; a marihuana, de 9%; a combinación, de 25%. Conclusiones. Estos hallazgos demuestran que uno de cada cuatro ingresos por causa traumática está asociado al abuso de drogas, solas o en combinación, lo que revela una estrecha relación causa-efecto.Objective. To determine the association between patient admission due to trauma and the consumption of marihuana, cocaine and bazooka (basic cocaine paste at the Central Hospital of Valencia, Venezuela. Material and methods. 148 subjects were studied who had entered the emergency room due to lesions caused by aggression (AL, traffic accidents (TA, work-related accidents (WRA, self-inflicted injury (SII and intoxication (INT. A questionnaire was applied and toxicology analyses performed. Results. Drug consumption, alone or in combination, was found in 23.6% of individuals (13.5% cocaine, 7.4% marihuana and 2.7% both. Of the cocaine positive, 50% entered for AL, 20% for INT, 10% for SII, 5% for WRA and 15% for other causes. Of the marihuana positive, 36

  10. Evaluating the future of HCI: challenges for the evaluation of emerging applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poppe, Ronald Walter; Rienks, R.J.

    2007-01-01

    Current evaluation methods are inappropriate for emerging HCI applications. In this paper, we give three examples of these applications and show that traditional evaluation methods fail. We identify trends in HCI development and discuss the issues that arise with evaluation. We aim at achieving

  11. Evaluating the Future of HCI : Challenges for the Evaluation of Emerging Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poppe, Ronald Walter; Rienks, R.J.; van Dijk, Elisabeth M.A.G.; Huang, T.S; Nijholt, Antinus; Pantic, Maja; Pentland, A.

    2007-01-01

    Current evaluation methods are inappropriate for emerging HCI applications. In this paper, we give three examples of these applications and show that traditional evaluation methods fail. We identify trends in HCI development and discuss the issues that arise with evaluation. We aim at achieving

  12. Bringing together emerging and endemic zoonoses surveillance: shared challenges and a common solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halliday, Jo; Daborn, Chris; Auty, Harriet; Mtema, Zacharia; Lembo, Tiziana; Bronsvoort, Barend M Dec; Handel, Ian; Knobel, Darryn; Hampson, Katie; Cleaveland, Sarah

    2012-10-19

    Early detection of disease outbreaks in human and animal populations is crucial to the effective surveillance of emerging infectious diseases. However, there are marked geographical disparities in capacity for early detection of outbreaks, which limit the effectiveness of global surveillance strategies. Linking surveillance approaches for emerging and neglected endemic zoonoses, with a renewed focus on existing disease problems in developing countries, has the potential to overcome several limitations and to achieve additional health benefits. Poor reporting is a major constraint to the surveillance of both emerging and endemic zoonoses, and several important barriers to reporting can be identified: (i) a lack of tangible benefits when reports are made; (ii) a lack of capacity to enforce regulations; (iii) poor communication among communities, institutions and sectors; and (iv) complexities of the international regulatory environment. Redirecting surveillance efforts to focus on endemic zoonoses in developing countries offers a pragmatic approach that overcomes some of these barriers and provides support in regions where surveillance capacity is currently weakest. In addition, this approach addresses immediate health and development problems, and provides an equitable and sustainable mechanism for building the culture of surveillance and the core capacities that are needed for all zoonotic pathogens, including emerging disease threats.

  13. Emerging middle powers and global security challenges: the case of Brazil and Turkey - implications for Portugal

    OpenAIRE

    Balla, Evanthia

    2012-01-01

    Today's global order fundamentally differs from the one of classic multipolarity, Cold War bipolarity or post Cold War unipolarity. There are many emerging powers and many no nation-states entities with powers. Yet, the world seems to slowly adjusting to these new realities.

  14. Adsorption of Emerging Ionizable Contaminants on Carbon Nanotubes: Advancements and Challenges

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    Xingmao Ma

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The superior adsorption capacity of carbon nanotubes has been well recognized and there is a wealth of information in the literature concerning the adsorption of unionized organic pollutants on carbon nanotubes. Recently, the adsorption of emerging environmental pollutants, most of which are ionizable, has attracted increasing attention due to the heightened concerns about the accumulation of these emerging contaminants in the environment. These recent studies suggest that the adsorption of emerging ionizable contaminants on carbon nanotubes exhibit different characteristics than unionized ones. For example, a new charge-assisted intermolecular force has been proposed for ionizable compounds because some adsorption phenomenon cannot be easily explained by the conventional force theory. The adsorption of ionizable compounds also displayed much stronger dependence on solution pH and ionic strength than unionized compounds. This article aims to present a brief review on the current understanding of the adsorption of emerging ionizable contaminants to carbon nanotubes and discuss further research needs required to advance the mechanistic understanding of the interactions between ionizable contaminants and carbon nanotubes.

  15. Emerging pollutants in the environment : A challenge for water resource management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geissen, V.; Mol, J.G.J.; Klumpp, Erwin; Umlauf, Günter; Nadal, M.; Ploeg, van der M.J.; Zee, van der S.E.A.T.M.; Ritsema, C.J.

    2015-01-01

    A significant number of emerging pollutants (EPs) resulting from point and diffuse pollution is present in the aquatic environment. These are chemicals that are not commonly monitored but have the potential to enter the environment and cause adverse ecological and human health effects. According to

  16. Delivering MBA Programs in Emerging Markets: The Challenge of National Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    Increasingly, Western-style MBA programs are being delivered in emerging markets, as the developed countries become more and more saturated with MBAs and related offerings. This article, based on the global experience of the author in teaching and assessing MBA modules including thesis and dissertation research and writing, suggests approaches to…

  17. Linguistic and Cultural Challenges in Communication and Translation in US-Sponsored HIV Prevention Research in Emerging Economies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donna Hanrahan

    Full Text Available Linguistic and cultural differences can impede comprehension among potential research participants during the informed consent process, but how researchers and IRBs respond to these challenges in practice is unclear. We conducted in-depth interviews with 15 researchers, research ethics committee (REC chairs and members from 8 different countries with emerging economies, involved in HIV-related research sponsored by HIV Prevention Trials Network (HPTN, regarding the ethical and regulatory challenges they face in this regard. In the interviews, problems with translating study materials often arose as major concerns. Four sets of challenges were identified concerning linguistic and cultural translations of informed consent documents and other study materials, related to the: (1 context, (2 process, (3 content and (4 translation of these documents. Host country contextual issues included low literacy rates, education (e.g., documents may need to be written below 5th grade reading level, and experiences with research, and different views of written documentation. Certain terms and concepts may not exist in other languages, or have additional connotations that back translations do not always reveal. Challenges arise because of not only the content of word-for-word, literal translation, but the linguistic form of the language, such as tone (e.g., appropriate forms of politeness vs. legalese, seen as harsh, syntax, manner of questions posed, and the concept of the consent; and the contexts of use affect meaning. Problems also emerged in bilateral communications--US IRBs may misunderstand local practices, or communicate insufficiently the reasons for their decisions to foreign RECs. In sum, these data highlight several challenges that have received little, if any, attention in past literature on translation of informed consent and study materials, and have crucial implications for improving practice, education, research and policy, suggesting several

  18. Linguistic and Cultural Challenges in Communication and Translation in US-Sponsored HIV Prevention Research in Emerging Economies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Linguistic and cultural differences can impede comprehension among potential research participants during the informed consent process, but how researchers and IRBs respond to these challenges in practice is unclear. We conducted in-depth interviews with 15 researchers, research ethics committee (REC) chairs and members from 8 different countries with emerging economies, involved in HIV-related research sponsored by HIV Prevention Trials Network (HPTN), regarding the ethical and regulatory challenges they face in this regard. In the interviews, problems with translating study materials often arose as major concerns. Four sets of challenges were identified concerning linguistic and cultural translations of informed consent documents and other study materials, related to the: (1) context, (2) process, (3) content and (4) translation of these documents. Host country contextual issues included low literacy rates, education (e.g., documents may need to be written below 5th grade reading level), and experiences with research, and different views of written documentation. Certain terms and concepts may not exist in other languages, or have additional connotations that back translations do not always reveal. Challenges arise because of not only the content of word-for-word, literal translation, but the linguistic form of the language, such as tone (e.g., appropriate forms of politeness vs. legalese, seen as harsh), syntax, manner of questions posed, and the concept of the consent); and the contexts of use affect meaning. Problems also emerged in bilateral communications – US IRBs may misunderstand local practices, or communicate insufficiently the reasons for their decisions to foreign RECs. In sum, these data highlight several challenges that have received little, if any, attention in past literature on translation of informed consent and study materials, and have crucial implications for improving practice, education, research and policy, suggesting several strategies

  19. Management of maxillofacial trauma in emergency: An update of challenges and controversies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose, Anson; Nagori, Shakil Ahmed; Agarwal, Bhaskar; Bhutia, Ongkila; Roychoudhury, Ajoy

    2016-01-01

    Trauma management has evolved significantly in the past few decades thereby reducing mortality in the golden hour. However, challenges remain, and one such area is maxillofacial injuries in a polytrauma patient. Severe injuries to the maxillofacial region can complicate the early management of a trauma patient owing to the regions proximity to the brain, cervical spine, and airway. The usual techniques of airway breathing and circulation (ABC) management are often modified or supplemented with other methods in case of maxillofacial injuries. Such modifications have their own challenges and pitfalls in an already difficult situation. PMID:27162439

  20. Management of maxillofacial trauma in emergency: An update of challenges and controversies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anson Jose

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Trauma management has evolved significantly in the past few decades thereby reducing mortality in the golden hour. However, challenges remain, and one such area is maxillofacial injuries in a polytrauma patient. Severe injuries to the maxillofacial region can complicate the early management of a trauma patient owing to the regions proximity to the brain, cervical spine, and airway. The usual techniques of airway breathing and circulation (ABC management are often modified or supplemented with other methods in case of maxillofacial injuries. Such modifications have their own challenges and pitfalls in an already difficult situation.

  1. EMERGING CHALLENGES IN THE MANAGEMENT OF CONTEMPORARY PUBLIC SPACES IN URBAN NEIGHBOURHOODS

    OpenAIRE

    Rajjan Man Chitrakar; Douglas C Baker; Mirko Guaralda

    2017-01-01

    The lack of management has led to the degrading quality of public space in modern cities around the globe. Contemporary public spaces are facing challenges in terms of maintaining them as a “social space” so that they are accessible and functional for the users. Using Kathmandu as a case study, this paper explores the challenges the contemporary public spaces within urban neighbourhoods are facing in their management. The study reveals that the regulation of use is a major concern of public s...

  2. Challenging Authority During an Emergency-the Effect of a Teaching Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Zeev; Perelman, Vsovolod; McLuckie, Duncan; Andrews, Meghan; Noble, Laura M K; Malavade, Archana; Bould, M Dylan

    2017-08-01

    Previous research has shown that residents were unable to effectively challenge a superior's wrong decision during a crisis situation, a problem that can contribute to preventable mortality. We aimed to assess whether a teaching intervention enabled residents to effectively challenge clearly wrong clinical decisions made by their staff. Following ethics board approval, second year residents were randomized to a teaching intervention targeting cognitive skills needed to challenge a superior's decision, or a control group receiving general crisis management instruction. Two weeks later, subjects participated in a simulated crisis that presented them with opportunities to challenge clearly wrong decisions in a can't-intubate-can't-ventilate scenario. It was only disclosed that the staff was a confederate during the debriefing. Performances were video recorded and assessed by two raters blinded to group allocation using the modified Advocacy-Inquiry Score. Fifty residents completed the study. The interrater reliability of the modified Advocacy-Inquiry Scores (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.87) was excellent. The median (interquartile range) best modified Advocacy-Inquiry Score was significantly better in the intervention group 5.0 (4.50-5.62 [4-6]) than in the control group 3.5 (3.0-4.75 [3-6]) (p authority during a life-threatening crisis situation. This educational gap can have significant implications for patients' safety.

  3. Descriptive study of an emergency centre in Western Kenya: Challenges and opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darlene R. House

    2014-03-01

    Conclusions: The most common presentation for acute care in western Kenya was injury related. However, the severity of illness, lack of pre-hospital transportation, and lack of community mental health services provide significant challenges and opportunities for developing ECs in sub-Saharan Africa.

  4. A Case Study of Emerging Challenges and Reflections on Internationalization of Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Nan; Carpenter, Victoria

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to examine challenges and issues of higher education (HE) internationalization. A qualitative study was conducted at a UK university. A total of 20 interviewees from the case study institution participated in this research. Content analysis, critical discourse analysis and categorization of meaning were adopted as…

  5. Emerging natural gas markets in the East Asian countries - Challenges for market development and international cooperation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozaki, Hiroshi

    1997-01-01

    Energy and natural gas demand as well as the natural gas market in East Asia is analyzed. Gas distribution and long distance gas transmission pipelines are considered. International cooperation is outlined for meeting the market challenges in the region. (R.P.)

  6. Emergency medical service systems research: problems of the past, challenges of the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaite, D W; Criss, E A; Valenzuela, T D; Guisto, J

    1995-08-01

    Out-of-hospital emergency care was designed around the concept of a system of interrelated events that combine to offer a patient the best care possible outside the hospital. However, in contrast to the actual operations of emergency medical service (EMS) systems, research has not typically used systems-based models as the method for evaluation. In this discussion we outline the weaknesses of component-based research models in EMS evaluation and attempt to provide a "systems-analysis" framework that can be used for future research. Incorporation of this multidiscipline approach into EMS research is essential if there is to be any hope of finding answers to many of the important questions that remain in the arena of out-of-hospital health care.

