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Sample records for electron transfer flavoprotein-ubiquinone

  1. Assignment of electron transfer flavoprotein-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (ETF-QO) to human chromosome 4q33 by fluorescence in situ hybridization and somatic cell hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spector, E B; Seltzer, W K; Goodman, S I

    1999-08-01

    Electron transfer flavoprotein-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (ETF-QO) is a nuclear-encoded protein located in the inner mitochondrial membrane. Inherited defects of ETF-QO cause glutaric acidemia type II. We here describe the localization of the ETF-QO gene to human chromosome 4q33 by somatic cell hybridization and fluorescence in situ hybridization. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  2. Electron spin relaxation enhancement measurements of interspin distances in human, porcine, and Rhodobacter electron transfer flavoprotein ubiquinone oxidoreductase (ETF QO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fielding, Alistair J.; Usselman, Robert J.; Watmough, Nicholas; Simkovic, Martin; Frerman, Frank E.; Eaton, Gareth R.; Eaton, Sandra S.

    2008-02-01

    Electron transfer flavoprotein-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (ETF-QO) is a membrane-bound electron transfer protein that links primary flavoprotein dehydrogenases with the main respiratory chain. Human, porcine, and Rhodobacter sphaeroides ETF-QO each contain a single [4Fe-4S] 2+,1+ cluster and one equivalent of FAD, which are diamagnetic in the isolated enzyme and become paramagnetic on reduction with the enzymatic electron donor or with dithionite. The anionic flavin semiquinone can be reduced further to diamagnetic hydroquinone. The redox potentials for the three redox couples are so similar that it is not possible to poise the proteins in a state where both the [4Fe-4S] + cluster and the flavoquinone are fully in the paramagnetic form. Inversion recovery was used to measure the electron spin-lattice relaxation rates for the [4Fe-4S] + between 8 and 18 K and for semiquinone between 25 and 65 K. At higher temperatures the spin-lattice relaxation rates for the [4Fe-4S] + were calculated from the temperature-dependent contributions to the continuous wave linewidths. Although mixtures of the redox states are present, it was possible to analyze the enhancement of the electron spin relaxation of the FAD semiquinone signal due to dipolar interaction with the more rapidly relaxing [4Fe-4S] + and obtain point-dipole interspin distances of 18.6 ± 1 Å for the three proteins. The point-dipole distances are within experimental uncertainty of the value calculated based on the crystal structure of porcine ETF-QO when spin delocalization is taken into account. The results demonstrate that electron spin relaxation enhancement can be used to measure distances in redox poised proteins even when several redox states are present.

  3. Electron-transfer flavoprotein-ubiquinone oxidoreductase from pig liver: purification and molecular, redox, and catalytic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckmann, J D; Frerman, F E

    1985-07-16

    Electron-transfer flavoprotein-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (ETF-QO) was purified to homogeneity from pig liver submitochondrial particles. It is comparable in molecular weight and general properties to ETF-QO from beef heart [Ruzicka, F. J., & Beinert, H. (1977) J. Biol. Chem. 252, 8440-8445], and the electron spin resonance signals of the reduced iron-sulfur cluster are essentially identical. ETF-QO catalyzes the transfer of electrons from electron-transfer flavoprotein (ETF) to nitro blue tetrazolium, with a sluggish reaction turnover number of about 10-30 min-1. In contrast, the enzyme rapidly disproportionates ETF semiquinone, with a turnover number of 200 s-1. The reverse reaction, comproportionation of oxidized and hydroquinone ETF, provides an enzymatic assay for ETF-QO with picomolar sensitivity. Equilibrium spectrophotometric titrations show that ETF-QO accepts a maximum of two electrons from ETF and accepts three electron equivalents from dithionite or by photochemical reduction. All electrons from the enzymatically or chemically reduced protein can be transferred to 2,3-dimethoxy-5-methyl-6-pentyl-1,4-benzoquinone (PB), and this reaction is readily reversible. Reduction of ETF-QO by 2,3-dimethoxy-5-methyl-6-pentyl-1,4-benzohydroquinone is pH dependent and indicates the enzyme to have a redox potential that decreases by 47 mV per pH unit. Therefore, ETF-QO binds one to two protons upon reduction. The EO' at pH 7.3 is 38 mV. The ability of ETF-QO to catalyze the equilibration of ETF redox states has been used to evaluate the equilibrium 2ETFsq + nH+ in equilibrium ETFox + ETFhq.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. The Iron-Sulfur Cluster of Electron Transfer Flavoprotein-ubiquinone Oxidoreductase (ETF-QO) is the Electron Acceptor for Electron Transfer Flavoprotein†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Michael A.; Usselman, Robert J.; Frerman, Frank E.; Eaton, Gareth R.; Eaton, Sandra S.

    2011-01-01

    Electron-transfer flavoprotein-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (ETF-QO) accepts electrons from electron-transfer flavoprotein (ETF) and reduces ubiquinone from the ubiquinone-pool. It contains one [4Fe-4S]2+,1+ and one FAD, which are diamagnetic in the isolated oxidized enzyme and can be reduced to paramagnetic forms by enzymatic donors or dithionite. In the porcine protein, threonine 367 is hydrogen bonded to N1 and O2 of the flavin ring of the FAD. The analogous site in Rhodobacter sphaeroides ETF-QO is asparagine 338. Mutations N338T and N338A were introduced into the R. sphaeroides protein by site-directed mutagenesis to determine the impact of hydrogen bonding at this site on redox potentials and activity. The mutations did not alter the optical spectra, EPR g-values, spin-lattice relaxation rates, or the [4Fe-4S]2+,1+ to FAD point-dipole interspin distances. The mutations had no impact on the reduction potential for the iron-sulfur cluster, which was monitored by changes in the continuous wave EPR signals of the [4Fe-4S]+ at 15 K. For the FAD semiquinone, significantly different potentials were obtained by monitoring the titration at 100 or 293 K. Based on spectra at 293 K the N338T mutation shifted the first and second midpoint potentials for the FAD from +47 mV and −30 mV for wild type to −11 mV and −19 mV, respectively. The N338A mutation decreased the potentials to −37 mV and −49 mV. Lowering the midpoint potentials resulted in a decrease in the quinone reductase activity and negligible impact on disproportionation of ETF1e− catalyzed by ETF-QO. These observations indicate that the FAD is involved in electron transfer to ubiquinone, but not in electron transfer from ETF to ETF-QO. Therefore the iron-sulfur cluster is the immediate acceptor from ETF. PMID:18672901

  5. Cross-linking of the electron-transfer flavoprotein to electron-transfer flavoprotein-ubiquinone oxidoreductase with heterobifunctional reagents.

    OpenAIRE

    Steenkamp, D J

    1988-01-01

    The mitochondrial electron-transfer flavoprotein (ETF) is a heterodimer containing only one FAD. In previous work on the structure-function relationships of ETF, its interaction with the general acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (GAD) was studied by chemical cross-linking with heterobifunctional reagents [D. J. Steenkamp (1987) Biochem. J. 243, 519-524]. GAD whose lysine residues were substituted with 3-(2-pyridyldithio)propionyl groups was preferentially cross-linked to the small subunit of ETF, the ly...

  6. Electron spin relaxation enhancement measurements of interspin distances in human, porcine, and Rhodobacter electron transfer flavoprotein-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (ETF-QO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fielding, Alistair J; Usselman, Robert J; Watmough, Nicholas; Simkovic, Martin; Frerman, Frank E; Eaton, Gareth R; Eaton, Sandra S

    2008-02-01

    Electron transfer flavoprotein-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (ETF-QO) is a membrane-bound electron transfer protein that links primary flavoprotein dehydrogenases with the main respiratory chain. Human, porcine, and Rhodobacter sphaeroides ETF-QO each contain a single [4Fe-4S](2+,1+) cluster and one equivalent of FAD, which are diamagnetic in the isolated enzyme and become paramagnetic on reduction with the enzymatic electron donor or with dithionite. The anionic flavin semiquinone can be reduced further to diamagnetic hydroquinone. The redox potentials for the three redox couples are so similar that it is not possible to poise the proteins in a state where both the [4Fe-4S](+) cluster and the flavoquinone are fully in the paramagnetic form. Inversion recovery was used to measure the electron spin-lattice relaxation rates for the [4Fe-4S](+) between 8 and 18K and for semiquinone between 25 and 65K. At higher temperatures the spin-lattice relaxation rates for the [4Fe-4S](+) were calculated from the temperature-dependent contributions to the continuous wave linewidths. Although mixtures of the redox states are present, it was possible to analyze the enhancement of the electron spin relaxation of the FAD semiquinone signal due to dipolar interaction with the more rapidly relaxing [4Fe-4S](+) and obtain point-dipole interspin distances of 18.6+/-1A for the three proteins. The point-dipole distances are within experimental uncertainty of the value calculated based on the crystal structure of porcine ETF-QO when spin delocalization is taken into account. The results demonstrate that electron spin relaxation enhancement can be used to measure distances in redox poised proteins even when several redox states are present.

  7. Glutaric acidemia type II: gene structure and mutations of the electron transfer flavoprotein:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (ETF:QO) gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Stephen I; Binard, Robert J; Woontner, Michael R; Frerman, Frank E

    2002-01-01

    Glutaric acidemia type II is a human inborn error of metabolism which can be due to defects in either subunit of electron transfer flavoprotein (ETF) or in ETF:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (ETF:QO), but few disease-causing mutations have been described. The ETF:QO gene is located on 4q33, and contains 13 exons. Primers to amplify these exons are presented, together with mutations identified by molecular analysis of 20 ETF:QO-deficient patients. Twenty-one different disease-causing mutations were identified on 36 of the 40 chromosomes.

  8. Impact of mutations on the midpoint potential of the [4Fe-4S]+1,+2 cluster and on catalytic activity in electron transfer flavoprotein-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (ETF-QO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usselman, Robert J; Fielding, Alistair J; Frerman, Frank E; Watmough, Nicholas J; Eaton, Gareth R; Eaton, Sandra S

    2008-01-08

    Electron-transfer flavoprotein-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (ETF-QO) is an iron-sulfur flavoprotein that accepts electrons from electron-transfer flavoprotein (ETF) and reduces ubiquinone from the Q-pool. ETF-QO contains a single [4Fe-4S]2+,1+ cluster and one equivalent of FAD, which are diamagnetic in the isolated oxidized enzyme and can be reduced to paramagnetic forms by enzymatic donors or dithionite. Mutations were introduced by site-directed mutagenesis of amino acids in the vicinity of the iron-sulfur cluster of Rhodobacter sphaeroides ETF-QO. Y501 and T525 are equivalent to Y533 and T558 in the porcine ETF-QO. In the porcine protein, these residues are within hydrogen-bonding distance of the Sgamma of the cysteine ligands to the iron-sulfur cluster. Y501F, T525A, and Y501F/T525A substitutions were made to determine the effects on midpoint potential, activity, and EPR spectral properties of the cluster. The integrity of the mutated proteins was confirmed by optical spectra, EPR g-values, and spin-lattice relaxation rates, and the cluster to flavin point-dipole distance was determined by relaxation enhancement. Potentiometric titrations were monitored by changes in the CW EPR signals of the cluster and semiquinone. Single mutations decreased the midpoint potentials of the iron-sulfur cluster from +37 mV for wild type to -60 mV for Y501F and T525A and to -128 mV for Y501F/T525A. Lowering the midpoint potential resulted in a decrease in steady-state ubiquinone reductase activity and in ETF semiquinone disproportionation. The decrease in activity demonstrates that reduction of the iron-sulfur cluster is required for activity. There was no detectable effect of the mutations on the flavin midpoint potentials.

  9. Impact of Mutations on the Midpoint Potential of the [4Fe-4S]+1,+2 Cluster and on Catalytic Activity in Electron Transfer Flavoprotein-ubiquinone Oxidoreductase (ETF-QO)†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usselman, Robert J.; Fielding, Alistair J.; Frerman, Frank E.; Watmough, Nicholas J.; Eaton, Gareth R.; Eaton, Sandra S.

    2011-01-01

    Electron transfer flavoprotein - ubiquinone oxidoreductase (ETF-QO) is an iron-sulfur flavoprotein that accepts electrons from electron-transfer flavoprotein (ETF) and reduces ubiquinone from the Q-pool. ETF-QO contains a single [4Fe-4S]2+,1+ cluster and one equivalent of FAD, which are diamagnetic in the isolated oxidized enzyme and can be reduced to paramagnetic forms by enzymatic donors or dithionite. Mutations were introduced by site-directed mutagenesis of amino acids in the vicinity of the iron-sulfur cluster of Rhodobacter sphaeroides ETF-QO. Y501 and T525 are equivalent to Y533 and T558 in the porcine ETF-QO. In the porcine protein, these residues are within hydrogen bonding distance of the Sγ of the cysteine ligands to the iron-sulfur cluster. Y501F, T525A, and Y501F/T525A substitutions were made to determine the effects on midpoint potential, activity, and EPR spectral properties of the cluster. The integrity of the mutated proteins was confirmed by optical spectra, EPR g-values, and spin-lattice relaxation rates, and the cluster to flavin point-dipole distance was determined by relaxation enhancement. Potentiometric titrations were monitored by changes in the CW EPR signals of the cluster and semiquinone. Single mutations decreased the mid-point potentials of the iron-sulfur cluster from +37 mV for wild type to −60 mV for Y501F and T525A and to −128 mV for Y501F/T525A. Lowering the midpoint potential resulted in a decrease in steady-state ubiquinone reductase activity and in ETF semiquinone disproportionation. The decrease in activity demonstrates that reduction of the iron-sulfur cluster is required for activity. There was no detectable effect of the mutations on the flavin midpoint potentials. PMID:18069858

  10. Late-onset form of beta-electron transfer flavoprotein deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Curcoy, A; Olsen, Rikke Katrine Jentoft; Ribes, A

    2003-01-01

    Multiple acyl-CoA-dehydrogenase deficiency (MADD) or glutaric aciduria type II (GAII) are a group of metabolic disorders due to deficiency of either electron transfer flavoprotein (ETF) or electron transfer flavoprotein ubiquinone oxidoreductase (ETF-QO). We report the clinical features...... and biochemical and molecular genetic analyses of a patient with a mild late-onset form of GAII due to beta-ETF deficiency. Biochemical data showed an abnormal urine organic acid profile, low levels of free carnitine, increased levels of C(10:1n-6), and C(14:1n-9) in plasma, and decreased oxidation of [9,10-3H...

  11. Late-onset form of beta-electron transfer flavoprotein deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Curcoy, A; Olsen, R K J; Ribes, A

    2003-01-01

    Multiple acyl-CoA-dehydrogenase deficiency (MADD) or glutaric aciduria type II (GAII) are a group of metabolic disorders due to deficiency of either electron transfer flavoprotein (ETF) or electron transfer flavoprotein ubiquinone oxidoreductase (ETF-QO). We report the clinical features...... and biochemical and molecular genetic analyses of a patient with a mild late-onset form of GAII due to beta-ETF deficiency. Biochemical data showed an abnormal urine organic acid profile, low levels of free carnitine, increased levels of C(10:1n-6), and C(14:1n-9) in plasma, and decreased oxidation of [9,10-3H......]palmitate and [9,10-3H]myristate in fibroblasts, suggesting MAD deficiency. In agreement with these findings, mutational analysis of the ETF/ETFDH genes demonstrated an ETFB missense mutation 124T>C in exon 2 leading to replacement of cysteine-42 with arginine (C42R), and a 604_606AAG deletion in exon 6...

  12. Electron transfer reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Cannon, R D

    2013-01-01

    Electron Transfer Reactions deals with the mechanisms of electron transfer reactions between metal ions in solution, as well as the electron exchange between atoms or molecules in either the gaseous or solid state. The book is divided into three parts. Part 1 covers the electron transfer between atoms and molecules in the gas state. Part 2 tackles the reaction paths of oxidation states and binuclear intermediates, as well as the mechanisms of electron transfer. Part 3 discusses the theories and models of the electron transfer process; theories and experiments involving bridged electron transfe

  13. Electron transfer in proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, O; Pecht, I

    1991-01-01

    Electron migration between and within proteins is one of the most prevalent forms of biological energy conversion processes. Electron transfer reactions take place between active centers such as transition metal ions or organic cofactors over considerable distances at fast rates and with remarkable...... specificity. The electron transfer is attained through weak electronic interaction between the active sites, so that considerable research efforts are centered on resolving the factors that control the rates of long-distance electron transfer reactions in proteins. These factors include (in addition......-containing proteins. These proteins serve almost exclusively in electron transfer reactions, and as it turns out, their metal coordination sites are endowed with properties uniquely optimized for their function....

  14. Domain Modeling: NP_004444.2 [SAHG[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NP_004444.2 chr4 Structure of Porcine Electron Transfer Flavoprotein-Ubiquinone Oxidoreductase c2gmjb_...c2gmjb_ chr4/NP_004444.2/NP_004444.2_holo_40-617.pdb blast 74V,75G,76A,77G,78P,79A,80G,103V,104E,105K,106A

  15. Lipid-storage myopathy and respiratory insufficiency due to ETFQO mutations in a patient with late-onset multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenation deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, R K J; Pourfarzam, M; Morris, A A M

    2004-01-01

    We report a patient with lipid-storage myopathy due to multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenation deficiency (MADD). Molecular genetic analysis showed that she was compound heterozygous for mutations in the gene for electron transfer flavoprotein:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (ETFQO). Despite a good initial r...

  16. Nonadiabatic anharmonic electron transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, P. P. [Molecular Physics Research, 6547 Kristina Ursula Court, Falls Church, Virginia 22044 (United States)

    2013-03-28

    The effect of an inner sphere, local mode vibration on an electron transfer is modeled using the nonadiabatic transition probability (rate) expression together with both the anharmonic Morse and the harmonic oscillator potential. For an anharmonic inner sphere mode, a variational analysis uses harmonic oscillator basis functions to overcome the difficulties evaluating Morse-model Franck-Condon overlap factors. Individual matrix elements are computed with the use of new, fast, robust, and flexible recurrence relations. The analysis therefore readily addresses changes in frequency and/or displacement of oscillator minimums in the different electron transfer states. Direct summation of the individual Boltzmann weighted Franck-Condon contributions avoids the limitations inherent in the use of the familiar high-temperature, Gaussian form of the rate constant. The effect of harmonic versus anharmonic inner sphere modes on the electron transfer is readily seen, especially in the exoergic, inverted region. The behavior of the transition probability can also be displayed as a surface for all temperatures and values of the driving force/exoergicity {Delta}=-{Delta}G. The temperature insensitivity of the transfer rate is clearly seen when the exoergicity equals the collective reorganization energy ({Delta}={Lambda}{sub s}) along a maximum ln (w) vs. {Delta} ridge of the surface. The surface also reveals additional regions for {Delta} where ln (w) appears to be insensitive to temperature, or effectively activationless, for some kinds of inner sphere contributions.

  17. Advances in electron transfer chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Mariano, Patrick S

    1993-01-01

    Advances in Electron Transfer Chemistry, Volume 3 presents studies that discuss findings in the various aspects of electron chemistry. The book is comprised of four chapters; each chapter reviews a work that tackles an issue in electron transfer chemistry. Chapter 1 discusses the photoinduced electron transfer in flexible biaryl donor-acceptor molecules. Chapter 2 tackles light-induced electron transfer in inorganic systems in homogeneous and heterogeneous phases. The book also covers internal geometry relaxation effects on electron transfer rates of amino-centered systems. The sequential elec

  18. Electron Transfer in Biological Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evenson, Jeffrey Wayne

    1993-01-01

    A review of electron transfer in biology is provided. Chemiosmotic theory, a phenomenological discussion of electron transfer in the bacterial reaction center, and a general formalism for treating electron transfer in condensed systems (including biological systems) are presented. The effective electronic donor/acceptor coupling (H_{DA}) for a bridged electron transfer system is defined. An expression for H_{DA} in terms of the bridge Green's function is developed for systems represented by a tight-binding Hamiltonian. H_{DA } is computed exactly for two systems, and the existence of a dimensionless parameter which determines whether the effective coupling oscillates or decays with increasing donor/acceptor distance is shown. A numerical technique for computing H_{DA} is developed and shown to be significantly more powerful than the conventional Larsson technique. The inverse matrix technique and pathway methods for computing the effective coupling in bridged electron transfer systems are defined and compared. The inverse matrix technique is found to be more powerful on general theoretical grounds and more accurate for numerical calculations of the effective coupling for the butane-1-4-diyl diradical and dimethylene cyclohexane. Parameters for electron transfer Hamiltonians and multi-pathway effects are discussed. Calculations for a simple model electron transfer system and tuna cytochrome c demonstrate a dichotomy in the behavior of the effective coupling distance dependence. In one regime the effective coupling varies exponentially with distance and depends only on the average properties of the bridging material; in the other regime the effective coupling has a complex distance dependence and is sensitive to the details of the bridging material. Experiments and theory indicate that both regimes occur in biological systems, providing a new perspective on a recent controversy over the nature of the distance dependence. We review the status of effective coupling

  19. Advances in electron transfer chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Mariano, Patrick S

    1995-01-01

    Advances in Electron Transfer Chemistry, Volume 4 presents the reaction mechanisms involving the movement of single electrons. This book discusses the electron transfer reactions in organic, biochemical, organometallic, and excited state systems. Organized into four chapters, this volume begins with an overview of the photochemical behavior of two classes of sulfonium salt derivatives. This text then examines the parameters that control the efficiencies for radical ion pair formation. Other chapters consider the progress in the development of parameters that control the dynamics and reaction p

  20. Two-Electron Transfer Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jiaxing; Balamurugan, D; Zhang, Peng; Skourtis, Spiros S; Beratan, David N

    2015-06-18

    The frontiers of electron-transfer chemistry demand that we develop theoretical frameworks to describe the delivery of multiple electrons, atoms, and ions in molecular systems. When electrons move over long distances through high barriers, where the probability for thermal population of oxidized or reduced bridge-localized states is very small, the electrons will tunnel from the donor (D) to acceptor (A), facilitated by bridge-mediated superexchange interactions. If the stable donor and acceptor redox states on D and A differ by two electrons, it is possible that the electrons will propagate coherently from D to A. While structure-function relations for single-electron superexchange in molecules are well established, strategies to manipulate the coherent flow of multiple electrons are largely unknown. In contrast to one-electron superexchange, two-electron superexchange involves both one- and two-electron virtual intermediate states, the number of virtual intermediates increases very rapidly with system size, and multiple classes of pathways interfere with one another. In the study described here, we developed simple superexchange models for two-electron transfer. We explored how the bridge structure and energetics influence multielectron superexchange, and we compared two-electron superexchange interactions to single-electron superexchange. Multielectron superexchange introduces interference between singly and doubly oxidized (or reduced) bridge virtual states, so that even simple linear donor-bridge-acceptor systems have pathway topologies that resemble those seen for one-electron superexchange through bridges with multiple parallel pathways. The simple model systems studied here exhibit a richness that is amenable to experimental exploration by manipulating the multiple pathways, pathway crosstalk, and changes in the number of donor and acceptor species. The features that emerge from these studies may assist in developing new strategies to deliver multiple

  1. Electron transfer in pnicogen bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Liangyu; Mo, Yirong

    2014-10-02

    As a new type of noncovalent interactions, pnicogen bond between a VA group element (N, P, and As) and an electron donor (Lewis base) has grabbed attention in recent several years. Here we employ the block-localized wave function (BLW) based energy decomposition scheme to probe the bonding nature in a series of substituted phosphines X(n)PH(3-n) complexed with ammonia. As the BLW method can derive the optimal monomer orbitals in a complex with the electron transfer among monomers quenched, we can effectively examine the HOMO-LUMO interaction in these pnicogen bonding systems. Among various energy components, electron transfer energy together with the polarization energy dominates the pnicogen bonding energy. Although usually it is assumed that the electron transfer from ammonia to substituted phosphines occurs in the form of n → σ*(XP) hyperconjugative interaction, we identify a kind of new pathway when X = NO2 and CN, i.e., n → dπ*, which results from the interaction between the π orbital of cyano or nitro substituent and d orbitals on P. But still this picture of electron transfer using a single pair of orbitals is greatly simplified, as the electron density difference (EDD) maps corresponding to the overall electron transfer processes show the accumulation of electron density on the P side opposite to the X-P bond, with insignificant or even negligible gain of electron density on the substituent group side. Thus, the EDD maps tend to support the concept of σ-hole in pnicogen bonds.

  2. Exocellular electron transfer in anaerobic microbial communities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stams, A.J.M.; Bok, de F.A.M.; Plugge, C.M.; Eekert, van M.H.A.; Dolfing, J.; Schraa, G.

    2006-01-01

    Exocellular electron transfer plays an important role in anaerobic microbial communities that degrade organic matter. Interspecies hydrogen transfer between microorganisms is the driving force for complete biodegradation in methanogenic environments. Many organic compounds are degraded by obligatory

  3. Hierarchical control of electron-transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westerhoff, Hans V.; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal; Egger, Louis

    1997-01-01

    In this chapter the role of electron transfer in determining the behaviour of the ATP synthesising enzyme in E. coli is analysed. It is concluded that the latter enzyme lacks control because of special properties of the electron transfer components. These properties range from absence of a strong...... back pressure by the protonmotive force on the rate of electron transfer to hierarchical regulation of the expression of the gens that encode the electron transfer proteins as a response to changes in the bioenergetic properties of the cell.The discussion uses Hierarchical Control Analysis...

  4. Recent Developments in Electron Transfer Reactions

    OpenAIRE

    Marcus, Rudolph A.

    1987-01-01

    Earlier results and more recent developments in electron transfer reactions are reviewed. The more recent results include inverted behavior, electronic orientation effects on reaction rates, solvent dynamics, early steps in photosynthesis, and light emission from metal electrodes.

  5. Coupled electron transfers in artificial photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammarström, Leif; Styring, Stenbjörn

    2008-03-27

    Light-induced charge separation in molecular assemblies has been widely investigated in the context of artificial photosynthesis. Important progress has been made in the fundamental understanding of electron and energy transfer and in stabilizing charge separation by multi-step electron transfer. In the Swedish Consortium for Artificial Photosynthesis, we build on principles from the natural enzyme photosystem II and Fe-hydrogenases. An important theme in this biomimetic effort is that of coupled electron-transfer reactions, which have so far received only little attention. (i) Each absorbed photon leads to charge separation on a single-electron level only, while catalytic water splitting and hydrogen production are multi-electron processes; thus there is the need for controlling accumulative electron transfer on molecular components. (ii) Water splitting and proton reduction at the potential catalysts necessarily require the management of proton release and/or uptake. Far from being just a stoichiometric requirement, this controls the electron transfer processes by proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET). (iii) Redox-active links between the photosensitizers and the catalysts are required to rectify the accumulative electron-transfer reactions, and will often be the starting points of PCET.

  6. Photoinduced electron transfer in [N]phenylenes

    OpenAIRE

    Dosche, Carsten; Mickler, Wulfhard; Löhmannsröben, Hans-Gerd; Agent, Nicolas; Vollhardt, K. Peter C.

    2007-01-01

    First studies of electron transfer in [N]phenylenes were performed in bimolecular quenching reactions of angular [3]- and triangular [4]phenylene with various electron acceptors. The relation between the quenching rate constants kq and the free energy change of the electron transfer (ΔG0CS ) could be described by the Rehm-Weller equation. From the experimental results, a reorganization energy λ of 0.7 eV was derived. Intramolecular electron transfer reactions were studied in an [N]phenylene b...

  7. Local control approach to ultrafast electron transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vindel-Zandbergen, Patricia [Departamento de Química Física, Universidad Complutense, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Meier, Christoph [Laboratoire Colisions, Agrégats et Reactivité, UMR 5589, IRSAMC, Université Paul Sabatier, 31062 Toulouse (France); Sola, Ignacio R., E-mail: isola@quim.ucm.es [Departamento de Química Física, Universidad Complutense, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2016-10-20

    We study ultrafast electron transfer between separated nuclei using local control theory. By imposing electron ionization and electron transport through the continuum, different local control formulations are used to increase the yield of retrapping the electron at the desired nuclei. The control mechanism is based on impulsive de-excitation. Both symmetric and asymmetric nuclear arrangements are analyzed, as well as the role of the nuclear motion.

  8. Flavin Charge Transfer Transitions Assist DNA Photolyase Electron Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skourtis, Spiros S.; Prytkova, Tatiana; Beratan, David N.

    2007-12-01

    This contribution describes molecular dynamics, semi-empirical and ab-initio studies of the primary photo-induced electron transfer reaction in DNA photolyase. DNA photolyases are FADH--containing proteins that repair UV-damaged DNA by photo-induced electron transfer. A DNA photolyase recognizes and binds to cyclobutatne pyrimidine dimer lesions of DNA. The protein repairs a bound lesion by transferring an electron to the lesion from FADH-, upon photo-excitation of FADH- with 350-450 nm light. We compute the lowest singlet excited states of FADH- in DNA photolyase using INDO/S configuration interaction, time-dependent density-functional, and time-dependent Hartree-Fock methods. The calculations identify the lowest singlet excited state of FADH- that is populated after photo-excitation and that acts as the electron donor. For this donor state we compute conformationally-averaged tunneling matrix elements to empty electron-acceptor states of a thymine dimer bound to photolyase. The conformational averaging involves different FADH--thymine dimer confromations obtained from molecular dynamics simulations of the solvated protein with a thymine dimer docked in its active site. The tunneling matrix element computations use INDO/S-level Green's function, energy splitting, and Generalized Mulliken-Hush methods. These calculations indicate that photo-excitation of FADH- causes a π→π* charge-transfer transition that shifts electron density to the side of the flavin isoalloxazine ring that is adjacent to the docked thymine dimer. This shift in electron density enhances the FADH--to-dimer electronic coupling, thus inducing rapid electron transfer.

  9. Single-Molecule Interfacial Electron Transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, H. Peter [Bowling Green State Univ., Bowling Green, OH (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Center for Photochemical Sciences

    2017-11-28

    This project is focused on the use of single-molecule high spatial and temporal resolved techniques to study molecular dynamics in condensed phase and at interfaces, especially, the complex reaction dynamics associated with electron and energy transfer rate processes. The complexity and inhomogeneity of the interfacial ET dynamics often present a major challenge for a molecular level comprehension of the intrinsically complex systems, which calls for both higher spatial and temporal resolutions at ultimate single-molecule and single-particle sensitivities. Combined single-molecule spectroscopy and electrochemical atomic force microscopy approaches are unique for heterogeneous and complex interfacial electron transfer systems because the static and dynamic inhomogeneities can be identified and characterized by studying one molecule at a specific nanoscale surface site at a time. The goal of our project is to integrate and apply these spectroscopic imaging and topographic scanning techniques to measure the energy flow and electron flow between molecules and substrate surfaces as a function of surface site geometry and molecular structure. We have been primarily focusing on studying interfacial electron transfer under ambient condition and electrolyte solution involving both single crystal and colloidal TiO2 and related substrates. The resulting molecular level understanding of the fundamental interfacial electron transfer processes will be important for developing efficient light harvesting systems and broadly applicable to problems in fundamental chemistry and physics. We have made significant advancement on deciphering the underlying mechanism of the complex and inhomogeneous interfacial electron transfer dynamics in dyesensitized TiO2 nanoparticle systems that strongly involves with and regulated by molecule-surface interactions. We have studied interfacial electron transfer on TiO2 nanoparticle surfaces by using ultrafast single

  10. Electron transfer across a thermal gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craven, Galen T; Nitzan, Abraham

    2016-08-23

    Charge transfer is a fundamental process that underlies a multitude of phenomena in chemistry and biology. Recent advances in observing and manipulating charge and heat transport at the nanoscale, and recently developed techniques for monitoring temperature at high temporal and spatial resolution, imply the need for considering electron transfer across thermal gradients. Here, a theory is developed for the rate of electron transfer and the associated heat transport between donor-acceptor pairs located at sites of different temperatures. To this end, through application of a generalized multidimensional transition state theory, the traditional Arrhenius picture of activation energy as a single point on a free energy surface is replaced with a bithermal property that is derived from statistical weighting over all configurations where the reactant and product states are equienergetic. The flow of energy associated with the electron transfer process is also examined, leading to relations between the rate of heat exchange among the donor and acceptor sites as functions of the temperature difference and the electronic driving bias. In particular, we find that an open electron transfer channel contributes to enhanced heat transport between sites even when they are in electronic equilibrium. The presented results provide a unified theory for charge transport and the associated heat conduction between sites at different temperatures.

  11. Transient Exciplex Formation Electron Transfer Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael G. Kuzmin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Transient exciplex formation mechanism of excited-state electron transfer reactions is analyzed in terms of experimental data on thermodynamics and kinetics of exciplex formation and decay. Experimental profiles of free energy, enthalpy, and entropy for transient exciplex formation and decay are considered for several electron transfer reactions in various solvents. Strong electronic coupling in contact pairs of reactants causes substantial decrease of activation energy relative to that for conventional long-range ET mechanism, especially for endergonic reactions, and provides the possibility for medium reorganization concatenated to gradual charge shift in contrast to conventional preliminary medium and reactants reorganization. Experimental criteria for transient exciplex formation (concatenated mechanism of excited-state electron transfer are considered. Available experimental data show that this mechanism dominates for endergonic ET reactions and provides a natural explanation for a lot of known paradoxes of ET reactions.

  12. Reference: 250 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available imitsune et al. 2005 Sep. Plant Cell 17(9):2587-600. In mammals, electron-transfer flavoprotein:ubiquinone oxidore...ductase (ETFQO) and electron-transfer flavoprotein (ETF) are functionally associated, and ETF accepts ...f the unique Arabidopsis thaliana homologue of ETFQO revealed high similarity to the mammalian ETFQO protein. Moreover, green fluore...or this protein. RNA gel blot analysis revealed that Arabidopsis ETFQO transcript...s accumulated in long-term dark-treated leaves. Analysis of three independent insertional mutants of Arabidopsis ETFQO re

  13. Protein electron transfer: Dynamics and statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matyushov, Dmitry V

    2013-07-14

    Electron transfer between redox proteins participating in energy chains of biology is required to proceed with high energetic efficiency, minimizing losses of redox energy to heat. Within the standard models of electron transfer, this requirement, combined with the need for unidirectional (preferably activationless) transitions, is translated into the need to minimize the reorganization energy of electron transfer. This design program is, however, unrealistic for proteins whose active sites are typically positioned close to the polar and flexible protein-water interface to allow inter-protein electron tunneling. The high flexibility of the interfacial region makes both the hydration water and the surface protein layer act as highly polar solvents. The reorganization energy, as measured by fluctuations, is not minimized, but rather maximized in this region. Natural systems in fact utilize the broad breadth of interfacial electrostatic fluctuations, but in the ways not anticipated by the standard models based on equilibrium thermodynamics. The combination of the broad spectrum of static fluctuations with their dispersive dynamics offers the mechanism of dynamical freezing (ergodicity breaking) of subsets of nuclear modes on the time of reaction/residence of the electron at a redox cofactor. The separation of time-scales of nuclear modes coupled to electron transfer allows dynamical freezing. In particular, the separation between the relaxation time of electro-elastic fluctuations of the interface and the time of conformational transitions of the protein caused by changing redox state results in dynamical freezing of the latter for sufficiently fast electron transfer. The observable consequence of this dynamical freezing is significantly different reorganization energies describing the curvature at the bottom of electron-transfer free energy surfaces (large) and the distance between their minima (Stokes shift, small). The ratio of the two reorganization energies

  14. Quantifying electron transfer reactions in biological systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjulstok, Emil Sjulstok; Olsen, Jógvan Magnus Haugaard; Solov'yov, Ilia A

    2015-01-01

    Various biological processes involve the conversion of energy into forms that are usable for chemical transformations and are quantum mechanical in nature. Such processes involve light absorption, excited electronic states formation, excitation energy transfer, electrons and protons tunnelling...... which for example occur in photosynthesis, cellular respiration, DNA repair, and possibly magnetic field sensing. Quantum biology uses computation to model biological interactions in light of quantum mechanical effects and has primarily developed over the past decade as a result of convergence between...... quantum physics and biology. In this paper we consider electron transfer in biological processes, from a theoretical view-point; namely in terms of quantum mechanical and semi-classical models. We systematically characterize the interactions between the moving electron and its biological environment...

  15. Facile Interfacial Electron Transfer of Hemoglobin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunhai Fan

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: We herein describe a method of depositing hemoglobin (Hb and sulfonated polyaniline (SPAN on GC electrodes that facilitate interfacial protein electron transfer. Well-defined, reproducible, chemically reversible peaks of Hb and SPAN can be obtained in our experiments. We also observed enhanced peroxidase activity of Hb in SPAN films. These results clearly showed that SPAN worked as molecular wires and effectively exchanged electrons between Hb and electrodes.Mediated by Conjugated Polymers

  16. Facile Interfacial Electron Transfer of Hemoglobin

    OpenAIRE

    Chunhai Fan; Shiping Song; Haiping Wu; Lihua Wang; Xiaofang Hu; Runguang Sun; Bo Zhou

    2005-01-01

    Abstract: We herein describe a method of depositing hemoglobin (Hb) and sulfonated polyaniline (SPAN) on GC electrodes that facilitate interfacial protein electron transfer. Well-defined, reproducible, chemically reversible peaks of Hb and SPAN can be obtained in our experiments. We also observed enhanced peroxidase activity of Hb in SPAN films. These results clearly showed that SPAN worked as molecular wires and effectively exchanged electrons between Hb and electrodes.Mediated by Conjugated...

  17. A Study Looking the Electronic Funds Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Codruta POENAR

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to present the characteristics of the most important electronic funds transfer in the world, both interperson and interbank. We identified the following informations: location, type, owner, operator, number of transactions, transsactions value, clients, financial scheme and the message format.

  18. Mechanism of electron transfer reaction of ternary ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The rate of the reaction increases with increasing pH due to the deprotonation equilibria of the complex. The experimental rate law is consistent with a mechanism in which the deprotonated form [CrIII(DPA)(OX)(OH)]2− is more reactive than the conjugated acid. It is proposed that electron transfer proceeds through an ...

  19. Photoinitiated electron transfer in multichromophoric species: Synthetic tetrads and pentads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-04-12

    This research project involves the design, synthesis and study of molecules which mimic many of the important aspects of photosynthetic electron and energy transfer. Specifically, the molecules are designed to mimic the following aspects of natural photosynthetic multistep electron transfer: electron donation from a tetrapyrrole excited singlet state, electron transfer between tetrapyrroles, electron transfer from tetrapyrroles to quinones, and electron transfer between quinones with different redox properties. In addition, they model carotenoid antenna function in photosynthesis (singlet-singlet energy transfer from carotenoid polyenes to chlorophyll) and carotenoid photoprotection from singlet oxygen damage (triplet-triplet energy transfer from chlorophyll to carotenoids).

  20. Defining Electron Bifurcation in the Electron-Transferring Flavoprotein Family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia Costas, Amaya M; Poudel, Saroj; Miller, Anne-Frances; Schut, Gerrit J; Ledbetter, Rhesa N; Fixen, Kathryn R; Seefeldt, Lance C; Adams, Michael W W; Harwood, Caroline S; Boyd, Eric S; Peters, John W

    2017-11-01

    Electron bifurcation is the coupling of exergonic and endergonic redox reactions to simultaneously generate (or utilize) low- and high-potential electrons. It is the third recognized form of energy conservation in biology and was recently described for select electron-transferring flavoproteins (Etfs). Etfs are flavin-containing heterodimers best known for donating electrons derived from fatty acid and amino acid oxidation to an electron transfer respiratory chain via Etf-quinone oxidoreductase. Canonical examples contain a flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) that is involved in electron transfer, as well as a non-redox-active AMP. However, Etfs demonstrated to bifurcate electrons contain a second FAD in place of the AMP. To expand our understanding of the functional variety and metabolic significance of Etfs and to identify amino acid sequence motifs that potentially enable electron bifurcation, we compiled 1,314 Etf protein sequences from genome sequence databases and subjected them to informatic and structural analyses. Etfs were identified in diverse archaea and bacteria, and they clustered into five distinct well-supported groups, based on their amino acid sequences. Gene neighborhood analyses indicated that these Etf group designations largely correspond to putative differences in functionality. Etfs with the demonstrated ability to bifurcate were found to form one group, suggesting that distinct conserved amino acid sequence motifs enable this capability. Indeed, structural modeling and sequence alignments revealed that identifying residues occur in the NADH- and FAD-binding regions of bifurcating Etfs. Collectively, a new classification scheme for Etf proteins that delineates putative bifurcating versus nonbifurcating members is presented and suggests that Etf-mediated bifurcation is associated with surprisingly diverse enzymes.IMPORTANCE Electron bifurcation has recently been recognized as an electron transfer mechanism used by microorganisms to maximize

  1. Molecular rational for riboflavin and CoQ10

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornelius, Nanna

    2013-01-01

    dissertation on 10/07-2013. Riboflavin Responsive Multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenation deficiency (RR-MADD), is an autosomal recessively inherited disorder of energy metabolism. In most cases, RR-MADD is caused by variations in the gene encoding the Electron Transfer Flavoprotein-Ubiquinone Oxidoreductase (ETF...... a chaperone-like effect on the ETF-QO protein helping the ETF-QO protein to fold correctly, hereby increasing the activity of the protein. Furthermore, studies showed that RR-MADD patient cells show indications of increased oxidative stress and that treatment of the patient cells with CoQ10 can reduce...

  2. Electronic Equipment Cooling by Simultaneous Heat and Mass Transfer,

    Science.gov (United States)

    ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT, COOLING, HEAT TRANSFER, SUPERSONIC AIRCRAFT, HIGH ALTITUDE, DENSITY, THERMAL STRESSES, AIR, COOLING AND VENTILATING EQUIPMENT, FLUIDS, COOLANTS, HEAT EXCHANGERS, WATER, MASS TRANSFER .

  3. Electron transfer control in soluble methane monooxygenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weixue; Iacob, Roxana E; Luoh, Rebecca P; Engen, John R; Lippard, Stephen J

    2014-07-09

    The hydroxylation or epoxidation of hydrocarbons by bacterial multicomponent monooxygenases (BMMs) requires the interplay of three or four protein components. How component protein interactions control catalysis, however, is not well understood. In particular, the binding sites of the reductase components on the surface of their cognate hydroxylases and the role(s) that the regulatory proteins play during intermolecular electron transfer leading to the hydroxylase reduction have been enigmatic. Here we determine the reductase binding site on the hydroxylase of a BMM enzyme, soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO) from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath). We present evidence that the ferredoxin domain of the reductase binds to the canyon region of the hydroxylase, previously determined to be the regulatory protein binding site as well. The latter thus inhibits reductase binding to the hydroxylase and, consequently, intermolecular electron transfer from the reductase to the hydroxylase diiron active site. The binding competition between the regulatory protein and the reductase may serve as a control mechanism for regulating electron transfer, and other BMM enzymes are likely to adopt the same mechanism.

  4. Transfer coating by electron initiated polymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nablo, Sam V.

    The high speed and depth of cure possible with electron initiated monomer/oligomer coating systems provide many new opportunities for approaches to product finishing. Moreover, the use of transfer or cast coating using films or metallic surfaces offers the ability to precisely control the surface topology of liquid film surfaces during polymerization. Transfer coating such as with textiles has been a commercial process for many years and the synergistic addition of EB technology permits the manufacture of unusual new products. One of these, the casting paper used in the manufacture of vinyl and urethane fabrics, is the first EB application to use a drum surface for pattern replication in the coating. In this case the coated paper is cured against, and then released from, an engraved drum surface. Recent developments in the use of plastic films for transfer have been applied to the manufacture of transfer metallized and coated paper and paperboard products for packaging. Details of these and related processes will be presented as well as a discussion of the typical product areas (e.g. photographic papers, release papers, magnetic media) using this high speed transfer technology.

  5. Promoting Interspecies Electron Transfer with Biochar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shanshan; Rotaru, Amelia-Elena; Shrestha, Pravin Malla; Malvankar, Nikhil S.; Liu, Fanghua; Fan, Wei; Nevin, Kelly P.; Lovley, Derek R.

    2014-01-01

    Biochar, a charcoal-like product of the incomplete combustion of organic materials, is an increasingly popular soil amendment designed to improve soil fertility. We investigated the possibility that biochar could promote direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) in a manner similar to that previously reported for granular activated carbon (GAC). Although the biochars investigated were 1000 times less conductive than GAC, they stimulated DIET in co-cultures of Geobacter metallireducens with Geobacter sulfurreducens or Methanosarcina barkeri in which ethanol was the electron donor. Cells were attached to the biochar, yet not in close contact, suggesting that electrons were likely conducted through the biochar, rather than biological electrical connections. The finding that biochar can stimulate DIET may be an important consideration when amending soils with biochar and can help explain why biochar may enhance methane production from organic wastes under anaerobic conditions. PMID:24846283

  6. Promoting interspecies electron transfer with biochar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Shanshan; Rotaru, Amelia-Elena; Shrestha, Pravin Malla

    2014-01-01

    Biochar, a charcoal-like product of the incomplete combustion of organic materials, is an increasingly popular soil amendment designed to improve soil fertility. We investigated the possibility that biochar could promote direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) in a manner similar...... to that previously reported for granular activated carbon (GAC). Although the biochars investigated were 1000 times less conductive than GAC, they stimulated DIET in co-cultures of Geobacter metallireducens with Geobacter sulfurreducens or Methanosarcina barkeri in which ethanol was the electron donor. Cells were...... attached to the biochar, yet not in close contact, suggesting that electrons were likely conducted through the biochar, rather than biological electrical connections. The finding that biochar can stimulate DIET may be an important consideration when amending soils with biochar and can help explain why...

  7. Photoinitiated electron transfer in multichromophoric species: Synthetic tetrads and pentads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gust, J.D. Jr.; Moore, T.A.

    1988-04-12

    This research project involves the design, synthesis and study of molecules which mimic many of the important aspects of photosynthetic electron and energy transfer. The knowledge gained from the study of synthetic model systems which abstract features of the natural photosynthetic apparatus can be used to design artificial photosynthetic systems which employ the basic physics and chemistry of photosynthesis to help meet mankind's energy needs. More specifically, the proposed models are designed to mimic the following aspects of natural photosynthetic multistep electron transfer: electron donation from a tetrapyrrole excited singlet state, electron transfer between tetrapyrroles, electron transfer from tetrapyrroles to quinones, and electron transfer between quinones with different redox properties.

  8. Fast photoinduced electron transfer through DNA intercalation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, C J; Arkin, M R; Ghatlia, N D; Bossmann, S; Turro, N J; Barton, J K

    1994-06-07

    We report evidence for fast photoinduced electron transfer mediated by the DNA helix that requires metal complexes that are avid intercalators of DNA. Here the donor bis(phenanthroline)(dipyridophenazine)ruthenium(II) [Ru(phen)2dppz2+] and acceptor bis(9,10-phenanthrenequinone diimine)(phenanthroline)rhodium(III) [Rh(phi)2phen3+] intercalate into DNA with Kb > 10(6) M-1. Luminescence quenching experiments in the presence of two different lengths of DNA yield upward-curving Stern-Volmer plots and the loss of luminescence intensity far exceeds the change in emission lifetimes. In the presence of a nonintercalative electron acceptor, Ru(NH3)3+(6), Ru(phen)2dppz2+ luminescence is quenched much less efficiently compared to that found for the intercalative Rh(phi)2phen3+ quencher and follows linear Stern-Volmer kinetics; steady-state and time-resolved Stern-Volmer plots are comparable in scale. These experiments are consistent with a model involving fast long-range electron transfer between intercalators through the DNA helix.

  9. Single-Molecule Interfacial Electron Transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, Wilson [University of California - Irvine

    2018-02-03

    Interfacial electron transfer (ET) plays an important role in many chemical and biological processes. Specifically, interfacial ET in TiO2-based systems is important to solar energy technology, catalysis, and environmental remediation technology. However, the microscopic mechanism of interfacial ET is not well understood with regard to atomic surface structure, molecular structure, bonding, orientation, and motion. In this project, we used two complementary methodologies; single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy, and scanning-tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy (STM and STS) to address this scientific need. The goal of this project was to integrate these techniques and measure the molecular dependence of ET between adsorbed molecules and TiO2 semiconductor surfaces and the ET induced reactions such as the splitting of water. The scanning probe techniques, STM and STS, are capable of providing the highest spatial resolution but not easily time-resolved data. Single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy is capable of good time resolution but requires further development to match the spatial resolution of the STM. The integrated approach involving Peter Lu at Bowling Green State University (BGSU) and Wilson Ho at the University of California, Irvine (UC Irvine) produced methods for time and spatially resolved chemical imaging of interfacial electron transfer dynamics and photocatalytic reactions. An integral aspect of the joint research was a significant exchange of graduate students to work at the two institutions. This project bridged complementary approaches to investigate a set of common problems by working with the same molecules on a variety of solid surfaces, but using appropriate techniques to probe under ambient (BGSU) and ultrahigh vacuum (UCI) conditions. The molecular level understanding of the fundamental interfacial electron transfer processes obtained in this joint project will be important for developing efficient light harvesting, solar energy

  10. Electron transfer interactome of cytochrome C.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander N Volkov

    Full Text Available Lying at the heart of many vital cellular processes such as photosynthesis and respiration, biological electron transfer (ET is mediated by transient interactions among proteins that recognize multiple binding partners. Accurate description of the ET complexes - necessary for a comprehensive understanding of the cellular signaling and metabolism - is compounded by their short lifetimes and pronounced binding promiscuity. Here, we used a computational approach relying solely on the steric properties of the individual proteins to predict the ET properties of protein complexes constituting the functional interactome of the eukaryotic cytochrome c (Cc. Cc is a small, soluble, highly-conserved electron carrier protein that coordinates the electron flow among different redox partners. In eukaryotes, Cc is a key component of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, where it shuttles electrons between its reductase and oxidase, and an essential electron donor or acceptor in a number of other redox systems. Starting from the structures of individual proteins, we performed extensive conformational sampling of the ET-competent binding geometries, which allowed mapping out functional epitopes in the Cc complexes, estimating the upper limit of the ET rate in a given system, assessing ET properties of different binding stoichiometries, and gauging the effect of domain mobility on the intermolecular ET. The resulting picture of the Cc interactome 1 reveals that most ET-competent binding geometries are located in electrostatically favorable regions, 2 indicates that the ET can take place from more than one protein-protein orientation, and 3 suggests that protein dynamics within redox complexes, and not the electron tunneling event itself, is the rate-limiting step in the intermolecular ET. Further, we show that the functional epitope size correlates with the extent of dynamics in the Cc complexes and thus can be used as a diagnostic tool for protein mobility.

  11. Electron transfer pathways in microbial oxygen biocathodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freguia, Stefano, E-mail: stefano@kais.kyoto-u.ac.j [Bio-analytical and Physical Chemistry Laboratory, Division of Applied Life Sciences, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8205 (Japan); Tsujimura, Seiya, E-mail: seiya@kais.kyoto-u.ac.j [Bio-analytical and Physical Chemistry Laboratory, Division of Applied Life Sciences, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8205 (Japan); Kano, Kenji, E-mail: kkano@kais.kyoto-u.ac.j [Bio-analytical and Physical Chemistry Laboratory, Division of Applied Life Sciences, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8205 (Japan)

    2010-01-01

    The ability of some bacteria to enhance the rate of cathodic oxygen reduction to water has been recently discovered, opening the way to an entirely renewable and environmentally friendly concept of biocathode. In this study we reveal that several mechanisms may induce catalytic effects by bacteria. These comprise mechanisms that are putatively beneficial to the bacteria as well as mechanisms which are merely side effects, including quinone autoxidation and direct O{sub 2} reduction by heme compounds. Here we showed that 1 muM of ACNQ is able to generate a significant catalytic wave for oxygen reduction, with onset at approximately 0 V vs. SHE. Similarly, adsorption of hemin on a carbon surface catalyses O{sub 2} reduction to H{sub 2}O{sub 2} with an onset of +0.2 V vs. SHE. To evaluate the catalytic pathways of live cells on cathodic oxygen reduction, two species of electrochemically active bacteria were selected as pure cultures, namely Acinetobacter calcoaceticus and Shewanella putrefaciens. The former appears to exploit a self-excreted redox compound with redox characteristics matching those of pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) for extracellular electron transfer. The latter appears to utilise outer membrane-bound redox compounds. Interaction of quinones and cytochromes with the membrane-bound electron transfer chain is yet to be proven.

  12. INVERSE ELECTRON TRANSFER IN PEROXYOXALATE CHEMIEXCITATION USING EASILY REDUCIBLE ACTIVATORS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartoloni, Fernando Heering; Monteiro Leite Ciscato, Luiz Francisco; Augusto, Felipe Alberto; Baader, Wilhelm Josef

    2010-01-01

    INVERSE ELECTRON TRANSFER IN PEROXYOXALATE CHEMIEXCITATION USING EASILY REDUCIBLE ACTIVATORS. Chemiluminescence properties of the peroxyoxalate reaction in the presence of activators bearing electron withdrawing substituents were studied, to evaluate the possible occurrence of an inverse electron

  13. Electron transfer at sensitized semiconductor electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spitler, M.T.

    1977-03-01

    Electron transfer from the excited state of sensitizing dyes to the conduction band of semiconductors has been studied through photoelectrochemical techniques. Two systems were analyzed in detail: rhodamine B on ZnO and rose bengal on TiO/sub 2/. Prior to electrochemical experimentation, the adsorption characteristics of these dyes were investigated using ZnO, ZnS, and TiO/sub 2/ single crystals as substrates. Absorbance measurements of the adsorbed dye were taken as a function of the solution concentration of the dye. Adsorption isotherms heats of adsorption were also established; they were similar to literature data reported for adsorption of these dyes on powdered substrates. Using the absorbance data, the quantum efficiency for photoinjection of electrons from rhodamine B into a ZnO electrode was determined to be 2.7 x 10/sup -2/. This value was independent of the dye surface concentration down to 50% coverage of the electrode. With the assumption that not all of the rhodamine B adsorbed on the electrode has the same rate of electron injection, a kinetic model for the time decay of the photocurrent was developed; data were analyzed according to this theory. A rate constant for photoreduction of the adsorbed dye was determined for the reducing agents. 86 references.

  14. Transfer line TT70 (electrons from PS to SPS)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1981-01-01

    As injectors for LEP, PS and SPS had to be converted to the acceleration of electrons and positrons. So far, only positively charged particles had been transferred from the PS to the SPS, for the negatively charged electrons a new transfer line, TT70, had to be built. Due to the difference in level of the two machines, the transfer line slopes and tilts.

  15. Respiratory electron transfer in Escherichia coli : components, energetics and regulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekker, M.

    2009-01-01

    The respiratory chain that is housed in the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane, generally transfers electrons from NADH to oxygen; in the absence of oxygen it can use several alternative electron acceptors, such as nitrate and fumarate. Transfer of electrons through this chain is usually coupled to the

  16. Studies on electron transfer reactions of Keggin-type mixed ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    [PVIVW11O40]5- and [PVIVVVW10O40]6-. Oxygraph measurements show that there is no uptake of molecular oxygen during the course of reaction. The reaction proceeds through multi-step electron-proton-electron transfer mechanism, with rate limiting initial one electron transfer from NADH to HPA by outer sphere ...

  17. Theoretical aspects of electron transfer reactions of complex molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuznetsov, A. M.; Ulstrup, Jens

    2001-01-01

    Features of electron transfer involving complex molecules are discussed. This notion presently refers to molecular reactants where charge transfer is accompanied by large molecular reorganization, and commonly used displaced harmonic oscillator models do not apply. It is shown that comprehensive ...

  18. Theory of interrelated electron and proton transfer processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuznetsov, A.M.; Ulstrup, Jens

    2003-01-01

    A simple theory of elementary act of interrelated reactions of electron and proton transfer is developed. Mechanisms of synchronous and multistage transfer and coherent transitions via a dynamically populated intermediate state are discussed. Formulas for rate constants of adiabatic and nonadiaba......A simple theory of elementary act of interrelated reactions of electron and proton transfer is developed. Mechanisms of synchronous and multistage transfer and coherent transitions via a dynamically populated intermediate state are discussed. Formulas for rate constants of adiabatic...

  19. Ultrafast direct electron transfer at organic semiconductor and metal interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Bo; Li, Yingmin; Pham, C Huy; Paesani, Francesco; Xiong, Wei

    2017-11-01

    The ability to control direct electron transfer can facilitate the development of new molecular electronics, light-harvesting materials, and photocatalysis. However, control of direct electron transfer has been rarely reported, and the molecular conformation-electron dynamics relationships remain unclear. We describe direct electron transfer at buried interfaces between an organic polymer semiconductor film and a gold substrate by observing the first dynamical electric field-induced vibrational sum frequency generation (VSFG). In transient electric field-induced VSFG measurements on this system, we observe dynamical responses (directly transferred from the Fermi level of gold to the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital of organic semiconductor. Transient spectra further reveal that, although the interfaces are prepared without deliberate alignment control, a subensemble of surface molecules can adopt conformations for direct electron transfer. Density functional theory calculations support the experimental results and ascribe the observed electron transfer to a flat-lying polymer configuration in which electronic orbitals are found to be delocalized across the interface. The present observation of direct electron transfer at complex interfaces and the insights gained into the relationship between molecular conformations and electron dynamics will have implications for implementing novel direct electron transfer in energy materials.

  20. Vectorial electron transfer on designed surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bard, A. J.; Campion, A.; Fox, M. A.; Mallouk, T. E.; Webber, S. E.

    Bipolar CdSe/CoS semiconductor photoelectrode panels, capable of vectorial electron transfer, were used in series arrays to photodecompose water to yield hydrogen and oxygen in stoichiometric ratio with a maximum solar efficiency of about 1 precent. An analytical model was developed for these arrays which addresses the question of watersplitting and electrical power generation efficiencies as functions of the number of panels, the overpotential of the gas generating electrodes, incident light intensity, and the concentrations of the redox couples. Hydrogen production using a self-assembling zeolite system was discovered. Sensitized anatase TiO2 electrodes were used in photoelectrochemical cells employing variety of solution redox couples. The photoassisted production of hydrogen from methanol-water solutions containing mixtures of small particles of CdS/SiO2 and a wide bandgap semiconductor (TiO, ZnO, SnO2, or WO3), supported on silica and platinized was studied. The phenomenon of interparticle charge separation for Cds/SiO2 was found to be operative for CdS/SiO2 with WS sub 2/SiO2.

  1. Polyoxometalate-mediated electron transfer-oxygen transfer oxidation of cellulose and hemicellulose to synthesis gas

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sarma, Bidyut Bikash; Neumann, Ronny

    2014-01-01

    .... Here we show that by using a polyoxometalate as an electron transfer-oxygen transfer catalyst, carbon monoxide is formed by cleavage of all the carbon-carbon bonds through dehydration of initially formed formic acid...

  2. Photoinitiated electron transfer in multichromophoric species: Synthetic tetrads and pentads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-03-01

    This project involves the design, synthesis and study of molecules which mimic some of the important aspects of photosynthetic electron and energy transfer. This research project is leading to a better understanding of the energy conserving steps of photosynthesis via the study of synthetic model systems which abstract features of the natural photosynthetic apparatus. The knowledge gained from these studies will aid in the design of artificial photosynthetic reaction centers which employ the basic chemistry and physics of photosynthesis to help meet mankind`s energy needs. The approach to artificial photosynthesis employed in this project is to use synthetic pigments, electron donors, and electron acceptors similar to those found in biological reaction centers, but to replace the protein component with covalent bonds. These chemical linkages determine the electronic coupling between the various moieties by controlling separation, relative orientation, and overlap of electronic orbitals. The model systems are designed to mimic the following aspects of natural photosynthetic electron transfer: electron donation from a tetrapyrrole excited single state, electron transfer between tetrapyrroles, electron transfer from tetrapyrroles to quinones, and electron transfer between quinones with different redox properties. In addition, they mimic carotenoid antenna function in photosynthesis (singlet-singlet energy transfer from carotenoid polyenes to chlorophyll) and carotenoid photoprotection from singlet oxygen damage (triplet-triplet energy transfer from chlorophyll to carotenoids).

  3. THE ELECTRONIC COURSE OF HEAT AND MASS TRANSFER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander P. Solodov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The Electronic course of heat and mass transfer in power engineering is presented containing the full Electronic book as the structured hypertext document, the full set of Mathcad-documents with the whole set of educative computer models of heat and mass transfer, the computer labs, and selected educational presentations. 

  4. 76 FR 81019 - Electronic Fund Transfers (Regulation E)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-27

    ... civil and criminal liability. (6) Telephone-initiated transfers. Any transfer of funds that: (i) Is... regarding civil and criminal liability. Sec. 1005.4 General disclosure requirements; jointly offered... rights, liabilities, and responsibilities of participants in electronic fund transfer (EFT) systems...

  5. Investigation of electron transfer between hexaarylbiimidazole and visible sensitizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yi; Liu, Andong; Trifunac, Alexander D.; Krongauz, Vadim V.

    1992-10-01

    Photoinduced electron transfer between the hexaarylbiimidazole (HABI) and visible sensitizer, 2,5-bis [(2,3,6,7-tetrahydro- 1H,5H-benzo [i,j] quinolizin- l-yl ) methylene] cyclopentanone (JAW), in liquid solution was investigated experimentally. The relative fluorescence quantum yield of the sensitizer molecule was measured as a function of HABI concentration. An exponential dependence on HABI concentration was observed for the sensitizer fluorescence yield, from which the critical distance for the electron transfer interaction was determined to be approximately 12 A. The time-dependent fluorescence quenching was studied with the time-correlated single-photon counting technique. The dynamics of the electron transfer process was determined by comparing the experimental data to existing models of electron transfer in liquids, The inclusion of the relative diffusion between the electron donor and acceptor molecules is necessary to fit all the observations and to obtain accurate transfer parameters.

  6. K-shell Analysis Reveals Distinct Functional Parts in an Electron Transfer Network and Its Implications for Extracellular Electron Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewu eDing

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is capable of extracellular electron transfer (EET and hence has attracted considerable attention. The EET pathways mainly consist of c-type cytochromes, along with some other proteins involved in electron transfer processes. By whole genome study and protein interactions inquisition, we constructed a large-scale electron transfer network containing 2276 interactions among 454 electron transfer related proteins in S. oneidensis MR-1. Using the k-shell decomposition method, we identified and analyzed distinct parts of the electron transfer network. We found that there was a negative correlation between the ks (k-shell values and the average DR_100 (disordered regions per 100 amino acids in every shell, which suggested that disordered regions of proteins played an important role during the formation and extension of the electron transfer network. Furthermore, proteins in the top three shells of the network are mainly located in the cytoplasm and inner membrane; these proteins can be responsible for transfer of electrons into the quinone pool in a wide variety of environmental conditions. In most of the other shells, proteins are broadly located throughout the five cellular compartments (cytoplasm, inner membrane, periplasm, outer membrane and extracellular, which ensures the important EET ability of S. oneidensis MR-1. Specifically, the fourth shell was responsible for EET and the c-type cytochromes in the remaining shells of the electron transfer network were involved in aiding EET. Taken together, these results show that there are distinct functional parts in the electron transfer network of S. oneidensis MR-1, and the EET processes could achieve high efficiency through cooperation through such an electron transfer network.

  7. Photoinduced electron transfer of chlorophyll in lipid bilayer system

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Photoinduced electron transfer from chlorophyll- through the interface of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) headgroup of the lipid bilayers was studied with electron magnetic resonance (EMR). The photoproduced radicals were identified with electron spin resonance (ESR) and radical yields of chlorophyll- were ...

  8. Final Report: Vibrational Dynamics in Photoinduced Electron Transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenneth G. Spears

    2006-04-19

    The objective of this grant was to understand how molecular vibrational states (geometry distortions) are involved in photoinduced electron transfer rates of molecules. This subject is an important component of understanding how molecular absorbers of light convert that energy into charge separation. This is important because the absorption usually excites molecular vibrations in a new electronic state prior to electron transfer to other molecules or semiconductor nanoparticles, as in some types of solar cells. The speeds of charge separation and charge recombination are key parameters that require experiments such as those in this work to test the rules governing electron transfer rates. Major progress was made on this goal. Some of the molecular structures selected for developing experimental data were bimolecular charge transfer complexes that contained metals of cobalt or vanadium. The experiments used the absorption of an ultrafast pulse of light to directly separate charges onto the two different molecular parts of the complex. The charge recombination then proceeds naturally, and one goal was to measure the speed of this recombination for different types of molecular vibrations. We used picosecond and femtosecond duration pulses with tunable colors at infrared wavelengths to directly observe vibrational states and their different rates of charge recombination (also called electron transfer). We discovered that different contact geometries in the complexes had very different electron transfer rates, and that one geometry had a significant dependence on the amount of vibration in the complex. This is the first and only measurement of such rates, and it allowed us to confirm our interpretation with a number of molecular models and test the sensitivity of electron transfer to vibrational states. This led us to develop a general theory, where we point out how molecular distortions can change the electron transfer rates to be much faster than prior theories

  9. Extracellular electron transfer mechanisms between microorganisms and minerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Liang; Dong, Hailiang; Reguera, Gemma; Beyenal, Haluk; Lu, Anhuai; Liu, Juan; Yu, Han-Qing; Fredrickson, James K.

