WorldWideScience

Sample records for electron optics model

  1. Electron optics

    CERN Document Server

    Grivet, Pierre; Bertein, F; Castaing, R; Gauzit, M; Septier, Albert L

    1972-01-01

    Electron Optics, Second English Edition, Part I: Optics is a 10-chapter book that begins by elucidating the fundamental features and basic techniques of electron optics, as well as the distribution of potential and field in electrostatic lenses. This book then explains the field distribution in magnetic lenses; the optical properties of electrostatic and magnetic lenses; and the similarities and differences between glass optics and electron optics. Subsequent chapters focus on lens defects; some electrostatic lenses and triode guns; and magnetic lens models. The strong focusing lenses and pris

  2. Electron Correlation Models for Optical Activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Höhn, E. G.; O. E. Weigang, Jr.

    1968-01-01

    A two-system no-overlap model for rotatory strength is developed for electric-dipole forbidden as well as allowed transitions. General equations which allow for full utilization of symmetry in the chromophore and in the environment are obtained. The electron correlation terms are developed in full...

  3. Optical-potential model for electron-atom scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callaway, J.; Oza, D.H.

    1985-01-01

    It is proposed that the addition of a matrix optical potential to a close-coupling calculation should lead to improved results in studies of electron-atom scattering. This procedure is described with use of a pseudostate expansion to evaluate the optical potential. The integro-differential equations are solved by a linear-algebraic method. As a test case, applications are made to electron-hydrogen scattering, and the results are compared with those obtained by other calculational procedures, and with experiment

  4. Modeling a Miniaturized Scanning Electron Microscope Focusing Column - Lessons Learned in Electron Optics Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loyd, Jody; Gregory, Don; Gaskin, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    This presentation discusses work done to assess the design of a focusing column in a miniaturized Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) developed at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) for use in-situ on the Moon-in particular for mineralogical analysis. The MSFC beam column design uses purely electrostatic fields for focusing, because of the severe constraints on mass and electrical power consumption imposed by the goals of lunar exploration and of spaceflight in general. The resolution of an SEM ultimately depends on the size of the focused spot of the scanning beam probe, for which the stated goal here is a diameter of 10 nanometers. Optical aberrations are the main challenge to this performance goal, because they blur the ideal geometrical optical image of the electron source, effectively widening the ideal spot size of the beam probe. In the present work the optical aberrations of the mini SEM focusing column were assessed using direct tracing of non-paraxial rays, as opposed to mathematical estimates of aberrations based on paraxial ray-traces. The geometrical ray-tracing employed here is completely analogous to ray-tracing as conventionally understood in the realm of photon optics, with the major difference being that in electron optics the lens is simply a smoothly varying electric field in vacuum, formed by precisely machined electrodes. Ray-tracing in this context, therefore, relies upon a model of the electrostatic field inside the focusing column to provide the mathematical description of the "lens" being traced. This work relied fundamentally on the boundary element method (BEM) for this electric field model. In carrying out this research the authors discovered that higher accuracy in the field model was essential if aberrations were to be reliably assessed using direct ray-tracing. This led to some work in testing alternative techniques for modeling the electrostatic field. Ultimately, the necessary accuracy was attained using a BEM

  5. Optical electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Yariv, Amnon

    1991-01-01

    This classic text introduces engineering students to the first principles of major phenomena and devices of optoelectronics and optical communication technology. Yariv's "first principles" approach employs real-life examples and extensive problems. The text includes separate chapters on quantum well and semiconductor lasers, as well as phase conjugation and its applications. Optical fiber amplification, signal and noise considerations in optical fiber systems, laser arrays and distributed feedback lasers all are covered extensively in major sections within chapters.

  6. Optical model theory of elastic electron- and positron-atom scattering at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joachain, C.J.

    1977-01-01

    It is stated that the basic idea of the optical model theory is to enable analysis of the elastic scattering of a particle from a complex target by replacing the complicated interactions between the beam and the target by an optical potential, or pseudopotential, in which the incident particle moves. Once the optical potential is determined the original many-body elastic scattering problem reduces to a one-body situation. The resulting optical potential is, however, a very complicated operator, and the formal expressions obtained from first principles for the optical potential can only be evaluated approximately in a few simple cases, such as high energy elastic hadron-nucleus scattering, for the the optical potential can be expressed in terms of two-body hadron-nucleon amplitudes, and the non-relativistic elastic scattering of fast charged particles by atoms. The elastic scattering of an electron or positron by a neutral atom at intermediate energies is here considered. Exchange effects between the projectile and the atomic electrons are considered; also absorption and polarisation effects. Applications of the full-wave optical model have so far only been made to the elastic scattering of fast electrons and positrons by atomic H, He, Ne, and Ar. Agreements of the optical model results with absolute measurements of differential cross sections for electron scattering are very good, an agreement that improves as the energy increases, but deteriorates quickly as the incident energy becomes lower than 50 eV for atomic H or 100 eV for He. For more complex atoms the optical model calculations also appear very encouraging. With regard to positron-atom elastic scattering the optical model results for positron-He scattering differ markedly at small angles from the corresponding electron-He values. It would be interesting to have experimental angular distributions of positron-atom elastic scattering in order to check predictions of the optical model theory. (U.K.)

  7. Optical modeling of induction-linac driven free-electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scharlemann, E.T.; Fawley, W.M.

    1986-01-01

    The free-electron laser (FEL) simulation code FRED, developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) primarily to model single-pass FEL amplifiers driven by induction linear accelerators, is described. The main emphasis is on the modeling of optical propagation in the laser and on the differences between the requirements for modeling rf-linac-driven vs. induction-linac-driven FELs. Examples of optical guiding and mode cleanup are presented for a 50 μm FEL

  8. Optical modeling of plasma-deposited ZnO films: Electron scattering at different length scales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knoops, Harm C. M.; Loo, Bas W. H. van de; Smit, Sjoerd; Ponomarev, Mikhail V.; Weber, Jan-Willem; Sharma, Kashish; Kessels, Wilhelmus M. M.; Creatore, Mariadriana

    2015-01-01

    In this work, an optical modeling study on electron scattering mechanisms in plasma-deposited ZnO layers is presented. Because various applications of ZnO films pose a limit on the electron carrier density due to its effect on the film transmittance, higher electron mobility values are generally preferred instead. Hence, insights into the electron scattering contributions affecting the carrier mobility are required. In optical models, the Drude oscillator is adopted to represent the free-electron contribution and the obtained optical mobility can be then correlated with the macroscopic material properties. However, the influence of scattering phenomena on the optical mobility depends on the considered range of photon energy. For example, the grain-boundary scattering is generally not probed by means of optical measurements and the ionized-impurity scattering contribution decreases toward higher photon energies. To understand this frequency dependence and quantify contributions from different scattering phenomena to the mobility, several case studies were analyzed in this work by means of spectroscopic ellipsometry and Fourier transform infrared (IR) spectroscopy. The obtained electrical parameters were compared to the results inferred by Hall measurements. For intrinsic ZnO (i-ZnO), the in-grain mobility was obtained by fitting reflection data with a normal Drude model in the IR range. For Al-doped ZnO (Al:ZnO), besides a normal Drude fit in the IR range, an Extended Drude fit in the UV-vis range could be used to obtain the in-grain mobility. Scattering mechanisms for a thickness series of Al:ZnO films were discerned using the more intuitive parameter “scattering frequency” instead of the parameter “mobility”. The interaction distance concept was introduced to give a physical interpretation to the frequency dependence of the scattering frequency. This physical interpretation furthermore allows the prediction of which Drude models can be used in a specific

  9. Calculation of inelastic mean free path and stopping power for electrons in solids from an optical-data model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez-Varea, J.M.; Mayol, R.; Salvat, F.; Liljequist, D.

    1992-11-01

    The numerical calculation of electron inelastic mean free path and stopping power from an optical-data model recently proposed by Fernandez-Varea et al. is described in detail. Explicit expressions for the one-electron total cross sections of the two-modes model of the free-electron gas and the δ-oscillator are derived. The inelastic mean free path and the stopping power are obtained as integrals of these one-electron total cross sections weighted by the optical as integrals of these one-electron total cross sections weighted by the optical oscillator strength. The integrals can be easily evaluated, with a selected accuracy, by using the FORTRAN 77 subroutine GABQ described here, which implements a 20-points Gauss adaptive bipartition quadrature method. Source listings of FORTRAN 77 subroutines to compute the one-electron total cross sections are also given

  10. Increased-accuracy numerical modeling of electron-optical systems with space-charge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sveshnikov, V.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a method for improving the accuracy of space-charge computation for electron-optical systems. The method proposes to divide the computational region into two parts: a near-cathode region in which analytical solutions are used and a basic one in which numerical methods compute the field distribution and trace electron ray paths. A numerical method is used for calculating the potential along the interface, which involves solving a non-linear equation. Preliminary results illustrating the improvement of accuracy and the convergence of the method for a simple test example are presented.

  11. Cross sections and oscillator strengths for electron-impact excitation of electronic states in polyatomic molecules. Application examples of the BEf- scaling model in optically-allowed transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, H.; Kawahara, H.; Hoshino, M.

    2009-12-01

    Integral cross sections for optically allowed electronic-state excitations by electron impact, are reviewed for polyatomic molecules by applying the Binary-Encounter-Bethe (BEB) scaling model. Following the context of the present review, the scaling model originally proposed by Yong-Ki Kim to determine electron-impact cross sections for ionization of atoms and molecules is also summarized briefly for its wide range of applications [Electron-Impact Cross Section Database, NIST, Y.-K. Kim]. The present report not only focuses on the need for the cross-section data, but also elucidates the verification of the scaling model in the general application for atoms and molecules. Since this report is for a data base, it is summarized for data base users by citing (copying) the descriptions in the original papers and the references within those papers in the style of a textbook. (author)

  12. PREVAIL: latest electron optics results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, Hans C.; Golladay, Steven D.; Gordon, Michael S.; Kendall, Rodney A.; Lieberman, Jon E.; Rockrohr, James D.; Stickel, Werner; Yamaguchi, Takeshi; Okamoto, Kazuya; Umemoto, Takaaki; Shimizu, Hiroyasu; Kojima, Shinichi; Hamashima, Muneki

    2002-07-01

    The PREVAIL electron optics subsystem developed by IBM has been installed at Nikon's facility in Kumagaya, Japan, for integration into the Nikon commercial EPL stepper. The cornerstone of the electron optics design is the Curvilinear Variable Axis Lens (CVAL) technique originally demonstrated with a proof of concept system. This paper presents the latest experimental results obtained with the electron optical subsystem at Nikon's facility. The results include micrographs illustrating proper CVAL operation through the spatial resolution achieved over the entire optical field of view. They also include data on the most critical issue of the EPL exposure approach: subfield stitching. The methodology of distortion correction will be described and both micrographs and metrology data of stitched subfields will be presented. This paper represents a progress report of the IBM/Nikon alliance activity on EPL.

  13. Electron quantum optics as quantum signal processing

    OpenAIRE

    Roussel, B.; Cabart, C.; Fève, G.; Thibierge, E.; Degiovanni, P.

    2016-01-01

    The recent developments of electron quantum optics in quantum Hall edge channels have given us new ways to probe the behavior of electrons in quantum conductors. It has brought new quantities called electronic coherences under the spotlight. In this paper, we explore the relations between electron quantum optics and signal processing through a global review of the various methods for accessing single- and two-electron coherences in electron quantum optics. We interpret electron quantum optics...

  14. Optimising electron microscopy experiment through electron optics simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubo, Y. [CEMES-CNRS, 29 Rue Jeanne Marvig, 31055 Toulouse France (France); Hitachi High-Technologies Corporation, 882, Ichige, Hitachinaka, Ibaraki 312-8504 (Japan); Gatel, C.; Snoeck, E. [CEMES-CNRS, 29 Rue Jeanne Marvig, 31055 Toulouse France (France); Houdellier, F., E-mail: florent.houdellier@cemes.fr [CEMES-CNRS, 29 Rue Jeanne Marvig, 31055 Toulouse France (France)

    2017-04-15

    We developed a new type of electron trajectories simulation inside a complete model of a modern transmission electron microscope (TEM). Our model incorporates the precise and real design of each element constituting a TEM, i.e. the field emission (FE) cathode, the extraction optic and acceleration stages of a 300 kV cold field emission gun, the illumination lenses, the objective lens, the intermediate and projection lenses. Full trajectories can be computed using magnetically saturated or non-saturated round lenses, magnetic deflectors and even non-cylindrical symmetry elements like electrostatic biprism. This multi-scale model gathers nanometer size components (FE tip) with parts of meter length (illumination and projection systems). We demonstrate that non-trivial TEM experiments requiring specific and complex optical configurations can be simulated and optimized prior to any experiment using such model. We show that all the currents set in all optical elements of the simulated column can be implemented in the real column (I2TEM in CEMES) and used as starting alignment for the requested experiment. We argue that the combination of such complete electron trajectory simulations in the whole TEM column with automatic optimization of the microscope parameters for optimal experimental data (images, diffraction, spectra) allows drastically simplifying the implementation of complex experiments in TEM and will facilitate the development of advanced use of the electron microscope in the near future. - Highlights: • Using dedicated electron optics software, we calculate full electrons trajectories inside a modern transmission electron microscope. • We have determined how to deal with multi-scale electron optics elements like high voltage cold field emission source. • W • e have succeed to model both weak and strong magnetic lenses whether in saturated or unsaturated conditions as well as electrostatic biprism and magnetic deflectors. • We have applied this model

  15. Optimising electron microscopy experiment through electron optics simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubo, Y.; Gatel, C.; Snoeck, E.; Houdellier, F.

    2017-01-01

    We developed a new type of electron trajectories simulation inside a complete model of a modern transmission electron microscope (TEM). Our model incorporates the precise and real design of each element constituting a TEM, i.e. the field emission (FE) cathode, the extraction optic and acceleration stages of a 300 kV cold field emission gun, the illumination lenses, the objective lens, the intermediate and projection lenses. Full trajectories can be computed using magnetically saturated or non-saturated round lenses, magnetic deflectors and even non-cylindrical symmetry elements like electrostatic biprism. This multi-scale model gathers nanometer size components (FE tip) with parts of meter length (illumination and projection systems). We demonstrate that non-trivial TEM experiments requiring specific and complex optical configurations can be simulated and optimized prior to any experiment using such model. We show that all the currents set in all optical elements of the simulated column can be implemented in the real column (I2TEM in CEMES) and used as starting alignment for the requested experiment. We argue that the combination of such complete electron trajectory simulations in the whole TEM column with automatic optimization of the microscope parameters for optimal experimental data (images, diffraction, spectra) allows drastically simplifying the implementation of complex experiments in TEM and will facilitate the development of advanced use of the electron microscope in the near future. - Highlights: • Using dedicated electron optics software, we calculate full electrons trajectories inside a modern transmission electron microscope. • We have determined how to deal with multi-scale electron optics elements like high voltage cold field emission source. • W • e have succeed to model both weak and strong magnetic lenses whether in saturated or unsaturated conditions as well as electrostatic biprism and magnetic deflectors. • We have applied this model

  16. Investigation of the shape of the imaginary part of the optical-model potential for electron scattering by rare gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staszewska, G.; Schwenke, D.W.; Truhlar, D.G.

    1984-01-01

    We present a comparative study of several empirical and nonempirical models for the absorption potential, which is the imaginary part of an optical-model potential, for electron scattering by rare gases. We show that the elastic differential cross section is most sensitive to the absorption potential for high-impact energy and large scattering angles. We compare differential cross sections calculated by several models for the absorption potential and by several arbitrary modifications of these model potentials. We are able to associate the effect of the absorption potential on the elastic differential cross section with its form at small electron-atom distances r, and we are able to deduce various qualitative features that the absorption potential must possess at small and large r in order to predict both accurate differential cross sections and accurate absorption cross sections. Based on these observations, the Pauli blocking conditions of the quasifree scattering model for the absorption potential are modified empirically, thus producing a more accurate model that may be applied to other systems; e.g., electron-molecule scattering, with no adjustable parameters

  17. All-Optical Electron Injector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umstadter, Donald

    2002-04-01

    Conventional electron acceleration at a place like SLAC needs miles to boost particles up to 50 GeV energies by feeding microwaves into a succession of cavities. In recent years we have been developing alternative acceleration concepts, based on lasers focused into plasmas, that might someday do the job in a much smaller space without the use of cavities. Our near term goal is to produce a first stage accelerator that outputs electron beams with lower energy but with properties that are more suitable for x-ray sources, such as those based on Compton scattering or the proposed linear synchrotrons at SLAC and DESY. In the plasma wakefield approach, for example, a terawatt laser beam is focused onto a gas jet, ionizing it and driving plasma waves that move at relativistic speeds. If timed just right, electrons in the plasma can surf the plasma waves to high speeds, as high as 100 MeV in the space of only a millimeter. NanoCoulombs of charge have been accelerated in well-collimated beams (1-degree divergence angle). One problem with this concept is the mismatch between the electron source (sometimes an external photocathode, sometimes an uncontrolled cloud of electrons from the plasma itself) and the incoming laser pulse. We will be reporting methods for generating electrons in a controllable way, namely the use of a pair of crossed laser beams which position, heat, and synchronize the insertion of electrons into the plasma wave. We show that this "all-optical injection" increases the number and energy of energetic electrons as compared with use of only one laser beam. It has been shown theoretically that this approach can ultimately be used to reduce the electron energy spread to a few percent. Besides potential applications to particle physics and x-ray lasers, high gradient acceleration schemes are also expected to benefit the production of medical radioisotopes and the ignition of thermonuclear fusion reactions.

  18. Development of nonperturbative nonlinear optics models including effects of high order nonlinearities and of free electron plasma: Maxwell–Schrödinger equations coupled with evolution equations for polarization effects, and the SFA-like nonlinear optics model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorin, E; Bandrauk, A D; Lytova, M; Memarian, A

    2015-01-01

    This paper is dedicated to the exploration of non-conventional nonlinear optics models for intense and short electromagnetic fields propagating in a gas. When an intense field interacts with a gas, usual nonlinear optics models, such as cubic nonlinear Maxwell, wave and Schrödinger equations, derived by perturbation theory may become inaccurate or even irrelevant. As a consequence, and to include in particular the effect of free electrons generated by laser–molecule interaction, several heuristic models, such as UPPE, HOKE models, etc, coupled with Drude-like models [1, 2], were derived. The goal of this paper is to present alternative approaches based on non-heuristic principles. This work is in particular motivated by the on-going debate in the filamentation community, about the effect of high order nonlinearities versus plasma effects due to free electrons, in pulse defocusing occurring in laser filaments [3–9]. The motivation of our work goes beyond filamentation modeling, and is more generally related to the interaction of any external intense and (short) pulse with a gas. In this paper, two different strategies are developed. The first one is based on the derivation of an evolution equation on the polarization, in order to determine the response of the medium (polarization) subject to a short and intense electromagnetic field. Then, we derive a combined semi-heuristic model, based on Lewenstein’s strong field approximation model and the usual perturbative modeling in nonlinear optics. The proposed model allows for inclusion of high order nonlinearities as well as free electron plasma effects. (paper)

  19. Electronic tunneling currents at optical frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faris, S. M.; Fan, B.; Gustafson, T. K.

    1975-01-01

    Rectification characteristics of nonsuperconducting metal-barrier-metal junctions as deduced from electronic tunneling theory have been observed experimentally for optical frequency irradiation of the junction.

  20. SLC polarized beam source electron optics design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eppley, K.R.; Lavine, T.L.; Early, R.A.; Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.; Miller, R.H.; Schultz, D.C.; Spencer, C.M.; Yeremian, A.D.

    1991-05-01

    This paper describes the design of the beam-line from the polarized electron gun to the linac injector in the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC). The polarized electron source is a GaAs photocathode, requiring 10 -11 -Torr-range pressure for adequate quantum efficiency and longevity. The photocathode is illuminated by 3-nsec-long laser pulses. The quality of the optics for the 160-kV beam is crucial since electron-stimulated gas desorption from beam loss in excess of 0.1% of the 20-nC pulses may poison the photocathode. Our design for the transport line consists of a differential pumping region isolated by a pair of valves. Focusing is provided by a pair of Helmholtz coils and by several iron-encased solenoidal lenses. Our optics design is based on beam transport simulations using 2 1/2-D particle-in-cell codes to model the gun and to solve the fully-relativistic time-dependent equations of motion in three dimensions for electrons in the presence of azimuthally symmetric electromagnetic fields. 6 refs., 6 figs

  1. Theory of optical spectra of solvated electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kestner, N.R.

    1975-01-01

    During the last few years better theoretical models of solvated electron have been developed. These models allow one to calculate a priori the observable properties of the trapped electron. One of the most important and most widely determined properties is the optical spectrum. In this paper we consider the predictions of the theories not only as to the band maximum but line shape and width. In addition we will review how the theories predict these will depend on the solvent, pressure, temperature, and solvent density. In all cases extensive comparisons will be made with experimental work. In addition four new areas will be explored and recent results will be presented. These concern electrons in dense polar gases, the time development of the solvated electron spectrum, solvated electrons in mixed solvents, and photoelectron emission spectra (PEE) as it relates to higher excited states. This paper will review all recent theoretical calculations and present a critical review of the present status and future developments which are anticipated. The best theories are quite successful in predicting trends, and qualitative agreement concerning band maximum. The theory is still weak in predicting line shape and line width

  2. Optical conductivity calculation of a k.p model semiconductor GaAs incorporating first-order electron-hole vertex correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurhuda, Maryam; Aziz Majidi, Muhammad

    2018-04-01

    The role of excitons in semiconducting materials carries potential applications. Experimental results show that excitonic signals also appear in optical absorption spectra of semiconductor system with narrow gap, such as Gallium Arsenide (GaAs). While on the theoretical side, calculation of optical spectra based purely on Density Functional Theory (DFT) without taking electron-hole (e-h) interactions into account does not lead to the appearance of any excitonic signal. Meanwhile, existing DFT-based algorithms that include a full vertex correction through Bethe-Salpeter equation may reveal an excitonic signal, but the algorithm has not provided a way to analyze the excitonic signal further. Motivated to provide a way to isolate the excitonic effect in the optical response theoretically, we develop a method of calculation for the optical conductivity of a narrow band-gap semiconductor GaAs within the 8-band k.p model that includes electron-hole interactions through first-order electron-hole vertex correction. Our calculation confirms that the first-order e-h vertex correction reveals excitonic signal around 1.5 eV (the band gap edge), consistent with the experimental data.

  3. First principles and Debye model study of the thermodynamic, electronic and optical properties of MgO under high-temperature and pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Yurun; Li, Huayang; Wang, Hongjuan; He, Kaihua; Wang, Qingbo

    2018-02-01

    First principles and quasi-harmonic Debye model have been used to study the thermodynamic properties, enthalpies, electronic and optical properties of MgO up to the core-mantle boundary (CMB) condition (137 GPa and 3700 K). Thermodynamic properties calculation includes thermal expansion coefficient and capacity, which have been studied up to the CMB pressure (137 GPa) and temperature (3700 K) by the Debye model with generalized gradient approximation (GGA) and local-density approximation (LDA). First principles with hybrid functional method (PBE0) has been used to calculate the electronic and optical properties under pressure up to 137 GPa and 0 K. Our results show the Debye model with LDA and first principles with PBE0 can provide accurate thermodynamic properties, enthalpies, electronic and optical properties. Calculated enthalpies show that MgO keep NaCl (B1) structure up to 137 GPa. And MgO is a direct bandgap insulator with a 7.23 eV calculated bandgap. The bandgap increased with increasing pressure, which will induce a blue shift of optical properties. We also calculated the density of states (DOS) and discussed the relation between DOS and band, optical properties. Equations were used to fit the relations between pressure and bandgaps, absorption coefficient (α(ω)) of MgO. The equations can be used to evaluate pressure after careful calibration. Our calculations can not only be used to identify some geological processes, but also offer a reference to the applications of MgO in the future.

  4. Electron quantum optics in ballistic chiral conductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bocquillon, Erwann; Freulon, Vincent; Parmentier, Francois D.; Berroir, Jean-Marc; Placais, Bernard; Feve, Gwendal [Laboratoire Pierre Aigrain, Ecole Normale Superieure, CNRS (UMR 8551), Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Universite Paris Diderot, Paris (France); Wahl, Claire; Rech, Jerome; Jonckheere, Thibaut; Martin, Thierry [Aix Marseille Universite, CNRS, CPT, UMR 7332, Marseille (France); Universite de Toulon, CNRS, CPT, UMR 7332, La Garde (France); Grenier, Charles; Ferraro, Dario; Degiovanni, Pascal [Universite de Lyon, Federation de Physique Andre Marie Ampere, CNRS - Laboratoire de Physique de l' Ecole Normale Superieure de Lyon, Lyon (France)

    2014-01-15

    The edge channels of the quantum Hall effect provide one dimensional chiral and ballistic wires along which electrons can be guided in an optics-like setup. Electronic propagation can then be analyzed using concepts and tools derived from optics. After a brief review of electron optics experiments performed using stationary current sources which continuously emit electrons in the conductor, this paper focuses on triggered sources, which can generate on-demand a single particle state. It first outlines the electron optics formalism and its analogies and differences with photon optics and then turns to the presentation of single electron emitters and their characterization through the measurements of the average electrical current and its correlations. This is followed by a discussion of electron quantum optics experiments in the Hanbury-Brown and Twiss geometry where two-particle interferences occur. Finally, Coulomb interactions effects and their influence on single electron states are considered. (copyright 2013 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  5. Electron quantum optics in ballistic chiral conductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bocquillon, Erwann; Freulon, Vincent; Parmentier, Francois D.; Berroir, Jean-Marc; Placais, Bernard; Feve, Gwendal; Wahl, Claire; Rech, Jerome; Jonckheere, Thibaut; Martin, Thierry; Grenier, Charles; Ferraro, Dario; Degiovanni, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    The edge channels of the quantum Hall effect provide one dimensional chiral and ballistic wires along which electrons can be guided in an optics-like setup. Electronic propagation can then be analyzed using concepts and tools derived from optics. After a brief review of electron optics experiments performed using stationary current sources which continuously emit electrons in the conductor, this paper focuses on triggered sources, which can generate on-demand a single particle state. It first outlines the electron optics formalism and its analogies and differences with photon optics and then turns to the presentation of single electron emitters and their characterization through the measurements of the average electrical current and its correlations. This is followed by a discussion of electron quantum optics experiments in the Hanbury-Brown and Twiss geometry where two-particle interferences occur. Finally, Coulomb interactions effects and their influence on single electron states are considered. (copyright 2013 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  6. Comparison of optical and electron spectra in an infra-red free electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacLeod, A.M.; Gillespie, W.A.; Martin, P.F. [Univ. of Abertay, Dundee (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    Time-resolved electron and optical spectra recently acquired at the FELIX facility are presented, showing the evolution of the respective macropulses. A comparison is made between the optical power output during the macropulse and the measured power extracted from the electron beam using a simple model of the cavity losses. Data are available for a wide range of operating conditions: the wavelength range is from 9 {mu}m to 28 {mu}m and detuning are between 1/4{lambda} and 2{lambda}. The effect of rapid electron beam energy changes on the optical and electron spectra will also be discussed.

  7. Electronic and optical properties of lead iodide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahuja, R.; Arwin, H.; Ferreira da Silva, A.

    2002-01-01

    The electronic properties and the optical absorption of lead iodide (PbI2) have been investigated experimentally by means of optical absorption and spectroscopic ellipsometry, and theoretically by a full-potential linear muffin-tin-orbital method. PbI2 has been recognized as a very promising...

  8. Optical electronics self-organized integration and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Yoshimura, Tetsuzo

    2012-01-01

    IntroductionFrom Electronics to Optical ElectronicsAnalysis Tools for Optical CircuitsSelf-Organized Optical Waveguides: Theoretical AnalysisSelf-Organized Optical Waveguides: Experimental DemonstrationsOptical Waveguide Films with Vertical Mirrors 3-D Optical Circuits with Stacked Waveguide Films Heterogeneous Thin-Film Device IntegrationOptical Switches OE Hardware Built by Optical ElectronicsIntegrated Solar Energy Conversion SystemsFuture Challenges.

  9. Determination of Non-Maxwellian Electron Energy Distributions in Low-Pressure Plasmas by Using the Optical Emission Spectroscopy and a Collisional-Radiative Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Ximing; Pu Yikang

    2011-01-01

    A Maxwellian electron energy distribution function (EEDF) is often assumed when using the optical emission line-ratio method to determine the electron temperature in low-temperature plasmas. However, in many cases, non-Maxwellian EEDFs can be formed due to the non-local electron heating or the inelastic-collisional energy loss processes. In this work, with a collisional-radiative model, we propose an approach to obtain the non-Maxwellian EEDF with a 'two-temperature structure' from the emission line-ratios of Paschen 2p levels of argon and krypton atoms. For applications of this approach in reactive gas (CF 4 , O 2 , etc) discharges that contain argon and krypton, recommendations of some specific emission line-ratios are provided, according to their sensitivities to the EEDF variation. The kinetic processes of the relevant excited atoms are also discussed in detail. (cai awardee's article)

  10. Electron cascades in sensors for optical detection of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    London, Richard A.; Lowry, Mark E.; Vernon, Stephen P.; Stewart, Richard E.

    2013-01-01

    A new class of high-speed detectors, called RadOptic detectors, measures ionizing radiation incident on a transparent semiconductor by sensing changes in the refractive index with an optical probe beam. We describe the role of radiation-initiated electron cascades in setting the sensitivity and the spatial and temporal resolution of RadOptic detectors. We model electron cascades with both analytical and Monte Carlo computational methods. We find that the timescale for the development of an electron cascade is less than of order 100 fs and is not expected to affect the time response of a detector. The characteristic size of the electron cloud is typically less than 2 μm, enabling high spatial resolution in imaging systems. The electron-hole pair density created by single x-rays is much smaller than the saturation density and, therefore, single events should not saturate the detector

  11. Optics of Electron Beam in the Recycler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burov, A.; Kroc, T.; Lebedev, V.; Nagaitsev, S.; Prost, L.; Pruss, S.; Shemyakin, A.; Sutherland, M.; Warner, A.; Kazakevich, G.; Tiunov, M.

    2006-01-01

    Electron cooling of 8.9 GeV/c antiprotons in the Recycler ring (Fermilab) requires high current and good quality of the DC electron beam. Electron trajectories of ∼0.2 A or higher DC electron beam have to be parallel in the cooling section, within ∼ 0.2 mrad, making the beam envelope cylindrical. These requirements yielded a specific scheme of the electron transport from a gun to the cooling section, with electrostatic acceleration and deceleration in the Pelletron. Recuperation of the DC beam limits beam losses at as tiny level as ∼0.001%, setting strict requirements on the return electron line to the Pelletron and a collector. To smooth the beam envelope in the cooling section, it has to be linear and known at the transport start. Also, strength of the relevant optic elements has to be measured with good accuracy. Beam-based optic measurements are being carried out and analysed to get this information. They include beam simulations in the Pelletron, differential optic (beam response) measurements and simulation, beam profile measurements with optical transition radiation, envelope measurements and analysis with orifice scrapers. Current results for the first half-year of commissioning are presented. Although electron cooling is already routinely used for pbar stacking, its efficiency is expected to be improved

  12. Results from Coupled Optical and Electrical Sentaurus TCAD Models of a Gallium Phosphide on Silicon Electron Carrier Selective Contact Solar Cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Limpert, Steven; Ghosh, Kunal; Wagner, Hannes; Bowden, Stuart; Honsberg, Christiana; Goodnick, Stephen; Bremner, Stephen; Green, Martin

    2014-06-09

    We report results from coupled optical and electrical Sentaurus TCAD models of a gallium phosphide (GaP) on silicon electron carrier selective contact (CSC) solar cell. Detailed analyses of current and voltage performance are presented for devices having substrate thicknesses of 10 μm, 50 μm, 100 μm and 150 μm, and with GaP/Si interfacial quality ranging from very poor to excellent. Ultimate potential performance was investigated using optical absorption profiles consistent with light trapping schemes of random pyramids with attached and detached rear reflector, and planar with an attached rear reflector. Results indicate Auger-limited open-circuit voltages up to 787 mV and efficiencies up to 26.7% may be possible for front-contacted devices.

  13. Electronic structure of the amorphous oxide semiconductor a-InGaZnO4-x: Tauc-Lorentz optical model and origins of subgap states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamiya, Toshio; Nomura, Kenji; Hosono, Hideo

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses an optical model and subgap electronic states for a representative amorphous oxide semiconductor, InGaZnO 4 (a-IGZO). Parameterized optical models were developed based on the Tauc-Lorentz model combined with a Lorentz-type oscillator. The measured optical absorption spectra exhibit nearly linear dependences on photon energy (E) between 3 eV 0,TL ) being around 4 eV. The optimized parameters for the fixed E 0,TL of 3.7 eV are provided for four different a-IGZO films with root-mean-square errors less than 1%. Formation energies of crystalline IGZO, stoichiometric a-IGZO, oxygen deficient a-IGZO and their constituent oxides were calculated by the density functional theory using the local density approximation (LDA) and generalized gradient approximation with PBE96 functionals (PBE). PBE gives larger unit cell volumes at the ground states and better agreement in the formation energies than LDA does. The formation energies of an oxygen deficiency in a-IGZO were calculated to be 3.2-3.5 eV. The calculated electronic structures of stoichiometric a-IGZO models exhibit somewhat large dispersions for conduction bands (CB), which are not largely affected by the disordered structure in a-IGZO, while the dispersions of the valence bands (VBs) are very small, unlike the crystalline IGZO, showing that a-IGZO have strongly localized states at the VB maximums (VBMs). Oxygen-deficient a-IGZO models showed that oxygen deficiencies form both a deep localized state at 0.4-1 eV above VBM and a shallow donor state depending on local atomic configurations. An oxygen deficiency that forms a deep state breaks the dispersion of the CB, which could be an origin of the subgap states observed near CB. (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  14. Kaxiras’s Porphyrin: DFT Modeling of Redox-Tuned Optical and Electronic Properties in a Theoretically Designed Catechol-Based Bioinspired Platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlando Crescenzi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available A detailed computational investigation of the 5,6-dihydroxyindole (DHI-based porphyrin-type tetramer first described by Kaxiras as a theoretical structural model for eumelanin biopolymers is reported herein, with a view to predicting the technological potential of this unique bioinspired tetracatechol system. All possible tautomers/conformers, as well as alternative protonation states, were explored for the species at various degrees of oxidation and all structures were geometry optimized at the density functional theory (DFT level. Comparison of energy levels for each oxidized species indicated a marked instability of most oxidation states except the six-electron level, and an unexpected resilience to disproportionation of the one-electron oxidation free radical species. Changes in the highest energy occupied molecular orbital (HOMO–lowest energy unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO gaps with oxidation state and tautomerism were determined along with the main electronic transitions: more or less intense absorption in the visible region is predicted for most oxidized species. Data indicated that the peculiar symmetry of the oxygenation pattern pertaining to the four catechol/quinone/quinone methide moieties, in concert with the NH centers, fine-tunes the optical and electronic properties of the porphyrin system. For several oxidation levels, conjugated systems extending over two or more indole units play a major role in determining the preferred tautomeric state: thus, the highest stability of the six-electron oxidation state reflects porphyrin-type aromaticity. These results provide new clues for the design of innovative bioinspired optoelectronic materials.

  15. Optical Conductivity in a Two-Dimensional Extended Hubbard Model for an Organic Dirac Electron System α-(BEDT-TTF2I3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daigo Ohki

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The optical conductivity in the charge order phase is calculated in the two-dimensional extended Hubbard model describing an organic Dirac electron system α -(BEDT-TTF 2 I 3 using the mean field theory and the Nakano-Kubo formula. Because the interband excitation is characteristic in a two-dimensional Dirac electron system, a peak structure is found above the charge order gap. It is shown that the peak structure originates from the Van Hove singularities of the conduction and valence bands, where those singularities are located at a saddle point between two Dirac cones in momentum space. The frequency of the peak structure exhibits drastic change in the vicinity of the charge order transition.

  16. Electron-optical phonon coupling in superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rietschel, H.

    1975-01-01

    The role of the optical phonons in superconductivity is investigated in the case of compounds with different atomic masses Msub(k). It is shown that the electron mass enhancement factor lambda is independent of Msub(k) if the force constant matrix is mass independent. However, when using lambda to calculate Tsub(c), it must be decomposed into its acoustical and optical contributions, which depend separately on Msub(k). Interference scattering from a light and a heavy mass is studied and its contributions to lambda within the free electron approximation. Numerical results are presented for a rocksalt structure crystal with nearest and next nearest neighbour coupling. These results indicate that the optical phonon contributions to lambda may substantially increase Tsub(c). (orig.) [de

  17. Electron-optical systems for Mott polarimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fishkova, T.Ya.; Mamaev, Yu.A.; Ovsyannikova, I.P.; Petrov, V.N.; Shpak, E.V.

    1994-01-01

    Electron-optical systems, forming polarized electron beams from solid and gaseous sources at a Mott detector with operating potentials of 20 and 50 kV, have been theoretically investigated. The integral EOS creates a beam <2.6 nm in diameter at the target of the Mott detector for secondary electrons with energies of 1-20 eV and exit angles of 0 -60 . The differential EOS provides an energy resolution of 2-6% within the range of 3-2000 eV, the illumination being 5-13% for a 4π angle; at the target of the Mott detector it creates a beam of 1-6 mm in diameter. Both systems have been constructed at the laboratory of Spin-polarized Electron Spectroscopy (Department of Experimental Physics) at St. Petersburg State Technical University. ((orig.))

  18. Study of optical and electronic properties of nickel from reflection electron energy loss spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, H.; Yang, L. H.; Da, B.; Tóth, J.; Tőkési, K.; Ding, Z. J.

    2017-09-01

    We use the classical Monte Carlo transport model of electrons moving near the surface and inside solids to reproduce the measured reflection electron energy-loss spectroscopy (REELS) spectra. With the combination of the classical transport model and the Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling of oscillator parameters the so-called reverse Monte Carlo (RMC) method was developed, and used to obtain optical constants of Ni in this work. A systematic study of the electronic and optical properties of Ni has been performed in an energy loss range of 0-200 eV from the measured REELS spectra at primary energies of 1000 eV, 2000 eV and 3000 eV. The reliability of our method was tested by comparing our results with the previous data. Moreover, the accuracy of our optical data has been confirmed by applying oscillator strength-sum rule and perfect-screening-sum rule.

  19. Models of optical quantum computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krovi Hari

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available I review some work on models of quantum computing, optical implementations of these models, as well as the associated computational power. In particular, we discuss the circuit model and cluster state implementations using quantum optics with various encodings such as dual rail encoding, Gottesman-Kitaev-Preskill encoding, and coherent state encoding. Then we discuss intermediate models of optical computing such as boson sampling and its variants. Finally, we review some recent work in optical implementations of adiabatic quantum computing and analog optical computing. We also provide a brief description of the relevant aspects from complexity theory needed to understand the results surveyed.

  20. Modeling of semiconductor optical amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørk, Jesper; Bischoff, Svend; Berg, Tommy Winther

    We discuss the modelling of semiconductor optical amplifiers with emphasis on their high-speed properties. Applications in linear amplification as well as ultrafast optical signal processing are reviewed. Finally, the possible role of quantum-dot based optical amplifiers is discussed.......We discuss the modelling of semiconductor optical amplifiers with emphasis on their high-speed properties. Applications in linear amplification as well as ultrafast optical signal processing are reviewed. Finally, the possible role of quantum-dot based optical amplifiers is discussed....

  1. Electron optics with ballistic graphene junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shaowen

    Electrons transmitted across a ballistic semiconductor junction undergo refraction, analogous to light rays across an optical boundary. A pn junction theoretically provides the equivalent of a negative index medium, enabling novel electron optics such as negative refraction and perfect (Veselago) lensing. In graphene, the linear dispersion and zero-gap bandstructure admit highly transparent pn junctions by simple electrostatic gating, which cannot be achieved in conventional semiconductors. Robust demonstration of these effects, however, has not been forthcoming. Here we employ transverse magnetic focusing to probe propagation across an electrostatically defined graphene junction. We find perfect agreement with the predicted Snell's law for electrons, including observation of both positive and negative refraction. Resonant transmission across the pn junction provides a direct measurement of the angle dependent transmission coefficient, and we demonstrate good agreement with theory. Comparing experimental data with simulation reveals the crucial role played by the effective junction width, providing guidance for future device design. Efforts toward sharper pn junction and possibility of zero field Veselago lensing will also be discussed. This work is supported by the Semiconductor Research Corporations NRI Center for Institute for Nanoelectronics Discovery and Exploration (INDEX).

  2. Hybrid electronic/optical synchronized chaos communication system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toomey, J P; Kane, D M; Davidović, A; Huntington, E H

    2009-04-27

    A hybrid electronic/optical system for synchronizing a chaotic receiver to a chaotic transmitter has been demonstrated. The chaotic signal is generated electronically and injected, in addition to a constant bias current, to a semiconductor laser to produce an optical carrier for transmission. The optical chaotic carrier is photodetected to regenerate an electronic signal for synchronization in a matched electronic receiver The system has been successfully used for the transmission and recovery of a chaos masked message that is added to the chaotic optical carrier. Past demonstrations of synchronized chaos based, secure communication systems have used either an electronic chaotic carrier or an optical chaotic carrier (such as the chaotic output of various nonlinear laser systems). This is the first electronic/optical hybrid system to be demonstrated. We call this generation of a chaotic optical carrier by electronic injection.

  3. Organic structures design applications in optical and electronic devices

    CERN Document Server

    Chow, Tahsin J

    2014-01-01

    ""Presenting an overview of the syntheses and properties of organic molecules and their applications in optical and electronic devices, this book covers aspects concerning theoretical modeling for electron transfer, solution-processed micro- and nanomaterials, donor-acceptor cyclophanes, molecular motors, organogels, polyazaacenes, fluorogenic sensors based on calix[4]arenes, and organic light-emitting diodes. The publication of this book is timely because these topics have become very popular nowadays. The book is definitely an excellent reference for scientists working in these a

  4. Electron optical characteristics of a concave electrostatic electron mirror for a scanning electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamarat, R.T.; Witzani, J.; Hoerl, E.M.

    1984-08-01

    Numerical computer calculations are used to explore the design characteristics of a concave electrostatic electron mirror for a mirror attachment for a conventional scanning electron microscope or an instrument designed totally as a scanning electron mirror microscope. The electron paths of a number of set-ups are calculated and drawn graphically in order to find the optimum shape and dimensions of the mirror geometry. This optimum configuration turns out to be the transition configuration between two cases of electron path deflection, towards the optical axis of the system and away from it. (Author)

  5. Particles and waves in electron optics and microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Pozzi, Giulio

    2016-01-01

    Advances in Imaging and Electron Physics merges two long-running serials, Advances in Electronics and Electron Physics and Advances in Optical and Electron Microscopy. The series features extended articles on the physics of electron devices (especially semiconductor devices), particle optics at high and low energies, microlithography, image science, digital image processing, electromagnetic wave propagation, electron microscopy, and the computing methods used in all these domains. * Contains contributions from leading authorities on the subject matter* Informs and updates all the latest developments in the field of imaging and electron physics* Provides practitioners interested in microscopy, optics, image processing, mathematical morphology, electromagnetic fields, electron, and ion emission with a valuable resource* Features extended articles on the physics of electron devices (especially semiconductor devices), particle optics at high and low energies, microlithography, image science, and digital image pro...

  6. Numerical simulation methods for electron and ion optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munro, Eric

    2011-01-01

    This paper summarizes currently used techniques for simulation and computer-aided design in electron and ion beam optics. Topics covered include: field computation, methods for computing optical properties (including Paraxial Rays and Aberration Integrals, Differential Algebra and Direct Ray Tracing), simulation of Coulomb interactions, space charge effects in electron and ion sources, tolerancing, wave optical simulations and optimization. Simulation examples are presented for multipole aberration correctors, Wien filter monochromators, imaging energy filters, magnetic prisms, general curved axis systems and electron mirrors.

  7. Tl{sub 4}CdI{sub 6} – Wide band gap semiconductor: First principles modelling of the structural, electronic, optical and elastic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piasecki, M., E-mail: m.piasecki@ajd.czest.pl [Institute of Physics, Jan Dlugosz University, Armii Krajowej 13/15, 42-200 Czestochowa (Poland); Brik, M.G. [College of Sciences, Chongqing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Chongqing 400065 (China); Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, Ravila 14C, Tartu 50411 (Estonia); Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotników 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Kityk, I.V. [Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Czestochowa University of Technology, Armii Krajowej 17, 42-200 Czestochowa (Poland)

    2015-08-01

    A novel infrared optoelectronic material Tl{sub 4}CdI{sub 6} was studied using the density functional theory (DFT)-based techniques. Its structural, electronic, optical and elastic properties were all calculated in the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) with the Perdew–Burke–Ernzerhof (PBE) and the local density approximation (LDA) with the Ceperley-Alder–Perdew-Zunger (CA–PZ) functionals. The studied material is a direct band gap semiconductor with the calculated band gaps of 2.043 eV (GGA) and 1.627 eV (LDA). The wavelength dependence of the refractive index was fitted to the Sellmeier equation in the spectral range from 400 to 2000 nm. Good agreement between the GGA-calculated values of refractive index and experimental data was achieved. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first consistent theoretical description of the title compound, which includes calculations and analysis of the structural, electronic, optical and elastic properties. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Infrared optoelectronic material Tl{sub 4}CdI{sub 6} was studied using ab initio methods. • Structural, electronic, optical and elastic properties were calculated. • Independent components of the elastic constants tensor were calculated. • Good agreement with available experimental results was achieved.

  8. Tl4CdI6 – Wide band gap semiconductor: First principles modelling of the structural, electronic, optical and elastic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piasecki, M.; Brik, M.G.; Kityk, I.V.

    2015-01-01

    A novel infrared optoelectronic material Tl 4 CdI 6 was studied using the density functional theory (DFT)-based techniques. Its structural, electronic, optical and elastic properties were all calculated in the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) with the Perdew–Burke–Ernzerhof (PBE) and the local density approximation (LDA) with the Ceperley-Alder–Perdew-Zunger (CA–PZ) functionals. The studied material is a direct band gap semiconductor with the calculated band gaps of 2.043 eV (GGA) and 1.627 eV (LDA). The wavelength dependence of the refractive index was fitted to the Sellmeier equation in the spectral range from 400 to 2000 nm. Good agreement between the GGA-calculated values of refractive index and experimental data was achieved. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first consistent theoretical description of the title compound, which includes calculations and analysis of the structural, electronic, optical and elastic properties. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Infrared optoelectronic material Tl 4 CdI 6 was studied using ab initio methods. • Structural, electronic, optical and elastic properties were calculated. • Independent components of the elastic constants tensor were calculated. • Good agreement with available experimental results was achieved

  9. The optical model in atomic physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarthy, I.E.

    1978-01-01

    The optical model for electron scattering on atoms has quite a short history in comparison with nuclear physics. The main reason for this is that there were insufficient data. Angular distribution for elastic and some inelastic scattering have now been measured for the atoms which exist in gaseous form at reasonable temperatures, inert gases, hydrogen, alkalies and mercury being the main ones out in. The author shows that the optical model makes sense in atomic physics by considering its theory and recent history. (orig./AH) [de

  10. The theoretical study of the optical klystron free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Zhenhua

    2001-01-01

    The work of the theoretical study and numerical simulation of optical klystron free electron laser is supported by National 863 Research Development Program and National Science Foundation of China. The object of studying UV band free electron laser (FEL) is to understand the physical law of optical klystron FEL and to gain experience for design. A three-dimensional code OPFEL are made and it is approved that the code is correct completely. The magnetic field of the optical klystron, the energy modulation of the electron beam, the density modulation of the electron beam, spontaneous emission of the electron beam in optical klystron, the harmonic super-radiation of the electron beam, and the effects of the undulator magnetic field error on modulation of the electron beam energy are simulated. These results are useful for the future experiments

  11. Nonlinear optics with coherent free electron lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bencivenga, F.; Capotondi, F.; Mincigrucci, R.; Cucini, R.; Manfredda, M.; Pedersoli, E.; Principi, E.; Simoncig, A.; Masciovecchio, C.

    2016-12-01

    We interpreted the recent construction of free electron laser (FELs) facilities worldwide as an unprecedented opportunity to bring concepts and methods from the scientific community working with optical lasers into the domain of x-ray science. This motivated our efforts towards the realization of FEL-based wave-mixing applications. In this article we present new extreme ultraviolet transient grating (X-TG) data from vitreous SiO2, collected using two crossed FEL pulses (photon frequency 38 eV) to generate the X-TG and a phase matched optical probing pulse (photon frequency 3.1 eV). This experiment extends our previous investigation, which was carried out on a nominally identical sample using a different FEL photon frequency (45 eV) to excite the X-TG. The present data are featured by a peak intensity of the X-TG signal substantially larger than that previously reported and by slower modulations of the X-TG signal at positive delays. These differences could be ascribed to the different FEL photon energy used in the two experiments or to differences in the sample properties. A systematic X-TG study on the same sample as a function of the FEL wavelength is needed to draw a consistent conclusion. We also discuss how the advances in the performance of the FELs, in terms of generation of fully coherent photon pulses and multi-color FEL emission, may push the development of original experimental strategies to study matter at the femtosecond-nanometer time-length scales, with the unique option of element and chemical state specificity. This would allow the development of advanced experimental tools based on wave-mixing processes, which may have a tremendous impact in the study of a large array of phenomena, ranging from nano-dynamics in complex materials to charge and energy transfer processes.

  12. Optical polarimeter based on Fourier analysis and electronic control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilardy, J; Salas, V.; Torres, C.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we show the design and implementation of an optical polarimeter using electronic control and the Fourier analysis. The polarimeter prototype will be used as a main tool for the students of the Universidad Popular del Cesar that belong to the following university programs: Electronics engineering (optoelectronics area), Math and Physics degree and the Master in Physics Sciences, in order to learning the theory and experimental aspects of the state of optical polarization via the Stokes vector measurement. Using the electronic polarimeter proposed in this paper, the students will be able to observe (in an optical bench) and understand the different interactions of the states of optical polarization when the optical waves pass through to the polarizers and retarder waves plates. The electronic polarimeter has a software that captures the optical intensity measurement and evaluates the Stokes vector. (Author)

  13. Nonlinear fiber optics formerly quantum electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Agrawal, Govind

    1995-01-01

    The field of nonlinear fiber optics has grown substantially since the First Edition of Nonlinear Fiber Optics, published in 1989. Like the First Edition, this Second Edition is a comprehensive, tutorial, and up-to-date account of nonlinear optical phenomena in fiber optics. It synthesizes widely scattered research material and presents it in an accessible manner for students and researchers already engaged in or wishing to enter the field of nonlinear fiber optics. Particular attention is paid to the importance of nonlinear effects in the design of optical fiber communication systems. This is

  14. Deuteron microscopic optical model potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Hairui; Han Yinlu; Shen Qingbiao; Xu Yongli

    2010-01-01

    A deuteron microscopic optical model potential is obtained by the Green function method through nuclear-matter approximation and local-density approximation based on the effective Skyrme interaction. The microscopic optical model potential is used to calculate the deuteron reaction cross sections and the elastic scattering angular distributions for some target nuclei in the mass range 6≤A≤208 with incident deuteron energies up to 200 MeV. The calculated results are compared with the experimental data.

  15. Structural, electronic and optical properties of carbon nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, M L [California Univ., Berkeley (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1996-05-01

    Carbon nitride was proposed as a superhard material and a structural prototype, {beta}-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}, was examined using several theoretical models. Some reports claiming experimental verifications have been made recently. The current status of the theory and experiment is reviewed, and a detailed discussion is presented of calculations of the electronic and optical properties of this material. These calculations predict that {beta}-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} will have a minimum gap which is indirect at 6.4{+-}0.5 eV. A discussion of the possibility of carbon nitride nanotubes is also presented. (orig.)

  16. Integrated optical transceiver with electronically controlled optical beamsteering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davids, Paul; DeRose, Christopher; Tauke-Pedretti, Anna

    2017-08-22

    A beam-steering optical transceiver is provided. The transceiver includes one or more modules, each comprising an antenna chip and a control chip bonded to the antenna chip. Each antenna chip has a feeder waveguide, a plurality of row waveguides that tap off from the feeder waveguide, and a plurality of metallic nanoantenna elements arranged in a two-dimensional array of rows and columns such that each row overlies one of the row waveguides. Each antenna chip also includes a plurality of independently addressable thermo-optical phase shifters, each configured to produce a thermo-optical phase shift in a respective row. Each antenna chip also has, for each row, a row-wise heating circuit configured to produce a respective thermo-optic phase shift at each nanoantenna element along its row. The control chip includes controllable current sources for the independently addressable thermo-optical phase shifters and the row-wise heating circuits.

  17. FDTD method and models in optical education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xiaogang; Wan, Nan; Weng, Lingdong; Zhu, Hao; Du, Jihe

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method has been proposed as a pedagogical way in optical education. Meanwhile, FDTD solutions, a simulation software based on the FDTD algorithm, has been presented as a new tool which helps abecedarians to build optical models and to analyze optical problems. The core of FDTD algorithm is that the time-dependent Maxwell's equations are discretized to the space and time partial derivatives, and then, to simulate the response of the interaction between the electronic pulse and the ideal conductor or semiconductor. Because the solving of electromagnetic field is in time domain, the memory usage is reduced and the simulation consequence on broadband can be obtained easily. Thus, promoting FDTD algorithm in optical education is available and efficient. FDTD enables us to design, analyze and test modern passive and nonlinear photonic components (such as bio-particles, nanoparticle and so on) for wave propagation, scattering, reflection, diffraction, polarization and nonlinear phenomena. The different FDTD models can help teachers and students solve almost all of the optical problems in optical education. Additionally, the GUI of FDTD solutions is so friendly to abecedarians that learners can master it quickly.

