WorldWideScience

Sample records for electrodes lateral tunneling

  1. Giant electrode effect on tunnelling electroresistance in ferroelectric tunnel junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soni, Rohit; Petraru, Adrian; Meuffels, Paul; Vavra, Ondrej; Ziegler, Martin; Kim, Seong Keun; Jeong, Doo Seok; Pertsev, Nikolay A; Kohlstedt, Hermann

    2014-11-17

    Among recently discovered ferroelectricity-related phenomena, the tunnelling electroresistance (TER) effect in ferroelectric tunnel junctions (FTJs) has been attracting rapidly increasing attention owing to the emerging possibilities of non-volatile memory, logic and neuromorphic computing applications of these quantum nanostructures. Despite recent advances in experimental and theoretical studies of FTJs, many questions concerning their electrical behaviour still remain open. In particular, the role of ferroelectric/electrode interfaces and the separation of the ferroelectric-driven TER effect from electrochemical ('redox'-based) resistance-switching effects have to be clarified. Here we report the results of a comprehensive study of epitaxial junctions comprising BaTiO(3) barrier, La(0.7)Sr(0.3)MnO(3) bottom electrode and Au or Cu top electrodes. Our results demonstrate a giant electrode effect on the TER of these asymmetric FTJs. The revealed phenomena are attributed to the microscopic interfacial effect of ferroelectric origin, which is supported by the observation of redox-based resistance switching at much higher voltages.

  2. Tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance in Co/AIOx/Al tunnel junctions with fcc Co (111) electrodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Kai; Tran, T. Lan Ahn; Brinks, Peter; Brinks, P.; Sanderink, Johannes G.M.; Bolhuis, Thijs; van der Wiel, Wilfred Gerard; de Jong, Machiel Pieter

    2013-01-01

    Tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance (TAMR) has been characterized in junctions comprised of face-centered cubic (fcc) Co (111) ferromagnetic electrodes grown epitaxially on sapphire substrates, amorphous AlOx tunnel barriers, and nonmagnetic Al counterelectrodes. Large TAMR ratios have been

  3. Tunneling magnetoresistance phenomenon utilizing graphene magnet electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, T.; Kamikawa, S.; Haruyama, J.; Soriano, D.; Pedersen, J. G.; Roche, S.

    2014-01-01

    Using magnetic rare-metals for spintronic devices is facing serious problems for the environmental contamination and the limited material-resource. In contrast, by fabricating ferromagnetic graphene nanopore arrays (FGNPAs) consisting of honeycomb-like array of hexagonal nanopores with hydrogen-terminated zigzag-type atomic structure edges, we reported observation of polarized electron spins spontaneously driven from the pore edge states, resulting in rare-metal-free flat-energy-band ferromagnetism. Here, we demonstrate observation of tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) behaviors on the junction of cobalt/SiO 2 /FGNPA electrode, serving as a prototype structure for future rare-metal free TMR devices using magnetic graphene electrodes. Gradual change in TMR ratios is observed across zero-magnetic field, arising from specified alignment between pore-edge- and cobalt-spins. The TMR ratios can be controlled by applying back-gate voltage and by modulating interpore distance. Annealing the SiO 2 /FGNPA junction also drastically enhances TMR ratios up to ∼100%

  4. Tunneling magnetoresistance phenomenon utilizing graphene magnet electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashimoto, T.; Kamikawa, S.; Haruyama, J., E-mail: J-haru@ee.aoyama.ac.jp [Faculty of Science and Engineering, Aoyama Gakuin University, 5-10-1 Fuchinobe, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5258 (Japan); Soriano, D. [Institut Català de Nanociència i Nanotecnologia (ICN2), Campus de la UAB, Edifici ICN2, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Pedersen, J. G. [Institut Català de Nanociència i Nanotecnologia (ICN2), Campus de la UAB, Edifici ICN2, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Department of Micro-and Nanotechnology, DTU Nanotech, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Roche, S. [Institut Català de Nanociència i Nanotecnologia (ICN2), Campus de la UAB, Edifici ICN2, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); ICREA - Institucio Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avancats, 08010 Barcelona (Spain)

    2014-11-03

    Using magnetic rare-metals for spintronic devices is facing serious problems for the environmental contamination and the limited material-resource. In contrast, by fabricating ferromagnetic graphene nanopore arrays (FGNPAs) consisting of honeycomb-like array of hexagonal nanopores with hydrogen-terminated zigzag-type atomic structure edges, we reported observation of polarized electron spins spontaneously driven from the pore edge states, resulting in rare-metal-free flat-energy-band ferromagnetism. Here, we demonstrate observation of tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) behaviors on the junction of cobalt/SiO{sub 2}/FGNPA electrode, serving as a prototype structure for future rare-metal free TMR devices using magnetic graphene electrodes. Gradual change in TMR ratios is observed across zero-magnetic field, arising from specified alignment between pore-edge- and cobalt-spins. The TMR ratios can be controlled by applying back-gate voltage and by modulating interpore distance. Annealing the SiO{sub 2}/FGNPA junction also drastically enhances TMR ratios up to ∼100%.

  5. Electron tunneling in nanoscale electrodes for battery applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Hidenori; Narayanan, Rajaram; Bandaru, Prabhakar R.

    2018-03-01

    It is shown that the electrical current that may be obtained from a nanoscale electrochemical system is sensitive to the dimensionality of the electrode and the density of states (DOS). Considering the DOS of lower dimensional systems, such as two-dimensional graphene, one-dimensional nanotubes, or zero-dimensional quantum dots, yields a distinct variation of the current-voltage characteristics. Such aspects go beyond conventional Arrhenius theory based kinetics which are often used in experimental interpretation. The obtained insights may be adapted to other devices, such as solid-state batteries. It is also indicated that electron transport in such devices may be considered through electron tunneling.

  6. Long Josephson tunnel junctions with doubly connected electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Monaco, R.; Mygind, J.; Koshelets, V. P.

    2012-01-01

    of such experiments, the number of magnetic flux quanta spontaneously trapped in a superconducting loop was measured by means of a long Josephson tunnel junction built on top of the loop itself. We have analyzed this system and found a number of interesting features not occurring in the conventional case with simply...... connected electrodes. In particular, the fluxoid quantization results in a frustration of the Josephson phase, which, in turn, reduces the junction critical current. Further, the possible stable states of the system are obtained by a self-consistent application of the principle of minimum energy...

  7. Spin-dependent tunneling transport in a lateral magnetic diode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yu; Shi, Ying

    2012-01-01

    Based on the gate-tunable two-dimensional electron gas, we have constructed laterally a double-barrier resonant tunneling structure by employing a peculiar triple-gate configuration, namely a ferromagnetic gate sandwiched closely by a pair of Schottky gates. Because of the in-plane stray field of ferromagnetic gate, the resulting bound spin state in well gives rise to the remarkable resonant spin polarization following the spin-dependent resonant tunneling regime. Importantly, by aligning the bound spin state through surface gate-voltage configuration, this resonant spin polarization can be externally manipulated, showing the desirable features for the spin-logic device applications. -- Highlights: ► A lateral spin-RTD was proposed by applying triple-gate modulated 2DEG. ► Spin-dependent resonant tunneling transport and large resonant spin polarization has been clarified from the systematic simulation. ► Both electric and/or magnetic strategies can be employed to modulate the system spin transport, providing the essential features for the spin-logic application.

  8. Optimized electrode configuration for current-in-plane characterization of magnetic tunnel junction stacks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cagliani, Alberto; Kjær, Daniel; Østerberg, Frederik Westergaard

    2017-01-01

    The current-in-plane tunneling technique (CIPT) has been a crucial tool in the development of magnetic tunnel junction stacks suitable for magnetic random access memories (MRAM) for more than a decade. The MRAM development has now reached the maturity to make the transition from the R&D phase...... of electrodes on a multi-electrode probe to reach up to 36% improvement on the repeatability for the resistance area product and the tunneling magnetoresistance measurement, without any hardware modification....

  9. Long Josephson tunnel junctions with doubly connected electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaco, R.; Mygind, J.; Koshelets, V. P.

    2012-03-01

    In order to mimic the phase changes in the primordial Big Bang, several cosmological solid-state experiments have been conceived, during the last decade, to investigate the spontaneous symmetry breaking in superconductors and superfluids cooled through their transition temperature. In one of such experiments, the number of magnetic flux quanta spontaneously trapped in a superconducting loop was measured by means of a long Josephson tunnel junction built on top of the loop itself. We have analyzed this system and found a number of interesting features not occurring in the conventional case with simply connected electrodes. In particular, the fluxoid quantization results in a frustration of the Josephson phase, which, in turn, reduces the junction critical current. Further, the possible stable states of the system are obtained by a self-consistent application of the principle of minimum energy. The theoretical findings are supported by measurements on a number of samples having different geometrical configuration. The experiments demonstrate that a very large signal-to-noise ratio can be achieved in the flux quanta detection.

  10. Tunnel Magnetoresistance Sensors with Magnetostrictive Electrodes: Strain Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavassolizadeh, Ali; Rott, Karsten; Meier, Tobias; Quandt, Eckhard; Hölscher, Hendrik; Reiss, Günter; Meyners, Dirk

    2016-11-11

    Magnetostrictive tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) sensors pose a bright perspective in micro- and nano-scale strain sensing technology. The behavior of TMR sensors under mechanical stress as well as their sensitivity to the applied stress depends on the magnetization configuration of magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJ)s with respect to the stress axis. Here, we propose a configuration resulting in an inverse effect on the tunnel resistance by tensile and compressive stresses. Numerical simulations, based on a modified Stoner-Wohlfarth (SW) model, are performed in order to understand the magnetization reversal of the sense layer and to find out the optimum bias magnetic field required for high strain sensitivity. At a bias field of -3.2 kA/m under a 0.2 × 10 - 3 strain, gauge factors of 2294 and -311 are calculated under tensile and compressive stresses, respectively. Modeling results are investigated experimentally on a round junction with a diameter of 30 ± 0.2 μ m using a four-point bending apparatus. The measured field and strain loops exhibit nearly the same trends as the calculated ones. Also, the gauge factors are in the same range. The junction exhibits gauge factors of 2150 ± 30 and -260 for tensile and compressive stresses, respectively, under a -3.2 kA/m bias magnetic field. The agreement of the experimental and modeling results approves the proposed configuration for high sensitivity and ability to detect both tensile and compressive stresses by a single TMR sensor.

  11. Band-to-band tunneling in Γ valley for Ge source lateral tunnel field effect transistor: Thickness scaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Prateek; Rastogi, Priyank; Yadav, Chandan; Agarwal, Amit; Chauhan, Yogesh Singh

    2017-07-01

    The direct and indirect valleys in Germanium (Ge) are separated by a very small offset, which opens up the prospect of direct tunneling in the Γ valley of an extended Ge source tunnel field effect transistor (TFET). We explore the impact of thickness scaling of extended Ge source lateral TFET on the band to band tunneling (BTBT) current. The Ge source is extended inside the gate by 2 nm to confine the tunneling in Ge only. We observe that as the thickness is scaled, the band alignment at the Si/Ge heterojunction changes significantly, which results in an increase in Ge to Si BTBT current. Based on density functional calculations, we first obtain the band structure parameters (bandgap, effective masses, etc.) for the Ge and Si slabs of varying thickness, and these are then used to obtain the thickness dependent Kane's BTBT tunneling parameters. We find that electrostatics improves as the thickness is reduced in the ultra-thin Ge film ( ≤ 10 nm). The ON current degrades as we scale down in thickness; however, the subthreshold slope ( S S AVG ) improves remarkably with thickness scaling due to subsurface BTBT. We predict that 8 nm thin devices offer the best option for optimized ON current and S S AVG .

  12. Tunnel Magnetoresistance Sensors with Magnetostrictive Electrodes: Strain Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Tavassolizadeh

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Magnetostrictive tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR sensors pose a bright perspective in micro- and nano-scale strain sensing technology. The behavior of TMR sensors under mechanical stress as well as their sensitivity to the applied stress depends on the magnetization configuration of magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs with respect to the stress axis. Here, we propose a configuration resulting in an inverse effect on the tunnel resistance by tensile and compressive stresses. Numerical simulations, based on a modified Stoner–Wohlfarth (SW model, are performed in order to understand the magnetization reversal of the sense layer and to find out the optimum bias magnetic field required for high strain sensitivity. At a bias field of −3.2 kA/m under a 0.2 × 10 - 3 strain, gauge factors of 2294 and −311 are calculated under tensile and compressive stresses, respectively. Modeling results are investigated experimentally on a round junction with a diameter of 30 ± 0.2 μ m using a four-point bending apparatus. The measured field and strain loops exhibit nearly the same trends as the calculated ones. Also, the gauge factors are in the same range. The junction exhibits gauge factors of 2150 ± 30 and −260 for tensile and compressive stresses, respectively, under a −3.2 kA/m bias magnetic field. The agreement of the experimental and modeling results approves the proposed configuration for high sensitivity and ability to detect both tensile and compressive stresses by a single TMR sensor.

  13. Gate tunneling current and quantum capacitance in metal-oxide-semiconductor devices with graphene gate electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Yanbin; Shekhawat, Aniruddh; Behnam, Ashkan; Pop, Eric; Ural, Ant

    2016-11-01

    Metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) devices with graphene as the metal gate electrode, silicon dioxide with thicknesses ranging from 5 to 20 nm as the dielectric, and p-type silicon as the semiconductor are fabricated and characterized. It is found that Fowler-Nordheim (F-N) tunneling dominates the gate tunneling current in these devices for oxide thicknesses of 10 nm and larger, whereas for devices with 5 nm oxide, direct tunneling starts to play a role in determining the total gate current. Furthermore, the temperature dependences of the F-N tunneling current for the 10 nm devices are characterized in the temperature range 77-300 K. The F-N coefficients and the effective tunneling barrier height are extracted as a function of temperature. It is found that the effective barrier height decreases with increasing temperature, which is in agreement with the results previously reported for conventional MOS devices with polysilicon or metal gate electrodes. In addition, high frequency capacitance-voltage measurements of these MOS devices are performed, which depict a local capacitance minimum under accumulation for thin oxides. By analyzing the data using numerical calculations based on the modified density of states of graphene in the presence of charged impurities, it is shown that this local minimum is due to the contribution of the quantum capacitance of graphene. Finally, the workfunction of the graphene gate electrode is extracted by determining the flat-band voltage as a function of oxide thickness. These results show that graphene is a promising candidate as the gate electrode in metal-oxide-semiconductor devices.

  14. Note: A quartz cell with Pt single crystal bead electrode for electrochemical scanning tunneling microscope measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Zhigang; Wang, Jihao; Hou, Yubin; Lu, Qingyou

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we provide and demonstrate a design of a unique cell with Pt single crystal bead electrode for electrochemical scanning tunneling microscope (ECSTM) measurements. The active metal Pt electrode can be protected from air contamination during the preparation process. The transparency of the cell allows the tip and bead to be aligned by direct observation. Based on this, a new and effective alignment method is introduced. The high-quality bead preparations through this new cell have been confirmed by the ECSTM images of Pt (111).

  15. Tunnelling conductive hybrid films of gold nanoparticles and cellulose and their applications as electrochemical electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Zhiming; Wang, Xuefeng; Wu, Wenjian; Li, Mei

    2015-01-01

    Conductive hybrid films of metal nanoparticles and polymers have practical applications in the fields of sensing, microelectronics and catalysis, etc. Herein, we present the electrochemical availability of tunnelling conductive hybrid films of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) and cellulose. The hybrid films were provided with stable tunnelling conductive properties with 12 nm GNPs of 12.7% (in weight). For the first time, the conductive hybrid films were used as substrates of electrochemical electrodes to load calmodulin (CaM) proteins for sensing of calcium cations. The electrodes of hybrid films with 20 nm GNPs of 46.7% (in weight) exhibited stable electrochemical properties, and showed significant responses to calcium cations with concentrations as low as 10 −9 M after being loaded with CaM proteins. (paper)

  16. Thermopower in double planar tunnel junctions with ferromagnetic barriers and nonmagnetic electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilczyński, M., E-mail: wilczyns@if.pw.edu.pl

    2017-01-01

    The Seebeck effect is investigated in double planar tunnel junctions consisting of nonmagnetic electrodes and the central layer separated by ferromagnetic barriers. Calculations are performed in the linear response theory using the free-electron model. The thermopower is analyzed as a function of the thickness of the central layer, temperature of the junctions and the relative orientation of magnetic moments of the barriers. It has been found that the thermopower can be significantly enhanced in the junction with special central layer thickness due to electron tunneling by resonant states. The thickness of the central layer for which the thermopower is enhanced depends not only on the temperature of the junction but also on the orientation of magnetic moments in the barriers. - Highlights: • Thermopower in the double planar junctions with magnetic barriers is analyzed. • Thermopower can be enhanced due to the resonant tunneling. • Thermopower depends on the magnetic configuration of the junction.

  17. Optimized electrode configuration for current-in-plane characterization of magnetic tunnel junction stacks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cagliani, A; Kjær, D; Østerberg, F W; Hansen, O; Petersen, D H; Nielsen, P F

    2017-01-01

    The current-in-plane tunneling technique (CIPT) has been a crucial tool in the development of magnetic tunnel junction stacks suitable for magnetic random access memories (MRAM) for more than a decade. The MRAM development has now reached the maturity to make the transition from the R and D phase to the pilot production phase. This will require an improvement in the repeatability of the CIPT metrology technique. Here, we present an analytical model that can be used to simulate numerically the repeatability of a CIPT measurement for an arbitrary MTJ stack prior to any CIPT measurement. The model describes mathematically the main sources of error arising when a micro multi-electrode probe is used to perform a CIPT measurement. The numerically simulated repeatability values obtained on four different MTJ stacks are verified by experimental data and the model is used to optimize the choice of electrodes on a multi-electrode probe to reach up to 36% improvement on the repeatability for the resistance area product and the tunneling magnetoresistance measurement, without any hardware modification. (paper)

  18. The effects of changing the electrodes temperature on the tunnel magnetoresistance in the ferromagnetic single electron transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, N.; Pourali, N.; Kavaz, E.

    2018-01-01

    Ferromagnetic single electron transistor with electrodes having different temperatures is investigated and the effects of changing electrodes temperature on TMR of system are studied. A modified orthodox theory is used to study the system and to calculate the electron tunneling transition rate. The results show that the temperature of electrodes can be an effective tool to control and tune the tunnel magnetoresistance of FM-SET. Also, the effects of parameters such as resistance ratio of junctions, magnetic polarization and spin relaxation time on the behaviour of the system are studied.

  19. Tunneling spectroscopy of a germanium quantum dot in single-hole transistors with self-aligned electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, G-L; Kuo, David M T; Lai, W-T; Li, P-W

    2007-01-01

    We have fabricated a Ge quantum dot (QD) (∼10 nm) single-hole transistor with self-aligned electrodes using thermal oxidation of a SiGe-on-insulator nanowire based on FinFET technology. This fabricated device exhibits clear Coulomb blockade oscillations with large peak-to-valley ratio (PVCR) of 250-750 and negative differential conductance with PVCR of ∼12 at room temperature. This reveals that the gate-induced tunneling barrier lowering is effectively suppressed due to the self-aligned electrode structure. The magnitude of tunneling current spectra also reveals the coupling strengths between the energy levels of the Ge QD and electrodes

  20. Quasiparticle lifetimes and tunneling times in a superconductor-insulator-superconductor tunnel junction with spatially inhomogeneous electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golubov, A.A.; Houwman, E.P.; Gijsbertsen, J.G.; Flokstra, J.; Rogalla, H.; le Grand, J.B.; de Korte, P.A.J.

    1994-01-01

    The low-energy quasiparticle scattering and recombination lifetimes for a proximity sandwich of two superconductors S and S' with different bulk energy gaps, are calculated as a function of the spatial coordinate and temperature. The spatial dependence of the order parameter and density of states are calculated on the basis of a microscopic model of the proximity effect, based on the Usadel equations, for dirty superconductors in thermal equilibrium. A zero boundary resistance between S and S' and a Boltzmann-like energy distribution of the excess quasiparticles are assumed. In the case of a small diffusion time constant an effective quasiparticle relaxation rate into and excitation rate out of the reduced gap region in the SS' sandwich are obtained as a function of (finite, but low) temperature and strength of the proximity effect, determined by the parameter γ m , by averaging over the energies and positions of the quasiparticles. In the same way effective tunneling times for electrons and holes tunneling out of the trap in the SS' sandwich to the other electrode of an SS'IS''S junction are determined as a function of temperature, voltage, and γ m

  1. Novel high-voltage power lateral MOSFET with adaptive buried electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Wen-Tong; Wu Li-Juan; Qiao Ming; Luo Xiao-Rong; Zhang Bo; Li Zhao-Ji

    2012-01-01

    A new high-voltage and low-specific on-resistance (R on,sp ) adaptive buried electrode (ABE) silicon-on-insulator (SOI) power lateral MOSFET and its analytical model of the electric fields are proposed. The MOSFET features are that the electrodes are in the buried oxide (BOX) layer, the negative drain voltage V d is divided into many partial voltages and the output to the electrodes is in the buried oxide layer and the potentials on the electrodes change linearly from the drain to the source. Because the interface silicon layer potentials are lower than the neighboring electrode potentials, the electronic potential wells are formed above the electrode regions, and the hole potential wells are formed in the spacing of two neighbouring electrode regions. The interface hole concentration is much higher than the electron concentration through designing the buried layer electrode potentials. Based on the interface charge enhanced dielectric layer field theory, the electric field strength in the buried layer is enhanced. The vertical electric field E I and the breakdown voltage (BV) of ABE SOI are 545 V/μm and −587 V in the 50 μm long drift region and the 1 μm thick dielectric layer, and a low R on,sp is obtained. Furthermore, the structure also alleviates the self-heating effect (SHE). The analytical model matches the simulation results. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  2. Monolithic and Flexible ZnS/SnO2 Ultraviolet Photodetectors with Lateral Graphene Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cheng; Xie, Yunchao; Deng, Heng; Tumlin, Travis; Zhang, Chi; Su, Jheng-Wun; Yu, Ping; Lin, Jian

    2017-05-01

    A continuing trend of miniaturized and flexible electronics/optoelectronic calls for novel device architectures made by compatible fabrication techniques. However, traditional layer-to-layer structures cannot satisfy such a need. Herein, a novel monolithic optoelectronic device fabricated by a mask-free laser direct writing method is demonstrated in which in situ laser induced graphene-like materials are employed as lateral electrodes for flexible ZnS/SnO 2 ultraviolet photodetectors. Specifically, a ZnS/SnO 2 thin film comprised of heterogeneous ZnS/SnO 2 nanoparticles is first coated on polyimide (PI) sheets by a solution process. Then, CO 2 laser irradiation ablates designed areas of the ZnS/SnO 2 thin film and converts the underneath PI into highly conductive graphene as the lateral electrodes for the monolithic photodetectors. This in situ growth method provides good interfaces between the graphene electrodes and the semiconducting ZnS/SnO 2 resulting in high optoelectronic performance. The lateral electrode structure reduces total thickness of the devices, thus minimizing the strain and improving flexibility of the photodetectors. The demonstrated lithography-free monolithic fabrication is a simple and cost-effective method, showing a great potential for developement into roll-to-roll manufacturing of flexible electronics. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Analytical expression for the tunnel current through the redox-mediated tunneling contact in the case of the adiabatic electron transfer at one of the working electrodes and any possible type of the electron transfer at the other electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medvedev, Igor G

    2017-11-21

    We study the tunnel current through a one-level redox molecule immersed into the electrolyte solution for the case when the coupling of the molecule to one of the working electrodes is strong while it is arbitrary to the other electrode. Using the Feynman-Vernon influence functional theory and the perturbation expansion of the effective action of the classical oscillator coupled both to the valence level of the redox molecule and to the thermal bath representing the classical fluctuations of the polarization of the solvent, we obtain, following the canonical way, the Langevin equation for the oscillator. It is found that for the aqueous electrolyte solution, the damping and the stochastic forces which arise due to the tunnel current are much smaller than those due to the thermal bath and therefore can be neglected. We estimate the higher-order corrections to the effective action and show that the Langevin dynamics takes place in this case for arbitrary parameters of the tunneling junction under the condition of the strong coupling of the redox molecule to one of the working electrodes. Then the steady-state coordinate distribution function of the oscillator resulting from the corresponding Fokker-Planck equation is the Boltzmann distribution function which is determined by the adiabatic free energy surface arising from the mean current-induced force. It enables us to obtain the expression for the tunnel current in the case when the coupling of the redox molecule to one of the working electrodes is strong while it is arbitrary to the other electrode.

  4. Comparison of two Methods of Lateral Osteotomies withwithout Subperiosteal Tunnel creation on Edema and Ecchymosis after Rhinoplasty.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MR As’habyamin

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Postoperative periorbital edema and ecchymosis is one of the main complication of rhinoplasty. This complication is mostly due to lateral osteotomy. During performing the endonasal lateral osteotomy, with the goal of reducing injury to surrounding tissues and reducing the postoperative edema and ecchymosis. The aim of this study goal was to determine whether creating a subperiosteal tunnel before lateral osteotomy had an effect on postoperative periorbital edema and ecchymosis. Methods: 102 patients were included in the study. They were underwent rhinoplasty. In each patients lateral osteotomies were carried out bilaterally, after creating a subperiosteal tunnel with periosteum elevator on a randomly chosen side and without creating a subperiosteal tunnel on the other side. The rest of the procedure was similar bilaterally. The patients were examined on the 2nd and 7th days after surgery. The levels of edema and periorbital ecchymosis were score by a different surgery who was unaware of the side with the periosteal tunnel, and the results were compared together. Results: According to the data analysis, there was no statistically significant difference between the severity of periorbital edema at the side with subperiosteal tunnel and the side without it on the 2nd and 7th days after surgery (P value=0/096 and Pvalue=0/252, respectively. There was not found any statistical significant between periorbital ecchymosis at the side with subperiosteal tunnel and the side without it on the 2nd and 7th days after surgery (P value=0/783 and Pvalue=0/094, respectively. Conclusions: Creating a subperiostal tunnel before lateral osteotomy in rhinoplasty does not influence on the severity of postoperative edema and ecchymosis.

  5. Peak stresses shift from femoral tunnel aperture to tibial tunnel aperture in lateral tibial tunnel ACL reconstructions: a 3D graft-bending angle measurement and finite-element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Der Bracht, Hans; Tampere, Thomas; Beekman, Pieter; Schepens, Alexander; Devriendt, Wouter; Verdonk, Peter; Victor, Jan

    2018-02-01

    To investigate the effect of tibial tunnel orientation on graft-bending angle and stress distribution in the ACL graft. Eight cadaveric knees were scanned in extension, 45°, 90°, and full flexion. 3D reconstructions with anatomically placed anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) grafts were constructed with Mimics 14.12 ® . 3D graft-bending angles were measured for classic medial tibial tunnels (MTT) and lateral tibial tunnels (LTT) with different drill-guide angles (DGA) (45°, 55°, 65°, and 75°). A pivot shift was performed on 1 knee in a finite-element analysis. The peak stresses in the graft were calculated for eight different tibial tunnel orientations. In a classic anatomical ACL repair, the largest graft-bending angle and peak stresses are seen at the femoral tunnel aperture. The use of a different DGA at the tibial side does not change the graft-bending angle at the femoral side or magnitude of peak stresses significantly. When using LTT, the largest graft-bending angles and peak stresses are seen at the tibial tunnel aperture. In a classic anatomical ACL repair, peak stresses in the ACL graft are found at the femoral tunnel aperture. When an LTT is used, peak stresses are similar compared to classic ACL repairs, but the location of the peak stress will shift from the femoral tunnel aperture towards the tibial tunnel aperture. the risk of graft rupture is similar for both MTTs and LTTs, but the location of graft rupture changes from the femoral tunnel aperture towards the tibial tunnel aperture, respectively. I.

  6. Atomic-Monolayer Two-Dimensional Lateral Quasi-Heterojunction Bipolar Transistors with Resonant Tunneling Phenomenon

    KAUST Repository

    Lin, Che-Yu; Zhu, Xiaodan; Tsai, Shin-Hung; Tsai, Shiao-Po; Lei, Sidong; Li, Ming-Yang; Shi, Yumeng; Li, Lain-Jong; Huang, Shyh-Jer; Wu, Wen-Fa; Yeh, Wen-Kuan; Su, Yan-Kuin; Wang, Kang L.; Lan, Yann-Wen

    2017-01-01

    High-frequency operation with ultra-thin, lightweight and extremely flexible semiconducting electronics are highly desirable for the development of mobile devices, wearable electronic systems and defense technologies. In this work, the first experimental observation of quasi-heterojunction bipolar transistors utilizing a monolayer of the lateral WSe2-MoS2 junctions as the conducting p-n channel is demonstrated. Both lateral n-p-n and p-n-p heterojunction bipolar transistors are fabricated to exhibit the output characteristics and current gain. A maximum common-emitter current gain of around 3 is obtained in our prototype two-dimensional quasi-heterojunction bipolar transistors. Interestingly, we also observe the negative differential resistance in the electrical characteristics. A potential mechanism is that the negative differential resistance is induced by resonant tunneling phenomenon due to the formation of quantum well under applying high bias voltages. Our results open the door to two-dimensional materials for high-frequency, high-speed, high-density and flexible electronics.

  7. Atomic-Monolayer Two-Dimensional Lateral Quasi-Heterojunction Bipolar Transistors with Resonant Tunneling Phenomenon

    KAUST Repository

    Lin, Che-Yu

    2017-10-04

    High-frequency operation with ultra-thin, lightweight and extremely flexible semiconducting electronics are highly desirable for the development of mobile devices, wearable electronic systems and defense technologies. In this work, the first experimental observation of quasi-heterojunction bipolar transistors utilizing a monolayer of the lateral WSe2-MoS2 junctions as the conducting p-n channel is demonstrated. Both lateral n-p-n and p-n-p heterojunction bipolar transistors are fabricated to exhibit the output characteristics and current gain. A maximum common-emitter current gain of around 3 is obtained in our prototype two-dimensional quasi-heterojunction bipolar transistors. Interestingly, we also observe the negative differential resistance in the electrical characteristics. A potential mechanism is that the negative differential resistance is induced by resonant tunneling phenomenon due to the formation of quantum well under applying high bias voltages. Our results open the door to two-dimensional materials for high-frequency, high-speed, high-density and flexible electronics.

  8. Atomic-Monolayer Two-Dimensional Lateral Quasi-Heterojunction Bipolar Transistors with Resonant Tunneling Phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Che-Yu; Zhu, Xiaodan; Tsai, Shin-Hung; Tsai, Shiao-Po; Lei, Sidong; Shi, Yumeng; Li, Lain-Jong; Huang, Shyh-Jer; Wu, Wen-Fa; Yeh, Wen-Kuan; Su, Yan-Kuin; Wang, Kang L; Lan, Yann-Wen

    2017-11-28

    High-frequency operation with ultrathin, lightweight, and extremely flexible semiconducting electronics is highly desirable for the development of mobile devices, wearable electronic systems, and defense technologies. In this work, the experimental observation of quasi-heterojunction bipolar transistors utilizing a monolayer of the lateral WSe 2 -MoS 2 junctions as the conducting p-n channel is demonstrated. Both lateral n-p-n and p-n-p heterojunction bipolar transistors are fabricated to exhibit the output characteristics and current gain. A maximum common-emitter current gain of around 3 is obtained in our prototype two-dimensional quasi-heterojunction bipolar transistors. Interestingly, we also observe the negative differential resistance in the electrical characteristics. A potential mechanism is that the negative differential resistance is induced by resonant tunneling phenomenon due to the formation of quantum well under applying high bias voltages. Our results open the door to two-dimensional materials for high-frequency, high-speed, high-density, and flexible electronics.

  9. Controlled structures in laterally patterned barrier discharges by illumination of the semiconductor electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wild, R; Schumann, T; Stollenwerk, L

    2014-01-01

    In this contribution, we present a possibility to actively control emerging patterns in laterally extended barrier discharges. One of the barriers is a high-ohmic semiconductive GaAs electrode. As the electrode is illuminated from its plasma-far side, the voltage inside the plasma gap is increased. If the gap voltage becomes higher than the ignition voltage of the gas, a discharge is started. A corresponding electrical model is given. The lateral resolution of control for a laterally homogeneous discharge is investigated. It is found that the luminescence of the discharge is controlled by both a variation of illumination power density and a variation of the applied voltage. However, during an increase in the applied voltage, the discharge may become larger than the area of illumination. Further, an investigation of the patterned discharge control shows that the number of current spots depends on the illumination power density and the area of illumination. The behaviour of current spot appearance suggests an inhibitory influence, preventing a discharge in its immediate surrounding and limiting the total number of current spots. (paper)

  10. All-Epiphyseal Anterior Cruciate Ligament Femoral Tunnel Drilling: Avoiding Injury to the Physis, Lateral Collateral Ligament, Anterolateral Ligament, and Popliteus-A 3-Dimensional Computed Tomography Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, Kevin G; Cannamela, Peter C; Fabricant, Peter D; Terhune, Elizabeth B; Polousky, John D; Milewski, Matthew D; Anderson, Allen F; Ganley, Theodore J

    2018-01-25

    To investigate the relation of the at-risk structures (distal femoral physis, lateral collateral ligament, anterolateral ligament, popliteus, and articular cartilage) during all-epiphyseal femoral tunnel drilling. A second purpose was 2-fold: (1) to develop recommendations for tunnel placement and orientation that anatomically reconstruct the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) while minimizing the risk of injury to these at-risk structures, and (2) to allow for maximal tunnel length to increase the amount of graft in the socket to facilitate healing. Three-dimensional models of 6 skeletally immature knees (aged 7-11 years) were reconstructed from computed tomography and used to simulate all-epiphyseal femoral tunnels. Tunnels began within the ACL footprint and were directed laterally or anterolaterally, with the goal of avoiding injury to at-risk structures. The spatial relation between the ideal tunnel and these structures was evaluated. Full-length tunnels and partial length condyle sockets were simulated in the models using the same trajectories. An anterolateral tunnel could be placed to avoid direct injury to lateral structures. The safe zone on the anterolateral aspect of the femur was larger than that of a tunnel with a direct lateral trajectory (median 127 mm 2 vs 83 mm 2 , P = .028). Anterolateral tunnels were longer than direct lateral tunnels (median 30 mm vs 24 mm, P = .041). Safe angles for anterolateral tunnels were 34° to 40° from the posterior condylar axis; direct lateral tunnels were drilled 4° to 9° from the posterior condylar axis. Sockets could be placed without direct injury to structures at risk with either orientation. An all-epiphyseal ACL femoral tunnel can be placed without causing direct injury to at-risk structures. A tunnel angled anterolaterally from the ACL origin is longer and has a larger safe zone compared with the direct lateral tunnel. The largest safe zone for femoral all-epiphyseal ACL drilling was (1) anterior to

  11. Spin injection and magnetoresistance in MoS2-based tunnel junctions using Fe3Si Heusler alloy electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotjanapittayakul, Worasak; Pijitrojana, Wanchai; Archer, Thomas; Sanvito, Stefano; Prasongkit, Jariyanee

    2018-03-19

    Recently magnetic tunnel junctions using two-dimensional MoS 2 as nonmagnetic spacer have been fabricated, although their magnetoresistance has been reported to be quite low. This may be attributed to the use of permalloy electrodes, injecting current with a relatively small spin polarization. Here we evaluate the performance of MoS 2 -based tunnel junctions using Fe 3 Si Heusler alloy electrodes. Density functional theory and the non-equilibrium Green's function method are used to investigate the spin injection efficiency (SIE) and the magnetoresistance (MR) ratio as a function of the MoS 2 thickness. We find a maximum MR of ~300% with a SIE of about 80% for spacers comprising between 3 and 5 MoS 2 monolayers. Most importantly, both the SIE and the MR remain robust at finite bias, namely MR > 100% and SIE > 50% at 0.7 V. Our proposed materials stack thus demonstrates the possibility of developing a new generation of performing magnetic tunnel junctions with layered two-dimensional compounds as spacers.

  12. Strength of suture anchor versus transosseous tunnel in anatomic reconstruction of the ankle lateral ligaments: a biomechanical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong-Yun; Hua, Ying-Hui; Wu, Zi-Ying; Chen, Bo; Chen, Shi-Yi

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the biomechanical characteristics of fixation with 2-suture anchors versus transosseous tunnel fixation in anatomic reconstruction of the ankle lateral ligaments. Six matched pairs of human cadaveric ankles underwent anatomic lateral ankle reconstruction, and fixation of the graft on the talus was achieved with 2 suture anchors or a transosseous tunnel. Ankles for the transosseous tunnel group were chosen at random, with the paired contralateral ankles used for the 2-suture anchor group. Half of the peroneus brevis tendon was harvested as a graft. For each technique, one end of the tendon was secured to the original insertion point of the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL) at the talus, whereas the other end was armed with 2 No. 5 nonabsorbable sutures (Ethicon, Somerville, NJ) and passed through the bone tunnel in the fibula. Biomechanical testing was performed by applying the force in line with the graft. Load to failure was determined at a displacement rate of 50 mm/min. The load-displacement curve, maximum load at failure (N), and stiffness (N/mm) were recorded and compared between the 2 techniques. There was no difference between constructs in the 2-suture anchor group and the transosseous tunnel group in terms of the ultimate load and stiffness (161.8 ± 47.6 N v 171.9 ± 76.0 N; P = .92; 4.59 ± 1.85 N/mm v 5.77 ± 1.98 N/mm; P = .35). Most constructs failed because of anchor pullout in the 2-suture anchor group (5 of 6) and fracture of the bony bridge in the transosseous tunnel group (6 of 6). The strength of fixation with suture anchors in anatomic reconstruction of the ankle lateral ligaments was equivalent to transosseous tunnel fixation as determined with biomechanical testing. However, this study did not prove that one is advantageous over the other. Both techniques showed excellent biomechanical results. Therefore, the 2-suture anchor fixation approach can be safely used in anatomic reconstruction of the

  13. The relationship of lateral anatomic structures to exiting guide pins during femoral tunnel preparation utilizing an accessory medial portal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrow, Lutul D; Parker, Richard D

    2010-06-01

    Anatomic reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament through an accessory medial portal has become increasingly popular. The purpose of this study is to describe the relationship of guide pin exit points to the lateral anatomic structures when preparing the anterior cruciate ligament femoral tunnel through an accessory medial portal. We utilized seven fresh frozen cadaveric knees. Utilizing an anteromedial approach, a guide wire was placed into the center of each bundle's footprint. Each guide wire was advanced through the lateral femoral cortex. The guide pins were passed at 90, 110, and 130 degrees of knee flexion. The distances from each guide pin to the closest relevant structures on the lateral side of the knee were measured. At 90 degrees the posterolateral bundle guide pin was closest to the lateral condyle articular cartilage (mean 5.4 +/- 2.2 mm) and gastrocnemius tendon (mean 5.7 +/- 2.1 mm). At 110 degrees the posterolateral bundle pin was closest to the gastrocnemius tendon (mean 4.5 +/- 3.4 mm). At 130 degrees the posterolateral bundle pin was closest to the gastrocnemius tendon (mean 7.2 +/- 5.5 mm) and lateral collateral ligament (mean 6.8 +/- 2.1 mm). At 90 degrees the anteromedial bundle guide pin was closest to the articular cartilage (mean 2.0 +/- 2.0 mm). At 110 degrees the anteromedial bundle pin was closest to the articular cartilage (mean 7.4 +/- 3.5 mm) and gastrocnemius tendon (mean 12.3 +/- 3.1 mm). At 130 degrees the AM bundle pin was closest to the gastrocnemius tendon (mean 8.2 +/- 3.2 mm) and LCL (mean 15.1 +/- 2.9 mm). Neither guide pin (anteromedial or posterolateral bundle) put the peroneal nerve at risk at any knee flexion angle. At low knee flexion angles the anteromedial and posterolateral bundle guide pins closely approximated multiple lateral structures when using an accessory medial arthroscopic portal. Utilizing higher flexion angles increases the margin of error when preparing both femoral tunnels. During preparation of

  14. Large tunnel magnetoresistance at room temperature with a Co2FeAl full-Heusler alloy electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamura, S.; Miyazaki, A.; Sugimoto, S.; Tezuka, N.; Inomata, K.

    2005-01-01

    Magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) with a Co 2 FeAl Heusler alloy electrode are fabricated by the deposition of the film using an ultrahigh vacuum sputtering system followed by photolithography and Ar ion etching. A tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) of 47% at room temperature (RT) are obtained in a stack of Co 2 FeAl/Al-O x /Co 75 Fe 25 magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) fabricated on a thermally oxidized Si substrate despite the A2 type atomic site disorder for Co 2 FeAl. There is no increase of TMR in MTJs with the B2 type Co 2 FeAl, which is prepared by the deposition on a heated substrate. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) depth profiles in Co 2 FeAl single layer films reveal that Al atoms in Co 2 FeAl are oxidized preferentially at the surfaces. On the other hand, at the interfaces in Co 2 FeAl/Al-O x /Co 75 Fe 25 MTJs, the ferromagnetic layers are hardly oxidized during plasma oxidation for a formation of Al oxide barriers

  15. Surface x-ray scattering and scanning tunneling microscopy studies at the Au(111) electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ocko, B.M.; Magnussen, O.M.; Wang, J.X.; Adzic, R.R.

    1993-01-01

    This chapter reviews Surface X-ray Scattering and Scanning Tunneling Microscopy results carried out at the Au(111) surface under electrochemical conditions. Results are presented for the reconstructed surface, and for bromide and thallium monolayers. These examples are used to illustrate the complementary nature of the techniques

  16. Large Magnetoresistance at Room Temperature in Organic Molecular Tunnel Junctions with Nonmagnetic Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zuoti; Shi, Sha; Liu, Feilong; Smith, Darryl L; Ruden, P Paul; Frisbie, C Daniel

    2016-09-27

    We report room-temperature resistance changes of up to 30% under weak magnetic fields (0.1 T) for molecular tunnel junctions composed of oligophenylene thiol molecules, 1-2 nm in length, sandwiched between gold contacts. The magnetoresistance (MR) is independent of field orientation and the length of the molecule; it appears to be an interface effect. Theoretical analysis suggests that the source of the MR is a two-carrier (two-hole) interaction at the interface, resulting in spin coupling between the tunneling hole and a localized hole at the Au/molecule contact. Such coupling leads to significantly different singlet and triplet transmission barriers at the interface. Even weak magnetic fields impede spin relaxation processes and thus modify the ratio of holes tunneling via the singlet state versus the triplet state, which leads to the large MR. Overall, the experiments and analysis suggest significant opportunities to explore large MR effects in molecular tunnel junctions based on widely available molecules.

  17. Theory of magnetoresistance of organic molecular tunnel junctions with nonmagnetic electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Sha; Xie, Zuoti; Liu, Feilong; Smith, Darryl L.; Frisbie, C. Daniel; Ruden, P. Paul

    2017-04-01

    Large room-temperature magnetoresistance observed for devices composed of self-assembled monolayers of different oligophenylene thiols sandwiched between gold contacts has recently been reported [Z. Xie, S. Shi, F. Liu, D. L. Smith, P. P. Ruden, and C. D. Frisbie, ACS Nano 10, 8571 (2016), 10.1021/acsnano.6b03853]. The transport mechanism through the organic molecules was determined to be nonresonant tunneling. To explain this kind of magnetoresistance, we develop an analytical model based on the interaction of the tunneling charge carrier with an unpaired charge carrier populating a contact-molecule interface state. The Coulomb interaction between carriers causes the transmission coefficients to depend on their relative spin orientation. Singlet and triplet pairing of the tunneling and the interface carriers thus correspond to separate conduction channels with different transmission probabilities. Spin relaxation enabling transitions between the different channels, and therefore tending to maximize the tunneling current for a given applied bias, can be suppressed by relatively small magnetic fields, leading to large magnetoresistance. Our model elucidates how the Coulomb interaction gives rise to transmission probabilities that depend on spin and how an applied magnetic field can inhibit transitions between different spin configurations.

  18. Bias induced transition from an ohmic to a non-ohmic interface in supramolecular tunneling junctions with Ga2O3/EGaIn top electrodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wimbush, K.S.; Fratila, R.M.; Wang, D.D.; Qi, D.C.; Liang, C.; Yuan, L.; Yakovlev, N.; Loh, K.P.; Reinhoudt, D.N.; Velders, A.H.; Nijhuis, C.A.

    2014-01-01

    This study describes that the current rectification ratio, R h equivalent to vertical bar J vertical bar(+2.0 V)/vertical bar J vertical bar(+2.0 V) for supramolecular tunneling junctions with a top-electrode of eutectic gallium indium (EGaIn) that contains a conductive thin (0.7 nm) supporting

  19. Impact of semiconducting electrodes on the electroresistance of ferroelectric tunnel junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asa, M.; Bertacco, R.

    2018-02-01

    Ferroelectric tunnel junctions are promising candidates for the realization of energy-efficient digital memories and analog memcomputing devices. In this work, we investigate the impact of a semiconducting layer in series to the junction on the sign of electroresistance. To this scope, we compare tunnel junctions fabricated out of Pt/BaTiO3/La1/3Sr2/3MnO3 (LSMO) and Pt/BaTiO3/Nb:SrTiO3 (Nb:STO) heterostructures, displaying an opposite sign of the electroresistance. By capacitance-voltage profiling, we observe a behavior typical of Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor tunnel devices in both cases but compatible with the opposite sign of charge carriers in the semiconducting layer. While Nb:STO displays the expected n-type semiconducting character, metallic LSMO develops an interfacial p-type semiconducting layer. The different types of carriers at the semiconducting interfaces and the modulation of the depleted region by the ferroelectric charge have a deep impact on electroresistance, possibly accounting for the different sign observed in the two systems.

  20. Electrical resistivity of monolayers and bilayers of alkanethiols in tunnel junction with gate electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    York, Roger L.; Nacionales, David; Slowinski, Krzysztof

    2005-01-01

    The tunneling resistances of monolayers and bilayers of n-alkanethiols in macroscopic Hg-Hg junctions with an electrochemical gate are reported. The resistances near zero bias calculated per 1 hydrocarbon chain vary from (5 ± 4) x 10 12 Ω for n-nonanethiol to (4 ± 2) x 10 16 Ω for n-octadecanethiol. These values indicate that monolayers of hydrocarbons in Hg-Hg junctions are substantially more resistive as compared to measurements employing microscopic tunnel junctions. The tunneling resistances of monolayer junctions are approximately 1 order of magnitude larger than those of bilayer junctions containing the same number of atoms indicating inefficient electronic coupling across the non-bonded -CH 3 |Hg interface. The symmetric current-voltage curves observed for the asymmetric junctions of Hg-S-(CH 2 ) n -CH 3 |Hg type suggest that these junctions do not behave as molecular diodes. Additional experimental evidence for the nature of the -CH 3 |Hg interface in the Hg-S-(CH 2 ) n -CH 3 |Hg junction is also presented

  1. Addressing the challenges of using ferromagnetic electrodes in the magnetic tunnel junction-based molecular spintronics devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyagi, Pawan; Friebe, Edward; Baker, Collin

    2015-01-01

    Addressing the challenges of using high-Curie temperature ferromagnetic (FM) electrodes is critical for molecular spintronics devices (MSDs) research. Two FM electrodes simultaneously chemically bonded with a thiol-functionalized molecule can produce novel MSDs to exploring new quantum mechanical phenomenon and computer technologies. For developing a commercially viable MSD, it is crucial to developing a device fabrication scheme that carefully considers FM electrodes’ susceptibility to oxidation, chemical etching, and stress-induced deformations during fabrication and usage. This paper studies NiFe, an alloy extensively used in present-day memory devices and high-temperature engineering applications, as a candidate FM electrode for the fabrication of MSDs. Our spectroscopic reflectance studies show that NiFe oxidized aggressively after heating beyond ∼90 °C. The NiFe surfaces, aged for several months or heated for several minutes below ∼90 °C, exhibited remarkable electrochemical activity and were found suitable for chemical bonding with the thiol-functionalized molecular device elements. NiFe also demonstrated excellent etching resistance against commonly used solvents and lithography related chemicals. Additionally, NiFe mitigated the adverse effects of mechanical stress by subsiding the stress-induced deformities. A magnetic tunnel junction-based MSD approach was designed by carefully considering the merits and limitations of NiFe. The device fabrication protocol considers the safe temperature limit to avoiding irreversible surface oxidation, the effect of mechanical stresses, surface roughness, and chemical etching. This paper provides foundational experimental insights in realizing a versatile MSD allowing a wide range of transport and magnetic studies

  2. Electrochemistry and in situ scanning tunnelling microscopy of pure and redox-marked DNA- and UNA-based oligonucleotides on Au(111)-electrode surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Allan Glargaard; Salvatore, Princia; Karlsen, K.

    2013-01-01

    the strongest and in accord with multiple site Ru-attachment. In situ STM disclosed molecular scale features in varying coverage on addition of the metal ions. The Ru-derivatives showed a bias voltage dependent broad maximum in the tunnelling current–overpotential correlation which could be correlated......We have studied adsorption and electrochemical electron transfer of several 13- and 15-base DNA and UNA (unlocked nucleic acids) oligonucleotides (ONs) linked to Au(111)-electrode surfaces via a 50-C6-SH group using cyclic voltammetry (CV) and scanning tunnelling microscopy in aqueous buffer under...

  3. Gap anisotropy and tunneling currents. [MPS3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lazarides, N.; Sørensen, Mads Peter

    1996-01-01

    The tunneling Hamiltonian formalism is applied to calculate the tunnelingcurrents through a small superconducting tunnel junction. The formalism isextended to nonconstant tunneling matrix elements. The electrodes of thejunction are assumed to......The tunneling Hamiltonian formalism is applied to calculate the tunnelingcurrents through a small superconducting tunnel junction. The formalism isextended to nonconstant tunneling matrix elements. The electrodes of thejunction are assumed to...

  4. Determination of corrosion rate of reinforcement with a modulated guard ring electrode; analysis of errors due to lateral current distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wojtas, H.

    2004-01-01

    The main source of errors in measuring the corrosion rate of rebars on site is a non-uniform current distribution between the small counter electrode (CE) on the concrete surface and the large rebar network. Guard ring electrodes (GEs) are used in an attempt to confine the excitation current within a defined area. In order to better understand the functioning of modulated guard ring electrode and to assess its effectiveness in eliminating errors due to lateral spread of current signal from the small CE, measurements of the polarisation resistance performed on a concrete beam have been numerically simulated. Effect of parameters such as rebar corrosion activity, concrete resistivity, concrete cover depth and size of the corroding area on errors in the estimation of polarisation resistance of a single rebar has been examined. The results indicate that modulated GE arrangement fails to confine the lateral spread of the CE current within a constant area. Using the constant diameter of confinement for the calculation of corrosion rate may lead to serious errors when test conditions change. When high corrosion activity of rebar and/or local corrosion occur, the use of the modulated GE confinement may lead to significant underestimation of the corrosion rate

  5. An electrocorticographic electrode array for simultaneous recording from medial, lateral, and intrasulcal surface of the cortex in macaque monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Makoto; Saunders, Richard C; Mullarkey, Matthew; Doyle, Alexandra M; Mishkin, Mortimer; Fujii, Naotaka

    2014-08-15

    Electrocorticography (ECoG) permits recording electrical field potentials with high spatiotemporal resolution over a large part of the cerebral cortex. Application of chronically implanted ECoG arrays in animal models provides an opportunity to investigate global spatiotemporal neural patterns and functional connectivity systematically under various experimental conditions. Although ECoG is conventionally used to cover the gyral cortical surface, recent studies have shown the feasibility of intrasulcal ECoG recordings in macaque monkeys. Here we developed a new ECoG array to record neural activity simultaneously from much of the medial and lateral cortical surface of a single hemisphere, together with the supratemporal plane (STP) of the lateral sulcus in macaque monkeys. The ECoG array consisted of 256 electrodes for bipolar recording at 128 sites. We successfully implanted the ECoG array in the left hemisphere of three rhesus monkeys. The electrodes in the auditory and visual cortex detected robust event related potentials to auditory and visual stimuli, respectively. Bipolar recording from adjacent electrode pairs effectively eliminated chewing artifacts evident in monopolar recording, demonstrating the advantage of using the ECoG array under conditions that generate significant movement artifacts. Compared with bipolar ECoG arrays previously developed for macaque monkeys, this array significantly expands the number of cortical target areas in gyral and intralsulcal cortex. This new ECoG array provides an opportunity to investigate global network interactions among gyral and intrasulcal cortical areas. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Observation of large low field magnetoresistance in ramp-edge tunneling junctions based on doped manganite ferromagnetic electrodes and a SrTiO{sub 3} insulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, C.; Jia, Q.X.; Fan, Y.; Hundley, M.F.; Reagor, D.W.; Hawley, M.E.; Peterson, D.E.

    1998-07-01

    The authors report the fabrication of ferromagnet-insulator-ferromagnet junction devices using a ramp-edge geometry based on (La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3})MnO{sub 3} ferromagnetic electrodes and a SrTiO{sub 3} insulator. The multilayer thin films were deposited using pulsed laser deposition and the devices were patterned using photolithography and ion milling. As expected from the spin-dependent tunneling, the junction magnetoresistance depends on the relative orientation of the magnetization in the electrodes. The maximum junction magnetoresistance (JMR) of 30% is observed below 300 Oe at low temperatures (T < 100 K).

  7. Lateral energy band profile modulation in tunnel field effect transistors based on gate structure engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Cui

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Choosing novel materials and structures is important for enhancing the on-state current in tunnel field-effect transistors (TFETs. In this paper, we reveal that the on-state performance of TFETs is mainly determined by the energy band profile of the channel. According to this interpretation, we present a new concept of energy band profile modulation (BPM achieved with gate structure engineering. It is believed that this approach can be used to suppress the ambipolar effect. Based on this method, a Si TFET device with a symmetrical tri-material-gate (TMG structure is proposed. Two-dimensional numerical simulations demonstrated that the special band profile in this device can boost on-state performance, and it also suppresses the off-state current induced by the ambipolar effect. These unique advantages are maintained over a wide range of gate lengths and supply voltages. The BPM concept can serve as a guideline for improving the performance of nanoscale TFET devices.

  8. Laterally configured resistive switching device based on transition-metal nano-gap electrode on Gd oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawakita, Masatoshi; Okabe, Kyota [Department of Physics, Kyushu University, 6-10-1 Hakozaki, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan); Kimura, Takashi [Department of Physics, Kyushu University, 6-10-1 Hakozaki, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan); Research Center for Quantum Nano-Spin Sciences, Kyushu University, 6-10-1 Hakozaki, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan)

    2016-01-11

    We have developed a fabrication process for a laterally configured resistive switching device based on a Gd oxide. A nano-gap electrode connected by a Gd oxide with the ideal interfaces has been created by adapting the electro-migration method in a metal/GdO{sub x} bilayer system. Bipolar set and reset operations have been clearly observed in the Pt/GdO{sub x} system similarly in the vertical device based on GdO{sub x}. Interestingly, we were able to observe a clear bipolar switching also in a ferromagnetic CoFeB nano-gap electrode with better stability compared to the Pt/GdO{sub x} device. The superior performance of the CoFeB/GdO{sub x} device implies the importance of the spin on the resistive switching.

  9. Voltammetry and In Situ Scanning Tunneling Microscopy of Cytochrome c Nitrite Reductase on Au(111)-Electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gwyer, James; Zhang, Jingdong; Butt, Julea

    2006-01-01

    of the density and orientational distribution of NrfA molecules are disclosed. The submonolayer coverage resolved by in situ STM is readily reconciled with the failure to detect nonturnover signals in cyclic voltammetry of the NrfA films. The molecular structures show a range of lateral dimensions...... a direct approach to correlate electrocatalytic and molecular properties of the protein layer, a long-standing issue in protein film voltammetry....

  10. [Pain in the trochanteric region caused by tunnel compression of the lateral cutaneous perforating branch of the ilio-hypogastric nerve. Indications for neurolysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touzard, R C; Maigne, J Y; Maigne, R; Doursounian, L

    1989-01-01

    After consideration of anatomical and clinical studies, the authors describe a new tunnel syndrome involving the lateral cutaneous branch of the iliohypogastric nerve as it emerges above the iliac crest. Irritation of the strangulated nerve produces pain over the lateral aspect of the hip. In 7 cases where local infiltration failed, neurolysis was carried out and produced excellent results in 5 patients, thus confirming the pathophysiology of this syndrome.

