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Sample records for electroconvulsive therapy predictors

  1. Electroconvulsive therapy: predictors and trends in utilization from 1976 to 2000

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk-Olsen, Trine; Laursen, Thomas Munk; Videbech, Poul

    2006-01-01

    with bipolar and schizoaffective disorders received the treatment in 2000 compared with 1976. CONCLUSIONS: Unipolar affective disorders, long duration of admissions, and no history of previous admissions are strong predictors of receiving first ECT. Despite a decrease in available inpatient beds, the treatment......BACKGROUND: Use of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) may have changed during the last decades due to advances in psychopharmacology and organizational changes of psychiatric care. OBJECTIVES: To identify predictors for receiving ECT for the first time and to describe temporal trends in ECT...... utilization. METHODS: A register-based case-control study. The sample included 2010 cases treated with ECT between 1976 and 2000 and 148,284 controls. RESULTS: Predictors for receiving first ECT were unipolar affective disorders, long admissions, and no previous admissions. Significantly fewer patients...

  2. Electroconvulsive therapy: predictors and trends in utilization from 1976 to 2000

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk-Olsen, Trine; Laursen, Thomas Munk; Videbech, Poul

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Use of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) may have changed during the last decades due to advances in psychopharmacology and organizational changes of psychiatric care. OBJECTIVES: To identify predictors for receiving ECT for the first time and to describe temporal trends in ECT...... utilization. METHODS: A register-based case-control study. The sample included 2010 cases treated with ECT between 1976 and 2000 and 148,284 controls. RESULTS: Predictors for receiving first ECT were unipolar affective disorders, long admissions, and no previous admissions. Significantly fewer patients...... with bipolar and schizoaffective disorders received the treatment in 2000 compared with 1976. CONCLUSIONS: Unipolar affective disorders, long duration of admissions, and no history of previous admissions are strong predictors of receiving first ECT. Despite a decrease in available inpatient beds, the treatment...

  3. Symptom predictors of response to electroconvulsive therapy in older patients with treatment-resistant depression

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    Tominaga K

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Keiichiro Tominaga¹, Mioto Okazaki¹, Hisashi Higuchi¹, Itaru Utagawa¹, Etsuko Nakamura², Noboru Yamaguchi¹¹Department of Neuropsychiatry, St Marianna University School of Medicine, Miyamae-ku, Kawasaki City, Kanagawa, ²Tsurukawa Sanatorium Hospital, Machida City, Tokyo, JapanBackground: Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT has been used for treatment-resistant depression. However, predictors of response to ECT have not been adequately studied using the Montgomery and Åsberg Depression Rating Scale, especially in older patients with treatment-resistant depression.Methods: This study included 18 Japanese patients who fulfilled the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders Fourth Edition Text Revision criteria for a diagnosis of major depressive disorder or bipolar disorder with a current major depressive episode, and met the definition of treatment-resistant depression outlined by Thase and Rush, scoring ≥21 on the Montgomery and Åsberg Depression Rating Scale. The three-factor model of the Montgomery and Åsberg Depression Rating Scale was used for analysis. Factor 1 was defined by three items, factor 2 by four items, and factor 3 by three items, representing dysphoria, retardation, and vegetative symptoms, respectively. ECT was performed twice a week for a total of six sessions using a Thymatron System IV device with the brief pulse technique. Clinical responses were defined on the basis of a ≥50% decrease in total pretreatment Montgomery and Åsberg Depression Rating Scale scores.Results: The mean pretreatment factor 2 score for responders (n = 7 was significantly lower than that for nonresponders (n = 11. Furthermore, a significant difference in mean factor 3 score between responders and nonresponders was observed one week after six sessions of ECT, indicating a time lag of response. No significant differences were observed for age, number of previous episodes, and duration of the current episode between responders and

  4. Electroconvulsive Therapy and Suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanney, Bryan L.

    1986-01-01

    When the effectiveness and mortality-morbidity of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) are compared with those of drug therapies, it appears that ECT is an effective and preferred treatment strategy. It remains underutilized as a modality of suicide prevention. Addresses controversies that presently limit the use of this treatment. (Author/ABB)

  5. Electroconvulsive therapy in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón-Fajardo, Humberto; Cervantes-Arriaga, Amin; Llorens-Arenas, Rodrigo; Ramírez-Bermudez, Jesús; Ruiz-Chow, Ángel; Rodríguez-Violante, Mayela

    2015-10-01

    Purpose To analyze the effectiveness of electroconvulsive therapy for the management of depression and/or psychosis refractory to drug therapy in patients with Parkinson disease.Methods A retrospective study was carried out including patients treated with electroconvulsive therapy during the period between 2002 and 2013. A review of the literature was performed.Results A total of 27 patients were included. In regards to the neuropsychiatric diagnosis, 14 patients had major depression, 12 patients had both psychosis and depression, and only one patient had isolated psychosis. The mean number of electroconvulsive therapy sessions was 12 ± 2.8. After electroconvulsive therapy, all patients showed a statistically significant improvement in the Brief Psychiatric Rating scale (reduction of 52% points) and Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (reduction of 50% points) independent of the presence of psychosis, depression or both.Conclusion Electroconvulsive therapy is effective for the treatment of refractory neuropsychiatric symptoms in Parkinson's disease.

  6. Electroconvulsive therapy and memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, R G; Wiens, A N

    1975-10-01

    Recent research on the effects of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) on memory is critically reviewed. Despite some inconsistent findings, unilateral nondominant ECT appears to affect verbal memory less than bilateral ECT. Adequate research on multiple monitored ECT is lacking. With few exceptions, the research methodologies for assessing memory have been inadequate. Many studies have confounded learning with retention, and only very recently has long term memory been adequately studied. Standardized assessment procedures for short term and long term memory are needed, in addition to more sophisticated assessment of memory processes, the duration of memory loss, and qualitative aspects of memories.

  7. Neuroimaging and electroconvulsive therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bolwig, Tom G

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Since the 1970s, a number of neuroimaging studies of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) have been conducted to elucidate the working action of this highly efficacious treatment modality. The technologies used are single photon emission tomography, positron emission tomography, magnetic...... in localized cortical and subcortical areas of the brain and have revealed differences in neurophysiology and metabolism between the hyperactive ictal state and the restorative interictal/postictal periods. Recent magnetic resonance imaging studies seem to pave way for new insights into ECT's effects...... on increased connectivity in the brain during depression. CONCLUSION: The existing data reveal considerable variations among studies and therefore do not yet allow the formulation of a unified hypothesis for the mechanism of ECT. The rapid developments in imaging technology, however, hold promises for further...

  8. How does electroconvulsive therapy work?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bolwig, Tom G

    2011-01-01

    This article reviews 3 current theories of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). One theory points to generalized seizures as essential for the therapeutic efficacy of ECT. Another theory highlights the normalization of neuroendocrine dysfunction in melancholic depression as a result of ECT. A third...... theory is based on recent findings of increased hippocampal neurogenesis and synaptogenesis in experimental animals given electroconvulsive seizures. Presently, the endocrine theory has the strongest foundation to explain the working mechanism of ECT....

  9. How does electroconvulsive therapy work?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bolwig, Tom G

    2011-01-01

    This article reviews 3 current theories of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). One theory points to generalized seizures as essential for the therapeutic efficacy of ECT. Another theory highlights the normalization of neuroendocrine dysfunction in melancholic depression as a result of ECT. A third t...... theory is based on recent findings of increased hippocampal neurogenesis and synaptogenesis in experimental animals given electroconvulsive seizures. Presently, the endocrine theory has the strongest foundation to explain the working mechanism of ECT....

  10. Predictors of Seizure Threshold in Right Unilateral Ultrabrief Electroconvulsive Therapy: Role of Concomitant Medications and Anaesthesia Used.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gálvez, Verònica; Hadzi-Pavlovic, Dusan; Smith, Deidre; Loo, Colleen K

    2015-01-01

    An individualized approach to maximize electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) efficacy and minimize cognitive side effects is to treat patients relative to their seizure threshold (ST). However, although Right Unilateral-Ultrabrief (0.3 ms) (RUL-UB) ECT is increasingly used in clinical settings as an effective form of ECT with minimal cognitive effects, there is sparse data regarding predictors of ST. To analyze the relationship between ST and clinical and demographic factors in a sample of patients treated with RUL-UB ECT. Clinical, demographic and ECT data from 179 patients in ECT research studies were examined. Seizure threshold was titrated at the first ECT session. ECT was performed with a Thymatron(®) or Mecta(®) device, with thiopentone (2.5-5 mg/kg) or propofol (1-2 mg/kg) anaesthesia. Medications taken at the time of ST titration were documented. The association between ST and candidate predictor variables was examined with regression analysis. Multiple regression analyses showed that 34% of the variance in ST (P < 0.001) could be predicted. Older age (R(2) = 0.194, P < 0.001), propofol (vs thiopentone) (R(2) = 0.029, P ≤ 0.01) and higher anaesthetic dose (mg in propofol equivalents) (R(2) = 0.029, P < 0.05) were found to be predictors of higher initial ST. Treatment with lithium (R(2) = 0.043, P < 0.01) and study site (R(2) = 0.019, P < 0.05) significantly predicted lower initial ST. Empirical titration is recommended for accurate determination of ST in patients receiving RUL-UB ECT. Novel findings of this study are that propofol anaesthesia resulted in higher ST than thiopentone and concomitant treatment with lithium treatment lowered ST. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Electroconvulsive Therapy: A Current Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gokben Hizli Sayar

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Most of the electroconvulsive therapy guidelines state that severe major depression with psychotic features, manic delirium, or catatonia are conditions where there is a clear consensus favoring early electroconvulsive therapy. The decision to administer electroconvulsive therapy is based on an evaluation of the risks and benefits for the individual patient and involves a combination of factors, including psychiatric diagnosis, type and severity of symptoms, prior treatment history and response, identification of possible alternative treatment options, and consumer preference. In this review history, mechanisms of action, side effects that have been referenced in the literature and clinical experience are discussed. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2014; 6(2.000: 107-125

  12. Electroconvulsive Therapy: A Comprehensive Assessment

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    Tayfun Zeren

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT is one of the most important discoveries of psychiatric treatments. This article comprehensively assesses historical progress, mechanism of actions, practical methods, indications, side effects, complications, drug interactions of ECT and attitudes towards ECT. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2003; 12(4.000: 340-377

  13. Electroconvulsive therapy for schizophrenia.

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    Tharyan, P; Adams, C E

    2005-04-18

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) involves the induction of a seizure for therapeutic purposes by the administration of a variable frequency electrical stimulus shock via electrodes applied to the scalp. The effects of its use in people with schizophrenia are unclear. To determine whether electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) results in clinically meaningful benefit with regard to global improvement, hospitalisation, changes in mental state, behaviour and functioning for people with schizophrenia, and to determine whether variations in the practical administration of ECT influences outcome. We undertook electronic searches of Biological Abstracts (1982-1996), EMBASE (1980-1996), MEDLINE (1966-2004), PsycLIT (1974-1996),SCISEARCH (1996) and the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group's Register (July 2004). We also inspected the references of all identified studies and contacted relevant authors. We included all randomised controlled clinical trials that compared ECT with placebo, 'sham ECT', non-pharmacological interventions and antipsychotics and different schedules and methods of administration of ECT for people with schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder or chronic mental disorder. Working independently, we selected and critically appraised studies, extracted data and analysed on an intention-to-treat basis. Where possible and appropriate we calculated risk ratios (RR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) with the number needed to treat (NNT). For continuous data Weighted Mean Differences (WMD) were calculated. We presented scale data for only those tools that had attained pre-specified levels of quality. We also undertook tests for heterogeneity and publication bias. This review includes 26 trials with 50 reports. When ECT is compared with placebo or sham ECT, more people improved in the real ECT group (n=392, 10 RCTs, RR 0.76 random CI 0.59 to 0.98, NNT 6 CI 4 to 12) and though data were heterogeneous (chi-square 17.49 df=9 P=0.04), its impact on variability of data was not

  14. Atrioventricular Dissociation after Electroconvulsive Therapy

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    Siegfried William Yu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT is increasingly used as a treatment for psychiatric disorders. Cardiac effects are the principal cause of medical complications in these patients. We report a case of atrioventricular (AV dissociation that occurred after ECT that was treated with pacemaker implantation. The mechanisms contributing to the onset of AV dissociation in this patient, and the management and rationale for device therapy, in light of the most recent guidelines, are reviewed.

  15. Predictors of Time to Relapse/Recurrence after Electroconvulsive Therapy in Patients with Major Depressive Disorder: A Population-Based Cohort Study

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    Axel Nordenskjöld

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim of the study is to define predictors of relapse/recurrence after electroconvulsive therapy, ECT, for patients with major depressive disorder. Methods. A study of all patients (n=486 treated by means of ECT for major depressive disorder was performed. The data were derived from a regional quality register in Sweden. Psychiatric hospitalisation or suicide was used as a marker for relapse/recurrence. Results. The relapse/recurrence rate within one year after ECT was 34%. Factors associated with increased risk of relapse/recurrence included comorbid substance dependence and treatment with benzodiazepines or antipsychotics during the follow-up period. Conclusions. Within the first years after ECT, relapses/recurrences leading to hospitalisation or suicide are common. Treatment with lithium might be beneficial, while benzodiazepines, antipsychotics, or continuation ECT does not seem to significantly reduce the risk of relapse/recurrence.

  16. Predicting Retrograde Autobiographical Memory Changes Following Electroconvulsive Therapy: Relationships between Individual, Treatment, and Early Clinical Factors.

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    Martin, Donel M; Gálvez, Verònica; Loo, Colleen K

    2015-06-19

    Loss of personal memories experienced prior to receiving electroconvulsive therapy is common and distressing and in some patients can persist for many months following treatment. Improved understanding of the relationships between individual patient factors, electroconvulsive therapy treatment factors, and clinical indicators measured early in the electroconvulsive therapy course may help clinicians minimize these side effects through better management of the electroconvulsive therapy treatment approach. In this study we examined the associations between the above factors for predicting retrograde autobiographical memory changes following electroconvulsive therapy. Seventy-four depressed participants with major depressive disorder were administered electroconvulsive therapy 3 times per week using either a right unilateral or bitemporal electrode placement and brief or ultrabrief pulse width. Verbal fluency and retrograde autobiographical memory (assessed using the Columbia Autobiographical Memory Interview - Short Form) were tested at baseline and after the last electroconvulsive therapy treatment. Time to reorientation was measured immediately following the third and sixth electroconvulsive therapy treatments. Results confirmed the utility of measuring time to reorientation early during the electroconvulsive therapy treatment course as a predictor of greater retrograde amnesia and the importance of assessing baseline cognitive status for identifying patients at greater risk for developing later side effects. With increased number of electroconvulsive therapy treatments, older age was associated with increased time to reorientation. Consistency of verbal fluency performance was moderately correlated with change in Columbia Autobiographical Memory Interview - Short Form scores following right unilateral electroconvulsive therapy. Electroconvulsive therapy treatment techniques associated with lesser cognitive side effects should be particularly considered for

  17. Nonconvulsive status epilepticus after electroconvulsive therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Povlsen, Uffe Juul; Wildschiødtz, Gordon; Høgenhaven, Hans

    2003-01-01

    SUMMARY: We describe three cases of nonconvulsive status epilepticus induced by electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). Nonconvulsive status epilepticus is an important differential diagnosis in patients who develop prolonged confusion after ECT. The present cases exemplify the difficulty in defining...

  18. Predictors of the short-term responder rate of Electroconvulsive therapy in depressive disorders - a population based study

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    Nordenskjöld Axel

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of the present study is to investigate the responder rate of Electroconvulsive therapy, ECT, in clinical routine work and to define clinical characteristics predictive of response to ECT. The main hypothesis is that the responder rate of ECT might be lower in clinical routine than in controlled trials. Methods This is a population-based study of all patients (N = 990 treated with ECT for depressive disorders, between 2008–2010 in eight hospitals in Sweden. Patients with Clinical Global Impression-Improvement scores of 1 or 2 (much improved within one week after ECT were considered responders to ECT. The predictive values of single clinical variables were tested by means of chi-squared tests and the relative importance was tested in a logistic regression analysis. Results The responder rate was 80.1%. A higher proportion of older patients (>50 years responded (84.3% vs. 74.2%, p  Conclusions This study focuses exclusively on the short term responder rate with ECT in clinical practice. Similarly to results from controlled trials a high responder rate is reported. Older patients, more severely ill patients, psychotically ill patients and patients without personality disorders had the highest responder rates. Inpatients may have better outcome with ECT than outpatients.

  19. Medication management during electroconvulsant therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zolezzi M

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Monica Zolezzi Clinical Pharmacy and Practice, College of Pharmacy, Qatar University, Doha, Qatar Abstract: Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT has demonstrated to be highly effective and safe, even life saving for many psychiatric disorders such as major depression, bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. Most patients who require ECT are also on concurrent pharmacotherapy. As such, the objective of this article is to provide a review of the most recent literature focusing on the medications used during an ECT procedure and on the effects of concurrent psychiatric and non-psychiatric medications on the effectiveness and safety of ECT. The review also attempts to summarize the recommendations derived from existing documents to guide pharmacotherapy decisions for patients undergoing ECT. For this purpose, using electronic databases, an extensive search of the current literature was made using ECT and medications or drug classes as keywords. Keywords: ECT, medications, drug interactions

  20. [Clinical analysis of safety and effectiveness of electroconvulsive therapy].

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    Dabrowski, Marek; Parnowski, Tadeusz

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess efficacy and safety of electroconvulsive therapy. 43 patients included into the study were hospitalised in The Institute of Psychiatry and Neurology and received all together over 400 bilateral electroconvulsive procedures. Most of the patients (N = 25) were qualified for electroconvulsive therapy due to treatment resistant depression (58.1%). Six patients: 2 with catatonia and 4 with depression had life saving indications for electroconvulsive therapy. Three patients (7%) were excluded from electroconvulsive therapy, following 1 or 2 electroconvulsive procedures. Forty patients continued electroconvulsive therapy. There were no complications and serious adverse events in patients who continued electroconvulsive therapy. Generally, electroconvulsive therapy was well tolerated and treatment had been cut down in only one case due to adverse events and high risk related to the procedure. Transient cardiac arrhythmias (10% of patients) were the most often occurring adverse events and patients (35%) mostly reported headaches. We observed remission in 22 patients (58%) and improvement in 14 patients (35%) following electroconvulsive treatment. Only 4 patients (10%) had no benefit after a series of electroconvulsive procedures. Electroconvulsive treatment was most effective in patients with catatonia (80% patients had full recovery) and in depressive patients with bipolar disorder (73% patients had full recovery). Electroconvulsive procedures were safe and effective. Electroconvulsive treatment was most effective in catatonic patients with schizophrenia and in depressive patients with bipolar disorder.

  1. 21 CFR 882.5940 - Electroconvulsive therapy device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Electroconvulsive therapy device. 882.5940 Section 882.5940 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Electroconvulsive therapy device. (a) Identification. An electroconvulsive therapy device is a device used for...

  2. Anesthetic considerations for pediatric electroconvulsive therapy.

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    Franklin, Andrew D; Sobey, Jenna H; Stickles, Eric T

    2017-05-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy is being used more frequently in the treatment of many chronic and acute psychiatric illnesses in children. The most common psychiatric indications for pediatric electroconvulsive therapy are refractory depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, catatonia, and autism. In addition, a relatively new indication is the treatment of pediatric refractory status epilepticus. The anesthesiologist may be called upon to assist in the care of this challenging and vulnerable patient population. Unique factors for pediatric electroconvulsive therapy include the potential need for preoperative anxiolytic and inhalational induction of anesthesia, which must be weighed against the detrimental effects of anesthetic agents on the evoked seizure quality required for a successful treatment. Dexmedetomidine is likely the most appropriate preoperative anxiolytic as oral benzodiazepines are relatively contraindicated. Methohexital, though becoming less available at many institutions, remains the gold standard for induction of anesthesia for pediatric electroconvulsive therapy though ketamine, propofol, and sevoflurane are becoming increasingly viable options. Proper planning and communication between the multidisciplinary teams involved in the care of children presenting for electroconvulsive therapy treatments is vital to mitigating risks and achieving the greatest therapeutic benefit. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Electroconvulsive therapy practice in Ukraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olekseev, Aleksey; Ungvari, Gabor S; Gazdag, Gábor

    2014-09-01

    Patterns of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) use have recently been extensively surveyed in Central-Eastern Europe. However, data from post-USSR countries are limited. This study aimed to survey ECT practice in Ukraine. All psychiatric services in Ukraine were identified and contacted to obtain information on the use of ECT in 2011 using a 22-item questionnaire. Of the 146 psychiatric inpatient facilities, only 5 confirmed that they performed ECT in 2011. Three other services also performed ECT but refused to provide further information. In the only private psychiatric institute where ECT was offered, 14.28% of inpatients received this treatment in 2011, whereas the corresponding figure in the 6 public psychiatric facilities was a mere 0.4%. Three centers used unmodified ECT, and only 2 centers had equipment that monitored electroencephalogram. In 7 services, in line with international recommendations, affective disorders were the first indications for ECT in Ukraine, whereas uncommon indications such as anorexia or Parkinsonism were also reported. This was the first survey of ECT practice conducted in Ukraine. The provision of ECT in only 8 centers is clearly insufficient for a large country such as Ukraine, which is reflected in the low rate of inpatients treated with ECT. The very limited availability of this effective treatment modality should be addressed by the Ukrainian health authorities.

  4. [Electroconvulsive therapy in nonconsenting patients].

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    Besse, M; Methfessel, I; Wiltfang, J; Zilles, D

    2017-01-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is a potent and successful method for the treatment of severe psychiatric disorders. Severe depressive and psychotic disorders may lead to legal incapacity and inability to consent. In Germany, administration of ECT against the patient's will is feasible under certain constellations and is regulated under the terms of the guardianship law. This article outlines the prevalence, effectiveness and tolerability of ECT when applied in nonconsenting patients. Case report and literature review. The literature on ECT as a treatment in nonconsenting patients is relatively sparse. In 2008 the prevalence in Germany was less than 0.5 % of all patients receiving ECT. Case reports and case series suggest a good and equal level of effectiveness when compared to consenting patients. In the course of treatment the majority of patients consented to receive further ECT and retrospectively judged ECT as helpful. The use of ECT is a highly effective treatment in severe psychiatric disorders even when administered as treatment in nonconsenting patients. It can be lifesaving and lead to a rapid improvement of symptoms and relief from severe suffering also from the patients' perspective. Thus, it seems unethical not to consider ECT as a treatment against the nonautonomous will of legally incompetent patients in individual cases. Nevertheless, physicians should always seek to obtain the patients' consent as soon as possible for both legal and ethical reasons.

  5. Electroconvulsive therapy and nursing care.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kavanagh, Adam

    2011-04-27

    Modified electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is a controlled medical procedure in which a seizure is induced in an anaesthetized patient to produce a therapeutic effect. ECT is the most acutely effective treatment available for affective disorders and is more effective than antidepressant drugs. Although in use for 70 years, ECT continues to attract controversy and there is considerable stigma associated with its use that often overshadows the empirical evidence for its effectiveness. One way to overcome this is for health professionals to be educated about contemporary ECT practice. Patients need to make informed decisions when consenting to ECT and this process can be influenced by preconceived ideas and scientific fact. It is, therefore, essential that nurses possess sufficient information to help patients make rational and informed treatment decisions and be able to care for both the clinical and psychological needs of patients treated with ECT. This review outlines the nursing role in ECT and summarizes the main aspects of contemporary ECT practice relevant to general and psychiatric nursing practice.

  6. Electroconvulsive Therapy Intervention for Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narang, Puneet; Glowacki, Anna; Lippmann, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy is an established means to improve function in a variety of psychiatric and neurologic conditions, particularly for patients who remain treatment-refractory. Parkinson's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder that sometimes does not respond well to conventional pharmacotherapies. Reports have indicated that electroconvulsive therapy may be an effective and safe treatment for those patients with Parkinson's disease who are not optimally responding to first-line treatments. Despite these reports, however, electroconvulsive therapy is not often used by clinicians in patients with treatment-resistant Parkinson's disease, perhaps due to stigma, lack of knowledge regarding its safety and efficacy, and/or inability to predict the duration of therapeutic benefit. Our objective was to determine if the available literature on ECT supports it as a safe and effective treatment option in patients with treatment-refractory Parkinson's disease. Motoric improvement induced by electroconvulsive therapy has been documented for decades in persons with Parkinson's disease. Efficacy and safety are reported following electroconvulsive therapy in people with Parkinson's disease who have sub-optimal response to medicines or experience the "on/off" phenomenon to L-dopa. Electroconvulsive therapy is an effective option for acute and maintenance treatment of Parkinson's disease in select patients. Inability to predict how long the beneficial effects of ECT therapy will last in patients with Parkinson's disease may be a reason why this treatment is underutilized by clinicians. More research is warranted to clarify parameters for application and duration of therapeutic benefit in individuals with difficult-to-treat Parkinson's disease.

  7. Electroconvulsive Therapy Practice in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Mark Wilkinson; Morrison, John; Jones, Paul Anthony

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the contemporary practice of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in New Zealand. A 53-item questionnaire was sent to all services providing ECT as of December 2015. Electroconvulsive therapy was provided by 16 services covering 15 district health boards funded by the New Zealand government. No private facilities provided ECT. All services providing ECT responded to an online survey questionnaire. Rates of ECT utilization were low relative to similar countries. Survey results indicated ECT was practiced to an overall good standard. Several resource and logistical issues potentially contributing to low ECT utilization were identified. Electroconvulsive therapy in New Zealand is provided using modern equipment and practices. However, overall rates of utilization remain low, perhaps as a result of controversy surrounding ECT and some resourcing issues.

  8. Is electroconvulsive therapy during pregnancy safe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Cornejo, Magdalena; Zamorano-Levi, Natalia; Jeria, Álvaro

    2016-12-07

    Therapeutic options for psychiatric conditions are limited during pregnancy because many drugs are restricted or contraindicated. Electroconvulsive therapy constitutes an alternative, however there is controversy over its safety. Using the Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by searching multiple databases, we found five systematic reviews, including 81 studies overall describing case series or individual cases. Data were extracted from the identified reviews and summary tables of the results were prepared using the GRADE method. We concluded it is not clear what are the risks associated with electroconvulsive therapy during pregnancy because the certainty of the existing evidence is very low. Likewise, existing systematic reviews and international clinical guidelines differ in their conclusions and recommendations.

  9. Protocolized hyperventilation enhances electroconvulsive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Arriba-Arnau, Aida; Dalmau, Antonia; Soria, Virginia; Salvat-Pujol, Neus; Ribes, Carmina; Sánchez-Allueva, Ana; Menchón, José Manuel; Urretavizcaya, Mikel

    2017-08-01

    Hyperventilation is recommended in electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) to enhance seizures and to increase patients' safety. However, more evidence is needed regarding its effects and the optimum method of application. This prospective study involving 21 subjects compared two procedures, protocolized hyperventilation (PHV) and hyperventilation as usual (HVau), applied to the same patient in two consecutive sessions. Transcutaneous partial pressure of carbon dioxide (TcPCO 2 ) was measured throughout all sessions. Ventilation parameters, hemodynamic measures, seizure characteristics, and side effects were also explored. PHV resulted in lower TcPCO 2 after hyperventilation (p=.008) and over the whole session (p=.035). The lowest TcPCO 2 was achieved after voluntary hyperventilation. Changes in TcPCO 2 from baseline showed differences between HVau and PHV at each session time-point (all p<.05). Between- and within-subjects factors were statistically significant in a general linear model. Seizure duration was greater in PHV sessions (p=.028), without differences in other seizure quality parameters or adverse effects. Correlations were found between hypocapnia induction and seizure quality indexes. Secondary outcomes could be underpowered. PHV produces hypocapnia before the stimulus, modifies patients' TcPCO 2 values throughout the ECT session and lengthens seizure duration. Voluntary hyperventilation is the most important part of the PHV procedure with respect to achieving hypocapnia. A specific ventilation approach, CO 2 quantification and monitoring may be advisable in ECT. PHV is easy to apply in daily clinical practice and does not imply added costs. Ventilation management has promising effects in terms of optimizing ECT technique. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Electroconvulsive therapy after maxillofacial metallic implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, G Mark; Perry, Matthew T; Manatt, George S; Cristancho, Pilar

    2014-03-01

    A growing body of literature suggests that electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) can be safely utilized in patients with craniofacial metallic implants. Here we provide radiographic images and the clinical course of a 49-year-old woman with both maxillary and mandibular metallic implants who safely received ECT.

  11. Beta-Blocking Agents and Electroconvulsive Therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.W. van den Broek (Walter); T.H.N. Groenland (Theo); A. Kusuma (Ari); T.K. Birkenhäger (Tom); E.M. Pluijms (Esther); J.A. Bruijn (Jan); P.G.H. Mulder (Paul)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractIn this review we want to summarize the results of the placebo-controlled randomized clinical trials with betablocking adrenergic agents during electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), and review the effect on seizure duration and cardiovascular variables. We searched for studies in the

  12. Electroconvulsive therapy and its different indications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghai, Thomas C.; Möller, Hans-Jürgen

    2008-01-01

    In spite of recent developments in the pharmacotherapy of depressive disorders, the delay until clinical improvement can be achieved, and the considerable rate of nonresponse and nonremission, are major problems which remain unresolved. Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is a nonpharmacoloqic bioloqical treatment which has been proven to be a highly effective treatment option, predominantly for depression, but also for schizophrenia and other indications. Though there is a lack of controlled investigations on long-term treatments, ECT can also be used for relapse prevention during maintenance therapies. The safety and tolerabitity of electroconvulsive treatment have been enhanced by the use of modified stimulation techniques and by progress in modern anesthesia. Thus, today a safe treatment can also be offered to patients with higher somatic risks, ECT still represents an important option, especially in the therapy of treatmentresistant psychiatric disorders after medication treatment failures. Earlier consideration of ECT may reduce the rate of chronic and difficult-to-treat psychiatric disorders. PMID:18472488

  13. Improvement of cycloid psychosis following electroconvulsive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Jonas; Brus, Ole; Båve, Ullvi; Landen, Mikael; Lundberg, Johan; Nordanskog, Pia; von Knorring, Lars; Nordenskjöld, Axel

    2017-08-01

    The treatment of choice for cycloid psychosis has traditionally been electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), but there is a lack of studies on its effectiveness. The primary aim of this register study was to determine the rates of remission and response after ECT for cycloid psychosis. The secondary aim was to examine possible predictors of outcome. Data were obtained from the National Quality Register for ECT in Sweden. The study population was patients (n = 42) who received ECT for acute polymorphic psychotic disorder without symptoms of schizophrenia or for cycloid psychosis between 2011-2015 in 13 hospitals. Remission and response rates were calculated using Clinical Global Impression-Severity (CGI-S) and -Improvement scores, respectively. Variables with possible predictive value were tested using Chi-square and Fisher's exact test. The response rate was 90.5%. The remission rate was 45.2%. Of 42 patients, 40 improved their CGI-S score after ECT (p < 0.001). The mean number of ECT treatments was 2.5 for non-responders and 7.0 for responders (p = 0.010). The mean number of ECT treatments did not differ significantly between remitters and non-remitters (7.2 vs 6.1, p = 0.31). None of the other investigated potential predictors was statistically significantly associated with outcome. ECT is an effective treatment for cycloid psychosis. Future studies need to compare the outcome of ECT to that of other treatment strategies. The high response rate with ECT indicates that cycloid psychosis is a clinically useful diagnosis.

  14. The practice of electroconvulsive therapy in Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaliora, Styliani C; Braga, Raphael J; Petrides, Georgios; Chatzimanolis, John; Papadimitriou, George N; Zervas, Iannis M

    2013-09-01

    To describe the practice of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in Greece. A survey was conducted during the academic year 2008-2009. Electroconvulsive therapy use was investigated for 2007. All civilian institutions providing inpatient care were included. Centers that provided ECT completed a 57-item questionnaire. Centers that did not offer ECT completed a 13-item questionnaire. Fifty-five (82.1%) of 67 institutions responded. Electroconvulsive therapy was offered in 18 hospitals. Only 2 of 10 university hospitals offered ECT. Overall, 137 patients were treated with 1271 sessions in 2007. Only 1.47% discontinued treatment owing to adverse events. There were no deaths. Schizophrenia was the most common diagnosis (41.3%) among those receiving ECT, followed by major depression (28.9%), bipolar depression (9.1%), catatonia (4.1%), suicidal ideation (3.3%), and schizoaffective disorder (2.5%). Physicians considered major depression (93.8%), catatonia (86.5%), schizophrenia (56.3%), and mania (50%) the most appropriate indications. Written informed consent was required in 77.8% of the institutions, whereas the rest required verbal consent. Bilateral ECT was the preferred electrode placement (88.9%). Modified ECT was used exclusively. Propofol was the preferred anesthetic (44.4%), followed by thiopental (38.9%). Seven (38.9%) of 18 hospitals used a fixed stimulus dose at first treatment. Five (27.8%) of 18 hospitals used the half-age method. Continuation/maintenance ECT was used in 33.3% of the hospitals. Outpatient ECT was seldom used. Lack of training, difficult access to anesthesiology, billing issues, and stigma were cited as the main impediments to the practice of ECT. Electroconvulsive therapy is practiced in moderate numbers in Greece and almost exclusively on an inpatient basis. Lack of training and lack of availability of anesthesiologists were cited as the most common obstacles to providing ECT.

  15. Concurrent Electroconvulsive Therapy and Bupropion Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takala, Christopher R; Leung, Jonathan G; Murphy, Lauren L; Geske, Jennifer R; Palmer, Brian A

    2017-09-01

    Bupropion is associated with a dose-dependent increased risk of seizures. Use of concomitant bupropion and electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) remains controversial because of an increased risk of prolonged seizures. This is the first systematic evaluation of the effect of bupropion on ECT. A case group (n = 119), patients treated with concomitant ECT and bupropion, was compared with an age and gender frequency-matched control group (n = 261), treated with only ECT. Electroconvulsive therapy treatment data including seizure length, number of treatments, and concurrent medications were extracted. Longitudinal mixed models examined ECT versus ECT + bupropion group differences over the course of treatments measured by seizure duration (electroencephalogram [EEG] and motor). Multivariable models examined the total number of treatments and first and last seizure duration. All models considered group differences with ECT treatment measures adjusted for age, gender, benzodiazepine treatment, lead placement, and setting. Electroconvulsive therapy treatment with bupropion led to shorter motor seizure duration (0.047) and EEG seizure duration (P = 0.001). The number of ECT treatments (7.3 vs 7.0 treatments; P = 0.23), respectively, or the probability of a prolonged seizure (P = 0.15) was not significantly different. Benzodiazepine use was significantly more common in control subjects (P = 0.01). This is a retrospective analysis limited in part by unavailable variables (seizure threshold, nature of EEG and motor seizure monitoring, type of ECT device, dosing and formulation of bupropion, and duration of the current depressive illness). This study revealed a significantly shorter duration in seizure length with ECT + concomitant bupropion, but not in the number of required treatments in those treated compared with ECT without bupropion. There remains a critical need to reevaluate the efficacy of concomitant use of psychotropic medications + ECT.

  16. Neurally mediated syncope in electroconvulsive therapy maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbaizar, Beatriz; Llorca, Javier

    2012-03-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is especially necessary to revert some types of depressive disease; nevertheless, it has some widely recognized adverse effects, such as short-term memory loss. Moreover, some articles have reported its potential association with falls; this literature is, however, scanty and mainly consists of case reports. We present the case of a man who has a diagnosis of neurally mediated syncope at the age of 79 years, during the maintenance ECT. The patient had a significant increase in syncope frequency in the period he was treated with ECT, followed by a dramatic decrease when ECT was discontinued.

  17. Somatic symptom disorder treated with electroconvulsive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisovskaya, Anna; Augsburger, Jay Alan

    2017-05-01

    Somatic symptom disorder (SSD) is a challenging condition to treat with chronic pain, a common and disabling symptom. We present a patient who received electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) for SSD with significant improvement in pain and gastrointestinal symptoms. We also present a brief literature review of similar cases treated with ECT. Preliminary evidence suggests that ECT should be considered for treatment of SSD comorbid with major depressive disorder, when standard treatments fail. Further research is needed to clarify whether ECT can be used for SSD without associated depression.

  18. Prediction of electroconvulsive therapy response and remission in major depression: Meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Diermen, L. (Linda); Van Den Ameele, S. (Seline); A.M. Kamperman (Astrid); Sabbe, B.C.G. (Bernard C.G.); Vermeulen, T. (Tom); Schrijvers, D. (Didier); T.K. Birkenhäger (Tom)

    2018-01-01

    textabstractElectroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is considered to be the most effective treatment in severe major depression. The identification of reliable predictors of ECT response could contribute to a more targeted patient selection and consequently increased ECT response rates. Aims To investigate

  19. Pregnancy and Electroconvulsive Therapy: A Multidisciplinary Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray-Griffith, Shona L; Coker, Jessica L; Rabie, Nader; Eads, Lou Ann; Golden, Kimberly J; Stowe, Zachary N

    2016-06-01

    To scrutinize a series of pregnant women treated with electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) at a tertiary treatment center and combine these data with a literature review to refine the treatment guidelines for ECT during pregnancy. A retrospective chart review of mentally ill pregnant patients treated with ECT since the establishment of a formal women's mental health program. A total of 8 pregnant women treated with ECT were identified from January 2012 to August 2014. Information was extracted from the medical records of a total of 30 ECT treatments across this group. Subjects received an average of 3.75 ECT treatments (range, 1-7). All women were diagnosed as having a mood disorder (either unipolar or bipolar), and 5 of the 8 women had suicidal ideation. The treatment team for ECT was consistent across all treatments. Two women experienced significant complications after the initial treatment: 1) an acute episode of complete heart block; and 2) acute onset of mania after ECT. Obstetrical complications included 2 women with preterm delivery-one secondary to premature rupture of membranes. No other complications or adverse outcomes were recorded. The 5 women with suicidal ideation had symptom resolution, and significant symptom improvement was noted in 6 of the 8 women. Electroconvulsive therapy is a safe and effective treatment during pregnancy and of particular benefit in the acute treatment of suicidal ideation.

  20. Retrograde amnesia after electroconvulsive therapy: a temporary effect?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meeter, M.; Murre, J.M.J.; Janssen, S.M.J.; Birkenhager, T.; van den Broek, W.W.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Although electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is generally considered effective against depression, it remains controversial because of its association with retrograde memory loss. Here, we assessed memory after ECT in circumstances most likely to yield strong retrograde amnesia. Method: A

  1. Electroconvulsive therapy: Promoting awareness among primary care physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicher, Sarah; Gedzior, Joanna

    2016-04-01

    This article aims to promote awareness among primary care providers and support electroconvulsive therapy as a generally well-tolerated, effective therapeutic modality to treat specific psychiatric conditions in appropriately selected patients. There seem to be several potential barriers to treatment with electroconvulsive therapy including stigma, lack of providers who preform it, and lack of awareness among providers referring patients who may be appropriate candidates. The article provides a brief overview of electroconvulsive therapy principles and topics and includes a case report to illustrate clinical utility. The article proposes the concept that a potential way to overcome barriers to treatment with electroconvulsive therapy may be to promote education and awareness of it as a viable treatment modality among primary care providers. © The Author(s) 2016.

  2. Pre-treatment amygdala volume predicts electroconvulsive therapy response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Doesschate, Freek; van Eijndhoven, Philip; Tendolkar, Indira; van Wingen, Guido A.; van Waarde, Jeroen A.

    2014-01-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is an effective treatment for patients with severe depression. Knowledge on factors predicting therapeutic response may help to identify patients who will benefit most from the intervention. Based on the neuroplasticity hypothesis, volumes of the amygdala and

  3. Aminophylline increases seizure length during electroconvulsive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, L; Dannon, P N; Hirschmann, S; Schriber, S; Amytal, D; Dolberg, O T; Grunhaus, L

    1999-12-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is considered to be one of the most effective treatments for patients with major depression and persistent psychosis. Seizure characteristics probably determine the therapeutic effect of ECT; as a consequence, short seizures are accepted as one of the factors of poor outcome. During most ECT courses seizure threshold increases and seizure duration decreases. Methylxanthine preparations, caffeine, and theophylline have been used to prolong seizure duration. The use of aminophylline, more readily available than caffeine, has not been well documented. The objective of this study was to test the effects of aminophylline on seizure length. Fourteen drug-free patients with diagnoses of affective disorder or psychotic episode receiving ECT participated in this study. Seizure length was assessed clinically and per EEG. Statistical comparisons were done using paired t tests. A significant increase (p < 0.04) in seizure length was achieved and maintained on three subsequent treatments with aminophylline. No adverse events were noted from the addition of aminophylline.

  4. The origins of electroconvulsive therapy in denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kragh, Jesper Vaczy

    2009-12-01

    In recent years, the history of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) has received renewed attention from historical researchers, who have published thorough monographs and articles on the subject of ECT. In these studies, however, one of the important events in the history of ECT has been overlooked: the lectures by Cerletti and Bini at the Third International Neurological Congress in Copenhagen. The lectures at the congress were the first presentation of ECT before a large international audience and became the impetus to the first Danish ECT trials. The first part of this article outlines the events of the neurological congress in 1939 and provides a translation of the paper presented by Bini at the congress. In the last part of the article, the history of ECT in Denmark is summarized.

  5. Pharmacogenetics in electroconvulsive therapy and adjunctive medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzakhani, Hooman; van Noorden, Martijn S; Swen, Jesse; Nozari, Ala; Guchelaar, Henk-Jan

    2015-01-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) has shown apparent efficacy in treatment of patients with depression and other mental illnesses who do not respond to psychotropic medications or need urgent control of their symptoms. Pharmacogenetics contributes to an individual's sensitivity and response to a variety of drugs. Clinical insights into pharmacogenetics of ECT and adjunctive medications not only improves its safety and efficacy in the indicated patients, but can also lead to the identification of novel treatments in psychiatric disorders through understanding of potential molecular and biological mechanisms involved. In this review, we explore the indications of pharmacogenetics role in safety and efficacy of ECT and present the evidence for its role in patients with psychiatric disorders undergoing ECT.

  6. Death by suicide long after electroconvulsive therapy. Is the sense of coherence test of Antonovsky a predictor of mortality from depression?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Erik Berg

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Prediction of increased risk of suicide is difficult. We had the opportunity to follow up 20 patients receiving electroconvulsive therapy (ECT because of severe depression. They filled in the Antonovsky sense of coherence test (SOC and Beck depression inventory (BDI before and after a series of ECT treatments. Seventeen surviving patients had a mean observation time of 20.6 months, whereas the three deceased patients had 11.3 months. There was a lower mean age at onset of illness and a longer mean duration of disease in the deceased. Other clinical parameters did not differ. The surviving patients had a significant decrease on the BDI from 35 to 18 (P less than 0.001 and an increase on the SOC test after ECT from 2.45 to 3.19 (P less than 0.001, indicating both less depression and better functioning in life. The deceased had a larger change on the BDI from 32 to 13, not attaining significance because of the low number of deceased. The SOC test, however, did not increase to a purported normal level; that is, from 2.43 to 2.87. Although the SOC scale has been shown to predict mortality in substance abusers, the SOC test has not been part of earlier reviews of predictive power. Tentatively, a low pathological score on the SOC test may indicate low sense of coherence in life that might increase the propensity for suicide. These preliminary results need replication in larger studies.

  7. Transient Serotonin Toxicity Evoked by Combination of Electroconvulsive Therapy and Fluoxetine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René Klysner

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The serotonin syndrome has been described only in rare instances for electroconvulsive therapy combined with an antidepressant medication. We describe a case of serotonin toxicity induced by electroconvulsive therapy in combination with fluoxetine.

  8. Transient Serotonin Toxicity Evoked by Combination of Electroconvulsive Therapy and Fluoxetine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klysner, René; Bjerg Bendsen, Birgitte; Hansen, Maja Soon

    2014-01-01

    The serotonin syndrome has been described only in rare instances for electroconvulsive therapy combined with an antidepressant medication. We describe a case of serotonin toxicity induced by electroconvulsive therapy in combination with fluoxetine.......The serotonin syndrome has been described only in rare instances for electroconvulsive therapy combined with an antidepressant medication. We describe a case of serotonin toxicity induced by electroconvulsive therapy in combination with fluoxetine....

  9. Pulseless electrical activity during electroconvulsive therapy: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalava Arun

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Arrhythmias resulting in cardiac arrest during electroconvulsive therapy have been reported. Most reported cases of cardiac arrest had asystole as the initial rhythm. Pulseless electrical activity as an initial rhythm of cardiac arrest during electroconvulsive therapy has never been reported. Also, thromboembolism after inflation of pneumatic tourniquet during lower limb surgery has been reported but never following tourniquet inflation during an electroconvulsive therapy. Case presentation We report a case involving an 81- year- old female who presented to us for an electroconvulsive therapy for severe depression and developed pulseless electrical activity immediately after electroconvulsive therapy. She was successfully resuscitated and was later found to have bilateral pulmonary emboli with a complete occlusion of the right lower lobe pulmonary artery. The source of embolus was from her left lower extremity deep venous thrombus, which we believe, got dislodged intraoperatively after inflation of pneumatic tourniquet. Our patient not only survived the massive pulmonary embolus, but also showed significant improvement in her mental status compared to her pre-admission level at the time of discharge to a sub-acute rehabilitation centre. Conclusion We recommend that patients who are elderly and at high risk of thromboembolism should selectively undergo a preoperative doppler ultrasound for deep venous thrombosis. Also, selective application of tourniquet in the upper limb, to monitor for seizure activity, would reduce the incidence of pulmonary thrombo-embolism as embolic events are significantly less from deep venous thromboses of upper extremities when compared to lower extremities.

  10. Electroconvulsive therapy's mechanism of action: neuroendocrine hypotheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haskett, Roger F

    2014-06-01

    Despite a range of etiological theories since the introduction of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) more than 75 years ago, its mechanism of action remains poorly understood. The neuroendocrine hypothesis is based on the seizure-related release of hypothalamic hormones into the blood and cerebrospinal fluid and evidence of endocrine dysfunction in many patients with severe mood disorder. The specific effect of ECT was hypothesized to result from the transverse passage of current through the brain with direct stimulation of axial structures including the diencephalon. The prompt release of adrenocorticotropic hormone, cortisol, and prolactin into blood followed ECT with a return to pretreatment baseline levels in several hours. The elevated levels of hormones were absorbed by the cerebrospinal fluid, providing contact with brain cells and central nervous system structures. An apparently specific pattern of ECT-induced hormone changes, limited to prolactin and cortisol, suggested that ECT released a substance with dopaminergic antagonist and antipsychotic properties. As hypothalamic dysfunction is a key finding in endogenomorphic depression and the abnormal endocrine and physiological functions usually normalize with recovery, this led to a search for biological markers that would supplement clinical assessment of diagnosis and treatment response. One of these, the overnight dexamethasone suppression test found that 40% to 50% of melancholic depressed patients had abnormal results, whereas 90% of control patients suppressed normally. This was followed by a period of uncritical overenthusiasm followed by wholesale rejection of the clinical neuroendocrine strategies. Several key methodological issues received inadequate attention, and there have been calls to revisit this topic.

  11. [Use of electroconvulsive therapy in the adolescent].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, D; Dubos, P F; Basquin, M

    1997-01-01

    Despite the progress of pharmocotherapy, electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is still used in a majority of countries to treat severe intractable mental disorders of the youth, yet few studies have been conducted to assess its use for individuals under 20-year-old. Efficacy, indications, side effects, technical characteristics and outcome are uncertain. A review of the 96 cases reported in the literature shows that: 1) its average frequency in adolescent psychiatric practice is similar throughout western nations and can be estimated around one ECT every year per million people; 2) intractable mood disorders, both manic and depressive episodes, are its main indications, since ECT treated more than 90% of the 66 cases reported; ECT can also offer an interesting alternative in some schizoaffective and schizophrenic episodes, in particular catatonic ones; 3) tolerance appears to be good, although secondary effects may occur. The most serious ones are infrequent spontaneous seizures and more common memory loss. Although no prospective studies are available on the evolution of cognitive side effects, they seem to disappear within a few weeks.

  12. Regional variation in electroconvulsive therapy use.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dunne, R

    2011-03-01

    Although electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is the most powerful treatment for depression, substantial variability in use has been described in Ireland. The Mental Health Commission collects usage data from approved centres but does not include home addresses or independent sector patients. Therefore, estimates of regional variation cannot be accurate, e.g. 145 (35% of total) independent sector patients were omitted from their 2008 analysis. When public and independent sector patients are combined inter-regional variation for 2008 is more than halved (chi-squared decreased from 83 to 30), with Western region contributing most to variation (chi-squared = 43). Ratio of ECT programmes to depressed admissions correlated negatively with rate for depressed admissions (r = -0.53, p = 0.01), while depressed admission numbers correlated with acute beds per area (r = 0.68, p = 0.001). Regional variation in ECT is less than previously reported; service factors probably account for much of this with smaller centres admitting severely ill patients more likely to require ECT.

  13. Prediction of electroconvulsive therapy response and remission in major depression : meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Diermen, van, Linda; Ameele, van den, Seline; Kamperman, Astrid M.; Sabbe, Bernard G.C.; Vermeulen, Tom; Schrijvers, Didier; Birkenhager, Tom K.

    2018-01-01

    Abstract: Background Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is considered to be the most effective treatment in severe major depression. The identification of reliable predictors of ECT response could contribute to a more targeted patient selection and consequently increased ECT response rates. Aims To investigate the predictive value of age, depression severity, psychotic and melancholic features for ECT response and remission in major depression. Method A meta-analysis was conducted according to t...

  14. Electroconvulsive Therapy in Schizophrenia in China: A National Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qian; Su, Yun-Ai; Xiang, Yu-Tao; Shu, Liang; Yu, Xin; Ungvari, Gabor S; Seiner, Stephen J; Chiu, Helen F K; Ning, Yu-Ping; Wang, Gao-Hua; Zhang, Ke-Rang; Li, Tao; Sun, Li-Zhong; Shi, Jian-Guo; Chen, Xian-Sheng; Mei, Qi-Yi; Li, Ke-Qing; Si, Tian-Mei

    2017-06-01

    Little is known about electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) use in the treatment of schizophrenia in China. This study examined the frequency of ECT use, its trend between 2006 and 2012, and its independent demographic and clinical correlates in a nationwide survey in China. A total of 5162 inpatients in 45 Chinese psychiatric hospitals/centers were interviewed (2696 in 2006 and 2466 in 2012). Patients' sociodemographic and clinical characteristics were recorded using a standardized protocol and data collection procedure. Electroconvulsive therapy was used in 6.1% of the whole sample; 4.7% in 2006 and 7.7% in 2012 (P Electroconvulsive therapy for schizophrenia has increased between 2006 and 2012 in China. Its percentage was higher than the figures reported in most other countries. Reasons for the substantial variations in the frequency of ECT across different provinces in China require further investigations.

  15. Electroconvulsive therapy for lycanthropy and Cotard syndrome: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Sandeep; Shah, Ruchita; Ghosh, Abhishek

    2010-12-01

    We present a case of psychotic depression presenting with lycanthropy (being converted to a pig) and Cotard syndrome simultaneously and treated with electroconvulsive therapy. A 37-year-old female patient developed psychotic depression after a stressor (a possibility of having a malignancy). As her depression worsened, she developed delusional belief of self being metamorphosed to a pig and her children also being metamorphosed into pig. In addition, she had the delusional belief that her own body and body of her children was rotting away. She was treated with electroconvulsive therapy along with venlafaxine and olanzapine, with which she improved completely.

  16. Caffeine Sodium Benzoate for Electroconvulsive Therapy Augmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozymski, Kevin M; Potter, Teresa G; Venkatachalam, Vasu; Pandurangi, Ananda K; Crouse, Ericka L

    2018-05-15

    Because of an ongoing manufacturer shortage of injectable caffeine sodium benzoate (CSB), patients at our health system were given CSB compounded in-house to increase seizure response during electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). Therefore, we aimed to evaluate its effectiveness and safety as an ECT augmentation agent. Medical records of patients who received compounded CSB at Virginia Commonwealth University Health System were reviewed to identify adults receiving it as part of an index ECT treatment course between June 2012 and December 2016. The primary outcome was change in electroencephalogram seizure duration from pre-caffeine session to initial caffeine session. Data were also collected on demographics, motor seizure duration, maximum heart rate, mean arterial pressure, and concurrent medication use for these sessions and the last caffeine session. Seven-one patients were included in the study, predominantly white females with a mean age of 58.6 years. The most common indication for ECT was major depressive disorder resistant to pharmacotherapy (71.8%), followed by catatonia associated with another mental disorder (19.7%). Electroencephalogram seizure duration increased by 24.1 seconds on average with first CSB use (P < 0.0001), allowing 24 more patients overall to achieve goal of at least 30 seconds (P < 0.0001). No clinically significant changes in maximum heart rate or mean arterial pressure were observed, nor did any patients require an abortive agent for prolonged seizure. Five patients (7%) discontinued CSB prematurely: 4 related to adverse effects and 1 secondary to ineffectiveness. We confirm results of prior studies of the utility of CSB and add that compounded CSB is effective for ECT augmentation, maintaining effectiveness throughout the index course with minimal safety concerns.

  17. Subjective Memory Immediately Following Electroconvulsive Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brus, Ole; Nordanskog, Pia; Båve, Ullvi; Cao, Yang; Hammar, Åsa; Landén, Mikael; Lundberg, Johan; Nordenskjöld, Axel

    2017-06-01

    The aims of the present study were to describe the short-term rate of subjective memory worsening (SMW) and identify factors of importance for SMW in a large clinical sample treated for depression with electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). This register-based study included 1212 patients from the Swedish National Quality Register for ECT. Subjective memory worsening was defined as a 2-point worsening on the memory item of the Comprehensive Psychopathological Rating Scale from before to within 1 week after treatment. Associations between patient characteristics and treatment factors were examined using logistic regression. Subjective memory worsening was experienced in 26%. It was more common in women than in men (31% vs 18%; P < 0.001) and more common in patients aged 18 to 39 years than in patients 65 years or older (32% vs 22%; P = 0.008). Patients with less subjective memory disturbances before ECT had a greater risk of SMW. Patients in remission after ECT had a lower risk of SMW. A brief pulse width stimulus gave higher risk of SMW compared with ultrabrief pulse (odds ratio, 1.61; 95% confidence interval, 1.05-2.47). Subjective memory worsening is reported by a minority of patients. However, young women are at risk of experiencing SMW. Ultrabrief pulse width stimulus could be considered for patients treated with unilateral electrode placement who experience SMW. Each patient should be monitored with regard to symptoms and adverse effects, and treatment should be adjusted on an individual basis to maximize the clinical effect and with efforts to minimize the cognitive adverse effects.

  18. British nurses' attitudes to electroconvulsive therapy, 1945-2000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, John

    2015-10-01

    The aim of the study was to collect and analyse historical material on nurses' attitudes to electroconvulsive therapy in Britain between 1945-2000. Electroconvulsive therapy became widely used in Britain from the late 1940s onwards and remains in current use, but became one of the main targets of the 'antipsychiatry' movement of the 1960s and 1970s. A cultural history design was used to recreate the perspectives of mental health nurses in the period under review. A range of primary sources including journal articles, textbooks and oral history sources were combined to create a coherent historical account. The controversy surrounding electroconvulsive therapy created a deep-seated ambivalence towards it among mental health nurses. While a sizeable minority were critical of its use and may have taken steps to avoid involvement with it, most acquiesced in providing the treatment. Recorded incidents of outright refusal to participate are few. Mental health nurses' views on electroconvulsive therapy are reflective of the profession's growing knowledge of the use of evidence in debating whether particular therapies should be used. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Anaesthesia for electroconvulsive therapy: An overview with an update on its role in potentiating electroconvulsive therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavan Kumar Kadiyala

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite advances in pharmacotherapy, electroconvulsive therapy (ECT remains a mainstay treatment option in psychiatry since its introduction in 1930s. It can be used primarily in severe illnesses when there is an urgent need for treatment or secondarily after failure or intolerance to pharmacotherapy. The 'unmodified' technique of ECT was practised initially, with a high incidence of musculoskeletal complications. Several modifications including general anaesthesia and muscle relaxation are used to increase the safety and patient acceptability of ECT. Various anaesthetic techniques including medications are considered to provide adequate therapeutic seizure, simultaneously controlling seizure-induced haemodynamic changes and side effects. A brief review of literature on choice of these anaesthetic techniques is discussed. This article is intended to reinforce the knowledge of clinicians, who may have limited exposure to ECT procedure. Importance is given to the recent updates on the role of induction agents in potentiating therapeutic response to ECT in psychiatric disorders.

  20. Electroconvulsive Therapy in the Elderly: New Findings in Geriatric Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geduldig, Emma T; Kellner, Charles H

    2016-04-01

    This paper reviews recent research on the use of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in elderly depressed patients. The PubMed database was searched for literature published within the past 4 years, using the search terms: "electroconvulsive elderly," "electroconvulsive geriatric," "ECT and elderly," and "ECT elderly cognition." The studies in this review indicate excellent efficacy for ECT in geriatric patients. Adverse cognitive effects of ECT in this population are usually transient and not typically severe. In addition, continuation/maintenance ECT (C/M-ECT) may be a favorable strategy for relapse prevention in the elderly after a successful acute course of ECT. ECT is an important treatment option for depressed geriatric patients with severe and/or treatment-resistant illness. New data add to the evidence demonstrating that ECT is a highly effective, safe, and well-tolerated antidepressant treatment option for geriatric patients.

  1. Electroconvulsive therapy in the continuation and maintenance treatment of depression: Systematic review and meta-analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, Alby; Phutane, Vivek H; Clarke, Sandy; Prudic, Joan

    2018-05-01

    Acute course of electroconvulsive therapy is effective in inducing remission from depression, but recurrence rate is unacceptably high following termination of electroconvulsive therapy despite continued pharmacotherapy. Continuation electroconvulsive therapy and maintenance electroconvulsive therapy have been studied for their efficacy in preventing relapse and recurrence of depression. The purpose of this meta-analysis was to examine the efficacy of continuation electroconvulsive therapy and maintenance electroconvulsive therapy in preventing relapse and recurrence of depression in comparison to antidepressant pharmacotherapy alone. We searched MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO, clinicaltrials.gov and Cochrane register of controlled trials from the database inception to December 2016 without restriction on language or publication status for randomized trials of continuation electroconvulsive therapy and maintenance electroconvulsive therapy. Two independent Cochrane reviewers extracted the data in accordance with Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines for systematic reviews and meta-analyses. The risk of bias was assessed using four domains of the Cochrane Collaboration Risk of Bias Tool. Outcomes were pooled using random effect model. The primary outcome was relapse or recurrence of depression. Five studies involving 436 patients were included in the meta-analysis. Analysis of the pooled data showed that continuation electroconvulsive therapy and maintenance electroconvulsive therapy, both with pharmacotherapy, were associated with significantly fewer relapses and recurrences than pharmacotherapy alone at 6 months and 1 year after a successful acute course of electroconvulsive therapy (risk ratio = 0.64, 95% confidence interval = [0.41, 0.98], p = 0.04, risk ratio = 0.46, 95% confidence interval = [0.21, 0.98], p = 0.05, respectively). There was insufficient data to perform a meta-analysis of stand

  2. A case of Todd's Palsy following unilateral electroconvulsive therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Christine; Lepping, Peter; Clifford, John; Gardner-Thorpe, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    This case describes a woman undergoing unilateral electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) who developed a Todd's Palsy following the treatment, and which resolved when converted to bilateral ECT. We go on to hypothesize that this rare side effect may be an indication of the need to switch laterality during a course of ECT. PMID:22988330

  3. Achieving Competency in Electroconvulsive Therapy: A Model Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolenc, Tamara J.; Philbrick, Kemuel L.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: This article illustrates a model electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) curriculum with specific parameters of both practice-based learning and medical knowledge. Method: The authors review the recommendations of the APA Task Force on ECT as they relate to training in ECT in psychiatry residency programs, and discuss diverse educational…

  4. Electroconvulsive therapy in single manic episodes: a case series

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... in pharmacotherapy, electroconvulsive therapy is an effective treatment strategy in ... Behavioral Sciences Research Center, Noor University Hospital,. Ostandari Street .... side effects of ECT such as cognitive impairment to the degree that the .... adolescents with mood disorders: patients' and parents' attitude. Psychiatry ...

  5. Patient with intractable delirium successfully treated with electroconvulsive therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgren, Eske; Hageman, Ida

    2014-01-01

    and in this situation electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) can be a quick and efficient treatment. In this case report of a 26-year-old man a post-operative intractable delirium persisting for three weeks was efficiently and swiftly relieved by three consecutive ECTs. The patient was discharged without need for further...

  6. Electroconvulsive Therapy. Consensus Development Conference Statement, Vol. 5, No. 11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Institutes of Health (DHHS), Bethesda, MD.

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), a treatment for severe mental illness in which a brief application of electric stimulus is used to produce a generalized seizure, has been in use for over 45 years. Controversies still exist today concerning the use of ECT. In 1985, the National Institutes of Health and the National Institute of Mental Health held…

  7. Thiopental is better than propofol for electroconvulsive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuzzi, Massimiliano; Delmonte, Dario; Barbini, Barbara; Pasin, Laura; Sottocorna, Ornella; Casiraghi, Giuseppina Maria; Colombo, Cristina; Landoni, Giovanni; Zangrillo, Alberto

    2018-01-16

    electroconvulsive therapy is a psychiatric procedure requiring general anesthesia. The choice of the hypnotic agent is important because the success of the intervention is associated to the occurrence and duration of motor convulsion. However, all available anesthetic agents have anti-convulsant activity. We compared the effect of thiopental and propofol on seizures. We designed a retrospective study at Mood Disorders Unit of a teaching Hospital. Fifty-six consecutive patients undergoing electroconvulsive therapy were enrolled. Patients received fentanyl followed by either thiopental or propofol. We evaluated the incidence and the duration of seizure after electric stimulus at the first session of electroconvulsive therapy for each patient. Adverse perioperative effects were recorded. Patients were 60±12.1 years old and 64% was female. There was a statistically significant higher number of patients who had motor convulsion activity in the thiopental group when compared to the propofol group (25 vs 13, p=0.023). Seizure duration was statistically significant longer in the thiopental group than in the propofol group (35 sec vs 11 sec, p=0.046). No hemodynamic instability, oxygen desaturation episodes, prolonged recovery time from anesthesia and adverse effects related to anesthesia were recorded. Thiopental induction has a favourable effect on seizure when compared to propofol in patients undergoing electroconvulsive therapy.

  8. Electroconvulsive Therapy: A Primer for Mental Health Counselors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leinbaugh, Tracy C.

    2001-01-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy is the treatment of choice for severe depressive episodes. Although little definitive research exists to explain its effectiveness, since its development in 1938 it has proven effective for the treatment of depression with psychotic features and suicidal ideation. Explains the procedure and discusses implications for the…

  9. Multifactorial Determinants of the Neurocognitive Effects of Electroconvulsive Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    McClintock, Shawn M.; Choi, Jimmy; Deng, Zhi-De; Appelbaum, Lawrence G.; Krystal, Andrew D.; Lisanby, Sarah H.

    2014-01-01

    For many patients with neuropsychiatric illnesses, standard psychiatric treatments with mono or combination pharmacotherapy, psychotherapy, and transcranial magnetic stimulation are ineffective. For these patients with treatment resistant neuropsychiatric illnesses, a main therapeutic option is electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). Decades of research have found ECT to be highly effective; however, it can also result in adverse neurocognitive effects. Specifically, ECT results in disorientation af...

  10. Does Electroconvulsive therapy aggravate the rise in potassium and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Potassium and creatine kinase levels increase after the administration of suxamethonium. This rise may be exaggerated by the combination of suxamethonium fasciculation and the modified tonic/clonic convulsion induced by electroconvulsive therapy. This study compared the magnitude of increase in ...

  11. SUCCESSFUL TREATMENT OF OBSESSIVE-COMPULSIVE DISORDER WITH ELECTROCONVULSIVE THERAPY

    OpenAIRE

    Kishimoto, Toshifumi; Ikawa, Genro

    1995-01-01

    Two men with obsessive-compulsive disorder showed abnormal behaviors including agitation and aggression without evidence of depression. They responded to electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) following failure of drug treatments. Further investigation of the utility of ECT in treating drug refractory obsessive-compulsive disorder is indicated.

  12. The use of electroconvulsive therapy in the treatment of psychiatric ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Out of 1816 patients admitted to Umzimkulu Hospital between 1976 and 1982, 378 (20,8%) received electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in combination with drugs. The use of ECT at this hospital is described and comparisons are made between ECT and non-ECT patients using length of stay in hospital as the criterion ...

  13. Update on electroconvulsive therapy dosing strategies : review article

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Electroconvulsive Therapy (ECT) remains a controversial treatment modality, with a wide range of clinical practice and application. Recently significant advances in the technique of application of ECT have been made. These new approaches incorporate a variety of advances in ECT dosing strategies and techniques, ...

  14. A meta-analysis of electroconvulsive therapy efficacy in depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kho, King Han; van Vreeswijk, Michiel Floris; Simpson, Steve; Zwinderman, Aeilko H.

    2003-01-01

    Recently published controlled studies comparing electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) with other treatments for depression offer the opportunity to perform a meta-analysis of ECT in depression. Fifteen studies were identified which fulfilled the inclusion criteria. From these controlled trials, 20 effect

  15. Electroconvulsive therapy in single manic episodes: a case series ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of electroconvulsive therapy in the treatment of Bipolar I Disorder patients with a single manic episode. Method: In a retrospective study, we reviewed medical records of inpatients who had been admitted to treat a single manic episode of Bipolar I Disorder at Noor University Hospital, ...

  16. ELECTROCONVULSIVE THERAPY EXPERIENCES AT NARA MEDICAL UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL

    OpenAIRE

    Kishimoto, Toshifumi; Ueda, Atsushi; Noriyama, Yoshinobu; Nagai, Toshiya; Hirayama, Tomohide; Kirita, Ikuhiro; Hata, Kazuya; Ikawa, Genro

    1995-01-01

    We surveyed the clinical electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) treatment expe- riences between 1987 and 1992 at Nara Medical University Hospital. ECT is restrictedly applied to severely ill patients who have no response to other somatic therapies. For 5 years, 43 cases were treated with ECT, of which 27 suffered from depressive disorders, 3 from schizophrenia, 3 from somatoform disorders, and 10 from anxiety disorders. ECT was selected by psychiatrists for severe depressive states after failure of ...

  17. Delays in accessing electroconvulsive therapy: a comparison between two urban and two rural populations in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Natalie E

    2015-10-01

    A comparison of the timing, rates and characteristics of electroconvulsive therapy use between urban and rural populations. The medical records of patients who received an acute course of electroconvulsive therapy at two rural and two urban psychiatric hospitals in New South Wales (NSW), Australia, in 2010 were reviewed retrospectively. Main outcome measures were the time from symptom onset, diagnosis and admission to commencing electroconvulsive therapy. Rates of use of electroconvulsive therapy were also compared between rural and urban hospitals using NSW statewide data. There was a significant delay in the time it took for rural patients to receive electroconvulsive therapy compared with urban patients when measured both from the time of symptom onset and from when they received a diagnosis. There were corresponding delays in the time taken for rural patients to be admitted to hospital compared with urban patients. There was no difference in the time it took to commence electroconvulsive therapy once a patient was admitted to hospital. NSW statewide urban-rural comparisons showed rates of electroconvulsive therapy treatment were significantly higher in urban hospitals. Patients in rural areas receive electroconvulsive therapy later in their acute illness due to delays in being admitted to hospital. The rate of use of electroconvulsive therapy also differs geographically. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2015.

  18. Review of electroconvulsive therapy practice from a tertiary Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Preeti; Gogi, Prabhu Kiran Vishwanath; Srinath, Shoba; Thirthalli, Jagadisha; Girimaji, Satish; Seshadri, Shekhar; Sagar, John Vijay

    2014-12-01

    The use of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in children and adolescents is a controversial issue. This study was done to examine the pattern and practice as well as the outcome of electroconvulsive therapy administered to children and adolescents admitted to a tertiary care centre. A 10 year retrospective chart review of all children and adolescents (up to 16 years of age) admitted in the Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Centre, National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences (NIMHANS) who had received at least 1 session of ECT was done. Information regarding diagnosis, reasons for prescribing electroconvulsive therapy, details regarding the procedure and outcome variables was collected from the records. Clinical Global Impressions (CGI) scale rating of the severity of illness and improvement seen were done by 2 trained psychiatrists independently. 22 children and adolescents received electroconvulsive therapy over 10 years. There were an equal number of boys and girls. All received modified ECT. Most patients who received electroconvulsive therapy were severely ill. Catatonic symptoms 54.5% (12) were the most common reason for prescribing electroconvulsive therapy. It was efficacious in 77.3% (17) of the patients. Electroconvulsive therapy was relatively safe, and most experienced no acute side effects. 68.2% (15) who were on follow up and did not experience any long term side effects due to the electroconvulsive therapy. Electroconvulsive therapy has a place in the acute management of severe childhood psychiatric disorders. Further long term prospective studies are required. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Anaesthesia for electroconvulsive therapy - new tricks for old drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stripp, Tobias Kvist; Jorgensen, Martin Balslev; Olsen, Niels Vidiendal

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of this review is to investigate existing literature in order to delineate whether the use of anaesthesia and timing of seizure induction in a new and optimised way may improve the efficacy of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). METHODS: PubMed/MEDLINE was searched for exist......OBJECTIVE: The objective of this review is to investigate existing literature in order to delineate whether the use of anaesthesia and timing of seizure induction in a new and optimised way may improve the efficacy of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). METHODS: PubMed/MEDLINE was searched...... the shortest seizures, etomidate and ketamine the longest. Etomidate and ketamine+propofol 1 : 1 seems to yield the seizures with best quality. Seizure quality is improved when induction of ECT is delayed until the effect of the anaesthetic has waned - possibly monitored with BIS values. Manual...