  7. Arboviruses emerging in Brazil: challenges for clinic and implications for public health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Rita Donalisio

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Arboviruses have been emerging in different parts of the world due to genetic changes in the virus, alteration of the host and vector population dynamics, or because of anthropogenic environmental factors. These viruses’ capacity for adaptation is notable, as well as the likelihood of their emergence and establishment in new geographic areas. In Brazilian epidemiologic scenario, the most common arboviruses are DENV, CHIKV, and ZIKV, although others may spread in the country. Little is yet known of the impact of viral co-circulation, which would theoretically result in more intense viremia or other immunological alterations that could trigger autoimmune diseases, such as Guillain-Barré syndrome. The impact on morbidity and mortality intensifies as extensive epidemics lead to a high number of affected individuals, severe cases, and implications for health services, mainly due to the absence of treatment, vaccines, and effective prevention and control measures.

  8. Asia’s Major Powers and the Emerging Challenges to Nuclear Stability Among Them

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-01

    conducted by the Institute for Defense Analyses (IDA) under contract DASW01-04-C-0003,Task DC-6-2819, “Nuclear Stability in Asia ,” for the Defense Threat...review of emerging nuclear stability issues in Asia . Sponsored by DTRA’s Advanced Systems and Concepts Office, this paper is the latest in a...nuclear weapon states in Asia , such that Asia is now the most nuclearized of all continents. 2. The increasing potential for a cascade of

  9. Emergent and divergent spaces in the Women’s March: the challenges of intersectionality and inclusion

    OpenAIRE

    Moss, Pamela; Maddrell, Avril

    2017-01-01

    This piece introduces the set of articles assembled from our call for Rapid Responses to the Women’s March on Washington circulated in February, 2017. Each addresses issues arising through collective expressions of protest. The Women’s March on Washington, organized on the twin principles of intersectionality and inclusion, acted as a flashpoint for the generation of emergent spaces to do politics differently. In the search for solidarity, tensions within groups and among individuals shaped t...

  10. Emerging pollutants in the environment : A challenge for water resource management

    OpenAIRE

    Geissen, V.; Mol, J.G.J.; Klumpp, Erwin; Umlauf, Günter; Nadal, M.; Ploeg, van der, M.J.; Zee, van der, S.E.A.T.M.; Ritsema, C.J.

    2015-01-01

    A significant number of emerging pollutants (EPs) resulting from point and diffuse pollution is present in the aquatic environment. These are chemicals that are not commonly monitored but have the potential to enter the environment and cause adverse ecological and human health effects. According to the NORMAN network, at least 700 substances categorized into 20 classes, have been identified in the European aquatic environment. In light of their potential impact action is urgently required.In ...

  11. Design and challenges of a randomized clinical trial of medical expulsive therapy (tamsulosin) for urolithiasis in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrows, Pamela K; Hollander, Judd E; Wolfson, Allan B; Kurz, Michael C; Richards, Lorna; DiFiore, Sara; Watts, Phillip; Patkar, Nivedita; Brown, Jeremy; Jackman, Stephen; Kirkali, Ziya; Kusek, John W; Michel, Chloe; Meltzer, Andrew C

    2017-01-01

    Urolithiasis or urinary stone disease has been estimated to affect about 1 in 11 Americans. Patients with urinary stone disease commonly present to the emergency department for management of their acute pain. In addition to providing analgesia, administration of drug (medical expulsive therapy) is often prescribed to assist passage of the urinary stone. In this methodology paper, we describe the design of a prospective, multi-center, randomized, double-blind placebo controlled clinical trial of the alpha-adrenergic blocker, tamsulosin, to evaluate its effectiveness as medical expulsive therapy. In addition, we describe the unique challenges of conducting a trial of this type within the setting of the emergency department. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Frailty and cognitive impairment: Unique challenges in the older emergency surgical patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moug, S J; Stechman, M; McCarthy, K; Pearce, L; Myint, P K; Hewitt, J

    2016-03-01

    Older patients (>65 years of age) admitted as general surgical emergencies increasingly require improved recognition of their specific needs relative to younger patients. Two such needs are frailty and cognitive impairment. These are evolving research areas that the emergency surgeon increasingly requires knowledge of to improve short- and long-term patient outcomes. This paper reviews the evidence for frailty and cognitive impairment in the acute surgical setting by defining frailty and cognitive impairment, introducing methods of diagnosis, discussing the influence on prognosis and proposing strategies to improve older patient outcomes. Frailty is present in 25% of the older surgical population. Using frailty-scoring tools, frailty was associated with a significantly longer hospital stay and higher mortality at 30 and 90 days after admission to an acute surgical unit. Cognitive impairment is present in a high number of older acute surgical patients (approximately 70%), whilst acute onset cognitive impairment, termed delirium, is documented in 18%. However, patients with delirium had significantly longer hospital stays and higher in-hospital mortality than those with cognitive impairment. Improved knowledge of frailty and delirium by the emergency surgeon allows the specialised needs of older surgical patients to be taken into account. Early recognition, and consideration of minimally invasive surgery or radiological intervention alongside potentially transferable successful elective interventions such as comprehensive geriatric assessment, may help to improve short- and long-term patient outcomes in this vulnerable population.

  13. Emerging Challenges in the Development and Management of Nuclear Knowledge in Kenya

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chesori, R.C.; Kilavi, P.K.; Omondi, C.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: Nuclear knowledge remains a crucial asset in the nuclear industry. Establishment of new nuclear builds, operations, maintenance and the decommissioning of nuclear power plants (NPPs) essentially are knowledge intensive endeavors that require a lot of technical expertise. The expertise is defined by knowledgeable and competent personnel that range from nuclear engineers to nuclear economists, nuclear lawyers, and environmentalists among others. The technological challenge facing the industry currently is the aging experts that have created a huge knowledge gap that threatens the future of the industry. This realization has caused an alarm and has led to concerted efforts aimed at facilitating knowledge transfer to younger generations at a global scale especially in countries with established nuclear industry. This effort has led to development of nuclear knowledge management best practices models by knowledge experts at IAEA that seeks to assist member states in coping with the present day challenges in the industry. (author

  14. Electric Vehicles in Logistics and Transportation: A Survey on Emerging Environmental, Strategic, and Operational Challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Juan, Angel Alejandro; Mendez, Carlos Alberto; Faulin, Javier; de Armas, Jesica; Grasman, Scott

    2017-01-01

    Current logistics and transportation (L&T) systems include heterogeneous fleets consisting of common internal combustion engine vehicles as well as other types of vehicles using ?green? technologies, e.g., plug-in hybrid electric vehicles and electric vehicles (EVs). However, the incorporation of EVs in L&T activities also raise some additional challenges from the strategic, planning, and operational perspectives. For instance, smart cities are required to provide recharge stations for electr...

  15. A Study Of Cyber Security Challenges And Its Emerging Trends On Latest Technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Reddy, G. Nikhita; Reddy, G. J. Ugander

    2014-01-01

    Cyber Security plays an important role in the field of information technology .Securing the information have become one of the biggest challenges in the present day. When ever we think about the cyber security the first thing that comes to our mind is cyber crimes which are increasing immensely day by day. Various Governments and companies are taking many measures in order to prevent these cyber crimes. Besides various measures cyber security is still a very big concern to many. This paper ma...

  16. The Emerging Role of Mindfulness Research in the Workplace and its Challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Marek Vich

    2015-01-01

    This paper focuses on the current state of art in mindfulness research on workplace and identifies some of the necessary steps and risks in the creation of mindful leadership theory. Mindfulness has the potential to effectively address three topical organizational challenges of growing demands on adaptability, prevailing issues of work-related stress and the necessity to raise the moral level in organizations. Current studies seem to suitably respond to the issues of work-related stress; howe...

  17. Factores predictores de uso problemático de alcohol en personas atendidas en una sala de emergencia Predictive factors of alcohol use problems among patients visiting an emergency room

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabián Fiestas

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos. Valorar el efecto predictivo de características claves de pacientes atendidos en salas de emergencia para detectar casos de uso problemático de alcohol. Materiales y Métodos. La muestra de estudio estuvo constituida por 371 personas atendidas en el lapso de siete días completos de enero de 2005 en el servicio de emergencia de un hospital público de Lima, Perú. Se aplicó un cuestionario demográfico, el SIDUC/CICAD para uso reciente de sustancias psicoactivas en salas de emergencias (i.e., uso dentro de las seis horas previas a la atención y el AUDIT para uso problemático de alcohol en el último año. El análisis de regresión logística simple y multivariada permitió valorar el efecto predictor de la edad, sexo, especialidad del servicio de atención, presencia de daño físico y el uso reciente de alcohol para detectar casos problemáticos de su uso. Resultados. El odds de tener uso problemático de alcohol en los varones es 26 veces el odds de tener dicho problema entre las mujeres (pObjectives. To assess the predictive effect of key individual-level characteristics to identify cases of alcohol use problems among patients visiting an emergency room. Materials and methods. The study sample was composed of 371 people attending an emergency room in a public hospital in Lima, Peru, during a period of seven complete days in January, 2005. For data gathering, we used a questionnaire for demographic information, the SIDUC/CICAD for recent use (i.e., in the last 6 hours of psychoactive substances before arriving to the emergency room, and the AUDIT, to identify alcohol use problems in the last year. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression models were used to estimate the predictive effect of age, sex, area of attention in the emergency room, presence of physical injuries and recent use of alcohol. Results. The odds of being a case of alcohol use problem for males is 26 times the odds of having that problem for females (p

  18. Emerging Infectious Diseases, Antimicrobial Resistance and Millennium Development Goals: Resolving the Challenges through One Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. V. Asokan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Most emerging infectious diseases are zoonoses, which could severely hamper reaching the targets of millennium development goals (MDG. Five out of the total eight MDG’s are strongly associated with the Emerging Infectious Diseases (EIDs. Recent emergence and dissemination of drug-resistant pathogens has accelerated and prevent reaching the targets of MDG, with shrinking of therapeutic arsenal, mostly due to antimicrobial resistance (AMR. World Health Organization (WHO has identified AMR as 1 of the 3 greatest threats to global health. Until now, methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA and vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE have been observed in hospital-acquired infections. In India, within a span of three years, New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase prevalence has risen from three percent in hospitals to twenty- fifty percent and is found to be colistin resistant as well. Routine use of antimicrobials in animal husbandry accounts for more than 50% in tonnage of all antimicrobial production to promote growth and prophylaxis. This has consequences to human health and environmental contamination with a profound impact on the environmental microbiome, resulting in resistance. Antibiotic development is now considered a global health crisis. The average time required to receive regulatory approval is 7.2 years. Moreover, the clinical approval success is only 16%. To overcome resistance in antimicrobials, intersectoral partnerships among medical, veterinary, and environmental disciplines, with specific epidemiological, diagnostic, and therapeutic approaches are needed. Joint efforts under “One Health”, beyond individual professional boundaries are required to stop antimicrobial resistance against zoonoses (EID and reach the MDG.

  19. Globalization and cognitive enhancement: emerging social and ethical challenges for ADHD clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ilina; Filipe, Angela M; Bard, Imre; Bergey, Meredith; Baker, Lauren

    2013-09-01

    Globalization of ADHD and the rise of cognitive enhancement have raised fresh concerns about the validity of ADHD diagnosis and the ethics of stimulant drug treatment. We review the literature on these two emerging phenomena, with a focus on the corresponding social, scientific and ethical debates over the universality of ADHD and the use of stimulant drug treatments in a global population of children and adolescents. Drawing on this literature, we reflect on the importance of ethically informed, ecologically sensitive clinical practices in relation to ADHD diagnosis and treatment.

  20. [Challenges in the assessment and managment of health risks associated with emerging water micropollutants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levi, Yves

    2009-06-01

    Analytical laboratories can now identify and quantify an impressive number of "new" pollutants present at very low concentrations in water. Nanotechnology products are a new cause for concern. " Emerging " pollutants are defined as substances that were not previously sought or detected (plasticizers, drugs, chlorination byproducts, persistant organic pollutants, ...) and that are now being identified in many continental water resources. The biological actions of these substances, alone and in combination with other more " classical "pollutants, include such effects as endocrine disruption. Contaminants may be present in surface and groundwater resources, may be generated during treatment, and are found in drinking water distribution networks. In industrialized countries, the main source of emerging pollutants for humans is not water, but rather food, cosmetics and air. Urgent measures are needed to protect biodiversity and human health, including quantitative risk assessment, toxicologic studies of xenobiotic mixtures and chronic effects, strategies to protect water resources, technological advances in wastewater treatment, reliable potable water production, and new inert materials for transport and storage. Good sanitation and safe tap water are major contributors to human health and well-being Major efforts and investments are needed, based on rigorous, objective assessments of risks for the environment and public health.