  11. Periodontal regenerative management of residual tunnel osseous defect results from the enucleation of lateral periodontal cyst in anterior maxilla: A rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjeev Kumar Salaria

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The lateral periodontal cyst (LPC is a nonkeratinized, noninflammatory developmental cyst occurring adjacent or lateral to tooth root. It is a relatively uncommon lesion found in the maxillary incisors and found mostly in adults during 5th to 7th decades. In this case, 45-year-old male patient reported with occasional mild discomfort between left maxillary central and lateral incisor region since 1 year. Interproximally, a well-defined round radiolucent area with corticated borders was determined radiographically between vital tooth #21 and #22. Preliminary diagnosis of LPC was established based on clinical and radiographical findings. Following enucleation of the lesion, an anticipated residual tunnel osseous defect was observed, which was managed successfully utilizing bone graft and guided tissue regeneration-assisted technique. Cystic tissue removed was examined histologically; hematoxylin- and eosin-stained sections showed features suggestive of LPC. Complete healing of tunnel defect was achieved at 1 year follow-up.

  12. Contactless Measurement of Magnetic Nanoparticles on Lateral Flow Strips Using Tunneling Magnetoresistance (TMR) Sensors in Differential Configuration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Huaming; Wang, Kan; Ji, Xiaojun; Cui, Daxiang

    2016-12-14

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are commonly used in biomedical detection due to their capability to bind with some specific antibodies. Quantification of biological entities could be realized by measuring the magnetic response of MNPs after the binding process. This paper presents a contactless scanning prototype based on tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) sensors for quantification of MNPs present in lateral flow strips (LFSs). The sensing unit of the prototype composes of two active TMR elements, which are parallel and closely arranged to form a differential sensing configuration in a perpendicular magnetic field. Geometrical parameters of the configuration are optimized according to theoretical analysis of the stray magnetic field produced by the test line (T-line) while strips being scanned. A brief description of our prototype and the sample preparation is presented. Experimental results show that the prototype exhibits the performance of high sensitivity and strong anti-interference ability. Meanwhile, the detection speed has been improved compared with existing similar techniques. The proposed prototype demonstrates a good sensitivity for detecting samples containing human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) at a concentration of 25 mIU/mL. The T-line produced by the sample with low concentration is almost beyond the visual limit and produces a maximum stray magnetic field some 0.247 mOe at the sensor in the x direction.

  13. Contactless Measurement of Magnetic Nanoparticles on Lateral Flow Strips Using Tunneling Magnetoresistance (TMR Sensors in Differential Configuration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huaming Lei

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs are commonly used in biomedical detection due to their capability to bind with some specific antibodies. Quantification of biological entities could be realized by measuring the magnetic response of MNPs after the binding process. This paper presents a contactless scanning prototype based on tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR sensors for quantification of MNPs present in lateral flow strips (LFSs. The sensing unit of the prototype composes of two active TMR elements, which are parallel and closely arranged to form a differential sensing configuration in a perpendicular magnetic field. Geometrical parameters of the configuration are optimized according to theoretical analysis of the stray magnetic field produced by the test line (T-line while strips being scanned. A brief description of our prototype and the sample preparation is presented. Experimental results show that the prototype exhibits the performance of high sensitivity and strong anti-interference ability. Meanwhile, the detection speed has been improved compared with existing similar techniques. The proposed prototype demonstrates a good sensitivity for detecting samples containing human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG at a concentration of 25 mIU/mL. The T-line produced by the sample with low concentration is almost beyond the visual limit and produces a maximum stray magnetic field some 0.247 mOe at the sensor in the x direction.

  14. Molecular assembly and electro polymerization of 3,4-ethylenedioxy thiophene on Au(100) single crystal electrode using in-situ electrochemical scanning tunneling microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, Jonyl L.; Tongol, Bernard John V.; ShuehLin Yau

    2012-01-01

    Electrochemical scanning tunneling microscopy (Ec-STM) is a powerful technique that can provide molecular-level information regarding electrode surface processes in-situ in electrolyte solvent under ambient conditions. In this study, the adsorption and electro polymerization of an industrially important conducting polymer precursor, 3,4-ethylenedioxy thiophene (EDOT), on Au (100) single crystal was probed using Ec-STM. The Au (100) single crystal electrode substrate used for this study was fabricated using the well-known Clavilier's flame melting procedure. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) was used along with Ec-STM to characterize the bare, EDOT-modified, and poly(EDOT)-modified Au (100) single crystal electrode. Time-dependent Ec-STM imaging at 0.550 V showed the formation of an EDOT self-assembled monolayer through 2-D surface dillusion. The resulting EDOT molecular assembly on Au (100) single crystal electrode was found to fit in a 4√2χ3√2 unit cell. Difference in apparent corrugation between molecular rows was attributed to different angular orientation with respect to the substrate. The electro polymerization of EDOT on Au (100) single crystal electrode was done by potentiostatic and potentiodynamic methods. Both methods suggested a solution-process mechanism for EDOT electro polymerization. (author)

  15. Design and analysis of compact ultra energy-efficient logic gates using laterally-actuated double-electrode NEMS

    KAUST Repository

    Dadgour, Hamed F.

    2010-01-01

    Nano-Electro-Mechanical Switches (NEMS) are among the most promising emerging devices due to their near-zero subthreshold-leakage currents. This paper reports device fabrication and modeling, as well as novel logic gate design using "laterally-actuated double-electrode NEMS" structures. The new device structure has several advantages over existing NEMS architectures such as being immune to impact bouncing and release vibrations (unlike a vertically-actuated NEMS) and offer higher flexibility to implement compact logic gates (unlike a single-electrode NEMS). A comprehensive analytical framework is developed to model different properties of these devices by solving the Euler-Bernoulli\\'s beam equation. The proposed model is validated using measurement data for the fabricated devices. It is shown that by ignoring the non-uniformity of the electrostatic force distribution, the existing models "underestimate" the actual value of Vpull-in and Vpull-out. Furthermore, novel energy efficient NEMS-based circuit topologies are introduced to implement compact inverter, NAND, NOR and XOR gates. For instance, the proposed XOR gate can be implemented by using only two NEMS devices compared to that of a static CMOS-based XOR gate that requires at least 10 transistors. © Copyright 2010 ACM.

  16. An international multicenter study comparing arrhythmia prevalence between the intracardiac lateral tunnel and the extracardiac conduit type of Fontan operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaji, Seshadri; Daga, Ankana; Bradley, David J; Etheridge, Susan P; Law, Ian H; Batra, Anjan S; Sanatani, Shubayan; Singh, Anoop K; Gajewski, Kelly K; Tsao, Sabrina; Singh, Harinder R; Tisma-Dupanovic, Svjetlana; Tateno, Shigeru; Takamuro, Motoki; Nakajima, Hiromichi; Roos-Hesselink, Jolien W; Shah, Maully

    2014-08-01

    The study objective was to determine whether the extracardiac conduit Fontan confers an arrhythmia advantage over the intracardiac lateral tunnel Fontan. This multicenter study of 1271 patients compared bradyarrhythmia (defined as need for pacing) and tachyarrhythmia (defined as needing antiarrhythmic therapy) between 602 patients undergoing the intracardiac Fontan and 669 patients undergoing the extracardiac Fontan. The median age at the time of the Fontan procedure was 2.1 years (interquartile range, 1.6-3.2 years) for the intracardiac group and 3.0 years (interquartile range, 2.4-3.9) for the extracardiac group (P 30 days) bradyarrhythmia occurred in 105 patients (18%) in the intracardiac group and 63 patients (9%) in the extracardiac group (P 30 days) tachyarrhythmia occurred in 58 patients (10%) in the intracardiac group and 23 patients (3%) in the extracardiac group (P factoring time since surgery, more patients in the extracardiac group had early bradycardia (odds ratio, 2.9; 95% confidence interval, 1.8-4.6), with no difference in early tachycardia, late bradycardia, or late tachycardia. Overall arrhythmia burden is similar between the 2 groups, but the extracardiac Fontan group had a higher incidence of early bradyarrhythmias. There was no difference in the incidence of late tachyarrhythmias over time between the 2 operations. Therefore, the type of Fontan performed should be based on factors other than an anticipated reduction in arrhythmia burden from the extracardiac conduit. Copyright © 2014 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Voltammetry and In Situ Scanning Tunnelling Microscopy of De Novo Designed Heme Protein Monolayers on Au(111)-Electrode Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrecht, Tim; Li, Wu; Haehnel, Wolfgang

    2006-01-01

    to the tunnelling current, apparently due to slow electron transfer kinetics. As a consequence, STM images of heme-containing and heme-free MOP-C did not reveal any notable differences in apparent height or physical extension. The apparent height of heme-containing MOP-C did not show any dependence on the substrate...... potential being varied around the redox potential of the protein. The mere presence of an accessible molecular energy level is not sufficient to result in detectable tunnelling current modulation. (c) 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.......In the present work, we report the electrochemical characterization and in situ scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) studies of monolayers of an artificial de novo designed heme protein MOP-C, covalently immobilized on modified Au(111) surfaces. The protein forms closely packed monolayers, which...

  18. Comparison of bone tunnel and suture anchor techniques in the modified Broström procedure for chronic lateral ankle instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chang-Yong; Lee, Keun-Bae; Song, Eun-Kyoo; Kim, Myung-Sun; Park, Kyung-Soon

    2013-08-01

    The modified Broström procedure is frequently used to treat chronic lateral ankle instability. There are 2 common methods of the modified Broström procedure, which are the bone tunnel and suture anchor techniques. To compare the clinical outcomes of the modified Broström procedure using the bone tunnel and suture anchor techniques. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 2. Eighty-one patients (81 ankles) treated with the modified Broström procedure for chronic lateral ankle instability constituted the study cohort. The 81 ankles were divided into 2 groups, namely, a bone tunnel technique (BT group; 40 ankles) and a suture anchor technique (SA group; 41 ankles). The Karlsson score, American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) ankle-hindfoot score, anterior talar translation, and talar tilt angle were used to evaluate clinical and radiographic outcomes. The BT group consisted of 32 men and 8 women with a mean age of 34.8 years at surgery and a mean follow-up duration of 34.2 months. The SA group consisted of 33 men and 8 women with a mean age of 33.3 years at surgery and a mean follow-up duration of 32.8 months. Mean Karlsson scores improved significantly from 57.0 points preoperatively to 94.9 points at final follow-up in the BT group and from 59.9 points preoperatively to 96.4 points at final follow-up in the SA group. Mean AOFAS scores also improved from 64.2 points preoperatively to 97.8 points at final follow-up in the BT group and from 70.3 points preoperatively to 97.4 points at final follow-up in the SA group. Mean anterior talar translations in the BT group and SA group improved from 9.0 mm and 9.2 mm preoperatively to 6.5 mm and 6.8 mm at final follow-up, respectively. Mean talar tilt angles were 12.0° in the BT group and 12.5° in the SA group preoperatively and 8.8° at final follow-up for both groups. No significant differences were found between the 2 groups in terms of the Karlsson score, AOFAS score, anterior talar translation, and talar tilt

  19. Electronic Transport in Single Molecule Junctions: Control of the Molecule-Electrode Coupling Through Intramolecular Tunneling Barriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danilov, Andrey; Kubatkin, Sergey; Kafanov, Sergey

    2008-01-01

    We report on single molecule electron transport measurements of two oligophenylenevinylene (OPV3) derivatives placed in a nanogap between gold (Au) or lead (Pb) electrodes in a field effect transistor device. Both derivatives contain thiol end groups that allow chemical binding to the electrodes....... One derivative has additional methylene groups separating the thiols from the delocalized -electron system. The insertion of methylene groups changes the open state conductance by 3-4 orders of magnitude and changes the transport mechanism from a coherent regime with finite zero-bias conductance...

  20. Bias induced transition from an ohmic to a non-ohmic interface in supramolecular tunneling junctions with Ga2O3/EGaIn top electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wimbush, Kim S; Fratila, Raluca M; Wang, Dandan; Qi, Dongchen; Liang, Cao; Yuan, Li; Yakovlev, Nikolai; Loh, Kian Ping; Reinhoudt, David N; Velders, Aldrik H; Nijhuis, Christian A

    2014-10-07

    This study describes that the current rectification ratio, R ≡ |J|(-2.0 V)/|J|(+2.0 V) for supramolecular tunneling junctions with a top-electrode of eutectic gallium indium (EGaIn) that contains a conductive thin (0.7 nm) supporting outer oxide layer (Ga2O3), increases by up to four orders of magnitude under an applied bias of >+1.0 V up to +2.5 V; these junctions did not change their electrical characteristics when biased in the voltage range of ±1.0 V. The increase in R is caused by the presence of water and ions in the supramolecular assemblies which react with the Ga2O3/EGaIn layer and increase the thickness of the Ga2O3 layer. This increase in the oxide thickness from 0.7 nm to ∼2.0 nm changed the nature of the monolayer-top-electrode contact from an ohmic to a non-ohmic contact. These results unambiguously expose the experimental conditions that allow for a safe bias window of ±1.0 V (the range of biases studies of charge transport using this technique are normally conducted) to investigate molecular effects in molecular electronic junctions with Ga2O3/EGaIn top-electrodes where electrochemical reactions are not significant. Our findings also show that the interpretation of data in studies involving applied biases of >1.0 V may be complicated by electrochemical side reactions which can be recognized by changes of the electrical characteristics as a function voltage cycling or in current retention experiments.

  1. Electrode Materials, Thermal Annealing Sequences, and Lateral/Vertical Phase Separation of Polymer Solar Cells from Multiscale Molecular Simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, Cheng-Kuang; Wodo, Olga; Ganapathysubramanian, Baskar; Pao, Chun-Wei

    2014-01-01

    . Simulations are performed for various configurations of electrode materials as well as processing temperature. The complex CG molecular data are characterized using a novel extension of our graph-based framework to quantify morphology and establish a link

  2. Electrode Materials, Thermal Annealing Sequences, and Lateral/Vertical Phase Separation of Polymer Solar Cells from Multiscale Molecular Simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, Cheng-Kuang

    2014-12-10

    © 2014 American Chemical Society. The nanomorphologies of the bulk heterojunction (BHJ) layer of polymer solar cells are extremely sensitive to the electrode materials and thermal annealing conditions. In this work, the correlations of electrode materials, thermal annealing sequences, and resultant BHJ nanomorphological details of P3HT:PCBM BHJ polymer solar cell are studied by a series of large-scale, coarse-grained (CG) molecular simulations of system comprised of PEDOT:PSS/P3HT:PCBM/Al layers. Simulations are performed for various configurations of electrode materials as well as processing temperature. The complex CG molecular data are characterized using a novel extension of our graph-based framework to quantify morphology and establish a link between morphology and processing conditions. Our analysis indicates that vertical phase segregation of P3HT:PCBM blend strongly depends on the electrode material and thermal annealing schedule. A thin P3HT-rich film is formed on the top, regardless of bottom electrode material, when the BHJ layer is exposed to the free surface during thermal annealing. In addition, preferential segregation of P3HT chains and PCBM molecules toward PEDOT:PSS and Al electrodes, respectively, is observed. Detailed morphology analysis indicated that, surprisingly, vertical phase segregation does not affect the connectivity of donor/acceptor domains with respective electrodes. However, the formation of P3HT/PCBM depletion zones next to the P3HT/PCBM-rich zones can be a potential bottleneck for electron/hole transport due to increase in transport pathway length. Analysis in terms of fraction of intra- and interchain charge transports revealed that processing schedule affects the average vertical orientation of polymer chains, which may be crucial for enhanced charge transport, nongeminate recombination, and charge collection. The present study establishes a more detailed link between processing and morphology by combining multiscale molecular

  3. Catalytic monolayer voltammetry and in situ scanning tunneling microscopy of copper nitrite reductase on cysteamine-modified Au(111) electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jingdong; Welinder, A.C.; Hansen, Allan Glargaard

    2003-01-01

    electrochemical scanning tunneling microscopy (in situ STM) directly in aqueous acetate buffer, pH 6.0 has been used. High-resolution in situ STM shows that cysteamine packs into ordered domains with strip features of a periodic distance of 11.7 +/- 0.3 Angstrom. No voltammetric signals of the nitrite substrate...... on this surface could be detected. A strong cathodic catalytic wave appears in the presence of nitrite. The catalytic current follows a Michaelis-Menten pattern with a Michaelis constant of K-m approximate to 44 muM, which is close to the value for AxCuNiR in homogeneous solution. The apparent catalytic rate...

  4. Use of a mid-scala and a lateral wall electrode in children: insertion depth and hearing preservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benghalem, Abdelhamid; Gazibegovic, Dzemal; Saadi, Fatima; Tazi-Chaoui, Zakia

    2017-01-01

    Atraumatic insertion of the HiFocus TM Mid-Scala (HFMS) electrode via the round window was successfully achieved in seven children. Residual hearing 6 months post-operatively was preserved to within 10 dB HL of the pre-operative audiogram at 500 Hz for six children, indicating minimal initial insertion trauma to the cochlea. The objectives were to document the clinical experience and evaluate differences between HFMS and HiFocus TM 1j (HF1j) by means of insertion depth and hearing preservation results. Nineteen children were prospectively recruited and consecutively implanted with the HF1j electrode (n = 12) or the HFMS electrode (n = 7) via the round window. Average median angular insertion depths and the amount of residual hearing preserved at 6 months post-operatively were compared between the two electrode groups. The median angular insertion depth for the HF1j was 439° and for the HFMS 435°. Preservation of residual hearing at 500 Hz was assessed in seven HFMS subjects and 11 HF1j subjects. Based on the Skarzynski formula, three out of seven subjects (42%) in the HFMS group had their residual hearing completely preserved at 500 Hz. In the control group, no subjects had complete hearing preservation and five subjects had a complete loss of residual hearing.

  5. Design and analysis of compact ultra energy-efficient logic gates using laterally-actuated double-electrode NEMS

    KAUST Repository

    Dadgour, Hamed F.; Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa; Smith, Casey Eben; Banerjee, Kaustav

    2010-01-01

    Nano-Electro-Mechanical Switches (NEMS) are among the most promising emerging devices due to their near-zero subthreshold-leakage currents. This paper reports device fabrication and modeling, as well as novel logic gate design using "laterally

  6. Lateral ordering of PTCDA on the clean and the oxygen pre-covered Cu(100) surface investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy and low energy electron diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gärtner, Stefan; Fiedler, Benjamin; Bauer, Oliver; Marele, Antonela; Sokolowski, Moritz M

    2014-01-01

    We have investigated the adsorption of perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic acid dianhydride (PTCDA) on the clean and on the oxygen pre-covered Cu(100) surface [referred to as (√2 × 2√2)R45° - 2O/Cu(100)] by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and low energy electron diffraction (LEED). Our results confirm the (4√2 × 5√2)R45° superstructure of PTCDA/Cu(100) reported by A. Schmidt et al. [J. Phys. Chem. 1995, 99,11770-11779]. However, contrary to Schmidt et al., we have no indication for a dissociation of the PTCDA upon adsorption, and we propose a detailed structure model with two intact PTCDA molecules within the unit cell. Domains of high lateral order are obtained, if the deposition is performed at 400 K. For deposition at room temperature, a significant density of nucleation defects is found pointing to a strong interaction of PTCDA with Cu(100). Quite differently, after preadsorption of oxygen and formation of the (√2 × 2√2)R45° - 2O/Cu(100) superstructure on Cu(100), PTCDA forms an incommensurate monolayer with a structure that corresponds well to that of PTCDA bulk lattice planes.

  7. Lateral ordering of PTCDA on the clean and the oxygen pre-covered Cu(100 surface investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy and low energy electron diffraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Gärtner

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated the adsorption of perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic acid dianhydride (PTCDA on the clean and on the oxygen pre-covered Cu(100 surface [referred to as (√2 × 2√2R45° – 2O/Cu(100] by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM and low energy electron diffraction (LEED. Our results confirm the (4√2 × 5√2R45° superstructure of PTCDA/Cu(100 reported by A. Schmidt et al. [J. Phys. Chem. 1995, 99,11770–11779]. However, contrary to Schmidt et al., we have no indication for a dissociation of the PTCDA upon adsorption, and we propose a detailed structure model with two intact PTCDA molecules within the unit cell. Domains of high lateral order are obtained, if the deposition is performed at 400 K. For deposition at room temperature, a significant density of nucleation defects is found pointing to a strong interaction of PTCDA with Cu(100. Quite differently, after preadsorption of oxygen and formation of the (√2 × 2√2R45° – 2O/Cu(100 superstructure on Cu(100, PTCDA forms an incommensurate monolayer with a structure that corresponds well to that of PTCDA bulk lattice planes.

  8. Uncooled tunneling infrared sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, Thomas W. (Inventor); Kaiser, William J. (Inventor); Podosek, Judith A. (Inventor); Vote, Erika C. (Inventor); Muller, Richard E. (Inventor); Maker, Paul D. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    An uncooled infrared tunneling sensor in which the only moving part is a diaphragm which is deflected into contact with a micromachined silicon tip electrode prepared by a novel lithographic process. Similarly prepared deflection electrodes employ electrostatic force to control the deflection of a silicon nitride, flat diaphragm membrane. The diaphragm exhibits a high resonant frequency which reduces the sensor's sensitivity to vibration. A high bandwidth feedback circuit controls the tunneling current by adjusting the deflection voltage to maintain a constant deflection of the membrane. The resulting infrared sensor can be miniaturized to pixel dimensions smaller than 100 .mu.m. An alternative embodiment is implemented using a corrugated membrane to permit large deflection without complicated clamping and high deflection voltages. The alternative embodiment also employs a pinhole aperture in a membrane to accommodate environmental temperature variation and a sealed chamber to eliminate environmental contamination of the tunneling electrodes and undesireable accoustic coupling to the sensor.

  9. A wind-tunnel investigation at high subsonic speeds of the lateral control characteristics of various plain spoiler configurations on a 3-percent-thick 60 degree delta wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, Harleth G

    1954-01-01

    Results are presented of wind-tunnel investigations at Mach numbers of 0.60 to 0.94 and angles of attack of -2 degrees to about 24 degrees to determine the lateral control characteristics of spoilers with various wing chord-wise and spanwise locations and spoiler spans and deflections on thin 60 degree delta wing of NACA 65a003 airfoil section parallel to free stream.

  10. Tunneling magnetoresistance in ferromagnetic planar hetero-nanojunctions

    KAUST Repository

    Useinov, Arthur

    2010-05-03

    We present a theoretical study of the tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) in nanojunctions between non-identical ferromagnetic metals in the framework of the quasiclassical approach. The lateral size of a dielectric oxide layer, which is considered as a tunneling barrier between the metallic electrodes, is comparable with the mean-free path of electrons. The dependence of the TMR on the bias voltage, physical parameters of the dielectric barrier, and spin polarization of the electrodes is studied. It is demonstrated that a simple enough theory can give high TMR magnitudes of several hundred percent at bias voltages below 0.5 V. A qualitative comparison with the available experimental data is given. © 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Multi-electrode laterally coupled distributed feedback InGaAsP/InP lasers: a prescription for longitudinal mode control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benhsaien, Abdessamad; Dridi, Kais; Zhang, Jessica; Hall, Trevor J.

    2013-10-01

    Photonic Integrated Circuits (PICs) enable photons as data carriers at a very high speed. PIC market opportunities call for reduced wafer dimensions, power consumption and cost as well as enhanced reliability. The PIC technology development must cater for the latter relentless traits. In particular, monolithic PICs are sought as they can integrate hundreds of components and functions onto a single chip. InGaAsP/InP laterally-coupled distributed feedback (LC-DFB) lasers stand as key enablers in the PIC technology thanks to the compelling advantages their embedded high-order surface-gratings have. The patterning of the spatial corrugation along the sidewalls of the LC-DFB ridge, has been established to make the epitaxial overgrowth unnecessary thereby reducing the cost and time of manufacturing, and ultimately increasing the yield. LC-DFBs boast a small footprint synonymous of enhanced monolithic integrate-ability. Nonetheless, LC-DFBs suffer from the adverse longitudinal spatial hole burning (LSHB) effects materialized by typically quite high threshold current levels. Indeed, the carrier density longitudinal gradient- responsible for modes contending for the available material gain in the cavity- may be alleviated somewhat by segmenting the LC-DFB electrode into two or three reasonably interspaced longitudinal sections. In this work we report on the realization and performance of various electrode partition configurations. At room temperature, the experimental characterization of many as-cleaved LC-DFB devices provides ample evidence of superior performance such as a narrow linewidth (less than 400 kHz), a wide wavelength tune-ability (over 4 nm) and a hop-free single mode emission (side mode suppression ratio (SMSR) exceeding 54dB).

  12. Supramolecular tunneling junctions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wimbush, K.S.

    2012-01-01

    In this study a variety of supramolecular tunneling junctions were created. The basis of these junctions was a self-assembled monolayer of heptathioether functionalized ß-cyclodextrin (ßCD) formed on an ultra-flat Au surface, i.e., the bottom electrode. This gave a well-defined hexagonally packed

  13. Supplementary Investigation in the Free-Spinning Tunnel of a 1/24-Scale Model of the Grumman F9F-6 Airplane Incorporating only Flaperons for Lateral Control, TED No. NACA DE 364

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinar, Walter J.; Lee, Henry A.

    1954-01-01

    A supplementary investigation was conducted in the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel on a 1/24-scale model of the Grumman F9F-6 airplane. The primary purpose of the investigation was to reevaluate the spin-recovery characteristics of the airplane in view of the fact that the ailerons had been eliminated from the flaperon-aileron lateral control system of the airplane. A spin-tunnel investigation on a model of the earlier version of the F9F-6 airplane had indicated that use of ailerons with the spin (stick right in a right spin) was essential to insure recovery. The results indicate that with.ailerons eliminated, it may be difficult to obtain an erect developed spin but if a fully developed spin is obtained on the airplane, recovery therefrom may be difficult or impossible. Flaperon deflection should have little effect on spins or recoveries.

  14. High-Speed Wind-Tunnel Investigation of the Lateral Stability Characteristics of a 0.10-Scale Model of the Grumman XF9F-2 Airplane, TED No. NACA DE 301

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polhamus, Edward C.; King, Thomas J., Jr.

    1949-01-01

    An investigation was made in the Langley high-speed 7- by 10-foot tunnel to determine the high-speed lateral and directional stability characteristics of a 0.10-scale model of the Grumman XF9F-2 airplane in the Mach number range from 0.40 to 0.85. The results indicate that static lateral and directional stability is present throughout the Mach number range investigated although in the Mach number range from 0.75 to 0.85 there is an appreciable decrease in rolling moment due to sideslip. Calculations of the dynamic stability indicate that according to current flying-quality requirements the damping of the lateral oscillation, although probably satisfactory for the sea-level condition, may not be satisfactory for the majority of the altitude conditions investigated

  15. The role of Mg interface layer in MgO magnetic tunnel junctions with CoFe and CoFeB electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyunsoo Yang

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The tunneling spin polarization (TSP is directly measured from reactively sputter deposited crystalline MgO tunnel barriers with various CoFe(B compositions using superconducting tunneling spectroscopy. We find that the Mg interface layer thickness dependence of TSP values for CoFeB/Mg/MgO junctions is substantially different from those for CoFe/Mg/MgO especially in the pre-annealed samples due to the formation of boron oxide at the CoFeB/MgO interface. Annealing depletes boron at the interface thus requiring a finite Mg interface layer to prevent CoFeOx formation at the CoFeB/MgO interface so that the TSP values can be optimized by controlling Mg thickness.

  16. Integrated tunneling sensor for nanoelectromechanical systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sadewasser, S.; Abadal, G.; Barniol, N.

    2006-01-01

    Transducers based on quantum mechanical tunneling provide an extremely sensitive sensor principle, especially for nanoelectromechanical systems. For proper operation a gap between the electrodes of below 1 nm is essential, requiring the use of structures with a mobile electrode. At such small...... distances, attractive van der Waals and capillary forces become sizable, possibly resulting in snap-in of the electrodes. The authors present a comprehensive analysis and evaluation of the interplay between the involved forces and identify requirements for the design of tunneling sensors. Based...... on this analysis, a tunneling sensor is fabricated by Si micromachining technology and its proper operation is demonstrated. (c) 2006 American Institute of Physics....

  17. Scanning Tunneling Spectroscope Use in Electrocatalysis Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knutsen, Turid

    2010-01-01

    The relationship between the electrocatalytic properties of an electrode and its ability to transfer electrons between the electrode and a metallic tip in a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) is investigated. The alkaline oxygen evolution reaction (OER) was used as a test reaction with four different metallic glasses, Ni78Si8B14, Ni70Mo20Si5B5, Ni58Co20Si10B12, and Ni25Co50Si15B10, as electrodes. The electrocatalytic properties of the electrodes were determined. The electrode surfaces were then investigated with an STM. A clear relationship between the catalytic activity of an electrode toward the OER and its tunneling characteristics was found. The use of a scanning tunneling spectroscope (STS) in electrocatalytic testing may increase the efficiency of the optimization of electrochemical processes.

  18. Scanning Tunneling Spectroscope Use in Electrocatalysis Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turid Knutsen

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between the electrocatalytic properties of an electrode and its ability to transfer electrons between the electrode and a metallic tip in a scanning tunneling microscope (STM is investigated. The alkaline oxygen evolution reaction (OER was used as a test reaction with four different metallic glasses, Ni78Si8B14, Ni70Mo20Si5B5, Ni58Co20Si10B12, and Ni25Co50Si15B10, as electrodes. The electrocatalytic properties of the electrodes were determined. The electrode surfaces were then investigated with an STM. A clear relationship between the catalytic activity of an electrode toward the OER and its tunneling characteristics was found. The use of a scanning tunneling spectroscope (STS in electrocatalytic testing may increase the efficiency of the optimization of electrochemical processes.

  19. Thermovoltages in vacuum tunneling investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Hoffmann, D. H.; Rettenberger, Armin; Grand, Jean Yves; Läuger, K.; Leiderer, Paul; Dransfeld, Klaus; Möller, Rolf

    1995-01-01

    By heating the tunneling tip of a scanning tunneling microscope the thermoelectric properties of a variable vacuum barrier have been investigated. The lateral variation of the observed thermovoltage will be discussed for polycrystalline gold, stepped surfaces of silver, as well as for copper islands on silver.

  20. Influence of quasiparticle multi-tunneling on the energy flow through the superconducting tunnel junction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samedov, V. V.; Tulinov, B. M.

    2011-01-01

    Superconducting tunnel junction (STJ) detector consists of two layers of superconducting material separated by thin insulating barrier. An incident particle produces in superconductor excess nonequilibrium quasiparticles. Each quasiparticle in superconductor should be considered as quantum superposition of electron-like and hole-like excitations. This duality nature of quasiparticle leads to the effect of multi-tunneling. Quasiparticle starts to tunnel back and forth through the insulating barrier. After tunneling from biased electrode quasiparticle loses its energy via phonon emission. Eventually, the energy that equals to the difference in quasiparticle energy between two electrodes is deposited in the signal electrode. Because of the process of multi-tunneling, one quasiparticle can deposit energy more than once. In this work, the theory of branching cascade processes was applied to the process of energy deposition caused by the quasiparticle multi-tunneling. The formulae for the mean value and variance of the energy transferred by one quasiparticle into heat were derived. (authors)

  1. Tunneling junction as an open system. Normal tunneling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, Y.

    1978-01-01

    The method of the tunneling Hamiltonian is reformulated in the case of normal tunneling by introducing two independent particle baths. Due to the baths, it becomes possible to realize a final stationary state where the electron numbers of the two electrodes in the tunneling system are maintained constant and where there exists a stationary current. The effect of the bath-system couplings on the current-voltage characteristics of the junction is discussed in relation to the usual expression of the current as a function of voltage. (Auth.)

  2. Tunneling works. Tunnel koji

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higo, M [Hazam Gumi, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1991-10-25

    A mountain tunneling method for rock-beds used to be applied mainly to construction works in the mountains under few restrictions by environmental problems. However, construction works near residential sreas have been increasing. There are such enviromental problems due to tunneling works as vibration, noise, lowering of ground-water level, and influences on other structures. This report mainly describes the measurement examples of vibration and noise accompanied with blasting and the effects of the measures to lessen such influences. When the tunneling works for the railroad was carried out on the natural ground mainly composed of basalt, vibration of the test blasting was measured at three stations with piezoelectric accelerometers. Then, ordinary blasting, mutistage blasting, and ABM blasting methods were used properly besed on the above results, and only a few complaints were made. In the different works, normal noise and low-frequency sound were mesured at 22 stations around the pit mouth. As countermeasures for noise, sound-proof sheets, walls, and single and double doors were installed and foundto be effective. 1 ref., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Magnetic tunnel junction device having an intermediate layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2001-01-01

    A magnetic tunnel junction device has a multi-layer structure including a pair of electrode layers of a ferromagnetic material and a tunnel barrier layer of an insulating material between the electrode layers. In order to realize a low resistance, the multi-layer structure also includes an

  4. MDCT evaluation of pulmonary embolism in children and young adults following a lateral tunnel Fontan procedure: optimizing contrast-enhancement techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prabhu, Sanjay P.; Mahmood, Soran; Sena, Laureen; Lee, Edward Y.

    2009-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a life-threatening thromboembolic complication in patients who have undergone a Fontan procedure for augmenting pulmonary blood flow in the setting of single-ventricle physiology. In patients following a Fontan procedure, lack of proper contrast agent mixing in the right atrium and sluggish, low-velocity blood flow within the Fontan circulation often results in suboptimal contrast enhancement within the pulmonary artery for evaluating PE. Unfortunately, there is a paucity of information describing the optimal contrast-enhancement technique with multidetector CT (MDCT) for evaluating PE in children and young adults following a Fontan procedure. We illustrate the MDCT imaging findings of suboptimal contrast enhancement within the pulmonary artery, which can be mistaken for PE, in patients following a lateral Fontan procedure, and we discuss MDCT techniques to optimize contrast enhancement within the pulmonary artery in these patients for evaluating PE. The MDCT imaging findings in pediatric and young adult patients following a lateral Fontan procedure and with clinically suspected PE are illustrated. We describe intravenous contrast agent injection techniques that can be used to optimize the contrast enhancement in the pulmonary artery in patients following a lateral Fontan procedure. The use of a suboptimal contrast-enhancement technique led to initial misdiagnosis and incomplete evaluation of PE in the three patients following a lateral Fontan procedure. Imaging in two patients showed that optimal evaluation of thrombosis in the Fontan pathway and PE in the pulmonary arteries can be successfully achieved with simultaneous upper- and lower-limb injections of contrast agent. This series demonstrates that suboptimal contrast enhancement can result in misdiagnosis or incomplete evaluation of PE in children and young adults following a lateral Fontan procedure. Careful attention to optimizing contrast enhancement during MDCT examination for

  5. Thermal stability of tunneling spin polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kant, C.H.; Kohlhepp, J.T.; Paluskar, P.V.; Swagten, H.J.M.; Jonge, W.J.M. de

    2005-01-01

    We present a study of the thermal stability of tunneling spin polarization in Al/AlOx/ferromagnet junctions based on the spin-polarized tunneling technique, in which the Zeeman-split superconducting density of states in the Al electrode is used as a detector for the spin polarization. Thermal robustness of the polarization, which is of key importance for the performance of magnetic tunnel junction devices, is demonstrated for post-deposition anneal temperatures up to 500 o C with Co and Co 90 Fe 10 top electrodes, independent of the presence of an FeMn layer on top of the ferromagnet

  6. Britain's delegation to CERN, the European Centre for Nuclear Research near Geneva, voted in favour of a project which take seven years to build, involve a 27 kilometre long tunnel, and cost 230 million pounds. Now LEP receives the go-ahead later this month

    CERN Multimedia

    Llewellyn Smith, Christopher Hubert

    1981-01-01

    Britain's delegation to CERN, the European Centre for Nuclear Research near Geneva, voted in favour of a project which take seven years to build, involve a 27 kilometre long tunnel, and cost 230 million pounds. Now LEP receives the go-ahead later this month

  7. Tunneling Anomalous and Spin Hall Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos-Abiague, A; Fabian, J

    2015-07-31

    We predict, theoretically, the existence of the anomalous Hall effect when a tunneling current flows through a tunnel junction in which only one of the electrodes is magnetic. The interfacial spin-orbit coupling present in the barrier region induces a spin-dependent momentum filtering in the directions perpendicular to the tunneling current, resulting in a skew tunneling even in the absence of impurities. This produces an anomalous Hall conductance and spin Hall currents in the nonmagnetic electrode when a bias voltage is applied across the tunneling heterojunction. If the barrier is composed of a noncentrosymmetric material, the anomalous Hall conductance and spin Hall currents become anisotropic with respect to both the magnetization and crystallographic directions, allowing us to separate this interfacial phenomenon from the bulk anomalous and spin Hall contributions. The proposed effect should be useful for proving and quantifying the interfacial spin-orbit fields in metallic and metal-semiconductor systems.

  8. High current density GaAs/Si rectifying heterojunction by defect free Epitaxial Lateral overgrowth on Tunnel Oxide from nano-seed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renard, Charles; Molière, Timothée; Cherkashin, Nikolay; Alvarez, José; Vincent, Laetitia; Jaffré, Alexandre; Hallais, Géraldine; Connolly, James Patrick; Mencaraglia, Denis; Bouchier, Daniel

    2016-05-04

    Interest in the heteroepitaxy of GaAs on Si has never failed in the last years due to the potential for monolithic integration of GaAs-based devices with Si integrated circuits. But in spite of this effort, devices fabricated from them still use homo-epitaxy only. Here we present an epitaxial technique based on the epitaxial lateral overgrowth of micrometer scale GaAs crystals on a thin SiO2 layer from nanoscale Si seeds. This method permits the integration of high quality and defect-free crystalline GaAs on Si substrate and provides active GaAs/Si heterojunctions with efficient carrier transport through the thin SiO2 layer. The nucleation from small width openings avoids the emission of misfit dislocations and the formation of antiphase domains. With this method, we have experimentally demonstrated for the first time a monolithically integrated GaAs/Si diode with high current densities of 10 kA.cm(-2) for a forward bias of 3.7 V. This epitaxial technique paves the way to hybrid III-V/Si devices that are free from lattice-matching restrictions, and where silicon not only behaves as a substrate but also as an active medium.

  9. Programmable ferroelectric tunnel memristor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andy eQuindeau

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available We report an analogously programmable memristor based on genuine electronic resistive switching combining ferroelectric switching and electron tunneling. The tunnel current through an 8 unit cell thick epitaxial Pb(Zr[0.2]Ti[0.8]O[3] film sandwiched between La[0.7]Sr[0.3]MnO[3] and cobalt electrodes obeys the Kolmogorov-Avrami-Ishibashi model for bidimensional growth with a characteristic switching time in the order of 10^-7 seconds. The analytical description of switching kinetics allows us to develop a characteristic transfer function that has only one parameter viz. the characteristic switching time and fully predicts the resistive states of this type of memristor.

  10. Tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance driven by magnetic phase transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, X Z; Feng, J F; Wang, Z C; Zhang, J; Zhong, X Y; Song, C; Jin, L; Zhang, B; Li, F; Jiang, M; Tan, Y Z; Zhou, X J; Shi, G Y; Zhou, X F; Han, X D; Mao, S C; Chen, Y H; Han, X F; Pan, F

    2017-09-06

    The independent control of two magnetic electrodes and spin-coherent transport in magnetic tunnel junctions are strictly required for tunneling magnetoresistance, while junctions with only one ferromagnetic electrode exhibit tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance dependent on the anisotropic density of states with no room temperature performance so far. Here, we report an alternative approach to obtaining tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance in α'-FeRh-based junctions driven by the magnetic phase transition of α'-FeRh and resultantly large variation of the density of states in the vicinity of MgO tunneling barrier, referred to as phase transition tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance. The junctions with only one α'-FeRh magnetic electrode show a magnetoresistance ratio up to 20% at room temperature. Both the polarity and magnitude of the phase transition tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance can be modulated by interfacial engineering at the α'-FeRh/MgO interface. Besides the fundamental significance, our finding might add a different dimension to magnetic random access memory and antiferromagnet spintronics.Tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance is promising for next generation memory devices but limited by the low efficiency and functioning temperature. Here the authors achieved 20% tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance at room temperature in magnetic tunnel junctions with one α'-FeRh magnetic electrode.

  11. Variability in ACL tunnel placement: observational clinical study of surgeon ACL tunnel variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Brian R; Ramme, Austin J; Wright, Rick W; Brophy, Robert H; McCarty, Eric C; Vidal, Armando R; Parker, Richard D; Andrish, Jack T; Amendola, Annunziato

    2013-06-01

    Multicenter and multisurgeon cohort studies on anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction are becoming more common. Minimal information exists on intersurgeon and intrasurgeon variability in ACL tunnel placement. Purpose/ The purpose of this study was to analyze intersurgeon and intrasurgeon variability in ACL tunnel placement in a series of The Multicenter Orthopaedic Outcomes Network (MOON) ACL reconstruction patients and in a clinical cohort of ACL reconstruction patients. The hypothesis was that there would be minimal variability between surgeons in ACL tunnel placement. Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Seventy-eight patients who underwent ACL reconstruction by 8 surgeons had postoperative imaging with computed tomography, and ACL tunnel location and angulation were analyzed using 3-dimensional surface processing and measurement. Intersurgeon and intrasurgeon variability in ACL tunnel placement was analyzed. For intersurgeon variability, the range in mean ACL femoral tunnel depth between surgeons was 22%. For femoral tunnel height, there was a 19% range. Tibial tunnel location from anterior to posterior on the plateau had a 16% range in mean results. There was only a small range of 4% for mean tibial tunnel location from the medial to lateral dimension. For intrasurgeon variability, femoral tunnel depth demonstrated the largest ranges, and tibial tunnel location from medial to lateral on the plateau demonstrated the least variability. Overall, surgeons were relatively consistent within their own cases. Using applied measurement criteria, 85% of femoral tunnels and 90% of tibial tunnels fell within applied literature-based guidelines. Ninety-one percent of the axes of the femoral tunnels fell within the boundaries of the femoral footprint. The data demonstrate that surgeons performing ACL reconstructions are relatively consistent between each other. There is, however, variability of average tunnel placement up to 22% of mean condylar depth

  12. Tunnel magnetoresistance in asymmetric double-barrier magnetic tunnel junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Useinov, N.Kh.; Petukhov, D.A.; Tagirov, L.R.

    2015-01-01

    The spin-polarized tunnel conductance and tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) through a planar asymmetric double-barrier magnetic tunnel junction (DBMTJ) have been calculated using quasi-classical model. In DBMTJ nanostructure the magnetization of middle ferromagnetic metal layer can be aligned parallel or antiparallel with respect to the fixed magnetizations of the top and bottom ferromagnetic electrodes. The transmission coefficients of an electron to pass through the barriers have been calculated in terms of quantum mechanics. The dependencies of tunnel conductance and TMR on the applied voltage have been calculated in case of non-resonant transmission. Estimated in the framework of our model, the difference between the spin-channels conductances at low voltages was found relatively large. This gives rise to very high magnitude of TMR. - Highlights: • The spin-polarized conductance through the junction is calculated. • Dependencies of the tunnel conductance vs applied bias are shown. • Bias voltage dependence of tunnel magnetoresistance for the structure is shown

  13. Electron tunneling across a tunable potential barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mangin, A; Anthore, A; Rocca, M L Della; Boulat, E; Lafarge, P

    2009-01-01

    We present an experiment where the elementary quantum electron tunneling process should be affected by an independent gate voltage parameter. We have realized nanotransistors where the source and drain electrodes are created by electromigration inducing a nanometer sized gap acting as a tunnel barrier. The barrier potential shape is in first approximation considered trapezoidal. The application of a voltage to the gate electrode close to the barrier region can in principle affect the barrier shape. Simulations of the source drain tunnel current as a function of the gate voltage predict modulations as large as one hundred percent. The difficulty of observing the predicted behaviour in our samples might be due to the peculiar geometry of the realized tunnel junction.

  14. Klein tunneling phenomenon with pair creation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, G. Z.; Zhou, C. T.; Fu, L. B.

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we study the Klein tunneling phenomenon with electron-positron pair creation process. Pairs can be created from the vacuum by a supercritical single-well potential (for electrons). In the time region, the time-dependent growth pattern of the created pairs can be characterized by four distinct regimes which can be considered as four different statuses of the single well. We find that if positrons penetrate the single well by Klein tunneling in different statuses, the total number of the tunneling positrons will be different. If Klein tunneling begins at the initial stage of the first status i.e. when the sing well is empty, the tunneling process and the total number of tunneling positrons are similar to the traditional Klein tunneling case without considering the pair creation process. As the tunneling begins later, the total tunneling positron number increases. The number will finally settle to an asymptotic value when the tunneling begins later than the settling-down time t s of the single well which has been defined in this paper.

  15. Tunneling magnetoresistance phenomenon utilizing graphene magnet electrode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hashimoto, T.; Kamikawa, S.; Soriano, D.

    2014-01-01

    Using magnetic rare-metals for spintronic devices is facing serious problems for the environmental contamination and the limited material-resource. In contrast, by fabricating ferromagnetic graphene nanopore arrays (FGNPAs) consisting of honeycomb-like array of hexagonal nanopores with hydrogen-t...

  16. Scanning Tunneling Microscope For Use In Vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, Phillip B.

    1993-01-01

    Scanning tunneling microscope with subangstrom resolution developed to study surface structures. Although instrument used in air, designed especially for use in vacuum. Scanning head is assembly of small, mostly rigid components made of low-outgassing materials. Includes coarse-positioning mechanical-translation stage, on which specimen mounted by use of standard mounting stub. Tunneling tip mounted on piezoelectric fine-positioning tube. Application of suitable voltages to electrodes on piezoelectric tube controls scan of tunneling tip across surface of specimen. Electronic subsystem generates scanning voltages and collects data.

  17. Recognition tunneling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lindsay, S.; He, J.; Sankey, O.; Hapala, Prokop; Jelínek, Pavel; Zhang, P.; Chang, S.; Huang, S.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 26 (2010), 262001/1-262001/12 ISSN 0957-4484 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/09/0545 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : STM * tunneling current * molecular electronics * DFT calculations Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.644, year: 2010

  18. A high stability and repeatability electrochemical scanning tunneling microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, Zhigang; Wang, Jihao; Lu, Qingyou, E-mail: qxl@ustc.edu.cn [High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Chinese Academy of Sciences and University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at Microscale, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Hou, Yubin [High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Chinese Academy of Sciences and University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)

    2014-12-15

    We present a home built electrochemical scanning tunneling microscope (ECSTM) with very high stability and repeatability. Its coarse approach is driven by a closely stacked piezo motor of GeckoDrive type with four rigid clamping points, which enhances the rigidity, compactness, and stability greatly. It can give high clarity atomic resolution images without sound and vibration isolations. Its drifting rates in XY and Z directions in solution are as low as 84 pm/min and 59 pm/min, respectively. In addition, repeatable coarse approaches in solution within 2 mm travel distance show a lateral deviation less than 50 nm. The gas environment can be well controlled to lower the evaporation rate of the cell, thus reducing the contamination and elongating the measurement time. Atomically resolved SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} image on Au (111) work electrode is demonstrated to show the performance of the ECSTM.

  19. A high stability and repeatability electrochemical scanning tunneling microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Zhigang; Wang, Jihao; Hou, Yubin; Lu, Qingyou

    2014-12-01

    We present a home built electrochemical scanning tunneling microscope (ECSTM) with very high stability and repeatability. Its coarse approach is driven by a closely stacked piezo motor of GeckoDrive type with four rigid clamping points, which enhances the rigidity, compactness, and stability greatly. It can give high clarity atomic resolution images without sound and vibration isolations. Its drifting rates in XY and Z directions in solution are as low as 84 pm/min and 59 pm/min, respectively. In addition, repeatable coarse approaches in solution within 2 mm travel distance show a lateral deviation less than 50 nm. The gas environment can be well controlled to lower the evaporation rate of the cell, thus reducing the contamination and elongating the measurement time. Atomically resolved SO4(2-) image on Au (111) work electrode is demonstrated to show the performance of the ECSTM.

  20. Tunnel - history of

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-11-01

    This book introduces history of tunnel in ancient times, the middle ages and modern times, survey of tunnel and classification of bedrock like environment survey of position, survey of the ground, design of tunnel on basic thing of the design, and design of tunnel of bedrock, analysis of stability of tunnel and application of the data, construction of tunnel like lattice girder and steel fiber reinforced shot crete, and maintenance control and repair of tunnel.

  1. Tunneling magnetoresistance in ferromagnetic planar hetero-nanojunctions

    KAUST Repository

    Useinov, Arthur; Deminov, R. G.; Useinov, Niazbeck Kh H; Tagirov, Lenar R.

    2010-01-01

    as a tunneling barrier between the metallic electrodes, is comparable with the mean-free path of electrons. The dependence of the TMR on the bias voltage, physical parameters of the dielectric barrier, and spin polarization of the electrodes is studied

  2. Electrodes for Semiconductor Gas Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sung Pil

    2017-01-01

    The electrodes of semiconductor gas sensors are important in characterizing sensors based on their sensitivity, selectivity, reversibility, response time, and long-term stability. The types and materials of electrodes used for semiconductor gas sensors are analyzed. In addition, the effect of interfacial zones and surface states of electrode–semiconductor interfaces on their characteristics is studied. This study describes that the gas interaction mechanism of the electrode–semiconductor interfaces should take into account the interfacial zone, surface states, image force, and tunneling effect. PMID:28346349

  3. A Quantitative Tunneling/Desorption Model for the Exchange Current at the Porous Electrode/Beta - Alumina/Alkali Metal Gas Three Phase Zone at 700-1300K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, R. M.; Ryan, M. A.; Saipetch, C.; LeDuc, H. G.

    1996-01-01

    The exchange current observed at porous metal electrodes on sodium or potassium beta -alumina solid electrolytes in alkali metal vapor is quantitatively modeled with a multi-step process with good agreement with experimental results.

  4. Spin-dependent tunnelling in magnetic tunnel junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsymbal, Evgeny Y; Mryasov, Oleg N; LeClair, Patrick R

    2003-01-01

    The phenomenon of electron tunnelling has been known since the advent of quantum mechanics, but continues to enrich our understanding of many fields of physics, as well as creating sub-fields on its own. Spin-dependent tunnelling (SDT) in magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) has recently aroused enormous interest and has developed in a vigorous field of research. The large tunnelling magnetoresistance (TMR) observed in MTJs garnered much attention due to possible applications in non-volatile random-access memories and next-generation magnetic field sensors. This led to a number of fundamental questions regarding the phenomenon of SDT. In this review article we present an overview of this field of research. We discuss various factors that control the spin polarization and magnetoresistance in MTJs. Starting from early experiments on SDT and their interpretation, we consider thereafter recent experiments and models which highlight the role of the electronic structure of the ferromagnets, the insulating layer, and the ferromagnet/insulator interfaces. We also discuss the role of disorder in the barrier and in the ferromagnetic electrodes and their influence on TMR. (topical review)

  5. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a passing cramp? It could be carpal tunnel syndrome. The carpal tunnel is a narrow passageway of ... three times more likely to have carpal tunnel syndrome than men. Early diagnosis and treatment are important ...

  6. Variable electronic properties of lateral phosphorene-graphene heterostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Xiaoqing; Liu, Lin; Du, Yu; Gu, Juan; Xu, Jian-Bin; Yakobson, Boris I

    2015-12-21

    Phosphorene and graphene have a tiny lattice mismatch along the armchair direction, which can result in an atomically sharp in-plane interface. The electronic properties of the lateral heterostructures of phosphorene/graphene are investigated by the first-principles method. Here, we demonstrate that the electronic properties of this type of heterostructure can be highly tunable by the quantum size effects and the externally applied electric field (Eext). At strong Eext, Dirac Fermions can be developed with Fermi velocities around one order smaller than that of graphene. Undoped and hydrogen doped configurations demonstrate three drastically different electronic phases, which reveal the strongly tunable potential of this type of heterostructure. Graphene is a naturally better electrode for phosphorene. The transport properties of two-probe devices of graphene/phosphorene/graphene exhibit tunnelling transport characteristics. Given these results, it is expected that in-plane heterostructures of phosphorene/graphene will present abundant opportunities for applications in optoelectronic and electronic devices.

  7. External field induced switching of tunneling current in the coupled quantum dots

    OpenAIRE

    Mantsevich, V. N.; Maslova, N. S.; Arseyev, P. I.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the tunneling current peculiarities in the system of two coupled by means of the external field quantum dots (QDs) weakly connected to the electrodes in the presence of Coulomb correlations. It was found that tuning of the external field frequency induces fast multiple tunneling current switching and leads to the negative tunneling conductivity. Special role of multi-electrons states was demonstrated. Moreover we revealed conditions for bistable behavior of the tunneling curre...

  8. Resonant tunnel magnetoresistance in a double magnetic tunnel junction

    KAUST Repository

    Useinov, Arthur

    2011-08-09

    We present quasi-classical approach to calculate a spin-dependent current and tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) in double magnetic tunnel junctions (DMTJ) FML/I/FMW/I/FMR, where the magnetization of the middle ferromagnetic metal layer FMW can be aligned parallel or antiparallel with respect to the fixed magnetizations of the left FML and right FMR ferromagnetic electrodes. The transmission coefficients for components of the spin-dependent current, and TMR are calculated as a function of the applied voltage. As a result, we found a high resonant TMR. Thus, DMTJ can serve as highly effective magnetic nanosensor for biological applications, or as magnetic memory cells by switching the magnetization of the inner ferromagnetic layer FMW.© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011.

  9. Voltammetry and in situ scanning tunnelling spectroscopy of osmium, iron, and ruthenium complexes of 2,2′:6′,2′′-terpyridine covalently linked to Au(111)-electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salvatore, Princia; Hansen, Allan Glargaard; Moth-Poulsen, Kasper

    2011-01-01

    prepared in situ by first linking the terpy ligand to the surface via the S-atom, followed by addition of suitable metal compounds. The metal-terpy SAMs were studied by cyclic voltammetry (CV), and in situ scanning tunnelling microscopy with full electrochemical potential control of substrate and tip (in...

  10. Measuring voltage transients with an ultrafast scanning tunneling microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keil, Ulrich Dieter Felix; Jensen, Jacob Riis; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    1997-01-01

    circuit, where the tunneling tip is directly connected to the current amplifier of the scanning tunneling microscope, this dependence is eliminated. Ail results can be explained with coupling through the geometrical capacitance of the tip-electrode junction. By illuminating the current......We use an ultrafast scanning tunneling microscope to resolve propagating voltage transients in space and time. We demonstrate that the previously observed dependence of the transient signal amplitude on the tunneling resistance was only caused by the electrical sampling circuit. With a modified...

  11. Tunneling magnetoresistance in Si nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    Montes Muñoz, Enrique

    2016-11-09

    We investigate the tunneling magnetoresistance of small diameter semiconducting Si nanowires attached to ferromagnetic Fe electrodes, using first principles density functional theory combined with the non-equilibrium Green\\'s functions method for quantum transport. Silicon nanowires represent an interesting platform for spin devices. They are compatible with mature silicon technology and their intrinsic electronic properties can be controlled by modifying the diameter and length. Here we systematically study the spin transport properties for neutral nanowires and both n and p doping conditions. We find a substantial low bias magnetoresistance for the neutral case, which halves for an applied voltage of about 0.35 V and persists up to 1 V. Doping in general decreases the magnetoresistance, as soon as the conductance is no longer dominated by tunneling.

  12. Tunneling technologies for the collider ring tunnels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frobenius, P.