  20. Neuropsychological effects and attitudes in patients following electroconvulsive therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Feliu, Miriam; Edwards, Christopher L; Sudhakar, Shiv; McDougald, Camela; Raynor, Renee; Johnson, Stephanie; Byrd, Goldie; Whitfield, Keith; Jonassaint, Charles; Romero, Heather; Edwards, Lekisha; Wellington, Chante?; Hill, LaBarron K; Sollers, James; Logue, Patrick E

    2008-01-01

    The current study examined the effects of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) on neuropsychological test performance. Forty-six patients completed brief neuropsychological and psychological testing before and after receiving ECT for the treatment of recalcitrant and severe depression. Neuropsychological testing consisted of the Levin Selective Reminding Test (Levin) and Wechsler Memory Scale-Revised Edition (WMS-R). Self-report measures included the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), the Short-Term...

  1. The depiction of electroconvulsive therapy in Hindi cinema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Chittaranjan; Shah, Nilesh; Venkatesh, Basappa K

    2010-03-01

    There is little literature on the depiction of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in movies. In India, Hindi cinema is an important source of public information and misinformation about ECT. We identified depictions of ECT in Hindi cinema through inquiries with e-communities, video libraries, and other sources. We also searched the PubMed database using search terms related to ECT and movies. Between 1967 and 2008, 13 Hindi movies contained referrals to or depictions of ECT. By and large, the depictions were inaccurate, distorted, and dramatized. Electroconvulsive therapy was administered to punish, to obliterate identity, to induce insanity, and for other rarely clinically valid indications. Electroconvulsive therapy was almost always administered by force. Premedication was rare. Genuine ECT devices were uncommonly used. Electroconvulsive therapy stimulation almost invariably appeared to cause pain. Multiple shocks were frequently delivered in the same session. The convulsions were usually bizarre. The treatment caused mental disturbance, amnesia, weakness, and even a zombielike state, thought not mortality; clinical improvement was rare. There was no pattern of increasing accuracy of depiction of ECT with recency of movie release. We examine the extent to which the identified inaccuracies are practically important and offer reasons for the inaccuracies. Although the inaccuracies are a cause for concern, we suggest that because Hindi cinema is generally hyperbolic, the public may be willing to distinguish real life from reel life when facing clinical decisions about ECT. Nevertheless, considering the potential for harm in the dissemination of misinformation, filmmakers should exhibit a greater sense of ethics when creating impressions that might adversely influence health.

  2. On electroconvulsive therapy in depression : Clinical, cognitive and neurobiological aspects

    OpenAIRE

    Nordanskog, Pia

    2015-01-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is used worldwide to treat severe mental disorders. The most common mental disorder, and the third leading cause of disease burden in the world is depression. The clinical efficacy of ECT for severe depression is well-established. However, both the pathophysiology of depression and the mechanism of action of ECT remain elusive. The main aims of this thesis are to address the following issues: 1) the use and practice of ECT in Sweden has not been systematically ...

  3. Knowledge, experience & attitudes concerning electroconvulsive therapy among patients & their relatives

    OpenAIRE

    Rajagopal, R.; Chakrabarti, S.; Grover, S.; Khehra, N.

    2012-01-01

    Background & objectives: Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is used frequently in developing countries, but investigations of patients’ awareness and perception of ECT are rare. The present study thus attempted a comprehensive examination of knowledge, experience and attitudes concerning ECT among patients treated with brief-pulse, bilateral, modified ECT, and their relatives. Methods: Of the 153 recipients of ECT, 77 patients and relatives were eventually assessed using questionnaires designed ...

  4. Electroconvulsive therapy stimulus titration: Not all it seems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenman, Stephen J

    2018-05-01

    To examine the provenance and implications of seizure threshold titration in electroconvulsive therapy. Titration of seizure threshold has become a virtual standard for electroconvulsive therapy. It is justified as individualisation and optimisation of the balance between efficacy and unwanted effects. Present day threshold estimation is significantly different from the 1960 studies of Cronholm and Ottosson that are its usual justification. The present form of threshold estimation is unstable and too uncertain for valid optimisation or individualisation of dose. Threshold stimulation (lowest dose that produces a seizure) has proven therapeutically ineffective, and the multiples applied to threshold to attain efficacy have never been properly investigated or standardised. The therapeutic outcomes of threshold estimation (or its multiples) have not been separated from simple dose effects. Threshold estimation does not optimise dose due to its own uncertainties and the different short-term and long-term cognitive and memory effects. Potential harms of titration have not been examined. Seizure threshold titration in electroconvulsive therapy is not a proven technique of dose optimisation. It is widely held and practiced; its benefit and harmlessness assumed but unproven. It is a prematurely settled answer to an unsettled question that discourages further enquiry. It is an example of how practices, assumed scientific, enter medicine by obscure paths.

  5. Overgeneral memory predicts stability of short-term outcome of electroconvulsive therapy for depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raes, Filip; Sienaert, Pascal; Demyttenaere, Koen; Peuskens, Joseph; Williams, J Mark G; Hermans, Dirk

    2008-03-01

    To investigate the predictive value of overgeneral memory (OGM) for outcome of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) for depression. The Autobiographical Memory Test was used to measure OGM in 25 patients with depression before ECT. The Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD) was administered weekly to 1 week posttreatment. Overgeneral memory did not predict HRSD scores from the last ECT treatment, but did predict HRSD change scores from the last treatment to 1-week follow-up: patients high in OGM experienced a relatively greater increase in HRSD scores after the last treatment. Results further extend the status of OGM as a predictor of an unfavorable course of depression to a previously unstudied ECT population.

  6. Antipsychotic Polypharmacy in a Treatment-Refractory Schizophrenia Population Receiving Adjunctive Treatment With Electroconvulsive Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Diana; Hageman, Ida; Bauer, Jeanett

    2013-01-01

    Antipsychotic polypharmacy (APP) is frequent, but its pattern is unknown in treatment-refractory schizophrenia-spectrum patients receiving electroconvulsive therapy (ECT).......Antipsychotic polypharmacy (APP) is frequent, but its pattern is unknown in treatment-refractory schizophrenia-spectrum patients receiving electroconvulsive therapy (ECT)....

  7. Pivotal role of tissue plasminogen activator in the mechanism of action of electroconvulsive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoirisch-Clapauch, Silvia; Mezzasalma, Marco A U; Nardi, Antonio E

    2014-02-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy is an important treatment option for major depressive disorders, acute mania, mood disorders with psychotic features, and catatonia. Several hypotheses have been proposed as electroconvulsive therapy's mechanism of action. Our hypothesis involves many converging pathways facilitated by increased synthesis and release of tissue-plasminogen activator. Human and animal experiments have shown that tissue-plasminogen activator participates in many mechanisms of action of electroconvulsive therapy or its animal variant, electroconvulsive stimulus, including improved N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-mediated signaling, activation of both brain-derived neurotrophic factor and vascular endothelial growth factor, increased bioavailability of zinc, purinergic release, and increased mobility of dendritic spines. As a result, tissue-plasminogen activator helps promote neurogenesis in limbic structures, modulates synaptic transmission and plasticity, improves cognitive function, and mediates antidepressant effects. Notably, electroconvulsive therapy seems to influence tissue-plasminogen activator metabolism. For example, electroconvulsive stimulus increases the expression of glutamate decarboxylase 65 isoform in γ-aminobutyric acid-releasing neurons, which enhances the release of tissue-plasminogen activator, and the expression of p11, a protein involved in plasminogen and tissue-plasminogen activator assembling. This paper reviews how electroconvulsive therapy correlates with tissue-plasminogen activator. We suggest that interventions aiming at increasing tissue-plasminogen activator levels or its bioavailability - such as daily aerobic exercises together with a carbohydrate-restricted diet, or normalization of homocysteine levels - be evaluated in controlled studies assessing response and remission duration in patients who undergo electroconvulsive therapy.

  8. Electroconvulsive therapy in adolescents: a retrospective study from north India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Sandeep; Malhotra, Savita; Varma, Sannidhya; Chakrabarti, Subho; Avasthi, Ajit; Mattoo, Surendra K

    2013-06-01

    There are minimal data on the use of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in adolescents from India. The present study aimed to evaluate the clinical profile and effectiveness of ECT in adolescents (aged 13-18 years). A retrospective chart review was carried out to identify adolescents (aged 13-18 years) who had received ECT during the period 1999-2011. During the study period, 39 such patients received ECT; complete records of 25 patients were available. Details regarding their sociodemographic, clinical, and treatment data were extracted from these records for the present study. During the study period, 658 patients received ECT, of which 39 were aged 18 or younger (5.9%). Schizophrenia (n = 14; 56%) was the commonest diagnosis for which ECT was used in adolescents, followed by depression (n = 3; 12%). Catatonic symptoms (n = 17; 68%) were the most common symptoms among these subjects. Electroconvulsive therapy was considered as a treatment of choice taking the clinical picture account in about three fourths of the patients (n = 19; 76%). The mean (SD) numbers of ECTs administered per patient were 10.1 (4.87) (range, 2-21). The mean (SD) response rate to ECT was 76% (23.3%) (range, 31%-100%). Response rates according to diagnosis were the following: 76.3% for schizophrenia, 87.2% for depression, 81.8% for psychosis (not otherwise specified), and 77.7% for acute and transient psychosis. Response rate in patients with catatonia was 91.6%. Prolonged seizures, nausea and vomiting, and headache were reported in 2 cases each. Electroconvulsive therapy is used less frequently in children and adolescents compared to the older patients. This study shows that ECT is effective in the treatment of severe psychiatric disorders in adolescents and is associated with the same frequency of adverse effects as the adults.

  9. Labetalol does not lengthen asystole during electroconvulsive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dannon, P N; Iancu, I; Hirschmann, S; Ross, P; Dolberg, O T; Grunhaus, L

    1998-12-01

    Labetalol, a combined alpha- and beta-adrenergic blocker is often used to attenuate the transient increases in heart rate and blood pressure that accompany electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). It has been suggested that labetalol should not be administered during ECT without the protection provided by anticholinergic medications, because of its potential severe bradycardic effects. We present our experience with 32 patients from all age groups who received labetalol without anticholinergic treatment during ECT. None of the patients demonstrated adverse bradycardic effects. We conclude that administration of labetalol during ECT does not routinely require premedication with anticholinergic drugs and does not lengthen asystole.

  10. Electroconvulsive therapy in patients taking monoamine oxidase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolenc, Tamara J; Habl, Samar S; Barnes, Roxann D; Rasmussen, Keith G

    2004-12-01

    Concerns have been expressed regarding the use of general anesthesia for electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in patients taking monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs). We review the published literature and present 4 new cases and conclude that there is no evidence of a dangerous interaction between ECT and MAOI use. In general, a cautious approach would be to discontinue MAOIs before ECT if the medication has not been helpful; however, there is no need for a washout interval before starting ECT. Furthermore, if there is otherwise a reason for continuing the MAOI, it can be continued during index ECT or initiated during maintenance ECT.

  11. Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in literature: Sylvia Plath's The Bell Jar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellner, Charles H

    2013-01-01

    Sylvia Plath's well-known novel, The Bell Jar, recounts her experience of a severe depressive episode. In the novel, the protagonist is treated with electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), as was Plath in life. The first ECT is given in the now-obsolete "unmodified" form, without general anesthesia. Later in the story, she receives ECT again, this time with full general anesthesia and muscle relaxation, as is the standard of care today. This chapter examines how the novelistic descriptions of the treatment compare with actual clinical practice. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. The Treatment of Clozapine-Withdrawal Delirium with Electroconvulsive Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anish Modak

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Clozapine, a commonly used atypical antipsychotic, can precipitate a severe withdrawal syndrome. In this report, we describe a case of delirium with catatonic features emerging after the immediate cessation of clozapine subsequent to concerns of developing neuroleptic malignant syndrome. After multiple treatments were found to be inefficacious, electroconvulsive therapy (ECT was initiated, resulting in significant improvement. A literature search revealed six previous cases of clozapine-withdrawal syndromes of varied symptomatology treated with ECT. To our knowledge, the present case represents the first reported clozapine-withdrawal delirium treated successfully with ECT.

  13. Electroconvulsive therapy with S-ketamine anesthesia for catatonia in coexisting depression and dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litvan, Zsuzsa; Bauer, Martin; Kasper, Siegfried; Frey, Richard

    2017-07-01

    Information on efficacy and safety of electroconvulsive therapy in patients with dementia is sparse. The current case report describes a patient suffering from severe depression and dementia who received electroconvulsive therapy with S-ketamine anesthesia at our psychiatric intensive care unit for the treatment of her therapy-resistant catatonic stupor. The patient's condition improved remarkably through the treatment. By the end of 16 electroconvulsive therapy sessions, her catatonic symptoms remitted entirely, her affect was brighter and she performed markedly better at the cognitive testing.

  14. Electroconvulsive therapy increases hippocampal and amygdala volume in therapy refractory depression : A longitudinal pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tendolkar, Indira; van Beek, Marleen; van Oostrom, Iris; Mulder, Marlies; Janzing, Joost; Voshaar, Richard Oude; van Eijndhoven, Philip

    2013-01-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is the most potent biological therapy in depression. Animal studies suggest that ECT acts via neuroplasticity effects on limbic structures involved in the pathophysiology of depression but in vivo evidence at the human system level is scarce. Therefore, the aim of the

  15. Individualized Low-Amplitude Seizure Therapy: Minimizing Current for Electroconvulsive Therapy and Magnetic Seizure Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterchev, Angel V; Krystal, Andrew D; Rosa, Moacyr A; Lisanby, Sarah H

    2015-01-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) at conventional current amplitudes (800–900 mA) is highly effective but carries the risk of cognitive side effects. Lowering and individualizing the current amplitude may reduce side effects by virtue of a less intense and more focal electric field exposure in the brain, but this aspect of ECT dosing is largely unexplored. Magnetic seizure therapy (MST) induces a weaker and more focal electric field than ECT; however, the pulse amplitude is not individualized and the minimum amplitude required to induce a seizure is unknown. We titrated the amplitude of long stimulus trains (500 pulses) as a means of determining the minimum current amplitude required to induce a seizure with ECT (bilateral, right unilateral, bifrontal, and frontomedial electrode placements) and MST (round coil on vertex) in nonhuman primates. Furthermore, we investigated a novel method of predicting this amplitude-titrated seizure threshold (ST) by a non-convulsive measurement of motor threshold (MT) using single pulses delivered through the ECT electrodes or MST coil. Average STs were substantially lower than conventional pulse amplitudes (112–174 mA for ECT and 37.4% of maximum device amplitude for MST). ST was more variable in ECT than in MST. MT explained 63% of the ST variance and is hence the strongest known predictor of ST. These results indicate that seizures can be induced with less intense electric fields than conventional ECT that may be safer; efficacy and side effects should be evaluated in clinical studies. MT measurement could be a faster and safer alternative to empirical ST titration for ECT and MST. PMID:25920013

  16. Postpartum electroconvulsive therapy: a systematic review and case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gressier, Florence; Rotenberg, Samuel; Cazas, Odile; Hardy, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Postpartum depression can have devastating consequences on the mother and child. Prompt treatment is challenging. Whereas electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is considered to be an effective treatment modality in severe depression and brings about rapid clinical improvement, little is known about ECT during the postpartum period. We systematically reviewed the literature on the use of ECT during the postpartum period using PubMed, Institute for Scientific Information Web of Knowledge and PsycINFO databases until September 2014, using the search terms "electroconvulsive therapy" or "ECT" and "postpartum". Then, we described the successful treatment with ECT and the joint mother-baby hospitalization of a woman with severe depression. Eight case reports and 8 studies were identified. All of the studies reported that ECT is effective in the postpartum period. It is well tolerated, provides a fast response and allows for breastfeeding. In addition, our case report showed the benefits of the hospitalization of the mother-baby unit. Combined ECT and joint mother-baby hospitalization could be a valuable treatment by targeting both the mother-infant relationship and the maternal depressive symptoms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Electroconvulsive Therapy - What Do Patients Think Of Their Treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguire, S; Rea, S M; Convery, P

    2016-09-01

    The Regulation and Quality Improvement Authority (RQIA) monitors the administration of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in Northern Ireland (NI). As part of their inspection methodology RQIA wished to include feedback from ECT patients. The aim of this report is to summarise the opinions of ECT patients over a 1-year period and to compare their feedback about treatment with the standards of best practice, as defined by the Electroconvulsive Therapy Accreditation Service (ECTAS). RQIA was granted permission to use the ECTAS patient questionnaire. The questionnaire was distributed to all the ECT clinics in NI and staff were requested to give them to patients who had received a course of ECT. A total of 42 individuals returned questionnaires, 24 females (57.1%) and 18 (42.9%) males. The response rate was 26%. Almost half of respondents were detained under the Mental Health (Northern Ireland) Order 1986 (n=19, 45.2%), with one third receiving ECT as a day patient (n=14, 33.3%). Respondents reported having detailed information about ECT, with ECTAS standards 4.2 and 4.3 being affirmed in over 80% of cases. Eighty percent of respondents (n=34) believed they benefited from ECT. The results are mainly favourable towards ECT. The majority felt they benefited from treatment.

  18. [Successful electroconvulsive therapy of Cotard syndrome with bitemporal hypoperfusion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohmann, T; Nishimura, K; Sabri, O; Klosterkötter, J

    1996-05-01

    A case study is presented to illustrate a rare condition described by Cotard as "délire de négation". The central symptom is a nihilistic delusion with denial of one's own existence of oneself and that of the external world. In the present case, the syndrome became manifest as an escalation of a recurrent depressive disorder late in life. After initial resistance to therapy, the syndrome was successfully treated with electroconvulsive therapy. For the first time, we report the regional cerebral blood flow measured by 99mTc-HMPAO-SPECT before and after therapy. Before treatment, significant bitemporal hypoperfusion relative to the cerebellum was found, which was no longer demonstrable on remission.

  19. The Use of Electroconvulsive Therapy in Atypical Psychotic Presentations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasu, Devi

    2007-01-01

    Convulsive therapy and its progeny, electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), were originally used for the treatment of catatonic schizophrenia, and there is little doubt that ECT remains an effective intervention for the treatment of schizophrenia. However, current practice tends to favor the use of ECT in severe or treatment refractory affective disorders, and its use in schizophrenia and other nonaffective (atypical) psychotic disorders has become controversial. Case reports have suggested a role for ECT in two specific atypical psychotic disorders: Cotard's syndrome and cycloid psychosis. In this article, we review the atypical psychotic disorders and report a series of five case examples that signify the role of ECT in atypical psychotic presentations, particularly when the symptoms resemble those found in Cotard's syndrome and cycloid psychosis. PMID:20428309

  20. Current electroconvulsive therapy practice and research in the geriatric population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerner, Nancy; Prudic, Joan

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is utilized worldwide for various severe and treatment-resistant psychiatric disorders. Research studies have shown that ECT is the most effective and rapid treatment available for elderly patients with depression, bipolar disorder and psychosis. For patients who suffer from intractable catatonia and neuroleptic malignant syndrome, ECT can be life saving. For elderly patients who cannot tolerate or respond poorly to medications and who are at a high risk for drug-induced toxicity or toxic drug interactions, ECT is the safest treatment option. Organic causes are frequently associated with late-life onset of neuropsychiatric conditions, such as parkinsonism, dementia and stroke. ECT has proven to be efficacious even when these conditions are present. During the next decade, research studies should focus on the use of ECT as a synergistic therapy, to enhance other biological and psychological treatments, and prevent symptom relapse and recurrence. PMID:24778709

  1. Electroconvulsive therapy for obsessive-compulsive disorder: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontenelle, Leonardo F; Coutinho, Evandro S F; Lins-Martins, Natália M; Fitzgerald, Paul B; Fujiwara, Hironobo; Yücel, Murat

    2015-07-01

    Surgical therapies for treatment-refractory obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), such as deep brain stimulation or psychosurgery, remain unattainable for many patients. Despite the long-held view that electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is an ineffective treatment for OCD, there is no systematic review to support or refute this claim, which is the basis of the current review. A systematic search of MEDLINE, Web of Science, Scopus, and LILACS databases was conducted on December 22, 2013, using the terms obsessive-compulsive disorder and electroconvulsive therapy. Reference lists, specific journals, and clinical trial registries were also scrutinized. No date or language limitation was imposed on the search. After irrelevant and redundant records from the 500 identified titles were excluded, the 50 articles reporting the acute treatment effects of ECT in OCD and related constructs (involving a total of 279 patients) were analyzed for this study. The relevant sociodemographic, clinical, and outcome data of individual cases were extracted. Data from individual cases were used to compare the characteristics of responders versus nonresponders to ECT. Most selected records were case reports/series; there were no randomized controlled trials. A positive response was reported in 60.4% of the 265 cases in which individual responses to ECT were available. ECT responders exhibited a significantly later onset of OCD symptoms (P = .003), were more frequently nondepressed (P = .009), more commonly reported being treated with ECT for severe OCD (P = .01), and received a fewer number of ECT sessions (P = .03). ECT responders were also less frequently previously treated with adequate trials of serotonin reuptake inhibitors (P = .05) and cognitive-behavioral therapy (P = .005). Although 60% of the reported cases reviewed exhibited some form of a positive response to ECT, it cannot be stated that this provides evidence that ECT is indeed effective for OCD. © Copyright 2015 Physicians

  2. Volume of the human hippocampus and clinical response following electroconvulsive therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oltedal, Leif; Narr, Katherine L.; Abbott, Christopher

    2018-01-01

    Background: Hippocampal enlargements are commonly reported following electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). To clarify mechanisms, we examined if ECT induced hippocampal volume change relates to dose (number of ECT sessions and electrode placement) and acts as a biomarker of clinical outcome. Methods...

  3. An electroconvulsive therapy procedure impairs reconsolidation of episodic memories in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroes, Marijn C. W.; Tendolkar, Indira; van Wingen, Guido A.; van Waarde, Jeroen A.; Strange, Bryan A.; Fernández, Guillén

    2014-01-01

    Despite accumulating evidence for a reconsolidation process in animals, support in humans, especially for episodic memory, is limited. Using a within-subjects manipulation, we found that a single application of electroconvulsive therapy following memory reactivation in patients with unipolar

  4. Electroconvulsive therapy for the treatment of clozapine nonresponders suffering from schizophrenia--an open label study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kho, K. H.; Blansjaar, B. A.; de Vries, S.; Babuskova, D.; Zwinderman, A. H.; Linszen, D. H.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This open label study describes the efficacy of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) as adjunctive treatment in clozapine nonresponders suffering from schizophrenia. METHOD: The results of clozapine and ECT treatment in 11 clozapine nonresponders suffering from schizophrenia are reported in

  5. White Matter Hyperintensities and Cognitive Impairment During Electroconvulsive Therapy in Severely Depressed Elderly Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oudega, M.L.; van Exel, E.; Wattjes, M.P.; Comijs, H.C.; Scheltens, P.; Barkhof, F.; Eikelenboom, P.; Craen, A.J.M.; Beekman, A.T.F.; Stek, M.L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Transient cognitive impairment during electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) can be a reason to discontinue ECT in depressed elderly patients. We hypothesized that both white matter hyperintensities and medial temporal lobe atrophy contribute to transient cognitive impairment during ECT.

  6. Risk of long-lasting negative cognitive consequences after electroconvulsive therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Anne Marie; Miskowiak, Kamilla; Vinberg, Maj

    2013-01-01

    This case study describes a patient who had a unipolar depression and experienced long-lasting cognitive problems after electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). Neuropsychological testing revealed lower scores on measures of learning, memory and sustained attention. These results stress the importance...

  7. Electroconvulsive therapy-induced brain functional connectivity predicts therapeutic efficacy in patients with schizophrenia: a multivariate pattern recognition study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peng; Jing, Ri-Xing; Zhao, Rong-Jiang; Ding, Zeng-Bo; Shi, Le; Sun, Hong-Qiang; Lin, Xiao; Fan, Teng-Teng; Dong, Wen-Tian; Fan, Yong; Lu, Lin

    2017-05-11

    Previous studies suggested that electroconvulsive therapy can influence regional metabolism and dopamine signaling, thereby alleviating symptoms of schizophrenia. It remains unclear what patients may benefit more from the treatment. The present study sought to identify biomarkers that predict the electroconvulsive therapy response in individual patients. Thirty-four schizophrenia patients and 34 controls were included in this study. Patients were scanned prior to treatment and after 6 weeks of treatment with antipsychotics only (n = 16) or a combination of antipsychotics and electroconvulsive therapy (n = 13). Subject-specific intrinsic connectivity networks were computed for each subject using a group information-guided independent component analysis technique. Classifiers were built to distinguish patients from controls and quantify brain states based on intrinsic connectivity networks. A general linear model was built on the classification scores of first scan (referred to as baseline classification scores) to predict treatment response. Classifiers built on the default mode network, the temporal lobe network, the language network, the corticostriatal network, the frontal-parietal network, and the cerebellum achieved a cross-validated classification accuracy of 83.82%, with specificity of 91.18% and sensitivity of 76.47%. After the electroconvulsive therapy, psychosis symptoms of the patients were relieved and classification scores of the patients were decreased. Moreover, the baseline classification scores were predictive for the treatment outcome. Schizophrenia patients exhibited functional deviations in multiple intrinsic connectivity networks which were able to distinguish patients from healthy controls at an individual level. Patients with lower classification scores prior to treatment had better treatment outcome, indicating that the baseline classification scores before treatment is a good predictor for treatment outcome. CONNECTIVITY NETWORKS

  8. LIPID PEROXIDATION AND BIOCHEMICAL PROFILE IN PRE AND POST ELECTROCONVULSIVE THERAPY IN PSYCHIATRIC PATIENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Narasimha Rao Babji; Santhisree

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is an important treatment for a variety of neuropsychiatric disorders. The invasiveness of the procedure and major adverse effects of memory loss and confusion are limiting variables in the use of ECT. Free radical molecules are released during a shock seizure. The effect of electroconvulsive therapy on lipid peroxidation and on enzymes is not well studied. In the present study Malondialdehyde (MDA), Aspartate transaminase (AST), Alan...

  9. Catatonia in dementia managed with electroconvulsive therapy: A case report and review of the evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Grover

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available There is limited literature on catatonia as a presenting manifestation of dementia. Further, whenever catatonia occurs in patients with dementia, it often responds to lorazepam. There is limited literature on use of electroconvulsive therapy for management of catatonia among patients with dementia. In this report, we present a case of catatonia occurring during dementia of Lewy body which did not respond to lorazepam but responded to use of electroconvulsive therapy.

  10. Electrocardiographic and Blood Pressure Alterations During Electroconvulsive Therapy in Young Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rumi Demetrio Ortega

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE - To study cardiovascular alterations in young patients with no apparent organic disease who underwent electroconvulsive therapy. METHODS - The study comprised 47 healthy patients (22 males and 25 females with a mean age of 30.3 years, who underwent electroconvulsive therapy. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring and continuous electrocardiographic monitoring (Holter monitor were performed during 24 hours. Blood pressure and heart rate were assessed 4 hours prior to electric shock administration, during electric shock administration, and 3 hours after electric shock administration. Arrhythmias and alterations in the ST segment in 24 hours were recorded. RESULTS - On electroconvulsive therapy, a significant increase in blood pressure and heart rate was observed and the measurements returned to basal values after 25 minutes. Three females had tracings with depression of the ST segment suggesting myocardial ischemia prior to and after electroconvulsive therapy. Coronary angiography was normal. No severe cardiac arrhythmias were diagnosed. CONCLUSION - 1 Electroconvulsive therapy is a safe therapeutic modality in psychiatry; 2 it causes a significant increase in blood pressure and heart rate; 3 it may be associated with myocardial ischemia in the absence of coronary obstructive disease; 4 electroconvulsive therapy was not associated with the occurrence of severe cardiac arrhythmias.

  11. Oral Health in Electroconvulsive Therapy: A Neglected Topic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzyka, Brian C; Glass, Magdalena; Glass, Oliver M

    2017-03-01

    Psychiatric medications may have serious and untoward adverse effects such as blurred vision, restlessness, agranulocytosis, muscle rigidity, and tremors. When compared to medications, electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is becoming a more acceptable treatment due to its efficacy, tolerability, and minimal adverse effect profile. Oral trauma can be an ECT-related adverse effect. We reviewed the published literature on oral health and dental protection in patients undergoing ECT, and found that there are deficits in all guidelines on dental protection during ECT. Dental assessment and treatment before and after ECT is warranted. Given the increased risk of poor oral health in psychiatric patients, and the continued evolution of ECT as a mainstay treatment, it is important that studies be conducted to determine the optimal method of oral protection. If adequate care can be ensured, the risks of ECT-induced oral trauma will be minimized.

  12. New-onset dissociative disorder after electroconvulsive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidner, Eduardo; Sewell, R Andrew; Murray, Evan; Schiller, Allen; Price, Bruce H; Cunningham, Miles G

    2010-09-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is an exceptionally effective treatment for a number of psychiatric conditions; however, a common adverse effect is temporary cognitive impairment, especially memory loss. The dissociative disorders also involve disturbances of memory, as well as consciousness and personal identity, but are rarely iatrogenic. We report a case in which dissociative symptoms developed after ECT. A 51-year-old woman with hypothyroidism, migraine headaches, bipolar disorder, and anorexia by history was admitted for worsening depression with suicidal ideation. After a course of 7 right-sided ECT treatments, she experienced remarkable personality change, claiming that it was 1976 and behaving as though she was 30 years younger. Neuropsychological tests were normal, and her memory and former personality spontaneously returned 2 weeks later. This case illustrates that such events may be seen in patients with certain psychiatric profiles, and further studies are needed to determine the risk factors for the occurrence of dissociative episodes after ECT.

  13. The influence of cognitive reserve on memory following electroconvulsive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legendre, Susan A; Stern, Robert A; Solomon, David A; Furman, Martin J; Smith, Kristin E

    2003-01-01

    Cognitive reserve (CR) theory proposes that certain genetic and nonacquired variables, such as larger head size and greater neuronal density, and some life experiences, such as higher educational and occupational attainment, provide a buffer against brain dysfunction in the face of acquired central nervous system (CNS) dysfunction. This study examined CR in the pseudoexperimental paradigm of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). Subjects included fifty (N = 50) depressed patients treated with bilateral ECT. Subjects were placed in high (n = 27) or low (n = 23) CR groups based on years of education and occupational attainment. At baseline, no significant differences were observed between the groups in the amount of information forgotten on a verbal memory measure (Randt stories) after a 30-minute delay. Following three ECT treatments, however, the high CR group forgot significantly less information after a 30-minute delay, as compared to the low CR group (p memory loss in ECT.

  14. Electroconvulsive therapy and memory loss: a personal journey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donahue, A B

    2000-06-01

    The cause for the significant gap between research and anecdotal evidence regarding the extent of some memory loss after electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) has never been adequately explained. A patient's development of awareness and self-education about her severe side effects from ECT raises questions regarding many current assumptions about memory loss. ECT-specific studies, which conclude that side effects are short term and narrow in scope, have serious limitations, including the fact that they do not take into account broader scientific knowledge about memory function. Because of the potential for devastating and permanent memory loss with ECT, informed consent needs significant enhancement until advancing research on both improved techniques and on better predictive knowledge regarding memory loss progresses to making a greater impact on clinical applications. Follow-up care and education in coping skills need to be a regular part of ECT practice when patients do experience severe effects.

  15. Research on electroconvulsive therapy in India: An overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangadhar, Bangalore N.; Phutane, Vivek H.; Thirthalli, Jagadisha

    2010-01-01

    The contribution of researchers from India in the field of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) has been substantial. Over 250 papers have been published by authors from India in the past five decades on this issue; about half of these have appeared in the Indian Journal of Psychiatry. This article summarizes the papers on ECT research that have appeared in the Journal. A bulk of these articles has focused on establishing the efficacy in different disorders. Considerable numbers of papers describe refinement in the ECT procedure, including anesthetic modification, ECT machine and EEG monitoring. Papers on neurobiology of ECT and long-term follow-up of ECT-treated patients form a minority. Despite the decline in the use of ECT across the globe, papers on ECT have only increased in the recent decades in the Journal. PMID:21836706

  16. How Electroconvulsive Therapy Works?: Understanding the Neurobiological Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Amit; Kar, Sujita Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is a time tested treatment modality for the management of various psychiatric disorders. There have been a lot of modifications in the techniques of delivering ECT over decades. Despite lots of criticisms encountered, ECT has still been used commonly in clinical practice due to its safety and efficacy. Research evidences found multiple neuro-biological mechanisms for the therapeutic effect of ECT. ECT brings about various neuro-physiological as well as neuro-chemical changes in the macro- and micro-environment of the brain. Diverse changes involving expression of genes, functional connectivity, neurochemicals, permeability of blood-brain-barrier, alteration in immune system has been suggested to be responsible for the therapeutic effects of ECT. This article reviews different neurobiological mechanisms responsible for the therapeutic efficacy of ECT. PMID:28783929

  17. Electroconvulsive therapy in a patient with moyamoya syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghignone, Erica; Rosenthal, Lisa; Lloyd, Robert Brett; Mouli, Samdeep; Dinwiddie, Stephen

    2015-03-01

    We report on a 30-year-old woman diagnosed with moyamoya syndrome resulting from sickle cell disease who developed catatonia and was successfully treated with electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). Neuroimaging revealed severe tandem narrowing of the left internal carotid artery with diminished cerebral blood flow, moderate narrowing of the right supraclinoid aspect of the right internal carotid artery, and associated numerous lenticulostriate collaterals bilaterally, consistent with moyamoya. The patient presented with mutism; posturing; immobility; stupor; withdrawal; refusal to eat, drink, or speak; and staring, supporting a diagnosis of catatonia. It initially responded to a lorazepam challenge; however, a complicated hospital course and deterioration of the patient's condition, including septic shock, delirium, and continued catatonic symptoms, led to the pursuit of ECT to treat her symptoms. We discuss the risks involved with the administration of ECT in a patient with fragile cerebral vasculature and the successful treatment of catatonia in this patient without resultant stroke or cerebral hemorrhage.

  18. Glycopyrrolate prevents extreme bradycardia and cerebral deoxygenation during electroconvulsive therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Peter; Andersson, John-Erik; Koch, Palle

    2007-01-01

    The stimulation phase of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) induces bradycardia. We evaluated the effect of this bradycardia on cerebral perfusion and oxygenation by administration of the anticholinergic drug glycopyrrolate (Glp). Cerebral perfusion was estimated by transcranial ultrasound......) during the stimulation phase of ECT (P cerebral artery V(mean) decreased 43% (9%-71%; P ....8) to 0.0 (-4.2 to 0.8) microM (P stimulation phase of ECT, maintaining HR at 78 (40-94) beats min(-1), MCA V(mean) at 53 (37-77) cm s(-1), and O(2)Hb at 5.6 (10.6-38.5) microM (P cerebral perfusion...

  19. Electroconvulsive Therapy in Functional Hallucination: Scope and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulochana Joshi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Functional hallucinations are hallucinations triggered by a stimulus in the same modality and cooccur with it. They are rare in occurrence; however, their rarity has no significance as psychopathology till date. Also, very little is known about the treatment of such hallucinations. Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT has been tested for several psychiatric illnesses and has a few relative contraindications; however, it has not previously been used in treating functional hallucinations. We report on a female patient with paranoid schizophrenia who experienced functional hallucinations continuously despite the use of adequate risperidone, which controlled other symptoms. She was treated with ECT which resolved the functional hallucinations. The case highlights the need to ponder on the significance of the phenomenon as well as treatment of this psychopathology by ECT. It also underscores ECT as a treatment option for this kind of hallucination.

  20. Association of Electroconvulsive Therapy With Psychiatric Readmissions in US Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slade, Eric P; Jahn, Danielle R; Regenold, William T; Case, Brady G

    2017-08-01

    Although electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is considered the most efficacious treatment available for individuals with severe affective disorders, ECT's availability is limited and declining, suggesting that information about the population-level effects of ECT is needed. To examine whether inpatient treatment with ECT is associated with a reduction in 30-day psychiatric readmission risk in a large, multistate sample of inpatients with severe affective disorders. A quasi-experimental instrumental variables probit model of the association correlation of ECT administration with patient risk of 30-day readmission was estimated using observational, longitudinal data on hospital inpatient discharges from US general hospitals in 9 states. From a population-based sample of 490 252 psychiatric inpatients, a sample was drawn that consisted of 162 691 individuals with a principal diagnosis of major depressive disorder (MDD), bipolar disorder, or schizoaffective disorder. The key instrumental variable used in the analysis was ECT prevalence in the prior calendar year at the treating hospital. To examine whether ECT's association with readmissions was heterogeneous across population subgroups, analyses included interactions of ECT with age group, sex, race/ethnicity, and diagnosis group. The study was conducted from August 27, 2015, to March 7, 2017. Readmission within 30 days of being discharged. Overall, 2486 of the 162 691 inpatients (1.5%) underwent ECT during their index admission. Compared with other inpatients, those who received ECT were older (mean [SD], 56.8 [16.5] vs 45.9 [16.5] years; P Electroconvulsive therapy may be associated with reduced short-term psychiatric inpatient readmissions among psychiatric inpatients with severe affective disorders. This potential population health effect may be overlooked in US hospitals' current decision making regarding the availability of ECT.

  1. Beta-blocking agents during electroconvulsive therapy: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boere, E; Birkenhäger, T K; Groenland, T H N; van den Broek, W W

    2014-07-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is associated with at least transient episodes of hypertension and tachycardia. Beta-blocking agents may be indicated to prevent cardiovascular complications and may shorten seizure duration. This review evaluates studies that used beta-blocking agents during ECT to determine which agent has the most favourable outcomes on cardiovascular variables and seizure duration. A Medline database search was made using the combined keywords 'adrenergic beta-antagonists' and 'electroconvulsive therapy'. The search was restricted to double-blind randomized controlled trials and yielded 29 original studies. With the use of esmolol, significant attenuating effects were found on cardiovascular parameters in the first 5 min after stimulation; its shortening effects on seizure duration may be dose-related. With the use of labetalol, findings on cardiovascular effects were inconsistent during the first minutes after stimulation but were significant after 5 min and thereafter; seizure duration was scarcely studied. Landiolol attenuates heart rate but with inconsistent findings regarding arterial pressure (AP); seizure duration was mostly unaffected. Esmolol appears to be effective in reducing the cardiovascular response, although seizure duration may be affected with higher dosages. Landiolol can be considered a suitable alternative, but effects on AP need further investigation. Labetalol has been studied to a lesser extent and may have prolonged cardiovascular effects. The included studies varied in design, methodology, and the amount of exact data provided in the publications. Further study of beta-blocking agents in ECT is clearly necessary. © The Author [2014]. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Journal of Anaesthesia. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. MRI T2 relaxometry of brain regions and cognitive dysfunction following electroconvulsive therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Kunigiri, Girish; Jayakumar, P. N.; Janakiramaiah, N.; Gangadhar, B. N.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Although electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) causes no structural brain damage, recent studies reported altered brain perfusion acutely following ECT. This is in keeping with brain edema which was noted in animal experiments following electroconvulsive shock. Aim: This study examined alteration in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) T2 relaxation time, a measure of brain edema, and its relation to therapeutic efficacy, orientation and memory impairment with ECT. Materials and Methods: Fi...

  3. ELECTROCONVULSIVE THERAPY EFFECTS ON COGNITION AND MEMORY AND NURSE’S ROLE

    OpenAIRE

    Stergiopoulou, Antonia

    2016-01-01

    Background: Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is brain stimulation with a short controlled series of electrical pulses co-administered with intravenous anesthesia. Aims: The aim of this review is the evaluation of electroconvulsive effect as a first and second choice psychiatric treatment associated with memory impairment effects. Method: A literature review search took place between 1989 to 2014, concerning aspects and reports of ECT. Results: Specifically 27 studies were selected and in nine ...

  4. The Relationship between Symptom Relief and Psychosocial Functional Improvement during Acute Electroconvulsive Therapy for Patients with Major Depressive Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ching-Hua; Yang, Wei-Cheng

    2017-07-01

    We aimed to compare the degree of symptom relief to psychosocial functional (abbreviated as "functional") improvement and explore the relationships between symptom relief and functional improvement during acute electroconvulsive therapy for patients with major depressive disorder. Major depressive disorder inpatients (n=130) requiring electroconvulsive therapy were recruited. Electroconvulsive therapy was generally performed for a maximum of 12 treatments. Symptom severity, using the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, and psychosocial functioning (abbreviated as "functioning"), using the Modified Work and Social Adjustment Scale, were assessed before electroconvulsive therapy, after every 3 electroconvulsive therapy treatments, and after the final electroconvulsive therapy. Both 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale and Modified Work and Social Adjustment Scale scores were converted to T-score units to compare the degrees of changes between depressive symptoms and functioning after electroconvulsive therapy. Structural equation modeling was used to test the relationships between 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale and Modified Work and Social Adjustment Scale during acute electroconvulsive therapy. One hundred sixteen patients who completed at least the first 3 electroconvulsive therapy treatments entered the analysis. Reduction of 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale T-scores was significantly greater than that of Modified Work and Social Adjustment Scale T-scores at assessments 2, 3, 4, and 5. The model analyzed by structural equation modeling satisfied all indices of goodness-of-fit (chi-square = 32.882, P =.107, TLI = 0.92, CFI = 0.984, RMSEA = 0.057). The 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale change did not predict subsequent Modified Work and Social Adjustment Scale change. Functioning improved less than depressive symptoms during acute electroconvulsive therapy. Symptom reduction did not predict subsequent functional improvement

  5. General Anaesthesia Protocols for Patients Undergoing Electroconvulsive Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Aravind; Lal, Chandar; Al-Sinawi, Hamed

    2017-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to review general anaesthesia protocols for patients undergoing electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) at a tertiary care hospital in Oman, particularly with regards to clinical profile, potential drug interactions and patient outcomes. Methods This retrospective study took place at the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital (SQUH), Muscat, Oman. The electronic medical records of patients undergoing ECT at SQUH between January 2010 and December 2014 were reviewed for demographic characteristics and therapy details. Results A total of 504 modified ECT sessions were performed on 57 patients during the study period. All of the patients underwent a uniform general anaesthetic regimen consisting of propofol and succinylcholine; however, they received different doses between sessions, as determined by the treating anaesthesiologist. Variations in drug doses between sessions in the same patient could not be attributed to any particular factor. Self-limiting tachycardia and hypertension were periprocedural complications noted among all patients. One patient developed aspiration pneumonitis (1.8%). Conclusion All patients undergoing ECT received a general anaesthetic regimen including propofol and succinylcholine. However, the interplay of anaesthetic drugs with ECT efficacy could not be established due to a lack of comprehensive data, particularly with respect to seizure duration. In addition, the impact of concurrent antipsychotic therapy on anaesthetic dose and subsequent complications could not be determined. PMID:28417028

  6. Electroconvulsive therapy use in adolescents: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Considered as a moment of psychological vulnerability, adolescence is remarkably a risky period for the development of psychopathologies, when the choice of the correct therapeutic approach is crucial for achieving remission. One of the researched therapies in this case is electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). The present study reviews the recent and classical aspects regarding ECT use in adolescents. Methods Systematic review, performed in November 2012, conformed to the PRISMA statement. Results From the 212 retrieved articles, only 39 were included in the final sample. The reviewed studies bring indications of ECT use in adolescents, evaluate the efficiency of this therapy regarding remission, and explore the potential risks and complications of the procedure. Conclusions ECT use in adolescents is considered a highly efficient option for treating several psychiatric disorders, achieving high remission rates, and presenting few and relatively benign adverse effects. Risks can be mitigated by the correct use of the technique and are considered minimal when compared to the efficiency of ECT in treating psychopathologies. PMID:23718899

  7. State of the art: nursing knowledge and electroconvulsive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froimson, L; Creed, P; Mathew, L

    1995-09-01

    Nursing services attempting to develop standards for their own facilities will find limited literature specific to nursing and electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in American publications. From 1966 to December 1994, there were only 19 publications in American nursing journals that provide a specific focus on nursing and ECT. Only one of these articles reported research findings. Twenty-seven citations in Convulsive Therapy included nurse contributors. While the APA Task Force on the Practice of ECT has addressed educational needs of nursing and technical elements of the procedure, there do not currently exist specific standards for nursing practice in ECT. Concerns salient to nursing that have generated articles by nurses include instruction of patients, support to patients and families, safety of patients, assessment of clinical status, informed consent, and nurses' and patients' attitudes about ECT. Nurses are encouraged to join their physician-colleagues in developing and disseminating the information needed for the field of nursing to contribute its own expertise to the care of patients receiving ECT.

  8. Multifactorial Determinants of the Neurocognitive Effects of Electroconvulsive Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClintock, Shawn M.; Choi, Jimmy; Deng, Zhi-De; Appelbaum, Lawrence G.; Krystal, Andrew D.; Lisanby, Sarah H.

    2014-01-01

    For many patients with neuropsychiatric illnesses, standard psychiatric treatments with mono or combination pharmacotherapy, psychotherapy, and transcranial magnetic stimulation are ineffective. For these patients with treatment resistant neuropsychiatric illnesses, a main therapeutic option is electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). Decades of research have found ECT to be highly effective; however, it can also result in adverse neurocognitive effects. Specifically, ECT results in disorientation after each session, anterograde amnesia for recently learned information, and retrograde amnesia for previously learned information. Unfortunately, the neurocognitive effects and underlying mechanisms of action of ECT remain poorly understood. The purpose of this paper is to synthesize the multiple moderating and mediating factors that are thought to underlie the neurocognitive effects of ECT into a coherent model. Such factors include demographic and neuropsychological characteristics, neuropsychiatric symptoms, ECT technical parameters, and ECT associated neurophysiological changes. Future research is warranted to evaluate and test this model, so that these findings may support the development of more refined clinical seizure therapy delivery approaches and efficacious cognitive remediation strategies to improve the utility of this important and widely used intervention tool for neuropsychiatric diseases. PMID:24820942

  9. Electroconvulsive therapy and anticoagulation after pulmonary embolism: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Cesar Lazaro

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT is considered the most effective treatment for catatonia regardless its underlying condition. The rigid fixed posture and immobility observed in catatonia may lead to several clinical complications, of which, pulmonary embolism (PE is one of the most severe. The rapid improvement of the psychiatric condition in catatonia-related PE is essential, since immobility favors the occurrence of new thromboembolic events and further complications. In that scenario, ECT should be considered, based on a risk-benefit analysis, aiming at the faster resolution of the catatonia. Methods Case report and literature review. Results A 66-years-old woman admitted to the psychiatric ward with catatonia due to a depressive episode presented bilateral PE. Clinically stable, but still severely depressed after a trial of antidepressants, she was treated with ECT in the course of full anticoagulation with enoxaparin. After five ECT sessions, her mood was significantly better and she was walking and eating spontaneously. She did not present complications related either to PE or to anticoagulation. After the eighth ECT session, she evolved with hypomania, which was managed with oral medication adjustments. The patient was completely euthymic at discharge. Conclusion The case we presented provides further evidence to the anecdotal case reports on the safety of ECT in the course of concomitant full anticoagulant therapy after PE, and illustrates how, with the proper precautions, the benefits of ECT in such condition might outweigh its risks.

  10. Unilateral brief-pulse electroconvulsive therapy and cognition: effects of electrode placement, stimulus dosage and time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semkovska, Maria; Keane, Deborah; Babalola, Oyemi; McLoughlin, Declan M

    2011-06-01

    To clarify advantages of unilateral electrode placement as an optimisation technique for electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) for depression, aims were to meta-analyse unilateral ECT effects on cognitive performance relative to: (1) bitemporal electrode placement, (2) electrical dosage, and (3) time interval between final treatment and cognitive reassessment. Relevant electronic databases were systematically searched through May 2009, using the terms: "electroconvulsive therapy" and ["cogniti∗", "neuropsycholog∗", "memory", "attention", "executive", "spatial", or "intellectual"]. Inclusion criteria were: independent study of depressed patients receiving unilateral or bitemporal brief-pulse ECT; within-subjects design; use of objective cognitive assessments; available mean electrical dosage for unilateral samples. Standardized pre-post ECT weighted effect sizes were computed and pooled within 16 cognitive domains by a mixed-effects model. Thirty-nine studies (1415 patients) were meta-analysed. Up to three days after final treatment, unilateral ECT was associated with significantly smaller decreases in global cognition, delayed verbal memory retrieval, and autobiographical memory, compared to bitemporal ECT. Significant publication bias was found for autobiographical memory, favouring reporting of larger percentage loss. Higher unilateral ECT electrical dosage predicted larger decreases in verbal learning, delayed verbal memory retrieval, visual recognition, and semantic memory retrieval. When retested more than three days after completing ECT, no significant differences remained between the two electrode placements; for unilateral ECT, electrical dosage no longer predicted cognitive performance whereas increasing interval between final treatment and retesting predicted growing improvement in some variables. This interval is a more useful long-term predictor of cognitive function than electrode placement or electrical dosage following unilateral ECT. Copyright © 2010

  11. Unilateral brief-pulse electroconvulsive therapy and cognition: Effects of electrode placement, stimulus dosage and time.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Semkovska, Maria

    2010-11-23

    To clarify advantages of unilateral electrode placement as an optimisation technique for electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) for depression, aims were to meta-analyse unilateral ECT effects on cognitive performance relative to: (1) bitemporal electrode placement, (2) electrical dosage, and (3) time interval between final treatment and cognitive reassessment. Relevant electronic databases were systematically searched through May 2009, using the terms: "electroconvulsive therapy" and ["cogniti∗", "neuropsycholog∗", "memory", "attention", "executive", "spatial", or "intellectual"]. Inclusion criteria were: independent study of depressed patients receiving unilateral or bitemporal brief-pulse ECT; within-subjects design; use of objective cognitive assessments; available mean electrical dosage for unilateral samples. Standardized pre-post ECT weighted effect sizes were computed and pooled within 16 cognitive domains by a mixed-effects model. Thirty-nine studies (1415 patients) were meta-analysed. Up to three days after final treatment, unilateral ECT was associated with significantly smaller decreases in global cognition, delayed verbal memory retrieval, and autobiographical memory, compared to bitemporal ECT. Significant publication bias was found for autobiographical memory, favouring reporting of larger percentage loss. Higher unilateral ECT electrical dosage predicted larger decreases in verbal learning, delayed verbal memory retrieval, visual recognition, and semantic memory retrieval. When retested more than three days after completing ECT, no significant differences remained between the two electrode placements; for unilateral ECT, electrical dosage no longer predicted cognitive performance whereas increasing interval between final treatment and retesting predicted growing improvement in some variables. This interval is a more useful long-term predictor of cognitive function than electrode placement or electrical dosage following unilateral ECT.

  12. Effects of maintenance electroconvulsive therapy on cognitive functions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vothknecht, S.; Kho, K. H.; van Schaick, H. W.; Zwinderman, A. H.; Middelkoop, H.; Blansjaar, B. A.

    2003-01-01

    Background: This study examined cognitive side effects of maintenance electroconvulsive (ECT) in comparison with maintenance pharmacotherapy after index ECT. Method: Clinical outcome data and neuropsychological measurements were compared in 11 maintenance ECT patients and 13 control patients treated

  13. Public attitudes towards electroconvulsive therapy in the Chuvash Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golenkov, Andrei; Ungvari, Gabor S; Gazdag, Gábor

    2012-05-01

    Public attitudes towards a given medical procedure can have a significant influence on the employment of that method. Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is a medical procedure that has received an exceptionally ambiguous public reception since its inception. To survey the level of information about and attitudes towards ECT in a general population sample of the Chuvash Republic of the Russian Federation. A randomly selected cohort of 5,373 people was contacted by telephone. The respondents were asked three closed and three open questions. The response rate was 74.7%. Only 35.2% of those interviewed said they knew anything about ECT. Health professionals and younger respondents were better informed. The two main sources of information about ECT were foreign films and the mass media. The main indication of ECT was thought to be schizophrenia. The majority (63.3%) of the respondents had negative opinions and emotions about ECT. Limited information about and generally negative attitudes towards ECT were found in the general population of the Chuvash Republic. Gender, age, education level, employment in the health industry, and information source were found to be the determining factors in the knowledge of and attitudes towards ECT.

  14. Knowledge and attitudes of residents regarding electroconvulsive therapy

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    Gokay Alpak

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To determine the knowledge and attitudes of non-psychiatry residents about electroconvulsive therapy (ECT and additionally to make a comparison between residents of medical sciences and surgical sciences. METHODS: The study consisted of 176 medical school graduates in their residency training (119 medical sciences, 57 surgical sciences at a university hospital. All subjects are asked to fill a questionnaire prepared by the authors. RESULTS: Among all, 58 of the medical sciences residents (48.7%, and 32 of the surgical sciences residents (56.1% had reported that they have never observed any ECT session. There was no statistically significant difference between the residents of the two groups in terms of theirs attitudes towards ECT (p>0.05. The residents of surgical sciences differed from the others only in their response to the question that sought answer whether they would agree to have any of their relatives to undergo ECT. They more often disagreed to this statement (p=0.02. CONCLUSIONS: The knowledge and attitudes of residents in medical, and surgical sciences about ECT seemed to be similar. Despite their significant amount of knowledge about ECT the residents showed similar attitudes towards it with the patients and their caregivers that were previously reported in the literature. Additionally, the results also suggest that current training in medical schools need a revision that would eventually improve attitudes of medical graduates towards ECT. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2015; 14(1.000: 33-38

  15. Retrograde amnesia after electroconvulsive therapy: a temporary effect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeter, Martijn; Murre, Jaap M J; Janssen, Steve M J; Birkenhager, Tom; van den Broek, W W

    2011-07-01

    Although electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is generally considered effective against depression, it remains controversial because of its association with retrograde memory loss. Here, we assessed memory after ECT in circumstances most likely to yield strong retrograde amnesia. A cohort of patients undergoing ECT for major depression was tested before and after ECT, and again at 3-months follow-up. Included were 21 patients scheduled to undergo bilateral ECT for severe major depression and 135 controls matched for gender, age, education, and media consumption. Two memory tests were used: a verbal learning test to assess anterograde memory function, and a remote memory test that assessed memory for news during the course of one year. Before ECT the patients' scores were lower than those of controls. They were lower again after treatment, suggesting retrograde amnesia. At follow-up, however, memory for events before treatment had returned to the pre-ECT level. Memory for events in the months after treatment was as good as that of controls. The sample size in this study was not large. Moreover, memory impairment did not correlate with level of depression, which may be due to restriction of range. Our results are consistent with the possibility that ECT as currently practiced does not cause significant lasting retrograde amnesia, but that amnesia is mostly temporary and related to the period of impairment immediately following ECT. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Neuropsychological effects and attitudes in patients following electroconvulsive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feliu, Miriam; Edwards, Christopher L; Sudhakar, Shiv; McDougald, Camela; Raynor, Renee; Johnson, Stephanie; Byrd, Goldie; Whitfield, Keith; Jonassaint, Charles; Romero, Heather; Edwards, Lekisha; Wellington, Chante'; Hill, LaBarron K; Sollers, James; Logue, Patrick E

    2008-06-01

    The current study examined the effects of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) on neuropsychological test performance. Forty-six patients completed brief neuropsychological and psychological testing before and after receiving ECT for the treatment of recalcitrant and severe depression. Neuropsychological testing consisted of the Levin Selective Reminding Test (Levin) and Wechsler Memory Scale-Revised Edition (WMS-R). Self-report measures included the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), the Short-Term Memory Questionnaire (STMQ), and several other measures of emotional functioning and patient attitudes toward ECT. The mean number of days between pre-ECT and post-ECT testing was 24. T-test revealed a significant decrease in subjective ratings of depression as rated by the BDI, t(45) = 9.82, P Objective ratings of memory appeared impaired following treatment, and patients' self-report measures of memory confirmed this decline. More specifically, repeated measures MANOVA [Wilks Lambda F(11,30) = 4.3, p memory (p recall (p visual designs (p memory functioning, and post-ECT self-reports may not be reliable.

  17. Rocuronium-Sugammadex in Anesthesia for Electroconvulsive Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilay Tas

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT is a form of treatment which is very effective in many psychiatric disorders. The administration of anesthesia plays a positive role in the success of ECT and improves the oxygenation of the body during the process. Succinylcholine, is a depolarizing neuromuscular blocker of choice, the most common agent used to provide muscular relaxation during ECT. Alternative neuromusculer blokers have been used during anesthesia because of contraindications and serious side effects of succinylcholine. Rocuronium is a nondepolarizing neuromuscular blocker with inter-mediate time of action which may be used safely during ECT. Although relatively late onset of action and long half life compared to succinylcholine may seem as drawbacks, the new generation reversing agents like suggamadex have made these disadvantages ignorable. Sugammadex, a new generation neuromuscular blocker reversal agent, not having serious side effects as much as the classic reversals, such as cardiovascular side effects, is playing an important role in anesthesiology practice. In recent years, rocuronium-sugammadex combination is being included in the ECT practice extensively. In this paper, the usability of rocuronium-sugammadex combination as an alternative to succinylcholine has been revised. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2016; 8(1: 76-84

  18. Electroconvulsive therapy regulates emotional memory bias of depressed patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Tongjian; Xie, Wen; Wei, Qiang; Chen, Yang; Mu, Jingjing; Tian, Yanghua; Wang, Kai

    2017-11-01

    Emotional memory bias is considered to be an important base of the etiology of depression and can be reversed by antidepressants via enhancing the memory for positive stimuli. Another antidepressant treatment, electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), has rapid antidepressant effect and frequently causes short-term memory impairment. However, it is unclear about the short-term effect of ECT on memory bias. In this study, the incidental memory task with emotional pictures were applied to evaluate the emotional memory of twenty depressed patients at pre- and post-ECT (three days after ECT) compared to twenty healthy controls. The depressive symptoms were evaluated using the Hamilton rating scale of depression (HRSD). Before ECT, patients showed decreased recognition memory for positive pictures compared to controls and remembered negative pictures more easily than positive pictures in the recognition task. In patients, the main effect of session (pre-ECT and post-ECT) was significant for both recognition and recall memory with reduced memory performance. The interaction between valence (positive, neutral and negative) and session was significant for recognition memory, indicating that negative memory was impaired more severely than positive memory. Our study indicates that ECT relieves depressive symptoms and regulates emotional memory through more severe impairment on memory for negative stimuli. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. [Assessment of individual clinical outcomes: regarding an electroconvulsive therapy case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iraurgi, Ioseba; Gorbeña, Susana; Martínez-Cubillos, Miren-Itxaso; Escribano, Margarita; Gómez-de-Maintenant, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Evaluation of therapeutic results and of the efficacy and effectiveness of treatments is an area of interest both for clinicians and researchers. In general, randomized controlled trial designs have been used as the methodology of choice in which intergroup comparisons are made having a minimum of participants in each arm of treatment. However, these procedures are seldom used in daily clinical practice. Despite this fact, the evaluation of treatment results for a specific patient is important for the clinician in order to address if therapeutic goals have been accomplished both in terms of statistical significance and clinical meaningfulness. The methodology based on the reliable change index (Jacobson y Truax)1 provides an estimate of these two criteria. The goal of this article is to propose a procedure to apply the methodology with a single case study of a woman diagnosed with major depression and treated with electroconvulsive therapy. Copyright © 2014 SEP y SEPB. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  20. A systematic review of left unilateral electroconvulsive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellner, C H; Farber, K G; Chen, X R; Mehrotra, A; Zipursky, G D N

    2017-08-01

    To systematically review the published clinical trials, case series, and case reports on left unilateral (LUL) electrode placement for clinical electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). PubMed, Ovid Medline, and the Cochrane Library were searched for articles concerning LUL ECT. Number of patients, efficacy, and cognitive outcomes were extracted from the papers that met our inclusion criteria. A total of 52 articles were included in this review, consisting of 33 clinical trials, seven case series, and 12 case reports. Overall, the efficacy of LUL electrode placement for the treatment of depression and psychosis is similar to that of right unilateral (RUL) and bilateral (BL) electrode placements. Patients receiving LUL ECT tend to experience more verbal memory impairment than patients receiving RUL ECT, but less verbal impairment than patients receiving BL ECT. In contrast, patients receiving LUL ECT tended to experience the least visual and nonverbal memory impairment, compared to patients receiving RUL or BL ECT. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Use of electroconvulsive therapy in the Baltic states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lõokene, Margus; Kisuro, Aigars; Mačiulis, Valentinas; Banaitis, Valdas; Ungvari, Gabor S; Gazdag, Gábor

    2014-07-01

    While the use of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) has been investigated worldwide, nothing is known about its use in the Baltic states. The purpose of this study was thus to explore ECT practice in the three Baltic countries. A 21-item, semi-structured questionnaire was sent out to all psychiatric inpatient settings that provided ECT in 2010. In Lithuania, four services provided ECT in 2010. Only modified ECT with anaesthesia and muscle relaxation is performed in the country. In 2010, approximately 120 patients received ECT, i.e., 0.375 patients/10,000 population. Only two centres offer ECT in Latvia. The first centre treated only three patients with ECT in 2010, while the second centre six patients. In both centres outdated Soviet machines are used. The main indication for ECT was severe, malignant catatonia. ECT is practiced in five psychiatric facilities in Estonia. In 2010, it was used in the treatment of 362 patients (17% women) nationwide, i.e., 2.78 patients/10,000 population. Only a senior psychiatrist may indicate ECT in Estonia and pregnancy is no contraindication. In 2010, the main indication for ECT was schizophrenia (47.8%). This 2010 survey revealed significant differences in the use and availability of ECT between the Baltic countries.

  2. Electroconvulsive Therapy In Neuropsychiatry : Relevance Of Seizure Parameters

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    Gangadhar BN

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT is used to induce therapeutic seizures in various clinical conditions. It is specifically useful in depression, catatonia, patients with high suicidal risk, and those intolerant to drugs. Its beneficial effects surpass its side effects. Memory impairment is benign and transient. Its mechanism of action is unknown, though numerous neurotransmitters and neuroreceptors have been implicated. The standards of ECT practice are well established but still evolving in some particularly in unilateral ECT. Assessment of threshold by formula method may deliver higher stimulus dose compared with titration method. Cerebral seizure during ECT procedure is necessary. Motor (cuff method and EEG seizure monitoring are mandatory. Recent studies have shown some EEG parameters (amplitude, fractal dimension, symmetry, and post ictal suppression to be associated with therapeutic outcome. Besides seizure monitoring, measuring other physiological parameters such as heart rate (HR and blood pressure (BP may be useful indicators of therapeutic response. Use of ECT in neurological conditions as well as its application in psychiatric illnesses associated with neurological disorders has also been reviewed briefly.

  3. Electroconvulsive therapy in the elderly: Anesthetic considerations and Psychotropic interactions

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    Harsh Garekar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT has been found to be a rapid and effective treatment strategy for psychiatric and neurological conditions in the elderly, but the administration of ECT in the elderly can be challenging due to a high risk of adverse events. The increased risk can be attributed to a declined physiological reserve, the presence of physical comorbidities, and the use of multiple drugs, which interact with the electrical stimulus and the anesthetic medications used during the ECT procedure. The selection of appropriate induction agents and muscle relaxants should be guided by patient's clinical status and the psychotropic drugs being used. Modifications in the doses of psychotropic drugs also need to be carried out before ECT to reduce cardiovascular and neurological side effects. Modification in the conduct of anesthesia can also aid in augmenting seizures and in preventing common side effects of ECT. A vital step in preventing adverse events in the elderly is carrying out a thorough pre.ECT evaluation. Despite these challenges, ECT can be carried out safely in elderly patients with severe comorbidities, provided clinical ECT, and anesthetic parameters are adequately optimized.

  4. A Case of Treatment- resistant Depression and Body Dysmorphic Disorder: The Role of Electroconvulsive Therapy Revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahato, Ram S; San Gabriel, Maria Chona P; Longshore, Carrol T; Schnur, David B

    2016-01-01

    Body dysmorphic disorder is a common, often disabling condition, and is frequently comorbid with major depressive disorder. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors constitute first line set of somatic interventions but the management of refractory patients remains challenging. Electroconvulsive therapy, an often highly beneficial treatment for medication resistant-depression, is not considered an effective therapeutic alternative for treatment refractory body dysmorphic disorder. Here we present a 50-year-old woman with body dysmorphic disorder and comorbid major depressive disorder who remained incapacitated and suicidal despite several trials with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and antipsychotic medication. Depressive and dysmorphic symptoms appeared to resolve with electroconvulsive therapy, and remission was sustained for two months. Electroconvulsive therapy has an important place in the management of treatment- resistant depression associated with body dysmorphic disorder, and, in select cases, may be effective for dysmorphic symptoms as well.

  5. Assessment of the cardiovascular effects of electroconvulsive therapy in individuals older than 50 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takada J.Y.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the impact of electroconvulsive therapy on arterial blood pressure, heart rate, heart rate variability, and the occurrence of ischemia or arrhythmias, 38 (18 men depressive patients free from systemic diseases, 50 to 83 years old (mean: 64.7 ± 8.6 underwent electroconvulsive therapy. All patients were studied with simultaneous 24-h ambulatory blood pressure and Holter monitoring, starting 18 h before and continuing for 3 h after electroconvulsive therapy. Blood pressure, heart rate, heart rate variability, arrhythmias, and ischemic episodes were recorded. Before each session of electroconvulsive therapy, blood pressure and heart rate were in the normal range; supraventricular ectopic beats occurred in all patients and ventricular ectopic beats in 27/38; 2 patients had non-sustained ventricular tachycardia. After shock, systolic, mean and diastolic blood pressure increased 29, 25, and 24% (P < 0.001, respectively, and returned to baseline values within 1 h. Maximum, mean and minimum heart rate increased 56, 52, and 49% (P < 0.001, respectively, followed by a significant decrease within 5 min; heart rate gradually increased again thereafter and remained elevated for 1 h. Analysis of heart rate variability showed increased sympathetic activity during shock with a decrease in both sympathetic and parasympathetic drive afterwards. No serious adverse effects occurred; electroconvulsive therapy did not trigger any malignant arrhythmias or ischemia. In middle-aged and elderly people free from systemic diseases, electroconvulsive therapy caused transitory increases in blood pressure and heart rate and a decrease in heart rate variability but these changes were not associated with serious adverse clinical events.

  6. Patients' perspectives on electroconvulsive therapy: a reevaluation of the review by Rose et al on memory loss after electroconvulsive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergsholm, Per

    2012-03-01

    In 2003, based on a review of 7 studies, Rose et al concluded that at least one third of patients report significant memory loss 6 months or more after electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). However, few details on the included studies were given. The present study evaluates factors that may have influenced the results. The 7 studies were scrutinized as to the 6-month assessment criterion, whether the data represent ECT-treated patients in general, specification and significance of the memory loss, stimulus type, and electrode placement. In 3 studies, the 6-month inclusion criterion was not met, including 1 study with 98% satisfied patients and 1 study with only 37% valid response rate. Two other studies selected individuals from user/advocacy groups generally biased against ECT and were probably overlapping. The significance of memory problems was not mentioned in any of the studies. Two studies reported that 30% and 55% of patients treated with bilateral ECT in the 1970s felt they had persistent memory gaps around the time of treatment, but the long-obsolete sine wave stimulus type was used. The results mostly concerned bilateral ECT, whereas unilateral ECT seemed to cause little complaints. Data used by Rose et al are severely flawed, making their results inconclusive and misleading.

  7. Cognitive and Neurophysiological Recovery Following Electroconvulsive Therapy: A Study Protocol

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    Ben J. A. Palanca

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT employs the elective induction of generalizes seizures as a potent treatment for severe psychiatric illness. As such, ECT provides an opportunity to rigorously study the recovery of consciousness, reconstitution of cognition, and electroencephalographic (EEG activity following seizures. Fifteen patients with major depressive disorder refractory to pharmacologic therapy will be enrolled (Clinicaltrials.gov, NCT02761330. Adequate seizure duration will be confirmed following right unilateral ECT under etomidate anesthesia. Patients will then undergo randomization for the order in which they will receive three sequential treatments: etomidate + ECT, ketamine + ECT, and ketamine + sham ECT. Sessions will be repeated in the same sequence for a total of six treatments. Before each session, sensorimotor speed, working memory, and executive function will be assessed through a standardized cognitive test battery. After each treatment, the return of purposeful responsiveness to verbal command will be determined. At this point, serial cognitive assessments will begin using the same standardized test battery. The presence of delirium and changes in depression severity will also be ascertained. Sixty-four channel EEG will be acquired throughout baseline, ictal, and postictal epochs. Mixed-effects models will correlate the trajectories of cognitive recovery, clinical outcomes, and EEG metrics over time. This innovative research design will answer whether: (1 time to return of responsiveness will be prolonged with ketamine + ECT compared with ketamine + sham ECT; (2 time of restoration to baseline function in each cognitive domain will take longer after ketamine + ECT than after ketamine + sham ECT; (3 postictal delirium is associated with delayed restoration of baseline function in all cognitive domains; and (4 the sequence of reconstitution of cognitive domains following the three treatments in this study is similar to that

  8. Maintenance electroconvulsive therapy for depression with catatonia in a young woman with Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torr, Jennifer; D'Abrera, Juan Carlos

    2014-12-01

    To describe and discuss the use of maintenance electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in a young woman with Down syndrome and depression with catatonia. Clinical case report. A 23-year-old woman with Down syndrome (mosaic type) and a 4-year history of depressed mood triggered by adverse life events presented with mutism, psychomotor retardation, and compromised oral intake. Multiple trials of antidepressant medications were either ineffective or complicated by adverse reactions. She improved rapidly with a course of bilateral ECT but required maintenance ECT to sustain recovery. A series of premorbid, morbid, and post-treatment drawings by the young woman highlight the efficacy of treatment. Electroconvulsive therapy was found to be a safe and effective treatment for life-threatening mental illness in a young woman with Down syndrome who had failed multiple trials of antidepressant medications. This case highlights the importance of considering catatonia as a diagnosis in persons with Down syndrome and the effectiveness of electroconvulsive treatment.