    2016-08-30

    Electrons can be transferred from microorganisms to multivalent metal ions that are associated with minerals and vice versa. As the microbial cell envelope is neither physically permeable to minerals nor electrically conductive, microorganisms have evolved strategies to exchange electrons with extracellular minerals. In this Review, we discuss the molecular mechanisms that underlie the ability of microorganisms to exchange electrons, such as c-type cytochromes and microbial nanowires, with extracellular minerals and with microorganisms of the same or different species. Microorganisms that have extracellular electron transfer capability can be used for biotechnological applications, including bioremediation, biomining and the production of biofuels and nanomaterials.

  10. What Hinders Electron Transfer Dissociation (ETD) of DNA Cations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hari, Yvonne; Leumann, Christian J.; Schürch, Stefan

    2017-09-01

    Radical activation methods, such as electron transfer dissociation (ETD), produce structural information complementary to collision-induced dissociation. Herein, electron transfer dissociation of 3-fold protonated DNA hexamers was studied to gain insight into the fragmentation mechanism. The fragmentation patterns of a large set of DNA hexamers confirm cytosine as the primary target of electron transfer. The reported data reveal backbone cleavage by internal electron transfer from the nucleobase to the phosphate linker leading either to a•/w or d/z• ion pairs. This reaction pathway contrasts with previous findings on the dissociation processes after electron capture by DNA cations, suggesting multiple, parallel dissociation channels. However, all these channels merely result in partial fragmentation of the precursor ion because the charge-reduced DNA radical cations are quite stable. Two hypotheses are put forward to explain the low dissociation yield of DNA radical cations: it is either attributed to non-covalent interactions between complementary fragments or to the stabilization of the unpaired electron in stacked nucleobases. MS3 experiments suggest that the charge-reduced species is the intact oligonucleotide. Moreover, introducing abasic sites significantly increases the dissociation yield of DNA cations. Consequently, the stabilization of the unpaired electron by π-π-stacking provides an appropriate rationale for the high intensity of DNA radical cations after electron transfer. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  11. What Hinders Electron Transfer Dissociation (ETD) of DNA Cations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hari, Yvonne; Leumann, Christian J.; Schürch, Stefan

    2017-12-01

    Radical activation methods, such as electron transfer dissociation (ETD), produce structural information complementary to collision-induced dissociation. Herein, electron transfer dissociation of 3-fold protonated DNA hexamers was studied to gain insight into the fragmentation mechanism. The fragmentation patterns of a large set of DNA hexamers confirm cytosine as the primary target of electron transfer. The reported data reveal backbone cleavage by internal electron transfer from the nucleobase to the phosphate linker leading either to a•/ w or d/ z• ion pairs. This reaction pathway contrasts with previous findings on the dissociation processes after electron capture by DNA cations, suggesting multiple, parallel dissociation channels. However, all these channels merely result in partial fragmentation of the precursor ion because the charge-reduced DNA radical cations are quite stable. Two hypotheses are put forward to explain the low dissociation yield of DNA radical cations: it is either attributed to non-covalent interactions between complementary fragments or to the stabilization of the unpaired electron in stacked nucleobases. MS3 experiments suggest that the charge-reduced species is the intact oligonucleotide. Moreover, introducing abasic sites significantly increases the dissociation yield of DNA cations. Consequently, the stabilization of the unpaired electron by π-π-stacking provides an appropriate rationale for the high intensity of DNA radical cations after electron transfer. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  12. Photoinduced electron transfer in some photosensitive molecules ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    An intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) molecule, -N,N-dimethylaminobenzoic acid (DMABA) has been studied in zeolite and colloidal media. The ratio of ICT to normal emission (ICT/LE) is greatly enhanced in zeolites compared to that in polar solvents. The ICT emission of DMABA was quenched by increasing the ...

  13. CHARGE TRANSFER. Efficient hot-electron transfer by a plasmon-induced interfacial charge-transfer transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, K; Chen, J; McBride, J R; Lian, T

    2015-08-07

    Plasmon-induced hot-electron transfer from metal nanostructures is a potential new paradigm for solar energy conversion; however, the reported efficiencies of devices based on this concept are often low because of the loss of hot electrons via ultrafast electron-electron scattering. We propose a pathway, called the plasmon-induced interfacial charge-transfer transition (PICTT), that enables the decay of a plasmon by directly exciting an electron from the metal to a strongly coupled acceptor. We demonstrated this concept in cadmium selenide nanorods with gold tips, in which the gold plasmon was strongly damped by cadmium selenide through interfacial electron transfer. The quantum efficiency of the PICTT process was high (>24%), independent of excitation photon energy over a ~1-electron volt range, and dependent on the excitation polarization. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  14. Studies on electron transfer reactions of Keggin-type mixed ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    (PV2) in aqueous phosphate buffer of pH 6 at ambient temperature. Electrochemical and optical studies show that the stoichiometry of the reaction is 1: 2 (NADH : HPA). EPR and optical studies show that HPA act as one electron acceptor and the products of electron transfer reactions are one elec- tron reduced heteropoly ...

  15. Photoinduced electron transfer in model systems of photosynthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofstra, U.

    1988-01-01

    This Thesis describes Investigations on photoinduced electron transfer (ET) for several compounds, serving as model systems of the natural photosynthesis. In addition, the properties of the systems, e.g. the conformation in solution and the electronic properties of the photoexcited states

  16. Toddlers' word learning and transfer from electronic and print books.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strouse, Gabrielle A; Ganea, Patricia A

    2017-04-01

    Transfer from symbolic media to the real world can be difficult for young children. A sample of 73 toddlers aged 17 to 23months were read either an electronic book displayed on a touchscreen device or a traditional print book in which a novel object was paired with a novel label. Toddlers in both conditions learned the label within the context of the book. However, only those who read the traditional format book generalized and transferred the label to other contexts. An older group of 28 toddlers aged 24 to 30months did generalize and transfer from the electronic book. Across ages, those children who primarily used screens to watch prerecorded video at home transferred less from the electronic book than those with more diverse home media experiences. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Mathematics and electronics - the conceptual transfer problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waks, S.

    1988-07-01

    The article deals with the gap between the technological-school student's mastery of pure mathematical principles and his/her competence in their implementation in electronics and suggests a means for narrowing this, using a case study. A cooperative effort by mathematics and electronics teachers, involving coordination of content, teaching strategies and timing, was implemented on two groups (treatment and control). The treatment group achieved significantly higher average scores in tests in those questions where the mathematical reinforcement provided in the treatment process could be used - and this in spite of the group's weaker standing in the electronics course. Moreover, it was establised that treatment students adopted a more analytical approach in their solution strategies, while control students tended to rely more on recall and 'ready-made' formulae. The main conclusion of our case study is that mastery of mathematical theory and principles is a prerequisite to efficient tackling of technological problems, but is not always enough. Cooperation between the maths and electronics teachers contributes to improvement of the teaching-learning process in a technological discipline.

  18. Electronic Energy Transfer in Polarizable Heterogeneous Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Casper Steinmann; Kongsted, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    such couplings provide important insight into the strength of interaction between photo-active pigments in protein-pigment complexes. Recently, attention has been payed to how the environment modifies or even controls the electronic couplings. To enable such theoretical predictions, a fully polarizable embedding......-order multipole moments. We use this extended model to systematically examine three different ways of obtaining EET couplings in a heterogeneous medium ranging from use of the exact transition density to a point-dipole approximation. Several interesting observations are made including that explicit use...... of transition densities in the calculation of the electronic couplings - also when including the explicit environment contribution - can be replaced by a much simpler transition point charge description without comprising the quality of the model predictions....

  19. A novel conformational switch for electron transfer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    The soluble fraction of the sub-unit II cloned and over-expressed in E. coli has been studied as a model of the electron entry site (CuA) of cytochrome oxidase. The CuA site in the sub-unit II was found to exist in a pH induced conformational equilibrium with a high pH conformer being preferred at elevated temperatures.

  20. Direct estimation of the transfer integral for photoinduced electron transfer from TD DFT calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blancafort, Lluís; Voityuk, Alexander A

    2017-11-20

    The rate of photoinduced ET in molecular systems is controlled by electronic coupling of the locally excited and charge transfer states. We generalize the Bixon-Jortner-Verhoeven expression for electronic coupling to systems with a small energy gap and derive the transfer integral for charge separation in two model heterojunctions using the excitation energies and oscillator strengths computed with TD DFT. The estimated couplings are in good agreement with the reference values.

  1. Electronic state selectivity in dication-molecule single electron transfer reactions: NO(2+) + NO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkes, Michael A; Lockyear, Jessica F; Schröder, Detlef; Roithová, Jana; Price, Stephen D

    2011-11-07

    The single-electron transfer reaction between NO(2+) and NO, which initially forms a pair of NO(+) ions, has been studied using a position-sensitive coincidence technique. The reactivity in this class of collision system, which involves the interaction of a dication with its neutral precursor, provides a sensitive test of recent ideas concerning electronic state selectivity in dicationic single-electron transfer reactions. In stark contrast to the recently observed single-electron transfer reactivity in the analogous CO(2)(2+)/CO(2) and O(2)(2+)/O(2) collision systems, electron transfer between NO(2+) and NO generates two product NO(+) ions which behave in an identical manner, whether the ions are formed from NO(2+) or NO. This observed behaviour is in excellent accord with the recently proposed rationalization of the state selectivity in dication-molecule SET reactions using simple propensity rules involving one-electron transitions. This journal is © the Owner Societies 2011

  2. Computational Approach to Electron Charge Transfer Reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jónsson, Elvar Örn

    -molecular mechanics scheme, and tools to analyse statistical data and generate relative free energies and free energy surfaces. The methodology is applied to several charge transfer species and reactions in chemical environments - chemical in the sense that solvent, counter ions and substrate surfaces are taken...... statistics and a simple post-sampling scheme used to generate free energy surfaces - which compare to full ab initio calculations. In the last part both the molecular dynamics and hybrid classical and quantum mechanics method are used to generate a vast data set for the accurate analysis of dynamical...... in to account - which directly influence the reactants and resulting reaction through both physical and chemical interactions. All methods are though general and can be applied to different types of chemistry. First, the basis of the various theoretical tools is presented and applied to several test systems...

  3. Theory of reversible electron transfer reactions in a condensed phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhole, Kajal; Modak, Brindaban; Samanta, Alok; Ghosh, Swapan K

    2010-07-01

    We have derived an exact analytical expression for the average forward rate of a reversible electron transfer reaction, modeled through a reaction coordinate undergoing diffusive motion in arbitrary potential wells of the reactant and the product in presence of a localized sink of arbitrary location and strength. The dynamics of diffusive motion is described by employing two coupled generalized diffusion reaction (Smoluchowski) equations with coordinate dependent diffusivity and delta sink. The average forward electron transfer rate constant obtained here for the system, with equilibrium or nonequilibrium distributions as initial condition, is determined by the forward and backward rate constants calculated based on the transition state theory and the weighted average rate for the well dynamics. We also discuss various limiting cases for the rate of electron transfer reactions corresponding to the different experimental situations. As an illustrative example, we have considered back electron transfer (ET) reaction and shown that the present theory can explain the non-Marcus free energy gap dependence of the rate of ET reactions. More importantly, the approach presented here can easily be extended to systems describing the dynamics of diffusive motion in coupled multipotential surfaces associated with electron transfer reactions.

  4. Phonon-mediated path-interference in electronic energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossein-Nejad, Hoda; Olaya-Castro, Alexandra; Scholes, Gregory D

    2012-01-14

    We present a formalism to quantify the contribution of path-interference in phonon-mediated electronic energy transfer. The transfer rate between two molecules is computed by considering the quantum mechanical amplitudes associated with pathways connecting the initial and final sites. This includes contributions from classical pathways, but also terms arising from interference of different pathways. We treat the vibrational modes coupled to the molecules as a non-Markovian harmonic oscillator bath, and investigate the correction to transfer rates due to the lowest-order interference contribution. We show that depending on the structure of the harmonic bath, the correction due to path-interference may have a dominant vibrational or electronic character, and can make a notable contribution to the transfer rate in the steady state.

  5. A role for excreted quinones in extracellular electron transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Dianne K.; Kolter, Roberto

    2000-05-01

    Respiratory processes in bacteria are remarkable because of their ability to use a variety of compounds, including insoluble minerals, as terminal electron acceptors. Although much is known about microbial electron transport to soluble electron acceptors, little is understood about electron transport to insoluble compounds such as ferric oxides. In anaerobic environments, humic substances can serve as electron acceptors and also as electron shuttles to ferric oxides. To explore this process, we identified mutants in Shewanella putrefaciens that are unable to respire on humic substances. Here we show that these mutants contain disruptions in a gene that is involved in the biosynthesis of menaquinone. During growth, the wild type releases a menaquinone-related redox-active small molecule into the medium that complements the mutants. This finding raises the possibility that electron transfer to a variety of oxidants, including poorly soluble minerals, may be mediated by microbially excreted quinones that have yet to be identified.

  6. Negative electron transfer dissociation of deprotonated phosphopeptide anions: choice of radical cation reagent and competition between electron and proton transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huzarska, Malwina; Ugalde, Israel; Kaplan, Desmond A; Hartmer, Ralf; Easterling, Michael L; Polfer, Nick C

    2010-04-01

    Despite significant developments in mass spectrometry technology in recent years, no routine proteomics sequencing tool is currently available for peptide anions. The use of a molecular open-shell cation is presented here as a possible reaction partner to induce electron transfer dissociation with deprotonated peptide anions. In this negative electron transfer dissociation (NETD) scheme, an electron is abstracted from the peptide anion and transferred to the radical cation. This is demonstrated for the example of the fluoranthene cation, C(16)H(10)(+*), which is reacted with deprotonated phosphorylated peptides in a 3-D ion trap mass spectrometer. Selective backbone cleavage at the C(alpha)-C bond is observed to yield a and x fragments, similarly to electron detachment dissociation (EDD) of peptide anions. Crucially, the phosphorylation site is left intact in the dissociation process, allowing an identification and localization of the post-translational modification (PTM) site. In contrast, NETD using Xe(+*) as the reagent cation results in sequential neutral losses (CO(2) and H(3)PO(4)) from a/x fragments, which complicate the interpretation of the mass spectra. This difference in dissociation behavior can be understood in the framework of the reduced recombination energy of the electron transfer process for fluoranthene, which is estimated at 2.5-4.5 eV, compared to 6.7-8.7 eV for xenon. Similarly to ETD, proton transfer is found to compete with electron transfer processes in NETD. Isotope fitting of the charge-reduced species shows that in the case of fluoranthene-mediated NETD, proton transfer only accounts for anions.

  7. Electron transfer between physically bound electron donors and acceptors: a fluorescence blob model approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baig, Christine Keyes; Duhamel, Jean

    2010-11-11

    The present study reports on the applicability of the fluorescence blob model (FBM) to analyze the complex fluorescence decays obtained with DNA-intercalated ethidium bromide (EB) as it transfers an electron to copper cations bound to the DNA helix. Traditionally, the information retrieved about the electron transfer process taking place between an electron donor intercalated in DNA and an electron acceptor physically and randomly bound to DNA has been limited due to the distribution of distances that quenching can occur over, which leads to a distribution of rate constants resulting in complex fluorescence decays. These complications can be overcome by analyzing the fluorescence data with a fluorescence blob model (FBM) that allows for the study of fluorescence quenching between fluorophores and quenchers randomly spaced along a polymeric backbone. The fluorescence decays obtained for EB intercalated between two DNA base pairs (bp) as it transfers an electron to copper randomly bound to the DNA were well fit with the FBM. In the FBM analysis, electron transfer is characterized by the size of a blob in term of base pairs, N(blob), over which electron transfer occurs, as well as the rate constant of electron transfer inside a blob, k(blob). The present work demonstrates that electron transfer between intercalated EB and randomly bound copper occurs over an average distance that increases with increasing duplex length up to a duplex length of 12 bp, beyond which the distance over which electron transfer occurs remains constant with duplex length and equals 10.8 ± 0.4 bp.

  8. High-pressure effects on intramolecular electron transfer compounds

    CERN Document Server

    He Li Ming; Li Hong; Zhang Bao Wen; Li Yi; Yang Guo Qiang

    2002-01-01

    We explore the effect of pressure on the fluorescence spectra of the intramolecular electron transfer compound N-(1-pyrenylmethyl), N-methyl-4-methoxyaniline (Py-Am) and its model version, with poly(methyl methacrylate) blended in, at high pressure up to 7 GPa. The emission properties of Py-Am and pyrene show distinct difference with the increase of pressure. This difference indicates the strength of the charge transfer interaction resulting from the adjusting of the conformation of Py-Am with increase of pressure. The relationship between the electronic state of the molecule and pressure is discussed.

  9. Efficient Hot Electron Transfer by Plasmon Induced Interfacial Charge Transfer Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Tianquan

    Surface plasmon resonance in metal nanostructures has been widely used to enhance the efficiency of semiconductors and/or molecular chromophore based solar energy conversion devices by increasing the absorption or energy transfer rate through the enhanced local field strength. In more recent years, it has been shown that excitation of plasmons in metal nanostructures can lead to the injection of hot electrons into semiconductors and enhanced photochemistry. This novel mechanism suggests that plasmonic nanostructures can potentially function as a new class of widely tunable and robust light harvesting materials for solar energy conversion. However, plasmon-induced hot electron injections from metal to semiconductor or molecules are still inefficient because of the competing ultrafast hot electron relaxation processes within the metallic domain. In this paper we discuss a recent study on the plasmon-exciton interaction mechanisms in colloidal quantum-confined semiconductor-gold nanorod heterostructures. In CdSe NRs with Au tips, the distinct plasmon band of the Au nanoparticles was completely damped due to strong interaction with the CdSe domain. Using transient absorption spectroscopy, we show that optical excitation of plasmons in the Au tip leads to efficient hot electron injection into the semiconductor nanorod. In the presence of sacrificial electron donors, this plasmon induced hot electron transfer process can be utilized to drive photoreduction reactions under continuous illumination. We propose that the strong metal/semiconductor coupling in CdSe/Au hetersostructures leads to a new pathway for this surprising efficient hot electron transfer. In this plasmon induced interfacial charge transfer transition (PICTT) the a plasmon decay by direct excitation of an electron from the metal to semiconductor, bypassing the competition with hot electron transfer in metal. Ongoing studies are examining the generality of this mechanism and exploring possible approaches

  10. Magnetic resonance studies of photo-induced electron transfer reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Willigen, H.

    1992-11-01

    Fourier Transform Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (FT EPR) is useful in study of photochemical reactions: a microwave pulse rotates the electron spin magnetization vector from z (magnetic field) into xy plane ([pi]/2 pulse); the time evolution of magnetization in xy plane, the free induction decay (FID), is sampled. Fourier transform of FID gives the frequency domain EPR spectrum of the free radicals, and the method is ideal for time-resolved studies of free radicals produced by pulsed-laser excitation. Investigations of electron transfer reactions focused on porphyrin (donor) - quinone (acceptor) systems. First, two hydrogen abstraction reactions were studied with FT EPR: photoreduction of acetone with 2-propanol, yielding the acetone ketyl radical, and the reaction of 2-propanol with t-butoxy radicals. Then, the FT EPR study of benzoquinone or duroquinone anion radicals generated by pulsed-laser induced electron transfer from zinc tetraphenylporphyrin (ZnTPP) or tetrasulfonated Zn(TPP), was carried out in homogeneous solution, micellar solutions, and silica gel. Finally, FT EPR was used to study electron transfer quenching of triplet C[sub 60] by electron donors.

  11. Accumulative electron transfer: multiple charge separation in artificial photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Susanne; Boixel, Julien; Pellegrin, Yann; Blart, Errol; Becker, Hans-Christian; Odobel, Fabrice; Hammarström, Leif

    2012-01-01

    To achieve artificial photosynthesis it is necessary to couple the single-electron event of photoinduced charge separation with the multi-electron reactions of fuel formation and water splitting. Therefore, several rounds of light-induced charge separation are required to accumulate enough redox equivalents at the catalytic sites for the target chemistry to occur, without any sacrificial donors or acceptors other than the catalytic substrates. Herein, we discuss the challenges of such accumulative electron transfer in molecular systems. We present a series of closely related systems base on a Ru(II)-polypyridine photosensitizer with appended triaryl-amine or oligo-triaryl-amine donors, linked to nanoporous TiO2 as the acceptor. One of the systems, based on dye 4, shows efficient accumulative electron transfer in high overall yield resulting in the formation of a two-electron charge-separated state upon successive excitation by two photons. In contrast, the other systems do not show accumulative electron transfer because of different competing reactions. This illustrates the difficulties in designing successful systems for this still largely unexplored type of reaction scheme.

  12. Electronic Coupling Dependence of Ultrafast Interfacial Electron Transfer on Nanocrystalline Thin Films and Single Crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lian, Tianquan

    2014-04-22

    The long-term goal of the proposed research is to understand electron transfer dynamics in nanoparticle/liquid interface. This knowledge is essential to many semiconductor nanoparticle based devices, including photocatalytic waste degradation and dye sensitized solar cells.

  13. α-Helicomimetic foldamers as electron transfer mediators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulka-Ziach, K; Sęk, S

    2017-10-12

    α-Helical peptides are known as efficient mediators of electron transfer; however, their use is limited to compounds longer that 7-10 residues. To overcome this limitation, α-helicomimetic foldamers, based on the oligourea backbone with the general formula [-CH(R)-CH2-NH-CO-NH]n, were synthesized. Oligoureas are known to adopt a robust 2.5-helical conformation where only four residues are enough to form stable 1.5 helical turns. This feature makes them great models to study the charge transfer process and the dependence of the mechanism of the electron transition on the length of the mediator. Two families of different chain length (2, 4 and 6 residues) oligoureas were synthesized with a thiol group attached to the δ+ or δ- helix dipole pole. This enables the adsorption of the molecules onto the gold surface, leading to the formation of self-assembled monolayers. The helicity of compounds was confirmed in solution and in the solid state. Such systems were used to study the electron transfer process by current sensing atomic force microscopy (CS-AFM). The results showed that oligoureas may act as electron transfer mediators. Additionally, it was shown by the increasing force applied to the AFM tip that the oligourea helix is more stable than the helix formed by peptides.

  14. Studies on electron transfer reactions: Reduction of heteropoly 10 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rates of electron transfer reaction of thioglycolic acid with vanadium(V) substituted Keggintype heteropolyanion, [PVVVVW10O40]5-, in acetate-acetic acid buffers have been measured spectrophotometrically at 25°C. The order of the reaction with respect to substrate and oxidant is unity. The reaction shows simple second ...

  15. Electron Transfer from Azide Radical to Histidine Generates ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The formation of histidinyl radical (HR), which is a product of electron transfer reaction between histidine and some free radicals, was studied by pulse radiolysis. The reaction between histidine and azide radicals was found to produce HR, which has a distinct absorption spectrum with peaks at 300, 480 and 520 nm.

  16. Electron transfer in syntrophic communities of anaerobic bacteria and archaea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stams, A.J.M.; Plugge, C.M.

    2009-01-01

    Interspecies electron transfer is a key process in methanogenic and sulphate-reducing environments. Bacteria and archaea that live in syntrophic communities take advantage of the metabolic abilities of their syntrophic partner to overcome energy barriers and break down compounds that they cannot

  17. 31 CFR 208.3 - Payment by electronic funds transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Payment by electronic funds transfer. 208.3 Section 208.3 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) FISCAL SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT SERVICE MANAGEMENT OF FEDERAL AGENCY...

  18. Adsorption and Interfacial Electron Transfer of Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Allan Glargaard; Boisen, Anja; Nielsen, Jens Ulrik

    2003-01-01

    We have studied the adsorption and electron-transfer dynamics of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (yeast) iso-l-cytochrome c adsorbed on Au(lll) electrodes in aqueous phosphate buffer media. This cytochrome possesses a thiol group dos e to the protein surface (Cysl02) suitable for linking the protein...

  19. Correlating electronic and vibrational motions in charge transfer systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khalil, Munira [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2014-06-27

    The goal of this research program was to measure coupled electronic and nuclear motions during photoinduced charge transfer processes in transition metal complexes by developing and using novel femtosecond spectroscopies. The scientific highlights and the resulting scientific publications from the DOE supported work are outlined in the technical report.

  20. Electronic Data Transfer--A System That's Working in Connecticut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Robert A.

    1994-01-01

    The Electronic Data Transfer (EDT) network for Connecticut local school districts encompasses nine major databases and provides dozens of online data reports to network users. At a low cost and high degree of success, EDT has improved the data collection and reconciliation process at the state and local levels and generated a capacity for…

  1. Analysis of Exchange Interaction and Electron Delocalization as Intramolecular Determinants of Intermolecular Electron-Transfer Kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bominaar, E. L.; Achim, C.; Borshch, S. A.; Girerd, J.-J.; Münck, E.

    1997-08-13

    During the past decades, spectroscopic characterization of exchange interactions and electron delocalization has developed into a powerful tool for the recognition of metal clusters in metalloproteins. By contrast, the biological relevance of these interactions has received little attention thus far. This paper presents a theoretical study in which this problem is addressed. The rate constant for intermolecular electron-transfer reactions which are essential in many biological processes is investigated. An expression is derived for the dependence of the rate constant for self-exchange on the delocalization degree of the mixed-valence species. This result allows us to rationalize published kinetic data. In the simplest case of electron transfer from an exchange-coupled binuclear mixed-valence donor to a diamagnetic acceptor, the rate constant is evaluated, taking into account spin factors and exchange energies in the initial and final state. The theoretical analysis indicates that intramolecular spin-dependent electron delocalization (double exchange) and Heisenberg-Dirac-van Vleck (HDvV) exchange have an important impact on the rate constant for intermolecular electron transfer. This correlation reveals a novel relationship between magnetochemistry and electrochemistry. Contributions to the electron transfer from the ground and excited states of the exchange-coupled dimer have been evaluated. For clusters in which these states have different degrees of delocalization, the excited-state contributions to electron transfer may become dominant at potentials which are less reductive than the potential at which the rate constant for the transfer from the ground state is maximum. The rate constant shows a steep dependence on HDvV exchange, which suggests that an exchange-coupled cluster can act as a molecular switch for exchange-controlled electron gating. The relevance of this result is discussed in the context of substrate specificity of electron-transfer reactions in

  2. Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer in Artificial Photosynthetic Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, S Jimena; Odella, Emmanuel; Moore, Gary F; Gust, Devens; Moore, Thomas A; Moore, Ana L

    2018-01-08

    Artificial photosynthetic constructs can in principle operate more efficiently than natural photosynthesis because they can be rationally designed to optimize solar energy conversion for meeting human demands rather than the multiple needs of an organism competing for growth and reproduction in a complex ecosystem. The artificial photosynthetic constructs described in this Account consist primarily of covalently linked synthetic chromophores, electron donors and acceptors, and proton donors and acceptors that carry out the light absorption, electron transfer, and proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) processes characteristic of photosynthetic cells. PCET is the movement of an electron from one site to another accompanied by proton transfer. PCET and the transport of protons over tens of angstroms are important in all living cells because they are a fundamental link between redox processes and the establishment of transmembrane gradients of proton electrochemical potential, known as proton-motive force (PMF), which is the unifying concept in bioenergetics. We have chosen a benzimidazole phenol (BIP) system as a platform for the study of PCET because with appropriate substitutions it is possible to design assemblies in which one or multiple proton transfers can accompany oxidation of the phenol. In BIP, oxidation of the phenol increases its acidity by more than ten pKa units; thus, electrochemical oxidation of the phenol is associated with a proton transfer to the imidazole. This is an example of a PCET process involving transfer of one electron and one proton, known as electron-proton transfer (EPT). When the benzimidazole moiety of BIP is substituted at the 4-position with good proton acceptor groups such as aliphatic amines, experimental and theoretical results indicate that two proton transfers occur upon one-electron oxidation of the phenol. This phenomenon is described as a one-electron-two-proton transfer (E2PT) process and results in translocation of

  3. Syntrophic Growth via Quinone-Mediated Interspecies Electron Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica A Smith

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms by which microbial species exchange electrons are of interest because interspecies electron transfer can expand the metabolic capabilities of microbial communities. Previous studies with the humic substance analog anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS suggested that quinone-mediated interspecies electron transfer (QUIET is feasible, but it was not determined if sufficient energy is available from QUIET to support the growth of both species. Furthermore, there have been no previous studies on the mechanisms for the oxidation of anthrahydroquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AHQDS. A co-culture of Geobacter metallireducens and Geobacter sulfurreducens metabolized ethanol with the reduction of fumarate much faster in the presence of AQDS, and there was an increase in cell protein. G. sulfurreducens was more abundant, consistent with G. sulfurreducens obtaining electrons from acetate that G. metallireducens produced from ethanol, as well as from AHQDS. Cocultures initiated with a citrate synthase-deficient strain of G. sulfurreducens that was unable to use acetate as an electron donor also metabolized ethanol with the reduction of fumarate and cell growth, but acetate accumulated over time. G. sulfurreducens and G. metallireducens were equally abundant in these co-cultures reflecting the inability of the citrate synthase-deficient strain of G. sulfurreducens to metabolize acetate. Evaluation of the mechanisms by which G. sulfurreducens accepts electrons from AHQDS demonstrated that a strain deficient in outer-surface c-type cytochromes that are required for AQDS reduction was as effective at QUIET as the wild-type strain. Deletion of additional genes previously implicated in extracellular electron transfer also had no impact on QUIET. These results demonstrate that QUIET can yield sufficient energy to support the growth of both syntrophic partners, but that the mechanisms by which electrons are derived from extracellular hydroquinones require

  4. Photoinitiated electron transfer in multi-chromophoric species: Synthetic tetrads and pentads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-02-14

    This research project involves the design, synthesis and study of the molecules which mimic many of the important aspects of photosynthetic electron and energy transfer. Specifically, the molecules are designed to mimic the following aspects of natural photosynthetic multistep electron transfer: electron donation from a tetrapyrrole excited singlet state, electron transfer between tetrapyrroles, electron transfer from tetrapyrroles to quinones, and electron transfer between quinones with different redox properties. In addition, they model carotenoid antenna function in photosynthesis (singlet-singlet energy transfer from carotenoid polyenes to chlorophyll) and carotenoid photoprotection from singlet oxygen damage (triplet-triplet energy transfer from chlorophyll to carotenoids).

  5. Photoinitiated electron transfer in multichromophoric species: Synthetic tetrads and pentads. Technical progress report, 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-04-12

    This research project involves the design, synthesis and study of molecules which mimic many of the important aspects of photosynthetic electron and energy transfer. Specifically, the molecules are designed to mimic the following aspects of natural photosynthetic multistep electron transfer: electron donation from a tetrapyrrole excited singlet state, electron transfer between tetrapyrroles, electron transfer from tetrapyrroles to quinones, and electron transfer between quinones with different redox properties. In addition, they model carotenoid antenna function in photosynthesis (singlet-singlet energy transfer from carotenoid polyenes to chlorophyll) and carotenoid photoprotection from singlet oxygen damage (triplet-triplet energy transfer from chlorophyll to carotenoids).

  6. Ultrafast photoinduced electron transfer in green fluorescent protein bearing a genetically encoded electron acceptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Xiaoxuan; Yu, Yang; Zhou, Meng; Hu, Cheng; Gao, Feng; Li, Jiasong; Liu, Xiaohong; Deng, Kai; Zheng, Peng; Gong, Weimin; Xia, Andong; Wang, Jiangyun

    2015-06-17

    Electron transfer (ET) is widely used for driving the processes that underlie the chemistry of life. However, our abilities to probe electron transfer mechanisms in proteins and design redox enzymes are limited, due to the lack of methods to site-specifically insert electron acceptors into proteins in vivo. Here we describe the synthesis and genetic incorporation of 4-fluoro-3-nitrophenylalanine (FNO2Phe), which has similar reduction potentials to NAD(P)H and ferredoxin, the most important biological reductants. Through the genetic incorporation of FNO2Phe into green fluorescent protein (GFP) and femtosecond transient absorption measurement, we show that photoinduced electron transfer (PET) from the GFP chromophore to FNO2Phe occurs very fast (within 11 ps), which is comparable to that of the first electron transfer step in photosystem I, from P700* to A0. This genetically encoded, low-reduction potential unnatural amino acid (UAA) can significantly improve our ability to investigate electron transfer mechanisms in complex reductases and facilitate the design of miniature proteins that mimic their functions.

  7. Electron Transfer Strategies Regulate Carbonate Mineral and Micropore Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Zhirui; Tice, Michael M.

    2018-01-01

    Some microbial carbonates are robust biosignatures due to their distinct morphologies and compositions. However, whether carbonates induced by microbial iron reduction have such features is unknown. Iron-reducing bacteria use various strategies to transfer electrons to iron oxide minerals (e.g., membrane-bound enzymes, soluble electron shuttles, nanowires, as well as different mechanisms for moving over or attaching to mineral surfaces). This diversity has the potential to create mineral biosignatures through manipulating the microenvironments in which carbonate precipitation occurs. We used Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, Geothrix fermentans, and Geobacter metallireducens GS-15, representing three different strategies, to reduce solid ferric hydroxide in order to evaluate their influence on carbonate and micropore formation (micro-size porosity in mineral rocks). Our results indicate that electron transfer strategies determined the morphology (rhombohedral, spherical, or long-chained) of precipitated calcium-rich siderite by controlling the level of carbonate saturation and the location of carbonate formation. Remarkably, electron transfer strategies also produced distinctive cell-shaped micropores in both carbonate and hydroxide minerals, thus producing suites of features that could potentially serve as biosignatures recording information about the sizes, shapes, and physiologies of iron-reducing organisms.

  8. Vibrationally assisted electron transfer mechanism of olfaction: myth or reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solov'yov, Ilia A; Chang, Po-Yao; Schulten, Klaus

    2012-10-28

    Smell is a vital sense for animals. The mainstream explanation of smell is based on recognition of the odorant molecules through characteristics of their surface, e.g., shape, but certain experiments suggest that such recognition is complemented by recognition of vibrational modes. According to this suggestion an olfactory receptor is activated by electron transfer assisted through odorant vibrational excitation. The hundreds to thousands of different olfactory receptors in an animal recognize odorants over a discriminant landscape with surface properties and vibrational frequencies as the two major dimensions. In the present paper we introduce the vibrationally assisted mechanism of olfaction and demonstrate for several odorants that, indeed, a strong enhancement of an electron tunneling rate due to odorant vibrations can arise. We discuss in this regard the influence of odorant deuteration and explain, thereby, recent experiments performed on Drosophila melanogaster. Our demonstration is based on known physical properties of biological electron transfer and on ab initio calculations on odorants carried out for the purpose of the present study. We identify a range of physical characteristics which olfactory receptors and odorants must obey for the vibrationally assisted electron transfer mechanism to function. We argue that the stated characteristics are feasible for realistic olfactory receptors, noting, though, that the receptor structure presently is still unknown, but can be studied through homology modeling.

  9. Electron Transfer Between Electrically Conductive Minerals and Quinones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taran, Olga

    2017-07-01

    Long-distance electron transfer in marine environments couples physically separated redox half-reactions, impacting biogeochemical cycles of iron, sulfur and carbon. Bacterial bio-electrochemical systems that facilitate electron transfer via conductive filaments or across man-made electrodes are well known, but the impact of abiotic currents across naturally occurring conductive and semiconducitve minerals is poorly understood. In this paper I use cyclic voltammetry to explore electron transfer between electrodes made of common iron minerals (magnetite, hematite, pyrite, pyrrhotite, mackinawite and greigite), and hydroquinones - a class of organic molecules found in carbon-rich sediments. Of all tested minerals, only pyrite and magnetite showed an increase in electric current in the presence of organic molecules, with pyrite showing excellent electrocatalytic performance. Pyrite electrodes performed better than commercially available glassy carbon electrodes and showed higher peak currents, lower overpotential values and a smaller separation between oxidation and reduction peaks for each tested quinone. Hydroquinone oxidation on pyrite surfaces was reversible, diffusion controlled, and stable over a large number of potential cycles. Given the ubiquity of both pyrite and quinones, abiotic electron transfer between minerals and organic molecules is likely widespread in Nature and may contribute to several different phenomena, including anaerobic respiration of a wide variety of microorganisms in temporally anoxic zones or in the proximity of hydrothermal vent chimneys, as well as quinone cycling and the propagation of anoxic zones in organic rich waters. Finally, interactions between pyrite and quinones make use of electrochemical gradients that have been suggested as an important source of energy for the origins of life on Earth. Ubiquinones and iron sulfide clusters are common redox cofactors found in electron transport chains across all domains of life and

  10. Alternating electron and proton transfer steps in photosynthetic water oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klauss, André; Haumann, Michael; Dau, Holger

    2012-10-02

    Water oxidation by cyanobacteria, algae, and plants is pivotal in oxygenic photosynthesis, the process that powers life on Earth, and is the paradigm for engineering solar fuel-production systems. Each complete reaction cycle of photosynthetic water oxidation requires the removal of four electrons and four protons from the catalytic site, a manganese-calcium complex and its protein environment in photosystem II. In time-resolved photothermal beam deflection experiments, we monitored apparent volume changes of the photosystem II protein associated with charge creation by light-induced electron transfer (contraction) and charge-compensating proton relocation (expansion). Two previously invisible proton removal steps were detected, thereby filling two gaps in the basic reaction-cycle model of photosynthetic water oxidation. In the S(2) → S(3) transition of the classical S-state cycle, an intermediate is formed by deprotonation clearly before electron transfer to the oxidant (Y Z OX). The rate-determining elementary step (τ, approximately 30 µs at 20 °C) in the long-distance proton relocation toward the protein-water interface is characterized by a high activation energy (E(a) = 0.46 ± 0.05 eV) and strong H/D kinetic isotope effect (approximately 6). The characteristics of a proton transfer step during the S(0) → S(1) transition are similar (τ, approximately 100 µs; E(a) = 0.34 ± 0.08 eV; kinetic isotope effect, approximately 3); however, the proton removal from the Mn complex proceeds after electron transfer to . By discovery of the transient formation of two further intermediate states in the reaction cycle of photosynthetic water oxidation, a temporal sequence of strictly alternating removal of electrons and protons from the catalytic site is established.

  11. Numerical Simulation of Transient Moisture Transfer into an Electronic Enclosure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shojaee Nasirabadi, Parizad; Jabbaribehnam, Mirmasoud; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2016-01-01

    inside the enclosures to be able to protect the electronic systems.In this work, moisture transfer into a typical electronic enclosure is numerically studied using CFD. In order to reduce theCPU-time and make a way for subsequent factorial design analysis, a simplifying modification is applied in which...... the real3D geometry is approximated by a 2D axial symmetry one. The results for 2D and 3D models were compared in order tocalibrate the 2D representation. Furthermore, simulation results were compared with experimental data and good agreementwas found....

  12. Aza-heterocyclic Receptors for Direct Electron Transfer Hemoglobin Biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vinay; Kashyap, D. M. Nikhila; Hebbar, Suraj; Swetha, R.; Prasad, Sujay; Kamala, T.; Srikanta, S. S.; Krishnaswamy, P. R.; Bhat, Navakanta

    2017-02-01

    Direct Electron Transfer biosensors, facilitating direct communication between the biomolecule of interest and electrode surface, are preferable compared to enzymatic and mediator based sensors. Although hemoglobin (Hb) contains four redox active iron centres, direct detection is not possible due to inaccessibility of iron centres and formation of dimers, blocking electron transfer. Through the coordination of iron with aza-heterocyclic receptors - pyridine and imidazole - we report a cost effective, highly sensitive and simple electrochemical Hb sensor using cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry. The receptor can be either in the form of liquid micro-droplet mixed with blood or dry chemistry embedded in paper membrane on top of screen printed carbon electrodes. We demonstrate excellent linearity and robustness against interference using clinical samples. A truly point of care technology is demonstrated by integrating disposable test strips with handheld reader, enabling finger prick to result in less than a minute.

  13. Blocking layer modeling for temperature analysis of electron transfer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this article, we simulate thermal effects on the electron transfer rate from three quantum dots CdSe, CdS and CdTe to three metal oxides TiO2, SnO2 and ZnO2 in the presence of four blocking layers ZnS, ZnO, TiO2 and Al2O3, in a porous quantum dot sensitized solar cell (QDSSC) structure, using Marcus theory.

  14. Ultrafast Photoinduced Electron Transfer in Bimolecular Donor-Acceptor Systems

    KAUST Repository

    Alsulami, Qana A.

    2016-11-30

    The efficiency of photoconversion systems, such as organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells, is largely controlled by a series of fundamental photophysical processes occurring at the interface before carrier collection. A profound understanding of ultrafast interfacial charge transfer (CT), charge separation (CS), and charge recombination (CR) is the key determinant to improving the overall performances of photovoltaic devices. The discussion in this dissertation primarily focuses on the relevant parameters that are involved in photon absorption, exciton separation, carrier transport, carrier recombination and carrier collection in organic photovoltaic devices. A combination of steady-state and femtosecond broadband transient spectroscopies was used to investigate the photoinduced charge carrier dynamics in various donor-acceptor systems. Furthermore, this study was extended to investigate some important factors that influence charge transfer in donor-acceptor systems, such as the morphology, energy band alignment, electronic properties and chemical structure. Interestingly, clear correlations among the steady-state measurements, time-resolved spectroscopy results, grain alignment of the electron transporting layer (ETL), carrier mobility, and device performance are found. In this thesis, we explored the significant impacts of ultrafast charge separation and charge recombination at donor/acceptor (D/A) interfaces on the performance of a conjugated polymer PTB7-Th device with three fullerene acceptors: PC71BM, PC61BM and IC60BA. Time-resolved laser spectroscopy and high-resolution electron microscopy can illustrate the basis for fabricating solar cell devices with improved performances. In addition, we studied the effects of the incorporation of heavy metals into π-conjugated chromophores on electron transfer by monitoring the triplet state lifetime of the oligomer using transient absorption spectroscopy, as understanding the mechanisms controlling intersystem crossing and

  15. Insights into Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer from Computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provorse, Makenzie R.

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) is utilized throughout Nature to facilitate essential biological processes, such as photosynthesis, cellular respiration, and DNA replication and repair. The general approach to studying PCET processes is based on a two-dimensional More O'Ferrall-Jencks diagram in which electron transfer (ET) and proton transfer (PT) occur in a sequential or concerted fashion. Experimentally, it is difficult to discern the contributing factors of concerted PCET mechanisms. Several theoretical approaches have arisen to qualitatively and quantitatively investigate these reactions. Here, we present a multistate density functional theory (MSDFT) method to efficiently and accurately model PCET mechanisms. The MSDFT method is validated against experimental and computational data previously reported on an isoelectronic series of small molecule self-exchange hydrogen atom transfer reactions and a model complex specifically designed to study long-range ET through a hydrogen-bonded salt-bridge interface. Further application of this method to the hydrogen atom abstraction of ascorbate by a nitroxyl radical demonstrates the sensitivity of the thermodynamic and kinetic properties to solvent effects. In particular, the origin of the unusual kinetic isotope effect is investigated. Lastly, the MSDFT is employed in a combined quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) approach to explicitly model PCET in condensed phases.

  16. Mathematical model of mass transfer at electron beam treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konovalov, Sergey V.; Sarychev, Vladimir D.; Nevskii, Sergey A.; Kobzareva, Tatyana Yu.; Gromov, Victor E.; Semin, Alexander P.

    2017-01-01

    The paper proposes a model of convective mass transfer at electron beam treatment with beams in titanium alloys subjected to electro-explosion alloying by titanium diboride powder. The proposed model is based on the concept that treatment with concentrated flows of energy results in the initiation of vortices in the melted layer. The formation mechanism of these vortices rooted in the idea that the availability of temperature drop leads to the initiation of the thermo-capillary convection. For the melted layer of metal the equations of the convective heat transfer and boundary conditions in terms of the evaporated material are written. The finite element solution of these equations showed that electron-beam treatment results in the formation of multi-vortex structure that in developing captures all new areas of material. It leads to the fact that the strengthening particles are observed at the depth increasing many times the depth of their penetration according to the diffusion mechanism. The distribution of micro-hardness at depth and the thickness of strengthening zone determined from these data supported the view that proposed model of the convective mass transfer describes adequately the processes going on in the treatment with low-energy high-current electron beam.

  17. The electron transfer system of syntrophically grown Desulfovibrio vulgaris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, C.B.; He, Z.; Yang, Z.K.; Ringbauer, Jr., J.A.; He, Q.; Zhou, J.; Voordouw, G.; Wall, J.D.; Arkin, A.P.; Hazen, T.C.; Stolyar, S.; Stahl, D.A.

    2009-05-01

    Interspecies hydrogen transfer between organisms producing and consuming hydrogen promotes the decomposition of organic matter in most anoxic environments. Although syntrophic couplings between hydrogen producers and consumers are a major feature of the carbon cycle, mechanisms for energy recovery at the extremely low free energies of reactions typical of these anaerobic communities have not been established. In this study, comparative transcriptional analysis of a model sulfate-reducing microbe, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, suggested the use of alternative electron transfer systems dependent upon growth modality. During syntrophic growth on lactate with a hydrogenotrophic methanogen, D. vulgaris up-regulated numerous genes involved in electron transfer and energy generation when compared with sulfate-limited monocultures. In particular, genes coding for the putative membrane-bound Coo hydrogenase, two periplasmic hydrogenases (Hyd and Hyn) and the well-characterized high-molecular weight cytochrome (Hmc) were among the most highly expressed and up-regulated. Additionally, a predicted operon coding for genes involved in lactate transport and oxidation exhibited up-regulation, further suggesting an alternative pathway for electrons derived from lactate oxidation during syntrophic growth. Mutations in a subset of genes coding for Coo, Hmc, Hyd and Hyn impaired or severely limited syntrophic growth but had little affect on growth via sulfate-respiration. These results demonstrate that syntrophic growth and sulfate-respiration use largely independent energy generation pathways and imply that understanding of microbial processes sustaining nutrient cycling must consider lifestyles not captured in pure culture.

  18. The Electron Transfer System of Syntrophically Grown Desulfovibrio vulgaris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PBD; ENIGMA; GTL; VIMSS; Walker, Christopher B.; He, Zhili; Yang, Zamin K.; Ringbauer Jr., Joseph A.; He, Qiang; Zhou, Jizhong; Voordouw, Gerrit; Wall, Judy D.; Arkin, Adam P.; Hazen, Terry C.; Stolyar, Sergey; Stahl, David A.

    2009-06-22

    Interspecies hydrogen transfer between organisms producing and consuming hydrogen promotes the decomposition of organic matter in most anoxic environments. Although syntrophic couplings between hydrogen producers and consumers are a major feature of the carbon cycle, mechanisms for energy recovery at the extremely low free energies of reactions typical of these anaerobic communities have not been established. In this study, comparative transcriptional analysis of a model sulfate-reducing microbe, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, suggested the use of alternative electron transfer systems dependent upon growth modality. During syntrophic growth on lactate with a hydrogenotrophic methanogen, D. vulgaris up-regulated numerous genes involved in electron transfer and energy generation when compared with sulfate-limited monocultures. In particular, genes coding for the putative membrane-bound Coo hydrogenase, two periplasmic hydrogenases (Hyd and Hyn) and the well-characterized high-molecular weight cytochrome (Hmc) were among the most highly expressed and up-regulated. Additionally, a predicted operon coding for genes involved in lactate transport and oxidation exhibited up-regulation, further suggesting an alternative pathway for electrons derived from lactate oxidation during syntrophic growth. Mutations in a subset of genes coding for Coo, Hmc, Hyd and Hyn impaired or severely limited syntrophic growth but had little affect on growth via sulfate-respiration. These results demonstrate that syntrophic growth and sulfate-respiration use largely independent energy generation pathways and imply that understanding of microbial processes sustaining nutrient cycling must consider lifestyles not captured in pure culture.

  19. Mechanisms for control of biological electron transfer reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Heather R; Dow, Brian A; Davidson, Victor L

    2014-12-01

    Electron transfer (ET) through and between proteins is a fundamental biological process. The rates and mechanisms of these ET reactions are controlled by the proteins in which the redox centers that donate and accept electrons reside. The protein influences the magnitudes of the ET parameters, the electronic coupling and reorganization energy that are associated with the ET reaction. The protein can regulate the rates of the ET reaction by requiring reaction steps to optimize the system for ET, leading to kinetic mechanisms of gated or coupled ET. Amino acid residues in the segment of the protein through which long range ET occurs can also modulate the ET rate by serving as staging points for hopping mechanisms of ET. Specific examples are presented to illustrate these mechanisms by which proteins control rates of ET reactions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Electron transfer rates and equilibrium within cytochrome c oxidase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, O; Einarsdóttir, O; Pecht, I

    2000-01-01

    Intramolecular electron transfer (ET) between the CuA center and heme a in bovine cytochrome c oxidase was investigated by pulse radiolysis. CuA, the initial electron acceptor, was reduced by 1-methyl nicotinamide radicals in a diffusion-controlled reaction, as monitored by absorption changes...... at 830 nm. After the initial reduction phase, the 830 nm absorption was partially restored, corresponding to reoxidation of the CuA center. Concomitantly, the absorption at 445 nm and 605 nm increased, indicating reduction of heme a. The rate constants for heme a reduction and CuA reoxidation were...... identical within experimental error and independent of the enzyme concentration. This demonstrates that a fast intramolecular electron equilibration is taking place between CuA and heme a. The rate constants for CuA --> heme a ET and the reverse (heme a --> CuA) process were found to be 13 000 s-1 and 3700...

  1. Reduced density matrix hybrid approach: Application to electronic energy transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berkelbach, Timothy C.; Reichman, David R. [Department of Chemistry, Columbia University, 3000 Broadway, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Markland, Thomas E. [Department of Chemistry, Stanford University, 333 Campus Drive, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2012-02-28

    Electronic energy transfer in the condensed phase, such as that occurring in photosynthetic complexes, frequently occurs in regimes where the energy scales of the system and environment are similar. This situation provides a challenge to theoretical investigation since most approaches are accurate only when a certain energetic parameter is small compared to others in the problem. Here we show that in these difficult regimes, the Ehrenfest approach provides a good starting point for a dynamical description of the energy transfer process due to its ability to accurately treat coupling to slow environmental modes. To further improve on the accuracy of the Ehrenfest approach, we use our reduced density matrix hybrid framework to treat the faster environmental modes quantum mechanically, at the level of a perturbative master equation. This combined approach is shown to provide an efficient and quantitative description of electronic energy transfer in a model dimer and the Fenna-Matthews-Olson complex and is used to investigate the effect of environmental preparation on the resulting dynamics.

  2. Photoinitiated electron transfer in multichromophoric species: Synthetic tetrads and pentads. Technical progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gust, J.D. Jr.; Moore, T.A.

    1988-04-12

    This research project involves the design, synthesis and study of molecules which mimic many of the important aspects of photosynthetic electron and energy transfer. The knowledge gained from the study of synthetic model systems which abstract features of the natural photosynthetic apparatus can be used to design artificial photosynthetic systems which employ the basic physics and chemistry of photosynthesis to help meet mankind`s energy needs. More specifically, the proposed models are designed to mimic the following aspects of natural photosynthetic multistep electron transfer: electron donation from a tetrapyrrole excited singlet state, electron transfer between tetrapyrroles, electron transfer from tetrapyrroles to quinones, and electron transfer between quinones with different redox properties.

  3. Electron transfer mechanism and photochemistry of ferrioxalate induced by excitation in the charge transfer band.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jie; Zhang, Hua; Tomov, Ivan V; Rentzepis, Peter M

    2008-03-17

    The photoredox reaction of ferrioxalate after 266/267 nm excitation in the charge transfer band has been studied by means of ultrafast extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis, optical transient spectroscopy, and quantum chemistry calculations. The Fe-O bond length changes combined with the transient spectra and kinetics have been measured and in combination with ultrahigh frequency density functional theory (UHF/DFT) calculations are used to determine the photochemical mechanism for the Fe(III) to Fe(II) redox reaction. The present data and the results obtained with 266/267 nm excitations strongly suggest that the primary reaction is the dissociation of the Fe-O bond before intramolecular electron transfer occurs. Low quantum yield electron photodetachment from ferrioxalate has also been observed.

  4. MATHEMATICAL MODELING OF EXTRACELLULAR ELECTRON TRANSFER IN BIOFILMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renslow, Ryan S.; Babauta, Jerome T.; Kuprat, Andrew P.; Schenk, Jim; Ivory, Cornelius; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beyenal, Haluk

    2015-09-12

    Electrochemically active biofilms have a unique form of respiration in which they utilize solid external materials as terminal electron acceptors for their metabolism. Currently, two primary mechanisms have been identified for long-range extracellular electron transfer (EET): a diffusion- and a conduction-based mechanism. Evidence in the literature suggests that some biofilms, particularly Shewanella oneidensis, produce the requisite components for both mechanisms. In this study, a generic model is presented that incorporates the diffusion- and the conduction-based mechanisms and allows electrochemically active biofilms to utilize both simultaneously. The model was applied to S. oneidensis and Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms using experimentally generated data found in the literature. Our simulation results show that 1) biofilms having both mechanisms available, especially if they can interact, may have a metabolic advantage over biofilms that can use only a single mechanism; 2) the thickness of G. sulfurreducens biofilms is likely not limited by conductivity; 3) accurate intrabiofilm diffusion coefficient values are critical for current generation predictions; and 4) the local biofilm potential and redox potential are two distinct parameters and cannot be assumed to have identical values. Finally, we determined that simulated cyclic and squarewave voltammetry based on our model are currently not capable of determining the specific percentages of extracellular electron transfer mechanisms in a biofilm. The developed model will be a critical tool for designing experiments to explain EET mechanisms.

  5. Triboelectric effect: A new perspective on electron transfer process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Shuaihang; Zhang, Zhinan

    2017-10-01

    As interest in the triboelectric effect increases in line with the development of tribo-electrification related devices, the mechanisms involved in this phenomenon require more systematic review from the dual perspectives of developed classical insights and emerging quantum understanding. In this paper, the clear energy changing and transferring process of electrons have been proposed from the quantum point of view as the trigger for the charging initiation process in the triboelectric effect, and the phonon modes on the friction surfaces are believed to hold great importance as one of the main driving forces. Compatible with Maxwell Displacement Current theory, the complete consideration for charging steady state, i.e., the competition mechanisms between the breakdown process and the continuously charging process, and the balance mechanisms of phonon-electron interaction, built voltage, and induced polarization, are illustrated. In brief, the proposed theory emphasizes the fundamental role of electron transferring in tribo-electrical fields. By comparing certain experimental results from the previous studies, the theory is justified.

  6. Controlling time scales for electron transfer through proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scot Wherland

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Electron transfer processes within proteins constitute key elements in biological energy conversion processes as well as in a wide variety of biochemical transformations. Pursuit of the parameters that control the rates of these processes is driven by the great interest in the latter reactions. Here, we review a considerable body of results emerging from investigation of intramolecular electron transfer (ET reactions in two types of proteins, all done by the use of the pulse-radiolysis method: first are described results of extensive studies of a model system, the bacterial electron mediating protein azurin, where an internal ET between the disulfide radical ion and the Cu(II is induced. Impact of specific structural changes introduced into azurin on the reaction rates and the parameters controlling it are discussed. Then, the presentation is extended to results of investigations of intra-protein ET reactions that are part of catalytic cycles of multi-copper containing enzymes. Again, the rates and the parameters controlling them are presented and discussed in the context of their efficacy and possible constraints set on their evolution.

  7. Observation of electron-transfer-mediated decay in aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unger, Isaak; Seidel, Robert; Thürmer, Stephan; Pohl, Marvin N.; Aziz, Emad F.; Cederbaum, Lorenz S.; Muchová, Eva; Slavíček, Petr; Winter, Bernd; Kryzhevoi, Nikolai V.

    2017-07-01

    Photoionization is at the heart of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), which gives access to important information on a sample's local chemical environment. Local and non-local electronic decay after photoionization—in which the refilling of core holes results in electron emission from either the initially ionized species or a neighbour, respectively—have been well studied. However, electron-transfer-mediated decay (ETMD), which involves the refilling of a core hole by an electron from a neighbouring species, has not yet been observed in condensed phase. Here we report the experimental observation of ETMD in an aqueous LiCl solution by detecting characteristic secondary low-energy electrons using liquid-microjet soft XPS. Experimental results are interpreted using molecular dynamics and high-level ab initio calculations. We show that both solvent molecules and counterions participate in the ETMD processes, and different ion associations have distinctive spectral fingerprints. Furthermore, ETMD spectra are sensitive to coordination numbers, ion-solvent distances and solvent arrangement.

  8. Electron Transfer and Solvent-Mediated Electronic Localization in Molecular Photocatalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dohn, Asmus Ougaard; Kjær, Kasper Skov; Harlang, Tobias B.

    2016-01-01

    This work provides a detailed mechanism for electron transfer in a heterodinuclear complex designed as a model system in which to study homogeneous molecular photocatalysis. With efficient Born–Oppenheimer molecular dynamics simulations, we show how intermediate, charge-separated states can mediate...

  9. Photoinduced electron transfer in singly labeled thiouredopyrenetrisulfonate azurin derivatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borovok, N; Kotlyar, A B; Pecht, I

    1999-01-01

    efficiency. TUPS derivatives of azurin, singly labeled at specific lysine residues, were prepared and purified to homogeneity by ion exchange HPLC. Transient absorption spectroscopy was used to directly monitor the rates of the electron transfer reaction from the photoexcited triplet state of TUPS to Cu......(II) and the back reaction from Cu(I) to the oxidized dye. For all singly labeled derivatives, the rate constants of copper ion reduction were one or two orders of magnitude larger than for its reoxidation, consistent with the larger thermodynamic driving force for the former process. Using 3-D coordinates...

  10. Quantum simulation of nuclear rearrangement in electron transfer reactions

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Chong; McCammon, J. Andrew; Wolynes, Peter G.

    1989-01-01

    A quantum simulation scheme based on the path integral molecular dynamics technique has been used to calculate the effective activation energies associated with nuclear rearrangement in the electron transfer reactions Co(NH3)62+ + Co(NH3)63+ → Co(NH3)63+ + Co(NH3)62+ and Ru(NH3)62+ + Ru(NH3)63+ → Ru(NH3)63+ + Ru(NH3)62+. Even with a simple Hamiltonian and short time dynamic simulations, the results are in satisfactory agreement with other theoretical calculations. This simulation approach can...

  11. Photoinduced Electron Transfer Based Ion Sensing within an Optical Fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englich, Florian V.; Foo, Tze Cheung; Richardson, Andrew C.; Ebendorff-Heidepriem, Heike; Sumby, Christopher J.; Monro, Tanya M.

    2011-01-01

    We combine suspended-core microstructured optical fibers with the photoinduced electron transfer (PET) effect to demonstrate a new type of fluorescent optical fiber-dip sensing platform for small volume ion detection. A sensor design based on a simple model PET-fluoroionophore system and small core microstructured optical fiber capable of detecting sodium ions is demonstrated. The performance of the dip sensor operating in a high sodium concentration regime (925 ppm Na+) and for lower sodium concentration environments (18.4 ppm Na+) is explored and future approaches to improving the sensor’s signal stability, sensitivity and selectivity are discussed. PMID:22163712

  12. Nanoscale and single-molecule interfacial electron transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Allan Glargaard; Wackerbarth, Hainer; Nielsen, Jens Ulrik

    2003-01-01

    Electrochemical science and technology in the 21st century have reached high levels of sophistication. A fundamental quantum mechanical theoretical frame for interfacial electrochemical electron transfer (ET) was introduced by Revaz Dogonadze. This frame has remained for four decades as a basis...... for comprehensive later theoretical work and data interpretation in many areas of chemistry, electrochemistry, and biology. We discuss here some new areas of theoretical electrochemical ET science, with focus on nanoscale electrochemical and bioelectrochemical sciences. Particular attention is given to in situ...

  13. Photoinduced Electron Transfer Based Ion Sensing within an Optical Fiber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanya M. Monro

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available We combine suspended-core microstructured optical fibers with the photoinduced electron transfer (PET effect to demonstrate a new type of fluorescent optical fiber-dip sensing platform for small volume ion detection. A sensor design based on a simple model PET-fluoroionophore system and small core microstructured optical fiber capable of detecting sodium ions is demonstrated. The performance of the dip sensor operating in a high sodium concentration regime (925 ppm Na+ and for lower sodium concentration environments (18.4 ppm Na+ is explored and future approaches to improving the sensor’s signal stability, sensitivity and selectivity are discussed.

  14. Geometric phase and quantum interference in photosynthetic reaction center: Regulation of electron transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Yuming, E-mail: ymsun@ytu.edu.cn; Su, Yuehua; Dai, Zhenhong; Wang, WeiTian

    2016-10-20

    Photosynthesis is driven by electron transfer in reaction centers in which the functional unit is composed of several simple molecules C{sub 2}-symmetrically arranged into two branches. In view of quantum mechanism, both branches are possible pathways traversed by the transferred electron. Due to different evolution of spin state along two pathways in transmembrane electric potential (TEP), quantum state of the transferred electron at the bridged site acquires a geometric phase difference dependent on TEP, the most efficient electron transport takes place in a specific range of TEP beyond which electron transfer is dramatically suppressed. What’s more, reaction center acts like elaborately designed quantum device preparing polarized spin dependent on TEP for the transferred electron to regulate the reduction potential at bridged site. In brief, electron transfer generates the TEP, reversely, TEP modulates the efficiency of electron transfer. This may be an important approach to maintaining an appreciable pH environment in photosynthesis.

  15. Geometric phase and quantum interference in photosynthetic reaction center: Regulation of electron transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yuming; Su, Yuehua; Dai, Zhenhong; Wang, WeiTian

    2016-10-01

    Photosynthesis is driven by electron transfer in reaction centers in which the functional unit is composed of several simple molecules C2-symmetrically arranged into two branches. In view of quantum mechanism, both branches are possible pathways traversed by the transferred electron. Due to different evolution of spin state along two pathways in transmembrane electric potential (TEP), quantum state of the transferred electron at the bridged site acquires a geometric phase difference dependent on TEP, the most efficient electron transport takes place in a specific range of TEP beyond which electron transfer is dramatically suppressed. What's more, reaction center acts like elaborately designed quantum device preparing polarized spin dependent on TEP for the transferred electron to regulate the reduction potential at bridged site. In brief, electron transfer generates the TEP, reversely, TEP modulates the efficiency of electron transfer. This may be an important approach to maintaining an appreciable pH environment in photosynthesis.

  16. Intramolecular electron transfer in Pseudomonas aeruginosa cd(1) nitrite reductase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, Ole; Brunori, Maurizio; Cutruzzolà, Francesca

    2009-01-01

    The cd(1) nitrite reductases, which catalyze the reduction of nitrite to nitric oxide, are homodimers of 60 kDa subunits, each containing one heme-c and one heme-d(1). Heme-c is the electron entry site, whereas heme-d(1) constitutes the catalytic center. The 3D structure of Pseudomonas aeruginosa...... is controlling this internal ET step. In this study we have investigated the internal ET in the wild-type and His369Ala mutant of P. aeruginosa nitrite reductases and have observed similar cooperativity to that of the Pseudomonas stutzeri enzyme. Heme-c was initially reduced, in an essentially diffusion...... nitrite reductase has been determined in both fully oxidized and reduced states. Intramolecular electron transfer (ET), between c and d(1) hemes is an essential step in the catalytic cycle. In earlier studies of the Pseudomonas stutzeri enzyme, we observed that a marked negative cooperativity...

  17. Resolution of two distinct electron transfer sites on azurin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, O; Blatt, Y; Pecht, I

    1982-01-01

    reaction rates of the Cr(III)-modified protein are attenuated. This decreased reactivity of Cr(III)-labeled azurin toward one of its physiological partners suggests the involvement of the labeled region in the electron transfer reaction with cytochrome c551. Furthermore, the presence of a second active......Pseudomonas aeruginosa azurin is stoichiometrically and specifically labeled upon reduction by Cr(II)aq ions, yielding a substitution-inert Cr(III) adduct on the protein surface. We investigated the effect of this chemical modification on the reactivity of azurin with two of its presumed partners...... in the redox system of the bacterium. The Pseudomonas cytochrome oxidase catalyzed oxidation of reduced native and Cr(III)-labeled azurin by O2 was found to be unaffected by the modification. The kinetics of the electron exchange reaction between native or Cr(III)-labeled azurin and cytochrome c551 were...

  18. Electromagnetic field generation by ATP-induced reverse electron transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Richard H

    2003-03-01

    This paper describes a mechanism to explain low-level light emission in biology. A biological analog of the electrical circuitry, modeled on the parallel plate capacitor, traversed by a helical structure, required to generate electromagnetic radiation in the optical spectral range, is described. The charge carrier required for the emissions is determined to be an accelerating electron driven by an ATP-induced reverse electron transfer. The radial velocity component, the emission trajectory, of the moving charges traversing helical protein structures in a cyclotron-type mechanism is proposed to be imposed by the ferromagnetic field components of the iron in the iron-sulfur proteins. The redox systems NADH, riboflavin, and chlorophyll were examined with their long-wavelength absorption maxima determining the energetic parameters for the calculations. Potentials calculated from the axial velocity components for the riboflavin and NADH systems were found to equal the standard redox potentials of these systems as measured electrochemically and enzymatically. The mechanics for the three systems determined the magnetic moments, the angular momenta, and the orbital magnetic fluxes to be adiabatic invariant parameters. The De Broglie dual wave-particle equation, the fundamental equation of wave mechanics, and the key idea of quantum mechanics, establishes the wavelengths for accelerating electrons which, divided into a given radial velocity, gives its respective emission frequency. Electrons propelled through helical structures, traversed by biologically available electric and magnetic fields, make accessible to the internal environment the optical spectral frequency range that the solar spectrum provides to the external environment.