    1989-01-01

    The Texas site chosen for the Superconducting Super Collider has been studied, and it has been determined that proven, conventional technology and accepted engineering practice are suitable for constructing the collider tunnels. The Texas National Research Laboratory Commission report recommended that two types of tunneling machines be used for construction of the tunnels: a conventional hard rock tunnel boring machine (TBM) for the Austin chalk and a double shielded, rotary TBM for the Taylor marl. Since the tunneling machines usually set the pace for the project, efficient planning, operation, and coordination of the tunneling system components will be critical to the schedule and cost of the project. During design, tunneling rate prediction should be refined by focusing on the development of an effective tunneling system and evaluating its capacity to meet or exceed the required schedules. 8 refs., 13 figs

  13. Electrical imaging for localizing historical tunnels at an urban environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osella, Ana; Martinelli, Patricia; Grunhut, Vivian; de la Vega, Matías; Bonomo, Néstor; Weissel, Marcelo

    2015-08-01

    We performed a geophysical study at a historical site in Buenos Aires, Argentina, corresponding to the location of a Jesuit Mission established during the 17th century, remaining there until the 18th century. The site consisted of a church, cloisters, a school, orchards and a procurator’s office; also several tunnels were built, connecting the mission with different public buildings in the town. In the 19th century the Faculty of Sciences of the University of Buenos Aires was built in a sector of the site originally occupied by an orchard, functioning until its demolition in 1973. At present, this area is a cobbled square. With the aim of preserving and restoring the buried structures, work was carried out in this square looking for tunnels and remains of the basement of the old building. Considering the conductive features of the subsoil, mainly formed by clays and silt, the complex characteristics of the buried structures, and the urban localization of the study area with its consequent high level of environmental electromagnetic noise, we performed pre-feasibility studies to determine the usefulness of different geophysical methods. The best results were achieved from the geoelectrical method. Dipole-dipole profiles with electrode spacings of 1.5 and 3 m provided enough lateral and vertical resolution and the required penetration depth. Reliable data were obtained as long as the electrodes were buried at least 15 cm among the cobble stones. Nine 2D electrical resistivity tomographies were obtained by using a robust inversion procedure to reduce the effect of possible data outliers in the resulting models. The effect on these models of different error estimations was also analyzed. Then, we built up a pseudo-3D model by laterally interpolating the 2D inversion results. Finally, by correlating the resulting model with the original plans, the remains of the expected main structures embedded in the site were characterized. In addition, an anomaly was

  14. Electrical imaging for localizing historical tunnels at an urban environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osella, Ana; Martinelli, Patricia; De la Vega, Matías; Bonomo, Néstor; Grunhut, Vivian; Weissel, Marcelo

    2015-01-01

    We performed a geophysical study at a historical site in Buenos Aires, Argentina, corresponding to the location of a Jesuit Mission established during the 17 th century, remaining there until the 18th century. The site consisted of a church, cloisters, a school, orchards and a procurator’s office; also several tunnels were built, connecting the mission with different public buildings in the town. In the 19th century the Faculty of Sciences of the University of Buenos Aires was built in a sector of the site originally occupied by an orchard, functioning until its demolition in 1973. At present, this area is a cobbled square. With the aim of preserving and restoring the buried structures, work was carried out in this square looking for tunnels and remains of the basement of the old building.Considering the conductive features of the subsoil, mainly formed by clays and silt, the complex characteristics of the buried structures, and the urban localization of the study area with its consequent high level of environmental electromagnetic noise, we performed pre-feasibility studies to determine the usefulness of different geophysical methods. The best results were achieved from the geoelectrical method. Dipole–dipole profiles with electrode spacings of 1.5 and 3 m provided enough lateral and vertical resolution and the required penetration depth. Reliable data were obtained as long as the electrodes were buried at least 15 cm among the cobble stones. Nine 2D electrical resistivity tomographies were obtained by using a robust inversion procedure to reduce the effect of possible data outliers in the resulting models. The effect on these models of different error estimations was also analyzed. Then, we built up a pseudo-3D model by laterally interpolating the 2D inversion results. Finally, by correlating the resulting model with the original plans, the remains of the expected main structures embedded in the site were characterized. In addition, an anomaly was

  15. DNA-modified electrodes (Ⅶ)——Preparation and characterization of DNA-bonded and DNA-adsorbed SAM/Au electrodes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆琪; 庞代文; 胡深; 程介克; 蔡雄伟; 施财辉; 毛秉伟; 戴鸿平

    1999-01-01

    Two kinds of DNA-modified electrodes were prepared by covalent and adsorptive immobilization of DNA onto self-assembled monolayers of 2, 2’-dithiodiethanol on gold electrodes and characterized by cyclic voltammetry, Xray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy. The results suggest that the methods are satisfactory for the immobilization of DNA on electrodes.

  16. Fabrication of magnetic tunnel junctions with a single-crystalline LiF tunnel barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna Narayananellore, Sai; Doko, Naoki; Matsuo, Norihiro; Saito, Hidekazu; Yuasa, Shinji

    2018-04-01

    We fabricated Fe/LiF/Fe magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) by molecular beam epitaxy on a MgO(001) substrate, where LiF is an insulating tunnel barrier with the same crystal structure as MgO (rock-salt type). Crystallographical studies such as transmission electron microscopy and nanobeam electron diffraction observations revealed that the LiF tunnel barrier is single-crystalline and has a LiF(001)[100] ∥ bottom Fe(001)[110] crystal orientation, which is constructed in the same manner as MgO(001) on Fe(001). Also, the in-plane lattice mismatch between the LiF tunnel barrier and the Fe bottom electrode was estimated to be small (about 0.5%). Despite such advantages for the tunnel barrier of the MTJ, the observed tunnel magnetoresistance (MR) ratio was low (˜6% at 20 K) and showed a significant decrease with increasing temperature (˜1% at room temperature). The results imply that indirect tunneling and/or thermally excited carriers in the LiF tunnel barrier, in which the current basically is not spin-polarized, play a major role in electrical transport in the MTJ.

  17. Spin polarized electron tunneling and magnetoresistance in molecular junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szulczewski, Greg

    2012-01-01

    This chapter reviews tunneling of spin-polarized electrons through molecules positioned between ferromagnetic electrodes, which gives rise to tunneling magnetoresistance. Such measurements yield important insight into the factors governing spin-polarized electron injection into organic semiconductors, thereby offering the possibility to manipulate the quantum-mechanical spin degrees of freedom for charge carriers in optical/electrical devices. In the first section of the chapter a brief description of the Jullière model of spin-dependent electron tunneling is reviewed. Next, a brief description of device fabrication and characterization is presented. The bulk of the review highlights experimental studies on spin-polarized electron tunneling and magnetoresistance in molecular junctions. In addition, some experiments describing spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy on single molecules are mentioned. Finally, some general conclusions and prospectus on the impact of spin-polarized tunneling in molecular junctions are offered.

  18. A review on all-perovskite multiferroic tunnel junctions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuewei Yin

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Although the basic concept was proposed only about 10 years ago, multiferroic tunnel junctions (MFTJs with a ferroelectric barrier sandwiched between two ferromagnetic electrodes have already drawn considerable interests, driven mainly by its potential applications in multi-level memories and electric field controlled spintronics. The purpose of this article is to review the recent progress of all-perovskite MFTJs. Starting from the key functional properties of the tunneling magnetoresistance, tunneling electroresistance, and tunneling electromagnetoresistance effects, we discuss the main origins of the tunneling electroresistance effect, recent progress in achieving multilevel resistance states in a single device, and the electrical control of spin polarization and transport through the ferroelectric polarization reversal of the tunneling barrier.

  19. Tunneling magnetoresistance from a symmetry filtering effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, William H

    2008-01-01

    This paper provides a brief overview of the young, but rapidly growing field of spintronics. Its primary objective is to explain how as electrons tunnel through simple insulators such as MgO, wavefunctions of certain symmetries are preferentially transmitted. This symmetry filtering property can be converted into a spin-filtering property if the insulator is joined epitaxially to a ferromagnetic electrode with the same two-dimensional symmetry parallel to the interface. A second requirement of the ferromagnetic electrodes is that a wavefunction with the preferred symmetry exists in one of the two spin channels but not in the other. These requirements are satisfied for electrons traveling perpendicular to the interface for Fe-MgO-Fe tunnel barriers. This leads to a large change in the resistance when the magnetic moment of one of the electrodes is rotated relative to those of the other electrode. This large tunneling magnetoresistance effect is being used as the read sensor in hard drives and may form the basis for a new type of magnetic memory. (topical review)

  20. Liquid electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekechukwu, A.A.

    1994-07-05

    A dropping electrolyte electrode is described for use in electrochemical analysis of non-polar sample solutions, such as benzene or cyclohexane. The liquid electrode, preferably an aqueous salt solution immiscible in the sample solution, is introduced into the solution in dropwise fashion from a capillary. The electrolyte is introduced at a known rate, thus, the droplets each have the same volume and surface area. The electrode is used in making standard electrochemical measurements in order to determine properties of non-polar sample solutions. 2 figures.

  1. Dihydroazulene photoswitch operating in sequential tunneling regime

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broman, Søren Lindbæk; Lara-Avila, Samuel; Thisted, Christine Lindbjerg

    2012-01-01

    to electrodes so that the electron transport goes by sequential tunneling. To assure weak coupling, the DHA switching kernel is modified by incorporating p-MeSC6H4 end-groups. Molecules are prepared by Suzuki cross-couplings on suitable halogenated derivatives of DHA. The synthesis presents an expansion of our......, incorporating a p-MeSC6H4 anchoring group in one end, has been placed in a silver nanogap. Conductance measurements justify that transport through both DHA (high resistivity) and VHF (low resistivity) forms goes by sequential tunneling. The switching is fairly reversible and reenterable; after more than 20 ON...

  2. Fabrication of fully epitaxial magnetic tunnel junctions with a Co2MnSi thin film and a MgO tunnel barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kijima, H.; Ishikawa, T.; Marukame, T.; Matsuda, K.-I.; Uemura, T.; Yamamoto, M.

    2007-01-01

    Fully epitaxial magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) were fabricated with a Co-based full-Heusler alloy Co 2 MnSi (CMS) thin film having the ordered L2 1 structure as a lower electrode, a MgO tunnel barrier, and a Co 50 Fe 50 upper electrode. Reflection high-energy electron diffraction patterns observed in situ for each layer in the MTJ layer structure during fabrication clearly indicated that all layers of the CMS lower electrode, MgO tunnel barrier, and Co 50 Fe 50 upper electrode grew epitaxially. The microfabricated fully epitaxial CMS/MgO/Co 50 Fe 50 MTJs demonstrated relatively high tunnel magnetoresistance ratios of 90% at room temperature and 192% at 4.2 K

  3. electrode array

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF EKWUEME

    A geoelectric investigation employing vertical electrical soundings (VES) using the Ajayi - Makinde Two-Electrode array and the ... arrangements used in electrical D.C. resistivity survey. These include ..... Refraction Tomography to Study the.

  4. (Na,□)5[MnO2]13 nanorods: a new tunnel structure for electrode materials determined ab initio and refined through a combination of electron and synchrotron diffraction data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mugnaioli, Enrico; Gemmi, Mauro; Merlini, Marco; Gregorkiewitz, Michele

    2016-01-01

    (Nax□1 − x)5[MnO2]13 has been synthesized with x = 0.80 (4), corresponding to Na0.31[MnO2]. This well known material is usually cited as Na0.4[MnO2] and is believed to have a romanèchite-like framework. Here, its true structure is determined, ab initio, by single-crystal electron diffraction tomography (EDT) and refined both by EDT data applying dynamical scattering theory and by the Rietveld method based on synchrotron powder diffraction data (χ2 = 0.690, R wp = 0.051, R p = 0.037, R F2 = 0.035). The unit cell is monoclinic C2/m, a = 22.5199 (6), b = 2.83987 (6), c = 14.8815 (4) Å, β = 105.0925 (16)°, V = 918.90 (4) Å3, Z = 2. A hitherto unknown [MnO2] framework is found, which is mainly based on edge- and corner-sharing octahedra and comprises three types of tunnels: per unit cell, two are defined by S-shaped 10-rings, four by egg-shaped 8-rings, and two by slightly oval 6-rings of Mn polyhedra. Na occupies all tunnels. The so-determined structure excellently explains previous reports on the electrochemistry of (Na,□)5[MnO2]13. The trivalent Mn3+ ions concentrate at two of the seven Mn sites where larger Mn—O distances and Jahn–Teller distortion are observed. One of the Mn3+ sites is five-coordinated in a square pyramid which, on oxidation to Mn4+, may easily undergo topotactic transformation to an octahedron suggesting a possible pathway for the transition among different tunnel structures. PMID:27910840

  5. Phonon-assisted tunneling and its dependence on pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, P.N.; Singh, A.P.; Thakur, B.N.

    1999-01-01

    First the mechanism of phonon-assisted tunneling has been investigated. The indirect tunnel current density has been computed after taking the amplitude of the time dependent perturbation as the energy of the lattice vibration. Later the pressure dependence of the phonon-assisted tunnel current has been computed using Payne's expression for the dependence of phonon frequency on pressure. Very good qualitative agreements are obtained between predicted and observed characteristics. (author)

  6. Asymmetric voltage behavior of the tunnel magnetoresistance in double barrier magnetic tunnel junctions

    KAUST Repository

    Useinov, Arthur

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, we study the value of the tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) as a function of the applied voltage in double barrier magnetic tunnel junctions (DMTJs) with the left and right ferromagnetic (FM) layers being pinned and numerically estimate the possible difference of the TMR curves for negative and positive voltages in the homojunctions (equal barriers and electrodes). DMTJs are modeled as two single barrier junctions connected in series with consecutive tunneling (CST). We investigated the asymmetric voltage behavior of the TMR for the CST in the range of a general theoretical model. Significant asymmetries of the experimental curves, which arise due to different annealing regimes, are mostly explained by different heights of the tunnel barriers and asymmetries of spin polarizations in magnetic layers. © (2012) Trans Tech Publications.

  7. Theoretical consideration of spin-polarized resonant tunneling in magnetic tunnel junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mu Haifeng; Zhu Zhengang; Zheng Qingrong; Jin Biao; Wang Zhengchuan; Su Gang

    2004-01-01

    A recent elegant experimental realization [S. Yuasa et al., Science 297 (2002) 234] of the spin-polarized resonant tunneling in magnetic tunnel junctions is interpreted in terms of a two-band model. It is shown that the tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) decays oscillatorily with the thickness of the normal metal (NM) layer, being fairly in agreement with the experimental observation. The tunnel conductance is found to decay with slight oscillations with the increase of the NM layer thickness, which is also well consistent with the experiment. In addition, when the magnetizations of both ferromagnet electrodes are not collinearly aligned, TMR is found to exhibit sharp resonant peaks at some particular thickness of the NM layer. The peaked TMR obeys nicely a Gaussian distribution against the relative orientation of the magnetizations

  8. Resonant tunnel magnetoresistance in double-barrier planar magnetic tunnel junctions

    KAUST Repository

    Useinov, A. N.

    2011-08-24

    We present a theoretical approach to calculate the spin-dependent current and tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) in a double-barrier magnetic tunnel junction (DMTJ), in which the magnetization of the middle ferromagnetic metal layer can be aligned parallel or antiparallel in relation to the fixed magnetizations of the left and right ferromagnetic electrodes. The electron transport through the DMTJ is considered as a three-dimensional problem, taking into account all transmitting electron trajectories as well as the spin-dependent momentum conservation law. The dependence of the transmission coefficient and spin-polarized currents on the applied voltage is derived as an exact solution to the quantum-mechanical problem for the spin-polarized transport. In the range of the developed physical model, the resonant tunneling, nonresonant tunneling, and enhanced spin filtering can be explained; the simulation results are in good agreement with experimental data.

  9. Resonant tunnel magnetoresistance in double-barrier planar magnetic tunnel junctions

    KAUST Repository

    Useinov, A. N.; Kosel, Jü rgen; Useinov, N. Kh.; Tagirov, L. R.

    2011-01-01

    We present a theoretical approach to calculate the spin-dependent current and tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) in a double-barrier magnetic tunnel junction (DMTJ), in which the magnetization of the middle ferromagnetic metal layer can be aligned parallel or antiparallel in relation to the fixed magnetizations of the left and right ferromagnetic electrodes. The electron transport through the DMTJ is considered as a three-dimensional problem, taking into account all transmitting electron trajectories as well as the spin-dependent momentum conservation law. The dependence of the transmission coefficient and spin-polarized currents on the applied voltage is derived as an exact solution to the quantum-mechanical problem for the spin-polarized transport. In the range of the developed physical model, the resonant tunneling, nonresonant tunneling, and enhanced spin filtering can be explained; the simulation results are in good agreement with experimental data.

  10. Asymmetric voltage behavior of the tunnel magnetoresistance in double barrier magnetic tunnel junctions

    KAUST Repository

    Useinov, Arthur; Gooneratne, Chinthaka Pasan; Kosel, Jü rgen

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we study the value of the tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) as a function of the applied voltage in double barrier magnetic tunnel junctions (DMTJs) with the left and right ferromagnetic (FM) layers being pinned and numerically estimate the possible difference of the TMR curves for negative and positive voltages in the homojunctions (equal barriers and electrodes). DMTJs are modeled as two single barrier junctions connected in series with consecutive tunneling (CST). We investigated the asymmetric voltage behavior of the TMR for the CST in the range of a general theoretical model. Significant asymmetries of the experimental curves, which arise due to different annealing regimes, are mostly explained by different heights of the tunnel barriers and asymmetries of spin polarizations in magnetic layers. © (2012) Trans Tech Publications.

  11. Distribution of tunnelling times for quantum electron transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudge, Samuel L.; Kosov, Daniel S.

    2016-01-01

    In electron transport, the tunnelling time is the time taken for an electron to tunnel out of a system after it has tunnelled in. We define the tunnelling time distribution for quantum processes in a dissipative environment and develop a practical approach for calculating it, where the environment is described by the general Markovian master equation. We illustrate the theory by using the rate equation to compute the tunnelling time distribution for electron transport through a molecular junction. The tunnelling time distribution is exponential, which indicates that Markovian quantum tunnelling is a Poissonian statistical process. The tunnelling time distribution is used not only to study the quantum statistics of tunnelling along the average electric current but also to analyse extreme quantum events where an electron jumps against the applied voltage bias. The average tunnelling time shows distinctly different temperature dependence for p- and n-type molecular junctions and therefore provides a sensitive tool to probe the alignment of molecular orbitals relative to the electrode Fermi energy.

  12. Structural and tunneling properties of Si nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    Montes Muñoz, Enrique

    2013-12-06

    We investigate the electronic structure and electron transport properties of Si nanowires attached to Au electrodes from first principles using density functional theory and the nonequilibrium Green\\'s function method. We systematically study the dependence of the transport properties on the diameter of the nanowires, on the growth direction, and on the length. At the equilibrium Au-nanowire distance we find strong electronic coupling between the electrodes and nanowires, which results in a low contact resistance. With increasing nanowire length we study the transition from metallic to tunneling conductance for small applied bias. For the tunneling regime we investigate the decay of the conductance with the nanowire length and rationalize the results using the complex band structure of the pristine nanowires. The conductance is found to depend strongly on the growth direction, with nanowires grown along the ⟨110⟩ direction showing the smallest decay with length and the largest conductance and current.

  13. Structural and tunneling properties of Si nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    Montes Muñ oz, Enrique; Gkionis, Konstantinos; Rungger, Ivan; Sanvito, Stefano; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the electronic structure and electron transport properties of Si nanowires attached to Au electrodes from first principles using density functional theory and the nonequilibrium Green's function method. We systematically study the dependence of the transport properties on the diameter of the nanowires, on the growth direction, and on the length. At the equilibrium Au-nanowire distance we find strong electronic coupling between the electrodes and nanowires, which results in a low contact resistance. With increasing nanowire length we study the transition from metallic to tunneling conductance for small applied bias. For the tunneling regime we investigate the decay of the conductance with the nanowire length and rationalize the results using the complex band structure of the pristine nanowires. The conductance is found to depend strongly on the growth direction, with nanowires grown along the ⟨110⟩ direction showing the smallest decay with length and the largest conductance and current.

  14. Magnetic interaction between spatially extended superconducting tunnel junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønbech-Jensen, Niels; Samuelsen, Mogens Rugholm

    2002-01-01

    A general description of magnetic interactions between superconducting tunnel junctions is given. The description covers a wide range of possible experimental systems, and we explicitly explore two experimentally relevant limits of coupled junctions. One is the limit of junctions with tunneling...... been considered through arrays of superconducting weak links based on semiconductor quantum wells with superconducting electrodes. We use the model to make direct interpretations of the published experiments and thereby propose that long-range magnetic interactions are responsible for the reported...

  15. Lateral Concepts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gad, Christopher; Bruun Jensen, casper

    2016-01-01

    This essay discusses the complex relation between the knowledges and practices of the researcher and his/her informants in terms of lateral concepts. The starting point is that it is not the prerogative of the (STS) scholar to conceptualize the world; all our “informants” do it too. This creates...... the possibility of enriching our own conceptual repertoires by letting them be inflected by the concepts of those we study. In a broad sense, the lateral means that there is a many-to-many relation between domains of knowledge and practice. However, each specific case of the lateral is necessarily immanent...... to a particular empirical setting and form of inquiry. In this sense lateral concepts are radically empirical since it locates concepts within the field. To clarify the meaning and stakes of lateral concepts, we first make a contrast between lateral anthropology and Latour’s notion of infra-reflexivity. We end...

  16. Cermet electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maskalick, Nicholas J.

    1988-08-30

    Disclosed is a cermet electrode consisting of metal particles of nickel, cobalt, iron, or alloys or mixtures thereof immobilized by zirconia stabilized in cubic form which contains discrete deposits of about 0.1 to about 5% by weight of praseodymium, dysprosium, terbium, or a mixture thereof. The solid oxide electrode can be made by covering a substrate with particles of nickel, cobalt, iron, or mixtures thereof, growing a stabilized zirconia solid oxide skeleton around the particles thereby immobilizing them, contacting the skeleton with a compound of praseodymium, dysprosium, terbium, or a mixture thereof, and heating the skeleton to a temperature of at least 500.degree. C. The electrode can also be made by preparing a slurry of nickel, cobalt, iron, or mixture and a compound of praseodymium, dysprosium, terbium, or a mixture thereof, depositing the slurry on a substrate, heating the slurry to dryness, and growing a stabilized zirconia skeleton around the metal particles.

  17. Aerodynamic interactions from reaction controls for lateral control of the M2-F2 lifting-body entry configuration at transonic and supersonic and supersonic Mach numbers. [wind tunnel tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, R. O.; Brownson, J. J.

    1979-01-01

    Tests were conducted in the Ames 6 by 6 foot wind tunnel to determine the interaction of reaction jets for roll control on the M2-F2 lifting-body entry vehicle. Moment interactions are presented for a Mach number range of 0.6 to 1.7, a Reynolds number range of 1.2 x 10 to the 6th power to 1.6 x 10 to the 6th power (based on model reference length), an angle-of-attack range of -9 deg to 20 deg, and an angle-of-sideslip range of -6 deg to 6 deg at an angle of attack of 6 deg. The reaction jets produce roll control with small adverse yawing moment, which can be offset by horizontal thrust component of canted jets.

  18. Wind-tunnel investigation of longitudinal and lateral-directional stability and control characteristics of a 0.237-scale model of a remotely piloted research vehicle with a thick, high-aspect-ratio supercritical wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrdsong, T. A.; Brooks, C. W., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    A 0.237-scale model of a remotely piloted research vehicle equipped with a thick, high-aspect-ratio supercritical wing was tested in the Langley 8-foot transonic tunnel to provide experimental data for a prediction of the static stability and control characteristics of the research vehicle as well as to provide an estimate of vehicle flight characteristics for a computer simulation program used in the planning and execution of specific flight-research mission. Data were obtained at a Reynolds number of 16.5 x 10 to the 6th power per meter for Mach numbers up to 0.92. The results indicate regions of longitudinal instability; however, an adequate margin of longitudinal stability exists at a selected cruise condition. Satisfactory effectiveness of pitch, roll, and yaw control was also demonstrated.

  19. Homoepitaxial graphene tunnel barriers for spin transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam L. Friedman

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Tunnel barriers are key elements for both charge-and spin-based electronics, offering devices with reduced power consumption and new paradigms for information processing. Such devices require mating dissimilar materials, raising issues of heteroepitaxy, interface stability, and electronic states that severely complicate fabrication and compromise performance. Graphene is the perfect tunnel barrier. It is an insulator out-of-plane, possesses a defect-free, linear habit, and is impervious to interdiffusion. Nonetheless, true tunneling between two stacked graphene layers is not possible in environmental conditions usable for electronics applications. However, two stacked graphene layers can be decoupled using chemical functionalization. Here, we demonstrate that hydrogenation or fluorination of graphene can be used to create a tunnel barrier. We demonstrate successful tunneling by measuring non-linear IV curves and a weakly temperature dependent zero-bias resistance. We demonstrate lateral transport of spin currents in non-local spin-valve structures, and determine spin lifetimes with the non-local Hanle effect. We compare the results for hydrogenated and fluorinated tunnel and we discuss the possibility that ferromagnetic moments in the hydrogenated graphene tunnel barrier affect the spin transport of our devices.

  20. Homoepitaxial graphene tunnel barriers for spin transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Adam L.; van't Erve, Olaf M. J.; Robinson, Jeremy T.; Whitener, Keith E.; Jonker, Berend T.

    2016-05-01

    Tunnel barriers are key elements for both charge-and spin-based electronics, offering devices with reduced power consumption and new paradigms for information processing. Such devices require mating dissimilar materials, raising issues of heteroepitaxy, interface stability, and electronic states that severely complicate fabrication and compromise performance. Graphene is the perfect tunnel barrier. It is an insulator out-of-plane, possesses a defect-free, linear habit, and is impervious to interdiffusion. Nonetheless, true tunneling between two stacked graphene layers is not possible in environmental conditions usable for electronics applications. However, two stacked graphene layers can be decoupled using chemical functionalization. Here, we demonstrate that hydrogenation or fluorination of graphene can be used to create a tunnel barrier. We demonstrate successful tunneling by measuring non-linear IV curves and a weakly temperature dependent zero-bias resistance. We demonstrate lateral transport of spin currents in non-local spin-valve structures, and determine spin lifetimes with the non-local Hanle effect. We compare the results for hydrogenated and fluorinated tunnel and we discuss the possibility that ferromagnetic moments in the hydrogenated graphene tunnel barrier affect the spin transport of our devices.

  1. Structural and electrical characterization of ultra-thin SrTiO3 tunnel barriers grown over YBa2Cu3O7 electrodes for the development of high Tc Josephson junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Félix, L Avilés; Sirena, M; Guzmán, L A Agüero; Sutter, J González; Vargas, S Pons; Steren, L B; Bernard, R; Trastoy, J; Villegas, J E; Briático, J; Bergeal, N; Lesueur, J; Faini, G

    2012-12-14

    The transport properties of ultra-thin SrTiO(3) (STO) layers grown over YBa(2)Cu(3)O(7) electrodes were studied by conductive atomic force microscopy at the nano-scale. A very good control of the barrier thickness was achieved during the deposition process. A phenomenological approach was used to obtain critical parameters regarding the structural and electrical properties of the system. The STO layers present an energy barrier of 0.9 eV and an attenuation length of 0.23 nm, indicating very good insulating properties for the development of high-quality Josephson junctions.

  2. Structural and electrical characterization of ultra-thin SrTiO3 tunnel barriers grown over YBa2Cu3O7 electrodes for the development of high Tc Josephson junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avilés Félix, L; Sirena, M; Agüero Guzmán, L A; González Sutter, J; Pons Vargas, S; Steren, L B; Bernard, R; Trastoy, J; Villegas, J E; Briático, J; Bergeal, N; Lesueur, J; Faini, G

    2012-01-01

    The transport properties of ultra-thin SrTiO 3 (STO) layers grown over YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 electrodes were studied by conductive atomic force microscopy at the nano-scale. A very good control of the barrier thickness was achieved during the deposition process. A phenomenological approach was used to obtain critical parameters regarding the structural and electrical properties of the system. The STO layers present an energy barrier of 0.9 eV and an attenuation length of 0.23 nm, indicating very good insulating properties for the development of high-quality Josephson junctions. (paper)

  3. Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) is a continuous flow wind-tunnel facility capable of speeds up to Mach 1.2 at stagnation pressures up to one atmosphere. The TDT...

  4. Quantum theory of tunneling

    CERN Document Server

    Razavy, Mohsen

    2014-01-01

    In this revised and expanded edition, in addition to a comprehensible introduction to the theoretical foundations of quantum tunneling based on different methods of formulating and solving tunneling problems, different semiclassical approximations for multidimensional systems are presented. Particular attention is given to the tunneling of composite systems, with examples taken from molecular tunneling and also from nuclear reactions. The interesting and puzzling features of tunneling times are given extensive coverage, and the possibility of measurement of these times with quantum clocks are critically examined. In addition by considering the analogy between evanescent waves in waveguides and in quantum tunneling, the times related to electromagnetic wave propagation have been used to explain certain aspects of quantum tunneling times. These topics are treated in both non-relativistic as well as relativistic regimes. Finally, a large number of examples of tunneling in atomic, molecular, condensed matter and ...

  5. Road and Railroad Tunnels

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Tunnels in the United States According to the HSIP Tiger Team Report, a tunnel is defined as a linear underground passageway open at both ends. This dataset is based...

  6. Hypersonic Tunnel Facility (HTF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Hypersonic Tunnel Facility (HTF) is a blow-down, non-vitiated (clean air) free-jet wind tunnel capable of testing large-scale, propulsion systems at Mach 5, 6,...

  7. Improvement of wind tunnel experiment method for atmospheric diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakai, Masayuki; Sada, Koichi

    1987-01-01

    A wind direction fluctuation vane was added to CRIEPI's large - scale atmospheric diffusion wind tunnel for the purpose of increasing and controlling turbulence intensity. When the wind direction fluctuation vane was operated lateral plume spread and lateral turbulence intersity became greater than for cases when it was not operated. Use of the vane improved the ability of the wind tunnel to simulate plane spread under natural conditions. (author)

  8. Spin transport in spin filtering magnetic tunneling junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yun; Lee, Eok Kyun

    2007-11-01

    Taking into account spin-orbit coupling and s-d interaction, we investigate spin transport properties of the magnetic tunneling junctions with spin filtering barrier using Landauer-Büttiker formalism implemented with the recursive algorithm to calculate the real-space Green function. We predict completely different bias dependence of negative tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) between the systems composed of nonmagnetic electrode (NM)/ferromagnetic barrier (FB)/ferromagnet (FM) and NM/FB/FM/NM spin filtering tunnel junctions (SFTJs). Analyses of the results provide us possible ways of designing the systems which modulate the TMR in the negative magnetoresistance regime.

  9. Tunnel magnetoresistance of magnetic molecules with spin-vibron coupling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Kenawy

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The effect of molecular vibrations on the tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR of a magnetic tunnel junction with a single spin-anisotropic molecule interconnecting its electrodes is investigated theoretically. We demonstrate that if these vibrations couple at the same time to the charge of tunneling electrons and to the spin of the molecule, the spin anisotropy of such a molecule becomes enhanced. This has, in turn, a profound impact on the TMR of such a device showing that molecular vibrations lead to a significant change of spin-polarized transport, differing for the parallel and antiparallel magnetic configuration of the junction.

  10. Magnetohydrodynamic electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The object of the invention is the provision of a material capable of withstanding a high-temperature, corrosive and erosive environment for use as a ceramic-metal composite electrode current collector in the channel of a magnetohydrodynamic generator. (U.K.)

  11. Charge Transport in 2D DNA Tunnel Junction Diodes

    KAUST Repository

    Yoon, Minho

    2017-11-06

    Recently, deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is studied for electronics due to its intrinsic benefits such as its natural plenitude, biodegradability, biofunctionality, and low-cost. However, its applications are limited to passive components because of inherent insulating properties. In this report, a metal-insulator-metal tunnel diode with Au/DNA/NiOx junctions is presented. Through the self-aligning process of DNA molecules, a 2D DNA nanosheet is synthesized and used as a tunneling barrier, and semitransparent conducting oxide (NiOx ) is applied as a top electrode for resolving metal penetration issues. This molecular device successfully operates as a nonresonant tunneling diode, and temperature-variable current-voltage analysis proves that Fowler-Nordheim tunneling is a dominant conduction mechanism at the junctions. DNA-based tunneling devices appear to be promising prototypes for nanoelectronics using biomolecules.

  12. Charge Transport in 2D DNA Tunnel Junction Diodes

    KAUST Repository

    Yoon, Minho; Min, Sung-Wook; Dugasani, Sreekantha Reddy; Lee, Yong Uk; Oh, Min Suk; Anthopoulos, Thomas D.; Park, Sung Ha; Im, Seongil

    2017-01-01

    Recently, deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is studied for electronics due to its intrinsic benefits such as its natural plenitude, biodegradability, biofunctionality, and low-cost. However, its applications are limited to passive components because of inherent insulating properties. In this report, a metal-insulator-metal tunnel diode with Au/DNA/NiOx junctions is presented. Through the self-aligning process of DNA molecules, a 2D DNA nanosheet is synthesized and used as a tunneling barrier, and semitransparent conducting oxide (NiOx ) is applied as a top electrode for resolving metal penetration issues. This molecular device successfully operates as a nonresonant tunneling diode, and temperature-variable current-voltage analysis proves that Fowler-Nordheim tunneling is a dominant conduction mechanism at the junctions. DNA-based tunneling devices appear to be promising prototypes for nanoelectronics using biomolecules.

  13. Large Current Modulation and Spin-Dependent Tunneling of Vertical Graphene/MoS$_{2}$ Heterostructures

    OpenAIRE

    Myoung, Nojoon; Seo, Kyungchul; Lee, Seung Joo; Ihm, Gukhyung

    2013-01-01

    Vertical graphene heterostructures have been introduced as an alternative architecture for electronic devices by using quantum tunneling. Here, we present that the current on/off ratio of vertical graphene field-effect transistors is enhanced by using an armchair graphene nanoribbon as an electrode. Moreover, we report spin-dependent tunneling current of the graphene/MoS2 heterostructures. When an atomically thin MoS2 layer sandwiched between graphene electrodes becomes magnetic, Dirac fermio...

  14. A 2D analytical cylindrical gate tunnel FET (CG-TFET) model: impact of shortest tunneling distance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, S.; Mishra, G. P.

    2015-09-01

    A 2D analytical tunnel field-effect transistor (FET) potential model with cylindrical gate (CG-TFET) based on the solution of Laplace’s equation is proposed. The band-to-band tunneling (BTBT) current is derived by the help of lateral electric field and the shortest tunneling distance. However, the analysis is extended to obtain the subthreshold swing (SS) and transfer characteristics of the device. The dependency of drain current, SS and transconductance on gate voltage and shortest tunneling distance is discussed. Also, the effect of scaling the gate oxide thickness and the cylindrical body diameter on the electrical parameters of the device is analyzed.

  15. A 2D analytical cylindrical gate tunnel FET (CG-TFET) model: impact of shortest tunneling distance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dash, S; Mishra, G P

    2015-01-01

    A 2D analytical tunnel field-effect transistor (FET) potential model with cylindrical gate (CG-TFET) based on the solution of Laplace’s equation is proposed. The band-to-band tunneling (BTBT) current is derived by the help of lateral electric field and the shortest tunneling distance. However, the analysis is extended to obtain the subthreshold swing (SS) and transfer characteristics of the device. The dependency of drain current, SS and transconductance on gate voltage and shortest tunneling distance is discussed. Also, the effect of scaling the gate oxide thickness and the cylindrical body diameter on the electrical parameters of the device is analyzed. (paper)

  16. Electrode Processes in Porous Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-11-26

    F104470 2.0 MASS SPECTROMETRY One part of activity for this year is an investigation of the behavior of silver electrodes through the distribution of...al. (2)). These, in some cases, involve tedious and time comsuming procedures and discrepencies of as much as 15% have been observed in the results. As

  17. Proton tunneling in solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondo, J.

    1998-10-01

    The tunneling rate of the proton and its isotopes between interstitial sites in solids is studied theoretically. The phonons and/or the electrons in the solid have two effects on the tunneling phenomenon. First, they suppress the transfer integral between two neighbouring states. Second, they give rise to a finite lifetime of the proton state. Usually the second effect is large and the tunneling probability per unit time (tunneling rate) can be defined. In some cases, however, a coherent tunneling is expected and actually observed. (author)

  18. Proton tunneling in solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, J.

    1998-01-01

    The tunneling rate of the proton and its isotopes between interstitial sites in solids is studied theoretically. The phonons and/or the electrons in the solid have two effects on the tunneling phenomenon. First, they suppress the transfer integral between two neighbouring states. Second, they give rise to a finite lifetime of the proton state. Usually the second effect is large and the tunneling probability per unit time (tunneling rate) can be defined. In some cases, however, a coherent tunneling is expected and actually observed. (author)

  19. Large spin-valve effect in a lateral spin-valve device based on ferromagnetic semiconductor GaMnAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asahara, Hirokatsu; Kanaki, Toshiki; Ohya, Shinobu; Tanaka, Masaaki

    2018-03-01

    We investigate the spin-dependent transport properties of a lateral spin-valve device based on the ferromagnetic semiconductor GaMnAs. This device is composed of a GaMnAs channel layer grown on GaAs with a narrow trench across the channel. Its current-voltage characteristics show tunneling behavior. Large magnetoresistance (MR) ratios of more than ˜10% are obtained. These values are much larger than those (˜0.1%) reported for lateral-type spin metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors. The magnetic field direction dependence of the MR curve differs from that of the anisotropic magnetoresistance of GaMnAs, which confirms that the MR signal originates from the spin-valve effect between the GaMnAs electrodes.

  20. Coherent tunnelling conductance in normal-metal/d-wave superconductor/normal-metal double tunnel junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, Z C; Zheng, Z M; Xing, D Y

    2004-01-01

    Taking simultaneously into account the electron-injected current from one normal-metal (N) electrode and the hole-injected current from the other N electrode, we study the coherent tunnelling conductance and quantum interference effects in N/d-wave superconductor (S)/N double tunnel junctions. It is found that oscillations of all quasiparticle transport coefficients and the conductance spectrum with quasiparticle energy and thickness of the d-wave S depend to a great extent on the crystal orientation of the d-wave S. The zero-bias conductance peak is gradually lowered with increasing barrier strength and/or temperature, its magnitude exhibiting damped oscillatory behaviour with thickness of S

  1. A Pascalian lateral drift sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jansen, H.

    2016-01-01

    A novel concept of a layer-wise produced semiconductor sensor for precise particle tracking is proposed herein. In contrast to common semiconductor sensors, local regions with increased doping concentration deep in the bulk termed charge guides increase the lateral drift of free charges on their way to the read-out electrode. This lateral drift enables charge sharing independent of the incident position of the traversing particle. With a regular grid of charge guides the lateral charge distribution resembles a normalised Pascal's triangle for particles that are stopped in depths lower than the depth of the first layer of the charge guides. For minimum ionising particles a sum of binomial distributions describes the lateral charge distribution. This concept decouples the achievable sensor resolution from the pitch size as the characteristic length is replaced by the lateral distance of the charge guides.

  2. A Pascalian lateral drift sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansen, H., E-mail: hendrik.jansen@desy.de

    2016-09-21

    A novel concept of a layer-wise produced semiconductor sensor for precise particle tracking is proposed herein. In contrast to common semiconductor sensors, local regions with increased doping concentration deep in the bulk termed charge guides increase the lateral drift of free charges on their way to the read-out electrode. This lateral drift enables charge sharing independent of the incident position of the traversing particle. With a regular grid of charge guides the lateral charge distribution resembles a normalised Pascal's triangle for particles that are stopped in depths lower than the depth of the first layer of the charge guides. For minimum ionising particles a sum of binomial distributions describes the lateral charge distribution. This concept decouples the achievable sensor resolution from the pitch size as the characteristic length is replaced by the lateral distance of the charge guides.

  3. Tunnel effect wave energy detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, William J. (Inventor); Waltman, Steven B. (Inventor); Kenny, Thomas W. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    Methods and apparatus for measuring gravitational and inertial forces, magnetic fields, or wave or radiant energy acting on an object or fluid in space provide an electric tunneling current through a gap between an electrode and that object or fluid in space and vary that gap with any selected one of such forces, magnetic fields, or wave or radiant energy acting on that object or fluid. These methods and apparatus sense a corresponding variation in an electric property of that gap and determine the latter force, magnetic fields, or wave or radiant energy in response to that corresponding variation, and thereby sense or measure such parameters as acceleration, position, particle mass, velocity, magnetic field strength, presence or direction, or wave or radiant energy intensity, presence or direction.

  4. Nb/NiCu bilayers in single and stacked superconductive tunnel junctions: preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pepe, G.P.; Ruotolo, A.; Parlato, L.; Peluso, G.; Ausanio, G.; Carapella, G.; Latempa, R.

    2004-01-01

    We present preliminary experimental results concerning both single and stacked tunnel junctions in which one of the electrodes was formed by a superconductor/ferromagnet (S/F) bi-layer. In particular, in the stacked configuration a Nb/NiCu bi-layer was used as the intermediate electrode, and it was probed by tunneling on both sides. Tunnel junctions have been characterized in terms of current-voltage characteristics (IVC), and differential conductance. Preliminary steady-state injection-detection measurements performed in the stacked devices at T=4.2 K are also presented and discussed

  5. Spin-polarized tunneling through a ferromagnetic insulator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, M.; Kok, M.; Beukers, J.N.; Brinkman, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    The polarization of the tunnel conductance of spin-selective ferromagnetic insulators is modeled, providing a generalized concept of polarization including both the effects of electrode and barrier polarization. The polarization model is extended to take additional non-spin-polarizing insulating

  6. Modified Arthroscopic Brostrom Procedure With Bone Tunnels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2016-08-01

    The open anatomic repair of the anterior talofibular and calcaneofibular ligaments (modified Brostrom procedure) is widely accepted as the standard surgical stabilization procedure for lateral ankle instability that does not respond to conservative measures. Arthroscopic Brostrom procedures with a suture anchor have been reported to achieve both anatomic repair of the lateral ankle ligaments and management of the associated intra-articular lesions. However, the complication rates are higher than open Brostom procedures. Many of these complications are associated with the use of a suture anchor. We report a modified arthroscopic Brostrom procedure in which the anterolateral ankle capsule is anchored to the lateral malleolus through small bone tunnels instead of suture anchors.

  7. Quantum tunneling time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Z.S.; Lai, C.H.; Oh, C.H.; Kwek, L.C.

    2004-01-01

    We present a calculation of quantum tunneling time based on the transition duration of wave peak from one side of a barrier to the other. In our formulation, the tunneling time comprises a real and an imaginary part. The real part is an extension of the phase tunneling time with quantum corrections whereas the imaginary time is associated with energy derivatives of the probability amplitudes

  8. Charge Islands Through Tunneling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Daryl C.

    2002-01-01

    It has been recently reported that the electrical charge in a semiconductive carbon nanotube is not evenly distributed, but rather it is divided into charge "islands." This paper links the aforementioned phenomenon to tunneling and provides further insight into the higher rate of tunneling processes, which makes tunneling devices attractive. This paper also provides a basis for calculating the charge profile over the length of the tube so that nanoscale devices' conductive properties may be fully exploited.

  9. Josephson tunneling and nanosystems

    OpenAIRE

    Ovchinnikov, Yurii; Kresin, Vladimir

    2010-01-01

    Josephson tunneling between nanoclusters is analyzed. The discrete nature of the electronic energy spectra, including their shell ordering, is explicitly taken into account. The treatment considers the two distinct cases of resonant and non-resonant tunneling. It is demonstrated that the current density greatly exceeds the value discussed in the conventional theory. Nanoparticles are shown to be promising building blocks for nanomaterials-based tunneling networks.

  10. About tunnelling times

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olkhovsky, V.S.; Recami, E.

    1991-08-01

    In this paper, first we critically analyse the main theoretical definitions and calculations of the sub-barrier tunnelling and reflection times. Secondly, we propose a new, physically sensible definition of such durations, on the basis of a recent general formalism (already tested for other types of quantum collisions). At last, we discuss some results regarding temporal evolution of the tunnelling processes, and in particular the ''particle'' speed during tunnelling. (author). 36 refs, 1 fig

  11. Large resistance change on magnetic tunnel junction based molecular spintronics devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyagi, Pawan; Friebe, Edward

    2018-05-01

    Molecular bridges covalently bonded to two ferromagnetic electrodes can transform ferromagnetic materials and produce intriguing spin transport characteristics. This paper discusses the impact of molecule induced strong coupling on the spin transport. To study molecular coupling effect the octametallic molecular cluster (OMC) was bridged between two ferromagnetic electrodes of a magnetic tunnel junction (Ta/Co/NiFe/AlOx/NiFe/Ta) along the exposed side edges. OMCs induced strong inter-ferromagnetic electrode coupling to yield drastic changes in transport properties of the magnetic tunnel junction testbed at the room temperature. These OMCs also transformed the magnetic properties of magnetic tunnel junctions. SQUID and ferromagnetic resonance studies provided insightful data to explain transport studies on the magnetic tunnel junction based molecular spintronics devices.

  12. Field-Effect-Transistor Behavior of a Multiwall Carbon Nano Fiber Directly Grown on Nickel Electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. W. Chang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiwall carbon nanofibers (MWCNFs were directly grown across the catalyst electrodes fabricated through photolithography by a microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MPECVD method. The conductivities were measured repeatedly at various ranges of the drain-source voltage VDS at low temperatures which shows clearly the nonlinear behavior in electrical conductance. The electric-charging energy increases as the length and diameter of the floated carbon nanowire increases in accord with the theoretical estimation for capacitive charging as further verified from the experimentally nonlinear I-V characterization. The oscillation of the I-V curves is tacitly assumed to be embodied in the irregular variation of conductance rewarding the tremendous applications of single-electron devices for MWCNFs. The directly lateral growth of MWCNFs across electrodes allows a high contact current in spite of the existence of tunneling barriers between the wire and electrodes. The high absorption capacity of environment gases of this device is expecting it to have a pragmatic use in gas sensing.

  13. Microsystem Aeromechanics Wind Tunnel

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Microsystem Aeromechanics Wind Tunnel advances the study of fundamental flow physics relevant to micro air vehicle (MAV) flight and assesses vehicle performance...

  14. Fermi velocity mismatch effects in the tunneling characteristics of high-Tc superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aponte, J.M.; Nunez-Regueiro, J.E.; Bellorin, A.; Octavio, M.

    1994-01-01

    We present a comparative study of the tunneling characteristics of point contacts in which one electrode was a superconducting single crystal of Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O x and the other electrode was either a normal metal (N-HTSC point contact), or a non-superconducting rare earth metallic oxide (REMO-HTSC point contact), or another crystal of the same superconductor (HTSC'-HTSC point contact). We show that the mismatch of the Fermi velocities of the electrodes is in part responsible for the irreproducibility of most of the tunneling conductance curves observed in high temperature superconductors. (orig.)

  15. Post-test examination of a copper electrode from deposition hole 5 in the Prototype Repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosborg, Bo [Rosborg Consulting, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    2013-04-15

    Three copper electrodes have been exposed for eight years in the outer section of the Prototype Repository at Aespoe. The electrodes were installed in the upper bentonite block of deposition hole 5 in May 2003. Most of the time the temperature of the electrodes has been somewhat below 35 deg C. The electrodes were retrieved for post-test examination in September 2011. This report presents results from electrochemical measurements and the post-test examination of one of the electrodes. The corrosion potential of the examined copper electrode was -40 mV SHE (2011-02-04) when part of the concrete plug to the outer section of the repository had been removed and made measurements possible. When the back-fill in the deposition tunnel had been removed it was 25 mV SHE (2011-09-12). Finally, before letting loose the copper electrode from the retrieved bentonite block, the corrosion potential was found to be 165 mV SHE (2011-11-15) being a sign of air ingress to the electrode/ bentonite interface. It was immediately obvious from the appearance of the copper electrode, when part of the surrounding bentonite had been removed, that both Cu(I) and Cu(II) corrosion products existed on the electrode surface. X-ray diffraction measurements also verified the presence of cuprite, Cu{sub 2}O, and malachite, Cu{sub 2}(OH){sub 2}CO{sub 3}, on the electrode; however, paratacamite, Cu{sub 2}(OH){sub 3}Cl, was not found. The performed Fourier transform infrared and Raman spectroscopy confirmed these observations. The corrosion product film, of which cuprite is the main part, was quite uneven and porous. No unmistakable signs of pitting have been found. The appearance of the copper electrode reminded of the coupons from the retrieved LOT test parcels, but was different from the appearance of the surface on the full-size canisters. For the latter blue-green Cu(II) corrosion products have not or only rarely been observed from visual examination immediately after removing the surrounding

  16. Post-test examination of a copper electrode from deposition hole 5 in the Prototype Repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosborg, Bo

    2013-04-01

    Three copper electrodes have been exposed for eight years in the outer section of the Prototype Repository at Aespoe. The electrodes were installed in the upper bentonite block of deposition hole 5 in May 2003. Most of the time the temperature of the electrodes has been somewhat below 35 deg C. The electrodes were retrieved for post-test examination in September 2011. This report presents results from electrochemical measurements and the post-test examination of one of the electrodes. The corrosion potential of the examined copper electrode was -40 mV SHE (2011-02-04) when part of the concrete plug to the outer section of the repository had been removed and made measurements possible. When the back-fill in the deposition tunnel had been removed it was 25 mV SHE (2011-09-12). Finally, before letting loose the copper electrode from the retrieved bentonite block, the corrosion potential was found to be 165 mV SHE (2011-11-15) being a sign of air ingress to the electrode/ bentonite interface. It was immediately obvious from the appearance of the copper electrode, when part of the surrounding bentonite had been removed, that both Cu(I) and Cu(II) corrosion products existed on the electrode surface. X-ray diffraction measurements also verified the presence of cuprite, Cu 2 O, and malachite, Cu 2 (OH) 2 CO 3 , on the electrode; however, paratacamite, Cu 2 (OH) 3 Cl, was not found. The performed Fourier transform infrared and Raman spectroscopy confirmed these observations. The corrosion product film, of which cuprite is the main part, was quite uneven and porous. No unmistakable signs of pitting have been found. The appearance of the copper electrode reminded of the coupons from the retrieved LOT test parcels, but was different from the appearance of the surface on the full-size canisters. For the latter blue-green Cu(II) corrosion products have not or only rarely been observed from visual examination immediately after removing the surrounding bentonite. Differences that

  17. Tunnelling through a Gaussian random barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bezak, Viktor

    2008-01-01

    A thorough analysis of the tunnelling of electrons through a laterally inhomogeneous rectangular barrier is presented. The barrier height is defined as a statistically homogeneous Gaussian random function. In order to simplify calculations, we assume that the electron energy is low enough in comparison with the mean value of the barrier height. The randomness of the barrier height is defined vertically by a constant variance and horizontally by a finite correlation length. We present detailed calculations of the angular probability density for the tunnelled electrons (i.e. for the scattering forwards). The tunnelling manifests a remarkably diffusive character if the wavelength of the electrons is comparable with the correlation length of the barrier

  18. Electron tunneling in carbon nanotube composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gau, C; Kuo, Cheng-Yung; Ko, H S

    2009-01-01

    Nanocomposites, such as polymer blending with carbon nanotubes (CNTs), have been shown to have a drastic reduction in the resistivity and become conductive when the CNTs concentration has reached a certain percolation threshold. The reduction could be more than a millionth of the original polymer material. This has been realized as the formation of an infinite cluster of connected CNTs or pathways. Therefore, the conductivity of a nanocomposite should follow that of CNTs. Here we show that the resistivity of a nanocomposite is not governed by the interconnected CNTs, but the polymer between neighboring CNTs. That is, polymer-CNTs exhibit the nature of a conducting polymer, which can be explained as the tunneling of electrons one by one from the first CNT electrode to the next-nearest CNT electrode, forming a CNT/polymer pathway. A conduction model based on the tunneling of electrons passing, one by one, through the polymer gap between two neighboring CNT electrodes is formulated and derived. This model can accurately predict the significant reduction of the polymer-CNTs' resistivity with the addition of CNTs. The temperature effect can be readily incorporated to account for resistivity variation with the temperature of this nanocomposites.

  19. Light addressable gold electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khalid, Waqas

    2011-07-01

    The main objective carried out in this dissertation was to fabricate Light Amplified Potentiometric sensors (LAPS) based upon the semiconductor nanoparticles (quantum dots) instead of its bulk form. Quantum dots (QDs) were opted for this device fabrication because of their superior fluorescent, electric and catalytic properties. Also in comparison to their bulk counterparts they will make device small, light weighted and power consumption is much lower. QDs were immobilized on a Au substrate via 1,4 benzene dithiol (BDT) molecule. Initially a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of BDT was established on Au substrate. Because of SAM, the conductivity of Au substrate decreased dramatically. Furthermore QDs were anchored with the help of BDT molecule on Au substrate. When QDs immobilized on Au substrate (QD/Au) via BDT molecule were irradiated with UV-visible light, electron-hole pairs were generated in QDs. The surface defect states in QDs trapped the excited electrons and long lived electron-hole pairs were formed. By the application of an appropriate bias potential on Au substrate the electrons could be supplied or extracted from the QDs via tunneling through BDT. Thus a cathodic or anodic current could be observed depending upon bias potential under illumination. However without light illumination the QD/Au electrode remained an insulator. To improve the device different modifications were made, including different substrates (Au evaporated on glass, Au evaporated on mica sheets and Au sputtered on SiO{sub 2}/Si) and different dithiol molecules (capped and uncapped biphenyl 4,4' dithiol and capped and uncapped 4,4' dimercaptostilbenes) were tried. Also different QD immobilization techniques (normal incubation, spin coating, layer by layer assembly (LbL) of polyelectrolytes and heat immobilization) were employed. This device was able to detect electrochemically different analytes depending upon the QDs incorporated. For example CdS QDs were able to detect 4

  20. Building information modelling review with potential applications in tunnel engineering of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Weihong; Qin, Haiyang; Qiu, Junling; Fan, Haobo; Lai, Jinxing; Wang, Ke; Wang, Lixin

    2017-08-01

    Building information modelling (BIM) can be applied to tunnel engineering to address a number of problems, including complex structure, extensive design, long construction cycle and increased security risks. To promote the development of tunnel engineering in China, this paper combines actual cases, including the Xingu mountain tunnel and the Shigu Mountain tunnel, to systematically analyse BIM applications in tunnel engineering in China. The results indicate that BIM technology in tunnel engineering is currently mainly applied during the design stage rather than during construction and operation stages. The application of BIM technology in tunnel engineering covers many problems, such as a lack of standards, incompatibility of different software, disorganized management, complex combination with GIS (Geographic Information System), low utilization rate and poor awareness. In this study, through summary of related research results and engineering cases, suggestions are introduced and an outlook for the BIM application in tunnel engineering in China is presented, which provides guidance for design optimization, construction standards and later operation maintenance.

  1. The tunneling magnetoresistance and spin-polarized optoelectronic properties of graphyne-based molecular magnetic tunnel junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Zhi; Ouyang, Bin; Lan, Guoqing; Xu, Li-Chun; Liu, Ruiping; Liu, Xuguang

    2017-01-01

    Using density functional theory and the non-equilibrium Green’s function method, we investigate the spin-dependent transport and optoelectronic properties of the graphyne-based molecular magnetic tunnel junctions (MMTJs). We find that these MMTJs exhibit an outstanding tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) effect. The TMR value is as high as 10 6 %. When the magnetization directions of two electrodes are antiparallel under positive or negative bias voltages, two kinds of pure spin currents can be obtained in the systems. Furthermore, under the irradiation of infrared, visible or ultraviolet light, spin-polarized photocurrents can be generated in the MMTJs, but the corresponding microscopic mechanisms are different. More importantly, if the magnetization directions of two electrodes are antiparallel, the photocurrents with different spins are spatially separated, appearing at different electrodes. This phenomenon provides a new way to simultaneously generate two spin currents. (paper)

  2. Scanning tunneling microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binnig, G.; Rohrer, H.

    1983-01-01

    Based on vacuum tunneling, a novel type of microscope, the scanning tunneling microscope (STM) was developed. It has an unprecedented resolution in real space on an atomic scale. The authors review the important technical features, illustrate the power of the STM for surface topographies and discuss its potential in other areas of science and technology. (Auth.)

  3. Electron tunneling in chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamaraev, K.I.; Khajrutdinov, R.F.; Zhdanov, V.P.; Molin, Yu.N.