  9. Neuropsychological effects and attitudes in patients following electroconvulsive therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Feliu

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Miriam Feliu1,2, Christopher L Edwards1,2,3, Shiv Sudhakar4, Camela McDougald1, Renee Raynor5, Stephanie Johnson6, Goldie Byrd7, Keith Whitfield8, Charles Jonassaint8, Heather Romero1, Lekisha Edwards1, Chante’ Wellington1, LaBarron K Hill9, James Sollers, III9, Patrick E Logue11Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences; 2Duke Pain and Palliative Care Center; 3Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology; 4Drexel University Medical School; 5Brain Tumor Center, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA; 6Science Directorate, American Psychological Association; 7Department of Biology, North Carolina A&T State University; 8Department of Psychology, Duke University; 9Department of Psychology, The Ohio State UniversityAbstract: The current study examined the effects of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT on neuropsychological test performance. Forty-six patients completed brief neuropsychological and psychological testing before and after receiving ECT for the treatment of recalcitrant and severe depression. Neuropsychological testing consisted of the Levin Selective Reminding Test (Levin and Wechsler Memory Scale-Revised Edition (WMS-R. Self-report measures included the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI, the Short-Term Memory Questionnaire (STMQ, and several other measures of emotional functioning and patient attitudes toward ECT. The mean number of days between pre-ECT and post-ECT testing was 24. T-test revealed a significant decrease in subjective ratings of depression as rated by the BDI, t(45 = 9.82, P < 0.0001 (Pre-BDI = 27.9 ± 20.2; post-BDI = 13.5 ± 9.7. Objective ratings of memory appeared impaired following treatment, and patients’ self-report measures of memory confirmed this decline. More specifically, repeated measures MANOVA [Wilks Lambda F(11,30 = 4.3, p < 0.001] indicated significant decreases for measures of immediate recognition memory (p < 0.005, long-term storage (p < 0.05, delayed prose passage recall (p < 0

  10. The subjective experience of patients who received electroconvulsive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koopowitz, Leslie Frank; Chur-Hansen, Anna; Reid, Sally; Blashki, Miriam

    2003-02-01

    Despite the vast amount of scientific literature available on electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), there is little qualitative focus upon the patients' subjective experience of this procedure. Using an exploratory descriptive methodology, this study aims to provide a more unique insight into what certain patients actually think of ECT. Semistructured interviews were conducted to explore eight patients' opinions and experiences of ECT. Interviews were subjected to analysis by a five-step framework approach that identified prominent themes in relation to five broad questions and in conjunction with issues raised by the subjects themselves. Eleven major themes were identified. Four of these were chosen for discussion, not only as the most prevalent themes (in terms of how frequently they were mentioned by the subjects), but also as the most striking (in regards to the intensity of emotions evoked, or their influence on their perception of ECT as a future treatment option). The four themes are fear of ECT, attribution of cognitive decline and memory loss to ECT, positive ECT experiences, and patients' suggestions. Using such a qualitative approach, the depth of the information obtained has revealed new perspectives on how patients perceive the experience of ECT. Fears reported by patients present an opportunity to address specific areas of the procedure that generate the most angst. These were closely associated with recommendations that many patients proposed throughout the interviews. Patients' perceptions of the cognitive effects of ECT do not necessarily correspond with those commonly reported in the literature on ECT. Positive experiences with ECT were more complex than simply its efficacy. There is a need for future research in order to explore and address patients' experiences of ECT.

  11. Contemporary use and practice of electroconvulsive therapy worldwide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiknes, Kari Ann; Jarosh-von Schweder, Lindy; Høie, Bjørg

    2012-01-01

    To explore contemporary (from 1990) utilization and practice of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) worldwide. Systematic search (limited to studies published 1990 and after) was undertaken in the databases Medline, Embase, PsycINFO, SveMed, and EBSCO/Cinahl. Primary data-based studies/surveys with reported ECT utilization and practice in psychiatric institutions internationally, nationally, and regionally; city were included. Two reviewers independently checked study titles and abstracts according to inclusion criteria, and extracted ECT utilization and practice data from those retrieved in full text. Seventy studies were included, seven from Australia and New Zealand, three Africa, 12 North and Latin America, 33 Europe, and 15 Asia. Worldwide ECT differences and trends were evident, average number ECTs administered per patient were eight; unmodified (without anesthesia) was used in Asia (over 90%), Africa, Latin America, Russia, Turkey, Spain. Worldwide preferred electrode placement was bilateral, except unilateral at some places (Europe and Australia/New Zealand). Although mainstream was brief-pulse wave, sine-wave devices were still used. Majority ECT treated were older women with depression in Western countries, versus younger men with schizophrenia in Asian countries. ECT under involuntary conditions (admissions), use of ambulatory-ECT, acute first line of treatment, as well as administered by other professions (geriatricians, nurses) were noted by some sites. General trends were only some institutions within the same country providing ECT, training inadequate, and guidelines not followed. Mandatory reporting and overall country ECT register data were sparse. Many patients are still treated with unmodified ECT today. Large global variation in ECT utilization, administration, and practice advocates a need for worldwide sharing of knowledge about ECT, reflection, and learning from each other's experiences. PMID:22741102

  12. High-sensitivity Cardiac Troponin Elevation after Electroconvulsive Therapy (ECT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duma, Andreas; Pal, Swatilika; Johnston, Joshua; Helwani, Mohammad A.; Bhat, Adithya; Gill, Bali; Rosenkvist, Jessica; Cartmill, Christopher; Brown, Frank; Miller, J. Philip; Scott, Mitchell G; Sanchez-Conde, Francisco; Jarvis, Michael; Farber, Nuri B.; Zorumski, Charles F.; Conway, Charles; Nagele, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Background While electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is widely regarded as a life-saving and safe procedure, evidence regarding its effects on myocardial cell injury are sparse. The objective of this investigation was to determine incidence and magnitude of new cardiac troponin elevation after ECT using a novel high-sensitivity cardiac troponin I (hscTnI) assay. Methods This was a prospective cohort study in adult patients undergoing ECT in a single academic center (up to three ECT treatments per patient). The primary outcome was new hscTnI elevation after ECT, defined as an increase of hscTnI >100% after ECT compared to baseline with at least one value above the limit of quantification (10 ng/L). 12-lead ECG and hscTnI values were obtained prior to and 15–30 minutes after ECT; in a subset of patients an additional 2-hour hscTnI value was obtained. Results The final study population was 100 patients and a total of 245 ECT treatment sessions. Eight patients (8/100, 8%) experienced new hscTnI elevation after ECT with a cumulative incidence of 3.7% (9/245 treatments; one patient had two hscTnI elevations), two of whom had a non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction (incidence 2/245, 0.8%). Median hscTnI concentrations did not increase significantly after ECT. Tachycardia and/or elevated systolic blood pressure developed after approximately two thirds of ECT treatments. Conclusions ECT appears safe from a cardiac standpoint in a large majority of patients. A small subset of patients with pre-existing cardiovascular risk factors, however, may develop new cardiac troponin elevation after ECT, the clinical relevance of which is unclear in the absence of signs of myocardial ischemia. PMID:28166110

  13. Common Use of Electroconvulsive Therapy for Chinese Adolescent Psychiatric Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qing-E; Wang, Zhi-Min; Sha, Sha; Ng, Chee H; Seiner, Stephen J; Welch, Charles A; Lok, Grace K I; Chow, Ines H I; Wang, Fei; Li, Lu; Xiang, Yu-Tao

    2016-12-01

    Little is known about the use of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) for adolescent psychiatric patients in China. This study examined the frequency of ECT and the demographic and clinical correlates of adolescent psychiatric patients hospitalized in a tertiary psychiatric hospital in China. This was a retrospective chart review of 954 inpatients aged between 13 and 17 years treated over a period of 8 years (2007-2013). Sociodemographic and clinical data were collected from the electronic chart management system for discharged patients. The rate of ECT use was 42.6% in the whole sample (46.5% for patients with schizophrenia, 41.8% for major depressive disorder, 57.8% for bipolar disorders, and 23.9% for other diagnoses). Use of ECT was independently and positively associated with older age, high aggression risk at time of admission, and use of antipsychotics and antidepressants. Compared with patients with schizophrenia, those with other psychiatric diagnoses were less likely to receive ECT. The above significant correlates explained 32% of the variance of ECT use (P < 0.001). Limitations of this study included the lack of data regarding the efficacy and side effects of ECT. Furthermore, the high rate of ECT applied only to 1 setting which limits the ability to extrapolate the implications of the results to other populations. The use of ECT was exceedingly high in adolescent patients treated in a tertiary clinical centre in China. It is unlikely that such a high rate of ECT use is found across China or that such practice reflects standard of care for psychiatrically ill adolescents. The underlying reasons for the high use of ECT at this center warrant urgent investigations.

  14. Knowledge and Attitude of Nursing Students toward Electroconvulsive Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Nitasha; Ghai, Sandhya; Grover, Sandeep

    2017-01-01

    Background: Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is one of the commonly used treatment modalities for patients with severe mental disorders. However, acceptance of ECT by the patient and relatives often depends on how the health-care professionals themselves present the treatment modality to the patients and their relatives. There is a lack of information about the knowledge and attitude toward ECT among health professionals. Aim: This study aimed to evaluate the knowledge about and attitude toward ECT among nursing students. Methodology: Knowledge of and attitudes toward ECT among nursing students were assessed using ECT knowledge and attitude questionnaires. Results: The study included 183 nursing students. Majority (n = 62; 60.8%) of the participants obtained information about ECT from media (movies, television, print media, etc.). None of the students had full knowledge about ECT. Although a significant proportion of students had knowledge about the ECT procedure and consent procedure, majority of them had poor knowledge about the effectiveness, mechanism of action, indications, and side effects of ECT. Negative attitudes were also highly prevalent, with more than two-thirds of the participants having negative attitudes toward ECT on more than half of the attitude items of the scale. Total knowledge score positively correlated with total attitude score, suggesting that higher knowledge was associated with more positive attitude. Conclusions: Although nursing students have knowledge about basic ECT procedure and consent, they lack knowledge about the effectiveness, mechanism of action, indications, and side effects of ECT. Negative attitude toward ECT is also highly prevalent among nursing students. Accordingly, there is a need to improve the knowledge and address the negative attitude of nursing students, which may ultimately lead to better acceptance of the treatment. PMID:28936064

  15. Developing and Implementing a Quality Assurance Strategy for Electroconvulsive Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollingsworth, Jessa; Baliko, Beverly; McKinney, Selina; Rosenquist, Peter

    2018-04-17

    The literature provides scant guidance in effective quality assurance strategies concerning the use of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) for the treatment of psychiatric conditions. Numerous guidelines are published that provide guidance in the delivery of care; however, little has been done to determine how a program or facility might ensure compliance to best practice for safety, tolerability, and efficacy in performing ECT. The objective of this project was to create a quality assurance strategy specific to ECT. Determining standards for quality care and clarifying facility policy were key outcomes in establishing an effective quality assurance strategy. An audit tool was developed utilizing quality criteria derived from a systematic review of ECT practice guidelines, peer review, and facility policy. All ECT procedures occurring over a 2-month period of May to June 2017 were retrospectively audited and compared against target compliance rates set for the facility's ECT program. Facility policy was adapted to reflect quality standards, and audit findings were used to inform possible practice change initiatives, were used to create benchmarks for continuous quality monitoring, and were integrated into regular hospital quality meetings. Clarification on standards of care and the use of clinical auditing in ECT was an effective starting point in the development of a quality assurance strategy. Audit findings were successfully integrated into the hospital's overall quality program, and recognition of practice compliance informed areas for future quality development and policy revision in this small community-based hospital in the southeastern United States. This project sets the foundation for a quality assurance strategy that can be used to help monitor procedural safety and guide future improvement efforts in delivering ECT. Although it is just the first step in creating meaningful quality improvement, setting clear standards and identifying areas of greatest

  16. ELECTROCONVULSIVE THERAPY AMONG ADOLESCENT PSYCHIATRIC PATIENTS- A RETROSPECTIVE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakshimi Borgohain

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Electroconvulsive Therapy (ECT among adolescent psychiatric patient is rarely used and studies in this regard are also rare, while its need is of great importance. Aim of this study was to study the prevalence of ECT in common psychiatric illnesses among adolescent age group, where it is indicated and outcome of ECT in those psychiatric patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS All data were collected retrospectively from the chart review for those adolescents aged between 12 to 18 years who received ECT during the period of 2008 - 2012. During the study period a total of 554 patients received ECT, among whom 104 were adolescents. RESULTS Adolescent patients were 18.77% in the whole ECT sample; the average age of the adolescents was 16.33 years and number of patients were more with older age. Among all the patients, 48.08% had positive family history of mental illness and 81.73% were from lower Socioeconomic Class. The use of ECT was more with schizophrenia (n= 63, 60.57% and acute and transient psychotic disorder (n= 30, 28.85%. The most common indication was agitation and aggression (n= 29, 27.88% followed by poor medication response (n= 19, 18.27%. Good response is found in most of the cases (n= 88, 84.62%, only a few percentage of cases showed minor and transient adverse event. CONCLUSION The result of our study suggests that prevalence of ECT among adolescent psychiatric patients is quite high and ECT is a safe and effective method of treatment in the adolescent psychiatric patients, especially those patients who are severely ill and poorly responding to medication.

  17. The Efficacy of Acute Electroconvulsive Therapy in Atypical Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husain, Mustafa M.; McClintock, Shawn M.; Rush, A. John; Knapp, Rebecca G.; Fink, Max; Rummans, Teresa A.; Rasmussen, Keith; Claassen, Cynthia; Petrides, Georgios; Biggs, Melanie M.; Mueller, Martina; Sampson, Shirlene; Bailine, Samuel H.; Lisanby, Sarah H.; Kellner, Charles H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study examined the characteristics and outcomes of patients with major depressive disorder (MDD), with or without atypical features, who were treated with acute bilateral electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). Method Analyses were conducted with 489 patients who met DSM-IV criteria for MDD. Subjects were identified as typical or atypical on the basis of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV obtained at baseline prior to ECT. Depression symptom severity was measured by the 24-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D24) and the 30-item Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology–Self-Report (IDS-SR30). Remission was defined as at least a 60% decrease from baseline in HAM-D24 score and a total score of 10 or below on the last 2 consecutive HAM-D24 ratings. The randomized controlled trial was performed from 1997 to 2004. Results The typical (N = 453) and atypical (N = 36) groups differed in several sociodemographic and clinical variables including gender (p = .0071), age (p = .0005), treatment resistance (p = .0014), and age at first illness onset (p < .0001) and onset of current episode (p = .0008). Following an acute course of bilateral ECT, a considerable portion of both the typical (67.1%) and the atypical (80.6%) groups reached remission. The atypical group was 2.6 (95% CI = 1.1 to 6.2) times more likely to remit than the typical group after adjustment for age, psychosis, gender, clinical site, and depression severity based on the HAM-D24. Conclusion Acute ECT is an efficacious treatment for depressed patients with typical or atypical symptom features. PMID:18278988

  18. Treatment of Adults With Treatment-Resistant Depression: Electroconvulsive Therapy Plus Antidepressant or Electroconvulsive Therapy Alone? Evidence From an Indirect Comparison Meta-Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Guo-Min; Tian, Xu; Shuai, Ting; Yi, Li-Juan; Zeng, Zi; Liu, Shuang; Zhou, Jian-Guo; Wang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and antidepressant are the effective treatment alternatives for patients with treatment-resistant depression (TRD); however, the effects and safety of the ECT plus antidepressant relative to ECT alone remain controversial. We decide to assess the potential of ECT plus antidepressant compared with ECT alone by undertaking an indirect comparison meta-analysis. Databases from PubMed, ISI Web of Science, CENTRAL, Clinicaltrials.gov, EMBASE, CBM (China Biom...

  19. Successful and rapid response to electroconvulsive therapy of a suicidal patient with comorbid bipolar I disorder and histrionic personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapinesi, Chiara; Serata, Daniele; Del Casale, Antonio; Simonetti, Alessio; Milioni, Mara; Mazzarini, Lorenzo; Scatena, Paola; Fensore, Claudio; Carbonetti, Paolo; Kotzalidis, Giorgio D; Tatarelli, Roberto; Pompili, Maurizio; Girardi, Paolo

    2012-03-01

    A woman with bipolar disorder I, histrionic personality disorder, and suicidal ideation with repeated suicide attempts, who had been treated for 2 years with mood stabilizers, antipsychotics, and benzodiazepines, received a total of 8 bitemporal-biparietal electroconvulsive therapy sessions. Her suicidal ideation and self-harm behavior disappeared immediately after the first session and her psychopathology soon after. This supports the existence of a relatively independent suicidal syndrome and confirms data on its immediate responsiveness to electroconvulsive therapy. Electroconvulsive therapy must not be long withheld from patients with such characteristics to reduce unnecessary sufferance and suicidality.

  20. Successful maintenance electroconvulsive therapy for more than seven years

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijkstra, J; Nolen, WA

    We report on a patient with recurrent major depressive episodes with psychotic features who was successfully treated with maintenance electroconvulsive treatment (M-ECT) over a long period without the need for concurrent treatment with an antidepressant or mood stabilizer. She started ECT in 1996

  1. Electroconvulsive therapy in a pediatric patient with malignant catatonia and paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Andrew; Glick, David B; Dinwiddie, Stephen H

    2006-12-01

    Paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis is a rare disorder that can cause memory loss, confusion, personality change, cognitive dysfunction, and psychosis. We present a case of an 11-year-old girl who was successfully treated with electroconvulsive therapy for a catatonic state associated with paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis caused by an ovarian teratoma.

  2. Repeated dose titration versus age-based method in electroconvulsive therapy: a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aten, J.J.; Oudega, M.L.; van Exel, E.; Stek, M.L.; van Waarde, J.A.

    2015-01-01

    In electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), a dose titration method (DTM) was suggested to be more individualized and therefore more accurate than formula-based dosing methods. A repeated DTM (every sixth session and dose adjustment accordingly) was compared to an age-based method (ABM) regarding treatment

  3. Efficacy of Electroconvulsive Therapy for Comorbid Frontotemporal Dementia with Bipolar Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Paul, Sean; Goetz, Jennifer; Bennett, Jeffrey; Korah, Tessy

    2013-01-01

    Challenges encountered in the diagnosis and treatment of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) are further confounded when presented with comorbid psychiatric disorder. Here we report a case of progressive FTD in a patient with a long history of bipolar affective disorder (BAD) 1, depressed type. We also report beneficial effects of electroconvulsive therapy and its potential application in similar comorbid disorders.

  4. Efficacy of Electroconvulsive Therapy for Comorbid Frontotemporal Dementia with Bipolar Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Paul

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Challenges encountered in the diagnosis and treatment of frontotemporal dementia (FTD are further confounded when presented with comorbid psychiatric disorder. Here we report a case of progressive FTD in a patient with a long history of bipolar affective disorder (BAD 1, depressed type. We also report beneficial effects of electroconvulsive therapy and its potential application in similar comorbid disorders.

  5. Immune and neurotrophin stimulation by electroconvulsive therapy : is some inflammation needed after all?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Buel, E. M.; Patas, K.; Peters, M.; Bosker, F. J.; Eisel, U. L. M.; Klein, H. C.

    2015-01-01

    A low-grade inflammatory response is commonly seen in the peripheral blood of major depressive disorder (MDD) patients, especially those with refractory and chronic disease courses. However, electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), the most drastic intervention reserved for these patients, is closely

  6. Brief Report: Electroconvulsive Therapy for Malignant Catatonia in an Autistic Adolescent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachtel, Lee Elizabeth; Griffin, Margaret Merrie; Dhossche, Dirk Marcel; Reti, Irving Michael

    2010-01-01

    A 14-year-old male with autism and mild mental retardation developed malignant catatonia characterized by classic symptoms of catatonia, bradycardia and hypothermia. Bilateral electroconvulsive therapy and lorazepam were required for resolution. The case expands the occurrence of catatonia in autism into its malignant variant.

  7. Butyrylcholinesterase gene mutations in patients with prolonged apnea after succinylcholine for electroconvulsive therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mollerup, Hannah Malthe; Gätke, M R

    2011-01-01

    patients undergoing electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) often receive succinylcholine as part of the anesthetic procedure. The duration of action may be prolonged in patients with genetic variants of the butyrylcholinesterase enzyme (BChE), the most common being the K- and the A-variants. The aim...

  8. Electroconvulsive Therapy as a Powerful Treatment for Delirium A Case Report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, Karen S.; Marijnissen, Radboud M.; van Waarde, Jeroen A.

    Objective The aim of the study was to describe the successful treatment of delirium with electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). Methods The method of the study was a case report. Results A 75-year-old man, with a recently diagnosed carcinoma of the parotid gland, was admitted with a fluctuating

  9. Elevated dopamine D1 receptor availability in striatum of Göttingen minipigs after electroconvulsive therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Landau, Anne M; Alstrup, Aage Ko; Audrain, Helene

    2018-01-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), a direct form of brain stimulation, is an effective antidepressant. We hypothesized that the beneficial effects of ECT are mediated by increased dopaminergic neurotransmission, in which the baseline activity of D1 receptors may predict the response to ECT. We esta......, the baseline binding capacity of D1 receptors predicts the magnitude of increased binding, up to a maximum binding capacity....

  10. Objective cognitive performance associated with electroconvulsive therapy for depression: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Semkovska, Maria

    2010-09-15

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is the most acutely effective treatment for depression, but is limited by cognitive side effects. However, research on their persistence, severity, and pattern is inconsistent. We aimed to quantify ECT-associated cognitive changes, specify their pattern, and determine progression.

  11. Methohexitone, propofol and etomidate in electroconvulsive therapy for depression: a naturalistic comparison study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Eranti, Savithasri V

    2009-02-01

    Methohexitone has been the most widely used anaesthetic for electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). However, recent scarcity and erratic availability has led to use of other anaesthetics with differing effects upon ECT. We compared treatment parameters and response to ECT in patients anaesthetised with different anaesthetics in a routine clinical setting.

  12. Tics as signs of catatonia: electroconvulsive therapy response in 2 men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhossche, Dirk M; Reti, Irving M; Shettar, Shashidhar M; Wachtel, Lee E

    2010-12-01

    Tics have rarely been described in catatonia although tics are sudden and nonrhythmic variants of stereotypic or repetitive movement abnormalities that are considered cardinal symptoms of catatonia. We describe 2 men with tics and self-injurious behavior, who met criteria for catatonia. One patient met criteria for autism. We reported 2 new cases and performed a literature review using PubMed to identify other cases of tics that were treated with electroconvulsive therapy. Tics along with other catatonic symptoms and self-injurious behavior responded to electroconvulsive therapy in 2 men. Eight other patients with tics that were treated with electroconvulsive therapy were found in the literature. Catatonia was recognized in 4 of the 8 patients. Two patients met criteria for autism. Tics, with or without self-injurious behavior, may be signs of catatonia. Patients with tics or Tourette syndrome warrant assessment for catatonia. If catatonia is present, electroconvulsive therapy provides a safe but rarely used alternative to pharmacotherapy, psychosurgery, or invasive brain stimulation in the treatment of tics and Tourette syndrome. © 2010 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.

  13. Cognitive Effects of Electroconvulsive Therapy in Patients with Major Depressive, Bipolar and Schizophrenia Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Fouladi

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aim: Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT is a highly effective treatment for affective and schizophrenic disorders. The main objective of this study was to examine the cognitive effects of ECT in patients with major depressive, bipolar and schizophrenia disorders. Methods: In this study we administered a battery of cognitive tasks on 90 patients with major depressive, bipolar and schizophrenia disorders, one day before and after the termination of ECT. The effects were measured by a set of computerized cognitive tests including: auditory reaction time, visual reaction time, verbal memory, Benton visual memory, Wisconsin card sort and motor function. The collected data were analyzed using One-way ANOVA and dependent t-test. Results: The results showed that depressive patients had poorer verbal memory and motor function after the termination of ECT compared to pretest, but their executive function was improved (p<0.05. After the termination of ECT the verbal and visual memory and executive function was significantly improved in patients with bipolar and schizophrenia disorders but their motor function was significantly reduced (p<0.05. Conclusion: Results of this study showed improvement for most cognitive functions in patients after electroconvulsive therapy. Findings of this study may help patients and their families to overcome their fear of electroconvulsive therapy. The results also can aware patients regarding the cognitive effects of electroconvulsive therapy.

  14. Anterograde amnesia during electroconvulsive therapy: A prospective pilot-study in patients with major depressive disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.A. Boere (Ingrid); A.M. Kamperman (Astrid); Van't Hoog, A.E. (Arianne E.); W.W. van den Broek (Walter); T.K. Birkenhäger (Tom)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractElectroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is considered an effective treatment for major depression with melancholic features. However, neurocognitive side-effects such as anterograde amnesia still regularly occur. The present study aims to evaluate the severity and course of anterograde amnesia

  15. Electroconvulsive therapy for treating schizophrenia: a chart review of patients from two catchment areas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Diana; Bauer, Jeanett; Pedersen, Ida Hageman

    2011-01-01

    To examine disease and treatment characteristics of patients with schizophrenia treated with electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). We examined charts from 79 patients diagnosed with schizophrenia (n = 55), persistent delusional disorders (n = 7), and schizoaffective disorders (n = 17) between 2003...

  16. Eletroconvulsoterapia na depressão maior: aspectos atuais Electroconvulsive therapy in major depression: current aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Barros Antunes

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: A eficácia da eletroconvulsoterapia em tratar sintomas depressivos está estabelecida por meio de inúmeros estudos desenvolvidos durante as últimas décadas. A eletroconvulsoterapia é o tratamento biológico mais efetivo para depressão atualmente disponível. O objetivo deste estudo foi demonstrar o papel da eletroconvulsoterapia no tratamento da depressão e destacar aspectos atuais relativos à sua prática. MÉTODO: Foram revisados na literatura estudos de eficácia, remissão de sintomas, fatores preditores de resposta, assim como aspectos atuais acerca da qualidade de vida, percepção dos pacientes, mecanismo de ação, técnica e prejuízo cognitivos. RESULTADOS: Os principais achados desta revisão foram: 1 a eletroconvulsoterapia é mais efetiva do que qualquer medicação antidepressiva; 2 a remissão da depressão com a eletroconvulsoterapia varia, em geral, de 50 a 80%; 3 Ainda é controverso o efeito da eletroconvulsoterapia nos níveis de fator neurotrófico derivado do cérebro (acho que aqui pode colocar entre parenteses o "BNDF"; 4 a eletroconvulsoterapia tem efeito positivo na melhora da qualidade de vida; 5 os pacientes submetidos à eletroconvulsoterapia, em geral, têm uma percepção positiva do tratamento. CONCLUSÃO: A eletroconvulsoterapia permanece sendo um tratamento altamente eficaz em pacientes com depressão resistente. Com o avanço da sua técnica, a eletroconvulsoterapia tornou-se um procedimento ainda mais seguro e útil tanto para a fase aguda, quanto para a prevenção de novos episódios depressivos.OBJECTIVE: The efficacy of electroconvulsive therapy in treating depressive symptoms has been established by means of innumerable studies developed along the last decades. Electroconvulsive therapy is the most effective biological treatment for depression currently available. The objective of this study was to demonstrate the role of electroconvulsive therapy in the treatment of depression and

  17. Does a single session of electroconvulsive therapy alter the neural response to emotional faces in depression? A randomised sham-controlled functional magnetic resonance imaging study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miskowiak, Kamilla W; Kessing, Lars V; Ott, Caroline V

    2017-01-01

    neurocognitive bias in major depressive disorder. Patients with major depressive disorder were randomised to one active ( n=15) or sham electroconvulsive therapy ( n=12). The following day they underwent whole-brain functional magnetic resonance imaging at 3T while viewing emotional faces and performed facial...... expression recognition and dot-probe tasks. A single electroconvulsive therapy session had no effect on amygdala response to emotional faces. Whole-brain analysis revealed no effects of electroconvulsive therapy versus sham therapy after family-wise error correction at the cluster level, using a cluster...... to faces after a single electroconvulsive therapy session, the observed trend changes after a single electroconvulsive therapy session point to an early shift in emotional processing that may contribute to antidepressant effects of electroconvulsive therapy....

  18. Do ictal EEG characteristics predict treatment outcomes in schizophrenic patients undergoing electroconvulsive therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simsek, Gulnihal Gokce; Zincir, Selma; Gulec, Huseyin; Eksioglu, Sevgin; Semiz, Umit Basar; Kurtulmus, Yasemin Sipka

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship between features of electroencephalography (EEG), including seizure time, energy threshold level and post-ictal suppression time, and clinical variables, including treatment outcomes and side-effects, among schizophrenia inpatients undergoing electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). This is a naturalistic follow-up study on schizophrenia patients, diagnosed using DSM-IV-TR criteria, treated by a psychosis inpatient service. All participants completed the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS), the Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF) scale, the Frontal Assessment Battery (FAB) and a Data Collection Form. Assessments were made before treatment, during ECT and after treatment. Statistically significant improvements in both clinical and cognitive outcome were noted after ECT in all patients. Predictors of improvement were sought by evaluating electrophysiological variables measured at three time points (after the third, fifth and seventh ECT sessions). Logistic regression analysis showed that clinical outcome/improvement did not differ by seizure duration, threshold energy level or post-ictal suppression time. We found that ictal EEG parameters measured at several ECT sessions did not predict clinical recovery/outcomes. This may be because our centre defensively engages in "very specific patient selection" when ECT is contemplated. ECT does not cause short-term cognitive functional impairment and indeed improves cognition, because symptoms of the schizophrenic episode are alleviated.

  19. Cognitive impairment and electroconvulsive therapy in geriatric depression, what could be the role of rivastigmine? A case series

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Schaik, Audrey Monica; Rhebergen, Didi; Henstra, Marieke Jantien; Kadouch, Daniel J.; van Exel, Eric; Stek, Maximilianus Lourentius

    2015-01-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), albeit highly effective in treating depression, is frequently associated with cognitive impairment, either temporary or more persistent. Especially in older patients, who generally respond even better, serious cognitive impairment during the course of ECT may lead to

  20. Cotard's syndrome with schizophreniform disorder can be successfully treated with electroconvulsive therapy: case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caliyurt, Okan; Vardar, Erdal; Tuglu, Cengiz

    2004-01-01

    We report a case of Cotard's syndrome associated with psychotic symptoms. A 27-year-old man was admitted to hospital with the diagnosis of schizophreniform disorder. His presenting symptoms, which had started 1 month before hospital admission, were somatic delusions of gastrointestinal and cardiovascular malfunction and the absence of a stomach, which resulted in a decrease in weight from 75 kg to 63 kg in 1 month. Cranial computed tomographic images showed dilatation of the lateral and third ventricles, whereas magnetic resonance imaging revealed central atrophy and lateral ventricle dilatation. Single- photon emission computed tomography demonstrated left temporal, left frontal and left parietal hypoperfusion. The patient did not respond to antipsychotic therapies, but he was successfully treated with electroconvulsive therapy. This report emphasizes that Cotard's syndrome may be accompanied by lesions of the left hemisphere and that electroconvulsive therapy could be the first-line therapy in such patients with psychotic disorder. PMID:15069468

  1. Hypocapnia and hyperoxia induction using a hyperventilation protocol in electroconvulsive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Arriba-Arnau, Aida; Dalmau, Antonia; Salvat-Pujol, Neus; Soria, Virginia; Bocos, Javier; Menchón, José Manuel; Urretavizcaya, Mikel

    Hyperventilation in electroconvulsive therapy sessions has been associated with seizure threshold, seizure characteristics, and cognitive effects. There is no consensus on the optimal procedure of applying hyperventilation manoeuvres during electroconvulsive therapy. Prospective evaluation of the effects of systematic use of hyperventilation manoeuvres with facial mask and capnography (protocolized hyperventilation [pHV]), on ventilation parameters and on seizures. The study included a sample of 130 sessions (65 performed according to hyperventilation standard practice and 65 successive sessions, with pHV) of 35 patients over a period of 10 weeks. The pHV manoeuvres reduced exhaled CO 2 and increased O 2 saturation significantly (Pelectroconvulsive therapy procedure without adding costs. Copyright © 2016 SEP y SEPB. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Electroconvulsive therapy for depression in Parkinson's disease: systematic review of evidence and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisovskaya, Anna; Bryson, William Culbertson; Buchholz, Jonathan; Samii, Ali; Borson, Soo

    2016-04-01

    We performed a systematic review of evidence regarding treatment of depression in Parkinson's disease (PD) utilizing electroconvulsive therapy. The search led to the inclusion of 43 articles, mainly case reports or case series, with the largest number of patients totaling 19. The analysis included 116 patients with depression and PD; depression improved in 93.1%. Where motor symptoms' severity was reported, 83% of patients improved. Cognition did not worsen in the majority (94%). Many patients experienced delirium or transient confusion, sometimes necessitating discontinuation of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). Little is known about maintenance ECT in this population. ECT can benefit patients suffering from PD and depression. We recommend an algorithm for treatment of depression in PD, utilizing ECT sooner rather than later.

  3. Is electroconvulsive therapy effective as augmentation in clozapine-resistant schizophrenia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittsteiner Manubens, Lucas; Lobos Urbina, Diego; Aceituno, David

    2016-10-14

    Clozapine is considered to be the most effective antipsychotic drug for patients with treatment resistant schizophrenia, but up to a third of the patients do not respond to this treatment. Various strategies have been tried to augment the effect of clozapine in non-responders, one of these strategies being electroconvulsive therapy. However, its efficacy and safety are not yet clear. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified six systematic reviews including 55 studies, among them six randomized controlled trials addressing clozapine-resistant schizophrenia. We combined the evidence using meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings following the GRADE approach. We concluded electroconvulsive therapy probably augments response to clozapine in patients with treatment resistant schizophrenia, but it is not possible to determine if it leads to cognitive adverse effects because the certainty of the evidence is very low.

  4. Amlodipine and the Successful Management of Post-Electroconvulsive Therapy Agitation

    OpenAIRE

    Shahriari, Ali; Khooshideh, Maryam; Sheikh, Mahdi

    2016-01-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is a highly effective nonpharmacologic treatment for the management of depression and some other psychiatric disorders. Post-ECT agitation occurs in up to 12% of ECT treatments and is characterized by motor restlessness, irritability, disorientation, and panic-like behaviors. The severity of post-ECT agitation ranges from mild and self-limited to serious and severe forms requiring prompt medical intervention to protect the patient and the medical staff. In seve...

  5. Retrospective chart review of elderly patients receiving electroconvulsive therapy in a tertiary general hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Mosam Phirke; Harshal Sathe; Nilesh Shah; Sushma Sonavane; Anup Bharati; Avinash DeSousa

    2015-01-01

    Background: Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is the one of the oldest and effective treatments in psychiatry today. It has been used in a wide variety of psychiatric disorders in both young and old patients. Aims of the study: The present study is a retrospective chart review of geriatric patients receiving ECT as a treatment option in a tertiary care general hospital psychiatry setting. Methodology: The study evaluated ECT records over a 5-year period between the years 2010 and 2014...

  6. Studies on cellular changes and amnesia in a rat model of electroconvulsive therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Jansson, Linda

    2011-01-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is a well-established treatment for severe depressive disorder, but its clinical use has been limited by concerns about side effects such as memory disturbances. Despite over 70 years in clinical use, the exact mechanisms of action behind the therapeutic or adverse effects are not fully understood. Enhanced brain plasticity, including neurogenesis, angiogenesis and synaptic reorganization, has been suggested to underlie the therapeutic effects of ECT. In the cu...

  7. Rocuronium-sugammadex use for electroconvulsive therapy in a hemodialysis patient: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Kurita, Shigeaki; Moriwaki, Katsuyuki; Shiroyama, Kazuhisa; Sanuki, Mikako; Toyota, Yukari; Takebayashi, Minoru

    2016-01-01

    Background Recently, rocuronium with subsequent use of sugammadex was proposed for electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) as an alternative to succinylcholine. Because sugammadex is cleared via the kidney with no metabolism, it is unknown that rocuronium-sugammadex use is safe in hemodialysis patients who received ECT. Case presentation In this case report, we used rocuronium with subsequent administration of sugammadex in a 69-year-old female, hemodialysis patient, scheduled for ten ECT sessions fo...

  8. Butyrylcholinesterase gene mutations in patients with prolonged apnea after succinylcholine for electroconvulsive therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mollerup, Hannah Malthe; Gätke, M R

    2011-01-01

    patients undergoing electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) often receive succinylcholine as part of the anesthetic procedure. The duration of action may be prolonged in patients with genetic variants of the butyrylcholinesterase enzyme (BChE), the most common being the K- and the A-variants. The aim...... of the study was to assess the clinical significance of genetic variants in butyrylcholinesterase gene (BCHE) in patients with a suspected prolonged duration of action of succinylcholine after ECT....

  9. Early effects of modern electroconvulsive therapy on subjective memory in patients with mania or depression

    OpenAIRE

    Bag, Sevda; Canbek, Ozge; Atagun, Ilhan Murat; Kutlar, Tarik Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    Context: Although electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is considered a very effective tool for the treatment of psychiatric diseases, memory disturbances are among the most important adverse effects. Aims: This study aimed to assess prospectively early subjective memory complaints in depressive and manic patients due to bilateral, brief-pulse ECT, at different stages of the treatment, compare the associations between psychiatric diagnosis, sociodemographic characteristics, and ECT characteristics....

  10. Effectiveness of an Educational Intervention on Medical Students' Knowledge About and Attitude Towards Electroconvulsive Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Susan; Simiyon, Manjula; Vedachalam, Ahalya

    2016-04-01

    This study was done to determine the effectiveness of a lecture and exposure to electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) followed by interaction with patient, on medical students' knowledge about and attitude towards electroconvulsive therapy. A questionnaire was administered to second year medical students to determine their baseline knowledge about and attitude towards electroconvulsive therapy. Following this, they underwent two educational interventions, a lecture on ECT and exposure to the procedure and interaction with the patient and relative, and their knowledge and attitude were reassessed after each intervention using the same questionnaire. Eighty-one students completed all the three assessments. Students' knowledge about ECT at baseline was minimal (mean 3.58 out of 12). Their knowledge increased significantly after the lecture (mean 10.3), and there was further increase following exposure to the procedure and subsequent interaction with the patient and relative (mean 11.1). At baseline, students had an overall negative attitude towards ECT. There was significant improvement on all attitude items following the lecture. Exposure to the procedure resulted in further improvement in attitude regarding whether ECT is a cruel treatment and has to be used as a last resort. Exposure to ECT in lecture and clinical scenarios followed by interaction with the patient should be included in the undergraduate medical curriculum to improve students' knowledge and attitude about this safe, effective, and potentially lifesaving treatment modality.

  11. Treatment-resistant, five-year long, postpartum-onset Capgras episode resolving after electroconvulsive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapinesi, Chiara; Kotzalidis, Georgios D; Del Casale, Antonio; Ferri, Vittoria Rachele; Di Pietro, Simone; Scatena, Paola; Serata, Daniele; Danese, Emanuela; Sani, Gabriele; Koukopoulos, Alexia E; Angeletti, Gloria; Girardi, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Postpartum psychosis, which rarely presents with Capgras syndrome (delusional misidentification), requires rapid symptom resolution. First-line drugs have important drawbacks, such as delayed onset of clinical response and secretion in breast milk. In this report, we report successful treatment of a treatment-resistant woman presenting with treatment-resistant Capgras syndrome, with onset during postpartum. A 36-year-old woman had presented with Capgras syndrome during postpartum. For more than five years, she believed her son and other family members were substituted by impostors. All adequately administrated treatments were unsuccessful. We suggested electroconvulsive therapy to overcome treatment resistance. After six electroconvulsive therapy sessions, delusions of doubles subsided and other symptoms improved. She was discharged two weeks later with a mood stabilizer and low-dose atypical antipychotic combination and is well at the one-and-a-half-year follow-up. Electroconvulsive therapy followed by a mood stabilizer-antipsychotic drug combination showed rapid, permanent, and effective control of long-standing Capgras syndrome in a young woman. © The Author(s) 2015 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  12. CAN MELATONIN BE EFFECTIVELY USED TO DIMINISH SIDE EFFECTS OF VARIOUS PSYCHOTROPIC DRUGS AND ELECTROCONVULSIVE THERAPY?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Aleksandrovich Bekker

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To study and summarize the existing evidence base for the use of melatonin as a mean to counteract or diminish the side effects of various psychotropic drugs and electroconvulsive therapy, and to provide the reader with relevant conclusions. Methodology. The authors have searched for the scientific literature regarding the use of melatonin as a mean to counteract or diminish the side effects of various psychotropic drugs and electroconvulsive therapy, using the PubMed and Google Scholar as a search tool. Then the authors thoroughly reviewed the data they found. The resulting review is presented in this article. Results. The data we have obtained from this review of the literature indicate that melatonin can be effectively used both in monotherapy and in combination with other therapeutic means in order to reduce several different side effects of psychotropic drugs and electroconvulsive therapy. Melatonin also deserves further study in this regard. The evidence base for its use in this manner is very variable in quality for different side effects. For now, the greatest evidence base exists regarding the potential effectiveness of melatonin in the prevention and treatment of drug-induced insomnia, memory and cognitive impairment, akathisia, tardive dyskinesias, and metabolic syndrome. Practical implications. The results we have obtained can be widely applied in psychiatry, neurology and addiction medicine, as well as in all those areas of general medicine, which make use of psychotropic drugs.

  13. Unaltered Neuronal and Glial Counts in Animal Models of Magnetic Seizure Therapy and Electroconvulsive Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dwork, A.J.; Christensen, J.R.; Larsen, K.B.

    2009-01-01

    report on its anatomical effects. We discerned no histological lesions in the brains of higher mammals subjected to electroconvulsive shock (ECS) or MST, under conditions that model closely those used in humans. We sought to extend these findings by determining whether these interventions affected...... the number of neurons or glia in the frontal cortex or hippocampus. Twenty-four animals received 6 weeks of ECS, MST, or anesthesia alone, 4 days per week. After perfusion fixation, numbers of neurons and glia in frontal cortex and hippocampus were determined by unbiased stereological methods. We found...... no effect of either intervention on volumes or total number or numerical density of neurons or glia in hippocampus, frontal cortex, or subregions of these structures. Induction of seizures in a rigorous model of human ECT and MST therapy does not cause a change in the number of neurons or glia...

  14. Is there a decline in cognitive functions after combined electroconvulsive therapy and antipsychotic therapy in treatment-refractory schizophrenia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawełczyk, Agnieszka; Kołodziej-Kowalska, Emilia; Pawełczyk, Tomasz; Rabe-Jabłońska, Jolanta

    2015-03-01

    An analysis of literature shows that there is still little evidence concerning the efficacy of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) combined with antipsychotic therapy in a group of treatment-resistant schizophrenia patients. More precisely, its influence on cognitive functions is still equivocal. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of ECT combined with antipsychotic therapy on working memory, attention, and executive functions in a group of treatment-refractory schizophrenia patients. Twenty-seven patients completed the study: 14 men and 13 women, aged 21 to 55 years (mean age, 32.8 years), diagnosed with treatment-resistant schizophrenia. Each patient underwent a course of ECT sessions and was treated with antipsychotic medications. Before the ECT and within 3 days after the last ECT session, the participants were assessed with the following neuropsychological tests: Trail Making Test (TMT) and Wisconsin Cart Sorting Test (WCST). There were no significant differences in the TMT and WCST results after combined ECT and antipsychotic therapy in treatment-refractory schizophrenia patients. According to the results of the neuropsychological tests, there was no decline in attention, executive functions, or working memory. The current study shows no significant difference in attention, working memory, or executive functions after treatment with a combination of electroconvulsive and antipsychotic therapy. This suggests that combined electroconvulsive therapy may not have a negative influence on the neuropsychological functioning of patients with treatment resistant schizophrenia.

  15. Seizure threshold and the half-age method in bilateral electroconvulsive therapy in Japanese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Kazuyuki; Kobayashi, Kaoru; Yamaguchi, Masayasu; Tanaka, Koichi; Fujii, Tomokazu; Kitahara, Yuichi; Tamaoki, Toshio; Matsushita, Yutaka; Nunomura, Akihiko; Motohashi, Nobutaka

    2015-01-01

    Seizure threshold (ST) in electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) has not been reported previously in Japanese patients. We investigated ST in bilateral ECT in Japanese patients using the dose-titration method. The associations between demographic and clinical characteristics and ST were analyzed to identify the predictors of ST. Finally, the validity of the half-age method for the stimulus dose was evaluated. Fifty-four Japanese patients with mood disorder, schizophrenia, and other psychotic disorders received an acute course of bilateral ECT using a brief-pulse device. ST was determined at the first session using a fixed titration schedule. ST was correlated with age, sex, body mass index, history of previous ECT, and psychotropic drugs on multiple regression analysis. Furthermore, the rate of accomplished seizures was calculated using the half-age method. Mean ST was 136 mC. ST was influenced by age, sex, history of previous ECT, and medication with benzodiazepines. The accomplished seizure rate using the half-age method was 72%, which was significantly lower in men and subjects on benzodiazepines. ST in Japanese patients was equal to or slightly higher than that previously reported in other ethnic groups, which might be attributable, at least in part, to high prevalence of and large-dose benzodiazepine prescription. Higher age, male gender, no history of ECT, and benzodiazepines were related to higher ST. The half-age method was especially useful in female patients and subjects without benzodiazepine medication. © 2014 The Authors. Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences © 2014 Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology.

  16. Possible Association between Serum Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) Levels and Relapse in Depressed Patients following Electroconvulsive Therapy (ECT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibasaki, Chiyo; Itagaki, Kei; Abe, Hiromi; Kajitani, Naoto; Okada-Tsuchioka, Mami; Takebayashi, Minoru

    2018-03-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases are involved in neuroinflammatory processes, which could underlie depression. Serum levels of MMP-9 and MMP-2 in depressed patients are significantly altered following electroconvulsive therapy, but an association between altered matrix metalloproteinases after successful ECT and possible relapse has yet to be investigated. Serum was obtained twice, before and immediately after a course of electroconvulsive therapy, from 38 depressed patients. Serum was also collected, once, from two groups of age- and gender-matched healthy controls, 40 volunteers in each group. Possible associations between levels of matrix metalloproteinases and relapse during a 1-year follow-up period were analyzed. Excluding patients who did not respond to electroconvulsive therapy and patients lost to follow-up, data from 28 patients were evaluated. Eighteen of the patients (64.3%) relapsed within 1 year. In the group that did not relapse, serum levels of MMP-9 were significantly decreased after a course of electroconvulsive therapy, but not in the group that relapsed. No association between MMP-2 and relapse was observed. The degree of change in serum MMP-9 change could be associated with relapse following electroconvulsive therapy in depressed patients. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of CINP.

  17. Catatonia after deep brain stimulation successfully treated with lorazepam and right unilateral electroconvulsive therapy: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Davin K; Rees, Caleb; Brodsky, Aaron; Deligtisch, Amanda; Evans, Daniel; Khafaja, Mohamad; Abbott, Christopher C

    2014-09-01

    The presence of a deep brain stimulator (DBS) in a patient who develops neuropsychiatric symptoms poses unique diagnostic challenges and questions for the treating psychiatrist. Catatonia has been described only once, during DBS implantation, but has not been reported in a successfully implanted DBS patient. We present a case of a patient with bipolar disorder and renal transplant who developed catatonia after DBS for essential tremor. The patient was successfully treated for catatonia with lorazepam and electroconvulsive therapy after careful diagnostic workup. Electroconvulsive therapy has been successfully used with DBS in a handful of cases, and certain precautions may help reduce potential risk. Catatonia is a rare occurrence after DBS but when present may be safely treated with standard therapies such as lorazepam and electroconvulsive therapy.

  18. Response to Electroconvulsive Therapy in Patients With Autism Spectrum Disorder and Intractable Challenging Behaviors Associated With Symptoms of Catatonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajith, Sreedharan Geetha; Liew, Siew Fai; Tor, Phern Chern

    2017-03-01

    There are several reports of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) used in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in the context of catatonic symptoms. We describe response to ECT in two adults with ASD and intellectual disability with intractable aggression and self-injurious behaviors associated with catatonic symptoms who had not responded to standard interventions. Unilateral ECT at a frequency of 3 times a week was given followed by weekly maintenance ECT. Patients' catatonic symptoms included episodes of agitation and echophenomena. Electroconvulsive therapy resulted in significant improvement in their behavior problems but 1 patient relapsed when the ECT was discontinued or frequency of treatment reduced. The second patient required 2 courses of ECT before improvement which was maintained on weekly ECT. Electroconvulsive therapy could be a potentially beneficial intervention in patients with ASD and severe challenging behaviors associated with catatonic symptoms including agitated or excited forms of catatonia.

  19. Decreased cognitive functioning after electroconvulsive therapy is related to increased hippocampal volume : Exploring the role of brain plasticity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oostrom, Iris; van Eijndhoven, Philip; Butterbrod, E.; van Beek, Maria H; Janzing, Joost; Donders, Rogier; Schene, Aart; Tendolkar, Indira

    2018-01-01

    Objective:Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is still the most effective treatment of severe and therapy-refractory major depressive disorder. Cognitive side effects are the major disadvantage of ECT. Cognitive deficits are generally temporary in nature and may be mediated by the hippocampus. Recent

  20. Does a single session of electroconvulsive therapy alter the neural response to emotional faces in depression? A randomised sham-controlled functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miskowiak, Kamilla W; Kessing, Lars V; Ott, Caroline V; Macoveanu, Julian; Harmer, Catherine J; Jørgensen, Anders; Revsbech, Rasmus; Jensen, Hans M; Paulson, Olaf B; Siebner, Hartwig R; Jørgensen, Martin B

    2017-09-01

    Negative neurocognitive bias is a core feature of major depressive disorder that is reversed by pharmacological and psychological treatments. This double-blind functional magnetic resonance imaging study investigated for the first time whether electroconvulsive therapy modulates negative neurocognitive bias in major depressive disorder. Patients with major depressive disorder were randomised to one active ( n=15) or sham electroconvulsive therapy ( n=12). The following day they underwent whole-brain functional magnetic resonance imaging at 3T while viewing emotional faces and performed facial expression recognition and dot-probe tasks. A single electroconvulsive therapy session had no effect on amygdala response to emotional faces. Whole-brain analysis revealed no effects of electroconvulsive therapy versus sham therapy after family-wise error correction at the cluster level, using a cluster-forming threshold of Z>3.1 ( p2.3; pelectroconvulsive therapy-induced changes in parahippocampal and superior frontal responses to fearful versus happy faces as well as in fear-specific functional connectivity between amygdala and occipito-temporal regions. Across all patients, greater fear-specific amygdala - occipital coupling correlated with lower fear vigilance. Despite no statistically significant shift in neural response to faces after a single electroconvulsive therapy session, the observed trend changes after a single electroconvulsive therapy session point to an early shift in emotional processing that may contribute to antidepressant effects of electroconvulsive therapy.

  1. Cognitive-behavioral therapy as continuation treatment to sustain response after electroconvulsive therapy in depression: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brakemeier, Eva-Lotta; Merkl, Angela; Wilbertz, Gregor; Quante, Arnim; Regen, Francesca; Bührsch, Nicole; van Hall, Franziska; Kischkel, Eva; Danker-Hopfe, Heidi; Anghelescu, Ion; Heuser, Isabella; Kathmann, Norbert; Bajbouj, Malek

    2014-08-01

    Although electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is the most effective acute antidepressant intervention, sustained response rates are low. It has never been systematically assessed whether psychotherapy, continuation ECT, or antidepressant medication is the most efficacious intervention to maintain initial treatment response. In a prospective, randomized clinical trial, 90 inpatients with major depressive disorder (MDD) were treated with right unilateral ultra-brief acute ECT. Electroconvulsive therapy responders received 6 months guideline-based antidepressant medication (MED) and were randomly assigned to add-on therapy with cognitive-behavioral group therapy (CBT-arm), add-on therapy with ultra-brief pulse continuation electroconvulsive therapy (ECT-arm), or no add-on therapy (MED-arm). After the 6 months of continuation treatment, patients were followed-up for another 6 months. The primary outcome parameter was the proportion of patients who remained well after 12 months. Of 90 MDD patients starting the acute phase, 70% responded and 47% remitted to acute ECT. After 6 months of continuation treatment, significant differences were observed in the three treatment arms with sustained response rates of 77% in the CBT-arm, 40% in the ECT-arm, and 44% in the MED-arm. After 12 months, these differences remained stable with sustained response rates of 65% in the CBT-arm, 28% in the ECT-arm, and 33% in the MED-arm. These results suggest that ultra-brief pulse ECT as a continuation treatment correlates with low sustained response rates. However, the main finding implicates cognitive-behavioral group therapy in combination with antidepressants might be an effective continuation treatment to sustain response after successful ECT in MDD patients. Copyright © 2014 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Risk of long-lasting negative cognitive consequences after electroconvulsive therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Anne Marie; Miskowiak, Kamilla; Vinberg, Maj

    2013-01-01

    This case study describes a patient who had a unipolar depression and experienced long-lasting cognitive problems after electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). Neuropsychological testing revealed lower scores on measures of learning, memory and sustained attention. These results stress the importance...... of informing patients who have ECT of the potential cognitive consequences of this treatment as it may influence the patients' functional capabilities. Prospective studies are needed since we do not have sufficient knowledge regarding the 3-5% of these patients who experience sustained cognitive problems....

  3. Maintenance Electroconvulsive Therapy in a Patient with Treatment-Resistant Paranoid Schizophrenia and Comorbid Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beppe Micallef-Trigona

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of choice for acute schizophrenia is antipsychotic drug treatment and electroconvulsive therapy (ECT and should only be considered as an option for treatment-resistant schizophrenia, where treatment with clozapine has already proven ineffective or intolerable. The use of ECT as a maintenance treatment for patients with schizophrenia and comorbid epilepsy is uncommon as scant evidence exists to support this. We describe a patient with a serious case of paranoid schizophrenia and comorbid epilepsy who had not responded to typical and atypical antipsychotic medication, but responded remarkably to acute ECT and required maintenance ECT to sustain a positive therapeutic response.

  4. Treatment of post-electroconvulsive therapy headache with topical methyl salicylate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Christopher J; Stewart, Jonathan T

    2012-06-01

    Headache after administration of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is common, affecting approximately half of patients treated. Post-ECT headache is typically treated with acetaminophen or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs but occasionally requires agents such as sumatriptan, opioids, or β-blockers. We report on a patient whose severe post-ECT headaches responded completely to methyl salicylate ointment, applied to the area of his temporalis and masseter muscles. Topical methyl salicylate is generally well tolerated and may be a viable option for some patients with post-ECT headache.

  5. Electroconvulsive therapy modulates plasma pigment epithelium-derived factor in depression: a proteomics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, K M; Glaviano, A; O'Donovan, S M; Kolshus, E; Dunne, R; Kavanagh, A; Jelovac, A; Noone, M; Tucker, G M; Dunn, M J; McLoughlin, D M

    2017-03-28

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is the most effective treatment for severe depression, yet its mechanism of action is not fully understood. Peripheral blood proteomic analyses may offer insights into the molecular mechanisms of ECT. Patients with a major depressive episode were recruited as part of the EFFECT-Dep trial (enhancing the effectiveness of electroconvulsive therapy in severe depression; ISRCTN23577151) along with healthy controls. As a discovery-phase study, patient plasma pre-/post-ECT (n=30) was analyzed using 2-dimensional difference in gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Identified proteins were selected for confirmation studies using immunodetection methods. Samples from a separate group of patients (pre-/post-ECT; n=57) and matched healthy controls (n=43) were then used to validate confirmed changes. Target protein mRNA levels were also assessed in rat brain and blood following electroconvulsive stimulation (ECS), the animal model of ECT. We found that ECT significantly altered 121 protein spots with 36 proteins identified by mass spectrometry. Confirmation studies identified a post-ECT increase (P<0.01) in the antiangiogenic and neuroprotective mediator pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF). Validation work showed an increase (P<0.001) in plasma PEDF in depressed patients compared with the controls that was further increased post-ECT (P=0.03). PEDF levels were not associated with mood scores. Chronic, but not acute, ECS increased PEDF mRNA in rat hippocampus (P=0.02) and dentate gyrus (P=0.03). This study identified alterations in blood levels of PEDF in depressed patients and further alterations following ECT, as well as in an animal model of ECT. These findings implicate PEDF in the biological response to ECT for depression.

  6. Minimum Electric Field Exposure for Seizure Induction with Electroconvulsive Therapy and Magnetic Seizure Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Won H; Lisanby, Sarah H; Laine, Andrew F; Peterchev, Angel V

    2017-05-01

    Lowering and individualizing the current amplitude in electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) has been proposed as a means to produce stimulation closer to the neural activation threshold and more focal seizure induction, which could potentially reduce cognitive side effects. However, the effect of current amplitude on the electric field (E-field) in the brain has not been previously linked to the current amplitude threshold for seizure induction. We coupled MRI-based E-field models with amplitude titrations of motor threshold (MT) and seizure threshold (ST) in four nonhuman primates (NHPs) to determine the strength, distribution, and focality of stimulation in the brain for four ECT electrode configurations (bilateral, bifrontal, right-unilateral, and frontomedial) and magnetic seizure therapy (MST) with cap coil on vertex. At the amplitude-titrated ST, the stimulated brain subvolume (23-63%) was significantly less than for conventional ECT with high, fixed current (94-99%). The focality of amplitude-titrated right-unilateral ECT (25%) was comparable to cap coil MST (23%), demonstrating that ECT with a low current amplitude and focal electrode placement can induce seizures with E-field as focal as MST, although these electrode and coil configurations affect differently specific brain regions. Individualizing the current amplitude reduced interindividual variation in the stimulation focality by 40-53% for ECT and 26% for MST, supporting amplitude individualization as a means of dosing especially for ECT. There was an overall significant correlation between the measured amplitude-titrated ST and the prediction of the E-field models, supporting a potential role of these models in dosing of ECT and MST. These findings may guide the development of seizure therapy dosing paradigms with improved risk/benefit ratio.

  7. The effect of electroconvulsive therapy on autobiographical memory: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Louisa M; O'Carroll, Ronan E; Ebmeier, Klaus P

    2008-03-01

    In the last 20 years, an increasing number of articles have been published about effects of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) on memory. Here, we review autobiographical memory studies in particular because there have been conflicting reports about the extent and persistence of ECT effects and the period before treatment from which memories are most likely to be affected. Five psychological and medical databases (MEDLINE, PubMed, PsychINFO, ScienceDirect, and Web of Knowledge) were searched from 1980 to 2007, yielding 15 studies of ECT and autobiographical memory. Evidence suggests that autobiographical memory impairment does occur as a result of ECT. Objective measures found memory loss to be relatively short term (6 months post-ECT). Electroconvulsive therapy predominantly affects memory of prior personal events that are near the treatment (within 6 months). Autobiographical memory loss is reduced by using brief pulse ECT rather than sine wave-unilateral positioning of electrodes rather than bilateral-and by titrating electrical current relative to the patient's own seizure threshold. Further research is required to determine memory loss associated with ECT, controlling for the direct effects of the depressive state.

  8. Electroconvulsive Therapy (ECT) and Race: A Report of ECT Use and Sociodemographic Trends in Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Julie; Chiu, Lawrence; Livingston, Robin

    2017-06-01

    Minimal research on race and other sociodemographic disparities in patients receiving electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) exists. One previously noted national trend reveals whites receiving ECT disproportionately more than other races. The aim of this study is to determine whether a county ECT program demonstrates similar disparities observed at the state and national levels. This study examined 21 years of ECT data, between 1993 and 2014, provided by the Texas Department of State Health Services, focusing on race, sex, age, and payer source and 2.5 years of the same variables from a Harris County hospital ECT program. In addition, population demographic data for Harris County and the state of Texas during the same period were obtained from the Department of State Health Services Web site. Despite an overall decrease in the population of whites countywide and statewide, whites continue to use more ECT than African Americans, Latinos, and Asians in both Harris County and Texas. However, the rates of ECT use in minorities increased overall. Both countywide and statewide, ECT was used more than twice as often in women than men. Statewide, elderly patients (>65 years old) saw decreases in ECT use, and there was an increase in private third-party payer source. Electroconvulsive therapy remains underused among African Americans, Latinos, and Asians. Hypotheses and areas for future study include cultural beliefs, stigma, patient and provider knowledge of ECT, and access to care. Despite this, the general use of ECT in Texas has increased overall, and minority use is slowly on the rise.

  9. Safety and utility of acute electroconvulsive therapy for agitation and aggression in dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Deepa; Harper, David G; Achtyes, Eric D; Seiner, Stephen J; Mahdasian, Jack A; Nykamp, Louis J; Adkison, Lesley; Van der Schuur White, Lori; McClintock, Shawn M; Ujkaj, Manjola; Davidoff, Donald A; Forester, Brent P

    2015-03-01

    Agitation and aggression are among the most frequent and disruptive behavioral complications of dementia that contribute to increased cost of care, hospitalization, caregiver burden, and risk of premature institutionalization. This current study examined the safety and efficacy of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) as a treatment for behavioral disturbances in dementia. We hypothesized that ECT would result in reduced agitated and aggressive behaviors between baseline and discharge. Twenty-three participants admitted to McLean Hospital (Belmont, MA, USA) and Pine Rest Christian Mental Health Services (Grand Rapids, MI, USA), with a diagnosis of dementia who were referred for ECT to treat agitation and/or aggression, were enrolled in the study. We administered the Cohen-Mansfield Agitation Inventory-Short Form, Neuropsychiatric Inventory-Nursing Home Version, Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia, and the Clinical Global Impression Scale at baseline, during, and after the ECT course. Regression analyses revealed a significant decrease from baseline to discharge on the Cohen-Mansfield Agitation Inventory (F(4,8) = 13.3; p = 0.006) and Neuropsychiatric Inventory (F(4,31) = 14.6; p Electroconvulsive therapy may be a safe treatment option to reduce symptoms of agitation and aggression in patients with dementia whose behaviors are refractory to medication management. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. A Survey of the Practice of Electroconvulsive Therapy in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson-Martin, Janine J; Milligan, Peter D

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the contemporary practice of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in South Africa. A 36-item questionnaire was sent to all hospitals that practiced ECT in a 12-month period between 2011 and 2012. Forty-two institutions had an ECT machine on site, but 13 institutions reported nonuse. Electroconvulsive therapy services were available in only 6 of the 9 provinces. Questionnaires were sent to the 29 active sites. Twenty-four units (82.8%) responded, and of these, 20 institutions (68.9%) responded to question on the number of patients treated with ECT. Pre-ECT procedures commonly involved informed consent, a physical examination, and basic blood investigations. Bilateral, unilateral, and bifrontal electrode placements were used, whereas dose titration methods and seizure monitoring were used by most respondents. The number of persons treated with ECT per 10,000 persons per year was 0.22, whereas the number of ECT procedures performed per 10,000 persons per year was 1.19. The most common indication for ECT was depression, with most patients being between the ages of 18 and 59 years. The characteristics and rate of ECT utilization in South Africa have been determined and generally emulated international guidelines and trends. However, accessibility to services and aspects such as training and accreditation could be improved.

  11. Episodic memory following deep brain stimulation of the ventral anterior limb of the internal capsule and electroconvulsive therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergfeld, Isidoor O; Mantione, Mariska; Hoogendoorn, Mechteld L C; Horst, Ferdinand; Notten, Peter; Schuurman, P Richard; Denys, D.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Electroconvulsive Therapy (ECT) and Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) are effective treatments for patients with treatment-resistant depression (TRD). However, a common side effect of ECT is autobiographical memory loss (e.g., personal experiences), whereas the impact of DBS on

  12. Episodic memory following deep brain stimulation of the ventral anterior limb of the internal capsule and electroconvulsive therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergfeld, Isidoor O.; Mantione, Mariska; Hoogendoorn, Mechteld L. C.; Horst, Ferdinand; Notten, Peter; Schuurman, P. Richard; Denys, Damiaan

    2017-01-01

    Background: Electroconvulsive Therapy (ECT) and Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) are effective treatments for patients with treatment-resistant depression (TRD). However, a common side effect of ECT is autobiographical memory loss (e.g., personal experiences), whereas the impact of DBS on

  13. Short- and long-term neurocognitive functioning after electroconvulsive therapy in depressed elderly: a prospective naturalistic study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verwijk, E.; Comijs, H.C.; Kok, R.M.; Spaans, H.P.; Tielkes, C.E.M.; Scherder, E.J.A.; Stek, M.L.

    2014-01-01

    Background: It is generally assumed that the elderly patients are more vulnerable to cognitive side effects after electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) than younger depressed patients. The current study aims to evaluate the nature and extent of changes across multiple domains of neurocognitive functioning

  14. The study protocol of the Norwegian randomized controlled trial of electroconvulsive therapy in treatment resistant depression in bipolar disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oedegaard Ketil J

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The treatment of depressive phases of bipolar disorder is challenging. The effects of the commonly used antidepressants in bipolar depression are questionable. Electroconvulsive therapy is generally considered to be the most effective treatment even if there are no randomized controlled trials of electroconvulsive therapy in bipolar depression. The safety of electroconvulsive therapy is well documented, but there are some controversies as to the cognitive side effects. The aim of this study is to compare the effects and side effects of electroconvulsive therapy to pharmacological treatment in treatment resistant bipolar depression. Cognitive changes and quality of life during the treatment will be assessed. Methods/Design A prospective, randomised controlled, multi-centre six- week acute treatment trial with seven clinical assessments. Follow up visit at 26 weeks or until remission (max 52 weeks. A neuropsychological test battery designed to be sensitive to changes in cognitive function will be used. Setting: Nine study centres across Norway, all acute psychiatric departments. Sample: n = 132 patients, aged 18 and over, who fulfil criteria for treatment resistant depression in bipolar disorder, Montgomery Åsberg Depression Rating Scale Score of at least 25 at baseline. Intervention: Intervention group: 3 sessions per week for up to 6 weeks, total up to 18 sessions. Control group: algorithm-based pharmacological treatment as usual. Discussion This study is the first randomized controlled trial that aims to investigate whether electroconvulsive therapy is better than pharmacological treatment as usual in treatment resistant bipolar depression. Possible long lasting cognitive side effects will be evaluated. The study is investigator initiated, without support from industry. Trial registration NCT00664976

  15. A Systematic Review of the Combined Use of Electroconvulsive Therapy and Psychotherapy for Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClintock, Shawn M.; Brandon, Anna R.; Husain, Mustafa M.; Jarrett, Robin B.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is one of the most effective treatments for severe Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). However, after acute phase treatment and initial remission, relapse rates are significant. Strategies to prolong remission include continuation phase ECT, pharmacotherapy, psychotherapy, or their combinations. This systematic review synthesizes extant data regarding the combined use of psychotherapy with ECT for the treatment of patients with severe MDD and offers the hypothesis that augmenting ECT with depression-specific psychotherapy represents a promising strategy for future investigation. Methods The authors performed two independent searches in PsychInfo (1806 – 2009) and MEDLINE (1948 – 2009) using combinations of the following search terms: Electroconvulsive Therapy (including ECT, ECT therapy, electroshock therapy, EST, shock therapy) and Psychotherapy (including cognitive behavioral, interpersonal, group, psychodynamic, psychoanalytic, individual, eclectic, and supportive). We included in this review a total of six articles (English language) that mentioned ECT and psychotherapy in the abstract, and provided a case report, series, or clinical trial. We examined the articles for data related to ECT and psychotherapy treatment characteristics, cohort characteristics, and therapeutic outcome. Results Although research over the past seven decades documenting the combined use of ECT and psychotherapy is limited, the available evidence suggests that testing this combination has promise and may confer additional, positive functional outcomes. Conclusions Significant methodological variability in ECT and psychotherapy procedures, heterogeneous patient cohorts, and inconsistent outcome measures prevent strong conclusions; however, existing research supports the need for future investigations of combined ECT and psychotherapy in well-designed, controlled clinical studies. Depression-specific psychotherapy approaches may need special

  16. Effect of Electroconvulsive Therapy on Cognitive Functions of Rats with Depression-Like Disorders Induced by Ultrasound Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushakova, V M; Zubkov, E A; Morozova, A Y; Gorlova, A V; Pavlov, D A; Inozemtsev, A N; Chekhonin, V P

    2017-09-01

    We studied the effect of electroconvulsive therapy on cognitive functions in rats with depression-like disorder caused by exposure to ultrasound of varying frequency (20-45 kHz). Object recognition and Morris water-maze tests revealed no negative effects of the therapy on memory. Moreover, positive effect of therapy was demonstrated that manifested in amelioration of memory disturbances in depression-like disorders in these behavioral tests. The results of this study do not support the idea about side effects of electroconvulsive therapy, in particular, development of transient amnesia, and are a prerequisite for a more thorough study of internal mechanisms of the effect of the therapy on cognitive sphere.

  17. The use of electroconvulsive therapy in atypical psychotic presentations: a case review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, John H; Vasu, Devi

    2007-10-01

    Convulsive therapy and its progeny, electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), were originally used for the treatment of catatonic schizophrenia, and there is little doubt that ECT remains an effective intervention for the treatment of schizophrenia. However, current practice tends to favor the use of ECT in severe or treatment refractory affective disorders, and its use in schizophrenia and other nonaffective (atypical) psychotic disorders has become controversial.CASE REPORTS HAVE SUGGESTED A ROLE FOR ECT IN TWO SPECIFIC ATYPICAL PSYCHOTIC DISORDERS: Cotard's syndrome and cycloid psychosis. In this article, we review the atypical psychotic disorders and report a series of five case examples that signify the role of ECT in atypical psychotic presentations, particularly when the symptoms resemble those found in Cotard's syndrome and cycloid psychosis.

  18. Maintenance electroconvulsive therapy for comorbid pharmacotherapy-refractory obsessive-compulsive and schizoaffective disorder

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    Hanisch F

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective There is a high comorbidity of schizophrenia and obsessive-compulsory disorder (OCD associated with more severe symptoms. Standard pharmacotherapy achieve symptom improvement in approximately 60% only. Results We report about a 48-old women treated for depression which developed successively psychotic symptoms (ideas of reference, psychotic worries, negative symptoms (blunted affect, impoverished thinking, difficulties in planning, and obsessive-compulsive symptoms (mainly repeating rituals, avoidance behaviour, collecting and hoarding. She did not respond to combined treatment with neuroleptics and high dose selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors. She acutely improved during a course of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT and was maintained on outpatient ECTs fortnightly together with 12 mg sertindol and 45 mg mirtazapine for 42 weeks. Conclusion Maintenance ECT is not an approved therapy in OCD but might be an option in pharmacotherapy refractory cases of comorbid OCD and schizophrenic/schizoaffective disorder.

