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Sample records for ejection forces determines

  1. Do centrioles generate a polar ejection force?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Jonathan

    2005-01-01

    A microtubule-dependent polar ejection force that pushes chromosomes away from spindle poles during prometaphase is observed in animal cells but not in the cells of higher plants. Elongating microtubules and kinesin-like motor molecules have been proposed as possible causes, but neither accounts for all the data. In the hypothesis proposed here a polar ejection force is generated by centrioles, which are found in animals but not in higher plants. Centrioles consist of nine microtubule triplets arranged like the blades of a tiny turbine. Instead of viewing centrioles through the spectacles of molecular reductionism and neo-Darwinism, this hypothesis assumes that they are holistically designed to be turbines. Orthogonally oriented centriolar turbines could generate oscillations in spindle microtubules that resemble the motion produced by a laboratory vortexer. The result would be a microtubule-mediated ejection force tending to move chromosomes away from the spindle axis and the poles. A rise in intracellular calcium at the onset of anaphase could regulate the polar ejection force by shutting down the centriolar turbines, but defective regulation could result in an excessive force that contributes to the chromosomal instability characteristic of most cancer cells.

  2. Ejection experience in Serbian air force, 1990-2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlović Miroslav

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Ejection injuries are the problem for air forces. The present risk for injuries is still too high, approximately 30-50%. This study was an effort to determine factors responsible for and contributing to injuries in the Serbian Air Force (SAF in the last two decades. Methods. All ejection cases in the SAF between 1990 and 2010 were analyzed. The collected data were: aircraft type, ejection seat generation, pilots ´ age and experience, causes of ejection, aeronautical parameters, the condition of aircraft control and types of injuries. For ease of comparison the U.S. Air Force Safety Regulation was used to define of major injuries: hospitalization for 5 days or more, loss of consciousness for over 5 min, bone fracture, joint dislocation, injury to any internal organ, any third-degree burn, or second-degree burn over 5% of the body surface area. Results. There were 52 ejections (51 pilots and 1 mechanic on 44 airplanes. The ejected persons were from 22 to 46 years, average 32 years. Major injuries were present in 25.49% cases. Of all the ejected pilots 9.61% had fractures of thoracic spine, 11.53% fractures of legs, 3.48% fractures of arms. Of all major injuries, fractures of thoracic spine were 38.46%. None of the pilots had experienced ejection previously. Conclusion. Our results suggest to obligatory take preventive measures: magnetic resonance imaging (MRI scan must be included in the standard pilot selection procedure and procedure after ejection. Physical conditioning of pilots has to be improved. Training on ejection trainer has to be accomplished, too.

  3. Left atrial ejection force predicts the outcome after catheter ablation for paroxysmal atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishima, Hideyuki; Mine, Takanao; Takahashi, Satoshi; Ashida, Kenki; Ishihara, Masaharu; Masuyama, Tohru

    2018-02-01

    Left atrium (LA) systolic dysfunction is observed in the early stages of atrial fibrillation (AF) prior to LA anatomical change. We investigated whether LA systolic dysfunction predicts recurrent AF after catheter ablation (CA) in patients with paroxysmal AF. We studied 106 patients who underwent CA for paroxysmal AF. LA systolic function was assessed with the LA emptying volume = Maximum LA volume (LAV max ) - Minimum LA volume (LAV min ), LA emptying fraction = [(LAV max - LAV min )/LAV max ] × 100, and LA ejection force calculated with Manning's method [LA ejection force = (0.5 × ρ × mitral valve area × A 2 )], where ρ is the blood density and A is the late-diastolic mitral inflow velocity. Recurrent AF was detected in 35/106 (33%) during 14.6 ± 9.1 months. Univariate analysis revealed reduced LA ejection force, decreased LA emptying fraction, larger LA diameter, and elevated brain natriuretic peptide as significant variables. On multivariate analysis, reduced LA ejection force and larger LA diameter were independently associated with recurrent AF. Moreover, patients with reduced LA ejection force and larger LA diameter had a higher risk of recurrent AF than preserved LA ejection force (log-rank P = 0.0004). Reduced LA ejection force and larger LA diameter were associated with poor outcome after CA for paroxysmal AF, and could be a new index to predict recurrent AF. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. A new method of determining the ejected mass of novae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sparks, W.M.

    1994-12-31

    A new method of determining the ejected mass of novae based on simple, reasonable assumptions is presented. This method assumes that the remnant mass on the white dwarf is the same as that from the previous nova outburst. The hydrogen, helium, and metal abundances of the accreted material from the secondary must also be known or assumed. The white dwarf`s mass has a small effect because the amount of hydrogen consumed during the thermonuclear runaway only depends weakly upon this mass. If the composition of the ejecta and the time of the remnant shell burnout are determined from observations, then the ejected and remnant masses can be deduced. At present only a sharp decrease in the X-rays observed by ROSAT has been attributed to this remnant burnout and only for two novae: GQ Mus and V1974 Cyg. The ejected and remnant masses for these two novae are calculated. If other indicators of nova remnant burnout, such as a rapid decrease in high-ionization lines, can be identified, then this method could be applied to additional novae.

  5. Determination of left ventricular ejection fraction by radionuclide angiocardiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoeilund-Carlsen, P.F.; Rasmussen, S.; Hesse, B.; Dige-Petersen, H.; Folke, K.; Godtfredsen, J.; Jensen, G.; Fabricius, J.

    1982-01-01

    Radionuclide angiocardiography is a non-invasive gamma camera investigation for evaluation and quantification of heart performance. We investigated the reliability of the method in measuring left ventricular ejection fraction (EF). The accuracy was determined by measuring EF in 29 patients by both radionuclide angiocardiography and conventional single-plane cineventriculography. The two methods correlated well: r=0.92; y=0.86x+0.07. The precision of the method was evaluated as follows: The coefficient of variance was 6% for duplicate determinations performed on the same day (n=27) and 5% for determinations with 1-3 days interval (n=21). The interobserver variation expressed by the coefficient of variance was maximally 6% with the radionuclide method (n=29, three observers). The intraobserver variation was 4% compared to 9% with cineventriculography (P<0.01). Radionuclide angiocardiography is a reliable way of measuring EF. As the method is non-invasive, it is well suited for sequential determinations of EF in the same patient. (authors)

  6. Effects of gender, ejection fraction and weight on cardiac force development in patients undergoing cardiac surgery--an experimental examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bening, Constanze; Weiler, Helge; Vahl, Christian-Friedrich

    2013-11-18

    It has long been recognized that differences exist between men and women in the impact of risc factors, symptoms, development and outcome of special diseases like the cardiovascular disease. Gender determines the cardiac baseline parameters like the number of cardiac myocyte, size and demand and may suggest differences in myofilament function among genders, which might be pronounced under pathological conditions. Does gender impact and maybe impair the contractile apparatus? Are the differences more prominent when other factors like weight, age, ejection fraction are added?Therefore we performed a study on 36 patients (21 male, 15 female) undergoing aortic valve replacement (AVR) or aortocoronary bypass operation (CABG) to examine the influence of gender, ejection fraction, surgical procedure and body mass index (BMI) on cardiac force development. Tissue was obtained from the right auricle and was stored in a special solution to prevent any stretching of the fibers. We used the skinned muscle fiber model and single muscle stripes, which were mounted on the "muscle machine" and exposed to a gradual increase of calcium concentration calculated by an attached computer program. 1.) In general female fibers show more force than male fibers: 3.9 mN vs. 2.0 mN (p = 0.03) 2.) Female fibers undergoing AVR achieved more force than those undergoing CABG operation: 5.7 mN vs. 2.8 mN (p = 0.02) as well as male fibers with AVR showed more force values compared to those undergoing CABG: 2.0 mN vs. 0.5 mN (p = 0.01). 3.) Male and female fibers of patients with EF > 55% developed significantly more force than from those with less ejection fraction than 30%: p = 0.002 for the male fibers (1.6 vs. 2.8 mN) and p = 0.04 for the female fibers (5.7 vs. 2.8 mN). 4.) Patients with a BMI between 18 till 25 develop significant more force than those with a BMI > 30: Females 5.1 vs. 2.6 mN; p 0.03, Males 3.8 vs. 0.8 mN; p 0.04). Our data suggest that female patients undergoing AVR or CABG

  7. Energy of Force-Free Magnetic Fields in Relation to Coronal Mass Ejections; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    G.S. Choe; C.Z. Cheng

    2002-01-01

    In typical observations of coronal mass ejections (CMEs), a magnetic structure of a helmet-shaped closed configuration bulges out and eventually opens up. However, a spontaneous transition between these field configurations has been regarded to be energetically impossible in force-free fields according to the Aly-Sturrock theorem. The theorem states that the maximum energy state of force-free fields with a given boundary normal field distribution is the open field. The theorem implicitly assumes the existence of the maximum energy state, which may not be taken for granted. In this study, we have constructed force-free fields containing tangential discontinuities in multiple flux systems. These force-free fields can be generated from a potential field by footpoint motions that do not conserve the boundary normal field distribution. Some of these force-free fields are found to have more magnetic energy than the corresponding open fields. The constructed force-free configurations are compared with observational features of CME-bearing active regions. Possible mechanisms of CMEs are also discussed

  8. Energy of Force-Free Magnetic Fields in Relation to Coronal Mass Ejections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choe, G.S.; Cheng, C.Z.

    2002-01-01

    In typical observations of coronal mass ejections (CMEs), a magnetic structure of a helmet-shaped closed configuration bulges out and eventually opens up. However, a spontaneous transition between these field configurations has been regarded to be energetically impossible in force-free fields according to the Aly-Sturrock theorem. The theorem states that the maximum energy state of force-free fields with a given boundary normal field distribution is the open field. The theorem implicitly assumes the existence of the maximum energy state, which may not be taken for granted. In this study, we have constructed force-free fields containing tangential discontinuities in multiple flux systems. These force-free fields can be generated from a potential field by footpoint motions that do not conserve the boundary normal field distribution. Some of these force-free fields are found to have more magnetic energy than the corresponding open fields. The constructed force-free configurations are compared with observational features of CME-bearing active regions. Possible mechanisms of CMEs are also discussed

  9. Force Reconstruction from Ejection Tests of Stores from Aircraft Used for Model Predictions and Missing/Bad Gages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, Michael; Cap, Jerome S.; Starr, Michael J.; Urbina, Angel; Brink, Adam Ray

    2015-12-01

    One of the more severe environments for a store on an aircraft is during the ejection of the store. During this environment it is not possible to instrument all component responses, and it is also likely that some instruments may fail during the environment testing. This work provides a method for developing these responses from failed gages and uninstrumented locations. First, the forces observed by the store during the environment are reconstructed. A simple sampling method is used to reconstruct these forces given various parameters. Then, these forces are applied to a model to generate the component responses. Validation is performed on this methodology.

  10. Ejection Tower Lab

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Ejection Tower Facility's mission is to test and evaluate new ejection seat technology being researched and developed for future defense forces. The captive and...

  11. Automatic determination of the regional ejection fraction of the left ventricle (gated bloodpool)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feser, J.A.

    1982-01-01

    The left ventricular volume curve and the ejection fraction are calculated according to the ''sliding region of interest'' method in which the ventricle contour is redetermined for every single picture of the various phases of the heart beat. The original set of data, consisting of 32 pictures in 64 x 64 matrix resolution, is processed by a three-dimensional filtering process in space (x,y) and time (t). The ventricle contour is determined by convolution of the filtered images with a 7-point Laplacian operator in 4 independent directions. The atrial and ventricular phase histograms are then calculated on the basis of this contour. (WU) [de

  12. Determination of right ventricular ejection fraction in children with cystic fibrosis, using krypton-81m

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piepsz, A.; Ham, H.R.; Millet, E.; Dab, I.

    1984-01-01

    The diagnosis of cor pulmonale and incipient heart failure remains difficult to assess in cystic fibrosis (CF) on the basis of the clinical as well as the biological parameters. The measurement of the right ventricular ejection fraction has been facilitated these last years by the introduction of the radionuclide methods. Methodological difficulties are however encountered when Tc-99m RBC are used, and are mainly related to heart chambers superposition (equilibrium method) or the low count density (first pass method). Few papers have been published on RVEF in cystic fibrosis and the results are somewhat contradictory. The authors have recently introduced a new method for the determination of RVEF, using equilibrium study during continuous injection of Kr-81m in glucose solution. This method offers several advantages related to an increased accuracy and a favorable dosimetry. In 25 patients aged 2 to 23 years with CF, one or more RVEF studies were performed. The severity of the disease was evaluated on the basis of the clinical Schwachman score, the lung function tests, the ventilation scan and the pa02. RVEF tended to decrease with the progression of the lung disease, although, owing to the spread of the results, no RVEF could be predicted on the basis of the other parameters. The decrease of RVEF in patients with advanced lung disease was moderate and terminal lung disease was sometimes associated with normal right heart contractility

  13. Left ventricular ejection fraction determined by gated Tl-201 perfusion SPECT and quantitative software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyun, In Young; Kim, Sung Eun; Seo, Jeong Kee; Hong, Eui Soo; Kwan, Jun; Park, Keum Soo; Lee, Woo Hyung

    2000-01-01

    We compared estimates of ejection fraction (EF) determined by gated Tl-201 perfusion SPECT (g-Tl-SPECT) with those by gated blood pool (GBP) scan. Eighteen subjects underwent g-Tl-SPECT and GBP scan. After reconstruction of g-Tl-SPECT, we measured EF with Cedars software. The comparison of the EF with g-Tl-SPECT and GBP scan was assessed by correlation analysis and Bland Altman plot. The estimates of EF were significantly different (p<0.05) with g-Tl-SPECT (40%±14%) and GBP scan (43%±14%). There was an excellent correlation of EF between g-Tl-SPECT and GBP scan (r=3D0.94, p<0.001). The mean difference of EF between GBP scan and g-Tl-SPECT was +3.2%. Ninety-five percent limits of agreement were ±9.8%. EF between g-Tl-SPECT and GBP scan were in poor agreement. The estimates of EF by g-Tl-SPECT was well correlated with those by GBP scan. However, EF of g-Tl-SPECT doesn't agree with EF of GBP scan. EF of g-Tl-SPECT can't be used interchangeably with EF of GBP scan.=20

  14. ECG-gated blood pool tomography in the determination of left ventricular volume, ejection fraction, and wall motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Underwood, S.R.; Ell, P.J.; Jarritt, P.H.; Emanuel, R.W.; Swanton, R.H.

    1984-01-01

    ECG-gated blood pool tomography promises to provide a ''gold standard'' for noninvasive measurement of left ventricular volume, ejection fraction, and wall motion. This study compares these measurements with those from planar radionuclide imaging and contrast ventriculography. End diastolic and end systolic blood pool images were acquired tomographically using an IGE400A rotating gamma camera and Star computer, and slices were reconstructed orthogonal to the long axis of the heart. Left ventricular volume was determined by summing the areas of the slices, and wall motion was determined by comparison of end diastolic and end systolic contours. In phantom experiments this provided an accurate measurement of volume (r=0.98). In 32 subjects who were either normal or who had coronary artery disease left ventricular volume (r=0.83) and ejection fraction (r=0.89) correlated well with those using a counts based planar technique. In 16 of 18 subjects who underwent right anterior oblique X-ray contrast ventriculography, tomographic wall motion agreed for anterior, apical, and inferior walls, but abnormal septal motion which was not apparent by contrast ventriculography, was seen in 12 subjects tomographically. All 12 had disease of the left anterior descending coronary artery and might have been expected to have abnormal septal motion. ECG-gated blood pool tomography can thus determine left ventricular volume and ejection fraction accurately, and provides a global description of wall motion in a way that is not possible from any single planar image

  15. Pedal force determination respect to ride comfort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mačužić, Slavica; Lukić, Jovanka; Glišović, Jasna; Miloradović, Danijela

    2017-10-01

    Automotive ergonomics is a set of knowledge which has a task to design a vehicle to make the passengers feel comfortable. Interior packaging represents an important stage in the vehicle design process, in order to enable the driver to every important aspect of movement. During the process of driving, the driver performs various movements of arms and legs, leading to a certain fatigue. Each seating position in the vehicle, contain certain boundary conditions, and for that reason it was necessary to examine how the seating position affects the driver possibilities. In this paper, the pedal forces were determined by application of Ramsis human model. Different human populations were taken into account. Correlation between subjects’ anthropometrics measures and the foot pedal force pedal was observed. Obtained results were significant input data for vehicle packaging.

  16. Automated determination of the right ventricular ejection fraction by digital processing of sup(81m)Kr scintigrams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elfner, R.; Vaknine, R.; Knapp, W.H.; Tillmanns, H.; Lorenz, W.J.

    1986-01-01

    A method is presented for the automated determination of the right ventricular ejection fraction (RVEF) by digital image processing of scintigrams obtained by intravenous infusion of Krypton 81m (sup(81m)Kr) dissolved in a glucose solution. End-diastolic and end-systolic sum pictures were computed by the addition of approximately 30-40 frames selected from the time-activity curve of a preliminary, manually drawn, right ventricular region of interest. After processing these two images with an adaptive Wiener filter, the right ventricular contour was determined by a recently developed algorithm using morphological and functional criteria. The RVEF was calculated for a series of 51 patients from the counts in the detected right ventricular regions in the end-diastolic and end-systolic sum images. In 16 patients without evidence of cardiopulmonary disease, the mean RVEF was 50+-6.1%. RVEF was significantly reduced in 18 patients with obstructive pulmonary disease (42+-6.5%) and in 17 patients with congestive cardiomyopathy (36+-7.1%). The correlation coefficient between two determinations of the RVEF was r=0.94. Through digital image processing, the determination of the RVEF by radioventriculography with sup(81m)Kr showed high reliability and reproducibility. (orig.)

  17. Determination of Geometric and Kinematical Parameters of Coronal Mass Ejections Using STEREO Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fainshtein, V. G.; Tsivileva, D. M.; Kashapova, L. K.

    2010-03-01

    We present a new, relatively simple and fast method to determine true geometric and kinematical CME parameters from simultaneous STEREO A, B observations of CMEs. These parameters are the three-dimensional direction of CME propagation, velocity and acceleration of CME front, CME angular sizes and front position depending on time. The method is based on the assumption that CME shape may be described by a modification of so-called ice-cream cone models. The method has been tested for several CMEs.

  18. Determination of Geometric and Kinematical Parameters of Coronal Mass Ejections Using STEREO Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fainshtein, V. G.; Tsivileva, D. M.; Kashapova, L. K.

    2010-01-01

    We present a new, relatively simple and fast method to determine true geometric and kinematical CME parameters from simultaneous STEREO A, B observations of CMEs. These parameters are the three-dimensional direction of CME propagation, velocity and acceleration of CME front, CME angular sizes and front position depending on time. The method is based on the assumption that CME shape may be described by a modification of so-called ice-cream cone models. The method has been tested for several CMEs.

  19. Comparison of 16-frame and 8-frame gated SPET imaging for determination of left ventricular volumes and ejection fraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navare, Sachin M.; Liu, Yi-Hwa; Wackers, Frans J.T.

    2003-01-01

    Electrocardiographic (ECG) gated single-photon emission tomography (SPET) allows for simultaneous assessment of myocardial perfusion and left ventricular (LV) function. Presently 8-frame per cardiac cycle ECG gating of SPET images is standard. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of 8-frame and 16-frame gated SPET on measurements of LV volumes and to evaluate the effects of the presence of myocardial perfusion defects and of radiotracer dose administered on the calculation of LV volumes. A total of 86 patients underwent technetium-99m SPET myocardial perfusion imaging using 16-frame per cardiac cycle acquisition. Eight-frame gated SPET images were generated by summation of contiguous frames. Left ventricular end-diastolic volume (EDV), end-systolic volume (ESV) and ejection fraction (EF) were calculated from the 16-frame and 8-frame data sets. The patients were divided into groups according to the administered dose of the radiotracer and the size of the perfusion defect. Results. Sixteen frame per cardiac cycle acquisition resulted in significantly larger EDV (122±72 ml vs 115±68 ml, P<0.0001), smaller ESV (64±58.6 ml vs 67.6±59.5 ml, P<0.0001), and higher LVEF (55.3%±18% vs 49%±17.4%, P<0.0001) as compared to 8-frame SPET imaging. This effect was seen regardless of whether a high or a low dose was administered and whether or not significant perfusion defects were present. This study shows that EDV, ESV and LVEF determined by 16-frame gated SPET are significantly different from those determined by 8-frame gated SPET. The radiotracer dose and perfusion defects do not affect estimation of LV parameters by 16-frame gated SPET. (orig.)

  20. Coronal Mass Ejections

    CERN Document Server

    Kunow, H; Linker, J. A; Schwenn, R; Steiger, R

    2006-01-01

    It is well known that the Sun gravitationally controls the orbits of planets and minor bodies. Much less known, however, is the domain of plasma fields and charged particles in which the Sun governs a heliosphere out to a distance of about 15 billion kilometers. What forces activates the Sun to maintain this power? Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) and their descendants are the troops serving the Sun during high solar activity periods. This volume offers a comprehensive and integrated overview of our present knowledge and understanding of Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) and their descendants, Interplanetary CMEs (ICMEs). It results from a series of workshops held between 2000 and 2004. An international team of about sixty experimenters involved e.g. in the SOHO, ULYSSES, VOYAGER, PIONEER, HELIOS, WIND, IMP, and ACE missions, ground observers, and theoreticians worked jointly on interpreting the observations and developing new models for CME initiations, development, and interplanetary propagation. The book provides...

  1. Femtosecond pulse-width dependent trapping and directional ejection dynamics of dielectric nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Chiang, Weiyi

    2013-09-19

    We demonstrate that laser pulse duration, which determines its impulsive peak power, is an effective parameter to control the number of optically trapped dielectric nanoparticles, their ejections along the directions perpendicular to polarization vector, and their migration distances from the trapping site. This ability to controllably confine and eject the nanoparticle is explained by pulse width-dependent optical forces exerted on nanoparticles in the trapping site and ratio between the repulsive and attractive forces. We also show that the directional ejections occur only when the number of nanoparticles confined in the trapping site exceeds a definite threshold. We interpret our data by considering the formation of transient assembly of the optically confined nanoparticles, partial ejection of the assembly, and subsequent filling of the trapping site. The understanding of optical trapping and directional ejections by ultrashort laser pulses paves the way to optically controlled manipulation and sorting of nanoparticles. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  2. Computer-assisted determination of left ventricular endocardial borders reduces variability in the echocardiographic assessment of ejection fraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindstrom Lena

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Left ventricular size and function are important prognostic factors in heart disease. Their measurement is the most frequent reason for sending patients to the echo lab. These measurements have important implications for therapy but are sensitive to the skill of the operator. Earlier automated echo-based methods have not become widely used. The aim of our study was to evaluate an automatic echocardiographic method (with manual correction if needed for determining left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF based on an active appearance model of the left ventricle (syngo®AutoEF, Siemens Medical Solutions. Comparisons were made with manual planimetry (manual Simpson, visual assessment and automatically determined LVEF from quantitative myocardial gated single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT. Methods 60 consecutive patients referred for myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI were included in the study. Two-dimensional echocardiography was performed within one hour of MPI at rest. Image quality did not constitute an exclusion criterion. Analysis was performed by five experienced observers and by two novices. Results LVEF (%, end-diastolic and end-systolic volume/BSA (ml/m2 were for uncorrected AutoEF 54 ± 10, 51 ± 16, 24 ± 13, for corrected AutoEF 53 ± 10, 53 ± 18, 26 ± 14, for manual Simpson 51 ± 11, 56 ± 20, 28 ± 15, and for MPI 52 ± 12, 67 ± 26, 35 ± 23. The required time for analysis was significantly different for all four echocardiographic methods and was for uncorrected AutoEF 79 ± 5 s, for corrected AutoEF 159 ± 46 s, for manual Simpson 177 ± 66 s, and for visual assessment 33 ± 14 s. Compared with the expert manual Simpson, limits of agreement for novice corrected AutoEF was lower than for novice manual Simpson (0.8 ± 10.5 vs. -3.2 ± 11.4 LVEF percentage points. Calculated for experts and with LVEF (% categorized into Conclusion Corrected AutoEF reduces the variation in measurements compared with

  3. Determinants of Female Labor Force Participation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Adiqa Kausar Kiani

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available There are many factors related to female entering the labor market. For example, household income, household expenditure, education and status of the head of the household (male/ female. The degree of correlation between each variable and female labor force participation rate varies throughout the country. This study focused on the factors due to which women enter in labor market. Tobit model is used for this analysis. It is concluded that education and household expenditures have positive but insignificant impact on the female LF, whereas household income and head of the household has negative impact on FLF. It is suggested that in order to improve the working condition of female labor force government should take necessary action, for example women education etc.

  4. Ultrasound - Aided ejection in micro injection molding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masato, D.; Sorgato, M.; Lucchetta, G.

    2018-05-01

    In this work, an ultrasound-aided ejection system was designed and tested for different polymers (PS, COC and POM) and mold topographies. The proposed solution aims at reducing the ejection friction by decreasing the adhesion component of the frictional force, which is controlled by the contact area developed during the filling stage of the injection molding process. The experimental results indicate a positive effect of ultrasound vibration on the friction force values, with a maximum reduction of 16. Moreover, it is demonstrated that the ultrasound effect is strictly related to both polymer selection and mold roughness. The combined effect on the ejection force of mold surface roughness, melt viscosity during filling and polymer elastic modulus at ejection was modeled to the experimental data, in order to demonstrate that the effect of ultrasound vibration on the ejection friction reduction is due to the heating of the contact interface and the consequent reduction of the polymer elastic modulus.

  5. FIRST DETERMINATION OF THE TRUE MASS OF CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS: A NOVEL APPROACH TO USING THE TWO STEREO VIEWPOINTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colaninno, Robin C.; Vourlidas, Angelos

    2009-01-01

    The twin Sun Earth Connection Coronal and Heliospheric Investigation (SECCHI) COR2 coronagraphs of the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) provide images of the solar corona from two viewpoints in the solar system. Since their launch in late 2006, the STEREO Ahead (A) and Behind (B) spacecraft have been slowly separating from Earth at a rate of 22. 0 5 per year. By the end of 2007, the two spacecraft were separated by more than 40 deg. from each other. At that time, we began to see large-scale differences in the morphology and total intensity between coronal mass ejections (CMEs) observed with SECCHI-COR2 on STEREO-A and B. Due to the effects of the Thomson scattering geometry, the intensity of an observed CME is dependent on the angle it makes with the observed plane of the sky. From the intensity images, we can calculate the integrated line-of-sight electron density and mass. We demonstrate that it is possible to simultaneously derive the direction and true total mass of the CME if we make the simple assumption that the same mass should be observed in COR2-A and B.

  6. Determination of right ventricular ejection fraction from reprojected gated blood pool SPET: comparison with first-pass ventriculography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartlett, M.L.; Seaton, D.; McEwan, L.; Fong, W.

    2001-01-01

    Gated blood pool (GBP) studies are widely available and relatively inexpensive. We have previously published a simple and convenient method for measuring left ventricle ejection fraction (EF) with increased accuracy from single-photon emission tomography (SPET) GBP scans. This paper describes an extension of this method by which right ventricular EF may also be measured. Gated SPET images of the blood pool are acquired and re-oriented in short-axis slices. Counts from the left ventricle are excluded from the short-axis slices, which are then reprojected to give horizontal long-axis images. Time-activity curves are generated from each pixel around the right ventricle, and an image is created with non-ventricular pixels ''greyed out''. This image is used as a guide in drawing regions of interest around the right ventricle on the end-diastolic and end-systolic long-axis images. In 28 patients, first-pass ventriculography studies were acquired followed by SPET GBP scans. The first-pass images were analysed a total of four times by two observers and the SPET images were analysed three times each by two observers. The agreement between the two techniques was good, with a correlation coefficient of 0.72 and a mean absolute difference between first-pass and reprojected SPET EFs of 4.8 EF units. Only four of the 28 patients had a difference of greater than 8 EF units. Variability was also excellent for SPET right ventricular EF values. Intra-observer variability was significantly lower for SPET than for first-pass EFs: standard error of the estimate (SEE)=5.1 and 7.3 EF units, respectively (P<0.05). Inter-observer variability was comparable in the two techniques (SEE=5.2 and 6.9 EF units for SPET and first-pass ventriculography, respectively). (orig.)

  7. Determinants of the response of left ventricular ejection fraction to vasodilator stress in electrocardiographically gated {sup 82}rubidium myocardial perfusion PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Tracy L.Y.; Merrill, Jennifer; Bengel, Frank M. [Johns Hopkins University, Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Volokh, Lana [GE Healthcare, Haifa (Israel)

    2008-02-15

    Myocardial perfusion imaging with {sup 82}Rb PET allows for ECG-gated studies to be obtained early after radiotracer injection, capturing ventricular function close to peak pharmacologic action of dipyridamole. This is different from gated SPECT and may potentially provide additional diagnostic information. We sought to identify potential correlates of the PET-derived ejection fraction response to vasodilator stress. One hundred ten consecutive patients undergoing {sup 82}Rb PET myocardial perfusion imaging during evaluation for coronary artery disease were included. Using a GE Discovery STRx PET-CT scanner, ECG-gated images (eight bins) were obtained at rest and 4 min after dipyridamole infusion, 90 s after infusion of 1,480-2,220 MBq of {sup 82}Rb. Summed rest, stress, and difference scores (SRS, SSS, and SDS) were determined using a five-point scoring system and 20-segment model. Ejection fraction was calculated using automated QGS software. Significant reversibility (SDS {>=} 4) was found in 23 patients (21%). Mean LVEF in all patients was 47 {+-} 13% at rest and 53 {+-} 13% during dipyridamole. LVEF increased in 89 patients, and decreased in 17 patients during vasodilation. The change in LVEF was inversely correlated with SDS (r = -0.26; p = 0.007). Additionally, it was inversely correlated with resting LVEF (r = -0.20; p = 0.03) and SSS (r = -0.25; p = 0.009). No significant correlations were observed with SRS, heart rate, blood pressure, age, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, or pretest likelihood of disease. At multivariate regression analysis, SDS was an independent predictor of the change in LVEF. Gated {sup 82}Rb PET during pharmacologic stress allows for assessment of the functional response to vasodilation. The magnitude of LVEF increase is determined by stress perfusion/reversible perfusion defects. Functional response to hyperemia may thus be incorporated in future evaluations of diagnostic and prognostic algorithms based on {sup 82}Rb PET. (orig.)

  8. Noninvasive determination of optical lever sensitivity in atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higgins, M.J.; Proksch, R.; Sader, J.E.; Polcik, M.; Mc Endoo, S.; Cleveland, J.P.; Jarvis, S.P.

    2006-01-01

    Atomic force microscopes typically require knowledge of the cantilever spring constant and optical lever sensitivity in order to accurately determine the force from the cantilever deflection. In this study, we investigate a technique to calibrate the optical lever sensitivity of rectangular cantilevers that does not require contact to be made with a surface. This noncontact approach utilizes the method of Sader et al. [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 70, 3967 (1999)] to calibrate the spring constant of the cantilever in combination with the equipartition theorem [J. L. Hutter and J. Bechhoefer, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 64, 1868 (1993)] to determine the optical lever sensitivity. A comparison is presented between sensitivity values obtained from conventional static mode force curves and those derived using this noncontact approach for a range of different cantilevers in air and liquid. These measurements indicate that the method offers a quick, alternative approach for the calibration of the optical lever sensitivity

  9. Noninvasive determination of optical lever sensitivity in atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, M. J.; Proksch, R.; Sader, J. E.; Polcik, M.; Mc Endoo, S.; Cleveland, J. P.; Jarvis, S. P.

    2006-01-01

    Atomic force microscopes typically require knowledge of the cantilever spring constant and optical lever sensitivity in order to accurately determine the force from the cantilever deflection. In this study, we investigate a technique to calibrate the optical lever sensitivity of rectangular cantilevers that does not require contact to be made with a surface. This noncontact approach utilizes the method of Sader et al. [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 70, 3967 (1999)] to calibrate the spring constant of the cantilever in combination with the equipartition theorem [J. L. Hutter and J. Bechhoefer, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 64, 1868 (1993)] to determine the optical lever sensitivity. A comparison is presented between sensitivity values obtained from conventional static mode force curves and those derived using this noncontact approach for a range of different cantilevers in air and liquid. These measurements indicate that the method offers a quick, alternative approach for the calibration of the optical lever sensitivity.

  10. Determination of differences in the left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) by radionuclides and echocardiography pre and post treatment with anthracycline in pediatric patients with oncology diagnostic of the La Raza Medical Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veras R, H.

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this work was to correlate the left ventricular ejection fraction determine by radionuclide angiocardiography and echocardiography in pediatric patients under anthracycline treatment. Material and methods: 41 patients were studied with range age from 3 to 14 years, with oncology diagnostic that were treated with anthracycline. Radionuclide angiocardiography and echocardiography were performed before an after anthracycline administration to determine the changes in the Ieft ventricular ejection fraction. Results: Anthracycline treatment caused no changes in the electrocardiography, echocardiogram and radionuclide angiocardiography. Conclusions: In our study anthracycline treatment caused no changes in the electrocardiography, echocardiography and both radionuclide angiocardiography techniques, first-pass and equilibrium. A high correlation was obtaining when left ventricular ejection fraction is compared between radionuclide angiocardiography and echocardiogram. (Author)

  11. Mass ejections from the solar corona into interplanetary space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hildner, E.

    1977-01-01

    Mass ejections from the corona are common occurrances, as observations with the High Altitude Observatory's white light coronagraph aboard Skylab showed. During 227 days of operation in 1973 and 1974 at least 77 mass ejections were observed and as many more probably occurred unobserved. It is suggested that the frequency of ejections varies with the solar cycle and that ejections may contribute 10 percent or more of the total solar mass efflux to the interplanetary medium at solar maximum. Since ejections are confined to relatively low latitudes, their fractional mass flux contribution is greater near the ecliptic than far from it. From the behavior of ejecta, we can estimate the magnitude of the force driving them through the corona. It is also suggested that loop-shaped ejection - the largest fraction of ejections - are driven, primarily, by magnetic forces. By comparison, gas pressure forces are negligible, and forces due to wave pressure are completely inadequate. That magnetic forces are important is consistent with observation that ejections seem to come, primarily, from regions where the magnetic field is more intense and more complex than elsewhere. Indeed, ejections are associated with phenomena (flares and eruptive prominences) which occur over lines separating regions of opposite polarities. (Auth.)

  12. Semi-automatic segmentation of gated blood pool emission tomographic images by watersheds: application to the determination of right and left ejection fractions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mariano-Goulart, D.; Collet, H.; Kotzki, P.-O.; Zanca, M.; Rossi, M.

    1998-01-01

    Tomographic multi-gated blood pool scintigraphy (TMUGA) is a widely available method which permits simultaneous assessment of right and left ventricular ejection fractions. However, the widespread clinical use of this technique is impeded by the lack of segmentation methods dedicated to an automatic analysis of ventricular activities. In this study we evaluated how a watershed algorithm succeeds in providing semi-automatic segmentation of ventricular activities in order to measure right and left ejection fractions by TMUGA. The left ejection fractions of 30 patients were evaluated both with TMUGA and with planar multi-gated blood pool scintigraphy (PMUGA). Likewise, the right ejection fractions of 25 patients were evaluated with first-pass scintigraphy (FP) and with TMUGA. The watershed algorithm was applied to the reconstructed slices in order to group together the voxels whose activity came from one specific cardiac cavity. First, the results of the watershed algorithm were compared with manual drawing around left and right ventricles. Left ejection fractions evaluated by TMUGA with the watershed procedure were not significantly different (p=0.30) from manual outlines whereas a small but significant difference was found for right ejection fractions (p=0.004). Then right and left ejection fractions evaluated by TMUGA (with the semi-automatic segmentation procedure) were compared with the results obtained by FP or PMUGA. Left ventricular ejection fractions evaluated by TMUGA showed an excellent correlation with those evaluated by PMUGA (r=0.93; SEE=5.93%; slope=0.99; intercept = 4.17%). The measurements of these ejection fractions were significantly higher with TMUGA than with PMUGA (P<0.01). The interoperator variability for the measurement of left ejection fractions by TMUGA was 4.6%. Right ventricular ejection fractions evaluated by TMUGA showed a good correlation with those evaluated by FP (r = 0.81; SEE = 6.68%; slope = 1.00; intercept = 0.85%) and were not

  13. Aircrew ejection experience: questionnaire responses from 20 survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taneja, Narinder; Pinto, Leslie J; Dogra, Manmohan

    2005-07-01

    Published studies on ejection have focused predominantly on the injuries sustained by aircrew and discussed their preventive measures from an aeromedical perspective. However, studies have not discussed aircrew experiences related to ejection or how they would like to advise other aircrew to successfully handle ejection as an event. Such information can assist in designing realistic indoctrination and training programs. This study was conducted to fill gaps in our understanding of aircrew perspectives of successful ejections. Aircrew reporting to the Institute of Aerospace Medicine (IAM), Indian Air Force, for post-ejection evaluation during the period of May 2003 to January 2005 completed a questionnaire that was designed for the study. A total of 20 aircrew completed this questionnaire. The mean age of the aircrew was 30.25 +/- 4.45 yr. Most of them had logged more than 500 flying hours. Some aircrew described their initial moments of ejection as "blacked out," "dazed, yet conscious," or as "a shock that gradually decreased." Practicing ejection drills on the ground, being prepared at all times, making a timely decision to eject, and assuming correct posture were identified as the most important factors for success. Descriptions of ejection as an event suggest intense emotional arousal could occur following ejection. This study provides first hand inputs into the psychological processes accompanying ejections. Such information could be very useful in understanding the critical factors that influence successful ejection.

  14. Impact of early, late, and no ST-segment resolution measured by continuous ST Holter monitoring on left ventricular ejection fraction and infarct size as determined by cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haeck, Joost D. E.; Verouden, Niels J. W.; Kuijt, Wichert J.; Koch, Karel T.; Majidi, Mohamed; Hirsch, Alexander; Tijssen, Jan G. P.; Krucoff, Mitchell W.; de Winter, Robbert J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The goal of this study is to determine the predictive value of ST-segment resolution (STR) early after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), late STR, and no STR for left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and infarct size (IS) by cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) at

  15. Multi-slice CT (MSCT) in cardiac function imaging: threshold-value-supported 3D volume reconstructions to determine the left ventricular ejection fraction in comparison to MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehrhard, K.; Oberholzer, K.; Gast, K.; Mildenberger, P.; Kreitner, K.F.; Thelen, M.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To assess MSCT of the heart to determining left ventricular ejection fraction (EF) based on threshold-value-supported 3D volume reconstructions compared to MRI. Methods: Cardiac MSCT was performed in 7 patients. Images were reconstructed during end-systolic and end-diastolic phases of the cardiac cycle and transformed to 3D volumes to determine end-systolic (ESV) and end-diastolic volume (EDV) by using different lower threshold values: besides fixed lower threshold values, identical for each image sequence, individual lower threshold values dependent on contrast enhancement of the left ventricle were applied. The latter represent the mean value calculated by combining the average CT-density of the myocardium and the contrast-enhanced blood in the left ventricle. The EF derived from ESV and EDV. Results: The best correlation with MR imaging was obtained for ESV and EDV by using the individual lower threshold values for the respective sequence. The correlation coefficient for ESV was 0.95 and for EDV it was 0.93. On average, the ESV was overestimated by 3.72 ml, while the ESD was underestimated by 2.85 ml. The respective standard deviation for the ESV was 14,87 ml, for the EDV it was 26.83 ml. On average, the EF was underestimated by 3.57% with a standard deviation of 9.43% and a correlation coefficient of 0.83 in comparison to MRI. Conclusion: The threshold-value-supported 3D volume reconstruction of the left ventricle represents a good method to determine the left ventricular function parameters. Due to the differences in the contrast enhancement, the use of an individual lower threshold value for every image sequence is of particular importance. (orig.) [de

  16. Determination of left and right ventricular ejection and filling by fast cine MR imaging in the breath-hold technique in healthy subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rominger, M.B.; Bachmann, G.F.; Geuer, M.; Puzik, M.; Rau, W.S.; Pabst, W.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: Evaluation and comparison of localized and global left and right ventricular ejection and filling with fast cine MR imaging in the breath-hold technique. Materials and Methods: 10 healthy volunteers were examined with a 1.5 Tesla unit and phased-array-coil using a segmented FLASH-2D sequence in breath-hold technique. Peak ejection and peak filling rates [PER, PFR enddiastolic volume (EDV)/s], time to PER and PFR [TPER, TPFR ms] and time of endsystole [TSYS in % RR-intervall] of all slices (complete-slice-evaluation) were evaluated and compared to three left ventricular and one right ventricular slices (reduced three-slice-evaluation). Results: There were significant regional left ventricular differences of PER (p=0.002) and PFR (p=0.007), but not of TPER and TPFR. Ejection and filling indices of the left ventricular middle slice were closest to the overall evaluation of all sections. In the left-/right-side comparison the right ventricular PFR was higher than the left ventricular (5.1 and 4.2 EDV/s) and the right ventricular TPFR was earlier than the left (92.2 and 123.5 ms). Conclusions: With fast cine techniques, regional and global left and right ventricular ejection and filling indices can be evaluated in addition to the global heart volume indices. The three-slice-evaluation represents a comprehensive, clear and time-saving method for daily routine. (orig.) [de

  17. Attempting to train a digital human model to reproduce human subject reach capabilities in an ejection seat aircraft

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zehner, G.F.; Hudson, J.A.; Oudenhuijzen, A.

    2006-01-01

    From 1997 through 2002, the Air Force Research Lab and TNO Defence, Security and Safety (Business Unit Human Factors) were involved in a series of tests to quantify the accuracy of five Human Modeling Systems (HMSs) in determining accommodation limits of ejection seat aircraft. The results of these

  18. Determining prestressing forces for inspection of prestressed concrete containments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-07-01

    General Design Criterion 53, ''Provisions for Containment Testing and Inspection,'' of Appendix A, ''General Design Criteria for Nuclear Power Plants,'' to 10 CFR Part 50, ''Domestic Licensing of Production and Utilization Facilities,'' requires, in part, that the reactor containment be designed to permit (1) periodic inspection of all important areas and (2) an appropriate surveillance program. Regulatory Guide 1.35, ''Inservice Inspection of Ungrouted Tendons in Prestressed Concrete Containment Structures,'' describes a basis acceptable to the NRC staff for developing an appropriate inservice inspection and surveillance program for ungrouted tendons in prestressed concrete containment structures of light-water-cooled reactors. This guide expands and clarifies the NRC staff position on determining prestressing forces to be used for inservice inspections of prestressed concrete containment structures

  19. Interactive forces between lignin and cellulase as determined by atomic force microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Qin, Chengrong; Clarke, Kimberley; Li, Kecheng

    2014-01-01

    Background Lignin is a complex polymer which inhibits the enzymatic conversion of cellulose to glucose in lignocellulose biomass for biofuel production. Cellulase enzymes irreversibly bind to lignin, deactivating the enzyme and lowering the overall activity of the hydrolyzing reaction solution. Within this study, atomic force microscopy (AFM) is used to compare the adhesion forces between cellulase and lignin with the forces between cellulase and cellulose, and to study the moiety groups invo...

  20. THREE-DIMENSIONAL RECONSTRUCTIONS AND MASS DETERMINATION OF THE 2008 JUNE 2 LASCO CORONAL MASS EJECTION USING STELab INTERPLANETARY SCINTILLATION OBSERVATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bisi, M. M.; Jackson, B. V.; Hick, P. P.; Buffington, A.; Clover, J. M.; Tokumaru, M.; Fujiki, K.

    2010-01-01

    We examine and reconstruct the interplanetary coronal mass ejection (ICME) first seen in space-based coronagraph white-light difference images on 2008 June 1 and 2. We use observations of interplanetary scintillation (IPS) taken with the Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory (STELab), Japan, in our three-dimensional (3D) tomographic reconstruction of density and velocity. The coronal mass ejection (CME) was first observed by the LASCO C3 instrument at around 04:17 UT on 2008 June 2. Its motion subsequently moved across the C3 field of view with a plane-of-the-sky velocity of 192 km s -1 . The 3D reconstructed ICME is consistent with the trajectory and extent of the CME measurements taken from the CDAW CME catalog. However, excess mass estimates vary by an order of magnitude from Solar and Heliospheric Observatory and Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory coronagraphs to our 3D IPS reconstructions of the inner heliosphere. We discuss the discrepancies and give possible explanations for these differences as well as give an outline for future studies.

  1. Determination of brace forces caused by construction loads and wind loads during bridge construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    The first objective of this study was to develop procedures for determining bracing forces during bridge construction. : Numerical finite element models and analysis techniques were developed for evaluating brace forces induced by construction loads ...

  2. Polarized DNA Ejection from the Herpesvirus Capsid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newcomb, William W.; Cockrell, Shelley K.; Homa, Fred L.; Brown, Jay C.

    2009-01-01

    Ejection of DNA from the capsid is an early step in infection by all herpesviruses. Ejection or DNA uncoating occurs after a parental capsid has entered the host cell cytoplasm, migrated to the nucleus and bound to a nuclear pore. DNA exits the capsid through the portal vertex and proceeds by way of the nuclear pore complex into the nucleoplasm where it is transcribed and replicated. Here we describe use of an in vitro uncoating system to determine which genome end exits first from the herpes simplex virus (HSV-1) capsid. Purified DNA-containing capsids were bound to a solid surface and warmed under conditions in which some, but not all, of the DNA was ejected. Restriction endonuclease digestion was then used to identify the genomic origin of the ejected DNA. The results support the view that the S segment end exits the capsid first. Preferential release at the S end demonstrates that herpesvirus DNA uncoating conforms to the paradigm in dsDNA bacteriophage where the last end packaged is the first to be ejected. Release of HSV-1 DNA beginning at the S end causes the first gene to enter the host cell nucleus to be α4, a transcription factor required for expression of early genes. PMID:19631662

  3. Proton ejection project for Saturne

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bronca, G.; Gendreau, G.

    1959-01-01

    The reasons for choosing the ejection system are given. The characteristics required for the ejected beam are followed by a description of the ejection process, in chronological order from the viewpoint of the protons: movement of the particles, taking into account the various elements which make up the system (internal magnet, external magnet, quadrupoles, ejection correction coils, thin and thick cables,...) and specification of these elements. Then follows an estimation of the delay in manufacture and the cost of the project. Finally, the characteristics of the magnets and quadrupoles are listed in an appendix. (author) [fr

  4. Towards quantitative determination of the spring constant of a scanning force microscope cantilever with a microelectromechanical nano-force actuator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Sai; Herrmann, Konrad; Zhang, Zhikai; Wu, Yong

    2010-01-01

    The calibration of the performance of an SFM (scanning force microscope) cantilever has gained more and more interest in the past years, particularly due to increasing applications of SFMs for the determination of the mechanical properties of materials, such as biological structures and organic molecules. In this paper, a MEMS-based nano-force actuator with a force resolution up to nN (10 −9 N) is presented to quantitatively determine the stiffness of an SFM cantilever. The principle, structure design and realization of the nano-force actuator are detailed. Preliminary experiments demonstrate that the long-term self-calibration stability of the actuator is better than 3.7 × 10 −3 N m −1 (1σ) over 1 h. With careful calibration of the stiffness of the actuator, the MEMS actuator has the capability to determine the stiffness of various types of cantilevers (from 100 N m −1 down to 0.1 N m −1 ) with high accuracy. In addition, thanks to the large displacement and force range (up to 8 µm and 1 mN, respectively) of the actuator, the calibration procedure with our MEMS nano-force actuator features simple and active operation, and therefore applicability for different types of quantitative SFMs

  5. Determination of adhesion forces between smooth and structured solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, Hartmut R.; Gelinck, Edwin R.M.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Extension of know data with respect to decency of adhesion from probe radius to 8 decades. ► Use of large interaction surface areas for precision measurement of adhesion forces. ► Deliberated increase of roughness as tool to tune adhesion forces and to suppress spontaneous adhesion. - Abstract: Surfaces tend to be made smoother in order to gain flatness or in order to fulfill the need for more precise and reproducible positioning of parts. Adhesion or even sticking of the surfaces is a major showstopper for these applications. There are several measures that can be taken in order to reduce spontaneous adhesion. Quantification of the effectiveness of the chosen solution is most often done using an atomic force microscope (AFM) with probes varying from 1 nm to 8 μm of contact diameter. A serious disadvantage in measuring adhesion by sharp tips is the wear of the tips. Sharp tips wear easily, resulting in undefined contact areas. When the real area of contact is not well defined, the quantification of the adhesion force is not significant. In the current study results of AFM measurements from literature with different tip diameters of colloidal probes are compared with AFM cantilevers with a plateau tip and using probes from large spheres using an alternative setup in combination with a Universal Nano-mechanical Analyzer (UNAT). Test results are shown. Another part of the study deals with a deliberately roughening of smooth surfaces to minimize (spontaneous) adhesion. Good agreement has been found with existing results.

  6. Determination of constants of factorized pairing force from conservation laws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voronkov, Yu.P.; Mikhajlov, V.M.

    1975-01-01

    The constants of a factorized interaction in the particle-particle channel are evaluated on the basis of average field parameters and Cooper pairing. The relations between the constants of multipole particle-particle forces are derived for the spherical nuclei. The constants of the quadrupole pairing are obtained for deformed nuclei from the angular momentum conservation law. The calculated constants are compared with empiricalones

  7. Pilot ejection, parachute, and helicopter crash injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBratney, Colleen M; Rush, Stephen; Kharod, Chetan U

    2014-01-01

    USAF Pararescuemen (PJs) respond to downed aircrew as a fundamental mission for personnel recovery (PR), one of the Air Force's core functions. In addition to responding to these in Military settings, the PJs from the 212 Rescue Squadron routinely respond to small plane crashes in remote regions of Alaska. While there is a paucity of information on the latter, there have been articles detailing injuries sustained from helicopter crashes and while ejecting or parachuting from fixed wing aircraft. The following represents a new chapter added to the Pararescue Medical Operations Handbook, Sixth Edition (2014, editors Matt Wolf, MD, and Stephen Rush, MD, in press). It was designed to be a quick reference for PJs and their Special Operations flight surgeons to help with understanding of mechanism of injury with regard to pilot ejection, parachute, and helicopter accident injuries. It outlines the nature of the injuries sustained in such mishaps and provides an epidemiologic framework from which to approach the problem. 2014.

  8. Experimental and theoretical determination of optical binding forces

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brzobohatý, Oto; Čižmár, T.; Karásek, Vítězslav; Šiler, Martin; Dholakia, K.; Zemánek, Pavel

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 24 (2010), s. 25389-25402 ISSN 1094-4087 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/09/0348; GA MŠk OC08034; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06007; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : optical binding forces * micro-particles * inter-particle effects * optical manipulation * optical tweezers Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 3.749, year: 2010

  9. Magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the ejection of a magnetic flux rope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagano, P.; Mackay, D. H.; Poedts, S.

    2013-06-01

    Context. Coronal mass ejections (CME's) are one of the most violent phenomena found on the Sun. One model to explain their occurrence is the flux rope ejection model. In this model, magnetic flux ropes form slowly over time periods of days to weeks. They then lose equilibrium and are ejected from the solar corona over a few hours. The contrasting time scales of formation and ejection pose a serious problem for numerical simulations. Aims: We simulate the whole life span of a flux rope from slow formation to rapid ejection and investigate whether magnetic flux ropes formed from a continuous magnetic field distribution, during a quasi-static evolution, can erupt to produce a CME. Methods: To model the full life span of magnetic flux ropes we couple two models. The global non-linear force-free field (GNLFFF) evolution model is used to follow the quasi-static formation of a flux rope. The MHD code ARMVAC is used to simulate the production of a CME through the loss of equilibrium and ejection of this flux rope. Results: We show that the two distinct models may be successfully coupled and that the flux rope is ejected out of our simulation box, where the outer boundary is placed at 2.5 R⊙. The plasma expelled during the flux rope ejection travels outward at a speed of 100 km s-1, which is consistent with the observed speed of CMEs in the low corona. Conclusions: Our work shows that flux ropes formed in the GNLFFF can lead to the ejection of a mass loaded magnetic flux rope in full MHD simulations. Coupling the two distinct models opens up a new avenue of research to investigate phenomena where different phases of their evolution occur on drastically different time scales. Movies are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  10. Codon Usage Bias and Determining Forces in Taenia solium Genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xing; Ma, Xusheng; Luo, Xuenong; Ling, Houjun; Zhang, Xichen; Cai, Xuepeng

    2015-12-01

    The tapeworm Taenia solium is an important human zoonotic parasite that causes great economic loss and also endangers public health. At present, an effective vaccine that will prevent infection and chemotherapy without any side effect remains to be developed. In this study, codon usage patterns in the T. solium genome were examined through 8,484 protein-coding genes. Neutrality analysis showed that T. solium had a narrow GC distribution, and a significant correlation was observed between GC12 and GC3. Examination of an NC (ENC vs GC3s)-plot showed a few genes on or close to the expected curve, but the majority of points with low-ENC (the effective number of codons) values were detected below the expected curve, suggesting that mutational bias plays a major role in shaping codon usage. The Parity Rule 2 plot (PR2) analysis showed that GC and AT were not used proportionally. We also identified 26 optimal codons in the T. solium genome, all of which ended with either a G or C residue. These optimal codons in the T. solium genome are likely consistent with tRNAs that are highly expressed in the cell, suggesting that mutational and translational selection forces are probably driving factors of codon usage bias in the T. solium genome.

  11. Air pollution and heart failure: Relationship with the ejection fraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez-Rodriguez, Alberto; Abreu-Afonso, Javier; Rodríguez, Sergio; Juarez-Prera, Ruben A; Arroyo-Ucar, Eduardo; Gonzalez, Yenny; Abreu-Gonzalez, Pedro; Avanzas, Pablo

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To study whether the concentrations of particulate matter in ambient air are associated with hospital admission due to heart failure in patients with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction and reduced ejection fraction. METHODS: We studied 353 consecutive patients admitted into a tertiary care hospital with a diagnosis of heart failure. Patients with ejection fraction of ≥ 45% were classified as having heart failure with preserved ejection fraction and those with an ejection fraction of < 45% were classified as having heart failure with reduced ejection fraction. We determined the average concentrations of different sizes of particulate matter (< 10, < 2.5, and < 1 μm) and the concentrations of gaseous pollutants (carbon monoxide, sulphur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide and ozone) from 1 d up to 7 d prior to admission. RESULTS: The heart failure with preserved ejection fraction population was exposed to higher nitrogen dioxide concentrations compared to the heart failure with reduced ejection fraction population (12.95 ± 8.22 μg/m3 vs 4.50 ± 2.34 μg/m3, P < 0.0001). Multivariate analysis showed that nitrogen dioxide was a significant predictor of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (odds ratio ranging from (1.403, 95%CI: 1.003-2.007, P = 0.04) to (1.669, 95%CI: 1.043-2.671, P = 0.03). CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates that short-term nitrogen dioxide exposure is independently associated with admission in the heart failure with preserved ejection fraction population. PMID:23538391

  12. Comparative analysis of methods for determining bite force in the spiny dogfish Squalus acanthias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Daniel Robert; Motta, Philip Jay

    2004-01-01

    Many studies have identified relationships between the forces generated by the cranial musculature during feeding and cranial design. Particularly important to understanding the diversity of cranial form amongst vertebrates is knowledge of the generated magnitudes of bite force because of its use as a measure of ecological performance. In order to determine an accurate morphological proxy for bite force in elasmobranchs, theoretical force generation by the quadratomandibularis muscle of the spiny dogfish Squalus acanthias was modeled using a variety of morphological techniques, and lever-ratio analyses were used to determine resultant bite forces. These measures were compared to in vivo bite force measurements obtained with a pressure transducer during tetanic stimulation experiments of the quadratomandibularis. Although no differences were found between the theoretical and in vivo bite forces measured, modeling analyses indicate that the quadratomandibularis muscle should be divided into its constituent divisions and digital images of the cross-sections of these divisions should be used to estimate cross-sectional area when calculating theoretical force production. From all analyses the maximum bite force measured was 19.57 N. This relatively low magnitude of bite force is discussed with respect to the ecomorphology of the feeding mechanism of S. acanthias to demonstrate the interdependence of morphology, ecology, and behavior in organismal design. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Recurrent mass ejections observed in H-alpha and CIV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmieder, B.; Simon, G.

    1984-01-01

    Time sequences of recurrent mass ejections have been observed during a coordinated SMY program (Sept. 1, 1980 - Sept. 23, 1980 - Oct. 2, 1980). Comparison of the temporal evolution of H-alpha and CIV brightnesses shows a weak phase lag between H-alpha and CIV maxima, in the case of homologous flares, with CIV brightness maxima preceding H-alpha maxima. The analysis of the variation of the ejection velocities is expected to lead to the determination of an energy balance. Such recurrent ejections could be due to periodic energy storage and periodic reorganization of magnetic field as envisaged to occur for flares, but at lower energy levels

  14. Risk Related to Pre-Diabetes Mellitus and Diabetes Mellitus in Heart Failure With Reduced Ejection Fraction: Insights From Prospective Comparison of ARNI With ACEI to Determine Impact on Global Mortality and Morbidity in Heart Failure Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, Søren L; Preiss, David; Jhund, Pardeep S; Squire, Iain; Cardoso, José Silva; Merkely, Bela; Martinez, Felipe; Starling, Randall C; Desai, Akshay S; Lefkowitz, Martin P; Rizkala, Adel R; Rouleau, Jean L; Shi, Victor C; Solomon, Scott D; Swedberg, Karl; Zile, Michael R; McMurray, John J V; Packer, Milton

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of pre-diabetes mellitus and its consequences in patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction are not known. We investigated these in the Prospective Comparison of ARNI With ACEI to Determine Impact on Global Mortality and Morbidity in Heart Failure (PARADIGM-HF) trial. We examined clinical outcomes in 8399 patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction according to history of diabetes mellitus and glycemic status (baseline hemoglobin A1c [HbA1c]: diabetes mellitus], and ≥ 6.5% [≥ 48 mmol/mol; diabetes mellitus]), in Cox regression models adjusted for known predictors of poor outcome. Patients with a history of diabetes mellitus (n = 2907 [35%]) had a higher risk of the primary composite outcome of heart failure hospitalization or cardiovascular mortality compared with those without a history of diabetes mellitus: adjusted hazard ratio, 1.38; 95% confidence interval, 1.25 to 1.52; P diabetes mellitus and 2103 (25%) had pre-diabetes mellitus. The hazard ratio for patients with undiagnosed diabetes mellitus (HbA1c, > 6.5%) and known diabetes mellitus compared with those with HbA1c diabetes mellitus were also at higher risk (hazard ratio, 1.27 [1.10-1.47]; P diabetes mellitus is associated with a higher risk of adverse cardiovascular outcomes (compared with patients with no diabetes mellitus and HbA1c < 6.0%). LCZ696 was beneficial compared with enalapril, irrespective of glycemic status. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01035255. © 2016 The Authors.

  15. A COMPARISON OF GROUND REACTION FORCES DETERMINED BY PORTABLE FORCE-PLATE AND PRESSURE-INSOLE SYSTEMS IN ALPINE SKIING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosuke Nakazato

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available For the determination of ground reaction forces in alpine skiing, pressure insole (PI systems and portable force plate (FP systems are well known and widely used in previous studies. The purposes of this study were 1 to provide reference data for the vertical component of the ground reaction forces (vGRF during alpine skiing measured by the PI and FP systems, and 2 to analyze whether the differences in the vGRF measured by the PI and the FP depend on a skier's level, skiing mode and pitch. Ten expert and ten intermediate level skiers performed 10 double turns with the skiing technique "Carving in Short Radii" as High Dynamic Skiing mode and "Parallel Ski Steering in Long Radii" as Low Dynamic Skiing mode on both the steep (23 ° and the flat (15 ° slope twice. All subjects skied with both the PI and the FP system simultaneously. During the outside phase, the mean vGRF and the maximum vGRF determined by the FP are greater than the PI (p < 0.01. Additionally during the inside phase, the mean vGRF determined by the FP were greater than the PI (p < 0.01. During the edge changing phases, the mean vGRF determined by the FP were greater than the PI (p < 0.01. However, the minimum vGRF during the edge changing phases determined by the FP were smaller than the PI (p < 0.01 in the High-Steep skiing modes of Experts and Intermediates (p < 0.001. We have found that generally, the PI system underestimates the total vGRF compared to the FP system. However, this difference depends not only the phase in the turn (inside, outside, edge changing, but also is affected by the skier's level, the skiing mode performed and pitch.

  16. Self-determination in New Contexts: The Self-determination of Refugees and Forced Migrants in International Law

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen McVay

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The international movement of people as a result of conflict, natural disaster, and famine is increasingly challenging for States. The Refugee Convention and its additional protocols have proven to be inadequate for protecting many people from human rights abuses. Accordingly this paper seeks to ascertain whether self-determination may operate to protect permanent refugee and forced migrant communities. Self-determination is a human right that has attracted considerable controversy. However, its universal applicability and the strength of the right make it an attractive means of limiting the power of a State in respect of refugee and forced migrant communities. Drawing from historical analogy this article concludes that in limited circumstances self-determination may be available for permanent refugee or forced migrant communities.

  17. Coronal Mass Ejections An Introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Howard, Timothy

    2011-01-01

    In times of growing technological sophistication and of our dependence on electronic technology, we are all affected by space weather. In its most extreme form, space weather can disrupt communications, damage and destroy spacecraft and power stations, and increase radiation exposure to astronauts and airline passengers. Major space weather events, called geomagnetic storms, are large disruptions in the Earth’s magnetic field brought about by the arrival of enormous magnetized plasma clouds from the Sun. Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) contain billions of tons of plasma and hurtle through space at speeds of several million miles per hour. Understanding coronal mass ejections and their impact on the Earth is of great interest to both the scientific and technological communities. This book provides an introduction to coronal mass ejections, including a history of their observation and scientific revelations, instruments and theory behind their detection and measurement, and the status quo of theories describing...

  18. DETERMINATION OF FRAME FORCE FOR ELECTRIC LOCOMOTIVE VL80 WHEN MOVING IN THE CURVED TRACK SECTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Y. Kuzyshyn

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. When locomotives move in curved sections of the railway track, horizontal forces arise, which lead to pressing the ridge of the wheel pair to the railway track. The article is aimed to develop a method for determining the frame force acting on the bogie from the side of body of the locomotive section using the current methodology of calculating the lateral force. It is also aimed to determine the basic parameters that influence the value of the frame force. It is necessary to construct the dependencies of the frame force on the travel time of electric locomotive in the corresponding curve changing these parameters. Methodology. As is known, the electric locomotive is a multimass mechanical system. We will assume that this system consists of seven bodies: a body, two frames of carriages and four wheel sets. To determine the lateral force acting on the rail from the wheelset one need to solve differential equations of motion of locomotive bogie in curves of small radius. Using the equations of kinetostatics for wheelset one should come to determining the frame force acting on the car bogie from the side of body of the locomotive section. The nominal geometric and mass parameters of parts and components of electric locomotive are taken in the calculations. The curve radius, the length of transition curve, the length of circular curve, the longitudinal slope of railway track and other parameters are fixed values. Findings. There were obtained calculated values of the frame force of electric locomotive VL80 acting on the bogie from the side of body of the locomotive section. Based on the obtained results there were built the dependencies of frame force on the travel time of electric locomotive on the corresponding curve when changing the speed and corresponding elevation of the outer rail. Originality. On the basis of the existing methodology for calculating the lateral force it was developed the method for determining the frame force acting

  19. Influence of Ejection Fraction on Outcomes and Efficacy of Sacubitril/Valsartan (LCZ696) in Heart Failure with Reduced Ejection Fraction: The Prospective Comparison of ARNI with ACEI to Determine Impact on Global Mortality and Morbidity in Heart Failure (PARADIGM-HF) Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Scott D; Claggett, Brian; Desai, Akshay S; Packer, Milton; Zile, Michael; Swedberg, Karl; Rouleau, Jean L; Shi, Victor C; Starling, Randall C; Kozan, Ömer; Dukat, Andrej; Lefkowitz, Martin P; McMurray, John J V

    2016-03-01

    The angiotensin receptor neprilysin inhibitor sacubitril/valsartan (LCZ696) reduced cardiovascular morbidity and mortality compared with enalapril in patients with heart failure (HF) and reduced ejection fraction (EF) in the Prospective Comparison of ARNI with ACEI to Determine Impact on Global Mortality and Morbidity in Heart Failure (PARADIGM-HF) trial. We evaluated the influence of EF on clinical outcomes and on the effectiveness of sacubitril/valsartan compared with enalapril. Eight thousand three hundred ninety-nine patients with New York Heart Association class II to IV HF with reduced EF [left ventricular EF (LVEF) ≤40%] were randomized to sacubitril/valsartan 97/103 mg twice daily versus enalapril 10 mg twice daily and followed for a median of 27 months. The primary study end point was cardiovascular death or HF hospitalization. LVEF was assessed at the sites and recorded on case report forms. We related LVEF to study outcomes and assessed the effectiveness of sacubitril/valsartan across the LVEF spectrum. The mean LVEF in PARADIGM-HF, reported by sites, was 29.5 (interquartile range, 25-34). The risk of all outcomes increased with decreasing LVEF. Each 5-point reduction in LVEF was associated with a 9% increased risk of cardiovascular death or HF hospitalization (hazard ratio, 1.09; 95% confidence interval, 1.05-1.13; PSacubitril/valsartan was effective across the LVEF spectrum, with no evidence of heterogeneity, when modeled either in tertiles (P interaction=0.87) or continuously (P interaction=0.95). In patients with HF and reduced EF enrolled in PARADIGM-HF, LVEF was a significant and independent predictor of all outcomes. Sacubitril/valsartan was effective at reducing cardiovascular death and HF hospitalization throughout the LVEF spectrum. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01035255. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. Structure and partitioning of bacterial DNA: determined by a balance of competion and expansion forces?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woldringh, C. L.; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal; Westerhoff, H. V.