  1. Emergent Toxins in North Atlantic Temperate Waters: A Challenge for Monitoring Programs and Legislation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisa Silva

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Harmful Algal Blooms (HAB are complex to manage due to their intermittent nature and their severe impact on the economy and human health. The conditions which promote HAB have not yet been fully explained, though climate change and anthropogenic intervention are pointed as significant factors. The rise of water temperature, the opening of new sea canals and the introduction of ship ballast waters all contribute to the dispersion and establishment of toxin-producing invasive species that promote the settling of emergent toxins in the food-chain. Tetrodotoxin, ciguatoxin, palytoxin and cyclic imines are commonly reported in warm waters but have also caused poisoning incidents in temperate zones. There is evidence that monitoring for these toxins exclusively in bivalves is simplistic and underestimates the risk to public health, since new vectors have been reported for these toxins and as well for regulated toxins such as PSTs and DSTs. In order to avoid public health impacts, there is a need for adequate monitoring programs, a need for establishing appropriate legislation, and a need for optimizing effective methods of analysis. In this review, we will compile evidence concerning emergent marine toxins and provide data that may indicate the need to restructure the current monitoring programs of HAB.

  2. Emergent Toxins in North Atlantic Temperate Waters: A Challenge for Monitoring Programs and Legislation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Marisa; Pratheepa, Vijaya K.; Botana, Luis M.; Vasconcelos, Vitor

    2015-01-01

    Harmful Algal Blooms (HAB) are complex to manage due to their intermittent nature and their severe impact on the economy and human health. The conditions which promote HAB have not yet been fully explained, though climate change and anthropogenic intervention are pointed as significant factors. The rise of water temperature, the opening of new sea canals and the introduction of ship ballast waters all contribute to the dispersion and establishment of toxin-producing invasive species that promote the settling of emergent toxins in the food-chain. Tetrodotoxin, ciguatoxin, palytoxin and cyclic imines are commonly reported in warm waters but have also caused poisoning incidents in temperate zones. There is evidence that monitoring for these toxins exclusively in bivalves is simplistic and underestimates the risk to public health, since new vectors have been reported for these toxins and as well for regulated toxins such as PSTs and DSTs. In order to avoid public health impacts, there is a need for adequate monitoring programs, a need for establishing appropriate legislation, and a need for optimizing effective methods of analysis. In this review, we will compile evidence concerning emergent marine toxins and provide data that may indicate the need to restructure the current monitoring programs of HAB. PMID:25785464

  3. Dermatologic challenges of health care for displaced people. lessons from a German emergency refugee camp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uwe Wollina

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The World faces the highest waves of displaced people since World War II. There is limited knowledge about need of dermatological care for refugees and asylum seekers. Methods: We report the experience with a temporary emergency refugee camp in Dresden form the viewpoint of a hospital department. This is a descriptive report covering the period of 10 weeks. Results: In this refugee camp up to 1 100 people were hosted. The male to female ratio was 5.3. The majority of inhabitants were young males (60%, 20% were children. While 40% of refuges came from Syria, Afghanistan, Iraq and Pakistan were also important countries of origin. Communication war a crucial issue while providing health care. Dermatologic service was granted as consultation, outpatient and inpatient clinic. Most contacts were noted in the outpatient clinic. The majority of patient attended the clinic with communicable diseases such as bacterial or viral infections and infestations. Wounds and chronic inflammatory diseases were rather uncommon. Only 4 patients had to be treated in the hospital (inpatient clinic. Conclusions: Displaced people (refugees, asylum seekers come in big waves to Europe. Dermatologic service is an important part of first aid health care in an emergency camp. Language barriers and cultural barriers have to overcome for optimal service. This is the first report from Germany.

  4. Converging requirements and emerging challenges to public health diseases surveillance and bio surveillance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, V.; Abel, T.

    2009-01-01

    Disease surveillance systems are a critical component of an early warning system for public health agencies to prepare and respond to major public health catastrophes. With a growing emphasis for more robust early indicator and warning systems to track emerging and dangerous diseases of suspicious nature, considerable emphasis is now placed on deployment of more expanded electronic disease surveillance systems. The architectural considerations for bio surveillance information system are based on collection, analysis and dissemination of human, veterinary and agricultural related disease surveillance to broader regional areas likely to be affected in the event of an emerging disease, or due to bioterrorism and better coordinate plans, preparations and response by governmental agencies and multilateral forums. The diseases surveillance systems architectures by intent and design could as well support biological threat monitoring and threat reduction initiatives. As an illustrative sample set, this paper will describe the comparative informatics requirements for a disease surveillance systems developed by CSC for the US Centers for Diseases Control and Prevention (CDC) currently operational nationwide, and biological weapons threat assessment developed as part of the Threat Agent Detection and Response (TADR) Network under the US Biological Threat Reduction Program and deployed at Uzbekistan, Kazakhstan, Georgia, and Azerbaijan.(author)

  5. Emergency management in the Swedish electricity market: The need to challenge the responsibility gap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palm, Jenny

    2008-01-01

    A secure energy supply is a basic need of society. Along with electricity market deregulation, a responsibility gap has arisen, where private energy companies lack economic incentives to invest in an electricity distribution grid that is secured to the level desired by society. This article discusses the emergency management strategies of municipal authorities for securing the electricity supply, according to a networked, or 'governance', control and direction structure, and how this influences the relationship between electricity companies and Swedish municipalities. The Swedish electricity system has traditionally developed in a monopoly context. Since electricity market deregulation, the responsibility for electricity supply security has become unclear; field studies of Swedish municipalities indicate that all actors still seem to be seeking to find their proper roles in the deregulated market. Municipalities still expect to exercise influence over private energy company decisions regarding prioritization of emergency power deliveries. Energy companies vacillate between emphasizing their need to regard economic factors and their sense of responsibility for providing a secure electricity supply to vital municipal functions (even though municipalities may lack contracts specifying this)

  6. Emerging Challenges and Opportunities for Education and Research in Weed Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Bhagirath S; Matloob, Amar; Mahajan, Gulshan; Aslam, Farhena; Florentine, Singarayer K; Jha, Prashant

    2017-01-01

    In modern agriculture, with more emphasis on high input systems, weed problems are likely to increase and become more complex. With heightened awareness of adverse effects of herbicide residues on human health and environment and the evolution of herbicide-resistant weed biotypes, a significant focus within weed science has now shifted to the development of eco-friendly technologies with reduced reliance on herbicides. Further, with the large-scale adoption of herbicide-resistant crops, and uncertain climatic optima under climate change, the problems for weed science have become multi-faceted. To handle these complex weed problems, a holistic line of action with multi-disciplinary approaches is required, including adjustments to technology, management practices, and legislation. Improved knowledge of weed ecology, biology, genetics, and molecular biology is essential for developing sustainable weed control practices. Additionally, judicious use of advanced technologies, such as site-specific weed management systems and decision support modeling, will play a significant role in reducing costs associated with weed control. Further, effective linkages between farmers and weed researchers will be necessary to facilitate the adoption of technological developments. To meet these challenges, priorities in research need to be determined and the education system for weed science needs to be reoriented. In respect of the latter imperative, closer collaboration between weed scientists and other disciplines can help in defining and solving the complex weed management challenges of the 21st century. This consensus will provide more versatile and diverse approaches to innovative teaching and training practices, which will be needed to prepare future weed science graduates who are capable of handling the anticipated challenges of weed science facing in contemporary agriculture. To build this capacity, mobilizing additional funding for both weed research and weed management

  7. Emerging Challenges and Opportunities for Education and Research in Weed Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhagirath S. Chauhan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In modern agriculture, with more emphasis on high input systems, weed problems are likely to increase and become more complex. With heightened awareness of adverse effects of herbicide residues on human health and environment and the evolution of herbicide-resistant weed biotypes, a significant focus within weed science has now shifted to the development of eco-friendly technologies with reduced reliance on herbicides. Further, with the large-scale adoption of herbicide-resistant crops, and uncertain climatic optima under climate change, the problems for weed science have become multi-faceted. To handle these complex weed problems, a holistic line of action with multi-disciplinary approaches is required, including adjustments to technology, management practices, and legislation. Improved knowledge of weed ecology, biology, genetics, and molecular biology is essential for developing sustainable weed control practices. Additionally, judicious use of advanced technologies, such as site-specific weed management systems and decision support modeling, will play a significant role in reducing costs associated with weed control. Further, effective linkages between farmers and weed researchers will be necessary to facilitate the adoption of technological developments. To meet these challenges, priorities in research need to be determined and the education system for weed science needs to be reoriented. In respect of the latter imperative, closer collaboration between weed scientists and other disciplines can help in defining and solving the complex weed management challenges of the 21st century. This consensus will provide more versatile and diverse approaches to innovative teaching and training practices, which will be needed to prepare future weed science graduates who are capable of handling the anticipated challenges of weed science facing in contemporary agriculture. To build this capacity, mobilizing additional funding for both weed research and

  8. Electric Vehicles in Logistics and Transportation: A Survey on Emerging Environmental, Strategic, and Operational Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel Alejandro Juan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Current logistics and transportation (L&T systems include heterogeneous fleets consisting of common internal combustion engine vehicles as well as other types of vehicles using “green” technologies, e.g., plug-in hybrid electric vehicles and electric vehicles (EVs. However, the incorporation of EVs in L&T activities also raise some additional challenges from the strategic, planning, and operational perspectives. For instance, smart cities are required to provide recharge stations for electric-based vehicles, meaning that investment decisions need to be made about the number, location, and capacity of these stations. Similarly, the limited driving-range capabilities of EVs, which are restricted by the amount of electricity stored in their batteries, impose non-trivial additional constraints when designing efficient distribution routes. Accordingly, this paper identifies and reviews several open research challenges related to the introduction of EVs in L&T activities, including: (a environmental-related issues; and (b strategic, planning and operational issues associated with “standard” EVs and with hydrogen-based EVs. The paper also analyzes how the introduction of EVs in L&T systems generates new variants of the well-known Vehicle Routing Problem, one of the most studied optimization problems in the L&T field, and proposes the use of metaheuristics and simheuristics as the most efficient way to deal with these complex optimization problems.

  9. The Emerging Role of Mindfulness Research in the Workplace and its Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Vich

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the current state of art in mindfulness research on workplace and identifies some of the necessary steps and risks in the creation of mindful leadership theory. Mindfulness has the potential to effectively address three topical organizational challenges of growing demands on adaptability, prevailing issues of work-related stress and the necessity to raise the moral level in organizations. Current studies seem to suitably respond to the issues of work-related stress; however, the challenges of adaptability and morality so far lack appropriate empirical validation. Lack of empirical support is also noticeable in the case of mindful leadership theory as most studies still focus solely on individual leader development. However, it is important to start to discuss the suitable core variables of mindful leadership now as a clear differentiation from other leadership approaches like authentic leadership will be crucial for successful creation of mindful leadership theory. This paper also presents recommendations for entrepreneurs and managers willing to incorporate mindfulness into their organizational settings.

  10. EMERGING CHALLENGES IN THE MANAGEMENT OF CONTEMPORARY PUBLIC SPACES IN URBAN NEIGHBOURHOODS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajjan Man Chitrakar

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The lack of management has led to the degrading quality of public space in modern cities around the globe. Contemporary public spaces are facing challenges in terms of maintaining them as a “social space” so that they are accessible and functional for the users. Using Kathmandu as a case study, this paper explores the challenges the contemporary public spaces within urban neighbourhoods are facing in their management. The study reveals that the regulation of use is a major concern of public space management in the new neighbourhoods of Kathmandu as evident in the limited accessibility and utility of public space, due to control and commercialisation. The use of public space has also been affected by the lack of regular maintenance. The root cause of these problems lies in weak urban governance at the neighbourhood level, which has led the local community-based organisations to take a role in neighbourhood management. These findings confirm that the management of public space is a critical issue of urban development with commonalities existing across geographical regions that demand adequate consideration from the stakeholders.