  19. Evaluation of serum indexes and electrophysiological characteristics after ziprasidone combined with modified electroconvulsive therapy for schizophrenian

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    Hong-Bo Cao

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the effect of ziprasidone combined with modified electroconvulsive therapy (MECT on serum indexes and electrophysiological characteristics of schizophrenia. Methods: A total of 44 patients with schizophrenia treated in our hospital between May 2014 and July 2016 were selected and randomly divided into MECT group and control group, MECT group received ziprasidone combined with MECT therapy and control group received ziprasidone therapy. Before treatment as well as 1 month, 2 months and 3 months after treatment, serum nerve cytokine levels and inflammatory factor levels as well as nerve electrophysiology parameters were detected. Results: 1 month, 2 months and 3 months after treatment, serum BDNF, GDNF and NGF levels of both groups were significantly higher than those before treatment, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-17 and TNF-α levels were significantly lower than those before treatment, P300 and N2-P3 latency were significantly shorter than those before treatment, and P300 and N2-P3 amplitude were significantly higher than those before treatment; serum BDNF, GDNF and NGF levels of MECT group were significantly higher than those of control group, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-17 and TNF-α levels were significantly lower than those of control group, P300 and N2-P3 latency were significantly shorter than those of control group, and P300 and N2-P3 amplitude were significantly higher than those of control group. Conclusion: Ziprasidone combined with modified electroconvulsive therapy can improve neuron function, reduce neuron damage and adjust nerve electrophysiology function.

  20. Speed of recovery from disorientation may predict the treatment outcome of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in elderly patients with major depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magne Bjølseth, Tor; Engedal, Knut; Šaltytė Benth, Jūratė; Bergsholm, Per; Strømnes Dybedal, Gro; Lødøen Gaarden, Torfinn; Tanum, Lars

    2016-01-15

    No study has previously investigated whether the speed of recovery from disorientation in the post-ictal period may predict the short-term treatment outcome of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). This longitudinal cohort study included 57 elderly patients with unipolar or bipolar major depression, aged 60-85 years, treated with formula-based ECT. Treatment outcome was assessed weekly during the ECT course using the 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD17). The post-ictal reorientation time (PRT) was assessed at the first and third treatments. Longer PRTs at the first and third treatments predicted a more rapid decline and a lower end-point in continuous HRSD17 scores (p=0.002 and 0.019, respectively). None of the patients who recovered from disorientation in less than 5 min met the remission criterion, defined as an HRSD17 score of 7 or less. A greater increment in stimulus dosage from the first to the third ECT session rendered a smaller relative decline in PRT (p<0.001). The limited number of subjects may reduce the generalizability of the findings. The speed of recovery from disorientation at the first and third sessions seems to be a predictor of the treatment outcome of formula-based ECT, at least in elderly patients with major depression. It remains to be clarified how the PRT may be utilized to guide stimulus dosing. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. A retrospective controlled study into memory complaints reported by depressed patients after treatment with electroconvulsive therapy and pharmacotherapy or pharmacotherapy only

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kho, K.H.; van Vreeswijk, M.F.; Murre, J.M.J.

    2006-01-01

    Few studies have been conducted comparing complaints of memory problems using objective and subjective memory scales in depressed patients who received electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) + pharmacotherapy or treatment with pharmacotherapy only. Patients who suffer from depression according to the

  2. [Cardiac safety of electroconvulsive therapy in an elderly patient--a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakuła-Juchnowicz, Hanna; Próchnicki, Michał; Kiciński, Paweł; Olajossy, Marcin; Pelczarska-Jamroga, Agnieszka; Dzikowski, Michał; Jaroszyński, Andrzej

    2015-10-01

    Since electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) was introduced as treatment for psychiatric disorders in 1938, it has remained one of the most effective therapeutic methods. ECT is often used as a "treatment of last resort" when other methods fail, and a life-saving procedure in acute clinical states when a rapid therapeutic effect is needed. Mortality associated with ECT is lower, compared to the treatment with tricyclic antidepressants, and comparable to that observed in so-called minor surgery. In the literature, cases of effective and safe electroconvulsive therapy have been described in patients of advanced age, with a burden of many somatic disorders. However, cases of acute cardiac episodes have also been reported during ECT. The qualification of patients for ECT and the selection of a group of patients at the highest risk of cardiovascular complications remains a serious clinical problem. An assessment of the predictive value of parameters of standard electrocardiogram (ECG), which is a simple, cheap and easily available procedure, deserves special attention. This paper reports a case of a 74-year-old male patient treated with ECT for a severe depressive episode, in the context of cardiologic safety. Both every single ECT session and the full course were assessed to examine their impact on levels of troponin T, which is a basic marker of cardiac damage, and selected ECG parameters (QTc, QRS). In the presented case ECT demonstrated its high general and cardiac safety with no negative effect on cardiac troponin (TnT) levels, corrected QT interval (QTc) duration, or other measured ECG parameters despite initially increased troponin levels, the patient's advanced age, the burden of a severe somatic disease and its treatment (anticancer therapy). © 2015 MEDPRESS.

  3. Key updates in the clinical application of electroconvulsive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Richard D; Reti, Irving M

    2017-04-01

    ECT is the oldest and most effective therapy available for the treatment of severe major depression. It is highly effective in individuals with treatment resistance and when a rapid response is required. However, ECT is associated with memory impairment that is the most concerning side-effect of the treatment, substantially contributing to the controversy and stigmatization surrounding this highly effective treatment. There is overwhelming evidence for the efficacy and safety of an acute course of ECT for the treatment of a severe major depressive episode, as reflected by the recent FDA advisory panel recommendation to reclassify ECT devices from Class III to the lower risk category Class II. However, its application for other indications remains controversial, despite strong evidence to the contrary. This article reviews the indication of ECT for major depression, as well as for other conditions, including catatonia, mania, and acute episodes of schizophrenia. This study also reviews the growing evidence supporting the use of maintenance ECT to prevent relapse after an acute successful course of treatment. Although ECT is administered uncommonly to patients under the age of 18, the evidence supporting its use is also reviewed in this patient population. Finally, memory loss associated with ECT and efforts at more effectively monitoring and reducing it are reviewed.

  4. Coronary arterial disease after electroconvulsive therapy: a case report

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    Nataly Pimentel Rodrigues

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives Unipolar depression (UPD is a leading cause of global burden of diseases, particularly among the elderly, whose treatment may be challenging. In such cases, ECT is often recommended due to its safety and efficacy. This report presents a case of a 67-year-old male inpatient that developed a rare cardiac complication during ECT. Methods Clinical case report with patient’s consent and bibliographic review. Results A 67-year-old male inpatient with recurrent severe psychotic depression was hospitalized and ECT was indicated after failure of the pharmacological treatment. A comprehensive clinical pre-evaluation revealed only nonspecific ST-segment changes in electrocardiogram. During the 7th ECT session, it was observed transitory ST-segment depression followed by a discrete increase of plasma troponin I. Severe tri-vessel coronary artery stenosis was found and a percutaneous coronary angioplasty was performed, with satisfactory psychiatric and cardiac outcomes. Conclusions Unipolar depression (UPD and cardiovascular disease are often coexistent conditions, especially among the elderly. In the current case, myocardial ischemia was detected lately during ECT therapy and its treatment allowed the UPD treatment to be completed adequately.

  5. Bio-heat transfer model of electroconvulsive therapy: Effect of biological properties on induced temperature variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Marilia M; Wen, Paul; Ahfock, Tony

    2016-08-01

    A realistic human head model consisting of six tissue layers was modelled to investigate the behavior of temperature profile and magnitude when applying electroconvulsive therapy stimulation and different biological properties. The thermo-electrical model was constructed with the use of bio-heat transfer equation and Laplace equation. Three different electrode montages were analyzed as well as the influence of blood perfusion, metabolic heat and electric and thermal conductivity in the scalp. Also, the effect of including the fat layer was investigated. The results showed that temperature increase is inversely proportional to electrical and thermal conductivity increase. Furthermore, the inclusion of blood perfusion slightly drops the peak temperature. Finally, the inclusion of fat is highly recommended in order to acquire more realistic results from the thermo-electrical models.

  6. Hypochondriacal delusion in an elderly woman recovers quickly with electroconvulsive therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dols, Annemieke; Rhebergen, Didi; Eikelenboom, Piet; Stek, Max L.

    2012-01-01

    A 72-year-old woman without any medical and psychiatric history, suffered from nausea, pain in the epigastria and constipation for over a year. She eventually lost 20 kilograms despite nightly drip-feeding. Extensive additional tests did not reveal any clues for her complaints. She remained convinced that her symptoms were a side-effect of anti-fungal medication she used. She was diagnosed with hypochondria. In the course of time her ideas about her somatic symptoms became delusional and she was diagnosed with a hypochondriacal delusion as part of melancholia, without depressed mood or loss of interest or pleasure as prominent features. It is important to recognize melancholia as soon as possible by continually evaluating other symptoms of depression. This may enable to avoid repetitive and exhaustive somatic examinations, which are not indicated, and to start effective treatment. In our patient electroconvulsive therapy resulted in a fast and complete recovery. PMID:24765410

  7. Hypochondriacal delusion in an elderly woman recovers quickly with electroconvulsive therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annemieke Dols

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A 72-year-old woman without any medical and psychiatric history, suffered from nausea, pain in the epigastria and constipation for over a year. She eventually lost 20 kilograms despite nightly drip-feeding. Extensive additional tests did not reveal any clues for her complaints. She remained convinced that her symptoms were a side-effect of anti-fungal medication she used. She was diagnosed with hypochondria. In the course of time her ideas about her somatic symptoms became delusional and she was diagnosed with a hypochondriacal delusion as part of melancholia, without depressed mood or loss of interest or pleasure as prominent features. It is important to recognize melancholia as soon as possible by continually evaluating other symptoms of depression. This may enable to avoid repetitive and exhaustive somatic examinations, which are not indicated, and to start effective treatment. In our patient electroconvulsive therapy resulted in a fast and complete recovery.

  8. Atypical Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Evolution after Electroconvulsive Therapy for Catatonic Depression

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    Iria Grande

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a case report of an 80-year-old woman who presented with symptomatology compatible with an episode of major depression with catatonia. After psychiatric admission, electroconvulsive therapy (ECT was applied, but symptoms progressed with cognitive impairment, bradykinesia, widespread stiffness, postural tremor, and gait disturbance. After compatible magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, diffusion changes, and electroencephalogram (EEG findings the case was reoriented to Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD. The genetic study found a methionine/valine heterozygosity at codon 129 of the prion protein gene PrPSc. On followup, a significant clinical recovery turned out. For this reason, EEG and MRI were repeated and confirmed the findings. The patient subsequently demonstrated progressive clinical deterioration and died 21 months later. The diagnosis was verified postmortem by neuropathology. The vCJD subtype MV2 is indeed characterized by early and prominent psychiatric symptoms and a prolonged disease duration however no frank clinical recovery has before been reported.

  9. Ketamine appears associated with better word recall than etomidate after a course of 6 electroconvulsive therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaniel, William W; Sahota, Anupinder K; Vyas, Barin V; Laguerta, Nena; Hategan, Liana; Oswald, Jessica

    2006-06-01

    Ten patients treated with electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) for depressive illness received anesthesia with either etomidate or ketamine. Three patients received both etomidate and ketamine anesthesia for ECT during separate episodes of depression. Patients anesthetized with ketamine for ECT had significantly less impairment of short-term memory function than did patients who received ECT with etomidate anesthesia. All patients who received both anesthetics for ECT during 2 different episodes had less memory loss during ECT with ketamine than with etomidate. These results show the importance of studying the effects of all anesthetic agents used during ECT on cognitive functions. The results imply that the effect of ECT on memory may be largely caused by effects mediated by glutamate at N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors and suggest that N-methyl-d-aspartate antagonists may offer protection from memory dysfunction during ECT.

  10. Retrograde amnesia and bilateral electroconvulsive therapy. Long-term follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squire, L R; Slater, P C; Miller, P L

    1981-01-01

    Memory for past events was assessed in 43 patients who had been prescribed bilateral electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) for relief of depressive illness. Four memory tests of personal or public events were administered before ECT, shortly after the fifth treatment, one week after completion of treatment, and about seven months later. The results indicated that ECT can initially disrupt recall of events that occurred many years previously, but recovery of these memories was virtually complete by seven months after treatment. It was also clear that persisting memory loss for information acquired only a few days before treatment can occur. For information acquired one to two years prior to treatment, recovery was substantial, but the results suggested that some memory problems might persist for events that occurred during this time period.

  11. Falls associated with electroconvulsive therapy among the geriatric population: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Sanjay S; Daly, John W; Sewell, Daniel D

    2008-06-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is the treatment of choice in many older individuals with depression and a few other conditions. Like all medical treatments, this intervention has certain possible risks, which include undesirable reactions associated with general anesthesia and those attributed specifically to ECT itself, such as short-term memory loss. The potential association of falls with ECT has not been well studied. Our recent literature search revealed that information on this topic consists mainly of chart reviews and case reports. We present a case of an older woman with a history of recurrent major depressive disorder that required intervention with ECT. She suffered 2 falls during her course of ECT. This case adds to the growing body of anecdotal evidence supporting an association of falls with ECT and highlights the need for more scientifically rigorous data to clarify whether this apparent association is real and/or causally related.

  12. Rivastigmine treatment for the prevention of electroconvulsive therapy-induced memory deficits in patients with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stryjer, Rafael; Ophir, Dana; Bar, Faina; Spivak, Baruch; Weizman, Abraham; Strous, Rael D

    2012-01-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is an effective strategy in some treatment-resistant patients with schizophrenia. However, ECT is associated with cognitive adverse effects, most notably, memory loss. This study examined the effects of rivastigmine, a selective central nervous system acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, with benefits on cognition in Alzheimer disease, on memory performance in patients with schizophrenia treated with ECT. Thirty inpatients with Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision schizophrenia treated with ECT were coadministered rivastigmine (3-4.5 mg/d) or placebo in a prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial (maximum period of 4 weeks). Over the ECT course, scores on the cognitive subscale of the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment in subjects receiving placebo showed no significant change, whereas subjects receiving rivastigmine displayed decreased cognitive subscale of the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment scores, indicating cognitive improvement (P ECT and indicate possible beneficial effects of rivastigmine coadministration in minimizing some of these ECT-induced cognitive impairments.

  13. Lack of effect of naloxone on prolactin and seizures in electroconvulsive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperling, M R; Melmed, S; McAllister, T; Price, T R

    1989-01-01

    Both opiate agonist and antagonist injection have been reported to modulate prolactin secretion, alter brain excitability and produce seizures, and modify the postictal state. We studied the effects of administration of high-dose naloxone, an opiate antagonist, on postictal prolactin levels, seizure duration, and postictal behavior, using patients undergoing electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) as a seizure model. Seven patients had 8 mg naloxone injected prior to one ECT treatment and saline injected prior to another treatment, with the order of injection randomized. Before ECT and 15 min after ECT, prolactin levels were drawn, and no blunting of the expected postictal prolactin elevation by naloxone injection was observed. We found no evidence that endogenous opiates trigger prolactin secretion during seizures. Seizure duration was also similar in saline and naloxone groups, and naloxone did not reverse postictal depression, as has been reported in an animal model.

  14. Electroconvulsive therapy in patients with cardiac pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolenc, Tamara J; Barnes, Roxann D; Hayes, David L; Rasmussen, Keith G

    2004-09-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is used to treat major depressive illness, especially in elderly and medically frail patients. Not uncommonly, these patients have cardiac pacemakers or implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs). Only a few case reports in the literature describe the use of ECT in such patients. Herein we review our ECT experience treating 26 pacemaker patients and 3 ICD patients. All patients obtained significant antidepressant benefits with ETC. Only one serious cardiac event occurred, a case of supraventricular tachycardia (SVT) requiring a stay on the cardiac intensive care unit. The SVT resolved and the patient went on to receive further uncomplicated ECT treatments. We conclude from this experience that with proper pre-ECT cardiac and pacemaker/defibrillator assessment, ECT can be safely and effectively administered to patients with an implanted cardiac device.

  15. Electroconvulsive therapy-induced Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enomoto, Shingo; Yoshino, Aihide; Takase, Bonpei; Kuwahara, Tatsuro; Tatsuzawa, Yasutaka; Nomura, Soichiro

    2013-01-01

    Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome is characterized by premature ventricular excitation due to the presence of an abnormal accessory pathway. Electrocardiography (ECG) of patients with WPW syndrome portrays a short PR interval and a wide QRS interval with a delta wave. Herein, we report the case of a patient with schizophrenia who developed a wide QRS interval with a delta wave immediately following electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). Initially, the delta wave disappeared within 2 days after ECT. However, the duration of the delta wave increased exponentially to 4 months when ECT was repeated. Although the patient's cardiocirculatory dynamics remained normal, we continued to monitor her ECG until the delta wave disappeared because WPW syndrome can lead to serious arrhythmia. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Electroconvulsive therapy, hypertensive surge, blood-brain barrier breach, and amnesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andrade, Chittaranjan; Bolwig, Tom G

    2014-01-01

    Preclinical and clinical evidence show that electroconvulsive therapy (ECT)-induced intraictal surge in blood pressure may result in a small, transient breach in the blood-brain barrier, leading to mild cerebral edema and a possible leach of noxious substances from blood into brain tissues...... convincing evidence of benefits. It is concluded that there is insufficient support, at present, for the hypothesis that the hypertensive surge during ECT and the resultant blood-brain barrier breach contribute meaningfully to ECT-induced cognitive deficits. Future research should address the subset....... These changes may impair neuronal functioning and contribute to the mechanisms underlying ECT-induced cognitive deficits. Some but not all clinical data on the subject suggest that blood pressure changes during ECT correlate with indices of cognitive impairment. In animal models, pharmacological manipulations...

  17. Body temperature change during anesthesia for electroconvulsive therapy: implications for quality incentives in anesthesiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modell, Jerome H; Gravenstein, Nikolaus; Morey, Timothy E

    2008-11-01

    The American Society of Anesthesiologists has announced that perioperative normothermia is a "Quality Incentive in Anesthesiology." We examined whether we could meet this quality incentive in a simple population: patients undergoing anesthesia for electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). We compared infrared-measured ear temperature before anesthesia to temperature upon delivery of patients to the postanesthesia care unit (PACU) after 101 consecutive brief anesthetics to facilitate ECT. For 35 procedures, the patients had an infrared ear thermometer temperature of measures were substandard. Also, current methods of measuring temperature may be inadequate to ascertain if patients are hypothermic after surgery. As the avoidance of hypothermia is a meritorious goal, anesthesia departments need to ensure that their temperature monitoring equipment is adequate to ensure accurate measurement of postanesthetic temperature if this variable is to be used as a quality incentive.

  18. Neuroleptic malignant syndrome: a case responding to electroconvulsive therapy plus bupropion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quintí Foguet-Boreu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS is a severe motor syndrome occurring as a consequence of neuroleptic treatment. We present a case of a 67-year-old Caucasian woman with a history of a major depressive disorder with psychotic features. During her third hospital admission, symptoms of autonomic instability, hyperpyrexia, severe extrapyramidal side effects, and delirium appeared, suggesting NMS due to concomitant treatment with risperidone and quetiapine, among other drugs. Despite several consecutive pharmacological treatments (lorazepam, bromocriptine and amantadine and prompt initiation of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT, clinical improvement was observed only after combining bupropion with ECT. The symptoms that had motivated the admission gradually remitted and the patient was discharged home. Bupropion increases dopaminergic activity in both the nucleus accumbens and the prefrontal cortex. Therefore, from a physiopathological standpoint, bupropion has a potential role in treating NMS. However, there is scarce evidence supporting this approach and therefore future cases should be carefully considered.

  19. Knowledge and Attitudes of Patients and Their Relatives Toward Electroconvulsive Therapy in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; An, Feng-Rong; Zhu, Hui; Chiu, Helen F K; Ungvari, Gabor S; H Ng, Chee; Lai, Kelly Y C; Xiang, Yu-Tao

    2016-10-01

    To examine the knowledge and attitudes of patients and their relatives as well as patients' subjective experience with electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in China. Up to 420 responders including patients receiving ECT (n = 210) and their relatives (n = 210) were assessed with self-reported questionnaires. Patients and their relatives did not receive adequate information before ECT, particularly about the mode of its delivery, risks, and adverse effects. The most common adverse effect of ECT reported by patients was memory impairment. Both patients and their relatives had positive attitudes toward ECT and appeared satisfied with its therapeutic effects. Mental health professionals need to address the inadequate information on ECT provided to patients and their relatives prior to the treatment. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Immune and neurotrophin stimulation by electroconvulsive therapy: is some inflammation needed after all?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Buel, E M; Patas, K; Peters, M; Bosker, F J; Eisel, U L M; Klein, H C

    2015-01-01

    A low-grade inflammatory response is commonly seen in the peripheral blood of major depressive disorder (MDD) patients, especially those with refractory and chronic disease courses. However, electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), the most drastic intervention reserved for these patients, is closely associated with an enhanced haematogenous as well as neuroinflammatory immune response, as evidenced by both human and animal studies. A related line of experimental evidence further shows that inflammatory stimulation reinforces neurotrophin expression and may even mediate dramatic neurogenic and antidepressant-like effects following exposure to chronic stress. The current review therefore attempts a synthesis of our knowledge on the neurotrophic and immunological aspects of ECT and other electrically based treatments in psychiatry. Perhaps contrary to contemporary views, we conclude that targeted potentiation, rather than suppression, of inflammatory responses may be of therapeutic relevance to chronically depressed patients or a subgroup thereof. PMID:26218851

  1. Electroconvulsive therapy-induced brain plasticity determines therapeutic outcome in mood disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dukart, Juergen; Regen, Francesca; Kherif, Ferath; Colla, Michael; Bajbouj, Malek; Heuser, Isabella; Frackowiak, Richard S.; Draganski, Bogdan

    2014-01-01

    There remains much scientific, clinical, and ethical controversy concerning the use of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) for psychiatric disorders stemming from a lack of information and knowledge about how such treatment might work, given its nonspecific and spatially unfocused nature. The mode of action of ECT has even been ascribed to a “barbaric” form of placebo effect. Here we show differential, highly specific, spatially distributed effects of ECT on regional brain structure in two populations: patients with unipolar or bipolar disorder. Unipolar and bipolar disorders respond differentially to ECT and the associated local brain-volume changes, which occur in areas previously associated with these diseases, correlate with symptom severity and the therapeutic effect. Our unique evidence shows that electrophysical therapeutic effects, although applied generally, take on regional significance through interactions with brain pathophysiology. PMID:24379394

  2. Delirium during the course of electroconvulsive therapy in a patient on lithium carbonate treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadananda, Suneetha Karkada; Narayanaswamy, Janardhanan C; Srinivasaraju, Ravindra; Math, Suresh Bada

    2013-01-01

    The safety of concurrent mood stabilizers during the course of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is yet to be clearly established. Delirium with concurrent administration of ECT and lithium carbonate is described in this case report. A 30-year-old male with a past history of significant head injury developed delirium during the course of bitemporal ECT. The clinical picture and the details of the cognitive impairment have been discussed in the report with a focus on relationship between the lithium carbonate administration and the concurrent ECT. Patients with preexisting organic brain damage could be prone to develop the cognitive adverse effect while on a combination of lithium and ECT. Possible interactions between lithium and ECT need further systematic evaluation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Rocuronium-sugammadex for electroconvulsive therapy management in neuroleptic malignant syndrome: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas Reza, P; Gestal Vázquez, M; Outeiro Rosato, Á; López Álvarez, S; Diéguez García, P

    2017-02-01

    Neuroleptics are a group of drugs widely used in the treatment of psychotic symptoms. Among their adverse effects is the ability to trigger a neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS). The diagnosis of NMS is determined by exclusion, and its initial therapeutic management should be the withdrawal of neuroleptics, the administration of benzodiazepines, and electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). ECT is an effective treatment in these patients, and in those cases with a poor response to treatment with antipsychotic drugs. A review is presented on the treatment options and anaesthetic implications of ECT used to handle a patient diagnosed with paranoid schizophrenia in the context of NMS. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Recurrent Aspiration in a Patient With Gastric Band Undergoing Electroconvulsive Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubit, Elana B; Fetterman, Tammy Cohen; Ying, Patrick

    2016-06-01

    We report a case of a 33-year-old woman with depression and suicidal ideation, treated successfully with electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in the past. Since her previous course of ECT, she underwent gastric banding, a bariatric surgical procedure associated with increased risk of gastric regurgitation. Despite increasingly stringent measures to minimize the risk of regurgitation and aspiration during ECT, she had several episodes of regurgitation, the last of which precipitated an acute illness consistent with aspiration pneumonitis. We took additional precautions after each event, until she had no further episodes of regurgitation. We discuss the risk posed by the gastric band, the measures we implemented to minimize that risk, and our recommendations for assessment and management of post-gastric banding patients who present for ECT.

  5. Electroconvulsive therapy in treatment-resistant mania: case reports A Eletroconvulsoterapia no tratamento da mania resistente: relatos de casos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia Britto de Macedo Soares

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available Electroconvulsive therapy is known to be effective in the treatment of mood disorders, more specifically for depression and mania. Although a large body of evidence confirms the efficacy of electroconvulsive therapy in the treatment of mania, few prospective studies have been done to assess its effectiveness in treatment-resistant manic episodes. These case reports describe the initial results of a study that is being conducted to evaluate the efficacy of Electroconvulsive therapy among treatment-resistant bipolar patients. METHODS: Three manic patients (according to DSM-IV criteria who were considered treatment-resistant underwent a series of 12 bilateral Electroconvulsive therapy sessions. Before the treatment and then weekly, they were evaluated with the following rating scales: Young Mania Rating Scale, Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression, Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale, and Clinical Global Impressions-Bipolar Version. RESULTS: The 3 patients showed a satisfactory response to Electroconvulsive therapy, although some differences in the course of response were observed. CONCLUSION: These case reports suggest that Electroconvulsive therapy needs further evaluation for the treatment of resistant bipolar patients.A Eletroconvulsoterapia é uma alternativa reconhecidamente eficaz no tratamento dos transtornos do humor. Embora vários estudos tenham confirmado a eficácia desta modalidade terapêutica no tratamento da mania aguda, poucos estudos foram realizados em pacientes maníacos resistentes à farmacoterapia. Esses relatos de casos descrevem resultados preliminares de um projeto de pesquisa que tem por objetivo avaliar a eficácia da Eletroconvulsoterapia no tratamento de transtornos bipolares resistentes. MÉTODOS: Três pacientes com diagnóstico de mania (de acordo com os critérios do DSM-IV, considerados resistentes ao tratamento medicamentoso, foram submetidos a 12 aplicações bilaterais de Eletroconvulsoterapia. Antes do tratamento e

  6. The hippocampus in patients treated with electroconvulsive therapy: a proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ende, G; Braus, D F; Walter, S; Weber-Fahr, W; Henn, F A

    2000-10-01

    We monitored the effect of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) on the nuclear magnetic resonance-detectable metabolites N-acetylaspartate, creatine and phosphocreatine, and choline-containing compounds in the hippocampus by means of hydrogen 1 magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging. We hypothesized that if ECT-induced memory deterioration was associated with neuronal loss in the hippocampus, the N-acetylaspartate signal would decrease after ECT and any increased membrane turnover would result in an increase in the signal from choline-containing compounds. Seventeen patients received complete courses of ECT, during which repeated proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging studies of the hippocampal region were performed. Individual changes during the course of ECT were compared with values obtained in 24 healthy control subjects and 6 patients remitted from major depression without ECT. No changes in the hippocampal N-acetylaspartate signals were detected after ECT. A significant mean increase of 16% of the signal from choline-containing compounds after 5 or more ECT treatments was observed. Despite the mostly unilateral ECT application (14 of 17 patients), the increase in the choline-containing compound signal was observed bilaterally. Lactate or elevated lipid signals were not detected. All patients showed clinical amelioration of depression after ECT. Electroconvulsive therapy is not likely to induce hippocampal atrophy or cell death, which would be reflected by a decrease in the N-acetylaspartate signal. Compared with an age-matched control group, the choline-containing compounds signal in patients with a major depressive episode was significantly lower than normal, before ECT and normalized during ECT.

  7. Electroconvulsive Therapy Under General Anesthesia With Cisatracurium, Laryngeal Mask Airways, and Bispectral Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Cai-Cai; Qian, Xiao-Yan; An, Jian-Xiong; Yu, Zeng-Lei; Wu, Jian-Ping; Wen, Hui; Cao, Zong-Xin; Wang, Yong; Fang, Qi-Wu; Williams, John P

    2016-03-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) has dramatically reduced musculoskeletal complications when carried out with muscle relaxants under general anesthesia. However, seizure quality can be affected by the depth of anesthesia and choice of anesthetic agent. The purpose of this study was to describe a general anesthetic technique for ECT by using laryngeal mask, bispectral index (BIS), and muscle relaxant monitoring. Twenty-one patients, between ages 18 and 70 years (American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status I-III), who underwent a total of 89 sessions of ECT were examined in a retrospective study. Anesthesia was induced by use of propofol (1.0 mg/kg) followed by cisatracurium (0.2 mg/kg). The BIS, train-of-four, and end-tidal carbon dioxide were all monitored continuously. A laryngeal mask airway was used to maintain and protect the airway during the procedure. Electroconvulsive therapy stimuli were applied bilaterally when the train-of-four was assessed as being zero and BIS scores were 70. All patients then received 5 μg sufentanil and 2 mg midazolam, while titrated to maintain the BIS value at 40 to 50, before the muscle relaxation exhibited complete recovery. The mean duration of treatment process takes approximately 82.5 minutes. Mean (SD) seizure length was 58.8 (28.3) seconds, with 4.5% incidence of restimulation per treatment. Incidence of awareness was 0%. No patients exhibited delirium, nausea, vomiting, or myalgia in the postseizure phase. Bispectral index monitoring of the depth of anesthesia may have improved seizure quality, and awareness did not occur.

  8. Electroconvulsive therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Updated by: Fred K. Berger, MD, addiction and forensic psychiatrist, Scripps Memorial Hospital, La Jolla, CA. ... (www.urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is an independent audit to verify that A.D.A.M. follows ...

  9. Effectiveness of Electroconvulsive Therapy for Depression and Cotard’s Syndrome in a Patient with Frontotemporal Lobe Dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiyuki Kobayashi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the field of psychogeriatrics, the differential diagnosis of depression and dementia, as well as the treatment of depression and comorbid dementia, is an important issue. In this paper, the authors present the case of a 72-year-old woman with Cotard’s syndrome and frontotemporal dementia (FTD who was admitted to a psychiatric hospital with delusions of negation accompanied by depressive symptoms. Pharmacotherapy over a 2-year hospitalization was unsuccessful, and she was subsequently transferred to our university hospital. A total of 18 sessions of electroconvulsive therapy released her from psychomotor inhibition, appetite loss, and Cotard’s delusions. The indication for electroconvulsive therapy in patients with dementia is discussed.

  10. Acute electroconvulsive therapy followed by maintenance electroconvulsive therapy decreases hospital re-admission rates of older patients with severe mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelef, Assaf; Mazeh, Doron; Berger, Uri; Baruch, Yehuda; Barak, Yoram

    2015-06-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is a highly effective treatment for patients with severe mental illness (SMI). Maintenance ECT (M-ECT) is required for many elderly patients experiencing severe recurrent forms of mood disorders, whereas M-ECT for schizophrenia patients is a poorly studied treatment. We report on the outcomes in aged patients with SMI: schizophrenia and severe affective disorders treated by M-ECT of varying duration to prevent relapse after a successful course of acute ECT. The study measured the effectiveness of M-ECT in preventing hospital readmissions and reducing admission days. A retrospective chart review of 42 consecutive patients comparing the number and length of psychiatric admissions before and after the start of M-ECT was used. We analyzed diagnoses, previous ECT treatments, number of ECT treatments, and number and length of psychiatric admissions before and after M-ECT. Mean age in our sample was 71.5 (6.9) years. Twenty-two (52%) patients experienced severe affective disorders and 20 (48%) experienced schizophrenia. Patients were administered 92.8 (85.9) M-ECT treatments. Average duration of the M-ECT course was 34 (29.8) months. There were on average 1.88 admissions before M-ECT and only 0.38 admissions in the M-ECT period (P < 0.001). Duration of mean hospitalization stay decreased from 215.9 to 12.4 days during the M-ECT (P < 0.01). Our findings suggest that acute ECT followed by M-ECT is highly effective in selected elderly patients with SMIs.

  11. Comparison of anesthetics in electroconvulsive therapy: an effective treatment with the use of propofol, etomidate, and thiopental

    OpenAIRE

    Dannon, Pinhas; Zahavi,Guy

    2014-01-01

    Guy Sender Zahavi,1 Pinhas Dannon1,2 1Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Israel; 2Brain Stimulation Unit at Beer Yaakov-Ness Ziona Mental Health Center, Israel Objectives: Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is considered to be one of the most effective treatments in psychiatry. Currently, three medications for anesthesia are used routinely during ECT: propofol, etomidate, and thiopental. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of the anesthetics used in ECT on seiz...

  12. The safety of electroconvulsive therapy and lithium in combination: a case series and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolenc, Tamara J; Rasmussen, Keith G

    2005-09-01

    Early reports cautioned against the combination of lithium and electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), citing risk of excessive cognitive disturbance, prolonged apnea, and spontaneous seizures. However, recent case series with larger numbers of patients indicate that the combination may be used safely and with optimal efficacy in certain clinical circumstances. In this report, we describe 12 patients in whom the combination of lithium and ECT was deemed safe. We also provide a comprehensive review of published literature and provide detailed recommendations for clinical practice.

  13. Evaluation of nonmemory cognitive parameters in psychiatric patients? pre- and post-electroconvulsive therapy: An observational study

    OpenAIRE

    Prakash, Jyoti; Srivastava, Kalpana; Manandhar, Pradeep; Saha, Amitabh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Possibility of cognitive side effects has made electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) questionable. Variable deficits have been debated in memory cognition. Pattern of changes in nonmemory cognition pre- and post-ECT is not clear. Methodology: Forty patients undergoing ECT were studied on nonmemory cognitive parameters before ECT, after a course of ECT, and after 4 weeks of last. ECT. Results: Nonmemory cognition improved during the course of ECT and over 4 weeks of ECT. Co...

  14. Mouse repeated electroconvulsive seizure (ECS) does not reverse social stress effects but does induce behavioral and hippocampal changes relevant to electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) side-effects in the treatment of depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Buel, Erin M; Sigrist, Hannes; Seifritz, Erich; Fikse, Lianne; Bosker, Fokko J; Schoevers, Robert A; Klein, Hans C; Pryce, Christopher R; Eisel, Ulrich Lm

    2017-01-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is an effective treatment for depression, but can have negative side effects including amnesia. The mechanisms of action underlying both the antidepressant and side effects of ECT are not well understood. An equivalent manipulation that is conducted in experimental

  15. Electroconvulsive Therapy in Anti-N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptor Encephalitis: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffey, M Justin; Cooper, Joseph J

    2016-12-01

    There is a growing scientific literature describing the neuropsychiatric symptoms of anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor encephalitis, including the use of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) to treat those symptoms. We sought to consolidate this literature into a review that highlights its relevance to ECT practitioners. We performed a PubMed search using the terms electroconvulsive therapy and encephalitis, autoimmune encephalitis, or anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis. We reviewed all relevant studies in detail, cross-referenced all bibliographies, and collected key clinical information related to the practice of ECT. We identified 6 studies offering patient-level descriptions of the use of ECT in patients with anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis. In all cases ECT was used to target symptoms of catatonia. Electroconvulsive therapy was delivered safely and effectively irrespective of the timing of diagnosis, tumor removal, or immunotherapy. There are no controlled data on the use of ECT in anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis. Further investigation is needed to determine whether ECT has a disease-modifying effect on this form of autoimmune encephalitis.

  16. Heat transfer due to electroconvulsive therapy: Influence of anisotropic thermal and electrical skull conductivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes de Oliveira, Marilia; Wen, Peng; Ahfock, Tony

    2016-09-01

    This paper focuses on electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and head models to investigate temperature profiles arising when anisotropic thermal and electrical conductivities are considered in the skull layer. The aim was to numerically investigate the threshold for which this therapy operates safely to the brain, from the thermal point of view. A six-layer spherical head model consisting of scalp, fat, skull, cerebro-spinal fluid, grey matter and white matter was developed. Later on, a realistic human head model was also implemented. These models were built up using the packages from COMSOL Inc. and Simpleware Ltd. In these models, three of the most common electrode montages used in ECT were applied. Anisotropic conductivities were derived using volume constraint and included in both spherical and realistic head models. The bio-heat transferring problem governed by Laplace equation was solved numerically. The results show that both the tensor eigenvalues of electrical conductivity and the electrode montage affect the maximum temperature, but thermal anisotropy does not have a significant influence. Temperature increases occur mainly in the scalp and fat, and no harm is caused to the brain by the current applied during ECT. The work assures the thermal safety of ECT and also provides a numerical method to investigate other non-invasive therapies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Nitrous oxide (laughing gas) inhalation as an alternative to electroconvulsive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milne, Brian

    2010-05-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is used widely in the treatment of psychiatric conditions; however, its use is not without controversy with some recommending a moratorium on its clinical use. Complications and side effects of ECT include memory loss, injury, problems originating from sympathetic stimulation such as arrhythmias and myocardial ischemia and the risk of general anesthesia. Nitrous oxide (laughing gas) could potentially substitute for ECT as it shares some similar effects, has potential beneficial properties for these psychiatric patients and is relatively safe and easy to administer. Nitrous oxide induces laughter which has been described as nature's epileptoid catharsis which one might surmise would be beneficial for depression. It also produces a central sympathetic stimulation similar to ECT and causes release of endogenous opioid peptides, which are potential candidates for the development of antidepressant drugs. Nitrous oxide is also associated with seizure like activity itself. Administration of nitrous oxide as a substitute for ECT is eminently feasible and could be given in a series of treatments similar to ECT therapy.

  18. An Investigation of Patient Preferences for Music Played Before Electroconvulsive Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff, Veena; Wingfield, Peter; Adams, David; Rabinowitz, Terry

    2016-09-01

    Patients often feel anxious before electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), which can lead to avoidance of treatments. Music is a noninvasive safe option to reduce anxiety in the preoperative setting. Therefore, we examined patients' preferences of listening to music while receiving ECT by providing music-by way of headphones or speakers-to participants before treatment. Patients receiving ECT were recruited for this study. Patients served as their own controls in 3 separate music intervention sessions: 1) randomization to music via headphones or speakers, 2) no music, 3) the remaining music intervention. Patients completed a questionnaire related to satisfaction and preferences of music being played before ECT. Patients received a final questionnaire at the end of the study asking which intervention they preferred. Thirty patients completed the study. Ninety percent enjoyed listening to music through speakers. Eighty percent liked listening to music through headphones. Seventeen percent preferred not having any music. The difference in preference between speakers and headphones was not significant (P = 0.563; McNemar-Bowker test). There was no association between preference at the end of the study and the initial assignment of speakers or headphones (P = 0.542 and P = 0.752, respectively; Pearson χ tests). No adverse events were reported. Music is a low-cost intervention with virtually no side effects that could be offered as an adjunctive therapy for patients receiving ECT. A significant proportion of patients liked hearing music before treatment.

  19. Effects of Electroconvulsive Therapy on Thyroid Function Parameters in Depressed Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Akbari

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A considerable portion of patients with depressive disorders do not respond properly to medical treatment and need Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT. On the other hand, as some beneficial effects of ECT are attributed to increase in thyroid hormones, levothyronin is used as an adjuvant prior to ECT. The aim of this study was to evaluate thyroid function changes after ECT. Methods: This was an out come study done on depressed patients attending the psychiatric clinic who were resistant to medical therapy and therefore candidates for ECT. Blood samples were drawn before the first and the last ECT and serum levels of T3, T4, T3RU and TSH were measured. Results: Thirty-one patients (19 males and 12 females were enrolled the study. Serum levels of T3 and T3RU significantly increased by ECT (p-values of 0.0001 and 0.029, respectively. T3 increased in all 31 patients and this was true for both genders and all age groups and also for various durations of depression, but T4 and TSH levels decreased significantly (p-values of 0.025 and 0.0001, respectively. Conclusion: Our findings showed that some effects of ECT may be primarily due to increased T3 levels and other parameters change accordingly. These findings need to be confirmed by further studies

  20. Improvement in verbal memory performance in depressed in-patients after treatment with electroconvulsive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biedermann, S V; Bumb, J M; Demirakca, T; Ende, G; Sartorius, A

    2016-12-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is a highly effective and well-tolerated therapy for severe and treatment-resistant depression. Cognitive side-effects are still feared by some patients and clinicians. Importantly, cognitive impairments are among the most disabling symptoms of depression itself. Patients suffering from a severe episode of depression were treated with either ECT or treatment as usual (TAU) in an in-patient setting. Matched healthy participants served as controls (HC). Verbal memory was tested with the California Verbal Learning Test (CVLT) before the specific treatment started (ECT = 15, TAU = 16, HC = 31) and 2 months after the last ECT session or 2 months after discharge respectively. Before the specific treatment started, depressed patients performed substantially worse compared with HC in total, short- and long-delay recall in the CVLT, while the ECT group showed the worst performance. More severely depressed patients showed worse performances in these measures. Intriguingly, verbal memory showed a significant improvement in ECT-treated patients, but not in the other groups. No differences between the groups were found at follow-up. Contrary to the widely feared assumption that ECT has long-term impact on memory functions, we found evidence that ECT is superior to TAU in improving verbal memory in depressed patients. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Effects of Pulse Width and Electrode Placement on the Efficacy and Cognitive Effects of Electroconvulsive Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sackeim, Harold A.; Prudic, Joan; Nobler, Mitchell S.; Fitzsimons, Linda; Lisanby, Sarah H.; Payne, Nancy; Berman, Robert M.; Brakemeier, Eva-Lotta; Perera, Tarique; Devanand, D. P.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND While electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in major depression is effective, cognitive effects limit its use. Reducing the width of the electrical pulse and using the right unilateral electrode placement may decrease adverse cognitive effects, while preserving efficacy. METHODS In a double-masked study, we randomly assigned 90 depressed patients to right unilateral ECT at 6 times seizure threshold or bilateral ECT at 2.5 times seizure threshold, using either a traditional brief pulse (1.5 ms) or an ultrabrief pulse (0.3 ms). Depressive symptoms and cognition were assessed before, during, and immediately, two, and six months after therapy. Patients who responded were followed for a one-year period. RESULTS The final remission rate for ultrabrief bilateral ECT was 35 percent, compared with 73 percent for ultrabrief unilateral ECT, 65 percent for standard pulse width bilateral ECT, and 59 percent for standard pulse width unilateral ECT (all P’stherapy. Both the ultrabrief stimulus and right unilateral electrode placement produced less short- and long-term retrograde amnesia. Patients rated their memory deficits as less severe following ultrabrief right unilateral ECT compared to each of the other three conditions (P<0.001). CONCLUSIONS The use of an ultrabrief stimulus markedly reduces adverse cognitive effects, and when coupled with markedly suprathreshold right unilateral ECT, also preserves efficacy. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00487500.) PMID:19756236

  2. Balance and gait in older electroconvulsive therapy recipients: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Plakiotis C

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Chris Plakiotis,1,2 Fay Barson,2 Bharathi Vengadasalam,3 Terry P Haines,4 Daniel W O'Connor1,2 1School of Psychology and Psychiatry, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia; 2MonashHealth, Melbourne, VIC, Australia; 3Universiti Putra Malaysia, Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia; 4Allied Health Research Unit, Monash University and MonashHealth, Melbourne, VIC, Australia Background: Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT is commonly used to treat depression in older adults. Despite its efficacy in this regard, an associated increase in the risk of falls in this population is a downside of treatment. ECT research has focused on the incidence of falls, but its effect on balance and gait – intrinsic factors in instability and falls – has not been studied. Our aim was to examine changes in balance and gait among older adults before and after a single ECT session and explore the effect of patient-related and treatment factors on any changes found. Methods: Participants were 21 older adults requiring ECT for depression in public psychiatric services. Patients with clinically overt mobility problems (impairing test participation or increasing the risk of falls were excluded. Balance and gait testing 1 hour pre-ECT and 1, 2 and 3 hours post-ECT included: (1 steady standing test; (2 perturbation of standing balance by self-initiated movements; (3 perturbation of standing balance by an external perturbation; and (4 timed up and go test. Results: No deterioration in test performance was found, using one-way repeated measures analysis of variance. Conclusion: Balance and gait did not deteriorate immediately after ECT. Exclusion of participants with clinically overt mobility problems and falls being better attributable to factors unrelated to balance and gait (such as post-ECT confusion may account for our findings. This research does not repudiate the occurrence of ECT-related falls but calls into question the utility of introducing routine balance and gait

  3. A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Brief Versus Ultrabrief Right Unilateral Electroconvulsive Therapy for Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tor, Phern-Chern; Bautovich, Alison; Wang, Min-Jung; Martin, Donel; Harvey, Samuel B; Loo, Colleen

    2015-09-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is an effective depression treatment, but it has potential cognitive side effects. Ultrabrief pulse (UBP) right unilateral (RUL) ECT is an increasingly used treatment option that can potentially combine efficacy with lesser cognitive side effects. However, current trials are underpowered or have conflicting results. A systematic review and meta-analysis was conducted to evaluate the relative efficacy and cognitive effects of brief pulse (BP) and UBP RUL ECT. MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CENTRAL, DARE, and the International Clinical Trials Registry Platform were searched with the search terms ECT, electroconvulsive therapy, electroconvulsive shock, electroconvulsive shock therapy, electrical stimulation, electroconvulsive combined with brief, ultra*, pulse, and trial in English, all fields including title, abstract, subject heading, and full text up to June 20, 2013, for studies comparing BP and UBP RUL ECT in depressed patients that reported formalized mood ratings for depression. Six studies met the inclusion criteria, comprising a total of 689 patients. Efficacy, cognitive, response, and remission outcomes were extracted from each publication or obtained directly from authors. BP RUL ECT was significantly more efficacious in treating depression than UBP RUL ECT (standardized mean difference = 0.25; 95% CI, 0.08–0.41; P = .004) but showed significantly more cognitive side effects in all cognitive domains examined (global cognition, anterograde learning and recall, retrograde memory) (P < .01). The mean number of treatment sessions given was 8.7 for BP ECT and 9.6 for UBP ECT (P < .001). UBP had a lower remission rate (OR = 0.71; 95% CI, 0.51–0.99; P = .045), with a number needed to treat of 12.1. BP compared with UBP RUL ECT was slightly more efficacious in treating depression and required fewer treatment sessions, but led to greater cognitive side effects. The decision of whether to use BP or UBP RUL ECT should be made on an

  4. S -ketamine compared to etomidate during electroconvulsive therapy in major depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavorotnyy, Maxim; Kluge, Ina; Ahrens, Kathrin; Wohltmann, Thomas; Köhnlein, Benjamin; Dietsche, Patricia; Dannlowski, Udo; Kircher, Tilo; Konrad, Carsten

    2017-12-01

    Objective of the study was to compare two commonly used anesthetic drugs, S-ketamine and etomidate, regarding their influence on seizure characteristics, safety aspects, and outcome of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in major depression. Treatment data of 60 patients who underwent a total number of 13 ECTs (median) because of the severe or treatment-resistant major depressive disorder (DSM-IV) were analyzed. Etomidate, mean dosage (SD) = 0.25 (0.04) mg/kg, was used for anesthesia in 29 participants; 31 patients received S-ketamine, mean dosage (SD) = 0.96 (0.26) mg/kg. Right unilateral brief pulse ECTs were performed. The number of ECTs was individually adjusted to clinical needs, mean (SD) = 13.0 (4.3). Seizure characteristics, adverse events, and the clinical global impression (CGI) scores were compared between the both groups during ECT series. In the S-ketamine group, a lower initial seizure threshold (p = 0.014), stimulation charge (p ketamine might hold a potential to become a clinically favorable anesthetic agent during ECT. However, the current findings should be interpreted with caution, and further prospective randomized clinical trials are required. Also, specific adverse effects profile of S-ketamine, especially with regard to the cardiovascular risk, needs to be taken into account.

  5. Evaluation of the efficacy of the continuation electroconvulsive therapy in treatment-resistant schizophrenia

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    Isil Gogcegoz Gul

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background : Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT has been reported being a safe and effective treatment in schizophrenia. However, there are a limited number of studies assessing continuation ECT utilization in patients with schizophrenia giving partial response to pharmacological treatment. Objective : The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of continuation ECT in preventing relapse in patients with treatment-resistant schizophrenia. Methods : In this retrospective analysis, schizophrenia patients (n = 73 were defined in three groups such as patients who received only AP treatment (only AP, patients who received acute ECT only during hospitalization (aECT+AP, patients who received acute ECT and continuation ECT (a-cECT+AP. Three groups were compared according to positive and negative syndrome scale (PANSS and Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS scores. Results : As per comparison of only AP group, aECT+AP group and a+cECT+AP groups in terms of after discharge PANSS and after discharge BPRS scores for 1st month, 3rd month and 6th month; 3rd and 6th month’s PANSS scores of a+cECT+AP group were statistically significantly lower than other two groups. Discussion : Although this study suffers the limitations of retrospective medical chart analysis, results suggest that, in patients with a diagnosis of schizophrenia who have responded to an acute course of ECT, continuation ECT in combination with antipsychotics is more effective than antipsychotics alone in preventing relapse.

  6. Retrospective chart review of elderly patients receiving electroconvulsive therapy in a tertiary general hospital

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    Mosam Phirke

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT is the one of the oldest and effective treatments in psychiatry today. It has been used in a wide variety of psychiatric disorders in both young and old patients. Aims of the study: The present study is a retrospective chart review of geriatric patients receiving ECT as a treatment option in a tertiary care general hospital psychiatry setting. Methodology: The study evaluated ECT records over a 5-year period between the years 2010 and 2014, and it was observed that 23 elderly patients (aged ≥60 years had received ECT. Results: The patients received modified bitemporal ECT using a brief pulse ECT machine and had no major complications. A total of 184 ECT treatments were administered at an average of 8 treatments per case. The major diagnoses of patients were schizophrenia and major depression. The main indications of ECT were intolerance to medication, suicidal behavior and aggression. Out of the 23 elderly patients, 18 (78.26% showed a good response to ECT. The only complication noted was memory loss and confusion in 3 cases. Patients with medical illnesses like hypertension, diabetes and both together received ECT without any complications. Conclusions: This study adds to the scarce database on the use of ECT in elderly patients in India and adds evidence to the fact that ECT is a safe and effective treatment in the elderly.

  7. SAFETY AND UTILITY OF ACUTE ELECTROCONVULSIVE THERAPY FOR AGITATION AND AGGRESSION IN DEMENTIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Deepa; Harper, David G.; Achtyes, Eric D.; Seiner, Stephen J.; Mahdasian, Jack A.; Nykamp, Louis J.; Adkison, Lesley; Van der Schuur White, Lori; McClintock, Shawn M.; Ujkaj, Manjola; Davidoff, Donald A.; Forester, Brent P.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Agitation and aggression are among the most frequent and disruptive behavioral complications of dementia that contribute to increased cost of care, hospitalization, caregiver burden, and risk of premature institutionalization. This current study examined the safety and efficacy of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) as a treatment for behavioral disturbances in dementia. We hypothesized that ECT would result in reduced agitated and aggressive behaviors between baseline and discharge. Methods Twenty-three participants admitted to McLean Hospital (Belmont, MA) and Pine Rest Christian Mental Health Services (Grand Rapids, MI), with a diagnosis of dementia who were referred for ECT to treat agitation and/or aggression, were enrolled in the study. We administered the Cohen-Mansfield Agitation Inventory (CMAI)-short form, Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI)-Nursing Home Version, Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia (CSDD), and the Clinical Global Impression Scale (CGI) at baseline, during, and after the ECT course. Results Regression analyses revealed a significant decrease from baseline to discharge on the CMAI (F(4, 8) =13.3; p=0.006) and NPI (F(4, 31)= 14.6; pagitated/aggressive” at baseline to “borderline agitated/aggressive” at discharge. Treatment with ECT was well tolerated by most participants; discontinuation of ECT occurred for two participants due to recurrence of agitation and for three participants due to adverse events. Conclusions ECT may be a safe treatment option to reduce symptoms of agitation and aggression in patients with dementia whose behaviors are refractory to medication management. PMID:24838521

  8. Amlodipine and the Successful Management of Post-Electroconvulsive Therapy Agitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahriari, Ali; Khooshideh, Maryam; Sheikh, Mahdi

    2016-01-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is a highly effective nonpharmacologic treatment for the management of depression and some other psychiatric disorders. Post-ECT agitation occurs in up to 12% of ECT treatments and is characterized by motor restlessness, irritability, disorientation, and panic-like behaviors. The severity of post-ECT agitation ranges from mild and self-limited to serious and severe forms requiring prompt medical intervention to protect the patient and the medical staff. In severe agitation medical management may be necessary which consists of using sedative agents, either benzodiazepines or propofol. The side-effects of these sedative agents, especially in the elderly population, necessitate finding ways that could help the prevention of the occurrence of agitation after ECT treatments. We report a 68-year-old female with major depression who was referred for ECT. She experienced severe post-ECT agitation requiring medical intervention after all ECT treatments. Administering of oral amlodipine (5 mg) one hour before ECT treatment successfully prevented the occurrence of post-ECT agitation in this patient. We briefly discuss the possible underlying mechanisms and pathophysiology of amlodipine in the prevention of post-ECT agitation.

  9. Amlodipine and the Successful Management of Post-Electroconvulsive Therapy Agitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Shahriari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT is a highly effective nonpharmacologic treatment for the management of depression and some other psychiatric disorders. Post-ECT agitation occurs in up to 12% of ECT treatments and is characterized by motor restlessness, irritability, disorientation, and panic-like behaviors. The severity of post-ECT agitation ranges from mild and self-limited to serious and severe forms requiring prompt medical intervention to protect the patient and the medical staff. In severe agitation medical management may be necessary which consists of using sedative agents, either benzodiazepines or propofol. The side-effects of these sedative agents, especially in the elderly population, necessitate finding ways that could help the prevention of the occurrence of agitation after ECT treatments. We report a 68-year-old female with major depression who was referred for ECT. She experienced severe post-ECT agitation requiring medical intervention after all ECT treatments. Administering of oral amlodipine (5 mg one hour before ECT treatment successfully prevented the occurrence of post-ECT agitation in this patient. We briefly discuss the possible underlying mechanisms and pathophysiology of amlodipine in the prevention of post-ECT agitation.

  10. Measuring retrograde autobiographical amnesia following electroconvulsive therapy: historical perspective and current issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semkovska, Maria; McLoughlin, Declan M

    2013-06-01

    Retrograde amnesia following electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is a major concern for both patients and clinicians. In contemporary ECT research, retrograde autobiographical amnesia (RAA) is commonly measured with instruments assessing autobiographical memory (AM) consistency over time. However, normal AM recall loses in consistency with the passage of time, and time has a differential effect on stability of personal memories. In addition, experiencing depression is associated with a decreased ability to recall specific AMs, and this difficulty may persist in the euthymic phase of recurrent depression. Despite these scientific facts, relatively few attempts have been made to accurately measure the specific effect of ECT on AM independent of both normal and mood-associated forgetting over time. This major gap in our knowledge prevents us at present from objectively quantifying the nature and extent of RAA associated with ECT. In turn, this hinders our identifying and implementing strategies for prevention or remediation of AM deficits. The present article aims to provide an up-to-date review and historical perspective of this major methodological conundrum for ECT research, highlight current issues in retrograde amnesia assessment following ECT, and propose directions for future studies. In conclusion, we suggest methods to reliably and specifically measure the extent and progression over time of ECT-associated RAA independently from persistent depressive symptoms' contribution and normal loss in AM consistency over time.

  11. Comparison of clinical efficacy and side effects for bitemporal and bifrontal electrode placement in electroconvulsive therapy.

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    Bakewell, Catherine J; Russo, Joan; Tanner, Craig; Avery, David H; Neumaier, John F

    2004-09-01

    Bifrontal (BF) placement of electrodes in electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) has become a popular alternative to bitemporal (BT) placement. This study compares the clinical efficacy, side effects, and rehospitalization rates of BT and BF electrode placement in a community hospital setting. Charts from 76 patients receiving ECT treatments at Harborview Medical Center from 1994 to 2000 were reviewed to extract data on the characteristics of the course of ECT, clinical response, total headaches, narcotic and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug doses, as well as documentation of confusion, disorientation, memory loss, and treatment emergent need for assistance with activities of daily living. The BT patients experienced more clinical improvement during their stay (a 7-point greater change in Psychiatric Symptom Assessment Scale score, P < 0.05) and were significantly less likely to be rehospitalized within a 1-year time frame (odds ratio = 4.9, P = <0.05), even after controlling for relevant covariates. Although the two patient groups had equal rates of headache and analgesic administration, the BT placement caused significantly more cognitive impairment. This study suggests that BT electrode placement offers better efficacy but modestly greater cognitive impairment than BF electrode placement.

  12. Comparing bilateral to unilateral electroconvulsive therapy in a randomized study with EEG monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horne, R L; Pettinati, H M; Sugerman, A A; Varga, E

    1985-11-01

    In a double-blind study, 48 DSM-III depressed patients were randomly assigned to either the bilateral or nondominant unilateral electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) group. Seizure length was monitored by electroencephalography (EEG). When seizures were less than 25 s, ECT was immediately readministered. When length of seizure and pretreatment depression scores were controlled between the two groups, there were no differences in treatment effectiveness, as measured by the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression and the Beck Depression Inventory, or in the number of treatments required. This was true after five ECT treatments as well as after completing all ECT treatments. Thus, when ECT is monitored via EEG to assure the presence of an adequate seizure, bilateral and nondominant unilateral placement yield equivalent responses. If ECT had not been readministered immediately following a missed seizure, unilateral patients would have had significantly more missed seizures. Significant difficulties in both short- and long-term memory were found 24 hours after the fifth ECT in bilateral but not in nondominant unilateral patients. No apparent memory loss could be documented in nondominant unilateral ECT.

  13. Hippocampal volume in relation to clinical and cognitive outcome after electroconvulsive therapy in depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordanskog, P; Larsson, M R; Larsson, E-M; Johanson, A

    2014-04-01

    In a previous magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study, we found a significant increase in hippocampal volume immediately after electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in patients with depression. The aim of this study was to evaluate hippocampal volume up to 1 year after ECT and investigate its possible relation to clinical and cognitive outcome. Clinical and cognitive outcome in 12 in-patients with depression receiving antidepressive pharmacological treatment referred for ECT were investigated with the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) and a broad neuropsychological test battery within 1 week before and after ECT. The assessments were repeated 6 and 12 months after baseline in 10 and seven of these patients, respectively. Hippocampal volumes were measured on all four occasions with 3 Tesla MRI. Hippocampal volume returned to baseline during the follow-up period of 6 months. Neither the significant antidepressant effect nor the significant transient decrease in executive and verbal episodic memory tests after ECT could be related to changes in hippocampal volume. No persistent cognitive side effects were observed 1 year after ECT. The immediate increase in hippocampal volume after ECT is reversible and is not related to clinical or cognitive outcome. © 2013 The Authors. Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Rocuronium-sugammadex use for electroconvulsive therapy in a hemodialysis patient: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurita, Shigeaki; Moriwaki, Katsuyuki; Shiroyama, Kazuhisa; Sanuki, Mikako; Toyota, Yukari; Takebayashi, Minoru

    2016-01-01

    Recently, rocuronium with subsequent use of sugammadex was proposed for electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) as an alternative to succinylcholine. Because sugammadex is cleared via the kidney with no metabolism, it is unknown that rocuronium-sugammadex use is safe in hemodialysis patients who received ECT. In this case report, we used rocuronium with subsequent administration of sugammadex in a 69-year-old female, hemodialysis patient, scheduled for ten ECT sessions for severe major depression. In the initial eight sessions, we tested the feasibility of rocuronium-sugammadex use for ECT. During the series of four ECT sessions, we measured plasma concentrations for the sum of sugammadex and sugammadex-rocuronium complex and observed whether possible residual sugammadex affected muscle relaxation during subsequent sessions of ECT. The results showed the feasibility of rocuronium-sugammadex use as muscle relaxants for ECT in patients undergoing hemodialysis. However, an accumulation of sugammadex did occur even after two sessions of hemodialysis, and residual sugammadex decreased the effect of the rocuronium given in the subsequent ECT sessions. Rocuronium-sugammadex was successfully utilized as muscle relaxants for ECT in this patient. Our experience in this case may indicate that if succinylcholine is contraindicated, rocuronium-sugammadex can be an alternative method for muscle relaxation during ECT in patients undergoing hemodialysis. When this rocuronium-sugammadex procedure is used, the effect of residual sugammadex after hemodialysis on the subsequently administered rocuronium should be considered.

  15. Knowledge of and attitudes toward electroconvulsive therapy among medical students, psychology students, and the general public.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aki, Ozlem Erden; Ak, Sertac; Sonmez, Yunus Emre; Demir, Basaran

    2013-03-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is safe and effective for the treatment of various psychiatric disorders. Despite being a well-known treatment method among health care professionals, lay people generally have a negative opinion of ECT. The present study aimed to examine knowledge of and attitudes toward ECT among medical students, psychology students, and the general public. Psychology students were included because they are among the important groups in mental health care in Turkey. A Likert-type questionnaire was administered to fifth-year medical students (n = 28), master of science and doctor of philosophy clinical psychology students (n = 35), and a sample of the general public (n = 26). The questionnaire included questions about the general principles of and indications for ECT, and sources of knowledge of and attitudes toward ECT. The medical students were the most knowledgeable about ECT, as expected. The medical students also had a more positive attitude toward ECT than the other 2 groups. More psychology students had negative attitudes on some aspects than general public sample, despite being more knowledgeable. Medical school theoretical and practical training in ECT played an important role in increasing the level of knowledge of and decreasing the prevalence of negative attitudes toward ECT among the medical students; similar training for psychology students is required to achieve similar results.

  16. Neuroversion: using electroconvulsive therapy as a bridge to deep brain stimulation implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Nolan R; Sahlem, Greg; Pannu, Jaspreet; Takacs, Istvan; Short, Baron; Revuelta, Gonzalo; George, Mark S

    2017-02-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a movement disorder with significant neuropsychiatric comorbidities. Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is effective in treating these neuropsychiatric symptoms; however, clinicians are reluctant to use ECT in patients with deep brain stimulation (DBS) implantations for fear of damaging the device, as well as potential cognitive side effects. Right unilateral ultra-brief pulse (RUL UBP) ECT has a more favorable cognitive side-effect profile yet has never been reported in PD patients with DBS implants. We present a case series of three patients with a history of PD that all presented with psychiatric decompensation immediately prior to planned DBS surgery. All three patients had DBS electrode(s) in place at the time and an acute course of ECT was utilized in a novel method to "bridge" these individuals to neurosurgery. The patients all experienced symptom resolution (psychosis and/or depression and/or anxiety) without apparent cognitive side effects. This case series not only illustrates that right unilateral ultra-brief pulse can be utilized in patients with DBS electrodes but also illustrates that this intervention can be utilized as a neuromodulatory "bridge", where nonoperative surgical candidates with unstable psychiatric symptoms can be converted to operative candidates in a manner similar to electrical cardioversion.

  17. Routine Cross-Sectional Head Imaging Before Electroconvulsive Therapy: A Tertiary Center Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajedi, Payam I; Mitchell, Jason; Herskovits, Edward H; Raghavan, Prashant

    2016-04-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is generally contraindicated in patients with intracranial mass lesions or in the presence of increased intracranial pressure. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of incidental abnormalities on routine cross-sectional head imaging, including CT and MRI, that would preclude subsequent ECT. This retrospective study involved a review of the electronic medical records of 105 patients (totaling 108 imaging studies) between April 27, 2007, and March 20, 2015, referred for cranial CT or MRI with the primary indication of pre-ECT evaluation. The probability of occurrence of imaging findings that would preclude ECT was computed. A cost analysis was also performed on the practice of routine pre-ECT imaging. Of the 105 patients who presented with the primary indication of ECT clearance (totaling 108 scans), 1 scan (0.93%) revealed findings that precluded ECT. None of the studies demonstrated findings that indicated increased intracranial pressure. A cost analysis revealed that at least $18,662.70 and 521.97 relative value units must be expended to identify one patient with intracranial pathology precluding ECT. The findings of this study demonstrate an extremely low prevalence of findings that preclude ECT on routine cross-sectional head imaging. The costs incurred in identifying a potential contraindication are high. The authors suggest that the performance of pre-ECT neuroimaging be driven by the clinical examination. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Unilateral ultra-brief pulse electroconvulsive therapy for depression in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, N R; Bentzley, B S; Sahlem, G L; Pannu, J; Korte, J E; Revuelta, G; Short, E B; George, M S

    2017-04-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) has demonstrated efficacy in treating core symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD); however, widespread use of ECT in PD has been limited due to concern over cognitive burden. We investigated the use of a newer ECT technology known to have fewer cognitive side effects (right unilateral [RUL] ultra-brief pulse [UBP]) for the treatment of medically refractory psychiatric dysfunction in PD. This open-label pilot study included 6 patients who were assessed in the motoric, cognitive, and neuropsychiatric domains prior to and after RUL UBP ECT. Primary endpoints were changes in total score on the HAM-D-17 and GDS-30 rating scales. Patients were found to improve in motoric and psychiatric domains following RUL UBP ECT without cognitive side effects, both immediately following ECT and at 1-month follow-up. This study demonstrates that RUL UBP ECT is safe, feasible, and potentially efficacious in treating multiple domains of PD, including motor and mood, without clear cognitive side effects. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Electroconvulsive therapy and its relationships with clinical characteristics and quality of life in Chinese psychiatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Feng-Rong; Zhang, Ling; Zhang, Qing-E; Ungvari, Gabor S; Ng, Chee H; Chiu, Helen F K; Wu, Ping-Ping; Jin, Xin; Li, Lu; Lok, Grace K I; Xiang, Yu-Tao

    2016-12-30

    Little is known about the pattern of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) use in the clinical population in China. This study examined the percentage of ECT use and its association with clinical characteristics and quality of life (QOL) in a psychiatric center in China that caters for a population of 20 million. A total sample of 1364 inpatients was consecutively recruited for the study. Demographic and clinical data including the use of ECT were collected. Psychopathology, activity of daily living and QOL were measured using standardized instruments. The percentage of ECT use was 52.1% in the whole sample; 53.4% in major depression, 57.8% in bipolar disorder, 57.0% in schizophrenia and 32.4% in other diagnoses. There was no significant difference between the ECT and non-ECT groups in any domain of QOL. Multivariate analyses revealed that ECT was independently associated with the diagnoses of major depression, bipolar disorder and schizophrenia, physical restraint, severe aggression, better activity of daily living skills, more frequent use of antipsychotics and less frequent use of benzodiazepines. The percentage of ECT use was much greater in a major psychiatric center in China than those reported from other parts of the world. Use of ECT had no influence on the short-term QOL. Further investigations are warranted to explore the reasons for the high percentage of ECT use. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Pattern of electroconvulsive therapy use in Spain: Proposals for an optimal practice and equitable access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz-Fuentenebro, Javier; Vera, Ignacio; Verdura, Ernesto; Urretavizcaya, Mikel; Martínez-Amorós, Erika; Soria, Virginia; Bernardo, Miquel

    The main aims of our study were to estimate the current rates and pattern of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) use in Spain, as well as exploring the causes that may be limiting its use in our country. A cross-sectional survey was conducted covering every psychiatric unit in Spain as of 31 December 2012. More than half (54.9%) of the psychiatric units applied ECT at a rate of 0.66 patients per 10,000 inhabitants. There are wide variations with regard to ECT application rates between the different autonomous communities (0.00-1.39) and provinces (0.00-3.90). ECT was prescribed to a mean of 25.5 patients per hospital that used the technique and 4.5 in referral centre (P=.000), but wide differences were reported in the number of patients who were prescribed ECT from hospital to hospital. Although the percentage of psychiatric units applying ECT in our country is among the highest in the world, the ECT application rate in Spain is among the lowest within western countries. Large differences in ECT use have been reported across the various autonomous communities, provinces and hospitals. Thus, health planning strategies need to be implemented, as well as promoting training in ECT among health professionals, if these differences in ECT use are to be reduced. Copyright © 2016 SEP y SEPB. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. The experience of electroconvulsive therapy and its impact on associated stigma: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Yuta; Yamaguchi, Sosei; Ando, Shuntaro; Sasaki, Natsuki; Bernick, Peter J; Akiyama, Tsuyoshi

    2016-12-01

    Despite its efficacy and safety, electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is underutilized, in part due to stigma associated with the treatment. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that experiencing ECT has an impact on associated stigma, as measured by patient and family knowledge of and attitudes toward ECT. A comprehensive literature search was conducted using MEDLINE, EMBASE and PsycINFO. Studies with cross-sectional and/or longitudinal designs were identified. Studies were further categorized into subcategories based on participant type (patients or patient family members) and outcome domain (knowledge or attitudes). Effect size (Cohen's d) was calculated for each study and then integrated into each subcategory (participant type by outcome domain) using a random effect model. Eight studies were identified as being eligible for analysis. Two studies were cross-sectional, five were longitudinal and one incorporated both designs. Analysis of the longitudinal studies indicated that experiencing ECT both increased knowledge of and improved attitudes toward ECT in patients; in family members of patients, analysis showed significant positive change in knowledge of ECT, but no significant change in attitudes toward ECT. Experience with ECT may have a positive impact on knowledge of and attitudes toward ECT. However, the quality of evidence of included studies was low; further research is required in order to clarify the relationship and to identify information of use to individuals considering ECT as a treatment option. © The Author(s) 2016.