    1995-01-01

    The mechanisms that determine chromosome structure and chromosome partitioning in bacteria are largely unknown. Here we discuss two hypotheses: (i) the structure of the Escherichia coli nucleoid is determined by DNA binding proteins and DNA supercoiling, representing a compaction force on the one...

  1. The Social Determinants of Health in Military Forces of Iran: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanaeinasab, Hormoz; Ghanei, Mostafa; Mehrabi Tavana, Ali; Ravangard, Ramin; Karamali, Mazyar

    2015-01-01

    Providing effective health interventions and achieving equity in health need to apply the community-based approaches such as social determinants of health. In the military organizations, these determinants have received less attention from the military health researchers and policymakers. Therefore, this study aimed to identify and explain the social determinants affecting the health of military forces in Iran. This was a qualitative study which was conducted in 2014. The required data were collected through semistructured interviews and analyzed through Conventional Content Analysis. The studied sample consisted of 22 military health experts, policymakers, and senior managers selected using purposeful sampling method with maximum variation sampling. MAXQDA.2007 was used to analyze the collected data. After analyzing the collected data, two main contents, that is, “general social determinants of health” and “military social determinants of health,” with 22 themes and 90 subthemes were identified as the social determinants of military forces' health. Main themes were religious rule, spirituality promotion policies, international military factors, military command, and so forth. Given the role and importance of social factors determining the military forces' health, it can be recommended that the military organizations should pay more attention to these determinants in making policies and creating social, economic, and cultural structures for their forces. PMID:26379716

  2. 40 CFR 86.229-94 - Road load force, test weight, and inertia weight class determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... inertia weight class determination. 86.229-94 Section 86.229-94 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... § 86.229-94 Road load force, test weight, and inertia weight class determination. (a) Flywheels... vehicle weight (pounds) Equivalent test weight (pounds) Inertia weight class (pounds) Up-1,062 1,000 1,000...

  3. Determination of Unit Pressure Force in Material Volume in the Course of Refractory Stamping Press Moulding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orłowicz A.W.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of assessment of the unit pressure force within the refractory material volume in the course press-moulding of stampings for refractory precast shapes. The force was evaluated with the use of physical simulation of deformation undergone by lead balls placed in the raw refractory mass subjected to pressing in a metal die. To determine the value of unit pressure force applied to the aggregate grains in the course of stamping press-moulding, physical model of deformation of a sphere induced by the uniaxial stress state was used.

  4. Performance of a fully automated program for measurement of left ventricular ejection fraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Douglass, K.H.; Tibbits, P.; Kasecamp, W.; Han, S.T.; Koller, D.; Links, J.M.; Wagner, H.H. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    A fully automated program developed by us for measurement of left ventricular ejection fraction from equilibrium gated blood studies was evaluated in 130 additional patients. Both of 6-min (130 studies) and 2-min (142 studies in 31 patients) gated blood pool studies were acquired and processed. The program successfully generated ejection fractions in 86% of the studies. These automatically generated ejection fractions were compared with ejection fractions derived from manually drawn regions the interest. When studies were acquired for 6-min with the patient at rest, the correlation between automated and manual ejection fractions was 0.92. When studies were acquired for 2-min, both at rest and during bicycle exercise, the correlation was 0.81. In 25 studies from patients who also underwent contrast ventriculography, the program successfully generated regions of interest in 22 (88%). The correlation between the ejection fraction determined by contrast ventriculography and the automatically generated radionuclide ejection fraction was 0.79. (orig.)

  5. Femtosecond pulse-width dependent trapping and directional ejection dynamics of dielectric nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Chiang, Weiyi; Usman, Anwar; Masuhara, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    the repulsive and attractive forces. We also show that the directional ejections occur only when the number of nanoparticles confined in the trapping site exceeds a definite threshold. We interpret our data by considering the formation of transient assembly

  6. COMPOSITION OF CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zurbuchen, T. H.; Weberg, M.; Lepri, S. T. [Department of Climate and Space Sciences and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Von Steiger, R. [International Space Science Institute, Bern (Switzerland); Mewaldt, R. A. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States); Antiochos, S. K. [Heliophysics Science Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States)

    2016-07-20

    We analyze the physical origin of plasmas that are ejected from the solar corona. To address this issue, we perform a comprehensive analysis of the elemental composition of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) using recently released elemental composition data for Fe, Mg, Si, S, C, N, Ne, and He as compared to O and H. We find that ICMEs exhibit a systematic abundance increase of elements with first ionization potential (FIP) < 10 eV, as well as a significant increase of Ne as compared to quasi-stationary solar wind. ICME plasmas have a stronger FIP effect than slow wind, which indicates either that an FIP process is active during the ICME ejection or that a different type of solar plasma is injected into ICMEs. The observed FIP fractionation is largest during times when the Fe ionic charge states are elevated above Q {sub Fe} > 12.0. For ICMEs with elevated charge states, the FIP effect is enhanced by 70% over that of the slow wind. We argue that the compositionally hot parts of ICMEs are active region loops that do not normally have access to the heliosphere through the processes that give rise to solar wind. We also discuss the implications of this result for solar energetic particles accelerated during solar eruptions and for the origin of the slow wind itself.

  7. Acceptance criteria for determining armed response force size at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-02-01

    This guidance document contains acceptance criteria to be used in the NRC license review process. It consists of a scored worksheet and guidelines for interpreting the worksheet score that can be used in determining the adequacy of the armed response force size at a nuclear power reactor facility

  8. 40 CFR 86.529-98 - Road load force and inertia weight determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Road load force and inertia weight... inertia weight determination. (a)(1) Road load as a function of speed is given by the following equation: F = A + CV2 (2) The values for coefficients A and C and the test inertia are given in Figure F98-9...

  9. Experimental determination of the gravitational forces at separations around 10 meters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, H.; Ni, W.; Hu, C.; Liu, F.; Yang, C.; Liu, W.

    1979-01-01

    We use a Worden gravimeter to measure the gravitational forces at fixed positions when a large oil tank is full and when it is empty. The differences determine the gravitational constant at various separations around 10 m to about 10% accuracy

  10. Topology determines force distributions in one-dimensional random spring networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidemann, Knut M.; Sageman-Furnas, Andrew O.; Sharma, Abhinav; Rehfeldt, Florian; Schmidt, Christoph F.; Wardetzky, Max

    2018-02-01

    Networks of elastic fibers are ubiquitous in biological systems and often provide mechanical stability to cells and tissues. Fiber-reinforced materials are also common in technology. An important characteristic of such materials is their resistance to failure under load. Rupture occurs when fibers break under excessive force and when that failure propagates. Therefore, it is crucial to understand force distributions. Force distributions within such networks are typically highly inhomogeneous and are not well understood. Here we construct a simple one-dimensional model system with periodic boundary conditions by randomly placing linear springs on a circle. We consider ensembles of such networks that consist of N nodes and have an average degree of connectivity z but vary in topology. Using a graph-theoretical approach that accounts for the full topology of each network in the ensemble, we show that, surprisingly, the force distributions can be fully characterized in terms of the parameters (N ,z ) . Despite the universal properties of such (N ,z ) ensembles, our analysis further reveals that a classical mean-field approach fails to capture force distributions correctly. We demonstrate that network topology is a crucial determinant of force distributions in elastic spring networks.

  11. Determination of the force systems produced by different configurations of tear drop orthodontic loops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Thiesen

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine the mechanical characteristics of teardrop loop with and without helix fabricated using different metal alloy compositions (stainless steel and beta-titanium, submitted to different intensities of bends preactivation (0º and 40º, and with different cross-sectional dimension of the wire used to build these loops (0.017 x 0.025-in and 0.019 x 0.025-in. METHODS: Eighty loops used to close spaces were submitted to mechanical tests. The magnitudes of horizontal force, the moment/force ratio, and the load/deflection ratio produced by the specimens were quantified. Loops were submitted to a total activation of 5.0 mm and the values were registered for each 1.0 mm of activation. For statistic data analysis, a analysis of variance was performed and a Tukey's Multiple Comparison test was used as supplement, considering a 5% level of significance. RESULTS: In general, teardrop loops with helix produced lower magnitudes of horizontal force and load/deflection ratio, and higher moment/force ratio than teardrop loops without helix. Among all analyzed variables, metal alloy composition presented greater influence in the horizontal force and in the load/deflection ratio. The moment/force ratio showed to be more influenced by the preactivation of loops for space closure.

  12. Fitting and Reconstruction of Thirteen Simple Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Haddad, Nada; Nieves-Chinchilla, Teresa; Savani, Neel P.; Lugaz, Noé; Roussev, Ilia I.

    2018-05-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are the main drivers of geomagnetic disturbances, but the effects of their interaction with Earth's magnetic field depend on their magnetic configuration and orientation. Fitting and reconstruction techniques have been developed to determine important geometrical and physical CME properties, such as the orientation of the CME axis, the CME size, and its magnetic flux. In many instances, there is disagreement between different methods but also between fitting from in situ measurements and reconstruction based on remote imaging. This could be due to the geometrical or physical assumptions of the models, but also to the fact that the magnetic field inside CMEs is only measured at one point in space as the CME passes over a spacecraft. In this article we compare three methods that are based on different assumptions for measurements by the Wind spacecraft for 13 CMEs from 1997 to 2015. These CMEs are selected from the interplanetary coronal mass ejections catalog on https://wind.nasa.gov/ICMEindex.php https://wind.nasa.gov/ICMEindex.php" TargetType="URL"/> because of their simplicity in terms of: 1) slow expansion speed throughout the CME and 2) weak asymmetry in the magnetic field profile. This makes these 13 events ideal candidates for comparing codes that do not include expansion or distortion. We find that for these simple events, the codes are in relatively good agreement in terms of the CME axis orientation for six of the 13 events. Using the Grad-Shafranov technique, we can determine the shape of the cross-section, which is assumed to be circular for the other two models, a force-free fitting and a circular-cylindrical non force-free fitting. Five of the events are found to have a clear circular cross-section, even when this is not a precondition of the reconstruction. We make an initial attempt at evaluating the adequacy of the different assumptions for these simple CMEs. The conclusion of this work strongly suggests that attempts

  13. Ejection of a rear facing, golf cart passenger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schau, Kyle; Masory, Oren

    2013-10-01

    The following report details the findings of a series of experiments and simulations performed on a commercially available, shuttle style golf cart during several maneuvers involving rapid accelerations of the vehicle. It is determined that the current set of passive restraints on these types of golf carts are not adequate in preventing ejection of a rear facing passenger during rapid accelerations in the forward and lateral directions. Experimental data and simulations show that a hip restraint must be a minimum of 13 in. above the seat in order to secure a rear facing passenger during sharp turns, compared to the current restraint height of 5 in. Furthermore, it is determined that a restraint directly in front of the rear facing passenger is necessary to prevent ejection. In addressing these issues, golf cart manufacturers could greatly reduce the likelihood of injury due to ejection of a rear facing, golf cart passenger. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The capillary adhesion technique: a versatile method for determining the liquid adhesion force and sample stiffness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Gandyra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a novel, practical technique for the concerted, simultaneous determination of both the adhesion force of a small structure or structural unit (e.g., an individual filament, hair, micromechanical component or microsensor to a liquid and its elastic properties. The method involves the creation and development of a liquid meniscus upon touching a liquid surface with the structure, and the subsequent disruption of this liquid meniscus upon removal. The evaluation of the meniscus shape immediately before snap-off of the meniscus allows the quantitative determination of the liquid adhesion force. Concurrently, by measuring and evaluating the deformation of the structure under investigation, its elastic properties can be determined. The sensitivity of the method is remarkably high, practically limited by the resolution of the camera capturing the process. Adhesion forces down to 10 µN and spring constants up to 2 N/m were measured. Three exemplary applications of this method are demonstrated: (1 determination of the water adhesion force and the elasticity of individual hairs (trichomes of the floating fern Salvinia molesta. (2 The investigation of human head hairs both with and without functional surface coatings (a topic of high relevance in the field of hair cosmetics was performed. The method also resulted in the measurement of an elastic modulus (Young’s modulus for individual hairs of 3.0 × 105 N/cm2, which is within the typical range known for human hair. (3 Finally, the accuracy and validity of the capillary adhesion technique was proven by examining calibrated atomic force microscopy cantilevers, reproducing the spring constants calibrated using other methods.

  15. Determination of Quantum Chemistry Based Force Fields for Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Aromatic Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, Richard; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Ab initio quantum chemistry calculations for model molecules can be used to parameterize force fields for molecular dynamics simulations of polymers. Emphasis in our research group is on using quantum chemistry-based force fields for molecular dynamics simulations of organic polymers in the melt and glassy states, but the methodology is applicable to simulations of small molecules, multicomponent systems and solutions. Special attention is paid to deriving reliable descriptions of the non-bonded and electrostatic interactions. Several procedures have been developed for deriving and calibrating these parameters. Our force fields for aromatic polyimide simulations will be described. In this application, the intermolecular interactions are the critical factor in determining many properties of the polymer (including its color).

  16. The Social Determinants of Health in Military Forces of Iran: A Qualitative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadkarim Bahadori

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Providing effective health interventions and achieving equity in health need to apply the community-based approaches such as social determinants of health. In the military organizations, these determinants have received less attention from the military health researchers and policymakers. Therefore, this study aimed to identify and explain the social determinants affecting the health of military forces in Iran. This was a qualitative study which was conducted in 2014. The required data were collected through semistructured interviews and analyzed through Conventional Content Analysis. The studied sample consisted of 22 military health experts, policymakers, and senior managers selected using purposeful sampling method with maximum variation sampling. MAXQDA.2007 was used to analyze the collected data. After analyzing the collected data, two main contents, that is, “general social determinants of health” and “military social determinants of health,” with 22 themes and 90 subthemes were identified as the social determinants of military forces’ health. Main themes were religious rule, spirituality promotion policies, international military factors, military command, and so forth. Given the role and importance of social factors determining the military forces’ health, it can be recommended that the military organizations should pay more attention to these determinants in making policies and creating social, economic, and cultural structures for their forces.

  17. Survivability rate among pilots in case of ejection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandru GHEORGHIU

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The current paper presents a statistical analysis of a recent research made by the author [1], showing the factors causing the accidents that happened in Romanian Air Force from 1952 to 2014. Also the decision of ejection is analyzed. The study contains 225 events: 110 catastrophes and 115 accidents. 280 fighter pilots and 235 aircraft were involved in this analysis. The below information is a personal one and does not reflect an official position of the Ministry of National Defence.

  18. Cobalt irradiation box ejection accident of ETRR-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Messiry, A.M.

    2000-01-01

    The new Egyptian test and research reactor number 2 ETRR-2, MTR type, is now under operational tests. It has a main central irradiation channel for the purpose of Co 60 isotope production with an intended rated capacity of 50000 Ci per year. The reactivity introduced in the reactor due to accidental ejection of the Co 60 irradiation box (CIB) should be discussed. This reactivity insertion accident (RIA) may be fast or slow with maximum reactivity worth 2.9428 $. The CIB may move with constant speed or variable acceleration according to its initial speed and the applied forces. This results in a linear, parabolic or sinusoidal motion, which in turn affects the reactivity insertion rate (RIR). The present work analyzes this type of perturbation during normal operating conditions: 22 MW full power and 1900 kg s -1 forced core cooling flow. The work serves as a part of the safety evaluation process applicable to similar MTR cores. The RIA code TRANSP20 is developed for this study. It simulates various types of RIR, fast or slow resulting from different CIB ejections. Scram signal due to power, period, inlet and outlet temperatures, or temperature difference is expected to activate the shutdown system. The work presents five case studies, two for fast ejection and three for slow. The transient behavior of the reactor during this is illustrated. The results show that the reactor can withstand slow ejection if the scram is available. However, for fast ejection the scram system does not prevent the clad temperature from exceeding safety limits. Recommendations to prevent or mitigate this accident are highlighted. (orig.)

  19. DETERMINATION THE PERMISSIBLE FORCES IN ASSESSING THE LIFT RESISTANT FACTOR OF FREIGHT CARS IN TRAINS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. O. Shvets

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. In the analytical research are considered: 1 relationships between the longitudinal force acting on the car in the train; 2 lateral and vertical forces of interaction in the contact zone «wheel – rail»; 3 dynamic indicators of cars with the magnitude of the car lift resistance factor; 4 obtaining of the dependencies between them. Methodology. The study was conducted by an analytical method assessing the sustainability of the freight car when driving at different speeds on the straight and curved track sections. Findings. In the process of studying the motion of the train, in the investigation of transport events, as well as during the training on the simulator operator, to assess the actions of the driver, the values of the longitudinal forces in the inter car connections are used. To calculate the longitudinal compressive forces, acting on the car, in which car lift resistance factor will be equal to the allowable value (critical force. To assess the impact on the value of the longitudinal force speed, coefficients of the vertical and horizontal dynamics, as well as the wind load on the side surface of the car body are the results of calculations of motion of the empty gondola car, model № 12-532 curve radius of 250 m with a rise of 150 mm and a transverse run of body of car frame relative to the track axis of the guide section 50 mm. Originality. In this study, the technique of determining the longitudinal compressive force was shown, that is somewhat different from the standard. So, as well as assessing the impact on it the speed of rolling coefficients of vertical and horizontal dynamics and wind load on the side surface of the car body. Practical value. The authors developed proposals on the enhancement of existing methods for determining the value of the longitudinal compressive forces acting on the car in which the safety value of the car lift resistance factor will be equal to the allowable value. It will evaluate the

  20. POWER LEVEL EFFECT IN A PWR ROD EJECTION ACCIDENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diamond, D.J.; Bromley, B.P.; Aronson, A.L.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the effect of the initial power level during a rod ejection accident (REA) on the ejected rod worth and the resulting energy deposition in the fuel. The model used is for the hot zero power (HZP) conditions at the end of a typical fuel cycle for the Three Mile Island Unit 1 pressurized water reactor. PARCS , a transient, three-dimensional, two-group neutron nodal diffusion code, coupled with its own thermal-hydraulics model, is used to perform both steady-state and transient simulations. The worth of an ejected control rod is affected by both power level, and the positions of control banks. As the power level is increased, the worth of a single central control rod tends to drop due to thermal-hydraulic feedback and control bank removal, both of which flatten the radial neutron flux and power distributions. Although the peak fuel pellet enthalpy rise during an REA will be greater for a given ejected rod worth at elevated initial power levels, it is more likely the HZP condition will cause a greater net energy deposition because an ejected rod will have the highest worth at HZP. Thus, the HZP condition can be considered the most conservative in a safety evaluation

  1. Psychophysically determined forces of dynamic pushing for female industrial workers: Comparison of two apparatuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciriello, Vincent M; Maikala, Rammohan V; Dempsey, Patrick G; O'Brien, Niall V

    2010-01-01

    Using psychophysics, the maximum acceptable forces for pushing have been previously developed using a magnetic particle brake (MPB) treadmill at the Liberty Mutual Research Institute for Safety. The objective of this study was to investigate the reproducibility of maximum acceptable initial and sustained forces while performing a pushing task at a frequency of 1min(-1) both on a MPB treadmill and on a high-inertia pushcart. This is important because our pushing guidelines are used extensively as a ergonomic redesign strategy and we would like the information to be as applicable as possible to cart pushing. On two separate days, nineteen female industrial workers performed a 40-min MPB treadmill pushing task and a 2-hr pushcart task, in the context of a larger experiment. During pushing, the subjects were asked to select a workload they could sustain for 8h without "straining themselves or without becoming unusually tired, weakened, overheated or out of breath." The results demonstrated that maximum acceptable initial and sustained forces of pushing determined on the high inertia pushcart were 0.8% and 2.5% lower than the MPB treadmill. The results also show that the maximum acceptable sustained force of the MPB treadmill task was 0.5% higher than the maximum acceptable sustained force of Snook and Ciriello (1991). Overall, the findings confirm that the existing pushing data developed by the Liberty Mutual Research Institute for Safety still provides an accurate estimate of maximal acceptable forces for the selected combination of distance and frequency of push for female industrial workers.

  2. 3-D rod ejection analysis using a conservative methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Min Ho; Park, Jin Woo; Park, Guen Tae; Um, Kil Sup; Ryu, Seok Hee; Lee, Jae Il; Choi, Tong Soo [KEPCO, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The point kinetics model which simplifies the core phenomena and physical specifications is used for the conventional rod ejection accident analysis. The point kinetics model is convenient to assume conservative core parameters but this simplification loses large amount of safety margin. The CHASER system couples the three-dimensional core neutron kinetics code ASTRA, the sub-channel analysis code THALES and the fuel performance analysis code FROST. The validation study for the CHASER system is addressed using the NEACRP three-dimensional PWR core transient benchmark problem. A series of conservative rod ejection analyses for the APR1400 type plant is performed for both hot full power (HFP) and hot zero power (HZP) conditions to determine the most limiting cases. The conservative rod ejection analysis methodology is designed to properly consider important phenomena and physical parameters.

  3. Round Robin computer simulation of ejection probability in sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sigmund, P.; Hautala, M.; Yamamura, Y.; Hosaka, S.; Ishitani, T.; Shulga, V.I.; Harrison, D.E. Jr.; Chakarov, I.R.; Karpuzov, D.S.; Kawatoh, E.; Shimizu, R.; Valkealahti, S.; Nieminen, R.M.; Betz, G.; Husinsky, W.; Shapiro, M.H.; Vicanek, M.; Urbassek, H.M.

    1989-01-01

    We have studied the ejection of a copper atom through a planar copper surface as a function of recoil velocity and depth of origin. Results were obtained from six molecular dynamics codes, four binary collision lattice simulation codes, and eight Monte Carlo codes. Most results were found with a Born-Mayer interaction potential between the atoms with Gibson 2 parameters and a planar surface barrier, but variations on this standard were allowed for, as well as differences in the adopted cutoff radius for the interaction potential, electronic stopping, and target temperature. Large differences were found between the predictions of the various codes, but the cause of these differences could be determined in most cases. A fairly clear picture emerges from all three types of codes for the depth range and the angular range for ejection at energies relevant to sputter ejection, although a quantitative discussion would have to include an analysis of replacement collision events which has been left out here. (orig.)

  4. Global Energetics in Solar Flares and Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.

    2017-08-01

    We present a statistical study of the energetics of coronal mass ejections (CME) and compare it with the magnetic, thermal, and nonthermal energy dissipated in flares. The physical parameters of CME speeds, mass, and kinetic energies are determined with two different independent methods, i.e., the traditional white-light scattering method using LASCO/SOHO data, and the EUV dimming method using AIA/SDO data. We analyze all 860 GOES M- and X-class flare events observed during the first 7 years (2010-2016) of the SDO mission. The new ingredients of our CME modeling includes: (1) CME geometry in terms of a self-similar adiabatic expansion, (2) DEM analysis of CME mass over entire coronal temperature range, (3) deceleration of CME due to gravity force which controls the kinetic and potentail CME energy as a function of time, (4) the critical speed that controls eruptive and confined CMEs, (5) the relationship between the center-of-mass motion during EUV dimming and the leading edge motion observed in white-light coronagraphs. Novel results are: (1) Physical parameters obtained from both the EUV dimming and white-light method can be reconciled; (2) the equi-partition of CME kinetic and thermal flare energy; (3) the Rosner-Tucker-Vaiana scaling law. We find that the two methods in EUV and white-light wavelengths are highly complementary and yield more complete models than each method alone.

  5. Correlation of damage threshold and surface geometry of nodular defects in HR coatings as determined by in-situ atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staggs, M.C.; Kozlowski, M.R.; Siekhaus, W.J.; Balooch, M.

    1992-10-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to determine in-situ the correlation between the surface dimensions of defects in dielectric multilayer optical coatings and their susceptibility to damage by pulsed laser illumination. The primary surface defects studied were μm-scale domes associated with the classic nodule defect. The optical film studied was a highly reflective dielectric multilayer consisting of pairs of alternating HfO 2 and SiO 2 layers of quarter wave thickness at 1.06 μm. Nodule defect height and width dimensions were measured prior to laser illumination on two different samples. Correlation between these dimensions supported a simple model for the defect geometry. Defects with high nodule heights (> 0.6 μm) were found to be most susceptible to laser damage over a range of fluences between 0-35 J/cm 2 (1.06 μm, 10 ns, and 1/e 2 diam. of 1.3 mm). Crater defects, formed by nodules ejected from the coating prior to illumination, were also studied. None of the crater defects damaged when illuminated over the same range of fluences that the nodule defects were subjected to

  6. Determination of electrostatic force and its characteristics based on phase difference by amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kesheng; Cheng, Jia; Yao, Shiji; Lu, Yijia; Ji, Linhong; Xu, Dengfeng

    2016-12-01

    Electrostatic force measurement at the micro/nano scale is of great significance in science and engineering. In this paper, a reasonable way of applying voltage is put forward by taking an electrostatic chuck in a real integrated circuit manufacturing process as a sample, applying voltage in the probe and the sample electrode, respectively, and comparing the measurement effect of the probe oscillation phase difference by amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy. Based on the phase difference obtained from the experiment, the quantitative dependence of the absolute magnitude of the electrostatic force on the tip-sample distance and applied voltage is established by means of theoretical analysis and numerical simulation. The results show that the varying characteristics of the electrostatic force with the distance and voltage at the micro/nano scale are similar to those at the macroscopic scale. Electrostatic force gradually decays with increasing distance. Electrostatic force is basically proportional to the square of applied voltage. Meanwhile, the applicable conditions of the above laws are discussed. In addition, a comparison of the results in this paper with the results of the energy dissipation method shows the two are consistent in general. The error decreases with increasing distance, and the effect of voltage on the error is small.

  7. Differential MS2 Interaction with Food Contact Surfaces Determined by Atomic Force Microscopy and Virus Recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, J; Stewart, D S; Nikolov, A D; Wasan, D T; Wang, R; Yan, R; Shieh, Y C

    2017-12-15

    Enteric viruses are recognized as major etiologies of U.S. foodborne infections. These viruses are easily transmitted via food contact surfaces. Understanding virus interactions with surfaces may facilitate the development of improved means for their removal, thus reducing transmission. Using MS2 coliphage as a virus surrogate, the strength of virus adhesion to common food processing and preparation surfaces of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and glass was assessed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and virus recovery assays. The interaction forces of MS2 with various surfaces were measured from adhesion peaks in force-distance curves registered using a spherical bead probe preconjugated with MS2 particles. MS2 in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) demonstrated approximately 5 times less adhesion force to glass (0.54 nN) than to PVC (2.87 nN) ( P force for PVC (∼0 nN) and consistently increased virus recovery by 19%. With direct and indirect evidence of virus adhesion, this study illustrated a two-way assessment of virus adhesion for the initial evaluation of potential means to mitigate virus adhesion to food contact surfaces. IMPORTANCE The spread of foodborne viruses is likely associated with their adhesive nature. Virus attachment on food contact surfaces has been evaluated by quantitating virus recoveries from inoculated surfaces. This study aimed to evaluate the microenvironment in which nanometer-sized viruses interact with food contact surfaces and to compare the virus adhesion differences using AFM. The virus surrogate MS2 demonstrated less adhesion force to glass than to PVC via AFM, with the force-contributing factors including the intrinsic nature and the topography of the contact surfaces. This adhesion finding is consistent with the virus recoveries, which were determined indirectly. Greater numbers of viruses were recovered from glass than from PVC, after application at the same levels. The stronger MS2 adhesion onto PVC could be interrupted by incorporating a

  8. Hyperdynamic left ventricular ejection fraction in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paonessa, Joseph R; Brennan, Thomas; Pimentel, Marco; Steinhaus, Daniel; Feng, Mengling; Celi, Leo Anthony

    2015-08-07

    Limited information exists on the etiology, prevalence, and significance of hyperdynamic left ventricular ejection fraction (HDLVEF) in the intensive care unit (ICU). Our aim in the present study was to compare characteristics and outcomes of patients with HDLVEF with those of patients with normal left ventricular ejection fraction in the ICU using a large, public, deidentified critical care database. We conducted a longitudinal, single-center, retrospective cohort study of adult patients who underwent echocardiography during a medical or surgical ICU admission at the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center using the Multiparameter Intelligent Monitoring in Intensive Care II database. The final cohort had 2867 patients, of whom 324 had HDLVEF, defined as an ejection fraction >70%. Patients with an ejection fraction <55% were excluded. Compared with critically ill patients with normal left ventricular ejection fraction, the finding of HDLVEF in critically ill patients was associated with female sex, increased age, and the diagnoses of hypertension and cancer. Patients with HDLVEF had increased 28-day mortality compared with those with normal ejection fraction in multivariate logistic regression analysis adjusted for age, sex, Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score, Elixhauser score for comorbidities, vasopressor use, and mechanical ventilation use (odds ratio 1.38, 95% confidence interval 1.039-1.842, p =0.02). The presence of HDLVEF portended increased 28-day mortality, and may be helpful as a gravity marker for prognosis in patients admitted to the ICU. Further research is warranted to gain a better understanding of how these patients respond to common interventions in the ICU and to determine if pharmacologic modulation of HDLVEF improves outcomes.

  9. Determination of Elevator and Rudder Hinge Forces on the Learjet Model 55 Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boroughs, R. R.; Padmanabhan, V.

    1983-01-01

    The empennage structure on the Learjet 55 aircraft was quite similar to the empennage structure on earlier Learjet models. However, due to an important structural change in the vertical fin along with the new loads environment on the 50 series aircraft, a structural test was required on the vertical fin, but the horizontal tail was substantiated by a comparative analysis with previous tests. NASTRAN analysis was used to investigate empennage deflections, stress levels, and control surface hinge forces. The hinge force calculations were made with the control surfaces in the deflected as well as undeflected configurations. A skin panel buckling analysis was also performed, and the non-linear effects of buckling were simulated in the NASTRAN model to more accurately define internal loads and stress levels. Comparisons were then made between the Model 55 and the Model 35/36 stresses and internal forces to determine which components were qualified by previous tests. Some of the methods and techniques used in this analysis are described.

  10. Determining Time Variation of Cable Tension Forces in Suspended Bridges Using Time-Frequency Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gannon Stromquist-LeVoir

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A feasibility study was conducted to develop a novel method to determine the temporal changes of tensile forces in bridge suspender cables using time-frequency analysis of ambient vibration measurements. An analytical model of the suspender cables was developed to evaluate the power spectral density (PSD function of a cable with consideration of cable flexural stiffness. Discrete-time, short-time Fourier transform (STFT was utilized to analyze the recorded acceleration histories in both time and frequency domains. A mathematical convolution of the analytical PSD function and time-frequency data was completed to evaluate changes in cable tension force over time. The method was implemented using acceleration measurements collected from an in-service steel arch bridge with a suspended deck to calculate the temporal variation in cable forces from the vibration measurements. The observations served as proof of concept that the proposed method may be used for cable fatigue life calculations and bridge weigh-in-motion studies.

  11. Determination of ferroelectric contributions to electromechanical response by frequency dependent piezoresponse force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seol, Daehee; Park, Seongjae; Varenyk, Olexandr V; Lee, Shinbuhm; Lee, Ho Nyung; Morozovska, Anna N; Kim, Yunseok

    2016-07-28

    Hysteresis loop analysis via piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) is typically performed to probe the existence of ferroelectricity at the nanoscale. However, such an approach is rather complex in accurately determining the pure contribution of ferroelectricity to the PFM. Here, we suggest a facile method to discriminate the ferroelectric effect from the electromechanical (EM) response through the use of frequency dependent ac amplitude sweep with combination of hysteresis loops in PFM. Our combined study through experimental and theoretical approaches verifies that this method can be used as a new tool to differentiate the ferroelectric effect from the other factors that contribute to the EM response.

  12. Improved treatment of global positioning system force parameters in precise orbit determination applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigue, Y.; Lichten, S. M.; Muellerschoen, R. J.; Blewitt, G.; Heflin, M. B.

    1993-01-01

    Data collected from a worldwide 1992 experiment were processed at JPL to determine precise orbits for the satellites of the Global Positioning System (GPS). A filtering technique was tested to improve modeling of solar-radiation pressure force parameters for GPS satellites. The new approach improves orbit quality for eclipsing satellites by a factor of two, with typical results in the 25- to 50-cm range. The resultant GPS-based estimates for geocentric coordinates of the tracking sites, which include the three DSN sites, are accurate to 2 to 8 cm, roughly equivalent to 3 to 10 nrad of angular measure.

  13. An experiment for Shuttle aerodynamic force coefficient determination from inflight dynamical and atmospheric measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compton, H. R.; Blanchard, R. C.; Walberg, G. D.

    1978-01-01

    A two-phase experiment is proposed which utilizes the Shuttle Orbiter and its unique series of repeated entries into the earth's atmosphere as an airborne in situ aerodynamic testing laboratory. The objective of the experiment is to determine static aerodynamic force coefficients, first of the orbiter, and later of various entry configurations throughout the high speed flight regime, including the transition from free molecule to continuum fluid flow. The objective will be accomplished through analysis of inflight measurements from both shuttle-borne and shuttle-launched instrumented packages. Results are presented to demonstrate the feasibility of such an experiment.

  14. Development of force sensing circuit to determine the optimal force required for effective dynamic tripod grip/writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suraj S., S.; Kulkarni, Palash; Bokadia, Pratik; Ramanathan, Prabhu; Nageswaran, Sharmila

    2018-04-01

    Handwriting is a combination of fine motor perceptions and cognitive skills to produce words on paper. For writing, the most commonly used and recommended grip is the dynamic tripod grip. A child's handwriting starts developing during the times of pre-schooling and improves over time. While writing, children apply excessive force on the writing instrument. This force is exerted by their fingers and as per the law of reaction, the writing instruments tend to exert an equal and opposite force, that could damage the delicate soft tissue structures in their fingers and initiate cramps and pains. This condition is also prevalent in adults who tend to write for long hours under pressure. An example would be adolescence student during the exams. Clinically this condition is termed as `Writer's Cramp', which is usually characterized by muscle fatigue and pain in the fingers. By understanding and fixing the threshold of the force that should be exerted by the fingers while gripping the instrument, the pain can be controlled or avoided. This research aims in designing an electronic module which can help in understanding the threshold of pressure which is optimum enough to establish a better contact between the fingers and the instrument and should be capable of controlling or avoiding the pain. The design of FSR based electronic system is explained with its circuitry and results of initial testing is presented in this paper.

  15. Speeds of coronal mass ejections: SMM observations from 1980 and 1984-1989

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hundhausen, A. J.; Burkepile, J. T.; St. Cyr, O. C.

    1994-01-01

    The speeds of 936 features in 673 coronal mass ejections have been determined from trajectories observed with the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) coronagraph in 1980 and 1984 to 1989. The distribution of observed speeds has a range (from 5th to 95th percentile) of 35 to 911 km/s; the average and median speeds are 349 and 285 km/s. The speed distributions of some selected classes of mass ejections are significantly different. For example, the speeds of 331 'outer loops' range from 80 to 1042 km/s; the average and median speeds for this class of ejections are 445 and 372 km/s. The speed distributions from each year of SMM observations show significant changes, with the annual average speeds varying from 157 (1984) to 458 km/s (1985). These variations are not simply related to the solar activity cycle; the annual averages from years near the sunspot maxima and minimum are not significantly different. The widths, latitudes, and speeds of mass ejections determined from the SMM observations are only weakly correlated. In particular, mass ejection speeds vary only slightly with the heliographic latitudes of the ejection. High-latitude ejections, which occur well poleward of the active latitudes, have speeds similar to active latitude ejections.

  16. Quantitative Methods for Determining U.S. Air Force Crew Cushion Comfort

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-09-01

    Directorate Biosciences and Protection Division Biomechanics Branch Wright Patterson AFB OH 45433-7947 Form Approved REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE OMB No...Division Biomechanics Branch Wright-Patterson AFB OH 45433-7947 9. SPONSORING I MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 10. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S...workstations were constructed utilizing ejection seat long-term flight. mockups and foot pedal assemblies modified to simulate the ACES II seat in the F-16

  17. Inverse Force Determination on a Small Scale Launch Vehicle Model Using a Dynamic Balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Christina L.; Powell, Jessica M.; Ross, James C.

    2017-01-01

    A launch vehicle can experience large unsteady aerodynamic forces in the transonic regime that, while usually only lasting for tens of seconds during launch, could be devastating if structural components and electronic hardware are not designed to account for them. These aerodynamic loads are difficult to experimentally measure and even harder to computationally estimate. The current method for estimating buffet loads is through the use of a few hundred unsteady pressure transducers and wind tunnel test. Even with a large number of point measurements, the computed integrated load is not an accurate enough representation of the total load caused by buffeting. This paper discusses an attempt at using a dynamic balance to experimentally determine buffet loads on a generic scale hammer head launch vehicle model tested at NASA Ames Research Center's 11' x 11' transonic wind tunnel. To use a dynamic balance, the structural characteristics of the model needed to be identified so that the natural modal response could be and removed from the aerodynamic forces. A finite element model was created on a simplified version of the model to evaluate the natural modes of the balance flexures, assist in model design, and to compare to experimental data. Several modal tests were conducted on the model in two different configurations to check for non-linearity, and to estimate the dynamic characteristics of the model. The experimental results were used in an inverse force determination technique with a psuedo inverse frequency response function. Due to the non linearity, the model not being axisymmetric, and inconsistent data between the two shake tests from different mounting configuration, it was difficult to create a frequency response matrix that satisfied all input and output conditions for wind tunnel configuration to accurately predict unsteady aerodynamic loads.

  18. Comparison between radioisotopic ventriculography in balance with Tc99-albumine-DTPA and quantitative gated SPECT with Tc-99m-MIBI for determining the eject fraction of left ventricle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noguera, E. C; Jaime, Adelina; Pamellin, Miriam; Veliz, J

    2002-01-01

    Radionuclide ventriculography (RNV) and electrocardiography gated myocardial perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (GSPECT), can be used to assess the ventricular function.The purpose of this study was:1) to compare left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF(%) using post-stress or rest gated GSPECT with LVEF by resting RNV and 2) to evaluate the 99m-Tc99m human serum albumin (HAS) with diethylenetriaminepenta-acetic acid (DTPA) (99m-TcHSA-DTPA) as a potential use a as blood pool imaging agent (Au)

  19. Measurement method for determining the magnetic hysteresis effects of reluctance actuators by evaluation of the force and flux variation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrijsen, N.H.; Jansen, J.W.; Compter, J.C.; Lomonova, E.

    2013-01-01

    A measurement method is presented which identifies the magnetic hysteresis effects present in the force of linear reluctance actuators. The measurement method is applied to determine the magnetic hysteresis in the force of an E-core reluctance actuator, with and without pre-biasing permanent magnet.

  20. Modeling of Non-Gravitational Forces for Precise and Accurate Orbit Determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackel, Stefan; Gisinger, Christoph; Steigenberger, Peter; Balss, Ulrich; Montenbruck, Oliver; Eineder, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Remote sensing satellites support a broad range of scientific and commercial applications. The two radar imaging satellites TerraSAR-X and TanDEM-X provide spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) and interferometric SAR data with a very high accuracy. The precise reconstruction of the satellite's trajectory is based on the Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements from a geodetic-grade dual-frequency Integrated Geodetic and Occultation Receiver (IGOR) onboard the spacecraft. The increasing demand for precise radar products relies on validation methods, which require precise and accurate orbit products. An analysis of the orbit quality by means of internal and external validation methods on long and short timescales shows systematics, which reflect deficits in the employed force models. Following the proper analysis of this deficits, possible solution strategies are highlighted in the presentation. The employed Reduced Dynamic Orbit Determination (RDOD) approach utilizes models for gravitational and non-gravitational forces. A detailed satellite macro model is introduced to describe the geometry and the optical surface properties of the satellite. Two major non-gravitational forces are the direct and the indirect Solar Radiation Pressure (SRP). The satellite TerraSAR-X flies on a dusk-dawn orbit with an altitude of approximately 510 km above ground. Due to this constellation, the Sun almost constantly illuminates the satellite, which causes strong across-track accelerations on the plane rectangular to the solar rays. The indirect effect of the solar radiation is called Earth Radiation Pressure (ERP). This force depends on the sunlight, which is reflected by the illuminated Earth surface (visible spectra) and the emission of the Earth body in the infrared spectra. Both components of ERP require Earth models to describe the optical properties of the Earth surface. Therefore, the influence of different Earth models on the orbit quality is assessed. The scope of

  1. Experimental and Computational Analysis of Water-Droplet Formation and Ejection Process Using Hollow Microneedle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Norihisa; Oka, Ryotaro; Sakai, Takahiro; Shibata, Takayuki; Kawashima, Takahiro; Nagai, Moeto; Mineta, Takashi; Makino, Eiji

    2011-06-01

    In this paper, we present the possibility of liquid delivery using fabricated hollow silicon dioxide microneedles of approximately 2 µm in diameter. As a fundamental study, the water-droplet formation and ejection process was examined via dynamic observations during water ejection tests and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis. The experimental results indicated that fluid flow in a microneedle follows the Hagen-Poiseuille law, i.e., the flow rate is approximately directly proportional to the fourth power of the inner diameter. Moreover, the ejection pressure and maximum droplet curvature obtained using the proposed microfluid ejection model were in good agreement with the experimental results. The resulting ejection pressure is equal to the theoretical pressure difference of a spherical droplet, which is determined using the Young-Laplace equation. The maximum curvature of a droplet formed at the tip of a microneedle can be estimated on the basis of the contact angle theory expressed by the Young equation.

  2. Biomechanically determined hand force limits protecting the low back during occupational pushing and pulling tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weston, Eric B; Aurand, Alexander; Dufour, Jonathan S; Knapik, Gregory G; Marras, William S

    2018-06-01

    Though biomechanically determined guidelines exist for lifting, existing recommendations for pushing and pulling were developed using a psychophysical approach. The current study aimed to establish objective hand force limits based on the results of a biomechanical assessment of the forces on the lumbar spine during occupational pushing and pulling activities. Sixty-two subjects performed pushing and pulling tasks in a laboratory setting. An electromyography-assisted biomechanical model estimated spinal loads, while hand force and turning torque were measured via hand transducers. Mixed modelling techniques correlated spinal load with hand force or torque throughout a wide range of exposures in order to develop biomechanically determined hand force and torque limits. Exertion type, exertion direction, handle height and their interactions significantly influenced dependent measures of spinal load, hand force and turning torque. The biomechanically determined guidelines presented herein are up to 30% lower than comparable psychophysically derived limits and particularly more protective for straight pushing. Practitioner Summary: This study utilises a biomechanical model to develop objective biomechanically determined push/pull risk limits assessed via hand forces and turning torque. These limits can be up to 30% lower than existing psychophysically determined pushing and pulling recommendations. Practitioners should consider implementing these guidelines in both risk assessment and workplace design moving forward.

  3. Determination of lutetium (III) hydrolysis constants in the middle of ion force 1M sodium chloride at 303 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jimenez R, M.; Solache R, M.J.; Ramirez G, J.J.; Rojas H, A.

    1997-01-01

    With the purpose to complete information about the lutetium (III) hydrolysis constants here is used the potentiometric method to determine those in the middle of ion force 1M sodium chloride at 303 K. (Author)

  4. Validity of Various Methods for Determining Velocity, Force, and Power in the Back Squat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banyard, Harry G; Nosaka, Ken; Sato, Kimitake; Haff, G Gregory

    2017-10-01

    To examine the validity of 2 kinematic systems for assessing mean velocity (MV), peak velocity (PV), mean force (MF), peak force (PF), mean power (MP), and peak power (PP) during the full-depth free-weight back squat performed with maximal concentric effort. Ten strength-trained men (26.1 ± 3.0 y, 1.81 ± 0.07 m, 82.0 ± 10.6 kg) performed three 1-repetition-maximum (1RM) trials on 3 separate days, encompassing lifts performed at 6 relative intensities including 20%, 40%, 60%, 80%, 90%, and 100% of 1RM. Each repetition was simultaneously recorded by a PUSH band and commercial linear position transducer (LPT) (GymAware [GYM]) and compared with measurements collected by a laboratory-based testing device consisting of 4 LPTs and a force plate. Trials 2 and 3 were used for validity analyses. Combining all 120 repetitions indicated that the GYM was highly valid for assessing all criterion variables while the PUSH was only highly valid for estimations of PF (r = .94, CV = 5.4%, ES = 0.28, SEE = 135.5 N). At each relative intensity, the GYM was highly valid for assessing all criterion variables except for PP at 20% (ES = 0.81) and 40% (ES = 0.67) of 1RM. Moreover, the PUSH was only able to accurately estimate PF across all relative intensities (r = .92-.98, CV = 4.0-8.3%, ES = 0.04-0.26, SEE = 79.8-213.1 N). PUSH accuracy for determining MV, PV, MF, MP, and PP across all 6 relative intensities was questionable for the back squat, yet the GYM was highly valid at assessing all criterion variables, with some caution given to estimations of MP and PP performed at lighter loads.

  5. Space weather and coronal mass ejections

    CERN Document Server

    Howard, Tim

    2013-01-01

    Space weather has attracted a lot of attention in recent times. Severe space weather can disrupt spacecraft, and on Earth can be the cause of power outages and power station failure. It also presents a radiation hazard for airline passengers and astronauts. These ""magnetic storms"" are most commonly caused by coronal mass ejections, or CMES, which are large eruptions of plasma and magnetic field from the Sun that can reach speeds of several thousand km/s. In this SpringerBrief, Space Weather and Coronal Mass Ejections, author Timothy Howard briefly introduces the coronal mass ejection, its sc

  6. Using Maximal Isometric Force to Determine the Optimal Load for Measuring Dynamic Muscle Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiering, Barry A.; Lee, Stuart M. C.; Mulavara, Ajitkumar P.; Bentley, Jason R.; Nash, Roxanne E.; Sinka, Joseph; Bloomberg, Jacob J.

    2009-01-01

    Maximal power output occurs when subjects perform ballistic exercises using loads of 30-50% of one-repetition maximum (1-RM). However, performing 1-RM testing prior to power measurement requires considerable time, especially when testing involves multiple exercises. Maximal isometric force (MIF), which requires substantially less time to measure than 1-RM, might be an acceptable alternative for determining the optimal load for power testing. PURPOSE: To determine the optimal load based on MIF for maximizing dynamic power output during leg press and bench press exercises. METHODS: Twenty healthy volunteers (12 men and 8 women; mean +/- SD age: 31+/-6 y; body mass: 72 +/- 15 kg) performed isometric leg press and bench press movements, during which MIF was measured using force plates. Subsequently, subjects performed ballistic leg press and bench press exercises using loads corresponding to 20%, 30%, 40%, 50%, and 60% of MIF presented in randomized order. Maximal instantaneous power was calculated during the ballistic exercise tests using force plates and position transducers. Repeated-measures ANOVA and Fisher LSD post hoc tests were used to determine the load(s) that elicited maximal power output. RESULTS: For the leg press power test, six subjects were unable to be tested at 20% and 30% MIF because these loads were less than the lightest possible load (i.e., the weight of the unloaded leg press sled assembly [31.4 kg]). For the bench press power test, five subjects were unable to be tested at 20% MIF because these loads were less than the weight of the unloaded aluminum bar (i.e., 11.4 kg). Therefore, these loads were excluded from analysis. A trend (p = 0.07) for a main effect of load existed for the leg press exercise, indicating that the 40% MIF load tended to elicit greater power output than the 60% MIF load (effect size = 0.38). A significant (p . 0.05) main effect of load existed for the bench press exercise; post hoc analysis indicated that the effect of

  7. Controlled tungsten melting and droplet ejection studies in ASDEX Upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krieger, K; Lunt, T; Dux, R; Janzer, A; Müller, H W; Potzel, S; Pütterich, T; Yang, Z

    2011-01-01

    Tungsten rods of 1×1×3 mm 3 were exposed in single H-mode discharges at the outer divertor target plate of ASDEX Upgrade using the divertor manipulator system. Melting of the W rod at a pre-defined time was induced by moving the initially far away outer strike point close to the W-rod position. Visible light emissions of both the W pin and consecutively ejected W droplets were recorded by two fast cameras with crossed viewing cones. The time evolution of the local W source at the pin location was measured by spectroscopic observation of the WI line emission at 400.9 nm and compared to the subsequent increase of tungsten concentration in the confined plasma derived from tungsten vacuum UV line emission. Combining these measurements with the total amount of released tungsten due to the pin melt events and ejected droplets allowed us to derive an estimate of the screening factor for this type of tungsten source. The resulting values of the tungsten divertor retention in the range 10-20 agree with those found in previous studies using a W source of sublimated W(CO) 6 vapour at the same exposure location. Ejected droplets were found to be always accelerated in the general direction of the plasma flow, attributed to friction forces and to rocket forces. Furthermore, the vertically inclined target plates cause the droplets, which are repelled by the target plate surface potential due to their electric charge, to move upwards against gravity due to the centrifugal force component parallel to the target plate.

  8. Determination of tensile forces to enhance the supply stability of reinforced fiber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kun Woo; Lee, Jae Wook; Jang, Jin Seok; Jeong, Myeong Sik; Oh, Joo Young; Kang, Hoon; Kang, Ji Heon [Daegyeong Regional Division, Korea Institute of Industrial Technology, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyung Ryul [Agency for Defense Development, Changwon (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Wan Suk [School of Mechanical Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    The manufacturing process of long fiber thermoplastic is initiated by supplying reinforced fiber wound in a spool dispenser. If problems such as tangling or kinking occur in the apparatus used for supplying the reinforced fiber in the long-fiber thermoplastic direct process, the productivity of the long-fiber thermoplastic decreases. Therefore, it is important to enhance the supply stability of reinforced fiber. In general, the increase in supply stability can be achieved by maintaining a steady balloon shape that is controlled by the unwinding velocity or tensile force of the reinforced fiber. In this research, the range of suitable tensile force was determined under the assumption that the unwinding velocity remained constant. The reinforced fiber was assumed to be inextensible, homogeneous, and isotropic and to have uniform density. The transient-state unwinding equation of motion to analyze the unwinding motion of reinforced fiber can be derived by using Hamilton’s principle for an open system in which mass can change within a control volume. In the process of solving the transient-state unwinding equation of motion, the exact two-point boundary conditions are adopted for each time step.

  9. Labor Force – Main Determinant Of the Foreign Direct Investments Located in Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aniela Raluca Danciu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The foreign direct investments can be considered as one of the main factors that have sustained the evolution of the centralized former communist East-European economies into open competitive market systems. The East-European countries were the destination of some significant capital inflow because of some important features of each market as: development level of the infrastructure, labor force characteristics, market size and its future development possibilities, regulation level of the market, liberalization level of the prices, tax policies and technology absorption capability. When talking about Romania one of the main determinants of the foreign direct investments was the labor force, which attracted in the manufacturing industry to types of investors: cost oriented investors and quality oriented investors. The main goal of this research paper is to provide a clear description of the similarities and of the differences of the two investor types, at national and regional. Data used in this research were collected using a questionnaire and were further analyzed using the SPSS software.

  10. Chemically triggered ejection of membrane tubules controlled by intermonolayer friction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, J-B; Khalifat, N; Puff, N; Angelova, M I

    2009-01-09

    We report a chemically driven membrane shape instability that triggers the ejection of a tubule growing exponentially toward a chemical source. The instability is initiated by a dilation of the exposed monolayer, which is coupled to the membrane spontaneous curvature and slowed down by intermonolayer friction. Our experiments are performed by local delivery of a basic pH solution to a giant vesicle. Quantitative fits of the data give an intermonolayer friction coefficient b approximately 2x10;{9} J s/m;{4}. The exponential growth of the tubule may be explained by a Marangoni stress yielding a pulling force proportional to its length.

  11. Experimental determination of conduction and valence bands of semiconductor nanoparticles using Kelvin probe force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Wen; Chen Yongsheng

    2013-01-01

    The ability to determine a semiconductor’s band edge positions is important for the design of new photocatalyst materials. In this paper, we introduced an experimental method based on Kelvin probe force microscopy to determine the conduction and valence band edge energies of semiconductor nanomaterials, which has rarely been demonstrated. We tested the method on six semiconductor nanoparticles (α-Fe 2 O 3 , CeO 2 , Al 2 O 3 , CuO, TiO 2 , and ZnO) with known electronic structures. The experimentally determined band edge positions for α-Fe 2 O 3 , Al 2 O 3 , and CuO well matched the literature values with no statistical difference. Except CeO 2 , all other metal oxides had a consistent upward bias in the experimental measurements of band edge positions because of the shielding effect of the adsorbed surface water layer. This experimental approach may outstand as a unique alternative way of probing the band edge energy positions of semiconductor materials to complement the current computational methods, which often find limitations in new synthetic or complex materials. Ultimately, this work provides scientific foundation for developing experimental tools to probe nanoscale electronic properties of photocatalytic materials, which will drive breakthroughs in the design of novel photocatalytic systems and advance the fundamental understanding of material properties.

  12. Correlation between in vitro Elastomeric Force Degradation and Glass Transition Temperature determined by Dynamic Mechanical Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manu Krishnan

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: Tg can be considered as a dependable parameter in envisaging the force properties of an elastomeric chain. Clinically, it suggested that a polymer with higher Tg can give higher or optimum levels of force for tooth movement.

  13. Multinucleon Ejection Model for Two Body Current Neutrino Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobczyk, Jan T.; /Fermilab

    2012-06-01

    A model is proposed to describe nucleons ejected from a nucleus as a result of two-body-current neutrino interactions. The model can be easily implemented in Monte Carlo neutrino event generators. Various possibilities to measure the two-body-current contribution are discussed. The model can help identify genuine charge current quasielastic events and allow for a better determination of the systematic error on neutrino energy reconstruction in neutrino oscillation experiments.

  14. Ejection of Uranium Atoms from UO{sub 2} by Fission Fragments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsson, Goesta

    1964-02-15

    The numbers of uranium atoms ejected from the surface of sintered plates of UO{sub 2} by fission fragments have been measured over the fission density range 5x10{sup 15} to 7x10{sup 16} fissions/cm{sup 3}. The number of uranium atoms ejected per escaping fragment was about 9. The measurements were performed by irradiating the plates in vacuum and collecting a fraction of the uranium atoms ejected on catcher foils. The amount collected was determined by fission counting. Saturation of the amount collected, as reported by Rogers and Adam, was not observed. The numbers of uranium atoms ejected as knock-ons under the same experimental conditions have been calculated. The reasonably close agreement between the experimental and theoretical values indicates that, under the prevailing experimental conditions, mainly knock-ons are ejected. Other ejection mechanisms, e. g. evaporation of material in thermal spikes, are probably insignificant; this is in contrast to the usual interpretation of the ejection process. The mean range in UO{sub 2}, of fission products of mass number 140 was found to be 7.37 {+-} 0. 05 mg/cm{sup 2} by direct gamma spectrometric, determination of the fraction of {sup 140}La escaping from the surface of the plates.

  15. A method for the on-site determination of prestressing forces using long-gauge fiber optic strain sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Jaber, H; Glisic, B

    2014-01-01

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) consists of the continuous or periodic measurement of structural parameters and their analysis with the aim of deducing information about the performance and health condition of a structure. The significant increase in the construction of prestressed concrete bridges motivated this research on an SHM method for the on-site determination of the distribution of prestressing forces along prestressed concrete beam structures. The estimation of the distribution of forces is important as it can give information regarding the overall performance and structural integrity of the bridge. An inadequate transfer of the designed prestressing forces to the concrete cross-section can lead to a reduced capacity of the bridge and consequently malfunction or failure at lower loads than predicted by design. This paper researches a universal method for the determination of the distribution of prestressing forces along concrete beam structures at the time of transfer of the prestressing force (e.g., at the time of prestressing or post-tensioning). The method is based on the use of long-gauge fiber optic sensors, and the sensor network is similar (practically identical) to the one used for damage identification. The method encompasses the determination of prestressing forces at both healthy and cracked cross-sections, and for the latter it can yield information about the condition of the cracks. The method is validated on-site by comparison to design forces through the application to two structures: (1) a deck-stiffened arch and (2) a curved continuous girder. The uncertainty in the determination of prestressing forces was calculated and the comparison with the design forces has shown very good agreement in most of the structures’ cross-sections, but also helped identify some unusual behaviors. The method and its validation are presented in this paper. (papers)

  16. Optimization of digital image processing to determine quantum dots' height and density from atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, J E; Paciornik, S; Pinto, L D; Ptak, F; Pires, M P; Souza, P L

    2018-01-01

    An optimized method of digital image processing to interpret quantum dots' height measurements obtained by atomic force microscopy is presented. The method was developed by combining well-known digital image processing techniques and particle recognition algorithms. The properties of quantum dot structures strongly depend on dots' height, among other features. Determination of their height is sensitive to small variations in their digital image processing parameters, which can generate misleading results. Comparing the results obtained with two image processing techniques - a conventional method and the new method proposed herein - with the data obtained by determining the height of quantum dots one by one within a fixed area, showed that the optimized method leads to more accurate results. Moreover, the log-normal distribution, which is often used to represent natural processes, shows a better fit to the quantum dots' height histogram obtained with the proposed method. Finally, the quantum dots' height obtained were used to calculate the predicted photoluminescence peak energies which were compared with the experimental data. Again, a better match was observed when using the proposed method to evaluate the quantum dots' height. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Determination of the Frictional Behavior at Compaction of Powder Materials Consisting of Spray-Dried Granules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staf, Hjalmar; Olsson, Erik; Lindskog, Per; Larsson, Per-Lennart

    2018-03-01

    The frictional behavior during powder compaction and ejection is studied using an instrumented die with eight radial sensors. The average friction over the total powder pillar is used to determine a local friction coefficient at each sensor. By comparing forces at compaction with forces at ejection, it can be shown that the Coulomb's friction coefficient can be described as a function of normal pressure. Also stick phenomena has been investigated in order to assess its influence on the determination of the local friction coefficient.

  18. Classification of the ejection mechanisms of charged macromolecules from liquid droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consta, Styliani; Malevanets, Anatoly

    2013-01-28

    The relation between the charge state of a macromolecule and its ejection mechanism from droplets is one of the important questions in electrospray ionization methods. In this article, effects of solvent-solute interaction on the manifestation of the charge induced instability in a droplet are examined. We studied the instabilities in a prototype system of a droplet comprised of charged poly(ethylene glycol) and methanol, acetonitrile, and water solvents. We observed instances of three, previously only conjectured, [S. Consta, J. Phys. Chem. B 114, 5263 (2010)] mechanisms of macroion ejection. The mechanism of ejection of charged macroion in methanol is reminiscent of "pearl" model in polymer physics. In acetonitrile droplets, the instability manifests through formation of solvent spines around the solvated macroion. In water, we find that the macroion is ejected from the droplet through contiguous extrusion of a part of the chain. The difference in the morphology of the instabilities is attributed to the interplay between forces arising from the macroion solvation energy and the surface energy of the droplet interface. For the contiguous extrusion of a charged macromolecule from a droplet, we demonstrate that the proposed mechanism leads to ejection of the macromolecule from droplets with sizes well below the Rayleigh limit. The ejected macromolecule may hold charge significantly higher than that suggested by prevailing theories. The simulations reveal new mechanisms of macroion evaporation that differ from conventional charge residue model and ion evaporation mechanisms.

  19. Determination of the viscous acoustic field for liquid drop positioning/forcing in an acoustic levitation chamber in microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyell, Margaret J.

    1992-01-01

    The development of acoustic levitation systems has provided a technology with which to undertake droplet studies as well as do containerless processing experiments in a microgravity environment. Acoustic levitation chambers utilize radiation pressure forces to position/manipulate the drop. Oscillations can be induced via frequency modulation of the acoustic wave, with the modulated acoustic radiation vector acting as the driving force. To account for tangential as well as radial forcing, it is necessary that the viscous effects be included in the acoustic field. The method of composite expansions is employed in the determination of the acoustic field with viscous effects.

  20. An inverse method for determining the interaction force between the probe and sample using scanning near-field optical microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Win-Jin; Fang, Te-Hua

    2006-01-01

    This study proposes a means for calculating the interaction force during the scanning process using a scanning near-field optical microscope (SNOM) probe. The determination of the interaction force in the scanning system is regarded as an inverse vibration problem. The conjugate gradient method is applied to treat the inverse problem using available displacement measurements. The results show that the conjugate gradient method is less sensitive to measurement errors and prior information on the functional form of quality was not required. Furthermore, the initial guesses for the interaction force can be arbitrarily chosen for the iteration process

  1. Neutrino diffusion and mass ejection in protoneutron stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, L. G.; Rodrigues, H.; Portes, D. Jr.; Duarte, S. B.

    2010-01-01

    We discuss the mass ejection mechanism induced by diffusion of neutrino during the early stage of the protoneutron star cooling. A dynamical calculation is employed in order to determine the amount of matter ejected and the remnant compact object mass. An equation of state considering hadronic and quark phases for the stellar dense matter was used to solve the whole time evolution of the system during the cooling phase. The initial neutrino population was obtained by considering beta equilibrium in the dense stellar matter with confined neutrinos, in the very early period of the deleptonic stage of the nascent pulsar. For specified initial configurations of the protoneutron star, we solve numerically the set of equations of motion together with neutrino diffusion through the dense stellar medium.

  2. Dynamics of post-flare ejections and magnetic loop geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mein, P.; Mein, N.

    1982-01-01

    Flare-associated mass ejections have been observed at the solar limb on June 29, 1980 in the Hα line, with the Multichannel Subtractive Double Pass spectrograph of the Meudon solar tower. Radial velocities were measured as a function of time in a two dimensional field, and kinematics investigated in one selected fine structure. A simple model of locally dipole-type magnetic field increasing with time can be fitted to the data. It can be checked from extrapolation that the model is consistent with an ejection starting roughly from the same point at the same time. Height of the loops (approx. equal to 135,000 km) is consistent with other determinations. Magnetic field is found to be increasing locally by a factor 1.14 within 10 min. (orig.)

  3. Force Balance at the Magnetopause Determined with MMS: Application to Flux Transfer Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, C.; Russell, C. T.; Strangeway, R. J.; Petrinec, S. M.; Paterson, W. R.; Zhou, M.; Anderson, B. J.; Baumjohann, W.; Bromund, K. R.; Chutter, M.; hide

    2016-01-01

    The Magnetospheric Multiscale mission (MMS) consists of four identical spacecraft forming a closely separated (less than or equal to 10 km) and nearly regular tetrahedron. This configuration enables the decoupling of spatial and temporal variations and allows the calculation of the spatial gradients of plasma and electromagnetic field quantities. We make full use of the well cross-calibrated MMS magnetometers and fast plasma instruments measurements to calculate both the magnetic and plasma forces in flux transfer events (FTEs) and evaluate the relative contributions of different forces to the magnetopause momentum variation. This analysis demonstrates that some but not all FTEs, consistent with previous studies, are indeed force-free structures in which the magnetic pressure force balances the magnetic curvature force. Furthermore, we contrast these events with FTE events that have non-force-free signatures.

  4. Motor unit recruitment strategies and muscle properties determine the influence of synaptic noise on force steadiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dideriksen, Jakob L.; Negro, Francesco; Enoka, Roger M.

    2012-01-01

    Motoneurons receive synaptic inputs from tens of thousands of connections that cause membrane potential to fluctuate continuously (synaptic noise), which introduces variability in discharge times of action potentials. We hypothesized that the influence of synaptic noise on force steadiness during voluntary contractions is limited to low muscle forces. The hypothesis was examined with an analytical description of transduction of motor unit spike trains into muscle force, a computational model of motor unit recruitment and rate coding, and experimental analysis of interspike interval variability during steady contractions with the abductor digiti minimi muscle. Simulations varied contraction force, level of synaptic noise, size of motor unit population, recruitment range, twitch contraction times, and level of motor unit short-term synchronization. Consistent with the analytical derivations, simulations and experimental data showed that force variability at target forces above a threshold was primarily due to low-frequency oscillations in neural drive, whereas the influence of synaptic noise was almost completely attenuated by two low-pass filters, one related to convolution of motoneuron spike trains with motor unit twitches (temporal summation) and the other attributable to summation of single motor unit forces (spatial summation). The threshold force above which synaptic noise ceased to influence force steadiness depended on recruitment range, size of motor unit population, and muscle contractile properties. This threshold was low (motor unit recruitment and muscle properties of a typical muscle are tuned to limit the influence of synaptic noise on force steadiness to low forces and that the inability to produce a constant force during stronger contractions is mainly attributable to the common low-frequency oscillations in motoneuron discharge rates. PMID:22423000

  5. Simulating AIA observations of a flux rope ejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagano, P.; Mackay, D. H.; Poedts, S.