  19. Enzymatic cellulose oxidation is linked to lignin by long-range electron transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westereng, Bjorge; Cannella, David; Wittrup Agger, Jane

    2015-01-01

    cell walls. Electron transfer was confirmed by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy showing that LPMO activity on cellulose changes the level of unpaired electrons in the lignin. The discovery of a long-range electron transfer mechanism links the biodegradation of cellulose and lignin and sheds...

  20. Photoinduced charge accumulation by metal ion-coupled electron transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonn, Annabell G; Wenger, Oliver S

    2015-10-07

    An oligotriarylamine (OTA) unit, a Ru(bpy)3(2+) photosensitizer moiety (Ru), and an anthraquinone (AQ) entity were combined to a molecular dyad (Ru-OTA) and a molecular triad (AQ-Ru-OTA). Pulsed laser excitation at 532 nm led to the formation of charge-separated states of the type Ru(-)-OTA(+) and AQ(-)-Ru-OTA(+) with lifetimes of ≤10 ns and 2.4 μs, respectively, in de-aerated CH3CN at 25 °C. Upon addition of Sc(OTf)3, very long-lived photoproducts were observed. Under steady-state irradiation conditions using a flux of (6.74 ± 0.21) × 10(15) photons per second at 450 nm, the formation of twofold oxidized oligotriarylamine (OTA(2+)) was detected in aerated CH3CN containing 0.02 M Sc(3+), as demonstrated unambiguously by comparison with UV-Vis absorption spectra obtained in the course of chemical oxidation with Cu(2+). Photodriven charge accumulation on the OTA unit of Ru-OTA and AQ-Ru-OTA is possible due to the lowering of the O2 reduction potential caused by the interaction of superoxide with the strong Lewis acid Sc(3+). The presence of the anthraquinone unit in AQ-Ru-OTA accelerates the rate-determining reaction step for charge accumulation by a factor of 10 compared to the Ru-OTA dyad. This is attributed to the formation of Sc(3+)-stabilized anthraquinone radical anion intermediates in the triad. Possible mechanistic pathways leading to charge accumulation are discussed. Photodriven charge accumulation is of key importance for solar fuels because their production will have to rely on multi-electron chemistry rather than single-electron reaction steps. Our study is the first to demonstrate that metal ion-coupled electron transfer (MCET) can be exploited to accumulate charges on a given molecular unit using visible light as an energy input. The approach of using a combination of intra- and intermolecular electron transfer reactions which are enabled by MCET is conceptually novel, and the fundamental insights gained from our study are relevant in the greater

  1. Electron transfer flavoprotein deficiency: Functional and molecular aspects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiff, M; Froissart, R; Olsen, Rikke Katrine Jentoft

    2006-01-01

    Multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (MADD) is a recessively inherited metabolic disorder that can be due to a deficiency of electron transfer flavoprotein (ETF) or its dehydrogenase (ETF-ubiquinone oxidoreductase). ETF is a mitochondrial matrix protein consisting of alpha- (30kDa) and beta......- (28kDa) subunits encoded by the ETFA and ETFB genes, respectively. In the present study, we have analysed tissue samples from 16 unrelated patients with ETF deficiency, and we report the results of ETF activity, Western blot analysis and mutation analysis. The ETF assay provides a reliable diagnostic...... tool to confirm ETF deficiency in patients suspected to suffer from MADD. Activity ranged from less than 1 to 16% of controls with the most severely affected patients disclosing the lowest activity values. The majority of patients had mutations in the ETFA gene while only two of them harboured...

  2. Intramolecular electron transfer in single-site-mutated azurins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, O; Skov, L K; Pascher, T

    1993-01-01

    . Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 86, 6968-6972]. The RSSR- radical produced in the above reaction was reoxidized in a slower intramolecular electron-transfer process (30-70 s-1 at 298 K) concomitant with a further reduction of the Cu(II) ion. The temperature dependence of the latter rates was determined...... and used to derive information on the possible effects of the mutations. The substitution of residue Phe114, situated on the opposite side of Cu relative to the disulfide, by Ala resulted in a rate increase by a factor of almost 2. By assuming that this effect is only due to an increase in driving force......Single-site mutants of the blue, single-copper protein, azurin, from Pseudomonas aeruginosa were reduced by CO2- radicals in pulse radiolysis experiments. The single disulfide group was reduced directly by CO2- with rates similar to those of the native protein [Farver, O., & Pecht, I. (1989) Proc...

  3. Electron transfer in systems of well-defined geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Overfield, R.E.; Kaufmann, K.J.; Wasielewski, M.R.

    1980-01-01

    Two mesopyropheophorbide macrocycles can be joined via two covalent linkages to produce a cyclophane. It is possible to insert one or two Mg atoms into the cyclophane. The Qy transitions of the macrocycles are nearly orthogonal. The visible absorption spectrum of the monometal cyclophane is nearly a superposition of the spectra of the monomers. Emission from the monometal cyclophane arises primarily from the red most absorbing chromophore. The excited state difference spectrum shows that both macrocycles are excited. Fluorescence lifetimes of the monometal cyclophane decrease with increasing dielectric strength. Changes in the fluorescence and the triplet yield parallel the shortening of the singlet lifetime. Thus the radiative rate is solvent independent. This is in contrast to what one would expect if the emitting state had charge transfer character. Since the fluorescence lifetime is dependent on dielectric, the nonradiative relaxation from the singlet state is due to formation of a radical pair. The decay rate of the postulated radical pair was monitored by observing the kinetics of ground state repopulation. For the geometry of this cyclophane, electron transfer proceeds relatively slowly (k = 3 x 10/sup 9/ sec/sup -1/) in the forward direction. Modeling calculations indicate that the rate of annihilation of the radical pair may decrease as the solvent dielectric decreases.

  4. "Sticky electrons" transport and interfacial transfer of electrons in the dye-sensitized solar cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Laurence

    2009-11-17

    Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs, also known as Gratzel cells) mimic the photosynthetic process by using a sensitizer dye to harvest light energy to generate electrical power. Several functional features of these photochemical devices are unusual, and DSC research offers a rewarding arena in which to test new ideas, new materials, and new methodologies. Indeed, one of the most attractive chemical features of the DSC is that the basic concept can be used to construct a range of devices, replacing individual components with alternative materials. Despite two decades of increasing research activity, however, many aspects of the behavior of electrons in the DSC remain puzzling. In this Account, we highlight current understanding of the processes involved in the functioning of the DSC, with particular emphasis on what happens to the electrons in the mesoporous film following the injection step. The collection of photoinjected electrons appears to involve a random walk process in which electrons move through the network of interconnected titanium dioxide nanoparticles while undergoing frequent trapping and detrapping. During their passage to the cell contact, electrons may be lost by transfer to tri-iodide species in the redox electrolyte that permeates the mesoporous film. Competition between electron collection and back electron transfer determines the performance of a DSC: ideally, all injected electrons should be collected without loss. This Account then goes on to survey recent experimental and theoretical progress in the field, placing particular emphasis on issues that need to be resolved before we can gain a clear picture of how the DSC works. Several important questions about the behavior of "sticky" electrons, those that undergo multiple trapping and detrapping, in the DSC remain unanswered. The most fundamental of these concerns is the nature of the electron traps that appear to dominate the time-dependent photocurrent and photovoltage response of DSCs. The

  5. Theoretical study on the electronic structure of triphenyl sulfonium salts: Electronic excitation and electron transfer processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petsalakis, Ioannis D.; Theodorakopoulos, Giannoula; Lathiotakis, Nektarios N.; Georgiadou, Dimitra G.; Vasilopoulou, Maria; Argitis, Panagiotis

    2014-05-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) and Time Dependent DFT calculations on triphenyl sulfonium cation (TPS) and the salts of TPS with triflate, nonaflate, perfluoro-1-octanesulfonate and hexafluoro antimonate anions are presented. These systems are widely used as cationic photoinitiators and as electron ejection layer for polymer light-emitting diodes. While some differences exist in the electronic structure of the different salts, their lowest energy intense absorption maxima are calculated at nearly the same energy for all systems. The first excited state of TPS and of the TPS salts is dissociating. Electron addition to the TPS salts lowers their energy by 1.0-1.33 eV.

  6. Long-Range Photoinduced Electron Transfer Through a DNA Helix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, C. J.; Arkin, M. R.; Jenkins, Y.; Ghatlia, N. D.; Bossmann, S. H.; Turro, N. J.; Barton, J. K.

    1993-11-01

    Rapid photoinduced electron transfer is demonstrated over a distance of greater than 40 angstroms between metallointercalators that are tethered to the 5' termini of a 15-base pair DNA duplex. An oligomeric assembly was synthesized in which the donor is Ru(phen)_2dppz^2+ (phen, phenanthroline, and dppz, dipyridophenazine) and the acceptor is Rh(phi)_2phen^3+ (phi, phenanthrenequinone diimine). These metal complexes are intercalated either one or two base steps m from the helix termini. Although the ruthenium-modified oligonucleotide hybridized to an unmodified complement luminesces intensely, the ruthenium-modified oligomer hybridized to the rhodium-modified oligomer shows no detectable luminescence. Time-resolved studies point to a lower limit of 109 per second for the quenching rate. No quenching was observed upon metallation of two complementary octamers by Ru(phen)_32+ and Rh(phen)_33+ under conditions where the phen complexes do not intercalate. The stacked aromatic heterocycles of the DNA duplex therefore serve as an efficient medium for coupling electron donors and acceptors over very long distances.

  7. Long-range photoinduced electron transfer through a DNA helix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, C.J.; Arkin, M.R.; Jenkins, Y.; Barton, J.K. (California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States)); Ghatlia, N.D.; Bossmann, S.H.; Turro, N.J. (Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States))

    1993-11-12

    Rapid photoinduced electron transfer is demonstrated over a distance of greater than 40 angstroms between metallointercalators that are tethered to the 5' termini of a 15-base pair DNA duplex. An oligomeric assembly was synthesized in which the donor is Ru(phen)[sub 2]dppz[sup 2+] (phen, phenanthroline, and dppz, dipyridophenazine) and the acceptor is Rh(phi)[sub 2]phen[sup 3+] (phi, phenanthrenequinone diimine). These metal complexes are intercalated either one or two base steps in from the helix termini. Although the ruthenium-modified oligonucleotide hybridized to an unmodified complement luminesces intensely, the ruthenium-modified oligomer hybridized to the rhodium-modified oligomer shows no detectable luminescence. Time-resolved studies point to a lower limit of 10[sup 9] per second for the quenching rate. No quenching was observed upon metallation of two complementary octamers by Ru(phen)[sub 3][sup 2+] and Rh(phen)[sub 3][sup 3+] under conditions where the phen complexes do not intercalate. The stacked aromatic heterocycles of the DNA duplex therefore serve as an efficient medium for coupling electron donors and acceptors over very long distances.

  8. Electron transfer in peptides: on the formation of silver nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kracht, Sonja; Messerer, Matthias; Lang, Matthieu; Eckhardt, Sonja; Lauz, Miriam; Grobéty, Bernard; Fromm, Katharina M; Giese, Bernd

    2015-03-02

    Some microorganisms perform anaerobic mineral respiration by reducing metal ions to metal nanoparticles, using peptide aggregates as medium for electron transfer (ET). Such a reaction type is investigated here with model peptides and silver as the metal. Surprisingly, Ag(+) ions bound by peptides with histidine as the Ag(+)-binding amino acid and tyrosine as photoinducible electron donor cannot be reduced to Ag nanoparticles (AgNPs) under ET conditions because the peptide prevents the aggregation of Ag atoms to form AgNPs. Only in the presence of chloride ions, which generate AgCl microcrystals in the peptide matrix, does the synthesis of AgNPs occur. The reaction starts with the formation of 100 nm Ag@AgCl/peptide nanocomposites which are cleaved into 15 nm AgNPs. This defined transformation from large nanoparticles into small ones is in contrast to the usually observed Ostwald ripening processes and can be followed in detail by studying time-resolved UV/Vis spectra which exhibit an isosbestic point. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Machine Learning for Silver Nanoparticle Electron Transfer Property Prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Baichuan; Fernandez, Michael; Barnard, Amanda S

    2017-10-23

    Nanoparticles exhibit diverse structural and morphological features that are often interconnected, making the correlation of structure/property relationships challenging. In this study a multi-structure/single-property relationship of silver nanoparticles is developed for the energy of Fermi level, which can be tuned to improve the transfer of electrons in a variety of applications. By combining different machine learning analytical algorithms, including k-mean, logistic regression, and random forest with electronic structure simulations, we find that the degree of twinning (characterized by the fraction of hexagonal closed packed atoms) and the population of the {111} facet (characterized by a surface coordination number of nine) are strongly correlated to the Fermi energy of silver nanoparticles. A concise three layer artificial neural network together with principal component analysis is built to predict this property, with reduced geometrical, structural, and topological features, making the method ideal for efficient and accurate high-throughput screening of large-scale virtual nanoparticle libraries and the creation of single-structure/single-property, multi-structure/single-property, and single-structure/multi-property relationships in the near future.

  10. Photoinduced intermolecular electron transfer in complex liquids: Experiment and theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavernier, H. L.; Kalashnikov, M. M.; Fayer, M. D.

    2000-12-01

    Photoinduced intermolecular electron transfer between Rhodamine 3B and N,N-dimethylaniline has been studied in a series of seven liquids: acetonitrile, ethanol, propylene glycol, and mixtures of ethanol, 2-butanol, ethylene glycol, propylene glycol, and glycerol. In each liquid, the donor and acceptors have different diffusion constants and experience distinct dielectric properties. Ps time-dependent fluorescence measurements and steady-state fluorescence yield measurements were made and analyzed using a detailed statistical mechanical theory that includes a distance-dependent Marcus rate constant, diffusion with the hydrodynamic effect, and solvent structure. All solvent-dependent parameters necessary for calculations were measured, including dielectric constants, diffusion constants, and redox potentials, leaving the electronic coupling unknown. Taking the distance-dependence of the coupling to be β=1 Å-1, data were fit to a single parameter, the coupling matrix element at contact, J0. The theory is able to reproduce both the functional form of the time-dependence and the concentration-dependence of the data in all seven liquids by fitting only J0. Despite the substantial differences in the properties of the experimental systems studied, fits to the data are very good and the values for J0 are very similar for all solvents.

  11. Allosteric control of internal electron transfer in cytochrome cd1 nitrite reductase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, Ole; Kroneck, Peter M H; Zumft, Walter G

    2003-01-01

    Cytochrome cd1 nitrite reductase is a bifunctional multiheme enzyme catalyzing the one-electron reduction of nitrite to nitric oxide and the four-electron reduction of dioxygen to water. Kinetics and thermodynamics of the internal electron transfer process in the Pseudomonas stutzeri enzyme have...... been studied and found to be dominated by pronounced interactions between the c and the d1 hemes. The interactions are expressed both in dramatic changes in the internal electron-transfer rates between these sites and in marked cooperativity in their electron affinity. The results constitute a prime...... example of intraprotein control of the electron-transfer rates by allosteric interactions....

  12. Modular electron transfer circuits for synthetic biology: insulation of an engineered biohydrogen pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agapakis, Christina M; Silver, Pamela A

    2010-01-01

    Electron transfer is central to a wide range of essential metabolic pathways, from photosynthesis to fermentation. The evolutionary diversity and conservation of proteins that transfer electrons makes these pathways a valuable platform for engineered metabolic circuits in synthetic biology. Rational engineering of electron transfer pathways containing hydrogenases has the potential to lead to industrial scale production of hydrogen as an alternative source of clean fuel and experimental assays for understanding the complex interactions of multiple electron transfer proteins in vivo. We designed and implemented a synthetic hydrogen metabolism circuit in Escherichia coli that creates an electron transfer pathway both orthogonal to and integrated within existing metabolism. The design of such modular electron transfer circuits allows for facile characterization of in vivo system parameters with applications toward further engineering for alternative energy production. © 2010 Landes Bioscience

  13. Modular electron transfer circuits for synthetic biology: Insulation of an engineered biohydrogen pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Agapakis, Christina M; Silver, Pamela A

    2010-01-01

    Electron transfer is central to a wide range of essential metabolic pathways, from photosynthesis to fermentation. The evolutionary diversity and conservation of proteins that transfer electrons makes these pathways a valuable platform for engineered metabolic circuits in synthetic biology. Rational engineering of electron transfer pathways containing hydrogenases has the potential to lead to industrial scale production of hydrogen as an alternative source of clean fuel and experimental assay...

  14. Syntrophic growth with direct interspecies electron transfer as the primary mechanism for energy exchange

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shrestha, Pravin Malla; Rotaru, Amelia-Elena; Aklujkar, Muktak

    2013-01-01

    Direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) through biological electrical connections is an alternative to interspecies H2 transfer as a mechanism for electron exchange in syntrophic cultures. However, it has not previously been determined whether electrons received via DIET yield energy to supp...... dehydrogenase, the pilus-associated c-type cytochrome OmcS and pili consistent with electron transfer via DIET. These results suggest that electrons transferred via DIET can serve as the sole energy source to support anaerobic respiration....... to support cell growth. In order to investigate this, co-cultures of Geobacter metallireducens, which can transfer electrons to wild-type G. sulfurreducens via DIET, were established with a citrate synthase-deficient G. sulfurreducens strain that can receive electrons for respiration through DIET only...

  15. Control of Electron Transfer from Lead-Salt Nanocrystals to TiO 2

    KAUST Repository

    Hyun, Byung-Ryool

    2011-05-11

    The roles of solvent reorganization energy and electronic coupling strength on the transfer of photoexcited electrons from PbS nanocrystals to TiO 2 nanoparticles are investigated. We find that the electron transfer depends only weakly on the solvent, in contrast to the strong dependence in the nanocrystal-molecule system. This is ascribed to the larger size of the acceptor in this system, and is accounted for by Marcus theory. The electronic coupling of the PbS and TiO 2 is varied by changing the length, aliphatic and aromatic structure, and anchor groups of the linker molecules. Shorter linker molecules consistently lead to faster electron transfer. Surprisingly, linker molecules of the same length but distinct chemical structures yield similar electron transfer rates. In contrast, the electron transfer rate can vary dramatically with different anchor groups. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  16. Hydrated Electron Transfer to Nucleobases in Aqueous Solutions Revealed by Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing; Wang, Mei; Fu, Aiyun; Yang, Hongfang; Bu, Yuxiang

    2015-08-03

    We present an ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulation study into the transfer dynamics of an excess electron from its cavity-shaped hydrated electron state to a hydrated nucleobase (NB)-bound state. In contrast to the traditional view that electron localization at NBs (G/A/C/T), which is the first step for electron-induced DNA damage, is related only to dry or prehydrated electrons, and a fully hydrated electron no longer transfers to NBs, our AIMD simulations indicate that a fully hydrated electron can still transfer to NBs. We monitored the transfer dynamics of fully hydrated electrons towards hydrated NBs in aqueous solutions by using AIMD simulations and found that due to solution-structure fluctuation and attraction of NBs, a fully hydrated electron can transfer to a NB gradually over time. Concurrently, the hydrated electron cavity gradually reorganizes, distorts, and even breaks. The transfer could be completed in about 120-200 fs in four aqueous NB solutions, depending on the electron-binding ability of hydrated NBs and the structural fluctuation of the solution. The transferring electron resides in the π*-type lowest unoccupied molecular orbital of the NB, which leads to a hydrated NB anion. Clearly, the observed transfer of hydrated electrons can be attributed to the strong electron-binding ability of hydrated NBs over the hydrated electron cavity, which is the driving force, and the transfer dynamics is structure-fluctuation controlled. This work provides new insights into the evolution dynamics of hydrated electrons and provides some helpful information for understanding the DNA-damage mechanism in solution. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Vibrational and Electronic Energy Transfer and Dissociation of Diatomic Molecules by Electron Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Winifred M.; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    At high altitudes and velocities equal to or greater than the geosynchronous return velocity (10 kilometers per second), the shock layer of a hypersonic flight will be in thermochemical nonequilibrium and partially ionized. The amount of ionization is determined by the velocity. For a trans atmospheric flight of 10 kilometers per second and at an altitude of 80 kilometers, a maximum of 1% ionization is expected. At a velocity of 12 - 17 kilometer per second, such as a Mars return mission, up to 30% of the atoms and molecules in the flow field will be ionized. Under those circumstances, electrons play an important role in determining the internal states of atoms and molecules in the flow field and hence the amount of radiative heat load and the distance it takes for the flow field to re-establish equilibrium. Electron collisions provide an effective means of transferring energy even when the electron number density is as low as 1%. Because the mass of an electron is 12,760 times smaller than the reduced mass of N2, its average speed, and hence its average collision frequency, is more than 100 times larger. Even in the slightly ionized regime with only 1% electrons, the frequency of electron-molecule collisions is equal to or larger than that of molecule-molecule collisions, an important consideration in the low density part of the atmosphere. Three electron-molecule collision processes relevant to hypersonic flows will be considered: (1) vibrational excitation/de-excitation of a diatomic molecule by electron impact, (2) electronic excitation/de-excitation, and (3) dissociative recombination in electron-diatomic ion collisions. A review of available data, both theory and experiment, will be given. Particular attention will be paid to tailoring the molecular physics to the condition of hypersonic flows. For example, the high rotational temperatures in a hypersonic flow field means that most experimental data carried out under room temperatures are not applicable. Also

  18. Type IV pili of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans can transfer electrons from extracellular electron donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongquan; Li, Hongyu

    2014-03-01

    Studies on Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans accepting electrons from Fe(II) have previously focused on cytochrome c. However, we have discovered that, besides cytochrome c, type IV pili (Tfp) can transfer electrons. Here, we report conduction by Tfp of A. ferrooxidans analyzed with a conducting-probe atomic force microscope (AFM). The results indicate that the Tfp of A. ferrooxidans are highly conductive. The genome sequence of A. ferrooxidans ATCC 23270 contains two genes, pilV and pilW, which code for pilin domain proteins with the conserved amino acids characteristic of Tfp. Multiple alignment analysis of the PilV and PilW (pilin) proteins indicated that pilV is the adhesin gene while pilW codes for the major protein element of Tfp. The likely function of Tfp is to complete the circuit between the cell surface and Fe(II) oxides. These results indicate that Tfp of A. ferrooxidans might serve as biological nanowires transferring electrons from the surface of Fe(II) oxides to the cell surface. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. When things are not as they seem: quantum interference turns molecular electron transfer "rules" upside down.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Gemma C; Andrews, David Q; Van Duyne, Richard P; Ratner, Mark A

    2008-06-25

    We present an interesting consequence of the differences between cross-conjugated and linearly conjugated molecules: the breakdown of conventional understanding of trends in molecular electron transfer. Interference effects are dominant in cross-conjugated molecules with unusual results: long molecules may have faster rates of electron transfer than short molecules, saturated molecules may have faster rates of electron transfer than conjugated molecules of the same length, and the rate of electron transfer cannot be correlated with energy gaps between the donor and acceptor states and the energy levels of the bridging molecule.

  20. Overpotential-induced lability of the electronic overlap factor in long-range electrochemical electron transfer: charge and distance dependence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kornyshev, A. A.; Kuznetsov, A. M.; Nielsen, Jens Ulrik

    2000-01-01

    Long-distance electrochemical electron transfer exhibits approximately exponential dependence on the electron transfer distance. On the basis of a jellium model of the metal surface we show that the slope of the logarithm of the current vs. the transfer distance also depends strongly...... on the electrode charge. The slope is smaller the more negative the charge density due to enhanced extension of the surface electronic density profile on the solution side, and thereby better electronic overlap with the reacting molecule. The effect is sensitive to the bulk electron density of the metal...... and the localization of the electronic state at the molecular reactant site. Effects similar to these have been observed experimentally and could be common for electronically light metals....

  1. Thermal transfer structures coupling electronics card(s) to coolant-cooled structure(s)

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Milnes P; Graybill, David P; Iyengar, Madhusudan K; Kamath, Vinod; Kochuparambil, Bejoy J; Parida, Pritish R; Schmidt, Roger R

    2014-12-16

    Cooling apparatuses and coolant-cooled electronic systems are provided which include thermal transfer structures configured to engage with a spring force one or more electronics cards with docking of the electronics card(s) within a respective socket(s) of the electronic system. A thermal transfer structure of the cooling apparatus includes a thermal spreader having a first thermal conduction surface, and a thermally conductive spring assembly coupled to the conduction surface of the thermal spreader and positioned and configured to reside between and physically couple a first surface of an electronics card to the first surface of the thermal spreader with docking of the electronics card within a socket of the electronic system. The thermal transfer structure is, in one embodiment, metallurgically bonded to a coolant-cooled structure and facilitates transfer of heat from the electronics card to coolant flowing through the coolant-cooled structure.

  2. Electron transfer reactions in condensed phase: effect of reversibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhole, Kajal; Jena, Naresh K; Samanta, Alok; Ghosh, Swapan K

    2012-02-01

    We propose a generalized one-dimensional kinetic equation for multidimensional reversible electron transfer (ET) reaction with a nonequilibrium situation as the initial condition. The rate constant for the forward reversible ET reaction obtained here consists of the rate for the corresponding irreversible ET reaction, and an extra term due to reversibility of the ET process which includes the rates of diffusion dynamics in the reactant and product wells. In order to understand the effect of reversibility, we consider back ET reaction in a system consisting of an electron donor-acceptor pair in a solvent modeled through low frequency solvent collective coordinates (multidimensional) characterized by the orientational polarization and slowly relaxing one-dimensional vibrational mode. We propose here a new generalized polarization energy functional corresponding to the extension of the continuum version for the same, which has opened up the possibility of inclusion of molecular nature of the solvent into the solvent reorganization energy. We then derive an exact expression for the ET rate for this model system. The numerical results calculated by using the proposed one-dimensional approach are shown to be in good agreement with the available experimental results. Non-Marcus free energy gap dependence of the rates observed here for the reversible and irreversible ET reactions are very close to each other in the barrierless region, while for other situations, the rate for the former process is found to be less than the latter. The extra term, which makes the difference between the rate constants for irreversible and reversible ET reactions, is found to be contributed by the diffusion dynamics from both reactant and product wells but the dominating contribution is provided mainly by the product well.

  3. Hybrid organic-inorganic coatings via electron transfer behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoubi, Wail Al; Min, Ji Hoon; Ko, Young Gun

    2017-08-01

    A novel method to functionalize the surface of inorganic coating by growing organic coating has been investigated based on microstructural interpretation, electrochemical assessment, and quantum chemical analysis. For this purpose, inorganic coating with magnesium aluminate, magnesium oxide, and titanium dioxide was prepared on magnesium alloy via plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO), and, then, subsequent dip-coating method was used to tailor organic coating using diethyl-5-hydroxyisophthalate (DEIP) as organic molecules. The incorporation of TiO2 particles worked as a sealing agent to block the micro-defects which resulted mainly from the intense plasma sparks during PEO. In addition, such incorporation played an important role in enhancing the adhesion between inorganic and organic coatings. The use of DEIP as organic corrosion inhibitor resulted in a significant decrease in porosity of inorganic coating. Quantum chemical calculation was used to clarify the corrosion inhibition mechanism which was activated by introduction of DEIP. Thus, the electrochemical analysis based on potentiodynamic polarization and impedance spectroscopy tests in 3.5 wt% NaCl solution suggested that corrosion resistance of magnesium alloy sample was enhanced significantly due to a synergistic effect arising from the hybrid inorganic and organic coatings. This phenomenon was explained in relation to electron transfer behaviour between inorganic and organic coatings.

  4. Electron transfer precedes ATP hydrolysis during nitrogenase catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duval, Simon; Danyal, Karamatullah; Shaw, Sudipta; Lytle, Anna K.; Dean, Dennis R.; Hoffman, Brian M.; Antony, Edwin; Seefeldt, Lance C.

    2013-01-01

    The biological reduction of N2 to NH3 catalyzed by Mo-dependent nitrogenase requires at least eight rounds of a complex cycle of events associated with ATP-driven electron transfer (ET) from the Fe protein to the catalytic MoFe protein, with each ET coupled to the hydrolysis of two ATP molecules. Although steps within this cycle have been studied for decades, the nature of the coupling between ATP hydrolysis and ET, in particular the order of ET and ATP hydrolysis, has been elusive. Here, we have measured first-order rate constants for each key step in the reaction sequence, including direct measurement of the ATP hydrolysis rate constant: kATP = 70 s−1, 25 °C. Comparison of the rate constants establishes that the reaction sequence involves four sequential steps: (i) conformationally gated ET (kET = 140 s−1, 25 °C), (ii) ATP hydrolysis (kATP = 70 s−1, 25 °C), (iii) Phosphate release (kPi = 16 s−1, 25 °C), and (iv) Fe protein dissociation from the MoFe protein (kdiss = 6 s−1, 25 °C). These findings allow completion of the thermodynamic cycle undergone by the Fe protein, showing that the energy of ATP binding and protein–protein association drive ET, with subsequent ATP hydrolysis and Pi release causing dissociation of the complex between the Feox(ADP)2 protein and the reduced MoFe protein. PMID:24062462

  5. 77 FR 50243 - Electronic Fund Transfers (Regulation E)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-20

    ..., senders should be informed they would not receive actual notice of the price of the transfer or of the... high price, and a person who offers many more transfers for free or at a very low price, as a value... Transfers (Regulation E); Final Rule #0;#0;Federal Register / Vol. 77 , No. 161 / Monday, August 20, 2012...

  6. Ab initio quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical simulation of electron transfer process: fractional electron approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xiancheng; Hu, Hao; Hu, Xiangqian; Cohen, Aron J; Yang, Weitao

    2008-03-28

    Electron transfer (ET) reactions are one of the most important processes in chemistry and biology. Because of the quantum nature of the processes and the complicated roles of the solvent, theoretical study of ET processes is challenging. To simulate ET processes at the electronic level, we have developed an efficient density functional theory (DFT) quantum mechanical (QM)/molecular mechanical (MM) approach that uses the fractional number of electrons as the order parameter to calculate the redox free energy of ET reactions in solution. We applied this method to study the ET reactions of the aqueous metal complexes Fe(H(2)O)(6)(2+/3+) and Ru(H(2)O)(6)(2+/3+). The calculated oxidation potentials, 5.82 eV for Fe(II/III) and 5.14 eV for Ru(II/III), agree well with the experimental data, 5.50 and 4.96 eV, for iron and ruthenium, respectively. Furthermore, we have constructed the diabatic free energy surfaces from histogram analysis based on the molecular dynamics trajectories. The resulting reorganization energy and the diabatic activation energy also show good agreement with experimental data. Our calculations show that using the fractional number of electrons (FNE) as the order parameter in the thermodynamic integration process leads to efficient sampling and validate the ab initio QM/MM approach in the calculation of redox free energies.

  7. Photoinitiated electron transfer in multi-chromophoric species: Synthetic tetrads and pentads. Technical progress report, 1987--1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-02-14

    This research project involves the design, synthesis and study of the molecules which mimic many of the important aspects of photosynthetic electron and energy transfer. Specifically, the molecules are designed to mimic the following aspects of natural photosynthetic multistep electron transfer: electron donation from a tetrapyrrole excited singlet state, electron transfer between tetrapyrroles, electron transfer from tetrapyrroles to quinones, and electron transfer between quinones with different redox properties. In addition, they model carotenoid antenna function in photosynthesis (singlet-singlet energy transfer from carotenoid polyenes to chlorophyll) and carotenoid photoprotection from singlet oxygen damage (triplet-triplet energy transfer from chlorophyll to carotenoids).

  8. Enzymatic cellulose oxidation is linked to lignin by long-range electron transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westereng, Bjørge; Cannella, David; Wittrup Agger, Jane; Jørgensen, Henning; Larsen Andersen, Mogens; Eijsink, Vincent G.H.; Felby, Claus

    2015-01-01

    Enzymatic oxidation of cell wall polysaccharides by lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) plays a pivotal role in the degradation of plant biomass. While experiments have shown that LPMOs are copper dependent enzymes requiring an electron donor, the mechanism and origin of the electron supply in biological systems are only partly understood. We show here that insoluble high molecular weight lignin functions as a reservoir of electrons facilitating LPMO activity. The electrons are donated to the enzyme by long-range electron transfer involving soluble low molecular weight lignins present in plant cell walls. Electron transfer was confirmed by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy showing that LPMO activity on cellulose changes the level of unpaired electrons in the lignin. The discovery of a long-range electron transfer mechanism links the biodegradation of cellulose and lignin and sheds new light on how oxidative enzymes present in plant degraders may act in concert. PMID:26686263

  9. Photoinduced electron transfer from semiconductor quantum dots to metal oxide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tvrdy, Kevin; Frantsuzov, Pavel A.; Kamat, Prashant V.

    2011-01-01

    Quantum dot-metal oxide junctions are an integral part of next-generation solar cells, light emitting diodes, and nanostructured electronic arrays. Here we present a comprehensive examination of electron transfer at these junctions, using a series of CdSe quantum dot donors (sizes 2.8, 3.3, 4.0, and 4.2 nm in diameter) and metal oxide nanoparticle acceptors (SnO2, TiO2, and ZnO). Apparent electron transfer rate constants showed strong dependence on change in system free energy, exhibiting a sharp rise at small driving forces followed by a modest rise further away from the characteristic reorganization energy. The observed trend mimics the predicted behavior of electron transfer from a single quantum state to a continuum of electron accepting states, such as those present in the conduction band of a metal oxide nanoparticle. In contrast with dye-sensitized metal oxide electron transfer studies, our systems did not exhibit unthermalized hot-electron injection due to relatively large ratios of electron cooling rate to electron transfer rate. To investigate the implications of these findings in photovoltaic cells, quantum dot-metal oxide working electrodes were constructed in an identical fashion to the films used for the electron transfer portion of the study. Interestingly, the films which exhibited the fastest electron transfer rates (SnO2) were not the same as those which showed the highest photocurrent (TiO2). These findings suggest that, in addition to electron transfer at the quantum dot-metal oxide interface, other electron transfer reactions play key roles in the determination of overall device efficiency. PMID:21149685

  10. Photoinduced bimolecular electron transfer kinetics in small unilamellar vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Sharmistha Dutta; Kumbhakar, Manoj; Nath, Sukhendu; Pal, Haridas

    2007-11-01

    Photoinduced electron transfer (ET) from N,N-dimethylaniline to some coumarin derivatives has been studied in small unilamellar vesicles (SUVs) of the phospholipid, DL-α-dimyristoyl-phosphatidylcholine, using steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence quenching, both below and above the phase transition temperature of the vesicles. The primary interest was to examine whether Marcus inversion [H. Sumi and R. A. Marcus, J. Chem. Phys. 84, 4894 (1986)] could be observed for the present ET systems in these organized assemblies. The influence of the topology of SUVs on the photophysical properties of the reactants and consequently on their ET kinetics has also been investigated. Absorption and fluorescence spectral data of the coumarins in SUVs and the variation of their fluorescence decays with temperature indicate that the dyes are localized in the bilayer of the SUVs. Time-resolved area normalized emission spectra analysis, however, reveals that the dyes are distributed in two different microenvironments in the SUVs, which we attribute to the two leaflets of the bilayer, one toward bulk water and the other toward the inner water pool. The microenvironments in the two leaflets are, however, not indicated to be that significantly different. Time-resolved anisotropy decays were biexponential for all the dyes in SUVs, and this has been interpreted in terms of the compound motion model according to which the dye molecules can experience a fast wobbling-in-cone type of motion as well as a slow overall rotating motion of the cone containing the molecule. The expected bimolecular diffusion-controlled rates in SUVs, as estimated by comparing the microviscosities in SUVs (determined from rotational correlation times) and that in acetonitrile solution, are much slower than the observed fluorescence quenching rates, suggesting that reactant diffusion (translational) does not play any role in the quenching kinetics in the present systems. Accordingly, clear inversions are

  11. 41 CFR 102-118.70 - Must my agency make all payments via electronic funds transfer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... payments via electronic funds transfer? 102-118.70 Section 102-118.70 Public Contracts and Property... Services § 102-118.70 Must my agency make all payments via electronic funds transfer? Yes, under 31 U.S.C. 3332, et seq., your agency must make all payments for goods and services via EFT (this includes goods...

  12. Photoinduced energy and electron transfer in rubrene-benzoquinone and rubrene-porphyrin systems

    KAUST Repository

    Khan, Jafar Iqbal

    2014-11-01

    Excited-state electron and energy transfer from singlet excited rubrene (Ru) to benzoquinone (BQ) and tetra-(4-aminophenyl) porphyrin (TAPP) were investigated by steady-state absorption and emission, time-resolved transient absorption, and femtosecond (fs)-nanosecond (ns) fluorescence spectroscopy. The low reduction potential of BQ provides the high probability of electron transfer from the excited Ru to BQ. Steady-state and time-resolved results confirm such an excited electron transfer scenario. On the other hand, strong spectral overlap between the emission of Ru and absorption of TAPP suggests that energy transfer is a possible deactivation pathway of the Ru excited state.

  13. One-dimensional description of multidimensional electron transfer reactions in condensed phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhole, Kajal; Samanta, Alok; Ghosh, Swapan K

    2008-06-05

    We derive a one-dimensional energy diffusion equation for describing the dynamics of multidimensional electron transfer reactions in condensed phase, which is conceptually simpler and computationally more economic than the conventional approaches. We also obtain an analytical expression for the rate of electron transfer reactions for a general one-dimensional effective potential as well as an energy dependent diffusitivity. As an illustrative example, we consider application to electron transfer in a contact ion pair system modeled through harmonic potentials consisting of two slow classical modes and a high frequency vibrational mode for which the numerical results calculated using the proposed one-dimensional approach are shown to be in good agreement with experimental results. The energy diffusion equation and the rate expression for electron transfer obtained from the present theory, therefore, open up the possibility of describing the dynamics of electron transfer in complex systems, through a simpler approach.

  14. Demonstration of Lignin-to-Peroxidase Direct Electron Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáez-Jiménez, Verónica; Baratto, Maria Camilla; Pogni, Rebecca; Rencoret, Jorge; Gutiérrez, Ana; Santos, José Ignacio; Martínez, Angel T.; Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco Javier

    2015-01-01

    Versatile peroxidase (VP) is a high redox-potential peroxidase of biotechnological interest that is able to oxidize phenolic and non-phenolic aromatics, Mn2+, and different dyes. The ability of VP from Pleurotus eryngii to oxidize water-soluble lignins (softwood and hardwood lignosulfonates) is demonstrated here by a combination of directed mutagenesis and spectroscopic techniques, among others. In addition, direct electron transfer between the peroxidase and the lignin macromolecule was kinetically characterized using stopped-flow spectrophotometry. VP variants were used to show that this reaction strongly depends on the presence of a solvent-exposed tryptophan residue (Trp-164). Moreover, the tryptophanyl radical detected by EPR spectroscopy of H2O2-activated VP (being absent from the W164S variant) was identified as catalytically active because it was reduced during lignosulfonate oxidation, resulting in the appearance of a lignin radical. The decrease of lignin fluorescence (excitation at 355 nm/emission at 400 nm) during VP treatment under steady-state conditions was accompanied by a decrease of the lignin (aromatic nuclei and side chains) signals in one-dimensional and two-dimensional NMR spectra, confirming the ligninolytic capabilities of the enzyme. Simultaneously, size-exclusion chromatography showed an increase of the molecular mass of the modified residual lignin, especially for the (low molecular mass) hardwood lignosulfonate, revealing that the oxidation products tend to recondense during the VP treatment. Finally, mutagenesis of selected residues neighboring Trp-164 resulted in improved apparent second-order rate constants for lignosulfonate reactions, revealing that changes in its protein environment (modifying the net negative charge and/or substrate accessibility/binding) can modulate the reactivity of the catalytic tryptophan. PMID:26240145

  15. Electron-phonon energy transfer in hot-carrier solar cells

    OpenAIRE

    Luque López, Antonio; Martí Vega, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Hot-carrier solar cells may yield very high efficiency if the heat transfer from electrons to phonons is low enough. In this paper we calculate this heat transfer for the two inelastic mechanisms known to limit the electric conductivity: the multi-valley scattering in non-polar semiconductors and the coupling of electrons to longitudinal optical phonons in polar semiconductors. Heat transfer is ruled by matrix elements deduced from electric conductivity measurements. The cell power extracted ...

  16. Pulse radiolytic and electrochemical investigations of intramolecular electron transfer in carotenoporphyrins and carotenoporphyrin-quinone triads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Land, E.J.; Lexa, D.; Bensasson, R.V.; Gust, D.; Moore, T.A. Moore, A.L.; Liddell, P.A.; Nemeth, G.A.

    1987-08-27

    Thermodynamic and kinetic aspects of intramolecular electron-transfer reactions in carotenoporphyrin dyads and carotenoid-porphyrin-quinone triads have been studied by using pulse radiolysis and cyclic voltammetry. Rapid (<1 ..mu..s) electron transfer from carotenoid radical anions to attached porphyrins has been inferred. Carotenoid cations, on the other hand, do not readily accept electrons from attached porphyrins or pyropheophorbides. Electrochemical studies provide the thermodynamic basis for these observations and also allow estimation of the energetics of photoinitiated two-step electron transfer and two-step charge recombination in triad models for photosynthetic charge separation.

  17. Communication: Charge transfer dominates over proton transfer in the reaction of nitric acid with gas-phase hydrated electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lengyel, Jozef; Med, Jakub; Slavíček, Petr; Beyer, Martin K.

    2017-09-01

    The reaction of HNO3 with hydrated electrons (H2O)n- (n = 35-65) in the gas phase was studied using Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry and ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. Kinetic analysis of the experimental data shows that OH-(H2O)m is formed primarily via a reaction of the hydrated electron with HNO3 inside the cluster, while proton transfer is not observed and NO3-(H2O)m is just a secondary product. The reaction enthalpy was determined using nanocalorimetry, revealing a quite exothermic charge transfer with -241 ± 69 kJ mol-1. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations indicate that proton transfer is an allowed reaction pathway, but the overall thermochemistry favors charge transfer.

  18. Positronium Inhibition and Quenching by Organic Electron Acceptors and Charge Transfer Complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jansen, P.; Eldrup, Morten Mostgaard; Jensen, Bror Skytte

    1975-01-01

    Positron lifetime measurements were performed on a series of organic electron acceptors and charge-transfer complexes in solution. The acceptors cause both positronium (Ps) inhibition (with maybe one exception) and quenching, but when an acceptor takes part in a charge-transfer complex...... in terms of the spur reaction model of Ps formation. Correlation was also made to gas phase reaction between electron acceptors and free electron, as well as to pulse radiolysis data....

  19. 78 FR 66251 - Electronic Fund Transfers(Regulation E)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-05

    ... requires remittance transfer providers to give consumers sending remittance transfers certain specified... appropriate countries and areas on the list. To provide input, please send your feedback and any supporting... your suggestions or input considered for the Bureau's next review, please send your feedback on whether...

  20. Chemical electron-transfer reactions in electrospray mass spectrometry: Effective oxidation potentials of electron-transfer reagents in methylene chloride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Berkel, G.J.; Zhou, F. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

    1994-10-15

    Cyclic voltammetry (CV), UV/visible absorption spectroscopy, and electrospray mass spectrometry (ES-MS) are used in conjunction to study the mono- and /or dications produced in solution from the reaction of three model compounds ([beta]-carotene, cobalt(II) octaethylporphyrin (Co[sup II]OEP), nickel(II) octaethylporphyrin (Ni[sup II]OEP), in three different solvent/electron-transfer reagent systems (methylene chloride/0.1% trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) (v/v), methylene chloride/0.1% TFA/2,3-dichloro-5,6-dicyano-1,4-benzoquinone (DDQ) v/v/200 [mu]M), methylene chloride/0.1% TFA/0.1% antimony pentafluoride (SbF[sub 5]) (v/v/v)). The reactions were carried out on-line with ES-MS by means of flow injection. Correlation of the CV data for these analytes with the ionic species determined to be in the solution on the basis of UV/visible absorption spectra and/or on the basis of the ionic species observed in the gas phase by ES-MS, along with our previously published data on these solvent/reagent systems, allowed an effective oxidation potential range, E, to be assigned to these solvent/reagent systems: methylene chloride/0.1% TFA (v/v), 0.6V [le] E[sub TFA] < 0.7 V; methylene chloride/0.1% TFA/DDQ (v/v/200 [mu]M), 0.8 [le] E[sub TFA/DDQ] < 1.0 V; methylene chloride/0.1% TFA/0.1% SbF[sub 5] (v/v/v), 1.3 [le] E[sub TFA/SbF(5)] < 1.5. 40 refs., 7 figs.

  1. Transferable Pseudo-Classical Electrons for Aufbau of Atomic Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekesan, Solen; Kale, Seyit; Herzfeld, Judith

    2014-01-01

    Generalizing the LEWIS reactive force field from electron pairs to single electrons, we present LEWIS• in which explicit valence electrons interact with each other and with nuclear cores via pairwise interactions. The valence electrons are independently mobile particles, following classical equations of motion according to potentials modified from Coulombic as required to capture quantum characteristics. As proof of principle, the aufbau of atomic ions is described for diverse main group elements from the first three rows of the periodic table, using a single potential for interactions between electrons of like spin and another for electrons of unlike spin. The electrons of each spin are found to distribute themselves in a fashion akin to the major lobes of the hybrid atomic orbitals, suggesting a pointillist description of the electron density. The broader validity of the LEWIS• force field is illustrated by predicting the vibrational frequencies of diatomic and triatomic hydrogen species. PMID:24752384

  2. Transferable pseudoclassical electrons for aufbau of atomic ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekesan, Solen; Kale, Seyit; Herzfeld, Judith

    2014-06-05

    Generalizing the LEWIS reactive force field from electron pairs to single electrons, we present LEWIS• in which explicit valence electrons interact with each other and with nuclear cores via pairwise interactions. The valence electrons are independently mobile particles, following classical equations of motion according to potentials modified from Coulombic as required to capture quantum characteristics. As proof of principle, the aufbau of atomic ions is described for diverse main group elements from the first three rows of the periodic table, using a single potential for interactions between electrons of like spin and another for electrons of unlike spin. The electrons of each spin are found to distribute themselves in a fashion akin to the major lobes of the hybrid atomic orbitals, suggesting a pointillist description of the electron density. The broader validity of the LEWIS• force field is illustrated by predicting the vibrational frequencies of diatomic and triatomic hydrogen species. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. High throughput electron transfer from carbon dots to chloroplast: a rationale of enhanced photosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Sourov; Pradhan, Saheli; Mitra, Shouvik; Patra, Prasun; Bhattacharya, Ankita; Pramanik, Panchanan; Goswami, Arunava

    2014-03-01

    A biocompatible amine functionalized fluorescent carbon dots were developed and isolated for gram scale applications. Such carbogenic quantum dots can strongly conjugate over the surface of the chloroplast and due to that strong interaction the former can easily transfer electrons towards the latter by assistance of absorbed light or photons. An exceptionally high electron transfer from carbon dots to the chloroplast can directly effect the whole chain electron transfer pathway in a light reaction of photosynthesis, where electron carriers play an important role in modulating the system. As a result, carbon dots can promote photosynthesis by modulating the electron transfer process as they are capable of fastening the conversion of light energy to the electrical energy and finally to the chemical energy as assimilatory power (ATP and NADPH).A biocompatible amine functionalized fluorescent carbon dots were developed and isolated for gram scale applications. Such carbogenic quantum dots can strongly conjugate over the surface of the chloroplast and due to that strong interaction the former can easily transfer electrons towards the latter by assistance of absorbed light or photons. An exceptionally high electron transfer from carbon dots to the chloroplast can directly effect the whole chain electron transfer pathway in a light reaction of photosynthesis, where electron carriers play an important role in modulating the system. As a result, carbon dots can promote photosynthesis by modulating the electron transfer process as they are capable of fastening the conversion of light energy to the electrical energy and finally to the chemical energy as assimilatory power (ATP and NADPH). Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr06079a

  4. Enhanced Performance of Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells with Nanostructure Graphene Electron Transfer Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Hung Hsu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The utilization of nanostructure graphene thin films as electron transfer layer in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs was demonstrated. The effect of a nanostructure graphene thin film in DSSC structure was examined. The nanostructure graphene thin films provides a great electron transfer channel for the photogenerated electrons from TiO2 to indium tin oxide (ITO glass. Obvious improvements in short-circuit current density of the DSSCs were observed by using the graphene electron transport layer modified photoelectrode. The graphene electron transport layer reduces effectively the back reaction in the interface between the ITO transparent conductive film and the electrolyte in the DSSC.

  5. Sequence analysis of peptide:oligonucleotide heteroconjugates by electron capture dissociation and electron transfer dissociation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivos, Kady L; Limbach, Patrick A

    2010-08-01

    Mass spectrometry analysis of protein-nucleic acid cross-links is challenging due to the dramatically different chemical properties of the two components. Identifying specific sites of attachment between proteins and nucleic acids requires methods that enable sequencing of both the peptide and oligonucleotide component of the heteroconjugate cross-link. While collision-induced dissociation (CID) has previously been used for sequencing such heteroconjugates, CID generates fragmentation along the phosphodiester backbone of the oligonucleotide preferentially. The result is a reduction in peptide fragmentation within the heteroconjugate. In this work, we have examined the effectiveness of electron capture dissociation (ECD) and electron-transfer dissociation (ETD) for sequencing heteroconjugates. Both methods were found to yield preferential fragmentation of the peptide component of a peptide:oligonucleotide heteroconjugate, with minimal differences in sequence coverage between these two electron-induced dissociation methods. Sequence coverage was found to increase with increasing charge state of the heteroconjugate, but decreases with increasing size of the oligonucleotide component. To overcome potential intermolecular interactions between the two components of the heteroconjugate, supplemental activation with ETD was explored. The addition of a supplemental activation step was found to increase peptide sequence coverage over ETD alone, suggesting that electrostatic interactions between the peptide and oligonucleotide components are one limiting factor in sequence coverage by these two approaches. These results show that ECD/ETD methods can be used for the tandem mass spectrometry sequencing of peptide:oligonucleotide heteroconjugates, and these methods are complementary to existing CID methods already used for sequencing of protein-nucleic acid cross-links. Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Electronic transmission coefficient for outer-sphere electron transfer reactions in solution: A Landau-Zener formalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Shahed U. M.; Zhou, Zheng Yu

    1990-12-01

    The Landau-Zener formulation and literature values of electronic transition matrix were utilized to compute the theoretical values of electronic transmission coefficient of several outer-sphere electron transfer reactions in solution. The slopes of the energy surfaces that are needed for the Landau-Zener equation were obtained using both intermediate neglect of differential overlaps (INDO/2) molecular orbital and classical improved average dipole orientation (IADO) methods. Theoretical results of electronic transmission coefficient of electron transfer reaction obtained using values of slopes from INDO/2-MO (molecular orbital) as well as IADO methods are found in close agreement with the quasiexperimental values of electronic transmission coefficient obtained from experimental data of rate constant. These theoretical values of electronic transmission coefficient, as well as those from experimental values of rate constant are found to be less than unity. These results indicate that outer-sphere electron transfer reactions in solution involving aquo and amine complexes of the transition metal ions studied in this work are nonadiabatic in nature. Theoretical results of electronic transmission coefficient obtained using values of slopes from the classical improved average dipole orientation (IADO) method is found in close agreement with those obtained from the quantum chemical INDO/2-MO method and also with those from experimental values of rate constant and hence justifies the validity of the use of the former.

  7. Role of protein fluctuation correlations in electron transfer in photosynthetic complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesterov, Alexander I.; Berman, Gennady P.

    2015-04-01

    We consider the dependence of the electron transfer in photosynthetic complexes on correlation properties of random fluctuations of the protein environment. The electron subsystem is modeled by a finite network of connected electron (exciton) sites. The fluctuations of the protein environment are modeled by random telegraph processes, which act either collectively (correlated) or independently (uncorrelated) on the electron sites. We derived an exact closed system of first-order linear differential equations with constant coefficients, for the average density matrix elements and for their first moments. Under some conditions, we obtained analytic expressions for the electron transfer rates and found the range of parameters for their applicability by comparing with the exact numerical simulations. We also compared the correlated and uncorrelated regimes and demonstrated numerically that the uncorrelated fluctuations of the protein environment can, under some conditions, either increase or decrease the electron transfer rates.

  8. Directing the path of light-induced electron transfer at a molecular fork using vibrational excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delor, Milan; Archer, Stuart A.; Keane, Theo; Meijer, Anthony J. H. M.; Sazanovich, Igor V.; Greetham, Gregory M.; Towrie, Michael; Weinstein, Julia A.

    2017-11-01

    Ultrafast electron transfer in condensed-phase molecular systems is often strongly coupled to intramolecular vibrations that can promote, suppress and direct electronic processes. Recent experiments exploring this phenomenon proved that light-induced electron transfer can be strongly modulated by vibrational excitation, suggesting a new avenue for active control over molecular function. Here, we achieve the first example of such explicit vibrational control through judicious design of a Pt(II)-acetylide charge-transfer donor-bridge-acceptor-bridge-donor 'fork' system: asymmetric 13C isotopic labelling of one of the two -C≡C- bridges makes the two parallel and otherwise identical donor→acceptor electron-transfer pathways structurally distinct, enabling independent vibrational perturbation of either. Applying an ultrafast UVpump(excitation)-IRpump(perturbation)-IRprobe(monitoring) pulse sequence, we show that the pathway that is vibrationally perturbed during UV-induced electron transfer is dramatically slowed down compared to its unperturbed counterpart. One can thus choose the dominant electron transfer pathway. The findings deliver a new opportunity for precise perturbative control of electronic energy propagation in molecular devices.

  9. Pulse radiolytic studies of electron transfer processes and applications to solar photochemistry. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neta, P.

    1995-02-01

    The pulse radiolysis technique is applied to the study of electron transfer processes in a variety of chemical systems. Reactive intermediates are produced in solution by electron pulse irradiation and the kinetics of their reactions are followed by time resolved absorption spectrophotometry. Complementary experiments are carried out with excimer laser flash photolysis. These studies are concerned with mechanisms, kinetics, and thermodynamics of reactions of organic and inorganic radicals and unstable oxidation states of metal ions. Reactions are studied in both aqueous and non-aqueous solutions. The studies focus on the unique ability of pulse radiolysis to provide absolute rate constants for reactions of many inorganic radicals and organic peroxyl radicals, species that are key intermediates in many chemical processes. A special concern of this work is the study of electron transfer reactions of metalloporphyrins, which permits evaluation of these molecules as intermediates in solar energy conversion. Metalloporphyrins react with free radicals via electron transfer, involving the ligand or the metal center, or via bonding to the metal, leading to a variety of chemical species whose behavior is also investigated. The highlights of the results during the past three years are summarized below under the following sections: (a) electron transfer reactions of peroxyl radicals, concentrating on the characterization of new peroxyl radicals derived from vinyl, phenyl, other aryl, and pyridyl; (b) solvent effects on electron transfer reactions of inorganic and organic peroxyl radicals, including reactions with porphyrins, and (c) electron transfer and alkylation reactions of metalloporphyrins and other complexes.

  10. Electron Transfer in Chemistry and Biology - The Primary Events in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J J Thomson it would be most appropriate to recount how such a discovery has really enlarged our understanding of many facets of chemistry and biology. Chemistry as it is practised today cannot exist without a proper appreciation of the role of the electron. The concept of a chemical bond as the electron distribution ...

  11. Time-bin state transfer to electron spin coherence in solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosaka, Hideo; Inagaki, Takahiro; Hitomi, Ryuta; Izawa, Fumishige; Rikitake, Yoshiaki; Imamura, Hiroshi; Mitsumori, Yasuyoshi; Edamatsu, Keiichi

    2014-12-01

    We demonstrate that a coherent superposition state of two temporally separated optical pulses, called a time-bin state, can be transferred to that of up/down electron spins in a semiconductor by synchronizing the time separation to the precession period of either electrons or holes. The time-bin transfer scheme does not require polarization mode degeneracy and can map the time-bin state to the electron spin state that is not accessible directly using only polarization. The scheme offers a new approach for quantum interfaces between photons and electron spins.

  12. Time-bin state transfer to electron spin coherence in solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosaka, Hideo; Inagaki, Takahiro; Hitomi, Ryuta; Izawa, Fumishige; Mitsumori, Yasuyoshi; Edamatsu, Keiichi [Research Institute of Electrical Communication, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Rikitake, Yoshiaki [Sendai National College of Technology, Sendai 989-3128 (Japan); Imamura, Hiroshi [Nanosystem Research Institute, AIST, Tsukuba 305-8568 (Japan)

    2014-12-04

    We demonstrate that a coherent superposition state of two temporally separated optical pulses, called a time-bin state, can be transferred to that of up/down electron spins in a semiconductor by synchronizing the time separation to the precession period of either electrons or holes. The time-bin transfer scheme does not require polarization mode degeneracy and can map the time-bin state to the electron spin state that is not accessible directly using only polarization. The scheme offers a new approach for quantum interfaces between photons and electron spins.

  13. ElectronTransfer Induced Ring Opening of α-Epoxyketones: Spirodioxolane Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzad Nikpour

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Stereospecific formation of spirodioxolanes has been observed on electron transfer induced ring opening of α-epoxyketones by 2,4,6-triphenylpyrylium tetrafluoroborate in the presence of cyclohexanone

  14. Density Functional Reactivity Theory Characterizes Charge Separation Propensity in Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer Reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Shubin [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Ess, Daniel H. [Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States); Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Schauer, Cynthia [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)

    2011-04-20

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions occur in many biological and artificial solar energy conversion processes. In these reactions the electron is often transferred to a site distant to the proton acceptor site. In this work, we employ the dual descriptor and the electrophilic Fukui function from density functional reactivity theory (DFRT) to characterize the propensity for an electron to be transferred to a site other than the proton acceptor site. The electrophilic regions of hydrogen bond or van der Waal reactant complexes were examined using these DFRT descriptors to determine the region of space to which the electron is most likely to be transferred. This analysis shows that in PCET reactions the electrophilic region of the reactant complex does not include the proton acceptor site.

  15. Role of ligand substitution on long-range electron transfer in azurins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, O; Jeuken, L J; Canters, G W

    2000-01-01

    Azurin contains two potential redox sites, a copper centre and, at the opposite end of the molecule, a cystine disulfide (RSSR). Intramolecular electron transfer between a pulse radiolytically produced RSSR- radical anion and the blue Cu(II) ion was studied in a series of azurins in which single......-site mutations were introduced into the copper ligand sphere. In the Met121His mutant, the rate constant for intramolecular electron transfer is half that of the corresponding wild-type azurin. In the His46Gly and His117Gly mutants, a water molecule is co-ordinated to the copper ion when no external ligands...... are added. Both these mutants also exhibit slower intramolecular electron transfer than the corresponding wild-type azurin. However, for the His117Gly mutant in the presence of excess imidazole, an azurin-imidazole complex is formed and the intramolecular electron-transfer rate increases considerably...

  16. Electrode assemblies composed of redox cascades from microbial respiratory electron transfer chains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gates, Andrew J. [Univ. of East Anglia, Norwich (United Kingdom); Marritt, Sophie [Univ. of East Anglia, Norwich (United Kingdom); Bradley, Justin [Univ. of East Anglia, Norwich (United Kingdom); Shi, Liang [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); McMillan, Duncan G. [Univ. of Leeds (United Kingdom); Jeuken, Lars J. [Univ. of Leeds (United Kingdom); Richardson, David [Univ. of East Anglia, Norwich (United Kingdom); Butt, Julea N. [Univ. of East Anglia, Norwich (United Kingdom)

    2013-10-01

    Respiratory and photosynthetic electron transfer chains are dependent on vectorial electron transfer through a series of redox proteins. Examples include electron transfer from NapC to NapAB nitrate reductase in Paracoccus denitrificans and from CymA to Fcc3 (flavocytochrome c3) fumarate reductase in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. In the present article, we demonstrate that graphite electrodes can serve as surfaces for the stepwise adsorption of NapC and NapAB, and the stepwise adsorption of CymA and Fcc3. Aspects of the catalytic properties of these assemblies are different from those of NapAB and Fcc3 adsorbed in isolation. We propose that this is due to the formation of NapC-NapAB and of CymA-Fcc3 complexes that are capable of supporting vectorial electron transfer.

  17. Extracellular polymeric substances act as transient media in extracellular electron transfer of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiao, Yong; Zhang, Jingdong; Ulstrup, Jens

    It is well known that microorganism is surrounded by extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) which include polysaccharides, proteins, glycoproteins, nucleic acids, phospholipids, and humic acids. However, previous studies on microbial extracellular electron transfer (EET) are conducted on cells...

  18. Synthesis of 3-Alkenyl-1-azaanthraquinones via Diels-Alder and Electron Transfer Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrice Vanelle

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available A convenient route to 3-alkenyl-1-azaanthraquinones via a hetero Diels-Alder reaction between an azadiene and naphthoquinone, a free radical chlorination and an electron transfer reaction is reported.

  19. 77 FR 71035 - Financial Management Service; Proposed Collection of Information: Electronic Funds Transfer (EFT...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-28

    ... Fiscal Service Financial Management Service; Proposed Collection of Information: Electronic Funds Transfer (EFT) Market Research Study AGENCY: Financial Management Service, Fiscal Service, Treasury. ACTION: Notice and Request for comments. SUMMARY: The Financial Management Service, as part of its continuing...

  20. 77 FR 34127 - Financial Management Service; Proposed Collection of Information: Electronic Transfer Account...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-08

    ... Fiscal Service Financial Management Service; Proposed Collection of Information: Electronic Transfer Account (ETA) Financial Agency Agreement AGENCY: Financial Management Service, Fiscal Service, Treasury. ACTION: Notice and Request for comments. SUMMARY: The Financial Management Service, as part of its...

  1. Quantifying electron transfer reactions in biological systems: what interactions play the major role?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjulstok, Emil; Olsen, Jógvan Magnus Haugaard; Solov'yov, Ilia A

    2015-12-22

    Various biological processes involve the conversion of energy into forms that are usable for chemical transformations and are quantum mechanical in nature. Such processes involve light absorption, excited electronic states formation, excitation energy transfer, electrons and protons tunnelling which for example occur in photosynthesis, cellular respiration, DNA repair, and possibly magnetic field sensing. Quantum biology uses computation to model biological interactions in light of quantum mechanical effects and has primarily developed over the past decade as a result of convergence between quantum physics and biology. In this paper we consider electron transfer in biological processes, from a theoretical view-point; namely in terms of quantum mechanical and semi-classical models. We systematically characterize the interactions between the moving electron and its biological environment to deduce the driving force for the electron transfer reaction and to establish those interactions that play the major role in propelling the electron. The suggested approach is seen as a general recipe to treat electron transfer events in biological systems computationally, and we utilize it to describe specifically the electron transfer reactions in Arabidopsis thaliana cryptochrome-a signaling photoreceptor protein that became attractive recently due to its possible function as a biological magnetoreceptor.

  2. Quantifying electron transfer reactions in biological systems: what interactions play the major role?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjulstok, Emil; Olsen, Jógvan Magnus Haugaard; Solov'Yov, Ilia A.

    2015-12-01

    Various biological processes involve the conversion of energy into forms that are usable for chemical transformations and are quantum mechanical in nature. Such processes involve light absorption, excited electronic states formation, excitation energy transfer, electrons and protons tunnelling which for example occur in photosynthesis, cellular respiration, DNA repair, and possibly magnetic field sensing. Quantum biology uses computation to model biological interactions in light of quantum mechanical effects and has primarily developed over the past decade as a result of convergence between quantum physics and biology. In this paper we consider electron transfer in biological processes, from a theoretical view-point; namely in terms of quantum mechanical and semi-classical models. We systematically characterize the interactions between the moving electron and its biological environment to deduce the driving force for the electron transfer reaction and to establish those interactions that play the major role in propelling the electron. The suggested approach is seen as a general recipe to treat electron transfer events in biological systems computationally, and we utilize it to describe specifically the electron transfer reactions in Arabidopsis thaliana cryptochrome-a signaling photoreceptor protein that became attractive recently due to its possible function as a biological magnetoreceptor.

  3. 77 FR 6310 - Electronic Fund Transfers (Regulation E)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-07

    ... disclosure and two receipts) for each transfer described above would create information overload for..., DC 20006. All submissions must include the agency name and docket number or Regulatory Information... public record and subject to public disclosure. Sensitive personal information, such as account numbers...

  4. Quantum electron transfer processes induced by thermo-coherent ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    WINTEC

    Katz et al11 and by Silbey et al12 along with a bridge mediated processes in refs 13–15. Another major change in the work of ET processes was appeared to ... transfer rate27,28 for the solvent mode and intramolecu- lar mode to incorporate the quantum nature of the potential surfaces of the reactants and products. As a.

  5. Flow Boiling Heat Transfer in Microchannel Cold Plate Evaporators for Electronics Cooling

    OpenAIRE

    Bertsch, Stefan S.; Groll, Eckhard A; Garimella, Suresh V.

    2008-01-01

    The local two-phase heat transfer coefficient is a critical parameter in the design of microchannel cold plate evaporators used in applications such as electronics cooling systems. Only a few past studies on microchannels have investigated the heat transfer characteristics over the entire vapor quality range and conflicting trends have been reported even in these studies. Therefore, the present study focuses on the investigation of the local flow boiling heat transfer coefficient at different...