  18. PREVAIL-EPL alpha tool electron optics subsystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, Hans C.; Dhaliwal, Rajinder S.; Golladay, Steven D.; Doran, Samuel K.; Gordon, Michael S.; Kendall, Rodney A.; Lieberman, Jon E.; Pinckney, David J.; Quickle, Robert J.; Robinson, Christopher F.; Rockrohr, James D.; Stickel, Werner; Tressler, Eileen V.

    2001-08-01

    The IBM/Nikon alliance is continuing pursuit of an EPL stepper alpha tool based on the PREVAIL technology. This paper provides a status report of the alliance activity with particular focus on the Electron Optical Subsystem developed at IBM. We have previously reported on design features of the PREVAIL alpha system. The new state-of-the-art e-beam lithography concepts have since been reduced to practice and turned into functional building blocks of a production level lithography tool. The electron optical alpha tool subsystem has been designed, build, assembled and tested at IBM's Semiconductor Research and Development Center (SRDC) in East Fishkill, New York. After demonstrating subsystem functionality, the electron optical column and all associated control electronics hardware and software have been shipped during January 2001 to Nikon's facility in Kumagaya, Japan, for integration into the Nikon commercial e-beam stepper alpha tool. Early pre-shipment results obtained with this electron optical subsystem are presented.

  19. Geometrical model for the electron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Sherbini, T.M.

    1985-07-01

    A model for an electron of finite dimensions is proposed. This model disregards the concept of electronic charge and leads to Bohr's frequency formula for the hydrogen atom and to Maxwell's equations for electromagnetic fields. The stability of a free electron under the action of centrifugal and transverse forces is discussed. (author)

  20. Modifying the electronic and optical properties of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinder, Jesse M.

    The intrinsic electronic and optical properties of carbon nanotubes make them promising candidates for circuit elements and LEDs in nanoscale devices. However, applied fields and interactions with the environment can modify these intrinsic properties. This dissertation is a theoretical study of perturbations to an ideal carbon nanotube. It illustrates how transport and optical properties of carbon nanotubes can be adversely affected or intentionally modified by the local environment. The dissertation is divided into three parts. Part I analyzes the effect of a transverse electric field on the single-electron energy spectrum of semiconducting carbon nanotubes. Part II analyzes the effect of the local environment on selection rules and decay pathways relevant to dark excitons. Part III is a series of 26 appendices. Two different models for a transverse electric field are introduced in Part I. The first is a uniform field perpendicular to the nanotube axis. This model suggests the field has little effect on the band gap until it exceeds a critical value that can be tuned with strain or a magnetic field. The second model is a transverse field localized to a small region along the nanotube axis. The field creates a pair of exponentially localized bound states but has no effect on the band gap for particle transport. Part II explores the physics of dark excitons in carbon nanotubes. Two model calculations illustrate the effect of the local environment on allowed optical transitions and nonradiative recombination pathways. The first model illustrates the role of inversion symmetry in the optical spectrum. Broken inversion symmetry may explain low-lying peaks in the exciton spectrum of boron nitride nanotubes and localized photoemission around impurities and interfaces in carbon nanotubes. The second model in Part II suggests that free charge carriers can mediate an efficient nonradiative decay process for dark excitons in carbon nanotubes. The appendices in Part III

  1. Spectroscopic ellipsometric modeling of a Bi–Te–Se write layer of an optical data storage device as guided by atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hao; Madaan, Nitesh; Bagley, Jacob; Diwan, Anubhav [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602 (United States); Liu, Yiqun [Department of Chemistry, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA 18015 (United States); Davis, Robert C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602 (United States); Lunt, Barry M. [Department of Information Technology, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602 (United States); Smith, Stacey J., E-mail: ssmith@chem.byu.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602 (United States); Linford, Matthew R., E-mail: mrlinford@chem.byu.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602 (United States)

    2014-10-31

    Conventional magnetic tape is the most widely used medium for archival data storage. However, data stored on it need to be migrated every ca. 5 years. Recently, optical discs that store information for hundreds, or even more than 1000 years, have been introduced to the market. We recently proposed that technology in these optical discs be used to make an optical tape that would show greater permanence than its magnetic counterpart. Here we provide a detailed optical characterization of a sputtered thin film of bismuth, tellurium, and selenium (BTS) that is a proposed data storage layer for these devices. The methodology described herein should be useful in the future development of related materials. Spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) data are obtained using interference enhancement, and the modeling of this data is guided by results from atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray reflectivity (XRR). By AFM, ca. 40 nm BTS films show ca. 10 nm roughness. SEM images also suggest considerable roughness in the films and indicate that they are composed of 13.1 ± 5.9 nm grains. XRD confirms that the films are crystalline and predicts a grain size of 17 ± 2 nm. XRD results are consistent with the composition of the films — a mildly oxidized BTS material. Three models of increasing complexity are investigated to explain the SE data. The first model consists of a smooth, homogeneous BTS film. The second model adds a roughness layer to the previous model. The third model also has two layers. The bottom layer is modeled as a mixture of BTS and void using a Bruggeman effective medium approximation. The upper layer is similarly modeled, but with a gradient. The first model was unable to adequately model the SE data. The second model was an improvement — lower MSE (4.4) and good agreement with step height measurements. The third model was even better — very low MSE (2.6) and good agreement with AFM results. The

  2. Density functional study of : Electronic and optical properties

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K C Bhamu

    3Department of Physics, Swami Keshvanand Insitute of Technology, Management and Gramothan, ... Published online 20 June 2017. Abstract. This paper focusses on the electronic and optical properties of scandium-based silver delafossite.

  3. Electron Optics for Biologists: Physical Origins of Spherical Aberrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geissler, Peter; Zadunaisky, Jose

    1974-01-01

    Reports on the physical origins of spherical aberrations in axially symmetric electrostatic lenses to convey the essentials of electon optics to those who must think critically about the resolution of the electron microscope. (GS)

  4. First-principle calculations of structural, electronic, optical, elastic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S CHEDDADI

    2017-11-28

    Nov 28, 2017 ... First-principle calculations on the structural, electronic, optical, elastic and thermal properties of the chalcopyrite ... The Kohn–Sham equations were solved using the ... RMTKmax = 7 was used for all the investigated systems,.

  5. Electronic structure and optical properties of solid C60

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattesini, M.; Ahuja, R.; Sa, L.; Hugosson, H.W.; Johansson, B.; Eriksson, O.

    2009-01-01

    The electronic structure and the optical properties of face-centered-cubic C 60 have been investigated by using an all-electron full-potential method. Our ab initio results show that the imaginary dielectric function for high-energy values looks very similar to that of graphite, revealing close electronic structure similarities between the two systems. We have also identified the origin of different peaks in the dielectric function of fullerene by means of the calculated electronic density of states. The computed optical spectrum compares fairly well with the available experimental data for the Vis-UV absorption spectrum of solid C 60 .

  6. DNA Diagnostics: Optical or by Electronics?

    KAUST Repository

    Khan, Hadayat Ullah; Knoll, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we very briefly review DNA biosensors based on optical and electrical detection principles, referring mainly to our past work applying both techniques but here using nearly identical sensor chip surface architectures, i.e., capture

  7. Anomalous optical and electronic properties of dense sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Dafang; Liu Hanyu; Wang Baotian; Shi Hongliang; Zhu Shaoping; Yan Jun; Zhang Ping

    2010-01-01

    Based on the density functional theory, we systematically study the optical and electronic properties of the insulating dense sodium phase (Na-hp4) reported recently (Ma et al., 2009). The structure is found optically anisotropic. Through Bader analysis, we conclude that ionicity exists in the structure and becomes stronger with increasing pressure.

  8. Electronic and optical properties of Fe, Pd, and Ti studied by reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tahir, Dahlang; Kraaer, Jens; Tougaard, Sven

    2014-01-01

    We have studied the electronic and optical properties of Fe, Pd, and Ti by reflection electron energy-loss spectroscopy (REELS). REELS spectra recorded for primary energies in the range from 300 eV to 10 keV were corrected for multiple inelastically scattered electrons to determine the effective inelastic-scattering cross section. The dielectric functions and optical properties were determined by comparing the experimental inelastic-electron scattering cross section with a simulated cross section calculated within the semi-classical dielectric response model in which the only input is Im(−1/ε) by using the QUEELS-ε(k,ω)-REELS software package. The complex dielectric functions ε(k,ω), in the 0–100 eV energy range, for Fe, Pd, and Ti were determined from the derived Im(−1/ε) by Kramers-Kronig transformation and then the refractive index n and extinction coefficient k. The validity of the applied model was previously tested and found to give consistent results when applied to REELS spectra at energies between 300 and 1000 eV taken at widely different experimental geometries. In the present paper, we provide, for the first time, a further test on its validity and find that the model also gives consistent results when applied to REELS spectra in the full range of primary electron energies from 300 eV to 10000 eV. This gives confidence in the validity of the applied method.

  9. Collision models in quantum optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciccarello, Francesco

    2017-12-01

    Quantum collision models (CMs) provide advantageous case studies for investigating major issues in open quantum systems theory, and especially quantum non-Markovianity. After reviewing their general definition and distinctive features, we illustrate the emergence of a CM in a familiar quantum optics scenario. This task is carried out by highlighting the close connection between the well-known input-output formalism and CMs. Within this quantum optics framework, usual assumptions in the CMs' literature - such as considering a bath of noninteracting yet initially correlated ancillas - have a clear physical origin.

  10. Optical and magneto-optical properties of the electron-doped and hole-doped C{sub 82} crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rostampour, E., E-mail: el_rostampour@yahoo.com [Plasma Physics Research Center, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Koohi, A. [Plasma Physics and Nuclear Fusion Research School, Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, AEOI, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-01-15

    The optical and magnetic properties of the doped C{sub 82} crystal have been investigated by Su–Schrieffer–Heeger (SSH) model, which is based on the Ewald method. When the C{sub 82} molecule is doped with one electron (or hole), a single electron is remained in the energy level that affects the optical and magnetic properties of the C{sub 82} crystal. The lattice and electronic structures of C{sub 82} changed with doping electron (or hole) in the molecule of C{sub 82}. Therefore, polarons are predicted in doped fullerenes. The obtained results showed that the dielectric tensor of the C{sub 82} crystal increased with doping electron (or hole) in the molecule of C{sub 82}. The spectral shapes of the dielectric tensor, circular dichroism and birefringence coefficient of the C{sub 82} crystal turn out to be determined mainly by the geometrical distributions of the pentagons in the fullerene structures.

  11. Optical Biosensors: A Revolution Towards Quantum Nanoscale Electronics Device Fabrication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Dey

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The dimension of biomolecules is of few nanometers, so the biomolecular devices ought to be of that range so a better understanding about the performance of the electronic biomolecular devices can be obtained at nanoscale. Development of optical biomolecular device is a new move towards revolution of nano-bioelectronics. Optical biosensor is one of such nano-biomolecular devices that has a potential to pave a new dimension of research and device fabrication in the field of optical and biomedical fields. This paper is a very small report about optical biosensor and its development and importance in various fields.

  12. Ultrafast electron diffraction studies of optically excited thin bismuth films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajkovic, Ivan

    2008-01-01

    This thesis contains work on the design and the realization of an experimental setup capable of providing sub-picosecond electron pulses for ultrafast electron diffraction experiments, and performing the study of ultrafast dynamics in bismuth after optical excitation using this setup. (orig.)

  13. Ultrafast electron diffraction studies of optically excited thin bismuth films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajkovic, Ivan

    2008-10-21

    This thesis contains work on the design and the realization of an experimental setup capable of providing sub-picosecond electron pulses for ultrafast electron diffraction experiments, and performing the study of ultrafast dynamics in bismuth after optical excitation using this setup. (orig.)

  14. Optical plasma torch electron bunch generation in plasma wakefield accelerators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Wittig

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A novel, flexible method of witness electron bunch generation in plasma wakefield accelerators is described. A quasistationary plasma region is ignited by a focused laser pulse prior to the arrival of the plasma wave. This localized, shapeable optical plasma torch causes a strong distortion of the plasma blowout during passage of the electron driver bunch, leading to collective alteration of plasma electron trajectories and to controlled injection. This optically steered injection is more flexible and faster when compared to hydrodynamically controlled gas density transition injection methods.

  15. Electron-Beam Produced Air Plasma: Optical and Electrical Diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidmar, Robert; Stalder, Kenneth; Seeley, Megan

    2006-10-01

    High energy electron impact excitation is used to stimulate optical emissions that quantify the measurement of electron beam current. A 100 keV 10-ma electron beam source is used to produce air plasma in a test cell at a pressure between 1 mTorr and 760 Torr. Optical emissions originating from the N2 2^nd positive line at 337.1 nm and the N2^+ 1^st negative line at 391.4 nm are observed. Details on calibration using signals from an isolated transmission window and a Faraday plate are discussed. Results using this technique and other electrical signal are presented.

  16. Optical studies of polarized-electron-noble-gas collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gay, T.I.; Furst, J.E.; Geesmann, H.; Khakoo, M.A.; Madison, D.H.; Wijayaratna, W.M.K.P.; Bartschat, K.

    1992-01-01

    We have measured the Stoke's parameters of light emitted following impact excitation of He and Xe by transversely-polarized electrons. For He, the 2 3 S-3 3 P, 389 nm transition was studied in an effort to systematically develop a highly accurate optical electron polarimeter. The 6 3 P 2 -6 3 D 3 , 882 nm transition in Xe was used to assess the importance of spin-dependent forces on the continuum electron for this target. We attempted (and failed) to made the first optical observations of Mott scattering. (Author)

  17. Interference electron microscopy of one-dimensional electron-optical phase objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fazzini, P.F.; Ortolani, L.; Pozzi, G.; Ubaldi, F.

    2006-01-01

    The application of interference electron microscopy to the investigation of electron optical one-dimensional phase objects like reverse biased p-n junctions and ferromagnetic domain walls is considered. In particular the influence of diffraction from the biprism edges on the interference images is analyzed and the range of applicability of the geometric optical equation for the interpretation of the interference fringe shifts assessed by comparing geometric optical images with full wave-optical simulations. Finally, the inclusion of partial spatial coherence effects are discussed

  18. The neutron optical model potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodgson, P.E.

    1989-01-01

    The present status of optical model calculations of neutron scattering and interactions is reviewed, with special emphasis on more recent developments and the more promising lines of research. The use of dispersion relations to provide an extra constraint on the potential is discussed, together with their application to studies of the Fermi surface anomaly. The application of potential inversion techniques to determine the form of the potential is also considered. (author). 39 refs, figs

  19. Electron beams, lenses, and optics. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Kareh, A.B.; El-Kareh, J.C.J.

    1970-01-01

    This volume presents a systematic coverage of aberrations. It analyzes the geometrical aberrations and treats the spherical and chromatic aberrations in great detail. The coefficients of spherical and chromatic aberration have been computed for a series of electrostatic and magnetic lenses and are listed in table form. The book also covers space charge and its effect on highly focused electron beams

  20. Electro-optic spatial decoding on the spherical-wavefront Coulomb fields of plasma electron sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, K; Esirkepov, T; Koga, J K; Kotaki, H; Mori, M; Hayashi, Y; Nakanii, N; Bulanov, S V; Kando, M

    2018-02-13

    Detections of the pulse durations and arrival timings of relativistic electron beams are important issues in accelerator physics. Electro-optic diagnostics on the Coulomb fields of electron beams have the advantages of single shot and non-destructive characteristics. We present a study of introducing the electro-optic spatial decoding technique to laser wakefield acceleration. By placing an electro-optic crystal very close to a gas target, we discovered that the Coulomb field of the electron beam possessed a spherical wavefront and was inconsistent with the previously widely used model. The field structure was demonstrated by experimental measurement, analytic calculations and simulations. A temporal mapping relationship with generality was derived in a geometry where the signals had spherical wavefronts. This study could be helpful for the applications of electro-optic diagnostics in laser plasma acceleration experiments.

  1. DNA Diagnostics: Optical or by Electronics?

    KAUST Repository

    Khan, Hadayat Ullah

    2016-01-15

    In this paper, we very briefly review DNA biosensors based on optical and electrical detection principles, referring mainly to our past work applying both techniques but here using nearly identical sensor chip surface architectures, i.e., capture probe layers that were prepared based on a pulsed plasma deposition protocol for maleic anhydride and subsequent wet-chemical attachment of the amine-functionalized peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probe oligonucleotides. 15 mer DNA target strands, labeled with Cy5-chromophores that were attached at the 5’ end were used for surface plasmon optical detection and the same target DNA but without label was used in OTFT sensor-based detection where the mere charge density of the bound (hybridized) DNA molecules modulate the source-drain current. The sensing mechanisms and the detection limits of the devices are described in some detail. Both techniques allow for the monitoring of surface hybridization reactions, and offer the capacity to quantitatively discriminate between targets with different degrees of mismatched sequences.

  2. Polarized electrons and the origin of optical activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonner, W.A.; Dort, M.A. Van; Yearian, M.R.; Zeman, H.D.; Li, G.C.; Stanford Univ., Calif.

    1976-01-01

    The history of experiments bearing on the origin of optical acitivity in nature by parity non-conservation during the β-decay of radioactive isotopes is briefly reviewed. Following this, we present a more detailed description of our recent published and unpublished data and calculations regarding the generation of optical activity in DL-leucine by means of artificially produced longitudinally polarized electrons from a linear accelerator

  3. Electron beam optics for the FEL experiment and IFEL experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    van Steenbergen, A.

    1990-01-01

    Electron beam transport system parameters for the FEL experiment and for the FEL experiment are given. The perturbation of the ''interaction region'' optics due to wiggler focussing is taken into account and a range of solutions are provided for relevant Twiss parameters in the FEL or IFEL region. Modifications of the transport optics in specific sections of the overall beam transport lines, for reasons of enhanced diagnostic capability or enhanced beam momentum analysis resolution, is also presented

  4. Optical guiding and beam bending in free-electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scharlemann, E.T.

    1987-01-01

    The electron beam in a free-electron laser (FEL) can act as an optical fiber, guiding or bending the optical beam. The refractive and gain effects of the bunched electron beam can compensate for diffraction, making possible wigglers that are many Rayleigh ranges (i.e., characteristic diffraction lengths) long. The origin of optical guiding can be understood by examining gain and refractive guiding in a fiber with a complex index of refraction, providing a mathematical description applicable also to the FEL, with some extensions. In the exponential gain regime of the FEL, the electron equations of motion must be included, but a self-consistent description of exponential gain with diffraction fully included becomes possible. The origin of the effective index of refraction of an FEL is illustrated with a simple example of bunched, radiating dipoles. Some of the properties of the index of refraction are described. The limited experimental evidence for optical beam bending is summarized. The evidence does not yet provide conclusive proof of the existence of optical guiding, but supports the idea. Finally, the importance of refractive guiding for the performance of a high-gain tapered-wiggler FEL amplifier is illustrated with numerical simulations

  5. Optical distortions in electron/positron storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, K.L.; Donald, M.; Servranckx, R.

    1983-01-01

    We have studied the optical distortions in the PEP electron/positron storage ring for various optical configurations using the computer programs DIMAT, HARMON, PATRICIA, and TURTLE. The results are shown graphically by tracing several thousand trajectories from one interaction region to the next using TURTLE and by tracing a few selected rays several hundred turns using the programs DIMAT and PATRICIA. The results show an interesting correlation between the calculated optical cleanliness of a particular lattice configuration and the observed operating characteristics of the machine

  6. New fiber optics illumination system for application to electronics holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciammarella, Cesar A.

    1995-08-01

    The practical application of electronic holography requires the use of fiber optics. The need of employing coherent fiber optics imposes restrictions in the efficient use of laser light. This paper proposes a new solution to this problem. The proposed method increases the efficiency in the use of the laser light and simplifies the interface between the laser source and the fiber optics. This paper will present the theory behind the proposed method. A discussion of the effect of the different parameters that influence the formation of interference fringes is presented. Limitations and results that can be achieved are given. An example of application is presented.

  7. Electronic, Optical, and Thermal Properties of Reduced-Dimensional Semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shouting

    Reduced-dimensional materials have attracted tremendous attention because of their new physics and exotic properties, which are of great interests for fundamental science. More importantly, the manipulation and engineering of matter on an atomic scale yield promising applications for many fields including nanoelectronics, nanobiotechnology, environments, and renewable energy. Because of the unusual quantum confinement and enhanced surface effect of reduced-dimensional materials, traditional empirical models suffer from necessary but unreliable parameters extracted from previously-studied bulk materials. In this sense, quantitative, parameter-free approaches are highly useful for understanding properties of reduced-dimensional materials and, furthermore, predicting their novel applications. The first-principles density functional theory (DFT) is proven to be a reliable and convenient tool. In particular, recent progress in many-body perturbation theory (MBPT) makes it possible to calculate excited-state properties, e.g., quasiparticle (QP) band gap and optical excitations, by the first-principles approach based on DFT. Therefore, during my PhD study, I employed first-principles calculations based on DFT and MBPT to systematically study fundamental properties of typical reduced-dimensional semiconductors, i.e., the electronic structure, phonons, and optical excitations of core-shell nanowires (NWs) and graphene-like two-dimensional (2D) structures of current interests. First, I present first-principles studies on how to engineer band alignments of nano-sized radial heterojunctions, Si/Ge core-shell NWs. Our calculation reveals that band offsets in these one-dimensional (1D) nanostructures can be tailored by applying axial strain or varying core-shell sizes. In particular, the valence band offset can be efficiently tuned across a wide range and even be diminished via applied strain. Two mechanisms contribute to this tuning of band offsets. Furthermore, varying the

  8. Characterization of nanocrystalline zirconia powders by electron optical techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bursill, L.A.

    1989-01-01

    Electron optical techniques are described for the characterization of the size distribution of agglomerates, aggregates and primary micro- and nanocrystallites of as-processed zirconia powders. These techniques allow for direct identification of individual crystallites as tetragonal or monoclinic, by optical transform of high-resolution electron micrographs. The latter also permit surface morphology to be examined with atomic resolution. Applications to a range of pure and doped zirconia powders, of recent commercial interest, are presented, which enable the results of concurrent studies by sedimentation, surface specific area measurements, porosity and sinterability to be correctly interpreted. 18 figs

  9. Optical and electron microanalysis of cuprate superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoff, H.A.; Osofsky, M.S.; Toth, L.E.; Richards, L.E.; Pande, C.S.; Lechter, W.L.

    1990-01-01

    Individual anisotropic grains in heterogeneous and opaque cuprate materials, when viewed in a reflected-light optical microscope through crossed polarizers, often have characteristic colors, when a daylight source is used. Of the cuprate superconductors, regardless of charge carrier type, examined so far, only one characteristic color has been observed We have studied the presence of color and found a strong correlation with the existence of superconductivity. The change in color from insulator to metal to superconductor and the compositions corresponding to these changes found by quantitative energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy on superconducting Tl-Sr-Ca-Cu-O and metallic but not superconducting La-Sr-Cu-O materials is discussed

  10. Fiber optic probe of free electron evanescent fields in the optical frequency range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    So, Jin-Kyu, E-mail: js1m10@orc.soton.ac.uk; MacDonald, Kevin F. [Optoelectronics Research Centre and Centre for Photonic Metamaterials, University of Southampton, Highfield, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Zheludev, Nikolay I. [Optoelectronics Research Centre and Centre for Photonic Metamaterials, University of Southampton, Highfield, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Centre for Disruptive Photonic Technologies, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 637371 (Singapore)

    2014-05-19

    We introduce an optical fiber platform which can be used to interrogate proximity interactions between free-electron evanescent fields and photonic nanostructures at optical frequencies in a manner similar to that in which optical evanescent fields are sampled using nanoscale aperture probes in scanning near-field microscopy. Conically profiled optical fiber tips functionalized with nano-gratings are employed to couple electron evanescent fields to light via the Smith-Purcell effect. We demonstrate the interrogation of medium energy (30–50 keV) electron fields with a lateral resolution of a few micrometers via the generation and detection of visible/UV radiation in the 700–300 nm (free-space) wavelength range.

  11. Electron optics development for photo-electron spectrometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wannberg, Bjoern [VG Scienta AB, P.O. Box 15120, SE-750 15 Uppsala (Sweden); BW Particle Optics AB, P.O. Box 55, SE-822 22 Alfta (Sweden)], E-mail: bjorn@particleoptics.se

    2009-03-21

    The demand for simultaneous observation of photo-electron distributions in several dimensions has made the hemispherical deflection analyzer (HDA) and the time-of-flight (TOF) analyzer the dominating spectrometer types. Some common limiting factors for resolution and sensitivity are considered. Recent developments of the HDA and its lens system which increase the energy range and angular acceptance are described. The properties of a recently developed angle-resolving TOF system (AR-TOF) are also described. The possibility to avoid integration losses in energy or angular resolution by applying non-linear mappings of the primary data is discussed.

  12. Electron optics development for photo-electron spectrometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wannberg, Bjoern

    2009-01-01

    The demand for simultaneous observation of photo-electron distributions in several dimensions has made the hemispherical deflection analyzer (HDA) and the time-of-flight (TOF) analyzer the dominating spectrometer types. Some common limiting factors for resolution and sensitivity are considered. Recent developments of the HDA and its lens system which increase the energy range and angular acceptance are described. The properties of a recently developed angle-resolving TOF system (AR-TOF) are also described. The possibility to avoid integration losses in energy or angular resolution by applying non-linear mappings of the primary data is discussed.

  13. Structure, Electronic and Nonlinear Optical Properties of Furyloxazoles and Thienyloxazoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dagli, Ozlem; Gok, Rabia; Bahat, Mehmet; Ozbay, Akif

    2016-01-01

    Geometry optimization, electronic and nonlinear optical properties of isomers of furyloxazole and thienyloxazole molecules are carried out at the B3LYP/6-311++G(2d,p) level. The conformational analysis of 12 compounds have been studied as a function of torsional angle between rings. Electronic and NLO properties such as dipole moment, energy gap, polarizability and first hyperpolarizability were also calculated. (paper)

  14. Optical properties and electron transport in low-dimensional nanostructures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Král, Karel; Menšík, Miroslav

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 54, 2-2 (2011), s. 4-13 ISSN 0021-3411 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) OC10007 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520; CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : quantum dots * electron -photon interaction * optical properties * electron relaxation * DNA molecule Subject RIV: BE - The oretical Physics http://elibrary.ru/contents.asp?issueid=1010336

  15. Examples of electrostatic electron optics: The Farrand and Elektros microscopes and electron mirrors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawkes, P.W.

    2012-01-01

    The role of Gertrude Rempfer in the design of the Farrand and Elektros microscopes is evoked. The study of electron mirror optics, aberration correction using mirrors and the development of microscopes employing electron mirrors are recapitulated, accompanied by a full bibliography, of earlier publications in particular.

  16. The structural design and the electron optics of a hybrid electron-ion gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bas, E.B.; Gisler, E.; Stucki, F.

    1984-01-01

    This paper describes a new kind of a particle gun called the hybrid gun. It is able to deliver a finely focused electron or ion beam simply by reversing the polarity of the acceleration voltage. The detailed design features of the gun are given and the electron-ion optical properties are discussed. (author)

  17. Electronic displays using optically pumped luminescent semiconductor nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Shimon [Pinole, CA; Schlamp, Michael C [Plainsboro, NJ; Alivisatos, A Paul [Oakland, CA

    2011-09-27

    A multicolor electronic display is based on an array of luminescent semiconductor nanocrystals. Nanocrystals which emit light of different colors are grouped into pixels. The nanocrystals are optically pumped to produce a multicolor display. Different sized nanocrystals are used to produce the different colors. A variety of pixel addressing systems can be used.

  18. Structural, elastic, electronic and optical properties of bi-alkali ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The structural parameters, elastic constants, electronic and optical properties of the bi-alkali ... and efficient method for the calculation of the ground-state ... Figure 2. Optimization curve (E–V) of the bi-alkali antimonides: (a) Na2KSb, (b) Na2RbSb, (c) Na2CsSb, .... ical shape of the charge distributions in the contour plots.

  19. Electronic structure and optical properties of thorium monopnictides

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Indian Academy of Sciences. 165. Electronic structure and optical properties of thorium monopnictides. S KUMAR* and S AULUCK†. Physics Department, Institute of Engineering and Technology, M.J.P. Rohilkhand University, Bareilly 243 006,. India. †Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee 247 667, ...

  20. Applied nonlinear optics in the journal 'Quantum Electronics'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grechin, Sergei G; Dmitriev, Valentin G; Chirkin, Anatolii S

    2011-01-01

    A brief historical review of the experimental and theoretical works on nonlinear optical frequency conversion (generation of harmonics, up- and down-conversion, parametric oscillation), which have been published in the journal 'Quantum Electronics' for the last 40 years, is presented.

  1. Optical klystron and harmonic generation free electron laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qika Jia

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The optical field evolution of an optical klystron free electron laser is analytically described for both low gain and high gain cases. The harmonic optical klystron (HOK in which the second undulator is resonant on the higher harmonic of the first undulator is analyzed as a harmonic amplifier. The optical field evolution equation of the HOK is derived analytically for both the CHG mode (coherent harmonic generation, the quadratic gain regime and the HGHG mode (high gain harmonic generation, the exponential gain regime, the effects of energy spread, energy modulation, and dispersion in the whole process are taken into account. The linear theory is given and discussed for the HGHG mode. The analytical formula is given for the CHG mode.

  2. Optical studies of MBE-grown InN nanocolumns: Evidence of surface electron accumulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura-Ruiz, J.; Garro, N.; Cantarero, A.; Denker, C.; Malindretos, J.; Rizzi, A.

    2009-03-01

    Vertically self-aligned InN nanocolumns have been investigated by means of scanning electron microscopy, Raman scattering, and photoluminescence spectroscopy. Different nanocolumn morphologies corresponding to different molecular beam epitaxy growth conditions have been studied. Raman spectra revealed strain-free nanocolumns with high crystalline quality for the full set of samples studied. Longitudinal optical modes both uncoupled and coupled to an electron plasma coexist in the Raman spectra pointing to the existence of two distinctive regions in the nanocolumn: a surface layer of degenerated electrons and a nondegenerated inner core. The characteristics of the low-temperature photoluminescence and its dependence on temperature and excitation power can be explained by a model considering localized holes recombining with degenerated electrons close to the nonpolar surface. The differences observed in the optical response of different samples showing similar crystalline quality have been attributed to the variation in the electron accumulation layer with the growth conditions.

  3. An optical study of multiple NEIAL events driven by low energy electron precipitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Sullivan

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Optical data are compared with EISCAT radar observations of multiple Naturally Enhanced Ion-Acoustic Line (NEIAL events in the dayside cusp. This study uses narrow field of view cameras to observe small-scale, short-lived auroral features. Using multiple-wavelength optical observations, a direct link between NEIAL occurrences and low energy (about 100 eV optical emissions is shown. This is consistent with the Langmuir wave decay interpretation of NEIALs being driven by streams of low-energy electrons. Modelling work connected with this study shows that, for the measured ionospheric conditions and precipitation characteristics, growth of unstable Langmuir (electron plasma waves can occur, which decay into ion-acoustic wave modes. The link with low energy optical emissions shown here, will enable future studies of the shape, extent, lifetime, grouping and motions of NEIALs.

  4. Future opportunities in production of disposable optics and electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korhonen, Raimo

    2001-05-01

    The several production methods of paper processing chain can be used, by analogy, to generate novel ideas for production of optics and electronics. Paper processing is a very fast reel-to-reel process: In the beginning of the paper web production the process is running at the speed of over thousand meters per minute and the web width can be 10 meters, and still at the later stages the speed is several hundreds of meters per minute with the web width of a couple of meters. There are several potential reel-to-reel production methods like embossing, printing, laminating and different kinds of vacuum coating, for example evaporation and sputtering. End products are complex multi-layer composite structures. The benefits from this analogy for optics and electronics would be ideas for ultra fast production, paper-like disposable and recyclable products and the integration of optics and electronics into ordinary things like books, wallpapers, tissue papers and packages. Two experiments are presented to demonstrate the possibilities. In the first experiment optical patterns are embossed directly on paper. In the second one conductive polymers are printed on paper and plastic webs. In future, a wide network of cooperation will be needed to realize all the opportunities.

  5. Projection-reduction method applied to deriving non-linear optical conductivity for an electron-impurity system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nam Lyong Kang

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The projection-reduction method introduced by the present authors is known to give a validated theory for optical transitions in the systems of electrons interacting with phonons. In this work, using this method, we derive the linear and first order nonlinear optical conductivites for an electron-impurity system and examine whether the expressions faithfully satisfy the quantum mechanical philosophy, in the same way as for the electron-phonon systems. The result shows that the Fermi distribution function for electrons, energy denominators, and electron-impurity coupling factors are contained properly in organized manners along with absorption of photons for each electron transition process in the final expressions. Furthermore, the result is shown to be represented properly by schematic diagrams, as in the formulation of electron-phonon interaction. Therefore, in conclusion, we claim that this method can be applied in modeling optical transitions of electrons interacting with both impurities and phonons.

  6. Electronic and optical properties of finite carbon nanotubes in an electric field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, R B; Lee, C H; Chang, C P; Lin, M F

    2007-01-01

    The effects, caused by the geometric structure and an electric field (E), on the electronic and optical properties of quasi-zero-dimensional finite carbon nanotubes are explored by employing the tight-binding model coupled with curvature effects. Electronic properties (state energies, symmetry of electronic states, energy spacing and state degeneracy) are significantly affected by the magnitude and the direction of the electric field and the geometric structure (radius, length and chirality). The electric field, by lowering the symmetry of finite carbon nanotubes, modifies the electronic properties. Thus, the optical excitation spectra, excited by electric polarization parallel to the nanotube axis, exhibit rich delta-function-like peaks, which reveal the characteristics of the electronic properties. Therefore it follows that geometric structure and E influence the low-energy absorption spectra, i.e. the change of frequency of the first peak, the alternation of the peak height and the production of the new peaks. There are more absorption peaks when E is oriented closer to the cross-section plane. Moreover, the very complicated optical absorption spectra are characteristic for the individual chiral carbon nanotube due to its specific geometric structure. Above all, the predicted absorption spectra and the associated electronic properties could be verified by optical measurements

  7. Integrable models of quantum optics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yudson Vladimir

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We give an overview of exactly solvable many-body models of quantum optics. Among them is a system of two-level atoms which interact with photons propagating in a one-dimensional (1D chiral waveguide; exact eigenstates of this system can be explicitly constructed. This approach is used also for a system of closely located atoms in the usual (non-chiral waveguide or in 3D space. Moreover, it is shown that for an arbitrary atomic system with a cascade spontaneous radiative decay, the fluorescence spectrum can be described by an exact analytic expression which accounts for interference of emitted photons. Open questions related with broken integrability are discussed.

  8. Electronic properties and optical absorption of a phosphorene quantum dot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, F. X.; Ren, Y. H.; Zhang, X. D.; Jiang, Z. T.

    2018-03-01

    Using the tight-binding Hamiltonian approach, we theoretically study the electronic and optical properties of a triangular phosphorene quantum dot (PQD) including one normal zigzag edge and two skewed armchair edges (ZAA-PQD). It is shown that the energy spectrum can be classified into the filled band (FB), the zero-energy band (ZB), and the unfilled band (UB). Numerical calculations of the FB, ZB, and UB probability distributions show that the FB and the UB correspond to the bulk states, while the ZB corresponds to the edge states, which appear on all of the three edges of the ZAA-PQD sharply different from the other PQDs. We also find that the strains and the electric fields can affect the energy levels inhomogeneously. Then the optical properties of the ZAA-PQD are investigated. There appear some strong low-energy optical absorption peaks indicating its sensitive low-energy optical response that is absent in other PQDs. Moreover, the strains and the electric fields can make inhomogeneous influences on the optical spectrum of the ZAA-PQD. This work may provide a useful reference for designing the electrical, mechanical, and optical PQD devices.

  9. Interaction of low-energy electrons and positrons with condensed matter: Stopping powers and inelastic mean free paths from optical data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashley, J.C.

    1989-01-01

    An ''optical-data model'' is described for evaluating energy loss per unit pathlength and inelastic mean free path for low-energy electrons and positrons (approx lt 10 keV) from optical data on the medium of interest. Exchange between the incident electron and electrons in the medium is included. Results from the optical-data model are compared with previous theoretical calculations. 15 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  10. Modeling Incoherent Electron Cloud Effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vay, Jean-Luc; Benedetto, E.; Fischer, W.; Franchetti, G.; Ohmi, K.; Schulte, D.; Sonnad, K.; Tomas, R.; Vay, J.-L.; Zimmermann, F.; Rumolo, G.; Pivi, M.; Raubenheimer, T.

    2007-01-01

    Incoherent electron effects could seriously limit the beam lifetime in proton or ion storage rings, such as LHC, SPS, or RHIC, or blow up the vertical emittance of positron beams, e.g., at the B factories or in linear-collider damping rings. Different approaches to modeling these effects each have their own merits and drawbacks. We describe several simulation codes which simplify the descriptions of the beam-electron interaction and of the accelerator structure in various different ways, and present results for a toy model of the SPS. In addition, we present evidence that for positron beams the interplay of incoherent electron-cloud effects and synchrotron radiation can lead to a significant increase in vertical equilibrium emittance. The magnitude of a few incoherent e+e- scattering processes is also estimated. Options for future code development are reviewed

  11. Optical models of the human eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atchison, David A; Thibos, Larry N

    2016-03-01

    Optical models of the human eye have been used in visual science for purposes such as providing a framework for explaining optical phenomena in vision, for predicting how refraction and aberrations are affected by change in ocular biometry and as computational tools for exploring the limitations imposed on vision by the optical system of the eye. We address the issue of what is understood by optical model eyes, discussing the 'encyclopaedia' and 'toy train' approaches to modelling. An extensive list of purposes of models is provided. We discuss many of the theoretical types of optical models (also schematic eyes) of varying anatomical accuracy, including single, three and four refracting surface variants. We cover the models with lens structure in the form of nested shells and gradient index. Many optical eye models give accurate predictions only for small angles and small fields of view. If aberrations and image quality are important to consider, such 'paraxial' model eyes must be replaced by 'finite model' eyes incorporating features such as aspheric surfaces, tilts and decentrations, wavelength-dependent media and curved retinas. Many optical model eyes are population averages and must become adaptable to account for age, gender, ethnicity, refractive error and accommodation. They can also be customised for the individual when extensive ocular biometry and optical performance data are available. We consider which optical model should be used for a particular purpose, adhering to the principle that the best model is the simplest fit for the task. We provide a glimpse into the future of optical models of the human eye. This review is interwoven with historical developments, highlighting the important people who have contributed so richly to our understanding of visual optics. © 2016 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Optometry © 2016 Optometry Australia.

  12. Electron cyclotron emission from optically thin plasma in compact helical system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Idei, Hiroshi; Kubo, Shin; Hosokawa, Minoru; Iguchi, Harukazu; Ohkubo, Kunizo; Sato, Teruyuki.

    1994-01-01

    A frequency spectrum of second harmonic electron cyclotron emission was observed for an optically thin plasma produced by fundamental electron cyclotron heating in a compact helical system. A radial electron temperature profile deduced from this spectrum neglecting the multiple reflections effect shows a clear difference from that measured by Thomson scattering. We relate the spectrum with the electron temperature profile by the modified emission model including the scrambling effect. The scrambling effect results from both mode conversion and change in the trajectory due to multiple reflections of the emitting ray at the vessel wall. The difference between the two temperature profiles is explained well by using the modified emission model. Reconstruction of the electron temperature profile from the spectrum using this model is also discussed. (author)

  13. Quantum entanglement in electron optics generation, characterization, and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Chandra, Naresh

    2013-01-01

    This monograph forms an interdisciplinary study in atomic, molecular, and quantum information (QI) science. Here a reader will find that applications of the tools developed in QI provide new physical insights into electron optics as well as properties of atoms & molecules which, in turn, are useful in studying QI both at fundamental and applied levels. In particular, this book investigates entanglement properties of flying electronic qubits generated in some of the well known processes capable of taking place in an atom or a molecule following the absorption of a photon. Here, one can generate Coulombic or fine-structure entanglement of electronic qubits. The properties of these entanglements differ not only from each other, but also from those when spin of an inner-shell photoelectron is entangled with the polarization of the subsequent fluorescence. Spins of an outer-shell electron and of a residual photoion can have free or bound entanglement in a laboratory.

  14. Optical Performance of Carbon-Nanotube Electron Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonge, Niels de; Allioux, Myriam; Oostveen, Jim T.; Teo, Kenneth B. K.; Milne, William I.

    2005-01-01

    The figure of merit for the electron optical performance of carbon-nanotube (CNT) electron sources is presented. This figure is given by the relation between the reduced brightness and the energy spread in the region of stable emission. It is shown experimentally that a CNT electron source exhibits a highly stable emission process that follows the Fowler-Nordheim theory for field emission, fixing the relationship among the energy spread, the current, and the radius. The performance of the CNT emitter under realistic operating conditions is compared with state-of-the-art electron point sources. It is demonstrated that the reduced brightness is a function of the tunneling parameter, a measure of the energy spread at low temperatures, only, independent of the geometry of the emitter

  15. Materials and Reliability Handbook for Semiconductor Optical and Electron Devices

    CERN Document Server

    Pearton, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Materials and Reliability Handbook for Semiconductor Optical and Electron Devices provides comprehensive coverage of reliability procedures and approaches for electron and photonic devices. These include lasers and high speed electronics used in cell phones, satellites, data transmission systems and displays. Lifetime predictions for compound semiconductor devices are notoriously inaccurate due to the absence of standard protocols. Manufacturers have relied on extrapolation back to room temperature of accelerated testing at elevated temperature. This technique fails for scaled, high current density devices. Device failure is driven by electric field or current mechanisms or low activation energy processes that are masked by other mechanisms at high temperature. The Handbook addresses reliability engineering for III-V devices, including materials and electrical characterization, reliability testing, and electronic characterization. These are used to develop new simulation technologies for device operation and ...

  16. Pseudorandom binary injection of levitons for electron quantum optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glattli, D. C.; Roulleau, P.

    2018-03-01

    The recent realization of single-electron sources lets us envision performing electron quantum optics experiments, where electrons can be viewed as flying qubits propagating in a ballistic conductor. To date, all electron sources operate in a periodic electron injection mode, leading to energy spectrum singularities in various physical observables which sometimes hide the bare nature of physical effects. To go beyond this, we propose a spread-spectrum approach where electron flying qubits are injected in a nonperiodic manner following a pseudorandom binary bit pattern. Extending the Floquet scattering theory approach from periodic to spread-spectrum drive, the shot noise of pseudorandom binary sequences of single-electron injection can be calculated for leviton and nonleviton sources. Our new approach allows us to disentangle the physics of the manipulated excitations from that of the injection protocol. In particular, the spread-spectrum approach is shown to provide better knowledge of electronic Hong-Ou-Mandel correlations and to clarify the nature of the pulse train coherence and the role of the dynamical orthogonality catastrophe for noninteger charge injection.

  17. Optical potential study of electron scattering by rubidium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chin, J. H.; Ratnavelu, K. [University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Zhou, Y. [Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin (China)

    2011-10-15

    The coupled-channel optical method (CCOM) has been implemented in a study of electronrubidium scattering. This method includes the continuum effect in the calculation via an ab-initio optical potential. Eight atomic states (5s, 5p, 4d, 6s, 6p, 5d, 7s, 7p) were used together with the continuum optical potential in the 5s-5s, 5s-5p, and 5p-5p coupling. The elastic, inelastic and total cross sections for electron-rubidium scattering at low and intermediate energies, ranging from 10 eV to 100 eV, are reported. The results are compared with available experimental and theoretical data.

  18. Characterization of polycapillary optics installed in an analytical electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takano, Akira; Maehata, Keisuke; Iyomoto, Naoko; Hara, Toru; Mitsuda, Kazuhisa; Yamasaki, Noriko; Tanaka, Keiichi

    2016-01-01

    An energy-dispersive spectrometer with a superconducting transition edge sensor (TES) microcalorimeter mounted on a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) is developed to enhance the accuracy of nanoscale materials analysis. TES microcalorimeters generally have sensitive surface areas of the order of 100 × 100 µm 2 . Also, the magnetic field generated by the STEM objective lens means that a TES microcalorimeter cannot be placed in a STEM column. We therefore use polycapillary optics to collect the X-rays. In this study, X-rays are collected from a STEM specimen and are then focused on a silicon drift detector; from these measurements, the optics are characterized and the experimental results are compared with the design of the optics. (author)

  19. Electronic structure and optical properties of AIN under high pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Zetao; Dang Suihu; Li Chunxia

    2011-01-01

    We have calculated the electronic structure and optical properties of Wurtzite structure AIN under different high pressure with generalized gradient approximation (GGA) in this paper. The total energy, density of state, energy band structure and optical absorption and reflection properties under high pressure are calculated. By comparing the changes of the energy band structure, we obtained AIN phase transition pressure for 16.7 GPa, which is a direct band structure transforming to an indirect band structure. Meanwhile, according to the density of states distribution and energy band structure, we analyzed the optical properties of AIN under high-pressure, the results showed that the absorption spectra moved from low-energy to high-energy. (authors)

  20. Dephasing of optically generated electron spins in semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Idrish Miah, M.

    2010-01-01

    Dephasing of optically generated electron spins in the presence of the external magnetic field and electric bias in semiconductor nano-structures has been studied by time- and polarization-resolved spectrometry. The obtained experimental data are presented in dependence of the strength of the magnetic field. The optically generated electron-spin precession frequency and dephasing time and rate are estimated. It is found that both the spin precession frequency and dephasing rate increase linearly with the external magnetic field up to about 9 T. However, the spin dephasing time is within sub-μs and is found to decrease exponentially with the strength of the external magnetic field. The results are discussed by exploring possible mechanisms of spin dephasing in low-dimensional semiconductor structures, where the quantum-confinement persists within the nano-range.

  1. Dephasing of optically generated electron spins in semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Idrish Miah, M., E-mail: m.miah@griffith.edu.a [Department of Physics, University of Chittagong, Chittagong, Chittagong - 4331 (Bangladesh)

    2010-09-13

    Dephasing of optically generated electron spins in the presence of the external magnetic field and electric bias in semiconductor nano-structures has been studied by time- and polarization-resolved spectrometry. The obtained experimental data are presented in dependence of the strength of the magnetic field. The optically generated electron-spin precession frequency and dephasing time and rate are estimated. It is found that both the spin precession frequency and dephasing rate increase linearly with the external magnetic field up to about 9 T. However, the spin dephasing time is within sub-{mu}s and is found to decrease exponentially with the strength of the external magnetic field. The results are discussed by exploring possible mechanisms of spin dephasing in low-dimensional semiconductor structures, where the quantum-confinement persists within the nano-range.

  2. Electronic structure and optical properties of metal doped tetraphenylporphyrins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Esha V.; Roy, Debesh R.

    2018-05-01

    A density functional scrutiny on the structure, electronic and optical properties of metal doped tetraphenylporphyrins MTPP (M=Fe, Co, Ni) is performed. The structural stability of the molecules is evaluated based on the electronic parameters like HOMO-LUMO gap (HLG), chemical hardness (η) and binding energy of the central metal atom to the molecular frame etc. The computed UltraViolet-Visible (UV-Vis) optical absorption spectra for all the compounds are also compared. The molecular structures reported are the lowest energy configurations. The entire calculations are carried out with a widely reliable functional, viz. B3LYP with a popular basis set which includes a scaler relativistic effect, viz. LANL2DZ.

  3. Short wavelength optics for future free electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attwood, D.T.

    1984-04-01

    Although much free-electron laser work is directed toward achieving sufficient single-pass gain to be useful for research purposes, the availability of mirrors of high reflectance for the vacuum ultraviolet and soft x-ray regime would make resonant cavities a possibility. In addition, as in ordinary synchrotron radiation work, mirrors are required for the construction of realistic experiments and for beam manipulation purposes such as folding and extraction. The Working Group discussed a number of approaches to reflecting optics for free electron lasers, which are summarized here, and described in some detail. 16 references, 2 figures

  4. OPTICAL-ELECTRONIC SYSTEM FOR EXPRESS ANALYSIS OF ORE DRESSABILITY FOR MINERAL RAW MATERIALS BY OPTICAL METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Alekhin

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with creation results of experimental prototype of optical-electronic complex, designed to assess ore dressability of mineral raw materials by optical sorting method.

  5. Nanodiamond Landmarks for Subcellular Multimodal Optical and Electron Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurbuchen, Mark A.; Lake, Michael P.; Kohan, Sirus A.; Leung, Belinda; Bouchard, Louis-S.

    2013-01-01

    There is a growing need for biolabels that can be used in both optical and electron microscopies, are non-cytotoxic, and do not photobleach. Such biolabels could enable targeted nanoscale imaging of sub-cellular structures, and help to establish correlations between conjugation-delivered biomolecules and function. Here we demonstrate a sub-cellular multi-modal imaging methodology that enables localization of inert particulate probes, consisting of nanodiamonds having fluorescent nitrogen-vacancy centers. These are functionalized to target specific structures, and are observable by both optical and electron microscopies. Nanodiamonds targeted to the nuclear pore complex are rapidly localized in electron-microscopy diffraction mode to enable “zooming-in” to regions of interest for detailed structural investigations. Optical microscopies reveal nanodiamonds for in-vitro tracking or uptake-confirmation. The approach is general, works down to the single nanodiamond level, and can leverage the unique capabilities of nanodiamonds, such as biocompatibility, sensitive magnetometry, and gene and drug delivery. PMID:24036840

  6. Modeling paraxial wave propagation in free-electron laser oscillators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karssenberg, J.G.; van der Slot, Petrus J.M.; Volokhine, I.; Verschuur, Jeroen W.J.; Boller, Klaus J.

    2006-01-01

    Modeling free-electron laser (FEL) oscillators requires calculation of both the light-beam interaction within the undulator and the light propagation outside the undulator. We have developed a paraxial optical propagation code that can be combined with various existing models of gain media, for

  7. Irradiation Effects of Electron Beam on Optical Fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Kyu; Cho, Gyu Seong [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Hong Gu; Oh, Kyung Hwan [Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Ho Jin [Nucron Co. Ltd., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-10-15

    The surveillance or monitoring systems used in space station, nuclear power plant and nuclear waste repository, are often equipped with optical fibers to remotely locating expensive camera systems so as to protect them from direct irradiation. Especially in nuclear power plant and nuclear waste repository, irradiation by gamma-ray and beta-ray are most concerned. The effective life-time of such surveillance system may depend on the soundness of the optical fiber because it is the component to be exposed the high intensity of radiation field by purpose. Though the degradation of mechanical properties such as hardness and elasticity may occur but the degradation of the optical property such as spectral transmittance is the most possible cause of the effective life-time limitation. Generally 30 % reduction of light signal transmittance is considered as the life-time threshold point of such optical systems. In this paper, we studied irradiation effects on spectral transparency of various commonly-used optical fibers with high energy electron beam to conveniently simulate the both gamma-ray and beta-ray irradiation situation.

  8. Simulation of Non-Uniform Electron Beams in the Gyrotron Electron-Optical System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louksha, O. I.; Trofimov, P. A.

    2018-04-01

    New calculated data on the effect of emission inhomogeneities on the quality of the electron beam, which is formed in an electron-optical system of a gyrotron, have been obtained. The calculations were based on emission current density distributions, which were measured for the different cathodes in the gyrotron of Peter the Great St. Petersburg Polytechnic University. A satisfactory agreement between the experimental and calculated data on the influence of emission nonuniformities on the velocity spread of electrons has been shown. The necessity of considering the real distribution of the emission current density over the cathode surface to determine the main parameters of the electron beam—the velocity and energy spreads of the electrons, spatial structure of the beam, and coefficient of reflection of electrons from the magnetic mirror—has been demonstrated. The maximum level of emission inhomogeneities, which are permissible for effective work of gyrotrons, has been discussed.

  9. Theoretical study on optical model potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim Hung Gi.

    1984-08-01

    The optical model potential of non-local effect on the rounded edge of the potential is derived. On the basis of this potential the functional form of the optical model potential, the energy dependence and relationship of its parameters, and the dependency of the values of the parameters on energy change are shown in this paper. (author)

  10. Applied Electronics and Optical Laboratory: an optimized practical course for comprehensive training on optics and electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kaiwei; Wang, Xiaoping

    2017-08-01

    In order to enhance the practical education and hands-on experience of optoelectronics and eliminate the overlapping contents that previously existed in the experiments section adhering to several different courses, a lab course of "Applied Optoelectronics Laboratory" has been established in the College of Optical Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University. The course consists of two sections, i.e., basic experiments and project design. In section 1, basic experiments provide hands-on experience with most of the fundamental concept taught in the corresponding courses. These basic experiments including the study of common light sources such as He-Ne laser, semiconductor laser and solid laser and LED; the testing and analysis of optical detectors based on effects of photovoltaic effect, photoconduction effect, photo emissive effect and array detectors. In section 2, the course encourages students to build a team and establish a stand-alone optical system to realize specific function by taking advantage of the basic knowledge learned from section 1. Through these measures, students acquired both basic knowledge and the practical application skills. Moreover, interest in science has been developed among students.

  11. Electron spin control of optically levitated nanodiamonds in vacuum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Thai M; Ahn, Jonghoon; Bang, Jaehoon; Li, Tongcang

    2016-07-19

    Electron spins of diamond nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centres are important quantum resources for nanoscale sensing and quantum information. Combining NV spins with levitated optomechanical resonators will provide a hybrid quantum system for novel applications. Here we optically levitate a nanodiamond and demonstrate electron spin control of its built-in NV centres in low vacuum. We observe that the strength of electron spin resonance (ESR) is enhanced when the air pressure is reduced. To better understand this system, we investigate the effects of trap power and measure the absolute internal temperature of levitated nanodiamonds with ESR after calibration of the strain effect. We also observe that oxygen and helium gases have different effects on both the photoluminescence and the ESR contrast of nanodiamond NV centres, indicating potential applications of NV centres in oxygen gas sensing. Our results pave the way towards a levitated spin-optomechanical system for studying macroscopic quantum mechanics.

