WorldWideScience

Sample records for electron laser applications

  1. Applications for Energy Recovering Free Electron Lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George Neil

    2007-08-01

    The availability of high-power, high-brilliance sources of tunable photons from energy-recovered Free Electron Lasers is opening up whole new fields of application of accelerators in industry. This talk will review some of the ideas that are already being put into production, and some of the newer ideas that are still under development.

  2. Applications of laser printing for organic electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaporte, Ph.; Ainsebaa, A.; Alloncle, A.-P.; Benetti, M.; Boutopoulos, C.; Cannata, D.; Di Pietrantonio, F.; Dinca, V.; Dinescu, M.; Dutroncy, J.; Eason, R.; Feinaugle, M.; Fernández-Pradas, J.-M.; Grisel, A.; Kaur, K.; Lehmann, U.; Lippert, T.; Loussert, C.; Makrygianni, M.; Manfredonia, I.; Mattle, T.; Morenza, J.-L.; Nagel, M.; Nüesch, F.; Palla-Papavlu, A.; Rapp, L.; Rizvi, N.; Rodio, G.; Sanaur, S.; Serra, P.; Shaw-Stewart, J.; Sones, C. L.; Verona, E.; Zergioti, I.

    2013-03-01

    The development of organic electronic requires a non contact digital printing process. The European funded e-LIFT project investigated the possibility of using the Laser Induced Forward Transfer (LIFT) technique to address this field of applications. This process has been optimized for the deposition of functional organic and inorganic materials in liquid and solid phase, and a set of polymer dynamic release layer (DRL) has been developed to allow a safe transfer of a large range of thin films. Then, some specific applications related to the development of heterogeneous integration in organic electronics have been addressed. We demonstrated the ability of LIFT process to print thin film of organic semiconductor and to realize Organic Thin Film Transistors (OTFT) with mobilities as high as 4 10-2 cm2.V-1.s-1 and Ion/Ioff ratio of 2.8 105. Polymer Light Emitting Diodes (PLED) have been laser printed by transferring in a single step process a stack of thin films, leading to the fabrication of red, blue green PLEDs with luminance ranging from 145 cd.m-2 to 540 cd.m-2. Then, chemical sensors and biosensors have been fabricated by printing polymers and proteins on Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) devices. The ability of LIFT to transfer several sensing elements on a same device with high resolution allows improving the selectivity of these sensors and biosensors. Gas sensors based on the deposition of semiconducting oxide (SnO2) and biosensors for the detection of herbicides relying on the printing of proteins have also been realized and their performances overcome those of commercial devices. At last, we successfully laser-printed thermoelectric materials and realized microgenerators for energy harvesting applications.

  3. Workshop on scientific and industrial applications of free electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Difilippo, F.C.; Perez, R.B.

    1990-05-01

    A Workshop on Scientific and Industrial Applications of Free Electron Lasers was organized to address potential uses of a Free Electron Laser in the infrared wavelength region. A total of 13 speakers from national laboratories, universities, and the industry gave seminars to an average audience of 30 persons during June 12 and 13, 1989. The areas covered were: Free Electron Laser Technology, Chemistry and Surface Science, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Condensed Matter, and Biomedical Applications, Optical Damage, and Optoelectronics

  4. CERN's web application updates for electron and laser beam technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Sigas, Christos

    2017-01-01

    This report describes the modifications at CERN's web application for electron and laser beam technologies. There are updates at both the front and the back end of the application. New electron and laser machines were added and also old machines were updated. There is also a new feature for printing needed information.

  5. Laser applications in the electronics and optoelectronics industry in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washio, Kunihiko

    1999-07-01

    This paper explains current status and technological trends in laser materials processing applications in electronics and optoelectronics industry in Japan. Various laser equipment based on solid state lasers or gas lasers such as excimer lasers or CO2 lasers has been developed and applied in manufacturing electronic and optoelectronic devices to meet the strong demands for advanced device manufacturing technologies for high-performance, lightweight, low power-consumption portable digital electronic appliances, cellular mobile phones, personal computers, etc. Representative applications of solid-state lasers are, opaque and clear defects repairing of photomasks for LSIs and LCDs, trimming of thick-film chip resistors and low resistance metal resistors, laser cutting and drilling of thin films for high-pin count semiconductor CSP packages, laser patterning of thin-film amorphous silicon solar cells, and laser welding of electronic components such as hard-disk head suspensions, optical modules, miniature relays and lithium ion batteries. Compact and highly efficient diode- pumped and Q-switched solid-state lasers in second or third harmonic operation mode are now being increasingly incorporated in various laser equipment for fine material processing. Representative applications of excimer lasers are, sub-quarter micron design-rule LSI lithography and low- temperature annealing of poly-silicon TFT LCD.

  6. Biological applications of ultraviolet free-electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutherland, J.C.

    1997-10-01

    This review examines the possibilities for biological research using the three ultraviolet free-electron lasers that are nearing operational status in the US. The projected operating characteristics of major interest in biological research of the free-electron lasers at Brookhaven National Laboratory, the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, and Duke University are presented. Experimental applications in the areas of far- and vacuum ultraviolet photophysics and photochemistry, structural biology, environmental photobiology, and medical research are discussed and the prospects for advances in these areas, based upon the characteristics of the new ultraviolet free-electron lasers, are evaluated

  7. Optimization and application of electron acceleration in relativistic laser plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koenigstein, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    This thesis describes experiments and simulations of the acceleration of electrons to relativistic energies (toward γ e ∼ 10 3 ) by structures in plasmas which are generated by ultrashort (pulse length < 10 -14 s) laser pulses. The first part of this work discusses experiments in a parameter space where quasimonoenergetic electron bunches are generated in subcritical (gaseous) plasmas and compares them to analytical scalings. A primary concern in this work is to optimize the stability of the energy and the pointing of the electrons. The second part deals with acceleration of electrons along the surface of solid substrates by laser-plasma interaction. The measurements show good agreement with existing analytical scalings and dedicated numerical simulations. In the third part, two new concepts for multi-stage acceleration will be presented and parameterised by analytical considerations and numerical simulations. The first method uses electron pairs, as produced in the first part, to transfer energy from the first bunch to the second by means of a plasma wave. The second method utilizes a low intensity laser pulse in order to inject electrons from a neutral gas into the accelerating phase of a plasma wave. The final chapter proposes and demonstrates a first application that has been developed in collaboration with ESA. The use of electron beams with exponential energy distribution, as in the second part of this work, offers the potential to investigate the resistance of electronic components against space radiation exposure.

  8. Applications of Free Electron Lasers in Biology and Medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelka, J.B.; Tybor, K.R.; Nietubyc, R.; Wrochna, G.

    2010-01-01

    The advent of free electron lasers opens up new opportunities to probe the dynamics of ultrafast processes and the structure of matter with unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution. New methods inaccessible with other known types of radiation sources can be developed, resulting in a breakthrough in deep understanding the fundamentals of life as well as in numerous medical and biological applications. In the present work the properties of free electron laser radiation that make the sources excellent for probing biological matter at an arbitrary wavelength, in a wide range of intensities and pulse durations are briefly discussed. A number of biophysical and biomedical applications of the new sources, currently considered among the most promising in the field, are presented. (author)

  9. Field Emitter Arrays for a Free Electron Laser Application

    CERN Document Server

    Shing-Bruce-Li, Kevin; Ganter, Romain; Gobrecht, Jens; Raguin, Jean Yves; Rivkin, Leonid; Wrulich, Albin F

    2004-01-01

    The development of a new electron gun with the lowest possible emittance would help reducing the total length and cost of a free electron laser. Field emitter arrays (FEAs) are an attractive technology for electron sources of ultra high brightness. Indeed, several thousands of microscopic tips can be deposited on a 1 mm diameter area. Electrons are then extracted by applying voltage to a first grid layer close to the tip apexes, the so called gate layer, and focused by a second grid layer one micrometer above the tips. The typical aperture diameter of the gate and the focusing layer is in the range of one micrometer. One challenge for such cathodes is to produce peak currents in the ampere range since the usual applications of FEAs require less than milliampere. Encouraging peak current performances have been obtained by applying voltage pulses at low frequency between gate and tips. In this paper we report on different tip materials available on the market: diamond FEAs from Extreme Devices Inc., ZrC single ...

  10. Free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortega, J.M.; Billardon, M.

    1986-01-01

    Operation principle of a laser and an oscillator are recalled together with the klystron one. In the free electron laser, electrons go through an undulator or an optical klystron. Principles of the last one are given. The two distinct ways of producing coherent radiation with an undulator and an optical klystron are presented. The first one is the use of the free electron laser, the second is to make use of the spontaneous emission generation (harmonics generation). The different current types of free electron lasers are presented (Stanford, Los Alamos, Aco at Orsay). Prospects and applications are given in conclusion [fr

  11. Accelerator for medical applications and electron acceleration by laser plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosokai, Tomonao; Uesaka, Mitsuru

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the current status of radiation therapies in Japan and updated medical accelerators are reviewed. For medical use, there is a strong demand of a compact and flexible accelerator. At present, however, we have only two choices of the S-band linac with one or two rotation axis combined with the multi leaf collimator, or the X-band linac with a rather flexible robotic arm. In addition, the laser plasma cathode that is the second generation of the laser wake-field accelerator (LWFA) is studied as a high-quality electron source for medical use though it is still at the stage of the basic research. The potential of LWFA as medical accelerator near future is discussed based on updated results of laser plasma cathode experiment in Univ. of Tokyo. (author)

  12. Scaling of electron beam sources for laser fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlitt, L.G.; Bradley, L.P.

    1975-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a scheme for constructing electron beam machines capable of pumping large volumes of gas, to analyze their performance within the framework of existing knowledge of the physical mechanisms involved, to use this analysis to assess the viability of the overall concept, pinpoint weaknesses in the understanding of the physics, identify the most important limiting physical processes, and hence to propose a program to prepare for the eventual construction of a large scale gas laser system. (auth)

  13. Design of a compact application-oriented free-electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, K. C. D.; Meier, K.; Nguyen, D.; Sheffield, R.; Wang, T. S.; Warren, R. W.; Wilson, W.; Young, L. M.

    The goal of the Advanced Free-Electron Laser Project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory is to demonstrate that a free-electron laser (FEL) suitable for industrial, medical, and research applications can be built. This FEL system should be efficient, compact, robust, and user-friendly. To achieve this goal, we have incorporated advanced components presently available. Electrons produced by a photoelectron source are accelerated to 20 MeV by a high-brightness accelerator. They are transported by an emittance-preserving beamline with permanent-magnet quadrupoles and dipoles. The electron beam has excellent instantaneous beam quality better than: 2.5 (pi) mm mrad in transverse emittance and 0.3 percent in energy spread at a Peak current up to 310 A. It is used to excite a FEL oscillator with a pulsed-current microwiggler. Including operation at higher harmonics, the laser wavelength extends from 3.7 to 0.4 microns.

  14. Microwave free-electron laser applications for electron cyclotron heating of plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomassen, K.

    1990-01-01

    Millimeter wave power may be the ideal source of heat for the plasma, but advances in technology are needed to meet requirements of next generation fusion devices. Free electron lasers (FEL) are one candidate for such sources, and this paper reviews the progress, issues of physics and technology, and potential benefits for fusion from these devices

  15. Microwave free-electron laser applications for electron cyclotron heating of plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomassen, K.I.

    1990-01-01

    Millimeter wave power may be the ideal source of heat for a plasma, but advances in technology are needed to meet requirements of next generation fusion devices. Free electron lasers (FEL) are one candidate for such sources, and this paper reviews the progress, issues of physics and technology, and potential benefits for fusion from these devices. 15 refs., 13 figs

  16. Production and applications of quasi-monoenergetic electron bunches in laser-plasma based accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glinec, Y.; Faure, J.; Ewald, F.; Lifschitz, A.; Malka, V.

    2006-01-01

    Plasmas are attractive media for the next generation of compact particle accelerators because they can sustain electric fields larger than those in conventional accelerators by three orders of magnitude. However, until now, plasma-based accelerators have produced relatively poor quality electron beams even though for most practical applications, high quality beams are required. In particular, beams from laser plasma-based accelerators tend to have a large divergence and very large energy spreads, meaning that different particles travel at different speeds. The combination of these two problems makes it difficult to utilize these beams. Here, we demonstrate the production of high quality and high energy electron beams from laser-plasma interaction: in a distance of 3 mm, a very collimated and quasi-monoenergetic electron beam is emitted with a 0.5 nanocoulomb charge at 170 ± 20 MeV. In this regime, we have observed very nonlinear phenomena, such as self-focusing and temporal self-shortenning down to 10 fs durations. Both phenomena increase the excitation of the wakefield. The laser pulse drives a highly nonlinear wakefield, able to trap and accelerate plasma background electrons to a single energy. We will review the different regimes of electron acceleration and we will show how enhanced performances can be reached with state-of-the-art ultrashort laser systems. Applications such as gamma radiography of such electron beams will also be discussed

  17. Laser ablation principles and applications

    CERN Document Server

    1994-01-01

    Laser Ablation provides a broad picture of the current understanding of laser ablation and its many applications, from the views of key contributors to the field. Discussed are in detail the electronic processes in laser ablation of semiconductors and insulators, the post-ionization of laser-desorbed biomolecules, Fourier-transform mass spectroscopy, the interaction of laser radiation with organic polymers, laser ablation and optical surface damage, laser desorption/ablation with laser detection, and laser ablation of superconducting thin films.

  18. Synchrotron light sources and free-electron lasers accelerator physics, instrumentation and science applications

    CERN Document Server

    Khan, Shaukat; Schneider, Jochen; Hastings, Jerome

    2016-01-01

    Hardly any other discovery of the nineteenth century did have such an impact on science and technology as Wilhelm Conrad Röntgen’s seminal find of the X-rays. X-ray tubes soon made their way as excellent instruments for numerous applications in medicine, biology, materials science and testing, chemistry and public security. Developing new radiation sources with higher brilliance and much extended spectral range resulted in stunning developments like the electron synchrotron and electron storage ring and the freeelectron laser. This handbook highlights these developments in fifty chapters. The reader is given not only an inside view of exciting science areas but also of design concepts for the most advanced light sources. The theory of synchrotron radiation and of the freeelectron laser, design examples and the technology basis are presented. The handbook presents advanced concepts like seeding and harmonic generation, the booming field of Terahertz radiation sources and upcoming brilliant light sources dri...

  19. Design of a compact application-oriented free-electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, K.C.D.; Meier, K.; Nguyen, D.; Sheffield, R.; Wang, T.S.; Warren, R.W.; Wilson, W.; Young, L.M.

    1992-01-01

    The goal of the Advanced Free-Electron Laser Project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory is to demonstrate that a free-electron laser (FEL) suitable for industrial, medical, and research applications can be built. This FEL system should be efficient, compact, robust, and user-friendly. To achieve this goal, we have incorporated advanced components presently available. Electrons produced by a photoelectron source are accelerated to 20 MeV by a high-brightness accelerator. They are transported by an emittance-preserving beamline with permanent-magnet quadrupoles and dipoles. The electron beam has excellent instantaneous beam quality better than: 2.5 π mm mrad in transverse emittance and 0.3% in energy spread at a Peak current up to 310 A. It is used to excite a FEL oscillator with a pulsed-current microwiggler. Including operation at higher harmonics, the laser wavelength extends from 3.7 μm to 0.4 μm

  20. Medical Application of Free Electron Laser Trasmittance using Hollow Optical Fiber

    CERN Document Server

    Suzuki, Sachiko; Ishii, Katsonuri

    2004-01-01

    Mid-infrared Free Electron Laser (FEL) is expected as new application for biomedical surgery. However, delivery of MIR-FEL into the body is difficult because the common glass optical fibers have strong absorption at MIR region. A good operational and flexible line for FEL is required at medical field. A Hollow optical fiber is developed for IR laser and high-power laser delivery. We evaluated the fiber for FEL transmission line. This fiber is coated with cyclic olefin polymer (COP) and silver thin film on the inside of glass capillary tube. It is 700 μm-bore and 1m in lengths. The fiber transmission loss of the measured wavelength region of 5.5 μm to 12 μm is less than 1dB/m when the fiber is straight and 1.2 dB/m when bent to radius of 20 cm. Additionally, the output beam profile and the pulse structure is not so different form incidence beam. In conclusion, the fiber is suitable for delivery of the FEL energy for applications in medical and laser surgery.

  1. High-power free-electron lasers-technology and future applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Socol, Yehoshua

    2013-03-01

    Free-electron laser (FEL) is an all-electric, high-power, high beam-quality source of coherent radiation, tunable - unlike other laser sources - at any wavelength within wide spectral region from hard X-rays to far-IR and beyond. After the initial push in the framework of the “Star Wars” program, the FEL technology benefited from decades of R&D and scientific applications. Currently, there are clear signs that the FEL technology reached maturity, enabling real-world applications. E.g., successful and unexpectedly smooth commissioning of the world-first X-ray FEL in 2010 increased in one blow by more than an order of magnitude (40×) wavelength region available by FEL technology and thus demonstrated that the theoretical predictions just keep true in real machines. Experience of ordering turn-key electron beamlines from commercial companies is a further demonstration of the FEL technology maturity. Moreover, successful commissioning of the world-first multi-turn energy-recovery linac demonstrated feasibility of reducing FEL size, cost and power consumption by probably an order of magnitude in respect to previous configurations, opening way to applications, previously considered as non-feasible. This review takes engineer-oriented approach to discuss the FEL technology issues, keeping in mind applications in the fields of military and aerospace, next generation semiconductor lithography, photo-chemistry and isotope separation.

  2. X-ray free electron laser and its application to 3-dimensional imaging of non-crystalline nano-structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, Tetsuya

    2007-01-01

    The Laser in the X-ray region has been anticipated to be realized as a light source to probe the nano-world. Free electron lasers using high energy electron accelerators have been promising the candidates. The finding of the principle of Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE) resolved the technological difficulties accompanying the X-ray free electron laser, and the construction of large scale SASE facilities started in western countries. In Japan the construction of an SASE facility started in 2006 to be completed in 2010 at the site of the large synchrotron radiation facility, SPring-8 positioned as a 'critical technology of national importance' by the Japanese government. The principle of the X-ray free electron laser is explained and the outline of the Japanese facility construction plan is presented. Also the application of the X-ray laser to the imaging of non-crystalline nano-structure is introduced. (K.Yoshida)

  3. Novel Aspects of Materials Processing by Ultrafast Lasers: From Electronic to Biological and Cultural Heritage Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fotakis, C; Zorba, V; Stratakis, E; Athanassiou, A; Tzanetakis, P; Zergioti, I; Papagoglou, D G; Sambani, K; Filippidis, G; Farsari, M; Pouli, V; Bounos, G; Georgiou, S

    2007-01-01

    Materials processing by ultrafast lasers offers several distinct possibilities for micro/nano scale applications. This is due to the unique characteristics of the laser-matter interactions involved, when sub-picosecond pulses are employed. Prospects arising will be discussed in the context of surface and in bulk laser induced modifications. In particular, examples of diverse applications including the development and functionalization of laser engineered surfaces, the laser transfer of biomolecules and the functionalization of 3D structures constructed by three-photon stereolithography will be presented. Furthermore, the removal of molecular substrates by ultrafast laser ablation will be discussed with emphasis placed on assessing the photochemical changes induced in the remaining bulk material. The results indicate that in femtosecond laser processing of organic materials, besides the well acknowledged morphological advantages, a second fundamental factor responsible for its success pertains to the selective chemical effects. This is crucial for the laser cleaning of sensitive painted artworks

  4. Applications of free electron lasers and synchrotrons in industry and research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barletta, William A. [Dept. of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Cambridge MA (United States)

    2013-04-19

    Synchrotron radiation sources have had a profound effect on both science and technology from their beginnings decades ago as parasitic operations on accelerators for high energy physics. Now the general area of photon science has opened up new experimental techniques which have become the mainstay tools of materials science, surface physics, protein crystallography, and nanotechnology. With the promise of ultra-bright beams from the latest generation of storage rings and free electron lasers with full coherence, the tools of photon science promise to open a new area of mesoscale science and technology as well as prove to be a disruptive wildcard in the search for sustainable energy technologies. This review will survey a range of applications and explore in greater depth the potential applications to EUV lithography and to technologies for solar energy.

  5. Applications of free-electron lasers to measurements of energy transfer in biopolymers and materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Glenn S.; Johnson, J. B.; Kozub, John A.; Tribble, Jerri A.; Wagner, Katrina

    1992-08-01

    Free-electron lasers (FELs) provide tunable, pulsed radiation in the infrared. Using the FEL as a pump beam, we are investigating the mechanisms for energy transfer between localized vibrational modes and between vibrational modes and lattice or phonon modes. Either a laser-Raman system or a Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer will serve as the probe beam, with the attribute of placing the burden of detection on two conventional spectroscopic techniques that circumvent the limited response of infrared detectors. More specifically, the Raman effect inelastically shifts an exciting laser line, typically a visible frequency, by the energy of the vibrational mode; however, the shifted Raman lines also lie in the visible, allowing for detection with highly efficient visible detectors. With regards to FTIR spectroscopy, the multiplex advantage yields a distinct benefit for infrared detector response. Our group is investigating intramolecular and intermolecular energy transfer processes in both biopolymers and more traditional materials. For example, alkali halides contain a number of defect types that effectively transfer energy in an intermolecular process. Similarly, the functioning of biopolymers depends on efficient intramolecular energy transfer. Understanding these mechanisms will enhance our ability to modify biopolymers and materials with applications to biology, medecine, and materials science.

  6. Dose properties of a laser accelerated electron beam and prospects for clinical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kainz, K.K.; Hogstrom, K.R.; Antolak, J.A.; Almond, P.R.; Bloch, C.D.; Chiu, C.; Fomytskyi, M.; Raischel, F.; Downer, M.; Tajima, T.

    2004-01-01

    Laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) technology has evolved to where it should be evaluated for its potential as a future competitor to existing technology that produces electron and x-ray beams. The purpose of the present work is to investigate the dosimetric properties of an electron beam that should be achievable using existing LWFA technology, and to document the necessary improvements to make radiotherapy application for LWFA viable. This paper first qualitatively reviews the fundamental principles of LWFA and describes a potential design for a 30 cm accelerator chamber containing a gas target. Electron beam energy spectra, upon which our dose calculations are based, were obtained from a uniform energy distribution and from two-dimensional particle-in-cell (2D PIC) simulations. The 2D PIC simulation parameters are consistent with those reported by a previous LWFA experiment. According to the 2D PIC simulations, only approximately 0.3% of the LWFA electrons are emitted with an energy greater than 1 MeV. We studied only the high-energy electrons to determine their potential for clinical electron beams of central energy from 9 to 21 MeV. Each electron beam was broadened and flattened by designing a dual scattering foil system to produce a uniform beam (103%>off-axis ratio>95%) over a 25x25 cm2 field. An energy window (ΔE) ranging from 0.5 to 6.5 MeV was selected to study central-axis depth dose, beam flatness, and dose rate. Dose was calculated in water at a 100 cm source-to-surface distance using the EGS/BEAM Monte Carlo algorithm. Calculations showed that the beam flatness was fairly insensitive to ΔE. However, since the falloff of the depth-dose curve (R 10 -R 90 ) and the dose rate both increase with ΔE, a tradeoff between minimizing (R 10 -R 90 ) and maximizing dose rate is implied. If ΔE is constrained so that R 10 -R 90 is within 0.5 cm of its value for a monoenergetic beam, the maximum practical dose rate based on 2D PIC is approximately 0.1 Gy min-1

  7. Applications of UV-storage ring free electron lasers: the case of super-ACO

    CERN Document Server

    Nahon, L; Couprie, Marie Emmanuelle; Merola, F; Dumas, P; Marsi, M; Taleb-Ibrahimi, A; Nutarelli, D; Roux, R; Billardon, M

    1999-01-01

    The potential of UV-storage ring free electron lasers (SRFELs) for the performance of original application experiments is shown with a special emphasis concerning their combination with the naturally synchronized synchrotron radiation (SR). The first two-color FEL+SR experiment, performed in surface science at Super-ACO is reported. The experimental parameters found to be the most important as gathered from the acquired experience, are underlined and discussed. Finally, future prospects for the scientific program of the Super-ACO FEL are presented with two-color experiments combining the FEL with SR undulator-based XUV and VUV beamlines as well as with a SR white light bending magnet beamline emiting in the IR-UV (20 mu m-0.25 mu m).

  8. Supersonic micro-jets and their application to few-cycle laser-driven electron acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmid, Karl

    2009-01-01

    This thesis covers the few-cycle laser-driven acceleration of electrons in a laser-generated plasma. The laser system employed in this work is a new development based on optical parametric chirped pulse amplification and is the only multi-TW few-cycle laser in the world. In the experiment, the laser beam is focused onto a supersonic helium gas jet which leads to the formation of a plasma channel. The laser pulse, having an intensity of 10 19 W/cm 2 propagates through the plasma with an electron density of 2 x 10 19 cm -3 and forms via a highly nonlinear interaction a strongly anharmonic plasma wave. The amplitude of the wave is so large that the wave breaks, thereby injecting electrons from the background plasma into the accelerating phase. The energy transfer from the laser pulse to the plasma is so strong that the maximum propagation distance is limited to the 100 m range. Therefore, gas jets specifically tuned to these requirements have to be employed. The properties of microscopic supersonic gas jets are thoroughly analyzed in this work. Based on numeric flow simulation, this study encompasses several extensive parameter studies that illuminate all relevant features of supersonic flows in microscopic gas nozzles. This allowed the optimized design of de Laval nozzles with exit diameters ranging from 150 μm to 3 mm. The employment of these nozzles in the experiment greatly improved the electron beam quality. After these optimizations, the laser-driven electron accelerator now yields monoenergetic electron pulses with energies up to 50 MeV and charges between one and ten pC. The electron beam has a typical divergence of 5 mrad and comprises an energy spectrum that is virtually free from low energetic background. The electron pulse duration could not yet be determined experimentally but simulations point towards values in the range of 1 fs. The acceleration gradient is estimated from simulation and experiment to be approximately 0.5 TV/m. The electron accelerator

  9. Supersonic micro-jets and their application to few-cycle laser-driven electron acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmid, Karl

    2009-07-23

    This thesis covers the few-cycle laser-driven acceleration of electrons in a laser-generated plasma. The laser system employed in this work is a new development based on optical parametric chirped pulse amplification and is the only multi-TW few-cycle laser in the world. In the experiment, the laser beam is focused onto a supersonic helium gas jet which leads to the formation of a plasma channel. The laser pulse, having an intensity of 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2} propagates through the plasma with an electron density of 2 x 10{sup 19} cm{sup -3} and forms via a highly nonlinear interaction a strongly anharmonic plasma wave. The amplitude of the wave is so large that the wave breaks, thereby injecting electrons from the background plasma into the accelerating phase. The energy transfer from the laser pulse to the plasma is so strong that the maximum propagation distance is limited to the 100 m range. Therefore, gas jets specifically tuned to these requirements have to be employed. The properties of microscopic supersonic gas jets are thoroughly analyzed in this work. Based on numeric flow simulation, this study encompasses several extensive parameter studies that illuminate all relevant features of supersonic flows in microscopic gas nozzles. This allowed the optimized design of de Laval nozzles with exit diameters ranging from 150 {mu}m to 3 mm. The employment of these nozzles in the experiment greatly improved the electron beam quality. After these optimizations, the laser-driven electron accelerator now yields monoenergetic electron pulses with energies up to 50 MeV and charges between one and ten pC. The electron beam has a typical divergence of 5 mrad and comprises an energy spectrum that is virtually free from low energetic background. The electron pulse duration could not yet be determined experimentally but simulations point towards values in the range of 1 fs. The acceleration gradient is estimated from simulation and experiment to be approximately 0.5 TV/m. The

  10. Lasers and optoelectronics fundamentals, devices and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Maini, Anil K

    2013-01-01

    With emphasis on the physical and engineering principles, this book provides a comprehensive and highly accessible treatment of modern lasers and optoelectronics. Divided into four parts, it explains laser fundamentals, types of lasers, laser electronics & optoelectronics, and laser applications, covering each of the topics in their entirety, from basic fundamentals to advanced concepts. Key features include: exploration of technological and application-related aspects of lasers and optoelectronics, detailing both existing and emerging applications in industry, medical diag

  11. Application of nonlinear models to estimate the gain of one-dimensional free-electron lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, E.; Rizzato, F. B.; Endler, A.

    2017-06-01

    In the present work, we make use of simplified nonlinear models based on the compressibility factor (Peter et al., Phys. Plasmas, vol. 20 (12), 2013, 123104) to predict the gain of one-dimensional (1-D) free-electron lasers (FELs), considering space-charge and thermal effects. These models proved to be reasonable to estimate some aspects of 1-D FEL theory, such as the position of the onset of mixing, in the case of a initially cold electron beam, and the position of the breakdown of the laminar regime, in the case of an initially warm beam (Peter et al., Phys. Plasmas, vol. 21 (11), 2014, 113104). The results given by the models are compared to wave-particle simulations showing a reasonable agreement.

  12. A comparative study of via drilling and scribing on PEN and PET substrates for flexible electronic applications using excimer and Nd:YAG laser sources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mandamparambil, R.; Fledderus, H.; Brand, J. van den; Saalmink, M.; Kusters, R.; Podprocky, T.; Steenberge, G. van; Baets, J. de; Dietzel, A.H.

    2009-01-01

    A study on via drilling and channel scribing on PEN and PET substrates for flexible electronic application is discussed in this paper. For the experiments, both KIF excimer laser (248 nm) and frequency tripled Nd:YAG (355 nm) laser are used. Different measurement techniques like optical microscopy,

  13. Lights Will Guide You : Sample Preparation and Applications for Integrated Laser and Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karreman, M. A.

    2013-03-01

    Correlative microscopy is the combined use of two different forms of microscopy in the study of a specimen, allowing for the exploitation of the advantages of both imaging tools. The integrated Laser and Electron Microscope (iLEM), developed at Utrecht University, combines a fluorescence microscope (FM) and a transmission electron microscope (TEM) in a single set-up. The region of interest in the specimen is labeled or tagged with a fluorescent probe and can easily be identified within a large field of view with the FM. Next, this same area is retraced in the TEM and can be studied at high resolution. The iLEM demands samples that can be imaged with both FM and TEM. Biological specimen, typically composed of light elements, generate low image contrast in the TEM. Therefore, these samples are often ‘contrasted’ with heavy metal stains. FM, on the other hand, images fluorescent samples. Sample preparation for correlative microscopy, and iLEM in particular, is complicated by the fact that the heavy metals stains employed for TEM quench the fluorescent signal of the probe that is imaged with FM. The first part of this thesis outlines preparation procedures for biological material yielding specimen that can be imaged with the iLEM. Here, approaches for the contrasting of thin sections of cells and tissue are introduced that do not affect the fluorescence signal of the probe that marks the region of interest. Furthermore, two novel procedures, VIS2FIXH and VIS2FIX­FS are described that allow for the chemical fixation of thin sections of cryo-immobilized material. These procedures greatly expedite the sample preparation process, and open up novel possibilities for the immuno-labeling of difficult antigens, eg. proteins and lipids that are challenging to preserve. The second part of this thesis describes applications of iLEM in research in the field of life and material science. The iLEM was employed in the study of UVC induced apoptosis (programmed cell death) of

  14. Study of beam transverse properties of a thermionic electron gun for application to a compact THz free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Tongning; Qin, Bin; Tan, Ping; Chen, Qushan; Yang, Lei; Pei, Yuanji; Li, Ji

    2014-01-01

    A novel thermionic electron gun adopted for use in a high power THz free electron laser (FEL) is proposed in this paper. By optimization of the structural and radiofrequency (RF) parameters, the physical design of the gun is performed using dynamic calculations. Velocity bunching is used to minimize the bunch's energy spread, and the dynamic calculation results indicate that high quality beams can be provided. The transverse properties of the beams generated by the gun are also analyzed. The novel RF focusing effects of the resonance cavity are investigated precisely and are used to establish emittance compensation, which enables the injector length to be reduced. In addition, the causes of the extrema of the beam radius and the normalized transverse emittance are analyzed and interpreted, respectively, and slice simulations are performed to illustrate how the RF focusing varies along the bunch length and to determine the effects of that variation on the emittance compensation. Finally, by observation of the variations of the beam properties in the drift tube behind the electron gun, prospective assembly scenarios for the complete THz-FEL injector are discussed, and a joint-debugging process for the injector is implemented

  15. Katherine E. Weimer Award: X-ray light sources from laser-plasma and laser-electron interaction: development and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Felicie

    2017-10-01

    Bright sources of x-rays, such as synchrotrons and x-ray free electron lasers (XFEL) are transformational tools for many fields of science. They are used for biology, material science, medicine, or industry. Such sources rely on conventional particle accelerators, where electrons are accelerated to gigaelectronvolts (GeV) energies. The accelerated particles are wiggled in magnetic structures to emit x-ray radiation that is commonly used for molecular crystallography, fluorescence studies, chemical analysis, medical imaging, and many other applications. One of the drawbacks of these machines is their size and cost, because electric field gradients are limited to about 100 V/M in conventional accelerators. Particle acceleration in laser-driven plasmas is an alternative to generate x-rays via betatron emission, Compton scattering, or bremsstrahlung. A plasma can sustain electrical fields many orders of magnitude higher than that in conventional radiofrequency accelerator structures. When short, intense laser pulses are focused into a gas, it produces electron plasma waves in which electrons can be trapped and accelerated to GeV energies. X-ray sources, driven by electrons from laser-wakefield acceleration, have unique properties that are analogous to synchrotron radiation, with a 1000-fold shorter pulse. An important use of x-rays from laser plasma accelerators is in High Energy Density (HED) science, which requires laser and XFEL facilities to create in the laboratory extreme conditions of temperatures and pressures that are usually found in the interiors of stars and planets. To diagnose such extreme states of matter, the development of efficient, versatile and fast (sub-picosecond scale) x-ray probes has become essential. In these experiments, x-ray photons can pass through dense material, and absorption of the x-rays can be directly measured, via spectroscopy or imaging, to inform scientists about the temperature and density of the targets being studied. Performed

  16. Technological laser application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shia, D.O.; Kollen, R.; Rods, U.

    1980-01-01

    Problems of the technological applications of lasers are stated in the popular form. Main requirements to a technological laser as well as problems arising in designing any system using lasers have been considered. Areas of the laser applications are described generally: laser treatment of materials, thermal treatment, welding, broach and drilling of holes, scribing, microtreatment and adjustment of resistors, material cutting, investigations into controlled thermonuclear fussion

  17. Excimer laser applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fantoni, R.

    1988-01-01

    This lecture deals with laser induced material photoprocessing, especially concerning those processes which are initiated by u.v. lasers (mostly excimer laser). Advantages of using the u.v. radiation emitted by excimer lasers, both in photophysical and photochemical processes of different materials, are discussed in detail. Applications concerning microelectronics are stressed with respect to other applications in different fields (organic chemistry, medicine). As further applications of excimer lasers, main spectroscopic techniques for ''on line'' diagnostics which employ excimer pumped dye lasers, emitting tunable radiation in the visible and near u.v. are reviewed

  18. High-precision cutting of polyimide film using femtosecond laser for the application in flexible electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganin, D. V.; Lapshin, K. E.; Obidin, A. Z.; Vartapetov, S. K.

    2018-01-01

    The experimental results of cutting a polyimide film on the optical glass substrate by means of femtosecond lasers are given. Two modes of laser cutting of this film without damages to a glass base are determined. The first is the photo graphitization using a high repetition rate femtosecond laser. The second is ablative, under the effect of femtosecond laser pulses with high energy and low repetition rate. Cutting of semiconductor chips formed on the polyimide film surface is successfully demonstrated.

  19. Free-electron laser results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stein, W.E.; Brau, C.A.; Newnam, B.E.; Warren, R.W.; Winston, J.; Young, L.M.

    1981-01-01

    The Los Alamos free-electron laser (FEL) amplifier experiment was designed to demonstrate high efficiency for transfer of energy from an electron beam to a light beam in the magnetic field of a tapered wiggler. Initial results indicate an energy transfer consistent with theory. Distinct groups of decelerated electrons as well as accelerated electrons are clearly present in the energy spectrum of electrons emerging from the wiggler when the laser light is present. The observed energy decrease for the electrons captured in the decelerating bucket is approx. 6% and the average decrease of the entire energy distribution is approx. 2% for the conditions of these initial measurements

  20. Free-electron laser beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minehara, Eisuke

    2003-01-01

    The principle and history of free-electron laser (FEL), first evidenced in 1977, the relationship between FEL wavelength and output power, the high-power FEL driven by the superconducting linac, the X-ray FEL by the linac, and the medical use are described. FEL is the vacuum oscillator tube and essentially composed from the high-energy linac, undulator and light-resonator. It utilizes free electrons in the vacuum to generate the beam with wavelength ranging from microwave to gamma ray. The first high-power FEL developed in Japanese Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) is based on the development of superconducting linac for oscillating the highest power beam. In the medical field, applications to excise brain tumors (in US) and to reconstruct experimentally blood vessels in the pig heart (in Gunma University) by lasing and laser coagulator are in progress with examinations to remove intra-vascular cholesterol mass by irradiation of 5.7μm FEL beam. Cancer cells are considered diagnosed by FEL beam of far-infrared-THz range. The FEL beam CT is expected to have a wide variety of application without the radiation exposure and its resolution is equal or superior to that of usual imaging techniques. (N.I.)

  1. LASER APPLICATIONS AND OTHER TOPICS IN QUANTUM ELECTRONICS: Modification of biological objects in water media by CO2-laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranov, G. A.; Belyaev, A. A.; Onikienko, S. B.; Smirnov, S. A.; Khukharev, V. V.

    2005-09-01

    The modification of biological objects (polysaccharides and cells) by CO2-laser radiation in water added drop by drop into the interaction region is studied theoretically and experimentally. Calculations are performed by using the models describing gas-dynamic and heterogeneous processes caused by absorption of laser radiation by water drops. It is found experimentally that the laser modification of polysaccharides leads to the formation of low-molecular derivatives with immunostimulating properties. A dose of the product of laser activation of the yeast culture Saccharamyces cerevisiae prevented the development of a toxic emphysema in mice and protected them against lethal grippe and also prevented a decrease of survival rate, increased the average life, and prevented the development of metabolic and immune disorders in mice exposed to sublethal gamma-radiation doses.

  2. Photonic Free-Electron Lasers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Slot, Petrus J.M.; Denis, T.; Lee, J.H.H.; van Dijk, M.W.; Boller, Klaus J.

    2012-01-01

    A photonic free-electron laser (pFEL) produces coherent Cerenkov radiation from a set of parallel electron beams streaming through a photonic crystal. The function of the crystal is to slow down the phase velocity of a copropagating electromagnetic wave, such that also mildly relativistic electrons

  3. Tunable laser applications

    CERN Document Server

    Duarte, FJ

    2008-01-01

    Introduction F. J. Duarte Spectroscopic Applications of Tunable Optical Parametric Oscillators B. J. Orr, R. T. White, and Y. He Solid-State Dye Lasers Costela, I. García-Moreno, and R. Sastre Tunable Lasers Based on Dye-Doped Polymer Gain Media Incorporating Homogeneous Distributions of Functional Nanoparticles F. J. Duarte and R. O. James Broadly Tunable External-Cavity Semiconductor Lasers F. J. Duarte Tunable Fiber Lasers T. M. Shay and F. J. Duarte Fiber Laser Overview and Medical Applications

  4. Applications of Gunn lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balkan, N.; Chung, S. H.

    2008-04-01

    The principle of the operation of a Gunn laser is based on the band to band recombination of impact ionized non-equilibrium electron-hole pairs in propagating high field space-charge domains in a Gunn diode, which is biased above the negative differential resistance threshold and placed in a Fabry-Perot or a vertical micro cavity (VCSEL). In conventional VCSEL structures, unless specific measures such as the addition of oxide apertures and use of small windows are employed, the lack of uniformity in the density of current injected into the active region can reduce the efficiency and delay the lasing threshold. In a vertical-cavity structured Gunn device, however, the current is uniformly injected into the active region independently of the distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) layers. Therefore, lasing occurs from the entire surface of the device. The light emission from Gunn domains is an electric field induced effect. Therefore, the operation of Gunn-VCSEL or F-P laser is independent of the polarity of the applied voltage. Red-NIR VCSELs emitting in the range of 630-850 nm are also possible when Ga 1-xAl xAs (x communications. Furthermore the device may find applications as an optical clock and cross link between microwave and NIR communications. The operation of a both Gunn-Fabry-Perot laser and Gunn-VCSEL has been demonstrated by us recently. In the current work we present the potential results of experimental and theoretical studies concerning the applications together with the gain and emission characteristics of Gunn-Lasers.

  5. Laser-driven electron accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, R.B.

    1981-01-01

    The following possibilities are discussed: inverse free electron laser (wiggler accelerator); inverse Cerenkov effect; plasma accelerator; dielectric tube; and grating linac. Of these, the grating acceleraton is considered the most attractive alternative

  6. Wave function of free electron in a strong laser plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Shitong; Shen Wenda; Guo Qizhi

    1993-01-01

    The wave function of free electron in a strong laser plasma is obtained by solving exactly the Dirac equation in a curved space-time with optical metric for the laser plasma. When the laser field is diminished to zero, the wave function is naturally reduced to relativistic wave function of free electron. The possible application of the wave function is discussed

  7. Effect of slope errors on the performance of mirrors for x-ray free electron laser applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardini, Tom; Cocco, Daniele; Hau-Riege, Stefan P

    2015-12-14

    In this work we point out that slope errors play only a minor role in the performance of a certain class of x-ray optics for X-ray Free Electron Laser (XFEL) applications. Using physical optics propagation simulations and the formalism of Church and Takacs [Opt. Eng. 34, 353 (1995)], we show that diffraction limited optics commonly found at XFEL facilities posses a critical spatial wavelength that makes them less sensitive to slope errors, and more sensitive to height error. Given the number of XFELs currently operating or under construction across the world, we hope that this simple observation will help to correctly define specifications for x-ray optics to be deployed at XFELs, possibly reducing the budget and the timeframe needed to complete the optical manufacturing and metrology.

  8. Laser applications in materials processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ready, J.F.

    1980-01-01

    The seminar focused on laser annealing of semiconductors, laser processing of semiconductor devices and formation of coatings and powders, surface modification with lasers, and specialized laser processing methods. Papers were presented on the theoretical analysis of thermal and mass transport during laser annealing, applications of scanning continuous-wave and pulsed lasers in silicon technology, laser techniques in photovoltaic applications, and the synthesis of ceramic powders from laser-heated gas-phase reactants. Other papers included: reflectance changes of metals during laser irradiation, surface-alloying using high-power continuous lasers, laser growth of silicon ribbon, and commercial laser-shock processes

  9. Application of mid-infrared free-electron laser tuned to amide bands for dissociation of aggregate structure of protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Takayasu; Yaji, Toyonari; Ohta, Toshiaki; Tsukiyama, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    A mid-infrared free-electron laser (FEL) is a linearly polarized, high-peak powered pulse laser with tunable wavelength within the mid-infrared absorption region. It was recently found that pathogenic amyloid fibrils could be partially dissociated to the monomer form by the irradiation of the FEL targeting the amide I band (C=O stretching vibration), amide II band (N-H bending vibration) and amide III band (C-N stretching vibration). In this study, the irradiation effect of the FEL on keratin aggregate was tested as another model to demonstrate an applicability of the FEL for dissociation of protein aggregates. Synchrotron radiation infrared microscopy analysis showed that the α-helix content in the aggregate structure decreased to almost the same level as that in the monomer state after FEL irradiation tuned to 6.06 µm (amide I band). Both irradiations at 6.51 µm (amide II band) and 8.06 µm (amide III band) also decreased the content of the aggregate but to a lesser extent than for the irradiation at the amide I band. On the contrary, the irradiation tuned to 5.6 µm (non-absorbance region) changed little the secondary structure of the aggregate. Scanning-electron microscopy observation at the submicrometer order showed that the angular solid of the aggregate was converted to non-ordered fragments by the irradiation at each amide band, while the aggregate was hardly deformed by the irradiation at 5.6 µm. These results demonstrate that the amide-specific irradiation by the FEL was effective for dissociation of the protein aggregate to the monomer form.

  10. Laser Applications in Orthodontics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidari, Somayeh; Torkan, Sepideh

    2013-01-01

    A laser is a collimated single wavelength of light which delivers a concentrated source of energy. Soon after different types of lasers were invented, investigators began to examine the effects of different wavelengths of laser energy on oral tissues, routine dental procedures and experimental applications. Orthodontists, along with other specialist in different fields of dentistry, can now benefit from several different advantages that lasers provide during the treatment process, from the beginning of the treatment, when separators are placed, to the time of resin residues removal from the tooth surface at the end of orthodontic treatment. This article outlines some of the most common usages of laser beam in orthodontics and also provides a comparison between laser and other conventional method that were the standard of care prior to the advent of laser in this field. PMID:25606324

  11. Electronic Subsystems For Laser Communication System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Catherine; Maruschak, John; Patschke, Robert; Powers, Michael

    1992-01-01

    Electronic subsystems of free-space laser communication system carry digital signals at 650 Mb/s over long distances. Applicable to general optical communications involving transfer of great quantities of data, and transmission and reception of video images of high definition.

  12. Electrons and atoms in intense laser fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidovich, L.

    1982-01-01

    Several non-linear effects that show up when electrons and atoms interact with strong laser fields are considered. Thomson scattering, electron potential scattering in the presence of a laser beam, atomic ionization by strong laser fields, the refraction of electrons by laser beams and the Kapitza-Dirac effect are discussed. (Author) [pt

  13. Electrons and atoms in intense laser fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidovich, L.

    1982-11-01

    Several non-linear effects that show up when electrons and atoms interact with strong laser fields are considered. Thomson scattering, electron potential scattering in the presence of a laser beam, atomic ionization by strong laser fields, the refraction of electrons by laser beams and the Kapitza-Dirac effect are discussed. (Author) [pt

  14. Linac technology for free-electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, R.K.; Morton, P.L.; Wilson, P.B.; Keefe, D.; Faltens, A.

    1983-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to concentrate on the properties of high-energy electron linear accelerators for use in free-electron lasers operating principally in the Compton regime. To fix our focus somewhat, we shall consider electron energies in the 20- to 200-MeV range and consider requirements for high-power free-electron lasers operating in the 0.5- to 10-μm range. Preliminary remarks are made on high-power free-electron laser amplifiers and oscillators and some desirable characteristics of the linacs that deliver electron beams for these devices. Both the high peak-current requirements of the amplifier and the high pulse-repetition frequency requirements of the oscillator can be met by present-day linac technology, although not necessarily by the same machine. In this papers second and third section, the technology of two rather different types of linear accelerators, the rf linac and the induction linac, is reviewed. In conclusion, applications to the Free Electron Lasers are stated

  15. Undulators and free-electron lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Luchini, P

    1990-01-01

    This book is a reference text for all those working in free-electron laser research as well as being a learning aid for physicists and graduate students who wish an introduction to this field. Only a basic understanding of relativistic mechanics and electromagnetism is presupposed. After an overview of early developments and general principles of operation, the different models that can be used to describe free-electron lasers are presented, organized according to their range of applicability. The relevent conceptual and mathematical constructs are built up from first principles with attention to obtaining the practically important results in a simple but rigorous way. Interaction of the undulator with the driving electron accelerator and the laser cavity and design of undulator magnets are treated and an overview is given of some typical experiments.

  16. Propagation of an ultra intense laser pulse in an under dense plasma: production of quasi monoenergetic electron beams and development of applications; Propagation d'une impulsion laser ultra-intense dans un plasma sous-dense: generation de faisceaux d'electrons quasi monoenergetiques et developpement d'applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glinec, Y

    2006-09-15

    This experimental study concerns the generation of electron beams with original properties. These electrons beams originate from the interaction of an ultra-intense and short laser pulse with a gas jet. Previously, these electron beams had a large divergence and a broad spectrum. A major improvement in this field was achieved when an electron beam with low divergence (10 mrad) and a peaked spectrum (170 MeV) was observed during this thesis, using a new single shot electron spectrometer. A parametric study of the interaction allowed to observe the evolution of the electron beam. Experiments have been carried out to deepen the characterization of the electron beam. The observation of transition radiation generated by the electrons at an interface shows that the electron beam interacts with the laser pulse during the acceleration. Radial oscillations of the electron beam around the laser axis, named betatron oscillations, were also observed on the electron spectra. Such a quasi-monoenergetic spectrum is essential for many applications. In order to justify the interest of this electron beam, several applications are presented: a sub-milli-metric gamma-ray radiography of dense objects, a dose profile of the electron beam comparable to present capabilities of photon sources for radiotherapy, a very short temporal profile useful for water radiolysis and the generation of a bright X-ray source with low divergence. (author)

  17. Propagation of an ultra intense laser pulse in an under dense plasma: production of quasi monoenergetic electron beams and development of applications; Propagation d'une impulsion laser ultra-intense dans un plasma sous-dense: generation de faisceaux d'electrons quasi monoenergetiques et developpement d'applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glinec, Y

    2006-09-15

    This experimental study concerns the generation of electron beams with original properties. These electrons beams originate from the interaction of an ultra-intense and short laser pulse with a gas jet. Previously, these electron beams had a large divergence and a broad spectrum. A major improvement in this field was achieved when an electron beam with low divergence (10 mrad) and a peaked spectrum (170 MeV) was observed during this thesis, using a new single shot electron spectrometer. A parametric study of the interaction allowed to observe the evolution of the electron beam. Experiments have been carried out to deepen the characterization of the electron beam. The observation of transition radiation generated by the electrons at an interface shows that the electron beam interacts with the laser pulse during the acceleration. Radial oscillations of the electron beam around the laser axis, named betatron oscillations, were also observed on the electron spectra. Such a quasi-monoenergetic spectrum is essential for many applications. In order to justify the interest of this electron beam, several applications are presented: a sub-milli-metric gamma-ray radiography of dense objects, a dose profile of the electron beam comparable to present capabilities of photon sources for radiotherapy, a very short temporal profile useful for water radiolysis and the generation of a bright X-ray source with low divergence. (author)

  18. Laser control of electron matter waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jones, E.; Becker, M.; Luiten, O.J.; Batelaan, H.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years laser light has been used to control the motion of electron waves. Electrons can now be diffracted by standing waves of light. Laser light in the vicinity of nanostructures is used to affect free electrons, for example, femto-second and atto-second laser-induced electrons are emitted

  19. Semiconductor lasers driven by self-sustained chaotic electronic oscillators and applications to optical chaos cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingni, Sifeu Takougang; Mbé, Jimmi Hervé Talla; Woafo, Paul

    2012-09-01

    In this work, we numerically study the dynamics of vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) firstly when it is driven by Chua's oscillator, secondly in case where it is driven by a broad frequency spectral bandwidth chaotic oscillator developed by Nana et al. [Commun. Nonlinear Sci. Numer. Simul. 14, 2266 (2009)]. We demonstrated that the VCSEL generated robust chaotic dynamics compared to the ones found in VCSEL subject to a sinusoidally modulated current and therefore it is more suitable for chaos encryption techniques. The synchronization characteristics and the communication performances of unidirectional coupled VCSEL driven by the broad frequency spectral bandwidth chaotic oscillators are investigated numerically. The results show that high-quality synchronization and transmission of messages can be realized for suitable system parameters. Chaos shift keying method is successfully applied to encrypt a message at a high bitrate.

  20. Ultraintense lasers and their applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mourou, G.A.

    2001-01-01

    Traditional optics concerns physical phenomena in the electron-volt regime. The new frontier will address giga-electron-volt energy scales. In the last decade, lasers have undergone orders-of-magnitude jumps in peak power, with the invention of the technique of chirped pulse amplification (CPA) and the refinement of femtosecond techniques. Modern CPA lasers can produce intensities greater than 10 21 W/cm 2 , one million times greater than previously possible. These ultraintense lasers give researchers a tool to produce unprecedented pressures (terabars), magnetic fields (gigagauss), temperatures (10 10 K), and accelerations (10 25 g) with applications in fusion energy, nuclear physics, high-energy physics, astrophysics, and cosmology. (author)

  1. Free-electron lasers 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petroff, Y.

    1989-01-01

    This book presents papers on free-electron laser technology. The authors cover technological developments on existing FELs, new FEL research, and the use of FELs in experimental investigations. Among the studies reported are lasing in the visible and UV on the Novosibirsk VEPP-3 storage ring, description of Japanese FEL research, and Mark III FEL, and the Paladin results

  2. Free Electron Lasers in 2005

    CERN Document Server

    Colson, W B; Voughs, T

    2005-01-01

    Twenty-eight years after the first operation of the short wavelength free electron laser (FEL) at Stanford University, there continue to be many important experiments, proposed experiments, and user facilities around the world. Properties of FELs in the infrared, visible, UV, and x-ray wavelength regimes are listed and discussed.

  3. Free Electron Lasers in 2004

    CERN Document Server

    Colson, William B

    2004-01-01

    Twenty-seven years after the first operation of the short wavelength free electron laser (FEL) at Stanford University, there continue to be many important experiments, proposed experiments, and user facilities around the world. Properties of FELs operating in the infrared, visible, UV, and x-ray wavelength regimes are listed and discussed.

  4. Synchronization of sub-picosecond electron and laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenzweig, J.B.; Le Sage, G.P.

    1999-01-01

    Sub-picosecond laser-electron synchronization is required to take full advantage of the experimental possibilities arising from the marriage of modern high intensity lasers and high brightness electron beams in the same laboratory. Two particular scenarios stand out in this regard, injection of ultra-short electron pulses in short wavelength laser-driven plasma accelerators, and Compton scattering of laser photons from short electron pulses. Both of these applications demand synchronization, which is sub-picosecond, with tens of femtosecond synchronization implied for next generation experiments. The design of a microwave timing modulator system is now being investigated in more detail. (AIP) copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  5. Power Beaming, Orbital Debris Removal, and Other Space Applications of a Ground Based Free Electron Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    ahead through a scary wood or to chomp down on a strange new food. I try to approach the opportunities in my life with the same bravado and positive...scientific applications, HEO orbits allow for measuring detailed cross sections of interesting phenomena. By transiting across a large range of geocentric ...satellite’s design tolerances. However, this approach utilizes basic assumptions about atmospheric transmission and a simplistic illumination pattern of the

  6. Electron beam cooling by laser

    CERN Document Server

    Urakawa, J; Terunuma, N; Taniguchi, T; Yamazaki, Y; Hirano, K; Nomura, M; Sakai, I; Takano, M; Sasao, N; Honda, Y; Noda, A; Bulyak, E; Gladkikh, P; Mystykov, A; Zelinsky, A; Zimmermann, Frank

    2004-01-01

    In 1997, Z.Huang and R.Ruth proposed a compact laser-electron storage ring (LESR) for electron beam cooling or x-ray generation. Because the laser-wire monitor in the ATF storage ring has worked well and demonstrated the achievement of the world's smallest transverse emittance for a circulating electron beam, we have started the design of a small storage ring with about 10 m circumference and the development of basic technologies for the LESR. In this paper, we describe the design and experimental results of pulse stacking in a 42-cm long optical cavity. Since our primary purpose is demonstrating the proof-of-principle of the LESR, we will then discuss the future experimental plan at the KEK-ATF for the generation of high average-brilliance gamma-rays.