  2. Effectiveness of electroconvulsive therapy in patients with treatment resistant schizophrenia: A retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Sandeep; Chakrabarti, Subho; Hazari, Nandita; Avasthi, Ajit

    2017-03-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) among patients with treatment resistant schizophrenia (TRS). Records of patients who had received ECT were reviewed to identify patients with TRS who were administered ECT in combination with clozapine. Socio-demographic, clinical data and ECT details were extracted. The most common diagnosis was of paranoid schizophrenia (49%) followed by undifferentiated schizophrenia (36%). A-fifth (22%) of the patients were judged to have poor response to clozapine. The mean number of ECTs given were 13.97 (SD-7.67) and mean clozapine dose was 287.5mgs/day (SD-100.1). About two-thirds (63%) of the patients showed >30% reduction in scores on different symptom-rating scales with combined use of clozapine and ECT. Among clozapine non-responders, approximately 69% responded to the combination. Post-ECT rise in blood pressure was the most common side effect (16.9%) followed by prolonged seizures (7%). Long-term follow-up data was available for 47 out of the 59 patients. More than two-third (N=34; 72%) followed-up for an average of 30 months (SD 32.3; range: 1-120), maintained well with continued clozapine treatment. To conclude, results of this study further endorse the effectiveness, safety and long-term benefits of the clozapine-ECT combination in TRS and clozapine-refractory schizophrenia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Reorganization of Anatomical Connectome following Electroconvulsive Therapy in Major Depressive Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinkun Zeng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT is considered one of the most effective and fast-acting treatment options for depressive episodes. Little is known, however, about ECT’s enabling brain (neuroplasticity effects, particular for plasticity of white matter pathway. Materials and Methods. We collected longitudinal diffusion tensor imaging in the first-episode, drug-naïve major depressive disorder (MDD patients n=24 before and after a predefined time window ECT treatment. We constructed large-scale anatomical networks derived from white matter fiber tractography and evaluated the topological reorganization using graph theoretical analysis. We also assessed the relationship between topological reorganization with improvements in depressive symptoms. Results. Our investigation revealed three main findings: (1 the small-worldness was persistent after ECT series; (2 anatomical connections changes were found in limbic structure, temporal and frontal lobes, in which the connection changes between amygdala and parahippocampus correlate with depressive symptom reduction; (3 significant nodal strength changes were found in right paralimbic network. Conclusions. ECT elicits neuroplastic processes associated with improvements in depressive symptoms that act to specific local ventral frontolimbic circuits, but not small-world property. Overall, ECT induced topological reorganization in large-scale brain structural network, opening up new avenues to better understand the mode of ECT action in MDD.

  4. I had no other option: Women, electroconvulsive therapy, and informed consent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Karen-Ann; Barnes, Margaret; Ross, Dyann

    2018-06-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is a controversial procedure used in the management of depression. Whilst it may be administered under mental health legislation, it is usually given to people who voluntarily consent. At the practice level, the consent process for ECT requires a detailed explanation of the procedure. The person consenting must have capacity to make this decision, and consent must be given freely and without coercion. Research using a feminist narrative approach unexpectedly highlighted the issue of potential coercion in the context of explaining the procedure. In-depth interviews were used to understand seven women's accounts of deciding to receive ECT. A thematic analysis of their narratives uncovered a shared concern with how they consented to the treatment. Four subthemes were identified that related to the way in which they provided their consent: (i) 'Not enough information'; (ii) 'I had no other choice'; (iii) 'Just go along with it'; and (iv) 'Lacking capacity'. A consent process that includes elements of passive coercion and a lack of timely and appropriate information influences the way some women make decisions. These factors can disempower women at the point of decision-making. A practice shift is needed where women are enabled to have control over decisions. Further, there is a need to adhere more rigorously to noncoercive practice when obtaining consent. © 2017 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  5. Electroconvulsive therapy and risk of dementia in patients with affective disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osler, Merete; Rozing, Maarten Pieter; Christensen, Gunhild Tidemann

    2018-01-01

    included in the study, 5901 (3·5%) patients had at least one ECT. During the median follow-up of 4·9 years (IQR 2·4-7·8) and 872 874 person years, the number of patients who developed dementia was 111 (0·1%) of 99 045 patients aged 10-49 years, 965 (2·7%) of 35 945 aged 50-69 years, and 4128 (12·5%) of 33...... 025 aged 70-108 years. 217 (3·6%) of the 5901 patients treated with ECT developed dementia, whereas of 162 114 patients not treated with ECT 4987 (3·1%) developed dementia. The corresponding incidences were 70·4 cases per 10 000 person-years (95% CI 61·6-80·5) and 59·2 per 10 000 person-years (57......BACKGROUND: Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is the most effective treatment for severe episodes of mood disorders. Temporary memory loss is a common side-effect, but ongoing discussions exist regarding potential long-term adverse cognitive outcomes. Only a few studies have examined the frequency...

  6. Are morphological changes necessary to mediate the therapeutic effects of electroconvulsive therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickl-Jockschat, Thomas; Palomero Gallagher, Nicola; Kumar, Vinod; Hoffstaedter, Felix; Brügmann, Elisabeth; Habel, Ute; Eickhoff, Simon B; Grözinger, Michael

    2016-04-01

    The neurotrophic hypothesis has become the favorite model to explain the antidepressant properties of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). It is based on the assumption that a restoration of previously defective neural networks drives therapeutic effects. Recent data in rather young patients suggest that neurotrophic effects of ECT might be detectable by diffusion tensor imaging. We here aimed to investigate whether the therapeutic response to ECT necessarily goes along with mesoscopic effects in gray matter (GM) or white matter (WM) in our patients in advanced age. Patients (n = 21, 15 males and 7 females) suffering from major depressive disorder were treated with ECT. Before the start of treatment and after the completion of the index series, they underwent magnetic resonance imaging, including a diffusion-weighed sequence. We used voxel-based morphometry to assess GM changes and tract-based spatial statistics and an SPM-based whole-brain analysis to detect WM changes in the course of treatment. Patients significantly improved clinically during the course of ECT. This was, however, not accompanied by GM or WM changes. This result challenges the notion that mesoscopic brain structure changes are an obligatory prerequisite for the antidepressant effects of ECT.

  7. Twenty years of electroconvulsive therapy in a psychiatric unit at a university general hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amilton dos Santos Jr.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To describe the sociodemographic and clinical profile of patients who underwent electroconvulsive therapy (ECT at a university general hospital. Method: In this retrospective study, records from all patients undergoing ECT between January 1988 and January 2008 at the psychiatric unit of the general hospital of Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP were reviewed. Telephone contact was made with patients/relatives to collect follow-up data. Results: A total of 200 charts were reviewed. The majority of patients were women, with a mean age of 39 years, and history of psychiatric hospitalization. The main indications for ECT were depression and catatonia. Complications were observed in less than half of the cases, and most were temporary and not severe. There was a good psychiatric outcome for 89.7% of the patients, especially for catatonic patients (100%, p = 0.02. Thirty-four percent of the cases were later contacted by telephone calls, at a mean of 8.5 years between the procedure and the contact. Among these, three (1.5% reported persistent memory disorders and 73% considered ECT a good treatment. Conclusion: ECT has been performed according to international guidelines. In the vast majority of cases, undesirable effects were temporary and not severe. Response to ECT was positive in most cases, particularly in catatonic patients.

  8. Antidepressant and neurocognitive effects of isoflurane anesthesia versus electroconvulsive therapy in refractory depression.

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    Howard R Weeks

    Full Text Available Many patients have serious depression that is nonresponsive to medications, but refuse electroconvulsive therapy (ECT. Early research suggested that isoflurane anesthesia may be an effective alternative to ECT. Subsequent studies altered drug, dose or number of treatments, and failed to replicate this success, halting research on isoflurane's antidepressant effects for a decade. Our aim was to re-examine whether isoflurane has antidepressant effects comparable to ECT, with less adverse effects on cognition.Patients with medication-refractory depression received an average of 10 treatments of bifrontal ECT (n = 20 or isoflurane (n = 8 over 3 weeks. Depression severity (Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression-24 and neurocognitive responses (anterograde and retrograde memory, processing speed and verbal fluency were assessed at Pretreatment, Post all treatments and 4-week Follow-up.Both treatments produced significant reductions in depression scores at Post-treatment and 4-week Follow-up; however, ECT had modestly better antidepressant effect at follow-up in severity-matched patients. Immediately Post-treatment, ECT (but not isoflurane patients showed declines in memory, fluency, and processing speed. At Follow-up, only autobiographical memory remained below Pretreatment level for ECT patients, but isoflurane patients had greater test-retest neurocognitive score improvement.Our data reconfirm that isoflurane has an antidepressant effect approaching ECT with less adverse neurocognitive effects, and reinforce the need for a larger clinical trial.

  9. Anterograde Amnesia during Electroconvulsive Therapy: A Prospective Pilot-Study in Patients with Major Depressive Disorder.

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    Elvira Boere

    Full Text Available Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT is considered an effective treatment for major depression with melancholic features. However, neurocognitive side-effects such as anterograde amnesia still regularly occur. The present study aims to evaluate the severity and course of anterograde amnesia in severely depressed patients undergoing ECT. In a prospective naturalistic study, anterograde memory function was assessed among inpatients who underwent ECT (n = 11. Subjects met DSM-IV criteria for major depressive disorder. Recruitment took place between March 2010-March 2011 and March 2012-March 2013. Controls treated with antidepressants (n = 9 were matched for age, gender and depression severity. Primary outcome measure was immediate recall; secondary outcome measures were delayed recall, recognition, and visual association. Differences were tested using repeated measures ANOVA and paired t-tests. Correlations with hypothesized covariates were calculated. In patients with major depressive disorder, ECT had a significant effect on delayed memory function (p<0.01 with large effect sizes. Findings on immediate recall were less consistent. Four weeks after treatment discontinuation, these memory functions had recovered. Age was identified as a very important covariate. The main limitations of our study are its naturalistic design, possibly compromising internal validity, and its small sample size. However, if these findings can be reproduced in a more comprehensive study group, then the possible induction of anterograde amnesia is not a justifiable reason for clinicians to disregard ECT as a treatment option.

  10. Clinically insubstantial cognitive side effects of bitemporal electroconvulsive therapy at 0.5 msec pulse width.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnell, Ronald L; Swartz, Conrad M; Thomson, Alice

    2011-11-01

    We measured cognitive side effects from bitemporal electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) using stimuli of 0.5 msec pulse width 900 milliamperes (mA). Mini-Mental State Exam (MMSE) and 21-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD-21) were rated within 36 hours before and 36 hours after a series of 6 bitemporal ECT sessions on 15 patients age ≥45. MMSE remained high after ECT (pre-ECT mean 29, standard deviation [SD] 1.60, post-ECT mean 28.53, SD 1.36) with no significant change. The mean HRSD-21 fell from 27.5 to 16.3. Post-ECT MMSE was significantly and markedly higher than in previous studies of bitemporal ECT; all had used ECT stimuli of pulse width at least 1 msec. With stimuli of 0.5 msec pulse width and 900 mA, 6 bitemporal ECTs did not decrease MMSE score. This result leaves no opportunity for further decrease in basic cognitive side effects, and complements published reports of stronger physiological effects with stimuli of 0.5 msec pulse width and 900 mA. ECT stimuli of 0.5 msec pulse width and 900 mA are more desirable than wider pulse widths. Six bitemporal ECT sessions using these stimuli generally will not have more cognitive side effects than treatments with other placements, allowing maintenance of full efficacy with clinically insubstantial side effects.

  11. Electric field strength and focality in electroconvulsive therapy and magnetic seizure therapy: a finite element simulation study

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    Deng, Zhi-De; Lisanby, Sarah H.; Peterchev, Angel V.

    2011-02-01

    We present the first computational study comparing the electric field induced by various electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and magnetic seizure therapy (MST) paradigms. Four ECT electrode configurations (bilateral, bifrontal, right unilateral, and focal electrically administered seizure therapy) and three MST coil configurations (circular, cap, and double cone) were modeled. The model incorporated a modality-specific neural activation threshold. ECT (0.3 ms pulse width) and MST induced the maximum electric field of 2.1-2.5 V cm-1 and 1.1-2.2 V cm-1 in the brain, corresponding to 6.2-7.2 times and 1.2-2.3 times the neural activation threshold, respectively. The MST electric field is more confined to the superficial cortex compared to ECT. The brain volume stimulated was much larger with ECT (up to 100%) than with MST (up to 8.2%). MST with the double-cone coil was the most focal, and bilateral ECT was the least focal. Our results suggest a possible biophysical explanation of the reduced side effects of MST compared to ECT. Our results also indicate that the conventional ECT pulse amplitude (800-900 mA) is much higher than necessary for seizure induction. Reducing the ECT pulse amplitude should be explored as a potential means of diminishing side effects.

  12. Modulation of intrinsic brain activity by electroconvulsive therapy in major depression

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    Leaver, Amber M.; Espinoza, Randall; Pirnia, Tara; Joshi, Shantanu H.; Woods, Roger P.; Narr, Katherine L.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction One of the most effective interventions for intractable major depressive episodes is electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). Because ECT is also relatively fast-acting, longitudinal study of its neurobiological effects offers critical insight into the mechanisms underlying depression and antidepressant response. Here we assessed modulation of intrinsic brain activity in corticolimbic networks associated with ECT and clinical response. Methods We measured resting-state functional connectivity (RSFC) in patients with treatment-resistant depression (n=30), using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) acquired before and after completing a treatment series with right-unilateral ECT. Using independent component analysis, we assessed changes in RSFC with 1) symptom improvement and 2) ECT regardless of treatment outcome in patients, with reference to healthy controls (n=33, also scanned twice). Results After ECT, consistent changes in RSFC within targeted depression-relevant functional networks were observed in the dorsal anterior cingulate (ACC), mediodorsal thalamus (mdTh), hippocampus, and right anterior temporal, medial parietal, and posterior cingulate cortex in all patients. In a separate analysis, changes in depressive symptoms were associated with RSFC changes in the dorsal ACC, mdTh, putamen, medial prefrontal, and lateral parietal cortex. RSFC of these regions did not change in healthy controls. Conclusions Neuroplasticity underlying clinical change was in part separable from changes associated with the effects of ECT observed in all patients. However, both ECT and clinical change were associated with RSFC modulation in dorsal ACC, mdTh and hippocampus, which may indicate that these regions underlie the mechanisms of clinical outcome in ECT and may be effective targets for future neurostimulation therapies. PMID:26878070

  13. Electroconvulsive therapy in patients with skull defects or metallic implants: a review of the literature and case report.

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    Amanullah, Shabbir; Delva, Nicholas; McRae, Harold; Campbell, Laura A; Cole, Julie

    2012-01-01

    Head injury is often associated with psychiatric morbidity. While it is well understood that the loss of critical areas of the brain may play a role in cognitive dysfunction and change in personality, head injury can also have profound effects on mood and cognition. The role of medications in the treatment of mood disorders associated with brain injury is well documented, and there is also evidence favoring the use of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in this context. However, data are limited on the use of ECT in patients with skull defects or metallic head implants. First, a review of the literature on use of ECT in patients with metallic head implants is provided. Electronic databases and online sites, including PubMed, Cochrane Library of Systematic Reviews, and UpToDate, were used to search for relevant articles and case reports on the use of ECT in patients with and without metallic implants in the head (1964 to 2009). The search terms electroconvulsive, electroconvulsive therapy, ECT, electroshock therapy, EST, head injury, brain injury, metallic plates, metallic implants, skull prosthesis, and depression were used interchangeably. The search produced 7 articles discussing exclusively the use of ECT in patients with a metallic skull plate. Second, the case of the successful and safe use of ECT in an individual with a previous history of brain trauma and metallic plate implantation is described. Most cases of head injury are managed by neurologists and rehabilitation consultants; the more severe cases of depression and other mood disorders tend to be referred for specialist psychiatric care. With greater degrees of deficit following head injury, management becomes more complicated. Our patient showed positive results with ECT, including improvement in depressive features and resolution of suicidal ideas/plans. ECT is an effective and safe alternative in patients with a history of brain trauma and metallic plate implantation who subsequently develop treatment

  14. Delivery of electroconvulsive therapy in Canada: a first national survey report on usage, treatment practice, and facilities.

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    Martin, Barry A; Delva, Nicholas John; Graf, Peter; Gosselin, Caroline; Enns, Murray W; Gilron, Ian; Jewell, Mark; Lawson, James Stuart; Milev, Roumen; Patry, Simon; Chan, Peter K Y

    2015-06-01

    The aims of this study were to document electroconvulsive therapy use in Canada with respect to treatment facilities and caseloads based on a survey of practice (Canadian Electroconvulsive Therapy Survey/Enquete Canadienne Sur Les Electrochocs-CANECTS/ECANEC) and to consider these findings in the context of guideline recommendations. All 1273 registered hospitals in Canada were contacted, and 175 sites were identified as providing electroconvulsive therapy; these sites were invited to complete a comprehensive questionnaire. The survey period was calendar year 2006 or fiscal year 2006/2007. National usage rates were estimated from the responses. Sixty-one percent of the sites completed the questionnaire; a further 10% provided caseload data. Seventy were identified as general; 31, as university teaching; and 21, as provincial psychiatric/other single specialty (psychiatric) hospitals. Caseload volumes ranged from a mean of fewer than 2 to greater than 30 treatments per week. Estimated national usage during the 1-year survey period was 7340 to 8083 patients (2.32-2.56 per 10,000 population) and 66,791 to 67,424 treatments (2.11-2.13 per 1000 population). The diagnostic indications, admission status, and protocols for course end points are described. The usage rates are in keeping with earlier Canadian data and with those from other jurisdictions. The difficulty obtaining caseload data from individual hospitals is indicative of the need for standardized data collection to support both clinical research and quality assurance. The wide variation in protocols for number of treatments per course indicates a need for better informed clinical guidelines. The broad range of caseload volumes suggests the need to review the economies of scale in the field.

  15. A new method to model electroconvulsive therapy in rats with increased construct validity and enhanced translational value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theilmann, Wiebke; Löscher, Wolfgang; Socala, Katarzyna; Frieling, Helge; Bleich, Stefan; Brandt, Claudia

    2014-06-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy is the most effective therapy for major depressive disorder (MDD). The remission rate is above 50% in previously pharmacoresistant patients but the mechanisms of action are not fully understood. Electroconvulsive stimulation (ECS) in rodents mimics antidepressant electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in humans and is widely used to investigate the underlying mechanisms of ECT. For the translational value of findings in animal models it is essential to establish models with the highest construct, face and predictive validity possible. The commonly used model for ECT in rodents does not meet the demand for high construct validity. For ECT, cortical surface electrodes are used to induce therapeutic seizures whereas ECS in rodents is exclusively performed by auricular or corneal electrodes. However, the stimulation site has a major impact on the type and spread of the induced seizure activity and its antidepressant effect. We propose a method in which ECS is performed by screw electrodes placed above the motor cortex of rats to closely simulate the clinical situation and thereby increase the construct validity of the model. Cortical ECS in rats induced reliably seizures comparable to human ECT. Cortical ECS was more effective than auricular ECS to reduce immobility in the forced swim test. Importantly, auricular stimulation had a negative influence on the general health condition of the rats with signs of fear during the stimulation sessions. These results suggest that auricular ECS in rats is not a suitable ECT model. Cortical ECS in rats promises to be a valid method to mimic ECT. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Electroconvulsive therapy in geriatric patients: A literature review and program report from Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia, USA

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    Andrew D Snyder

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT is an effective therapeutic intervention in the elderly patients with major depression, especially those with psychosis, suicidality, catatonia, nutritional compromise, and resistance to medications. Response rates can be as high as 80%. We present an extensive review of the relevant literature, provide a description of the ECT program at Virginia Commonwealth University in Richmond, Virginia, USA, and present results of our experience with ECT in fifty elderly patients. The treatments were safe, well tolerated, and produced high response rates, variably between 68% and 84%. Patients in the long-term maintenance ECT program continue to show sustained benefits from ECT.

  17. Evaluation of nonmemory cognitive parameters in psychiatric patients' pre- and post-electroconvulsive therapy: An observational study

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    Jyoti Prakash

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Possibility of cognitive side effects has made electroconvulsive therapy (ECT questionable. Variable deficits have been debated in memory cognition. Pattern of changes in nonmemory cognition pre- and post-ECT is not clear. Methodology: Forty patients undergoing ECT were studied on nonmemory cognitive parameters before ECT, after a course of ECT, and after 4 weeks of last. ECT. Results: Nonmemory cognition improved during the course of ECT and over 4 weeks of ECT. Conclusions: ECT does not affect the nonmemory cognition adversely.

  18. The influence of the anesthesia-to-stimulation time interval on seizure quality parameters in electroconvulsive therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorgensen, A; Christensen, S J; Jensen, A E K

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) continues to be the most efficacious treatment for severe depression and other life-threatening acute psychiatric conditions. Treatment efficacy is dependent upon the induced seizure quality, which may be influenced by a range of treatment related factors....... Recently, the time interval from anesthesia to the electrical stimulation (ASTI) has been suggested to be an important determinant of seizure quality. METHODS: We measured ASTI in 73 ECT sessions given to 22 individual patients, and analyzed its influence on five seizure quality parameters (EEG seizure...

  19. [Case report: electroconvulsive therapy in a 33-year-old man with hysterical quadriplegia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaillard, A; Gaillard, R; Mouaffak, F; Radtchenko, A; Lôo, H

    2012-02-01

    Conversion disorder refers to the occurrence of neurological-like symptoms or deficits that are neither intentionally produced nor simulated. While it cannot be explained by an organic disease, it is often related to psychological events. We report the case of a 33-year-old patient with a fluctuating hysterical tetraplegia, which had started three years earlier. After the failure or the exhaustion of several biological (psychotropic medication, transcranial magnetic stimulation) and psychotherapeutic strategies, treatment with electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) was conducted. A total of thirty-five ECT sessions were performed. Whereas the patient's clinical state was initially characterized by a complete quadriplegia and an uncontrollable muscular hypertonia, we noted that the ECT sessions were associated with a slow, though remarkable, progress. At first, the sessions were followed by moments of altered consciousness during which the patient would be relaxed and could make simple movements. Secondarily, not only was our patient able to consciously move his four limbs, but he was also able to walk. However, those improvements remained partial and fluctuating, sometimes allowing the symptom to return temporarily secondary to frustrations or annoyances. Finally, our patient relapsed. Nevertheless, his clinical state presently remains better than that in which we first knew him. The treatment of conversion disorders has been the subject of few studies and predominantly remains symptomatic. Its main goals are: to lessen secondary gains impact by adopting a neutral behaviour towards the symptom and by encouraging physical rehabilitation; to lower the symptom by allowing the patient to understand the normal functioning of the diseased organ, and; to help the patient to deal with stressful situations. There is no evidence that hypnosis is superior to medical and other psychotherapeutic approaches. Pharmacological treatments may be helpful in the case of anxiety, impulsivity

  20. Patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder who receive multiple electroconvulsive therapy sessions: characteristics, indications, and results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iancu, Iulian; Pick, Nimrod; Seener-Lorsh, Orit; Dannon, Pinhas

    2015-01-01

    While electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) has been used for many years, there is insufficient research regarding the indications for continuation/maintenance (C/M)-ECT, its safety and efficacy, and the characteristics of patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder who receive multiple ECT sessions. The aims of this study were to characterize a series of patients who received 30 ECT sessions or more, to describe treatment regimens in actual practice, and to examine the results of C/M-ECT in terms of safety and efficacy, especially the effect on aggression and functioning. We performed a retrospective chart review of 20 consecutive patients (mean age 64.6 years) with schizophrenia (n=16) or schizoaffective disorder (n=4) who received at least 30 ECT sessions at our ECT unit, and also interviewed the treating physician and filled out the Clinical Global Impression-Severity, Global Assessment of Functioning, and the Staff Observation Aggression Scale-Revised. Patients received a mean of 91.3 ECT sessions at a mean interval of 2.6 weeks. All had been hospitalized for most or all of the previous 3 years. There were no major adverse effects, and cognitive side effects were relatively minimal (cognitive deficit present for several hours after treatment). We found that ECT significantly reduced scores on the Staff Observation Aggression Scale-Revised subscales for verbal aggression and self-harm, and improved Global Assessment of Functioning scores. There were reductions in total aggression scores, subscale scores for harm to objects and to others, and Clinical Global Impression-Severity scores, these were not statistically significant. C/M-ECT is safe and effective for chronically hospitalized patients. It improves general functioning and reduces verbal aggression and self-harm. More research using other aggression tools is needed to determine its effects and to reproduce our findings in prospective and controlled studies.

  1. Cognitive training to improve memory in individuals undergoing electroconvulsive therapy: Negative findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jimmy; Wang, Yuanjia; Feng, Tianshu; Prudic, Joan

    2017-09-01

    Although electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) remains the most effective treatment for severe depression, some patients report persistent memory problems following ECT that impact their quality of life and their willingness to consent to further ECT. While cognitive training has been shown to improve memory performance in various conditions, this approach has never been applied to help patients regain their memory after ECT. In a double-blind study, we tested the efficacy of a new cognitive training program called Memory Training for ECT (Mem-ECT), specifically designed to target anterograde and retrograde memory that can be compromised following ECT. Fifty-nine patients with treatment-resistant depression scheduled to undergo ultra-brief right unilateral ECT were randomly assigned to either: (a) Mem-ECT, (b) active control comprised of nonspecific mental stimulation, or (c) treatment as usual. Participants were evaluated within one week prior to the start of ECT and then again within 2 weeks following the last ECT session. All three groups improved in global function, quality of life, depression, and self-reported memory abilities without significant group differences. While there was a decline in verbal delayed recall and mental status, there was no decline in general retrograde memory or autobiographical memory in any of the groups, with no significant memory or clinical benefit for the Mem-ECT or active control conditions compared to treatment as usual. While we report negative findings, these results continue to promote the much needed discussion on developing effective strategies to minimize the adverse memory side effects of ECT, in hopes it will make ECT a better and more easily tolerated treatment for patients with severe depression who need this therapeutic option. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Electroconvulsive Therapy for Agitation in Schizophrenia: Metaanalysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Xiaojing; Zheng, Wei; Guo, Tong; Ungvari, Gabor S; Chiu, Helen F K; Cao, Xiaolan; D'Arcy, Carl; Meng, Xiangfei; Ning, Yuping; Xiang, Yutao

    2017-02-25

    Agitation poses a significant challenge in the treatment of schizophrenia. Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is a fast, effective and safe treatment for a variety of psychiatric disorders, but no meta-analysis of ECT treatment for agitation in schizophrenia has yet been reported. To systematically evaluate the efficacy and safety of ECT alone or ECT-antipsychotics (APs) combination for agitation in schizophrenia. Systematic literature search of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) was performed. Two independent evaluators selected studies, extracted data about outcomes and safety with available data, conducted quality assessment and data synthesis. The Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) was used to judge the level of the overall evidence of main outcomes. Seven RCTs from China, including ECT alone (4 RCTs with 5 treatment arms, n=240) and ECT-APs combination (3 RCTs, n=240), were identified. Participants in the studies were on average 34.3(4.5) years of age and lasted an average of 4.3(3.1) weeks of treatment duration. All 7 RCTs were non-blinded, and were rated as low quality based on Jadad scale. Meta-analysis of the pooled sample found no significant difference in the improvement of the agitation sub-score of the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) when ECT alone (weighted mean difference=-0.90, (95% confidence interval (CI): -2.91, 1.11), p=0.38) or ECT-APs combination (WMD=-1.34, (95%CI: -4.07, 1.39), p=0.33) compared with APs monotherapy. However, ECT alone was superior to APs monotherapy regarding PANSS total score (WMD=-7.13, I 2 =0%, p =0.004) and its excitement sub-score (WMD=-1.97, p agitation related outcomes in schizophrenia patients. However, ECT alone or ECT-APs combination were associated with significant reduction in the PANSS total score. High-quality RCTs are needed to confirm the current interpretations.

  3. A dissociation between anterograde and retrograde amnesia after treatment with electroconvulsive therapy: a naturalistic investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Margaret; Lebowitz, Brian K; Ly, Jenny; Panizzon, Matthew S; Elkin-Frankston, Seth; Dey, Sangeeta; Bloomingdale, Kerry; Thall, Mark; Pearlman, Chester

    2008-06-01

    The aim of the present study is to investigate the cumulative effects of a clinically determined course of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) on anterograde and retrograde amnesia. In this study, mood and memory were examined in the context of a protocol driven by therapeutic response, rather than by preordained research criteria. Twenty-two patients with major depressive disorder and 18 nondepressed controls were taught a series of faces and names before the initiation of ECT, and their retention of this information was examined after the end of treatment. Anterograde (ie, new learning) and retrograde memory (ie, recall of information learned before ECT) were assessed. Eleven ECT patients underwent unilateral (UL) stimulation, and 11 had a combination of UL and bilateral stimulation. Major depressive disorder patients and nondepressed controls participants were matched according to baseline memory abilities. Unilateral and unilateral/bilateral (UB) ECT patients were matched according to baseline depression and memory abilities. Treatment with ECT resulted in a dissociation between anterograde and retrograde memory; after treatment, major depressive disorder patients demonstrated significant retrograde amnesia, whereas there was no change in their anterograde memory. Unilateral and UB ECT patients performed equally well on tasks of anterograde memory. Contrary to our expectation, UB ECT was not associated with greater retrograde memory loss than was UL ECT treatment. However, a trend toward a group difference was present on 1 memory measure. Results of the study suggest that a clinical course of ECT is associated with isolated impairment for information learned before treatment (ie, retrograde memory), whereas there was no effect of ECT on posttreatment learning abilities (ie, anterograde memory).

  4. Persistent genital arousal disorder (PGAD): case report of long-term symptomatic management with electroconvulsive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korda, Joanna B; Pfaus, James G; Kellner, Charles H; Goldstein, Irwin

    2009-10-01

    This is the second case report of a woman with bipolar disorder type I who noted the onset of persistent genital arousal disorder (PGAD) symptoms after abrupt cessation of paroxetine. With the worsening of PGAD symptoms, she developed severe depression and suicidal thoughts, resulting in her undergoing electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) as management. To describe a case of PGAD and develop hypotheses to explain the beneficial actions of ECT on PGAD based on 4 years of ECT administration. Patient self-report after obtaining consent, as well as literature review. After the fourth ECT, the patient's PGAD symptoms abated serendipitously. She was placed on ECT on demand for the treatment of her PGAD. With each ECT treatment, PGAD symptoms immediately disappeared, relapsing slowly over time until the next ECT was administered. The patient has, thus far, received a total of 30 treatments of ECT. Side effects continue to be minimal and include brief short-term memory loss, headache, and muscle aches. ECT is known to induce cerebral excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitter changes after acute and chronic administration. Sexual arousal is stimulated by the action of hypothalamic and limbic dopamine, noradrenaline, melanocortin, and oxytocin, and inhibited by serotonin, cerebral opioids, and endocannabinoids. Based on the patient's bipolar disorder, the mechanism of action of ECT and the observation of ECT effectiveness on her PGAD, we hypothesize the following: (i) bipolar disorder led to central hyperactive dopamine release, an important component in the pathophysiology of her PGAD; (ii) central serotonin deficiency after selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) withdrawal resulted in a lack of inhibition of sexual excitement; (iii) ECT resulted in lowering of the hyperstimulated central dopamine release; and (iv) ECT led to an increase in sexual inhibition by stimulating serotonin activity. Further research in the central control of sexual arousal is needed.

  5. The effect of propofol-remifentanil anesthesia on selected seizure quality indices in electroconvulsive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinwiddie, Stephen H; Glick, David B; Goldman, Morris B

    2012-07-01

    Use of a short-acting opiate to potentiate anesthetic induction agents has been shown to increase seizure duration in electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), but little is known of the effect of this combination on indices of seizure quality. To determine whether anesthetic modality affects commonly provided indices of seizure quality. Twenty-five subjects were given propofol 2 mg/kg body weight for their first ECT session, at which time seizure threshold was titrated. Subjects thereafter alternated between that anesthetic regimen or propofol 0.5 mg/kg plus remifentanil 1 mcg/kg. Linear mixed models with random subject effect, adjusting for electrode placement, electrical charge, and number of treatments, were fit to estimate effect of anesthesia on seizure duration and several standard seizure quality indices (average seizure energy, time to peak electroencephalography (EEG) power, maximum sustained power, interhemispheric coherence, early and midictal EEG amplitude, and maximum sustained interhemispheric EEG coherence). Propofol-remifentanil anesthesia significantly lengthened seizure duration and was associated with longer time to reach maximal EEG power and coherence as well as maximal degree of interhemispheric EEG coherence. No effect was seen on early ictal amplitude or average seizure energy index. Propofol-remifentanil anesthesia prolongs seizure duration and has a significant effect on some, but not all, measures of seizure quality. This effect may be of some benefit in cases where adequate seizures are otherwise difficult to elicit. Varying anesthetic technique may allow more precise investigation of the relationships between and relative impacts of commonly used seizure quality indices on clinical outcomes and ECT-related cognitive side effects. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Electroconvulsive therapy clinical database: Influence of age and gender on the electrical charge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvador Sánchez, Javier; David, Mónica Delia; Torrent Setó, Aurora; Martínez Alonso, Montserrat; Portella Moll, Maria J; Pifarré Paredero, Josep; Vieta Pascual, Eduard; Mur Laín, María

    The influence of age and gender in the electrical charge delivered in a given population was analysed using an electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) clinical database. An observational, prospective, longitudinal study with descriptive analysis was performed using data from a database that included total bilateral frontotemporal ECT carried out with a Mecta spECTrum 5000Q ® in our hospital over 6 years. From 2006 to 2012, a total of 4,337 ECT were performed on 187 patients. Linear regression using mixed effects analysis was weighted by the inverse of the number of ECT performed on each patient per year of treatment. The results indicate that age is related with changes in the required charge (P=.031), as such that the older the age a higher charge is needed. Gender is also associated with changes in charge (P=.014), with women requiring less charge than men, a mean of 87.3mC less. When the effects of age and gender are included in the same model, both are significant (P=.0080 and P=.0041). Thus, for the same age, women require 99.0mC less charge than men, and in both genders the charge increases by 2.3mC per year. From our study, it is concluded that the effect of age on the dosage of the electrical charge is even more significant when related to gender. It would be of interest to promote the systematic collection of data for a better understanding and application of the technique. Copyright © 2015 SEP y SEPB. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Repeated dose titration versus age-based method in electroconvulsive therapy: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aten, Jan Jaap; Oudega, Mardien; van Exel, Eric; Stek, Max L; van Waarde, Jeroen A

    2015-06-01

    In electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), a dose titration method (DTM) was suggested to be more individualized and therefore more accurate than formula-based dosing methods. A repeated DTM (every sixth session and dose adjustment accordingly) was compared to an age-based method (ABM) regarding treatment characteristics, clinical outcome, and cognitive functioning after ECT. Thirty-nine unipolar depressed patients dosed using repeated DTM and 40 matched patients treated with ABM were compared. Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) and Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) were assessed at baseline and at the end of the index course, as well as the total number of ECT sessions. Both groups were similar regarding age, sex, psychotic features, mean baseline MADRS, and median baseline MMSE. At the end of the index course, the two methods showed equal outcome (mean end MADRS, 11.6 ± 8.3 in DTM and 9.5 ± 7.6 in ABM (P = 0.26); median end MMSE, 28 (25-29) and 28 (25-29.8), respectively (P = 0.81). However, the median number of all ECT sessions differed 16 (11-22) in DTM versus 12 (10-14.8) in ABM; P = 0.02]. Using regression analysis, dosing method and age were independently associated with the total number of ECT sessions, with less sessions needed in ABM (P = 0.02) and in older patients (P = 0.001). In this comparative cohort study, ABM and DTM showed equal outcome for depression and cognition. However, the median ECT course duration in repeated DTM appeared longer. Additionally, higher age was associated with shorter ECT courses regardless of the dosing method. Further prospective studies are needed to confirm these findings.

  8. Acute effects of electroconvulsive therapy on regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in psychiatric disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prohovnik, I.; Alderson, P.O.; Sackheim, H.A.; Decina, P.; Kahn, D.

    1984-01-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is frequently used in the treatment of major depression and other psychiatric disorders; its mechanism of action is not established, but previous evidence suggests that it is associated with postictal metabolic suppression. The authors have used measurements of rCBF as an index of cortical metabolic activity to study the acute effects of ECT. Measurements of rCBF were made in 32 cortical regions in 10 patients (pts) following one minute breathing of Xe-133 (5mCi/L); the measurements were performed 30min before and 50min after ECT. Bilateral ECT was administered to six pts (five diagnosed as major depressives and one schizophrenic) and unilateral ECT to four (all diagnosed as unipolar or bipolar affective disorder). The total rCBF material consists of 52 measurements in these pts, made before and after 16 bilateral and 10 unilateral treatments. ECT was found to cause significant reduction of rCBF. Mean hemispheric flows (using the Initial Slope Index to measure grey-matter flow) were reduced by about 5% in both hemispheres following bilateral treatment. Unilateral treatment caused a 9% reduction of flow in the treated hemisphere, but only 2% contralaterally. Regional patterns of flow decreases also differed between the two treatment modes: bilateral frontal reductions were found after bilateral treatment, whereas unilateral ECT caused a widespread flow reduction in the treated hemisphere, and almost no effect contralaterally. These results suggest that rCBF studies are useful for assessing ECT, and indicate that the acute cerebral effects of ECT vary with the mode of treatment

  9. Superior anti-suicidal effects of electroconvulsive therapy in unipolar disorder and bipolar depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Chih-Sung; Chung, Chi-Hsiang; Ho, Pei-Shen; Tsai, Chia-Kuang; Chien, Wu-Chien

    2017-12-11

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) has long been believed to reduce suicidal tendencies in patients with affective disorders; however, ECT recipients, who constitute the most severely ill and suicidal patients, are not eligible to participate in head-to-head randomized controlled trials. Large-scale studies are required to investigate the anti-suicidal effects of ECT vs psychopharmacotherapy. A nationwide retrospective cohort study design was used. Data were obtained from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. Inpatients with unipolar disorder or bipolar disorder who received ECT (n = 487) were observed from 1 January 2000 to 31 December 2013 for suicide events. The non-ECT control cohort consisted of inpatients with psychopharmacotherapy randomly matched (ratio, 1:4) by age, sex, and diagnosis. After potential confounds had been accounted for, the adjusted hazard ratio (HR) was 0.803, indicating that ECT recipients showed a 19.7% lower risk of suicide than control individuals. The stratum-specific adjusted HR was 0.79 in patients with unipolar disorder (P = .041) and 0.923 in patients with bipolar disorder (P = .254). Upon further stratification of the patients with bipolar disorder by their affective states, the adjusted HR was 0.805 (P = .046) for bipolar depression, 1.048 for bipolar mania (P = .538), and 0.976 for mixed bipolar state (P = .126). Compared with psychopharmacotherapy, ECT exerted superior anti-suicidal effects in patients with unipolar disorder and bipolar depression; however, there was a lack of superior anti-suicidal effects of ECT in the treatment of patients with bipolar mania and mixed state. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Maintenance Electroconvulsive Therapy in Severe Bipolar Disorder: A Retrospective Chart Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos Pina, Laura; Bouckaert, Filip; Obbels, Jasmien; Wampers, Martien; Simons, Wim; Wyckaert, Sabien; Sienaert, Pascal

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of continuation and maintenance electroconvulsive therapy (C/M-ECT) in patients with bipolar or schizoaffective disorder. We reviewed the charts of all patients diagnosed with a bipolar or schizoaffective disorder treated with C/M-ECT from August 2009 until December 2013. We gathered demographic data and treatment variables (electrode placement, stimulus dose, and concomitant use of medication; number of C/M-ECT sessions; and number of new ECT courses). Primary outcome measure was the number of hospitalization days during C/M-ECT as compared with an equal period before starting the index course. Twenty women (64.5%) and 11 men (35.5%) with a Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition bipolar disorder (n = 22, 71%) or schizoaffective disorder (n = 9, 29%) received C/M-ECT. The mean (SD) age was 51.23 (14.86; range, 28-74) years. Before the start of the index ECT, patients had a mean of 290 hospitalization days (248.4 days, full hospitalization; 41.6 days, partial hospitalization), whereas during C/M-ECT, they had a mean of 214.7 hospitalization days (85.4 days, full hospitalization; 129.3 days, partial hospitalization). The number of readmissions before ECT was 2.13, whereas during C/M-ECT, it decreased to 1.48. Only the decrease in number of full hospitalization days was significant. Most patients (n = 23, 74.19%) needed an acute course of ECT during M-ECT. Maintenance ECT seems to significantly reduce the number of full hospitalization days in patients with severe bipolar or schizoaffective disorder.

  11. Catatonia in 26 patients with bipolar disorder: clinical features and response to electroconvulsive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medda, Pierpaolo; Toni, Cristina; Luchini, Federica; Giorgi Mariani, Michela; Mauri, Mauro; Perugi, Giulio

    2015-12-01

    We describe the clinical characteristics and short-term outcomes of a sample of inpatients with bipolar disorder with severe catatonic features resistant to pharmacological treatment. The study involved 26 catatonic patients, resistant to a trial of benzodiazepines, and then treated with electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). All patients were evaluated prior to and one week following the ECT course using the Bush-Francis Catatonia Rating Scale (BFCRS) and the Clinical Global Impression (CGI). In our sample, women were over-represented (n = 23, 88.5%), the mean (± standard deviation) age was 49.5 ± 12.5 years, the mean age at onset was 28.1 ± 12.8 years, and the mean number of previous mood episodes was 5.3 ± 2.9. The mean duration of catatonic symptoms was 16.7 ± 11.8 (range: 3-50) weeks, and personal history of previous catatonic episodes was present in 10 patients (38.5%). Seventeen (65.4%) patients showed abnormalities at cerebral computerized tomography and/or magnetic resonance imaging and neurological comorbidities were observed in 15.4% of the sample. Stupor, rigidity, staring, negativism, withdrawal, and mutism were observed in more than 90% of patients. At the end of the ECT course, 21 patients (80.8%) were classified as responders. The BFCRS showed the largest percentage of improvement, with an 82% reduction of the initial score. The number of previous mood episodes was significantly lower and the use of anticholinergic and dopamine-agonist medications was significantly more frequent in non-responders than in responders. Our patients with bipolar disorder had predominantly retarded catatonia, frequent previous catatonic episodes, indicating a recurrent course, and high rates of concomitant brain structure alterations. However, ECT was a very effective treatment for catatonia in this patient group that was resistant to benzodiazepines. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Assessment of Arterial Oxygen Saturation by Pulse Oximetry Before, During and After Electroconvulsive Therapy

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    SH Tarig

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT is used widely in psychiatric practice. The goal of anesthesia for ECT is the prevention of complications such as discomfort, fractures, aspiration of gastric contents and hypoxia. However, general anesthesia can cause some adverse effects as hypoxia. Prevention and treatment of hypoxia is important due to its undesirable effects on seizure duration and cardiovascular system. This study was designed to detect the incidence and probable times of desaturation in patients receiving ECT. Materials & Methods: This prospective randomized clinical trial was carried out on 100 patients (18-50 y/o with ASA I or II who were scheduled for ECT. After pre-oxygenation and similar anesthesia induction the patients received ECT. The patients were ventilated by oxygen and face masked until the return of their spontaneous respiration with adequate tidal volume and respiratory rate. Then they were transferred to recovery room where there was no oxygen supplementation. Oxygen saturation was measured by a Nell core pulse oximeter and was recorded at six stages: before and after anesthesia induction, during ECT, after ECT, 5 minutes after entering recovery room and before leaving there. The data were analyzed by standard statistical tests using SPSS software Results: Data analysis revealed that desaturation was not noticed at any stage except for the 5th stage (5 minutes after entering recovery room, when 13% of patients developed Sao2% less than 90%. Also there was a significant difference between Sao2% of patients between this stage (5th and other stages (p<0.001. Conclusion: According to our findings, appropriate oxygen supplementation and pulse oximetry monitoring during recovery period after ECT can be recommend

  13. Junior medical students’ knowledge about and attitudes towards electroconvulsive therapy in a South African setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew B. Mausling

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although electroconvulsive therapy (ECT is a safe and effective treatment modality with a long history of use in psychiatry, it remains controversial owing to misconceptions and negative attitudes among the public and medical profession. The aim of this study was to explore the state of knowledge and attitudes towards ECT among a sample of South African medical students. Method: Prior to their theoretical psychiatry module, 131 second-year medical students responded to an anonymous online survey designed to assess the source and extent of their ECT knowledge as well as their attitude towards ECT and psychiatry in general. Results: The Internet (46.6% and TV and/or movies (30.5% were the principal sources of knowledge of ECT while ‘professional publication’ was the least common (0%. The students’ attitudes towards psychiatry were generally positive and nearly one-third (29.8% would consider specialising in the field. Overall, perception towards ECT was mixed, with many respondents approving of its use albeit only as a last resort. Notably, low ECT knowledge scores were associated with more negative attitudes towards this treatment modality and a lower perception of psychiatry as a medical speciality. Conclusion: The findings indicate that for these students, media is the main source of ECT knowledge. While they are generally knowledgeable about ECT, they still harbour some misconceptions and negative attitudes about the treatment. Knowledge appears able to amend these attitudes, thus underlining the importance of integrating accurate information about ECT into the preclinical medical curriculum rather than leaving it to mass media to forge warped perceptions and attitudes for these future clinicians.

  14. Early effects of modern electroconvulsive therapy on subjective memory in patients with mania or depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bag, Sevda; Canbek, Ozge; Atagun, Ilhan Murat; Kutlar, Tarik Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    Context: Although electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is considered a very effective tool for the treatment of psychiatric diseases, memory disturbances are among the most important adverse effects. Aims: This study aimed to assess prospectively early subjective memory complaints in depressive and manic patients due to bilateral, brief-pulse ECT, at different stages of the treatment, compare the associations between psychiatric diagnosis, sociodemographic characteristics, and ECT characteristics. Settings and Design: This prospective study was done with patients undergoing ECT between November 2008 and April 2009 at a tertiary care psychiatry hospital of 2000 beds. Materials and Methods: A total of 140 patients, scheduled for ECT with a diagnosis of bipolar disorder (depressive or manic episode) or unipolar depression according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders IV diagnostic criteria, were included in the study and invited to complete the Squire Subjective Memory Questionnaire (SSMQ) before ECT, after the first and third sessions and end of ECT treatment. Statistical Analysis: Mean values were compared with the Kruskal–Wallis test and comparison of the longitudinal data was performed with a nonparametric longitudinal data analysis method, F1_LD_F1 design. Results: SSMQ scores of the patients before ECT were zero. SSMQ scores showed a decrease after the first and third ECT sessions and before discharge, showing a memory disturbance after ECT and were significantly less severe in patients with mania in comparison to those with depression. Conclusions: These findings suggest an increasing degree of subjective memory complaints with bilateral brief-pulse ECT parallel to the increasing number of ECT sessions. PMID:27385854

  15. Antidepressant Effects of Electroconvulsive Therapy Correlate With Subgenual Anterior Cingulate Activity and Connectivity in Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi; Du, Lian; Li, Yongmei; Liu, Haixia; Zhao, Wenjing; Liu, Dan; Zeng, Jinkun; Li, Xingbao; Fu, Yixiao; Qiu, Haitang; Li, Xirong; Qiu, Tian; Hu, Hua; Meng, Huaqing; Luo, Qinghua

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The mechanisms underlying the effects of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in major depressive disorder (MDD) are not fully understood. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) is a new tool to study the effects of brain stimulation interventions, particularly ECT. The authors aim to investigate the mechanisms of ECT in MDD by rs-fMRI. They used rs-fMRI to measure functional changes in the brain of first-episode, treatment-naive MDD patients (n = 23) immediately before and then following 8 ECT sessions (brief-pulse square-wave apparatus, bitemporal). They also computed voxel-wise amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF) as a measure of regional brain activity and selected the left subgenual anterior cingulate cortex (sgACC) to evaluate functional connectivity between the sgACC and other brain regions. Increased regional brain activity measured by ALFF mainly in the left sgACC following ECT. Functional connectivity of the left sgACC increased in the ipsilateral parahippocampal gyrus, pregenual ACC, contralateral middle temporal pole, and orbitofrontal cortex. Importantly, reduction in depressive symptoms were negatively correlated with increased ALFF in the left sgACC and left hippocampus, and with distant functional connectivity between the left sgACC and contralateral middle temporal pole. That is, across subjects, as depression improved, regional brain activity in sgACC and its functional connectivity increased in the brain. Eight ECT sessions in MDD patients modulated activity in the sgACC and its networks. The antidepressant effects of ECT were negatively correlated with sgACC brain activity and connectivity. These findings suggest that sgACC-associated prefrontal-limbic structures are associated with the therapeutic effects of ECT in MDD. PMID:26559309

  16. The Psychiatric Patient as a Health Resource Consumer: Costs Associated with Electroconvulsive Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selva-Sevilla, Carmen; Gonzalez-Moral, Maria Luisa; Tolosa-Perez, Maria Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Background: Clinical practice protocols should consider both the psychological criteria related to a patient’s satisfaction as a consumer of health services and the economic criteria to allocate resources efficiently. An electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) program was implemented in our hospital to treat psychiatric patients. The main objective of this study was to determine the cost associated with the ECT sessions implemented in our hospital between 2008 and 2014. A secondary objective was to calculate the cost of sessions that were considered ineffective, defined as those sessions in which electrical convulsion did not reach the preset threshold duration, in order to identify possible ways of saving money and improving satisfaction among psychiatric patients receiving ECT. Methods: A descriptive analysis of the direct health costs related to ECT from the perspective of the public health system between 2008 and 2014 was performed using a retrospective chart review. All of the costs are in euros (2011) and were discounted at a rate of 3%. Based on the base case, a sensitivity analysis of the changes of those variables showing the greatest uncertainty was performed. Results: Seventy-six patients received 853 sessions of ECT. The cumulative cost of these sessions was €1409528.63, and 92.9% of this cost corresponded to the hospital stay. A total of €420732.57 (29.8%) was inefficiently spent on 269 ineffective sessions. A sensitivity analysis of the economic data showed stable results to changes in the variables of uncertainty. Conclusion: The efficiency of ECT in the context outlined here could be increased by discerning a way to shorten the associated hospital stay and by reducing the number of ineffective sessions performed. PMID:27303347

  17. Variation of plasma cortisol levels in patients with depression after treatment with bilateral electroconvulsive therapy

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    Daniel Fortunato Burgese

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: More than 60 years after the introduction of modern psychopharmacology, electroconvulsive therapy (ECT continues to be an essential therapeutic modality in the treatment of mental disorders, but its mechanism of action remains unclear. Hormones play an essential role in the development and expression of a series of behavioral changes. One aspect of the influence of hormones on behavior is their potential contribution to the pathophysiology of psychiatric disorders and the mechanism of action of psychotropic drugs and ECT.Objective: We measured blood levels of the hormone cortisol in patients with unipolar depression according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition (DSM-IV and compared results with levels found in healthy adults.Method: Blood cortisol levels were measured before the beginning of treatment with ECT, at the seventh session, and at the last session, at treatment completion. Depression symptoms were assessed using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI.Results: Cortisol levels remained stable in both men and women between the seventh and the last sessions of ECT; values ranged from 0.686±9.6330 g/dL for women, and there was a mean decrease of 5.825±6.0780 g/dL (p = 0.024. Mean number of ECT sessions was 12. After the seventh and the last ECT sessions, patients with depression and individuals in the control group had similar cortisol levels, whereas BDI scores remained different.Conclusion: Cortisol levels decreased during ECT treatment. ECT seems to act as a regulator of the hypothalamic-pituitaryadrenal axis.

  18. Use of electroconvulsive therapy for Asian patients with schizophrenia (2001-2009): Trends and correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Yu-Tao; Ungvari, Gabor S; Correll, Christoph U; Chiu, Helen F K; Lai, Kelly Y C; Wang, Chuan-Yue; Si, Tian-Mei; Lee, Edwin H M; He, Yan-Ling; Yang, Shu-Yu; Chong, Mian-Yoon; Kua, Ee-Heok; Fujii, Senta; Sim, Kang; Yong, Michael K H; Trivedi, Jitendra K; Chung, Eun-Kee; Udomratn, Pichet; Chee, Kok-Yoon; Sartorius, Norman; Tan, Chay-Hoon; Shinfuku, Naotaka

    2015-08-01

    Little is known about electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) use in Asian inpatients with schizophrenia. This study examined trends of ECT use for schizophrenia patients in Asia between 2001 and 2009 and its independent demographic and clinical correlates. Data on 6761 hospitalized schizophrenia patients (2001 = 2399, 2004 = 2136, and 2009 = 2226) in nine Asian countries and territories were collected by either chart review or interviews during a 1-month period. Patients' sociodemographic and clinical characteristics, prescriptions of psychotropic drugs and ECT use were recorded using a standardized protocol and data-collection procedure. The frequency of ECT was 3.3% in the whole sample; rising from 1.8% in 2001 to 3.3% in 2004 and 4.9% in 2009 (P < 0.0001). However, this increased trend was driven solely by increased ECT use in China (P < 0.0001), and the inclusion of India in the 2009 survey. There were wide inter-country variations: 2001, 0% (Hong Kong, Korea) to 5.9% (China); 2004, 0% (Singapore) to 11.1% (China); 2009, 0% (Hong Kong) to 13.8% (India) and 15.2% (China). Multiple logistic regression analysis of the whole sample revealed that patients receiving ECT were less likely in the 35-64-year age group, had shorter length of current hospitalization and fewer negative symptoms, and were more likely to receive second-generation antipsychotic medications compared to those who were not treated with ECT (R(2)  = 0.264, P < 0.001). ECT use for schizophrenia has increased over the past decade in China, being low/relatively stable in other Asian countries/regions. Reasons for substantial variations in ECT frequency in Asia require further study. © 2015 The Authors. Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences © 2015 Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology.

  19. Electroconvulsive therapy and structural neuroplasticity in neocortical, limbic and paralimbic cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirnia, T; Joshi, S H; Leaver, A M; Vasavada, M; Njau, S; Woods, R P; Espinoza, R; Narr, K L

    2016-01-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is a highly effective and rapidly acting treatment for severe depression. To understand the biological bases of therapeutic response, we examined variations in cortical thickness from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data in 29 patients scanned at three time points during an ECT treatment index series and in 29 controls at two time points. Changes in thickness across time and with symptom improvement were evaluated at high spatial resolution across the cortex and within discrete cortical regions of interest. Patients showed increased thickness over the course of ECT in the bilateral anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), inferior and superior temporal, parahippocampal, entorhinal and fusiform cortex and in distributed prefrontal areas. No changes across time occurred in controls. In temporal and fusiform regions showing significant ECT effects, thickness differed between patients and controls at baseline and change in thickness related to therapeutic response in patients. In the ACC, these relationships occurred in treatment responders only, and thickness measured soon after treatment initiation predicted the overall ECT response. ECT leads to widespread neuroplasticity in neocortical, limbic and paralimbic regions and changes relate to the extent of antidepressant response. Variations in ACC thickness, which discriminate treatment responders and predict response early in the course of ECT, may represent a biomarker of overall clinical outcome. Because post-mortem studies show focal reductions in glial density and neuronal size in patients with severe depression, ECT-related increases in thickness may be attributable to neuroplastic processes affecting the size and/or density of neurons and glia and their connections. PMID:27271858

  20. Electroconvulsive therapy in the elderly: Retrospective analysis from an urban general hospital psychiatry unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimple D Dadarwala

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The number of elder patients with severe psychiatric illnesses other than depression is increasing. Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT has a special role in the treatment of late-life depression and other psychiatric conditions in the elderly. Using ECTs in the elderly could be difficult. In an Indian setting, ECT in the geriatric population is used as last resort of treatment which is in contrast to Western countries. There is dearth of data available for the use of ECT in the elderly in India. Methodology: Retrospective data review was carried out to identify patients 55 years or older who had received ECT from January 2014 to June 2016 in tertiary care teaching hospital in a metropolitan city in India. Results: A total of 304 ECTs were administered to 25 elderly aged> 55 years with average of 12 ECTs per patient. Schizophrenia (56% was the most common diagnosis among patients who were considered for ECT, and this was followed by major depression without psychotic features (24% and major depression with psychotic features (8%. The most common indication to start ECT was nonresponsiveness to medications (92%. There was an increase in mean Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE scores from baseline (23.42 to the end of the sixth (24.60 and last ECT (24.60. Duration of current used during ECT had positive correlation with MMSE. Patients with comorbid medical illness (20% received ECT without any complication. Conclusions: This study adds to scarce database on the use of ECT in old-age patients in India and adds to evidence that ECT is safe and effective treatment in old age with no negative impact on cognition.

  1. Chart review of electroconvulsive therapy practice from a tertiary care geriatric mental health set up

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    Akanksha Sonal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT is frequently used treatment procedure, and is utilized more often for severe, treatment-resistant, or refractory psychiatric disorders. However, published data on the use of ECT is limited, more so for special population like older adults. Aim: The aim of the study was to explore the clinical, demographic, and diagnostic profiles of older adults, and the parameters of ECT treatment, in a tertiary care Geriatric Mental Health set up. Materials and Methods: Approval to review the case notes was obtained from the Institutional Ethical Committee. The individuals were aged 60 years and above and had received ECT between January 2014 and May 2017. The relevant details pertaining to the aims of the study were recorded in a spreadsheet. Results: Twenty-five courses (absolute number = 191 of ECT were given to 21 patients (mean age = 67.44 ± 9.8 years with mean of 7.64 ± 3.6 ECT per patient. Majority of the patients belonged to age group 60–69 years, and were male (81%. Depression was the most common diagnosis for giving ECT (43% in these individuals, and poor response to pharmacological treatment (81% was the most common indication. The mean duration of the seizure elicited was 28.8 ± 13.2 s, and a therapeutic response was seen in 86% of cases. No major complications were noted during ECT treatment. Conclusion: When used judiciously and with trained staff, ECT is an effective and relatively safe mode of treatment even in older adults.

  2. The Optical Fractionator Technique to Estimate Cell Numbers in a Rat Model of Electroconvulsive Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Mikkel Vestergaard; Needham, Esther Kjær; Pakkenberg, Bente

    2017-01-01

    present the optical fractionator in conjunction with BrdU immunohistochemistry to estimate the production and survival of newly-formed neurons in the granule cell layer (including the sub-granular zone) of the rat hippocampus following electroconvulsive stimulation, which is among the most potent...

  3. Electroconvulsive therapy substantially reduces symptom severity and social disability associated with multiple chemical sensitivity: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elberling, Jesper; Gulmann, Nils; Rasmussen, Alice

    2010-09-01

    Multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS) is a chronic nonallergic, multisymptom disorder triggered by common environmental chemicals in concentrations considered nontoxic for most individuals. The condition may lead to loss of occupation and social isolation, and no effective treatment has been reported. Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is a safe and effective treatment of severe depression and medical conditions such as chronic pain disorders. We report a case of a 45-year-old man with a 5-year history of MCS who had to quit his job to live a solitary life without his wife and children because of the condition. The patient had no history of psychiatric illness and no signs of clinical depression at treatment start. Over a 3-week period, he underwent a course of 8 ECTs, giving a remarkable effect on symptom severity and social functional level. After a partial symptom relapse, maintenance treatment was started with 1 ECT every second week. No memory impairment or other complications of ECT were reported at the 4-month follow-up. In this case, a substantial, positive effect on symptom severity and social disability related to MCS was obtained by an initial ECT course and maintenance treatment. Electroconvulsive therapy should be considered an option in severe and socially disabling MCS, but more studies are needed to evaluate if ECT can be recommended as a treatment in MCS.

  4. Episodic Visual Learning/Memory and Attentional Flexibility in Patients With Major Depressive Disorder After Clinically Effective Electroconvulsive Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalogerakou, Stamatina; Oulis, Panagiotis; Anyfandi, Eleni; Konstantakopoulos, George; Papakosta, Vasiliki-Maria; Kontis, Dimitrios; Theochari, Eirini; Angelopoulos, Elias; Zervas, Ioannis M; Mellon, Robert C; Papageorgiou, Charalambos C; Tsaltas, Eleftheria

    2015-12-01

    This study is a follow-up of a previous one reporting that the neuropsychological profile of pharmacoresistant patients with major depressive disorder referred for electroconvulsive therapy (ECT, ECT group) contrasted with that of their pharmacorespondent counterparts (NECT group). The NECT group exhibited severe visuospatial memory and minor executive deficits; the ECT group presented the reverse pattern. In that same ECT group, the current follow-up study examined the effects of clinically effective ECT on both cognitive domains 2 months later. Fifteen ECT patients were administered Hamilton Depression (HAMD-24), Hamilton Anxiety (HAMA), Mini-Mental State Examination Scales and 5 tests of Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery at intake (pre-ECT), end of ECT course (post-ECT), and 2 months thereafter (follow-up). Electroconvulsive therapy was effective in relieving clinical depression. After a post-ECT decline, the patients exhibited significant improvement in both Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery, paired associate learning, and Stockings of Cambridge. By contrast, their major pre-ECT deficit in intra/extradimensional set shifting remained virtually unaffected. Our findings suggest that attentional flexibility deficits may constitute a neuropsychological trait-like feature of pharmacoresistant, ECT-referred major depressive disorder patients. However, this deficit does not seem generalized, given patient improvement in episodic visual learning/memory and some indication of improvement in spatial planning after ECT.