  12. Electron spin control of optically levitated nanodiamonds in vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Thai M.; Ahn, Jonghoon; Bang, Jaehoon; Li, Tongcang

    2016-07-01

    Electron spins of diamond nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centres are important quantum resources for nanoscale sensing and quantum information. Combining NV spins with levitated optomechanical resonators will provide a hybrid quantum system for novel applications. Here we optically levitate a nanodiamond and demonstrate electron spin control of its built-in NV centres in low vacuum. We observe that the strength of electron spin resonance (ESR) is enhanced when the air pressure is reduced. To better understand this system, we investigate the effects of trap power and measure the absolute internal temperature of levitated nanodiamonds with ESR after calibration of the strain effect. We also observe that oxygen and helium gases have different effects on both the photoluminescence and the ESR contrast of nanodiamond NV centres, indicating potential applications of NV centres in oxygen gas sensing. Our results pave the way towards a levitated spin-optomechanical system for studying macroscopic quantum mechanics.

  13. Electron localization and optical absorption of polygonal quantum rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitek, Anna; Serra, Llorenç; Gudmundsson, Vidar; Manolescu, Andrei

    2015-06-01

    We investigate theoretically polygonal quantum rings and focus mostly on the triangular geometry where the corner effects are maximal. Such rings can be seen as short core-shell nanowires, a generation of semiconductor heterostructures with multiple applications. We show how the geometry of the sample determines the electronic energy spectrum, and also the localization of electrons, with effects on the optical absorption. In particular, we show that irrespective of the ring shape low-energy electrons are always attracted by corners and are localized in their vicinity. The absorption spectrum in the presence of a magnetic field shows only two peaks within the corner-localized state domain, each associated with different circular polarization. This picture may be changed by an external electric field which allows previously forbidden transitions, and thus enables the number of corners to be determined. We show that polygonal quantum rings allow absorption of waves from distant ranges of the electromagnetic spectrum within one sample.

  14. Electron Spin Optical Orientation in Charged Quantum Dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabaev, A.; Gershoni, D.; Korenev, V. L.

    2005-03-01

    We present a theory of nonresonant optical orientation of electron spins localized in quantum dots. This theory explains the negative circularly polarized photoluminescence of singlet trions localized in quantum dots previously observed in experiments where trion polarization changed to negative with time and where the degree of the negative polarization increased with intensity of pumping light. We have shown that this effect can be explained by the accumulation of dark excitons that occurs due to the spin blocking of the singlet trion formation - the major mechanism of dark exciton recombination. The accumulation of dark excitons results from a lack of electrons with a spin matching the exciton polarization. The electron spin lifetime is shortened by a transverse magnetic field or a temperature increase. This takes the block off the dark exciton recombination and restores the positive degree of trion polarization. The presented theory gives good agreement with experimental data.

  15. Optical observations of Magnetosphere-Ionosphere coupling: Inter-hemispheric electron reflections within pulsating aurora

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samara, M.; Michell, R.; Khazanov, G. V.; Grubbs, G. A., II

    2017-12-01

    Magnetosphere-Ionosphere coupling is exhibited in reflected primary and secondary electrons which constitute the second step in the formation of the total precipitating electron distribution. While they have largely been missing from the current theoretical studies of particle precipitation, ground based observations point to the existence of a reflected electron population. We present evidence that pulsating aurora is caused by electrons bouncing back and forth between the two hemispheres. This means that these electrons are responsible for some of the total light in the aurora, a possibility that has largely been ignored in theoretical models. Pulsating auroral events imaged optically at high time resolution present direct observational evidence in agreement with the inter-hemispheric electron bouncing predicted by the SuperThermal Electron Trans-port (STET) model. Immediately following each of the `pulsation-on' times are equally spaced, and subsequently fainter pulsations, which can be explained by the primary precipitating electrons reflecting upwards from the ionosphere, traveling to the opposite hemisphere, and reflecting upwards again. The high time-resolution of these data, combined with the short duration of the `pulsation-on' time ( 1 s) and the relatively long spacing between pulsations ( 6 to 9 s) made it possible to observe the faint optical pulses caused by the reflected electrons coming from the opposite hemisphere. These results are significant and have broad implications because they highlight that the formation of the auroral electron distributions within regions of diffuse and pulsating aurora contain contributions from reflected primary and secondary electrons. These processes can ultimately lead to larger fluxes than expected when considering only the primary injection of magnetospheric electrons.

  16. Electronic and optical properties of diamond/organic semiconductor heterostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gajewski, Wojciech; Garrido, Jose; Niedermeier, Martin; Stutzmann, Martin [Walter Schottky Institute, TU Muenchen, Am Coulombwall 3, 85748 Garching (Germany); Williams, Oliver; Haenen, Ken [Institute for Materials Research, University of Hasselt, Wetenschapspark 1, BE-3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium)

    2007-07-01

    Different diamond substrates (single crystalline: SCD, poly-crystalline: PCD and nano-crystalline: NCD) were used to investigate the electronic and optical properties of the diamond/organic semiconductor heterostructures. Layers of a poly[ethynyl-(2-decyloxy-5methoxy)benzene] - PEB, pentacene and 4-nitro-biphenyl-4-diazonium cations - Ph-Ph-NO{sub 2} were prepared by spin coating, thermal evaporation and grafting, respectively. The measurements of the electronic transport along the organic layer were performed using a Hg probe as well as Hall effect measurements in the temperature range 70-400 K. The I-V characteristics of the B-doped diamond/organic semiconductor heterostructures were measured at room temperature by means of the Hg probe. Undoped IIa and undoped PCD films were used for a study of the optical and optoelectronic properties of prepared heterostructures. The influence of the organic layer homogeneity and layer thickness on the optical properties will be discussed. Furthermore, preliminary data on perpendicular and parallel transport in the heterostructures layer will be reported.

  17. Electronic and Optical Properties of Twisted Bilayer Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shengqiang

    The ability to isolate single atomic layers of van der Waals materials has led to renewed interest in the electronic and optical properties of these materials as they can be fundamentally different at the monolayer limit. Moreover, these 2D crystals can be assembled together layer by layer, with controllable sequence and orientation, to form artificial materials that exhibit new features that are not found in monolayers nor bulk. Twisted bilayer graphene is one such prototype system formed by two monolayer graphene layers placed on top of each other with a twist angle between their lattices, whose electronic band structure depends on the twist angle. This thesis presents the efforts to explore the electronic and optical properties of twisted bilayer graphene by Raman spectroscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy measurements. We first synthesize twisted bilayer graphene with various twist angles via chemical vapor deposition. Using a combination of scanning tunneling microscopy and Raman spectroscopy, the twist angles are determined. The strength of the Raman G peak is sensitive to the electronic band structure of twisted bilayer graphene and therefore we use this peak to monitor changes upon doping. Our results demonstrate the ability to modify the electronic and optical properties of twisted bilayer graphene with doping. We also fabricate twisted bilayer graphene by controllable stacking of two graphene monolayers with a dry transfer technique. For twist angles smaller than one degree, many body interactions play an important role. It requires eight electrons per moire unit cell to fill up each band instead of four electrons in the case of a larger twist angle. For twist angles smaller than 0.4 degree, a network of domain walls separating AB and BA stacking regions forms, which are predicted to host topologically protected helical states. Using scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy, these states are confirmed to appear on the domain walls when inversion

  18. Interpretation of the electron cyclotron emission of hot ASDEX upgrade plasmas at optically thin frequencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denk, Severin Sebastian; Stroth, Ulrich [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Physik-Department E28, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, 85748 Garching (Germany); Fischer, Rainer; Poli, Emanuele; Willensdorfer, Matthias; Maj, Omar; Stober, Joerg; Suttrop, Wolfgang [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Collaboration: The ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2016-07-01

    The electron cyclotron emission diagnostic (ECE) provides routinely electron temperature (T{sub e}) measurements. ''Kinetic effects'' (relativistic mass shift and Doppler shift) can cause the measured radiation temperatures (T{sub rad}) to differ from T{sub e} at cold resonance position complicating the determination of T{sub e} from the measured radiation temperature profile (T{sub rad}). For the interpretation of such ECE measurements an electron cyclotron forward model solving the radiation transport equation for given T{sub e} and electron density profiles is in use in the framework of Integrated Data Analysis at ASDEX Upgrade. While the original model lead to improved T{sub e} profiles near the plasma edge in moderately hot H-mode discharges, vacuum approximations in the model lead to inaccuracies given large T{sub e}. In hot plasmas ''wave-plasma interaction'', i.e. the dielectric effect of the background plasma onto the electron cyclotron emission, becomes important at optical thin measured frequencies. Additionally, given moderate electron densities and large T{sub e}, the refraction of the line of sight has to be considered for the interpretation of ECE measurements with low optical depth.

  19. Optical modelling data for room temperature optical properties of organic–inorganic lead halide perovskites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yajie Jiang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The optical properties of perovskites at ambient temperatures are important both to the design of optimised solar cells as well as in other areas such as the refinement of electronic band structure calculations. Limited previous information on the optical modelling has been published. The experimental fitting parameters for optical constants of CH3NH3PbI3−xClx and CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite films are reported at 297 K as determined by detailed analysis of reflectance and transmittance data. The data in this study is related to the research article “Room temperature optical properties of organic–inorganic lead halide perovskites” in Solar Energy Materials & Solar Cells [1].

  20. Extending electro-optic detection to ultrashort electron beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. H. Helle

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available We propose a technique to extend noninvasive electro-optic detection of relativistic electron beams to bunch lengths of ≃10  fs. This is made possible by detecting the frequency mixing that occurs between the optical probe and the space charge fields of the beam, while simultaneously time resolving the resulting mixed frequency signal. The necessary formalism to describe this technique is developed and numerical solutions for various possible experimental conditions are made. These solutions are then compared to simulation results for consistency. Finally, the method to reconstruct the original bunch profile from the proposed diagnostic is discussed and an example showing a 15 fs test beam reconstructed to within an accuracy of 15% is given.

  1. Optically transparent semiconducting polymer nanonetwork for flexible and transparent electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Kilho; Park, Byoungwook; Kim, Geunjin; Kim, Chang-Hyun; Park, Sungjun; Kim, Jehan; Jung, Suhyun; Jeong, Soyeong; Kwon, Sooncheol; Kang, Hongkyu; Kim, Junghwan; Yoon, Myung-Han; Lee, Kwanghee

    2016-01-01

    Simultaneously achieving high optical transparency and excellent charge mobility in semiconducting polymers has presented a challenge for the application of these materials in future “flexible” and “transparent” electronics (FTEs). Here, by blending only a small amount (∼15 wt %) of a diketopyrrolopyrrole-based semiconducting polymer (DPP2T) into an inert polystyrene (PS) matrix, we introduce a polymer blend system that demonstrates both high field-effect transistor (FET) mobility and excellent optical transparency that approaches 100%. We discover that in a PS matrix, DPP2T forms a web-like, continuously connected nanonetwork that spreads throughout the thin film and provides highly efficient 2D charge pathways through extended intrachain conjugation. The remarkable physical properties achieved using our approach enable us to develop prototype high-performance FTE devices, including colorless all-polymer FET arrays and fully transparent FET-integrated polymer light-emitting diodes. PMID:27911774

  2. Localized second-order optical potential for electron scattering in terms of imaginary-frequency susceptibilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valone, S.M.; Truhlar, D.G.; Thirumialai, D.

    1982-01-01

    A local approximation to the second-order optical potential for elastic scattering of low-energy electrons from ground-state atoms is expressed in terms of the imaginary-frequency susceptibilities of the atom due to a point charge and to modified perturbing potentials. This provides a basis for the physically appealing concept of regarding the perturbation due to the projectile as having a position-dependent effective frequency associated with it. The result is extended to higher energies with the use of the concept of a local kinetic energy. With a semiclassical approximation the result reduces to a simple general form that should be useful for model potential studies of electron-atom and electron-molecule scattering. Alternatively, variational functionals for the susceptibilities can be used to calculate the approximate optical potential most rigorously without making effective-frequency, average-kinetic-energy, or semiclassical approximations. Intermediate levels of rigor are also possible

  3. Simulation of multicomponent light source for optical-electronic system of color analysis objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peretiagin, Vladimir S.; Alekhin, Artem A.; Korotaev, Valery V.

    2016-04-01

    Development of lighting technology has led to possibility of using LEDs in the specialized devices for outdoor, industrial (decorative and accent) and domestic lighting. In addition, LEDs and devices based on them are widely used for solving particular problems. For example, the LED devices are widely used for lighting of vegetables and fruit (for their sorting or growing), textile products (for the control of its quality), minerals (for their sorting), etc. Causes of active introduction LED technology in different systems, including optical-electronic devices and systems, are a large choice of emission color and LED structure, that defines the spatial, power, thermal and other parameters. Furthermore, multi-element and color devices of lighting with adjustable illumination properties can be designed and implemented by using LEDs. However, devices based on LEDs require more attention if you want to provide a certain nature of the energy or color distribution at all the work area (area of analysis or observation) or surface of the object. This paper is proposed a method of theoretical modeling of the lighting devices. The authors present the models of RGB multicomponent light source applied to optical-electronic system for the color analysis of mineral objects. The possibility of formation the uniform and homogeneous on energy and color illumination of the work area for this system is presented. Also authors showed how parameters and characteristics of optical radiation receiver (by optical-electronic system) affect on the energy, spatial, spectral and colorimetric properties of a multicomponent light source.

  4. Optical rotation and electron spin resonance of an electro-optically active polythiophene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, Hiromasa

    2010-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The electro-chiroptical polythiophene displays optical rotation at wavelengths corresponding to the doping band observable in the absorption spectra. The formation of polarons on the main-chain is confirmed by electron spin resonance measurements. - Abstract: A chiroptical polythiophene, is synthesized by electrolytic polymerization in a cholesteric liquid crystal electrolyte solution. The polymer displays a fingerprint texture similar to that of the cholesteric electrolyte solution. Upon electrochemical doping, the polymer displays optical rotation at wavelengths corresponding to the doping band observable in the absorption spectra. The formation of polarons on the main-chain is confirmed by electron spin resonance measurements. The results demonstrate the intermolecular chirality of polarons in this π-conjugated polymer, indicating continuum delocalized polarons are in a three-dimensional helical environment.

  5. Optical conductivity and electronic Raman response of cuprate superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanyolos, A.; Dora, B.; Virosztek, A.

    2010-01-01

    We present the results of detailed analytical calculations for the in-plane optical conductivity and the electronic Raman susceptibility in quasi two-dimensional systems possessing a ground state with two competing order parameters: a d-wave density wave (dDW) and d-wave superconductor (dSC). In the coexisting dDW+dSC phase we determine the frequency dependence of these correlation functions in the presence of randomly distributed non-magnetic impurities in the unitary limit.

  6. Quantum theory of the optical and electronic properties of semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Haug, Hartmut

    1990-01-01

    The current technological revolution in the development of computing devices has created a demand for a textbook on the quantum theory of the electronic and optical properties of semiconductors and semiconductor devices. This book successfully fulfills this need. Based on lectures given by the authors, it is a comprehensive introduction for researchers or graduate-level students to the subject. Certain sections can also serve as a graduate-level textbook for use in solid state physics courses or for more specialized courses. The final chapters establish a direct link to current research in sem

  7. Wave-optics modeling of the optical-transport line for passive optical stochastic cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andorf, M. B.; Lebedev, V. A.; Piot, P.; Ruan, J.

    2018-03-01

    Optical stochastic cooling (OSC) is expected to enable fast cooling of dense particle beams. Transition from microwave to optical frequencies enables an achievement of stochastic cooling rates which are orders of magnitude higher than ones achievable with the classical microwave based stochastic cooling systems. A subsystemcritical to the OSC scheme is the focusing optics used to image radiation from the upstream "pickup" undulator to the downstream "kicker" undulator. In this paper, we present simulation results using wave-optics calculation carried out with the SYNCHROTRON RADIATION WORKSHOP (SRW). Our simulations are performed in support to a proof-of-principle experiment planned at the Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA) at Fermilab. The calculations provide an estimate of the energy kick received by a 100-MeV electron as it propagates in the kicker undulator and interacts with the electromagnetic pulse it radiated at an earlier time while traveling through the pickup undulator.

  8. Wave-Optics Modeling of the Optical-Transport Line for Passive Optical Stochastic Cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andorf, M. B. [NICADD, DeKalb; Lebedev, V. A. [Fermilab; Piot, P. [Fermilab; Ruan, J. [Fermilab

    2018-03-01

    Optical stochastic cooling (OSC) is expected to enable fast cooling of dense particle beams. Transition from microwave to optical frequencies enables an achievement of stochastic cooling rates which are orders of magnitude higher than ones achievable with the classical microwave based stochastic cooling systems. A subsytem critical to the OSC scheme is the focusing optics used to image radiation from the upstream "pickup" undulator to the downstream "kicker" undulator. In this paper, we present simulation results using wave-optics calculation carried out with the {\\sc Synchrotron Radiation Workshop} (SRW). Our simulations are performed in support to a proof-of-principle experiment planned at the Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA) at Fermilab. The calculations provide an estimate of the energy kick received by a 100-MeV electron as it propagates in the kicker undulator and interacts with the electromagnetic pulse it radiated at an earlier time while traveling through the pickup undulator.

  9. Electronic and Optical Properties of Aluminum Oxide Before and After Surface Reduction by Ar+ Bombardment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Tahir

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The electronic and optical properties of a-Al2O3 after induced by 3-keV Ar+ sputtering have been studied quantitatively by use of reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy (REELS spectra. The band gap values of a-Al2O3 was determined from the onset values of the energy loss spectrum to the background level of REELS spectra as a function of time Ar+ bombardment. The bandgap changes from 8.4 eV before sputtering to 6.2 eV after 4 minutes of sputtering.The optical properties of α-Al2O3 thin films have been determined by comparing the experimental cross section obtained from reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy with the theoretical inelastic scattering cross section, deduced from the simulated energy loss function (ELF by using QUEELS-ε(k-REELS software. The peak assignments are based on ELF and compared with reported data on the electronic structure of α-Al2O3 obtained using different techniques. The results demonstrate that the electronic and optical properties before and after surface reduction will provide further understanding in the fundamental properties of α-Al2O3 which will be useful in the design, modeling and analysis of devices applications performance.

  10. Optical beam diagnostics at the Electron Stretcher Accelerator ELSA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zander, Sven

    2013-10-01

    At the ELectron Stretcher Accelerator ELSA, a resonant excitation of the horizontal particle oscillations is used to extract the electrons to the experiments. This so-called resonance extraction influences the properties of the extracted beam. The emittance, as a number of the beam quality, was determined by using synchrotron light monitors. To enable broad investigations of the emittance a system of synchrotron light monitors was set up. This system was used to measure the influence of the extraction method on the emittance. Time resolved measurements were conducted to investigate the development of the emittance during an accelerator cycle. To improve the optical beam diagnostics a new beamline to an external laboratory was constructed. There, a new high resolution synchrotron light monitor was commissioned. In addition, a streak camera has been installed to enable longitudinal diagnostics of the beam profiles. First measurements of the longitudinal charge distribution with a time resolution in the range of a few picoseconds were conducted successfully.

  11. Correlative Stochastic Optical Reconstruction Microscopy and Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Doory; Deerinck, Thomas J.; Sigal, Yaron M.; Babcock, Hazen P.; Ellisman, Mark H.; Zhuang, Xiaowei

    2015-01-01

    Correlative fluorescence light microscopy and electron microscopy allows the imaging of spatial distributions of specific biomolecules in the context of cellular ultrastructure. Recent development of super-resolution fluorescence microscopy allows the location of molecules to be determined with nanometer-scale spatial resolution. However, correlative super-resolution fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy (EM) still remains challenging because the optimal specimen preparation and imaging conditions for super-resolution fluorescence microscopy and EM are often not compatible. Here, we have developed several experiment protocols for correlative stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM) and EM methods, both for un-embedded samples by applying EM-specific sample preparations after STORM imaging and for embedded and sectioned samples by optimizing the fluorescence under EM fixation, staining and embedding conditions. We demonstrated these methods using a variety of cellular targets. PMID:25874453

  12. Electron-plasmon model in the electron liquid theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.V.Vavrukh

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Here we propose an accurate approach to the description of the electron liquid model in the electron and plasmon terms. Our ideas in the present paper are close to the conception of the collective variables which was developed in the papers of Bohm and Pines. However we use another body of mathematics in the transition to the expanded space of variable particles and plasmons realized by the transition operator. It is evident that in the Random Phase Approximation (RPA, the model which consists of two interactive subsystems of electrons and plasmons is equivalent to the electron liquid model with Coulomb interaction.

  13. Optical Thermal Characterization Enables High-Performance Electronics Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-02-01

    NREL developed a modeling and experimental strategy to characterize thermal performance of materials. The technique provides critical data on thermal properties with relevance for electronics packaging applications. Thermal contact resistance and bulk thermal conductivity were characterized for new high-performance materials such as thermoplastics, boron-nitride nanosheets, copper nanowires, and atomically bonded layers. The technique is an important tool for developing designs and materials that enable power electronics packaging with small footprint, high power density, and low cost for numerous applications.

  14. Precision laser processing for micro electronics and fiber optic manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Andrew; Osborne, Mike; Foster-Turner, Gideon; Dinkel, Duane W.

    2008-02-01

    The application of laser based materials processing for precision micro scale manufacturing in the electronics and fiber optic industry is becoming increasingly widespread and accepted. This presentation will review latest laser technologies available and discuss the issues to be considered in choosing the most appropriate laser and processing parameters. High repetition rate, short duration pulsed lasers have improved rapidly in recent years in terms of both performance and reliability enabling flexible, cost effective processing of many material types including metal, silicon, plastic, ceramic and glass. Demonstrating the relevance of laser micromachining, application examples where laser processing is in use for production will be presented, including miniaturization of surface mount capacitors by applying a laser technique for demetalization of tracks in the capacitor manufacturing process and high quality laser machining of fiber optics including stripping, cleaving and lensing, resulting in optical quality finishes without the need for traditional polishing. Applications include telecoms, biomedical and sensing. OpTek Systems was formed in 2000 and provide fully integrated systems and sub contract services for laser processes. They are headquartered in the UK and are establishing a presence in North America through a laser processing facility in South Carolina and sales office in the North East.

  15. Implementation of Optical Characterization for Flexible Organic Electronics Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laskarakis, A.; Logothetidis, S.

    One of the most rapidly evolving sectors of the modern science and technology is the flexible organic electronic devices (FEDs) that are expected to significantly improve and revolutionize our everyday life. The FED application includes the generation of electricity by renewable sources (by organic photovoltaic cells - OPVs), power storage (thin film batteries), the visualization of information (by organic displays), the working and living environment (ambient lighting, sensors), safety, market (smart labels, radio frequency identification tags - RFID), textiles (smart fabrics with embedded display and sensor capabilities), as well as healthcare (smart sensors for vital sign monitoring), etc. Although there has been important progresses in inorganic-based Si devices, there are numerous advances in the organic (semiconducting, conducting), inorganic, and hybrid (organic-inorganic) materials that exhibit desirable properties and stability, and in the synthesis and preparation methods. The understanding of the organic material properties can lead to the fast progress of the functionality and performance of FEDs. The investigation of the optical properties of these materials can promote the understanding of the optical, electrical, structural properties of organic semiconductors and electrodes and can contribute to the optimization of the synthesis process and the tuning of their structure and morphology. In this chapter, we will describe briefly some of the advances toward the implementation of optical characterization methods, such as Spectroscopic Ellipsometry (SE) from the infrared to the visible and ultraviolet spectral region for the study of materials (flexible polymer substrates, barrier layers, transparent electrodes) to be used for application in the fabrication of FEDs.

  16. Controlling the optical field chaos in storage ring free-electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Wenjie

    1995-01-01

    The controlling of optical field chaos in a storage ring free-electron laser oscillator is discussed by using a phenomenal model. A novel method (which is called the 'beating method') of controlling chaos in a nonlinear dynamical system described by non-autonomous ordinary differential equations was developed. The result of theoretical analysis and numerical simulation shows that the optical field chaos in a storage ring free-electron laser oscillator can be suppressed and a periodic laser intensity can be obtained when a weak periodic control field is added to the optical cavity. The validity of this method of eliminating chaos is confirmed by the fact that the leading Lyapunov characteristic exponent of the system changes from a positive real number to a negative one. A further research is carried out, and it is found that only when the period of the control field equals to an integral multiple of that of the gain modulation in the optical cavity can the optical field chaos be suppressed. This means that the 'beating method' of controlling chaos is a kind of resonant method. A way to determine the 'best beating position' in the phase trajectory has also been obtained

  17. Femtosecond laser excitation of dielectric materials: experiments and modeling of optical properties and ablation depths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wædegaard, Kristian Juncher; Frislev, Martin Thomas; Balling, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Modeling of the interaction between a dielec- tric material and ultrashort laser pulses provides the tem- poral evolution of the electronic excitation and the optical properties of the dielectric. Experimentally determined re- flectances and ablation depths for sapphire are compared...... to the calculations. A decrease in reflectance at high fluences is observed experimentally, which demonstrates the neces- sity of a temperature-dependent electron scattering rate in the model. The comparison thus provides new constraints on the optical parameters of the model....

  18. Electronic, structural, and optical properties of crystalline yttria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Y.; Gu, Z.; Ching, W.Y.

    1997-01-01

    The electronic structure of crystalline Y 2 O 3 is investigated by first-principles calculations within the local-density approximation (LDA) of the density-functional theory. Results are presented for the band structure, the total density of states (DOS), the atom- and orbital-resolved partial DOS, effective charges, bond order, and charge-density distributions. Partial covalent character in the Y-O bonding is shown, and the nonequivalency of the two Y sites is demonstrated. The calculated electronic structure is compared with a variety of available experimental data. The total energy of the crystal is calculated as a function of crystal volume. A bulk modulus B of 183 Gpa and a pressure coefficient B ' of 4.01 are obtained, which are in good agreement with compression data. An LDA band gap of 4.54 eV at Γ is obtained which increases with pressure at a rate of dE g /dP=0.012eV/Gpa at the equilibrium volume. Also investigated are the optical properties of Y 2 O 3 up to a photon energy of 20 eV. The calculated complex dielectric function and electron-energy-loss function are in good agreement with experimental data. A static dielectric constant of var-epsilon(0)=3.20 is obtained. It is also found that the bottom of the conduction band consists of a single band, and direct optical transition at Γ between the top of the valence band and the bottom of the conduction band may be symmetry forbidden. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  19. Quantum Electrostatic Model for Optical Properties of Nanoscale Gold Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Haoliang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The optical properties of thin gold films with thickness varying from 2.5 nm to 30 nm are investigated. Due to the quantum size effect, the optical constants of the thin gold film deviate from the Drude model for bulk material as film thickness decreases, especially around 2.5 nm, where the electron energy level becomes discrete. A theory based on the self-consistent solution of the Schrödinger equation and the Poisson equation is proposed and its predictions agree well with experimental results.

  20. Analysis of secondary electron emission for conducting materials using 4-grid LEED/AES optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patino, M I; Wirz, R E; Raitses, Y; Koel, B E

    2015-01-01

    A facility utilizing 4-grid optics for LEED/AES (low energy electron diffraction/Auger electron spectroscopy) was developed to measure the total secondary electron yield and secondary electron energy distribution function for conducting materials. The facility and experimental procedure were validated with measurements of 50–500 eV primary electrons impacting graphite. The total yield was calculated from measurements of the secondary electron current (i) from the sample and (ii) from the collection assembly, by biasing each surface. Secondary electron yield results from both methods agreed well with each other and were within the spread of previous results for the total yield from graphite. Additionally, measurements of the energy distribution function of secondary electrons from graphite are provided for a wider range of incident electron energies. These results can be used in modeling plasma-wall interactions in plasmas bounded by graphite walls, such as are found in plasma thrusters, and divertors and limiters of magnetic fusion devices. (paper)

  1. Extended Hubbard models for ultracold atoms in optical lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juergensen, Ole

    2015-06-05

    In this thesis, the phase diagrams and dynamics of various extended Hubbard models for ultracold atoms in optical lattices are studied. Hubbard models are the primary description for many interacting particles in periodic potentials with the paramount example of the electrons in solids. The very same models describe the behavior of ultracold quantum gases trapped in the periodic potentials generated by interfering beams of laser light. These optical lattices provide an unprecedented access to the fundamentals of the many-particle physics that govern the properties of solid-state materials. They can be used to simulate solid-state systems and validate the approximations and simplifications made in theoretical models. This thesis revisits the numerous approximations underlying the standard Hubbard models with special regard to optical lattice experiments. The incorporation of the interaction between particles on adjacent lattice sites leads to extended Hubbard models. Offsite interactions have a strong influence on the phase boundaries and can give rise to novel correlated quantum phases. The extended models are studied with the numerical methods of exact diagonalization and time evolution, a cluster Gutzwiller approximation, as well as with the strong-coupling expansion approach. In total, this thesis demonstrates the high relevance of beyond-Hubbard processes for ultracold atoms in optical lattices. Extended Hubbard models can be employed to tackle unexplained problems of solid-state physics as well as enter previously inaccessible regimes.

  2. Extended Hubbard models for ultracold atoms in optical lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juergensen, Ole

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis, the phase diagrams and dynamics of various extended Hubbard models for ultracold atoms in optical lattices are studied. Hubbard models are the primary description for many interacting particles in periodic potentials with the paramount example of the electrons in solids. The very same models describe the behavior of ultracold quantum gases trapped in the periodic potentials generated by interfering beams of laser light. These optical lattices provide an unprecedented access to the fundamentals of the many-particle physics that govern the properties of solid-state materials. They can be used to simulate solid-state systems and validate the approximations and simplifications made in theoretical models. This thesis revisits the numerous approximations underlying the standard Hubbard models with special regard to optical lattice experiments. The incorporation of the interaction between particles on adjacent lattice sites leads to extended Hubbard models. Offsite interactions have a strong influence on the phase boundaries and can give rise to novel correlated quantum phases. The extended models are studied with the numerical methods of exact diagonalization and time evolution, a cluster Gutzwiller approximation, as well as with the strong-coupling expansion approach. In total, this thesis demonstrates the high relevance of beyond-Hubbard processes for ultracold atoms in optical lattices. Extended Hubbard models can be employed to tackle unexplained problems of solid-state physics as well as enter previously inaccessible regimes.

  3. Electronic and optical properties of vacancy defects in single-layer transition metal dichalcogenides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, M. A.; Erementchouk, Mikhail; Hendrickson, Joshua; Leuenberger, Michael N.

    2017-06-01

    A detailed first-principles study has been performed to evaluate the electronic and optical properties of single-layer (SL) transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) (M X 2 ; M = transition metal such as Mo, W, and X = S, Se, Te), in the presence of vacancy defects (VDs). Defects usually play an important role in tailoring electronic, optical, and magnetic properties of semiconductors. We consider three types of VDs in SL TMDCs: (i) X vacancy, (ii) X2 vacancy, and (iii) M vacancy. We show that VDs lead to localized defect states (LDS) in the band structure, which in turn gives rise to sharp transitions in in-plane and out-of-plane optical susceptibilities, χ∥ and χ⊥. The effects of spin-orbit coupling (SOC) are also considered. We find that SOC splitting in LDS is directly related to the atomic number of the transition metal atoms. Apart from electronic and optical properties we also find magnetic signatures (local magnetic moment of ˜μB ) in MoSe2 in the presence of the Mo vacancy, which breaks the time-reversal symmetry and therefore lifts the Kramers degeneracy. We show that a simple qualitative tight-binding model (TBM), involving only the hopping between atoms surrounding the vacancy with an on-site SOC term, is sufficient to capture the essential features of LDS. In addition, the existence of the LDS can be understood from the solution of the two-dimensional Dirac Hamiltonian by employing infinite mass boundary conditions. In order to provide a clear description of the optical absorption spectra, we use group theory to derive the optical selection rules between LDS for both χ∥ and χ⊥.

  4. Interband optical absorption in the Wannier-Stark ladder under the electron-LO-phonon resonance condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Govorov, A.O.

    1993-08-01

    Interband optical absorption in the Wannier-Stark ladder in the presence of the electron-LO-phonon resonance is investigated theoretically. The electron-LO-phonon resonance occurs when the energy spacing between adjacent Stark-ladder levels coincides with the LO-phonon energy. We propose a model describing the polaron effect in a superlattice. Calculations show that the absorption line shape is strongly modified due to the polaron effect under the electron-LO-phonon resonance condition. We consider optical phenomena in a normal magnetic field that leads to enhancement of polaron effects. (author). 17 refs, 5 figs

  5. Optical and electronic properties of polyvinyl alcohol doped with pairs of mixed valence metal ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulinski, Mircea; Kuncser, Victor; Plapcianu, Carmen; Krautwald, Stefan; Franke, Hilmar; Rotaru, P; Filoti, George

    2004-01-01

    The electronic mechanisms induced by the UV exposure of thin films of polyvinyl alcohol doped with pairs of mixed valence metal ions were studied in relation to their optical behaviour by Moessbauer spectroscopy and optical absorption. The results obtained definitely point to the role of each element from the pair in the electronic mechanism involved, with influence on the optical properties regarding applications in real-time holography and integrated optics

  6. Magnetic, electronic, dielectric and optical properties of Pr(Ca:Sr)MnO 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sichelschmidt, J.; Paraskevopoulos, M.; Brando, M.; Wehn, R.; Ivannikov, D.; Mayr, F.; Pucher, K.; Hemberger, J.; Pimenov, A.; Krug von Nidda, H.-A.; Lunkenheimer, P.; Ivanov, V. Yu.; Mukhin, A. A.; Balbashov, A. M.; Loidl, A.

    2001-03-01

    The charge-ordered perovskite Pr0.65Ca0.28Sr0.07MnO3 was investigated by means of magnetic susceptibility, specific heat, dielectric and optical spectroscopy and electron-spin resonance techniques. Under moderate magnetic fields, the charge order melts yielding colossal magnetoresistance effects with changes of the resistivity over eleven orders of magnitude. The optical conductivity is studied from audio frequencies far into the visible spectral regime. Below the phonon modes hopping conductivity is detected. Beyond the phonon modes the optical conductivity is explained by polaronic excitations out of a bound state. ESR techniques yield detailed informations on the (H,T ) phase diagram and reveal a broadening of the linewidth which can be modeled in terms of activated polaron hopping.

  7. Nonlinear optical model for strip plasmonic waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lysenko, Oleg; Bache, Morten; Lavrinenko, Andrei

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a theoretical model of nonlinear optical properties for strip plasmonic waveguides. The particular waveguides geometry that we investigate contains a gold core, adhesion layers, and silicon dioxide cladding. It is shown that the third-order susceptibility of the gold core...... significantly depends on the layer thickness and has the dominant contribution to the effective third-order susceptibility of the long-range plasmon polariton mode. This results in two nonlinear optical effects in plasmonic waveguides, which we experimentally observed and reported in [Opt. Lett. 41, 317 (2016...... approaches. (C) 2016 Optical Society of America...

  8. An automatic chip structure optical inspection system for electronic components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Zhichao; Xue, Bindang; Liang, Jiyuan; Wang, Ke; Chen, Junzhang; Liu, Yunhe

    2018-01-01

    An automatic chip structure inspection system based on machine vision is presented to ensure the reliability of electronic components. It consists of four major modules, including a metallographic microscope, a Gigabit Ethernet high-resolution camera, a control system and a high performance computer. An auto-focusing technique is presented to solve the problem that the chip surface is not on the same focusing surface under the high magnification of the microscope. A panoramic high-resolution image stitching algorithm is adopted to deal with the contradiction between resolution and field of view, caused by different sizes of electronic components. In addition, we establish a database to storage and callback appropriate parameters to ensure the consistency of chip images of electronic components with the same model. We use image change detection technology to realize the detection of chip images of electronic components. The system can achieve high-resolution imaging for chips of electronic components with various sizes, and clearly imaging for the surface of chip with different horizontal and standardized imaging for ones with the same model, and can recognize chip defects.

  9. Vlasov fluid model with electron pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerwin, R.

    1975-11-01

    The Vlasov-ion, fluid-electron model of Freidberg for studying the linear stability of hot-ion pinch configurations is here extended to include electron pressure. Within the framework of an adiabatic electron-gas picture, it is shown that this model is still amenable to the numerical methods described by Lewis and Freidberg

  10. Transmission electron microscope sample holder with optical features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milas, Mirko [Port Jefferson, NY; Zhu, Yimei [Stony Brook, NY; Rameau, Jonathan David [Coram, NY

    2012-03-27

    A sample holder for holding a sample to be observed for research purposes, particularly in a transmission electron microscope (TEM), generally includes an external alignment part for directing a light beam in a predetermined beam direction, a sample holder body in optical communication with the external alignment part and a sample support member disposed at a distal end of the sample holder body opposite the external alignment part for holding a sample to be analyzed. The sample holder body defines an internal conduit for the light beam and the sample support member includes a light beam positioner for directing the light beam between the sample holder body and the sample held by the sample support member.

  11. Simulation of electron beam formation and transport in a gas-filled electron-optical system with a plasma emitter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grishkov, A. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of High Current Electronics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation); Kornilov, S. Yu., E-mail: kornilovsy@gmail.com; Rempe, N. G. [Tomsk State University of Control Systems and Radioelectronics (Russian Federation); Shidlovskiy, S. V. [Tomsk State University (Russian Federation); Shklyaev, V. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of High Current Electronics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation)

    2016-07-15

    The results of computer simulations of the electron-optical system of an electron gun with a plasma emitter are presented. The simulations are performed using the KOBRA3-INP, XOOPIC, and ANSYS codes. The results describe the electron beam formation and transport. The electron trajectories are analyzed. The mechanisms of gas influence on the energy inhomogeneity of the beam and its current in the regions of beam primary formation, acceleration, and transport are described. Recommendations for optimizing the electron-optical system with a plasma emitter are presented.

  12. Geometry, electronic structures and optical properties of phosphorus nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Tao; Hashmi, Arqum; Hong, Jisang

    2015-01-01

    Using a first principles approach, we investigated the geometry, electronic structures, and optical properties of phosphorus nanotubes (PNTs). Two possible 1D configurations, the so-called α-PNTs and β-PNTs, are proposed, which are structurally related to blue and black phosphorus monolayers, respectively. Hereby, we predict that both armchair and zigzag geometries can be synthesized in α-PNTs, but the zigzag form of β-PNT is highly unfavorable because of large strain and conformation energies. The band gap of α-PNTs is expected to be ∼2.67 eV, and this is insensitive to the chirality when the tube’s inner diameter is larger than 1.3 nm, while the armchair β-PNTs have a much smaller band gap. Interestingly, we find nearly flat band structures in the zigzag α-PNT system. This may indicate that an excited particle–hole pair has a huge effective mass. We also find asymmetric optical properties with respect to the polarization direction. The armchair α-PNT for parallel polarization shows a large refractive index of 2.6 near the ultraviolet wavelength, and also we find that the refractive index can be even smaller than 1 in certain frequency ranges. The zigzag tubes show very weak reflectivity for parallel polarization, while the armchair tube displays high reflectivity. (paper)

  13. Optical properties of electron-irradiated gallium phosphide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brailovskii, E.Yu.; Grigoryan, N.E.; Eritsyan, G.N.

    1980-01-01

    Results of optical absorption and photoconductivity measurements in the 0.1 to 2.4 eV range of GaP crystals irradiated with 7.5 and 50 MeV electrons are presented. The absorption of irradiated crystals near the edge can be represented by two exponential regions. In the free carrier absorption region one can observe as a result of irradiation a decrease of the power index p in the dependence α proportional to lambdap. Photoconductivity with long-time relaxation takes place in the spectral interval where the additional absorption is observed. The quenching of residual conductivity can be observed at hν=1.0eV. Variations in absorption and photoconductivity are attributed to the 'tails' of density states near the zone edges arising at introduction of both point defects and disordered regions. At hν=2.1eV one can observe a resonance band which is attributed to intra-centre transitions on point defects. A recovery of the optical properties of GaP at annealing is studied. In heavily irradiated GaP crystals point defects can form gatherings which display themselves as disordered regions. (author)

  14. Electron transport and nonlinear optical properties of substituted aryldimesityl boranes: a DFT study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altaf Hussain Pandith

    Full Text Available A comprehensive theoretical study was carried out on a series of aryldimesityl borane (DMB derivatives using Density Functional theory. Optimized geometries and electronic parameters like electron affinity, reorganization energy, frontiers molecular contours, polarizability and hyperpolarizability have been calculated by employing B3PW91/6-311++G (d, p level of theory. Our results show that the Hammett function and geometrical parameters correlates well with the reorganization energies and hyperpolarizability for the series of DMB derivatives studied in this work. The orbital energy study reveals that the electron releasing substituents increase the LUMO energies and electron withdrawing substituents decrease the LUMO energies, reflecting the electron transport character of aryldimesityl borane derivatives. From frontier molecular orbitals diagram it is evident that mesityl rings act as the donor, while the phenylene and Boron atom appear as acceptors in these systems. The calculated hyperpolarizability of secondary amine derivative of DMB is 40 times higher than DMB (1. The electronic excitation contributions to the hyperpolarizability studied by using TDDFT calculation shows that hyperpolarizability correlates well with dipole moment in ground and excited state and excitation energy in terms of the two-level model. Thus the results of these calculations can be helpful in designing the DMB derivatives for efficient electron transport and nonlinear optical material by appropriate substitution with electron releasing or withdrawing substituents on phenyl ring of DMB system.

  15. Modeling and optimization of LCD optical performance

    CERN Document Server

    Yakovlev, Dmitry A; Kwok, Hoi-Sing

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this book is to present the theoretical foundations of modeling the optical characteristics of liquid crystal displays, critically reviewing modern modeling methods and examining areas of applicability. The modern matrix formalisms of optics of anisotropic stratified media, most convenient for solving problems of numerical modeling and optimization of LCD, will be considered in detail. The benefits of combined use of the matrix methods will be shown, which generally provides the best compromise between physical adequacy and accuracy with computational efficiency and optimization fac

  16. Electronic band structures and optical properties of type-II superlattice photodetectors with interfacial effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Peng-Fei; Mou, Shin; Chuang, Shun Lien

    2012-01-30

    The electronic band structures and optical properties of type-II superlattice (T2SL) photodetectors in the mid-infrared (IR) range are investigated. We formulate a rigorous band structure model using the 8-band k · p method to include the conduction and valence band mixing. After solving the 8 × 8 Hamiltonian and deriving explicitly the new momentum matrix elements in terms of envelope functions, optical transition rates are obtained through the Fermi's golden rule under various doping and injection conditions. Optical measurements on T2SL photodetectors are compared with our model and show good agreement. Our modeling results of quantum structures connect directly to the device-level design and simulation. The predicted doping effect is readily applicable to the optimization of photodetectors. We further include interfacial (IF) layers to study the significance of their effect. Optical properties of T2SLs are expected to have a large tunable range by controlling the thickness and material composition of the IF layers. Our model provides an efficient tool for the designs of novel photodetectors.

  17. Progress in Studies of Electron-Cloud-Induced Optics Distortions at CesrTA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crittenden, James; Penn, Gregory; Venturini, Marco; Harkay, Katherine; Holtzapple, Robert; Pivi, Mauro; Wang, Lanfa

    2012-01-01

    The Cornell Electron Storage Ring Test Accelerator (CesrTA) program has included extensive measurements of coherent betatron tune shifts for a variety of electron and positron beam energies, bunch population levels, and bunch train configurations. The tune shifts have been shown to result primarily from the interaction of the beam with the space-charge field of the beam-induced low-energy electron cloud in the vacuum chamber. Comparison to several advanced electron cloud simulation codes has allowed determination of the sensitivity of these measurements to physical parameters characterizing the synchrotron radiation flux, the production of photo-electrons on the vacuum chamber wall, the beam emittance, lattice optics, and the secondary-electron yield model. We report on progress in understanding the cloud buildup and decay mechanisms in magnetic fields and in field-free regions, addressing quantitatively the precise determination of the physical parameters of the modeling. Validation of these models will serve as essential input in the design of damping rings for future high-energy linear colliders.

  18. Analysis of a Thin Optical Lens Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivchenko, Vladimir V.

    2011-01-01

    In this article a thin optical lens model is considered. It is shown that the limits of its applicability are determined not only by the ratio between the thickness of the lens and the modules of the radii of curvature, but above all its geometric type. We have derived the analytical criteria for the applicability of the model for different types…

  19. A correlative optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy approach to locating nanoparticles in brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempen, Paul J; Kircher, Moritz F; de la Zerda, Adam; Zavaleta, Cristina L; Jokerst, Jesse V; Mellinghoff, Ingo K; Gambhir, Sanjiv S; Sinclair, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The growing use of nanoparticles in biomedical applications, including cancer diagnosis and treatment, demands the capability to exactly locate them within complex biological systems. In this work a correlative optical and scanning electron microscopy technique was developed to locate and observe multi-modal gold core nanoparticle accumulation in brain tumor models. Entire brain sections from mice containing orthotopic brain tumors injected intravenously with nanoparticles were imaged using both optical microscopy to identify the brain tumor, and scanning electron microscopy to identify the individual nanoparticles. Gold-based nanoparticles were readily identified in the scanning electron microscope using backscattered electron imaging as bright spots against a darker background. This information was then correlated to determine the exact location of the nanoparticles within the brain tissue. The nanoparticles were located only in areas that contained tumor cells, and not in the surrounding healthy brain tissue. This correlative technique provides a powerful method to relate the macro- and micro-scale features visible in light microscopy with the nanoscale features resolvable in scanning electron microscopy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Optically stimulated luminescence in electronic components for emergency dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geber-Bergstrand, T.; Bernhardsson, C.; Mattsson, S.; Raeaef, C.L.

    2015-01-01

    Document available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: Accidents and, luckily more rarely, attacks involving nuclear or radiological material do occur from time to time. A very possible consequence of an accident or attack of this kind is that nearby people might be exposed to ionising radiation. Since these types of exposure situations, unlike the ones occurring in medicine, are unplanned, there are no radiation-monitoring data available. For several reasons, it is nevertheless of value to find out the dose that these people have received. The first and most urgent reason is after-the-event triage, to be able to carry out proper medical treatments and also to focus the available medical assets to the persons needing it the most. This is where different retrospective dosimetry techniques, such as luminescence, can be employed. Various electronic components from mobile phones and other portable devices have been studied using optically stimulated luminescence for their potential use in retrospective dosimetry. Previous investigations have been performed in laboratory conditions and have showed very promising properties for emergency dosimetry. In this study, the more practical parts of using electronic components in retrospective dosimetry have been considered. In a triage situation, one of the key parameters to consider is time; thus, effort has been made to speed up the readout procedure, yet without the loss of too much accuracy. (authors)

  1. Investigation of porous asphalt microstructure using optical and electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulikakos, L D; Partl, M N

    2010-11-01

    Direct observations of porous asphalt concrete samples in their natural state using optical and electron microscopy techniques led to useful information regarding the microstructure of two mixes and indicated a relationship between microstructure and in situ performance. This paper presents evidence that suboptimal microstructure can lead to premature failure thus making a first step in defining well or suboptimal performing pavements with a bottom-up approach (microstructure). Laboratory and field compaction produce different samples in terms of the microstructure. Laboratory compaction using the gyratory method has produced more microcracks in mineral aggregates after the binder had cooled. Well-performing mixes used polymer-modified binders, had a more homogeneous void structure with fewer elongated voids and better interlocking of the aggregates. Furthermore, well-performing mixes showed better distribution of the mastic and better coverage of the aggregates with bitumen. Low vacuum scanning electron microscopy showed that styrene butadiene styrene polymer modification in binder exists in the form of discontinuous globules and not continuous networks. A reduction in the polymer phase was observed as a result of aging and in-service use. © 2010 The Authors Journal compilation © 2010 The Royal Microscopical Society.

  2. Stable aqueous dispersions of optically and electronically active phosphorene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Joohoon; Wells, Spencer A; Wood, Joshua D; Lee, Jae-Hyeok; Liu, Xiaolong; Ryder, Christopher R; Zhu, Jian; Guest, Jeffrey R; Husko, Chad A; Hersam, Mark C

    2016-10-18

    Understanding and exploiting the remarkable optical and electronic properties of phosphorene require mass production methods that avoid chemical degradation. Although solution-based strategies have been developed for scalable exfoliation of black phosphorus, these techniques have thus far used anhydrous organic solvents in an effort to minimize exposure to known oxidants, but at the cost of limited exfoliation yield and flake size distribution. Here, we present an alternative phosphorene production method based on surfactant-assisted exfoliation and postprocessing of black phosphorus in deoxygenated water. From comprehensive microscopic and spectroscopic analysis, this approach is shown to yield phosphorene dispersions that are stable, highly concentrated, and comparable to micromechanically exfoliated phosphorene in structure and chemistry. Due to the high exfoliation efficiency of this process, the resulting phosphorene flakes are thinner than anhydrous organic solvent dispersions, thus allowing the observation of layer-dependent photoluminescence down to the monolayer limit. Furthermore, to demonstrate preservation of electronic properties following solution processing, the aqueous-exfoliated phosphorene flakes are used in field-effect transistors with high drive currents and current modulation ratios. Overall, this method enables the isolation and mass production of few-layer phosphorene, which will accelerate ongoing efforts to realize a diverse range of phosphorene-based applications.

  3. Superluminescence from an optically pumped molecular tunneling junction by injection of plasmon induced hot electrons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Braun

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Here, we demonstrate a bias-driven superluminescent point light-source based on an optically pumped molecular junction (gold substrate/self-assembled molecular monolayer/gold tip of a scanning tunneling microscope, operating at ambient conditions and providing almost three orders of magnitude higher electron-to-photon conversion efficiency than electroluminescence induced by inelastic tunneling without optical pumping. A positive, steadily increasing bias voltage induces a step-like rise of the Stokes shifted optical signal emitted from the junction. This emission is strongly attenuated by reversing the applied bias voltage. At high bias voltage, the emission intensity depends non-linearly on the optical pump power. The enhanced emission can be modelled by rate equations taking into account hole injection from the tip (anode into the highest occupied orbital of the closest substrate-bound molecule (lower level and radiative recombination with an electron from above the Fermi level (upper level, hence feeding photons back by stimulated emission resonant with the gap mode. The system reflects many essential features of a superluminescent light emitting diode.

  4. Optical Coherence Tomography: Advanced Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Peter E.; Thrane, Lars; Yura, Harold T.

    2013-01-01

    - and multiple-scattering regimes is derived. An advanced Monte Carlo model for calculating the OCT signal is also derived, and the validity of this model is shown through a mathematical proof based on the extended Huygens-Fresnel principle. From the analytical model, an algorithm for enhancing OCT images...... are discussed. Finally, the Wigner phase-space distribution function is derived in a closed-form solution, which may have applications in OCT....

  5. Modeling the behavior of optical elements in radiation environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barlow, T.A.; Rhoades, C.E. Jr.; Merker, M.; Triplett, J.R.

    1986-01-01

    Calculation of heating caused by the deposition of x-rays in thin film optical elements is complicated because the mean free path of photo and autoionization electrons is comparable to the thin film thickness and thus the electron deposition cannot be considered local. This paper describes the modeling in a 1-D code of: (a) x-ray deposition and transport; (b) electron production, deposition and transport; and (c) thermal conduction and transport. X-ray transport is handled by multigroup discrete ordinates, electron transport is done by the method of characteristics, applied to the two term spherical harmonics expansion approximation (P1) to the Spencer-Lewis transport equation, and thermal transport is computed by a simple Richardson extrapolation of a backward Euler solution to the heat conduction equations. Results of a few test cases are presented. 8 refs., 26 figs., 2 tabs

  6. Density-dependent electron transport and precise modeling of GaN high electron mobility transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bajaj, Sanyam, E-mail: bajaj.10@osu.edu; Shoron, Omor F.; Park, Pil Sung; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Akyol, Fatih; Hung, Ting-Hsiang [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Reza, Shahed; Chumbes, Eduardo M. [Raytheon Integrated Defense Systems, Andover, Massachusetts 01810 (United States); Khurgin, Jacob [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Rajan, Siddharth [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Department of Material Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

    2015-10-12

    We report on the direct measurement of two-dimensional sheet charge density dependence of electron transport in AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs). Pulsed IV measurements established increasing electron velocities with decreasing sheet charge densities, resulting in saturation velocity of 1.9 × 10{sup 7 }cm/s at a low sheet charge density of 7.8 × 10{sup 11 }cm{sup −2}. An optical phonon emission-based electron velocity model for GaN is also presented. It accommodates stimulated longitudinal optical (LO) phonon emission which clamps the electron velocity with strong electron-phonon interaction and long LO phonon lifetime in GaN. A comparison with the measured density-dependent saturation velocity shows that it captures the dependence rather well. Finally, the experimental result is applied in TCAD-based device simulator to predict DC and small signal characteristics of a reported GaN HEMT. Good agreement between the simulated and reported experimental results validated the measurement presented in this report and established accurate modeling of GaN HEMTs.

  7. Density-dependent electron transport and precise modeling of GaN high electron mobility transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bajaj, Sanyam; Shoron, Omor F.; Park, Pil Sung; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Akyol, Fatih; Hung, Ting-Hsiang; Reza, Shahed; Chumbes, Eduardo M.; Khurgin, Jacob; Rajan, Siddharth

    2015-01-01

    We report on the direct measurement of two-dimensional sheet charge density dependence of electron transport in AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs). Pulsed IV measurements established increasing electron velocities with decreasing sheet charge densities, resulting in saturation velocity of 1.9 × 10 7  cm/s at a low sheet charge density of 7.8 × 10 11  cm −2 . An optical phonon emission-based electron velocity model for GaN is also presented. It accommodates stimulated longitudinal optical (LO) phonon emission which clamps the electron velocity with strong electron-phonon interaction and long LO phonon lifetime in GaN. A comparison with the measured density-dependent saturation velocity shows that it captures the dependence rather well. Finally, the experimental result is applied in TCAD-based device simulator to predict DC and small signal characteristics of a reported GaN HEMT. Good agreement between the simulated and reported experimental results validated the measurement presented in this report and established accurate modeling of GaN HEMTs

  8. Analytical model of the optical vortex microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Płocinniczak, Łukasz; Popiołek-Masajada, Agnieszka; Masajada, Jan; Szatkowski, Mateusz

    2016-04-20

    This paper presents an analytical model of the optical vortex scanning microscope. In this microscope the Gaussian beam with an embedded optical vortex is focused into the sample plane. Additionally, the optical vortex can be moved inside the beam, which allows fine scanning of the sample. We provide an analytical solution of the whole path of the beam in the system (within paraxial approximation)-from the vortex lens to the observation plane situated on the CCD camera. The calculations are performed step by step from one optical element to the next. We show that at each step, the expression for light complex amplitude has the same form with only four coefficients modified. We also derive a simple expression for the vortex trajectory of small vortex displacements.