  7. Free electron laser and superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Iwata, A

    2003-01-01

    The lasing of the first free-electron laser (FEL) in the world was successfully carried out in 1977, so the history of FELs as a light source is not so long. But FELs are now utilized for research in many scientific and engineering fields owing to such characteristics as tunability of the wavelength, and short pulse and high peak power, which is difficult utilizing a common light source. Research for industrial applications has also been carried out in some fields, such as life sciences, semiconductors, nano-scale measurement, and others. The task for the industrial use of FEL is the realization of high energy efficiency and high optical power. As a means of promoting realization, the combining of an FEL and superconducting linac is now under development in order to overcome the thermal limitations of normal-conducting linacs. Further, since tuning the wavelength is carried out by changing the magnetic density of the undulator, which is now induced by moving part of the stack of permanent magnets, there is un...

  8. Free-electron laser theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dattoli, G.; Torre, A.

    1989-01-01

    The essential features of the theory of the free electron laser (FEL) are given in some detail. Beginning with an explanation of the basic gain mechanism, the lectures continue with a discussion of the problems associated with single-passage and recirculated (storage-ring) operation. Pulse propagation effects and the so-called 'lethargic' behaviour are analysed more completely. Finally, elements of FEL quantum theory are reported, in order to clarify the laser process from the microscopic point of view. Appendices give a fuller treatment of optical cavities and undulator magnets. (orig.)

  9. High average power CW FELs [Free Electron Laser] for application to plasma heating: Designs and experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Booske, J.H.; Granatstein, V.L.; Radack, D.J.; Antonsen, T.M. Jr.; Bidwell, S.; Carmel, Y.; Destler, W.W.; Latham, P.E.; Levush, B.; Mayergoyz, I.D.; Zhang, Z.X.

    1989-01-01

    A short period wiggler (period ∼ 1 cm), sheet beam FEL has been proposed as a low-cost source of high average power (1 MW) millimeter-wave radiation for plasma heating and space-based radar applications. Recent calculation and experiments have confirmed the feasibility of this concept in such critical areas as rf wall heating, intercepted beam (''body'') current, and high voltage (0.5 - 1 MV) sheet beam generation and propagation. Results of preliminary low-gain sheet beam FEL oscillator experiments using a field emission diode and pulse line accelerator have verified that lasing occurs at the predicted FEL frequency. Measured start oscillation currents also appear consistent with theoretical estimates. Finally, we consider the possibilities of using a short-period, superconducting planar wiggler for improved beam confinement, as well as access to the high gain, strong pump Compton regime with its potential for highly efficient FEL operation

  10. Laser printed interconnects for flexible electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pique, Alberto; Beniam, Iyoel; Mathews, Scott; Charipar, Nicholas

    Laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) can be used to generate microscale 3D structures for interconnect applications non-lithographically. The laser printing of these interconnects takes place through aggregation of voxels of either molten metal or dispersed metallic nanoparticles. However, the resulting 3D structures do not achieve the bulk conductivity of metal interconnects of the same cross-section and length as those formed by wire bonding or tab welding. It is possible, however, to laser transfer entire structures using a LIFT technique known as lase-and-place. Lase-and-place allows whole components and parts to be transferred from a donor substrate onto a desired location with one single laser pulse. This talk will present the use of LIFT to laser print freestanding solid metal interconnects to connect individual devices into functional circuits. Furthermore, the same laser can bend or fold the thin metal foils prior to transfer, thus forming compliant 3D structures able to provide strain relief due to flexing or thermal mismatch. Examples of these laser printed 3D metallic bridges and their role in the development of next generation flexible electronics by additive manufacturing will be presented. This work was funded by the Office of Naval Research (ONR) through the Naval Research Laboratory Basic Research Program.

  11. Laser applications in neurosurgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerullo, Leonard J.

    1985-09-01

    The "false start" of the laser in neurosurgery should not be misconstrued as a denial of the inherent advantages of precision and gentleness in dealing with neural tissue. Rather, early investigators were frustrated by unrealistic expectations, cumbersome equipment, and a general ignorance of microtechnique. By the early 70s, microneurosurgery was well established, surgical laser equipment for free hand and microlinked application had been developed, and a more realistic view of the limitations of the laser had been established. Consequently, the late 70s really heralded the renaissance of the laser in neurosurgery. Since then, there has been an overwhelming acceptance of the tool in a variety of clinical situations, broadly categorized in five groups. 1)|Perhaps the most generally accepted area is in the removal of extra-axial tumors of the brain and spinal cord. These tumors, benign by histology but treacherous by location, do not present until a significant amount of neurological compensation has already occurred. The application of additional trauma to the neural tissue, whether by further tumor growth or surgical manipulation, frequently results in irreversible damage. Here, the ability of the laser to vaporize tissue, in a fairly hemostatic fashion, without mechanical or thermal damage to sensitive surrounding tissues, is essential. 2)|The ability to incise delicate neural tissue with minimal spread of thermal destruction to adjacent functioning tissue makes the laser the ideal instrument when tumors deep under the surface are encountered in the brain or spinal cord. Thus, the second group of applications is in the transgression of normal neural structures to arrive at deeper pathological tissue. 3)|The third area of benefit for the laser in neurosurgery has been in the performance of neuroablative procedures, calling for deliberate destruction of functioning neural tissue in a controlled fashion. Again, the precision and shape confinement of the destructive

  12. Los Alamos advanced free-electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, K. C. D.; Kraus, R. H.; Ledford, J.; Meier, K. L.; Meyer, R. E.; Nguyen, D.; Sheffield, R. L.; Sigler, F. L.; Young, L. M.; Wang, T. S.; Wilson, W. L.; Wood, R. L.

    1992-07-01

    Los Alamos researchers are building a free-electron laser (FEL) for industrial, medical, and research applications. This FEL, which will incorporate many of the new technologies developed over the last decade, will be compact, robust, and user-friendly. Electrons produced by a photocathode will be accelerated to 20 MeV by a high-brightness accelerator and transported by permanent-magnet quadrupoles and dipoles. The resulting electron beam will have an excellent instantaneous beam quality of 10πmm mrad in transverse emittance and 0.3% in energy spread at a peak current up to 300 A. Including operation at higher harmonics, the laser wavelength extends from 3.7 μm to 0.4 μm.

  13. Free Electron Laser in Poland

    CERN Document Server

    Romaniuk, Ryszard

    2009-01-01

    The idea of building a new IVth generation of light sources of high luminosity, which use accelerators, arose in the 80ties of XXth century. Now, in a numerable synchrotron and laser laboratories in Europe, there is carried out, since a couple of years, intense applied research on free electron lasers (FEL) [17,18]. Similarly, in this country, free electron laser in Poland – POLFEL [9] is, in a design, a coherent light source of the IVth generation, characterized by very short pulses in the range of 10-100fs, of big power 0,2GW and UV wavelength of 27nm, of average power 1W, with effective high power third harmonic of 9nm. The laser consists of a linear superconducting accelerator 100m in length, undulator and experimental lines. It generates a monochromatic and coherent radiation and can be tuned from THz range via IR, visible to UV, and potentially to X-rays. The linac works in quasi-CW or real-CW mode. It is planned by IPJ [9,10] and XFEL-Poland Consortium [16] as a part of the ESFRI [1] priority EuroFEL...

  14. Inverse Free Electron Laser accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, A.; Gallardo, J.; van Steenbergen, A.; Sandweiss, J.

    1992-09-01

    The study of the INVERSE FREE ELECTRON LASER, as a potential mode of electron acceleration, is being pursued at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Recent studies have focussed on the development of a low energy, high gradient, multi stage linear accelerator. The elementary ingredients for the IFEL interaction are the 50 MeV Linac e - beam and the 10 11 Watt CO 2 laser beam of BNL's Accelerator Test Facility (ATF), Center for Accelerator Physics (CAP) and a wiggler. The latter element is designed as a fast excitation unit making use of alternating stacks of Vanadium Permendur (VaP) ferromagnetic laminations, periodically interspersed with conductive, nonmagnetic laminations, which act as eddy current induced field reflectors. Wiggler parameters and field distribution data will be presented for a prototype wiggler in a constant period and in a ∼ 1.5 %/cm tapered period configuration. The CO 2 laser beam will be transported through the IFEL interaction region by means of a low loss, dielectric coated, rectangular waveguide. Short waveguide test sections have been constructed and have been tested using a low power cw CO 2 laser. Preliminary results of guide attenuation and mode selectivity will be given, together with a discussion of the optical issues for the IFEL accelerator. The IFEL design is supported by the development and use of 1D and 3D simulation programs. The results of simulation computations, including also wiggler errors, for a single module accelerator and for a multi-module accelerator will be presented

  15. Laser diode technology and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Figueroa, L.

    1989-01-01

    This book covers a wide range of semiconductor laser technology, from new laser structures and laser design to applications in communications, remote sensing, and optoelectronics. The authors report on new laser diode physics and applications and present a survey of the state of the art as well as progress in new developments

  16. LASER APPLICATIONS AND OTHER TOPICS IN QUANTUM ELECTRONICS: Laser-induced extreme UV radiation sources for manufacturing next-generation integrated circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisov, V. M.; Vinokhodov, A. Yu; Ivanov, A. S.; Kiryukhin, Yu B.; Mishchenko, V. A.; Prokof'ev, A. V.; Khristoforov, O. B.

    2009-10-01

    The development of high-power discharge sources emitting in the 13.5±0.135-nm spectral band is of current interest because they are promising for applications in industrial EUV (extreme ultraviolet) lithography for manufacturing integrated circuits according to technological precision standards of 22 nm and smaller. The parameters of EUV sources based on a laser-induced discharge in tin vapours between rotating disc electrodes are investigated. The properties of the discharge initiation by laser radiation at different wavelengths are established and the laser pulse parameters providing the maximum energy characteristics of the EUV source are determined. The EUV source developed in the study emits an average power of 276 W in the 13.5±0.135-nm spectral band on conversion to the solid angle 2π sr in the stationary regime at a pulse repetition rate of 3000 Hz.

  17. Electron-beam pumping of visible and ultraviolet gas lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradley, L.P.

    1975-01-01

    Several techniques for using direct electron-pumping of gas lasers are reviewed. The primary objective is to categorize pump geometries and to give guidelines for gun selection and pulser design. Examples and application of pump technology are given

  18. Electron-beam initiated HF lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerber, R.A.; Patterson, E.L.

    1975-01-01

    Electron beams were used to ignite hydrogen/fluorine mixtures, producing laser energies up to 4.2 kJ, and giving hope that this approach may soon produce energy levels suitable for laser-fusion studies. (auth)

  19. Laser frequency modulation with electron plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, T. J.; Latorre, V. R.

    1972-01-01

    When laser beam passes through electron plasma its frequency shifts by amount proportional to plasma density. This density varies with modulating signal resulting in corresponding modulation of laser beam frequency. Necessary apparatus is relatively inexpensive since crystals are not required.

  20. Architecture design of the application software for the low-level RF control system of the free-electron laser at Hamburg

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geng, Z.; Ayvazyan, V.; Simrock, S.

    2012-01-01

    The superconducting linear accelerator of the Free-Electron Laser at Hamburg (FLASH) provides high performance electron beams to the lasing system to generate synchrotron radiation to various users. The Low-Level RF (LLRF) system is used to maintain the beam stabilities by stabilizing the RF field in the superconducting cavities with feedback and feed forward algorithms. The LLRF applications are sets of software to perform RF system model identification, control parameters optimization, exception detection and handling, so as to improve the precision, robustness and operability of the LLRF system. In order to implement the LLRF applications in the hardware with multiple distributed processors, an optimized architecture of the software is required for good understandability, maintainability and extendibility. This paper presents the design of the LLRF application software architecture based on the software engineering approach for FLASH. (authors)

  1. Smith-Purcell free-electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woods, K.J.; Walsh, J.E.

    1995-01-01

    The term Smith-Purcell free electron laser can be employed generally to describe any coherent radiation source in which a diffraction grating is used to couple an electron beam with the electromagnetic field. To date, most practical developments of this concept have focused on devices which operate in the millimeter spectral regime. In this paper construction of a Smith-Purcell free-electron laser operating in the far-infrared (FIR) region using a novel resonator cavity design and the electron beam from a low energy (0.5-5 MeV) radio-frequency accelerator will be discussed. A tunable source in this region would have many applications and since the beam energy is low, the small size and low overall cost of such a device would make it a laboratory instrument. Current projects which are progressing towards developing a FIR source are the programs at Stanford and CREOL. Both of these projects are using permanent magnet undulators to couple the electron beam with the electromagnetic field. An alternative approach is to use an electron beam passing over a diffraction grating as the radiating mechanism. This phenomenon is known as Smith-Purcell radiation and was first demonstrated for incoherent emission at visible wavelengths. The addition of feedback enhances the stimulated component of the emission which leads to the growth of coherence. Recent calculations for spontaneous emission have shown that the wiggler parameter and the grating efficiency are analogous. This result has important implications for the development of a Smith-Purcell FEL because a grating based free-electron laser would offer a greater range of tunability at a lower cost than its wiggler based counterpart

  2. Ultraviolet laser transverse profile shaping for improving x-ray free electron laser performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, S.; Alverson, S.; Bohler, D.; Egger, A.; Fry, A.

    2017-01-01

    The photocathode rf gun is one of the most critical components in x-ray free electron lasers. The drive laser strikes the photocathode surface, which emits electrons with properties that depend on the shape of the drive laser. Most free electron lasers use photocathodes with work function in the ultraviolet, a wavelength where direct laser manipulation becomes challenging. In this paper, we present a novel application of a digital micromirror device (DMD) for the 253 nm drive laser at the Linear Coherent Light Source. Laser profile shaping is accomplished through an iterative algorithm that takes into account shaping error and efficiency. Next, we use laser shaping to control the X-ray laser output via an online optimizer, which shows improvement in FEL pulse energy. Lastly, as a preparation for electron beam shaping, we use the DMD to measure the photocathode quantum efficiency across cathode surface with an averaged laser rms spot size of 59 μm. In conclusion, our experiments demonstrate promising outlook of using DMD to shape ultraviolet lasers for photocathode rf guns with various applications.

  3. Ultraviolet laser transverse profile shaping for improving x-ray free electron laser performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, S.; Alverson, S.; Bohler, D.; Egger, A.; Fry, A.; Gilevich, S.; Huang, Z.; Miahnahri, A.; Ratner, D.; Robinson, J.; Zhou, F.

    2017-08-01

    The photocathode rf gun is one of the most critical components in x-ray free electron lasers. The drive laser strikes the photocathode surface, which emits electrons with properties that depend on the shape of the drive laser. Most free electron lasers use photocathodes with work function in the ultraviolet, a wavelength where direct laser manipulation becomes challenging. In this paper, we present a novel application of a digital micromirror device (DMD) for the 253 nm drive laser at the Linear Coherent Light Source. Laser profile shaping is accomplished through an iterative algorithm that takes into account shaping error and efficiency. Next, we use laser shaping to control the X-ray laser output via an online optimizer, which shows improvement in FEL pulse energy. Lastly, as a preparation for electron beam shaping, we use the DMD to measure the photocathode quantum efficiency across cathode surface with an averaged laser rms spot size of 59 μ m . Our experiments demonstrate promising outlook of using DMD to shape ultraviolet lasers for photocathode rf guns with various applications.

  4. Electron-beam-excited gas laser research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, A.W.; Gerardo, J.B.; Patterson, E.L.; Gerber, R.A.; Rice, J.K.; Bingham, F.W.

    1975-01-01

    Net energy gain in laser fusion places requirements on the laser that are not realized by any existing laser. Utilization of relativistic electron beams (REB's), a relatively new source for the excitation of gas laser media, may lead to new lasers that could satisfy these requirements. Already REB's have been utilized to excite gas laser media and produce gas lasers that have not been produced as successfully any other way. Electron-beam-excitation has produced electronic-transition dimer lasers that have not yet been produced by any other excitation scheme (for example, Xe 2 / sup *(1)/, Kr:O(2 1 S)/sup 2/, KrF/sup *(3)/). In addition, REB's have initiated chemical reactions to produce HF laser radiation with unique and promising results. Relativistic-electron-beam gas-laser research is continuing to lead to new lasers with unique properties. Results of work carried out at Sandia Laboratories in this pioneering effort of electron-beam-excited-gas lasers are reviewed. (U.S.)

  5. Design Features of a Planar Hybrid/Permanent Magnet Strong Focusing Undulator for Free Electron Laser (FEL) And Synchrotron Radiation (SR) Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tatchyn, Roman; /SLAC

    2011-09-09

    Insertion devices for Angstrom-wavelength Free Electron Laser (FEL) amplifiers driven by multi-GeV electron beams generally require distributed focusing substantially stronger than their own natural focusing fields. Over the last several years a wide variety of focusing schemes and configurations have been proposed for undulators of this class, ranging from conventional current-driven quadrupoles external to the undulator magnets to permanent magnet (PM) lattices inserted into the insertion device gap. In this paper we present design studies of a flexible high-field hybrid/PM undulator with strong superimposed planar PM focusing proposed for a 1.5 Angstrom Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) driven by an electron beam with a 1 mm-mr normalized emittance. Attainable field parameters, tuning modes, and potential applications of the proposed structure are discussed.

  6. Lasers: principles, applications and energetic measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subran, C.; Sagaut, J.; Lapointe, S.

    2009-01-01

    After having recalled the principles of a laser and the properties of the laser beam, the authors describe the following different types of lasers: solid state lasers, fiber lasers, semiconductor lasers, dye lasers and gas lasers. Then, their applications are given. Very high energy lasers can reproduce the phenomenon of nuclear fusion of hydrogen atoms. (O.M.)

  7. High frequency free-electron laser results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyer, K.; Brau, C.A.; Newman, B.E.; Stein, W.E.; Warren, R.W.; Winston, J.G.; Young, L.M.

    1983-01-01

    By looking at the free-electron laser as a particle accelerator working backwards, Morton realized that the techniques used to accelerate particles could be used to improve the performance of free-electron lasers. In particular, he predicted the capture of electrons in ''stable-phase'' regions, or ''buckets'' in the electron phase space, and proposed that by decelerating the buckets, the trapped electrons could be decelerated to extract significant amounts of their energy as optical radiation. In fact, since electrons not trapped in the stable regions are forever excluded from them--at least in the adiabatic approximation--displacement techniques could also be used to accelerate or decelerate electrons in a free-electron laser. This paper explains the principle behind ''phase-displacement'' acceleration and details an experiment carried out with a 20-MeV electron beam to test these predictions. Results obtained with a tapered-wiggler free-electron laser demonstrate the concepts proposed by Morton for enhanced efficiency. They show deceleration of electrons by as much as 7% and extraction of more than 3% of the total electron-beam energy as laser energy when the laser is operated as an amplifier. The experiment is presently being reconfigured to examine its performance as a laser oscillator

  8. Physics study of the application of an IFEL [Induction Free-Electron Laser] to CIT [Compact Ignition Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hooper, E.B.

    1990-01-01

    The ECH system requirements on CIT might be met by microwaves generated by an induction free-electron laser (IFEL). Design studies have assumed that the system is windowless, thus eliminating one of the most highly stressed components of the ECH system. The trade-off for this advantage is that the IFEL is exposed to tritium diffusing from CIT. As reported in the attached appendix, we have investigated the use of cryopumping to control the tritium diffusion to the IFEL. With one to three pumping stations (depending on size) we can reduce the level of tritium in the IFEL to a level that may not pose a breathing hazard after one year of operation. In addition, adding pumping may allow hands-on maintenance after one year. Preliminary indications are that likely accident scenarios will occur slowly enough to permit valves to be closed before the IFEL is significantly contaminated

  9. Free-electron lasers considered for CEBAF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    Spinoff development of industrial free-electron lasers is in prospect for an industry-universitylaboratory consortium centred at the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility in Newport News, Virginia, site of the CEBAF 4 GeV superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) accelerator, now being commissioned (see page 42). Together with several US corporations and universities, the Laboratory is now also addressing the potential of smaller SRF electron accelerators for ''driving'' free-electron lasers (FELs)

  10. High-power fiber lasers for photocathode electron injectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi Zhao

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Many new applications for electron accelerators require high-brightness, high-average power beams, and most rely on photocathode-based electron injectors as a source of electrons. To achieve such a photoinjector, one requires both a high-power laser system to produce the high average current beam, and also a system at reduced repetition rate for electron beam diagnostics to verify high beam brightness. Here we report on two fiber laser systems designed to meet these specific needs, at 50 MHz and 1.3 GHz repetition rate, together with pulse pickers, second harmonic generation, spatiotemporal beam shaping, intensity feedback, and laser beam transport. The performance and flexibility of these laser systems have allowed us to demonstrate electron beam with both low emittance and high average current for the Cornell energy recovery linac.

  11. Pulse power technology application to lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prestwich, K.R.

    1975-01-01

    Recent developments of intense relativistic electron beam accelerators and the associated pulse power technology are reviewed. The design of specific accelerators for gas laser excitation sources is discussed. A 3 MV, 800 kA, 24 ns electron beam accelerator under development for the electron beam fusion program is described along with the low jitter multichannel oil-dielectric rail switches developed for this application. This technology leads to the design of a 20 kJ, short pulse accelerator optimized gas laser excitation with radially converging electron beams. Other gas laser research requirements have led to the development of an accelerator that will produce a 0.5 MV, 20 kJ, 1 μs electron beam pulse. (auth)

  12. Laser wakefield electron acceleration. A novel approach employing supersonic microjets and few-cycle laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmid, Karl

    2011-01-01

    This thesis covers the few-cycle laser-driven acceleration of electrons in a laser-generated plasma. This process, known as laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA), relies on strongly driven plasma waves for the generation of accelerating gradients in the vicinity of several 100 GV/m, a value four orders of magnitude larger than that attainable by conventional accelerators. This thesis demonstrates that laser pulses with an ultrashort duration of 8 fs and a peak power of 6 TW allow the production of electron energies up to 50 MeV via LWFA. The special properties of laser accelerated electron pulses, namely the ultrashort pulse duration, the high brilliance, and the high charge density, open up new possibilities in many applications of these electron beams. (orig.)

  13. Laser-electron Compton interaction in plasma channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pogorelsky, I.V.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Hirose, T.

    1998-10-01

    A concept of high intensity femtosecond laser synchrotron source (LSS) is based on Compton backscattering of focused electron and laser beams. The short Rayleigh length of the focused laser beam limits the length of interaction to a few picoseconds. However, the technology of the high repetition rate high-average power picosecond lasers required for high put through LSS applications is not developed yet. Another problem associated with the picosecond laser pulses is undesirable nonlinear effects occurring when the laser photons are concentrated in a short time interval. To avoid the nonlinear Compton scattering, the laser beam has to be split, and the required hard radiation flux is accumulated over a number of consecutive interactions that complicates the LSS design. In order to relieve the technological constraints and achieve a practically feasible high-power laser synchrotron source, the authors propose to confine the laser-electron interaction region in the extended plasma channel. This approach permits to use nanosecond laser pulses instead of the picosecond pulses. That helps to avoid the nonlinear Compton scattering regime and allows to utilize already existing technology of the high-repetition rate TEA CO 2 lasers operating at the atmospheric pressure. They demonstrate the advantages of the channeled LSS approach by the example of the prospective polarized positron source for Japan Linear Collider

  14. LASER APPLICATIONS AND OTHER TOPICS IN QUANTUM ELECTRONICS: Spectroscopy of V4+ and V3+ ions in a forsterite crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veremeichik, T. F.; Gaister, A. V.; Zharikov, Evgeny V.; Protopopov, V. N.; Smirnov, Valerii A.; Subbotin, Kirill A.

    2000-05-01

    The absorption spectra of impurity vanadium ions in forsterite crystals are studied in the wavelength range from 600 to 2000 nm. It is found that the V4+ ion in the tetrahedral coordination in crystals grown by the Czochralski technique exhibits strong absorption in the range from 600 to 1200 nm. The intense electron-vibrational progressions in the absorption spectra of impurity d-ions in crystals were observed for the first time at temperatures 300 and 77 K. In the authors' opinion, these progressions appear due to the formation of the oxovanadate complex and distortions of the structural tetrahedron. The forsterite crystal doped with V4+ ions has a very high absorption cross section (up to 2.1×10-18 cm2) and a continuous broad absorption band, which makes this crystal promising as a passive laser switch in the range between 600 and 1200 nm. At the same time, the V4+ ions in the forsterite crystal do not emit luminescence because of a high probability of the nonradiative relaxation of their excited state. It is shown that luminescence of a V:Mg2SiO4 crystal is related to the tetrahedral V3+ ion.

  15. Biomedical Studies with the Free Electron Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-05-15

    and Berns. Mi. W. User pitotora- 26. Kestel. D.. And Chou. T. C. Tumer -localizing components of the ptirph% rin diation therapy of cancer following... cancer , (2) laser tissue interactions for the study of atherosclerosis, (3) pulsed laser effects on the eye, (4) laser application in genetic...these studies. Please refer to the appropriate article/abstract for further detail. 1. Dye plus laser photosensitization of cancer . Significant

  16. High-intensity-laser-electron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyerhofer, D.D.

    1997-01-01

    In the field of an intense laser, photon-electron scattering becomes nonlinear when the oscillatory energy of the electron approaches its rest mass. The electron wave function is dressed by the field with a concomitant increase in the effective electron mass. When the photon energy in the electron rest frame is comparable to the electron rest mass, multiphoton Compton scattering occurs. When the photon energy is significantly lower than the electron rest mass, the electron acquires momentum from the photon field and emits harmonics. This paper reviews nonlinear photon-electron scattering processes and results from two recent experiments where they have been observed

  17. Precision laser processing for micro electronics and fiber optic manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Andrew; Osborne, Mike; Foster-Turner, Gideon; Dinkel, Duane W.

    2008-02-01

    The application of laser based materials processing for precision micro scale manufacturing in the electronics and fiber optic industry is becoming increasingly widespread and accepted. This presentation will review latest laser technologies available and discuss the issues to be considered in choosing the most appropriate laser and processing parameters. High repetition rate, short duration pulsed lasers have improved rapidly in recent years in terms of both performance and reliability enabling flexible, cost effective processing of many material types including metal, silicon, plastic, ceramic and glass. Demonstrating the relevance of laser micromachining, application examples where laser processing is in use for production will be presented, including miniaturization of surface mount capacitors by applying a laser technique for demetalization of tracks in the capacitor manufacturing process and high quality laser machining of fiber optics including stripping, cleaving and lensing, resulting in optical quality finishes without the need for traditional polishing. Applications include telecoms, biomedical and sensing. OpTek Systems was formed in 2000 and provide fully integrated systems and sub contract services for laser processes. They are headquartered in the UK and are establishing a presence in North America through a laser processing facility in South Carolina and sales office in the North East.

  18. Electronic Submissions of Pesticide Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Applications for pesticide registration can be submitted electronically, including forms, studies, and draft product labeling. Applicants need not submit multiple electronic copies of any pieces of their applications.

  19. X-ray Free-electron Lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feldhaus, J.; /DESY; Arthur, J.; Hastings, J.B.; /SLAC

    2007-02-23

    In a free-electron laser (FEL) the lasing medium is a high-energy beam of electrons flying with relativistic speed through a periodic magnetic field. The interaction between the synchrotron radiation that is produced and the electrons in the beam induces a periodic bunching of the electrons, greatly increasing the intensity of radiation produced at a particular wavelength. Depending only on a phase match between the electron energy and the magnetic period, the wavelength of the FEL radiation can be continuously tuned within a wide spectral range. The FEL concept can be adapted to produce radiation wavelengths from millimeters to Angstroms, and can in principle produce hard x-ray beams with unprecedented peak brightness, exceeding that of the brightest synchrotron source by ten orders of magnitude or more. This paper focuses on short-wavelength FELs. It reviews the physics and characteristic properties of single-pass FELs, as well as current technical developments aiming for fully coherent x-ray radiation pulses with pulse durations in the 100 fs to 100 as range. First experimental results at wavelengths around 100 nm and examples of scientific applications planned on the new, emerging x-ray FEL facilities are presented.

  20. Development of laser heated high current DC electron gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, Srutarshi; Bhattacharjee, Dhruva; Kandaswamy, E.; Ghodke, S.R.; Tiwari, Rajnish; Bakhtsingh, R.I.

    2015-01-01

    The paper deals with the development of a Laser heated cathode for Electron Accelerator. The electron gun is meant for Megawatt-class DC Accelerator for Electron Beam Flue Gas Treatment applications. Conventionally, LaB 6 cathode is indirectly heated by tungsten filaments whereas in the newly proposed gun, Laser is utilized for heating. A Nd:YAG Laser is used to heat the LaB 6 cathode to emission temperatures. The characterization of cathode heating at various Laser powers has been carried out. In initial trials, it has been observed that with 125 W of Laser power, the LaB 6 pellet was heated to 1315 ° C. Based on these experimental results, an electron gun rated for 30 kV, 350 mA CW has been designed. The optimization of gun electrode geometry has been done using CST Particle Studio in order to tune the various electron gun parameters. The beam diameter obtained in simulation is 8 mm at 100 mm from the LaB 6 cathode. The perveance obtained is 7.1 x 10 -8 A/V 3/2 . The Laser heated cathode has the advantages of eliminating the magnetic field effects of filament on the electron beam, electrical isolation needed for gun filament power supplies and better electron beam emittances. (author)

  1. Novel aspects of direct laser acceleration of relativistic electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arefiev, Alexey

    2015-11-01

    Production of energetic electrons is a keystone aspect of ultraintense laser-plasma interactions that underpins a variety of topics and applications, including fast ignition inertial confinement fusion and compact particle and radiation sources. There is a wide range of electron acceleration regimes that depend on the duration of the laser pulse and the plasma density. This talk focuses on the regime in which the plasma is significantly underdense and the laser pulse duration is longer than the electron response time, so that, in contrast to the wakefield acceleration regime, the pulse creates a quasi-static channel in the electron density. Such a regime is of particular interest, since it can naturally arise in experiments with solid density targets where the pre-pulse of an ultraintense laser produces an extended sub-critical pre-plasma. This talk examines the impact of several key factors on electron acceleration by the laser pulse and the resulting electron energy gain. A detailed consideration is given to the role played by: (1) the static longitudinal electric field, (2) the static transverse electric field, (3) the electron injection into the laser pulse, (4) the electromagnetic dispersion, and (5) the static longitudinal magnetic field. It is shown that all of these factors lead, under conditions outlined in the talk, to a considerable electron energy gain that greatly exceeds the ponderomotive limit. The static fields do not directly transfer substantial energy to electrons. Instead, they alter the longitudinal dephasing between the electrons and the laser pulse, which then allows the electrons to gain extra energy from the pulse. The talk will also outline a time-resolution criterion that must be satisfied in order to correctly reproduce these effects in particle-in-cell simulations. Supported by AFOSR Contract No. FA9550-14-1-0045, National Nuclear Security Administration Contract No. DE-FC52-08NA28512, and US Department of Energy Contract No. DE-FG02

  2. Electron beam simulation applicators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purdy, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    A system for simulating electron beam treatment portals using low-temperature melting point alloy is described. Special frames having the same physical dimensions as the electron beam applicators used on the Varian Clinac 20 linear accelerator were designed and constructed

  3. Free electron laser as a fusion driver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prosnitz, D.; Schlitt, L.

    1981-01-01

    The Free Electron Laser (FEL) is shown to be a potentially attractive solution to the problem of finding a suitable short wavelength fusion driver. The design of a 3 MJ, 250 nm FEL fusion driver is discussed

  4. Equipment concept design and development plans for microgravity science and applications research on space station: Combustion tunnel, laser diagnostic system, advanced modular furnace, integrated electronics laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhran, M. L.; Youngblood, W. W.; Georgekutty, T.; Fiske, M. R.; Wear, W. O.

    1986-01-01

    Taking advantage of the microgravity environment of space NASA has initiated the preliminary design of a permanently manned space station that will support technological advances in process science and stimulate the development of new and improved materials having applications across the commercial spectrum. Previous studies have been performed to define from the researcher's perspective, the requirements for laboratory equipment to accommodate microgravity experiments on the space station. Functional requirements for the identified experimental apparatus and support equipment were determined. From these hardware requirements, several items were selected for concept designs and subsequent formulation of development plans. This report documents the concept designs and development plans for two items of experiment apparatus - the Combustion Tunnel and the Advanced Modular Furnace, and two items of support equipment the Laser Diagnostic System and the Integrated Electronics Laboratory. For each concept design, key technology developments were identified that are required to enable or enhance the development of the respective hardware.

  5. Electronic circuits fundamentals & applications

    CERN Document Server

    Tooley, Mike

    2015-01-01

    Electronics explained in one volume, using both theoretical and practical applications.New chapter on Raspberry PiCompanion website contains free electronic tools to aid learning for students and a question bank for lecturersPractical investigations and questions within each chapter help reinforce learning Mike Tooley provides all the information required to get to grips with the fundamentals of electronics, detailing the underpinning knowledge necessary to appreciate the operation of a wide range of electronic circuits, including amplifiers, logic circuits, power supplies and oscillators. The

  6. Ultraviolet laser technology and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Elliott, David L

    1995-01-01

    Ultraviolet Laser Technology and Applications is a hands-on reference text that identifies the main areas of UV laser technology; describes how each is applied; offers clearly illustrated examples of UV opticalsystems applications; and includes technical data on optics, lasers, materials, and systems. This book is unique for its comprehensive, in-depth coverage. Each chapter deals with a different aspect of the subject, beginning with UV light itself; moving through the optics, sources, and systems; and concluding with detailed descriptions of applications in various fields.The text enables pr

  7. Reconstructing the energy band electronic structure of pulsed laser deposited CZTS thin films intended for solar cell absorber applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandiyan, Rajesh [Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique, Centre-Énergie, Matériaux et Télécommunications, 1650 Blvd. Lionel–Boulet, C.P. 1020, Varennes, QC J3X-1S2 (Canada); Oulad Elhmaidi, Zakaria [Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique, Centre-Énergie, Matériaux et Télécommunications, 1650 Blvd. Lionel–Boulet, C.P. 1020, Varennes, QC J3X-1S2 (Canada); University of Mohammed V, Faculty of Sciences, Materials Physics Laboratory, B.P. 1014 Rabat (Morocco); Sekkat, Zouheir [Optics & Photonics Center, Moroccan Foundation for Advanced Science, Innovation and Research, Rabat (Morocco); Abd-lefdil, Mohammed [University of Mohammed V, Faculty of Sciences, Materials Physics Laboratory, B.P. 1014 Rabat (Morocco); El Khakani, My Ali, E-mail: elkhakani@emt.inrs.ca [Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique, Centre-Énergie, Matériaux et Télécommunications, 1650 Blvd. Lionel–Boulet, C.P. 1020, Varennes, QC J3X-1S2 (Canada)

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • High quality CZTS thin films grown by means of PLD technique without resorting to any post sulfurization process. • Effect of thermal annealing treatments (in the 200–500 °C range) on the structural, morphological and optoelectronic properties of PLD-CZTS films. • Experimental determination of key optoelectronic parameters (i.e.; E{sub g}, VBM, ϕ, I{sub p}, and χ) enabling the reconstruction of energy band electronic structure of the PLD-CZTS films. • Investigation on the energy band alignments of the heterojunction interface formed between CZTS and both CdS and ZnS buffer layer materials. - Abstract: We report here on the use of pulsed KrF-laser deposition (PLD) technique for the growth of high-quality Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4} (CZTS) thin films onto Si, and glass substrates without resorting to any post sulfurization process. The PLD-CZTS films were deposited at room temperature (RT) and then subjected to post annealing at different temperatures ranging from 200 to 500 °C in Argon atmosphere. The X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy confirmed that the PLD films crystallize in the characteristic kesterite CZTS structure regardless of their annealing temperature (T{sub a}), but their crystallinity is much improved for T{sub a} ≥ 400 °C. The PLD-CZTS films were found to exhibit a relatively dense morphology with a surface roughness (RMS) that increases with T{sub a} (from ∼14 nm at RT to 70 nm at T{sub a} = 500 °C with a value around 40 nm for T{sub a} = 300–400 °C). The optical bandgap of the PLD-CZTS films, was derived from UV–vis transmission spectra analysis, and found to decrease from 1.73 eV for non-annealed films to ∼1.58 eV for those annealed at T{sub a} = 300 °C. These band gap values are very close to the optimum value needed for an ideal solar cell absorber. In order to achieve a complete reconstruction of the one-dimensional energy band structure of these PLD-CZTS absorbers, we have combined both XPS and UPS

  8. Application of Various Lasers to Laser Trimming Resistance System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Ji-feng

    2007-01-01

    Though the laser trimming resistance has been an old laser machining industry for over 30 years, the development of technology brings new alternative lasers which can be used for the traditional machining. The paper describes application of various lasers to laser trimming resistance system including early traditional krypton arc lamp pumped Nd:YAG to laser, modern popular diode pumped solid state laser and the present advanced harmonic diode pumped solid state laser. Using the new alternative lasers in the laser trimming resistance system can dramatically improve the yields and equipment performance.

  9. Laser Beam Scintillation with Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Andrews, Larry C; Young, Cynthia

    2001-01-01

    Renewed interest in laser communication systems has sparked development of useful new analytic models. This book discusses optical scintillation and its impact on system performance in free-space optical communication and laser radar applications, with a detailed look at propagation phenomena and the role of scintillation on system behavior. Intended for practicing engineers, scientists, and students.

  10. Direct longitudinal laser acceleration of electrons in free space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Carbajo

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Compact laser-driven accelerators are pursued heavily worldwide because they make novel methods and tools invented at national laboratories widely accessible in science, health, security, and technology [V. Malka et al., Principles and applications of compact laser-plasma accelerators, Nat. Phys. 4, 447 (2008]. Current leading laser-based accelerator technologies [S. P. D. Mangles et al., Monoenergetic beams of relativistic electrons from intense laser-plasma interactions, Nature (London 431, 535 (2004; T. Toncian et al., Ultrafast laser-driven microlens to focus and energy-select mega-electron volt protons, Science 312, 410 (2006; S. Tokita et al. Single-shot ultrafast electron diffraction with a laser-accelerated sub-MeV electron pulse, Appl. Phys. Lett. 95, 111911 (2009] rely on a medium to assist the light to particle energy transfer. The medium imposes material limitations or may introduce inhomogeneous fields [J. R. Dwyer et al., Femtosecond electron diffraction: “Making the molecular movie,”, Phil. Trans. R. Soc. A 364, 741 (2006]. The advent of few cycle ultraintense radially polarized lasers [S. Carbajo et al., Efficient generation of ultraintense few-cycle radially polarized laser pulses, Opt. Lett. 39, 2487 (2014] has ushered in a novel accelerator concept [L. J. Wong and F. X. Kärtner, Direct acceleration of an electron in infinite vacuum by a pulsed radially polarized laser beam, Opt. Express 18, 25035 (2010; F. Pierre-Louis et al. Direct-field electron acceleration with ultrafast radially polarized laser beams: Scaling laws and optimization, J. Phys. B 43, 025401 (2010; Y. I. Salamin, Electron acceleration from rest in vacuum by an axicon Gaussian laser beam, Phys. Rev. A 73, 043402 (2006; C. Varin and M. Piché, Relativistic attosecond electron pulses from a free-space laser-acceleration scheme, Phys. Rev. E 74, 045602 (2006; A. Sell and F. X. Kärtner, Attosecond electron bunches accelerated and

  11. Application of lasers in endodontics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertl, Thomas P.; Benthin, Hartmut; Majaron, Boris; Mueller, Gerhard J.

    1997-12-01

    Root canal treatment is still a problem in dentistry. Very often the conventional treatment fails and several treatment sessions are necessary to save the tooth from root resection or extraction. Application of lasers may help in this situation. Bacteria reduction has been demonstrated both in vitro and clinically and is either based on laser induced thermal effects or by using an ultraviolet light source. Root canal cleansing is possible by Er:YAG/YSGG-Lasers, using the hydrodynamic motion of a fluid filled in the canals. However root canal shaping using lasers is still a problem. Via falsas and fiber breakage are points of research.

  12. Electron beams and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haouat, G.; Couillaud, C.

    1998-01-01

    Studies of the physical properties of the ELSA-linac electron beam are presented. They include measurements of the characteristic beam parameter and analyzes of the beam transport using simulation codes. The aim of these studies is to determine the best conditions for production of intense and very short electron bunches and to optimize the transport of space-charge dominated beams. Precise knowledge of the transport dynamics allows to produce beams with the required characteristics for light production in Free-Electron Laser (FEL), and to give a good description of energy-transfer phenomena between electrons and photons in the wriggler. The particular features of ELSA authorize studies of high-intensity, high-brightness beam properties, especially the halo surrounding the dense core of the electron bunches, which is formed by the space charge effects. It is also shown that the ELSA facility is well suited for the fabrication of very short γ and X-rays sources for applied research in nuclear and plasma physics, or for time response studies of fast detectors. (author)

  13. Control system for JAERI Free Electron Laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, Masayoshi

    1992-01-01

    A control system comprising of the personal computers network and the CAMAC stations for the JAERI Free Electron Laser is designed and is in the development stage. It controls the equipment and analyzes the electron and optical beam experiments. The concept and the prototype of the control system are described. (author)

  14. Laser-assisted electron-atom collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, N.J.

    1989-01-01

    New developments in our understanding of the electron-atom collision process have been made possible by combining the use of highly monochromatic electron beams and intense CO 2 lasers. This paper reviews such experiments and discusses possible future progress in what is a new field in atomic collision physics. (author)

  15. The application of laser plasma in ophthalmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Yujiang; Luo Le; Sun Yabing

    2000-01-01

    The production and development of laser plasma are introduced, and the contribution of laser biomedicine and laser plasma technology to ophthalmology is analyzed. The latest three progresses (laser photocoagulation, photo-refractive keratotomy and laser iridectomy) of laser plasma applications in ophthalmology are presented

  16. LASER APPLICATIONS AND OTHER TOPICS IN QUANTUM ELECTRONICS: Change in the optical properties of hyaline cartilage heated by the near-IR laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagratashvili, Viktor N.; Bagratashvili, N. V.; Gapontsev, V. P.; Makhmutova, G. Sh; Minaev, V. P.; Omel'chenko, A. I.; Samartsev, I. E.; Sviridov, A. P.; Sobol', E. N.; Tsypina, S. I.

    2001-06-01

    The in vitro dynamics of the change in optical properties of hyaline cartilage heated by fibre lasers at wavelengths 0.97 and 1.56 μm is studied. The laser-induced bleaching (at 1.56 μm) and darkening (at 0.97 μm) of the cartilage, caused by the heating and transport of water as well as by a change in the cartilage matrix, were observed and studied. These effects should be taken into account while estimating the depth of heating of the tissue. The investigated dynamics of light scattering in the cartilage allows one to choose the optimum radiation dose for laser plastic surgery of cartilage tissues.

  17. Polarization in free electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papadichev, V.A. [Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1995-12-31

    Polarization of electromagnetic radiation is required very often in numerous scientific and industrial applications: studying of crystals, molecules and intermolecular interaction high-temperature superconductivity, semiconductors and their transitions, polymers and liquid crystals. Using polarized radiation allows to obtain important data (otherwise inaccessible) in astrophysics, meteorology and oceanology. It is promising in chemistry and biology for selective influence on definite parts of molecules in chain synthesis reactions, precise control of various processes at cell and subcell levels, genetic engineering etc. Though polarization methods are well elaborated in optics, they can fail in far-infrared, vacuum-ultraviolet and X-ray regions because of lack of suitable non-absorbing materials and damaging of optical elements at high specific power levels. Therefore, it is of some interest to analyse polarization of untreated FEL radiation obtained with various types of undulators, with and without axial magnetic field. The polarization is studied using solutions for electron orbits in various cases: plane or helical undulator with or without axial magnetic field, two plane undulators, a combination of right- and left-handed helical undulators with equal periods, but different field amplitudes. Some examples of how a desired polarization (elliptical circular or linear) can be obtained or changed quickly, which is necessary in many experiments, are given.

  18. Compact electron accelerator for pumping gas lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duncan, C.V.; Bradley, L.P.

    1976-01-01

    A description is given of the design and application of a simple e-beam generator for the repetitive pulse pumping of gas lasers. The circuit uses a low inductance Marx and series tuned pulse forming elements

  19. Long range coherence in free electron lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colson, W. B.

    1984-01-01

    The simple free electron laser (FEL) design uses a static, periodic, transverse magnetic field to undulate relativistic electrons traveling along its axis. This allows coupling to a co-propagating optical wave and results in bunching to produce coherent radiation. The advantages of the FEL are continuous tunability, operation at wavelengths ranging from centimeters to angstroms, and high efficiency resulting from the fact that the interaction region only contains light, relativistic electrons, and a magnetic field. Theoretical concepts and operational principles are discussed.

  20. Civilian applications of laser fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maniscalco, J.; Blink, J.; Buntzen, R.; Hovingh, J.; Meier, W.; Monsler, M.; Walker, P.

    1978-01-01

    The commercial aspects of laser fusion were evaluated in an attempt to relate the end products (neutrons and energy) to significant commercial applications. We have found that by far the largest markets and highest payoffs for laser fusion are associated with electric power production. Hence, much of this report evaluates the prospects of producing commercial electricity with laser fusion. To this end, we have described in detail a new and promising laser fusion concept--the liquid lithium waterfall reactor. In addition, we have taken the most attractive features from our laser fusion studies and used them to compare laser fusion to other long-range sources of energy (breeder reactors and solar energy). It is our contention that all three sources of electrical energy should be developed to the point where the final selections are primarily based on economic competitiveness. The other potential applications of laser fusion (fissile fuel production, synthetic fuel production, actinide burning, and propulsion) are also discussed, and our preliminary plan for the engineering development of laser fusion is presented

  1. Civilian applications of laser fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maniscalco, J.; Blink, J.; Buntzen, R.; Hovingh, J.; Meier, W.; Monsler, M.; Walker, P.

    1977-01-01

    The commercial aspects of laser fusion were evaluated in an attempt to relate the end products (neutrons and energy) to significant commercial applications. It was found that by far the largest markets and highest payoffs for laser fusion are associated with electric power production. Hence, much of this report evaluates the prospects of producing commercial electricity with laser fusion. To this end, we have described in detail a new and promising laser fusion concept--the liquid lithium waterfall reactor. In addition, we have taken the most attractive features from our laser studies and used them to compare laser fusion to other long-range sources of energy (breeder reactors and solar energy). It is our contention that all three sources of electrical energy should be developed to the point where the final selections are primarily based on economic competitiveness. The other potential applications of laser fusion (fissile fuel production, synthetic fuel production, actinide burning, and propulsion) are also discussed, and our preliminary plan for the engineering development of laser fusion is presented

  2. Civilian applications of laser fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maniscalco, J.; Blink, J.; Buntzen, R.; Hovingh, J.; Meier, W.; Monsler, M.; Walker, P.

    1977-11-17

    The commercial aspects of laser fusion were evaluated in an attempt to relate the end products (neutrons and energy) to significant commercial applications. It was found that by far the largest markets and highest payoffs for laser fusion are associated with electric power production. Hence, much of this report evaluates the prospects of producing commercial electricity with laser fusion. To this end, we have described in detail a new and promising laser fusion concept--the liquid lithium waterfall reactor. In addition, we have taken the most attractive features from our laser studies and used them to compare laser fusion to other long-range sources of energy (breeder reactors and solar energy). It is our contention that all three sources of electrical energy should be developed to the point where the final selections are primarily based on economic competitiveness. The other potential applications of laser fusion (fissile fuel production, synthetic fuel production, actinide burning, and propulsion) are also discussed, and our preliminary plan for the engineering development of laser fusion is presented.

  3. Applications Of Laser Processing For Automotive Manufacturing In Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Masashi; Ueda, Katsuhiko; Takagi, Soya

    1986-11-01

    Recently in Japan, laser processing is increasingly being employed for production, so that laser cutting, laser welding and other laser material processing have begun to be used in various industries. As a result, the number of lasers sold has been increasing year by year in Japan. In the Japanese automotive industry, a number applications have been introduced in laboratories and production lines. In this paper, several current instances of such laser applications will be introduced. In the case of welding, studies have been conducted on applying laser welding to automatic transmission components, in place of electron beam welding. Another example of application, the combination of lasers and robots to form highly flexible manufacturing systems, has been adopted for trimming steel panel and plastic components.

  4. Beamline for X-ray Free Electron Laser of SACLA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tono, K; Togashi, T; Ohashi, H; Kimura, H; Takahashi, S; Takeshita, K; Tomizawa, H; Goto, S; Inubushi, Y; Sato, T; Yabashi, M

    2013-01-01

    A beamline for X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) has been developed at SACLA, SPring-8 Angstrom Compact free electron LAser. The beamline delivers and diagnoses an XFEL beam without degrading the beam quality. The transport optics are applicable in the range of 4–30 keV with a double-crystal monochromator or 4–15 keV with either of two double-mirror systems. A photon diagnostic system of the beamline monitors intensity, photon energy, center-of-mass position, and spatial profile in shot-by-shot and non-destructive manners.

  5. Electron distribution function in laser heated plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fourkal, E.; Bychenkov, V. Yu.; Rozmus, W.; Sydora, R.; Kirkby, C.; Capjack, C. E.; Glenzer, S. H.; Baldis, H. A.

    2001-01-01

    A new electron distribution function has been found in laser heated homogeneous plasmas by an analytical solution to the kinetic equation and by particle simulations. The basic kinetic model describes inverse bremsstrahlung absorption and electron--electron collisions. The non-Maxwellian distribution function is comprised of a super-Gaussian bulk of slow electrons and a Maxwellian tail of energetic particles. The tails are heated due to electron--electron collisions and energy redistribution between superthermal particles and light absorbing slow electrons from the bulk of the distribution function. A practical fit is proposed to the new electron distribution function. Changes to the linear Landau damping of electron plasma waves are discussed. The first evidence for the existence of non-Maxwellian distribution functions has been found in the interpretation, which includes the new distribution function, of the Thomson scattering spectra in gold plasmas [Glenzer , Phys. Rev. Lett. 82, 97 (1999)

  6. Increasing Laser Stability with Improved Electronic Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troxel, Daylin; Bennett, Aaron; Erickson, Christopher J.; Jones, Tyler; Durfee, Dallin S.

    2010-03-01

    We present several electronic instruments developed to implement an ultra-stable laser lock. These instruments include a high speed, low noise homodyne photo-detector; an ultrahigh stability, low noise current driver with high modulation bandwidth and digital control; a high-speed, low noise PID controller; a low-noise piezo driver; and a laser diode temperature controller. We will present the theory of operation for these instruments, design and construction techniques, and essential characteristics for each device.

  7. Laser applications in nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murnick, D.E.

    1985-01-01

    A large fraction of the International Workshop on Hyperfine Interactions was devoted to various aspects of 'laser applications in nuclear physics'. This panel discussion took place before all of the relevant formal presentations on the subject were complete. Nevertheless, there had been sufficient discussions for the significance of this emerging area of hyperfine interaction research to be made clear. An attempt was made to identify critical and controversial aspects of the subject in order to critically evaluate past successes and indicate important future directions of research. Each of the panelists made a short statement on one phase of laser-nuclear physics research, which was followed by general discussions with the other panelists and the audience. In this report, a few areas which were not covered in the formal presentations are summarized: extensions of laser spectroscopy to shorter lifetimes; extension of laser techniques to nuclei far off stability; interpretation of laser spectroscopic data; sensitivity and spectral resolution; polarized beams and targets. (Auth.)

  8. LASER APPLICATIONS AND OTHER TOPICS IN QUANTUM ELECTRONICS: Synthesis of bulk SiO2 : MxOy materials in a steady-state laser plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebedev, V. F.

    1997-01-01

    An analysis was made of the conditions of existence of a two-component steady-state laser plume in atmospheric air. Such a plume is used in single-stage synthesis of bulk molten materials belonging to the SiO2 : MxOy system. Targets of the SiO2 : M type (metal foil and a silica glass rod) and doping elements with boiling points below and above the boiling point of silica glass are discussed. The regimes and efficiency of steady-state transfer of the dopants are considered. The efficiency of transfer of metal oxides during growth of samples with the aid of a cw CO2 laser is reported to be ~0.05, 0.4, and 0.75g min-1 kW-1 when the mass dopant concentration is ~8%, 20%, and 60% for the oxides of Ti, Cu, and Ni, respectively.

  9. LASER APPLICATIONS AND OTHER TOPICS IN QUANTUM ELECTRONICS: Dynamics of splashing of molten metals during irradiation with single CO2 laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arutyunyan, R. V.; Baranov, V. Yu; Bol'shov, Leonid A.; Dolgov, V. A.; Malyuta, D. D.; Mezhevov, V. S.; Semak, V. V.

    1988-03-01

    An experimental investigation was made of the dynamics of the loss of the melt as a result of interaction with single-mode CO2 laser radiation pulses of 5-35 μs duration. The dynamics of splashing of the melt during irradiation with short pulses characterized by a Gaussian intensity distribution differed from that predicted by models in which the distribution of the vapor pressure was assumed to be radially homogeneous.