  11. Arboviruses emerging in Brazil: challenges for clinic and implications for public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donalisio, Maria Rita; Freitas, André Ricardo Ribas; Zuben, Andrea Paula Bruno Von

    2017-04-10

    Arboviruses have been emerging in different parts of the world due to genetic changes in the virus, alteration of the host and vector population dynamics, or because of anthropogenic environmental factors. These viruses' capacity for adaptation is notable, as well as the likelihood of their emergence and establishment in new geographic areas. In Brazilian epidemiologic scenario, the most common arboviruses are DENV, CHIKV, and ZIKV, although others may spread in the country. Little is yet known of the impact of viral co-circulation, which would theoretically result in more intense viremia or other immunological alterations that could trigger autoimmune diseases, such as Guillain-Barré syndrome. The impact on morbidity and mortality intensifies as extensive epidemics lead to a high number of affected individuals, severe cases, and implications for health services, mainly due to the absence of treatment, vaccines, and effective prevention and control measures. RESUMO Notifica-se a emergência de arboviroses em diferentes regiões do planeta em decorrência de mudanças genéticas no vírus, alteração da dinâmica populacional de hospedeiros e vetores ou por fatores ambientais de origem antropogênica. É notável a capacidade de adaptação desses vírus e a possibilidade de emergirem e se estabelecerem em novas áreas geográficas. No contexto epidemiológico brasileiro, os arbovírus de maior circulação são DENV, CHIKV e ZIKV, embora existam outros com potencial de disseminação no País. O impacto da cocirculação viral ainda é pouco conhecido, a qual teoricamente resultaria em viremias mais intensas ou outras alterações imunológicas que poderiam ser o gatilho para doenças autoimunes, como a síndrome de Guillain-Barré. O impacto na morbidade e mortalidade se intensifica à medida que extensas epidemias pressupõem grande número de indivíduos acometidos, casos graves e implicações sobre os serviços de saúde, principalmente diante da aus

  12. An innovative longitudinal curriculum to increase emergency medicine residents’ exposure to rarely encountered and technically challenging procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grall KH

    2014-07-01

    indicated that the residents were able to reach their goal numbers. Conclusion: Based on survey results, the procedure series improved our residents’ perceived understanding of and perceived ability to perform uncommon and more technically challenging procedures. Further, results suggest that the use of a cognitive curriculum model as developed by Manthey and Fitch is adaptable and could be modified to fit the needs of other medical specialties. Keywords: graduate medical education, emergency medical education, procedural competency, high-fidelity simulation

  13. Thyroid Storm in a Patient with Trauma - A Challenging Diagnosis for the Emergency Physician: Case Report and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hsiang-I; Yiang, Giou-Teng; Hsu, Chin-Wang; Wang, Jen-Chun; Lee, Chien-Hsing; Chen, Yu-Long

    2017-03-01

    Thyroid storm, an endocrine emergency, remains a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. It is recognized to develop as a result of several factors, including infection, surgery, acute illness, and rarely, trauma. Recognition of thyroid storm in a trauma patient is difficult because the emergency physician usually focuses on managing more obvious injuries. We present a case of trauma-related thyroid storm and review the previous literature on posttraumatic thyroid storm to delineate risk factors of the disease. The case occurred in a 32-year-old man after a motorcycle accident. Careful investigation of patient history and risk factors of trauma-related thyroid storms and utilization of the scoring system may facilitate early diagnosis. Traumatically induced thyroid storm usually responds to medical treatment developed for hyperthyroidism. Surgical intervention may be needed for patients who failed medical treatment or those with direct thyroid gland injuries. The outcome is usually fair under appropriate management. We present a case of trauma-related thyroid storm to illustrate the diagnostic and therapeutic approach with a summary of the previous literature. Emergency physicians should be aware of the clinical presentation and risk factors of patients with trauma-related thyroid storm to reduce the rate of misdiagnosis and prevent catastrophic outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. [The TraumaRegister DGU® as the basis of medical quality management. Ten years experience of a national trauma centre exemplified by emergency room treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helm, M; Bitzl, A; Klinger, S; Lefering, R; Lampl, L; Kulla, M

    2013-07-01

    The trauma register of the German Society of Trauma Surgery (TraumaRegister DGU®/TR-DGU) has been proven to be a valuable tool for external assessment of quality in the treatment of patients with major trauma. This publication shows for the first time how the quality of trauma treatment in a level I trauma centre could be improved over a period of almost ten years with the help of continuous quality management, i.e. recognizing a problem, developing a solution and evaluating its effect. Tracer parameters and indicators of quality are presented in four periods over a total study period from 1st January 1989 to 31st March 2007. The division into four periods is due to major changes in the trauma treatment algorithms or structural changes in the trauma room. The results are displayed for all patients treated in the trauma room and for those patients with an injury severity score (ISS)≥16. Over all four periods a total number of n=2,239 patients were admitted to the trauma room. Based on the results of the trauma register a number of changes were made, not only structural changes, such as the introduction of point-of-care diagnostics, initially conventional X-ray, then digital X-ray and finally multislice computed tomography (CT) scanning in the trauma room but also changes in the way personnel participating in the trauma treatment are trained. Advanced trauma life support (ATLS®) has become the standard training for doctors and prehospital trauma life support (PHTLS®) for nurses. Time efficient treatment algorithms were introduced. All measures led to changes in several parameters which are chosen as indicators for good treatment quality. It was for instance possible to reduce the average total trauma treatment time for patients with an ISS≥16 from initially 90.9±48.6 min to 37.4±18.  min in the final study period. The external quality management performed by the TR-DGU has proved to be a constant source of inspiration. The effects of the changes made can

  15. Plant genetic resources for food and agriculture: opportunities and challenges emerging from the science and information technology revolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halewood, Michael; Chiurugwi, Tinashe; Sackville Hamilton, Ruaraidh; Kurtz, Brad; Marden, Emily; Welch, Eric; Michiels, Frank; Mozafari, Javad; Sabran, Muhamad; Patron, Nicola; Kersey, Paul; Bastow, Ruth; Dorius, Shawn; Dias, Sonia; McCouch, Susan; Powell, Wayne

    2018-03-01

    Contents Summary 1407 I. Introduction 1408 II. Technological advances and their utility for gene banks and breeding, and longer-term contributions to SDGs 1408 III. The challenges that must be overcome to realise emerging R&D opportunities 1410 IV. Renewed governance structures for PGR (and related big data) 1413 V. Access and benefit sharing and big data 1416 VI. Conclusion 1417 Acknowledgements 1417 ORCID 1417 References 1417 SUMMARY: Over the last decade, there has been an ongoing revolution in the exploration, manipulation and synthesis of biological systems, through the development of new technologies that generate, analyse and exploit big data. Users of Plant Genetic Resources (PGR) can potentially leverage these capacities to significantly increase the efficiency and effectiveness of their efforts to conserve, discover and utilise novel qualities in PGR, and help achieve the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). This review advances the discussion on these emerging opportunities and discusses how taking advantage of them will require data integration and synthesis across disciplinary, organisational and international boundaries, and the formation of multi-disciplinary, international partnerships. We explore some of the institutional and policy challenges that these efforts will face, particularly how these new technologies may influence the structure and role of research for sustainable development, ownership of resources, and access and benefit sharing. We discuss potential responses to political and institutional challenges, ranging from options for enhanced structure and governance of research discovery platforms to internationally brokered benefit-sharing agreements, and identify a set of broad principles that could guide the global community as it seeks or considers solutions. © 2018 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2018 New Phytologist Trust.

  16. Emerging molecular-targeted therapies—the challenging case of endometrial cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ines Vasconcelos

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Endometrial cancer newly affects an estimated 54,870 women in the United States, being responsible for an estimated 10,170 deaths in 2015. It has demonstrated to harbor a complex carcinogenesis process, with limited treatment options for advanced or persistent disease. Identification and targeting of genetic alterations that lead to progressive disease and therapy resistance is not only challenging, but also often does not correlate with a clinical benefit. Targeted maintenance therapies in endometrial cancer have been largely disappointing. Nonetheless, targeted personalized treatment should be the main goal of treatment of advanced disease in the future. Due to the high variety of drugs being tested in early clinical trials, it is hard to keep pace with the latest developments and ongoing trials. This review aims to summarize the latest published and ongoing trials on targeted therapies in endometrial cancer.

  17. Ultrafast-laser-inscribed 3D integrated photonics: challenges and emerging applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gross S.

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Since the discovery that tightly focused femtosecond laser pulses can induce a highly localised and permanent refractive index modification in a large number of transparent dielectrics, the technique of ultrafast laser inscription has received great attention from a wide range of applications. In particular, the capability to create three-dimensional optical waveguide circuits has opened up new opportunities for integrated photonics that would not have been possible with traditional planar fabrication techniques because it enables full access to the many degrees of freedom in a photon. This paper reviews the basic techniques and technological challenges of 3D integrated photonics fabricated using ultrafast laser inscription as well as reviews the most recent progress in the fields of astrophotonics, optical communication, quantum photonics, emulation of quantum systems, optofluidics and sensing.

  18. Maintaining competence in radiological protection in emergency situations - a challenge for the 21st century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, W.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: State of the art radiological protection in emergency situations requires specific resources and competence in a variety of scientific and technical areas. These include e.g. nuclear and reactor physics, metrology, health sciences, radiobiology, food production, waste management, and information technology. In many of these areas a high technical standard is currently available. This standard is based on great efforts of governments, universities/research institutions and the nuclear industry during the second half of the 20 th century. Although the number of scientists and technicians in these areas may appear to be sufficient today at least in some countries, there are strong indicators that future expertise is at risk. The indicators are declining university enrolment, dilution of university course content, high retirement expectations of staff members with little or no replacement planned. During the last decade many international organizations have analyzed the current situation and identified risk areas. Many proposals of general nature are available to take appropriate steps to maintain competence in the 21 st century. These proposals include the following recommendations for governments, for the industry, and for international and supra-national organisations. Governments are encouraged to engage in long term strategic planning and funding to maintain competence; organize networks of collaboration between specialised organisations to maintain critical groups size; take responsibility for ensuring that human resources are available to meet obligations; support 'educational networks' among universities, research institutions, and the industry; provide scholarships, fellowships, and traineeships as part of their funding policy. The industry is encouraged to maintain high level training and in house education to meet their specific needs; develop research programmes which are attractive for students and employees; improve co-operation with

  19. Migrants and emerging public health issues in a globalized world: threats, risks and challenges, an evidence-based framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gushulak, Bd; Weekers, J; Macpherson, Dw

    2009-01-01

    International population mobility is an underlying factor in the emergence of public health threats and risks that must be managed globally. These risks are often related, but not limited, to transmissible pathogens. Mobile populations can link zones of disease emergence to lowprevalence or nonendemic areas through rapid or high-volume international movements, or both. Against this background of human movement, other global processes such as economics, trade, transportation, environment and climate change, as well as civil security influence the health impacts of disease emergence. Concurrently, global information systems, together with regulatory frameworks for disease surveillance and reporting, affect organizational and public awareness of events of potential public health significance. International regulations directed at disease mitigation and control have not kept pace with the growing challenges associated with the volume, speed, diversity, and disparity of modern patterns of human movement. The thesis that human population mobility is itself a major determinant of global public health is supported in this article by review of the published literature from the perspective of determinants of health (such as genetics/biology, behavior, environment, and socioeconomics), population-based disease prevalence differences, existing national and international health policies and regulations, as well as inter-regional shifts in population demographics and health outcomes. This paper highlights some of the emerging threats and risks to public health, identifies gaps in existing frameworks to manage health issues associated with migration, and suggests changes in approach to population mobility, globalization, and public health. The proposed integrated approach includes a broad spectrum of stakeholders ranging from individual health-care providers to policy makers and international organizations that are primarily involved in global health management, or are influenced

  20. The challenge of interacting with the public on nuclear emergency preparedness and iodine prophylaxis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Bladel, L.; Pauwels, A.; Smeesters, P.

    2001-01-01

    In 1999 the Belgian federal authorities launched a large-scale campaign on nuclear emergency preparedness. The main objective was to inform the public at large of the whole territory on all aspects of radiological accidents and more specifically on the possible countermeasures, some of which they might be asked to take an active part in. At the same occasion, people living within the 10-kilometer zone surrounding the major nuclear sites were invited to collect a household stock of iodine tablets from their local pharmacy. Some well-defined target groups were offered specific and more extensive information. This was done for intervention workers, medical doctors, pharmacists and persons carrying responsibilities in schools, like principals and teachers. This paper first discusses the objectives of the campaign and the content of the information, explains the organisational set-up and practical execution, and finally gives some preliminary results of a recently conducted study on the perception of this campaign by members of the public. (authors)

  1. Influence of androgen deprivation therapy on the uptake of PSMA-targeted agents: Emerging opportunities challenges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakht, Martin K.; Oh, So Won; Youn, Hye Won; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Kwak, Cheol; Kang, Keon Wook [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-09-15

    Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is an attractive target for both diagnosis and therapy because of its high expression in the vast majority of prostate cancers. Development of small molecules for targeting PSMA is important for molecular imaging and radionuclide therapy of prostate cancer. Recent evidence implies that androgen-deprivation therapy increase PSMA-ligand uptake in some cases. The reported upregulations in PSMA-ligand uptake after exposure to second-generation antiandrogens such as enzalutamide and abiraterone might disturb PSMA-targeted imaging for staging and response monitoring of patients undergoing treatment with antiandrogen-based drugs. On the other hand, second-generation antiandrogens are emerging as potential endoradio-/chemosensitizers. Therefore, the enhancement of the therapeutic efficiency of PSMA-targeted theranostic methods can be listed as a new capability of antiandrogens. In this manuscript, we will present what is currently known about the mechanism of increasing PSMA uptake following exposure to antiandrogens. In addition, we will discuss whether these above-mentioned antiandrogens could play the role of endoradio-/chemosensitizers in combination with the well-established PSMA-targeted methods for pre-targeting of prostate cancer.

  2. Emerging roles for biomedical librarians: a survey of current practice, challenges, and changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crum, Janet A; Cooper, I Diane

    2013-10-01

    This study is intended to (1) identify emerging roles for biomedical librarians and determine how common these roles are in a variety of library settings, (2) identify barriers to taking on new roles, and (3) determine how librarians are developing the capacity to take on new roles. A survey was conducted of librarians in biomedical settings. Most biomedical librarians are taking on new roles. The most common roles selected by survey respondents include analysis and enhancement of user experiences, support for social media, support for systematic reviews, clinical informationist, help for faculty or staff with authorship issues, and implementation of researcher profiling and collaboration tools. Respondents in academic settings are more likely to report new roles than hospital librarians are, but some new roles are common in both settings. Respondents use a variety of methods to free up time for new roles, but predominant methods vary between directors and librarians and between academic and hospital respondents. Lack of time is the biggest barrier that librarians face when trying to adopt new roles. New roles are associated with increased collaboration with individuals and/or groups outside the library. This survey documents the widespread incorporation of new roles in biomedical libraries in the United States, as well as the barriers to adopting these roles and the means by which librarians are making time for them. The results of the survey can be used to inform strategic planning, succession planning, library education, and career development for biomedical librarians.