    2014-08-01

    Context. Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are the most violent phenomena observed on the Sun. Currently, extreme ultraviolet (EUV) images from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO) are providing new insights into the early phase of CME evolution. In particular, observations now show the ejection of magnetic flux ropes from the solar corona and how they evolve into CMEs. While this is the case, these observations are difficult to interpret in terms of basic physical mechanisms and quantities. To fully understand CMEs we need to compare equivalent quantities derived from both observations and theoretical models. This will aid in bridging the gap between observations and models. Aims: To this end, we aim to produce synthesised AIA observations from simulations of a flux rope ejection. To carry this out we include the role of thermal conduction and radiative losses, both of which are important for determining the temperature distribution of the solar corona during a CME. Methods: We perform a simulation where a flux rope is ejected from the solar corona. From the density and temperature of the plasma in the simulation we synthesise AIA observations. The emission is then integrated along the line of sight using the instrumental response function of AIA. Results: We sythesise observations of AIA in the channels at 304 Å, 171 Å, 335 Å, and 94 Å. The synthesised observations show a number of features similar to actual observations and in particular reproduce the general development of CMEs in the low corona as observed by AIA. In particular we reproduce an erupting and expanding arcade in the 304 Å and 171 Å channels with a high density core. Conclusions: The ejection of a flux rope reproduces many of the features found in the AIA observations. This work is therefore a step forward in bridging the gap between observations and models, and can lead to more direct interpretations of EUV observations in terms of flux rope

  6. Role of attractive forces in determining the equilibrium structure and dynamics of simple liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toxværd, Søren

    2015-01-01

    Molecular Dynamics simulations of a Lennard-Jones system with different range of attraction show that the attractive forces modify the radial distribution of the particles. For condensed liquids only, the forces within the the first coordination shell (FCS) are important, but for gases and moderate...... condensed fluids, even the attractive forces outside the FCS play a role. The changes in the distribution caused by neglecting the attractive forces, lead to a too high pressure. The weak long-range attractions damp the dynamics and the diffusion of the particles in gas-, super critical fluid- and in liquid...

  7. Proton ejection project for Saturne; Projet d'ejection des protons de saturne

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bronca, G; Gendreau, G

    1959-07-01

    The reasons for choosing the ejection system are given. The characteristics required for the ejected beam are followed by a description of the ejection process, in chronological order from the viewpoint of the protons: movement of the particles, taking into account the various elements which make up the system (internal magnet, external magnet, quadrupoles, ejection correction coils, thin and thick cables,...) and specification of these elements. Then follows an estimation of the delay in manufacture and the cost of the project. Finally, the characteristics of the magnets and quadrupoles are listed in an appendix. (author) [French] On donne d'abord les raisons du choix du systeme d'ejection, puis le principe. Apres les caracteristiques requises pour le faisceau ejecte, on decrit le processus d'ejection selon l'ordre chronologique vu par les protons: mouvement des particules compte tenu des divers elements composant le systeme (aimant interne, aimant externe, quadrupoles, enroulements correcteurs ejection, cibles mince et epaisse,. ..) et cahier de charge de ces elements. On estime, ensuite les delais de realisation et le cout du projet. Enfin, un resume des caracteristiques des aimants et quadrupoles est donne en appendice. (auteur)

  8. On the mass ejected by supernova explosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohigas, J.

    1984-01-01

    A simple model is developed in order to calculate the mass ejected by superonovae. We find that the 185, 1006, 1572 and 1604 AD events, all of them classified as either probable or possible type I supernovae, ejected between 0.1 and 0.4 solar masses with an expansion velocity of roughly 10,000 km s -1 . This range of masses suggests that a collapsed object is at the center of the remnants produced by these supernovae if the precursor was a white dwarf whose mass was closed to the Chandrasekhar limit. For the Crab we obtain an ejected mass of 0.45 Msub(sun) and point out that this value is not in contradiction with a proposal in which the moderate helium stars are good candidates for producing this kind of supernovae. Finally we obtain an ejected mass of 3.1 Msub(sun) for Cas A, indicating that a type II event produced this remnant. This ejected mass is closed to what would be expected for a progenitor like an OBN star. (author)

  9. Elasticity of human embryonic stem cells as determined by atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, Robert; Bock, Henry; Pells, Steve; Canetta, Elisabetta; Adya, Ashok K; Moore, Andrew J; De Sousa, Paul; Willoughby, Nicholas A

    2011-10-01

    The expansive growth and differentiation potential of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) make them a promising source of cells for regenerative medicine. However, this promise is off set by the propensity for spontaneous or uncontrolled differentiation to result in heterogeneous cell populations. Cell elasticity has recently been shown to characterize particular cell phenotypes, with undifferentiated and differentiated cells sometimes showing significant differences in their elasticities. In this study, we determined the Young's modulus of hESCs by atomic force microscopy using a pyramidal tip. Using this method we are able to take point measurements of elasticity at multiple locations on a single cell, allowing local variations due to cell structure to be identified. We found considerable differences in the elasticity of the analyzed hESCs, reflected by a broad range of Young's modulus (0.05-10 kPa). This surprisingly high variation suggests that elasticity could serve as the basis of a simple and efficient large scale purification/separation technique to discriminate subpopulations of hESCs.

  10. A socioecological analysis of the determinants of national public health nutrition work force capacity: Australia as a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Roger

    2006-01-01

    This article uses a socioecological analytical approach to assess the capacity of the public health nutrition work force in Australia as a prelude to work force development strategy planning. It demonstrates how the socioecological model can be used to assess and inform the development of the infrastructure required for effective public health nutrition effort. An interpretive case study method was used involving triangular analysis of quantitative and qualitative data from multiple sources including semistructured interviews with advanced-level practitioners, literature review, a cross-sectional national work force survey, and position description audit and consensus development using a Delphi study. The findings of this analysis indicate that the Australian public health nutrition work force's capacity to effectively address priority nutrition issues is limited by determinants that can be categorized as relating to human resource infrastructure, organizational and policy environments, intelligence access and use, practice improvement and learning systems, and work force preparation. This socioecological analysis supports an intelligence-based focus for work force development effort in Australia and a conceptual framework for work force capacity assessment with potential applications in other countries.

  11. Coronal mass ejections and coronal structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hildner, E.; Bassi, J.; Bougeret, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    Research on coronal mass ejections (CMF) took a variety of forms, both observational and theoretical. On the observational side there were: case studies of individual events, in which it was attempted to provide the most complete descriptions possible, using correlative observations in diverse wavelengths; statistical studies of the properties of CMEs and their associated activity; observations which may tell us about the initiation of mass ejections; interplanetary observations of associated shocks and energetic particles; observations of CMEs traversing interplanetary space; and the beautiful synoptic charts which show to what degree mass ejections affect the background corona and how rapidly (if at all) the corona recovers its pre-disturbance form. These efforts are described in capsule form with an emphasis on presenting pictures, graphs, and tables so that the reader can form a personal appreciation of the work and its results

  12. Ultrasonographic ejection fraction of normal gallbladder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jin Hun; Kim, Seung Yup; Park, Yaung Hee; Kang, Ik Won; Yoon, Jong Sup [Hangang Sacred Heart Hospital, Halym College, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of)

    1984-06-15

    Real-time ultrasonography is a simple, accurate, noninvasive and potentially valuable means of studying gallbladder size and emptying. The authors calculated ultrasonographically the ejection fraction of 80 cases of normally functioning gallbladder on oral cholecystography, from June 1983 to April 1984, at the department of radiology, Hangang Sacred Heart Hospital. The results were obtained as follows; 1. Ultrasonographic Ejection Fraction at 30 minutes after the fatty meal was 73.1{+-}16.85. 2. There was no significant difference in age and sex, statistically.

  13. Correlation of left ventricular systolic dysfunction determined by low ejection fraction and 30-day mortality in patients with severe sepsis and septic shock: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevilla Berrios, Ronaldo A; O'Horo, John C; Velagapudi, Venu; Pulido, Juan N

    2014-08-01

    The prognostic implications of myocardial dysfunction in patients with sepsis and its association with mortality are controversial. Several tools have been proposed to evaluate cardiac function in these patients, but their usefulness beyond guiding therapy is unclear. We review the value of echocardiographic estimate of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) in the setting of severe sepsis and/or septic shock and its correlation with 30-day mortality. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate the prognostic functionality of newly diagnosed LV systolic dysfunction by transthoracic echocardiography on critical ill patients admitted to the intensive care unit with severe sepsis or septic shock. A search of EMBASE and PubMed, Ovide MEDLINE, and Cochrane CENTRAL medical databases yielded 7 studies meeting inclusion criteria reporting on a total of 585 patients. The pooled sensitivity of depressed LVEF for mortality was 52% (95% confidence interval [CI], 29%-73%), and pooled specificity was 63% (95% CI, 53%-71%). Summary receiver operating characteristic curve showed an area under the curve of 0.62 (95% CI, 0.58-0.67). The overall mortality diagnostic odd ratio for septic patients with LV systolic dysfunction was 1.92 (95% CI, 1.27-2.899). Statistical heterogeneity of studies was moderate. The presence of new LV systolic dysfunction associated with sepsis and defined as low LVEF is neither a sensitive nor a specific predictor of mortality. These findings are limited because of the heterogeneity and underpower of the studies. Further research into this method is warranted. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Functional Fit Evaluation to Determine Optimal Ease Requirements in Canadian Forces Chemical Protective Gloves

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tremblay-Lutter, Julie

    1995-01-01

    A functional fit evaluation of the Canadian Forces (CF) chemical protective lightweight glove was undertaken in order to quantify the amount of ease required within the glove for optimal functional fit...

  15. Reciprocity-based experimental determination of dynamic forces and moments: A feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ver, Istvan L.; Howe, Michael S.

    1994-01-01

    BBN Systems and Technologies has been tasked by the Georgia Tech Research Center to carry Task Assignment No. 7 for the NASA Langley Research Center to explore the feasibility of 'In-Situ Experimental Evaluation of the Source Strength of Complex Vibration Sources Utilizing Reciprocity.' The task was carried out under NASA Contract No. NAS1-19061. In flight it is not feasible to connect the vibration sources to their mounting points on the fuselage through force gauges to measure dynamic forces and moments directly. However, it is possible to measure the interior sound field or vibration response caused by these structureborne sound sources at many locations and invoke principle of reciprocity to predict the dynamic forces and moments. The work carried out in the framework of Task 7 was directed to explore the feasibility of reciprocity-based measurements of vibration forces and moments.

  16. Height and Body Composition Determine Arm Propulsive Force in Youth Swimmers Independent of a Maturation Stage

    OpenAIRE

    Moura, Tatiane; Costa, Manoel; Oliveira, Saulo; Júnior, Marcos Barbosa; Ritti-Dias, Raphael; Santos, Marcos

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between anthropometric variables, body composition and propulsive force in swimmers aged 9–17 years. Anthropometric characteristics (body height and mass, sitting height, arm span, arm muscle area and body composition) and the propulsive force of the arm (tethered swimming test) were evaluated in 56 competitive male swimmers. Tanner’s stages of genital maturation (P1–5) were used. The data analysis included correlations and multiple linear...

  17. Soil-blade orientation effect on tillage forces determined by 3D finite element models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayadi Ibrahmi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigated the effect of the cutting parameters of a blade on the tillage force components using finite element modeling. A three-dimensional model was carried out with Abaqus Explicit in order to study the interaction between the tool and soil. The soil was modeled with linear forms of the Drucker-Pager model, while the tool was considered as a rigid body with a reference point taken at its tip. The effect of tillage depth and the width of a vertical blade were studied. It was found that the amounts of the draught and vertical forces increase linearly with a slope of 0.037 and 0.0143 respectively when the width increases. The narrow tool (width< 60mm has a greater effect on the specific draught force than a larger tool. Draught and specific draught force increase with polynomial and linear curve respectively versus the depth. However, this effect was reduced for the vertical force. These results were in a good agreement with previously published works. The second part of this paper is focused on the oblique position of the blade to evaluate the effect of the attack angles on both the tillage forces (draught, lateral and vertical and the cutting process of the soil during and after its failure. For all considered angles, the draught force presents the highest values compared to the vertical and lateral forces. Results showed that working with small cutting and an average rake angles (30° to 60° and 45° respectively can produce a good soil inversion.

  18. An improved method to determine neuromuscular properties using force laws - From single muscle to applications in human movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebert, T; Sust, M; Thaller, S; Tilp, M; Wagner, H

    2007-04-01

    We evaluate an improved method for individually determining neuromuscular properties in vivo. The method is based on Hill's equation used as a force law combined with Newton's equation of motion. To ensure the range of validity of Hill's equation, we first perform detailed investigations on in vitro single muscles. The force-velocity relation determined with the model coincides well with results obtained by standard methods (r=.99) above 20% of the isometric force. In addition, the model-predicted force curves during work loop contractions very well agree with measurements (mean difference: 2-3%). Subsequently, we deduce theoretically under which conditions it is possible to combine several muscles of the human body to model muscles. This leads to a model equation for human leg extension movements containing parameters for the muscle properties and for the activation. To numerically determine these invariant neuromuscular properties we devise an experimental method based on concentric and isometric leg extensions. With this method we determine individual muscle parameters from experiments such that the simulated curves agree well with experiments (r=.99). A reliability test with 12 participants revealed correlations r=.72-.91 for the neuromuscular parameters (p<.01). Predictions of similar movements under different conditions show mean errors of about 5%. In addition, we present applications in sports practise and theory.

  19. Determination of viscosity through terminal velocity: use of the drag force with a quadratic term in velocity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vertchenko, Lev; Vertchenko, Larissa

    2017-01-01

    A correction to the term with quadratic dependency of the velocity in the Oseen´s drag force by a dimensionless factor is proposed in order to determine the viscosity of glycerin through the measurement of the terminal velocity of spheres falling inside the fluid. This factor incorporates the eff...

  20. Supernova mass ejection and core hydrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colgate, S.A.

    1978-01-01

    Simplifications that have emerged in the descriptions of stellar unstable collapse to a neutron star are discussed. The neutral current weak interaction leads to almost complete neutrino trapping in the collapse and to an electron fraction Y/sub e/ congruent to 0.35 in equilibrium with trapped electron neutrinos and ''iron'' nuclei. A soft equation of state (γ congruent to 1.30) leads to collapse, and bounce occurs on a hard core, γ = 2.5, at nuclear densities. Neutrino emission is predicted from a photosphere at r congruent to 2 x 10 7 cm and E/sub ν/ congruent to 10 MeV. The ejection of matter by an elastic core bounce and a subsequent escaping shock is marginal and may not be predicted for accurate values of the equation of state. A new concept of Rayleigh-Taylor driven core instabilities is invoked to predict an increased mass ejection either due to an increased flux and energy of neutrinos at second bounce time and, or, the rapid 0.1 to 0.4 second formation of a more energetically bound neutron star. The instability is caused by highly neutronized external matter from which neutrinos have escaped being supported by lighter matter of the lepton trapped core. An initial anisotropy of 10 -2 to 10 -3 should lead to adequately rapid (several milliseconds) overturn following several (2 to 4) bounces. Subsequent to the overturnwith or without a strong ejection shock, a weak ejection shock will allow an accretion shock to form on the ''cold'' neutron star core due to the reimplosion or rarefaction wave in the weakly ejected matter. The accretion shock forms at low enough mass accumulation rate, 1 / 2 M/sub solar/ sec -1 , such that a black body neutrino flux can escape from the shock front (kT congruent to 10 MeV, [E/sub ν/] congruent to 30 MeV). This strongly augments the weaker bounce ejection shock by heating the external matter in the mantle by electron neutrino scattering (congruent to 10 52 ergs) causing adequate mass ejection

  1. A feasibility study for experimentally determining dynamic force distribution in a lap joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayes, Randall Lee [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Developing constitutive models of the physics in mechanical joints is currently stymied by inability to measure forces and displacements within the joint. The current state of the art estimates whole joint stiffness and energy loss per cycle from external measured force input and one or two acceleration responses. To validate constitutive models beyond this state requires a measurement of the distributed forces and displacements at the joint interface. Unfortunately, introducing measurement devices at the interface completely disrupts the desired physics. A feasibility study is presented for a non-intrusive method of solving for the interface dynamic forces from an inverse problem using full field measured responses. The responses come from the viewable surface of a beam. The noise levels associated with digital image correlation and continuous scanning laser Doppler velocimetry are evaluated from typical beam experiments. Two inverse problems are simulated. One utilizes the extended Sum of Weighted Accelerations Technique (SWAT). The second is a new approach dubbed the method of truncated orthogonal forces. These methods are much more robust if the contact patch geometry is well identified. Various approaches to identifying the contact patch are investigated, including ion marker tracking, Prussian blue and ultrasonic measurements. A typical experiment is conceived for a beam which has a lap joint at one end with a single bolt connecting it to another identical beam. In a virtual test using the beam finite element analysis, it appears that the SWAT inverse method requires evaluation of too many coefficients to adequately identify the force distribution to be viable. However, the method of truncated orthogonal forces appears viable with current digital image correlation (and probably other) imaging techniques.

  2. Evidence of elevated X-ray absorption before and during major flare ejections in GRS 1915+105

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Punsly, Brian [1415 Granvia Altamira, Palos Verdes Estates, CA 90274 (United States); Rodriguez, Jérôme [Laboratoire AIM, CEA/DSM-CNRS-Université Paris Diderot, IRFU SAp, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Trushkin, Sergei A., E-mail: brian.punsly1@verizon.net, E-mail: brian.punsly@comdev-usa.com [Special Astrophysical Observatory RAS, Nizhnij Arkhyz, 369167 (Russian Federation)

    2014-03-10

    We present time-resolved X-ray spectroscopy of the microquasar GRS 1915+105 with the MAXI observatory in order to study the accretion state just before and during the ejections associated with its major flares. Radio monitoring with the RATAN-600 radio telescope from 4.8-11.2 GHz has revealed two large, steep-spectrum major flares in the first eight months of 2013. Since the RATAN has received one measurement per day, we cannot determine the jet-forming time without more information. Fortunately, this is possible since a distinct X-ray light curve signature that occurs preceding and during major ejections has been determined in an earlier study. The X-ray luminosity spikes to very high levels in the hours before ejection, then becomes variable (with a nearly equal X-ray luminosity when averaged over the duration of the ejection) during a brief 3-8 hr ejection process. By comparing this X-ray behavior with MAXI light curves, we can estimate the beginning and end of the ejection episode of the strong 2013 flares to within ∼3 hr. Using this estimate in conjunction with time-resolved spectroscopy from the data in the MAXI archives allows us to deduce that the X-ray absorbing hydrogen column density increases significantly in the hours preceding the ejections and remains elevated during the ejections responsible for the major flares. This finding is consistent with an outflowing wind or enhanced accretion at high latitudes.

  3. Measurement of action forces and posture to determine the lumbar load of healthcare workers during care activities with patient transfers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theilmeier, Andreas; Jordan, Claus; Luttmann, Alwin; Jäger, Matthias

    2010-11-01

    Moving patients or other care activities with manual patient handling is characterized by high mechanical load on the lumbar spine of healthcare workers (HCWs). During the patient transfer activity, the caregivers exert lifting, pulling, and pushing forces varying over time with respect to amplitude and direction. Furthermore, the caregivers distinctly change their posture and frequently obtain postures asymmetrical to the median sagittal plane, including lateral bending and turning the trunk. This paper describes a procedure to determine lumbar load during patient transfer supported by measurement techniques and an exemplary application; this methodology represents the basis of a complex research project, the third 'Dortmund Lumbar Load Study (DOLLY 3)'. Lumbar load was determined by simulation calculations using a comprehensive biomechanical model ('The Dortmunder'). As the main influencing factors, the hand forces of the caregiver exerted during typical patient transfers and the posture and movements of the HCW were recorded in laboratory studies. The action forces were determined three-dimensionally with the help of a newly developed 'measuring bed', two different 'measuring chairs', a 'measuring bathtub', and a 'measuring floor'. To capture the forces during transfers in or at the bed, a common hospital bed was equipped with an additional framework, which is attached to the bedstead and connected to the bedspring frame via three-axial force sensors at the four corners. The other measuring systems were constructed similarly. Body movements were recorded using three-dimensional optoelectronic recording tools and video recordings. The posture and force data served as input data for the quantification of various lumbar-load indicators.

  4. Higher-speed coronal mass ejections and their geoeffectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, A. K.; Bhargawa, Asheesh; Tonk, Apeksha

    2018-06-01

    We have attempted to examine the ability of coronal mass ejections to cause geoeffectiveness. To that end, we have investigated total 571 cases of higher-speed (> 1000 km/s) coronal mass ejection events observed during the years 1996-2012. On the basis of angular width (W) of observance, events of coronal mass ejection were further classified as front-side or halo coronal mass ejections (W = 360°); back-side halo coronal mass ejections (W = 360°); partial halo (120°mass ejections were much faster and more geoeffective in comparison of partial halo and non-halo coronal mass ejections. We also inferred that the front-sided halo coronal mass ejections were 67.1% geoeffective while geoeffectiveness of partial halo coronal mass ejections and non-halo coronal mass ejections were found to be 44.2% and 56.6% respectively. During the same period of observation, 43% of back-sided CMEs showed geoeffectiveness. We have also investigated some events of coronal mass ejections having speed > 2500 km/s as a case study. We have concluded that mere speed of coronal mass ejection and their association with solar flares or solar activity were not mere criterion for producing geoeffectiveness but angular width of coronal mass ejections and their originating position also played a key role.

  5. Right Ventricular Ejection Fraction using ECG-Gated First Pass Cardioangiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Young Hee; Lee, Hae Giu; Lee, Sung Yong; Park, Suk Min; Chung, Soo Kyo; Yim, Jeong Ik; Bahk, Yong Whee; Shinn, Kyung Sub; Kim, Young Gyun; Kwon, Soon Seog [Catholic University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-03-15

    Radionuclide cardioangiography has been widely applied and has played major roles in moninvasive assessment of cardiac function. Three techniques, first-pass gated first and gated equilibrium methods have commonly been used to evaluate right ventricular ejection fraction which usually abnormal in the patients with cardiopulmonary disease. It has been known that the gated first pass method is most accurate method among the three techniques in assessment of fight ventricular ejection fraction. The radionuclide right ventricular ejection fraction values were determined in 13 normal subjects and in 15 patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease by the gated first pass method and compared with those of the first pass method because there has been no published data of fight ejection fraction by the gated first pass method were compared with the defects from the pulmonary function test performed in the patients with chronic obstructive pulmomary disease. The results were as follows; 1) The values of fight ventricular ejection fraction by the gated first pass method were 50.1 +- 6.1% in normal subjects and 38.5 +- 8.5 in the patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. There was statistically significant difference between the right ventricular ejection fraction of each of the two groups (p<0.05) 2) The right ventricular ejection fraction by the gated first pass method was not linearly correlated ith FEV{sub 1}, VC. DLCO. and FVC as well as P{sub a}O2 and P{sub a}CO2 of the patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. We concluded that right ventricular ejection fraction by the gated first pass method using radionuclide cardioangiography may be useful in clinical assessment of the right ventricular function.

  6. Rollover Car Crashes with Ejection: A Deadly Combination—An Analysis of 719 Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rifat Latifi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rollover car crashes (ROCs are serious public safety concerns worldwide. Objective. To determine the incidence and outcomes of ROCs with or without ejection of occupants in the State of Qatar. Methods. A retrospective study of all patients involved in ROCs admitted to Level I trauma center in Qatar (2011-2012. Patients were divided into Group I (ROC with ejection and Group II (ROC without ejection. Results. A total of 719 patients were evaluated (237 in Group I and 482 in Group II. The mean age in Group I was lower than in Group II (24.3±10.3 versus 29±12.2; P=0.001. Group I had higher injury severity score and sustained significantly more head, chest, and abdominal injuries in comparison to Group II. The mortality rate was higher in Group I (25% versus 7%; P=0.001. Group I patients required higher ICU admission rate (P=0.001. Patients in Group I had a 5-fold increased risk for age-adjusted mortality (OR 5.43; 95% CI 3.11–9.49, P=0.001. Conclusion. ROCs with ejection are associated with higher rate of morbidity and mortality compared to ROCs without ejection. As an increased number of young Qatari males sustain ROCs with ejection, these findings highlight the need for research-based injury prevention initiatives in the country.

  7. Determination of reliable force platform parameters and number of trial to evaluate sit-to-stand movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chorin, Frédéric; Rahmani, Abderrahmane; Beaune, Bruno; Cornu, Christophe

    2015-08-01

    Sit-to-stand (STS) movement is useful for evaluating lower limb muscle function, especially from force platforms. Nevertheless, due to a lack of standardization of the STS movement (e.g., position, subject's instructions, etc.), it is difficult to compare results obtained in previous studies. The aim of the present study was to determine the most relevant condition, parameters, and number of trial to perform STS movements. In this study, STS mechanical (maximal and mean force, impulse) and temporal parameters were measured in the vertical, medio-lateral and antero-posterior axes using a force platform. Five STS conditions (i.e., with or without armrests, variation of the height of the chair and the movement speed) were analyzed to evaluate repeatability of different standardized procedures. Most of the mechanical and temporal parameters were influenced by the STS condition (p movement.

  8. Labor Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Occupational Outlook Quarterly, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The labor force is the number of people ages 16 or older who are either working or looking for work. It does not include active-duty military personnel or the institutionalized population, such as prison inmates. Determining the size of the labor force is a way of determining how big the economy can get. The size of the labor force depends on two…

  9. Determination of the physical parameters distribution in spin transition compounds using experimental FORC diagram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanasa, Radu; Linares, Jorge; Enachescu, Cristian; Varret, Francois; Stancu, Alexandru

    2006-01-01

    Spin transitions materials are characterized with an innovative experimental method, i.e. first-order reversal curve (FORC) diagram. The interpretation of the results is performed in the framework of two different Ising-like models: a mean-field approach and the exact solution done by the Monte Carlo entropic sampling (MCES) method

  10. Measuring system and method of determining the Adaptive Force

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Schaefer

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The term Adaptive Force (AF describes the capability of adaptation of the nerve-muscle-system to externally applied forces during isometric and eccentric muscle action. This ability plays an important role in real life motions as well as in sports. The focus of this paper is on the specific measurement method of this neuromuscular action, which can be seen as innovative. A measuring system based on the use of compressed air was constructed and evaluated for this neuromuscular function. It depends on the physical conditions of the subject, at which force level it deviates from the quasi isometric position and merges into eccentric muscle action. The device enables – in contrast to the isokinetic systems – a measure of strength without forced motion. Evaluation of the scientific quality criteria of the devices was done by measurements regarding the intra- and interrater-, the test-retest-reliability and fatiguing measurements. Comparisons of the pneumatic device with a dynamometer were also done. Looking at the mechanical evaluation, the results show a high level of consistency (r²=0.94 to 0.96. The parallel test reliability delivers a very high and significant correlation (ρ=0.976; p=0.000. Including the biological system, the concordance of three different raters is very high (p=0.001, Cronbachs alpha α=0.987. The test retest with 4 subjects over five weeks speaks for the reliability of the device in showing no statistically significant differences. These evaluations indicate that the scientific evaluation criteria are fulfilled. The specific feature of this system is that an isometric position can be maintained while the externally impacting force rises. Moreover, the device can capture concentric, static and eccentric strength values. Fields of application are performance diagnostics in sports and medicine.

  11. Ejection Performance of Coated Core Pins Intended for Application on High Pressure Die Casting Tools for Aluminium Alloys Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Terek

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In high pressure die casting (HPDC process of aluminium alloys cast alloy soldering severely damages tool surfaces. It hampers casting ejection, reduces the casting quality and decreases the overall production efficiency. Thin ceramic PVD (physical vapor deposition coatings applied on tool surfaces successfully reduce these effects. However, their performance is still not recognised for surfaces with various topographies. In this investigation, soldering tendency of Al-Si-Cu alloy toward EN X27CrMoV51 steel, plasma nitrided steel, CrN and TiAlN duplex PVD coatings is evaluated using ejection test. The coatings were prepared to a range of surface roughness and topographies. After the tests sample surfaces were analysed by different microscopy techniques and profilometry. It was found that the ejection performance is independent of the chemical composition of investigated materials. After the ejection, the cast alloy soldering layer was found on surfaces of all tested materials. This built-up layer formed by effects of mechanical soldering, without corrosion reactions. Coated samples displayed a pronounced dependence of ejection force on surface roughness and topography. By decreasing roughness, ejection force increased, which is a consequence of intensified adhesion effects. Presented findings are a novel information important for efficient application of PVD coatings intendent for protection of HPDC tools.

  12. Determinants of child and forced marriage in Morocco: stakeholder perspectives on health, policies and human rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbe, Alexia; Oulami, Halima; Zekraoui, Wahiba; Hikmat, Halima; Temmerman, Marleen; Leye, Els

    2013-10-16

    In Morocco, the social and legal framework surrounding sexual and reproductive health has transformed greatly in the past decade, especially with the introduction of the new Family Law or Moudawana. Yet, despite raising the minimum age of marriage for girls and stipulating equal rights in the family, child and forced marriage is widespread. The objective of this research study was to explore perspectives of a broad range of professionals on factors that contribute to the occurrence of child and forced marriage in Morocco. A qualitative approach was used to generate both primary and secondary data for the analysis. Primary data consist of individual semi-structured interviews that were conducted with 22 professionals from various sectors: health, legal, education, NGO's and government. Sources of secondary data include academic papers, government and NGO reports, various legal documents and media reports. Data were analyzed using thematic qualitative analysis. Four major themes arose from the data, indicating that the following elements contribute to child and forced marriage: (1) the legal and social divergence in conceptualizing forced and child marriage; (2) the impact of legislation; (3) the role of education; and (4) the economic factor. Emphasis was especially placed on the new Family Code or Moudawana as having the greatest influence on advancement of women's rights in the sphere of marriage. However, participants pointed out that embedded patriarchal attitudes and behaviours limit its effectiveness. The study provided a comprehensive understanding of the factors that compound the problem of child and forced marriage in Morocco. From the viewpoint of professionals, who are closely involved in tackling the issue, policy measures and the law have the greatest potential to bring child and forced marriage to a halt. However, the implementation of new legal tools is facing barriers and resistance. Additionally, the legal and policy framework should go hand in hand

  13. Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections detected by HAWC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara, Alejandro

    The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) observatory is being constructed at the volcano Sierra Negra (4100 m a.s.l.) in Mexico. HAWC’s primary purpose is the study of both: galactic and extra-galactic sources of high energy gamma rays. HAWC will consist of 300 large water Cherenkov detectors (WCD), instrumented with 1200 photo-multipliers. The Data taking has already started while construction continues, with the completion projected for late 2014. The HAWC counting rate will be sensitive to cosmic rays with energies above the geomagnetic cutoff of the site (˜ 8 GV). In particular, HAWC will detect solar energetic particles known as Ground Level Enhancements (GLEs), and the effects of Coronal Mass Ejections on the galactic cosmic ray flux, known as Forbush Decreases. In this paper, we present a description of the instrument and its response to interplanetary coronal mass ejections, and other solar wind large scale structures, observed during the August-December 2013 period.

  14. Observational determination of surface radiative forcing by CO2 from 2000 to 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, D R; Collins, W D; Gero, P J; Torn, M S; Mlawer, E J; Shippert, T R

    2015-03-19

    The climatic impact of CO2 and other greenhouse gases is usually quantified in terms of radiative forcing, calculated as the difference between estimates of the Earth's radiation field from pre-industrial and present-day concentrations of these gases. Radiative transfer models calculate that the increase in CO2 since 1750 corresponds to a global annual-mean radiative forcing at the tropopause of 1.82 ± 0.19 W m(-2) (ref. 2). However, despite widespread scientific discussion and modelling of the climate impacts of well-mixed greenhouse gases, there is little direct observational evidence of the radiative impact of increasing atmospheric CO2. Here we present observationally based evidence of clear-sky CO2 surface radiative forcing that is directly attributable to the increase, between 2000 and 2010, of 22 parts per million atmospheric CO2. The time series of this forcing at the two locations-the Southern Great Plains and the North Slope of Alaska-are derived from Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer spectra together with ancillary measurements and thoroughly corroborated radiative transfer calculations. The time series both show statistically significant trends of 0.2 W m(-2) per decade (with respective uncertainties of ±0.06 W m(-2) per decade and ±0.07 W m(-2) per decade) and have seasonal ranges of 0.1-0.2 W m(-2). This is approximately ten per cent of the trend in downwelling longwave radiation. These results confirm theoretical predictions of the atmospheric greenhouse effect due to anthropogenic emissions, and provide empirical evidence of how rising CO2 levels, mediated by temporal variations due to photosynthesis and respiration, are affecting the surface energy balance.

  15. Regional ejection fraction: a quantitative radionuclide index of regional left ventricular performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maddox, D.E.; Wynne, J.; Uren, R.; Parker, J.A.; Idoine, J.; Siegel, L.C.; Neill, J.M.; Cohn, P.F.; Holman, B.L.

    1979-01-01

    Left ventricular regional ejection fractions were derived from background-corrected, time-activity curves in 43 patients assessed by both gated equilibrium radionuclide angiocardiography and left ventricular contrast angiography. From a single, modified left anterior oblique projection, the regional change in background corrected counts was determined in each of three anatomic regions. The normal range for regional radionuclide ejection fraction was determined in 10 patients with normal contrast ventriculograms and without obstructive coronary artery disease at coronary arteriography. Regional ejection fraction was compared with percent segmental axis shortening and extent of akinetic segments in corresponding regions of the contrast ventriculogram. Radionuclide and roentgenographic methods were in agreement as to the presence or absence of abnormal wall motion in 83 of 99 left ventricular regions (84%) in 33 patients evaluated prospectively. Comparison of regional ejection fraction demonstrated significant differences between regions with roentgenographically determined normokinesis hypokinesis, and akinesis. We conclude that the left ventricular regional ejection fraction provides a reliable quantitative assessment of regional left ventricular performance

  16. High Fidelity Non-Gravitational Force Models for Precise and Accurate Orbit Determination of TerraSAR-X

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackel, Stefan; Montenbruck, Oliver; Steigenberger, -Peter; Eineder, Michael; Gisinger, Christoph

    Remote sensing satellites support a broad range of scientific and commercial applications. The two radar imaging satellites TerraSAR-X and TanDEM-X provide spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) and interferometric SAR data with a very high accuracy. The increasing demand for precise radar products relies on sophisticated validation methods, which require precise and accurate orbit products. Basically, the precise reconstruction of the satellite’s trajectory is based on the Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements from a geodetic-grade dual-frequency receiver onboard the spacecraft. The Reduced Dynamic Orbit Determination (RDOD) approach utilizes models for the gravitational and non-gravitational forces. Following a proper analysis of the orbit quality, systematics in the orbit products have been identified, which reflect deficits in the non-gravitational force models. A detailed satellite macro model is introduced to describe the geometry and the optical surface properties of the satellite. Two major non-gravitational forces are the direct and the indirect Solar Radiation Pressure (SRP). Due to the dusk-dawn orbit configuration of TerraSAR-X, the satellite is almost constantly illuminated by the Sun. Therefore, the direct SRP has an effect on the lateral stability of the determined orbit. The indirect effect of the solar radiation principally contributes to the Earth Radiation Pressure (ERP). The resulting force depends on the sunlight, which is reflected by the illuminated Earth surface in the visible, and the emission of the Earth body in the infrared spectra. Both components of ERP require Earth models to describe the optical properties of the Earth surface. Therefore, the influence of different Earth models on the orbit quality is assessed within the presentation. The presentation highlights the influence of non-gravitational force and satellite macro models on the orbit quality of TerraSAR-X.

  17. Magnetic vortex chirality determination via local hysteresis loops measurements with magnetic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coïsson, Marco; Barrera, Gabriele; Celegato, Federica; Manzin, Alessandra; Vinai, Franco; Tiberto, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic vortex chirality in patterned square dots has been investigated by means of a field-dependent magnetic force microscopy technique that allows to measure local hysteresis loops. The chirality affects the two loop branches independently, giving rise to curves that have different shapes and symmetries as a function of the details of the magnetisation reversal process in the square dot, that is studied both experimentally and through micromagnetic simulations. The tip-sample interaction is taken into account numerically, and exploited experimentally, to influence the side of the square where nucleation of the vortex preferably occurs, therefore providing a way to both measure and drive chirality with the present technique. PMID:27426442

  18. A method to provide rapid in situ determination of tip radius in dynamic atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Sergio; Guang Li; Souier, Tewfik; Gadelrab, Karim; Chiesa, Matteo; Thomson, Neil H.

    2012-01-01

    We provide a method to characterize the tip radius of an atomic force microscopy in situ by monitoring the dynamics of the cantilever in ambient conditions. The key concept is that the value of free amplitude for which transitions from the attractive to repulsive force regimes are observed, strongly depends on the curvature of the tip. In practice, the smaller the value of free amplitude required to observe a transition, the sharper the tip. This general behavior is remarkably independent of the properties of the sample and cantilever characteristics and shows the strong dependence of the transitions on the tip radius. The main advantage of this method is rapid in situ characterization. Rapid in situ characterization enables one to continuously monitor the tip size during experiments. Further, we show how to reproducibly shape the tip from a given initial size to any chosen larger size. This approach combined with the in situ tip size monitoring enables quantitative comparison of materials measurements between samples. These methods are set to allow quantitative data acquisition and make direct data comparison readily available in the community.

  19. Determination of Residual Forces in Mechanisms Assembled by Edge-Form Rolling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Turgut Gürsel

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Steering and suspension systems are components that supply driving safety in vehicles. For a correct working the mechanisms of these systems consist of many ball-joints that have different functions. Generally the ball-joints are assembled to systems in press-fit without any gaps, but even with residual forces. On the other hand excessive tightness causes high moments, which requires additional processes of manufacturing. But low tightness also creates gaps in joints. None of these conditions are desired. Manufacturing a ball-race that has long-life, low-friction and provides required working angles in every road condition, can be designed after long test processes and sample productions including lots of improvements. An important element of steering systems in vehicles is suspension ball-race that can be manufactured by assembling with plastic deformation after designing the ball-joint. In this study, during the manufacturing of the suspension ball-race supplying the motion transmission, the edge-form rolling process that is a subsection of rolling process of manufacturing methods based on plastic deformation was examined. Effects of pressure forces occurring after edge-form rolling in bearing systems at different values were studied by changing operation pressure of edge form rolling by means of specific numerical simulations.

  20. Use of forces from instrumented Charpy V-notch testing to determine crack-arrest toughness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iskander, S.K.; Nanstad, R.K.; Sokolov, M.A.; McCabe, D.E.; Hutton, J.T.

    1996-06-01

    The objective of this investigation is an estimation of the crack-arrest toughness, particularly of irradiated materials, from voltage versus time output of an instrumented setup during a test on a Charpy V-notch (CVN) specimen. This voltage versus time trace (which can be converted to force versus displacement) displays events during fracture of the specimen. Various stages of the fracture process can be identified on the trace, including an arrest point indicating arrest of brittle fracture. The force at arrest, F a , versus test temperature, T, relationship is examined to explore possible relationships to other experimental measures of crack-arrest toughness such as the drop-weight nil-ductility temperature (NDT), or crack-arrest toughness, K a . For a wide range of weld and plate materials, the temperature at which F a = 2.45 kN correlates with NDT with a standard deviation, sigma, of about 11 K. Excluding the so-called low upper-shelf energy (USE) welds from the analysis resulted in F a = 4.12 kN and σ = 6.6 K. The estimates of the correlation of the temperature for F a = 7.4 kN with the temperature at 100-MPa√m level for a mean American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) type K Ia curve through crack-arrest toughness values show that prediction of conservative values of K a are possible

  1. Use of classifier to determine coffee harvest time by detachment force

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murilo M. de Barros

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Coffee quality is an essential aspect to increase its commercial value and for the Brazilian coffee business to remain prominent in the world market. Fruit maturity stage at harvest is an important factor that affects the quality and commercial value of the product. Therefore, the objective of this study was to develop a classifier using neural networks to distinguish green coffee fruits from mature coffee fruits, based on the detachment force. Fruit detachment force and the percentage value of the maturity stage were measured during a 75-day harvest window. Collections were carried out biweekly, resulting in five different moments within the harvest period. A classifier was developed using neural networks to distinguish green fruits from mature fruits in the harvest period analyzed. The results show that, in the first half of June, the supervised classified had the highest success percentage in differentiating green fruits from mature fruits, and this period was considered as ideal for a selective harvest under these experimental conditions.

  2. Non-specific binding of Na+ and Mg2+ to RNA determined by force spectroscopy methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizarro, C. V.; Alemany, A.; Ritort, F.

    2012-01-01

    RNA duplex stability depends strongly on ionic conditions, and inside cells RNAs are exposed to both monovalent and multivalent ions. Despite recent advances, we do not have general methods to quantitatively account for the effects of monovalent and multivalent ions on RNA stability, and the thermodynamic parameters for secondary structure prediction have only been derived at 1M [Na+]. Here, by mechanically unfolding and folding a 20 bp RNA hairpin using optical tweezers, we study the RNA thermodynamics and kinetics at different monovalent and mixed monovalent/Mg2+ salt conditions. We measure the unfolding and folding rupture forces and apply Kramers theory to extract accurate information about the hairpin free energy landscape under tension at a wide range of ionic conditions. We obtain non-specific corrections for the free energy of formation of the RNA hairpin and measure how the distance of the transition state to the folded state changes with force and ionic strength. We experimentally validate the Tightly Bound Ion model and obtain values for the persistence length of ssRNA. Finally, we test the approximate rule by which the non-specific binding affinity of divalent cations at a given concentration is equivalent to that of monovalent cations taken at 100-fold concentration for small molecular constructs. PMID:22492710

  3. Determining concentration depth profiles in fluorinated networks by means of electric force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miccio, Luis A.; Kummali, Mohammed M.; Alegria, Angel; Montemartini, Pablo E.; Oyanguren, Patricia A.; Schwartz, Gustavo A.; Colmenero, Juan

    2011-01-01

    By means of electric force microscopy, composition depth profiles were measured with nanometric resolution for a series of fluorinated networks. By mapping the dielectric permittivity along a line going from the surface to the bulk, we were able to experimentally access to the fluorine concentration profile. Obtained data show composition gradient lengths ranging from 30 nm to 80 nm in the near surface area for samples containing from 0.5 to 5 wt. % F, respectively. In contrast, no gradients of concentration were detected in bulk. This method has several advantages over other techniques because it allows profiling directly on a sectional cut of the sample. By combining the obtained results with x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements, we were also able to quantify F/C ratio as a function of depth with nanoscale resolution.

  4. Determinants for employer-paid health insurance coverage: a population-based study of the Danish labour force

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Ann Demant; Søgaard, Rikke

    2013-01-01

    AIM: In 2002, the Danish tax law was changed, giving employees a tax exemption on supplemental, employer-paid health insurance. This might have conflicted with one of the key foundations of the healthcare system, namely equal access for equal needs. The aim of this study was to investigate...... determinants for employer-paid health insurance coverage. Because the policy change affected only people who were part of the labour force and because the public sector at that time had no tradition of providing fringe benefits, the analysis was restricted to the private labour force. METHOD: The analysis...... employer-paid health insurance coverage. RESULTS: The individuals who were most likely to be insured were those employed in foreign companies as mid-level managers within the field of building and construction. Other important variables were the number of persons employed in a company, gender, ethnicity...

  5. Development of method for experimental determination of wheel–rail contact forces and contact point position by using instrumented wheelset

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bižić, Milan B; Petrović, Dragan Z; Tomić, Miloš C; Djinović, Zoran V

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents the development of a unique method for experimental determination of wheel–rail contact forces and contact point position by using the instrumented wheelset (IWS). Solutions of key problems in the development of IWS are proposed, such as the determination of optimal locations, layout, number and way of connecting strain gauges as well as the development of an inverse identification algorithm (IIA). The base for the solution of these problems is the wheel model and results of FEM calculations, while IIA is based on the method of blind source separation using independent component analysis. In the first phase, the developed method was tested on a wheel model and a high accuracy was obtained (deviations of parameters obtained with IIA and really applied parameters in the model are less than 2%). In the second phase, experimental tests on the real object or IWS were carried out. The signal-to-noise ratio was identified as the main influential parameter on the measurement accuracy. Тhе obtained results have shown that the developed method enables measurement of vertical and lateral wheel–rail contact forces Q and Y and their ratio Y / Q with estimated errors of less than 10%, while the estimated measurement error of contact point position is less than 15%. At flange contact and higher values of ratio Y / Q or Y force, the measurement errors are reduced, which is extremely important for the reliability and quality of experimental tests of safety against derailment of railway vehicles according to the standards UIC 518 and EN 14363. The obtained results have shown that the proposed method can be successfully applied in solving the problem of high accuracy measurement of wheel–rail contact forces and contact point position using IWS. (paper)

  6. Determinants of Health Promotion Behavior in Active Duty Air Force Personnel

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Grabowski, Bridgette

    1997-01-01

    .... The purpose of this research study was to determine the extent perceived locus of control and demographic factors, as selected factors of Nola Pender's Health Promotion Model, can predict health...

  7. Activity associated with coronal mass ejections at solar minimum - SMM observations from 1984-1986

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. Cyr, O. C.; Webb, D. F.

    1991-01-01

    Seventy-three coronal mass ejections (CMEs) observed by the coronagraph aboard SMM between 1984 and 1986 were examined in order to determine the distribution of various forms of solar activity that were spatially and temporally associated with mass ejections during solar minimum phase. For each coronal mass ejection a speed was measured, and the departure time of the transient from the lower corona estimated. Other forms of solar activity that appeared within 45 deg longitude and 30 deg latitude of the mass ejection and within +/-90 min of its extrapolated departure time were explored. The statistical results of the analysis of these 73 CMEs are presented, and it is found that slightly less than half of them were infrequently associated with other forms of solar activity. It is suggested that the distribution of the various forms of activity related to CMEs does not change at different phases of the solar cycle. For those CMEs with associations, it is found that eruptive prominences and soft X-rays were the most likely forms of activity to accompany the appearance of mass ejections.

  8. FORECASTING A CORONAL MASS EJECTION'S ALTERED TRAJECTORY: ForeCAT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kay, C.; Opher, M.; Evans, R. M.

    2013-01-01

    To predict whether a coronal mass ejection (CME) will impact Earth, the effects of the background on the CME's trajectory must be taken into account. We develop a model, ForeCAT (Forecasting a CME's Altered Trajectory), of CME deflection due to magnetic forces. ForeCAT includes CME expansion, a three-part propagation model, and the effects of drag on the CME's deflection. Given the background solar wind conditions, the launch site of the CME, and the properties of the CME (mass, final propagation speed, initial radius, and initial magnetic strength), ForeCAT predicts the deflection of the CME. Two different magnetic backgrounds are considered: a scaled background based on type II radio burst profiles and a potential field source surface (PFSS) background. For a scaled background where the CME is launched from an active region located between a coronal hole and streamer region, the strong magnetic gradients cause a deflection of 8.°1 in latitude and 26.°4 in longitude for a 10 15 g CME propagating out to 1 AU. Using the PFSS background, which captures the variation of the streamer belt (SB) position with height, leads to a deflection of 1.°6 in latitude and 4.°1 in longitude for the control case. Varying the CME's input parameters within observed ranges leads to the majority of CMEs reaching the SB within the first few solar radii. For these specific backgrounds, the SB acts like a potential well that forces the CME into an equilibrium angular position

  9. Temperature response of an acoustically forced turbulent lean premixed flame: A quantitative experimental determination

    KAUST Repository

    Chrystie, Robin; Burns, Iain Stewart; Kaminski, Clemens Friedrich

    2013-01-01

    Temperature measurements have been taken on an acoustically forced lean premixed turbulent bluff-body stabilized flame. The burner used in this study is a test-bed to investigate thermoacoustic instability in gas-turbine engines at the University of Cambridge. Numerous experiments have been performed on the burner, one of which used two-line OH planar laser induced fluorescence to measure temperature. Here, we employ vibrational coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) of nitrogen as an alternative to measure temperature, circumventing the limitations of the former method. The use of nitrogen CARS avoids the problem of probing regions of the flame with low OH concentrations that resulted in erroneous temperature. Such an application of CARS showed that the results from previous efforts were systematically biased up to 47% close to the bluff-body. We also critically review the limitations of CARS used in our experiments, pertaining to spatial resolution and associated biasing further downstream from the bluff-body. Using the more accurate results from this work, more up-to-date computational fluid dynamical (CFD) models of the burner can be validated, with the aim of improved understanding and prediction of thermoacoustic instability in gas turbines. © 2013 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.

  10. Determination of a silane intermolecular force field potential model from an ab initio calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Arvin Huang-Te; Chao, Sheng D.; Chang, Chien-Cheng

    2010-01-01

    Intermolecular interaction potentials of the silane dimer in 12 orientations have been calculated by using the Hartree-Fock (HF) self-consistent theory and the second-order Moeller-Plesset (MP2) perturbation theory. We employed basis sets from Pople's medium-size basis sets [up to 6-311++G(3df, 3pd)] and Dunning's correlation consistent basis sets (up to the triply augmented correlation-consistent polarized valence quadruple-zeta basis set). We found that the minimum energy orientations were the G and H conformers. We have suggested that the Si-H attractions, the central silicon atom size, and electronegativity play essential roles in weakly binding of a silane dimer. The calculated MP2 potential data were employed to parametrize a five-site force field for molecular simulations. The Si-Si, Si-H, and H-H interaction parameters in a pairwise-additive, site-site potential model for silane molecules were regressed from the ab initio energies.

  11. Temperature response of an acoustically forced turbulent lean premixed flame: A quantitative experimental determination

    KAUST Repository

    Chrystie, Robin

    2013-01-02

    Temperature measurements have been taken on an acoustically forced lean premixed turbulent bluff-body stabilized flame. The burner used in this study is a test-bed to investigate thermoacoustic instability in gas-turbine engines at the University of Cambridge. Numerous experiments have been performed on the burner, one of which used two-line OH planar laser induced fluorescence to measure temperature. Here, we employ vibrational coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) of nitrogen as an alternative to measure temperature, circumventing the limitations of the former method. The use of nitrogen CARS avoids the problem of probing regions of the flame with low OH concentrations that resulted in erroneous temperature. Such an application of CARS showed that the results from previous efforts were systematically biased up to 47% close to the bluff-body. We also critically review the limitations of CARS used in our experiments, pertaining to spatial resolution and associated biasing further downstream from the bluff-body. Using the more accurate results from this work, more up-to-date computational fluid dynamical (CFD) models of the burner can be validated, with the aim of improved understanding and prediction of thermoacoustic instability in gas turbines. © 2013 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.

  12. Comparative Influences of Fluid and Shell on Modeled Ejection Performance of a Piezoelectric Micro-Jet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The piezoelectric micro-jet, which can achieve the drop-on-demand requirement, is based on ink-jet technology and small droplets can be ejected out by precise control. The droplets are driven out of the nozzle by the acoustic pressure waves which are generated by the piezoelectric vibrator. The propagation processes of the acoustic pressure waves are affected by the acoustic properties of the fluid and the shell material of the micro-jet, as well as the excitations and the structure sizes. The influences of the fluid density and acoustic velocity in the fluid on the nozzle pressure and support reaction force of the vibrator are analyzed in this paper. The effects of the shell material on the ejection performance are studied as well. In order to improve the ejection performance of the micro-jet, for ejecting a given fluid, the recommended methods of selecting the shell material and adjusting excitations are provided based on the results, and the influences of the factors on working frequencies are obtained as well.

  13. Anti-ejection device, which can be released, for control rods of nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belz, G.

    1983-01-01

    The present invention proposes an anti-ejection device which allows to withdraw the control rod out of a PWR reactor core if the locking systems of the rod translation are streck. This device prohibits the control rod ejection as long as an effort lower than a predetermined value is not applied on the control rod. This limit value is determined with regard of the efforts which may be applied on the control rod in case of an external accidental source. Nevertheless, if the anti-ejection mechanism remains stuck, it is however possible to withdraw the control rod out of the core applying on its control rod drives an effort higher than the limit value [fr

  14. Gravitational wave generated by mass ejection in protoneutron star neutrino burst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, L. G.; Rodrigues, H.; Portes, D. JR.; Duarte, S. B.

    2010-01-01

    In this work we discuss the mechanism of mass ejection in protoneutron stars induced by diffusion of neutrinos. A dynamical calculation is employed in order to determine the amount of matter ejected and the properties of the remnant compact object [1]. The equations of state of this supra-nuclear regime [2] is properly linked with others describing the different sub-nuclear regimes of density [3, 4, 5]. For specified initial configurations of the protoneutron star, we solve numerically the set of equations of motion together with a schematic treatment of the neutrino transport through the dense stellar medium. We investigate the gravitational waves production accompanying the mass ejection induced by the neutrino burst. It is estimated the gravitational wave intensity and the detection of such wave by the existing detector or near future project for this purpose is discussed.

  15. Application of force-length curve for determination of leg stiffness during a vertical jump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struzik, Artur; Zawadzki, Jerzy

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to present the methodology for estimation of a leg stiffness during a countermovement jump. The question was asked whether leg stiffness in the countermovement and take-off phases are similar to each other as demonstrated in previous reports. It was also examined whether the stiffness in left lower limb is similar to the one in right lower limb. The research was conducted on 35 basketball players. Each participant performed three countermovement jumps with arm swing to the maximum height. Measurements employed a Kistlerforce plate and a BTS SMART system for motion analysis. Leg stiffness (understood as an inclination of the curve of ground reaction forces vs. length) was computed for these parts of countermovement and take-off phases where its value was relatively constant and F(Δl) relationship was similar to linear. Mean value (±SD) of total stiffness of both lower limbs in the countermovement phase was 7.1 ± 2.3 kN/m, whereas this value in the take-off phase was 7.5 ± 1 kN/m. No statistically significant differences were found between the leg stiffness in the countermovement and the take-off phases. No statistically significant differences were found during the comparison of the stiffness in the right and left lower limb. The calculation methodology allows us to estimate the value of leg stiffness based on the actual shape of F(Δl) curve rather than on extreme values of ΔF and Δl. Despite different tasks of the countermovement and the take-off phases, leg stiffness in these phases is very similar. Leg stiffness during a single vertical jump maintains a relatively constant value in the parts with a small value of acceleration.

  16. Detection of chaotic determinism in time series from randomly forced maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chon, K H; Kanters, J K; Cohen, R J

    1997-01-01

    Time series from biological system often display fluctuations in the measured variables. Much effort has been directed at determining whether this variability reflects deterministic chaos, or whether it is merely "noise". Despite this effort, it has been difficult to establish the presence of cha...... series followed by an estimation of the characteristic exponents of the model over the observed probability distribution of states for the system. The method is tested by computer simulations, and applied to heart rate variability data....

  17. Detection of chaotic determinism in time series from randomly forced maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chon, K. H.; Kanters, J. K.; Cohen, R. J.; Holstein-Rathlou, N. H.

    1997-01-01

    Time series from biological system often display fluctuations in the measured variables. Much effort has been directed at determining whether this variability reflects deterministic chaos, or whether it is merely "noise". Despite this effort, it has been difficult to establish the presence of chaos in time series from biological sytems. The output from a biological system is probably the result of both its internal dynamics, and the input to the system from the surroundings. This implies that the system should be viewed as a mixed system with both stochastic and deterministic components. We present a method that appears to be useful in deciding whether determinism is present in a time series, and if this determinism has chaotic attributes, i.e., a positive characteristic exponent that leads to sensitivity to initial conditions. The method relies on fitting a nonlinear autoregressive model to the time series followed by an estimation of the characteristic exponents of the model over the observed probability distribution of states for the system. The method is tested by computer simulations, and applied to heart rate variability data.

  18. Association between Hypotension, Low Ejection Fraction and Cognitive Performance in Cardiac Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca F. Gottesman

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: Impaired cardiac function can adversely affect the brain via decreased perfusion. The purpose of this study was to determine if cardiac ejection fraction (EF is associated with cognitive performance, and whether this is modified by low blood pressure.

  19. Characteristics of Droplets Ejected from Liquid Propellants Ablated by Laser Pulses in Laser Plasma Propulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Zhiyuan; Gao Hua; Fan Zhenjun; Xing Jie

    2014-01-01

    The angular distribution and pressure force of droplets ejected from liquid water and glycerol ablated by nanosecond laser pulses are investigated under different viscosities in laser plasma propulsion. It is shown that with increasing viscosity, the distribution angles present a decrease tendency for two liquids, and the angular distribution of glycerol is smaller than that of water. A smaller distribution leads to a higher pressure force generation. The results indicate that ablation can be controlled by varying the viscosity of liquid propellant in laser plasma propulsion

  20. Community health centers and community development financial institutions: joining forces to address determinants of health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotelchuck, Ronda; Lowenstein, Daniel; Tobin, Jonathan N

    2011-11-01

    Community health centers and community development financial institutions share similar origins and missions and are increasingly working together to meet community needs. Addressing the social and economic determinants of health is a common focus. The availability of new federal grants and tax credits has led these financial institutions to invest in the creation and expansion of community health centers. This article reviews the most recent trends in these two sectors and explores opportunities for further collaboration to transform the health and well-being of the nation's low-income communities.

  1. Combined short scale roughness and surface dielectric function gradient effects on the determination of tip-sample force in atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gusso, André, E-mail: gusso@metal.eeimvr.uff.br [Departamento de Ciências Exatas-EEIMVR, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Volta Redonda, RJ 27255-125 (Brazil)

    2013-11-11

    The contribution of tip roughness to the van der Waals force between an atomic force microscopy probe tip and the sample is calculated using the multilayer effective medium model, which allows us to consider the relevant case of roughness characterized by correlation length and amplitude in the nanometer scale. The effect of the surface dielectric function gradient is incorporated in the tip-sample force model. It is concluded that for rms roughness in the few nanometers range the effect of short scale tip roughness is quite significant.

  2. Measurement of right and left ventricular ejection fraction in dogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brynjolf, I.; Qvist, J.; Mygind, T.; Jordening, H.; Dorph, S.; Munck, O.

    1983-08-01

    Three techniques for measurement of right (RVEF) and two techniques for left (LVEF) ventricular ejection fraction were evaluated in five dogs. RVEF was measured with a first-pass radionuclide technique using erythrocytes labelled in vitro with Technetium-99m methylene disphosphonate (MDP) and compared with RVEF measured with a thermodilution technique. Thermodilution-determined RVEF was compared with RVEF values measured with cine angiocardiography. LVEF was measured with a radionuclide ECG-gated equilibrium technique and compared with cine angiocardiography. Measurements were performed before and during a continuous infusion of dopamine. There was an excellent correlation between RVEF measured with the first-pass and the thermodilution technique. LVEF measured with the ECG-gated equilibrium technique correlated well with cine angiocardiography.

  3. An ice-cream cone model for coronal mass ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, X. H.; Wang, C. B.; Dou, X. K.

    2005-08-01

    In this study, we use an ice-cream cone model to analyze the geometrical and kinematical properties of the coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Assuming that in the early phase CMEs propagate with near-constant speed and angular width, some useful properties of CMEs, namely the radial speed (v), the angular width (α), and the location at the heliosphere, can be obtained considering the geometrical shapes of a CME as an ice-cream cone. This model is improved by (1) using an ice-cream cone to show the near real configuration of a CME, (2) determining the radial speed via fitting the projected speeds calculated from the height-time relation in different azimuthal angles, (3) not only applying to halo CMEs but also applying to nonhalo CMEs.

  4. Coronal mass ejections and large geomagnetic storms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gosling, J.T.; Bame, S.J.; McComas, D.J.; Phillips, J.L.

    1990-01-01

    Previous work indicates that coronal mass ejection (CME) events in the solar wind at 1 AU can be identified by the presence of a flux of counterstreaming solar wind halo electrons (above about 80 eV). Using this technique to identify CMEs in 1 AU plasma data, the authors find that most large geomagnetic storms during the interval surrounding the last solar maximum (Aug. 1978-Oct. 1982) were associated with Earth-passage of interplanetary disturbances in which the Earth encountered both a shock and the CME driving the shock. However, only about one CME in six encountered by Earth was effective in causing a large geomagnetic storm. Slow CMEs which did not interact strongly with the ambient solar wind ahead were particularly ineffective in a geomagnetic sense

  5. ISAAC: A REXUS Student Experiment to Demonstrate an Ejection System with Predefined Direction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balmer, G.; Berquand, A.; Company-Vallet, E.; Granberg, V.; Grigore, V.; Ivchenko, N.; Kevorkov, R.; Lundkvist, E.; Olentsenko, G.; Pacheco-Labrador, J.; Tibert, G.; Yuan, Y.

    2015-09-01

    ISAAC Infrared Spectroscopy to Analyse the middle Atmosphere Composition — was a student experiment launched from SSC's Esrange Space Centre, Sweden, on 29th May 2014, on board the sounding rocket REXUS 15 in the frame of the REXUS/BEXUS programme. The main focus of the experiment was to implement an ejection system for two large Free Falling Units (FFUs) (240 mm x 80 mm) to be ejected from a spinning rocket into a predefined direction. The system design relied on a spring-based ejection system. Sun and angular rate sensors were used to control and time the ejection. The flight data includes telemetry from the Rocket Mounted Unit (RMU), received and saved during flight, as well as video footage from the GoPro camera mounted inside the RMU and recovered after the flight. The FFUs' direction, speed and spin frequency as well as the rocket spin frequency were determined by analyzing the video footage. The FFU-Rocket-Sun angles were 64.3° and 104.3°, within the required margins of 90°+45°. The FFU speeds were 3.98 mIs and 3.74 mIs, lower than the expected 5± 1 mIs. The FFUs' spin frequencies were 1 .38 Hz and 1 .60 Hz, approximately half the rocket's spin frequency. The rocket spin rate slightly changed from 3. 163 Hz before the ejection to 3.1 17 Hz after the ejection of the two FFUs. The angular rate, sun sensor data and temperature on the inside of the rocket module skin were also recorded. The experiment design and results of the data analysis are presented in this paper.

  6. Coronal mass ejections and disturbances in solar wind plasma parameters in relation with geomagnetic storms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verma, P L; Singh, Puspraj; Singh, Preetam

    2014-01-01

    Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) are the drastic solar events in which huge amount of solar plasma materials are ejected into the heliosphere from the sun and are mainly responsible to generate large disturbances in solar wind plasma parameters and geomagnetic storms in geomagnetic field. We have studied geomagnetic storms, (Dst ≤-75 nT) observed during the period of 1997-2007 with Coronal Mass Ejections and disturbances in solar wind plasma parameters (solar wind temperature, velocity, density and interplanetary magnetic field) .We have inferred that most of the geomagnetic storms are associated with halo and partial halo Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs).The association rate of halo and partial halo coronal mass ejections are found 72.37 % and 27.63 % respectively. Further we have concluded that geomagnetic storms are closely associated with the disturbances in solar wind plasma parameters. We have determined positive co-relation between magnitudes of geomagnetic storms and magnitude of jump in solar wind plasma temperature, jump in solar wind plasma density, jump in solar wind plasma velocity and jump in average interplanetary magnetic field with co-relation co-efficient 0 .35 between magnitude of geomagnetic storms and magnitude of jump in solar wind plasma temperature, 0.19 between magnitude of geomagnetic storms and magnitude of jump in solar wind density, 0.34 between magnitude of geomagnetic storms and magnitude of jump in solar wind plasma velocity, 0.66 between magnitude of geomagnetic storms and magnitude of jump in average interplanetary magnetic field respectively. We have concluded that geomagnetic storms are mainly caused by Coronal Mass Ejections and disturbances in solar wind plasma parameters that they generate.

  7. Control rod ejection analysis during a depressurization accident and the development of a rod-ejection-preventing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitake, S.; Itoh, K.; Fukushima, H.; Inoue, T.

    1982-01-01

    The control rods used for the experimental VHTR are suspended in the core by means of flexible steel cables and it is conceivable that an accidental rod ejection could occur due to a depressurization accident. The computer code AFLADE was developed in order to analyze the possibility of accidental rod ejection, and several studies were performed. The parametric study results showed that the adopted design condition for the VHTR core will not cause a rod ejection accident. In parallel with these accident analyses, a rod-ejection-preventing device was developed in preparation for a hypothetical accident, and its function was verified by the component tests

  8. A methodology to determine boundary conditions from forced convection experiments using liquid crystal thermography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakkareddy, Pradeep S.; Balaji, C.