  10. Laser-pulsed relativistic electron gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherman, N.K.

    1986-01-01

    A relativistic (β ≅ 0.8) electron gun with good emittance and subnanosecond pulse duration which can be synchronized to picosecond laser pulses is being developed at NRC for use in studies of particle acceleration by lasers. Bursts of electron pulses exceeding 280 keV in energy have been extracted into air form a laser-driven vacuum photodiode. Trains of 5 ps pulses of ultraviolet UV light illuminate a magnesium cathode. Photoelectrons emitted from the cathode are accelerated in a graded electrostatic potential set up by a 360 kV Marx-generator. The UV pulses are obtained by doubling the frequency of a 606 nm dye laser modelocked at 160 MHz. Electron energies were measured by residual range in an echelon of Al foils. Total charge per burst was measured by picoammeter. Time structure of the bursts has been examined with plastic scintillator and a fast photomultiplier. Tests on a low voltage photodiode achieved a current density of 180 A/cm/sup 2/ from an Mg cathode, with quantum efficiency of 2.4 x 10/sup -6/ electron per UV photon. The brevity and intensity of the laser pulses cause the electric charge collected per pulse to increase linearly with bias voltage rather than according to the Langmuir-Child law. Gun emittance is about 150 mm-msr and beam brightness is about 1A/cm/sup 2/-sr. Estimated duration of individual electron pulses of a burst is about 400 ps with instantaneous current of about 0.1 mA. Energy spread within one pulse is expected to be about 15%. This gun has the potential to be a useful source of relativistic electrons for laser acceleration studies

  11. Progress toward the Wisconsin Free Electron Laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bisognano, Joseph; Bosch, R.A.; Eisert, D.; Fisher, M.V.; Green, M.A.; Jacobs, K.; Kleman, K.J.; Kulpin, J.; Rogers, G.C.; Lawler, J.E.; Yavuz, D.; Legg, R.

    2011-01-01

    The University of Wisconsin-Madison/Synchrotron Radiation Center is advancing its design for a seeded VUV/soft X-ray Free Electron Laser facility called WiFEL. To support this vision of an ultimate light source, we are pursuing a program of strategic R and D addressing several crucial elements. This includes development of a high repetition rate, VHF superconducting RF electron gun, R and D on photocathode materials by ARPES studies, and evaluation of FEL facility architectures (e.g., recirculation, compressor scenarios, CSR dechirping, undulator technologies) with the specific goal of cost containment. Studies of high harmonic generation for laser seeding are also planned.

  12. The laser principles and application techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maillet, H.

    1990-01-01

    In this book on laser applications chapter 4 is devoted to uranium isotopic separation and chapter 5 to laser inertial fusion, other topics include machining, medical applications, measurements, military applications, holography, reprography, telecommunications, compact discs, light shows and safety [fr

  13. In vitro study of 960 nm high power diode laser applications in dental enamel, aided by the presence of a photoinitiator dye: scanning electron microscopy analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Marcelo Vinicius de

    2002-06-01

    The objective of this study is to verify if a high power diode laser can effectively modify the morphology of an enamel surface, and if this can be done in a controlled fashion by changing the lasers parameters. Previous studies using SEM demonstrated that through irradiation with Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm) it is possible to modify the morphology of the dental surface in such way as to increase its resistance against caries decays. The desired procedures that should achieve a decrease of the index of caries decays and of its sequels are on a primary level, which means that action is necessary before the disease installs itself. In this study it was used for the first time a prototype of a high power diode laser operating at 960 nm, produced by the Laboratory of Development of Lasers of the Center for Lasers and Applications of the IPEN. This equipment can present several advantages as reliability, reduced size and low cost. The aim was establish parameters of laser irradiation that produce the desired effects wanted in the enamel and protocols that guarantee its safety during application in dental hard tissues, protecting it of heating effects such as fissures and carbonization. (author)

  14. An inverse free electron laser accelerator experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wernick, I.; Marshall, T.C.

    1992-01-01

    A free electron laser was configured as an autoaccelerator to test the principle of accelerating electrons by stimulated absorption of radiation (λ = 1.65mm) by an electron beam (750kV) traversing an undulator. Radiation is produced in the first section of a constant period undulator (1 w1 = 1.43cm) and then absorbed (∼ 40%) in a second undulator, having a tapered period (1 w2 = 1.8 - 2.25cm), which results in the acceleration of a subgroup (∼ 9%) of electrons to ∼ 1MeV

  15. Comparison of three different laser systems for application in dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mindermann, Anja; Niemz, M. H.; Eisenmann, L.; Loesel, Frieder H.; Bille, Josef F.

    1993-12-01

    Three different laser systems have been investigated according to their possible application in dentistry: a free running and a Q-switched microsecond Ho:YAG laser, a free running microsecond Er:YAG laser and picosecond Nd:YLF laser system consisting of an actively mode locked oscillator and a regenerative amplifier. The experiments focused on the question if lasers can support or maybe replace ordinary drilling machines. For this purpose several cavities were generated with the lasers mentioned above. Their depth and quality were judged by light and electron microscopy. The results of the experiments showed that the picosecond Nd:YLF laser system has advantages compared to other lasers regarding their application in dentistry.

  16. Quantum aspects of the free electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaiba, R.

    2007-03-15

    We study the role of Quantum Mechanics in the physics of Free Electron Lasers. While the Free Electron Laser (FEL) is usually treated as a classical device, we review the advantages of a quantum formulation of the FEL. We then show the existence of a regime of operation of the FEL that can only be described using Quantum Mechanics: if the dimensionless quantum parameter anti {rho} is smaller than 1, then in the 1-dimensional approximation the Hamiltonian that describes the FEL becomes equivalent to the Hamiltonian of a two-level system coupled to a radiation field. We give analytical and numerical solutions for the photon statistics of a Free Electron Laser operating in the quantum regime under various approximations. Since in the quantum regime the momentum of the electrons is discrete, we give a description of the electrons in phase space by introducing the Discrete Wigner Function. We then drop the assumption of a mono-energetic electron beam and describe the general case of a initial electron energy spread G({gamma}). Numerical analysis shows that the FEL quantum regime is observed only when the width of the initial momentum distribution is smaller than the momentum of the emitted photons. Both the analytical results in the linear approximation and the numerical simulations show that only the electrons close to a certain resonant energy start to emit photons. This generates the so-called Hole-burning effect in the electrons energy distribution, as it can be seen in the simulations we provide. Finally, we present a brief discussion about a fundamental uncertainty relation that ties the electron energy spread and the electron bunching. (orig.)

  17. Short Pulse Laser Applications Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Town, R.J.; Clark, D.S.; Kemp, A.J.; Lasinski, B.F.; Tabak, M.

    2008-01-01

    We are applying our recently developed, LDRD-funded computational simulation tool to optimize and develop applications of Fast Ignition (FI) for stockpile stewardship. This report summarizes the work performed during a one-year exploratory research LDRD to develop FI point designs for the National Ignition Facility (NIF). These results were sufficiently encouraging to propose successfully a strategic initiative LDRD to design and perform the definitive FI experiment on the NIF. Ignition experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) will begin in 2010 using the central hot spot (CHS) approach, which relies on the simultaneous compression and ignition of a spherical fuel capsule. Unlike this approach, the fast ignition (FI) method separates fuel compression from the ignition phase. In the compression phase, a laser such as NIF is used to implode a shell either directly, or by x rays generated from the hohlraum wall, to form a compact dense (∼300 g/cm 3 ) fuel mass with an areal density of ∼3.0 g/cm 2 . To ignite such a fuel assembly requires depositing ∼20kJ into a ∼35 (micro)m spot delivered in a short time compared to the fuel disassembly time (∼20ps). This energy is delivered during the ignition phase by relativistic electrons generated by the interaction of an ultra-short high-intensity laser. The main advantages of FI over the CHS approach are higher gain, a lower ignition threshold, and a relaxation of the stringent symmetry requirements required by the CHS approach. There is worldwide interest in FI and its associated science. Major experimental facilities are being constructed which will enable 'proof of principle' tests of FI in integrated subignition experiments, most notably the OMEGA-EP facility at the University of Rochester's Laboratory of Laser Energetics and the FIREX facility at Osaka University in Japan. Also, scientists in the European Union have recently proposed the construction of a new FI facility, called HiPER, designed to

  18. Rippled beam free electron laser amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsten, Bruce E.

    1999-01-01

    A free electron laser amplifier provides a scalloping annular electron beam that interacts with the axial electric field of a TM.sub.0n mode. A waveguide defines an axial centerline and, a solenoid arranged about the waveguide produces an axial constant magnetic field within the waveguide. An electron beam source outputs a annular electron beam that interacts with the axial magnetic field to have an equilibrium radius and a ripple radius component having a variable radius with a ripple period along the axial centerline. An rf source outputs an axial electric field that propagates within the waveguide coaxial with the electron beam and has a radial mode that interacts at the electron beam at the equilibrium radius component of the electron beam.

  19. A high-repetition rate LWFA for studies of laser propagation and electron generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhaohan; Easter, James; Hou, Bixue; Krushelnick, Karl; Nees, John; Thomas, Alec

    2010-11-01

    Advances in ultrafast optics today have enabled laser systems to deliver ever shorter and more intense pulses. When focused, such laser pulses can easily exceed relativistic intensities where the wakefield created by the strong laser electric field can be used to accelerate electrons. Laser wakefield acceleration of electrons holds promise for future compact electron accelerators or drivers of other radiation sources in many scientific, medical and engineering applications. We present experimental studies of laser wakefield acceleration using the λ-cubed laser at the University of Michigan -- a table-top high-power laser system operating at 500 Hz repetition rate. The high repetition rate allows statistical studies of laser propagation and electron acceleration which are not accessible with typical sub-0.1 Hz repetition rate systems. In addition, we compare the experiments with particle-in-cell simulations using the code OSIRIS.

  20. Nonlinear optics with coherent free electron lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bencivenga, F.; Capotondi, F.; Mincigrucci, R.; Cucini, R.; Manfredda, M.; Pedersoli, E.; Principi, E.; Simoncig, A.; Masciovecchio, C.

    2016-12-01

    We interpreted the recent construction of free electron laser (FELs) facilities worldwide as an unprecedented opportunity to bring concepts and methods from the scientific community working with optical lasers into the domain of x-ray science. This motivated our efforts towards the realization of FEL-based wave-mixing applications. In this article we present new extreme ultraviolet transient grating (X-TG) data from vitreous SiO2, collected using two crossed FEL pulses (photon frequency 38 eV) to generate the X-TG and a phase matched optical probing pulse (photon frequency 3.1 eV). This experiment extends our previous investigation, which was carried out on a nominally identical sample using a different FEL photon frequency (45 eV) to excite the X-TG. The present data are featured by a peak intensity of the X-TG signal substantially larger than that previously reported and by slower modulations of the X-TG signal at positive delays. These differences could be ascribed to the different FEL photon energy used in the two experiments or to differences in the sample properties. A systematic X-TG study on the same sample as a function of the FEL wavelength is needed to draw a consistent conclusion. We also discuss how the advances in the performance of the FELs, in terms of generation of fully coherent photon pulses and multi-color FEL emission, may push the development of original experimental strategies to study matter at the femtosecond-nanometer time-length scales, with the unique option of element and chemical state specificity. This would allow the development of advanced experimental tools based on wave-mixing processes, which may have a tremendous impact in the study of a large array of phenomena, ranging from nano-dynamics in complex materials to charge and energy transfer processes.

  1. Laser-induced nuclear physics and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ledingham, K.W.D.; Singhal, R.P.; McKenna, P.; Spencer, I.

    2002-01-01

    With a 1 ps pulse laser at 1 μm wavelength, He gas is ionised at about 3.10 14 W.cm -2 . As the intensity increases, the inert gases become multiple ionised and between 10 18 and 10 19 W.cm -2 photon induced nuclear reactions are energetically possible. Close to 10 21 W.cm -2 pion production can take place. At the very high intensities of 10 28 W.cm -2 , it can be shown that electron-positron pairs can be created from the vacuum. The authors review the applications of high intensity focused laser beams in particle acceleration, laser-induced fission and laser production of protons and neutrons. Exciting new phenomena are expected at intensities higher than 10 22 W.cm -2 , -) the oscillating electric field can affect directly the protons in exactly the same way as the electrons in the plasma, -) fusion reactions by direct laser acceleration of ions. (A.C.)

  2. LASER APPLICATIONS AND OTHER TOPICS IN QUANTUM ELECTRONICS: Screw dislocations of laser speckle fields in interferograms with a circular line structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobrov, B. D.

    1991-07-01

    Experimental results are used to show that circular interferograms are of interest in studies of screw dislocations of speckle-distorted laser beams because of a close correspondence between the symmetry of these interferograms and defects. The presence of dislocations transforms a system of the usual rings into a split network. Typical structure elements of such interferograms are right- and left-handed spirals connecting singular points of dislocations. Spiral fragments can be used in the diagnostics of dislocations regarded as independent defects. A method is suggested for the formation of highly directed optical beams with a low level of the usual aberrations, but with a complex phase surface topology. Screw dislocations are shown to be a natural analog of helical waves known in optics and capable of deliberate generation.

  3. Electron acceleration in a plane laser beam

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Petržílka, Václav; Krlín, Ladislav; Tataronis, J. A.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 52, supplement D (2002), s. 279-282 ISSN 0011-4626. [Symposium on Plasma Physics and Technology/20th./. Prague, 10.06.2002-13.06.2002] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2043910 Keywords : electron acceleration, laser beam Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 0.311, year: 2002

  4. Argon laser application to endodontics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blankenau, Richard J.; Ludlow, Marvin; Anderson, David

    1993-07-01

    The application of laser technology to endodontics has been studied for some time. At the present time several major problems are being investigated: (1) removal of infected tissues, (2) sterilization of canals, (3) obturation of canals, and (4) preservation of the vitality of supporting tissues. This list is not intended to imply other problems do not exist or have been solved, but it is a starting point. This paper reviews some of the literature that relates to laser applications to endodontics and concludes with some of the findings from our investigation.

  5. Laser spectroscopy and its applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radziemski, L.J.; Solarz, R.W.; Paisner, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    Laser spectroscopy has applications in diverse fields ranging from combustion studies and trace-sample detection to biological research. At the same time, it has also contributed greatly to the discovery of hundreds of new lasers. This symbiotic relationship has promoted an especially rapid expansion of the field. This book provides a review of the subject. It includes, for example, chapters on laser isotope separation techniques, enabling scientists to compare their relative advantages and drawbacks. This volume also gives numerous tables that summarize important features of lasers, experiments, and parameters for quick reference. In addition, it presents diagrams for visualizing rotational molecular energy levels of high J in order to enhance our understanding of molecular motions and their relationship to molecular energy levels. Offering insights into how experts think this technology will improve, it considers research and development in each topic discussed

  6. Experimental study of hot electrons propagation and energy deposition in solid or laser-shock compressed targets: applications to fast igniter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pisani, F.

    2000-02-01

    In the fast igniter scheme, a recent approach proposed for the inertial confinement fusion, the idea is to dissociate the fuel ignition phase from its compression. The ignition phase would be then achieved by means of an external energy source: a fast electron beam generated by the interaction with an ultra-intense laser. The main goal of this work is to study the mechanisms of the hot electron energy transfer to the compressed fuel. We intent in particular to study the role of the electric and collisional effects involved in the hot electron propagation in a medium with properties similar to the compressed fuel. We carried out two experiments, one at the Vulcan laser facility (England) and the second one at the new LULI 100 TW laser (France). During the first experiment, we obtained the first results on the hot electron propagation in a dense and hot plasma. The innovating aspect of this work was in particular the use of the laser-shock technique to generate high pressures, allowing the strongly correlated and degenerated plasma to be created. The role of the electric and magnetic effects due to the space charge associated with the fast electron beam has been investigated in the second experiment. Here we studied the propagation in materials with different electrical characteristics: an insulator and a conductor. The analysis of the results showed that only by taking into account simultaneously the two propagation mechanisms (collisions and electric effects) a correct treatment of the energy deposition is possible. We also showed the importance of taking into account the induced modifications due to the electrons beam crossing the target, especially the induced heating. (author)

  7. Ultrashort pulse laser technology laser sources and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Schrempel, Frank; Dausinger, Friedrich

    2016-01-01

    Ultrashort laser pulses with durations in the femtosecond range up to a few picoseconds provide a unique method for precise materials processing or medical applications. Paired with the recent developments in ultrashort pulse lasers, this technology is finding its way into various application fields. The book gives a comprehensive overview of the principles and applications of ultrashort pulse lasers, especially applied to medicine and production technology. Recent advances in laser technology are discussed in detail. This covers the development of reliable and cheap low power laser sources as well as high average power ultrashort pulse lasers for large scale manufacturing. The fundamentals of laser-matter-interaction as well as processing strategies and the required system technology are discussed for these laser sources with respect to precise materials processing. Finally, different applications within medicine, measurement technology or materials processing are highlighted.

  8. Reconstructing the energy band electronic structure of pulsed laser deposited CZTS thin films intended for solar cell absorber applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandiyan, Rajesh; Oulad Elhmaidi, Zakaria; Sekkat, Zouheir; Abd-lefdil, Mohammed; El Khakani, My Ali

    2017-02-01

    We report here on the use of pulsed KrF-laser deposition (PLD) technique for the growth of high-quality Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) thin films onto Si, and glass substrates without resorting to any post sulfurization process. The PLD-CZTS films were deposited at room temperature (RT) and then subjected to post annealing at different temperatures ranging from 200 to 500 °C in Argon atmosphere. The X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy confirmed that the PLD films crystallize in the characteristic kesterite CZTS structure regardless of their annealing temperature (Ta), but their crystallinity is much improved for Ta ≥ 400 °C. The PLD-CZTS films were found to exhibit a relatively dense morphology with a surface roughness (RMS) that increases with Ta (from ∼14 nm at RT to 70 nm at Ta = 500 °C with a value around 40 nm for Ta = 300-400 °C). The optical bandgap of the PLD-CZTS films, was derived from UV-vis transmission spectra analysis, and found to decrease from 1.73 eV for non-annealed films to ∼1.58 eV for those annealed at Ta = 300 °C. These band gap values are very close to the optimum value needed for an ideal solar cell absorber. In order to achieve a complete reconstruction of the one-dimensional energy band structure of these PLD-CZTS absorbers, we have combined both XPS and UPS spectroscopies to determine their chemical bondings, the position of their valence band maximum (relative to Fermi level), and their work function values. This enabled us to sketch out, as accurately as possible, the band alignment of the heterojunction interface formed between CZTS and both CdS and ZnS buffer layer materials.

  9. Improvement of the quality of laser-wakefield accelerators: towards a compact free-electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehe, R.

    2014-01-01

    When an intense and short laser pulse propagates through an underdense gas, it can accelerate a fraction of the electrons of the gas, and thereby generate an electron bunch with an energy of a few hundreds of MeV. This phenomenon, which is referred to as laser-wakefield acceleration, has many potential applications, including the design of ultra-bright X-ray sources known as free electron lasers (FEL). However, these applications require the electron bunch to have an excellent quality (low divergence, emittance and energy spread). In this thesis, different solutions to improve the quality of the electron bunch are developed, both analytically and through the use of Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulations. It is first shown however that PIC simulations tend to erroneously overestimate the emittance of the bunch, due to the numerical Cherenkov effect. Thus, in order to correctly estimate the emittance, a modified PIC algorithm is proposed, which is not subject to this unphysical Cherenkov effect. Using this algorithm, we have observed and studied a new mechanism to generate the electron bunch: optical transverse injection. This mechanism can produce bunches with a high charge, a low emittance and a low energy spread. In addition, we also proposed an experimental setup - the laser-plasma lens - which can strongly reduce the final divergence of the bunch. Finally, these results are put into context by discussing the properties required for the design of a compact FEL. It is shown in particular that laser-wakefield accelerator could be advantageously combined with innovative laser-plasma undulators, in order to produce bright X-rays sources. (author)

  10. Rapid localized deactivation of self-assembled monolayers by propagation-controlled laser-induced plasma and its application to self-patterning of electronics and biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jongsu; Kwon, Seung-Gab; Back, Seunghyun; Kang, Bongchul

    2018-03-01

    We present a novel laser-induced surface treatment process to rapidly control the spatial wettabilities of various functional solutions with submicron to micron resolutions. Ultrathin hydrophobic self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) that little absorb typical laser lights due to short penetration depth were selectively deactivated by instantaneous interaction with laser-induced metallic plasmas. The spatial region of the deactivated SAM, which corresponds to process resolution, is adjustable by controlling the spatial propagation of the plasma. This method leads to the parallel formation of hydrophilic functional solutions on glass substrates with a minimum resolution on the submicron scale. To show its feasibility in device engineering fields, this method was applied to the cost-effective fabrication of electronics and biosensors. Rapid self-patterning of electronic and biological functional solutions (silver nanoparticle solution and streptavidin protein solution) was successfully realized by selective deactivation of two different SAMs (tridecafluoro-1,1,2,2-tetrahydrooctyltrichlorosilane (FOTS) for electronics and the hetero-hybrid SAM (octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS)/2-[methoxy(polyethyleneoxy)propyl] trichlorosilane (PEG)) for biosensors). As a result, this method can be exploited for the rapid and low-cost fabrication of various thin film devices such as electronics, biosensors, energy, displays, and photonics.

  11. Applications for electronic documents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beitel, G.A.

    1995-01-01

    This paper discusses the application of electronic media to documents, specifically Safety Analysis Reports (SARs), prepared for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (ER ampersand WM) programs being conducted for the Department of Energy (DOE) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). Efforts are underway to upgrade our document system using electronic format. To satisfy external requirements (DOE, State, and Federal), ER ampersand WM programs generate a complement of internal requirements documents including a SAR and Technical Safety Requirements along with procedures and training materials. Of interest, is the volume of information and the difficulty in handling it. A recently prepared ER ampersand WM SAR consists of 1,000 pages of text and graphics; supporting references add 10,000 pages. Other programmatic requirements documents consist of an estimated 5,000 pages plus references

  12. The FERMI@Elettra free-electron-laser source for coherent X-ray physics: photon properties, beam transport system, and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allaria, Enrico; Callegari, Carlo; Cocco, Daniele; Fawley, William M.; Kiskinova, Maya; Masciovecchio, Claudio; Parmigiani, Fulvio

    2010-04-05

    FERMI@Elettra is comprised of two free electron lasers (FELs) that will generate short pulses (tau ~;; 25 to 200 fs) of highly coherent radiation in the XUV and soft X-ray region. The use of external laser seeding together with a harmonic upshift scheme to obtain short wavelengths will give FERMI@Elettra the capability to produce high quality, longitudinal coherent photon pulses. This capability together with the possibilities of temporal synchronization to external lasers and control of the output photon polarization will open new experimental opportunities not possible with currently available FELs. Here we report on the predicted radiation coherence properties and important configuration details of the photon beam transport system. We discuss the several experimental stations that will be available during initial operations in 2011, and we give a scientific perspective on possible experiments that can exploit the critical parameters of this new light source.

  13. Simulations of free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwan, T.; Godfrey, B.B.

    1979-01-01

    The generation of coherent electromagnetic radiation by the interaction of a relativistic electron beam with a static helical magnetic field is investigated using one- and two-dimensional relativistic electromagnetic plasma simulation codes. In the one-dimensional simulations, we observed the coupling between the negative energy beam mode and the positive energy electromagnetic wave. Substantial growth rate (omega 1 approx. 0.1 omega/sub pe/) of the unstable electromagnetic wave has been observed and efficiency of radiation production is found to be between 25 to 30% depending on various parameters. In the two-dimensional simulations, we observed a decrease in the growth rate, but increased efficiency due to the decrease in the phase velocity of the unstable electrostatic wave. In addition, we also observed waves propagating at an angle with respect to the electron beam. Consequently, the beam is bunched in the radial as well as the axial directions. These waves are believed to be generated by another instability which saturates at relatively low level

  14. Diode Lasers used in Plastic Welding and Selective Laser Soldering - Applications and Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinl, S.

    Aside from conventional welding methods, laser welding of plastics has established itself as a proven bonding method. The component-conserving and clean process offers numerous advantages and enables welding of sensitive assemblies in automotive, electronic, medical, human care, food packaging and consumer electronics markets. Diode lasers are established since years within plastic welding applications. Also, soft soldering using laser radiation is becoming more and more significant in the field of direct diode laser applications. Fast power controllability combined with a contactless temperature measurement to minimize thermal damage make the diode laser an ideal tool for this application. These advantages come in to full effect when soldering of increasingly small parts in temperature sensitive environments is necessary.

  15. Two-stage free electron laser research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segall, S. B.

    1984-10-01

    KMS Fusion, Inc. began studying the feasibility of two-stage free electron lasers for the Office of Naval Research in June, 1980. At that time, the two-stage FEL was only a concept that had been proposed by Luis Elias. The range of parameters over which such a laser could be successfully operated, attainable power output, and constraints on laser operation were not known. The primary reason for supporting this research at that time was that it had the potential for producing short-wavelength radiation using a relatively low voltage electron beam. One advantage of a low-voltage two-stage FEL would be that shielding requirements would be greatly reduced compared with single-stage short-wavelength FEL's. If the electron energy were kept below about 10 MeV, X-rays, generated by electrons striking the beam line wall, would not excite neutron resonance in atomic nuclei. These resonances cause the emission of neutrons with subsequent induced radioactivity. Therefore, above about 10 MeV, a meter or more of concrete shielding is required for the system, whereas below 10 MeV, a few millimeters of lead would be adequate.

  16. Direct acceleration of electrons by a CO2 laser in a curved plasma waveguide

    CERN Document Server

    Yi, Longqing; Shen, Baifei

    2016-01-01

    Laser plasma interaction with micro-engineered targets at relativistic intensities has been greatly promoted by recent progress in the high contrast lasers and the manufacture of advanced micro- and nano-structures. This opens new possibilities for the physics of laser-matter interaction. Here we propose a novel approach that leverages the advantages of high-pressure CO 2 laser, laser-waveguide interaction, as well as micro-engineered plasma structure to accelerate electrons to peak energy greater than 1 GeV with narrow slice energy spread (~1%) and high overall efficiency. The acceleration gradient is 26 GV/m for a 1.3 TW CO2 laser system. The micro-bunching of a long electron beam leads to the generation of a chain of ultrashort electron bunches with the duration roughly equal to half-laser-cycle. These results open a way for developing a compact and economic electron source for diverse applications.

  17. Electronic Noses and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martine LUMBRERAS

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Electronic noses are customized devices employed to detect and to identify gaseous mixtures, even to give the concentration of the atmosphere components. Nowadays, the research in this domain is more and more growing, in Europe and other countries in the world, for many applications, such as environmental protection, food industries, perfumery, public safety, medicine, and pharmacy. Electronic noses allow to detect many organic volatile compounds, for which there is no specific detector. They constitute an alternative to complex, long, and too expensive existing methods, unable to ensure continuous monitoring. Their conception deals with many related areas (metrology, chemistry, physics, electronics, informatics, statistics, modelisation as well as areas related to the molecules to be detected. The system training is a primary step: during a measurement under a gaseous atmosphere, we must record the sensor time-responses in a treatment system, while specifying the name of the concerned odor. This process must be repeated many times for each studied atmosphere, and for all the chosen atmospheres. So a learning data base can be created, made from representative parameters of all the realized measures. After this training stage, clustering software will classify the data analysis in “concentration” or “nature” groups. Using the group separation rules given by this supervised classification, the system will be able to find itself the name of an odor or a concentration.

  18. Inverse free-electron laser accelerator development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, A.; Gallardo, J.; Steenbergen, A. van; Sandweiss, J.; Fang, J.M.

    1994-06-01

    The study of the Inverse Free-Electron Laser, as a potential mode of electron acceleration, has been pursued at Brookhaven National Laboratory for a number of years. More recent studies focused on the development of a low energy (few GeV), high gradient, multistage linear accelerator. The authors are presently designing a short accelerator module which will make use of the 50 MeV linac beam and high power (2 x 10 11 W) CO 2 laser beam of the Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) at the Center for Accelerator Physics (CAP), Brookhaven National Laboratory. These elements will be used in conjunction with a fast excitation (300 μsec pulse duration) variable period wiggler, to carry out an accelerator demonstration stage experiment

  19. Nuclear excitation via the motion of electrons in a strong laser field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, J.F.; Gogny, D.; Weiss, M.S.

    1987-12-01

    A method of switching from a nuclear isomeric state to a lasing state is examined. A semi-classical model of laser-electron-nuclear coupling is developed. In it the electrons are treated as free in the external field of the laser, but with initial conditions corresponding to their atomic orbits. Application is made to testing this model in 235 U and to the design criteria of a gamma-ray laser. 14 refs., 2 tabs

  20. Elsa: an infrared free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guimbal, P.; Chaix, P.

    1998-01-01

    Since the first experiments, twenty years ago, free-electron lasers (FEL) have known a strong development because of their promise: broadband tunability from X-rays to microwaves and high (peak or average) power, limited only by technological issues. ELSA has been designed as a research tool to investigate the physics of high-power FELs. After a brief introduction of the FEL field of research, we point out the unique characteristics of ELSA and why it is a valuable tool for the study of FEL interaction in the strong electron-photon coupling. The main experimental results are reviewed. We conclude on the concept of Two-Frequency-Wiggler. (author)

  1. Laser system for a subpicosecond electron linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crowell, R. A.

    1998-01-01

    At the Argonne Chemistry Division efforts are underway to develop a sub-picosecond electron beam pulse radiolysis facility for chemical studies. The target output of the accelerator is to generate electron pulses that can be adjusted from 3nC in .6ps to 100nC in 45ps. In conjunction with development of the accelerator a state-of-the-art ultrafast laser system is under construction that will drive the linac's photocathode and provide probe pulses that are tunable from the UV to IR spectral regions

  2. The waveguide Free-Electron Laser. 14

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walsh, J.E.

    1990-01-01

    The general characteristics of free-electron lasers (FELs) which employ a waveguiding structure to confine electromagnetic fields and to couple them to the electron beam is discussed. The mode structure of the basic parallel plate waveguide and its adaptation via quasi-optical techniques to FEL resonator design are considered in detail. A summary of the theory of FEL systems which depend intrinsically on a guide structure (micro-undulator, Cerenkov and metal-grating FELs) and a review of progress on waveguide FEL experiments are also presented. (author). 44 refs.; 16 figs

  3. High-efficiency free-electron laser results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyer, K.; Baru, C.A.; Newnam, B.E.; Stein, W.E.; Warren, R.W.; Winston, J.G.; Young, L.M.

    1983-01-01

    Results obtained with a tapered-wiggler free-electron laser demonstrate the concepts proposed by Morton for enhanced efficiency and show deceleration of electrons by as much as 7%, and extraction of more than 3% of the total electron-beam energy as laser energy when the laser is operated as an amplifier. The experiment is presently being reconfigured to examine its performance as a laser oscillator

  4. [The application of laser in endodontics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, W X; Liu, N N; Wang, X L; He, X Y

    2016-08-01

    Since laser was introduced in the field of medicine in 1970's, its application range has continuously expanded. The application of laser in endodontics also increased due to its safety and effectiveness in dental treatments. The majority of the laser application researches in dentistry focused on dentin hypersensitivity, removal of carious tissues, tooth preparations, pulp capping or pulpotomy, and root canal treatment. In this article, we reviewed literature on the effects of laser in the treatments of dental and pulp diseases.

  5. Energy Spread Reduction of Electron Beams Produced via Laser Wake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollock, Bradley Bolt [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Laser wakefield acceleration of electrons holds great promise for producing ultra-compact stages of GeV scale, high quality electron beams for applications such as x-ray free electron lasers and high energy colliders. Ultra-high intensity laser pulses can be self-guided by relativistic plasma waves over tens of vacuum diffraction lengths, to give >1 GeV energy in cm-scale low density plasma using ionization-induced injection to inject charge into the wake at low densities. This thesis describes a series of experiments which investigates the physics of LWFA in the self-guided blowout regime. Beginning with high density gas jet experiments the scaling of the LWFA-produced electron beam energy with plasma electron density is found to be in excellent agreement with both phenomenological theory and with 3-D PIC simulations. It is also determined that self-trapping of background electrons into the wake exhibits a threshold as a function of the electron density, and at the densities required to produce electron beams with energies exceeding 1 GeV a different mechanism is required to trap charge into low density wakes. By introducing small concentrations of high-Z gas to the nominal He background the ionization-induced injection mechanism is enabled. Electron trapping is observed at densities as low as 1.3 x 1018 cm-3 in a gas cell target, and 1.45 GeV electrons are demonstrated for the first time from LWFA. This is currently the highest electron energy ever produced from LWFA. The ionization-induced trapping mechanism is also shown to generate quasi-continuous electron beam energies, which is undesirable for accelerator applications. By limiting the region over which ionization-induced trapping occurs, the energy spread of the electron beams can be controlled. The development of a novel two-stage gas cell target provides the capability to tailor the gas composition in the longitudinal direction, and confine the trapping process to occur only in a

  6. The KAERI laser facility with temporal laser beam shaping for application's user

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Sung Ki; Kim, Min Suk; Kim, Young Won; Ko, Kwanghoon; Lim, Changhwan; Seo, Young Seok

    2008-01-01

    The Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute(KAERI)has been developed a high energy Nd:Glass laser facility(KLF)for fast ignition research and high energy physics applications at early 2008. Now, we are researching the temporal laser beam shaping for application's user. The temporal laser beam shaping has been applied to a number of industrial applications. The KLF beam shaping system with fiber based consists of two electro optic modulator with DC bias using a Mach Zehnder interferometer, an arbitrary electronic waveform generator, a continuous wavelength fiber laser source, a fiber based pulse amplification system and DC bias source to generate temporally shaped pulses with a high extinction ratio and high resolution. RF signal waveform user defined by an arbitrary electronic waveform generator is only connected to one electro optic modulator. DC bias source with auto feed back or manual controller is connected both two electro optic modulators. Emitting laser light from a continuous wavelength fiber laser source is modulated to meet a user defined laser pulse with a high extinction ratio by two electro optic modulators. Experimental results are shown in Fig.1. Figure 1(a)shows two programmed waveforms with the signal width 10ns in an arbitrary electronic waveform generator. Figure 1(b)shows output laser pulses with sub mJ energy from amplification results of the KLF beam shaping system which can control the pulse width ranges from 400ps to sub us

  7. Lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Milonni, Peter W

    1988-01-01

    A comprehensive introduction to the operating principles and applications of lasers. Explains basic principles, including the necessary elements of classical and quantum physics. Provides concise discussions of various laser types including gas, solid state, semiconductor, and free electron lasers, as well as of laser resonators, diffraction, optical coherence, and many applications including holography, phase conjugation, wave mixing, and nonlinear optics. Incorporates many intuitive explanations and practical examples. Discussions are self-contained in a consistent notation and in a style that should appeal to physicists, chemists, optical scientists and engineers.

  8. Laser-driven electron beam and radiation sources for basic, medical and industrial sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    NAKAJIMA, Kazuhisa

    2015-01-01

    To date active research on laser-driven plasma-based accelerators have achieved great progress on production of high-energy, high-quality electron and photon beams in a compact scale. Such laser plasma accelerators have been envisaged bringing a wide range of applications in basic, medical and industrial sciences. Here inheriting the groundbreaker’s review article on “Laser Acceleration and its future” [Toshiki Tajima, (2010)],1) we would like to review recent progress of producing such electron beams due to relativistic laser-plasma interactions followed by laser wakefield acceleration and lead to the scaling formulas that are useful to design laser plasma accelerators with controllability of beam energy and charge. Lastly specific examples of such laser-driven electron/photon beam sources are illustrated. PMID:26062737

  9. Low-energy x-ray and electron physics and applications to diagnostics development for laser-produced plasma research. Final report, April 30, 1980-April 29, 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henke, B.L.

    1981-08-01

    This final report describes a collaborative extension of an ongoing research program in low-energy x-ray and electron physics into particular areas of immediate need for the diagnostics of plasmas as involved in laser-produced fusion research. It has been for the continued support for one year of a post-doctoral research associate and for three student research assistants who have been applied to the following specific efforts: (1) the continuation of our research on the absolute characterization of x-ray photocathode systems for the 0.1 to 10 keV photon energy region. The research results were applied collaboratively to the design, construction and calibration of photocathodes for time-resolved detection with the XRD and the streak and framing cameras; (2) the design, construction and absolute calibration of optimized, bolt-on spectrographs for the absolute measurement of laser-produced plasma spectra.

  10. Low-energy x-ray and electron physics and applications to diagnostics development for laser-produced plasma research. Final report, April 30, 1980-April 29, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henke, B.L.

    1981-08-01

    This final report describes a collaborative extension of an ongoing research program in low-energy x-ray and electron physics into particular areas of immediate need for the diagnostics of plasmas as involved in laser-produced fusion research. It has been for the continued support for one year of a post-doctoral research associate and for three student research assistants who have been applied to the following specific efforts: (1) the continuation of our research on the absolute characterization of x-ray photocathode systems for the 0.1 to 10 keV photon energy region. The research results were applied collaboratively to the design, construction and calibration of photocathodes for time-resolved detection with the XRD and the streak and framing cameras; (2) the design, construction and absolute calibration of optimized, bolt-on spectrographs for the absolute measurement of laser-produced plasma spectra

  11. Multi-level multi-thermal-electron FDTD simulation of plasmonic interaction with semiconducting gain media: applications to plasmonic amplifiers and nano-lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, X; Bhola, B; Huang, Y; Ho, S T

    2010-08-02

    Interactions between a semiconducting gain medium and confined plasmon-polaritons are studied using a multilevel multi-thermal-electron finite-difference time-domain (MLMTE-FDTD) simulator. We investigated the amplification of wave propagating in a plasmonic metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) waveguide filled with semiconductor gain medium and obtained the conditions required to achieve net optical gain. The MSM gain waveguide is used to form a plasmonic semiconductor nano-ring laser(PSNRL) with an effective mode volume of 0.0071 microm3, which is about an order of magnitude smaller than the smallest demonstrated integrated photonic crystal based laser cavities. The simulation shows a lasing threshold current density of 1kA/cm2 for a 300 nm outer diameter ring cavity with 80 nm-wide ring. This current density can be realistically achieved in typical III-V semiconductor, which shows the experimental feasibility of the proposed PSNRL structure.

  12. An Inverse Free-Electron-Laser accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, A.S.; Gallardo, J.C.; van Steenbergen, A.; Ulc, S.; Woodle, M.; Sandweiss, J.; Fang, Jyan-Min

    1993-01-01

    Recent work at BNL on electron acceleration using the Inverse Free-Electron Laser (IFEL) has considered a low-energy, high-gradient, multi-stage linear accelerator. Experiments are planned at BNL's Accelerator Test Facility using its 50-MeV linac and 100-GW CO 2 laser. We have built and tested a fast-excitation wiggler magnet with constant field, tapered period, and overall length of 47 cm. Vanadium-Permendur ferromagnetic laminations are stacked in alternation with copper, eddy-current-induced, field reflectors to achieve a 1.4-T peak field with a 4-mm gap and a typical period of 3 cm. The laser beam will pass through the wiggler in a low-loss, dielectric-coated stainless-steel, rectangular waveguide. The attenuation and transverse mode has been measured in waveguide sections of various lengths, with and without the dielectric. Results of 1-D and 3-D IFEL simulations, including wiggler errors, will be presented for several cases: the initial, single-module experiment with ΔE = 39 MeV, a four-module design giving ΔE = 100 MeV in a total length of 2 m, and an eight-module IFEL with ΔE = 210 MeV

  13. Applications of lasers and electro-optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, B.C.; Low, K.S.; Chen, Y.H.; Harith bin Ahmad; Tou, T.Y.

    1994-01-01

    Supported by the IRPA Programme on Laser Technology and Applications, many types of lasers have been designed, constructed and applied in various areas of science, medicine and industries. Amongst these lasers constructed were high power carbon dioxide lasers, rare gas halide excimer lasers, solid state Neodymium-YAG lasers, nitrogen lasers, flashlamp pumped dye lasers and nitrogen and excimer laser pumped dye lasers. These lasers and the associated electro-optics system, some with computer controlled, are designed and developed for the following areas of applications: 1. Industrial applications of high power carbon dioxide lasers for making of i.c. components and other materials processing purposes. Prototype operational systems have been developed. 2. Medical applications of lasers for cancer treatment using the technique of photodynamic therapy. A new and more effective treatment protocol has been proposed. 3. Agricultural applications of lasers in palm oil and palm fruit-fluorescence diagnostic studies. Fruit ripeness signature has been developed and palm oil oxidation level were investigated. 4. Development of atmospheric pollution monitoring systems using laser lidar techniques. Laboratory scale systems were developed. 5. Other applications of lasers including laser holographic and interferometric methods for the non destructive testing of materials. The activities of the group (from 1988-1990) have resulted in the submission of a patent for a laser device, publication of many research paper sin local and overseas journals and conference proceedings, completion of 1 Ph.D. dissertation and 6 M. Phil theses. Currently (1991), a total of 3 Ph.D., 6 M. Phil research programmes are involved in this research and development programme

  14. High gain free electron laser at ETA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orzechowski, T.J.; Prosnitz, D.; Halbach, K.

    1983-01-01

    A single pass, tapered electron wiggler and associated beam transport has been constructed at the Experimental Test Accelerator (ETA) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The system is designed to transport 1 kA of 4.5 MeV electrons with an emittance of 30 millirad-cm. The planar wiggler is provided by a pulsed electromagnet. The interaction region is an oversized rectangular waveguide. Quadrupole fields stabilize the beam in the plane parallel to the wiggler field. The 3 meter long wiggler has a 9.8 cm period. The Free Electron Laser (FEL) will serve as an amplifier for input frequencies of 35 GHz and 140 GHz. The facility is designed to produce better than 500 Megawatts peak power

  15. Proceedings of the workshop prospects for a 1 angstrom free-electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallardo, J.C. (ed.)

    1990-01-01

    This report contains papers on the following topics free-electron laser theory, scaling relations and simulations; micro-wigglers; photocathode and switched power gun; applications; and summary of working groups.

  16. Proceedings of the workshop prospects for a 1 angstrom free-electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallardo, J.C.

    1990-01-01

    This report contains papers on the following topics free-electron laser theory, scaling relations and simulations; micro-wigglers; photocathode and switched power gun; applications; and summary of working groups

  17. Laser-driven injector of electrons for IOTA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanov, Aleksandr

    2017-03-01

    Fermilab is developing the Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA) ring for experiments on nonlinear integrable optics. The machine will operate with either electron beams of 150 MeV or proton beams of 2.5 MeV energies, respectively. The stability of integrable optics depends critically on the precision of the magnetic lattice, which demands the use of beam-based lattice measurements for optics correction. In the proton mode, the low-energy proton beam does not represent a good probe for this application; hence we consider the use of a low-intensity reverse-injected electron beam of matched momentum (70 MeV). Such an injector could be implemented with the use of laser-driven acceleration techniques. This report presents the consideration for a laser-plasma injector for IOTA and discusses the requirements determined by the ring design.

  18. Electron dynamics in RF sources with a laser controlled emission

    CERN Document Server

    Khodak, I V; Metrochenko, V V

    2001-01-01

    Photoemission radiofrequency (RF) electron sources are sources of electron beams with extremely high brightness. Beam bunching processes in such devices are well studied in case when laser pulse duration is much lower of rf oscillation period.At the same time photoemission RF guns have some merits when operating in 'long-pulse' mode. In this case the laser pulse duration is much higher of rf oscillation period but much lower of rise time of oscillations in a gun cavity. Beam parameters at the gun output are compared for photoemission and thermoemission cathode applications. The paper presents results of a beam dynamics simulation in such guns with different resonance structures. Questions connected with defining of the current pulse peak value that can be obtained in such guns are discussed.

  19. Optical coatings for laser fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowdermilk, W.H.; Milam, D.; Rainer, F.

    1980-01-01

    Lasers for fusion experiments use thin-film dielectric coatings for reflecting, antireflecting and polarizing surface elements. Coatings are most important to the Nd:glass laser application. The most important requirements of these coatings are accuracy of the average value of reflectance and transmission, uniformity of amplitude and phase front of the reflected or transmitted light, and laser damage threshold. Damage resistance strongly affects the laser's design and performance. The success of advanced lasers for future experiments and for reactor applications requires significant developments in damage resistant coatings for ultraviolet laser radiation

  20. Free-electron lasers in ultraviolet photobiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coohill, T.P.; Sutherland, J.C.

    1989-01-01

    The potential uses for a free-electron laser (FEL), tunable in wavelength from 10 to 400 nm, for photobiological experiments is discussed. Inherent problems of cell and molecular absorption, especially in certain regions of the ultraviolet (UV), are addressed. Absorption values for living cells and viruses at selected wavelengths in the UV are tabulated, and a calculation of the flux needed to inactivate mammalian cells is included. A comparison is made of the UV output of a proposed rf-linac FEL with those of a monochromator, a tunable dye laser, and a synchrotron. The advantages of a UV FEL are apparent, especially in the wavelength regions where the cross section for absorption by biological molecules is low, i.e., 300 to 400 nm and 10 to 200 nm. It is apparent that a UV FEL would be an ideal source for a variety of biological studies that use both intact organisms and isolated cells and viruses

  1. Free electron laser and fundamental physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dattoli, Giuseppe; Nguyen, Federico

    2018-03-01

    This review paper is devoted to the understanding of free-electron lasers (FEL) as devices for fundamental physics (FP) studies. After clarifying what FP stands for, we select some aspects of the FEL physics which can be viewed as fundamental. Furthermore, we discuss the perspective uses of the FEL in FP experiments. Regarding the FP aspects of the FEL, we analyze the quantum electrodynamics (QED) nature of the underlying laser mechanism. We look for the truly quantum signature in a process whose phenomenology is dominated by classical effects. As to the use of FEL as a tool for FP experiments we discuss the realization of a device dedicated to the study of non-linear effects in QED such as photon-photon scattering and shining-through-the-wall experiments planned to search for dark matter candidates like axions.

  2. Electron acceleration using laser produced plasmas

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Landua, Rolf

    2005-01-01

    Low density plasmas have long been of interest as a potential medium for particle acceleration since relativistic plasma waves are capable of supporting electric fields greater than 100 GeV/m. The physics of particle acceleration using plasmas will be reviewed, and new results will be discussed which have demonstrated that relatively narrow energy spread (<3%) beams having energies greater than 100 MeV can be produced from femtosecond laser plasma interactions. Future experiments and potential applications will also be discussed.

  3. Applications of soft x-ray lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skinner, C.H.

    1993-01-01

    The high brightness and short pulse duration of soft x-ray lasers provide unique advantages for novel applications. Imaging of biological specimens using x-ray lasers has been demonstrated by several groups. Other applications to fields such as chemistry, material science, plasma diagnostics, and lithography are beginning to emerge. We review the current status of soft x-ray lasers from the perspective of applications, and present an overview of the applications currently being developed

  4. Oceanographic applications of laser technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoge, F. E.

    1988-01-01

    Oceanographic activities with the Airborne Oceanographic Lidar (AOL) for the past several years have primarily been focussed on using active (laser induced pigment fluorescence) and concurrent passive ocean color spectra to improve existing ocean color algorithms for estimating primary production in the world's oceans. The most significant results were the development of a technique for selecting optimal passive wavelengths for recovering phytoplankton photopigment concentration and the application of this technique, termed active-passive correlation spectroscopy (APCS), to various forms of passive ocean color algorithms. Included in this activity is use of airborne laser and passive ocean color for development of advanced satellite ocean color sensors. Promising on-wavelength subsurface scattering layer measurements were recently obtained. A partial summary of these results are shown.

  5. Electron accelerators: History, applications, and perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, M. N.; Silva, T. F.

    2014-02-01

    This paper will present an outlook on sources of radiation, focusing on electron accelerators. We will review advances that were important for the development of particle accelerators, concentrating on those that led to modern electron accelerators. Electron accelerators are multipurpose machines that deliver beams with energies spanning five orders of magnitude, and are used in applications that range from fundamental studies of particle interactions to cross-linking polymer chains in industrial plants. Each accelerator type presents specific characteristics that make it more suitable for certain applications. Our work will focus on radiation sources for medical applications, dominated by electron linacs (linear accelerators), and those used for research, field where electron rings dominate. We will outline the main technological advances that occurred in the past decades, which made possible the construction of machines fit for clinical environments. Their compactness, efficiency and reliability have been key to their acceptance in clinical applications. This outline will include advances that allowed for the construction of brighter synchrotron light sources, where the relevant beam characteristics are good optical quality and high beam current. The development of insertion devices will also be discussed, as well the development of Free Electron Lasers (FEL). We conclude the review with an outline of the new developments of electron accelerators and the expectations for Energy Recovery Linacs.

  6. What makes for a successful laser application

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Flemmming Ove

    1997-01-01

    Industrial application of lasers are within several different niches. A few of these niches are so large that standard equipment are on the market. However, most applications are more or less custom designed.The industrial laser market is new, the market size is small, and therefore the systems...... suppliers do normally not pocess internal ressources for efficient application development, except for their key market segments.The industrial laser market is further characterized by the large divertisement in products: Is the optimum laser for a certain job a CO2- or a ND-YAG-laser? Ore perhaps a Copper...

  7. Acceleration of laser-injected electron beams in an electron-beam driven plasma wakefield accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knetsch, Alexander

    2018-03-01

    Plasma wakefields deliver accelerating fields that are approximately a 100 times higher than those in conventional radiofrequency or even superconducting radiofrequency cavities. This opens a transformative path towards novel, compact and potentially ubiquitous accelerators. These prospects, and the increasing demand for electron accelerator beamtime for various applications in natural, material and life sciences, motivate the research and development on novel plasma-based accelerator concepts. However, these electron beam sources need to be understood and controlled. The focus of this thesis is on electron beam-driven plasma wakefield acceleration (PWFA) and the controlled injection and acceleration of secondary electron bunches in the accelerating wake fields by means of a short-pulse near-infrared laser. Two laser-triggered injection methods are explored. The first one is the Trojan Horse Injection, which relies on very good alignment and timing control between electron beam and laser pulse and then promises electron bunches with hitherto unprecedented quality as regards emittance and brightness. The physics of electron injection in the Trojan Horse case is explored with a focus on the final longitudinal bunch length. Then a theoretical and numerical study is presented that examines the physics of Trojan Horse injection when performed in an expanding wake generated by a smooth density down-ramp. The benefits are radically decreased drive-electron bunch requirements and a unique bunch-length control that enables longitudinal electron-bunch shaping. The second laser-triggered injection method is the Plasma Torch Injection, which is a versatile, all-optical laser-plasma-based method capable to realize tunable density downramp injection. At the SLAC National Laboratory, the first proof-of-principle was achieved both for Trojan Horse and Plasma Torch injection. Setup details and results are reported in the experimental part of the thesis along with the commissioning

  8. Therapeutic application of lasers in ophthalmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misiuk-Hojlo, M.; Krzyzanowska-Berkowska, P.; Hill-Bator, A.

    2007-01-01

    Lasers have found application in diverse branches of medicine. In ophthalmology, laser technology has various therapeutic and diagnostic applications. The purpose of this article is to review the major therapeutic applications of lasers in different eye disorders. The effects of lasers on biological tissues and different laser techniques as well as the indications for laser therapy in various parts of the eye are discussed. Lasers are used to treat glaucoma and many vascular disorders of the retina. Laser treatment may be useful in preventing the development of neovascularization in diabetic retinopathy, BRVO, or CRVO. Laser techniques are also available for the treatment of the exudative form of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and some malignant and benign intraocular tumors and in retina abnormalities which predispose to rhegmatogenous retinal detachment. Corneal laser surgery is the most frequently applied laser procedure in ophthalmology. PRK, LASIK, and LASEK are used to correct errors in vision such as myopia, hyperopia, and astigmatism. Laser photocoagulation is also helpful in cataract surgery. Nowadays, lasers have become so universal that it is difficult to imagine ophthalmology without them. We are still witnessing rapid advances in the development of laser techniques, especially in plastic surgery, cataract extraction, and ocular imaging. (authors)

  9. Kinetic theory of free electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hafizi, B. [Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States); Roberson, C.W. [Office of Naval Research, Arlington, VA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    We have developed a relativistic kinetic theory of free electron lasers (FELs). The growth rate, efficiency, filling factor and radius of curvature of the radiation wave fronts are determined. We have used the theory to examine the effects of beam compression on growth rate. The theory has been extended to include self field effects on FEL operation. These effects are particularly important in compact, low voltage FELs. The surprising result is that the self field contribution to the beam quality is opposite to the emittance contribution. Hence self fields can improve beam quality, particularly in compact, low voltage FELs.

  10. Free electron lasers on superconducting linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lapierrre, Y.

    1986-01-01

    Analysing the results of several Free Electron Laser experiments, we show that the best accelerator should be a superconducting linear accelerator: it can provide a c.w. high quality beam (energy spread and emittance). The technology of RF superconductivity provide the opportunity to build such an accelerator. In this paper, we present the foreseen results one can expect from a FEL based on such a machine: - Average power > 1 Kw, - Total efficiency > 2.5%, - Tunability between 0.6 and 5 μm [fr

  11. The free electron laser: conceptual history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madey, John; Scully, Marlan O; Sprangle, Phillip

    2016-01-01

    The free electron laser (FEL) has lived up to its promise as given in (Madey 1971 J. Appl. Phys. 42 1906) to wit: ‘As shall be seen, finite gain is available …from the far-infrared through the visible region …with the further possibility of partially coherent radiation sources in the x-ray region’. In the present paper we review the history of the FEL drawing liberally (and where possible literally) from the original sources. Coauthors, Madey, Scully and Sprangle were involved in the early days of the subject and give a first hand account of the subject with an eye to the future. (invited comment)

  12. Industrial application of high power disk lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockmann, Rüdiger; Havrilla, David

    2008-02-01

    Laser welding has become one of the fastest growing areas for industrial laser applications. The increasing cost effectiveness of the laser process is enabled by the development of new highly efficient laser sources, such as the Disk laser, coupled with decreasing cost per Watt. TRUMPF introduced the Disk laser several years ago, and today it has become the most reliable laser tool on the market. The excellent beam quality and output powers of up to 10 kW enable its application in the automotive industry as well as in the range of thick plate welding, such as heavy construction and ship building. This serves as an overview of the most recent developments on the TRUMPF Disk laser and its industrial applications like cutting, welding, remote welding and hybrid welding, too. The future prospects regarding increased power and even further improved productivity and economics are presented.

  13. Research on heightening quality of free electron laser using superconducting linear accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minehara, Eisuke

    1996-01-01

    In this paper, the superconducting high frequency linear accelerator technology using low temperature superconductor is introduced, and its application to the heightening of quality of free electron laser is discussed. The high frequency application of superconductivity is a relatively new technology, and the first superconducting high frequency linear accelerator was made at the middle of 1960s. The invention of free electron laser and the development so far are described. In free electron laser, the variation of wavelength, high efficiency and high power output are possible as compared with conventional type lasers. The price and the size are two demerits of free electron laser that remain to the last. In Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, the adjustment experiment is carried out for the prototype free electron laser. About this prototype, injection system, superconducting accelerator, helium refrigerator, whole solid element high frequency power source, control system, electron beam transport system, undulator system and optical resonator are described. The application of high mean power output free electron laser and its future are discussed. (K.I.)