  3. Recent successes and emerging challenges for coordinated satellite/ground-based magnetospheric exploration and modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelopoulos, Vassilis

    With the availability of a distributed constellation of spacecraft (THEMIS, Geotail, Cluster) and increased capability ground based arrays (SuperDARN, THEMIS/GBOs), it is now pos-sible to infer simply from timing significant information regarding mapping of magnetospheric phenomena. Optical, magnetometer and radar data can pinpoint the location and nature of onset signatures. On the other hand, magnetic field modeling constrained by physical bound-aries (such as the isotropy boundary) the measured magnetic field and total pressure values at a distibuted network of satellites has proven to do a much better job at correlating ionospheric precipitation and diffuse auroral boundaries to magnetospheric phenomena, such as the inward boundary of the dipolarization fronts. It is now possible to routinely compare in-situ measured phase space densities of ion and electron distributions during ionosphere -magnetosphere con-junctions, in the absense of potential drops. It is also possible to not only infer equivalent current systems from the ground, but use reconstruction of the ionospheric current system from space to determine the full electrodynamics evolution of the ionosphere and compare with radars. Assimilation of this emerging ground based and global magnetospheric panoply into a self consistent magnetospheric model will likely be one of the most fruitful endeavors in magnetospheric exploration during the next few years.

  4. Emerging roles for biomedical librarians: a survey of current practice, challenges, and changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crum, Janet A.; Cooper, I. Diane

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study is intended to (1) identify emerging roles for biomedical librarians and determine how common these roles are in a variety of library settings, (2) identify barriers to taking on new roles, and (3) determine how librarians are developing the capacity to take on new roles. Methods: A survey was conducted of librarians in biomedical settings. Results: Most biomedical librarians are taking on new roles. The most common roles selected by survey respondents include analysis and enhancement of user experiences, support for social media, support for systematic reviews, clinical informationist, help for faculty or staff with authorship issues, and implementation of researcher profiling and collaboration tools. Respondents in academic settings are more likely to report new roles than hospital librarians are, but some new roles are common in both settings. Respondents use a variety of methods to free up time for new roles, but predominant methods vary between directors and librarians and between academic and hospital respondents. Lack of time is the biggest barrier that librarians face when trying to adopt new roles. New roles are associated with increased collaboration with individuals and/or groups outside the library. Conclusion and Implications: This survey documents the widespread incorporation of new roles in biomedical libraries in the United States, as well as the barriers to adopting these roles and the means by which librarians are making time for them. The results of the survey can be used to inform strategic planning, succession planning, library education, and career development for biomedical librarians. PMID:24163599

  5. Preparedness of Operation Teams' Non-technical Skills in a Main Control Room of Nuclear Power Plants to Manage Emergency Situations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yim, Ho Bin; Kim, Ar Ryum; Seong, Poong Hyun [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    Human reliability is one of the important determinants for the system safety. Nuclear Energy Agency reported that approximately half of events reported by foreign nuclear industry were related with inappropriate human actions. The human error problems can be viewed in two ways: the person approach and the system approach. Other terms to represent each approach are active failures and latent conditions. Active failures are unsafe acts committed by people who are in direct contact with systems whereas latent conditions are the inevitable 'resident pathogens' within the system. To identify what kinds of non-technical skills were needed to cope with emergency conditions, a method to evaluate preparedness of task management in emergency conditions based on monitoring patterns was presented. Five characteristics were suggested to evaluate emergency task management and communication: latent mistake resistibility, latent violation resistibility, thoroughness, communication, and assertiveness. Case study was done by analyzing emergency training of 9 different real operation teams in the reference plant. The result showed that the 9 teams had their own emergency task management skills which resulted in good and bad performances

  6. Preparedness of Operation Teams' Non-technical Skills in a Main Control Room of Nuclear Power Plants to Manage Emergency Situations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yim, Ho Bin; Kim, Ar Ryum; Seong, Poong Hyun

    2012-01-01

    Human reliability is one of the important determinants for the system safety. Nuclear Energy Agency reported that approximately half of events reported by foreign nuclear industry were related with inappropriate human actions. The human error problems can be viewed in two ways: the person approach and the system approach. Other terms to represent each approach are active failures and latent conditions. Active failures are unsafe acts committed by people who are in direct contact with systems whereas latent conditions are the inevitable 'resident pathogens' within the system. To identify what kinds of non-technical skills were needed to cope with emergency conditions, a method to evaluate preparedness of task management in emergency conditions based on monitoring patterns was presented. Five characteristics were suggested to evaluate emergency task management and communication: latent mistake resistibility, latent violation resistibility, thoroughness, communication, and assertiveness. Case study was done by analyzing emergency training of 9 different real operation teams in the reference plant. The result showed that the 9 teams had their own emergency task management skills which resulted in good and bad performances

  7. Emerging technologies for the detection of rabies virus: challenges and hopes in the 21st century.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony R Fooks

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The diagnosis of rabies is routinely based on clinical and epidemiological information, especially when exposures are reported in rabies-endemic countries. Diagnostic tests using conventional assays that appear to be negative, even when undertaken late in the disease and despite the clinical diagnosis, have a tendency, at times, to be unreliable. These tests are rarely optimal and entirely dependent on the nature and quality of the sample supplied. In the course of the past three decades, the application of molecular biology has aided in the development of tests that result in a more rapid detection of rabies virus. These tests enable viral strain identification from clinical specimens. Currently, there are a number of molecular tests that can be used to complement conventional tests in rabies diagnosis. Indeed the challenges in the 21st century for the development of rabies diagnostics are not of a technical nature; these tests are available now. The challenges in the 21st century for diagnostic test developers are two-fold: firstly, to achieve internationally accepted validation of a test that will then lead to its acceptance by organisations globally. Secondly, the areas of the world where such tests are needed are mainly in developing regions where financial and logistical barriers prevent their implementation. Although developing countries with a poor healthcare infrastructure recognise that molecular-based diagnostic assays will be unaffordable for routine use, the cost/benefit ratio should still be measured. Adoption of rapid and affordable rabies diagnostic tests for use in developing countries highlights the importance of sharing and transferring technology through laboratory twinning between the developed and the developing countries. Importantly for developing countries, the benefit of molecular methods as tools is the capability for a differential diagnosis of human diseases that present with similar clinical symptoms. Antemortem

  8. Perinatally acquired HIV infection in adolescents from sub-Saharan Africa: a review of emerging challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowenthal, Elizabeth D; Bakeera-Kitaka, Sabrina; Marukutira, Tafireyi; Chapman, Jennifer; Goldrath, Kathryn; Ferrand, Rashida A

    2014-07-01

    Worldwide, more than three million children are infected with HIV, 90% of whom live in sub-Saharan Africa. As the HIV epidemic matures and antiretroviral treatment is scaled up, children with HIV are reaching adolescence in large numbers. The growing population of adolescents with perinatally acquired HIV infection living within this region presents not only unprecedented challenges but also opportunities to learn about the pathogenesis of HIV infection. In this Review, we discuss the changing epidemiology of paediatric HIV and the particular features of HIV infection in adolescents in sub-Saharan Africa. Longstanding HIV infection acquired when the immune system is not developed results in distinctive chronic clinical complications that cause severe morbidity. As well as dealing with chronic illness, HIV-infected adolescents have to confront psychosocial issues, maintain adherence to drugs, and learn to negotiate sexual relationships, while undergoing rapid physical and psychological development. Context-specific strategies for early identification of HIV infection in children and prompt linkage to care need to be developed. Clinical HIV care should integrate age-appropriate sexual and reproductive health and psychological, educational, and social services. Health-care workers will need to be trained to recognise and manage the needs of these young people so that the increasing numbers of children surviving to adolescence can access quality care beyond specialist services at low-level health-care facilities. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Urban growth and water access in sub-Saharan Africa: Progress, challenges, and emerging research directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, S; Adams, E A; Neville, G; Wada, Y; de Sherbinin, A; Mullin Bernhardt, E; Adamo, S B

    2017-12-31

    For the next decade, the global water crisis remains the risk of highest concern, and ranks ahead of climate change, extreme weather events, food crises and social instability. Across the globe, nearly one in ten people is without access to an improved drinking water source. Least Developed Countries (LDCs) especially in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) are the most affected, having disproportionately more of the global population without access to clean water than other major regions. Population growth, changing lifestyles, increasing pollution and accelerating urbanization will continue to widen the gap between the demand for water and available supply especially in urban areas, and disproportionately affect informal settlements, where the majority of SSA's urban population resides. Distribution and allocation of water will be affected by climate-induced water stresses, poor institutions, ineffective governance, and weak political will to address scarcity and mediate uncertainties in future supply. While attempts have been made by many scientists to examine different dimensions of water scarcity and urban population dynamics, there are few comprehensive reviews, especially focused on the particular situation in Sub-Saharan Africa. This paper contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of urban water supply by distilling and integrating relevant empirical knowledge on urban dynamics and water issues in SSA, focusing on progress made and associated challenges. It then points out future research directions including the need to understand how alternatives to centralized water policies may help deliver sustainable water supply to cities and informal settlements in the region. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Dietary phosphorus restriction in advanced chronic kidney disease: merits, challenges, and emerging strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, Orlando M; Wolf, Myles

    2010-01-01

    Hyperphosphatemia is an independent risk factor for mortality in patients on maintenance dialysis. Since phosphorus clearance by standard three times-weekly dialysis is insufficient to balance ongoing dietary phosphorus intake, strategies to prevent absorption of dietary phosphorus are essential for attenuating increased serum levels. Dietary phosphorus binders are used widely for this purpose but dietary phosphorus restriction is relatively underutilized, most likely because of the logistical complexity of instituting and monitoring a low phosphorus diet, and for fear of worsening protein-energy wasting, which itself is a potent risk factor for mortality. In this review, we propose sustainable strategies for reducing phosphorus intake while avoiding exacerbation of protein-energy wasting. The approach is based on recognition of the dissociation between protein and phosphorus content in phosphorus-rich processed foods and the varying phosphorus bioavailability in different dietary sources. Controlling serum phosphate levels is among the most challenging aspects of day-to-day dialysis care but integration of sensible dietary interventions will likely improve phosphorus control.

  11. Transitioning adolescents living with HIV/AIDS to adult-oriented health care: an emerging challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Daisy Maria; Succi, Regina C; Turato, Egberto Ribeiro

    2010-01-01

    To review the literature on transition from pediatric to adult-oriented health care and discuss this issue in the specific context of chronic conditions. MEDLINE and LILACS were searched for relevant English and French-language articles published between 1990 and 2010. The transition of adolescents with chronic diseases from pediatric care to adult-oriented services has been a growing concern among pediatric specialties. In recent years, young people living with HIV/AIDS have begun to reach adulthood, giving rise to several challenges. The studies reviewed herein discuss such relevant topics as: the difference between transfer, an isolated event, and transition, a gradual process; the transition models used in different services; the importance of transitioning in a planned and individualized manner; the need for comprehensive interaction between pediatric and adult-oriented care teams; the importance of joint participation of adolescents, their families, and health professionals in the process; barriers to and factors that promote successful transitions; and the special needs of adolescents with HIV/AIDS in this important period of life. Several authors agree that transitioning adolescents to adult-oriented health care should be a gradual process not determined by age alone. It requires a plan established with ample dialogue among adolescents, their families, and pediatric and adult care teams. However, there is little evidence to support any specific model of health care transition. This should prompt researchers to conduct more prospective studies on the theme, especially in more vulnerable groups such as adolescents living with HIV/AIDS.

  12. Emerging from the tragedies in Bangladesh: a challenge to voluntarism in the global economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claeson, Björn Skorpen

    2015-02-01

    Under the regime of private company or multi-stakeholder voluntary codes of conduct and industry social auditing, workers have absorbed low wages and unsafe and abusive conditions; labor leaders and union members have become the targets of both government and factory harassment and violence; and trade union power has waned. Nowhere have these private systems of codes and audits so clearly failed to protect workers as in Bangladesh's apparel industry. However, international labor groups and Bangladeshi unions have succeeded in mounting a challenge to voluntarism in the global economy, persuading more than 180 companies to make a binding and enforceable commitment to workers' safety in an agreement with 12 unions. The extent to which this Bangladesh Accord will be able to influence the entrenched global regime of voluntary codes and weak trade unions remains an open question. But if the Accord can make progress in Bangladesh, it can help to inspire similar efforts in other countries and in other industries. © 2015 SAGE Publications.

  13. Emerging research in micro and nano systems: opportunities and challenges for societal impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianchandani, Yogesh B.