  5. Increased BDNF levels after electroconvulsive therapy in patients with major depressive disorder: A meta-analysis study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Renan Boeira; Dondossola, Eduardo Ronconi; Grande, Antônio José; Colonetti, Tamy; Ceretta, Luciane Bisognin; Passos, Ives C; Quevedo, Joao; da Rosa, Maria Inês

    2016-12-01

    We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to estimate brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) level in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) after electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). A comprehensive search of the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, LILACS, Grey literature, and EMBASE was performed for papers published from January 1990 to April 2016. The following key terms were searched: "major depressive disorder", "unipolar depression", "brain-derived neurotrophic factor", and "electroconvulsive therapy". A total of 252 citations were identified by the search strategy, and nine studies met the inclusion criteria of the meta-analysis. BDNF levels were increased among patients with MDD after ECT (P value = 0.006). The standardized mean difference was 0.56 (95% CI: 0.17-0.96). Additionally, we found significant heterogeneity between studies (I 2  = 73%). Our findings suggest a potential role of BDNF as a marker of treatment response after ECT in patients with MDD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Successful switch from bilateral brief pulse to right unilateral ultrabrief pulse electroconvulsive therapy after failure to induce seizures

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    Kawashima H

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Hirotsugu Kawashima,1 Yuko Kobayashi,1 Taro Suwa,2 Toshiya Murai,2 Ryuichi Yoshioka1 1Department of Psychiatry, Toyooka Hospital, Toyooka, Hyogo, Japan; 2Department of Neuropsychiatry, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan Abstract: Inducing adequate therapeutic seizures during electroconvulsive therapy (ECT is sometimes difficult due to a high seizure threshold, even at the maximum stimulus charge. Previous studies have demonstrated that seizure threshold is lower in patients treated with right unilateral ultrabrief pulse (RUL-UBP ECT than in those treated with bilateral or brief pulse (BL-BP ECT. Therefore, switching to RUL-UBP ECT may be beneficial for patients in whom seizure induction is difficult with conventional ECT. In the present report, we discuss the case of a patient suffering from catatonic schizophrenia in whom BL-BP ECT failed to induce seizures at the maximum charge. However, RUL-UBP ECT successfully elicited therapeutic seizures and enabled the patient to achieve complete remission. This case illustrates that, along with other augmentation strategies, RUL-UBP ECT represents an alternative for seizure induction in clinical practice. Keywords: electroconvulsive therapy, augmentation, ultrabrief pulse, electrode placement, seizure threshold

  7. Efficacy and cognitive side effects after brief pulse and ultrabrief pulse right unilateral electroconvulsive therapy for major depression: a randomized, double-blind, controlled study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spaans, H.P.; Verwijk, E.; Comijs, H.C.; Kok, R.M.; Sienaert, P.; Bouckaert, F.; Fannes, K.; Vandepoel, K.; Scherder, E.J.A.; Stek, M.L.; Kho, K.H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To compare the efficacy and cognitive side effects of high-dose unilateral brief pulse electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) with those of high-dose unilateral ultrabrief pulse ECT in the treatment of major depression. Method: From April 2007 until March 2011, we conducted a prospective,

  8. Relapse and long-term cognitive performance after brief pulse or ultrabrief pulse right unilateral electroconvulsive therapy: A multicenter naturalistic follow up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verwijk, E.; Spaans, H.P.; Comijs, H.C.; Kho, K.H.; Sienaert, P.; Bouckaert, F.; Obbels, J.; Scherder, E.J.A.; Stek, M.L.; Kok, R.M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Superior cognitive functioning for electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) with right unilateral (RUL) ultrabrief pulse (UBP) stimulation compared to RUL brief pulse (BP) stimulation is not clearly established and long-term data is needed. Methods We conducted a prospective naturalistic follow-up

  9. Prediction of Individual Response to Electroconvulsive Therapy via Machine Learning on Structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redlich, Ronny; Opel, Nils; Grotegerd, Dominik; Dohm, Katharina; Zaremba, Dario; Bürger, Christian; Münker, Sandra; Mühlmann, Lisa; Wahl, Patricia; Heindel, Walter; Arolt, Volker; Alferink, Judith; Zwanzger, Peter; Zavorotnyy, Maxim; Kugel, Harald; Dannlowski, Udo

    2016-06-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is one of the most effective treatments for severe depression. However, biomarkers that accurately predict a response to ECT remain unidentified. To investigate whether certain factors identified by structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques are able to predict ECT response. In this nonrandomized prospective study, gray matter structure was assessed twice at approximately 6 weeks apart using 3-T MRI and voxel-based morphometry. Patients were recruited through the inpatient service of the Department of Psychiatry, University of Muenster, from March 11, 2010, to March 27, 2015. Two patient groups with acute major depressive disorder were included. One group received an ECT series in addition to antidepressants (n = 24); a comparison sample was treated solely with antidepressants (n = 23). Both groups were compared with a sample of healthy control participants (n = 21). Binary pattern classification was used to predict ECT response by structural MRI that was performed before treatment. In addition, univariate analysis was conducted to predict reduction of the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale score by pretreatment gray matter volumes and to investigate ECT-related structural changes. One participant in the ECT sample was excluded from the analysis, leaving 67 participants (27 men and 40 women; mean [SD] age, 43.7 [10.6] years). The binary pattern classification yielded a successful prediction of ECT response, with accuracy rates of 78.3% (18 of 23 patients in the ECT sample) and sensitivity rates of 100% (13 of 13 who responded to ECT). Furthermore, a support vector regression yielded a significant prediction of relative reduction in the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale score. The principal findings of the univariate model indicated a positive association between pretreatment subgenual cingulate volume and individual ECT response (Montreal Neurological Institute [MNI] coordinates x = 8, y = 21, z = -18

  10. Clinical usefulness and economic implications of continuation/maintenance electroconvulsive therapy in a Spanish National Health System public hospital: A case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Jimenez, Roberto; Bagney, Alexandra; Torio, Iosune; Caballero, Montserrat; Ruiz, Pedro; Rivas, Francisco de Paula Jose; Jimenez-Arriero, Miguel Angel

    2015-01-01

    Continuation/maintenance electroconvulsive therapy has been shown to be effective for prevention of relapse in affective and psychotic disorders. However, there is a limited nubber of studies that investigate clinical management, associated costs, and perceived quality variables. A series of 8 cases included during the first 18 months of the Continuation/Maintenance Electroconvulsive Therapy Program of the Psychiatry Department at 12 de Octubre University Hospital is presented. Clinical variables (Clinical Global Impression-Improvement Scale, length of hospitalization, number of Emergency Department visits, number of urgent admissions) before and after inclusion in the continuation/maintenance electroconvulsive therapy program were compared for each patient, as well as associated costs and perceived quality. After inclusion in the program, 50.0% of patients reported feeling « much better » and 37.5% « moderately better » in the Clinical Global Impression-Improvement Scale. In addition, after inclusion in the continuation/maintenance electroconvulsive therapy program, patients were hospitalized for a total of 349 days, visited the Emergency Department on 3 occasions, and had 2 urgent admissions, compared to 690 days of hospitalization (P = .012), 26 Emergency Department visits (P = .011) and 22 urgent admissions (P = .010) during the same period before inclusion in the program. Associated direct costs per day of admission were reduced to 50.6% of the previous costs, and costs associated with Emergency Department visits were reduced to 11.5% of the previous costs. As regards perceived quality, 87.5% of patients assessed the care and treatment received as being « very satisfactory », and 12.5% as « satisfactory ». This continuation/maintenance electroconvulsive therapy program has shown to be clinically useful and to have a favourable economic impact, as well as high perceived quality. Copyright © 2014 SEP y SEPB. Published by Elsevier España. All rights

  11. Knowledge about and attitude toward electroconvulsive therapy of elderly patients with severe mental disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Grover

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT is quite often used in elderly patients with severe mental disorders. One of the important factors which determine the acceptance of ECT among patients is the knowledge and attitude toward ECT. Aim: The present study attempted to assess the knowledge about and attitude toward ECT among elderly patients with severe mental disorders who had never received ECT. Materials and Methods: Knowledge and attitudes regarding ECT were assessed using ECT knowledge and attitude questionnaires, among 102 clinically stable elderly patients with severe mental disorders. Results: Majority (n = 62; 60.8% of the patients obtained information mostly from "general word of mouth" or media (n = 23; 22.6%. None of the patients had full knowledge about ECT. Majority of the patients were not aware of the basic facts about ECT. Except for the fact that ECT involves use of electric current and can be given by a doctor, more than two-third of the patients were unaware of the basic facts about the procedure of ECT. Less than half of the patients were aware of the need for informed consent. Knowledge about indications, efficacy, and side effects of ECT was also very poor. In terms of attitude toward ECT, on most (15 out of 16 of the items, positive attitudes toward ECT were found in less than half of the patients (8.8-44.1%. In addition, significant proportions of patients were uncertain about their attitudes to ECT (35.3-66.7% or had a negative attitude toward ECT (4.9-32.4%. There was significant positive correlation between the total knowledge and attitude score, suggesting that higher knowledge was associated with more positive attitude and vice versa. There was no relationship of total knowledge and total attitude score with demographic and clinical variables. Conclusions: Elderly patients with severe mental disorders have poor knowledge, and a significant proportion of them have a negative attitude toward ECT. Accordingly, it is

  12. Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) for treating agitation in dementia (major neurocognitive disorder) - a promising option.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Oliver M; Forester, Brent P; Hermida, Adriana P

    2017-05-01

    Agitation in patients with dementia increases caretaker burden, increases healthcare costs, and worsens the patient's quality of life. Antipsychotic medications, commonly used for the treatment of agitation in patients with dementia have a box warning from the FDA for elevated mortality risk. Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) has made significant advances over the past several years, and is efficacious in treating a wide range of psychiatric conditions. We provide a systematic review of published literature regarding the efficacy of ECT for the treatment of agitation in patients with dementia (major neurocognitive disorder). We searched PubMed, Medline, Google Scholar, UptoDate, Embase, and Cochrane for literature concerning ECT for treating agitation in dementia using the title search terms "ECT agitation dementia;" "ECT aggression dementia;" "ECT Behavior and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia;" and "ECT BPSD." The term "dementia" was also interchanged with "Major Neurocognitive Disorder." No time frame restriction was placed. We attempted to include all publications that were found to ensure a comprehensive review. We found 11 papers, with a total (N) of 216 patients. Limited to case reports, case series, retrospective chart review, retrospective case-control, and an open label prospective study, ECT has demonstrated promising results in decreasing agitation in patients with dementia. Patients who relapsed were found to benefit from maintenance ECT. Available studies are often limited by concomitant psychotropic medications, inconsistent use of objective rating scales, short follow-up, lack of a control group, small sample sizes, and publication bias. A future randomized controlled trial will pose ethical and methodological challenges. A randomized controlled trial must carefully consider the definition of usual care as a comparison group. Well-documented prospective studies and/or additional case series with explicit selection criteria, a wide range of outcome

  13. Neurocognitive effects after brief pulse and ultrabrief pulse unilateral electroconvulsive therapy for major depression: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verwijk, Esmée; Comijs, Hannie C; Kok, Rob M; Spaans, Harm-Pieter; Stek, Max L; Scherder, Erik J A

    2012-11-01

    Neurocognitive functioning is well known to be affected after ECT. However quantified data about the severity of the cognitive impairment after ultrabrief pulse and brief pulse ECT are limited, which makes it hard to judge its clinical relevance. To review all prospective studies using right unilateral (ultra) brief pulse index electroconvulsive therapy published up until February 2011 which used at least one instrument for cognitive assessment before and after ECT. The severity and persistence of neurocognitive side effects immediately (one to seven days post ECT), between one and six months and after six months post ECT were assessed by calculating effect sizes using Cohen's d. Ten studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria and provided detailed information to compute effect sizes. The results indicate loss of autobiographical memory and impairment of verbal fluency, anterograde verbal and non-verbal memory immediately after brief pulse RUL ECT. To a lesser extent impairment of working memory and reduced speed of processing is found. Autobiographical memory is the only domain still being impaired between one and six months post ECT, but improved in this period. Verbal fluency normalized to baseline performance between one and six months post ECT whereas anterograde verbal and non-verbal memory normalized or even improved. Speed of processing improved within six months after ECT. Long-term data on these cognitive domains were not available. Based on two of the ten included studies the results suggest that ultrabrief pulse RUL ECT causes less decline in autobiographical and anterograde memory after ECT than brief pulse RUL ECT. This review may be limited because of the small number of included studies and due to unreliable effect sizes. Furthermore, few data were available for non-memory domains and cognitive functioning after six months. Loss of autobiographical memory is still present between one and six months after unilateral brief pulse ECT. Ultrabrief pulse RUL

  14. Concomitant Anticonvulsants With Bitemporal Electroconvulsive Therapy: A Randomized Controlled Trial With Clinical and Neurobiological Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakesh, Gopalkumar; Thirthalli, Jagadisha; Kumar, Channaveerachari Naveen; Muralidharan, Kesavan; Phutane, Vivek H; Gangadhar, Bangalore N

    2017-03-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is an effective treatment for major affective disorders. The combined use of ECT and anticonvulsant mood stabilizers is a common clinical scenario. There is dearth of systematic studies on the use of this combination with regard to clinical or cognitive outcomes. We aimed to compare clinical improvement and cognitive adverse effects between patients who received only ECT versus those who received ECT and anticonvulsants. We hypothesized that improvement would be fastest in patients who received only ECT. We conducted a randomized controlled trial in which patients prescribed ECT while being treated with anticonvulsants were randomized into 3 groups: full-dose (FD), half-dose (HD), and stop anticonvulsant. A blind rater assessed clinical improvement in patients using rating scales [Young's Mania Rating Scale (YMRS) and Clinical Global Impression] for clinical improvement and cognitive adverse effects (Postgraduate Institute memory scale). Analysis was done using mixed-effects modeling to delineate differences in clinical and cognitive outcomes across the 3 arms of the study over the course of ECT. Of the 54 patients recruited, 36 patients went into treatment allocation arms per the initial randomization plan. The main anticonvulsants prescribed were sodium valproate and carbamazepine. Patients in the 3 groups were comparable on clinical features. The most common diagnosis was bipolar affective disorder-with current episode of mania. Overall, there was no difference across the 3 groups in final clinical outcome scores (YMRS and Clinical Global Impression) when analyzed as intention to treat (ITT) or "as treated." In both analyses, group × time interaction was significant when comparing trend of YMRS scores between the FD anticonvulsant group and the HD group from baseline to last ECT (P = 0.0435 in ITT and P = 0.0055 in as treated). Patients in the FD group improved faster than those in the HD group. There were no differences across

  15. Does comorbid alcohol and substance abuse affect electroconvulsive therapy outcome in the treatment of mood disorders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Lori; Vaidya, Nutan

    2014-03-01

    Antidepressant medications remain the principal agents used to treat patients with mood disorders, although 30% to 40% of these patients do not improve. One of the factors associated with poor medication response is alcohol and substance abuse. Persons with mood disorders are at the greatest risk for suicide, and alcoholism is a significant additional risk factor. Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is shown to be the most effective treatment for major depression especially when associated with psychosis, catatonia, and suicide intent. However, similar to most antidepressant trials, patients with depression and comorbid alcohol and substance abuse are excluded from ECT efficacy studies. Through a retrospective chart review, we compared response to ECT in patients with mood disorder and comorbid alcohol and drug abuse to those with mood disorder only. From 2004 to 2010, 80 patients with mood disorder received ECT. Fifty of these had comorbid alcohol or drug abuse. Using a 10-item psychopathology scale, we compared pre- and post-ECT symptom severity between the 2 groups. Outcome was determined by measuring a decrease in the pre-ECT and post-ECT score using Wilcoxon rank tests, with statistical significance at P = 0.05. There was no difference between the 2 groups in most demographics, ECT medication, or seizure quality. There was no difference in ECT outcome between those with comorbid alcohol abuse and those without based on percent decrease in pre- and post-ECT symptom scores (abuse: mean [SD], 0.89 [0.2] vs nonabuse: mean [SD], 0.93 [0.16]; Wilcoxon, 1332; P = 0.086). When we compared those who met the criteria for alcohol or drug dependence (19 patients) with those with no abuse, there was a trend for the dependence group to not do as well (dependence: mean [SD], 0.83 [0.25] vs nonabuse: mean [SD], 0.93 [0.16]; Wilcoxon, 405; P = 0.053). Those with combined drug and alcohol abuse (18 patients) did have a significantly worse outcome (combined: mean [SD], 0.82 [0

  16. [Electroconvulsive therapy and level of evidence: From causality to dose-effect relationship].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micoulaud-Franchi, J-A; Quilès, C; Cermolacce, M; Belzeaux, R; Adida, M; Fakra, E; Azorin, J-M

    2016-12-01

    The first objective of this article is to summarize the history of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in psychiatry in order to highlight the transition from clinical level of evidence based on phenomenological descriptions to controlled trial establishing causal relationship. The second objective is to apply the criteria of causation for ECT, to focus on the dose-effect relationship criteria, and thus to analyze the conditions of application of these criteria for ECT. A literature review exploring the use of electricity, ECT and electroencephalography (EEG) in psychiatry was conducted. The publications were identified from the Pubmed and GoogleScholar electronic databases. The scientific literature search of international articles was performed in July 2016. In 1784, a Royal commission established in France by King Louis XVI tested Mesmer's claims concerning animal magnetism. By doing that, the commission, including such prominent scientists as the chemist Anton Lavoisier and the scientist and researcher on electricity and therapeutics Benjamin Franklin, played a central role in establishing the criteria needed to assess the level of evidence of electrical therapeutics in psychiatry. Surprisingly, it is possible to identify the classical Bradford Hill criteria of causation in the report of the commission, except the dose-effect relationship criteria. Since then, it has been conducted blinded randomized controlled trials that confirmed the effectiveness of ECT against ECT placebos for the treatment of psychiatric disorders. At present, the dose-effect relationship criteria can be analyzed through an EEG quality assessment of ECT-induced seizures. EEG quality assessment includes several indices: TSLOW (time to onset of seizure activity ≤5Hz, seconds), peak mid-ictal amplitude (mm), regularity (intensity or morphology of the seizure (0-6)), stereotypy (global seizure patterning, 0-3) and post-ictal suppression (0-3). A manual rating sheet is needed to score theses

  17. The Practice of Electroconvulsive Therapy in US Correctional Facilities: A Nationwide Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surya, Sandarsh; McCall, W Vaughn; Iltis, Ana S; Rosenquist, Peter B; Hogan, Elizabeth

    2015-09-01

    There are little data regarding the practice of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in correctional settings in the United States. A survey was conducted to study the current practice of ECT in US prisons. We hypothesize that ECT is underutilized in the correctional setting. We also review the ethical aspects of using ECT for the treatment of mental illness in the prison population. A 12-question survey via a Survey Monkey link was emailed to chiefs of psychiatry, or the equivalent, of each state's department of corrections. We examined the frequency of Likert-type responses, tabulated individual comments for qualitative review, and grouped for comparison. Email contacts for chiefs of psychiatry, or the equivalent, for the department of corrections in 45 states (90%) were obtained and a survey link was sent. Thirty-one (68.9%) of 45 responded to the survey. Respondent estimates of the number of inmates with mental illness in 31 prison systems varied from less than 500 to more than 4500. Of these 31, 12 (38.7%) had more than 4500 inmates with mental illness. Four systems reported the use of ECT within the last 5 years. Of those, one reported use in the last 1 to 6 months, and 3 reported use in the last 2 to 5 years. Of these 4 prison systems, all felt that they had up to 10 patients who would benefit if ECT continued to be offered or became available in the future. None of these systems provided ECT within the prison. The inmates were referred to a local state psychiatric facility, a university hospital, or other institutions. The reasons for not using ECT as reported by the respondents are grouped under subheadings of stigma, ethical concerns, logistical concerns, and others. Considering the high prevalence of mental illness in prisons, one might expect a high prevalence of ECT responsive mental illness and, hence, provision of ECT to some prisoners with mental illness. However, our survey suggests that the use of ECT in prisons in the United States is low. Stigma

  18. Use of modified electroconvulsive therapy in a case of polymyositis presenting with delusion of nihilism of proxy (Odysseus syndrome).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Ruchita; Grover, Sandeep; Krishna, Kodakandla; Singh, Dharminder

    2011-03-01

    We present a case of psychotic depression with polymyositis presenting with the distinct phenomenon of nihilism by proxy, which was treated with electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). A female patient with polymyositis was initially treated with pharmacotherapy. After initial response, there was deterioration in her mental state and hence, after careful consideration, neurological, and anaesthetic consultations, modified ECT was given with close monitoring. The mental state of the patient improved with a course of ECT, which proceeded without any complications. Her depressive symptoms including the delusion of nihilism by proxy responded to ECT. To the best of our knowledge, the use of ECT has not been reported in a case of polymyositis before, and this case shows that modified ECT can be given successfully in patients with polymyositis.

  19. Pulmonary edema after electroconvulsive therapy in a patient treated for long-standing asthma with a beta2 stimulant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatta, Kotaro; Kitajima, Akiyoshi; Ito, Masanobu; Usui, Chie; Arai, Heii

    2007-03-01

    A 68-year-old man was scheduled to receive 8 treatments of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) for severe depression. He was being treated for long-standing asthma with a beta2 stimulant, clenbuterol hydrochloride, and had experienced no asthma attack for 9 years. Although he experienced no adverse consequence in his 7 treatments, pulmonary edema ensued from his eighth treatment despite no change in anesthesia and in the technical parameters of ECT. He was treated with oxygen and intravenous hydrocortisone, after which he quickly recovered. Transient eosinophilia was observed, but clinical symptoms of asthma did not appear. Although the association between pulmonary edema and well-controlled asthma was unclear, thiopental as induction of anesthesia or esmolol as poststimulus delivery might have played a role in the event. There may be a possibility of pulmonary edema even after several uneventful ECT treatments in a patient with asthma.

  20. A case of deep venous thrombosis following protracted catatonic immobility recovered with electroconvulsive therapy: the relevance for an early intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medda, Pierpaolo; Fornaro, Michele; Fratta, Sara; Callari, Antonio; Manzo, Valerio; Ciaponi, Benedetta; Perugi, Giulio

    2012-01-01

    Catatonic patients often experience prolonged inactivity and dehydration, thus being prone to venous stasis leading to life-threatening thrombosis and pulmonary embolism (PE). When this occurs, the prescription of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), actually irreplaceable in most life-threatening cases, remains controversial essentially due to an increased risk for PE and cerebral haemorrhage, with timing clinical decisions being as crucial as difficult to take. We report the case of a catatonic patient affected by malnutrition, deep venous thrombosis, severe pressure ulcers and septic syndrome resulting from previous untimely management, successfully treated with 16 well-tolerated ECT applications upon intensive supportive care. Although anecdotal, cases like this remind the relevance of early ECT to reduce the risk for potentially life-threatening complications due to prolonged catatonic inactivity, especially to those clinicians substantially disregarding this practice. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. A randomized controlled comparison of electroconvulsive therapy and repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in severe and resistant nonpsychotic major depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunhaus, Leon; Schreiber, Shaul; Dolberg, Ornah T; Polak, Dana; Dannon, Pinhas N

    2003-02-15

    Studies published over the past few years suggest that transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) may have significant antidepressant actions. In a previous report, we compared electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and repetitive TMS (rTMS) and found ECT to be superior for psychotic major depression (MD); however, ECT and rTMS had similar results in nonpsychotic MD. We now report on a controlled randomized comparison of ECT and rTMS in patients with nonpsychotic MD. Forty patients with nonpsychotic MD referred for ECT were included. Electroconvulsive therapy was performed according to established protocols. Repetitive TMS was performed over the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex at 90% motor threshold. Patients were treated with 20 sessions (five times per week for 4 weeks) of 10-Hz treatments (1200 pulses per treatment-day) at 90% motor threshold. Response to treatment was defined as a decrease of at least 50% in the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD) score, with a final HRSD equal or less than 10 points and a final Global Assessment of Function Scale rating of 60 or more points. The overall response rate was 58% (23 out of 40 patients responded to treatment). In the ECT group, 12 responded and eight did not; in the rTMS group, 11 responded and nine did not (chi2 =.10, ns). Thus, patients responded as well to either ECT or rTMS. This study adds to the growing literature supporting an antidepressant effect for rTMS. This study is particularly relevant because it suggests that rTMS and ECT reach similar results in nonpsychotic major depressive disorder.

  2. The Role of Electroconvulsive Therapy (ECT) in Bipolar Disorder: Effectiveness in 522 Patients with Bipolar Depression, Mixed-state, Mania and Catatonic Features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perugi, Giulio; Medda, Pierpaolo; Toni, Cristina; Mariani, Michela Giorgi; Socci, Chiara; Mauri, Mauro

    2017-04-01

    We evaluated the effectiveness of Electroconvulsive Therapy (ECT) in the treatment of Bipolar Disorder (BD) in a large sample of bipolar patients with drug resistant depression, mania, mixed state and catatonic features. 522 consecutive patients with DSM-IV-TR BD were evaluated prior to and after the ECT course. Responders and nonresponders were compared in subsamples of depressed and mixed patients. Descriptive analyses were reported for patients with mania and with catatonic features. Of the original sample only 22 patients were excluded for the occurrence of side effects or consent withdrawal. After the ECT course, 344 (68.8%) patients were considered responders (final CGIi score ≤2) and 156 (31.2%) nonresponders. Response rates were respectively 68.1% for BD depression, 72.9% for mixed state, 75% for mania and 80.8% for catatonic features. Length of current episode and global severity of the illness were the only statistically significant predictors of nonresponse. ECT resulted to be an effective and safe treatment for all the phases of severe and drug-resistant BD. Positive response was observed in approximately two-thirds of the cases and in 80% of the catatonic patients. The duration of the current episode was the major predictor of nonresponse. The risk of ECT-induced mania is virtually absent and mood destabilization very unlikely. Our results clearly indicate that current algorithms for the treatment of depressive, mixed, manic and catatonic states should be modified and, at least for the most severe patients, ECT should not be considered as a "last resort".

  3. Electroconvulsive therapy and risk of dementia in patients with affective disorders: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osler, Merete; Rozing, Maarten Pieter; Christensen, Gunhild Tidemann; Andersen, Per Kragh; Jørgensen, Martin Balslev

    2018-04-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is the most effective treatment for severe episodes of mood disorders. Temporary memory loss is a common side-effect, but ongoing discussions exist regarding potential long-term adverse cognitive outcomes. Only a few studies have examined the frequency of dementia in patients after ECT. The aim of this study was to examine the association between ECT and risk of subsequent dementia in patients with a first-time hospital diagnosis of affective disorder. We did a cohort study of patients aged 10 years and older in Denmark with a first-time hospital contact for an affective disorder from Jan 1, 2005, through Dec 31, 2015, identified in the Danish National Patient Registry with ICD-10 codes F30.0 to F39.9. From the registry we retrieved information on all ECTs registered for patients and followed up patients for incidental dementia (defined by hospital discharge diagnoses or acetylcholinesterase inhibitor use) until Oct 31, 2016. We examined the association between ECT and dementia using Cox regression analyses with multiple adjustments and propensity-score matching on sociodemographic and clinical variables. Of 168 015 patients included in the study, 5901 (3·5%) patients had at least one ECT. During the median follow-up of 4·9 years (IQR 2·4-7·8) and 872 874 person years, the number of patients who developed dementia was 111 (0·1%) of 99 045 patients aged 10-49 years, 965 (2·7%) of 35 945 aged 50-69 years, and 4128 (12·5%) of 33 025 aged 70-108 years. 217 (3·6%) of the 5901 patients treated with ECT developed dementia, whereas of 162 114 patients not treated with ECT 4987 (3·1%) developed dementia. The corresponding incidences were 70·4 cases per 10 000 person-years (95% CI 61·6-80·5) and 59·2 per 10 000 person-years (57·6-60·8). In patients younger than 50 years and 50-69 years, ECT was not associated with a risk of dementia compared with age-matched patients who were not given ECT (age-adjusted hazard

  4. Effect of olanzapine combined with modified electroconvulsive therapy on cytokines, sTNFRs and neural electrophysiological characteristics in patients with schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Cheng

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze the effect of olanzapine combined with modified electroconvulsive therapy on cytokines, sTNFRs and neural electrophysiological characteristics in patients with schizophrenia. Methods: Patients with schizophrenia treated in our hospital between March 2013 and March 2016 were selected and randomly divided into two groups, the observation group received olanzapine combined with modified electroconvulsive therapy, and the control group received olanzapine therapy. After 6 weeks of treatment, serum levels of soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor (sTNFR, acute phase reaction proteins and brain function indexes as well as the neural electrophysiological characteristics were compared between the two groups. Results: After 6 weeks of treatment, serum sTNFRs, CRP, CER and AAG content of observation group were lower than those of control group while TRF content was higher than that of control group; serum brain function indexes NGF and BDNF content were higher than those of control group while GFAP, S100B, NSE and Hcy content were lower than those of control group; nerve electrophysiology indexes P300, LPP and ERN amplitude were higher than those of control group while LPP amplitude was lower than that of control group. Conclusions: Olanzapine combined with modified electroconvulsive therapy can optimize the condition of schizophrenia, reduce the abnormal degree of nerve electrophysiology and help to improve treatment outcome.

  5. Serum lipid profile changes after successful treatment with electroconvulsive therapy in major depression: A prospective pilot trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksay, Suna Su; Bumb, Jan Malte; Janke, Christoph; Biemann, Ronald; Borucki, Katrin; Lederbogen, Florian; Deuschle, Michael; Sartorius, Alexander; Kranaster, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Cholesterol is reduced in depressed patients, however, these patients have a higher risk for cardiovascular diseases. Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is a highly effective treatment option for specific forms of depression. Like for other non-pharmacological therapies targeting depression such as psychotherapy or sleep deprivation, there is a lack of evidence about the effects on peripheral lipid parameters. Our objective was to study the impact of ECT as a non-pharmacological treatment on the peripheral lipid pattern in depressive patients. Peripheral lipid profile composition before and after a course of ECT was analysed in 27 non-fasting inpatients at a university psychiatric hospital with DSM-IV major depressive episode. For the impact of ECT treatment on each lipid parameter a multivariate repeated measurement regression analysis was performed and computed separately for every dependent variable. Total Cholesterol and the cholesterol subtypes HDL and LDL were increased after the treatment compared to baseline. Apolipoprotein A1 was also increased after ECT, whereas apolipoprotein B was not. Indices for the prediction of cardiovascular diseases were unchanged after successful treatment by ECT. The reduction of depressive psychopathology negatively correlated with increases of HDL cholesterol and apolipoprotein A1. Subjects received several antidepressants and other psychotropic medication before and during the ECT. In our preliminary pilot study ECT as a non-pharmacological, effective treatment of depression led to distinct effects on the peripheral lipid pattern. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Effects of electroconvulsive therapy on amygdala function in major depression - a longitudinal functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redlich, R; Bürger, C; Dohm, K; Grotegerd, D; Opel, N; Zaremba, D; Meinert, S; Förster, K; Repple, J; Schnelle, R; Wagenknecht, C; Zavorotnyy, M; Heindel, W; Kugel, H; Gerbaulet, M; Alferink, J; Arolt, V; Zwanzger, P; Dannlowski, U

    2017-09-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is one of the most effective treatments for severe depression. However, little is known regarding brain functional processes mediating ECT effects. In a non-randomized prospective study, functional magnetic resonance imaging data during the automatic processing of subliminally presented emotional faces were obtained twice, about 6 weeks apart, in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) before and after treatment with ECT (ECT, n = 24). Additionally, a control sample of MDD patients treated solely with pharmacotherapy (MED, n = 23) and a healthy control sample (HC, n = 22) were obtained. Before therapy, both patient groups equally showed elevated amygdala reactivity to sad faces compared with HC. After treatment, a decrease in amygdala activity to negative stimuli was discerned in both patient samples indicating a normalization of amygdala function, suggesting mechanisms potentially unspecific for ECT. Moreover, a decrease in amygdala activity to sad faces was associated with symptomatic improvements in the ECT sample (r spearman = -0.48, p = 0.044), and by tendency also for the MED sample (r spearman = -0.38, p = 0.098). However, we did not find any significant association between pre-treatment amygdala function to emotional stimuli and individual symptom improvement, neither for the ECT sample, nor for the MED sample. In sum, the present study provides first results regarding functional changes in emotion processing due to ECT treatment using a longitudinal design, thus validating and extending our knowledge gained from previous treatment studies. A limitation was that ECT patients received concurrent medication treatment.

  7. EFFICACY AND LONG-TERM CLINICAL OUTCOME OF COMORBID POSTTRAUMATIC STRESS DISORDER AND MAJOR DEPRESSIVE DISORDER AFTER ELECTROCONVULSIVE THERAPY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Naser; Moss, Lori; Simon, Edwin; Nemeroff, Charles B; Atre-Vaidya, Nutan

    2016-07-01

    Many patients fulfill criteria for both posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and major depressive disorder (MDD). Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is generally acknowledged to be the most-effective treatment for refractory MDD. This study investigated the efficacy of ECT on long-term clinical outcome of comorbid PTSD and MDD. This retrospective nested matched case-control study is inclusive of 22,164 subjects [3,485 with comorbid MDD and PTSD (92 with ECT and 3,393 without ECT) and 18,679 without MDD and PTSD]. Using the clinical global impression scale (CGI) to assess efficacy, more-robust improvement of PTSD and MDD symptoms was observed with ECT (90%), compared to antidepressant-treatment alone(50%) (P = 0.001). During the median of 8 years of follow-up, the death-rate was 8% in subjects without PTSD and MDD, 9.7% in PTSD and MDD treated with ECT and 18% in PTSD and MDD without ECT (P 0.05). The relative risk of suicidality, all-cause, and cardiovascular mortality was reduced 64, 65, and 46% in MDD and PTSD patients treated with ECT, compared to those without ECT (P < 0.05). ECT is associated with a significant reduction of symptoms of PTSD and MDD, as well as reduction in risk of suicidality, cardiovascular, and all-cause mortality in MDD and PTSD, an effect more robust than antidepressant-therapy alone. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder who receive multiple electroconvulsive therapy sessions: characteristics, indications, and results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iancu I

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Iulian Iancu,* Nimrod Pick,* Orit Seener-Lorsh, Pinhas Dannon Be’er Ya’akov Mental Health Center, affiliated with the Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel *These authors share first authorship of this paper Background: While electroconvulsive therapy (ECT has been used for many years, there is insufficient research regarding the indications for continuation/maintenance (C/M-ECT, its safety and efficacy, and the characteristics of patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder who receive multiple ECT sessions. The aims of this study were to characterize a series of patients who received 30 ECT sessions or more, to describe treatment regimens in actual practice, and to examine the results of C/M-ECT in terms of safety and efficacy, especially the effect on aggression and functioning.Methods: We performed a retrospective chart review of 20 consecutive patients (mean age 64.6 years with schizophrenia (n=16 or schizoaffective disorder (n=4 who received at least 30 ECT sessions at our ECT unit, and also interviewed the treating physician and filled out the Clinical Global Impression-Severity, Global Assessment of Functioning, and the Staff Observation Aggression Scale-Revised.Results: Patients received a mean of 91.3 ECT sessions at a mean interval of 2.6 weeks. All had been hospitalized for most or all of the previous 3 years. There were no major adverse effects, and cognitive side effects were relatively minimal (cognitive deficit present for several hours after treatment. We found that ECT significantly reduced scores on the Staff Observation Aggression Scale-Revised subscales for verbal aggression and self-harm, and improved Global Assessment of Functioning scores. There were reductions in total aggression scores, subscale scores for harm to objects and to others, and Clinical Global Impression-Severity scores, these were not statistically significant.Conclusion: C/M-ECT is safe and effective for

  9. Electroconvulsive stimulation reverses anhedonia and cognitive impairments in rats exposed to chronic mild stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    K, Henningsen,; Woldbye, David Paul Drucker; Wiborg, Ove

    2013-01-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy remains the most effective treatment for depression including a fast onset of action. However, this therapeutic approach suffers from some potential drawbacks. In the acute phase this includes amnesia. Electroconvulsive stimulation (ECS) has previously been shown...

  10. Electroconvulsive therapy in Brazil after the "psychiatric reform": a public health problem--example from a university service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Rafael Bernardon; Melzer-Ribeiro, Débora Luciana; Rigonatti, Sérgio Paulo; Cordeiro, Quirino

    2012-09-01

    The Brazilian public health system does not provide electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), which is limited to a few academic services. National mental health policies are against ECT. Our objectives were to analyze critically the public policies toward ECT and present the current situation using statistics from the Institute of Psychiatry of the University of São Paulo (IPq-HCFMUSP) and summary data from the other 13 ECT services identified in the country. Data regarding ECT treatment at the IPq-HCFMUSP were collected from January 2009 to June 2010 (demographical, number of sessions, and diagnoses). All the data were analyzed using SPSS 19, Epic Info 2000, and Excel. During this period, 331 patients were treated at IPq-HCFMUSP: 221 (67%) were from São Paulo city, 50 (15.2%) from São Paulo's metropolitan area, 39 (11.8%) from São Paulo's countryside, and 20 (6.1%) from other states; 7352 ECT treatments were delivered-63.0% (4629) devoted entirely via the public health system (although not funded by the federal government); the main diagnoses were a mood disorder in 86.4% and schizophrenia in 7.3% of the cases. There is an important lack of public assistance for ECT, affecting mainly the poor and severely ill patients. The university services are overcrowded and cannot handle all the referrals. The authors press for changes in the mental health policies.

  11. The effect of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) on implicit memory: skill learning and perceptual priming in patients with major depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakil, E; Grunhaus, L; Nagar, I; Ben-Chaim, E; Dolberg, O T; Dannon, P N; Schreiber, S

    2000-01-01

    While explicit memory in amnesics is impaired, their implicit memory remains preserved. Memory impairment is one of the side effects of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). ECT patients are expected to show impairment on explicit but not implicit tasks. The present study examined 17 normal controls and 17 patients with severe major depressive disorder who underwent right unilateral ECT. Patients were tested in three sessions: 24-48 hours prior to, 24-48 hours following the first ECT, and 24-48 hours following the eighth ECT. The controls were tested in three sessions, at time intervals that paralleled those of the patients. Implicit memory was tested by the perceptual priming task - Partial Picture-Identification (PPI). The skill learning task used entailed solving the Tower of Hanoi puzzle (TOHP). Explicit memory was tested by picture recall from the PPI task, verbal recall of information regarding the TOHP, and by the Visual Paired Association (VPA) test. Results showed that explicit questions about the implicit tasks were impaired following ECT treatment. Patients' learning ability, as measured by the VPA task, was only impaired in the first testing session, prior to ECT treatment, reflecting the effect of depression. In addition, groups only differed in the first session on the learning rate of the skill learning task. Perceptual priming was preserved in the patients' group in all sessions, indicating that it is resilient to the effect of depression and ECT. The results are interpreted in terms of the differential effect of depression and ECT on explicit and implicit memory.

  12. Changes in EEG complexity with electroconvulsive therapy in a patient with autism spectrum disorders: a multiscale entropy approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryoko eOkazaki

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Autism spectrum disorders (ASD are heterogeneous neurodevelopmental disorders that are reportedly characterized by aberrant neural networks. Recently developed multiscale entropy analysis (MSE can characterize the complexity inherent in EEG dynamics over multiple temporal scales in the dynamics of neural networks. We encountered an 18-year-old man with ASD whose refractory catatonic obsessive–compulsive symptoms were improved dramatically after electroconvulsive therapy (ECT. In this clinical case study, we strove to clarify the neurophysiological mechanism of ECT in ASD by assessing EEG complexity using MSE. Along with ECT, the frontocentral region showed decreased EEG complexity at higher temporal scales, whereas the occipital region expressed an increase at lower temporal scales. Furthermore, these changes were associated with clinical improvement associated with the elevation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor, which is a molecular hypothesis of ECT, playing key roles in ASD pathogenesis. Changes in EEG complexity in a region-specific and temporal scale-specific manner we found might reflect atypical EEG dynamics in ASD. Although MSE is not a direct approach to measuring neural connectivity and the results are from only a single case, they might reflect specific aberrant neural network activity and the therapeutic neurophysiological mechanism of ECT in ASD.

  13. Is electroconvulsive therapy an evidence-based treatment for catatonia? A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroy, Arnaud; Naudet, Florian; Vaiva, Guillaume; Francis, Andrew; Thomas, Pierre; Amad, Ali

    2017-06-21

    We aimed to review and discuss the evidence-based arguments for the efficacy of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in the treatment of catatonia. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and observational studies focusing on the response to ECT in catatonia were selected in PubMed, the Cochrane Library, Embase, ClinicalTrials.gov and Current Controlled Trials through October 2016 and qualitatively described. Trials assessing pre-post differences using a catatonia or clinical improvement rating scale were pooled together using a random effect model. Secondary outcomes were adverse effects of anesthesia and seizure. 564 patients from 28 studies were included. RCTs were of low quality and were heterogeneous; therefore, it was not possible to combine their efficacy results. An improvement of catatonic symptoms after ECT treatment was evidenced in ten studies (SMD = -3.14, 95% CI [-3.95; -2.34]). The adverse effects that were reported in seven studies included mental confusion, memory loss, headache, or adverse effects associated with anesthesia. ECT protocols were heterogeneous. The literature consistently describes improvement in catatonic symptoms after ECT. However, the published studies fail to demonstrate efficacy and effectiveness. It is now crucial to design and perform a quality RCT to robustly validate the use of ECT in catatonia.Prospero registration information: PROSPERO 2016: CRD42016041660.

  14. Effects of the addition of remifentanil to propofol anesthesia on seizure length and postictal suppression index in electroconvulsive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Richard; Booth, David; Gray, Hamish; Frampton, Chris

    2008-09-01

    Propofol is a widely used anesthetic agent for electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). However, there are concerns that its anticonvulsant effect may interfere with the efficacy of ECT. We aimed to investigate the effects on seizure activity of the addition of the opiate remifentanil to propofol anesthesia for ECT. A retrospective analysis of 633 treatments in 73 patients was conducted. At each treatment, patients had received anesthesia with propofol alone or propofol plus remifentanil, depending on which anesthetist was providing anesthesia. Analysis of variance was performed to examine the effects of the anesthetic used, the electrode placement, the dose of electricity administered, and the stage in the course of treatment. Dependent variables were electroencephalogram seizure length and postictal suppression index (PSI). Addition of remifentanil resulted in a small but significantly lower dose of propofol being used to induce unconsciousness. Addition of remifentanil affected seizure length, mainly related to an effect when placement was right unilateral (F = 5.70; P = 0.017). There was also a significantly increased PSI (F = 4.3; P = 0.039), which was not dependent on dose or on placement. The data suggest that addition of remifentanil to propofol anesthesia significantly alters seizure indices. This may be secondary to a reduction in the amount of propofol required or to an independent effect of remifentanil. The increase in PSI in particular suggests that addition of remifentanil may improve clinical response. However, this can only be examined in a randomized controlled trial.

  15. Efficacy and safety of electroconvulsive therapy in the first trimester of pregnancy: a case of severe manic catatonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinna, Martina; Manchia, Mirko; Pillai, Gianluca; Salis, Piergiorgio; Minnai, Gian Paolo

    2015-08-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is an appropriate, albeit often neglected, option for managing severe or life-threatening psychiatric symptoms during pregnancy. We report on the rapid effectiveness and safety of ECT during the first trimester of pregnancy in a 28-year-old woman with severe catatonia. Catatonic symptoms were assessed using the Catatonia Rating Scale (CRS). The patient was treated with unilateral ECT using left anterior right temporal (LART) placement. Seizure quality and duration were monitored by a two-lead electroencephalograph (EEG) and by one-lead electromyography (EMG). During each ECT session, the fetal heart rate was monitored with electrocardiogram (ECG). After the second ECT treatment (day 13 of hospitalization), we observed remission of the catatonic symptoms, as shown by the drop in the CRS score from 22 to 0. No cognitive abnormalities were reported and no gynecological complications were detected (e.g. vaginal bleeding, abdominal pain, or uterine contraction). The patient delivered at term a healthy male neonate who presented normal growth as well as normal psychomotor development. This case highlights the effectiveness of ECT in treating severe catatonic mania during the first 3 months of pregnancy. In addition, ECT proved to be a safe therapeutic option, since neither mother nor infant experienced any adverse event. We suggest that ECT might be considered as a valid and safe option in the therapeutic decision-making process when catatonic symptoms manifest during pregnancy. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Does Gender Influence Electroconvulsive Therapy Sessions Required across Psychiatric Diagnoses? A 5-Year Experience from a Single Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manohar, Harshini; Subramanian, Karthick; Menon, Vikas; Kattimani, Shivanand

    2017-01-01

    Context: There is a paucity of systematic data reflecting the practice of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) from developing countries. Aim: We aimed to identify the number of ECT sessions required to yield response and gender diffeferences in the number of sessions across various diagnostic categories. Setting and Design: A record-based study from a teaching cum tertiary care hospital in South India. Subjects and Methods: Case records of patients who received modified ECT from January 2011 to January 2016 were reviewed. The sociodemographic details and ECT-related data were collected. Psychiatric diagnoses were ascertained as per the International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision criteria. Statistical Analysis Used: Kruskal–Wallis test and Mann–Whitney U-test. Results: Among 148 patients, 82 (55.4%) had mood disorder (bipolar disorder and recurrent depressive disorder), 43 (29.1%) had schizophrenia, and 22 (14.9%) had other acute and transient psychotic disorders (ATPDs). Patients with mood disorders, schizophrenia, and other ATPD received 7.3 (± 3.8), 9.7 (± 6.1), and 5.4 (± 2.0) ECT sessions, respectively, to achieve response. There was no gender difference in the number of sessions received. Conclusion: Our findings show that number of ECT sessions required to yield response may be disorder-specific. Gender does not influence the ECT dose requirement. Variations in ECT parameters across settings may limit the generalizability of results. PMID:28694625

  17. Low medical morbidity and mortality after acute courses of electroconvulsive therapy in a population-based sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumberger, D M; Seitz, D P; Herrmann, N; Kirkham, J G; Ng, R; Reimer, C; Kurdyak, P; Gruneir, A; Rapoport, M J; Daskalakis, Z J; Mulsant, B H; Vigod, S N

    2017-12-01

    To determine event rates for specific medical events and mortality among individuals receiving electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). Population-based cohort study using health administrative data of acute ECT treatments delivered in Ontario, Canada, from 2003 to 2011. We measured the following medical event rates, per 10 000 ECT treatments, up to 7 and 30 days post-treatment: stroke, seizure, acute myocardial infarction, arrhythmia, pneumonia, pulmonary embolus, deep vein thrombosis, gastrointestinal bleeding, falls, hip fracture, and mortality. A total of 135 831 ECT treatments were delivered to 8810 unique patients. Overall medical event rates were 9.1 and 16.8 per 10 000 ECT treatments respectively. The most common medical events were falls (2.7 and 5.5 per 10 000 ECT treatments) and pneumonia (1.8 and 3.8 per 10 000 ECT treatments). Fewer than six deaths occurred on the day of an ECT treatment. This corresponded to a mortality rate of less than 0.4 per 10 000 treatments. Deaths within 7 and 30 days of an ECT treatment, excluding deaths due to external causes (e.g., accidental and intentional causes of death), were 1.0 and 2.4 per 10 000 ECT treatments respectively. Morbidity and mortality events after ECT treatments were relatively low, supporting ECT as a low-risk medical procedure. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Success of tardive electroconvulsive therapy sessions after loxapine-induced malignant syndrome in the context of very poor metabolisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Descoeur, Juliette; Philibert, Laurent; Chalard, Kevin; Attal, Jérôme; Petit, Pierre; Klouche, Kada; Olivier, Mathieu

    2017-12-01

    We report the success of tardive electroconvulsive therapy in a case of loxapine malignant syndrome with catatonia. Loxapine and its metabolites were measured in biological samples by liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry. Genes were studied by sequencing and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Plasmatic drug concentrations showed a supratherapeutic concentration of loxapine with a very low 8-hydroxyloxapine/loxapine ratio (range from 0.32 to 0.66, normal value>2 for 100mg) and a very long elimination half-life of loxapine (half-life>140h, normal value from 1 to 4hours). We tried to explain this kinetics by exploring the main pharmacogenes implicated in the metabolism of loxapine. No genetic abnormality for CYP1A2 was observed. The study of associated treatments showed the potential contribution of valproate. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacogenetics investigations revealed a blockade of the CYP1A2 metabolic pathway without genetic abnormalities, probably due to valproate co-medication. Toxicological monitoring of loxapine and its metabolites helped to explain the persistence of symptoms and to adapt the therapeutic management. Copyright © 2017 Société française de pharmacologie et de thérapeutique. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Global decrease of serotonin-1A receptor binding after electroconvulsive therapy in major depression measured by PET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanzenberger, R; Baldinger, P; Hahn, A; Ungersboeck, J; Mitterhauser, M; Winkler, D; Micskei, Z; Stein, P; Karanikas, G; Wadsak, W; Kasper, S; Frey, R

    2013-01-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is a potent therapy in severe treatment-refractory depression. Although commonly applied in psychiatric clinical routine since decades, the exact neurobiological mechanism regarding its efficacy remains unclear. Results from preclinical and clinical studies emphasize a crucial involvement of the serotonin-1A receptor (5-HT1A) in the mode of action of antidepressant treatment. This includes associations between treatment response and changes in 5-HT1A function and density by antidepressants. Further, alterations of the 5-HT1A receptor are consistently reported in depression. To elucidate the effect of ECT on 5-HT1A receptor binding, 12 subjects with severe treatment-resistant major depression underwent three positron emission tomography (PET) measurements using the highly selective radioligand [carbonyl-11C]WAY100635, twice before (test–retest variability) and once after 10.08±2.35 ECT sessions. Ten patients (∼83%) were responders to ECT. The voxel-wise comparison of the 5-HT1A receptor binding (BPND) before and after ECT revealed a widespread reduction in cortical and subcortical regions (P<0.05 corrected), except for the occipital cortex and the cerebellum. Strongest reductions were found in regions consistently reported to be altered in major depression and involved in emotion regulation, such as the subgenual part of the anterior cingulate cortex (−27.5%), the orbitofrontal cortex (−30.1%), the amygdala (−31.8%), the hippocampus (−30.6%) and the insula (−28.9%). No significant change was found in the raphe nuclei. There was no significant difference in receptor binding in any region comparing the first two PET scans conducted before ECT. This PET study proposes a global involvement of the postsynaptic 5-HT1A receptor binding in the effect of ECT. PMID:22751491

  20. A case report of schizoaffective disorder with ritualistic behaviors and catatonic stupor: successful treatment by risperidone and modified electroconvulsive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yuanhan; Yang, Xi; Zeng, Zhiqiang; Yang, Haichen

    2018-03-13

    Ritualistic behaviors are common in obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), while catatonic stupor occasionally occurs in psychotic or mood disorders. Schizoaffective disorder is a specific mental disorder involving both psychotic and affective symptoms. The syndrome usually represents a specific diagnosis, as in the case of the 10th edition of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10) or the 5th edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5). However, symptom-based diagnosis can result in misdiagnosis and hinder effective treatment. Few cases of ritualistic behaviors and catatonic stupor associated with schizoaffective disorder have been reported. Risperidone and modified electroconvulsive therapy (MECT) were effective in our case. A 35-year-old man with schizoaffective disorder-depression was admitted to the hospital because of ritualistic behaviors, depression, and distrust. At the time of admission, prominent ritualistic behaviors and depression misled us to make the diagnosis of OCD. Sertraline add-on treatment exacerbated the psychotic symptoms, such as pressure of thoughts and delusion of control. In the presence of obvious psychotic symptoms and depression, schizoaffective disorder-depression was diagnosed according to ICD-10. Meanwhile, the patient unfortunately developed catatonic stupor and respiratory infection, which was identified by respiratory symptoms, blood tests, and a chest X-ray. To treat psychotic symptoms, catatonic stupor, and respiratory infection, risperidone, MECT, and ceftriaxone were administered. As a result, we successfully cured the patient with the abovementioned treatment strategies. Eventually, the patient was diagnosed with schizoaffective disorder-depression with ritualistic behaviors and catatonia. Risperidone and MECT therapies were dramatically effective. Making a differential diagnosis of mental disorders is a key step in treating disease. Sertraline was not recommended for treating

  1. Mouse repeated electroconvulsive seizure (ECS) does not reverse social stress effects but does induce behavioral and hippocampal changes relevant to electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) side-effects in the treatment of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Buel, Erin M; Sigrist, Hannes; Seifritz, Erich; Fikse, Lianne; Bosker, Fokko J; Schoevers, Robert A; Klein, Hans C; Pryce, Christopher R; Eisel, Ulrich Lm

    2017-01-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is an effective treatment for depression, but can have negative side effects including amnesia. The mechanisms of action underlying both the antidepressant and side effects of ECT are not well understood. An equivalent manipulation that is conducted in experimental animals is electroconvulsive seizure (ECS). Rodent studies have provided valuable insights into potential mechanisms underlying the antidepressant and side effects of ECT. However, relatively few studies have investigated the effects of ECS in animal models with a depression-relevant manipulation such as chronic stress. In the present study, mice were first exposed to chronic social stress (CSS) or a control procedure for 15 days followed by ECS or a sham procedure for 10 days. Behavioral effects were investigated using an auditory fear conditioning (learning) and expression (memory) test and a treadmill-running fatigue test. Thereafter, immunohistochemistry was conducted on brain material using the microglial marker Iba-1 and the cholinergic fibre marker ChAT. CSS did not increase fear learning and memory in the present experimental design; in both the control and CSS mice ECS reduced fear learning and fear memory expression. CSS induced the expected fatigue-like effect in the treadmill-running test; ECS induced increased fatigue in CSS and control mice. In CSS and control mice ECS induced inflammation in hippocampus in terms of increased expression of Iba-1 in radiatum of CA1 and CA3. CSS and ECS both reduced acetylcholine function in hippocampus as indicated by decreased expression of ChAT in several hippocampal sub-regions. Therefore, CSS increased fatigue and reduced hippocampal ChAT activity and, rather than reversing these effects, a repeated ECS regimen resulted in impaired fear learning-memory, increased fatigue, increased hippocampal Iba-1 expression, and decreased hippocampal ChAT expression. As such, the current model does not provide insights into the

  2. Electroconvulsive therapy for manic state with mixed and psychotic features in a teenager with bipolar disorder and comorbid episodic obsessive-compulsive disorder: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rask, Olof; Suneson, Klara; Holmström, Eva; Bäckström, Beata; Johansson, Björn Axel

    2017-12-12

    Comorbidity of bipolar disorder and obsessive-compulsive disorder is common in adolescence. Obsessive-compulsive disorder symptoms may be episodic and secondary to alterations in mood, and display specific features. Management of pediatric bipolar disorder-obsessive-compulsive disorder is challenging, as pharmacotherapy of obsessive-compulsive disorder may induce or exacerbate manic episodes and there is limited evidence of treatment efficacy. Electroconvulsive therapy is sparsely used in children and adolescents, but is documented to be a safe and efficacious intervention in adults with bipolar disorder. In view of the severity of symptoms in juvenile mania, studies on treatment strategies are warranted. We report a case of an adolescent with bipolar disorder-obsessive-compulsive disorder who was successfully treated with electroconvulsive therapy during an episode of severe mania. A 16-year-old girl of Middle East origin first presented to us with depressed mood, irritability, and increased obsessive-compulsive disorder symptoms, which were initially interpreted in the context of acute stress secondary to migration. She had been diagnosed with bipolar disorder and obsessive-compulsive disorder in her previous home country, but had difficulties in accounting for earlier psychiatric history. During hospitalization her mood switched to a manic state with mixed and psychotic features, at times showing aggression toward others. Interruption in her lithium treatment for a short period and possibly the introduction of an atypical antipsychotic could in part have been triggering factors. After 8 weeks of in-patient care and psychotropic drug trials, electroconvulsive therapy was initiated and administered every second or third day for 4 weeks, with marked positive response. No apparent side effects were reported. This case demonstrates the need for a detailed medical history, taking special note of periodicity and character of obsessive-compulsive disorder symptoms, in

  3. Comparison of anesthetics in electroconvulsive therapy: an effective treatment with the use of propofol, etomidate, and thiopental.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahavi, Guy Sender; Dannon, Pinhas

    2014-01-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is considered to be one of the most effective treatments in psychiatry. Currently, three medications for anesthesia are used routinely during ECT: propofol, etomidate, and thiopental. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of the anesthetics used in ECT on seizure threshold and duration, hemodynamics, recovery from ECT, and immediate side effects. Our study is a retrospective cohort study, in which a comparison was made between three groups of patients who underwent ECT and were anesthetized with propofol, etomidate, or thiopental. The main effect compared was treatment dose and seizure duration. All patients were chosen as responders to ECT. Data were gathered about 91 patients (39 were anesthetized with thiopental, 29 with etomidate, and 23 with propofol). Patients in the thiopental group received a lower electrical dose compared to the propofol and etomidate group (mean of 459 mC compared to 807 mC and 701 mC, respectively, P<0.001). Motor seizure duration was longer in the thiopental group compared to propofol and etomidate (mean of 40 seconds compared to 21 seconds and 23 seconds, respectively, P=0.018). Seizure duration recorded by electroencephalography was similar in the thiopental and etomidate groups and lower in the propofol group (mean of 57 seconds in both groups compared to 45 seconds, respectively, P=0.038). Patients who were anesthetized with thiopental received a lower electrical treatment dose without an unwanted decrease in seizure duration. Thiopental might be the anesthetic of choice when it is congruent with other medical considerations.

  4. Comparison of anesthetics in electroconvulsive therapy: an effective treatment with the use of propofol, etomidate, and thiopental

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahavi GS

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Guy Sender Zahavi,1 Pinhas Dannon1,2 1Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Israel; 2Brain Stimulation Unit at Beer Yaakov-Ness Ziona Mental Health Center, Israel Objectives: Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT is considered to be one of the most effective treatments in psychiatry. Currently, three medications for anesthesia are used routinely during ECT: propofol, etomidate, and thiopental. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of the anesthetics used in ECT on seizure threshold and duration, hemodynamics, recovery from ECT, and immediate side effects. Methods: Our study is a retrospective cohort study, in which a comparison was made between three groups of patients who underwent ECT and were anesthetized with propofol, etomidate, or thiopental. The main effect compared was treatment dose and seizure duration. All patients were chosen as responders to ECT. Results: Data were gathered about 91 patients (39 were anesthetized with thiopental, 29 with etomidate, and 23 with propofol. Patients in the thiopental group received a lower electrical dose compared to the propofol and etomidate group (mean of 459 mC compared to 807 mC and 701 mC, respectively, P<0.001. Motor seizure duration was longer in the thiopental group compared to propofol and etomidate (mean of 40 seconds compared to 21 seconds and 23 seconds, respectively, P=0.018. Seizure duration recorded by electroencephalography was similar in the thiopental and etomidate groups and lower in the propofol group (mean of 57 seconds in both groups compared to 45 seconds, respectively, P=0.038. Conclusion: Patients who were anesthetized with thiopental received a lower electrical treatment dose without an unwanted decrease in seizure duration. Thiopental might be the anesthetic of choice when it is congruent with other medical considerations. Keywords: anesthesia, ECT, seizure

  5. Influence of valproate on the required dose of propofol for anesthesia during electroconvulsive therapy of bipolar affective disorder patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hızlı Sayar G

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Gökben Hizli Sayar, Gül Eryilmaz, Siban Şemieoğlu, Eylem Özten, Işil Göğcegöz Gül Uskudar University, Neuropsychiatry Istanbul Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey Background: Propofol is often used as an anesthetic agent for electroconvulsive therapy (ECT. In recent studies, propofol was shown to possess significant seizure-shortening properties during ECT. "Valproate" is a mood stabilizer used mainly in the treatment of bipolar affective disorder. It is reported that valproate, being an anticonvulsant, raises the seizure threshold, thus decreases the efficacy of ECT treatment. Aim: The purpose of our study was to compare the dose of propofol in valproate-using patients and valproate-free patients. Methods: In an open design, 17 patients with bipolar affective disorder manic episodes who were to be treated with valproate and ECT in combination, were compared with 16 manic-episode patients who were to be treated with ECT but not valproate. The two groups were compared on the basis of electroencephalography-registered seizure duration and the propofol dosage required to induce anesthesia. Results: Valproate, compared with no valproate treatment, results in a decrease in the propofol dose required to induce anesthesia. In the valproate group of study participants, seizure duration was significantly shorter than in the valproate-free group. Conclusion: The results suggest that valproate reduces the dose of propofol required for anesthesia during ECT treatment in patients with bipolar affective disorder manic episodes. Although propofol is a safe and efficacious anesthetic for ECT treatment, lower doses of propofol should be used to induce anesthesia for patients under valproate treatment. When the clinician needs to prolong seizure duration in patients treated with valproate, interruption of the valproate treatment or an anesthetic agent other than propofol should be considered. Keywords: bipolar affective disorder, ECT, anticonvulsant, mood

  6. Episodic memory following deep brain stimulation of the ventral anterior limb of the internal capsule and electroconvulsive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergfeld, Isidoor O; Mantione, Mariska; Hoogendoorn, Mechteld L C; Horst, Ferdinand; Notten, Peter; Schuurman, P Richard; Denys, Damiaan

    Electroconvulsive Therapy (ECT) and Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) are effective treatments for patients with treatment-resistant depression (TRD). However, a common side effect of ECT is autobiographical memory loss (e.g., personal experiences), whereas the impact of DBS on autobiographical memories has never been established. Comparing autobiographical memories following DBS and ECT. In two hospitals in The Netherlands, we interviewed 25 TRD patients treated with DBS of the ventral anterior limb of the internal capsule (vALIC), 14 TRD patients treated with ECT and 22 healthy controls (HC) with the Autobiographical Memory Inventory - Short Form (AMI-SF) in a prospective, longitudinal study between March 2010 and August 2016. Patients treated with DBS were interviewed before surgery, after surgery, and twice during treatment over 122.7 (SD: ±22.2) weeks. Patients treated with ECT were tested before ECT, after six right unilateral (RUL) ECT sessions and twice following ECT over 65.1 (±9.3) weeks. Controls were tested four times over 81.5 (±15.6) weeks. Compared to HC, the AMI-SF score decreased faster in both TRD groups (P ECT group was larger than both the DBS and HC groups. Both ECT and vALIC DBS result in a faster autobiographical memory decline compared to HC. DBS might have a negative impact on autobiographical memories, although less so than ECT. Future work should dissect whether DBS or characteristics of TRD cause this decline. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The clonic phase of seizures in patients treated with electroconvulsive therapy is related to age and stimulus intensity

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    Chih-Chieh eTseng

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT is effective in the treatment of major depressive disorder and schizophrenia in patients who are drug-naïve or less-receptive to antipsychotic drugs. Several studies have discussed the correlation between patient characteristics, input current volume and seizure duration. According to the present principle of ECT guidelines, the therapeutic effect of ECT mostly correlates with seizure duration. As the tonic phase is different from the clonic phase with respect to brain function and activity, it is informative to analyse both the tonic and clonic phases. Thus, this study sought to clarify the relationship between the features of the two phases, and to re-examine and refine guidelines regarding ECT treatment.Method: ECT-course data from 44 schizophrenia patients were recollected, including the number of treatments that they had received, their gender, age, and the association of these characteristics with motor seizure duration was analysed. A two-factor correlation was employed to test the relationship between each of the two factors.Result: The meta-analysis results indicate that seizure duration and age are significantly correlated. Older patients had relatively short seizure durations after ECT-treatment. Notably, a negative correlation was only found between age and the clonic phase of the seizure, not between age and the tonic phase. Furthermore, this study also found an inverse relationship between ECT-intensity and the clonic phase, but not between ECT-intensity and the tonic phase.Conclusion: This study demonstrated that age and ECT-intensity are negatively correlated with seizure duration, particularly in the clonic phase. The present observations are not fully consistent with the basic guidelines of the APA-ECT practical manual. Accordingly, the predictions regarding the therapeutic effect of ECT can be based on both the seizure duration and the clonic phase.

  8. Remission of depression following electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is associated with higher levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire, Thiago Fernando Vasconcelos; Fleck, Marcelo Pio de Almeida; da Rocha, Neusa Sica

    2016-03-01

    Research on the association between electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and increased brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels has produced conflicting result. There have been few studies which have evaluated BDNF levels in clinical contexts where there was remission following treatment. The objective of this study was to investigate whether remission of depression following ECT is associated with changes in BDNF levels. Adult inpatients in a psychiatric unit were invited to participate in this naturalistic study. Diagnoses were made using the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI) and symptoms were evaluated at admission and discharge using the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HDRS-17). Thirty-one patients who received a diagnosis of depression and were subjected to ECT were included retrospectively. Clinical remission was defined as a score of less than eight on the HDRS-17 at discharge. Serum BDNF levels were measured in blood samples collected at admission and discharge with a commercial kit used in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions. Subjects HDRS-17 scores improved following ECT (t = 13.29; p = 0.00). A generalized estimating equation (GEE) model revealed a remission × time interaction with BDNF levels as a dependent variable in a Wald chi-square test [Wald χ(2) = 5.98; p = 0.01]. A post hoc Bonferroni test revealed that non-remitters had lower BDNF levels at admission than remitters (p = 0.03), but there was no difference at discharge (p = 0.16). ECT remitters had higher serum BDNF levels at admission and the level did not vary during treatment. ECT non-remitters had lower serum BDNF levels at admission, but levels increased during treatment and were similar to those of ECT remitters at discharge. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Frontal and temporal cortical functional recovery after electroconvulsive therapy for depression: A longitudinal functional near-infrared spectroscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Jinichi; Takamiya, Akihiro; Yamagata, Bun; Hotta, Syogo; Miyasaka, Yukiko; Pu, Shenghong; Iwanami, Akira; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Mimura, Masaru

    2017-08-01

    While the efficacy and tolerability of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) for depression has been well established, the acute effects of ECT on brain function remain unclear. Particularly, although cognitive dysfunction has been consistently observed after ECT, little is known about the extent and time course of ECT-induced brain functional changes, as observed during cognitive tasks. Considering the acute antidepressant effects of ECT on depression, aberrant brain functional responses during cognitive tasks in patients with depression may improve immediately after this treatment. To clarify changes in cortical functional responses to cognitive tasks following ECT, we used task-related functional near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) to assess 30 patients with major depressive disorder or bipolar depression before and after an ECT series, as well as 108 healthy controls. Prior to ECT, patients exhibited significantly smaller [oxy-Hb] values in the bilateral frontal cortex during a letter verbal fluency task (VFT) compared with healthy controls. We found a significant increase in [oxy-Hb] values in the bilateral frontal cortex during the VFT after ECT in the patient group. A decrease in depression severity was significantly correlated with an increase in [oxy-Hb] values in the right ventrolateral prefrontal cortex following ECT. This is the first NIRS study to evaluate brain functional changes before vs. after ECT. Impaired functional responses, observed during the cognitive task in depressed patients, were normalized after ECT. Thus, recovery from abnormal functional responses to cognitive tasks in the frontal brain regions may be associated with the acute therapeutic effects of ECT for depression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Peripheral blood microRNA and VEGFA mRNA changes following electroconvulsive therapy: implications for psychotic depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolshus, E; Ryan, K M; Blackshields, G; Smyth, P; Sheils, O; McLoughlin, D M

    2017-12-01

    MicroRNAs are short, non-coding molecules that regulate gene expression. Here, we investigate the role of microRNAs in depression and electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). We performed three studies: a deep sequencing discovery-phase study of miRNA changes in whole blood following ECT (n = 16), followed by a validation study in a separate cohort of patients pre-/post-ECT (n = 37) and matched healthy controls (n = 34). Changes in an experimentally validated gene target (VEGFA) were then analysed in patients pre-/post-ECT (n = 97) and in matched healthy controls (n = 53). In the discovery-phase study, we found no statistically significant differences in miRNA expression from baseline to end of treatment in the group as a whole, but post hoc analysis indicated a difference in patients with psychotic depression (n = 3). In a follow-up validation study, patients with psychotic depression (n = 7) had elevated baseline levels of miR-126-3p (t = 3.015, P = 0.006) and miR-106a-5p (t = 2.598, P = 0.025) compared to healthy controls. Following ECT, these differences disappeared. Baseline VEGFA levels were significantly higher in depressed patients compared to healthy controls (F(1,144) = 27.688, P = <0.001). Following ECT, there was a significant change in VEGFA levels in the psychotic group only (t = 2.915, P = 0.010). Molecular differences (miRNA and VEGFA) may exist between psychotic and non-psychotic depression treated with ECT. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Awareness and perceptions of electroconvulsive therapy among psychiatric patients: a cross-sectional survey from teaching hospitals in Karachi, Pakistan

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    Choudhary Maria

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT is shown to be effective in many psychiatric illnesses, but its distorted projection by the Pakistani media and its unregulated use by many physicians across the country have adversely affected its acceptability. Given this situation we aimed to assess the awareness and perceptions regarding ECT as a treatment modality among the psychiatric patients. Methods This was a questionnaire based cross-sectional study carried out at 2 tertiary care hospitals in Karachi, Pakistan. Results We interviewed 190 patients of which 140 were aware of ECT. The study showed that the level of education had a significant impact on the awareness of ECT (p = 0.009. The most common source of awareness was electronic and print media (38%, followed by relatives (24% and doctors (23%. Physical injuries (42% and neurological (12% and cognitive disturbances (11% were the commonly feared side effects. The most popular belief about ECT was that it was a treatment of last resort (56%. Thirty-nine percent thought that ECT could lead to severe mental and physical illness and 37% considered it inhumane. Patients' willingness to receive ECT was dependant on whether or not they were convinced of its safety (p = 0.001 and efficacy (p = 0.0001. Conclusion We identified a serious lack of dissemination of information regarding ECT by the psychiatrists and the mental health care providers. This may be the result of an inadequate postgraduate training in Pakistan or just a lack of concern about the mentally ill patients. The media seemed to be the major source of information for our patients. We also saw the prevalence of a variety of myths regarding ECT in our society, which we feel may be responsible for the patients' adverse attitudes. Given the widespread applicability of ECT there is a dire need to dispel these misconceptions and improve its acceptability.

  12. Effects of COMT, DRD2, BDNF, and APOE Genotypic Variation on Treatment Efficacy and Cognitive Side Effects of Electroconvulsive Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousman, Chad A; Katalinic, Natalie; Martin, Donel M; Smith, Deidre J; Ingram, Anna; Dowling, Nathan; Ng, Chee; Loo, Colleen K

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the main and interaction effects of the COMT Val158Met, DRD2 C957T, BDNF Val66Met, and APOE polymorphisms on treatment efficacy and cognitive side effects of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). A total of 117 adult inpatients with a diagnosis of major depressive disorder recruited from 3 hospitals were administered the Montgomery-Äsberg Depression Rating Scale and a cognitive battery assessing global cognition, anterograde memory, executive function, speed and concentration, as well as retrograde memory at baseline and after ECT treatment. DRD2 C957T heterozygotes had 3.7 (95% confidence interval, 1.13-12.25; P = 0.032) greater odds of remission compared with CC homozygotes. Among the men, COMT Val/Val carriers had greater depressive symptom reduction compared with Met/Met carriers (Montgomery-Äsberg Depression Rating Scale percentage of reduction, 76% vs 35%; P = 0.020) but not among the women (P = 0.903) after ECT. For cognitive outcomes, an interaction effect on anterograde memory was observed between the DRD2 and BDNF polymorphisms (P = 0.016), in which carriers of the DRD2 TT and BDNF Val/Val genotypes had significantly less decline in anterograde performance than those that carried the TC and Met-allele (P = 0.001) or CC and Met-allele (P = 0.003) genotypes. However, no results withstood correction for multiple comparisons. These observations provide preliminary evidence supporting an association between common functional genotypic variation and ECT efficacy as well as anterograde memory side effects after ECT. Validation of these findings is required before firm conclusions can be made and clinical utility can be assessed.

  13. Comparison of the serial position effect in very mild Alzheimer's disease, mild Alzheimer's disease, and amnesia associated with electroconvulsive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayley, P J; Salmon, D P; Bondi, M W; Bui, B K; Olichney, J; Delis, D C; Thomas, R G; Thal, L J

    2000-03-01

    Individuals given a series of words to memorize normally show better immediate recall for items from the beginning and end of the list than for mid-list items. This phenomenon, known as the serial position effect, is thought to reflect the concurrent contributions of secondary and primary memory, respectively, to recall performance. The present study compared the serial position effects produced on Trial 1 of the California Verbal Learning Test (CVLT) in mildly demented (N = 25; M MMSE = 20.0) and very mildly demented (N = 25; M MMSE = 25.5) patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), and age- and education-matched normal control (NC) participants (N = 50). In addition, the serial position effects of the very mildly demented AD patients were compared to those of patients with a transient, circumscribed amnesia arising from a prescribed series of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) treatments for the relief of depressive illness (N = 11). While the NC group exhibited the typical serial position effect, AD patients recalled significantly fewer words than NC participants overall, and exhibited a significantly reduced primacy effect (i.e., recall of the first 2 list items) with a normal recency effect (i.e., recall of the last 2 list items). Patients with circumscribed amnesia due to ECT were as impaired as the very mildly demented AD patients on most standard CVLT measures of learning and memory, but exhibited primacy and recency effects, which were within normal limits. These results suggest that a reduction in the primacy effect, but not the recency effect, is an early and ubiquitous feature of the memory impairment of AD. It is not, however, a necessary feature of all causes of memory impairment.

  14. Right unilateral electroconvulsive therapy does not cause more cognitive impairment than pharmacologic treatment in treatment-resistant bipolar depression: A 6-month randomized controlled trial follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjoerke-Bertheussen, Jeanette; Schoeyen, Helle; Andreassen, Ole A; Malt, Ulrik F; Oedegaard, Ketil J; Morken, Gunnar; Sundet, Kjetil; Vaaler, Arne E; Auestad, Bjoern; Kessler, Ute

    2017-12-21

    Electroconvulsive therapy is an effective treatment for bipolar depression, but there are concerns about whether it causes long-term neurocognitive impairment. In this multicenter randomized controlled trial, in-patients with treatment-resistant bipolar depression were randomized to either algorithm-based pharmacologic treatment or right unilateral electroconvulsive therapy. After the 6-week treatment period, all of the patients received maintenance pharmacotherapy as recommended by their clinician guided by a relevant treatment algorithm. Patients were assessed at baseline and at 6 months. Neurocognitive functions were assessed using the Measurement and Treatment Research to Improve Cognition in Schizophrenia (MATRICS) Consensus Cognitive Battery, and autobiographical memory consistency was assessed using the Autobiographical Memory Interview-Short Form. Seventy-three patients entered the trial, of whom 51 and 26 completed neurocognitive assessments at baseline and 6 months, respectively. The MATRICS Consensus Cognitive Battery composite score improved by 4.1 points in both groups (P = .042) from baseline to 6 months (from 40.8 to 44.9 and from 41.9 to 46.0 in the algorithm-based pharmacologic treatment and electroconvulsive therapy groups, respectively). The Autobiographical Memory Interview-Short Form consistency scores were reduced in both groups (72.3% vs 64.3% in the algorithm-based pharmacologic treatment and electroconvulsive therapy groups, respectively; P = .085). This study did not find that right unilateral electroconvulsive therapy caused long-term impairment in neurocognitive functions compared to algorithm-based pharmacologic treatment in bipolar depression as measured using standard neuropsychological tests, but due to the low number of patients in the study the results should be interpreted with caution. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00664976. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Mouse repeated electroconvulsive seizure (ECS does not reverse social stress effects but does induce behavioral and hippocampal changes relevant to electroconvulsive therapy (ECT side-effects in the treatment of depression.

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    Erin M van Buel

    Full Text Available Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT is an effective treatment for depression, but can have negative side effects including amnesia. The mechanisms of action underlying both the antidepressant and side effects of ECT are not well understood. An equivalent manipulation that is conducted in experimental animals is electroconvulsive seizure (ECS. Rodent studies have provided valuable insights into potential mechanisms underlying the antidepressant and side effects of ECT. However, relatively few studies have investigated the effects of ECS in animal models with a depression-relevant manipulation such as chronic stress. In the present study, mice were first exposed to chronic social stress (CSS or a control procedure for 15 days followed by ECS or a sham procedure for 10 days. Behavioral effects were investigated using an auditory fear conditioning (learning and expression (memory test and a treadmill-running fatigue test. Thereafter, immunohistochemistry was conducted on brain material using the microglial marker Iba-1 and the cholinergic fibre marker ChAT. CSS did not increase fear learning and memory in the present experimental design; in both the control and CSS mice ECS reduced fear learning and fear memory expression. CSS induced the expected fatigue-like effect in the treadmill-running test; ECS induced increased fatigue in CSS and control mice. In CSS and control mice ECS induced inflammation in hippocampus in terms of increased expression of Iba-1 in radiatum of CA1 and CA3. CSS and ECS both reduced acetylcholine function in hippocampus as indicated by decreased expression of ChAT in several hippocampal sub-regions. Therefore, CSS increased fatigue and reduced hippocampal ChAT activity and, rather than reversing these effects, a repeated ECS regimen resulted in impaired fear learning-memory, increased fatigue, increased hippocampal Iba-1 expression, and decreased hippocampal ChAT expression. As such, the current model does not provide insights

  16. Electroconvulsive therapy hasn’t negative effects on short-term memory function, as assessed using a bedside hand-held device

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    Helge H.O. Müller

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT is effective in the treatment of treatment-resistant major depression. The fear of cognitive impairment after ECT often deters patients from choosing this treatment option. There is little reliable information regarding the effects of ECT on overall cognitive performance, while short-term memory deficits are well known but not easy to measure within clinical routines. In this pilot study, we examined ECT recipients’ pre- and posttreatment performances on a digital ascending number tapping test. We found that cognitive performance measures exhibited good reproducibility in individual patients and that ECT did not significantly alter cognitive performance up to 2 hours after this therapy was applied. Our results can help patients and physicians make decisions regarding the administration of ECT. Digital measurements are recommended, especially when screening for the most common side effects on cognitive performance and short-term memory.

  17. Electroconvulsive Therapy Added to Non-Clozapine Antipsychotic Medication for Treatment Resistant Schizophrenia: Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

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    Wei Zheng

    Full Text Available This meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs examined the efficacy and safety of the combination of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT and antipsychotic medication (except for clozapine versus the same antipsychotic monotherapy for treatment-resistant schizophrenia (TRS. Two independent investigators extracted data for a random effects meta-analysis and pre-specified subgroup and meta-regression analyses. Weighted and standard mean difference (WMD/SMD, risk ratio (RR ±95% confidence intervals (CIs, number needed to treat (NNT, and number needed to harm (NNH were calculated. Eleven studies (n = 818, duration = 10.2±5.5 weeks were identified for meta-analysis. Adjunctive ECT was superior to antipsychotic monotherapy regarding (1 symptomatic improvement at last-observation endpoint with an SMD of -0.67 (p<0.00001; I2 = 62%, separating the two groups as early as weeks 1–2 with an SMD of -0.58 (p<0.00001; I2 = 0%; (2 study-defined response (RR = 1.48, p<0.0001 with an NNT of 6 (CI = 4–9 and remission rate (RR = 2.18, p = 0.0002 with an NNT of 8 (CI = 6–16; (3 PANSS positive and general symptom sub-scores at endpoint with a WMD between -3.48 to -1.32 (P = 0.01 to 0.009. Subgroup analyses were conducted comparing double blind/rater-masked vs. open RCTs, those with and without randomization details, and high quality (Jadad≥adadup analyses were Jadad<3 studies. The ECT-antipsychotic combination caused more headache (p = 0.02 with an NNH of 6 (CI = 4–11 and memory impairment (p = 0.001 with an NNH of 3 (CI = 2–5. The use of ECT to augment antipsychotic treatment (clozapine excepted can be an effective treatment option for TRS, with increased frequency of self-reported memory impairment and headache.CRD42014006689 (PROSPERO.