  14. Application of ring lasers to determine the directions to the poles of Earth's rotation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golyaev, Yu D; Kolbas, Yu Yu

    2012-01-01

    Application of a ring laser to determine the directions to the poles of Earth's rotation is considered. The maximum accuracy of determining the directions is calculated, physical and technical mechanisms that limit the accuracy are analysed, and the instrumental errors are estimated by the example of ring He — Ne lasers with Zeeman biasing. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  15. Applications of super - high intensity lasers in nuclear engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salomaa, R.; Hakola, A.; Santala, M.

    2007-01-01

    Laser-plasma interactions arising when a super intense ultrashort laser pulse impinges a solid target creates intense partly collimated and energy resolved photons, high energy electron and protons and neutrons. In addition the plasma plume can generate huge magnetic and electric fields. Also ultra short X-ray pulses are created. We have participated in some of such experiments at Rutherford and Max-Planck Institute and assessed the applications of such kind as laser-driven accelerators. This paper discusses applications in nuclear engineering (neutron sources, isotope separation, fast ignition and transmutation, etc). In particular the potential for extreme time resolution and to partial energy resolution are assessed

  16. Externally Controlled Injection of Electrons by a Laser Pulse in a Laser Wakefield Electron Accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Chen Szu Yuan; Chen Wei Ting; Chien, Ting-Yei; Lee, Chau-Hwang; Lin, Jiunn-Yuan; Wang, Jyhpyng

    2005-01-01

    Spatially and temporally localized injection of electrons is a key element for development of plasma-wave electron accelerator. Here we report the demonstration of two different schemes for electron injection in a self-modulated laser wakefield accelerator (SM-LWFA) by using a laser pulse. In the first scheme, by implementing a copropagating laser prepulse with proper timing, we are able to control the growth of Raman forward scattering and the production of accelerated electrons. We found that the stimulated Raman backward scattering of the prepulse plays the essential role of injecting hot electrons into the fast plasma wave driven by the pump pulse. In the second scheme, by using a transient density ramp we achieve self-injection of electrons in a SM-LWFA with spatial localization. The transient density ramp is produced by a prepulse propagating transversely to drill a density depression channel via ionization and expansion. The same mechanism of injection with comparable efficiency is also demonstrated wi...

  17. Short Rayleigh Length Free Electron Lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Crooker, P P; Armstead, R L; Blau, J

    2004-01-01

    Conventional free electron laser (FEL) oscillators minimize the optical mode volume around the electron beam in the undulator by making the resonator Rayleigh length about one third of the undulator length. This maximizes gain and beam-mode coupling. In compact configurations of high-power infrared FELs or moderate power UV FELs, the resulting optical intensity can damage the resonator mirrors. To increase the spot size and thereby reduce the optical intensity at the mirrors below the damage threshold, a shorter Rayleigh length can be used, but the FEL interaction is significantly altered. A new FEL interaction is described and analyzed with a Rayleigh length that is only one tenth the undulator length, or less. The effect of mirror vibration and positioning are more critical in the short Rayleigh length design, but we find that they are still within normal design tolerances.

  18. Free electron laser variable bridge coupler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spalek, G.; Billen, J.H.; Garcia, J.A.; McMurry, D.E.; Harnsborough, L.D.; Giles, P.M.; Stevens, S.B.

    1985-01-01

    The Los Alamos free-electron laser (FEL) is being modified to test a scheme for recovering most of the power in the residual 20-MeV electron beam by decelerating the microbunches in a linear standing-wave accelerator and using the recovered energy to accelerate new beam. A variable-coupler low-power model that resonantly couples the accelerator and decelerator structures has been built and tested. By mixing the TE 101 and TE 102 modes, this device permits continuous variation of the decelerator fields relative to the accelerator fields through a range of 1:1 to 1:2.5. Phase differences between the two structures are kept below 1 0 and are independent of power-flow direction. The rf power is also fed to the two structures through this coupling device. Measurements were also made on a three-post-loaded variable coupler that is a promising candidate for the same task

  19. All-optical time-resolved measurement of laser energy modulation in a relativistic electron beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Xiang

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available We propose and demonstrate an all-optical method to measure laser energy modulation in a relativistic electron beam. In this scheme the time-dependent energy modulation generated from the electron-laser interaction in an undulator is converted into time-dependent density modulation with a chicane, which is measured to infer the laser energy modulation. The method, in principle, is capable of simultaneously providing information on femtosecond time scale and 10^{-5} energy scale not accessible with conventional methods. We anticipate that this method may have wide applications in many laser-based advanced beam manipulation techniques.

  20. Development of superconducting acceleration cavity technology for free electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong Min; Lee, Byung Cheol; Kim, Sun Kook; Jeong, Young Uk; Cho, Sung Oh

    2000-10-01

    As a result of the cooperative research between the KAERI and Peking University, the key technologies of superconducting acceleration cavity and photoelectron gun have been developed for the application to high power free electron lasers. A 1.5-GHz, 1-cell superconducting RF cavity has been designed and fabricated by using pure Nb sheets. The unloaded Q values of the fabricated superconducting cavity has been measured to be 2x10 9 at 2.5K, and 8x10 9 at 1.8K. The maximum acceleration gradient achieved was 12 MeV/m at 2.5K, and 20MV/m at 1.8 K. A cryostat for the 1-cell superconducting cavity has been designed. As a source of electron beam, a DC photocathode electron gun has been designed and fabricated, which is composed of a photocathode evaporation chamber and a 100-keV acceleration chamber. The efficiency of the Cs2Te photocathode is 3% nominally at room temperature, 10% at 290 deg C. The superconducting photoelectron gun system developed has been estimated to be a good source of high-brightness electron beam for high-power free electron lasers

  1. Development of superconducting acceleration cavity technology for free electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong Min; Lee, Byung Cheol; Kim, Sun Kook; Jeong, Young Uk; Cho, Sung Oh

    2000-10-01

    As a result of the cooperative research between the KAERI and Peking University, the key technologies of superconducting acceleration cavity and photoelectron gun have been developed for the application to high power free electron lasers. A 1.5-GHz, 1-cell superconducting RF cavity has been designed and fabricated by using pure Nb sheets. The unloaded Q values of the fabricated superconducting cavity has been measured to be 2x10{sup 9} at 2.5K, and 8x10{sup 9} at 1.8K. The maximum acceleration gradient achieved was 12 MeV/m at 2.5K, and 20MV/m at 1.8 K. A cryostat for the 1-cell superconducting cavity has been designed. As a source of electron beam, a DC photocathode electron gun has been designed and fabricated, which is composed of a photocathode evaporation chamber and a 100-keV acceleration chamber. The efficiency of the Cs2Te photocathode is 3% nominally at room temperature, 10% at 290 deg C. The superconducting photoelectron gun system developed has been estimated to be a good source of high-brightness electron beam for high-power free electron lasers.

  2. Fast-electron-relaxation measurement for laser-solid interaction at relativistic laser intensities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, H.; Shepherd, R.; Chung, H. K.; Kemp, A.; Hansen, S. B.; Wilks, S. C.; Ping, Y.; Widmann, K.; Fournier, K. B.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Dyer, G.; Faenov, A.; Pikuz, T.

    2007-01-01

    We present measurements of the fast-electron-relaxation time in short-pulse (0.5 ps) laser-solid interactions for laser intensities of 10 17 , 10 18 , and 10 19 W/cm 2 , using a picosecond time-resolved x-ray spectrometer and a time-integrated electron spectrometer. We find that the laser coupling to hot electrons increases as the laser intensity becomes relativistic, and that the thermalization of fast electrons occurs over time scales on the order of 10 ps at all laser intensities. The experimental data are analyzed using a combination of models that include Kα generation, collisional coupling, and plasma expansion

  3. Experimental study of hot electrons propagation and energy deposition in solid or laser-shock compressed targets: applications to fast igniter; Etude experimentale de la propagation et du depot d'energie d'electrons rapides dans une cible solide ou comprimee par choc laser: application a l'allumeur rapide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pisani, F

    2000-02-15

    In the fast igniter scheme, a recent approach proposed for the inertial confinement fusion, the idea is to dissociate the fuel ignition phase from its compression. The ignition phase would be then achieved by means of an external energy source: a fast electron beam generated by the interaction with an ultra-intense laser. The main goal of this work is to study the mechanisms of the hot electron energy transfer to the compressed fuel. We intent in particular to study the role of the electric and collisional effects involved in the hot electron propagation in a medium with properties similar to the compressed fuel. We carried out two experiments, one at the Vulcan laser facility (England) and the second one at the new LULI 100 TW laser (France). During the first experiment, we obtained the first results on the hot electron propagation in a dense and hot plasma. The innovating aspect of this work was in particular the use of the laser-shock technique to generate high pressures, allowing the strongly correlated and degenerated plasma to be created. The role of the electric and magnetic effects due to the space charge associated with the fast electron beam has been investigated in the second experiment. Here we studied the propagation in materials with different electrical characteristics: an insulator and a conductor. The analysis of the results showed that only by taking into account simultaneously the two propagation mechanisms (collisions and electric effects) a correct treatment of the energy deposition is possible. We also showed the importance of taking into account the induced modifications due to the electrons beam crossing the target, especially the induced heating. (author)

  4. Abstracts of 2. International conference on lasers and their applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The following topics are presented at 2. international conference on lasers and their applications in Iran: laser principle and technology, laser applications in spectroscopy; nonlinear optics; industry; medicine; and laser related techniques

  5. Current new applications of laser plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauer, A.A.; Forslund, D.W.; McKinstrie, C.J.; Wark, J.S.; Hargis, P.J. Jr.; Hamil, R.A.; Kindel, J.M.

    1988-09-01

    This report describes several new applications of laser-produced plasmas that have arisen in the last few years. Most of the applications have been an outgrowth of the active research in laser/matter interaction inspired by the pursuit of laser fusion. Unusual characteristics of high-intensity laser/matter interaction, such as intense x-ray and particle emission, were noticed early in the field and are now being employed in a significant variety of applications outside the fusion filed. Applications range from biology to materials science to pulsed-power control and particle accelerators. 92 refs., 23 figs., 4 tabs

  6. Laser technology and applications in gynaecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adelman, M R; Tsai, L J; Tangchitnob, E P; Kahn, B S

    2013-04-01

    The term 'laser' is an acronym for Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation. Lasers are commonly described by the emitted wavelength, which determines the colour of the light, as well as the active lasing medium. Currently, over 40 types of lasers have been developed with a wide range of both industrial and medical uses. Gas and solid-state lasers are frequently used in surgical applications, with CO2 and Ar being the most common examples of gas lasers, and the Nd:YAG and KTP:YAG being the most common examples of solid-state lasers. At present, it appears that the CO2, Nd:YAG, and KTP lasers provide alternative methods for achieving similar results, as opposed to superior results, when compared with traditional endoscopic techniques, such as cold-cutting monopolar and bipolar energy. This review focuses on the physics, tissue interaction, safety and applications of commonly used lasers in gynaecological surgery.

  7. High-energy molecular lasers self-controlled volume-discharge lasers and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Apollonov, V V

    2016-01-01

    This book displays the physics and design of high-power molecular lasers. The lasers described are self-controlled volume-discharge lasers. The book explains self-sustained discharge lasers, self-initiated discharge lasers and technical approaches to laser design. Important topics discussed are laser efficiency, laser beam quality and electric field homogeneity. The book contains many new innovative applications.

  8. Electron accelerators: History, applications, and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martins, M.N.; Silva, T.F.

    2014-01-01

    This paper will present an outlook on sources of radiation, focusing on electron accelerators. We will review advances that were important for the development of particle accelerators, concentrating on those that led to modern electron accelerators. Electron accelerators are multipurpose machines that deliver beams with energies spanning five orders of magnitude, and are used in applications that range from fundamental studies of particle interactions to cross-linking polymer chains in industrial plants. Each accelerator type presents specific characteristics that make it more suitable for certain applications. Our work will focus on radiation sources for medical applications, dominated by electron linacs (linear accelerators), and those used for research, field where electron rings dominate. We will outline the main technological advances that occurred in the past decades, which made possible the construction of machines fit for clinical environments. Their compactness, efficiency and reliability have been key to their acceptance in clinical applications. This outline will include advances that allowed for the construction of brighter synchrotron light sources, where the relevant beam characteristics are good optical quality and high beam current. The development of insertion devices will also be discussed, as well the development of Free Electron Lasers (FEL). We conclude the review with an outline of the new developments of electron accelerators and the expectations for Energy Recovery Linacs. - Highlights: ► We present an outlook on sources of radiation, focusing on electron accelerators. ► We review important advances for the development of modern electron accelerators. ► We outline advances that allowed for brighter synchrotron light sources. ► We describe the history of the development of electron accelerators in Brazil

  9. Double-sided electron-beam generator for KrF laser excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlitt, L.; Swingle, J.

    1980-05-01

    Several laser systems excited by electron beam have been identified as candidates for pump sources for laser fusion applications. The electron beam generators required must be compact, reliable and capable of synchronization with other system components. A KrF laser producing a minimum output of 25 J was needed for the RAPIER (Raman Amplifier Pumped by Intensified Excimer Radiation) system. A double-sided electron beam system was designed and constructed specifically for this purpose and has produced > 35 J of KrF output. Each of the two electron beam machines in the system operates with an rms jitter of 0.4 ns and together occupy approx. 3.5 m 2 of floor space. The successful operation of this laser has engendered requests for a description of the engineering details of this system. This document contains a brief description of the design issues and a full set of engineering drawings for this KrF laser amplifier

  10. Design of an electron injector for multi-stages laser wakefield acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Audet, T.

    2016-01-01

    Laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) is a particle acceleration process relying on the interaction between high intensity laser pulses, of the order of 10 18 W/cm 2 and a plasma. The plasma wave generated in the laser wake sustain high amplitude electric fields (1- 100 GV/m). Those electric fields are 3 orders of magnitude higher than maximum electric fields in radio frequency cavities and represent the main benefit of LWFA, allowing more compact acceleration. However improvements of the LWFA-produced electron bunches properties, stability and repetition rate are mandatory for LWFA to be usable for applications. A scheme to improve electron bunches properties and to potentially increase the repetition rate is multi-stage LWFA. The laser plasma electron source, called the injector, has to produce relatively low energy (50 - 100 MeV), but high charge, small size and low divergence electron bunches. Produced electron bunches then have to be transported and injected into a second stage to increase electron kinetic energy. The subject of this thesis is to study and design a laser wakefield electron injector for multistage LWFA. In the frame of CILEX and the two-stages LWFA program, a prototype of the injector was built : ELISA consisting in a variable length gas cell. The plasma electronic density, which is a critical parameter for the control of the electron bunches properties, was characterized both experimentally and numerically. ELISA was used at 2 different laser facilities and physical mechanisms linked to electron bunches properties were studied in function of experimental parameters. A range of experimental parameters suitable for a laser wakefield injector was determined. A magnetic transport and diagnostic line was also built, implemented and tested at the UHI100 laser facility of the CEA Saclay. It allowed a more precise characterization of electron bunches generated with ELISA as well as an estimation of the quality of transported electron bunches for their

  11. Conceptual design of industrial free electron laser using superconducting accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saldin, E.L.; Schneidmiller, E.A.; Ulyanov, Yu.N. [Automatic Systems Corporation, Samara (Russian Federation)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    Paper presents conceptual design of free electron laser (FEL) complex for industrial applications. The FEL complex consists of three. FEL oscillators with the optical output spanning the infrared (IR) and ultraviolet (UV) wave-lengths ({lambda} = 0.3...20 {mu}m) and with the average output power 10 - 20 kW. The driving beam for the FELs is produced by a superconducting accelerator. The electron beam is transported to the FELs via three beam lines (125 MeV and 2 x 250 MeV). Peculiar feature of the proposed complex is a high efficiency of the. FEL oscillators, up to 20 %. This becomes possible due to the use of quasi-continuous electron beam and the use of the time-dependent undulator tapering.

  12. Dye laser principles with applications

    CERN Document Server

    Duarte, Frank J; Liao, Peter F; Kelley, Paul

    1990-01-01

    A tutorial introduction to the field of dye lasers, Dye Laser Principles also serves as an up-to-date overview for those using dye lasers as research and industrial tools. A number of the issues discussed in this book are pertinent not only to dye lasers but also to lasers in general. Most of the chapters in the book contain problem sets that expand on the material covered in the chapter.Key Features* Dye lasers are among the most versatile and successful laser sources currently available in use Offering both pulsed and continuous-wave operation and tunable from the near ultraviole

  13. Injection of electrons by colliding laser pulses in a laser wakefield accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansson, M., E-mail: martin.hansson@fysik.lth.se; Aurand, B.; Ekerfelt, H.; Persson, A.; Lundh, O.

    2016-09-01

    To improve the stability and reproducibility of laser wakefield accelerators and to allow for future applications, controlling the injection of electrons is of great importance. This allows us to control the amount of charge in the beams of accelerated electrons and final energy of the electrons. Results are presented from a recent experiment on controlled injection using the scheme of colliding pulses and performed using the Lund multi-terawatt laser. Each laser pulse is split into two parts close to the interaction point. The main pulse is focused on a 2 mm diameter gas jet to drive a nonlinear plasma wave below threshold for self-trapping. The second pulse, containing only a fraction of the total laser energy, is focused to collide with the main pulse in the gas jet under an angle of 150°. Beams of accelerated electrons with low divergence and small energy spread are produced using this set-up. Control over the amount of accelerated charge is achieved by rotating the plane of polarization of the second pulse in relation to the main pulse. Furthermore, the peak energy of the electrons in the beams is controlled by moving the collision point along the optical axis of the main pulse, and thereby changing the acceleration length in the plasma. - Highlights: • Compact colliding pulse injection set-up used to produce low energy spread e-beams. • Beam charge controlled by rotating the polarization of injection pulse. • Peak energy controlled by point of collision to vary the acceleration length.

  14. Short Rayleigh length free electron lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. B. Colson

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Conventional free electron laser (FEL oscillators minimize the optical mode volume around the electron beam in the undulator by making the resonator Rayleigh length about one third to one half of the undulator length. This maximizes gain and beam-mode coupling. In compact configurations of high-power infrared FELs or moderate power UV FELs, the resulting optical intensity can damage the resonator mirrors. To increase the spot size and thereby reduce the optical intensity at the mirrors below the damage threshold, a shorter Rayleigh length can be used, but the FEL interaction is significantly altered. We model this interaction using a coordinate system that expands with the rapidly diffracting optical mode from the ends of the undulator to the mirrors. Simulations show that the interaction of the strongly focused optical mode with a narrow electron beam inside the undulator distorts the optical wave front so it is no longer in the fundamental Gaussian mode. The simulations are used to study how mode distortion affects the single-pass gain in weak fields, and the steady-state extraction in strong fields.

  15. Electron acceleration by femtosecond laser interaction with micro-structured plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goers, Andy James

    Laser-driven accelerators are a promising and compact alternative to RF accelerator technology for generating relativistic electron bunches for medical, scientific, and security applications. This dissertation presents three experiments using structured plasmas designed to advance the state of the art in laser-based electron accelerators, with the goal of reducing the energy of the drive laser pulse and enabling higher repetition rate operation with current laser technology. First, electron acceleration by intense femtosecond laser pulses in He-like nitrogen plasma waveguides is demonstrated. Second, significant progress toward a proof of concept realization of quasi-phasematched direct acceleration (QPM-DLA) is presented. Finally, a laser wakefield accelerator at very high plasma density is studied, enabling relativistic electron beam generation with ˜10 mJ pulse energies. Major results from these experiments include: • Acceleration of electrons up to 120 MeV from an ionization injected wakefield accelerator driven in a 1.5 mm long He-like nitrogen plasma waveguide • Guiding of an intense, quasi-radially polarized femtosecond laser pulse in a 1 cm plasma waveguide. This pulse provides a strong drive field for the QPM-DLA concept. • Wakefield acceleration of electrons up to ˜10 MeV with sub-terawatt, ˜10 mJ pulses interacting with a thin (˜200 mum), high density (>1020 cm-3) plasma. • Observation of an intense, coherent, broadband wave breaking radiation flash from a high plasma density laser wakefield accelerator. The flash radiates > 1% of the drive laser pulse energy in a bandwidth consistent with half-cycle (˜1 fs) emission from violent unidirectional acceleration of electron bunches from rest. These results open the way to high repetition rate (>˜kHz) laser-driven generation of relativistic electron beams with existing laser technology.

  16. The Two-Beam Free Electron Laser Oscillator

    CERN Document Server

    Thompson, Neil R

    2004-01-01

    A one-dimensional model of a free-electron laser operating simultaneously with two electron beams of different energies [1] is extended to an oscillator configuration. The electron beam energies are chosen so that an harmonic of the lower energy beam is at the fundamental radiation wavelength of the higher energy beam. Potential benefits over a single-beam free-electron laser oscillator are discussed.

  17. Ultrafast magnetodynamics with free-electron lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malvestuto, Marco; Ciprian, Roberta; Caretta, Antonio; Casarin, Barbara; Parmigiani, Fulvio

    2018-02-01

    The study of ultrafast magnetodynamics has entered a new era thanks to the groundbreaking technological advances in free-electron laser (FEL) light sources. The advent of these light sources has made possible unprecedented experimental schemes for time-resolved x-ray magneto-optic spectroscopies, which are now paving the road for exploring the ultimate limits of out-of-equilibrium magnetic phenomena. In particular, these studies will provide insights into elementary mechanisms governing spin and orbital dynamics, therefore contributing to the development of ultrafast devices for relevant magnetic technologies. This topical review focuses on recent advancement in the study of non-equilibrium magnetic phenomena from the perspective of time-resolved extreme ultra violet (EUV) and soft x-ray spectroscopies at FELs with highlights of some important experimental results.

  18. Imaging femtosecond laser-induced electronic excitation in glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao Xianglei; Mao, Samuel S.; Russo, Richard E.

    2003-01-01

    While substantial progress has been achieved in understanding laser ablation on the nanosecond and picosecond time scales, it remains a considerable challenge to elucidate the underlying mechanisms during femtosecond laser material interactions. We present experimental observations of electronic excitation inside a wide band gap glass during single femtosecond laser pulse (100 fs, 800 nm) irradiation. Using a femtosecond time-resolved imaging technique, we measured the evolution of a laser-induced electronic plasma inside the glass and calculated the electron number density to be on the order of 10 19 cm -3

  19. Electronic packaging: new results in singulation by Laser Microjet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Frank; Sibailly, Ochelio; Richerzhagen, Bernold

    2004-07-01

    Cutting electronic packages that are produced in a matrix array fashion is an important process and deals with the ready-to-use devices. Thus an increase in the singulation yield is directly correlated to an increase in benefit. Due to the usage of different substrate materials, the saws encounter big problems in terms of lifetime and constancy of cut quality in these applications. Today"s equipment manufacturers are not yet in the position to propose an adequate solution for all types of packages. Compared to classical laser cutting, the water-jet guided laser technology minimizes the heat damages in any kind of sample. This new material processing method consists in guiding a laser beam inside a hair thin, lowpressure water-jet by total internal reflection, and is applied to package singulation since two years approximately. Using a frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser guided by a water jet, an LTCC-ceramics based package is singulated according to a scribe and break process. Speeds of 2-10 mm/s are reached in the LTTC and 40 mm/s in the mold compound. The process is wear-free and provides very good edge quality of the LTCC and the mold compound as well as reliable separation of the packages.

  20. Short pulse laser systems for biomedical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Mitra, Kunal

    2017-01-01

    This book presents practical information on the clinical applications of short pulse laser systems and the techniques for optimizing these applications in a manner that will be relevant to a broad audience, including engineering and medical students as well as researchers, clinicians, and technicians. Short pulse laser systems are useful for both subsurface tissue imaging and laser induced thermal therapy (LITT), which hold great promise in cancer diagnostics and treatment. Such laser systems may be used alone or in combination with optically active nanoparticles specifically administered to the tissues of interest for enhanced contrast in imaging and precise heating during LITT. Mathematical and computational models of short pulse laser-tissue interactions that consider the transient radiative transport equation coupled with a bio-heat equation considering the initial transients of laser heating were developed to analyze the laser-tissue interaction during imaging and therapy. Experiments were first performe...

  1. Some applications on laser material processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oros, C.

    2005-01-01

    An overview of the state-of-the-art in laser material processing for a large types of lasers from IR (CO 2 laser, NdYAG laser) to UV (excimer laser) and different kinds of materials (metals, dielectrics) is given. Laser radiation has found a wide range of applications as machining tool for various kinds of materials processing. The machining geometry, the work piece geometry, the material properties and economic productivity claim for customized systems with special design for beam guiding, shaping and delivery in order to fully utilize the laser radiation for surface processing with optimum efficiency, maximum processing speed and high processing quality. The laser-material interaction involves complex processes of heating, melting, vaporization, ejection of atoms, ions, and molecules, shock waves, plasma initiation and plasma expansion. The interaction is dependent on the laser beam parameters (pulse duration, energy and wavelength), the solid target properties and the surrounding environments condition. Experimental results for laser surface melting and laser ablation are given. Also, assuming the applicability of a one dimensional model for short pulses used, and restricting condition to single-pulse exposure, the temperature rise on the target was calculated taking account of the finite optical absorption depth and pulse duration of the laser

  2. Nonlinear theory of the free-electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chian, A.C.-L.; Padua Brito Serbeto, A. de.

    1984-01-01

    A theory of Raman free-electron laser using a circularly polarized electromagnetic pump is investigated. Coupled wave equations that describe both linear and nonlinear evolution of stimulated Raman scattering are derived. The dispersion relation and the growth rate for the parametric instability are obtained. Nonlinear processes that may lead to saturation of the free-electron laser are discussed. (Author) [pt

  3. Two-dimensional optimization of free-electron-laser designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosnitz, D.; Haas, R.A.

    1982-05-04

    Off-axis, two-dimensional designs for free electron lasers are described that maintain correspondence of a light beam with a synchronous electron at an optimal transverse radius r > 0 to achieve increased beam trapping efficiency and enhanced laser beam wavefront control so as to decrease optical beam diffraction and other deleterious effects.

  4. Time-resolved measurements with streaked diffraction patterns from electrons generated in laser plasma wakefield

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhaohan; Nees, John; Hou, Bixue; Krushelnick, Karl; Thomas, Alec; Beaurepaire, Benoît; Malka, Victor; Faure, Jérôme

    2013-10-01

    Femtosecond bunches of electrons with relativistic to ultra-relativistic energies can be robustly produced in laser plasma wakefield accelerators (LWFA). Scaling the electron energy down to sub-relativistic and MeV level using a millijoule laser system will make such electron source a promising candidate for ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) applications due to the intrinsic short bunch duration and perfect synchronization with the optical pump. Recent results of electron diffraction from a single crystal gold foil, using LWFA electrons driven by 8-mJ, 35-fs laser pulses at 500 Hz, will be presented. The accelerated electrons were collimated with a solenoid magnetic lens. By applying a small-angle tilt to the magnetic lens, the diffraction pattern can be streaked such that the temporal evolution is separated spatially on the detector screen after propagation. The observable time window and achievable temporal resolution are studied in pump-probe measurements of photo-induced heating on the gold foil.

  5. Optimizing chirped laser pulse parameters for electron acceleration in vacuum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akhyani, Mina; Jahangiri, Fazel; Niknam, Ali Reza; Massudi, Reza, E-mail: r-massudi@sbu.ac.ir [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran 1983969411 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-11-14

    Electron dynamics in the field of a chirped linearly polarized laser pulse is investigated. Variations of electron energy gain versus chirp parameter, time duration, and initial phase of laser pulse are studied. Based on maximizing laser pulse asymmetry, a numerical optimization procedure is presented, which leads to the elimination of rapid fluctuations of gain versus the chirp parameter. Instead, a smooth variation is observed that considerably reduces the accuracy required for experimentally adjusting the chirp parameter.

  6. Measurements of the temporal and spatial phase variations of a 33 GHz pulsed free electron laser amplifier and application to high gradient RF acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volfbeyn, P.; Bekefi, G. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    We report the results of temporal and spatial measurements of phase of a pulsed free electron laser amplifier (FEL) operating in combined wiggler and axial guide magnetic fields. The 33 GHz FEL is driven by a mildly relativistic electron beam (750 kV, 90-300 A, 30 ns) and generates 61 MW of radiation with a high power magnetron as the input source. The phase is measured by an interferometric technique from which frequency shifting is determined. The results are simulated with a computer code. Experimental studies on a CERN-CLIC 32.98 GHz 26-cell high gradient accelerating section (HGA) were carried out for input powers from 0.1 MW to 35 MW. The FEL served as the r.f. power source for the HGA. The maximum power in the transmitted pulse was measured to be 15 MW for an input pulse of 35 MW. The theoretically calculated shunt impedance of 116 M{Omega}/m predicts a field gradient of 65 MeV/m inside the HGA. For power levels >3MW the pulse transmitted through the HGA was observed to be shorter than the input pulse and pulse shortening became more serious with increasing power input. At the highest power levels the output pulse length (about 5 nsec) was about one quarter of the input pulse length. Various tests suggest that these undesirable effects occur in the input coupler to the HGA. Light and X-ray production inside the HGA have been observed.

  7. Electronic applications presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grants.gov requirement effective February 17, 2015. All initial applications submitted for competitiveawards based on solicitations issued on or after February 17, 2015 must be submitted to EPAelectronically through Grants.gov.

  8. Laser technology in biomimetics basics and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Belegratis, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Lasers are progressively more used as versatile tools for fabrication purposes. The wide range of available powers, wavelengths, operation modes, repetition rates etc. facilitate the processing of a large spectrum of materials at exceptional precision and quality. Hence, manifold methods were established in the past and novel methods are continuously under development. Biomimetics, the translation from nature-inspired principles to technical applications, is strongly multidisciplinary. This field offers intrinsically a wide scope of applications for laser based methods regarding structuring and modification of materials. This book is dedicated to laser fabrication methods in biomimetics. It introduces both, a laser technology as well as an application focused approach.  The book covers the most important laser lithographic methods and various biomimetics application scenarios ranging from coatings and biotechnology to construction, medical applications and photonics.

  9. Cascade laser applications: trends and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Humières, B.; Margoto, Éric; Fazilleau, Yves

    2016-03-01

    When analyses need rapid measurements, cost effective monitoring and miniaturization, tunable semiconductor lasers can be very good sources. Indeed, applications like on-field environmental gas analysis or in-line industrial process control are becoming available thanks to the advantage of tunable semiconductor lasers. Advances in cascade lasers (CL) are revolutionizing Mid-IR spectroscopy with two alternatives: interband cascade lasers (ICL) in the 3-6μm spectrum and quantum cascade lasers (QCL), with more power from 3 to 300μm. The market is getting mature with strong players for driving applications like industry, environment, life science or transports. CL are not the only Mid-IR laser source. In fact, a strong competition is now taking place with other technologies like: OPO, VCSEL, Solid State lasers, Gas, SC Infrared or fiber lasers. In other words, CL have to conquer a share of the Mid-IR application market. Our study is a market analysis of CL technologies and their applications. It shows that improvements of components performance, along with the progress of infrared laser spectroscopy will drive the CL market growth. We compare CL technologies with other Mid-IR sources and estimate their share in each application market.

  10. A multi-frequency approach to free electron lasers driven by short electron bunches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piovella, Nicola

    1997-01-01

    A multi-frequency model for free electron lasers (FELs), based on the Fourier decomposition of the radiation field coupled with the beam electrons, is discussed. We show that the multi-frequency approach allows for an accurate description of the evolution of the radiation spectrum, also when the FEL is driven by short electron bunches, of arbitrary longitudinal profile. We derive from the multi-frequency model, by averaging over one radiation period, the usual FEL equations modelling the slippage between radiation and particles and describing the super-radiant regime in high-gain FELs. As an example of application of the multi-frequency model, we discuss the coherent spontaneous emission (CSE) from short electron bunches

  11. Pulse forming networks for fast pumping of high power electron-beam-controlled CO2 lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riepe, K.B.

    1975-01-01

    The transverse electric discharge is a widely used technique for pumping CO 2 lasers at high pressures for the generation, simply and efficiently, of very high power laser pulses. The development of the electron-beam-controlled discharge has allowed the application of the transverse discharge to large aperture, very high energy systems. LASL is now in the process of assembly and checkout of a CO 2 laser which is designed to generate a one nanosecond pulse containing 10 kilojoules, for use in laser fusion experiments. The front end of this laser consists of a set of preamplifiers and a mode locked oscillator with electro-optic single pulse switchout. The final amplifier stage consists of four parallel modules, each one consisting of a two-sided electron gun, and two 35 x 35 x 200 cm gas pumping regions operating at a pressure of 1800 torr with a 3/ 1 / 4 /1 (He/N 2 /CO 2 ) laser mix. (auth)

  12. Tunable lasers for waste management photochemistry applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finch, F.T.

    1978-09-01

    A review of lasers with potential photochemical applications in waste management indicates that dye lasers, as a class, can provide tunable laser output through the visible and near-uv regions of the spectrum of most interest to photochemistry. Many variables can affect the performance of a specific dye laser, and the interactions of these variables, at the current state of the art, are complex. The recent literature on dye-laser characteristics has been reviewed and summarized, with emphasis on those parameters that most likely will affect the scaling of dye lasers in photochemical applications. Current costs are reviewed and correlated with output power. A new class of efficient uv lasers that appear to be scalable in both energy output and pulse rate, based on rare-gas halide excimers and similar molecules, is certain to find major applications in photochemistry. Because the most important developments are too recent to be adequately described in the literature or are the likely outcome of current experiments, the basic physics underlying the class of excimer lasers is described. Specific cost data are unavailable, but these new gas lasers should reflect costs similar to those of existing gas lasers, in particular, the pulsed CO 2 lasers. To complete the survey of tunable-laser characteristics, the technical characteristics of the various classes of lasers in the ir are summarized. Important developments in ir laser technology are being accelerated by isotope-separation research, but, initially at least, this portion of the spectrum is least likely to receive emphasis in waste-management-oriented photochemistry

  13. Chaotic behaviour and controlling chaos in free electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Wenjie; Chen Shigang; Du Xiangwan; Wang Guangrui

    1995-01-01

    Chaos in free electron lasers (FEL) is reviewed. Special attention has been paid to the chaotic behaviour of the electrons and the laser field. The problem of controlling and utilizing chaotic motion of the electrons and the laser field has also been discussed. In order to find out the rules of instability and chaos in FEL, some typical methods of the chaotic theory are used. These methods include making the Poincare surface of section, drawing the phase space diagrams of the electron orbits, calculating the Liapunov exponents, and computing the power spectrum, etc. Finally, some problems in FEL research are discussed (103 refs., 54 figs.)

  14. Electronic properties of asymmetrical quantum dots dressed by laser field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kibis, O.V. [Department of Applied and Theoretical Physics, Novosibirsk State Technical University, Karl Marx Avenue 20, 630092 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Slepyan, G.Ya.; Maksimenko, S.A. [Institute for Nuclear Problems, Belarus State University, Bobruyskaya St. 11, 220050 Minsk (Belarus); Hoffmann, A. [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Technische Universitaet Berlin, Hardenbergstrasse 36, 10623 Berlin (Germany)

    2012-05-15

    In the present paper, we demonstrate theoretically that the strong non-resonant interaction between asymmetrical quantum dots (QDs) and a laser field results in harmonic oscillations of their band gap. It is shown that such oscillations change the spectrum of elementary electron excitations in QDs: in the absence of the laser pumping there is only one resonant electron frequency, but QDs dressed by the laser field have a set of electron resonant frequencies. One expects that this modification of elementary electron excitations in QDs can be observable in optical experiments. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  15. Polymers for electronic & photonic application

    CERN Document Server

    Wong, C P

    2013-01-01

    The most recent advances in the use of polymeric materials by the electronic industry can be found in Polymers for Electronic and Photonic Applications. This bookprovides in-depth coverage of photoresis for micro-lithography, microelectronic encapsulants and packaging, insulators, dielectrics for multichip packaging,electronic and photonic applications of polymeric materials, among many other topics. Intended for engineers and scientists who design, process, and manufacturemicroelectronic components, this book will also prove useful for hybrid and systems packaging managers who want to be info

  16. Applications of laser-driven particle acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Parodi, Katia; Schreiber, Jorg

    2018-01-01

    The first book of its kind to highlight the unique capabilities of laser-driven acceleration and its diverse potential, Applications of Laser-Driven Particle Acceleration presents the basic understanding of acceleration concepts and envisioned prospects for selected applications. As the main focus, this new book explores exciting and diverse application possibilities, with emphasis on those uniquely enabled by the laser driver that can also be meaningful and realistic for potential users. A key aim of the book is to inform multiple, interdisciplinary research communities of the new possibilities available and to inspire them to engage with laser-driven acceleration, further motivating and advancing this developing field. Material is presented in a thorough yet accessible manner, making it a valuable reference text for general scientific and engineering researchers who are not necessarily subject matter experts. Applications of Laser-Driven Particle Acceleration is edited by Professors Paul R. Bolton, Katia ...

  17. Electron beam pumped KrF lasers for fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sethian, J.D.; Friedman, M.; Giuliani, J.L. Jr.; Lehmberg, R.H.; Obenschain, S.P.; Kepple, P.; Wolford, M.; Hegeler, F.; Swanekamp, S.B.; Weidenheimer, D.; Welch, D.; Rose, D.V.; Searles, S.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, we describe the development of electron beam pumped KrF lasers for inertial fusion energy. KrF lasers are an attractive driver for fusion, on account of their demonstrated very high beam quality, which is essential for reducing imprint in direct drive targets; their short wavelength (248 nm), which mitigates the growth of plasma instabilities; and their modular architecture, which reduces development costs. In this paper we present a basic overview of KrF laser technology as well as current research and development in three key areas: electron beam stability and transport; KrF kinetics and laser propagation; and pulsed power. The work will be cast in context of the two KrF lasers at the Naval Research Laboratory, The Nike Laser (5 kJ, single shot), and The Electra Laser (400-700 J repetitively pulsed)

  18. In situ laser processing in a scanning electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, Nicholas A.; Magel, Gregory A.; Hartfield, Cheryl D.; Moore, Thomas M.; Fowlkes, Jason D.; Rack, Philip D. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States) and Omniprobe, Inc., an Oxford Instruments Company, 10410 Miller Rd., Dallas, Texas 75238 (United States); Omniprobe, Inc., an Oxford Instruments Company, 10410 Miller Rd., Dallas, Texas 75238 (United States); Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States) and Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Laser delivery probes using multimode fiber optic delivery and bulk focusing optics have been constructed and used for performing materials processing experiments within scanning electron microscope/focused ion beam instruments. Controlling the current driving a 915-nm semiconductor diode laser module enables continuous or pulsed operation down to sub-microsecond durations, and with spot sizes on the order of 50 {mu}m diameter, achieving irradiances at a sample surface exceeding 1 MW/cm{sup 2}. Localized laser heating has been used to demonstrate laser chemical vapor deposition of Pt, surface melting of silicon, enhanced purity, and resistivity via laser annealing of Au deposits formed by electron beam induced deposition, and in situ secondary electron imaging of laser induced dewetting of Au metal films on SiO{sub x}.

  19. High energy gain electron beam acceleration by 100TW laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotaki, Hideyuki; Kando, Masaki; Kondo, Shuji; Hosokai, Tomonao; Kanazawa, Shuhei; Yokoyama, Takashi; Matoba, Toru; Nakajima, Kazuhisa

    2001-01-01

    A laser wakefield acceleration experiment using a 100TW laser is planed at JAERI-Kansai. High quality and short pulse electron beams are necessary to accelerate the electron beam by the laser. Electron beam - laser synchronization is also necessary. A microtron with a photocathode rf-gun was prepared as a high quality electron injector. The quantum efficiency (QE) of the photocathode of 2x10 -5 was obtained. A charge of 100pC from the microtron was measured. The emittance and pulse width of the electron beam was 6π mm-mrad and 10ps, respectively. In order to produce a short pulse electron beam, and to synchronize between the electron beam and the laser pulse, an inverse free electron laser (IFEL) is planned. One of problems of LWFA is the short acceleration length. In order to overcome the problem, a Z-pinch plasma waveguide will be prepared as a laser wakefield acceleration tube for 1 GeV acceleration. (author)

  20. Hemostatic properties of the free-electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cram, G.P. Jr.; Copeland, M.L. [Department of Neurosurgery, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States)

    1998-09-02

    We have investigated the hemostatic properties of the free-electron laser (FEL) and compared these properties to the most commonly used commercial lasers in neurosurgery, CO{sub 2} and Nd:YAG, using an acute canine model. Arterial and venous vessels, of varying diameters from 0.1 to 1.0 mm, were divided with all three lasers. Analysis of five wavelengths of the FEL (3.0, 4.5, 6.1, 6.45, and 7.7 microns) resulted in bleeding without evidence of significant coagulation, regardless of whether the vessel was an artery or vein. Hemorrhage from vessels less than 0.4 mm diameter was subsequently easily controlled with Gelfoam registered (topical hemostatic agent) alone, whereas larger vessels required bipolar electrocautery. No significant charring, or contraction of the surrounding parenchyma was noted with any of the wavelengths chosen from FEL source. The CO{sub 2} laser, in continuous mode, easily coagulated vessels with diameters of 4 mm and less, while larger vessels displayed significant bleeding requiring bipolar electrocautery for control. Tissue charring was noted with application of the CO{sub 2} laser. In super pulse mode, the CO{sub 2} laser exhibited similar properties, including significant charring of the surrounding parenchyma. The Nd:YAG coagulated all vessels tested up to 1.4 mm, which was the largest diameter cortical artery found, however this laser displayed significant and extensive contraction and retraction of the surrounding parenchyma. In conclusion, the FEL appears to be a poor hemostatic agent. Our results did not show any benefit of the FEL over current conventional means of achieving hemostasis. However, control of hemorrhage was easily achieved with currently used methods of hemostasis, namely Gelfoam registered or bipolar electrocuatery. Although only cortical vessels in dogs were tested, we feel this data can be applied to all animals, including humans, and the peripheral, as well as central, vasculature, as our data on the CO{sub 2} and

  1. Hemostatic properties of the free-electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cram, G.P. Jr.; Copeland, M.L.

    1998-01-01

    We have investigated the hemostatic properties of the free-electron laser (FEL) and compared these properties to the most commonly used commercial lasers in neurosurgery, CO 2 and Nd:YAG, using an acute canine model. Arterial and venous vessels, of varying diameters from 0.1 to 1.0 mm, were divided with all three lasers. Analysis of five wavelengths of the FEL (3.0, 4.5, 6.1, 6.45, and 7.7 microns) resulted in bleeding without evidence of significant coagulation, regardless of whether the vessel was an artery or vein. Hemorrhage from vessels less than 0.4 mm diameter was subsequently easily controlled with Gelfoam registered (topical hemostatic agent) alone, whereas larger vessels required bipolar electrocautery. No significant charring, or contraction of the surrounding parenchyma was noted with any of the wavelengths chosen from FEL source. The CO 2 laser, in continuous mode, easily coagulated vessels with diameters of 4 mm and less, while larger vessels displayed significant bleeding requiring bipolar electrocautery for control. Tissue charring was noted with application of the CO 2 laser. In super pulse mode, the CO 2 laser exhibited similar properties, including significant charring of the surrounding parenchyma. The Nd:YAG coagulated all vessels tested up to 1.4 mm, which was the largest diameter cortical artery found, however this laser displayed significant and extensive contraction and retraction of the surrounding parenchyma. In conclusion, the FEL appears to be a poor hemostatic agent. Our results did not show any benefit of the FEL over current conventional means of achieving hemostasis. However, control of hemorrhage was easily achieved with currently used methods of hemostasis, namely Gelfoam registered or bipolar electrocuatery. Although only cortical vessels in dogs were tested, we feel this data can be applied to all animals, including humans, and the peripheral, as well as central, vasculature, as our data on the CO 2 and Nd:YAG appear to closely

  2. Integrated Applications with Laser Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Octavian DOSPINESCU

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of new materials as Power Point presentations are the most convenient way of teaching a course or to display a scientific paper. In order to support this function, most schools, universities, institutions, are equipped with projectors and computers. For controlling the presentation of the materials, the persons that are in charge with the presentation use, in most cases, both the keyboard of the computer as well as the mouse for the slides, thing that burdens, in a way, the direct communication (face to face with the audience. Of course, the invention of the wireless mouse allowed a sort of freedom in controlling from the distance the digital materials. Although there seems to appear a certain impediment: in order to be used, the mouse requires to be placed on a flat surface. This article aims at creating a new application prototype that will manipulate, only through the means of a light-beam instrument (laser fascicle, both the actions of the mouse as well as some of the elements offered by the keyboard on a certain application or presentation. The light fascicle will be „connected” to a calculus system only through the images that were captured by a simple webcam.

  3. New fiber optics illumination system for application to electronics holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciammarella, Cesar A.

    1995-08-01

    The practical application of electronic holography requires the use of fiber optics. The need of employing coherent fiber optics imposes restrictions in the efficient use of laser light. This paper proposes a new solution to this problem. The proposed method increases the efficiency in the use of the laser light and simplifies the interface between the laser source and the fiber optics. This paper will present the theory behind the proposed method. A discussion of the effect of the different parameters that influence the formation of interference fringes is presented. Limitations and results that can be achieved are given. An example of application is presented.

  4. Introduction to the theory of free electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krinsky, S.

    1985-01-01

    We present an introduction to some fundamental aspects of the theory of free electron lasers. Spontaneous radiation emitted by electrons traversing a wiggler magnet is briefly reviewed, and stimulated emission in the low-gain regime is discussed using Colson's pendulum equations and Madey's theorems. The high-gain regime is treated by an extention of the work of Bonifacio, Pellegrini, and Narducci. We introduce dynamical variables to describe the radiation field, and a Hamiltonian formulation of Maxwell's equations is employed. A canonical transformation to the interaction representation factors out the fast time variation of the radiation field, and the slow time dependence is determined by linearized equations for the appropriate collective variables. As an application of this technique we consider self-amplified spontaneous radiation, and we comment upon the relationship between our approach and the use of coupled Vlasov-Maxwell equations

  5. Introduction to free electron lasers (1/3)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2002-01-01

    The Free-electron laser (FEL) is a source of coherent electromagnetic radiation based on a relativistic electron beam. First operated 25 years ago, the FEL has now reached a stage of maturity for operation in the infra-red region of the spectrum and several facilities provide intense FEL radiation beams for research covering a wide range of disciplines. Several projects both underway and proposed aim at pushing the minimum wavelength from its present limit around 100 nm progressively down to the 1 Angstrom region where the X-ray FEL would open up many new and exciting research possibilities. Other developments aim at increasing power levels to the 10's of kW level. In this series of lectures we give an introduction to the basic principles of FELs and their different modes of operation, and summarise their applications and current state of development.

  6. Introduction to free electron lasers (3/3)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2002-01-01

    The Free-electron laser (FEL) is a source of coherent electromagnetic radiation based on a relativistic electron beam. First operated 25 years ago, the FEL has now reached a stage of maturity for operation in the infra-red region of the spectrum and several facilities provide intense FEL radiation beams for research covering a wide range of disciplines. Several projects both underway and proposed aim at pushing the minimum wavelength from its present limit around 100 nm progressively down to the 1 Angstrom region where the X-ray FEL would open up many new and exciting research possibilities. Other developments aim at increasing power levels to the 10's of kW level. In this series of lectures we give an introduction to the basic principles of FELs and their different modes of operation, and summarise their applications and current state of development.

  7. Introduction to free electron lasers (2/3)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2002-01-01

    The Free-electron laser (FEL) is a source of coherent electromagnetic radiation based on a relativistic electron beam. First operated 25 years ago, the FEL has now reached a stage of maturity for operation in the infra-red region of the spectrum and several facilities provide intense FEL radiation beams for research covering a wide range of disciplines. Several projects both underway and proposed aim at pushing the minimum wavelength from its present limit around 100 nm progressively down to the 1 Angstrom region where the X-ray FEL would open up many new and exciting research possibilities. Other developments aim at increasing power levels to the 10's of kW level. In this series of lectures we give an introduction to the basic principles of FELs and their different modes of operation, and summarise their applications and current state of development.

  8. Laser-plasma interactions and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Neely, David; Bingham, Robert; Jaroszynski, Dino

    2013-01-01

    Laser-Plasma Interactions and Applications covers the fundamental and applied aspects of high power laser-plasma physics. With an internationally renowned team of authors, the book broadens the knowledge of young researchers working in high power laser-plasma science by providing them with a thorough pedagogical grounding in the interaction of laser radiation with matter, laser-plasma accelerators, and inertial confinement fusion. The text is organised such that the theoretical foundations of the subject are discussed first, in Part I. In Part II, topics in the area of high energy density physics are covered. Parts III and IV deal with the applications to inertial confinement fusion and as a driver of particle and radiation sources, respectively. Finally, Part V describes the principle diagnostic, targetry, and computational approaches used in the field. This book is designed to give students a thorough foundation in the fundamental physics of laser-plasma interactions. It will also provide readers with knowl...

  9. Laser Assisted Free-Free Transition in Electron - Atom Collision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, C.; Bhatia, A. K.

    2011-01-01

    Free-free transition is studied for electron-Hydrogen atom system in ground state at very low incident energies in presence of an external homogeneous, monochromatic and linearly polarized laser field. The incident electron is considered to be dressed by the laser in a non perturbative manner by choosing the Volkov solutions in both the channels. The space part of the scattering wave function for the electron is solved numerically by taking into account the effect of electron exchange, short range as well as of the long range interactions. Laser assisted differential as well as elastic total cross sections are calculated for single photon absorption/emission in the soft photon limit, the laser intensity being much less than the atomic field intensity. A strong suppression is noted in the laser assisted cross sections as compared to the field free situations. Significant difference is noted in the singlet and the triplet cross sections.

  10. Industrial applications of electron accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Cleland, M R

    2006-01-01

    This paper addresses the industrial applications of electron accelerators for modifying the physical, chemical or biological properties of materials and commercial products by treatment with ionizing radiation. Many beneficial effects can be obtained with these methods, which are known as radiation processing. The earliest practical applications occurred during the 1950s, and the business of radiation processing has been expanding since that time. The most prevalent applications are the modification of many different plastic and rubber products and the sterilization of single-use medical devices. Emerging applications are the pasteurization and preservation of foods and the treatment of toxic industrial wastes. Industrial accelerators can now provide electron energies greater than 10 MeV and average beam powers as high as 700 kW. The availability of high-energy, high-power electron beams is stimulating interest in the use of X-rays (bremsstrahlung) as an alternative to gamma rays from radioactive nuclides.

  11. The semi classical laser theory and some applications of laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdalla, Abbaker Ali

    1995-04-01

    The semi classical laser theory is concerned with the interaction between light and matter in such a way that the matter is treated quantum-mechanically whereas light is treated in terms of the classical electromagnetic equations. In this work the Maxwell-Bloch equations are employed to describe the interaction between light and matter. Applications of the theory as well as different types of lasers are reviewed. (Author)

  12. Electron Raman scattering in a double quantum well tuned by an external nonresonant intense laser field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiutiunnyk, A.; Mora-Ramos, M. E.; Morales, A. L.; Duque, C. M.; Restrepo, R. L.; Ungan, F.; Martínez-Orozco, J. C.; Kasapoglu, E.; Duque, C. A.

    2017-02-01

    In this work we shall present a study of inelastic light scattering involving inter-subband electron transitions in coupled GaAs-(Ga,Al)As quantum wells. Calculations include the electron related Raman differential cross section and Raman gain. The effects of an external nonresonant intense laser field are used in order to tune these output properties. The confined electron states will be described by means of a diagonalization procedure within the effective mass and parabolic band approximations. It is shown that the application of the intense laser field can produce values of the intersubband electron Raman gain above 400 cm-1. The system proposed here is an alternative choice for the development of AlxGa1-xAs semiconductor laser diodes that can be tuned via an external nonresonant intense laser field.

  13. Application of laser in powder metallurgy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolochko, N.K.

    1995-01-01

    Modern status of works in the field of laser application in powder metallurgy (powders preparation, sintering, coatings formation, powder materials processing) is considered. The attention is paid to the new promising direction in powder products shape-formation technology - laser layer-by-layer selective powders sintering and bulk sintering of packaged layered profiles produced by laser cutting of powder-based sheet blanks. 67 refs

  14. Laser-Electron-Gamma-Source. Progress report, July 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dowell, D.H.; Fineman, B.; Giordano, G.; Kistner, OC.; Matone, G.; Sandorfi, A.M.; Schaerf, C.; Thorn, C.E.; Ziegler, W.