  6. Photoinduced Electron Transfer in DNA: Charge Shift Dynamics Between 8-Oxo-Guanine Anion and Adenine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuyuan; Dood, Jordan; Beckstead, Ashley A; Li, Xi-Bo; Nguyen, Khiem V; Burrows, Cynthia J; Improta, Roberto; Kohler, Bern

    2015-06-18

    Femtosecond time-resolved IR spectroscopy is used to investigate the excited-state dynamics of a dinucleotide containing an 8-oxoguanine anion at the 5'-end and neutral adenine at the 3'-end. UV excitation of the dinucleotide transfers an electron from deprotonated 8-oxoguanine to its π-stacked neighbor adenine in less than 1 ps, generating a neutral 8-oxoguanine radical and an adenine radical anion. These species are identified by the excellent agreement between the experimental and calculated IR difference spectra. The quantum efficiency of this ultrafast charge shift reaction approaches unity. Back electron transfer from the adenine radical anion to the 8-oxguanine neutral radical occurs in 9 ps, or approximately 6 times faster than between the adenine radical anion and the 8-oxoguanine radical cation (Zhang, Y. et al. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 2014, 111, 11612-11617). The large asymmetry in forward and back electron transfer rates is fully rationalized by semiclassical nonadiabatic electron transfer theory. Forward electron transfer is ultrafast because the driving force is nearly equal to the reorganization energy, which is estimated to lie between 1 and 2 eV. Back electron transfer is highly exergonic and takes place much more slowly in the Marcus inverted region.

  7. Determination of the electronics transfer function for current transient measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scharf, Christian, E-mail: Christian.Scharf@desy.de; Klanner, Robert

    2015-04-11

    We describe a straight-forward method for determining the transfer function of the readout of a sensor for the situation in which the current transient of the sensor can be precisely simulated. The method relies on the convolution theorem of Fourier transforms. The specific example is a planar silicon pad diode. The charge carriers in the sensor are produced by picosecond lasers with light of wavelengths of 675 and 1060 nm. The transfer function is determined from the 1060 nm data with the pad diode biased at 1000 V. It is shown that the simulated sensor response convoluted with this transfer function provides an excellent description of the measured transients for laser light of both wavelengths. The method has been applied successfully for the simulation of current transients of several different silicon pad diodes. It can also be applied for the analysis of transient-current measurements of radiation-damaged solid state sensors, as long as sensors properties, like high-frequency capacitance, are not too different.

  8. The thermodynamics of charge transfer in DNA photolyase: using thermodynamic integration calculations to analyse the kinetics of electron transfer reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krapf, Sebastian; Koslowski, Thorsten; Steinbrecher, Thomas

    2010-08-28

    DNA Photolyases are light sensitive oxidoreductases present in many organisms that participate in the repair of photodamaged DNA. They are capable of electron transfer between a bound cofactor and a chain of tryptophan amino acid residues. Due to their unique mechanism and important function, photolyases have been subject to intense study in recent times, with both experimental and computational efforts. In this work, we present a novel application of classical molecular dynamics based free energy calculations, combined with quantum mechanical computations, to biomolecular charge transfer. Our approach allows for the determination of all reaction parameters in Marcus' theory of charge transport. We were able to calculate the free energy profile for the movement of a positive charge along protein sidechains involved in the biomolecule's function as well as charge-transfer rates that are in good agreement with experimental results. Our approach to simulate charge-transfer reactions explicitly includes the influence of protein flexibility and solvent dynamics on charge-transfer energetics. As applied here to a biomolecular system of considerable scientific interest, we believe the method to be easily adaptable to the study of charge-transfer phenomena in biochemistry and other fields.

  9. "Super-Reducing" Photocatalysis: Consecutive Energy and Electron Transfers with Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasholz, Malte

    2017-08-21

    Donation welcome: Recent developments in visible-light photocatalysis allow the utilization of increasingly negative reduction potentials. Successive energy and electron transfer with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons enables the catalytic formation of strongly reducing arene radical anions, classical stoichiometric reagents for one-electron reduction in organic synthesis. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. The Role of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Outer Surface Structures in Extracellular Electron Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    strains were grown similarly for scanning electron microscopy imaging. Cells were lifted off agar plates onto glass cover slips then fixed and treated...observed differences in electron transfer to ferrihydrite and anode surfaces is not clear. Formation of biominerals, such as magnetite (Fe3O4), during

  11. Effect of strong coupling on interfacial electron transfer dynamics in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Transient absorption studies on TPP-cat/TiO2 system exciting both the Soret band at 400 nm and the Q-band at 800 nm have been carried out to determine excitation wavelength-dependence on ET dynamics. The reaction channel for the electron-injection process has been found to be different for both the excitation ...

  12. Photoinduced electron transfer of chlorophyll in lipid bilayer system

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    electron donors and acceptors, relative to the solvent typically water. Although the structures of ... slightly water soluble, surface-active compounds such as alcohols and cholesterol modify the assembly interface. ... was purchased from Sigma Chemical Co. and was used without further purification. *For correspondence ...

  13. Electron transfer from alpha-keggin anions to dioxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurii V. Geletii; Rajai H. Atalla; Craig L. Hill; Ira A. Weinstock

    2004-01-01

    Polyoxometalates (POMs), of which alpha-Keggin anions are representative, are a diverse and rapidly growing class of water-soluble cluster-anion structures with applications ranging from molecular catalysis to materials. [1] POMs are inexpensive, minimally or non-toxic, negatively charged clusters comprised of early transition-metals, usually in their do electronic...

  14. Long-distance electron transfer by cable bacteria in aquifer sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Hubert; Bosch, Julian; Griebler, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The biodegradation of organic pollutants in aquifers is often restricted to the fringes of contaminant plumes where steep countergradients of electron donors and acceptors are separated by limited dispersive mixing. However, long-distance electron transfer (LDET) by filamentous ‘cable bacteria’ has...... recycling of sulfate by electron transfer over 1–2-cm distance. Sediments were taken from a hydrocarbon-contaminated aquifer, amended with iron sulfide and saturated with water, leaving the sediment surface exposed to air. Steep geochemical gradients developed in the upper 3 cm, showing a spatial separation...

  15. Molecular view of an electron transfer process essential for iron–sulfur protein biogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banci, Lucia; Bertini, Ivano; Calderone, Vito; Ciofi-Baffoni, Simone; Giachetti, Andrea; Jaiswal, Deepa; Mikolajczyk, Maciej; Piccioli, Mario; Winkelmann, Julia

    2013-01-01

    Biogenesis of iron–sulfur cluster proteins is a highly regulated process that requires complex protein machineries. In the cytosolic iron–sulfur protein assembly machinery, two human key proteins—NADPH-dependent diflavin oxidoreductase 1 (Ndor1) and anamorsin—form a stable complex in vivo that was proposed to provide electrons for assembling cytosolic iron–sulfur cluster proteins. The Ndor1–anamorsin interaction was also suggested to be implicated in the regulation of cell survival/death mechanisms. In the present work we unravel the molecular basis of recognition between Ndor1 and anamorsin and of the electron transfer process. This is based on the structural characterization of the two partner proteins, the investigation of the electron transfer process, and the identification of those protein regions involved in complex formation and those involved in electron transfer. We found that an unstructured region of anamorsin is essential for the formation of a specific and stable protein complex with Ndor1, whereas the C-terminal region of anamorsin, containing the [2Fe-2S] redox center, transiently interacts through complementary charged residues with the FMN-binding site region of Ndor1 to perform electron transfer. Our results propose a molecular model of the electron transfer process that is crucial for understanding the functional role of this interaction in human cells. PMID:23596212

  16. Photochemistry and electron-transfer mechanism of transition metal oxalato complexes excited in the charge transfer band.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jie; Zhang, Hua; Tomov, Ivan V; Ding, Xunliang; Rentzepis, Peter M

    2008-10-07

    The photoredox reaction of trisoxalato cobaltate (III) has been studied by means of ultrafast extended x-ray absorption fine structure and optical transient spectroscopy after excitation in the charge-transfer band with 267-nm femtosecond pulses. The Co-O transient bond length changes and the optical spectra and kinetics have been measured and compared with those of ferrioxalate. Data presented here strongly suggest that both of these metal oxalato complexes operate under similar photoredox reaction mechanisms where the primary reaction involves the dissociation of a metal-oxygen bond. These results also indicate that excitation in the charge-transfer band is not a sufficient condition for the intramolecular electron transfer to be the dominant photochemistry reaction mechanism.

  17. Effect of morphology and defect density on electron transfer of electrochemically reduced graphene oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yan, E-mail: yanzhang@sues.edu.cn [School of Material Engineering, Shanghai University of Engineering Science, Shanghai 201620 (China); Hao, Huilian, E-mail: huilian.hao@sues.edu.cn [School of Material Engineering, Shanghai University of Engineering Science, Shanghai 201620 (China); Wang, Linlin, E-mail: wlinlin@mail.ustc.edu.cn [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shanghai University of Engineering Science, Shanghai 201620 (China)

    2016-12-30

    Highlights: • Different morphologies of ERGO on the surface of GCE were prepared via different methods. • The defect densities of ERGO were controlled by tuning the mass or concentration of GO. • A higher defect density of ERGO accelerates electron transfer rate. • ERGO with more exposed edge planes shows significantly higher electron transfer kinetics. • Both edge planes and defect density contribute to electron transfer of ERGO. - Abstract: Electrochemically reduced graphene oxide (ERGO) is widely used to construct electrochemical sensors. Understanding the electron transfer behavior of ERGO is essential for its electrode material applications. In this paper, different morphologies of ERGO were prepared via two different methods. Compared to ERGO/GCEs prepared by electrochemical reduction of pre-deposited GO, more exposed edge planes of ERGO are observed on the surface of ERGO-GCE that was constructed by electrophoretic deposition of GO. The defect densities of ERGO were controlled by tuning the mass or concentration of GO. The electron transfer kinetics (k{sup 0}) of GCE with different ERGOs was comparatively investigated. Owing to increased surface areas and decreased defect density, the k{sup 0} values of ERGO/GCE initially increase and then decrease with incrementing of GO mass. When the morphology and surface real areas of ERGO-GCE are the same, an increased defect density induces an accelerated electron transfer rate. k{sup 0} valuesof ERGO-GCEs are about 1 order of magnitude higher than those of ERGO/GCEs due to the difference in the amount of edge planes. This work demonstrates that both defect densities and edge planes of ERGO play crucial roles in electron transfer kinetics.

  18. Sandwiched confinement of quantum dots in graphene matrix for efficient electron transfer and photocurrent production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Nan; Zheng, Kaibo; J. Karki, Khadga

    2015-01-01

    interlink QDs and significantly improve electronic coupling, resulting in fast electron transfer from photoexcited QDs to graphene with a rate constant of 1.3 × 109 s−1. Efficient electron transfer dramatically enhances photocurrent generation in a liquid-junction QD-sensitized solar cell where the hybrid......Quantum dots (QDs) and graphene are both promising materials for the development of new-generation optoelectronic devices. Towards this end, synergic assembly of these two building blocks is a key step but remains a challenge. Here, we show a one-step strategy for organizing QDs in a graphene...... matrix via interfacial self-assembly, leading to the formation of sandwiched hybrid QD-graphene nanofilms. We have explored structural features, electron transfer kinetics and photocurrent generation capacity of such hybrid nanofilms using a wide variety of advanced techniques. Graphene nanosheets...

  19. Coherence transfer and electron T1-, T2-relaxation in nitroxide spin labels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Derek

    2017-04-01

    Abragam's double-commutator spin operator method is used to analyse: 1) electron coherence transfer by intermolecular dipolar interaction between spin-label radicals, and 2) longitudinal and transverse electron spin relaxation by rotational modulation of the Zeeman and nitrogen-hyperfine anisotropies of isolated nitroxide spin labels. Results compatible with earlier treatments by Redfield theory are obtained without specifically evaluating matrix elements. Extension to single-transition operators for isolated nitroxides predicts electron coherence transfer by pseudosecular electron-nuclear dipolar interaction, in the absence of intermolecular dipolar coupling. This explains earlier experimental findings that coherence transfer (specifically dispersion-like distortion of the EPR absorption line shape) does not extrapolate to zero at low concentrations of nitroxide spin labels.

  20. Coherence transfer and electron T1-, T2-relaxation in nitroxide spin labels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marsh, Derek

    2017-01-01

    Abragam's double-commutator spin operator method is used to analyse: 1) electron coherence transfer by intermolecular dipolar interaction between spin-label radicals, and 2) longitudinal and transverse electron spin relaxation by rotational modulation of the Zeeman and nitrogen......-hyperfine anisotropies of isolated nitroxide spin labels. Results compatible with earlier treatments by Redfield theory are obtained without specifically evaluating matrix elements. Extension to single-transition operators for isolated nitroxides predicts electron coherence transfer by pseudosecular electron......-nuclear dipolar interaction, in the absence of intermolecular dipolar coupling. This explains earlier experimental findings that coherence transfer (specifically dispersion-like distortion of the EPR absorption line shape) does not extrapolate to zero at low concentrations of nitroxide spin labels....

  1. Challenges in reduction of dinitrogen by proton and electron transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Ham, Cornelis J M; Koper, Marc T M; Hetterscheid, Dennis G H

    2014-08-07

    Ammonia is an important nutrient for the growth of plants. In industry, ammonia is produced by the energy expensive Haber-Bosch process where dihydrogen and dinitrogen form ammonia at a very high pressure and temperature. In principle one could also reduce dinitrogen upon addition of protons and electrons similar to the mechanism of ammonia production by nitrogenases. Recently, major breakthroughs have taken place in our understanding of biological fixation of dinitrogen, of molecular model systems that can reduce dinitrogen, and in the electrochemical reduction of dinitrogen at heterogeneous surfaces. Yet for efficient reduction of dinitrogen with protons and electrons major hurdles still have to be overcome. In this tutorial review we give an overview of the different catalytic systems, highlight the recent breakthroughs, pinpoint common grounds and discuss the bottlenecks and challenges in catalytic reduction of dinitrogen.

  2. Electrochemical proton-coupled electron transfer of an osmium aquo complex: theoretical analysis of asymmetric tafel plots and transfer coefficients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludlow, Michelle K; Soudackov, Alexander V; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2010-02-03

    Electrochemical proton-coupled electron transfer of an osmium aquo complex attached to a self-assembled monolayer on a gold electrode is studied with a recently developed theoretical formulation. The calculated hydrogen/deuterium kinetic isotope effect for the standard rate constant, the cathodic transfer coefficient at zero overpotential, and the Tafel plot are in excellent agreement with experimental data. The input quantities to the heterogeneous rate constant expressions were calculated with density functional theory in conjunction with dielectric continuum models, and no parameters were fit to experimental data. The theoretical calculations indicate that the asymmetry of the Tafel plot and the deviation of the transfer coefficient at zero overpotential from the standard value of one-half arise from the change in the equilibrium proton donor-acceptor distance upon electron transfer. The direction of the asymmetry and deviation from one-half is determined by the sign of this distance change, and the magnitude of these effects is determined by the magnitude of this distance change, as well as the reorganization energy and the distance dependence of the overlap between the initial and final proton vibrational wave functions. This theory provides experimentally testable predictions for the impact of specific system properties on the qualitative behavior of the Tafel plots.

  3. Electronic Structure of the Perylene / Zinc Oxide Interface: A Computational Study of Photoinduced Electron Transfer and Impact of Surface Defects

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Jingrui

    2015-07-29

    The electronic properties of dye-sensitized semiconductor surfaces consisting of pery- lene chromophores chemisorbed on zinc oxide via different spacer-anchor groups, have been studied at the density-functional-theory level. The energy distributions of the donor states and the rates of photoinduced electron transfer from dye to surface are predicted. We evaluate in particular the impact of saturated versus unsaturated aliphatic spacer groups inserted between the perylene chromophore and the semiconductor as well as the influence of surface defects on the electron-injection rates.

  4. Fast spin information transfer between distant quantum dots using individual electrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, B; Hermelin, S; Takada, S; Yamamoto, M; Tarucha, S; Ludwig, A; Wieck, A D; Bäuerle, C; Meunier, T

    2016-08-01

    Transporting ensembles of electrons over long distances without losing their spin polarization is an important benchmark for spintronic devices. It usually requires injecting and probing spin-polarized electrons in conduction channels using ferromagnetic contacts or optical excitation. In parallel with this development, important efforts have been dedicated to achieving control of nanocircuits at the single-electron level. The detection and coherent manipulation of the spin of a single electron trapped in a quantum dot are now well established. Combined with the recently demonstrated control of the displacement of individual electrons between two distant quantum dots, these achievements allow the possibility of realizing spintronic protocols at the single-electron level. Here, we demonstrate that spin information carried by one or two electrons can be transferred between two quantum dots separated by a distance of 4 μm with a classical fidelity of 65%. We show that at present it is limited by spin flips occurring during the transfer procedure before and after electron displacement. Being able to encode and control information in the spin degree of freedom of a single electron while it is being transferred over distances of a few micrometres on nanosecond timescales will pave the way towards 'quantum spintronics' devices, which could be used to implement large-scale spin-based quantum information processing.

  5. Time-resolved measurement of intramolecular photoinduced electron transfer processes in perylene diimides (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Döring, Robin Carl; Baal, Eduard; Sundermeyer, Jörg; Chatterjee, Sangam

    2017-02-01

    Perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic acid (PTCDA) and respective derivatives (e.g. perylene diimide - PDI) are widely used as dyes but also for device applications such as organic field effect transistors or in organic photovoltaics. Due to their intrinsically high quantum efficiencies they are also used as spectroscopic standards. One major drawback of these materials is their low solubility in organic solvents which can be addressed by long alkyl substitutions. When introducing a tertiary amine into the molecule a mechanism known as photoinduced electron transfer (PET) can occur. Here, following an optically excited HOMO-LUMO transition of the core, an electron from the electron lone pair of the amine is transferred to the HOMO of the perylene core. Hence, radiative recombination is disallowed and photoluminescence effectively quenched. Here, we perform a systematic study of the distance dependence of the PET by introducing alkyle groups as spacer units between PDI core and the tertiary amine. Dynamics of the PET are extracted from ultrafast time-resolved photoluminescence measurement data. A rate equation model, simulating a three level system, reveals rate constant of the back electron transfer, otherwise not accessible with our experimental methods. Assuming a Marcus model of electron transfer, electronic coupling strength between the electronic states involved in the respective transitions can be calculated. In addition to the distance dependence, the effects of protonation and methylation of the the tertiary amine units are studied.

  6. Designed Surface Residue Substitutions in [NiFe] Hydrogenase that Improve Electron Transfer Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaac T. Yonemoto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Photobiological hydrogen production is an attractive, carbon-neutral means to convert solar energy to hydrogen. We build on previous research improving the Alteromonas macleodii “Deep Ecotype” [NiFe] hydrogenase, and report progress towards creating an artificial electron transfer pathway to supply the hydrogenase with electrons necessary for hydrogen production. Ferredoxin is the first soluble electron transfer mediator to receive high-energy electrons from photosystem I, and bears an electron with sufficient potential to efficiently reduce protons. Thus, we engineered a hydrogenase-ferredoxin fusion that also contained several other modifications. In addition to the C-terminal ferredoxin fusion, we truncated the C-terminus of the hydrogenase small subunit, identified as the available terminus closer to the electron transfer region. We also neutralized an anionic patch surrounding the interface Fe-S cluster to improve transfer kinetics with the negatively charged ferredoxin. Initial screening showed the enzyme tolerated both truncation and charge neutralization on the small subunit ferredoxin-binding face. While the enzyme activity was relatively unchanged using the substrate methyl viologen, we observed a marked improvement from both the ferredoxin fusion and surface modification using only dithionite as an electron donor. Combining ferredoxin fusion and surface charge modification showed progressively improved activity in an in vitro assay with purified enzyme.

  7. Charge transfer dynamics from adsorbates to surfaces with single active electron and configuration interaction based approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramakrishnan, Raghunathan, E-mail: r.ramakrishnan@unibas.ch [Institute of Physical Chemistry, National Center for Computational Design and Discovery of Novel Materials (MARVEL), Department of Chemistry, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 80, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland); Nest, Mathias [Theoretische Chemie, Technische Universität München, Lichtenbergstr. 4, 85747 Garching (Germany)

    2015-01-13

    Highlights: • We model electron dynamics across cyano alkanethiolates attached to gold cluster. • We present electron transfer time scales from TD-DFT and TD-CI based simulations. • Both DFT and CI methods qualitatively predict the trend in time scales. • TD-CI predicts the experimental relative time scale very accurately. - Abstract: We employ wavepacket simulations based on many-body time-dependent configuration interaction (TD-CI), and single active electron theories, to predict the ultrafast molecule/metal electron transfer time scales, in cyano alkanethiolates bonded to model gold clusters. The initial states represent two excited states where a valence electron is promoted to one of the two virtual π{sup ∗} molecular orbitals localized on the cyanide fragment. The ratio of the two time scales indicate the efficiency of one charge transfer channel over the other. In both our one-and many-electron simulations, this ratio agree qualitatively with each other as well as with the previously reported experimental time scales (Blobner et al., 2012), measured for a macroscopic metal surface. We study the effect of cluster size and the description of electron correlation on the charge transfer process.

  8. Enhanced Electronic Properties of SnO2 via Electron Transfer from Graphene Quantum Dots for Efficient Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jiangsheng; Huang, Kun; Yu, Xuegong; Yang, Zhengrui; Xiao, Ke; Qiang, Yaping; Zhu, Xiaodong; Xu, Lingbo; Wang, Peng; Cui, Can; Yang, Deren

    2017-09-26

    Tin dioxide (SnO2) has been demonstrated as an effective electron-transporting layer (ETL) for attaining high-performance perovskite solar cells (PSCs). However, the numerous trap states in low-temperature solution processed SnO2 will reduce the PSCs performance and result in serious hysteresis. Here, we report a strategy to improve the electronic properties in SnO2 through a facile treatment of the films with adding a small amount of graphene quantum dots (GQDs). We demonstrate that the photogenerated electrons in GQDs can transfer to the conduction band of SnO2. The transferred electrons from the GQDs will effectively fill the electron traps as well as improve the conductivity of SnO2, which is beneficial for improving the electron extraction efficiency and reducing the recombination at the ETLs/perovskite interface. The device fabricated with SnO2:GQDs could reach an average power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 19.2 ± 1.0% and a highest steady-state PCE of 20.23% with very little hysteresis. Our study provides an effective way to enhance the performance of perovskite solar cells through improving the electronic properties of SnO2.

  9. Poisson-distributed electron-transfer dynamics from single quantum dots to C60 molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Nianhui; Zhu, Haiming; Jin, Shengye; Zhan, Wei; Lian, Tianquan

    2011-01-25

    Functional quantum dot (QD)-based nanostructures are often constructed through the self-assembly of QDs with binding partners (molecules or other nanoparticles), a process that leads to a statistical distribution of the number of binding partners. Using single QD fluorescence spectroscopy, we probe this distribution and its effect on the function (electron-transfer dynamics) in QD-C60 complexes. Ensemble-averaged transient absorption and fluorescence decay as well as single QD fluorescence decay measurements show that the QD exciton emission was quenched by electron transfer from the QD to C60 molecules and the electron-transfer rate increases with the C60-to-QD ratio. The electron-transfer rate of single QD-C60 complexes fluctuates with time and varies among different QDs. The standard deviation increases linearly with the average of electron-transfer rates of single QD-C60 complexes, and the distributions of both quantities obey Poisson statistics. The observed distributions of single QD-C60 complexes and ensemble-averaged fluorescence decay kinetics can be described by a model that assumes a Poisson distribution of the number of adsorbed C60 molecules per QD. Our findings suggest that, in self-assembled QD nanostructures, the statistical distribution of the number of adsorbed partners can dominate the distributions of the averages and standard deviation of their interfacial dynamical properties.

  10. Charge transfer in the electron donor-acceptor complex BH3NH3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Yirong; Song, Lingchun; Wu, Wei; Zhang, Qianer

    2004-03-31

    As a simple yet strongly binding electron donor-acceptor (EDA) complex, BH(3)NH(3) serves as a good example to study the electron pair donor-acceptor complexes. We employed both the ab initio valence bond (VB) and block-localized wave function (BLW) methods to explore the electron transfer from NH(3) to BH(3). Conventionally, EDA complexes have been described by two diabatic states: one neutral state and one ionic charge-transferred state. Ab initio VB self-consistent field (VBSCF) computations generate the energy profiles of the two diabatic states together with the adiabatic (ground) state. Our calculations evidently demonstrated that the electron transfer between NH(3) and BH(3) falls in the abnormal regime where the reorganization energy is less than the exoergicity of the reaction. The nature of the NH(3)-BH(3) interaction is probed by an energy decomposition scheme based on the BLW method. We found that the variation of the charge-transfer energy with the donor-acceptor distance is insensitive to the computation levels and basis sets, but the estimation of the amount of electron transferred heavily depends on the population analysis procedures. The recent resurgence of interest in the nature of the rotation barrier in ethane prompted us to analyze the conformational change of BH(3)NH(3), which is an isoelectronic system with ethane. We found that the preference of the staggered structure over the eclipsed structure of BH(3)NH(3) is dominated by the Pauli exchange repulsion.

  11. Electron-transfer kinetics in cyanobacterial cells: methyl viologen is a poor inhibitor of linear electron flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sétif, Pierre

    2015-02-01

    The inhibitor methyl viologen (MV) has been widely used in photosynthesis to study oxidative stress. Its effects on electron transfer kinetics in Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 cells were studied to characterize its electron-accepting properties. For the first hundreds of flashes following MV addition at submillimolar concentrations, the kinetics of NADPH formation were hardly modified (less than 15% decrease in signal amplitude) with a significant signal decrease only observed after more flashes or continuous illumination. The dependence of the P700 photooxidation kinetics on the MV concentration exhibited a saturation effect at 0.3 mM MV, a concentration which inhibits the recombination reactions in photosystem I. The kinetics of NADPH formation and decay under continuous light with MV at 0.3 mM showed that MV induces the oxidation of the NADP pool in darkness and that the yield of linear electron transfer decreased by only 50% after 1.5-2 photosystem-I turnovers. The unexpectedly poor efficiency of MV in inhibiting NADPH formation was corroborated by in vitro flash-induced absorption experiments with purified photosystem-I, ferredoxin and ferredoxin-NADP(+)-oxidoreductase. These experiments showed that the second-order rate constants of MV reduction are 20 to 40-fold smaller than the competing rate constants involved in reduction of ferredoxin and ferredoxin-NADP(+)-oxidoreductase. The present study shows that MV, which accepts electrons in vivo both at the level of photosystem-I and ferredoxin, can be used at submillimolar concentrations to inhibit recombination reactions in photosystem-I with only a moderate decrease in the efficiency of fast reactions involved in linear electron transfer and possibly cyclic electron transfer. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. In situ raman spectroelectrochemistry of electron transfer between glassy carbon and a chemisorbed nitroazobenzene monolayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Takashi; McCreery, Richard L

    2002-09-11

    In situ Raman spectroscopy was used to monitor 4-nitroazobenzene (NAB) in an electrochemical cell, both as a free molecule and as a chemisorbed monolayer on a glassy carbon (GC) electrode surface. Reduction of free NAB exhibited two well-defined voltammetric couples in acetonitrile, and the accompanying spectral changes supported a mechanism involving two successive 1-e(-) transfers. Raman spectra of NAB chemisorbed to GC via diazonium ion reduction were obtained in acetonitrile with a high-sensitivity, line-focused CCD spectrometer. The chemisorbed NAB spectra were quite different from the free NAB spectra, and were sufficiently strong to monitor as a function of applied potential. In the potential range of +400 to -800 mV vs Ag/Ag(+), the intensity of the Raman bands associated with the phenyl-NO(2) moiety varied, implying an electronic interaction between the pi system of the graphitic substrate and the chemisorbed NAB molecules. Negative of -800 mV, a 1-e(-) voltammetric reduction peak was observed, which was reversible on the positive voltage scan. This peak was accompanied by significant spectral changes, particularly the loss of the N=N and NO(2) stretches. The spectra are consistent with formation of a quinoid structure containing a C=C double bond between the NAB and the graphitic surface. The electron transfer and spectral changes occurred over a wider potential range than expected for a conventional Nernstian equilibrium, but did not appear to be broadened by slow electron-transfer kinetics. The results imply a significant perturbation of electron transfer between the GC and the monolayer, caused by strong electronic coupling between the graphitic pi system and the NAB orbitals. Rather than a discrete electron transfer to a free molecule, the electron transfer to chemisorbed NAB is more gradual, and is presumably driven by the electric field at the electrode/solution interface.

  13. Distal [FeS]-Cluster Coordination in [NiFe]-Hydrogenase Facilitates Intermolecular Electron Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Petrenko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Biohydrogen is a versatile energy carrier for the generation of electric energy from renewable sources. Hydrogenases can be used in enzymatic fuel cells to oxidize dihydrogen. The rate of electron transfer (ET at the anodic side between the [NiFe]-hydrogenase enzyme distal iron–sulfur cluster and the electrode surface can be described by the Marcus equation. All parameters for the Marcus equation are accessible from Density Functional Theory (DFT calculations. The distal cubane FeS-cluster has a three-cysteine and one-histidine coordination [Fe4S4](His(Cys3 first ligation sphere. The reorganization energy (inner- and outer-sphere is almost unchanged upon a histidine-to-cysteine substitution. Differences in rates of electron transfer between the wild-type enzyme and an all-cysteine mutant can be rationalized by a diminished electronic coupling between the donor and acceptor molecules in the [Fe4S4](Cys4 case. The fast and efficient electron transfer from the distal iron–sulfur cluster is realized by a fine-tuned protein environment, which facilitates the flow of electrons. This study enables the design and control of electron transfer rates and pathways by protein engineering.

  14. Recent Advances in Photoinduced Electron Transfer Processes of Fullerene-Based Molecular Assemblies and Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osamu Ito

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Photosensitized electron-transfer processes of fullerenes hybridized with electron donating or other electron accepting molecules have been surveyed in this review on the basis of the recent results reported mainly from our laboratories. Fullerenes act as photo-sensitizing electron acceptors with respect to a wide variety of electron donors; in addition, fullerenes in the ground state also act as good electron acceptors in the presence of light-absorbing electron donors such as porphyrins. With single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs, the photoexcited fullerenes act as electron acceptor. In the case of triple fullerene/porphyrin/SWCNT architectures, the photoexcited porphyrins act as electron donors toward the fullerene and SWCNT. These mechanisms are rationalized with the molecular orbital considerations performed for these huge supramolecules. For the confirmation of the electron transfer processes, transient absorption methods have been used, in addition to time-resolved fluorescence spectral measurements. The kinetic data obtained in solution are found to be quite useful to predict the efficiencies of photovoltaic cells.

  15. Recent advances in photoinduced electron transfer processes of fullerene-based molecular assemblies and nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Osamu; D'Souza, Francis

    2012-05-16

    Photosensitized electron-transfer processes of fullerenes hybridized with electron donating or other electron accepting molecules have been surveyed in this review on the basis of the recent results reported mainly from our laboratories. Fullerenes act as photo-sensitizing electron acceptors with respect to a wide variety of electron donors; in addition, fullerenes in the ground state also act as good electron acceptors in the presence of light-absorbing electron donors such as porphyrins. With single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), the photoexcited fullerenes act as electron acceptor. In the case of triple fullerene/porphyrin/SWCNT architectures, the photoexcited porphyrins act as electron donors toward the fullerene and SWCNT. These mechanisms are rationalized with the molecular orbital considerations performed for these huge supramolecules. For the confirmation of the electron transfer processes, transient absorption methods have been used, in addition to time-resolved fluorescence spectral measurements. The kinetic data obtained in solution are found to be quite useful to predict the efficiencies of photovoltaic cells.

  16. DFT and time-resolved IR investigation of electron transfer between photogenerated 17- and 19-electron organometallic radicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cahoon, James B.; Kling, Matthias F.; Sawyer, Karma R.; Andersen, Lars K.; Harris, Charles B.

    2008-04-30

    The photochemical disproportionation mechanism of [CpW(CO){sub 3}]{sub 2} in the presence of Lewis bases PR{sub 3} was investigated on the nano- and microsecond time-scales with Step-Scan FTIR time-resolved infrared spectroscopy. 532 nm laser excitation was used to homolytically cleave the W-W bond, forming the 17-electron radicals CpW(CO){sub 3} and initiating the reaction. With the Lewis base PPh{sub 3}, disproportionation to form the ionic products CpW(CO){sub 3}PPh{sub 3}{sup +} and CpW(CO){sub 3}{sup -} was directly monitored on the microsecond time-scale. Detailed examination of the kinetics and concentration dependence of this reaction indicates that disproportionation proceeds by electron transfer from the 19-electron species CpW(CO){sub 3}PPh{sub 3} to the 17-electron species CpW(CO){sub 3}. This result is contrary to the currently accepted disproportionation mechanism which predicts electron transfer from the 19-electron species to the dimer [CpW(CO){sub 3}]{sub 2}. With the Lewis base P(OMe){sub 3} on the other hand, ligand substitution to form the product [CpW(CO){sub 2}P(OMe){sub 3}]{sub 2} is the primary reaction on the microsecond time-scale. Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations support the experimental results and suggest that the differences in the reactivity between P(OMe){sub 3} and PPh{sub 3} are due to steric effects. The results indicate that radical-to-radical electron transfer is a previously unknown but important process for the formation of ionic products with the organometallic dimer [CpW(CO){sub 3}]{sub 2} and may also be applicable to the entire class of organometallic dimers containing a single metal-metal bond.

  17. Reactivity of hydropersulfides toward the hydroxyl radical unraveled: disulfide bond cleavage, hydrogen atom transfer, and proton-coupled electron transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anglada, Josep M; Crehuet, Ramon; Adhikari, Sarju; Francisco, Joseph S; Xia, Yu

    2018-02-14

    Hydropersulfides (RSSH) are highly reactive as nucleophiles and hydrogen atom transfer reagents. These chemical properties are believed to be key for them to act as antioxidants in cells. The reaction involving the radical species and the disulfide bond (S-S) in RSSH, a known redox-active group, however, has been scarcely studied, resulting in an incomplete understanding of the chemical nature of RSSH. We have performed a high-level theoretical investigation on the reactions of the hydroxyl radical (˙OH) toward a set of RSSH (R = -H, -CH 3 , -NH 2 , -C(O)OH, -CN, and -NO 2 ). The results show that S-S cleavage and H-atom abstraction are the two competing channels. The electron inductive effect of R induces selective ˙OH substitution at one sulfur atom upon S-S cleavage, forming RSOH and ˙SH for the electron donating groups (EDGs), whereas producing HSOH and ˙SR for the electron withdrawing groups (EWGs). The H-Atom abstraction by ˙OH follows a classical hydrogen atom transfer (hat) mechanism, producing RSS˙ and H 2 O. Surprisingly, a proton-coupled electron transfer (pcet) process also occurs for R being an EDG. Although for RSSH having EWGs hat is the leading channel, S-S cleavage can be competitive or even dominant for the EDGs. The overall reactivity of RSSH toward ˙OH attack is greatly enhanced with the presence of an EDG, with CH 3 SSH being the most reactive species found in this study (overall rate constant: 4.55 × 10 12 M -1 s -1 ). Our results highlight the complexity in RSSH reaction chemistry, the extent of which is closely modulated by the inductive effect of the substituents in the case of the oxidation by hydroxyl radicals.

  18. Electron- and hydride-transfer reactivity of an isolable manganese(V)-oxo complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Kotani, Hiroaki; Prokop, Katharine A; Goldberg, David P

    2011-02-16

    The electron-transfer and hydride-transfer properties of an isolated manganese(V)−oxo complex, (TBP8Cz)Mn(V)(O) (1) (TBP8Cz = octa-tert-butylphenylcorrolazinato) were determined by spectroscopic and kinetic methods. The manganese(V)−oxo complex 1 reacts rapidly with a series of ferrocene derivatives ([Fe(C5H4Me)2], [Fe(C5HMe4)2], and ([Fe(C5Me5)2] = Fc*) to give the direct formation of [(TBP8Cz)Mn(III)(OH)]− ([2-OH]−), a two-electron-reduced product. The stoichiometry of these electron-transfer reactions was found to be (Fc derivative)/1 = 2:1 by spectral titration. The rate constants of electron transfer from ferrocene derivatives to 1 at room temperature in benzonitrile were obtained, and the successful application of Marcus theory allowed for the determination of the reorganization energies (λ) of electron transfer. The λ values of electron transfer from the ferrocene derivatives to 1 are lower than those reported for a manganese(IV)−oxo porphyrin. The presumed one-electron-reduced intermediate, a Mn(IV) complex, was not observed during the reduction of 1. However, a Mn(IV) complex was successfully generated via one-electron oxidation of the Mn(III) precursor complex 2 to give [(TBP8Cz)Mn(IV)]+ (3). Complex 3 exhibits a characteristic absorption band at λ(max) = 722 nm and an EPR spectrum at 15 K with g(max)′ = 4.68, g(mid)′ = 3.28, and g(min)′ = 1.94, with well-resolved 55Mn hyperfine coupling, indicative of a d3 Mn(IV)S = 3/2 ground state. Although electron transfer from [Fe(C5H4Me)2] to 1 is endergonic (uphill), two-electron reduction of 1 is made possible in the presence of proton donors (e.g., CH3CO2H, CF3CH2OH, and CH3OH). In the case of CH3CO2H, saturation behavior for the rate constants of electron transfer (k(et)) versus acid concentration was observed, providing insight into the critical involvement of H+ in the mechanism of electron transfer. Complex 1 was also shown to be competent to oxidize a series of dihydronicotinamide adenine

  19. Electron transfer in proteins: nonorthogonal projections onto donor-acceptor subspace of the Hilbert space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Andrade, Paulo C P; Freire, José A

    2004-04-22

    We develop nonorthogonal projectors, called Löwdin projectors, to construct an effective donor-acceptor system composed of localized donor (D) and acceptor (A) states of a long-distance electron transfer problem. When these states have a nonvanishing overlap with the bridge states these projectors are non-Hermitian and there are various possible effective two-level systems that can be built. We show how these can be constructed directly from the Schrödinger or Dyson equation projected onto the D-A subspace of the Hilbert space and explore these equations to determine the connection between Hamiltonian and Green function partitioning. We illustrate the use of these effective two-level systems in estimating the electron transfer rate in the context of a simple electron transfer model. (c) 2004 American Institute of Physics

  20. Three-dimensional optical transfer functions in the aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, L; Nellist, P D

    2014-05-01

    In the scanning transmission electron microscope, hardware aberration correctors can now correct for the positive spherical aberration of round electron lenses. These correctors make use of nonround optics such as hexapoles or octupoles, leading to the limiting aberrations often being of a nonround type. Here we explore the effect of a number of potential limiting aberrations on the imaging performance of the scanning transmission electron microscope through their resulting optical transfer functions. In particular, the response of the optical transfer function to changes in defocus are examined, given that this is the final aberration to be tuned just before image acquisition. The resulting three-dimensional optical transfer functions also allow an assessment of the performance of a system for focal-series experiments or optical sectioning applications. © 2014 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2014 Royal Microscopical Society.

  1. Technology transfer present and futures in the electronic arts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Degger

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We are entering an era where creating the fantastical is possible in the arts. In the areas of mixed reality and biological arts, responsive works are created based on advances in basic science and technology. This is enabling scientists and artists to pose new questions. As the time between discovery and application is so short, artists need imaginative ways of accessing new technology in order to critique and use it.These are the new paints that the majority of artists cannot afford or access, technology to enable cloning of DNA, to print channels on a chip, to access proprietary 3G networks. Currently, partnerships or residencies are used to facilitate artist’s access to these technologies. What would they do if technology was available that enabled them to make any art work they so desire? Are the limitations in current technology an advantage rather than a disadvantage in some of their works? Does interaction with technologists make their work more robust? Are there disadvantages? How do they get access to the technology they require? Open source or proprietary? Or have they encountered the situation where their vision is greater than technology allows. When their work breaks because of this fact, is their art broken? Blast Theory (Brighton,UK, FoAM(Brussels, Belgium and Amsterdam, Netherlands, SymbioticA (Perth, Australia are organisations pushing technological boundaries in the service of art. This paper addresses some questions of technology transfer in relation to recent artworks, particularly I like Frank in Adelaide (Blast Theory, transient reality generators (trg (FoAM and Multi electrode array artist (MeART (SymbioticA.

  2. Effect of energy transfer from atomic electron shell to an α particle emitted by decaying nucleus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Igashov, S. Yu., E-mail: igashov@theor.mephi.ru [All-Russian Research Institute of Automatics (Russian Federation); Tchuvil’sky, Yu. M. [Moscow State University, Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics (Russian Federation)

    2016-12-15

    The process of energy transfer from the electron shell of an atom to an α particle propagating through the shell is formulated mathematically. Using the decay of the {sup 226}Ra nucleus as an example, it is demonstrated that this phenomenon increases the α-decay intensity in contrast with other known effects of similar type. Moreover, the α decay of the nucleus is more strongly affected by the energy transfer than by all other effects taken together.

  3. Imaging charge and energy transfer in molecules using free-electron lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudenko, Artem

    2014-05-01

    Charge and energy transfer reactions drive numerous important processes in physics, chemistry and biology, with applications ranging from X-ray astrophysics to artificial photosynthesis and molecular electronics. Experimentally, the central goal in studies of transfer phenomena is to trace the spatial localization of charge at a given time. Because of their element and site sensitivity, ultrafast X-rays provide a promising tool to address this goal. In this talk I will discuss several experiments where free-electron lasers were employed to study charge and energy transfer dynamics in fragmenting molecules. In a first example, we used intense, 70 femtosecond 1.5 keV pulses from the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) to study distance dependence of electron transfer in laser-dissociated methyl iodide molecules. Inducing well-localized positive charge on the heavy iodine atom, we observe signature of electron transition from the separated methyl group up to the distances of 35 atomic units. In a complementary experiment, we studied charge exchange between two partners in a dissociating molecular iodine employing a pump-probe arrangement with two identical 90 eV pulses from the Free-Electron LASer in Hamburg (FLASH). In both cases, the effective spatial range of the electron transfer can be reasonably described by a classical over-the-barrier model developed for ion-atom collisions. Finally, I will discuss a time-resolved measurement on non-local relaxation mechanism based on a long-range energy transfer, the so-called interatomic Coulombic decay. This work was supported by Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences Division, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Office of Science, US Department of Energy and by the Kansas NSF ``First Award'' program.

  4. Promotion of multi-electron transfer for enhanced photocatalysis: A review focused on oxygen reduction reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Changhua [Centre for Advanced Optoelectronic Functional Materials Research, and Key Laboratory for UV-Emitting Materials and Technology of Ministry of Education, Northeast Normal University, Changchun 130024 (China); College of Chemistry and Biology, Beihua University, Jilin 132013 (China); Zhang, Xintong, E-mail: xtzhang@nenu.edu.cn [Centre for Advanced Optoelectronic Functional Materials Research, and Key Laboratory for UV-Emitting Materials and Technology of Ministry of Education, Northeast Normal University, Changchun 130024 (China); Liu, Yichun [Centre for Advanced Optoelectronic Functional Materials Research, and Key Laboratory for UV-Emitting Materials and Technology of Ministry of Education, Northeast Normal University, Changchun 130024 (China)

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • Oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in photocatalysis process is focused. • Multi-electron transfer ORR is reviewed. • This review provides a guide to access to enhanced photocatalysis via multi-electron transfer. - Abstract: Semiconductor photocatalysis has attracted significant interest for solar light induced environmental remediation and solar fuel generation. As is well known, photocatalytic performance is determined by three steps: photoexcitation, separation and transport of photogenerated charge carriers, and surface reactions. To achieve higher efficiency, significant efforts have been made on improvement of efficiency of above first two steps, which have been well documented in recent review articles. In contrast, this review intends to focus on strategies moving onto the third step of improvement for enhanced photocatalysis wherein active oxygen species including superoxide radical, hydrogen peroxide, hydroxyl radical are in situ detected. Particularly, surface electron-transfer reduction of oxygen over single component photocatalysts is reviewed and systems enabling multi-electron transfer induced oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) are highlighted. It is expected this review could provide a guideline for readers to better understand the critical role of ORR over photocatalyst in charge carrier separation and transfer and obtain reliable results for enhanced aerobic photocatalysis.

  5. Human ceruloplasmin. Intramolecular electron transfer kinetics and equilibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, O; Bendahl, L; Skov, L K

    1999-01-01

    and indeed electron equilibration between T1A and the trinuclear copper center in the domain 1-6 interface takes place with a rate constant of 2.9 +/- 0.6 s(-1). The equilibrium constant is 0.17. Following reduction of T1A Cu(II), another ET process takes place between RSSR(-) and T1B copper(II) of domain 4......) copper centers, the following is proposed. The first T1 copper(II) ion to be reduced in ceruloplasmin is the blue copper center of domain 6 (T1A) by ET from RSSR(-) of domain 5. The rate constant is 28 +/- 2 s(-1) at 279 K and pH 7.0. T1A is in close covalent contact with the type 3 copper pair...... with a rate constant of 3.9 +/- 0.8. No reoxidation of T1B Cu(I) could be resolved. It appears that the third T1 center (T1C of domain 2) is not participating in intramolecular ET, as it seems to be in a reduced state in the resting enzyme....

  6. The effects of fulvic acid on microbial denitrification: promotion of NADH generation, electron transfer, and consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mu; Su, Yinglong; Chen, Yinguang; Wan, Rui; Zheng, Xiong; Liu, Kun

    2016-06-01

    The heterotrophic denitrification requires the participation of electrons which are derived from direct electron donor (usually nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH)), and the electrons are transferred via electron transport system in denitrifiers and then consumed by denitrifying enzymes. Despite the reported electron transfer ability of humic substances (HS), the influences of fulvic acid (FA), an ubiquitous major component of HS, on promoting NADH generation, electron transfer, and consumption in denitrification process have never been reported. The presence of FA, compared with the control, was found not only significantly improved the total nitrogen (TN) removal efficiency (99.9 % versus 74.8 %) but remarkably reduced the nitrite accumulation (0.2 against 43.8 mg/L) and N2O emission (0.003 against 0.240 mg nitrogen/mg TN removed). The mechanisms study showed that FA increased the metabolism of carbon source via glycolysis and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle pathways to produce more available NADH. FA also facilitated the electron transfer activities from NADH to denitrifying enzymes via complex I and complex III in electron transport system, which improved the reduction of nitrate and accelerated the transformations of nitrite and N2O, and lower nitrite and N2O accumulations were therefore observed. In addition, the consumption of electrons in denitrification was enhanced due to FA stimulating the synthesis and the catalytic activity of key denitrifying enzymes, especially nitrite reductase and N2O reductase. It will provide an important new insight into the potential effect of FA on microbial denitrification metabolism process and even nitrogen cycle in nature niches.

  7. Photo-induced regeneration of hormones by electron transfer processes: Potential biological and medical consequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Getoff, Nikola, E-mail: nikola.getoff@univie.ac.a [Section of Radiation Biology, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Vienna, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Hartmann, Johannes [Department of Gynecologic Endocrinology and Reproduction, Medical University of Vienna, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Schittl, Heike [Section of Radiation Biology, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Vienna, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Gerschpacher, Marion [Department of Gynecologic Endocrinology and Reproduction, Medical University of Vienna, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Quint, Ruth Maria [Section of Radiation Biology, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Vienna, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2011-08-15

    Based on the previous results concerning electron transfer processes in biological substances, it was of interest to investigate if hormone transients resulting by e.g. electron emission can be regenerated. The presented results prove for the first time that the hormone transients originating by the electron emission process can be successfully regenerated by the transfer of electrons from a potent electron donor, such as vitamin C (VitC). Investigations were performed using progesterone (PRG), testosterone (TES) and estrone (E1) as representatives of hormones. By irradiation with monochromatic UV light ({lambda}=254 nm) in a media of 40% water and 60% ethanol, the degradation as well as the regeneration of the hormones was studied with each hormone individually and in the mixture with VitC as a function of the absorbed UV dose, using HPLC. Calculated from the obtained initial yields, the determined regeneration of PRG amounted to 52.7%, for TES to 58.6% and for E1 to 90.9%. The consumption of VitC was determined in the same way. The reported results concerning the regeneration of hormones by the transfer of electrons from an electron donor offer a new, promising method for the therapy with hormones. As a consequence of the regeneration of hormones, a decreased formation of carcinogenic metabolites is expected.

  8. Electron Transfer Mechanism in Gold Surface Modified with Self-Assembly Monolayers from First Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Filipe C. D. A.; Iost, Rodrigo M.; Crespilho, Frank N.; Caldas, Marília J.; Calzolari, Arrigo; Petrilli, Helena M.

    2013-03-01

    We report the investigation of electron tunneling mechanism of peptide ferrocenyl-glycylcystamine self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) onto Au (111) electrode surfaces. Recent experimental investigations showed that electron transfer in peptides can occur across long distances by separating the donor from the acceptor. This mechanism can be further fostered by the presence of electron donor terminations of Fc terminal units on SAMs but the charge transfer mechanism is still not clear. We study the interaction of the peptide ferrocenyl-glycylcystamine on the Au (111) from first principles calculations to evaluate the electron transfer mechanism. For this purpose, we used the Kohn Sham (KS) scheme for the Density Functional Theory (DFT) as implemented in the Quantum-ESPRESSO suit of codes, using Vandebilt ultrasoft pseudopotentials and GGA-PBE exchange correlation functional to evaluate the ground-state atomic and electronic structure of the system. The analysis of KS orbital at the Fermi Energy showed high electronic density localized in Fc molecules and the observation of a minor contribution from the solvent and counter ion. Based on the results, we infer evidences of electron tunneling mechanism from the molecule to the Au(111). We acknowledge FAPESP for grant support. Also, LCCA/USP, RICE and CENAPAD for computational resources.

  9. The charger transfer electronic coupling in diabatic perspective: A multi-state density functional theory study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xinwei; Qu, Zexing; Gao, Jiali

    2018-01-01

    The multi-state density functional theory (MSDFT) provides a convenient way to estimate electronic coupling of charge transfer processes based on a diabatic representation. Its performance has been benchmarked against the HAB11 database with a mean unsigned error (MUE) of 17 meV between MSDFT and ab initio methods. The small difference may be attributed to different representations, diabatic from MSDFT and adiabatic from ab initio calculations. In this discussion, we conclude that MSDFT provides a general and efficient way to estimate the electronic coupling for charge-transfer rate calculations based on the Marcus-Hush model.

  10. Fast electron transfer through a single molecule natively structured redox protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Della Pia, Eduardo Antonio; Chi, Qijin; Macdonald, J. Emyr

    2012-01-01

    of the conductance through single-molecules of the electron transfer protein cytochrome b562 in its native conformation, under pseudo-physiological conditions. This is achieved by thiol (SH) linker pairs at opposite ends of the molecule through protein engineering, resulting in defined covalent contact between...... and remarkably high conductance was observed in this relatively complex electron transfer system, with single-molecule conductance values peaking around 18 nS and 12 nS for the SH-SA and SH-LA cytochrome b562 molecules near zero electrochemical overpotential. This strongly points to the important role...

  11. Creation, destruction, and transfer of atomic multipole moments by electron scattering: Quantum-mechanical treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csanak, G.; Kilcrease, D. P.; Fursa, D. V.; Bray, I.

    2008-12-01

    Using the wave-packet propagation method of Rodberg and Thaler and the density matrix method of Fano and Blum, we have defined by completely quantum-mechanical methods the cross sections for the creation, destruction, and transfer of atomic multipole moments by both elastic and inelastic scattering of electrons by atomic targets. All cross sections obtained quantum mechanically, except for the coherence transfer cross sections, agree in form with those obtained semiclassically by Fujimoto and co-workers. We also used the converged close-coupling (CCC) method to calculate numerically some of the above cross sections for selected transitions in electron scattering from hydrogen and barium atoms.

  12. Direct electron transfer: an approach for electrochemical biosensors with higher selectivity and sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freire Renato S.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The most promising approach for the development of electrochemical biosensors is to establish a direct electrical communication between the biomolecules and the electrode surface. This review focuses on advances, directions and strategies in the development of third generation electrochemical biosensors. Subjects covered include a brief description of the fundamentals of the electron transfer phenomenon and amperometric biosensor development (different types and new oriented enzyme immobilization techniques. Special attention is given to different redox enzymes and proteins capable of electrocatalyzing reactions via direct electron transfer. The analytical applications and future trends for third generation biosensors are also presented and discussed.

  13. Characterization of photo-induced electron and hole transfer in a porphyrin based ambipolar organic molecule with cascade energy levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tianyang; Weerasinghe, Krishanthi C.; Sun, Haiya; Li, Ping'an; Liu, Dongzhi; Li, Wei; Hu, Wenping; Zhou, Xueqin; Wang, Lichang

    2017-08-01

    A porphyrin based ambipolar organic molecule consisting of styrene based triphenylamine derivative (MTPA) as electron donor, s-triazine group (TRC) as electron acceptor 1 and metal-free tetraphenyl porphyrin (HTPP) as electron acceptor 2 was synthesized and characterized using computational methods and electrochemical and spectroscopic measurements. The kinetics analysis indicates that the photo-induced charge-separated states, MTPA.+-TRC-HTPP.-, were generated by sequential electron transfers from MTPA to TRC then to HTPP and/or a direct hole transfer from HTPP to MTPA. In toluene, the charge-separated states were formed with 54% through electron transfer and 46% through hole transfer once MTPA moiety was excited. However, in dichloromethane, they were formed with 75% through electron transfer and 25% through hole transfer. Furthermore, more charge-separated species were generated in dichloromethane than in toluene.

  14. Ru(II)-diimine functionalized metalloproteins: From electron transfer studies to light-driven biocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Quan; Kato, Mallory; Cheruzel, Lionel

    2016-05-01

    The unique photochemical properties of Ru(II)-diimine complexes have helped initiate a series of seminal electron transfer studies in metalloenzymes. It has thus been possible to experimentally determine rate constants for long-range electron transfers. These studies have laid the foundation for the investigation of reactive intermediates in heme proteins and for the design of light-activated biocatalysts. Various metalloenzymes such as hydrogenase, carbon monoxide dehydrogenase, nitrogenase, laccase and cytochrome P450 BM3 have been functionalized with Ru(II)-diimine complexes. Upon visible light-excitation, these photosensitized metalloproteins are capable of sustaining photocatalytic activity to reduce small molecules such as protons, acetylene, hydrogen cyanide and carbon monoxide or activate molecular dioxygen to produce hydroxylated products. The Ru(II)-diimine photosensitizers are hence able to deliver multiple electrons to metalloenzymes buried active sites, circumventing the need for the natural redox partners. In this review, we will highlight the key achievements of the light-driven biocatalysts, which stem from the extensive electron transfer investigations. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Biodesign for Bioenergetics--the design and engineering of electronic transfer cofactors, proteins and protein networks, edited by Ronald L. Koder and J.L. Ross Anderson. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Comparing the temperature dependence of photosynthetic electron transfer in Chloroflexus aurantiacus and Rhodobactor sphaeroides reaction centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhi; Lin, Su; Xin, Yueyong; Wang, Haiyu; Blankenship, Robert E; Woodbury, Neal W

    2011-09-29

    The process of electron transfer from the special pair, P, to the primary electron donor, H(A), in quinone-depleted reaction centers (RCs) of Chloroflexus (Cf.) aurantiacus has been investigated over the temperature range from 10 to 295 K using time-resolved pump-probe spectroscopic techniques. The kinetics of the electron transfer reaction, P* → P(+)H(A)(-), was found to be nonexponential, and the degree of nonexponentiality increased strongly as temperature decreased. The temperature-dependent behavior of electron transfer in Cf. aurantiacus RCs was compared with that of the purple bacterium Rhodobacter (Rb.) sphaeroides . Distinct transitions were found in the temperature-dependent kinetics of both Cf. aurantiacus and Rb. sphaeroides RCs, at around 220 and 160 K, respectively. Structural differences between these two RCs, which may be associated with those differences, are discussed. It is suggested that weaker protein-cofactor hydrogen bonding, stronger electrostatic interactions at the protein surface, and larger solvent interactions likely contribute to the higher transition temperature in Cf. aurantiacus RCs temperature-dependent kinetics compared with that of Rb. sphaeroides RCs. The reaction-diffusion model provides an accurate description for the room-temperature electron transfer kinetics in Cf. aurantiacus RCs with no free parameters, using coupling and reorganization energy values previously determined for Rb. sphaeroides , along with an experimental measure of protein conformational diffusion dynamics and an experimental literature value of the free energy gap between P* and P(+)H(A)(-). © 2011 American Chemical Society

  16. Analysis of the non-Markovianity for electron transfer reactions in an oligothiophene-fullerene heterojunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangaud, E.; Meier, C.; Desouter-Lecomte, M.

    2017-09-01

    The non-Markovianity of the electron transfer in an oligothiophene-fullerene heterojunction described by a spin-boson model is analyzed using the time dependent decoherence canonical rates and the volume of accessible states in the Bloch sphere. The dynamical map of the reduced electronic system is computed by the hierarchical equations of motion methodology (HEOM) providing an exact dynamics. Transitory witness of non-Markovianity is linked to the bath dynamics analyzed from the HEOM auxiliary matrices. The signature of the collective bath mode detected from HEOM in each electronic state is compared with predictions of the effective mode extracted from the spectral density. We show that including this main reaction coordinate in a one-dimensional vibronic system coupled to a residual bath satisfactorily describes the electron transfer by a simple Markovian Redfield equation. Non-Markovianity is computed for three inter fragment distances and compared with a priori criterion based on the system and bath characteristic timescales.

  17. Potential for direct interspecies electron transfer in methanogenic wastewater digester aggregates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morita, Masahiko; Malvankar, Nikhil S; Franks, Ashley E

    2011-01-01

    Mechanisms for electron transfer within microbial aggregates derived from an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor converting brewery waste to methane were investigated in order to better understand the function of methanogenic consortia. The aggregates were electrically conductive, with conduc......Mechanisms for electron transfer within microbial aggregates derived from an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor converting brewery waste to methane were investigated in order to better understand the function of methanogenic consortia. The aggregates were electrically conductive...... metallic-like conductance previously described for the conductive pili of Geobacter sulfurreducens and was inconsistent with electron conduction through minerals. Studies in which aggregates were incubated with high concentrations of potential electron donors demonstrated that the aggregates had...

  18. Electrocatalytic investigation of light-induced electron transfer between cytochrome c6 and photosystem I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proux-Delrouyre, Vanessa; Demaille, Christophe; Leibl, Winfried; Sétif, Pierre; Bottin, Hervé; Bourdillon, Christian

    2003-11-12

    A light-activated electron-transfer chain was assembled using solubilized cyanobacterial photosystem I as photoactive enzyme, cytochrome c(6) (also from cyanobacteria) as electron donor, and methyl viologen as electron acceptor. The photocatalytic activity of the ensemble was measured by direct and reversible electrochemistry of cytochrome c(6) at a surface-modified gold electrode. Analysis of the electrochemical response with an appropriate model for the reaction mechanism allowed the relation of the overall catalytic reaction rate to the individual steps of the catalytic cycle. Second-order rate constants were determined for the first time under steady-state conditions. The results validate this approach as an efficient method for the study of electron transfer between photoactive enzymes and their redox partners.

  19. Quantifying electron transfer reactions in biological systems: what interactions play the major role?

    OpenAIRE

    Emil Sjulstok; Jógvan Magnus Haugaard Olsen; Ilia A. Solov’yov

    2015-01-01

    Various biological processes involve the conversion of energy into forms that are usable for chemical transformations and are quantum mechanical in nature. Such processes involve light absorption, excited electronic states formation, excitation energy transfer, electrons and protons tunnelling which for example occur in photosynthesis, cellular respiration, DNA repair, and possibly magnetic field sensing. Quantum biology uses computation to model biological interactions in light of quantum me...

  20. Picosecond laser studies of the charge-transfer reaction of excited triplet diphenylcarbene with electron donors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitzmann, E. V.; Langan, J.; Eisenthal, K. B.

    1983-12-01

    Evidence of a one-electron transfer process in a carbene reaction has been observed for the first time. The example is the quenching of the photoexcited triplet state of diphenylcarbene ( 3*DPC) by electron donors. Measurement of the fluorescence lifetime as a function of donor concentration yielded the bimolecular rate constant, 3* k. An explanation is offered as to why 3* and 1DPC react efficiently with amines as well as alcohols, whereas the ground triplet, 3DPC, does not.

  1. Constraint-based modeling of carbon fixation and the energetics of electron transfer in Geobacter metallireducens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feist, Adam M; Nagarajan, Harish; Rotaru, Amelia-Elena; Tremblay, Pier-Luc; Zhang, Tian; Nevin, Kelly P; Lovley, Derek R; Zengler, Karsten

    2014-04-01

    Geobacter species are of great interest for environmental and biotechnology applications as they can carry out direct electron transfer to insoluble metals or other microorganisms and have the ability to assimilate inorganic carbon. Here, we report on the capability and key enabling metabolic machinery of Geobacter metallireducens GS-15 to carry out CO2 fixation and direct electron transfer to iron. An updated metabolic reconstruction was generated, growth screens on targeted conditions of interest were performed, and constraint-based analysis was utilized to characterize and evaluate critical pathways and reactions in G. metallireducens. The novel capability of G. metallireducens to grow autotrophically with formate and Fe(III) was predicted and subsequently validated in vivo. Additionally, the energetic cost of transferring electrons to an external electron acceptor was determined through analysis of growth experiments carried out using three different electron acceptors (Fe(III), nitrate, and fumarate) by systematically isolating and examining different parts of the electron transport chain. The updated reconstruction will serve as a knowledgebase for understanding and engineering Geobacter and similar species.

  2. Constraint-based modeling of carbon fixation and the energetics of electron transfer in Geobacter metallireducens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam M Feist

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Geobacter species are of great interest for environmental and biotechnology applications as they can carry out direct electron transfer to insoluble metals or other microorganisms and have the ability to assimilate inorganic carbon. Here, we report on the capability and key enabling metabolic machinery of Geobacter metallireducens GS-15 to carry out CO2 fixation and direct electron transfer to iron. An updated metabolic reconstruction was generated, growth screens on targeted conditions of interest were performed, and constraint-based analysis was utilized to characterize and evaluate critical pathways and reactions in G. metallireducens. The novel capability of G. metallireducens to grow autotrophically with formate and Fe(III was predicted and subsequently validated in vivo. Additionally, the energetic cost of transferring electrons to an external electron acceptor was determined through analysis of growth experiments carried out using three different electron acceptors (Fe(III, nitrate, and fumarate by systematically isolating and examining different parts of the electron transport chain. The updated reconstruction will serve as a knowledgebase for understanding and engineering Geobacter and similar species.

  3. Role of solvent dynamics in ultrafast photoinduced proton-coupled electron transfer reactions in solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazra, Anirban; Soudackov, Alexander V; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2010-09-30

    A theoretical formulation for modeling photoinduced nonequilibrium proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions in solution is presented. In this formulation, the PCET system is described by donor and acceptor electron-proton vibronic free energy surfaces that depend on a single collective solvent coordinate. Dielectric continuum theory is used to obtain a generalized Langevin equation of motion for this collective solvent coordinate. The terms in this equation depend on the solvent properties, such as the dielectric constants, relaxation time, and molecular moment of inertia, as well as the solute properties characterizing the vibronic surfaces. The ultrafast dynamics following photoexcitation is simulated using a surface hopping method in conjunction with the Langevin equation of motion. This methodology is used to examine a series of model photoinduced PCET systems, where the initial nonequilibrium state is prepared by vertical photoexcitation from the ground electronic state to the donor electronic state. Analysis of the dynamical trajectories provides insight into the interplay between the solvent dynamics and the electron-proton transfer for these types of processes. In addition, these model studies illustrate how the coupling between the electron-proton transfer and the solvent dynamics can be tuned by altering the solute and solvent properties.

  4. Thermal Relaxation in Titanium Nanowires: Signatures of Inelastic Electron-Boundary Scattering in Heat Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elo, Teemu; Lähteenmäki, Pasi; Golubev, Dmitri; Savin, Alexander; Arutyunov, Konstantin; Hakonen, Pertti

    2017-11-01

    We have employed noise thermometry for investigations of thermal relaxation between the electrons and the substrate in nanowires patterned from 40-nm-thick titanium film on top of silicon wafers covered by a native oxide. By controlling the electronic temperature T_e by Joule heating at the base temperature of a dilution refrigerator, we probe the electron-phonon coupling and the thermal boundary resistance at temperatures T_e= 0.5-3 K. Using a regular T^5-dependent electron-phonon coupling of clean metals and a T^4-dependent interfacial heat flow, we deduce a small contribution for the direct energy transfer from the titanium electrons to the substrate phonons due to inelastic electron-boundary scattering.