  9. Analytical local electron-electron interaction model potentials for atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neugebauer, Johannes; Reiher, Markus; Hinze, Juergen

    2002-01-01

    Analytical local potentials for modeling the electron-electron interaction in an atom reduce significantly the computational effort in electronic structure calculations. The development of such potentials has a long history, but some promising ideas have not yet been taken into account for further improvements. We determine a local electron-electron interaction potential akin to those suggested by Green et al. [Phys. Rev. 184, 1 (1969)], which are widely used in atom-ion scattering calculations, electron-capture processes, and electronic structure calculations. Generalized Yukawa-type model potentials are introduced. This leads, however, to shell-dependent local potentials, because the origin behavior of such potentials is different for different shells as has been explicated analytically [J. Neugebauer, M. Reiher, and J. Hinze, Phys. Rev. A 65, 032518 (2002)]. It is found that the parameters that characterize these local potentials can be interpolated and extrapolated reliably for different nuclear charges and different numbers of electrons. The analytical behavior of the corresponding localized Hartree-Fock potentials at the origin and at long distances is utilized in order to reduce the number of fit parameters. It turns out that the shell-dependent form of Green's potential, which we also derive, yields results of comparable accuracy using only one shell-dependent parameter

  10. Shack-Hartmann Electron Densitometer (SHED): An Optical System for Diagnosing Free Electron Density in Laser-Produced Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Free Electron Density in Laser-Produced Plasmas by Anthony R Valenzuela Approved for public release; distribution is...AND SUBTITLE Shack-Hartmann Electron Densitometer (SHED): An Optical System for Diagnosing Free Electron Density in Laser-Produced Plasmas 5a...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The Shack-Hartmann Electron Densitometer is a novel method to diagnose ultrashort pulse laser–produced plasmas

  11. Study of the Welding Electron Gun Optical Properties for Work Piece Imaging

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vlček, Ivan

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 44, 5-6 (2009), s. 70-72 ISSN 0861-4717 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN300100702 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : electron beam welding * electron gun * electron optics design Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  12. Tuning of few-electron states and optical absorption anisotropy in GaAs quantum rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhenhua; Li, Jian; Li, Jun; Yin, Huaxiang; Liu, Yu

    2017-11-15

    The electronic and optical properties of a GaAs quantum ring (QR) with few electrons in the presence of the Rashba spin-orbit interaction (RSOI) and the Dresselhaus spin-orbit interaction (DSOI) have been investigated theoretically. The configuration interaction (CI) method is employed to calculate the eigenvalues and eigenstates of the multiple-electron QR accurately. Our numerical results demonstrate that the symmetry breaking induced by the RSOI and DSOI leads to an anisotropic distribution of multi-electron states. The Coulomb interaction offers additional modulation of the electron distribution and thus the optical absorption indices in the quantum rings. By tuning the magnetic/electric fields and/or electron numbers in a quantum ring, one can change its optical properties significantly. Our theory provides a new way to control the multi-electron states and optical properties of a QR by hybrid modulations or by electrical means only.

  13. Progress in studies of Electron-Cloud-Induced Optics Distortions at CESRTA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crittenden, J.A.; Calvey, J.R.; Dugan, G.F.; Kreinick, D.L.; Leong, Z.; Livezey, J.A.; Palmer, M.A.; Rubin, D.L.; Sagan, D.C.; Holtzapple, R.L.; Furman, M.A.; Penn, G.; Venturini, M.; Pivi, M.; Wang, L.; Harkay, K.

    2010-01-01

    The Cornell Electron Storage Ring Test Accelerator (CesrTA) program has included extensive measurements of coherent betatron tune shifts for a variety of electron and positron beam energies, bunch population levels, and bunch train configurations. The tune shifts have been shown to result primarily from the interaction of the beam with the space-charge field of the beam-induced low energy electron cloud in the vacuum chamber. Comparison to several advanced electron cloud simulation program packages has allowed determination of the sensitivity of these measurements to physical parameters characterizing the synchrotron radiation flux, the production of photoelectrons on the vacuum chamberwall, the beam emittance, lattice optics, and the secondary-electron yield model. We report on progress in understanding the cloud buildup and decay mechanisms in magnetic fields and in field-free regions, addressing quantitatively the precise determination of the physical parameters of the modeling. Validation of these models will serve as essential input in the design of damping rings for future high-energy linear colliders.

  14. Study of warm dense plasma electronic dynamics by optical interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deneuville, F.

    2013-01-01

    The Warm Dense Matter (WDM) regime is characterised by a density close to the solid density and an electron temperature close to the Fermi temperature. In this work, the nonequilibrium Warm Dense Matter is studied during the solid to liquid phase transition induced by an ultra short laser interacting with a solid. A 30 femtosecond time resolution pump-probe experiment (FDI) is set up, yielding to the measurement of the heated sample complex reflectivity for both S and P polarisation. We have determined a criterion based on the measured reflectivities, which permits to control the interface shape of the probed matter. For pump laser fluences around 1 J/cm 2 , the hydrodynamics of the heated matter is studied and experimental results are compared to the two-temperatures code ESTHER. Furthermore, the evolution of the dielectric function at 800 nm and 400 nm is inferred from our measurements on a sub-picosecond time-scale. Within the Drude-Lorentz model for the conduction electrons, the dielectric function yields information such as ionisation state, electronic temperature and electron collision frequency. (author) [fr

  15. Electronic Structure and Optical Properties Of EuIn2P2

    KAUST Repository

    Singh, Nirpendra

    2011-10-25

    The electronic structures and, optical and magneto‐optical properties of a newly found Zintl compound EuIn2P2 have been investigated within the density‐functional theory using the highly precise full‐potential linear‐augmented‐plane‐wave method. Results of detailed investigation of the electronic structure and related properties are reported.

  16. Equipment for evaluation of the characteristics of electronic-optic converters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Getsov, Petar; Mardirossian, Garo; Nedkov, Rumen; Stoyanov, Stiliyan; Bo, Wang; Prokopenko, Olga; Boyanov, Petar

    2018-01-01

    In this paper we consider the concept, structure, operation and application of original equipment for evaluation of the characteristics of electronic-optic converters (EOC) created in the Space Research and Technologies Institute at the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences. The equipment is recognized as an invention and it is subject to patent protection. Key words: electronic-optic converter, infrared radiation, night surveillance devices

  17. U-10Mo Sample Preparation and Examination using Optical and Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prabhakaran, Ramprashad [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Joshi, Vineet V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rhodes, Mark A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Schemer-Kohrn, Alan L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Guzman, Anthony D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lavender, Curt A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide guidelines to prepare specimens of uranium alloyed with 10 weight percent molybdenum (U-10Mo) for optical metallography and scanning electron microscopy. This document also provides instructions to set up an optical microscope and a scanning electron microscope to analyze U-10Mo specimens and to obtain the required information.

  18. U-10Mo Sample Preparation and Examination using Optical and Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prabhakaran, Ramprashad [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Joshi, Vineet V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rhodes, Mark A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Schemer-Kohrn, Alan L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Guzman, Anthony D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lavender, Curt A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-03-30

    The purpose of this document is to provide guidelines to prepare specimens of uranium alloyed with 10 weight percent molybdenum (U-10Mo) for optical metallography and scanning electron microscopy. This document also provides instructions to set up an optical microscope and a scanning electron microscope to analyze U-10Mo specimens and to obtain the required information.

  19. Optical-phonon-induced frictional drag in coupled two-dimensional electron gases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Ben Yu-Kuang

    1998-01-01

    The role of optical phonons in frictional drag between two adjacent but electrically isolated two-dimensional electron gases is investigated. Since the optical phonons in III-V materials have a considerably larger coupling to electrons than acoustic phonons (which are the dominant drag mechanism ...

  20. U-10Mo Sample Preparation and Examination using Optical and Scanning Electron Microscopy. Rev. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prabhakaran, Ramprashad; Joshi, Vineet V.; Rhodes, Mark A.; Schemer-Kohrn, Alan L.; Guzman, Anthony D.; Lavender, Curt A.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide guidelines to prepare specimens of uranium alloyed with 10 weight percent molybdenum (U-10Mo) for optical metallography and scanning electron microscopy. This document also provides instructions to set up an optical microscope and a scanning electron microscope to analyze U-10Mo specimens and to obtain the required information.

  1. Average electronegativity, electronic polarizability and optical basicity of lanthanide oxides for different coordination numbers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Xinyu; Wang Xiaoli; Lin Hai; Wang Zhiqiang

    2008-01-01

    On the basis of new electronegativity values, electronic polarizability and optical basicity of lanthanide oxides are calculated from the concept of average electronegativity given by Asokamani and Manjula. The estimated values are in close agreement with our previous conclusion. Particularly, we attempt to obtain new data of electronic polarizability and optical basicity of lanthanide sesquioxides for different coordination numbers (6-12). The present investigation suggests that both electronic polarizability and optical basicity increase gradually with increasing coordination number. We also looked for another double peak effect, that is, electronic polarizability and optical basicity of trivalent lanthanide oxides show a gradual decrease and then an abrupt increase at the Europia and Ytterbia. Furthermore, close correlations are investigated among average electronegativity, optical basicity, electronic polarizability and coordination number in this paper

  2. Modeling GMPLS and Optical MPLS Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Henrik Lehrmann; Wessing, Henrik

    2003-01-01

    . The MPLS concept is attractive because it can work as a unifying control structure. covering all technologies. This paper describes how a novel scheme for optical MPLS and circuit switched GMPLS based networks can incorporated in such multi-domain, MPLS-based scenarios and how it could be modeled. Network...

  3. Theoretical aspects of the optical model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahaux, C.

    1980-01-01

    We first recall the definition of the optical-model potential for nucleons and the physical interpretation of the main related quantities. We then survey the recent theoretical progress towards a reliable calculation of this potential. The present limitations of the theory and some prospects for future developments are outlined. (author)

  4. Parametric uncertainty in optical image modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potzick, James; Marx, Egon; Davidson, Mark

    2006-10-01

    Optical photomask feature metrology and wafer exposure process simulation both rely on optical image modeling for accurate results. While it is fair to question the accuracies of the available models, model results also depend on several input parameters describing the object and imaging system. Errors in these parameter values can lead to significant errors in the modeled image. These parameters include wavelength, illumination and objective NA's, magnification, focus, etc. for the optical system, and topography, complex index of refraction n and k, etc. for the object. In this paper each input parameter is varied over a range about its nominal value and the corresponding images simulated. Second order parameter interactions are not explored. Using the scenario of the optical measurement of photomask features, these parametric sensitivities are quantified by calculating the apparent change of the measured linewidth for a small change in the relevant parameter. Then, using reasonable values for the estimated uncertainties of these parameters, the parametric linewidth uncertainties can be calculated and combined to give a lower limit to the linewidth measurement uncertainty for those parameter uncertainties.

  5. Advances in imaging and electron physics optics of charged particle analyzers

    CERN Document Server

    Hawkes, Peter W

    2011-01-01

    Advances in Imaging and Electron Physics merges two long-running serials--Advances in Electronics and Electron Physics and Advances in Optical and Electron Microscopy. This series features extended articles on the physics of electron devices (especially semiconductor devices), particle optics at high and low energies, microlithography, image science and digital image processing, electromagnetic wave propagation, electron microscopy, and the computing methods used in all these domains. Contributions from leading international scholars and industry experts Discusses hot topic areas and presents current and future research trends Invaluable reference and guide for physicists, engineers and mathematicians.

  6. Advances in imaging and electron physics optics of charged particle analyzers

    CERN Document Server

    Hawkes, Peter W

    2011-01-01

    Advances in Imaging and Electron Physics merges two long-running serials--Advances in Electronics and Electron Physics and Advances in Optical and Electron Microscopy. This series features extended articles on the physics of electron devices (especially semiconductor devices), particle optics at high and low energies, microlithography, image science and digital image processing, electromagnetic wave propagation, electron microscopy, and the computing methods used in all these domains. * Contributions from leading international scholars and industry experts * Discusses hot topic areas and presents current and future research trends * Invaluable reference and guide for physicists, engineers and mathematicians.

  7. Summary of radiation-induced transient absorption and recovery in fiber optic waveguides. [Pulsed electrons and x-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skoog, C.D.

    1976-11-01

    The absorption induced in fiber optic waveguides by pulsed electron and X-ray radiation has been measured as a function of optical wavelength from 450 to 950 nm, irradiation temperature from -54 to 71/sup 0/C, and dose from 1 to 500 krads. The fibers studied are Ge-doped silica core fibers (Corning Low Loss), ''pure'' vitreous silica core fibers (Schott, Bell Laboratories, Fiberoptic Cable Corp., and Valtec Fiberoptics), polymethyl-methacrylate core fibers (DuPont CROFON and PFX), and polystyrene core fibers (International Fiber Optics and Polyoptics). Models that have been developed to account for the observed absorption recovery are also summarized.

  8. Inhomogeneous electron distribution in InN nanowires: Influence on the optical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molina-Sanchez, A.; Garro, N.; Garcia-Cristobal, A.; Cantarero, A. [Instituto de Ciencia de los Materiales, Universidad de Valencia (Spain); Segura-Ruiz, J. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Experiments Div., Grenoble (France); Iikawa, F. [Instituto de Fisica Gleb Wataghin - Unicamp, CP 6165, Campinas (Brazil); Denker, C.; Malindretos, J.; Rizzi, A. [IV. Physikalisches Institut, Georg-August Universitaet Goettingen (Germany)

    2012-03-15

    In this work, we study theoretically and experimentally the influence of the surface electron accumulation on the optical properties of InN nanowires. For this purpose, the photoluminescence and photoluminescence excitation spectra have been measured for a set of self-assembled InN NWs grown under different conditions. The photoluminescence excitation experimental lineshapes have been reproduced by a self-consistent calculation of the absorption in a cylindrical InN nanowires. With the self-consistent model we can explore how the optical absorption depends on nanowires radius and doping concentration. Our model solves the Schroedinger equation for a cylindrical nanowire of infinite length, assuming a parabolic conduction band. The columnar geometry introduces effects in both the electron density and in the self-consistent conduction band profile, with no equivalence in planar layer. On the other hand, the differences in the photoluminescence excitation spectra are related to the inhomogeneous electron distribution inside the nanowires, caused by a bulk donor concentration and a two-dimensional density of ionized surface states. For nanowire radii larger than 30 nm, such concentrations modify the absorption edge and the lineshape, respectively, and can be determined from the comparison with the experimental data (copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  9. Phenomenological optical potentials and optical model computer codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prince, A.

    1980-01-01

    An introduction to the Optical Model is presented. Starting with the purpose and nature of the physical problems to be analyzed, a general formulation and the various phenomenological methods of solution are discussed. This includes the calculation of observables based on assumed potentials such as local and non-local and their forms, e.g. Woods-Saxon, folded model etc. Also discussed are the various calculational methods and model codes employed to describe nuclear reactions in the spherical and deformed regions (e.g. coupled-channel analysis). An examination of the numerical solutions and minimization techniques associated with the various codes, is briefly touched upon. Several computer programs are described for carrying out the calculations. The preparation of input, (formats and options), determination of model parameters and analysis of output are described. The class is given a series of problems to carry out using the available computer. Interpretation and evaluation of the samples includes the effect of varying parameters, and comparison of calculations with the experimental data. Also included is an intercomparison of the results from the various model codes, along with their advantages and limitations. (author)

  10. A classical model for the electron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Visser, M.

    1989-01-01

    The construction of classical and semi-classical models for the electron has had a long and distinguished history. Such models are useful more for what they teach us about field theory than what they teach us about the electron. In this Letter I exhibit a classical model of the electron consisting of ordinary electromagnetism coupled with a self-interacting version of Newtonian gravity. The gravitational binding energy of the system balances the electrostatic energy in such a manner that the total rest mass of the electron is finite. (orig.)

  11. Electron optics in hybrid photodetectors in magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, D.

    1996-12-01

    The CMS detector design has the hadronic calorimeter immersed in a 4 T magnetic field. The scintillator photon transducer must work reliably in this environment. The baseline phototransducer is the ''hybrid photomultiplier'', which consists of a standard photocathode (S20) followed by a high field acceleration onto the surface of a Si diode. Such a device has a linear response, 1 e out for every 3.6 eV of potential drop in excess of the threshold needed to penetrate the passivation layer of the diode. A threshold voltage of ∼2 kV is typical of these devices, leading to a gain of ∼2000 at 10 kV applied voltage. In the interest of reducing costs, the Si surface can be cut into pixels. However, the optics of the electron trajectories must be well understood so as to avoid crosstalk between pixels caused by misalignment of the accelerating electric field and the axis of the CMS magnetic field. The depletion depth of the Si is quite standard, ∼300 μm. The source capacity is ∼20 pF. The output pulse has a ∼6 nsec risetime for > 60 V diode biasing. The device is expected to be highly immune to magnetic field effects due to the short spacing, ∼3 mm, between photocathode and Si

  12. Establishing a cat model of acute optic nerve injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    optic nerve (about 3 mm) went through optic foramen and entered into brain tissue. It was squeezed with noninvasive vascular clip for 20 seconds, then the clip was removed, and then the skull was closed after it was examined to be no bleeding. The size of bilateral pupils, direct and indirect light reflexes were observed postoperatively. Successfully established models were judged by larger operated pupil than controlateral one,disappearance of direct light reflex and the existence of indirect light reflex. No model establishment was performed in the control group. Each cat was tested with flash visual evoked potential (F-VEP) to observe the electrophysiological changes before and after experiment. All the cats in the control group and model groups were killed under anesthesia before model establishment and at 6 hours, 1, 3, 7 and 14 days after model establishment respectively, and the pathological changes of the optic nerve after injury were observed under electron microscope and light microscope.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: VEP and the ultrastructural changes of optic nerve after acute optic nerve injury in both groups.RESULTS: All the 28 cats were involved in the analysis of results. ① VEP results: The VEP latencies were obviously different between the control group and model group at each time point (P < 0.05), whereas there were no obvious differences among different time points in the model group (P > 0.05). The VEP amplitudes were obviously different between the control group and model group at each time point (P < 0.05), whereas there were no obvious differences among different time points in the model group (P > 0.05).② Ultrastructural changes of the optic nerve: Under electron microscope, normal optic nerve myelin sheath had complete structure, tramal plates were clear and arranged tightly, axolemma was complete, whereas the structures of endoneurium, myelin sheath, tramal plates, axolemma and axon were in disorders after optic nerve injury

  13. Computational Modeling of Ultrafast Pulse Propagation in Nonlinear Optical Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goorjian, Peter M.; Agrawal, Govind P.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    There is an emerging technology of photonic (or optoelectronic) integrated circuits (PICs or OEICs). In PICs, optical and electronic components are grown together on the same chip. rib build such devices and subsystems, one needs to model the entire chip. Accurate computer modeling of electromagnetic wave propagation in semiconductors is necessary for the successful development of PICs. More specifically, these computer codes would enable the modeling of such devices, including their subsystems, such as semiconductor lasers and semiconductor amplifiers in which there is femtosecond pulse propagation. Here, the computer simulations are made by solving the full vector, nonlinear, Maxwell's equations, coupled with the semiconductor Bloch equations, without any approximations. The carrier is retained in the description of the optical pulse, (i.e. the envelope approximation is not made in the Maxwell's equations), and the rotating wave approximation is not made in the Bloch equations. These coupled equations are solved to simulate the propagation of femtosecond optical pulses in semiconductor materials. The simulations describe the dynamics of the optical pulses, as well as the interband and intraband.

  14. Modelling of new generation plasma optical devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Litovko Irina V.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents new generation plasma optical devices based on the electrostatic plasma lens configuration that opens a novel attractive possibility for effective high-tech practical applications. Original approaches to use of plasma accelerators with closed electron drift and open walls for the creation of a cost-effective low-maintenance plasma lens with positive space charge and possible application for low-cost, low-energy rocket engine are described. The preliminary experimental, theoretical and simulation results are presented. It is noted that the presented plasma devices are attractive for many different applications in the state-of-the-art vacuum-plasma processing.

  15. Feasibility of Optical Transition Radiation Imaging for Laser-driven Plasma Accelerator Electron-Beam Diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumpkin, A. H. [Fermilab; Rule, D. W. [Unlisted, US, MD; Downer, M. C. [Texas U.

    2017-10-09

    We report the initial considerations of using linearly polarized optical transition radiation (OTR) to characterize the electron beams of laser plasma accelerators (LPAs) such as at the Univ. of Texas at Austin. The two LPAs operate at 100 MeV and 2-GeV, and they currently have estimated normalized emittances at ~ 1-mm mrad regime with beam divergences less than 1/γ and beam sizes to be determined at the micron level. Analytical modeling results indicate the feasibility of using these OTR techniques for the LPA applications.

  16. Ionospheric Electron Heating Associated With Pulsating Auroras: Joint Optical and PFISR Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jun; Donovan, E.; Reimer, A.; Hampton, D.; Zou, S.; Varney, R.

    2018-05-01

    In a recent study, Liang et al. (2017, https://doi.org/10.1002/2017JA024127) repeatedly identified strong electron temperature (Te) enhancements when Swarm satellites traversed pulsating auroral patches. In this study, we use joint optical and Poker Flat Incoherent Scatter Radar (PFISR) observations to further investigate the F region plasma signatures related to pulsating auroras. On 19 March 2015 night, which contained multiple intervals of pulsating auroral activities, we identify a statistical trend, albeit not a one-to-one correspondence, of strong Te enhancements ( 500-1000 K) in the upper F region ionosphere during the passages of pulsating auroras over PFISR. On the other hand, there is no discernible and repeatable density enhancement in the upper F region during pulsating auroral intervals. Collocated optical and NOAA satellite observations suggest that the pulsating auroras are composed of energetic electron precipitation with characteristic energy >10 keV, which is inefficient in electron heating in the upper F region. Based upon PFISR observations and simulations from Liang et al. (2017) model, we propose that thermal conduction from the topside ionosphere, which is heated by precipitating low-energy electrons, offers the most likely explanation for the observed electron heating in the upper F region associated with pulsating auroras. Such a heating mechanism is similar to that underlying the "stable auroral red arcs" in the subauroral ionosphere. Our proposal conforms to the notion on the coexistence of an enhanced cold plasma population and the energetic electron precipitation, in magnetospheric flux tubes threading the pulsating auroral patch. In addition, we find a trend of enhanced ion upflows during pulsating auroral intervals.

  17. Electron spin resonance of nitrogen-vacancy centers in optically trapped nanodiamonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, Viva R.; Alemán, Benjamín J.; Christle, David J.; Cleland, Andrew N.; Awschalom, David D.

    2012-01-01

    Using an optical tweezers apparatus, we demonstrate three-dimensional control of nanodiamonds in solution with simultaneous readout of ground-state electron-spin resonance (ESR) transitions in an ensemble of diamond nitrogen-vacancy color centers. Despite the motion and random orientation of nitrogen-vacancy centers suspended in the optical trap, we observe distinct peaks in the measured ESR spectra qualitatively similar to the same measurement in bulk. Accounting for the random dynamics, we model the ESR spectra observed in an externally applied magnetic field to enable dc magnetometry in solution. We estimate the dc magnetic field sensitivity based on variations in ESR line shapes to be approximately . This technique may provide a pathway for spin-based magnetic, electric, and thermal sensing in fluidic environments and biophysical systems inaccessible to existing scanning probe techniques. PMID:22869706

  18. Optical Response of Warm Dense Matter Using Real-Time Electron Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baczewski, Andrew; Shulenburger, Luke; Desjarlais, Michael; Magyar, Rudolph

    2014-03-01

    The extreme temperatures and solid-like densities in warm dense matter present a unique challenge for theory, wherein neither conventional models from condensed matter nor plasma physics capture all of the relevant phenomenology. While Kubo-Greenwood DFT calculations have proven capable of reproducing optical properties of WDM, they require a significant number of virtual orbitals to reach convergence due to their perturbative nature. Real-time TDDFT presents a complementary framework with a number of computationally favorable properties, including reduced cost complexity and better scalability, and has been used to reproduce the optical response of finite and ordered extended systems. We will describe the use of Ehrenfest-TDDFT to evolve coupled electron-nuclear dynamics in WDM systems, and the subsequent evaluation of optical response functions from the real-time electron dynamics. The advantages and disadvantages of this approach will be discussed relative to the current state-of-the-art. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  19. Fundamental models of electronic transport in amorphous semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emin, D.

    1982-01-01

    Significant fundamental questions lie at the heart of our understanding of the electronic and optical properties of semiconducting and insulating glasses. In this article the principal features of the Mott-CFO model and the small-polaron model are described. While the Mott-CFO model seems to apply to the high-mobility electron transport in glassy SiO 2 and Cd 2 As 3 it does not appear applicable to the most frequently studied chalocogenide glasses. Furthermore, the Mott-CFO model does not account for as basic a feature as the sign of the Hall effect. On the other hand, the small-polaron model accounts for the observed d.c. conductivity, Peltier heat and Hall mobility in a very simple and direct manner

  20. Optical and opto-electronic characterization of semiconducting nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Offer, Matthias

    2011-01-01

    In the present thesis, the photoluminescence (PL) of cadmium selenide nanoparticles and doped gallium arsenide nanowires are investigated. Furthermore, in GaAs nanowires, with a distinct pn-junction in the direction of growth, electroluminescence (EL) is demonstrated and analyzed for the fist time. Using PL spectroscopy, the excitonic states of individual CdSe nanoparticles are studied. Sharp emission lines, which can be assigned to different excitonic transitions, can be observed. At a sample temperature of T≅10 K, line widths of ΔE FWHM ≤8 meV are found. Additionally, it is demonstrated that, apart from the main line, phonon replica of the LO and 2LO-phonon can be observed. An exciton in an ionized nanoparticle has the electronic structure of a trion. In silicon, the recombination of a trion in CdSe nanoparticles, while optically allowed, will not be detected visually because faster non-radiative Auger processes dominate (off-state). However, this work shows that, on a coated aluminium alloy substrate, the trions of single CdSe nanoparticles are observable. This observation is due to the reduction of the optical lifetime and is caused by surface plasmons. Instead of the commonly occurring off-state, a jump-like and discrete red shift of the emission energy of ΔE ∼24 meV is observed. This emission line can also be attributed to a negative trion. In addition, p- and n-doped GaAs nanowires are characterized using spatially resolved PL spectroscopy. The intrinsic stump of the nanowire shows the typical PL of GaAs. Through doping of the GaAs nanowire, there is a recognizable shift in the emission energy. This shift can be attributed to increasing dopant concentration. By analyzing the line shape, information regarding the distribution and concentration of the dopant can be found. Using these findings, the PL of a single GaAs nanowire with a distinct pn-junction in the direction of growth is examined. This observation shows that a compensated region develops

  1. Effective electron-electron and electron-phonon interactions in the Hubbard-Holstein model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aprea, G.; Di Castro, C.; Grilli, M. . E-mail marco.grilli@roma1.infn.it; Lorenzana, J.

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the interplay between the electron-electron and the electron-phonon interaction in the Hubbard-Holstein model. We implement the flow-equation method to investigate within this model the effect of correlation on the electron-phonon effective coupling and, conversely, the effect of phonons in the effective electron-electron interaction. Using this technique we obtain analytical momentum-dependent expressions for the effective couplings and we study their behavior for different physical regimes. In agreement with other works on this subject, we find that the electron-electron attraction mediated by phonons in the presence of Hubbard repulsion is peaked at low transferred momenta. The role of the characteristic energies involved is also analyzed

  2. Anatomically accurate, finite model eye for optical modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, H L; Brennan, N A

    1997-08-01

    There is a need for a schematic eye that models vision accurately under various conditions such as refractive surgical procedures, contact lens and spectacle wear, and near vision. Here we propose a new model eye close to anatomical, biometric, and optical realities. This is a finite model with four aspheric refracting surfaces and a gradient-index lens. It has an equivalent power of 60.35 D and an axial length of 23.95 mm. The new model eye provides spherical aberration values within the limits of empirical results and predicts chromatic aberration for wavelengths between 380 and 750 nm. It provides a model for calculating optical transfer functions and predicting optical performance of the eye.

  3. Optical pumping of electron and nuclear spin in a negatively-charged quantum dot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracker, Allan; Gershoni, David; Korenev, Vladimir

    2005-03-01

    We report optical pumping of electron and nuclear spins in an individual negatively-charged quantum dot. With a bias-controlled heterostructure, we inject one electron into the quantum dot. Intense laser excitation produces negative photoluminescence polarization, which is easily erased by the Hanle effect, demonstrating optical pumping of a long-lived resident electron. The electron spin lifetime is consistent with the influence of nuclear spin fluctuations. Measuring the Overhauser effect in high magnetic fields, we observe a high degree of nuclear spin polarization, which is closely correlated to electron spin pumping.

  4. Advanced modelling of optical coherence tomography systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, Peter E; Thrane, Lars; Yura, Harold T; Tycho, Andreas; Joergensen, Thomas M; Frosz, Michael H

    2004-01-01

    Analytical and numerical models for describing and understanding the light propagation in samples imaged by optical coherence tomography (OCT) systems are presented. An analytical model for calculating the OCT signal based on the extended Huygens-Fresnel principle valid both for the single and multiple scattering regimes is reviewed. An advanced Monte Carlo model for calculating the OCT signal is also reviewed, and the validity of this model is shown through a mathematical proof based on the extended Huygens-Fresnel principle. Moreover, for the first time the model is verified experimentally. From the analytical model, an algorithm for enhancing OCT images is developed; the so-called true-reflection algorithm in which the OCT signal may be corrected for the attenuation caused by scattering. For the first time, the algorithm is demonstrated by using the Monte Carlo model as a numerical tissue phantom. Such algorithm holds promise for improving OCT imagery and to extend the possibility for functional imaging

  5. The role of ligands in the optical and electronic spectra of CdSe nanoclusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilina, Svletana [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sergei, Ivanov A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Victor, Klimov I [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sergei, Tretiak [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the impact of ligands on morphology, electronic structure, and optical response of the Cd33Se33 cluster, which already overlapps in size with the smallest synthesized CdSe quantum dots (QDs). Our Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations demonstrate significant surface reorganization both for the bare cluster and for the cluster capped by amine and phosphine oxide ligand models. We observe strong surface-ligand interactions leading to substantial charge redistribution and polarization effects on the surface. This effect results in the appearance of hybridized states, where the electronic density is spread over the cluster and the ligands. Neither the ligand's nor hybridized molecular orbitals appear as trap states inside or near the band gap of the QD. Instead, being optically dark, dense hybridized states from the edges of the valence and the conduction bands could open new relaxation channels for high energy photoexcitations. Comparing quantum dots passivated by different ligands, we found that hybridized states are denser in at the edge of the conduction band of the cluster ligated with phosphine oxide molecules than that with primary amines. Such a different manifestation of ligand binding may potentially lead to the faster electron relaxation in dots passivated by phosphine oxide than by amine ligands, which is in agreement with experimental data.

  6. New Electronic Technology Applied in Flexible Organic Optical System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre F. S. Guedes

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis and application of new organic materials, nanostructured, for developing technology based on organic devices, have been the main focus of the scientific community. In recent years, the first polymeric electronics products have entered the market (organic semiconductor materials and there are some electrochromic devices among them that have been called smart windows, once they control the passage of light or heat through a closed environment as an ordinary window. The main functional aspect of electrochromic devices, when being used in architectural and automotive industry, is to control the passage of light and temperature with thermal and visual comfort. These devices can be flexible and very thin, not containing heavy metals, and formed by layers of organic material deposited in several architectures. In this study, the electro-deposition of organic materials in the Polyaniline, PANI case, which provide stability in optical and electrical parameters, was utilized with the means of developing prototypes of organic electrochromic devices. These materials were characterized by: ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy absorption (UV-Vis, measurement of thickness (MT and electrical measurements (EM. This study aims to establish the relationship between the thickness of the active layer and the value of the electrical resistivity of the layer deposited through an electro-deposition technique. The experimental results enabled the equating of the electrical resistivity related to the thickness of the deposited layer. The linear fit of these results has expressed the thickness of the conducting layer, α, and the lowest value of the electrical resistivity, β, associated with the gap between the valence band and the conduction band. Thus, the results have demonstrated that, when the layer of organic material is completely conductive, we may obtain the thickness of the organic material deposited on the substrate.

  7. Optical sensor array platform based on polymer electronic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koetse, Marc M.; Rensing, Peter A.; Sharpe, Ruben B. A.; van Heck, Gert T.; Allard, Bart A. M.; Meulendijks, Nicole N. M. M.; Kruijt, Peter G. M.; Tijdink, Marcel W. W. J.; De Zwart, René M.; Houben, René J.; Enting, Erik; van Veen, Sjaak J. J. F.; Schoo, Herman F. M.

    2007-10-01

    Monitoring of personal wellbeing and optimizing human performance are areas where sensors have only begun to be used. One of the reasons for this is the specific demands that these application areas put on the underlying technology and system properties. In many cases these sensors will be integrated in clothing, be worn on the skin, or may even be placed inside the body. This implies that flexibility and wearability of the systems is essential for their success. Devices based on polymer semiconductors allow for these demands since they can be fabricated with thin film technology. The use of thin film device technology allows for the fabrication of very thin sensors (e.g. integrated in food product packaging), flexible or bendable sensors in wearables, large area/distributed sensors, and intrinsically low-cost applications in disposable products. With thin film device technology a high level of integration can be achieved with parts that analyze signals, process and store data, and interact over a network. Integration of all these functions will inherently lead to better cost/performance ratios, especially if printing and other standard polymer technology such as high precision moulding is applied for the fabrication. In this paper we present an optical transmission sensor array based on polymer semiconductor devices made by thin film technology. The organic devices, light emitting diodes, photodiodes and selective medium chip, are integrated with classic electronic components. Together they form a versatile sensor platform that allows for the quantitative measurement of 100 channels and communicates wireless with a computer. The emphasis is given to the sensor principle, the design, fabrication technology and integration of the thin film devices.

  8. Quantum theory of the optical and electronic properties of semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Haug, Hartmut

    2009-01-01

    This invaluable textbook presents the basic elements needed to understand and research into semiconductor physics. It deals with elementary excitations in bulk and low-dimensional semiconductors, including quantum wells, quantum wires and quantum dots. The basic principles underlying optical nonlinearities are developed, including excitonic and many-body plasma effects. Fundamentals of optical bistability, semiconductor lasers, femtosecond excitation, the optical Stark effect, the semiconductor photon echo, magneto-optic effects, as well as bulk and quantum-confined Franz-Keldysh effects, are covered. The material is presented in sufficient detail for graduate students and researchers with a general background in quantum mechanics.This fifth edition includes an additional chapter on 'Quantum Optical Effects' where the theory of quantum optical effects in semiconductors is detailed. Besides deriving the 'semiconductor luminescence equations' and the expression for the stationary luminescence spectrum, the resu...

  9. Quantum coherent optical phase modulation in an ultrafast transmission electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feist, Armin; Echternkamp, Katharina E; Schauss, Jakob; Yalunin, Sergey V; Schäfer, Sascha; Ropers, Claus

    2015-05-14

    Coherent manipulation of quantum systems with light is expected to be a cornerstone of future information and communication technology, including quantum computation and cryptography. The transfer of an optical phase onto a quantum wavefunction is a defining aspect of coherent interactions and forms the basis of quantum state preparation, synchronization and metrology. Light-phase-modulated electron states near atoms and molecules are essential for the techniques of attosecond science, including the generation of extreme-ultraviolet pulses and orbital tomography. In contrast, the quantum-coherent phase-modulation of energetic free-electron beams has not been demonstrated, although it promises direct access to ultrafast imaging and spectroscopy with tailored electron pulses on the attosecond scale. Here we demonstrate the coherent quantum state manipulation of free-electron populations in an electron microscope beam. We employ the interaction of ultrashort electron pulses with optical near-fields to induce Rabi oscillations in the populations of electron momentum states, observed as a function of the optical driving field. Excellent agreement with the scaling of an equal-Rabi multilevel quantum ladder is obtained, representing the observation of a light-driven 'quantum walk' coherently reshaping electron density in momentum space. We note that, after the interaction, the optically generated superposition of momentum states evolves into a train of attosecond electron pulses. Our results reveal the potential of quantum control for the precision structuring of electron densities, with possible applications ranging from ultrafast electron spectroscopy and microscopy to accelerator science and free-electron lasers.

  10. A Thermo-Optic Propagation Modeling Capability.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schrader, Karl; Akau, Ron

    2014-10-01

    A new theoretical basis is derived for tracing optical rays within a finite-element (FE) volume. The ray-trajectory equations are cast into the local element coordinate frame and the full finite-element interpolation is used to determine instantaneous index gradient for the ray-path integral equation. The FE methodology (FEM) is also used to interpolate local surface deformations and the surface normal vector for computing the refraction angle when launching rays into the volume, and again when rays exit the medium. The method is implemented in the Matlab(TM) environment and compared to closed- form gradient index models. A software architecture is also developed for implementing the algorithms in the Zemax(TM) commercial ray-trace application. A controlled thermal environment was constructed in the laboratory, and measured data was collected to validate the structural, thermal, and optical modeling methods.

  11. Optical Imaging and Radiometric Modeling and Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Kong Q.; Fitzmaurice, Michael W.; Moiser, Gary E.; Howard, Joseph M.; Le, Chi M.

    2010-01-01

    OPTOOL software is a general-purpose optical systems analysis tool that was developed to offer a solution to problems associated with computational programs written for the James Webb Space Telescope optical system. It integrates existing routines into coherent processes, and provides a structure with reusable capabilities that allow additional processes to be quickly developed and integrated. It has an extensive graphical user interface, which makes the tool more intuitive and friendly. OPTOOL is implemented using MATLAB with a Fourier optics-based approach for point spread function (PSF) calculations. It features parametric and Monte Carlo simulation capabilities, and uses a direct integration calculation to permit high spatial sampling of the PSF. Exit pupil optical path difference (OPD) maps can be generated using combinations of Zernike polynomials or shaped power spectral densities. The graphical user interface allows rapid creation of arbitrary pupil geometries, and entry of all other modeling parameters to support basic imaging and radiometric analyses. OPTOOL provides the capability to generate wavefront-error (WFE) maps for arbitrary grid sizes. These maps are 2D arrays containing digital sampled versions of functions ranging from Zernike polynomials to combination of sinusoidal wave functions in 2D, to functions generated from a spatial frequency power spectral distribution (PSD). It also can generate optical transfer functions (OTFs), which are incorporated into the PSF calculation. The user can specify radiometrics for the target and sky background, and key performance parameters for the instrument s focal plane array (FPA). This radiometric and detector model setup is fairly extensive, and includes parameters such as zodiacal background, thermal emission noise, read noise, and dark current. The setup also includes target spectral energy distribution as a function of wavelength for polychromatic sources, detector pixel size, and the FPA s charge

  12. FDTD modeling of anisotropic nonlinear optical phenomena in silicon waveguides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dissanayake, Chethiya M; Premaratne, Malin; Rukhlenko, Ivan D; Agrawal, Govind P

    2010-09-27

    A deep insight into the inherent anisotropic optical properties of silicon is required to improve the performance of silicon-waveguide-based photonic devices. It may also lead to novel device concepts and substantially extend the capabilities of silicon photonics in the future. In this paper, for the first time to the best of our knowledge, we present a three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method for modeling optical phenomena in silicon waveguides, which takes into account fully the anisotropy of the third-order electronic and Raman susceptibilities. We show that, under certain realistic conditions that prevent generation of the longitudinal optical field inside the waveguide, this model is considerably simplified and can be represented by a computationally efficient algorithm, suitable for numerical analysis of complex polarization effects. To demonstrate the versatility of our model, we study polarization dependence for several nonlinear effects, including self-phase modulation, cross-phase modulation, and stimulated Raman scattering. Our FDTD model provides a basis for a full-blown numerical simulator that is restricted neither by the single-mode assumption nor by the slowly varying envelope approximation.

  13. A model for negative ion extraction and comparison of negative ion optics calculations to experimental results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pamela, J.

    1990-10-01

    Negative ion extraction is described by a model which includes electron diffusion across transverse magnetic fields in the sheath. This model allows a 2-Dimensional approximation of the problem. It is used to introduce electron space charge effects in a 2-D particle trajectory code, designed for negative ion optics calculations. Another physical effect, the stripping of negative ions on neutral gas atoms, has also been included in our model; it is found to play an important role in negative ion optics. The comparison with three sets of experimental data from very different negative ion accelerators, show that our model is able of accurate predictions

  14. Cathodoluminescence-activated nanoimaging: noninvasive near-field optical microscopy in an electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischak, Connor G; Hetherington, Craig L; Wang, Zhe; Precht, Jake T; Kaz, David M; Schlom, Darrell G; Ginsberg, Naomi S

    2015-05-13

    We demonstrate a new nanoimaging platform in which optical excitations generated by a low-energy electron beam in an ultrathin scintillator are used as a noninvasive, near-field optical scanning probe of an underlying sample. We obtain optical images of Al nanostructures with 46 nm resolution and validate the noninvasiveness of this approach by imaging a conjugated polymer film otherwise incompatible with electron microscopy due to electron-induced damage. The high resolution, speed, and noninvasiveness of this "cathodoluminescence-activated" platform also show promise for super-resolution bioimaging.

  15. Ab initio calculation of the electronic and optical properties of solid pentacene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiago, Murilo L.; Northrup, John E.; Louie, Steve G.

    2002-01-01

    The optical and electronic properties of crystalline pentacene are studied, using a first-principles Green's-function approach. The quasiparticle energies are calculated within the GW approximation and the electron-hole excitations are computed by solving the Bethe-Salpeter equation. We investigate the role of polymorphism on the electronic energy gap and linear optical spectrum by studying two different crystalline phases: the solution-phase structure and the vapor-phase structure. charge-transfer excitons are found to dominate the optical spectrum. Excitons with sizable binding energies are predicted for both phases

  16. Estimation of edge electron temperature profiles via forward modelling of the electron cyclotron radiation transport at ASDEX Upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rathgeber, S K; Barrera, L; Eich, T; Fischer, R; Suttrop, W; Wolfrum, E; Nold, B; Willensdorfer, M

    2013-01-01

    We present a method to obtain reliable edge profiles of the electron temperature by forward modelling of the electron cyclotron radiation transport. While for the core of ASDEX Upgrade plasmas, straightforward analysis of electron cyclotron intensity measurements based on the optically thick plasma approximation is usually justified, reasonable analysis of the steep and optically thin plasma edge needs to consider broadened emission and absorption profiles and radiation transport processes. This is carried out in the framework of integrated data analysis which applies Bayesian probability theory for joint analysis of the electron density and temperature with data of different interdependent and complementary diagnostics. By this means, electron cyclotron radiation intensity delivers highly spatially resolved electron temperature data for the plasma edge. In H-mode, the edge gradient of the electron temperature can be several times higher than the one of the radiation temperature. Furthermore, we are able to reproduce the ‘shine-through’ peak—the observation of increased radiation temperatures at frequencies resonant in the optically thin scrape-off layer. This phenomenon is caused by strongly down-shifted radiation of Maxwellian tail electrons located in the H-mode edge region and, therefore, contains valuable information about the electron temperature edge gradient. (paper)

  17. Status of Galileo interim radiation electron model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, H. B.; Jun, I.; Ratliff, J. M.; Evans, R. W.; Clough, G. A.; McEntire, R. W.

    2003-01-01

    Measurements of the high energy, omni-directional electron environment by the Galileo spacecraft Energetic Particle Detector (EDP) were used to develop a new model of Jupiter's trapped electron radiation in the jovian equatorial plane for the range 8 to 16 Jupiter radii.

  18. An Electronic Publishing Model for Academic Publishers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Jon D.

    1994-01-01

    Describes an electronic publishing model based on Standard Generalized Markup Language (SGML) and considers its use by an academic publisher. Highlights include how SGML is used to produce an electronic book, hypertext, methods of delivery, intellectual property rights, and future possibilities. Sample documents are included. (two references) (LRW)

  19. Modeling microwave/electron-cloud interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattes, M; Sorolla, E; Zimmermann, F

    2013-01-01

    Starting from the separate codes BI-RME and ECLOUD or PyECLOUD, we are developing a novel joint simulation tool, which models the combined effect of a charged particle beam and of microwaves on an electron cloud. Possible applications include the degradation of microwave transmission in telecommunication satellites by electron clouds; the microwave-transmission techniques being used in particle accelerators for the purpose of electroncloud diagnostics; the microwave emission by the electron cloud itself in the presence of a magnetic field; and the possible suppression of electron-cloud formation in an accelerator by injecting microwaves of suitable amplitude and frequency. A few early simulation results are presented. (author)

  20. Green Network Planning Model for Optical Backbones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gutierrez Lopez, Jose Manuel; Riaz, M. Tahir; Jensen, Michael

    2010-01-01

    on the environment in general. In network planning there are existing planning models focused on QoS provisioning, investment minimization or combinations of both and other parameters. But there is a lack of a model for designing green optical backbones. This paper presents novel ideas to be able to define......Communication networks are becoming more essential for our daily lives and critically important for industry and governments. The intense growth in the backbone traffic implies an increment of the power demands of the transmission systems. This power usage might have a significant negative effect...

  1. Geometrical optics model of Mie resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roll; Schweiger

    2000-07-01

    The geometrical optics model of Mie resonances is presented. The ray path geometry is given and the resonance condition is discussed with special emphasis on the phase shift that the rays undergo at the surface of the dielectric sphere. On the basis of this model, approximate expressions for the positions of first-order resonances are given. Formulas for the cavity mode spacing are rederived in a simple manner. It is shown that the resonance linewidth can be calculated regarding the cavity losses. Formulas for the mode density of Mie resonances are given that account for the different width of resonances and thus may be adapted to specific experimental situations.

  2. Electron scattering in the interacting boson model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dieperink, AEL; Iachello, F; Rinat, A; Creswell, C

    1978-01-01

    It is suggested that the interacting boson model be used in the analysis of electron scattering data. Qualitative features of the expected behavior of the inelastic excitation of some 2 ÷ states inthe transitional Sm-Nd region are discussed

  3. Three-dimensional optical transfer functions in the aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, L; Nellist, P D

    2014-05-01

    In the scanning transmission electron microscope, hardware aberration correctors can now correct for the positive spherical aberration of round electron lenses. These correctors make use of nonround optics such as hexapoles or octupoles, leading to the limiting aberrations often being of a nonround type. Here we explore the effect of a number of potential limiting aberrations on the imaging performance of the scanning transmission electron microscope through their resulting optical transfer functions. In particular, the response of the optical transfer function to changes in defocus are examined, given that this is the final aberration to be tuned just before image acquisition. The resulting three-dimensional optical transfer functions also allow an assessment of the performance of a system for focal-series experiments or optical sectioning applications. © 2014 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2014 Royal Microscopical Society.

  4. A model for hot electron phenomena: Theory and general results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrillo, J.L.; Rodriquez, M.A.

    1988-10-01

    We propose a model for the description of the hot electron phenomena in semiconductors. Based on this model we are able to reproduce accurately the main characteristics observed in experiments of electric field transport, optical absorption, steady state photoluminescence and relaxation process. Our theory does not contain free nor adjustable parameters, it is very fast computerwise, and incorporates the main collision mechanisms including screening and phonon heating effects. Our description on a set of nonlinear rate equations in which the interactions are represented by coupling coefficients or effective frequencies. We calculate three coefficients from the characteristic constants and the band structure of the material. (author). 22 refs, 5 figs, 1 tab

  5. Optical network and FPGA/DSP based control system for free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romaniuk, R.S.; Pozniak, K.T.; Czarski, T.; Czuba, K.; Giergusiewicz, W.; Kasprowicz, G.; Koprek, W.

    2005-01-01

    The work presents a structural and functional model of a distributed low level radio frequency (LLRF) control, diagnostic and telemetric system for a large industrial object. An example of system implementation is the European TESLA-XFEL accelerator. The free electron laser is expected to work in the VUV region now and in the range of X-rays in the future. The design of a system based on the FPGA circuits and multi-gigabit optical network is discussed. The system design approach is fully parametric. The major emphasis is put on the methods of the functional and hardware concentration to use fully both: a very big transmission capacity of the optical fiber telemetric channels and very big processing power of the latest series of DSP/PC enhanced and optical I/O equipped, FPGA chips. The subject of the work is the design of a universal, laboratory module of the LLRF sub-system. The current parameters of the system model, under the design, are presented. The considerations are shown on the background of the system application in the hostile industrial environment. The work is a digest of a few development threads of the hybrid, optoelectronic, telemetric networks (HOTN). In particular, the outline of construction theory of HOTN node was presented as well as the technology of complex, modular, multilayer HOTN system PCBs. The PCBs contain critical sub-systems of the node and the network. The presented exemplary sub-systems are: fast optical data transmission of 2.5 Gbit/s, 3.125 Gbit/s and 10 Gbit/s; fast A/C and C/A multichannel data conversion managed by FPGA chip (40 MHz, 65 MHz, 105 MHz), data and functionality concentration, integration of floating point calculations in the DSP units of FPGA circuit, using now discrete and next integrated PC chip with embedded OS; optical distributed timing system of phase reference; and 1GbEth video interface (over UTP or FX) for CCD telemetry and monitoring. The data and functions concentration in the HOTN node is necessary to

  6. Acoustic force mapping in a hybrid acoustic-optical micromanipulation device supporting high resolution optical imaging† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Additional information about 1D model calculations for a piezoelectric transducer. See DOI: 10.1039/c6lc00182c Click here for additional data file.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDougall, Craig; MacDonald, Michael Peter; Ritsch-Marte, Monika

    2016-01-01

    Many applications in the life-sciences demand non-contact manipulation tools for forceful but nevertheless delicate handling of various types of sample. Moreover, the system should support high-resolution optical imaging. Here we present a hybrid acoustic/optical manipulation system which utilizes a transparent transducer, making it compatible with high-NA imaging in a microfluidic environment. The powerful acoustic trapping within a layered resonator, which is suitable for highly parallel particle handling, is complemented by the flexibility and selectivity of holographic optical tweezers, with the specimens being under high quality optical monitoring at all times. The dual acoustic/optical nature of the system lends itself to optically measure the exact acoustic force map, by means of direct force measurements on an optically trapped particle. For applications with (ultra-)high demand on the precision of the force measurements, the position of the objective used for the high-NA imaging may have significant influence on the acoustic force map in the probe chamber. We have characterized this influence experimentally and the findings were confirmed by model simulations. We show that it is possible to design the chamber and to choose the operating point in such a way as to avoid perturbations due to the objective lens. Moreover, we found that measuring the electrical impedance of the transducer provides an easy indicator for the acoustic resonances. PMID:27025398

  7. Terahertz instability of surface optical-phonon polaritons that interact with surface plasmon polaritons in the presence of electron drift

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sydoruk, O.; Solymar, L.; Shamonina, E.; Kalinin, V.

    2010-01-01

    Traveling-wave interaction between optical phonons and electrons drifting in diatomic semiconductors has potential for amplification and generation of terahertz radiation. Existing models of this interaction were developed for infinite materials. As a more practically relevant configuration, we studied theoretically a finite semiconductor slab surrounded by a dielectric. This paper analyzes the optical-phonon instability in the slab including the Lorentz force and compares it to the instability in an infinite material. As the analysis shows, the slab instability occurs because of the interaction of surface optical-phonon polaritons with surface plasmon polaritons in the presence of electron drift. The properties of the instability depend on the slab thickness when the thickness is comparable to the wavelength. For large slab thicknesses, however, the dispersion relation of the slab is similar to that of an infinite material, although the coupling is weaker. The results could be used for the design of practical terahertz traveling-wave oscillators and amplifiers.

  8. Energy modulation of nonrelativistic electrons in an optical near field on a metal microslit

    OpenAIRE

    R., Ishikawa; Jongsuck, Bae; K., Mizuno

    2001-01-01

    Energy modulation of nonrelativistic electrons with a laser beam using a metal microslit as an interaction circuit has been investigated. An optical near field is induced in the proximity of the microslit by illumination of the laser beam. The electrons passing close to the slit are accelerated or decelerated by an evanescent wave contained in the near field whose phase velocity is equal to the velocity of the electrons. The electron-evanescent wave interaction in the microslit has been analy...

  9. The optical design of 3D ICs for smartphone and optro-electronics sensing module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jiun-Woei

    2018-03-01

    Smartphone require limit space for image system, current lens, used in smartphones are refractive type, the effective focal length is limited the thickness of phone physical size. Other, such as optro-electronics sensing chips, proximity optical sensors, and UV indexer chips are integrated into smart phone with limit space. Due to the requirement of multiple lens in smartphone, proximity optical sensors, UV indexer and other optro-electronics sensing chips in a limited space of CPU board in future smart phone, optro-electronics 3D IC's integrated with optical lens or components may be a key technology for 3 C products. A design for reflective lens is fitted to CMOS, proximity optical sensors, UV indexer and other optro-electronics sensing chips based on 3-D IC. The reflective lens can be threes times of effective focal lens, and be able to resolve small object. The system will be assembled and integrated in one 3-D IC more easily.

  10. Simulation of the behaviour of electron-optical systems using a parallel computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balladore, J.L.; Hawkes, P.W.

    1990-01-01

    The advantage of using a multiprocessor computer for the calculation of electron-optical properties is investigated. A considerable reduction of computing time is obtained by reorganising the finite-element field computation. (orig.)

  11. Structural and optical properties of electron beam evaporated CdSe ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    electronic applications such as photo detection or solar energy conversion, due to its optical and electrical properties, as well as its good chemical and mechanical stability. In order to explore the possibility of using this in optoelectronics, ...