    2017-02-01

    This paper reports the results of an experimental study to estimate the heat flux and convective heat transfer coefficient using liquid crystal thermography and Bayesian inference in a heat generating sphere, enclosed in a cubical Teflon block. The geometry considered for the experiments comprises a heater inserted in a hollow hemispherical aluminium ball, resulting in a volumetric heat generation source that is placed at the center of the Teflon block. Calibrated thermochromic liquid crystal sheets are used to capture the temperature distribution at the front face of the Teflon block. The forward model is the three dimensional conduction equation which is solved within the Teflon block to obtain steady state temperatures, using COMSOL. Match up experiments are carried out for various velocities by minimizing the residual between TLC and simulated temperatures for every assumed loss coefficient, to obtain a correlation of average Nusselt number against Reynolds number. This is used for prescribing the boundary condition for the solution to the forward model. A surrogate model obtained by artificial neural network built upon the data from COMSOL simulations is used to drive a Markov Chain Monte Carlo based Metropolis Hastings algorithm to generate the samples. Bayesian inference is adopted to solve the inverse problem for determination of heat flux and heat transfer coefficient from the measured temperature field. Point estimates of the posterior like the mean, maximum a posteriori and standard deviation of the retrieved heat flux and convective heat transfer coefficient are reported. Additionally the effect of number of samples on the performance of the estimation process has been investigated.

  9. Determination of Model Kinetics for Forced Unsteady State Operation of Catalytic CH4 Oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Effendy Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The catalytic oxidation of methane for abating the emission vented from coal mine or natural gas transportation has been known as most reliable method. A reverse flow reactor operation has been widely used to oxidize this methane emission due to its capability for autothermal operation and heat production. The design of the reverse flow reactor requires a proper kinetic rate expression, which should be developed based on the operating condition. The kinetic rate obtained in the steady state condition cannot be applied for designing the reactor operated under unsteady state condition. Therefore, new approach to develop the dynamic kinetic rate expression becomes indispensable, particularly for periodic operation such as reverse flow reactor. This paper presents a novel method to develop the kinetic rate expression applied for unsteady state operation. The model reaction of the catalytic methane oxidation over Pt/-Al2O3 catalyst was used with kinetic parameter determined from laboratory experiments. The reactor used was a fixed bed, once-through operation, with a composition modulation in the feed gas. The switching time was set at 3 min by varying the feed concentration, feed flow rate, and reaction temperature. The concentrations of methane in the feed and product were measured and analysed using gas chromatography. The steady state condition for obtaining the kinetic rate expression was taken as a base case and as a way to judge its appropriateness to be applied for dynamic system. A Langmuir-Hinshelwood reaction rate model was developed. The time period during one cycle was divided into some segments, depending on the ratio of CH4/O2. The experimental result shows that there were kinetic regimes occur during one cycle: kinetic regime controlled by intrinsic surface reaction and kinetic regime controlled by external diffusion. The kinetic rate obtained in the steady state operation was not appropriate when applied for unsteady state operation

  10. Ispitivanje piropatrona i raketnog motora pilotskog sedišta / Testing pyrocartridges and the rocket motor of the ejection seat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milorad Savković

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Raketni motor pilotskog sedišta ima složen geometrijski oblik, tako da njegov potisak deluje pod određenim uglom u odnosu na ravan simetrije pilotskog sedišta. Radi određivanja intenziteta i napadne linije potiska izvršen je veći broj eksperimenata. Meren je potisak raketnog motora na višekomponentnom opitnom stolu. Letno ispitivanje pilotskog sedišta obavljeno je pomoću lutke koja simulira masu pilota. Takođe, analizirano je letno ispitivanje pilotskog sedišta u početnom periodu katapultiranja za vreme rada raketnog motora. Obrađeni su i rezultati merenja ubrzanja, koji su korišćeni za određivanje karakteristika leta pilotskog sedišta. U radu je prikazan teorijski model kretanja sedišta. / Due to a complex geometrical shape of the rocket motor of the ejection seat, the rocket motor thrust occurs under certain angle in relation to the plane of symmetry of the ejection seat. A number of tests were carried out in order to determine thrust intensity and angle of attack. The rocket motor thrust was measured on the multicomponent test stand. The ejection seat whit a dummy simulating a mass of a pilot was tested during ejection. The paper presents an analysis of the ejection seat flight in the initial phase of ejection, during the rocket motor running. The results of the acceleration read-outs were processed and then used for the determination of the characteristics of the ejection seat flight. A theoretical model of the ejection seat flight is given in the paper.

  11. Determinants of early withdrawal and of early withdrawal by reason of disability from the Irish labour force in the third age

    OpenAIRE

    Lawless, Martin

    2015-01-01

    III – Abstract: Determinants of early withdrawal and early withdrawal by reason of disability from the Irish labour force in the Third Age.Background. This study examines the relationship between early withdrawal and early withdrawal through disability from the Irish labour force in the Third Age. The relationship between unemployment or early retirement and ill health has been determined by a number of studies and, while unemployment through ill health or occupational disability may lead to ...

  12. Determinants for employer-paid health insurance coverage: a population-based study of the Danish labour force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Ann; Søgaard, Rikke

    2013-08-01

    In 2002, the Danish tax law was changed, giving employees a tax exemption on supplemental, employer-paid health insurance. This might have conflicted with one of the key foundations of the healthcare system, namely equal access for equal needs. The aim of this study was to investigate determinants for employer-paid health insurance coverage. Because the policy change affected only people who were part of the labour force and because the public sector at that time had no tradition of providing fringe benefits, the analysis was restricted to the private labour force. The analysis was based on data from a range of Danish person-level and company-level registers (explanatory variables). These data were combined with information on insurance status obtained from the trade organisation for insurance (dependent variable). A logistic regression was performed to estimate the odds of having employer-paid health insurance coverage. The individuals who were most likely to be insured were those employed in foreign companies as mid-level managers within the field of building and construction. Other important variables were the number of persons employed in a company, gender, ethnicity, region of residence, years of education, and annual income. Both company and individual characteristics were found to be important and significant predictors for employer-paid health insurance coverage. The Danish tax exemption on private health insurance in the years 2002-12 thus seems to have led to inequality in employer-paid health insurance coverage.

  13. Determination of the cutting forces regression functions for milling machining of the X105CrMo17 material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popovici, T. D.; Dijmărescu, M. R.

    2017-08-01

    The aim of the research presented in this paper is to determine a cutting force prediction model for milling machining of the X105CrMo17 stainless steel. The analysed material is a martensitic stainless steel which, due to the high Carbon content (∼1%) and Chromium (∼17%), has high hardness and good corrosion resistance characteristics. This material is used for the steel structures parts which are subject of wear in corrosive environments, for making valve seats, bearings, various types of cutters, high hardness bushings, casting shells and nozzles, measuring instruments, etc. The paper is structured into three main parts in accordance to the considered research program; they are preceded by an introduction and followed by relevant conclusions. In the first part, for a more detailed knowledge of the material characteristics, a quality and quantity micro-analysis X-ray and a spectral analysis were performed. The second part presents the physical experiment in terms of input, necessary means, process and registration of the experimental data. In the third part, the experimental data is analysed and the cutting force model is developed in terms of the cutting regime parameters such as cutting speed, feed rate, axial depth and radial depth.

  14. A combination method of the theory and experiment in determination of cutting force coefficients in ball-end mill processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung-Chou Kao

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the cutting force calculation of ball-end mill processing was modeled mathematically. All derivations of cutting forces were directly based on the tangential, radial, and axial cutting force components. In the developed mathematical model of cutting forces, the relationship of average cutting force and the feed per flute was characterized as a linear function. The cutting force coefficient model was formulated by a function of average cutting force and other parameters such as cutter geometry, cutting conditions, and so on. An experimental method was proposed based on the stable milling condition to estimate the cutting force coefficients for ball-end mill. This method could be applied for each pair of tool and workpiece. The developed cutting force model has been successfully verified experimentally with very promising results.

  15. Determination of forces induced by steam flow in turbines; Determinacion de fuerzas inducidas por flujo de vapor en turbinas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia Castrejon, Juan Carlos

    2008-09-15

    The steam flow induced vibrations in turbines is a common problem during the operation of 300 MW turbines and it is one of the problems that requires solution to develop 1 GW steam turbines. The flow induced vibration is caused because there is an interaction between blades and the flow field. Blades are subjected to the forces caused by the flow field, but also the flow field is affected by the blades and its movement. The nozzle wakes cause uneven pressure field downstream and produces alternating forces on blades which lead to blade vibrations. Some of the vibrations originated in this way may damage the blades and affect the turbine performance. The forces acting on blades (and causing forced vibrations) as a result of the variations in the flow field in the axial rotor-stator clearance are studied in this project. These forces were determined applying computer fluid dynamics (CFD) in two turbine stages. The CFD analysis was carried out in the Curtis stage and in the last stage, using 2D and 3D models. An important part of the analysis is focused on discussing the pressure field variation, because this variation caused the forces acting on blades. The flow field was resolved using CFD and the computed pressure field was integrated around the blades to get the forces acting on blades. These computed dynamical forces were analyzed using a FFT analysis and the results were used in the blade useful life estimation and in the investigation of the failure causes of these blades. In every turbine stage the RNG - turbulence model and the sliding mesh method was used to deal with the blade motion. The 3D models were resolved using parallel computation in a cluster of 6 AMD 64 Opteron processors of 2412.36 MHz and 8 Gb of RAM. The results of the simulation in both stages get the pressure field behavior in the axial rotor-stator clearance and determine the force acting on the blades. These results showed that both, the pressure field and the force magnitude acting on

  16. Evaluation of the rod ejection accident in Westinghouse Pressurized Water Reactors using spatial kinetics methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Risher, D.H. Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The consequences of a rod ejection accident are investigated in relation to the latest, high power density Westinghouse reactors. Limiting criteria are presented, based on experimental evidence, and if not exceeded these criteria will ensure that there will be no interference with core cooling capability, and radiation releases, if any, will be within the guidelines of 10CFR100. A basis is presented for the conservative selection of plant parameters to be used in the analysis, such that the analysis is applicable to a wide range of past, present, and future reactors. The calculational method employs a one-dimensional spatial kinetics computer code and a transient fuel heat transfer computer code to determine the hot spot fuel temperature versus time following a rod ejection. Using these computer codes, the most limiting hot channel factor (which does not cause the fuel damage limit criteria to be exceeded) has been determined as a function of the ejected rod worth. By this means, the limit criteria have been translated into ejected rod worths and hot channel factors which can be used effectively by the nuclear designer and safety analyst. The calculational method is shown to be conservative, compared to the results of a three-dimensional spatial kinetics analysis

  17. Experimental determination of heat transfer critical conditions in water forced convection at low pressure in a circular channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, M.P.

    1973-02-01

    An experimental determination was made of heat transfer critical conditions in a circular channel, uniformly heated, and internally cooled by water in ascending forced convection, under a pressure slightly above atmospheric pressure. Measurements were made of water flow, pressure, electric power temperature and heating, and a systematic analysis was made of the system's parameters. The values obtained for the heat critical flux are circa 50% lower than those predicted by Becker and Biasi and this is accounted to flowing instabilities of thermo-hydrodynamic nature. It is suggested that the flowing channels of circuits aiming at the study of the boiling crisis phenomenon be expanded in its upper extremity, and that the coolant circulation be kept through a pump with a pressure X flow characteristic as vertical as possible

  18. Lubricant influence on the ejection and roughness of in-die electro sinter forged Ti-discs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cannella, Emanuele; Nielsen, Chris Valentin

    2018-01-01

    Electro Sinter Forging (ESF) is a new sintering process based on Joule heating by high electrical current flowing through compacted metal powder under mechanical pressure. The whole process takes about three seconds and is based on a closed-die setup, where the sample is sintered inside a die....... A near-net shape component is therefore manufactured. One of the challenges associated with this process is the ejection of the sample after sintering. Due to powder compaction and axial loading during sintering, a radial pressure is generated at the die/sample interface. Consequently, the ejection can...... of commercially pure titanium powder. The force was measured while ejecting the samples by using a speed-controlled press. The surface roughness parameter Sa was measured by using a laser confocal microscope....

  19. Labor Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Occupational Outlook Quarterly, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The labor force is the number of people aged 16 or older who are either working or looking for work. It does not include active-duty military personnel or institutionalized people, such as prison inmates. Quantifying this total supply of labor is a way of determining how big the economy can get. Labor force participation rates vary significantly…

  20. Active Longitude and Coronal Mass Ejection Occurrences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gyenge, N.; Kiss, T. S.; Erdélyi, R.; Singh, T.; Srivastava, A. K.

    2017-01-01

    The spatial inhomogeneity of the distribution of coronal mass ejection (CME) occurrences in the solar atmosphere could provide a tool to estimate the longitudinal position of the most probable CME-capable active regions in the Sun. The anomaly in the longitudinal distribution of active regions themselves is often referred to as active longitude (AL). In order to reveal the connection between the AL and CME spatial occurrences, here we investigate the morphological properties of active regions. The first morphological property studied is the separateness parameter, which is able to characterize the probability of the occurrence of an energetic event, such as a solar flare or CME. The second morphological property is the sunspot tilt angle. The tilt angle of sunspot groups allows us to estimate the helicity of active regions. The increased helicity leads to a more complex buildup of the magnetic structure and also can cause CME eruption. We found that the most complex active regions appear near the AL and that the AL itself is associated with the most tilted active regions. Therefore, the number of CME occurrences is higher within the AL. The origin of the fast CMEs is also found to be associated with this region. We concluded that the source of the most probably CME-capable active regions is at the AL. By applying this method, we can potentially forecast a flare and/or CME source several Carrington rotations in advance. This finding also provides new information for solar dynamo modeling.

  1. Active Longitude and Coronal Mass Ejection Occurrences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gyenge, N.; Kiss, T. S.; Erdélyi, R. [Solar Physics and Space Plasmas Research Centre (SP2RC), School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Sheffield Hounsfield Road, Hicks Building, Sheffield S3 7RH (United Kingdom); Singh, T.; Srivastava, A. K., E-mail: n.g.gyenge@sheffield.ac.uk [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology (Banaras Hindu University), Varanasi (India)

    2017-03-20

    The spatial inhomogeneity of the distribution of coronal mass ejection (CME) occurrences in the solar atmosphere could provide a tool to estimate the longitudinal position of the most probable CME-capable active regions in the Sun. The anomaly in the longitudinal distribution of active regions themselves is often referred to as active longitude (AL). In order to reveal the connection between the AL and CME spatial occurrences, here we investigate the morphological properties of active regions. The first morphological property studied is the separateness parameter, which is able to characterize the probability of the occurrence of an energetic event, such as a solar flare or CME. The second morphological property is the sunspot tilt angle. The tilt angle of sunspot groups allows us to estimate the helicity of active regions. The increased helicity leads to a more complex buildup of the magnetic structure and also can cause CME eruption. We found that the most complex active regions appear near the AL and that the AL itself is associated with the most tilted active regions. Therefore, the number of CME occurrences is higher within the AL. The origin of the fast CMEs is also found to be associated with this region. We concluded that the source of the most probably CME-capable active regions is at the AL. By applying this method, we can potentially forecast a flare and/or CME source several Carrington rotations in advance. This finding also provides new information for solar dynamo modeling.

  2. Active Longitude and Coronal Mass Ejection Occurrences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyenge, N.; Singh, T.; Kiss, T. S.; Srivastava, A. K.; Erdélyi, R.

    2017-03-01

    The spatial inhomogeneity of the distribution of coronal mass ejection (CME) occurrences in the solar atmosphere could provide a tool to estimate the longitudinal position of the most probable CME-capable active regions in the Sun. The anomaly in the longitudinal distribution of active regions themselves is often referred to as active longitude (AL). In order to reveal the connection between the AL and CME spatial occurrences, here we investigate the morphological properties of active regions. The first morphological property studied is the separateness parameter, which is able to characterize the probability of the occurrence of an energetic event, such as a solar flare or CME. The second morphological property is the sunspot tilt angle. The tilt angle of sunspot groups allows us to estimate the helicity of active regions. The increased helicity leads to a more complex buildup of the magnetic structure and also can cause CME eruption. We found that the most complex active regions appear near the AL and that the AL itself is associated with the most tilted active regions. Therefore, the number of CME occurrences is higher within the AL. The origin of the fast CMEs is also found to be associated with this region. We concluded that the source of the most probably CME-capable active regions is at the AL. By applying this method, we can potentially forecast a flare and/or CME source several Carrington rotations in advance. This finding also provides new information for solar dynamo modeling.

  3. Solar origins of coronal mass ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahler, Stephen

    1987-01-01

    The large scale properties of coronal mass ejections (CMEs), such as morphology, leading edge speed, and angular width and position, have been cataloged for many events observed with coronagraphs on the Skylab, P-78, and SMM spacecraft. While considerable study has been devoted to the characteristics of the SMEs, their solar origins are still only poorly understood. Recent observational work has involved statistical associations of CMEs with flares and filament eruptions, and some evidence exists that the flare and eruptive-filament associated CMEs define two classes of events, with the former being generally more energetic. Nevertheless, it is found that eruptive-filament CMEs can at times be very energetic, giving rise to interplanetary shocks and energetic particle events. The size of the impulsive phase in a flare-associated CME seems to play no significant role in the size or speed of the CME, but the angular sizes of CMEs may correlate with the scale sizes of the 1-8 angstrom x-ray flares. At the present time, He 10830 angstrom observations should be useful in studying the late development of double-ribbon flares and transient coronal holes to yield insights into the CME aftermath. The recently available white-light synoptic maps may also prove fruitful in defining the coronal conditions giving rise to CMEs.

  4. ANATOMY OF DEPLETED INTERPLANETARY CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kocher, M.; Lepri, S. T.; Landi, E.; Zhao, L.; Manchester, W. B. IV, E-mail: mkocher@umich.edu [Department of Climate and Space Sciences and Engineering, University of Michigan, 2455 Hayward Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2143 (United States)

    2017-01-10

    We report a subset of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) containing distinct periods of anomalous heavy-ion charge state composition and peculiar ion thermal properties measured by ACE /SWICS from 1998 to 2011. We label them “depleted ICMEs,” identified by the presence of intervals where C{sup 6+}/C{sup 5+} and O{sup 7+}/O{sup 6+} depart from the direct correlation expected after their freeze-in heights. These anomalous intervals within the depleted ICMEs are referred to as “Depletion Regions.” We find that a depleted ICME would be indistinguishable from all other ICMEs in the absence of the Depletion Region, which has the defining property of significantly low abundances of fully charged species of helium, carbon, oxygen, and nitrogen. Similar anomalies in the slow solar wind were discussed by Zhao et al. We explore two possibilities for the source of the Depletion Region associated with magnetic reconnection in the tail of a CME, using CME simulations of the evolution of two Earth-bound CMEs described by Manchester et al.

  5. EIT Observations of Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurman, J. B.; Fisher, Richard B. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Before the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO), we had only the sketchiest of clues as to the nature and topology of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) below 1.1 - 1.2 solar radii. Occasionally, dimmings (or 'transient coronal holes') were observed in time series of soft X-ray images, but they were far less frequent than CME's. Simply by imaging the Sun frequently and continually at temperatures of 0.9 - 2.5 MK we have stumbled upon a zoo of CME phenomena in this previously obscured volume of the corona: (1) waves, (2) dimmings, and (3) a great variety of ejecta. In the three and a half years since our first observations of coronal waves associated with CME's, combined Large Angle Spectroscopic Coronagraph (LASCO) and extreme ultra-violet imaging telescope (EIT) synoptic observations have become a standard prediction tool for space weather forecasters, but our progress in actually understanding the CME phenomenon in the low corona has been somewhat slower. I will summarize the observations of waves, hot (> 0.9 MK) and cool ejecta, and some of the interpretations advanced to date. I will try to identify those phenomena, analysis of which could most benefit from the spectroscopic information available from ultraviolet coronograph spectrometer (UVCS) observations.

  6. In-situ determination of the mechanical properties of gliding or non-motile bacteria by atomic force microscopy under physiological conditions without immobilization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samia Dhahri

    Full Text Available We present a study about AFM imaging of living, moving or self-immobilized bacteria in their genuine physiological liquid medium. No external immobilization protocol, neither chemical nor mechanical, was needed. For the first time, the native gliding movements of Gram-negative Nostoc cyanobacteria upon the surface, at speeds up to 900 µm/h, were studied by AFM. This was possible thanks to an improved combination of a gentle sample preparation process and an AFM procedure based on fast and complete force-distance curves made at every pixel, drastically reducing lateral forces. No limitation in spatial resolution or imaging rate was detected. Gram-positive and non-motile Rhodococcus wratislaviensis bacteria were studied as well. From the approach curves, Young modulus and turgor pressure were measured for both strains at different gliding speeds and are ranging from 20±3 to 105±5 MPa and 40±5 to 310±30 kPa depending on the bacterium and the gliding speed. For Nostoc, spatially limited zones with higher values of stiffness were observed. The related spatial period is much higher than the mean length of Nostoc nodules. This was explained by an inhomogeneous mechanical activation of nodules in the cyanobacterium. We also observed the presence of a soft extra cellular matrix (ECM around the Nostoc bacterium. Both strains left a track of polymeric slime with variable thicknesses. For Rhodococcus, it is equal to few hundreds of nanometers, likely to promote its adhesion to the sample. While gliding, the Nostoc secretes a slime layer the thickness of which is in the nanometer range and increases with the gliding speed. This result reinforces the hypothesis of a propulsion mechanism based, for Nostoc cyanobacteria, on ejection of slime. These results open a large window on new studies of both dynamical phenomena of practical and fundamental interests such as the formation of biofilms and dynamic properties of bacteria in real physiological conditions.

  7. In-Situ Determination of the Mechanical Properties of Gliding or Non-Motile Bacteria by Atomic Force Microscopy under Physiological Conditions without Immobilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhahri, Samia; Ramonda, Michel; Marlière, Christian

    2013-01-01

    We present a study about AFM imaging of living, moving or self-immobilized bacteria in their genuine physiological liquid medium. No external immobilization protocol, neither chemical nor mechanical, was needed. For the first time, the native gliding movements of Gram-negative Nostoc cyanobacteria upon the surface, at speeds up to 900 µm/h, were studied by AFM. This was possible thanks to an improved combination of a gentle sample preparation process and an AFM procedure based on fast and complete force-distance curves made at every pixel, drastically reducing lateral forces. No limitation in spatial resolution or imaging rate was detected. Gram-positive and non-motile Rhodococcus wratislaviensis bacteria were studied as well. From the approach curves, Young modulus and turgor pressure were measured for both strains at different gliding speeds and are ranging from 20±3 to 105±5 MPa and 40±5 to 310±30 kPa depending on the bacterium and the gliding speed. For Nostoc, spatially limited zones with higher values of stiffness were observed. The related spatial period is much higher than the mean length of Nostoc nodules. This was explained by an inhomogeneous mechanical activation of nodules in the cyanobacterium. We also observed the presence of a soft extra cellular matrix (ECM) around the Nostoc bacterium. Both strains left a track of polymeric slime with variable thicknesses. For Rhodococcus, it is equal to few hundreds of nanometers, likely to promote its adhesion to the sample. While gliding, the Nostoc secretes a slime layer the thickness of which is in the nanometer range and increases with the gliding speed. This result reinforces the hypothesis of a propulsion mechanism based, for Nostoc cyanobacteria, on ejection of slime. These results open a large window on new studies of both dynamical phenomena of practical and fundamental interests such as the formation of biofilms and dynamic properties of bacteria in real physiological conditions. PMID:23593493

  8. Enhancement of gravimetric forced flow through system to determine sorption, swelling, and mass transfer characteristics of liquid sorbents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dresp, G.; Petermann, M.; Fieback, T. M.

    2018-04-01

    An existing apparatus for forced flow through of liquid sorbents has been enhanced with an optically accessible system including a transparent crucible, high pressure viewing cell, and camera. With this optical system, the active surface area between gas and liquid can be determined in situ for the first time under industrial process conditions while maintaining the accuracy of a magnetic suspension balance. Additionally, occurring swelling and the resulting buoyancy changes can now be corrected, further improving the quality of the data. Validation measurements focusing on the sorption isotherms, swelling, and bubble geometry of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate with nitrogen at 303 K and up to 17 MPa, as well as with carbon dioxide at 303 K, 323 K, and 373 K at up to 3.5 MPa were completed. Absorption of nitrogen resulted in no observable volume change, whereas absorption of carbon dioxide resulted in temperature independent swelling of up to 9.8%. The gas bubble's structure and behavior during its ascend through the liquid was optically tracked in situ. Combining these two data sets with the absorption kinetics forms the basis to determine the measuring system independent mass transfer coefficients, which are applicable in other laboratory scale and industrial processes.

  9. Evidence linking coronal mass ejections with interplanetary magnetic clouds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, R.M.; Hildner, E.

    1983-12-01

    Using proxy data for the occurrence of those mass ejections from the solar corona which are directed earthward, we investigate the association between the post-1970 interplanetary magnetic clouds of Klein and Burlaga and coronal mass ejections. The evidence linking magnetic clouds following shocks with coronal mass ejections is striking. Six of nine clouds observed at Earth were preceded an appropriate time earlier by meter-wave type II radio bursts indicative of coronal shock waves and coronal mass ejections occurring near central meridian. During the selected periods when no clouds were detected near Earth, the only type II bursts reported were associated with solar activity near the limbs. Where the proxy solar data to be sought are not so clearly suggested, that is, for clouds preceding interaction regions and clouds within cold magnetic enhancements, the evidence linking the clouds and coronal mass ejections is not as clear proxy data usually suggest many candidate mass-ejection events for each cloud. Overall, the data are consistent with and support the hypothesis suggested by Klein and Burlaga that magnetic clouds observed with spacecraft at 1 AU are manifestations of solar coronal mass ejection transients

  10. Orbital evolution of a test particle around a black hole: indirect determination of the self-force in the post-Newtonian approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burko, Lior M

    2006-01-01

    Comparing the corrections to Kepler's law with orbital evolution under a self-force, we extract the finite, already regularized part of the latter in a specific gauge. We apply this method to a quasi-circular orbit around a Schwarzschild black hole of an extreme mass ratio binary, and determine the first- and second-order conservative gravitational self-force in a post-Newtonian expansion. We use these results in the construction of the gravitational waveform, and revisit the question of the relative contribution of the self-force and spin-orbit coupling

  11. Magazine Influence on Cartridge Case Ejection Patterns with Glock Pistols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerkhoff, Wim; Alberink, Ivo; Mattijssen, Erwin J A T

    2018-01-01

    In this study, the cartridge case ejection patterns of six different Glock model pistols (one specimen per model) were compared under three conditions: firing with a loaded magazine, an empty magazine, and without magazine. The distances, covered by the ejected cartridge cases given these three conditions, were compared for each of the six models. A significant difference was found between the groups of data for each of the tested specimens. This indicates that it is important that, to reconstruct a shooting scene incident based on the ejection patterns of a pistol, test shots are fired with the same pistol type and under the correct magazine condition. © 2017 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  12. Coronal mass ejections and solar radio bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kundu, M.R.

    1990-01-01

    The properties of coronal mass ejection (CME) events and their radio signatures are discussed. These signatures are mostly in the form of type II and type IV burst emissions. Although type II bursts are temporally associated with CMEs, it is shown that there is no spatial relationship between them. Type II's associated with CMEs have in most cases a different origin, and they are not piston-driven by CMEs. Moving type IV and type II bursts can be associated with slow CMEs with speeds as low as 200 km/s, contrary to the earlier belief that only CMEs with speeds >400 km/s are associated with radio bursts. A specific event has been discussed in which the CME and type IV burst has nearly the same speed and direction, but the type II burst location was behind the CME and its motion was transverse. The speed and motion of the type II burst strongly suggest that the type II shock was decoupled from the CME and was probably due to a flare behind the limb. Therefore only the type IV source could be directly associated with the slow CME. The electrons responsble for the type IV emission could be produced in the flare or in the type II and then become trapped in a plasmoid associated with the CME. The reconnected loop could then move outwards as in the usual palsmoid model. Alternatively, the type IV emission could be interpreted as due to electrons produced by acceleration in wave turbulence driven by currents in the shock front driven by the CME. The lower-hybrid model Lampe and Papadopoulos (1982), which operates at both fast and slow mode shocks, could be applied to this situation. (author). 31 refs., 12 figs

  13. Relationship between cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction and cloud albedo, and new surface-based approach for determining cloud albedo

    OpenAIRE

    Y. Liu; W. Wu; M. P. Jensen; T. Toto

    2011-01-01

    This paper focuses on three interconnected topics: (1) quantitative relationship between surface shortwave cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction, and cloud albedo; (2) surfaced-based approach for measuring cloud albedo; (3) multiscale (diurnal, annual and inter-annual) variations and covariations of surface shortwave cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction, and cloud albedo. An analytical expression is first derived to quantify the relationship between cloud radiative forcing, cloud fractio...

  14. MAGNETIC FIELD STRUCTURES TRIGGERING SOLAR FLARES AND CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusano, K.; Bamba, Y.; Yamamoto, T. T.; Iida, Y.; Toriumi, S.; Asai, A.

    2012-01-01

    Solar flares and coronal mass ejections, the most catastrophic eruptions in our solar system, have been known to affect terrestrial environments and infrastructure. However, because their triggering mechanism is still not sufficiently understood, our capacity to predict the occurrence of solar eruptions and to forecast space weather is substantially hindered. Even though various models have been proposed to determine the onset of solar eruptions, the types of magnetic structures capable of triggering these eruptions are still unclear. In this study, we solved this problem by systematically surveying the nonlinear dynamics caused by a wide variety of magnetic structures in terms of three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations. As a result, we determined that two different types of small magnetic structures favor the onset of solar eruptions. These structures, which should appear near the magnetic polarity inversion line (PIL), include magnetic fluxes reversed to the potential component or the nonpotential component of major field on the PIL. In addition, we analyzed two large flares, the X-class flare on 2006 December 13 and the M-class flare on 2011 February 13, using imaging data provided by the Hinode satellite, and we demonstrated that they conform to the simulation predictions. These results suggest that forecasting of solar eruptions is possible with sophisticated observation of a solar magnetic field, although the lead time must be limited by the timescale of changes in the small magnetic structures.

  15. A miniaturized, high frequency mechanical scanner for high speed atomic force microscope using suspension on dynamically determined points

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herfst, Rodolf; Dekker, Bert; Witvoet, Gert; Crowcombe, Will; Lange, Dorus de [Department of Optomechatronics, Netherlands Organization for Applied Scientific Research, TNO, Delft (Netherlands); Sadeghian, Hamed, E-mail: hamed.sadeghianmarnani@tno.nl, E-mail: h.sadeghianmarnani@tudelft.nl [Department of Optomechatronics, Netherlands Organization for Applied Scientific Research, TNO, Delft (Netherlands); Department of Precision and Microsystems Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands)

    2015-11-15

    One of the major limitations in the speed of the atomic force microscope (AFM) is the bandwidth of the mechanical scanning stage, especially in the vertical (z) direction. According to the design principles of “light and stiff” and “static determinacy,” the bandwidth of the mechanical scanner is limited by the first eigenfrequency of the AFM head in case of tip scanning and by the sample stage in terms of sample scanning. Due to stringent requirements of the system, simply pushing the first eigenfrequency to an ever higher value has reached its limitation. We have developed a miniaturized, high speed AFM scanner in which the dynamics of the z-scanning stage are made insensitive to its surrounding dynamics via suspension of it on specific dynamically determined points. This resulted in a mechanical bandwidth as high as that of the z-actuator (50 kHz) while remaining insensitive to the dynamics of its base and surroundings. The scanner allows a practical z scan range of 2.1 μm. We have demonstrated the applicability of the scanner to the high speed scanning of nanostructures.

  16. Anti-ejection system for control rod drives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthews, J.C.

    1977-01-01

    A linearly movable latch mechanism is provided to move into engagement with a deformable collet whenever an undesired ejection of a leadscrew is initiated from a nuclear reactor mounted control rod drive. Such an undesired ejection would occur in the event of a rupture in a housing of the control rod drive. The collet is deformed by the linear movement of the latch mechanism to wedge itself against the leadscrew and prevent the ejection of the leadscrew from the housing. The latch mechanism is made to be controllably engageable with the leadscrew and when thus engaged to allow the leadscrew to move in a control direction while moving with the leadscrew to engage and deform the collet when the leadscrew moves in an ejection direction. 13 claims, 2 figures

  17. Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Elastography in Determining the Effects of Type 1 Diabetes on Pancreas and Kidney Elasticity in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sağlam, Dilek; Bilgici, Meltem Ceyhan; Kara, Cengiz; Yılmaz, Gülay Can; Çamlıdağ, İlkay

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the effects of type 1 diabetes on pancreas and kidney elasticity in children, using acoustic radiation force impulse ultrasound elastography. Sixty autoantibody-positive patients with type 1 diabetes (45% girls; mean [± SD] age, 11.7 ± 4.4 years; range, 1.9-19.3 years) admitted to the pediatric endocrinology outpatient clinic and 32 healthy children (50% girls; mean age, 10.2 ± 3.8 years; range, 2.1-17.3 years) were included in the study. Acoustic radiation force impulse elastography measurements were performed of the kidneys and pancreas in both groups. Body mass index, duration of diabetes, HbA1c levels, and insulin dosage of patients with type 1 diabetes were recorded. The mean shear-wave velocities of the pancreas were 0.99 ± 0.25 m/s in patients with type 1 diabetes and 1.09 ± 0.22 m/s in healthy control subjects; the difference was not significant (p = 0.08). The median shear-wave velocities of the right and left kidneys in patients with type 1 diabetes were 2.43 ± 0.29 and 2.47 ± 0.25 m/s, respectively. There were no significant differences in the shear-wave velocities of the right and left kidneys between the patients with type 1 diabetes and the healthy control subjects (p = 0.91 and p = 0.73, respectively). Correlation analysis showed no correlation between the shear-wave velocities of the pancreas and kidney versus HbA1c level, duration of diabetes, insulin dosage, height, weight, and body mass index of the patients with type 1 diabetes. The current study showed no significant difference in the shear-wave velocity of kidneys in children with type 1 diabetes with normoalbuminuria compared with the healthy control subjects. We also observed that the shear-wave velocity of the pancreas in children with type 1 diabetes and healthy control subjects did not differ significantly.

  18. Reconstructing the Morphology of an Evolving Coronal Mass Ejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    694, 707 Wood, B. E., Howard, R. A ., Thernisien, A ., Plunkett, S. P., & Socker, D. G. 2009b, Sol. Phys., 259, 163 Wood, B. E., Karovska , M., Chen, J...Reconstructing the Morphology of an Evolving Coronal Mass Ejection B. E. Wood, R. A . Howard, D. G. Socker Naval Research Laboratory, Space Science...mission, we empirically reconstruct the time-dependent three-dimensional morphology of a coronal mass ejection (CME) from 2008 June 1, which exhibits

  19. Jet behaviors and ejection mode recognition of electrohydrodynamic direct-write

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jianyi; Zhang, Kai; Jiang, Jiaxin; Wang, Xiang; Li, Wenwang; Liu, Yifang; Liu, Juan; Zheng, Gaofeng

    2018-01-01

    By introducing image recognition and micro-current testing, jet behavior research was conducted, in which the real-time recognition of ejection mode was realized. To study the factors influencing ejection modes and the current variation trends under different modes, an Electrohydrodynamic Direct-Write (EDW) system with functions of current detection and ejection mode recognition was firstly built. Then a program was developed to recognize the jet modes. As the voltage applied to the metal tip increased, four jet ejection modes in EDW occurred: droplet ejection mode, Taylor cone ejection mode, retractive ejection mode and forked ejection mode. In this work, the corresponding relationship between the ejection modes and the effect on fiber deposition as well as current was studied. The real-time identification of ejection mode and detection of electrospinning current was realized. The results in this paper are contributed to enhancing the ejection stability, providing a good technical basis to produce continuous uniform nanofibers controllably.

  20. Chromospheric Plasma Ejections in a Light Bridge of a Sunspot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Donguk; Chae, Jongchul; Yurchyshyn, Vasyl; Lim, Eun-Kyung; Cho, Kyung-Suk; Yang, Heesu; Cho, Kyuhyoun; Kwak, Hannah

    2017-02-01

    It is well-known that light bridges (LBs) inside a sunspot produce small-scale plasma ejections and transient brightenings in the chromosphere, but the nature and origin of such phenomena are still unclear. Utilizing the high-spatial and high-temporal resolution spectral data taken with the Fast Imaging Solar Spectrograph and the TiO 7057 Å broadband filter images installed at the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope of Big Bear Solar Observatory, we report arcsecond-scale chromospheric plasma ejections (1.″7) inside a LB. Interestingly, the ejections are found to be a manifestation of upwardly propagating shock waves as evidenced by the sawtooth patterns seen in the temporal-spectral plots of the Ca II 8542 Å and Hα intensities. We also found a fine-scale photospheric pattern (1″) diverging with a speed of about 2 km s-1 two minutes before the plasma ejections, which seems to be a manifestation of magnetic flux emergence. As a response to the plasma ejections, the corona displayed small-scale transient brightenings. Based on our findings, we suggest that the shock waves can be excited by the local disturbance caused by magnetic reconnection between the emerging flux inside the LB and the adjacent umbral magnetic field. The disturbance generates slow-mode waves, which soon develop into shock waves, and manifest themselves as the arcsecond-scale plasma ejections. It also appears that the dissipation of mechanical energy in the shock waves can heat the local corona.

  1. Mass ejection in failed supernovae: variation with stellar progenitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Rodrigo; Quataert, Eliot; Kashiyama, Kazumi; Coughlin, Eric R.

    2018-05-01

    We study the ejection of mass during stellar core-collapse when the stalled shock does not revive and a black hole forms. Neutrino emission during the protoneutron star phase causes a decrease in the gravitational mass of the core, resulting in an outward going sound pulse that steepens into a shock as it travels out through the star. We explore the properties of this mass ejection mechanism over a range of stellar progenitors using spherically symmetric, time-dependent hydrodynamic simulations that treat neutrino mass-loss parametrically and follow the shock propagation over the entire star. We find that all types of stellar progenitor can eject mass through this mechanism. The ejected mass is a decreasing function of the surface gravity of the star, ranging from several M⊙ for red supergiants to ˜0.1 M⊙ for blue supergiants and ˜10-3 M⊙ for Wolf-Rayet stars. We find that the final shock energy at the surface is a decreasing function of the core-compactness, and is ≲ 1047-1048 erg in all cases. In progenitors with a sufficiently large envelope, high core-compactness, or a combination of both, the sound pulse fails to unbind mass. Successful mass ejection is accompanied by significant fallback accretion that can last from hours to years. We predict the properties of shock breakout and thermal plateau emission produced by the ejection of the outer envelope of blue supergiant and Wolf-Rayet progenitors in otherwise failed supernovae.

  2. INTERCOMPARISON OF RESULTS FOR A PWR ROD EJECTION ACCIDENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DIAMOND,D.J.; ARONSON,A.; JO,J.; AVVAKUMOV,A.; MALOFEEV,V.; SIDOROV,V.; FERRARESI,P.; GOUIN,C.; ANIEL,S.; ROYER,M.E.

    1999-10-01

    This study is part of an overall program to understand the uncertainty in best-estimate calculations of the local fuel enthalpy during the rod ejection accident. Local fuel enthalpy is used as the acceptance criterion for this design-basis event and can also be used to estimate fuel damage for the purpose of determining radiological consequences. The study used results from neutron kinetics models in PARCS, BARS, and CRONOS2, codes developed in the US, the Russian Federation, and France, respectively. Since BARS uses a heterogeneous representation of the fuel assembly as opposed to the homogeneous representations in PARCS and CRONOS, the effect of the intercomparison was primarily to compare different intra-assembly models. Quantitative comparisons for core power, reactivity, assembly fuel enthalpy and pin power were carried out. In general the agreement between methods was very good providing additional confidence in the codes and providing a starting point for a quantitative assessment of the uncertainty in calculated fuel enthalpy using best-estimate methods.

  3. Scaling law to determine peak forces in tapping-mode AFM experiments on finite elastic soft matter systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman, Horacio V

    2017-01-01

    Analytical equations to estimate the peak force will facilitate the interpretation and the planning of amplitude-modulation force microscopy (tapping mode) experiments. A closed-form analytical equation to estimate the tip-sample peak forces while imaging soft materials in liquid environment and within an elastic deformation regime has been deduced. We have combined a multivariate regression method with input from the virial-dissipation equations and Tatara's bidimensional deformation contact mechanics model. The equation enables to estimate the peak force based on the tapping mode observables, probe characteristics and the material properties of the sample. The accuracy of the equation has been verified by comparing it to numerical simulations for the archetypical operating conditions to image soft matter with high spatial resolution in tapping-mode AFM.

  4. [The geometry of the keel determines the behaviour of the tibial tray against torsional forces in total knee replacement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García David, S; Cortijo Martínez, J A; Navarro Bermúdez, I; Maculé, F; Hinarejos, P; Puig-Verdié, L; Monllau, J C; Hernández Hermoso, J A

    2014-01-01

    The keel design of the tibial tray is essential for the transmission of the majority of the forces to the peripheral bone structures, which have better mechanical proprieties, thus reducing the risk of loosening. The aim of the present study was to compare the behaviour of different tibial tray designs submitted to torsional forces. Four different tibial components were modelled. The 3-D reconstruction was made using the Mimics software. The solid elements were generated by SolidWorks. The finite elements study was done by Unigraphics. A torsional force of 6 Nm. applied to the lateral aspects of each tibial tray was simulated. The GENUTECH® tibial tray, with peripheral trabecular bone support, showed a lower displacement and less transmitted tensions under torsional forces. The results suggest that a tibial tray with more peripheral support behaves mechanically better than the other studied designs. Copyright © 2013 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  5. Characterizing the original ejection velocity field of the Koronis family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carruba, V.; Nesvorný, D.; Aljbaae, S.

    2016-06-01

    An asteroid family forms as a result of a collision between an impactor and a parent body. The fragments with ejection speeds higher than the escape velocity from the parent body can escape its gravitational pull. The cloud of escaping debris can be identified by the proximity of orbits in proper element, or frequency, domains. Obtaining estimates of the original ejection speed can provide valuable constraints on the physical processes occurring during collision, and used to calibrate impact simulations. Unfortunately, proper elements of asteroids families are modified by gravitational and non-gravitational effects, such as resonant dynamics, encounters with massive bodies, and the Yarkovsky effect, such that information on the original ejection speeds is often lost, especially for older, more evolved families. It has been recently suggested that the distribution in proper inclination of the Koronis family may have not been significantly perturbed by local dynamics, and that information on the component of the ejection velocity that is perpendicular to the orbital plane (vW), may still be available, at least in part. In this work we estimate the magnitude of the original ejection velocity speeds of Koronis members using the observed distribution in proper eccentricity and inclination, and accounting for the spread caused by dynamical effects. Our results show that (i) the spread in the original ejection speeds is, to within a 15% error, inversely proportional to the fragment size, and (ii) the minimum ejection velocity is of the order of 50 m/s, with larger values possible depending on the orbital configuration at the break-up.

  6. Rheumatic patients at work : a study of labour force participations and its determinants in rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and juvenile chronic arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chorus, A.M.J.

    2004-01-01

    This thesis at the University of Maastricht, defended at May 7, 2004, yields several important and new findings with regard to work related quality of life, participation in the labour force and its determinants of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and juvenile

  7. Measurement and comparison of left ventricular ejection fraction utilizing first transit and gated scintiangiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fletcher, J.W.; Herbig, F.K.; Daly, J.L.; Walter, K.E.

    1975-01-01

    Paired serial radionuclide scans were used for determinations of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) in open chest dogs with constant cardiac output and varying ventricular rates following the left atrial injection of 99m-Tc human serum albumin. Values of LVEF obtained by first transit (high frequency) data analysis and ECG-gated scintiphotography were obtained over a wide range of ventricular rate and stroke volume. The results of this study show no significant difference in LVEF as determined by both of these methods of data acquisition and analysis and demonstrate the feasibility of rapid serial determination of LVEF by radioisotope techniques

  8. Two-Stage Dynamics of In Vivo Bacteriophage Genome Ejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Ju; Wu, David; Gelbart, William; Knobler, Charles M.; Phillips, Rob; Kegel, Willem K.

    2018-04-01

    Biopolymer translocation is a key step in viral infection processes. The transfer of information-encoding genomes allows viruses to reprogram the cell fate of their hosts. Constituting 96% of all known bacterial viruses [A. Fokine and M. G. Rossmann, Molecular architecture of tailed double-stranded DNA phages, Bacteriophage 4, e28281 (2014)], the tailed bacteriophages deliver their DNA into host cells via an "ejection" process, leaving their protein shells outside of the bacteria; a similar scenario occurs for mammalian viruses like herpes, where the DNA genome is ejected into the nucleus of host cells, while the viral capsid remains bound outside to a nuclear-pore complex. In light of previous experimental measurements of in vivo bacteriophage λ ejection, we analyze here the physical processes that give rise to the observed dynamics. We propose that, after an initial phase driven by self-repulsion of DNA in the capsid, the ejection is driven by anomalous diffusion of phage DNA in the crowded bacterial cytoplasm. We expect that this two-step mechanism is general for phages that operate by pressure-driven ejection, and we discuss predictions of our theory to be tested in future experiments.

  9. Right heart ejection fraction, ventricular volumes, and left to right cardiac shunt measurements with a conventional Anger camera in congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, S.A.; Go, R.T.; MacIntyre, W.J.; Moodie, D.S.; Houser, T.S.; Ceimo, J.; Underwood, D.; Yiannikas, J.

    1982-01-01

    The object of this investigation was to demonstrate that a conventional Anger camera can be used for measurement of right heart ejection fraction, ventricular volumes and left to right shunts in routine clinical determinations. The automatic selection of chamber and lung regions, the recirculation subtraction of recirculation, and the filtering of the right heart ejection fraction dilution curves are all done entirely without operator intervention. Thus, this entire evaluation has been incorporated into the routine procedures of patient care

  10. Predicting Coronal Mass Ejections Using Machine Learning Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobra, M. G.; Ilonidis, S.

    2016-04-01

    Of all the activity observed on the Sun, two of the most energetic events are flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Usually, solar active regions that produce large flares will also produce a CME, but this is not always true. Despite advances in numerical modeling, it is still unclear which circumstances will produce a CME. Therefore, it is worthwhile to empirically determine which features distinguish flares associated with CMEs from flares that are not. At this time, no extensive study has used physically meaningful features of active regions to distinguish between these two populations. As such, we attempt to do so by using features derived from (1) photospheric vector magnetic field data taken by the Solar Dynamics Observatory’s Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager instrument and (2) X-ray flux data from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite’s X-ray Flux instrument. We build a catalog of active regions that either produced both a flare and a CME (the positive class) or simply a flare (the negative class). We then use machine-learning algorithms to (1) determine which features distinguish these two populations, and (2) forecast whether an active region that produces an M- or X-class flare will also produce a CME. We compute the True Skill Statistic, a forecast verification metric, and find that it is a relatively high value of ∼0.8 ± 0.2. We conclude that a combination of six parameters, which are all intensive in nature, will capture most of the relevant information contained in the photospheric magnetic field.

  11. PREDICTING CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS USING MACHINE LEARNING METHODS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bobra, M. G.; Ilonidis, S. [W.W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2016-04-20

    Of all the activity observed on the Sun, two of the most energetic events are flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Usually, solar active regions that produce large flares will also produce a CME, but this is not always true. Despite advances in numerical modeling, it is still unclear which circumstances will produce a CME. Therefore, it is worthwhile to empirically determine which features distinguish flares associated with CMEs from flares that are not. At this time, no extensive study has used physically meaningful features of active regions to distinguish between these two populations. As such, we attempt to do so by using features derived from (1) photospheric vector magnetic field data taken by the Solar Dynamics Observatory ’s Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager instrument and (2) X-ray flux data from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite’s X-ray Flux instrument. We build a catalog of active regions that either produced both a flare and a CME (the positive class) or simply a flare (the negative class). We then use machine-learning algorithms to (1) determine which features distinguish these two populations, and (2) forecast whether an active region that produces an M- or X-class flare will also produce a CME. We compute the True Skill Statistic, a forecast verification metric, and find that it is a relatively high value of ∼0.8 ± 0.2. We conclude that a combination of six parameters, which are all intensive in nature, will capture most of the relevant information contained in the photospheric magnetic field.

  12. B-Type Natriuretic Peptide and Prognosis in Heart Failure Patients With Preserved and Reduced Ejection Fraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Linssen, Gerard C. M.; Jaarsma, Tiny; van Gilst, Wiek H.; Hoes, Arno W.; Tijssen, Jan G. P.; Paulus, Walter J.; Voors, Adriaan A.; Hillege, Hans L.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives This study sought to determine the prognostic value of B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) in patients with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFPEF), in comparison to data in HF patients with reduced left ventricular (LV) EF ( Background Management of patients with HFPEF is

  13. CMR reference values for left ventricular volumes, mass, and ejection fraction using computer-aided analysis : The Framingham Heart Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chuang, Michael L.; Gona, Philimon; Hautvast, Gilion L.T.F.; Salton, Carol J.; Breeuwer, Marcel; O'Donnell, Christopher J.; Manning, Warren J.

    Purpose To determine sex-specific reference values for left ventricular (LV) volumes, mass, and ejection fraction (EF) in healthy adults using computer-aided analysis and to examine the effect of age on LV parameters. Materials and Methods We examined data from 1494 members of the Framingham Heart

  14. INFLUENCE OF THE AMBIENT SOLAR WIND FLOW ON THE PROPAGATION BEHAVIOR OF INTERPLANETARY CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Temmer, Manuela; Rollett, Tanja; Moestl, Christian; Veronig, Astrid M. [Kanzelhoehe Observatory-IGAM, Institute of Physics, University of Graz, Universitaetsplatz 5, A-8010 Graz (Austria); Vrsnak, Bojan [Hvar Observatory, Faculty of Geodesy, University of Zagreb, Kaciceva 26, HR-10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Odstrcil, Dusan [Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2011-12-20

    We study three coronal mass ejection (CME)/interplanetary coronal mass ejection (ICME) events (2008 June 1-6, 2009 February 13-18, and 2010 April 3-5) tracked from Sun to 1 AU in remote-sensing observations of Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory Heliospheric Imagers and in situ plasma and magnetic field measurements. We focus on the ICME propagation in interplanetary (IP) space that is governed by two forces: the propelling Lorentz force and the drag force. We address the question: which heliospheric distance range does the drag become dominant and the CME adjust to the solar wind flow. To this end, we analyze speed differences between ICMEs and the ambient solar wind flow as a function of distance. The evolution of the ambient solar wind flow is derived from ENLIL three-dimensional MHD model runs using different solar wind models, namely, Wang-Sheeley-Arge and MHD-Around-A-Sphere. Comparing the measured CME kinematics with the solar wind models, we find that the CME speed becomes adjusted to the solar wind speed at very different heliospheric distances in the three events under study: from below 30 R{sub Sun }, to beyond 1 AU, depending on the CME and ambient solar wind characteristics. ENLIL can be used to derive important information about the overall structure of the background solar wind, providing more reliable results during times of low solar activity than during times of high solar activity. The results from this study enable us to obtain greater insight into the forces acting on CMEs over the IP space distance range, which is an important prerequisite for predicting their 1 AU transit times.

  15. INFLUENCE OF THE AMBIENT SOLAR WIND FLOW ON THE PROPAGATION BEHAVIOR OF INTERPLANETARY CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Temmer, Manuela; Rollett, Tanja; Möstl, Christian; Veronig, Astrid M.; Vršnak, Bojan; Odstrčil, Dusan

    2011-01-01

    We study three coronal mass ejection (CME)/interplanetary coronal mass ejection (ICME) events (2008 June 1-6, 2009 February 13-18, and 2010 April 3-5) tracked from Sun to 1 AU in remote-sensing observations of Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory Heliospheric Imagers and in situ plasma and magnetic field measurements. We focus on the ICME propagation in interplanetary (IP) space that is governed by two forces: the propelling Lorentz force and the drag force. We address the question: which heliospheric distance range does the drag become dominant and the CME adjust to the solar wind flow. To this end, we analyze speed differences between ICMEs and the ambient solar wind flow as a function of distance. The evolution of the ambient solar wind flow is derived from ENLIL three-dimensional MHD model runs using different solar wind models, namely, Wang-Sheeley-Arge and MHD-Around-A-Sphere. Comparing the measured CME kinematics with the solar wind models, we find that the CME speed becomes adjusted to the solar wind speed at very different heliospheric distances in the three events under study: from below 30 R ☉ , to beyond 1 AU, depending on the CME and ambient solar wind characteristics. ENLIL can be used to derive important information about the overall structure of the background solar wind, providing more reliable results during times of low solar activity than during times of high solar activity. The results from this study enable us to obtain greater insight into the forces acting on CMEs over the IP space distance range, which is an important prerequisite for predicting their 1 AU transit times.

  16. Determinants and magnitudes of manual force strengths and joint moments during two-handed standing maximal horizontal pushing and pulling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Amy Y; Dickerson, Clark R

    2016-04-01

    Pushing and pulling are common occupational exertions that are increasingly associated with musculoskeletal complaints. This study focuses on the sensitivity of shoulder capacity to gender, handle height, exertion type (push or pull) and handle orientation for these tasks. All factors except for handle orientation influenced unilateral and total manual force strength (p pushing and pulling tasks for a diverse population. Practitioner Summary: pushing and pulling comprise nearly half of all manual materials handling tasks. Practitioners often assess, design or modify these tasks while incorporating constraints, including manual force direction and handle interface. This study provides guidance to aid design of pushing and pulling tasks in the context of shoulder physical capacity.

  17. Determination of the friction coefficient via the force autocorrelation function. A molecular dynamics investigation for a dense Lennard-Jones fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogelsang, R.; Hoheisel, C.

    1987-01-01

    For a large region of dense fluid states of a Lennard-Jones system, they have calculated the friction coefficient by the force autocorrelation function of a Brownian-type particle by molecular dynamics (MD). The time integral over the force autocorrelation function showed an interesting behavior and the expected plateau value when the mass of the Brownian particle was chosen to be about a factor of 100 larger than the mass of the fluid particle. Sufficient agreement was found for the friction coefficient calculated by this way and that obtained by calculations of the self-diffusion coefficient using the common relation between these coefficients. Furthermore, a modified friction coefficient was determined by integration of the force autocorrelation function up to the first maximum. This coefficient can successfully be used to derive a reasonable soft part of the friction coefficient necessary for the Rice-Allnatt approximation for the shear velocity and simple liquids

  18. 77 FR 66595 - U.S. Air Force Broadcast of Consent Order, and Determination of Interest Level for a United...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-06

    ... the Consent Order, and the role of the Compliance Officer to oversee the Respondents' compliance with... solicitation issuance. The Deputy Under Secretary of the Air Force (Space), as the Compliance Officer under the... the Department of Defense appoint a Compliance Officer to oversee compliance with the Consent Order by...

  19. The First ALMA Observation of a Solar Plasmoid Ejection from an X-Ray Bright Point

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimojo, Masumi [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Tokyo, 181-8588 (Japan); Hudson, Hugh S. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); White, Stephen M. [Space Vehicles Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory, Kirtland AFB, NM 87117-5776 (United States); Bastian, Timothy S. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Iwai, Kazumasa, E-mail: masumi.shimojo@nao.ac.jp [Institute for Space-Earth Environmental Research, Nagoya University, Nagoya, 464-8601 (Japan)

    2017-05-20

    Eruptive phenomena such as plasmoid ejections or jets are important features of solar activity and have the potential to improve our understanding of the dynamics of the solar atmosphere. Such ejections are often thought to be signatures of the outflows expected in regions of fast magnetic reconnection. The 304 Å EUV line of helium, formed at around 10{sup 5} K, is found to be a reliable tracer of such phenomena, but the determination of physical parameters from such observations is not straightforward. We have observed a plasmoid ejection from an X-ray bright point simultaneously at millimeter wavelengths with ALMA, at EUV wavelengths with SDO /AIA, and in soft X-rays with Hinode /XRT. This paper reports the physical parameters of the plasmoid obtained by combining the radio, EUV, and X-ray data. As a result, we conclude that the plasmoid can consist either of (approximately) isothermal ∼10{sup 5} K plasma that is optically thin at 100 GHz, or a ∼10{sup 4} K core with a hot envelope. The analysis demonstrates the value of the additional temperature and density constraints that ALMA provides, and future science observations with ALMA will be able to match the spatial resolution of space-borne and other high-resolution telescopes.

  20. Structural and Functional Phenotyping of the Failing Heart: Is the Left Ventricular Ejection Fraction Obsolete?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bristow, Michael R; Kao, David P; Breathett, Khadijah K; Altman, Natasha L; Gorcsan, John; Gill, Edward A; Lowes, Brian D; Gilbert, Edward M; Quaife, Robert A; Mann, Douglas L

    2017-11-01

    Diagnosis, prognosis, treatment, and development of new therapies for diseases or syndromes depend on a reliable means of identifying phenotypes associated with distinct predictive probabilities for these various objectives. Left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) provides the current basis for combined functional and structural phenotyping in heart failure by classifying patients as those with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) and those with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). Recently the utility of LVEF as the major phenotypic determinant of heart failure has been challenged based on its load dependency and measurement variability. We review the history of the development and adoption of LVEF as a critical measurement of LV function and structure and demonstrate that, in chronic heart failure, load dependency is not an important practical issue, and we provide hemodynamic and molecular biomarker evidence that LVEF is superior or equal to more unwieldy methods of identifying phenotypes of ventricular remodeling. We conclude that, because it reliably measures both left ventricular function and structure, LVEF remains the best current method of assessing pathologic remodeling in heart failure in both individual clinical and multicenter group settings. Because of the present and future importance of left ventricular phenotyping in heart failure, LVEF should be measured by using the most accurate technology and methodologic refinements available, and improved characterization methods should continue to be sought. Copyright © 2017 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. A survivability model for ejection of green compacts in powder metallurgy technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payman Ahi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Reliability and quality assurance have become major considerations in the design and manufacture of today’s parts and products. Survivability of green compact using powder metallurgy technology is considered as one of the major quality attributes in manufacturing systems today. During powder metallurgy (PM production, the compaction conditions and behavior of the metal powder dictate the stress and density distribution in the green compact prior to sintering. These parameters greatly influence the mechanical properties and overall strength of the final component. In order to improve these properties, higher compaction pressures are usually employed, which make unloading and ejection of green compacts more challenging, especially for the powder-compacted parts with relatively complicated shapes. This study looked at a mathematical survivability model concerning green compact characteristics in PM technology and the stress-strength failure model in reliability engineering. This model depicts the relationship between mechanical loads (stress during ejection, experimentally determined green strength and survivability of green compact. The resulting survivability is the probability that a green compact survives during and after ejection. This survivability model can be used as an efficient tool for selecting the appropriate parameters for the process planning stage in PM technology. A case study is presented here in order to demonstrate the application of the proposed survivability model.

  2. Chromospheric Plasma Ejections in a Light Bridge of a Sunspot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Donguk; Chae, Jongchul; Yang, Heesu; Cho, Kyuhyoun; Kwak, Hannah [Astronomy Program, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, 1 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 08826 (Korea, Republic of); Yurchyshyn, Vasyl [Big Bear Solar Observatory, New Jersey Institute of Technology, 40386 North Shore Lane, Big Bear City, CA 92314-9672 (United States); Lim, Eun-Kyung; Cho, Kyung-Suk, E-mail: dusong@astro.snu.ac.kr [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute 776, Daedeokdae-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34055 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-01

    It is well-known that light bridges (LBs) inside a sunspot produce small-scale plasma ejections and transient brightenings in the chromosphere, but the nature and origin of such phenomena are still unclear. Utilizing the high-spatial and high-temporal resolution spectral data taken with the Fast Imaging Solar Spectrograph and the TiO 7057 Å broadband filter images installed at the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope of Big Bear Solar Observatory, we report arcsecond-scale chromospheric plasma ejections (1.″7) inside a LB. Interestingly, the ejections are found to be a manifestation of upwardly propagating shock waves as evidenced by the sawtooth patterns seen in the temporal-spectral plots of the Ca ii 8542 Å and H α intensities. We also found a fine-scale photospheric pattern (1″) diverging with a speed of about 2 km s{sup −1} two minutes before the plasma ejections, which seems to be a manifestation of magnetic flux emergence. As a response to the plasma ejections, the corona displayed small-scale transient brightenings. Based on our findings, we suggest that the shock waves can be excited by the local disturbance caused by magnetic reconnection between the emerging flux inside the LB and the adjacent umbral magnetic field. The disturbance generates slow-mode waves, which soon develop into shock waves, and manifest themselves as the arcsecond-scale plasma ejections. It also appears that the dissipation of mechanical energy in the shock waves can heat the local corona.

  3. Analysing the effects of rigid and flexible aircraft dynamics on the ejection of a large store

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Jamison, Kevin

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available duration ? ERU forces + store weight release causes aircraft ?g-jump? ? Period of ERU force is short enough to excite wing vibration modes ? ERU force/time & front/back force balance important for determining store separation rates from aircraft... ? Constrained motion in other DOF ? Used mass, inertias, CG of aircraft without Katleho ? Used trimmed forces of aircraft with Katleho ? Assumes delay in pilot response to g-jump ? CSIR 2011 Slide 14 Aircraft rigid accelerations Aircraft mass...

  4. PARAMETER DETERMINATION FOR ADDITIONAL OPERATING FORCE MECHANISM IN DEVICE FOR PNEUMO-CENTRIFUGAL MACHINING OF BALL-SHAPED WORKPIECES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Sukhotsky

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes development of the methodology for optimization of parameters for an additional operating force mechanism in a device for pneumo-centrifugal machining of glass balls. Specific feature in manufacturing glass balls for micro-optics in accordance with technological process for obtaining ball-shaped workpieces is grinding and polishing of spherical surface in a free state. In this case component billets of future balls are made in the form of cubes and the billets are given preliminary a form of ball with the help of rough grinding. An advanced method for obtaining ball-shaped work-pieces from brittle materials is a pneumocentrifugal machining. This method presupposes an application of two conic rings with abrasive working surfaces which are set coaxially with large diameters to each other and the billets are rolled along these rings. Rotation of the billets is conveyed by means of pressure medium.The present devices for pneumo-centrifugal machining are suitable for obtaining balls up to 6 mm. Machining of the work-pieces with full spherical surfaces and large diameter is non-productive due to impossibility to ensure a sufficient force on the billet in the working zone. For this reason the paper proposes a modified device where an additional force on the machined billet is created by upper working disc that is making a reciprocating motion along an axis of abrasive conic rings. The motion is realized with the help of a cylindrical camshaft mechanism in the form of a ring with a profile working end face and the purpose of present paper is to optimize parameters of the proposed device.The paper presents expressions for calculation of constitutive parameters of the additional operating force mechanism including parameters of loading element motion, main dimensions of the additional operating force mechanism and parameters of a profile element in the additional operating force mechanism.Investigation method is a mathematical

  5. Assessment of cardiac performance with quantitative radionuclide angiocardiography: sequential left ventricular ejection fraction, normalized left ventricular ejection rate, and regional wall motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, R.C.; Berger, H.J.; Costin, J.C.; Freedman, G.S.; Wolberg, J.; Cohen, L.S.; Gotischalk, A.; Zaret, B.L.

    1977-01-01

    Sequential quantitative first pass radionuclide angiocardiograms (RA) were used to measure left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and left ventricular ejection rate (LVER), and to assess regional wall motion (RWM) in the anterior (ANT) and left anterior oblique (LAO) positions. Studies were obtained with a computerized multicrystal scintillation camera suitable for acquiring high count-rate data. Background was determined in a new fashion by selecting frames temporally from the left ventricular region of interest time-activity curve. A ''representative'' cardiac cycle was formed by summing together counts over three to six cardiac cycles. From this background corrected, high count-rate ''representative''cardiac cycle, LVEF, LVER, and RWM were determined. In 22 patients with normal sinus rhythm in the absence of significant valvular regurgitation, RA LVEF correlated well with that measured by contrast angiography (r = 0.95). LVER correlated well with LVEF measured at contrast angiography (r = 0.90) and allowed complete separation of those with normal (LVER = 3.4 +- 0.17 sec -1 ) and abnormal (LVER = 1.22 +- 0.11 sec -1 ) (P < 0.001) left ventricular performance. This separation was independent of background. Isoproterenol infusion in five normal subjects caused LVER to increase by 81 +- 17% while LVEF increased by 10 +- 2.0%. RWM was correctly defined in 21/22 patients and 89% of left ventricular segments with abnormal wall motion

  6. Designing a Tool System for Lowering Friction during the Ejection of In-Die Sintered Micro Gears

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuele Cannella

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The continuous improvements in micro-forging technologies generally involve process, material, and tool design. The field assisted sintering technique (FAST is a process that makes possible the manufacture of near-net-shape components in a closed-die setup. However, the final part quality is affected by the influence of friction during the ejection phase, caused by radial expansion of the compacted and sintered powder. This paper presents the development of a pre-stressed tool system for the manufacture of micro gears made of aluminum. By using the hot isostatic pressing (HIP sintering process and different combinations of process parameters, the designed tool system was compared to a similar tool system designed without a pre-stressing strategy. The comparison between the two tool systems was based on the ejection force and part fidelity. The ejection force was measured during the tests, while the part fidelity was documented using an optical microscope and computed tomography in order to obtain a multi-scale characterization. The results showed that the use of pre-stress reduced the porosity in the gear by 40% and improved the dimensional fidelity by more than 75% compared to gears produced without pre-stress.