    1985-01-01

    Results of experimental and theoretical investigations are outlined systematically on electron tunnelling in chemical reactions. Mechanism of electron transport to great distances is shown to be characteristic to chemical compounds of a wide range. The function of tunnel reactions is discussed for various fields of chemistry, including radiation chemistry, electrochemistry, chemistry of solids, chemistry of surface and catalysis

  4. Tunnel fire dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Ingason, Haukur; Lönnermark, Anders

    2015-01-01

    This book covers a wide range of issues in fire safety engineering in tunnels, describes the phenomena related to tunnel fire dynamics, presents state-of-the-art research, and gives detailed solutions to these major issues. Examples for calculations are provided. The aim is to significantly improve the understanding of fire safety engineering in tunnels. Chapters on fuel and ventilation control, combustion products, gas temperatures, heat fluxes, smoke stratification, visibility, tenability, design fire curves, heat release, fire suppression and detection, CFD modeling, and scaling techniques all equip readers to create their own fire safety plans for tunnels. This book should be purchased by any engineer or public official with responsibility for tunnels. It would also be of interest to many fire protection engineers as an application of evolving technical principles of fire safety.

  5. Atomistic nature in band-to-band tunneling in two-dimensional silicon pn tunnel diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabe, Michiharu; Tan, Hoang Nhat; Mizuno, Takeshi; Muruganathan, Manoharan; Anh, Le The; Mizuta, Hiroshi; Nuryadi, Ratno; Moraru, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    We study low-temperature transport properties of two-dimensional (2D) Si tunnel diodes, or Si Esaki diodes, with a lateral layout. In ordinary Si Esaki diodes, interband tunneling current is severely limited because of the law of momentum conservation, while nanoscale Esaki diodes may behave differently due to the dopants in the narrow depletion region, by atomistic effects which release such current limitation. In thin-Si lateral highly doped pn diodes, we find clear signatures of interband tunneling between 2D-subbands involving phonon assistance. More importantly, the tunneling current is sharply enhanced in a narrow voltage range by resonance via a pair of a donor- and an acceptor-atom in the pn junction region. Such atomistic behavior is recognized as a general feature showing up only in nanoscale tunnel diodes. In particular, a donor-acceptor pair with deeper ground-state energies is likely to be responsible for such a sharply enhanced current peak, tunable by external biases.

  6. Sheep laterality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Dean M; Murray, Leigh W

    2013-01-01

    Turning preferences among 309 white-faced ewes were individually evaluated in an enclosed, artificially lit T-maze, followed by each ewe choosing either a right or left return alley to return to peers. Data recorded included time in the start box, time in the T-maze, exit arm chosen to leave the T-maze, and return alley. Right and left arms of the T-maze were chosen 65.7% and 34.3% of the time, respectively, while right and left return alleys were chosen 32.4% and 67.6%, respectively. Exit arm and return alley were not independently chosen (p laterality was not related (α =.05) to time of day the test was administered, ewe's age or genetics, most recent liveweight, or most recent shorn fleece weight. The mean time spent in the start box (21 s) was not related to exit arm (p =.947) or return alley (p =.779). Mean time (15 s) spent in the T-maze was not related to exit arm (p =.086) or return alley (p =.952). More research will be required to understand sheep turning laterality and how it can impact working facilities and research equipment.

  7. Can one speak about tunneling times in polite society?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauge, E.H.

    1997-01-01

    A brief and partial review of the tunneling time issue, as it was debated in the late 1980s, is given. The review will be strongly biased, stressing the point of view taken by the author. Although later theoretical developments are not covered, a few pointers to the recent experiments on photonic tunneling will be given. The emphasis will be on matters of interpretation and internal consistency. It is argued that the question of local tunneling times, as commonly understood, has no answer. Instead of continuing a debate on objects of dubious experimental relevance, one should instead focus on understanding existing experiments and, if possible, make predictions on feasible new ones. (author)

  8. Ultrafast scanning tunneling microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botkin, D.A. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    I have developed an ultrafast scanning tunneling microscope (USTM) based on uniting stroboscopic methods of ultrafast optics and scanned probe microscopy to obtain nanometer spatial resolution and sub-picosecond temporal resolution. USTM increases the achievable time resolution of a STM by more than 6 orders of magnitude; this should enable exploration of mesoscopic and nanometer size systems on time scales corresponding to the period or decay of fundamental excitations. USTM consists of a photoconductive switch with subpicosecond response time in series with the tip of a STM. An optical pulse from a modelocked laser activates the switch to create a gate for the tunneling current, while a second laser pulse on the sample initiates a dynamic process which affects the tunneling current. By sending a large sequence of identical pulse pairs and measuring the average tunnel current as a function of the relative time delay between the pulses in each pair, one can map the time evolution of the surface process. USTM was used to measure the broadband response of the STM`s atomic size tunnel barrier in frequencies from tens to hundreds of GHz. The USTM signal amplitude decays linearly with the tunnel junction conductance, so the spatial resolution of the time-resolved signal is comparable to that of a conventional STM. Geometrical capacitance of the junction does not appear to play an important role in the measurement, but a capacitive effect intimately related to tunneling contributes to the measured signals and may limit the ultimate resolution of the USTM.

  9. Tunnel magnetoresistance in alumina, magnesia and composite tunnel barrier magnetic tunnel junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schebaum, Oliver; Drewello, Volker; Auge, Alexander; Reiss, Guenter; Muenzenberg, Markus; Schuhmann, Henning; Seibt, Michael; Thomas, Andy

    2011-01-01

    Using magnetron sputtering, we have prepared Co-Fe-B/tunnel barrier/Co-Fe-B magnetic tunnel junctions with tunnel barriers consisting of alumina, magnesia, and magnesia-alumina bilayer systems. The highest tunnel magnetoresistance ratios we found were 73% for alumina and 323% for magnesia-based tunnel junctions. Additionally, tunnel junctions with a unified layer stack were prepared for the three different barriers. In these systems, the tunnel magnetoresistance ratios at optimum annealing temperatures were found to be 65% for alumina, 173% for magnesia, and 78% for the composite tunnel barriers. The similar tunnel magnetoresistance ratios of the tunnel junctions containing alumina provide evidence that coherent tunneling is suppressed by the alumina layer in the composite tunnel barrier. - Research highlights: → Transport properties of Co-Fe-B/tunnel barrier/Co-Fe-B magnetic tunnel junctions. → Tunnel barrier consists of MgO, Al-Ox, or MgO/Al-Ox bilayer systems. → Limitation of TMR-ratio in composite barrier tunnel junctions to Al-Ox values. → Limitation indicates that Al-Ox layer is causing incoherent tunneling.

  10. Tunneling current between graphene layers

    OpenAIRE

    Poklonski, Nikolai A.; Siahlo, Andrei I.; Vyrko, Sergey A.; Popov, Andrey M.; Lozovik, Yurii E.

    2013-01-01

    The physical model that allows to calculate the values of the tunneling current be-tween graphene layers is proposed. The tunneling current according to the pro-posed model is proportional to the area of tunneling transition. The calculated value of tunneling conductivity is in qualitative agreement with experimental data.

  11. Vacuum phonon tunneling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altfeder, Igor; Voevodin, Andrey A; Roy, Ajit K

    2010-10-15

    Field-induced phonon tunneling, a previously unknown mechanism of interfacial thermal transport, has been revealed by ultrahigh vacuum inelastic scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Using thermally broadened Fermi-Dirac distribution in the STM tip as in situ atomic-scale thermometer we found that thermal vibrations of the last tip atom are effectively transmitted to sample surface despite few angstroms wide vacuum gap. We show that phonon tunneling is driven by interfacial electric field and thermally vibrating image charges, and its rate is enhanced by surface electron-phonon interaction.

  12. TOPICAL REVIEW: Tunneling magnetoresistance from a symmetry filtering effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William H Butler

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides a brief overview of the young, but rapidly growing field of spintronics. Its primary objective is to explain how as electrons tunnel through simple insulators such as MgO, wavefunctions of certain symmetries are preferentially transmitted. This symmetry filtering property can be converted into a spin-filtering property if the insulator is joined epitaxially to a ferromagnetic electrode with the same two-dimensional symmetry parallel to the interface. A second requirement of the ferromagnetic electrodes is that a wavefunction with the preferred symmetry exists in one of the two spin channels but not in the other. These requirements are satisfied for electrons traveling perpendicular to the interface for Fe–MgO–Fe tunnel barriers. This leads to a large change in the resistance when the magnetic moment of one of the electrodes is rotated relative to those of the other electrode. This large tunneling magnetoresistance effect is being used as the read sensor in hard drives and may form the basis for a new type of magnetic memory.

  13. Spin transfer torque with spin diffusion in magnetic tunnel junctions

    KAUST Repository

    Manchon, Aurelien

    2012-08-09

    Spin transport in magnetic tunnel junctions in the presence of spin diffusion is considered theoretically. Combining ballistic tunneling across the barrier and diffusive transport in the electrodes, we solve the spin dynamics equation in the metallic layers. We show that spin diffusion mixes the transverse spin current components and dramatically modifies the bias dependence of the effective spin transfer torque. This leads to a significant linear bias dependence of the out-of-plane torque, as well as a nonconventional thickness dependence of both spin torque components.

  14. Planar Josephson tunnel junctions in a transverse magnetic field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Monacoa, R.; Aarøe, Morten; Mygind, Jesper

    2007-01-01

    demagnetization effects imposed by the tunnel barrier and electrodes geometry are important. Measurements of the junction critical current versus magnetic field in planar Nb-based high-quality junctions with different geometry, size, and critical current density show that it is advantageous to use a transverse......Traditionally, since the discovery of the Josephson effect in 1962, the magnetic diffraction pattern of planar Josephson tunnel junctions has been recorded with the field applied in the plane of the junction. Here we discuss the static junction properties in a transverse magnetic field where...

  15. Quantum tunneling with friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokieda, M.; Hagino, K.

    2017-05-01

    Using the phenomenological quantum friction models introduced by P. Caldirola [Nuovo Cimento 18, 393 (1941), 10.1007/BF02960144] and E. Kanai [Prog. Theor. Phys. 3, 440 (1948), 10.1143/ptp/3.4.440], M. D. Kostin [J. Chem. Phys. 57, 3589 (1972), 10.1063/1.1678812], and K. Albrecht [Phys. Lett. B 56, 127 (1975), 10.1016/0370-2693(75)90283-X], we study quantum tunneling of a one-dimensional potential in the presence of energy dissipation. To this end, we calculate the tunneling probability using a time-dependent wave-packet method. The friction reduces the tunneling probability. We show that the three models provide similar penetrabilities to each other, among which the Caldirola-Kanai model requires the least numerical effort. We also discuss the effect of energy dissipation on quantum tunneling in terms of barrier distributions.

  16. Wind Tunnel Testing Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — NASA Ames Research Center is pleased to offer the services of our premier wind tunnel facilities that have a broad range of proven testing capabilities to customers...

  17. INCAS TRISONIC WIND TUNNEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florin MUNTEANU

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The 1.2 m x 1.2 m Trisonic Blowdown Wind Tunnel is the largest of the experimental facilities at the National Institute for Aerospace Research - I.N.C.A.S. "Elie Carafoli", Bucharest, Romania. The tunnel has been designed by the Canadian company DSMA (now AIOLOS and since its commissioning in 1978 has performed high speed aerodynamic tests for more than 120 projects of aircraft, missiles and other objects among which the twin jet fighter IAR-93, the jet trainer IAR-99, the MIG-21 Lancer, the Polish jet fighter YRYDA and others. In the last years the wind tunnel has been used mostly for experimental research in European projects such as UFAST. The high flow quality parameters and the wide range of testing capabilities ensure the competitivity of the tunnel at an international level.

  18. The ISI Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-10-01

    DP /etc/tunnelvisa p zephyr dark -star TCP /etc/tunnelvisa p zephyr dak’star ICMP /etc/tunnelvisa p zephyr quark MDP /etc/tunnelvisa p zephyr quark ...drax-net-yp 128.9.32.2 1 route add quark -net-yp 128.9.32.3 1 route add vlsi-net-yp 128.9.32.4 1 route add darkstar-net-yp 128.9.32.3 1 route add rocky...TCP /etc/tunnel-visa p zephyr quark ICMP /etc/tunnel-visa p zephyr drax tTI)P /etc/tunnel-visa p zephyr drax TCP /etc/tunnel_visa p zephyr drax ICMP

  19. Wind Tunnel Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This ARDEC facility consists of subsonic, transonic, and supersonic wind tunnels to acquire aerodynamic data. Full-scale and sub-scale models of munitions are fitted...

  20. Water Tunnel Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — NETL’s High-Pressure Water Tunnel Facility in Pittsburgh, PA, re-creates the conditions found 3,000 meters beneath the ocean’s surface, allowing scientists to study...

  1. The Beginner's Guide to Wind Tunnels with TunnelSim and TunnelSys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Thomas J.; Galica, Carol A.; Vila, Anthony J.

    2010-01-01

    The Beginner's Guide to Wind Tunnels is a Web-based, on-line textbook that explains and demonstrates the history, physics, and mathematics involved with wind tunnels and wind tunnel testing. The Web site contains several interactive computer programs to demonstrate scientific principles. TunnelSim is an interactive, educational computer program that demonstrates basic wind tunnel design and operation. TunnelSim is a Java (Sun Microsystems Inc.) applet that solves the continuity and Bernoulli equations to determine the velocity and pressure throughout a tunnel design. TunnelSys is a group of Java applications that mimic wind tunnel testing techniques. Using TunnelSys, a team of students designs, tests, and post-processes the data for a virtual, low speed, and aircraft wing.

  2. Tunnelling of a molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarvis, P.D.; Bulte, D.P.

    1998-01-01

    A quantum-mechanical description of tunnelling is presented for a one-dimensional system with internal oscillator degrees of freedom. The 'charged diatomic molecule' is frustrated on encountering a barrier potential by its centre of charge not being coincident with its centre of mass, resulting in transitions amongst internal states. In an adiabatic limit, the tunnelling of semiclassical coherent-like oscillator states is shown to exhibit the Hartman and Bueuttiker-Landauer times t H and t BL , with the time dependence of the coherent state parameter for the tunnelled state given by α(t) = α e -iω(t+Δt) , Δt = t H - it BL . A perturbation formalism is developed, whereby the exact transfer matrix can be expanded to any desired accuracy in a suitable limit. An 'intrinsic' time, based on the oscillator transition rate during tunnelling, transmission or reflection, is introduced. In simple situations the resulting intrinsic tunnelling time is shown to vanish to lowest order. In the general case a particular (nonzero) parametrisation is inferred, and its properties discussed in comparison with the literature on tunnelling times for both wavepackets and internal clocks. Copyright (1998) CSIRO Australia

  3. Effect of an Interfacial Layer on Electron Tunneling through Atomically Thin Al2O3 Tunnel Barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilt, Jamie; Sakidja, Ridwan; Goul, Ryan; Wu, Judy Z

    2017-10-25

    Electron tunneling through high-quality, atomically thin dielectric films can provide a critical enabling technology for future microelectronics, bringing enhanced quantum coherent transport, fast speed, small size, and high energy efficiency. A fundamental challenge is in controlling the interface between the dielectric and device electrodes. An interfacial layer (IL) will contain defects and introduce defects in the dielectric film grown atop, preventing electron tunneling through the formation of shorts. In this work, we present the first systematic investigation of the IL in Al 2 O 3 dielectric films of 1-6 Å's in thickness on an Al electrode. We integrated several advanced approaches: molecular dynamics to simulate IL formation, in situ high vacuum sputtering atomic layer deposition (ALD) to synthesize Al 2 O 3 on Al films, and in situ ultrahigh vacuum scanning tunneling spectroscopy to probe the electron tunneling through the Al 2 O 3 . The IL had a profound effect on electron tunneling. We observed a reduced tunnel barrier height and soft-type dielectric breakdown which indicate that defects are present in both the IL and in the Al 2 O 3 . The IL forms primarily due to exposure of the Al to trace O 2 and/or H 2 O during the pre-ALD heating step of fabrication. As the IL was systematically reduced, by controlling the pre-ALD sample heating, we observed an increase of the ALD Al 2 O 3 barrier height from 0.9 to 1.5 eV along with a transition from soft to hard dielectric breakdown. This work represents a key step toward the realization of high-quality, atomically thin dielectrics with electron tunneling for the next generation of microelectronics.

  4. Electrochemistry at a Metal Nanoparticle on a Tunneling Film: A Steady-State Model of Current Densities at a Tunneling Ultramicroelectrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Caleb M; Kim, Jiyeon; Bard, Allen J

    2015-09-09

    Here, a new methodology is proposed for treating electrochemical current densities in metal-insulator-metal nanoparticle (M-I-MNP) systems. The described model provides broad, practical insights about MNP-mediated electron transfer to redox species in solution, where electron transfer from the underlying electrode to a MNP via tunneling and heterogeneous electron transfer from the MNP to redox species in solution are treated as sequential steps. Tunneling is treated through an adaptation of the Simmons model of tunneling in metal-insulator-metal structures, and explicit equations are provided for tunneling currents, which demonstrate the effect of various experimental parameters, such as insulator thickness and MNP size. Overall, a general approach is demonstrated for determining experimental conditions where tunneling will have a measurable impact on the electrochemistry of M-I-MNP systems.

  5. Resonant tunneling quantum waveguides of variable cross-section, asymptotics, numerics, and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Baskin, Lev; Plamenevskii, Boris; Sarafanov, Oleg

    2015-01-01

    This volume studies electron resonant tunneling in two- and three-dimensional quantum waveguides of variable cross-sections in the time-independent approach. Mathematical models are suggested for the resonant tunneling and develop asymptotic and numerical approaches for investigating the models. Also, schemes are presented for several electronics devices based on the phenomenon of resonant tunneling.   Devices based on the phenomenon of electron resonant tunneling are widely used in electronics. Efforts are directed towards refining properties of resonance structures. There are prospects for building new nanosize electronics elements based on quantum dot systems.   However, the role of resonance structure can also be given to a quantum wire of variable cross-section. Instead of an "electrode - quantum dot - electrode" system, one can use a quantum wire with two narrows. A waveguide narrow is an effective potential barrier for longitudinal electron motion along a waveguide. The part of the waveguide between ...

  6. Large current modulation and spin-dependent tunneling of vertical graphene/MoS2 heterostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myoung, Nojoon; Seo, Kyungchul; Lee, Seung Joo; Ihm, G

    2013-08-27

    Vertical graphene heterostructures have been introduced as an alternative architecture for electronic devices by using quantum tunneling. Here, we present that the current on/off ratio of vertical graphene field-effect transistors is enhanced by using an armchair graphene nanoribbon as an electrode. Moreover, we report spin-dependent tunneling current of the graphene/MoS2 heterostructures. When an atomically thin MoS2 layer sandwiched between graphene electrodes becomes magnetic, Dirac fermions with different spins feel different heights of the tunnel barrier, leading to spin-dependent tunneling. Our finding will develop the present graphene heterostructures for electronic devices by improving the device performance and by adding the possibility of spintronics based on graphene.

  7. Dynamic Tunneling Junctions at the Atomic Intersection of Two Twisted Graphene Edges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellunato, Amedeo; Vrbica, Sasha D; Sabater, Carlos; de Vos, Erik W; Fermin, Remko; Kanneworff, Kirsten N; Galli, Federica; van Ruitenbeek, Jan M; Schneider, Grégory F

    2018-04-11

    The investigation of the transport properties of single molecules by flowing tunneling currents across extremely narrow gaps is relevant for challenges as diverse as the development of molecular electronics and sequencing of DNA. The achievement of well-defined electrode architectures remains a technical challenge, especially due to the necessity of high precision fabrication processes and the chemical instability of most bulk metals. Here, we illustrate a continuously adjustable tunneling junction between the edges of two twisted graphene sheets. The unique property of the graphene electrodes is that the sheets are rigidly supported all the way to the atomic edge. By analyzing the tunneling current characteristics, we also demonstrate that the spacing across the gap junction can be controllably adjusted. Finally, we demonstrate the transition from the tunneling regime to contact and the formation of an atomic-sized junction between the two edges of graphene.

  8. Reliability of tunnel angle in ACL reconstruction: two-dimensional versus three-dimensional guide technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiter, Jeff R S; de Korompay, Nevin; Macdonald, Lindsey; McRae, Sheila; Froese, Warren; Macdonald, Peter B

    2011-08-01

    To compare the reliability of tibial tunnel position and angle produced with a standard ACL guide (two-dimensional guide) or Howell 65° Guide (three-dimensional guide) in the coronal and sagittal planes. In the sagittal plane, the dependent variables were the angle of the tibial tunnel relative to the tibial plateau and the position of the tibial tunnel with respect to the most posterior aspect of the tibia. In the coronal plane, the dependent variables were the angle of the tunnel with respect to the medial joint line of the tibia and the medial and lateral placement of the tibial tunnel relative to the most medial aspect of the tibia. The position and angle of the tibial tunnel in the coronal and sagittal planes were determined from anteroposterior and lateral radiographs, respectively, taken 2-6 months postoperatively. The two-dimensional and three-dimensional guide groups included 28 and 24 sets of radiographs, respectively. Tibial tunnel position was identified, and tunnel angle measurements were completed. Multiple investigators measured the position and angle of the tunnel 3 times, at least 7 days apart. The angle of the tibial tunnel in the coronal plane using a two-dimensional guide (61.3 ± 4.8°) was more horizontal (P guide (64.7 ± 6.2°). The position of the tibial tunnel in the sagittal plane was more anterior (P guide group compared to the three-dimensional guide group (43.3 ± 2.9%). The Howell Tibial Guide allows for reliable placement of the tibial tunnel in the coronal plane at an angle of 65°. Tibial tunnels were within the anatomical footprint of the ACL with either technique. Future studies should investigate the effects of tibial tunnel angle on knee function and patient quality of life. Case-control retrospective comparative study, Level III.

  9. Resonant tunneling across a ferroelectric domain wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, M.; Tao, L. L.; Velev, J. P.; Tsymbal, E. Y.

    2018-04-01

    Motivated by recent experimental observations, we explore electron transport properties of a ferroelectric tunnel junction (FTJ) with an embedded head-to-head ferroelectric domain wall, using first-principles density-functional theory calculations. We consider a FTJ with L a0.5S r0.5Mn O3 electrodes separated by a BaTi O3 barrier layer and show that an in-plane charged domain wall in the ferroelectric BaTi O3 can be induced by polar interfaces. The resulting V -shaped electrostatic potential profile across the BaTi O3 layer creates a quantum well and leads to the formation of a two-dimensional electron gas, which stabilizes the domain wall. The confined electronic states in the barrier are responsible for resonant tunneling as is evident from our quantum-transport calculations. We find that the resonant tunneling is an orbital selective process, which leads to sharp spikes in the momentum- and energy-resolved transmission spectra. Our results indicate that domain walls embedded in FTJs can be used to control the electron transport.

  10. High-temperature magnetoresistance study of a magnetic tunnel junction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, D.C.; Yao, Y.D.; Chen, C.M.; Hung, James; Chen, Y.S.; Wang, W.H.; Chen, W.C.; Kao, M.J.

    2006-01-01

    The thermal stability and the spin transportation phenomenon at room temperature and 140 deg. C of a series of magnetic tunneling junctions with the structure of bottom electrode/PtMn/Pinned layer/ AlO x /CoFe/NiFe/top electrode have been investigated. The MR ratio decreases from 33.5% at room temperature to 29% at 140 deg. C. The MR ratio at room temperature increases roughly 0.8% after thermal treatment at temperatures above 60 deg. C. This is related to the thermal relaxation of the strains existing in the samples

  11. Electric and VLF-MT survey of Tegatayama tunnel; Tegatayama tunnel no denki tansa oyobi VLF tansa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishitani, T [Akita University, Akita (Japan). Mining College

    1997-05-27

    To survey the structure at the depth between 20 and 30 m, field tests were conducted by means of vertical electric and VFL-MT (magnetotelluric) survey. Tegatayama tunnel has a total length of 276 m, width of 7.5 m, and height of 4.7 m, and the depth from the surface is about 28 m near the top of mountain. Near the tunnel, the thickness of surface soil is about 60 cm, which consists of clay soil including soft mudstone gravel. It was found that terrace deposit is distributed up to the depth of 8 m, and that mudstone is distributed below the depth of 8 m. Weighted four-electrode method was adopted for the vertical electrical survey. Measurements were conducted at the immediately above the tunnel, 10 m apart from the center of tunnel in the right and left, and 20 m apart from the center in the east. For the VLF-MT method, component of frequency 22.2 kHz was used. As a result of the tests, it was difficult to illustrate the existence of tunnel from the vertical electrical survey only at one point. Feature of the tunnel could be well illustrated by means of the VLF-MT method. 3 refs., 9 figs.

  12. All-electric-controlled spin current switching in single-molecule magnet-tunnel junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zheng-Zhong; Shen, Rui; Sheng, Li; Wang, Rui-Qiang; Wang, Bai-Gen; Xing, Ding-Yu

    2011-04-01

    A single-molecule magnet (SMM) coupled to two normal metallic electrodes can both switch spin-up and spin-down electronic currents within two different windows of SMM gate voltage. Such spin current switching in the SMM tunnel junction arises from spin-selected single electron resonant tunneling via the lowest unoccupied molecular orbit of the SMM. Since it is not magnetically controlled but all-electrically controlled, the proposed spin current switching effect may have potential applications in future spintronics.

  13. High performance cermet electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isenberg, Arnold O.; Zymboly, Gregory E.

    1986-01-01

    Disclosed is a method of increasing the operating cell voltage of a solid oxide electrochemical cell having metal electrode particles in contact with an oxygen-transporting ceramic electrolyte. The metal electrode is heated with the cell, and oxygen is passed through the oxygen-transporting ceramic electrolyte to the surface of the metal electrode particles so that the metal electrode particles are oxidized to form a metal oxide layer between the metal electrode particles and the electrolyte. The metal oxide layer is then reduced to form porous metal between the metal electrode particles and the ceramic electrolyte.

  14. Single Electron Tunneling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruggiero, Steven T.

    2005-01-01

    Financial support for this project has led to advances in the science of single-electron phenomena. Our group reported the first observation of the so-called ''Coulomb Staircase'', which was produced by tunneling into ultra-small metal particles. This work showed well-defined tunneling voltage steps of width e/C and height e/RC, demonstrating tunneling quantized on the single-electron level. This work was published in a now well-cited Physical Review Letter. Single-electron physics is now a major sub-field of condensed-matter physics, and fundamental work in the area continues to be conducted by tunneling in ultra-small metal particles. In addition, there are now single-electron transistors that add a controlling gate to modulate the charge on ultra-small photolithographically defined capacitive elements. Single-electron transistors are now at the heart of at least one experimental quantum-computer element, and single-electron transistor pumps may soon be used to define fundamental quantities such as the farad (capacitance) and the ampere (current). Novel computer technology based on single-electron quantum dots is also being developed. In related work, our group played the leading role in the explanation of experimental results observed during the initial phases of tunneling experiments with the high-temperature superconductors. When so-called ''multiple-gap'' tunneling was reported, the phenomenon was correctly identified by our group as single-electron tunneling in small grains in the material. The main focus throughout this project has been to explore single electron phenomena both in traditional tunneling formats of the type metal/insulator/particles/insulator/metal and using scanning tunneling microscopy to probe few-particle systems. This has been done under varying conditions of temperature, applied magnetic field, and with different materials systems. These have included metals, semi-metals, and superconductors. Amongst a number of results, we have

  15. Resonant tunnel magnetoresistance in a double magnetic tunnel junction

    KAUST Repository

    Useinov, Arthur; Useinov, Niazbeck Kh H; Tagirov, Lenar R.; Kosel, Jü rgen

    2011-01-01

    We present quasi-classical approach to calculate a spin-dependent current and tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) in double magnetic tunnel junctions (DMTJ) FML/I/FMW/I/FMR, where the magnetization of the middle ferromagnetic metal layer FMW can

  16. Incoherent tunneling and heat dissipation in molecular bridges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pecchia, A; Gagliardi, A; Solomon, G; Carlo, A Di; Frauenheim, Th; Reimers, J R

    2006-01-01

    Simulated IV characteristics and inelastic electron tunneling spectra of octanedithiol chemisorbed on gold electrodes are presented. The geometric and electronic structure is obtained from calculations based on a density functional scheme. A non-equilibrium Green's function formalism is employed to deal with the transport aspect of the problem. Both the IV and the calculated spectra show good agreement with experimental results and suggest further details in the assignment and characterization of such spectra

  17. Interaction between groundwater and TBM (Tunnel Boring Machine) excavated tunnels

    OpenAIRE

    Font Capó, Jordi

    2012-01-01

    A number of problems, e.g. sudden inflows are encountered during tunneling under the piezometric level, especially when the excavation crosses high transmissivity areas. These inflows may drag materials when the tunnel crosses low competent layers, resulting in subsidence, chimney formation and collapses. Moreover, inflows can lead to a decrease in head level because of aquifer drainage. Tunnels can be drilled by a tunnel boring machine (TBM) to minimize inflows and groundwater impacts, restr...

  18. An experimental and computational investigation of electrical resistivity imaging for prediction ahead of tunnel boring machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaeffer, Kevin P.

    Tunnel boring machines (TBMs) are routinely used for the excavation of tunnels across a range of ground conditions, from hard rock to soft ground. In complex ground conditions and in urban environments, the TBM susceptible to damage due to uncertainty of what lies ahead of the tunnel face. The research presented here explores the application of electrical resistivity theory for use in the TBM tunneling environment to detect changing conditions ahead of the machine. Electrical resistivity offers a real-time and continuous imaging solution to increase the resolution of information along the tunnel alignment and may even unveil previously unknown geologic or man-made features ahead of the TBM. The studies presented herein, break down the tunneling environment and the electrical system to understand how its fundamental parameters can be isolated and tested, identifying how they influence the ability to predict changes ahead of the tunnel face. A proof-of-concept, scaled experimental model was constructed in order assess the ability of the model to predict a metal pipe (or rod) ahead of face as the TBM excavates through a saturated sand. The model shows that a prediction of up to three tunnel diameters could be achieved, but the unique presence of the pipe (or rod) could not be concluded with certainty. Full scale finite element models were developed in order evaluate the various influences on the ability to detect changing conditions ahead of the face. Results show that TBM/tunnel geometry, TBM type, and electrode geometry can drastically influence prediction ahead of the face by tens of meters. In certain conditions (i.e., small TBM diameter, low cover depth, large material contrasts), changes can be detected over 100 meters in front of the TBM. Various electrode arrays were considered and show that in order to better detect more finite differences (e.g., boulder, lens, pipe), the use of individual cutting tools as electrodes is highly advantageous to increase spatial

  19. Seepage into PEP tunnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weidner, H.

    1990-01-01

    The current rate of seepage into the PEP tunnel in the vicinity of IR-10 is very low compared to previous years. Adequate means of handling this low flow are in place. It is not clear whether the reduction in the flow is temporary, perhaps due to three consecutive dry years, or permanent due to drainage of a perched water table. During PEP construction a large amount of effort was expended in attempts to seal the tunnel, with no immediate effect. The efforts to ''manage'' the water flow are deemed to be successful. By covering equipment to protect it from dripping water and channeling seepage into the drainage gutters, the seepage has been reduced to a tolerable nuisance. There is no sure, safe procedure for sealing a leaky shotcreted tunnel

  20. Tunneling in BP-MoS2 heterostructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaochi; Qu, Deshun; Kim, Changsik; Ahmed, Faisal; Yoo, Won Jong

    Tunnel field effect transistor (TFET) is considered to be a leading option for achieving SS mV/dec. In this work, black phosphorus (BP) and molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) heterojunction devices are fabricated. We find that thin BP flake and MoS2 form normal p-n junctions, tunneling phenomena can be observed when BP thickness increases to certain level. PEO:CsClO4 is applied on the surface of the device together with a side gate electrode patterned together with source and drain electrodes. The Fermi level of MoS2 on top of BP layer can be modulated by the side gating, and this enables to vary the MoS2-BP tunnel diode property from off-state to on-state. Since tunneling is the working mechanism of MoS2-BP junction, and PEO:CsClO4\\ possesses ultra high dielectric constant and small equivalent oxide thickness (EOT), a low SS of 55 mV/dec is obtained from MoS2-BP TFET. This work was supported by the Global Research Laboratory and Global Frontier R&D Programs at the Center for Hybrid Interface Materials, both funded by the Ministry of Science, ICT & Future Planning via the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF).

  1. Resonant tunnelling and negative differential conductance in graphene transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britnell, L.; Gorbachev, R. V.; Geim, A. K.; Ponomarenko, L. A.; Mishchenko, A.; Greenaway, M. T.; Fromhold, T. M.; Novoselov, K. S.; Eaves, L.

    2013-04-01

    The chemical stability of graphene and other free-standing two-dimensional crystals means that they can be stacked in different combinations to produce a new class of functional materials, designed for specific device applications. Here we report resonant tunnelling of Dirac fermions through a boron nitride barrier, a few atomic layers thick, sandwiched between two graphene electrodes. The resonance occurs when the electronic spectra of the two electrodes are aligned. The resulting negative differential conductance in the device characteristics persists up to room temperature and is gate voltage-tuneable due to graphene’s unique Dirac-like spectrum. Although conventional resonant tunnelling devices comprising a quantum well sandwiched between two tunnel barriers are tens of nanometres thick, the tunnelling carriers in our devices cross only a few atomic layers, offering the prospect of ultra-fast transit times. This feature, combined with the multi-valued form of the device characteristics, has potential for applications in high-frequency and logic devices.

  2. Instabilities in thin tunnel junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konkin, M.K.; Adler, J.G.

    1978-01-01

    Tunnel junctions prepared for inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy are often plagued by instabilities in the 0-500-meV range. This paper relates the bias at which the instability occurs to the barrier thickness

  3. Construction of tunnel Bôrik

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jozef Čížik

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available When tunneling engineers talk on NATM, they often mean different things because some of them define it as a special technique,but others as a sort of philosophy. Recently the scene has been complicated by new terms and even alternative names, when discussingcertain aspects of NATM.The NATM integrates the principles of the behaviour of rock masses under load and monitoring the performance of undergroundconstruction during construction. The NATM is not a set of specific excavation and support techniques. Based on the computationof the optimal cross section, just a thin shotcrete protection is necessary. Additionally, geotechnical instruments are installed to measurethe later deformation of excavation. Therefore a monitoring of the stress distribution within the rock is possible. This monitoring makesthe method very flexible, even at surprising changes of the geomechanical rock consistency during the tunneling work.

  4. Tunneling in axion monodromy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Jon; Cottrell, William; Shiu, Gary; Soler, Pablo [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin,Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2016-10-06

    The Coleman formula for vacuum decay and bubble nucleation has been used to estimate the tunneling rate in models of axion monodromy in recent literature. However, several of Coleman’s original assumptions do not hold for such models. Here we derive a new estimate with this in mind using a similar Euclidean procedure. We find that there are significant regions of parameter space for which the tunneling rate in axion monodromy is not well approximated by the Coleman formula. However, there is also a regime relevant to large field inflation in which both estimates parametrically agree. We also briefly comment on the applications of our results to the relaxion scenario.

  5. LEP tunnel monorail

    CERN Multimedia

    1985-01-01

    A monorail from CERN's Large Electron Positron collider (LEP, for short). It ran around the 27km tunnel, transporting equipment and personnel. With its 27-kilometre circumference, LEP was the largest electron-positron accelerator ever built and ran from 1989 to 2000. During 11 years of research, LEP's experiments provided a detailed study of the electroweak interaction. Measurements performed at LEP also proved that there are three – and only three – generations of particles of matter. LEP was closed down on 2 November 2000 to make way for the construction of the Large Hadron Collider in the same tunnel.

  6. Excavating a transfer tunnel

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    2000-01-01

    The transfer tunnel being dug here will take the 450 GeV beam from the SPS and inject it into the LHC where the beam energies will be increased to 7 TeV. In order to transfer this beam from the SPS to the LHC, two transfer tunnels are used to circulate the beams in opposite directions. When excavated, the accelerator components, including magnets, beam pipes and cryogenics will be installed and connected to both the SPS and LHC ready for operation to begin in 2008.

  7. Tunneling spectroscopy on grain boundary junctions in electron-doped high-temperature superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welter, B.

    2007-01-01

    Some methods are developed anf presented, by means of which from experimental tunnel spectra, especially on symmetric SIS contacts, informations about the properties of electrodes and tunnel barriers can be obtained. Especially a procedure for the numerical unfolding of symmetric SIS spectra is proposed. Furthermore a series of models is summarized, which can explain the linear background conductivity observed in many spectra on high-temperature superconductors. The results of resistance measurements on film bridges are presented. Especially different methods for the determination of H c2 (T) respectively H c2 (0) are presented and applied to the experimental data. Finally the results of the tunnel-spectroscopy measurements are shown

  8. Elimination of two level fluctuators in superconducting quantum bits by an epitaxial tunnel barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Seongshik; Cicak, Katarina; Kline, Jeffrey S.; Sillanpaeae, Mika A.; Osborn, Kevin D.; Whittaker, Jed D.; Simmonds, Raymond W.; Pappas, David P.

    2006-01-01

    Quantum computing based on Josephson junction technology is considered promising due to its scalable architecture. However, decoherence is a major obstacle. Here, we report evidence for improved Josephson quantum bits (qubits) using a single-crystal Al 2 O 3 tunnel barrier. We have found an ∼80% reduction in the density of the spectral splittings that indicate the existence of two-level fluctators (TLFs) in amorphous tunnel barriers. The residual ∼20% TLFs can be attributed to interfacial effects that may be further reduced by different electrode materials. These results show that decoherence sources in the tunnel barrier of Josephson qubits can be identified and eliminated

  9. Breaking through the tranfer tunnel

    CERN Document Server

    Laurent Guiraud

    2001-01-01

    This image shows the tunnel boring machine breaking through the transfer tunnel into the LHC tunnel. Proton beams will be transferred from the SPS pre-accelerator to the LHC at 450 GeV through two specially constructed transfer tunnels. From left to right: LHC Project Director, Lyn Evans; CERN Director-General (at the time), Luciano Maiani, and Director for Accelerators, Kurt Hubner.

  10. Control of tunneling in heterostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volokhov, V M; Tovstun, C A; Ivlev, B

    2007-01-01

    A tunneling current between two rectangular potential wells can be effectively controlled by applying an external ac field. A variation of the ac frequency by 10% may lead to the suppression of the tunneling current by two orders of magnitude, which is a result of quantum interference under the action of the ac field. This effect of destruction of tunneling can be used as a sensitive control of tunneling current across nanosize heterostructures

  11. A Simple Hydrogen Electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggen, Per-Odd

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the construction of an inexpensive, robust, and simple hydrogen electrode, as well as the use of this electrode to measure "standard" potentials. In the experiment described here the students can measure the reduction potentials of metal-metal ion pairs directly, without using a secondary reference electrode. Measurements…

  12. The Composite Insertion Electrode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Atlung, Sven; Zachau-Christiansen, Birgit; West, Keld

    1984-01-01

    The specific energy obtainable by discharge of porous insertion electrodes is limited by electrolyte depletion in thepores. This can be overcome using a solid ion conductor as electrolyte. The term "composite" is used to distinguishthese electrodes from porous electrodes with liquid electrolyte...

  13. Near-Electrode Imager

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rathke, Jerome W.; Klingler, Robert J.; Woelk, Klaus; Gerald, Rex E.,II

    1999-05-01

    An apparatus, near-electrode imager, for employing nuclear magnetic resonance imaging to provide in situ measurements of electrochemical properties of a sample as a function of distance from a working electrode. The near-electrode imager use the radio frequency field gradient within a cylindrical toroid cavity resonator to provide high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectral information on electrolyte materials.

  14. Optically controlled electroresistance and electrically controlled photovoltage in ferroelectric tunnel junctions

    KAUST Repository

    Jin Hu, Wei; Wang, Zhihong; Yu, Weili; Wu, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Ferroelectric tunnel junctions (FTJs) have recently attracted considerable interest as a promising candidate for applications in the next-generation non-volatile memory technology. In this work, using an ultrathin (3 nm) ferroelectric Sm0.1Bi0.9FeO3 layer as the tunnelling barrier and a semiconducting Nb-doped SrTiO3 single crystal as the bottom electrode, we achieve a tunnelling electroresistance as large as 105. Furthermore, the FTJ memory states could be modulated by light illumination, which is accompanied by a hysteretic photovoltaic effect. These complimentary effects are attributed to the bias- and light-induced modulation of the tunnel barrier, both in height and width, at the semiconductor/ferroelectric interface. Overall, the highly tunable tunnelling electroresistance and the correlated photovoltaic functionalities provide a new route for producing and non-destructively sensing multiple non-volatile electronic states in such FTJs.

  15. Magneto-Seebeck effect in magnetic tunnel junctions with perpendicular anisotropy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keyu Ning

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available As one invigorated filed of spin caloritronics combining with spin, charge and heat current, the magneto-Seebeck effect has been experimentally and theoretically studied in spin tunneling thin films and nanostructures. Here we analyze the tunnel magneto-Seebeck effect in magnetic tunnel junctions with perpendicular anisotropy (p-MTJs under various measurement temperatures. The large tunnel magneto-Seebeck (TMS ratio up to −838.8% for p-MTJs at 200 K is achieved, with Seebeck coefficient S in parallel and antiparallel states of 6.7 mV/K and 62.9 mV/K, respectively. The temperature dependence of the tunnel magneto-Seebeck can be attributed to the contributing transmission function and electron states at the interface between CoFeB electrode and MgO barrier.

  16. Optically controlled electroresistance and electrically controlled photovoltage in ferroelectric tunnel junctions

    KAUST Repository

    Jin Hu, Wei

    2016-02-29

    Ferroelectric tunnel junctions (FTJs) have recently attracted considerable interest as a promising candidate for applications in the next-generation non-volatile memory technology. In this work, using an ultrathin (3 nm) ferroelectric Sm0.1Bi0.9FeO3 layer as the tunnelling barrier and a semiconducting Nb-doped SrTiO3 single crystal as the bottom electrode, we achieve a tunnelling electroresistance as large as 105. Furthermore, the FTJ memory states could be modulated by light illumination, which is accompanied by a hysteretic photovoltaic effect. These complimentary effects are attributed to the bias- and light-induced modulation of the tunnel barrier, both in height and width, at the semiconductor/ferroelectric interface. Overall, the highly tunable tunnelling electroresistance and the correlated photovoltaic functionalities provide a new route for producing and non-destructively sensing multiple non-volatile electronic states in such FTJs.

  17. Ivar Giaever, Tunneling, and Superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    dropdown arrow Site Map A-Z Index Menu Synopsis Ivar Giaever, Tunneling, and Superconductors Resources with in Superconductors Measured by Electron Tunneling; Physical Review Letters, Vol. 5 Issue 4: 147 - 148 ; August 15, 1960 Electron Tunneling Between Two Superconductors; Physical Review Letters, Vol. 5 Issue 10

  18. Scanning tunneling microscope nanoetching method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yun-Zhong; Reifenberger, Ronald G.; Andres, Ronald P.

    1990-01-01

    A method is described for forming uniform nanometer sized depressions on the surface of a conducting substrate. A tunneling tip is used to apply tunneling current density sufficient to vaporize a localized area of the substrate surface. The resulting depressions or craters in the substrate surface can be formed in information encoding patterns readable with a scanning tunneling microscope.

  19. Physics of optimal resonant tunneling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Racec, P.N.; Stoica, T.; Popescu, C.; Lepsa, M.I.; Roer, van de T.G.

    1997-01-01

    The optimal resonant tunneling, or the complete tunneling transparence of a biased double-barrier resonant-tunneling (DBRT) structure, is discussed. It is shown that its physics does not rest on the departure from the constant potential within the barriers and well, due to the applied electric

  20. Doped Josephson tunneling junction for use in a sensitive IR detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fletcher, J.C.; Saffren, M.M.

    1975-01-01

    A superconductive tunneling device having a modified tunnel barrier capable of supporting Josephson tunneling current is provided. The tunnel barrier located between a pair of electrodes includes a molecular species which is capable of coupling incident radiation of a spectrum characteristic of the molecular species into the tunnel barrier. The coupled radiation modulates the known Josephson characteristics of the superconducting device. As a result of the present invention, a superconductive tunneling device can be tuned or made sensitive to a particular radiation associated with the dopant molecular species. The present invention is particularly useful in providing an improved infrared detector. The tunnel barrier region can be, for example, an oxide of an electrode or frozen gas. The molecular species can be intermixed with the barrier region such as the frozen gas or deposited as one or more layers of molecules on the barrier region. The deposited molecules of the molecular species are unbonded and capable of responding to a radiation characteristic of the molecules. Semi-conductor material can be utilized as the molecular species to provide an increased selective bandwidth response. Finally, appropriate detector equipment can be utilized to measure the modulation of any of the Josephson characteristics such as critical current, voltage steps, Lambe-Jaklevic peaks and plasma frequency. (auth)

  1. Tunneling path toward spintronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miao Guoxing; Moodera, Jagadeesh S; Muenzenberg, Markus

    2011-01-01

    The phenomenon of quantum tunneling, which was discovered almost a century ago, has led to many subsequent discoveries. One such discovery, spin polarized tunneling, was made 40 years ago by Robert Meservey and Paul Tedrow (Tedrow and Meservey 1971 Phys. Rev. Lett. 26 192), and it has resulted in many fundamental observations and opened up an entirely new field of study. Until the mid-1990s, this field developed at a steady, low rate, after which a huge increase in activity suddenly occurred as a result of the unraveling of successful spin tunneling between two ferromagnets. In the past 15 years, several thousands of papers related to spin polarized tunneling and transport have been published, making this topic one of the hottest areas in condensed matter physics from both fundamental science and applications viewpoints. Many review papers and book chapters have been written in the past decade on this subject. This paper is not exhaustive by any means; rather, the emphases are on recent progress, technological developments and informing the reader about the current direction in which this topic is moving.

  2. Magnetic Fluxtube Tunneling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlburg, Russell B.; Antiochos,, Spiro K.; Norton, D.

    1996-01-01

    We present numerical simulations of the collision and subsequent interaction of two initially orthogonal, twisted, force free field magnetic fluxtubes. The simulations were carried out using a new three dimensional explicit parallelized Fourier collocation algorithm for solving the viscoresistive equations of compressible magnetohydrodynamics. It is found that, under a wide range of conditions, the fluxtubes can 'tunnel' through each other. Two key conditions must be satisfied for tunneling to occur: the magnetic field must be highly twisted with a field line pitch much greater than 1, and the magnetic Lundquist number must be somewhat large, greater than or equal to 2880. This tunneling behavior has not been seen previously in studies of either vortex tube or magnetic fluxtube interactions. An examination of magnetic field lines shows that tunneling is due to a double reconnection mechanism. Initially orthogonal field lines reconnect at two specific locations, exchange interacting sections and 'pass' through each other. The implications of these results for solar and space plasmas are discussed.

  3. Tunnel nitrogen spill experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ageyev, A.I.; Alferov, V.N.; Mulholland, G.T.

    1983-01-01

    The Energy Saver Safety Analysis Report (SAR) found the tunnel oxygen deficiency considerations emphasized helium spills. These reports concluded the helium quickly warms and because of its low denisty, rises to the apex of the tunnel. The oxygen content below the apex and in all but the immediate vicinity of the helium spill is essentially unchanged and guarantees an undisturbed source of oxygen especially important to fallen personnel. In contrast nitrogen spills warm slower than helium due to the ratio of the enthalpy changes per unit volume spilled spread more uniformly across the tunnel cross-section when warmed because of the much smaller density difference with air, and generally provides a greater hazard than helium spills as a result. In particular there was concern that personnel that might fall to the floor for oxygen deficiency or other reasons might find less, and not more, oxygen with dire consequences. The SAR concluded tunnel nitrogen spills were under-investigated and led to this work

  4. The scanning tunneling microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvan, F.

    1986-01-01

    A newly conceived microscope, based on a pure quantum phenomenon, is an ideal tool to study atom by atom the topography and properties of surfaces. Applications are presented: surface ''reconstruction'' of silicon, lamellar compound study, etc... Spectroscopy by tunnel effect will bring important information on electronic properties; it is presented with an application on silicon [fr

  5. Monitoring pilot projects on bored tunnelling : The Second Heinenoord Tunnel and the Botlek Rail Tunnel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, K.J.; De Boer, F.; Admiraal, J.B.M.; Van Jaarsveld, E.P.

    1999-01-01

    Two pilot projects for bored tunnelling in soft soil have been undertaken in the Netherlands. The monitoring was commissioned under the authority of the Centre for Underground Construction (COB). A description of the research related to the Second Heinenoord Tunnel and the Botlek Rail Tunnel will be

  6. Lateralization of cortical negative motor areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borggraefe, Ingo; Catarino, Claudia B; Rémi, Jan; Vollmar, Christian; Peraud, Aurelia; Winkler, Peter A; Noachtar, Soheyl

    2016-10-01

    The lateral and mesial aspects of the central and frontal cortex were studied by direct electrical stimulation of the cortex in epilepsy surgery candidates in order to determine the localization of unilateral and bilateral negative motor responses. Results of electrical cortical stimulation were examined in epilepsy surgery candidates in whom invasive electrodes were implanted. The exact localization of subdural electrodes was defined by fusion of 3-dimensional reconstructed MRI and CT images in 13 patients and by analysis of plane skull X-rays and intraoperative visual localization of the electrodes in another 7 patients. Results of electrical stimulation of the cortex were evaluated in a total of 128 patients in whom invasive electrodes were implanted for planning resective epilepsy surgery. Twenty patients, in whom negative motor responses were obtained, were included in the study. Bilateral upper limb negative motor responses were more often elicited from stimulation of the mesial frontal cortex whereas stimulation of the lateral central cortex leads to contralateral upper limb negative motor responses (pfrontal gyrus whereas contralateral negative motor responses localized predominantly in the anterior part of the precentral gyrus (pgyrus and the mesial fronto-central cortex showing functional differences with regard to unilateral and bilateral upper limb representation. The lateral fronto-central negative motor area serves predominantly contralateral upper limb motor control whereas the mesial frontal negative motor area represents bilateral upper limb movement control. Copyright © 2016 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Measuring fire size in tunnels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Xiaoping; Zhang, Qihui

    2013-01-01

    A new measure of fire size Q′ has been introduced in longitudinally ventilated tunnel as the ratio of flame height to the height of tunnel. The analysis in this article has shown that Q′ controls both the critical velocity and the maximum ceiling temperature in the tunnel. Before the fire flame reaches tunnel ceiling (Q′ 1.0), Fr approaches a constant value. This is also a well-known phenomenon in large tunnel fires. Tunnel ceiling temperature shows the opposite trend. Before the fire flame reaches the ceiling, it increases very slowly with the fire size. Once the flame has hit the ceiling of tunnel, temperature rises rapidly with Q′. The good agreement between the current prediction and three different sets of experimental data has demonstrated that the theory has correctly modelled the relation among the heat release rate of fire, ventilation flow and the height of tunnel. From design point of view, the theoretical maximum of critical velocity for a given tunnel can help to prevent oversized ventilation system. -- Highlights: • Fire sizing is an important safety measure in tunnel design. • New measure of fire size a function of HRR of fire, tunnel height and ventilation. • The measure can identify large and small fires. • The characteristics of different fire are consistent with observation in real fires

  8. Coexistance of Giant Tunneling Electroresistance and Magnetoresistance in an All-Oxide Composite Magnetic Tunnel Junction

    KAUST Repository

    Caffrey, Nuala Mai

    2012-11-30

    We propose, by performing advanced abinitio electron transport calculations, an all-oxide composite magnetic tunnel junction, within which both large tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) and tunneling electroresistance (TER) effects can coexist. The TMR originates from the symmetry-driven spin filtering provided by an insulating BaTiO3 barrier to the electrons injected from the SrRuO3 electrodes. Following recent theoretical suggestions, the TER effect is achieved by intercalating a thin insulating layer, here SrTiO3, at one of the SrRuO3/BaTiO3 interfaces. As the complex band structure of SrTiO3 has the same symmetry as that of BaTiO3, the inclusion of such an intercalated layer does not negatively alter the TMR and in fact increases it. Crucially, the magnitude of the TER also scales with the thickness of the SrTiO3 layer. The SrTiO3 thickness becomes then a single control parameter for both the TMR and the TER effect. This protocol offers a practical way to the fabrication of four-state memory cells. © 2012 American Physical Society.

  9. Coexistance of Giant Tunneling Electroresistance and Magnetoresistance in an All-Oxide Composite Magnetic Tunnel Junction

    KAUST Repository

    Caffrey, Nuala Mai; Archer, Thomas; Rungger, Ivan; Sanvito, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    We propose, by performing advanced abinitio electron transport calculations, an all-oxide composite magnetic tunnel junction, within which both large tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) and tunneling electroresistance (TER) effects can coexist. The TMR originates from the symmetry-driven spin filtering provided by an insulating BaTiO3 barrier to the electrons injected from the SrRuO3 electrodes. Following recent theoretical suggestions, the TER effect is achieved by intercalating a thin insulating layer, here SrTiO3, at one of the SrRuO3/BaTiO3 interfaces. As the complex band structure of SrTiO3 has the same symmetry as that of BaTiO3, the inclusion of such an intercalated layer does not negatively alter the TMR and in fact increases it. Crucially, the magnitude of the TER also scales with the thickness of the SrTiO3 layer. The SrTiO3 thickness becomes then a single control parameter for both the TMR and the TER effect. This protocol offers a practical way to the fabrication of four-state memory cells. © 2012 American Physical Society.

  10. Experimental study on lateral strength of wall-slab joint subjected to lateral cyclic load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masrom, Mohd Asha'ari; Mohamad, Mohd Elfie; Hamid, Nor Hayati Abdul; Yusuff, Amer

    2017-10-01

    Tunnel form building has been utilised in building construction since 1960 in Malaysia. This method of construction has been applied extensively in the construction of high rise residential house (multistory building) such as condominium and apartment. Most of the tunnel form buildings have been designed according to British standard (BS) whereby there is no provision for seismic loading. The high-rise tunnel form buildings are vulnerable to seismic loading. The connections between slab and shear walls in the tunnel-form building constitute an essential link in the lateral load resisting mechanism. Malaysia is undergoing a shifting process from BS code to Eurocode (EC) for building construction since the country has realised the safety threats of earthquake. Hence, this study is intended to compare the performance of the interior wall slab joint for a tunnel form structure designed based on Euro and British codes. The experiment included a full scale test of the wall slab joint sub-assemblages under reversible lateral cyclic loading. Two sub-assemblage specimens of the wall slab joint were designed and constructed based on both codes. Each specimen was tested using lateral displacement control (drift control). The specimen designed by using Eurocode was found could survive up to 3.0% drift while BS specimen could last to 1.5% drift. The analysis results indicated that the BS specimen was governed by brittle failure modes with Ductility Class Low (DCL) while the EC specimen behaved in a ductile manner with Ductility Class Medium (DCM). The low ductility recorded in BS specimen was resulted from insufficient reinforcement provided in the BS code specimen. Consequently, the BS specimen could not absorb energy efficiently (low energy dissipation) and further sustain under inelastic deformation.

  11. Rock mass seismic imaging around the ONKALO tunnel, Olkiluoto 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cosma, C.; Cozma, M.; Balu, L.; Enescu, N.

    2008-11-01

    Posiva Oy prepares for disposal of spent nuclear fuel in bedrock focusing in Olkiluoto, Eurajoki. This is in accordance of the application filed in 1999, the Decision-in-Principle of the State Council in 2000, and ratification by the Parliament in 2001. Vibrometric Oy has performed a tunnel seismic survey in ONKALO access tunnel on a 100 m line in December 2007. Tunnel length (chainage) was 1720 - 1820 m (vertical depth 170 - 180 m). Measurement applied 120 source positions at 1 m spacing, and on the both ends at 4 m spacing. Electromechanical Vibsist-20 tool was used as the source. Hammer produced 15.36 s sweeps. Signal was recorded with 2-component geophone assemblies, installed in 400 mm long, 45 mm drillholes in the tunnel wall. Sweeps were recorded with Summit II seismograph and decoded to seismic traces. Also percussion drill rig, which is used in drilling the blasting holes in tunnel excavation, was tested from a 100-m distance as a seismic source. Signal is equally good as from actual seismic source, and may be applied later on for production. Obtained seismic results were processed with tomographic reconstruction of the first arrivals to P and S wave refraction tomograms, and to tomograms of Young's modulus and Shear Modulus. The obtained values correspond the typical levels known from Olkiluoto. There are indications of lower velocity near tunnel wall, but resolution is not adequate for further interpretation. Some variation of velocity is detected in the rock mass. Seismic data was also processed with normal reflection profile interpretation and migrated. As a result there was obtained reflection images to a 100-m distance from the tunnel. Several reflecting events were observed in the rock mass. Features making an angle of 30 deg or more with tunnel axis can be imaged from distances of tens of metres. Vertical fractures perpendicular to tunnel can be imaged only near the tunnel. Gently dipping features can be imaged below and above. Images are 2D, i

  12. Function Lateralization via Measuring Coherence Laterality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ze; Mechanic-Hamilton, Dawn; Pluta, John; Glynn, Simon; Detre, John A.