  12. Kinetic electron model for plasma thruster plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merino, Mario; Mauriño, Javier; Ahedo, Eduardo

    2018-03-01

    A paraxial model of an unmagnetized, collisionless plasma plume expanding into vacuum is presented. Electrons are treated kinetically, relying on the adiabatic invariance of their radial action integral for the integration of Vlasov's equation, whereas ions are treated as a cold species. The quasi-2D plasma density, self-consistent electric potential, and electron pressure, temperature, and heat fluxes are analyzed. In particular, the model yields the collisionless cooling of electrons, which differs from the Boltzmann relation and the simple polytropic laws usually employed in fluid and hybrid PIC/fluid plume codes.

  13. Optical manipulation of electron spin in quantum dot systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villas-Boas, Jose; Ulloa, Sergio; Govorov, Alexander

    2006-03-01

    Self-assembled quantum dots (QDs) are of particular interest for fundamental physics because of their similarity with atoms. Coupling two of such dots and addressing them with polarized laser light pulses is perhaps even more interesting. In this paper we use a multi-exciton density matrix formalism to model the spin dynamics of a system with single or double layers of QDs. Our model includes the anisotropic electron-hole exchange in the dots, the presence of wetting layer states, and interdot tunneling [1]. Our results show that it is possible to switch the spin polarization of a single self-assembled quantum dot under elliptically polarized light by increasing the laser intensity. In the nonlinear mechanism described here, intense elliptically polarized light creates an effective exchange channel between the exciton spin states through biexciton states, as we demonstrate by numerical and analytical methods. We further show that the effect persists in realistic ensembles of dots, and we propose alternative ways to detect it. We also extend our study to a double layer of quantum dots, where we find a competition between Rabi frequency and tunneling oscillations. [1] J. M. Villas-Boas, S. E. Ulloa, and A. O. Govorov, Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 057404 (2005); Phys. Rev. B 69, 125342 (2004).

  14. Damping effect of the inner band electrons on the optical absorption and bandwidth of metal nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ochoo, Lawrence, E-mail: lawijapuonj@yahoo.com; Migwi, Charles; Okumu, John [Kenyatta University, Physics Department (Kenya)

    2012-12-15

    Conflicts and discrepancies around nanoparticle (NP) size effect on the optical properties of metal NPs of sizes below the mean free path of electron can be traced to the internal damping effect of the hybrid resonance of the inner band (IB) and the conduction band (CB) electrons of the noble metals. We present a scheme to show how alternative mathematical formulation of the physics of interaction between the CB and the IB electrons of NP sizes <50 nm justifies this and resolves the conflicts. While a number of controversies exist between classical and quantum theories over the phenomenological factors to attribute to the NP size effect on the absorption bandwidth, this article shows that the bandwidth behavior can be well predicted from a different treatment of the IB damping effect, without invoking any of the controversial phenomenological factors. It finds that the IB damping effect is mainly frequency dependent and only partly size dependent and shows how its influence on the surface plasmon resonance can be modeled to show the influence of NP size on the absorption properties. Through the model, it is revealed that strong coupling of IB and CB electrons drastically alters the absorption spectra, splitting it into distinctive dipole and quadrupole modes and even introduce a behavioral switch. It finds a strong overlap between the IB and the CB absorptions for Au and Cu but not Ag, which is sensitive to the NP environment. The CB modes shift with the changing refractive index of the medium in a way that can allow their independent excitation, free of influence of the IB electrons. Through a hybrid of parameters, the model further finds that metal NP sizes can be established not only by their spectral absorption peak locations but also from a proper correlation of the peak location and the bandwidth (FWHM).

  15. Electronic band structure and optical properties of antimony selenide under pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abhijit, B.K.; Jayaraman, Aditya; Molli, Muralikrishna, E-mail: muralikrishnamolli@sssihl.edu.in [Department of Physics, Sri Sathya Sai Institute of Higher Learning, Prasanthinilayam, 515 134 (India)

    2016-05-23

    In this work we present the optical properties of Antimony Selenide (Sb{sub 2}Se{sub 3}) under ambient conditions and under pressure of 9.2 GPa obtained using first principles calculations. We investigated the electronic band structure using the FP-LAPW method within the sphere of the density functional theory. Optical properties like refractive index, absorption coefficient and optical conductivity are calculated using the WIEN2k code.

  16. Electronic Structure and Optical Properties Of EuIn2P2

    KAUST Repository

    Singh, Nirpendra; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo; Rhee, J. Y.

    2011-01-01

    The electronic structures and, optical and magneto‐optical properties of a newly found Zintl compound EuIn2P2 have been investigated within the density‐functional theory using the highly precise full‐potential linear‐augmented‐plane‐wave method

  17. Optical properties, electronic structure and magnetism of alpha '-NaxV2O5

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konstantinovic, MI; Popovic, ZV; Presura, C; Gajic, R; Isobe, M; Ueda, Y; Moshchalkov, VV

    2002-01-01

    The optical properties of sodium-deficient alpha'-NaxV2O5 (0.85 less than or equal to x less than or equal to 1.00) single crystals are analyzed using ellipsometry, and infrared reflectivity techniques. In sodium deficient samples, the optical absorption peak associated to the fundamental electronic

  18. Electronic and optical properties of nanocrystalline WO3 thin films studied by optical spectroscopy and density functional calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansson, Malin B; Niklasson, Gunnar A; Österlund, Lars; Baldissera, Gustavo; Persson, Clas; Valyukh, Iryna; Arwin, Hans

    2013-01-01

    The optical and electronic properties of nanocrystalline WO 3 thin films prepared by reactive dc magnetron sputtering at different total pressures (P tot ) were studied by optical spectroscopy and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Monoclinic films prepared at low P tot show absorption in the near infrared due to polarons, which is attributed to a strained film structure. Analysis of the optical data yields band-gap energies E g ≈ 3.1 eV, which increase with increasing P tot by 0.1 eV, and correlate with the structural modifications of the films. The electronic structures of triclinic δ-WO 3 , and monoclinic γ- and ε-WO 3 were calculated using the Green function with screened Coulomb interaction (GW approach), and the local density approximation. The δ-WO 3 and γ-WO 3 phases are found to have very similar electronic properties, with weak dispersion of the valence and conduction bands, consistent with a direct band-gap. Analysis of the joint density of states shows that the optical absorption around the band edge is composed of contributions from forbidden transitions (>3 eV) and allowed transitions (>3.8 eV). The calculations show that E g in ε-WO 3 is higher than in the δ-WO 3 and γ-WO 3 phases, which provides an explanation for the P tot dependence of the optical data. (paper)

  19. Electronic and optical properties of nanocrystalline WO3 thin films studied by optical spectroscopy and density functional calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Malin B.; Baldissera, Gustavo; Valyukh, Iryna; Persson, Clas; Arwin, Hans; Niklasson, Gunnar A.; Österlund, Lars

    2013-05-01

    The optical and electronic properties of nanocrystalline WO3 thin films prepared by reactive dc magnetron sputtering at different total pressures (Ptot) were studied by optical spectroscopy and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Monoclinic films prepared at low Ptot show absorption in the near infrared due to polarons, which is attributed to a strained film structure. Analysis of the optical data yields band-gap energies Eg ≈ 3.1 eV, which increase with increasing Ptot by 0.1 eV, and correlate with the structural modifications of the films. The electronic structures of triclinic δ-WO3, and monoclinic γ- and ε-WO3 were calculated using the Green function with screened Coulomb interaction (GW approach), and the local density approximation. The δ-WO3 and γ-WO3 phases are found to have very similar electronic properties, with weak dispersion of the valence and conduction bands, consistent with a direct band-gap. Analysis of the joint density of states shows that the optical absorption around the band edge is composed of contributions from forbidden transitions (>3 eV) and allowed transitions (>3.8 eV). The calculations show that Eg in ε-WO3 is higher than in the δ-WO3 and γ-WO3 phases, which provides an explanation for the Ptot dependence of the optical data.

  20. Electronic Processes at Organic−Organic Interfaces: Insight from Modeling and Implications for Opto-electronic Devices †

    KAUST Repository

    Beljonne, David

    2011-02-08

    We report on the recent progress achieved in modeling the electronic processes that take place at interfaces between π-conjugated materials in organic opto-electronic devices. First, we provide a critical overview of the current computational techniques used to assess the morphology of organic: organic heterojunctions; we highlight the compromises that are necessary to handle large systems and multiple time scales while preserving the atomistic details required for subsequent computations of the electronic and optical properties. We then review some recent theoretical advances in describing the ground-state electronic structure at heterojunctions between donor and acceptor materials and highlight the role played by charge-transfer and long-range polarization effects. Finally, we discuss the modeling of the excited-state electronic structure at organic:organic interfaces, which is a key aspect in the understanding of the dynamics of photoinduced electron-transfer processes. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  1. Optical potential approach to the electron-atom impact ionization threshold problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temkin, A.; Hahn, Y.

    1973-01-01

    The problem of the threshold law for electron-atom impact ionization is reconsidered as an extrapolation of inelastic cross sections through the ionization threshold. The cross sections are evaluated from a distorted wave matrix element, the final state of which describes the scattering from the Nth excited state of the target atom. The actual calculation is carried for the e-H system, and a model is introduced which is shown to preserve the essential properties of the problem while at the same time reducing the dimensionability of the Schrodinger equation. Nevertheless, the scattering equation is still very complex. It is dominated by the optical potential which is expanded in terms of eigen-spectrum of QHQ. It is shown by actual calculation that the lower eigenvalues of this spectrum descend below the relevant inelastic thresholds; it follows rigorously that the optical potential contains repulsive terms. Analytical solutions of the final state wave function are obtained with several approximations of the optical potential.

  2. Energy modulation of nonrelativistic electrons in an optical near field on a metal microslit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, R.; Bae, J.; Mizuno, K.

    2001-04-01

    Energy modulation of nonrelativistic electrons with a laser beam using a metal microslit as an interaction circuit has been investigated. An optical near field is induced in the proximity of the microslit by illumination of the laser beam. The electrons passing close to the slit are accelerated or decelerated by an evanescent wave contained in the near field whose phase velocity is equal to the velocity of the electrons. The electron-evanescent wave interaction in the microslit has been analyzed theoretically and experimentally. The theory has predicted that electron energy can be modulated at optical frequencies. Experiments performed in the infrared region have verified theoretical predictions. The electron-energy changes of more than ±5 eV with a 10 kW CO2 laser pulse at the wavelength of 10.6 μm has been successfully observed for an electron beam with an energy of less than 80 keV.

  3. Half-period optical pulse generation using a free-electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaroszynski, D.A.; Chaix, P.; Piovella, N.

    1995-01-01

    Recently there has been growth, in interest in non-equilibrium interaction of half-period long optical pulses with matter. To date the optical pulses have been produced by chopping out a half-period long segment from a longer pulse using a semiconductor switch driven by a femtosecond laser. In this paper we present new methods for producing tunable ultra-short optical pulses as short as half an optical period using a free-electron laser driven by electron bunches with a duration a fraction of an optical period. Two different methods relying on the production of coherent spontaneous emission will be described. In the first method we show that when a train of ultra-short optical pulses as short as one half period. We present calculations which show that the small signal gain is unimportant in the early stages of radiation build up in the cavity when the startup process is dominated by coherent spontaneous emission. To support our proposed method we present encouraging experimental results from the FELIX experiment in the Netherlands which show that interference effects between the coherent spontaneous optical pulses at start-up are very important. The second proposed method relies on the fact that coherent spontaneous emission mimics the undulations of electrons as they pass through the undulator. We show that ultra-short optical pulses are produced by coherent spontaneous emission when ultra-short electron bunches pass through an ultra-short undulator. We discuss the interesting case of such undulator radiation in the presence of an optical cavity and show that the optical pulse can be open-quotes tayloredclose quotes by simply adjusting the optical cavity desynchronism. The proposed methods may be realisable using existing rf driven FELs in the far-infrared

  4. Optical Model and Cross Section Uncertainties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herman,M.W.; Pigni, M.T.; Dietrich, F.S.; Oblozinsky, P.

    2009-10-05

    Distinct minima and maxima in the neutron total cross section uncertainties were observed in model calculations using spherical optical potential. We found this oscillating structure to be a general feature of quantum mechanical wave scattering. Specifically, we analyzed neutron interaction with 56Fe from 1 keV up to 65 MeV, and investigated physical origin of the minima.We discuss their potential importance for practical applications as well as the implications for the uncertainties in total and absorption cross sections.

  5. The forward tracking, an optical model method

    CERN Document Server

    Benayoun, M

    2002-01-01

    This Note describes the so-called Forward Tracking, and the underlying optical model, developed in the context of LHCb-Light studies. Starting from Velo tracks, cheated or found by real pattern recognition, the tracks are found in the ST1-3 chambers after the magnet. The main ingredient to the method is a parameterisation of the track in the ST1-3 region, based on the Velo track parameters and an X seed in one ST station. Performance with the LHCb-Minus and LHCb-Light setups is given.

  6. Optical model representation of coupled channel effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wall, N.S.; Cowley, A.A.; Johnson, R.C.; Kobas, A.M.

    1977-01-01

    A modification to the usual 6-parameter Woods-Saxon parameterization of the optical model for the scattering of composite particles is proposed. This additional real term reflects the effect of coupling other channels to the elastic scattering. The analyses favor a repulsive interaction for this term, especially for alpha particles. It is found that the repulsive term when combined with a Woods-Saxon term yields potentials with central values and volume integrals similar to those found by uncoupled elastic scattering calculations. These values are V(r = 0) approximately equal to 125 MeV and J/4A approximately equal to 300 MeV-fm 3

  7. Optical modeling and simulation of thin-film photovoltaic devices

    CERN Document Server

    Krc, Janez

    2013-01-01

    In wafer-based and thin-film photovoltaic (PV) devices, the management of light is a crucial aspect of optimization since trapping sunlight in active parts of PV devices is essential for efficient energy conversions. Optical modeling and simulation enable efficient analysis and optimization of the optical situation in optoelectronic and PV devices. Optical Modeling and Simulation of Thin-Film Photovoltaic Devices provides readers with a thorough guide to performing optical modeling and simulations of thin-film solar cells and PV modules. It offers insight on examples of existing optical models

  8. Electronic Payments Profitability Extent Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudolf Vohnout

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Cashless payments are recent phenomena, which even increased with the introduction of contactless means like NFC, PayPass or payWave. Such new methods speed-up the entire payment process and in comparison to cash transactions are much simpler and faster. But on the other hand the key question for merchant is if it is worth to have such device, which accept these new payment means or not to have the terminal at all. What is the amount of cash flow, which delimits the cash holdings to be still profitable? This paper tries to give answers to such question by presenting general profitability model, which will address defining the cash threshold amount. The aim is to show that cash holdings could be profitable up to certain amount, but after the threshold is met, cashless payment methods are fairly superior despite their additional costs.

  9. Electron beam excitation assisted optical microscope with ultra-high resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inami, Wataru; Nakajima, Kentaro; Miyakawa, Atsuo; Kawata, Yoshimasa

    2010-06-07

    We propose electron beam excitation assisted optical microscope, and demonstrated its resolution higher than 50 nm. In the microscope, a light source in a few nanometers size is excited by focused electron beam in a luminescent film. The microscope makes it possible to observe dynamic behavior of living biological specimens in various surroundings, such as air or liquids. Scan speed of the nanometric light source is faster than that in conventional near-field scanning optical microscopes. The microscope enables to observe optical constants such as absorption, refractive index, polarization, and their dynamic behavior on a nanometric scale. The microscope opens new microscopy applications in nano-technology and nano-science.

  10. Electron conductivity model for dense plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Y.T.; More, R.M.

    1984-01-01

    An electron conductivity model for dense plasmas is described which gives a consistent and complete set of transport coefficients including not only electrical conductivity and thermal conductivity, but also thermoelectric power, and Hall, Nernst, Ettinghausen, and Leduc--Righi coefficients. The model is useful for simulating plasma experiments with strong magnetic fields. The coefficients apply over a wide range of plasma temperature and density and are expressed in a computationally simple form. Different formulas are used for the electron relaxation time in plasma, liquid, and solid phases. Comparisons with recent calculations and available experimental measurement show the model gives results which are sufficiently accurate for many practical applications

  11. Model Comparison for Electron Thermal Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, Gregory; Chenhall, Jeffrey; Cao, Duc; Delettrez, Jacques

    2015-11-01

    Four electron thermal transport models are compared for their ability to accurately and efficiently model non-local behavior in ICF simulations. Goncharov's transport model has accurately predicted shock timing in implosion simulations but is computationally slow and limited to 1D. The iSNB (implicit Schurtz Nicolai Busquet electron thermal transport method of Cao et al. uses multigroup diffusion to speed up the calculation. Chenhall has expanded upon the iSNB diffusion model to a higher order simplified P3 approximation and a Monte Carlo transport model, to bridge the gap between the iSNB and Goncharov models while maintaining computational efficiency. Comparisons of the above models for several test problems will be presented. This work was supported by Sandia National Laboratory - Albuquerque and the University of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics.

  12. Electronic structure and optical properties of thorium monopnictides

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We have calculated the electronic density of states (DOS) and dielectric function for the ThX (X = P, As and Sb) using the linear muffin tin orbital method within atomic sphere approximation (LMTO–ASA) including the combined correction terms. The calculated electronic DOS of ThSb has been compared with the available ...

  13. On the optical stability of high-resolution transmission electron microscopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barthel, J.; Thust, A.

    2013-01-01

    In the recent two decades the technique of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy experienced an unprecedented progress through the introduction of hardware aberration correctors and by the improvement of the achievable resolution to the sub-Ångström level. The important aspect that aberration correction at a given resolution requires also a well defined amount of optical stability has received little attention so far. Therefore we investigate the qualification of a variety of high-resolution electron microscopes to maintain an aberration corrected optical state in terms of an optical lifetime. We develop a comprehensive statistical framework for the estimation of the optical lifetime and find remarkably low values between tens of seconds and a couple of minutes. Probability curves are introduced, which inform the operator about the chance to work still in the fully aberration corrected state. - Highlights: • We investigate the temporal stability of optical aberrations in HRTEM. • We develop a statistical framework for the estimation of optical lifetimes. • We introduce plots showing the success probability for aberration-free work. • Optical lifetimes in sub-Ångström electron microscopy are surprisingly low. • The success of aberration correction depends strongly on the optical stability

  14. The Need for Optical Means as an Alternative for Electronic Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adbeldayem, Hossin; Frazier, Donald; Witherow, William; Paley, Steve; Penn, Benjamin; Bank, Curtis; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    An increasing demand for faster computers is rapidly growing to encounter the fast growing rate of Internet, space communication, and robotic industry. Unfortunately, the Very Large Scale Integration technology is approaching its fundamental limits beyond which the device will be unreliable. Optical interconnections and optical integrated circuits are strongly believed to provide the way out of the extreme limitations imposed on the growth of speed and complexity of nowadays computations by conventional electronics. This paper demonstrates two ultra-fast, all-optical logic gates and a high-density storage medium, which are essential components in building the future optical computer.

  15. Thermostimulated luminescence in KBr-In crystals after optical creation of electronic excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popov, A.I.

    1990-01-01

    Thermal stability of the radiation defects produced in KBr-In by optical creation of the electronic excitation (optical creation of the excitons or optical ionization of In + -ions under C-band illumination) is investigated by the method of thermostimulated luminescence (TSL). A method of detection of prehistory defects, when the optical ionization of In + -ions and TSL are performed, is proposed. Quadratic dependence of V 2 -center creation upon dose is shown. This dependence confirms assocative mechanism of the creation of V 2 -centers from two interstitial centers

  16. Wave Optical Calculation of Probe Size in Low Energy Scanning Electron Microscope

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Radlička, Tomáš

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 21, S4 (2015), s. 212-217 ISSN 1431-9276 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : scanning electron microscope * optical calculation Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.730, year: 2015

  17. Optical emission from a high-refractive-index waveguide excited by a traveling electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuwamura, Yuji; Yamada, Minoru; Okamoto, Ryuichi; Kanai, Takeshi; Fares, Hesham

    2008-01-01

    An optical emission scheme was demonstrated, in which a high-refractive-index waveguide is excited by a traveling electron beam in a vacuum environment. The waveguide was made of Si-SiO 2 layers. The velocity of light propagating in the waveguide was slowed down to 1/3 of that in free space due to the high refractive index of Si. The light penetrated partly into the vacuum in the form of a surface wave. The electron beam was emitted from an electron gun and propagated along the surface of the waveguide. When the velocity of the electron coincided with that of the light, optical emission was observed. This emission is a type of Cherenkov radiation and is not conventional cathode luminescence from the waveguide materials because Si and SiO 2 are transparent to light at the emitted wavelength. This type of emission was observed in an optical wavelength range from 1.2 to 1.6 μm with an electron acceleration voltage of 32-42 kV. The characteristics of the emitted light, such as the polarization direction and the relation between the acceleration voltage of the electron beam and the optical wavelength, coincided well with the theoretical results. The coherent length of an electron wave in the vacuum was confirmed to be equal to the electron spacing, as found by measuring the spectral profile of the emitted light

  18. Simulation of Space Charge Effects in Electron Optical System Based on the Calculations of Current Density

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zelinka, Jiří; Oral, Martin; Radlička, Tomáš

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 21, S4 (2015), s. 246-251 ISSN 1431-9276 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : electron optical system * calculations of current density Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.730, year: 2015

  19. Measurement of single electron and nuclear spin states based on optically detected magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berman, Gennady P [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Bishop, Alan R [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Chernobrod, Boris M [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Hawley, Marilyn E [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Brown, Geoffrey W [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Tsifrinovich, Vladimir I [Polytechnic University, Brooklyn, NY 11201 (United States)

    2006-05-15

    A novel approach for measurement of single electron and nuclear spin states is suggested. Our approach is based on optically detected magnetic resonance in a nano-probe located at the apex of an AFM tip. The method provides single electron spin sensitivity with nano-scale spatial resolution.

  20. Measurement of single electron and nuclear spin states based on optically detected magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berman, Gennady P; Bishop, Alan R; Chernobrod, Boris M; Hawley, Marilyn E; Brown, Geoffrey W; Tsifrinovich, Vladimir I

    2006-01-01

    A novel approach for measurement of single electron and nuclear spin states is suggested. Our approach is based on optically detected magnetic resonance in a nano-probe located at the apex of an AFM tip. The method provides single electron spin sensitivity with nano-scale spatial resolution

  1. Quantum theory of the electronic and optical properties of low-dimensional semiconductor systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Wayne Heung

    This thesis examines the electronic and optical properties of low-dimensional semiconductor systems. A theory is developed to study the electron-hole generation-recombination process of type-II semimetallic semiconductor heterojunctions based on a 3 x 3 k·p matrix Hamiltonian (three-band model) and an 8 x 8 k·p matrix Hamiltonian (eight-band model). A novel electron-hole generation and recombination process, which is called activationless generation-recombination process, is predicted. It is demonstrated that the current through the type-II semimetallic semiconductor heterojunctions is governed by the activationless electron-hole generation-recombination process at the heterointerfaces, and that the current-voltage characteristics are essentially linear. A qualitative agreement between theory and experiments is observed. The numerical results of the eight-band model are compared with those of the threeband model. Based on a lattice gas model, a theory is developed to study the influence of a random potential on the ionization equilibrium conditions for bound electron-hole pairs (excitons) in III--V semiconductor heterostructures. It is demonstrated that ionization equilibrium conditions for bound electron-hole pairs change drastically in the presence of strong disorder. It is predicted that strong disorder promotes dissociation of excitons in III--V semiconductor heterostructures. A theory of polariton (photon dressed by phonon) spontaneous emission in a III--V semiconductor doped with semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) or quantum wells (QWs) is developed. For the first time, superradiant and subradiant polariton spontaneous emission phenomena in a polariton-QD (QW) coupled system are predicted when the resonance energies of the two identical QDs (QWs) lie outside the polaritonic energy gap. It is also predicted that when the resonance energies of the two identical QDs (QWs) lie inside the polaritonic energy gap, spontaneous emission of polariton in the polariton

  2. Fifty years old, and still going strong: Transmission electron optical studies of materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, L.M.

    2008-01-01

    Highlights in the history of transmission electron microscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy include the introduction of diffraction contrast, resolution of periodic lattices by phase contrast and incoherent imaging via the high-angle annular dark-field detector. Convergent-beam electron diffraction and analytical electron microscopy, especially the application of energy-dispersive X-ray and electron energy-loss spectrometry, have provided structural and chemical information in addition to strain contrast from lattice defects. From the outset, novel specimen stages and improvements to aid the operator enhanced the electron-optical engineering provided by the instrument makers. The spatial resolution achieved was mainly determined by the way the instrument was used, and not by the basic resolution limit set by the electron optics. However, the application of computer controlled correction of spherical (and higher order) aberration has resulted in a new generation of instruments capable of sub-Angstrom point-to-point resolution. This improved performance, combined with electron energy-loss spectrometry, promises genuine three-dimensional determination of atomic and electronic structure: an indispensable weapon in the battle to fabricate and control useful nanostructures. The uncertainty principle now fundamentally restricts some of the observations one can make, but much more technical development over the next decades must occur before one can say that the techniques of electron-optical imaging of material structure have reached their fundamental limitations. One can expect remarkable progress over the next few years

  3. Teaching Chemistry with Electron Density Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shusterman, Gwendolyn P.; Shusterman, Alan J.

    1997-07-01

    Linus Pauling once said that a topic must satisfy two criteria before it can be taught to students. First, students must be able to assimilate the topic within a reasonable amount of time. Second, the topic must be relevant to the educational needs and interests of the students. Unfortunately, the standard general chemistry textbook presentation of "electronic structure theory", set as it is in the language of molecular orbitals, has a difficult time satisfying either criterion. Many of the quantum mechanical aspects of molecular orbitals are too difficult for most beginning students to appreciate, much less master, and the few applications that are presented in the typical textbook are too limited in scope to excite much student interest. This article describes a powerful new method for teaching students about electronic structure and its relevance to chemical phenomena. This method, which we have developed and used for several years in general chemistry (G.P.S.) and organic chemistry (A.J.S.) courses, relies on computer-generated three-dimensional models of electron density distributions, and largely satisfies Pauling's two criteria. Students find electron density models easy to understand and use, and because these models are easily applied to a broad range of topics, they successfully convey to students the importance of electronic structure. In addition, when students finally learn about orbital concepts they are better prepared because they already have a well-developed three-dimensional picture of electronic structure to fall back on. We note in this regard that the types of models we use have found widespread, rigorous application in chemical research (1, 2), so students who understand and use electron density models do not need to "unlearn" anything before progressing to more advanced theories.

  4. The optical/ultraviolet excess of isolated neutron stars in the resonant cyclotron scattering model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Hao; Xu, Ren-Xin; Song, Li-Ming

    2011-12-01

    X-ray dim isolated neutron stars are peculiar pulsar-like objects, characterized by their Planck-like spectrum. In studying their spectral energy distributions, optical/ultraviolet (UV) excess is a long standing problem. Recently Kaplan et al. measured the optical/UV excess for all seven sources, which is understandable in the resonant cyclotron scattering (RCS) model previously addressed. The RCS model calculations show that the RCS process can account for the observed optical/UV excess for most sources. The flat spectrum of RX J2143.0+0654 may be due to contributions from the bremsstrahlung emission of the electron system in addition to the RCS process.

  5. Optical trapping of a spherically symmetric sphere in the ray-optics regime: a model for optical tweezers upon cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang Yiren; Hsu Long; Chi Sien

    2006-01-01

    Since their invention in 1986, optical tweezers have become a popular manipulation and force measurement tool in cellular and molecular biology. However, until recently there has not been a sophisticated model for optical tweezers on trapping cells in the ray-optics regime. We present a model for optical tweezers to calculate the optical force upon a spherically symmetric multilayer sphere representing a common biological cell. A numerical simulation of this model shows that not only is the magnitude of the optical force upon a Chinese hamster ovary cell significantly three times smaller than that upon a polystyrene bead of the same size, but the distribution of the optical force upon a cell is also much different from that upon a uniform particle, and there is a 30% difference in the optical trapping stiffness of these two cases. Furthermore, under a small variant condition for the refractive indices of any adjacent layers of the sphere, this model provides a simple approximation to calculate the optical force and the stiffness of an optical tweezers system

  6. Electronic and optical properties of 2D graphene-like ZnS: DFT calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lashgari, Hamed; Boochani, Arash; Shekaari, Ashkan; Solaymani, Shahram; Sartipi, Elmira; Mendi, Rohollah Taghavi

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • DFT has been applied to investigate the optical properties of 2D-ZnS and 3D-ZnS. • The electronic and the optical properties of 3D-ZnS and 2D-ZnS are compared. • At visible range of energies the transparency of 2D-ZnS is more than the 3D. - Abstract: Density-functional theory has been applied to investigate the electronic and optical properties of graphene-like two-dimensional ZnS in the (0001) direction of its Wurtzite phase. A comparison with 3D-ZnS has been carried out within the PBE- and EV-GGA. The electronic properties of 2D- and 3D-ZnS have been derived by the examination of the electronic band structures and density of states. The optical properties have been determined through the study of the dielectric function, reflectivity, electron loss function, refractive and extinction indices, the absorption index and optical conductivity. It is found that the transparency of 2D-ZnS is greater than the 3D over the visible range. A thorough study of the dielectric function has been performed so that the peaks and the transition bands have been specified. The electron loss function demonstrates that the plasmonic frequency for 2D- and 3D-ZnS is accrued at 11.22 and 19.93 eV within the PBE-GGA, respectively.

  7. Quantum computers based on electron spins controlled by ultrafast off-resonant single optical pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Susan M; Fu, Kai-Mei C; Ladd, Thaddeus D; Yamamoto, Yoshihisa

    2007-07-27

    We describe a fast quantum computer based on optically controlled electron spins in charged quantum dots that are coupled to microcavities. This scheme uses broadband optical pulses to rotate electron spins and provide the clock signal to the system. Nonlocal two-qubit gates are performed by phase shifts induced by electron spins on laser pulses propagating along a shared waveguide. Numerical simulations of this scheme demonstrate high-fidelity single-qubit and two-qubit gates with operation times comparable to the inverse Zeeman frequency.

  8. Electron-optical system of 200 kV gun for the VEPP-5 preinjector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akimov, V.E.; Kazarezov, I.V.; Tiunov, M.A.

    2004-01-01

    The electron gun with a new electron-optical system to match project parameters of the VEPP-5 preinjector is described. The gun produces the current with 10 A amplitude, pulse duration 2...3 ns at half-height and electron energy 200 keV. The gun has a dispenser cathode 20 mm in diameter and 100 mm spherical radius. The current control is performed by means of molybdenum equipotential grid with the cell size 0.4 centre dot 0.4 mm and optical transparency of about 0.68. The experimental results obtained are in good agreement with project parameters

  9. Measurement of optically and thermally stimulated electron emission from natural minerals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ankjærgaard, C.; Murray, A.S.; Denby, P.M.

    2006-01-01

    to a Riso TL/OSL reader, enabling optically stimulated electrons (OSE) and thermally stimulated electrons (TSE) to be measured simultaneously with optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) and thermoluminescence (TL). Repeated irradiation and measurement is possible without removing the sample from...... the counting chamber. Using this equipment both OSE and TSE from loose sand-sized grains of natural minerals has been recorded. It is shown that both the surface electron traps (giving rise to the OSE signals) and the bulk traps (giving rise to OSL) have the same dosimetric properties. A comparison of OSL...

  10. Long-wavelength optical phonon behavior in uniaxial strained graphene: Role of electron-phonon interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Assili, Mohamed; Haddad, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    We derive the frequency shifts and the broadening of $\\Gamma$ point longitudinal optical (LO) and transverse optical (TO) phonon modes, due to electron-phonon interaction, in graphene under uniaxial strain as a function of the electron density and the disorder amount. We show that, in the absence of a shear strain component, such interaction gives rise to a lifting of the degeneracy of the LO and TO modes which contributes to the splitting of the G Raman band. The anisotropy of the electronic...

  11. Study of electron-beam-evaporated MgO films using electron diffraction, optical absorption and cathodoluminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aboelfotoh, M.O.; Ramsey, J.N.

    1982-05-21

    Reflection high energy electron diffraction, optical absorption and cathodoluminescence were used to study MgO films deposited onto fused silica, single-crystal silicon and LiF substrates at various temperatures. Results showed that some of the same optical absorption and emission bands observed in X- or UV-irradiated, additively colored or mechanically deformed MgO crystals were observed in evaporated MgO films. The peak positions and the relative peak intensities of the optical absorption and emission bands depended on the substrate temperature during film deposition as well as on the structure of the film. The effect of heating the films in air and vacuum on the optical absorption and emission bands is also discussed.

  12. EGUN: An electron optics and gun design program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.

    1988-10-01

    The name EGUN has become commonly associated with the program also known as the SLAC Electron Trajectory Program. This document is an updated version of SLAC-226, published in 1979. The program itself has had substantial upgrading since then, but only a few new features are of much concern to the user. Most of the improvements are internal and are intended to improve speed or accuracy. EGUN is designed to compute trajectories of charged particles in electrostatic and magnetostatic fields, including the effects of space charge and self-magnetic fields. Starting options include Child's Law conditions on cathodes of various shapes, as well as used specified initial conditions. Either rectangular or cylindrical symmetry may be used. In the new jargon, the program is a 2-1/2 dimension code meaning 2-D in all fields and 3-D in all particle motion. A Poisson's Equation Solver is used to find the electrostatic fields by using difference equations derived from the boundary conditions. Magnetic fields are to be specified externally, by the user, by using one of several methods including data from another program or arbitrary configurations of coils. This edition of the documentation also covers the program EGN87c, which is a recently developed version of EGUN designed to be used on the newer models of personal computers, small main frames, work stations, etc. The EGN87c program uses the programming language C which is very transportable so the program should operate on any system that supports C. Plotting routines for most common PC monitors are included, and the capability to make hard copy plots on dot-matrix printer-plotters is provided. 18 refs., 7 figs

  13. Exact diagonalization library for quantum electron models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iskakov, Sergei; Danilov, Michael

    2018-04-01

    We present an exact diagonalization C++ template library (EDLib) for solving quantum electron models, including the single-band finite Hubbard cluster and the multi-orbital impurity Anderson model. The observables that can be computed using EDLib are single particle Green's functions and spin-spin correlation functions. This code provides three different types of Hamiltonian matrix storage that can be chosen based on the model.

  14. Proton disorder in cubic ice: Effect on the electronic and optical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garbuio, Viviana; Pulci, Olivia; Cascella, Michele; Kupchak, Igor; Seitsonen, Ari Paavo

    2015-01-01

    The proton disorder in ice has a key role in several properties such as the growth mode, thermodynamical properties, and ferroelectricity. While structural phase transitions from proton disordered to proton ordered ices have been extensively studied, much less is known about their electronic and optical properties. Here, we present ab initio many body perturbation theory-based calculations of the electronic and optical properties of cubic ice at different levels of proton disorder. We compare our results with those from liquid water, that acts as an example of a fully (proton- and oxygen-)disordered system. We find that by increasing the proton disorder, a shrinking of the electronic gap occurs in ice, and it is smallest in the liquid water. Simultaneously, the excitonic binding energy decreases, so that the final optical gaps result to be almost independent on the degree of proton disorder. We explain these findings as an interplay between the local dipolar disorder and the electronic correlation

  15. Electron-Beam Produced Air Plasma: Optical Measurement of Beam Current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidmar, Robert; Stalder, Kenneth; Seeley, Megan

    2006-10-01

    Experiments to quantify the electron beam current and distribution of beam current in air plasma are discussed. The air plasma is produced by a 100-keV 10-mA electron beam source that traverses a transmission window into a chamber with air as a target gas. Air pressure is between 1 mTorr and 760 Torr. Strong optical emissions due to electron impact ionization are observed for the N2 2^nd positive line at 337.1 nm and the N2^+ 1^st negative line at 391.4 nm. Calibration of optical emissions using signals from the isolated transmission window and a Faraday plate are discussed. The calibrated optical system is then used to quantify the electron distribution in the air plasma.

  16. Optical absorption and electron spin resonance in natural, irradiated and heated spodumene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, A.S.; Isotani, S.

    1983-09-01

    Heat treatment and X and γ-Rays irradiation of lylac and colorless natural spodumene, LiAlSi 2 O 6 , have been studied. Irradiation produces a color change, from lylac or colorless to green. Irradiated samples heated at 200 0 C turn lylac and bleach at 400 0 C. Optical absorption spectra were decomposed into gaussian line shape bands and it is observed that green and lylac centers are simultaneously created by irradiation. These centers are independent from each other. Optical absorption, EPR and X-Ray fluorescence results show the spectra of impurities, responsible by the presence of the created centers and indicated Mn participation in the process of centers creation and destruction. Decay Kinetics of green and lylac centers have been studied and it is observed that simple Kinetic models do not apply to these cases. An empirical fit allowed the calculation of activation energies of the lylac and green centers decays. Discussions about the present results led us to propose a new model where the green and lylac centers are due to Mn 3+ ions in two different Al 3+ sites, whose absorption are intensified by the interaction with an electron trapped in a neighbour oxygen. (Author) [pt

  17. Optical circular deflector with attosecond resolution for ultrashort electron beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Zhang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available A novel method using high-power laser as a circular deflector is proposed for the measurement of femtosecond (fs and sub-fs electron beam. In the scheme, the electron beam interacts with a laser pulse operating in a radially polarized doughnut mode (TEM_{01^{*}} in a helical undulator, generating angular kicks along the beam in two directions at the same time. The phase difference between the two angular kicks makes the beam form a ring after a propagation section with appropriate phase advance, which can reveal the current profile of the electron beam. Detailed theoretical analysis of the method and numerical results with reasonable parameters are both presented. It is shown that the temporal resolution can reach up to ∼100 attosecond, which is a significant improvement for the diagnostics of ultrashort electron beam.

  18. The Anderson model for electron localisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pruisken, A.M.M.; Schaefer, L.

    1982-01-01

    The Anderson model for localisation problems is treated with field theory employing the replica trick. We show that no valid perturbation theory results out of the usual (S2)2 formalism due to mishandling of symmetries. The problem is reformulated in terms of matrix fields. It is shown that the Anderson model asymptotically exhibits an exact local gauge symmetry. Elimination of massive longitudinal components leads to a non-compact sigma model, obtained earlier for the description of electronic disorder. We thus establish that the Anderson model is in the same universality class as Wegner's gauge invariant real matrix model. (orig.)

  19. Cylindrical integrated optical microresonators: modeling by 3-D vectorial coupled mode theory

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stoffer, R.; Hiremath, K. R.; Hammer, M.; Prkna, Ladislav; Čtyroký, Jiří

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 256, 1/3 (2005), s. 46-67 ISSN 0030-4018 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA102/05/0987 Grant - others:European Commission(XE) IST-2000-28018 NAIS Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20670512 Keywords : integrated optics * optical waveguide theory * modelling Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.456, year: 2005

  20. Effective-mass model and magneto-optical properties in hybrid perovskites

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Z. G.

    2016-01-01

    Hybrid inorganic-organic perovskites have proven to be a revolutionary material for low-cost photovoltaic applications. They also exhibit many other interesting properties, including giant Rashba splitting, large-radius Wannier excitons, and novel magneto-optical effects. Understanding these properties as well as the detailed mechanism of photovoltaics requires a reliable and accessible electronic structure, on which models of transport, excitonic, and magneto-optical properties can be effici...

  1. Observation of superconducting fluxons by transmission electron microscopy: A Fourier space approach to calculate the electron optical phase shifts and images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beleggia, M.; Pozzi, G.

    2001-01-01

    An approach is presented for the calculation of the electron optical phase shift experienced by high-energy electrons in a transmission electron microscope, when they interact with the magnetic field associated with superconducting fluxons in a thin specimen tilted with respect to the beam. It is shown that by decomposing the vector potential in its Fourier components and by calculating the phase shift of each component separately, it is possible to obtain the Fourier transform of the electron optical phase shift, which can be inverted either analytically or numerically. It will be shown how this method can be used to recover the result, previously obtained by the real-space approach, relative to the case of a straight flux tube perpendicular to the specimen surfaces. Then the method is applied to the case of a London fluxon in a thin film, where the bending and the broadening of the magnetic-field lines due to the finite specimen thickness are now correctly taken into account and not treated approximately by means of a parabolic fit. Finally, it will be shown how simple models for the pancake structure of the fluxon can be analyzed within this framework and the main features of electron transmission images predicted

  2. Optical Evaluation of the Rear Contacts of Crystalline Silicon Solar Cells by Coupled Electromagnetic and Statistical Ray-Optics Modeling

    KAUST Repository

    Dabirian, Ali

    2017-02-15

    High-efficiency crystalline silicon (c-Si) solar cells increasingly feature sophisticated electron and hole contacts aimed at minimizing electronic losses. At the rear of photovoltaic devices, such contacts—usually consisting of stacks of functional layers—offer opportunities to enhance the infrared response of the solar cells. Here, we propose an accurate and simple modeling procedure to evaluate the infrared performance of rear contacts in c-Si solar cells. Our method combines full-wave electromagnetic modeling of the rear contact with a statistical ray optics model to obtain the fraction of optical energy dissipated from the rear contact relative to that absorbed by the Si wafer. Using this technique, we study the impact of the refractive index, extinction coefficient, and thickness of the rear-passivating layer and establish basic design rules. In addition, we evaluate novel optical structures, including stratified thin films, nanoparticle composites, and conductive nanowires embedded in a low-index dielectric matrix, for integration into advanced rear contacts in c-Si photovoltaic devices. From an optical perspective, nanowire structures preserving low contact resistance appear to be the most effective approach to mitigating dissipation losses from the rear contact.

  3. Optical absorption and electron spin resonance studies of Cu in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Na2O–50B2O3–10As2O3 glasses. In this paper, we report the ESR and optical absorption spectra of Cu2+ ions in xLi2O–(40 – x)Na2O–50B2O3–. 10As2O3 glasses. The values of x were adjusted so that the compositional parameter defined as ...

  4. Space Object Radiometric Modeling for Hardbody Optical Signature Database Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    Introduction This presentation summarizes recent activity in monitoring spacecraft health status using passive remote optical nonimaging ...Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Space Object Radiometric Modeling for Hardbody Optical Signature Database Generation...It is beneficial to the observer/analyst to understand the fundamental optical signature variability associated with these detection and

  5. Electronic and optical properties of ZrB12 and YB6. Discussion on electron-phonon coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teyssier, J.; Kuzmenko, A.; Marel, D. van der; Lortz, R.; Junod, A.; Filippov, V.; Shitsevalova, N.

    2006-01-01

    We report the optical properties of high-quality single crystals of low temperature superconductors zirconiumdodecaboride ZrB 12 (T c =5.95 K) and yttrium hexaboride YB 6 (T c =7.15 K) in the range 6 meV-4.6 eV at room temperature. The experimental optical conductivity was extracted from the analysis of the reflectivity in the infrared range and ellipsometry measurement of the dielectric function in the visible range. The electronic band structure of these compounds was calculated by the self-consistent full-potential LMTO method and used to compute the interband part of the optical conductivity and the plasma frequency Ω p . A good agreement was observed between the interband part of the experimental optical conductivities and the band structure calculations. Different methods combining optical spectroscopy, resistivity, specific heat measurements and results of band structure calculations are used to determine the electron-phonon coupling constant. (copyright 2006 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  6. Thermal and optical excitation of trapped electrons in high-density polyethylene (HDPE) studied through positron annihilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nahid, F.; Zhang, J.D.; Yu, T.F.; Ling, C.C.; Fung, S.; Beling, C.D.

    2011-01-01

    Positronium (Ps) formation in high-density polyethylene (HDPE) has been studied below the glass transition temperature. The formation probability increases with positron irradiation time due to an increasing number of inter-track trapped electrons becoming available for positron capture. The temperature variation of the saturated Ps level is discussed in different models. The quenching of trapped electrons by light has been studied and the optical de-trapping cross-section for different photon energies has been estimated over the visible region.

  7. Optical modeling of Fresnel zoneplate microscopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naulleau, Patrick P.; Mochi, Iacopo; Goldberg, Kenneth A.

    2011-01-01

    Defect free masks remain one of the most significant challenges facing the commercialization of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography. Progress on this front requires high-performance wavelength-specific metrology of EUV masks, including high-resolution and aerial-image microscopy performed near the 13.5 nm wavelength. Arguably the most cost-effective and rapid path to proliferating this capability is through the development of Fresnel zoneplate-based microscopes. Given the relative obscurity of such systems, however, modeling tools are not necessarily optimized to deal with them and their imaging properties are poorly understood. Here we present a modeling methodology to analyze zoneplate microscopes based on commercially available optical modeling software and use the technique to investigate the imaging performance of an off-axis EUV microscope design. The modeling predicts that superior performance can be achieved by tilting the zoneplate, making it perpendicular to the chief ray at the center of the field, while designing the zoneplate to explicitly work in that tilted plane. Although the examples presented here are in the realm of EUV mask inspection, the methods described and analysis results are broadly applicable to zoneplate microscopes in general, including full-field soft-x-ray microscopes routinely used in the synchrotron community.

  8. Optically isolated electronic trigger system for experiments on a subnanosecond time scale with a pulsed Van de Graaff electron accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luthjens, L.H.; Vermeulen, M.J.W.; Hom, M.L.

    1980-01-01

    An optically isolated electronic trigger system for a pulsed Van de Graaff electron accelerator, producing an external pretrigger pulse 75 ns before arrival of the electron pulse at the target, is described. The total time jitter between trigger signal and electron pulse is 50 ps. The measurement of optical and electrical transients on a subnanosecond time scale with a sequential sampling oscilloscope is demonstrated. The contribution of various parts of the equipment to the total jitter is discussed. Those contributions to the jitter due to the electron transit time fluctuations in the accelerator assuming a constant acceleration voltage gradient and to the shot noise in the photomultiplier detector of the trigger system are calculated to be 5 ps and 12 to 21 ps respectively. Comparison with the experimental results leads to the conclusion that a considerable part of the total jitter may be attributed to acceleration voltage gradient fluctuations, to accelerator vibrations and possibly to density fluctuations in the insulation gas. Possible improvements of the trigger system are discussed. The apparatus is used for pulse radiolysis experiments with subnanosecond time resolution down to 100 ps in combination with subnanosecond time duration electron pulses

  9. Electron scattering in the interacting boson model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dieperink, A.E.L.; Iachello, F.; Creswell, C.

    1978-01-01

    It is suggested that the interacting boson model be used in the analysis of electron scattering data. Qualitative features of the expected behavior of the inelastic excitation of some 2 + states in the transitional Sm-Nd region are discussed. (Auth.)

  10. Models for the transport of low energy electrons in water and the yield of hydrated electrons at early times

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brenner, D.J.; Miller, J.H.; Ritchie, R.H.; Bichsel, H.

    1985-01-01

    An insulator model with four experimental energy bands was used to fit the optical properties of liquid water and to extend these data to non-zero momentum transfer. Inelastic mean free paths derived from this dielectric response function provided the basic information necessary to degrade high energy electrons to the subexcitation energy domain. Two approaches for the transport of subexcitation electrons were investigated. (i) Gas phase cross sections were used to degrade subexcitation electrons to thermal energy and the thermalization lengths were scaled to unit density. (ii) Thermalization lengths were estimated by age-diffusion theory with a stopping power deduced from the data on liquid water and transport cross sections derived from elastic scattering in water vapor. Theoretical ranges were compared to recent experimental results. A stochastic model was used to calculate the rapid diffusion and reaction of hydrated electrons with other radiolysis products. The sensitivity of the calculated yields to the model assumptions and comparison with experimental data are discussed

  11. Modeling and multidimensional optimization of a tapered free electron laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Jiao

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Energy extraction efficiency of a free electron laser (FEL can be greatly increased using a tapered undulator and self-seeding. However, the extraction rate is limited by various effects that eventually lead to saturation of the peak intensity and power. To better understand these effects, we develop a model extending the Kroll-Morton-Rosenbluth, one-dimensional theory to include the physics of diffraction, optical guiding, and radially resolved particle trapping. The predictions of the model agree well with that of the GENESIS single-frequency numerical simulations. In particular, we discuss the evolution of the electron-radiation interaction along the tapered undulator and show that the decreasing of refractive guiding is the major cause of the efficiency reduction, particle detrapping, and then saturation of the radiation power. With this understanding, we develop a multidimensional optimization scheme based on GENESIS simulations to increase the energy extraction efficiency via an improved taper profile and variation in electron beam radius. We present optimization results for hard x-ray tapered FELs, and the dependence of the maximum extractable radiation power on various parameters of the initial electron beam, radiation field, and the undulator system. We also study the effect of the sideband growth in a tapered FEL. Such growth induces increased particle detrapping and thus decreased refractive guiding that together strongly limit the overall energy extraction efficiency.

  12. In plane optical sensor based on organic electronic devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koetse, M.M; Rensing, P.A.; Heck, G.T. van; Sharpe, R.B.A.; Allard, B.A.M.; Wieringa, F.P.; Kruijt, P.G.M.; Meulendijks, N.M.M.; Jansen, H.; Schoo, H.F.M.

    2008-01-01

    Sensors based on organic electronic devices are emerging in a wide range of application areas. Here we present a sensor platform using organic light emitting diodes (OLED) and organic photodiodes (OPD) as active components. By means of lamination and interconnection technology the functional foils

  13. Electronic and optical properties of Y-doped Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} by density functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Zhifeng [State Key Lab of Advanced Technology for Materials Synthesis and Processing, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China); Chen, Fei, E-mail: chenfei027@gmail.com [State Key Lab of Advanced Technology for Materials Synthesis and Processing, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China); Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Specially Functional Materials, Ministry of Education, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China); Su, Rui; Wang, Zhihao; Li, Junyang; Shen, Qiang [State Key Lab of Advanced Technology for Materials Synthesis and Processing, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China); Zhang, Lianmeng [State Key Lab of Advanced Technology for Materials Synthesis and Processing, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China); Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Specially Functional Materials, Ministry of Education, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Y-doped α-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} and β-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} are systematically investigated by DFT. • Impacts of local structure and bond character on electronic property are studied. • Static dielectric constants and optical absorption properties are investigated. - Abstract: Geometry structures, formation energies, electronic and optical properties of Y-doped α-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} and β-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} are investigated based on the density functional theory (DFT). The low values of formation energies indicate both Y-doped Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} models can be easily synthesized. Besides, the negative formation energies of α-Y{sub i}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} demonstrate that interstitial Y-doped α-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} has an excellent stability. The energies of impurity levels are different resulting from the different chemical environment around Y atoms. The impurity levels localized in the band gap reduces the maximum energy gaps, which enhances the optical properties of Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}. The static dielectric constants become larger and the optical absorption spectra show the red-shift phenomena for all Y-doped Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} models.

  14. Optical and electrical properties of some electron and proton irradiated polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, R.; Tripathy, S.P.; Sinha, D.; Dwivedi, K.K.; Ghosh, S.; Khathing, D.T.; Mueller, M.; Fink, D.; Chung, W.H.

    2000-01-01

    Ion beam treatment studies have been carried out to investigate the potential for improvements in conductivity properties of the polymers Polytetrafluroethylene (PTFE), Polyimide (PI), Polyethyleneterepthalate (PET) and Polypropylene (PP), after 2 MeV electron and 62 MeV proton irradiation. The shift in optical absorption edges as observed by UV-VIS spectra of the irradiated polymers has been correlated to the optical band-gap using Tauc's expression. A decrease in the optical band-gap has been observed in irradiated PP and PTFE, but no considerable change was found for the optical band-gaps of PET and PI. Further AC conductivity measurements confirmed an increase in conductivity in electron irradiated PP

  15. Study of optically thin electron cyclotron emission from TFTR using a Michelson interferometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stauffer, F.J.; Boyd, D.A.

    1986-01-01

    The TFTR Michelson interferometer, which is used as an electron temperature diagnostic, has a spectral range of 75-540 GHz. This range is adequate for measuring at least the first three cyclotron harmonics, and it spans both optically thick and thin portions of the ECE spectrum. During the most recent opening of the TFTR vacuum vessel, a concave, carbon reflector was installed on the back wall of the vessel, opposite the light collecting optic of the Michelson system. The reflector is designed to prevent the observation of optically thin ECE that originates from a location that is outside the field of view of the light collecting optic. If this is achieved, it should be possible to derive the electron density profile from measurements of either the extraordinary mode third harmonic or the ordinary mode second harmonic. An analysis of ECE spectra that have been measured before and after installation of the reflector is presented

  16. Analogies in optics and micro electronics selected contributions on recent developments

    CERN Document Server

    Lenstra, Daan

    1990-01-01

    This book gives an account of a number of recent developments in two different subfields of research, optics and micro--electronics. The leading principle in presenting them together in one book is the striking similarity between a variety of notions in these two research areas. We mention in this respect tunneling, quantum interference and localization, which are important concepts in quantummechanics and more specifically in condensed matter physics. Miniaturization in solid state engineering has led to new phenomena in which these concepts play their significant roles. As it is the wave character of electrons which is strongly emphasized in these phenomena one's attention is quite naturally directed to the field of optics in which the above quantum-mechanical notions all seem to have their direct classical wavemechanical counterparts. Both micro--electronics and optics have been and still are in a mode of intensifying activity. The possibilities to technically "translate" devices developed within one resea...

  17. Cerenkov light generated in optical fibres and other light pipes irradiated by electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beddar, A.S.; Mackie, T.R.; Attix, F.H.