    1986-07-01

    When completed, the Laser Electron Gamma Source (LEGS) is expected to provide intense beams of monochromatic and polarized (circular or linear) gamma rays with energies up to 500 MeV. The gamma-ray beams will be produced by Compton backscattering uv laser light from the electrons circulating in a storage ring. Progress with installation of the facility is described, particularly the Ar-ion laser and tagging spectrometer. Tests of the tagging spectrometer coponents is reported, and a second laser is described for higher energy operation. Estimates are given of expected beam parameters. Experimental equipment for the planned research projects to be carried out at the LEGS facility is discussed

  15. Application of electron accelerator worldwide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machi, Sueo

    2003-01-01

    Electron accelerator is an important radiation source for radiation technology, which covers broad fields such as industry, health care, food and environmental protection. There are about 1,000 electron accelerators for radiation processing worldwide. Electron accelerator has advantage over Co-60 irradiator in term of high dose rate and power, assurance of safety, and higher economic performance at larger volume of irradiation. Accelerator generating higher energy in the range of 10 MeV and high power electron beam is now commercially available. There is a trend to use high-energy electron accelerator replacing Co-60 in case of large through-put of medical products. Irradiated foods, in particular species, are on the commercial market in 35 countries. Electron accelerator is used efficiently and economically for production of new or modified polymeric materials through radiation-induced cross-linking, grafting and polymerization reaction. Another important application of electron beam is the curing of surface coatings in the manufacture of products. Electron accelerators of large capacity are used for cleaning exhaust gases in industrial scale. Economic feasibility studies of this electron beam process have shown that this technology is more cost effective than the conventional process. It should be noted that the conventional limestone process produce gypsum as a by-product, which cannot be used in some countries. By contrast, the by-product of the electron beam process is a valuable fertilizer. (Y. Tanaka)

  16. Application of electron accelerator worldwide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machi, Sueo [Japan Atomic Industrial Forum, Inc., Tokyo (Japan)

    2003-02-01

    Electron accelerator is an important radiation source for radiation technology, which covers broad fields such as industry, health care, food and environmental protection. There are about 1,000 electron accelerators for radiation processing worldwide. Electron accelerator has advantage over Co-60 irradiator in term of high dose rate and power, assurance of safety, and higher economic performance at larger volume of irradiation. Accelerator generating higher energy in the range of 10 MeV and high power electron beam is now commercially available. There is a trend to use high-energy electron accelerator replacing Co-60 in case of large through-put of medical products. Irradiated foods, in particular species, are on the commercial market in 35 countries. Electron accelerator is used efficiently and economically for production of new or modified polymeric materials through radiation-induced cross-linking, grafting and polymerization reaction. Another important application of electron beam is the curing of surface coatings in the manufacture of products. Electron accelerators of large capacity are used for cleaning exhaust gases in industrial scale. Economic feasibility studies of this electron beam process have shown that this technology is more cost effective than the conventional process. It should be noted that the conventional limestone process produce gypsum as a by-product, which cannot be used in some countries. By contrast, the by-product of the electron beam process is a valuable fertilizer. (Y. Tanaka)

  17. Industrial applications of electron accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, A.

    1994-01-01

    The interaction of high-energy radiation with organic systems produces very reactive, short-lived, ionic and free-radical species. The chemical changes brought about by these species are very useful in several systems, and are the basis of the growth of the electron processing industry. Some typical areas of the industrial use of electron accelerators are crosslinking wire and cable insulation, manufacturing heat shrink plastic items, curing coatings, and partially curing rubber products. Electron accelerators are also being considered in other areas such as sewage treatment, sterilizing medical disposables, and food irradiation. An emerging application of industrial electron accelerators is the production of advanced composites for the aerospace and other industries. Traditionally, the carbon-, aramid- and glass-fibre-reinforced composites with epoxy matrices are produced by thermal curing. However, equivalent composites with acrylated-epoxy matrices can be made by electron curing. Cost estimates suggest that electron curing could be more economical than thermal curing. Food irradiation has traditionally been an application for 60 Co γ-radiation. With the increasing demand for food irradiation in various countries, it may become necessary to use electron accelerators for this purpose. Since the dose rate during gamma and electron irradiation are generally very different, a review of the relevant work on the effect of dose rates has been done. This paper presents an overview of the industrial applications of electron accelerator for radiation processing, emphasises the electron curing of advanced composites and, briefly reviews the dose-rate effects in radiation processing of advanced composites and food irradiation. (author). 84 refs., 8 tabs

  18. Commercial application of laser fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Booth, L.A.

    1976-01-01

    The fundamentals of laser-induced fusion, some laser-fusion reactor concepts, and attendant means of utilizing the thermonuclear energy for commercial electric power generation are discussed. Theoretical fusion-pellet microexplosion energy release characteristics are described and the effects of pellet design options on pellet-microexplosion characteristics are discussed. The results of analyses to assess the engineering feasibility of reactor cavities for which protection of cavity components is provided either by suitable ablative materials or by diversion of plasmas by magnetic fields are presented. Two conceptual laser-fusion electric generating stations, based on different laser-fusion reactor concepts, are described

  19. Parametric study of transport beam lines for electron beams accelerated by laser-plasma interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scisciò, M.; Lancia, L.; Migliorati, M.; Mostacci, A.; Palumbo, L.; Papaphilippou, Y.; Antici, P.

    2016-03-01

    In the last decade, laser-plasma acceleration of high-energy electrons has attracted strong attention in different fields. Electrons with maximum energies in the GeV range can be laser-accelerated within a few cm using multi-hundreds terawatt (TW) lasers, yielding to very high beam currents at the source (electron bunches with up to tens-hundreds of pC in a few fs). While initially the challenge was to increase the maximum achievable electron energy, today strong effort is put in the control and usability of these laser-generated beams that still lack of some features in order to be used for applications where currently conventional, radio-frequency (RF) based, electron beam lines represent the most common and efficient solution. Several improvements have been suggested for this purpose, some of them acting directly on the plasma source, some using beam shaping tools located downstream. Concerning the latter, several studies have suggested the use of conventional accelerator magnetic devices (such as quadrupoles and solenoids) as an easy implementable solution when the laser-plasma accelerated beam requires optimization. In this paper, we report on a parametric study related to the transport of electron beams accelerated by laser-plasma interaction, using conventional accelerator elements and tools. We focus on both, high energy electron beams in the GeV range, as produced on petawatt (PW) class laser systems, and on lower energy electron beams in the hundreds of MeV range, as nowadays routinely obtained on commercially available multi-hundred TW laser systems. For both scenarios, our study allows understanding what are the crucial parameters that enable laser-plasma accelerators to compete with conventional ones and allow for a beam transport. We show that suitable working points require a tradeoff-combination between low beam divergence and narrow energy spread.

  20. Spin effects in strong-field laser-electron interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahrens, S; Bauke, H; Müller, T-O; Villalba-Chávez, S; Müller, C

    2013-01-01

    The electron spin degree of freedom can play a significant role in relativistic scattering processes involving intense laser fields. In this contribution we discuss the influence of the electron spin on (i) Kapitza-Dirac scattering in an x-ray laser field of high intensity, (ii) photo-induced electron-positron pair production in a strong laser wave and (iii) multiphoton electron-positron pair production on an atomic nucleus. We show that in all cases under consideration the electron spin can have a characteristic impact on the process properties and their total probabilities. To this end, spin-resolved calculations based on the Dirac equation in the presence of an intense laser field are performed. The predictions from Dirac theory are also compared with the corresponding results from the Klein-Gordon equation.

  1. Laser vacuum acceleration of a relativistic electron bunch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glazyrin, I V; Karpeev, A V; Kotova, O G; Nazarov, K S [E.I. Zababakhin All-Russian Scientific-Research Institute of Technical Physics, Russian Federal Nuclear Centre, Snezhinsk, Chelyabinsk region (Russian Federation); Bychenkov, V Yu [P N Lebedev Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-06-30

    With regard to the problem of laser acceleration of a relativistic electron bunch we present a scheme of its vacuum acceleration directly by a relativistic intensity laser pulse. The energy of the electron bunch injected into the laser pulse leading edge increases during its coaxial movement to a thin, pulse-reflecting target. The laser-accelerated electrons continue to move free forward, passing through the target. The study of this acceleration scheme in the three-dimensional geometry is verified in a numerical simulation by the particle-in-cell method, which showed that the energy of a part of the electrons can increase significantly compared to the initial one. Restrictions are discussed, which impose limiting values of energy and total charge of accelerated electrons. (superstrong light fields)

  2. Commissioning of the JAERI free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minehara, E.J.; Nagai, R.; Sawamura, M.

    1993-01-01

    We have developed, and constructed a prototype for a quasi-cw, and high-average power free electron laser driven by a 15MeV superconducting rf linac at Tokai, JAERI. In designing a high power FEL, there are many available design options to generate the required power output. By applying the superconducting rf linac driver, some of the options relating to the FEL itself may be relaxed by transferring design difficulties to the driver. Because wall losses become minimal in the superconducting accelerator cavity, very long pulse or quasi-cw, and resultant high average power may be readily attained at the JAERI superconducting rf linac FEL. In 1992 Japanese fiscal year, we have successfully demonstrated better cryogenic (stand-by loss<3.5W at 4.5K) and accelerating fields' performances (Eacc=7-9.4MV/m and Q=1-2x10+9) of four JAERI superconducting accelerator modules, and installed them in the FEL accelerator vault. In 1993, Optical resonators and beam transport systems, which have been already assembled, are now under commissioning. A description and the latest results of the JAERI super-conducting rf linac FEL will be discussed in comparison with a normal-conducting one, and reported in the symposium. (author)

  3. The suppression of radiation reaction and laser field depletion in laser-electron beam interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, J. F.; Moritaka, T.; Takabe, H.

    2018-03-01

    The effects of radiation reaction (RR) have been studied extensively by using the interaction of ultraintense lasers with a counter-propagating relativistic electron. At the laser intensity at the order of 1023 W/cm2, the effects of RR are significant in a few laser periods for a relativistic electron. However, a laser at such intensity is tightly focused and the laser energy is usually assumed to be fixed. Then, the signal of RR and energy conservation cannot be guaranteed. To assess the effects of RR in a tightly focused laser pulse and the evolution of the laser energy, we simulated this interaction with a beam of 109 electrons by means of a Particle-In-Cell method. We observe that the effects of RR are suppressed due to the ponderomotive force and accompanied by a non-negligible amount of laser field energy reduction. This is because the ponderomotive force prevents the electrons from approaching the center of the laser pulse and leads to an interaction at the weaker field region. At the same time, the laser energy is absorbed through ponderomotive acceleration. Thus, the kinetic energy of the electron beam has to be carefully selected such that the effects of RR become obvious.

  4. Free electron laser and coherent radiation. Working group summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gover, A.; Csonka, P.; Deacon, D.

    1984-01-01

    The planned development of a new storage ring at SSRL gives hope for the exciting possibility that an x-ray laser may become available in a users facility. Such a device would certainly be a unique and revolutionary tool for scientific research and industrial applications, which may take advantage of the spatial and temporal coherence, high power and high brightness of this device in a wavelength regime where no alternative coherent radiation sources exist. The feasibility of implementing such a device in the new ring should be examined carefully by the ring designers. If conclusions are positive, the ring design should take into account the special requirements which are set by the x-ray laser design parameters. Our working group made the first step in this examination process. Most of the emphasis was put on the consideration of an X-Ray Free Electron Laser (XR FEL). FEL technology has developed in the last few years and was recently demonstrated to operate successfully in the visible wavelength regime in the ACO storage ring in Orsay

  5. Electron acceleration via high contrast laser interacting with submicron clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Lu; Chen Liming; Wang Weiming; Yan Wenchao; Yuan Dawei; Mao Jingyi; Wang Zhaohua; Liu Cheng; Shen Zhongwei; Li Yutong; Dong Quanli; Lu Xin; Ma Jinglong; Wei Zhiyi; Faenov, Anatoly; Pikuz, Tatiana; Li Dazhang; Sheng Zhengming; Zhang Jie

    2012-01-01

    We experimentally investigated electron acceleration from submicron size argon clusters-gas target irradiated by a 100 fs, 10 TW laser pulses having a high-contrast. Electron beams are observed in the longitudinal and transverse directions to the laser propagation. The measured energy of the longitudinal electron reaches 600 MeV and the charge of the electron beam in the transverse direction is more than 3 nC. A two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation of the interaction has been performed and it shows an enhancement of electron charge by using the cluster-gas target.

  6. Industrial applications of electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chmielewski, A.G.

    1997-01-01

    The review of industrial applications with use of electron beams has been done. Especially the radiation technologies being developed in Poland have been shown. Industrial installations with electron accelerators as radiation source have been applied for: modification of polymers; modification of thyristors; sterilization of health care materials; radiopreservation of food and other consumer products; purification of combustion flue gases in heat and power plants. 14 refs, 6 tabs, 7 figs

  7. Industrial applications or electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, J. I.

    2001-01-01

    Industrial use of electron beams began in the 1950's with the crosslinking of polyethylene film and wire insulation. Today the number of electron beam Processing Systems installed for industrial applications throughout the world has grown to more than six hundred stations in over 35 countries. Total installed power is now approaching 40 megawatts (over 8 million tons of products per year). Electron beam is now utilized by many major industries including plastics, automotive, rubber goods, wire and cable, electrical insulation, semiconductor, medical, packaging, or pollution control. The principal effect of high-energy electrons is to produce ions in the materials treated, resulting in the liberation of orbital electrons. As a result, the original molecule is modified and the ree radicals combine to form new molecules with new chemical reactions or dis organisation od the DNA chains of living organisms (insects, fungus, microorganisms, etc.). (Author) 8 refs

  8. Material Processing Opportunites Utilizing a Free Electron Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Alan

    1996-11-01

    Many properties of photocathode-driven Free Electron Lasers (FEL) are extremely attractive for material processing applications. These include: 1) broad-band tunability across the IR and UV spectra which permits wavelength optimization, depth deposition control and utilization of resonance phenomena; 2) picosecond pulse structure with continuous nanosecond spacing for optimum deposition efficiency and minimal collateral damage; 3) high peak and average radiated power for economic processing in quantity; and 4) high brightness for spatially defined energy deposition and intense energy density in small spots. We discuss five areas: polymer, metal and electronic material processing, micromachining and defense applications; where IR or UV material processing will find application if the economics is favorable. Specific examples in the IR and UV, such as surface texturing of polymers for improved look and feel, and anti-microbial food packaging films, which have been demonstrated using UV excimer lamps and lasers, will be given. Unfortunately, although the process utility is readily proven, the power levels and costs of lamps and lasers do not scale to production margins. However, from these examples, application specific cost targets ranging from 0.1=A2/kJ to 10=A2/kJ of delivered radiation at power levels from 10 kW to 500 kW, have been developed and are used to define strawman FEL processing systems. Since =46EL radiation energy extraction from the generating electron beam is typically a few percent, at these high average power levels, economic considerations dictate the use of a superconducting RF accelerator with energy recovery to minimize cavity and beam dump power loss. Such a 1 kW IR FEL, funded by the US Navy, is presently under construction at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. This dual-use device, scheduled to generate first light in late 1997, will test both the viability of high-power FELs for shipboard self-defense against cruise

  9. Electron self-injection and acceleration in the bubble regime of laser-plasma interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostyukov, I.; Nerush, E.

    2010-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. The intense laser-plasma and beam-plasma interactions are highly nonlinear-phenomena, which besides being of fundamental interest, attract a great attention due to a number of important applications. One of the key applications is particle acceleration based on excitation of the strong plasma wakefield by laser pulse. In the linear regime of interaction when the laser intensity is low the plasma wake is the linear plasma wave. Moreover, the ponderomotive force of the laser pulse pushes out the plasma electrons from high intensity region leaving behind the laser pulse the plasma cavity - bubble, which is almost free from the plasma electrons. This is the bubble the laser-plasma interaction. Although the bubble propagates with velocity, which is close to speed of light, the huge charge of unshielded ions inside the plasma cavity can trap the cold plasma electrons. Moreover, the electrons are trapped in the accelerated phase of the bubble plasma field thereby leading to efficient electron acceleration. The electron self-injection is an important advantage of the plasma-based acceleration, which allows to exclude the beam loading system requiring accurate synchronization and additional space. The recent experiments have demonstrated high efficiency of the electron self-injection. The beam quality is often of crucial importance in many applications ranging from inertial confinement fusion to the x-ray free electron lasers. Despite a great interest there is still a little theory for relativistic electron dynamics in the plasma wake in multidimensional geometry including electron self-injection. The dynamics of the self-injected electrons can be roughly divided into three stage: (i) electron scattering by the laser pulse, (ii) electron trapping by the bubble, (iii) electron acceleration in the bubble. We developed two analytical models for electron dynamics in the bubble field and verify them by direct measurements of model parameters

  10. Femtosecond lasers for countermeasure applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franssen, G.C.; Schleijpen, H.M.A.; Heuvel, J.C. van den; Buersing, H.; Eberle, B.; Walter, D.

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, much advance in the field of high-power femtosecond laser technology has been made. The high pulse power of femtosecond laser systems leads to various interesting phenomena, such as a very high power density and the formation of a plasma in the propagation medium, which is usually

  11. Two-pulse laser control of nuclear and electronic motion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønager, Michael; Henriksen, Niels Engholm

    1997-01-01

    We discuss an explicitly time-dependent two-pulse laser scheme for controlling where nuclei and electrons are going in unimolecular reactions. We focus on electronic motion and show, with HD+ as an example, that one can find non-stationary states where the electron (with some probability...

  12. Advanced lasers for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krupke, W.F.

    1978-11-01

    Projections indicate that MJ/MW laser systems, operating with efficiencies in escess of 1 percent, are required to drive laser fusion power reactors. Moreover, a premium in pellet performance is anticipated as the wavelength of the driver laser system is decreased. Short wavelength laser systems based on atomic selenium (lambda = 0.49μ), terbium molcular vapors (0.55μ), thulium doped dielectric solids (0.46μ), and on pulse compressions of KrF excimer laser radiaton (0.27μ) have been proposed and studied for this purpose. The technological scalability and efficiency of each of these systems is examined in this paper. All of these systems are projected to meet minimum systems requirements. Amont them, the pulse-compressed KrF system is projected to have the highest potential efficiency (6%) and the widest range of systems design options

  13. Dosimetry of laser-accelerated electron beams used for in vitro cell irradiation experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, C.; Kaluza, M.; Karsch, L.; Schlenvoigt, H.-P.; Schürer, M.; Sobiella, M.; Woithe, J.; Pawelke, J.

    2011-01-01

    The dosimetric characterization of laser-accelerated electrons applied for the worldwide first systematic radiobiological in vitro cell irradiation will be presented. The laser-accelerated electron beam at the JeTi laser system has been optimized, monitored and controlled in terms of dose homogeneity, stability and absolute dose delivery. A combination of different dosimetric components were used to provide both an online beam as well as dose monitoring and a precise absolute dosimetry. In detail, the electron beam was controlled and monitored by means of an ionization chamber and an in-house produced Faraday cup for a defined delivery of the prescribed dose. Moreover, the precise absolute dose delivered to each cell sample was determined by an radiochromic EBT film positioned in front of the cell sample. Furthermore, the energy spectrum of the laser-accelerated electron beam was determined. As presented in a previous work of the authors, also for laser-accelerated protons a precise dosimetric characterization was performed that enabled initial radiobiological cell irradiation experiments with laser-accelerated protons. Therefore, a precise dosimetric characterization, optimization and control of laser-accelerated and therefore ultra-short pulsed, intense particle beams for both electrons and protons is possible, allowing radiobiological experiments and meeting all necessary requirements like homogeneity, stability and precise dose delivery. In order to fulfill the much higher dosimetric requirements for clinical application, several improvements concerning, i.e., particle energy and spectral shaping as well as patient safety are necessary.

  14. Recombinational laser employing electron transitions of diatomic molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biriukov, A S; Prokhorov, A M; Shelepin, L A; Shirokov, N N

    1974-12-01

    Conditions are established for obtaining laser action in the visible and uv regions of the spectrum, using transitions between electronic states of diatomic molecules during recombination of a dissociated gas. The mechanism of population inversion was studied for the oxygen molecule, and gain estimates were obtained for laser action at a wavelength of 4881 A. The feasibility of laser action at other wavelengths was examined.

  15. Peculiarities of laser phase behavior associated with the accelerated electron in a chirped laser pulse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Q.; Wu, X. Y.; Wang, J. X.; Kawata, S.; Wang, P. X.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we qualitatively analyzed peculiarities of laser phase behavior associated with the accelerated electron in a chirped laser pulse. We unveiled the relationship between the changes in the orientation of the electron trajectory and the cusps in magnitude of the phase velocity of the optical field along the electron trajectory in a chirped laser pulse. We also explained how the chirp effect induced the singular point of the phase velocity. Finally, we discussed the phase velocity and phase witnessed by the electron in the particle's moving instantaneous frame

  16. Application of Laser Irradiation for Restorative Treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davoudi, Amin; Sanei, Maryam; Badrian, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, lasers are widely used in many fields of medicine. Also, they can be applied at many branches of dental practice such as diagnosis, preventive procedures, restorative treatments, and endodontic therapies. Procedures like caries removal, re-mineralization, and vital pulp therapy are the most noticeable effects of laser irradiation which has gained much attention among clinicians. With controlled and appropriate wavelength, they can help stimulating dentinogenesis, controlling pulpal hemorrhage, sterilization, healing of collagenic proteins, formation of a fibrous matrix, and inducing hard tissue barrier. Nevertheless, there are many controversies in literatures regarding their effects on the quality of bonded restorations. It hampered a wide application of lasers in some aspects of restorative dentistry and requirements to identify the best way to use this technology. The aim of this mini review is to explain special characteristics of laser therapy and to introduce the possible applications of laser devices for dental purposes.

  17. Stabilization in laser wavelength semiconductor with fiber optical amplifier application doped with erbium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camas, J.; Anzueto, G.; Mendoza, S.; Hernandez, H.; Garcia, C.; Vazquez, R.

    2009-01-01

    In this work, we present a novel electronic design of a DC source, which automatically controls the temperature of a tunable laser. The temperature change in the laser is carried out by the control of DC that circulates through a cooling stage where the laser is set. The laser can be tuned in a wavelength around 1550 nm. Its application is in Erbium Doped Fiber Amplifier (EDFA) in reflective configuration. (Author)

  18. Scaling electron acceleration in the bubble regime for upcoming lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jansen, O.; Tueckmantel, T.; Pukhov, A.

    2014-01-01

    Electron acceleration in the laser-plasma bubble appeared to be the most successful regime of laser wake field acceleration in the last decade. The laser technology became mature enough to generate short and relativistically intense pulses required to reach the bubble regime naturally delivering quasi-monoenergetic bunches of relativistic electrons. The upcoming laser technology projects are promising short pulses with many times more energy than the existing ones. The natural question is how will the bubble regime scale with the available laser energy. We present here a parametric study of laser-plasma acceleration in the bubble regime using full three dimensional particle-in-cell simulations and compare numerical results with the analytical scalings from the relativistic laser-plasma similarity theory. Our simulations and the theory match almost perfectly for spot sizes above R = 2λ and laser amplitudes above a 0 = 4. We also studied the emission of synchrotron radiation by the accelerated electrons. Both classical and a QED model were applied. We found borders, at which theory and simulations stopped matching. With small spot radii (R < 2λ) we almost never observed the formation of a bubble structure or any form of mono-energetic acceleration. Low laser amplitudes lead to higher energies than predicted by the theory

  19. Modified diamond dies for laser applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McWilliams, R.A.

    1978-06-21

    A modified wire drawing die for spatial filtering techniques is described. It was designed for use in high power laser systems. The diamond aperture is capable of enduring high intensity laser frequency without damaging the laser beam profile. The diamond is mounted at the beam focus in a vacuum of 1 x 10/sup -5/ Torr. The vacuum prevents plasma forming at the diamond aperture, thus enabling the beam to pass through without damaging the holder or aperture. The spatial filters are fitted with a manipulator that has three electronic stepping motors, can position the aperture in three orthogonal directions, and is capable of 3.2 ..mu..m resolution. Shiva laser system is using 105 diamond apertures for shaping the High Energy Laser Beam.

  20. The quantum mechanical analysis of the free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dattoli, G.; Renieri, A.

    1985-01-01

    A quantum analysis of the Free Electron Laser is presented. The theory is developed both in single and longitudinal multimode regimes. Finally a self-consistent procedure to study the growth of the laser signal from the vacuum to the macroscopic level is presented

  1. Electron acceleration by a self-diverging intense laser pulse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, K.P.; Gupta, D.N.; Tripathi, V.K.; Gupta, V.L.

    2004-01-01

    Electron acceleration by a laser pulse having a Gaussian radial and temporal profile of intensity has been studied. The interaction region is vacuum followed by a gas. The starting point of the gas region has been chosen around the point at which the peak of the pulse interacts with the electron. The tunnel ionization of the gas causes a defocusing of the laser pulse and the electron experiences the action of a ponderomotive deceleration at the trailing part of the pulse with a lower intensity rather than an acceleration at the rising part of the laser pulse with a high intensity, and thus gains net energy. The initial density of the neutral gas atoms should be high enough to properly defocus the pulse; otherwise the electron experiences some deceleration during the trailing part of the pulse and the net energy gain is reduced. The rate of tunnel ionization increases with the increase in the laser intensity and the initial density of neutral gas atoms, and with the decreases in the laser spot size, which causes more defocusing of the laser pulse. The required initial density of neutral gas atoms decreases with the increase in the laser intensity and also with the decrease in the laser spot size

  2. A control system for a free electron laser experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giove, D.

    1992-01-01

    The general layout of a control and data acquisition system for a Free Electron Laser experiment will be discussed. Some general considerations about the requirements and the architecture of the whole system will be developed. (author)

  3. Optical guiding and beam bending in free-electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scharlemann, E.T.

    1987-01-01

    The electron beam in a free-electron laser (FEL) can act as an optical fiber, guiding or bending the optical beam. The refractive and gain effects of the bunched electron beam can compensate for diffraction, making possible wigglers that are many Rayleigh ranges (i.e., characteristic diffraction lengths) long. The origin of optical guiding can be understood by examining gain and refractive guiding in a fiber with a complex index of refraction, providing a mathematical description applicable also to the FEL, with some extensions. In the exponential gain regime of the FEL, the electron equations of motion must be included, but a self-consistent description of exponential gain with diffraction fully included becomes possible. The origin of the effective index of refraction of an FEL is illustrated with a simple example of bunched, radiating dipoles. Some of the properties of the index of refraction are described. The limited experimental evidence for optical beam bending is summarized. The evidence does not yet provide conclusive proof of the existence of optical guiding, but supports the idea. Finally, the importance of refractive guiding for the performance of a high-gain tapered-wiggler FEL amplifier is illustrated with numerical simulations

  4. Radial electron beam laser excitation: the REBLE report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez, J.J.; Prestwich, K.R.

    1978-10-01

    The results of an investigation of techniques to generate high-power radially converging electron beams and the application of these beams to gas lasers is discussed. The design and performance of the REBLE accelerator that was developed for this program is presented. Reliable operation of the radial diode has been obtained at levels up to 1 MV, 200 kA, and 20 ns. It has been demonstrated that the anode current density can be made uniform to better than 15% over 1000 cm 2 areas with 100 to 250 A/cm 2 intensities. The measured total and spatially resolved energy deposition of this radial electron beam in various gases is compared with Monte Carlo calculations. In most cases, these codes give an accurate description of the beam transport and energy deposition. With the electron beam pumping xenon gas, the amplitude of xenon excimer radiation (1720 A 0 ) was radially uniform to within the experimental uncertainty. The efficiency of converting deposited electron beam energy to xenon excimer radiation was 20%

  5. Laser Structuring of Thin Layers for Flexible Electronics by a Shock Wave-induced Delamination Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Pierre; Ehrhardt, Martin; Zimmer, Klaus

    The defect-free laser-assisted structuring of thin films on flexible substrates is a challenge for laser methods. However, solving this problem exhibits an outstanding potential for a pioneering development of flexible electronics. Thereby, the laser-assisted delamination method has a great application potential. At the delamination process: the localized removal of the layer is induced by a shock wave which is produced by a laser ablation process on the rear side of the substrate. In this study, the thin-film patterning process is investigated for different polymer substrates dependent on the material and laser parameters using a KrF excimer laser. The resultant structures were studied by optical microscopy and white light interferometry (WLI). The delamination process was tested at different samples (indium tin oxide (ITO) on polyethylene terephthalate (PET), epoxy-based negative photoresist (SU8) on polyimide (PI) and indium tin oxide/copper indium gallium selenide/molybdenum (ITO/CIGS/Mo) on PI.

  6. Second harmonic generation in Te crystal using free electron laser

    CERN Document Server

    Yamauchi, T; Minehara, E J

    2002-01-01

    The second harmonic generation signal converted from the fundamental wavelength of 22 mu m of a free electron laser was observed for the first time using a birefringent Te crystal. The experimental conversion efficiency of Te crystal for second harmonic generation is 0.53%, which is equivalent to the theoretical value within a factor of 2. The Te crystal has been incorporated into an autocorrelator system to measure the micro-pulse width of infrared free electron laser successfully. (author)

  7. Laser application for hypertrophic rhinitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inouye, Tetsuzo; Tanabe, Tetsuya; Nakanoboh, Manabu; Ogura, Masami

    1995-05-01

    The CO2 and KTP/532 lasers have been used in the treatment of an allergic and hypertrophic rhinitis for the past several years. As we know, the laser enables a surgeon to perform the operation with minimum hemorrhage and minimized pain, during and after the procedure. Additionally many of these operations can be performed under local anesthesia instead of general anesthesia, on an outpatient basis. The laser is used to irradiate the mucous membranes of the inferior turbinates. Vaporization and cutting is easily done. Post operative management of the local operated area is easy. The advantages of laser surgery over regular surgical techniques are supreme for intranasal operations when performed under local anesthesia.

  8. Free-electron lasers with magnetized ion-wiggler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehdian, H.; Jafari, S.; Hasanbeigi, A.; Ebrahimi, F.

    2009-01-01

    Significant progress has been made using laser ionized channels to guide electron beams in the ion focus regime in a free-electron laser. Propagation of an electron beam in the ion focusing regime (IFR) allows the beam to propagate without expanding from space-charge repulsion. The ninth-degree polynomial dispersion relation for electromagnetic and space-charge waves is derived analytically by solving the electron momentum transfer and wave equations. The variation of resonant frequencies and peak growth rates with axial magnetic field strength has been demonstrated. Substantial enhancement in peak growth rate is obtained as the axial field frequency approaches the gyroresonance frequency.

  9. High energy electron acceleration with PW-class laser system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakanii, N.; Kondo, K.; Yabuuchi, T.; Tsuji, K.; Kimura, K.; Fukumochi, S.; Kashihara, M.; Tanimoto, T.; Nakamura, H.; Ishikura, T.; Kodama, R.; Mima, K.; Tanaka, K. A.; Mori, Y.; Miura, E.; Suzuki, S.; Asaka, T.; Yanagida, K.; Hanaki, H.; Kobayashi, T.

    2008-01-01

    We performed electron acceleration experiment with PW-class laser and a plasma tube, which was created by imploding a hollow polystyrene cylinder. In this experiment, electron energies in excess of 600 MeV have been observed. Moreover, the spectra of a comparatively high-density plasma ∼10 19 cm -3 had a bump around 10 MeV. Additionally, we performed the absolute sensitivity calibration of imaging plate for 1 GeV electrons from the injector Linac of Spring-8 in order to evaluate absolute number of GeV-class electrons in the laser acceleration experiment

  10. An application of the theory of laser to nitrogen laser pumped dye laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osman, Fatima Ahmed

    1998-03-01

    In this thesis we gave a general discussion on lasers, reviewing some of their properties, types and application. We also conducted an experiment where we obtained a dye laser pumped by nitrogen laser with a wave length of 337.1 nm and a power of 5 Mw.It was noticed that the produced radiation possesses characteristics different from those of other types of laser. This characteristics determine the tunability i.e the possibility of choosing the appropriately required wave-length of radiation for various applications.(Author)

  11. Investigation of longitudinal dynamic in laser electron storage ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karnaukhov, I.; Zelinsky, A. E-mail: zelinsky@kipt.kharkov.ua; Telegin, Yu

    2001-09-01

    Longitudinal dynamic of electron beam due to radiation damping and quantum fluctuations in the storage ring with a laser-electron interaction section (Compton scattering) is investigated. This investigation was carried out by numerical simulations using the Monte Carlo method. The dependence of the steady-state energy spread of electron beam due to the Compton back scattering of photons on the electron beam energy and photon flash density were obtained. Simulation findings are compared with the analytical estimations by Z. Huang.

  12. Investigation of longitudinal dynamic in laser electron storage ring

    CERN Document Server

    Karnaukhov, I; Telegin, Yu P

    2001-01-01

    Longitudinal dynamic of electron beam due to radiation damping and quantum fluctuations in the storage ring with a laser-electron interaction section (Compton scattering) is investigated. This investigation was carried out by numerical simulations using the Monte Carlo method. The dependence of the steady-state energy spread of electron beam due to the Compton back scattering of photons on the electron beam energy and photon flash density were obtained. Simulation findings are compared with the analytical estimations by Z. Huang.

  13. Staged electron laser accelerator (STELLA) experiment at brookhaven ATF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pogorelsky, I V; Steenbergen, A van; Gallardo, J C [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); and others

    1998-03-01

    The STELLA experiment is being prepared at the BNL Accelerator Test Facility (STF). The goal of the experiment is to demonstrate quasi-monochromatic inverse Cherenkov acceleration (ICA) of electrons bunched to the laser wavelength period. Microbunches on the order of 2 {mu}m in length separated by 10.6 {mu}m will be produced using an inverse free electron laser (IFEL) accelerator driven by a CO{sub 2} laser. The design and simulations for two phases of this experiment including demonstration of 10 MeV and 100 MeV acceleration are presented. (author)

  14. Structural defects in laser- and electron-beam annealed silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narayan, J.

    1979-01-01

    Laser and electron beam pulses provide almost an ideal source of heat by which thin layers of semiconductors can be rapidly melted and solidified with heating and cooling rates exceeding 10 80 C/sec. Microstructural modifications obtained as a function of laser parameters are examined and it is shown that both laser and electron beam pulses can be used to remove displacement damage, dislocations, dislocation loops and precipitates. Annealing of defects underneath the oxide layers in silicon is possible within a narrow energy window. The formation of cellular structure provides a rather clear evidence of melting which leads to segregation and supercooling, and subsequent cell formation

  15. Magnetic Field Generation and Electron Acceleration in Relativistic Laser Channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostyukov, I.Yu.; Shvets, G.; Fisch, N.J.; Rax, J.M.

    2001-01-01

    The interaction between energetic electrons and a circularly polarized laser pulse inside an ion channel is studied. Laser radiation can be resonantly absorbed by electrons executing betatron oscillations in the ion channel and absorbing angular momentum from the laser. The absorbed angular momentum manifests itself as a strong axial magnetic field (inverse Faraday effect). The magnitude of this magnetic field is calculated and related to the amount of the absorbed energy. Absorbed energy and generated magnetic field are estimated for the small and large energy gain regimes. Qualitative comparisons with recent experiments are also made

  16. CO2 electric discharge lasers - Present status and future applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reilly, J.P.

    1979-01-01

    CO 2 electric discharge lasers (EDLs) have proven themselves to be efficient sources of high-power high-quality laser energy. The paper outlines applications of high-power CO 2 EDLs, applications which are now becoming commercially viable, as well as those which are still being investigated in research laboratories. Applications of CO 2 lasers are discussed relative to industrial applications (laser welding, laser surface hardening, heat treatment, and surface chemistry modification by laser alloying and laser glazing), laser radar applications, laser-induced fusion, and laser propulsion. Attention is given to requirements of applications versus status of technology. Examples are given of the engineering solutions used to address the technology issues identified by particular laser applications

  17. Laser-Compton Scattering as a Potential Electron Beam Monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chouffani, K.; Wells, D.; Harmon, F.; Lancaster, G.; Jones, J.

    2002-01-01

    LCS experiments were carried out at the Idaho Accelerator Center (IAC); sharp monochromatic x-ray lines were observed. These are produced using the so-called inverse Compton effect, whereby optical laser photons are collided with a relativistic electron beam. The back-scattered photons are then kinematically boosted to keV x-ray energies. We have first demonstrated these beams using a 20 MeV electron beam collided with a 100 MW, 7 ns Nd; YAG laser. We observed narrow LCS x-ray spectral peaks resulting from the interaction of the electron beam with the Nd; YAG laser second harmonic (532 nm). The LCS x-ray energy lines and energy deviations were measured as a function of the electron beam energy and energy-spread respectively. The results showed good agreement with the predicted valves. LCS could provide an excellent probe of electron beam energy, energy spread, transverse and longitudinal distribution and direction

  18. Multiple quasi-monoenergetic electron beams from laser-wakefield acceleration with spatially structured laser pulse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Y.; Li, M. H.; Li, Y. F.; Wang, J. G.; Tao, M. Z.; Han, Y. J.; Zhao, J. R.; Huang, K.; Yan, W. C.; Ma, J. L.; Li, Y. T. [Beijing National Laboratory of Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, CAS, Beijing 100080 (China); Chen, L. M., E-mail: lmchen@iphy.ac.cn [Beijing National Laboratory of Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, CAS, Beijing 100080 (China); Department of Physics and Astronomy and IFSA Collaborative Innovation Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Li, D. Z. [Institute of High Energy Physics, CAS, Beijing 100049 (China); Chen, Z. Y. [Institute of Fluid Physics, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang, Sichuan 621999 (China); Sheng, Z. M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and IFSA Collaborative Innovation Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Department of Physics, Scottish Universities Physics Alliance, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Zhang, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and IFSA Collaborative Innovation Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2015-08-15

    By adjusting the focus geometry of a spatially structured laser pulse, single, double, and treble quasi-monoenergetic electron beams were generated, respectively, in laser-wakefield acceleration. Single electron beam was produced as focusing the laser pulse to a single spot. While focusing the laser pulse to two spots that are approximately equal in energy and size and intense enough to form their own filaments, two electron beams were produced. Moreover, with a proper distance between those two focal spots, three electron beams emerged with a certain probability owing to the superposition of the diffractions of those two spots. The energy spectra of the multiple electron beams are quasi-monoenergetic, which are different from that of the large energy spread beams produced due to the longitudinal multiple-injection in the single bubble.

  19. Self-field effects on small-signal gain in two-stage free-electron lasers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    electron lasers. S JAFARI. ∗. , H MEHDIAN and A HASANBEIGI. Department of Physics and ... put power. This is particularly important for applications in which the radiation source is required to operate at high efficiency. For example, the tunability ...

  20. Spectroscopic and Dynamic Applications of Laser - Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quesada, Mark Alejandro

    1987-05-01

    Five different studies of laser-molecule interactions are conducted in this thesis. In part one, the first observation of Autler-Townes splitting of molecules is discussed and used to measure vibronic transition moments between excited electronic states. The effect was observed in the two-color, four -photon ionization of hydrogen via the resonant levels E,F(v = 6, J = 1) and D(v = 2, J = 2). Calculations gave good fits to the observed spectra yielding a vibronic transition moment of 2.0 +/- 0.5 a.u. between the above excited states. In part two, a method for extracting the alignment parameters of a molecular angular momentum distribution using laser-induced fluorescence is presented. The treatment is applicable to the common case of cylindrically symmetric orientation distributions in the high J-limit. Four different combinations of rotational branches in the LIF absorption emission process are examined. Computer algebra programs are used to generate simple analytical expressions which account for the influence of saturation on determining alignment parameters. In part three, the application of MPI-optogalvanic spectroscopy to the molecule 1,4-diazabicyclo (2.2.2) octane (DABCO) at various levels in a methane/air flame environment is described. The method employs a burner design that permits access to preheated and primary reaction zones of the flame for laser probing. Hot bands arising from two-photon resonant (X_1 ' to A_1') transitions are measured and the intramolecular vibrational potentials for the ground and first excited state are determined. In part four, DABCO's nu_ {13} torsional mode relaxation in a helium -DABCO and argon-DABCO supersonic jet, under low expansion conditions, is discussed. Modeling of the relaxation using the linear Landau-Teller relaxation equation is undertaken with various attempts to incorporate the effects of velocity slip. The relaxation rate is found to be independent of slip and the cross section dependent on the inverse of

  1. Laser measurement technology fundamentals and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Donges, Axel

    2015-01-01

    Laser measurement technology has evolved in the last years in a versatile and reflationary way. Today, its methods are indispensable for research and development activities as well as for production technology. Every physicist and engineer should therefore gain a working knowledge of laser measurement technology. This book closes the gap of existing textbooks. It introduces in a comprehensible presentation laser measurement technology in all its aspects. Numerous figures, graphs and tables allow for a fast access into the matter. In the first part of the book the important physical and optical basics are described being necessary to understand laser measurement technology. In the second part technically significant measuring methods are explained and application examples are presented. Target groups of this textbook are students of natural and engineering sciences as well as working physicists and engineers, who are interested to make themselves familiar with laser measurement technology and its fascinating p...

  2. Development of broadband free electron laser technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, B. C.; Jeong, Y. W.; Joe, S. O.; Park, S. H.; Ryu, J. K.; Kazakevich, G.; Cha, H. J.; Sohn, S. C.; Han, S. J.

    2003-02-01

    Layer cladding technology was developed to mitigate the fretting wear damages occurred at fuel spacers in Hanaro reactor. The detailed experimental procedures are as follows. 1) Analyses of fretting wear damages and fabrication process of fuel spacers 2) Development and analysis of spherical Al 6061 T-6 alloy powders for the laser cladding 3) Analysis of parameter effects on laser cladding process for clad bids, and optimization of laser cladding process 4) Analysis on the changes of cladding layers due to overlapping factor change 5) Microstructural observation and phase analysis 6) Characterization of materials properties (hardness wear tests) 7) Development of a vision system and revision of its related software 8) Manufacture of prototype fuel spacers. As a result, it was confirmed that the laser cladding technology could increased considerably the wear resistance of Al 6061 alloy which is the raw material of fuel spacers.

  3. High quality electron beams from a plasma channel guided laser wakefield accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geddes, C.G.R.; Toth, Cs.; Tilborg, J. van; Esarey, E.; Schroeder, C.B.; Bruhwiler, D.; Nieter, C.; Cary, J.; Leemans, W.P.

    2004-01-01

    Laser driven accelerators, in which particles are accelerated by the electric field of a plasma wave driven by an intense laser, have demonstrated accelerating electric fields of hundreds of GV/m. These fields are thousands of times those achievable in conventional radiofrequency (RF) accelerators, spurring interest in laser accelerators as compact next generation sources of energetic electrons and radiation. To date however, acceleration distances have been severely limited by lack of a controllable method for extending the propagation distance of the focused laser pulse. The ensuing short acceleration distance results in low energy beams with 100% electron energy spread, limiting applications. Here we demonstrate that a relativistically intense laser can be guided by a preformed plasma density channel and that the longer propagation distance can result in electron beams of percent energy spread with low emittance and increased energy, containing >10 9 electrons above 80 MeV. The preformed plasma channel technique forms the basis of a new class of accelerators, combining beam quality comparable to RF accelerators with the high gradients of laser accelerators to produce compact tunable high brightness electron and radiation sources

  4. Escaping Electrons from Intense Laser-Solid Interactions as a Function of Laser Spot Size

    OpenAIRE

    Rusby, Dean; Gray, Ross; Butler, Nick; Dance, Rachel; Scott, Graeme; Bagnoud, Vincent; Zielbauer, Bernhard; McKenna, Paul; Neely, David

    2018-01-01

    The interaction of a high-intensity laser with a solid target produces an energetic distribution of electrons that pass into the target. These electrons reach the rear surface of the target creating strong electric potentials that act to restrict the further escape of additional electrons. The measurement of the angle, flux and spectra of the electrons that do escape gives insights to the initial interaction. Here, the escaping electrons have been measured using a differentially filtered imag...

  5. The chirped-pulse inverse free-electron laser: A high-gradient vacuum laser accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartemann, F.V.; Landahl, E.C.; Troha, A.L.; Van Meter, J.R.; Baldis, H.A.; Freeman, R.R.; Luhmann, N.C. Jr.; Song, L.; Kerman, A.K.; Yu, D.U.

    1999-01-01

    The inverse free-electron laser (IFEL) interaction is studied theoretically and computationally in the case where the drive laser intensity approaches the relativistic regime, and the pulse duration is only a few optical cycles long. The IFEL concept has been demonstrated as a viable vacuum laser acceleration process; it is shown here that by using an ultrashort, ultrahigh-intensity drive laser pulse, the IFEL interaction bandwidth and accelerating gradient are increased considerably, thus yielding large energy gains. Using a chirped pulse and negative dispersion focusing optics allows one to take further advantage of the laser optical bandwidth and produce a chromatic line focus maximizing the gradient. The combination of these novel ideas results in a compact vacuum laser accelerator capable of accelerating picosecond electron bunches with a high gradient (GeV/m) and very low energy spread. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  6. The theoretical study of the optical klystron free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Zhenhua

    2001-01-01

    The work of the theoretical study and numerical simulation of optical klystron free electron laser is supported by National 863 Research Development Program and National Science Foundation of China. The object of studying UV band free electron laser (FEL) is to understand the physical law of optical klystron FEL and to gain experience for design. A three-dimensional code OPFEL are made and it is approved that the code is correct completely. The magnetic field of the optical klystron, the energy modulation of the electron beam, the density modulation of the electron beam, spontaneous emission of the electron beam in optical klystron, the harmonic super-radiation of the electron beam, and the effects of the undulator magnetic field error on modulation of the electron beam energy are simulated. These results are useful for the future experiments

  7. Atomic electron correlations in intense laser fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DiMauro, L.F.; Sheehy, B.; Walker, B.; Agostini, P.A.

    1998-01-01

    This talk examines two distinct cases in strong optical fields where electron correlation plays an important role in the dynamics. In the first example, strong coupling in a two-electron-like system is manifested as an intensity-dependent splitting in the ionized electron energy distribution. This two-electron phenomenon (dubbed continuum-continuum Autler-Townes effect) is analogous to a strongly coupled two-level, one-electron atom but raises some intriguing questions regarding the exact nature of electron-electron correlation. The second case examines the evidence for two-electron ionization in the strong-field tunneling limit. Although their ability to describe the one-electron dynamics has obtained a quantitative level of understanding, a description of the two (multiple) electron ionization remains unclear

  8. Dynamics of photoionization from molecular electronic wavepacket states in intense pulse laser fields: A nonadiabatic electron wavepacket study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Takahide; Takatsuka, Kazuo

    2017-04-07

    A theory for dynamics of molecular photoionization from nonadiabatic electron wavepackets driven by intense pulse lasers is proposed. Time evolution of photoelectron distribution is evaluated in terms of out-going electron flux (current of the probability density of electrons) that has kinetic energy high enough to recede from the molecular system. The relevant electron flux is in turn evaluated with the complex-valued electronic wavefunctions that are time evolved in nonadiabatic electron wavepacket dynamics in laser fields. To uniquely rebuild such wavefunctions with its electronic population being lost by ionization, we adopt the complex-valued natural orbitals emerging from the electron density as building blocks of the total wavefunction. The method has been implemented into a quantum chemistry code, which is based on configuration state mixing for polyatomic molecules. Some of the practical aspects needed for its application will be presented. As a first illustrative example, we show the results of hydrogen molecule and its isotope substitutes (HD and DD), which are photoionized by a two-cycle pulse laser. Photon emission spectrum associated with above threshold ionization is also shown. Another example is taken from photoionization dynamics from an excited state of a water molecule. Qualitatively significant effects of nonadiabatic interaction on the photoelectron spectrum are demonstrated.

  9. Laser application in high temperature materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohse, R.W.

    1988-01-01

    The scope and priorities of laser application in materials science and technology are attracting widespread interest. After a brief discussion of the unique capabilities of laser application in the various fields of materials science, main emphasis is given on the three areas of materials processing, surface modification and alloying, and property measurements at high temperatures. In materials processing the operational regimes for surface hardening, drilling, welding and laser glazing are discussed. Surface modifications by laser melting, quenching and surface alloying, the formation of solid solutions, metastable phases and amorphous solids on the basis of rapid solidification, ion implantation and ion beam mixing are considered. The influence of solidification rates and interface velocities on the surface properties are given. The extension of property measurements up to and beyond the melting point of refractory materials into their critical region by a transient-type dynamic laser pulse heating technique is given for the three examples of vapour pressure measurement, density and heat capacity determination in the solid and liquid phases. A new approach, the laser autoclave technique, applying laser heating and x-ray shadow technique under autoclave conditions to acoustically levitated spheres will be presented. (author)

  10. Millimeter wave free electron laser amplifiers: Experiments and designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bidwell, S.W.; Zhang, Z.X.; Antonsen, T.M. Jr.; Bensen, D.M.; Destler, W.W.; Granatstein, V.L.; Lantham, P.E.; Levush, B.; Rodgers, J.

    1991-01-01

    Free electron laser amplifies are investigated as sources of high- average-power (1 MW) millimeter to submillimeter wave radiation (200 GHz - 600 GHz) for application to electron cyclotron resonance heating of magnetically confined fusion plasmas. As a stepping-stone to higher frequencies and cw operation a pulsed amplifier (τ pulse ≅ 80 ns) at 98 GHz is being developed. Status is reported on this experiment which investigates linear gain amplification with use of sheet electron beam (transverse cross section = 0.1 cm x 2.0 cm, V beam = 440 keV, I beam ≅ 10 A) and short-period wiggler (ell w = 0.96 cm) and with expected output of 140 W. Predictions of gain and efficiency from a 1-D universal formulation are presented. Beam propagation results, with wiggler focusing as a means of sheet beam confinement in both transverse dimensions, through the 54 cm (56 period) pulsed electromagnet wiggler are discussed. Peak wiggler fields of 5.1 kG on-axis have been achieved

  11. Laser beam diagnostics for metalworking applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramos, T.J.; Lingenfelter, A.C.

    1984-01-01

    The Materials Fabrication Division of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has three pulsed Nd-YAG lasers dedicated to metalworking. The units are used in a job shop primarily for welding. They also have a number of applications requiring cutting and drilling capability. Each of these metalworking operations requires somewhat different laser beam characteristics. As most investigators have found, the mode of the laser beam and the mode stability are the key variables which must be controlled if optimum results are to be achieved. The authors use several techniques to observe and measure these variables, i.e. Charge Couple Device (CCD) Camera, Thermal Image Plate and thermal-sensitive paper

  12. Relativistic electron kinetic effects on laser diagnostics in burning plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirnov, V. V.; Den Hartog, D. J.

    2018-02-01

    Toroidal interferometry/polarimetry (TIP), poloidal polarimetry (PoPola), and Thomson scattering systems (TS) are major optical diagnostics being designed and developed for ITER. Each of them relies upon a sophisticated quantitative understanding of the electron response to laser light propagating through a burning plasma. Review of the theoretical results for two different applications is presented: interferometry/polarimetry (I/P) and polarization of Thomson scattered light, unified by the importance of relativistic (quadratic in vTe/c) electron kinetic effects. For I/P applications, rigorous analytical results are obtained perturbatively by expansion in powers of the small parameter τ = Te/me c2, where Te is electron temperature and me is electron rest mass. Experimental validation of the analytical models has been made by analyzing data of more than 1200 pulses collected from high-Te JET discharges. Based on this validation the relativistic analytical expressions are included in the error analysis and design projects of the ITER TIP and PoPola systems. The polarization properties of incoherent Thomson scattered light are being examined as a method of Te measurement relevant to ITER operational regimes. The theory is based on Stokes vector transformation and Mueller matrices formalism. The general approach is subdivided into frequency-integrated and frequency-resolved cases. For each of them, the exact analytical relativistic solutions are presented in the form of Mueller matrix elements averaged over the relativistic Maxwellian distribution function. New results related to the detailed verification of the frequency-resolved solutions are reported. The precise analytic expressions provide output much more rapidly than relativistic kinetic numerical codes allowing for direct real-time feedback control of ITER device operation.

  13. Diode lasers and their applications in spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavone, F.S.

    1997-01-01

    The impact of semiconductor diode laser in different fields ranging from communications to spectroscopy is becoming huge and pushes the research into developing sources satisfying the different requirements. For applications related to trace gas detection, the low amplitude noise in the light source of semiconductor diode laser is sufficient to obtain interesting results. Trace gas of molecular species as methane is interesting for different reason: it plays an important role in both radiative transport an photochemistry in the atmosphere

  14. Theory and Simulation of an Inverse Free Electron Laser Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, S. K.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Fang, J. M.; Marshall, T. C.

    1996-11-01

    An experimental demonstration of the acceleration of electrons using a high power CO2 laser in an inverse free electron laser (IFEL) is underway at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. This experiment has generated data, which we are attempting to simulate. Included in our studies are such effects as: a low-loss metallic waveguide with a dielectric coating on the walls; multi-mode coupling due to self-consistent interaction between the electrons and the optical wave; space charge (which is significant at lower laser power); energy-spread of the electrons; arbitrary wiggler field profile; and slippage. Two types of wiggler profile have been considered: a linear taper of the period, and a step-taper of the period (the period is ~ 3cm, the field is ~ 1T, and the wiggler length is 47cm). The energy increment of the electrons ( ~ 1-2%) is analyzed in detail as a function of laser power, wiggler parameters, and the initial beam energy (40MeV). For laser power ~ 0.5GW, the predictions of the simulations are in good accord with experimental results. A matter currently under study is the discrepancy between theory and observations for the electron energy distribution observed at the end of the IFEL. This work is supported by the Department of Energy.

  15. Electron acceleration by CO/sub 2/ laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, H.; Kitagawa, Y.; Daido, H.

    1986-01-01

    Experiments on electron acceleration have been performed by LEKKO VIII CO/sub 2/ laser system. The laser light was focused by an off-axis parabolic mirror with the F-number of 1.5 and irradiated to thin foil and pipe targets in order to obtain uniform underdense plasmas. Energy spectrum of electrons was measured by an electron spectrometer in the range of 0.3-1.1 MeV. In the single frequency case, electrons up to 1 MeV were observed in the direction of the laser axis for the laser intensity above 1.6 x 10/sup 14/ W/cm/sup 2/ which was equal to the estimated threshold for forward Raman scattering. Amount of high energy electrons depended on the interaction length and the background hot electron temperature. More electrons could resonate with the plasma wave for the higher hot electron temperature. This was confirmed by particle simulation. In most experiments, the plasma density was estimated of about 0.1 n/sub c/. When the plasma density was reduced to 0.01 n/sub c/ using pre-pulse, high energy electrons were not observed because of the low background hot electron temperature and the higher instability threshold. In the two frequency case, energetic electron beam injection is planned for efficient coupling with fast plasma wave. Pipe target seems to be hopeful because 1) the laser light is confined by the plasma fiber and 2) the phase velocity of the plasma wave is controlled by the transverse mode

  16. High-efficiency free-electron-laser experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyer, K.; Brau, C.A.; Goldstein, J.C.; Hohla, K.L.; Newnam, B.E.; Stein, W.E.; Warren, R.W.; Winston, J.G.

    1983-01-01

    Experiments with a tapered-wiggler free-electron laser have demonstrated extraction of about 3% of the energy from the electron beam and measured the corresponding optical emission. These results are in excellent agreement with theory and represent an order-of-magnitude improvement over all previous results

  17. Coherent Startup of an Infrared Free-Electron Laser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaroszynski, D. A.; Bakker, R. J.; van der Meer, A. F. G.; Oepts, D.; van Amersfoort, P. W.

    1993-01-01

    Coherent enhancement of the spontaneous undulator radiation by several orders of magnitude has been observed in a free-electron laser at wavelengths from 40 to 100 mum. The coherent emission can be explained by details of the electron-beam micropulse structure. Furthermore, it has been found that

  18. Linac-driven XUV free-electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newnam, B.E.; Goldstein, J.C.; Fraser, J.S.; Cooper, R.K.

    1983-01-01

    Use of an rf linear accelerator as the electron source for a free-electron laser operating in the extreme ultraviolet wavelength range from 100 nm to at least as low as 50 nm appears feasible. Peak and average power outputs of greater than 100 kW and 50W, respectively, are predicted

  19. Free electron laser amplifier driven by an induction linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neil, V.K.

    1986-01-01

    This paper discusses the use of a free-electron laser amplifier as a means of converting the kinetic energy of an electron beam into coherent radiation. In particular, the use of an induction linear accelerator is discussed. The motion of the elections in the tapered and untapered wiggler magnets is discussed as well as the beam emittance, and the radiation fields involved

  20. XUV/VUV free-electron laser oscillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldstein, J.C.; Newnam, B.E.; Cooper, R.K.; Comly, J.C. Jr.