    2009-01-01

    A data-driven approach for lateralization of brain function based on the spatial coherence difference of functional MRI (fMRI) data in homologous regions-of-interest (ROI) in each hemisphere is proposed. The utility of using coherence laterality (CL) to determine function laterality was assessed first by examining motor laterality using normal subjects’ data acquired both at rest and with a simple unilateral motor task and subsequently by examining mesial temporal lobe memory laterality in normal subjects and patients with temporal lobe epilepsy. The motor task was used to demonstrate that CL within motor ROI correctly lateralized functional stimulation. In patients with unilateral epilepsy studied during a scene-encoding task, CL in a hippocampus-parahippocampus-fusiform (HPF) ROI was concordant with lateralization based on task activation, and the CL index (CLI) significantly differentiated the right side group to the left side group. By contrast, normal controls showed a symmetric HPF CLI distribution. Additionally, similar memory laterality prediction results were still observed using CL in epilepsy patients with unilateral seizures after the memory encoding effect was removed from the data, suggesting the potential for lateralization of pathological brain function based on resting fMRI data. A better lateralization was further achieved via a combination of the proposed approach and the standard activation based approach, demonstrating that assessment of spatial coherence changes provides a complementary approach to quantifying task-correlated activity for lateralizing brain function. PMID:19345736

  13. Effective Area and Charge Density of Iridium Oxide Neural Electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, Alexander R.; Paolini, Antonio G.; Wallace, Gordon G.

    2017-01-01

    The effective electrode area and charge density of iridium metal and anodically activated iridium has been measured by optical and electrochemical techniques. The degree of electrode activation could be assessed by changes in electrode colour. The reduction charge, activation charge, number of activation pulses and charge density were all strongly correlated. Activated iridium showed slow electron transfer kinetics for reduction of a dissolved redox species. At fast voltammetric scan rates the linear diffusion electroactive area was unaffected by iridium activation. At slow voltammetric scan rates, the steady state diffusion electroactive area was reduced by iridium activation. The steady state current was consistent with a ring electrode geometry, with lateral resistance reducing the electrode area. Slow electron transfer on activated iridium would require a larger overpotential to reduce or oxidise dissolved species in tissue, limiting the electrodes charge capacity but also reducing the likelihood of generating toxic species in vivo.

  14. Uncharged positive electrode composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaun, Thomas D.; Vissers, Donald R.; Shimotake, Hiroshi

    1977-03-08

    An uncharged positive-electrode composition contains particulate lithium sulfide, another alkali metal or alkaline earth metal compound other than sulfide, e.g., lithium carbide, and a transition metal powder. The composition along with a binder, such as electrolytic salt or a thermosetting resin is applied onto an electrically conductive substrate to form a plaque. The plaque is assembled as a positive electrode within an electrochemical cell opposite to a negative electrode containing a material such as aluminum or silicon for alloying with lithium. During charging, lithium alloy is formed within the negative electrode and transition metal sulfide such as iron sulfide is produced within the positive electrode. Excess negative electrode capacity over that from the transition metal sulfide is provided due to the electrochemical reaction of the other than sulfide alkali metal or alkaline earth metal compound.

  15. Thermionic emission and tunneling at carbon nanotube-organic semiconductor interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarker, Biddut K; Khondaker, Saiful I

    2012-06-26

    We study the charge carrier injection mechanism across the carbon nanotube (CNT)-organic semiconductor interface using a densely aligned carbon nanotube array as electrode and pentacene as organic semiconductor. The current density-voltage (J-V) characteristics measured at different temperatures show a transition from a thermal emission mechanism at high temperature (above 200 K) to a tunneling mechanism at low temperature (below 200 K). A barrier height of ∼0.16 eV is calculated from the thermal emission regime, which is much lower compared to the metal/pentacene devices. At low temperatures, the J-V curves exhibit a direct tunneling mechanism at low bias, corresponding to a trapezoidal barrier, while at high bias the mechanism is well described by Fowler-Nordheim tunneling, which corresponds to a triangular barrier. A transition from direct tunneling to Fowler-Nordheim tunneling further signifies a small injection barrier at the CNT/pentacene interface. Our results presented here are the first direct experimental evidence of low charge carrier injection barrier between CNT electrodes and an organic semiconductor and are a significant step forward in realizing the overall goal of using CNT electrodes in organic electronics.

  16. Tunnel boring machine applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharyya, K.K.; McDonald, R.; Saunders, R.S.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that characterization of Yucca Mountain for a potential repository requires construction of an underground Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF). Mechanical excavating methods have been proposed for construction of the ESF as they offer a number of advantages over drilling and blasting at the Yucca Mountain site, including; less ground disturbance and therefore a potential for less adverse effects on the integrity of the site, creation of a more stable excavation cross section requiring less ground support, and an inherently safer and cleaner working environment. The tunnel boring machine (TBM) provides a proven technology for excavating the welded and unwelded Yucca Mountain tuffs. The access ramps and main underground tunnels form the largest part of the ESF underground construction work, and have been designed for excavation by TBM

  17. Hawking Radiation As Tunneling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parikh, Maulik K.; Wilczek, Frank

    2000-01-01

    We present a short and direct derivation of Hawking radiation as a tunneling process, based on particles in a dynamical geometry. The imaginary part of the action for the classically forbidden process is related to the Boltzmann factor for emission at the Hawking temperature. Because the derivation respects conservation laws, the exact spectrum is not precisely thermal. We compare and contrast the problem of spontaneous emission of charged particles from a charged conductor

  18. Tunnel blasting - recent developments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, T.E.

    1999-05-01

    While tunnelling machines are more efficient than previously, there are still areas where blasting is a more efficient method of advance. Drilling and design methods are increasingly sophisticated, as is choice of explosive. Explosive deployment must be carefully calculated so as to avoid desensitisation. Nitroglycerine may be used as slurries; bulk mixing on site of ANFO is also practised in mining in the UK. Electric detonators, Nonel tubes, and electronic detonators are also increasingly employed.

  19. The beam dump tunnels

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2002-01-01

    In these images workers are digging the tunnels that will be used to dump the counter-circulating beams. Travelling just a fraction under the speed of light, the beams at the LHC will each carry the energy of an aircraft carrier travelling at 12 knots. In order to dispose of these beams safely, a beam dump is used to extract the beam and diffuse it before it collides with a radiation shielded graphite target.

  20. Primary Tunnel Junction Thermometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pekola, Jukka P.; Holmqvist, Tommy; Meschke, Matthias

    2008-01-01

    We describe the concept and experimental demonstration of primary thermometry based on a four-probe measurement of a single tunnel junction embedded within four arrays of junctions. We show that in this configuration random sample specific and environment-related errors can be avoided. This method relates temperature directly to Boltzmann constant, which will form the basis of the definition of temperature and realization of official temperature scales in the future

  1. Optically controlled resonant tunneling in a double-barrier diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, S. C.; Wu, S.; Sanders, S.; Griffel, G.; Yariv, A.

    1991-03-01

    The resonant tunneling effect is optically enhanced in a GaAs/GaAlAs double-barrier structure that has partial lateral current confinement. The peak current increases and the valley current decreases simultaneously when the device surface is illuminated, due to the increased conductivity of the top layer of the structure. The effect of the lateral current confinement on the current-voltage characteristic of a double-barrier resonant tunneling structure was also studied. With increased lateral current confinement, the peak and valley current decrease at a different rate such that the current peak-to-valley ratio increases up to three times. The experimental results are explained by solving the electrostatic potential distribution in the structure using a simple three-layer model.

  2. Electron-spin polarization in tunnel junctions with ferromagnetic EuS barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao, X.; Moodera, J.S.; Meservey, R.

    1989-01-01

    The authors report here spin-polarized tunneling experiments using non-ferromagnetic electrodes and ferromagnetic EuS barriers. Because of the conduction band in EuS splits into spin-up and spin-down subbands when the temperature is below 16.7 K, the Curie temperature of EuS, the tunnel barrier for electrons with different spin directions is different, therefore giving rise to tunnel current polarization. The spin-filter effect, as it may be called, was observed earlier, directly or indirectly, by several groups: Esaki et al. made a tunneling study on junctions having EuS and EuSe barriers; Thompson et al. studied Schottky barrier tunneling between In and doped EuS; Muller et al. and Kisker et al. performed electron field emission experiments on EuS-coated tungsten tips. The field emission experiments gave a maximum polarization of (89 + 7)% for the emitted electrons. Although the previous tunneling studies did not directly show electron polarization, their results were explained by the same spin- filter effect. This work uses the spin-polarized tunneling technique to show directly that tunnel current is indeed polarized and polarization can be as high as 85%

  3. Probing the local environment of a single OPE3 molecule using inelastic tunneling electron spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frisenda, R.; Perrin, M.L.; Van der Zant, H.S.J.

    2015-01-01

    We study single-molecule oligo(phenylene ethynylene)dithiol junctions by means of inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS). The molecule is contacted with gold nano-electrodes formed with the mechanically controllable break junction technique. We record the IETS spectrum of the molecule from

  4. Homoepitaxial graphene tunnel barriers for spin transport (Presentation Recording)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Adam L.

    2015-09-01

    Tunnel barriers are key elements for both charge-and spin-based electronics, offering devices with reduced power consumption and new paradigms for information processing. Such devices require mating dissimilar materials, raising issues of heteroepitaxy, interface stability, and electronic states that severely complicate fabrication and compromise performance. Graphene is the perfect tunnel barrier. It is an insulator out-of-plane, possesses a defect-free, linear habit, and is impervious to interdiffusion. Nonetheless, true tunneling between two stacked graphene layers is not possible in environmental conditions (magnetic field, temperature, etc.) usable for electronics applications. However, two stacked graphene layers can be decoupled using chemical functionalization. Here, we demonstrate homoepitaxial tunnel barrier devices in which graphene serves as both the tunnel barrier and the high mobility transport channel. Beginning with multilayer graphene, we fluorinate or hydrogenate the top layer to decouple it from the bottom layer, so that it serves as a single monolayer tunnel barrier for both charge and spin injection into the lower graphene transport channel. We demonstrate successful tunneling by measuring non-linear IV curves, and a weakly temperature dependent zero bias resistance. We perform lateral transport of spin currents in non-local spin-valve structures and determine spin lifetimes with the non-local Hanle effect to be commensurate with previous studies (~200 ps). However, we also demonstrate the highest spin polarization efficiencies (~45%) yet measured in graphene-based spin devices [1]. [1] A.L. Friedman, et al., Homoepitaxial tunnel barriers with functionalized graphene-on-graphene for charge and spin transport, Nat. Comm. 5, 3161 (2014).

  5. Hydrodynamic optical soliton tunneling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprenger, P.; Hoefer, M. A.; El, G. A.

    2018-03-01

    A notion of hydrodynamic optical soliton tunneling is introduced in which a dark soliton is incident upon an evolving, broad potential barrier that arises from an appropriate variation of the input signal. The barriers considered include smooth rarefaction waves and highly oscillatory dispersive shock waves. Both the soliton and the barrier satisfy the same one-dimensional defocusing nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation, which admits a convenient dispersive hydrodynamic interpretation. Under the scale separation assumption of nonlinear wave (Whitham) modulation theory, the highly nontrivial nonlinear interaction between the soliton and the evolving hydrodynamic barrier is described in terms of self-similar, simple wave solutions to an asymptotic reduction of the Whitham-NLS partial differential equations. One of the Riemann invariants of the reduced modulation system determines the characteristics of a soliton interacting with a mean flow that results in soliton tunneling or trapping. Another Riemann invariant yields the tunneled soliton's phase shift due to hydrodynamic interaction. Soliton interaction with hydrodynamic barriers gives rise to effects that include reversal of the soliton propagation direction and spontaneous soliton cavitation, which further suggest possible methods of dark soliton control in optical fibers.

  6. Resonant Tunneling Spin Pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, David Z.

    2007-01-01

    The resonant tunneling spin pump is a proposed semiconductor device that would generate spin-polarized electron currents. The resonant tunneling spin pump would be a purely electrical device in the sense that it would not contain any magnetic material and would not rely on an applied magnetic field. Also, unlike prior sources of spin-polarized electron currents, the proposed device would not depend on a source of circularly polarized light. The proposed semiconductor electron-spin filters would exploit the Rashba effect, which can induce energy splitting in what would otherwise be degenerate quantum states, caused by a spin-orbit interaction in conjunction with a structural-inversion asymmetry in the presence of interfacial electric fields in a semiconductor heterostructure. The magnitude of the energy split is proportional to the electron wave number. Theoretical studies have suggested the possibility of devices in which electron energy states would be split by the Rashba effect and spin-polarized currents would be extracted by resonant quantum-mechanical tunneling.

  7. Handbook of reference electrodes

    CERN Document Server

    Inzelt, György; Scholz, Fritz

    2013-01-01

    Reference Electrodes are a crucial part of any electrochemical system, yet an up-to-date and comprehensive handbook is long overdue. Here, an experienced team of electrochemists provides an in-depth source of information and data for the proper choice and construction of reference electrodes. This includes all kinds of applications such as aqueous and non-aqueous solutions, ionic liquids, glass melts, solid electrolyte systems, and membrane electrodes. Advanced technologies such as miniaturized, conducting-polymer-based, screen-printed or disposable reference electrodes are also covered. Essen

  8. Scanning tunnel microscopy of semiconductor nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eder, C.

    1997-09-01

    In this work a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) is utilized as a surface sensitive tool for local characterization of internal potential profiles of GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructures. The STM is operated at variable temperatures under ambient conditions, i.e. either in air or in the variable temperature insert of a cryostat. Distinct local differences between current-voltage curves taken on inverted heterostructures, which were patterned by wet chemically etching, are found. The spectroscopic differences can be ascribed to the internal potential profile in the subsurface regions of the sample. Current imaging tunneling spectroscopy (CITS) is applied to study quantum wire regions. It is found that the magnitude of the CITS-current is an indirect measure of edge depletion zones, which are much larger at 4.2 K. Direct measurements of relevant energy levels in quantum structures were obtained by ballistic electron emission microscopy (BEEM). It is shown that this 3-terminal technique is an excellent tool for transport characterization of minibands formed in semiconductor superlattices. Furthermore, low dimensional electron gases are shown to act as very efficient collector electrodes at low temperatures. For the first time, BEEM experiments were performed at 4.2 K. The enhanced thermal resolution at 4.2 K allows an analysis of the relevant scattering processes. It is found that the collector current is strongly influenced by diffusive scattering at the metal/semiconductor interface. (author)

  9. Frequency shift, damping, and tunneling current coupling with quartz tuning forks in noncontact atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nony, Laurent; Bocquet, Franck; Para, Franck; Loppacher, Christian

    2016-09-01

    A combined experimental and theoretical approach to the coupling between frequency-shift (Δ f ) , damping, and tunneling current (It) in combined noncontact atomic force microscopy/scanning tunneling microscopy using quartz tuning forks (QTF)-based probes is reported. When brought into oscillating tunneling conditions, the tip located at the QTF prong's end radiates an electromagnetic field which couples to the QTF prong motion via its piezoelectric tensor and loads its electrodes by induction. Our approach explains how those It-related effects ultimately modify the Δ f and the damping measurements. This paradigm to the origin of the coupling between It and the nc-AFM regular signals relies on both the intrinsic piezoelectric nature of the quartz constituting the QTF and its electrodes design.

  10. Interlayer tunnel field-effect transistor (ITFET): physics, fabrication and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Sangwoo; Mou, Xuehao; Fallahazad, Babak; Prasad, Nitin; Wu, Xian; Valsaraj, Amithraj; Movva, Hema C. P.; Kim, Kyounghwan; Tutuc, Emanuel; Register, Leonard F.; Banerjee, Sanjay K.

    2017-09-01

    The scaling challenges of complementary metal oxide semiconductors (CMOS) are increasing with the pace of scaling showing marked signs of slowing down. This slowing has brought about a widespread search for an alternative beyond-CMOS device concept. While the charge tunneling phenomenon has been known for almost a century, and tunneling based transistors have been studied in the past few decades, its possibilities are being re-examined with the emergence of a new class of two-dimensional (2D) materials. By stacking varying 2D materials together, with two electrode layers sandwiching a tunnel dielectric layer, it could be possible to make vertical tunnel transistors without the limitations that have plagued such devices implemented within other material systems. When the two electrode layers are of the same material, under certain conditions, one can achieve resonant tunneling between the two layers, manifesting as negative differential resistance (NDR) in the interlayer current-voltage characteristics. We call this type of device an interlayer tunnel FET (ITFET). We review the basic operation principles of this device, experimental and theoretical studies, and benchmark simulation results for several digital logic gates based on a compact model that we developed. The results are placed in the context of work going on in other groups.

  11. Featuring of transient tunneling current by voltage pulse and application to an electrochemical biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Jun Yeon; Lee, Won Cheol; Choi, Seong Wook; Park, Young June

    2018-03-01

    We suggest a voltage pulse method for detecting the transient tunneling current component (faradaic current component) in a metal/redox-active monolayer/electrolyte system. After applying the pulse to the metal electrode, the capacitive current prevails; therefore, it is difficult to extract the tunneling current, which carries information on the biochemical reactions occurring between the biomarkers in the electrolyte and the self-assembled monolayer (SAM) as the probe peptide system. Instead of waiting until the capacitive current diminishes, and thereby, the tunneling current also decreases, we try to extract the tunneling current in an early stage of the pulse. The method is based on the observation that the capacitive current becomes symmetrized in the positive and negative pulses after introducing the SAM on the metal electrode. When the energy level of the redox molecule is higher than the Fermi level of the metal under zero-bias condition, the tunneling current in the negative pulse can be extracted by subtracting the capacitive current obtained from the positive pulse, where the tunneling current is neglected. The experiment conducted for detecting trypsin as a biomarker shows that the method enhances the sensitivity and the specific-to-nonspecific ratio of the sensor device in the case of the nonspecific protein-abundant electrolyte solution, as evinced by cyclic voltammetry measurements in comparison.

  12. Submucosal tunneling techniques: current perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobara, Hideki; Mori, Hirohito; Rafiq, Kazi; Fujihara, Shintaro; Nishiyama, Noriko; Ayaki, Maki; Yachida, Tatsuo; Matsunaga, Tae; Tani, Johji; Miyoshi, Hisaaki; Yoneyama, Hirohito; Morishita, Asahiro; Oryu, Makoto; Iwama, Hisakazu; Masaki, Tsutomu

    2014-01-01

    Advances in endoscopic submucosal dissection include a submucosal tunneling technique, involving the introduction of tunnels into the submucosa. These tunnels permit safer offset entry into the peritoneal cavity for natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery. Technical advantages include the visual identification of the layers of the gut, blood vessels, and subepithelial tumors. The creation of a mucosal flap that minimizes air and fluid leakage into the extraluminal cavity can enhance the safety and efficacy of surgery. This submucosal tunneling technique was adapted for esophageal myotomy, culminating in its application to patients with achalasia. This method, known as per oral endoscopic myotomy, has opened up the new discipline of submucosal endoscopic surgery. Other clinical applications of the submucosal tunneling technique include its use in the removal of gastrointestinal subepithelial tumors and endomicroscopy for the diagnosis of functional and motility disorders. This review suggests that the submucosal tunneling technique, involving a mucosal safety flap, can have potential values for future endoscopic developments.

  13. A study of inelastic electron-phonon interactions on tunneling magnetoresistance of a nano-scale device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modarresi, M.; Roknabadi, M.R.; Shahtahmasbi, N.; Vahedi Fakhrabad, D.; Arabshahi, H.

    2011-01-01

    In this research, we have studied the effect of inelastic electron-phonon interactions on current-voltage characteristic and tunneling magnetoresistance of a polythiophene molecule that is sandwiched between two cobalt electrodes using modified Green's function method as proposed by Walczak. The molecule is described with a modified Su-Schrieffer-Heeger Hamiltonian. The ground state of the molecule is obtained by Hellman-Feynman theorem. Electrodes are described in the wide-band approximation and spin-flip is neglected during conduction. Our calculation results show that with increase in voltage the currents increase and tunneling magnetoresistance decreases. Change in tunneling magnetoresistance due to inelastic interactions is limited in a small bias voltage interval and can be neglected in the other bias voltages. -- Research Highlights: →We investigate the effect of inelastic interaction on transport properties. →Due to inelastic interactions tunneling magnetoresistance decreases. →Decrease in TMR is restricted in a small voltage interval.

  14. Drilling the femoral tunnel during ACL reconstruction: transtibial versus anteromedial portal techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudisco, Cosimo; Bisicchia, Salvatore

    2012-08-01

    Incorrect bone tunnel position, particularly on the femoral side, is a frequent cause of failed anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Several studies have reported that drilling the femoral tunnel through the anteromedial portal allows a more anatomical placement on the lateral femoral condyle and higher knee stability than does transtibial reconstruction.In the current study, the femoral tunnel was drilled with transtibial (n=6) and anteromedial (n=6) portal techniques in 12 cadaveric knees. With appropriate landmarks inserted into bone tunnels, the direction and length of the tunnels were determined on anteroposterior and lateral radiographs. Knee stability was evaluated with a KT1000 arthrometer (MEDmetric Corporation, San Diego, California) and pivot shift test, comparing the pre- and postoperative values of both techniques. Finally, all knees were dissected to enhance vision of the insertion of the reconstructed ligament. The anteromedial portal technique led to better placement of the femoral tunnel in the coronal and sagittal planes, with higher knee stability according to the pivot shift test but not the KT1000 arthrometer. Anatomical and clinical results reported in the literature on transtibial and anteromedial portal techniques are controversial, but most of studies report better results with the anteromedial portal technique, especially regarding rotational stability. The current cadaveric study showed that the anteromedial portal technique provided better tunnel placement on the lateral femoral condyle in the coronal and sagittal planes, with an improvement in the rotational stability of the knee. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  15. Tunneling explains efficient electron transport via protein junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fereiro, Jerry A; Yu, Xi; Pecht, Israel; Sheves, Mordechai; Cuevas, Juan Carlos; Cahen, David

    2018-05-15

    Metalloproteins, proteins containing a transition metal ion cofactor, are electron transfer agents that perform key functions in cells. Inspired by this fact, electron transport across these proteins has been widely studied in solid-state settings, triggering the interest in examining potential use of proteins as building blocks in bioelectronic devices. Here, we report results of low-temperature (10 K) electron transport measurements via monolayer junctions based on the blue copper protein azurin (Az), which strongly suggest quantum tunneling of electrons as the dominant charge transport mechanism. Specifically, we show that, weakening the protein-electrode coupling by introducing a spacer, one can switch the electron transport from off-resonant to resonant tunneling. This is a consequence of reducing the electrode's perturbation of the Cu(II)-localized electronic state, a pattern that has not been observed before in protein-based junctions. Moreover, we identify vibronic features of the Cu(II) coordination sphere in transport characteristics that show directly the active role of the metal ion in resonance tunneling. Our results illustrate how quantum mechanical effects may dominate electron transport via protein-based junctions.

  16. Semiclassical description of resonant tunneling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogomolny, E.B.; Rouben, D.C.

    1996-01-01

    A semiclassical formula is calculated for the tunneling current of electrons trapped in a potential well which can tunnel into and across a wide quantum well. The tunneling current is measured at the second interface of this well and the calculations idealized an experimental situation where a strong magnetic field tilted with respect to an electric field was used. It is shown that the contribution to the tunneling current, due to trajectories which begin at the first interface and end on the second, is dominant for periodic orbits which hit both walls of the quantum well. (author)

  17. Electrode stabilizing materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amine, Khalil; Abouimrane, Ali; Moore, Jeffrey S.; Odom, Susan A.

    2015-11-03

    An electrolyte includes a polar aprotic solvent; an alkali metal salt; and an electrode stabilizing compound that is a monomer, which when polymerized forms an electrically conductive polymer. The electrode stabilizing compound is a thiophene, a imidazole, a anilines, a benzene, a azulene, a carbazole, or a thiol. Electrochemical devices may incorporate such electrolytes.

  18. Durable fuel electrode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    the composite. The invention also relates to the use of the composite as a fuel electrode, solid oxide fuel cell, and/or solid oxide electrolyser. The invention discloses a composite for an electrode, comprising a three-dimensional network of dispersed metal particles, stabilised zirconia particles and pores...

  19. Probing the local environment of a single OPE3 molecule using inelastic tunneling electron spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisenda, Riccardo; Perrin, Mickael L; van der Zant, Herre S J

    2015-01-01

    We study single-molecule oligo(phenylene ethynylene)dithiol junctions by means of inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS). The molecule is contacted with gold nano-electrodes formed with the mechanically controllable break junction technique. We record the IETS spectrum of the molecule from direct current measurements, both as a function of time and electrode separation. We find that for fixed electrode separation the molecule switches between various configurations, which are characterized by different IETS spectra. Similar variations in the IETS signal are observed during atomic rearrangements upon stretching of the molecular junction. Using quantum chemistry calculations, we identity some of the vibrational modes which constitute a chemical fingerprint of the molecule. In addition, changes can be attributed to rearrangements of the local molecular environment, in particular at the molecule-electrode interface. This study shows the importance of taking into account the interaction with the electrodes when describing inelastic contributions to transport through single-molecule junctions.

  20. Theory of spin-dependent tunnelling in magnetic junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathon, J.

    2002-01-01

    Rigorous theory of the tunnelling magnetoresistance (TMR) based on the real-space Kubo formula and fully realistic tight-binding bands fitted to an ab initio band structure is described. It is first applied to calculate the TMR of two Co electrodes separated by a vacuum gap. The calculated TMR ratio reaches ∼65% in the tunnelling regime but can be as high as 280% in the metallic regime when the vacuum gap is of the order of the Co interatomic distance (abrupt domain wall). It is also shown that the spin polarization P of the tunnelling current is negative in the metallic regime but becomes positive P∼35% in the tunnelling regime. Calculation of the TMR of an epitaxial Fe/MgO/Fe(001) junction is also described. The calculated optimistic TMR ratio is in excess of 1000% for an MgO barrier of ∼20 atomic planes and the spin polarization of the tunnelling current is positive for all MgO thicknesses. It is also found that spin-dependent tunnelling in an Fe/MgO/Fe(001) junction is not entirely determined by states at the Γ point (k parallel = 0) even for MgO thicknesses as large as ∼20 atomic planes. Finally, it is demonstrated that the TMR ratio calculated from the Kubo formula remains non-zero when one of the Co electrodes is covered with a copper layer. It is shown that non-zero TMR is due to quantum well states in the Cu layer which do not participate in transport. Since these only occur in the down-spin channel, their loss from transport creates a spin asymmetry of electrons tunnelling from a Cu interlayer, i.e. non-zero TMR. Numerical modelling is used to show that diffuse scattering from a random distribution of impurities in the barrier may cause quantum well states to evolve into propagating states, in which case the spin asymmetry of the non-magnetic layer is lost and with it the TMR. (author)

  1. Engineers win award for Swiss tunnel

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    A Derby engineering consultancy has won the Tunnelling Industry Award 2003 for Excellence in Tunnel Design, offered by the British Tunnelling Society, for its work on the LHC in Geneva, Switzerland (1/2 page).

  2. Q factor and resonance amplitude of Josephson tunnel junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broom, R.F.; Wolf, P.

    1977-01-01

    The surface impedance of the superconducting films comprising the electrodes of Josephson tunnel junctions has been derived from the BCS theory in the extreme London limit. Expressions have been obtained for (i) the dependence of the penetration depth lambda on frequency and temperature, and (ii) the quality factor Q of the junction cavity, attributable to surface absorption in the electrodes. The effect of thin electrodes (t 9 or approx. = lambda) is also included in the calculations. Comparison of the calculated frequency dependence of lambda with resonance measurements on Pb-alloy and all-Nb tunnel junctions yields quite good agreement, indicating that the assumptions made in the theory are reasonable. Measurements of the (current) amplitude of the resonance peaks of the junctions have been compared with the values obtained from inclusion of the calculated Q in the theory by Kulik. In common with observations on microwave cavities by other workers, we find that a small residual conductivity must be added to the real part of the BCS value. With its inclusion, good agreement is found between calculation and experiment, within the range determined by the simplifying assumptions of Kulik's theory. From the results, we believe the calculation of Q to be reasonably accurate for the materials investigated. It is shown that the resonance amplitude of Josephson junctions can be calculated directly from the material constants and a knowledge of the residual conductivity

  3. Magnetic tunnel junctions with monolayer hexagonal boron nitride tunnel barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piquemal-Banci, M.; Galceran, R.; Bouzehouane, K.; Anane, A.; Petroff, F.; Fert, A.; Dlubak, B.; Seneor, P. [Unité Mixte de Physique, CNRS, Thales, Univ. Paris-Sud, Université Paris-Saclay, Palaiseau 91767 (France); Caneva, S.; Martin, M.-B.; Weatherup, R. S.; Kidambi, P. R.; Robertson, J.; Hofmann, S. [Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB21PZ (United Kingdom); Xavier, S. [Thales Research and Technology, 1 avenue Augustin Fresnel, Palaiseau 91767 (France)

    2016-03-07

    We report on the integration of atomically thin 2D insulating hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) tunnel barriers into Co/h-BN/Fe magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs). The h-BN monolayer is directly grown by chemical vapor deposition on Fe. The Conductive Tip Atomic Force Microscopy (CT-AFM) measurements reveal the homogeneity of the tunnel behavior of our h-BN layers. As expected for tunneling, the resistance depends exponentially on the number of h-BN layers. The h-BN monolayer properties are also characterized through integration into complete MTJ devices. A Tunnel Magnetoresistance of up to 6% is observed for a MTJ based on a single atomically thin h-BN layer.

  4. Geo electrical Resistivity Survey for Ancient Tunnel Detection at Bukit Tenggek, Setiu, Terengganu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siti Nazira Masrom; Mohd Hariri Arifin; Abd Rahim Harun; Abdul Rahim Samsudin

    2011-01-01

    Geo electrical resistivity survey was conducted in the Bukit Tenggek, Setiu, Terengganu to detect the possible existence of an ancient tunnel which is believed to be in the area. Geo electrical resistivity method was found very effective in searching for archaeological exploration and underground structures (tunnels and artifacts). Geo electrical resistivity survey was carried out using Terrameter ABEM SAS1000 and Wenner array electrode configuration. The survey area is located in a damp valley with a stream across the region. 2-D resistivity image showed the existence of anomalies in several areas that can be associated with the structure. Low resistivity value represents the estimated existence of the old tunnel, while isolated rounded anomalies are believed to be associated with barrels/artifacts. 3-D resistivity profiles, shows anomalies that may be caused by the existence of a horizontal and two vertical tunnels (shaft). However, the drillings work need to be done to figure out the exact cause of these anomalies. (author)

  5. High performance vertical tunneling diodes using graphene/hexagonal boron nitride/graphene hetero-structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwan Lee, Seung; Lee, Jia; Ho Ra, Chang; Liu, Xiaochi; Hwang, Euyheon [Samsung-SKKU Graphene Center (SSGC), Sungkyunkwan University, 2066, Seobu-ro, Jangan-gu, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Nano Science and Technology, SKKU Advanced Institute of Nano-Technology (SAINT), Sungkyunkwan University, 2066, Seobu-ro, Jangan-gu, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Sup Choi, Min [Department of Nano Science and Technology, SKKU Advanced Institute of Nano-Technology (SAINT), Sungkyunkwan University, 2066, Seobu-ro, Jangan-gu, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Center for Human Interface Nano Technology (HINT), Sungkyunkwan University, 2066, Seobu-ro, Jangan-gu, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Hee Choi, Jun [Frontier Research Laboratory, Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd., Yongin, Gyeonggi-do 446-711 (Korea, Republic of); Zhong, Jianqiang; Chen, Wei [Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, 2 Science Drive 3, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); Department of Chemistry, National University of Singapore, 3 Science Drive 3, Singapore 117543 (Singapore); Jong Yoo, Won, E-mail: yoowj@skku.edu [Samsung-SKKU Graphene Center (SSGC), Sungkyunkwan University, 2066, Seobu-ro, Jangan-gu, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Nano Science and Technology, SKKU Advanced Institute of Nano-Technology (SAINT), Sungkyunkwan University, 2066, Seobu-ro, Jangan-gu, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Center for Human Interface Nano Technology (HINT), Sungkyunkwan University, 2066, Seobu-ro, Jangan-gu, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-03

    A tunneling rectifier prepared from vertically stacked two-dimensional (2D) materials composed of chemically doped graphene electrodes and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) tunneling barrier was demonstrated. The asymmetric chemical doping to graphene with linear dispersion property induces rectifying behavior effectively, by facilitating Fowler-Nordheim tunneling at high forward biases. It results in excellent diode performances of a hetero-structured graphene/h-BN/graphene tunneling diode, with an asymmetric factor exceeding 1000, a nonlinearity of ∼40, and a peak sensitivity of ∼12 V{sup −1}, which are superior to contending metal-insulator-metal diodes, showing great potential for future flexible and transparent electronic devices.

  6. Properties on niobium-based Josephson tunneling elements in junction microstructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albrecht, G.; Richter, J.; Weber, P.

    1982-01-01

    We describe the fabrication and electrical characteristics of niobium oxide-barrier tunnel junctions with counterelectrodes of lead/lead alloy. Primary attention is directed to the experimental conditions necessary to obtain high-quality tunnel barriers as well as studies on characterizing the atomic structure of the barrier region. In order to study the tunnel barrier homogeneity in the tunneling region the magnetic field dependence of the critical Josephson current is investigated. The I--V characteristics and dependence of the critical Josephson current on temperature are analyzed quantitatively by using a proximity effect model. Finally, we discuss experimental results on the improvement of junction quality by including traces of carbon in the rf argon plasma during the sputter cleaning of niobium base electrodes

  7. Gate-controlled current and inelastic electron tunneling spectrum of benzene: a self-consistent study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Y Y; Chen, H; Mizuseki, H; Kawazoe, Y

    2011-04-14

    We use density functional theory based nonequilibrium Green's function to self-consistently study the current through the 1,4-benzenedithiol (BDT). The elastic and inelastic tunneling properties through this Au-BDT-Au molecular junction are simulated, respectively. For the elastic tunneling case, it is found that the current through the tilted molecule can be modulated effectively by the external gate field, which is perpendicular to the phenyl ring. The gate voltage amplification comes from the modulation of the interaction between the electrodes and the molecules in the junctions. For the inelastic case, the electron tunneling scattered by the molecular vibrational modes is considered within the self-consistent Born approximation scheme, and the inelastic electron tunneling spectrum is calculated.

  8. Tunneling conductance in superconductor-hybrid double quantum dots Josephson junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamoli, Tanuj; Ajay

    2018-05-01

    The present work deals with the theoretical model study to analyse the tunneling conductance across a superconductor hybrid double quantum dots tunnel junction (S-DQD-S). Recently, there are many experimental works where the Josephson current across such nanoscopic junction is found to be dependent on nature of the superconducting electrodes, coupling of the hybrid double quantum dot's electronic states with the electronic states of the superconductors and nature of electronic structure of the coupled dots. For this, we have attempted a theoretical model containing contributions of BCS superconducting leads, magnetic coupled quantum dot states and coupling of superconducting leads with QDs. In order to include magnetic coupled QDs the contributions of competitive Kondo and Ruderman-Kittel- Kasuya-Yosida (RKKY) interaction terms are also introduced through many body effects in the model Hamiltonian at low temperatures (where Kondo temperature TK tunnel junctions. Tunneling conductance is proportional to DOS, hence we can analyse it's behaviour with the help of DOS.

  9. The (2 × 2) tunnels structured manganese dioxide nanorods with α phase for lithium air batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghouri, Zafar Khan; Zahoor, Awan; Barakat, Nasser A. M.; Alsoufi, Mohammad S.; Bawazeer, Tahani M.; Mohamed, Ahmed F.; Kim, Hak Yong

    2016-02-01

    The (2 × 2) tunnels structured manganese dioxide nanorods with α phase (α-MnO2) are synthesized via simplistic hydrothermal method at low temperature. The obtained tunnels structured α-MnO2 nanorods are characterized by, Transmission electron microscopy, Scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction techniques. The oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity was studied by cyclic voltammetry and rotating ring-disc electrode voltammetry techniques in alkaline media. Moreover; the highly electrocatalytic tunnels structured α-MnO2 nanorods were then also applied as cathode in rechargeable Li-O2 cells. The Li-O2 cells exhibited initial discharge capacity as high as ∼4000 mAh/g with the tunnels structured α-MnO2 nanorods which was double the original capacity of the cells without any catalyst. Also we obtained 100% round trip efficiency upon cycling with limited capacity for more than 50 cycles.

  10. Anatomic single-bundle ACL surgery: consequences of tibial tunnel diameter and drill-guide angle on tibial footprint coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Bracht, H; Verhelst, L; Stuyts, B; Page, B; Bellemans, J; Verdonk, P

    2014-05-01

    To investigate the consequences of differences in drill-guide angle and tibial tunnel diameter on the amount of tibial anatomical anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) footprint coverage and the risk of overhang of the tibial tunnel aperture over the edges of the native tibial ACL footprint. Twenty fresh-frozen adult human knee specimens with a median age of 46 years were used for this study. Digital templates mimicking the ellipsoid aperture of tibial tunnels with a different drill-guide angle and a different diameter were designed. The centres of these templates were positioned over the geometric centre of the tibial ACL footprint. The amount of tibial ACL footprint coverage and overhang was calculated. Risk factors for overhang were determined. Footprint coverage and the risk of overhang were also compared between a lateral tibial tunnel and a classic antero-medial tibial tunnel. A larger tibial tunnel diameter and a smaller drill-guide angle both will create significant more footprint coverage and overhang. In 45% of the knees, an overhang was created with a 10-mm diameter tibial tunnel with drill-guide angle 45°. Furthermore, a lateral tibial tunnel was found not to be at increased risk of overhang. A larger tibial tunnel diameter and a smaller drill-guide angle both will increase the amount of footprint coverage. Inversely, larger tibial tunnel diameters and smaller drill-guide angles will increase the risk of overhang of the tibial tunnel aperture over the edges of the native tibial ACL footprint. A lateral tibial tunnel does not increase the risk of overhang.

  11. Spin tunnelling in mesoscopic systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We study spin tunnelling in molecular magnets as an instance of a mesoscopic phenomenon, with special emphasis on the molecule Fe8. We show that the tunnel splitting between various pairs of Zeeman levels in this molecule oscillates as a function of applied magnetic field, vanishing completely at special points in the ...

  12. Hawking temperature from tunnelling formalism

    OpenAIRE

    Mitra, P.

    2007-01-01

    It has recently been suggested that the attempt to understand Hawking radiation as tunnelling across black hole horizons produces a Hawking temperature double the standard value. It is explained here how one can obtain the standard value in the same tunnelling approach.

  13. Controlled electroplating and electromigration in nickel electrodes for nanogap formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Los Santos Valladares, Luis; Mitrelias, Thanos; Sfigakis, Francois; Barnes, Crispin H W [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, J J Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Leon Felix, Lizbet; Bustamante Dominguez, Angel [Laboratorio de Ceramicos y Nanomateriales, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Ap. Postal 14-0149, Lima (Peru); Khondaker, Saiful I [NanoScience Technology Center and Department of Physics, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32826 (United States); Majima, Yutaka, E-mail: ld301@cam.ac.uk, E-mail: luisitodv@yahoo.es [Materials and Structures Laboratory, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta-cho, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan)

    2010-11-05

    We report the fabrication of nickel nanospaced electrodes by electroplating and electromigration for nanoelectronic devices. Using a conventional electrochemical cell, nanogaps can be obtained by controlling the plating time alone and after a careful optimization of electrodeposition parameters such as electrolyte bath, applied potential, cleaning, etc. During the process, the gap width decreases exponentially with time until the electrode gaps are completely bridged. Once the bridge is formed, the ex situ electromigration technique can reopen the nanogap. When the gap is {approx} 1 nm, tunneling current-voltage characterization shows asymmetry which can be corrected by an external magnetic field. This suggests that charge transfer in the nickel electrodes depends on the orientation of magnetic moments.

  14. Controlled electroplating and electromigration in nickel electrodes for nanogap formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Los Santos Valladares, Luis; Mitrelias, Thanos; Sfigakis, Francois; Barnes, Crispin H W; Leon Felix, Lizbet; Bustamante Dominguez, Angel; Khondaker, Saiful I; Majima, Yutaka

    2010-01-01

    We report the fabrication of nickel nanospaced electrodes by electroplating and electromigration for nanoelectronic devices. Using a conventional electrochemical cell, nanogaps can be obtained by controlling the plating time alone and after a careful optimization of electrodeposition parameters such as electrolyte bath, applied potential, cleaning, etc. During the process, the gap width decreases exponentially with time until the electrode gaps are completely bridged. Once the bridge is formed, the ex situ electromigration technique can reopen the nanogap. When the gap is ∼ 1 nm, tunneling current-voltage characterization shows asymmetry which can be corrected by an external magnetic field. This suggests that charge transfer in the nickel electrodes depends on the orientation of magnetic moments.

  15. Influence of edge roughness on graphene nanoribbon resonant tunnelling diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Gengchiau; Khalid, Sharjeel Bin; Lam, Kai-Tak

    2010-01-01

    The edge roughness effects of graphene nanoribbons on their application in resonant tunnelling diodes with different geometrical shapes (S, H and W) were investigated. Sixty samples for each 5%, 10% and 15% edge roughness conditions of these differently shaped graphene nanoribbon resonant tunnelling diodes were randomly generated and studied. Firstly, it was observed that edge roughness in the barrier regions decreases the effective barrier height and thickness, which increases the broadening of the quantized states in the quantum well due to the enhanced penetration of the wave-function tail from the electrodes. Secondly, edge roughness increases the effective width of the quantum well and causes the lowering of the quantized states. Furthermore, the shape effects on carrier transport are modified by edge roughness due to different interfacial scattering. Finally, with the effects mentioned above, edge roughness has a considerable impact on the device performance in terms of varying the peak-current positions and degrading the peak-to-valley current ratio.

  16. Manipulating the voltage dependence of tunneling spin torques

    KAUST Repository

    Manchon, Aurelien

    2012-10-01

    Voltage-driven spin transfer torques in magnetic tunnel junctions provide an outstanding tool to design advanced spin-based devices for memory and reprogrammable logic applications. The non-linear voltage dependence of the torque has a direct impact on current-driven magnetization dynamics and on devices performances. After a brief overview of the progress made to date in the theoretical description of the spin torque in tunnel junctions, I present different ways to alter and control the bias dependence of both components of the spin torque. Engineering the junction (barrier and electrodes) structural asymmetries or controlling the spin accumulation profile in the free layer offer promising tools to design effcient spin devices.

  17. Offset-electrode profile acquisition strategy for electrical resistivity tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Austin R.; Plattner, Alain

    2018-04-01

    We present an electrode layout strategy that allows electrical resistivity profiles to image the third dimension close to the profile plane. This "offset-electrode profile" approach involves laterally displacing electrodes away from the profile line in an alternating fashion and then inverting the resulting data using three-dimensional electrical resistivity tomography software. In our synthetic and field surveys, the offset-electrode method succeeds in revealing three-dimensional structures in the vicinity of the profile plane, which we could not achieve using three-dimensional inversions of linear profiles. We confirm and explain the limits of linear electrode profiles through a discussion of the three-dimensional sensitivity patterns: For a homogeneous starting model together with a linear electrode layout, all sensitivities remain symmetric with respect to the profile plane through each inversion step. This limitation can be overcome with offset-electrode layouts by breaking the symmetry pattern among the sensitivities. Thanks to freely available powerful three-dimensional resistivity tomography software and cheap modern computing power, the requirement for full three-dimensional calculations does not create a significant burden and renders the offset-electrode approach a cost-effective method. By offsetting the electrodes in an alternating pattern, as opposed to laying the profile out in a U-shape, we minimize shortening the profile length.

  18. Electroretinography in dogs using a fiber electrode prototype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.L. Pereira

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We compared two electroretinography (ERG electrodes in dogs using ERG standards of the International Society for Clinical Electrophysiology of Vision (ISCEV. Ten healthy Yorkshire terrier dogs (mean age, 2.80 ± 1.42 years; 6 females weighing 5.20 ± 1.56 kg were evaluated using an ERG system for veterinary use. Dark- and light-adapted ERG responses were recorded using an ERG-Jet electrode and a fiber electrode prototype. The examinations were performed during 2 visits, 3 weeks apart. Both electrodes (ERG-Jet or fiber prototype were used on each animal and the first eye to be recorded (OD × OS was selected randomly. Three weeks later the examination was repeated on the same animal switching the type of electrode to be used that day and the first eye to be examined. The magnitude and waveform quality obtained with the two electrode types were similar for all ERG responses. ERG amplitudes and implicit times obtained from dogs using the fiber electrode prototype were comparable to those obtained with the ERG-Jet electrode for rod, maximal rod-cone summed, cone, and 30-Hz flicker responses. The fiber electrode prototype is a low-cost device, available as an alternative instrument for clinical veterinary ERG recording for retinal function assessment.

  19. Electroretinography in dogs using a fiber electrode prototype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.L. Pereira

    Full Text Available We compared two electroretinography (ERG electrodes in dogs using ERG standards of the International Society for Clinical Electrophysiology of Vision (ISCEV. Ten healthy Yorkshire terrier dogs (mean age, 2.80 ± 1.42 years; 6 females weighing 5.20 ± 1.56 kg were evaluated using an ERG system for veterinary use. Dark- and light-adapted ERG responses were recorded using an ERG-Jet electrode and a fiber electrode prototype. The examinations were performed during 2 visits, 3 weeks apart. Both electrodes (ERG-Jet or fiber prototype were used on each animal and the first eye to be recorded (OD × OS was selected randomly. Three weeks later the examination was repeated on the same animal switching the type of electrode to be used that day and the first eye to be examined. The magnitude and waveform quality obtained with the two electrode types were similar for all ERG responses. ERG amplitudes and implicit times obtained from dogs using the fiber electrode prototype were comparable to those obtained with the ERG-Jet electrode for rod, maximal rod-cone summed, cone, and 30-Hz flicker responses. The fiber electrode prototype is a low-cost device, available as an alternative instrument for clinical veterinary ERG recording for retinal function assessment.

  20. Electroretinography in dogs using a fiber electrode prototype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, A.L.; Montiani-Ferreira, F.; Santos, V.R.; Salomão, S.R.; Souza, C.; Berezovsky, A.

    2013-01-01

    We compared two electroretinography (ERG) electrodes in dogs using ERG standards of the International Society for Clinical Electrophysiology of Vision (ISCEV). Ten healthy Yorkshire terrier dogs (mean age, 2.80 ± 1.42 years; 6 females) weighing 5.20 ± 1.56 kg were evaluated using an ERG system for veterinary use. Dark- and light-adapted ERG responses were recorded using an ERG-Jet electrode and a fiber electrode prototype. The examinations were performed during 2 visits, 3 weeks apart. Both electrodes (ERG-Jet or fiber prototype) were used on each animal and the first eye to be recorded (OD × OS) was selected randomly. Three weeks later the examination was repeated on the same animal switching the type of electrode to be used that day and the first eye to be examined. The magnitude and waveform quality obtained with the two electrode types were similar for all ERG responses. ERG amplitudes and implicit times obtained from dogs using the fiber electrode prototype were comparable to those obtained with the ERG-Jet electrode for rod, maximal rod-cone summed, cone, and 30-Hz flicker responses. The fiber electrode prototype is a low-cost device, available as an alternative instrument for clinical veterinary ERG recording for retinal function assessment

  1. Tunneling Ionization of Diatomic Molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensmark, Jens Søren Sieg

    2016-01-01

    When a molecule is subject to a strong laser field, there is a probability that an electron can escape, even though the electrons are bound by a large potential barrier. This is possible because electrons are quantum mechanical in nature, and they are therefore able to tunnel through potential...... barriers, an ability classical particles do not possess. Tunnelling is a fundamental quantum mechanical process, a process that is distinctly non-classical, so solving this tunnelling problem is not only relevant for molecular physics, but also for quantum theory in general. In this dissertation the theory...... of tunneling ionizaion of molecules is presented and the results of numerical calculations are shown. One perhaps surprising result is, that the frequently used Born-Oppenheimer approximation breaks down for weak fields when describing tunneling ionization. An analytic theory applicable in the weak-field limit...

  2. Tunneling from the past horizon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Subeom; Yeom, Dong-han

    2018-04-01

    We investigate a tunneling and emission process of a thin-shell from a Schwarzschild black hole, where the shell was initially located beyond the Einstein-Rosen bridge and finally appears at the right side of the Penrose diagram. In order to obtain such a solution, we should assume that the areal radius of the black hole horizon increases after the tunneling. Hence, there is a parameter range such that the tunneling rate is exponentially enhanced, rather than suppressed. We may have two interpretations regarding this. First, such a tunneling process from the past horizon is improbable by physical reasons; second, such a tunneling is possible in principle, but in order to obtain a stable Einstein-Rosen bridge, one needs to restrict the parameter spaces. If such a process is allowed, this can be a nonperturbative contribution to Einstein-Rosen bridges as well as eternal black holes.

  3. Three-dimensional scanning force/tunneling spectroscopy at room temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, Yoshiaki; Ueda, Keiichi; Abe, Masayuki; Morita, Seizo

    2012-01-01

    We simultaneously measured the force and tunneling current in three-dimensional (3D) space on the Si(111)-(7 × 7) surface using scanning force/tunneling microscopy at room temperature. The observables, the frequency shift and the time-averaged tunneling current were converted to the physical quantities of interest, i.e. the interaction force and the instantaneous tunneling current. Using the same tip, the local density of states (LDOS) was mapped on the same surface area at constant height by measuring the time-averaged tunneling current as a function of the bias voltage at every lateral position. LDOS images at negative sample voltages indicate that the tip apex is covered with Si atoms, which is consistent with the Si-Si covalent bonding mechanism for AFM imaging. A measurement technique for 3D force/current mapping and LDOS imaging on the equivalent surface area using the same tip was thus demonstrated. (paper)

  4. Electrode-electrolyte interface model of tripolar concentric ring electrode and electrode paste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasrollaholhosseini, Seyed Hadi; Steele, Preston; Besio, Walter G

    2016-08-01

    Electrodes are used to transform ionic currents to electrical currents in biological systems. Modeling the electrode-electrolyte interface could help to optimize the performance of the electrode interface to achieve higher signal to noise ratios. There are previous reports of accurate models for single-element biomedical electrodes. In this paper we develop a model for the electrode-electrolyte interface for tripolar concentric ring electrodes (TCRE) that are used to record brain signals.

  5. Bipolar Electrode Sample Preparation Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi (Inventor); Song, Hongjun (Inventor); Pant, Kapil (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    An analyte selection device can include: a body defining a fluid channel having a channel inlet and channel outlet; a bipolar electrode (BPE) between the inlet and outlet; one of an anode or cathode electrically coupled with the BPE on a channel inlet side of the BPE and the other of the anode or cathode electrically coupled with the BPE on a channel outlet side of the BPE; and an electronic system operably coupled with the anode and cathode so as to polarize the BPE. The fluid channel can have any shape or dimension. The channel inlet and channel outlet can be longitudinal or lateral with respect to the longitudinal axis of the channel. The BPE can be any metallic member, such as a flat plate on a wall or mesh as a barrier BPE. The anode and cathode can be located at a position that polarizes the BPE.

  6. Continuous separation of submicron particles using Angled electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yunus, Nurul A Md; Green, Nicolas G

    2008-01-01

    Dielectrophoretic separation of particles is achieved by the generation of electric forces on the particles by non-uniform electric fields. This paper presents a technique based on negative dielectrophoresis in a novel design of electrode array for the non-contact separation of polarisable particles. Angled electrodes are used to generate a lateral force in a microfluidic channel separating a mixed stream of particles into distinct streams of constituent components and achieving a high degree of spatial separation.

  7. A15 Nb-Sn tunnel junction fabrication and properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudman, D.A.; Hellman, F.; Hammond, R.H.; Beasley, M.R.

    1984-01-01

    We have investigated the deposition conditions necessary to produce optimized films of A15 Nb-Sn (19--26 at. % Sn) by electron-beam codeposition. Reliable high-quality superconducting tunnel junctions can be made on this material by using an oxidized-amorphous silicon overlayer as the tunneling barrier and lead as the counter-electrode. These junctions have been used both as a tool for materials diagnosis and as a probe of the superconducting properties (critical temperature and gap) of the films. Careful control of the substrate temperature during the growth of the films has proved critical to obtain homogeneous samples. When the substrate temperature is properly stabilized, stoichiometric Nb 3 Sn is found to be relatively insensitive to the deposition temperature and conditions. In contrast, the properties of the off-stoichiometry (Sn-poor) material depend strongly on the deposition temperature. For this Sn-poor material the ratio 2Δ/kT/sub c/ at a given composition increases with increasing deposition temperature. This change appears to be due to an increase in the gap at the surface of the material (as measured by tunneling) relative to the critical temperature of the bulk. All the tunnel junctions exhibit some persistent nonidealities in their current-voltage characteristics that are qualitatively insensitive to composition or deposition conditions. In particular, the junctions show excess conduction below the sum of the energy gaps (with onset at the counter-electrode gap) and a broadened current rise at the sum gap. The detailed origins of these problems are not yet understood

  8. Lateral and Vertical Organic Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Shadeedi, Akram

    An extensive study has been performed to provide a better understanding of the operation principles of doped organic field-effect transistors (OFETs), organic p-i-n diodes, Schottky diodes, and organic permeable base transistors (OPBTs). This has been accomplished by a combination of electrical and structural characterization of these devices. The discussion of doped OFETs focuses on the shift of the threshold voltage due to increased doping concentrations and the generation and transport of minority charge carriers. Doping of pentacene OFETs is achieved by co-evaporation of pentacene with the n-dopant W2(hpp)4. It is found that pentacene thin film are efficiently doped and that a conductivity in the range of 2.6 x 10-6 S cm-1 for 1 wt% to 2.5 x 10-4 S cm-1 for 16 wt% is reached. It is shown that n-doped OFET consisting of an n-doped channel and n-doped contacts are ambipolar. This behavior is surprising, as n-doping the contacts should suppress direct injection of minority charge carriers (holes). It was proposed that minority charge carrier injection and hence the ambipolar characteristic of n-doped OFETs can be explained by Zener tunneling inside the intrinsic pentacene layer underneath the drain electrode. It is shown that the electric field in this layer is indeed in the range of the breakdown field of pentacene based p-i-n Zener homodiodes. Doping the channel has a profound influence on the onset voltage of minority (hole) conduction. The onset voltage can be shifted by lightly n-doping the channel. The shift of onset voltage can be explained by two mechanisms: first, due to a larger voltage that has to be applied to the gate in order to fully deplete the n-doped layer. Second, it can be attributed to an increase in hole trapping by inactive dopants. Moreover, it has been shown that the threshold voltage of majority (electron) conduction is shifted by an increase in the doping concentration, and that the ambipolar OFETs can be turned into unipolar OFETs at

  9. Electrochemistry of Hemin on Single-Crystal Au(111)-electrode Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Ling; Ulstrup, Jens; Zhang, Jingdong

    adsorption on well-defined single-crystal Au(111)-electrode surfaces using electrochemistry combined with scanning tunnelling microscopy under electrochemical control. Hemin gives two voltammetric peaks assigned to adsorbed monomers and dimmers (Fig. 1B). In situ STM shows that hemin self...

  10. Analysis of oxidation of self-baking electrodes (Soederberg electrodes) by means of three-dimensional model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pashnin, S. V.