    1992-01-01

    The use of a small plastic scintillator coupled to an optical fibre bundle light pipe for the dosimetry of radiotherapy x-ray or electron beams in a phantom has been studied. Under such conditions, some light is generated by the direct action of the radiation on the optical fibres themselves, and this 'background' signal must be correctly accounted for. Electron beams were incident on fused silica optical fibres and other light pipes made of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), polystyrene and water. The observed light signal generated in all cases was found to depend strongly on the angle between the electron direction and the light pipe axis, and to correlate well with the angular characteristics uniquely associated with Cerenkov radiation. The use of a parallel fibre bundle light pipe, identical to the one that carries light from the scintillator, offers a suitable means of generating a similar background Cerenkov light signal that can be subtracted to obtain output from the scintillation dosimeter alone. (author)

  18. Electron beam manipulation, injection and acceleration in plasma wakefield accelerators by optically generated plasma density spikes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wittig, Georg; Karger, Oliver S.; Knetsch, Alexander [Institute of Experimental Physics, University of Hamburg, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Xi, Yunfeng; Deng, Aihua; Rosenzweig, James B. [Particle Beam Physics Laboratory, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Bruhwiler, David L. [RadiaSoft LLC, Boulder, CO 80304 (United States); RadiaBeam Technologies LLC (United States); Smith, Jonathan [Tech-X UK Ltd, Daresbury, Cheshire WA4 4FS (United Kingdom); Sheng, Zheng-Ming; Jaroszynski, Dino A.; Manahan, Grace G. [Physics Department, SUPA, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Hidding, Bernhard [Institute of Experimental Physics, University of Hamburg, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Physics Department, SUPA, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom)

    2016-09-01

    We discuss considerations regarding a novel and robust scheme for optically triggered electron bunch generation in plasma wakefield accelerators [1]. In this technique, a transversely propagating focused laser pulse ignites a quasi-stationary plasma column before the arrival of the plasma wake. This localized plasma density enhancement or optical “plasma torch” distorts the blowout during the arrival of the electron drive bunch and modifies the electron trajectories, resulting in controlled injection. By changing the gas density, and the laser pulse parameters such as beam waist and intensity, and by moving the focal point of the laser pulse, the shape of the plasma torch, and therefore the generated trailing beam, can be tuned easily. The proposed method is much more flexible and faster in generating gas density transitions when compared to hydrodynamics-based methods, and it accommodates experimentalists needs as it is a purely optical process and straightforward to implement.

  19. Design of fiber optic electronic seal system based on C8051 microcontroller

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Yuming; Chen Rongye; Zuo Guangxia; Song Cang

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents fiber optic electronic seal system, witch uses C8051 microcontroller as core, matching other circuits such as optical signal detection module, movement detection module, temperature detection module and power module, etc. The results show that the seal system can record the tampering events' information accurately and quickly no matter there is one tamper event or more, and the ability of anti-tamper is improved. (authors)

  20. Model Order Reduction for Electronic Circuits:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Poul G.; Shontz, Suzanne

    Electronic circuits are ubiquitous; they are used in numerous industries including: the semiconductor, communication, robotics, auto, and music industries (among many others). As products become more and more complicated, their electronic circuits also grow in size and complexity. This increased...... in the semiconductor industry. Circuit simulation proceeds by using Maxwell’s equations to create a mathematical model of the circuit. The boundary element method is then used to discretize the equations, and the variational form of the equations are then solved on the graph network....

  1. A model for disruption generated runaway electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russo, A.J.; Campbell, R.B.

    1993-01-01

    One of the possible consequences of disruptions in tokamaks is the generation of runaway electrons which can impact plasma facing components and cause damage, owing to high local energy deposition. This problem becomes more serious as the machine size and plasma current increase. Since large size and high currents are characteristics of proposed future machines, control of runaway generation is an important design consideration. A lumped circuit model for disruption runaway electron generation indicates that impurity concentration and type, as well as plasma motion, can strongly influence runaway behaviour. A comparison of disruption data from several runs on JET and DIII-D with model results demonstrate the effects of impurities, and plasma motion, on runaway number density and energy. The model is also applied to the calculation of runaway currents for ITER. (author). 16 refs, 13 figs

  2. Research on heightening of performance of optical system for free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumagai, Hiroshi; Kawamura, Yoshiyuki; Toyada, Koichi

    1996-01-01

    Free electron laser will become in future the center of industrial laser technology as a high efficiency, high power output laser. For the development of free electron laser, the development of the elementary technologies such as accelerator, wiggler, optical system and so on must be carried out. For the stable functioning of free electron laser for long hours, the innovative technical development of the optical technology has been strongly desired. In this research, the development of the method of manufacturing a new high performance, multilayer film reflection mirror and the research on compound optical damage by new high energy photon generation process were advanced. The research on the formation of aluminum oxide thin films by using surface reaction, the development of the technology for forming high accuracy, multi-layer thin films and the evaluation of the optical performance of multi-layer films are reported. The constitution of compound optical damage evaluation system, the calculation of the luminance of high energy photons and the experiment on the generation of photons by a carbon dioxide gas laser are described regarding the compound optical damage research. (K.I.)

  3. First-principles Study of the Electronic Structure and Optical Properties of MgH2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alford, Ashley; Chou, Mei-Yin

    2003-03-01

    It has been noticed that magnesium might play an interesting role in recently discovered switchable-mirror systems. For example, the films of rare earth and magnesium alloys are found to be superior to the pure rare-earth samples in maximum transparency and mirror-state reflectivity [1]. Moreover, the magnesium-rich Ni-Mg alloy films turned out to be a switchable-mirror system without rare earths [2]. In both cases, pure transparent MgH2 is reversibly formed when these alloys take up hydrogen. In order to model the optical properties of these films, we need to know the electronic and optical properties of MgH2. In this work, we investigate its bonding characteristics, band structure, and dielectric properties with first-principles theoretical methods. The stability of the crystal and the bonding are studied using density functional theory and pseudopotential methods. The excited state properties (the quasiparticle spectra) are studied by many-body perturbation theory within the so-called GW approximation in which the electronic self-energy is approximated by the full Green's function (G) times the screened Coulomb interaction (W). We will report the results for both the rutile-structured alpha-MgH2 and the low-symmetry gamma-MgH2. [1] P. van der Sluis, M. Ouwerkerk, and P. A. Duine, Appl. Phys. Lett. 70, 3356 (1997). [2] T. J. Richardson, J. L. Slack, R. D. armitage, R. Kostecki, B. Farangis, and M. D. Rubin, Appl. Phys. Lett. 78, 3047 (2001).

  4. The electronic and optical properties of warm dense nitrous oxide using quantum molecular dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yujuan; Wang Cong; Zhang Ping

    2012-01-01

    First-principles molecular-dynamics simulations based on density-functional theory have been used to study the electronic and optical properties of fluid nitrous oxide under extreme conditions. Systematic descriptions of pair-correlation function, atomic structure, and the charge density distribution are used to investigate the dissociation of fluid nitrous oxide. The electrical and optical properties are derived from the Kubo-Greenwood formula. It is found that the nonmetal-metal transition for fluid nitrous oxide can be directly associated to the dissociation and has significant influence on the optical properties of the fluid.

  5. Optical Pumping of the Electronic and Nuclear Spin of Single Charge-Tunable Quantum Dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracker, A. S.; Stinaff, E. A.; Gammon, D.; Ware, M. E.; Tischler, J. G.; Shabaev, A.; Efros, Al. L.; Park, D.; Gershoni, D.; Korenev, V. L.; Merkulov, I. A.

    2005-02-01

    We present a comprehensive examination of optical pumping of spins in individual GaAs quantum dots as we change the net charge from positive to neutral to negative with a charge-tunable heterostructure. Negative photoluminescence polarization memory is enhanced by optical pumping of ground state electron spins, which we prove with the first measurements of the Hanle effect on an individual quantum dot. We use the Overhauser effect in a high longitudinal magnetic field to demonstrate efficient optical pumping of nuclear spins for all three charge states of the quantum dot.

  6. Optical radiation emitted by a silver surface bombarded by low-energy electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miserey, F.; Lebon, P.; Septier, A.; Trehin, F.; Beaugrand, C.

    1975-01-01

    Thick silver targets are obtained on flat glass discs by evaporation in a UHV cell (p -10 torr) and their optical coefficients measured by ellipsometry. A field-emission electron gun bombards a limited region of the target, corresponding to the entry pupil of a light spectrometer. Radiation emitted in the domain 250-600nm is analyzed for both normal and parallel polarizations. Spectral distributions of photons are obtained by using a very sensitive counting device including a multi channel analyzer. First experimental results concerning optical radiation generated by 6keV electrons are reported and compared to Transition Radiation and Bremsstrahlung theoretical spectra [fr

  7. Quasiparticle electronic and optical properties of the Si-Sn system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, Rasmus V S; Pedersen, Thomas G; Larsen, Arne N

    2011-01-01

    The Si 1-x Sn x material system is an interesting candidate for an optically active material compatible with Si. Based on density functional theory with quasiparticle corrections we calculate the electronic band structure of zinc-blende SiSn under both compressive and tensile strain. At 2.2% tensile strain the band gap becomes direct with a magnitude of 0.85 eV. We develop an accurate tight-binding parameterization of the electronic structure and calculate the optical properties of SiSn. Furthermore, the silicide SiSn 2 is investigated and found to have metallic character. (paper)

  8. Investigation of the electronic, magnetic and optical properties of newest carbon allotrope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemi, Samira; Moradian, Rostam

    2018-05-01

    We investigate triple properties of monolayer pentagon graphene that include electronic, magnetic and optical properties based on density functional theory (DFT). Our results show that in the electronic and magnetic properties this structure with a direct energy gap of about 2.2 eV along Γ - Γ direction and total magnetic moment of 0.0013 μB per unit cell is almost a non-magnetic semiconductor. Also, its optical properties show that if this allotrope used in solar cell technology, its efficiency in the low energy will be better, because, in the range of energy, its loss energy function and reflectivity will be minimum.

  9. Quantum electronics and Moscow State University's Khokhlov-Akhmanov school of coherent and nonlinear optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makarov, V.A.

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the report is to describe the history of the Moscow University Coherent and Nonlinear Optics School headed by R.V. Khokhlov and S.A. Akhmanov being a part of the history of the Russian efforts to investigate into quantum electronics. The reports describes briefly the most significant results of the mentioned School activity, in particular, thermonuclear reactions initiated by laser pulses in plasma; the procedure to accelerate electrons up to 1 GeV using the present-day lasers; the nonlinear-optical analogues of the Faraday and the Kerr effects [ru

  10. Optical and Electronic NOx Sensors for Applications in Mechatronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott D. Wolter

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Current production and emerging NOx sensors based on optical and nanomaterials technologies are reviewed. In view of their potential applications in mechatronics, we compared the performance of: i Quantum cascade lasers (QCL based photoacoustic (PA systems; ii gold nanoparticles as catalytically active materials in field-effect transistor (FET sensors, and iii functionalized III-V semiconductor based devices. QCL-based PA sensors for NOx show a detection limit in the sub part-per-million range and are characterized by high selectivity and compact set-up. Electrochemically synthesized gold-nanoparticle FET sensors are able to monitor NOx in a concentration range from 50 to 200 parts per million and are suitable for miniaturization. Porphyrin-functionalized III-V semiconductor materials can be used for the fabrication of a reliable NOx sensor platform characterized by high conductivity, corrosion resistance, and strong surface state coupling.

  11. Optical and Electronic NOx Sensors for Applications in Mechatronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Franco, Cinzia; Elia, Angela; Spagnolo, Vincenzo; Scamarcio, Gaetano; Lugarà, Pietro Mario; Ieva, Eliana; Cioffi, Nicola; Torsi, Luisa; Bruno, Giovanni; Losurdo, Maria; Garcia, Michael A.; Wolter, Scott D.; Brown, April; Ricco, Mario

    2009-01-01

    Current production and emerging NOx sensors based on optical and nanomaterials technologies are reviewed. In view of their potential applications in mechatronics, we compared the performance of: i) Quantum cascade lasers (QCL) based photoacoustic (PA) systems; ii) gold nanoparticles as catalytically active materials in field-effect transistor (FET) sensors, and iii) functionalized III-V semiconductor based devices. QCL-based PA sensors for NOx show a detection limit in the sub part-per-million range and are characterized by high selectivity and compact set-up. Electrochemically synthesized gold-nanoparticle FET sensors are able to monitor NOx in a concentration range from 50 to 200 parts per million and are suitable for miniaturization. Porphyrin-functionalized III-V semiconductor materials can be used for the fabrication of a reliable NOx sensor platform characterized by high conductivity, corrosion resistance, and strong surface state coupling. PMID:22412315

  12. Physical model of optical inhomogeneities of water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shybanov, E. B.

    2017-11-01

    The paper is devoted to theoretical aspects of the light scattering of water that does not contain suspended particles. To be consistent with current physical point of view the water as far as any liquid is regarded as a complex unstable nonergodic media. It was proposed that at fixed time the water as a condensed medium had global inhomogeneities similar to linear and planar defects in a solid. Anticipated own global inhomogeneities of water have been approximated by the system randomly distributed spherical clusters filling the entire water bulk. An analytical expression for the single scattered light has been derived. The formula simultaneously describes both the high anisotropy of light scattering and the high degree of polarization which one close to those for molecular scattering. It is shown that at general angles there is a qualitative coincidence with the two-component Kopelevich's model for the light scattering by marine particles. On the contrary towards to forwards angles the spectral law becomes much more prominent i.e. it corresponds to results for model of optically soft particles.

  13. Modeling the Nab Experiment Electronics in SPICE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blose, Alexander; Crawford, Christopher; Sprow, Aaron; Nab Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    The goal of the Nab experiment is to measure the neutron decay coefficients a, the electron-neutrino correlation, as well as b, the Fierz interference term to precisely test the Standard Model, as well as probe for Beyond the Standard Model physics. In this experiment, protons from the beta decay of the neutron are guided through a magnetic field into a Silicon detector. Event reconstruction will be achieved via time-of-flight measurement for the proton and direct measurement of the coincident electron energy in highly segmented silicon detectors, so the amplification circuitry needs to preserve fast timing, provide good amplitude resolution, and be packaged in a high-density format. We have designed a SPICE simulation to model the full electronics chain for the Nab experiment in order to understand the contributions of each stage and optimize them for performance. Additionally, analytic solutions to each of the components have been determined where available. We will present a comparison of the output from the SPICE model, analytic solution, and empirically determined data.

  14. Stochastic model of the spinning electron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simaciu, I.; Borsos, Z.

    2002-01-01

    In Stochastic Electrodynamics (SED) it is demonstrated that electrostatic interaction is the result of the scattering of the Classical Zero-Point Field (CZPF) background by the charged particles. In such models, the electron is modelled as a two-dimensional oscillator, which interacts with the electric component of the CZPF background. The electron with spin is not only an electric monopole but also a magnetic dipole. The interaction of the spin electron with the CZPF background is not only electric but also magnetic. We calculate the scattering cross-section of magnetic dipole in the situation when a magnetic field, variable in time B arrow = B 0 arrow sin ωt, acts over the rigid magnetic dipole given by the symmetry of the model. The cross-section of a magnetic dipole σ m must be equal to the cross-section of an electric monopole σ e . This equality between σ m and σ e cross-sections is motivated, too, by the fact that, in the model of the two-dimensional oscillator, the electric charge q e has the motion speed c. (authors)

  15. Modelling the optical bleaching of the thermoluminescence of K2YF5:Pr3+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcazzó, J.; Santiago, M.; Khaidukov, N.; Caselli, E.

    2012-01-01

    Optical bleaching of the thermoluminescence (TL) curve of K 2 YF 5 :Pr 3+ has been observed after optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) readout of pre-irradiated crystals. The traps being responsible for the TL signal are not emptied completely by the optical stimulation. Furthermore, if the illumination time is increased a constant intensity level of the residual TL glow curve is eventually achieved. On the other hand, if the low temperature peak of the glow curve is thermally cleaned, no subsequent OSL is measured. This behavior has been successfully explained by assuming that part of the electrons in the trap being responsible for the low temperature glow peak of K 2 YF 5 :Pr 3+ recombine with holes via localized transitions during optical stimulation. During TL all trapped electrons recombine via delocalized transitions. Simulations have been carried out in order to demonstrate the feasibility of the model. - Highlights: ► The optical bleaching of the thermoluminescence of K2YF5:Pr 3+ has been studied. ► A model accounting for the optical bleaching has been put forward. ► Thermoluminescence occurs via delocalized transitions. ► Localized transitions occur during optical stimulation.

  16. Electron optics with magnetic vector potential barriers in graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, Sankalpa; Sharma, Manish

    2009-01-01

    An analysis of electron transport in graphene in the presence of various arrangements of delta-function like magnetic barriers is presented. The motion through one such barrier gives an unusual non-specular refraction leading to asymmetric transmission. The symmetry is restored by putting two such barriers in opposite directions side by side. Periodic arrangements of such barriers can be used as Bragg reflectors whose reflectivity has been calculated using a transfer matrix formalism. Such Bragg reflectors can be used to make resonant cavities. We also analyze the associated band structure for the case of infinite periodic structures. (fast track communication)

  17. Electron hopping and optic phonons in Eu3S4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guentherodt, G.

    1981-01-01

    Raman scattering on single crystals of Eu 3 S 4 does not show the allowed q=o phonon modes in the cubic phase and exhibits no new modes in the distorted low temperature phase (T 2- ions. This mode does not show any anomaly near the charge order -disorder phase transition Tsub(t)=186 K. Temperature tunable spin fluctuations associated with the temperature activated Eu 2+ → Eu 3+ electron hopping are detected in the scattering intensity, superimposed on the usual thermal spin disorder. (author)

  18. Physics design of the in-vessel collection optics for the ITER electron cyclotron emission diagnostic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowan, W. L., E-mail: w.l.rowan@austin.utexas.edu; Houshmandyar, S.; Phillips, P. E.; Austin, M. E. [Institute for Fusion Studies, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Beno, J. H.; Ouroua, A. [Center for Electromechanics, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Hubbard, A. E. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, MIT, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Khodak, A.; Taylor, G. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    Measurement of the electron cyclotron emission (ECE) is one of the primary diagnostics for electron temperature in ITER. In-vessel, in-vacuum, and quasi-optical antennas capture sufficient ECE to achieve large signal to noise with microsecond temporal resolution and high spatial resolution while maintaining polarization fidelity. Two similar systems are required. One views the plasma radially. The other is an oblique view. Both views can be used to measure the electron temperature, while the oblique is also sensitive to non-thermal distortion in the bulk electron distribution. The in-vacuum optics for both systems are subject to degradation as they have a direct view of the ITER plasma and will not be accessible for cleaning or replacement for extended periods. Blackbody radiation sources are provided for in situ calibration.

  19. Electron spin dynamics and optical orientation of Mn2+ ions in GaAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akimov, I. A.; Dzhioev, R. I.; Korenev, V. L.; Kusrayev, Yu. G.; Sapega, V. F.; Yakovlev, D. R.; Bayer, M.

    2013-04-01

    We present an overview of spin-related phenomena in GaAs doped with low concentration of Mn-acceptors (below 1018 cm-3). We use the combination of different experimental techniques such as spin-flip Raman scattering and time-resolved photoluminescence. This allows to evaluate the time evolution of both electron and Mn spins. We show that optical orientation of Mn ions is possible under application of weak magnetic field, which is required to suppress the manganese spin relaxation. The optically oriented Mn2+ ions maintain the spin and return part of the polarization back to the electron spin system providing a long-lived electron spin memory. This leads to a bunch of spectacular effects such as non-exponential electron spin decay and spin precession in the effective exchange fields.

  20. Electronic structures and magnetic/optical properties of metal phthalocyanine complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baba, Shintaro; Suzuki, Atsushi, E-mail: suzuki@mat.usp.ac.jp; Oku, Takeo [Department of Materials Science, The University of Shiga Prefecture. 2500 Hassaka, Hikone, Shiga 522-8533 (Japan)

    2016-02-01

    Electronic structures and magnetic / optical properties of metal phthalocyanine complexes were studied by quantum calculations using density functional theory. Effects of central metal and expansion of π orbital on aromatic ring as conjugation system on the electronic structures, magnetic, optical properties and vibration modes of infrared and Raman spectra of metal phthalocyanines were investigated. Electron and charge density distribution and energy levels near frontier orbital and excited states were influenced by the deformed structures varied with central metal and charge. The magnetic parameters of chemical shifts in {sup 13}C-nuclear magnetic resonance ({sup 13}C-NMR), principle g-tensor, A-tensor, V-tensor of electric field gradient and asymmetry parameters derived from the deformed structures with magnetic interaction of nuclear quadruple interaction based on electron and charge density distribution with a bias of charge near ligand under crystal field.

  1. Imaging photoelectron photoion coincidence spectroscopy with velocity focusing electron optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodi, Andras; Johnson, Melanie; Gerber, Thomas; Gengeliczki, Zsolt; Sztaray, Balint; Baer, Tomas

    2009-01-01

    An imaging photoelectron photoion coincidence spectrometer at the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) beamline of the Swiss Light Source is presented and a few initial measurements are reported. Monochromatic synchrotron VUV radiation ionizes the cooled or thermal gas-phase sample. Photoelectrons are velocity focused, with better than 1 meV resolution for threshold electrons, and also act as start signal for the ion time-of-flight analysis. The ions are accelerated in a relatively low, 40-80 V cm -1 field, which enables the direct measurement of rate constants in the 10 3 -10 7 s -1 range. All electron and ion events are recorded in a triggerless multiple-start/multiple-stop setup, which makes it possible to carry out coincidence experiments at >100 kHz event frequencies. As examples, the threshold photoelectron spectrum of the argon dimer and the breakdown diagrams for hydrogen atom loss in room temperature methane and the chlorine atom loss in cold chlorobenzene are shown and discussed.

  2. Experimental Study of Electronic Quantum Interference, Photonic Crystal Cavity, Photonic Band Edge Effects for Optical Amplification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-26

    AFRL-RV-PS- AFRL-RV-PS- TR-2016-0003 TR-2016-0003 EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF ELECTRONIC QUANTUM INTERFERENCE , PHOTONIC CRYSTAL CAVITY, PHOTONIC BAND...EDGE EFFECTS FOR OPTICAL AMPLIFICATION Shawn-Yu Lin Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 110 8th Street Troy, New York 12180 26 Jan 2016 Final Report...2014 – 11 Jan 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Experimental Study of Electronic Quantum Interference , Photonic Crystal Cavity, Photonic Band Edge Effects

  3. Nonlinear optical properties of a three-electron quantum dot with account of the Rashba spin-orbit interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassanabadi, Hassan, E-mail: h.hasanabadi@shahroodut.ac.ir [Physics Department, Shahrood University of Technology, P.O. Box 3619995161-316, Shahrood (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rahimov, Hamed [Physics Department, Shahrood University of Technology, P.O. Box 3619995161-316, Shahrood (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Lu Liangliang [Department of Physics, College of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Guangzhou University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Wang Chao [Institute of Public Administration, Guangzhou University, Guangzhou 510006 (China)

    2012-05-15

    In this study, a detailed investigation of the nonlinear optical properties such as optical absorption and refractive index change associated with intersubband transitions in a three-electron quantum dot in two dimensions in the presence of the Rashba spin-orbit interaction has been carried out. We present the exact wave functions and energy levels of the system. Numerical results on typical GaAs/AlGaAs materials show that the decrease of the quantum dot radius blueshifts and amplifies the absorption coefficients as well as the refractive index changes, as expected. Additionally, an increase of the optical intensity and relaxation time considerably changes the absorption coefficients and the refractive index changes. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We consider a three-electron quantum dot in 2D in the presence of the Rashba spin-orbit interaction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We present the exact wave functions and energy levels of the system. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We apply this model for GaAs/AlGaAs materials. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The detailed nonlinear optical properties have been investigated.

  4. Classical Electron Model with QED Corrections

    OpenAIRE

    Lenk, Ron

    2010-01-01

    In this article we build a metric for a classical general relativistic electron model with QED corrections. We calculate the stress-energy tensor for the radiative corrections to the Coulomb potential in both the near-field and far-field approximations. We solve the three field equations in both cases by using a perturbative expansion to first order in alpha (the fine-structure constant) while insisting that the usual (+, +, -, -) structure of the stress-energy tensor is maintained. The resul...

  5. Models of fast-electron penetration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perry, D.J.; Raisis, S.K.

    1994-01-01

    We introduce multiple scattering models of charged-particle penetration which are based on the previous analyses of Yang and Perry. Our development removes the main limitations of the Fermi-Eyges approach while retaining its considerable potential as a theory which is useful for applied work. We illustrate key predictions with sample calculations that are of particular interest in therapeutic applications, 5-20 MeV electrons incident on water. 8 refs., 5 figs

  6. Energies of rare-earth ion states relative to host bands in optical materials from electron photoemission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiel, Charles Warren

    There are a vast number of applications for rare-earth-activated materials and much of today's cutting-edge optical technology and emerging innovations are enabled by their unique properties. In many of these applications, interactions between the rare-earth ion and the host material's electronic states can enhance or inhibit performance and provide mechanisms for manipulating the optical properties. Continued advances in these technologies require knowledge of the relative energies of rare-earth and crystal band states so that properties of available materials may be fully understood and new materials may be logically developed. Conventional and resonant electron photoemission techniques were used to measure 4f electron and valence band binding energies in important optical materials, including YAG, YAlO3, and LiYF4. The photoemission spectra were theoretically modeled and analyzed to accurately determine relative energies. By combining these energies with ultraviolet spectroscopy, binding energies of excited 4fN-15d and 4fN+1 states were determined. While the 4fN ground-state energies vary considerably between different trivalent ions and lie near or below the top of the valence band in optical materials, the lowest 4f N-15d states have similar energies and are near the bottom of the conduction band. As an example for YAG, the Tb3+ 4f N ground state is in the band gap at 0.7 eV above the valence band while the Lu3+ ground state is 4.7 eV below the valence band maximum; however, the lowest 4fN-15d states are 2.2 eV below the conduction band for both ions. We found that a simple model accurately describes the binding energies of the 4fN, 4fN-1 5d, and 4fN+1 states. The model's success across the entire rare-earth series indicates that measurements on two different ions in a host are sufficient to predict the energies of all rare-earth ions in that host. This information provides new insight into electron transfer transitions, luminescence quenching, and valence

  7. Constitutive Modeling of the Mechanical Properties of Optical Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeti, L.; Moghazy, S.; Veazie, D.; Cuddihy, E.

    1998-01-01

    Micromechanical modeling of the composite mechanical properties of optical fibers was conducted. Good agreement was obtained between the values of Young's modulus obtained by micromechanics modeling and those determined experimentally for a single mode optical fiber where the wave guide and the jacket are physically coupled. The modeling was also attempted on a polarization-maintaining optical fiber (PANDA) where the wave guide and the jacket are physically decoupled, and found not to applicable since the modeling required perfect bonding at the interface. The modeling utilized constituent physical properties such as the Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, and shear modulus to establish bounds on the macroscopic behavior of the fiber.

  8. Color electron microprobe cathodoluminescence of Bishunpur meteorite compared with the traditional optical microscopy method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Araujo Tosi

    Full Text Available Abstract Cathodoluminescence (CL imaging is an outstanding method for sub classification of Unequilibrated Ordinary Chondrites (UOC - petrological type 3. CL can be obtained by several electron beam apparatuses. The traditional method uses an electron gun coupled to an optical microscope (OM. Although many scanning electron microscopes (SEM and electron microprobes (EPMA have been equipped with a cathodoluminescence, this technique was not fully explored. Images obtained by the two methods differ due to a different kind of signal acquisition. While in the CL-OM optical photography true colors are obtained, in the CL-EPMA the results are grayscale monochromatic electronic signals. L-RGB filters were used in the CL-EPMA analysis in order to obtain color data. The aim of this work is to compare cathodoluminescence data obtained from both techniques, optical microscope and electron microprobe, on the Bishunpur meteorite classified as LL 3.1 chondrite. The present study allows concluding that 20 KeV and 7 nA is the best analytical condition at EPMA in order to test the equivalence between CL-EPMA and CL-OM colour results. Moreover, the color index revealed to be a method for aiding the study of the thermal metamorphism, but it is not definitive for the meteorite classification.

  9. Optical conductivity of the Hubbard model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vicente Alvarez, J.J.; Balseiro, C.A.; Ceccatto, H.A.

    1996-07-01

    We study the response to a static electric field (charge stiffness) and the frequency-dependent conductivity of the Hubbard model in a resonant-valence-bond-type paramagnetic phase. This phase is described by means of a charge and spin rotational-invariant approach, based on a mixed fermion-boson representation of the original strongly correlated electrons. We found that the Mott transition at half filling is well described by the charge stiffness behaviour, and that the values for this quantity off half filling agree reasonably well with numerical results. Furthermore, for the frequency-dependent conductivity we trace back the origin of the band which appears inside the Hubbard gap to magnetic pair breaking. This points to a magnetic origin of midinfrared band in high-T c compounds, with no relation to superconductivity. (author). 12 refs, 2 tabs

  10. Program description of FIBRAM (Fiber Optic Radiation Attenuation Model): a radiation attenuation model for optical fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ingram, W.J.

    1987-06-01

    The report describes a fiber-optics system model and its computer implementation. This implementation can calculate the bit error ratio (BER) versus time for optical fibers that have been exposed to gamma radiation. The program is designed so that the user may arbitrarily change any or all of the system input variables and produce separate outputs. The primary output of the program is a table of the BER as a function of time. This table may be stored on magnetic media and later incorporated into computer graphic programs. The program was written in FORTRAN 77 for the IBM PC/AT/XT computers. Flow charts and program listings are included in the report

  11. Optically pumped electron spin polarized targets for use in the production of polarized ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, L.W.

    1979-01-01

    The production of relatively dense electron spin polarized alkali metal vapor targets by optical pumping with intense cw dye lasers is discussed. The target density and electron spin polarization depend on the dye laser intensity and bandwidth, the magnetic field at the target, and the electron spin depolarization time. For example in a magnetic field of 1.5 x 10 3 G, and using 1 W dye laser with a bandwidth of 10 10 Hz one can construct an electron spin polarized Na vapor target with a target thickness of 1.6 x 10 13 atoms/cm 2 and an average electron spin polarization of about 90% even though the Na atoms are completely depolarized at every wall collision. Possible uses of the electron spin polarized targets for the production of intense beams of polarized H - or 3 He - ions are discussed. (orig.)

  12. Novel simulation method of space charge effects in electron optical systems including emission of electrons

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zelinka, Jiří; Oral, Martin; Radlička, Tomáš

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 184, JAN (2018), s. 66-76 ISSN 0304-3991 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : space charge * self-consistent simulation * aberration polynomial * electron emission Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 2.843, year: 2016

  13. Electron-optical design parameters for a high-resolution electron monochromator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, H.; Huebner, R.H.

    1976-01-01

    Detailed design parameters of a new, high-resolution electron monochromator are presented. The design utilizes a hemispherical filter as the energy-dispersing element and combines both cylindrical and aperture electrostatic lenses to accelerate, decelerate, transport, and focus the electron beam from the cathode to the interaction region

  14. Model potential for electron scattering from rubidium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gien, T.E. (Memorial Univ. of Newfoundland, St. John' s, NF (Canada). Dept. of Physics)

    1992-11-28

    An analytic model potential for the e[sup -]-Rb[sup +] system is generated from experimental data, using an iteration method. The potential obtained can reproduce rather accurately the energy levels of rubidium. We employed it in the calculation of elastic differential cross sections for electron (and positron) scatterings from rubidium in the conventional Glauber approximation. The differential cross sections calculated in the model potential approach are compared to those in the frozen-core approach, employing either the Clementi-Roetti or the Szasz-McGinn wavefunctions. The core correlation and polarization effects are found to significantly affect the cross section results. (author).

  15. Model potential for electron scattering from rubidium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gien, T.E.

    1992-01-01

    An analytic model potential for the e - -Rb + system is generated from experimental data, using an iteration method. The potential obtained can reproduce rather accurately the energy levels of rubidium. We employed it in the calculation of elastic differential cross sections for electron (and positron) scatterings from rubidium in the conventional Glauber approximation. The differential cross sections calculated in the model potential approach are compared to those in the frozen-core approach, employing either the Clementi-Roetti or the Szasz-McGinn wavefunctions. The core correlation and polarization effects are found to significantly affect the cross section results. (author)

  16. Development techniques and electron optical studies of high voltage, high current electron guns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rangarajan, L.M.; Mahadevan, S.; Ramamurthi, S.S.

    1992-01-01

    The progress of the electron gun design, limiting to axially symmetric geometries is discussed here with a view to utilise such guns for electron accelerators. The mechanical design features leading to the physical configuration of the gun with stringent tolerances are outlined. Vacuum processing is done at pressures of 1.3x10 -5 Pa. The gun employs W-filament emitter or a cathode pellet with bombarder service. A water cooled compact faraday cup is used to measure the electron current. Electron gun geometries have been studied using the computer programme. The preveance of the gun is 0.7x10 -7 A/Vsup(1.5) at 80 kV. Developmental techniques of such pulsed electron guns are described. (author). 7 refs., 5 figs

  17. Analytical modeling of electron energy loss spectroscopy of graphene: Ab initio study versus extended hydrodynamic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djordjević, Tijana; Radović, Ivan; Despoja, Vito; Lyon, Keenan; Borka, Duško; Mišković, Zoran L

    2018-01-01

    We present an analytical modeling of the electron energy loss (EEL) spectroscopy data for free-standing graphene obtained by scanning transmission electron microscope. The probability density for energy loss of fast electrons traversing graphene under normal incidence is evaluated using an optical approximation based on the conductivity of graphene given in the local, i.e., frequency-dependent form derived by both a two-dimensional, two-fluid extended hydrodynamic (eHD) model and an ab initio method. We compare the results for the real and imaginary parts of the optical conductivity in graphene obtained by these two methods. The calculated probability density is directly compared with the EEL spectra from three independent experiments and we find very good agreement, especially in the case of the eHD model. Furthermore, we point out that the subtraction of the zero-loss peak from the experimental EEL spectra has a strong influence on the analytical model for the EEL spectroscopy data. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Electronic and optical properties of doped oxides for energy conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Antonio Ferreira da

    2016-01-01

    Full text: Photocatalytic materials have gained remarkable attention in the field of solar fuel production, which is a promising approach for efficient solar energy conversion and storage . Among other oxides, doped BiNb(Ta)O 4 , ZnO , SnO 2 , WO 3 and TiO 2 have been identified as potential photocatalytic materials due to their appropriate band gap energies. We have used high quality materials as for instance by the citrate method according to reference [1], a modified ion beam assisted deposition technique [2] and as titanium dioxide nanotubes (TiO 2 -NTs) arrays synthesized by electrochemical anodization [3]. We present the optical properties spectra of these materials using the X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Ellipsometry and first principles approach by DFT respectively [1,2]. In this work, position of reduction and oxidation level with respect to the vacuum level are identified for these materials. We can conclude that some of them are good candidates for the production of hydrogen by splitting of water in the presence of sunlight and for efficient solar energy conversion as well. [1] C. G. Almeida, R. B. Araujo, R. G. Yoshimura, A. J. S. Mascarenhas, A. Ferreira da Silva, C. M.Araujo, L. A. Silva,Int. J. Hyd. Energy 39, 1220 (2014). [2] M. Kumar, G.Baldissera, C.Persson, D.G.F.David ,M.V.S.da Silva , J.A.Freitas Jr., J.G. Tischler , J.F.D.Chubaci, M.Matsuoka , A.Ferreira da Silva, , J. of Crystal Growth 403, 124 (2014). [3] J. R. Gonzalez et all., Nanotechnology (2016 in press). (author)

  19. Electronic and optical properties of doped oxides for energy conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Antonio Ferreira da, E-mail: ferreira.fis@gmail.com [Universidade Federal da Bahia (UFBA), Salvador (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    Full text: Photocatalytic materials have gained remarkable attention in the field of solar fuel production, which is a promising approach for efficient solar energy conversion and storage . Among other oxides, doped BiNb(Ta)O{sub 4}, ZnO , SnO{sub 2}, WO{sub 3} and TiO{sub 2} have been identified as potential photocatalytic materials due to their appropriate band gap energies. We have used high quality materials as for instance by the citrate method according to reference [1], a modified ion beam assisted deposition technique [2] and as titanium dioxide nanotubes (TiO{sub 2}-NTs) arrays synthesized by electrochemical anodization [3]. We present the optical properties spectra of these materials using the X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Ellipsometry and first principles approach by DFT respectively [1,2]. In this work, position of reduction and oxidation level with respect to the vacuum level are identified for these materials. We can conclude that some of them are good candidates for the production of hydrogen by splitting of water in the presence of sunlight and for efficient solar energy conversion as well. [1] C. G. Almeida, R. B. Araujo, R. G. Yoshimura, A. J. S. Mascarenhas, A. Ferreira da Silva, C. M.Araujo, L. A. Silva,Int. J. Hyd. Energy 39, 1220 (2014). [2] M. Kumar, G.Baldissera, C.Persson, D.G.F.David ,M.V.S.da Silva , J.A.Freitas Jr., J.G. Tischler , J.F.D.Chubaci, M.Matsuoka , A.Ferreira da Silva, , J. of Crystal Growth 403, 124 (2014). [3] J. R. Gonzalez et all., Nanotechnology (2016 in press). (author)

  20. Optical basicity and electronic polarizability of zinc borotellurite glass doped La3+ ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.K. Halimah

    Full Text Available Zinc borotellurite glasses doped with lanthanum oxide were successfully prepared through melt-quenching technique. The amorphous nature of the glass system was validated by the presence of a broad hump in the XRD result. The refractive index of the prepared glass samples was calculated by using the equation proposed by Dimitrov and Sakka. The theoretical value of molar refraction, electronic polarizability, oxide ion polarizability and metallization criterion were calculated by using Lorentz-Lorenz equation. Meanwhile, expression proposed by Duffy and Ingram for the theoretical value of optical basicity of multi-component glasses were applied to obtain energy band gap based optical basicity and refractive index based optical basicity. The optical basicity of prepared glasses decreased with the increasing concentration of lanthanum oxide. Metallization criterion on the basis of refractive index showed an increasing trend while energy band gap based metallization criterion showed a decreasing trend. The small metallization criterion values of the glass samples represent that the width of the conduction band becomes larger which increase the tendency for metallization of the glasses. The results obtained indicates that the fabricated glasses have high potential to be applied on optical limiting devices in photonic field. Keywords: Borotellurite glasses, Refractive index, Electronic polarizability, Oxide ion polarizability, Optical basicity, Metallization criterion

  1. Electronic transient processes and optical spectra in quantum dots for quantum computing

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Král, Karel; Zdeněk, Petr; Khás, Zdeněk

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 3, č. 1 (2004), s. 17-25 ISSN 1536-125X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA1010113 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : depopulation * electronic relaxation * optical spectra * quantum dots * self-assembled quantum dots * upconversion Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics Impact factor: 3.176, year: 2004

  2. Electronic and optical properties of new multifunctional materials via half-substituted hematite: First principles calculations

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Hua; Mi, Wenbo; Bai, Haili; Cheng, Yingchun

    2012-01-01

    Electronic structure and optical properties of α-FeMO 3 systems (M = Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Cu, Cd or In) have been investigated using first principles calculations. All of the FeMO 3 systems have a large net magnetic moment. The ground state of pure α-Fe 2

  3. New Optical Card for Sneaker’s Network in Place of Electronic Clinical Record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Kenya; Satsukawa, Takatoshi; Chiba, Seisho; Ohmori, Takaaki

    2006-02-01

    In order to solve problems in electronic medical records, a new optical card of the digital versatile disk (DVD) type with higher capacity and lower cost than conventional compact disc recording (CD-R)-type cards has been developed, which is thinner, stronger and wearable like a credit card.

  4. Optically Controlled Electron-Transfer Reaction Kinetics and Solvation Dynamics : Effect of Franck-Condon States

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gupta, Kriti; Patra, Aniket; Dhole, Kajal; Samanta, Alok Kumar; Ghosh, Swapan K.

    2017-01-01

    Experimental results for optically controlled electron-transfer reaction kinetics (ETRK) and nonequilibrium solvation dynamics (NESD) of Coumarin 480 in DMPC vesicle show their dependence on excitation wavelength λex. However, the celebrated Marcus theory and linear-response-theory-based approaches

  5. The fully relativistic foundation of linear transfer theory in electron optics based on the Dirac equation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferwerda, H.A.; Hoenders, B.J.; Slump, C.H.

    The fully relativistic quantum mechanical treatment of paraxial electron-optical image formation initiated in the previous paper (this issue) is worked out and leads to a rigorous foundation of the linear transfer theory. Moreover, the status of the relativistic scaling laws for mass and wavelength,

  6. Electronic and optical properties of antiferromagnetic iron doped NiO - A first principles study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, John E.; Twagirayezu, Fidele; Scolfaro, Luisa M.; Borges, Pablo D.; Geerts, Wilhelmus J.

    2017-05-01

    Antiferromagnetic NiO is a candidate for next generation high-speed and scaled RRAM devices. Here, electronic and optical properties of antiferromagnetic NiO: Fe 25% in the rock salt structure are studied and compared to intrinsic NiO. From density of states and complex dielectric function analysis, the first optical transition is found to be at lower frequency than intrinsic NiO due to an Fe impurity level being the valence band maximum. The resulting effects on refractive index, reflectivity, absorption, optical conductivity and loss function for Fe-doped NiO are compared to those of intrinsic NiO, and notable differences are analyzed. The electronic component of the static dielectric constant of NiO: Fe 25% is calculated to be about 2% less than that of intrinsic NiO.

  7. Electron irradiation response on Ge and Al-doped SiO{sub 2} optical fibres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaakob, N.H.; Wagiran, H. [Department of Physics, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Skudai, Johor Darul Takzim (Malaysia); Hossain, I., E-mail: imamhossain@utm.m [Department of Physics, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Skudai, Johor Darul Takzim (Malaysia); Ramli, A.T. [Department of Physics, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Skudai, Johor Darul Takzim (Malaysia); Bradley, D.A [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Hashim, S. [Department of Physics, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Skudai, Johor Darul Takzim (Malaysia); Ali, H. [Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Hospital Sultan Ismail, Johor Darul Takzim (Malaysia)

    2011-05-01

    This paper describes the thermoluminescence response, sensitivity, stability and reproducibility of SiO{sub 2} optical fibres with various electron energies and doses. The TL materials that comprise Al- and Ge-doped silica fibres were used in this experiment. The TL results are compared with those of the commercially available TLD-100. The doped SiO{sub 2} optical fibres and TLD-100 are placed in a solid phantom and irradiated with 6, 9 and 12 MeV electron beams at doses ranging from 0.2 to 4.0 Gy using the LINAC at Hospital Sultan Ismail, Johor Bahru, Malaysia. It was found that the commercially available Al- and Ge-doped optical fibres have a linear dose-TL signal relationship. The intensity of TL response of Ge-doped fibre is markedly greater than that of the Al-doped fibre.

  8. Measurement of Sub-Picosecond Electron Bunches via Electro-Optic Sampling of Coherent Transition Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maxwell, Timothy John [Northern Illinois U.

    2012-01-01

    Future collider applications as well as present high-gradient laser plasma wakefield accelerators and free-electron lasers operating with picosecond bunch durations place a higher demand on the time resolution of bunch distribution diagnostics. This demand has led to significant advancements in the field of electro-optic sampling over the past ten years. These methods allow the probing of diagnostic light such as coherent transition radiation or the bunch wakefields with sub-picosecond time resolution. We present results on the single-shot electro-optic spectral decoding of coherent transition radiation from bunches generated at the Fermilab A0 photoinjector laboratory. A longitudinal double-pulse modulation of the electron beam is also realized by transverse beam masking followed by a transverse-to-longitudinal phase-space exchange beamline. Live profile tuning is demonstrated by upstream beam focusing in conjunction with downstream monitoring of single-shot electro-optic spectral decoding of the coherent transition radiation.

  9. Electron irradiation response on Ge and Al-doped SiO 2 optical fibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaakob, N. H.; Wagiran, H.; Hossain, I.; Ramli, A. T.; Bradley, D. A.; Hashim, S.; Ali, H.

    2011-05-01

    This paper describes the thermoluminescence response, sensitivity, stability and reproducibility of SiO 2 optical fibres with various electron energies and doses. The TL materials that comprise Al- and Ge-doped silica fibres were used in this experiment. The TL results are compared with those of the commercially available TLD-100. The doped SiO 2 optical fibres and TLD-100 are placed in a solid phantom and irradiated with 6, 9 and 12 MeV electron beams at doses ranging from 0.2 to 4.0 Gy using the LINAC at Hospital Sultan Ismail, Johor Bahru, Malaysia. It was found that the commercially available Al- and Ge-doped optical fibres have a linear dose-TL signal relationship. The intensity of TL response of Ge-doped fibre is markedly greater than that of the Al-doped fibre.

  10. Electron irradiation response on Ge and Al-doped SiO2 optical fibres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yaakob, N.H.; Wagiran, H.; Hossain, I.; Ramli, A.T.; Bradley, D.A; Hashim, S.; Ali, H.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the thermoluminescence response, sensitivity, stability and reproducibility of SiO 2 optical fibres with various electron energies and doses. The TL materials that comprise Al- and Ge-doped silica fibres were used in this experiment. The TL results are compared with those of the commercially available TLD-100. The doped SiO 2 optical fibres and TLD-100 are placed in a solid phantom and irradiated with 6, 9 and 12 MeV electron beams at doses ranging from 0.2 to 4.0 Gy using the LINAC at Hospital Sultan Ismail, Johor Bahru, Malaysia. It was found that the commercially available Al- and Ge-doped optical fibres have a linear dose-TL signal relationship. The intensity of TL response of Ge-doped fibre is markedly greater than that of the Al-doped fibre.

  11. Optical Sideband Generation: a Longitudinal Electron Beam Diagnostic Beyond the Laser Bandwidth Resolution Limit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Tilborg, J. van; Matlis, N. H.; Plateau, G. R.; Leemans, W. P.

    2010-06-01

    Electro-optic sampling (EOS) is widely used as a technique to measure THz-domain electric field pulses such asthe self-fields of femtosecond electron beams. We present an EOS-based approach for single-shot spectral measurement that excels in simplicity (compatible with fiber integration) and bandwidth coverage (overcomes the laser bandwidth limitation), allowing few-fs electron beams or single-cycle THz pulses to be characterized with conventional picosecond probes. It is shown that the EOS-induced optical sidebands on the narrow-bandwidth optical probe are spectrally-shifted replicas of the THz pulse. An experimental demonstration on a 0-3 THz source is presented.

  12. Optical depth sectioning in the aberration-corrected scanning transmission and scanning confocal electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behan, G; Nellist, P D

    2008-01-01

    The use of spherical aberration correctors in the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) has the effect of reducing the depth of field of the microscope, making three-dimensional imaging of a specimen possible by optical sectioning. Depth resolution can be improved further by placing aberration correctors and lenses pre and post specimen to achieve an imaging mode known as scanning confocal electron microscopy (SCEM). We present the calculated incoherent point spread functions (PSF) and optical transfer functions (OTF) of a STEM and SCEM. The OTF for a STEM is shown to have a missing cone region which results in severe blurring along the optic axis, which can be especially severe for extended objects. We also present strategies for reconstruction of experimental data, such as three-dimensional deconvolution of the point spread function.

  13. Electronic polarizability, optical basicity and interaction parameter for Nd2O3 doped lithium-zinc-phosphate glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algradee, M. A.; Sultan, M.; Samir, O. M.; Alwany, A. Elwhab B.

    2017-08-01

    The Nd3+-doped lithium-zinc-phosphate glasses were prepared by means of conventional melt quenching method. X-ray diffraction results confirmed the glassy nature of the studied glasses. The physical parameters such as the density, molar volume, ion concentration, polaron radius, inter-ionic distance, field strength and oxygen packing density were calculated using different formulae. The transmittance and reflectance spectra of glasses were recorded in the wavelength range 190-1200 nm. The values of optical band gap and Urbach energy were determined based on Mott-Davis model. The refractive indices for the studied glasses were evaluated from optical band gap values using different methods. The average electronic polarizability of the oxide ions, optical basicity and an interaction parameter were investigated from the calculated values of the refractive index and the optical band gap for the studied glasses. The variations in the different physical and optical properties of glasses with Nd2O3 content were discussed in terms of different parameters such as non-bridging oxygen and different concentrations of Nd cation in glass system.

  14. Optical diagnosis system for intense electron beam diode plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Jie; Shu Ting; Zhang Jun; Fan Yuwei; Yang Jianhua; Liu Lie; Yin Yi; Luo Ling

    2012-01-01

    A nanosecond time-resolved imaging platform for diode plasmas diagnostics has been constructed based on the pulsed electron beam accelerator and high speed framing camera (HSFC). The accelerator can provide an electrical pulse with voltages of 200-500 kV, rise-time (from 10% to 90% amplitude) of 25 ns and duration of 110 ns. The diode currents up to kA level can be extracted. The trigger signal for camera was picked up by a water-resistor voltage divider after the main switch of the accelerator, which could avoid the disadvantageous influence of the time jitter caused by the breakdown of the gas gaps. Then the sampled negative electrical pulse was converted into a transistor-transistor logic (TTL) signal (5 V) with rise time of about 1.5 ns and time jitter less than 1 ns via a processor. And this signal was taken as the synchronization time base. According to the working characteristics of the camera, the synchronization scheme relying mainly on electrical pulse delay method supplemented by light signal delay method was determined to make sure that the camera can work synchronously with the light production and transportation from the diode plasma within the time scale of nanosecond. Moreover, shielding and filtering methods were used to restrain the interference on the measurement system from the accelerator. Finally, time resolved 2-D framing images of the diode plasma were acquired. (authors)

  15. Optimization of the optical and electrical properties of electron beam evaporated aluminum-doped zinc oxide films for opto-electronic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, H. M.; Abd El-Raheem, M. M.; Megahed, N. M.; Mohamed, H. A.

    2006-08-01

    Aluminum-doped zinc oxide (AZO) thin films have been deposited by electron beam evaporation technique on glass substrates. The structural, electrical and optical properties of AZO films have been investigated as a function of annealing temperature. It was observed that the optical properties such as transmittance, reflectance, optical band gap and refractive index of AZO films were strongly affected by annealing temperature. The transmittance values of 84% in the visible region and 97% in the NIR region were obtained for AZO film annealed at 475 °C. The room temperature electrical resistivity of 4.6×10-3 Ω cm has been obtained at the same temperature of annealing. It was found that the calculated refractive index has been affected by the packing density of the thin films, whereas, the high annealing temperature gave rise to improve the homogeneity of the films. The single-oscillator model was used to analyze the optical parameters such as the oscillator and dispersion energies.

  16. Continuous wave protocol for simultaneous polarization and optical detection of P1-center electron spin resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamp, E. J.; Carvajal, B.; Samarth, N.

    2018-01-01

    The ready optical detection and manipulation of bright nitrogen vacancy center spins in diamond plays a key role in contemporary quantum information science and quantum metrology. Other optically dark defects such as substitutional nitrogen atoms (`P1 centers') could also become potentially useful in this context if they could be as easily optically detected and manipulated. We develop a relatively straightforward continuous wave protocol that takes advantage of the dipolar coupling between nitrogen vacancy and P1 centers in type 1b diamond to detect and polarize the dark P1 spins. By combining mutual spin flip transitions with radio frequency driving, we demonstrate the simultaneous optical polarization and detection of the electron spin resonance of the P1 center. This technique should be applicable to detecting and manipulating a broad range of dark spin populations that couple to the nitrogen vacancy center via dipolar fields, allowing for quantum metrology using these spin populations.

  17. Cerenkov light spectrum in an optical fiber exposed to a photon or electron radiation therapy beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, Jamil; Yin Yongbai; McKenzie, David R.; Law, Sue; Suchowerska, Natalka

    2009-01-01

    A Cerenkov signal is generated when energetic charged particles enter the core of an optical fiber. The Cerenkov intensity can be large enough to interfere with signals transmitted through the fiber. We determine the spectrum of the Cerenkov background signal generated in a poly(methyl methacrylate) optical fiber exposed to photon and electron therapeutic beams from a linear accelerator. This spectral measurement is relevant to discrimination of the signal from the background, as in scintillation dosimetry using optical fiber readouts. We find that the spectrum is approximated by the theoretical curve after correction for the wavelength dependent attenuation of the fiber. The spectrum does not depend significantly on the angle between the radiation beam and the axis of the fiber optic but is dependent on the depth in water at which the fiber is exposed to the beam.

  18. Measuring optical properties of a blood vessel model using optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitz, David; Hinds, Monica T.; Tran, Noi; Vartanian, Keri; Hanson, Stephen R.; Jacques, Steven L.

    2006-02-01

    In this paper we develop the concept of a tissue-engineered optical phantom that uses engineered tissue as a phantom for calibration and optimization of biomedical optics instrumentation. With this method, the effects of biological processes on measured signals can be studied in a well controlled manner. To demonstrate this concept, we attempted to investigate how the cellular remodeling of a collagen matrix affected the optical properties extracted from optical coherence tomography (OCT) images of the samples. Tissue-engineered optical phantoms of the vascular system were created by seeding smooth muscle cells in a collagen matrix. Four different optical properties were evaluated by fitting the OCT signal to 2 different models: the sample reflectivity ρ and attenuation parameter μ were extracted from the single scattering model, and the scattering coefficient μ s and root-mean-square scattering angle θ rms were extracted from the extended Huygens-Fresnel model. We found that while contraction of the smooth muscle cells was clearly evident macroscopically, on the microscopic scale very few cells were actually embedded in the collagen. Consequently, no significant difference between the cellular and acellular samples in either set of measured optical properties was observed. We believe that further optimization of our tissue-engineering methods is needed in order to make the histology and biochemistry of the cellular samples sufficiently different from the acellular samples on the microscopic level. Once these methods are optimized, we can better verify whether the optical properties of the cellular and acellular collagen samples differ.

  19. Optical Fibres in the Modeling of Translucent Concrete Blocks

    OpenAIRE

    M.N.V.Padma Bhushan, D.Johnson, Md. Afzal Basheer Pasha And Ms. K. Prasanthi

    2013-01-01

    Translucent concrete is a concrete based material with light-transmissive properties, obtained due to embedded light optical elements like Optical fibers in it. Light is conducted through the stone from one end to the other. This results into a certain light pattern on the other surface, depending on the fibre structure. Optical fibres transmit light so effectively that there is virtually no loss of light conducted through the fibres. Our paper deals with the modelling of such translucent or ...