  18. The use of electroconvulsive therapy in a cohort of forensic psychiatric patients with schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Diana; Brandt-Christensen, Anne Mette; Ockelmann, Hans Henrik

    2012-01-01

    ) for schizophrenia, but not explicitly for this complex forensic group. AIMS: The aim of this study was to describe the outcome of using ECT as augmentation therapy in a cohort of forensic psychiatric patients with schizophrenia who were failing to respond to antipsychotic medication. METHODS: In one university......-based psychiatric clinic, data were extracted from the medical records of all patients treated with ECT during a 6-year period. Fifty-nine of these patients were diagnosed within the schizophrenia spectrum and eight were in specialist forensic hospital services. RESULTS: The mean duration of illness...... for the forensic cohort was 16¿years (range 3-33¿years), with the index episode having lasted a mean of 34¿months (3¿weeks to 8¿years) in spite of treatment with at least two antipsychotic drugs. Psychotic symptoms were accompanied by seriously assaultive behaviour in all cases. All but one of these patients had...

  19. Acute effect of electroconvulsive therapy on brain perfusion assessed by Tc99m-hexamethylpropyleneamineoxim and single photon emission computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bajc, M.; Basic, M.; Topuzovic, N.; Babic, D.; Ivancevic, D. (Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Rebro, Zagreb (Yugoslavia)); Medved, V. (Psychiatric Clinic, University Hospital Rebro, Zagreb (Yugoslavia))

    1989-01-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was measured in relative terms with Tc99m-hexamethylpropyleneamineoxim and single photon emission computed tomography in 11 patients undergoing electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). The patients suffered from major depressive disorder (n=8) or schizoaffective disorders (n=3). rCBF was measured under general anesthesia 3 days prior to the ECT treatment and coinciding with the ECT stimualtion. ECT caused a redistribution of the tracers uptake. The uptake became more pronounced in frontal parts of the brain and in the basal ganglia than in posterior parts of the cortex, and the thalamus. This selective effect of ECT on rCBF may be related to catecholaminergic projections to anterior parts of the brain. (author).

  20. Acute effect of electroconvulsive therapy on brain perfusion assessed by Tc99m-hexamethylpropyleneamineoxim and single photon emission computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bajc, M.; Basic, M.; Topuzovic, N.; Babic, D.; Ivancevic, D.; Medved, V.

    1989-01-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was measured in relative terms with Tc99m-hexamethylpropyleneamineoxim and single photon emission computed tomography in 11 patients undergoing electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). The patients suffered from major depressive disorder (n=8) or schizoaffective disorders (n=3). rCBF was measured under general anesthesia 3 days prior to the ECT treatment and coinciding with the ECT stimualtion. ECT caused a redistribution of the tracers uptake. The uptake became more pronounced in frontal parts of the brain and in the basal ganglia than in posterior parts of the cortex, and the thalamus. This selective effect of ECT on rCBF may be related to catecholaminergic projections to anterior parts of the brain. (author)

  1. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation is as effective as electroconvulsive therapy in the treatment of nondelusional major depressive disorder: an open study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunhaus, L; Dannon, P N; Schreiber, S; Dolberg, O H; Amiaz, R; Ziv, R; Lefkifker, E

    2000-02-15

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), a new method for the stimulation of the central nervous system, is being proposed as a potential new treatment in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). We tested the hypothesis that rTMS would be as effective as electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in patients with MDD. Forty patients with MDD referred for ECT were randomly assigned to either ECT or rTMS. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation was performed at 90% power of the motor threshold. The stimulation frequency was 10 Hz for either 2 sec (first eight patients) or 6 sec (final 12 patients) for 20 trains. Patients were treated for up to 20 treatment days. Electroconvulsive therapy was performed according to standard protocols. Overall patients responded best to ECT (chi(2) = 3.8, p <.05). Patients with MDD and psychosis responded significantly better to ECT (chi(2) = 9.2, p <. 01), whereas MDD patients without psychosis responded similarly to both treatments (chi(2) = 0.0, ns). The analysis of variance with repeated measures of clinical variables for the whole sample revealed significant treatment effects for both groups; however, interaction between group and treatment was seen only for the Global Assessment of Function and the Sleep assessment. When the psychosis-nonpsychosis grouping was considered, patients with psychosis responded dramatically better to ECT in all assessments, whereas those without psychosis responded similarly to both treatments. Overall ECT was a more potent treatment for patients with MDD, this being particularly evident in patients with MDD and psychosis; however, in patients with MDD without psychosis the effects of rTMS were similar to those of ECT. The results we report are encouraging and support an important role for rTMS in the treatment of severe MDD; however, additional blinded studies are needed to precisely define this role.

  2. Unmodified electroconvulsive therapy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    acute phase reactants (C-reactive protein, á-2-macroglobulin, ceruloplasmin, factor B, C-4 ..... College of Physicians. [Oral](Personal Communication, 28 November 2008) ... Walter G, McDonald A, Rey JM, Rosen A. Medical student knowledge ...

  3. Bitemporal v. high-dose right unilateral electroconvulsive therapy for depression: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolshus, E; Jelovac, A; McLoughlin, D M

    2017-02-01

    Brief-pulse electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is the most acutely effective treatment for severe depression though concerns persist about cognitive side-effects. While bitemporal electrode placement is the most commonly used form worldwide, right unilateral ECT causes less cognitive side-effects though historically it has been deemed less effective. Several randomized trials have now compared high-dose (>5× seizure threshold) unilateral ECT with moderate-dose (1.0-2.5× seizure threshold) bitemporal ECT to investigate if it is as effective as bitemporal ECT but still has less cognitive side-effects. We aimed to systematically review these trials and meta-analyse clinical and cognitive outcomes where appropriate. We searched PubMed, PsycINFO, Web of Science, Cochrane Library and EMBASE for randomized trials comparing these forms of ECT using the terms 'electroconvulsive' OR 'electroshock' AND 'trial'. Seven trials (n = 792) met inclusion criteria. Bitemporal ECT did not differ from high-dose unilateral ECT on depression rating change scores [Hedges's g = -0.03, 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.17 to 0.11], remission (RR 1.06, 95% CI 0.93-1.20), or relapse at 12 months (RR 1.42, 95% CI 0.90-2.23). There was an advantage for unilateral ECT on reorientation time after individual ECT sessions (mean difference in minutes = -8.28, 95% CI -12.86 to -3.70) and retrograde autobiographical memory (Hedges's g = -0.46, 95% CI -0.87 to -0.04) after completing an ECT course. There were no differences for general cognition, category fluency and delayed visual and verbal memory. High-dose unilateral ECT does not differ from moderate-dose bitemporal ECT in antidepressant efficacy but has some cognitive advantages.

  4. Blood serum concentrations of kynurenic acid in patients diagnosed with recurrent depressive disorder, depression in bipolar disorder, and schizoaffective disorder treated with electroconvulsive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olajossy, Marcin; Olajossy, Bartosz; Wnuk, Sebastian; Potembska, Emilia; Urbańska, Ewa

    2017-06-18

    The aim of the present study was to compare blood serum kynurenic acid (KYNA) concentrations measured before ECT and after 1, 6 and 12 electroconvulsive treatment (ECT) sessions in patients with diagnoses of recurrent depressive disorder (RDD), depression in bipolar disorder (DBD) and schizoaffective disorder (SAD). The study group comprised of 50 patients with ICD-10 diagnoses of RDD, DBD and SAD. Blood serum KYNA concentrations were determined and clinical assessment was performed using the MADRS and the GAF scale. Significant differences were found in blood serum KYNA levels between RDD, DBD and SAD patients treated with electroconvulsive therapy and healthy controls: 1) KYNA concentrations in DBD patients measured before ECT and after 12 ECT sessions were significantly lower than in the control group; 2) KYNA concentrations in the serum of RDD patients measured before ECT and after one and 12 ECT sessions were significantly lower than in the control group, while those measured after 6 ECT session did not differ significantly from KYNA concentrations in healthy controls; 3) higher pre-treatment blood serum concentrations of KYNA in DBD patients correlated with a higher number of illness phases and poorer general functioning before treatment; 4) significant relationships were found between higher blood serum concentrations of KYNA in RDD patients after 1 ECT session and male gender, and between higher KYNA concentrations after 6 ECT sessions and increased depression and poorer functioning before treatment in those patients. Results show that KYNA concentrations in all diagnostic groups were lower before ECT (not statistically significant for the SAD group) and that there were no significant changes in those concentrations (compared with the baseline) during ECT.

  5. Inadequate Response to Therapy as a Predictor of Suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlsgaard, Katherine K.; Beck, Aaron T.; Brown, Gregory K.

    1998-01-01

    The role of response to cognitive therapy as a predictor of suicide was investigated by comparing 17 outpatients with mood disorders who committed suicide with 17 matched patients who did not commit suicide. Significant differences were found on several variables including higher levels of hopelessness at termination of therapy. (Author/EMK)

  6. Short-Term Effects of Electroconvulsive Therapy on Subjective and Actigraphy-Assessed Sleep Parameters in Severely Depressed Inpatients

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    Alexander Hoogerhoud

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Sleep disturbances are a key feature of major depression. Electroconvulsive treatment (ECT may improve polysomnography-assessed sleep characteristics, but its short-term effects on actigraphy-assessed and subjective sleep characteristics are unknown. We therefore aimed to assess the effects of ECT on subjective and objective sleep parameters in a proof-of-principle study. Methods. We assessed subjective and objective sleep parameters in 12 severely depressed patients up to 5 consecutive days during their ECT course, corresponding to a total of 43 nights (including 19 ECT sessions. The 12 patients were 83% female and on average 62 (standard deviation (SD 14 years old and had an average MADRS score of 40 at baseline (SD 21. Results. Subjective and objective sleep parameters were not directly affected by ECT. The subjective sleep efficiency parameter was similar on the day after ECT and other days. ECT did not affect the number of errors in the Sustained Attention to Response Task. Patients subjectively underestimated their total sleep time by 1.4 hours (P<0.001 compared to actigraphy-assessed sleep duration. Conclusion. ECT did not affect subjective and actigraphy-assessed sleep in the short term. Depressed patients profoundly underestimated their sleep duration.

  7. Comparison between neurostimulation techniques repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation vs electroconvulsive therapy for the treatment of resistant depression: patient preference and cost-effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnezi, Racheli; Aminov, Emanuel; Shmuel, Dikla; Dreifuss, Merav; Dannon, Pinhas

    2016-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a common disorder, widely distributed in the population, and is often associated with severe symptoms and functional impairment. It has been estimated that 30% of MDD patients do not benefit adequately from therapeutic interventions, including pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy. Treatment-resistant depression (TRD) is generally defined as a failure to achieve remission, despite therapeutic interventions. The most effective treatment alternatives for TRD are hospitalization, electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Here we compared the clinical effectiveness of ECT and TMS, including success rates, patient responses, side-effect profiles, and financial worthiness. We found that ECT (P<0.0001) was more effective than TMS (P<0.012) (not statistically significant in group effect) in TRD patients. However, ECT patients reported a higher percentage of side effects (P<0.01) and the TMS treatment scored better in terms of patient preference. The cost benefit of ECT was higher than that of TMS (US$2075 vs US$814). Patient's preferences for treatment could be more intense in the TMS, if the TMS is included in the Health Maintenance Organization's service list. We propose that both of these treatment options should be available in psychiatric wards, thus expanding the therapeutic toolkit for TRD.

  8. Preventive Effect of Liothyronine on Electroconvulsive Therapy-Induced Memory Deficit in Patients with Major Depressive Disorder: A Double-Blind Controlled Clinical Trial

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    Arash Mohagheghi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and Objective. Despite the effectiveness of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT in treating major depressive disorder (MDD, its cognitive side effects make it less popular. This study investigated the impact of liothyronine on ECT-induced memory deficit in patients with MDD. Methodology. This is a double-blind clinical trial, in which 60 patients with MDD who were referred for ECT were selected. The diagnosis was based on the criteria of DSM-IV-TR. Patients were divided randomly into two groups to receive either liothyronine (50 mcg every morning or placebo. After the assessment with Wechsler Memory Scale-Revised (WMS-R before first session of ECT, posttests were repeated again, two months after the completion of ECT. Findings. By controlling the pretest scores, the mean scores of the experimental group were higher than the control group in delayed recall, verbal memory, visual memory, general memory, and attention/concentration scales (P<0.05. Conclusion. Liothyronine may prevent ECT-induced memory impairment in patients with MDD. This study has been registered in IRCT under IRCT201401122660N2.

  9. Effect of three different dosages of magnesium sulfate on attenuating hemodynamic responses after electroconvulsive therapy: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honarmand, A.; Safavi, M.; Mehdizadeh, F.; Salehi, M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study was to compare the efficacy of three different dosages of MgSO/sub 4/ administration (10, 20, and 30 mg/kg) versus placebo on attenuation of cardiovascular response to electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). Methodology: Thirty-five adult patients scheduled for 8 ECT sessions were randomly assigned to be allocated twice into one of the four study groups: MgSO/sub 4/ 10 mg/kg (M10), MgSO/sub 4/ 20 mg/ kg (M20), MgSO/sub 4/ 30 mg/kg (M30), and placebo control (P). Systolic (SAP), diastolic (DAP) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) were recorded at 0, 1, 3, and 10 minutes after termination of ECT-induced seizures. Duration of electroencephalographs (EEGs) and motor seizures and peak HR during convulsions were also recorded. Results: Changes in SAP, DAP, and MAP were significantly attenuated at 0, one, and three minutes after ECT in groups M20 and M30 compared with group P (P< 0.05). Peak HR changes were significantly less in groups M20 and M30 compared with groups M10 and P (P< 0.05). Duration of motor and EEG seizure activity was not significantly different among the four groups. Conclusion: Administration of either 20 or 30 mg/kg MgSO/sub 4/ significantly attenuated increased blood pressure and peak HR after ECT without decreasing seizure duration. (author)

  10. Administration of electroconvulsive therapy for depression associated with deep brain stimulation in a patient with post-traumatic Parkinson's Disease: a case study.

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    Cunningham, Miles G; Yadollahikhales, Golnaz; Vitaliano, Gordana; van Horne, Craig

    2016-11-15

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been shown to be effective for parkinsonian symptoms poorly responsive to medications. DBS is typically well-tolerated, as are the maintenance battery changes. Here we describe an adverse event during a battery replacement procedure that caused rapid onset of severe depression. The patient is a 58-year-old woman who was in a serious motor vehicle accident and sustained a concussion with loss of consciousness. Within weeks of the accident she began developing parkinsonian symptoms that progressively worsened over the subsequent 10 years. Responding poorly to medications, she received DBS, which controlled her movement symptoms. Five years after initiating DBS, during a routine battery change, an apparent electrical event occurred that triggered the rapid onset of severe depression. Anti-seizure and antidepressant medications were ineffective, and the patient was offered a course of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), which resulted in complete reversal of her depressive episode. Parkinson's syndrome can be seen after a single closed head injury event. Post-traumatic parkinsonism is responsive to DBS; however, DBS has been associated with an infrequent occurrence of dramatic disruption in mood. ECT is a therapeutic option for patients who develop intractable depressive illness associated with DBS.

  11. Comparing the Effects of Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation and Electroconvulsive Therapy in the Treatment of Depression: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

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    Beppe Micallef-Trigona

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT is the longest standing psychiatric treatment available and has unequivocal benefit in severe depression. However this treatment comes with a number of side effects such as memory impairment. On the other hand, Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS is a relatively new form of treatment which has been shown to be efficacious in patients suffering from a number of psychopathologies, including severe depression, with few reported side effects. Due to its potential therapeutic efficacy and lack of side effects, rTMS has gained traction in the treatment of depression, with a number of authors keen to see it take over from ECT. However, it is not clear whether rTMS represents a therapeutic alternative to ECT. This meta-analysis will therefore compare the “gold standard” treatment for severe depression, with the relatively new but promising rTMS. A literature search will be performed with the intention to include all randomised clinical trials. The null hypothesis is that there is no difference in the antidepressant efficacy between the two types of treatment modalities. Statistical analysis of Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS scores will be performed.

  12. Transient Serotonin Syndrome by Concurrent Use of Electroconvulsive Therapy and Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

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    Nagahisa Okamoto

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The serotonin syndrome, which is characterized by psychiatric, autonomic nervous and neurological symptoms, is considered to be caused by excessive stimulation of the 5-HT1A and 5-HT2 receptors in the gray matter and spinal cord of the central nervous system, after the start of dosing or increase of the dose of a serotoninergic drug. There have been hardly any reports of induction of serotonin syndrome by electroconvulsive therapy (ECT in combination with antidepressant. We present the case of a female patient with major depressive disorder (MDD who developed transient serotonin syndrome soon after the first session of ECT in combination with paroxetine. Paroxetine was discontinued, and her psychiatric, autonomic nervous and neurological symptoms were gradually relieved and disappeared within 2 days. We performed the second ECT session 5 days after the initial session and performed 12 sessions of ECT without any changes in the procedure of ECT and anesthesia, but no symptoms of SS were observed. Finally, her MDD remitted. ECT might cause transiently increased blood-brain barrier (BBB permeability and enhance the transmissivity of the antidepressant in BBB. Therefore, it is necessary to pay attention to rare side effect of serotonin syndrome by ECT in combination with antidepressant.

  13. Transient serotonin syndrome by concurrent use of electroconvulsive therapy and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Nagahisa; Sakamoto, Kota; Yamada, Maki

    2012-01-01

    The serotonin syndrome, which is characterized by psychiatric, autonomic nervous and neurological symptoms, is considered to be caused by excessive stimulation of the 5-HT1A and 5-HT2 receptors in the gray matter and spinal cord of the central nervous system, after the start of dosing or increase of the dose of a serotoninergic drug. There have been hardly any reports of induction of serotonin syndrome by electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in combination with antidepressant. We present the case of a female patient with major depressive disorder (MDD) who developed transient serotonin syndrome soon after the first session of ECT in combination with paroxetine. Paroxetine was discontinued, and her psychiatric, autonomic nervous and neurological symptoms were gradually relieved and disappeared within 2 days. We performed the second ECT session 5 days after the initial session and performed 12 sessions of ECT without any changes in the procedure of ECT and anesthesia, but no symptoms of SS were observed. Finally, her MDD remitted. ECT might cause transiently increased blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability and enhance the transmissivity of the antidepressant in BBB. Therefore, it is necessary to pay attention to rare side effect of serotonin syndrome by ECT in combination with antidepressant.

  14. Patient predictors of response to cognitive behaviour therapy and schema therapy for depression.

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    Carter, Janet D; McIntosh, Virginia Vw; Jordan, Jennifer; Porter, Richard J; Douglas, Katie; Frampton, Christopher M; Joyce, Peter R

    2018-01-01

    Few studies have examined differential predictors of response to psychotherapy for depression. Greater understanding about the factors associated with therapeutic response may better enable therapists to optimise response by targeting therapy for the individual. The aim of the current exploratory study was to examine patient characteristics associated with response to cognitive behaviour therapy and schema therapy for depression. Participants were 100 outpatients in a clinical trial randomised to either cognitive behaviour therapy or schema therapy. Potential predictors of response examined included demographic, clinical, functioning, cognitive, personality and neuropsychological variables. Individuals with chronic depression and increased levels of pre-treatment negative automatic thoughts had a poorer response to both cognitive behaviour therapy and schema therapy. A treatment type interaction was found for verbal learning and memory. Lower levels of verbal learning and memory impairment markedly impacted on response to schema therapy. This was not the case for cognitive behaviour therapy, which was more impacted if verbal learning and memory was in the moderate range. Study findings are consistent with the Capitalisation Model suggesting that therapy that focuses on the person's strengths is more likely to contribute to a better outcome. Limitations were that participants were outpatients in a randomised controlled trial and may not be representative of other depressed samples. Examination of a variety of potential predictors was exploratory and requires replication.

  15. Comparison between neurostimulation techniques rapid transcranial magnetic stimulation vs electroconvulsive therapy for the treatment of resistant depression: patient preference and cost-effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magnezi R

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Racheli Magnezi,1 Emanuel Aminov,1 Dikla Shmuel,2 Merav Dreifuss,1 Pinhas Dannon1,2 1Public Health and Health Systems Management Program, Department of Management, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat Gan, 2Beer Yaakov Mental Health Center affiliated to Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel Objectives: Major depressive disorder (MDD is a common disorder, widely distributed in the population, and is often associated with severe symptoms and functional impairment. It has been estimated that 30% of MDD patients do not benefit adequately from therapeutic interventions, including pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy. Treatment-resistant depression (TRD is generally defined as a failure to achieve remission, despite therapeutic interventions. Aim: The most effective treatment alternatives for TRD are hospitalization, electroconvulsive therapy (ECT, and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS. Here we compared the clinical effectiveness of ECT and TMS, including success rates, patient responses, side-effect profiles, and financial worthiness. Results: We found that ECT (P<0.0001 was more effective than TMS (P<0.012 (not statistically significant in group effect in TRD patients. However, ECT patients reported a higher percentage of side effects (P<0.01 and the TMS treatment scored better in terms of patient preference. The cost benefit of ECT was higher than that of TMS (US$2075 vs US$814. Patient’s preferences for treatment could be more intense in the TMS, if the TMS is included in the Health Maintenance Organization’s service list. Conclusion: We propose that both of these treatment options should be available in psychiatric wards, thus expanding the therapeutic toolkit for TRD. Keywords: ECT, TMS, treatment-resistant depression, cost benefit, patient preference

  16. Practice of Acute and Maintenance Electroconvulsive Therapy in the Psychiatric Clinic of a University Hospital from Turkey: between 2007 and 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengul, Melike Ceyhan Balci; Kenar, Ayse Nur Inci; Hanci, Ezgi; Sendur, İbrahim; Sengul, Cem; Herken, Hasan

    2016-01-01

    Objective Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) can be given as the form of acute, continuation or maintenance ECT according to the process of administration. We report our 7 years’ observation with acute and maintenance ECT in a university hospital in Turkey. Methods The medical records of the hospitalized patients treated with acute or maintenance ECT between the years 2007 and 2013 was retrospectively analyzed. The sociodemographic characteristics, diagnosis, data of ECT and the co-administered psychotropic drugs were recorded. The frequency of ECT was calculated by identifying the total number of the hospitalized patients during the study period from the hospital records. Results A total number of 1,432 female and 1,141 male patients hospitalized in a period of 7 years, with a total number of 111 patients treated with ECT. The ratio of ECT was 4%, maintenance/acute ECT 11%. For acute ECT, affective disorders (65.3%) and psychotic disorders (21.6%) were among the leading diagnoses. Maintenance ECT, the diagnosis was; 6 affective disorders, 4 psychotic disorders and 1 obsessive compulsive disorder. There was a significant difference between the patients receiving acute and maintenance ECT in terms of age, duration of illness, and number of previous hospitalizations and ECTs. Conclusion The percentage of patients treated with acute ECT is lower in our institution than that in many other institutions from our country. Acute and maintenance ECT should be considered as an important treatment option particularly for patients with long disease duration, a high number of hospitalizations and a history of benefiting from previous ECTs. PMID:26792041

  17. Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and aerobic exercise training (AET) increased plasma BDNF and ameliorated depressive symptoms in patients suffering from major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, Iraj; Hosseini, Seyed Mohammad; Haghighi, Mohammad; Jahangard, Leila; Bajoghli, Hafez; Gerber, Markus; Pühse, Uwe; Holsboer-Trachsler, Edith; Brand, Serge

    2016-05-01

    To treat patients suffering from major depressive disorder (MDD), research has focused on electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and aerobic exercise training (AET). Brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) seems to be key in MDD. The aims of the present study were therefore two-fold, to investigate in a three-arm interventional study the differential effects of ECT, ECT plus AET, and AET alone in patients suffering from TR-MDD on 1. depressive symptoms and 2. plasma BDNF (pBDNF). 60 patients with MDD (mean age: 31 years; 31.6% female patients) were randomly assigned either to the ECT, ECT + AET, or AET condition. The AET condition consisted of treadmill exercise for 45 min, three times a week. Both depression severity and pBDNF levels were assessed at baseline and 4 weeks later. All patients were further treated with an SSRI standard medication. pBDNF levels increased over time in all three study conditions, though, highest increase was observed in the ECT + EAT condition, and lowest increase was observed in the AET condition. Depressive symptoms decreased in all three conditions over time, though, strongest decrease was observed in the ECT + AET condition. The combination of ECT + AET led to significantly greater remission rates than in either the ECT or AET alone conditions. BDNF levels were not associated with symptoms of depression. The pattern of results suggests that ECT, AET and particularly their combination are promising directions for the treatment of patients suffering from MDD, and that it remains unclear to what extent pBDNF is key and a reliable biomarker for MDD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Comparative efficacy and acceptability of electroconvulsive therapy versus repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation for major depression: A systematic review and multiple-treatments meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian-Jun; Zhao, Li-Bo; Liu, Yi-Yun; Fan, Song-Hua; Xie, Peng

    2017-03-01

    The effects of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and bilateral, left prefrontal, and right prefrontal repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) on major depressive disorder (MDD) have not been adequately addressed by previous studies. Here, a multiple-treatments meta-analysis, which incorporates evidence from direct and indirect comparisons from a network of trials, was performed to assess the efficacy and acceptability of these four treatment modalities on MDD. The literature was searched for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on ECT, bilateral rTMS, and unilateral rTMS for treating MDD up to May 2016. The main outcome measures were response and drop-out rates. Data were obtained from 25 studies consisting of 1288 individuals with MDD. ECT was non-significantly more efficacious than B-rTMS, R-rTMS, and L-rTMS. Left prefrontal rTMS was non -significantly less efficacious than all other treatment modalities. In terms of acceptability, R-rTMS was non-significantly better tolerated than ECT, B-rTMS, and L-rTMS. ECT was the most efficacious treatment with the cumulative probabilities of being the most efficacious treatment being: ECT (65%), B-rTMS (25%), R-rTMS (8%), and L-rTMS (2%). R-rTMS was the best-tolerated treatment with the cumulative probabilities of being the best-tolerated treatment being: R-rTMS (52%), B-rTMS (17%), L-rTMS (16%), and ECT (14%). Coherence analysis detected no statistically significant incoherence in any comparisons of direct with indirect evidence for the response rate and drop-out rate. ECT was the most efficacious, but least tolerated, treatment, while R-rTMS was the best tolerated treatment for MDD. B-rTMS appears to have the most favorable balance between efficacy and acceptability. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Correlates of self-reported, autobiographical, and mini-mental status examination defined memory deficits following electroconvulsive therapy in South India.

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    Rajkumar, Anto P; Petit, Cheryl P; Rachana, Arun; Deinde, Funmi; Shyamsundar, G; Thangadurai, P; Jacob, Kuruthukulangara S

    2018-04-01

    Cognitive deficits, self-reported or found following electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), and their correlates are diverse. Despite the characteristics of people receiving ECT in Asia differ widely from the west, pertinent research from Asia remains sparse. We investigated the correlates of self-reported, mini-mental status examination (MMSE) defined, and autobiographical memory deficits in a cohort that received ECT in a south Indian tertiary-care setting. 76 consecutive consenting people were recruited within seven days of completing their ECT course. Memory was assessed by a subjective Likert scale, MMSE, and an autobiographical memory scale (AMS). Psychopathology was assessed by brief psychiatric rating scale, and serum cortisol levels were estimated by chemi-luminescence immunoassays. Relevant sociodemographic and clinical data were collected from the participants, and their medical records. The correlates were analysed using generalised linear models after adjusting for the effects of potential confounders. Self-reported, MMSE-defined, and autobiographical memory deficits were present in 27.6% (95%CI 17.6-37.7%), 42.1% (95%CI 31.0-53.2%), and 36.8% (95%CI 26.0-47.7%) of participants, respectively. Agreement between the memory deficits was poor. Age, less education, duration of illness, hypothyroidism, and past history of another ECT course were significantly associated with MMSE-defined deficits. Age, anaemia, past ECT course, and pre-ECT blood pressure were significantly associated with autobiographical memory deficits, while residual psychopathology and cortisol levels were significantly associated with self-reported memory deficits. Self-reported, MMSE-defined, and autobiographical memory deficits are common at the completion of ECT course, and their correlates differ. All service users receiving ECT need periodic cognitive assessments evaluating multiple cognitive domains. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. A retrospective comparison of the effects of propofol and etomidate on stimulus variables and efficacy of electroconvulsive therapy in depressed inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graveland, Pieternella E; Wierdsma, André I; van den Broek, Walter W; Birkenhäger, Tom K

    2013-08-01

    To compare the effects of propofol and etomidate on the stimulus variables and efficacy of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in depressed inpatients. This retrospective study included 54 inpatients (aged 18-75 years) who met the DSM-IV criteria for major depression and were treated with bilateral ECT. For the first part of the study, the primary outcome was the mean stimulus charge per ECT session. For the second part, the main outcome measure was the proportion of patients achieving full remission. Propofol-treated patients showed a higher mean stimulus charge (etomidate = 227.58 ± 130.44, propofol = 544.91 ± 237.56, p<0.001) despite the lack of a significant difference in starting threshold doses. The propofol group had shorter mean electroencephalogram (etomidate = 69.41 ± 22.50, propofol = 42.95 ± 22.26, p<0.001) seizure duration and motor (etomidate = 46.11 ± 14.38, propofol = 22.89 ± 7.13, p<0.001) seizure duration and a higher mean number of inadequate seizures (etomidate = 0.12 ± 0.15, propofol = 0.47 ± 0.26, p<0.001). No significant differences were found between the groups for the effects of the anesthetics on the efficacy of ECT. Our study is limited by a retrospective design and the small number of patients treated with propofol restricted the sample size. Anesthesia with propofol has a significant reducing effect on seizure duration during the course of ECT which results in more inadequate seizures, despite the use of a higher mean stimulus charge. Regarding the possible effect of the anesthetics on ECT, randomized clinical trials with sufficient power to detect differences are warranted. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Effect of age and anticonvulsants on seizure threshold during bilateral electroconvulsive therapy with brief-pulse stimulus: A chart-based analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitturkar, Abhishek R.; Sinha, Preeti; Bagewadi, Virupakshappa I.; Thirthalli, Jagadisha

    2016-01-01

    Background: Efficacy and adverse effects of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) depend on the extent to which the electrical stimulus exceeds patients' seizure thresholds (STs). Titration method of estimating ST is recommended. Age and co-prescribed anticonvulsants (ACs) are known to affect ST. Literature on ST in bilateral ECT (BLECT) is sparse. Objective: To explore the clinical and demographic determinants of ST in a clinically representative sample of patients prescribed with BLECT. Materials and Methods: ECT records of 640 patients who received BLECT in 2011 in an academic psychiatric setting were studied. Demographic, clinical, pharmacological, and ECT details were analyzed. As per the standard practice, during the 1st ECT session, ST was determined by titration method, starting with 30 milli-Coulombs (mC) and increasing by 30 mC and thence in steps of 60 mC. Increase in ST over up to 6th session of ECT was noted. Receiver operating characteristic curve was used to find age cut-off with high specificity for ST ≥120 mC. The associations of ST and increase in ST with the age cut-off and other clinical factors were assessed using Chi-square test and logistic regression analysis. Results: The mean age was 30.98 years (+11.23 years) and mean ST at 1st ECT session was 130.36 mC (+51.96 mC). There was significantly high positive correlation (r = 0.37, P < 0.001) between age and ST. Cut-off age of 45 years had high specificity: Only 4.6% of those older than 45 years had ST <120 mC. Higher proportion of patients on AC had ST ≥120 mC. These associations were seen even after controlling for potential confounds of each other using logistic regression analysis. The results were similar for increase in ST over the course of ECT. Sex, diagnosis, use of antipsychotics, antidepressants, lithium, and benzodiazepines (BZPs) had no effect on ST or its increase. Conclusions: For BLECT using brief-pulse stimulus, ST depends on age and use of AC. For patients above the age of 45

  2. Effects of electroconvulsive therapy and repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels in patients with depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura eGedge

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF levels are decreased in individuals with depression and increase following antidepressant treatment. The objective of this study is to compare pre- and post-treatment serum BDNF levels in patients with drug-resistant major depressive disorder (MDD who received either electroconvulsive therapy (ECT or repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS. It is hypothesized that non-pharmacological treatments also increase serum BDNF levels.Methods: This was a prospective, single-blind study comparing pre- and post-treatment serum BDNF levels of twenty-nine patients with drug-resistant MDD who received ECT or rTMS treatment. Serum BDNF levels were measured one week prior to and one week after treatment using the sandwich ELISA technique. Depression severity was measured one week before and one week after treatment using the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale. Two-sided normal distribution paired t-test analysis was used to compare pre- and post-treatment BDNF concentration and illness severity. Bivariate correlations using Pearson's coefficient assessed the relationship between post-treatment BDNF levels and post-treatment depression severity.Results: There was no significant difference in serum BDNF levels before and after ECT, although concentrations tended to increase from a baseline mean of 9.95 ng/ml to 12.29 ng/ml after treatment (p= 0.137. Treatment with rTMS did not significantly alter BDNF concentrations (p= 0.282. Depression severity significantly decreased following both ECT (p= 0.003 and rTMS (p< 0.001. Post-treatment BDNF concentration was not significantly correlated with post-treatment depression severity in patients who received either ECT (r= -0.133, p= 0.697 or rTMS (r= 0.374, p= 0.126.Conclusion: This study suggests that ECT and rTMS may not exert their clinical effects by altering serum BDNF levels. Serum BDNF concentration may not be a biomarker of ECT or rTMS treatment response.

  3. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial on the role of preemptive analgesia with acetaminophen [paracetamol] in reducing headache following electroconvulsive therapy [ECT].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isuru, Amila; Rodrigo, Asiri; Wijesinghe, Chamara; Ediriweera, Dileepa; Premadasa, Shan; Wijesekara, Carmel; Kuruppuarachchi, Lalith

    2017-07-28

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is a safe and efficient treatment for several severe psychiatric disorders, but its use is limited by side effects. Post-ECT headache is one of the commonest side effects. Preemptive analgesia is effective in post-surgical pain management. The most commonly used analgesic is acetaminophen (paracetamol). However, acetaminophen as a preemptive analgesic for post-ECT headache has not been studied adequately. This study was conducted to compare the incidence and severity of post-ECT headache in patients who were administered acetaminophen pre-ECT with a placebo group. This study was a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Sixty-three patients received 1 g acetaminophen and 63 patients received a placebo identical to acetaminophen. The incidence and severity of headache 2 h before and after ECT were compared between placebo and acetaminophen groups. The severity was measured using a visual analog scale. Generalised linear models were used to evaluate variables associated with post ECT headache. Demographic and clinical variables of placebo and acetaminophen groups were comparable except for the energy level used to induce a seizure. Higher proportion of the placebo group (71.4%) experienced post-ECT headache when compared to the acetaminophen group (p < 0.001). The median pain score for headache was 0 (Inter quartile range: 0-2) in acetaminophen group whereas the score was 2 (IQR: 0-4) in placebo group (P < 0.001). Model fitting showed that the administration of acetaminophen is associated with less post-ECT headache (odds ratio = 0.23, 95% CI: 0.11-0.48, P < 0.001). A significant reduction was seen in both the incidence and severity of post-ECT headache with preemptive analgesia with acetaminophen. Ethical approval was granted by an Ethic review committee, University of Kelaniya, Sri Lanka (P/166/10/2015) and the trial was registered in the Sri Lanka Clinical Trials Registry ( SLCTR/2015/27 ).

  4. Erythropoietin as an add-on treatment for cognitive side effects of electroconvulsive therapy: a study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Lejla Sjanic; Petersen, Jeff Zarp; Vinberg, Maj; Hageman, Ida; Olsen, Niels Vidiendal; Kessing, Lars Vedel; Jørgensen, Martin Balslev; Miskowiak, Kamilla Woznica

    2018-04-19

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is the most effective treatment for severe depression, but its use is impeded by its cognitive side effects. Novel treatments that can counteract these side effects may therefore improve current treatment strategies for depression. The present randomized trial investigates (1) whether short-term add-on treatment with erythropoietin (EPO) can reduce the cognitive side -effects of ECT and (2) whether such effects are long-lasting. Further, structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) will be used to explore the neural underpinnings of such beneficial effects of EPO. Finally, the trial examines whether potential protective effects of EPO on cognition are accompanied by changes in markers of oxidative stress, inflammation, and neuroplasticity. The trial has a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, parallel group design. Patients with unipolar or bipolar disorder with current moderate to severe depression referred to ECT (N = 52) are randomized to receive four high-dose infusions of EPO (40,000 IU/ml) or placebo (saline). The first EPO/saline infusion is administered within 24 h before the first ECT. The following three infusions are administered at weekly intervals immediately after ECT sessions 1, 4, and 7. Cognition assessments are conducted at baseline, after the final EPO/saline infusion (3 days after eight ECT sessions), and at a 3 months follow-up after ECT treatment completion. The neuronal substrates for potential cognitive benefits of EPO are investigated with structural and functional MRI after the final EPO/saline infusion. The primary outcome is change from baseline to after EPO treatment (3 days after eight ECT sessions) in a cognitive composite score spanning attention, psychomotor speed, and executive functions. With a sample size of N = 52 (n = 26 per group), we have ≥ 80% power to detect a clinically relevant between-group difference in the primary outcome measure at an alpha

  5. Combined use of electroconvulsive therapy and antipsychotics (both clozapine and non-clozapine in treatment resistant schizophrenia: A comparative meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Ahmed

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To assess the relative efficacies of clozapine plus Electroconvulsive Therapy (ECT compared against non-clozapine typical and atypical antipsychotics plus ECT for the treatment of “Treatment Resistant Schizophrenia” (TRS. Primarily to assess if clozapine delivers a significant improvement over other antipsychotics when combined with ECT. Design: Major electronic databases were searched between 1990 and March 2017 for trials measuring the effects of either clozapine augmented ECT, other antipsychotic-augmented ECT, or both. After the systematic review of the data, a random-effects meta-analysis was conducted measuring the relative effect sizes of the different treatment regimens. Subjects: 1179 patients in 23 studies reporting the usage of ECT augmentation with antipsychotics. A total of 95 patients were tested with clozapine, and ECT (9 studies and 1084 patients were tested with non-clozapine antipsychotics (14 studies such as flupenthixol, chlorpromazine, risperidone, sulpiride, olanzapine, and loxapine with concurrent ECT treatment considered for systematic review. Of these, 13 studies reported pre and post-treatment scores were included in the meta-analysis. Main outcome measures: The main outcome measure was the presence and degree of both positive and negative psychotic symptoms, as measured by either of two standardized clinician administered tests, the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS, and the Positive and Negative Symptom Scale (PANSS. Results: The comparison of the different antipsychotics established the supremacy of ECT-augmented clozapine treatment against other typical and atypical antipsychotics. The Forest Plot revealed that the overall standard mean difference was 0.891 for non-clozapine studies and 1.504 for clozapine studies, at a 95% interval. Furthermore, the heterogeneity plots showed that while clozapine studies showed no significant heterogeneity, non-clozapine studies showed an I2 statistic value at 42

  6. Electroconvulsive seizures (ECS) do not prevent LPS-induced behavioral alterations and microglial activation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Buel, E. M.; Bosker, F. J.; van Drunen, J.; Strijker, J.; Douwenga, W.; Klein, H. C.; Eisel, U. L. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Long-term neuroimmune activation is a common finding in major depressive disorder (MDD). Literature suggests a dual effect of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), a highly effective treatment strategy for MDD, on neuroimmune parameters: while ECT acutely increases inflammatory parameters,

  7. Predictors of Postoperative Complications After Trimodality Therapy for Esophageal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Jingya; Wei, Caimiao; Tucker, Susan L.; Myles, Bevan; Palmer, Matthew; Hofstetter, Wayne L.; Swisher, Stephen G.; Ajani, Jaffer A.; Cox, James D.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Liao, Zhongxing; Lin, Steven H.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: While trimodality therapy for esophageal cancer has improved patient outcomes, surgical complication rates remain high. The goal of this study was to identify modifiable factors associated with postoperative complications after neoadjuvant chemoradiation. Methods and Materials: From 1998 to 2011, 444 patients were treated at our institution with surgical resection after chemoradiation. Postoperative (pulmonary, gastrointestinal [GI], cardiac, wound healing) complications were recorded up to 30 days postoperatively. Kruskal-Wallis tests and χ 2 or Fisher exact tests were used to assess associations between continuous and categorical variables. Multivariate logistic regression tested the association between perioperative complications and patient or treatment factors that were significant on univariate analysis. Results: The most frequent postoperative complications after trimodality therapy were pulmonary (25%) and GI (23%). Lung capacity and the type of radiation modality used were independent predictors of pulmonary and GI complications. After adjusting for confounding factors, pulmonary and GI complications were increased in patients treated with 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) versus intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT; odds ratio [OR], 2.018; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.104-3.688; OR, 1.704; 95% CI, 1.03-2.82, respectively) and for patients treated with 3D-CRT versus proton beam therapy (PBT; OR, 3.154; 95% CI, 1.365-7.289; OR, 1.55; 95% CI, 0.78-3.08, respectively). Mean lung radiation dose (MLD) was strongly associated with pulmonary complications, and the differences in toxicities seen for the radiation modalities could be fully accounted for by the MLD delivered by each of the modalities. Conclusions: The radiation modality used can be a strong mitigating factor of postoperative complications after neoadjuvant chemoradiation

  8. Comparative Study of the Clonidin and Propranolol Effect in the Prevention of Hemodynamic Changes after Electroconvulsive Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Moradi

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: ECT is an inevitable therapy for many of psychiatric patients. During ECT severe hemodynamic changes occur which may cause dangerous cardiovascular complications especially in elderly patients with cardiac disease and may lead to arrhythmia,ischemia and myocardial infarction. The purpose of this study was to show the effect of clonidin and propranolol on the prevention of hemodynamic changes following the ECT.Materials & Methods: This study was a controlled double blind clinical trial which was carried out on 31 patients ASA I, II hospitalized in psychiatry ward of Hamadan Sina hospital who were in need of ECT. In order to increase the accuracy of the study the personal factors on the drug metabolism were omitted and the chosen patients were given ECT three times separately with the interval of 48 hours. Two hours before every ECT clonidin (0.2 mg, propranolol (40 mg and placebo (vitamin c were administered and after each ECT the hemodynamic parameters including systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, rate pressure product and ECG were measured at certain intervals and recorded on information forms and then analyzed by SPSS 9 soft ware. Results: The result of this study showed that the average changes of hemodynamic parameters in different times occurred in all groups significantly(p<0.001. Following ECT, arrhythmia in control group has been plentiful in comparison with the other two groups, and the changes were statistically meaningful (p=0.001.Conclusion: We concluded that the modifying hemodynamic changes and decrease of arrhythmia taking the drugs in comparison with placebo have been more effective and of the two drugs, propranolol has been more effective on the prevention of hemodynamic changes after ECT.

  9. Challenges in comparing the acute cognitive outcomes of high-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (HF-rTMS) vs. electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in major depression: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedzior, Karina Karolina; Schuchinsky, Maria; Gerkensmeier, Imke; Loo, Colleen

    2017-08-01

    The present study aimed to systematically compare the cognitive outcomes of high-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (HF-rTMS) and electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in head-to-head studies with major depression (MDD) patients. A systematic literature search identified six studies with 219 MDD patients that were too heterogeneous to reliably detect meaningful differences in acute cognitive outcomes after ECT vs. HF-rTMS. Cognitive effects of brain stimulation vary depending on the timeframe and methods of assessment, stimulation parameters, and maintenance treatment. Thus, acute and longer-term differences in cognitive outcomes both need to be investigated at precisely defined timeframes and with similar instruments assessing comparable functions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Predictors of nonresponse to intravenous immunoglobulin therapy in Kawasaki disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyo Min Park

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available &lt;b&gt;Purpose:&lt;/b&gt; It has been reported that 10% to 20% of children with Kawasaki disease (KD will not respond to intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG treatment. In this study, we aimed to identify useful predictors of therapeutic failure in children with KD. &lt;b&gt;Methods:&lt;/b&gt; We examined 309 children diagnosed with KD at the Kyungpook National University Hospital and the Inje University Busan Paik Hospital between January 2005 and June 2011. We retrospectively reviewed their medical records and analyzed multiple parameters in responders and nonresponders to IVIG. &lt;b&gt;Results:&lt;/b&gt; Among the 309 children, 30 (9.7% did not respond to IVIG. They had significantly higher proportion of neutrophils, and higher levels of aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase (ALT, total bilirubin, and N-terminal fragment of B-type natriuretic peptide than did responders. IVIGnonresponders had a significantly longer duration of hospitalization, and more frequently experienced coronary artery lesion, and sterile pyuria. No differences in the duration of fever at initial treatment or, clinical features were noted. &lt;b&gt;Conclusion:&lt;/b&gt; Two independent predictors (ALT?#248;4 IU/L, total bilirubin?#240;.9 mg/dL for nonresponse were confirmed through multivariate logistic regression analysis. Thus elevated ALT and total bilirubin levels might be useful in predicting nonresponse to IVIG therapy in children with KD.

  11. Patient Characteristics and Patient Behavior as Predictors of Outcome in Cognitive Therapy and Exposure Therapy for Hypochondriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richtberg, Samantha; Jakob, Marion; Höfling, Volkmar; Weck, Florian

    2017-06-01

    Psychotherapy for hypochondriasis has greatly improved over the last decades and cognitive-behavioral treatments are most promising. However, research on predictors of treatment outcome for hypochondriasis is rare. Possible predictors of treatment outcome in cognitive therapy (CT) and exposure therapy (ET) for hypochondriasis were investigated. Characteristics and behaviors of 75 patients were considered as possible predictors: sociodemographic variables (sex, age, and cohabitation); psychopathology (pretreatment hypochondriacal symptoms, comorbid mental disorders, and levels of depression, anxiety, and somatic symptoms); and patient in-session interpersonal behavior. Severity of pretreatment hypochondriacal symptoms, comorbid mental disorders, and patient in-session interpersonal behavior were significant predictors in multiple hierarchical regression analyses. Interactions between the predictors and the treatment (CT or ET) were not found. In-session interpersonal behavior is an important predictor of outcome. Furthermore, there are no specific contraindications to treating hypochondriasis with CT or ET. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Predictors of Substance Use and Family Therapy Outcome among Physically and Sexually Abused Runaway Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slesnick, Natasha; Bartle-Haring, Suzanne; Gangamma, Rashmi

    2006-01-01

    There is a dearth of research that examines the impact of family systems therapy on problems among sexually and/or physically abused youth. Given this void, differential outcome and predictors of substance use change were evaluated for abused, as compared with nonabused, runaway adolescents who were randomly assigned to family therapy or treatment…

  13. Eletroconvulsoterapia e estimulação magnética transcraniana: semelhanças e diferenças Electroconvulsive therapy and transcranial magnetic stimulation: similarities and differences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moacyr Alexandro Rosa

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Neste artigo, é feita uma revisão detalhada das semelhanças e diferenças entre os dois principais tratamentos biológicos não-medicamentosos existentes na atualidade para o tratamento da depressão, a eletroconvulsoterapia e a estimulação magnética transcraniana de repetição. São comparados detalhadamente os efeitos fisiológicos, os aspectos clínicos, a técnica e os mecanismos de ação. Por fim, é feita uma revisão da eficácia comparativa entre os dois tratamentos para a depressão.This article is a detailed review of similarities and differences between the two main non pharmacological biological treatments currently used for depression, electroconvulsive therapy and repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation. Comparison is made on physiological effects, clinical aspects, technique and mechanisms of action. A review of the clinical efficacy is shown in the end of the article.

  14. Opinião e conhecimento de pacientes e familiares sobre o uso da eletroconvulsoterapia: implicações para a enfermagem Opinion and knowledge of pacients and their relativies of the electroconvulsive therapy: implication for nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudinei José Gomes Campos

    1997-08-01

    Full Text Available Neste trabalho verificou-se a opinião e o conhecimento de pacientes internados em uma unidade psiquiátrica e seus familiares, sobre a aceitação do uso da eletroconvulsoterapia. Através de análise quantitativa constatou-se a aprovação da maioria ao tratamento, apesar do escasso conhecimento sobre este, apresentado pelos indivíduos estudados. Constatou-se também que o conhecimento desse tratamento e a confiança depositada no profissional médico que indica o tratamento, parece influir na opinião dos indivíduos sobre seu uso. Desta forma existe a importância do papel do enfermeiro na educação dos indivíduos em relação à eletroconvulsoterapia.The aim of this report was to verify in-patients and their relative's opinion and knowledge of the use of electroconvulsive therapy. By means of a quantitative analysis, the use of this treatment was shown to be accepted despite the individuals knew little about it. It was observed taht the knowledge of this treatment had influence over individual's opinion about it. Thus nurses play an important role on the instruction of these individuals regarding this treatment.

  15. Electroconvulsive therapy changes the regional resting state function measured by regional homogeneity (ReHo) and amplitude of low frequency fluctuations (ALFF) in elderly major depressive disorder patients: An exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Xiao-Ming; Xu, Shu-Xian; Sun, Yan; Wang, Ke-Yong; Wang, Chen; Zhang, Ji; Xia, Jin-Xiang; Zhang, Li; Tan, Bo-Jian; Xie, Xin-Hui

    2017-06-30

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is the most effective and rapid treatment for severe major depressive disorder (MDD) in elderly patients. The mechanism of ECT is unclear, and studies on ECT in elderly MDD patients by resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging are rare. Thirteen elderly MDD patients were scanned before and after ECT using a 3.0T MRI scanner. Regional homogeneity (ReHo) and amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations (ALFF) were processed to compare resting-state function before and after treatment. Depression and anxiety symptoms of all patients abated after ECT. Decreased ReHo values in the bilateral superior frontal gyrus (SFG) were observed after ECT, and the values of right SFG significantly correlated with an altered Hamilton depression rating scale score. Increased ALFF values in the left middle frontal gyrus, right middle frontal gyrus, orbital part, and decreased ALFF values in the left midcingulate area, left precentral gyrus, right SFG/middle frontal gyrus after ECT were also observed. These results support the hypothesis that ECT may affect the regional resting state brain function in geriatric MDD patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Time course and duration of changes in Kv7.2 and Kv11.1 mRNA expression in the hippocampus and piriform cortex following electroconvulsive stimulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjaeresen, Marie-Louise; Hageman, Ida; Wortwein, Gitta

    2012-01-01

    A minimum of six electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) treatments has to be delivered to achieve sustained improvement in major depression. However, the mechanisms of the therapeutic actions of ECT are still debated.......A minimum of six electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) treatments has to be delivered to achieve sustained improvement in major depression. However, the mechanisms of the therapeutic actions of ECT are still debated....

  17. Predictors of mortality in patients initiating antiretroviral therapy in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a history of oral candidiasis (HR 2.58, 95% CI 1.37 - 4.88) remained significant in multivariate analysis. A history of tuberculosis was not a significant predictor of mortality. Conclusions. Simple clinical and laboratory data independently predict mortality and allow for risk stratification in patients initiating ART in South Africa.

  18. Cognitive and behavioral predictors of light therapy use.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn A Roecklein

    Full Text Available Although light therapy is effective in the treatment of seasonal affective disorder (SAD and other mood disorders, only 53-79% of individuals with SAD meet remission criteria after light therapy. Perhaps more importantly, only 12-41% of individuals with SAD continue to use the treatment even after a previous winter of successful treatment.Participants completed surveys regarding (1 social, cognitive, and behavioral variables used to evaluate treatment adherence for other health-related issues, expectations and credibility of light therapy, (2 a depression symptoms scale, and (3 self-reported light therapy use.Individuals age 18 or older responded (n = 40, all reporting having been diagnosed with a mood disorder for which light therapy is indicated. Social support and self-efficacy scores were predictive of light therapy use (p's<.05.The findings suggest that testing social support and self-efficacy in a diagnosed patient population may identify factors related to the decision to use light therapy. Treatments that impact social support and self-efficacy may improve treatment response to light therapy in SAD.

  19. Distinct Neural-Functional Effects of Treatments With Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors, Electroconvulsive Therapy, and Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation and Their Relations to Regional Brain Function in Major Depression: A Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chau, David T; Fogelman, Phoebe; Nordanskog, Pia; Drevets, Wayne C; Hamilton, J Paul

    2017-05-01

    Functional neuroimaging studies have examined the neural substrates of treatments for major depressive disorder (MDD). Low sample size and methodological heterogeneity, however, undermine the generalizability of findings from individual studies. We conducted a meta-analysis to identify reliable neural changes resulting from different modes of treatment for MDD and compared them with each other and with reliable neural functional abnormalities observed in depressed versus control samples. We conducted a meta-analysis of studies reporting changes in brain activity (e.g., as indexed by positron emission tomography) following treatments with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), or transcranial magnetic stimulation. Additionally, we examined the statistical reliability of overlap among thresholded meta-analytic SSRI, ECT, and transcranial magnetic stimulation maps as well as a map of abnormal neural function in MDD. Our meta-analysis revealed that 1) SSRIs decrease activity in the anterior insula, 2) ECT decreases activity in central nodes of the default mode network, 3) transcranial magnetic stimulation does not result in reliable neural changes, and 4) regional effects of these modes of treatment do not significantly overlap with each other or with regions showing reliable functional abnormality in MDD. SSRIs and ECT produce neurally distinct effects relative to each other and to the functional abnormalities implicated in depression. These treatments therefore may exert antidepressant effects by diminishing neural functions not implicated in depression but that nonetheless impact mood. We discuss how the distinct neural changes resulting from SSRIs and ECT can account for both treatment effects and side effects from these therapies as well as how to individualize these treatments. Copyright © 2017 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Pattern Visual Evoked Potential as a Predictor of Occlusion Therapy for Amblyopia

    OpenAIRE

    Chung, Woosuk; Hong, Samin; Lee, Jong Bok; Han, Sueng-Han

    2008-01-01

    Purpose This study was conducted to investigate the role of the pattern visual evoked potential (pVEP) as a predictor of occlusion therapy for patients with strabismic, anisometropic, and isometropic amblyopia. The secondary aim was to compare the characteristics of pVEP between strabismic and anisometropic amblyopia. Methods This retrospective comparative case series included 120 patients who had received occlusion therapy or a glasses prescription for correction of strabismic, anisometropic...

  1. Clinical efficacy of formula-based bifrontal versus right unilateral electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in the treatment of major depression among elderly patients: a pragmatic, randomized, assessor-blinded, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjølseth, Tor Magne; Engedal, Knut; Benth, Jūratė Šaltytė; Dybedal, Gro Strømnes; Gaarden, Torfinn Lødøen; Tanum, Lars

    2015-04-01

    No prior study has compared the efficacy of bifrontal (BF) vs right unilateral (RUL) electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) by including the subgroup that is most likely to receive it: only elderly patients with major depression (MD). This single-site, randomized, assessor-blinded, controlled trial was conducted from 2009 to 2013. Seventy-three elderly patients with MD, unipolar and bipolar, were treated with a course of formula-based BF ECT or RUL ECT. The 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD17) was used to measure efficacy. Safety was assessed with the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE). Both electrode placements resulted in highly significant downward trends in symptom severity (all p<0.001), with a non-significant difference between methods (p=0.703). At the end of the ECT course, response rates for the BF and RUL group were 63.9% and 67.6%, respectively. Short-term remission, defined as an HRSD17 score≤7, was achieved in 14 (38.9%) patients in the BF group and 19 (51.4%) patients in the RUL group. Global cognitive function, as measured by the MMSE, did not deteriorate in the two treatment groups. The small number of subjects may have led to reduced power to detect real differences. The MMSE is not sufficient to ascertain the negative effect of ECT on cognition. This study indicates that formula-based BF and RUL ECT are equally efficacious, and that remission rates of formula-based dosing are lower than those previously reported for titrated dosing, in a clinical sample of elderly patients with MD. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01559324. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Predictors of Outcome for Cognitive Behaviour Therapy in Binge Eating Disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lammers, M.W.; Vroling, M.S.; Ouwens, M.A.; Engels, R.C.M.E.; Strien, T. van

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this naturalistic study was to identify pretreatment predictors of response to cognitive behaviour therapy in treatment-seeking patients with binge eating disorder (BED; N=304). Furthermore, we examined end-of-treatment factors that predict treatment outcome 6months later (N=190). We

  3. Predictors of outcome for cognitive behaviour therapy in binge eating disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lammers, M.W.; Vroling, M.S.; Ouwens, M.A.; Engels, R.C.M.E.; van Strien, T.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this naturalistic study was to identify pretreatment predictors of response to cognitive behaviour therapy in treatment-seeking patients with binge eating disorder (BED; N = 304). Furthermore, we examined end-of-treatment factors that predict treatment outcome 6 months later (N = 190). We

  4. Predictors of Treatment Response to Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Depression in Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobkin, Roseanne D.; Rubino, Jade Tiu; Allen, Lesley A.; Friedman, Jill; Gara, Michael A.; Mark, Margery H.; Menza, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to examine predictors of treatment response to cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for depression in Parkinson's disease (PD). Method: The sample comprised 80 depressed ("DSM-IV" criteria) adults with PD (60% male) and their caregivers who participated in an National Institutes of Health-sponsored…

  5. Lymphocytic Colitis: Pathologic predictors of response to therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setia, Namrata; Alpert, Lindsay; van der Sloot, Kimberley Wj; Colussi, Dora; Stewart, Kathleen O; Misdraji, Joseph; Khalili, Hamed; Lauwers, Gregory Y

    2018-02-13

    While the presence of intraepithelial lymphocytosis with surface epithelial damage is a unifying feature of lymphocytic colitis, there are non-classical features that create morphologic heterogeneity between cases. Limited data are available on the significance of these secondary histologic features. Cases of lymphocytic colitis diagnosed between 2002 and 2013 were identified using the Research Patient Data Registry of a tertiary referral center. Diagnostic biopsy slides were reviewed and evaluated for histologic features of lymphocytic colitis. Clinical data including type of therapy and response to treatment were collected. Chi-square (or Fischer's exact test) and logistic regression analysis were used where appropriate. Thirty-two cases of lymphocytic colitis with complete clinical data and slides available for review were identified. The mean age was 56.4 years, and the female-to-male ratio was 3:2. Eleven (11) patients improved with minimal intervention (Group 1), 14 patients responded to steroid therapy (Group 2), and 7 patients responded to mesalamine, bismuth subsalicylate and/or cholestyramine therapy (Group 3). Histologic differences in the characteristics of the subepithelial collagen table (p=0.018), the severity of lamina propria inflammation (p=0.042) and the presence of eosinophil clusters (p=0.016) were seen between groups 2 and 3. Patients in group 1 were more likely to have mild crypt architectural distortion in their biopsies than patients in groups 2 and 3. Lymphocytic colitis is a heterogeneous disease and the evaluation of histologic factors may help identify various subtypes and predict therapy response. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Epigenetic regulation of Dnmt3a> and Arc gene expression after electroconvulsive stimulation in the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyrvig, Mads; Gøtzsche, Casper René; Woldbye, David P. D.

    2015-01-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) remains one of the most effective treatments of major depression. Unfortunately, some patients report side effects, of which the most prominent are memory deficits. The immediate early gene Arc plays a critical role in the maintenance phase of long-term potentiatio...

  7. Child and Adolescent Adherence With Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Anxiety: Predictors and Associations With Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Phyllis; Zehgeer, Asima; Ginsburg, Golda S; McCracken, James; Keeton, Courtney; Kendall, Philip C; Birmaher, Boris; Sakolsky, Dara; Walkup, John; Peris, Tara; Albano, Anne Marie; Compton, Scott

    2017-04-27

    Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for anxiety disorders is effective, but nonadherence with treatment may reduce the benefits of CBT. This study examined (a) four baseline domains (i.e., demographic, youth clinical characteristics, therapy related, family/parent factors) as predictors of youth adherence with treatment and (b) the associations between youth adherence and treatment outcomes. Data were from 279 youth (7-17 years of age, 51.6% female; 79.6% White, 9% African American), with Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed., text rev.) diagnoses of separation anxiety disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, and/or social phobia, who participated in CBT in the Child/Adolescent Anxiety Multimodal Study. Adherence was defined in three ways (session attendance, therapist-rated compliance, and homework completion). Multiple regressions revealed several significant predictors of youth adherence with CBT, but predictors varied according to the definition of adherence. The most robust predictors of greater adherence were living with both parents and fewer youth comorbid externalizing disorders. With respect to outcomes, therapist ratings of higher youth compliance with CBT predicted several indices of favorable outcome: lower anxiety severity, higher global functioning, and treatment responder status after 12 weeks of CBT. Number of sessions attended and homework completion did not predict treatment outcomes. Findings provide information about risks for youth nonadherence, which can inform treatment and highlight the importance of youth compliance with participating in therapy activities, rather than just attending sessions or completing homework assignments.

  8. Predictors of response to combined wake and light therapy in treatment-resistant inpatients with depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragh, Mette; Roj Larsen, Erik; Martiny, Klaus

    2018-01-01

    There is growing evidence for combined chronotherapeutic interventions as adjunctive treatments for major depression. However, as the treatments can be demanding, we need to identify predictors of response. This study aimed to describe predictors of response, remission and deterioration in the sh......There is growing evidence for combined chronotherapeutic interventions as adjunctive treatments for major depression. However, as the treatments can be demanding, we need to identify predictors of response. This study aimed to describe predictors of response, remission and deterioration...... in the short-term phase, as well as predictors of long-term response. The predictors investigated were gender, type of depression, severity of depression, treatment resistance, quetiapine use, general self-efficacy, educational level and positive diurnal variation. Follow-up data from 27 inpatients...... with moderate-to-severe depression participating in a chronotherapeutic intervention were analysed. As a supplement to standard treatment, they completed 3 wake therapy sessions in the first week, 30 min daily light treatment and sleep-time stabilisation in the entire 9-week study period. Patients had...

  9. Predictors of dropout from inpatient dialectical behavior therapy among women with borderline personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüsch, Nicolas; Schiel, Sarah; Corrigan, Patrick W; Leihener, Florian; Jacob, Gitta A; Olschewski, Manfred; Lieb, Klaus; Bohus, Martin

    2008-12-01

    Inpatient dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) is an effective treatment for borderline personality disorder (BPD), but often treatment is ended prematurely and predictors of dropout are poorly understood. We, therefore, studied predictors of dropout among 60 women with BPD during inpatient DBT. Non-completers had higher experiential avoidance and trait anxiety at baseline, but fewer life-time suicide attempts than completers. There was a trend for more anger-hostility and perceived stigma among non-completers. Experiential avoidance and anxiety may be associated with dropout in inpatient DBT. Low life-time suicidality and high anger could reflect a subtype at risk for discontinuation of inpatient treatment.

  10. Predictors of Renal Replacement Therapy in Acute Kidney Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Koziolek

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Backgrounds: Criteria that may guide early renal replacement therapy (RRT initiation in patients with acute kidney injury (AKI currently do not exist. Methods: In 120 consecutive patients with AKI, clinical and laboratory data were analyzed on admittance. The prognostic power of those parameters which were significantly different between the two groups was analyzed by receiver operator characteristic curves and by leave-1-out cross validation. Results: Six parameters (urine albumin, plasma creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, daily urine output, fluid balance and plasma sodium were combined in a logistic regression model that estimates the probability that a particular patient will need RRT. Additionally, a second model without daily urine output was established. Both models yielded a higher accuracy (89 and 88% correct classification rate, respectively than the best single parameter, cystatin C (correct classification rate 74%. Conclusions: The combined models may help to better predict the necessity of RRT using clinical and routine laboratory data in patients with AKI.

  11. Genetic Predictors of Response to Systemic Therapy in Esophagogastric Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janjigian, Yelena Y; Sanchez-Vega, Francisco; Jonsson, Philip; Chatila, Walid K; Hechtman, Jaclyn F; Ku, Geoffrey Y; Riches, Jamie C; Tuvy, Yaelle; Kundra, Ritika; Bouvier, Nancy; Vakiani, Efsevia; Gao, Jianjiong; Heins, Zachary J; Gross, Benjamin E; Kelsen, David P; Zhang, Liying; Strong, Vivian E; Schattner, Mark; Gerdes, Hans; Coit, Daniel G; Bains, Manjit; Stadler, Zsofia K; Rusch, Valerie W; Jones, David R; Molena, Daniela; Shia, Jinru; Robson, Mark E; Capanu, Marinela; Middha, Sumit; Zehir, Ahmet; Hyman, David M; Scaltriti, Maurizio; Ladanyi, Marc; Rosen, Neal; Ilson, David H; Berger, Michael F; Tang, Laura; Taylor, Barry S; Solit, David B; Schultz, Nikolaus

    2018-01-01

    The incidence of esophagogastric cancer is rapidly rising, but only a minority of patients derive durable benefit from current therapies. Chemotherapy as well as anti-HER2 and PD-1 antibodies are standard treatments. To identify predictive biomarkers of drug sensitivity and mechanisms of resistance, we implemented prospective tumor sequencing of patients with metastatic esophagogastric cancer. There was no association between homologous recombination deficiency defects and response to platinum-based chemotherapy. Patients with microsatellite instability-high tumors were intrinsically resistant to chemotherapy but more likely to achieve durable responses to immunotherapy. The single Epstein-Barr virus-positive patient achieved a durable, complete response to immunotherapy. The level of ERBB2 amplification as determined by sequencing was predictive of trastuzumab benefit. Selection for a tumor subclone lacking ERBB2 amplification, deletion of ERBB2 exon 16, and comutations in the receptor tyrosine kinase, RAS, and PI3K pathways were associated with intrinsic and/or acquired trastuzumab resistance. Prospective genomic profiling can identify patients most likely to derive durable benefit to immunotherapy and trastuzumab and guide strategies to overcome drug resistance. Significance: Clinical application of multiplex sequencing can identify biomarkers of treatment response to contemporary systemic therapies in metastatic esophagogastric cancer. This large prospective analysis sheds light on the biological complexity and the dynamic nature of therapeutic resistance in metastatic esophagogastric cancers. Cancer Discov; 8(1); 49-58. ©2017 AACR. See related commentary by Sundar and Tan, p. 14 See related article by Pectasides et al., p. 37 This article is highlighted in the In This Issue feature, p. 1 . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  12. Differences in the Treatment Response to Antithyroid Drugs versus Electroconvulsive Therapy in a Case of Recurrent Catatonia due to Graves’ Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Saito

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We reported a case which presented recurrent episodes of catatonia as a result of Graves’ disease with hyperthyroidism. The patient showed different treatment response in each episodes; in the first episode, psychiatric and physical symptoms were resolved by a combination of antithyroid and anxiolytic therapies, while in the second episode, the combination therapy did not ameliorate her symptoms and ECT was indicated. We postulated that decreased CSF level of TTR and the resulting susceptibility to the derangement of peripheral thyroid function might be involved in this different treatment response.

  13. Comparison of the neuropsychological mechanisms of 2,6-diisopropylphenol and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist against electroconvulsive therapy-induced learning and memory impairment in depressed rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gang; Liu, Chao; Zhang, Xue-Ning

    2015-09-01

    The present study aimed to examine the neurophysiological mechanisms of the 2,6-diisopropylphenol and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist against learning and memory impairment, induced by electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). A total of 48 adult depressed rats without olfactory bulbs were randomly divided into six experimental groups: i) saline; ii) 10 mg/kg MK‑801; iii) 10 mg/kg MK‑801 and a course of ECT; iv) 200 mg/kg 2,6‑diisopropylphenol; v) 200 mg/kg 2,6‑diisopropylphenol and a course of ECT; and vi) saline and a course of ECT. The learning and memory abilities of the rats were assessed using a Morris water maze 1 day after a course of ECT. The hippocampus was removed 1 day after assessment using the Morris water maze assessment. The content of glutamate in the hippocampus was detected using high‑performance liquid chromatography. The expression levels of p‑AT8Ser202 and GSK‑3β1H8 in the hippocampus were determined using immunohistochemical staining and western blot analysis. The results demonstrated that the 2,6‑diisopropylphenol NMDA receptor antagonist, MK‑801 and ECT induced learning and memory impairment in the depressed rats. The glutamate content was significantly upregulated by ECT, reduced by 2,6‑diisopropylphenol, and was unaffected by the NMDA receptor antagonist in the hippocampus of the depressed rats. Tau protein hyperphosphorylation in the hippocampus was upregulated by ECT, but was reduced by 2,6‑diisopropylphenol and the MK‑801 NMDA receptor antagonist. It was also demonstrated that 2,6‑diisopropylphenol prevented learning and memory impairment and reduced the hyperphosphorylation of the Tau protein, which was induced by eECT. GSK‑3β was found to be the key protein involved in this signaling pathway. The ECT reduced the learning and memory impairment, caused by hyperphosphorylation of the Tau protein, in the depressed rats by upregulating the glutamate content.