    2017-10-01

    The paper presents the methodology and results of the development of the temperature dependence of the oxidation speed of the self-baking electrode (Soederberg Electrodes) in the ore-thermal furnaces. For the study of oxidation, the working ends of the self-baking electrodes, which were taken out from the ore-thermal furnaces after their scabbings, were used. The temperature of the electrode surface by its height was calculated with the help of the mathematical model of heat work of self-baking electrode. The comparison of electrode surface temperatures with the speed of oxidation of the electrode allowed one to obtain the temperature dependency of the oxidation of the lateral electrode surface. Comparison of the experimental data, obtained in the laboratory by various authors, showed their qualitative coincidence with results of calculations of the oxidation rate presented in this article. With the help of the mathematical model of temperatures fields of electrode, the calculations of the sizes of the cracks, appearing after burnout ribs, were performed. Calculations showed that the sizes of the cracks after the ribs burnout, calculated by means of the obtained temperature dependence, coincide with the experimental data with sufficient accuracy.

  11. Radiographic positions of femoral ACL, AM and PL centres : accuracy of guidelines based on the lateral quadrant method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luites, Joan W.H.; Verdonschot, Nico

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Femoral tunnel positioning is an important factor in anatomical ACL reconstructions. To improve accuracy, lateral radiographic support can be used to determine the correct tunnel location, applying the quadrant method. Piefer et al. (Arthroscopy 28:872–881, 2012) combined various outcomes

  12. Tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance in single-molecule magnet junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Haiqing; Wang, Qiang; Jiao, Hujun; Liang, J.-Q.

    2012-08-01

    We theoretically investigate quantum transport through single-molecule magnet (SMM) junctions with ferromagnetic and normal-metal leads in the sequential regime. The current obtained by means of the rate-equation gives rise to the tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance (TAMR), which varies with the angle between the magnetization direction of ferromagnetic lead and the easy axis of SMM. The angular dependence of TAMR can serve as a probe to determine experimentally the easy axis of SMM. Moreover, it is demonstrated that both the magnitude and the sign of TAMR are tunable by the bias voltage, suggesting a new spin-valve device with only one magnetic electrode in molecular spintronics.

  13. Fluctuation Dominated Josephson Tunneling with a Scanning Tunneling Microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naaman, O.; Teizer, W.; Dynes, R. C.

    2001-01-01

    We demonstrate Josephson tunneling in vacuum tunnel junctions formed between a superconducting scanning tunneling microscope tip and a Pb film, for junction resistances in the range 50--300 k Omega. We show that the superconducting phase dynamics is dominated by thermal fluctuations, and that the Josephson current appears as a peak centered at small finite voltage. In the presence of microwave fields (f=15.0 GHz) the peak decreases in magnitude and shifts to higher voltages with increasing rf power, in agreement with theory

  14. Frequency driven inversion of tunnel magnetoimpedance and observation of positive tunnel magnetocapacitance in magnetic tunnel junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parui, Subir; Ribeiro, Mário; Atxabal, Ainhoa; Llopis, Roger; Bedoya-Pinto, Amilcar; Sun, Xiangnan; Casanova, Fèlix; Hueso, Luis E.

    2016-01-01

    The relevance for modern computation of non-volatile high-frequency memories makes ac-transport measurements of magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) crucial for exploring this regime. Here, we demonstrate a frequency-mediated effect in which the tunnel magnetoimpedance reverses its sign in a classical Co/Al 2 O 3 /NiFe MTJ, whereas we only observe a gradual decrease in the tunnel magnetophase. Such effects are explained by the capacitive coupling of a parallel resistor and capacitor in the equivalent circuit model of the MTJ. Furthermore, we report a positive tunnel magnetocapacitance effect, suggesting the presence of a spin-capacitance at the two ferromagnet/tunnel-barrier interfaces. Our results are important for understanding spin transport phenomena at the high frequency regime in which the spin-polarized charge accumulation due to spin-dependent penetration depth at the two interfaces plays a crucial role.

  15. Frequency driven inversion of tunnel magnetoimpedance and observation of positive tunnel magnetocapacitance in magnetic tunnel junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parui, Subir, E-mail: s.parui@nanogune.eu, E-mail: l.hueso@nanogune.eu; Ribeiro, Mário; Atxabal, Ainhoa; Llopis, Roger [CIC nanoGUNE, 20018 Donostia-San Sebastian (Spain); Bedoya-Pinto, Amilcar [CIC nanoGUNE, 20018 Donostia-San Sebastian (Spain); Max Planck Institute of Microstructure Physics, D-06120 Halle (Germany); Sun, Xiangnan [CIC nanoGUNE, 20018 Donostia-San Sebastian (Spain); National Center for Nanoscience and Technology, 100190 Beijing (China); Casanova, Fèlix; Hueso, Luis E., E-mail: s.parui@nanogune.eu, E-mail: l.hueso@nanogune.eu [CIC nanoGUNE, 20018 Donostia-San Sebastian (Spain); IKERBASQUE, Basque Foundation for Science, 48011 Bilbao (Spain)

    2016-08-01

    The relevance for modern computation of non-volatile high-frequency memories makes ac-transport measurements of magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) crucial for exploring this regime. Here, we demonstrate a frequency-mediated effect in which the tunnel magnetoimpedance reverses its sign in a classical Co/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/NiFe MTJ, whereas we only observe a gradual decrease in the tunnel magnetophase. Such effects are explained by the capacitive coupling of a parallel resistor and capacitor in the equivalent circuit model of the MTJ. Furthermore, we report a positive tunnel magnetocapacitance effect, suggesting the presence of a spin-capacitance at the two ferromagnet/tunnel-barrier interfaces. Our results are important for understanding spin transport phenomena at the high frequency regime in which the spin-polarized charge accumulation due to spin-dependent penetration depth at the two interfaces plays a crucial role.

  16. Effect of Orbital Hybridization on Spin-Polarized Tunneling across Co/C60 Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kai; Strambini, Elia; Sanderink, Johnny G M; Bolhuis, Thijs; van der Wiel, Wilfred G; de Jong, Michel P

    2016-10-26

    The interaction between ferromagnetic surfaces and organic semiconductors leads to the formation of hybrid interfacial states. As a consequence, the local magnetic moment is altered, a hybrid interfacial density of states (DOS) is formed, and spin-dependent shifts of energy levels occur. Here, we show that this hybridization affects spin transport across the interface significantly. We report spin-dependent electronic transport measurements for tunnel junctions comprising C 60 molecular thin films grown on top of face-centered-cubic (fcc) epitaxial Co electrodes, an AlO x tunnel barrier, and an Al counter electrode. Since only one ferromagnetic electrode (Co) is present, spin-polarized transport is due to tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance (TAMR). An in-plane TAMR ratio of approximately 0.7% has been measured at 5 K under application of a magnetic field of 800 mT. The magnetic switching behavior shows some remarkable features, which are attributed to the rotation of interfacial magnetic moments. This behavior can be ascribed to the magnetic coupling between the Co thin films and the newly formed Co/C 60 hybridized interfacial states. Using the Tedrow-Meservey technique, the tunnel spin polarization of the Co/C 60 interface was found to be 43%.

  17. Imaging of buried phosphorus nanostructures in silicon using scanning tunneling microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oberbeck, Lars [Centre for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology, School of Physics, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales 2052 (Australia); TOTAL Marketing Services, New Energies, La Défense 10, 92069 Paris La Défense Cedex (France); Reusch, Thilo C. G.; Hallam, Toby; Simmons, Michelle Y., E-mail: n.curson@ucl.ac.uk, E-mail: michelle.simmons@unsw.edu.au [Centre for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology, School of Physics, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales 2052 (Australia); Schofield, Steven R. [Centre for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology, School of Physics, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales 2052 (Australia); London Centre for Nanotechnology, UCL, London WC1H 0AH (United Kingdom); Department of Physics and Astronomy, UCL, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Curson, Neil J., E-mail: n.curson@ucl.ac.uk, E-mail: michelle.simmons@unsw.edu.au [Centre for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology, School of Physics, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales 2052 (Australia); London Centre for Nanotechnology, UCL, London WC1H 0AH (United Kingdom); Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, UCL, London WC1E 7JE (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-23

    We demonstrate the locating and imaging of single phosphorus atoms and phosphorus dopant nanostructures, buried beneath the Si(001) surface using scanning tunneling microscopy. The buried dopant nanostructures have been fabricated in a bottom-up approach using scanning tunneling microscope lithography on Si(001). We find that current imaging tunneling spectroscopy is suited to locate and image buried nanostructures at room temperature and with residual surface roughness present. From these studies, we can place an upper limit on the lateral diffusion during encapsulation with low-temperature Si molecular beam epitaxy.

  18. Imaging of buried phosphorus nanostructures in silicon using scanning tunneling microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oberbeck, Lars; Reusch, Thilo C. G.; Hallam, Toby; Simmons, Michelle Y.; Schofield, Steven R.; Curson, Neil J.

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate the locating and imaging of single phosphorus atoms and phosphorus dopant nanostructures, buried beneath the Si(001) surface using scanning tunneling microscopy. The buried dopant nanostructures have been fabricated in a bottom-up approach using scanning tunneling microscope lithography on Si(001). We find that current imaging tunneling spectroscopy is suited to locate and image buried nanostructures at room temperature and with residual surface roughness present. From these studies, we can place an upper limit on the lateral diffusion during encapsulation with low-temperature Si molecular beam epitaxy.

  19. Lateral collateral ligament (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The lateral collateral ligament connects the end of the femur (thigh) to the top of the fibula (the thin bone that runs next to the shin bone). The lateral collateral ligament provides stability against varus stress. Varus stress ...

  20. Clavicular bone tunnel malposition leads to early failures in coracoclavicular ligament reconstructions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Jay B; Shaha, James S; Rowles, Douglas J; Bottoni, Craig R; Shaha, Steven H; Tokish, John M

    2013-01-01

    Modern techniques for the treatment of acromioclavicular (AC) joint dislocations have largely centered on free tendon graft reconstructions. Recent biomechanical studies have demonstrated that an anatomic reconstruction with 2 clavicular bone tunnels more closely matches the properties of native coracoclavicular (CC) ligaments than more traditional techniques. No study has analyzed tunnel position in regard to risk of early failure. To evaluate the effect of clavicular tunnel position in CC ligament reconstruction as a risk of early failure. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. A retrospective review was performed of a consecutive series of CC ligament reconstructions performed with 2 clavicular bone tunnels and a free tendon graft. The population was largely a young, active-duty military group of patients. Radiographs were analyzed for the maintenance of reduction and location of clavicular bone tunnels using a picture archiving and communication system. The distance from the lateral border of the clavicle to the center of each bone tunnel was divided by the total clavicular length to establish a ratio. Medical records were reviewed for operative details and functional outcome. Failure was defined as loss of intraoperative reduction. The overall failure rate was 28.6% (8/28) at an average of 7.4 weeks postoperatively. Comparison of bone tunnel position showed that medialized bone tunnels were a significant predictor for early loss of reduction for the conoid (a ratio of 0.292 vs 0.248; P = .012) and trapezoid bone tunnels (a ratio of 0.171 vs 0.128; P = .004); this correlated to an average of 7 to 9 mm more medial in the reconstructions that failed. Reconstructions performed with a conoid ratio of ≥0.30 were significantly more likely to fail (5/5, 100%) than were those performed lateral to a ratio of 0.30 (3/23, 13.0%) (P < .01). There were no failures when the conoid ratio was <0.25 (0/10, 0%). Conoid tunnel placement was also statistically significant for

  1. Sensor employing internal reference electrode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention concerns a novel internal reference electrode as well as a novel sensing electrode for an improved internal reference oxygen sensor and the sensor employing same.......The present invention concerns a novel internal reference electrode as well as a novel sensing electrode for an improved internal reference oxygen sensor and the sensor employing same....

  2. High energy storage capacitor by embedding tunneling nano-structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holme, Timothy P; Prinz, Friedrich B; Van Stockum, Philip B

    2014-11-04

    In an All-Electron Battery (AEB), inclusions embedded in an active region between two electrodes of a capacitor provide enhanced energy storage. Electrons can tunnel to/from and/or between the inclusions, thereby increasing the charge storage density relative to a conventional capacitor. One or more barrier layers is present in an AEB to block DC current flow through the device. The AEB effect can be enhanced by using multi-layer active regions having inclusion layers with the inclusions separated by spacer layers that don't have the inclusions. The use of cylindrical geometry or wrap around electrodes and/or barrier layers in a planar geometry can enhance the basic AEB effect. Other physical effects that can be employed in connection with the AEB effect are excited state energy storage, and formation of a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC).

  3. Enhancement of tunneling current in phosphorene tunnel field effect transistors by surface defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Juan; Fan, Zhi-Qiang; Gong, Jian; Chen, Jie-Zhi; ManduLa, Huhe; Zhang, Yan-Yang; Yang, Shen-Yuan; Jiang, Xiang-Wei

    2018-02-21

    The effects of the staggered double vacancies, hydrogen (H), 3d transition metals, for example cobalt, and semiconductor covalent atoms, for example, germanium, nitrogen, phosphorus (P) and silicon adsorption on the transport properties of monolayer phosphorene were studied using density functional theory and non-equilibrium Green's function formalism. It was observed that the performance of the phosphorene tunnel field effect transistors (TFETs) with an 8.8 nm scaling channel length could be improved most effectively, if the adatoms or vacancies were introduced at the source channel interface. For H and P doped devices, the upper limit of on-state currents of phosphorene TFETs were able to be quickly increased to 2465 μA μm -1 and 1652 μA μm -1 , respectively, which not only outperformed the pristine sample, but also met the requirements for high performance logic applications for the next decade in the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS). It was proved that the defect-induced band gap states make the effective tunneling path between the conduction band (CB) and valence band (VB) much shorter, so that the carriers can be injected easily from the left electrode, then transfer to the channel. In this regard, the tunneling properties of phosphorene TFETs can be manipulated using surface defects. In addition, the effects of spin polarization on the transport properties of doped phosphorene TFETs were also rigorously considered, H and P doped TFETs could achieve a high ON current of 1795 μA μm -1 and 1368 μA μm -1 , respectively, which is closer to realistic nanodevices.

  4. Tunneling of Atoms, Nuclei and Molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertulani, C.A.

    2015-01-01

    This is a brief review of few relevant topics on tunneling of composite particles and how the coupling to intrinsic and external degrees of freedom affects tunneling probabilities. I discuss the phenomena of resonant tunneling, different barriers seen by subsystems, damping of resonant tunneling by level bunching and continuum effects due to particle dissociation. (author)

  5. Computational Multiqubit Tunnelling in Programmable Quantum Annealers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-25

    ARTICLE Received 3 Jun 2015 | Accepted 26 Nov 2015 | Published 7 Jan 2016 Computational multiqubit tunnelling in programmable quantum annealers...state itself. Quantum tunnelling has been hypothesized as an advantageous physical resource for optimization in quantum annealing. However, computational ...qubit tunnelling plays a computational role in a currently available programmable quantum annealer. We devise a probe for tunnelling, a computational

  6. 78 FR 46117 - National Tunnel Inspection Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-30

    ... busiest vehicular tunnel in the world. The Fort McHenry Tunnel handles a daily traffic volume of more than... vehicular, transit, and rail tunnels in the New York City metropolitan area. Although it is still too early... congestion along alternative routes, and save users both dollars and fuel. If these tunnels were closed due...

  7. Een systeem voor classificatie van korte tunnels.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreuder, D.A.

    1985-01-01

    The most difficult problems in the lighting of tunnels occur in daylight and in particular in the entrance of the tunnel, while drivers approaching the tunnel must be able to look into the tunnel from the outside to detect the road course and eventual obstacles. A classification should The made on

  8. Tunnel fire testing and modeling the Morgex North tunnel experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Borghetti, Fabio; Gandini, Paolo; Frassoldati, Alessio; Tavelli, Silvia

    2017-01-01

    This book aims to cast light on all aspects of tunnel fires, based on experimental activities and theoretical and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analyses. In particular, the authors describe a transient full-scale fire test (~15 MW), explaining how they designed and performed the experimental activity inside the Morgex North tunnel in Italy. The entire organization of the experiment is described, from preliminary evaluations to the solutions found for management of operational difficulties and safety issues. This fire test allowed the collection of different measurements (temperature, air velocity, smoke composition, pollutant species) useful for validating and improving CFD codes and for testing the real behavior of the tunnel and its safety systems during a diesel oil fire with a significant heat release rate. Finally, the fire dynamics are compared with empirical correlations, CFD simulations, and literature measurements obtained in other similar tunnel fire tests. This book will be of interest to all ...

  9. Apparent tunneling in chemical reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Niels Engholm; Hansen, Flemming Yssing; Billing, G. D.

    2000-01-01

    A necessary condition for tunneling in a chemical reaction is that the probability of crossing a barrier is non-zero, when the energy of the reactants is below the potential energy of the barrier. Due to the non-classical nature (i.e, momentum uncertainty) of vibrational states this is, however......, not a sufficient condition in order to establish genuine tunneling as a result of quantum dynamics. This proposition is illustrated for a two-dimensional model potential describing dissociative sticking of N-2 on Ru(s). It is suggested that the remarkable heavy atom tunneling, found in this system, is related...

  10. Rectified tunneling current response of bio-functionalized metal-bridge-metal junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yaqing; Offenhäusser, Andreas; Mayer, Dirk

    2010-01-15

    Biomolecular bridged nanostructures allow direct electrical addressing of electroactive biomolecules, which is of interest for the development of bioelectronic and biosensing hybrid junctions. In the present paper, the electroactive biomolecule microperoxidase-11 (MP-11) was integrated into metal-bridge-metal (MBM) junctions assembled from a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) setup. Before immobilization of MP-11, the Au working electrode was first modified by a self-assembled monolayer of 1-undecanethiol (UDT). A symmetric and potential independent response of current-bias voltage (I(t)/V(b)) was observed for the Au (substrate)/UDT/Au (tip) junction. However, the I(t)/V(b) characteristics became potential dependent and asymmetrical after binding of MP-11 between the electrodes of the junction. The rectification ratio of the asymmetric current response varies with gate electrode modulation. A resonant tunneling process between metal electrode and MP-11 enhances the tunneling current and is responsible for the observed rectification. Our investigations demonstrated that functional building blocks of proteins can be reassembled into new conceptual devices with operation modes deviating from their native function, which could prove highly useful in the design of future biosensors and bioelectronic devices. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Safety evaluation model of urban cross-river tunnel based on driving simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yingqi; Lu, Linjun; Lu, Jian John

    2017-09-01

    Currently, Shanghai urban cross-river tunnels have three principal characteristics: increased traffic, a high accident rate and rapidly developing construction. Because of their complex geographic and hydrological characteristics, the alignment conditions in urban cross-river tunnels are more complicated than in highway tunnels, so a safety evaluation of urban cross-river tunnels is necessary to suggest follow-up construction and changes in operational management. A driving risk index (DRI) for urban cross-river tunnels was proposed in this study. An index system was also constructed, combining eight factors derived from the output of a driving simulator regarding three aspects of risk due to following, lateral accidents and driver workload. Analytic hierarchy process methods and expert marking and normalization processing were applied to construct a mathematical model for the DRI. The driving simulator was used to simulate 12 Shanghai urban cross-river tunnels and a relationship was obtained between the DRI for the tunnels and the corresponding accident rate (AR) via a regression analysis. The regression analysis results showed that the relationship between the DRI and the AR mapped to an exponential function with a high degree of fit. In the absence of detailed accident data, a safety evaluation model based on factors derived from a driving simulation can effectively assess the driving risk in urban cross-river tunnels constructed or in design.

  12. Tunneling progress on the Yucca Mountain Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansmire, W.H.; Munzer, R.J.

    1996-01-01

    The current status of tunneling progress on the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) is presented in this paper. The Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF), a key part of the YMP, has been long in development and construction is ongoing. This is a progress report on the tunneling aspects of the ESF as of January 1, 1996. For purposes of discussion in this summary, the tunneling has progressed in four general phases. The paper describes: tunneling in jointed rock under low stress; tunneling through the Bow Ridge Fault and soft rock; tunneling through the Imbricate Fault Zone; and Tunneling into the candidate repository formation

  13. Tunneling through landsliding zone; Jisuberi chitainai no tunnel seko

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konbu, A; Hatabu, K; Kano, T [Tekken Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1994-08-01

    At the new tunnel construction site of the Shirakata tunnel on the Obama line in Yamaguchi Prefecture, a landsliding occurred at about 60 meters to the upper portion obliquely to the right hand side of the shaft when the excavation progressed to about 10 meters from the starting side. The landslide caused displacement at the shaft opening and change in the supports. As a result of the re-investigation, it was confirmed that the slide face went through the tunnel cross section. The measures taken were removal of the upper soil and an adoption of the all ground fastening (AGF) method (injection type long tip fastening method) as an auxiliary construction to stop loosening of the natural ground associated with the tunnel excavation. The result was a completion of tunneling the landsliding zone without a problem. This paper reports the AGF method adopted in the above construction, together with the construction works and natural ground conditions. The AGF method is about the same as the pipe roof method with regard to the natural ground accepting mechanism and the materials used. The difference is building an improved body in a limited area in the natural ground around the steel pipes by injecting the fixing material. The use of this method caused no problems in subsidence and displacement in the surrounding ground, and completed the tunneling construction without an unusual event. 1 ref., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Effect of gamma-ray irradiation on the surface states of MOS tunnel junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, T. P.; Barker, R. C.

    1974-01-01

    Gamma-ray irradiation with doses up to 8 megarad produces no significant change on either the C(V) or the G(V) characteristics of MOS tunnel junctions with intermediate oxide thicknesses (40-60 A), whereas the expected flat-band shift toward negative electrode voltages occurs in control thick oxide capacitors. A simple tunneling model would explain the results if the radiation-generated hole traps are assumed to lie below the valence band of the silicon. The experiments also suggest that the observed radiation-generated interface states in conventional MOS devices are not due to the radiation damage of the silicon surface.

  15. Giant tunneling electroresistance effect driven by an electrically controlled spin valve at a complex oxide interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, J D; Tsymbal, E Y

    2011-04-15

    A giant tunneling electroresistance effect may be achieved in a ferroelectric tunnel junction by exploiting the magnetoelectric effect at the interface between the ferroelectric barrier and a magnetic La(1-x)Sr(x)MnO3 electrode. Using first-principles density-functional theory we demonstrate that a few magnetic monolayers of La(1-x)Sr(x)MnO3 near the interface act, in response to ferroelectric polarization reversal, as an atomic-scale spin valve by filtering spin-dependent current. This produces more than an order of magnitude change in conductance, and thus constitutes a giant resistive switching effect.

  16. A new spin-functional MOSFET based on magnetic tunnel junction technology: pseudo-spin-MOSFET

    OpenAIRE

    Shuto, Yusuke; Nakane, Ryosho; Wang, Wenhong; Sukegawa, Hiroaki; Yamamoto, Shuu'ichirou; Tanaka, Masaaki; Inomata, Koichiro; Sugahara, Satoshi

    2009-01-01

    We fabricated and characterized a new spin-functional MOSFET referred to as a pseudo-spin-MOSFET (PS-MOSFET). The PS-MOSFET is a circuit using an ordinary MOSFET and magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) for reproducing functions of spin-transistors. Device integration techniques for a bottom gate MOSFET using a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) substrate and for an MTJ with a full-Heusler alloy electrode and MgO tunnel barrier were developed. The fabricated PS-MOSFET exhibited high and low transconductanc...

  17. Observation of negative differential resistance and single-electron tunneling in electromigrated break junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noguchi, Yutaka; Ueda, Rieko; Kubota, Tohru; Kamikado, Toshiya; Yokoyama, Shiyoshi; Nagase, Takashi

    2008-01-01

    We observed a negative differential resistance (NDR) along with single-electron tunneling (SET) in the electron transport of electromigrated break junctions with metal-free tetraphenylporphyrin (H 2 BSTBPP) at a temperature of 11 K. The NDR strongly depended on the applied gate voltages, and appeared only in the electron tunneling region of the Coulomb diamond. We could explain the mechanism of this new type of electron transport by a model assuming a molecular Coulomb island and local density of states of the source and the drain electrodes

  18. Challenging aspects of contemporary cochlear implant electrode array design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistrík, Pavel; Jolly, Claude; Sieber, Daniel; Hochmair, Ingeborg

    2017-12-01

    A design comparison of current perimodiolar and lateral wall electrode arrays of the cochlear implant (CI) is provided. The focus is on functional features such as acoustic frequency coverage and tonotopic mapping, battery consumption and dynamic range. A traumacity of their insertion is also evaluated. Review of up-to-date literature. Perimodiolar electrode arrays are positioned in the basal turn of the cochlea near the modiolus. They are designed to initiate the action potential in the proximity to the neural soma located in spiral ganglion. On the other hand, lateral wall electrode arrays can be inserted deeper inside the cochlea, as they are located along the lateral wall and such insertion trajectory is less traumatic. This class of arrays targets primarily surviving neural peripheral processes. Due to their larger insertion depth, lateral wall arrays can deliver lower acoustic frequencies in manner better corresponding to cochlear tonotopicity. In fact, spiral ganglion sections containing auditory nerve fibres tuned to low acoustic frequencies are located deeper than 1 and half turn inside the cochlea. For this reason, a significant frequency mismatch might be occurring for apical electrodes in perimodiolar arrays, detrimental to speech perception. Tonal languages such as Mandarin might be therefore better treated with lateral wall arrays. On the other hand, closer proximity to target tissue results in lower psychophysical threshold levels for perimodiolar arrays. However, the maximal comfort level is also lower, paradoxically resulting in narrower dynamic range than that of lateral wall arrays. Battery consumption is comparable for both types of arrays. Lateral wall arrays are less likely to cause trauma to cochlear structures. As the current trend in cochlear implantation is the maximal protection of residual acoustic hearing, the lateral wall arrays seem more suitable for hearing preservation CI surgeries. Future development could focus on combining the

  19. Josephson tunnel junctions with ferromagnetic interlayer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weides, M.P.

    2006-01-01

    Superconductivity and ferromagnetism are well-known physical properties of solid states that have been widely studied and long thought about as antagonistic phenomena due to difference in spin ordering. It turns out that the combination of both superconductor and ferromagnet leads to a very rich and interesting physics. One particular example, the phase oscillations of the superconducting order parameter inside the ferromagnet, will play a major role for the devices discussed in this work. In this thesis, I present Josephson junctions with a thin Al 2 O 3 tunnel barrier and a ferromagnetic interlayer, i.e. superconductor-insulator-ferromagnet-superconductor (SIFS) stacks. The fabrication of junctions was optimized regarding the insulation of electrodes and the homogeneity of the current transport. The junctions were either in the 0 or π coupled ground state, depending on the thickness of the ferromagnetic layer and on temperature. The influence of ferromagnetic layer thickness on the transport properties and the coupling (0, π) of SIFS tunnel junctions was studied. Furthermore, using a stepped ferromagnetic layer with well-chosen thicknesses, I obtained the so-called 0-π Josephson junction. At a certain temperature this 0-π junction can be made perfectly symmetric. In this case the ground state corresponds to a vortex of supercurrent creating a magnetic flux which is a fraction of the magnetic flux quantum Φ 0 . Such structures allow to study the physics of fractional vortices and to build various electronic circuits based on them. The SIFS junctions presented here have an exponentially vanishing damping at T → 0. The SIFS technology developed within the framework of this work may be used to construct classical and quantum devices such as oscillators, memory cells and qubits. (orig.)

  20. Josephson tunnel junctions with ferromagnetic interlayer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weides, M.P.

    2006-07-01

    Superconductivity and ferromagnetism are well-known physical properties of solid states that have been widely studied and long thought about as antagonistic phenomena due to difference in spin ordering. It turns out that the combination of both superconductor and ferromagnet leads to a very rich and interesting physics. One particular example, the phase oscillations of the superconducting order parameter inside the ferromagnet, will play a major role for the devices discussed in this work. In this thesis, I present Josephson junctions with a thin Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} tunnel barrier and a ferromagnetic interlayer, i.e. superconductor-insulator-ferromagnet-superconductor (SIFS) stacks. The fabrication of junctions was optimized regarding the insulation of electrodes and the homogeneity of the current transport. The junctions were either in the 0 or {pi} coupled ground state, depending on the thickness of the ferromagnetic layer and on temperature. The influence of ferromagnetic layer thickness on the transport properties and the coupling (0, {pi}) of SIFS tunnel junctions was studied. Furthermore, using a stepped ferromagnetic layer with well-chosen thicknesses, I obtained the so-called 0-{pi} Josephson junction. At a certain temperature this 0-{pi} junction can be made perfectly symmetric. In this case the ground state corresponds to a vortex of supercurrent creating a magnetic flux which is a fraction of the magnetic flux quantum {phi}{sub 0}. Such structures allow to study the physics of fractional vortices and to build various electronic circuits based on them. The SIFS junctions presented here have an exponentially vanishing damping at T {yields} 0. The SIFS technology developed within the framework of this work may be used to construct classical and quantum devices such as oscillators, memory cells and qubits. (orig.)

  1. FUNDAMENTAL TUNNELING PROCESSES IN MOSa SOLAR CELLS

    OpenAIRE

    Balberg , I.; Hanak , J.; Weakliem , H.; Gal , E.

    1981-01-01

    In previous studies of tunneling through a MOSa tunnel junction, where Sa was a-Si : H, it was shown that their characteristics resemble those of MOSc devices where Sc was crystalline silicon. In the present work we would like to report a demonstration of fundamental tunneling processes in such tunnel junctions. In particular, the transition from semiconductor controlled regime to tunneling controlled regime can be clearly distinguished. The present results represent one of the rare cases whe...

  2. Destructive quantum interference in spin tunneling problems

    OpenAIRE

    von Delft, Jan; Henley, Christopher L.

    1992-01-01

    In some spin tunneling problems, there are several different but symmetry-related tunneling paths that connect the same initial and final configurations. The topological phase factors of the corresponding tunneling amplitudes can lead to destructive interference between the different paths, so that the total tunneling amplitude is zero. In the study of tunneling between different ground state configurations of the Kagom\\'{e}-lattice quantum Heisenberg antiferromagnet, this occurs when the spi...

  3. 13th Australian tunnelling conference. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-07-01

    The theme of the conference was 'Engineering in a changing environment'. Topics covered include Australian tunnelling projects, design and development of ground support, tunnelling, international projects, fire and life safety, mining projects, risk management in tunnelling, and tunnel boring machine tunnelling. Papers of particular interest to the coal industry are: improving roadway development in underground coal mine (G. Lewis and G. Gibson), and polymer-based alternative to steel mesh for coal mine strata reinforcement (C. Lukey and others).

  4. Tunnelling instability via perturbation theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graffi, S. (Bologna Univ. (Italy). Dip. di Matematica); Grecchi, V. (Moderna Univ. (Italy). Dip. di Matematica); Jona-Lasinio, G. (Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France). Lab. de Physique Theorique et Hautes Energies)

    1984-10-21

    The semiclassical limit of low lying states in a multiwell potential is studied by rigorous perturbative techniques. In particular tunnelling instability and localisation of wave functions is obtained in a simple way under small deformations of symmetric potentials.

  5. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy - image interpretation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maca, F.

    1998-01-01

    The basic ideas of image interpretation in Scanning Tunneling Microscopy are presented using simple quantum-mechanical models and supplied with examples of successful application. The importance is stressed of a correct interpretation of this brilliant experimental surface technique

  6. Electron tunneling in proteins program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagras, Muhammad A; Stuchebrukhov, Alexei A

    2016-06-05

    We developed a unique integrated software package (called Electron Tunneling in Proteins Program or ETP) which provides an environment with different capabilities such as tunneling current calculation, semi-empirical quantum mechanical calculation, and molecular modeling simulation for calculation and analysis of electron transfer reactions in proteins. ETP program is developed as a cross-platform client-server program in which all the different calculations are conducted at the server side while only the client terminal displays the resulting calculation outputs in the different supported representations. ETP program is integrated with a set of well-known computational software packages including Gaussian, BALLVIEW, Dowser, pKip, and APBS. In addition, ETP program supports various visualization methods for the tunneling calculation results that assist in a more comprehensive understanding of the tunneling process. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Tunneling Plasmonics in Bilayer Graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Z; Iwinski, E G; Ni, G X; Zhang, L M; Bao, W; Rodin, A S; Lee, Y; Wagner, M; Liu, M K; Dai, S; Goldflam, M D; Thiemens, M; Keilmann, F; Lau, C N; Castro-Neto, A H; Fogler, M M; Basov, D N

    2015-08-12

    We report experimental signatures of plasmonic effects due to electron tunneling between adjacent graphene layers. At subnanometer separation, such layers can form either a strongly coupled bilayer graphene with a Bernal stacking or a weakly coupled double-layer graphene with a random stacking order. Effects due to interlayer tunneling dominate in the former case but are negligible in the latter. We found through infrared nanoimaging that bilayer graphene supports plasmons with a higher degree of confinement compared to single- and double-layer graphene, a direct consequence of interlayer tunneling. Moreover, we were able to shut off plasmons in bilayer graphene through gating within a wide voltage range. Theoretical modeling indicates that such a plasmon-off region is directly linked to a gapped insulating state of bilayer graphene, yet another implication of interlayer tunneling. Our work uncovers essential plasmonic properties in bilayer graphene and suggests a possibility to achieve novel plasmonic functionalities in graphene few-layers.

  8. Shaft and tunnel sealing considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelsall, P.C.; Shukla, D.K.

    1980-01-01

    Much of the emphasis of previous repository sealing research has been placed on plugging small diameter boreholes. It is increasingly evident that equal emphasis should now be given to shafts and tunnels which constitute more significant pathways between a repository and the biosphere. The paper discusses differences in requirements for sealing shafts and tunnels as compared with boreholes and the implications for seal design. Consideration is given to a design approach for shaft and tunnel seals based on a multiple component design concept, taking into account the requirements for retrievability of the waste. A work plan is developed for the future studies required to advance shaft and tunnel sealing technology to a level comparable with the existing technology for borehole sealing

  9. Organic tunnel field effect transistors

    KAUST Repository

    Tietze, Max Lutz; Lussem, Bjorn; Liu, Shiyi

    2017-01-01

    Various examples are provided for organic tunnel field effect transistors (OTFET), and methods thereof. In one example, an OTFET includes a first intrinsic layer (i-layer) of organic semiconductor material disposed over a gate insulating layer

  10. Bijzondere belastingen in tunnels : Eindrapport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molenaar, D.J.; Weerheijm, J.; Vervuurt, A.; Burggraaf, H.; Roekaerts, D.; Meijers, P.

    2009-01-01

    Verkeerstunnels en overkapte wegen (landtunnels) komen de milieukundige en stedenbouwkundige inpassing ten goede en maken meervoudig ruimtegebruik in de stad mogelijk. Het aantal tunnels en overkappingen groeit dan ook. Dit maakt het vervoer van explosiegevaarlijke stoffen en onder hoge druk

  11. Free Surface Water Tunnel (FSWT)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description: The Free Surface Water Tunnel consists of the intake plenum, the test section and the exit plenum. The intake plenum starts with a perforated pipe that...

  12. The new mid-scala electrode array: a radiologic and histologic study in human temporal bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassepass, Frederike; Bulla, Stefan; Maier, Wolfgang; Laszig, Roland; Arndt, Susan; Beck, Rainer; Traser, Lousia; Aschendorff, Antje

    2014-09-01

    To analyze the quality of insertion of the newly developed midscala (MS) electrode, which targets a midscalar electrode position to reduce the risk of trauma to the lateral wall and the modiolus. Modern cochlear implant surgery aims for a safe intracochlear placement of electrode arrays with an ongoing debate regarding cochleostomy or round window (RW) insertion and the use of lateral wall or perimodiolar electrode placement. Intracochlear trauma after insertion of different electrodes depends on insertion mode and electrode design and may result in trauma to the delicate structures of the cochlear. We performed a temporal bone (TB) trial with insertion of the MS electrode in n = 20 TB's after a mastoidectomy and posterior tympanotomy. Insertion was performed either via the RW or a cochleostomy. Electrode positioning, length of insertion, and angle of insertion were analyzed with rotational tomography (RT). TBs were histologically analyzed. Results of RT and histology were compared. Scala tympani (ST) insertion could be accomplished reliably by both RW and via a cochleostomy approach. In 20 TBs, 1 scala vestibuli insertion, 1 incomplete (ST), and 1 elevation of basilar membrane were depicted. No trauma was found in 94.7% of all ST insertions. RT allowed determination of the intracochlear electrode position, which was specified by histologic sectioning. The new MS electrode seems to fulfill reliable atraumatic intracochlear placement via RW and cochleostomy approaches. RT is available for evaluation of intracochlear electrode position, serving as a potential quality control instrument in human implantation.

  13. Direct, coherent and incoherent intermediate state tunneling and scanning tunnel microscopy (STM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halbritter, J.

    1997-01-01

    Theory and experiment in tunneling are still qualitative in nature, which hold true also for the latest developments in direct-, resonant-, coherent- and incoherent-tunneling. Those tunnel processes have recently branched out of the field of ''solid state tunnel junctions'' into the fields of scanning tunnel microscopy (STM), single electron tunneling (SET) and semiconducting resonant tunnel structures (RTS). All these fields have promoted the understanding of tunneling in different ways reaching from the effect of coherence, of incoherence and of charging in tunneling, to spin flip or inelastic effects. STM allows not only the accurate measurements of the tunnel current and its voltage dependence but, more importantly, the easy quantification via the (quantum) tunnel channel conductance and the distance dependence. This new degree of freedom entering exponentially the tunnel current allows an unique identification of individual tunnel channels and their quantification. In STM measurements large tunnel currents are observed for large distances d > 1 nm explainable by intermediate state tunneling. Direct tunneling with its reduced tunnel time and reduced off-site Coulomb charging bridges distances below 1 nm, only. The effective charge transfer process with its larger off-site and on-site charging at intermediate states dominates tunnel transfer in STM, biology and chemistry over distances in the nm-range. Intermediates state tunneling becomes variable range hopping conduction for distances larger than d > 2 nm, for larger densities of intermediate states n 1 (ε) and for larger temperatures T or voltages U, still allowing high resolution imaging

  14. Quantum resonances in physical tunneling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nieto, M.M.; Truax, D.R.

    1985-01-01

    It has recently been emphasized that the probability of quantum tunneling is a critical function of the shape of the potential. Applying this observation to physical systems, we point out that in principal information on potential surfaces can be obtained by studying tunneling rates. This is especially true in cases where only spectral data is known, since many potentials yield the same spectrum. 13 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab

  15. Computational Role of Tunneling in a Programmable Quantum Annealer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boixo, Sergio; Smelyanskiy, Vadim; Shabani, Alireza; Isakov, Sergei V.; Dykman, Mark; Amin, Mohammad; Mohseni, Masoud; Denchev, Vasil S.; Neven, Hartmut

    2016-01-01

    Quantum tunneling is a phenomenon in which a quantum state tunnels through energy barriers above the energy of the state itself. Tunneling has been hypothesized as an advantageous physical resource for optimization. Here we present the first experimental evidence of a computational role of multiqubit quantum tunneling in the evolution of a programmable quantum annealer. We developed a theoretical model based on a NIBA Quantum Master Equation to describe the multi-qubit dissipative cotunneling effects under the complex noise characteristics of such quantum devices.We start by considering a computational primitive, the simplest non-convex optimization problem consisting of just one global and one local minimum. The quantum evolutions enable tunneling to the global minimum while the corresponding classical paths are trapped in a false minimum. In our study the non-convex potentials are realized by frustrated networks of qubit clusters with strong intra-cluster coupling. We show that the collective effect of the quantum environment is suppressed in the critical phase during the evolution where quantum tunneling decides the right path to solution. In a later stage dissipation facilitates the multiqubit cotunneling leading to the solution state. The predictions of the model accurately describe the experimental data from the D-WaveII quantum annealer at NASA Ames. In our computational primitive the temperature dependence of the probability of success in the quantum model is opposite to that of the classical paths with thermal hopping. Specially, we provide an analysis of an optimization problem with sixteen qubits,demonstrating eight qubit cotunneling that increases success probabilities. Furthermore, we report results for larger problems with up to 200 qubits that contain the primitive as subproblems.

  16. Seismic source characterisation of a Tunnel Boring Machine (TBM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreutzer, Ingrid; Brückl, Ewald; Radinger, Alexander

    2015-04-01

    The Tunnel Seismic While Drilling (TSWD) method aims at predicting continuously the geological situation ahead of the tunnel without disturbing the construction work. Thereby the Tunnel Boring Machine (TBM) itself is used as seismic source. The cutting process generates seismic waves radiating into the rock mass and vibrations propagating to the main bearing of the cutter head. These vibrations are monitored and used as pilot signal. For the processing and interpretation it was hypothesized so far that the TBM acts like a single force. To prove this assumption the radiation pattern of several TBM's under construction were investigated. Therefore 3-components geophones were installed at the surface, which were situated directly above the tunnel axes and also with lateral offset. Additional, borehole geophones were placed in the wall of one tube of a two-tube tunnel. The geophones collected the forward and backward radiated wave field, as the TBM, operating in the other tube, passed their positions. The obtained seismic data contains continuous records over a range of 600 m of the TBM position. The offsets vary from 25 m to 400 m and the frequency ranges from 20-250 Hertz. The polarisation of the p-wave and the s-wave and their amplitude ratio were determined and compared with modelled seismograms with different source mechanism. The results show that the description of the source mechanism by a single force can be used as a first order approximation. More complex radiation pattern including tensile forces and several source locations like the transmission of reaction forces over the gripper to the tunnel wall are further tested and addressed.

  17. Single-molecule electron tunnelling through multiple redox levels with environmental relaxation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuznetsov, A.M.; Ulstrup, Jens

    2004-01-01

    represent the substrate and tip in electrochemical in situ scanning tunnelling microscopy. An equivalent three-electrode configuration represents a molecular single-electron transistor in which the enclosing electrodes constitute source and drain, and the reference electrode the gate. Current-bias voltage...... relations at fixed electrochemical overpotential or gate voltage, and current-overpotential or current-gate voltage relations at fixed bias voltage are equivalent in the two systems. Due to the activation-less nature of the processes, electron flow between the electrodes through the molecular redox levels...... level(s) subsequent to electron transfer. Several physical mechanisms can be distinguished and distinctive current-overpotential/gate voltage or current-bias voltage relations obtained. These reflect electronic level separation, environmental nuclear reorganisation, and coherent or incoherent multi...

  18. A Study of Vertical Transport through Graphene toward Control of Quantum Tunneling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaodan; Lei, Sidong; Tsai, Shin-Hung; Zhang, Xiang; Liu, Jun; Yin, Gen; Tang, Min; Torres, Carlos M; Navabi, Aryan; Jin, Zehua; Tsai, Shiao-Po; Qasem, Hussam; Wang, Yong; Vajtai, Robert; Lake, Roger K; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Wang, Kang L

    2018-02-14

    Vertical integration of van der Waals (vdW) materials with atomic precision is an intriguing possibility brought forward by these two-dimensional (2D) materials. Essential to the design and analysis of these structures is a fundamental understanding of the vertical transport of charge carriers into and across vdW materials, yet little has been done in this area. In this report, we explore the important roles of single layer graphene in the vertical tunneling process as a tunneling barrier. Although a semimetal in the lateral lattice plane, graphene together with the vdW gap act as a tunneling barrier that is nearly transparent to the vertically tunneling electrons due to its atomic thickness and the transverse momenta mismatch between the injected electrons and the graphene band structure. This is accentuated using electron tunneling spectroscopy (ETS) showing a lack of features corresponding to the Dirac cone band structure. Meanwhile, the graphene acts as a lateral conductor through which the potential and charge distribution across the tunneling barrier can be tuned. These unique properties make graphene an excellent 2D atomic grid, transparent to charge carriers, and yet can control the carrier flux via the electrical potential. A new model on the quantum capacitance's effect on vertical tunneling is developed to further elucidate the role of graphene in modulating the tunneling process. This work may serve as a general guideline for the design and analysis of vdW vertical tunneling devices and heterostructures, as well as the study of electron/spin injection through and into vdW materials.

  19. Integrating atomic layer deposition and ultra-high vacuum physical vapor deposition for in situ fabrication of tunnel junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliot, Alan J., E-mail: alane@ku.edu, E-mail: jwu@ku.edu; Malek, Gary A.; Lu, Rongtao; Han, Siyuan; Wu, Judy Z., E-mail: alane@ku.edu, E-mail: jwu@ku.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas 66045 (United States); Yu, Haifeng; Zhao, Shiping [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2014-07-15

    Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) is a promising technique for growing ultrathin, pristine dielectrics on metal substrates, which is essential to many electronic devices. Tunnel junctions are an excellent example which require a leak-free, ultrathin dielectric tunnel barrier of typical thickness around 1 nm between two metal electrodes. A challenge in the development of ultrathin dielectric tunnel barriers using ALD is controlling the nucleation of dielectrics on metals with minimal formation of native oxides at the metal surface for high-quality interfaces between the tunnel barrier and metal electrodes. This poses a critical need for integrating ALD with ultra-high vacuum (UHV) physical vapor deposition. In order to address these challenges, a viscous-flow ALD chamber was designed and interfaced to an UHV magnetron sputtering chamber via a load lock. A sample transportation system was implemented for in situ sample transfer between the ALD, load lock, and sputtering chambers. Using this integrated ALD-UHV sputtering system, superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) Nb-Al/Al{sub 2}O{sub 2}/Nb Josephson tunnel junctions were fabricated with tunnel barriers of thickness varied from sub-nm to ∼1 nm. The suitability of using an Al wetting layer for initiation of the ALD Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} tunnel barrier was investigated with ellipsometry, atomic force microscopy, and electrical transport measurements. With optimized processing conditions, leak-free SIS tunnel junctions were obtained, demonstrating the viability of this integrated ALD-UHV sputtering system for the fabrication of tunnel junctions and devices comprised of metal-dielectric-metal multilayers.

  20. Composite carbon foam electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Steven T.; Pekala, Richard W.; Kaschmitter, James L.

    1997-01-01

    Carbon aerogels used as a binder for granularized materials, including other forms of carbon and metal additives, are cast onto carbon or metal fiber substrates to form composite carbon thin film sheets. The thin film sheets are utilized in electrochemical energy storage applications, such as electrochemical double layer capacitors (aerocapacitors), lithium based battery insertion electrodes, fuel cell electrodes, and electrocapacitive deionization electrodes. The composite carbon foam may be formed by prior known processes, but with the solid particles being added during the liquid phase of the process, i.e. prior to gelation. The other forms of carbon may include carbon microspheres, carbon powder, carbon aerogel powder or particles, graphite carbons. Metal and/or carbon fibers may be added for increased conductivity. The choice of materials and fibers will depend on the electrolyte used and the relative trade off of system resistivty and power to system energy.

  1. Porous electrode preparation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arons, R.M.; Dusek, J.T.

    1983-10-18

    A porous sintered plaque is provided with a bimodal porosity that is especially well suited for use as an electrode within a molten carbonate fuel cell. The coarse porosity is sufficient for admitting gases into contact with the reaction surfaces while the fine porosity is wetted with and retains molten electrolyte on the reaction sites. The electrode structure is prepared by providing a very fine powder of such as nickel oxide and blending the powder with a suitable decomposable binder to form a solid mass. The mass is comminuted into agglomerate size particles substantially larger than the fine oxide particles and formed into a cohesive compact for subsequent sintering. Sintering is carried out at sufficient conditions to bind the agglomerates together into a porous structure having both coarse and fine porosity. Where lithiated nickel oxide cathodes are prepared, the sintering conditions can be moderate enough to retain substantial quantities of lithium within the electrode for adequate conductivity. 2 figs.

  2. Sub-Angstrom oscillation amplitude non-contact atomic force microscopy for lateral force gradient measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atabak, Mehrdad; Unverdi, Ozhan; Ozer, H. Ozguer; Oral, Ahmet

    2009-01-01

    We report the first results from novel sub-Angstrom oscillation amplitude non-contact atomic force microscopy developed for lateral force gradient measurements. Quantitative lateral force gradients between a tungsten tip and Si(1 1 1)-(7 x 7) surface can be measured using this microscope. Simultaneous lateral force gradient and scanning tunnelling microscope images of single and multi atomic steps are obtained. In our measurement, tunnel current is used as feedback. The lateral stiffness contrast has been observed to be 2.5 N/m at single atomic step, in contrast to 13 N/m at multi atomic step on Si(1 1 1) surface. We also carried out a series of lateral stiffness-distance spectroscopy. We observed lateral stiffness-distance curves exhibit sharp increase in the stiffness as the sample is approached towards the surface. We usually observed positive stiffness and sometimes going into slightly negative region.

  3. Tunnelling without barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, K.

    1987-01-01

    The evolution in flat and curved space-time of quantum fields in theories with relative flat potential and its consequences are considered. It is shown that bubble nucleation, a quantum mechanical tunnelling process, may occur in flat space-time, having a bounce solution, even if V(phi) has no barrier. It is shown that bubble nucleation can also occur in curved space-time even though there is no bounce solution in the standard formalism for the bubble nucleation rate in curved space-time. Additionally, bubbles can nucleate during the slow rolling period on the potential in flat and curved space-time, in this case also there is no bounce solution. It is known in the new inflationary scenario that energy density perturbations caused by quantum fluctuations of the scalar field can satisfy the presently observed bounds on density perturbations. Bubble nucleation during the slow rolling period also gives rise to density perturbations. For a model potential density perturbations by bubbles are calculated at the horizon reentering. By applying the bound from the almost isotropic microwave black body radiation on these density perturbations, a constraint on the model potential is obtained. Finally, some further implications on the galaxy formation and applications in more realistic potential are discussed

  4. Sandwich-type electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wen-Tong P.; Garcia, Earl R.

    1983-01-01

    Disclosed is an improvement on a method of making an electrode wherein a suspension in a liquid is prepared of a powdered catalyst containing a noble metal, carbon powder and a binder, and the suspension is poured over a carbon substrate dried, compressed and sintered to form a solid catalyst layer bonded to the carbon substrate. The improvement is placing a carbon paper on the catalyst layer prior to compressing. The improved electrode can be used as either a cathode or an anode in a sulfur dioxide depolarized electrolyzer in a process for producing hydrogen from water.

  5. Ion-selective electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikhelson, Konstantin N. [St. Petersburg State Univ. (Russian Federation). Ion-Selective Electrode Laboratory

    2013-06-01

    Ion-selective electrodes (ISEs) have a wide range of applications in clinical, environmental, food and pharmaceutical analysis as well as further uses in chemistry and life sciences. Based on his profound experience as a researcher in ISEs and a course instructor, the author summarizes current knowledge for advanced teaching and training purposes with a particular focus on ionophore-based ISEs. Coverage includes the basics of measuring with ISEs, essential membrane potential theory and a comprehensive overview of the various classes of ion-selective electrodes. The principles of constructing ISEs are outlined, and the transfer of methods into routine analysis is considered.

  6. Single Electrode Heat Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Torben; Broers, G. H. J.

    1977-01-01

    The heat evolution at a single irreversibly working electrode is treated onthe basis of the Brønsted heat principle. The resulting equation is analogous to the expression for the total heat evolution in a galvanic cellwith the exception that –DeltaS is substituted by the Peltier entropy, Delta......SP, of theelectrode reaction. eta is the overvoltage at the electrode. This equation is appliedto a high temperature carbonate fuel cell. It is shown that the Peltier entropyterm by far exceeds the heat production due to the irreversible losses, and thatthe main part of heat evolved at the cathode is reabsorbed...

  7. Ion-selective electrodes

    CERN Document Server

    Mikhelson, Konstantin N

    2013-01-01

    Ion-selective electrodes (ISEs) have a wide range of applications in clinical, environmental, food and pharmaceutical analysis as well as further uses in chemistry and life sciences. Based on his profound experience as a researcher in ISEs and a course instructor, the author summarizes current knowledge for advanced teaching and training purposes with a particular focus on ionophore-based ISEs. Coverage includes the basics of measuring with ISEs, essential membrane potential theory and a comprehensive overview of the various classes of ion-selective electrodes. The principles of constructing I

  8. Breakthrough in current-in-plane tunneling measurement precision by application of multi-variable fitting algorithm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cagliani, Alberto; Østerberg, Frederik Westergaard; Hansen, Ole

    2017-01-01

    We present a breakthrough in micro-four-point probe (M4PP) metrology to substantially improve precision of transmission line (transfer length) type measurements by application of advanced electrode position correction. In particular, we demonstrate this methodology for the M4PP current-in-plane t......We present a breakthrough in micro-four-point probe (M4PP) metrology to substantially improve precision of transmission line (transfer length) type measurements by application of advanced electrode position correction. In particular, we demonstrate this methodology for the M4PP current......-in-plane tunneling (CIPT) technique. The CIPT method has been a crucial tool in the development of magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) stacks suitable for magnetic random-access memories for more than a decade. On two MTJ stacks, the measurement precision of resistance-area product and tunneling magnetoresistance...

  9. Magnetic tunnel junctions with AlN and AlNxOy barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwickert, M. M.; Childress, J. R.; Fontana, R. E.; Kellock, A. J.; Rice, P. M.; Ho, M. K.; Thompson, T. J.; Gurney, B. A.

    2001-01-01

    Nonoxide tunnel barriers such as AlN are of interest for magnetic tunnel junctions to avoid the oxidation of the magnetic electrodes. We have investigated the fabrication and properties of thin AlN-based barriers for use in low resistance magnetic tunnel junctions. Electronic, magnetic and structural data of tunnel valves of the form Ta (100 Aa)/PtMn (300 Aa)/CoFe 20 (20 Aa - 25 Aa)/barrier/CoFe 20 (10 - 20 Aa)/NiFe 16 (35 - 40 Aa)/Ta (100 Aa) are presented, where the barrier consists of AlN, AlN x O y or AlN/AlO x with total thicknesses between 8 and 15 Aa. The tunnel junctions were sputter deposited and then lithographically patterned down to 2 x 2μm 2 devices. AlN was deposited by reactive sputtering from an Al target with 20% - 35% N 2 in the Ar sputter gas at room temperature, resulting in stoichiometric growth of AlN x (x=0.50±0.05), as determined by RBS. TEM analysis shows that the as-deposited AlN barrier is crystalline. For AlN barriers and AlN followed by natural O 2 oxidation, we obtain tunnel magnetoresistance >10% with specific junction resistance R j down to 60Ωμm 2 . [copyright] 2001 American Institute of Physics

  10. Scaling for quantum tunneling current in nano- and subnano-scale plasmonic junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng

    2015-05-19

    When two conductors are separated by a sufficiently thin insulator, electrical current can flow between them by quantum tunneling. This paper presents a self-consistent model of tunneling current in a nano- and subnano-meter metal-insulator-metal plasmonic junction, by including the effects of space charge and exchange correlation potential. It is found that the J-V curve of the junction may be divided into three regimes: direct tunneling, field emission, and space-charge-limited regime. In general, the space charge inside the insulator reduces current transfer across the junction, whereas the exchange-correlation potential promotes current transfer. It is shown that these effects may modify the current density by orders of magnitude from the widely used Simmons' formula, which is only accurate for a limited parameter space (insulator thickness > 1 nm and barrier height > 3 eV) in the direct tunneling regime. The proposed self-consistent model may provide a more accurate evaluation of the tunneling current in the other regimes. The effects of anode emission and material properties (i.e. work function of the electrodes, electron affinity and permittivity of the insulator) are examined in detail in various regimes. Our simple model and the general scaling for tunneling current may provide insights to new regimes of quantum plasmonics.

  11. Scanning Tunneling Optical Resonance Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Sheila; Wilt, Dave; Raffaelle, Ryne; Gennett, Tom; Tin, Padetha; Lau, Janice; Castro, Stephanie; Jenkins, Philip; Scheiman, Dave

    2003-01-01

    Scanning tunneling optical resonance microscopy (STORM) is a method, now undergoing development, for measuring optoelectronic properties of materials and devices on the nanoscale by means of a combination of (1) traditional scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) with (2) tunable laser spectroscopy. In STORM, an STM tip probing a semiconductor is illuminated with modulated light at a wavelength in the visible-to-near-infrared range and the resulting photoenhancement of the tunneling current is measured as a function of the illuminating wavelength. The photoenhancement of tunneling current occurs when the laser photon energy is sufficient to excite charge carriers into the conduction band of the semiconductor. Figure 1 schematically depicts a proposed STORM apparatus. The light for illuminating the semiconductor specimen at the STM would be generated by a ring laser that would be tunable across the wavelength range of interest. The laser beam would be chopped by an achromatic liquid-crystal modulator. A polarization-maintaining optical fiber would couple the light to the tip/sample junction of a commercial STM. An STM can be operated in one of two modes: constant height or constant current. A STORM apparatus would be operated in the constant-current mode, in which the height of the tip relative to the specimen would be varied in order to keep the tunneling current constant. In this mode, a feedback control circuit adjusts the voltage applied to a piezoelectric actuator in the STM that adjusts the height of the STM tip to keep the tunneling current constant. The exponential relationship between the tunneling current and tip-to-sample distance makes it relatively easy to implement this mode of operation. The choice of method by which the photoenhanced portion of the tunneling current would be measured depends on choice of the frequency at which the input illumination would be modulated (chopped). If the frequency of modulation were low enough (typically tunneling current

  12. Electronic noise of superconducting tunnel junction detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jochum, J.; Kraus, H.; Gutsche, M.; Kemmather, B.; Feilitzsch, F. v.; Moessbauer, R.L.