  20. Electron beam position stabilization with a piezo-electric optical correction system

    CERN Document Server

    Averett, T; McKeown, R D; Pitt, M

    1999-01-01

    A piezo-electrically controlled optical correction system was successfully used to reduce the helicity-correlated pulse-to-pulse position differences of a laser spot to better than +-100 nm at a pulse rate of 600 Hz. Using a simple feedback algorithm, average position differences of DELTA x-bar=-3.5+-4.2 nm and DELTA y-bar=2.6+-6.6 nm were obtained over a 6 h period. This optical correction system was successfully used in the polarized electron source at the Bates Linear Accelerator Center to stabilize the position of the electron beam during the recent SAMPLE experiment. Because this experiment measures a parity violating signal at the 10 sup - sup 6 level, it is sensitive to systematic effects which are correlated with the helicity of the incident electrons. One potentially large systematic effect is the helicity-correlated motion of the incident electron beam. By using this optical correction system, electron beam position differences at the location of the experiment were routinely kept well below +-100 n...

  1. Calculations of the electronic density of states and conductivity consistent with the generalized optical theorem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oosten, A.B. van; Geertsma, W.

    1985-01-01

    In order to study density of states (DOS) effects on the resistivity of liquid metals and alloys we derive a set of integral equations for these quantities so that this set satisfies the generalized optical theorem. The DOS is calculated up to second order in the scattering potential using renormalized propagators. The theory is applicable to weak scattering systems, for example, alkali and alkaline earth metals and, for example, to Li-Pb alloys for compositions where the mean free path is much larger that the average interatomic distance. From our numerical results we conclude that the Ziman equation for the resistivity should be multiplied by g 2 =N 2 (Esub(F))/N 2 sub(O)(Esub(F)) where N(Esub(F)) is the DOS at the Fermi level as calculated in our model and Nsub(O)(Esub(F)) is the free electron DOS. This solves the long standing problem of whether or not one should correct the Ziman equation by an effective mass correction. Our model is only valid for alloys consisting of atoms with a small difference in electronegativity. This is clearly shown in the results for the liquid Li-Pb system. Some of the existing resistivity theories for weak and intermediate scattering are examined in the light of our calculations. (author)

  2. Observation of vacuum-enhanced electron spin resonance of optically levitated nanodiamonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tongcang; Hoang, Thai; Ahn, Jonghoon; Bang, Jaehoon

    Electron spins of diamond nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers are important quantum resources for nanoscale sensing and quantum information. Combining such NV spin systems with levitated optomechanical resonators will provide a hybrid quantum system for many novel applications. Here we optically levitate a nanodiamond and demonstrate electron spin control of its built-in NV centers in low vacuum. We observe that the strength of electron spin resonance (ESR) is enhanced when the air pressure is reduced. To better understand this novel system, we also investigate the effects of trap power and measure the absolute internal temperature of levitated nanodiamonds with ESR after calibration of the strain effect. Our results show that optical levitation of nanodiamonds in vacuum not only can improve the mechanical quality of its oscillation, but also enhance the ESR contrast, which pave the way towards a novel levitated spin-optomechanical system for studying macroscopic quantum mechanics. The results also indicate potential applications of NV centers in gas sensing.

  3. New trends in the optical and electronic applications of polymers containing transition-metal complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shu-Juan; Chen, Yang; Xu, Wen-Juan; Zhao, Qiang; Huang, Wei

    2012-04-13

    Polymers containing transition-metal complexes exhibit excellent optical and electronic properties, which are different from those of polymers with a pure organic skeleton and combine the advantages of both polymers and metal complexes. Hence, research about this class of polymers has attracted more and more interest in recent years. Up to now, a number of novel polymers containing transition-metal complexes have been exploited, and significant advances in their optical and electronic applications have been achieved. In this article, we summarize some new research trends in the applications of this important class of optoelectronic polymers, such as chemo/biosensors, electronic memory devices and photovoltaic devices. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Single-shot electro-optic experiments for electron bunch diagnostics at Tsinghua Accelerator Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Wei; Du, Yingchao; Yan, Lixin; Hua, Jianfei; Zhang, Zhen; Zhou, Zheng [Accelerator Laboratory, Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Key Laboratory of Particle and Radiation Imaging, Tsinghua University, Ministry of Education, Beijing 100084 (China); Huang, Wenhui, E-mail: huangwh@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [Accelerator Laboratory, Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Key Laboratory of Particle and Radiation Imaging, Tsinghua University, Ministry of Education, Beijing 100084 (China); Tang, Chuanxiang [Accelerator Laboratory, Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Key Laboratory of Particle and Radiation Imaging, Tsinghua University, Ministry of Education, Beijing 100084 (China); Li, Ming [Institute of Applied Electronics, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China)

    2016-10-21

    The electro-optic (EO) technique detects the Coulomb electric field distribution of relativistic electron bunches to obtain the associated longitudinal profile. This diagnostic method allows the direct time-resolved single-shot measurement and thus the real-time monitoring of the bunch profile and beam arrival time in a non-destructive way with sub-picosecond temporal resolution. In this paper, we report the measurement of the longitudinal profile of an electron bunch through electro-optic spectral decoding detection, in which the bunch profile is encoded into the spectra of the linearly chirped laser pulse. The experimental setup and measurement results of a 40 MeV electron bunch are presented, with a temporal profile length of 527 fs rms (~1.24 ps FWHM) and a beam arrival time jitter of 471 fs rms. Temporal resolution and future experimental improvement are also discussed.

  5. Long-wavelength optical phonon behavior in uniaxial strained graphene: Role of electron-phonon interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assili, M.; Haddad, S.

    2014-09-01

    We derive the frequency shifts and the broadening of Γ-point longitudinal optical (LO) and transverse optical (TO) phonon modes, due to electron-phonon interaction, in graphene under uniaxial strain as a function of the electron density and the disorder amount. We show that, in the absence of a shear strain component, such interaction gives rise to a lifting of the degeneracy of the LO and TO modes which contributes to the splitting of the G Raman band. The anisotropy of the electronic spectrum, induced by the strain, results in a polarization dependence of the LO and TO modes. This dependence is in agreement with the experimental results showing a periodic modulation of the Raman intensity of the split G peak. Moreover, the anomalous behavior of the frequency shift reported in undeformed graphene is found to be robust under strain.

  6. Electronic and Optical Properties of CuO Based on DFT+U and GW Approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, F; Agusta, M K; Dipojono, H K

    2016-01-01

    We report ab initio calculations of electronic structure and optical properties of monoclinic CuO based on DFT+U and GW approximation. CuO is an antiferromagnetic material with strong electron correlations. Our calculation shows that DFT+U and GW approximation sufficiently reliable to investigate the material properties of CuO. The calculated band gap of DFT+U for reasonable value of U slightly underestimates. The use of GW approximation requires adjustment of U value to get realistic result. Hybridization Cu 3dxz, 3dyz with O 2p plays an important role in the formation of band gap. The calculated optical properties based on DFT+U and GW corrections by solving Bethe-Salpeter are in good agreement with the calculated electronic properties and the experimental result. (paper)

  7. Novel applications of the dispersive optical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickhoff, W. H.; Charity, R. J.; Mahzoon, M. H.

    2017-03-01

    A review of recent developments of the dispersive optical model (DOM) is presented. Starting from the original work of Mahaux and Sartor, several necessary steps are developed and illustrated which increase the scope of the DOM allowing its interpretation as generating an experimentally constrained functional form of the nucleon self-energy. The method could therefore be renamed as the dispersive self-energy method. The aforementioned steps include the introduction of simultaneous fits of data for chains of isotopes or isotones allowing a data-driven extrapolation for the prediction of scattering cross sections and level properties in the direction of the respective drip lines. In addition, the energy domain for data was enlarged to include results up to 200 MeV where available. An important application of this work was implemented by employing these DOM potentials to the analysis of the (d, p) transfer reaction using the adiabatic distorted wave approximation. We review these calculations which suggest that physically meaningful results are easier to obtain by employing DOM ingredients as compared to the traditional approach which relies on a phenomenologically-adjusted bound-state wave function combined with a global (nondispersive) optical-model potential. Application to the exotic 132Sn nucleus also shows great promise for the extrapolation of DOM potentials towards the drip line with attendant relevance for the physics of FRIB. We note that the DOM method combines structure and reaction information on the same footing providing a unique approach to the analysis of exotic nuclei. We illustrate the importance of abandoning the custom of representing the non-local Hartree-Fock (HF) potential in the DOM by an energy-dependent local potential as it impedes the proper normalization of the solution of the Dyson equation. This important step allows for the interpretation of the DOM potential as representing the nucleon self-energy permitting the calculations of

  8. A Comparative Study of Spectral Auroral Intensity Predictions From Multiple Electron Transport Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubbs, Guy; Michell, Robert; Samara, Marilia; Hampton, Donald; Hecht, James; Solomon, Stanley; Jahn, Jorg-Micha

    2018-01-01

    It is important to routinely examine and update models used to predict auroral emissions resulting from precipitating electrons in Earth's magnetotail. These models are commonly used to invert spectral auroral ground-based images to infer characteristics about incident electron populations when in situ measurements are unavailable. In this work, we examine and compare auroral emission intensities predicted by three commonly used electron transport models using varying electron population characteristics. We then compare model predictions to same-volume in situ electron measurements and ground-based imaging to qualitatively examine modeling prediction error. Initial comparisons showed differences in predictions by the GLobal airglOW (GLOW) model and the other transport models examined. Chemical reaction rates and radiative rates in GLOW were updated using recent publications, and predictions showed better agreement with the other models and the same-volume data, stressing that these rates are important to consider when modeling auroral processes. Predictions by each model exhibit similar behavior for varying atmospheric constants, energies, and energy fluxes. Same-volume electron data and images are highly correlated with predictions by each model, showing that these models can be used to accurately derive electron characteristics and ionospheric parameters based solely on multispectral optical imaging data.

  9. Analysis of operating model of electronic invoice colombian Colombian electronic billing analysis of the operational model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Roberto da Silva

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Colombia has been one of the first countries to introduce electronic billing process on a voluntary basis, from a traditional to a digital version. In this context, the article analyzes the electronic billing process implemented in Colombia and the advantages. Methodological research is applied, qualitative, descriptive and documentary; where the regulatory framework and the conceptualization of the model is identified; the process of adoption of electronic billing is analyzed, and finally the advantages and disadvantages of its implementation is analyzed. The findings indicate that the model applied in Colombia to issue an electronic billing in sending and receiving process, is not complex, but it requires a small adequate infrastructure and trained personnel to reach all sectors, especially the micro and business which is the largest business network in the country.

  10. Modeling nitrogen plasmas produced by intense electron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angus, J. R.; Swanekamp, S. B.; Schumer, J. W.; Hinshelwood, D. D. [Plasma Physics Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Mosher, D.; Ottinger, P. F. [Independent contractors for NRL through Engility, Inc., Alexandria, Virginia 22314 (United States)

    2016-05-15

    A new gas–chemistry model is presented to treat the breakdown of a nitrogen gas with pressures on the order of 1 Torr from intense electron beams with current densities on the order of 10 kA/cm{sup 2} and pulse durations on the order of 100 ns. For these parameter regimes, the gas transitions from a weakly ionized molecular state to a strongly ionized atomic state on the time scale of the beam pulse. The model is coupled to a 0D–circuit model using the rigid–beam approximation that can be driven by specifying the time and spatial profiles of the beam pulse. Simulation results are in good agreement with experimental measurements of the line–integrated electron density from experiments done using the Gamble II generator at the Naval Research Laboratory. It is found that the species are mostly in the ground and metastable states during the atomic phase, but that ionization proceeds predominantly through thermal ionization of optically allowed states with excitation energies close to the ionization limit.

  11. The production and extraction of polarized electrons from an optically pumped helium discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandiver, R.J.; Schearer, L.D.; Gay, T.J.

    1992-01-01

    Polarized electrons are produced from interactions involving nearly 100% polarized helium 2 3 S 1 metastable atoms in a weak electrical discharge. The high metastable polarizations are obtained through the use of recently developed, high-power lasers tunable to the relevant helium transitions near 1083 nm and the development of a crossed beam pumping technique. The dominant interactions involving the 2 3 S 1 atoms and electrons are spin preserving; hence the electrons of the discharge attain a high polarization. The authors have extracted a well collimated electron beam with over 20 μA of current from the discharge. An optical polarimeter will be used to determine the polarization of the extracted electrons

  12. High definition in-situ electro-optical characterization for Roll to Roll printed electronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pastorelli, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    Resume: Printed electronics is emerging as a new, large scale and cost effective technology that will be disruptive in fields such as energy harvesting, consumer electronics and medical sensors. The performance of printed organic electronic devices relies principally on the carrier mobility...... and molecular packing of the polymer semiconductor material. Unfortunately, the analysis of such materials is generally performed with destructive techniques, which are hard to make compatible with in situ measurements, and pose a great obstacle for the mass production of printed electronics devices. A rapid......-photon induced photoluminescence (TPPL) and second harmonic response. We anticipate that this non-linear optical method will substantially contribute to the understanding of printed electronic devices and demonstrate it as a promising novel tool for non-destructive and facile testing of materials during printing...

  13. Thermoluminescence response of Ge-, Al- and Nd- doped optical fibers by 6 MeV - electron and 6 MeV - photon irradiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hossain, I.; Moburak, A. A.; Saeed, M.A.; Wagiran, H.; Hida, N.; Yaakob, H.N.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we report the prediction of thermoluminescence responses of Neodymium-doped SiO 2 optical fibre with various dose ranges from 0.5 Gy to 4.0 Gy by 6 MeV - electron irradiations without requirement for experimental measurements. A technique has been developed to calculate prediction of 6 MeV - electron response of Neodymium-doped SiO 2 optical fibre by observing the measured TL response of 6 MV - photon and the ratio of known measured photon/electron yield ratio distribution for Ge-doped, Al-doped optical fibre and standard TLD 100 dosimeter. The samples were kept in gelatin capsule an irradiated with 6 MV - photon at the dose range from 0.5 Gy to 4.0 Gy. Siemens model Primus 3368 linear accelerator located at Hospital Sultan Ismail, Johor Bahru has been used to deliver the photon beam to the samples. We found the average response ratio of 6 MV - photon and 6 MeV - electron in Ge-doped, Al-doped optical fibre and standard TLD-100 dosimeter are 0.83(3). Observing the measured value of 6 MV - photon irradiation this average ratio is useful to find the prediction of thermoluminescence responses by 6 MeV - electron irradiation of Neodymium-doped SiO 2 optical fibre by the requirement for experimental measurements with various dose ranges from 0.5 Gy to 4.0 Gy by 6 MV - photon irradiations.

  14. Modelling transport in single electron transistor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinh Sy Hien; Huynh Lam Thu Thao; Le Hoang Minh

    2009-01-01

    We introduce a model of single electron transistor (SET). Simulation programme of SET is used as the exploratory tool in order to gain better understanding of process and device physics. This simulator includes a graphic user interface (GUI) in Matlab. The SET was simulated using GUI in Matlab to get current-voltage (I-V) characteristics. In addition, effects of device capacitance, bias, temperature on the I-V characteristics were obtained. In this work, we review the capabilities of the simulator of the SET. Typical simulations of the obtained I-V characteristics of the SET are presented.

  15. The Maxwell-Lorentz Model for optical Pulses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mads Peter; Brio, Moysey

    2007-01-01

    Dynamics of optical pulses, especially of ultra short femtosecond pulses, are of great technological and theoretical interest. The dynamics of optical pulses is usually studied using the nonlinear Schrodinger (NLS) equation model. While such approach works surprisingly well for description of pulse...

  16. Modelling of Extrinsic Fiber Optic Sagnac Ultrasound Interferometer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ultrasonic waves are used extensively in nondestructive testing both for characterization of material properties, in this paper, we describe a fiber optic sensor suitable for detection of ultrasonic waves. This sensor is based on an extrinsic fiber optic sagnac interferometer. The proposed sensor model can act as a conventional ...

  17. Full optical model of micro-endoscope with optical coherence microscopy, multiphoton microscopy and visible capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, David; Kiekens, Kelli C.; Syson, Nikolas C.; Romano, Gabriella; Baker, Tressa; Barton, Jennifer K.

    2018-02-01

    While Optical Coherence Microscopy (OCM), Multiphoton Microscopy (MPM), and narrowband imaging are powerful imaging techniques that can be used to detect cancer, each imaging technique has limitations when used by itself. Combining them into an endoscope to work in synergy can help achieve high sensitivity and specificity for diagnosis at the point of care. Such complex endoscopes have an elevated risk of failure, and performing proper modelling ensures functionality and minimizes risk. We present full 2D and 3D models of a multimodality optical micro-endoscope to provide real-time detection of carcinomas, called a salpingoscope. The models evaluate the endoscope illumination and light collection capabilities of various modalities. The design features two optical paths with different numerical apertures (NA) through a single lens system with a scanning optical fiber. The dual path is achieved using dichroic coatings embedded in a triplet. A high NA optical path is designed to perform OCM and MPM while a low NA optical path is designed for the visible spectrum to navigate the endoscope to areas of interest and narrowband imaging. Different tests such as the reflectance profile of homogeneous epithelial tissue were performed to adjust the models properly. Light collection models for the different modalities were created and tested for efficiency. While it is challenging to evaluate the efficiency of multimodality endoscopes, the models ensure that the system is design for the expected light collection levels to provide detectable signal to work for the intended imaging.

  18. Transverse phase space mapping of relativistic electron beams using optical transition radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. P. Le Sage

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Optical transition radiation (OTR has proven to be a versatile and effective diagnostic for measuring the profile, divergence, and emittance of relativistic electron beams with a wide range of parameters. Diagnosis of the divergence of modern high brightness beams is especially well suited to OTR interference (OTRI techniques, where multiple dielectric or metal foils are used to generate a spatially coherent interference pattern. Theoretical analysis of measured OTR and OTRI patterns allows precise measurement of electron beam emittance characteristics. Here we describe an extension of this technique to allow mapping of divergence characteristics as a function of transverse coordinates within a measured beam. We present the first experimental analysis of the transverse phase space of an electron beam using all optical techniques. Comparing an optically masked portion of the beam to the entire beam, we measure different angular spread and average direction of the particles. Direct measurement of the phase-space ellipse tilt angle has been demonstrated using this optical masking technique.

  19. Electronic and Optical Properties of Two-Dimensional GaN from First-Principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Nocona; Bayerl, Dylan; Shi, Guangsha; Mengle, Kelsey A; Kioupakis, Emmanouil

    2017-12-13

    Gallium nitride (GaN) is an important commercial semiconductor for solid-state lighting applications. Atomically thin GaN, a recently synthesized two-dimensional material, is of particular interest because the extreme quantum confinement enables additional control of its light-emitting properties. We performed first-principles calculations based on density functional and many-body perturbation theory to investigate the electronic, optical, and excitonic properties of monolayer and bilayer two-dimensional (2D) GaN as a function of strain. Our results demonstrate that light emission from monolayer 2D GaN is blueshifted into the deep ultraviolet range, which is promising for sterilization and water-purification applications. Light emission from bilayer 2D GaN occurs at a similar wavelength to its bulk counterpart due to the cancellation of the effect of quantum confinement on the optical gap by the quantum-confined Stark shift. Polarized light emission at room temperature is possible via uniaxial in-plane strain, which is desirable for energy-efficient display applications. We compare the electronic and optical properties of freestanding two-dimensional GaN to atomically thin GaN wells embedded within AlN barriers in order to understand how the functional properties are influenced by the presence of barriers. Our results provide microscopic understanding of the electronic and optical characteristics of GaN at the few-layer regime.

  20. Analytical models of optical response in one-dimensional semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedersen, Thomas Garm

    2015-01-01

    The quantum mechanical description of the optical properties of crystalline materials typically requires extensive numerical computation. Including excitonic and non-perturbative field effects adds to the complexity. In one dimension, however, the analysis simplifies and optical spectra can be computed exactly. In this paper, we apply the Wannier exciton formalism to derive analytical expressions for the optical response in four cases of increasing complexity. Thus, we start from free carriers and, in turn, switch on electrostatic fields and electron–hole attraction and, finally, analyze the combined influence of these effects. In addition, the optical response of impurity-localized excitons is discussed. - Highlights: • Optical response of one-dimensional semiconductors including excitons. • Analytical model of excitonic Franz–Keldysh effect. • Computation of optical response of impurity-localized excitons

  1. Characterization and optimization of an optical and electronic architecture for photon counting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa, M. del M.; Pérez, F. R.

    2018-04-01

    This work shows a time-domain method for the discrimination and digitization of pulses coming from optical detectors, considering the presence of electronic noise and afterpulsing. The developed signal processing scheme is based on a time-to-digital converter (TDC) and a voltage discriminator. After setting appropriate parameters for taking spectra, acquisition data was corrected by wavelength, intensity response function, and noise suppression. The performance of this scheme is discussed by its characterization as well as the comparison of its spectra to those obtained by an Ocean Optics HR4000 commercial reference.

  2. The Electronic and Optical Properties of Au Doped Single-Layer Phosphorene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ziqing; Chen, Changpeng; Liu, Jiayi; Han, Lu

    2018-01-01

    The electronic properties and optical properties of single and double Au-doped phosphorene have been comparatively investigated using the first-principles plane-wave pseudopotential method based on density functional theory. The decrease from direct band gap 0.78 eV to indirect band gap 0.22 and 0.11 eV are observed in the single and double Au-doped phosphorene, respectively. The red shifts of absorbing edge occur in both doped systems, which consequently enhance the absorbing of infrared light in phosphorene. Band gap engineering can, therefore, be used to directly tune the optical absorption of phosphorene system by substitutional Au doping.

  3. Electronic properties and optical absorption of graphene-polyvinylidene fluoride nanocomposites: A theoretical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chopra, Siddheshwar, E-mail: schopra1@amity.edu

    2017-01-15

    Graphene/polyvinylidene fluoride (graphene/PVDF) nanocomposites were studied using Density functional theory (DFT)/Time dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) calculations. Five nanocomposite configurations were constructed. Electronic properties like binding energy, electronic gap and work function were calculated. The most stable structure was determined. The electronic gap of graphene shifts from semiconducting to conducting, on nanocomposite formation. Workfunction of the most stable nanocomposite was 4.34eV ± 0.05eV, close to that of the pristine graphene (4.33eV ± 0.05eV). Thermochemical analysis showed that the adsorption is spontaneous above ∼870 K, and endothermic in nature. TDDFT calculations were performed for B3LYP, LSDA, BHHLYP and PBE0 functionals. B3LYP and PBE0 are suitable in describing optical absorption. Optical gap of graphene shrinks, and light absorption gets enhanced on nanocomposite formation. - Highlights: • Various properties of graphene-PVDF nanocomposites were studied theoretically. • Electronic gap of graphene shifts to conducting nature, on composite formation. • Adsorption is spontaneous above ∼870 K, and endothermic in nature. • B3LYP and PBE0 functionals are suitable in describing absorption. • Optical absorption gets enhanced on nanocomposite formation.

  4. Electronic properties and optical absorption of graphene-polyvinylidene fluoride nanocomposites: A theoretical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopra, Siddheshwar

    2017-01-01

    Graphene/polyvinylidene fluoride (graphene/PVDF) nanocomposites were studied using Density functional theory (DFT)/Time dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) calculations. Five nanocomposite configurations were constructed. Electronic properties like binding energy, electronic gap and work function were calculated. The most stable structure was determined. The electronic gap of graphene shifts from semiconducting to conducting, on nanocomposite formation. Workfunction of the most stable nanocomposite was 4.34eV ± 0.05eV, close to that of the pristine graphene (4.33eV ± 0.05eV). Thermochemical analysis showed that the adsorption is spontaneous above ∼870 K, and endothermic in nature. TDDFT calculations were performed for B3LYP, LSDA, BHHLYP and PBE0 functionals. B3LYP and PBE0 are suitable in describing optical absorption. Optical gap of graphene shrinks, and light absorption gets enhanced on nanocomposite formation. - Highlights: • Various properties of graphene-PVDF nanocomposites were studied theoretically. • Electronic gap of graphene shifts to conducting nature, on composite formation. • Adsorption is spontaneous above ∼870 K, and endothermic in nature. • B3LYP and PBE0 functionals are suitable in describing absorption. • Optical absorption gets enhanced on nanocomposite formation.

  5. Electronic and optical properties of graphene-like InAs: An ab initio study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohrabi, Leila; Boochani, Arash; Ali Sebt, S.; Mohammad Elahi, S.

    2018-03-01

    The present work initially investigates structural, optical, and electronic properties of graphene-like InAs by using the full potential linear augmented plane wave method in the framework of density functional theory and is then compared with the bulk Indium Arsenide in the wurtzite phase. The lattice parameters are optimized with GGA-PBE and LDA approximations for both 2D- and 3D-InAs. In order to study the electronic properties of graphene-like InAs and bulk InAs in the wurtzite phase, the band gap is calculated by GGA-PBG and GGA-EV approximations. Moreover, optical parameters of graphene-like InAs and bulk InAs such as the real and imaginary parts of dielectric function, electron energy loss function, refractivity, extinction and absorption coefficients, and optical conductivity are investigated. Plasmonic frequencies of 2D- and 3D-InAs are also calculated by using maximum electron energy loss function and the roots of the real part of the dielectric function.

  6. Design and Analysis of an Electron Gun/Booster and Free Electron Laser Optical Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    105 65. Stanford DC gun equipotentials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106 66. Energy plots for various electrode ratios...222 121. Graphical Cross-correlation Demonstration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 223 122. 2D cross-correlation surface ...them enough energy to escape the metal’s surface . Once free of the metal, the electric field accelerates the electrons toward an anode. If the anode is

  7. Model based design of electronic throttle control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherian, Fenin; Ranjan, Ashish; Bhowmick, Pathikrit; Rammohan, A.

    2017-11-01

    With the advent of torque based Engine Management Systems, the precise control and robust performance of the throttle body becomes a key factor in the overall performance of the vehicle. Electronic Throttle Control provides benefits such as improved air-fuel ratio for improving the vehicle performance and lower exhausts emissions to meet the stringent emission norms. Modern vehicles facilitate various features such as Cruise Control, Traction Control, Electronic Stability Program and Pre-crash systems. These systems require control over engine power without driver intervention, which is not possible with conventional mechanical throttle system. Thus these systems are integrated to function with the electronic throttle control. However, due to inherent non-linearities in the throttle body, the control becomes a difficult task. In order to eliminate the influence of this hysteresis at the initial operation of the butterfly valve, a control to compensate the shortage must be added to the duty required for starting throttle operation when the initial operation is detected. Therefore, a lot of work is being done in this field to incorporate the various nonlinearities to achieve robust control. In our present work, the ETB was tested to verify the working of the system. Calibration of the TPS sensors was carried out in order to acquire accurate throttle opening angle. The response of the calibrated system was then plotted against a step input signal. A linear model of the ETB was prepared using Simulink and its response was compared with the experimental data to find out the initial deviation of the model from the actual system. To reduce this deviation, non-linearities from existing literature were introduced to the system and a response analysis was performed to check the deviation from the actual system. Based on this investigation, an introduction of a new nonlinearity parameter can be used in future to reduce the deviation further making the control of the ETB more

  8. Modeling ion sensing in molecular electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Caroline J.; Smeu, Manuel; Ratner, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    We examine the ability of molecules to sense ions by measuring the change in molecular conductance in the presence of such charged species. The detection of protons (H + ), alkali metal cations (M + ), calcium ions (Ca 2+ ), and hydronium ions (H 3 O + ) is considered. Density functional theory (DFT) is used within the Keldysh non-equilibrium Green's function framework (NEGF) to model electron transport properties of quinolinedithiol (QDT, C 9 H 7 NS 2 ), bridging Al electrodes. The geometry of the transport region is relaxed with DFT. The transport properties of the device are modeled with NEGF-DFT to determine if this device can distinguish among the M + + QDT species containing monovalent cations, where M + = H + , Li + , Na + , or K + . Because of the asymmetry of QDT in between the two electrodes, both positive and negative biases are considered. The electron transmission function and conductance properties are simulated for electrode biases in the range from −0.5 V to 0.5 V at increments of 0.1 V. Scattering state analysis is used to determine the molecular orbitals that are the main contributors to the peaks in the transmission function near the Fermi level of the electrodes, and current-voltage relationships are obtained. The results show that QDT can be used as a proton detector by measuring transport through it and can conceivably act as a pH sensor in solutions. In addition, QDT may be able to distinguish among different monovalent species. This work suggests an approach to design modern molecular electronic conductance sensors with high sensitivity and specificity using well-established quantum chemistry

  9. Electronic, structural, and optical properties of host materials for inorganic phosphors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alemany, Pere; Moreira, Ibério de P.R.; Castillo, Rodrigo; Llanos, Jaime

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We performed a first-principles DFT study of the electronic structures of several wide band gap insulators (La 2 O 3 , La 2 O 2 S, Y 2 O 3 Y 2 O 2 S, La 2 TeO 6 , and Y 2 TeO 6 ) used as host materials for inorganic phosphors. ► The electronic, structural, and optical properties calculated for these compounds are in good agreement with the available experimental data. ► The electronic structure of the M 2 TeO 6 phases exhibits distinct features that could allow a fine tuning of the optical properties of luminescent materials obtained by doping with rare earth metals. - Abstract: A family of large gap insulators used as host materials for inorganic phosphors (La 2 O 3 , La 2 O 2 S, Y 2 O 3 , Y 2 O 2 S, La 2 TeO 6 , and Y 2 TeO 6 ) have been studied by first-principles DFT based calculations. We have determined electronic, structural, and optical properties for all these compounds both at the LDA and GGA levels obtaining, in general, a good agreement with available experimental data and previous theoretical studies. The electronic structure for the M 2 TeO 6 phases, addressed in this work for the first time, reveals some significant differences with respect to the other compounds, especially in the region of the lower conduction band, where the appearance of a group of four isolated oxygen/tellurium based bands below the main part of the La (Y) centered conduction band is predicted to lead to significant changes in the optical properties of the two tellurium containing compounds with respect to the rest of compounds in the series.

  10. Doping of wide-bandgap titanium-dioxide nanotubes: optical, electronic and magnetic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alivov, Yahya; Singh, Vivek; Ding, Yuchen; Cerkovnik, Logan Jerome; Nagpal, Prashant

    2014-08-01

    Doping semiconductors is an important step for their technological application. While doping bulk semiconductors can be easily achieved, incorporating dopants in semiconductor nanostructures has proven difficult. Here, we report a facile synthesis method for doping titanium-dioxide (TiO2) nanotubes that was enabled by a new electrochemical cell design. A variety of optical, electronic and magnetic dopants were incorporated into the hollow nanotubes, and from detailed studies it is shown that the doping level can be easily tuned from low to heavily-doped semiconductors. Using desired dopants - electronic (p- or n-doped), optical (ultraviolet bandgap to infrared absorption in co-doped nanotubes), and magnetic (from paramagnetic to ferromagnetic) properties can be tailored, and these technologically important nanotubes can be useful for a variety of applications in photovoltaics, display technologies, photocatalysis, and spintronic applications.Doping semiconductors is an important step for their technological application. While doping bulk semiconductors can be easily achieved, incorporating dopants in semiconductor nanostructures has proven difficult. Here, we report a facile synthesis method for doping titanium-dioxide (TiO2) nanotubes that was enabled by a new electrochemical cell design. A variety of optical, electronic and magnetic dopants were incorporated into the hollow nanotubes, and from detailed studies it is shown that the doping level can be easily tuned from low to heavily-doped semiconductors. Using desired dopants - electronic (p- or n-doped), optical (ultraviolet bandgap to infrared absorption in co-doped nanotubes), and magnetic (from paramagnetic to ferromagnetic) properties can be tailored, and these technologically important nanotubes can be useful for a variety of applications in photovoltaics, display technologies, photocatalysis, and spintronic applications. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr02417f

  11. High-Resolution Two-Dimensional Optical Spectroscopy of Electron Spins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Salewski

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Multidimensional coherent optical spectroscopy is one of the most powerful tools for investigating complex quantum mechanical systems. While it was conceived decades ago in magnetic resonance spectroscopy using microwaves and radio waves, it has recently been extended into the visible and UV spectral range. However, resolving MHz energy splittings with ultrashort laser pulses still remains a challenge. Here, we analyze two-dimensional Fourier spectra for resonant optical excitation of resident electrons to localized trions or donor-bound excitons in semiconductor nanostructures subject to a transverse magnetic field. Particular attention is devoted to Raman coherence spectra, which allow one to accurately evaluate tiny splittings of the electron ground state and to determine the relaxation times in the electron spin ensemble. A stimulated steplike Raman process induced by a sequence of two laser pulses creates a coherent superposition of the ground-state doublet which can be retrieved only optically because of selective excitation of the same subensemble with a third pulse. This provides the unique opportunity to distinguish between different complexes that are closely spaced in energy in an ensemble. The related experimental demonstration is based on photon-echo measurements in an n-type CdTe/(Cd,MgTe quantum-well structure detected by a heterodyne technique. The difference in the sub-μeV range between the Zeeman splittings of donor-bound electrons and electrons localized at potential fluctuations can be resolved even though the homogeneous linewidth of the optical transitions is larger by 2 orders of magnitude.

  12. Electronic band-gap modified passive silicon optical modulator at telecommunications wavelengths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui; Yu, Haohai; Zhang, Huaijin; Liu, Xiangdong; Lu, Qingming; Wang, Jiyang

    2015-11-13

    The silicon optical modulator is considered to be the workhorse of a revolution in communications. In recent years, the capabilities of externally driven active silicon optical modulators have dramatically improved. Self-driven passive modulators, especially passive silicon modulators, possess advantages in compactness, integration, low-cost, etc. Constrained by a large indirect band-gap and sensitivity-related loss, the passive silicon optical modulator is scarce and has been not advancing, especially at telecommunications wavelengths. Here, a passive silicon optical modulator is fabricated by introducing an impurity band in the electronic band-gap, and its nonlinear optics and applications in the telecommunications-wavelength lasers are investigated. The saturable absorption properties at the wavelength of 1.55 μm was measured and indicates that the sample is quite sensitive to light intensity and has negligible absorption loss. With a passive silicon modulator, pulsed lasers were constructed at wavelengths at 1.34 and 1.42 μm. It is concluded that the sensitive self-driven passive silicon optical modulator is a viable candidate for photonics applications out to 2.5 μm.

  13. Novel optical waveguides by in-depth controlled electronic damage with swift ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivares, J.; García-Navarro, A.; Méndez, A.; Agulló-López, F.; García, G.; García-Cabañes, A.; Carrascosa, M.

    2007-04-01

    We review recent results on a novel method to modify crystalline dielectric materials and fabricate optical waveguides and integrated optics devices. It relies on irradiation with medium-mass high-energy ions (2-50 MeV) where the electronic stopping power is dominant over that one associated to nuclear collisions. By exploiting the processing capabilities of the method, novel optical structures can be achieved at moderate (1014 cm-2) and even low and ultralow (1012 cm-2) fluences. In particular, step-like waveguides with a high index jump Δn ∼ 0.1-0.2, guiding both ordinary and extraordinary modes, have been prepared with F and O ions (20 MeV) at moderate fluences. They present good non-linear and electrooptic perfomance and low losses. (1 dB/cm). Moreover, useful optical waveguiding has been also achieved at ultralow frequencies (isolated track regime), using Cl and Si ions (40-45 MeV). In this latter case, the individual amorphous nanotracks, whose radius increases with depth, create an effective optical medium causing optical trapping.

  14. Novel optical waveguides by in-depth controlled electronic damage with swift ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olivares, J.; Garcia-Navarro, A.; Mendez, A.; Agullo-Lopez, F.; Garcia, G.; Garcia-Cabanes, A.; Carrascosa, M.

    2007-01-01

    We review recent results on a novel method to modify crystalline dielectric materials and fabricate optical waveguides and integrated optics devices. It relies on irradiation with medium-mass high-energy ions (2-50 MeV) where the electronic stopping power is dominant over that one associated to nuclear collisions. By exploiting the processing capabilities of the method, novel optical structures can be achieved at moderate (10 14 cm -2 ) and even low and ultralow (10 12 cm -2 ) fluences. In particular, step-like waveguides with a high index jump Δn ∼ 0.1-0.2, guiding both ordinary and extraordinary modes, have been prepared with F and O ions (20 MeV) at moderate fluences. They present good non-linear and electrooptic perfomance and low losses. (1 dB/cm). Moreover, useful optical waveguiding has been also achieved at ultralow frequencies (isolated track regime), using Cl and Si ions (40-45 MeV). In this latter case, the individual amorphous nanotracks, whose radius increases with depth, create an effective optical medium causing optical trapping

  15. Electronic properties of wurtzite-phase InP nanowires determined by optical and magneto-optical spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luca, Marta; Polimeni, Antonio

    2017-12-01

    Thanks to their peculiar shape and dimensions, semiconductor nanowires (NWs) are emerging as building components of novel devices. The presence of wurtzite (WZ) phase in the lattice structure of non-nitride III-V NWs is one of the most surprising findings in these nanostructures: this phase, indeed, cannot be found in the same materials in the bulk form, where the zincblende (ZB) structure is ubiquitous, and therefore the WZ properties are poorly known. This review focuses on WZ InP NWs, because growth techniques have reached a high degree of control on the structural properties of this material, and optical studies performed on high-quality samples have allowed determining the most useful electronic properties, which are reviewed here. After an introduction summarizing the reasons for the interest in WZ InP nanowires (Sec. I), we give an overview on growth process and structural and optical properties of WZ InP NWs (Sec. II). In Sec. III, a complete picture of the energy and symmetry of the lowest-energy conduction and valence bands, as assessed by polarization-resolved photoluminescence (PL) and photoluminescence-excitation (PLE) studies is drawn and compared to all the available theoretical information. The elastic properties of WZ InP (determined by PL under hydrostatic pressure) and the radiative recombination dynamics of spatially direct and indirect (namely, occurring across the WZ/ZB interfaces) transitions are also discussed. Section IV, focuses on the magneto-optical studies of WZ InP NWs. The diagram of the energy levels of excitons in WZ materials—with and without magnetic field—is first provided. Then, all theoretical and experimental information available about the changes in the transport properties (i.e., carrier effective mass) caused by the ZB→WZ phase variation are reviewed. Different NW/magnetic field geometrical configurations, sensitive to polarization selection rules, highlight anisotropies in the diamagnetic shifts, Zeeman splitting

  16. Diagnostics of helium plasma by collisional-radiative modeling and optical emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Wonwook; Kwon, Duck-Hee [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Optical diagnostics for the electron temperature (T{sub e}) and the electron density (n{sub e}) of fusion plasma is important for understanding and controlling the edge and the divertor plasmas in tokamak. Since the line intensity ratio method using the collisional-radiative modeling and OES (optical emission spectroscopy) is simple and does not disturb the plasma, many fusion devices with TEXTOR, JET, JT-60U, LHD, and so on, have employed the line intensity ratio method as a basic diagnostic tool for neutral helium (He I). The accuracy of the line intensity ratio method depends on the reliability of the cross sections and rate coefficients. We performed state-of-the-art R-matrix calculations including couplings up to n=7 states and the distorted wave (DW) calculations for the electron-impact excitation (EIE) cross sections of He I using the flexible atomic code (FAC). The collisional-radiative model for He I was constructed using the calculated the cross sections. The helium collisional-radiative model for He I was constructed to diagnose the electron temperature and the electron density of the plasma. The electron temperature and density were determined by using the line intensity ratio method.

  17. The accuracy of heavy ion optical model calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozik, T.

    1980-01-01

    There is investigated in detail the sources and magnitude of numerical errors in heavy ion optical model calculations. It is shown on example of 20 Ne + 24 Mg scattering at Esub(LAB)=100 MeV. (author)

  18. NLOM - a program for nonlocal optical model calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, B.T.; Kyum, M.C.; Hong, S.W.; Park, M.H.; Udagawa, T.

    1992-01-01

    A FORTRAN program NLOM for nonlocal optical model calculations is described. It is based on a method recently developed by Kim and Udagawa, which utilizes the Lanczos technique for solving integral equations derived from the nonlocal Schroedinger equation. (orig.)

  19. Multiple Scattering Model for Optical Coherence Tomography with Rytov Approximation

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Muxingzi

    2017-01-01

    of speckles due to multiple scatterers within the coherence length, and other random noise. Motivated by the above two challenges, a multiple scattering model based on Rytov approximation and Gaussian beam optics is proposed for the OCT setup. Some previous

  20. Electro-optical modeling of bulk heterojunction solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchartz, Thomas; Pieters, Bart E.; Taretto, Kurt; Rau, Uwe

    2008-11-01

    We introduce a model for charge separation in bulk heterojunction solar cells that combines exciton transport to the interface between donor and acceptor phases with the dissociation of the bound electron/hole pair. We implement this model into a standard semiconductor device simulator, thereby creating a convenient method to simulate the optical and electrical characteristics of a bulk heterojunction solar cell with a commercially available program. By taking into account different collection probabilities for the excitons in the polymer and the fullerene, we are able to reproduce absorptance, internal and external quantum efficiency, as well as current/voltage curves of bulk heterojunction solar cells. We further investigate the influence of mobilities of the free excitons as well as the mobilities of the free charge carriers on the performance of bulk heterojunction solar cells. We find that, in general, the highest efficiencies are achieved with the highest mobilities. However, an optimum finite mobility of free charge carriers can result from a large recombination velocity at the contacts. In contrast, Langevin-type of recombination cannot lead to finite optimum mobilities even though this mechanism has a strong dependence on the free carrier mobilities.

  1. Elastic scattering by hot electrons and apparent lifetime of longitudinal optical phonons in gallium nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khurgin, Jacob B., E-mail: jakek@jhu.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Bajaj, Sanyam; Rajan, Siddharth [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

    2015-12-28

    Longitudinal optical (LO) phonons in GaN generated in the channel of high electron mobility transistors (HEMT) are shown to undergo nearly elastic scattering via collisions with hot electrons. The net result of these collisions is the diffusion of LO phonons in the Brillouin zone causing reduction of phonon and electron temperatures. This previously unexplored diffusion mechanism explicates how an increase in electron density causes reduction of the apparent lifetime of LO phonons, obtained from the time resolved Raman studies and microwave noise measurements, while the actual decay rate of the LO phonons remains unaffected by the carrier density. Therefore, the saturation velocity in GaN HEMT steadily declines with increased carrier density, in a qualitative agreement with experimental results.

  2. Analytical solution of dispersion relations for the nuclear optical model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    VanderKam, J.M. [Center for Communications Research, Thanet Road, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States); Weisel, G.J. [Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, and Duke University, Box 90308, Durham, NC 27708-0308 (United States); Penn State Altoona, 3000 Ivyside Park, Altoona, PA 16601-3760 (United States); Tornow, W. [Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, and Duke University, Box 90308, Durham, NC 27708-0308 (United States)

    2000-12-01

    Analytical solutions of dispersion integral relations, linking the real and imaginary parts of the nuclear optical model, have been derived. These are displayed for some widely used forms of the volume- and surface-absorptive nuclear potentials. When the analytical solutions are incorporated into the optical-model search code GENOA, replacing a numerical integration, the code runs three and a half to seven times faster, greatly aiding the analysis of direct-reaction, elastic scattering data. (author)

  3. Morphology, optical and ionic conductivity studies of electron beam irradiated polymer electrolyte film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devendrappa, H.; Yesappa, L.; Niranjana, M.; Ashokkumar, S. P.; Vijeth, H.; Ganesh, S.

    2018-04-01

    The effects of electron beam (EB) irradiation on morphology, optical properties and ionic conductivity of (PVdF-co-HFP: LiClO4=90:10, PHL10) electrolyte films. The FESEM image reveal increasing porous morphology with increasing EB dose confirms the polymer degradation as result more amorphousity. The optical absorbance was found to be increase with red shift in UV region and direct optical band gaps was found decreased upon EB dose from 3.70 eV to 2.65 eV. The ionic conductivity increases slowly in lower frequency, whereas rapidly increases at the high frequency and found about 8.28×10-4 S/cm at 120 kGy dose. The obtained results suggest that the physical properties of polymer electrolytes can be changed using EB irradiation as requirement.

  4. Electronic and Optical Properties of TiS_2 Determined from Generalized Gradient Approximation Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Kouch, Hamza; Farh, Larbi El; Sayah, Jamal; Challioui, Allal

    2015-01-01

    The electronic and optical properties of TiS_2 are studied by using an ab-initio calculation within the frame of density functional theory. A linearized and augmented plane wave basis set with the generalized gradient approximation as proposed by Perdew et al. is used for the energy exchange-correlation determination. The results show a metallic character of TiS_2, and the plots of total and partial densities of states of TiS_2 show the metallic character of the bonds and a strong hybridization between the states d of Ti and p of S below the Fermi energy. The optical properties of the material such as real and imaginary parts of dielectric constant (ϵ(ω) = ϵ_1(ω) + iϵ_2(ω)), refractive index n(ω), optical reflectivity R(ω), for E//x and E//z are performed for the energy range of 0–14 eV. (paper)

  5. Real-time data acquisition and computation for the SSC using optical and electronic technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantrell, C.D.; Fenyves, E.J.; Wallace, B.

    1990-01-01

    The authors discuss combinations of optical and electronic technologies that may be able to address major data-filtering and data-analysis problems at the SSC. Novel scintillation detectors and optical readout may permit the use of optical processing techniques for trigger decisions and particle tracking. Very-high-speed fiberoptic local-area networks will be necessary to pipeline data from the detectors to the triggers and from the triggers to computers. High-speed, few-processor MIMD superconductors with advanced fiberoptic I/O technology offer a usable, cost-effective alternative to the microprocessor farms currently proposed for event selection and analysis for the SSC. The use of a real-time operating system that provides standard programming tools will facilitate all tasks, from reprogramming the detectors' event-selection criteria to detector simulation and event analysis. 34 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  6. Electronic and optical properties of phosphorene-like arsenic phosphorus: a many-body study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Huabing; Guo, Jiyuan

    2018-03-01

    By employing density functional and many-body perturbation theories, we explore the geometrics, quasiparticle band structure, and optical response of two-dimensional arsenic phosphorus (α-AsxP1-x). Calculations indicate that the α-AsxP1-x exhibits excellent stability at high temperature. The quasi-particle bandgap of α-AsxP1-x is highly tunable in a broad range of 1.54-2.14 eV depending on the composition. The optical absorption of α-AsxP1-x can cover the visible and ultraviolet regions, and is highly anisotropic. More interestingly, it is tunable to optical absorption of α-AsxP1-x when the composition continuously increased. Also, they have sizable exciton binding energies. These findings suggest that α-AsxP1-x holds great potentials for applications in high-performance electronics and optoelectronics.

  7. Using optically stimulated electrons from quartz for the estimation of natural doses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ankjærgaard, Christina; Murray, A.S.; Denby, Phil M.

    2009-01-01

    A flow-through Geiger-Müller pancake electron detector attachment has been fitted to a standard Risø TL/OSL reader enabling optically stimulated electrons (OSE) to be measured simultaneously with optically stimulated luminescence (OSL). Using this detector, OSE and OSL measurements from natural......, a dose recovery test shows that OSE can successfully recover a laboratory dose of 300 Gy given before any laboratory thermal treatment, for preheating temperatures between 160 and 260 °C. Furthermore, for the first time natural OSE decay curves are detected and these signals are used to estimate a burial...... dose using the single-aliquot regenerative-dose (SAR) procedure. Finally, a comparative study of the equivalent doses estimated using both OSE and OSL from 10 quartz samples are presented, and it is shown that OSE has a significant potential in retrospective dosimetry....

  8. Electronic and optical properties of new multifunctional materials via half-substituted hematite: First principles calculations

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Hua

    2012-01-01

    Electronic structure and optical properties of α-FeMO 3 systems (M = Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Cu, Cd or In) have been investigated using first principles calculations. All of the FeMO 3 systems have a large net magnetic moment. The ground state of pure α-Fe 2O 3 is an antiferromagnetic insulator. For M = Cu or Cd, the systems are half-metallic. Strong absorption in the visible region can be observed in the Cu and Cd-doped systems. Systems with M = Sc, Ti, V, Cr or In are not half-metallic and are insulators. The strongest peaks shift toward shorter wavelengths in the absorption spectra. It is concluded that transition metal doping can modify the electronic structure and optical properties of α-FeMO 3 systems. This journal is © 2012 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  9. Electronic structure and optical absorption spectra of Y2 and Zr2 dimers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutsev, G.L.

    1989-01-01

    The electron structure, ionization potentials from valent levels and energies of optic transitions of Y 2 and Zr 2 dimers are calculated within the framework of discrete-variatin X α -method. It is shown that the symmetry state 1 Σ g + is the main state of Y 2 and Zr 2 dimers, and the atoms in dimers have high-spin 4d n+1 5s 1 configuration. The chemical binding in Y 2 has the dominating 5s-5s nature which is revealed in a considerable interatomic distance; binding of 4d-electrons brings about a significant decrease in the bond length in Zr 2 dimer. The theoretical spectrum of optical absorption of Zr 2 agrees well with the obtained experimental spectrum of this molecule isolated in the organ matrix

  10. Study on time of flight property of electron optical systems by differential algebraic method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Min; Tang Tiantong; Yao Zhenhua

    2002-01-01

    Differential algebraic method is a powerful and promising technique in computer numerical analysis. When applied to nonlinear dynamics systems, the arbitrary high-order transfer properties of the systems can be computed directly with high precision. In this paper, the principle of differential algebra is applied to study on the time of flight (TOF) property of electron optical systems and their arbitrary order TOF transfer properties can be numerically calculated out. As an example, TOF transfer properties of a uniform magnetic sector field analyzer have been studied by differential algebraic method. Relative errors of the first-order and second-order TOF transfer coefficients of the magnetic sector field analyzer are of the order 10 -11 or smaller compared with the analytic solutions. It is proved that differential algebraic TOF method is of high accuracy and very helpful for high-order TOF transfer property analysis of electron optical systems. (author)

  11. Optical transition radiation measurements for the Los Alamos and Boeing Free-Electron Laser experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumpkin, A.H.; Feldman, R.B.; Feldman, D.W.; Apgar, S.A.; Calsten, B.E.; Fiorito, R.B.; Rule, D.W.

    1988-01-01

    Optical transition radiation (OTR) measurements of the electron-beam emittance have been performed at a location just before the wiggler in the Los Alamos Free-Electron Laser (FEL) experiment. Beam profiles and beam divergence patterns from a single macropulse were recorded simultaneously using two intensified charge-injection device (CID) television cameras and an optical beamsplitter. Both single-foil OTR and two-foil OTR interference experiments were performed. Preliminary results are compared to a reference variable quadrupole, single screen technique. New aspects of using OTR properties for pointing the e-beam on the FEL oscillator axis, as well as measuring e-beam emittance are addressed. 7 refs., 9 figs.

  12. Optical-electronic shape recognition system based on synergetic associative memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jun; Bao, Jie; Chen, Dingguo; Yang, Youqing; Yang, Xuedong

    2001-04-01

    This paper presents a novel optical-electronic shape recognition system based on synergetic associative memory. Our shape recognition system is composed of two parts: the first one is feature extraction system; the second is synergetic pattern recognition system. Hough transform is proposed for feature extraction of unrecognized object, with the effects of reducing dimensions and filtering for object distortion and noise, synergetic neural network is proposed for realizing associative memory in order to eliminate spurious states. Then we adopt an approach of optical- electronic realization to our system that can satisfy the demands of real time, high speed and parallelism. In order to realize fast algorithm, we replace the dynamic evolution circuit with adjudge circuit according to the relationship between attention parameters and order parameters, then implement the recognition of some simple images and its validity is proved.

  13. Alignment of Duke free electron laser storage ring and optical beam delivery system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emamian, M.; Hower, N.

    1999-01-01

    Duke Free Electron Laser Laboratory (DFELL) hosts a 1.1 GeV electron beam storage ring facility which is capable of generating beams in the range of nearly monochromatic gamma rays to high peak power infra red (IR) laser. In this report specifications and procedures for alignment of OK-4 /Duke storage ring FEL wiggler and optical cavity mirrors will be discussed. The OK-4 FEL lasing has demonstrated a series of world record in the last few years. In August of this year the OK-4 FEL successfully commissioned to laser at 193.7 nm. Also in this article, alignment of the γ-ray and UV optical beam delivery system that is currently in progress will be described. (authors)

  14. Electronic and optical properties of AgAlO{sub 2}: A first-principles study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhamu, K.C., E-mail: kcbhamu85@gmail.com; Priolkar, K.R.

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, we present electronic and optical properties of silver-based delafossite compound AgAlO{sub 2} (AAO). For the electronic properties, we have computed band structure and density of states. The origin of band structure is elucidated in terms of density of states. A significant contribution in band structure comes from Ag-4d and O-2p states around the Fermi level. The estimated band gap shows the indirect semiconducting nature of AAO having the band gap value of 2.34 eV. For the optical properties, we have calculated frequency dependent dielectric functions. The peaks in the imaginary component of dielectric function are explained by electronic transitions in the dispersion relation. Our computed results are in agreement with those available in the literature. The wide band gap and hence transparency for the UV and visible incident light photons makes AAO a precious material for transparent electronics. - Highlights: • Applied different-different types of exchange-correlations and potentials. • Becke–Johnson with Hubbard potential (BJ + U) is better for 2H-AgAlO{sub 2}. • Band gap is in reasonable agreement with experimentally reported. • Origin of energy bands is elucidated in terms of density of states. • 2H-AgAlO{sub 2} is a promising candidate for transparent electronics.

  15. Electronic and optical properties of AgAlO_2: A first-principles study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhamu, K.C.; Priolkar, K.R.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we present electronic and optical properties of silver-based delafossite compound AgAlO_2 (AAO). For the electronic properties, we have computed band structure and density of states. The origin of band structure is elucidated in terms of density of states. A significant contribution in band structure comes from Ag-4d and O-2p states around the Fermi level. The estimated band gap shows the indirect semiconducting nature of AAO having the band gap value of 2.34 eV. For the optical properties, we have calculated frequency dependent dielectric functions. The peaks in the imaginary component of dielectric function are explained by electronic transitions in the dispersion relation. Our computed results are in agreement with those available in the literature. The wide band gap and hence transparency for the UV and visible incident light photons makes AAO a precious material for transparent electronics. - Highlights: • Applied different-different types of exchange-correlations and potentials. • Becke–Johnson with Hubbard potential (BJ + U) is better for 2H-AgAlO_2. • Band gap is in reasonable agreement with experimentally reported. • Origin of energy bands is elucidated in terms of density of states. • 2H-AgAlO_2 is a promising candidate for transparent electronics.