  5. pH-dependent electron transfer reaction and direct bioelectrocatalysis of the quinohemoprotein pyranose dehydrogenase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeda, Kouta [Department of Biotechnology and Life Science, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Matsumura, Hirotoshi; Ishida, Takuya [Department of Biomaterial Sciences, Graduate School of Agriculture and Life Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8657 (Japan); Yoshida, Makoto [Department of Environmental and Natural Resource Science, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Fuchu, Tokyo 183-8509 (Japan); Igarashi, Kiyohiko; Samejima, Masahiro [Department of Biomaterial Sciences, Graduate School of Agriculture and Life Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8657 (Japan); Ohno, Hiroyuki [Department of Biotechnology and Life Science, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Nakamura, Nobuhumi, E-mail: nobu1@cc.tuat.ac.jp [Department of Biotechnology and Life Science, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan)

    2016-08-26

    A pyranose dehydrogenase from Coprinopsis cinerea (CcPDH) is an extracellular quinohemoeprotein, which consists a b-type cytochrome domain, a pyrroloquinoline-quinone (PQQ) domain, and a family 1-type carbohydrate-binding module. The electron transfer reaction of CcPDH was studied using some electron acceptors and a carbon electrode at various pH levels. Phenazine methosulfate (PMS) reacted directly at the PQQ domain, whereas cytochrome c (cyt c) reacted via the cytochrome domain of intact CcPDH. Thus, electrons are transferred from reduced PQQ in the catalytic domain of CcPDH to heme b in the N-terminal cytochrome domain, which acts as a built-in mediator and transfers electron to a heterogenous electron transfer protein. The optimal pH values of the PMS reduction (pH 6.5) and the cyt c reduction (pH 8.5) differ. The catalytic currents for the oxidation of L-fucose were observed within a range of pH 4.5 to 11. Bioelectrocatalysis of CcPDH based on direct electron transfer demonstrated that the pH profile of the biocatalytic current was similar to the reduction activity of cyt c characters. - Highlights: • pH dependencies of activity were different for the reduction of cyt c and DCPIP. • DET-based bioelectrocatalysis of CcPDH was observed. • The similar pH-dependent profile was found with cyt c and electrode. • The present results suggested that IET reaction of CcPDH shows pH dependence.

  6. Role of the photosynthetic electron transfer chain in electrogenic activity of cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisciotta, John M; Zou, Yongjin; Baskakov, Ilia V

    2011-07-01

    Certain anaerobic bacteria, termed electrogens, produce an electric current when electrons from oxidized organic molecules are deposited to extracellular metal oxide acceptors. In these heterotrophic "metal breathers", the respiratory electron transport chain (R-ETC) works in concert with membrane-bound cytochrome oxidases to transfer electrons to the extracellular acceptors. The diversity of bacteria able to generate an electric current appears more widespread than previously thought, and aerobic phototrophs, including cyanobacteria, possess electrogenic activity. However, unlike heterotrophs, cyanobacteria electrogenic activity is light dependent, which suggests that a novel pathway could exist. To elucidate the electrogenic mechanism of cyanobacteria, the current studies used site-specific inhibitors to target components of the photosynthetic electron transport chain (P-ETC) and cytochrome oxidases. Here, we show that (1) P-ETC and, particularly, water photolysed by photosystem II (PSII) is the source of electrons discharged to the environment by illuminated cyanobacteria, and (2) water-derived electrons are transmitted from PSII to extracellular electron acceptors via plastoquinone and cytochrome bd quinol oxidase. Two cyanobacterial genera (Lyngbya and Nostoc) displayed very similar electrogenic responses when treated with P-ETC site-specific inhibitors, suggesting a conserved electrogenic pathway. We propose that in cyanobacteria, electrogenic activity may represent a form of overflow metabolism to protect cells under high-intensity light. This study offers insight into electron transfer between phototrophic microorganisms and the environment and expands our knowledge into biologically based mechanisms for harnessing solar energy.

  7. Crown-ether linked ruthenium-coronates a new type of photostable electron transfer-sensitizers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bossmann, S.; Duerr, H. (Universitaet des Saarlandes, Saarbruecken (Germany))

    1992-07-01

    A new interesting class of Ru-coronates was prepared containing a cage tritopic ligand bound to Ru. They have a high photostability and the bimolecular electron transfer of cage complexes is demonstrated for the first time by employing the new Ru coronates in a sacrificial hydrogen producing system.

  8. The fully relativistic foundation of linear transfer theory in electron optics based on the Dirac equation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferwerda, H.A.; Hoenders, B.J.; Slump, C.H.

    The fully relativistic quantum mechanical treatment of paraxial electron-optical image formation initiated in the previous paper (this issue) is worked out and leads to a rigorous foundation of the linear transfer theory. Moreover, the status of the relativistic scaling laws for mass and wavelength,

  9. 26 CFR 40.6302(a)-1 - Voluntary payments of excise taxes by electronic funds transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Voluntary payments of excise taxes by electronic funds transfer. 40.6302(a)-1 Section 40.6302(a)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS EXCISE TAXES EXCISE TAX PROCEDURAL REGULATIONS § 40.6302(a)-1 Voluntary payments of excise taxes by...

  10. Proton transfer in phenol-amine complexes: phenol electronic effects on free energy profile in solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aono, Shinji; Kato, Shigeki

    2010-12-01

    Free energy profiles for the proton transfer reactions in hydrogen-bonded complex of phenol with trimethylamine in methyl chloride solvent are studied with the reference interaction site model self-consistent field method. The reactions in both the electronic ground and excited states are considered. The second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation (MP) theory or the second-order multireference MP theory is used to evaluate the effect of the dynamical electron correlation on the free energy profiles. The free energy surface in the ground state shows a discrepancy with the experimental results for the related hydrogen-bonded complexes. To resolve this discrepancy, the effects of chloro-substitutions in phenol are examined, and its importance in stabilizing the ionic form is discussed. The temperature effect is also studied. In contrast to the ground state, the ππ* excited state of phenol-trimethylamine complex exhibits the proton transfer reaction with a low barrier. The reaction is almost thermoneutral. This is attributed to the reduction of proton affinity of phenol by the ππ* electronic excitation. We further examine the possibility of the electron-proton-coupled transfer in the ππ* state through the surface crossing with the charge transfer type πσ* state. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Bimolecular Excited-State Electron Transfer with Surprisingly Long-Lived Radical Ions

    KAUST Repository

    Alsam, Amani Abdu

    2015-09-02

    We explored the excited-state interactions of bimolecular, non-covalent systems consisting of cationic poly[(9,9-di(3,3’-N,N’-trimethyl-ammonium) propyl fluorenyl-2,7-diyl)-alt-co-(9,9-dioctyl-fluorenyl-2,7-diyl)] diiodide salt (PFN) and 1,4-dicyanobenzene (DCB) using steady-state and time-resolved techniques, including femto- and nanosecond transient absorption and femtosecond infrared spectroscopies with broadband capabilities. The experimental results demonstrated that photo-induced electron transfer from PFN to DCB occurs on the picosecond time scale, leading to the formation of PFN+• and DCB-• radical ions. Interestingly, real-time observations of the vibrational marker modes on the acceptor side provided direct evidence and insight into the electron transfer process indirectly inferred from UV-Vis experiments. The band narrowing on the picosecond time scale observed on the antisymmetric C-N stretching vibration of the DCB radical anion provides clear experimental evidence that a substantial part of the excess energy is channeled into vibrational modes of the electron transfer product and that the geminate ion pairs dissociate. More importantly, our nanosecond time-resolved data indicate that the charge-separated state is very long lived ( 30 ns) due to the dissociation of the contact radical ion pair into free ions. Finally, the fast electron transfer and slow charge recombination anticipate the current donor−acceptor system with potential applications in organic solar cells.

  12. Flavins mediate extracellular electron transfer in Gram-positive Bacillus megaterium strain LLD-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    You, Le-Xing; Liu, Li-Dan; Xiao, Yong

    2018-01-01

    The extracellular electron transfer (EET) mechanism of an isolated Gram-positive Bacillus megaterium strain (LLD-1), identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing and physiological analysis, was investigated in the present study. The electrochemical activity of strain LLD-1 was confirmed by electrochemi...

  13. Electron Transfer in Chemistry and Biology–The Primary Events in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 16; Issue 12. Electrons Transfer in Chemistry and Biology - The Primary Events in Photosynthesis. V Krishnan. Volume 16 Issue 12 December 2011 pp 1201-1210. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  14. Electron Transfer in Chemistry and Biology–The Primary Events in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 2; Issue 12. Electron Transfer in Chemistry and Biology – The Primary Events in Photosynthesis. V Krishnan. General Article Volume 2 Issue 12 December 1997 pp 77-86. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  15. Marcus Theory: Thermodynamics CAN Control the Kinetics of Electron Transfer Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverstein, Todd P.

    2012-01-01

    Although it is generally true that thermodynamics do not influence kinetics, this is NOT the case for electron transfer reactions in solution. Marcus Theory explains why this is so, using straightforward physical chemical principles such as transition state theory, Arrhenius' Law, and the Franck-Condon Principle. Here the background and…

  16. Infrared spectra and structure of products formed by electron transfer onsome substituted acrylonitriles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juchnovski, I. N.; Tsenov, J. A.; Binev, I. G.

    1985-07-01

    The structures of the products of electron transfer or substituted acrylonitriles have been studied by simultaneously taking into account infrared and quantum-chemical data. Conversion of neutral compounds into anion-radicals, monomeric dianions and dimeric dianions has been followed by infrared spectra.

  17. Exciplex mediated photoinduced electron transfer reactions of phthalocyanine-fullerene dyads

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niemi, Marja; Tkachenko, Nikolai V.; Efimov, Alexander; Lehtivuori, Heli; Ohkubo, Kei; Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Lemmetyinen, Helge

    2008-01-01

    Evidences of an intramolecular exciplex intermediate in a photoinduced electron transfer (ET) reaction of double-linked free-base and zinc phthalocyanine-C-60 dyads were found. This was the first time for a dyad with phthalocyanine donor. Excitation of the phthalocyanine moiety of the dyads results

  18. Deuterium isotope effect on the intramolecular electron transfer in Pseudomonas aeruginosa azurin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, O; Zhang, J; Chi, Q

    2001-01-01

    Intramolecular electron transfer in azurin in water and deuterium oxide has been studied over a broad temperature range. The kinetic deuterium isotope effect, k(H)/k(D), is smaller than unity (0.7 at 298 K), primarily caused by the different activation entropies in water (-56.5 J K(-1) mol(-1...

  19. The impact of driving force on electron transfer rates in photovoltaic donor-acceptor blends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Alexander J; Ruseckas, Arvydas; Kareem, Mohanad Mousa; Ebenhoch, Bernd; Serrano, Luis A; Al-Eid, Manal; Fitzpatrick, Brian; Rotello, Vincent M; Cooke, Graeme; Samuel, Ifor D W

    2015-04-17

    The effect of acceptor energy level on electron transfer rate in blends of the polymer solar-cell material poly[[4,8-bis[(2-ethylhexyl)oxy]benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b']dithiophene-2,6-diyl][3-fluoro-2-[(2-ethylhexyl)carbonyl]thieno[3,4-b]thiophenediyl

  20. Electron transfer reactions, cyanide and O2 binding of truncated hemoglobin from Bacillus subtilis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez, Esther; Larsson, Jonas T.; McLean, Kirsty J.

    2013-01-01

    The truncated hemoglobin from Bacillus subtilis (trHb-Bs) possesses a surprisingly high affinity for oxygen and resistance to (auto)oxidation; its physiological role in the bacterium is not understood and may be connected with its very special redox and ligand binding reactions. Electron transfer...

  1. Electron transfer between a quinohemoprotein alcohol dehydrogenase and an electrode via a redox polymer network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stigter, E.C.A.; Jong, G.A.H. de; Jongejan, J.A.; Duine, J.A.; Lugt, J.P. van der; Somers, W.A.C.

    1996-01-01

    A quinohemoprotein alcohol dehydrogenase (QH-EDH) from Comamonas testosteroni was immobilized on an electrode in a redox polymer network consisting of a polyvinylpyridine partially N-complexed with osmiumbis-(bipyridine)chloride. The enzyme effectively transfers electrons to the electrode via the

  2. Photoinduced electron-transfer from imidazole derivative to nano-semiconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karunakaran, C; Jayabharathi, J; Jayamoorthy, K; Devi, K Brindha

    2012-04-01

    Bioactive imidazole derivative absorbs in the UV region at 305 nm. The interaction of imidazole derivative with nanoparticulate WO3, Fe2O3, Fe3O4, CuO, ZrO2 and Al2O3 has been studied by UV-visible absorption, FT-IR and fluorescence spectroscopies. The imidazole derivative adsorbs strongly on the surfaces of nanosemiconductor, the apparent binding constants for the association between nanomaterials and imidazole derivative have been determined from the fluorescence quenching. In the case of nanocrystalline insulator, fluorescence quenching through electron transfer from the excited state of the imidazole derivative to alumina is not possible. However, a possible mechanism for the quenching of fluorescence by the insulator is energy transfer, that is, energy transferred from the organic molecule to the alumina lattice. Based on Forster's non-radiation energy transfer theory, the distance between the imidazole derivative and nanoparticles (r0∼2.00 nm) as well as the critical energy transfer distance (R0∼1.70 nm) has been calculated. The interaction between the imidazole derivative and nanosurfaces occurs through static quenching mechanism. The free energy change (ΔGet) for electron transfer process has been calculated by applying Rehm-Weller equation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Extracellular electron transfer mechanism in Shewanella loihica PV-4 biofilms formed at indium tin oxide and graphite electrodes

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Jain, A.; Connolly, J.O.; Woolley, R.; Krishnamurthy, S.; Marsili, E.

    Electroactive biofilms are capable of extracellular electron transfer to insoluble metal oxides and electrodes; such biofilms are relevant to biogeochemistry, bioremediation, and bioelectricity production. We investigated the extracellular electron...

  4. Constraint-Based Modeling of Carbon Fixation and the Energetics of Electron Transfer in Geobacter metallireducens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feist, AM; Nagarajan, H; Rotaru, AE; Tremblay, PL; Zhang, T; Nevin, KP; Lovley, DR; Zengler, K

    2014-04-24

    Geobacter species are of great interest for environmental and biotechnology applications as they can carry out direct electron transfer to insoluble metals or other microorganisms and have the ability to assimilate inorganic carbon. Here, we report on the capability and key enabling metabolic machinery of Geobacter metallireducens GS-15 to carry out CO2 fixation and direct electron transfer to iron. An updated metabolic reconstruction was generated, growth screens on targeted conditions of interest were performed, and constraint-based analysis was utilized to characterize and evaluate critical pathways and reactions in G. metallireducens. The novel capability of G. metallireducens to grow autotrophically with formate and Fe(III) was predicted and subsequently validated in vivo. Additionally, the energetic cost of transferring electrons to an external electron acceptor was determined through analysis of growth experiments carried out using three different electron acceptors (Fe(III), nitrate, and fumarate) by systematically isolating and examining different parts of the electron transport chain. The updated reconstruction will serve as a knowledgebase for understanding and engineering Geobacter and similar species. Author Summary The ability of microorganisms to exchange electrons directly with their environment has large implications for our knowledge of industrial and environmental processes. For decades, it has been known that microbes can use electrodes as electron acceptors in microbial fuel cell settings. Geobacter metallireducens has been one of the model organisms for characterizing microbe-electrode interactions as well as environmental processes such as bioremediation. Here, we significantly expand the knowledge of metabolism and energetics of this model organism by employing constraint-based metabolic modeling. Through this analysis, we build the metabolic pathways necessary for carbon fixation, a desirable property for industrial chemical production. We

  5. Control of interspecies electron transfer flow during anaerobic digestion: dynamic diffusion reaction models for hydrogen gas transfer in microbial flocs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, S S; Palsson, B O; Thiele, J H

    1989-02-05

    Dynamic reaction diffusion models were used to analyze the consequences of aggregation for syntrophic reactions in methanogenic ecosystems. Flocs from a whey digestor were used to measure all model parameters under the in situ conditions of a particular defined biological system. Fermentation simulations without adjustable parameters could precisely predict the kinetics of H(2) gas production of digestor flocs during syntrophic methanogenesis from ethanol. The results demonstrated a kinetic compartmentalization of H(2) metabolism inside the flocs. The interspecies electron transfer reaction was mildly diffusion controlled. The H(2) gas profiles across the flocs showed high H (2) concentrations inside the flocs at any time. Simulations of the syntrophic metabolism at low substrate concentrations such as in digestors or sediments showed that it is impossible to achieve high H(2) gas turnovers at simultaneously low steady-state H(2) concentrations. This showed a mechanistic contradiction in the concept of postulated low H(2) microenvironments for the anaerobic digestion process. The results of the computer experiments support the conclusion that syntrophic H(2) production may only be a side reaction of H(2) independent interspecies electron transfer in methanogenic ecosystems.

  6. Electrochemical performance and microbial community profiles in microbial fuel cells in relation to electron transfer mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uria, Naroa; Ferrera, Isabel; Mas, Jordi

    2017-10-18

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) operating with complex microbial communities have been extensively reported in the past, and are commonly used in applications such as wastewater treatment, bioremediation or in-situ powering of environmental sensors. However, our knowledge on how the composition of the microbial community and the different types of electron transfer to the anode affect the performance of these bioelectrochemical systems is far from complete. To fill this gap of knowledge, we designed a set of three MFCs with different constrains limiting direct and mediated electron transfer to the anode. The results obtained indicate that MFCs with a naked anode on which a biofilm was allowed unrestricted development (MFC-A) had the most diverse archaeal and bacterial community, and offered the best performance. In this MFC both, direct and mediated electron transfer, occurred simultaneously, but direct electron transfer was the predominant mechanism. Microbial fuel cells in which the anode was enclosed in a dialysis membrane and biofilm was not allowed to develop (MFC-D), had a much lower power output (about 60% lower), and a prevalence of dissolved redox species that acted as putative electron shuttles. In the anolyte of this MFC, Arcobacter and Methanosaeta were the prevalent bacteria and archaea respectively. In the third MFC, in which the anode had been covered by a cation selective nafion membrane (MFC-N), power output decreased a further 5% (95% less than MFC-A). In this MFC, conventional organic electron shuttles could not operate and the low power output obtained was presumably attributed to fermentation end-products produced by some of the organisms present in the anolyte, probably Pseudomonas or Methanosaeta. Electron transfer mechanisms have an impact on the development of different microbial communities and in turn on MFC performance. Although a stable current was achieved in all cases, direct electron transfer MFC showed the best performance concluding

  7. Anomalously large reactivity of single graphene layers and edges toward electron transfer chemistries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Richa; Baik, Joon Hyun; Perera, Chrisantha J; Strano, Michael S

    2010-02-10

    The reactivity of graphene and its various multilayers toward electron transfer chemistries with 4-nitrobenzene diazonium tetrafluoroborate is probed by Raman spectroscopy after reaction on-chip. Single graphene sheets are found to be almost 10 times more reactive than bi- or multilayers of graphene according to the relative disorder (D) peak in the Raman spectrum examined before and after chemical reaction in water. A model whereby electron puddles that shift the Dirac point locally to values below the Fermi level is consistent with the reactivity difference. Because the chemistry at the graphene edge is important for controlling its electronic properties, particularly in ribbon form, we have developed a spectroscopic test to examine the relative reactivity of graphene edges versus the bulk. We show, for the first time, that the reactivity of edges is at least two times higher than the reactivity of the bulk single graphene sheet, as supported by electron transfer theory. These differences in electron transfer rates may be important for selecting and manipulating graphitic materials on-chip.

  8. Photosensitizing Electron Transfer Processes of Fullerenes, Carbon Nanotubes, and Carbon Nanohorns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Osamu

    2017-03-01

    In this account, studies on the photosensitizing electron transfer of nanocarbons, such as fullerenes, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), and carbon nanohorns (CNH), performed in our laboratory for about 15 years in the early 21st century have been briefly reviewed. These novel nanocarbons act as excellent electron acceptors, when they are linked to light-absorbing electron donors, such as porphyrins or phthalocyanines. For such molecule-nanocarbon hybrids, the direct confirmation of fast, transient, electron-transfer phenomena must be performed with time-resolved spectroscopic methods, such as transient absorption spectral measurements, in addition to fluorescence time-profile measurements in the wide-wavelength regions. Careful use of these methods affords useful information to understand photoinduced electron-transfer mechanisms. In addition, kinetic data obtained by these methods can assist in the construction of light-active devices, such as photovoltaic cells and solar H2 -generation systems. © 2017 The Chemical Society of Japan & Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Influence of chemical and structural evolution of dissolved organic matter on electron transfer capacity during composting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Xiao-Song [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Criteria and Risk Assessment, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Innovation base of Ground Water and Environmental System Engineering, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Science, Beijing 100012 (China); Xi, Bei-Dou, E-mail: hexs82@126.com [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Criteria and Risk Assessment, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Innovation base of Ground Water and Environmental System Engineering, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Science, Beijing 100012 (China); Cui, Dong-Yu [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Criteria and Risk Assessment, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Innovation base of Ground Water and Environmental System Engineering, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Science, Beijing 100012 (China); Liu, Yong [Guangdong Key Laboratory of Agro-Environmental Integrated Control, Guangdong Institute of Eco-Environmental and Soil Sciences, Guangzhou 510650 (China); Tan, Wen-Bin; Pan, Hong-Wei; Li, Dan [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Criteria and Risk Assessment, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Innovation base of Ground Water and Environmental System Engineering, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Science, Beijing 100012 (China)

    2014-03-01

    Highlights: • Electron transfer capability (ETC) of compost-derived DOM was investigated. • Composting treatment increased the ETC of DOM from municipal solid wastes. • The ETC increase related to humic matter, and molecule weight, and N and S content. - Abstract: Dissolved organic matter (DOM) can mediate electron transfer and change chemical speciation of heavy metals. In this study, the electron transfer capability (ETC) of compost-derived DOM was investigated through electrochemical approaches, and the factors influencing the ETC were studied using spectral and elemental analysis. The results showed that the electron accepting capacity (EAC) and electron donating capacity (EDC) of compost-derived DOM were 3.29–40.14 μmol{sub e−} (g C){sup −1} and 57.1– 346.07 μmol{sub e−} (g C){sup −1}, respectively. Composting treatment increased the fulvic- and humic-like substance content, oxygenated aliphatic carbon content, lignin-derived aromatic carbon content, molecule weight, and N and S content of DOM, but decreased the aliphatic carbon content and the C and H content. This conversion increased the EDC and EAC of the DOM during composting.

  10. Large work function difference driven electron transfer from electrides to single-walled carbon nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Menamparambath, Mini Mol

    2014-06-23

    A difference in work function plays a key role in charge transfer between two materials. Inorganic electrides provide a unique opportunity for electron transfer since interstitial anionic electrons result in a very low work function of 2.4-2.6 eV. Here we investigated charge transfer between two different types of electrides, [Ca2N]+·e- and [Ca 24Al28O64]4+·4e-, and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with a work function of 4.73-5.05 eV. [Ca2N]+·e- with open 2-dimensional electron layers was more effective in donating electrons to SWNTs than closed cage structured [Ca24Al28O64] 4+·4e- due to the higher electron concentration (1.3 × 1022 cm-3) and mobility (∼200 cm 2 V-1 s-1 at RT). A non-covalent conjugation enhanced near-infrared fluorescence of SWNTs as high as 52%. The field emission current density of electride-SWNT-silver paste dramatically increased by a factor of 46000 (14.8 mA cm-2) at 2 V μm-1 (3.5 wt% [Ca2N]+·e-) with a turn-on voltage of 0.85 V μm-1. This journal is © the Partner Organisations 2014.

  11. Electron transfer processes of atomic and molecular doubly charged ions: information from beam experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Zdenek

    2013-07-01

    Single-electron transfer reactions in collisions of atomic and molecular doubly charged ions, with atoms and molecules, were investigated in a series of crossed-beam scattering, translational spectroscopy and product luminescence experiments. Investigation of a series of atomic dication-atom electron transfer at collision energies of 0.1-10 eV provided data on differential and relative total cross sections of state-to-state processes. Populations of electronic and vibrational states and rotational temperatures of molecular product ions were obtained from studies of non-dissociative electron transfer in systems containing simple molecular dications and/or molecular targets. The product electronic states populated with highest probability were those for which the translational energy release was 3-5 eV, indicating that the 'reaction window' concept, based on the Landau-Zener formalism, is applicable also to molecular systems. Population of the vibrational states of the molecular products could be described by Franck-Condon factors of the vertical transitions between the reactant and product states, especially at higher (keV) collision energies. Rotational temperature of the product molecular cations was found to be surprisingly low, mostly 400-500 K, practically the temperature of the ion source.

  12. Proton-coupled electron transfer dynamics in the catalytic mechanism of a [NiFe]-hydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Brandon L; Wu, Chang-Hao; McTernan, Patrick M; Adams, Michael W W; Dyer, R Brian

    2015-04-08

    The movement of protons and electrons is common to the synthesis of all chemical fuels such as H2. Hydrogenases, which catalyze the reversible reduction of protons, necessitate transport and reactivity between protons and electrons, but a detailed mechanism has thus far been elusive. Here, we use a phototriggered chemical potential jump method to rapidly initiate the proton reduction activity of a [NiFe] hydrogenase. Coupling the photochemical initiation approach to nanosecond transient infrared and visible absorbance spectroscopy afforded direct observation of interfacial electron transfer and active site chemistry. Tuning of intramolecular proton transport by pH and isotopic substitution revealed distinct concerted and stepwise proton-coupled electron transfer mechanisms in catalysis. The observed heterogeneity in the two sequential proton-associated reduction processes suggests a highly engineered protein environment modulating catalysis and implicates three new reaction intermediates; Nia-I, Nia-D, and Nia-SR(-). The results establish an elementary mechanistic understanding of catalysis in a [NiFe] hydrogenase with implications in enzymatic proton-coupled electron transfer and biomimetic catalyst design.

  13. Interaction studies between periplasmic cytochromes provide insights into extracellular electron transfer pathways of Geobacter sulfurreducens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Ana P; Nunes, Tiago C; Paquete, Catarina M; Salgueiro, Carlos A

    2017-02-20

    Geobacter bacteria usually prevail among other microorganisms in soils and sediments where Fe(III) reduction has a central role. This reduction is achieved by extracellular electron transfer (EET), where the electrons are exported from the interior of the cell to the surrounding environment. Periplasmic cytochromes play an important role in establishing an interface between inner and outer membrane electron transfer components. In addition, periplasmic cytochromes, in particular nanowire cytochromes that contain at least 12 haem groups, have been proposed to play a role in electron storage in conditions of an environmental lack of electron acceptors. Up to date, no redox partners have been identified in Geobacter sulfurreducens, and concomitantly, the EET and electron storage mechanisms remain unclear. In this work, NMR chemical shift perturbation measurements were used to probe for an interaction between the most abundant periplasmic cytochrome PpcA and the dodecahaem cytochrome GSU1996, one of the proposed nanowire cytochromes in G. sulfurreducens The perturbations on the haem methyl signals of GSU1996 and PpcA showed that the proteins form a transient redox complex in an interface that involves haem groups from two different domains located at the C-terminal of GSU1996. Overall, the present study provides for the first time a clear evidence for an interaction between periplasmic cytochromes that might be relevant for the EET and electron storage pathways in G. sulfurreducens. © 2017 The Author(s); published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  14. Molecular control of electron and hole transfer processes: Theory and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newton, M.D. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Cave, R.J. [Harvey Mudd Coll., Claremont, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1996-02-01

    Recent decades have seen remarkable advances in microscopic understanding of electron transfer (ET) processes in widely ranging contexts, including solid-state, liquid solution, and complex biological assemblies. The primary goal of this chapter is to report recent advances in the modeling, calculation, and analysis of electronic coupling in complex molecular aggregates, thereby allowing an assessment of current progress toward the goal of molecular-level control and design. The control of electron transfer kinetics (i.e., enhancing desired processes, while inhibiting others) involves, of course, system energetics (especially activation and reorganization energies) as well as electronic coupling, which is most directly relevant only after the system has reached the appropriate point (or region) along the reaction coordinate. Nevertheless, to focus the discussion in this chapter, the authors will consider such energetics, and the associated molecular and solvent coordinates which control then, only to the extent that they bear on the analysis of the electronic coupling. In the following sections they first discuss the formulation of basic ET models, including the definition of initial and final states, the role of orbitals and 1-particle models in a many-electron context, the utility of various effective Hamiltonians, and the role of vibronic as well as purely electronic effects. With these theoretical tools in hand, they then examine very recent applications to complex molecular systems using the techniques of computational quantum chemistry, followed by detailed analysis of the numerical results. They then conclude with some comments regarding the current ``state of the art`` and remaining challenges.

  15. Stereoselective Fluorescence Quenching in the Electron Transfer Photooxidation of Nucleobase-Related Azetidines by Cyanoaromatics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana B. Fraga-Timiraos

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Electron transfer involving nucleic acids and their derivatives is an important field in bioorganic chemistry, specifically in connection with its role in the photo-driven DNA damage and repair. Four-membered ring heterocyclic oxetanes and azetidines have been claimed to be the intermediates involved in the repair of DNA (6-4 photoproduct by photolyase. In this context, we examine here the redox properties of the two azetidine isomers obtained from photocycloaddition between 6-aza-1,3-dimethyluracil and cyclohexene. Steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence experiments using a series of photoreductants and photooxidants have been run to evaluate the efficiency of the electron transfer process. Analysis of the obtained quenching kinetics shows that the azetidine compounds can act as electron donors. Additionally, it appears that the cis isomer is more easily oxidized than its trans counterpart. This result is in agreement with electrochemical studies performed on both azetidine derivatives.

  16. Construction of Vibronic Diabatic Hamiltonian for Excited-State Electron and Energy Transfer Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yu; Jiang, Shengshi; Zheng, Jie; Lan, Zhenggang

    2017-12-21

    Photoinduced excited-state electron and energy transfer processes are crucial in biological photoharvesting systems and organic photovoltaic devices. We discuss the construction of a diabatic vibronic Hamiltonian for the proper treatment of these processes involving the projection approach acting on both electronic wave functions and vibrational modes. In the electronic part, the wave function projection approach is used to construct the diabatic Hamiltonian in which both local excited states and charge-transfer states are included on the same footing. For the vibrational degrees of freedom, the vibronic couplings in the diabatic Hamiltonian are obtained in the basis of the pseudonormal modes localized on each monomer site by applying delocalized-to-localized mode projection. This systematic approach allows us to construct the vibronic diabatic Hamiltonian in molecular aggregates.

  17. Visible-light-induced two-electron-transfer photoreductions on CdS: Effects of morphology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiragami, Tsutomu; Pac, Chyongjin; Yanagida, Shozo (Osaka Univ. (Japan))

    1990-01-25

    Freshly prepared CdS suspensions (CdS-O) consisting of quantized particles and their loose aggregation catalyze photoreductions of aromatic ketones and olefins in methanol under visible light irradiation using triethylamine as sacrificial electron donor, yielding alcohols and dihydro compounds, respectively, which are more selective than photocatalysis of commercially available crystalline CdS (Aldrich) (CdS-Ald). Deuterium incorporation experiments in photolysis of dimethyl maleate in methanol-O-D revealed that CdS-O catalyzes sequential two-electron-transfer photoreduction, affording dideuterated dimethyl succinate, while CdS-Ald induces both photoreduction and photoisomerization through disproportionation between one-electron-transfer-reduction intermediates, yielding much trideuterated dimethyl succinate and monodeuterated dimethyl fumarate and maleate.

  18. Nanosecond-timescale spin transfer using individual electrons in a quadruple-quantum-dot device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baart, T. A.; Jovanovic, N.; Vandersypen, L. M. K. [QuTech and Kavli Institute of Nanoscience, Delft University of Technology, P.O. Box 5046, 2600 GA Delft (Netherlands); Reichl, C.; Wegscheider, W. [Solid State Physics Laboratory, ETH Zürich, 8093 Zürich (Switzerland)

    2016-07-25

    The ability to coherently transport electron-spin states between different sites of gate-defined semiconductor quantum dots is an essential ingredient for a quantum-dot-based quantum computer. Previous shuttles using electrostatic gating were too slow to move an electron within the spin dephasing time across an array. Here, we report a nanosecond-timescale spin transfer of individual electrons across a quadruple-quantum-dot device. Utilizing enhanced relaxation rates at a so-called hot spot, we can upper bound the shuttle time to at most 150 ns. While actual shuttle times are likely shorter, 150 ns is already fast enough to preserve spin coherence in, e.g., silicon based quantum dots. This work therefore realizes an important prerequisite for coherent spin transfer in quantum dot arrays.

  19. Photoinduced electron transfer at the tetrapyrrole-TiO2 interface: Effect of the energy alignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto-Pescador, Jesus S.

    Photoinduced electron transfer is a ubiquitous process behind several physical, chemical, and biological processes. Its potential applications, ranging from solar cell technologies to photodynamic cancer therapy, require a thorough understanding of the basics of the reaction. This dissertation addresses open questions for a particular case of electron transfer processes: Heterogeneous Electron Transfer (HET). In this process, an electron is transferred between a localized donor and a multitude of delocalized acceptor states. HET between photoexcited tetrapyrroles and colloidal TiO2 has been investigated using femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy. Specifically, this work explores the not well-understood influence of the availability of states on the HET reaction. This problem is addressed by measuring electron injection times as a function of the energy difference between the LUMO and the conduction band of TiO2. The change in the energy alignment was done using two experimental strategies. The first one employs a recently synthesized phlorin with two different excited states above the conduction band of TiO2. This molecule allows comparing HET rates from two different excited states. The second strategy measures the electron injection rates after exciting the same electronic state of a set of specially designed porphyrins. The novelty of the approach is that the difference in energy alignment is attained by the introduction of dipole groups within the bridge group of the molecule. This strategy generates a difference in energy alignment of up to 200 meV. The reported measurements were carried in a high vacuum environment with an apparatus capable of resolving sub 30 fs processes. Disentanglement of the electron transfer processes was done, after careful study of the relaxation dynamics of the molecules in solution, by monitoring the decay of the excited state absorption and the rise of the cation spectral signatures. Within our time resolution, our results

  20. Extracellular polymeric substances are transient media for microbial extracellular electron transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yong; Zhang, Enhua; Zhang, Jingdong; Dai, Youfen; Yang, Zhaohui; Christensen, Hans E. M.; Ulstrup, Jens; Zhao, Feng

    2017-01-01

    Microorganisms exploit extracellular electron transfer (EET) in growth and information exchange with external environments or with other cells. Every microbial cell is surrounded by extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). Understanding the roles of three-dimensional (3D) EPS in EET is essential in microbiology and microbial exploitation for mineral bio-respiration, pollutant conversion, and bioenergy production. We have addressed these challenges by comparing pure and EPS-depleted samples of three representative electrochemically active strains viz Gram-negative Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, Gram-positive Bacillus sp. WS-XY1, and yeast Pichia stipites using technology from electrochemistry, spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, and microbiology. Voltammetry discloses redox signals from cytochromes and flavins in intact MR-1 cells, whereas stronger signals from cytochromes and additional signals from both flavins and cytochromes are found after EPS depletion. Flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy substantiated by N-acetylglucosamine and electron transport system activity data showed less than 1.5% cell damage after EPS extraction. The electrochemical differences between normal and EPS-depleted cells therefore originate from electrochemical species in cell walls and EPS. The 35 ± 15–nm MR-1 EPS layer is also electrochemically active itself, with cytochrome electron transfer rate constants of 0.026 and 0.056 s−1 for intact MR-1 and EPS-depleted cells, respectively. This surprisingly small rate difference suggests that molecular redox species at the core of EPS assist EET. The combination of all the data with electron transfer analysis suggests that electron “hopping” is the most likely molecular mechanism for electrochemical electron transfer through EPS. PMID:28695213

  1. Control of Interspecies Electron Flow during Anaerobic Digestion: Significance of Formate Transfer versus Hydrogen Transfer during Syntrophic Methanogenesis in Flocs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiele, Jurgen H; Zeikus, J Gregory

    1988-01-01

    Microbial formate production and consumption during syntrophic conversion of ethanol or lactate to methane was examined in purified flocs and digestor contents obtained from a whey-processing digestor. Formate production by digestor contents or purified digestor flocs was dependent on CO(2) and either ethanol or lactate but not H(2) gas as an electron donor. During syntrophic methanogenesis, flocs were the primary site for formate production via ethanol-dependent CO(2) reduction, with a formate production rate and methanogenic turnover constant of 660 muM/h and 0.044/min, respectively. Floc preparations accumulated fourfold-higher levels of formate (40 muM) than digestor contents, and the free flora was the primary site for formate cleavage to CO(2) and H(2) (90 muM formate per h). Inhibition of methanogenesis by CHCl(3) resulted in formate accumulation and suppression of syntrophic ethanol oxidation. H(2) gas was an insignificant intermediary metabolite of syntrophic ethanol conversion by flocs, and its exogenous addition neither stimulated methanogenesis nor inhibited the initial rate of ethanol oxidation. These results demonstrated that >90% of the syntrophic ethanol conversion to methane by mixed cultures containing primarily Desulfovibrio vulgaris and Methanobacterium formicicum was mediated via interspecies formate transfer and that <10% was mediated via interspecies H(2) transfer. The results are discussed in relation to biochemical thermodynamics. A model is presented which describes the dynamics of a bicarbonate-formate electron shuttle mechanism for control of carbon and electron flow during syntrophic methanogenesis and provides a novel mechanism for energy conservation by syntrophic acetogens.

  2. Two-Dimensional Electronic Spectroscopies for Probing Electronic Structure and Charge Transfer: Applications to Photosystem II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogilvie, Jennifer P. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Physics

    2016-11-22

    Photosystem II (PSII) is the only known natural enzyme that uses solar energy to split water, making the elucidation of its design principles critical for our fundamental understanding of photosynthesis and for our ability to mimic PSII’s remarkable properties. This report discusses progress towards addressing key open questions about the PSII RC. It describes new spectroscopic methods that were developed to answer these questions, and summarizes the outcomes of applying these methods to study the PSII RC. Using 2D electronic spectroscopy and 2D electronic Stark spectroscopy, models for the PSII RC were tested and refined. Work is ongoing to use the collected data to elucidate the charge separation mechanism in the PSII RC. Coherent dynamics were also observed in the PSII RC for the first time. Through extensive characterization and modeling we have assigned these coherences as vibronic in nature, and believe that they reflect resonances between key vibrational pigment modes and electronic energy gaps that may facilitate charge separation. Work is ongoing to definitively test the functional relevance of electronic-vibrational resonances.

  3. Photoinduced energy and electron transfer in phenylethynyl-bridged zinc porphyrin-oligothienylenevinylene-C60 ensembles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbani, Maxence; Ohkubo, Kei; Islam, D M Shafiqul; Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Langa, Fernando

    2012-06-11

    Donor-bridge-acceptor triad (Por-2TV-C(60)) and tetrad molecules ((Por)(2)-2TV-C(60)), which incorporated C(60) and one or two porphyrin molecules that were covalently linked through a phenylethynyl-oligothienylenevinylene bridge, were synthesized. Their photodynamics were investigated by fluorescence measurements, and by femto- and nanosecond laser flash photolysis. First, photoinduced energy transfer from the porphyrin to the C(60) moiety occurred rather than electron transfer, followed by electron transfer from the oligothienylenevinylene to the singlet excited state of the C(60) moiety to produce the radical cation of oligothienylenevinylene and the radical anion of C(60). Then, back-electron transfer occurred to afford the triplet excited state of the oligothienylenevinylene moiety rather than the ground state. Thus, the porphyrin units in (Por)-2TV-C(60) and (Por)(2)-2TV-C(60) acted as efficient photosensitizers for the charge separation between oligothienylenevinylene and C(60). Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Pathway of proton transfer in bacterial reaction centers: replacement of serine-L223 by alanine inhibits electron and proton transfers associated with reduction of quinone to dihydroquinone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paddock, M L; McPherson, P H; Feher, G; Okamura, M Y

    1990-01-01

    The pathway of proton transfer in the reaction center (RC) from Rhodobacter sphaeroides was investigated by site-directed mutagenesis. Ser-L223, a putative proton donor that forms a hydrogen bond with the secondary quinone acceptor QB, was replaced with Ala and Thr. RCs with Ala-L223 displayed reduced electron transfer and proton uptake rates in the reaction QA-QB- + 2H+----QAQBH2. The rate constant for this reaction, k(2)AB, was found to be reduced approximately 350-fold to 4.0 +/- 0.2 s-1. Proton uptake measurements using a pH indicator dye showed a rapid uptake of 1 H+ per RC followed by a slower uptake of 1 H+ per RC at a rate of 4.1 +/- 0.1 s-1; native RCs showed a rapid uptake of 2H+ per RC. Evidence is provided that these changes were not due to gross structural changes in the binding site of QB. RCs with Thr-L223 showed little reduction in the rates of electron and proton transfer. These results indicate that proton transfer from the hydroxyl group of Ser-L223 or Thr-L223 is required for fast electron and proton transfer associated with the formation of the dihydroquinone QH2. In contrast, previous work showed that replacing Glu-L212, another putative proton donor to QB, with Gln slowed proton uptake from solution without significantly altering electron transfer. We propose a model that involves two distinct proton transfer steps. The first step occurs prior to transfer of the second electron to QB and involves proton transfer from Ser-L223. The second step occurs after this electron transfer through a pathway involving Glu-L212. PMID:2168561

  5. Probing electron transfer mechanisms in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 using a nanoelectrode platform and single-cell imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Xiaocheng; Hu, Jinsong; Fitzgerald, Lisa A.; Biffinger, Justin C.; Xie, Ping; Ringeisen, Bradley R.; Lieber, Charles M.

    2010-01-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) represent a promising approach for sustainable energy production as they generate electricity directly from metabolism of organic substrates without the need for catalysts. However, the mechanisms of electron transfer between microbes and electrodes, which could ultimately limit power extraction, remain controversial. Here we demonstrate optically transparent nanoelectrodes as a platform to investigate extracellular electron transfer in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, ...

  6. Experimental study of transient forced convection heat transfer from simulated electronic chips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhowmik, H.; Tou, K. W.

    2005-05-01

    Experiments are performed to study the single-phase transient forced convection heat transfer on an array of four in-line, flush-mounted simulated electronic chips in a vertical rectangular channel. Water is the coolant media and the flow covers the wide range of laminar flow regime with Reynolds number, based on heat source length, from 800 to 2,625. The heat flux ranges from 1 W/cm2 to 7 W/cm2. The heat transfer characteristics are studied and correlations are presented. The transient correlation for overall data recommended is Nuℓ= 0.945(Peℓ 1/3) Fo-1/2.

  7. The two-photon exchange contribution to elastic electron-nucleon scattering at large momentum transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrei V. Afanasev; Stanley J. Brodsky; Carl E. Carlson; Yu-Chun Chen; Marc Vanderhaeghen

    2005-01-01

    We estimate the two-photon exchange contribution to elastic electron-proton scattering at large momentum transfer by using a quark-parton representation of virtual Compton scattering. We thus can relate the two-photon exchange amplitude to the generalized parton distributions which also enter in other wide angle scattering processes. We find that the interference of one- and two-photon exchange contribution is able to substantially resolve the difference between electric form factor measurements from Rosenbluth and polarization transfer experiments.

  8. Ru(II)-diimine functionalized metalloproteins: From electron transfer studies to light-driven biocatalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Quan; Kato, Mallory; Cheruzel, Lionel

    2015-01-01

    The unique photochemical properties of Ru(II)-diimine complexes have helped initiate a series of seminal electron transfer studies in metalloenzymes. It has thus been possible to experimentally determine rate constants for long-range electron transfers. These studies have laid the foundation for the investigation of reactive intermediates in heme proteins and for the design of light-activated biocatalysts. Various metalloenzymes, such as hydrogenase, carbon monoxide dehydrogenase, nitrogenase, laccase and cytochrome P450 BM3 have been functionalized with Ru(II)-diimine complexes. Upon visible light-excitation, these photosensitized metalloproteins are capable of sustaining photocatalytic activity to reduce small molecules such as protons, acetylene, hydrogen cyanide and carbon monoxide or activate molecular dioxygen to produce hydroxylated products. The Ru(II)-diimine photosensitizers are hence able to deliver multiple electrons to metalloenzymes buried active sites circumventing the need for the natural redox partners. In this review, we will highlight the key achievements of the light-driven biocatalysts, which stem from the extensive electron transfer investigations. PMID:26392147

  9. Direct electron transfer and electrochemical study of hemoglobin immobilized in ZnO hollow spheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Changhua; Xu, Jing; Wu, Zongfang

    2011-10-01

    ZnO hollow spheres were firstly prepared. A new type of amperometric hydrogen peroxide biosensor was fabricated by entrapping Hemoglobin (Hb) through the ZnO hollow spheres (ZHS) nanoparticles. The composition morphology and size were studied by transmission electron microscopy. The surface topography of the prepared films was imaged by atomic force microscope (AFM). Several techniques, including UV-vis absorption spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, chronoamperometry were employed to characterize the performance of the biosensor. The results indicated that the ZHS nanoparticles had enhanced the performance of the hydrogen peroxide sensors. The electrochemical parameters of Hb in the ZHS were calculated by the results of the electron-transfer coefficient (α) and the apparent heterogeneous electron-transfer rate constant K (s) as 0.5 and 3.1 s(-1), respectively. The resulting biosensors showed a wide linear range from 2.1 × 10(-6) to 5.18 × 10(-3) M, with a low detection limit of 7.0 × 10(-7) M (S/N = 3) under optimized experimental conditions. The results demonstrated that the ZHS matrix may improve the protein loading with the retention of bioactivity and greatly promote the direct electron transfer, which can be attributed to its unique morphology, high specific surface area, and biocompatibility. The biosensor obtained from this study possesses high sensitivity, good reproducibility, and long-term stability.

  10. Ab Initio Confirmation of a Harpoon-Type Electron Transfer in a Helium Droplet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lara-Castells, María Pilar; Hauser, Andreas W; Mitrushchenkov, Alexander O

    2017-09-07

    An ab initio study of a long-range electron transfer or "harpoon"-type process from Cs and Cs2 to C60 in a superfluid helium droplet is presented. The heliophobic Cs or Cs2 species are initially located at the droplet surface, while the heliophilic C60 molecule is fully immersed in the droplet. First, probabilities for the electron transfer in the gas phase are calculated for reactants with velocities below the critical Landau velocity of 57 m/s to account for the superfluid helium environment. Next, reaction pathways are derived that also include the repulsive contribution from the extrusion of helium upon the approach of the two reactants. Our results are in perfect agreement with recent experimental measurements of electron ionization mass spectroscopy [ Renzler , M. ; et al., J. Chem. Phys. 2016 , 145 , 181101 ], showing a high possibility for the formation of a Cs2-C60 complex inside of the droplet through a direct harpoon-type electron transfer involving the rotation of the molecule but a negligibly low reactivity for atomic Cs.

  11. The impact of size and shape distributions on the electron charge transfer properties of silver nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Baichuan; Barnard, Amanda S

    2017-08-31

    Many applications of silver nanoparticles are moderated by the electron charge transfer properties, such as the ionization potential, electron affinity and Fermi energy, which may be tuned by controlling the size and shape of individual particles. However, since producing samples of silver nanoparticles that are perfectly monodispersed in terms of both size and shape can be prohibitive, it is important to understand how these properties are impacted by polydispersivity, and ideally be able to predict the tolerance for variation of different geometric features. In this study, we use straightforward statistical methods, together with electronic structure simulations, to predict the electron charge transfer properties of different types of ensembles of silver nanoparticles and how restricting the structural diversity in different ways can improve or retard performance. In agreement with previous reports, we confirm that restricting the shape distribution will tune the charge transfer properties toward specific reactions, but by including the quality factors for each case we go beyond this assessment and show how targeting specific classes of morphologies and restricting the distribution of size can impact sensitivity.

  12. NI (II AND PB (II INHIBIT THE ENZYMATIC ACTIVITY OF DNA IN AN ELECTRON TRANSFER REACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B FARZAMI

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Ni and Pb are metals with several suggested mechanisms for their toxicity on the biological systems. We have recently investigated involvement of DNA in an electron transfer reaction as an enzyme. In this reaction non- fluorescent dichlorofluorescin (LDCF is converted to the dichlorofluorescein (DCF in the presence of peroxides and hematin. Methods. The fluorometric technique was used in this study. The pH effect on the reaction rate was investigated. The results showed that DCF has the maximum emission on tris buffer 0.05 Mat pH 8.4. Results. DNA and carnosine catalyze the reaction, which proceeds by the electron transfer mechanism. The presence of carnosine is necessary for the catalytic action of DNA as a cofactor. Ni (II and Pb (11 are the potent inhibitors of the reaction. The kinetic parameters and determined in the presence and absence of the above ligands. Discussion. DNA, which has the electrical properties only in the double helical forms, acts as a catalyst in the conversion of LDCF to DCF. The existence of the carnosine, an endogenous dipeptide with antioxidant and free radical scavenging roles, is an important factor for the progress of the reaction. Both Ni (11 and Pb (II inhibit the reaction. These metals could act as the electron pool to cause inhibition in such electron transfer reaction. This phenomenon could be related to the carcinogenic effect of these metals.

  13. Sandwiched confinement of quantum dots in graphene matrix for efficient electron transfer and photocurrent production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Nan; Zheng, Kaibo; Karki, Khadga J.; Abdellah, Mohamed; Zhu, Qiushi; Carlson, Stefan; Haase, Dörthe; Žídek, Karel; Ulstrup, Jens; Canton, Sophie E.; Pullerits, Tõnu; Chi, Qijin

    2015-05-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) and graphene are both promising materials for the development of new-generation optoelectronic devices. Towards this end, synergic assembly of these two building blocks is a key step but remains a challenge. Here, we show a one-step strategy for organizing QDs in a graphene matrix via interfacial self-assembly, leading to the formation of sandwiched hybrid QD-graphene nanofilms. We have explored structural features, electron transfer kinetics and photocurrent generation capacity of such hybrid nanofilms using a wide variety of advanced techniques. Graphene nanosheets interlink QDs and significantly improve electronic coupling, resulting in fast electron transfer from photoexcited QDs to graphene with a rate constant of 1.3 × 109 s-1. Efficient electron transfer dramatically enhances photocurrent generation in a liquid-junction QD-sensitized solar cell where the hybrid nanofilm acts as a photoanode. We thereby demonstrate a cost-effective method to construct large-area QD-graphene hybrid nanofilms with straightforward scale-up potential for optoelectronic applications.

  14. Calmodulin controls neuronal nitric-oxide synthase by a dual mechanism. Activation of intra- and interdomain electron transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Soud, H M; Yoho, L L; Stuehr, D J

    1994-12-23

    In neuronal nitric-oxide synthase (NOS), electron transfer proceeds across domains in a linear sequence from NADPH to flavins to heme, with calmodulin (CaM) triggering the interdomain electron transfer to the heme (Abu-Soud, H. M., and Stuehr, D. J. (1993) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 90, 10769-10772). Here, we utilized a neuronal NOS devoid of its bound heme and tetrahydrobiopterin (apo-NOS) to examine whether interdomain electron transfer is responsible for CaM's activation of NO synthesis, substrate-independent NADPH oxidation, and cytochrome c and ferricyanide reduction. Of the four activities, two (cytochrome c and ferricyanide reduction) were similarly stimulated by CaM in apo-NOS when compared with native NOS, indicating that activation occurs by a mechanism not involving flavin-to-heme electron transfer. Further analysis showed that CaM increased the rate of electron transfer from NADPH into the flavin centers by a factor of 20, revealing a direct activation of the NOS reductase domain by CaM. In contrast, CaM's activation of NO synthesis and substrate-independent NADPH oxidation appeared to involve flavin-to-heme electron transfer because these reactions were not activated in apo-NOS and were blocked in native NOS by agents that prevent heme iron reduction. Thus, CaM activates neuronal NOS at two points in the electron transfer sequence: electron transfer into the flavins and interdomain electron transfer between the flavins and heme. Activation at each point is associated with an up-regulation of domain-specific catalytic functions. The dual regulation by CaM is unique and represents a new means by which electron transfer can be controlled in a metalloflavoprotein.

  15. Terahertz-pulse driven modulation of electronic spectra: Modeling electron-phonon coupling in charge-transfer crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Maiolo, Francesco; Masino, Matteo; Painelli, Anna

    2017-08-01

    We calculate the optical spectra of a charge-transfer crystal modulated by a terahertz pulse, accounting for electron-vibration coupling. The model Hamiltonian is parametrized against first principle calculations and adiabatic results are validated against a fully non-adiabatic calculation where relaxation phenomena are introduced via the coupling of the quantum system to a dissipative bath of classic anharmonic oscillators. The experiment is well reproduced by the proposed model with no need to introduce any ad hoc assumption on the temporal dependence of model parameters, but just accounting for the quadratic dependence of the Hubbard U on non-totally symmetric molecular coordinates.

  16. Measurement of the oxidation-reduction potentials for one-electron and two-electron reduction of electron-transfer flavoprotein from pig liver.

    OpenAIRE

    Husain, M.; Stankovich, M T; Fox, B G

    1984-01-01

    Potentiometric titrations of pig liver electron-transfer flavoprotein (ETF) were performed at pH 7.5 and 4 degrees C, both in the reductive and oxidative directions. Reduction of ETF to the hydroquinone form required a total of two reducing equivalents/mol of ETF with the formation of sub-stoichiometric amounts of anionic semiquinone as an intermediate. The oxidation-reduction potentials for the two one-electron couples, oxidized ETF/ETF semiquinone and ETF semiquinone/fully reduced ETF, are ...

  17. Ultrafast static and diffusion-controlled electron transfer at Ag 29 nanocluster/molecular acceptor interfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Aly, Shawkat Mohammede

    2015-10-29

    Efficient absorption of visible light and a long-lived excited state lifetime of silver nanoclusters (Ag29 NCs) are integral properties for these new clusters to serve as light-harvesting materials. Upon optical excitation, electron injection at Ag29 NC/methyl viologen (MV2+) interfaces is very efficient and ultrafast. Interestingly, our femto- and nanosecond time-resolved results demonstrate clearly that both dynamic and static electron transfer mechanisms are involved in photoluminescence quenching of Ag29 NCs. © 2016 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  18. Rates and Routes of Electron Transfer of [NiFe]-Hydrogenase in an Enzymatic Fuel Cell

    OpenAIRE

    Petrenko, A.; Stein, M

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogenase enzymes are being used in enzymatic fuel cells immobilized on a graphite or carbon electrode surface, for example. The enzyme is used for the anodic oxidation of molecular hydrogen (H2) to produce protons and electrons. The association and orientation of the enzyme at the anode electrode for a direct electron transfer is not completely resolved. The distal FeS-cluster in [NiFe]-hydrogenases contains a histidine residue which is known to play a critical role in the intermolecular e...

  19. First principles design of a core bioenergetic transmembrane electron-transfer protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goparaju, Geetha; Fry, Bryan A; Chobot, Sarah E; Wiedman, Gregory; Moser, Christopher C; Leslie Dutton, P; Discher, Bohdana M

    2016-05-01

    Here we describe the design, Escherichia coli expression and characterization of a simplified, adaptable and functionally transparent single chain 4-α-helix transmembrane protein frame that binds multiple heme and light activatable porphyrins. Such man-made cofactor-binding oxidoreductases, designed from first principles with minimal reference to natural protein sequences, are known as maquettes. This design is an adaptable frame aiming to uncover core engineering principles governing bioenergetic transmembrane electron-transfer function and recapitulate protein archetypes proposed to represent the origins of photosynthesis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Biodesign for Bioenergetics--the design and engineering of electronic transfer cofactors, proteins and protein networks, edited by Ronald L. Koder and J.L. Ross Anderson. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Direct observation of multistep energy transfer in LHCII with fifth-order 3D electronic spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhengyang; Lambrev, Petar H.; Wells, Kym L.; Garab, Győző; Tan, Howe-Siang

    2015-07-01

    During photosynthesis, sunlight is efficiently captured by light-harvesting complexes, and the excitation energy is then funneled towards the reaction centre. These photosynthetic excitation energy transfer (EET) pathways are complex and proceed in a multistep fashion. Ultrafast two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (2DES) is an important tool to study EET processes in photosynthetic complexes. However, the multistep EET processes can only be indirectly inferred by correlating different cross peaks from a series of 2DES spectra. Here we directly observe multistep EET processes in LHCII using ultrafast fifth-order three-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (3DES). We measure cross peaks in 3DES spectra of LHCII that directly indicate energy transfer from excitons in the chlorophyll b (Chl b) manifold to the low-energy level chlorophyll a (Chl a) via mid-level Chl a energy states. This new spectroscopic technique allows scientists to move a step towards mapping the complete complex EET processes in photosynthetic systems.

  1. Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer in Organic Synthesis: Fundamentals, Applications, and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, David C.; Tarantino, Kyle T.; Knowles, Robert R.

    2016-01-01

    Proton-coupled electron transfers (PCETs) are unconventional redox processes in which both protons and electrons are exchanged, often in a concerted elementary step. While PCET is now recognized to play a central a role in biological redox catalysis and inorganic energy conversion technologies, its applications in organic synthesis are only beginning to be explored. In this chapter we aim to highlight the origins, development and evolution of PCET processes most relevant to applications in organic synthesis. Particular emphasis is given to the ability of PCET to serve as a non-classical mechanism for homolytic bond activation that is complimentary to more traditional hydrogen atom transfer processes, enabling the direct generation of valuable organic radical intermediates directly from their native functional group precursors under comparatively mild catalytic conditions. The synthetically advantageous features of PCET reactivity are described in detail, along with examples from the literature describing the PCET activation of common organic functional groups. PMID:27573270

  2. Semiclassical Green's functions and an instanton formulation of electron-transfer rates in the nonadiabatic limit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Jeremy O; Bauer, Rainer; Thoss, Michael

    2015-10-07

    We present semiclassical approximations to Green's functions of multidimensional systems, extending Gutzwiller's work to the classically forbidden region. Based on steepest-descent integrals over these functions, we derive an instanton method for computing the rate of nonadiabatic reactions, such as electron transfer, in the weak-coupling limit, where Fermi's golden-rule can be employed. This generalizes Marcus theory to systems for which the environment free-energy curves are not harmonic and where nuclear tunnelling plays a role. The derivation avoids using the Im F method or short-time approximations to real-time correlation functions. A clear physical interpretation of the nuclear tunnelling processes involved in an electron-transfer reaction is thus provided. In Paper II [J. O. Richardson, J. Chem. Phys. 143, 134116 (2015)], we discuss numerical evaluation of the formulae.

  3. Nanopore Electrochemistry: A Nexus for Molecular Control of Electron Transfer Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaiyu Fu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Pore-based structures occur widely in living organisms. Ion channels embedded in cell membranes, for example, provide pathways, where electron and proton transfer are coupled to the exchange of vital molecules. Learning from mother nature, a recent surge in activity has focused on artificial nanopore architectures to effect electrochemical transformations not accessible in larger structures. Here, we highlight these exciting advances. Starting with a brief overview of nanopore electrodes, including the early history and development of nanopore sensing based on nanopore-confined electrochemistry, we address the core concepts and special characteristics of nanopores in electron transfer. We describe nanopore-based electrochemical sensing and processing, discuss performance limits and challenges, and conclude with an outlook for next-generation nanopore electrode sensing platforms and the opportunities they present.

  4. Photoinduced charge-transfer electronic excitation of tetracyanoethylene/tetramethylethylene complex in dichloromethane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Long-Kun; Bi, Ting-Jun; Ming, Mei-Jun; Wang, Jing-Bo; Li, Xiang-Yuan

    2017-07-01

    Based on the previous work on nonequilibrium solvation model by the authors, Intermolecular charge-transfer electronic excitation of tetracyanoethylene (TCE)/tetramethylethylene (TME) π -stacked complex in dichloromethane (DCM) has been investigated. For weak interaction correction, dispersion corrected functional DFT-D3 is adopted for geometry optimization. In order to identify the excitation metric, dipole moment components of each Cartesian direction, atomic charge, charge separation and Δr index are analyzed for TCE/TME complex. Calculation shows that the calculated excitation energy is dependent on the functional choice, when conjuncted with suitable time-dependent density functional, the modified nonequilibrium expression gives satisfied results for intermolecular charge-transfer electronic excitation.

  5. Advances towards understanding and engineering direct interspecies electron transfer in anaerobic digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barua, Sajib; Dhar, Bipro Ranjan

    2017-11-01

    Direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) is a recently discovered microbial syntrophy where cell-to-cell electron transfer occurs between syntrophic microbial species. DIET between bacteria and methanogenic archaea in anaerobic digestion can accelerate the syntrophic conversion of various reduced organic compounds to methane. DIET-based syntrophy can naturally occur in some anaerobic digester via conductive pili, however, can be engineered via the addition of various non-biological conductive materials. In recent years, research into understanding and engineering DIET-based syntrophy has emerged with the aim of improving methanogenesis kinetics in anaerobic digestion. This article presents a state-of-art review focusing on the fundamental mechanisms, key microbial players, the role of electrical conductivity, the effectiveness of various conductive additives, the significance of substrate characteristics and organic loading rates in promoting DIET in anaerobic digestion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Nature does not rely on long-lived electronic quantum coherence for photosynthetic energy transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Duan, Hong-Guang; Cogdell, Richard; Ashraf, Khuram; Stevens, Amy L; Thorwart, Michael; Miller, R J Dwayne

    2016-01-01

    During the first steps of photosynthesis, the energy of impinging solar photons is transformed into electronic excitation energy of the light-harvesting biomolecular complexes. The subsequent energy transfer to the reaction center is understood in terms of exciton quasiparticles which move on a grid of biomolecular sites on typical time scales less than 100 femtoseconds (fs). Since the early days of quantum mechanics, this energy transfer is described as an incoherent Forster hopping with classical site occupation probabilities, but with quantum mechanically determined rate constants. This orthodox picture has been challenged by ultrafast optical spectroscopy experiments with the Fenna-Matthews-Olson protein in which interference oscillatory signals up to 1.5 picoseconds were reported and interpreted as direct evidence of exceptionally long-lived electronic quantum coherence. Here, we show that the optical 2D photon echo spectra of this complex at ambient temperature in aqueous solution do not provide evidenc...

  7. Decoupling diffusion from the bimolecular photoinduced electron transfer reaction: a combined ultrafast spectroscopic and kinetic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Puspal; Sen, Pratik

    2017-05-10

    We have studied the bimolecular photoinduced electron transfer (PET) reaction between benzophenone (Bp) and DABCO using femtosecond broadband transient absorption spectroscopy in different compositions of acetonitrile/1-butanol binary solvent mixtures. With the increase in the 1-butanol percentage in the mixture, we have observed an increase in the onset delay time of Bp˙(-), which is the product of the reaction. As 1-butanol is more viscous than acetonitrile, we related the onset time to the change in medium viscosity. Moreover, we undertook a complete kinetic analysis of the bimolecular PET reaction under different conditions to show that from transient absorption spectroscopy, we can get the exact rate of electron transfer. This kind of kinetic analysis along with the experimental data is the first of its kind to prove that transient absorption spectroscopy is probably the most useful tool in studying the PET reaction.

  8. 3-Coil resonance-based wireless power transfer system for implantable electronic

    KAUST Repository

    Yi, Ying

    2013-05-01

    This paper presents a 3-coil resonance-based wireless power transfer (R-WPT) system using a single layer of inductor coil windings, in a pancake configuration, in order to obtain a compact system for implantable electronic applications. A theoretical analysis and experimental measurements in terms of quality factor Q and power transfer efficiency (PTE), was done. Our proposed 3-coil scheme can achieve a high PTE with a resonance frequency of 2.46 MHz over a transfer distance of up to 30 mm, by using two 15-mm radius implant coils. The achieved experimental PTE is more than 85%at a 5 mm separation distance, and about 50% PTE at a distance of 20 mm. © 2013 IEEE.

  9. Heterogeneous electron transfer kinetics and electrocatalytic behaviour of mixed self-assembled ferrocenes and SWCNT layers

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Nkosi, D

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available in an acidic medium (0.5 M H(2)SO(4)) and in a solution of an outer-sphere redox probe ([Fe(CN)(6)](4-)/[Fe(CN)(6)](3-)) was explored. The electron transfer rate constants in both media essentially decreased as Au-Cys-FMCA > Au-Cys-SWCNT/FDCA > Au-Cys-FDCA > Au...

  10. Bibliography of electron transfer in heavy particle collisions, 1950--1975

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawthorne, S.W.; Barnett, C.F.; Crandall, D.H.; Gilbody, H.B.; Kirkpatrick, M.I.; McDaniel, E.; Phaneuf, R.A.; Thomas, E.W. (eds.)

    1979-02-01

    This annotated bibliography lists published work on electron transfer in heavy particle collisions for the period 1950 to 1975. Sources include scientific journals, abstract compilations, conference proceedings, books, and reports. The bibliography is arranged alphabetically by author. Each entry indicates whether the work was experimental or theoretical, what energy range was covered, and what reactants were investigated. Following the bibliographical listing are indexes of reactants and authors.

  11. Nature does not rely on long-lived electronic quantum coherence for photosynthetic energy transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Hong-Guang; Prokhorenko, Valentyn I.; Cogdell, Richard J.; Ashraf, Khuram; Stevens, Amy L.; Thorwart, Michael; Miller, R. J. Dwayne

    2017-08-01

    During the first steps of photosynthesis, the energy of impinging solar photons is transformed into electronic excitation energy of the light-harvesting biomolecular complexes. The subsequent energy transfer to the reaction center is commonly rationalized in terms of excitons moving on a grid of biomolecular chromophores on typical timescales light-harvesting complexes, we anticipate that this finding is general and directly applies to even larger photoactive biomolecular complexes.

  12. Bibliography on electron transfer processes in ion-ion/atom/molecule collisions. Updated 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tawara, H.

    1997-04-01

    Following our previous compilations (IPPJ-AM-45 (1986), NIFS-DATA-7 (1990), NIFS-DATA-20 (1993)), bibliographic information on experimental and theoretical studies on electron transfer processes in ion-ion/atom/molecule collisions is up-dated. The references published through 1954-1996 are listed in the order of the publication year. For easy finding of the references for a combination of collision partners, a simple list is provided. (author)

  13. Electron transfer reaction of butane -1,3-diol and cr(vi) in aqueous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kinetic and mechanistic studies of electron transfer reaction of butane-1,3-diol and Cr(VI) ion in aqueous acidic medium have been carried out in aqueous medium at 271°C, I = 1.0 mol dm-3 (NaCl), [H +] = 0.5mol dm-3 (HCl). The reaction was inhibited by added anions and showed negative salt effect. Spectroscopic ...