    2010-02-01

    In just a few decades, micro and nano technologies have changed the way that we live - how we work and communicate; the food and medicine that we consume; the clothing that we use; and the entertainment that we seek. While these technologies are being actively investigated in several research communities, the potential for continued societal impact is constrained by resources available for system-level research. Given the long time-lines and levels of investment that are typically necessary to develop functional systems, strategic prioritization of research directions from the perspective of societal needs can be helpful. This paper outlines the findings of an NSF-sponsored road-mapping workshop that was held in 2009, with the intention of initiating a conversation about the opportunities and challenges for micro and nano systems. Four areas of need were discussed: environmental sensing; health care; infrastructure monitoring; and energy alternatives. Possible research trajectories were identified by envisioning technological goals for the year 2040, and linking these to horizons for 2015 and 2025. This paper also provides few examples of current research in each of the four application domains. It is noted that a systems perspective can help to keep the research focused, accelerating and amplifying the societal gain with available resources. Practical and affordable solutions at the system level will require partnerships between specialists, and also between academia and industry.

  14. Diabetic retinopathy in sub-Saharan Africa: meeting the challenges of an emerging epidemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Philip I; Msukwa, Gerald; Beare, Nicholas A V

    2013-07-02

    Sub-Saharan Africa faces an epidemic of diabetes. Diabetes causes significant morbidity including visual loss from diabetic retinopathy, which is largely preventable. In this resource-poor setting, health systems are poorly organized to deliver chronic care with multiple system involvement. The specific skills and resources needed to manage diabetic retinopathy are scarce. The costs of inaction for individuals, communities and countries are likely to be high. Screening for and treatment of diabetic retinopathy have been shown to be effective, and cost-effective, in resource-rich settings. In sub-Saharan Africa, clinical services for diabetes need to be expanded with the provision of effective, integrated care, including case-finding and management of diabetic retinopathy. This should be underpinned by a high quality evidence base accounting for differences in diabetes types, resources, patients and society in Africa. Research must address the epidemiology of diabetic retinopathy in Africa, strategies for disease detection and management with laser treatment, and include health economic analyses. Models of care tailored to the local geographic and social context are most likely to be cost effective, and should draw on experience and expertise from other continents. Research into diabetic retinopathy in Africa can drive the political agenda for service development and enable informed prioritization of available health funding at a national level. Effective interventions need to be implemented in the near future to avert a large burden of visual loss from diabetic retinopathy in the continent. An increase in visual loss from diabetic retinopathy is inevitable as the diabetes epidemic emerges in sub-Saharan Africa. This could be minimized by the provision of case-finding and laser treatment, but how to do this most effectively in the regional context is not known. Research into the epidemiology, case-finding and laser treatment of diabetic retinopathy in sub

  15. Microbial P450 Enzymes in Bioremediation and Drug Discovery: Emerging Potentials and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Sukanta S; Yadav, Jagjit S

    2018-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 enzymes are a structurally conserved but functionally diverse group of heme-containing mixed function oxidases found across both prokaryotic and eukaryotic forms of the microbial world. Microbial P450s are known to perform diverse functions ranging from the synthesis of cell wall components to xenobiotic/drug metabolism to biodegradation of environmental chemicals. Conventionally, many microbial systems have been reported to mimic mammalian P450-like activation of drugs and were proposed as the in-vitro models of mammalian drug metabolism. Recent reports suggest that native or engineered forms of specific microbial P450s from these and other microbial systems could be employed for desired specific biotransformation reactions toward natural and synthetic (drug) compounds underscoring their emerging potential in drug improvement and discovery. On the other hand, microorganisms particularly fungi and actinomycetes have been shown to possess catabolic P450s with unusual potential to degrade toxic environmental chemicals including persistent organic pollutants (POPs). Wood-rotting basidiomycete fungi in particular have revealed the presence of exceptionally large P450 repertoire (P450ome) in their genomes, majority of which are however orphan (with no known function). Our pre- and post-genomic studies have led to functional characterization of several fungal P450s inducible in response to exposure to several environmental toxicants and demonstration of their potential in bioremediation of these chemicals. This review is an attempt to summarize the postgenomic unveiling of this versatile enzyme superfamily in microbial systems and investigation of their potential to synthesize new drugs and degrade persistent pollutants, among other biotechnological applications. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  16. A Critical Appraisal of the Juvenile Justice System under Cameroon's 2005 Criminal Procedure Code: Emerging Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Tabe

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this article is to examine the changes introduced by the 2005 Cameroonian Criminal Procedure Code on matters of juvenile justice, considering that before this Code, juvenile justice in Cameroon was governed by extra-national laws. In undertaking this analysis, the article highlights the evolution of the administration of juvenile justice 50 years after independence of Cameroon. It also points out the various difficulties and shortcomings in the treatment of juvenile offenders in Cameroon since the enactment of the new Criminal Procedure Code. The article reveals that the 2005 Code is an amalgamation of all hitherto existing laws in the country that pertained to juvenile justice, and that despite the considerable amount of criticism it has received, the Code is clearly an improvement of the system of juvenile justice in Cameroon, since it represents a balance of the due process rights of young people, the protection of society and the special needs of young offenders. This is so because the drafters of the Code took a broad view of the old laws on juvenile justice. Also a wide range of groups were consulted, including criminal justice professionals, children’s service organisations, victims, parents, young offenders, educators, advocacy groups and social-policy analysts. However, to address the challenges that beset the juvenile justice system of Cameroon, the strategy of the government should be focussed on three areas: the prevention of youth crime, the provision of meaningful consequences for the actions of young people, and the rehabilitation and reintegration of young offenders. Cameroonian law should seek educative solutions rather than to impose prison sentences or other repressive measures on young offenders. Special courts to deal with young offenders should be established outside the regular penal system and should be provided with resources that are adequate for and appropriate to fostering their understanding of

  17. Challenges for eco-design of emerging technologies: The case of electronic textiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Köhler, Andreas R.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Recent innovations of electronic textiles and their end-of-life impacts are reviewed. • The properties of e-textiles are examined against Design for Recycling (DfR) principles. • Eco-design strategies for sustainable product development are discussed. • Compatibility standards for e-textiles are proposed as a waste prevention strategy. • Labelling of e-textiles is suggested as a measure to facilitate recycling. - Abstract: The combination of textile and electronic technologies results in new challenges for sustainable product design. Electronic textiles (e-textiles) feature a seamless integration of textiles with electronics and other high-tech materials. Such products may, if they become mass consumer applications, result in a new kind of waste that could be difficult to recycle. The ongoing innovation process of e-textiles holds opportunities to prevent future end-of-life impacts. Implementing eco-design in the technological development process can help to minimise future waste. However, the existing Design for Recycling (DfR) principles for textiles or electronics do not match with the properties of the combined products. This article examines possibilities to advance eco-design of a converging technology. DfR strategies for e-textiles are discussed from the background of contemporary innovation trends. Three waste preventative eco-design approaches for e-textiles are discussed: 1 harnessing the inherent advantages of smart materials for sustainable design; 2 establishing open compatibility standards; 3 labelling the e-textiles to facilitate their recycling. It is argued that life-cycle thinking needs to be implemented concurrent to the technological development process

  18. Energy Transition: Missed Opportunities and Emerging Challenges for Landscape Planning and Designing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renée M. de Waal

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Making the shift from fossil fuels to renewable energy seems inevitable. Because energy transition poses new challenges and opportunities to the discipline of landscape architecture, the questions addressed in this paper are: (1 what landscape architects can learn from successful energy transitions in Güssing, Jühnde and Samsø; and (2 to what extent landscape architecture (or other spatial disciplines contributed to energy transition in the aforementioned cases. An exploratory, comparative case study was conducted to identify differences and similarities among the cases, to answer the research questions, and to formulate recommendations for further research and practice. The comparison indicated that the realized renewable energy systems are context-dependent and, therefore, specifically designed to meet the respective energy demand, making use of the available potentials for renewable energy generation and efficiency. Further success factors seemed to be the presence of (local frontrunners and a certain degree of citizen participation. The relatively smooth implementation of renewable energy technologies in Jühnde and on Samsø may indicate the importance of careful and (partly institutionalized consideration of landscape impact, siting and design. Comparing the cases against the literature demonstrated that landscape architects were not as involved as they, theoretically, could have been. However, particularly when the aim is sustainable development, rather than “merely” renewable energy provision, the integrative concept of “sustainable energy landscapes” can be the arena where landscape architecture and other disciplines meet to pursue global sustainability goals, while empowering local communities and safeguarding landscape quality.

  19. The management challenge for household waste in emerging economies like Brazil: realistic source separation and activation of reverse logistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehr, M

    2014-09-01

    Business opportunities in the household waste sector in emerging economies still evolve around the activities of bulk collection and tipping with an open material balance. This research, conducted in Brazil, pursued the objective of shifting opportunities from tipping to reverse logistics in order to close the balance. To do this, it illustrated how specific knowledge of sorted waste composition and reverse logistics operations can be used to determine realistic temporal and quantitative landfill diversion targets in an emerging economy context. Experimentation constructed and confirmed the recycling trilogy that consists of source separation, collection infrastructure and reverse logistics. The study on source separation demonstrated the vital difference between raw and sorted waste compositions. Raw waste contained 70% biodegradable and 30% inert matter. Source separation produced 47% biodegradable, 20% inert and 33% mixed material. The study on collection infrastructure developed the necessary receiving facilities. The study on reverse logistics identified private operators capable of collecting and processing all separated inert items. Recycling activities for biodegradable material were scarce and erratic. Only farmers would take the material as animal feed. No composting initiatives existed. The management challenge was identified as stimulating these activities in order to complete the trilogy and divert the 47% source-separated biodegradable discards from the landfills. © The Author(s) 2014.

  20. Fasciola hepatica: effect of the natural light level on cercarial emergence from temperature-challenged Galba truncatula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vignoles Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As abrupt changes in water temperature (thermal shock triggered a significantly greater cercarial emergence of Fasciola hepatica from experimentally infected Galba truncatula, laboratory investigations were carried out to study the influence of light on cercarial emergence in snails subjected to a thermal shock every week (a mean of 12 °C for 3 h during the patent period. Thermal shock for these temperature-challenged (TC snails was carried out outdoors under artificial or natural light, or indoors under constant artificial light. Compared with the infected control snails always reared indoors at 20 °C, the number of cercariae in TC snails subjected to a thermal shock and natural light outdoors was significantly greater. The repetition of this experiment by subjecting TC snails to the same thermal shock indoors under an artificial light level ranging from 600 to 3000 lux did not show any significant difference among the numbers of cercariae in the different subgroups. A detailed analysis of the results noted in the TC snails subjected to natural light during the thermal shock demonstrated that the number of cercariae-releasing snails was significantly higher between 601 and 1200 lux and for the highest nebulosity values (7–8 octas, which corresponds to a sufficiently or completely overcast sky. Contrary to the intensity of artificial light, which did not influence cercarial emergence, the natural light level had a significant effect on this process when F. hepatica-infected snails were subjected to a regular thermal shock during the patent period.

  1. Bench-to-bedside review: The MET syndrome – the challenges of researching and adopting medical emergency teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tee, Augustine; Calzavacca, Paolo; Licari, Elisa; Goldsmith, Donna; Bellomo, Rinaldo

    2008-01-01

    Studies of hospital performance highlight the problem of 'failure to rescue' in acutely ill patients. This is a deficiency strongly associated with serious adverse events, cardiac arrest, or death. Rapid response systems (RRSs) and their efferent arm, the medical emergency team (MET), provide early specialist critical care to patients affected by the 'MET syndrome': unequivocal physiological instability or significant hospital staff concern for patients in a non-critical care environment. This intervention aims to prevent serious adverse events, cardiac arrests, and unexpected deaths. Though clinically logical and relatively simple, its adoption poses major challenges. Furthermore, research about the effectiveness of RRS is difficult to conduct. Sceptics argue that inadequate evidence exists to support its widespread application. Indeed, supportive evidence is based on before-and-after studies, observational investigations, and inductive reasoning. However, implementing a complex intervention like RRS poses enormous logistic, political, cultural, and financial challenges. In addition, double-blinded randomised controlled trials of RRS are simply not possible. Instead, as in the case of cardiac arrest and trauma teams, change in practice may be slow and progressive, even in the absence of level I evidence. It appears likely that the accumulation of evidence from different settings and situations, though methodologically imperfect, will increase the rationale and logic of RRS. A conclusive randomised controlled trial is unlikely to occur. All truth passes through three stages. First, it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed. Third, it is accepted as being self-evident. Arthur Schopenhauer (1788–1860), German philosopher PMID:18254927

  2. Detection of severe stenosis and total occlusion in the left anterior descending coronary artery with transthoracic Doppler echocardiography in the emergency room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tani, Tomoko; Tanabe, Kazuaki; Kitai, Takeshi; Yamane, Takafumi; Kureha, Fumie; Katayama, Minako; Tamita, Koichi; Kaji, Shuichiro; Oda, Tomoyuki; Ehara, Natsuhiko; Kinoshita, Makoto; Yamamuro, Atsushi; Morioka, Shigefumi; Kihara, Yasuki

    2009-01-01

    The noninvasive measurement of coronary flow velocity in the left anterior descending artery (LAD) has recently been realized by using the transthoracic Doppler echocardiography (TTDE). A couple of investigations demonstrated that the diastolic-to-systolic peak velocity ratio (DSVR) by TTDE is a simple and noninvasive method for the detection of severe stenosis in the elective settings. However, the usefulness of DSVR by TTDE in the emergency settings has not been evaluated. The purpose of this study was to assess the clinical feasibility to document the LAD flow by TTDE in emergency patients who complained of chest pain. We studied 49 consecutive patients with acute coronary syndrome who were going to undergo emergency coronary angiography (CAG) for the anatomical diagnosis and the facilitated percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Prior to CAG, we recorded the LAD flow by TTDE and measured the diastolic peak velocity (DVp), systolic peak velocity (SVp), and their ratio, DSVR (DVp/SVp) of LAD flow. By CAG, the culprit lesions actually resided in the proximal LAD in 36 patients. Among the 36 patients, we detected the Doppler LAD flow in 29. Five out of 7 patients who were unable to detect the LAD flow revealed total occlusions by CAG. DSVR of the LAD is significantly lower in 17 patients who showed severe stenoses (>90%) than those in the rest of 12 patients who did not show such critical stenoses (1.44 +/- 0.16 vs 2.10 +/- 0.26, P < 0.0001). In the emergency settings, a noninvasive assessment of the LAD flow by TTDE accurately estimates the critical stenotic lesions of the LAD.