    1984-04-01

    It is shown, from computations based on a detailed theoretical model, that modest improvements in electron beam and optical mirror technologies will enable a free-electron laser, driven by an rf linear accelerator, to operate in the 50 to 200-nm range of optical wavelengths. 10 references

  1. Characterisation of electron beams from laser-driven particle accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunetti, E.; Manahan, G. G.; Shanks, R. P.; Islam, M. R.; Ersfeld, B.; Anania, M. P.; Cipiccia, S.; Issac, R. C.; Vieux, G.; Welsh, G. H.; Wiggins, S. M.; Jaroszynski, D. A. [Physics Department, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom)

    2012-12-21

    The development, understanding and application of laser-driven particle accelerators require accurate measurements of the beam properties, in particular emittance, energy spread and bunch length. Here we report measurements and simulations showing that laser wakefield accelerators can produce beams of quality comparable to conventional linear accelerators.

  2. Solar Pumped Lasers and Their Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ja H.

    1991-01-01

    Since 1980, NASA has been pursuing high power solar lasers as part of the space power beaming program. Materials in liquid, solid, and gas phases have been evaluated against the requirements for solar pumping. Two basic characteristics of solar insolation, namely its diffuse irradiance and 5800 K blackbody-like spectrum, impose rather stringent requirements for laser excitation. However, meeting these requirements is not insurmountable as solar thermal energy technology has progressed today, and taking advantage of solar pumping lasers is becoming increasingly attractive. The high density photons of concentrated solar energy have been used for mainly electric power generation and thermal processing of materials by the DOE Solar Thermal Technologies Program. However, the photons can interact with materials through many other direct kinetic paths, and applications of the concentrated photons could be extended to processes requiring photolysis, photosynthesis, and photoexcitation. The use of solar pumped lasers on Earth seems constrained by economics and sociopolitics. Therefore, prospective applications may be limited to those that require use of quantum effects and coherency of the laser in order to generate extremely high value products and services when conventional and inexpensive means are ineffective or impossible. The new applications already proposed for concentrated solar photons, such as destruction of hazardous waste, production of renewable fuel, production of fertilizer, and air/water pollution controls, may benefit from the use of inexpensive solar pumped laser matched with the photochemical kinetics of these processes.

  3. Photonuclear fission with quasimonoenergetic electron beams from laser wakefields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, S. A.; Chvykov, V.; Kalintchenko, G.; Matsuoka, T.; Rousseau, P.; Yanovsky, V.; Vane, C. R.; Beene, J. R.; Stracener, D.; Schultz, D. R.; Maksimchuk, A.

    2006-01-01

    Recent advancements in laser wakefield accelerators have resulted in the generation of low divergence, hundred MeV, quasimonoenergetic electron beams. The bremsstrahlung produced by these highly energetic electrons in heavy converters includes a large number of MeV γ rays that have been utilized to induce photofission in natural uranium. Analysis of the measured delayed γ emission demonstrates production of greater than 3x10 5 fission events per joule of laser energy, which is more than an order of magnitude greater than that previously achieved. Monte Carlo simulations model the generated bremsstrahlung spectrum and compare photofission yields as a function of target depth and incident electron energy

  4. Laser plasma acceleration of electrons with multi-PW laser beams in the frame of CILEX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cros, B., E-mail: brigitte.cros@u-psud.fr [LPGP, CNRS and Université Paris Sud, Orsay (France); Paradkar, B.S. [LPGP, CNRS and Université Paris Sud, Orsay (France); Davoine, X. [CEA DAM DIF, Arpajon F-91297 (France); Chancé, A. [CEA IRFU-SACM, Gif-Sur-Yvette (France); Desforges, F.G. [LPGP, CNRS and Université Paris Sud, Orsay (France); Dobosz-Dufrénoy, S. [CEA DSM-IRAMIS-SPAM, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Delerue, N. [LAL, CNRS and Universit Paris Sud, Orsay (France); Ju, J.; Audet, T.L.; Maynard, G. [LPGP, CNRS and Université Paris Sud, Orsay (France); Lobet, M.; Gremillet, L. [CEA DAM DIF, Arpajon F-91297 (France); Mora, P. [CPhT, CNRS and Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau (France); Schwindling, J.; Delferrière, O. [CEA IRFU-SACM, Gif-Sur-Yvette (France); Bruni, C.; Rimbault, C.; Vinatier, T. [LAL, CNRS and Universit Paris Sud, Orsay (France); Di Piazza, A. [Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Grech, M. [LULI, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS, CEA, UPMC, Palaiseau (France); and others

    2014-03-11

    Laser plasma acceleration of electrons has progressed along with advances in laser technology. It is thus expected that the development in the near-future of multi-PW-class laser and facilities will enable a vast range of scientific opportunities for laser plasma acceleration research. On one hand, high peak powers can be used to explore the extremely high intensity regime of laser wakefield acceleration, producing for example large amounts of electrons in the GeV range or generating high energy photons. On the other hand, the available laser energy can be used in the quasi-linear regime to create accelerating fields in large volumes of plasma and study controlled acceleration in a plasma stage of externally injected relativistic particles, either electrons or positrons. In the frame of the Centre Interdisciplinaire de la Lumière EXtrême (CILEX), the Apollon-10P laser will deliver two beams at the 1 PW and 10 PW levels, in ultra-short (>15fs) pulses, to a target area dedicated to electron acceleration studies, such as the exploration of the non-linear regimes predicted theoretically, or multi-stage laser plasma acceleration.

  5. Continuation of the Application of Parallel PIC Simulations to Laser and Electron Transport Through Plasmas Under Conditions Relevant to ICF and SBSS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warren B Mori

    2007-01-01

    In 2006/2007 we continued to study several issues related to underdense laser-plasma interactions. We have been studying the onset and saturation of Raman backscatter for NIF conditions, nonlinear plasma oscillations, and the two-plasmon decay instability

  6. Lasers '90: Proceedings of the 13th International Conference on Lasers and Applications, San Diego, CA, Dec. 10-14, 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, D.G.; Herbelin, J.

    1991-01-01

    The general topics considered are: x-ray lasers; FELs; solid state lasers; techniques and phenomena of ultrafast lasers; optical filters and free space laser communications; discharge lasers; tunable lasers; applications of lasers in medicine and surgery; lasers in materials processing; high power lasers; dynamics gratings, wave mixing, and holography; up-conversion lasers; lidar and laser radar; laser resonators; excimer lasers; laser propagation; nonlinear and quantum optics; blue-green technology; imaging; laser spectroscopy; chemical lasers; dye lasers; and lasers in chemistry

  7. An inverse free electron laser accelerator: Experiment and theoretical interpretation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, Jyan-Min.

    1997-01-01

    Experimental and numerical studies of the Inverse Free Electron Laser using a GW-level 10.6 μm CO 2 laser have been carried out at Brookhaven's Accelerator Test Facility. An energy gain of 2.5 % (ΔE/E) on a 40 MeV electron beam has been observed E which compares well with theory. The effects on IFEL acceleration with respect to the variation of the laser electric field, the input electron beam energy, and the wiggler magnetic field strength were studied, and show the importance of matching the resonance condition in the IFEL. The numerical simulations were performed under various conditions and the importance of the electron bunching in the IFEL is shown. The numerical interpretation of our IFEL experimental results was examined. Although good numerical agreement with the experimental results was obtained, there is a discrepancy between the level of the laser power measured in the experiment and used in the simulation, possibly due to the non-Gaussian profile of the input high power laser beam. The electron energy distribution was studied numerically and a smoothing of the energy spectrum by the space charge effect at the location of the spectrometer was found, compared with the spectrum at the exit of the wiggler. The electron bunching by the IFEL and the possibility of using the IFEL as an electron prebuncher for another laser-driven accelerator were studied numerically. We found that bunching of the electrons at 1 meter downstream from the wiggler can be achieved using the existing facility. The simulation shows that there is a fundamental difference between the operating conditions for using the IFEL as a high gradient accelerator, and as a prebuncher for another accelerator

  8. Diode laser based light sources for biomedical applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, André; Marschall, Sebastian; Jensen, Ole Bjarlin

    2013-01-01

    Diode lasers are by far the most efficient lasers currently available. With the ever-continuing improvement in diode laser technology, this type of laser has become increasingly attractive for a wide range of biomedical applications. Compared to the characteristics of competing laser systems, diode...... imaging. This review provides an overview of the latest development of diode laser technology and systems and their use within selected biomedical applications....

  9. Mid infrared lasers for remote sensing applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, Brian M., E-mail: brian.m.walsh@nasa.gov [NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA 23681 (United States); Lee, Hyung R. [National Institute of Aerospace, Hampton, VA 23666 (United States); Barnes, Norman P. [Science Systems and Applications, Inc., Hampton, VA 23666 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    To accurately measure the concentrations of atmospheric gasses, especially the gasses with low concentrations, strong absorption features must be accessed. Each molecular species or constituent has characteristic mid-infrared absorption features by which either column content or range resolved concentrations can be measured. Because of these characteristic absorption features the mid infrared spectral region is known as the fingerprint region. However, as noted by the Decadal Survey, mid-infrared solid-state lasers needed for DIAL systems are not available. The primary reason is associated with short upper laser level lifetimes of mid infrared transitions. Energy gaps between the energy levels that produce mid-infrared laser transitions are small, promoting rapid nonradiative quenching. Nonradiative quenching is a multiphonon process, the more phonons needed, the smaller the effect. More low energy phonons are required to span an energy gap than high energy phonons. Thus, low energy phonon materials have less nonradiative quenching compared to high energy phonon materials. Common laser materials, such as oxides like YAG, are high phonon energy materials, while fluorides, chlorides and bromides are low phonon materials. Work at NASA Langley is focused on a systematic search for novel lanthanide-doped mid-infrared solid-state lasers using both quantum mechanical models (theoretical) and spectroscopy (experimental) techniques. Only the best candidates are chosen for laser studies. The capabilities of modeling materials, experimental challenges, material properties, spectroscopy, and prospects for lanthanide-doped mid-infrared solid-state laser devices will be presented. - Highlights: • We discuss mid infrared lasers and laser materials. • We discuss applications to remote sensing. • We survey the lanthanide ions in low phonon materials for potential. • We present examples of praseodymium mid infrared spectroscopy and laser design.

  10. Quantum Cascade Lasers Modulation and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luzhansky, Edward

    The mid-wave IR (MWIR) spectral band, extending from 3 to 5 microns, is considered to be a low loss atmospheric window. There are several spectral sub-bands with relatively low atmospheric attenuation in this region making it popular for various commercial and military applications. Relatively low thermal and solar background emissions, effective penetration through the natural and anthropogenic obscurants and eye safety add to the long list of advantages of MWIR wavelengths. Quantum Cascade Lasers are compact semiconductor devices capable of operating in MWIR spectrum. They are based on inter-subband transitions in a multiple-quantum-well (QW) hetero-structure, designed by means of band-structure engineering. The inter-subband nature of the optical transition has several key advantages. First, the emission wavelength is primarily a function of the QW thickness. This characteristic allows choosing well-understood and reliable semiconductors for the generation of light in a wavelength range of interest. Second, a cascade process in which tens of photons are generated per injected electron. This cascading process is behind the intrinsic high-power capabilities of QCLs. This dissertation is focused on modulation properties of Quantum Cascade Lasers. Both amplitude and phase/frequency modulations were studied including modulation bandwidth, modulation efficiency and chirp linearity. Research was consisted of the two major parts. In the first part we describe the theory of frequency modulation (FM) response of Distributed Feedback Quantum Cascade Lasers (DFB QCL). It includes cascading effect on the QCL's maximum modulation frequency. The "gain levering" effect for the maximum FM response of the two section QCLs was studied as well. In the second part of research we concentrated on the Pulse Position Amplitude Modulation of a single section QCL. The low complexity, low size, weight and power Mid-Wavelength Infra-Red optical communications transceiver concept is

  11. Beam conditioner for free electron lasers and synchrotrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, H.; Neil, G.R.

    1998-01-01

    A focused optical has been used to introduce an optical pulse, or electromagnetic wave, collinear with the electron beam in a free electron laser or synchrotron thereby adding an axial field component that accelerates the electrons on the radial outside of the distribution of electrons in the electron beam. This invention consists of using the axial electrical component of a TEM 10 mode Gaussian beam in vacuum to condition the electron beam and speed up the outer electrons in the beam. The conditioning beam should possess about the same diameter as the electron beam. The beam waist of the conditioning wave must be located around the entrance of the undulator longitudinally to have a net energy exchange between the electrons in the outer part of the distribution and the conditioning wave owing to the natural divergence of a Gaussian beam. By accelerating the outer electrons, the outer and core electrons are caused to stay in phase. This increases the fraction of the electron beam energy that is converted to light thereby improving the efficiency of conversion of energy to light and therefore boosting the power output of the free electron laser and synchrotron. 4 figs

  12. Guiding-center equations for electrons in ultraintense laser fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, J.E.; Fisch, N.J.

    1994-01-01

    The guiding-center equations are derived for electrons in arbitrarily intense laser fields also subject to external fields and ponderomotive forces. Exhibiting the relativistic mass increase of the oscillating electrons, a simple frame-invariant equation is shown to govern the behavior of the electrons for sufficiently weak background fields and ponderomotive forces. The parameter regime for which such a formulation is valid is made precise, and some predictions of the equation are checked by numerical simulation

  13. Compact free-electron laser at the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, K.C.D.; Meier, K.L.; Nguyen, D.; Sheffield, R.L.; Wang, Tai-Sen F.; Warren, R.W.; Wilson, W.L.; Young, L.M.

    1991-01-01

    The design and construction of second-generation free-electron laser (FEL) system at Los Alamos will be described. comprising state-of-the art components, this FEL system will be sufficiently compact, robust and user-friendly for application in industry, medicine, and research. 11 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs

  14. Three electron beams from a laser-plasma wakefield accelerator and the energy apportioning question

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, X; Reboredo Gil, David; Welsh, Gregor H; Li, Y.F; Cipiccia, Silvia; Ersfeld, Bernhard; Grant, D. W; Grant, P. A; Islam, Muhammad; Tooley, M.B; Vieux, Gregory; Wiggins, Sally; Sheng, Zheng-Ming; Jaroszynski, Dino

    2017-01-01

    Laser-wakefield accelerators are compact devices capable of delivering ultra-short electron bunches with pC-level charge and MeV-GeV energy by exploiting the ultra-high electric fields arising from the interaction of intense laser pulses with plasma. We show experimentally and through numerical simulations that a high-energy electron beam is produced simultaneously with two stable lowerenergy beams that are ejected in oblique and counter-propagating directions, typically carrying off 5–10% of the initial laser energy. A MeV, 10s nC oblique beam is ejected in a 30°–60° hollow cone, which is filled with more energetic electrons determined by the injection dynamics. A nC-level, 100s keV backward-directed beam is mainly produced at the leading edge of the plasma column. We discuss the apportioning of absorbed laser energy amongst the three beams. Knowledge of the distribution of laser energy and electron beam charge, which determine the overall efficiency, is important for various applications of laser-wake...

  15. Laser application in tracheobronchial tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rau, B. Krishna; Krishna, Sharon

    2004-09-01

    Ninety three patients with obstructing tracheobronchial tumors were treated with Neodymium: Yttrium - Aluminum - Garnet (Nd:YAG) laser photocoagulation over a period of six years. There were sixty seven Males and 26 Females with a mean age of 44.3 years (range 6- 79 years). 21 benign and 72 malignant lesions were treated with a total 212 sessions of laser photocoagulation (mean 2.4 sessions). The anatomical distribution of lesions were as follows; larynx 9 (three benign and 6 malignant) trachea 39 (27 benign and 12 malignant) left main bronchus 27 (14 malignant) right main bronchus 24 (14 malignant) and vocal cords - 9 (three malignant). There were 21 patients with squamous cell carcinoma, two adenocarcinomas, one adenoid cystic carcinoma, 7 cases of locally infiltrating tumors from thyroid and esophagus, 6 cases of carcinoid tumor and 16 benign lesions. Twenty one patients had a tracheostomy tube in place when treatment was started. Eighteen of the 21 patients with tracheostomy were weaned off the tube in a mean of 5.5 days from the start of treatment. Lumen was restored in 31 (79.4%) patients. In the other eight (20.6%), lumen was achieved, but not sustained. Complications included bleeding in three cases which were managed conservatively, two cases of pneumothorax, and four cases of bronchospasm. There were six deaths during the follow up but none attributable to the procedure. Laser photocoagulation offered effective treatment in the majority of patients with obstructing tracheobronchial tumors, with acceptable morbidity.

  16. High power electron beam accelerators for gas laser excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, J.G.; Martin, T.H.; Halbleib, J.A.

    1976-06-01

    A preliminary parameter investigation has been used to determine a possible design of a high-power, relativistic electron beam, transversely excited laser. Based on considerations of present and developing pulsed power technology, broad area diode physics and projected laser requirements, an exciter is proposed consisting of a Marx generator, pulse shaping transmission lines, radially converging ring diodes and a laser chamber. The accelerator should be able to deliver approximately 20 kJ of electron energy at 1 MeV to the 10 4 cm 2 cylindrical surface of a laser chamber 1 m long and 0.3 m in diameter in 24 ns with very small azimuthal asymmetry and uniform radial deposition

  17. Electron in the ultrashort laser pulse

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pardy, Miroslav

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 42, č. 1 (2003), s. 99-110 ISSN 0020-7748 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A100 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2043910 Keywords : laser pulse, Volkov solution, compton effect Subject RIV: BE - The oretical Physics Impact factor: 0.476, year: 2003

  18. CTE:YAG laser applications in dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shori, Ramesh K.; Fried, Daniel; Featherstone, John D. B.; Kokta, Milan R.; Duhn, Clifford W.

    1998-04-01

    The suitability of CTE:YAG laser radiation was investigated for caries preventive laser treatments and caries ablation. Although, CTE:YAG laser radiation at 2.69 micrometer is less highly absorbed by dental hard tissues than other erbium laser wavelengths, namely 2.79 and 2.94 micrometer, it can readily be transmitted through a conventional low hydroxyl fiber with minimal loss. These studies show that reasonable ablation rates and efficiencies are obtainable with both free running (200 microseconds) and Q-switched (100 ns) laser pulses on both dentin and enamel with the application of a relatively thick layer of water to the tissue surface. The water served to remove tissue char and debris from the ablation site leaving a clean crater. However, mechanical forces produced during the energetic ablative process resulted in peripheral mechanical damage to the tissue. Surface dissolution studies on enamel indicated that CTE:YAG radiation inhibited surface dissolution by organic acid by 60 - 70% compared to unirradiated controls, albeit, at fluences an order of magnitude higher than those required for CO2 laser radiation. This layer system may be suitable for dental hard tissue applications if mechanical damage can be mitigated. This work was supported by NIH/NIDR Grants R29DE12091 and R01DE09958.

  19. Development of a free-electron laser user facility for the extreme ultraviolet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newnam, B.E.

    1987-01-01

    A free-electron laser user facility for scientific experimentation in the extreme ultraviolet is being developed at Los Alamos. A series of laser oscillators and amplifiers, driven by a single, rf linear accelerator, will generate broadly tunable, picosecond-pulse, coherent radiation from 1 nm to 400 nm. The design and output parameters of this facility are described, comparison with synchrotron radiation sources is made, and recent progress in developing the three primary components (electron beam, undulator, and resonator mirrors) is reviewed, and various categories of scientific applications are indicated

  20. Method of measuring directed electron velocities in flowing plasma using the incoherent regions of laser scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacoby, B.A.; York, T.M.

    1979-02-01

    With the presumption that a shifted Maxwellian velocity distribution adequately describes the electrons in a flowing plasma, the details of a method to measure their directed velocity are described. The system consists of a ruby laser source and two detectors set 180 0 from each other and both set at 90 0 with respect to the incident laser beam. The lowest velocity that can be determined by this method depends on the electron thermal velocity. The application of this diagnostic to the measurement of flow velocities in plasma being lost from the ends of theta-pinch devices is described

  1. Selection of high-brightness, laser-driven cathodes for electron accelerators and FELS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oettinger, P.E.

    1987-01-01

    Very intense, low emittance pulsed beams of electrons can be generated from laser-driven cathodes either by thermionic- or photo-emission. Several hundreds of amperes of electrons per square centimeter were observed for pulse lengths up to 50 ns. A normalized beam brightness of 10 7 A/cm 2 /rad 2 has been measured. These beams can be emission-gated at the cathode surface by modulating the laser-beam. Such beam bunching will generate picosecond-to-microsecond-long pulses at the source. A variety of cathodes are described, and a method of selection for specific applications is presented

  2. Compact two-beam push-pull free electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutton, Andrew [Yorktown, VA

    2009-03-03

    An ultra-compact free electron laser comprising a pair of opposed superconducting cavities that produce identical electron beams moving in opposite directions such that each set of superconducting cavities accelerates one electron beam and decelerates the other electron beam. Such an arrangement, allows the energy used to accelerate one beam to be recovered and used again to accelerate the second beam, thus, each electron beam is decelerated by a different structure than that which accelerated it so that energy exchange rather than recovery is achieved resulting in a more compact and highly efficient apparatus.

  3. Free-Electron Laser (FEL) Utilization in Space Applications (Ship-Borne Pointing Accuracy, Deep-Space Communications, and Orbital Debris Tracking)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    the energy to the target. From the stand point of weapon system considerations, the amount of available ammunition and the cost of running the...fired repeatedly for a minimal total cost . 7 Figure 1.3 FEL Efficiency. From [1] D. SHIP-BORNE EMPLOYMENT There are currently two primary possible...provided in [32]. This method requires three different geocentric vectors and their associated elevation angles with respect to the laser bore sight

  4. Intense pulsed sources of ions and electrons produced by lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourrabier, G.; Consoli, T.; Slama, L.

    1966-11-01

    We describe a device for the acceleration of the plasma burst produced by focusing a laser beam into a metal target. We extract the electrons and the ions from the plasma. The maximum current is around 2000 amperes during few microseconds. The study of the effect of the kind of the target on the characteristics of the current shows the great importance of the initial conditions that is the ionisation potential of the target and the energy laser. (authors) [fr

  5. Pulse propagation in tapered wiggler free electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldstein, J.C.; Colson, W.B.

    1981-01-01

    The one-dimensional theory of short pulse propagation in free electron lasers is extended to tapered wiggler devices and is used to study the behavior of an oscillator with parameter values close to those expected in forthcoming experiments. It is found that stable laser output is possible only over a small range of optical cavity lengths. Optical pulse characteristcs are presented and are found to change considerably over this range

  6. Solid state lasers: a major direction in quantum electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shcherbakov, I.A.

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the report is to analyze development of solid-state lasers (SSL) as one of the most important avenues of the quantum electronics. The obtained intensity of a laser radiation at the focus equal to 5x10 1 0 W/cm 2 (the field intensity equal to about 5x10 1 0 V/cm 2 ) is noted to enable to observe nonlinear quantum- electrodynamic effects. Besides, one managed to increase the SSL efficiency conventionally equal to maximum 3% up to 48-50%. Paper describes new types of SSLs, namely, the crystalline fiber lasers with the lateral gradient of the index of refraction [ru

  7. Ultrafast molecular imaging by laser-induced electron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, M.; Nguyen-Dang, T. T.; Cornaggia, C.; Saugout, S.; Charron, E.; Keller, A.; Atabek, O.

    2011-01-01

    We address the feasibility of imaging geometric and orbital structures of a polyatomic molecule on an attosecond time scale using the laser-induced electron diffraction (LIED) technique. We present numerical results for the highest molecular orbitals of the CO 2 molecule excited by a near-infrared few-cycle laser pulse. The molecular geometry (bond lengths) is determined within 3% of accuracy from a diffraction pattern which also reflects the nodal properties of the initial molecular orbital. Robustness of the structure determination is discussed with respect to vibrational and rotational motions with a complete interpretation of the laser-induced mechanisms.

  8. Diode laser spectroscopy of oxygen electronic band at 760 nm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucchesini, A.; De Rosa, M.; Gozzini, S.

    1998-01-01

    Collisional broadening and shift coefficients have been obtained by analyzing the line shapes of oxygen absorptions in the 760 nm electronic band. By using a diode laser spectrometer with commercially available etherostructure Al x Ga 1-x As diode lasers operating in 'free-running mode', line shape parameters have been collected at room temperature by varying the gas pressure. A systematic study has been carried on seven absorption lines by scanning the diode laser emission wavelength around the gas resonances. The weak absorption lines have been detected by using the wavelength modulation (WM) spectroscopy technique with second-harmonic detection

  9. Relativistic electron acceleration in focused laser fields after above-threshold ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodin, I.Y.; Fisch, N.J.

    2003-01-01

    Electrons produced as a result of above-threshold ionization of high-Z atoms can be accelerated by currently producible laser pulses up to GeV energies, as shown recently by Hu and Starace [Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 245003 (2002)]. To describe electron acceleration by general focused laser fields, we employ an analytical model based on a Hamiltonian, fully relativistic, ponderomotive approach. Though the above-threshold ionization represents an abrupt process compared to laser oscillations, the ponderomotive approach can still adequately predict the resulting energy gain if the proper initial conditions are introduced for the particle drift following the ionization event. Analytical expressions for electron energy gain are derived and the applicability conditions of the ponderomotive formulation are studied both analytically and numerically. The theoretical predictions are supported by numerical computations

  10. A spectral unaveraged algorithm for free electron laser simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andriyash, I.A.; Lehe, R.; Malka, V.

    2015-01-01

    We propose and discuss a numerical method to model electromagnetic emission from the oscillating relativistic charged particles and its coherent amplification. The developed technique is well suited for free electron laser simulations, but it may also be useful for a wider range of physical problems involving resonant field–particles interactions. The algorithm integrates the unaveraged coupled equations for the particles and the electromagnetic fields in a discrete spectral domain. Using this algorithm, it is possible to perform full three-dimensional or axisymmetric simulations of short-wavelength amplification. In this paper we describe the method, its implementation, and we present examples of free electron laser simulations comparing the results with the ones provided by commonly known free electron laser codes

  11. Free-electron laser driven by the LBNL laser-plasma accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeder, C.B.; Fawley, W.M.; Gruner, F.; Bakeman, M.; Nakamura, K.; Robinson, K.E.; Toth, Cs.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W.P.

    2008-01-01

    A design of a compact free-electron laser (FEL), generating ultra-fast, high-peak flux, XUV pulses is presented. The FEL is driven by ahigh-current, 0.5 GeV electron beam from the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) laser-plasma accelerator, whose active acceleration length is only a few centimeters. The proposed ultra-fast source (∼10 fs) would be intrinsically temporally synchronized to the drive laser pulse, enabling pump-probe studies in ultra-fast science. Owing to the high current (>10 kA) of the laser-plasma-accelerated electron beams, saturated output fluxes are potentially greater than 10 13 photons/pulse. Devices based both on self-amplified spontaneous emission and high-harmonic generated input seeds, to reduce undulator length and fluctuations, are considered.

  12. Design of a free-electron laser driven by the LBNL laser-plasma-accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeder, C.B.; Fawley, W.M.; Montgomery, A.L.; Robinson, K.E.; Gruner, F.; Bakeman, M.; Leemans, W.P.

    2007-01-01

    We discuss the design and current status of a compact free-electron laser (FEL), generating ultra-fast, high-peak flux, VUV pulses driven by a high-current, GeV electron beam from the existing Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) laser-plasma accelerator, whose active acceleration length is only a few cm. The proposed ultra-fast source would be intrinsically temporally synchronized to the drive laser pulse, enabling pump-probe studies in ultra-fast science with pulse lengths of tens of fs. Owing to the high current ( and 10 kA) of the laser-plasma-accelerated electron beams, saturated output fluxes are potentially greater than 1013 photons/pulse. Devices based both on SASE and high-harmonic generated input seeds, to reduce undulator length and fluctuations, are considered

  13. Multi-GeV electron-positron beam generation from laser-electron scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vranic, Marija; Klimo, Ondrej; Korn, Georg; Weber, Stefan

    2018-03-16

    The new generation of laser facilities is expected to deliver short (10 fs-100 fs) laser pulses with 10-100 PW of peak power. This opens an opportunity to study matter at extreme intensities in the laboratory and provides access to new physics. Here we propose to scatter GeV-class electron beams from laser-plasma accelerators with a multi-PW laser at normal incidence. In this configuration, one can both create and accelerate electron-positron pairs. The new particles are generated in the laser focus and gain relativistic momentum in the direction of laser propagation. Short focal length is an advantage, as it allows the particles to be ejected from the focal region with a net energy gain in vacuum. Electron-positron beams obtained in this setup have a low divergence, are quasi-neutral and spatially separated from the initial electron beam. The pairs attain multi-GeV energies which are not limited by the maximum energy of the initial electron beam. We present an analytical model for the expected energy cutoff, supported by 2D and 3D particle-in-cell simulations. The experimental implications, such as the sensitivity to temporal synchronisation and laser duration is assessed to provide guidance for the future experiments.

  14. Dosimetry for electron beam application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, A.

    1983-12-01

    This report describes two aspects of electron beam dosimetry, on one hand development of film dosimeters and measurements of their properties, and on the other hand development of calorimeters for calibration of routine dosimeters, e.g. thin films. Two types of radiochromic thin film dosimeters have been developed in this department, and the properties of these and commercially available dosimeters have been measured and found to be comparable. Calorimeters which are in use for routine measurements, are being investigated with reference to their application as standardizing instruments, and new calorimeters are being developed. (author)

  15. Free electron lasers for transmission of energy in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segall, S. B.; Hiddleston, H. R.; Catella, G. C.

    1981-01-01

    A one-dimensional resonant-particle model of a free electron laser (FEL) is used to calculate laser gain and conversion efficiency of electron energy to photon energy. The optical beam profile for a resonant optical cavity is included in the model as an axial variation of laser intensity. The electron beam profile is matched to the optical beam profile and modeled as an axial variation of current density. Effective energy spread due to beam emittance is included. Accelerators appropriate for a space-based FEL oscillator are reviewed. Constraints on the concentric optical resonator and on systems required for space operation are described. An example is given of a space-based FEL that would produce 1.7 MW of average output power at 0.5 micrometer wavelength with over 50% conversion efficiency of electrical energy to laser energy. It would utilize a 10 m-long amplifier centered in a 200 m-long optical cavity. A 3-amp, 65 meV electrostatic accelerator would provide the electron beam and recover the beam after it passes through the amplifier. Three to five shuttle flights would be needed to place the laser in orbit.

  16. Observation of second harmonics in laser-electron scattering using low energy electron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iinuma, Masataka [ADSM, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8530 (Japan)]. E-mail: iinuma@hiroshima-u.ac.jp; Matsukado, Koji [Venture Business Laboratory, Hiroshima University, 1-313 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8527 (Japan); Endo, Ichita [ADSM, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8530 (Japan); Hashida, Masaki [Institute for chemical Research, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Hayashi, Kenji [ADSM, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8530 (Japan); Kohara, Akitsugu [ADSM, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8530 (Japan); Matsumoto, Fumihiko [ADSM, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8530 (Japan); Nakanishi, Yoshitaka [ADSM, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8530 (Japan); Sakabe, Shuji [Institute for chemical Research, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Shimizu, Seiji [Institute for chemical Research, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Tauchi, Toshiaki [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Yamamoto, Ken [ADSM, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8530 (Japan); Takahashi, Tohru [ADSM, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8530 (Japan)

    2005-10-17

    We observed photon generation in the second harmonic region in collisions of 10 keV free electrons and the intense laser beam with the peak intensity of 4.0x10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}. Observed photon yield was 3 orders of magnitude higher than expectation from the nonlinear Compton scattering. The observation indicates necessity of further investigation for the interaction between the intense laser field and the low energy electron beam.

  17. Two-dimensional angular energy spectrum of electrons accelerated by the ultra-short relativistic laser pulse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borovskiy, A. V. [Department of Computer Science and Cybernetics, Baikal State University of Economics and Law, 11 Lenin Street, Irkutsk 664003 (Russian Federation); Galkin, A. L. [Coherent and Nonlinear Optics Department, A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the RAS, 38 Vavilov Street, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Department of Physics of MBF, Pirogov Russian National Research Medical University, 1 Ostrovitianov Street, Moscow 117997 (Russian Federation); Kalashnikov, M. P., E-mail: galkin@kapella.gpi.ru [Max-Born-Institute for Nonlinear Optics and Short-Time Spectroscopy, 2a Max-Born-Strasse, Berlin 12489 (Germany)

    2015-04-15

    The new method of calculating energy spectra of accelerated electrons, based on the parameterization by their initial coordinates, is proposed. The energy spectra of electrons accelerated by Gaussian ultra-short relativistic laser pulse at a selected angle to the axis of the optical system focusing the laser pulse in a low density gas are theoretically calculated. The two-peak structure of the electron energy spectrum is obtained. Discussed are the reasons for its appearance as well as an applicability of other models of the laser field.

  18. Short wavelength optics for future free electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attwood, D.T.

    1984-04-01

    Although much free-electron laser work is directed toward achieving sufficient single-pass gain to be useful for research purposes, the availability of mirrors of high reflectance for the vacuum ultraviolet and soft x-ray regime would make resonant cavities a possibility. In addition, as in ordinary synchrotron radiation work, mirrors are required for the construction of realistic experiments and for beam manipulation purposes such as folding and extraction. The Working Group discussed a number of approaches to reflecting optics for free electron lasers, which are summarized here, and described in some detail. 16 references, 2 figures

  19. A laser printing based approach for printed electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, T.; Hu, M.; Guo, Q.; Zhang, W.; Yang, J., E-mail: jyang@eng.uwo.ca [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Western University, London N6A 3K7 (Canada); Liu, Y.; Lau, W. [Chengdu Green Energy and Green Manufacturing Technology R& D Center, 355 Tengfei Road, 620107 Chengdu (China); Wang, X. [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Western University, London N6A 3K7 (Canada); Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2016-03-07

    Here we report a study of printing of electronics using an office use laser printer. The proposed method eliminates those critical disadvantages of solvent-based printing techniques by taking the advantages of electroless deposition and laser printing. The synthesized toner acts as a catalyst for the electroless copper deposition as well as an adhesion-promoting buffer layer between the substrate and deposited copper. The easy metallization of printed patterns and strong metal-substrate adhesion make it an especially effective method for massive production of flexible printed circuits. The proposed process is a high throughput, low cost, efficient, and environmentally benign method for flexible electronics manufacturing.

  20. Free electron laser on the ACO storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elleaume, P.

    1984-06-01

    This dissertation presents the design and characteristics of a Free Electron Laser built on the electron storage ring ACO at Orsay. The weak optical gain available (approximately 0.1% per pass) necessitated the use of an optical klystron instead of an undulator and the use of mirror with extremely high reflectivity. The laser characteristics: spectra, micro and macro-temporal structures, transverse structure and power are presented. They are in very good agreement with a classical theory based on the Lorentz force and Maxwell equations [fr

  1. A laser printing based approach for printed electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, T.; Hu, M.; Guo, Q.; Zhang, W.; Yang, J.; Liu, Y.; Lau, W.; Wang, X.

    2016-01-01

    Here we report a study of printing of electronics using an office use laser printer. The proposed method eliminates those critical disadvantages of solvent-based printing techniques by taking the advantages of electroless deposition and laser printing. The synthesized toner acts as a catalyst for the electroless copper deposition as well as an adhesion-promoting buffer layer between the substrate and deposited copper. The easy metallization of printed patterns and strong metal-substrate adhesion make it an especially effective method for massive production of flexible printed circuits. The proposed process is a high throughput, low cost, efficient, and environmentally benign method for flexible electronics manufacturing.

  2. Laser-induced plasmas and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radziemski, L.J.

    1989-01-01

    This book discusses optical science, engineering, and technology. Topics covered include the laser and its many commercial and industrial applications, the new optical materials, gradient index optics, electro- and acousto-optics, fiber optics and communications, optical computing and pattern recognition, optical data reading, recording and storage, biomedical instrumentation, industrial robotics, integrated optics, infrared and ultraviolet systems

  3. Laser Direct Write micro-fabrication of large area electronics on flexible substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacharatos, F.; Makrygianni, M.; Geremia, R.; Biver, E.; Karnakis, D.; Leyder, S.; Puerto, D.; Delaporte, P.; Zergioti, I.

    2016-06-01

    To date, Laser Direct Write (LDW) techniques, such as Laser Induced Forward Transfer (LIFT), selective laser ablation and selective laser sintering of metal nanoparticle (NP) ink layers are receiving growing attention for the printing of uniform and well-defined conductive patterns with resolution down to 10 μm. For flexible substrates in particular, selective laser sintering of such NP patterns has been widely applied, as a low temperature and high resolution process compatible with large area electronics. In this work, LDW of silver NP inks has been carried out on polyethylene-terephthalate (PET), polyethylene-naphthalate (PEN) and polyimide (PI) substrates to achieve low electrical resistivity electrodes. In more detail, high speed short pulsed (picosecond and nanosecond) lasers with repetition rates up to 1 MHz were used to print (LIFT) metal NP inks. We thus achieved uniform and continuous patterns with a minimum feature size of 1 μm and a total footprint larger than 1 cm2. Next, the printed patterns were laser sintered with ns pulses at 532 nm over a wide laser fluence window, resulting in an electrical resistivity of 10 μΩ cm. We carried out spatial beam shaping experiments to achieve a top-hat laser intensity profile and employed selective laser ablation of thin films (thickness on the order of 100 nm) to produce silver micro-electrodes with a resolution on the order of 10 μm and a low line edge roughness. Laser sintering was combined with laser ablation to constitute a fully autonomous micro-patterning technique of metallic micro-features, with a 10 μm resolution and geometrical characteristics tuned for interdigitated electrodes for sensor applications.

  4. Automatic tuning of free electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agapov, Ilya; Zagorodnov, Igor [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Geloni, Gianluca [European XFEL, Schenefeld (Germany); Tomin, Sergey [European XFEL, Schenefeld (Germany); NRC Kurchatov Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2017-04-07

    Existing FEL facilities often suffer from stability issues: so electron orbit, transverse electron optics, electron bunch compression and other parameters have to be readjusted often to account for drifts in performance of various components. The tuning procedures typically employed in operation are often manual and lengthy. We have been developing a combination of model-free and model-based automatic tuning methods to meet the needs of present and upcoming XFEL facilities. Our approach has been implemented at FLASH to achieve automatic SASE tuning using empirical control of orbit, electron optics and bunch compression. In this paper we describe our approach to empirical tuning, the software which implements it, and the results of using it at FLASH.We also discuss the potential of using machine learning and model-based techniques in tuning methods.

  5. Automatic tuning of free electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agapov, Ilya; Zagorodnov, Igor; Geloni, Gianluca; Tomin, Sergey

    2017-01-01

    Existing FEL facilities often suffer from stability issues: so electron orbit, transverse electron optics, electron bunch compression and other parameters have to be readjusted often to account for drifts in performance of various components. The tuning procedures typically employed in operation are often manual and lengthy. We have been developing a combination of model-free and model-based automatic tuning methods to meet the needs of present and upcoming XFEL facilities. Our approach has been implemented at FLASH to achieve automatic SASE tuning using empirical control of orbit, electron optics and bunch compression. In this paper we describe our approach to empirical tuning, the software which implements it, and the results of using it at FLASH.We also discuss the potential of using machine learning and model-based techniques in tuning methods.

  6. Generation of mega-electron-volt electron beams by an ultrafast intense laser pulse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiaofang; Saleh, Ned; Krishnan, Mohan; Wang Haiwen; Backus, Sterling; Murnane, Margaret; Kapteyn, Henry; Umstadter, Donald; Wang Quandong; Shen Baifei

    2003-01-01

    Mega-electron-volt (MeV) electron emission from the interaction of an ultrafast (τ∼29 fs), intense (>10 18 W/cm 2 ) laser pulse with underdense plasmas has been studied. A beam of MeV electrons with a divergence angle as small as 1 deg. is observed in the forward direction, which is correlated with relativistic filamentation of the laser pulse in plasmas. A novel net-energy-gain mechanism is proposed for electron acceleration resulting from the relativistic filamentation and beam breakup. These results suggest an approach for generating a beam of femtosecond, MeV electrons at a kilohertz repetition rate with a compact ultrafast intense laser system

  7. Laser applications in nanotechnology: nanofabrication using laser ablation and laser nanolithography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makarov, G N

    2013-01-01

    The fact that nanoparticles and nanomaterials have fundamental properties different both from their constituent atoms or molecules and from their bulk counterparts has stimulated great interest, both theoretical and practical, in nanoparticles and nanoparticle-based assemblies (functional materials), with the result that these structures have become the subject of explosive research over the last twenty years or so. A great deal of progress in this field has relied on the use of lasers. In this paper, the directions followed and results obtained in laser nanotechnology research are reviewed. The parameters, properties, and applications of nanoparticles are discussed, along with the physical and chemical methods for their fabrication and investigation. Nanofabrication applications of and fundamental physical principles behind laser ablation and laser nanolithography are discussed in detail. The applications of laser radiation are shown to range from fabricating, melting, and evaporating nanoparticles to changing their shape, structure, size, and size distribution, through studying their dynamics and forming them into periodic arrays and various structures and assemblies. The historical development of research on nanoparticles and nanomaterials and the application of laser nanotechnology in various fields are briefly reviewed. (reviews of topical problems)

  8. Non-Maxwellian electron distributions resulting from direct laser acceleration in near-critical plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Toncian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The irradiation of few-nm-thick targets by a finite-contrast high-intensity short-pulse laser results in a strong pre-expansion of these targets at the arrival time of the main pulse. The targets decompress to near and lower than critical densities with plasmas extending over few micrometers, i.e. multiple wavelengths. The interaction of the main pulse with such a highly localized but inhomogeneous target leads to the generation of a short channel and further self-focusing of the laser beam. Experiments at the Glass Hybrid OPCPA Scaled Test-bed (GHOST laser system at University of Texas, Austin using such targets measured non-Maxwellian, peaked electron distribution with large bunch charge and high electron density in the laser propagation direction. These results are reproduced in 2D PIC simulations using the EPOCH code, identifying direct laser acceleration (DLA [1] as the responsible mechanism. This is the first time that DLA has been observed to produce peaked spectra as opposed to broad, Maxwellian spectra observed in earlier experiments [2]. This high-density electrons have potential applications as injector beams for a further wakefield acceleration stage as well as for pump-probe applications.

  9. Laser Direct Write micro-fabrication of large area electronics on flexible substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zacharatos, F.; Makrygianni, M.; Geremia, R.; Biver, E.; Karnakis, D.; Leyder, S.; Puerto, D.; Delaporte, P.; Zergioti, I.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Laser Direct Writing of metallic patterns with a minimum feature size of 1 μm. • Selective Laser Ablation of 50 nm thick metal films on flexible substrates. • Selective Laser sintering resulting in an electrical resistivity of 9 μΩ cm. • Laser fabrication of interdigitated electrodes for sensor applications. - Abstract: To date, Laser Direct Write (LDW) techniques, such as Laser Induced Forward Transfer (LIFT), selective laser ablation and selective laser sintering of metal nanoparticle (NP) ink layers are receiving growing attention for the printing of uniform and well-defined conductive patterns with resolution down to 10 μm. For flexible substrates in particular, selective laser sintering of such NP patterns has been widely applied, as a low temperature and high resolution process compatible with large area electronics. In this work, LDW of silver NP inks has been carried out on polyethylene-terephthalate (PET), polyethylene-naphthalate (PEN) and polyimide (PI) substrates to achieve low electrical resistivity electrodes. In more detail, high speed short pulsed (picosecond and nanosecond) lasers with repetition rates up to 1 MHz were used to print (LIFT) metal NP inks. We thus achieved uniform and continuous patterns with a minimum feature size of 1 μm and a total footprint larger than 1 cm"2. Next, the printed patterns were laser sintered with ns pulses at 532 nm over a wide laser fluence window, resulting in an electrical resistivity of 10 μΩ cm. We carried out spatial beam shaping experiments to achieve a top-hat laser intensity profile and employed selective laser ablation of thin films (thickness on the order of 100 nm) to produce silver micro-electrodes with a resolution on the order of 10 μm and a low line edge roughness. Laser sintering was combined with laser ablation to constitute a fully autonomous micro-patterning technique of metallic micro-features, with a 10 μm resolution and geometrical characteristics tuned for

  10. Laser Direct Write micro-fabrication of large area electronics on flexible substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zacharatos, F.; Makrygianni, M. [National Technical University of Athens, Physics Department, Zografou Campus, 15780 (Greece); Geremia, R.; Biver, E.; Karnakis, D. [Oxford Lasers Ltd, Unit 8 Moorbrook Park, Oxfordshire OX11 7HP (United Kingdom); Leyder, S.; Puerto, D.; Delaporte, P. [Aix-Marseille University, CNRS, LP3 – UMR 7341, 13288 Marseille Cedex 9 (France); Zergioti, I., E-mail: zergioti@central.ntua.gr [National Technical University of Athens, Physics Department, Zografou Campus, 15780 (Greece)

    2016-06-30

    Highlights: • Laser Direct Writing of metallic patterns with a minimum feature size of 1 μm. • Selective Laser Ablation of 50 nm thick metal films on flexible substrates. • Selective Laser sintering resulting in an electrical resistivity of 9 μΩ cm. • Laser fabrication of interdigitated electrodes for sensor applications. - Abstract: To date, Laser Direct Write (LDW) techniques, such as Laser Induced Forward Transfer (LIFT), selective laser ablation and selective laser sintering of metal nanoparticle (NP) ink layers are receiving growing attention for the printing of uniform and well-defined conductive patterns with resolution down to 10 μm. For flexible substrates in particular, selective laser sintering of such NP patterns has been widely applied, as a low temperature and high resolution process compatible with large area electronics. In this work, LDW of silver NP inks has been carried out on polyethylene-terephthalate (PET), polyethylene-naphthalate (PEN) and polyimide (PI) substrates to achieve low electrical resistivity electrodes. In more detail, high speed short pulsed (picosecond and nanosecond) lasers with repetition rates up to 1 MHz were used to print (LIFT) metal NP inks. We thus achieved uniform and continuous patterns with a minimum feature size of 1 μm and a total footprint larger than 1 cm{sup 2}. Next, the printed patterns were laser sintered with ns pulses at 532 nm over a wide laser fluence window, resulting in an electrical resistivity of 10 μΩ cm. We carried out spatial beam shaping experiments to achieve a top-hat laser intensity profile and employed selective laser ablation of thin films (thickness on the order of 100 nm) to produce silver micro-electrodes with a resolution on the order of 10 μm and a low line edge roughness. Laser sintering was combined with laser ablation to constitute a fully autonomous micro-patterning technique of metallic micro-features, with a 10 μm resolution and geometrical characteristics tuned for

  11. Electron acceleration by laser produced wake field: Pulse shape effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Hitendra K.; Kumar, Sandeep; Nishida, Yasushi

    2007-12-01

    Analytical expressions are obtained for the longitudinal field (wake field: Ex), density perturbations ( ne') and the potential ( ϕ) behind a laser pulse propagating in a plasma with the pulse duration of the electron plasma period. A feasibility study on the wake field is carried out with Gaussian-like (GL) pulse, rectangular-triangular (RT) pulse and rectangular-Gaussian (RG) pulse considering one-dimensional weakly nonlinear theory ( ne'/n0≪1), and the maximum energy gain acquired by an electron is calculated for all these three types of the laser pulse shapes. A comparative study infers that the RT pulse yields the best results: In its case maximum electron energy gain is 33.5 MeV for a 30 fs pulse duration whereas in case of GL (RG) pulse of the same duration the gain is 28.6 (28.8)MeV at the laser frequency of 1.6 PHz and the intensity of 3.0 × 10 18 W/m 2. The field of the wake and hence the energy gain get enhanced for the higher laser frequency, larger pulse duration and higher laser intensity for all types of the pulses.

  12. Time-dependent restricted-active-space self-consistent eld theory: Formulation and application to laser-driven many-electron dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miyagi, Haruhide; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    We have developed a new theoretical framework for time-dependent many-electron problems named time-dependent restricted-active-space self-consistent field (TD-RASSCF) theory. The theory generalizes the multicongurational time-dependent Hartree-Fock (MCTDHF) theory by truncating the expansion...

  13. Emittance Measurements from a Laser Driven Electron Injector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reis, David A

    2003-07-28

    The Gun Test Facility (GTF) at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center was constructed to develop an appropriate electron beam suitable for driving a short wavelength free electron laser (FEL) such as the proposed Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). For operation at a wavelength of 1.5 {angstrom}, the LCLS requires an electron injector that can produce an electron beam with approximately 1 {pi} mm-mrad normalized rms emittance with at least 1 nC of charge in a 10 ps or shorter bunch. The GTF consists of a photocathode rf gun, emittance-compensation solenoid, 3 m linear accelerator (linac), drive laser, and diagnostics to measure the beam. The rf gun is a symmetrized 1.6 cell, s-band high gradient, room temperature, photocathode structure. Simulations show that this gun when driven by a temporally and spatially shaped drive laser, appropriately focused with the solenoid, and further accelerated in linac can produce a beam that meets the LCLS requirements. This thesis describes the initial characterization of the laser and electron beam at the GTF. A convolved measurement of the relative timing between the laser and the rf phase in the gun shows that the jitter is less than 2.5 ps rms. Emittance measurements of the electron beam at 35 MeV are reported as a function of the (Gaussian) pulse length and transverse profile of the laser as well as the charge of the electron beam at constant phase and gradient in both the gun and linac. At 1 nC the emittance was found to be {approx} 13 {pi} mm-mrad for 5 ps and 8 ps long laser pulses. At 0.5 nC the measured emittance decreased approximately 20% in the 5 ps case and 40% in the 8 ps case. These measurements are between 40-80% higher than simulations for similar experimental conditions. In addition, the thermal emittance of the electron beam was measured to be 0.5 {pi} mm-mrad.

  14. Bunch decompression for laser-plasma driven free-electron laser demonstration schemes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Seggebrock

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs require a very high electron beam quality in terms of emittance and energy spread. Since 2004 high quality electrons produced by laser-wakefield accelerators have been demonstrated, but the electron quality up to now did not allow the operation of a compact x-ray FEL using these electrons. Maier et al. [Phys. Rev. X 2, 031019 (2012PRXHAE2160-330810.1103/PhysRevX.2.031019] suggested a concept for a proof-of-principle experiment allowing FEL operation in the vacuum ultraviolet range based on an optimized undulator and bunch decompression using electron bunches from a laser-plasma accelerator as currently available. In this paper we discuss in more detail how a chicane can be used as a bunch stretcher instead of a bunch compressor to allow the operation of a laser-wakefield accelerator driven FEL using currently available electrons. A scaling characterizing the impact of bunch decompression on the gain length is derived and the feasibility of the concept is tested numerically in a demanding scenario.

  15. Modifying thin film diamond for electronic applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baral, B.

    1999-01-01

    The unique combination of properties that diamond possesses are being exploited in both electronic and mechanical applications. An important step forward in the field has been the ability to grow thin film diamond by chemical vapour deposition (CVD) methods and to control parameters such as crystal orientation, dopant level and surface roughness. An extensive understanding of the surface of any potential electronic material is vital to fully comprehend its behaviour within device structures. The surface itself ultimately controls key aspects of device performance when interfaced with other materials. This study has provided insight into important chemical reactions on polycrystalline CVD diamond surfaces, addressing how certain surface modifications will ultimately affect the properties of the material. A review of the structure, bonding, properties and potential of diamond along with an account of the current state of diamond technology and CVD diamond growth is provided. The experimental chapter reviews bulk material and surface analytical techniques employed in this work and is followed by an investigation of cleaning treatments for polycrystalline CVD diamond aimed at removing non-diamond carbon from the surface. Selective acid etch treatments are compared and contrasted for efficacy with excimer laser irradiation and hydrogen plasma etching. The adsorption/desorption kinetics of potential dopant-containing precursors on polycrystalline CVD diamond surfaces have been investigated to compare their effectiveness at introducing dopants into the diamond during the growth stage. Both boron and sulphur-containing precursor compounds have been investigated. Treating polycrystalline CVD diamond in various atmospheres / combination of atmospheres has been performed to enhance electron field emission from the films. Films which do not emit electrons under low field conditions can be modified such that they emit at fields as low as 10 V/μm. The origin of this enhancement

  16. Inhomogeneous effects in the quantum free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piovella, N.; Bonifacio, R.

    2006-01-01

    We include inhomogeneous effects in the quantum model of a free electron laser taking into account the initial energy spread of the electron beam. From a linear analysis, we obtain a generalized dispersion relation, from which the exponential gain can be explicitly calculated. We determine the maximum allowed initial energy spread in the quantum exponential regime and we discuss the limit of large energy spread

  17. Vibrational analysis of a shipboard free electron laser beam path

    OpenAIRE

    Gallant, Bryan M.

    2011-01-01

    This thesis explores the deployment of a free electron laser (FEL) weapon system in a shipboard vibration environment. A concept solid model of a shipboard FEL is developed and used as a basis for a finite element model which is subjected to vibration simulation in MATLAB. Vibration input is obtained from ship shock trials data and wave excited motion data from ship motion simulation software. Emphasis is placed on the motion of electron beam path components of the FEL and the feasibility of ...

  18. Desorption by Femtosecond Laser Pulses : An Electron-Hole Effect?

    OpenAIRE

    D. M., NEWNS; T. F., HEINZ; J. A., MISEWICH; IBM Research Division, T. J. Watson Research Center; IBM Research Division, T. J. Watson Research Center; IBM Research Division, T. J. Watson Research Center

    1992-01-01

    Desorption of molecules from metal surfaces induced by femtosecond visible laser pulses has been reported. Since the lattice temperature rise is insufficient to explain desorption, an electronic mechanism is clearly responsible. It is shown that a theory based on direct coupling between the center-of-mass degree of freedom of the adsorbate and the electron-hole excitations of the substrate provides a satisfactory explanation of the various experimental findings.

  19. High-intensity laser application in Orthodontics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Franzotti Sant’Anna

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction: In dental practice, low-level laser therapy (LLLT and high-intensity laser therapy (HILT are mainly used for dental surgery and biostimulation therapy. Within the Orthodontic specialty, while LLLT has been widely used to treat pain associated with orthodontic movement, accelerate bone regeneration after rapid maxillary expansion, and enhance orthodontic tooth movement, HILT, in turn, has been seen as an alternative for addressing soft tissue complications associated to orthodontic treatment. Objective: The aim of this study is to discuss HILT applications in orthodontic treatment. Methods: This study describes the use of HILT in surgical treatments such as gingivectomy, ulotomy, ulectomy, fiberotomy, labial and lingual frenectomies, as well as hard tissue and other dental restorative materials applications. Conclusion: Despite the many applications for lasers in Orthodontics, they are still underused by Brazilian practitioners. However, it is quite likely that this demand will increase over the next years - following the trend in the USA, where laser therapies are more widely used.