  14. Metal complex-based electron-transfer mediators in dye-sensitized solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, C. Michael; Sapp, Shawn A.; Bignozzi, Carlo Alberto; Contado, Cristiano; Caramori, Stefano

    2006-03-28

    This present invention provides a metal-ligand complex and methods for using and preparing the same. In particular, the metal-ligand complex of the present invention is of the formula: L.sub.a-M-X.sub.b where L, M, X, a, and b are those define herein. The metal-ligand complexes of the present invention are useful in a variety of applications including as electron-transfer mediators in dye-sensitized solar cells and related photoelectrochromic devices.

  15. Image transfer with spatial coherence for aberration corrected transmission electron microscopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosokawa, Fumio, E-mail: hosokawa@bio-net.co.jp [BioNet Ltd., 2-3-28 Nishikityo, Tachikwa, Tokyo (Japan); Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midoriku, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Sawada, Hidetaka [JEOL (UK) Ltd., JEOL House, Silver Court, Watchmead, Welwyn Garden City, Herts AL7 1LT (United Kingdom); Shinkawa, Takao [BioNet Ltd., 2-3-28 Nishikityo, Tachikwa, Tokyo (Japan); Sannomiya, Takumi [Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midoriku, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan)

    2016-08-15

    The formula of spatial coherence involving an aberration up to six-fold astigmatism is derived for aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy. Transfer functions for linear imaging are calculated using the newly derived formula with several residual aberrations. Depending on the symmetry and origin of an aberration, the calculated transfer function shows characteristic symmetries. The aberrations that originate from the field’s components, having uniformity along the z direction, namely, the n-fold astigmatism, show rotational symmetric damping of the coherence. The aberrations that originate from the field’s derivatives with respect to z, such as coma, star, and three lobe, show non-rotational symmetric damping. It is confirmed that the odd-symmetric wave aberrations have influences on the attenuation of an image via spatial coherence. Examples of image simulations of haemoglobin and Si [211] are shown by using the spatial coherence for an aberration-corrected electron microscope. - Highlights: • The formula of partial coherence for aberration corrected TEM is derived. • Transfer functions are calculated with several residual aberrations. • The calculated transfer function shows the characteristic damping. • The odd-symmetric wave aberrations can cause the attenuation of image via coherence. • The examples of aberration corrected TEM image simulations are shown.

  16. Identifying electron transfer coordinates in donor-bridge-acceptor systems using mode projection analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xunmo; Keane, Theo; Delor, Milan; Meijer, Anthony J. H. M.; Weinstein, Julia; Bittner, Eric R.

    2017-02-01

    We report upon an analysis of the vibrational modes that couple and drive the state-to-state electronic transfer branching ratios in a model donor-bridge-acceptor system consisting of a phenothiazine-based donor linked to a naphthalene-monoimide acceptor via a platinum-acetylide bridging unit. Our analysis is based upon an iterative Lanczos search algorithm that finds superpositions of vibronic modes that optimize the electron/nuclear coupling using input from excited-state quantum chemical methods. Our results indicate that the electron transfer reaction coordinates between a triplet charge-transfer state and lower lying charge-separated and localized excitonic states are dominated by asymmetric and symmetric modes of the acetylene groups on either side of the central atom in this system. In particular, we find that while a nearly symmetric mode couples both the charge-separation and charge-recombination transitions more or less equally, the coupling along an asymmetric mode is far greater suggesting that IR excitation of the acetylene modes preferentially enhances charge-recombination transition relative to charge-separation.

  17. High throughput engineering to revitalize a vestigial electron transfer pathway in bacterial photosynthetic reaction centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faries, Kaitlyn M; Kressel, Lucas L; Wander, Marc J; Holten, Dewey; Laible, Philip D; Kirmaier, Christine; Hanson, Deborah K

    2012-03-09

    Photosynthetic reaction centers convert light energy into chemical energy in a series of transmembrane electron transfer reactions, each with near 100% yield. The structures of reaction centers reveal two symmetry-related branches of cofactors (denoted A and B) that are functionally asymmetric; purple bacterial reaction centers use the A pathway exclusively. Previously, site-specific mutagenesis has yielded reaction centers capable of transmembrane charge separation solely via the B branch cofactors, but the best overall electron transfer yields are still low. In an attempt to better realize the architectural and energetic factors that underlie the directionality and yields of electron transfer, sites within the protein-cofactor complex were targeted in a directed molecular evolution strategy that implements streamlined mutagenesis and high throughput spectroscopic screening. The polycistronic approach enables efficient construction and expression of a large number of variants of a heteroligomeric complex that has two intimately regulated subunits with high sequence similarity, common features of many prokaryotic and eukaryotic transmembrane protein assemblies. The strategy has succeeded in the discovery of several mutant reaction centers with increased efficiency of the B pathway; they carry multiple substitutions that have not been explored or linked using traditional approaches. This work expands our understanding of the structure-function relationships that dictate the efficiency of biological energy-conversion reactions, concepts that will aid the design of bio-inspired assemblies capable of both efficient charge separation and charge stabilization.

  18. Ferrous iron reduction of superoxide, a proton-coupled electron-transfer four-point test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wander, Matthew C F; Kubicki, James D; Clark, Aurora E; Schoonen, Martin A A

    2009-02-12

    Nelsen's four-point method of separating oxidants and reductants has been tested to evaluate its applicability to proton-coupled electron-transfer reactions. An efficient computational method was developed to determine rate-limiting steps in complex, multistep redox reactions. Geochemical redox reactions are rarely single-step, and by identifying the rate-limiting steps, computational time can be greatly reduced. The reaction of superoxide and ferrous oxide was selected as a test case for its simplicity and its importance in environmental radical generation chemistry (Fenton's reaction). Two approaches, one quantum mechanical and the other semiempirical, were compared. In both approaches, hybrid density functional theory (DFT) was used with the B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) basis set and a polarized continuum model of the solvent to minimize the structures and determine the energies. In the quantum mechanical case, DFT was used to determine both the Gibbs free energies and the values for the intrinsic component of the reorganization energy of possible combinations of reactants and products. In the latter, experimental DeltaG(f) values were combined with calculated intrinsic reorganization energy values. The computational results matched the relative difference in rate barriers between the reduction of superoxide by ferrous iron above and below pH 4.8. In the acidic pH range, the proton is coupled to the electron transfer, whereas in the neutral case, the proton initiates the electron transfer.

  19. Marcus Bell-Shaped Electron Transfer Kinetics Observed in an Arrhenius Plot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waskasi, Morteza M; Kodis, Gerdenis; Moore, Ana L; Moore, Thomas A; Gust, Devens; Matyushov, Dmitry V

    2016-07-27

    The Marcus theory of electron transfer predicts a bell-shaped dependence of the reaction rate on the reaction free energy. The top of the "inverted parabola" corresponds to zero activation barrier when the electron-transfer reorganization energy and the reaction free energy add up to zero. Although this point has traditionally been reached by altering the chemical structures of donors and acceptors, the theory suggests that it can also be reached by varying other parameters of the system including temperature. We find here dramatic evidence of this phenomenon from experiments on a fullerene-porphyrin dyad. Following photoinduced electron transfer, the rate of charge recombination shows a bell-shaped dependence on the inverse temperature, first increasing with cooling and then decreasing at still lower temperatures. This non-Arrhenius rate law is a result of a strong, approximately hyperbolic temperature variation of the reorganization energy and the reaction free energy. Our results provide potentially the cleanest confirmation of the Marcus energy gap law so far since no modification of the chemical structure is involved.

  20. A screen for potential ferredoxin electron transfer partners uncovers new, redox dependent interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanke, G T; Satomi, Y; Shinmura, K; Takao, T; Hase, T

    2011-02-01

    Ferredoxin (Fd) is the primary soluble acceptor at the end of the photosynthetic electron transport chain, and is known to directly transfer electrons to a wide range of proteins for use in metabolism and regulatory processes. We have conducted a screen to identify new putative Fd interaction partners in the cyanobacteria Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 using Fd-chromatography in combination with MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. Many novel interactions were detected, including several redox enzymes, which are now candidates for further experiments to investigate electron transfer with Fd. In addition, some proteins with regulatory activity related to photosynthesis were identified. We cloned and expressed one such protein, known as RpaA, which is a specific regulator of energy transfer between phycobilisomes and PSI. Using the recombinant protein we confirmed direct interaction with Fd, and discovered that this was dependent on redox state. The screen for putative Fd-binding proteins was repeated, comparing oxidizing and reducing conditions, identifying many proteins whose interaction with Fd is redox dependent. These include several additional signaling molecules, among them the LexA repressor, Ycf53 and NII, which are all involved in interpreting the redox state of the cell. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Golden rule kinetics of transfer reactions in condensed phase: the microscopic model of electron transfer reactions in disordered solid matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basilevsky, M V; Odinokov, A V; Titov, S V; Mitina, E A

    2013-12-21

    The algorithm for a theoretical calculation of transfer reaction rates for light quantum particles (i.e., the electron and H-atom transfers) in non-polar solid matrices is formulated and justified. The mechanism postulated involves a local mode (an either intra- or inter-molecular one) serving as a mediator which accomplishes the energy exchange between the reacting high-frequency quantum mode and the phonon modes belonging to the environment. This approach uses as a background the Fermi golden rule beyond the usually applied spin-boson approximation. The dynamical treatment rests on the one-dimensional version of the standard quantum relaxation equation for the reduced density matrix, which describes the frequency fluctuation spectrum for the local mode under consideration. The temperature dependence of a reaction rate is controlled by the dimensionless parameter ξ0 = ℏω0/k(B)T where ω0 is the frequency of the local mode and T is the temperature. The realization of the computational scheme is different for the high/intermediate (ξ0 kinetic regime, the Redfield approximation to the solution of the relaxation equation proved to be sufficient and efficient in practical applications. The study of the essentially quantum-mechanical low-temperature kinetic regime in its asymptotic limit requires the implementation of the exact relaxation equation. The coherent mechanism providing a non-vanishing reaction rate has been revealed when T → 0. An accurate computational methodology for the cross-over kinetic regime needs a further elaboration. The original model of the hopping mechanism for electronic conduction in photosensitive organic materials is considered, based on the above techniques. The electron transfer (ET) in active centers of such systems proceeds via local intra- and intermolecular modes. The active modes, as a rule, operate beyond the kinetic regimes, which are usually postulated in the existing theories of the ET. Our alternative dynamic ET model for

  2. Interdomain electron transfer in cellobiose dehydrogenase is governed by surface electrostatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadek, Alan; Kavan, Daniel; Marcoux, Julien; Stojko, Johann; Felice, Alfons K G; Cianférani, Sarah; Ludwig, Roland; Halada, Petr; Man, Petr

    2017-02-01

    Cellobiose dehydrogenase (CDH) is a fungal extracellular oxidoreductase which fuels lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase with electrons during cellulose degradation. Interdomain electron transfer between the flavin and cytochrome domain in CDH, preceding the electron flow to lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase, is known to be pH dependent, but the exact mechanism of this regulation has not been experimentally proven so far. To investigate the structural aspects underlying the domain interaction in CDH, hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX-MS) with improved proteolytic setup (combination of nepenthesin-1 with rhizopuspepsin), native mass spectrometry with ion mobility and electrostatics calculations were used. HDX-MS revealed pH-dependent changes in solvent accessibility and hydrogen bonding at the interdomain interface. Electrostatics calculations identified these differences to result from charge neutralization by protonation and together with ion mobility pointed at higher electrostatic repulsion between CDH domains at neutral pH. In addition, we uncovered extensive O-glycosylation in the linker region and identified the long-unknown exact cleavage point in papain-mediated domain separation. Transition of CDH between its inactive (open) and interdomain electron transfer-capable (closed) state is shown to be governed by changes in the protein surface electrostatics at the domain interface. Our study confirms that the interdomain electrostatic repulsion is the key factor modulating the functioning of CDH. The results presented in this paper provide experimental evidence for the role of charge repulsion in the interdomain electron transfer in cellobiose dehydrogenases, which is relevant for exploiting their biotechnological potential in biosensors and biofuel cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Electrostatic models of electron-driven proton transfer across a lipid membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smirnov, Anatoly Yu; Nori, Franco [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, Wako-shi, Saitama, 351-0198 (Japan); Mourokh, Lev G [Department of Physics, Queens College, The City University of New York, Flushing, NY 11367 (United States)

    2011-06-15

    We present two models for electron-driven uphill proton transport across lipid membranes, with the electron energy converted to the proton gradient via the electrostatic interaction. In the first model, associated with the cytochrome c oxidase complex in the inner mitochondria membranes, the electrostatic coupling to the site occupied by an electron lowers the energy level of the proton-binding site, making proton transfer possible. In the second model, roughly describing the redox loop in a nitrate respiration of E. coli bacteria, an electron displaces a proton from the negative side of the membrane to a shuttle, which subsequently diffuses across the membrane and unloads the proton to its positive side. We show that both models can be described by the same approach, which can be significantly simplified if the system is separated into several clusters, with strong Coulomb interaction inside each cluster and weak transfer couplings between them. We derive and solve the equations of motion for the electron and proton creation/annihilation operators, taking into account the appropriate Coulomb terms, tunnel couplings, and the interaction with the environment. For the second model, these equations of motion are solved jointly with a Langevin-type equation for the shuttle position. We obtain expressions for the electron and proton currents and determine their dependence on the electron and proton voltage build-ups, on-site charging energies, reorganization energies, temperature, and other system parameters. We show that the quantum yield in our models can be up to 100% and the power-conversion efficiency can reach 35%.

  4. Theoretical Evidence for the Distance-Dependent Photoinduced Electron Transfer of Porphyrin-Oligothiophene-Fullerene Triads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The ground and excited state properties of nT-C60 dyads and Por-nT-C60 triads (n=4, 8, and 12 have been theoretically investigated by using the time-dependent density functional theory together with a set of extensive multidimensional visualization techniques. The results reveal that the length of the nT moiety strongly influences the charge transfer characters of these systems. The charge transfer ability is largely strengthened by introducing the porphyrin group and decreases with the length of the nT moiety. Also the adjustment of the electron transport mode of Por-nT-C60 triads by the length of the nT moiety was visualized. It is found that Por*-4T-C60 shows predominantly the energy transfer process generating Por-4T-1C60* but the charge transfer becomes predominant for other triads, such as the direct formation of Por∙+-12T-C60∙− via Por*-12T-C60. Furthermore, the process of Por∙−-8T∙+-C60→Por-8T∙+-C60∙− via Por*-8T-C60 has been proved to be possible. Finally, the energetically most stable final charge transfer excited state is confirmed to be Por-nT∙+-C60∙−.

  5. NMR study of the interaction of plastocyanin with chromium(II) analogues of inorganic electron transfer reagents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cookson, D J; Hayes, M T; Wright, P E

    1980-06-10

    High resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy has been used to examine the interaction of plastocyanins from French bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) and cucumber (Cucumis sativus) with three complexes--potassium hexacyano-chromate(III), hexamminechromium(III) nitrate and tris(1,10-phenanthroline)-chromium(III) perchlorate--which are analogues of inorganic electron transfer reagents. The results indicate a high degree of specificity in the binding of these complexes and two binding sites on the protein are identified. One binding site is situated close to the copper atom and is clearly suited to outer sphere electron transfer through one of the histidine ligands. The other binding site is more distant from the copper atom and this mechanism cannot be operative. Electron transfer via hydrophobic channels or electron tunneling are possible mechanisms of electron transfer.

  6. Handshake electron transfer from hydrogen Rydberg atoms incident at a series of metallic thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbard, J A; Softley, T P

    2016-06-21

    Thin metallic films have a 1D quantum well along the surface normal direction, which yields particle-in-a-box style electronic quantum states. However the quantum well is not infinitely deep and the wavefunctions of these states penetrate outside the surface where the electron is bound by its own image-charge attraction. Therefore a series of discrete, vacant states reach out from the thin film into the vacuum increasing the probability of electron transfer from an external atom or molecule to the thin film, especially for the resonant case where the quantum well energy matches that of the atom. We show that "handshake" electron transfer from a highly excited Rydberg atom to these thin-film states is experimentally measurable. Thicker films have a wider 1D box, changing the energetic distribution and image-state contribution to the thin film wavefunctions, resulting in more resonances. Calculations successfully predict the number of resonances and the nature of the thin-film wavefunctions for a given film thickness.

  7. Influence of Humic Acid Complexation with Metal Ions on Extracellular Electron Transfer Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shungui; Chen, Shanshan; Yuan, Yong; Lu, Qin

    2015-01-01

    Humic acids (HAs) can act as electron shuttles and mediate biogeochemical cycles, thereby influencing the transformation of nutrients and environmental pollutants. HAs commonly complex with metals in the environment, but few studies have focused on how these metals affect the roles of HAs in extracellular electron transfer (EET). In this study, HA-metal (HA-M) complexes (HA-Fe, HA-Cu, and HA-Al) were prepared and characterized. The electron shuttle capacities of HA-M complexes were experimentally evaluated through microbial Fe(III) reduction, biocurrent generation, and microbial azoreduction. The results show that the electron shuttle capacities of HAs were enhanced after complexation with Fe but were weakened when using Cu or Al. Density functional theory calculations were performed to explore the structural geometry of the HA-M complexes and revealed the best binding sites of the HAs to metals and the varied charge transfer rate constants (k). The EET activity of the HA-M complexes were in the order HA-Fe > HA-Cu > HA-Al. These findings have important implications for biogeochemical redox processes given the ubiquitous nature of both HAs and various metals in the environment. PMID:26593782

  8. Electron Transfer in Methylene-Blue-Labeled G3 Dendrimers Tethered to Gold

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Álvarez-Martos, Isabel; Kartashov, Andrey; Ferapontova, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Redox-modified branched 3D dendrimeric nanostructures are considered a proper tool for the wiring of redox enzymes be-cause they provide both an enzyme-friendly environment and exquisite electron transfer (ET) mediation. ET rates in G3 poly-(amido)amine (PAMAM) dendrimers, covalently attached...... to gold electrodes and labeled with methylene blue (MB), approached 267 s-1 and decreased as the packing density of dendrimers on the electrode surface was increased. A mechanistic analysis of the ET kinetics and fitting to the Marcus relationship showed that as the PAMAM surface coverage was increased......,the ET mechanism switched from surface-confined ET (electron tunneling) in dilute monolayers to diffusional ET (electron hopping) at higher surface populations of dendrimers. Structural changes in the positively charged dendrimers electrostatically compressed at negative charges of the electrode surface...

  9. The effect of intramolecular quantum modes on free energy relationships for electron transfer reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulstrup, Jens; Jortner, Joshua

    1975-01-01

    -frequency intramolecular degrees of feedom on the free energy relationship for series of closely related reactions was investigated for various model systems involving displacement of potential energy surfaces, frequency shift, and anharmonicity effects. The free energy plots are generally found to pass through a maximum...... and to be asymmetric with a slower decrease in the transition probability with increasing energy of reaction. For high-frequency intramolecular modes this provides a rationalization of the experimental observation of ''activationless'' regions. Isotope effects are discussed as also are the oscillatory free energy......A general quantum mechanical description of exothermic electron transfer reactions is formulated by treating such reactions as the nonradiative decay of a ''supermolecule'' consisting of the electron donor, the electron acceptor, and the polar solvent. In particular, the role of the high...

  10. Modeling Electronic-Nuclear Interactions for Excitation Energy Transfer Processes in Light-Harvesting Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mi Kyung; Coker, David F

    2016-08-18

    An accurate approach for computing intermolecular and intrachromophore contributions to spectral densities to describe the electronic-nuclear interactions relevant for modeling excitation energy transfer processes in light harvesting systems is presented. The approach is based on molecular dynamics (MD) calculations of classical correlation functions of long-range contributions to excitation energy fluctuations and a separate harmonic analysis and single-point gradient quantum calculations for electron-intrachromophore vibrational couplings. A simple model is also presented that enables detailed analysis of the shortcomings of standard MD-based excitation energy fluctuation correlation function approaches. The method introduced here avoids these problems, and its reliability is demonstrated in accurate predictions for bacteriochlorophyll molecules in the Fenna-Matthews-Olson pigment-protein complex, where excellent agreement with experimental spectral densities is found. This efficient approach can provide instantaneous spectral densities for treating the influence of fluctuations in environmental dissipation on fast electronic relaxation.

  11. A bioelectrochemical approach to characterize extracellular electron transfer by Synechocystis sp. PCC6803.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Cereda

    Full Text Available Biophotovoltaic devices employ photosynthetic organisms at the anode of a microbial fuel cell to generate electrical power. Although a range of cyanobacteria and algae have been shown to generate photocurrent in devices of a multitude of architectures, mechanistic understanding of extracellular electron transfer by phototrophs remains minimal. Here we describe a mediatorless bioelectrochemical device to measure the electrogenic output of a planktonically grown cyanobacterium, Synechocystis sp. PCC6803. Light dependent production of current is measured, and its magnitude is shown to scale with microbial cell concentration and light intensity. Bioelectrochemical characterization of a Synechocystis mutant lacking Photosystem II demonstrates conclusively that production of the majority of photocurrent requires a functional water splitting aparatus and electrons are likely ultimately derived from water. This shows the potential of the device to rapidly and quantitatively characterize photocurrent production by genetically modified strains, an approach that can be used in future studies to delineate the mechanisms of cyanobacterial extracellular electron transport.

  12. Controlled direct electron transfer kinetics of fructose dehydrogenase at cup-stacked carbon nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komori, K; Huang, J; Mizushima, N; Ko, S; Tatsuma, T; Sakai, Y

    2017-10-18

    Graphene edge sites not only facilitate heterogeneous electron transfer reactions of redox species because of localization of electrons, but also allow sensitivities and selectivities to be tuned by controlling the atomic oxygen/carbon (O/C) ratio. Here, we immobilized fructose dehydrogenase (FDH) onto the surface of cup-stacked carbon nanofibers (CSCNFs), which provide highly ordered graphene edges with a controlled O/C ratio, and investigated the direct electron communication with FDH. As the O/C ratio decreased at the CSCNF surface, the negative zeta potential was mitigated and the electrochemical communication with FDH was facilitated. This is likely due to improved orientation of FDH molecules on the CSCNF surface. CSCNFs with a controlled O/C ratio could be applied to FDH-based d-fructose biosensors with tunable dynamic range and fructose biofuel cells with a controlled maximum current.

  13. Nonadiabatic dynamics of photoinduced proton-coupled electron transfer: comparison of explicit and implicit solvent simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auer, Benjamin; Soudackov, Alexander V; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2012-07-05

    Theoretical approaches for simulating the ultrafast dynamics of photoinduced proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions in solution are developed and applied to a series of model systems. These processes are simulated by propagating nonadiabatic surface hopping trajectories on electron-proton vibronic surfaces that depend on the solute and solvent nuclear coordinates. The PCET system is represented by a four-state empirical valence bond model, and the solvent is treated either as explicit solvent molecules or as a dielectric continuum, in which case the solvent dynamics is described in terms of two collective solvent coordinates corresponding to the energy gaps associated with electron and proton transfer. The explicit solvent simulations reveal two distinct solvent relaxation time scales, where the faster time scale relaxation corresponds to librational motions of solvent molecules in the first solvation shell, and the slower time scale relaxation corresponds to the bulk solvent dielectric response. The charge transfer dynamics is strongly coupled to both the fast and slow time scale solvent dynamics. The dynamical multistate continuum theory is extended to include the effects of two solvent relaxation time scales, and the resulting coupled generalized Langevin equations depend on parameters that can be extracted from equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. The implicit and explicit solvent approaches lead to qualitatively similar charge transfer and solvent dynamics for model PCET systems, suggesting that the implicit solvent treatment captures the essential elements of the nonequilibrium solvent dynamics for many systems. A combination of implicit and explicit solvent approaches will enable the investigation of photoinduced PCET processes in a variety of condensed phase systems.

  14. Fabrication of micromagnetic beads with molecular recognition/electron-transfer peptides for the sensing of ovalbumin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugawara, Kazuharu, E-mail: kzsuga@maebashi-it.ac.jp [Maebashi Institute of Technology, Gunma, 371-0816 (Japan); Kuramitz, Hideki [Department of Environmental Biology and Chemistry, Graduate School of Science and Engineering for Research, University of Toyama, Toyama, 930-8555 (Japan); Shinohara, Hiroki [Maebashi Institute of Technology, Gunma, 371-0816 (Japan)

    2017-03-15

    Electrochemical sensing of ovalbumin (OVA) was performed using magnetic beads with OVA recognition (RNRCKGTDVQAW)/electron-transfer (YYYYC) peptides. The focus of this study was to construct a highly sensitive and regenerative tool for OVA detection based on the interaction between a protein and peptide-1(RNRCKGTDVQAWYYYYC). The peptide-1 was introduced to the bead through four types of cross-linking reagents. Magnetic beads of different sizes with N-(6-maleimidocaproyloxy)sulfosuccinimide (Sulfo-EMCS) were also prepared. An oxidation peak due to tyrosine residues at 0.65 V depended on the distance of the electron-transfer peptide from the bead surface and on the surface area of the magnetic beads that contacted the electrode surface. The response of the electro-transfer peptide moiety was decreased because the protein was accumulated via the recognition peptide on the beads. When using Sulfo-EMCS and beads that were 6.0–6.9 μm in diameter, the calibration curve of OVA was linear and ranged from 8.0 × 10{sup −13} to 2.0 × 10{sup −11} M. To regenerate the magnetic beads, the measurements were achieved after removal of the OVA using a denaturing reagent. When OVA was added to fetal bovine serum containing a complex matrix, OVA was recovered at a rate of 98–100%. Consequently, these magnetic beads could be a powerful tool for the sensing of OVA in real samples. - Highlights: • Ovalbumin recognition/electron-transfer peptides were immobilized on magnetic beads. • The accumulation of the protein through the peptides on the beads caused the change of electrode response. • The magnetic beads could be reused for sensing of ovalbumin.

  15. Impact of speciation on the electron charge transfer properties of nanodiamond drug carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Baichuan; Barnard, Amanda S.

    2016-07-01

    Unpassivated diamond nanoparticles (bucky-diamonds) exhibit a unique surface reconstruction involving graphitization of certain crystal facets, giving rise to hybrid core-shell particles containing both aromatic and aliphatic carbon. Considerable effort is directed toward eliminating the aromatic shell, but persistent graphitization of subsequent subsurface-layers makes perdurable purification a challenge. In this study we use some simple statistical methods, in combination with electronic structure simulations, to predict the impact of different fractions of aromatic and aliphatic carbon on the charge transfer properties of the ensembles of bucky-diamonds. By predicting quality factors for a variety of cases, we find that perfect purification is not necessary to preserve selectivity, and there is a clear motivation for purifying samples to improve the sensitivity of charge transfer reactions. This may prove useful in designing drug delivery systems where the release of (selected) drugs needs to be sensitive to specific conditions at the point of delivery.Unpassivated diamond nanoparticles (bucky-diamonds) exhibit a unique surface reconstruction involving graphitization of certain crystal facets, giving rise to hybrid core-shell particles containing both aromatic and aliphatic carbon. Considerable effort is directed toward eliminating the aromatic shell, but persistent graphitization of subsequent subsurface-layers makes perdurable purification a challenge. In this study we use some simple statistical methods, in combination with electronic structure simulations, to predict the impact of different fractions of aromatic and aliphatic carbon on the charge transfer properties of the ensembles of bucky-diamonds. By predicting quality factors for a variety of cases, we find that perfect purification is not necessary to preserve selectivity, and there is a clear motivation for purifying samples to improve the sensitivity of charge transfer reactions. This may prove

  16. Photoinduced electron transfer interaction of anthraquinones with aniline quenchers: Influence of methyl substitution in aniline donors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivakumar, V.; Ponnamma, Deepalekshmi; Hussein, Yasser H. A.

    2017-02-01

    Photoinduced electron transfer between triplet state of 9,10-anthraquinone (AQ) and its two derivatives: 2-chloro-9,10-anthraquinone (CAQ) and sodium anthraquinone-2-sulfonate (AQS) and ground state aniline (AN) and its dimethyl substitutions: 2,3-dimethylaniline (2,3-DMA), 2,6-dimethylaniline (2,6-DMA), 3,5-dimethylaniline (3,5-DMA) and N,N-dimethylaniline (N,N-DMA) is studied using nanosecond laser flash photolysis at room temperature. Detection of radical bands of quinone anions and aniline cations along with their formation and/or decay kinetics are used to confirm the electron transfer (ET) process. In MeCN medium, AN quenches the triplet state of CAQ (CAQT) but not the triplets AQT or AQST. However in aqueous medium, AN quenches AQST and forms radical ion pair. All the DMAs can react through ET with all the triplet quinones at different degrees of efficiency in MeCN medium. Noticeably, the ring substituted DMAs are less efficient in electron donation to AQT or AQST while the N,N-DMA shows high efficiency in donating electron to all triplet quinones in MeCN medium. Charge distribution of donor molecules, in MeCN medium is calculated using density functional theory (DFT), and shows an enhancement of electron density of the ring of N,N-DMA, making it an ideal electron donor for ET studies compared to other DMAs. This systematic selection and usage of anilines with electrochemically tunable quinones can be viewed as a working model of donor-acceptor system that can be utilized in photoinduced ET applications.

  17. Electron-transfer reactions of the reductase component of soluble methane monooxygenase from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopp, D A; Gassner, G T; Blazyk, J L; Lippard, S J

    2001-12-11

    Soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO) catalyzes the hydroxylation of methane by dioxygen to afford methanol and water, the first step of carbon assimilation in methanotrophic bacteria. This enzyme comprises three protein components: a hydroxylase (MMOH) that contains a dinuclear nonheme iron active site; a reductase (MMOR) that facilitates electron transfer from NADH to the diiron site of MMOH; and a coupling protein (MMOB). MMOR uses a noncovalently bound FAD cofactor and a [2Fe-2S] cluster to mediate electron transfer. The gene encoding MMOR was cloned from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) and expressed in Escherichia coli in high yield. Purified recombinant MMOR was indistinguishable from the native protein in all aspects examined, including activity, mass, cofactor content, and EPR spectrum of the [2Fe-2S] cluster. Redox potentials for the FAD and [2Fe-2S] cofactors, determined by reductive titrations in the presence of indicator dyes, are FAD(ox/sq), -176 +/- 7 mV; FAD(sq/hq), -266 +/- 15 mV; and [2Fe-2S](ox/red), -209 +/- 14 mV. The midpoint potentials of MMOR are not altered by the addition of MMOH, MMOB, or both MMOH and MMOB. The reaction of MMOR with NADH was investigated by stopped-flow UV-visible spectroscopy, and the kinetic and spectral properties of intermediates are described. The effects of pH on the redox properties of MMOR are described and exploited in pH jump kinetic studies to measure the rate constant of 130 +/- 17 s(-)(1) for electron transfer between the FAD and [2Fe-2S] cofactors in two-electron-reduced MMOR. The thermodynamic and kinetic parameters determined significantly extend our understanding of the sMMO system.

  18. Bimolecular electron transfer in ionic liquids: are reaction rates anomalously high?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Min; Kaintz, Anne; Baker, Gary A; Maroncelli, Mark

    2012-02-02

    Steady-state and picosecond time-resolved emission spectroscopy are used to monitor the bimolecular electron transfer reaction between the electron acceptor 9,10-dicyanoanthracene in its S(1) state and the donor N,N-dimethylaniline in a variety of ionic liquids and several conventional solvents. Detailed study of this quenching reaction was undertaken in order to better understand why rates reported for similar diffusion-limited reactions in ionic liquids sometimes appear much higher than expected given the viscous nature of these liquids. Consistent with previous studies, Stern-Volmer analyses of steady-state and lifetime data provide effective quenching rate constants k(q), which are often 10-100-fold larger than simple predictions for diffusion-limited rate constants k(D) in ionic liquids. Similar departures from k(D) are also observed in conventional organic solvents having comparably high viscosities, indicating that this behavior is not unique to ionic liquids. A more complete analysis of the quenching data using a model combining approximate solution of the spherically symmetric diffusion equation with a Marcus-type description of electron transfer reveals the reasons for frequent observation of k(q) ≫ k(D). The primary cause is that the high viscosities typical of ionic liquids emphasize the transient component of diffusion-limited reactions, which renders the interpretation of rate constants derived from Stern-Volmer analyses ambiguous. Using a more appropriate description of the quenching process enables satisfactory fits of data in both ionic liquid and conventional solvents using a single set of physically reasonable electron transfer parameters. Doing so requires diffusion coefficients in ionic liquids to exceed hydrodynamic predictions by significant factors, typically in the range of 3-10. Direct, NMR measurements of solute diffusion confirm this enhanced diffusion in ionic liquids.

  19. The influence of alternative pathways of respiration that utilize branched-chain amino acids following water shortage in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, Marcel V; Pereira Júnior, Adilson A; Medeiros, David B; Daloso, Danilo M; Pham, Phuong Anh; Barros, Kallyne A; Engqvist, Martin K M; Florian, Alexandra; Krahnert, Ina; Maurino, Veronica G; Araújo, Wagner L; Fernie, Alisdair R

    2016-06-01

    During dark-induced senescence isovaleryl-CoA dehydrogenase (IVDH) and D-2-hydroxyglutarate dehydrogenase (D-2HGDH) act as alternate electron donors to the ubiquinol pool via the electron-transfer flavoprotein/electron-transfer flavoprotein:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (ETF/ETFQO) pathway. However, the role of this pathway in response to other stresses still remains unclear. Here, we demonstrated that this alternative pathway is associated with tolerance to drought in Arabidopsis. In comparison with wild type (WT) and lines overexpressing D-2GHDH, loss-of-function etfqo-1, d2hgdh-2 and ivdh-1 mutants displayed compromised respiration rates and were more sensitive to drought. Our results demonstrated that an operational ETF/ETFQO pathway is associated with plants' ability to withstand drought and to recover growth once water becomes replete. Drought-induced metabolic reprogramming resulted in an increase in tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediates and total amino acid levels, as well as decreases in protein, starch and nitrate contents. The enhanced levels of the branched-chain amino acids in loss-of-function mutants appear to be related to their increased utilization as substrates for the TCA cycle under water stress. Our results thus show that mitochondrial metabolism is highly active during drought stress responses and provide support for a role of alternative respiratory pathways within this response. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Direct electron transfer of horseradish peroxidase on Nafion-cysteine modified gold electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Jun [Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of Tehran, P.O. Box 13145-1384, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Moosavi-Movahedi, Ali Akbar [Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of Tehran, P.O. Box 13145-1384, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghourchian, Hedayatollah [Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of Tehran, P.O. Box 13145-1384, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)]. E-mail: hadi@ibb.ut.ac.ir; Rad, Ahmad Molaei [Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of Tehran, P.O. Box 13145-1384, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rezaei-Zarchi, Saeed [Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of Tehran, P.O. Box 13145-1384, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2007-06-20

    Direct electron transfer of horseradish peroxidase, immobilized on a functional membrane-modified gold electrode, was studied. The electrode showed a quasi-reversible electrochemical redox behavior with a formal potential of 60mV (versus Ag/AgCl) in 20mM potassium phosphate buffer solution at pH 7.0 and temperature 25{sup o}C. The cathodic transfer coefficient was 0.42 and electron transfer rate constant was evaluated to be 1.6s{sup -1}. Furthermore, the modified electrode was used as a biosensor and exhibited a satisfactory stability and sensitivity to H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. The linear range of this biosensor for H{sub 2}O{sub 2} determination was from 5.0x10{sup -6} to 1.5x10{sup -4}M while its detection limit, based on a signal-to-noise ratio of 3, was 1.3x10{sup -6}M. The apparent Michaelis-Menten constant (K{sub m}{sup app}) for immobilized HRP was calculated to be 1.6x10{sup -4}M.

  1. Electron transfer energies and dipole moments of alkyl halides and amines from an electrostatic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Applequist, Jon; Felder, Clifford E.

    1981-08-01

    Energies of the electron transfer reaction CH3X+RX+→CH3X++RX and dipole moments of molecules RX, where R is an alkyl group and X = Cl, Br, I, or NH2, are calculated for an electrostatic model in which each atom is characterized by a fixed charge and polarizability located at the position of the nucleus. The calculation takes into account the mutual polarization of the atoms in the molecular field. Atom polarizabilities are obtained from previous applications of the atom-dipole interaction model to molecular polarizabilities. Atom charges are assumed to be nonzero only for X and Cα, and these are optimized to fit 13 experimental electron transfer energies from first ionization potentials and 17 gas-phase dipole moments for selected alkyl compounds. Energies of 19 transfer reactions and dipole moments of 29 molecules are calculated, showing satisfactory overall agreement with experiment. The results suggest that the electrostatic interaction of the fixed charges with the polarizable atoms is responsible for the trend toward decreasing ionization potential with increasing size of the R group.

  2. Modified Current Differencing Unit and its Application for Electronically Reconfigurable Simple First-order Transfer Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SOTNER, R.

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Modified current differencing unit (MCDU and its simple filtering application are introduced in this paper. Modification of the well-known current differencing unit consists in weighted difference of both input currents controlled by adjustable current gain, controllable intrinsic resistance of both current input terminals, and availability of additional voltage terminal(s. Definition of MCDU therefore requires four adjustable parameters (B1, B2, Rp, Rn. A presented active element offers and combines benefits of electronically controllable current conveyor of second generation and current differencing unit and allows synthesis of interesting adjustable applications, which are not available by classical approaches based on simple elements. MCDU brings variability of the transfer function into the structure. It provides several transfer types without necessity of input or output node change by simple electronic tuning. A presented structure represents so-called reconnection-less reconfigurable current-mode filter for realization of all-pass, inverting high-pass, low-pass and direct transfer response. Behavioral model of the MCDU was prepared and carefully tested in filtering application. Spice simulations and measurements confirmed theoretical assumptions.

  3. Electronic, structural and chemical effects of charge-transfer at organic/inorganic interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero, R.; Vázquez de Parga, A. L.; Gallego, J. M.

    2017-07-01

    During the last decade, interest on the growth and self-assembly of organic molecular species on solid surfaces spread over the scientific community, largely motivated by the promise of cheap, flexible and tunable organic electronic and optoelectronic devices. These efforts lead to important advances in our understanding of the nature and strength of the non-bonding intermolecular interactions that control the assembly of the organic building blocks on solid surfaces, which have been recently reviewed in a number of excellent papers. To a large extent, such studies were possible because of a smart choice of model substrate-adsorbate systems where the molecule-substrate interactions were purposefully kept low, so that most of the observed supramolecular structures could be understood simply by considering intermolecular interactions, keeping the role of the surface always relatively small (although not completely negligible). On the other hand, the systems which are more relevant for the development of organic electronic devices include molecular species which are electron donors, acceptors or blends of donors and acceptors. Adsorption of such organic species on solid surfaces is bound to be accompanied by charge-transfer processes between the substrate and the adsorbates, and the physical and chemical properties of the molecules cannot be expected any longer to be the same as in solution phase. In recent years, a number of groups around the world have started tackling the problem of the adsorption, self- assembly and electronic and chemical properties of organic species which interact rather strongly with the surface, and for which charge-transfer must be considered. The picture that is emerging shows that charge transfer can lead to a plethora of new phenomena, from the development of delocalized band-like electron states at molecular overlayers, to the existence of new substrate-mediated intermolecular interactions or the strong modification of the chemical

  4. Wave packet motions coupled to electron transfer in reaction centers of Chloroflexus aurantiacus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakovlev, Andrei G; Shkuropatova, Tatiana A; Vasilieva, Lyudmila G; Shkuropatov, Anatoli Ya; Shuvalov, Vladimir A

    2008-08-01

    Transient absorption difference spectroscopy with approximately 20 femtosecond (fs) resolution was applied to study the time and spectral evolution of low-temperature (90 K) absorbance changes in isolated reaction centers (RCs) of Chloroflexus (C.) aurantiacus. In RCs, the composition of the B-branch chromophores is different with respect to that of purple bacterial RCs by occupying the B(B) binding site of accessory bacteriochlorophyll by bacteriopheophytin molecule (Phi(B)). It was found that the nuclear wave packet motion induced on the potential energy surface of the excited state of the primary electron donor P* by approximately 20 fs excitation leads to a coherent formation of the states P+Phi(B)(-) and P+B(A)(-) (B(A) is a bacteriochlorophyll monomer in the A-branch of cofactors). The processes were studied by measuring coherent oscillations in kinetics of the absorbance changes at 900 nm and 940 nm (P* stimulated emission), at 750 nm and 785 nm (Phi(B) absorption bands), and at 1,020-1028 nm (B(A)(-) absorption band). In RCs, the immediate bleaching of the P band at 880 nm and the appearance of the stimulated wave packet emission at 900 nm were accompanied (with a small delay of 10-20 fs) by electron transfer from P* to the B-branch with bleaching of the Phi(B) absorption band at 785 nm due to Phi(B)(-) formation. These data are consistent with recent measurements for the mutant HM182L Rb. sphaeroides RCs (Yakovlev et al., Biochim Biophys Acta 1757:369-379, 2006). Only at a delay of 120 fs was the electron transfer from P* to the A-branch observed with a development of the B(A)(-) absorption band at 1028 nm. This development was in phase with the appearance of the P* stimulated emission at 940 nm. The data on the A-branch electron transfer in C. aurantiacus RCs are consistent with those observed in native RCs of Rb. sphaeroides. The mechanism of charge separation in RCs with the modified B-branch pigment composition is discussed in terms of coupling between

  5. Resonant electronic excitation energy transfer by exchange mechanism in the quantum dot system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikalova-Luzina, O. P.; Samosvat, D. M.; Vyatkin, V. M.; Zegrya, G. G.

    2017-11-01

    A microscopic theory of nonradiative resonance energy transfer between spherical A3B5 semiconductor quantum dots by the exchange mechanism is suggested. The interdot Coulomb interaction is taken into consideration. It is assumed that the quantum dot-donor and the quantum dot-acceptor are made from the same A3B5 compound and are embedded in the matrix of another material that produces potential barriers for electrons and holes. The dependences of the energy transfer rate on the quantum-dot system parameters are found in the frame of the Kane model that provides the most adequate description of the real spectra of A3B5 semiconductors. The analytical treatment is carried out with using the density matrix method, which enabled us to perform an energy transfer analysis both in the weak-interaction approximation and in the strong-interaction approximation. The numerical calculations showed the saturation of the energy transfer rate at the distances between the donor and the acceptor approaching the contact one. The contributions of the exchange and direct Coulomb intractions can be of the same order at the small distances and can have the same value in the saturation range.

  6. Observation of Electronic Excitation Transfer Through Light Harvesting Complex II Using Two-Dimensional Electronic-Vibrational Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, NHC; Gruenke, NL; Oliver, TAA; Ballottari, M; Bassi, R; Fleming, GR

    2016-10-05

    Light-harvesting complex II (LHCII) serves a central role in light harvesting for oxygenic photosynthesis and is arguably the most important photosynthetic antenna complex. In this article, we present two-dimensional electronic–vibrational (2DEV) spectra of LHCII isolated from spinach, demonstrating the possibility of using this technique to track the transfer of electronic excitation energy between specific pigments within the complex. We assign the spectral bands via comparison with the 2DEV spectra of the isolated chromophores, chlorophyll a and b, and present evidence that excitation energy between the pigments of the complex are observed in these spectra. Lastly, we analyze the essential components of the 2DEV spectra using singular value decomposition, which makes it possible to reveal the relaxation pathways within this complex.

  7. Effects of orientation at the phthalocyanine-CdSe interface on the electron transfer characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golovanov, V V; Nazarchuk, B V; Golovanova, V V; Tkachenko, N V; Rantala, T T

    2017-04-19

    A phthalocyanine molecule adsorbed on the (101[combining macron]0) surface of wurtzite CdSe is theoretically modeled by the DFT method. We have found that a linker does not affect substantially the redox properties of phthalocyanine, while saturation of the macrocycle with peripheral substituent groups causes a downward shift in the energy position of its frontier orbitals that can hinder electron injection to the CdSe surface. Tilting of the phthalocyanine molecule relative to the surface also leads to the lowering of its molecular electronic levels relative to the bands of CdSe. At a tilting angle of 30°, the LUMO level of the dye appears to be lower than the conduction band minimum of cadmium selenide, which makes the electron transfer to its hybridized surface unfavorable. By contrast, the HOMO level of the phenylbutyric acid linker provides a suitable intermediate channel for the hole transfer from the valence band of CdSe to the phthalocyanine that points to the possible acceptor behavior of the phthalocyanine molecule in its hybrids with CdSe nanostructures.

  8. Direct methanol biocatalytic fuel cell--considerations of restraints on electron transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xia-Chang; Ranta, Anja; Halme, Aarne

    2006-05-15

    In this paper structure and operational principles of a novel type direct methanol biocatalytic fuel cell (DMBFC) system is introduced. In addition observed restraints in the energy generation are discussed. The operational principle of the biofuel cell is enzymatic breakdown of methanol by methanol dehydrogenase (MDH) from Methylobacterium extorquens at the anode. The terminal electron acceptor at the cathode is potassium permanganate. Performance characteristics of the system are the following: open circuit voltage 1.4 V, power density 0.25 mW/cm2 and current density 0.38 mA/cm2 at the operating voltage of 0.67 V, and a continuous operation time of 2 weeks. A biofuel cell usually requires an electrochemically active reagent, a mediator, to ensure effective transfer of the electrons from the activity centre of the enzyme to the electrode. Inactivation of the mediator was found to restrict the electron transfer. Moreover, the rate of inactivation was found to increase in fuel cell conditions. The half-life of TMPD was observed to be maximum 5 days compared to 10 days in normal conditions. Experiments showed that addition of 0.2% w/w of aluminium dioxide into the anodic graphite paste stabilized the mediator.

  9. Ferricytochrome c oxidation of cobaltocytochrome c. Comparison of experiments with electron-transfer theories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, J C; Gibson, H L; Dickinson, L C

    1978-06-27

    Electron transfer from cobaltocytochrome c to ferricytochrome c has been studied by stopped-flow kinetics. The second-order rate constant at pH 7.0, 0.1 ionic strenght, 0.2 M phosphate, and 25 degrees C is 8.3 x 103 M-1 s-1. The activation parameters obtained from measurements made between 20 and 50 degrees C are deltaHnot equal to = 2.3 kcal mol-1 and deltaSnot equal to = -33 eu. The rate constant is not significantly dependent on ionic strength; it is also relatively independent of pH between the pK values for conformation transitions. The rate diminishes at pH greater than 12. The self-exchange reaction of cobalt cytochrome c was investigated with pulsed Fourier transform 1H NMR. The rate is too slow on the 1H NMR scale; it is estimated to be less than 133 M-1 s-1. These results together with the self-exchange rates of iron cytochrome c [Gupta, R.K., Koenig, S. H., and Redfield, A. G. (1972), J. Magn. Reson. 7, 66] were analyzed by theories of Jortner and Hopfield. The theories predict the self-exchange of Cocyt c to be too slow for 1H NMR determination. The rate constant calculated by the nonadiabatic multiphonon electron-tunneling theory for the Fecyt c-Fecyt c+ and Cocyt c-Fecyt c+ electron transfers are in good agreement with experiments.

  10. In situ Regeneration of NADH via Lipoamide Dehydrogenase-catalyzed Electron Transfer Reaction Evidenced by Spectroelectrochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tam, Tsz Kin; Chen, Baowei; Lei, Chenghong; Liu, Jun

    2012-08-01

    NAD/NADH is a coenzyme found in all living cells, carrying electrons from one reaction to another. We report on characterizations of in situ regeneration of NADH via lipoamide dehydrogenase (LD)-catalyzed electron transfer reaction to regenerate NADH using UV-vis spectroelectrochemistry. The Michaelis-Menten constant (Km) and maximum velocity (Vmax) of NADH regeneration were measured as 0.80 {+-} 0.15 mM and 1.91 {+-} 0.09 {micro}M s-1 in a 1-mm thin-layer spectroelectrochemical cell using gold gauze as the working electrode at the applied potential -0.75 V (vs. Ag/AgCl). The electrocatalytic reduction of the NAD system was further coupled with the enzymatic conversion of pyruvate to lactate by lactate dehydrogenase to examine the coenzymatic activity of the regenerated NADH. Although the reproducible electrocatalytic reduction of NAD into NADH is known to be difficult compared to the electrocatalytic oxidation of NADH, our spectroelectrochemical results indicate that the in situ regeneration of NADH via LD-catalyzed electron transfer reaction is fast and sustainable and can be potentially applied to many NAD/NADH-dependent enzyme systems.

  11. Charge constrained density functional molecular dynamics for simulation of condensed phase electron transfer reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberhofer, Harald; Blumberger, Jochen

    2009-08-14

    We present a plane-wave basis set implementation of charge constrained density functional molecular dynamics (CDFT-MD) for simulation of electron transfer reactions in condensed phase systems. Following the earlier work of Wu and Van Voorhis [Phys. Rev. A 72, 024502 (2005)], the density functional is minimized under the constraint that the charge difference between donor and acceptor is equal to a given value. The classical ion dynamics is propagated on the Born-Oppenheimer surface of the charge constrained state. We investigate the dependence of the constrained energy and of the energy gap on the definition of the charge and present expressions for the constraint forces. The method is applied to the Ru2+-Ru3+ electron self-exchange reaction in aqueous solution. Sampling the vertical energy gap along CDFT-MD trajectories and correcting for finite size effects, a reorganization free energy of 1.6 eV is obtained. This is 0.1-0.2 eV lower than a previous estimate based on a continuum model for solvation. The smaller value for the reorganization free energy can be explained by the fact that the Ru-O distances of the divalent and trivalent Ru hexahydrates are predicted to be more similar in the electron transfer complex than for the separated aqua ions.

  12. Direct simulation of proton-coupled electron transfer reaction dynamics and mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kretchmer, Joshua S.; Miller, Thomas F., III

    2014-03-01

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions, in which both an electron and an associated proton undergo reactive transfer, play an important role in many chemical and biological systems. Due to the complexity of this class of reactions, a variety of different mechanisms fall under the umbrella of PCET. However, the physical driving forces that determine the preferred mechanism in a given system still remain poorly understood. Towards this end, we extend ring polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD), a path-integral quantum dynamics method, to enable the direct simulation and characterization of PCET reaction dynamics in both fully atomistic and system-bath models of organometallic catalysts. In addition to providing validation for the simulation method via extensive comparison with existing PCET rate theories, we analyze the RPMD trajectories to investigate the competition between the concerted and sequential reaction mechanisms for PCET, elucidating the large role of the solvent in controlling the preferred mechanism. We further employ RPMD to determine the kinetics and mechanistic features of concerted PCET reactions across different regimes of electronic and vibrational coupling, providing evidence for a new and distinct PCET reaction mechanism.

  13. Role of the bridge in photoinduced electron transfer in porphyrin-fullerene dyads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelado, Beatriz; Abou-Chahine, Fawzi; Calbo, Joaquín; Caballero, Rubén; de la Cruz, Pilar; Junquera-Hernández, José M; Ortí, Enrique; Tkachenko, Nikolai V; Langa, Fernando

    2015-04-07

    The role of π-conjugated molecular bridges in through-space and through-bond electron transfer is studied by comparing two porphyrin-fullerene donor-acceptor (D-A) dyads. One dyad, ZnP-Ph-C60 (ZnP = zinc porphyrin), incorporates a phenyl bridge between D and A and behaves very similarly to analogous dyads studied previously. The second dyad, ZnP-EDOTV-C60, introduces an additional 3,4-ethylenedioxythienylvinylene (EDOTV) unit into the conjugated bridge, which increases the distance between D and A, but, at the same time, provides increased electronic communication between them. Two essential outcomes that result from the introduction of the EDOTV unit in the bridge are as follows: 1) faster charge recombination, which indicates enhanced electronic coupling between the charge-separated and ground electronic states; and 2) the disappearance of the intramolecular exciplex, which mediates photoinduced charge separation in the ZnP-Ph-C60 dyad. The latter can be interpreted as a gradual decrease in electronic coupling between locally excited singlet states of D and A when introducing the EDOTV unit into the D-A bridge. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Electron transfer-induced four-membered cyclic intermediate formation: Olefin cross-coupling vs. olefin cross-metathesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okada, Yohei [Department of Applied Life Science, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 3-5-8 Saiwai-cho, Fuchu, Tokyo 183-8509 (Japan); Chiba, Kazuhiro, E-mail: chiba@cc.tuat.ac.j [Department of Applied Life Science, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 3-5-8 Saiwai-cho, Fuchu, Tokyo 183-8509 (Japan)

    2011-01-01

    An electron transfer-induced four-membered cyclic intermediate, formed between a radical cation of an enol ether and an unactivated olefin, played a key role in the pathway toward either cross-coupling or cross-metathesis. The presence of an alkoxy group on the phenyl ring of the olefin entirely determined the synthetic outcome of the reaction, which mirrored the efficiency of the intramolecular electron transfer.

  15. Sensing lymphoma cells based on a cell-penetrating/apoptosis-inducing/electron-transfer peptide probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugawara, Kazuharu, E-mail: kzsuga@maebashi-it.ac.jp [Maebashi Institute of Technology, Gunma 371-0816 (Japan); Shinohara, Hiroki; Kadoya, Toshihiko [Maebashi Institute of Technology, Gunma 371-0816 (Japan); Kuramitz, Hideki [Department of Environmental Biology and Chemistry, Graduate School of Science and Engineering for Research, University of Toyama, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan)

    2016-06-14

    To electrochemically sense lymphoma cells (U937), we fabricated a multifunctional peptide probe that consists of cell-penetrating/apoptosis-inducing/electron-transfer peptides. Electron-transfer peptides derive from cysteine residue combined with the C-terminals of four tyrosine residues (Y{sub 4}). A peptide whereby Y{sub 4}C is bound to the C-terminals of protegrin 1 (RGGRLCYCRRRFCVCVGR-NH{sub 2}) is known to be an apoptosis-inducing agent against U937 cells, and is referred to as a peptide-1 probe. An oxidation response of the peptide-1 probe has been observed due to a phenolic hydroxyl group, and this response is decreased by the uptake of the peptide probe into the cells. To improve the cell membrane permeability against U937 cells, the RGGR at the N-terminals of the peptide-1 probe was replaced by RRRR (peptide-2 probe). In contrast, RNRCKGTDVQAWY{sub 4}C (peptide-3 probe), which recognizes ovalbumin, was constructed as a control. Compared with the other probes, the change in the peak current of the peptide-2 probe was the greatest at low concentrations and occurred in a short amount of time. Therefore, the cell membrane permeability of the peptide-2 probe was increased based on the arginine residues and the apoptosis-inducing peptides. The peak current was linear and ranged from 100 to 1000 cells/ml. The relative standard deviation of 600 cells/ml was 5.0% (n = 5). Furthermore, the membrane permeability of the peptide probes was confirmed using fluorescent dye. - Highlights: • We constructed a multifunctional peptide probe for the electrochemical sensing of lymphoma cells. • The peptide probe consists of cell-penetrating/apoptosis-inducing/electron-transfer peptides. • The electrode response of the peptide probe changes due to selective uptake into the cells.

  16. Electronic and vibronic properties of a discotic liquid-crystal and its charge transfer complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haverkate, Lucas A.; Zbiri, Mohamed; Johnson, Mark R.; Carter, Elizabeth; Kotlewski, Arek; Picken, S.; Mulder, Fokko M.; Kearley, Gordon J.

    2014-01-01

    Discotic liquid crystalline (DLC) charge transfer (CT) complexes combine visible light absorption and rapid charge transfer characteristics, being favorable properties for photovoltaic (PV) applications. We present a detailed study of the electronic and vibrational properties of the prototypic 1:1 mixture of discotic 2,3,6,7,10,11-hexakishexyloxytriphenylene (HAT6) and 2,4,7-trinitro-9-fluorenone (TNF). It is shown that intermolecular charge transfer occurs in the ground state of the complex: a charge delocalization of about 10-2 electron from the HAT6 core to TNF is deduced from both Raman and our previous NMR measurements [L. A. Haverkate, M. Zbiri, M. R. Johnson, B. Deme, H. J. M. de Groot, F. Lefeber, A. Kotlewski, S. J. Picken, F. M. Mulder, and G. J. Kearley, J. Phys. Chem. B 116, 13098 (2012)], implying the presence of permanent dipoles at the donor-acceptor interface. A combined analysis of density functional theory calculations, resonant Raman and UV-VIS absorption measurements indicate that fast relaxation occurs in the UV region due to intramolecular vibronic coupling of HAT6 quinoidal modes with lower lying electronic states. Relatively slower relaxation in the visible region the excited CT-band of the complex is also indicated, which likely involves motions of the TNF nitro groups. The fast quinoidal relaxation process in the hot UV band of HAT6 relates to pseudo-Jahn-Teller interactions in a single benzene unit, suggesting that the underlying vibronic coupling mechanism can be generic for polyaromatic hydrocarbons. Both the presence of ground state CT dipoles and relatively slow relaxation processes in the excited CT band can be relevant concerning the design of DLC based organic PV systems.

  17. Electronic and vibronic properties of a discotic liquid-crystal and its charge transfer complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haverkate, Lucas A.; Mulder, Fokko M. [Reactor Institute Delft, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 15, 2629JB Delft (Netherlands); Zbiri, Mohamed, E-mail: zbiri@ill.fr; Johnson, Mark R. [Institut Laue Langevin, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Carter, Elizabeth [Vibrational Spectroscopy Facility, School of Chemistry, The University of Sydney, NSW 2008 (Australia); Kotlewski, Arek; Picken, S. [ChemE-NSM, Faculty of Chemistry, Delft University of Technology, 2628BL/136 Delft (Netherlands); Kearley, Gordon J. [Bragg Institute, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Menai, NSW 2234 (Australia)

    2014-01-07

    Discotic liquid crystalline (DLC) charge transfer (CT) complexes combine visible light absorption and rapid charge transfer characteristics, being favorable properties for photovoltaic (PV) applications. We present a detailed study of the electronic and vibrational properties of the prototypic 1:1 mixture of discotic 2,3,6,7,10,11-hexakishexyloxytriphenylene (HAT6) and 2,4,7-trinitro-9-fluorenone (TNF). It is shown that intermolecular charge transfer occurs in the ground state of the complex: a charge delocalization of about 10{sup −2} electron from the HAT6 core to TNF is deduced from both Raman and our previous NMR measurements [L. A. Haverkate, M. Zbiri, M. R. Johnson, B. Deme, H. J. M. de Groot, F. Lefeber, A. Kotlewski, S. J. Picken, F. M. Mulder, and G. J. Kearley, J. Phys. Chem. B 116, 13098 (2012)], implying the presence of permanent dipoles at the donor-acceptor interface. A combined analysis of density functional theory calculations, resonant Raman and UV-VIS absorption measurements indicate that fast relaxation occurs in the UV region due to intramolecular vibronic coupling of HAT6 quinoidal modes with lower lying electronic states. Relatively slower relaxation in the visible region the excited CT-band of the complex is also indicated, which likely involves motions of the TNF nitro groups. The fast quinoidal relaxation process in the hot UV band of HAT6 relates to pseudo-Jahn-Teller interactions in a single benzene unit, suggesting that the underlying vibronic coupling mechanism can be generic for polyaromatic hydrocarbons. Both the presence of ground state CT dipoles and relatively slow relaxation processes in the excited CT band can be relevant concerning the design of DLC based organic PV systems.

  18. Electronic excitation energy transfer and nonstationary processes in KH2PO4:Tl crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogorodnikov, I. N.; Pustovarov, V. A.

    2017-04-01

    We report the results of our experimental study and numerical simulation of the electronic excitation energy transfer to impurity centers under conditions where nonstationary processes take place in the hydrogen sublattice of potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KH2PO4) single crystals doped with mercury-like Tl+ ions (KDP:Tl). We present the experimental results of our investigation of the decay kinetics of the transient optical absorption (100 ns-50 s) of intrinsic defects in the hydrogen sublattice of KDP:Tl obtained by pulsed absorption spectroscopy and the results of our study of the dynamics of the change in steady-state luminescence intensity with irradiation time (1-5000 s). To explain the transfer of the energy being released during electron recombination involving intrinsic KDP:Tl lattice defects, we formulate a mathematical model for the transfer of this energy to impurity Tl+ luminescence centers. Within the model being developed, we present the systems of differential balance equations describing the nonstationary processes in the electron subsystem and the hydrogen sublattice; provide a technique for calculating the pair correlation functions Y( r, t) of dissimilar defects based on the solution of the Smoluchowski equation for the system of mobile hydrogen sublattice defects; calculate the time-dependent reaction rate constants K( t) for various experimental conditions; and outline the peculiarities and results of the model parametrization based on our experimental data. Based on our investigation, the dramatic and significant effect of a gradual inertial increase by a factor of 50-100 in steady-state luminescence intensity in the 4.5-eV band in KDP:Tl crystals due to the luminescence of mercury-like Tl+ ions has been explained qualitatively and quantitatively.

  19. The role of electrostatics in TrxR electron transfer mechanism: A computational approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Vitor H; Capacho, Ana Sofia C; Machuqueiro, Miguel

    2016-12-01

    Thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) is an important enzyme in the control of the intracellular reduced redox environment. It transfers electrons from NADPH to several molecules, including its natural partner, thioredoxin. Although there is a generally accepted model describing how the electrons are transferred along TrxR, which involves a flexible arm working as a "shuttle," the molecular details of such mechanism are not completely understood. In this work, we use molecular dynamics simulations with Poisson-Boltzmann/Monte Carlo pKa calculations to investigate the role of electrostatics in the electron transfer mechanism. We observed that the combination of redox/protonation states of the N-terminal (FAD and Cys59/64) and C-terminal (Cys497/Selenocysteine498) redox centers defines the preferred relative positions and allows for the flexible arm to work as the desired "shuttle." Changing the redox/ionization states of those key players, leads to electrostatic triggers pushing the arm into the pocket when oxidized, and pulling it out, once it has been reduced. The calculated pKa values for Cys497 and Selenocysteine498 are 9.7 and 5.8, respectively, confirming that the selenocysteine is indeed deprotonated at physiological pH. This can be an important advantage in terms of reactivity (thiolate/selenolate are more nucleophilic than thiol/selenol) and ability to work as an electrostatic trigger (the "shuttle" mechanism) and may be the reason why TrxR uses selenium instead of sulfur. Proteins 2016; 84:1836-1843. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Can direct extracellular electron transfer occur in the absence of outer membrane cytochromes in Desulfovibrio vulgaris?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elias, Dwayne A [ORNL; Zane, Mr. Grant M. [University of Missouri, Columbia; Auer, Dr. Manfred [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Fields, Dr. Matthew Wayne [Montana State University; Wall, Judy D. [University of Missouri; Gorby, Dr. Yuri A. [J. Craig Venter Institute

    2010-01-01

    Extracellular electron transfer has been investigated over several decades via forms of soluble electron transfer proteins that are exported for extracellular reoxidation. More recently, several organisms have been shown to reduce extracellular metals via the direct transfer of electron through appendages; also known as nanowires. They have been reported most predominantly in Shewanella and Geobacter. While the relevancy and composition of these structures in each genus has been debated, both possess outer membrane cytochrome complexes that could theoretically come into direct contact with solid phase oxidized metals. Members of the genus Desulfovibrio apparently have no such cytochromes although similar appendages are present, are electrically conductive, and are different from flagella. Upon U(VI)-reduction, the structures in Desulfovibrio become coated with U(IV). Deletion of flagellar genes did not alter soluble or amorphous Fe(III) or U(VI) reduction, or appendage appearance. Removal of the chromosomal pilA gene hampered amorphous Fe(III)-reduction by ca. 25%, but cells lacking the native plasmid, pDV1, reduced soluble Fe(III) and U(VI) at ca. 50% of the wild type rate while amorphous Fe(III)-reduction slowed to ca. 20% of the wild type rate. Appendages were present in all deletions as well as pDV1, except pilA. Gene complementation restored all activities and morphologies to wild type levels. This suggests that pilA encodes the structural component, whereas genes within pDV1 may provide the reactive members. How such appendages function without outer membrane cytochromes is under investigation.

  1. Electron-transfer mediator for a NAD-glucose dehydrogenase-based glucose sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong-Min; Kim, Min-yeong; Reddy, Sanapalli S; Cho, Jaegeol; Cho, Chul-ho; Jung, Suntae; Shim, Yoon-Bo

    2013-12-03

    A new electron-transfer mediator, 5-[2,5-di (thiophen-2-yl)-1H-pyrrol-1-yl]-1,10-phenanthroline iron(III) chloride (FePhenTPy) oriented to the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-dependent-glucose dehydrogenase (NAD-GDH) system was synthesized through a Paal-Knorr condensation reaction. The structure of the mediator was confirmed by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, proton and carbon nucler magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and mass spectroscopy, and its electron-transfer characteristic for a glucose sensor was investigated using voltammetry and impedance spectroscopy. A disposable amperometric glucose sensor with NAD-GDH was constructed with FePhenTPy as an electron-transfer mediator on a screen printed carbon electrode (SPCE) and its performance was evaluated, where the addition of reduces graphene oxide (RGO) to the mediator showed the enhanced sensor performance. The experimental parameters to affect the analytical performance and the stability of the proposed glucose sensor were optimized, and the sensor exhibited a dynamic range between 30 mg/dL and 600 mg/dL with the detection limit of 12.02 ± 0.6 mg/dL. In the real sample experiments, the interference effects by acetaminophen, ascorbic acid, dopamine, uric acid, caffeine, and other monosaccharides (fructose, lactose, mannose, and xylose) were completely avoided through coating the sensor surface with the Nafion film containing lead(IV) acetate. The reliability of proposed glucose sensor was evaluated by the determination of glucose in artificial blood and human whole blood samples.