  3. Computer-enhanced interventions for drug use and HIV risk in the emergency room: preliminary results on psychological precursors of behavior change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonar, Erin E; Walton, Maureen A; Cunningham, Rebecca M; Chermack, Stephen T; Bohnert, Amy S B; Barry, Kristen L; Booth, Brenda M; Blow, Frederic C

    2014-01-01

    This article describes process data from a randomized controlled trial among 781 adults recruited in the emergency department who reported recent drug use and were randomized to: intervener-delivered brief intervention (IBI) assisted by computer, computerized BI (CBI), or enhanced usual care (EUC). Analyses examined differences between baseline and post-intervention on psychological constructs theoretically related to changes in drug use and HIV risk: importance, readiness, intention, help-seeking, and confidence. Compared to EUC, participants receiving the IBI significantly increased in confidence and intentions; CBI patients increased importance, readiness, confidence, and help-seeking. Both groups increased relative to the EUC in likelihood of condom use with regular partners. Examining BI components suggested that benefits of change and tools for change were associated with changes in psychological constructs. Delivering BIs targeting drug use and HIV risk using computers appears promising for implementation in healthcare settings. This trial is ongoing and future work will report behavioral outcomes. © 2013.

  4. Emerging geriatric challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, H L

    2005-10-01

    India is a vast country with diversity, both physical and cultural. 72% of World's second largest population live in rural experiencing varying degrees of socioeconomic change. However, there is no nationwide registry of older people and exact statistics about elderly population is not available. Community-based data on morbidity and disability are also not available. India is one of the few countries in the world where men out number women at all ages till about 70 years and only in very old age (80+) there are more women than men. One of the main social effect of extension of life in later years is the extended period of widowhood for women mainly due to cultural practice of men marrying younger women and widow marriage as well as divorce are uncommon. Much progress has been made in the health care services in the last 50 years giving much emphasis to mother and child programme with special emphasis on controlling population. But elderly population has been neglected, there is no separate ward for elderly in hospitals, no specialized courses in the Universities for training doctors and nurses for elderly care. Recently, Indian Medical Association has organized an ambitious project for rural elderly with emphasis on Geriatric care. Still recently, emphasis has been given for developing infrastructural facilities including creating training, courses on Geriatric Medicine and integrating with alternative system for better care of elderly. However, due to increasing awareness of policy makers to multiple issues related to aging, some progress has been made like old age pension scheme, income tax rebate for elderly, old homes and day care centers and law to help retired citizens in evicting tenants etc. but environment is not as elderly-friendly as in European countries, as the State is not likely to have adequate resources in the presence of other priorities in the country.

  5. The Evolution of Integrated Assessment and Emerging Challenges in the Assessment of Human and Natural System Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, L.

    2017-12-01

    Integrated assessment (IA) modeling and research has a long history, spanning over 30 years since its inception and addressing a wide range of contemporary issues along the way. Over the last decade, IA modeling and research has emerged as one of the primary analytical methods for understanding the complex interactions between human and natural systems, from the interactions between energy, water, and land/food systems to the interplay between health, climate, and air pollution. IA modeling and research is particularly well-suited for the analysis of these interactions because it is a discipline that strives to integrate representations of multiple systems into consistent computational platforms or frameworks. In doing so, it explicitly confronts the many tradeoffs that are frequently necessary to manage complexity and computational cost while still representing the most important interactions and overall, coupled system behavior. This talk explores the history of IA modeling and research as a means to better understand its role in the assessment of contemporary issues at the confluence of human and natural systems. It traces the evolution of IA modeling and research from initial exploration of long-term emissions pathways, to the role of technology in the global evolution of the energy system, to the key linkages between land and energy systems and, more recently, the linkages with water, air pollution, and other key systems and issues. It discusses the advances in modeling that have emerged over this evolution and the biggest challenges that still present themselves as we strive to better understand the most important interactions between human and natural systems and the implications of these interactions for human welfare and decision making.

  6. Successes and Challenges of Interprofessional Physiologic Birth and Obstetric Emergency Simulations in a Nurse-Midwifery Education Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw-Battista, Jenna; Belew, Cynthia; Anderson, Deborah; van Schaik, Sandrijn

    2015-01-01

    This article describes childbirth simulation design and implementation within the nurse-midwifery education program at the University of California, San Francisco. Nurse-midwife and obstetrician faculty coordinators were supported by faculty from multiple professions and specialties in curriculum review and simulation development and implementation. The primary goal of the resulting technology-enhanced simulations of normal physiologic birth and obstetric emergencies was to assist learners' development of interprofessional competencies related to communication, teamwork, and patient-centered care. Trainees included nurse-midwifery students; residents in obstetrics, pediatrics, and family medicine; medical students; and advanced practice nursing students in pediatrics. The diversity of participant types and learning levels provided benefits and presented challenges to effective scenario-based simulation design among numerous other theoretical and logistical considerations. This project revealed practical solutions informed by emerging health sciences and education research literature, faculty experience, and formal course evaluations by learners. Best practices in simulation development and implementation were incorporated, including curriculum revision grounded in needs assessment, case- and event-based clinical scenarios, optimization of fidelity, and ample time for participant debriefing. Adequate preparation and attention to detail increased the immersive experience and benefits of simulation. Suggestions for fidelity enhancement are provided with examples of simulation scenarios, a timeline for preparations, and discussion topics to facilitate meaningful learning by maternity and newborn care providers and trainees in clinical and academic settings. Pre- and postsimulation measurements of knowledge, skills, and attitudes are ongoing and not reported. This article is part of a special series of articles that address midwifery innovations in clinical practice

  7. Control room philosophy: Principles of control room design and control room work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skriver, Jan; Ramberg, Jasmine; Allwin, Pernilla

    2006-01-01

    In order to provide insights for improvement of work in control rooms several factors have to be considered. Knowledge of principles including control room philosophies will guide the recommended improvements. In addition to knowledge about specific principles an advantage for an organization can be an understanding of similarities and policies used in other high risk industry. The report has been developed on the basis of a document analysis of international standards and other guiding documents. (NUREG 0711, ISO 11064, ISO 6385, IEC 60964). In addition to the document analysis which has strived to compare the documents to see similarities in important principals, experience from working with control room design, modifications and evaluations in other high risk industries has pervaded the report. Important principles have been identified which are recommended to be included in a control room philosophy. Many of these are similar to the principles identified in the international standards. An additional principal which is regarded as important is the utilization of Key Performance Indicators (KPI) which can be used as a measure to target preventative means. Further more it is critical that the control room philosophy is easy to access and comprehend for all users. One of the challenges that remain after having developed a control room philosophy is how to utilize it in the daily work situation. It is vital that the document remains as a living document, guiding the continual improvement of the control room in the various life cycle stages

  8. Use of multislice CT for the evaluation of emergency room patients with chest pain: the so-called "triple rule-out".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Michael J; Raff, Gilbert L

    2008-01-01

    Recent advances in computed tomography (CT) technology have made high resolution noninvasive coronary angiograms possible. Multiple studies involving over 2,000 patients have established that coronary CT angiography (CCTA) is highly accurate for delineation of the presence and severity of coronary atherosclerosis. The high negative predictive value (>95%) found in these studies suggests that CCTA is an attractive option for exclusion of coronary artery disease in properly selected emergency department patients with acute chest pain. CT is also a well established and accurate tool for the diagnosis of acute aortic dissection and pulmonary embolism. Recent technical developments now permit acquisition of well-opacified images of the coronary arteries, thoracic aorta and pulmonary arteries from a single CT scan. While this so called "triple-rule out" scan protocol can potentially exclude fatal causes of chest pain in all three vascular beds, the attendant higher radiation dose of this method precludes its routine use except when there is sufficient support for the diagnosis of either aortic dissection or pulmonary embolism. This article provides an overview of CCTA, and reviews the clinical evidence supporting the use of this technique for triage of patients with acute chest pain. Copyright 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Nutritional psychiatry research: an emerging discipline and its intersection with global urbanization, environmental challenges and the evolutionary mismatch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Alan C; Jacka, Felice N

    2014-07-24

    In 21st-century public health, rapid urbanization and mental health disorders are a growing global concern. The relationship between diet, brain function and the risk of mental disorders has been the subject of intense research in recent years. In this review, we examine some of the potential socioeconomic and environmental challenges detracting from the traditional dietary patterns that might otherwise support positive mental health. In the context of urban expansion, climate change, cultural and technological changes and the global industrialization and ultraprocessing of food, findings related to nutrition and mental health are connected to some of the most pressing issues of our time. The research is also of relevance to matters of biophysiological anthropology. We explore some aspects of a potential evolutionary mismatch between our ancestral past (Paleolithic, Neolithic) and the contemporary nutritional environment. Changes related to dietary acid load, advanced glycation end products and microbiota (via dietary choices and cooking practices) may be of relevance to depression, anxiety and other mental disorders. In particular, the results of emerging studies demonstrate the importance of prenatal and early childhood dietary practices within the developmental origins of health and disease concept. There is still much work to be done before these population studies and their mirrored advances in bench research can provide translation to clinical medicine and public health policy. However, the clear message is that in the midst of a looming global epidemic, we ignore nutrition at our peril.

  10. The emergence of the State. A holistic approach to understand the origin, the role and challenges of public power

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis I. Gordillo Pérez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The term "State" is often used to identify a political phenomenon that emerged in Europe since the collapse of feudalism with the fundamental characteristics of territoriality, centralization, sovereignty, differentiation and institutionalization. This concept leads to limitations that result from the application of a methodology that is incomplete for a comprehensive understanding of the State, as it does not differentiate within the so-called States, the various existing types and political and social consequences derived from each of these types. This paper advocates the use of the methodology used by Pierre Birnbaum to analyze the State as a historical fact and social which is a creation from own social practices of a time and a specific space, in relation to a particular culture and with a particular historical trajectory. To this end, this article deals, first, with the sociological-historical theory on the origin of the State along with the presentation of their methodology and analysis of the relationship of capitalism, social structure and culture with the State (paragraphs 2 and 3 ; secondly, this work focuses on the advantages of the methodology proposed by Birnbaum to analyze the State while original creation, highlighting the division Strong State / Weak State proposed by the author (4 and 5; and, finally, it raises the challenges facing the State today (paragraphs 6 and 7.

  11. Nutritional psychiatry research: an emerging discipline and its intersection with global urbanization, environmental challenges and the evolutionary mismatch

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    In 21st-century public health, rapid urbanization and mental health disorders are a growing global concern. The relationship between diet, brain function and the risk of mental disorders has been the subject of intense research in recent years. In this review, we examine some of the potential socioeconomic and environmental challenges detracting from the traditional dietary patterns that might otherwise support positive mental health. In the context of urban expansion, climate change, cultural and technological changes and the global industrialization and ultraprocessing of food, findings related to nutrition and mental health are connected to some of the most pressing issues of our time. The research is also of relevance to matters of biophysiological anthropology. We explore some aspects of a potential evolutionary mismatch between our ancestral past (Paleolithic, Neolithic) and the contemporary nutritional environment. Changes related to dietary acid load, advanced glycation end products and microbiota (via dietary choices and cooking practices) may be of relevance to depression, anxiety and other mental disorders. In particular, the results of emerging studies demonstrate the importance of prenatal and early childhood dietary practices within the developmental origins of health and disease concept. There is still much work to be done before these population studies and their mirrored advances in bench research can provide translation to clinical medicine and public health policy. However, the clear message is that in the midst of a looming global epidemic, we ignore nutrition at our peril. PMID:25060574

  12. Psychosocial implications of type 1 diabetes mellitus among children in India: an emerging challenge for social work profession

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyoti Kakkar

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available One of the widespread childhood chronic illnesses, which is seldom talked about is type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM. The discussion on T1DM is often missed because the emphasis is majorly on the adult DM or type 2 DM which is a lifestyle disorder. T1DM occurs at an early age and is a lifelong insulin deficiency. The treatment and the strict regime lead to numerous psychological and social repercussions for the child (patient and the caregivers. The implications vary from issues in family, at school, at social gatherings, often creating behavioural disorders. These implications further affect the patient’s health, DM self-care tasks, glycaemic control, and adherence to treatment. It is important to create awareness among people that chronic illness often causes negative psychological and social consequences but one needs to learn to cope with them. T1DM is not just about insulin shots and blood tests; but much beyond it. It requires proper understanding and support which has to be provided by professionals other than doctors. This paper looks at the prevalence of the disease, the implications for the child and the caregivers, and discusses T1DM as an emerging challenge for social work profession.