  20. Channeling of electrons in a crossed laser field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. B. Dabagov

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this article a new analytical description of the effective interaction potential for a charged particle with the field of two interfering laser beams is presented. The potential dependence on the lasers intensities, orientation and parameters of the particle entering the considered system is analyzed. For the first time the phenomenon of effective potential inversion (or “relativistic reversal” is described for arbitrary lasers crossing angle. Threshold electron velocity values for the phenomenon are introduced and its extended illustration based on numerical simulations for two laser beams polarizations is presented. In addition the projectile radiation spectral distribution is given and general estimations on the expected beam radiation yield are outlined.

  1. Laser development for laser fusion applications. Research progress report, October 1979-September 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-04-01

    Research conducted during this period is reported on the following: (1) rare-gas-halogen lasers, (2) XeCl laser at excitation rates of 1.7 to 4.7 MW/cm 3 , (3) rare gas halogen laser modeling, (4) three-body ion recombination coefficients, (5) electron beam accelerators, (6) power conditioning studies for accelerators, (7) chemically pumped iodine lasers, (8) hydrogen fluoride lasers, and (9) supporting research

  2. Microlens Array Laser Transverse Shaping Technique for Photoemission Electron Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halavanau, A. [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States); Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Ha, G. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Pohang Univ. of Science and Technology (POSTECH) (Korea, Republic of); Qiang, G. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China); Gai, W. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Power, J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Piot, P. [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States); Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Wisniewski, E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Edstrom, D. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Ruan, J. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Santucci, J. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2016-09-06

    A common issue encountered in photoemission electron sources used in electron accelerators is distortion of the laser spot due to non ideal conditions at all stages of the amplification. Such a laser spot at the cathode may produce asymmetric charged beams that will result in degradation of the beam quality due to space charge at early stages of acceleration and fail to optimally utilize the cathode surface. In this note we study the possibility of using microlens arrays to dramatically improve the transverse uniformity of the drive laser pulse on UV photocathodes at both Fermilab Accelerator Science \\& Technology (FAST) facility and Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA). In particular, we discuss the experimental characterization of the homogeneity and periodic patterned formation at the photocathode. Finally, we compare the experimental results with the paraxial analysis, ray tracing and wavefront propagation software.

  3. Inverse free electron laser accelerator for advanced light sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. P. Duris

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the inverse free electron laser (IFEL scheme as a compact high gradient accelerator solution for driving advanced light sources such as a soft x-ray free electron laser amplifier or an inverse Compton scattering based gamma-ray source. In particular, we present a series of new developments aimed at improving the design of future IFEL accelerators. These include a new procedure to optimize the choice of the undulator tapering, a new concept for prebunching which greatly improves the fraction of trapped particles and the final energy spread, and a self-consistent study of beam loading effects which leads to an energy-efficient high laser-to-beam power conversion.

  4. Electronic dynamics induced by laser in (D)KDP crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duchateau, G.; Geoffroy, G.; Dyan, A.; Piombini, H.; Geoffroy, G.; Guizard, S.

    2011-01-01

    DKDP (KD 2 PO 4 ) and KDP (KH 2 PO 4 ) crystals that are used in frequency conversion systems have a damage threshold that limits the development of power lasers. It is assumed that laser-induced damage (LID) stems for a precursor defect present in the crystal or quickly generated by the laser-radiation. The Socrate bench has been useful for studying the evolution of LID but the understanding of the very beginning of the LID requires a new method. We have performed femtosecond interferometric measures to study the behaviour of charge carriers. We show that the valence electrons are excited through multi-photon absorption and their relaxation time depends on the isotope (hydrogen or deuterium). The various electron populations are computed through an adequate simulation and the comparison with experimental data has allowed us to get values for multi-photon absorption cross-sections and relaxation times

  5. Observation of laser multiple filamentation process and multiple electron beams acceleration in a laser wakefield accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Wentao; Liu, Jiansheng; Wang, Wentao; Chen, Qiang; Zhang, Hui; Tian, Ye; Zhang, Zhijun; Qi, Rong; Wang, Cheng; Leng, Yuxin; Li, Ruxin; Xu, Zhizhan

    2013-01-01

    The multiple filaments formation process in the laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) was observed by imaging the transmitted laser beam after propagating in the plasma of different density. During propagation, the laser first self-focused into a single filament. After that, it began to defocus with energy spreading in the transverse direction. Two filaments then formed from it and began to propagate independently, moving away from each other. We have also demonstrated that the laser multiple filamentation would lead to the multiple electron beams acceleration in the LWFA via ionization-induced injection scheme. Besides, its influences on the accelerated electron beams were also analyzed both in the single-stage LWFA and cascaded LWFA

  6. Advances in solid state laser technology for space and medical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byvik, C. E.; Buoncristiani, A. M.

    1988-01-01

    Recent developments in laser technology and their potential for medical applications are discussed. Gas discharge lasers, dye lasers, excimer lasers, Nd:YAG lasers, HF and DF lasers, and other commonly used lasers are briefly addressed. Emerging laser technology is examined, including diode-pumped lasers and other solid state lasers.

  7. Synchrotron radiation and free electron laser activities in Novosibirsk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korchuganov, V.N.; Kulipanov, G.N.; Mezentsev, N.A.; Oreshkov, A.D.; Panchenko, V.E.; Pindyurin, V.F.; Skrinskij, A.N.; Sheromov, M.A.; Vinokurov, N.A.; Zolotarev, K.V.

    1994-01-01

    The results of studies realized in the Siberian synchrotron radiation centre within the frameworks of wide program of synchrotron radiation and free electron laser research are summarized. The technical information on the VEPP-2M, VEPP-3 and VEPP-4M storage rings used as synchrotron radiation sources is given. 10 refs.; 8 figs.; 12 tabs

  8. Emittance growth in laser-driven RF electron guns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, K.J.

    1989-01-01

    A simple analysis for the evolution of the electron-beam phase space distribution in laser-driven rf guns is presented. In particular, formulas are derived for the transverse and longitudinal emittances at the exit of the gun. The results are compared and found to agree well with those from simulation. (Author). 9 refs.; 4 figs

  9. Three-dimensional simulations of free-electron laser physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McVey, B.D.

    1985-09-01

    A computer code has been developed to simulate three-dimensional free-electron laser physics. A mathematical formulation of the FEL equations is presented, and the numerical solution of the problem is described. Sample results from the computer code are discussed. 23 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  10. Modeling paraxial wave propagation in free-electron laser oscillators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karssenberg, J.G.; van der Slot, Petrus J.M.; Volokhine, I.; Verschuur, Jeroen W.J.; Boller, Klaus J.

    2006-01-01

    Modeling free-electron laser (FEL) oscillators requires calculation of both the light-beam interaction within the undulator and the light propagation outside the undulator. We have developed a paraxial optical propagation code that can be combined with various existing models of gain media, for

  11. Mechanisms for the production of harmonics in free electron lasers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elgin, J.N.; Penman, C.

    1991-01-01

    Harmonics in the radiation of a free electron laser are useful for extending the range of tuning, may originate in spontaneous or parametric processes, and can take part in stimulated emission or amplification. These mechanisms exhibit interesting analogies with those of nonlinear optics. Apart from

  12. Specular Reflectivity and Hot-Electron Generation in High-Contrast Relativistic Laser-Plasma Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kemp, Gregory Elijah [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Ultra-intense laser (> 1018 W/cm2) interactions with matter are capable of producing relativistic electrons which have a variety of applications in state-of-the-art scientific and medical research conducted at universities and national laboratories across the world. Control of various aspects of these hot-electron distributions is highly desired to optimize a particular outcome. Hot-electron generation in low-contrast interactions, where significant amounts of under-dense pre-plasma are present, can be plagued by highly non-linear relativistic laser-plasma instabilities and quasi-static magnetic field generation, often resulting in less than desirable and predictable electron source characteristics. High-contrast interactions offer more controlled interactions but often at the cost of overall lower coupling and increased sensitivity to initial target conditions. An experiment studying the differences in hot-electron generation between high and low-contrast pulse interactions with solid density targets was performed on the Titan laser platform at the Jupiter Laser Facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in Livermore, CA. To date, these hot-electrons generated in the laboratory are not directly observable at the source of the interaction. Instead, indirect studies are performed using state-of-the-art simulations, constrained by the various experimental measurements. These measurements, more-often-than-not, rely on secondary processes generated by the transport of these electrons through the solid density materials which can susceptible to a variety instabilities and target material/geometry effects. Although often neglected in these types of studies, the specularly reflected light can provide invaluable insight as it is directly influenced by the interaction. In this thesis, I address the use of (personally obtained) experimental specular reflectivity measurements to indirectly study hot-electron generation in the context of high-contrast, relativistic

  13. Electron laser acceleration in vacuum by a quadratically chirped laser pulse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salamin, Yousef I; Jisrawi, Najeh M

    2014-01-01

    Single MeV electrons in vacuum subjected to single high-intensity quadratically chirped laser pulses are shown to gain multi-GeV energies. The laser pulses are modelled by finite-duration trapezoidal and cos  2 pulse-shapes and the equations of motion are solved numerically. It is found that, typically, the maximum energy gain from interaction with a quadratic chirp is about half of what would be gained from a linear chirp. (paper)

  14. DEVELOPING APPLICATIONS FOR ELECTRONIC BUSINESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgeta Șoavă

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We are in the early 3rd millennium as companies face the need to exploit technology changing computer environments, in order to improve customer satisfaction and reduce costs. Thus, the development of e-business, the efficient use of new information technologies in business, by developing an alternative sales channel with relatively low costs, it manages to establish relationships with incomparably greater number of customers, to traditional approaches. Starting from these general considerations, we conducted this work we divided it into four parts. In the first part we present general context in which companies can achieve needs using new technologies, then we reviewed the basic elements in developing e-business type applications presenting their main benefits. Next, I approached refining models for e-business software development and use of distributed architectures for electronic commerce, concluding with a set of conclusions.

  15. Studies of harmonic generation in free electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldammer, K.

    2007-01-01

    Nonlinear harmonic generation is one of the most interesting aspects of Free Electron Lasers under study today. It provides for coherent, high intensity radiation at higher harmonics of the FEL resonant frequency. The sources, numerical simulation and applications of harmonic radiation in cascaded High Gain Harmonic Generation FELs were the subject of this thesis. Harmonic emission in FELs originates from harmonic microbunching of the particles and the particular electron trajectory during FEL interaction. Numerical FEL simulation codes model these analytical equations and predict the performance of Free Electron Lasers with good accuracy. This thesis has relied heavily upon the FEL simulation code Genesis 1.3 which has been upgraded in the framework of this thesis to compute harmonic generation in a self-consistent manner. Tests against analytical predictions suggest that the harmonic power levels as well as harmonic gain lengths are simulated correctly. A benchmark with the FEL simulation code GINGER yields excellent agreement of the harmonic saturation length and saturation power. The new version of the simulation code Genesis was also tested against measurements from the VUV-FEL FLASH at DESY. The spectral power distributions of fundamental and third harmonic radiation were recorded at 25.9 nm and 8.6 nm, respectively. The relative bandwidths (FWHM) were in the range of 2 % for both the fundamental as well as the third harmonic, which was accurately reproduced by time-dependent simulations with Genesis. The new code was also used to propose and evaluate a new design for the BESSY Soft X-Ray FEL, a cascaded High Gain Harmonic Generation FEL proposed by BESSY in Berlin. The original design for the BESSY High Energy FEL line requires four HGHG stages to convert the initial seed laser wavelength of 297.5 nm down to 1.24 nm. A new scheme is proposed that makes use of fifth harmonic radiation from the first stage and reduces the number of HGHG stages to three. It

  16. Studies of harmonic generation in free electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldammer, K.

    2007-11-12

    Nonlinear harmonic generation is one of the most interesting aspects of Free Electron Lasers under study today. It provides for coherent, high intensity radiation at higher harmonics of the FEL resonant frequency. The sources, numerical simulation and applications of harmonic radiation in cascaded High Gain Harmonic Generation FELs were the subject of this thesis. Harmonic emission in FELs originates from harmonic microbunching of the particles and the particular electron trajectory during FEL interaction. Numerical FEL simulation codes model these analytical equations and predict the performance of Free Electron Lasers with good accuracy. This thesis has relied heavily upon the FEL simulation code Genesis 1.3 which has been upgraded in the framework of this thesis to compute harmonic generation in a self-consistent manner. Tests against analytical predictions suggest that the harmonic power levels as well as harmonic gain lengths are simulated correctly. A benchmark with the FEL simulation code GINGER yields excellent agreement of the harmonic saturation length and saturation power. The new version of the simulation code Genesis was also tested against measurements from the VUV-FEL FLASH at DESY. The spectral power distributions of fundamental and third harmonic radiation were recorded at 25.9 nm and 8.6 nm, respectively. The relative bandwidths (FWHM) were in the range of 2 % for both the fundamental as well as the third harmonic, which was accurately reproduced by time-dependent simulations with Genesis. The new code was also used to propose and evaluate a new design for the BESSY Soft X-Ray FEL, a cascaded High Gain Harmonic Generation FEL proposed by BESSY in Berlin. The original design for the BESSY High Energy FEL line requires four HGHG stages to convert the initial seed laser wavelength of 297.5 nm down to 1.24 nm. A new scheme is proposed that makes use of fifth harmonic radiation from the first stage and reduces the number of HGHG stages to three. It

  17. Electron beam requirements for soft x-ray/XUV free-electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldstein, J.C.

    1987-01-01

    A discussion of the electron beam quality (peak current, energy spread, and transverse emittance) required to drive short wavelength free-electron lasers in the XUV (10-100 nm) and soft x-ray (<10 nm) optical wavelength ranges is presented

  18. Dielectric laser acceleration of non-relativistic electrons at a photonic structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breuer, John

    2013-08-29

    Stanford. The potential of dielectric laser accelerators lies in the larger attainable acceleration gradients resulting in a more compact design as well as a lower cost of these devices compared with conventional accelerator facilities. This size reduction by potentially a factor of 100 is owed to the two orders of magnitude larger damage threshold of dielectric materials as compared to metals. We present an outlook towards the design of an envisioned large-scale dielectric laser accelerator and its possible application in future compact free electron lasers.

  19. Orthogonal polarization in lasers physical phenomena and engineering applications

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Shulian

    2013-01-01

    This practical book summarizes the latest research results of orthogonally polarized lasers, birefringence laser cavities, and their applications. Coverage ranges from basic principles and technologies to the characteristics of different cavities and lasers to various measurement techniques. A number of figures, experimental designs, and measurement curves are included, helping readers gain a thorough understanding of the many applications in modern engineering and start their own projects. Many types of relevant lasers (Helium/Neon lasers, Nd:YAG lasers, laser diodes, etc.) are also discussed

  20. Intensity dependence of electron gas kinetics in a laser corona

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mašek Martin

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In various experimental situations relevant to the laser fusion, such as plasma near the light entrance holes of hohlraum in the indirect drive experiments or more recently in the shock ignition direct drive a relatively long underdense plasma of corona type is encountered, which is subject to an intense nanosecond laser beam. The plasma is only weakly collisional and thus in the electron phase space a complicated kinetic evolution is going on, which is taking the electron gas fairly far from the thermal equilibrium and contributes to its unstable behaviour. These phenomena impede the absorption and thermalization of the incoming laser energy, create groups of fast electrons and also may lead to a non-linear reflection of the heating laser beam. One of the key processes leading to the electron acceleration is the stimulated Raman scattering (SRS in its non-linear phase. The SRS in the presence of electron-ion collisions requires a certain threshold intensity above which the mentioned non-dissipative phenomena can occur and develop to the stage, where they may become unpleasant for the fusion experiments. To assess this intensity limit a computational model has been developed based on the Vlasov-Maxwell kinetics describing such a plasma in 1D geometry. At a relatively high intensity of 1016 W/cm2 a number of non-linear phenomena are predicted by the code such as a saturation of Landau damping, which is then translated in an unfavourable time dependence of the reflected light intensity and formation of accelerated electron groups due to the electron trapping. The purpose of the present contribution is to map the intensity dependence of this non-linear development with the aim of assessing its weight in fusion relevant situations.

  1. The free electron laser: a system capable of determining the gold standard in laser vision correction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, W. Craig; Rose, John G.; Chang, Daniel H.; Proia, Alan D.

    1999-01-01

    Introduction. In laser vision correction surgery, lasers are generally utilized based on their beam-tissue interactions and corneal absorption characteristics. Therefore, the free electron laser, with its ability to provide broad wavelength tunability, is a unique research tool for investigating wavelengths of possible corneal ablation. Methods. Mark III free electron laser wavelengths between 2.94 and 6.7 μm were delivered in serial 0.1 μm intervals to corneas of freshly enucleated porcine globes. Collateral damage, ablation depth, and ablation diameter were measured in histologic sections. Results. The least collateral damage (12-13 μm) was demonstrated at three wavelengths: 6.0, 6.1 (amide I), and 6.3 μm. Minimal collateral damage (15 μm) was noted at 2.94 μm (OH-stretch) and at 6.2 μm. Slightly greater collateral damage was noted at 6.45 μm (amide II), as well as at the 5.5-5.7 μm range, but this was still substantially less than the collateral damage noted at the other wavelengths tested. Conclusions. Our results suggest that select mid-infrared wavelengths have potential for keratorefractive surgery and warrant additional study. Further, the free electron laser's ability to allow parameter adjustment in the far-ultraviolet spectrum may provide unprecedented insights toward establishing the gold-standard parameters for laser vision correction surgery

  2. submitter Parametric study of transport beam lines for electron beams accelerated by laser-plasma interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Scisciò, M; Migliorati, M; Mostacci, A; Palumbo, L; Papaphilippou, Y; Antici, P

    2016-01-01

    In the last decade, laser-plasma acceleration of high-energy electrons has attracted strong attention in different fields. Electrons with maximum energies in the GeV range can be laser-accelerated within a few cm using multi-hundreds terawatt (TW) lasers, yielding to very high beam currents at the source (electron bunches with up to tens-hundreds of pC in a few fs). While initially the challenge was to increase the maximum achievable electron energy, today strong effort is put in the control and usability of these laser-generated beams that still lack of some features in order to be used for applications where currently conventional, radio-frequency (RF) based, electron beam lines represent the most common and efficient solution. Several improvements have been suggested for this purpose, some of them acting directly on the plasma source, some using beam shaping tools located downstream. Concerning the latter, several studies have suggested the use of conventional accelerator magnetic devices (such as quadrupo...

  3. Prospective application of laser plasma propulsion in rocket technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Xin; Zhang Jie; Li Yingjun

    2002-01-01

    Interest in laser plasma propulsion is growing intensively. The interaction of high intensity short laser pulses with materials can produce plasma expansion with a velocity of hundreds of km/s. The specific impulse of ablative laser propulsion can be many tens of times greater than that of chemical rockets. The development and potential application of laser plasma propulsion are discussed

  4. Femtosecond laser's application in the corneal surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Liang Wang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available With the rapid development over the past two decades,femtosecond(10-15slasers(FShas become a new application in ophthalmic surgery. As laser power is defined as energy delivered per unit time, decreasing the pulse duration to femtosecond level(100fsnot only increases the power delivered but also decreases the fluence threshold for laser induced optical breakdown. In ablating tissue, FS has an edge over nanosecond lasers as there is minimal collateral damage from shock waves and heat conduction during surgical ablation. Thus, application of FS has been widely spread, from flap creation for laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis(LASIKsurgery, cutting of donor and recipient corneas in keratoplasty, creation of pockets for intracorneal ring implantation. FS applied in keratoplasty is mainly used in making graft and recipient bed, and can exactly cut different tissue of keratopathy. FS can also cut partial tissue of cornea, even if it is under the moderate corneal macula and corneal edema condition.

  5. Electron energy and electron trajectories in an inverse free-electron laser accelerator based on a novel electrostatic wiggler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikrah, M.; Jafari, S.

    2016-06-01

    We expand here a theory of a high-gradient laser-excited electron accelerator based on an inverse free-electron laser (inverse-FEL), but with innovations in the structure and design. The electrostatic wiggler used in our scheme, namely termed the Paul wiggler, is generated by segmented cylindrical electrodes with applied oscillatory voltages {{V}\\text{osc}}(t) over {{90}\\circ} segments. The inverse-FEL interaction can be described by the equations that govern the electron motion in the combined fields of both the laser pulse and Paul wiggler field. A numerical study of electron energy and electron trajectories has been made using the fourth-order Runge-Kutta method. The results indicate that the electron attains a considerable energy at short distances in this device. It is found that if the electron has got sufficient suitable wiggler amplitude intensities, it can not only gain higher energy in longer distances, but also can retain it even after the passing of the laser pulse. In addition, the results reveal that the electron energy gains different peaks for different initial axial velocities, so that a suitable small initial axial velocity of e-beam produces substantially high energy gain. With regard to the transverse confinement of the electron beam in a Paul wiggler, there is no applied axial guide magnetic field in this device.

  6. Property Investigation of Laser Cladded, Laser Melted and Electron Beam Melted Ti-Al6-V4

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-05-01

    UNCLASSIFIED/UNLIMITED UNCLASSIFIED/UNLIMITED Figure 3: Examples of electron beam melted net shape parts; powder bed [3]. 1.4 Laser Cladding ...description, www.arcam.com. [4] K.-H. Hermann, S. Orban, S. Nowotny, Laser Cladding of Titanium Alloy Ti6242 to Restore Damaged Blades, Proceedings...Property Investigation of Laser Cladded , Laser Melted and Electron Beam Melted Ti-Al6-V4 Johannes Vlcek EADS Deutschland GmbH Corporate Research

  7. The Physics and Applications of High Brightness Electron Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palumbo, Luigi; Rosenzweig, J.; Serafini, Luca

    2007-09-01

    Plenary sessions. RF deflector based sub-Ps beam diagnostics: application to FEL and advanced accelerators / D. Alesini. Production of fermtosecond pulses and micron beam spots for high brightness electron beam applications / S.G. Anderson ... [et al.]. Wakefields of sub-picosecond electron bunches / K.L.F. Bane. Diamond secondary emitter / I. Ben-Zvi ... [et al.]. Parametric optimization for an X-ray free electron laser with a laser wiggler / R. Bonifacio, N. Piovella and M.M. Cola. Needle cathodes for high-brightness beams / C.H. Boulware ... [et al.]. Non linear evolution of short pulses in FEL cascaded undulators and the FEL harmonic cascade / L. Giannessi and P. Musumeci. High brightness laser induced multi-meV electron/proton sources / D. Giulietti ... [et al.]. Emittance limitation of a conditioned beam in a strong focusing FEL undulator / Z. Huang, G. Stupakov and S. Reiche. Scaled models: space-charge dominated electron storage rings / R.A. Kishek ... [et al.]. High brightness beam applications: energy recovered linacs / G.A. Krafft. Maximizing brightness in photoinjectors / C. Limborg-Deprey and H. Tomizawa. Ultracold electron sources / O.J. Luiten ... [et al.]. Scaling laws of structure-based optical accelerators / A. Mizrahi, V. Karagodsky and L. Schächter. High brightness beams-applications to free-electron lasers / S. Reiche. Conception of photo-injectors for the CTF3 experiment / R. Roux. Superconducting RF photoinjectors: an overview / J. Sekutowicz. Status and perspectives of photo injector developments for high brightness beams / F. Stephan. Results from the UCLA/FNLP underdense plasma lens experiment / M.C. Thompson ... [et al.]. Medical application of multi-beam compton scattering monochromatic tunable hard X-ray source / M. Uesaka ... [et al.]. Design of a 2 kA, 30 fs RF-photoinjector for waterbag compression / S.B. Van Der Geer, O.J. Luiten and M.J. De Loos. Proposal for a high-brightness pulsed electron source / M. Zolotorev ... [et al

  8. Detailed characterization of electron sources yielding first demonstration of European X-ray Free-Electron Laser beam quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Stephan

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The photoinjector test facility at DESY, Zeuthen site (PITZ, was built to develop and optimize photoelectron sources for superconducting linacs for high-brilliance, short-wavelength free-electron laser (FEL applications like the free-electron laser in Hamburg (FLASH and the European x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL. In this paper, the detailed characterization of two laser-driven rf guns with different operating conditions is described. One experimental optimization of the beam parameters was performed at an accelerating gradient of about 43  MV/m at the photocathode and the other at about 60  MV/m. In both cases, electron beams with very high phase-space density have been demonstrated at a bunch charge of 1 nC and are compared with corresponding simulations. The rf gun optimized for the lower gradient has surpassed all the FLASH requirements on beam quality and rf parameters (gradient, rf pulse length, repetition rate and serves as a spare gun for this facility. The rf gun studied with increased accelerating gradient at the cathode produced beams with even higher brightness, yielding the first demonstration of the beam quality required for driving the European XFEL: The geometric mean of the normalized projected rms emittance in the two transverse directions was measured to be 1.26±0.13  mm mrad for a 1-nC electron bunch. When a 10% charge cut is applied excluding electrons from those phase-space regions where the measured phase-space density is below a certain level and which are not expected to contribute to the lasing process, the normalized projected rms emittance is about 0.9 mm mrad.

  9. Attosecond Electron Wave Packet Dynamics in Strong Laser Fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnsson, P.; Remetter, T.; Varju, K.; L'Huillier, A.; Lopez-Martens, R.; Valentin, C.; Balcou, Ph.; Kazamias, S.; Mauritsson, J.; Gaarde, M. B.; Schafer, K. J.; Mairesse, Y.; Wabnitz, H.; Salieres, P.

    2005-01-01

    We use a train of sub-200 attosecond extreme ultraviolet (XUV) pulses with energies just above the ionization threshold in argon to create a train of temporally localized electron wave packets. We study the energy transfer from a strong infrared (IR) laser field to the ionized electrons as a function of the delay between the XUV and IR fields. When the wave packets are born at the zero crossings of the IR field, a significant amount of energy (∼20 eV) is transferred from the field to the electrons. This results in dramatically enhanced above-threshold ionization in conditions where the IR field alone does not induce any significant ionization. Because both the energy and duration of the wave packets can be varied independently of the IR laser, they are valuable tools for studying and controlling strong-field processes

  10. A new far infrared free-electron laser

    CERN Document Server

    Walsh, J E; Swartz, J C; Urata, J; Kimmitt, M F

    1999-01-01

    The operation of a new ultra compact diffraction grating coupled free-electron laser (FEL) has been demonstrated. The basic elements of the device which is termed a grating coupled oscillator (GCO) are the beam in a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and a diffraction grating which is mounted in the e-beam focal region of the SEM. The e-beam is controlled by the SEM's electron optical system and distributed feed back is provided by the grating itself. Recent experimental results are presented and techniques for extending the wavelength and power coverage are discussed.

  11. A new far infrared free-electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walsh, J.E.; Brownell, J.H.; Swartz, J.C.; Urata, J.; Kimmitt, M.F.

    1999-01-01

    The operation of a new ultra compact diffraction grating coupled free-electron laser (FEL) has been demonstrated. The basic elements of the device which is termed a grating coupled oscillator (GCO) are the beam in a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and a diffraction grating which is mounted in the e-beam focal region of the SEM. The e-beam is controlled by the SEM's electron optical system and distributed feed back is provided by the grating itself. Recent experimental results are presented and techniques for extending the wavelength and power coverage are discussed

  12. A new far infrared free-electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, J.E.; Brownell, J.H.; Swartz, J.C.; Urata, J.; Kimmitt, M.F

    1999-06-01

    The operation of a new ultra compact diffraction grating coupled free-electron laser (FEL) has been demonstrated. The basic elements of the device which is termed a grating coupled oscillator (GCO) are the beam in a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and a diffraction grating which is mounted in the e-beam focal region of the SEM. The e-beam is controlled by the SEM's electron optical system and distributed feed back is provided by the grating itself. Recent experimental results are presented and techniques for extending the wavelength and power coverage are discussed.

  13. Transient analysis of a bunched beam free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, J.M.; Yu, L.H.

    1985-01-01

    The problem of the bunched beam operation of a free electron laser was studied. Assuming the electron beam to be initially monoenergetic, the Maxwell-Vlasov equations describing the system reduce to a third order partial differential equation for the envelope of the emitted light. The Green's function corresponding to an arbitrary shape of the electron bunch, which describes the transient behavior of the system, is obtained. The Green's function was used to discuss the start up problem as well as the power output and the power specrum of a self-amplified spontaneous emission

  14. High-energy inverse free-electron laser accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Courant, E.D.; Pellegrini, C.; Zakowicz, W.

    1985-01-01

    We study the inverse free electron laser (IFEL) accelerator and show that it can accelerate electrons to the few hundred GeV region with average acceleration rates of the order of 200 meV/m. Several possible accelerating structures are analyzed, and the effect of synchrotron radiation losses is studied. The longitudinal phase stability of accelerated particles is also analyzed. A Hamiltonian description, which takes into account the dissipative features of the IFEL accelerator, is introduced to study perturbations from the resonant acceleration. Adiabatic invariants are obtained and used to estimate the change of the electron phase space density during the acceleration process

  15. A microwave FEL [free electron laser] code using waveguide modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byers, J.A.; Cohen, R.H.

    1987-08-01

    A free electron laser code, GFEL, is being developed for application to the LLNL tokamak current drive experiment, MTX. This single frequency code solves for the slowly varying complex field amplitude using the usual wiggler-averaged equations of existing codes, in particular FRED, except that it describes the fields by a 2D expansion in the rectangular waveguide modes, using coupling coefficients similar to those developed by Wurtele, which include effects of spatial variations in the fields seen by the wiggler motion of the particles. Our coefficients differ from those of Wurtele in two respects. First, we have found a missing √2γ/a/sub w/ factor in his C/sub z/; when corrected this increases the effect of the E/sub z/ field component and this in turn reduces the amplitude of the TM mode. Second, we have consistently retained all terms of second order in the wiggle amplitude. Both corrections are necessary for accurate computation. GFEL has the capability of following the TE/sub 0n/ and TE(M)/sub m1/ modes simultaneously. GFEL produces results nearly identical to those from FRED if the coupling coefficients are adjusted to equal those implied by the algorithm in FRED. Normally, the two codes produce results that are similar but different in detail due to the different treatment of modes higher than TE/sub 01/. 5 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  16. Large area electron beam pumped krypton fluoride laser amplifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sethian, J.D.; Obenschain, S.P.; Gerber, K.A.; Pawley, C.J.; Serlin, V.; Sullivan, C.A.; Webster, W.; Deniz, A.V.; Lehecka, T.; McGeoch, M.W.; Altes, R.A.; Corcoran, P.A.; Smith, I.D.; Barr, O.C.

    1997-01-01

    Nike is a recently completed multi-kilojoule krypton fluoride (KrF) laser that has been built to study the physics of direct drive inertial confinement fusion. This paper describes in detail both the pulsed power and optical performance of the largest amplifier in the Nike laser, the 60 cm amplifier. This is a double pass, double sided, electron beam-pumped system that amplifies the laser beam from an input of 50 J to an output of up to 5 kJ. It has an optical aperture of 60 cm x 60 cm and a gain length of 200 cm. The two electron beams are 60 cm high x 200 cm wide, have a voltage of 640 kV, a current of 540 kA, and a flat top power pulse duration of 250 ns. A 2 kG magnetic field is used to guide the beams and prevent self-pinching. Each electron beam is produced by its own Marx/pulse forming line system. The amplifier has been fully integrated into the Nike system and is used on a daily basis for laser-target experiments. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  17. Laser-assisted electron emission from gated field-emitters

    CERN Document Server

    Ishizuka, H; Yokoo, K; Mimura, H; Shimawaki, H; Hosono, A

    2002-01-01

    Enhancement of electron emission by illumination of gated field-emitters was studied using a 100 mW cw YAG laser at a wavelength of 532 nm, intensities up to 10 sup 7 W/m sup 2 and mechanically chopped with a rise time of 4 mu s. When shining an array of 640 silicon emitters, the emission current responded quickly to on-off of the laser. The increase of the emission current was proportional to the basic emission current at low gate voltages, but it was saturated at approx 3 mu A as the basic current approached 100 mu A with the increase of gate voltage. The emission increase was proportional to the square root of laser power at low gate voltages and to the laser power at elevated gate voltages. For 1- and 3-tip silicon emitters, the rise and fall of the current due to on-off of the laser showed a significant time lag. The magnitude of emission increase was independent of the position of laser spot on the emitter base and reached 2 mu A at a basic current of 5 mu A without showing signs of saturation. The mech...

  18. Optical polymers for laser medical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultanova, Nina G.; Kasarova, Stefka N.; Nikolov, Ivan D.

    2016-01-01

    In medicine, optical polymers are used not only in ophthalmology but in many laser surgical, diagnostic and therapeutic systems. The application in lens design is determined by their refractive and dispersive properties in the considered spectral region. We have used different measuring techniques to obtain precise refractometric data in the visible and near-infrared spectral regions. Dispersive, thermal and other important optical characteristics of polymers have been studied. Design of a plastic achromatic objective, used in a surgical stereo-microscope at 1064 nm laser wavelength, is accomplished. Geometrical and wavefront aberrations are calculated. Another example of application of polymers is the designed all-mirror apochromatic micro-lens, intended for superluminescent diode fiber coupling in medical systems.

  19. Nonlinear electron transport in magnetized laser plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kho, T.H.; Haines, M.G.

    1986-01-01

    Electron transport in a magnetized plasma heated by inverse bremsstrahlung is studied numerically using a nonlinear Fokker--Planck model with self-consistent E and B fields. The numerical scheme is described. Nonlocal transport is found to alter many of the transport coefficients derived from linear transport theory, in particular, the Nernst and Righi--Leduc effects, in addition to the perpendicular heat flux q/sub perpendicular/, are substantially reduced near critical surface. The magnetic field, however, remains strongly coupled to the nonlinear q/sub perpendicular/ and, as has been found in hydrosimulations, convective amplification of the magnetic field occurs in the overdense plasma

  20. High-current electron accelerator for gas-laser pumping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badaliants, G R; Mamikonian, V A; Nersisian, G Ts; Papanian, V O

    1978-11-26

    A high-current source of pulsed electron beams has been developed for the pumping of UV gas lasers. The parameters of the device are: energy of 0.3-0.7 MeV pulse duration of 30 ns and current density (in a high-pressure laser chamber) of 40-100 A/sq cm. The principal feature of the device is the use of a rectangular cold cathode with incomplete discharge along the surface of the high-permittivity dielectric. Cathodes made of stainless steel, copper, and graphite were investigated.

  1. Laser power beaming applications and technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Robert J.; Cover, Ralph A.; Curtin, Mark S.; Dinius, R.; Lampel, Michael C.

    1994-05-01

    Beaming laser energy to spacecraft has important economic potential. It promises significant reduction in the cost of access to space, for commercial and government missions. While the potential payoff is attractive, existing technologies perform the same missions and the keys to market penetration for power beaming are a competitive cost and a schedule consistent with customers' plans. Rocketdyne is considering these questions in the context of a commercial enterprise -- thus, evaluation of the requirements must be done based on market assessments and recognition that significant private funding will be involved. It is in the context of top level business considerations that the technology requirements are being assessed and the program being designed. These considerations result in the essential elements of the development program. Since the free electron laser is regarded as the `long pole in the tent,' this paper summarizes Rocketdyne's approach for a timely, cost-effective program to demonstrate an FEL capable of supporting an initial operating capability.

  2. Nanodiamonds of Laser Synthesis for Biomedical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perevedentseva, E; Peer, D; Uvarov, V; Zousman, B; Levinson, O

    2015-02-01

    In recent decade detonation nanodiamonds (DND), discovered 50 years ago and used in diverse technological processes, have been actively applied in biomedical research as a drug and gene delivery carrier, a contrast agent for bio-imaging and diagnostics and an adsorbent for protein separation and purification. In this work we report about nanodiamonds of high purity produced by laser assisted technique, compare them with DND and consider the prospect and advantages of their use in the said applications.

  3. Effect of laser and/or electron beam irradiation on void swelling in SUS316L austenitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Subing [School of Metallurgical and Ecological Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Yang, Zhanbing, E-mail: yangzhanbing@ustb.edu.cn [School of Metallurgical and Ecological Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); State Key Laboratory of Advanced Metallurgy, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Wang, Hui [School of Metallurgical and Ecological Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Watanabe, Seiichi; Shibayama, Tamaki [Center for Advanced Research of Energy and Materials, Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-8628 (Japan)

    2017-05-15

    Large amounts of void swelling still limit the application of austenitic stainless steels in nuclear reactors due to radiation-induced lattice point defects. In this study, laser and/or beam irradiation was conducted in a temperature range of 573–773 K to explore the suppression of void swelling. The results show that during sequential laser-electron beam irradiation, the void nucleation is enhanced because of the vacancy clusters and void nuclei formed under pre-laser irradiation, causing greater void swelling than single electron beam irradiation. However, simultaneous laser-electron dual-beam irradiation exhibits an obvious suppression effect on void swelling due to the enhanced recombination between interstitials and vacancies in the temperature range of 573–773 K; especially at 723 K, the swelling under simultaneous dual-beam irradiation is 0.031% which is only 22% of the swelling under electron beam irradiation (0.137%). These results provide new insight into the suppression of void swelling during irradiation. - Highlights: •The temperature dependence of void swelling under simultaneous laser-electron dual-beam irradiation has been investigated. •Pre-laser irradiation enhances void nucleation at temperatures from 573 K to 773 K. •Simultaneous laser-electron dual-beam irradiation suppresses void swelling in the temperature range of 573–773 K.

  4. Stable electron beams from laser wakefield acceleration with few-terawatt driver using a supersonic air jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boháček, K.; Kozlová, M.; Nejdl, J.; Chaulagain, U.; Horný, V.; Krůs, M.; Ta Phuoc, K.

    2018-03-01

    The generation of stable electron beams produced by the laser wakefield acceleration mechanism with a few-terawatt laser system (600 mJ, 50 fs) in a supersonic synthetic air jet is reported and the requirements necessary to build such a stable electron source are experimentally investigated in conditions near the bubble regime threshold. The resulting electron beams have stable energies of (17.4 ± 1.1) MeV and an energy spread of (13.5 ± 1.5) MeV (FWHM), which has been achieved by optimizing the properties of the supersonic gas jet target for the given laser system. Due to the availability of few-terawatt laser systems in many laboratories around the world these stable electron beams open possibilities for applications of this type of particle source.

  5. The laser principles and application techniques. 2. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maillet, H.

    1986-01-01

    Specialists of each field gathered to give a complete overview of laser techniques possibilities. Operation principles, properties and the different kinds of lasers are detailed. Inertial fusion, isotope separation, medecine are part of the laser application fields presented, and application techniques in these fields are described [fr

  6. High-power copper vapour lasers and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, J.J.; Warner, B.E.; Boley, C.D.; Dragon, E.P.

    1995-08-01

    Expanded applications of copper vapor lasers has prompted increased demand for higher power and better beam quality. This paper reports recent progress in laser power scaling, MOPA operation, beam quality improvement, and applications in precision laser machining. Issues such as gas heating, radial delay, discharge instability, and window heating will also be discussed.

  7. Investigation of electron heating in laser-plasma interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Parvazian

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available  In this paper, stimulated Raman scattering (SRS and electron heating in laser plasma propagating along the plasma fusion is investigated by particle-in cell simulation. Applying an external magnetic field to plasma, production of whistler waves and electron heating associated with whistler waves in the direction perpendicular to external magnetic field was observed in this simulation. The plasma waves with low phase velocities, generated in backward-SRS and dominateing initially in time and space, accelerated the backward electrons by trapping them. Then these electrons promoted to higher energies by the forward-SRS plasma waves with high phase velocities. This tow-stage electron acceleration is more efficient due to the coexistence of these two instabilities.

  8. Investigation of electron heating in laser-plasma interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parvazian, A.; Haji Sharifi, K.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, stimulated Raman scattering and electron heating in laser plasma propagating along the plasma fusion is investigated by particle-in cell simulation. Applying an external magnetic field to plasma, production of whistler waves and electron heating associated with whistler waves in the direction perpendicular to external magnetic field was observed in this simulation. The plasma waves with low phase velocities, generated in backward-stimulated Raman scattering and dominating initially in time and space, accelerated the backward electrons by trapping them. Then these electrons promoted to higher energies by the forward-stimulated Raman scattering plasma waves with high phase velocities. This two-stage electron acceleration is more efficient due to the coexistence of these two instabilities.

  9. Laser pulse control of bridge mediated heterogeneous electron transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Luxia; May, Volkhard

    2009-01-01

    Ultrafast heterogeneous electron transfer from surface attached dye molecules into semiconductor band states is analyzed. The focus is on systems where the dye is separated from the surface by different bridge anchor groups. To simulate the full quantum dynamics of the transfer process a model of reduced dimensionality is used. It comprises the electronic levels of the dye, the bridge anchor group electronic levels and the continuum of semiconductor band states, all defined versus a single intramolecular vibrational coordinate. The effect of the bridge states is demonstrated, firstly, in studying the injection dynamics following an impulsive excitation of the dye. Then, by discussing different control tasks it is demonstrate in which way the charge injection process can be influenced by tailored laser pulses. To highlight the importance of electron wave function interference emphasis is put on asymmetric two-bridge molecule systems which are also characterized by different and complex valued electronic transfer matrix elements.

  10. Beam manipulation for compact laser wakefield accelerator based free-electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loulergue, A; Labat, M; Benabderrahmane, C; Couprie, M E; Evain, C; Malka, V

    2015-01-01

    Free-electron lasers (FELs) are a unique source of light, particularly in the x-ray domain. After the success of FELs based on conventional acceleration using radio-frequency cavities, an important challenge is the development of FELs based on electron bunching accelerated by a laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA). However, the present LWFA electron bunch properties do not permit use directly for a significant FEL amplification. It is known that longitudinal decompression of electron beams delivered by state-of-the-art LWFA eases the FEL process. We propose here a second order transverse beam manipulation turning the large inherent transverse chromatic emittances of LWFA beams into direct FEL gain advantage. Numerical simulations are presented showing that this beam manipulation can further enhance by orders of magnitude the peak power of the radiation. (paper)

  11. Emittance Measurements from a Laser Driven Electron Injector

    CERN Document Server

    Reis, D

    2003-01-01

    The Gun Test Facility (GTF) at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center was constructed to develop an appropriate electron beam suitable for driving a short wavelength free electron laser (FEL) such as the proposed Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). For operation at a wavelength of 1.5 (angstrom), the LCLS requires an electron injector that can produce an electron beam with approximately 1 pi mm-mrad normalized rms emittance with at least 1 nC of charge in a 10 ps or shorter bunch. The GTF consists of a photocathode rf gun, emittance-compensation solenoid, 3 m linear accelerator (linac), drive laser, and diagnostics to measure the beam. The rf gun is a symmetrized 1.6 cell, s-band high gradient, room temperature, photocathode structure. Simulations show that this gun when driven by a temporally and spatially shaped drive laser, appropriately focused with the solenoid, and further accelerated in linac can produce a beam that meets the LCLS requirements. This thesis describes the initial characterization of the ...

  12. High quality electron beams from a laser wakefield accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiggins, S M; Issac, R C; Welsh, G H; Brunetti, E; Shanks, R P; Anania, M P; Cipiccia, S; Manahan, G G; Aniculaesei, C; Ersfeld, B; Islam, M R; Burgess, R T L; Vieux, G; Jaroszynski, D A [SUPA, Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Gillespie, W A [SUPA, Division of Electronic Engineering and Physics, University of Dundee, Dundee (United Kingdom); MacLeod, A M [School of Computing and Creative Technologies, University of Abertay Dundee, Dundee (United Kingdom); Van der Geer, S B; De Loos, M J, E-mail: m.wiggins@phys.strath.ac.u [Pulsar Physics, Burghstraat 47, 5614 BC Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2010-12-15

    High quality electron beams have been produced in a laser-plasma accelerator driven by femtosecond laser pulses with a peak power of 26 TW. Electrons are produced with an energy up to 150 MeV from the 2 mm gas jet accelerator and the measured rms relative energy spread is less than 1%. Shot-to-shot stability in the central energy is 3%. Pepper-pot measurements have shown that the normalized transverse emittance is {approx}1{pi} mm mrad while the beam charge is in the range 2-10 pC. The generation of high quality electron beams is understood from simulations accounting for beam loading of the wakefield accelerating structure. Experiments and self-consistent simulations indicate that the beam peak current is several kiloamperes. Efficient transportation of the beam through an undulator is simulated and progress is being made towards the realization of a compact, high peak brilliance free-electron laser operating in the vacuum ultraviolet and soft x-ray wavelength ranges.

  13. Multiple purpose research complex on the basis of electron accelerators and terahertz free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulipanov, G.N.

    2009-01-01

    In this report the basic positioning parameters of multiple purpose research complex are presented, the list of potential experiments and technological uses on the example of results received in the multiuser center of G.I. Budker Institut of nuclear physics Siberian department of the Russian Academy of Sciences is discussed. This research complex is directed on work in the big universities and nano technology centers. Electron accelerators is intended for development of electron-beam technologies different material modification, for production of nano powder, nano materials and solution of ecological tasks. In this work the project of multiple purpose research complex on the basis of new generation electron accelerator Il-14 and workable terahertz free electron laser is suggested. Terahertz free electron laser will be used for researches in the sphere of physics and chemistry, biology and medicine, nanotechnology engineering and different methods of nanodiagnostics.

  14. Discrete mode lasers for communications applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, L. P.; Herbert, C.; Jones, D.; Kaszubowska-Anandarajah, A.; Kelly, B.; O'Carroll, J.; Phelan, R.; Anandarajah, P.; Shi, K.; O'Gorman, J.

    2009-02-01

    The wavelength spectra of ridge waveguide Fabry Perot lasers can be modified by perturbing the effective refractive index of the guided mode along very small sections of the laser cavity. One way of locally perturbing the effective index of the lasing mode is by etching features into the ridge waveguide such that each feature has a small overlap with the transverse field profile of the unperturbed mode, consequently most of the light in the laser cavity is unaffected by these perturbations. A proportion of the propagating light is however reflected at the boundaries between the perturbed and the unperturbed sections. Suitable positioning of these interfaces allows the mirror loss spectrum of a Fabry Perot laser to be manipulated. In order to achieve single longitudinal mode emission, the mirror loss of a specified mode must be reduced below that of the other cavity modes. Here we review the latest results obtained from devices containing such features. These results clearly demonstrate that these devices exceed the specifications required for a number of FTTH and Datacomms applications, such as GEPON, LX4 and CWDM. As well as this we will also present initial results on the linewidth of these devices.

  15. New laser design for NIR lidar applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogelmann, H.; Trickl, T.; Perfahl, M.; Biggel, S.

    2018-04-01

    Recently, we quantified the very high spatio-temporal short term variability of tropospheric water vapor in a three dimensional study [1]. From a technical point of view this also depicted the general requirement of short integration times for recording water-vapor profiles with lidar. For this purpose, the only suitable technique is the differential absorption lidar (DIAL) working in the near-infrared (NIR) spectral region. The laser emission of most water vapor DIAL systems is generated by Ti:sapphire or alexandrite lasers. The water vapor absorption band at 817 nm is predominated for the use of Ti:sapphire. We present a new concept of transversely pumping in a Ti:Sapphire amplification stage as well as a compact laser design for the generation of single mode NIR pulses with two different DIAL wavelengths inside a single resonator. This laser concept allows for high output power due to repetitions rates up to 100Hz or even more. It is, because of its compactness, also suitable for mobile applications.

  16. Laser research and applications. Semiannual report, October 1980-March 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-06-01

    Research progress during this period is given for each of the following topics: (1) rare-gas halogen laser program; (2) laser-triggered switches; (3) laser-controlled ionization front accelerator; (4) lasers for combustion research; (5) 10-μm interferometer for electron density measurements; (6) Q-switched and free-running stable pulse 1.06 μm laser; (7) Raman spectroscopy; (8) multiphoton ionization; (9) chemical vapor deposition and plasma etching; (10) laser-desorption mass spectrometry; (11) collision broadening and shift of the K 4p-ns and 4p-nd lines by Ar, (12) chemically pumped iodine laser; (13) laser-induced chemical reactions; (14) photolytic pumping of a laser by a moving, hot plasma; (15) laser-based surface spectroscopy; (16) laser-generated low-density channels; (17) radiation-driven density waves in optically pumped gas lasers; (18) propagation of an annular laser beam; (19) theoretical modeling of the chemical vapor deposition process; (20) charge exchange cross sections for C 6+ -H collisions; (21) the stopping power of gold ions for protons; (22) electron ionization cross sections of low-Z ions; (23) electron shielding effects on fusion cross sections and (24) radiation efficiencies from imploding liners

  17. Exact and variational calculations of eigenmodes for three-dimensional free electron laser interaction with a warm electron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, M. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    I present an exact calculation of free-electron-laser (FEL) eigenmodes (fundamental as well as higher order modes) in the exponential-gain regime. These eigenmodes specify transverse profiles and exponential growth rates of the laser field, and they are self-consistent solutions of the coupled Maxwell-Vlasov equations describing the FEL interaction taking into account the effects due to energy spread, emittance and betatron oscillations of the electron beam, and diffraction and guiding of the laser field. The unperturbed electron distribution is assumed to be of Gaussian shape in four dimensional transverse phase space and in the energy variable, but uniform in longitudinal coordinate. The focusing of the electron beam is assumed to be matched to the natural wiggler focusing in both transverse planes. With these assumptions the eigenvalue problem can be reduced to a numerically manageable integral equation and solved exactly with a kernel iteration method. An approximate, but more efficient solution of the integral equation is also obtained for the fundamental mode by a variational technique, which is shown to agree well with the exact results. Furthermore, I present a handy formula, obtained from interpolating the numerical results, for a quick calculation of FEL exponential growth rate. Comparisons with simulation code TDA will also be presented. Application of these solutions to the design and multi-dimensional parameter space optimization for an X-ray free electron laser driven by SLAC linac will be demonstrated. In addition, a rigorous analysis of transverse mode degeneracy and hence the transverse coherence of the X-ray FEL will be presented based on the exact solutions of the higher order guided modes.

  18. Ultrafast pulse lasers jump to macro applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griebel, Martin; Lutze, Walter; Scheller, Torsten

    2016-03-01

    Ultrafast Lasers have been proven for several micro applications, e.g. stent cutting, for many years. Within its development of applications Jenoptik has started to use ultrafast lasers in macro applications in the automotive industry. The JenLas D2.fs-lasers with power output control via AOM is an ideal tool for closed loop controlled material processing. Jenoptik enhanced his well established sensor controlled laser weakening process for airbag covers to a new level. The patented process enables new materials using this kind of technology. One of the most sensitive cover materials is genuine leather. As a natural product it is extremely inhomogeneous and sensitive for any type of thermal load. The combination of femtosecond pulse ablation and closed loop control by multiple sensor array opens the door to a new quality level of defined weakening. Due to the fact, that the beam is directed by scanning equipment the process can be split in multiple cycles additionally reducing the local energy input. The development used the 5W model as well as the latest 10W release of JenLas D2.fs and achieved amazing processing speeds which directly fulfilled the requirements of the automotive industry. Having in mind that the average cycle time of automotive processes is about 60s, trials had been done of processing weakening lines in genuine leather of 1.2mm thickness. Parameters had been about 15 cycles with 300mm/s respectively resulting in an average speed of 20mm/s and a cycle time even below 60s. First samples had already given into functional and aging tests and passed successfully.