  2. On the ultrafast kinetics of the energy and electron transfer reactions in photosystem I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slavov, Chavdar Lyubomirov

    2009-07-09

    The subject of the current work is one of the main participants in the light-dependent phase of oxygenic photosynthesis, Photosystem I (PS I). This complex carries an immense number of cofactors: chlorophylls (Chl), carotenoids, quinones, etc, which together with the protein entity exhibit several exceptional properties. First, PS I has an ultrafast light energy trapping kinetics with a nearly 100% quantum efficiency. Secondly, both of the electron transfer branches in the reaction center are suggested to be active. Thirdly, there are some so called 'red' Chls in the antenna system of PS I, absorbing light with longer wavelengths than the reaction center. These 'red' Chls significantly modify the trapping kinetics of PS I. The purpose of this thesis is to obtain better understanding of the above-mentioned, specific features of PS I. This will not merely cast more light on the mechanisms of energy and electron transfer in the complex, but also will contribute to the future developments of optimized artificial light-harvesting systems. In the current work, a number of PS I complexes isolated from different organisms (Thermosynechococcus elongatus, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Arabidopsis thaliana) and possessing distinctive features (different macroorganisation, monomers, trimers, monomers with a semibelt of peripheral antenna attached; presence of 'red' Chls) is investigated. The studies are primarily focused on the electron transfer kinetics in each of the cofactor branches in the PS I reaction center, as well as on the effect of the antenna size and the presence of 'red' Chls on the trapping kinetics of PS I. These aspects are explored with the help of several ultrafast optical spectroscopy methods: (i) time-resolved fluorescence ? single photon counting and synchroscan streak camera; and (ii) ultrafast transient absorption. Physically meaningful information about the molecular mechanisms of the energy trapping in PS I is

  3. First principles design of a core bioenergetic transmembrane electron transfer protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goparaju, Geetha; Fry, Bryan A.; Chobot, Sarah E.; Wiedman, Gregory; Moser, Christopher C.; Dutton, P. Leslie; Discher, Bohdana M.

    2016-01-01

    Here we describe the design, E. coli expression and characterization of a simplified, adaptable and functionally transparent single chain 4-α-helix transmembrane protein frame that binds multiple heme and light activatable porphyrins. Such man-made cofactor-binding oxidoreductases, designed from first principles with minimal reference to natural protein sequences, are known as maquettes. This design is an adaptable frame aiming to uncover core engineering principles governing bioenergetic transmembrane electron-transfer function and recapitulate protein archetypes proposed to represent the origins of photosynthesis. PMID:26672896

  4. TD-DFT study on electron transfer mobility and intramolecular hydrogen bond of substituted indigo derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chi; Li, Hui; Yang, Yonggang; Li, Donglin; Liu, Yufang

    2015-10-01

    The density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) method were carried out to investigate the ground and excited states of indigo and its derivative molecules. The results demonstrate that the intramolecular hydrogen bond I is weakened and the intramolecular hydrogen bond II is strengthened upon photo-excitation to the S1 state. In the absorption spectra, the substitution at R4R4, of indigo causes a significant redshift. In addition, the halogen substitution obviously increases the electron transfer mobility of indigo. It is proved that the halogen substitution may be a new method to design high performance organic semiconductors.

  5. Electron Transfer Mediators for Photoelectrochemical Cells Based on Cu(I Metal Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Brugnati

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The preparation and the photoelectrochemical characterization of a series of bipyridine and pyridyl-quinoline Cu(I complexes, used as electron transfer mediators in regenerative photoelectrochemical cells, are reported. The best performing mediators produced maximum IPCEs of the order of 35–40%. The J-V curves recorded under monochromatic light showed that the selected Cu(I/(II couples generated higher Vocs and fill factors compared to an equivalent I-/I3- cell, due to a decreased dark current.

  6. Interfacial electrochemical electron transfer in biology – Towards the level of the single molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jingdong; Chi, Qijin; Hansen, Allan Glargaard

    2012-01-01

    with unprecedented resolution, opening a new area of single-molecule bioelectrochemistry. We consider first in situ STM of small redox molecules, followed by in situ STM of thiol-based SAMs as molecular views of bioelectrochemical environments. We then address electron transfer metalloproteins, and multi......Physical electrochemistry has undergone a remarkable evolution over the last few decades, integrating advanced techniques and theory from solid state and surface physics. Single-crystal electrode surfaces have been a core notion, opening for scanning tunnelling microscopy directly in aqueous......-centre metalloenzymes including applied single-biomolecular perspectives based on metalloprotein/metallic nanoparticle hybrids....

  7. Tensor polarization in elastic electron-deuteron scattering to the highest possible momentum transfers

    CERN Document Server

    Garçon, M; Ahmidouch, A; Anklin, H; Arvieux, J; Ball, J; Beedoe, S; Beise, E J; Bimbot, L; Böglin, W; Breuer, H; Carlini, R; Chant, N S; Danagulyan, S; Dow, K; Ducret, J E; Dunne, J; Ewell, L A; Eyraud, L; Furget, C; Gilman, R; Glashausser, C; Gueye, P; Gustafsson, K K; Hafidi, K; Honegger, A; Jourdan, J; Kox, S; Kumbartzki, G; Lü, L; Lung, A; Mack, D; Markowitz, P; McIntyre, J; Meekins, D; Merchez, F; Mitchell, J; Möhring, R H; Mtingwa, S; Mrktchyan, H; Pitz, D; Qin, L; Ransome, R; Real, J S; Roos, P G; Rutt, P; Schmidt, W; Sawafta, R; Stepanyan, S; Stephenson, E J; Tieulent, R; Tomasi-Gustafsson, E; Turchinetz, W E; Vansyoc, K; Volmer, J; Voutier, E; Vulcan, W; Williamson, C; Wood, S A; Yan, C; Zhao, J; Zhao, W

    1999-01-01

    In elastic electron-deuteron scattering, the tensor polarization moments t sub 2 sub 0 , t sub 2 sub 1 and t sub 2 sub 2 , together with the unpolarized cross-sections, have been measured up to a momentum transfer of 1.8 (GeV/c) sup 2 , or 6.8 fm sup - sup 1. The experiment was performed at Jefferson Laboratory using the recoil deuteron polarimeter POLDER. Preliminary results are presented and discussed, especially in view of their significance concerning the applicability of perturbative QCD to this exclusive process.

  8. Tensor polarization in elastic electron-deuteron scattering to the highest possible momentum transfers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcon, M; Ahmidouch, A; Anklin, H; Arvieux, J; Ball, J; Beedoe, S; Beise, E J; Bimbo, L; Boeglin, W; Breuer, H; Carlini, R; Chant, N S; Danagoulian, S; Dow, K; Ducret, J -E; Dunne, J; Ewell, L; Eyraud, L; Furget, C; Gilman, R; Glashausser, C; Gueye, P; Gustafsson, K; Hafidi, K; Honegger, A; Jourdan, J; Kox, S; Kumbartzki, G; Lu, L; Lung, A; Mack, D; Markowitz, P; McIntyre, J; Meekins, D; Merchez, F; Mitchell, J; Mohring, R; Mtingwa, S; Mrktchyan, H; Pitz, D; Qin, L; Ransome, R; Raoul, J -S; Roos, P G; Rutt, P; Schmidt, W; Sawafta, R; Stepanyan, S; Stephenson, R; Tieulent, R; Tomasi-Gustafsson, E

    1999-07-01

    In elastic electron-deuteron scattering, the tensor polarization moments t{sub 20}, t{sub 21} and t{sub 22}, together with the unpolarized cross-sections, have been measured up to a momentum transfer of 1.8 (GeV/c){sup 2}, or 6.8 fm{sup -1}. The experiment was performed at Jefferson Laboratory using the recoil deuteron polarimeter POLDER. Preliminary results are presented and discussed, especially in view of their significance concerning the applicability of perturbative QCD to this exclusive process.

  9. Electron loss and transfer for 20-110-keV iodine-rare-gas collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hird, B.; Orakzai, M. W.; Rahman, F.

    1989-05-01

    Atomic cross sections have been measured for the loss and transfer of an electron during a collision between a neutral iodine atom and a rare-gas atom. The neutral iodine beam, with energy between 20 to 110 keV, was unlikely to contain a significant mixture of metastable-state atoms because it was produced by neutralizing a negative-iodine-ion beam. The σ0+ cross section is largest for the argon and krypton targets, not for xenon, as might have been expected. The σ0- cross section is very small for the light targets and only becomes appreciable for xenon at the highest energy used.

  10. Bistable switching in supercritical n+-n-n+GaAs transferred electron devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jøndrup, Peter; Jeppesen, Palle; Jeppson, Bert

    1976-01-01

    Bistable switching in supercritically doped n+-n-n+GaAs transferred electron devices (TED's) is investigated experimentally and interpreted in computer simulations, for which details of the computer program are given. Three switching modes all leading to stable anode domains are discussed, namely......: 1) cathode-triggered traveling domain; 2) cathode-triggered accumulation layer; 3) anode-triggered domain. Relative current drops up to 40 percent, and switching times down to 60 ps are obtained in low-duty-cycle pulsed experiments with threshold currents around 400 mA. Optimum device parameters...

  11. Global proteomic profiling of phosphopeptides using electron transfer dissociation tandem mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molina, Henrik; Horn, David M; Tang, Ning

    2007-01-01

    Electron transfer dissociation (ETD) is a recently introduced mass spectrometric technique that provides a more comprehensive coverage of peptide sequences and posttranslational modifications. Here, we evaluated the use of ETD for a global phosphoproteome analysis. In all, we identified a total...... of 1,435 phosphorylation sites from human embryonic kidney 293T cells, of which 1,141 ( approximately 80%) were not previously described. A detailed comparison of ETD and collision-induced dissociation (CID) modes showed that ETD identified 60% more phosphopeptides than CID, with an average of 40% more...

  12. Intramolecular electron transfer in cytochrome cd(1) nitrite reductase from Pseudomonas stutzeri; kinetics and thermodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, Ole; Kroneck, Peter M H; Zumft, Walter G

    2002-01-01

    diffusion controlled process. Following this initial step, the reduction equivalent is equilibrating between the c and d(1) heme sites in a unimolecular process (k=23 s(-1), 298 K, pH 7.0) and an equilibrium constant of 1.0. The temperature dependence of this internal electron transfer process has been...... determined over a 277-313 K temperature range and yielded both equilibrium standard enthalpy and entropy changes as well as activation parameters of the specific rate constants. The significance of these parameters obtained at low degree of reduction of the enzyme is discussed and compared with earlier...

  13. Extracellular polymeric substances are transient media for microbial extracellular electron transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiao, Yong; Zhang, Enhua; Zhang, Jingdong

    2017-01-01

    Microorganisms exploit extracellular electron transfer (EET) in growth and information exchange with external environments or with other cells. Every microbial cell is surrounded by extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). Understanding the roles of three-dimensional (3D) EPS in EET is essential...... in microbiology and microbial exploitation for mineral bio-respiration, pollutant conversion, and bioenergy production. We have addressed these challenges by comparing pure and EPS-depleted samples of three representative electrochemically active strains viz Gram-negative Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, Gram...

  14. Long-range protein electron transfer observed at the single-molecule level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chi, Qijin; Farver, Ole; Ulstrup, Jens

    2005-01-01

    potential. Maximum resonance appears around the equilibrium redox potential of azurin with an on/off current ratio of approximately 9. Simulation analyses, based on a two-step interfacial ET model for the scanning tunneling microscopy redox process, were performed and provide quantitative information......A biomimetic long-range electron transfer (ET) system consisting of the blue copper protein azurin, a tunneling barrier bridge, and a gold single-crystal electrode was designed on the basis of molecular wiring self-assembly principles. This system is sufficiently stable and sensitive in a quasi...

  15. Biomimetic catalytic system driven by electron transfer for selective oxygenation of hydrocarbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guanyu; Ma, Yinfa; Xu, Jie

    2004-09-01

    Hydrocarbon oxyfunctionalization is a crucial industrial process. Most metallic catalysts require higher temperatures and often show lower selectivities. One of the intellectual approaches is the mimicry for bio-oxidation. We have established a biomimetic system with a nonmetallic redox center, composed of anthraquinones, N-hydroxyphthalimide, and zeolite HY, for selective hydrocarbon oxygenation by molecular oxygen. Selectivity of 95.8% for acetophenone and 66.2% conversion were accomplished for oxygenation of ethylbenzene at temperatures as low as 80 degrees C. The redox cycle, driven by one-electron transfer and product orientation by Zeolite HY, opens up the possibility of mimicking bio-oxidation under mild conditions.

  16. Robust and stretchable indium gallium zinc oxide-based electronic textiles formed by cilia-assisted transfer printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jongwon; Jeong, Yunkyung; Kim, Heeje; Yoo, Seonggwang; Jung, Hoon Sun; Kim, Yonghun; Hwang, Youngkyu; Hyun, Yujun; Hong, Woong-Ki; Lee, Byoung Hun; Choa, Sung-Hoon; Ko, Heung Cho

    2016-06-01

    Electronic textile (e-textile) allows for high-end wearable electronic devices that provide easy access for carrying, handling and using. However, the related technology does not seem to be mature because the woven fabric hampers not only the device fabrication process directly on the complex surface but also the transfer printing of ultrathin planar electronic devices. Here we report an indirect method that enables conformal wrapping of surface with arbitrary yet complex shapes. Artificial cilia are introduced in the periphery of electronic devices as adhesive elements. The cilia also play an important role in confining a small amount of glue and damping mechanical stress to maintain robust electronic performance under mechanical deformation. The example of electronic applications depicts the feasibility of cilia for `stick-&-play' systems, which provide electronic functions by transfer printing on unconventional complex surfaces.

  17. Driving Force Dependence of Electron Transfer from Electronically Excited [Ir(COD)(μ-Me2pz)]2 to Photo-Acid Generators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattler, Wesley; Rachford, Aaron A; LaBeaume, Paul J; Coley, Suzanne M; Thackeray, James W; Cameron, James F; Müller, Astrid M; Winkler, Jay R; Gray, Harry B

    2017-10-12

    We report the rates of electron transfer (ET) reactions of electronically excited [Ir(COD)(μ-Me2pz)]2 with onium salt photoacid generators (PAGs). The reduction potentials of the PAGs span a large electrochemical window that allows determination of the driving force dependence of the ET reactions. Rate constants of ET from electronically excited [Ir(COD)(μ-Me2pz)]2 to onium PAGs are determined by the reaction driving force until the diffusion limit in acetonitrile is reached.

  18. Fragment transition density method to calculate electronic coupling for excitation energy transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voityuk, Alexander A., E-mail: alexander.voityuk@icrea.cat [Institució Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avançats, 08010 Barcelona, Spain and Institut de Química Computacional i Catàlisi (IQCC), Universitat de Girona 17071 Girona (Spain)

    2014-06-28

    A general approach, the Fragment Transition Density (FTD) scheme, is introduced to estimate electronic coupling for excitation energy transfer in a molecular system. Within this method, the excitation energies and transition densities of the system are used to derive the coupling matrix element. The scheme allows one to treat systems where exciton donor and acceptor are close together and their exchange interaction and orbital overlap are significant. The FTD method can be applied in combination with any quantum mechanical approach to treat excited states of general nature including single-, double-, and higher excitations. Using FTD approach, we derive excitonic couplings for several systems computed with the CIS, TD DFT and MS-CASPT2 methods. In particular, it is shown that the estimated coupling values in DNA π-stacks are strongly affected by the short-range electronic interaction of adjacent nucleobases.

  19. Tailored Electron Transfer Pathways in Aucore /Ptshell -Graphene Nanocatalysts for Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seselj, Nedjeljko; Engelbrekt, Christian; Ding, Yi

    2018-01-01

    Aucore/Ptshell–graphene catalysts (G-Cys-Au@Pt) are prepared through chemical and surface chemical reactions. Au–Pt core–shell nanoparticles (Au@Pt NPs) covalently immobilized on graphene (G) are efficient electrocatalysts in low-temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells. The 9.5 ± 2 nm......–Pt. Functional tests in direct fomic acid, methanol and ethanol fuel cells exhibit 95%, 53%, and 107% increased power densities for G-Cys-Au@Pt over C–Pt, respectively.......-chemically immobilized G-Au@Pt and commercial platinum NPs catalyst (C-Pt), is a result of (1) the tailored electron transfer pathways of covalent bonds integrating Au@Pt NPs into the graphene framework, and (2) synergetic electronic effects of atomically thin Pt shells on Au cores. Enhanced electrocatalytic oxidation...

  20. Ultrafast Electron Transfer at Organic Semiconductor Interfaces: Importance of Molecular Orientation

    KAUST Repository

    Ayzner, Alexander L.

    2015-01-02

    © 2014 American Chemical Society. Much is known about the rate of photoexcited charge generation in at organic donor/acceptor (D/A) heterojunctions overaged over all relative arrangements. However, there has been very little experimental work investigating how the photoexcited electron transfer (ET) rate depends on the precise relative molecular orientation between D and A in thin solid films. This is the question that we address in this work. We find that the ET rate depends strongly on the relative molecular arrangement: The interface where the model donor compound copper phthalocyanine is oriented face-on with respect to the fullerene C60 acceptor yields a rate that is approximately 4 times faster than that of the edge-on oriented interface. Our results suggest that the D/A electronic coupling is significantly enhanced in the face-on case, which agrees well with theoretical predictions, underscoring the importance of controlling the relative interfacial molecular orientation.

  1. Ultrafast electron and energy transfer in dye-sensitized iron oxide and oxyhydroxide nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilbert, Benjamin; Katz, Jordan E.; Huse, Nils

    2013-01-01

    An emerging area in chemical science is the study of solid-phase redox reactions using ultrafast time-resolved spectroscopy. We have used molecules of the photoactive dye 2′,7′-dichlorofluorescein (DCF) anchored to the surface of iron(iii) oxide nanoparticles to create iron(ii) surface atoms via...... photo-initiated interfacial electron transfer. This approach enables time-resolved study of the fate and mobility of electrons within the solid phase. However, complete analysis of the ultrafast processes following dye photoexcitation of the sensitized iron(iii) oxide nanoparticles has not been reported....... We addressed this topic by performing femtosecond transient absorption (TA) measurements of aqueous suspensions of uncoated and DCF-sensitized iron oxide and oxyhydroxide nanoparticles, and an aqueous iron(iii)–dye complex. Following light absorption, excited state relaxation times of the dye of 115...

  2. Two-Dimensional Free Energy Surfaces for Electron Transfer Reactions in Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigeo Murata

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Change in intermolecular distance between electron donor (D and acceptor (A can induce intermolecular electron transfer (ET even in nonpolar solvent, where solvent orientational polarization is absent. This was shown by making simple calculations of the energies of the initial and final states of ET. In the case of polar solvent, the free energies are functions of both D-A distance and solvent orientational polarization. On the basis of 2-dimensional free energy surfaces, the relation of Marcus ET and exciplex formation is discussed. The transient effect in fluorescence quenching was measured for several D-A pairs in a nonpolar solvent. The results were analyzed by assuming a distance dependence of the ET rate that is consistent with the above model.

  3. TRANSFER

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Quenching of curcumine fluorescence by thionine, both immobilised in cellulose acetate occurs in accordance with the Forster mechanism of energy transfer. The rate constant of energy transfer for this donor - acceptor pair is found to be 9.4 x 109 L ' mol S1 with R0 = 37±1 Б. When this donor - acceptor pair is ...

  4. Mechanisms for Electron Transfer Through Pili to Fe(III) Oxide in Geobacter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lovley, Derek R. [Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States)

    2015-03-09

    The purpose of these studies was to aid the Department of Energy in its goal of understanding how microorganisms involved in the bioremediation of metals and radionuclides sustain their activity in the subsurface. This information is required in order to incorporate biological processes into decision making for environmental remediation and long-term stewardship of contaminated sites. The proposed research was designed to elucidate the mechanisms for electron transfer to Fe(III) oxides in Geobacter species because Geobacter species are abundant dissimilatory metal-reducing microorganisms in a diversity of sites in which uranium is undergoing natural attenuation via the reduction of soluble U(VI) to insoluble U(IV) or when this process is artificially stimulated with the addition of organic electron donors. This study investigated the novel, but highly controversial, concept that the final conduit for electron transfer to Fe(III) oxides are electrically conductive pili. The specific objectives were to: 1) further evaluate the conductivity along the pili of Geobacter sulfurreducens and related organisms; 2) determine the mechanisms for pili conductivity; and 3) investigate the role of pili in Fe(III) oxide reduction. The studies demonstrated that the pili of G. sulfurreducens are conductive along their length. Surprisingly, the pili possess a metallic-like conductivity similar to that observed in synthetic organic conducting polymers such as polyaniline. Detailed physical analysis of the pili, as well as studies in which the structure of the pili was genetically modified, demonstrated that the metallic-like conductivity of the pili could be attributed to overlapping pi-pi orbitals of aromatic amino acids. Other potential mechanisms for conductivity, such as electron hopping between cytochromes associated with the pili were definitively ruled out. Pili were also found to be essential for Fe(III) oxide reduction in G. metallireducens. Ecological studies demonstrated

  5. Electron transfer mediators accelerated the microbiologically influence corrosion against carbon steel by nitrate reducing Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Ru; Yang, Dongqing; Xu, Dake; Gu, Tingyue

    2017-12-01

    Electron transfer is a rate-limiting step in microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) caused by microbes that utilize extracellular electrons. Cross-cell wall electron transfer is necessary to transport the electrons released from extracellular iron oxidation into the cytoplasm of cells. Electron transfer mediators were found to accelerate the MIC caused by sulfate reducing bacteria. However, there is no publication in the literature showing the effect of electron transfer mediators on MIC caused by nitrate reducing bacteria (NRB). This work demonstrated that the corrosion of anaerobic Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PAO1) grown as a nitrate reducing bacterium biofilm on C1018 carbon steel was enhanced by two electron transfer mediators, riboflavin and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) separately during a 7-day incubation period. The addition of either 10ppm (w/w) (26.6μM) riboflavin or 10ppm (12.7μM) FAD did not increase planktonic cell counts, but they increased the maximum pit depth on carbon steel coupons considerably from 17.5μm to 24.4μm and 25.0μm, respectively. Riboflavin and FAD also increased the specific weight loss of carbon steel from 2.06mg/cm 2 to 2.34mg/cm 2 and 2.61mg/cm 2 , respectively. Linear polarization resistance, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and potentiodynamic polarization curves all corroborated the pitting and weight loss data. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Electronic coupling effects and charge transfer between organic molecules and metal surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forker, Roman

    2010-07-01

    We employ a variant of optical absorption spectroscopy, namely in situ differential reflectance spectroscopy (DRS), for an analysis of the structure-properties relations of thin epitaxial organic films. Clear correlations between the spectra and the differently intense coupling to the respective substrates are found. While rather broad and almost structureless spectra are obtained for a quaterrylene (QT) monolayer on Au(111), the spectral shape resembles that of isolated molecules when QT is grown on graphite. We even achieve an efficient electronic decoupling from the subjacent Au(111) by inserting an atomically thin organic spacer layer consisting of hexa-peri-hexabenzocoronene (HBC) with a noticeably dissimilar electronic behavior. These observations are further consolidated by a systematic variation of the metal substrate (Au, Ag, and Al), ranging from inert to rather reactive. For this purpose, 3,4,9,10-perylenetetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA) is chosen to ensure comparability of the molecular film structures on the different metals, and also because its electronic alignment on various metal surfaces has previously been studied with great intensity. We present evidence for ionized PTCDA at several interfaces and propose the charge transfer to be related to the electronic level alignment governed by interface dipole formation on the respective metals. (orig.)

  7. Tattoo-Paper Transfer as a Versatile Platform for All-Printed Organic Edible Electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonacchini, Giorgio E; Bossio, Caterina; Greco, Francesco; Mattoli, Virgilio; Kim, Yun-Hi; Lanzani, Guglielmo; Caironi, Mario

    2018-02-20

    The use of natural or bioinspired materials to develop edible electronic devices is a potentially disruptive technology that can boost point-of-care testing. The technology exploits devices that can be safely ingested, along with pills or even food, and operated from within the gastrointestinal tract. Ingestible electronics can potentially target a significant number of biomedical applications, both as therapeutic and diagnostic tool, and this technology may also impact the food industry, by providing ingestible or food-compatible electronic tags that can "smart" track goods and monitor their quality along the distribution chain. Temporary tattoo-paper is hereby proposed as a simple and versatile platform for the integration of electronics onto food and pharmaceutical capsules. In particular, the fabrication of all-printed organic field-effect transistors on untreated commercial tattoo-paper, and their subsequent transfer and operation on edible substrates with a complex nonplanar geometry is demonstrated. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Wireless Power Transfer to Millimeter-Sized Gastrointestinal Electronics Validated in a Swine Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abid, Abubakar; O'Brien, Jonathan M.; Bensel, Taylor; Cleveland, Cody; Booth, Lucas; Smith, Brian R.; Langer, Robert; Traverso, Giovanni

    2017-04-01

    Electronic devices placed in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract for prolonged periods have the potential to transform clinical evaluation and treatment. One challenge to the deployment of such gastroresident electronics is the difficulty in powering millimeter-sized electronics devices without using batteries, which compromise biocompatibility and long-term residence. We examined the feasibility of leveraging mid-field wireless powering to transfer power from outside of the body to electronics at various locations along the GI tract. Using simulations and ex vivo measurements, we designed mid-field antennas capable of operating efficiently in tissue at 1.2 GHz. These antennas were then characterized in vivo in five anesthetized pigs, by placing one antenna outside the body, and the other antenna inside the body endoscopically, at the esophagus, stomach, and colon. Across the animals tested, mean transmission efficiencies of -41.2, -36.1, and -34.6 dB were achieved in vivo while coupling power from outside the body to the esophagus, stomach, and colon, respectively. This corresponds to power levels of 37.5 μW, 123 μW and 173 μW received by antennas in the respective locations, while keeping radiation exposure levels below safety thresholds. These power levels are sufficient to wirelessly power a range of medical devices from outside of the body.

  9. Prediction of thymine dimer repair by electron transfer from photoexcited 8-aminoguanine or its deprotonated anion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieradzan, Iwona; Marchaj, Marzena; Anusiewicz, Iwona; Skurski, Piotr; Simons, Jack

    2014-09-04

    Electronic structure methods are used to estimate differences in reaction barriers for transfer of an electron from singlet ππ* excited 8-aminoguanine (A) or deprotonated 8-aminoguanine anion (A(-)) to a proximal thymine dimer site compared to barriers when ππ* excited 8-oxoguanine (O) or deprotonated 8-oxoguanine (O(-)) serve as the electron donor. It is predicted that the barrier for photoexcited A should be lower than for photoexcited O, and the barrier for photoexcited A(-) should be lower than for photoexcited O(-). Moreover, A, O(-), and A(-) are predicted to have ππ* excited states at energies near where O does, which allows them to be excited by photons low enough in energy to avoid exciting or ionizing any of DNA's bases. The origin of the differences in barriers is suggested to be the lower ionization potential of A compared to O and the lower electron detachment energy of A(-) compared to O(-). Because O and O(-) have been experimentally shown to produce thymine dimer repair, it is proposed that A and A(-) are promising repair agents deserving experimental study.

  10. Real-time observation of intersystem crossing induced by charge recombination during bimolecular electron transfer reactions

    KAUST Repository

    Alsam, Amani Abdu

    2016-09-21

    Real-time probing of intersystem crossing (ISC) and triplet-state formation after photoinduced electron transfer (ET) is a particularly challenging task that can be achieved by time-resolved spectroscopy with broadband capability. Here, we examine the mechanism of charge separation (CS), charge recombination (CR) and ISC of bimolecular photoinduced electron transfer (PET) between poly[(9,9-di(3,3′-N,N’-trimethyl-ammonium) propyl fluorenyl-2,7-diyl)-alt-co-(9,9-dioctyl-fluorenyl-2,7-diyl)] diiodide salt (PFN) and dicyanobenzene (DCB) using time-resolved spectroscopy. PET from PFN to DCB is confirmed by monitoring the transient absorption (TA) and infrared spectroscopic signatures for the radical ion pair (DCB─•-PFN+•). In addition, our time-resolved results clearly demonstrate that CS takes place within picoseconds followed by CR within nanoseconds. The ns-TA data exhibit the clear spectroscopic signature of PFN triplet-triplet absorption, induced by the CR of the radical ion pairs (DCB─•-PFN+•). As a result, the triplet state of PFN (3PFN*) forms and subsequently, the ground singlet state is replenished within microseconds. © 2016

  11. Metabolic transistor strategy for controlling electron transfer chain activity in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hui; Tuli, Leepika; Bennett, George N; San, Ka-Yiu

    2015-03-01

    A novel strategy to finely control a large metabolic flux by using a "metabolic transistor" approach was established. In this approach a small change in the level or availability of an essential component for the process is controlled by adding a competitive reaction that affects a precursor or an intermediate in its biosynthetic pathway. The change of the basal level of the essential component, considered as a base current in a transistor, has a large effect on the flux through the major pathway. In this way, the fine-tuning of a large flux can be accomplished. The "metabolic transistor" strategy was applied to control electron transfer chain function by manipulation of the quinone synthesis pathway in Escherichia coli. The achievement of a theoretical yield of lactate production under aerobic conditions via this strategy upon manipulation of the biosynthetic pathway of the key participant, ubiquinone-8 (Q8), in an E. coli strain provides an in vivo, genetically tunable means to control the activity of the electron transfer chain and manipulate the production of reduced products while limiting consumption of oxygen to a defined amount. Copyright © 2015 International Metabolic Engineering Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Quantum State Transfer from a Single Photon to a Distant Quantum-Dot Electron Spin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yu; He, Yu-Ming; Wei, Yu-Jia; Jiang, Xiao; Chen, Kai; Lu, Chao-Yang; Pan, Jian-Wei; Schneider, Christian; Kamp, Martin; Höfling, Sven

    2017-08-11

    Quantum state transfer from flying photons to stationary matter qubits is an important element in the realization of quantum networks. Self-assembled semiconductor quantum dots provide a promising solid-state platform hosting both single photon and spin, with an inherent light-matter interface. Here, we develop a method to coherently and actively control the single-photon frequency bins in superposition using electro-optic modulators, and measure the spin-photon entanglement with a fidelity of 0.796±0.020. Further, by Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger-type state projection on the frequency, path, and polarization degrees of freedom of a single photon, we demonstrate quantum state transfer from a single photon to a single electron spin confined in an InGaAs quantum dot, separated by 5 m. The quantum state mapping from the photon's polarization to the electron's spin is demonstrated along three different axes on the Bloch sphere, with an average fidelity of 78.5%.

  13. Surprisingly Long-Lived Ascorbyl Radicals in Acetonitrile: Concerted Proton-Electron Transfer Reactions and Thermochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Jeffrey J.; Mayer, James M.

    2008-01-01

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions and thermochemistry of 5,6-isopropylidene ascorbate (iAscH−) have been examined in acetonitrile solvent.iAscH− is oxidized by 2,4,6-tBu3C6H2O• and by excess TEMPO• to give the corresponding 5,6-isopropylidene ascorbyl radical anion (iAsc•−), which persists for hours at 298 K in dry MeCN solution. The stability of iAsc•− is surprising in light of the transience of the ascorbyl radical in aqueous solutions, and is due to the lack of the protons needed for radical disproportionation. A concerted proton-electron transfer (CPET) mechanism is indicated for the reactions of iAscH−. Redox potential, pKa and equilibrium measurements define the thermochemical landscape for 5,6-isopropylidene ascorbic acid and its derivatives in MeCN. These measurements give an O–H bond dissociation free energy (BDFE) for iAscH−of 65.4 ± 1.5 kcal mol−1 in MeCN. Similar studies on underivatized ascorbate indicate a BDFE of 67.8 ± 1.2 kcal mol−1. These values are much lower than the aqueous BDFE for ascorbate of 74.0 ± 1.5 kcal mol−1 derived from reported data. PMID:18505256

  14. Quantum State Transfer from a Single Photon to a Distant Quantum-Dot Electron Spin

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yu; He, Yu-Ming; Wei, Yu-Jia; Jiang, Xiao; Chen, Kai; Lu, Chao-Yang; Pan, Jian-Wei; Schneider, Christian; Kamp, Martin; Höfling, Sven

    2017-08-01

    Quantum state transfer from flying photons to stationary matter qubits is an important element in the realization of quantum networks. Self-assembled semiconductor quantum dots provide a promising solid-state platform hosting both single photon and spin, with an inherent light-matter interface. Here, we develop a method to coherently and actively control the single-photon frequency bins in superposition using electro-optic modulators, and measure the spin-photon entanglement with a fidelity of 0.796 ±0.020 . Further, by Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger-type state projection on the frequency, path, and polarization degrees of freedom of a single photon, we demonstrate quantum state transfer from a single photon to a single electron spin confined in an InGaAs quantum dot, separated by 5 m. The quantum state mapping from the photon's polarization to the electron's spin is demonstrated along three different axes on the Bloch sphere, with an average fidelity of 78.5%.

  15. Tyrosine oxidation in heme oxygenase: examination of long-range proton-coupled electron transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, Valeriy V; Roth, Justine P

    2014-10-01

    Heme oxygenase is responsible for the degradation of a histidine-ligated ferric protoporphyrin IX (Por) to biliverdin, CO, and the free ferrous ion. Described here are studies of tyrosyl radical formation reactions that occur after oxidizing Fe(III)(Por) to Fe(IV)=O(Por(·+)) in human heme oxygenase isoform-1 (hHO-1) and the structurally homologous protein from Corynebacterium diphtheriae (cdHO). Site-directed mutagenesis on hHO-1 probes the reduction of Fe(IV)=O(Por(·+)) by tyrosine residues within 11 Å of the prosthetic group. In hHO-1, Y58· is implicated as the most likely site of oxidation, based on the pH and pD dependent kinetics. The absence of solvent deuterium isotope effects in basic solutions of hHO-1 and cdHO contrasts with the behavior of these proteins in the acidic solution, suggesting that long-range proton-coupled electron transfer predominates over electron transfer.

  16. Ferrocene-o-benzosemiquinonato tin(IV) electron-transfer complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilyakina, Ekaterina V; Poddel'sky, Andrey I; Fukin, Georgy K; Bogomyakov, Artem S; Cherkasov, Vladimir K; Abakumov, Gleb A

    2013-05-06

    The interaction of ferrocene with tin(IV) o-benzosemiquinonato complexes in acetonitrile results in a reversible electron transfer (ET) from ferrocene to the redox-active ligand with the formation of electron-transfer complexes [(3,6-Cat)SnBr3](-)[Cp2Fe](+) (1) and [(3,6-Cat)(3,6-SQ)SnCl2](-)[Cp2Fe](+) (2), where 3,6-Cat is the 3,6-di-tert-butyl-catecholate dianion and 3,6-SQ is the 3,6-di-tert-butyl-o-benzosemiquinonato radical anion. The ET process and the solvent effect in the system "ferrocene-o-benzosemiquinonato tin(IV) complexes" were investigated on the basis of a combination of spectroscopic and X-ray diffraction methods. The molecular structures of 1 and 2 were confirmed by X-ray analysis. Complex 2 demonstrates the ferromagnetic coupling in the linear chain alternating ···D(+•)A(-•)D(+•)A(-•)··· motif.

  17. Concerted hydrogen atom and electron transfer mechanism for catalysis by lysine-specific demethylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Tao; Higashi, Masahiro; Cembran, Alessandro; Gao, Jiali; Truhlar, Donald G

    2013-07-18

    We calculate the free energy profile for the postulated hydride transfer reaction mechanism for the catalysis of lysine demethylation by lysine-specific demethylase LSD1. The potential energy surface is obtained by using combined electrostatically embedded multiconfiguration molecular mechanics (EE-MCMM) and single-configuration molecular mechanics (MM). We employ a constant valence bond coupling term to obtain analytical energies and gradients of the EE-MCMM subsystem, which contains 45 quantum mechanics (QM) atoms and which is parametrized with density functional calculations employing specific reaction parameters obtained by matching high-level wave function calculations. In the MM region, we employ the Amber ff03 and TIP3P force fields. The free energy of activation at 300 K is calculated by molecular dynamics (MD) umbrella sampling on a system with 102,090 atoms as the maximum of the free energy profile along the reaction coordinate as obtained by the weighted histogram analysis method with 17 umbrella sampling windows. This yields a free energy of activation of only 10 kcal/mol, showing that the previously postulated direct hydride transfer reaction mechanism is plausible, although we find that it is better interpreted as a concerted transfer of a hydrogen atom and an electron.

  18. New measurements of electron transfer in the presence of a nuclear resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schreiter, R.; Hammer, J.W.; Kunz, R. [Univ. of Stuttgart (Germany)] [and others

    1994-12-31

    Charge transfer collisions p + Ne {r_arrow} H + Ne{sub q+} (charge state q not specified) were studied in the vicinity of the elastic {sup 20}Ne(p,p){sup 20}Ne nuclear resonance at 1.955 MeV. Protons and neutral H atoms were observed under the same solid angle at 30{degrees} using magnetic separation and a position sensitive detector. The experiments were carried out at the Stuttgart 4MeV-DYNAMITRON accelerator (1-2kV ripple) in Stuttgart and made use of the supersonic gas jet target RHINOCEROS. With ion currents of about 30{mu}A on the target and a target thickness of about 10{sup 16} cm{sup {minus}2} the authors were able to measure the energy dependence of the electron capture probability with statistical uncertainties lower than 3%. Clear evidence of interference effects on the transfer amplitudes is found at the resonance energy. With the perspective of 10 times higher ion current in the near future and with the high density of the gas jet target the experiment promises a new and unprecedented quality of data for differential cross sections of charge transfer involving a nuclear resonance.

  19. Fundamental studies of energy-and hole/electron- transfer in hydroporphyrin architectures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bocian, David F. [University of California, Riverside, CA (United States)

    2014-08-20

    The long-term objective of the Bocian/Holten/Lindsey research program is to design, synthesize, and characterize tetrapyrrole-based molecular architectures that absorb sunlight, funnel energy, and separate charge with high efficiency and in a manner compatible with current and future solar-energy conversion schemes. The synthetic tetrapyrroles include porphyrins and hydroporphyrins; the latter classes of molecules encompass analogues of the naturally occurring chlorophylls and bacteriochlorophylls (e.g., chlorins, bacteriochlorins, and their derivatives). The attainment of the goals of the research program requires the close interplay of molecular design and synthesis (Lindsey group), static and time-resolved optical spectroscopic measurements (Holten group), and electrochemical, electron paramagnetic resonance, and resonance Raman studies, as well as density functional theory calculations (Bocian Group). The proposed research encompasses four interrelated themes: (1) Determination of the rates of ground-state hole/electron transfer between (hydro)porphyrins in multipigment arrays as a function of array size, distance between components, linker type, site of linker connection, and frontier molecular orbital composition. (2) Examination of excited-state energy transfer among hydroporphyrins in multipigment arrrays, including both pairwise and non-adjacent transfer, with a chief aim to identify the relative contributions of through-space (Förster) and through-bond (Dexter) mechanisms of energy transfer, including the roles of site of linker connection and frontier molecular orbital composition. (3) Elucidation of the role of substituents in tuning the spectral and electronic properties of bacteriochlorins, with a primary aim of learning how to shift the long-wavelength absorption band deeper into the near-infrared region. (4) Continued development of the software package PhotochemCAD for spectral manipulations and calculations through the compilation of a database

  20. Electron transfer mediation by aqueous C60 aggregates in H2O2/UV advanced oxidation of indigo carmine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Ling; Moor, Kyle; Zhang, Bo; He, Yiliang; Kim, Jae-Hong

    2014-10-01

    C60 fullerene has long been known to exhibit favorable electron accepting and shuttling properties, but little is known about the possibility of electron transfer mediation by fullerene aggregates (nC60) in water. In this study, we investigated the electron shuttling capabilities of nC60 using UV/H2O2 as a model oxidation process in the presence of an electron donor, indigo carmine (IC). nC60 addition to the IC/H2O2 system was found to drastically increase IC degradation and shift the reactive oxygen species (ROS) balance, favoring the formation of superoxide and perhydroxyl radical species compared to hydroxyl radicals. Results indicate that nC60 can act as an electron mediator, where the adsorbed IC donates an electron to nC60, which is subsequently transferred to H2O2 or perhydroxyl radical.C60 fullerene has long been known to exhibit favorable electron accepting and shuttling properties, but little is known about the possibility of electron transfer mediation by fullerene aggregates (nC60) in water. In this study, we investigated the electron shuttling capabilities of nC60 using UV/H2O2 as a model oxidation process in the presence of an electron donor, indigo carmine (IC). nC60 addition to the IC/H2O2 system was found to drastically increase IC degradation and shift the reactive oxygen species (ROS) balance, favoring the formation of superoxide and perhydroxyl radical species compared to hydroxyl radicals. Results indicate that nC60 can act as an electron mediator, where the adsorbed IC donates an electron to nC60, which is subsequently transferred to H2O2 or perhydroxyl radical. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr03647f

  1. Microelectrode voltammetry of multi-electron transfers complicated by coupled chemical equilibria: a general theory for the extended square scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laborda, Eduardo; Gómez-Gil, José María; Molina, Angela

    2017-06-28

    A very general and simple theoretical solution is presented for the current-potential-time response of reversible multi-electron transfer processes complicated by homogeneous chemical equilibria (the so-called extended square scheme). The expressions presented here are applicable regardless of the number of electrons transferred and coupled chemical processes, and they are particularized for a wide variety of microelectrode geometries. The voltammetric response of very different systems presenting multi-electron transfers is considered for the most widely-used techniques (namely, cyclic voltammetry, square wave voltammetry, differential pulse voltammetry and steady state voltammetry), studying the influence of the microelectrode geometry and the number and thermodynamics of the (electro)chemical steps. Most appropriate techniques and procedures for the determination of the 'interaction' between successive transfers are discussed. Special attention is paid to those situations where homogeneous chemical processes, such as protonation, complexation or ion association, affect the electrochemical behaviour of the system by different stabilization of the oxidation states.

  2. Crossed-beam scattering studies of electron-transfer processes between the dication CO2(2+) and neutral CO2: electronic states of reactants and products involved.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabka, Jan; Ricketts, Claire L; Schröder, Detlef; Roithová, Jana; Schwarz, Helmut; Thissen, Roland; Dutuit, Odile; Price, Stephen D; Herman, Zdenek

    2010-06-17

    Crossed-beam scattering experiments were carried out at collision energies of 4.51 and 2.71 eV to elucidate the electronic states involved in the nondissociative and dissociative electron-transfer reactions observed following CO(2)(2+)/CO(2) collisions. Specifically, we focus on the observation that, in the dissociative electron-transfer reaction, forming CO(+), the majority of the CO(+) product ions are formed via electron capture by the CO(2)(2+) rather than via ejection of an electron from the neutral CO(2) reaction partner. The main channels resulting in nondissociative electron transfer are reactions of the ground (X(3)Sigma(g)(-)) and excited states of CO(2)(2+) to give different combinations of the ground and excited states of the product pair of CO(2)(+) ions in which the combination AA appears to be significant. The CO(+) ions appear mainly to arise from slow dissociation of CO(2)(+)(b(4)Pi(u)) formed following electron capture by the ground state of the dication reactant (X(3)Sigma(g)(-)), with possible contributions from electron capture by higher triplet excited states of the dication.

  3. Electron transfer mediation by aqueous C₆₀ aggregates in H₂O₂/UV advanced oxidation of indigo carmine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Ling; Moor, Kyle; Zhang, Bo; He, Yiliang; Kim, Jae-Hong

    2014-11-21

    C60 fullerene has long been known to exhibit favorable electron accepting and shuttling properties, but little is known about the possibility of electron transfer mediation by fullerene aggregates (nC60) in water. In this study, we investigated the electron shuttling capabilities of nC60 using UV/H2O2 as a model oxidation process in the presence of an electron donor, indigo carmine (IC). nC60 addition to the IC/H2O2 system was found to drastically increase IC degradation and shift the reactive oxygen species (ROS) balance, favoring the formation of superoxide and perhydroxyl radical species compared to hydroxyl radicals. Results indicate that nC60 can act as an electron mediator, where the adsorbed IC donates an electron to nC60, which is subsequently transferred to H2O2 or perhydroxyl radical.

  4. The role of protein dynamics and thermal fluctuations in regulating cytochrome c/cytochrome c oxidase electron transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Paggi, Damian; Zitare, Ulises; Murgida, Daniel H

    2014-07-01

    In this overview we present recent combined electrochemical, spectroelectrochemical, spectroscopic and computational studies from our group on the electron transfer reactions of cytochrome c and of the primary electron acceptor of cytochrome c oxidase, the CuA site, in biomimetic complexes. Based on these results, we discuss how protein dynamics and thermal fluctuations may impact on protein ET reactions, comment on the possible physiological relevance of these results, and finally propose a regulatory mechanism that may operate in the Cyt/CcO electron transfer reaction in vivo. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 18th European Bioenergetic Conference. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Electronic coherence and the kinetics of inter-complex energy transfer in light-harvesting systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Pengfei; Miller, Thomas F

    2015-12-14

    We apply real-time path-integral dynamics simulations to characterize the role of electronic coherence in inter-complex excitation energy transfer (EET) processes. The analysis is performed using a system-bath model that exhibits the essential features of light-harvesting networks, including strong intra-complex electronic coupling and weak inter-complex coupling. Strong intra-complex coupling is known to generate both static and dynamic electron coherences, which delocalize the exciton over multiple chromophores and potentially influence the inter-complex EET dynamics. With numerical results from partial linearized density matrix (PLDM) real-time path-integral calculations, it is found that both static and dynamic coherence are correlated with the rate of inter-complex EET. To distinguish the impact of these two types of intra-complex coherence on the rate of inter-complex EET, we use Multi-Chromophore Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (MC-FRET) theory to map the original parameterization of the system-bath model to an alternative parameterization for which the effects of static coherence are preserved while the effects of dynamic coherence are largely eliminated. It is then shown that both parameterizations of the model (i.e., the original that supports dynamic coherence and the alternative that eliminates it), exhibit nearly identical EET kinetics and population dynamics over a wide range of parameters. These observations are found to hold for cases in which either the EET donor or acceptor is a dimeric complex and for cases in which the dimeric complex is either symmetric or asymmetric. The results from this study suggest that dynamic coherence plays only a minor role in the actual kinetics of inter-complex EET, whereas static coherence largely governs the kinetics of incoherent inter-complex EET in light-harvesting networks.

  6. Structural analysis of alternative complex III in the photosynthetic electron transfer chain of Chloroflexus aurantiacus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xinliu; Xin, Yueyong; Bell, Patrick D; Wen, Jianzhong; Blankenship, Robert E

    2010-08-10

    The green photosynthetic bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus, which belongs to the phylum of filamentous anoxygenic phototrophs, does not contain a cytochrome bc or bf type complex which is found in all other known groups of phototrophs. This suggests that a functional replacement exists to link the reaction center photochemistry to cyclic electron transfer as well as respiration. Earlier work identified a potential substitute of the cytochrome bc complex, now named alternative complex III (ACIII), which has been purified from C. aurantiacus, identified, and characterized. ACIII functions as a menaquinol:auracyanin oxidoreductase in the photosynthetic electron transfer chain, and a related but distinct complex functions in respiratory electron flow to a terminal oxidase. In this work, we focus on elucidating the structure of photosynthetic ACIII. We found that ACIII is an integral membrane protein complex of approximately 300 kDa that consists of eight subunits of seven different types. Among them, there are four metalloprotein subunits, including a 113 kDa iron-sulfur cluster-containing polypeptide, a 25 kDa penta-heme c-containing subunit, and two 20 kDa monoheme c-containing subunits in the form of a homodimer. A variety of analytical techniques were employed in determining the ACIII substructure, including HPLC combined with ESI-MS, metal analysis, potentiometric titration, and intensity analysis of heme staining SDS-PAGE. A preliminary structural model of ACIII is proposed on the basis of the analytical data and chemical cross-linking in tandem with mass analysis using MALDI-TOF, as well as transmembrane and transit peptide analysis.

  7. Photoinduced Electron Transfer from Various Aniline Derivatives to Graphene Quantum Dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Tufan; Chatterjee, Swarupa; Prasad, Edamana

    2015-12-10

    The present study utilizes the luminescence nature of the graphene quantum dots (GQDs) to analyze the mechanistic aspects of the photoinduced electron transfer (PET) processes between GQDs and aniline derivatives. A systematic investigation of PET from various aniline derivatives to GQDs has been presented. Solution-processable GQDs have been synthesized from graphene oxide (GO) at 200 °C. The as-synthesized GQDs exhibit a strong green luminescence at 510 nm, upon photoexcitation at 440 nm. Various aniline derivatives (aniline, N-methylaniline, N,N'-dimethylaniline, N-ethylaniline, N,N'-diethylaniline, and N,N'-diphenylaniline) have been utilized as electron donors to probe the PET process. Results from UV-visible absorption and steady-state and time-resolve luminescence spectroscopy suggest that the GQDs interact with the aniline derivatives in the excited state, which results in a significant luminescence quenching of the GQDs. The bimolecular rate constants of the dynamic quenching have been deduced for various donor-acceptor systems, and the values are in the range of (1.06-2.68) × 10(9) M(-1) s(-1). The negative values of the free energy change of the electron transfer process suggest that PET from aniline derivatives to GQDs is feasible and could be responsible for the luminescence quenching. The PET has been confirmed by detecting radical cations for certain aniline derivatives, using a nanosecond laser flash photolysis setup. The present study shows that among the various types of graphene systems, GQDs are better candidates for understanding the mechanism of PET in graphene-based donor-acceptor systems.

  8. Visualizing the non-equilibrium dynamics of photoinduced intramolecular electron transfer with femtosecond X-ray pulses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canton, Sophie E.; Kjær, Kasper S.; Vankó, György

    2015-01-01

    Ultrafast photoinduced electron transfer preceding energy equilibration still poses many experimental and conceptual challenges to the optimization of photoconversion since an atomic-scale description has so far been beyond reach. Here we combine femtosecond transient optical absorption spectrosc...... states is a key mechanistic feature. The present study demonstrates the extensive potential of femtosecond X-ray techniques as diagnostics of non-adiabatic electron transfer processes in synthetic and biological systems, and some directions for future studies, are outlined....... as compared with storage ring facilities, these measurements constitute the first X-ray-based visualization of a non-equilibrated intramolecular electron transfer process over large interatomic distances. Experimental and theoretical results establish that mediation through electronically excited molecular...

  9. Electrostatic calculations of amino acid titration and electron transfer, Q-AQB-->QAQ-B, in the reaction center.

    OpenAIRE

    Beroza, P; Fredkin, D R; Okamura, M Y; Feher, G

    1995-01-01

    The titration of amino acids and the energetics of electron transfer from the primary electron acceptor (QA) to the secondary electron acceptor (QB) in the photosynthetic reaction center of Rhodobacter sphaeroides are calculated using a continuum electrostatic model. Strong electrostatic interactions between titrating sites give rise to complex titration curves. Glu L212 is calculated to have an anomalously broad titration curve, which explains the seemingly contradictory experimental results...

  10. Role of Respiratory Terminal Oxidases in the Extracellular Electron Transfer Ability of Cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekar, Narendran; Wang, Jian; Zhou, Yan; Fang, Yi; Yan, Yajun; Ramasamy, Ramaraja P

    2018-01-08

    Cyanobacteria are used as anode catalysts in photo-bioelectrochemical cells to generate electricity in a sustainable, economic and environmental friendly manner using only water and sunlight. Though cyanobacteria (CB) possess unique advantage for solar energy conversion by virtue of its robust photosynthesis, they cannot efficiently perform extracellular electron transfer (EET). The reasons being, unlike dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria (that are usually exploited in microbial fuel cells to generate electricity), (1) CB do not possess any special features on their outer membrane to carry out EET and (2) the electrons generated in photosynthetic electron transport chain are channeled into competing respiratory pathways rather than to the anode. While, CB, genetically engineered to express outer membrane cytochrome S (OmcS), was found to generate ∼ nine-fold higher photocurrent compared to that of wild-type cyanobacterium in our previous work, the role of respiratory terminal oxidases (RTOs) of cyanobacteria for EET had not been much explored. In this study, each of the three RTOs in Synechococcus elongatus PCC7942 namely such as bd-type quinol oxidase, aa3 -type cytochrome oxidase and cbb3 -type cytochrome oxidase was knocked-out one at a time (cyd- , cox- and cco- respectively) and its contribution for extracellular ferricyanide reduction and photocurrent generation were investigated. The knock-out mutant lacking functional bd-type quinol oxidase (cyd- ) exhibited greater EET by reducing more ferricyanide compared to other single knock-out mutants as well as the wild type. Further, cyd- omcs (the cyd- mutant expressing OmcS) was found to generate more photocurrent than the corresponding single knock out controls and the wild type. This study clearly demonstrates that the bd-quinol oxidase diverted more electrons from the photosynthetic electron transport chain towards respiratory oxygen reduction and knocking it out had certainly enhanced the cyanobacterial

  11. Molecular dynamics simulations give insight into the conformational change, complex formation, and electron transfer pathway for cytochrome P450 reductase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sündermann, Axel; Oostenbrink, Chris

    2013-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 reductase (CYPOR) undergoes a large conformational change to allow for an electron transfer to a redox partner to take place. After an internal electron transfer over its cofactors, it opens up to facilitate the interaction and electron transfer with a cytochrome P450. The open conformation appears difficult to crystallize. Therefore, a model of a human CYPOR in the open conformation was constructed to be able to investigate the stability and conformational change of this protein by means of molecular dynamics simulations. Since the role of the protein is to provide electrons to a redox partner, the interactions with cytochrome P450 2D6 (2D6) were investigated and a possible complex structure is suggested. Additionally, electron pathway calculations with a newly written program were performed to investigate which amino acids relay the electrons from the FMN cofactor of CYPOR to the HEME of 2D6. Several possible interacting amino acids in the complex, as well as a possible electron transfer pathway were identified and open the way for further investigation by site directed mutagenesis studies. PMID:23832577

  12. Electron Transfer Governed Crystal Transformation of Tungsten Trioxide upon Li Ions Intercalation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhiguo; He, Yang; Gu, Meng; Du, Yingge; Mao, Scott X.; Wang, Chongmin

    2016-09-21

    Reversible insertion/extraction of ions into a host lattice constitutes the fundamental operating principle of rechargeable battery and electrochromic materials. It is far more commonly observed that insertion of ions into a host lattice can lead to structural evolution of the host lattice, and for the most cases such a lattice evolution is subtle. However, it has never been clear as what kind of factors to control such a lattice structural evolution. Based on tungsten trioxide (WO3) model crystal, we use in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and first principles calculation to explore the nature of Li ions intercalation induced crystal symmetry evolution of WO3. We discovered that Li insertion into the octahedral cavity of WO3 lattice will lead to a low to high symmetry transition, featuring a sequential monoclinic→tetragonal→cubic phase transition. The first principle calculation reveals that the phase transition is essentially governed by the electron transfer from Li to the WO6 octahedrons, which effectively leads to the weakening the W-O bond and modifying system band structure, resulting in an insulator to metal transition. The observation of the electronic effect on crystal symmetry and conductivity is significant, providing deep insights on the intercalation reactions in secondary rechargeable ion batteries and the approach for tailoring the functionalities of material based on insertion of ions in the lattice.

  13. Role and Potential of Direct Interspecies Electron Transfer in Anaerobic Digestion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gahyun Baek

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Anaerobic digestion (AD is an effective biological treatment for stabilizing organic compounds in waste/wastewater and in simultaneously producing biogas. However, it is often limited by the slow reaction rates of different microorganisms’ syntrophic biological metabolisms. Stable and fast interspecies electron transfer (IET between volatile fatty acid-oxidizing bacteria and hydrogenotrophic methanogens is crucial for efficient methanogenesis. In this syntrophic interaction, electrons are exchanged via redox mediators such as hydrogen and formate. Recently, direct IET (DIET has been revealed as an important IET route for AD. Microorganisms undergoing DIET form interspecies electrical connections via membrane-associated cytochromes and conductive pili; thus, redox mediators are not required for electron exchange. This indicates that DIET is more thermodynamically favorable than indirect IET. Recent studies have shown that conductive materials (e.g., iron oxides, activated carbon, biochar, and carbon fibers can mediate direct electrical connections for DIET. Microorganisms attach to conductive materials’ surfaces or vice versa according to particle size, and form conductive biofilms or aggregates. Different conductive materials promote DIET and improve AD performance in digesters treating different feedstocks, potentially suggesting a new approach to enhancing AD performance. This review discusses the role and potential of DIET in methanogenic systems, especially with conductive materials for promoting DIET.

  14. Leveraging Electron Transfer Dissociation for Site Selective Radical Generation: Applications for Peptide Epimer Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Yana A.; Beran, Gregory; Julian, Ryan R.

    2017-07-01

    Traditional electron-transfer dissociation (ETD) experiments operate through a complex combination of hydrogen abundant and hydrogen deficient fragmentation pathways, yielding c and z ions, side-chain losses, and disulfide bond scission. Herein, a novel dissociation pathway is reported, yielding homolytic cleavage of carbon-iodine bonds via electronic excitation. This observation is very similar to photodissociation experiments where homolytic cleavage of carbon-iodine bonds has been utilized previously, but ETD activation can be performed without addition of a laser to the mass spectrometer. Both loss of iodine and loss of hydrogen iodide are observed, with the abundance of the latter product being greatly enhanced for some peptides after additional collisional activation. These observations suggest a novel ETD fragmentation pathway involving temporary storage of the electron in a charge-reduced arginine side chain. Subsequent collisional activation of the peptide radical produced by loss of HI yields spectra dominated by radical-directed dissociation, which can be usefully employed for identification of peptide isomers, including epimers.

  15. Entanglement transfer from electrons to photons in quantum dots: an open quantum system approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budich, Jan C; Trauzettel, Björn

    2010-07-09

    We investigate entanglement transfer from a system of two spin-entangled electron-hole pairs, each placed in a separate single mode cavity, to the photons emitted due to cavity leakage. Dipole selection rules and a splitting between the light hole and the heavy hole subbands are the crucial ingredients establishing a one-to-one correspondence between electron spins and circular photon polarizations. To account for the measurement of the photons as well as dephasing effects, we choose a stochastic Schrödinger equation and a conditional master equation approach, respectively. The influence of interactions with the environment as well as asymmetries in the coherent couplings on the photon entanglement is analysed for two concrete measurement schemes. The first one is designed to violate the Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt (CHSH) inequality, while the second one employs the visibility of interference fringes to prove the entanglement of the photons. Because of the spatial separation of the entangled electronic system over two quantum dots, a successful verification of entangled photons emitted by this system would imply the detection of nonlocal spin entanglement of massive particles in a solid state structure.

  16. Magneto-controlled Quantized Electron Transfer to Surface-confined Redox Units and Metal Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itamar Willner

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Hydrophobic magnetic nanoparticles (NPs consisting of undecanoate-cappedmagnetite (Fe3O4, average diameter ca. 5 nm are used to control quantized electron transferto surface-confined redox units and metal NPs. A two-phase system consisting of anaqueous electrolyte solution and a toluene phase that includes the suspended undecanoate-capped magnetic NPs is used to control the interfacial properties of the electrode surface.The attracted magnetic NPs form a hydrophobic layer on the electrode surface resulting inthe change of the mechanisms of the surface-confined electrochemical processes. Aquinone-monolayer modified Au electrode demonstrates an aqueous-type of theelectrochemical process (2e- 2H+ redox mechanism for the quinone units in the absence ofthe hydrophobic magnetic NPs, while the attraction of the magnetic NPs to the surfaceresults in the stepwise single-electron transfer mechanism characteristic of a dry non-aqueous medium. Also, the attraction of the hydrophobic magnetic NPs to the Au electrodesurface modified with Au NPs (ca. 1.4 nm yields a microenvironment with a low dielectricconstant that results in the single-electron quantum charging of the Au NPs.

  17. An Electronic Structure Approach to Charge Transfer and Transport in Molecular Building Blocks for Organic Optoelectronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrickson, Heidi Phillips

    A fundamental understanding of charge separation in organic materials is necessary for the rational design of optoelectronic devices suited for renewable energy applications and requires a combination of theoretical, computational, and experimental methods. Density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent (TD)DFT are cost effective ab-initio approaches for calculating fundamental properties of large molecular systems, however conventional DFT methods have been known to fail in accurately characterizing frontier orbital gaps and charge transfer states in molecular systems. In this dissertation, these shortcomings are addressed by implementing an optimally-tuned range-separated hybrid (OT-RSH) functional approach within DFT and TDDFT. The first part of this thesis presents the way in which RSH-DFT addresses the shortcomings in conventional DFT. Environmentally-corrected RSH-DFT frontier orbital energies are shown to correspond to thin film measurements for a set of organic semiconducting molecules. Likewise, the improved RSH-TDDFT description of charge transfer excitations is benchmarked using a model ethene dimer and silsesquioxane molecules. In the second part of this thesis, RSH-DFT is applied to chromophore-functionalized silsesquioxanes, which are currently investigated as candidates for building blocks in optoelectronic applications. RSH-DFT provides insight into the nature of absorptive and emissive states in silsesquioxanes. While absorption primarily involves transitions localized on one chromophore, charge transfer between chromophores and between chromophore and silsesquioxane cage have been identified. The RSH-DFT approach, including a protocol accounting for complex environmental effects on charge transfer energies, was tested and validated against experimental measurements. The third part of this thesis addresses quantum transport through nano-scale junctions. The ability to quantify a molecular junction via spectroscopic methods is crucial to their

  18. Electron transfer properties of peat organic matter: from electrochemical analysis to redox processes in peatlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, Michael; Getzinger, Gordon; Walpen, Nicolas

    2017-04-01

    Peat organic matter contains redox-active functional groups that can accept and/or donate electrons from and to biotic and abiotic reaction partners present in peatlands. Several studies have provided evidence that electron accepting quinone moieties in the peat organic matter may act as terminal electron acceptors for anaerobic microbial respiration. This respiration pathway may competitively suppress methanogenesis and thereby lead to excess carbon dioxide to methane formation in peatlands. Electron donating phenolic moieties in peat organic matter have long been considered to inhibit microbial and enzymatic activities in peatlands, thereby contributing to carbon stabilization and accumulation in these systems. Phenols are expected to be comparatively stable in anoxic parts of the peats as phenoloxidases, a class of enzymes capable of oxidatively degrading phenols, require molecular oxygen as co-substrate. Despite the general recognition of the importance of redox-active moieties in peat organic matter, the abundance, redox properties and reactivities of these moieties remain poorly studied and understood, in large part due to analytical challenges. This contribution will, in a first part, summarize recent advances in our research group on the analytical chemistry of redox-active moieties in peat organic matter. We will show how mediated electrochemical analysis can be used to quantify the capacities of electron accepting and donating moieties in both dissolved and particulate peat organic matter. We will link these capacities to the physicochemical properties of peat organic matter and provide evidence for quinones and phenols as major electron accepting and donating moieties, respectively. The second part of this contribution will highlight how these electroanalytical techniques can be utilized to advance a more fundamental understanding of electron transfer processes involving peat organic matter. These processes include the redox cycling (i.e., repeated

  19. Electron transfer processes occurring on platinum neural stimulating electrodes: a tutorial on the i(V e) profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumsa, Doe W.; Bhadra, Narendra; Hudak, Eric M.; Kelley, Shawn C.; Untereker, Darrel F.; Mortimer, J. Thomas

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this tutorial is to encourage members of the neuroprosthesis community to incorporate electron transfer processes into their thinking and provide them with the tools to do so when they design and work with neurostimulating devices. The focus of this article is on platinum because it is the most used electrode metal for devices in commercial use. The i(V e) profile or cyclic voltammogram contains information about electron transfer processes that can occur when the electrode-electrolyte interface, V e, is at a specific potential, and assumed to be near steady-state conditions. For the engineer/designer this means that if the potential is not in the range of a specific electron transfer process, that process cannot occur. An i(V e) profile, recorded at sweep rates greater than 0.1 mVs-1, approximates steady-state conditions. Rapid transient potential excursions, like that seen with neural stimulation pulses, may be too fast for the reaction to occur, however, this means that if the potential is in the range of a specific electron transfer process it may occur and should be considered. The approach described here can be used to describe the thermodynamic electron transfer processes on other candidate electrode metals, e.g. stainless steel, iridium, carbon-based, etc.