  7. Simple Criteria to Determine the Set of Key Parameters of the DRPE Method by a Brute-force Attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalegaev, S. S.; Petrov, N. V.

    Known techniques of breaking Double Random Phase Encoding (DRPE), which bypass the resource-intensive brute-force method, require at least two conditions: the attacker knows the encryption algorithm; there is an access to the pairs of source and encoded images. Our numerical results show that for the accurate recovery by numerical brute-force attack, someone needs only some a priori information about the source images, which can be quite general. From the results of our numerical experiments with optical data encryption DRPE with digital holography, we have proposed four simple criteria for guaranteed and accurate data recovery. These criteria can be applied, if the grayscale, binary (including QR-codes) or color images are used as a source.

  8. Forward Modeling of Coronal Mass Ejection Flux Ropes in the Inner Heliosphere with 3DCORE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möstl, C.; Amerstorfer, T.; Palmerio, E.; Isavnin, A.; Farrugia, C. J.; Lowder, C.; Winslow, R. M.; Donnerer, J. M.; Kilpua, E. K. J.; Boakes, P. D.

    2018-03-01

    Forecasting the geomagnetic effects of solar storms, known as coronal mass ejections (CMEs), is currently severely limited by our inability to predict the magnetic field configuration in the CME magnetic core and by observational effects of a single spacecraft trajectory through its 3-D structure. CME magnetic flux ropes can lead to continuous forcing of the energy input to the Earth's magnetosphere by strong and steady southward-pointing magnetic fields. Here we demonstrate in a proof-of-concept way a new approach to predict the southward field Bz in a CME flux rope. It combines a novel semiempirical model of CME flux rope magnetic fields (Three-Dimensional Coronal ROpe Ejection) with solar observations and in situ magnetic field data from along the Sun-Earth line. These are provided here by the MESSENGER spacecraft for a CME event on 9-13 July 2013. Three-Dimensional Coronal ROpe Ejection is the first such model that contains the interplanetary propagation and evolution of a 3-D flux rope magnetic field, the observation by a synthetic spacecraft, and the prediction of an index of geomagnetic activity. A counterclockwise rotation of the left-handed erupting CME flux rope in the corona of 30° and a deflection angle of 20° is evident from comparison of solar and coronal observations. The calculated Dst matches reasonably the observed Dst minimum and its time evolution, but the results are highly sensitive to the CME axis orientation. We discuss assumptions and limitations of the method prototype and its potential for real time space weather forecasting and heliospheric data interpretation.

  9. Simulation of 'pathologic' changes in ICG waveforms resulting from superposition of the 'preejection' and ejection waves induced by left ventricular contraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermishkin, V. V.; Kolesnikov, V. A.; Lukoshkova, E. V.; Sonina, R. S.

    2013-04-01

    The impedance cardiography (ICG) is widely used for beat-to-beat noninvasive evaluation of the left ventricular stroke volume and contractility. It implies the correct determination of the ejection start and end points and the amplitudes of certain peaks in the differentiated impedance cardiogram. An accurate identification of ejection onset by ICG is often problematic, especially in the cardiologic patients, due to peculiar waveforms. Using a simple theoretical model, we tested the hypothesis that two major processes are responsible for the formation of impedance systolic wave: (1) the changes in the heart geometry and surrounding vessels produced by ventricular contraction, which occur during the isovolumic phase and precede ejection, and (2) expansion of aorta and adjacent arteries during the ejection phase. The former process initiates the preejection wave WpE and the latter triggers the ejection wave WEj. The model predicts a potential mechanism of generating the abnormal shapes of dZ/dt due to the presence of preejection waves and explains the related errors in ICG time and amplitude parameters. An appropriate decomposition method is a promising way to avoid the masking effects of these waves and a further step to correct determination of the onset of ejection and the corresponding peak amplitudes from 'pathologically shaped' ICG signals.

  10. The interaction of 2-mercaptobenzimidazole with human serum albumin as determined by spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy and molecular modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuqin; Jia, Baoxiu; Wang, Hao; Li, Nana; Chen, Gaopan; Lin, Yuejuan; Gao, Wenhua

    2013-04-01

    The interaction of 2-mercaptobenzimidazole (MBI) with human serum albumin (HSA) was studied in vitro by equilibrium dialysis under normal physiological conditions. This study used fluorescence, ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-vis), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), circular dichroism (CD) and Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and molecular modeling techniques. Association constants, the number of binding sites and basic thermodynamic parameters were used to investigate the quenching mechanism. Based on the fluorescence resonance energy transfer, the distance between the HSA and MBI was 2.495 nm. The ΔG(0), ΔH(0), and ΔS(0) values across temperature indicated that the hydrophobic interaction was the predominant binding Force. The UV, FT-IR, CD and Raman spectra confirmed that the HSA secondary structure was altered in the presence of MBI. In addition, the molecular modeling showed that the MBI-HSA complex was stabilized by hydrophobic forces, which resulted from amino acid residues. The AFM results revealed that the individual HSA molecule dimensions were larger after interaction with MBI. Overall, this study suggested a method for characterizing the weak intermolecular interaction. In addition, this method is potentially useful for elucidating the toxigenicity of MBI when it is combined with the biomolecular function effect, transmembrane transport, toxicological testing and other experiments. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Application of Electron Backscattered Diffraction (EBSD) and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) to Determine Texture, Mesotexture, and Grain Boundary Energies in Ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass, S.J.; Rohrer, G.S.; Saylor, D.M.; Vedula, V.R.

    1999-01-01

    Crystallographic orientations in alumina (Al 2 0 3 ) and magnesium aluminate spinel (MgAl 2 0 4 ) were obtained using electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) patterns. The texture and mesotexture (grain boundary mis-orientations) were random and no special boundaries were observed. The relative grain boundary energies were determined by thermal groove geometries using atomic force microscopy (AFM) to identify relationships between the grain boundary energies and mis-orientations

  12. Radiation dose distributions due to sudden ejection of cobalt device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdelhady, Amr

    2016-01-01

    The evaluation of the radiation dose during accident in a nuclear reactor is of great concern from the viewpoint of safety. One of important accident must be analyzed and may be occurred in open pool type reactor is the rejection of cobalt device. The study is evaluating the dose rate levels resulting from upset withdrawal of co device especially the radiation dose received by the operator in the control room. Study of indirect radiation exposure to the environment due to skyshine effect is also taken into consideration in order to evaluate the radiation dose levels around the reactor during the ejection trip. Microshield, SHLDUTIL, and MCSky codes were used in this study to calculate the radiation dose profiles during cobalt device ejection trip inside and outside the reactor building. - Highlights: • This study aims to calculate the dose rate profiles after cobalt device ejection from open-pool-type reactor core. • MicroShield code was used to evaluate the dose rates inside the reactor control room. • McSKY code was used to evaluate the dose rates outside the reactor building. • The calculated dose rates for workers are higher than the permissible limits after 18 s from device ejection.

  13. Initiation and Propagation of Coronal Mass Ejections P. F. Chen

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Introduction. Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) have been observed for over 30 years. They keep being an intriguing research topic, not only because they are now realized to be the major driver for space weather disturbances, which are intimately connected to human activities, but also because they themselves are full of ...

  14. Two-Stage Dynamics of In Vivo Bacteriophage Genome Ejection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Ju Chen

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Biopolymer translocation is a key step in viral infection processes. The transfer of information-encoding genomes allows viruses to reprogram the cell fate of their hosts. Constituting 96% of all known bacterial viruses [A. Fokine and M. G. Rossmann, Molecular architecture of tailed double-stranded DNA phages, Bacteriophage 4, e28281 (2014], the tailed bacteriophages deliver their DNA into host cells via an “ejection” process, leaving their protein shells outside of the bacteria; a similar scenario occurs for mammalian viruses like herpes, where the DNA genome is ejected into the nucleus of host cells, while the viral capsid remains bound outside to a nuclear-pore complex. In light of previous experimental measurements of in vivo bacteriophage λ ejection, we analyze here the physical processes that give rise to the observed dynamics. We propose that, after an initial phase driven by self-repulsion of DNA in the capsid, the ejection is driven by anomalous diffusion of phage DNA in the crowded bacterial cytoplasm. We expect that this two-step mechanism is general for phages that operate by pressure-driven ejection, and we discuss predictions of our theory to be tested in future experiments.

  15. Experimental Investigation of the Dispersion of Liquids by Ejection Atomizers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkhipov, V. A.; Bondarchuk, S. S.; Evsevleev, M. Ya.; Zharova, I. K.; Zhukov, A. S.; Zmanovskii, S. V.; Kozlov, E. A.; Konovalenko, A. I.; Trofimov, V. F.

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents the results of an experimental investigation of the dispersivity of liquid droplets in the spray cone of ejection atomizers. The calculational droplet size distribution function was measured by the method of low angles of the probe laser radiation scattering indicatrix on a pneumohydraulic bench under cold blow conditions. The efficiency of the proposed circuit designs of atomizers has been analyzed.

  16. Invasive hemodynamic characterization of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads Jønsson; Borlaug, Barry A

    2014-01-01

    Recent hemodynamic studies have advanced our understanding of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). Despite improved pathophysiologic insight, clinical trials have failed to identify an effective treatment for HFpEF. Invasive hemodynamic assessment can diagnose or exclude HFp...

  17. Popping the cork: mechanisms of phage genome ejection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molineux, I.J.; Panja, D.

    2013-01-01

    Sixty years after Hershey and Chase showed that nucleic acid is the major component of phage particles that is ejected into cells, we still do not fully understand how the process occurs. Advances in electron microscopy have revealed the structure of the condensed DNA confined in a phage capsid, and

  18. EJECTION AND CAPTURE DYNAMICS IN RESTRICTED THREE-BODY ENCOUNTERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Shiho; Hainick, Yanir; Sari, Re'em; Rossi, Elena M.

    2012-01-01

    We study the tidal disruption of binaries by a massive point mass (e.g., the black hole at the Galactic center), and we discuss how the ejection and capture preference between unequal-mass binary members depends on which orbit they approach the massive object. We show that the restricted three-body approximation provides a simple and clear description of the dynamics. The orbit of a binary with mass m around a massive object M should be almost parabolic with an eccentricity of |1 – e| ∼ 1/3 1/3 times the binary rotation velocity, it would be abruptly disrupted, and the energy change at the encounter can be evaluated in a simple disruption model. We evaluate the probability distributions for the ejection and capture of circular binary members and for the final energies. In principle, for any hyperbolic (elliptic) orbit, the heavier member has more chance to be ejected (captured), because it carries a larger fraction of the orbital energy. However, if the orbital energy is close to zero, the difference between the two members becomes small, and there is practically no ejection and capture preferences. The preference becomes significant when the orbital energy is comparable to the typical energy change at the encounter. We discuss its implications to hypervelocity stars and irregular satellites around giant planets.

  19. Experimental determination of unsteady flow forces on turbine blades by hydraulic analogy; Determination experimentale, par analogie hydraulique, des efforts instationnaires sur les aubages d`une turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verdonk, G. [GEC Alsthom Rateau, 93 - La Courneuve (France); Naudin, M. [Framatome Thermodyn, 71 - Le Creusot (France); Pluviose, M. [CNAM, 75 - Paris (France); Sankale, H. [CETIM, 44 - Nantes (France)

    1998-06-01

    The blades of turbomachinery undergo unsteady flow forces, created principally by the presence of a series of stator or diffuser blades prior to a series of rotor blades. The stage geometry is the main factor which defines the magnitude of these forces. The influence of both geometric and thermodynamic parameters is currently being analysed using a model representing the turbine blades and by applying the hydraulic analogy technique. The study is being conducted at CETIM in Nantes amongst a working group including manufacturers, research organisms, and technical center. Work is in progress and initial results have proved sufficiently encouraging for presentation at the forthcoming Symposium on multidisciplinary turbomachinery issues organised by the Societe Francaise des Mecaniciens. The study should eventually facilitate the optimisation of rotor blade dimensioning for total and partial injection turbine applications and furthermore to reduce the risk of blade failure. Following quantitative study, results obtained for a given geometry of total injection turbine are presented in this paper. (authors) 16 refs.

  20. DEFLECTIONS OF FAST CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS AND THE PROPERTIES OF ASSOCIATED SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLE EVENTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kahler, S. W.; Akiyama, S.; Gopalswamy, N.

    2012-01-01

    The onset times and peak intensities of solar energetic particle (SEP) events at Earth have long been thought to be influenced by the open magnetic fields of coronal holes (CHs). The original idea was that a CH lying between the solar SEP source region and the magnetic footpoint of the 1 AU observer would result in a delay in onset and/or a decrease in the peak intensity of that SEP event. Recently, Gopalswamy et al. showed that CHs near coronal mass ejection (CME) source regions can deflect fast CMEs from their expected trajectories in space, explaining the appearance of driverless shocks at 1 AU from CMEs ejected near solar central meridian (CM). This suggests that SEP events originating in CME-driven shocks may show variations attributable to CH deflections of the CME trajectories. Here, we use a CH magnetic force parameter to examine possible effects of CHs on the timing and intensities of 41 observed gradual E ∼ 20 MeV SEP events with CME source regions within 20° of CM. We find no systematic CH effects on SEP event intensity profiles. Furthermore, we find no correlation between the CME leading-edge measured position angles and SEP event properties, suggesting that the widths of CME-driven shock sources of the SEPs are much larger than the CMEs. Independently of the SEP event properties, we do find evidence for significant CME deflections by CH fields in these events.

  1. DEFLECTIONS OF FAST CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS AND THE PROPERTIES OF ASSOCIATED SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLE EVENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kahler, S. W. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Space Vehicles Directorate, 3550 Aberdeen Avenue, Kirtland AFB, NM 87117 (United States); Akiyama, S. [Institute for Astrophyics and Computational Sciences, Catholic University of America, Washington, DC 20064 (United States); Gopalswamy, N., E-mail: AFRL.RVB.PA@kirtland.af.mil [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2012-08-01

    The onset times and peak intensities of solar energetic particle (SEP) events at Earth have long been thought to be influenced by the open magnetic fields of coronal holes (CHs). The original idea was that a CH lying between the solar SEP source region and the magnetic footpoint of the 1 AU observer would result in a delay in onset and/or a decrease in the peak intensity of that SEP event. Recently, Gopalswamy et al. showed that CHs near coronal mass ejection (CME) source regions can deflect fast CMEs from their expected trajectories in space, explaining the appearance of driverless shocks at 1 AU from CMEs ejected near solar central meridian (CM). This suggests that SEP events originating in CME-driven shocks may show variations attributable to CH deflections of the CME trajectories. Here, we use a CH magnetic force parameter to examine possible effects of CHs on the timing and intensities of 41 observed gradual E {approx} 20 MeV SEP events with CME source regions within 20 Degree-Sign of CM. We find no systematic CH effects on SEP event intensity profiles. Furthermore, we find no correlation between the CME leading-edge measured position angles and SEP event properties, suggesting that the widths of CME-driven shock sources of the SEPs are much larger than the CMEs. Independently of the SEP event properties, we do find evidence for significant CME deflections by CH fields in these events.

  2. Deflections of Fast Coronal Mass Ejections and the Properties of Associated Solar Energetic Particle Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahler, S. W.; Akiyama, S.; Gopalswamy, N.

    2012-01-01

    The onset times and peak intensities of solar energetic particle (SEP) events at Earth have long been thought to be influenced by the open magnetic fields of coronal holes (CHs). The original idea was that a CH lying between the solar SEP source region and the magnetic footpoint of the 1 AU observer would result in a delay in onset and/or a decrease in the peak intensity of that SEP event. Recently, Gopalswamy et al. showed that CHs near coronal mass ejection (CME) source regions can deflect fast CMEs from their expected trajectories in space, explaining the appearance of driverless shocks at 1 AU from CMEs ejected near solar central meridian (CM). This suggests that SEP events originating in CME-driven shocks may show variations attributable to CH deflections of the CME trajectories. Here, we use a CH magnetic force parameter to examine possible effects of CHs on the timing and intensities of 41 observed gradual E approx 20 MeV SEP events with CME source regions within 20 deg. of CM. We find no systematic CH effects on SEP event intensity profiles. Furthermore, we find no correlation between the CME leading-edge measured position angles and SEP event properties, suggesting that the widths of CME-driven shock sources of the SEPs are much larger than the CMEs. Independently of the SEP event properties, we do find evidence for significant CME deflections by CH fields in these events

  3. ALOAD - a code to determine the concentrated forces equivalent with a distributed pressure field for a FEM analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolae APOSTOLESCU

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this paper is to describe a code for calculating an equivalent systemof concentrate loads for a FEM analysis. The tables from the Aerodynamic Department containpressure field for a whole bearing surface, and integrated quantities both for the whole surface andfor fixed and mobile part. Usually in a FEM analysis the external loads as concentrated loadsequivalent to the distributed pressure field are introduced. These concentrated forces can also be usedin static tests. Commercial codes provide solutions for this problem, but what we intend to develop isa code adapted to the user’s specific needs.

  4. Atomic force microscopy for the determination of refractive index profiles of optical fibres and waveguides: a quantitative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huntington, S.T.; Mulvaney, P.; Roberts, K.A.

    1997-01-01

    The use of preferential etching and atomic force microscopy to measure refractive index profiles of optical fibres is investigated. Both the etch rate and the position of lateral features are shown to be independent of etch time. An elliptical core fibre has been studied and the resultant profile found to be in qualitative agreement with the preform index profile. It is shown, however, that the ellipticity of the core has changed during the drawing process. The method has been extended to fluorine and germanium doped planar waveguides and the results correlated with the fabrication process

  5. ON SUN-TO-EARTH PROPAGATION OF CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Ying D.; Luhmann, Janet G.; Möstl, Christian; Bale, Stuart D.; Lin, Robert P.; Lugaz, Noé; Davies, Jackie A.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate how coronal mass ejections (CMEs) propagate through, and interact with, the inner heliosphere between the Sun and Earth, a key question in CME research and space weather forecasting. CME Sun-to-Earth kinematics are constrained by combining wide-angle heliospheric imaging observations, interplanetary radio type II bursts, and in situ measurements from multiple vantage points. We select three events for this study, the 2012 January 19, 23, and March 7 CMEs. Different from previous event studies, this work attempts to create a general picture for CME Sun-to-Earth propagation and compare different techniques for determining CME interplanetary kinematics. Key results are obtained concerning CME Sun-to-Earth propagation: (1) the Sun-to-Earth propagation of fast CMEs can be approximately formulated into three phases: an impulsive acceleration, then a rapid deceleration, and finally a nearly constant speed propagation (or gradual deceleration); (2) the CMEs studied here are still accelerating even after the flare maximum, so energy must be continuously fed into the CME even after the time of the maximum heating and radiation has elapsed in the corona; (3) the rapid deceleration, presumably due to interactions with the ambient medium, mainly occurs over a relatively short timescale following the acceleration phase; and (4) CME-CME interactions seem a common phenomenon close to solar maximum. Our comparison between different techniques (and data sets) has important implications for CME observations and their interpretations: (1) for the current cases, triangulation assuming a compact CME geometry is more reliable than triangulation assuming a spherical front attached to the Sun for distances below 50-70 solar radii from the Sun, but beyond about 100 solar radii we would trust the latter more; (2) a proper treatment of CME geometry must be performed in determining CME Sun-to-Earth kinematics, especially when the CME propagation direction is far away from the

  6. Calculation of cardiac pressures using left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) derived from radionuclide angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hommer, E.

    1981-01-01

    An attempt has been made to develop formulas to determine cardiac pressures in an undisturbed flow in patients without valvular or shunt diseases. These are based entirely on the results of left ventricular ejection fraction rates, permitting pressure analysis of several compartments at the same tine. According to BORER et al. they also enable determination of left ventricular 'Functional Reserve' after bycycle exercise as well as left ventricular 'Relaxation Reserve'. They support the views of NYHA in determining the grades of cardiac insufficiency proving the system- and low-pressure participation. A single formula for pulmonary flow can determine the pulmonary arterial pressure. The left ventricular enddiastolic pressure can also be exclusively calculated by values of left ventricular functions, thus both formulas may be used in disorders of the mitral valves. The possibility to calculate pressures of all the compartments of the heart from left ventricular ejection rate shows, that in undisturbed flow global heart function depends on left ventricular function. Therefore the mutual dependence of these formulas presents an intercompartimental pressure regulation of the heart through pulmonary flow and pulmonary vascular pressure, which leaves an aspect of autonomous cardiac regulation open to discussion. (orig.) [de

  7. Determination of Specific Forces and Tool Deflections in Micro-milling of Ti-6Al-4V alloy using Finite Element Simulations and Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farina, Simone; Ceretti, Elisabetta; Thepsonti, Thanongsak; Oezel, Tugrul

    2011-01-01

    Titanium alloys offer superb properties in strength, corrosion resistance and biocompatibility and are commonly utilized in medical devices and implants. Micro-end milling process is a direct and rapid fabrication method for manufacturing medical devices and implants in titanium alloys. Process performance and quality depend upon an understanding of the relationship between cutting parameters and forces and resultant tool deflections to avoid tool breakage. For this purpose, FE simulations of chip formation during micro-end milling of Ti-6Al-4V alloy with an ultra-fine grain solid carbide two-flute micro-end mill are investigated using DEFORM software.At first, specific forces in tangential and radial directions of cutting during micro-end milling for varying feed advance and rotational speeds have been determined using designed FE simulations for chip formation process. Later, these forces are applied to the micro-end mill geometry along the axial depth of cut in 3D analysis of ABAQUS. Consequently, 3D distributions for tool deflections and von Misses stress are determined. These analyses will yield in establishing integrated multi-physics process models for high performance micro-end milling and a leap-forward to process improvements.

  8. The reproducibility and variability of sequential left ventricular ejection fraction measurements by the nuclear stethoscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurata, Chinori; Hayashi, Hideharu; Kobayashi, Akira; Yamazaki, Noboru

    1986-01-01

    We evaluated the reproducibility and variability of sequential left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) measurements by the nuclear stethoscope in 72 patients. The group as a whole demonstrated excellent reproducibility (r = 0.96). However, repeat LVEF measurements by the nuclear stethoscope at 5-minute interval showed around 9 % absolute difference, at 95 % confidence levels, from one measurement to the next. The finding indicates that a change in LVEF greater than 9 % is necessary for determining an acute effect of an intervention in individual cases. (author)

  9. Low-q structure of Kr gas at undercritical densities. An accurate SANS determination of triplet forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guarini, E.; Casanova, G.; Genova Univ.; Bafile, U.; Firenze Univ.; Barocchi, F.; Firenze Univ.

    1999-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Besides the promising results of very recent attempts to directly measure the triple-dipole interactions in noble fluids, an alternative method can be applied to get much more accurate experimental information on the long-range triplet contributions from the density behavior of the structure factor S(q) in the low-q region. However this method requires the use of a model for the pair potential and its accuracy critically depends on the agreement between the experimental two-body properties of the fluid and the model assumed. It is shown how this condition is remarkably fulfilled by the results of a SANS measurement in gaseous Kr at densities below 4.3 nm -3 , thus leading to and unprecedented accuracy in the evaluation of triple-dipole forces. (author)

  10. Fusion surface material melting, ablation, and ejection under high heat loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holliday, M.R.; Doster, J.M.; Gilligan, J.G.

    1986-01-01

    Limiters, divertor plates, and sections of the first wall are exposed to intense heat loads during normal operation and plasma disruptions. This results in severe thermal stresses as well as erosion of the surface material. Large surface areas of compact high-field tokamaks are expected to be exposed to these high heat loads. The need for a fast and accurate computational model describing the heat transfer and phase change process has arisen as a part of the larger model of the plasma-edge region. The authors report on a solution scheme that has been developed that minimizes computational time for this time-dependent, one-dimensional, moving boundary problem. This research makes use of the heat balance integral technique, which is at least an order of magnitude faster than previous finite difference techniques. In addition, we report on the effect of molten material ejection (by external forces) on the total surface erosion rate

  11. Measurement of effective left ventricular ejection fraction by radiocardiography associated with cardiac chamber scanning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Vernejoul, P; Fauchet, M; Rimbert, J -N; Gambini, D; Agnely, J [Hopital Necker-Enfants-Malades, 75 - Paris (France)

    1976-03-01

    Left ventricular ejection fraction is usually measured by cineangiocardiography. When radiocardiography and cardiac chamber scanning are associated, it allows an effective left ventricular ejection fraction assessment. Ejection fractions calculated by both methods are the same in normal subjects. They are different in the case of left valvular heart disease with insufficiency. The whole regurgitation fraction can be calculated from this difference.

  12. Measurement of effective left ventricular ejection fraction by radiocardiography associated with cardiac chamber scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vernejoul, Pierre de; Fauchet, Michel; Rimbert, J.-N.; Gambini, Denis; Agnely, Jacqueline

    1976-01-01

    Left ventricular ejection fraction is usually measured by cineangiocardiography. When radiocardiography and cardiac chamber scanning are associated, it allows an effective left ventricular ejection fraction assessment. Ejection fractions calculated by both methods are the same in normal subjects. They are different in the case of left valvular heart disease with insufficiency. The whole regurgitation fraction can be calculated from this difference [fr

  13. Quality of life is impaired similarly in heart failure patients with preserved and reduced ejection fraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, Tialda; Lesman-Leegte, Ivonne; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Sanderman, Robbert; Jaarsma, Tiny

    Aims To compare quality of life (QoL) in heart failure (HF) patients with preserved ejection fraction (HF-PEF) and HF patients with reduced ejection fraction (HF-REF) in a well-defined HF population. Methods and results Patients with HF-PEF [left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) >= 40%] were

  14. The influence of occupant anthropometry and seat position on ejection risk in a rollover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Theresa; Fras, Andrew; Telehowski, Paul

    2010-08-01

    During rollover crashes, ejection increases an occupant's risk of severe to fatal injury as compared to risks for those retained in the vehicle. The current study examined whether occupant anthropometry might influence ejection risk. Factors such as restraint use/disuse, seating position, vehicle type, and roll direction were also considered in the analysis. The current study examined occupant ejections in 10 years of National Automotive Sampling System (NASS) single-event rollovers of passenger vehicles and light trucks. Statistical analysis of unweighted and weighted ejection data was carried out. No statistically significant differences in ejection rates were found based on occupant height, age, or body mass index. Drivers were ejected significantly more frequently than other occupants: 62 percent of unrestrained drivers were ejected vs. 51 percent unrestrained right front occupants. Second row unrestrained occupants were ejected at rates similar to right front-seated occupants. There were no significant differences in ejection rates for near- vs. far-side occupants. These data suggest that assessment of ejection prevention systems using either a 50th or 5th percentile adult anthropomorphic test dummy (ATD) might provide a reasonable measure of system function for a broad range of occupants. They also support the development of ejection mitigation technologies that extend beyond the first row to protect occupants in rear seat positions. Future studies should consider potential interaction effects (i.e., occupant size and vehicle dimensions) and the influence of occupant size on ejection risk in non-single-event rollovers.

  15. Radiation dose distributions due to sudden ejection of cobalt device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelhady, Amr

    2016-09-01

    The evaluation of the radiation dose during accident in a nuclear reactor is of great concern from the viewpoint of safety. One of important accident must be analyzed and may be occurred in open pool type reactor is the rejection of cobalt device. The study is evaluating the dose rate levels resulting from upset withdrawal of co device especially the radiation dose received by the operator in the control room. Study of indirect radiation exposure to the environment due to skyshine effect is also taken into consideration in order to evaluate the radiation dose levels around the reactor during the ejection trip. Microshield, SHLDUTIL, and MCSky codes were used in this study to calculate the radiation dose profiles during cobalt device ejection trip inside and outside the reactor building. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Coronal Mass Ejections: a Summary of Recent Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalswamy, Nat; Davila, J. M.

    2010-01-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) have been recognized as the most energetic phenomenon in the heliosphere, deriving their energy from the stressed magnetic fields on the Sun. This paper highlights some of the recent results on CMEs obtained from the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) and the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) missions. The summary of the talk follows. SOHO observations revealed that the CME rate is almost a factor of two larger than previously thought and varied with the solar activity cycle in a complex way (e.g., high-latitude CMEs occurred in great abundance during the solar maximum years). CMEs were found to interact with other CMEs as well as with other large-scale structures (coronal holes), resulting in deflections and additional particle acceleration. STEREO observations have confirmed the three-dimensional nature of CMEs and the shocks surrounding them. The EUV signatures (flare arcades, corona) dimming, filament eruption, and EUV waves) associated with CMEs have become vital in the identification of solar sources from which CMEs erupt. CMEs with speeds exceeding the characteristic speeds of the corona and the interplanetary medium drive shocks, which produce type II radio bursts. The wavelength range of type II bursts depends on the CME kinetic energy: type II bursts with emission components at all wavelengths (metric to kilometric) are due to CMEs of the highest kinetic energy. Some CMEs, as fast as 1600 km/s do not produce type II bursts, while slow CMEs (400 km/s) occasionally produce type II bursts. These observations can be explained as the variation in the ambient flow speed (solar wind) and the Alfven speed. Not all CME-driven shocks produce type II bursts because either they are subcritical or do not have the appropriate geometry. The same shocks that produce type II bursts also produce solar energetic particles (SEPs), whose release near the Sun seems to be delayed with respect to the onset of type II bursts

  17. Evidence for highly processed material ejected from Abell 30

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazard, C.; Terlvich, R.; Ferland, G.; Sargent, W.L.W.

    1980-01-01

    The discovery of compact knots of highly processed material apparently ejected from the central star of the emission nebula Abell 30 is reported here. Spectra obtained from the compact nebulosities surrounding the central star, which indicate a remarkable enhancement of helium relative to hydrogen, are discussed. Preliminary model calculations to investigate the properties of hydrogen deficient nebulae and to study the abundances of some heavy elements have been applied to the results. (UK)

  18. Analysis of Transportation Alternatives for Ejection Seat Training

    OpenAIRE

    Gambel, Ray; Lundy, David; Murphy, William; Southmost Consulting

    2011-01-01

    EMBA Project Report EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Student Military Aviators who complete primary flight training at Training Wing FOUR and select jets for their advanced training track will require Naval Aviation Survival Training Program (NASTP) Class 1 training until the T-6B replaces the T-34C as the primary flight training aircraft. This Class 1 training instructs students in ejection seat equipment and procedures for emergency egress of their new aircraft. Of the eight available Aviation Survi...

  19. Droplet ejection and sliding on a flapping film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Chen

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Water recovery and subsequent reuse are required for human consumption as well as industrial, and agriculture applications. Moist air streams, such as cooling tower plumes and fog, represent opportunities for water harvesting. In this work, we investigate a flapping mechanism to increase droplet shedding on thin, hydrophobic films for two vibrational cases (e.g., ± 9 mm and 11 Hz; ± 2 mm and 100 Hz. Two main mechanisms removed water droplets from the flapping film: vibrational-induced coalescence/sliding and droplet ejection from the surface. Vibrations mobilized droplets on the flapping film, increasing the probability of coalescence with neighboring droplets leading to faster droplet growth. Droplet departure sizes of 1–2 mm were observed for flapping films, compared to 3–4 mm on stationary films, which solely relied on gravity for droplet removal. Additionally, flapping films exhibited lower percentage area coverage by water after a few seconds. The second removal mechanism, droplet ejection was analyzed with respect to surface wave formation and inertia. Smaller droplets (e.g., 1-mm diameter were ejected at a higher frequency which is associated with a higher acceleration. Kinetic energy of the water was the largest contributor to energy required to flap the film, and low energy inputs (i.e., 3.3 W/m2 were possible. Additionally, self-flapping films could enable novel water collection and condensation with minimal energy input.

  20. Activity associated with the solar origin of coronal mass ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, D. F.; Hundhausen, A. J.

    1987-01-01

    Solar coronal mass ejections (CMEs) observed in 1980 with the HAO Coronagraph/Polarimeter on the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) satellite are compared with other forms of solar activity that might be physically related to the ejections. The solar phenomena checked and the method of association used were intentionally patterned after those of Munro et al.'s (1979) analysis of mass ejections observed with the Skylab coronagraph to facilitate comparison of the two epochs. Comparison of the results reveals that the types and degree of CME associations are similar near solar activity minimum and at maximum. For both epochs, most CMEs with associations had associated eruptive prominences, and the proportions of association of all types of activity were similar. A high percentage of association between SMM CMEs and X-ray long duration events is also found, in agreement with Skylab results. It is concluded that most CMEs are the result of the destabilization and eruption of a prominence and its overlying coronal structure, or of a magnetic structure capable of supporting a prominence.

  1. Determining the optimal system-specific cut-off frequencies for filtering in-vitro upper extremity impact force and acceleration data by residual analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhart, Timothy A; Dunning, Cynthia E; Andrews, David M

    2011-10-13

    The fundamental nature of impact testing requires a cautious approach to signal processing, to minimize noise while preserving important signal information. However, few recommendations exist regarding the most suitable filter frequency cut-offs to achieve these goals. Therefore, the purpose of this investigation is twofold: to illustrate how residual analysis can be utilized to quantify optimal system-specific filter cut-off frequencies for force, moment, and acceleration data resulting from in-vitro upper extremity impacts, and to show how optimal cut-off frequencies can vary based on impact condition intensity. Eight human cadaver radii specimens were impacted with a pneumatic impact testing device at impact energies that increased from 20J, in 10J increments, until fracture occurred. The optimal filter cut-off frequency for pre-fracture and fracture trials was determined with a residual analysis performed on all force and acceleration waveforms. Force and acceleration data were filtered with a dual pass, 4th order Butterworth filter at each of 14 different cut-off values ranging from 60Hz to 1500Hz. Mean (SD) pre-fracture and fracture optimal cut-off frequencies for the force variables were 605.8 (82.7)Hz and 513.9 (79.5)Hz, respectively. Differences in the optimal cut-off frequency were also found between signals (e.g. Fx (medial-lateral), Fy (superior-inferior), Fz (anterior-posterior)) within the same test. These optimal cut-off frequencies do not universally agree with the recommendations of filtering all upper extremity impact data using a cut-off frequency of 600Hz. This highlights the importance of quantifying the filter frequency cut-offs specific to the instrumentation and experimental set-up. Improper digital filtering may lead to erroneous results and a lack of standardized approaches makes it difficult to compare findings of in-vitro dynamic testing between laboratories. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Adaptive estimation of the electromotive force of the lithium-ion battery after current interruption for an accurate state-of-charge and capacity determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waag, Wladislaw; Sauer, Dirk Uwe

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • New adaptive approach for the EMF estimation. • The EMF is estimated by observing the voltage change after the current interruption. • The approach enables an accurate SoC and capacity determination. • Real-time capable algorithm. - Abstract: The online estimation of battery states and parameters is one of the challenging tasks when battery is used as a part of the pure electric or hybrid energy system. For the determination of the available energy stored in the battery, the knowledge of the present state-of-charge (SOC) and capacity of the battery is required. For SOC and capacity determination often the estimation of the battery electromotive force (EMF) is employed. The electromotive force can be measured as an open circuit voltage (OCV) of the battery when a significant time has elapsed since the current interruption. This time may take up to some hours for lithium-ion batteries and is needed to eliminate the influence of the diffusion overvoltages. This paper proposes a new approach to estimate the EMF by considering the OCV relaxation process within only some first minutes after the current interruption. The approach is based on an online fitting of an OCV relaxation model to the measured OCV relaxation curve. This model is based on an equivalent circuit consisting of a voltage source (represents the EMF) in series with the parallel connection of the resistance and a constant phase element (CPE). Based on this fitting the model parameters are determined and the EMF is estimated. The application of this method is exemplarily demonstrated for the state-of-charge and capacity estimation of the lithium-ion battery in an electrical vehicle. In the presented example the battery capacity is determined with the maximal inaccuracy of 2% using the EMF estimated at two different levels of state-of-charge. The real-time capability of the proposed algorithm is proven by its implementation on a low-cost 16-bit microcontroller (Infineon XC2287)

  3. Heart Failure with Preserved Ejection Fraction – Concept, Pathophysiology, Diagnosis and Challenges for Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidija Veterovska Miljkovik

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Heart failure (HF with preserved left ventricular (LV ejection fraction (HFpEF occurs in 40 to 60% of the patients with HF, with a prognosis which is similar to HF with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF. HFpEF pathophysiology is different from that of HFrEF, and has been characterized with diastolic dysfunction. Diastolic dysfunction has been defined with elevated left ventricular stiffness, prolonged iso-volumetric LV relaxation, slow LV filing and elevated LV end-diastolic pressure. Arterial hypertension occurs in majority cases with HFpEF worldwide. Patients are mostly older and obese. Diabetes mellitus and atrial fibrillation appear proportionally in a high frequency of patients with HFpEF. The HFpEF diagnosis is based on existence of symptoms and signs of heart failure, normal or approximately normal ejection and diagnosing of LV diastolic dysfunction by means of heart catheterization or Doppler echocardiography and/or elevated concentration of plasma natriuretic peptide. The present recommendations for HFpEF treatment include blood pressure control, heart chamber frequency control when atrial fibrillation exists, in some situations even coronary revascularization and an attempt for sinus rhythm reestablishment. Up to now, it is considered that no medication or a group of medications improve the survival of HFpEF patients. Due to these causes and the bad prognosis of the disorder, rigorous control is recommended of the previously mentioned precipitating factors for this disorder. This paper presents a universal review of the most important parameters which determine this disorder.

  4. Coronal mass ejection and stream interaction region characteristics and their potential geomagnetic effectiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindsay, G.M.; Russell, C.T.; Luhmann, J.G.

    1995-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that the largest geomagnetic storms are caused by extraordinary increases in the solar wind velocity and/or southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) produced by coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and their associated interplanetary shocks. However, much more frequent small to moderate increases in solar wind velocity and compressions in the IMF can be caused by either coronal mass ejections or fast/slow stream interactions. This study examines the relative statistics of the magnitudes of disturbances associated with the passage of both interplanetary coronal mass ejections and stream interaction regions, using an exceptionally continuous interplanetary database from the Pioneer Venus Orbiter at 0.7 AU throughout most of solar cycle 21. It is found that both stream interaction and CMEs produce magnetic fields significantly larger than the nominal IMF. Increases in field magnitude that are up to 2 and 3 times higher than the ambient field are observed for stream interaction regions and CMEs, respectively. Both stream interactions and CMEs produce large positive and negative Β z components at 0.7 AU, but only CMEs produce Β z magnitudes greater than 35 nT. CMEs are often associated with sustained periods of positive or negative Β z whereas stream interaction regions are more often associated with fluctuating Β z . CMEs tend to produce larger solar wind electric fields than stream interactions. Yet stream interactions tend to produce larger dynamic pressures than CMEs. Dst predictions based on solar wind duskward electric field and dynamic pressure indicate that CMEs produce the largest geomagnetic disturbances while the low-speed portion of stream interaction regions are least geomagnetically effective. Both stream interaction regions and CMEs contribute to low and moderate levels of activity with relative importance determined by their solar-cycle-dependent occurrence rates

  5. Response of left ventricular ejection fraction to recovery from general anesthesia: measurement by gated radionuclide angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coriat, P.; Mundler, O.; Bousseau, D.; Fauchet, M.; Rous, A.C.; Echter, E.; Viars, P.

    1986-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that, after anesthesia for noncardiac surgical procedures, the increased cardiac work during recovery induces wall motion and ejection fraction (EF) abnormalities in patients with mild angina pectoris, gated radionuclide angiography was performed in patients undergoing simple cholecystectomy under narcotic-relaxant general anesthesia. The ejection fraction was determined during anesthesia at the end of surgery, and then determined 3 min and 3 hr after extubation. A new angiography was performed 24 hr later, and a myocardial scintigraphy (Thallium 201) was performed during infusion of the coronary vasodilator, dipyridamole. In the first part of the investigation, eight patients without coronary artery disease (CAD) (group 1) and 20 patients with mild angina (group 2) were studied. In the second part of the study, seven patients (group 3) with mild angina pectoris received an intravenous infusion of 0.4 microgram X kg-1 X min-1 of nitroglycerin started before surgery and gradually decreased 4 hr after extubation. In group 1, EF remained unchanged at recovery. In contrast in group 2, EF responded abnormally to recovery: EF decreased from 55% during anesthesia to 45% 3 min after extubation (P less than 0.001). Patients in group 3, who received intravenous nitroglycerin, showed no change of EF at recovery. This study demonstrates that recovery from general anesthesia causes abnormalities in left ventricular function in patients suffering from CAD. These abnormalities are prevented by prophylactic intravenous nitroglycerin

  6. Development of a DNBR evaluation method for the CEA ejection accident in SMART core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Dae Hyun; Yoo, Y. J.; In, W. K.; Chang, M. H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1999-12-01

    A methodology applicable to the analysis of the CEA ejection accident in SMART is developed for the evaluation of the fraction of fuel failure caused by DNB. The transient behavior of the core thermal-hydraulic conditions is calculated by the subchannel analysis code MATRA. The minimum DNBR during the accident is calculated by KRB-1 CHF correlation considering the 1/8 symmetry of hot assembly. The variation of hot assembly power during the accident is simulated by the LTC(Limiting transient Curve) which is determined from the analysis of power distribution data resulting from the three-dimensional core dynamics calculations. The initial condition of the accident is determined by considering LOC(Limiting Conditions for Operation) of SMART core. Two different methodologies for the evaluation of DNB failure rate are established; a deterministic method based on the DNB envelope, and a probabilistic method based on the DNB probability of each fuel rod. The methodology developed in this study is applied to the analysis of CEA ejection accident in the preliminary design core of SMART. As the result, the fractions of DNB fuel failure by the deterministic method and the probabilistic method are calculated as 38.7% and 7.8%, respectively. 16 refs., 16 figs., 5 tabs. (Author)

  7. Determination the validity of the new developed Sport Experts® hand grip dynamometer, measuring continuity of force, and comparison with current Takei and Baseline® dynamometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güçlüöver, A; Kutlu, M; Ciğerci, A E; Esen, H T; Demirkan, E; Erdoğdu, M

    2015-11-01

    In this study the Sport Experts ™ brand of hand grip dynamometer, measuring the continuity of force with the new developed load cell technology, was compared with Takei and Baseline® dynamometers, the current in use. It was tried to determine the correlation between them. In a study with provides use of clinical, orthopedic and rehabilitative purposes in the athletes and patient populations, this developed dynamometer can provide useful data by observing the continuity of force. The sample of the study included 60 badminton players in 2010-2011; consisting of Turkish Junior National male players (N.=16, age: 16.8±1.5), Junior National female players (N.=14, age: 16.9±1.6), amateur level male players (N.=15, age: 16.3±0.8) and amateur level female players (N.=15, age: 16.1±0.6). ANOVA was used in the statistical methods in order to compare the hand grip strength made by different brands; Pearson's correlation coefficient was used to determine the relationship level between dynamometers. Furthermore, test-retest reliability analysis was completed the new developed expert dynamometer. There was no statistically significant difference in the comparison of the dynamometers (P>0.05). Besides, a highly significant relationship (r=0.95 to 0.96) was found among all three dynamometers. However, the reliability coefficient was found (Chronbachs α: 0.989, ICC:0.97, r=0.97), (Pexpert dynamometer. Comparison between the dynamometers and the statistical results obtained from the correlation relationships shows interchangeability of dynamometers. As a result, our observation of force continuity (progression) of the athlete and patient populations is thought to be important.

  8. Non-invasive measurement of stroke volume and left ventricular ejection fraction. Radionuclide cardiography compared with left ventricular cardioangiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelbaek, H; Svendsen, J H; Aldershvile, J

    1988-01-01

    The stroke volume (SV) was determined by first passage radionuclide cardiography and the left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) by multigated radionuclide cardiography in 20 patients with ischemic heart disease. The results were evaluated against those obtained by the invasive dye dilution or ...... are reliable. The discrepancy between the non-invasive and invasive LVEF values raises the question, whether LVEF is overestimated by cardioangiography or underestimated by radionuclide cardiography....

  9. Note: Determination of torsional spring constant of atomic force microscopy cantilevers: Combining normal spring constant and classical beam theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Álvarez-Asencio, R.; Thormann, Esben; Rutland, M.W.

    2013-01-01

    A technique has been developed for the calculation of torsional spring constants for AFM cantilevers based on the combination of the normal spring constant and plate/beam theory. It is easy to apply and allow the determination of torsional constants for stiff cantilevers where the thermal power s...... spectrum is difficult to obtain due to the high resonance frequency and low signal/noise ratio. The applicability is shown to be general and this simple approach can thus be used to obtain torsional constants for any beam shaped cantilever. © 2013 AIP Publishing LLC....

  10. [Formula: see text]Determination of the smoking gun of intent: significance testing of forced choice results in social security claimants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binder, Laurence M; Chafetz, Michael D

    2018-01-01

    Significantly below-chance findings on forced choice tests have been described as revealing "the smoking gun of intent" that proved malingering. The issues of probability levels, one-tailed vs. two-tailed tests, and the combining of PVT scores on significantly below-chance findings were addressed in a previous study, with a recommendation of a probability level of .20 to test the significance of below-chance results. The purpose of the present study was to determine the rate of below-chance findings in a Social Security Disability claimant sample using the previous recommendations. We compared the frequency of below-chance results on forced choice performance validity tests (PVTs) at two levels of significance, .05 and .20, and when using significance testing on individual subtests of the PVTs compared with total scores in claimants for Social Security Disability in order to determine the rate of the expected increase. The frequency of significant results increased with the higher level of significance for each subtest of the PVT and when combining individual test sections to increase the number of test items, with up to 20% of claimants showing significantly below-chance results at the higher p-value. These findings are discussed in light of Social Security Administration policy, showing an impact on policy issues concerning child abuse and neglect, and the importance of using these techniques in evaluations for Social Security Disability.

  11. Theoretical study to determine the heat transfer by forced convection coefficient in an empirical correlation in single phase, for annular channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrera A, E.

    1994-01-01

    In the heat transfer studies by forced convection, we have few data about behavior of the fluids in an annular channel heated by a concentric pipe, such date is necessary to know the heat transfer coefficient that establish the interchange of energy and the thermic properties of the fluid with the geometry of the flow. In this work the objective, was to compare some empirical correlations that we needed for determinate the heat transfer coefficient for annular channels, where we obtained similar at the theoretical results of an experiment made by Miller and Benforado. It is important to know such coefficients because we can determinate the heat quantity transmitted to a probe zone, in which we simulate a nuclear fuel element that developed huge heat quantity that must be dispersed in short time. We give theoretical data of the heat forced transfer convection and we analyzed the phenomena in annular channels given some empirical correlations employed by some investigators and we analyzed each one. (Author)

  12. Determining the Probability of Violating Upper-Level Wind Constraints for the Launch of Minuteman Ill Ballistic Missiles At Vandenberg Air Force Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafer, Jaclyn A.; Brock, Tyler M.

    2013-01-01

    The 30th Operational Support Squadron Weather Flight (30 OSSWF) provides comprehensive weather services to the space program at Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB) in California. One of their responsibilities is to monitor upper-level winds to ensure safe launch operations of the Minuteman Ill ballistic missile. The 30 OSSWF requested the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) analyze VAFB sounding data to determine the probability of violating (PoV) upper-level thresholds for wind speed and shear constraints specific to this launch vehicle, and to develop a graphical user interface (GUI) that will calculate the PoV of each constraint on the day of launch. The AMU suggested also including forecast sounding data from the Rapid Refresh (RAP) model. This would provide further insight for the launch weather officers (LWOs) when determining if a wind constraint violation will occur over the next few hours, and help to improve the overall upper winds forecast on launch day.

  13. Characteristics and long-term prognosis of patients with heart failure and mid-range ejection fraction compared with reduced and preserved ejection fraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritsen, Josephine; Gustafsson, Finn; Abdulla, Jawdat

    2018-01-01

    AIMS: This study aimed to assess by a meta-analysis the clinical characteristics, all-cause and cardiovascular mortality, and hospitalization of patients with heart failure (HF) with mid-range ejection fraction (HFmrEF) compared with HF with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) and HF with preserved...

  14. [Determination of serologic markers of hepatitis B virus in high risk areas at the Central Air Force Hospital of Peru].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valladares Alvarez, G; Galarza, J; Espinoza, J; Nieri, A; Makino, R; Berrocal, A; Grados, N

    1989-01-01

    In the present paper, the serologic markers of Hepatitis B virus were studied in 123 people belonging to the Hospital Central de la Fuerza Aérea del Perú that had been working in areas of high risk to get contact with this virus. The determination was done with the enzimo inmuno assay (EIA Abbot) and the results were the following: In 15 individuals (12.1%), at least one positive marker was found, evidence which proved to have been in contact with the virus in some moment of his life. Only one carrier (0.8%) was found, in 6 (4.8%) the presence of anti-HBc as only marker was found and in 8 (6.5%) the presence of Anti-HBc and Anti-HBs was observed which means post infection immunity. The great number of the individuals in which the markers were found, were male: 13 (16.0%) against only 2 (4.7%) female. There wasn't great difference with relation to the prevalency of markers according to the years of work like there has been observed in other greater series. It can be concluded that in this group the incidence of infection due to VHB was no greater than that of general population, which indicates us the little contact that they have had with the contaminating material during their professional life.

  15. The Prospect for Detecting Stellar Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osten, Rachel A.; Crosley, Michael Kevin

    2018-06-01

    The astrophysical study of mass loss, both steady-state and transient, on the cool half of the HR diagram has implications bothfor the star itself and the conditions created around the star that can be hospitable or inimical to supporting life. Recent results from exoplanet studies show that planets around M dwarfs are exceedingly common, which together with the commonality of M dwarfs in our galaxy make this the dominant mode of star and planet configurations. The closeness of the exoplanets to the parent M star motivate a comprehensive understanding of habitability for these systems. Radio observations provide the most clear signature of accelerated particles and shocks in stars arising as the result of MHD processes in the stellar outer atmosphere. Stellar coronal mass ejections have not been conclusively detected, despite the ubiquity with which their radiative counterparts in an eruptive event (stellar flares) have. I will review some of the different observational methods which have been used and possibly could be used in the future in the stellar case, emphasizing some of the difficulties inherent in such attempts. I will provide a framework for interpreting potential transient stellar mass loss in light of the properties of flares known to occur on magnetically active stars. This uses a physically motivated way to connect the properties of flares and coronal mass ejections and provides a testable hypothesis for observing or constraining transient stellar mass loss. I will describe recent results using radio observations to detect stellar coronal mass ejections, and what those results imply about transient stellar mass loss. I will provide some motivation for what could be learned in this topic from space-based low frequency radio experiments.

  16. The reverse remodeling response to sacubitril/valsartan therapy in heart failure with reduced ejection fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, Pieter; Beliën, Hanne; Dupont, Matthias; Vandervoort, Pieter; Mullens, Wilfried

    2018-05-17

    Major classes of medical therapy for heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) induce reverse remodeling. The revere remodeling response to sacubitril/valsartan remains unstudied. We performed a single-center, prospective assessor-blinded study to determine the reverse remodeling response of sacubitril/valsartan therapy in HFrEF patients with a class I indication (New York heart Association [NYHA]-class II-IV, Left ventricular ejection fraction [LVEF] sacubitril/valsartan were optimized to individual tolerance. Echocardiographic images were assessed offline by 2 investigators blinded to both the clinical data and timing of echocardiograms. One-hundred-twenty-five HFrEF patients (66 ± 10 years) were prospectively included. The amount of RAS-blocker before and after switch to sacubitril/valsartan was similar(P = .290), indicating individual optimal dosing of sacubitril/valsartan. Over a median(IQR) follow-up of 118(77-160) days after initiation of sacubitril/valsartan, LVEF improved (29.6 ± 6% vs 34.8 ± 6%; P sacubitril/valsartan leading to more reverse remodeling. Switching therapy in eligible HFrEF patients from a RAS-blocker to sacubitril/valsartan induces beneficial reverse remodeling of both metrics of systolic as diastolic function. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Evidence for the direct ejection of clusters from non-metallic solids during laser vaporization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloomfield, L.A.; Yang, Y.A.; Xia, P.; Junkin, A.L.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on the formation of molecular scale particles or clusters of alkali halides and semiconductors during laser vaporization of solids. By measuring the abundances of cluster ions produced in several different source configurations, the authors have determined that clusters are ejected directly from the source sample and do not need to grow from atomic or molecular vapor. Using samples of mixed alkali halide powders, the authors have found that unalloyed clusters are easily produced in a source that prevents growth from occurring after the clusters leave the sample surface. However, melting the sample or encouraging growth after vaporization lead to the production of alloyed cluster species. The sizes of the ejected clusters are initially random, but the population spectrum quickly becomes structured as hot, unstable-sized clusters decay into smaller particles. In carbon, large clusters with odd number of atoms decay almost immediately. The hot even clusters also decay, but much more slowly. The longest lived clusters are the magic C 50 and C 60 fullerenes. The mass spectrum of large carbon clusters evolves in time from structureless, to only the even clusters, to primarily C 50 and C 60 . If cluster growth is encouraged, the odd clusters reappear and the population spectrum again becomes relatively structureless

  18. Epidemiology of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Charlotte; Vasan, Ramachandran S

    2014-01-01

    Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFPEF) is a common condition, and the prevalence is projected to increase further. Studies differ in the reported incidence and mortality associated with this condition, although there is agreement that between a third and one-half of all patients...... with heart failure have HFPEF. Although several consensus statements and guidelines have been published, some recent randomized clinical trials have reported low mortality, raising doubts about whether all patients diagnosed with HFPEF have HFPEF or whether the condition is heterogeneous in its cause...

  19. PWR control rod ejection analysis with the numerical nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hursin, M.; Kochunas, B.; Downar, T. J.

    2008-01-01

    During the past several years, a comprehensive high fidelity reactor LWR core modeling capability has been developed and is referred to as the Numerical Nuclear Reactor (NNR). The NNR achieves high fidelity by integrating whole core neutron transport solution and ultra fine mesh computational fluid dynamics/heat transfer solution. The work described in this paper is a preliminary demonstration of the ability of NNR to provide a detailed intra pin power distribution during a control rod ejection accident. The motivation of the work is to quantify the impact on the fuel performance calculation of a more physically accurate representation of the power distribution within the fuel rod during the transient. The paper addresses first, the validation of the transient capability of the neutronic module of the NNR code system, DeCART. For this purpose, a 'mini core' problem consisting of a 3x3 array of typical PWR fuel assemblies is considered. The initial state of the 'mini core' is hot zero power with a control rod partially inserted into the central assembly which is fresh fuel and is adjacent to once and twice burned fuel representative of a realistic PWR arrangement. The thermal hydraulic feedbacks are provided by a simplified fluids and heat conduction solver consistent for both PARCS and DeCART. The control rod is ejected from the central assembly and the transient calculation is performed with DeCART and compared with the results of the U.S. NRC core simulation code PARCS. Because the pin power reconstruction in PARCS is based on steady state intra assembly pin power distributions which do not account for thermal feedback during the transient and which do not take into account neutron leakage from neighboring assemblies during the transient, there are some small differences in the PARCS and DeCART pin power prediction. Intra pin power density information obtained with DeCART represents new information not available with previous generation of methods. The paper then

  20. Exercise physiology in heart failure and preserved ejection fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haykowsky, Mark J; Kitzman, Dalane W

    2014-07-01

    Recent advances in the pathophysiology of exercise intolerance in patients with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFPEF) suggest that noncardiac peripheral factors contribute to the reduced peak V(o2) (peak exercise oxygen uptake) and to its improvement after endurance exercise training. A greater understanding of the peripheral skeletal muscle vascular adaptations that occur with physical conditioning may allow for tailored exercise rehabilitation programs. The identification of specific mechanisms that improve whole body and peripheral skeletal muscle oxygen uptake could establish potential therapeutic targets for medical therapies and a means to follow therapeutic response. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Concurrent validity and reliability of using ground reaction force and center of pressure parameters in the determination of leg movement initiation during single leg lift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldabe, Daniela; de Castro, Marcelo Peduzzi; Milosavljevic, Stephan; Bussey, Melanie Dawn

    2016-09-01

    Postural adjustment evaluations during single leg lift requires the initiation of heel lift (T1) identification. T1 measured by means of motion analyses system is the most reliable approach. However, this method involves considerable workspace, expensive cameras, and time processing data and setting up laboratory. The use of ground reaction forces (GRF) and centre of pressure (COP) data is an alternative method as its data processing and setting up is less time consuming. Further, kinetic data is normally collected using frequency samples higher than 1000Hz whereas kinematic data are commonly captured using 50-200Hz. This study describes the concurrent-validity and reliability of GRF and COP measurements in determining T1, using a motion analysis system as reference standard. Kinematic and kinetic data during single leg lift were collected from ten participants. GRF and COP data were collected using one and two force plates. Displacement of a single heel marker was captured by means of ten Vicon(©) cameras. Kinetic and kinematic data were collected using a sample frequency of 1000Hz. Data were analysed in two stages: identification of key events in the kinetic data, and assessing concurrent validity of T1 based on the chosen key events with T1 provided by the kinematic data. The key event presenting the least systematic bias, along with a narrow 95% CI and limits of agreement against the reference standard T1, was the Baseline COPy event. Baseline COPy event was obtained using one force plate and presented excellent between-tester reliability. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Subatomic forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutton, C.

    1989-01-01

    Inside the atom, particles interact through two forces which are never felt in the everyday world. But they may hold the key to the Universe. These ideas on subatomic forces are discussed with respect to the strong force, the electromagnetic force and the electroweak force. (author)

  3. THE HEIGHT EVOLUTION OF THE ''TRUE'' CORONAL MASS EJECTION MASS DERIVED FROM STEREO COR1 AND COR2 OBSERVATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bein, B. M.; Temmer, M.; Veronig, A. M.; Utz, D.; Vourlidas, A.

    2013-01-01

    Using combined STEREO-A and STEREO-B EUVI, COR1, and COR2 data, we derive deprojected coronal mass ejection (CME) kinematics and CME ''true'' mass evolutions for a sample of 25 events that occurred during 2007 December to 2011 April. We develop a fitting function to describe the CME mass evolution with height. The function considers both the effect of the coronagraph occulter, at the beginning of the CME evolution, and an actual mass increase. The latter becomes important at about 10-15 R ☉ and is assumed to mostly contribute up to 20 R ☉ . The mass increase ranges from 2% to 6% per R ☉ and is positively correlated to the total CME mass. Due to the combination of COR1 and COR2 mass measurements, we are able to estimate the ''true'' mass value for very low coronal heights ( ☉ ). Based on the deprojected CME kinematics and initial ejected masses, we derive the kinetic energies and propelling forces acting on the CME in the low corona ( ☉ ). The derived CME kinetic energies range between 1.0-66 × 10 23 J, and the forces range between 2.2-510 × 10 14 N.

  4. Murine Models of Heart Failure With Preserved Ejection Fraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Valero-Muñoz, PhD

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF is characterized by signs and symptoms of heart failure in the presence of a normal left ventricular ejection fraction. Despite accounting for up to 50% of all clinical presentations of heart failure, the mechanisms implicated in HFpEF are poorly understood, thus precluding effective therapy. The pathophysiological heterogeneity in the HFpEF phenotype also contributes to this disease and likely to the absence of evidence-based therapies. Limited access to human samples and imperfect animal models that completely recapitulate the human HFpEF phenotype have impeded our understanding of the mechanistic underpinnings that exist in this disease. Aging and comorbidities such as atrial fibrillation, hypertension, diabetes and obesity, pulmonary hypertension, and renal dysfunction are highly associated with HFpEF, yet the relationship and contribution between them remains ill-defined. This review discusses some of the distinctive clinical features of HFpEF in association with these comorbidities and highlights the advantages and disadvantage of commonly used murine models used to study the HFpEF phenotype.

  5. Left ventricular filling rate change as an earlier indicator than ejection fraction of chemotherapeutic cardiotoxicity in cancer paptents' nuclear medicine MUGA scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miko, T.G.

    2004-01-01

    According to Wang Siegel has long suggested that an earlier indicator of damage to the hearts of cancer patients undergoing potentially cardiotoxic chemotherapy could be change in the left ventricular filling rate (LVFT) rather than dependence on the left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) as a measure for when to discontinue chemotherapy. Currently ejection fraction obtained by performing the nuclear medicine MUGA scan is the gold standard for determining further treatment of patients with these cardiotoxic agents. We are seeking to see if changes in filling rate (LVFR) are an earlier indicator of cardiotoxicity by performing a retrospective analysis of MUGA scans performed at our facility pre- and post-chemotherapy and performing a statistical analysis of changes in ejection fraction us filling rate in patients known to have cardiotoxic changes due to chemotherapy. (authors)

  6. Effect of Vericiguat, a Soluble Guanylate Cyclase Stimulator, on Natriuretic Peptide Levels in Patients With Worsening Chronic Heart Failure and Reduced Ejection Fraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gheorghiade, Mihai; Greene, Stephen J; Butler, Javed

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE: Worsening chronic heart failure (HF) is a major public health problem. OBJECTIVE: To determine the optimal dose and tolerability of vericiguat, a soluble guanylate cyclase stimulator, in patients with worsening chronic HF and reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). DESIGN, ...

  7. Determination of aerodynamic damping and force coefficients of filleted twin cables in dry conditions through passive-dynamic wind tunnel tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mattiello, E.; Eriksen, M. B.; Georgakis, Christos T.

    /FORCE Technology Climatic Wind Tunnel facility. The measured aerodynamic damping of the twin-cable arrangement in dry conditions was compared to the values obtained from full-scale monitoring and from an analytical model using static force coefficients. The comparison revealed broad agreement in the investigated...... Re range, as did the force coefficients obtained from dynamic and static tests....

  8. An Evaluation of a New Format for Presenting Ejection Information in a NATOPS Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-11-01

    Assessment-the subject’s awareness of ejection system limits and knowledge of the specific principles and relationships involved in the ejection decision...percti & le pilot ejecting cannern tintiong onfigursesan at~ 71 knete arrtaeei.l From" th front cockpit. c. Normal aircraft pitc For conditions shown it...40) Arlington, VA 22209 700 Robbins Avenue * 1 CDR P.R. Chatelier Philadelphia, PA 19111 Office of the Undersecretary of Defense for Research

  9. Ejection fraction improvement and reverse remodeling achieved with Sacubitril/Valsartan in heart failure with reduced ejection fraction patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almufleh, Aws; Marbach, Jeffrey; Chih, Sharon; Stadnick, Ellamae; Davies, Ross; Liu, Peter; Mielniczuk, Lisa

    2017-01-01

    Sacubitril/Valsartan has been shown to improve mortality and reduce hospitalizations in patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF). The effect of Sacubitril/Valsartan on ejection fraction (EF) and reverse remodeling parameters have not been previously described. We performed a single-center, retrospective, cohort study of HFrEF patients (n=48) who were treated with Sacubitril/Valsartan for a median duration of 3 months (Interquartile range 2-6 months). Clinical and echocardiographic parameters were reviewed at three time points (pre-baseline which was median of 18 months before starting Sacubitril/Valsartan, baseline before treatment started, and post-Sacubitril/Valsartan). Paired sample t-test and one-way repeated measures ANOVA were used for normally distributed data, while Wilcoxon Signed Rank test for non-normally distributed data. Sacubitril/Valsartan use was associated with an average 5% (±1.2) increase in EF, from a mean baseline of 25.33% to 30.14% (pSacubitril/Valsartan was found to improve EF and multiple measures of reverse remodeling beyond the effects of concomitant optimal medical therapy. Though these results are encouraging, our small sample, observational study requires confirmation in larger cohorts with longer follow-up periods.

  10. Ejection fraction response to exercise in patients with chest pain and normal coronary arteriograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibbons, R.L.; Lee, K.L.; Cobb, F.; Jones, R.H.