  14. Predictors of Broad Dimensions of Psychopathology among Patients with Panic Disorder after Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Masaki; Ino, Keiko; Imai, Risa; Ii, Toshitaka; Furukawa, Toshi A.; Akechi, Tatsuo

    2018-01-01

    Background Many patients with panic disorder meet criteria for at least one other diagnosis, most commonly other anxiety or mood disorders. Cognitive-behavioral therapy is the best empirically supported psychotherapy for panic disorder. There is now evidence indicating that cognitive-behavioral therapy for panic disorder yields positive benefits upon comorbid disorders. Objectives The present study aimed to examine the predictors of broad dimensions of psychopathology in panic disorder after cognitive-behavioral therapy. Methods Two hundred patients affected by panic disorder were treated with manualized group cognitive-behavioral therapy. We examined if the baseline personality dimensions of NEO Five Factor Index predicted the subscales of Symptom Checklist-90 Revised at endpoint using multiple regression analysis based on the intention-to-treat principle. Results Conscientiousness score of NEO Five Factor Index at baseline was a predictor of four Symptom Checklist-90 Revised subscales including obsessive-compulsive (β = −0.15, P cognitive-behavioral therapy. For the purpose of improving a wide range of psychiatric symptoms with patients affected by panic disorder, it may be useful to pay more attention to this personal trait at baseline. PMID:29721499

  15. Predictors of Broad Dimensions of Psychopathology among Patients with Panic Disorder after Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sei Ogawa

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Many patients with panic disorder meet criteria for at least one other diagnosis, most commonly other anxiety or mood disorders. Cognitive-behavioral therapy is the best empirically supported psychotherapy for panic disorder. There is now evidence indicating that cognitive-behavioral therapy for panic disorder yields positive benefits upon comorbid disorders. Objectives. The present study aimed to examine the predictors of broad dimensions of psychopathology in panic disorder after cognitive-behavioral therapy. Methods. Two hundred patients affected by panic disorder were treated with manualized group cognitive-behavioral therapy. We examined if the baseline personality dimensions of NEO Five Factor Index predicted the subscales of Symptom Checklist-90 Revised at endpoint using multiple regression analysis based on the intention-to-treat principle. Results. Conscientiousness score of NEO Five Factor Index at baseline was a predictor of four Symptom Checklist-90 Revised subscales including obsessive-compulsive (β=-0.15, P<0.01, depression (β=-0.13, P<0.05, phobic anxiety (β=-0.15, P<0.05, and Global Severity Index (β=-0.13, P<0.05. Conclusion. Conscientiousness at baseline may predict several dimensions of psychopathology in patients with panic disorder after cognitive-behavioral therapy. For the purpose of improving a wide range of psychiatric symptoms with patients affected by panic disorder, it may be useful to pay more attention to this personal trait at baseline.

  16. Predictors of Broad Dimensions of Psychopathology among Patients with Panic Disorder after Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Sei; Kondo, Masaki; Ino, Keiko; Imai, Risa; Ii, Toshitaka; Furukawa, Toshi A; Akechi, Tatsuo

    2018-01-01

    Many patients with panic disorder meet criteria for at least one other diagnosis, most commonly other anxiety or mood disorders. Cognitive-behavioral therapy is the best empirically supported psychotherapy for panic disorder. There is now evidence indicating that cognitive-behavioral therapy for panic disorder yields positive benefits upon comorbid disorders. The present study aimed to examine the predictors of broad dimensions of psychopathology in panic disorder after cognitive-behavioral therapy. Two hundred patients affected by panic disorder were treated with manualized group cognitive-behavioral therapy. We examined if the baseline personality dimensions of NEO Five Factor Index predicted the subscales of Symptom Checklist-90 Revised at endpoint using multiple regression analysis based on the intention-to-treat principle. Conscientiousness score of NEO Five Factor Index at baseline was a predictor of four Symptom Checklist-90 Revised subscales including obsessive-compulsive ( β = -0.15, P cognitive-behavioral therapy. For the purpose of improving a wide range of psychiatric symptoms with patients affected by panic disorder, it may be useful to pay more attention to this personal trait at baseline.

  17. Predictors and correlates of adherence to combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) for chronic HIV infection: a meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Langebeek, Nienke; Gisolf, Elizabeth H; Reiss, Peter; Vervoort, Sigrid C; Hafsteinsdóttir, Thóra B; Richter, Clemens; Sprangers, Mirjam AG; Nieuwkerk, Pythia T

    2014-01-01

    Background Adherence to combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) is a key predictor of the success of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) treatment, and is potentially amenable to intervention. Insight into predictors or correlates of non-adherence to ART may help guide targets for the development of adherence-enhancing interventions. Our objective was to review evidence on predictors/correlates of adherence to ART, and to aggregate findings into quantitative estimates of their impact on adher...

  18. Predictors and correlates of adherence to combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) for chronic HIV infection: a meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langebeek, Nienke; Gisolf, Elizabeth H.; Reiss, Peter; Vervoort, Sigrid C.; Hafsteinsdóttir, Thóra B.; Richter, Clemens; Sprangers, Mirjam A. G.; Nieuwkerk, Pythia T.

    2014-01-01

    Adherence to combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) is a key predictor of the success of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) treatment, and is potentially amenable to intervention. Insight into predictors or correlates of non-adherence to ART may help guide targets for the development of

  19. Predictors of short term treatment outcome in patients with achalasia following endoscopic or surgical therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheorghe, Cristian; Bancila, Ion; Tutuian, Radu; Iacob, Razvan; Tomulescu, Victor

    2012-01-01

    Pneumatic balloon dilation and surgical myotomy are the most effective treatments for achalasia. While there is controversy which method is best, the aim of the current study was to identify predictors of symptom recurrence after endoscopic or surgical therapy. Patients undergoing pneumatic balloon dilatation (30mm) or laparoscopic Heller myotomy with Dor fundoplication were included in the study. Analyzed parameters include total symptom score (sum of 0-5 point intensity for dysphagia, regurgitation and chest pain), width and height of esophageal column at 2 and 5 minutes after oral barium ingestion, lower esophageal sphincter (LES) length, resting (LESP) and residual pressure (LESRP) before and 3 months after intervention. Patients with symptoms score surgical group were symptom-free 3 months after intervention. Therapies improved LESP (24.4±8.2mmHg pre- vs. 15.4±10.3mmHg post-therapy; p=0.003) and mean LESRP (7.9±4.3mmHg pre- vs. 5.3±6.7mmHg post-therapy; p=0.03). Univariate linear regression analysis identified barium contrast column width >5cm at 2 minutes (p=0.04), LES length 10mmHg (p=0.02) as predictors for persistent symptoms. While >85% of achalasia patients responded well to 30mm pneumatic balloon dilation, patients with elevated LES pressure, short LES and wide esophagus should be considered as primary surgical candidates.

  20. Predictors of outcome for cognitive behaviour therapy in binge eating disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammers, Mirjam W; Vroling, Maartje S; Ouwens, Machteld A; Engels, Rutger C M E; van Strien, Tatjana

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this naturalistic study was to identify pretreatment predictors of response to cognitive behaviour therapy in treatment-seeking patients with binge eating disorder (BED; N = 304). Furthermore, we examined end-of-treatment factors that predict treatment outcome 6 months later (N = 190). We assessed eating disorder psychopathology, general psychopathology, personality characteristics and demographic variables using self-report questionnaires. Treatment outcome was measured using the bulimia subscale of the Eating Disorder Inventory 1. Predictors were determined using hierarchical linear regression analyses. Several variables significantly predicted outcome, four of which were found to be both baseline predictors of treatment outcome and end-of-treatment predictors of follow-up: Higher levels of drive for thinness, higher levels of interoceptive awareness, lower levels of binge eating pathology and, in women, lower levels of body dissatisfaction predicted better outcome in the short and longer term. Based on these results, several suggestions are made to improve treatment outcome for BED patients. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.

  1. Predictors in Internet-delivered cognitive behavior therapy and behavioral stress management for severe health anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedman, Erik; Andersson, Erik; Lekander, Mats; Ljótsson, Brjánn

    2015-01-01

    Severe health anxiety can be effectively treated with exposure-based Internet-delivered cognitive behavior therapy (ICBT), but information about which factors that predict outcome is scarce. Using data from a recently conducted RCT comparing ICBT (n = 79) with Internet-delivered behavioral stress management (IBSM) (n = 79) the presented study investigated predictors of treatment outcome. Analyses were conducted using a two-step linear regression approach and the dependent variable was operationalized both as end state health anxiety at post-treatment and as baseline-to post-treatment improvement. A hypothesis driven approach was used where predictors expected to influence outcome were based on a previous predictor study by our research group. As hypothesized, the results showed that baseline health anxiety and treatment adherence predicted both end state health anxiety and improvement. In addition, anxiety sensitivity, treatment credibility, and working alliance were significant predictors of health anxiety improvement. Demographic variables, i.e. age, gender, marital status, computer skills, educational level, and having children, had no significant predictive value. We conclude that it is possible to predict a substantial proportion of the outcome variance in ICBT and IBSM for severe health anxiety. The findings of the present study can be of high clinical value as they provide information about factors of importance for outcome in the treatment of severe health anxiety. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The Process of Change in Cognitive Therapy for Depression: Predictors of Early Inter-Session Symptom Gains

    OpenAIRE

    Strunk, Daniel R.; Brotman, Melissa A.; DeRubeis, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Although Cognitive Therapy for depression is an efficacious treatment, questions about the aspects of the therapy that are most critical to successful implementation remain. In a sample of 60 Cognitive Therapy patients with moderate to severe depression, we examined three aspects of therapists’ adherence to Cognitive Therapy techniques, the patients’ facilitation or inhibition of these techniques, and the therapeutic alliance as predictors of session-to-session symptom improvement across the ...

  3. Predictors of trimodality therapy and trends in therapy for malignant pleural mesothelioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, David B; Rice, David C; Niu, Jiangong; Atay, Scott M; Vaporciyan, Ara A; Antonoff, Mara B; Hofstetter, Wayne L; Walsh, Garrett L; Swisher, Stephen G; Roth, Jack A; Tsao, Anne S; Gomez, Daniel R; Giordano, Sharon H; Mehran, Reza J; Sepesi, Boris

    2018-05-01

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma is an aggressive and rare malignancy that frequently recurs despite aggressive therapy. We evaluated the frequency of treatment with surgery, radiation or chemotherapy, changes in therapy and survival over time and factors associated with the receipt of trimodality therapy. The National Cancer Database (NCDB) was used to query patients with histologically proven malignant pleural mesothelioma (2004-14). Treatment over time was evaluated using the Armitage trend test. Factors associated with the receipt of trimodality therapy were analysed using logistic regression. Among 20 561 patients, only 4028 (20%) underwent cancer-directed surgery; 533 (2.6%) of whom received trimodality therapy. From 2004 to 2014, the use of surgery with chemotherapy increased 87% (P 26 miles for treatment were more likely to undergo trimodality therapy. Additional factors associated with the receipt of trimodality therapy include age less than 70, Charlson comorbidity score of 0 and presence of private insurance. Many malignant pleural mesothelioma patients are not treated with trimodality therapy, with significant variation in treatment patterns. Referrals to high-volume and specialized centres may help offer more therapeutic options and trial or registry enrolment.

  4. Outcome expectancy as a predictor of treatment response in cognitive behavioral therapy for public speaking fears within social anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Matthew; Anderson, Page L

    2012-06-01

    Outcome expectancy, the extent that clients anticipate benefiting from therapy, is theorized to be an important predictor of treatment response for cognitive-behavioral therapy. However, there is a relatively small body of empirical research on outcome expectancy and the treatment of social anxiety disorder. This literature, which has examined the association mostly in group-based interventions, has yielded mixed findings. The current study sought to further evaluate the effect of outcome expectancy as a predictor of treatment response for public-speaking fears across both individual virtual reality and group-based cognitive-behavioral therapies. The findings supported outcome expectancy as a predictor of the rate of change in public-speaking anxiety during both individual virtual reality exposure therapy and group cognitive-behavioral therapy. Furthermore, there was no evidence to suggest that the impact of outcome expectancy differed across virtual reality or group treatments. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved.

  5. National Trends and Predictors of Androgen Deprivation Therapy Use in Low-Risk Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, David D. [Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Muralidhar, Vinayak [Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Mahal, Brandon A. [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Labe, Shelby A.; Nezolosky, Michelle D.; Vastola, Marie E.; King, Martin T.; Martin, Neil E.; Orio, Peter F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Choueiri, Toni K. [Department of Medical Oncology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Trinh, Quoc-Dien [Division of Urological Surgery, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Spratt, Daniel E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Hoffman, Karen E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Feng, Felix Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Departments of Urology & Medicine and Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California at San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); and others

    2017-06-01

    Purpose: Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is not recommended for low-risk prostate cancer because of its lack of benefit and potential for harm. We evaluated the incidence and predictors of ADT use in low-risk disease. Methods and Materials: Using the National Cancer Database, we identified 197,957 patients with low-risk prostate cancer (Gleason score of 3 + 3 = 6, prostate-specific antigen level <10 ng/mL, and cT1-T2a) diagnosed from 2004 to 2012 with complete demographic and treatment information. We used multiple logistic regression to evaluate predictors of ADT use and Cox regression to examine its association with all-cause mortality. Results: Overall ADT use decreased from 17.6% in 2004 to 3.5% in 2012. In 2012, 11.5% of low-risk brachytherapy patients and 7.6% of external beam radiation therapy patients received ADT. Among 82,352 irradiation-managed patients, predictors of ADT use included treatment in a community versus academic cancer program (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 1.60; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.50-1.71; P<.001; incidence, 14.0% vs 6.0% in 2012); treatment in the South (AOR, 1.51), Midwest (AOR, 1.81), or Northeast (AOR, 1.90) versus West (P<.001); and brachytherapy use versus external beam radiation therapy (AOR, 1.32; 95% CI, 1.27-1.37; P<.001). Among 25,196 patients who did not receive local therapy, predictors of primary ADT use included a Charlson-Deyo comorbidity score of ≥2 versus 0 (AOR, 1.42; 95% CI, 1.06-1.91; P=.018); treatment in a community versus academic cancer program (AOR, 1.61; 95% CI, 1.37-1.90; P<.001); and treatment in the South (AOR, 1.26), Midwest (AOR, 1.52), or Northeast (AOR, 1.28) versus West (P≤.008). Primary ADT use was associated with increased all-cause mortality in patients who did not receive local therapy (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.28; 95% CI, 1.14-1.43; P<.001) after adjustment for age and comorbidity. Conclusions: ADT use in low-risk prostate cancer has declined nationally but may remain an issue

  6. Guided parent-delivered cognitive behavioral therapy for childhood anxiety: Predictors of treatment response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirlwall, Kerstin; Cooper, Peter; Creswell, Cathy

    2017-01-01

    Guided Parent-delivered Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (GPD-CBT) is a brief, effective treatment for childhood anxiety disorders, however not all children respond favourably. To examine predictors of response to GPD-CBT. Parents of 125 children (7-12 years) with an anxiety disorder received GPD-CBT over 2.6 or 5.3h. Recovery was measured post treatment and six months later. Younger children and those with primary Generalised Anxiety Disorder (GAD) improved more post treatment, but older children and those without primary GAD had better outcomes at six month follow up. Fewer children allocated to 2.6h had recovered post treatment compared to those allocated to the 5.2h intervention, but did not differ significantly six months later. The identification of predictors of short and longer-term treatment outcomes can guide treatment decisions following this low-intensity approach. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. Cognitive behavioral therapy for compulsive buying behavior: Predictors of treatment outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granero, R; Fernández-Aranda, F; Mestre-Bach, G; Steward, T; Baño, M; Agüera, Z; Mallorquí-Bagué, N; Aymamí, N; Gómez-Peña, M; Sancho, M; Sánchez, I; Menchón, J M; Martín-Romera, V; Jiménez-Murcia, S

    2017-01-01

    Compulsive buying behavior (CBB) is receiving increasing consideration in both consumer and psychiatric-epidemiological research, yet empirical evidence on treatment interventions is scarce and mostly from small homogeneous clinical samples. To estimate the short-term effectiveness of a standardized, individual cognitive behavioral therapy intervention (CBT) in a sample of n=97 treatment-seeking patients diagnosed with CBB, and to identify the most relevant predictors of therapy outcome. The intervention consisted of 12 individual CBT weekly sessions, lasting approximately 45minutes each. Data on patients' personality traits, psychopathology, sociodemographic factors, and compulsive buying behavior were used in our analysis. The risk (cumulative incidence) of poor adherence to the CBT program was 27.8%. The presence of relapses during the CBT program was 47.4% and the dropout rate was 46.4%. Significant predictors of poor therapy adherence were being male, high levels of depression and obsessive-compulsive symptoms, low anxiety levels, high persistence, high harm avoidance and low self-transcendence. Cognitive behavioral models show promise in treating CBB, however future interventions for CBB should be designed via a multidimensional approach in which patients' sex, comorbid symptom levels and the personality-trait profiles play a central role. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Особливості застосування електросудомної терапії при наркологічній патології = Features of the application of electroconvulsive therapy in the treatment of drug abuse pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Chugunov

    2016-09-01

    Zaporizhzhya State Medical University Ministry of Healthcare of Ukraine   Summary Objective: to examine the possibility of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT use for the treatment of patients with addiction to psychoactive substances (PAS. The algorithm of ECT, which consists of 3 stages and IX sub-stages is given. The study of the therapeutic viability of  ECT  in the case of  broad spectrum of addictive pathology (F10-F19 in the context of the relief of addictive attraction to PAS and comorbid disorders, including emotional disorders and resistant to pharmacotherapy of pain syndrome is made. ЕСТ is an effective method for additions therapy and comorbide psychopathological states. High therapeutic effect is connected with sanogenetic effect achieved in stopping of poorly curable pathology and achievement of sustained remission even in the cases where other methods are noneffective. Key words: addiction, substance abuse, drug addiction, alcoholism, electroconvulsive therapy

  9. Evidências da eficácia da eletroconvulsoterapia na prática psiquiátrica Evidencias de la eficacia de la electroconvulsoterapia en la práctica psiquiátrica Evidence of the effectiveness of electroconvulsive therapy in the psychiatric practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Meira Moser

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available A eletroconvulsoterapia (ECT consiste em tratamento biológico ainda não amplamente utilizado na prática psiquiátrica, devido aos inúmeros fatores que contribuem para uma resistência acerca do método. Objetivando sustentar, com embasamento científico, o emprego da ECT, agregamos evidências de sua eficácia, indicações, contra-indicações e efeitos adversos, advindas dos principais ensaios clínicos randomizados e meta-análises disponíveis na literatura médica atual sobre o tema (PubMed/MEDLINE, Cochrane.La electroconvulsoterapia (ECT consiste en tratamiento biológico todavía no ampliamente utilizado en la práctica psiquiátrica, debido a los innúmeros factores que contribuyen a una resistencia al método. Objetivando sostener, con embasamiento científico, el empleo de la ECT, añadimos evidencias de su eficacia, indicaciones, contraindicaciones y efectos secundarios, advenidos de los principales ensayos clínicos aleatorios y meta-análisis disponibles en la literatura médica actual sobre el tema (PubMed/MEDLINE, Cochrane.The electroconvulsive therapy is a biological treatment not widely used in the psychiatric practice. A number of factors contribute to resistance concerning this method. The goal of the present article is to provide scientific support to the use of electroconvulsive therapy by showing its effectiveness, indications, contraindications and adverse effects. Such factors were searched in the major randomized clinical trials and meta-analyses available in the current medical literature on the subject (PubMed/MEDLINE, Cochrane.

  10. Guided parent-delivered cognitive behavioral therapy for childhood anxiety: Predictors of treatment response

    OpenAIRE

    Thirlwall, Kerstin; Cooper, Peter; Creswell, Cathy

    2017-01-01

    Background: Guided Parent-delivered Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (GPD-CBT) is a brief, effective treatment for childhood anxiety disorders, however not all children respond favourably. \\ud Aims: To examine predictors of response to GPD-CBT.\\ud Methods: Parents of 125 children (7 – 12 years) with an anxiety disorder received GPD-CBT over 2.6 or 5.3 hours). Recovery was measured post treatment and six months later. \\ud Results: Younger children and those with primary Generalised Anxiety Disorder...

  11. Predictors for secondary therapy after surgical resection of nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratnasingam, Jeyakantha; Lenders, Nele; Ong, Benjamin; Boros, Samuel; Russell, Anthony W; Inder, Warrick J; Ho, Ken K Y

    2017-12-01

    Factors determining recurrence of nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas (NFAs) that require further therapy are unclear as are postoperative follow-up imaging guidelines. We aimed to identify predictors for secondary therapy after surgical resection of NFAs and use this knowledge to inform postoperative management. A single-centre retrospective study of surgically resected NFAs in 108 patients followed for up to 15 years. Serial tumour images were analysed for size, location and growth rate (GR) and tissue analysed for hormone cell type and proliferation indices with secondary treatment as outcome measure. Twenty-four of 66 (36%) patients harbouring a postoperative remnant required secondary treatment, all occurring within 10 years. No secondary treatment was required in any of 42 patients with complete tumour resection. Age, gender, remnant volume and tumour histology were not different between patients requiring and not requiring secondary therapy. Remnant GRs in those requiring secondary therapy were more than 10-fold higher (Prisk for secondary therapy. Tumour GR in the first three postoperative years correlated significantly (r 2 =.6, P<.01) with GR during the period of follow-up. In surgically resected NFAs further treatment is dependent on the presence of residual tumour, growth rate and location but not tumour histology. Postoperative growth rate of NFAs in the first 3 years of imaging can be used to tailor long-term follow-up to optimize use of health resources. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Spatial memory impairment in Morris water maze after electroconvulsive seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, Maria; Hallin, Thord; Broms, Jonas; Ekstrand, Joakim; Tingström, Anders

    2017-02-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is one of the most efficient treatments for severe major depression, but some patients suffer from retrograde memory loss after treatment. Electroconvulsive seizures (ECS), an animal model of ECT, have repeatedly been shown to increase hippocampal neurogenesis, and multiple ECS treatments cause retrograde amnesia in hippocampus-dependent memory tasks. Since recent studies propose that addition of newborn hippocampal neurons might degrade existing memories, we investigated whether the memory impairment after multiple ECS treatments is a cumulative effect of repeated treatments, or if it is the result of a delayed effect after a single ECS. We used the hippocampus-dependent memory task Morris water maze (MWM) to evaluate spatial memory. Rats were exposed to an 8-day training paradigm before receiving either a single ECS or sham treatment and tested in the MWM 24 h, 72 h, or 7 days after this treatment, or multiple (four) ECS or sham treatments and tested 7 days after the first treatment. A single ECS treatment was not sufficient to cause retrograde amnesia whereas multiple ECS treatments strongly disrupted spatial memory in the MWM. The retrograde amnesia after multiple ECS is a cumulative effect of repeated treatments rather than a delayed effect after a single ECS.

  13. Reasons and predictors for antiretroviral therapy change among HIV-infected adults at South West Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekonnen, Endalkachew; Workicho, Abdulhalik; Hussein, Nezif; Feyera, Teka

    2018-06-05

    This retrospective cohort study is aimed to assess reasons and predictors of regimen change from initial highly active antiretroviral therapy among 1533 Human Immunodeficiency virus-infected adult patients at the Jimma University Tertiary Hospital. One in two (47.7%) adults changed their antiretroviral therapy regimen. Patients who were above the primary level of education [Hazard ratio (HR) 1.241 (95% CI 1.070-1.440)] and with human immunodeficiency virus/tuberculosis co-infection [HR 1.405 (95% CI 1.156-1.708)] had the higher risk of regimen change than their comparator. Individuals on Efavirenz [HR 0.675 (95% CI 0.553-0.825)] and non-stavudine [HR 0.494 (95% CI 0.406-0.601)] based regimens had lower risk of regimen change.

  14. Frequency, predictors, and consequences of maintenance infliximab therapy intensification in ulcerative colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Fernández-Salazar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Infliximab (IFX therapy intensification in ulcerative colitis (UC is more common than established in pivotal studies. Objectives: To establish the frequency and form of intensification for UC in clinical practice, as well as predictors, and to compare outcomes between intensified and non-intensified treatment. Methods: A retrospective study of 10 hospitals and 144 patients with response to infliximab (IFX induction. Predictive variables for intensification were analyzed using a Cox regression analysis. Outcome, loss of response to IFX, and colectomy were compared between intensified and non-intensified therapy. Results: Follow-up time from induction to data collection: 38 months [interquartile range (IQR, 20-62]. Time on IFX therapy: 24 months (IQR, 10-44. In all, 37% of patients required intensification. Interval was shortened for 36 patients, dose was increased for 7, and 10 subjects received both. Concurrent thiopurine immunosuppressants (IMM and IFX initiation was an independent predictor of intensification [Hazard ratio, 0.034; p, 0.006; CI, 0.003-0.371]. In patients on intensified therapy IFX discontinuation for loss of response (30.4% vs. 10.2%; p, 0.002, steroid reintroduction (35% vs. 18%; p, 0.018, and colectomy (22% vs. 6.4%; p, 0.011 were more common. Of patients on intensification, 17% returned to receiving 5 mg/kg every 8 weeks. Conclusions: Intensification is common and occasionally reversible. IMM initiation at the time of induction with IFX predicts non-intensification. Intensification, while effective, is associated with poorer outcome.

  15. Dependence of the effectiveness of thrombolytic therapy at ischemic stroke from clinical and paraclinical predictors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Іванна Михайлівна Мельнічек

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the work. The aim of the work is an assessment of informativeness of several clinical and paraclinical predictors in prognostics of the results of effectiveness of thrombolytic therapy at the most acute period of ishemic stroke with the further definition of the most significant ones for achieving the least neurologic deficiency.Methods of research: There were retrospectively considered 61 patients 60,5±7,8 years old with ishemic stroket who sucsessfully underwent thrombolytic therapy as an intravenous administration of Actilyse. These patients demonstrated the next factors of gemostasis: prothrombin time, prothrombin index, fibrinogen. For the research there were also used the scales of neurological deficiency activisation (Rankin and NIHSS; ultrasound of the magistral arteries and extracranial CT of brain; methods of mathematical statistics (the definition of chances and confidence intervals ratio, Pirson and Student criteria, verification of hypothesis about the law of distribution and equality of the mean values in the both samplings.Results. There were defined the most informative factors in prognostication of the good result after thrombolytic therapy. There was formed the list of output factors that the results of actilyse thrombolytic therapy effectiveness in Lviv region are depending on. There was grounded the necessity of laboratory data monitoring in patients with stroke for receiving the best results of thrombolytic therapy.There was established that thrombolytic therapy of ishemic stroke must begin as early as possible (in computed tomography department if possible for receiving the maximal effectiveness. There was detected that ultrasound of magistral vessels that supply brain with blood is necessary for all patients who are candidates for thrombolytic therapy because the stenosis of the vessel lumen more than 60 % significantly worsens an effectiveness of treatment

  16. Predictors of Radiation Therapy Noncompliance in an Urban Academic Cancer Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohri, Nitin; Rapkin, Bruce D.; Guha, Debayan; Haynes-Lewis, Hilda; Guha, Chandan; Kalnicki, Shalom; Garg, Madhur

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify the frequency of patient noncompliance in an urban radiation oncology department and identify predictors of noncompliance. Methods and Materials: We identified patients treated with external beam radiation therapy (RT) with curative intent in our department from 2007 to 2012 for 1 of 7 commonly treated malignancies. Patients who missed 2 or more scheduled RT appointments were deemed “noncompliant.” An institutional database was referenced to obtain clinical and demographic information for each patient, as well as a quantitative estimate of each patient's socioeconomic status. Logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with RT noncompliance. Results: A total of 2184 patients met eligibility criteria. Of these, 442 (20.2%) were deemed “noncompliant.” On multivariate analysis, statistically significant predictors of noncompliance included diagnosis of head-and-neck, cervical, or uterine cancer, treatment during winter months, low socioeconomic status, and use of a long treatment course (all P<.05). Conclusion: This is the first large effort examining patient noncompliance with daily RT. We have identified demographic, clinical, and treatment-related factors that can be used to identify patients at high risk for noncompliance. These findings may inform future strategies to improve adherence to prescribed therapy

  17. Predictors of Radiation Therapy Noncompliance in an Urban Academic Cancer Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohri, Nitin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Rapkin, Bruce D. [Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Guha, Debayan; Haynes-Lewis, Hilda; Guha, Chandan; Kalnicki, Shalom [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Garg, Madhur, E-mail: mgarg@montefiore.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify the frequency of patient noncompliance in an urban radiation oncology department and identify predictors of noncompliance. Methods and Materials: We identified patients treated with external beam radiation therapy (RT) with curative intent in our department from 2007 to 2012 for 1 of 7 commonly treated malignancies. Patients who missed 2 or more scheduled RT appointments were deemed “noncompliant.” An institutional database was referenced to obtain clinical and demographic information for each patient, as well as a quantitative estimate of each patient's socioeconomic status. Logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with RT noncompliance. Results: A total of 2184 patients met eligibility criteria. Of these, 442 (20.2%) were deemed “noncompliant.” On multivariate analysis, statistically significant predictors of noncompliance included diagnosis of head-and-neck, cervical, or uterine cancer, treatment during winter months, low socioeconomic status, and use of a long treatment course (all P<.05). Conclusion: This is the first large effort examining patient noncompliance with daily RT. We have identified demographic, clinical, and treatment-related factors that can be used to identify patients at high risk for noncompliance. These findings may inform future strategies to improve adherence to prescribed therapy.

  18. Predictors of Mortality among Adult Antiretroviral Therapy Users in Southeastern Ethiopia: Retrospective Cohort Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tesfaye Setegn

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Although efforts have been made to reduce AIDS-related mortality by providing antiretroviral therapy (ART services, still people are dying while they are on treatment due to several factors. This study aimed to investigate the predictors of mortality among adult antiretroviral therapy (ART users in Goba Hospital, Southeast Ethiopia. Methods. The medical records of 2036 ART users who enrolled at Goba Hospital between 2007 and 2012 were reviewed and sociodemographic, clinical, and ART-related data were collected. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to measure risk of death and identify the independent predictors of mortality. Results. The overall mortality incidence rate was 20.3 deaths per 1000 person-years. Male, bedridden, overweight/obese, and HIV clients infected with TB and other infectious diseases had higher odds of death compared with their respective counterparts. On the other hand, ART clients with primary and secondary educational level and early and less advanced WHO clinical stage had lower odds of death compared to their counterparts. Conclusion. The overall mortality incidence rate was high and majority of the death had occurred in the first year of ART initiation. Intensifying and strengthening early ART initiation, improving nutritional status, prevention and control of TB, and other opportunistic infections are recommended interventions.

  19. Predictors of changes in child behaviour following parent management training: Child, context, and therapy factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagen, Kristine Amlund; Ogden, Terje

    2017-04-01

    This non-randomised study examined a set of predictive factors of changes in child behaviour following parent management training (PMTO). Families of 331 Norwegian girls (26%) and boys with clinic-level conduct problems participated. The children ranged in age from 3 to 12 years (M age = 8.69). Retention rate was 72.2% at post-assessment. Child-, parent- and therapy-level variables were entered as predictors of multi-informant reported change in externalising behaviour and social skills. Behavioural improvements following PMTO amounted to 1 standard deviation on parent rated and ½ standard deviation on teacher rated externalising behaviour, while social skills improvements were more modest. Results suggested that children with higher symptom scores and lower social skills score at pre-treatment were more likely to show improvements in these areas. According to both parent- and teacher-ratings, girls tended to show greater improvements in externalising behaviour and social skills following treatment and, according to parents, ADHD symptomology appeared to inhibit improvements in social skills. Finally, observed increases in parental skill encouragement, therapists' satisfaction with treatment and the number of hours spent in therapy by children were also positive and significant predictors of child outcomes. © 2016 International Union of Psychological Science.

  20. Group cognitive behavior therapy for Japanese patients with social anxiety disorder: preliminary outcomes and their predictors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watanabe Norio

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A number of studies have provided strong evidence for the use of cognitive behavior therapy (CBT in the treatment of social anxiety disorder (SAD. However, all of the previous reports were from Europe and North America and it is unknown whether Western psychological therapies are effective for SAD in non-Western cultures. The present pilot study aimed to evaluate CBT program for SAD which was originally developed for Western patients, among Japanese patients. Methods Fifty-seven outpatients who participated in group CBT for SAD were evaluated using eight self-reported and one clinician-administered questionnaires to measure various aspects of SAD symptomatology at the beginning and at the end of the program. Pre- and post-treatment scores were compared and the magnitude of treatment effect was quantified as well based once on the intention-to-treat (ITT and once among the completers only. We also examined baseline predictors of the CBT outcomes. Results Seven patients (12% did not complete the program. For the ITT sample, the percentage of reduction was 20% to 30% and the pre to post treatment effect sizes ranged from 0.37 to 1.01. Among the completers, the respective figures were 20% to 33% and 0.41 to 1.19. We found no significant pretreatment predictor of the outcomes. Conclusion Group CBT for SAD is acceptable and can bring about a similar degree of symptom reduction among Japanese patients with SAD as among Western patients.

  1. Predictors of Total Mortality and Echocardiographic Response for Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy: A Cohort Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Ferreira Gazzoni

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Clinical studies demonstrate that up to 40% of patients do not respond to cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT, thus, appropriate patient selection is critical to the success of CRT in heart failure. Objective: Evaluation of mortality predictors and response to CRT in the Brazilian scenario. Methods: Retrospective cohort study including patients submitted to CRT in a tertiary hospital in southern Brazil from 2008 to 2014. Survival was assessed through a database of the State Department of Health (RS. Predictors of echocardiographic response were evaluated using Poisson regression. Survival analysis was performed by Cox regression and Kaplan Meyer curves. A two-tailed p value less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: A total of 170 patients with an average follow-up of 1011 ± 632 days were included. The total mortality was 30%. The independent predictors of mortality were age (hazard ratio [HR] of 1.05, p = 0.027, previous acute myocardial infarction (AMI (HR of 2.17, p = 0.049 and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD (HR of 3.13, p = 0.015. The percentage of biventricular stimulation at 6 months was identified as protective factor of mortality ([HR] 0.97, p = 0.048. The independent predictors associated with the echocardiographic response were absence of mitral insufficiency, presence of left bundle branch block and percentage of biventricular stimulation. Conclusion: Mortality in patients submitted to CRT in a tertiary hospital was independently associated with age, presence of COPD and previous AMI. The percentage of biventricular pacing evaluated 6 months after resynchronizer implantation was independently associated with improved survival and echocardiographic response.

  2. Update on electroconvulsive therapy dosing strategies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adele

    In order to make an “evidence based” decision on the stimulus dose question .... based model would more accurately have dosed the older pa- .... ECT “dosing” to be established regardless of the induction agent .... the arguments over seizure threshold are a waste of energy and .... Examples here include lack of funding for.

  3. Unmodified electroconvulsive therapy: changes in knowledge and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The relevance of ECT as a treatment option for some psychiatric disorders continues to generate debate in professional and lay circles. Scientific evidence as to the effectiveness of ECT (with anaesthesia) abounds. In some developing countries, the process of change towards the full implementation and use of ...

  4. Is electroconvulsive therapy during pregnancy safe?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Jiménez-Cornejo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Resumen Muchos de los fármacos que se utilizan para tratar patologías psiquiátricas tienen ciertas restricciones o incluso se encuentran contraindicados durante el embarazo, lo cual restringe las opciones terapéuticas en este grupo de pacientes. La terapia electroconvulsiva constituye una alternativa efectiva, sin embargo, existe controversia sobre su seguridad. Utilizando la base de datos Epistemonikos, la cual es mantenida mediante búsquedas en múltiples bases de datos, se identificaron cinco revisiones sistemáticas que incluyen 82 estudios describiendo series de casos o casos individuales. Se extrajeron los datos de las revisiones identificadas y se construyeron tablas de resumen de los resultados utilizando el método GRADE. Se concluye que no está claro cuáles son los riesgos asociados a la terapia electroconvulsiva durante el embarazo, dada la baja certeza que provee la evidencia. Asimismo, revisiones sistemáticas y guías clínicas internacionales existentes difieren en sus conclusiones y recomendaciones.

  5. Predictors of dropout from internet-based self-help cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Wing-Fai; Chung, Ka-Fai; Ho, Fiona Yan-Yee; Ho, Lai-Ming

    2015-10-01

    Dropout from self-help cognitive-behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) potentially diminishes therapeutic effect and poses clinical concern. We analyzed the characteristics of subjects who did not complete a 6-week internet-based CBT-I program. Receiver operator characteristics (ROC) analysis was used to identify potential variables and cutoff for predicting dropout among 207 participants with self-report insomnia 3 or more nights per week for at least 3 months randomly assigned to self-help CBT-I with telephone support (n = 103) and self-help CBT-I (n = 104). Seventy-two participants (34.4%) did not complete all 6 sessions, while 42 of the 72 (56.9%) dropped out prior to the fourth session. Significant predictors of non-completion are total sleep time (TST) ≥ 6.82 h, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale depression score ≥ 9 and Insomnia Severity Index score dropout. Longer TST and less severe insomnia predict dropout in this study of self-help CBT-I, in contrast to shorter TST as a predictor in 2 studies of face-to-face CBT-I, while greater severity of depression predicts dropout in both this study and a study of face-to-face CBT-I. Strategies for minimizing dropout from internet-based CBT-I are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Outcome predictors for problem drinkers treated with combined cognitive behavioral therapy and naltrexone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuoristo-Myllys, Salla; Lipsanen, Jari; Lahti, Jari; Kalska, Hely; Alho, Hannu

    2014-03-01

    The opioid antagonist naltrexone, combined with cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), has proven efficacious for patients with alcohol dependence, but studies examining how this treatment works in a naturalistic treatment setting are lacking. This study examined predictors of the outcome of targeted naltrexone and CBT in a real-life outpatient setting. Participants were 315 patients who attended a treatment program providing CBT combined with the targeted use of naltrexone. Mixture models for estimating developmental trajectories were used to examine change in patients' alcohol consumption and symptoms of alcohol craving from treatment entry until the end of the treatment (20 weeks) or dropout. Predictors of treatment outcome were examined with analyses of multinomial logistic regression. Minimal exclusion criteria were applied to enhance the generalizability of the findings. Regular drinking pattern, having no history of previous treatments, and high-risk alcohol consumption level before the treatment were associated with less change in alcohol use during the treatment. The patients with low-risk alcohol consumption level before the treatment had the most rapid reduction in alcohol craving. Patients who drank more alcohol during the treatment had lower adherence with naltrexone. Medication non-adherence is a major barrier to naltrexone's effectiveness in a real-life treatment setting. Patients with more severe alcohol problems may need more intensive treatment for achieving better treatment outcome in real-word treatment settings.

  7. Predictors of Adoption and Reach Following Dialectical Behavior Therapy Intensive Training™.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-Haro, Maria V; Harned, Melanie S; Korslund, Kathryn E; DuBose, Anthony; Chen, Tianying; Ivanoff, André; Linehan, Marsha M

    2018-03-05

    Dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) is an evidence-based treatment for borderline personality disorder. The DBT Intensive Training™ is widely used to train community clinicians to deliver DBT, but little is known about its effectiveness. This study prospectively evaluated predictors of adoption and reach of DBT among 52 community teams (212 clinicians) after DBT Intensive Training™. Pre-post training questionnaires were completed by trainees and a follow-up survey by team leaders approximately 8 months later. Overall, 75% of teams adopted all DBT modes and delivered DBT to an average of 118 clients. Lower training and program needs, fewer bachelor's-level clinicians, and greater prior DBT experience predicted adoption of more DBT modes. More prior DBT experience, smaller team size, more negative team functioning, and staff with lower job satisfaction, growth, efficacy, and influence predicted greater DBT reach. DBT Intensive Training™ appears effective in promoting DBT adoption and reach in routine clinical practice settings.

  8. Predictors of pneumothorax following endoscopic valve therapy in patients with severe emphysema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gompelmann, Daniela; Lim, Hyun-Ju; Eberhardt, Ralf; Gerovasili, Vasiliki; Herth, Felix Jf; Heussel, Claus Peter; Eichinger, Monika

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic valve implantation is an effective treatment for patients with advanced emphysema. Despite the minimally invasive procedure, valve placement is associated with risks, the most common of which is pneumothorax. This study was designed to identify predictors of pneumothorax following endoscopic valve implantation. Preinterventional clinical measures (vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in 1 second, residual volume, total lung capacity, 6-minute walk test), qualitative computed tomography (CT) parameters (fissure integrity, blebs/bulla, subpleural nodules, pleural adhesions, partial atelectasis, fibrotic bands, emphysema type) and quantitative CT parameters (volume and low attenuation volume of the target lobe and the ipsilateral untreated lobe, target air trapping, ipsilateral lobe volume/hemithorax volume, collapsibility of the target lobe and the ipsilateral untreated lobe) were retrospectively evaluated in patients who underwent endoscopic valve placement (n=129). Regression analysis was performed to compare those who developed pneumothorax following valve therapy (n=46) with those who developed target lobe volume reduction without pneumothorax (n=83). Low attenuation volume% of ipsilateral untreated lobe (odds ratio [OR] =1.08, P=0.001), ipsilateral untreated lobe volume/hemithorax volume (OR =0.93, P=0.017), emphysema type (OR =0.26, P=0.018), pleural adhesions (OR =0.33, P=0.012) and residual volume (OR =1.58, P=0.012) were found to be significant predictors of pneumothorax. Fissure integrity (OR =1.16, P=0.075) and 6-minute walk test (OR =1.05, P=0.077) were also indicative of pneumothorax. The model including the aforementioned parameters predicted whether a patient would experience a pneumothorax 84% of the time (area under the curve =0.84). Clinical and CT parameters provide a promising tool to effectively identify patients at high risk of pneumothorax following endoscopic valve therapy.

  9. Predictors and Evolution of Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence Among Perinatally HIV-Infected Adolescents in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Côté, José; Delmas, Philippe; de Menezes Succi, Regina Célia; Galano, Eliana; Auger, Patricia; Sylvain, Hélène; Colson, Sebastien; Machado, Daisy Maria

    2016-09-01

    Antiretroviral therapy medication adherence is a complex phenomenon influenced by multiple factors. This study examines its evolution and predictors among perinatally HIV-infected youths in São Paulo, Brazil. During a 1-year longitudinal cohort study, perinatally HIV-infected youths aged 13-21 years taking antiretroviral therapy were recruited in hospitals and HIV/AIDS reference centers. Data were collected at baseline and after 12 months. Variables assessed were adherence, self-efficacy regarding medication intake, social support, stress level, depression, CD4 cell count, viral load, and symptoms. Adherence was defined as taking ≥95% of prescribed HIV medication in the past 7 days. Generalized estimating equation and analysis of variance methods were used. A total of 268 adolescents participated in the study (59% female; mean age of 16 years). At baseline, 63.06% of the sample was adherent to their HIV medication, and 52.99% had an undetectable viral load. All participants, regardless of adherence, reported: low levels of stress and symptoms of depression; high perception of medication self-efficacy and social support; and a mean of 6.8 symptoms related to their HIV medication. Predictors of adherence were: high perception of medication self-efficacy (odds ratio = 2.81; 95% confidence interval: 1.94-4.05) and low number of reported medication side effects (odds ratio = .97; 95% confidence interval: .95-.99]. Between baseline and follow-up, 49.6% remained adherent, 22.3% remained nonadherent, and the adherence level changed over time for 28.2%. These findings suggest the need to develop interventions to enhance self-efficacy toward medication and to help youth better manage HIV medication symptoms. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Outcome Expectancy as a Predictor of Treatment Response in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Public Speaking Fears Within Social Anxiety Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Price, Matthew; Anderson, Page L.

    2011-01-01

    Outcome expectancy, the extent that clients anticipate benefiting from therapy, is theorized to be an important predictor of treatment response for cognitive–behavioral therapy. However, there is a relatively small body of empirical research on outcome expectancy and the treatment of social anxiety disorder. This literature, which has examined the association mostly in group-based interventions, has yielded mixed findings. The current study sought to further evaluate the effect of outcome exp...

  11. Electroconvulsive stimulation results in long-term survival of newly generated hippocampal neurons in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Mikkel Vestergaard; Wörtwein, Gitta; Folke, Jonas

    2017-01-01

    Electroconvulsive stimulation (ECS) is one of the strongest stimulators of hippocampal neurogenesis in rodents that represents a plausible mechanism for the efficacy of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in major depressive disorder. Using design-based stereological cell counting, we recently...... in neurogenesis facilitates the behavioral outcome of the forced swim test (FST), an animal model of depression. The results showed that ECS in conjunction with CRS stimulates hippocampal neurogenesis, and that a significant quantity of the newly formed hippocampal neurons survives up to 12 months. The new Brd......U-positive neurons showed time-dependent attrition of ∼40% from day 1 to 3 months, with no further decline between 3 and 12 months. ECS did not affect the number of pre-existing dentate granule neurons or the volume of the dentate granule cell layer, suggesting no damaging effect of the treatment. Finally, we found...

  12. Electroconvulsive Stimulation, but not Chronic Restraint Stress, Causes Structural Alterations in Adult Rat Hippocampus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Mikkel V.; Wörtwein, Gitta; Pakkenberg, Bente

    2015-01-01

    The neurobiological mechanisms underlying depression are not fully understood. Only a few previous studies have used validated stereological methods to test how stress and animal paradigms of depression affect adult hippocampal neurogenesis and whether antidepressant therapy can counteract possible...... changes in an animal model. Thus, in this study we applied methods that are state of the art in regard to stereological cell counting methods. Using a validated rat model of depression in combination with a clinically relevant schedule of electroconvulsive stimulation, we estimated the total number...... of newly formed neurons in the hippocampal subgranular zone. Also estimated were the total number of neurons and the volume of the granule cell layer in adult rats subjected to chronic restraint stress and electroconvulsive stimulation either alone or in combination. We found that chronic restraint stress...

  13. Predictors and Moderators of Response to Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Medication for the Treatment of Binge Eating Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grilo, Carlos M.; Masheb, Robin M.; Crosby, Ross D.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To examine predictors and moderators of response to cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and medication treatments for binge-eating disorder (BED). Method: 108 BED patients in a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial testing CBT and fluoxetine treatments were assessed prior, throughout, and posttreatment. Demographic factors,…

  14. The Process of Change in Cognitive Therapy for Depression when Combined with Antidepressant Medication: Predictors of Early Intersession Symptom Gains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strunk, Daniel R.; Cooper, Andrew A.; Ryan, Elizabeth T.; DeRubeis, Robert J.; Hollon, Steven D.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Previous studies of cognitive therapy (CT) for depression have examined therapist adherence and the therapeutic alliance as predictors of subsequent symptom change. However, little is known about these CT process variables when CT is delivered in combination with antidepressant medication. Method: In a sample of 176 depressed…

  15. Predictors and a remedy for noncompliance with amblyopia therapy in children measured with the occlusion dose monitor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.E. Loudon (Sjoukje); M. Fronius; C.W.N. Looman (Caspar); M. Awan (Musarat); B. Simonsz-Tóth (Brigitte); P.J. van der Maas (Paul)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractPURPOSE. Noncompliance is one of the limiting factors in the success of occlusion therapy for amblyopia. Electronic monitoring was used to investigate predictors of noncompliance, and, in a prospective randomized clinical trial, determined the effectiveness of an educational program.

  16. Emotional Intelligence and Personality Traits as Predictors of Occupational Therapy students' Practice Education Performance: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Ted; Williams, Brett; Etherington, Jamie

    2016-12-01

    This study investigated whether occupational therapy students' emotional intelligence and personality traits are predictive of specific aspects of their fieldwork performance. A total of 114 second and third year undergraduate occupational therapy students (86.6% response rate) completed the Genos Emotional Intelligence Inventory (Genos EI) and the Ten-Item Personality Inventory (TIPI). Fieldwork performance scores were obtained from the Student Practice Evaluation Form Revised (SPEF-R). Linear regressions were completed with the SPEF-R domains being the dependent variables and the Genos EI and TIPI factors being the independent variables. Regression analysis results revealed that the Genos EI subscales of Emotional Management of Others (EMO), Emotional Awareness of Others (EAO), Emotional Expression (EEX) and Emotional Reasoning (ERE) were significant predictors of various domains of students' fieldwork performance. EAO and ERE were significant predictors of students' Communication Skills accounting for 4.6% of its variance. EMO, EAO, EEX and ERE were significant predictors of students' Documentation Skills explaining 6.8% of its variance. EMO was a significant predictor of students' Professional Behaviour accounting for 3.2% of its variance. No TIPI factors were found to be significant predictors of the SPEF-R domains. Occupational therapy students' emotional intelligence was a significant predictor of components of their fieldwork performance while students' personality traits were not. The convenience sampling approach used, small sample size recruited and potential issue of social desirability of the self-reported Genos EI and TIPI data are acknowledged as study limitations. It is recommended that other studies be completed to investigate if any other relevant constructs or factors are predictive of occupational therapy students' fieldwork performance. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Pattern visual evoked potential as a predictor of occlusion therapy for amblyopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Woosuk; Hong, Samin; Lee, Jong Bok; Han, Sueng-Han

    2008-12-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the role of the pattern visual evoked potential (pVEP) as a predictor of occlusion therapy for patients with strabismic, anisometropic, and isometropic amblyopia. The secondary aim was to compare the characteristics of pVEP between strabismic and anisometropic amblyopia. This retrospective comparative case series included 120 patients who had received occlusion therapy or a glasses prescription for correction of strabismic, anisometropic, and isometropic amblyopia (20 patients had strabismic amblyopia, 41 patients had anisometropic amblyopia, and 59 patients had isometropic amblyopia). For each patient, the value of the P100 latency on pVEP at the time of the initial diagnosis of amblyopia was collected. Subsequently, the P100 latency was compared according to types of amblyopia. Fifty of 120 patients (7 patients with strabismic amblyopia, 21 patients with anisometropic amblyopia, and 22 patients with isometropic amblyopia) who were followed-up for longer than 6 months were divided into two groups based on the value of their P100 latency (Group 1, P100 latency 120 msec or less; Group 2, P100 latency longer than 120 msec.) The amount of visual improvement after occlusion therapy or glasses was compared between two study groups. The mean P100 latency was 119.7+/-25.2 msec in eyes with strabismic amblyopia and 111.9+/-17.8 msec in eyes with non-strabismic (anisometropic or isometropic) amblyopia (p=0.213). In Group 1, the mean visual improvement after occlusion therapy or glasses was 3.69+/-2.14 lines on Dr. Hahn's standard test chart; in Group 2, the mean improvement was 2.27+/-2.21 lines (p=0.023). The P100 latency on pVEP at the time of initial diagnosis was significantly related to the visual improvement after occlusion therapy or glasses in patients with strabismic, anisometropic, and isometropic amblyopia. Therefore, it was presumed that patients with a delayed P100 latency might have less visual improvement after

  18. Prevalence and predictors of abandonment of therapy among children with cancer in El Salvador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonilla, Miguel; Rossell, Nuria; Salaverria, Carmen; Gupta, Sumit; Barr, Ronald; Sala, Alessandra; Metzger, Monika L; Sung, Lillian

    2009-11-01

    Abandonment of therapy is one of the most common causes of treatment failure among children with cancer in low-income countries. Our objectives were to describe the prevalence and predictors of abandonment among such children with cancer in El Salvador. We analyzed data on patients younger than 16 years, diagnosed with any malignancy between January 2001 and December 2003 at the Benjamin Bloom National Children's Hospital, San Salvador. Among 612 patients, 353 were male (58%); the median age at diagnosis was 5.1 years; 59% of patients were diagnosed with leukemia/lymphoma, 28% with solid tumors and 13% with brain tumors. The prevalence of abandonment was 13%. Median time to abandonment was 2.0 (range 0-36) months. In univariate analyses, paternal illiteracy [odds ratio (OR) 3.8, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.0-7.2; p = 0.001]; maternal illiteracy (OR = 5.1, 95% CI 2.5-10; p El Salvador, despite the provision of free treatment, socioeconomic variables significantly predict increased risk of abandonment of therapy. Understanding the pathways through which socioeconomic status affects abandonment may allow the design of effective interventions. (c) 2009 UICC.

  19. Cortisol as a predictor of psychological therapy response in depressive disorders: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Susanne; Strawbridge, Rebecca; Vives, Andres Herane; Cleare, Anthony J

    2017-02-01

    Many patients with depressive disorders demonstrate resistance to psychological therapy. A frequent finding is hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis alterations. As cortisol is known to modulate cognitive processes, those patients may be less likely to profit from psychological therapy. To conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis on cortisol as a predictor of psychological therapy response. The Cochrane Library, EMBASE, MEDLINE and PsycINFO databases were searched. Records were included if they looked at patients with any depressive disorder engaging in psychological therapy, with a pre-treatment cortisol and a post-treatment symptom measure. Eight articles satisfied our selection criteria. The higher the cortisol levels before starting psychological therapy, the more symptoms patients with depression experienced at the end of treatment and/or the smaller their symptom change. Our findings suggest that patients with depression with elevated HPA functioning are less responsive to psychological therapy. © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2017.

  20. Predictors of Hypothyroidism in Hodgkin Lymphoma Survivors After Intensity Modulated Versus 3-Dimensional Radiation Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinnix, Chelsea C; Cella, Laura; Andraos, Therese Y; Ayoub, Zeina; Milgrom, Sarah A; Gunther, Jillian; Thosani, Sonali; Wogan, Christine; Conson, Manuel; D'Avino, Vittoria; Oki, Yasuhiro; Fanale, Michelle; Lee, Hun J; Neelapu, Sattva; Fayad, Luis; Hagemeister, Frederick; Rodriguez, M Alma; Nastoupil, Loretta J; Nieto, Yago; Qiao, Wei; Pacelli, Roberto; Dabaja, Bouthaina

    2018-03-14

    To identify predictors of hypothyroidism after chemoradiation therapy for Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) and to compare outcomes after intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with those after 3-dimensional (3D) conformal radiation therapy (CRT). Ninety patients who underwent involved-site IMRT in 2009 through 2014 were evaluated for treatment-induced hypothyroidism, defined as elevated thyroid-stimulating hormone or decreased free thyroxine levels (or both). Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis identified individuals at low versus high risk based on dosimetric variables. Dosimetric cutoff points were verified with an external data set of 50 patients who underwent 3D-CRT. In the IMRT group, most patients (75 [83%]) had stage II HL, and the median prescribed dose was 30.6 Gy; in the 3D-CRT group, 32 patients (64%) had stage II HL, and the median prescribed dose was 32.0 Gy. No differences were found in the proportions of patients with bilateral (P = .982) or unilateral (P = .074) neck involvement between the 2 groups. Hypothyroidism rates were marginally higher in the IMRT group, with estimated 3-year rates of freedom from hypothyroidism of 56.1% in the 3D-CRT group and 40% in the IMRT group (P = .057). Univariate analysis showed that smaller thyroid volume and higher thyroid dose were associated with hypothyroidism in both groups (P hypothyroidism (P = .001 and P hypothyroidism (P hypothyroidism after either IMRT or 3D-CRT for HL. IMRT may confer a higher risk than 3D-CRT unless a treatment avoidance structure is used during planning. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Predictors of mortality in patients with extensively drug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii pneumonia receiving colistin therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Ik Sung; Lee, Yu Ji; Wi, Yu Mi; Kwan, Byung Soo; Jung, Kae Hwa; Hong, Woong Pyo; Kim, June Myong

    2016-08-01

    The ratio of the area under the free (unbound) concentration-time curve to minimum inhibitory concentration (fAUC/MIC) was proposed to be the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic index most strongly linked to the antibacterial effect of colistin against Acinetobacter baumannii. A retrospective study of patients who received colistin to treat pneumonia caused by extensively drug-resistant (XDR) A. baumannii over a 4-year period was performed to assess the impact of the colistin MIC on mortality. A total of 227 patients were included in the analysis. The 7-day and 14-day mortality rates of patients with XDR A. baumannii pneumonia receiving colistin therapy were 15.0% and 23.8%, respectively. In the multivariate analysis, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score, days from index culture to first dose of colistin, underlying tumour and septic shock at presentation were independent predictors of mortality in patients with XDR A. baumannii pneumonia receiving colistin therapy. In the univariate analysis, the colistin dose based on ideal body weight (IBW) correlated with patient outcome. Therefore, the use of IBW appeared to be more appropriate to calculate the colistin dosage. In addition, these results highlight the clinical significance of colistin MIC in patients with XDR A. baumannii pneumonia receiving colistin therapy. Although MICs were in the 'susceptible' range, patients infected with isolates with high colistin MICs showed a poorer clinical response rate than patients infected with isolates with low colistin MICs. Further clinical studies are needed to evaluate the roles of colistin MIC for predicting mortality in XDR A. baumannii pneumonia with a high colistin MIC. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  2. Determination of exacerbation predictors in patients with COPD in physical therapy - a longitudinal study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego M. Marino

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD typically presents the characteristic clinical condition of exacerbation, with more intense symptoms associated with greater functional loss and consequently lower chances of patient survival. Objectives: This study sought to determine the predictors of exacerbation, alone or in combination, in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD who received physical therapeutic treatment over 6 months. Method: This was an observational, longitudinal and prospective study in which 63 COPD patients residing within the municipality of São Carlos, SP, Brazil were evaluated. These patients had COPD stages II and III and were entered into a physical therapy program, consisting of 3 periods of assessment over 6 months. We evaluated the occurrence of acute exacerbation as well as the patients' body mass index (BMI, fat-free mass (FFM, fat-free mass index, forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1, dyspnea, distance walked (DW in the 6-minute walk test (6MWT and handgrip strength. Results: When applying Cox settings with each covariate separately, the results revealed 5% significance only for the DW in the 6MWT, which demonstrated an interaction between BMI and FFM. Comparison of the 3 periods of assessment across the covariates measured showed a significant difference only for the DW between evaluations in the 3rd and 6th months. Conclusion: Upon analyzing the predictors of risk over 6 months of follow-up in patients with COPD, we found that the DW in the 6MWT was associated with the risk of exacerbation, although this risk also depended on the covariates BMI and FFM.

  3. Important predictors of response determined by surgical staging prior to triple modality therapy for esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suntharalingam, M.; Vines, E.; Slawson, R.; Doyle, A.; Schuetz, J.; Greenwald, B.; Sonnet, J.; Krasna, M.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: Since 1992, the University of Maryland has routinely performed preoperative surgical staging including thoracoscopy and laparoscopy on patients undergoing concurrent chemoradiation followed by surgical resection for esophageal carcinoma. We have performed an analysis of the pathologic pretreatment data in an attempt to identify possible predictors of response and outcome. Materials: Patients underwent thoracoscopy and laparoscopy in order to determine resectability of the primary lesion and pathologic nodal status prior to therapy. To date, 32 patients have completed triple modality therapy (28 men, 4 women, median age 59). Patients received 50.4 Gy in 1.8 Gy fractions in conjunction with two cycles of 5-FU (1 gm/m2) and Cisplatin (100 mg/m2) on days 1 and 28. Radiotherapy fields were determined by the extent of disease discovered at time of surgical staging. Ivor Lewis esophagectomy was performed 4 to 6 weeks after completion of chemo/RT. The median follow up is 24.8 months (range 4-49 mo.) Sixteen patients had squamous cell ca and 16 had adenocarcinoma. Univariate and multivariate analysis was performed in order to determine the influence of age, KPS, T stage, Lymph Nodes status and histology, on the likelihood of achieving a pathologic complete response and disease free survival. Results: Twenty-eight have undergone preoperative staging (2 refused, 2 medical contraindications.) All 32 patients are valuable for response to therapy and are included in the analysis. The three year cause specific and disease free survival is 46% and 41% respectively with a median CSS of 23 months and DFS of 19 months. The overall complete response rate assessed by histologic and immunohistologic evaluation at the time of esophagectomy is 31%. The DFS at 32 months is 72% (median not reached) for these patients versus 24% for those with residual disease at the time of surgery. The most significant predictor for the likelihood of achieving a pathologic CR was the

  4. Moderators and predictors of response to behavior therapy for tics in Tourette syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhodolsky, Denis G; Woods, Douglas W; Piacentini, John; Wilhelm, Sabine; Peterson, Alan L; Katsovich, Lily; Dziura, James; Walkup, John T; Scahill, Lawrence

    2017-03-14

    To examine moderators and predictors of response to behavior therapy for tics in children and adults with Tourette syndrome and chronic tic disorders. Data from 2 10-week, multisite studies (1 in children and 1 in adults; total n = 248) comparing comprehensive behavioral intervention for tics (CBIT) to psychoeducation and supportive therapy (PST) were combined for moderator analyses. Participants (177 male, 71 female) had a mean age of 21.5 ± 13.9 years (range 9-69). Demographic and clinical characteristics, baseline tic-suppressing medication, and co-occurring psychiatric disorders were tested as potential moderators for CBIT vs PST or predictors of outcome regardless of treatment assignment. Main outcomes measures were the Yale Global Tic Severity Scale Total Tic score and the Clinical Global Impression-Improvement score assessed by masked evaluators. The presence of tic medication significantly moderated response to CBIT vs PST ( p = 0.01). Participants showed tic reduction after CBIT regardless of tic medication status, but only participants receiving tic medication showed reduction of tics after PST. Co-occurring psychiatric disorders, age, sex, family functioning, tic characteristics, and treatment expectancy did not moderate response. Across both treatments, greater tic severity ( p = 0.005) and positive participant expectancy ( p = 0.01) predicted greater tic improvement. Anxiety disorders ( p = 0.042) and premonitory urge severity ( p = 0.005) predicted lower tic reduction. Presence of co-occurring attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, or anxiety disorders did not moderate response to CBIT. Although participants on tic medication showed improvement after CBIT, the difference between CBIT and PST was greater for participants who were not on tic-suppressing medication. The child and adult CBIT studies are listed on clinical trials.gov (NCT00218777 and NCT00231985, respectively). This study provides Class I evidence that

  5. POSSIBLE PREDICTORS OF ATRIAL FIBRILLATION RECURRENCE IN LONG-TERM PROPHYLACTIC PROPAFENONE THERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. D. Kurbanov

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To identify possible predictors of atrial fibrillation (AF recurrence in 6-month prophylactic propafenone therapy. Material and methods. Patients (n=63; aged 52.2±12.6 years; 25.4% women with frequent AF recurrences who restored sinus rhythm with propafenone, were included into the study. Paroxysmal AF was observed in 84.1% of patients, and persistent AF — in 15.9% of patients. ECG, transthoracic echocardiography , chest radiography with the calculation of cardio-thoracic index (CTI was performed at baseline. All patients received rpropafenone therapy (450–600 mg/day during 6 months after sinus rhythm conversion. ECG and 24-hours ECG monitoring were performed in 1, 3 and 6 months of the therapy. Patients with 70–100% reduction in AF recurrence rate were included into the 1-st group, and patients with <70% reduction – into the 2-nd group. Results. 92%, 88.5% and 78% of patients were included into the group 1 after 1, 3 and 6 months of follow up, respectively. AF recurrences were observed 4.5, 3.8, and 1.7 times more often in women than these in men after 1, 3 and 6 months, respectively , (p>0.05. Mean age of patients in the group 2 was significantly older than this in patients of the group 1 (p<0.05. CTI, left atrium size and volume, interventricular septum thickness (IVST were significantly larger in group 2. Myocardium mass of the left ventricle (MMLV after 6 months of therapy was larger by 13.9% in patients of the group 2 vs this in patients of the group 1 (p<0.05. Conclusion. Insufficient preventive effect of propafenone was observed in 8%, 11.5% and 22% of patients in 1, 3 and 6 months of the follow-up, respectively. Propafenone prophylactic efficacy was slightly higher in men and younger patients. Patients with poor preventive effect of propafenone had a significantly larger baseline CTI, size and volume of the left atrium, IVST, and MMLV.

  6. Treatment of Febrile illness with artemisinin combination therapy: prevalence and predictors in five African household surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vialle-Valentin, Catherine E; LeCates, Robert F; Zhang, Fang; Ross-Degnan, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the determinants of compliance with national policies recommending Artemisinin Combination Therapy (ACT) for the treatment of uncomplicated malaria in the community. We used data from Gambia, Ghana, Kenya, Nigeria, and Uganda national household surveys that were conducted with a standardized World Health Organization (WHO) methodology to measure access to and use of medicines. We analyzed all episodes of acute fever reported in the five surveys. We used logistic regression models accounting for the clustered design of the surveys to identify determinants of seeking care in public healthcare facilities, of being treated with antimalarials, and of receiving ACT. Overall, 92% of individuals with a febrile episode sought care outside the home, 96% received medicines, 67% were treated with antimalarials, and 16% received ACT. The choice of provider was influenced by perceptions about medicines availability and affordability. In addition, seeking care in a public healthcare facility was the single most important predictor of treatment with ACT [odds ratio (OR): 4.64, 95% confidence intervals (CI): 2.98-7.22, P policies recommending ACT for the treatment of uncomplicated malaria depends not only on restricting ACT to confirmed malaria cases, but also on ensuring that ACT is available and affordable for those who need it.

  7. Hepatorenal Syndrome: Outcome of Response to Therapy and Predictors of Survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Heidemann

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Treatment of hepatorenal syndrome (HRS in patients with liver cirrhosis is still challenging and characterized by a very high mortality. This study aimed to delineate treatment patterns and clinical outcomes of patients with HRS intravenously treated with terlipressin. Methods. In this retrospective single-center cohort study, 119 patients (median [IQR]; 56.50 [50.75–63.00] years of age with HRS were included. All patients were treated with terlipressin and human albumin intravenously. Those with response to treatment (n=65 were compared to the patient cohort without improvement (n=54. Patient characteristics and clinical parameters (Child stage, ascites, hepatic encephalopathy, HRS type I/II, and initial MELD score were retrieved. Univariate analysis of factors influencing the success of terlipressin therapy and Cox regression analysis of factors influencing survival was carried out. Results. One-month survival was significantly longer in the group of responders (p=0.048. Cox regression analysis identified age [Hazard ratio, 95% confidence interval (CI; 1.05, 1.01–1.09, resp.], alcohol abuse [HR 3.05, 95% CI 1.11–8.38], duration of treatment [HR 0.92, 95% CI 0.88–0.96], and MELD score [HR 1.08, 95% CI 1.02–1.14] to be independent predictors of survival. Conclusions. Survival of HRS patients after treatment depends on age, etiology of liver disease, and the duration of treatment.

  8. Outcomes for Spine Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy and an Analysis of Predictors of Local Recurrence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bishop, Andrew J.; Tao, Randa; Rebueno, Neal C.; Christensen, Eva N.; Allen, Pamela K.; Wang, Xin A.; Amini, Behrang; Tannir, Nizar M.; Tatsui, Claudio E.; Rhines, Laurence D.; Li, Jing; Chang, Eric L.; Brown, Paul D.; Ghia, Amol J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate local control, survival outcomes, and predictors of local relapse for patients treated with spine stereotactic body radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the records of 332 spinal metastases consecutively treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy between 2002 and 2012. The median follow-up for all living patients was 33 months (range, 0-111 months). Endpoints were overall survival and local control (LC); recurrences were classified as either in-field or marginal. Results: The 1-year actuarial LC and overall survival rates were 88% and 64%, respectively. Patients with local relapses had poorer dosimetric coverage of the gross tumor volume (GTV) compared with patients without recurrence (minimum dose [Dmin] biologically equivalent dose [BED] 23.9 vs 35.1 Gy, P<.001; D98 BED 41.8 vs 48.1 Gy, P=.001; D95 BED 47.2 vs 50.5 Gy, P=.004). Furthermore, patients with marginal recurrences had poorer prescription coverage of the GTV (86% vs 93%, P=.01) compared with those with in-field recurrences, potentially because of more upfront spinal canal disease (78% vs 24%, P=.001). Using a Cox regression univariate analysis, patients with a GTV BED Dmin ≥33.4 Gy (median dose) (equivalent to 14 Gy in 1 fraction) had a significantly higher 1-year LC rate (94% vs 80%, P=.001) compared with patients with a lower GTV BED Dmin; this factor was the only significant variable on multivariate Cox analysis associated with LC (P=.001, hazard ratio 0.29, 95% confidence interval 0.14-0.60) and also was the only variable significant in a separate competing risk multivariate model (P=.001, hazard ratio 0.30, 95% confidence interval 0.15-0.62). Conclusions: Stereotactic body radiation therapy offers durable control for spinal metastases, but there is a subset of patients that recur locally. Patients with local relapse had significantly poorer tumor coverage, which was likely attributable to treatment planning directives that prioritized the

  9. Outcomes for Spine Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy and an Analysis of Predictors of Local Recurrence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bishop, Andrew J.; Tao, Randa [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Rebueno, Neal C. [Department of Radiation Dosimetry, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Christensen, Eva N.; Allen, Pamela K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Wang, Xin A. [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Amini, Behrang [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Tannir, Nizar M. [Department of Genitourinary Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Tatsui, Claudio E.; Rhines, Laurence D. [Department of Neurosurgery, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Li, Jing [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Chang, Eric L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, USC Norris Cancer Hospital, Keck School of Medicine of USC, Los Angeles, California (United States); Brown, Paul D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Ghia, Amol J., E-mail: ajghia@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: To investigate local control, survival outcomes, and predictors of local relapse for patients treated with spine stereotactic body radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the records of 332 spinal metastases consecutively treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy between 2002 and 2012. The median follow-up for all living patients was 33 months (range, 0-111 months). Endpoints were overall survival and local control (LC); recurrences were classified as either in-field or marginal. Results: The 1-year actuarial LC and overall survival rates were 88% and 64%, respectively. Patients with local relapses had poorer dosimetric coverage of the gross tumor volume (GTV) compared with patients without recurrence (minimum dose [Dmin] biologically equivalent dose [BED] 23.9 vs 35.1 Gy, P<.001; D98 BED 41.8 vs 48.1 Gy, P=.001; D95 BED 47.2 vs 50.5 Gy, P=.004). Furthermore, patients with marginal recurrences had poorer prescription coverage of the GTV (86% vs 93%, P=.01) compared with those with in-field recurrences, potentially because of more upfront spinal canal disease (78% vs 24%, P=.001). Using a Cox regression univariate analysis, patients with a GTV BED Dmin ≥33.4 Gy (median dose) (equivalent to 14 Gy in 1 fraction) had a significantly higher 1-year LC rate (94% vs 80%, P=.001) compared with patients with a lower GTV BED Dmin; this factor was the only significant variable on multivariate Cox analysis associated with LC (P=.001, hazard ratio 0.29, 95% confidence interval 0.14-0.60) and also was the only variable significant in a separate competing risk multivariate model (P=.001, hazard ratio 0.30, 95% confidence interval 0.15-0.62). Conclusions: Stereotactic body radiation therapy offers durable control for spinal metastases, but there is a subset of patients that recur locally. Patients with local relapse had significantly poorer tumor coverage, which was likely attributable to treatment planning directives that prioritized the

  10. Medical Therapies for Stricturing Crohn's Disease: Efficacy and Cross-Sectional Imaging Predictors of Therapeutic Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Cécile; Perrey, Antoine; Lambert, Céline; Pereira, Bruno; Goutte, Marion; Dubois, Anne; Goutorbe, Felix; Dapoigny, Michel; Bommelaer, Gilles; Hordonneau, Constance; Buisson, Anthony

    2017-06-01

    Medical therapy efficacy remains controversial in stricturing Crohn's disease. Cross-sectional imaging, especially magnetic resonance imaging, has been suggested as very helpful to guide therapeutic decision making. To assess efficacy and predictors of therapeutic failure in patients receiving medical treatments for stricturing Crohn's disease. In this retrospective study, therapeutic