  20. Electrochemical evaluation of electron transfer kinetics of high and low redox potential laccases on gold electrode surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frasconi, Marco [Department of Chemistry and Drug Technologies, Sapienza University of Rome, P.le Aldo Moro, 5 00185 Rome (Italy); Boer, Harry; Koivula, Anu [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O. Box 1000, FI-02044 VTT (Finland); Mazzei, Franco, E-mail: franco.mazzei@uniroma1.i [Department of Chemistry and Drug Technologies, Sapienza University of Rome, P.le Aldo Moro, 5 00185 Rome (Italy)

    2010-12-30

    Laccases and other multicopper oxidases are reported to be able to carry out direct electron transfer reactions when immobilized onto electrode surface. This allows detailed research of their electron transfer mechanisms. We have recently characterized the kinetic properties of four laccases in homogenous solution and immobilized onto an electrode surface with respect to a set of different redox mediators. In this paper we report the direct electron transfer of four purified laccases from Trametes hirsuta (ThL), Trametes versicolor (TvL), Melanocarpus albomyces (r-MaL) and Rhus vernicifera (RvL), by trapping the proteins within an electrochemically inert polymer of tributylmethyl phosphonium chloride coating a gold electrode surface. In particular, we have characterized the steps involved in the laccases electron transfer mechanism as well as the factors limiting each step. During the voltammetric experiments, non-turnover Faradic signals with midpoint potential of about 790 and 400 mV were observed for high potential laccases, ThL and TvL, corresponding to redox transformations of the T1 site and the T2/T3 cluster of the enzyme, respectively, whereas low redox potential laccases r-MaL and RvL shown a redox couple with a midpoint potential around 400 mV. The electrocatalytic properties of these laccase modified electrodes for the reduction of oxygen have been evaluated demonstrating significative direct electron transfer kinetics. The biocatalytic activity of laccases was also monitored in the presence of a well known inhibitor, sodium azide. On the basis of the experimental results, a hypothesis about the electronic pathway for intramolecular electron transfer characterizing laccases has been proposed.

  1. Coupling of electrons to intermolecular phonons in molecular charge transfer dimers: A resonance Raman study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedron, D.; Speghini, A.; Mulloni, V.; Bozio, R.

    1995-08-01

    We report resonance Raman scattering (RRS) spectra and Raman excitation profiles (REP) of a system containing π dimers of identical molecular radical ions measured with laser excitation in resonance with the charge transfer (CT) transition. A Peierls-Hubbard (PH) Hamiltonian has been used to model the investigated system and to calculate its optical and RRS properties. Results are reported for two polyoxometallate salts of tetrathiafulvalene (TTF), namely (TTF)2(W6O19) and (TTF)2(Mo6O19) whose structures contain almost isolated (TTF+)2 dimers. The RRS spectra of (TTF)2(W6O19), measured in resonance with the CT absorption band centered at 832 nm, show three phonon modes located at 55, 90, and 116 cm-1 which are strongly resonance enhanced. These modes have been associated to the out-of-phase combinations of the translational motions of the two molecules composing the dimer. Such modes are effective in modulating the intradimer transfer integral, thus providing an efficient mechanism for coupling with the electronic system and for enhancement of the scattering intensity at resonance with the CT transition. The REP for the three strongly coupled modes of (TTF)2(W6O19) have been measured with laser excitation wavelengths ranging from 740 to 930 nm. Quantitative analysis of the REP data has been performed based on a perturbative solution of the PH model to second order in the electron-molecular-vibration (EMV) and electron-intermolecular-phonon (EIP) interactions. The CT absorption profile and the REP's have been calculated using a time correlator technique and the model parameters have been optimized in order to fit the experimental REP data. Infrared vibronic absorptions of (TTF)2(W6O19), originated by the EMV coupling, have been measured and independent information on the electronic parameters of the PH model have been derived. This has made the choice of the fitting parameters used for the REP calculations rather unambiguous and has allowed us to obtain, for the

  2. Enhancing photoinduced electron transfer efficiency of fluorescent pH-probes with halogenated phenols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aigner, Daniel; Freunberger, Stefan A; Wilkening, Martin; Saf, Robert; Borisov, Sergey M; Klimant, Ingo

    2014-09-16

    Photoinduced electron transfer (PET), which causes pH-dependent quenching of fluorescent dyes, is more effectively introduced by phenolic groups than by amino groups which have been much more commonly used so far. That is demonstrated by fluorescence measurements involving several classes of fluorophores. Electrochemical measurements show that PET in several amino-modified dyes is thermodynamically favorable, even though it was not experimentally found, underlining the importance of kinetic aspects to the process. Consequently, the attachment of phenolic groups allows for fast and simple preparation of a wide selection of fluorescent pH-probes with tailor-made spectral properties, sensitive ranges, and individual advantages, so that a large number of applications can be realized. Fluorophores carrying phenolic groups may also be used for sensing analytes other than pH or molecular switching and signaling.

  3. Investigation of Electron Transfer-Based Photonic and Electro-Optic Materials and Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bromenshenk, Jerry J; Abbott, Edwin H; Dickensheets, David; Donovan, Richard P; Hobbs, J D; Spangler, Lee; McGuirl, Michele A; Spangler, Charles; Rebane, Aleksander; Rosenburg, Edward; Schmidt, V H; Singel, David J

    2008-03-28

    Montana's state program began its sixth year in 2006. The project's research cluster focused on physical, chemical, and biological materials that exhibit unique electron-transfer properties. Our investigators have filed several patents and have also have established five spin-off businesses (3 MSU, 2 UM) and a research center (MT Tech). In addition, this project involved faculty and students at three campuses (MSU, UM, MT Tech) and has a number of under-represented students, including 10 women and 5 Native Americans. In 2006, there was an added emphasis on exporting seminars and speakers via the Internet from UM to Chief Dull Knife Community College, as well as work with the MT Department of Commerce to better educate our faculty regarding establishing small businesses, licensing and patent issues, and SBIR program opportunities.

  4. Electron transfer in multiply bridged donor-acceptor molecules: Dephasing and quantum coherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, Randall H; Wasielewski, Michael R; Ratner, Mark A

    2006-10-19

    We present a simple theoretical treatment of nonadiabatic electron transfer in multiply bridged donor-bridge-acceptor molecules using the density matrix formalism. Destructive interference can result from different signed couplings between bridge sites, with the simplest system being a four-site Joachim-type molecular interferometer. Previous work has shown that deposition of energy on the bridge sites erases the interference and recovers transport. We show that pure local dephasing, a completely elastic process, is also capable of eliminating destructive interference and regaining transport. Destructive interference as a result of system connectivity can explain the familiar ortho-meta-para reactivity of benzene bridges. We also show that pure dephasing can yield a coalescence of ortho, meta, and para effective coupling strengths and suggest a system to observe this effect experimentally.

  5. A direct electron transfer-based glucose/oxygen biofuel cell operating in human serum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coman, V.; Gorton, L. [Department of Analytical Chemistry/Biochemistry, Lund University, 22100 Lund (Sweden); Ludwig, R. [Research Centre Applied Biocatalysis, 8010 Graz (Austria); Department of Food Sciences and Technology, BOKU-University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, 1190 Wien (Austria); Harreither, W.; Haltrich, D. [Department of Food Sciences and Technology, BOKU-University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, 1190 Wien (Austria); Ruzgas, T. [Biomedical Laboratory Science, Health and Society, Malmoe University, 20506 Malmoe (Sweden); Laboratory of Chemical Enzymology, A.N. Bach Institute of Biochemistry, 119071 Moscow (Russian Federation); Shleev, S.

    2010-02-15

    We report on the fabrication and characterisation of the very first direct electron transfer-based glucose/oxygen biofuel cell (BFC) operating in neutral glucose-containing buffer and human serum. Corynascus thermophilus cellobiose dehydrogenase and Myrothecium verrucaria bilirubin oxidase were used as anodic and cathodic bioelements, respectively. The following characteristics of the mediator-, separator- and membrane-less, a priori, non-toxic and simple miniature BFC, was obtained: an open-circuit voltage of 0.62 and 0.58 V, a maximum power density of ca. 3 and 4 {mu}W cm{sup -2} at 0.37 and 0.19 V of cell voltage, in phosphate buffer and human serum, respectively. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  6. ACRATA: a novel electron transfer domain associated to apoptosis and cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martinez-A Carlos

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently, several members of a vertebrate protein family containing a six trans-membrane (6TM domain and involved in apoptosis and cancer (e.g. STEAP, STAMP1, TSAP6, have been identified in Golgi and cytoplasmic membranes. The exact function of these proteins remains unknown. Methods We related this 6TM domain to distant protein families using intermediate sequences and methods of iterative profile sequence similarity search. Results Here we show for the first time that this 6TM domain is homolog to the 6TM heme binding domain of both the NADPH oxidase (Nox family and the YedZ family of bacterial oxidoreductases. Conclusions This finding gives novel insights about the existence of a previously undetected electron transfer system involved in apoptosis and cancer, and suggests further steps in the experimental characterization of these evolutionarily related families.

  7. Blue copper proteins as a model for investigating electron transfer processes within polypeptide matrices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, O; Pecht, I

    1994-01-01

    Intramolecular long-range electron transfer (ET) processes have been investigated in two types of blue copper proteins; the single-copper protein, azurin and the multi-copper oxidase, ascorbate oxidase. These have several advantages for investigating the parameters that control the above reactions...... resolution. (3) These proteins have no other cofactors except for the copper ions, thus the role of the polypeptide matrix can be addressed in a more straightforward manner. In azurins, the ET from the cystine (3-26) radical-ion produced by pulse-radiolytic reduction of this single disulfide bridge...... the relation between this enzyme's distinct functional states and the internal ET rates. We conclude that in both types of proteins, the investigated LRET proceed primarily along covalent pathways, thus providing suitable systems where the parameters controlling the efficiency of these processes can be pursued....

  8. Phylogenetic characterization of the ubiquitous electron transfer flavoprotein families ETF-alpha and ETF-beta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, M H; Saier, M H

    1995-06-01

    Electron transfer flavoproteins (ETF) are alpha beta-heterodimers found in eukaryotic mitochondria and bacteria. We have identified currently sequenced protein members of the ETF-alpha and ETF-beta families. Members of these two families include (a) the ETF subunits of mammals and bacteria, (b) homologous pairs of proteins (FixB/FixA) that are essential for nitrogen fixation in some bacteria, and (c) a pair of carnitine-inducible proteins encoded by two open reading frames in Escherichia coli (YaaQ and YaaR). These three groups of proteins comprise three clusters on both the ETF-alpha and ETF-beta phylogenetic trees, separated from each other by comparable phylogenetic distances. This fact suggests that these two protein families evolved with similar overall rates of evolutionary divergence. Relative regions of sequence conservation are evaluated, and signature sequences for both families are derived.

  9. Preferred sites and pathways for electron transfer in blue copper proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, O; Pecht, I

    1988-01-01

    probably also coordinated to carboxylate groups, present in plastocyanin, and in stellacyanin 12 A and 6 A, respectively, from the copper center. The salient feature emerging from examination of the three copper proteins is that a pi-facilitated electron transfer (E.T.) pathway may be operative; in azurin......, E.T. proceeds via an extended imidazole ring system, and in plastocyanin and stellacyanin via a weakly coupled pi-system. Therefore, a case emerges for suggesting that this is the common feature of the long-distance intramolecular E.T. in this class of metalloproteins. These pathways are most...... probably a regulatory alternative to the E.T. site recognized at the exposed, "Northern" imidazole coordinated to copper in all these proteins....

  10. One-Time Code Cardholder Verification Method in Electronic Funds Transfer Transactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sitek Albert

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Card payments are getting more and more popular across the world. The dominant standard used for Electronic Funds Transfer transaction is EMV. It is widely used across Europe and Canada, and currently it is being introduced in the USA. The most frequently used Cardholder Verification Method in EMV transaction is PIN, which requires from the payment terminal to be equipped with pinpad - which increases the cost of the whole payment device. In this article I present an alternative Cardholder Verification Method (CVM that can be used instead of traditional PIN. The key advantage of the presented mechanism is that it can be easily implemented in currently utilized authorization protocols, it does not affect rules of EMV specification and may decrease time of transaction processing.

  11. Mapping Protein Surface Accessibility via an Electron Transfer Dissociation Selectively Cleavable Hydrazone Probe*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasicek, Lisa; O'Brien, John P.; Browning, Karen S.; Tao, Zhihua; Liu, Hung-Wen; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.

    2012-01-01

    A protein's surface influences its role in protein-protein interactions and protein-ligand binding. Mass spectrometry can be used to give low resolution structural information about protein surfaces and conformations when used in combination with derivatization methods that target surface accessible amino acid residues. However, pinpointing the resulting modified peptides upon enzymatic digestion of the surface-modified protein is challenging because of the complexity of the peptide mixture and low abundance of modified peptides. Here a novel hydrazone reagent (NN) is presented that allows facile identification of all modified surface residues through a preferential cleavage upon activation by electron transfer dissociation coupled with a collision activation scan to pinpoint the modified residue in the peptide sequence. Using this approach, the correlation between percent reactivity and surface accessibility is demonstrated for two biologically active proteins, wheat eIF4E and PARP-1 Domain C. PMID:22393264

  12. Effects of tunnelling and asymmetry for system-bath models of electron transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattiat, Johann; Richardson, Jeremy O.

    2018-03-01

    We apply the newly derived nonadiabatic golden-rule instanton theory to asymmetric models describing electron-transfer in solution. The models go beyond the usual spin-boson description and have anharmonic free-energy surfaces with different values for the reactant and product reorganization energies. The instanton method gives an excellent description of the behaviour of the rate constant with respect to asymmetry for the whole range studied. We derive a general formula for an asymmetric version of the Marcus theory based on the classical limit of the instanton and find that this gives significant corrections to the standard Marcus theory. A scheme is given to compute this rate based only on equilibrium simulations. We also compare the rate constants obtained by the instanton method with its classical limit to study the effect of tunnelling and other quantum nuclear effects. These quantum effects can increase the rate constant by orders of magnitude.

  13. Nanoparticle mediated electron transfer across organic layers: from current understanding to applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gooding, J. Justin; Alam, Muhammad Tanzirul; Barfidokht, Abbas; Carter, Lachlan, E-mail: justin.gooding@unsw.edu.au [School of Chemistry and Australian Centre for NanoMedicine, The University of New South Wales, Sydney (Australia)

    2014-03-15

    In the last few years electrode-organic layer-nanoparticle constructs have attracted considerable research interest for systems where in the absence of the nanoparticles the electrode is passivated. This is because it has been observed that if the organic layer is a good self-assembled monolayer that passivates the electrode, the presence of the nanoparticles 'switches on' faradaic electrochemistry and because electron transfer between the electrode and the nanoparticles is apparently independent of the thickness of the organic layer. This review 1) outlines the full extent of the experimental observations regarding this phenomenon, 2) discusses a recent theoretical description to explain the observations that have just been supported with experimental evidences and 3) provides an overview of the application of these systems in sensing and photovoltaic. (author)

  14. Designed azurins show lower reorganization free energies for intraprotein electron transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, Ole; Marshall, Nicholas M; Wherland, Scot

    2013-01-01

    and to enable potential applications in different energy conversion systems. Herein we report studies of the intramolecular ET from pulse radiolytically produced disulfide radicals to Cu(II) in rationally designed azurin mutants. In these mutants, the copper coordination sphere has been fine-tuned to span......Low reorganization free energies are necessary for fast electron transfer (ET) reactions. Hence, rational design of redox proteins with lower reorganization free energies has been a long-standing challenge, promising to yield a deeper understanding of the underlying principles of ET reactivity...... a wide range of reduction potentials while leaving the metal binding site effectively undisrupted. We find that the reorganization free energies of ET within the mutants are indeed lower than that of WT azurin, increasing the intramolecular ET rate constants almost 10-fold: changes that are correlated...

  15. Extracellular polymeric substances play roles in extracellular electron transfer of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiao, Yong; Zhang, En-Hua; Christensen, Hans Erik Mølager

    It is well known that microorganism is surrounded by extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) which include polysaccharides, proteins, glycoproteins, nucleic acids, phospholipids, and humic acids. However, previous studies on microbial extracellular electron transfer (EET) are conducted on cells......, such as DNA, humic acids and some proteins, are electrochemically active or semiconductive. Herein, we report experimental evidences of EPS role on EET for Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Atomic force microscopy clearly showed that the cell surface was cleaned and few EPS could be observed on MR-1 after...... without extracting EPS or cells collected from log stage or early-steady stage cultures with little EPS. Therefore, microbial cells are believed in contact directly with each other or electrode. Such attempt apparently ignored the role of EPS in microbial EET, even though many components of EPS...

  16. Evidence for Fast Electron Transfer between the High-Spin Haems in Cytochrome bd-I from Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey A Siletsky

    Full Text Available Cytochrome bd-I is one of the three proton motive force-generating quinol oxidases in the O2-dependent respiratory chain of Escherichia coli. It contains one low-spin haem (b558 and the two high-spin haems (b595 and d as the redox-active cofactors. In order to examine the flash-induced intraprotein reverse electron transfer (the so-called ''electron backflow'', CO was photolyzed from the ferrous haem d in one-electron reduced (b5583+b5953+d2+-CO cytochrome bd-I, and the fully reduced (b5582+b5952+d2+-CO oxidase as a control. In contrast to the fully reduced cytochrome bd-I, the transient spectrum of one-electron reduced oxidase at a delay time of 1.5 μs is clearly different from that at a delay time of 200 ns. The difference between the two spectra can be modeled as the electron transfer from haem d to haem b595 in 3-4% of the cytochrome bd-I population. Thus, the interhaem electron backflow reaction induced by photodissociation of CO from haem d in one-electron reduced cytochrome bd-I comprises two kinetically different phases: the previously unnoticed fast electron transfer from haem d to haem b595 within 0.2-1.5 μs and the slower well-defined electron equilibration with τ ~16 μs. The major new finding of this work is the lack of electron transfer at 200 ns.

  17. Modulating indium doped tin oxide electrode properties for laccase electron transfer enhancement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaconu, Mirela [National Institute for Biological Sciences, Centre of Bioanalysis, 296 Spl. Independentei, Bucharest 060031 (Romania); Chira, Ana [National Institute for Biological Sciences, Centre of Bioanalysis, 296 Spl. Independentei, Bucharest 060031 (Romania); Politehnica University of Bucharest, Faculty of Applied Chemistry and Materials Science, 1-7 Polizu Str., 011061 (Romania); Radu, Lucian, E-mail: gl_radu@chim.upb.ro [Politehnica University of Bucharest, Faculty of Applied Chemistry and Materials Science, 1-7 Polizu Str., 011061 (Romania)

    2014-08-28

    Indium doped tin oxide (ITO) electrodes were functionalized with gold nanoparticles (GNPs) and cysteamine monolayer to enhance the heterogeneous electron transfer process of laccase from Trametes versicolor. The assembly of GNP on ITO support was performed through generation of H{sup +} species at the electrode surface by hydroquinone electrooxidation at 0.9 V vs Ag/AgCl. Uniform distribution of gold nanoparticle aggregates on electrode surfaces was confirmed by atomic force microscopy. The size of GNP aggregates was in the range of 200–500 nm. The enhanced charge transfer at the GNP functionalized ITO electrodes was observed by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Electrocatalytic behavior of laccase immobilized on ITO modified electrode toward oxygen reduction reaction was evaluated using CV in the presence of 2,2′-azino-bis 3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfuric acid (ABTS). The obtained sigmoidal-shaped voltammograms for ABTS reduction in oxygen saturated buffer solution are characteristic for a catalytic process. The intensity of catalytic current increased linearly with mediator concentration up to 6.2 × 10{sup −4} M. The registered voltammogram in the absence of ABTS mediator clearly showed a significant faradaic current which is the evidence of the interfacial oxygen reduction. - Highlights: • Assembly of gold nanoparticles on indium tin oxide support at positive potentials • Electrochemical and morphological evaluation of the gold nanoparticle layer assembly • Bioelectrocatalytic oxygen reduction on laccase modified electrode.

  18. Freezing hot electrons. Electron transfer and solvation dynamics at D{sub 2}O and NH{sub 3}-metal interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staehler, A.J.

    2007-05-15

    The present work investigates the electron transfer and solvation dynamics at the D{sub 2}O/Cu(111), D{sub 2}O/Ru(001), and NH{sub 3}/Cu(111) interfaces using femtosecond time-resolved two-photon photoelectron spectroscopy. Within this framework, the influence of the substrate, adsorbate structure and morphology, solvation site, coverage, temperature, and solvent on the electron dynamics are studied, yielding microscopic insight into the underlying fundamental processes. Transitions between different regimes of ET, substrate-dominated, barrier-determined, strong, and weak coupling are observed by systematic variation of the interfacial properties and development of empirical model descriptions. It is shown that the fundamental steps of the interfacial electron dynamics are similar for all investigated systems: Metal electrons are photoexcited to unoccupied metal states and transferred into the adlayer via the adsorbate's conduction band. The electrons localize at favorable sites and are stabilized by reorientations of the surrounding polar solvent molecules. Concurrently, they decay back two the metal substrate, as it offers a continuum of unoccupied states. However, the detailed characteristics vary for the different investigated interfaces: For amorphous ice-metal interfaces, the electron transfer is initially, right after photoinjection, dominated by the substrate's electronic surface band structure. With increasing solvation, a transient barrier evolves at the interface that increasingly screens the electrons from the substrate. Tunneling through this barrier becomes the rate-limiting step for ET. The competition of electron decay and solvation leads to lifetimes of the solvated electrons in the order of 100 fs. Furthermore, it is shown that the electrons bind in the bulk of the ice layers, but on the edges of adsorbed D{sub 2}O clusters and that the ice morphology strongly influences the electron dynamics. For the amorphous NH{sub 3}/Cu(111

  19. Pulse Radiolysis Studies of Temperature Dependent Electron Transfers among Redox Centers in ba(3)-Cytochrome c Oxidase from Thermus thermophilus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, Ole; Wherland, Scot; Antholine, William E

    2010-01-01

    in cytochrome ba(3) had no effect on the rate of this reaction whereas the II-Met160Leu Cu(A)-mutation was slower by an amount corresponding to a decreased driving force of ∼0.06 eV. The structures support the presence of a common, electron-conducting "wire" between Cu(A) and heme-a(b). The transfer......The functioning of cytochrome c oxidases involves orchestration of long-range electron transfer (ET) events among the four redox active metal centers. We report the temperature dependence of electron transfer from the Cu(A)(r) site to the low-spin heme-(a)b(o) site, i.e., Cu(A)(r) + heme...

  20. Tunneling Current of Electron in Armchair Graphene Nanoribbon Bipolar Transistor Model Using Transfer Matrix Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahmi, A. K.; Hasanah, L.; Rusdiana, D.; Aminudin, A.; Suhendi, E.

    2017-03-01

    The tunneling current of n-p-n bipolar junction transistor AGNR-based is modeled with semi-numerical method. The exponential solution from Schrödinger equation is used and solved analytically. The potential profile of n-p-n BJT divided into several segments in the numerical method. Then, the solved analytical result is used in the numerical method to compute the electron transmittance. Transfer Matrix Method (TMM) is the numerical method used to compute the electron transmittance. From the calculated transmittance the tunneling current can be computed by using Landauer formula with aid of Gauss-Legendre Quadrature (GLQ). Next, the tunneling current is computed with several change of variables which are base-emitter voltage (VBE), base-collector voltage (VBC), temperature and the AGNR’s width. The computed tunneling current shows that the larger value of applied voltage for both VBE and VBC results in larger value of tunneling current. At the lower temperature, the current is larger. The computed tunneling current shows that at wider width of AGNR, the current is also larger. This is due to the decreased band-gap energy (Eg) because of the wider width of AGNR.

  1. Model of convection mass transfer in titanium alloy at low energy high current electron beam action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarychev, V. D.; Granovskii, A. Yu; Nevskii, S. A.; Konovalov, S. V.; Gromov, V. E.

    2017-01-01

    The convection mixing model is proposed for low-energy high-current electron beam treatment of titanium alloys, pre-processed by heterogeneous plasma flows generated via explosion of carbon tape and powder TiB2. The model is based on the assumption vortices in the molten layer are formed due to the treatment by concentrated energy flows. These vortices evolve as the result of thermocapillary convection, arising because of the temperature gradient. The calculation of temperature gradient and penetration depth required solution of the heat problem with taking into account the surface evaporation. However, instead of the direct heat source the boundary conditions in phase transitions were changed in the thermal conductivity equation, assuming the evaporated material takes part in the heat exchange. The data on the penetration depth and temperature distribution are used for the thermocapillary model. The thermocapillary model embraces Navier-Stocks and convection heat transfer equations, as well as the boundary conditions with the outflow of evaporated material included. The solution of these equations by finite elements methods pointed at formation of a multi-vortices structure when electron-beam treatment and its expansion over new zones of material. As the result, strengthening particles are found at the depth exceeding manifold their penetration depth in terms of the diffusion mechanism.

  2. Ultrafast Photoinduced Electron Transfer in a π-Conjugated Oligomer/Porphyrin Complex

    KAUST Repository

    Aly, Shawkat Mohammede

    2014-10-02

    Controlling charge transfer (CT), charge separation (CS), and charge recombination (CR) at the donor-acceptor interface is extremely important to optimize the conversion efficiency in solar cell devices. In general, ultrafast CT and slow CR are desirable for optimal device performance. In this Letter, the ultrafast excited-state CT between platinum oligomer (DPP-Pt(acac)) as a new electron donor and porphyrin as an electron acceptor is monitored for the first time using femtosecond (fs) transient absorption (TA) spectroscopy with broad-band capability and 120 fs temporal resolution. Turning the CT on/off has been shown to be possible either by switching from an organometallic oligomer to a metal-free oligomer or by controlling the charge density on the nitrogen atom of the porphyrin meso unit. Our time-resolved data show that the CT and CS between DPP-Pt(acac) and cationic porphyrin are ultrafast (approximately 1.5 ps), and the CR is slow (ns time scale), as inferred from the formation and the decay of the cationic and anionic species. We also found that the metallic center in the DPP-Pt(acac) oligomer and the positive charge on the porphyrin are the keys to switching on/off the ultrafast CT process.

  3. Study of the Ne(^3P_2) + CH_3F Electron Transfer Reaction below 1 Kelvin

    CERN Document Server

    Jankunas, Justin; Osterwalder, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Relatively little is known about the dynamics of electron transfer reactions at low collision energy. We present a study of Penning ionization of ground state methyl fluoride molecules by electronically excited neon atoms in the 13 $\\mu$eV--4.8 meV (150 mK--56 K) collision energy range, using a neutral-neutral merged beam setup. Relative cross sections have been measured for three Ne($^3P_2$)+ CH$_3$F reaction channels by counting the number of CH$_3$F$^+$, CH$_2$F$^+$, and CH$_3^+$ product ions, as a function of relative velocity between the neon and methyl fluoride molecular beams. Experimental cross sections markedly deviate from the Langevin capture model at collision energies above 20 K. The branching ratios are constant. In other words, the chemical shape of the CH$_3$F molecule, as seen by Ne($^3P_2$) atom, appears not to change as the collision energy is varied, in contrast to related Ne($^3P_J$) + CH$_3$X (X=Cl and Br) reactions at higher collision energies.

  4. Time-dependent density functional theory study on direction-dependent electron and hole transfer processes in molecular systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partovi-Azar, Pouya; Kaghazchi, Payam

    2017-04-15

    We report on real-time time-dependent density functional theory calculations on direction-dependent electron and hole transfer processes in molecular systems. As a model system, we focus on α-sulfur. It is shown that time scale of the electron transfer process from a negatively charged S8 molecule to a neighboring neutral monomer is comparable to that of a strong infrared-active molecular vibrations of the dimer with one negatively charged monomer. This results in a strong coupling between the electrons and the nuclei motion which eventually leads to S8 ring opening before the electron transfer process is completed. The open-ring structure is found to be stable. The similar infrared-active peak in the case of hole transfer, however, is shown to be very weak and hence no significant scattering by the nuclei is possible. The presented approach to study the charge transfer processes in sulfur has direct applications in the increasingly growing research field of charge transport in molecular systems. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Angular differential studies of electron transfer in collisions of He-like ions with Na(3s) : The role of electron saddle crossings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blank, I.; Otranto, S.; Meinema, C.; Olson, R. E.; Hoekstra, R.

    2013-01-01

    We present a systematic experimental and theoretical study of angular differential cross sections of single-electron transfer in collisions of N5+, O6+, and Ne8+ with ground-state Na(3s) in the collision energy range from 1 to 8 keV/amu. Experiments were performed using recoil-ion momentum

  6. Blue copper proteins as a model for investigating electron transfer processes within polypeptide matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farver, O; Pecht, I

    1994-05-01

    Intramolecular long-range electron transfer (ET) processes have been investigated in two types of blue copper proteins; the single-copper protein, azurin and the multi-copper oxidase, ascorbate oxidase. These have several advantages for investigating the parameters that control the above reactions: (1) Their sole physiological role is mediating or catalyzing ET processes via the evolutionary optimized copper sites. (2) The three-dimensional structures of a considerable number of blue single copper containing proteins, e.g. azurins, and of ascorbate oxidase, have been determined at high resolution. (3) These proteins have no other cofactors except for the copper ions, thus the role of the polypeptide matrix can be addressed in a more straightforward manner. In azurins, the ET from the cystine (3-26) radical-ion produced by pulse-radiolytic reduction of this single disulfide bridge, to the Cu(II) ion bound at a distance of approximately 2.6 nm has been studied, in naturally occurring and in single-site mutated azurins. The role of changing specific amino acid residues on the internal long-range electron transfer (LRET) process and its potential pathways has been investigated. It is noteworthy that this process is most probably not part of the physiological function of azurin, hence, there has not been any evolutionary selection of structural elements for the reaction. Therefore, this provides a system for an unbiased examination of structural and chemical requirements for control of this process. By contrast, in blue copper oxidases, the internal ET from the electron uptake site from substrate to the O2 reduction site is part of these enzymes catalytic cycle, presumably optimized by selective pressure. We are investigating this internal ET in ascorbate oxidase and try to resolve the relation between this enzyme's distinct functional states and the internal ET rates. We conclude that in both types of proteins, the investigated LRET proceed primarily along covalent

  7. Electron transfer among the CuA-, heme b- and a3-centers of Thermus thermophilus cytochrome ba3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, Ole; Chen, Ying; Fee, James A

    2006-01-01

    . and Pecht, I. (2006) Rates and equilibrium of CuA to heme a electron transfer in Paracoccus denitrificans cytochrome c oxidase. Biophys. J. 90, 2131-2137]. Investigating this process in the cytochrome ba(3) of Thermus thermophilus (Tt), we now show that MNA(*) also reduces Cu(A) with a subsequent ET......The 1-methyl-nicotinamide radical (MNA(*)), produced by pulse radiolysis has previously been shown to reduce the Cu(A)-site of cytochromes aa(3), a process followed by intramolecular electron transfer (ET) to the heme a but not to the heme a(3) [Farver, O., Grell, E., Ludwig, B., Michel, H...

  8. On the electron transfer mechanism between cytochrome C and metal electrodes. Evidence for dynamic control at short distances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Hongjun; Khoshtariya, D; Waldeck, D H; Grochol, J; Hildebrandt, P; Murgida, D H

    2006-10-12

    Cytochrome c was coordinatively bound to self-assembled monolayers of pyridine-terminated alkanethiols on Au and Ag electrodes. The mechanism of heterogeneous electron transfer of the immobilized protein was investigated by cyclic voltammetry and time-resolved surface-enhanced resonance Raman spectroelectrochemistry. The temperature, distance, and overpotential dependencies of the electron transfer rates indicate a change of mechanism from a tunneling controlled reaction at long distances (thicker films) to a solvent/protein friction controlled reaction at smaller distances (thinner films).

  9. Sub-picosecond timing fluctuation suppression in laser-based atmospheric transfer of microwave signal using electronic phase compensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shijun; Sun, Fuyu; Bai, Qingsong; Chen, Dawei; Chen, Qiang; Hou, Dong

    2017-10-01

    We demonstrated a timing fluctuation suppression in outdoor laser-based atmospheric radio-frequency transfer over a 110 m one-way free-space link using an electronic phase compensation technique. Timing fluctuations and Allan Deviation are both measured to characterize the instability of transferred frequency incurred during the transfer process. With transferring a 1 GHz microwave signal over a timing fluctuation suppressed transmission link, the total root-mean-square (rms) timing fluctuation was measured to be 920 femtoseconds in 5000 s, with fractional frequency instability on the order of 1 × 10-12 at 1 s, and order of 2 × 10-16 at 1000 s. This atmospheric frequency transfer scheme with the timing fluctuation suppression technique can be used to fast build an atomic clock-based frequency free-space transmission link since its stability is superior to a commercial Cs and Rb clock.

  10. Oligo p-Phenylenevinylene Derivatives as Electron Transfer Matrices for UV-MALDI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellanos-García, Laura J.; Agudelo, Brian Castro; Rosales, Hernando F.; Cely, Melissa; Ochoa-Puentes, Christian; Blanco-Tirado, Cristian; Sierra, Cesar A.; Combariza, Marianny Y.

    2017-12-01

    Phenylenevinylene oligomers (PVs) have outstanding photophysical characteristics for applications in the growing field of organic electronics. Yet, PVs are also versatile molecules, the optical and physicochemical properties of which can be tuned by manipulation of their structure. We report the synthesis, photophysical, and MS characterization of eight PV derivatives with potential value as electron transfer (ET) matrices for UV-MALDI. UV-vis analysis show the presence of strong characteristic absorption bands in the UV region and molar absorptivities at 355 nm similar or higher than those of traditional proton (CHCA) and ET (DCTB) MALDI matrices. Most of the PVs exhibit non-radiative quantum yields (φ) above 0.5, indicating favorable thermal decay. Ionization potential values (IP) for PVs, calculated by the Electron Propagator Theory (EPT), range from 6.88 to 7.96 eV, making these oligomers good candidates as matrices for ET ionization. LDI analysis of PVs shows only the presence of radical cations (M+.) in positive ion mode and absence of clusters, adducts, or protonated species; in addition, M+. threshold energies for PVs are lower than for DCTB. We also tested the performance of four selected PVs as ET MALDI matrices for analytes ranging from porphyrins and phthalocyanines to polyaromatic compounds. Two of the four PVs show S/N enhancement of 1961% to 304% in comparison to LDI, and laser energy thresholds from 0.17 μJ to 0.47 μJ compared to 0.58 μJ for DCTB. The use of PV matrices also results in lower LODs (low fmol range) whereas LDI LODs range from pmol to nmol. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  11. Electron transfer behaviour of biological macromolecules towards the single-molecule level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingdong; Grubb, Mikala; Hansen, Allan G.; Kuznetsov, Alexander M.; Boisen, Anja; Wackerbarth, Hainer; Ulstrup, Jens

    2003-05-01

    Redox metalloproteins immobilized on metallic surfaces in contact with aqueous biological media are important in many areas of pure and applied sciences. Redox metalloprotein films are currently being addressed by new approaches where biotechnology including modified and synthetic proteins is combined with state-of-the-art physical electrochemistry with emphasis on single-crystal, atomically planar electrode surfaces, in situ scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) and other surface techniques. These approaches have brought bioelectrochemistry important steps forward towards the nanoscale and single-molecule levels. We discuss here these advances with reference to two specific redox metalloproteins, the blue single-copper protein Pseudomonas aeruginosa azurin and the single-haem protein Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cytochrome c, and a short oligonucleotide. Both proteins can be immobilized on Au(111) by chemisorption via exposed sulfur-containing residues. Voltammetric, interfacial capacitance, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and microcantilever sensor data, together with in situ STM with single-molecule resolution, all point to a coherent view of monolayer organization with protein electron transfer (ET) function retained. In situ STM can also address the microscopic mechanisms for electron tunnelling through the biomolecules and offers novel notions such as coherent multi-ET between the substrate and tip via the molecular redox levels. This differs in important respects from electrochemical ET at a single metal/electrolyte interface. Similar data for a short oligonucleotide immobilized on Au(111) show that oligonucleotides can be characterized with comparable detail, with novel perspectives for addressing DNA electronic conduction mechanisms and for biological screening towards the single-molecule level.

  12. Oligo p-Phenylenevinylene Derivatives as Electron Transfer Matrices for UV-MALDI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellanos-García, Laura J; Agudelo, Brian Castro; Rosales, Hernando F; Cely, Melissa; Ochoa-Puentes, Christian; Blanco-Tirado, Cristian; Sierra, Cesar A; Combariza, Marianny Y

    2017-12-01

    Phenylenevinylene oligomers (PVs) have outstanding photophysical characteristics for applications in the growing field of organic electronics. Yet, PVs are also versatile molecules, the optical and physicochemical properties of which can be tuned by manipulation of their structure. We report the synthesis, photophysical, and MS characterization of eight PV derivatives with potential value as electron transfer (ET) matrices for UV-MALDI. UV-vis analysis show the presence of strong characteristic absorption bands in the UV region and molar absorptivities at 355 nm similar or higher than those of traditional proton (CHCA) and ET (DCTB) MALDI matrices. Most of the PVs exhibit non-radiative quantum yields (φ) above 0.5, indicating favorable thermal decay. Ionization potential values (IP) for PVs, calculated by the Electron Propagator Theory (EPT), range from 6.88 to 7.96 eV, making these oligomers good candidates as matrices for ET ionization. LDI analysis of PVs shows only the presence of radical cations (M+.) in positive ion mode and absence of clusters, adducts, or protonated species; in addition, M+. threshold energies for PVs are lower than for DCTB. We also tested the performance of four selected PVs as ET MALDI matrices for analytes ranging from porphyrins and phthalocyanines to polyaromatic compounds. Two of the four PVs show S/N enhancement of 1961% to 304% in comparison to LDI, and laser energy thresholds from 0.17 μJ to 0.47 μJ compared to 0.58 μJ for DCTB. The use of PV matrices also results in lower LODs (low fmol range) whereas LDI LODs range from pmol to nmol. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  13. Negative Electron Transfer Dissociation Sequencing of Increasingly Sulfated Glycosaminoglycan Oligosaccharides on an Orbitrap Mass Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, Franklin E.; Riley, Nicholas M.; Westphall, Michael S.; Coon, Joshua J.; Amster, I. Jonathan

    2017-09-01

    The structural characterization of sulfated glycosaminoglycan (GAG) carbohydrates remains an important target for analytical chemists attributable to challenges introduced by the natural complexity of these mixtures and the defined need for molecular-level details to elucidate biological structure-function relationships. Tandem mass spectrometry has proven to be the most powerful technique for this purpose. Previously, electron detachment dissociation (EDD), in comparison to other methods of ion activation, has been shown to provide the largest number of useful cleavages for de novo sequencing of GAG oligosaccharides, but such experiments are restricted to Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometers (FTICR-MS). Negative electron transfer dissociation (NETD) provides similar fragmentation results, and can be achieved on any mass spectrometry platform that is designed to accommodate ion-ion reactions. Here, we examine for the first time the effectiveness of NETD-Orbitrap mass spectrometry for the structural analysis of GAG oligosaccharides. Compounds ranging in size from tetrasaccharides to decasaccharides were dissociated by NETD, producing both glycosidic and cross-ring cleavages that enabled the location of sulfate modifications. The highly-sulfated, heparin-like synthetic GAG, ArixtraTM, was also successfully sequenced by NETD. In comparison to other efforts to sequence GAG chains without fully ionized sulfate constituents, the occurrence of sulfate loss peaks is minimized by judicious precursor ion selection. The results compare quite favorably to prior results with electron detachment dissociation (EDD). Significantly, the duty cycle of the NETD experiment is sufficiently short to make it an effective tool for on-line separations, presenting a straightforward path for selective, high-throughput analysis of GAG mixtures. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  14. Oligo p-Phenylenevinylene Derivatives as Electron Transfer Matrices for UV-MALDI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellanos-García, Laura J.; Agudelo, Brian Castro; Rosales, Hernando F.; Cely, Melissa; Ochoa-Puentes, Christian; Blanco-Tirado, Cristian; Sierra, Cesar A.; Combariza, Marianny Y.

    2017-09-01

    Phenylenevinylene oligomers (PVs) have outstanding photophysical characteristics for applications in the growing field of organic electronics. Yet, PVs are also versatile molecules, the optical and physicochemical properties of which can be tuned by manipulation of their structure. We report the synthesis, photophysical, and MS characterization of eight PV derivatives with potential value as electron transfer (ET) matrices for UV-MALDI. UV-vis analysis show the presence of strong characteristic absorption bands in the UV region and molar absorptivities at 355 nm similar or higher than those of traditional proton (CHCA) and ET (DCTB) MALDI matrices. Most of the PVs exhibit non-radiative quantum yields (φ) above 0.5, indicating favorable thermal decay. Ionization potential values (IP) for PVs, calculated by the Electron Propagator Theory (EPT), range from 6.88 to 7.96 eV, making these oligomers good candidates as matrices for ET ionization. LDI analysis of PVs shows only the presence of radical cations (M+.) in positive ion mode and absence of clusters, adducts, or protonated species; in addition, M+. threshold energies for PVs are lower than for DCTB. We also tested the performance of four selected PVs as ET MALDI matrices for analytes ranging from porphyrins and phthalocyanines to polyaromatic compounds. Two of the four PVs show S/N enhancement of 1961% to 304% in comparison to LDI, and laser energy thresholds from 0.17 μJ to 0.47 μJ compared to 0.58 μJ for DCTB. The use of PV matrices also results in lower LODs (low fmol range) whereas LDI LODs range from pmol to nmol. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  15. Bond overlap population analysis on through-space electron transfer in [3{sub n}]cyclophanes (n = 2 – 5)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokunaga, Ken, E-mail: tokunaga@cc.kogakuin.ac.jp [Division of Liberal Arts, Kogakuin University, Nakano machi 2665-1, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0015 (Japan); Ohmori, Shigekazu [Venture Business Laboratory, Kyoto University, Yoshida honmachi, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); Kawabata, Hiroshi [Young Researchers Education Center, Hiroshima University, Kagamiyama 1-1-1, Higashi hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8512 (Japan)

    2014-03-03

    Through-space electron transfer between the benzene rings of [3{sub n}]cyclophanes, n = 2 – 5, was investigated using density functional theory calculations, CAM-B3LYP/6-311++G**. An external point charge, q, was placed on the axis perpendicular to a benzene ring of the cyclophane molecule. The dependence of the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO)–lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) gap and bond overlap population (BOP) of cyclophanes on the values of q and n are discussed. The HOMO–LUMO gap generally decreases as q decreases and n increases. It is found from the BOP analysis that electron transfer occurs mainly through LUMO + 2 for n = 2, LUMO for n = 3 and n = 4, and LUMO + 4 for n = 5. The result that the values of the BOP for n = 2 and 5 increase as q decreases means that the through-space electron transfer is enhanced by the negative charge on the neighboring molecule in the solid. - Highlights: • Bond overlap population (BOP) analysis for electron transfer in [3n]cyclophanes. • Specification of the first excited states and orbital component of cyclophanes. • Change of BOP and electron path by external point charge and methylene bridge.

  16. Modeling and computations of the intramolecular electron transfer process in the two-heme protein cytochrome c4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Natzmutdinov, Renat R.; Bronshtein, Michael D.; Zinkicheva, Tamara T.

    2012-01-01

    performed computational modeling of the intramolecular ET process by a combination of density functional theory (DFT) and quantum mechanical charge transfer theory to disclose reasons for this difference. We first address the electronic structures of the model heme core with histidine and methionine axial...... force were determined using dielectric continuum models. We then calculated the electronic transmission coefficient of the intramolecular ET rate using perturbation theory combined with the electronic wave functions determined by the DFT calculations for different heme group orientations and Fe......The di-heme protein Pseudomonas stutzeri cytochrome c4 (cyt c4) has emerged as a useful model for studying long-range protein electron transfer (ET). Recent experimental observations have shown a dramatically different pattern of intramolecular ET between the two heme groups in different local...

  17. Visualizing the non-equilibrium dynamics of photoinduced intramolecular electron transfer with femtosecond X-ray pulses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canton, Sophie E.; Kjær, Kasper S.; Vankó, György

    2015-01-01

    spectroscopy with ultrafast X-ray emission spectroscopy and diffuse X-ray scattering at the SACLA facility to track the non-equilibrated electronic and structural dynamics within a bimetallic donor–acceptor complex that contains an optically dark centre. Exploiting the 100-fold increase in temporal resolution...... as compared with storage ring facilities, these measurements constitute the first X-ray-based visualization of a non-equilibrated intramolecular electron transfer process over large interatomic distances. Experimental and theoretical results establish that mediation through electronically excited molecular...... states is a key mechanistic feature. The present study demonstrates the extensive potential of femtosecond X-ray techniques as diagnostics of non-adiabatic electron transfer processes in synthetic and biological systems, and some directions for future studies, are outlined....

  18. Excess-electron injection and transfer in terthiophene-modified DNA: terthiophene as a photosensitizing electron donor for thymine, cytosine, and adenine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Man Jae; Fujitsuka, Mamoru; Kawai, Kiyohiko; Majima, Tetsuro

    2012-02-13

    Excess-electron transfer (EET) in DNA has attracted wide attention owing to its close relation to DNA repair and nanowires. To clarify the dynamics of EET in DNA, a photosensitizing electron donor that can donate an excess electron to a variety of DNA sequences has to be developed. Herein, a terthiophene (3T) derivative was used as the photosensitizing electron donor. From the dyad systems in which 3T was connected to a single nucleobase, it was revealed that (1) 3T* donates an excess electron efficiently to thymine, cytosine, and adenine, despite adenine being a well-known hole conductor. The free-energy dependence of the electron-transfer rate was explained on the basis of the Marcus theory. From the DNA hairpins, it became clear that (1) 3T* can donate an excess electron not only to the adjacent nucleobase but also to the neighbor one nucleobase further along and so on. From the charge-injection rate, the possibilities of smaller β value and/or charge delocalization were discussed. In addition, EET through consecutive cytosine nucleobases was suggested. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Amphiphilic Four-Helix Bundle Peptides Designed for Light-Induced Electron Transfer Across a Soft Interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye,S.; Discher, B.; Strzalka, J.; Xu, T.; Wu, S.; Noy, D.; Kuzmenko, I.; Gog, T.; Blasie, K.; et al.

    2005-01-01

    A family of four-helix bundle peptides were designed to be amphiphilic, possessing distinct hydrophilic and hydrophobic domains along the length of the bundle's exterior. This facilitates their vectorial insertion across a soft interface between polar and nonpolar media. Their design also now provides for selective incorporation of electron donor and acceptor cofactors within each domain. This allows translation of the designed intramolecular electron transfer along the bundle axis into a macroscopic charge separation across the interface.

  20. Magnetic resonance studies of photo-induced electron transfer reactions. Final report, June 1, 1990--May 31, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Willigen, H.

    1992-11-01

    Fourier Transform Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (FT EPR) is useful in study of photochemical reactions: a microwave pulse rotates the electron spin magnetization vector from z (magnetic field) into xy plane ({pi}/2 pulse); the time evolution of magnetization in xy plane, the free induction decay (FID), is sampled. Fourier transform of FID gives the frequency domain EPR spectrum of the free radicals, and the method is ideal for time-resolved studies of free radicals produced by pulsed-laser excitation. Investigations of electron transfer reactions focused on porphyrin (donor) - quinone (acceptor) systems. First, two hydrogen abstraction reactions were studied with FT EPR: photoreduction of acetone with 2-propanol, yielding the acetone ketyl radical, and the reaction of 2-propanol with t-butoxy radicals. Then, the FT EPR study of benzoquinone or duroquinone anion radicals generated by pulsed-laser induced electron transfer from zinc tetraphenylporphyrin (ZnTPP) or tetrasulfonated Zn(TPP), was carried out in homogeneous solution, micellar solutions, and silica gel. Finally, FT EPR was used to study electron transfer quenching of triplet C{sub 60} by electron donors.

  1. Donor–acceptor graphene-based hybrid materials facilitating photo-induced electron-transfer reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasios Stergiou

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Graphene research and in particular the topic of chemical functionalization of graphene has exploded in the last decade. The main aim is to increase the solubility and thereby enhance the processability of the material, which is otherwise insoluble and inapplicable for technological applications when stacked in the form of graphite. To this end, initially, graphite was oxidized under harsh conditions to yield exfoliated graphene oxide sheets that are soluble in aqueous media and amenable to chemical modifications due to the presence of carboxylic acid groups at the edges of the lattice. However, it was obvious that the high-defect framework of graphene oxide cannot be readily utilized in applications that are governed by charge-transfer processes, for example, in solar cells. Alternatively, exfoliated graphene has been applied toward the realization of some donor–acceptor hybrid materials with photo- and/or electro-active components. The main body of research regarding obtaining donor–acceptor hybrid materials based on graphene to facilitate charge-transfer phenomena, which is reviewed here, concerns the incorporation of porphyrins and phthalocyanines onto graphene sheets. Through illustrative schemes, the preparation and most importantly the photophysical properties of such graphene-based ensembles will be described. Important parameters, such as the generation of the charge-separated state upon photoexcitation of the organic electron donor, the lifetimes of the charge-separation and charge-recombination as well as the incident-photon-to-current efficiency value for some donor–acceptor graphene-based hybrids, will be discussed.

  2. Kinetics and energetics of intramolecular electron transfer in yeast cytochrome c peroxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, P S; Hoffman, B M; Solomon, N; Kang, C H; Margoliash, E

    1984-08-28

    The oxidation of ferric cytochrome c peroxidase by hydrogen peroxide yields a product, compound ES [Yonetani, T., Schleyer, H., Chance, B., & Ehrenberg, A. (1967) in Hemes and Hemoproteins (Chance, B., Estabrook, R. W., & Yonetani, T., Eds.) p 293, Academic Press, New York], containing an oxyferryl heme and a protein free radical [Dolphin, D., Forman, A., Borg, D. C., Fajer, J., & Felton, R. H. (1971) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 68, 614-618]. The same oxidant takes the ferrous form of the enzyme to a stable Fe(IV) peroxidase [Ho, P. S., Hoffman, B. M., Kang, C. H., & Margoliash, E. (1983) J. Biol. Chem. 258, 4356-4363]. It is 1 equiv more highly oxidized than the ferric protein, contains the oxyferryl heme, but leaves the radical site unoxidized. Addition of sodium fluoride to Fe(IV) peroxidase gives a product with an optical spectrum similar to that of the fluoride complex of the ferric enzyme. However, reductive titration and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) data demonstrate that the oxidizing equivalent has not been lost but rather transferred to the radical site. The EPR spectrum for the radical species in the presence of Fe(III) heme is identical with that of compound ES, indicating that the unusual characteristics of the radical EPR signal do not result from coupling to the heme site. By stopped-flow measurements, the oxidizing equivalent transfer process between heme and radical site is first order, with a rate constant of 0.115 s-1 at room temperature, which is independent of either ligand or protein concentration.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Distinct Properties Underlie Flavin-Based Electron Bifurcation in a Novel Electron Transfer Flavoprotein FixAB from Rhodopseudomonas palustris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, Paul W [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Lubner, Carolyn E [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Duan, H. Diessel [University of Kentucky; Tokmina-Lukaszewska, Monika [Montana State University; Gauss, George H. [Montana State University; Bothner, Brian [Montana State University; Peters, John W. [Washington State University; Miller, Anne-Frances [University of Kentucky

    2018-02-09

    A newly-recognized third fundamental mechanism of energy conservation in biology, electron bifurcation, uses free energy from exergonic redox reactions to drive endergonic redox reactions. Flavin-based electron bifurcation furnishes low potential electrons to demanding chemical reactions such as reduction of dinitrogen to ammonia. We employed the heterodimeric flavoenzyme FixAB from the diazotrophic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris to elucidate unique properties that underpin flavin-based electron bifurcation.

  4. A stochastic study of electron transfer kinetics in nano-particulate photocatalysis: a comparison of the quasi-equilibrium approximation with a random walking model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Baoshun; Zhao, Xiujian; Yu, Jiaguo; Fujishima, Akira; Nakata, Kazuya

    2016-11-23

    In the photocatalysis of porous nano-crystalline materials, the transfer of electrons to O 2 plays an important role, which includes the electron transport to photocatalytic active centers and successive interfacial transfer to O 2 . The slowest of them will determine the overall speed of electron transfer in the photocatalysis reaction. Considering the photocatalysis of porous nano-crystalline TiO 2 as an example, although some experimental results have shown that the electron kinetics are limited by the interfacial transfer, we still lack the depth of understanding the microscopic mechanism from a theoretical viewpoint. In the present research, a stochastic quasi-equilibrium (QE) theoretical model and a stochastic random walking (RW) model were established to discuss the electron transport and electron interfacial transfer by taking the electron multi-trapping transport and electron interfacial transfer from the photocatalytic active centers to O 2 into consideration. By carefully investigating the effect of the electron Fermi level (E F ) and the photocatalytic center number on electron transport, we showed that the time taken for an electron to transport to a photocatalytic center predicated by the stochastic RW model was much lower than that predicted by the stochastic QE model, indicating that the electrons cannot reach a QE state during their transport to photocatalytic centers. The stochastic QE model predicted that the electron kinetics of a real photocatalysis for porous nano-crystalline TiO 2 should be limited by electron transport, whereas the stochastic RW model showed that the electron kinetics of a real photocatalysis can be limited by the interfacial transfer. Our simulation results show that the stochastic RW model was more in line with the real electron kinetics that have been observed in experiments, therefore it is concluded that the photoinduced electrons cannot reach a QE state before transferring to O 2 .

  5. ANISOTROPY EFFECTS IN SINGLE-ELECTRON TRANSFER BETWEEN LASER-EXCITED ATOMS AND HIGHLY-CHARGED IONS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Recent collision experiments are reviewed in which one-electron transfer between laser excited target atoms and (highly charged) keV-ions has been studied. Especially results showing a dependence of the charge exchange on the initial target orbital alignment are discussed. The question to what

  6. A simple approach to the solvent reorganisation Gibbs free energy in electron transfer reactions of redox metalloproteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulstrup, Jens

    1999-01-01

    We discuss a simple model for the environmental reorganisation Gibbs free energy, E-r, in electron transfer between a metalloprotein and a small reaction partner. The protein is represented as a dielectric globule with low dielectric constant, the metal centres as conducting spheres, all embedded...

  7. Inner Sphere and Outer Sphere Electron Transfer to Methyl Iodide. Deuterium and 13C Kinetic Isotope Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Torkil; Crossland, Ingolf

    1996-01-01

    Deuterium and 13C kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) have been determined for the conversion of methyl iodide into methyl radical via inner sphere ET (electron transfer) and via outer sphere ET. The alfa-deuterium KIE was found to be very high for in...

  8. Measurement of electron transfer through cytochrome P450 protein on nanopillars and the effect of bound substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jett, John E; Lederman, David; Wollenberg, Lance A; Li, Debin; Flora, Darcy R; Bostick, Christopher D; Tracy, Timothy S; Gannett, Peter M

    2013-03-13

    Electron transfer in cytochrome P450 enzymes is a fundamental process for activity. It is difficult to measure electron transfer in these enzymes because under the conditions typically used they exist in a variety of states. Using nanotechnology-based techniques, gold conducting nanopillars were constructed in an indexed array. The P450 enzyme CYP2C9 was attached to each of these nanopillars, and conductivity measurements made using conducting probe atomic force microscopy under constant force conditions. The conductivity measurements were made on CYP2C9 alone and with bound substrates, a bound substrate-effector pair, and a bound inhibitor. Fitting of the data with the Poole-Frenkel model indicates a correlation between the barrier height for electron transfer and the ease of CYP2C9-mediated metabolism of the bound substrates, though the spin state of iron is not well correlated. The approach described here should have broad application to the measurement of electron transfer in P450 enzymes and other metalloenzymes.

  9. Photoluminescence behavior and photoinduced electron transfer of Ru(bpy){sub 3}{sup 2+} in a poly-siloxane film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohshima, T.; Nagai, K.; Tada, M. [Waseda Univ., Tokyo (Japan); Ishikawa, S. [Ibaraki Univ., Mito (Japan); Kaneko, M. [Riken, Inc., Wako, Saitama (Japan)

    1997-05-01

    Photo-energy conversion is attracting a great deal of attention as one of the candidates to create a renewable energy resource from solar irradiation. In the present paper, the photoluminescence behavior and photoinduced electron transfer of tris(2,2`-bipyridine)ruthenium(II) (Ru(bpy){sub 3}{sup 2+}) in a poly-siloxane film were studied by observing the temperature dependence of the excited-state lifetime of Ru(bpy){sub 3}{sup 2+}; a long lifetime in a poly-siloxane film was attributed to the restricted molecular mobility of Ru(bpy){sub 3}{sup 2+}. Ru(bpy){sub 3}{sup 2+} and phenothiazine (PTZ) were dispersed in a poly-siloxane film, and electron transfer from PTZ to Ru(bpy){sub 3}{sup 2+*} was studied by the reductive quenching of the emission from Ru(bpy){sub 3}{sup 2+*}. The electron-transfer reaction from PTZ to Ru(bpy){sub 3}{sup 2+*} occurred by a static mechanism, and the electron transfer distance was found to be 1.5 nm 18 refs.

  10. Coherence, energy and charge transfers in de-excitation pathways of electronic excited state of biomolecules in photosynthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Henrik; Malik, F. Bary

    2013-01-01

    The observed multiple de-excitation pathways of photo-absorbed electronic excited state in the peridinin–chlorophyll complex, involving both energy and charge transfers among its constituents, are analyzed using the bio-Auger (B-A) theory. It is also shown that the usually used F¨orster–Dexter th...

  11. Met144Ala mutation of the copper-containing nitrite reductase from Alcaligenes xylosoxidans reverses the intramolecular electron transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, Ole; Eady, Robert R; Sawers, Gary

    2004-01-01

    Pulse radiolysis has been employed to investigate the intramolecular electron transfer (ET) between the type 1 (T1) and type 2 (T2) copper sites in the Met144Ala Alcaligenes xylosoxidans nitrite reductase (AxCuNiR) mutant. This mutation increases the reduction potential of the T1 copper center...

  12. Enhancing the Electron Transfer Capacity and Subsequent Color Removal in Bioreactors by Applying Thermophilic Anaerobic Treatment and Redox Mediators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santos, dos A.B.; Traverse, J.; Cervantes, F.J.; Lier, van J.B.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of temperature, hydraulic retention time (HRT) and the redox mediator anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS), on electron transfer and subsequent color removal from textile wastewater was assessed in mesophilic and thermophilic anaerobic bioreactors. The results clearly show that compared

  13. Introducing Students to Inner Sphere Electron Transfer Concepts through Electrochemistry Studies in Diferrocene Mixed-Valence Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura, Karen; Smith, Mark B.; Prat, Jacob R.; Echegoyen, Lourdes E.; Villagran´, Dino

    2017-01-01

    We have designed a 4 h physical chemistry laboratory to introduce upper division students to electrochemistry concepts, including mixed valency and electron transfer (ET), using cyclic and differential pulse voltammetries. In this laboratory practice, students use a ferrocene dimer consisting of two ferrocene centers covalently bonded through a…

  14. Heterogeneous electron transfer and oxygen reduction reaction at nanostructured iron(II) phthalocyanine and its MWCNTs nanocomposites

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mamuru, SA

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available species within the porous layers of MWCNTs. Electron transfer process is much easier at the EPPGE-MWCNT and EPPGE-MWCNT-nanoFePc compared to the other electrodes. The best response for oxygen reduction reaction was at the EPPGE-MWCNTnanoFePc, yielding a 4...

  15. Hydrogen Bond Switching among Flavin and Amino Acids Determines the Nature of Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer in BLUF Photoreceptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mathes, T.; Zhu, J.; van Stokkum, I.H.M.; Groot, M.L.; Hegemann, P.; Kennis, J.T.M.

    2012-01-01

    BLUF domains are flavin-binding photoreceptors that can be reversibly switched from a dark-adapted state to a light-adapted state. Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) from a conserved tyrosine to the flavin that results in a neutral flavin semiquinone/tyrosyl radical pair constitutes the

  16. Kinetic isotope effect of proton-coupled electron transfer in a hydrogen bonded phenol-pyrrolidino[60]fullerene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ravensbergen, J.; Brown, C.L.; Moore, G.F.; Frese, R.N.; van Grondelle, R.; Gust, D.; Moore, T.A.; Moore, A.L.; Kennis, J.T.M.

    2015-01-01

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) plays a central role in photosynthesis and potentially in solar-to-fuel systems. We report a spectroscopy study on a phenol-pyrrolidino[60]fullerene. Quenching of the singlet excited state from 1 ns to 250 ps is assigned to PCET. A H/D exchange study reveals a

  17. Photosensitized electron transfer from sterically hindered amines to the benzophenone triplet and its reversion in solvents of different polarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluge, T.; Brede, O.

    1998-06-01

    The reductive quenching of the benzophenone triplet by 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl- and 1,2,2,6,6-pentamethyl-piperidine was studied by laser flash photolysis. The rate constants for the quenching process were obtained in solvents of different polarity, acetonitrile, methanol, acetone, n-butanol, t-butanol, butyl chloride, chloroform, 1,4-dioxane, cyclohexane and benzene. The contact ion pair primarily formed, decays by proton transfer under the formation of the benzophenone ketyl radical, back electron transfer and charge separation. In our experiments no indication for the free solvated anion radical was found. The ketyl radical yields vary with solvent polarity, showing a minimum for the solvent butyl chloride. We explain this behaviour in terms of the solvent dependence of the back electron transfer process. Rate constants were determined for all reactions studied.

  18. Kinetics and energetics of electron transfer in reaction centers of the photosynthetic bacterium Roseiflexus castenholzii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Aaron M; Kirmaier, Christine; Holten, Dewey; Blankenship, Robert E

    2011-03-01

    The kinetics and thermodynamics of the photochemical reactions of the purified reaction center (RC)-cytochrome (Cyt) complex from the chlorosome-lacking, filamentous anoxygenic phototroph, Roseiflexus castenholzii are presented. The RC consists of L- and M-polypeptides containing three bacteriochlorophyll (BChl), three bacteriopheophytin (BPh) and two quinones (Q(A) and Q(B)), and the Cyt is a tetraheme subunit. Two of the BChls form a dimer P that is the primary electron donor. At 285K, the lifetimes of the excited singlet state, P*, and the charge-separated state P(+)H(A)(-) (where H(A) is the photoactive BPh) were found to be 3.2±0.3 ps and 200±20 ps, respectively. Overall charge separation P*→→ P(+)Q(A)(-) occurred with ≥90% yield at 285K. At 77K, the P* lifetime was somewhat shorter and the P(+)H(A)(-) lifetime was essentially unchanged. Poteniometric titrations gave a P(865)/P(865)(+) midpoint potential of +390mV vs. SHE. For the tetraheme Cyt two distinct midpoint potentials of +85 and +265mV were measured, likely reflecting a pair of low-potential hemes and a pair of high-potential hemes, respectively. The time course of electron transfer from reduced Cyt to P(+) suggests an arrangement where the highest potential heme is not located immediately adjacent to P. Comparisons of these and other properties of isolated Roseiflexus castenholzii RCs to those from its close relative Chloroflexus aurantiacus and to RCs from the purple bacteria are made. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Elucidating energy and electron transfer dynamics within molecular assemblies for solar energy conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morseth, Zachary Aaron

    The use of sunlight to make chemical fuels (i.e. solar fuels) is an attractive approach in the quest to develop sustainable energy sources. Using nature as a guide, assemblies for artificial photosynthesis will need to perform multiple functions. They will need to be able to harvest light across a broad region of the solar spectrum, transport excited-state energy to charge-separation sites, and then transport and store redox equivalents for use in the catalytic reactions that produce chemical fuels. This multifunctional behavior will require the assimilation of multiple components into a single macromolecular system. A wide variety of different architectures including porphyrin arrays, peptides, dendrimers, and polymers have been explored, with each design posing unique challenges. Polymer assemblies are attractive due to their relative ease of production and facile synthetic modification. However, their disordered nature gives rise to stochastic dynamics not present in more ordered assemblies. The rational design of assemblies requires a detailed understanding of the energy and electron transfer events that follow light absorption, which can occur on timescales ranging from femtoseconds to hundreds of microseconds, necessitating the use of sophisticated techniques. We have used a combination of time-resolved absorption and emission spectroscopies with observation times that span nine orders of magnitude to follow the excited-state evolution within single-site and polymer-based molecular assemblies. We complement experimental observations with electronic structure calculations, molecular dynamics simulations, and kinetic modeling to develop a microscopic view of these dynamics. This thesis provides an overview of work on single-site molecular assemblies and polymers decorated with pendant chromophores, both in solution and on surfaces. This work was made possible through extensive collaboration with Dr. Kirk Schanze's and Dr. John Reynolds' research groups who

  20. How safe is bisphenol A? Fundamentals of toxicity: metabolism, electron transfer and oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacic, Peter

    2010-07-01

    The FDA recently announced concern about the safety of bisphenol A (BPA) and the need for more research. In the current controversy, scant attention is being paid to toxicity at the fundamental, molecular level, which is the topic of this report. Important information is provided by extensive studies on metabolism. The principal pathway is detoxification, mainly by conjugation leading to a glucuronide. A minor route entails oxidation by hydroxylation to a catechol followed by further transformation to an o-quinone. The catechol-o-quinone couple is capable of redox cycling with generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative stress (OS). o-Quinones are highly electron affinic with very favorable reduction potentials that permit electron transfer (ET) under physiological conditions. Only small amounts are sufficient to generate large quantities of ROS catalytically. There is extensive evidence for production of ROS, which buttresses ET by o-quinone as a plausible source. In addition, there are numerous reports on toxicity to body constituents by BPA. Those adversely affected include the liver, DNA, genes, CNS, reproductive system and kidney. Since a plethora of prior studies links ROS-OS with toxicity, it is reasonable to propose a similar connection for BPA. Cell signaling also plays a role. There are various other factors involved with toxic responses, including age, with the fetus and infants being the most vulnerable. A report concludes that human exposure to BPA is not negligible. The present overview represents a novel, integrated approach to BPA toxicity. A similar article was recently published in this journal which deals with toxicity of prevalent phthalate plasticizers. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.