    1994-01-01

    The optimal signal to noise ratio for detectors based on superconducting tunnel junctions is calculated and compared for the cases of a detector consisting of one single tunnel junction, as well as of series and of parallel connections of such tunnel junctions. The influence of 1 / f noise and its dependence on the dynamical resistance of tunnel junctions is discussed quantitatively. A single tunnel junction yields the minimum equivalent noise charge. Such a tunnel junction exhibits the best signal to noise ratio if the signal charge is independent of detector size. In case, signal charge increases with detector size, a parallel or a series connection of tunnel junctions would provide the optimum signal to noise ratio. The equivalent noise charge and the respective signal to noise ratio are deduced as functions of tunnel junction parameters such as tunneling time, quasiparticle lifetime, etc. (orig.)

  13. Virtual electrodes for high-density electrode arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cela, Carlos J.; Lazzi, Gianluca

    2015-10-13

    The present embodiments are directed to implantable electrode arrays having virtual electrodes. The virtual electrodes may improve the resolution of the implantable electrode array without the burden of corresponding complexity of electronic circuitry and wiring. In a particular embodiment, a virtual electrode may include one or more passive elements to help steer current to a specific location between the active electrodes. For example, a passive element may be a metalized layer on a substrate that is adjacent to, but not directly connected to an active electrode. In certain embodiments, an active electrode may be directly coupled to a power source via a conductive connection. Beneficially, the passive elements may help to increase the overall resolution of the implantable array by providing additional stimulation points without requiring additional wiring or driver circuitry for the passive elements.

  14. Effects of electrode material and configuration on the characteristics of planar resistive switching devices

    KAUST Repository

    Peng, H.Y.; Pu, L.; Wu, J.C.; Cha, Dong Kyu; Hong, J.H.; Lin, W.N.; Li, Yangyang; Ding, Junfeng; David, A.; Li, K.; Wu, Tao

    2013-01-01

    We report that electrode engineering, particularly tailoring the metal work function, measurement configuration and geometric shape, has significant effects on the bipolar resistive switching (RS) in lateral memory devices based on self-doped SrTiO3

  15. Theory of superconducting tunneling without the tunneling Hamiltonian

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, G.B.

    1987-01-01

    When a tunneling barrier is nearly transparent, the standard tunneling (or transfer) Hamiltonian approximation fails. The author describes the theory which is necessary for calculating the tunneling current in these cases, and illustrate it by comparing theory and experiment on superconductor/insulator/superconductor (SIS) junctions have ultra-thin tunnel barriers. This theory accurately explains the subgap structure which appears in the dynamical resistance of such SIS junctions, including many observed details which no previous theory has reproduced. The expression for the current through an SIS junction with an ultrathin barrier is given by I(t) = Re{Sigma/sub n/ J/sub n/ (omega/sub o/)e/sup in omega/o/sup t/} where omega/sub o/ = 2eV/h is the Josephson frequency, V is the bias voltage, and the J/sub n/ are voltage dependent coefficients, one for each positive or negative integer, n, and n=0. The relative sign of the terms involving cos(n omega/sub o/t) and sin(n omega/sub o/t) agrees with experiment, in contrast to previous theories of Josephson tunneling

  16. Pre-microscope tunnelling — Inspiration or constraint?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walmsley, D. G.

    1987-03-01

    Before the microscope burst upon the scene, tunnelling had established for itself a substantial niche in the repertoire of the solid state physicist. Over a period of 20 years it has contributed importantly to our understanding of many systems. It elucidated the superconducting state, first by a direct display of the energy gap then by providing detailed information on the phonon spectra and electron-phonon coupling strength in junction electrodes. Its use as a phonon spectrometer was subsequently extended to semiconductors and to the oxides of insulating barriers. Eventually the vibrational spectra of monolayer organic and inorganic adsorbates became amenable with rich scientific rewards. In a few cases electronic transitions have been observed. Plasmon excitation by tunnelling electrons led to insights on the electron loss function in metals at visible frequencies and provided along the way an intriguing light emitting device. With the advent of the microscope it is now appropriate to enquire how much of this experience can profitably be carried over to the new environment. Are we constrained just to repeat the experiments in a new configuration? Happily no. The microscope offers us topographical and spectroscopic information of a new order. One might next ask how great is the contact between the two disciplines? We explore this question and seek to establish where the pre-microscope experience can be helpful in inspiring our use of this marvellous new facility that we know as the scanning tunnelling microscope.

  17. First Principles Study of Electron Tunneling through Ice

    KAUST Repository

    Cucinotta, Clotilde S.

    2012-10-25

    With the aim of understanding electrochemical scanning tunnel microscopy experiments in an aqueous environment, we investigate electron transport through ice in the coherent limit. This is done by using the nonequilibrium Greens functions method, implemented within density functional theory, in the self-interaction corrected local density approximation. In particular, we explore different ice structures and different Au electrode surface orientations. By comparing the decay coefficient for different thicknesses to the ice complex band structure, we find that the electron transport occurs via tunneling with almost one-dimensional character. The slow decay of the current with the ice thickness is largely due to the small effective mass of the conduction electrons. Furthermore, we find that the calculated tunneling decay coefficients at the Fermi energy are not sensitive to the structural details of the junctions and are at the upper end of the experimental range for liquid water. This suggests that linear response transport measurements are not capable of distinguishing between different ordered ice structures. However, we also demonstrate that a finite bias measurement may be capable of sorting polar from nonpolar interfaces due to the asymmetry of the current-voltage curves for polar interfaces. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  18. Thin-film chemical sensors based on electron tunneling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanna, S. K.; Lambe, J.; Leduc, H. G.; Thakoor, A. P.

    1985-01-01

    The physical mechanisms underlying a novel chemical sensor based on electron tunneling in metal-insulator-metal (MIM) tunnel junctions were studied. Chemical sensors based on electron tunneling were shown to be sensitive to a variety of substances that include iodine, mercury, bismuth, ethylenedibromide, and ethylenedichloride. A sensitivity of 13 parts per billion of iodine dissolved in hexane was demonstrated. The physical mechanisms involved in the chemical sensitivity of these devices were determined to be the chemical alteration of the surface electronic structure of the top metal electrode in the MIM structure. In addition, electroreflectance spectroscopy (ERS) was studied as a complementary surface-sensitive technique. ERS was shown to be sensitive to both iodine and mercury. Electrolyte electroreflectance and solid-state MIM electroreflectance revealed qualitatively the same chemical response. A modified thin-film structure was also studied in which a chemically active layer was introduced at the top Metal-Insulator interface of the MIM devices. Cobalt phthalocyanine was used for the chemically active layer in this study. Devices modified in this way were shown to be sensitive to iodine and nitrogen dioxide. The chemical sensitivity of the modified structure was due to conductance changes in the active layer.

  19. First Principles Study of Electron Tunneling through Ice

    KAUST Repository

    Cucinotta, Clotilde S.; Rungger, Ivan; Sanvito, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    With the aim of understanding electrochemical scanning tunnel microscopy experiments in an aqueous environment, we investigate electron transport through ice in the coherent limit. This is done by using the nonequilibrium Greens functions method, implemented within density functional theory, in the self-interaction corrected local density approximation. In particular, we explore different ice structures and different Au electrode surface orientations. By comparing the decay coefficient for different thicknesses to the ice complex band structure, we find that the electron transport occurs via tunneling with almost one-dimensional character. The slow decay of the current with the ice thickness is largely due to the small effective mass of the conduction electrons. Furthermore, we find that the calculated tunneling decay coefficients at the Fermi energy are not sensitive to the structural details of the junctions and are at the upper end of the experimental range for liquid water. This suggests that linear response transport measurements are not capable of distinguishing between different ordered ice structures. However, we also demonstrate that a finite bias measurement may be capable of sorting polar from nonpolar interfaces due to the asymmetry of the current-voltage curves for polar interfaces. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  20. Manipulating the spin states in a double molecular magnets tunneling junction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Liang; Liu, Xi [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Zhang, Zhengzhong, E-mail: zeikeezhang@126.com [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Nano Science and Technology Institute, University of Science and Technology of China, Suzhou 215123 (China); Wang, Ruiqiang [Laboratory of Quantum Engineering and Quantum Materials, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China)

    2014-01-17

    We theoretically explore the spin transport through nano-structures consisting of two serially coupled single-molecular magnets (SMM) sandwiched between two nonmagnetic electrodes. We find that the magnetization of SMM can be controlled by the spin transfer torque with respect to the bias voltage direction, and the electron current can be switched on/off in different magnetic structures. Such a manipulation is performed by full electrical manner, and needs neither external magnetic field nor ferromagnetic electrodes in the tunneling junction. The proposal device scheme can be realized with the use of the present technology and has potential applications in molecular spintronics or quantum information processing.

  1. Manipulating the spin states in a double molecular magnets tunneling junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Liang; Liu, Xi; Zhang, Zhengzhong; Wang, Ruiqiang

    2014-01-01

    We theoretically explore the spin transport through nano-structures consisting of two serially coupled single-molecular magnets (SMM) sandwiched between two nonmagnetic electrodes. We find that the magnetization of SMM can be controlled by the spin transfer torque with respect to the bias voltage direction, and the electron current can be switched on/off in different magnetic structures. Such a manipulation is performed by full electrical manner, and needs neither external magnetic field nor ferromagnetic electrodes in the tunneling junction. The proposal device scheme can be realized with the use of the present technology [6] and has potential applications in molecular spintronics or quantum information processing.

  2. Detecting Single-Nucleotides by Tunneling Current Measurements at Sub-MHz Temporal Resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morikawa, Takanori; Yokota, Kazumichi; Tanimoto, Sachie; Tsutsui, Makusu; Taniguchi, Masateru

    2017-04-18

    Label-free detection of single-nucleotides was performed by fast tunneling current measurements in a polar solvent at 1 MHz sampling rate using SiO₂-protected Au nanoprobes. Short current spikes were observed, suggestive of trapping/detrapping of individual nucleotides between the nanoelectrodes. The fall and rise features of the electrical signatures indicated signal retardation by capacitance effects with a time constant of about 10 microseconds. The high temporal resolution revealed current fluctuations, reflecting the molecular conformation degrees of freedom in the electrode gap. The method presented in this work may enable direct characterizations of dynamic changes in single-molecule conformations in an electrode gap in liquid.

  3. Robot-assisted placement of depth electrodes along the long Axis of the amygdalohippocampal complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvin Y. Chan

    2016-12-01

    Conclusions: We have developed the Robot-Assisted Lateral Transoccipital Approach (RALTA, which is an advantageous technique for placing bilateral amygdalohippocampal depth electrodes using robotic guidance. Benefits of this technique include fewer electrodes required per patient and ease of positioning compared with seated or prone positioning.

  4. Flexible electrode belt for EIT using nanofiber web dry electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Tong In; Kim, Tae Eui; Yoon, Sun; Kim, Kap Jin; Woo, Eung Je; Sadleir, Rosalind J

    2012-10-01

    Efficient connection of multiple electrodes to the body for impedance measurement and voltage monitoring applications is of critical importance to measurement quality and practicality. Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) experiments have generally required a cumbersome procedure to attach the multiple electrodes needed in EIT. Once placed, these electrodes must then maintain good contact with the skin during measurements that may last several hours. There is usually also the need to manage the wires that run between the electrodes and the EIT system. These problems become more severe as the number of electrodes increases, and may limit the practicality and portability of this imaging method. There have been several trials describing human-electrode interfaces using configurations such as electrode belts, helmets or rings. In this paper, we describe an electrode belt we developed for long-term EIT monitoring of human lung ventilation. The belt included 16 embossed electrodes that were designed to make good contact with the skin. The electrodes were fabricated using an Ag-plated PVDF nanofiber web and metallic threads. A large contact area and padding were used behind each electrode to improve subject comfort and reduce contact impedances. The electrodes were incorporated, equally spaced, into an elasticated fabric belt. We tested the electrode belt in conjunction with the KHU Mark1 multi-frequency EIT system, and demonstrate time-difference images of phantoms and human subjects during normal breathing and running. We found that the Ag-plated PVDF nanofiber web electrodes were suitable for long-term measurement because of their flexibility and durability. Moreover, the contact impedance and stability of the Ag-plated PVDF nanofiber web electrodes were found to be comparable to similarly tested Ag/AgCl electrodes.

  5. Wind tunnel evaluation of the RAAMP sampler. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanderpool, R.W.; Peters, T.M.

    1994-11-01

    Wind tunnel tests of the Department of Energy RAAMP (Radioactive Atmospheric Aerosol Monitoring Program) monitor have been conducted at wind speeds of 2 km/hr and 24 km/hr. The RAAMP sampler was developed based on three specific performance objectives: (1) meet EPA PM10 performance criteria, (2) representatively sample and retain particles larger than 10 microm for later isotopic analysis, (3) be capable of continuous, unattended operation for time periods up to 2 months. In this first phase of the evaluation, wind tunnel tests were performed to evaluate the sampler as a potential candidate for EPA PM10 reference or equivalency status. As an integral part of the project, the EPA wind tunnel facility was fully characterized at wind speeds of 2 km/hr and 24 km/hr in conjunction with liquid test aerosols of 10 microm aerodynamic diameter. Results showed that the facility and its operating protocols met or exceeded all 40 CFR Part 53 acceptance criteria regarding PM10 size-selective performance evaluation. Analytical procedures for quantitation of collected mass deposits also met 40 CFR Part 53 criteria. Modifications were made to the tunnel's test section to accommodate the large dimensions of the RAAMP sampler's instrument case

  6. Improved multidimensional semiclassical tunneling theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Albert F

    2013-12-12

    We show that the analytic multidimensional semiclassical tunneling formula of Miller et al. [Miller, W. H.; Hernandez, R.; Handy, N. C.; Jayatilaka, D.; Willets, A. Chem. Phys. Lett. 1990, 172, 62] is qualitatively incorrect for deep tunneling at energies well below the top of the barrier. The origin of this deficiency is that the formula uses an effective barrier weakly related to the true energetics but correctly adjusted to reproduce the harmonic description and anharmonic corrections of the reaction path at the saddle point as determined by second order vibrational perturbation theory. We present an analytic improved semiclassical formula that correctly includes energetic information and allows a qualitatively correct representation of deep tunneling. This is done by constructing a three segment composite Eckart potential that is continuous everywhere in both value and derivative. This composite potential has an analytic barrier penetration integral from which the semiclassical action can be derived and then used to define the semiclassical tunneling probability. The middle segment of the composite potential by itself is superior to the original formula of Miller et al. because it incorporates the asymmetry of the reaction barrier produced by the known reaction exoergicity. Comparison of the semiclassical and exact quantum tunneling probability for the pure Eckart potential suggests a simple threshold multiplicative factor to the improved formula to account for quantum effects very near threshold not represented by semiclassical theory. The deep tunneling limitations of the original formula are echoed in semiclassical high-energy descriptions of bound vibrational states perpendicular to the reaction path at the saddle point. However, typically ab initio energetic information is not available to correct it. The Supporting Information contains a Fortran code, test input, and test output that implements the improved semiclassical tunneling formula.

  7. Tunneling magnetoresistance in Fe{sub 3}Si/MgO/Fe{sub 3}Si(001) magnetic tunnel junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tao, L. L.; Liang, S. H.; Liu, D. P.; Wei, H. X.; Han, X. F., E-mail: xfhan@iphy.ac.cn [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Wang, Jian [Department of Physics and the Center of Theoretical and Computational Physics, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China)

    2014-04-28

    We present a theoretical study of the tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) and spin-polarized transport in Fe{sub 3}Si/MgO/Fe{sub 3}Si(001) magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ). It is found that the spin-polarized conductance and bias-dependent TMR ratios are rather sensitive to the structure of Fe{sub 3}Si electrode. From the symmetry analysis of the band structures, we found that there is no spin-polarized Δ{sub 1} symmetry bands crossing the Fermi level for the cubic Fe{sub 3}Si. In contrast, the tetragonal Fe{sub 3}Si driven by in-plane strain reveals half-metal nature in terms of Δ{sub 1} state. The giant TMR ratios are predicted for both MTJs with cubic and tetragonal Fe{sub 3}Si electrodes under zero bias. However, the giant TMR ratio resulting from interface resonant transmission for the former decreases rapidly with the bias. For the latter, the giant TMR ratio can maintain up to larger bias due to coherent transmission through the majority-spin Δ{sub 1} channel.

  8. Ring and peg electrodes for minimally-Invasive and long-term sub-scalp EEG recordings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benovitski, Y B; Lai, A; McGowan, C C; Burns, O; Maxim, V; Nayagam, D A X; Millard, R; Rathbone, G D; le Chevoir, M A; Williams, R A; Grayden, D B; May, C N; Murphy, M; D'Souza, W J; Cook, M J; Williams, C E

    2017-09-01

    Minimally-invasive approaches are needed for long-term reliable Electroencephalography (EEG) recordings to assist with epilepsy diagnosis, investigation and more naturalistic monitoring. This study compared three methods for long-term implantation of sub-scalp EEG electrodes. Three types of electrodes (disk, ring, and peg) were fabricated from biocompatible materials and implanted under the scalp in five ambulatory ewes for 3months. Disk electrodes were inserted into sub-pericranial pockets. Ring electrodes were tunneled under the scalp. Peg electrodes were inserted into the skull, close to the dura. EEG was continuously monitored wirelessly. High resolution CT imaging, histopathology, and impedance measurements were used to assess the status of the electrodes at the end of the study. EEG amplitude was larger in the peg compared with the disk and ring electrodes (pEEG, mechanical stability, and lower chewing artifact. Whereas, ring electrode arrays tunneled under the scalp enable minimal surgical techniques to be used for implantation and removal. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Electron tunneling in tantalum surface layers on niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruggiero, S.T.; Track, E.K.; Prober, D.E.; Arnold, G.B.; DeWeert, M.J.

    1986-01-01

    We have performed electron tunneling measurements on tantalum surface layers on niobium. The tunnel junctions comprise 2000-A-circle Nb base electrodes with 10--100-A-circle in situ--deposited Ta overlayers, an oxide barrier, and Ag, Pb, or Pb-Bi alloy counterelectrodes. The base electrodes were prepared by ion-beam sputter deposition. The characteristics of these junctions have been studied as a function of Ta-layer thickness. These include the critical current, bound-state energy, phonon structure, and oxide barrier shape. We have compared our results for the product I/sub c/R versus tantalum-layer thickness with an extended version of the Gallagher theory which accounts for both the finite mean free path in the Ta overlayers and suppression of the I/sub c/R product due to strong-coupling effects. Excellent fits to the data yield a value of the intrinsic scattering probability for electrons at the Ta/Nb interface of r 2 = 0.01. This is consistent with the value expected from simple scattering off the potential step created by the difference between the Fermi energies of Ta and Nb. We have found a universal empirical correlation in average barrier height phi-bar and width s in the form phi-bar = 6 eV/(s-10 A-circle) for measured junctions which holds both for our data and results for available data in the literature for oxide-barrier junctions. The latter are composed of a wide variety of base and counterelectrode materials. These results are discussed in the general context of oxide growth and compared with results for artificial tunnel barriers

  10. Effect of single Abrikosov vortices on the properties of Josephson tunnel junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golubov, A.A.; Kupriyanov, M.Yu.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of single Abrikosov vortices, trapped in the electrodes of a Josephson tunnel junction perpendicularly to the junction surface, on the tunnel current through the junction is studied within the framework of the microscopic theory. The current-voltage characteristic and the critical junction current I c are calculated for temperatures 0 c . It is shown that if the vortices at the junction are misaligned, singularities on the current-voltage characteristic appear at eV Δ (T), and in some cases the magnitude of suppression of I c may be of the order of magnitude of I c itself. The temperature dependence of the critical current is calculated for the case of one of the electrodes being a two-dimensional superconducting film in which the creation of opposite sign vortex pairs is significant

  11. Subway platform air quality: Assessing the influences of tunnel ventilation, train piston effect and station design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, T.; Pérez, N.; Reche, C.; Martins, V.; de Miguel, E.; Capdevila, M.; Centelles, S.; Minguillón, M. C.; Amato, F.; Alastuey, A.; Querol, X.; Gibbons, W.

    2014-08-01

    A high resolution air quality monitoring campaign (PM, CO2 and CO) was conducted on differently designed station platforms in the Barcelona subway system under: (a) normal forced tunnel ventilation, and (b) with daytime tunnel ventilation systems shut down. PM concentrations are highly variable (6-128 μgPM1 m-3, 16-314 μgPM3 m-3, and 33-332 μgPM10 m-3, 15-min averages) depending on ventilation conditions and station design. Narrow platforms served by single-track tunnels are heavily dependent on forced tunnel ventilation and cannot rely on the train piston effect alone to reduce platform PM concentrations. In contrast PM levels in stations with spacious double-track tunnels are not greatly affected when tunnel ventilation is switched off, offering the possibility of significant energy savings without damaging air quality. Sampling at different positions along the platform reveals considerable lateral variation, with the greatest accumulation of particulates occurring at one end of the platform. Passenger accesses can dilute PM concentrations by introducing cleaner outside air, although lateral down-platform accesses are less effective than those positioned at the train entry point. CO concentrations on the platform are very low (≤1 ppm) and probably controlled by ingress of traffic-contaminated street-level air. CO2 averages range from 371 to 569 ppm, changing during the build-up and exchange of passengers with each passing train.

  12. Superconducting tunneling with the tunneling Hamiltonian. II. Subgap harmonic structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, G.B.

    1987-01-01

    The theory of superconducting tunneling without the tunneling Hamiltonian is extended to treat superconductor/insulator/superconductor junctions in which the transmission coefficient of the insulating barrier approaches unity. The solution for the current in such junctions is obtained by solving the problem of a particle hopping in a one-dimensional lattice of sites, with forward and reverse transfer integrals that depend on the site. The results are applied to the problem of subgap harmonic structure in superconducting tunneling. The time-dependent current at finite voltage through a junction exhibiting subgap structure is found to have terms that oscillate at all integer multiples of the Josephson frequency, n(2eV/h). The amplitudes of these new, and as yet unmeasured, ac current contributions as a function of voltage are predicted

  13. Protected electrodes for plasma panels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, S.W.

    1984-01-01

    A metal oxide coating is applied between the conductive base and the magnesium oxide dielectric of the input and/or erase electrode(s) in a plasma display device to prevent break-down of the dielectric

  14. Typical Underwater Tunnels in the Mainland of China and Related Tunneling Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kairong Hong

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In the past decades, many underwater tunnels have been constructed in the mainland of China, and great progress has been made in related tunneling technologies. This paper presents the history and state of the art of underwater tunnels in the mainland of China in terms of shield-bored tunnels, drill-and-blast tunnels, and immersed tunnels. Typical underwater tunnels of these types in the mainland of China are described, along with innovative technologies regarding comprehensive geological prediction, grouting-based consolidation, the design and construction of large cross-sectional tunnels with shallow cover in weak strata, cutting tool replacement under limited drainage and reduced pressure conditions, the detection and treatment of boulders, the construction of underwater tunnels in areas with high seismic intensity, and the treatment of serious sedimentation in a foundation channel of immersed tunnels. Some suggestions are made regarding the three potential great strait-crossing tunnels—the Qiongzhou Strait-Crossing Tunnel, Bohai Strait-Crossing Tunnel, and Taiwan Strait-Crossing Tunnel—and issues related to these great strait-crossing tunnels that need further study are proposed. Keywords: Underwater tunnel, Strait-crossing tunnel, Shield-bored tunnel, Immersed tunnel, Drill and blast

  15. Impact of lattice strain on the tunnel magnetoresistance in Fe/insulator/Fe and Fe/insulator/La0.67Sr0.33MnO3 magnetic tunnel junctions

    KAUST Repository

    Useinov, Arthur

    2013-08-19

    The objective of this work is to describe the tunnel electron current in single-barrier magnetic tunnel junctions within an approach that goes beyond the single-band transport model. We propose a ballistic multichannel electron transport model that can explain the influence of in-plane lattice strain on the tunnel magnetoresistance as well as the asymmetric voltage behavior. We consider as an example single-crystal magnetic Fe(110) electrodes for Fe/insulator/Fe and Fe/insulator/La0.67Sr0.33MnO3 tunnel junctions, where the electronic band structures of Fe and La0.67Sr0.33MnO3 are derived by ab initio calculations.

  16. Impact of lattice strain on the tunnel magnetoresistance in Fe/insulator/Fe and Fe/insulator/La0.67Sr0.33MnO3 magnetic tunnel junctions

    KAUST Repository

    Useinov, Arthur; Saeed, Yasir; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo; Singh, Nirpendra; Useinov, N.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this work is to describe the tunnel electron current in single-barrier magnetic tunnel junctions within an approach that goes beyond the single-band transport model. We propose a ballistic multichannel electron transport model that can explain the influence of in-plane lattice strain on the tunnel magnetoresistance as well as the asymmetric voltage behavior. We consider as an example single-crystal magnetic Fe(110) electrodes for Fe/insulator/Fe and Fe/insulator/La0.67Sr0.33MnO3 tunnel junctions, where the electronic band structures of Fe and La0.67Sr0.33MnO3 are derived by ab initio calculations.

  17. Current noise in tunnel junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frey, Moritz; Grabert, Hermann [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Freiburg, Hermann-Herder-Strasse 3, 79104, Freiburg (Germany)

    2017-06-15

    We study current fluctuations in tunnel junctions driven by a voltage source. The voltage is applied to the tunneling element via an impedance providing an electromagnetic environment of the junction. We use circuit theory to relate the fluctuations of the current flowing in the leads of the junction with the voltage fluctuations generated by the environmental impedance and the fluctuations of the tunneling current. The spectrum of current fluctuations is found to consist of three parts: a term arising from the environmental Johnson-Nyquist noise, a term due to the shot noise of the tunneling current and a third term describing the cross-correlation between these two noise sources. Our phenomenological theory reproduces previous results based on the Hamiltonian model for the dynamical Coulomb blockade and provides a simple understanding of the current fluctuation spectrum in terms of circuit theory and properties of the average current. Specific results are given for a tunnel junction driven through a resonator. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  18. Superconducting tunnel-junction refrigerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melton, R.G.; Paterson, J.L.; Kaplan, S.B.

    1980-01-01

    The dc current through an S 1 -S 2 tunnel junction, with Δ 2 greater than Δ 1 , when biased with eV 1 +Δ 2 , will lower the energy in S 1 . This energy reduction will be shared by the phonons and electrons. This device is shown to be analogous to a thermoelectric refrigerator with an effective Peltier coefficient π* approx. Δ 1 /e. Tunneling calculations yield the cooling power P/sub c/, the electrical power P/sub e/ supplied by the bias supply, and the cooling efficiency eta=P/sub c//P/sub e/. The maximum cooling power is obtained for eV= +- (Δ 2 -Δ 1 ) and t 1 =T 1 /T/sub c/1 approx. 0.9. Estimates are made of the temperature difference T 2 -T 1 achievable in Al-Pb and Sn-Pb junctions with an Al 2 O 3 tunneling barrier. The performance of this device is shown to yield a maximum cooling efficiency eta approx. = Δ 1 /(Δ 2 -Δ 1 ) which can be compared with that available in an ideal Carnot refrigerator of eta=T 1 /(T 2 -T 1 ). The development of a useful tunnel-junction refrigerator requires a tunneling barrier with an effective thermal conductance per unit area several orders of magnitude less than that provided by the A1 2 O 3 barrier in the Al-Pb and Sn-Pb systems

  19. Ion-selective electrode reviews

    CERN Document Server

    Thomas, J D R

    1985-01-01

    Ion-Selective Electrode Reviews, Volume 7 is a collection of papers that covers the applications of electrochemical sensors, along with the versatility of ion-selective electrodes. The coverage of the text includes solid contact in membrane ion-selective electrodes; immobilized enzyme probes for determining inhibitors; potentiometric titrations based on ion-pair formation; and application of ion-selective electrodes in soil science, kinetics, and kinetic analysis. The text will be of great use to chemists and chemical engineers.

  20. Step tunneling enhanced asymmetry in metal-insulator-insulator-metal (MIIM) diodes for rectenna applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alimardani, N.; Conley, J. F.

    2013-09-01

    We combine nanolaminate bilayer insulator tunnel barriers (Al2O3/HfO2, HfO2/Al2O3, Al2O3/ZrO2) deposited via atomic layer deposition (ALD) with asymmetric work function metal electrodes to produce MIIM diodes with enhanced I-V asymmetry and non-linearity. We show that the improvements in MIIM devices are due to step tunneling rather than resonant tunneling. We also investigate conduction processes as a function of temperature in MIM devices with Nb2O5 and Ta2O5 high electron affinity insulators. For both Nb2O5 and Ta2O5 insulators, the dominant conduction process is established as Schottky emission at small biases and Frenkel-Poole emission at large biases. The energy depth of the traps that dominate Frenkel-Poole emission in each material are estimated.

  1. Measurements of quasiparticle tunneling dynamics in a band-gap-engineered transmon qubit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, L; DiCarlo, L; Reed, M D; Catelani, G; Bishop, Lev S; Schuster, D I; Johnson, B R; Yang, Ge A; Frunzio, L; Glazman, L; Devoret, M H; Schoelkopf, R J

    2012-06-08

    We have engineered the band gap profile of transmon qubits by combining oxygen-doped Al for tunnel junction electrodes and clean Al as quasiparticle traps to investigate energy relaxation due to quasiparticle tunneling. The relaxation time T1 of the qubits is shown to be insensitive to this band gap engineering. Operating at relatively low-E(J)/E(C) makes the transmon transition frequency distinctly dependent on the charge parity, allowing us to detect the quasiparticles tunneling across the qubit junction. Quasiparticle kinetics have been studied by monitoring the frequency switching due to even-odd parity change in real time. It shows the switching time is faster than 10  μs, indicating quasiparticle-induced relaxation has to be reduced to achieve T1 much longer than 100  μs.

  2. Studies of proximity-effect and tunneling in YBCO/metal layered films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greene, L.H.; Barner, J.B.; Feldmann, W.L.; Farrow, L.A.; Miceli, P.F.; Ramesh, R.; Wilkens, B.J.; Bagley, B.G.; Tarascon, J.M.; Wernick, J.H. (Bellcore, Red Bank, NJ (USA)); Giroud, M. (CRTBT-CNRS, Grenoble (France)); Rowell, J.M. (Conductus, Sunnyvale, CA (USA))

    1989-12-01

    The short coherence length of the high-Tc superconductors, coupled with their tendency to form non-superconducting surface layers, accounts for the difficulty in achieving good tunnel junctions. A proximity layer of a longer coherence length normal metal (N) is expected to ''draw out'' Cooper pairs. Our goal is to fabricate reproducible, planar tunnel junctions of SNIS layered structures for proximity tunneling spectroscopy. Such structures of YBCO/N/I/Pb and SNS structures of YBCO/N/Pb indicate that the normal metal produces a low resistance contact to the YBCO surface with a supercurrent observed in the SNS. The insulating barrier in the SNIS is reproducible, insulating and continuous: A sharp Pb gap and phonons from the counter-electrode are routinely observed. (orig.).

  3. Studies of proximity-effect and tunneling in YBCO/metal layered films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greene, L.H.; Barner, J.B.; Feldmann, W.L.; Farrow, L.A.; Miceli, P.F.; Ramesh, R.; Wilkens, B.J.; Bagley, B.G.; Tarascon, J.M.; Wernick, J.H.; Giroud, M.; Rowell, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    The short coherence length of the high-T c superconductors, coupled with their tendency to form non-superconducting surface layers, accounts for the difficulty in achieving good tunnel junctions. A proximity layer of a longer coherence length normal metal (N) is expected to draw out Cooper pairs. The authors' goal is to fabricate reproducible, planar tunnel junctions of SNIS layered structures for proximity tunneling spectroscopy. They discuss how such structures of YBCO/N/I/Pb and SNS structures of YBCO/N/Pb indicate that the normal metal produces a low resistance contact to the YBCO surface with a supercurrent observed in the SNS. The insulating barrier in the SNIS is reproducible, insulating and continuous: A sharp Pb gap and phonons from the counter-electrode are routinely observed

  4. MEMS Tunneling Micro Thermometer Based onTip Deflection of Bimetallic Cantilever Beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samrand K. Nezhadian

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Micro-electro-mechanical (MEM technology promises to significantly reduce the size, weight and cost of a variety of sensor systems. In this article has been described a highly sensitive novel type of thermometer based on deflection of a “bimetallic” microbeam. The proposed thermometer converts the thermal changes of a cantilevered bimetallic beam of submillimeter size into an electrical signal through tunneling-current modulation. The governing thermo-mechanical equation of a bimetallic cantilever beam has been derived and solved analytically. The obtained results show that the proposed tunneling micro thermometer is very sensitive to temperature changes due to exponential increasing of tunneling current but because of small gap between metallic electrodes, measurable range of temperature changes is small.

  5. Quantum decrease of capacitance in a nanometer-sized tunnel junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Untiedt, C.; Saenz, G.; Olivera, B.; Corso, M.; Sabater, C.; Pascual, J. I.

    2013-03-01

    We have studied the capacitance of the tunnel junction defined by the tip and sample of a Scanning Tunnelling Microscope through the measurement of the electrostatic forces and impedance of the junction. A decrease of the capacitance when a tunnel current is present has shown to be a more general phenomenon as previously reported in other systems. On another hand, an unexpected reduction of the capacitance is also observed when increasing the applied voltage above the work function energy of the electrodes to the Field Emission (FE) regime, and the decrease of capacitance due to a single FE-Resonance has been characterized. All these effects should be considered when doing measurements of the electronic characteristics of nanometer-sized electronic devices and have been neglected up to date. Spanish government (FIS2010-21883-C02-01, CONSOLIDER CSD2007-0010), Comunidad Valenciana (ACOMP/2012/127 and PROMETEO/2012/011)

  6. Electrical resistance tomography using steel cased boreholes as long electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daily, W; Newmark, R L; Ramirez, A

    1999-01-01

    Electrical resistance tomography (ERT) using multiple electrodes installed in boreholes has been shown to be useful for both site characterization and process monitoring. In some cases, however, installing multiple downhole electrodes is too costly (e.g., deep targets) or risky (e.g., contaminated sites). For these cases we have examined the possibility of using the steel casings of existing boreholes as electrodes. Several possibilities can be considered. The first case we investigated uses an array of steel casings as electrodes. This results in very few data and thus requires additional constraints to limit the domain of possible inverse solutions. Simulations indicate that the spatial resolution and sensitivity are understandably low but it is possible to coarsely map the lateral extent of subsurface processes such as steam floods. The second case uses an array of traditional point borehole electrodes combined with long-conductor electrodes (steel casings). Although this arrangement provides more data, in many cases it results in poor reconstructions of test targets. Results indicate that this method may hold promise for low resolution imaging where steel casings can be used as electrodes but the merits depend strongly on details of each application. Field tests using these configurations are currently being conducted

  7. Electrical resistance tomography using steel cased boreholes as electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newmark, R L; Daily, W; Ramirez, A

    1999-01-01

    Electrical resistance tomography (ERT) using multiple electrodes installed in boreholes has been shown to be useful for both site characterization and process monitoring. In some cases, however, installing multiple downhole electrodes is too costly (e.g., deep targets) or risky (e.g., contaminated sites). For these cases we have examined the possibility of using the steel casings of existing boreholes as electrodes. The first case we investigated used an array of steel casings as electrodes. This results in very few data and thus requires additional constraints to limit the domain of possible inverse solutions. Simulations indicate that the spatial resolution and sensitivity are understandably low but it is possible to coarsely map the lateral extent of subsurface processes such as steam floods. A hybrid case uses traditional point electrode arrays combined with long-conductor electrodes (steel casings). Although this arrangement provides more data, in many cases it results in poor reconstructions of test targets. Results indicate that this method may hold promise for low resolution imaging where steel casings can be used as electrodes

  8. TunnelVision: LHC Tunnel Photogrammetry System for Structural Monitoring

    CERN Document Server

    Fallas, William

    2014-01-01

    In this document an algorithm to detect deformations in the LHC Tunnel of CERN is presented. It is based on two images, one represents the ideal state of the tunnel and the other one the actual state. To find the differences between both, the algorithm is divided in three steps. First, an image enhancement is applied to make easier the detection. Second, two different approaches to reduce noise are applied to one or both images. And third, it is defined a group of characteristics about the type of deformation desired to detect. Finally, the conclusions show the effectiveness of the algorithm in the experimental results.

  9. The diagnostic efficacy of clinical findings and electrophysiological studies in carpal tunnel syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Buyukkoyuncu Pekel, Nilufer; Nar Senol, Pelin; Yildiz, Demet; Kilic, Ahmet Kasim; Kamaci Sener, Deniz; Seferoglu, Meral; Gunes, Aygul

    2017-01-01

    Objective. The aim of the study was to examine the relation between clinical findings, neurological examination and electrophysiological studies in diagnosing carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) and share our institutional experience in patients with CTS. Methods. Patients presenting with complaints of pain, paresthesia, and weakness in hands who diagnosed CTS between 2014 and 2015 were examined retrospectively. Demographic characteristics, clinical and neurological examination findings and electrod...

  10. Thermoelectric-induced spin currents in single-molecule magnet tunnel junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhengzhong; Jiang, Liang; Wang, Ruiqiang; Wang, Baigeng; Xing, D. Y.

    2010-12-01

    A molecular spin-current generator is proposed, which consists of a single-molecule magnet (SMM) coupled to two normal metal electrodes with temperature gradient. It is shown that this tunneling junction can generate a highly spin-polarized current by thermoelectric effects, whose flowing direction and spin polarization can be changed by adjusting the gate voltage applied to the SMM. This device can be realized with current technologies and may have practical use in spintronics and quantum information.

  11. Stability analysis of shallow tunnels subjected to eccentric loads by a boundary element method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Panji

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, stress behavior of shallow tunnels under simultaneous non-uniform surface traction and symmetric gravity loading was studied using a direct boundary element method (BEM. The existing full-plane elastostatic fundamental solutions to displacement and stress fields were used and implemented in a developed algorithm. The cross-section of the tunnel was considered in circular, square, and horseshoe shapes and the lateral coefficient of the domain was assumed as unit quantity. Double-node procedure of the BEM was applied at the corners to improve the model including sudden traction changes. The results showed that the method used was a powerful tool for modeling underground openings under various external as well as internal loads. Eccentric loads significantly influenced the stress pattern of the surrounding tunnel. The achievements can be practically used in completing and modifying regulations for stability investigation of shallow tunnels.

  12. R.f.-induced steps in mutually coupled, two-dimensional distributed Josephson tunnel junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, U.; Dammschneider, P.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on the amplitudes of the current steps in the I-V characteristics of mutually coupled two-dimensional distributed Josephson tunnel junctions driven by microwaves. For this purpose we use a numerical computation algorithm based on a planar resonator model for the individual Josephson tunnel junctions to calculate the d.c. current density distribution. In addition to the fundamental microwave frequency, harmonic contents of the tunneling current are also considered. The lateral dimensions of the individual junctions are small compared to the microwave wavelength and the Josephson penetration depth, giving an almost constant current density distribution. Therefore, the coupled junctions can give much greater step amplitudes than a single junction with an equal tunneling area, because of their nonuniform current density distribution

  13. Localizing and tracking electrodes using stereovision in epilepsy cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xiaoyao; Ji, Songbai; Roberts, David W.; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2015-03-01

    In epilepsy cases, subdural electrodes are often implanted to acquire intracranial EEG (iEEG) for seizure localization and resection planning. However, the electrodes may shift significantly between implantation and resection, during the time that the patient is monitored for iEEG recording. As a result, the accuracy of surgical planning based on electrode locations at the time of resection can be compromised. Previous studies have only quantified the electrode shift with respect to the skull, but not with respect to the cortical surface, because tracking cortical shift between surgeries is challenging. In this study, we use an intraoperative stereovision (iSV) system to visualize and localize the cortical surface as well as electrodes, record three-dimensional (3D) locations of the electrodes in MR space at the time of implantation and resection, respectively, and quantify the raw displacements, i.e., with respect to the skull. Furthermore, we track the cortical surface and quantify the shift between surgeries using an optical flow (OF) based motion-tracking algorithm. Finally, we compute the electrode shift with respect to the cortical surface by subtracting the cortical shift from raw measured displacements. We illustrate the method using one patient example. In this particular patient case, the results show that the electrodes not only shifted significantly with respect to the skull (8.79 +/- 3.00 mm in the lateral direction, ranging from 2.88 mm to 12.87 mm), but also with respect to the cortical surface (7.20 +/- 3.58 mm), whereas the cortical surface did not shift significantly in the lateral direction between surgeries (2.23 +/- 0.76 mm).

  14. Hybrid inflation exit through tunneling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garbrecht, Bjoern; Konstandin, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    For hybrid inflationary potentials, we derive the tunneling rate from field configurations along the flat direction towards the waterfall regime. This process competes with the classically rolling evolution of the scalar fields and needs to be strongly subdominant for phenomenologically viable models. Tunneling may exclude models with a mass scale below 10 12 GeV, but can be suppressed by small values of the coupling constants. We find that tunneling is negligible for those models, which do not require fine tuning in order to cancel radiative corrections, in particular for GUT-scale SUSY inflation. In contrast, electroweak scale hybrid inflation is not viable, unless the inflaton-waterfall field coupling is smaller than approximately 10 -11

  15. Laterally loaded masonry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raun Gottfredsen, F.

    In this thesis results from experiments on mortar joints and masonry as well as methods of calculation of strength and deformation of laterally loaded masonry are presented. The strength and deformation capacity of mortar joints have been determined from experiments involving a constant compressive...... stress and increasing shear. The results show a transition to pure friction as the cohesion is gradually destroyed. An interface model of a mortar joint that can take into account this aspect has been developed. Laterally loaded masonry panels have also been tested and it is found to be characteristic...... that laterally loaded masonry exhibits a non-linear load-displacement behaviour with some ductility....

  16. Calibration of tip and sample temperature of a scanning tunneling microscope using a superconductive sample

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stocker, Matthias; Pfeifer, Holger; Koslowski, Berndt, E-mail: berndt.koslowski@uni-ulm.de [Institute of Solid State Physics, University of Ulm, D-89069 Ulm (Germany)

    2014-05-15

    The temperature of the electrodes is a crucial parameter in virtually all tunneling experiments. The temperature not only controls the thermodynamic state of the electrodes but also causes thermal broadening, which limits the energy resolution. Unfortunately, the construction of many scanning tunneling microscopes inherits a weak thermal link between tip and sample in order to make one side movable. Such, the temperature of that electrode is badly defined. Here, the authors present a procedure to calibrate the tip temperature by very simple means. The authors use a superconducting sample (Nb) and a standard tip made from W. Due to the asymmetry in the density of states of the superconductor (SC)—normal metal (NM) tunneling junction, the SC temperature controls predominantly the density of states while the NM controls the thermal smearing. By numerically simulating the I-V curves and numerically optimizing the tip temperature and the SC gap width, the tip temperature can be accurately deduced if the sample temperature is known or measureable. In our case, the temperature dependence of the SC gap may serve as a temperature sensor, leading to an accurate NM temperature even if the SC temperature is unknown.

  17. Calibration of tip and sample temperature of a scanning tunneling microscope using a superconductive sample

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stocker, Matthias; Pfeifer, Holger; Koslowski, Berndt

    2014-01-01

    The temperature of the electrodes is a crucial parameter in virtually all tunneling experiments. The temperature not only controls the thermodynamic state of the electrodes but also causes thermal broadening, which limits the energy resolution. Unfortunately, the construction of many scanning tunneling microscopes inherits a weak thermal link between tip and sample in order to make one side movable. Such, the temperature of that electrode is badly defined. Here, the authors present a procedure to calibrate the tip temperature by very simple means. The authors use a superconducting sample (Nb) and a standard tip made from W. Due to the asymmetry in the density of states of the superconductor (SC)—normal metal (NM) tunneling junction, the SC temperature controls predominantly the density of states while the NM controls the thermal smearing. By numerically simulating the I-V curves and numerically optimizing the tip temperature and the SC gap width, the tip temperature can be accurately deduced if the sample temperature is known or measureable. In our case, the temperature dependence of the SC gap may serve as a temperature sensor, leading to an accurate NM temperature even if the SC temperature is unknown

  18. Fabrication and dc characteristics of small-area tantalum and niobium superconducting tunnel junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Face, D.W.; Prober, D.E.

    1987-01-01

    We discuss the fabrication and dc electrical characteristics of small-area (1--6 μm 2 ) superconducting tunnel junctions with Ta or Nb base electrodes and Pb or Pb/sub 0.9/Bi/sub 0.1/ counterelectrodes. These junctions have very small subgap leakage currents, a ''sharp'' current rise at the sum-gap voltage, and show strong quantum effects when used as microwave mixers. The use of a low-energy (--150 eV) ion cleaning process and a novel step-defined fabrication process that eliminates photoresist processing after base electrode deposition are discussed. Tunnel barriers formed by dc glow discharge oxidation were the most successful. Tunnel barrier formation by thermal oxidation and ion-beam oxidation is also discussed. An oxidized Ta overlayer (--7 nm thick) was found to improve the characteristics of Nb-based junctions. The electrical characteristics of junctions with different electrode and barrier materials are presented and discussed in terms of the physical mechanisms that lead to excess subgap current and to a width of the current rise at the sum-gap voltage

  19. Quantum mechanical tunneling in chemical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Nakamura, Hiroki

    2016-01-01

    Quantum mechanical tunneling plays important roles in a wide range of natural sciences, from nuclear and solid-state physics to proton transfer and chemical reactions in chemistry and biology. Responding to the need for further understanding of multidimensional tunneling, the authors have recently developed practical methods that can be applied to multidimensional systems. Quantum Mechanical Tunneling in Chemical Physics presents basic theories, as well as original ones developed by the authors. It also provides methodologies and numerical applications to real molecular systems. The book offers information so readers can understand the basic concepts and dynamics of multidimensional tunneling phenomena and use the described methods for various molecular spectroscopy and chemical dynamics problems. The text focuses on three tunneling phenomena: (1) energy splitting, or tunneling splitting, in symmetric double well potential, (2) decay of metastable state through tunneling, and (3) tunneling effects in chemical...

  20. Tunnel Boring Machine Performance Study. Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-06-01

    Full face tunnel boring machine "TBM" performance during the excavation of 6 tunnels in sedimentary rock is considered in terms of utilization, penetration rates and cutter wear. The construction records are analyzed and the results are used to inves...

  1. Large hadron collider in the LEP tunnel. Proceedings. Vol. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    A Workshop, jointly organized by ECFA and CERN, took place at Lausanne and at CERN in March 1984 to study various options for a pp (or panti p) collider which might be installed at a later data alongside LEP in the LEP tunnel. Following the exploration of e + e - physics up to the highest energy now foreseeable, this would open up the opportunity to investigate hadron collisions in the new energy range of 10 to 20 TeV in the centre of mass. These proceedings put together the documents prepared in connection with this Workshop. They cover possible options for a Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in the LEP tunnel, the physics case as it stands at present, and studies of experimental possibilities in this energy range with luminosities as now considered. See hints under the relevant topics. (orig./HSI)

  2. Large hadron collider in the LEP tunnel. Proceedings. Vol. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    A Workshop, jointly organized by ECFA and CERN, took place at Lausanne and at CERN in March 1984 to study various options for a pp (or panti p) collider which might be installed at a later date alongside LEP in the LEP tunnel. Following the exploration of e + e - physics up to the highest energy now foreseeable, this would open up the opportunity to investigate hadron collisions in the new energy range of 10 to 20 TeV in the centre of mass. These proceedings put together the documents prepared in connection with this Workshop. They cover possible options for a Large Hadron Collider (LHC= in the LEP tunnel, the physics case at it stands at present, and studies of experimental possibilities in this energy range with luminosities as now considered. See hints under the relevant topics. (orig.)

  3. Transit time for resonant tunneling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia Calderon, G.; Rubio, A.

    1990-09-01

    This work considers properties of the partial widths in one dimensional elastic resonant tunneling in order to propose a transit-time τ tr = (h/2π)/Γ n T res ) where Γ n is the elastic width and T res the transmission coefficient at resonance energy. This time is interpreted as an average over the resonance energy width. It is shown that the tunneling current density integrated across a sharp resonance is inversely proportional to τ tr . This transit time may be much larger than the values predicted by other definitions. (author). 20 refs

  4. Spin tunnelling in mesoscopic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Anupam

    2001-02-01

    We study spin tunnelling in molecular magnets as an instance of a mesoscopic phenomenon, with special emphasis on the molecule Fe8. We show that the tunnel splitting between various pairs of Zeeman levels in this molecule oscillates as a function of applied magnetic field, vanishing completely at special points in the space of magnetic fields, known as diabolical points. This phenomena is explained in terms of two approaches, one based on spin-coherent-state path integrals, and the other on a generalization of the phase integral (or WKB) method to difference equations. Explicit formulas for the diabolical points are obtained for a model Hamiltonian.

  5. Tunneling field effect transistor technology

    CERN Document Server

    Chan, Mansun

    2016-01-01

    This book provides a single-source reference to the state-of-the art in tunneling field effect transistors (TFETs). Readers will learn the TFETs physics from advanced atomistic simulations, the TFETs fabrication process and the important roles that TFETs will play in enabling integrated circuit designs for power efficiency. · Provides comprehensive reference to tunneling field effect transistors (TFETs); · Covers all aspects of TFETs, from device process to modeling and applications; · Enables design of power-efficient integrated circuits, with low power consumption TFETs.

  6. Inelastic scattering in resonant tunneling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wingreen, Ned S.; Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel; Wilkins, John W.

    1989-01-01

    The exact resonant-tunneling transmission probability for an electron interacting with phonons is presented in the limit that the elastic coupling to the leads is independent of energy. The phonons produce transmission sidebands but do not affect the integrated transmission probability or the esc......The exact resonant-tunneling transmission probability for an electron interacting with phonons is presented in the limit that the elastic coupling to the leads is independent of energy. The phonons produce transmission sidebands but do not affect the integrated transmission probability...

  7. Molecular series-tunneling junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Kung-Ching; Hsu, Liang-Yan; Bowers, Carleen M; Rabitz, Herschel; Whitesides, George M

    2015-05-13

    Charge transport through junctions consisting of insulating molecular units is a quantum phenomenon that cannot be described adequately by classical circuit laws. This paper explores tunneling current densities in self-assembled monolayer (SAM)-based junctions with the structure Ag(TS)/O2C-R1-R2-H//Ga2O3/EGaIn, where Ag(TS) is template-stripped silver and EGaIn is the eutectic alloy of gallium and indium; R1 and R2 refer to two classes of insulating molecular units-(CH2)n and (C6H4)m-that are connected in series and have different tunneling decay constants in the Simmons equation. These junctions can be analyzed as a form of series-tunneling junctions based on the observation that permuting the order of R1 and R2 in the junction does not alter the overall rate of charge transport. By using the Ag/O2C interface, this system decouples the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO, which is localized on the carboxylate group) from strong interactions with the R1 and R2 units. The differences in rates of tunneling are thus determined by the electronic structure of the groups R1 and R2; these differences are not influenced by the order of R1 and R2 in the SAM. In an electrical potential model that rationalizes this observation, R1 and R2 contribute independently to the height of the barrier. This model explicitly assumes that contributions to rates of tunneling from the Ag(TS)/O2C and H//Ga2O3 interfaces are constant across the series examined. The current density of these series-tunneling junctions can be described by J(V) = J0(V) exp(-β1d1 - β2d2), where J(V) is the current density (A/cm(2)) at applied voltage V and βi and di are the parameters describing the attenuation of the tunneling current through a rectangular tunneling barrier, with width d and a height related to the attenuation factor β.

  8. Watertightness of concrete tunnel structures

    OpenAIRE

    Glerum, A.

    1982-01-01

    The Netherlands are situated in the delta. of the rivers Rhine, Meuse and Scheldt. Therefore the ground mainly consists.of sediments, such as sand, clay and silt. In certain regions peat layers of varying thickness are found. The high permeability of some of these materials and the fact that the groundwater table is generally only 1 m below ground level, make an adequate watertightness one of the main features of tunnel engineering in the Netherlands. Tunnels in Holland are both of the immers...

  9. Enhanced tunneling through nonstationary barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palomares-Baez, J. P.; Rodriguez-Lopez, J. L.; Ivlev, B.

    2007-01-01

    Quantum tunneling through a nonstationary barrier is studied analytically and by a direct numerical solution of Schroedinger equation. Both methods are in agreement and say that the main features of the phenomenon can be described in terms of classical trajectories which are solutions of Newton's equation in complex time. The probability of tunneling is governed by analytical properties of a time-dependent perturbation and the classical trajectory in the plane of complex time. Some preliminary numerical calculations of Euclidean resonance (an easy penetration through a classical nonstationary barrier due to an underbarrier interference) are presented

  10. Ion-selective electrode reviews

    CERN Document Server

    Thomas, J D R

    1983-01-01

    Ion-Selective Electrode Reviews, Volume 5 is a collection of articles that covers ion-speciation. The book aims to present the advancements of the range and capabilities of selective ion-sensors. The topics covered in the selection are neutral carrier based ion-selective electrodes; reference electrodes and liquid junction effects in ion-selective electrode potentiometry; ion transfer across water/organic phase boundaries and analytical; and carbon substrate ion-selective electrodes. The text will be of great use to chemists and chemical engineers.

  11. Later zaaien kost opbrengst

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alblas, J.

    2000-01-01

    Onderzoek naar de gevolgen van het uitstellen van het zaaitijdstip op de gewasproductie en op opbrengstderving, bijvoorbeeld doordat de grond later bewerkt kan worden door een hogere grondwaterstand als gevolg van peilverhoging

  12. Drill and blast tunnelling; Konvensjonell drift av tunneler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roenn, Paal-Egil

    1997-12-31

    This thesis treats drill and blast tunnelling. The rapid technological advance necessitates revised and updated design criteria, quality requirements and quality control. In situ blast experiments were carried out in order to test new methods and improve the basis for calculation and design. The main topics of the experiments were (1) longer rounds and increased drillhole diameter, (2) emulsion slurry as explosives in tunnelling, and (3) electronic detonators in contour blasting. The experiments show that it is technically feasible to blast rounds of up to 8.6 m length. Using current technology, the economical optimum round length is substantially shorter. Dust, low visibility, noise and toxic fumes are occupational environmental strains for the tunnel workers. Several of the environmental factors are strongly influenced by the type of explosives used. For example, emulsion slurry resulted in 4 to 5 times better visibility than Anolit and the concentration of respirable dust and total dust was reduced by 30-50 %. Electronic detonators were tested and found to give a higher percentage of remaining drillholes in the contour than Nonel detonators. The thesis includes a chapter on economic design of hydropower tunnels. 42 refs., 83 figs., 45 tabs.