  16. All-optical time-resolved measurement of laser energy modulation in a relativistic electron beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Xiang

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available We propose and demonstrate an all-optical method to measure laser energy modulation in a relativistic electron beam. In this scheme the time-dependent energy modulation generated from the electron-laser interaction in an undulator is converted into time-dependent density modulation with a chicane, which is measured to infer the laser energy modulation. The method, in principle, is capable of simultaneously providing information on femtosecond time scale and 10^{-5} energy scale not accessible with conventional methods. We anticipate that this method may have wide applications in many laser-based advanced beam manipulation techniques.

  17. Electronic Structure and Optical Properties of Co and Fe doped ZnO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Chunping

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available First-principle ultrasoft pseudo potential approach of the plane wave based on density functional theory has been used for studying the electronic characterization and optical properties of ZnO and Fe, Co doped ZnO. The results show that the doping impurities change the lattice parameters a little, but bring more changes in the electronic structures. The band gaps are broadened by doping. And the Fermi level accesses to the conduction band which will lead the system to show the character of metallic properties. The dielectric function and absorption peaks are identified and the changes compared to pure ZnO are analyzed in detail.

  18. Photoabsorption Spectrum and Optically Forbidden Transitions of Krypton by Electron Impact

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苑震生; 朱林繁; 李文斌; 成华东; 徐克尊

    2002-01-01

    A high resolution fast electron energy loss spectrometer with multi-channel energy analysis was employed. The maxima just above the threshold 4p-1(2P1/2), which is regarded as a shape resonance, was obtained at 16.3 eV. The optically forbidden excitations of 4s electron were measured for the first time, and the energy positions are 23.75 eV(4s-15s), 25.66 eV (4s-16s/4d) and 26.60 eV(4s-17s/5d).

  19. Electronic states and optical properties of single donor in GaN conical quantum dot with spherical edge

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Aouami, A.; Feddi, E.; El-Yadri, M.; Aghoutane, N.; Dujardin, F.; Duque, C. A.; Phuc, Huynh Vinh

    2018-02-01

    In this paper we present a theoretical investigation of quantum confinement effects on the electron and single donor states in GaN conical quantum dot with spherical edge. In the framework of the effective mass approximation, the Schrödinger equations of electron and donor have been solved analytically in an infinite potential barrier model. Our calculations show that the energies of electron and donor impurity are affected by the two characteristic parameters of the structure which are the angle Ω and the radial dimension R. We show that, despite the fact that the reduction of the two parameters Ω and R leads to the same confinement effects, the energy remains very sensitive to the variation of the radial part than the variation of the angular part. The analysis of the photoionization cross-section corresponding to optical transitions between the conduction band and the first donor energy level shows clearly that the reduction of the radius R causes a shift in resonance peaks towards the high energies. On the other hand, the optical transitions between 1 s - 1 p , 1 p - 1 d and 1 p - 2 s show that the increment of the conical aperture Ω (or reduction of R) implies a displacement of the excitation energy to higher energies.

  20. Design of all-optical, hot-electron current-direction-switching device based on geometrical asymmetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumarasinghe, Chathurangi S; Premaratne, Malin; Gunapala, Sarath D; Agrawal, Govind P

    2016-02-18

    We propose a nano-scale current-direction-switching device(CDSD) that operates based on the novel phenomenon of geometrical asymmetry between two hot-electron generating plasmonic nanostructures. The proposed device is easy to fabricate and economical to develop compared to most other existing designs. It also has the ability to function without external wiring in nano or molecular circuitry since it is powered and controlled optically. We consider a such CDSD made of two dissimilar nanorods separated by a thin but finite potential barrier and theoretically derive the frequency-dependent electron/current flow rate. Our analysis takes in to account the quantum dynamics of electrons inside the nanorods under a periodic optical perturbation that are confined by nanorod boundaries, modelled as finite cylindrical potential wells. The influence of design parameters, such as geometric difference between the two nanorods, their volumes and the barrier width on quality parameters such as frequency-sensitivity of the current flow direction, magnitude of the current flow, positive to negative current ratio, and the energy conversion efficiency is discussed by considering a device made of Ag/TiO2/Ag. Theoretical insight and design guidelines presented here are useful for customizing our proposed CDSD for applications such as self-powered logic gates, power supplies, and sensors.

  1. Electronic, magnetic and optical properties of B, C, N and F doped MgO monolayer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghadam, A. Dashti; Maskane, P.; Esfandiari, S.

    2018-06-01

    MgO as one of the alkaline earth oxides has various applications in industry. In this work, we aim to investigate the electronic, optical and magnetic properties of MgO monolayers. Furthermore, monolayer structures with substituted B, N, C and F atoms instead of O atom are studied. These results indicate that MgO layer has possessed potential application in optoelectronic and spintronic nano-devices.

  2. The measurement of the optical cavity length for the infrared free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curtis, C.J.; Dahlberg, J.C.; Oren, W.A.; Tremblay, K.J.

    1999-01-01

    One of the final tasks involved in the alignment of the newly constructed Free Electron Laser at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility was to accurately measure the length between two mirrors which make up the optical cavity. This presentation examines the survey techniques and equipment assembled in order to complete these measurements, together with the possible sources of error, and the accuracy achieved. (authors)

  3. Electron accelerator with a laser ignition for investigation of beam plasma by optical methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kabanov, S.N.; Korolev, A.A.; Kul'beda, V.E.; Razumovskij, A.I.; Trukhin, V.A.

    1990-01-01

    Facility to conduct investigations into dense gas beam plasma is described. Facility comprises: electron accelerator (200-300 keV, 5kA, 20ns), OGM-40 ignition ruby laser LZhI-501 diagnostic laser (with 0.55-0.66 μm tunable wave length), Michelson interferometer and diagnostic equipment for optical measurements. Laser ignition of spark gap is introduced to strong synchronization (±10ns) of radiation pulse of diagnostic laser with beam current pulse

  4. Improved rate control for electron-beam evaporation and evaluation of optical performance improvements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gevelber, Michael; Xu, Bing; Smith, Douglas

    2006-03-01

    A new deposition-rate-control and electron-beam-gun (e-gun) strategy was developed that significantly reduces the growth-rate variations for e-beam-deposited SiO2 coatings. The resulting improvements in optical performance are evaluated for multilayer bandpass filters. The adverse effect of uneven silica-source depletion on coating spectral performances during long deposition runs is discussed.

  5. Electron and nuclear spin interactions in the optical spectra of single GaAs quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gammon, D; Efros, A L; Kennedy, T A; Rosen, M; Katzer, D S; Park, D; Brown, S W; Korenev, V L; Merkulov, I A

    2001-05-28

    Fine and hyperfine splittings arising from electron, hole, and nuclear spin interactions in the magneto-optical spectra of individual localized excitons are studied. We explain the magnetic field dependence of the energy splitting through competition between Zeeman, exchange, and hyperfine interactions. An unexpectedly small hyperfine contribution to the splitting close to zero applied field is described well by the interplay between fluctuations of the hyperfine field experienced by the nuclear spin and nuclear dipole/dipole interactions.

  6. Elementary and advanced Lie algebraic methods with applications to accelerator design, electron microscopes, and light optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dragt, A.J.

    1987-01-01

    A review is given of elementary Lie algebraic methods for treating Hamiltonian systems. This review is followed by a brief exposition of advanced Lie algebraic methods including resonance bases and conjugacy theorems. Finally, applications are made to the design of third-order achromats for use in accelerators, to the design of subangstroem resolution electron microscopes, and to the classification and study of high order aberrations in light optics. (orig.)

  7. Use of thin films obtained by electron beam evaporation as optical wave guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nobre, S.A.A.; Oliveira, C.A.S. de; Freire, G.F.de O.

    1986-01-01

    Thin films evaporated by electron beam for the fabrication of planar optical waveguides were used. The tested materials were aluminium oxide (Al 2 O 3 ) and tantalum pentoxide (Ta 2 O 5 ). The effect of annealing conditions on the film absorption was investigated for Ta 2 O 5 . The Al 2 O 3 films were characterized by the method of guided modes, in terms of refractive index measurements and film thickness. Atenuation measurements were also carried out. (M.C.K.) [pt

  8. Tunable electronic, electrical and optical properties of graphene oxide sheets by ion irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayalakshmi, G.; Saravanan, K.; Panigrahi, B. K.; Sundaravel, B.; Gupta, Mukul

    2018-05-01

    The tunable electronic, electrical and optical properties of graphene oxide (GO) sheets were investigated using a controlled reduction by 500 keV Ar+-ion irradiation. The carbon to oxygen ratio of the GO sheets upon the ion beam reduction has been estimated using resonant Rutherford backscattering spectrometry analyses and its effect on the electrical and optical properties of GO sheets has been studied using sheet resistance measurements and photoluminescence (PL) measurements. The restoration of sp 2-hybridized carbon atoms within the sp 3 matrix is found to be increases with increasing the Ar+-ion fluences as evident from Fourier transform infrared, and x-ray absorption near-edge structure measurements. The decrease in the number of disorder-induced local density of states (LDOSs) within the π-π* gap upon the reduction causes the shifting of PL emission from near infra-red to blue region and decreases the sheet resistance. The improved electrical and optical properties of GO sheets were correlated to the decrease in the number of LDOSs within the π-π* gap. Our experimental investigations suggest ion beam irradiation is one of an effective approaches to reduce GO to RGO and to tailor its electronic, electrical and optical properties.

  9. The relationship between optical guiding and the relative phase in free-electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freund, H.P.; Antonsen, T.M. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper the relationship between the relative phase and optical guiding in the free-electron laser is studied. The relative phase in this case is defined as the shift in the wavenumber from the vacuum value integrated over the interaction length. In terms of the optical guiding of the signal in free-electron lasers, the relative phase must be positive in order for refractive guiding of the signal to occur. The relative phase is studied from the standpoint of the linear stability analysis in both the high- and low-gain regimes, and the qualitative implications in each of these regimes of the relative phase on the refractive guiding of the signal are identical. Specifically, the relative phase is found to be negative at the low-frequency over this band until it turns positive at a frequency approximately 10% below the frequency of peak gain. Thus optical guiding is indicated over a large portion, but not all, of the gain band. A quantitative measure of the optical guiding of the signal is obtained by an analytic formulation of the guiding of the signal. This formulation is based upon a separable beam approximation in which the evolution of the signal is determined by a Green's function analysis. The specific example of interest involves the low-gain regime prior to saturation. In this case, it is shown that the analytic result is in substantial agreement with the calculation of the relative phase

  10. The electronic and optical properties of amorphous silica with hydrogen defects by ab initio calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Dahua; Xiang, Baoyan; Hu, Cheng; Qian, Kai; Cheng, Xinlu

    2018-04-01

    Hydrogen can be trapped in the bulk materials in four forms: interstitial molecular H2, interstitial atom H, O‑H+(2Si=O–H)+, Si‑H‑( {{4O}}\\bar \\equiv {{Si&x2212H}})‑ to affect the electronic and optical properties of amorphous silica. Therefore, the electronic and optical properties of defect-free and hydrogen defects in amorphous silica were performed within the scheme of density functional theory. Initially, the negative charged states hydrogen defects introduced new defect level between the valence band top and conduction band bottom. However, the neutral and positive charged state hydrogen defects made both the valence band and conduction band transfer to the lower energy. Subsequently, the optical properties such as absorption spectra, conductivity and loss functions were analyzed. It is indicated that the negative hydrogen defects caused the absorption peak ranging from 0 to 2.0 eV while the positive states produced absorption peaks at lower energy and two strong absorption peaks arose at 6.9 and 9.0 eV. However, the neutral hydrogen defects just improved the intensity of absorption spectrum. This may give insights into understanding the mechanism of laser-induced damage for optical materials. Project supported by the Science and Technology of Hubei Provincial Department of Education (No. B2017098).

  11. 5 CFR 532.267 - Special wage schedules for aircraft, electronic, and optical instrument overhaul and repair...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... manufacturing. 334418 Printed circuit assembly (electronic assembly) manufacturing. 334419 Other electronic..., electronic, and optical instrument overhaul and repair positions in Puerto Rico. 532.267 Section 532.267 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PREVAILING RATE SYSTEMS...

  12. Optical Propagation Modeling for the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, W H; Auerbach, J M; Henesian, M A; Jancaitis, K S; Manes, K R; Mehta, N C; Orth, C D; Sacks, R A; Shaw, M J; Widmayer, C C

    2004-01-12

    Optical propagation modeling of the National Ignition Facility has been utilized extensively from conceptual design several years ago through to early operations today. In practice we routinely (for every shot) model beam propagation starting from the waveform generator through to the target. This includes the regenerative amplifier, the 4-pass rod amplifier, and the large slab amplifiers. Such models have been improved over time to include details such as distances between components, gain profiles in the laser slabs and rods, transient optical distortions due to the flashlamp heating of laser slabs, measured transmitted and reflected wavefronts for all large optics, the adaptive optic feedback loop, and the frequency converter. These calculations allow nearfield and farfield predictions in good agreement with measurements.

  13. A robust fibre laser system for electro-optic electron bunch profile measurements at FLASH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wissmann, Laurens-Georg

    2012-08-01

    For the electro-optic measurement of electron bunch profiles at FLASH a robust ytterbium doped fibre laser (YDFL) system has been developed consisting of a laser oscillator and a two-staged amplifier. The oscillator is designed to meet the specifications of high reliability and low noise operation. The amplifier makes use of tailored nonlinearity to enhance the spectral bandwidth of the output laser pulses. Active repetition rate control enables sub-picosecond synchronisation of the laser to the accelerator reference RF. Using a two-stage gating scheme the output pulse train repetition rate is adopted to the accelerator repetition rate. An experimental site used for electro-optic electron bunch diagnostics has been redesigned to support single-shot bunch profile measurements based on spectral decoding. An existing bunch profile monitor with a similar laser system was upgraded and electro-optic bunch profile measurements were conducted, allowing for a comparison with measurements done with other longitudinal electron bunch diagnostics and with former measurements.

  14. A robust fibre laser system for electro-optic electron bunch profile measurements at FLASH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wissmann, Laurens-Georg

    2012-08-15

    For the electro-optic measurement of electron bunch profiles at FLASH a robust ytterbium doped fibre laser (YDFL) system has been developed consisting of a laser oscillator and a two-staged amplifier. The oscillator is designed to meet the specifications of high reliability and low noise operation. The amplifier makes use of tailored nonlinearity to enhance the spectral bandwidth of the output laser pulses. Active repetition rate control enables sub-picosecond synchronisation of the laser to the accelerator reference RF. Using a two-stage gating scheme the output pulse train repetition rate is adopted to the accelerator repetition rate. An experimental site used for electro-optic electron bunch diagnostics has been redesigned to support single-shot bunch profile measurements based on spectral decoding. An existing bunch profile monitor with a similar laser system was upgraded and electro-optic bunch profile measurements were conducted, allowing for a comparison with measurements done with other longitudinal electron bunch diagnostics and with former measurements.

  15. Optical and x-ray imaging of electron beams using synchrotron emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilke, M.

    1995-01-01

    In the case of very low emittance electron and positron storage ring beams, it is impossible to make intrusive measurements of beam properties without increasing the emittance and possibly disrupting the beam. In cases where electron or positron beams have high average power densities (such as free electron laser linacs), intrusive probes such as wires and optical transition radiation screens or Cherenkov emitting screens can be easily damaged or destroyed. The optical and x-ray emissions from the bends in the storage rings and often from linac bending magnets can be used to image the beam profile to obtain emittance information about the beam. The techniques, advantages and limitations of using both optical and x-ray synchrotron emission to measure beam properties are discussed and the possibility of single bunch imaging is considered. The properties of suitable imagers and converters such as phosphors are described. Examples of previous, existing and planned applications are given where available, including a pinhole imaging system currently being designed for the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory

  16. Optical and x-ray imaging of electron beams using synchrotron emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilke, M.D.

    1994-01-01

    In the case of very low eniittance electron and positron storage ring beams, it is impossible to make intrusive measurements of beam properties without increasing the emittance and possibly disrupting the beam. In cases where electron or positron beams have high average power densities (such as free electron laser linacs), intrusive probes such as wires and optical transition radiation screens or Cherenkov emitting screens can be easily damaged or destroyed. The optical and x-ray emissions from the bends in the storage rings and often from linac bending magnets can be used to image the beam profile to obtain emittance information about the beam. The techniques, advantages and limitations of using both optical and x-ray synchrotron emission to measure beam properties are discussed and the possibility of single bunch imaging is considered. The properties of suitable imagers and converters such as phosphors are described. Examples of previous, existing and planned applications are given where available, including a pinhole imaging system currently being designed for the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory

  17. Multidisciplinary Modelling Tools for Power Electronic Circuits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahman, Amir Sajjad

    in reliability assessment of power modules, a three-dimensional lumped thermal network is proposed to be used for fast, accurate and detailed temperature estimation of power module in dynamic operation and different boundary conditions. Since an important issue in the reliability of power electronics...... environment to be used for optimization of cooling system layout with respect to thermal resistance and pressure drop reductions. Finally extraction of electrical parasitics in the multi-chip power modules will be investigated. As the switching frequency of power devices increases, the size of passive...... components are reduced considerably that leads to increase of power density and cost reduction. However, electrical parasitics become more challenging with increasing the switching frequency and paralleled chips in the integrated and denser packages. Therefore, electrical parasitic models are analyzed based...

  18. Optical Transient-Grating Measurements of Spin Diffusion and Relaxation in a Two-Dimensional Electron Gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, Christopher P.

    2005-01-01

    Spin diffusion in n-GaAs quantum wells, as measured by our optical transient-grating technique, is strongly suppressed relative to that of charge. Over a broad range of temperatures and dopings, the suppression of Ds relative to Dc agrees quantitatively with the prediction of ''spin Coulomb dra'' theory, which takes into account the exchange of spin in electron-electron collisions. Moreover, the spin-diffusion length, Ls, is a nearly constant 1 micrometer over the same range of T and n, despite Ds's varying by nearly two orders of magnitude. This constancy supports the D'yakonov-Perel'-Kachorovskii model of spin relaxation through interrupted precessional dephasing in the spin-orbit field

  19. Electronic band structure, optical, dynamical and thermodynamic properties of cesium chloride (CsCl from first-principles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingol Suat

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The geometric structural optimization, electronic band structure, total density of states for valence electrons, density of states for phonons, optical, dynamical, and thermodynamical features of cesium chloride have been investigated by linearized augmented plane wave method using the density functional theory under the generalized gradient approximation. Ground state properties of cesium chloride are studied. The calculated ground state properties are consistent with experimental results. Calculated band structure indicates that the cesium chloride structure has an indirect band gap value of 5.46 eV and is an insulator. From the obtained phonon spectra, the cesium chloride structure is dynamically stable along the various directions in the Brillouin zone. Temperature dependent thermodynamic properties are studied using the harmonic approximation model.

  20. Optical Transient-Grating Measurements of Spin Diffusion andRelaxation in a Two-Dimensional Electron Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Christopher Phillip [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Spin diffusion in n-GaAs quantum wells, as measured by our optical transient-grating technique, is strongly suppressed relative to that of charge. Over a broad range of temperatures and dopings, the suppression of Ds relative to Dc agrees quantitatively with the prediction of ''spin Coulomb dra'' theory, which takes into account the exchange of spin in electron-electron collisions. Moreover, the spin-diffusion length, Ls, is a nearly constant 1 micrometer over the same range of T and n, despite Ds's varying by nearly two orders of magnitude. This constancy supports the D'yakonov-Perel'-Kachorovskii model of spin relaxation through interrupted precessional dephasing in the spin-orbit field.

  1. Final Technical Report [Scalable methods for electronic excitations and optical responses of nanostructures: mathematics to algorithms to observables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saad, Yousef

    2014-03-19

    The master project under which this work is funded had as its main objective to develop computational methods for modeling electronic excited-state and optical properties of various nanostructures. The specific goals of the computer science group were primarily to develop effective numerical algorithms in Density Functional Theory (DFT) and Time Dependent Density Functional Theory (TDDFT). There were essentially four distinct stated objectives. The first objective was to study and develop effective numerical algorithms for solving large eigenvalue problems such as those that arise in Density Functional Theory (DFT) methods. The second objective was to explore so-called linear scaling methods or Methods that avoid diagonalization. The third was to develop effective approaches for Time-Dependent DFT (TDDFT). Our fourth and final objective was to examine effective solution strategies for other problems in electronic excitations, such as the GW/Bethe-Salpeter method, and quantum transport problems.

  2. Structural, electronic, and optical properties of GaInO{sub 3}: A hybrid density functional study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, V., E-mail: wangvei@icloud.com; Ma, D.-M.; Liu, R.-J.; Yang, C.-M. [Department of Applied Physics, Xi' an University of Technology, Xi' an 710054 (China); Xiao, W. [State Key Lab of Nonferrous Metals and Processes, General Research Institute for Nonferrous Metals, Beijing 100088 (China)

    2014-01-28

    The structural, electronic, and optical properties of GaInO{sub 3} have been studied by first-principles calculations based on Heyd-Scuseria-Ernzerhof hybrid functional theory. The optical properties, including the optical reflectivity, refractive index, extinction coefficient, absorption coefficient, and electron energy loss are discussed for radiation up to 60 eV together with the calculated electronic structure. Our results predicted that GaInO{sub 3} displays good transparency over the whole vision region, which is in good agreement with the experimental data available in the literature.

  3. Measurement and modelization of silica opal optical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avoine, Amaury; Hong, Phan Ngoc; Frederich, Hugo; Aregahegn, Kifle; Bénalloul, Paul; Coolen, Laurent; Schwob, Catherine; Thu Nga, Pham; Gallas, Bruno; Maître, Agnès

    2014-03-01

    We present the synthesis process and optical characterization of artificial silica opals. The specular reflection spectra are analyzed and compared to band structure calculations and finite difference time domain (FDTD) simulations. The silica optical index is a key parameter to correctly describe an opal and is usually not known and treated as a free parameter. Here we propose a method to infer the silica index, as well as the silica spheres diameter, from the reflection spectra and we validate it by comparison with two independent infrared methods for the index and, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements for the spheres diameter.

  4. Measurement and modelization of silica opal optical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avoine, Amaury; Ngoc Hong, Phan; Frederich, Hugo; Aregahegn, Kifle; Bénalloul, Paul; Coolen, Laurent; Schwob, Catherine; Gallas, Bruno; Maître, Agnès; Thu Nga, Pham

    2014-01-01

    We present the synthesis process and optical characterization of artificial silica opals. The specular reflection spectra are analyzed and compared to band structure calculations and finite difference time domain (FDTD) simulations. The silica optical index is a key parameter to correctly describe an opal and is usually not known and treated as a free parameter. Here we propose a method to infer the silica index, as well as the silica spheres diameter, from the reflection spectra and we validate it by comparison with two independent infrared methods for the index and, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements for the spheres diameter. (paper)

  5. Acute optic nerve sheath fenestration with the free-electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jin-Hui; Casagrande, Vivien A.; Joos, Karen M.; Shetlar, Debra J.; Robinson, Richard D.; Head, William S.; Mavity-Hudson, Julia A.; Nunnally, Amy H.

    1999-06-01

    Purpose: To determine if the free electron laser (FEL) energy can be delivered to a small space to perform optic nerve sheath fenestration with minimal acute nerve damage. Methods: A 530 mm hollow waveguide probe was designed. Optic nerve sheath fenestration (1.0 mm diameter) was performed in 8 rabbits using either the FEL (4 eyes, 6.45mm, 10 Hz, 2 mJ) or a knife (4 eyes). Within 2 hours following surgery, the animals were perfused with aldehyde fixative. The integrity of the optic nerve and glial response at the site of fenestration were evaluated on tissue selections with H&E, and antibodies to S100β or GFAP. Results: Surgery using the FEL probe was found to be technically superior to the knife. The glial reaction was limited to a zone adjacent to the fenestration and was similar in both the FEL and knife incisions. Conclusions: The FEL appears capable of efficiently performing an optic nerve sheath fenestration in a small space with minimal acute damage. Both the FEL and knife incisions result in a rapid glial response at the site of fenestration even when optic nerve integrity is not compromised.

  6. Calculation of real optical model potential for heavy ions in the framework of the folding model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncharov, S.A.; Timofeyuk, N.K.; Kazacha, G.S.

    1987-01-01

    The code for calculation of a real optical model potential in the framework of the folding model is realized. The program of numerical Fourier-Bessel transformation based on Filon's integration rule is used. The accuracy of numerical calculations is ∼ 10 -4 for a distance interval up to a bout (2.5-3) times the size of nuclei. The potentials are calculated for interactions of 3,4 He with nuclei from 9 Be to 27 Al with different effective NN-interactions and densities obtained from electron scattering data. Calculated potentials are similar to phenomenological potentials in Woods-Saxon form. With calculated potentials the available elastic scattering data for the considered nuclei in the energy interval 18-56 MeV are analysed. The needed renormalizations for folding potentials are < or approx. 20%

  7. Modeling illumination performance of plastic optical fiber passive daylighting system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sulaiman, F; Ahmad, A [Universiti Teknologi MARA, Shah Alam (Malaysia). Faculty of Electrical Engineering; Ahmed, A Z [Universiti Teknologi MARA, Shah Alam (Malaysia). Bureau of Reseaarch and Consultancy

    2006-12-15

    of the most direct methods of utilizing solar energy for energy conservation is to bring natural light indoors to light up an area. This paper reports on the investigation of the feasibility to utilize large core optical fibers to convey and distribute solar light passively throughout residential or commercial structures. The focus of this study is on the mathematical modeling of the illumination performance and the light transmission efficiency of solid core end light fiber for optical day lighting systems. The Meatball simulations features the optical fiber transmittance for glass and plastic fibers, illumination performance over lengths of plastic end-lit fiber, spectral transmission, light intensity loss through the large diameter solid core optical fibers as well as the transmission efficiency of the optical fiber itself. It was found that plastic optical fiber has less transmission loss over the distance of the fiber run which clearly shows that the Plastic Optical Fiber should be optimized for emitting visible light. The findings from the analysis on the performance of large diameter optical fibers for day lighting systems seems feasible for energy efficient lighting system in commercial or residential buildings.

  8. Modeling illumination performance of plastic optical fiber passive daylighting system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulaiman, F.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmed, A.Z.

    2006-01-01

    One of the most direct methods of utilizing solar energy for energy conservation is to bring natural light indoors to light up an area. This paper reports on the investigation of the feasibility to utilize large core optical fibers to convey and distribute solar light passively throughout residential or commercial structures. The focus of this study is on the mathematical modeling of the illumination performance and the light transmission efficiency of solid core end light fiber for optical day lighting systems. The Meatball simulations features the optical fiber transmittance for glass and plastic fibers, illumination performance over lengths of plastic end-lit fiber, spectral transmission, light intensity loss through the large diameter solid core optical fibers as well as the transmission efficiency of the optical fiber itself. It was found that plastic optical fiber has less transmission loss over the distance of the fiber run which clearly shows that the Plastic Optical Fiber should be optimized for emitting visible light. The findings from the analysis on the performance of large diameter optical fibers for day lighting systems seems feasible for energy efficient lighting system in commercial or residential buildings

  9. Generic distortion model for metrology under optical microscopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xingjian; Li, Zhongwei; Zhong, Kai; Chao, YuhJin; Miraldo, Pedro; Shi, Yusheng

    2018-04-01

    For metrology under optical microscopes, lens distortion is the dominant source of error. Previous distortion models and correction methods mostly rely on the assumption that parametric distortion models require a priori knowledge of the microscopes' lens systems. However, because of the numerous optical elements in a microscope, distortions can be hardly represented by a simple parametric model. In this paper, a generic distortion model considering both symmetric and asymmetric distortions is developed. Such a model is obtained by using radial basis functions (RBFs) to interpolate the radius and distortion values of symmetric distortions (image coordinates and distortion rays for asymmetric distortions). An accurate and easy to implement distortion correction method is presented. With the proposed approach, quantitative measurement with better accuracy can be achieved, such as in Digital Image Correlation for deformation measurement when used with an optical microscope. The proposed technique is verified by both synthetic and real data experiments.

  10. Optical synchronization of a free-electron laser with femtosecond precision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loehl, F.

    2009-09-15

    High-gain free-electron lasers (FELs) are capable of generating sub-10 fs long light pulses. In order to take full advantage of these extremely short light pulses in time-resolved experiments, synchronization with a so far unprecedented timing accuracy is required. Within this thesis, an optical synchronization system providing sub-10 fs stability has been developed and was implemented at the ultra-violet and soft X-ray free-electron laser FLASH at DESY, Hamburg. The system uses a mode-locked laser as a timing reference. The laser pulses are distributed via length stabilized optical fiber-links to the remote locations. A key feature of the system is a bunch arrival-time monitor detecting the electron bunch arrival-time with an unrivaled resolution of 6 fs. A feedback system based on the arrival-time monitor was established, improving the arrival-time fluctuations from 200 fs in the unstabilized case to 25 fs with active feedback. In order to achieve the high peak current of several thousand amperes required for the FEL process, the electron bunches are longitudinally compressed in two magnetic chicanes. A second feedback system was developed stabilizing the bunch compression process based on measurements of diffraction radiation. The combination of both feedback systems improves the stability of the FEL radiation significantly. (orig.)

  11. Optical synchronization of a free-electron laser with femtosecond precision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loehl, F.

    2009-09-01

    High-gain free-electron lasers (FELs) are capable of generating sub-10 fs long light pulses. In order to take full advantage of these extremely short light pulses in time-resolved experiments, synchronization with a so far unprecedented timing accuracy is required. Within this thesis, an optical synchronization system providing sub-10 fs stability has been developed and was implemented at the ultra-violet and soft X-ray free-electron laser FLASH at DESY, Hamburg. The system uses a mode-locked laser as a timing reference. The laser pulses are distributed via length stabilized optical fiber-links to the remote locations. A key feature of the system is a bunch arrival-time monitor detecting the electron bunch arrival-time with an unrivaled resolution of 6 fs. A feedback system based on the arrival-time monitor was established, improving the arrival-time fluctuations from 200 fs in the unstabilized case to 25 fs with active feedback. In order to achieve the high peak current of several thousand amperes required for the FEL process, the electron bunches are longitudinally compressed in two magnetic chicanes. A second feedback system was developed stabilizing the bunch compression process based on measurements of diffraction radiation. The combination of both feedback systems improves the stability of the FEL radiation significantly. (orig.)

  12. Ultrafast electron-optical phonon scattering and quasiparticle lifetime in CVD-grown graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Jingzhi; Yu, Ting; Lin, Jianyi; Gurzadyan, Gagik G

    2011-04-26

    Ultrafast quasiparticle dynamics in graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) has been studied by UV pump/white-light probe spectroscopy. Transient differential transmission spectra of monolayer graphene are observed in the visible probe range (400-650 nm). Kinetics of the quasiparticle (i.e., low-energy single-particle excitation with renormalized energy due to electron-electron Coulomb, electron-optical phonon (e-op), and optical phonon-acoustic phonon (op-ap) interactions) was monitored with 50 fs resolution. Extending the probe range to near-infrared, we find the evolution of quasiparticle relaxation channels from monoexponential e-op scattering to double exponential decay due to e-op and op-ap scattering. Moreover, quasiparticle lifetimes of mono- and randomly stacked graphene films are obtained for the probe photon energies continuously from 1.9 to 2.3 eV. Dependence of quasiparticle decay rate on the probe energy is linear for 10-layer stacked graphene films. This is due to the dominant e-op intervalley scattering and the linear density of states in the probed electronic band. A dimensionless coupling constant W is derived, which characterizes the scattering strength of quasiparticles by lattice points in graphene.

  13. Electronic and optical properties of GaN under pressure: DFT calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javaheri, Sahar; Boochani, Arash; Babaeipour, Manuchehr; Naderi, Sirvan

    2017-12-01

    Optical and electronic properties of ZB, RS and WZ structures of gallium nitride (GaN) are studied in equilibrium and under pressure using the first-principles calculation in the density functional theory (DFT) framework to obtain quantities like dielectric function, loss function, reflectance and absorption spectra, refractive index and their relation parameters. The electronic properties are studied using EV-GGA and GGA approximations and the results calculated by EV-GGA approximation were found to be much closer to the experimental results. The interband electron transitions are studied using the band structure and electron transition peaks in the imaginary part of the dielectric function; these transitions occur in three structures from N-2p orbital to Ga-4s and Ga-4p orbitals in the conduction band. Different optical properties of WZ structure were calculated in two polarization directions of (100) and (001) and the results were close to each other. Plasmon energy corresponding to the main peak of the energy-loss function in RS with the value of 26 eV was the highest one, which increased under pressure. In general, RS shows more different properties than WZ and ZB.

  14. Electro-optic sampling for time resolving relativistic ultrafast electron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scoby, C. M.; Musumeci, P.; Moody, J.; Gutierrez, M.; Tran, T.

    2009-01-01

    The Pegasus laboratory at UCLA features a state-of-the-art electron photoinjector capable of producing ultrashort (<100 fs) high-brightness electron bunches at energies of 3.75 MeV. These beams recently have been used to produce static diffraction patterns from scattering off thin metal foils, and it is foreseen to take advantage of the ultrashort nature of these bunches in future pump-probe time-resolved diffraction studies. In this paper, single shot 2-d electro-optic sampling is presented as a potential technique for time of arrival stamping of electron bunches used for diffraction. Effects of relatively low bunch charge (a few 10's of pC) and modestly relativistic beams are discussed and background compensation techniques to obtain high signal-to-noise ratio are explored. From these preliminary tests, electro-optic sampling is suitable to be a reliable nondestructive time stamping method for relativistic ultrafast electron diffraction at the Pegasus lab.

  15. Experimental and modelling study of pulsed optically stimulated luminescence in quartz, marble and beta irradiated salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pagonis, V; Mian, S M; Barnold, C; Chithambo, M L; Christensen, E

    2009-01-01

    Optical stimulation luminescence (OSL) signals can be obtained using continuous-wave optical stimulation (CW-OSL), the linear modulation optical stimulation method (LM-OSL) and the time-resolved optical stimulation (TR-OSL) method. During TR-OSL measurements, the stimulation and emission of luminescence are experimentally separated in time by using short light pulses. This paper presents new TR-OSL data for annealed high purity synthetic quartz, for marble and for commercially available iodized salt. A new type of behaviour for TR-OSL signals for quartz and iodized salt is presented, in which the OSL signal exhibits a nonmonotonic behaviour during optical stimulation; this type of behaviour has not been reported previously in the literature for quartz. Furthermore, a luminescence component with very long luminescence lifetime is reported for some quartz aliquots, which may be due to the presence of a delayed-OSL (DOSL) mechanism in quartz. A new kinetic model for TR-OSL in quartz is presented, which is based on a main electron trap and on several luminescence centres. The model is used to quantitatively fit several sets of experimental data of pulsed optically stimulated luminescence from quartz.

  16. A Model for Teaching Electronic Commerce Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howard C. Woodard

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available The teaching of information technology in an ever-changing world at universities presents a challenge. Are courses taught as concepts, while ignoring hands-on courses, leaving the hands-on classes to the technical colleges or trade schools? Does this produce the best employees for industry or give students the knowledge and skills necessary to function in a high-tech world? At GeorgiaCollege & StateUniversity (GC&SU a model was developed that combines both concepts and practical hands-on skill to meet this challenge. Using this model, a program was developed that consists of classroom lecture of concepts as well as practical hands-on exercises for mastering the knowledge and developing the skills necessary to succeed in the high-tech world of electronic commerce. The students become productive day one of a new job assignment. This solves the problem of students having the "book knowledge" but not knowing how to apply what has been learned.

  17. Deep-lying hole states in the optical model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klevansky, S.P.; Lemmer, R.H.

    1982-01-01

    The strength function for deep-lying hole states in an optical potential is studied by the method of Green's functions. The role of isospin is emphasized. It is shown that, while the main trends of the experimental data on hole states in isotopes of Sn and Pd can be described by an energy independent optical potential, intermediate structures in these data indicate the specific nuclear polarization effects have to be included. This is done by introducing doorway states of good isospin into the optical model potential. Such states consist of neutron hole plus proton core vibrations as well as more complicated excitations that are analog states of proton hole plus neutron core vibrations of the parent nuclear system. Specific calculations for 115 Sn and 103 Pd give satisfactory fits to the strength function data using optical model and doorway state parameters that are reasonable on physical grounds

  18. ECISVIEW. An interactive toolbox for optical model development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koning, A.J.; Van Wijk, J.J.; Delaroche, J.P.

    1997-01-01

    The software package ECISVIEW is a graphical interface built around the multi-disciplinary nuclear reaction code ECIS-95. The key feature of the working method is that the user can specify the value of optical potential parameters as any mathematical function of the energy, A, Z or user defined parameters. This enables us to obtain conveniently the optimal optical potential parameters for a given nucleus over the whole energy region of interest. ECISVIEW makes it possible to simultaneously study the dependence of all calculated angular distributions, polarizations and total cross sections on optical model parameters. This method is perhaps more than 100 times faster than the conventional method of preparing an input file, running the code, editing the output file and finally viewing the data with a graphical program. As an example, a spherical 0-200 MeV nucleon optical model for 90 Zr is presented. A demonstration of ECISVIEW has been given at this Specialist's Meeting. (author)

  19. Optical properties of alkali halide crystals from all-electron hybrid TD-DFT calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webster, R., E-mail: ross.webster07@imperial.ac.uk; Harrison, N. M. [Thomas Young Centre, Department of Chemistry, Imperial College London, South Kensington, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Bernasconi, L. [Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, STFC, Harwell Oxford, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)

    2015-06-07

    We present a study of the electronic and optical properties of a series of alkali halide crystals AX, with A = Li, Na, K, Rb and X = F, Cl, Br based on a recent implementation of hybrid-exchange time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) (TD-B3LYP) in the all-electron Gaussian basis set code CRYSTAL. We examine, in particular, the impact of basis set size and quality on the prediction of the optical gap and exciton binding energy. The formation of bound excitons by photoexcitation is observed in all the studied systems and this is shown to be correlated to specific features of the Hartree-Fock exchange component of the TD-DFT response kernel. All computed optical gaps and exciton binding energies are however markedly below estimated experimental and, where available, 2-particle Green’s function (GW-Bethe-Salpeter equation, GW-BSE) values. We attribute this reduced exciton binding to the incorrect asymptotics of the B3LYP exchange correlation ground state functional and of the TD-B3LYP response kernel, which lead to a large underestimation of the Coulomb interaction between the excited electron and hole wavefunctions. Considering LiF as an example, we correlate the asymptotic behaviour of the TD-B3LYP kernel to the fraction of Fock exchange admixed in the ground state functional c{sub HF} and show that there exists one value of c{sub HF} (∼0.32) that reproduces at least semi-quantitatively the optical gap of this material.

  20. Electron spin control and torsional optomechanics of an optically levitated nanodiamond in vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tongcang; Hoang, Thai; Ahn, Jonghoon; Bang, Jaehoon

    Electron spins of diamond nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers are important quantum resources for nanoscale sensing and quantum information. Combining such NV spin systems with levitated optomechanical resonators will provide a hybrid quantum system for many novel applications. Here we optically levitate a nanodiamond and demonstrate electron spin control of its built-in NV centers in vacuum. We observe that the strength of electron spin resonance (ESR) is enhanced when the air pressure is reduced. We also observe that oxygen and helium gases have different effects on both the photoluminescence and the ESR contrast of nanodiamond NV centers, indicating potential applications of NV centers in oxygen gas sensing. For spin-optomechanics, it is important to control the orientation of the nanodiamond and NV centers in a magnetic field. Recently, we have observed the angular trapping and torsional vibration of a levitated nanodiamond, which paves the way towards levitated torsional optomechanics in the quantum regime. NSF 1555035-PHY.

  1. Optical Absorption and Electron Injection of 4-(Cyanomethylbenzoic Acid Based Dyes: A DFT Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuehua Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Density functional theory (DFT and time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT calculations were carried out to study the ground state geometries, electronic structures, and absorption spectra of 4-(cyanomethylbenzoic acid based dyes (AG1 and AG2 used for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs. The excited states properties and the thermodynamical parameters of electron injection were studied. The results showed that (a two dyes have uncoplanar structures along the donor unit and conjugated bridge space, (b two sensitizers exhibited intense absorption in the UV-Vis region, and (c the excited state oxidation potential was higher than the conduction band edge of TiO2 photoanode. As a result, a solar cell based on the 4-(cyanomethylbenzoic acid based dyes exhibited well photovoltaic performance. Furthermore, nine dyes were designed on the basis of AG1 and AG2 to improve optical response and electron injection.

  2. The limits of the electron optical parameters of asymmetric double pipecol magnetic objective lenses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-khashab, A. M.; Abas, K. A.

    1997-01-01

    The asymmetrical magnetic electron lens is of great importance for the electron microscopes intended for high resolution. Such lenses are determined not only by its geometric structure and shape parameters but also by the gap width to bore diameter (S/D) of its pole pieces. a systematic investigation has been carried out for asymmetric objective lenses having different bore diameters. The results indicate that the op per h ore diameter of pole piece lens has considerable effects on the electron optical properties. The Comparison between the two sets of the family of asymmetric lenses provides good performance, and suggests that the ratio of the lens gap width to the bore diameters of its pole pieces (S/ D 1 /D 2 =3) are favourable. (authors). 9 refs., 9 figs

  3. Optical and Morphological Properties of Electron-Beam Irradiated High-Density Thin Poly Ethylene Films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Hamid, H. M.; Fawzy, Y.H.A.; El-Sayed, S.M.

    2005-01-01

    Effects of surface morphology alterations on the optical properties of the high-density polyethylene (HDPE) films irradiated by 1.5 MeV electron beam has been investigated. The irradiation doses were conducted at the values: 30, 135, 295 and 540 kGy, respectively. The changes induced in HDPE involved: the creation of free radicals, the formation of chemical bonds i.e., intermolecular crosslinking and irreversible cleavage of bonds in the main chain, which resulted in the fragmentation of the molecules. An Ultraviolet-Visible Spectrophotometer (UV-VIS) and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) were used to characterize the changes. Because the crosslinking (induced by electron irradiation) limits the movability of the HDPE molecular chains, the optical energy gap was then subjected to a change. It decreased from 4.41 to 3.22 eV with an increasing electron dose up to 540 kGy. At a higher dose of irradiation (540 kGy), degradation of HDPE rather than crosslinking was raised. The irradiated HDPE films indicated that the crosslinking and degradation are likely to have an effect on their surface morphologies. The physical properties of polymeric materials can be modified by ionizing radiation in the form of gamma rays, X-rays and energetic electrons. High-energy electron beam is an especially useful tool in this regard (Cleland et al, 2003). Polymerizing, grafting, crosslinking and chain scission reactions can be initiated by irradiation. The results of such reactions can enhance the utility and value of commercial products. HDPE (CH2-CH2) has many attractive properties, such as an excellent chemical resistance, low friction and low moisture absorption

  4. DMSP optical and electron measurements in the vicinity of polar cap arcs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardy, D.A.; Burke, W.J.; Gussenhoven, M.S.

    1982-01-01

    We have completed an extensive analysis of the electron and optical data from the DMSP satellites for an external period of polar cap arc occurrences on December 12, 1977. The polar cap arcs are observed in three distinct intervals in a period of quieting after a time of intense substorm activity. The observation of polar cap arcs is associated with the admittance of large and variable fluxes of low-energy electrons into a major portion of both the northern and southern hemisphere polar caps. These fluxes fall into the following categories: First, nearly Maxwellian distributions of electrons with temperatures between 50 eV and 200 eV and number densities varying from 0.03/cm 3 to 4/cm 3 . The highest densities are found at the poleward boundary of the diffuse aurorae and near the visible polar cap arcs. The lowest densities are associated with the polar rain. Second, distributions of electrons peaked between 50 eV and 200 eV. These distributions result from accelertion of the cold Maxwellian distribution through a potential of 50 to 200 V without any heating of the electrons. Third, distributions of electrons displaying two populations; an intense low-energy component with a temperature of approx.20 eV and a much weaker high-energy component with a temperature of 180 eV. We interpret such distributions as evidence of direct admittance of magnetosheath electrons into the polar cap. Fourth,, distributions of electrons peaked at approx.1 keV. These distributions produce the visible arcs. They result from the acceleration of a two-component electron population with temperatures of 100 and 350 eV through a potential drop of approx.750 V

  5. Model of electron capture in low-temperature glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartczak, W.M.; Swiatla, D.; Kroh, J.

    1983-01-01

    The new model of electron capture by a statistical variety of traps in glassy matrices is proposed. The electron capture is interpreted as the radiationless transition (assisted by multiphonon emission) of the mobile electron to the localized state in the trap. The conception of 'unfair' and 'fair' traps is introduced. The 'unfair' trap captures the mobile electron by the shallow excited state. In contrast, the 'fair' trap captures the electron by the ground state. The model calculations of the statistical distributions of the occupied electron traps are presented and discussed with respect to experimental results. (author)

  6. An integrated electron and optical metallographic procedure for the identification of precipitate phases in type 316 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slattery, G.F.; O'Riordan, P.; Lambert, M.E.; Green, S.M.

    1981-01-01

    A sequential and integrated metallographic procedure has been developed and successfully employed to differentiate between carbide, sigma, chi, Laves and ferrite phases which are commonly encountered in type 316 austenitic steel. The experimental techniques of optical and electron microscopy to identify these phases have been outlined and provide a rapid and convenient method of characterizing the microstructure of the steel. The techniques sequence involves selective metallographic etching, Nomarski interference microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive microanalysis, transmission electron microscopy and electron diffraction. (author)

  7. Electronic band structure and optical properties of Srn+1TinO3n+1 Ruddlesden-Popper homologous series

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Reshak, Ali H; Auluck, S.; Kityk, I.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 47, č. 7 (2008), s. 5516-5520 ISSN 0021-4922 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : electronic structure * optical properties Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 1.309, year: 2008

  8. Quantum model for electro-optical amplitude modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capmany, José; Fernández-Pousa, Carlos R

    2010-11-22

    We present a quantum model for electro-optic amplitude modulation, which is built upon quantum models of the main photonic components that constitute the modulator, that is, the guided-wave beamsplitter and the electro-optic phase modulator and accounts for all the different available modulator structures. General models are developed both for single and dual drive configurations and specific results are obtained for the most common configurations currently employed. Finally, the operation with two-photon input for the control of phase-modulated photons and the important topic of multicarrier modulation are also addressed.

  9. Optical and electronic properties of microcrystalline silicon as a function of microcrystallinity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Daxing; Yue, Guozhen; Lorentzen, J. D.; Lin, Jing; Habuchi, H.; Wang, Qi

    2000-01-01

    Films were prepared by hot wire chemical vapor deposition at ∼240 degree sign C with varied hydrogen dilution ratios R=H 2 :SiH 4 from 1 to 20. The optical and electronic properties as a function of microcrystallinity were studied. We found: (a) At low H dilution R≤2, there is no measurable crystallinity by Raman spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction in the a-Si:H matrix, but an optical absorption peak at ∼1.25 eV appears; when R=2, the film shows the lowest subgap absorption, the highest photosensitivity, and the largest optical gap. (b) When R≥3, the c-Si phase is measurable by Raman and a low-energy photoluminescence (PL) band (0.84-1.0 eV) appears in addition to the high-energy band (1.3-1.4 eV). Meanwhile, all the absorption spectra show a featureless line shape. (c) An energy redshift is observed for both PL peaks as the film grows thicker. Finally, (d) the conductivity activation energy first decreases from 0.68 to 0.12 eV, then increases with increasing microcrystallinity. A mode of two sets of energy bands of electronic states for these two-phase materials is suggested. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics

  10. 'Diffraction-free' optical beams in inverse free electron laser accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, S.Y.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Marshall, T.C.

    1988-01-01

    'Diffraction-free' optical beams correspond to exact solutions of the wave equation in free space with the remarkable property that they propagate with negligible transverse spreading for distances much larger than the Rayleigh range. The requirement for this to occur is a large aperture. Using a 2D computer code, we find that these optical beams will also propagate with negligible diffraction even when perturbed by the electron beam in an IFEL; indeed they match well the FEL requirement for the accelerator. The numerical simulations are performed for the proposed facility at Brookhaven in which λ s =10 μm, B=1.5 T (linearly tapered l w =1.31-6.28 cm) and the optical beam power is either 8x10 11 W or 2.3x10 10 W. Approximately 70% of the electrons constituting a beam of current 5 mA or 15 A, radius 0.14 mm and initial energy of 50 MeV is accelerated at 50 MeV/m. (orig.)

  11. Research on lightning stroke model and characteristics of electronic transformer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Mu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the reliability of power supply, a large number of electronic voltage and current transformers are used in digital substations. In this paper, the mathematical model of the electronic transformer is analyzed firstly, and its circuit model is given. According to the difference of working characteristics between voltage transformer and current transformer, the circuit model of voltage type electronic transformer and current type electronic transformer is given respectively. By analyzing their broadband transmission characteristics, the accuracy of the model is verified, and their lightning analysis models are obtained.

  12. Formation of low time-bandwidth product, single-sided exponential optical pulses in free-electron laser oscillators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MacLeod, A. M.; Yan, X.; Gillespie, W. A.; Knippels, G.M.H.; Oepts, D.; van der Meer, A. F. G.; Rella, C. W.; Smith, T. J.; Schwettman, H. A.

    2000-01-01

    The detailed shape of picosecond optical pulses from a free-electron laser (FEL) oscillator has been studied for various cavity detunings. For large values of the cavity detuning the optical pulse develops an exponential leading edge, with a time constant proportional to the applied cavity detuning

  13. Optical linear algebra processors - Noise and error-source modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casasent, D.; Ghosh, A.

    1985-01-01

    The modeling of system and component noise and error sources in optical linear algebra processors (OLAPs) are considered, with attention to the frequency-multiplexed OLAP. General expressions are obtained for the output produced as a function of various component errors and noise. A digital simulator for this model is discussed.

  14. Optical linear algebra processors: noise and error-source modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casasent, D; Ghosh, A

    1985-06-01

    The modeling of system and component noise and error sources in optical linear algebra processors (OLAP's) are considered, with attention to the frequency-multiplexed OLAP. General expressions are obtained for the output produced as a function of various component errors and noise. A digital simulator for this model is discussed.

  15. Event-based Simulation Model for Quantum Optics Experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Raedt, H.; Michielsen, K.; Jaeger, G; Khrennikov, A; Schlosshauer, M; Weihs, G

    2011-01-01

    We present a corpuscular simulation model of optical phenomena that does not require the knowledge of the solution of a wave equation of the whole system and reproduces the results of Maxwell's theory by generating detection events one-by-one. The event-based corpuscular model gives a unified

  16. Optical Associative Memory Model With Threshold Modification Using Complementary Vector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Shaoping; Xu, Kebin; Hong, Jing

    1989-02-01

    A new criterion to evaluate the similarity between two vectors in associative memory is presented. According to it, an experimental research about optical associative memory model with threshold modification using complementary vector is carried out. This model is capable of eliminating the posibility to recall erroneously. Therefore the accuracy of reading out is improved.

  17. Event-Based Corpuscular Model for Quantum Optics Experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michielsen, K.; Jin, F.; Raedt, H. De

    A corpuscular simulation model of optical phenomena that does not require the knowledge of the solution of a wave equation of the whole system and reproduces the results of Maxwell's theory by generating detection events one-by-one is presented. The event-based corpuscular model is shown to give a

  18. The Watanabe model for 6Li-nucleus optical potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abul-Magd, A.Y.; Rabie, A.; El-Gazzar, M.A.

    1980-09-01

    Optical potentials for the scattering of 6 Li projectiles are calculated using the Watanabe model and an α+d cluster model wave function for 6 Li. Reasonable fits to the elastic differential cross-section and vector polarization are obtained. (author)

  19. Optical-model analysis of exotic atom data. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batty, C.J.

    1981-01-01

    Data for kaonic atoms are fitted using a simple optical model with a potential proportional to the nuclear density. Very satisfactory fits to strong interaction shift and width values are obtained but difficulties in fitting yield values indicate that the model is not completely satisfactory. The potential strength can be related to the free kaon-nucleon scattering lengths using a model due to Deloff. A good overall representation of the data is obtained with a black-sphere model. (orig.)

  20. A Novel Rodent Model of Posterior Ischemic Optic Neuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Brown, Dale P.; Duan, Yuanli; Kong, Wei; Watson, Brant D.; Goldberg, Jeffrey L.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To develop a reliable, reproducible rat model of posterior ischemic optic neuropathy (PION) and study the cellular responses in the optic nerve and retina. Methods Posterior ischemic optic neuropathy was induced in adult rats by photochemically induced ischemia. Retinal and optic nerve vasculature was examined by fluorescein isothiocyanate–dextran extravasation. Tissue sectioning and immunohistochemistry were used to investigate the pathologic changes. Retinal ganglion cell survival at different times after PION induction, with or without neurotrophic application, was quantified by fluorogold retrograde labeling. Results Optic nerve injury was confirmed after PION induction, including local vascular leakage, optic nerve edema, and cavernous degeneration. Immunostaining data revealed microglial activation and focal loss of astrocytes, with adjacent astrocytic hypertrophy. Up to 23%, 50%, and 70% retinal ganglion cell loss was observed at 1 week, 2 weeks, and 3 weeks, respectively, after injury compared with a sham control group. Experimental treatment by brain-derived neurotrophic factor and ciliary neurotrophic factor remarkably prevented retinal ganglion cell loss in PION rats. At 3 weeks after injury, more than 40% of retinal ganglion cells were saved by the application of neurotrophic factors. Conclusions Rat PION created by photochemically induced ischemia is a reproducible and reliable animal model for mimicking the key features of human PION. Clinical Relevance The correspondence between the features of this rat PION model to those of human PION makes it an ideal model to study the pathophysiologic course of the disease, most of which remains to be elucidated. Furthermore, it provides an optimal model for testing therapeutic approaches for optic neuropathies. PMID:23544206