    1981-01-01

    In this study we describe the ejection fraction response to upright exercise using first-pass radionuclide angiocardiography in a group of 60 patients with chest pain, normal coronary ateriograms and normal resting ventricular function. A wide range of resting function (heart rate and ejection fraction) and exercise function (heart rate, ejection fraction, peak work load and estimated peak oxygen uptake) were measured. The ejection fraction response to exercise demonstrated wide variation, ranging from a decrease of 23% to an increase of 24%. Six of 22 clinical and radionuclide angiocardiographic variables (resting ejection fraction, peak work load, age, sex, body surface area and the change in end-diastolic volume index with exercise) were significant univariate predictors of the ejection fraction response to exercise. Multivariable analysis identified resting ejection fraction, the change in end-diastolic volume index with exercise and either sex or peak work load as variables that provided significant independent predictive information. These observations indicate that the ejection fraction response to exercise is a complex response that is influenced by multiple physiologic variables. The wide variation in this population suggests that the ejection fraction response to exercise is not a reliable test for the diagnosis of coronary artery disease because of its low specificity

  11. Risk Related to Pre–Diabetes Mellitus and Diabetes Mellitus in Heart Failure With Reduced Ejection Fraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, Søren L.; Preiss, David; Jhund, Pardeep S.; Squire, Iain; Cardoso, José Silva; Merkely, Bela; Martinez, Felipe; Starling, Randall C.; Desai, Akshay S.; Lefkowitz, Martin P.; Rizkala, Adel R.; Rouleau, Jean L.; Shi, Victor C.; Solomon, Scott D.; Swedberg, Karl; Zile, Michael R.; Packer, Milton

    2016-01-01

    Background— The prevalence of pre–diabetes mellitus and its consequences in patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction are not known. We investigated these in the Prospective Comparison of ARNI With ACEI to Determine Impact on Global Mortality and Morbidity in Heart Failure (PARADIGM-HF) trial. Methods and Results— We examined clinical outcomes in 8399 patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction according to history of diabetes mellitus and glycemic status (baseline hemoglobin A1c [HbA1c]: 6.5%) and known diabetes mellitus compared with those with HbA1csacubitril/valsartan) compared with enalapril was consistent across the range of HbA1c in the trial. Conclusions— In patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction, dysglycemia is common and pre–diabetes mellitus is associated with a higher risk of adverse cardiovascular outcomes (compared with patients with no diabetes mellitus and HbA1c <6.0%). LCZ696 was beneficial compared with enalapril, irrespective of glycemic status. Clinical Trial Registration— URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01035255. PMID:26754626

  12. The Verification of Coupled Neutronics Thermal-Hydraulics Code NODAL3 in the PWR Rod Ejection Benchmark

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surian Pinem

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A coupled neutronics thermal-hydraulics code NODAL3 has been developed based on the few-group neutron diffusion equation in 3-dimensional geometry for typical PWR static and transient analyses. The spatial variables are treated by using a polynomial nodal method while for the neutron dynamic solver the adiabatic and improved quasistatic methods are adopted. In this paper we report the benchmark calculation results of the code against the OECD/NEA CRP PWR rod ejection cases. The objective of this work is to determine the accuracy of NODAL3 code in analysing the reactivity initiated accident due to the control rod ejection. The NEACRP PWR rod ejection cases are chosen since many organizations participated in the NEA project using various methods as well as approximations, so that, in addition to the reference solutions, the calculation results of NODAL3 code can also be compared to other codes’ results. The transient parameters to be verified are time of power peak, power peak, final power, final average Doppler temperature, maximum fuel temperature, and final coolant temperature. The results of NODAL3 code agree well with the PHANTHER reference solutions in 1993 and 1997 (revised. Comparison with other validated codes, DYN3D/R and ANCK, shows also a satisfactory agreement.

  13. Usefulness of the troponin-ejection fraction product to differentiate stress cardiomyopathy from ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Francisco O; Yang, Solomon; Larrauri-Reyes, Maiteder; Pineda, Andres M; Cornielle, Vertilio; Santana, Orlando; Heimowitz, Todd B; Stone, Gregg W; Beohar, Nirat

    2014-02-01

    The presentation of stress cardiomyopathy (SC) with nonobstructive coronary artery disease mimics that of ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) due to coronary occlusion. No single parameter has been successful in differentiating the 2 entities. We thus sought to develop a noninvasive clinical tool to discriminate between these 2 conditions. We retrospectively reviewed 59 consecutive cases of SC at our institution from July 2005 through June 2011 and compared those with 60 consecutives cases of angiographically confirmed STEMI treated with primary percutaneous coronary intervention in the same period. All patients underwent acute echocardiography, and the peak troponin I level was determined. The troponin-ejection fraction product (TEFP) was derived by multiplying the peak troponin I level and the echocardiographically derived left ventricular ejection fraction. Comparing the SC and STEMI groups, the mean left ventricular ejection fraction at the time of presentation was 30 ± 9% versus 44 ± 11%, respectively (p statistic 0.91 ± 0.02, p <0.001). In conclusion, for patients not undergoing emergent angiography, the TEFP may be used with high accuracy to differentiate SC with nonobstructive coronary artery disease from true STEMI due to coronary occlusion. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Clinical validation of fully automated computation of ejection fraction from gated equilibrium blood-pool scintigrams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiber, J.H.C.; Lie, S.P.; Simoons, M.L.; Hoek, C.; Gerbrands, J.J.; Wijns, W.; Bakker, W.H.; Kooij, P.P.M.

    1983-01-01

    A fully automated procedure for the computation of left-ventricular ejection fraction (EF) from cardiac-gated Tc-99m blood-pool (GBP) scintigrams with fixed, dual, and variable ROI methods is described. By comparison with EF data from contrast ventriculography in 68 patients, the dual-ROI method (separate end-diastolic and end-systolic contours) was found to be the method of choice; processing time was 2 min. Success score of dual-ROI procedure was 92% as assessed from 100 GBP studies. Overall reproducibility of data acquisition and analysis was determined in 12 patients. Mean value and standard deviation of differences between repeat studies (average time interval 27 min) were 0.8% and 4.3% EF units, respectively, (r=0.98). The authors conclude that left-ventricular EF can be computed automatically from GBP scintigrams with minimal operator-interaction and good reproducibility; EFs are similar to those from contrast ventriculography

  15. Forced degradation of mometasone furoate and development of two RP-HPLC methods for its determination with formoterol fumarate or salicylic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramzia I. El-Bagary

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Two simple, selective and precise stability-indicating reversed-phase liquid chromatographic methods were developed and validated for the determination of mometasone furoate in two binary mixtures, with formoterol fumarate (Mixture 1 and salicylic acid (Mixture 2. Also, a forced degradation study of mometasone furoate was carried out including acid and alkali hydrolysis, oxidation, thermal and photo-degradation. For mixture 1, the method was based on isocratic elution using a mobile phase consisting of (Acetonitrile: 3 mM Sodium lauryl sulfate (60:40, v/v at a flow rate of 1 ml min−1. Quantitation was achieved applying dual wavelength detection where mometasone furoate and its degradation products were detected at 247 nm and formoterol fumarate and its degradation product were detected at 214 nm at 30 °C. For mixture 2 and for the forced degradation study, separation was based on isocratic elution of mometasone furoate, its degradation products and salicylic acid on a reversed phase C8 column using a mobile phase consisting of acetonitrile:water:methanol:glacial acetic acid (60:30:10:0.1, v/v at a flow rate of 2 mL min−1. Quantitation was achieved with UV detection at 240 nm. In addition, products from alkaline forced degradation of mometasone furoate were verified by LC–MS. Linearity, accuracy and precision were found to be acceptable over the concentration range of 10–800 μg mL−1 and 5–60 μg mL−1 for mometasone furoate and formoterol fumarate, respectively and over the concentration range of 5–320 μg mL−1 and 20–1280 μg mL−1 for mometasone furoate and salicylic acid, respectively. The two proposed methods could be successfully applied for the routine analysis of the studied drugs in their pharmaceutical preparations without any preliminary separation step.

  16. Evaluation of training nurses to perform semi-automated three-dimensional left ventricular ejection fraction using a customised workstation-based training protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guppy-Coles, Kristyan B; Prasad, Sandhir B; Smith, Kym C; Hillier, Samuel; Lo, Ada; Atherton, John J

    2015-06-01

    We aimed to determine the feasibility of training cardiac nurses to evaluate left ventricular function utilising a semi-automated, workstation-based protocol on three dimensional echocardiography images. Assessment of left ventricular function by nurses is an attractive concept. Recent developments in three dimensional echocardiography coupled with border detection assistance have reduced inter- and intra-observer variability and analysis time. This could allow abbreviated training of nurses to assess cardiac function. A comparative, diagnostic accuracy study evaluating left ventricular ejection fraction assessment utilising a semi-automated, workstation-based protocol performed by echocardiography-naïve nurses on previously acquired three dimensional echocardiography images. Nine cardiac nurses underwent two brief lectures about cardiac anatomy, physiology and three dimensional left ventricular ejection fraction assessment, before a hands-on demonstration in 20 cases. We then selected 50 cases from our three dimensional echocardiography library based on optimal image quality with a broad range of left ventricular ejection fractions, which was quantified by two experienced sonographers and the average used as the comparator for the nurses. Nurses independently measured three dimensional left ventricular ejection fraction using the Auto lvq package with semi-automated border detection. The left ventricular ejection fraction range was 25-72% (70% with a left ventricular ejection fraction nurses showed excellent agreement with the sonographers. Minimal intra-observer variability was noted on both short-term (same day) and long-term (>2 weeks later) retest. It is feasible to train nurses to measure left ventricular ejection fraction utilising a semi-automated, workstation-based protocol on previously acquired three dimensional echocardiography images. Further study is needed to determine the feasibility of training nurses to acquire three dimensional echocardiography

  17. The effects of stress on left ventricular ejection fraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiess, M.C.; Dimsdale, J.E.; Moore, R.H.; Liu, P.; Newell, J.; Barlai-Kovach, M.; Boucher, C.A.; Strauss, H.W.; Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston; Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston

    1988-01-01

    The left ventricular ejection fraction (EF) was studied in 17 healthy volunteers with a new ambulatory left ventricular function monitor. Heart rate, EF, and blood pressure measurements were made during rest, a psychiatric stress interview, cold exposure, exercise, and eating. An increase in EF was seen during emotional stress (from 0.45±0.09 to 0.51±0.13, P<0.001). This increase was comparable to that observed during exercise (0.52±0.14) and eating (0.52±0.10, P<0.001). In contrast, cold exposure caused a decrease in EF (0.43±0.13, P<0.05). These observations demonstrate the powerful hemodynamic consequences of common behaviors as well as the utility and feasability of studying such behavioral factors in ambulatory subjects. (orig.)

  18. Fast, controlled stepping drive for D2 filament ejection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amenda, W.; Lang, R.S.

    1985-01-01

    Centrifugal pellet injectors are required to refuel plasma machines. The pellet feed into the centrifuge should, if possible, be direct to keep the exit angle divergence small. The D 2 filaments used are first stored in a cryostat and then rapidly transported to the intake region of the centrifuge. An intermittent drive for fast, controlled ejection of D 2 filaments is described here. Mean filament speed of up to 0.6 m/s per step (1.2 mm) are achieved for the centrifugal pellet injector which refuels the ASDEX tokamak at Garching. The timing of the (81) step shifts can be synchronized with the rotor motion. The drive allows rates of up to 50 pellets per second. The drive method also seems to be suitable for direct feeding of other known centrifugal pellet injectors

  19. On interplanetary coronal mass ejection identification at 1 AU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulligan, T.; Russell, C.T.; Gosling, J.T.

    1999-01-01

    Coronal mass ejections are believed to be produced in the corona from closed magnetic regions not previously participating in the solar wind expansion. At 1 AU their interplanetary counterparts (ICMEs) generally have a number of distinct plasma and field signatures that distinguish them from the ambient solar wind. These include heat flux dropouts, bi-directional streaming, enhanced alpha particle events, times of depressed proton temperatures, intervals of distorted or enhanced magnetic field, and times of large magnetic field rotations characteristic of magnetic clouds. The first three of these signatures are phenomena that occur at some point within the ICME, but do not necessarily persist throughout the entire ICME. The large scale magnetic field rotations, distortions and enhancements, and the proton temperature depressions tend to mark more accurately the beginning and end of the ICME proper. We examine herein the reliability with which each of these markers identifies ICMEs utilizing ISEE-3 data from 1978 - 1980. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  20. CORONAL MASS EJECTION INDUCED OUTFLOWS OBSERVED WITH HINODE/EIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, M.; Ding, M. D.; Chen, P. F.; Fang, C.; Imada, S.

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the outflows associated with two halo coronal mass ejections (CMEs) that occurred on 2006 December 13 and 14 in NOAA 10930, using the Hinode/EIS observations. Each CME was accompanied by an EIT wave and coronal dimmings. Dopplergrams in the dimming regions are obtained from the spectra of seven EIS lines. The results show that strong outflows are visible in the dimming regions during the CME eruption at different heights from the lower transition region to the corona. It is found that the velocity is positively correlated with the photospheric magnetic field, as well as the magnitude of the dimming. We estimate the mass loss based on height-dependent EUV dimmings and find it to be smaller than the CME mass derived from white-light observations. The mass difference is attributed partly to the uncertain atmospheric model, and partly to the transition region outflows, which refill the coronal dimmings.

  1. Coronal mass ejection kinematics deduced from white light (Solar Mass Ejection Imager) and radio (Wind/WAVES) observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiner, M. J.; Jackson, B. V.; Webb, D. F.; Mizuno, D. R.; Kaiser, M. L.; Bougeret, J.-L.

    2005-09-01

    White-light and radio observations are combined to deduce the coronal and interplanetary kinematics of a fast coronal mass ejection (CME) that was ejected from the Sun at about 1700 UT on 2 November 2003. The CME, which was associated with an X8.3 solar flare from W56°, was observed by the Mauna Loa and Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) Large-Angle Spectrometric Coronograph (LASCO) coronagraphs to 14 R⊙. The measured plane-of-sky speed of the LASCO CME was 2600 km s-1. To deduce the kinematics of this CME, we use the plane-of-sky white light observations from both the Solar Mass Ejection Imager (SMEI) all-sky camera on board the Coriolis spacecraft and the SOHO/LASCO coronagraph, as well as the frequency drift rate of the low-frequency radio data and the results of the radio direction-finding analysis from the WAVES experiment on the Wind spacecraft. In agreement with the in situ observations for this event, we find that both the white light and radio observations indicate that the CME must have decelerated significantly beginning near the Sun and continuing well into the interplanetary medium. More specifically, by requiring self-consistency of all the available remote and in situ data, together with a simple, but not unreasonable, assumption about the general characteristic of the CME deceleration, we were able to deduce the radial speed and distance time profiles for this CME as it propagated from the Sun to 1 AU. The technique presented here, which is applicable to mutual SMEI/WAVES CME events, is expected to provide a more complete description and better quantitative understanding of how CMEs propagate through interplanetary space, as well as how the radio emissions, generated by propagating CME/shocks, relate to the shock and CME. This understanding can potentially lead to more accurate predictions for the onset times of space weather events, such as those that were observed during this unique period of intense solar activity.

  2. Factors influencing the variations of ejection fraction during exercise in chronic aortic regurgitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bassand, J.P.; Faivre, R.; Berthout, P.; Maurat, J.P.; Cardot, J.C.; Verdenet, J.; Bidet, R.

    1987-01-01

    The influence of left ventricular volume variations and regurgitant fraction variations upon left ventricular ejection fraction during exercise was examined using equilibrium radionuclide angiography in patients suffering from aortic regurgitation. Ejection fraction (EF), regurgitant fraction (RF), end diastolic volume (EDV) and end systolic volume (ESV) variations from rest to peak exercise were determined in 44 patients suffering from chronic aortic regurgitation (AR) and in 8 healthy volunteers (C). In C, EF increased (+0.10±0.03, P<0.01) and ESV decreased significantly (-23%±12%, P<0.01), RF and EDV did not vary significantly. In AR patients, EF, EDV and ESV did not vary significantly because of important scattering of individual values. Changes in EF and ESV were inversely correlated (r=-0.79, P<0.01) and RF decreased significantly (-0.12±0.10, P<0.01). Volumes and EF changes during exercise occurred in three different ways. In a 1st subgroup of 7 patients, EF increased (+0.09±0.03, P<0.05) in conjunction with a reduction of ESV (-24%±12%, P<0.05) without a significant change in EDV. In a 2nd group of 22 patients, EF decreased (-0.04±0.07, P<0.01) in association with an increase in ESV (+17%±16%, P<0.01) and no changes in EDV. In a 3rd subgroup of 15 patients, EF decreased (-0.02±0.06, P<0.01) despite a reduction in ESV (-7%±6%, P<0.01) because of a dramatic EDV decrease (-10%±6%, P<0.05). In this subgroup, changes in EF were inversely correlated with changes in ESV (r=-0.55, P<0.01) and positively related to EDV variations (r=0.42, P=0.02). EDV changes were weakly, but significantly, correlated to RF decrease (r=0.39, P<0.05). We conclude that changes in left ventricular ejection fraction during exercise in patients with chronic aortic regurgitation are significantly related in some patients to changes in ventricular loading conditions as well as contractile state. (orig./MG)

  3. Inter-observer variation in estimates by nuclear angiography of left ventricular ejection fraction and ejection rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, K.C.; Railton, R.

    1980-01-01

    The recent decline in the cost of computing has led to the introduction of data processing of gamma-camera images in many medical centres, allowing the development and widespread use of radionuclide techniques for assessing left ventricular performance. Methods such as ECG-gated blood-pool imaging have the advantage of being less invasive than contrast ventriculography and do not rely on geometrical assumptions about the shape of the ventricle. A study has been made of the inter-observer variation in estimates of ejection fraction and average and maximum systolic contraction rates using a micro-computer (VIP-450 Video Image Processor, Ohio-Nuclear Limited, Rugby) to analyse gated blood-pool images of the left ventricle. (author)

  4. Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction in women : The dutch queen of hearts program

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Ruijter, H.; Pasterkamp, G.; Rutten, F. H.; Lam, C. S P; Chi, C.; Tan, K. H.; van Zonneveld, A. J.; Spaanderman, M.; de Kleijn, D. P V

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) poses a heavy burden on patients, their families and society. The syndrome of HF comes in two types: with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) and preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). The latter is on the increase and predominantly present in women, especially the older ones. There

  5. Septum magnet for ejection from the PS to the E-Hall

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1977-01-01

    Pulsed septum magnet for ejection from PS straight sections 61/62 to the East-Hall. This septum magnet, for ss 61, had only 1 turn, for minimum thickness. It was followed by another septum in ss 62, with 2 turns, as there the ejected beam was already farther away from the circulating beam. Both septa were water-cooled.

  6. Ejection Regimes in Picosecond Laser-Induced Forward Transfer of Metals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pohl, Ralph; Visser, C.W.; Römer, Gerardus Richardus, Bernardus, Engelina; Lohse, Detlef; Sun, Chao; Huis in 't Veld, Bert

    2015-01-01

    Laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) is a 3D direct-write method suitable for precision printing of various materials, including pure metals. To understand the ejection mechanism and thereby improve deposition, here we present visualizations of ejection events at high-spatial (submicrometer) and

  7. Una mirada empírica a los determinantes del desplazamiento forzado en Colombia An empirical look of tha determinants of forced displacement in Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pérez Murcia Luis Eduardo

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Esta investigacion propone un modelo empirico que falsea las distintas hipotesis explicativas sobre los determinantes del desplazamiento forzado. Segun los resultados empiricos no se puede argumentar que los desplazamientos se presentan en los municipios ricos o pobres, pero si se puede argumentar que se producen en zonas con alto potencial economico en donde por la existencia de fuertes mecanismos concentradores del ingreso, baja participacion politica y altos niveles de impunidad, las comunidades viven en condiciones de vulnerabilidad, que van mas alla de la pobreza; el conflicto armado.This research tries to pose an empirical model that denies the
    different alternative hypothesis about the determinants of forced
    displacement in Colombia. According to the empirical results it
    is not correct to state that displacements take place in rich or
    poor counties, but it is correct to argue that displacements take
    place in areas of great economic potential in which, given the
    existence of strong income concentration mechanisms, scarce political participation and high impunity levels, the communities
    live under vulnerable conditions that go beyond poverty; armed conflict.

  8. SIMULATIONS OF THE KELVIN–HELMHOLTZ INSTABILITY DRIVEN BY CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS IN THE TURBULENT CORONA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gómez, Daniel O.; DeLuca, Edward E. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Mininni, Pablo D. [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires and Instituto de Física de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2016-02-20

    Recent high-resolution Atmospheric Imaging Assembly/Solar Dynamics Observatory images show evidence of the development of the Kelvin–Helmholtz (KH) instability, as coronal mass ejections (CMEs) expand in the ambient corona. A large-scale magnetic field mostly tangential to the interface is inferred, both on the CME and on the background sides. However, the magnetic field component along the shear flow is not strong enough to quench the instability. There is also observational evidence that the ambient corona is in a turbulent regime, and therefore the criteria for the development of the instability are a priori expected to differ from the laminar case. To study the evolution of the KH instability with a turbulent background, we perform three-dimensional simulations of the incompressible magnetohydrodynamic equations. The instability is driven by a velocity profile tangential to the CME–corona interface, which we simulate through a hyperbolic tangent profile. The turbulent background is generated by the application of a stationary stirring force. We compute the instability growth rate for different values of the turbulence intensity, and find that the role of turbulence is to attenuate the growth. The fact that KH instability is observed sets an upper limit on the correlation length of the coronal background turbulence.

  9. A computational study of droplet evaporation with fuel vapor jet ejection induced by localized heat sources

    KAUST Repository

    Sim, Jaeheon

    2015-05-12

    Droplet evaporation by a localized heat source under microgravity conditions was numerically investigated in an attempt to understand the mechanism of the fuel vapor jet ejection, which was observed experimentally during the flame spread through a droplet array. An Eulerian-Lagrangian method was implemented with a temperature-dependent surface tension model and a local phase change model in order to effectively capture the interfacial dynamics between liquid droplet and surrounding air. It was found that the surface tension gradient caused by the temperature variation within the droplet creates a thermo-capillary effect, known as the Marangoni effect, creating an internal flow circulation and outer shear flow which drives the fuel vapor into a tail jet. A parametric study demonstrated that the Marangoni effect is indeed significant at realistic droplet combustion conditions, resulting in a higher evaporation constant. A modified Marangoni number was derived in order to represent the surface force characteristics. The results at different pressure conditions indicated that the nonmonotonic response of the evaporation rate to pressure may also be attributed to the Marangoni effect.

  10. Ejection of Coulomb Crystals from a Linear Paul Ion Trap for Ion-Molecule Reaction Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, K A E; Pollum, L L; Petralia, L S; Tauschinsky, A; Rennick, C J; Softley, T P; Heazlewood, B R

    2015-12-17

    Coulomb crystals are being increasingly employed as a highly localized source of cold ions for the study of ion-molecule chemical reactions. To extend the scope of reactions that can be studied in Coulomb crystals-from simple reactions involving laser-cooled atomic ions, to more complex systems where molecular reactants give rise to multiple product channels-sensitive product detection methodologies are required. The use of a digital ion trap (DIT) and a new damped cosine trap (DCT) are described, which facilitate the ejection of Coulomb-crystallized ions onto an external detector for the recording of time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectra. This enables the examination of reaction dynamics and kinetics between Coulomb-crystallized ions and neutral molecules: ionic products are typically cotrapped, thus ejecting the crystal onto an external detector reveals the masses, identities, and quantities of all ionic species at a selected point in the reaction. Two reaction systems are examined: the reaction of Ca(+) with deuterated isotopologues of water, and the charge exchange between cotrapped Xe(+) with deuterated isotopologues of ammonia. These reactions are examples of two distinct types of experiment, the first involving direct reaction of the laser-cooled ions, and the second involving reaction of sympathetically-cooled heavy ions to form a mixture of light product ions. Extensive simulations are conducted to interpret experimental results and calculate optimal operating parameters, facilitating a comparison between the DIT and DCT approaches. The simulations also demonstrate a correlation between crystal shape and image shape on the detector, suggesting a possible means for determining crystal geometry for nonfluorescing ions.

  11. Cardiac I123-MIBG Correlates Better than Ejection Fraction with Symptoms Severity in Systolic Heart Failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miranda, Sandra M.; Moscavitch, Samuel D.; Carestiato, Larissa R. [Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências Cardiovasculares, Hospital Universitário Antonio Pedro, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Felix, Renata M. [Departamento de Medicina Nuclear, Hospital Pró-Cardíaco, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Rodrigues, Ronaldo C.; Messias, Leandro R. [Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências Cardiovasculares, Hospital Universitário Antonio Pedro, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Azevedo, Jader C. [Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências Cardiovasculares, Hospital Universitário Antonio Pedro, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Departamento de Medicina Nuclear, Hospital Pró-Cardíaco, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Nóbrega, Antonio Cláudio L.; Mesquita, Evandro Tinoco [Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências Cardiovasculares, Hospital Universitário Antonio Pedro, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Mesquita, Claudio Tinoco, E-mail: ctinocom@cardiol.br [Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências Cardiovasculares, Hospital Universitário Antonio Pedro, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Departamento de Medicina Nuclear, Hospital Pró-Cardíaco, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-07-15

    The association of autonomic activation, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and heart failure functional class is poorly understood. Our aim was to correlate symptom severity with cardiac sympathetic activity, through iodine-123-metaiodobenzylguanidine ({sup 123}I-MIBG) scintigraphy and with LVEF in systolic heart failure (HF) patients without previous beta-blocker treatment. Thirty-one patients with systolic HF, class I to IV of the New York Heart Association (NYHA), without previous beta-blocker treatment, were enrolled and submitted to {sup 123}I-MIBG scintigraphy and to radionuclide ventriculography for LVEF determination. The early and delayed heart/mediastinum (H/M) ratio and the washout rate (WR) were performed. According with symptom severity, patients were divided into group A, 13 patients in NYHA class I/II, and group B, 18 patients in NYHA class III/IV. Compared with group B patients, group A had a significantly higher LVEF (25% ± 12% in group B vs. 32% ± 7% in group A, p = 0.04). Group B early and delayed H/M ratios were lower than group A ratios (early H/M 1.49 ± 0.15 vs. 1.64 ± 0.14, p = 0.02; delayed H/M 1.39 ± 0.13 vs. 1.58 ± 0.16, p = 0.001, respectively). WR was significantly higher in group B (36% ± 17% vs. 30% ± 12%, p= 0.04). The variable that showed the best correlation with NYHA class was the delayed H/M ratio (r= -0.585; p=0.001), adjusted for age and sex. This study showed that cardiac {sup 123}I-MIBG correlates better than ejection fraction with symptom severity in systolic heart failure patients without previous beta-blocker treatment.

  12. Determining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahram Andarzian

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Wheat production in the south of Khuzestan, Iran is constrained by heat stress for late sowing dates. For optimization of yield, sowing at the appropriate time to fit the cultivar maturity length and growing season is critical. Crop models could be used to determine optimum sowing window for a locality. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the Cropping System Model (CSM-CERES-Wheat for its ability to simulate growth, development, grain yield of wheat in the tropical regions of Iran, and to study the impact of different sowing dates on wheat performance. The genetic coefficients of cultivar Chamran were calibrated for the CSM-CERES-Wheat model and crop model performance was evaluated with experimental data. Wheat cultivar Chamran was sown on different dates, ranging from 5 November to 9 January during 5 years of field experiments that were conducted in the Khuzestan province, Iran, under full and deficit irrigation conditions. The model was run for 8 sowing dates starting on 25 October and repeated every 10 days until 5 January using long-term historical weather data from the Ahvaz, Behbehan, Dezful and Izeh locations. The seasonal analysis program of DSSAT was used to determine the optimum sowing window for different locations as well. Evaluation with the experimental data showed that performance of the model was reasonable as indicated by fairly accurate simulation of crop phenology, biomass accumulation and grain yield against measured data. The normalized RMSE were 3%, 2%, 11.8%, and 3.4% for anthesis date, maturity date, grain yield and biomass, respectively. Optimum sowing window was different among locations. It was opened and closed on 5 November and 5 December for Ahvaz; 5 November and 15 December for Behbehan and Dezful;and 1 November and 15 December for Izeh, respectively. CERES-Wheat model could be used as a tool to evaluate the effect of sowing date on wheat performance in Khuzestan conditions. Further model evaluations

  13. Determining the Probability of Violating Upper-Level Wind Constraints for the Launch of Minuteman III Ballistic Missiles at Vandenberg Air Force Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafer, Jaclyn A.; Brock, Tyler M.

    2012-01-01

    The 30th Operational Support Squadron Weather Flight (30 OSSWF) provides comprehensive weather services to the space program at Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB) in California. One of their responsibilities is to monitor upper-level winds to ensure safe launch operations of the Minuteman Ill ballistic missile. The 30 OSSWF tasked the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) to analyze VAFB sounding data with the goal of determining the probability of violating (PoV) their upper-level thresholds for wind speed and shear constraints specific to this launch vehicle, and to develop a tool that will calculate the PoV of each constraint on the day of launch. In order to calculate the probability of exceeding each constraint, the AMU collected and analyzed historical data from VAFB. The historical sounding data were retrieved from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Earth System Research Laboratory archive for the years 1994-2011 and then stratified into four sub-seasons: January-March, April-June, July-September, and October-December. The AMU determined the theoretical distributions that best fit the maximum wind speed and maximum wind shear datasets and applied this information when calculating the averages and standard deviations needed for the historical and real-time PoV calculations. In addition, the AMU included forecast sounding data from the Rapid Refresh model. This information provides further insight for the launch weather officers (LWOs) when determining if a wind constraint violation will occur over the next few hours on the day of launch. The AMU developed an interactive graphical user interface (GUI) in Microsoft Excel using Visual Basic for Applications. The GUI displays the critical sounding data easily and quickly for LWOs on day of launch. This tool will replace the existing one used by the 30 OSSWF, assist the LWOs in determining the probability of exceeding specific wind threshold values, and help to improve the overall upper winds forecast for

  14. Sizes and locations of coronal mass ejections - SMM observations from 1980 and 1984-1989

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hundhausen, A. J.

    1993-01-01

    A statistical description of the sizes and locations of 1209 mass ejections observed with the SMM coronagraph/polarimeter in 1980 and 1984-1989 is presented. The average width of the coronal mass ejections detected with this instrument was close to 40 deg in angle for the entire period of SMM observations. No evidence was found for a significant change in mass ejection widths as reported by Howard et al. (1986). There is clear evidence for changes in the latitude distribution of mass ejections over this epoch. Mass ejections occurred over a much wider range of latitudes at the times of high solar activity (1980 and 1989) than at times of low activity (1985-1986).

  15. Rate of force development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maffiuletti, Nicola A; Aagaard, Per; Blazevich, Anthony J

    2016-01-01

    The evaluation of rate of force development during rapid contractions has recently become quite popular for characterising explosive strength of athletes, elderly individuals and patients. The main aims of this narrative review are to describe the neuromuscular determinants of rate of force devel...

  16. Accretion and ejection in resistive GR-MHD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qian, Qian

    2017-05-10

    In this thesis, the accretion and ejection processes from a black hole accretion system is investigated by means of resistive general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic simulations. As a supplement to the results from prior research with non-relativistic simulations, my results confirm that the winds and outflows originated from thin accretion disks can also be observed in general relativistic simulations. In the first part, the execution of the implementation of resistivity, namely magnetic diffusivity, into the existing non-resistive general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic code HARM is illustrated. The test simulations of the new code rHARM include the comparison with analytical solution of the diffusion equation and a classic shock tube test. rHARM shows reliable performances in these tests. In the second part, rHARM is applied to investigate the evolution of magnetized tori. The results show that the existence of resistivity leads to inefficient accretions of matter from tori onto black holes by weakening the magnetorotational instability inside the tori. An indication for a critical magnetic diffusivity in this simulation setup is found beyond which no magnetorotational instability develops in the linear regime. In the third part, as the main purpose of this PhD project, rHARM is used to perform simulations of magnetically diffusive thin accretion disks that are threaded by a large-scale poloidal magnetic field around non-rotating and rotating black holes. These long-term simulations last 3000 code time units, which are about 195 rotation periods at the disk inner boundary, correspondingly. Their computational domains extend from black hole horizon to 80 Schwarzschild radii. Outflows driven from the accretion disk are clearly seen. These outflows have the typical radial velocity of 0.1 speed of light. In my analyses, I argue that these outflows are driven by the magnetic pressure gradient from the toroidal magnetic field generated by the rotation of the disk

  17. Intermolecular and surface forces

    CERN Document Server

    Israelachvili, Jacob N

    2011-01-01

    This reference describes the role of various intermolecular and interparticle forces in determining the properties of simple systems such as gases, liquids and solids, with a special focus on more complex colloidal, polymeric and biological systems. The book provides a thorough foundation in theories and concepts of intermolecular forces, allowing researchers and students to recognize which forces are important in any particular system, as well as how to control these forces. This third edition is expanded into three sections and contains five new chapters over the previous edition.· starts fr

  18. Aortic insufficiency and hydralazine: behaviour of left ventricular ejection fraction and of stroke index ratio at rest and during exercise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sole, C.; Florenzano, F.; Morales, B.; Neubauer, S.; Escobar, E.; Mollerach, F.; Mollerach, A.; Avella, O.

    1982-01-01

    The gated blood pool ventriculography in patients undergoing in vivo red blood cells labelling with 99mTc-pertechnetate, was evaluated critically as a form of quantifying aortic valvular regurgitation (AVR) and was applicated in severe aortic insufficiency (AI) to determine the effects of Hydralazine at rest and during exercise on the ventricular function parameters thus obtained. The beneficious effects of Hydralazine on left ventricular performance in patients with AI, have already been reported. The results confirm this too, but using a non-invasive method. These beneficious effects of Hydralazine in patients with AI were proved to be a consequence of significant increase in left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF)

  19. Dispersion Forces

    CERN Document Server

    Buhmann, Stefan Yoshi

    2012-01-01

    In this book, a modern unified theory of dispersion forces on atoms and bodies is presented which covers a broad range of advanced aspects and scenarios. Macroscopic quantum electrodynamics is shown to provide a powerful framework for dispersion forces which allows for discussing general properties like their non-additivity and the relation between microscopic and macroscopic interactions. It is demonstrated how the general results can be used to obtain dispersion forces on atoms in the presence of bodies of various shapes and materials. Starting with a brief recapitulation of volume I, this volume II deals especially with bodies of irregular shapes, universal scaling laws, dynamical forces on excited atoms, enhanced forces in cavity quantum electrodynamics, non-equilibrium forces in thermal environments and quantum friction. The book gives both the specialist and those new to the field a thorough overview over recent results in the field. It provides a toolbox for studying dispersion forces in various contex...

  20. The minimum or natural rate of flow and droplet size ejected by Taylor cone–jets: physical symmetries and scaling laws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gañán-Calvo, A M; Rebollo-Muñoz, N; Montanero, J M

    2013-01-01

    We aim to establish the scaling laws for both the minimum rate of flow attainable in the steady cone–jet mode of electrospray, and the size of the resulting droplets in that limit. Use is made of a small body of literature on Taylor cone–jets reporting precise measurements of the transported electric current and droplet size as a function of the liquid properties and flow rate. The projection of the data onto an appropriate non-dimensional parameter space maps a region bounded by the minimum rate of flow attainable in the steady state. To explain these experimental results, we propose a theoretical model based on the generalized concept of physical symmetry, stemming from the system time invariance (steadiness). A group of symmetries rising at the cone-to-jet geometrical transition determines the scaling for the minimum flow rate and related variables. If the flow rate is decreased below that minimum value, those symmetries break down, which leads to dripping. We find that the system exhibits two instability mechanisms depending on the nature of the forces arising against the flow: one dominated by viscosity and the other by the liquid polarity. In the former case, full charge relaxation is guaranteed down to the minimum flow rate, while in the latter the instability condition becomes equivalent to the symmetry breakdown by charge relaxation or separation. When cone–jets are formed without artificially imposing a flow rate, a microjet is issued quasi-steadily. The flow rate naturally ejected this way coincides with the minimum flow rate studied here. This natural flow rate determines the minimum droplet size that can be steadily produced by any electrohydrodynamic means for a given set of liquid properties. (paper)

  1. The minimum or natural rate of flow and droplet size ejected by Taylor cone-jets: physical symmetries and scaling laws

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gañán-Calvo, A. M.; Rebollo-Muñoz, N.; Montanero, J. M.

    2013-03-01

    We aim to establish the scaling laws for both the minimum rate of flow attainable in the steady cone-jet mode of electrospray, and the size of the resulting droplets in that limit. Use is made of a small body of literature on Taylor cone-jets reporting precise measurements of the transported electric current and droplet size as a function of the liquid properties and flow rate. The projection of the data onto an appropriate non-dimensional parameter space maps a region bounded by the minimum rate of flow attainable in the steady state. To explain these experimental results, we propose a theoretical model based on the generalized concept of physical symmetry, stemming from the system time invariance (steadiness). A group of symmetries rising at the cone-to-jet geometrical transition determines the scaling for the minimum flow rate and related variables. If the flow rate is decreased below that minimum value, those symmetries break down, which leads to dripping. We find that the system exhibits two instability mechanisms depending on the nature of the forces arising against the flow: one dominated by viscosity and the other by the liquid polarity. In the former case, full charge relaxation is guaranteed down to the minimum flow rate, while in the latter the instability condition becomes equivalent to the symmetry breakdown by charge relaxation or separation. When cone-jets are formed without artificially imposing a flow rate, a microjet is issued quasi-steadily. The flow rate naturally ejected this way coincides with the minimum flow rate studied here. This natural flow rate determines the minimum droplet size that can be steadily produced by any electrohydrodynamic means for a given set of liquid properties.

  2. Coronal mass ejections and their sheath regions in interplanetary space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilpua, Emilia; Koskinen, Hannu E. J.; Pulkkinen, Tuija I.

    2017-11-01

    Interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) are large-scale heliospheric transients that originate from the Sun. When an ICME is sufficiently faster than the preceding solar wind, a shock wave develops ahead of the ICME. The turbulent region between the shock and the ICME is called the sheath region. ICMEs and their sheaths and shocks are all interesting structures from the fundamental plasma physics viewpoint. They are also key drivers of space weather disturbances in the heliosphere and planetary environments. ICME-driven shock waves can accelerate charged particles to high energies. Sheaths and ICMEs drive practically all intense geospace storms at the Earth, and they can also affect dramatically the planetary radiation environments and atmospheres. This review focuses on the current understanding of observational signatures and properties of ICMEs and the associated sheath regions based on five decades of studies. In addition, we discuss modelling of ICMEs and many fundamental outstanding questions on their origin, evolution and effects, largely due to the limitations of single spacecraft observations of these macro-scale structures. We also present current understanding of space weather consequences of these large-scale solar wind structures, including effects at the other Solar System planets and exoplanets. We specially emphasize the different origin, properties and consequences of the sheaths and ICMEs.

  3. Spironolactone in patients with heart failure and preserved ejection fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Sánchez, C; Mendoza-Ruiz de Zuazu, H F; Formiga, F; Manzano, L; Ceresuela, L M; Carrera-Izquierdo, M; González Franco, Á; Epelde-Gonzalo, F; Cerqueiro-González, J M; Montero-Pérez-Barquero, M

    2015-01-01

    Aldosterone inhibitors have been shown to be beneficial for patients with systolic heart failure. However, the evidence from patients with heart failure and preserved ejection fraction (HFPEF) is limited. We evaluated the role of spironolactone in the prognosis of a cohort of patients with HFPEF. We analyzed the outcomes of patients hospitalized for HFPEF in 52 departments of internal medicine of the Spanish RICA registry according to those who did and did not take spironolactone. We recorded the posthospital mortality rate and readmissions at 1 year and performed a multivariate survival analysis. We included 1212 patients with HFPEF, with a mean age of 79 years (standard deviation, 7.9), (64.1% women), the majority of whom had hypertensive heart disease (50.7%). The patients treated with spironolactone, compared with those who were not treated with this diuretic, had a more advanced functional class, a higher number of readmissions (44.3 vs. 29.1%; p<0.001) and a higher rate in the combined variable of readmissions/mortality (39.0 vs. 29.0%; p=0.001). In the multivariate analysis, the administration of spironolactone was associated with an increase in readmissions (RR, 1.4; 95% CI, 1.16-1.78; p=0.001). For patients with HFPEF, the administration of spironolactone was associated with an increase in all-cause readmission, perhaps due to the higher rate of hyperpotassemia. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  4. Sheath-accumulating Propagation of Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Takuya; Shibata, Kazunari, E-mail: takahasi@kusastro.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Kwasan and Hida Observatories, Kyoto University, Yamashina, Kyoto 607–8471 (Japan)

    2017-03-10

    Fast interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) are the drivers of strong space weather storms such as solar energetic particle events and geomagnetic storms. The connection between the space-weather-impacting solar wind disturbances associated with fast ICMEs at Earth and the characteristics of causative energetic CMEs observed near the Sun is a key question in the study of space weather storms, as well as in the development of practical space weather prediction. Such shock-driving fast ICMEs usually expand at supersonic speeds during the propagation, resulting in the continuous accumulation of shocked sheath plasma ahead. In this paper, we propose a “sheath-accumulating propagation” (SAP) model that describes the coevolution of the interplanetary sheath and decelerating ICME ejecta by taking into account the process of upstream solar wind plasma accumulation within the sheath region. Based on the SAP model, we discuss (1) ICME deceleration characteristics; (2) the fundamental condition for fast ICMEs at Earth; (3) the thickness of interplanetary sheaths; (4) arrival time prediction; and (5) the super-intense geomagnetic storms associated with huge solar flares. We quantitatively show that not only the speed but also the mass of the CME are crucial for discussing the above five points. The similarities and differences between the SAP model, the drag-based model, and the“snow-plow” model proposed by Tappin are also discussed.

  5. Control assembly ejection accident analysis for WWER-440 (Armenian NPP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bznuni, S.; Malakyan, Ts.; Amirjanyan, A.; Ghasabyan, L.

    2007-01-01

    Control Assembly ejection in WWER-440 initiated by the loss of integrity of the Control Assemblies drive housing has been analyzed. This event causes a very rapid reactivity insertion to the core and small break LOCA which potentially could lead to rapid power increase and redistribution of heat release in the core resulting in a fuel, cladding and coolant temperature rise; primary pressure increase, radiological consequences due to loss of primary coolant and potential loss of cladding integrity and fuel disintegration (if applicable). Methodology of the analysis is based on conservative assumptions as well as on deterministic approach for selection of functioning logic of systems and equipment's to maximize reactor core power and minimize power decreasing reactivity feedback. Computational analyses were performed by 3D kinetics PARCS-RELAP coupled code. WWER-440 fuel cross-section libraries, diffusion coefficients and kinetics parameters were calculated by HELOS code. In this paper analysis of accident for Hot Full Power was presented. Results of analysis show that ANPP WWER-440 reactor design meets acceptance criteria prescribed for RIA type design based accidents (Authors)

  6. Coronal mass ejections and their sheath regions in interplanetary space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilia Kilpua

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs are large-scale heliospheric transients that originate from the Sun. When an ICME is sufficiently faster than the preceding solar wind, a shock wave develops ahead of the ICME. The turbulent region between the shock and the ICME is called the sheath region. ICMEs and their sheaths and shocks are all interesting structures from the fundamental plasma physics viewpoint. They are also key drivers of space weather disturbances in the heliosphere and planetary environments. ICME-driven shock waves can accelerate charged particles to high energies. Sheaths and ICMEs drive practically all intense geospace storms at the Earth, and they can also affect dramatically the planetary radiation environments and atmospheres. This review focuses on the current understanding of observational signatures and properties of ICMEs and the associated sheath regions based on five decades of studies. In addition, we discuss modelling of ICMEs and many fundamental outstanding questions on their origin, evolution and effects, largely due to the limitations of single spacecraft observations of these macro-scale structures. We also present current understanding of space weather consequences of these large-scale solar wind structures, including effects at the other Solar System planets and exoplanets. We specially emphasize the different origin, properties and consequences of the sheaths and ICMEs.

  7. Coronal ``Wave'': Magnetic Footprint of a Coronal Mass Ejection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attrill, Gemma D. R.; Harra, Louise K.; van Driel-Gesztelyi, Lidia; Démoulin, Pascal

    2007-02-01

    We investigate the properties of two ``classical'' EUV Imaging Telescope (EIT) coronal waves. The two source regions of the associated coronal mass ejections (CMEs) possess opposite helicities, and the coronal waves display rotations in opposite senses. We observe deep core dimmings near the flare site and also widespread diffuse dimming, accompanying the expansion of the EIT wave. We also report a new property of these EIT waves, namely, that they display dual brightenings: persistent ones at the outermost edge of the core dimming regions and simultaneously diffuse brightenings constituting the leading edge of the coronal wave, surrounding the expanding diffuse dimmings. We show that such behavior is consistent with a diffuse EIT wave being the magnetic footprint of a CME. We propose a new mechanism where driven magnetic reconnections between the skirt of the expanding CME magnetic field and quiet-Sun magnetic loops generate the observed bright diffuse front. The dual brightenings and the widespread diffuse dimming are identified as innate characteristics of this process.

  8. A numerical study of two interacting coronal mass ejections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Schmidt

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The interaction in the solar wind between two coronal mass ejections (CMEs is investigated using numerical simulations. We show that the nature of the interaction depends on whether the CME magnetic structures interact, but in all cases the result is an equilisation of the speed of the two CMEs. In the absence of magnetic interaction, the forward shock of the faster trailing CME interacts with the slow leading CME, and accelerates it. When the two CMEs have magnetic fields with the same sense of rotation, magnetic reconnection occurs between the two CMEs, leading to the formation of a single magnetic structure: in the most extreme cases, one CME "eats" the other. When the senses of rotation are opposite, reconnection does not occur, but the CMEs collide in a highly non-elastic manner, again forming a single structure. The possibility of enhanced particle acceleration in such processes is assessed. The presence of strong magnetic reconnection provides excellent opportunities for the acceleration of thermal particles, which then form a seed population for further acceleration at the CME shocks. The presence of a large population of seed particles will thus lead to an overall increase in energetic particle fluxes, as suggested by some observations.

  9. Sheath-accumulating Propagation of Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Takuya; Shibata, Kazunari

    2017-01-01

    Fast interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) are the drivers of strong space weather storms such as solar energetic particle events and geomagnetic storms. The connection between the space-weather-impacting solar wind disturbances associated with fast ICMEs at Earth and the characteristics of causative energetic CMEs observed near the Sun is a key question in the study of space weather storms, as well as in the development of practical space weather prediction. Such shock-driving fast ICMEs usually expand at supersonic speeds during the propagation, resulting in the continuous accumulation of shocked sheath plasma ahead. In this paper, we propose a “sheath-accumulating propagation” (SAP) model that describes the coevolution of the interplanetary sheath and decelerating ICME ejecta by taking into account the process of upstream solar wind plasma accumulation within the sheath region. Based on the SAP model, we discuss (1) ICME deceleration characteristics; (2) the fundamental condition for fast ICMEs at Earth; (3) the thickness of interplanetary sheaths; (4) arrival time prediction; and (5) the super-intense geomagnetic storms associated with huge solar flares. We quantitatively show that not only the speed but also the mass of the CME are crucial for discussing the above five points. The similarities and differences between the SAP model, the drag-based model, and the“snow-plow” model proposed by Tappin are also discussed.

  10. Regarding the detectability and measurement of coronal mass ejections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howard Timothy A.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this review I discuss the problems associated with the detection and measurement of coronal mass ejections (CMEs. CMEs are important phenomena both scientifically, as they play a crucial role in the evolution of the solar corona, and technologically, as their impact with the Earth leads to severe space weather activity in the form of magnetic storms. I focus on the observation of CMEs using visible white light imagers (coronagraphs and heliospheric imagers, as they may be regarded as the binding agents between different datasets and different models that are used to reconstruct them. Our ability to accurately measure CMEs observed by these imagers is hampered by many factors, from instrumental to geometrical to physical. Following a brief review of the history of CME observation and measurement, I explore the impediments to our ability to measure them and describe possible means for which we may be able to mitigate those impediments. I conclude with a discussion of the claim that we have reached the limit of the information that we can extract from the current generation of white light imagers, and discuss possible ways forward regarding future instrument capabilities.

  11. Incremental first pass technique to measure left ventricular ejection fraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocak, R.; Gulliford, P.; Hoggard, C.; Critchley, M.

    1980-01-01

    An incremental first pass technique was devised to assess the acute effects of any drug on left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) with or without a physiological stress. In particular, the effects of the vasodilater isosorbide dinitrate on LVEF before and after exercise were studied in 11 patients who had suffered cardiac failure. This was achieved by recording the passage of sup(99m)Tc pertechnetate through the heart at each stage of the study using a gamma camera computer system. Consistent values for four consecutive first pass values without exercise or drug in normal subjects illustrated the reproducibility of the technique. There was no significant difference between LVEF values obtained at rest and exercise before or after oral isosorbide dinitrate with the exception of one patient with gross mitral regurgitation. The advantages of the incremental first pass technique are that the patient need not be in sinus rhythm, the effects of physiological intervention may be studied and tests may also be repeated at various intervals during long term follow-up of patients. A disadvantage of the method is the limitation in the number of sequential measurements which can be carried out due to the amount of radioactivity injected. (U.K.)

  12. GLOBAL ENERGETICS OF SOLAR FLARES. IV. CORONAL MASS EJECTION ENERGETICS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.

    2016-01-01

    This study entails the fourth part of a global flare energetics project, in which the mass m cme , kinetic energy E kin , and the gravitational potential energy E grav of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) is measured in 399 M and X-class flare events observed during the first 3.5 years of the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) mission, using a new method based on the EUV dimming effect. EUV dimming is modeled in terms of a radial adiabatic expansion process, which is fitted to the observed evolution of the total emission measure of the CME source region. The model derives the evolution of the mean electron density, the emission measure, the bulk plasma expansion velocity, the mass, and the energy in the CME source region. The EUV dimming method is truly complementary to the Thomson scattering method in white light, which probes the CME evolution in the heliosphere at r ≳ 2 R ⊙ , while the EUV dimming method tracks the CME launch in the corona. We compare the CME parameters obtained in white light with the LASCO/C2 coronagraph with those obtained from EUV dimming with the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly onboard the SDO for all identical events in both data sets. We investigate correlations between CME parameters, the relative timing with flare parameters, frequency occurrence distributions, and the energy partition between magnetic, thermal, nonthermal, and CME energies. CME energies are found to be systematically lower than the dissipated magnetic energies, which is consistent with a magnetic origin of CMEs.

  13. Coronal Mass Ejections: Models and Their Observational Basis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. F. Chen

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Coronal mass ejections (CMEs are the largest-scale eruptive phenomenon in the solar system, expanding from active region-sized nonpotential magnetic structure to a much larger size. The bulk of plasma with a mass of ∼10^11 – 10^13 kg is hauled up all the way out to the interplanetary space with a typical velocity of several hundred or even more than 1000 km s^-1, with a chance to impact our Earth, resulting in hazardous space weather conditions. They involve many other much smaller-sized solar eruptive phenomena, such as X-ray sigmoids, filament/prominence eruptions, solar flares, plasma heating and radiation, particle acceleration, EIT waves, EUV dimmings, Moreton waves, solar radio bursts, and so on. It is believed that, by shedding the accumulating magnetic energy and helicity, they complete the last link in the chain of the cycling of the solar magnetic field. In this review, I try to explicate our understanding on each stage of the fantastic phenomenon, including their pre-eruption structure, their triggering mechanisms and the precursors indicating the initiation process, their acceleration and propagation. Particular attention is paid to clarify some hot debates, e.g., whether magnetic reconnection is necessary for the eruption, whether there are two types of CMEs, how the CME frontal loop is formed, and whether halo CMEs are special.

  14. THE RELATION BETWEEN EIT WAVES AND CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, P. F.

    2009-01-01

    More and more evidence indicates that 'EIT waves' are strongly related to coronal mass ejections (CMEs). However, it is still not clear how the two phenomena are related to each other. We investigate a CME event on 1997 September 9, which was well observed by both the EUV Imaging Telescope (EIT) and the high-cadence Mark-III K-Coronameter at Mauna Loa Solar Observatory, and compare the spatial relation between the 'EIT wave' fronts and the CME leading loops. It is found that 'EIT wave' fronts are cospatial with the CME leading loops, and the expanding EUV dimmings are cospatial with the CME cavity. It is also found that the CME stopped near the boundary of a coronal hole, a feature common to observations of 'EIT waves'. It is suggested that 'EIT waves'/dimmings are the EUV counterparts of the CME leading loop/cavity, based on which we propose that, as in the case of 'EIT waves', CME leading loops are apparently moving density enhancements that are generated by successive stretching (or opening-up) of magnetic loops.

  15. Reproducibility in the analysis of multigated radionuclide studies of left ventricular ejection fraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gjorup, T.; Kelbaek, H.; Vestergaard, B.; Fogh, J.; Munck, O.; Jensen, A.M.

    1989-01-01

    The authors determined the reproducibility (the standard deviation [SD]) in the analysis of multigated radionuclide studies of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). Radionuclide studies from a consecutive series of 38 patients suspected of ischemic heart disease were analyzed independently by four nuclear medicine physiologists and four laboratory technicians. Each study was analyzed three times by each of the observers. Based on the analyses of the eight observers, the SD could be estimated by the use of a variance component model for LVEF determinations calculated as the average of the analyses of an arbitrary number of observers making an arbitrary number of analyses. This study presents the SDs for LVEF determinations based on the analyses of one to five observers making one to five analyses each. The SD of a LVEF determination decreased from 3.96% to 2.98% when an observer increased his number of analyses from one to five. A more pronounced decrease in the SD from 3.96% to 1.77% was obtained when the LVEF determinations were based on the average of a single analysis made by one to five observers. However, when dealing with the difference between LVEF determinations from two studies, the highest reproducibility was obtained if the LVEF determinations at both studies were based on the analyses made by the same observer. No significant difference was found in the reproducibility of analyses made by nuclear medicine physicians and laboratory technicians. Our study revealed that to increase the reproducibility of LVEF determinations, special efforts should be made to standardize the outlining of the end-systolic region interest

  16. Assessment of vasodilator therapy in patients with severe congestive heart failure: limitations of measurements of left ventricular ejection fraction and volumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Firth, B.G.; Dehmer, G.J.; Markham, R.V. Jr.; Willerson, J.T.; Hillis, L.D.

    1982-01-01

    Although noninvasive techniques are often used to assess the effect of vasodilator therapy in patients with congestive heart failure, it is unknown whether changes in noninvasively determined left ventricular ejection fraction, volume, or dimension reliably reflect alterations in intracardiac pressure and flow. Accordingly, we compared the acute effect of sodium nitroprusside on left ventricular volume and ejection fraction (determined scintigraphically) with its effect on intracardiac pressure and forward cardiac index (determined by thermodilution) in 12 patients with severe, chronic congestive heart failure and a markedly dilated left ventricle. Nitroprusside (infused at 1.3 +/- 1.1 [mean +/- standard deviation] microgram/kg/min) caused a decrease in mean systemic arterial, mean pulmonary arterial, and mean pulmonary capillary wedge pressure as well as a concomitant increase in forward cardiac index. Simultaneously, left ventricular end-diastolic and end-systolic volume indexes decreased, but the scintigraphically determined cardiac index did not change significantly. Left ventricular ejection fraction averaged 0.19 +/- 0.05 before nitroprusside administration and increased by less than 0.05 units in response to nitroprusside in 11 of 12 patients. The only significant correlation between scintigraphically and invasively determined variables was that between the percent change in end-diastolic volume index and the percent change in pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (r . 0.68, p . 0.01). Although nitroprusside produced changes in scintigraphically determined left ventricular ejection fraction, end-systolic volume index, and cardiac index, these alterations bore no predictable relation to changes in intracardiac pressure, forward cardiac index, or vascular resistance. Furthermore, nitroprusside produced a considerably greater percent change in the invasively measured variables than in the scintigraphically determined ones

  17. NEAR-SIMULTANEOUS OBSERVATIONS OF X-RAY PLASMA EJECTION, CORONAL MASS EJECTION, AND TYPE II RADIO BURST

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yeon-Han; Bong, Su-Chan; Park, Y.-D.; Cho, K.-S.; Moon, Y.-J.

    2009-01-01

    We report the first simultaneous observation of X-ray plasma ejection (XPE), coronal mass ejection (CME), and type II solar radio burst on 1999 October 26. First, an XPE was observed from 21:12 UT to 21:24 UT in the Yohkoh SXT field of view (1.1 to 1.4 R sun ). The XPE was accelerated with a speed range from 190 to 410 km s -1 and its average speed is about 290 km s -1 . Second, the associated CME was observed by the Mauna Loa Mk4 coronameter (1.1-2.8 R sun ) from 21:16 UT. The CME front was clearly identified at 21:26 UT and propagated with a deceleration of about -110 m s -2 . Its average speed is about 360 km s -1 . At the type II burst start time (21:25 UT), the height of the CME front is around 1.7 R sun and its speed is about 470 km s -1 . Third, a type II solar radio burst was observed from 21:25 UT to 21:43 UT by the Culgoora solar radio spectrograph. The burst shows three emission patches during this observing period and the emission heights of the burst are estimated to be about 1.3 R sun (21:25 UT), 1.4 R sun (21:30 UT), and 1.8 R sun (21:40 UT). By comparing these three phenomena, we find that: (1) kinematically, while the XPE shows acceleration, the associated CME front shows deceleration; (2) there is an obvious height difference (0.3 R sun ) between the CME front and the XPE front around 21:24 UT and the formation height of the type II burst is close to the trajectory extrapolated from the XPE front; (3) both speeds of the XPE and the CME are comparable with each other around the starting time of the type II burst. Considering the formation height and the speed of the type II burst, we suggest that its first emission is due to the coronal shock generated by the XPE and the other two emissions are driven by the CME flank interacting with the high-density streamer.

  18. Comparison of left ventricular ejection fraction by 201Tl gated SPECT and gated blood pool scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lau, W.F.E.; Kelly, M.J.; O'Donnell, M.; Kalff, V.; Van Every, B.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: The aim of this study was to evaluate left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) determination by the Germano 201 Tl gated-SPECT myocardial perfusion (TLGSMP) method using gated blood pool scintigraphy (GBPS) as a reference. 21 patients underwent both TLGSMP and GBPS within eight days of each other from June 1997 to Jan 2000. Acquisition of TLGSMP was performed on a GE Optima NX dual head camera using Tl-201 dose of 1.5MBq/Kg and imaging time of 45 cardiac cycles/step with 16 steps/90 Deg of rotation per detector. All LVEF results were determined using a GE Genie workstation. GBPS results were compared with TLGSMP results for LVEF obtained from the reinjection images using automated Germano processing, and from the stress images using automatic and manual processing. Duplicate automatic analysis by a second observer produced identical mean TLGSMP LVEF results (r = 0.99). Stress TLGSMP LVEF by the automatic and manual processing correlate well (r = 0.99) but the manual LVEF is significantly lower. In conclusion LVEF determination using TLGSMP is highly reproducible and is also accurate when applied to reinjection data. Both manual processing and the use of stress data lead to underestimation of LVEF. Copyright (2000) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  19. Evidence for direct geographic influences on linguistic sounds: the case of ejectives.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caleb Everett

    Full Text Available We present evidence that the geographic context in which a language is spoken may directly impact its phonological form. We examined the geographic coordinates and elevations of 567 language locations represented in a worldwide phonetic database. Languages with phonemic ejective consonants were found to occur closer to inhabitable regions of high elevation, when contrasted to languages without this class of sounds. In addition, the mean and median elevations of the locations of languages with ejectives were found to be comparatively high. The patterns uncovered surface on all major world landmasses, and are not the result of the influence of particular language families. They reflect a significant and positive worldwide correlation between elevation and the likelihood that a language employs ejective phonemes. In addition to documenting this correlation in detail, we offer two plausible motivations for its existence. We suggest that ejective sounds might be facilitated at higher elevations due to the associated decrease in ambient air pressure, which reduces the physiological effort required for the compression of air in the pharyngeal cavity--a unique articulatory component of ejective sounds. In addition, we hypothesize that ejective sounds may help to mitigate rates of water vapor loss through exhaled air. These explications demonstrate how a reduction of ambient air density could promote the usage of ejective phonemes in a given language. Our results reveal the direct influence of a geographic factor on the basic sound inventories of human languages.

  20. New Classification for Heart Failure with Mildly Reduced Ejection Fraction; Greater clarity or more confusion?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Nadar

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The latest European Society of Cardiology (ESC guidelines for the diagnosis and management of heart failure include a new patient group for those with heart failure with mildly reduced ejection fraction (HFmrEF. By defining this group of patients as a separate entity, the ESC hope to encourage more research focusing on patients with HFmrEF. Previously, patients with this condition were caught between two classifications—heart failure with reduced ejection fraction and heart failure with preserved ejection fraction. Hopefully, the inclusion of new terminology will not increase confusion, but rather aid our understanding of heart failure, a complex clinical syndrome.

  1. Two codes used in analysis of rod ejection accident for Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Xinguan

    1987-12-01

    Two codes were developed to analyse rod ejection accident for Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant. One was based on point model with temperature reactivity feedback. In this code, the worth of ejected rod was obtained under'adiabatic' approximation. In the other code, the Nodal Green's Function Method was used to solve space-time dependent neutron diffusion equation. Using these codes, the transient core-power have been calculated for two rod ejection cases at beginning of core-life in Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant

  2. Impact of a systolic parameter, defined as the ratio of right brachial pre-ejection period to ejection time, on the relationship between brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity and left ventricular diastolic function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Po-Chao; Lin, Tsung-Hsien; Lee, Chee-Siong; Chu, Chun-Yuan; Su, Ho-Ming; Voon, Wen-Chol; Lai, Wen-Ter; Sheu, Sheng-Hsiung

    2011-04-01

    Arterial stiffness is correlated with left ventricular (LV) diastolic function as well as susceptibility to LV systolic function. Therefore, if LV systolic function is not known, the relationship between arterial stiffness and LV diastolic function is difficult to determine. A total of 260 patients were included in the study. The brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) and the ratio of right brachial pre-ejection period to ejection time (rbPEP/rbET) were measured using an ABI-form device. Patients were classified into four groups. Groups 1, 2, 3 and 4 were patients with rbPEP/rbET and baPWV below the median, rbPEP/rbET above but baPWV below the median, rbPET/rbET below but baPWV above the median, and rbPET/rbET and baPWV above the median, respectively. The LV ejection fractions in groups 1 and 3 were higher than those in groups 2 and 4 (Pwave velocity to Ea that were comparable to those in groups 3 and 4. In conclusion, rbPEP/rbET had an impact on the relationship between baPWV and LV diastolic function. In patients with high rbPEP/rbET but low baPWV, low baPWV may not indicate good LV diastolic function but implies that cardiac dysfunction may precede vascular dysfunction in such patients. When interpreting the relationship between baPWV and LV diastolic function, the rbPEP/rbET value obtained from the same examination should be considered.

  3. Evolution of coronal mass ejections and their heliospheric imprints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rollett, T.

    2014-01-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are the most powerful eruptions on the Sun and can reach speeds up to more than 3000 km/s. CMEs are the most important drivers of space weather and can cause geomagnetic storms when interacting with the Earth magnetosphere.The evolution and propagation of CMEs in interplanetary space is still not well understood. Interactions with the solar wind as well as other CMEs make accurate forecasting of arrival times difficult. The Constrained Harmonic Mean (CHM) method combines remote sensing white light data of STEREO/HI with in situ data and offers the possibility to derive kinematical profiles for any segment along the CME front to study its evolution in interplanetary space. We studied the influence of the ambient solar wind flow on the propagation behavior for three CME events. The kinematics revealed by the CHM method were compared to the simulated background solar wind. We found that CMEs are highly dependent on speed variations of the ambient medium. The CHM method was tested by analyzing a simulated CME as observed by STEREO/HI. After applying the CHM method, the resulting CME kinematics were compared to the real kinematics of the simulated CME. We found that the CHM method works best for small separation angles between the spacecraft. A case study of a fast CME that has been remotely observed by both STEREO/HI and in situ measured by four spacecraft at different heliocentric distances is also presented. Using this high number of in situ detections and the two side views we derived different speed profiles for the two different segments of the same CME causing a deformation of the overall structure of the CME. The studies presented show the effects of different influences of the ambient solar wind on the CME evolution. Interaction of CMEs with the solar wind or other CMEs lead to disturbances of the speed as well as the shape of CMEs, affecting their arrival time and their geoeffectivity. (author) [de

  4. Reproducibility of gallbladder ejection fraction measured by fatty meal cholescintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Muqbel, Kusai M.; Hani, M. N. Hani; Elheis, M. A.; Al-Omari, M. H.