  13. Experimental observation of the transition from weak link to tunnel junction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muller, C.J.; Ruitenbeek, J.M. van; Jongh, L.J. de

    1992-01-01

    An extension to Morelands break junction technique is developed in order to obtain a clean and stable, mechanically adjustable junction. As a function of an externally applied force the coupling of two electrodes can be varied in vacuum. Experiments are described of a junction with niobium electrodes at 4.2 K which undergo a continuous change in normal resistance R N , from 1 to 10 9 Ω upon applying an increasing force. In this resistance range we discern a transition from a weak link regime to a tunnel regime. The current voltage (I-V) curves are reproducible upon adjustment changes in the whole resistance range. In the weak link regime the two electrodes of the junction are in physical contact with each other. The product of the critical current and normal resistance is compared with predictions of Ambegaokar-Baratoff and Kulik-Omelyanchuk. The product of the excess current and normal resistance shows a logarithmic increase for low R N values and decreases for the highest R N values in the weak link regime. Subharmonic gap structure, originating from multiple Andreev reflections is observed over a wide range of R N . In the transition regime the two electrodes are not in contact but there is still a large overlap of the superconducting and quasiparticle wave functions. In this regime a finite slope in the ''critical current part'' in the current voltage curve is observed. The I-V curves show features characteristic for both a weak link and a tunnel junction. In the tunnel regime there exists a vacuum gap between the electrodes and the Josephson coupling is suppressed. A considerable subgap current is observed, where the product of the subgap current and normal resistance is constant over almost four orders of magnitude of R N . A decreasing conductance near zero bias shows up in this regime. The normal resistance exhibits an exponential behaviour upon variations in the vacuum gap. (orig./WL)

  14. Long-range protein electron transfer observed at the single-molecule level: In situ mapping of redox-gated tunneling resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chi, Qijin; Farver, O; Ulstrup, Jens

    2005-01-01

    on the redox potential. Maximum resonance appears around the equilibrium redox potential of azurin with an on/off current ratio of approximate to 9. Simulation analyses, based on a two-step interfacial ET model for the scanning tunneling microscopy redox process, were performed and provide quantitative......A biomimetic long-range electron transfer (ET) system consisting of the blue copper protein azurin, a tunneling barrier bridge, and a gold single-crystal electrode was designed on the basis of molecular wiring self-assembly principles. This system is sufficiently stable and sensitive in a quasi...... constants display tunneling features with distance-decay factors of 0.83 and 0.91 angstrom(-1) in H2O and D2O, respectively. Redox-gated tunneling resonance is observed in situ at the single-molecule level by using electrochemical scanning tunneling microscopy, exhibiting an asymmetric dependence...

  15. LATERAL ANKLE INJURY

    OpenAIRE

    Pollard, Henry; Sim, Patrick; McHardy, Andrew

    2002-01-01

    Background: Injury to the ankle joint is the most common peripheral joint injury. The sports that most commonly produce high ankle injury rates in their participating athletes include: basketball, netball, and the various codes of football. Objective: To provide an up to date understanding of manual therapy relevant to lateral ligament injury of the ankle. A discussion of the types of ligament injury and common complicating factors that present with lateral ankle pain is presented along with ...

  16. Electrostatic Levitator Electrode Layout

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    Schematic of Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) electrodes and controls system. The ESL uses static electricity to suspend an object (about 2-3 mm in diameter) inside a vacuum chamber while a laser heats the sample until it melts. This lets scientists record a wide range of physical properties without the sample contacting the container or any instruments, conditions that would alter the readings. The Electrostatic Levitator is one of several tools used in NASA's microgravity materials science program.

  17. [Lateral epicondylitis: conservative - operative].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altintas, Burak; Greiner, Stefan

    2016-10-01

    Lateral epicondylitis is a common disease of the common extensor origin at the lateral humerus. Despite its common self-limitation it can lead to chronic therapy-resistant pain with remarkable functional disability of the affected arm. Different conservative and operative treatment options of lateral epicondylitis are described and compared regarding benefits and risks. Additionally, recent surgical techniques and their complications are mentioned. Based on the current literature, it is shown which treatment option can be recommended. This review was based on the literature analysis in PubMed regarding "conservative and operative therapy of lateral epicondylitis" as well as the clinical experience of the authors. Conservative treatment is the primary choice for the treatment of lateral epicondylitis if concomitant pathologies such as instability among others can be excluded. It should include strengthening against resistance with eccentric stretching of the extensor group. In persistent cases, operative treatment is warranted. Resection of the pathologic tissue at the extensor origin with debridement and refixation of the healthy tendinous tissue yields good results. Most patients with lateral epicondylitis can be treated conservatively with success. Radiological evaluation should be performed in therapy-resistant cases. In the case of partial or complete rupture of the extensor origin, operative therapy is indicated.

  18. Characterization of magnetic tunnel junction test pads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østerberg, Frederik Westergaard; Kjær, Daniel; Nielsen, Peter Folmer

    2015-01-01

    We show experimentally as well as theoretically that patterned magnetic tunnel junctions can be characterized using the current-in-plane tunneling (CIPT) method, and the key parameters, the resistance-area product (RA) and the tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR), can be determined. The CIPT method...

  19. Tunnel Face Stability & New CPT Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broere, W.

    2001-01-01

    Nearly all tunnels bored in soft soils have encountered problems with the stability of the tunnel face. In several cases these problems led to an extended stand-still of the boring process. A better understanding of the face stability, and of the soil conditions around the tunnel boring machine, can

  20. Flexible transparent electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demiryont, Hulya; Shannon, Kenneth C., III; Moorehead, David; Bratcher, Matthew

    2011-06-01

    This paper presents the properties of the EclipseTECTM transparent conductor. EclipseTECTM is a room temperature deposited nanostructured thin film coating system comprised of metal-oxide semiconductor elements. The system possesses metal-like conductivity and glass-like transparency in the visible region. These highly conductive TEC films exhibit high shielding efficiency (35dB at 1 to 100GHz). EclipseTECTM can be deposited on rigid or flexible substrates. For example, EclipseTECTM deposited on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) is extremely flexible that can be rolled around a 9mm diameter cylinder with little or no reduction in electrical conductivity and that can assume pre-extension states after an applied stress is relieved. The TEC is colorless and has been tailored to have high visible transmittance which matches the eye sensitivity curve and allows the viewing of true background colors through the coating. EclipseTECTM is flexible, durable and can be tailored at the interface for applications such as electron- or hole-injecting OLED electrodes as well as electrodes in flexible displays. Tunable work function and optical design flexibility also make EclipseTECTM well-suited as a candidate for grid electrode replacement in next-generation photovoltaic cells.

  1. Tunneling into quantum wires: regularization of the tunneling Hamiltonian and consistency between free and bosonized fermions

    OpenAIRE

    Filippone, Michele; Brouwer, Piet

    2016-01-01

    Tunneling between a point contact and a one-dimensional wire is usually described with the help of a tunneling Hamiltonian that contains a delta function in position space. Whereas the leading order contribution to the tunneling current is independent of the way this delta function is regularized, higher-order corrections with respect to the tunneling amplitude are known to depend on the regularization. Instead of regularizing the delta function in the tunneling Hamiltonian, one may also obta...

  2. Macroscopic quantum tunneling in Josephson tunnel junctions and Coulomb blockade in single small tunnel junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleland, A.N.

    1991-04-01

    Experiments investigating the process of macroscopic quantum tunneling in a moderately-damped, resistively shunted, Josephson junction are described, followed by a discussion of experiments performed on very small capacitance normal-metal tunnel junctions. The experiments on the resistively-shunted Josephson junction were designed to investigate a quantum process, that of the tunneling of the Josephson phase variable under a potential barrier, in a system in which dissipation plays a major role in the dynamics of motion. All the parameters of the junction were measured using the classical phenomena of thermal activation and resonant activation. Theoretical predictions are compared with the experimental results, showing good agreement with no adjustable parameters; the tunneling rate in the moderately damped (Q ∼ 1) junction is seen to be reduced by a factor of 300 from that predicted for an undamped junction. The phase is seen to be a good quantum-mechanical variable. The experiments on small capacitance tunnel junctions extend the measurements on the larger-area Josephson junctions from the region in which the phase variable has a fairly well-defined value, i.e. its wavefunction has a narrow width, to the region where its value is almost completely unknown. The charge on the junction becomes well-defined and is predicted to quantize the current through the junction, giving rise to the Coulomb blockade at low bias. I present the first clear observation of the Coulomb blockade in single junctions. The electrical environment of the tunnel junction, however, strongly affects the behavior of the junction: higher resistance leads are observed to greatly sharpen the Coulomb blockade over that seen with lower resistance leads. I present theoretical descriptions of how the environment influences the junctions; comparisons with the experimental results are in reasonable agreement

  3. Polarization contrast in photon scanning tunnelling microscopy combined with atomic force microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Propstra, K.; Propstra, K.; van Hulst, N.F.

    1995-01-01

    Photon scanning tunnelling microscopy combined with atomic force microscopy allows simultaneous acquisition and direct comparison of optical and topographical images, both with a lateral resolution of about 30 nm, far beyond the optical diffraction limit. The probe consists of a modified

  4. Editorial Commentary: The All-Epiphyseal Anterior Cruciate Ligament Distal Femoral Approach: Sockets or Tunnels?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordasco, Frank A

    2018-05-01

    I believe that the distal femoral approach for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in the skeletally immature athlete with 3 to 6 years of remaining growth is best performed with an all-inside, all-epiphyseal technique using sockets rather than an outside-in approach creating tunnels. A shorter socket rather than a longer tunnel exposes a smaller surface area of the lateral distal femoral physis to potential compromise and resultant valgus malalignment. In addition, exiting the lateral femoral aspect of the epiphysis with a full-diameter tunnel as compared with a smaller diameter drill hole used to prepare a socket places the posterior articular cartilage, the lateral collateral ligament and anterolateral ligament footprints, and the popliteus tendon insertion at risk. My preference for sockets is also related to my belief that they provide a superior biologic milieu for graft incorporation compared with a full-length tunnel with the attendant violation of the lateral femoral cortex of the epiphysis. Copyright © 2018 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. A Temporal Same-Object Advantage in the Tunnel Effect: Facilitated Change Detection for Persisting Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flombaum, Jonathan I.; Scholl, Brian J.

    2006-01-01

    Meaningful visual experience requires computations that identify objects as the same persisting individuals over time, motion, occlusion, and featural change. This article explores these computations in the tunnel effect: When an object moves behind an occluder, and then an object later emerges following a consistent trajectory, observers…

  6. Materials and fabrication of electrode scaffolds for deposition of MnO2 and their true performance in supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jianyun; Li, Xiaohong; Wang, Yaming; Walsh, Frank C.; Ouyang, Jia-Hu; Jia, Dechang; Zhou, Yu

    2015-10-01

    MnO2 is a promising electrode material for high energy supercapacitors because of its large pseudo-capacitance. However, MnO2 suffers from low electronic conductivity and poor cation diffusivity, which results in poor utilization and limited rate performance of traditional MnO2 powder electrodes, obtained by pressing a mixed paste of MnO2 powder, conductive additive and polymer binder onto metallic current collectors. Developing binder-free MnO2 electrodes by loading nanoscale MnO2 deposits on pre-fabricated device-ready electrode scaffolds is an effective way to achieve both high power and energy performance. These electrode scaffolds, with interconnected skeletons and pore structures, will not only provide mechanical support and electron collection as traditional current collectors but also fast ion transfer tunnels, leading to high MnO2 utilization and rate performance. This review covers design strategies, materials and fabrication methods for the electrode scaffolds. Rational evaluation of the true performance of these electrodes is carried out, which clarifies that some of the electrodes with as-claimed exceptional performances lack potential in practical applications due to poor mass loading of MnO2 and large dead volume of inert scaffold materials/void spaces in the electrode structure. Possible ways to meet this challenge and bring MnO2 electrodes from laboratory studies to real-world applications are considered.

  7. The tunnel effect and their more important application: The microscope of quantum tunneling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez M, L.

    1999-01-01

    Thanks to a donation made by the Volunteered Japanese JICA Program, the University National Headquarters Manizales, in particular the group of Physics of the Plasma, it has acquired a equipment where it is possible to combine several microscopy techniques: STM (scanning tunneling microscopy), AFM (atomic forced microscopy), MFM (magnetic forced microscopy) and LFM (lateral forced microscopy). These techniques group under the generic name of probe microscopy (SPM). The objective of this article is to offer a basic understanding to the whole university community on one of the previously mentioned techniques, STM, with the goal of generating future collaborations among the diverse investigators of the Headquarters. In the first one it leaves it explains the physical phenomenon in which the STM is based, then it is exposed in a brief way the operation of the same one and finally some of its applications are mentioned

  8. Earth Pressure on Tunnel Crown

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars

    Two different analyses have been carried out in order to find the vertical earth pressure, or overburden pressure, at the crown of a tunnel going through a dike. Firstly, a hand calculation is performed using a simple dispersion of the stresses over depth. Secondly, the finite‐element program...

  9. Introduction to scanning tunneling microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, C Julian

    2008-01-01

    The scanning tunneling and the atomic force microscope, both capable of imaging individual atoms, were crowned with the Physics Nobel Prize in 1986, and are the cornerstones of nanotechnology today. This is a thoroughly updated version of this 'bible' in the field.

  10. Installation in the SPS tunnel

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    The SPS tunnel is 6910 m in circumference and has a cross section of 4 m inner diameter. It is situated at an elevation of 400 m above sea level at a depth below the surface varying between 23 and 65 m. Its walls are lined with a concrete shell of about 30 cm thickness. See also 7410043X

  11. Principles of electron tunneling spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Wolf, E L

    2012-01-01

    Electron tunnelling spectroscopy as a research tool has strongly advanced understanding of superconductivity. This book explains the physics and instrumentation behind the advances illustrated in beautiful images of atoms, rings of atoms and exotic states in high temperature superconductors, and summarizes the state of knowledge that has resulted.

  12. Time tunnels meet warped passages

    CERN Multimedia

    Kushner, David

    2006-01-01

    "Just in time for its 40th anniversary, the classic sci-fi television show "The time tunnel" is out on DVD. The conceit is something every engineer can relate to: a pulled plug. Scientists in an underground lab are working on a secret government experiment in time travel. (1 page)

  13. Zero energy Tunnel-concept

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dzhusupova, R.

    2012-01-01

    Creating a zero energy environment is a hot topic. The developments in this field are based on the concept of the "Trias Energetica": reducing energy consumption, using renewable energy sources, and efficiently using fossil fuels. A zero energy concept can also be applied to road tunnels to improve

  14. Travelling inside the SPS tunnel

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    The golf cart proved to be a very useful form of transport around the 7 km circumference of the machine. It could carry four passengers and pull light equipment in its trailer. Here Peter Zettwoch is the driver along a mock-up tunnel for installation tests. (see photo 7401011X and Photo Archive 7401018)

  15. A Seamless Ubiquitous Telehealthcare Tunnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sao-Jie Chen

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Mobile handheld devices are rapidly using to implement healthcare services around the World. Fundamentally, these services utilize telemedicine technologies. A disconnection of a mobile telemedicine system usually results in an interruption, which is embarrassing, and reconnection is necessary during the communication session. In this study, the Stream Control Transmission Protocol (SCTP is adopted to build a stable session tunnel to guarantee seamless switching among heterogeneous wireless communication standards, such as Wi-Fi and 3G. This arrangement means that the telemedicine devices will not be limited by a fixed wireless connection and can switch to a better wireless channel if necessary. The tunnel can transmit plain text, binary data, and video streams. According to the evaluation of the proposed software-based SCTP-Tunnel middleware shown, the performance is lower than anticipated and is slightly slower than a fixed connection. However, the transmission throughput is still acceptable for healthcare professionals in a healthcare enterprise or home care site. It is necessary to build more heterogeneous wireless protocols into the proposed tunnel-switching scheme to support all possible communication protocols. In addition, SCTP is another good choice for promoting communication in telemedicine and healthcare fields.

  16. Tunnel Vision in Environmental Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Alan

    1982-01-01

    Discusses problem-solving styles in environmental management and the specific deficiencies in these styles that might be grouped under the label "tunnel vision," a form of selective attention contributing to inadequate problem-formulation, partial solutions to complex problems, and generation of additional problems. Includes educational…

  17. Management of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooar, Pekka A; Doherty, William J; Murray, Jayson N; Pezold, Ryan; Sevarino, Kaitlyn S

    2018-03-15

    The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) has developed Appropriate Use Criteria (AUC) for Management of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome. Evidence-based information, in conjunction with the clinical expertise of physicians, was used to develop the criteria to improve patient care and obtain best outcomes while considering the subtleties and distinctions necessary in making clinical decisions. To provide the evidence foundation for this AUC, the AAOS Evidence-Based Medicine Unit provided the writing panel and voting panel with the 2016 AAOS Clinical Practice Guideline titled Management of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guideline. The Management of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome AUC clinical patient scenarios were derived from indications typical of patients with suspected carpal tunnel syndrome in clinical practice, as well as from current evidence-based clinical practice guidelines and supporting literature to identify the appropriateness of treatments. The 135 patient scenarios and 6 treatments were developed by the writing panel, a group of clinicians who are specialists in this AUC topic. Next, a separate, multidisciplinary, voting panel (made up of specialists and nonspecialists) rated the appropriateness of treatment of each patient scenario using a 9-point scale to designate a treatment as Appropriate (median rating, 7 to 9), May Be Appropriate (median rating, 4 to 6), or Rarely Appropriate (median rating, 1 to 3).

  18. Evaluation of Schottky and MgO-based tunnelling diodes with different ferromagnets for spin injection in n-Si

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uhrmann, T; Dimopoulos, T; Brueckl, H; Kovacs, A; Kohn, A; Weyers, S; Paschen, U; Smoliner, J

    2009-01-01

    In this work we present the electrical properties of sputter-deposited ferromagnetic (FM) Schottky diodes and MgO-based tunnelling diodes to n-doped (0 0 1) silicon. The effective Schottky barrier height (SBH) has been evaluated as a function of the FM electrode (Co 70 Fe 30 , Co 40 Fe 40 B 20 and Ni 80 Fe 20 ), the silicon doping density (10 15 to 10 18 cm -3 ), the MgO tunnelling barrier thickness (0, 1.5 and 2.5 nm) and post-deposition annealing up to 400 0 C. The ideality factors of the Schottky diodes are close to unity, indicating transport by thermionic emission and the absence of an interfacial oxide layer, which is confirmed by transmission electron microscopy. The effective SBH is found to be approximately 0.65 eV, independent of the FM material and decreasing with increasing doping density. The changes induced by high temperature annealing at the current-voltage characteristic of the Schottky diodes depend strongly on the FM electrode. The effective SBH for the tunnelling diodes is as low as 0.3 eV, which suggests a high density of oxide and interface traps. It is again independent of the FM electrode, decreasing with increasing doping density and annealing temperature. The inclusion of MgO leads to higher thermal stability of the tunnelling diodes. The measured contact resistance values are discussed with respect to the conductivity mismatch for spin injection and detection.

  19. 3D Numerical Analysis of the Effects of an Advancing Tunnel on an Existing Loaded Pile Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Soomro

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Tunnels are often preferred for underground transportation in densely populated areas. In these areas, it is almost inevitable for tunnels to run close to some existing pile foundations. Since tunnelling activities induce stress relief and soil movement in the ground, existing piles may suffer from additional axial and lateral forces, bending moments, settlements and lateral deflections. Most of the previous researches on the responses of pile foundations due to tunnel construction were carried out under the plane strain condition. In this paper, a three-dimensional, elasto-plastic and coupled-consolidation finite element parametric study has been carried out to investigate the effects of a 6 m open-face advancing tunnel on a two by two pile group in saturated stiff clay. The influence of different cover-to-diameter (C/D tunnel ratios (namely 2.0, 2.5 & 3.0 was studied. The objectives of this study are to determine the changes in axial load distribution, changes in shaft resistance along the shaft of pile group and settlement of pile cap due to an advancing open-face tunnel.

  20. Tunneling time, what is its meaning?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, C R; Orlando, G; Vampa, G; Brabec, T

    2015-01-01

    The tunnel time ionization dynamics for bound systems in laser fields are investigated. Numerical analysis for a step function switch-on of the field allows for the tunnel time to be defined as the time it takes the ground state to develop the under-barrier wavefunction components necessary to achieve the static field ionization rate. A relation between the tunnel time and the Keldysh time is established. The definition of the tunnel time is extended to time varying fields and experimental possibilities for measuring the tunnel time are discussed

  1. Dirac particle tunneling from black rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Qingquan

    2008-01-01

    Recent research shows that Hawking radiation can be treated as a quantum tunneling process, and Hawking temperatures of Dirac particles across the horizon of a black hole can be correctly recovered via the fermion tunneling method. In this paper, motivated by the fermion tunneling method, we attempt to apply the analysis to derive Hawking radiation of Dirac particles via tunneling from black ring solutions of 5-dimensional Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton gravity theory. Finally, it is interesting to find that, as in the black hole case, fermion tunneling can also result in correct Hawking temperatures for the rotating neutral, dipole, and charged black rings.

  2. Experimental Evidence for Quantum Tunneling Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camus, Nicolas; Yakaboylu, Enderalp; Fechner, Lutz; Klaiber, Michael; Laux, Martin; Mi, Yonghao; Hatsagortsyan, Karen Z.; Pfeifer, Thomas; Keitel, Christoph H.; Moshammer, Robert

    2017-07-01

    The first hundred attoseconds of the electron dynamics during strong field tunneling ionization are investigated. We quantify theoretically how the electron's classical trajectories in the continuum emerge from the tunneling process and test the results with those achieved in parallel from attoclock measurements. An especially high sensitivity on the tunneling barrier is accomplished here by comparing the momentum distributions of two atomic species of slightly deviating atomic potentials (argon and krypton) being ionized under absolutely identical conditions with near-infrared laser pulses (1300 nm). The agreement between experiment and theory provides clear evidence for a nonzero tunneling time delay and a nonvanishing longitudinal momentum of the electron at the "tunnel exit."

  3. Phase modulation of mid-infrared radiation in double-quantum-well structures under a lateral electric field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balagula, R. M.; Vinnichenko, M. Ya.; Makhov, I. S.; Sofronov, A. N., E-mail: sofronov@rphf.spbstu.ru; Firsov, D. A.; Vorobjev, L. E. [Peter the Great St. Petersburg Polytechnic University (Russian Federation)

    2017-03-15

    The modulation of polarized radiation by GaAs/AlGaAs structures with tunnel-coupled double quantum wells in a strong lateral electric field is studied. The spectra of the variation in the refractive index under a lateral electric field in the vicinity of the intersubband resonance are experimentally investigated.

  4. MgO magnetic tunnel junctions of enduring F-type upon annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schleicher, F; Halisdemir, U; Urbain, E; Gallart, M; Boukari, S; Beaurepaire, E; Gilliot, P; Bowen, M; Lacour, D; Montaigne, F; Hehn, M

    2015-01-01

    The authors performed magnetotransport experiments to determine whether annealing alters the oxygen vacancy-mediated tunnelling potential landscape of the central portion of a MgO ultrathin film within sputtered CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB magnetic tunnel junctions. Using the Î rel method reveals a temperature-dependent tunnelling barrier height for a non-annealed barrier that arises from single oxygen vacancies (F centres) and is qualitatively identical to that found for its partly and fully annealed counterparts. Thus these MTJs with F centres remain of F-type upon annealing. This explicitly confirms that the large tunnel-magnetoresistance (TMR) increase upon annealing results mainly from structural modifications of MgO and CoFeB and not from vacancy pairing within the barrier. Photoluminescence spectra performed on both annealed and non-annealed thin MgO films grown on CoFeB electrodes support this conclusion. This work should promote renewed scrutiny over the precise impact of annealing on tunnelling magnetotransport across MgO. (paper)

  5. Electron transport and noise spectroscopy in organic magnetic tunnel junctions with PTCDA and Alq3 barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Isidoro; Cascales, Juan Pedro; Hong, Jhen-Yong; Lin, Minn-Tsong; Prezioso, Mirko; Riminucci, Alberto; Dediu, Valentin A.; Aliev, Farkhad G.

    2016-10-01

    The possible influence of internal barrier dynamics on spin, charge transport and their fluctuations in organic spintronics remains poorly understood. Here we present investigation of the electron transport and low frequency noise at temperatures down to 0.3K in magnetic tunnel junctions with an organic PTCDA barriers with thickness up to 5 nm in the tunneling regime and with 200 nm thick Alq3 barrier in the hopping regime. We observed high tunneling magneto-resistance at low temperatures (15-40%) and spin dependent super-poissonian shot noise in organic magnetic tunnel junctions (OMTJs) with PTCDA. The Fano factor exceeds 1.5-2 values which could be caused by interfacial states controlled by spin dependent bunching in the tunneling events through the molecules.1 The bias dependence of the low frequency noise in OMTJs with PTCDA barriers which includes both 1/f and random telegraph noise activated at specific biases will also be discussed. On the other hand, the organic junctions with ferromagnetic electrodes and thick Alq3 barriers present sub-poissonian shot noise which depends on the temperature, indicative of variable range hopping.

  6. Tuning the tunneling magnetoresistance by using fluorinated graphene in graphene based magnetic junctions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shweta Meena

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Spin polarized properties of fluorinated graphene as tunnel barrier with CrO2 as two HMF electrodes are studied using first principle methods based on density functional theory. Fluorinated graphene with different fluorine coverages is explored as tunnel barriers in magnetic tunnel junctions. Density functional computation for different fluorine coverages imply that with increase in fluorine coverages, there is increase in band gap (Eg of graphene, Eg ∼ 3.466 e V was observed when graphene sheet is fluorine adsorbed on both-side with 100% coverage (CF. The results of CF graphene are compared with C4F (fluorination on one-side of graphene sheet with 25% coverage and out-of-plane graphene based magnetic tunnel junctions. On comparison of the results it is observed that CF graphene based structure offers high TMR ∼100%, and the transport of carrier is through tunneling as there are no transmission states near Fermi level. This suggests that graphene sheet with both-side fluorination with 100% coverages acts as a perfect insulator and hence a better barrier to the carriers which is due to negligible spin down current (I↓ in both Parallel Configuration (PC and Antiparallel Configuration (APC.

  7. Dual metal gate tunneling field effect transistors based on MOSFETs: A 2-D analytical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramezani, Zeinab; Orouji, Ali A.

    2018-01-01

    A novel 2-D analytical drain current model of novel Dual Metal Gate Tunnel Field Effect Transistors Based on MOSFETs (DMG-TFET) is presented in this paper. The proposed Tunneling FET is extracted from a MOSFET structure by employing an additional electrode in the source region with an appropriate work function to induce holes in the N+ source region and hence makes it as a P+ source region. The electric field is derived which is utilized to extract the expression of the drain current by analytically integrating the band to band tunneling generation rate in the tunneling region based on the potential profile by solving the Poisson's equation. Through this model, the effects of the thin film thickness and gate voltage on the potential, the electric field, and the effects of the thin film thickness on the tunneling current can be studied. To validate our present model we use SILVACO ATLAS device simulator and the analytical results have been compared with it and found a good agreement.

  8. Rock mass evaluation for predicting tunnel constructability in the preliminary investigation stage. Phenomena causing difficult tunneling and rockburst prediction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Koichi; Sawada, Masataka; Inohara, Yoshiki; Shidahara, Takumi; Hatano, Teruyoshi

    2011-01-01

    For the selection of the Detailed Investigation Areas for HLW disposal, predicting the tunnel constructability is one of the requirements together with assessing long-term safety. This report is the 1st of the three papers dealing with the evaluation of tunnel constructability. This paper deals with the geological factors relating to difficult tunneling such as squeezing, rockburst, and others. Also it deals with the prediction of rockburst. The 2nd paper will deal with the prediction of squeezing. The 3rd paper deals with the engineering characteristics of rock mass through rock mass classification. This paper about difficult tunneling has been based upon analysis of more than 500 tunneling reports about 280 tunnel constructions. The causes of difficult tunneling are related to (1) underground water, (2) mechanical properties of the rock, or (3) others such as gas. The geological factors for excessive water inflow are porous volcanic product of Quarternary, fault crush zone and hydrothermally altered zone of Green Tuff area, and degenerated mixed rock in accretionary complex. The geological factors for squeezing are solfataric clay at Quarternary volcanic zone, fault crush zone and hydrothermally altered zone of Green Tuff area, mudstone and fault crush zone of sedimentary rock of Neogene and later. Information useful for predicting rockburst has been gathered from previous reports. In the preliminary investigation stage, geological survey, geophysical survey and borehole survey from the surface are the source of information. Therefore rock type, P-wave velocity from seismic exploration and in-situ rock stress from hydrofracturing have been considered. Majority of rockburst events occurred at granitic rock, excluding coal mine where different kind of rockburst occurred at pillars. And P-wave velocity was around 5 km/s at the rock of rockburst events. Horizontal maximum and minimum stresses SH and Sh have been tested as a criterion for rockburst. It has been

  9. Evaluation of a new mid-scala cochlear implant electrode using microcomputed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisch, Christopher D; Carlson, Matthew L; Lane, John I; Driscoll, Colin L W

    2015-12-01

    To investigate electrode position, depth of insertion, and electrode contact using an electrode array with a mid-scala design following round window (RW) and cochleostomy insertion. Eight fresh-frozen cadaveric bones were implanted; half via a RW approach and half through an anteroinferior cochleostomy using a styleted mid-scala electrode design. Microcomputed tomography was used to acquire oblique coronal and oblique axial reformations. Individual electrode positions along each array, insertional depth, and electrode contact were determined using National Institutes of Health Image J software. All electrodes were inserted without significant resistance. The average angular depth of insertion was 436.5° for the RW group and 422.7° for the cochleostomy group. All electrodes acquired a perimodiolar position in the proximal segment and a lateral wall position at the basal turn, regardless of approach. Electrodes distal to the basal turn demonstrated a variable location, with 78% mid scala. One cochleostomy array fractured through the interscalar partition (ISP), acquiring a scala vestibuli position. The odds ratio for either abutting the modiolus, ISP, lateral wall or floor, or fracturing through the ISP were 2.7 times more likely following a cochleostomy insertion (P = .032). The styleted mid-scala electrode design acquires a proximal perimodiolar position, a lateral wall location, as it traverses the basal turn, and most commonly a mid-scala position in the distal array. Interscalar excursion occurred in one of the cochleostomy insertions. Cochleostomy insertion is more likely to result in ultimate final electrode position adjacent to critical intracochlear structures. NA. © 2015 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  10. Automated Boundary Conditions for Wind Tunnel Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Jan-Renee

    2018-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations of models tested in wind tunnels require a high level of fidelity and accuracy particularly for the purposes of CFD validation efforts. Considerable effort is required to ensure the proper characterization of both the physical geometry of the wind tunnel and recreating the correct flow conditions inside the wind tunnel. The typical trial-and-error effort used for determining the boundary condition values for a particular tunnel configuration are time and computer resource intensive. This paper describes a method for calculating and updating the back pressure boundary condition in wind tunnel simulations by using a proportional-integral-derivative controller. The controller methodology and equations are discussed, and simulations using the controller to set a tunnel Mach number in the NASA Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel are demonstrated.

  11. Tunneling Flight Time, Chemistry, and Special Relativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Jakob; Pollak, Eli

    2017-09-07

    Attosecond ionization experiments have not resolved the question "What is the tunneling time?". Different definitions of tunneling time lead to different results. Second, a zero tunneling time for a material particle suggests that the nonrelativistic theory includes speeds greater than the speed of light. Chemical reactions, occurring via tunneling, should then not be considered in terms of a nonrelativistic quantum theory calling into question quantum dynamics computations on tunneling reactions. To answer these questions, we define a new experimentally measurable paradigm, the tunneling flight time, and show that it vanishes for scattering through an Eckart or a square barrier, irrespective of barrier length or height, generalizing the Hartman effect. We explain why this result does not lead to experimental measurement of speeds greater than the speed of light. We show that this tunneling is an incoherent process by comparing a classical Wigner theory with exact quantum mechanical computations.

  12. Macroscopic quantum tunneling in Josephson tunnel junctions and Coulomb blockade in single small tunnel junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleland, A.N.

    1991-01-01

    Experiments investigated the process of macroscopic quantum tunneling in a moderately-damped, resistively shunted, Josephson junction are described, followed by a discussion of experiments performed on very-small-capacitance normal-metal tunnel junctions. The experiments on the resistively-shunted Josephson junction were designed to investigate a quantum process, that of the tunneling of the Josephson-phase variable under a potential barrier, in a system in which dissipation plays a major role in the dynamics of motion. All the parameters of the junction were measured using the classical phenomena of thermal activation and resonant activation. Theoretical predictions are compared with the experimental results, showing good agreement with no adjustable parameters. The experiments on small-capacitance tunnel junctions extend the measurements on the large-area Josephson junctions from the region in which the phase variable has a fairly well-defined value, i.e. its wave function has a narrow width, to the region where its value is almost completely unknown. The charge on the junction becomes well-defined and is predicted to quantize the current through the junction, giving rise to the Coulomb blockade at low bias

  13. Preventing Errors in Laterality

    OpenAIRE

    Landau, Elliot; Hirschorn, David; Koutras, Iakovos; Malek, Alexander; Demissie, Seleshie

    2014-01-01

    An error in laterality is the reporting of a finding that is present on the right side as on the left or vice versa. While different medical and surgical specialties have implemented protocols to help prevent such errors, very few studies have been published that describe these errors in radiology reports and ways to prevent them. We devised a system that allows the radiologist to view reports in a separate window, displayed in a simple font and with all terms of laterality highlighted in sep...

  14. Transparent Electrodes for Efficient Optoelectronics

    KAUST Repository

    Morales-Masis, Monica

    2017-03-30

    With the development of new generations of optoelectronic devices that combine high performance and novel functionalities (e.g., flexibility/bendability, adaptability, semi or full transparency), several classes of transparent electrodes have been developed in recent years. These range from optimized transparent conductive oxides (TCOs), which are historically the most commonly used transparent electrodes, to new electrodes made from nano- and 2D materials (e.g., metal nanowire networks and graphene), and to hybrid electrodes that integrate TCOs or dielectrics with nanowires, metal grids, or ultrathin metal films. Here, the most relevant transparent electrodes developed to date are introduced, their fundamental properties are described, and their materials are classified according to specific application requirements in high efficiency solar cells and flexible organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). This information serves as a guideline for selecting and developing appropriate transparent electrodes according to intended application requirements and functionality.

  15. Transparent Electrodes for Efficient Optoelectronics

    KAUST Repository

    Morales-Masis, Monica; De Wolf, Stefaan; Woods-Robinson, Rachel; Ager, Joel W.; Ballif, Christophe

    2017-01-01

    With the development of new generations of optoelectronic devices that combine high performance and novel functionalities (e.g., flexibility/bendability, adaptability, semi or full transparency), several classes of transparent electrodes have been developed in recent years. These range from optimized transparent conductive oxides (TCOs), which are historically the most commonly used transparent electrodes, to new electrodes made from nano- and 2D materials (e.g., metal nanowire networks and graphene), and to hybrid electrodes that integrate TCOs or dielectrics with nanowires, metal grids, or ultrathin metal films. Here, the most relevant transparent electrodes developed to date are introduced, their fundamental properties are described, and their materials are classified according to specific application requirements in high efficiency solar cells and flexible organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). This information serves as a guideline for selecting and developing appropriate transparent electrodes according to intended application requirements and functionality.

  16. The Third Quantization: To Tunnel or Not to Tunnel?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariam Bouhmadi-López

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Within the framework of the third quantization, we consider the possibility that an initially recollapsing baby universe can enter a stage of near de Sitter inflation by tunnelling through a Euclidean wormhole that connects the recollapsing and inflationary geometries. We present the solutions for the evolution of the scale factor in the Lorentzian and Euclidean regions as well as the probability that the baby universe indeed crosses the wormhole when it reaches its maximum size.

  17. Electrode for disintegrating metallic material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persang, J.C.

    1985-01-01

    A graphite electrode is provided for disintegrating and removing metallic material from a workpiece, e.g., such as portions of a nuclear reactor to be repaired while in an underwater and/or radioactive environment. The electrode is provided with a plurality of openings extending outwardly, and a manifold for supplying a mixture of water and compressed gas to be discharged through the openings for sweeping away the disintegrated metallic material during use of the electrode

  18. Lateral flow assays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Posthuma-Trumpie, G.A.; Amerongen, van A.

    2012-01-01

    A simple version of immunochemical-based methods is the Lateral Flow Assay (LFA). It is a dry chemistry technique (reagents are included); the fluid from the sample runs through a porous membrane (often nitrocellulose) by capillary force. Typically the membrane is cut as a strip of 0.5*5 cm. In most

  19. Stamina in later life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colerick, E J

    1985-01-01

    Patterns of aging raise a number of important questions concerning the paths to successful adaptation. What gives some older individuals their staying power in the face of misfortune? What causes others to function less effectively when stressed, to resist change? Clearly, the margin of safety, the degree of elasticity and resilience varies across individuals in the later years. This study focuses on event histories and current behavior of 62 elderly men and women (Phase I) and reports by their confidants (N = 62; Phase II). A central proposition, that stamina in later life depends, in part, on the appraisal of previous events involving loss is investigated using a model that incorporates aspects of earlier life, cognitive appraisal and clinically judged dimensions of stamina in old age. Multivariate (particularly path analytic) techniques are used to test the links between variable foci. Results suggest that antecedents of stamina involve the interaction of social resources and cognitive orientations. Specifically, stamina in later life is contingent, for the most part, on a triumphant, positive outlook during periods of adversity. Elderly so oriented are also those with robust health histories and marked educational accomplishments. Conversely, persons who view situations involving loss as threatening, overwhelming and potentially defeating experience no such outcome; low levels of stamina mark their later years. Interestingly, quality childhood ties matter for stamina in old age only by increasing the likelihood of perceptions of a supportive environment during hard times. The findings corroborate the general pattern of research documenting the importance of cognitive orientations in adaptive processes.

  20. The lateral angle revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morgan, Jeannie; Lynnerup, Niels; Hoppa, R.D.

    2013-01-01

    measurements taken from computed tomography (CT) scans. Previous reports have observed that the lateral angle size in females is significantly larger than in males. The method was applied to an independent series of 77 postmortem CT scans (42 males, 35 females) to validate its accuracy and reliability...... method appears to be of minimal practical use in forensic anthropology and archeology....

  1. Laterally situated sinus pericranii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koshu, K.; Takahashi, S.

    1981-01-01

    Sinus pericranii has been reported to be situated usually along the midline. Two cases of laterally situated sinus pericranii are presented. Venous blood was obtained by puncturing the tumors directly. Injection of contrast medium into the tumors demonstrated a communication between the tumors and the intracranial venous sinuses through marked diploic veins. (orig.)

  2. Ion-selective electrode reviews

    CERN Document Server

    Thomas, J D R

    1982-01-01

    Ion-Selective Electrode Reviews, Volume 3, provides a review of articles on ion-selective electrodes (ISEs). The volume begins with an article on methods based on titration procedures for surfactant analysis, which have been developed for discrete batch operation and for continuous AutoAnalyser use. Separate chapters deal with detection limits of ion-selective electrodes; the possibility of using inorganic ion-exchange materials as ion-sensors; and the effect of solvent on potentials of cells with ion-selective electrodes. Also included is a chapter on advances in calibration procedures, the d

  3. Field testing of sulphide electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, P.R.; Gaonkar, K.B.; Gadiyar, H.S.

    1993-01-01

    Sulphide ion selective electrodes have been developed at BARC, for determination of Ag + and S - ions directly and Cl - and CN - ions indirectly. The electrodes were tested for their use in sulphide environments in the EAD (Effluent After Dilution) stream at the Heavy Water Plant, Kota. The electrodes are suitable in the concentration range of 16000 ppm to 0.002 ppm, with a slope of 29-31 mV per decade change in the sulphide ion concentration. The response time is less than 10 seconds. These electrodes are reliable for continuous on-line use for a long period. (author). 7 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab

  4. Coated carbon nanotube array electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhifeng [Newton, MA; Wen, Jian [Newton, MA; Chen, Jinghua [Chestnut Hill, MA; Huang, Zhongping [Belmont, MA; Wang, Dezhi [Wellesley, MA

    2008-10-28

    The present invention provides conductive carbon nanotube (CNT) electrode materials comprising aligned CNT substrates coated with an electrically conducting polymer, and the fabrication of electrodes for use in high performance electrical energy storage devices. In particular, the present invention provides conductive CNTs electrode material whose electrical properties render them especially suitable for use in high efficiency rechargeable batteries. The present invention also provides methods for obtaining surface modified conductive CNT electrode materials comprising an array of individual linear, aligned CNTs having a uniform surface coating of an electrically conductive polymer such as polypyrrole, and their use in electrical energy storage devices.

  5. Microbial electrode sensor for alcohols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hikuma, M [Ajinomoto Co., Inc., Kawasaki, Japan; Kubo, T; Yasuda, T; Karube, I; Suzuki, S

    1979-10-01

    A microbial electrode consisting of immobilized microorganisms, a gas permeable Teflon membrane, and an oxygen electrode was prepared for the continuous determination of methyl and ethyl alcohols. Immobilized Trichosporon brassicae was employed for a microbial electrode sensor for ethyl alcohol. When a sample solution containing ethyl alcohol was injected into a microbial electrode system, the current of the electrode decreased markedly with time until a steady state was reached. The response time was within 10 min by the steady state method and within 6 min by the pulse method. A linear relationship was observed between the current decrease and the concentration of ethyl alcohol below 22.5 mg/liter. The current was reproducible within +- 6% of the relative error when a sample solution containing 16.5 mg/liter ethyl alcohol. The standard deviation was 0.5 mg/liter in 40 experiments. The selectivity of the microbial electrode sensor for ethyl alcohol was satisfactory. The microbial electrode sensor was applied to a fermentation broth of yeasts and satisfactory comparative results were obtained (correlation coefficient 0.98). The current output of the microbial electrode sensor was almost constant for more than three weeks and 2100 assays. A microbial electrode sensor using immobilized bacteria for methyl alcohol was also described.

  6. Wind-tunnel investigation of an armed mini remotely piloted vehicle. [conducted in Langley V/STOL tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, A. E., III

    1979-01-01

    A wind tunnel investigation of a full scale remotely piloted vehicle (RPV) armed with rocket launchers was conducted. The model had unacceptable longitudinal stability characteristics at negative angles of attack in the original design configuration. The addition of a pair of fins mounted in a V arrangement on the propeller shroud resulted in a configuration with acceptable longitudinal stability characteristics. The addition of wing mounted external stores to the modified configuration resulted in a slight reduction in the longitudinal stability. The lateral directional characteristics of the model were generally good, but the model had low directional stability at low angles of attack. Aerodynamic control power was very strong around all three axes.

  7. Lithium alloy negative electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huggins, Robert A.

    The 1996 announcement by Fuji Photo Film of the development of lithium batteries containing convertible metal oxides has caused a great deal of renewed interest in lithium alloys as alternative materials for use in the negative electrode of rechargeable lithium cells. The earlier work on lithium alloys, both at elevated and ambient temperatures is briefly reviewed. Basic principles relating thermodynamics, phase diagrams and electrochemical properties under near-equilibrium conditions are discussed, with the Li-Sn system as an example. Second-phase nucleation, and its hindrance under dynamic conditions plays an important role in determining deviations from equilibrium behavior. Two general types of composite microstructure electrodes, those with a mixed-conducting matrix, and those with a solid electrolyte matrix, are discussed. The Li-Sn-Si system at elevated temperatures, and the Li-Sn-Cd at ambient temperatures are shown to be examples of mixed-conducting matrix microstructures. The convertible oxides are an example of the solid electrolyte matrix type. Although the reversible capacity can be very large in this case, the first cycle irreversible capacity required to convert the oxides to alloys may be a significant handicap.

  8. Linear nanometric tunnel junction sensors with exchange pinned sensing layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leitao, D. C.; Silva, A. V.; Cardoso, S.; Ferreira, R.; Paz, E.; Deepack, F. L.; Freitas, P. P.

    2014-01-01

    Highly sensitive nanosensors with high spatial resolution provide the necessary features for high accuracy imaging of isolated magnetic nanoparticles. In this work, we report the fabrication and characterization of MgO-barrier magnetic tunnel junction nanosensors, with two exchange-pinned electrodes. The perpendicular magnetization configuration for field sensing is set using a two-step annealing process, where the second annealing temperature was optimized to yield patterned sensors responses with improved linearity. The optimized circular nanosensors show sensitivities up to 0.1%/Oe, larger than previously reported for nanometric sensors and comparable to micrometric spin-valves. Our strategy avoids the use of external permanent biasing or demagnetizing fields (large for smaller structures) to achieve a linear response, enabling the control of the linear operation range using only the stack and thus providing a small footprint device

  9. Linear nanometric tunnel junction sensors with exchange pinned sensing layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leitao, D. C., E-mail: dleitao@inesc-mn.pt; Silva, A. V.; Cardoso, S. [INESC-MN and IN, Rua Alves Redol 9, 1000-029 Lisboa (Portugal); Instituto Superior Técnico (IST), Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1000-029 Lisboa (Portugal); Ferreira, R.; Paz, E.; Deepack, F. L. [INL, Av. Mestre Jose Veiga, 4715-31 Braga (Portugal); Freitas, P. P. [INESC-MN and IN, Rua Alves Redol 9, 1000-029 Lisboa (Portugal); INL, Av. Mestre Jose Veiga, 4715-31 Braga (Portugal)

    2014-05-07

    Highly sensitive nanosensors with high spatial resolution provide the necessary features for high accuracy imaging of isolated magnetic nanoparticles. In this work, we report the fabrication and characterization of MgO-barrier magnetic tunnel junction nanosensors, with two exchange-pinned electrodes. The perpendicular magnetization configuration for field sensing is set using a two-step annealing process, where the second annealing temperature was optimized to yield patterned sensors responses with improved linearity. The optimized circular nanosensors show sensitivities up to 0.1%/Oe, larger than previously reported for nanometric sensors and comparable to micrometric spin-valves. Our strategy avoids the use of external permanent biasing or demagnetizing fields (large for smaller structures) to achieve a linear response, enabling the control of the linear operation range using only the stack and thus providing a small footprint device.

  10. A normal metal tunnel-junction heat diode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fornieri, Antonio, E-mail: antonio.fornieri@sns.it; Martínez-Pérez, María José; Giazotto, Francesco, E-mail: giazotto@sns.it [NEST, Istituto Nanoscienze-CNR and Scuola Normale Superiore, I-56127 Pisa (Italy)

    2014-05-05

    We propose a low-temperature thermal rectifier consisting of a chain of three tunnel-coupled normal metal electrodes. We show that a large heat rectification is achievable if the thermal symmetry of the structure is broken and the central island can release energy to the phonon bath. The performance of the device is theoretically analyzed and, under the appropriate conditions, temperature differences up to ∼200 mK between the forward and reverse thermal bias configurations are obtained below 1 K, corresponding to a rectification ratio R∼2000. The simplicity intrinsic to its design joined with the insensitivity to magnetic fields make our device potentially attractive as a fundamental building block in solid-state thermal nanocircuits and in general-purpose cryogenic electronic applications requiring energy management.

  11. Correlations of Platooning Track Test and Wind Tunnel Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lammert, Michael P. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Kelly, Kenneth J. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Yanowitz, Janet [Ecoengineering, Sharonville, OH (United States)

    2018-02-02

    In this report, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory analyzed results from multiple, independent truck platooning projects to compare and contrast track test results with wind tunnel test results conducted by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Some highlights from the report include compiled data, and results from four independent SAE J1321 full-size track test campaigns that were compared to LLNL wind tunnel testing results. All platooning scenarios tested demonstrated significant fuel savings with good correlation relative to following distances, but there are still unanswered questions and clear opportunities for system optimization. NOx emissions showed improvements from NREL tests in 2014 to Auburn tests in 2015 with respect to J1321 platooning track testing of Peloton system. NREL evaluated data from Volpe's Naturalistic Study of Truck Following Behavior, which showed minimal impact of naturalistic background platooning. We found significant correlation between multiple track studies, wind tunnel tests, and computational fluid dynamics, but also showed that there is more to learn regarding close formation and longer-distance effects. We also identified potential areas for further research and development, including development of advanced aerodynamic designs optimized for platooning, measurement of platoon system performance in traffic conditions, impact of vehicle lateral offsets on platooning performance, and characterization of the national potential for platooning based on fleet operational characteristics.

  12. Radial tunnel syndrome. Findings and treatment in 17 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Alberto Breglia

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Backround Radial tunnel syndrome is a condition secondary to the intermittent entrapment of the posterior interosseous nerve between superficial and deep mass of short supinator adjacent structures, such as vessels and fascias. The purpose of this study was to identify the anatomical structures that produce the eventual compression, to establish and communicate the differences in the subjective pain perception before and after the release of the posterior interosseous nerve in the radial tunnel. Method Between 2009 and 2014, 17 patients underwent surgical treatment by posterior interosseous nerve release. We used the approach between the first external radial and brachioradialis. Patients were assessed by visual analogue scale for pain intensity before surgery and at week 6, and according to the Roles and Maudsley functional criteria. Results The causes of posterior interosseous nerve compression were fibrous band of short supinator (arcade of Frohse (7 cases, recurrent vessels (4 cases, compression by the mass of the superficial portion of the short supinator muscle (2 cases and secondary compression by extensor carpi radialis brevis tendon (4 cases. Results were excellent (4 patients, good (10 patients and fair (3 patients. Patients treated through the Labor Risk Insurance had worse outcomes than those who were not covered by this system. Conclusions Radial tunnel syndrome is a condition that must be taken into account when there is refractory lateral epicondylalgia. This disease has a marked effect in patients with labor conflict, which may bias the outcome of treatment.

  13. Concrete Walls Crumble as Tunnel TI8 Breaks Through

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    On Wednesday, October 3rd, the excitement in the tunnels deep beneath CERN was high as an exuberant crowd watched the second and last transfer tunnel (TI8) from the SPS break through to the LHC. The Director-General with the Mayors of Meyrin and Prévessin at the breakthrough point. The area where the break through was to occur did not look particularly special, just a concrete wall with bright orange paint sprayed in the centre. But the austere surroundings quickly faded from importance as a tremendous ruckus filled the corridor. Just minutes later the first pieces of the wall started popping off. The suspense in the room grew and eventually the spinning drill became readily visible to the entire crowd.... and that's when the real noise started, the noise of applause! 'This is the second time I have seen this happen but it is always moving because it shows our steps forward.' said Prof. Luciano Maiani. Technicians, physicists, and engineers chatted excitedly as the tunnel team climbed through...

  14. Denervation of the lateral humeral epicondyle for treatment of chronic lateral epicondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Nicholas E; Forman, Scott K; Dellon, A Lee

    2013-02-01

    Chronic lateral epicondylitis remains a treatment challenge. Traditional surgical treatments for lateral epicondylitis involve variations of the classic Nirschl lateral release. Anatomic studies reveal that the posterior branch or branches of the posterior cutaneous nerve of the forearm consistently innervate the lateral humeral epicondyle. We undertook the present study to determine the effectiveness of denervation of the lateral humeral epicondyle in treating chronic lateral epicondylitis. An institutional review board-approved prospective study included 30 elbows in 26 patients. Inclusion criteria included failure to respond to nonoperative treatment for more than 6 months and improvement in grip strength and in visual analog pain scale after diagnostic nerve block of the posterior branches of the posterior cutaneous nerve of the forearm proximal to the lateral humeral epicondyle. We excluded patients who had undergone previous surgery for lateral epicondylitis. Outcome measures included visual analog pain scale and grip strength testing. Denervation surgery involved identification and transection of the posterior cutaneous nerve of the forearm branches with implantation into the triceps. The presence of radial tunnel syndrome was noted but did not affect inclusion criteria; if it was present, we did not correct it surgically. We used no postoperative splinting and permitted immediate return to activities of daily living. At a mean of 28 months of follow-up, the average visual analog scale score decreased from 7.9 to 1.9. Average grip strength with the elbow extended improved from 13 to 24 kg. A total of 80% of patients had good or excellent results, as defined by an improvement of 5 or more points on the visual analog scale for pain. Denervation of the lateral epicondyle was effective in relieving pain in 80% of patients with chronic lateral epicondylitis who had a positive response to a local anesthetic block of the posterior branches of the posterior

  15. Seismic scanning tunneling macroscope - Theory

    KAUST Repository

    Schuster, Gerard T.

    2012-09-01

    We propose a seismic scanning tunneling macroscope (SSTM) that can detect the presence of sub-wavelength scatterers in the near-field of either the source or the receivers. Analytic formulas for the time reverse mirror (TRM) profile associated with a single scatterer model show that the spatial resolution limit to be, unlike the Abbe limit of λ/2, independent of wavelength and linearly proportional to the source-scatterer separation as long as the point scatterer is in the near-field region; if the sub-wavelength scatterer is a spherical impedance discontinuity then the resolution will also be limited by the radius of the sphere. Therefore, superresolution imaging can be achieved as the scatterer approaches the source. This is analogous to an optical scanning tunneling microscope that has sub-wavelength resolution. Scaled to seismic frequencies, it is theoretically possible to extract 100 Hz information from 20 Hz data by imaging of near-field seismic energy.

  16. Single-contact tunneling thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksymovych, Petro

    2016-02-23

    A single-contact tunneling thermometry circuit includes a tunnel junction formed between two objects. Junction temperature gradient information is determined based on a mathematical relationship between a target alternating voltage applied across the junction and the junction temperature gradient. Total voltage measured across the junction indicates the magnitude of the target alternating voltage. A thermal gradient is induced across the junction. A reference thermovoltage is measured when zero alternating voltage is applied across the junction. An increasing alternating voltage is applied while measuring a thermovoltage component and a DC rectification voltage component created by the applied alternating voltage. The target alternating voltage is reached when the thermovoltage is nullified or doubled by the DC rectification voltage depending on the sign of the reference thermovoltage. Thermoelectric current and current measurements may be utilized in place of the thermovoltage and voltage measurements. The system may be automated with a feedback loop.

  17. Spin tunneling in magnetic molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kececioglu, Ersin

    In this thesis, we will focus on spin tunneling in a family of systems called magnetic molecules such as Fe8 and Mn12. This is comparatively new, in relation to other tunneling problems. Many issues are not completely solved and/or understood yet. The magnetic molecule Fe 8 has been observed to have a rich pattern of degeneracies in its magnetic spectrum. We focus on these degeneracies from several points of view. We start with the simplest anisotropy Hamiltonian to describe the Fe 8 molecule and extend our discussion to include higher order anisotropy terms. We give analytical expressions as much as we can, for the degeneracies in the semi-classical limit in both cases. We reintroduce jump instantons to the instanton formalism. Finally, we discuss the effect of the environment on the molecule. Our results, for all different models and techniques, agree well with both experimental and numerical results.

  18. Underwater piercing of a tunnel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solvik, O.

    1984-11-01

    Norwegian consultants and contractors have been confronted with the task of blasting a final penetrating passage that will open the way for the water in a reservoir to flow through the hydropower turbines. Norway has almost certainly led in this area because of its special topographical and geological conditions. The glacial activities have created a number of natural and very deep lakes forming cheap reservoirs. Piercings at depths up to about 100 m have been performed. Problems tend to increase with depth, but unsuccessful penetration can occur at any depth. Secondary effects to consider include the danger of slides when the water level is lowered, wave erosion along the lowered new shoreline, erosion at all streams and rivers flowing into the lake and groundwater erosion in the newly exposed dry shoreline. Methods of penetration can be roughly divided into two categories: penetration against the open tunnel shaft (open system); and penetration against the closed tunnel shaft (closed system). 6 figures.

  19. Seismic scanning tunneling macroscope - Theory

    KAUST Repository

    Schuster, Gerard T.; Hanafy, Sherif M.; Huang, Yunsong

    2012-01-01

    We propose a seismic scanning tunneling macroscope (SSTM) that can detect the presence of sub-wavelength scatterers in the near-field of either the source or the receivers. Analytic formulas for the time reverse mirror (TRM) profile associated with a single scatterer model show that the spatial resolution limit to be, unlike the Abbe limit of λ/2, independent of wavelength and linearly proportional to the source-scatterer separation as long as the point scatterer is in the near-field region; if the sub-wavelength scatterer is a spherical impedance discontinuity then the resolution will also be limited by the radius of the sphere. Therefore, superresolution imaging can be achieved as the scatterer approaches the source. This is analogous to an optical scanning tunneling microscope that has sub-wavelength resolution. Scaled to seismic frequencies, it is theoretically possible to extract 100 Hz information from 20 Hz data by imaging of near-field seismic energy.

  20. Tunneling of a coupled system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avishai, Y.

    1985-01-01

    We consider tunneling through a potential barrier V(x) in the presence of a coupling term W(x,y). Let H(y) be the internal Hamiltonian associated with the coordinate y and let E 0 (x) be the ground state energy of the operator H(x;y) = H(y) + W(x,y) in which x is a parameter. Our result for the tunneling probability (in the WKB approximation) is P = exp(2i ∫ k 0 (x)dx) where, at energy E, k 0 (x) = [E-E 0 (x)-V(x)]sup(1/2)/(h/2π) is the local wave number in the presence of coupling. (orig.)