  19. Relativistic electron mirrors from high intensity laser nanofoil interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiefer, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    The reflection of a laser pulse from a mirror moving close to the speed of light could in principle create an X-ray pulse with unprecedented high brightness owing to the increase in photon energy and accompanying temporal compression by a factor of 4γ 2 , where γ is the Lorentz factor of the mirror. While this scheme is theoretically intriguingly simple and was first discussed by A. Einstein more than a century ago, the generation of a relativistic structure which acts as a mirror is demanding in many different aspects. Recently, the interaction of a high intensity laser pulse with a nanometer thin foil has raised great interest as it promises the creation of a dense, attosecond short, relativistic electron bunch capable of forming a mirror structure that scatters counter-propagating light coherently and shifts its frequency to higher photon energies. However, so far, this novel concept has been discussed only in theoretical studies using highly idealized interaction parameters. This thesis investigates the generation of a relativistic electron mirror from a nanometer foil with current state-of-the-art high intensity laser pulses and demonstrates for the first time the reflection from those structures in an experiment. To achieve this result, the electron acceleration from high intensity laser nanometer foil interactions was studied in a series of experiments using three inherently different high power laser systems and free-standing foils as thin as 3nm. A drastic increase in the electron energies was observed when reducing the target thickness from the micrometer to the nanometer scale. Quasi-monoenergetic electron beams were measured for the first time from ultrathin (≤5nm) foils, reaching energies up to ∝35MeV. The acceleration process was studied in simulations well-adapted to the experiments, indicating the transition from plasma to free electron dynamics as the target thickness is reduced to the few nanometer range. The experience gained from those

  20. Relativistic electron mirrors from high intensity laser nanofoil interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiefer, Daniel

    2012-12-21

    The reflection of a laser pulse from a mirror moving close to the speed of light could in principle create an X-ray pulse with unprecedented high brightness owing to the increase in photon energy and accompanying temporal compression by a factor of 4γ{sup 2}, where γ is the Lorentz factor of the mirror. While this scheme is theoretically intriguingly simple and was first discussed by A. Einstein more than a century ago, the generation of a relativistic structure which acts as a mirror is demanding in many different aspects. Recently, the interaction of a high intensity laser pulse with a nanometer thin foil has raised great interest as it promises the creation of a dense, attosecond short, relativistic electron bunch capable of forming a mirror structure that scatters counter-propagating light coherently and shifts its frequency to higher photon energies. However, so far, this novel concept has been discussed only in theoretical studies using highly idealized interaction parameters. This thesis investigates the generation of a relativistic electron mirror from a nanometer foil with current state-of-the-art high intensity laser pulses and demonstrates for the first time the reflection from those structures in an experiment. To achieve this result, the electron acceleration from high intensity laser nanometer foil interactions was studied in a series of experiments using three inherently different high power laser systems and free-standing foils as thin as 3nm. A drastic increase in the electron energies was observed when reducing the target thickness from the micrometer to the nanometer scale. Quasi-monoenergetic electron beams were measured for the first time from ultrathin (≤5nm) foils, reaching energies up to ∝35MeV. The acceleration process was studied in simulations well-adapted to the experiments, indicating the transition from plasma to free electron dynamics as the target thickness is reduced to the few nanometer range. The experience gained from those

  1. Pilot study of synchronization on a femtosecond scale between the electronic gun REGAE and a laser-plasma accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Titberidze, Mikheil

    2017-10-01

    Laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) is a novel technique to accelerate charged particles. Acceleration is achieved by a high-power laser pulse transmitting a gas target where electrons and ions form a strong wakefield with gradients up to 100 GVm -1 . Hence, the size of the laser-plasma accelerator (LPA) is significantly smaller compared to conventional radio frequency (RF) accelerators, because its accelerating gradients are 3 orders of magnitude higher. At present, electron beams generated by LWFA do not satisfy all requirements to make them directly usable for applications such as LPA driven free-electron laser (FEL). Pointing stability and relatively high energy spread are the major limiting factors. Typically, plasma electrons are self-injected in the plasma wake which is created by a high-power laser. There is a lack of control for the injection process and there is no direct access for diagnostics. In order to overcome these challenges and better understand the overall LWFA process, external injection experiments are planned at Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY) in the framework of the Laboratory for Laser and beam-driven plasma Acceleration (LAOLA) collaboration. Thus, well characterized and ultrashort (< 10 fs) electron bunches from the conventional RF accelerator Relativistic Electron Gun for Atomic Exploration (REGAE) will be injected into the laser driven plasma wake. This approach allows to reconstruct and map the plasma wakefield by post diagnosing the injected electron bunches by measuring the energy spectra of it for different injection times. To conduct such a pump-probe type of experiment, synchronization with fs accuracy is required between the electron bunches from REGAE and the high-power driver laser. Two main aspects of the laser synchronization are presented in this thesis. First, a detailed experimental investigation of the conventional, fast photodiode based direct conversion laser-to-RF synchronization setup and its limitations are

  2. Pilot study of synchronization on a femtosecond scale between the electronic gun REGAE and a laser-plasma accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Titberidze, Mikheil

    2017-10-15

    Laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) is a novel technique to accelerate charged particles. Acceleration is achieved by a high-power laser pulse transmitting a gas target where electrons and ions form a strong wakefield with gradients up to 100 GVm{sup -1}. Hence, the size of the laser-plasma accelerator (LPA) is significantly smaller compared to conventional radio frequency (RF) accelerators, because its accelerating gradients are 3 orders of magnitude higher. At present, electron beams generated by LWFA do not satisfy all requirements to make them directly usable for applications such as LPA driven free-electron laser (FEL). Pointing stability and relatively high energy spread are the major limiting factors. Typically, plasma electrons are self-injected in the plasma wake which is created by a high-power laser. There is a lack of control for the injection process and there is no direct access for diagnostics. In order to overcome these challenges and better understand the overall LWFA process, external injection experiments are planned at Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY) in the framework of the Laboratory for Laser and beam-driven plasma Acceleration (LAOLA) collaboration. Thus, well characterized and ultrashort (< 10 fs) electron bunches from the conventional RF accelerator Relativistic Electron Gun for Atomic Exploration (REGAE) will be injected into the laser driven plasma wake. This approach allows to reconstruct and map the plasma wakefield by post diagnosing the injected electron bunches by measuring the energy spectra of it for different injection times. To conduct such a pump-probe type of experiment, synchronization with fs accuracy is required between the electron bunches from REGAE and the high-power driver laser. Two main aspects of the laser synchronization are presented in this thesis. First, a detailed experimental investigation of the conventional, fast photodiode based direct conversion laser-to-RF synchronization setup and its limitations

  3. On a laser beam fiducial line application for metrological purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batusov, V.; Budagov, J.; Lyablin, M.; Rusakovich, N.; Sisakyan, A.; Topilin, N.; Khubua, J.; Lasseur, C.

    2008-01-01

    The possibility of a collimated one-mode laser beam used as a fiducial line is considered. The technology of an 'extended' laser beam formation and application for a much extended fiducial line is proposed

  4. Ultrashort megaelectronvolt positron beam generation based on laser-accelerated electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tongjun; Shen, Baifei; Xu, Jiancai; Li, Shun; Yu, Yong; Li, Jinfeng; Lu, Xiaoming; Wang, Cheng; Wang, Xinliang; Liang, Xiaoyan; Leng, Yuxin; Li, Ruxin; Xu, Zhizhan

    2016-03-01

    Experimental generation of ultrashort MeV positron beams with high intensity and high density using a compact laser-driven setup is reported. A high-density gas jet is employed experimentally to generate MeV electrons with high charge; thus, a charge-neutralized MeV positron beam with high density is obtained during laser-accelerated electrons irradiating high-Z solid targets. It is a novel electron-positron source for the study of laboratory astrophysics. Meanwhile, the MeV positron beam is pulsed with an ultrashort duration of tens of femtoseconds and has a high peak intensity of 7.8 × 1021 s-1, thus allows specific studies of fast kinetics in millimeter-thick materials with a high time resolution and exhibits potential for applications in positron annihilation spectroscopy.

  5. Electron-molecule interactions and their applications

    CERN Document Server

    Christophorou, L G

    1984-01-01

    Electron-Molecule Interactions and Their Applications, Volume 2 provides a balanced and comprehensive account of electron-molecule interactions in dilute and dense gases and liquid media. This book consists of six chapters. Chapter 1 deals with electron transfer reactions, while Chapter 2 discusses electron-molecular positive-ion recombination. The electron motion in high-pressure gases and electron-molecule interactions from single- to multiple-collision conditions is deliberated in Chapter 3. In Chapter 4, knowledge on electron-molecule interactions in gases is linked to that on similar proc

  6. Development and application of a far infrared laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakayama, Kazuya; Okajima, Shigeki; Kawahata, Kazuo

    2011-01-01

    There has been a 40 years history on the application of an infrared laser to interference, polarization and scattering light sources in fusion plasma diagnostics. It is one of important light sources in ITER plasma diagnostics too. In the present review, authors recall the history of the infrared laser development especially of cw infrared lasers. In addition, the state-of-the-art technology for infrared lasers, infrared components and its applications to plasma diagnostics are discussed. (J.P.N.)

  7. Femtosecond laser ablation of gold interdigitated electrodes for electronic tongues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzoli, Alexandra; de Almeida, Gustavo F. B.; Filho, José A.; Mattoso, Luiz H. C.; Riul, Antonio; Mendonca, Cleber R.; Correa, Daniel S.

    2015-06-01

    Electronic tongue (e-tongue) sensors based on impedance spectroscopy have emerged as a potential technology to evaluate the quality and chemical composition of food, beverages, and pharmaceuticals. E-tongues usually employ transducers based on metal interdigitated electrodes (IDEs) coated with a thin layer of an active material, which is capable of interacting chemically with several types of analytes. IDEs are usually produced by photolithographic methods, which are time-consuming and costly, therefore, new fabrication technologies are required to make it more affordable. Here, we employed femtosecond laser ablation with pulse duration of 50 fs to microfabricate gold IDEs having finger width from 2.3 μm up to 3.2 μm. The parameters used in the laser ablation technique, such as light intensity, scan speed and beam spot size have been optimized to achieve uniform IDEs, which were characterized by optical and scanning electron microscopy. The electrical properties of gold IDEs fabricated by laser ablation were evaluated by impedance spectroscopy, and compared to those produced by conventional photolithography. The results show that femtosecond laser ablation is a promising alternative to conventional photolithography for fabricating metal IDEs for e-tongue systems.

  8. Harmonic operation of high gain harmonic generation free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Haixiao; Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing; Dai Zhimin

    2008-01-01

    In high gain harmonic generation (HGHG) free electron laser (FEL), with the right choice of parameters of the modulator undulator, the dispersive section and the seed laser, one may make the spatial bunching of the electron beam density distribution correspond to one of the harmonic frequencies of the radiator radiation, instead of the fundamental frequency of the radiator radiation in conventional HGHG, thus the radiator undulator is in harmonic operation (HO) mode. In this paper, we investigate HO of HGHG FEL. Theoretical analyses with universal method are derived and numerical simulations in ultraviolet and deep ultraviolet spectral regions are given. It shows that the power of the 3rd harmonic radiation in the HO of HGHG may be as high as 18.5% of the fundamental power level. Thus HO of HGHG FEL may obtain short wavelength by using lower beam energy. (authors)

  9. Charged beam dynamics, particle accelerators and free electron lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Dattoli, Giuseppe; Sabia, Elio; Artioli, Marcello

    2017-01-01

    Charged Beam Dynamics, Particle Accelerators and Free Electron Lasers summarises different topics in the field of accelerators and of Free Electron Laser (FEL) devices. It is intended as a reference manual for the different aspects of FEL devices, explaining how to design both a FEL device and the accelerator providing the driving beam. It covers both theoretical and experimental aspects, allowing researchers to attempt a first design of a FEL device in different operating conditions. It provides an analysis of what is already available, what is needed, and what the challenges are to determine new progress in this field. All chapters contain complements and exercises that are designed in such a way that the reader will gradually acquire self-confidence with the matter treated in the book.

  10. Electron injection by evolution of self-modulated laser wakefields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Changbum; Kim, Guang-Hoon; Kim, Jong-Uk; Lee, Hae June; Suk, Hyyong; Ko, In Soo

    2003-01-01

    Self-injection mechanisms in the self-modulated laser wakefield acceleration (SM-LWFA) are investigated. Two-dimensional (2D) particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations show that a significant amount of plasma electrons can be self-injected into the acceleration phase of a laser wakefield by a dynamic increase in the wake wavelength in the longitudinal direction. In this process, it is found that the wake wavelength increases due to the relativistic effect and this leads to a large amount of electron injection into the wakefields. In this paper, the injection phenomena are studied with 2D simulations and a brief explanation of the new self-injection mechanism is presented. (author)

  11. High-brightness electron source driven by laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Kui; Geng Rongli; Wang Lifang

    1996-01-01

    A DC high-brightness laser driven by photo emissive electron gun is being developed at Beijing University, in order to produce 50∼100 ps electron bunches of high quality. The gun consists of a photocathode preparation chamber and a DC acceleration cavity. Different ways of fabricating photocathode, such as chemical vapor deposition, ion beam implantation and ion beam enhanced deposition, can be adopted. The acceleration gap is designed with the aid of simulation codes EGUN and POISSON. 100 kV DC high voltage is fed to the anode through a careful designed ceramic insulator. The laser system is a mode locked Nd-YAG oscillator proceeded by an amplifier at 10 Hz repetition rate, which can deliver three different wavelength (1064/532/266 nm). The combination of a superconducting cavity with the photocathode preparation chamber is discussed

  12. Free-electron laser system with Raman amplifier outcoupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linford, G.J.

    1988-05-03

    A free-electron laser system is described comprising: a free-electron laser pump beam generator producing a high-power optical output beam in a vacuum environement; a Raman amplifier cell located in the path of the output beam from the pump beam generator; means for generating and introducing a Stokes seed beam into the Raman amplifier cell, a pair of gaseous windows through which the output beam enters and leaves the Raman amplifier cell, each window having a stream of gas moving continuously in a direction generally perpendicular to the beam; and a mirror positioned in the path of the output beam from the Raman amplifier, the mirror functioning to reflect and further direct the output beam, but not the unwanted spectral components.

  13. The stability of free-electron lasers against filamentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnard, J.J.; Scharlemann, E.T.; Yu, S.S.

    1987-01-01

    In inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments, the high electromagnetic fields propagating through a relatively dense plasma can result in a transverse instability, causing the matter and light to form filaments oriented parallel to the light beam. We examine whether a similar instability exists in the electron beam of a free-electron laser, where such an instability could interfere with the transfer of beam kinetic energy into optical wave energy. We heuristically examine the instability in a relativistic beam through which an intense laser beam is propagating. We ignore the FEL effects. We estimate how the altered index of refraction in an FEL affects the dispersion relation. Finally, we estimate the effect that the instability could have on the phase coherence of a particle as it transits an FEL. 10 refs., 2 tabs

  14. Crystallographic data processing for free-electron laser sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, Thomas A.; Barty, Anton; Stellato, Francesco; Holton, James M.; Kirian, Richard A.; Zatsepin, Nadia A.; Chapman, Henry N.

    2013-01-01

    A processing pipeline for diffraction data acquired using the ‘serial crystallography’ methodology with a free-electron laser source is described with reference to the crystallographic analysis suite CrystFEL and the pre-processing program Cheetah. A processing pipeline for diffraction data acquired using the ‘serial crystallography’ methodology with a free-electron laser source is described with reference to the crystallographic analysis suite CrystFEL and the pre-processing program Cheetah. A detailed analysis of the nature and impact of indexing ambiguities is presented. Simulations of the Monte Carlo integration scheme, which accounts for the partially recorded nature of the diffraction intensities, are presented and show that the integration of partial reflections could be made to converge more quickly if the bandwidth of the X-rays were to be increased by a small amount or if a slight convergence angle were introduced into the incident beam

  15. Crystallographic data processing for free-electron laser sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, Thomas A., E-mail: taw@physics.org; Barty, Anton; Stellato, Francesco [DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Holton, James M. [University of California, San Francisco, CA 94158 (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Kirian, Richard A. [DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Zatsepin, Nadia A. [Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Chapman, Henry N. [DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); University of Hamburg, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    A processing pipeline for diffraction data acquired using the ‘serial crystallography’ methodology with a free-electron laser source is described with reference to the crystallographic analysis suite CrystFEL and the pre-processing program Cheetah. A processing pipeline for diffraction data acquired using the ‘serial crystallography’ methodology with a free-electron laser source is described with reference to the crystallographic analysis suite CrystFEL and the pre-processing program Cheetah. A detailed analysis of the nature and impact of indexing ambiguities is presented. Simulations of the Monte Carlo integration scheme, which accounts for the partially recorded nature of the diffraction intensities, are presented and show that the integration of partial reflections could be made to converge more quickly if the bandwidth of the X-rays were to be increased by a small amount or if a slight convergence angle were introduced into the incident beam.

  16. Advanced laser technologies for high-brightness photocathode electron gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomizawa, Hiromitsu

    2012-01-01

    A laser-excited photocathode RF gun is one of the most reliable high-brightness electron beam sources for XFELs. Several 3D laser shaping methods have been developed as ideal photocathode illumination sources at SPring-8 since 2001. To suppress the emittance growth caused by nonlinear space-charge forces, the 3D cylindrical UV-pulse was optimized spatially as a flattop and temporally as squarely stacked chirped pulses. This shaping system is a serial combination of a deformable mirror that adaptively shapes the spatial profile with a genetic algorithm and a UV-pulse stacker that consists of four birefringent α-BBO crystal rods for temporal shaping. Using this 3D-shaped pulse, a normalized emittance of 1.4 πmm mrad was obtained in 2006. Utilizing laser's Z-polarization, Schottky-effect-gated photocathode gun was proposed in 2006. The cathode work functions are reduced by a laser-induced Schottky effect. As a result of focusing a radially polarized laser pulse with a hollow lens in vacuum, the Z-field (Z-polarization) is generated at the cathode. (author)

  17. Electron heating enhancement by frequency-chirped laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yazdani, E.; Afarideh, H., E-mail: hafarideh@aut.ac.ir [Department of Energy Engineering and Physics, Amirkabir University of Technology, P.O. Box 15875-4413, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sadighi-Bonabi, R., E-mail: Sadighi@sharif.ir [Department of Physics, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-9567, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Riazi, Z. [Physics and Accelerator School, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hora, H. [Department of Theoretical Physics, University of New South Wales, Sydney 2052 (Australia)

    2014-09-14

    Propagation of a chirped laser pulse with a circular polarization through an uprising plasma density profile is studied by using 1D-3V particle-in-cell simulation. The laser penetration depth is increased in an overdense plasma compared to an unchirped pulse. The induced transparency due to the laser frequency chirp results in an enhanced heating of hot electrons as well as increased maximum longitudinal electrostatic field at the back side of the solid target, which is very essential in target normal sheath acceleration regime of proton acceleration. For an applied chirp parameter between 0.008 and 0.01, the maximum amount of the electrostatic field is improved by a factor of 2. Furthermore, it is noticed that for a chirped laser pulse with a₀=5, because of increasing the plasma transparency length, the laser pulse can penetrate up to about n{sub e}≈6n{sub c}, where n{sub c} is plasma critical density. It shows 63% increase in the effective critical density compared to the relativistic induced transparency regime for an unchirped condition.

  18. Advanced Laser Technologies for High-brightness Photocathode Electron Gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomizawa, Hiromitsu

    A laser-excited photocathode RF gun is one of the most reliable high-brightness electron beam sources for XFELs. Several 3D laser shaping methods have been developed as ideal photocathode illumination sources at SPring-8 since 2001. To suppress the emittance growth caused by nonlinear space-charge forces, the 3D cylindrical UV-pulse was optimized spatially as a flattop and temporally as squarely stacked chirped pulses. This shaping system is a serial combination of a deformable mirror that adaptively shapes the spatial profile with a genetic algorithm and a UV-pulse stacker that consists of four birefringent α-BBO crystal rods for temporal shaping. Using this 3D-shaped pulse, a normalized emittance of 1.4 π mm mrad was obtained in 2006. Utilizing laser's Z-polarization, Schottky-effect-gated photocathode gun was proposed in 2006. The cathode work functions are reduced by a laser-induced Schottky effect. As a result of focusing a radially polarized laser pulse with a hollow lens in vacuum, the Z-field (Z-polarization) is generated at the cathode.

  19. Study of electrons distribution produced by laser-plasma interaction on x-ray generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikzad, L.; Sadighi-Bonabi, R.

    2010-01-01

    samples and thicknesses. The next-generation compact laser-based sources of energetic high-quality electrons and x-ray radiation can provide more effective technique for various applications in physics, chemistry, biology and medicine.

  20. Heat transfer between adsorbate and laser-heated hot electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueba, H; Persson, B N J

    2008-01-01

    Strong short laser pulses can give rise to a strong increase in the electronic temperature at metal surfaces. Energy transfer from the hot electrons to adsorbed molecules may result in adsorbate reactions, e.g. desorption or diffusion. We point out the limitations of an often used equation to describe the heat transfer process in terms of a friction coupling. We propose a simple theory for the energy transfer between the adsorbate and hot electrons using a newly introduced heat transfer coefficient, which depends on the adsorbate temperature. We calculate the transient adsorbate temperature and the reaction yield for a Morse potential as a function of the laser fluency. The results are compared to those obtained using a conventional heat transfer equation with temperature-independent friction. It is found that our equation of energy (heat) transfer gives a significantly lower adsorbate peak temperature, which results in a large modification of the reaction yield. We also consider the heat transfer between different vibrational modes excited by hot electrons. This mode coupling provides indirect heating of the vibrational temperature in addition to the direct heating by hot electrons. The formula of heat transfer through linear mode-mode coupling of two harmonic oscillators is applied to the recent time-resolved study of carbon monoxide and atomic oxygen hopping on an ultrafast laser-heated Pt(111) surface. It is found that the maximum temperature of the frustrated translation mode can reach high temperatures for hopping, even when direct friction coupling to the hot electrons is not strong enough

  1. Help system for control of JAERI FEL (Free Electron laser)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, Masayoshi

    1993-01-01

    The control system of JAERI FEL (Free Electron Laser) has a help system to provide the information necessary to operate the machine and to develop the new user interface. As the control software is constructed on the MS-Windows 3.x, the hyper-text feature of the Windows help system can be accessed. It consists of three major parts: (1) on-line help, (2) full document, and (3) tutorial system. (author)

  2. Storage ring free electron lasers and saw-tooth instability

    CERN Document Server

    Dattoli, Giuseppe; Migliorati, M; Palumbo, L; Renieri, A

    1999-01-01

    We show that Free Electron Lasers (FEL) operating with storage rings may counteract beam instabilities of the Saw Tooth (STI) type. We use a model based on a set of equations that couple those describing the FEL evolution to those accounting for the STI dynamics. The analysis provides a clear picture of the FEL-STI mutual feedback and clarifies the mechanisms of the instability inhibition. The reliability of the results is supported by a comparison with fully numerical codes.

  3. Unlimited electron acceleration in laser-driven plasma waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsouleas, T.; Dawson, J.M.

    1983-01-01

    It is shown that the limitation to the energy gain of 2(ω/ω/sub p/) 2 mc 2 of an electron in the laser-plasma beat-wave accelerator can be overcome by imposing a magnetic field of appropriate strength perpendicular to the plasma wave. This accelerates particles parallel to the phase fronts of the accelerating wave which keeps them in phase with it. Arbitrarily large energy is theoretically possible

  4. Applications of lasers in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raj, Rupam; Sanyal, D.N.; Sil, Jaydeb

    2013-01-01

    Applications of lasers in nuclear power plants: Bellow lip cutting and high pressure feeder coupling stud (HPFC) cutting during en-masse coolant channel replacement (EMCCR) campaign at Narora Atomic Power Station Reactor 1 in May 2006; cutting of pressure tubes from Madras Atomic Power Station 1 (MAPS-1) for easy storage in April 2005; In-situ cutting of selected coolant channel S-7 at Kakrapar Atomic Power Station (KAPS-2) (cutting of 12 mm thick end fitting and 4 mm thick liner tube of stainless steel from inside) in January 2005; Development of a miniature cutting mechanism for steam generator tubes (14 mm i.d.) from inside, In-situ bellow repair for secondary shutdown system; LASER welding may be deployed for End shield of MAPS-1 leak repair

  5. Ultrafast Diagnostics for Electron Beams from Laser Plasma Accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matlis, N.H.; Bakeman, M.; Geddes, C.G.R.; Gonsalves, T.; Lin, C.; Nakamura, K.; Osterhoff, J.; Plateau, G.R.; Schroeder, C.B.; Shiraishi, S.; Sokollik, T.; van Tilborg, J.; Toth, Cs.; Leemans, W.P.

    2010-01-01

    We present an overview of diagnostic techniques for measuring key parameters of electron bunches from Laser Plasma Accelerators (LPAs). The diagnostics presented here were chosen because they highlight the unique advantages (e.g., diverse forms of electromagnetic emission) and difficulties (e.g., shot-to-shot variability) associated with LPAs. Non destructiveness and high resolution (in space and time and energy) are key attributes that enable the formation of a comprehensive suite of simultaneous diagnostics which are necessary for the full characterization of the ultrashort, but highly-variable electron bunches from LPAs.

  6. Investigation of metal coatings for the free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, M.L.; Arendt, P.N.; Springer, R.W.; Cordi, R.C.; McCreary, W.J.

    1985-01-01

    We are investigating the deposition and characteristics of metal coatings for use in environments such as the Free Electron Laser where the radiation resistance of metal coatings could prove to be of great benefit. We have concentrated our initial efforts on silver laminate coatings due to the high reflectance of silver at 1 micron wavelength. Our initial laminate coatings have utilized thin layers of titanium oxide to break up the columnar structure of the silver during electron-beam deposition on fused silica substrates. Our initial results on equal coating thickness samples indicate an improvement in damage threshold that ranges from 1.07 to 1.71 at 351 nm

  7. Runaway electron beam control for longitudinally pumped metal vapor lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolbychev, G. V.; Kolbycheva, P. D.

    1995-08-01

    Physics and techniques for producing of the pulsed runaway electron beams are considered. The main obstacle for increasing electron energies in the beams is revealed to be a self- breakdown of the e-gun's gas-filled diode. Two methods to suppress the self-breakdown and enhance the volumetric discharge producing the e-beam are offered and examined. Each of them provides 1.5 fold increase of the ceiling potential on the gun. The methods also give the ways to control several guns simultaneously. Resulting in the possibility of realizing the powerful longitudinal pumping of metal-vapor lasers on self-terminated transitions of atoms or ions.

  8. The LLNL/UCLA high gradient inverse free electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moody, J. T.; Musumeci, P.; Anderson, G.; Anderson, S.; Betts, S.; Fisher, S.; Gibson, D.; Tremaine, A.; Wu, S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, UCLA, Los Angeles California, 90095 (United States); Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (United States)

    2012-12-21

    We describe the Inverse Free Electron Accelerator currently under construction at Lawrence Livermore National Lab. Upon completion of this accelerator, high brightness electrons generated in the photoinjector blowout regime and accelerated to 50 MeV by S-band accelerating sections will interact with > 4 TW peak power Ti:Sapphire laser in a highly tapered 50 cm undulator and experience an acceleration gradient of > 200 MeV/m. We present the final design of the accelerator as well as the results of start-to-end simulations investigating preservation of beam quality and tolerances involved with this accelerator.

  9. Ultrafast Diagnostics for Electron Beams from Laser Plasma Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matlis, N. H.; Bakeman, M.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Gonsalves, T.; Lin, C.; Nakamura, K.; Osterhoff, J.; Plateau, G. R.; Schroeder, C. B.; Shiraishi, S.; Sokollik, T.; van Tilborg, J.; Toth, Cs.; Leemans, W. P.

    2010-06-01

    We present an overview of diagnostic techniques for measuring key parameters of electron bunches from Laser Plasma Accelerators (LPAs). The diagnostics presented here were chosen because they highlight the unique advantages (e.g., diverse forms of electromagnetic emission) and difficulties (e.g., shot-to-shot variability) associated with LPAs. Non destructiveness and high resolution (in space and time and energy) are key attributes that enable the formation of a comprehensive suite of simultaneous diagnostics which are necessary for the full characterization of the ultrashort, but highly-variable electron bunches from LPAs.

  10. ETL linac facility and free-electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, T.; Noguchi, T.; Mikado, T.; Sugiyama, S.; Yamada, K.; Chiwaki, M.; Ohgaki, H.; Suzuki, R.; Sei, N.

    1993-01-01

    An outline is presented of the recent development on the ETL (Electro-technical Laboratory) electron-linac facility and storage-ring FELs (free-electron lasers). Some modifications including the injection system have been made to the linac. Four storage rings are working very well. The TERAS FEL system has been shut down after the successful oscillation around 590 nm. The new NIJI-IV FEL system has been proven to work well, and the current tunable wavelength range is over 100 nm (488-595 nm). Preparatory experiments on the FEL at shorter wavelength are underway. (author)

  11. Electronic and structural response of nanomaterials to ultrafast and ultraintense laser pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chen-Wei; Zhou, Xiang; Lin, Zhibin; Xie, Rui-Hua; Li, Fu-Li; Allen, Roland E

    2014-02-01

    The interaction of materials with ultrafast and ultraintense laser pulses is a current frontier of science both experimentally and theoretically. In this review, we briefly discuss some recent theoretical studies by the present authors with our method of semiclassical electron-radiation-ion dynamics (SERID). In particular, Zhou et al. and Jiang et al. respectively, determined the optimal duration and optimal timing for a series of femtosecond scale laser pulses to excite a specific vibrational mode in a general chemical system. A set of such modes can be used as a "fingerprint" for characterizing a particular molecule or a complex in a solid. One can therefore envision many applications, ranging from fundamental studies to detection of chemical or biological agents. Allen et al. proved that dimers are preferentially emitted during photofragmentation of C60 under an ultrafast and ultraintense laser pulse. For interactions between laser pulses and semiconductors, e.g., GaAs, Si and InSb, besides experimentally accessible optical properties--epsilon(omega) and chi(2)-Allen et al. offered many other indicators to confirm the nonthermal nature of structural changes driven by electronic excitations and occurring during the first few hundred femtoseconds. Lin et al. found that, after the application of a femtosecond laser pulse, excited electrons in materials automatically equilibrate to a Fermi-Dirac distribution within roughly 100 fs, solely because of their coupling to the nuclear motion, even though the resulting electronic temperature is one to two orders of magnitude higher than the kinetic temperature defined by the nuclear motion.

  12. Research on high performance mirrors for free electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitatani, Fumito

    1996-01-01

    For the stable functioning of free electron laser, high performance optical elements are required because of its characteristics. In particular in short wavelength free electron laser, since its gain is low, the optical elements having very high reflectivity are required. Also in free electron laser, since high energy noise light exists, the optical elements must have high optical breaking strength. At present in Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation, the research for heightening the performance of dielectric multi-layer film elements for short wavelength is carried out. For manufacturing such high performance elements, it is necessary to develop the new materials for vapor deposition, new vapor deposition process, and the techniques of accurate substrate polishing and inspection. As the material that satisfies the requirements, there is diamond-like carbon (DLC) film, of which the properties are explained. As for the manufacture of the DLC films for short wavelength optics, the test equipment for forming the DLC films, the test of forming the DLC films, the change of the film quality due to gas conditions, discharge conditions and substrate materials, and the measurement of the optical breaking strength are reported. (K.I.)

  13. The Livermore Free-Electron Laser Program Magnet Test Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, M.J.; Kulke, B.; Deis, G.A.; Frye, R.W.; Kallman, J.S.; Ollis, C.W.; Tyler, G.C.; Van Maren, R.D.; Weiss, W.C.

    1987-01-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Free-Electron Laser Program Magnet Test Laboratory supports the ongoing development of the Induction Linac Free Electron Laser (IFEL) and uses magnetic field measurement systems that are useful in the testing of long periodic magnetic structures, electron-beam transport magnets, and spectrometer magnets. The major systems described include two computer-controlled, three-axis Hall probe-and-search coil transports with computer-controlled data acquisition; a unique, automated-search coil system used to detect very small inaccuracies in wiggler fields; a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based Hall probe-calibration facility; and a high-current DC ion source using heavy ions of variable momentum to model the transport of high-energy electrons. Additionally, a high-precision electron-beam-position monitor for use within long wigglers that has a positional resolution of less than 100 μm is under development in the laboratory and will be discussed briefly. Data transfer to LLNL's central computing facility and on-line graphics enable us to analyze large data sets quickly. 3 refs

  14. Search for nuclear excitation by laser-driven electron motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bounds, J.A.; Dyer, P.

    1992-01-01

    It has been proposed that a nucleus may be excited by first exciting the atom's electrons with UV photons. The incident photons couple to the electrons, which would then couple via a virtual photon to the nucleus. As a test case, experiments with 235 U have been performed. A pulsed infrared laser produces an atomic vapor of 235 U which is then bombarded by a high-brightness UV laser beam. The resulting ions are collected. The first excited nuclear state of 235 U has a 26-min half-life and decays by internal conversion, resulting in emission of an atomic electron. These conversion electrons are detected by a channel electron multiplier. An upper limit of 4.0x10 -5 has been obtained for the probability of exciting the nucleus of a 235 U atom that is in the 248-nm UV beam for 700 fs at an irradiance in the range of 1.0x10 15 to 2.5x10 15 W/cm 2

  15. UV laser ionization and electron beam diagnostics for plasma lenses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Govil, R.; Volfbeyn, P.; Leemans, W.

    1995-04-01

    A comprehensive study of focusing of relativistic electron beams with overdense and underdense plasma lenses requires careful control of plasma density and scale lengths. Plasma lens experiments are planned at the Beam Test Facility of the LBL Center for Beam Physics, using the 50 MeV electron beam delivered by the linac injector from the Advanced Light Source. Here we present results from an interferometric study of plasmas produced in tri-propylamine vapor with a frequency quadrupled Nd:YAG laser at 266 nm. To study temporal dynamics of plasma lenses we have developed an electron beam diagnostic using optical transition radiation to time resolve beam size and divergence. Electron beam ionization of the plasma has also been investigated

  16. Electron Beam Charge Diagnostics for Laser Plasma Accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Kei; Gonsalves, Anthony; Lin, Chen; Smith, Alan; Rodgers, David; Donahue, Rich; Byrne, Warren; Leemans, Wim

    2011-01-01

    A comprehensive study of charge diagnostics is conducted to verify their validity for measuring electron beams produced by laser plasma accelerators (LPAs). First, a scintillating screen (Lanex) was extensively studied using subnanosecond electron beams from the Advanced Light Source booster synchrotron, at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The Lanex was cross calibrated with an integrating current transformer (ICT) for up to the electron energy of 1.5 GeV, and the linear response of the screen was confirmed for charge density and intensity up to 160 pC/mm 2 and 0.4 pC/(ps mm 2 ), respectively. After the radio-frequency accelerator based cross calibration, a series of measurements was conducted using electron beams from an LPA. Cross calibrations were carried out using an activation-based measurement that is immune to electromagnetic pulse noise, ICT, and Lanex. The diagnostics agreed within ±8%, showing that they all can provide accurate charge measurements for LPAs.

  17. Theory of free-electron-laser heating and current drive in magnetized plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, B.I.; Cohen, R.H.; Nevins, W.M.; Rognlien, T.D.

    1991-01-01

    The introduction of a powerful new microwave source, the free-electron laser, provides new opportunities for novel heating and current-drive schemes to be used in toroidal fusion devices. This high-power, pulsed source has a number of technical advantages for these applications, and its use is predicted to lead to improved current-drive efficiencies and opacities in reactor-grade fusion plasmas in specific cases. The Microwave Tokamak Experiment at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory will provide a test for some of these new heating and current-drive schemes. Although the motivation for much of this research has derived from the application of a free-electron laser to the heating of a tokamak plasma at a frequency near the electron cyclotron frequency, the underlying physics, i.e., the highly nonlinear interaction of an intense, pulsed, coherent electromagnetic wave with an electron in a magnetized plasma including relativistic effects, is of general interest. Other relevant applications include ionospheric modification by radio-frequency waves, high-energy electron accelerators, and the propagation of intense, pulsed electromagnetic waves in space and astrophysical plasmas. This review reports recent theoretical progress in the analysis and computer simulation of the absorption and current drive produced by intense pulses, and of the possible complications that may arise, e.g., parametric instabilities, nonlinear self-focusing, trapped-particle sideband instability, and instabilities of the heated plasma

  18. A tunable electron beam source using trapping of electrons in a density down-ramp in laser wakefield acceleration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekerfelt, Henrik; Hansson, Martin; Gallardo González, Isabel; Davoine, Xavier; Lundh, Olle

    2017-09-25

    One challenge in the development of laser wakefield accelerators is to demonstrate sufficient control and reproducibility of the parameters of the generated bunches of accelerated electrons. Here we report on a numerical study, where we demonstrate that trapping using density down-ramps allows for tuning of several electron bunch parameters by varying the properties of the density down-ramp. We show that the electron bunch length is determined by the difference in density before and after the ramp. Furthermore, the transverse emittance of the bunch is controlled by the steepness of the ramp. Finally, the amount of trapped charge depends both on the density difference and on the steepness of the ramp. We emphasize that both parameters of the density ramp are feasible to vary experimentally. We therefore conclude that this tunable electron accelerator makes it suitable for a wide range of applications, from those requiring short pulse length and low emittance, such as the free-electron lasers, to those requiring high-charge, large-emittance bunches to maximize betatron X-ray generation.

  19. Near-field enhanced electron acceleration from dielectric nanospheres in intense few-cycle laser fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zherebtsov, S.; Znakovskaya, I.; Wirth, A.; Herrwerth, O.; Suessmann, F.; Ahmad, I.; Trushin, S.; Fennel, Th.; Plenge, J.; Antonsson, E.

    2010-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. The interaction of nanostructured materials with few-cycle laser light has attracted significant attention lately. This interest is driven by both the quest for fundamental insight into the real-time dynamics of many-electron systems and a wide range of far-reaching applications, such as, e.g. ultrafast computation and information storage on the nanoscale and the generation of XUV frequency combs. We investigated the above-threshold electron emission from isolated SiO 2 nanoparticles in waveform controlled few-cycle laser fields at intensities close to the tunneling regime. The enhancement of the electron acceleration from the silica nanoparticles was explored as a function of the particle size (ranging from 50 to 147 nm) and the laser peak intensity (1 - 4x10 13 W/cm 2 ). Obtained cut-off values in the kinetic energy spectra are displayed in Fig. 1. The cut-off values show a linear dependence with intensity within the studied intensity range, with the average cut-off energy being 53 U P , indicated by the black line. Quasi-classical simulations of the emission process reveal that electron rescattering in the locally enhanced near-field of the particle is responsible for the large energy gain. The observed near-field enhancement offers promising new routes for pushing the limits of strong-field phenomena relying on electron rescattering, such as, high-harmonic generation and molecular imaging.

  20. Generation of attosecond electron beams in relativistic ionization by short laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cajiao Vélez, F.; Kamiński, J. Z.; Krajewska, K.

    2018-03-01

    Ionization by relativistically intense short laser pulses is studied in the framework of strong-field quantum electrodynamics. Distinctive patterns are found in the energy probability distributions of photoelectrons, which are sensitive to the properties of a driving laser field. It is demonstrated that these electrons are generated in the form of solitary attosecond wave packets. This is particularly important in light of various applications of attosecond electron beams such as in ultrafast electron diffraction and crystallography, or in time-resolved electron microscopy of physical, chemical, and biological processes. We also show that, for intense laser pulses, high-energy ionization takes place in narrow regions surrounding the momentum spiral, the exact form of which is determined by the shape of a driving pulse. The self-intersections of the spiral define the momenta for which the interference patterns in the energy distributions of photoelectrons are observed. Furthermore, these interference regions lead to the synthesis of single-electron wave packets characterized by coherent double-hump structures.

  1. Commissioning of Japanese x-ray free electron laser, SACLA and achieved laser performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Hitoshi; Amselem, Arnaud; Aoyagi, Hideki

    2012-01-01

    After 8 months of beam commissioning of SPring-8 Angstrom Compact free electron LAser, SACLA reached the primary target performance, i.e., a shortest laser wavelength of ∼0.6 Angstrom and a laser pulse energy value of sub-mJ at a wavelength of 1.2 Angstrom. This success was due to the following four factors; (1) performance estimation of each component of SACLA required for the target laser performance and its achievement, (2) elaboration of beam diagnostics and control systems enabling precise accelerator and undulator tuning, (3) a rational and strategic commissioning plan, (4) most adequate response to various accidental events during the beam commissioning period. This article, in order to light up the above four factors leading us to the success, starts with the features of SACLA and critical tolerance for the sub-system components, and then, explains our approach to achieve the target laser performance and how the beam commissioning of SACLA proceeded. At last, the article summarizes the present laser and operational status. (author)

  2. Self-amplified spontaneous emission free electron laser devices and nonideal electron beam transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. L. Lazzarino

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We have developed, at the SPARC test facility, a procedure for a real time self-amplified spontaneous emission free electron laser (FEL device performance control. We describe an actual FEL, including electron and optical beam transport, through a set of analytical formulas, allowing a fast and reliable on-line “simulation” of the experiment. The system is designed in such a way that the characteristics of the transport elements and the laser intensity are measured and adjusted, via a real time computation, during the experimental run, to obtain an on-line feedback of the laser performances. The detail of the procedure and the relevant experimental results are discussed.

  3. Ultrafast transmission electron microscopy using a laser-driven field emitter: Femtosecond resolution with a high coherence electron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feist, Armin; Bach, Nora; Rubiano da Silva, Nara; Danz, Thomas; Möller, Marcel; Priebe, Katharina E.; Domröse, Till; Gatzmann, J. Gregor; Rost, Stefan; Schauss, Jakob; Strauch, Stefanie; Bormann, Reiner; Sivis, Murat; Schäfer, Sascha, E-mail: sascha.schaefer@phys.uni-goettingen.de; Ropers, Claus, E-mail: claus.ropers@uni-goettingen.de

    2017-05-15

    We present the development of the first ultrafast transmission electron microscope (UTEM) driven by localized photoemission from a field emitter cathode. We describe the implementation of the instrument, the photoemitter concept and the quantitative electron beam parameters achieved. Establishing a new source for ultrafast TEM, the Göttingen UTEM employs nano-localized linear photoemission from a Schottky emitter, which enables operation with freely tunable temporal structure, from continuous wave to femtosecond pulsed mode. Using this emission mechanism, we achieve record pulse properties in ultrafast electron microscopy of 9 Å focused beam diameter, 200 fs pulse duration and 0.6 eV energy width. We illustrate the possibility to conduct ultrafast imaging, diffraction, holography and spectroscopy with this instrument and also discuss opportunities to harness quantum coherent interactions between intense laser fields and free-electron beams. - Highlights: • First implementation of an ultrafast TEM employing a nanoscale photocathode. • Localized single photon-photoemission from nanoscopic field emitter yields low emittance ultrashort electron pulses. • Electron pulses focused down to ~9 Å, with a duration of 200 fs and an energy width of 0.6 eV are demonstrated. • Quantitative characterization of ultrafast electron gun emittance and brightness. • A range of applications of high coherence ultrashort electron pulses is shown.

  4. Electron scattering from atoms in the presence of a laser field. III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mittleman, M.H.

    1977-01-01

    The development of the theory of the effect of a laser on electron-atom scattering is continued by the derivation of explicit relations between the observed electron-atom scattering cross sections in the presence of a laser and exact electron-atom scattering cross sections with no laser present. No approximation concerning the scattering interaction is made. The only approximations concerning the laser are that (1) the laser-atom interaction energy is small compared to atomic energies, (2) the Rabi frequency times the collision time is small, and (3) the laser intensity in appropriate units is small

  5. 3D laser microfabrication principles and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Misawa, Hiroaki

    2006-01-01

    A thorough introduction to 3D laser microfabrication technology, leading readers from the fundamentals and theory to its various potent applications, such as the generation of tiny objects or three-dimensional structures within the bulk of transparent materials. The book also presents new theoretical material on dielectric breakdown, allowing a better understanding of the differences between optical damage on surfaces and inside the bulk, as well as a look into the future.Chemists, physicists, materials scientists and engineers will find this a valuable source of interdisciplinary know

  6. A high power gain switched diode laser oscillator and amplifier for the CEBAF polarized electron injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poelker, M.; Hansknecht, J.

    1996-01-01

    The photocathode in the polarized electron source at Jefferson Lab is illuminated with pulsed laser light from a gain switched diode laser and diode optical amplifier. Laser pulse repetition rates up to 2,000 MHz, optical pulsewidths between 31 and 123 ps, and average power > 100 mW are demonstrated. The laser system is highly reliable and completely remotely controlled

  7. Laser applications for energy. Fifty years since advent of laser and next thirty years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakai, Sadao

    2011-01-01

    The utilization of light has been changed since the advent of lasers about fifty years ago. Now in the twenty first century, laser science is being applied in every industry as the fundamental technology. In the recent years, remarkable progresses have been made in the semiconductor lasers of high power and wide wavelength region. The amazing developments of ceramics laser materials like YAG and nonlinear optics materials of organic crystals have been achieved as well as the big progress in the fiber lasers. It is also to be pointed out that very high power ultra short laser pulses have become available. In the field of power photonics, which is based on the power semiconductor lasers, fiber lasers and new laser materials, various industrial applications are expected to be constructed further in civil engineering, manufacturing technology, agricultural and biological applications, medical utilization and space sciences. It is expected, by the development of ultra short pulse and ultra high mean power lasers, that particle accelerations, ultra high density sciences, nuclear fusion neutron sources and laser fusion power reactors are to be advanced drastically. Recent development and future prospects of high power lasers are illustrated. Lasers are now regarded as one of the key technologies in line with the national policy toward the creation of innovative industries. Realization of the laser fusion reactor is the most challenging target in the coming thirty years. (S. Funahashi)

  8. Development of a high power free-electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong Min; Lee, Byung Chul; Kim, Sun Kook; Jung, Yung Wook; Cho, Sung Oh [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-01-01

    A millimeter-wave free electron laser (FEL) driven by a recirculating electrostatic accelerator has been developed. The wavelength of the FEL is tunable in the range of 3 - 12 mm by tuning the energy of the electron beam. The output power is estimated to be 1 kW. The electrostatic accelerator is composed of high-current electron gun, acceleration tube, high-voltage generator, high-voltage terminal, deceleration tube, electron collator, and vacuum pumps. Two types of LaB{sub 6}-based thermionic electron guns (triode gun and diode gun) and their power supplies have been developed. The voltage of the guns is 30 kV and the output current is - 2 A. A beam-focusing planar undulator and a permanent-magnet helical undulator have been developed and 3D trajectories of electron beam in the undulators have been calculated to find optimal input condition of electron beam. 135 figs, 15 pix, 17 tabs, 98 refs. (Author).

  9. Development of a high power free-electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong Min; Lee, Byung Chul; Kim, Sun Kook; Jung, Yung Wook; Cho, Sung Oh

    1995-01-01

    A millimeter-wave free electron laser (FEL) driven by a recirculating electrostatic accelerator has been developed. The wavelength of the FEL is tunable in the range of 3 - 12 mm by tuning the energy of the electron beam. The output power is estimated to be 1 kW. The electrostatic accelerator is composed of high-current electron gun, acceleration tube, high-voltage generator, high-voltage terminal, deceleration tube, electron collator, and vacuum pumps. Two types of LaB 6 -based thermionic electron guns (triode gun and diode gun) and their power supplies have been developed. The voltage of the guns is 30 kV and the output current is - 2 A. A beam-focusing planar undulator and a permanent-magnet helical undulator have been developed and 3D trajectories of electron beam in the undulators have been calculated to find optimal input condition of electron beam. 135 figs, 15 pix, 17 tabs, 98 refs. (Author)

  10. Molecular electron recollision dynamics in intense circularly polarized laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandrauk, André D.; Yuan, Kai-Jun

    2018-04-01

    Extreme UV and x-ray table top light sources based on high-order harmonic generation (HHG) are focused now on circular polarization for the generation of circularly polarized attosecond pulses as new tools for controlling electron dynamics, such as charge transfer and migration and the generation of attosecond quantum electron currents for ultrafast magneto-optics. A fundamental electron dynamical process in HHG is laser induced electron recollision with the parent ion, well established theoretically and experimentally for linear polarization. We discuss molecular electron recollision dynamics in circular polarization by theoretical analysis and numerical simulation. The control of the polarization of HHG with circularly polarized ionizing pulses is examined and it is shown that bichromatic circularly polarized pulses enhance recollision dynamics, rendering HHG more efficient, especially in molecules because of their nonspherical symmetry. The polarization of the harmonics is found to be dependent on the compatibility of the rotational symmetry of the net electric field created by combinations of bichromatic circularly polarized pulses with the dynamical symmetry of molecules. We show how the field and molecule symmetry influences the electron recollision trajectories by a time-frequency analysis of harmonics. The results, in principle, offer new unique controllable tools in the study of attosecond molecular electron dynamics.

  11. Extremely short relativistic-electron-bunch generation in the laser wakefield via novel bunch injection scheme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khachatryan, A.G.; van Goor, F.A.; Boller, Klaus J.; Reitsma, A.J.W.; Jaroszynski, D.A.

    2004-01-01

    Recently a new electron-bunch injection scheme for the laser wakefield accelerator has been proposed [JETP Lett. 74, 371 (2001); Phys. Rev. E 65, 046504 (2002)]. In this scheme, a low energy electron bunch, sent in a plasma channel just before a high-intensity laser pulse, is trapped in the laser

  12. Laser surface treatment of grey cast iron for automotive applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ocelik, V.; Tang, P.N.; de Boer, M.C.; de Oliveira, U.; de Hosson, J.T.M.; DeHosson, JTM; Brebbia, CA; Nishida, SI

    2005-01-01

    The surface of pearlitic grey cast iron was treated using a 2 kW Nd:YAG laser beam with the final aim to improve its surface properties, mainly for automotive applications. Two kinds of laser surface treatments were experimentally applied. In the laser surface hardening approach the surface of cast

  13. A general theory of electronic parametric instability of relativistically intense laser light in plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parr, D.M.

    2000-04-01

    This thesis studies the propagation and stability of ultraintense laser light in plasma. A new method is devised, both general and inclusive yet requiring only modest computational effort. The exact anharmonic waveforms for laser light are established. An examination of their stability extends the theory of electron parametric instabilities to relativistic regimes in plasmas of any density including classically overdense plasma accessible by self-induced transparency. Such instabilities can rapidly degrade intense pulses, but can also be harnessed, for example in the self-resonant laser wakefield accelerator. Understanding both the new and established regimes is thus basic to the success of many applications arising in high-field science, including novel x-ray sources and ignition of laser fusion targets, as well as plasma-based accelerator schemes. A covariant formulation of a cold electron fluid plasma is Lorentz transformed to the laser group velocity frame; this is the essence of the method and produces a very simple final model. Then, first, the zero-order laser 'driver' model is developed, in this frame representing a spatially homogeneous environment and thus soluble numerically as ordinary differential equations. The linearised first-order system leads to a further set of differential equations, whose solution defines the growth and other characteristics of an instability. The method is exact, rugged and flexible, avoiding the many approximations and restrictions previously necessary. This approach unifies all theory on purely electronic parametric instabilities over the last 30 years and, for the first time in generality, extends it into the ultrahigh relativistic regime. Besides extensions to familiar parametric instabilities, such as Stimulated Raman Scattering and Two-Plasmon Decay, strong stimulated harmonic generation emerges across a wide range of harmonics with high growth rates, presenting a varied and complex physical entity

  14. Electron momentum spectroscopy of H2+ in the presence of laser radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulychev, A.A.; Kouzakov, K.A.

    2017-01-01

    Theoretical analysis of laser-assisted electron impact ionization of a hydrogen molecular ion H 2 + at high impact energy and large momentum transfer is carried out. The laser-field effects on the incoming and outgoing electrons are taken into account using the Volkov functions. The field-dressing of the target electron is treated with a quasistatic state approach. Calculations for laser radiation with frequency ω = 1.55 eV and intensity I = 5 * 10 11 W/cm 2 exhibit strong laser influence on the molecular bond oscillation in laser-assisted electron momentum distributions. (authors)

  15. Transmission electron microscopy of nanostructures synthesized by laser and charged particle beam interaction with materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dey, G. K.

    2011-01-01

    Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), because of its ability to image atomic arrangements directly and its ability to give spectroscopic information at similar resolution has emerged as a very powerful tool for understanding the structure of materials at atomic level. TEM has been particularly useful in resolving the interface structures in materials. This form of microscopy is very suitable for resolving the structure and defects in ultrafine microstructures such as those of the nanocrystalline phases. After a brief description of the different characterization abilities of the aberration corrected transmission electron microscope, this presentation describes the results of TEM investigations on nanocrystalline microstructures generated by laser materials interaction and due to interaction of electrons and ions with materials. Excimer laser has become an attractive choice for new and precision application for ablation and deposition in recent times. In this work, a KrF excimer laser having 30 ns pulse width and 600 mJ energy at source has been used to deposit zirconia on Zr-base alloy in order to explore the ability of the thin oxide film to act as a diffusion barrier to hydrogen ingress into the alloy. It has been found that the variation in pressure by an order of three has resulted in maximum influence on the roughness of the laser deposited oxide film that has not been possible to achieve by other parameters within the range of the instrument. Present study has also indicated an interrelation among the roughness, adherence and the film-thickness, where the last one is indicated by the XPS study. Transmission electron microscopy was carried out to study the size, size distribution and defects in the deposited film. Nanocrystalline phases generated by interaction of electron and ion irradiation of Zr based alloys; Ni based alloys and Fe based alloys have been examined in detail by conventional and high resolution transmission electron microscopy. Results of

  16. Electron density interferometry measurement in laser-matter interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popovics-Chenais, C.

    1981-05-01

    This work is concerned with the laser-interferometry measurement of the electronic density in the corona and the conduction zone external part. Particularly, it is aimed at showing up density gradients and at their space-time localization. The first chapter recalls the density profile influence on the absorption principal mechanisms and the laser energy transport. In chapter two, the numerical and analytical hydrodynamic models describing the density profile are analysed. The influence on the density profile of the ponderomotive force associated to high oscillating electric fields is studied, together with the limited thermal conduction and suprathermal electron population. The mechanism action, in our measurement conditions, is numerically simulated. Calculations are made with experimental parameters. The measurement interaction conditions, together with the diagnostic method by high resolution laser interferometry are detailed. The results are analysed with the help of numerical simulation which is the experiment modeling. An overview of the mechanisms shown up by interferometric measurements and their correlation with other diagnostics is the conclusion of this work [fr

  17. Femtosecond electron-bunch dynamics in laser wakefields and vacuum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Khachatryan

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in laser wakefield acceleration demonstrated the generation of extremely short (with a duration of a few femtoseconds relativistic electron bunches with relatively low (of the order of couple of percent energy spread. In this article we study the dynamics of such bunches in drift space (vacuum and in channel-guided laser wakefields. Analytical solutions were found for the transverse coordinate of an electron and for the bunch envelope in the wakefield in the case of arbitrary change in the energy. Our results show strong bunch dynamics already on a millimeter scale propagation distance both in plasma and in vacuum. When the bunch propagates in vacuum, its transverse sizes grow considerably; the same is observed for the normalized bunch emittance that worsens the focusability of the bunch. A scheme of two-stage laser wakefield accelerator with small drift space between the stages is proposed. It is found that fast longitudinal betatron phase mixing occurs in a femtosecond bunch when it propagates along the wakefield axis. When bunch propagates off axis, strong bunch decoherence and fast emittance degradation due to the finite bunch length was observed.

  18. Electron-atom collisions in a laser field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehlotzky, F.

    1998-01-01

    The present work is a report on recent progress made in our understanding of electron-atom collisions in a laser field. To some extent it is a continuation of a previous review covering a somewhat larger subject (Can. J. Phys. 63 (1985)). We shall discuss the present status of investigations in this field from the theoretical as well as experimental point of view but most of the report will be devoted to an analysis of the various approximation schemes used at present in this field to describe the different aspects of laser-assisted electron-atom interactions. As the table of contents shows, most of the work done so far is treating the atom as a spectator, described by a potential and only very little has been achieved over the years to include the atomic structure into consideration since the inclusion of these structure effects poses considerable computational problems. Since, for example, multiphoton ionization and its inverse process laser-assisted recombination may be considered as one half of a scattering process, it is quite natural that some of the theoretical techniques described here are also of interest for the treatment of other multiphoton processes not considered here since there are several other recent reviews available on these topics. (orig.)

  19. The electron beam dynamics simulation in the laser-electron storage ring involving compton and intrabeam scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gladkikh, P.I.; Telegin, Yu.N.; Karnaukhov, I.M.

    2002-01-01

    The feasibility of the development of intense X-ray sources based on Compton scattering in laser-electron storage rings is discussed. The results of the electron beam dynamics simulation involving Compton and intrabeam scattering are presented

  20. The electron beam dynamics simulation in the laser-electron storage ring involving compton and intrabeam scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Gladkikh, P I; Karnaukhov, I M

    2002-01-01

    The feasibility of the development of intense X-ray sources based on Compton scattering in laser-electron storage rings is discussed. The results of the electron beam dynamics simulation involving Compton and intrabeam scattering are presented.