    2010-01-01

    There are conflicting data in the literature regarding the reproducibility of the gallbladder ejection fraction (GBEF) measured by fatty meal cholescintigraphy (CS). We aimed to test the reproducibility of GBEF measured by fatty meal CS. Thirty-five subjects (25 healthy volunteers and 10 patients with chronic abdominal pain) underwent fatty meal CS twice in order to measure GBEF1 and GBEF2. The healthy volunteers underwent a repeat scan within 1-13 months from the first scan. The patients underwent a repeat scan within 1-4 years from the first scan and were not found to have chronic acalculous cholecystitis (CAC). Our standard fatty meal was composed of a 60-g Snickers chocolate bar and 200 ml full-fat yogurt. The mean ± SD values for GBEF1 and GBEF2 were 52±17% and 52±16%, respectively. There was a direct linear correlation between the values of GBEF1 and GBEF2 for the subjects, with a correlation coefficient of 0.509 (p=0.002). Subgroup data analysis of the volunteer group showed that there was significant linear correlation between volunteer values of GBEF1 and GBEF2, with a correlation coefficient of 0.473 (p=0.017). Subgroup data analysis of the non-CAC patient group showed no significant correlation between patient values of GBEF1 and GBEF2, likely due to limited sample size. This study showed that fatty meal CS is a reliable test in gallbladder motility evaluation and that GBEF measured by fatty meal CS is reproducible

  5. Reproducibility of gallbladder ejection fraction measured by fatty meal cholescintigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Muqbel, Kusai M.; Hani, M. N. Hani; Elheis, M. A.; Al-Omari, M. H. [School of Medicine, Jordan University of Science and Technology, Irbid (Jordan)

    2010-12-15

    There are conflicting data in the literature regarding the reproducibility of the gallbladder ejection fraction (GBEF) measured by fatty meal cholescintigraphy (CS). We aimed to test the reproducibility of GBEF measured by fatty meal CS. Thirty-five subjects (25 healthy volunteers and 10 patients with chronic abdominal pain) underwent fatty meal CS twice in order to measure GBEF1 and GBEF2. The healthy volunteers underwent a repeat scan within 1-13 months from the first scan. The patients underwent a repeat scan within 1-4 years from the first scan and were not found to have chronic acalculous cholecystitis (CAC). Our standard fatty meal was composed of a 60-g Snickers chocolate bar and 200 ml full-fat yogurt. The mean {+-} SD values for GBEF1 and GBEF2 were 52{+-}17% and 52{+-}16%, respectively. There was a direct linear correlation between the values of GBEF1 and GBEF2 for the subjects, with a correlation coefficient of 0.509 (p=0.002). Subgroup data analysis of the volunteer group showed that there was significant linear correlation between volunteer values of GBEF1 and GBEF2, with a correlation coefficient of 0.473 (p=0.017). Subgroup data analysis of the non-CAC patient group showed no significant correlation between patient values of GBEF1 and GBEF2, likely due to limited sample size. This study showed that fatty meal CS is a reliable test in gallbladder motility evaluation and that GBEF measured by fatty meal CS is reproducible

  6. Coronal Mass Ejection Data Clustering and Visualization of Decision Trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ruizhe; Angryk, Rafal A.; Riley, Pete; Filali Boubrahimi, Soukaina

    2018-05-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) can be categorized as either “magnetic clouds” (MCs) or non-MCs. Features such as a large magnetic field, low plasma-beta, and low proton temperature suggest that a CME event is also an MC event; however, so far there is neither a definitive method nor an automatic process to distinguish the two. Human labeling is time-consuming, and results can fluctuate owing to the imprecise definition of such events. In this study, we approach the problem of MC and non-MC distinction from a time series data analysis perspective and show how clustering can shed some light on this problem. Although many algorithms exist for traditional data clustering in the Euclidean space, they are not well suited for time series data. Problems such as inadequate distance measure, inaccurate cluster center description, and lack of intuitive cluster representations need to be addressed for effective time series clustering. Our data analysis in this work is twofold: clustering and visualization. For clustering we compared the results from the popular hierarchical agglomerative clustering technique to a distance density clustering heuristic we developed previously for time series data clustering. In both cases, dynamic time warping will be used for similarity measure. For classification as well as visualization, we use decision trees to aggregate single-dimensional clustering results to form a multidimensional time series decision tree, with averaged time series to present each decision. In this study, we achieved modest accuracy and, more importantly, an intuitive interpretation of how different parameters contribute to an MC event.

  7. Effect of exercise on circulating atrial natriuretic peptide and left ventricular ejection fraction in healthy persons and patients with coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Tetsuya; Ichikawa, Shuichi; Sakamaki, Tetsuo; Suzuki, Tadashi; Iizuka, Toshio; Yagi, Atsuko; Kurashina, Toshiaki; Kumakura, Hisao; Murata, Kazuhiko

    1988-01-01

    Radionuclide angiographic measurements of left ventricular ejection fraction were performed at rest and during exercise in 10 normal persons and 11 patients with coronary artery disease. Exercise was continued on a supine bicycle exercise table up to a symptom-limited maximum. Plasma levels of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) were also determined at rest and during exercise. Ejection fraction in the normal volunteers was 59±3% (mean±SEM) at rest and increased significantly (p<0.01) to 69±3% during exercise. Ejection fraction in the patients was 47±5% at rest and did not change significantly during exercise (51±7%). Plasma ANP in the normals rose significantly (p<0.01) from 62±16 pg/ml at rest to 454±94 pg/ml during exercise. Plasma ANP in the patients also rose significantly (p<0.01) from 231±102 pg/ml to 794±170 pg/ml. The response of plasma ANP to exercise was enhanced significantly (p<0.05) in the patients as compared with the normals in relation to ejection fraction by analysis of covariance. In both the normals and the patients, plasma ANP was inversely and significantly correlated with ejection fraction during exercise (r=0.46, p<0.05, n=21), however, not at rest. Because it has been reported that plasma ANP is correlated positively with pulmonary artery wedge pressure, the estimation of plasma ANP during an exercise stress test might be used for the evaluation of cardiac reserve in coronary artery disease. (author)

  8. Stoichiometry of H+ ejection during respiration-dependent accumulation of Ca2+ by rat liver mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, M D; Chen, C H; Lehninger, A L

    1976-02-25

    We have investigated the energy-dependent uptake of Ca2+ by rat liver mitochondria with succinate as respiratory substrate with rotenone added to block NAD-linked electron transport. In the presence of 3-hydroxybutyric or other permeant monocarboxylic acids Ca2+ was taken up to extents approaching those seen in the presence of phosphate. The quantitative relationship between cation and anion uptake was determined from the slope of a plot of 3-hydroxybutyrate uptake against Ca2+ uptake, a method which allowed determination of the stoichiometry without requiring ambiguous corrections for early nonenergized or nonstoichiometric binding events. This procedure showed that 2 molecules of 3-hydroxtbutyrate were accumulated with each Ca2+ ion. Under these conditions close to 2 Ca2+ ions and 4 molecules of 3-hydroxybutyrate were accumulated per pair of electrons per energy-conserving site of the respiratory chain. Since 3-hydroxybutyrate must be protonated to pass the membrane as the undissociated free acid, it is concluded that 4 protons were ejected (and subsequently reabsorbed) per pair of electrons per energy-conserving site, in contrast to the value 2.0 postulated by the chemiosmotic hypothesis.

  9. Different forces

    CERN Multimedia

    1982-01-01

    The different forces, together with a pictorial analogy of how the exchange of particles works. The table lists the relative strength of the couplings, the quanta associated with the force fields and the bodies or phenomena in which they have a dominant role.

  10. Examination of control rod ejection in WWER-440 type reactors at different circumstances using the code DYN3D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petoefi, G.; Aszodi, A.

    2001-01-01

    For nuclear reactors it is very important to examine the reactivity initiated transients caused by the ejection of a control rod. The event is found to be dependent on different thermal and neutronic parameters. In this paper the emphasis is laid on the effect of the power level at which the transient began and on the effect of the heat transfer coefficient measured in the gap between the fuel and the cladding. The most significant transients can be established by the ejection of the most effective control rod. So the first step is to determine the position of this rod. It was done by steady state calculations A calculation was carried out with all the rods inserted to the half level of the core, criticality was reached by adjusting the power level. Seven other calculations were made for each control rod at withdrawn position while the other six rods were inserted to the half plane of the core. From the results the most effective control rod could be determined.(authors)

  11. A simple criterion for determining the static friction force between nanowires and flat substrates using the most-bent-state method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Lizhen; Wang, Shiliang; Huang, Han

    2015-04-24

    A simple criterion was developed to assess the appropriateness of the currently available models that estimate the static friction force between nanowires and substrates using the 'most-bent-state' method. Our experimental testing of the static friction force between Al2O3 nanowires and Si substrate verified our theoretical analysis, as well as the establishment of the criterion. It was found that the models are valid only for the bent nanowires with the ratio of wire length over the minimum curvature radius [Formula: see text] no greater than 1. For the cases with [Formula: see text] greater than 1, the static friction force was overestimated as it neglected the effect of its tangential component.

  12. Improved Rock Core Sample Break-off, Retention and Ejection System, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed effort advances the design of an innovative core sampling and acquisition system with improved core break-off, retention and ejection features. The...

  13. Improved Rock Core Sample Break-off, Retention and Ejection System, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed effort advances the design of an innovative core sampling and acquisition system with improved core break-off, retention and ejection features. Phase 1...

  14. Investigation of Calibrating Force Transducer Using Sinusoidal Force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Li; Wang Yu; Zhang Lizhe

    2010-01-01

    Sinusoidal force calibration method was studied several years before at Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB). A similar dynamic force calibration system is developed at Changcheng Institute of Metrology and Measurement (CIMM). It uses electro-dynamic shakers to generate dynamic force in the range from 1 N to 20 kN, and heterodyne laser interferometers are used for acceleration measurement. The force transducer to be calibrated is mounted on the shaker, and a mass block is screwed on the top of force transducer, the sinusoidal forces realized by accelerated load masses are traceable to acceleration and mass according to the force definition. The methods of determining Spatial-dependent acceleration on mass block and measuring the end mass of force transducer in dynamic force calibration are discussed in this paper.

  15. Visually estimated ejection fraction by two dimensional and triplane echocardiography is closely correlated with quantitative ejection fraction by real-time three dimensional echocardiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manouras Aristomenis

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Visual assessment of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF is often used in clinical routine despite general recommendations to use quantitative biplane Simpsons (BPS measurements. Even thou quantitative methods are well validated and from many reasons preferable, the feasibility of visual assessment (eyeballing is superior. There is to date only sparse data comparing visual EF assessment in comparison to quantitative methods available. The aim of this study was to compare visual EF assessment by two-dimensional echocardiography (2DE and triplane echocardiography (TPE using quantitative real-time three-dimensional echocardiography (RT3DE as the reference method. Methods Thirty patients were enrolled in the study. Eyeballing EF was assessed using apical 4-and 2 chamber views and TP mode by two experienced readers blinded to all clinical data. The measurements were compared to quantitative RT3DE. Results There were an excellent correlation between eyeballing EF by 2D and TP vs 3DE (r = 0.91 and 0.95 respectively without any significant bias (-0.5 ± 3.7% and -0.2 ± 2.9% respectively. Intraobserver variability was 3.8% for eyeballing 2DE, 3.2% for eyeballing TP and 2.3% for quantitative 3D-EF. Interobserver variability was 7.5% for eyeballing 2D and 8.4% for eyeballing TP. Conclusion Visual estimation of LVEF both using 2D and TP by an experienced reader correlates well with quantitative EF determined by RT3DE. There is an apparent trend towards a smaller variability using TP in comparison to 2D, this was however not statistically significant.

  16. Visually estimated ejection fraction by two dimensional and triplane echocardiography is closely correlated with quantitative ejection fraction by real-time three dimensional echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahgaldi, Kambiz; Gudmundsson, Petri; Manouras, Aristomenis; Brodin, Lars-Ake; Winter, Reidar

    2009-08-25

    Visual assessment of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) is often used in clinical routine despite general recommendations to use quantitative biplane Simpsons (BPS) measurements. Even thou quantitative methods are well validated and from many reasons preferable, the feasibility of visual assessment (eyeballing) is superior. There is to date only sparse data comparing visual EF assessment in comparison to quantitative methods available. The aim of this study was to compare visual EF assessment by two-dimensional echocardiography (2DE) and triplane echocardiography (TPE) using quantitative real-time three-dimensional echocardiography (RT3DE) as the reference method. Thirty patients were enrolled in the study. Eyeballing EF was assessed using apical 4-and 2 chamber views and TP mode by two experienced readers blinded to all clinical data. The measurements were compared to quantitative RT3DE. There were an excellent correlation between eyeballing EF by 2D and TP vs 3DE (r = 0.91 and 0.95 respectively) without any significant bias (-0.5 +/- 3.7% and -0.2 +/- 2.9% respectively). Intraobserver variability was 3.8% for eyeballing 2DE, 3.2% for eyeballing TP and 2.3% for quantitative 3D-EF. Interobserver variability was 7.5% for eyeballing 2D and 8.4% for eyeballing TP. Visual estimation of LVEF both using 2D and TP by an experienced reader correlates well with quantitative EF determined by RT3DE. There is an apparent trend towards a smaller variability using TP in comparison to 2D, this was however not statistically significant.

  17. Relationships between egg-recognition and egg-ejection in a grasp-ejector species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Soler

    Full Text Available Brood parasitism frequently leads to a total loss of host fitness, which selects for the evolution of defensive traits in host species. Experimental studies have demonstrated that recognition and rejection of the parasite egg is the most common and efficient defence used by host species. Egg-recognition experiments have advanced our knowledge of the evolutionary and coevolutionary implications of egg recognition and rejection. However, our understanding of the proximate mechanisms underlying both processes remains poor. Egg rejection is a complex behavioural process consisting of three stages: egg recognition, the decision whether or not to reject the putative parasitic egg and the act of ejection itself. We have used the blackbird (Turdus merula as a model species to explore the relationship between egg recognition and the act of egg ejection. We have manipulated the two main characteristics of parasitic eggs affecting egg ejection in this grasp-ejector species: the degree of colour mimicry (mimetic and non-mimetic, which mainly affects the egg-recognition stage of the egg-rejection process and egg size (small, medium and large, which affects the decision to eject, while maintaining a control group of non-parasitized nests. The behaviour of the female when confronted with an experimental egg was filmed using a video camera. Our results show that egg touching is an indication of egg recognition and demonstrate that blackbirds recognized (i.e., touched non-mimetic experimental eggs significantly more than mimetic eggs. However, twenty per cent of the experimental eggs were touched but not subsequently ejected, which confirms that egg recognition does not necessarily mean egg ejection and that accepting parasitic eggs, at least sometimes, is the consequence of acceptance decisions. Regarding proximate mechanisms, our results show that the delay in egg ejection is not only due to recognition problems as usually suggested, given that experimental

  18. The control system for the CERN proton synchrotron continuous transfer ejection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloess, D.; Boucheron, J.; Flander, D.; Grier, D.; Krusche, A.; Ollenhauer, F.; Pearce, P.; Riege, H.; Schneider, G.C.

    1978-01-01

    This report describes the hardware and the software structure of a stand-alone control system for the continuous transfer ejection from the CERN Proton Synchrotron to the Super Proton Synchrotron. The process control system is built around a PDP 11/40 mini-computer interfaced to the ejection elements via CAMAC. It features automatic failure recovery and real-time process optimization. Performance, flexibility, and reliability of the system is evaluated. (Auth.)

  19. Overall performance assessment for scramjet with boundary-layer ejection control based on thermodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Yubao; Cao, Ruifeng; Huang, Hongyan; Qin, Jiang; Yu, Daren

    2017-01-01

    To avoid the inlet unstart at high equivalence ratio and increase the performance of scramjet with ram-mode, a flow control method of boundary-layer ejection is implemented based on the potential thermodynamic process in a turbo-pump supply system of fuel vapor within a cooling channel. The effect of ejection on overall scramjet performance is studied by taking the integration of measures including numerical simulation and stream thrust analysis. Results indicate that the critical backpressure is significantly increased as the ejection total pressure increased, thereby increasing the compression capacity and efficiency, and decreasing the irreversible losses of shock wave and viscous dissipation. For the ejection total pressure of P_t_,_e_j_e = 2.40–4.00 × 10"6 Pa, the critical backpressure ratio is quantitatively increased by 1.18–11.8% along with the utilization of ejection mass flow rate of about 88.0–100% overall mass flow rate of methane fuel gas, and simultaneously the total pressure ratio, kinetic efficiency is also increased by 7.32–13.1%, and 1.63–2.96%, respectively, while the dimensionless entropy increase is decreased by 14.5–26.8%. On this basis, the specific thrust, specific impulse, and total efficiency is increased by 2.84–4.69%, 2.80–4.68%, and 2.87–4.70%, respectively, which re-emphasizes that the boundary-layer ejection is an available fluid control method. - Highlights: • Pressure ratio affects cycle efficiency based on Brayton cycle analysis. • Ejection control concept is defined based on potential thermodynamic process. • Ejection increases compression capacity, efficiency and engine overall performance.

  20. Comparison of rod-ejection transient calculations in hexagonal-Z geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knight, M.P.; Brohan, P.; Finnemann, H.; Huesken, J.

    1995-01-01

    This paper proposes a set of 3-dimensional benchmark rod ejection problems for a VVER reactor, based on the well-known NEACRP PWR rod-ejection problems defined by Siemens/KWU. Predictions for these benchmarks derived using three hexagonal-z nodal transient codes, the PANTHER code of Nuclear Electric, the HEXTIME code of Siemens/KWU, and the DYN3D code of FZ-Rossendorf are presented and compared

  1. Assessment of poststress left ventricular ejection fraction by gated SPECT: comparison with equilibrium radionuclide angiocardiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acampa, Wanda; Liuzzi, Raffaele; De Luca, Serena; Capasso, Enza; Luongo, Luca; Cuocolo, Alberto; Caprio, Maria Grazia; Nicolai, Emanuele; Petretta, Mario

    2010-01-01

    We compared left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction obtained by gated SPECT with that obtained by equilibrium radionuclide angiocardiography in a large cohort of patients. Within 1 week, 514 subjects with suspected or known coronary artery disease underwent same-day stress-rest 99m Tc-sestamibi gated SPECT and radionuclide angiocardiography. For both studies, data were acquired 30 min after completion of exercise and after 3 h rest. In the overall study population, a good correlation between ejection fraction measured by gated SPECT and by radionuclide angiocardiography was observed at rest (r=0.82, p<0.0001) and after stress (r=0.83, p<0.0001). In Bland-Altman analysis, the mean differences in ejection fraction (radionuclide angiocardiography minus gated SPECT) were -0.6% at rest and 1.7% after stress. In subjects with normal perfusion (n=362), a good correlation between ejection fraction measured by gated SPECT and by radionuclide angiocardiography was observed at rest (r=0.72, p<0.0001) and after stress (r=0.70, p<0.0001) and the mean differences in ejection fraction were -0.9% at rest and 1.4% after stress. Also in patients with abnormal perfusion (n=152), a good correlation between the two techniques was observed both at rest (r=0.89, p<0.0001) and after stress (r=0.90, p<0.0001) and the mean differences in ejection fraction were 0.1% at rest and 2.5% after stress. In a large study population, a good agreement was observed in the evaluation of LV ejection fraction between gated SPECT and radionuclide angiocardiography. However, in patients with perfusion abnormalities, a slight underestimation in poststress LV ejection fraction was observed using gated SPECT as compared to equilibrium radionuclide angiocardiography. (orig.)

  2. The survival of patients with heart failure with preserved or reduced left ventricular ejection fraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesgaard, Søren

    2012-01-01

    A substantial proportion of patients with heart failure have preserved left ventricular ejection fraction (HF-PEF). Previous studies have reported mixed results whether survival is similar to those patients with heart failure and reduced EF (HF-REF).......A substantial proportion of patients with heart failure have preserved left ventricular ejection fraction (HF-PEF). Previous studies have reported mixed results whether survival is similar to those patients with heart failure and reduced EF (HF-REF)....

  3. Kadınların İşgücüne Katılımının Belirleyicileri: Ekonometrik bir Analiz = The Determinants of Female Participation to the Labour Force: an Econometric Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özlem Ayvaz KIZILGÖL

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study is to determine the reasons of why the single and married women living in Turkey, in urban and rural areas do participate the labour force through the 2002-2008 period. In other words, this study aims to search the reasons affecting the women’s decision of working. To this end, the study is conducted via a pooled data set merged by putting together the data gathered from Household Budget Surveys of the years 2002-2008. Logit model analysis is conducted for application. The results of the analysis illustrated that, education level, household income, dependency ratio, ownership of the property and women’s age are the most important factors as to the women’s decision of participating to labour force regarding the married and single women. Furthermore, the number of children reduces the labour force participation in urban areas while increases in rural areas.

  4. Linear theory on temporal instability of megahertz faraday waves for monodisperse microdroplet ejection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Shirley C; Tsai, Chen S

    2013-08-01

    A linear theory on temporal instability of megahertz Faraday waves for monodisperse microdroplet ejection based on mass conservation and linearized Navier-Stokes equations is presented using the most recently observed micrometer- sized droplet ejection from a millimeter-sized spherical water ball as a specific example. The theory is verified in the experiments utilizing silicon-based multiple-Fourier horn ultrasonic nozzles at megahertz frequency to facilitate temporal instability of the Faraday waves. Specifically, the linear theory not only correctly predicted the Faraday wave frequency and onset threshold of Faraday instability, the effect of viscosity, the dynamics of droplet ejection, but also established the first theoretical formula for the size of the ejected droplets, namely, the droplet diameter equals four-tenths of the Faraday wavelength involved. The high rate of increase in Faraday wave amplitude at megahertz drive frequency subsequent to onset threshold, together with enhanced excitation displacement on the nozzle end face, facilitated by the megahertz multiple Fourier horns in resonance, led to high-rate ejection of micrometer- sized monodisperse droplets (>10(7) droplets/s) at low electrical drive power (<;1 W) with short initiation time (<;0.05 s). This is in stark contrast to the Rayleigh-Plateau instability of a liquid jet, which ejects one droplet at a time. The measured diameters of the droplets ranging from 2.2 to 4.6 μm at 2 to 1 MHz drive frequency fall within the optimum particle size range for pulmonary drug delivery.

  5. Force determination in lateral magnetic tweezers combined with TIRF microscopy† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c7nr07344e

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madariaga-Marcos, J.; Hormeño, S.; Pastrana, C. L.; Fisher, G. L. M.; Dillingham, M. S.

    2018-01-01

    Combining single-molecule techniques with fluorescence microscopy has attracted much interest because it allows the correlation of mechanical measurements with directly visualized DNA : protein interactions. In particular, its combination with total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRF) is advantageous because of the high signal-to-noise ratio this technique achieves. This, however, requires stretching long DNA molecules across the surface of a flow cell to maximize polymer exposure to the excitation light. In this work, we develop a module to laterally stretch DNA molecules at a constant force, which can be easily implemented in regular or combined magnetic tweezers (MT)–TIRF setups. The pulling module is further characterized in standard flow cells of different thicknesses and glass capillaries, using two types of micrometer size superparamagnetic beads, long DNA molecules, and a home-built device to rotate capillaries with mrad precision. The force range achieved by the magnetic pulling module was between 0.1 and 30 pN. A formalism for estimating forces in flow-stretched tethered beads is also proposed, and the results compared with those of lateral MT, demonstrating that lateral MT achieve higher forces with lower dispersion. Finally, we show the compatibility with TIRF microscopy and the parallelization of measurements by characterizing DNA binding by the centromere-binding protein ParB from Bacillus subtilis. Simultaneous MT pulling and fluorescence imaging demonstrate the non-specific binding of BsParB on DNA under conditions restrictive to condensation. PMID:29461549

  6. The First ALMA Observation of a Solar Plasmoid Ejection from an X-Ray Bright Point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimojo, M.; Hudson, H. S.; White, S. M.; Bastian, T.; Iwai, K.

    2017-12-01

    Eruptive phenomena are important features of energy releases events, such solar flares, and have the potential to improve our understanding of the dynamics of the solar atmosphere. The 304 A EUV line of helium, formed at around 10^5 K, is found to be a reliable tracer of such phenomena, but the determination of physical parameters from such observations is not straightforward. We have observed a plasmoid ejection from an X-ray bright point simultaneously with ALMA, SDO/AIA, and Hinode/XRT. This paper reports the physical parameters of the plasmoid obtained by combining the radio, EUV, and X-ray data. As a result, we conclude that the plasmoid can consist either of (approximately) isothermal ˜10^5 K plasma that is optically thin at 100 GHz, or a ˜10^4 K core with a hot envelope. The analysis demonstrates the value of the additional temperature and density constraints that ALMA provides, and future science observations with ALMA will be able to match the spatial resolution of space-borne and other high-resolution telescopes.

  7. Development of a current sheet in the wake of a fast coronal mass ejection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ling, A. G.; Webb, D. F.; Burkepile, J. T.; Cliver, E. W.

    2014-01-01

    A bright ray that developed in the wake of a fast coronal mass ejection (CME) on 2005 September 7 presents a unique opportunity to study the early development and physical characteristics of a reconnecting current sheet (CS). Polarization brightness images from the Mk4 K-Coronameter at the Mauna Loa Solar Observatory are used to determine the structure of the ray along its axis low in the corona as it progressed outward. Coverage of the early development of the ray out to ∼1.3 R ☉ for a period of ∼27 hr after the start of the event enables for the first time in white light a measurement of a CME CS from the top of the arcade to the base of the flux rope. Measured widths of the ray are combined to obtain the kinematics of the upper and lower Y- points described in reconnection flux-rope models such as that of Lin and Forbes. The time dependence of these points are used to derive values for the speed and acceleration of the growth of the CS. We note the appearance of a large structure which increases in size as it expands outward in the early development of the ray and an apparent oscillation with a period of ∼0.5 hr in the position angle of the ray.

  8. CHALLENGING SOME CONTEMPORARY VIEWS OF CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS. I. THE CASE FOR BLAST WAVES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard, T. A. [Southwest Research Institute, 1050 Walnut Street, Suite 300, Boulder, CO 80302 (United States); Pizzo, V. J., E-mail: howard@boulder.swri.edu [NOAA Space Weather Prediction Center, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2016-06-20

    Since the closure of the “solar flare myth” debate in the mid-1990s, a specific narrative of the nature of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) has been widely accepted by the solar physics community. This narrative describes structured magnetic flux ropes at the CME core that drive the surrounding field plasma away from the Sun. This narrative replaced the “traditional” view that CMEs were blast waves driven by solar flares. While the flux rope CME narrative is supported by a vast quantity of measurements made over five decades, it does not adequately describe every observation of what have been termed CME-related phenomena. In this paper we present evidence that some large-scale coronal eruptions, particularly those associated with EIT waves, exhibit characteristics that are more consistent with a blast wave originating from a localized region (such as a flare site) rather than a large-scale structure driven by an intrinsic flux rope. We present detailed examples of CMEs that are suspected blast waves and flux ropes, and show that of our small sample of 22 EIT-wave-related CMEs, 91% involve a blast wave as at least part of the eruption, and 50% are probably blast waves exclusively. We conclude with a description of possible signatures to look for in determining the difference between the two types of CMEs and with a discussion on modeling efforts to explore this possibility.

  9. The impact of coronal mass ejection on the horizontal geomagnetic fields and the induced geoelectric fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falayi, E. O.; Adebesin, B. O.; Bolaji, O. S.

    2018-02-01

    This work investigates the influence of coronal mass ejection (CME) on the time derivatives of horizontal geomagnetic and geoelectric fields, proxy parameters for identifying GICs. 16 events were identified for the year 2003 from the CORONAS-PHOTON spacecraft. Five of the events (May 29, June 9, October 28, October 29, and November 4) were extensively discussed over four magnetic observatories, were analyzed using the time derivatives of the horizontal geomagnetic (dH/dt) and geoelectric (EH) fields obtained from data of the INTERMAGNET network. It was observed that energy distributions of the wavelet power spectrum of the horizontal geoelectric field are noticed at the nighttime on both 29 May and 9 June 2003 across the stations. Daytime and nighttime intensification of energy distribution of the wavelet power spectrum of the horizontal geoelectric field are observed on both 28 and 29 October 2003 due to strong westward electrojet. The 4 November 2003 event depicts daytime amplification of energy distributions of the wavelet power spectrum across the stations. The highest correlation magnitude is obtained in the event of 4 November 2003 between dH/dt and EH relationships during the intense solar flare of class X 17.4. We observed that the correlation magnitude between dH/dt and EH increases with increase in CME activity. We concluded that the response of the surface impedance model for different stations plays a key role in determining the surface electric field strength, due to large electric field changes at different stations.

  10. CHALLENGING SOME CONTEMPORARY VIEWS OF CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS. I. THE CASE FOR BLAST WAVES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, T. A.; Pizzo, V. J.

    2016-01-01

    Since the closure of the “solar flare myth” debate in the mid-1990s, a specific narrative of the nature of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) has been widely accepted by the solar physics community. This narrative describes structured magnetic flux ropes at the CME core that drive the surrounding field plasma away from the Sun. This narrative replaced the “traditional” view that CMEs were blast waves driven by solar flares. While the flux rope CME narrative is supported by a vast quantity of measurements made over five decades, it does not adequately describe every observation of what have been termed CME-related phenomena. In this paper we present evidence that some large-scale coronal eruptions, particularly those associated with EIT waves, exhibit characteristics that are more consistent with a blast wave originating from a localized region (such as a flare site) rather than a large-scale structure driven by an intrinsic flux rope. We present detailed examples of CMEs that are suspected blast waves and flux ropes, and show that of our small sample of 22 EIT-wave-related CMEs, 91% involve a blast wave as at least part of the eruption, and 50% are probably blast waves exclusively. We conclude with a description of possible signatures to look for in determining the difference between the two types of CMEs and with a discussion on modeling efforts to explore this possibility.

  11. Prognostic significance of hemoglobin level in patients with congestive heart failure and normal ejection fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varadarajan, Padmini; Gandhi, Siddharth; Sharma, Sanjay; Umakanthan, Branavan; Pai, Ramdas G

    2006-10-01

    Previous studies have shown low hemoglobin (Hb) to have an adverse effect on survival in patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) and reduced left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction (EF); but its effect on survival in patients with CHF and normal EF is not known. This study sought to determine whether low Hb has an effect on survival in patients with both CHF and normal EF. Detailed chart reviews were performed by medical residents on 2,246 patients (48% with normal EF) with a discharge diagnosis of CHF in a large tertiary care hospital from 1990 to 1999. The CHF diagnosis was validated using the Framingham criteria. Mortality data were obtained from the National Death Index. Survival analysis was performed using Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression models. By Kaplan-Meier analysis, low Hb (< 12 gm/dl) compared with normal hemoglobin was associated with a lower 5-year survival in patients with CHF and both normal (38 vs. 50%, p = 0.0008) and reduced (35 vs. 48%, p = 0.0009) EF. Using the Cox regression model, low Hb was an independent predictor of mortality after adjusting for age, gender, renal dysfunction, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and EF in both groups of patients. Low Hb has an independent adverse effect on survival in patients with CHF and both normal and reduced EF in both groups of patients.

  12. Measurement of the ejection fraction of the left ventricle with the isotope stethoscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marving, J.; Hoeilund-Carlsen, P.F.; Jensen, G. (Koebenhavns Amts Sygehus, Glostrup (Denmark))

    1982-01-01

    Non-invasive measurements of left ventricular ejection fraction was performed in 21 patients by two observers with the Nuclear Stethoscope, a new, mobile, non-imaging single probe equipment. sup 99mTc was used for erythrocyte-labelling. Measurements were carried out in two different ways: beat-to-beat mode (i.e. for individual beats or a few beats at a time) and by ventricular function mode (i.e. for a composite beat, registered over a preselected period of time). There was good correlation between the two Nuclear Stethoscope modes (r=0.97) and between these and a simultaneous measurement made by gammacamera (r=0.90 and r=0.88). Despite uncertainties in the determination of correct background-level and centering over the left ventricle, there was no difference between the accuracy of the results of the two observers, compared with gammacamera measurements. The Nuclear Stethoscope is considerably cheaper than a gammacamera with computer-system, it is simple to operate, and can easily be used at the bedside, even in severely ill patients. A special feature is its capability of measuring sudden alterations in heart contractility on a beat-to-beat basis. Clinically it can be employed for both diagnostic purposes and for the monitoring of spontaneous courses and the effect of therapeutic interventions.

  13. Measurement of the ejection fraction of the left ventricle with the isotope stethoscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marving, J.; Hoeilund-Carlsen, P.F.; Jensen, G.

    1982-01-01

    Non-invasive measurements of left ventricular ejection fraction was performed in 21 patients by two observers with the Nuclear Stethoscope, a new, mobile, non-imaging single probe equipment. sup 99mTc was used for erythrocyte-labelling. Measurements were carried out in two different ways: beat-to-beat mode (i.e. for individual beats or a few beats at a time) and by ventricular function mode (i.e. for a composite beat, registered over a preselected period of time). There was good correlation between the two Nuclear Stethoscope modes (r=0.97) and between these and a simultaneous measurement made by gammacamera (r=0.90 and r=0.88). Despite uncertainties in the determination of correct background-level and centering over the left ventricle, there was no difference between the accuracy of the results of the two observers, compared with gammacamera measurements. The Nuclear Stethoscope is considerably cheaper than a gammacamera with computer-system, it is simple to operate, and can easily be used at the bedside, even in severely ill patients. A special feature is its capability of measuring sudden alterations in heart contractility on a beat-to-beat basis. Clinically it can be employed for both diagnostic purposes and for the monitoring of spontaneous courses and the effect of therapeutic interventions. (authors)

  14. Comparison of Asymmetric and Ice-cream Cone Models for Halo Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, H.; Moon, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Halo coronal mass ejections (HCMEs) are major cause of the geomagnetic storms. To minimize the projection effect by coronagraph observation, several cone models have been suggested: an ice-cream cone model, an asymmetric cone model etc. These models allow us to determine the three dimensional parameters of HCMEs such as radial speed, angular width, and the angle between sky plane and central axis of the cone. In this study, we compare these parameters obtained from different models using 48 well-observed HCMEs from 2001 to 2002. And we obtain the root mean square error (RMS error) between measured projection speeds and calculated projection speeds for both cone models. As a result, we find that the radial speeds obtained from the models are well correlated with each other (R = 0.86), and the correlation coefficient of angular width is 0.6. The correlation coefficient of the angle between sky plane and central axis of the cone is 0.31, which is much smaller than expected. The reason may be due to the fact that the source locations of the asymmetric cone model are distributed near the center, while those of the ice-cream cone model are located in a wide range. The average RMS error of the asymmetric cone model (85.6km/s) is slightly smaller than that of the ice-cream cone model (87.8km/s).

  15. Comparison of two radionuclide ejection-fraction techniques with contrast angiography in ischemic heart disease and valvular heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassan, I.M.; Abdel-Dayem, H.M.; Mohammed, M.M.J.; Simo, M.; Yousef, A.M.; Badruddosa, M.; Mahmood, A.R.; Sayed, M.E.

    1986-04-01

    First-pass radionuclide angiography (FPRA) in the 30/sup 0/ right anterior oblique and equilibrium gated radionuclide angiography (EGNA) in the 45/sup 0/ left anterior oblique were used for quantitative measurements of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). Equipment used was a 400T gamma-camera interfaced with a Simis III Informatek computer. The results were compared with contrast angiography (CA). The aim of this study was to determine the sensitivity of both radionuclide techniques. The present data are based on 65 patients in whom CA and EGNA were performed. In 47 patients both FPRA and EGNA were performed. Results suggested that in ischemic heart disease (IHD) and valvular heart disease (VHD) the EGNA technique is well correlated with CA (r=0.9 and 0.73, respectively). FPRA correlated well only with CA in IHD (r=0.86), but not in VHD (r=0.18). This study indicates that both FPRA and EGNA are sensitive, noninvasive techniques for measuring ejection fraction in IHD, while in VHD, EGNA is more sensitive technique than FPRA.

  16. A comparison of two radionuclide ejection-fraction techniques with contrast angiography in ischemic heart disease and valvular heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, I.M.; Abdel-Dayem, H.M.; Mohammed, M.M.J.; Simo, M.; Yousef, A.M.; Badruddosa, M.; Mahmood, A.R.; Sayed, M.E.

    1986-01-01

    First-pass radionuclide angiography (FPRA) in the 30 0 right anterior oblique and equilibrium gated radionuclide angiography (EGNA) in the 45 0 left anterior oblique were used for quantitative measurements of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). Equipment used was a 400T gamma-camera interfaced with a Simis III Informatek computer. The results were compared with contrast angiography (CA). The aim of this study was to determine the sensitivity of both radionuclide techniques. The present data are based on 65 patients in whom CA and EGNA were performed. In 47 patients both FPRA and EGNA were performed. Results suggested that in ischemic heart disease (IHD) and valvular heart disease (VHD) the EGNA technique is well correlated with CA (r=0.9 and 0.73, respectively). FPRA correlated well only with CA in IHD (r=0.86), but not in VHD (r=0.18). This study indicates that both FPRA and EGNA are sensitive, noninvasive techniques for measuring ejection fraction in IHD, while in VHD, EGNA is more sensitive technique than FPRA. (orig.)

  17. Usefulness of acoustic quantification method in left ventricular volume and ejection fraction. Compared with ventriculography and scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Takahiro; Honda, Youichi; Kashiwagi, Hidehiko

    1996-01-01

    Acoustic quantification method (AQ: on-line automated boundary detection system) has proved to have a good correlation with left ventriculography (LVG) and scintigraphy (SG) in patients with normal left ventricular (LV) function. The aim of this study is to determine whether AQ is also useful in patients with abnormal LV function. We examined 54 patients with LV asynergy. End-diastolic volumes with AQ, LVG and SG were 77, 135, 118 ml. A good correlation was found between AQ and LVG and SG (LVG; r=0.81, SG; r=0.68). End-systolic volumes with AQ, LVG and SG were 38, 64 and 57 ml. Left ventricular volumes obtained from AQ had a good correlation with LVG and SG, but were underestimated. LV ejection fraction obtained from AQ had good correlation with those with LVG and SG (LVG; r=0.84. SG; r=0.77). On-line AQ appears to be a useful noninvasive method for evaluation of the left ventricular ejection fraction, but care must be exercised when estimations of left ventricular volumes are made. (author)

  18. Determination of blade-to-coolant heat-transfer coefficients on a forced-convection, water-cooled, single-stage turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freche, John C; Schum, Eugene F

    1951-01-01

    Blade-to-coolant convective heat-transfer coefficients were obtained on a forced-convection water-cooled single-stage turbine over a large laminar flow range and over a portion of the transition range between laminar and turbulent flow. The convective coefficients were correlated by the general relation for forced-convection heat transfer with laminar flow. Natural-convection heat transfer was negligible for this turbine over the Grashof number range investigated. Comparison of turbine data with stationary tube data for the laminar flow of heated liquids showed good agreement. Calculated average midspan blade temperatures using theoretical gas-to-blade coefficients and blade-to-coolant coefficients from stationary-tube data resulted in close agreement with experimental data.

  19. Role of Myocardial Collagen in Severe Aortic Stenosis With Preserved Ejection Fraction and Symptoms of Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echegaray, Kattalin; Andreu, Ion; Lazkano, Ane; Villanueva, Iñaki; Sáenz, Alberto; Elizalde, María Reyes; Echeverría, Tomás; López, Begoña; Garro, Asier; González, Arantxa; Zubillaga, Elena; Solla, Itziar; Sanz, Iñaki; González, Jesús; Elósegui-Artola, Alberto; Roca-Cusachs, Pere; Díez, Javier; Ravassa, Susana; Querejeta, Ramón

    2017-10-01

    We investigated the anatomical localization, biomechanical properties, and molecular phenotype of myocardial collagen tissue in 40 patients with severe aortic stenosis with preserved ejection fraction and symptoms of heart failure. Two transmural biopsies were taken from the left ventricular free wall. Mysial and nonmysial regions of the collagen network were analyzed. Myocardial collagen volume fraction (CVF) was measured by picrosirius red staining. Young's elastic modulus (YEM) was measured by atomic force microscopy in decellularized slices to assess stiffness. Collagen types I and III were measured as C I VF and C III VF, respectively, by confocal microscopy in areas with YEM evaluation. Compared with controls, patients exhibited increased mysial and nonmysial CVF and nonmysial:mysial CVF ratio (P < .05). In patients, nonmysial CVF (r = 0.330; P = .046) and the nonmysial:mysial CVF ratio (r = 0.419; P = .012) were directly correlated with the ratio of maximal early transmitral flow velocity in diastole to early mitral annulus velocity in diastole. Both the C I VF:C III VF ratio and YEM were increased (P ≤ .001) in nonmysial regions compared with mysial regions in patients, with a direct correlation (r = 0.895; P < .001) between them. These findings suggest that, in patients with severe aortic stenosis with preserved ejection fraction and symptoms of heart failure, diastolic dysfunction is associated with increased nonmysial deposition of collagen, predominantly type I, resulting in increased extracellular matrix stiffness. Therefore, the characteristics of collagen tissue may contribute to diastolic dysfunction in these patients. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Forced-air, vacuum, and hydro precooling of cauliflower (Brassica oleracea L. var. botrytis cv. Freemont): Part II. Determination of quality parameters during storage

    OpenAIRE

    Alibas, Ilknur; Koksal, Nezihe

    2015-01-01

    Cauliflower heads, which were precooled using four different methods including vacuum, forced-air, and high and low flow hydro precooling, were stored under controlled atmosphere and room conditions. Controlled atmosphere conditions (CA) were as follows: 1°C temperature, 90 ± 5% relative humidity, and 0:21 [(%CO2:%O2) – (0:21) control] atmosphere composition. Room conditions (RC) were: 22±1°C temperature and 55-60% humidity. Various quality parameters of the cauliflo...

  1. Forced-air, vacuum, and hydro precooling of cauliflower (Brassica oleracea L. var. botrytis cv. Freemont: part I. determination of precooling parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilknur Alibas

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to precool cauliflower using forced-air, vacuum and high and low flow hydro cooling methods. The weight of the precooled cauliflower heads (5000±5 g was measured before they were placed in standard plastic crates. Cauliflower heads, whose initial temperature was 23.5 ± 0.5 ºC, were cooled until the temperature reached at 1 ºC. During the precooling process, time-dependent temperature and energy consumption were measured, and during vacuum precooling, the decreasing pressure values were recorded, and a curve of time-dependent pressure decrease (vacuum was built. The most suitable cooling method to precool cauliflower in terms of cooling time and energy consumption was vacuum, followed by the high and low flow hydro and forced-air precooling methods, respectively. The highest weight loss was observed in the vacuum precooling method, followed by the forced-air method. However, there was an increase in the weight of the cauliflower heads in the high and low flow hydro precooling method. The best colour and hardness values were found in the vacuum precooling method. Among all methods tested, the most suitable method to precool cauliflower in terms of cooling and quality parameters was the vacuum precooling method.

  2. Increased left ventricular ejection fraction after a meal: potential source of error in performance of radionuclide angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, J.M.; White, C.J.; Sobol, S.M.; Lull, R.J.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of a standardized meal on left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction (EF) was determined by equilibrium radionuclide angiography in 16 patients with stable congestive heart failure but without pulmonary or valvular heart disease. LVEF was determined in the fasting state and 15, 30, and 45 minutes after a meal. Patients with moderately depressed fasting LVEF (30 to 50%), Group I, had a mean increase of 6.9 +/- 2.9% (p less than 0.005) in the LVEF at 45 minutes after the meal. Patients with severely depressed fasting LVEF (less than 30%), Group II, had no change after the meal. It is concluded that significant increases in LVEF may occur after meals in patients with moderate but not severe left ventricular dysfunction. Equilibrium radionuclide angiography studies that are not standardized for patients' mealtimes may introduce an important unmeasured variable that will affect the validity of data in serial studies of left ventricular function

  3. Increased left ventricular ejection fraction after a meal: potential source of error in performance of radionuclide angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, J.M.; White, C.J.; Sobol, S.M.; Lull, R.J.

    1983-06-01

    The effect of a standardized meal on left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction (EF) was determined by equilibrium radionuclide angiography in 16 patients with stable congestive heart failure but without pulmonary or valvular heart disease. LVEF was determined in the fasting state and 15, 30, and 45 minutes after a meal. Patients with moderately depressed fasting LVEF (30 to 50%), Group I, had a mean increase of 6.9 +/- 2.9% (p less than 0.005) in the LVEF at 45 minutes after the meal. Patients with severely depressed fasting LVEF (less than 30%), Group II, had no change after the meal. It is concluded that significant increases in LVEF may occur after meals in patients with moderate but not severe left ventricular dysfunction. Equilibrium radionuclide angiography studies that are not standardized for patients' mealtimes may introduce an important unmeasured variable that will affect the validity of data in serial studies of left ventricular function.

  4. A study on interaction of DNA molecules and carbon nanotubes for an effective ejection of the molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, N.; Wang, Q.

    2012-01-01

    The ejection of DNA molecules from carbon nanotubes is reported from interaction energy perspectives by molecular dynamics simulations. The critical ejection energy, which is to be applied to a DNA molecule for a successful ejection from a carbon nanotube, is investigated based on a study on the friction and binding energy between the DNA molecule and the tube. An effective ejection is realized by subjecting a kinetic energy on the DNA molecule that is larger than the solved critical ejection energy. In addition, the relationship between ejection energies and sizes of DNA molecules and carbon nanotubes is investigated. -- Highlights: ► Report the ejection of DNA molecules from CNTs from interaction energy perspectives. ► Develop a methodology for the critical energy of an effective ejection of a DNA molecule from a CNT. ► Present the relationship between critical ejection energies and sizes of DNA molecules and CNTs. ► Provide a general guidance on the ejection of encapsulated molecules from CNTs.

  5. Coronal mass ejections, interplanetary shocks in relation with forbush decreases associated with intense geomagnetic storms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verma, P L; Patel, Nand Kumar; Prajapati, Mateswari

    2014-01-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs} are the most energetic solar events in which large amount of solar plasma materials are ejected from the sun into heliosphere, causing major disturbances in solar wind plasma, Interplanetary shocks, Forbush decrease(Fds) in cosmic ray intensity and geomagnetic storms. We have studied Forbush decreases associated with intense geomagnetic storms observed at Oulu super neutron monitor, during the period of May 1998-Dec 2006 with coronal mass ejections (CMEs), X-ray solar flares and interplanetary shocks. We have found that all the (100%) Forbush decreases associated with intense geomagnetic storms are associated with halo and partial halo coronal mass ejections (CMEs). The association rate between halo and partial halo coronal mass ejections are found 96.00%and 04.00% respectively. Most of the Forbush decreases associated with intense geomagnetic storms (96.29%) are associated with X-ray solar flares of different categories . The association rates for X-Class, M-Class, and C- Class X -ray solar flares are found 34.62%, 50.00% and 15.38% respectively .Further we have concluded that majority of the Forbush decrease associated with intense geomagnetic storms are related to interplanetary shocks (92.30 %) and the related shocks are forward shocks. We have found positive co-relation with co-relation co-efficient .7025 between magnitudes of Forbush decreases associated with intense geomagnetic storms and speed of associated coronal mass ejections. Positive co-relation with co-relation co-efficient 0.48 has also been found between magnitudes of intense geomagnetic storms and speed of associated coronal mass ejections.

  6. Features of solar wind streams on June 21-28, 2015 as a result of interactions between coronal mass ejections and recurrent streams from coronal holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shugay, Yu. S.; Slemzin, V. A.; Rod'kin, D. G.

    2017-11-01

    Coronal sources and parameters of solar wind streams during a strong and prolonged geomagnetic disturbance in June 2015 have been considered. Correspondence between coronal sources and solar wind streams at 1 AU has been determined using an analysis of solar images, catalogs of flares and coronal mass ejections, solar wind parameters including the ionic composition. The sources of disturbances in the considered period were a sequence of five coronal mass ejections that propagated along the recurrent solar wind streams from coronal holes. The observed differences from typical in magnetic and kinetic parameters of solar wind streams have been associated with the interactions of different types of solar wind. The ionic composition has proved to be a good additional marker for highlighting components in a mixture of solar wind streams, which can be associated with different coronal sources.

  7. The mechanism of DNA ejection in the Bacillus anthracis spore-binding phage 8a revealed by cryo-electron tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Xiaofeng [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Texas Medical School at Houston, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Walter, Michael H. [Department of Biology, University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls, IA 50614 (United States); Paredes, Angel [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Texas Medical School at Houston, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Morais, Marc C., E-mail: mcmorais@utmb.edu [Sealy Center for Structural Biology and Molecular Biophysics, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555 (United States); Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555 (United States); Liu, Jun, E-mail: Jun.Liu.1@uth.tmc.edu [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Texas Medical School at Houston, Houston, TX 77030 (United States)

    2011-12-20

    The structure of the Bacillus anthracis spore-binding phage 8a was determined by cryo-electron tomography. The phage capsid forms a T = 16 icosahedron attached to a contractile tail via a head-tail connector protein. The tail consists of a six-start helical sheath surrounding a central tail tube, and a structurally novel baseplate at the distal end of the tail that recognizes and attaches to host cells. The parameters of the icosahedral capsid lattice and the helical tail sheath suggest protein folds for the capsid and tail-sheath proteins, respectively, and indicate evolutionary relationships to other dsDNA viruses. Analysis of 2518 intact phage particles show four distinct conformations that likely correspond to four sequential states of the DNA ejection process during infection. Comparison of the four observed conformations suggests a mechanism for DNA ejection, including the molecular basis underlying coordination of tail sheath contraction and genome release from the capsid.

  8. The Relation between Coronal Holes and Coronal Mass Ejections during the Rise, Maximum, and Declining Phases of Solar Cycle 23

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, A. A.; Gopalswamy, N; Yashiro, S.; Akiyama, S.; Makela, P.; Xie, H.; Jung, H.

    2012-01-01

    We study the interaction between coronal holes (CHs) and coronal mass ejections (CMEs) using a resultant force exerted by all the coronal holes present on the disk and is defined as the coronal hole influence parameter (CHIP). The CHIP magnitude for each CH depends on the CH area, the distance between the CH centroid and the eruption region, and the average magnetic field within the CH at the photospheric level. The CHIP direction for each CH points from the CH centroid to the eruption region. We focus on Solar Cycle 23 CMEs originating from the disk center of the Sun (central meridian distance =15deg) and resulting in magnetic clouds (MCs) and non-MCs in the solar wind. The CHIP is found to be the smallest during the rise phase for MCs and non-MCs. The maximum phase has the largest CHIP value (2.9 G) for non-MCs. The CHIP is the largest (5.8 G) for driverless (DL) shocks, which are shocks at 1 AU with no discernible MC or non-MC. These results suggest that the behavior of non-MCs is similar to that of the DL shocks and different from that of MCs. In other words, the CHs may deflect the CMEs away from the Sun-Earth line and force them to behave like limb CMEs with DL shocks. This finding supports the idea that all CMEs may be flux ropes if viewed from an appropriate vantage point.

  9. 3D trajectories re-construction of droplets ejected in controlled tungsten melting studies in ASDEX Upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Zhongshi; Krieger, K.; Lunt, T.; Brochard, F.; Briancon, J.-L.; Neu, R.; Dux, R.; Janzer, A.; Potzel, S.; Pütterich, T.

    2013-01-01

    Two fast visible range camera systems with vertically and tangentially oriented crossed viewing fields in the divertor region of ASDEX Upgrade were used to observe tungsten (W) droplets ejected from a melting W-pin into the divertor plasma. To obtain the spatial (3D) trajectories of the tungsten droplets, the trajectory of a given droplet in the (2D) camera image coordinate system was derived for each view separately. From these data, the 3D droplet position was derived by computing the shortest line segment connecting crossed viewing chords to a given droplet taking the centre coordinate of the line segment as actual coordinate. The experimental error of the derived position was estimated from the length of the connecting line segment. In the toroidal direction, the computed trajectories can be described by an analytical transport model for the droplets assuming an initial droplet diameter in the range of 60–100 μm. In the vertical direction the vertical distance droplets travelled when reaching the edge of the viewing field also agrees with the model predictions. However, discrepancies are found with respect to the time point whence a droplet reverts its initial downwards motion due to centrifugal forces exceeding gravity and plasma generated force components

  10. The Past, Present, and Future of the Air Force's Future Total Force

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Duffy, Dennis P

    2004-01-01

    This project examines the history of the Total Force policy since its inception in 1970 through its implementation today in an effort to determine a future direction for the Air Force's Future Total Force initiative...

  11. The Eruption of a Small-scale Emerging Flux Rope as the Driver of an M-class Flare and of a Coronal Mass Ejection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, X. L.; Xue, Z. K.; Wang, J. C.; Yang, L. H.; Kong, D. F. [Yunnan Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 396 Yangfangwang, Guandu District, Kunming 650216, Yunnan (China); Jiang, C. W. [Institute of Space Science and Applied Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology, Shenzhen, 5180055 (China); Priest, E. R. [Mathematics Institute, University of St Andrews, St Andrews, KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Cao, W. D. [Big Bear Solar Observatory, 40386 North Shore Lane, Big Bear City, CA 92314 (United States); Ji, H. S., E-mail: yanxl@ynao.ac.cn [Key Laboratory for Dark Matter and Space Science, Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008, Jiangsu (China)

    2017-08-10

    Solar flares and coronal mass ejections are the most powerful explosions in the Sun. They are major sources of potentially destructive space weather conditions. However, the possible causes of their initiation remain controversial. Using high-resolution data observed by the New Solar Telescope of Big Bear Solar Observatory, supplemented by Solar Dynamics Observatory observations, we present unusual observations of a small-scale emerging flux rope near a large sunspot, whose eruption produced an M-class flare and a coronal mass ejection. The presence of the small-scale flux rope was indicated by static nonlinear force-free field extrapolation as well as data-driven magnetohydrodynamics modeling of the dynamic evolution of the coronal three-dimensional magnetic field. During the emergence of the flux rope, rotation of satellite sunspots at the footpoints of the flux rope was observed. Meanwhile, the Lorentz force, magnetic energy, vertical current, and transverse fields were increasing during this phase. The free energy from the magnetic flux emergence and twisting magnetic fields is sufficient to power the M-class flare. These observations present, for the first time, the complete process, from the emergence of the small-scale flux rope, to the production of solar eruptions.

  12. Nuclear forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holinde, K.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper the present status of the meson theory of nuclear forces is reviewed. After some introductory remarks about the relevance of the meson exchange concept in the era of QCD and the empirical features of the NN interaction, the exciting history of nuclear forces is briefly outlined. In the main part, the author gives the basic physical ideas and sketch the derivation of the one-boson-exchange model of the nuclear force, in the Feynman approach. Secondly we describe, in a qualitative way, various necessary extensions, leading to the Bonn model of the N interaction. Finally, points to some interesting pen questions connected with the extended quark structure of the hadrons, which are topics of current research activity

  13. Beat-to-beat assessment of left ventricular ejection in atrial fibrillation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benjelloun, H; Brochier, M; Itti, R; Philippe, L; Lorgeron, J M

    1983-05-01

    Beat-to-beat left ventricular ejection was evaluated in a group of 20 patients with chronic atrial fibrillation using a computerized single probe detector. The reference group consisted of 10 patients with sinus rhythm. For each patient 30 successive cardiac cycles were analyzed and the relative variations of four parameters were assessed: R-R interval, diastolic and systolic time intervals, and ejection amplitude, corresponding to the left ventricular stroke volume. The mean variations were respectively 3.4%, 10.4%, 8.4%, and 11.8% in patients with sinus rhythm, and 21.9%, 37.9%, 10.6% and 30.5% in patients with artrial fibrillation. This demonstrates that changes in ejection are mainly related to the duration of the filling phase, with nearly constant systolic times. Correlations between R-R intervals and systolic ejection amplitudes were highly significant (P<0.001) in patients with atrial fibrillation in 85% of cases. This information complements the average ejection fraction obtained from multiple cycle superimposition.

  14. Beat-to-beat assessment of left ventricular ejection in atrial fibrillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benjelloun, H.; Brochier, M.; Itti, R.; Philippe, L.; Lorgeron, J.M.

    1983-01-01

    Beat-to-beat left ventricular ejection was evaluated in a group of 20 patients with chronic atrial fibrillation using a computerized single probe detector. The reference group consisted of 10 patients with sinus rhythm. For each patient 30 successive cardiac cycles were analyzed and the relative variations of four parameters were assessed: R-R interval, diastolic and systolic time intervals, and ejection amplitude, corresponding to the left ventricular stroke volume. The mean variations were respectively 3.4%, 10.4%, 8.4%, and 11.8% in patients with sinus rhythm, and 21.9%, 37.9%, 10.6% and 30.5% in patients with artrial fibrillation. This demonstrates that changes in ejection are mainly related to the duration of the filling phase, with nearly constant systolic times. Correlations between R-R intervals and systolic ejection amplitudes were highly significant (P<0.001) in patients with atrial fibrillation in 85% of cases. This information complements the average ejection fraction obtained from multiple cycle superimposition. (orig.)

  15. A three-dimensional pin-wise analysis for CEA ejection accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Guen-Tae; Park, Min-Ho; Park, Jin-Woo; Um, Kil-Sup; Choi, Tong-Soo [KEPCO NF, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    The ejection of a control element assembly (CEA) with high reactivity worth causes the sudden insertion of reactivity into the core. Immediately after the CEA ejection, the nuclear power of the reactor dramatically increases in an exponential behavior until the doppler effect becomes important and turns the reactivity balance and power down to lower levels. The 3-D CEA ejection analysis methodology has been developed using the multi-dimensional code coupling system, CHASER, which couples three dimensional core neutron kinetics code ASTRA, subchannel analysis code THALES, and fuel performance analysis code FROST using message passing interface (MPI). This paper presents the pin-by-pin level analysis result with the 3-D CEA ejection analysis methodology using the CHASER. The pin-by-pin level analysis consists of DNBR, enthalpy and Pellet/Clad Mechanical Interaction (PCMI) analysis. All the evaluations are simulated for APR1400 plant loaded with PLUS7 fuel. In this paper, the pin-by-pin analysis using the multidimensional core transient code, CHASER, is presented with respect to enthalpy, DNBR and PCMI for APR1400 plant loaded with PLUS7 fuel. For the pin-by-pin enthalpy and DNBR analysis, the quarter core for HFP case or 15 - 20 assemblies around the most severe assembly for part powers or HZP cases are selected. And PCMI calculation is performed for all the rods in the whole core during a conservative time period. The pin-by-pin analysis results show that the regulatory guidelines of CEA ejection accident are satisfied.

  16. Ejection dynamics of hydrogen molecular ions from methanol in intense laser fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okino, T; Furukawa, Y; Liu, P; Ichikawa, T; Itakura, R; Hoshina, K; Yamanouchi, K; Nakano, H

    2006-01-01

    The ejection of hydrogen molecular ions from two-body Coulomb explosion processes of methanol (CH 3 OH, CD 3 OH and CH 3 OD) in an intense laser field (800 nm, 60 fs, 0.2 PW cm -2 ) is investigated by a coincidence momentum imaging method. From the coincidence momentum maps, the ejection processes of hydrogen molecular ions, CH 3 OH 2+ → H m + + CH (3-m) OH + (m = 2, 3), CD 3 OH 2+ → D m + + CH (3-m) OH + (m = 2, 3) and CH 3 OD 2+ → H m + + CH (3-m) OD + (m = 2, 3), are identified. Based on the results obtained with isotopically substituted methanol, the isotope effect on the ejection process of hydrogen molecular ions is discussed. Furthermore, the ejection of H/D exchanged hydrogen molecular ions (HD + , HD 2 + and H 2 D + ) is identified, and the timescales for the H/D exchanging processes are estimated from the extent of anisotropy in the ejection directions

  17. THE NATURE OF HYPERVELOCITY STARS AND THE TIME BETWEEN THEIR FORMATION AND EJECTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Warren R.; Geller, Margaret J.; Kenyon, Scott J. [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Cohen, Judith G., E-mail: wbrown@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: mgeller@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: skenyon@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: jlc@astro.caltech.edu [Palomar Observatory, Mail Stop 249-17, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2012-07-20

    We obtain Keck HIRES spectroscopy of HVS5, one of the fastest unbound stars in the Milky Way halo. We show that HVS5 is a 3.62 {+-} 0.11 M{sub Sun} main-sequence B star at a distance of 50 {+-} 5 kpc. The difference between its age and its flight time from the Galactic center is 105 {+-} 18 (stat) {+-}30 (sys) Myr; flight times from locations elsewhere in the Galactic disk are similar. This 10{sup 8} yr 'arrival time' between formation and ejection is difficult to reconcile with any ejection scenario involving massive stars that live for only 10{sup 7} yr. For comparison, we derive arrival times of 10{sup 7} yr for two unbound runaway B stars, consistent with their disk origin where ejection results from a supernova in a binary system or dynamical interactions between massive stars in a dense star cluster. For HVS5, ejection during the first 10{sup 7} yr of its lifetime is ruled out at the 3{sigma} level. Together with the 10{sup 8} yr arrival times inferred for three other well-studied hypervelocity stars (HVSs), these results are consistent with a Galactic center origin for the HVSs. If the HVSs were indeed ejected by the central black hole, then the Galactic center was forming stars {approx_equal}200 Myr ago, and the progenitors of the HVSs took {approx_equal}100 Myr to enter the black hole's loss cone.

  18. THE NATURE OF HYPERVELOCITY STARS AND THE TIME BETWEEN THEIR FORMATION AND EJECTION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Warren R.; Geller, Margaret J.; Kenyon, Scott J.; Cohen, Judith G.

    2012-01-01

    We obtain Keck HIRES spectroscopy of HVS5, one of the fastest unbound stars in the Milky Way halo. We show that HVS5 is a 3.62 ± 0.11 M ☉ main-sequence B star at a distance of 50 ± 5 kpc. The difference between its age and its flight time from the Galactic center is 105 ± 18 (stat) ±30 (sys) Myr; flight times from locations elsewhere in the Galactic disk are similar. This 10 8 yr 'arrival time' between formation and ejection is difficult to reconcile with any ejection scenario involving massive stars that live for only 10 7 yr. For comparison, we derive arrival times of 10 7 yr for two unbound runaway B stars, consistent with their disk origin where ejection results from a supernova in a binary system or dynamical interactions between massive stars in a dense star cluster. For HVS5, ejection during the first 10 7 yr of its lifetime is ruled out at the 3σ level. Together with the 10 8 yr arrival times inferred for three other well-studied hypervelocity stars (HVSs), these results are consistent with a Galactic center origin for the HVSs. If the HVSs were indeed ejected by the central black hole, then the Galactic center was forming stars ≅200 Myr ago, and the progenitors of the HVSs took ≅100 Myr to enter the black hole's loss cone.

  19. Extracting and analyzing ejection fraction values from electronic echocardiography reports in a large health maintenance organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Fagen; Zheng, Chengyi; Yuh-Jer Shen, Albert; Chen, Wansu

    2017-12-01

    The left ventricular ejection fraction value is an important prognostic indicator of cardiovascular outcomes including morbidity and mortality and is often used clinically to indicate severity of heart disease. However, it is usually reported in free-text echocardiography reports. We developed and validated a computerized algorithm to extract ejection fraction values from echocardiography reports and applied the algorithm to a large volume of unstructured echocardiography reports between 1995 and 2011 in a large health maintenance organization. A total of 621,856 echocardiography reports with a description of ejection fraction values or systolic functions were identified, of which 70 percent contained numeric ejection fraction values and the rest (30%) were text descriptions explicitly indicating the systolic left ventricular function. The 12.1 percent (16.0% for male and 8.4% for female) of these extracted ejection fraction values are <45 percent. Validation conducted based on a random sample of 200 reports yielded 95.0 percent sensitivity and 96.9 percent positive predictive value.

  20. Force Reproduction Error Depends on Force Level, whereas the Position Reproduction Error Does Not

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Onneweer, B.; Mugge, W.; Schouten, Alfred Christiaan

    2016-01-01

    When reproducing a previously perceived force or position humans make systematic errors. This study determined the effect of force level on force and position reproduction, when both target and reproduction force are self-generated with the same hand. Subjects performed force reproduction tasks at

  1. Assessment of the background count to measure the left ventricular ejection fraction with a nuclear stethoscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doi, Mayumi; Hiroe, Michiaki; Marumo, Fumiaki; Itoh, Haruki; Taniguchi, Koichi.