  13. The conference hybrid control room

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gieci, A.; Caucik, J.; Macko, J.

    2008-01-01

    An original concept of a hybrid control room was developed for the Mochovce-3 and Mochovce-4 reactor units which are under construction. The basic idea underlying the concept is that the control room should be a main working place for the operators (reactor operator and turbine operator) and for the shift supervisor, designed as a comprehensive unit desk shaped so that all members of the control room crew are in a face-to-face contact constantly. The main desk consists of three clearly identified areas serving the operators and the unit supervisor as their main working places. A soft control system is installed at the main working places. A separate safety-related working place, designed as a panel with classical instrumentations at the conference hybrid control room, is provided in case of abnormal conditions or emergency situation. Principles of ergonomics and cognitive engineering were taken into account when designing the new conference hybrid control room for the Mochovce-3 and -4 reactor units. The sizes, propositions, shapes and disposition of the equipment at the control room have been created and verified by using virtual reality tools. (orig.)

  14. Characteristics of suicide attempts in patients diagnosed with schizophrenia in comparison with depression: a study of emergency room visit cases in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koeda, Atsuhiko; Otsuka, Kotaro; Nakamura, Hikaru; Yambe, Takehito; Fukumoto, Kentaro; Onuma, Yoshifumi; Saga, Yudai; Yoshioka, Yasuhito; Mita, Toshinari; Mizugai, Ayumi; Sakai, Akio; Endo, Shigeatsu

    2012-12-01

    We worked on characterizing suicide attempts in patients with schizophrenia in comparison with mood disorders. This study population comprised 260 patients with F2 disorders (ICD-10), i.e., "schizophrenic group" and 705 patients with F3 disorders, i.e., "depressive group" who presented at the psychiatric emergency department of our hospital for 8 years. They were compared in three age groups: young (≤24 years), middle-aged (25-44 years), and elderly (≥45 years). Multivariate logistic regression analysis identified factors associated with the seriousness of the suicide attempt method. The schizophrenic group (≥25 years) had a younger mean age and higher prevalences of "within-1-year suicide attempts" and "past suicide attempts" than the depressive group. The Schizophrenic group tended to use serious methods, such as "jumping from high places," "throwing oneself in front of an oncoming train," and "burning oneself," in their suicide attempts, with "hallucination-delusion" accounting for an overwhelmingly large percentage of suicide attempt motives, irrespective of the age group. In the elderly group, the ratio of "no-housemate" patients was high. In all age groups, jobless individuals were prevalent, and the schizophrenic group had lower LCU (Life Change Unit) scores than did the depressive group. The middle-aged cases of schizophrenic group had higher BPRS (Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale) scores and lower GAS (Global Assessment Scale) scores. Regarding factors influencing the seriousness of the methods, a history of within-1-year suicide attempts increased the method seriousness in the schizophrenic group. Years of education correlated with the method seriousness in the schizophrenic group. Low scores of overall health on the GAS increased the method seriousness in both groups. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Perceived organizational support and job involvement in the Iranian health care system: A case study of emergency room nurses in general hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorji, Hassan Abolghasem; Etemadi, Manal; Hoseini, Fatemeh

    2014-01-01

    Researchers believe that there are social exchanges between the employers and employees, because the employees would be interested in their organization and trust it based on how the organization values them and their welfare, comfort, and security. This belief is known as perceived organizational support that makes employees consider themselves as a part of their organization and have a commitment to it. The literature review is very limited in both variables in Iran and thus few studies also report the perceived organizational support and job involvement at the lower levels in our country. This research aimed at studying the levels of perceived organizational support and job involvement, relationship between this two, and the demographic factors relationship with both of them. This research was a descriptive analytical study conducted in 2012. The population included 123 emergency nurses in General Hospitals of Qom. Data were collected through Perceived Organizational Support and Job Involvement Questionnaires and analyzed using SPSS software, descriptive statistics and Spearman correlation and Chi-square test. Both mean scores for perceived organizational support and job involvement were in average level, 146/12 and 35/38, respectively. There was a significant relationship between perceived organizational support and age, education, tenure, organizational position, and job shift. There was also a significant relationship between job involvement and age and education and finally between perceived organizational support and job involvement (P = 0/029). The high correlation between perceived organizational support and job involvement indicates that the improvement of perceived organizational support are necessary through motivating the employees, showing interest in them, paying attention to them, respecting them, and providing development opportunity in the organization. These should be always considered by managers to improve job involvement.

  16. Utility of the tourniquet test and the white blood cell count to differentiate dengue among acute febrile illnesses in the emergency room.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J Gregory

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Dengue often presents with non-specific clinical signs, and given the current paucity of accurate, rapid diagnostic laboratory tests, identifying easily obtainable bedside markers of dengue remains a priority. Previous studies in febrile Asian children have suggested that the combination of a positive tourniquet test (TT and leucopenia can distinguish dengue from other febrile illnesses, but little data exists on the usefulness of these tests in adults or in the Americas. We evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of the TT and leucopenia (white blood cell count <5000/mm(3 in identifying dengue as part of an acute febrile illness (AFI surveillance study conducted in the Emergency Department of Saint Luke's Hospital in Ponce, Puerto Rico. From September to December 2009, 284 patients presenting to the ED with fever for 2-7 days and no identified source were enrolled. Participants were tested for influenza, dengue, leptospirosis and enteroviruses. Thirty-three (12% patients were confirmed as having dengue; 2 had dengue co-infection with influenza and leptospirosis, respectively. An infectious etiology was determined for 141 others (136 influenza, 3 enterovirus, 2 urinary tract infections, and 110 patients had no infectious etiology identified. Fifty-two percent of laboratory-positive dengue cases had a positive TT versus 18% of patients without dengue (P<0.001, 87% of dengue cases compared to 28% of non-dengue cases had leucopenia (P<0.001. The presence of either a positive TT or leucopenia correctly identified 94% of dengue patients. The specificity and positive predictive values of these tests was significantly higher in the subset of patients without pandemic influenza A H1N1, suggesting improved discriminatory performance of these tests in the absence of concurrent dengue and influenza outbreaks. However, even during simultaneous AFI outbreaks, the absence of leucopenia combined with a negative tourniquet test may be useful to rule out dengue.

  17. Hypertonic/hyperoncotic solution in hypovolemic patients: experience in the emergency room Solução hipertônica hiperoncótica em pacientes com hipovolemia: experiência na sala de admissão

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riad N. Younes

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Hypertonic solutions have been studied extensively in the treatment of hypovolemic shock, both in experimental and clinical models. Safety, efficacy, and long-term effects on animals and patients have been evaluated. The present article reviews indications, safety, mortality rates, and outcome in patients with hemorrhagic hypovolemic shock who were treated after admission with a hypertonic/hyperoncotic solution under strict observation in the emergency room.As soluções hipertônicas têm sido estudadas no tratamento de choque hipovolêmico, tanto em protocolos experimentais quanto clínicos. A eficácia, a segurança e os efeitos a longo prazo em animais e pacientes foram avaliados. O presente estudo apresenta uma revisão da literatura sobre as indicações, as taxas de morbidade e de mortalidade e a evolução de pacientes com choque hipovolêmico, admitidos e tratados com soluções hipertônicas/hiperoncóticas, admitidos e tratados sob observação contínua na sala de emergência do pronto socorro.

  18. Consumo de bebidas alcohólicas en pacientes de los servicios de urgencias de la ciudad de Pachuca, Hidalgo Alcohol consumption in emergency room patients in the city of Pachuca, Hidalgo, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Borges

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Se estudió la prevalencia del consumo y el abuso en la ingestión de alcohol entre los casos de urgencias médicas, accidentes y violencias atendidaos en las salas de urgencias de tres hospitales del sector salud de la ciudad de Pachuca, Hidalgo. Material y métodos. Se aplicó un cuestionario y se hizo una medición de alcohol en sangre a las personas que solicitaron atención por primera vez en estos servicios de urgencias. El cuestionario recabó datos demográficos, patrones de consumo de alcohol, escalas para medir la dependencia y el consumo riesgoso de alcohol, tales como el CAGE y el Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT. Se comparó, por medio de la prueba ji², el consumo de alcohol entre los pacientes que ingresaron por un accidente o acto de violencia y aquellos que ingresaron debido a una urgencia médica. Resultados. Se evaluaron 1 511 pacientes. El consumo fue mayor y más frecuente en los pacientes que ingresaron por un accidente o porque fueron víctimas de la violencia, en comparación con las urgencias médicas. De los pacientes con accidentes o víctimas de la violencia, 17.7% fueron positivos al alcosensor y 15.8% notificaron consumo de alcohol en las seis horas previas al accidente. El CAGE detectó como dependiente a 9.2% de los casos, y 10.9% calificaron como bebedores riesgosos según el AUDIT. Conclusiones. El consumo de bebidas alcohólicas, especialmente en los pacientes atendidos en los servicios de urgencias debido a un accidente o acto de violencia, es elevado. Son indispensables las medidas preventivas para disminuir el costo individual y social del abuso en el consumo de alcohol en esta población.Objective. Prevalence of alcohol consumption and abuse among patients with medical emergencies, accidents and violence, attending an emergency room in one of three public health hospitals in Pachuca, Hidalgo, was studied. Material and methods. Patients answered a questionnaire and their blood alcohol was

  19. Prepare to protect: Operating and maintaining a tornado safe room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herseth, Andrew; Goldsmith-Grinspoon, Jennifer; Scott, Pataya

    2017-06-01

    Operating and maintaining a tornado safe room can be critical to the effective continuity of business operations because a firm's most valuable asset is its people. This paper describes aspects of operations and maintenance (O&M) for existing tornado safe rooms as well as a few planning and design aspects that affect the ultimate operation of a safe room for situations where a safe room is planned, but not yet constructed. The information is based on several Federal Emergency Management Agency safe room publications that provide guidance on emergency management and operations, as well as the design and construction of tornado safe rooms.

  20. Upgrading the Benchmark Simulation Model Framework with emerging challenges - A study of N2O emissions and the fate of pharmaceuticals in urban wastewater systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Snip, Laura

    Nowadays a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) is not only expected to remove traditional pollutants from the wastewater; other emerging challenges have arisen as well. A WWTP is now, among other things, expected to also minimise its carbon footprint and deal with micropollutants. Optimising...

  1. Room to Groove?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seabrooke, Leonard

    . As long as they stay within the parameters of legitimate financial practice to signal institutional isomorphism, the `groove', creditors may well allow borrowers room for change in self-determined ways. This paper maps out the historical and conceptual terrain concerning civilizing ideas about...... the legitimacy of financial practices within global capital markets, and investigates relationships between Western `civilizers' and Emerging Market Economies during the last two periods of financial globalization, the late-nineteenth/ early-twentieth centuries and the late-twentieth century.......The use of a `standard of civilization', a preferred form of socio-political organization, in global capital markets presents both constraints and opportunities for creditors and borrowers. When imposed, civilizing standards may change how a borrower would prefer to conduct their affairs. Creditors...

  2. CEBAF Control Room Renovation

    CERN Document Server

    Spata, Michael; Fanning, Harry; Oren, Tom C

    2005-01-01

    The Machine Control Center at Jefferson Lab's Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility was initially constructed in the early 1990s and based on proven technology of that era. Through our experience over the last 15 years and in our planning for the facilities 12 GeV upgrade we reevaluated the control room environment to capitalize on emerging visualization and display technologies and improve on workflow processes and ergonomic attributes. This effort also sets the foundation for the redevelopment of the accelerator's control system to deliver high reliability performance with improvements in beam specifications management and information flow. The complete renovation was performed over a three-week period with no interruption to beam operations. We present the results of this effort.

  3. CEBAF Control Room Renovation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michael Spata; Anthony Cuffe; Thomas Oren

    2005-01-01

    The Machine Control Center (MCC) at Jefferson Lab's Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) was constructed in the early 1990s and based on proven technology of that era. Through our experience over the last 15 years and in our planning for the facilities 12 GeV upgrade we reevaluated the control room environment to capitalize on emerging visualization and display technologies and improve on work-flow processes and ergonomic attributes. The renovation was performed in two phases during the summer of 2004, with one phase occurring during machine operations and the latter, more extensive phase, occurring during our semi-annual shutdown period. The new facility takes advantage of advances in display technology, analog and video signal management, server technology, ergonomic workspace design, lighting engineering, acoustic ceilings and raised flooring solutions to provide a marked improvement in the overall environment of machine operations

  4. CEBAF Control Room Renovation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael Spata; Thomas Oren

    2005-05-01

    The Machine Control Center at Jefferson Lab's Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility was initially constructed in the early 1990s and based on proven technology of that era. Through our experience over the last 15 years and in our planning for the facilities 12 GeV upgrade we reevaluated the control room environment to capitalize on emerging visualization and display technologies and improve on workflow processes and ergonomic attributes. This effort also sets the foundation for the redevelopment of the accelerator's control system to deliver high reliability performance with improvements in beam specifications management and information flow. The complete renovation was performed over a three-week period with no interruption to beam operations. We present the results of this effort.

  5. CEBAF Control Room Renovation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael Spata; Anthony Cuffe; Thomas Oren

    2005-03-22

    The Machine Control Center (MCC) at Jefferson Lab's Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) was constructed in the early 1990s and based on proven technology of that era