    1993-01-01

    The nuclear stethoscope is a newly developed device for monitoring left ventricular ejection fraction (EF) with a pair of cadmium telluride detector for both left ventricular count (first channel) and background count (second channel). Although it is useful for evaluating the cardiac function during exercise, the methodology of the calculation for distinguishing the net ventricular blood count from the background count has not been established yet. In order to establish a reasonable method to calculate EF, we measured EF using a nuclear stethoscope and conventional gated blood pool scintigraphy in 20 healthy volunteers. All subjects underwent two supine ergometer exercise tests consisting of the 3 stages for the nuclear stethoscope and blood pool scintigraphy. The EF was determined with the following three methods for the nuclear stethoscope: 1) Cut-off level was fixed at 70% of first channel, 2) Cut-off level at 75%, and 3) Cut-off level was determined by the background count obtained from second channel. There was a poor relationship between the EFs obtained from gated blood scintigraphy and the EFs from the nuclear stethoscope calculated by any of these methods. Regarding the EF calculated using the background count, however, the delta values of EF between rest and any of the 3 stages during exercise correlated closely to those EF from blood scintigraphy. When we apply the EF-at-rest value obtained from blood pool scintigraphy to analysis with the nuclear stethoscope, the EFs of 3 stages indicated good correlation (Stage I r=0.91, Stage II r=0.82, Stage III r=0.69). These results suggest that detecting the background count is useful in order to measure the left ventricular EF with the nuclear stethoscope. Since the absolute value of EF does not necessarily correlate to that from blood pool scintigraphy in this mehod, it is recommended to evaluate only the changing values of the EF. (author)

  2. Assessment of the background count to measure the left ventricular ejection fraction with a nuclear stethoscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doi, Mayumi; Hiroe, Michiaki; Marumo, Fumiaki (Tokyo Medical and Dental Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine); Itoh, Haruki; Taniguchi, Koichi

    1993-06-01

    The nuclear stethoscope is a newly developed device for monitoring left ventricular ejection fraction (EF) with a pair of cadmium telluride detector for both left ventricular count (first channel) and background count (second channel). Although it is useful for evaluating the cardiac function during exercise, the methodology of the calculation for distinguishing the net ventricular blood count from the background count has not been established yet. In order to establish a reasonable method to calculate EF, we measured EF using a nuclear stethoscope and conventional gated blood pool scintigraphy in 20 healthy volunteers. All subjects underwent two supine ergometer exercise tests consisting of the 3 stages for the nuclear stethoscope and blood pool scintigraphy. The EF was determined with the following three methods for the nuclear stethoscope: (1) Cut-off level was fixed at 70% of first channel, (2) Cut-off level at 75%, and (3) Cut-off level was determined by the background count obtained from second channel. There was a poor relationship between the EFs obtained from gated blood scintigraphy and the EFs from the nuclear stethoscope calculated by any of these methods. Regarding the EF calculated using the background count, however, the delta values of EF between rest and any of the 3 stages during exercise correlated closely to those EF from blood scintigraphy. When we apply the EF-at-rest value obtained from blood pool scintigraphy to analysis with the nuclear stethoscope, the EFs of 3 stages indicated good correlation (Stage I r=0.91, Stage II r=0.82, Stage III r=0.69). These results suggest that detecting the background count is useful in order to measure the left ventricular EF with the nuclear stethoscope. Since the absolute value of EF does not necessarily correlate to that from blood pool scintigraphy in this mehod, it is recommended to evaluate only the changing values of the EF. (author).

  3. The Drag-based Ensemble Model (DBEM) for Coronal Mass Ejection Propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumbović, Mateja; Čalogović, Jaša; Vršnak, Bojan; Temmer, Manuela; Mays, M. Leila; Veronig, Astrid; Piantschitsch, Isabell

    2018-02-01

    The drag-based model for heliospheric propagation of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) is a widely used analytical model that can predict CME arrival time and speed at a given heliospheric location. It is based on the assumption that the propagation of CMEs in interplanetary space is solely under the influence of magnetohydrodynamical drag, where CME propagation is determined based on CME initial properties as well as the properties of the ambient solar wind. We present an upgraded version, the drag-based ensemble model (DBEM), that covers ensemble modeling to produce a distribution of possible ICME arrival times and speeds. Multiple runs using uncertainty ranges for the input values can be performed in almost real-time, within a few minutes. This allows us to define the most likely ICME arrival times and speeds, quantify prediction uncertainties, and determine forecast confidence. The performance of the DBEM is evaluated and compared to that of ensemble WSA-ENLIL+Cone model (ENLIL) using the same sample of events. It is found that the mean error is ME = ‑9.7 hr, mean absolute error MAE = 14.3 hr, and root mean square error RMSE = 16.7 hr, which is somewhat higher than, but comparable to ENLIL errors (ME = ‑6.1 hr, MAE = 12.8 hr and RMSE = 14.4 hr). Overall, DBEM and ENLIL show a similar performance. Furthermore, we find that in both models fast CMEs are predicted to arrive earlier than observed, most likely owing to the physical limitations of models, but possibly also related to an overestimation of the CME initial speed for fast CMEs.

  4. Response of right ventricular ejection fraction to exercise stress in coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narita, Michihiro; Kurihara, Tadashi; Murano, Kenichi; Usami, Masahisa

    1985-01-01

    The right ventricular (RV) response to exercise was assessed in 28 patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) and 9 normal subjects. The relationship between RV reserve, exercise left ventricular (LV) reserve and the presence of proximal right coronary artery (RCA) stenosis were evaluated. RV and LV ejection fraction (EF) were determined by multiple-gated equilibrium blood pool imaging with sup(99m)Tc in the modified left anterior oblique position. Graded supine exercise stress blood pool imaging was performed at the same position by using bicycle ergometer. For calculation of RVEF, variable ROIs were used. In normal subjects, both RVEF and LVEF increased significantly during exercise (%ΔRVEF 18.9+-5.9%, %ΔLVEF 16.3%+-4.7%). In CAD groups with and without RCA stenosis, LVEF and RVEF showed decrease or no change during exercise. Although magnitude of change in LVEF from rest to exercise (%ΔLVEF) was not significantly different in both CAD groups (4.1+-9.0% in cases with RCA disease and 6.2+-14.6% in cases without RCA disease), %ΔRVEF was different significantly (16.0+-14.3% in cases with RCA disease and 1.4+-14.1% in cases without RCA disease, p<0.05). In patients with RCA disease, 3 patients (25%) showed depression in RVEF with exercise regardless of the increase in LVEF. However, none of the patients without RCA disease showed depression in RVEF with the increment in LVEF during exercise. These findings suggested that proximal RCA stenosis is one major determinant of exercise RVEF response. But in 9 of 16 patients without RCA disease (56%) both RVEF and LVEF decreased during exercise. Besides, in patients without RCA disease there was a significant linear relationship between the direction and magnitude of change from rest to exercise of LVEF and RVEF (r=0.69). (J.P.N.)

  5. Nest Sanitation as the Evolutionary Background for Egg Ejection Behaviour and the Role of Motivation for Object Removal

    OpenAIRE

    Pol??ek, Miroslav; Griggio, Matteo; Bart?kov?, Michaela; Hoi, Herbert

    2013-01-01

    Higher interclutch colour variation can evolve under the pressure of brood parasitism to increase the detection of parasitic eggs. Nest sanitation could be a prerequisite for the evolution of anti-parasite defence in terms of egg ejection. In this respect, we used nest sanitation behaviour as a tool to identify: i) motivation and its underlying function and, ii) which features provoke ejection behaviour. Therefore, we experimentally tested whether size, colour or shape may influence ejection ...

  6. Geomagnetic response of interplanetary coronal mass ejections in the Earth's magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badruddin; Mustajab, F.; Derouich, M.

    2018-05-01

    A coronal mass ejections (CME) is the huge mass of plasma with embedded magnetic field ejected abruptly from the Sun. These CMEs propagate into interplanetary space with different speed. Some of them hit the Earth's magnetosphere and create many types of disturbances; one of them is the disturbance in the geomagnetic field. Individual geomagnetic disturbances differ not only in their magnitudes, but the nature of disturbance is also different. It is, therefore, desirable to understand these differences not only to understand the physics of geomagnetic disturbances but also to understand the properties of solar/interplanetary structures producing these disturbances of different magnitude and nature. In this work, we use the spacecraft measurements of CMEs with distinct magnetic properties propagating in the interplanetary space and generating disturbances of different levels and nature. We utilize their distinct plasma and field properties to search for the interplanetary parameter(s) playing important role in influencing the geomagnetic response of different coronal mass ejections.

  7. A study of stresses in powder compacted components during and after ejection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Redanz, Pia

    2001-01-01

    A finite strain finite element method is used to examine the residual stresses in a cup-shaped powder compact. Two rate-independent strain hardening porous material models are used: the combined material model (Fleck, N.A., Kuhn, L.T., McMeeking, R.M., 1992a. J. Mech. Phys. Solids 40 (5), 1139......-1162) and a material model which includes the dependency of inter-particle cohesive strength (Fleck, N.A., 1995. J. Mech. Phys. Solids 43, 1409-1431). The residual stress state in the unloaded cup is highly dependent on the compaction process and less dependent on the ejection route. The maximum principal stress...... plotted during ejection shows that higher stresses are found during the ejection process than those found in the completely unloaded specimen. The degree of inter-particle cohesive strength has hardly any effect on the porosity distributions in the compacts but it has a strong influence on the stress...

  8. Influence of edge conditions on material ejection from periodic grooves in laser shock-loaded tin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rességuier, T. de; Roland, C. [Institut PPRIME, UPR 3346, CNRS, ENSMA, Université de Poitiers, 1 ave. Clément Ader, 86961 Futuroscope Cedex (France); Prudhomme, G.; Lescoute, E.; Mercier, P. [CEA, DAM, DIF, 91297 Arpajon (France); Loison, D. [Institut de Physique de Rennes, CNRS, Université de Rennes 1, 35042 Rennes (France)

    2016-05-14

    In a material subjected to high dynamic compression, the breakout of a shock wave at a rough free surface can lead to the ejection of high velocity debris. Anticipating the ballistic properties of such debris is a key safety issue in many applications involving shock loading, including pyrotechnics and inertial confinement fusion experiments. In this paper, we use laser driven shocks to investigate particle ejection from calibrated grooves of micrometric dimensions and approximately sinusoidal profile in tin samples, with various boundary conditions at the groove edges, including single groove and periodic patterns. Fast transverse shadowgraphy provides ejection velocities after shock breakout. They are found to depend not only on the groove depth and wavelength, as predicted theoretically and already observed in the past, but also, unexpectedly, on the edge conditions, with a jet tip velocity significantly lower in the case of a single groove than behind a periodic pattern.

  9. Some elements of understanding about the cluster ejection accident in the EPR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vignon, Dominique

    2010-01-01

    The author answers to a publication made by an association (Sortir du Nucleaire) which is provided in appendix (some parts of this text are highlighted) and denounced risks associated with a cluster ejection accident in an EPR in relationship with steering modes which, according to this association, would be essentially related to an objective of economic profitability. The author first recalls some elements regarding the control and neutron stopping of pressurized water reactors. Then, after having outlined some specific aspects of the EPR design, he addresses the cluster ejection accident: safety approach and its application to this type of accident. He recalls the conclusions of studies of cluster ejection performed by EDF and AREVA, comments the consequences for the EPR power

  10. Synergistic effects in radiation-induced particle ejection from solid surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Noriaki

    1990-01-01

    A description is given on radiation-induced particle ejection from solid surfaces, emphasizing synergistic effects arising from multi-species particle irradiation and from irradiation under complex environments. First, it is pointed out that synergisms can be treated by introducing the effects of material modification on radiation-induced particle ejection. As examples of the effects of surface modification on the sputtering induced by elastic encounters, sputtering of alloys and chemical sputtering of graphite are briefly discussed. Then the particle ejection induced by electronic encounters is explained emphasizing the difference in the behaviors from materials to materials. The possible synergistic effects of electronic and elastic encounters are also described. Lastly, we point out the importance of understanding the elementary processes of material-particle interaction and of developing computer codes describing material behaviors under irradiation. (author)

  11. Noninvasive Assessment of Preload Reserve Enhances Risk Stratification of Patients With Heart Failure With Reduced Ejection Fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Kensuke; Onishi, Akira; Yamada, Hirotsugu; Kusunose, Kenya; Suto, Makiko; Hatani, Yutaka; Matsuzoe, Hiroki; Tatsumi, Kazuhiro; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Hirata, Ken-Ichi

    2018-05-01

    The leg-positive pressure maneuver can safely and noninvasively apply preload stress without increase in total body fluid volume. The purpose of this study was to determine whether preload stress could be useful for risk stratification of patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction. For this study, 120 consecutive patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction were prospectively recruited. The stroke work index was estimated as product of stroke volume index and mean blood pressure, and the E/e' ratio was calculated to estimate ventricular filling pressure. The echocardiographic parameters were obtained both at rest and during leg-positive pressure stress. During the median follow-up period of 20 months, 30 patients developed adverse cardiovascular events. During preload stress, stroke work index increased significantly (from 3280±1371 to 3857±1581 mm Hg·mL/m 2 ; P <0.001) along with minimal changes in ventricular filling pressure (E/e', from 16±10 to 17±9; P <0.05) in patients without cardiovascular events. However, patients with cardiovascular events showed impairment of Frank-Starling mechanism (stroke work index, from 2863±969 to 2903±1084 mm Hg·mL/m 2 ; P =0.70) and a serious increase in E/e' ratio (from 19±11 to 25±14; P <0.001). Both the patients without contractile reserve and those without diastolic reserve exhibited worse event-free survival than the others ( P <0.001). In a Cox proportional-hazards analysis, the changes in stroke work index (hazard ratio: 0.44 per 500 mm Hg·mL/m 2 increase; P =0.001) and in E/e' (hazard ratio: 2.58 per 5-U increase; P <0.001) were predictors of cardiovascular events. Contractile reserve and diastolic reserve during leg-positive pressure stress are important determinants of cardiovascular outcomes for patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction. © 2018 American Heart Association, Inc.

  12. What Shapes the Phylogenetic Structure of Anuran Communities in a Seasonal Environment? The Influence of Determinism at Regional Scale to Stochasticity or Antagonistic Forces at Local Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Clarissa de Araújo; Roque, Fabio de Oliveira; Santos, Bráulio A; Ferreira, Vanda Lúcia; Strüssmann, Christine; Tomas, Walfrido Moraes

    2015-01-01

    Ecological communities are structured by both deterministic and stochastic processes. We investigated phylogenetic patterns at regional and local scales to understand the influences of seasonal processes in shaping the structure of anuran communities in the southern Pantanal wetland, Brazil. We assessed the phylogenetic structure at different scales, using the Net Relatedness Index (NRI), the Nearest Taxon Index (NTI), and phylobetadiversity indexes, as well as a permutation test, to evaluate the effect of seasonality. The anuran community was represented by a non-random set of species with a high degree of phylogenetic relatedness at the regional scale. However, at the local scale the phylogenetic structure of the community was weakly related with the seasonality of the system, indicating that oriented stochastic processes (e.g. colonization, extinction and ecological drift) and/or antagonist forces drive the structure of such communities in the southern Pantanal.

  13. 3-Dimensional Methodology for the Control Rod Ejection Accident Analysis Using UNICORN{sup TM}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Chan-su; Um, Kil-sup; Ahn, Dawk-hwan [Korea Nuclear Fuel Company, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yo-han; Sung, Chang-kyung [KEPRI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Song, Jae-seung [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-07-01

    The control rod ejection accident has been analyzed with STRIKIN-II code using the point kinetics model coupled with conservative factors to address the three dimensional aspects. This may result in a severe transient with very high fuel enthalpy deposition. KNFC, under the support of KEPRI and KAERI, is developing 3-dimensional methodology for the rod ejection accident analysis using UNICORNTM (Unified Code of RETRAN, TORC and MASTER). For this purpose, 3-dimensional MASTER-TORC codes, which have been combined with the dynamic-link library by KAERI, are used in the transient analysis of the core and RETRAN code is used to estimate the enthalpy deposition in the hot rod.

  14. Gated cardiac imaging: manual calculations and observations of left ventricular ejection fraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawkins, T.; Keavey, P.M.

    1984-01-01

    Using gamma camera imaging, the fixed region and moving region methods of calculating left ventricular ejection fraction were studied. Data were obtained from gated blood pool studies on 125 cardiac patients with myocardial infarcts of varying extent and location. Ejection fractions ranged from 10 to 76%. The left anterior oblique angulation for optimal visualisation of the ventricles showed considerable patient variation. The authors conclude that a fixed angulation cannot be recommended and that there is little to justify it. Where the septum is not seen distinctly during setting up, a larger rather than smaller angle is generally advised. (U.K.)

  15. 3-Dimensional Methodology for the Control Rod Ejection Accident Analysis Using UNICORNTM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Chan-su; Um, Kil-sup; Ahn, Dawk-hwan; Kim, Yo-han; Sung, Chang-kyung; Song, Jae-seung

    2006-01-01

    The control rod ejection accident has been analyzed with STRIKIN-II code using the point kinetics model coupled with conservative factors to address the three dimensional aspects. This may result in a severe transient with very high fuel enthalpy deposition. KNFC, under the support of KEPRI and KAERI, is developing 3-dimensional methodology for the rod ejection accident analysis using UNICORNTM (Unified Code of RETRAN, TORC and MASTER). For this purpose, 3-dimensional MASTER-TORC codes, which have been combined with the dynamic-link library by KAERI, are used in the transient analysis of the core and RETRAN code is used to estimate the enthalpy deposition in the hot rod

  16. Finite-element solutions of the AER-2 rod ejection benchmark by CRONOS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolev, N.P.; Lenain, R.; Fedon-Magnaud, C.

    2001-01-01

    The finite-element option in CRONOS was used to analyse the AER-2 rod-ejection benchmark for WWER-440. The objective is to obtain spatially converged solutions by means of node subdivision and approximation refinement. This paper presents the first phase of analysis dealing with the initial and just-ejected states used for calculation of the initial reactivity. Fine-mesh and extrapolated to zero mesh size solutions were obtained and verified by comparison to MAG code solutions. These differences provide potential for large deviations in the transient results and deserve further attention in reactor safety analysis (Authors)

  17. Ejection fraction and outcomes in patients with atrial fibrillation and heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banerjee, Amitava; Taillandier, Sophie; Olesen, Jonas Bjerring

    2012-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) increases the risk of stroke and thrombo-embolism (TE) in non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF), and is incorporated in stroke risk stratification scores. We aimed to establish the role of ejection fraction (EF) in risk prediction in patients with NVAF and HF.......Heart failure (HF) increases the risk of stroke and thrombo-embolism (TE) in non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF), and is incorporated in stroke risk stratification scores. We aimed to establish the role of ejection fraction (EF) in risk prediction in patients with NVAF and HF....

  18. Analysis of a control rod ejection transient in a mox-fuelled PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lenain, R.; Mathonniere, G.; Perrutel, J.P.; Schaeffer, H.; Stelletta, S.; Lam Hime, M.

    1988-09-01

    The decision to use mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel in PWR's involved re-investigation of a certain number of accidents and notably control rod ejection transients. It has thus been shown that this accident would be no more severe than in the case of all-uranium cores, since the positive effects on the ejected rod worth would counterbalance the negative effects on the delayed neutron fraction. A new approach to the kinetics aspect of the calculation method for this accident is also presented, involving a 3-D kinetic calculation with only a few axial meshes

  19. Method of Calibrating a Force Balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Peter A. (Inventor); Rhew, Ray D. (Inventor); Johnson, Thomas H. (Inventor); Landman, Drew (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A calibration system and method utilizes acceleration of a mass to generate a force on the mass. An expected value of the force is calculated based on the magnitude and acceleration of the mass. A fixture is utilized to mount the mass to a force balance, and the force balance is calibrated to provide a reading consistent with the expected force determined for a given acceleration. The acceleration can be varied to provide different expected forces, and the force balance can be calibrated for different applied forces. The acceleration may result from linear acceleration of the mass or rotational movement of the mass.

  20. Energy distributions of neutral species ejected from well-characterized surfaces measured by means of multiphoton resonance ionization spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishikawa, D.; Ishigami, R.; Dhole, S.D.; Morita, K. E-mail: k-morita@mail.nucl.nagoya-u.ac.jp

    2000-04-01

    The energy distributions of neutral atoms ejected from the polycrystalline Cu target, the Si(1 1 1)-7x7 surface, and the Si(1 1 1)-''5 x 5''-Cu surface by 5 keV Ar{sup +} ion bombardment have been measured with very high efficiency by means of the multi-photon resonance ionization spectroscopy, in order to obtain the surface binding energies. The energy distributions for Cu from polycrystalline Cu target, Si from the Si(1 1 1)-7x7 surface, and Cu from the Si(1 1 1)-''5 x 5''-Cu surface have been found to have a peak at energies of around 3.0, 5.0 and 1.5 eV, and the function shapes of high energy tails to be proportional to E{sup -1.9}, E{sup -1.2} and E{sup -1.3}, respectively. Based on the linear collision cascade theory, the surface binding energies are determined to be 5.7, 6.0 and 2.0 eV, and the power factor m in the power law approximation to the Thomas-Fermi potential are determined to be 0.1, 0.4 and 0.3 for Cu from the Cu polycrystalline, Si from the Si(1 1 1)-7x7 surface, and Cu from the Si(1 1 1)-''5 x 5''-Cu surface, respectively. In conclusion, the results indicate that the energy distributions of ejected particles are well characterized by the linear collision cascade theory developed by Sigmund.

  1. A study of forced convective subcooled flow boiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serizawa, Akimi; Kenning, D.B.R.

    1979-01-01

    Based on a simple nucleation model, parameter survey technique is used to derive a predictive correlation for boiling initiation under forced convection. Results are expressed by a semi-empirical equation which considers effects of the flow turbulence on interfacial heat transfer coefficient for evaporation and condensation of vapour bubbles during their growth. This correlation agrees within +-25% with a variety of experimental water data presently available. The bubble departure diameter and the subcooling-dependence of active nucleation sites were examined, using experimental data available. Results are expressed by empirical equations. Finally, an analytical model is presented to predict conditions for the point of net vapour generation. The model is based on the formation and growth of a bubble boundary layer adjacent to the heated wall. It is shown that the point of net vapour generation is determined by the liquid subcooling at the boiling initiation and the subcooling-dependences of bubble departure diameter and bubble flux. The result implies that the bubble ejection from bubble layer is a possible mechanism for the significant void increase even at high velocities. (author)

  2. Radio Remote Sensing of Coronal Mass Ejections: Implications for Parker Solar Probe and Solar Orbiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooi, J. E.; Thomas, N. C.; Guy, M. B., III; Spangler, S. R.

    2017-12-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are fast-moving magnetic field structures of enhanced plasma density that play an important role in space weather. The Solar Orbiter and Parker Solar Probe will usher in a new era of in situ measurements, probing CMEs within distances of 60 and 10 solar radii, respectively. At the present, only remote-sensing techniques such as Faraday rotation can probe the plasma structure of CMEs at these distances. Faraday rotation is the change in polarization position angle of linearly polarized radiation as it propagates through a magnetized plasma (e.g. a CME) and is proportional to the path integral of the electron density and line-of-sight magnetic field. In conjunction with white-light coronagraph measurements, Faraday rotation observations have been used in recent years to determine the magnetic field strength of CMEs. We report recent results from simultaneous white-light and radio observations made of a CME in July 2015. We made radio observations using the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) at 1 - 2 GHz frequencies of a set of radio sources through the solar corona at heliocentric distances that ranged between 8 - 23 solar radii. These Faraday rotation observations provide a priori estimates for comparison with future in situ measurements made by the Solar Orbiter and Parker Solar Probe. Similar Faraday rotation observations made simultaneously with observations by the Solar Orbiter and Parker Solar Probe in the future could provide information about the global structure of CMEs sampled by these probes and, therefore, aid in understanding the in situ measurements.

  3. Urinary Proteomics Pilot Study for Biomarker Discovery and Diagnosis in Heart Failure with Reduced Ejection Fraction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasper Rossing

    Full Text Available Biomarker discovery and new insights into the pathophysiology of heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF may emerge from recent advances in high-throughput urinary proteomics. This could lead to improved diagnosis, risk stratification and management of HFrEF.Urine samples were analyzed by on-line capillary electrophoresis coupled to electrospray ionization micro time-of-flight mass spectrometry (CE-MS to generate individual urinary proteome profiles. In an initial biomarker discovery cohort, analysis of urinary proteome profiles from 33 HFrEF patients and 29 age- and sex-matched individuals without HFrEF resulted in identification of 103 peptides that were significantly differentially excreted in HFrEF. These 103 peptides were used to establish the support vector machine-based HFrEF classifier HFrEF103. In a subsequent validation cohort, HFrEF103 very accurately (area under the curve, AUC = 0.972 discriminated between HFrEF patients (N = 94, sensitivity = 93.6% and control individuals with and without impaired renal function and hypertension (N = 552, specificity = 92.9%. Interestingly, HFrEF103 showed low sensitivity (12.6% in individuals with diastolic left ventricular dysfunction (N = 176. The HFrEF-related peptide biomarkers mainly included fragments of fibrillar type I and III collagen but also, e.g., of fibrinogen beta and alpha-1-antitrypsin.CE-MS based urine proteome analysis served as a sensitive tool to determine a vast array of HFrEF-related urinary peptide biomarkers which might help improving our understanding and diagnosis of heart failure.

  4. Peak Exercise Oxygen Uptake Predicts Recurrent Admissions in Heart Failure With Preserved Ejection Fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palau, Patricia; Domínguez, Eloy; Núñez, Eduardo; Ramón, José María; López, Laura; Melero, Joana; Sanchis, Juan; Bellver, Alejandro; Santas, Enrique; Bayes-Genis, Antoni; Chorro, Francisco J; Núñez, Julio

    2018-04-01

    Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) is a highly prevalent syndrome with an elevated risk of morbidity and mortality. To date, there is scarce evidence on the role of peak exercise oxygen uptake (peak VO 2 ) for predicting the morbidity burden in HFpEF. We sought to evaluate the association between peak VO 2 and the risk of recurrent hospitalizations in patients with HFpEF. A total of 74 stable symptomatic patients with HFpEF underwent a cardiopulmonary exercise test between June 2012 and May 2016. A negative binomial regression method was used to determine the association between the percentage of predicted peak VO 2 (pp-peak VO 2 ) and recurrent hospitalizations. Risk estimates are reported as incidence rate ratios. The mean age was 72.5 ± 9.1 years, 53% were women, and all patients were in New York Heart Association functional class II to III. Mean peak VO 2 and median pp-peak VO 2 were 10 ± 2.8mL/min/kg and 60% (range, 47-67), respectively. During a median follow-up of 276 days [interquartile range, 153-1231], 84 all-cause hospitalizations in 31 patients (41.9%) were registered. A total of 15 (20.3%) deaths were also recorded. On multivariate analysis, accounting for mortality as a terminal event, pp-peak VO 2 was independently and linearly associated with the risk of recurrent admission. Thus, and modeled as continuous, a 10% decrease of pp-peak VO 2 increased the risk of recurrent hospitalizations by 32% (IRR, 1.32; 95%CI, 1.03-1.68; P = .028). In symptomatic elderly patients with HFpEF, pp-peak VO 2 predicts all-cause recurrent admission. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Effects of beta-blockers on heart failure with preserved ejection fraction: a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Effects of beta-blockers on the prognosis of the heart failure patients with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF remain controversial. The aim of this meta-analysis was to determine the impact of beta-blockers on mortality and hospitalization in the patients with HFpEF. METHODS: A search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library databases from 2005 to June 2013 was conducted. Clinical studies reporting outcomes of mortality and/or hospitalization for patients with HFpEF (EF ≥ 40%, being assigned to beta-blockers treatment and non-beta-blockers control group were included. RESULTS: A total of 12 clinical studies (2 randomized controlled trials and 10 observational studies involving 21,206 HFpEF patients were included for this meta-analysis. The pooled analysis demonstrated that beta-blocker exposure was associated with a 9% reduction in relative risk for all-cause mortality in patients with HFpEF (95% CI: 0.87 - 0.95; P < 0.001. Whereas, the all-cause hospitalization, HF hospitalization and composite outcomes (mortality and hospitalization were not affected by this treatment (P=0.26, P=0.97, and P=0.88 respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The beta-blockers treatment for the patients with HFpEF was associated with a lower risk of all-cause mortality, but not with a lower risk of hospitalization. These finding were mainly obtained from observational studies, and further investigations are needed to make an assertion.

  6. Echocardiographic right ventricle longitudinal contraction indices cannot predict ejection fraction in post-operative Fallot children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnemains, Laurent; Stos, Bertrand; Vaugrenard, Thibaud; Marie, Pierre-Yves; Odille, Freddy; Boudjemline, Younes

    2012-03-01

    To examine in a population of post-operative tetralogy of Fallot patients, the correlation between right ventricle (RV) ejection fractions (EF) computed from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and three echocardiographic indices of RV function: TAPSE, longitudinal strain and strain rate. Indeed, these patients present a pulmonary regurgitation which is responsible for progressive dilatation of the RV. An echocardiographic assessment of the RV function would be very useful in determining the timing of pulmonary revalvulation for Fallot patients. However, these indices are generally based on the ventricle contraction in the long axis direction which is impaired in this population and does not seem to correlate with the EF. Thirty-five post-operative tetralogy of Fallot patients and 20 patients with normal RVs were included. In both groups, RVEF, assessed by MRI, was compared with the three echocardiographic indices. Longitudinal strain and strain rates were computed both on the free wall and on the whole RV. No correlation was found between the echocardiographic indices and the MRI EF in our Fallot population. The accuracy of those indices as a diagnostic test of an altered RV was low with Younden's indices varying from -0.18 to 0.5 and areas under the Receiver Operating Characterictic (ROC) curves equal to 0.54 for tricuspid annulus plane systolic excursion, 0.59-0.62 for strain and 0.57-0.63 for strain rate. Three conventional echocardiographic indices based on RV longitudinal contraction failed to assess the EF in our population of post-operative tetralogy of Fallot patients.

  7. Development of a Full Ice-cream Cone Model for Halo Coronal Mass Ejections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Na, Hyeonock; Moon, Y.-J.; Lee, Harim, E-mail: nho0512@khu.ac.kr, E-mail: moonyj@khu.ac.kr [School of Space Research, Kyung Hee University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-20

    It is essential to determine three-dimensional parameters (e.g., radial speed, angular width, and source location) of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) for the space weather forecast. In this study, we investigate which cone type represents a halo CME morphology using 29 CMEs (12 Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) /Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO) halo CMEs and 17 Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory ( STEREO )/Sun–Earth Connection Coronal and Heliospheric Investigation COR2 halo CMEs) from 2010 December to 2011 June. These CMEs are identified as halo CMEs by one spacecraft ( SOHO or one of STEREO A and B ) and limb ones by the other spacecraft (One of STEREO A and B or SOHO ). From cone shape parameters of these CMEs, such as their front curvature, we find that the CME observational structures are much closer to a full ice-cream cone type than a shallow ice-cream cone type. Thus, we develop a full ice-cream cone model based on a new methodology that the full ice-cream cone consists of many flat cones with different heights and angular widths to estimate the three-dimensional parameters of the halo CMEs. This model is constructed by carrying out the following steps: (1) construct a cone for a given height and angular width, (2) project the cone onto the sky plane, (3) select points comprising the outer boundary, and (4) minimize the difference between the estimated projection speeds with the observed ones. By applying this model to 12 SOHO /LASCO halo CMEs, we find that 3D parameters from our method are similar to those from other stereoscopic methods (i.e., a triangulation method and a Graduated Cylindrical Shell model).

  8. Development of a Full Ice-cream Cone Model for Halo Coronal Mass Ejections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Na, Hyeonock; Moon, Y.-J.; Lee, Harim

    2017-01-01

    It is essential to determine three-dimensional parameters (e.g., radial speed, angular width, and source location) of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) for the space weather forecast. In this study, we investigate which cone type represents a halo CME morphology using 29 CMEs (12 Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) /Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO) halo CMEs and 17 Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory ( STEREO )/Sun–Earth Connection Coronal and Heliospheric Investigation COR2 halo CMEs) from 2010 December to 2011 June. These CMEs are identified as halo CMEs by one spacecraft ( SOHO or one of STEREO A and B ) and limb ones by the other spacecraft (One of STEREO A and B or SOHO ). From cone shape parameters of these CMEs, such as their front curvature, we find that the CME observational structures are much closer to a full ice-cream cone type than a shallow ice-cream cone type. Thus, we develop a full ice-cream cone model based on a new methodology that the full ice-cream cone consists of many flat cones with different heights and angular widths to estimate the three-dimensional parameters of the halo CMEs. This model is constructed by carrying out the following steps: (1) construct a cone for a given height and angular width, (2) project the cone onto the sky plane, (3) select points comprising the outer boundary, and (4) minimize the difference between the estimated projection speeds with the observed ones. By applying this model to 12 SOHO /LASCO halo CMEs, we find that 3D parameters from our method are similar to those from other stereoscopic methods (i.e., a triangulation method and a Graduated Cylindrical Shell model).

  9. Development of a Full Ice-cream Cone Model for Halo Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Hyeonock; Moon, Y.-J.; Lee, Harim

    2017-04-01

    It is essential to determine three-dimensional parameters (e.g., radial speed, angular width, and source location) of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) for the space weather forecast. In this study, we investigate which cone type represents a halo CME morphology using 29 CMEs (12 Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO)/Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO) halo CMEs and 17 Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO)/Sun-Earth Connection Coronal and Heliospheric Investigation COR2 halo CMEs) from 2010 December to 2011 June. These CMEs are identified as halo CMEs by one spacecraft (SOHO or one of STEREO A and B) and limb ones by the other spacecraft (One of STEREO A and B or SOHO). From cone shape parameters of these CMEs, such as their front curvature, we find that the CME observational structures are much closer to a full ice-cream cone type than a shallow ice-cream cone type. Thus, we develop a full ice-cream cone model based on a new methodology that the full ice-cream cone consists of many flat cones with different heights and angular widths to estimate the three-dimensional parameters of the halo CMEs. This model is constructed by carrying out the following steps: (1) construct a cone for a given height and angular width, (2) project the cone onto the sky plane, (3) select points comprising the outer boundary, and (4) minimize the difference between the estimated projection speeds with the observed ones. By applying this model to 12 SOHO/LASCO halo CMEs, we find that 3D parameters from our method are similar to those from other stereoscopic methods (I.e., a triangulation method and a Graduated Cylindrical Shell model).

  10. Geomagnetic activity associated with Earth passage of interplanetary shock disturbances and coronal mass ejections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gosling, J.T.; McComas, D.J.; Phillips, J.L.; Bame, S.J.

    1991-01-01

    Previous work indicates that virtually all transient shock wave disturbances in the solar wind are driven by fast coronal mass ejection events (CMEs). Using a recently appreciated capability for distinguishing CMEs in solar wind data in the form of counterstreaming solar wind electron events, this paper explores the overall effectiveness of shock wave disturbances and CMEs in general in stimulating geomagnetic activity. The study is confined to the interval from mid-August 1978 through mid-October 1982, spanning the last solar activity maximum, when ISEE 3 was in orbit about the L1 Lagrange point 220 R e upstream from Earth. The authors find that all but one of the 37 largest geomagnetic storms in that era were associated with Earth passage of CMEs and/or shock disturbances, with the large majority of these storms being associated with interplanetary events where Earth encountered both a shock and the CME driving the shock (shock/CME events). Although CMEs and/or shock disturbances were increasingly the cause of geomagnetic activity as the level of geomagnetic activity increased, many smaller geomagnetic disturbances were unrelated to these events. Further, approximately half of all CMEs and half of all shock disturbances encountered by Earth did not produce any substantial geomagnetic activity as measured by the planetary geomagnetic index Kp. The geomagnetic effectiveness of Earth directed CMEs and shock wave disturbances was directly related to the flow speed, the magnetic field magnitude, and the strength of the southward (GSM) field component associated with the events. The initial speed of a CME close to the Sun appears to be the most crucial factor in determining if an earthward directed event will be effective in exciting a large geomagnetic disturbance

  11. The interaction of two coronal mass ejections: Influence of relative orientation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lugaz, N.; Farrugia, C. J.; Schwadron, N. [Space Science Center and Department of Physics, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH (United States); Manchester IV, W. B. [Center for Space Environment Modeling, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2013-11-20

    We report on a numerical investigation of two coronal mass ejections (CMEs) that interact as they propagate in the inner heliosphere. We focus on the effect of the orientation of the CMEs relative to each other by performing four different simulations with the axis of the second CME rotated by 90° from one simulation to the next. Each magnetohydrodynamic simulation is performed in three dimensions with the Space Weather Modeling Framework in an idealized setting reminiscent of solar minimum conditions. We extract synthetic satellite measurements during and after the interaction and compare the different cases. We also analyze the kinematics of the two CMEs, including the evolution of their widths and aspect ratios. We find that the first CME contracts radially as a result of the interaction in all cases, but the amount of subsequent radial expansion depends on the relative orientation of the two CMEs. Reconnection between the two ejecta and between the ejecta and the interplanetary magnetic field determines the type of structure resulting from the interaction. When a CME with a high inclination with respect to the ecliptic overtakes one with a low inclination, it is possible to create a compound event with a smooth rotation in the magnetic field vector over more than 180°. Due to reconnection, the second CME only appears as an extended 'tail', and the event may be mistaken for a glancing encounter with an isolated CME. This configuration differs significantly from the one usually studied of a multiple-magnetic-cloud event, which we found to be associated with the interaction of two CMEs with the same orientation.

  12. Global Energetics of Solar Flares. VI. Refined Energetics of Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.

    2017-09-01

    In this study, we refine the coronal mass ejection (CME) model that was presented in an earlier study of the global energetics of solar flares and associated CMEs and apply it to all (860) GOES M- and X-class flare events observed during the first seven years (2010-2016) of the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) mission. The model refinements include (1) the CME geometry in terms of a 3D volume undergoing self-similar adiabatic expansion, (2) the solar gravitational deceleration during the propagation of the CME, which discriminates between eruptive and confined CMEs, (3) a self-consistent relationship between the CME center-of-mass motion detected during EUV dimming and the leading-edge motion observed in white-light coronagraphs, (4) the equipartition of the CME’s kinetic and thermal energies, and (5) the Rosner-Tucker-Vaiana scaling law. The refined CME model is entirely based on EUV-dimming observations (using Atmospheric Imager Assembly (AIA)/SDO data) and complements the traditional white-light scattering model (using Large-Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph Experiment (LASCO)/Solar and Heliospheric Observatory data), and both models are independently capable of determining fundamental CME parameters. Comparing the two methods, we find that (1) LASCO is less sensitive than AIA in detecting CMEs (in 24% of the cases), (2) CME masses below {m}{cme}≲ {10}14 g are underestimated by LASCO, (3) AIA and LASCO masses, speeds, and energies agree closely in the statistical mean after the elimination of outliers, and (4) the CME parameters speed v, emission measure-weighted flare peak temperature T e , and length scale L are consistent with the following scaling laws: v\\propto {T}e1/2, v\\propto {({m}{cme})}1/4, and {m}{cme}\\propto {L}2.

  13. Unambiguous Determination of Intermolecular Hydrogen Bond of NMR Structure by Molecular Dynamics Refinement Using All-Atom Force Field and Implicit Solvent Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jee, Jun Goo

    2010-01-01

    It has been shown that AMD refinement is very useful for defining an intermolecular hydrogen bond in NMR structure calculation. The refined structure also provides a clue for explaining the pH dependence in Ub and UIM complexes. As reported by Choi et al., serine-mediated hydrogen bonds are the third most populated hydrogen bonds found in protein-protein intermolecular interactions, after the backbone-backbone and backbone-aspartate ones. The abundance imposes the requirement of an method to determine the interface of protein-protein complexes. The precise geometry is particularly important in the complex structures between Ub and UBDs. Ub recognizes various targets with the same surface, where both hydrophobic and hydrophobic interactions are involved. Hence, the details of the hydrophilic interactions are necessary to find the common binding modes. The structure determination of a biomolecule by NMR depends heavily on the distance restraints derived by the NOE cross peaks that are observed between two protons within 6 A through space. Therefore, the existence of the NOE peaks and their correct assignments to two corresponding protons are essential for an accurate and precise structure determination. Recent developments of NOE assignment and calculation algorithms have enabled the determination of protein 3D structures without any manual interpretation, provided chemical shifts are assigned in most atoms and sufficient NOE peaks exist. Along with these advances, the necessity of determining complicated structures such as complexes is increasing

  14. Nanoscale orientation and lateral organization of chimeric metal-binding green fluorescent protein on lipid membrane determined by epifluorescence and atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prachayasittikul, Virapong; Isarankura Na Ayudhya, Chartchalerm; Tantimongcolwat, Tanawut; Galla, Hans-Joachim

    2005-01-01

    Epifluorescence microscopy as well as atomic force microscopy was successfully applied to explore the orientation and lateral organization of a group of chimeric green fluorescent proteins (GFPs) on lipid membrane. Incorporation of the chimeric GFP carrying Cd-binding region (His6CdBP4GFP) to the fluid phase of DPPC monolayer resulted in a strong fluorescence intensity at the air-water interface. Meanwhile, non-specific adsorption of the GFP having hexahistidine (His6GFP) led to the perturbation of the protein structure in which very low fluorescence was observed. Specific binding of both of the chimeric GFPs to immobilized zinc ions underneath the metal-chelating lipid membrane was revealed. This specific binding could be reversibly controlled by addition of metal ions or metal chelator. Binding of the chimeric GFPs to the metal-chelating lipid membrane was proven to be the end-on orientation while the side-on adsorption was contrarily noted in the absence of metal ions. Increase of lateral mobility owing to the fluidization effect on the chelating lipid membrane subsequently facilitated crystal formation. All these findings have opened up a potential approach for a specific orientation of immobilization of protein at the membrane interface. This could have accounted for a better opportunity of sensor development

  15. Raman spectroscopic determination of the length, strength, compressibility, Debye temperature, elasticity, and force constant of the C-C bond in graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, X X; Li, J W; Zhou, Z F; Wang, Y; Yang, L W; Zheng, W T; Sun, Chang Q

    2012-01-21

    From the perspective of bond relaxation and bond vibration, we have formulated the Raman phonon relaxation of graphene, under the stimuli of the number-of-layers, the uni-axial strain, the pressure, and the temperature, in terms of the response of the length and strength of the representative bond of the entire specimen to the applied stimuli. Theoretical unification of the measurements clarifies that: (i) the opposite trends of the Raman shifts, which are due to the number-of-layers reduction, of the G-peak shift and arises from the vibration of a pair of atoms, while the D- and the 2D-peak shifts involve the z-neighbor of a specific atom; (ii) the tensile strain-induced phonon softening and phonon-band splitting arise from the asymmetric response of the C(3v) bond geometry to the C(2v) uni-axial bond elongation; (iii) the thermal softening of the phonons originates from bond expansion and weakening; and (iv) the pressure stiffening of the phonons results from bond compression and work hardening. Reproduction of the measurements has led to quantitative information about the referential frequencies from which the Raman frequencies shift as well as the length, energy, force constant, Debye temperature, compressibility and elastic modulus of the C-C bond in graphene, which is of instrumental importance in the understanding of the unusual behavior of graphene.

  16. Forced-air, vacuum, and hydro precooling of cauliflower (Brassica oleracea L. var. botrytis cv. Freemont: Part II. Determination of quality parameters during storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilknur Alibas

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Cauliflower heads, which were precooled using four different methods including vacuum, forced-air, and high and low flow hydro precooling, were stored under controlled atmosphere and room conditions. Controlled atmosphere conditions (CA were as follows: 1°C temperature, 90 ± 5% relative humidity, and 0:21 [(%CO2:%O2 – (0:21 control] atmosphere composition. Room conditions (RC were: 22±1°C temperature and 55-60% humidity. Various quality parameters of the cauliflower heads were assessed during storage (days 0, 7, 14, 21, 28, and 35 under controlled atmosphere and room conditions (days 0, 5, and 10. During storage, weight loss, deterioration rate, overall sensory quality score, hardness, and colour (L, a, b, C and α were evaluated. In the present study, the strength and quality parameters of cauliflower under CA and RC conditions were obtained. Vacuum precooling was found to be most suitable method before cauliflower was submitted to cold storage and sent to market. Furthermore, the storage of cauliflower without precooling resulted in a significant decrease in quality parameters.

  17. Surface forces studied with colloidal probe atomic force microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giesbers, M.

    2001-01-01

    Forces between surfaces are a determining factor for the performance of natural as well as synthetic colloidal systems, and play a crucial role in industrial production processes. Measuring these forces is a scientific and experimental challenge and over the years several techniques have

  18. Particles and forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peierls, R.

    1981-01-01

    The particles and forces of matter, found in the Universe, are discussed with especial reference to some of the laws which govern behaviour in the sub-atomic world and which determine the way forces work to give matter its various characteristics. The recent history of the search for elementary constituents of matter in this century is outlined and the replacement of the simplicity anticipated in the 1930s by the proliferation of particle states uncovered in the 1950s and 1960s which led to the quark model is examined. (U.K.)

  19. Corrected direct force balance method for atomic force microscopy lateral force calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asay, David B.; Hsiao, Erik; Kim, Seong H.

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports corrections and improvements of the previously reported direct force balance method (DFBM) developed for lateral calibration of atomic force microscopy. The DFBM method employs the lateral force signal obtained during a force-distance measurement on a sloped surface and relates this signal to the applied load and the slope of the surface to determine the lateral calibration factor. In the original publication [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 77, 043903 (2006)], the tip-substrate contact was assumed to be pinned at the point of contact, i.e., no slip along the slope. In control experiments, the tip was found to slide along the slope during force-distance curve measurement. This paper presents the correct force balance for lateral force calibration.

  20. Rapid estimation of left ventricular ejection fraction in acute myocardial infarction by echocardiographic wall motion analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berning, J; Rokkedal Nielsen, J; Launbjerg, J

    1992-01-01

    Echocardiographic estimates of left ventricular ejection fraction (ECHO-LVEF) in acute myocardial infarction (AMI) were obtained by a new approach, using visual analysis of left ventricular wall motion in a nine-segment model. The method was validated in 41 patients using radionuclide...

  1. CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS AS A MECHANISM FOR PRODUCING IR VARIABILITY IN DEBRIS DISKS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osten, Rachel; Livio, Mario; Lubow, Steve; Pringle, J. E.; Soderblom, David; Valenti, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    Motivated by recent observations of short-timescale variations in the infrared emission of circumstellar disks, we propose that coronal mass ejections can remove dust grains on timescales as short as a few days. Continuous monitoring of stellar activity, coupled with infrared observations, can place meaningful constraints on the proposed mechanism.

  2. Angular distribution of electrons ejected by charged particles. IV. Combined classical and quantum-mechanical treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boesten, L.G.J.; Bonsen, T.F.M.

    1975-01-01

    Angular distributions of electrons ejected from helium by 100 and 300 keV protons have been calculated by a method which is a comination of the classical three-body collision theory and the quantum-mechanical Born approximation. The results of this theory have been compared with the corresponding

  3. The classification of ambiguity in polarimetric reconstruction of coronal mass ejection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai, Xinghua; Wang, Huaning; Huang, Xin; Du, Zhanle; He, Han

    2014-01-01

    The Thomson scattering theory indicates that there exist explicit and implicit ambiguities in polarimetric analyses of coronal mass ejection (CME) observations. We suggest a classification for these ambiguities in CME reconstruction. Three samples, including double explicit, mixed, and double implicit ambiguity, are shown with the polarimetric analyses of STEREO CME observations. These samples demonstrate that this classification is helpful for improving polarimetric reconstruction.

  4. Factors related to outcome in heart failure with a preserved (or normal) left ventricular ejection fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderson, John E

    2016-07-01

    Heart failure with a preserved ejection faction (HFpEF) is a growing and expensive cause of heart failure (HF) affecting particularly the elderly. It differs in substantial ways in addition to the normal left ventricular ejection fraction, from the more easily recognized form of heart failure with a reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF or 'systolic heart failure') and unlike HFrEF there have been little advances in treatment. In part, this relates to the complexity of the pathophysiology and identifying the correct targets. In HFpEF, there appears to be widespread stiffening of the vasculature and the myocardium affecting ventricular function (both systolic and diastolic), impeding ventricular suction, and thus early diastolic filling leading to breathlessness on exertion and later atrial failure and fibrillation. Left ventricular ejection fraction tends to gradually decline and some evolve into HFrEF. Most patients also have a mixture of several co-morbidities including hypertension, diabetes, obesity, poor renal function, lack of fitness, and often poor social conditions. Therefore, many factors may influence outcome in an individual patient. In this review, the epidemiology, possible causation, pathophysiology, the influence of co-morbidities and some of the many potential predictors of outcome will be considered.

  5. Global ejection fraction and phase analysis assessed by radionuclide angiography during exercise and after isoproterenol infusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Righetti, A.; Ratib, O.; Merier, G.; Widmann, T.; Donath, A.

    1983-01-01

    Radionuclide angiography obtained during and following Isoproterenol infusion is a new approach for detecting latent myocardial ischemia. It is very sensitive and could be considered as an alternative to conventional exercice radionuclide angiography. The data presented show that phase analysis assessment of regional systolic wall motion is a better indicator than global ejection fraction for quantifying left ventricular dysfunction

  6. The size distributions of fragments ejected at a given velocity from impact craters

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Keefe, John D.; Ahrens, Thomas J.

    1987-01-01

    The mass distribution of fragments that are ejected at a given velocity for impact craters is modeled to allow extrapolation of laboratory, field, and numerical results to large scale planetary events. The model is semi-empirical in nature and is derived from: (1) numerical calculations of cratering and the resultant mass versus ejection velocity, (2) observed ejecta blanket particle size distributions, (3) an empirical relationship between maximum ejecta fragment size and crater diameter, (4) measurements and theory of maximum ejecta size versus ejecta velocity, and (5) an assumption on the functional form for the distribution of fragments ejected at a given velocity. This model implies that for planetary impacts into competent rock, the distribution of fragments ejected at a given velocity is broad, e.g., 68 percent of the mass of the ejecta at a given velocity contains fragments having a mass less than 0.1 times a mass of the largest fragment moving at that velocity. The broad distribution suggests that in impact processes, additional comminution of ejecta occurs after the upward initial shock has passed in the process of the ejecta velocity vector rotating from an initially downward orientation. This additional comminution produces the broader size distribution in impact ejecta as compared to that obtained in simple brittle failure experiments.

  7. Awake craniotomy in a patient with ejection fraction of 10%: considerations of cerebrovascular and cardiovascular physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Lingzhong; Weston, Stephen D; Chang, Edward F; Gelb, Adrian W

    2015-05-01

    A 37-year-old man with nonischemic 4-chamber dilated cardiomyopathy and low-output cardiac failure (estimated ejection fraction of 10%) underwent awake craniotomy for a low-grade oligodendroglioma resection under monitored anesthesia care. The cerebrovascular and cardiovascular physiologic challenges and our management of this patient are discussed. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. A transcatheter intracardiac shunt device for heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (REDUCE LAP-HF)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasenfuß, Gerd; Hayward, Chris; Burkhoff, Dan

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFPEF) is a common, globally recognised, form of heart failure for which no treatment has yet been shown to improve symptoms or prognosis. The pathophysiology of HFPEF is complex but characterised by increased left atrial pressure, espec...

  9. PINEX-2: pinhole-TV imaging of fuel ejection from an internally vented capsule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berzins, G.J.; Lumpkin, A.H.

    1979-01-01

    The LASL pinhole-intensified TV system was used at the TREAT reactor to image an internally vented, fuel-ejection capsule designed and built by HEDL. Several improvements in the imaging system over PINEX-1 were incorporated. A sequence of 16-ms TV frames shows axial expansion, expulsion of fuel from the pin, and retention of clad integrity during the time of coverage

  10. Internal Energy Loss of the Electrons Ejected in Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drukarev, E. G.; Amusia, M. Ya.; Chernysheva, L. V.

    2017-01-01

    The excitations of the electron shell in neutrinoless double beta decay shifts the limiting energy available for ejected electrons. We present the general equations for this shift and make computations for the decays of two nuclei—germanium and xenon. (author)

  11. Ejection of solvated ions from electrosprayed methanol/water nanodroplets studied by molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahadi, Elias; Konermann, Lars

    2011-06-22

    The ejection of solvated small ions from nanometer-sized droplets plays a central role during electrospray ionization (ESI). Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations can provide insights into the nanodroplet behavior. Earlier MD studies have largely focused on aqueous systems, whereas most practical ESI applications involve the use of organic cosolvents. We conduct simulations on mixed water/methanol droplets that carry excess NH(4)(+) ions. Methanol is found to compromise the H-bonding network, resulting in greatly increased rates of ion ejection and solvent evaporation. Considerable differences in the water and methanol escape rates cause time-dependent changes in droplet composition. Segregation occurs at low methanol concentration, such that layered droplets with a methanol-enriched periphery are formed. This phenomenon will enhance the partitioning of analyte molecules, with possible implications for their ESI efficiencies. Solvated ions are ejected from the tip of surface protrusions. Solvent bridging prior to ion secession is more extensive for methanol/water droplets than for purely aqueous systems. The ejection of solvated NH(4)(+) is visualized as diffusion-mediated escape from a metastable basin. The process involves thermally activated crossing of a ~30 kJ mol(-1) free energy barrier, in close agreement with the predictions of the classical ion evaporation model.

  12. Identification of ultrasound-contrast-agent dilution systems for ejection fraction measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mischi, M.; Jansen, A.H.M.; Kalker, A.A.C.M.; Korsten, H.H.M.

    2005-01-01

    Left ventricular ejection fraction is an important cardiac-efficiency measure. Standard estimations are based on geometric analysis and modeling; they require time and experienced cardiologists. Alternative methods make use of indicator dilutions, but they are invasive due to the need for

  13. Impact-driven ejection of micro metal droplets on-demand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luo, Jun; Qi, Lehua; Tao, Yuan; Ma, Qian; Visser, C.W.

    2016-01-01

    On-demand metal droplet deposition will be a cornerstone technology in 3D metal printing. However, suitable small nozzles are hardly available, limiting the resolution and surface finish of final products. Here, the ejection of record-small metal droplets with a diameter of only 0.55±0.07 times the

  14. Simultaneous Observations of p-mode Light Walls and Magnetic Reconnection Ejections above Sunspot Light Bridges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Yijun; Zhang, Jun; Li, Ting; Yang, Shuhong; Li, Xiaohong, E-mail: yijunhou@nao.cas.cn, E-mail: zjun@nao.cas.cn [Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China)

    2017-10-10

    Recent high-resolution observations from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph reveal bright wall-shaped structures in active regions (ARs), especially above sunspot light bridges. Their most prominent feature is the bright oscillating front in the 1400/1330 Å channel. These structures are named light walls and are often interpreted to be driven by p-mode waves. Above the light bridge of AR 12222 on 2014 December 06, we observed intermittent ejections superimposed on an oscillating light wall in the 1400 Å passband. At the base location of each ejection, the emission enhancement was detected in the Solar Dynamics Observatory 1600 Å channel. Thus, we suggest that in wall bases (light bridges), in addition to the leaked p-mode waves consistently driving the oscillating light wall, magnetic reconnection could happen intermittently at some locations and eject the heated plasma upward. Similarly, in the second event occurring in AR 12371 on 2015 June 16, a jet was simultaneously detected in addition to the light wall with a wave-shaped bright front above the light bridge. At the footpoint of this jet, lasting brightening was observed, implying magnetic reconnection at the base. We propose that in these events, two mechanisms, p-mode waves and magnetic reconnection, simultaneously play roles in the light bridge, and lead to the distinct kinetic features of the light walls and the ejection-like activities, respectively. To illustrate the two mechanisms and their resulting activities above light bridges, in this study we present a cartoon model.

  15. Impact of Ejection Fraction on the Clinical Response to Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy in Mild Heart Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linde, Cecilia; Daubert, Claude; Abraham, William T

    2013-01-01

    Current guidelines recommend cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) in mild heart failure (HF) patients with QRS prolongation and ejection fraction (EF) ≤30%. To assess the effect of CRT in less severe systolic dysfunction, outcomes in the REsynchronization reVErses Remodeling in Systolic left v...

  16. "Trampoline" ejection of organic molecules from graphene and graphite via keV cluster ions impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verkhoturov, Stanislav V.; Gołuński, Mikołaj; Verkhoturov, Dmitriy S.; Geng, Sheng; Postawa, Zbigniew; Schweikert, Emile A.

    2018-04-01

    We present the data on ejection of molecules and emission of molecular ions caused by single impacts of 50 keV C602+ on a molecular layer of deuterated phenylalanine (D8Phe) deposited on free standing, 2-layer graphene. The projectile impacts on the graphene side stimulate the abundant ejection of intact molecules and the emission of molecular ions in the transmission direction. To gain insight into the mechanism of ejection, Molecular Dynamic simulations were performed. It was found that the projectile penetrates the thin layer of graphene, partially depositing the projectile's kinetic energy, and molecules are ejected from the hot area around the hole that is made by the projectile. The yield, Y, of negative ions of deprotonated phenylalanine, (D8Phe-H)-, emitted in the transmission direction is 0.1 ions per projectile impact. To characterize the ejection and ionization of molecules, we have performed the experiments on emission of (D8Phe-H)- from the surface of bulk D8Phe (Y = 0.13) and from the single molecular layer of D8Phe deposited on bulk pyrolytic graphite (Y = 0.15). We show that, despite the similar yields of molecular ions, the scenario of the energy deposition and ejection of molecules is different for the case of graphene due to the confined volume of projectile-analyte interaction. The projectile impact on the graphene-D8Phe sample stimulates the collective radial movement of analyte atoms, which compresses the D8Phe layer radially from the hole. At the same time, this compression bends and stretches the graphene membrane around the hole thus accumulating potential energy. The accumulated potential energy is transformed into the kinetic energy of correlated movement upward for membrane atoms, thus the membrane acts as a trampoline for the molecules. The ejected molecules are effectively ionized; the ionization probability is ˜30× higher compared to that obtained for the bulk D8Phe target. The proposed mechanism of ionization involves tunneling of

  17. "Trampoline" ejection of organic molecules from graphene and graphite via keV cluster ions impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verkhoturov, Stanislav V; Gołuński, Mikołaj; Verkhoturov, Dmitriy S; Geng, Sheng; Postawa, Zbigniew; Schweikert, Emile A

    2018-04-14

    We present the data on ejection of molecules and emission of molecular ions caused by single impacts of 50 keV C 60 2+ on a molecular layer of deuterated phenylalanine (D8Phe) deposited on free standing, 2-layer graphene. The projectile impacts on the graphene side stimulate the abundant ejection of intact molecules and the emission of molecular ions in the transmission direction. To gain insight into the mechanism of ejection, Molecular Dynamic simulations were performed. It was found that the projectile penetrates the thin layer of graphene, partially depositing the projectile's kinetic energy, and molecules are ejected from the hot area around the hole that is made by the projectile. The yield, Y, of negative ions of deprotonated phenylalanine, (D8Phe-H) - , emitted in the transmission direction is 0.1 ions per projectile impact. To characterize the ejection and ionization of molecules, we have performed the experiments on emission of (D8Phe-H) - from the surface of bulk D8Phe (Y = 0.13) and from the single molecular layer of D8Phe deposited on bulk pyrolytic graphite (Y = 0.15). We show that, despite the similar yields of molecular ions, the scenario of the energy deposition and ejection of molecules is different for the case of graphene due to the confined volume of projectile-analyte interaction. The projectile impact on the graphene-D8Phe sample stimulates the collective radial movement of analyte atoms, which compresses the D8Phe layer radially from the hole. At the same time, this compression bends and stretches the graphene membrane around the hole thus accumulating potential energy. The accumulated potential energy is transformed into the kinetic energy of correlated movement upward for membrane atoms, thus the membrane acts as a trampoline for the molecules. The ejected molecules are effectively ionized; the ionization probability is ∼30× higher compared to that obtained for the bulk D8Phe target. The proposed mechanism of ionization involves

  18. ATP sensitive potassium channels in the skeletal muscle functions : involvement of the KCNJ11(Kir6.2 gene in the determination of Warner Bratzer shear force

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico eTricarico

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The ATP-sensitive K+-channels (KATP are distributed in the tissues coupling metabolism with K+ ions efflux. KATP subunits are encoded by KCNJ8 (Kir6.1, KCNJ11 (Kir6.2, ABCC8 (SUR1 and ABCC9 (SUR2 genes, alternative RNA splicing give rise to SUR variants that confer distinct physiological properties on the channel. An high expression/activity of the sarco-KATP channel is observed in various rat fast-twitch muscles, characterized by elevated muscle strength, while a low expression/activity is observed in the slow-twitch muscles characterized by reduced strength and frailty. Down-regulation of the KATP subunits of fast-twitch fibres is found in conditions characterized by weakness and frailty. KCNJ11 gene knockout mice have reduced glycogen, lean phenotype, lower body fat, and weakness. KATP channel is also a sensor of muscle atrophy. The KCNJ11 gene is located on BTA15, close to a QTL for meat tenderness, it has also a role in glycogen storage, a key mechanism of the postmortem transformation of muscle into meat. The role of KCNJ11 gene in muscle function may underlie an effect of KCNJ11 genotypes on meat tenderness, as recently reported. The fiber phenotype and genotype are important in livestock production science. Quantitative traits including meat production and quality are influenced both by environment and genes. Molecular markers can play an important role in the genetic improvement of animals through breeding strategies. Many factors influence the muscle Warner-Bratzler shear force including breed, age, feeding, the biochemical and functional parameters. The role of KCNJ11gene and related genes on muscle tenderness will be discussed in the present review.

  19. Determining the sputter yields of molybdenum in low-index crystal planes via electron backscattered diffraction, focused ion beam and atomic force microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, H.S., E-mail: 160184@mail.csc.com.tw [New Materials Research and Development Department, China Steel Corporation, 1 Chung Kang Road, Hsiao Kang, Kaohsiung 812, Taiwan, ROC (China); Chiu, C.H.; Hong, I.T.; Tung, H.C. [New Materials Research and Development Department, China Steel Corporation, 1 Chung Kang Road, Hsiao Kang, Kaohsiung 812, Taiwan, ROC (China); Chien, F.S.-S. [Department of Physics, Tunghai University, 1727, Sec. 4, Xitun Dist., Taiwan Boulevard, Taichung 407, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2013-09-15

    Previous literature has used several monocrystalline sputtering targets with various crystalline planes, respectively, to investigate the variations of the sputter yield of materials in different crystalline orientations. This study presents a method to measure the sputtered yields of Mo for the three low-index planes (100), (110), and (111), through using an easily made polycrystalline target. The procedure was firstly to use electron backscattered diffraction to identify the grain positions of the three crystalline planes, and then use a focused ion beam to perform the micro-milling of each identified grain, and finally the sputter yields were calculated from the removed volumes, which were measured by atomic force microscope. Experimental results showed that the sputter yield of the primary orientations for Mo varied as Y{sub (110)} > Y{sub (100)} > Y{sub (111)}, coincidental with the ranking of their planar atomic packing densities. The concept of transparency of ion in the crystalline substance was applied to elucidate these results. In addition, the result of (110) orientation exhibiting higher sputter yield is helpful for us to develop a Mo target with a higher deposition rate for use in industry. By changing the deformation process from straight rolling to cross rolling, the (110) texture intensity of the Mo target was significantly improved, and thus enhanced the deposition rate. - Highlights: • We used EBSD, FIB and AFM to measure the sputter yields of Mo in low-index planes. • The sputter yield of the primary orientations for Mo varied as Y{sub (110)} > Y{sub (100)} > Y{sub (111)}. • The transparency of ion was used to elucidate the differences in the sputter yield. • We improved the sputter rate of polycrystalline Mo target by adjusting its texture.

  20. A filter system for steam-gas mixture ejections from under a nuclear reactor containment following a severe accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dulepov, Ju. N.; Sharygin, L. M.; Tretjakov, S. Ja.; Shtin, A.P.; Glushko, V. V.; Babenko, E. A.; Kurakov, Ju. A.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper newly built NPPs obligatory incorporate a containment having a filter system for removing radioactive materials ejections under severe accidents including nuclear fuel melting is described. The system prevents a containment failure and provides ejected radioactive materials decontamination to permissible levels. The physical-chemical and chemical characteristics of Termoxid-58 sorbent (TiO 5 based sorbent) are presented

  1. The relationship between mitral regurgitation and ejection fraction as predictors for the prognosis of patients with heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thune, Jens Jakob; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Hassager, Christian

    2011-01-01

    To study whether there is interaction between mitral regurgitation (MR) and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) in the mortality risk of heart failure (HF) patients.......To study whether there is interaction between mitral regurgitation (MR) and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) in the mortality risk of heart failure (HF) patients....

  2. International Geographic Variation in Event Rates in Trials of Heart Failure With Preserved and Reduced Ejection Fraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Søren L; Køber, Lars; Jhund, Pardeep S

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: International geographic differences in outcomes may exist for clinical trials of heart failure and reduced ejection fraction (HF-REF), but there are few data for those with preserved ejection fraction (HF-PEF). METHODS AND RESULTS: We analyzed outcomes by international geographic reg...

  3. CHARACTERISTICS OF KINEMATICS OF A CORONAL MASS EJECTION DURING THE 2010 AUGUST 1 CME-CME INTERACTION EVENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Temmer, Manuela; Rollett, Tanja; Bein, Bianca; Moestl, Christian; Veronig, Astrid M.; Flor, Olga [Kanzelhoehe Observatory-IGAM, Institute of Physics, University of Graz, Universitaetsplatz 5, A-8010 Graz (Austria); Vrsnak, Bojan; Zic, Tomislav [Hvar Observatory, Faculty of Geodesy, University of Zagreb, Kaciceva 26, HR-10000 Zagreb (Croatia); De Koning, Curt A. [NOAA Space Weather Prediction Center, Boulder, CO 80305 (United States); Liu, Ying [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Bosman, Eckhard [Space Research Institute, Austrian Academy of Sciences, A-8042 Graz (Austria); Davies, Jackie A.; Bothmer, Volker [Institut fuer Astrophysik, Goettingen University, Friedrich-Hund Platz 1, D-37077 Goettingen (Germany); Harrison, Richard [RAL Space, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Oxford, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Nitta, Nariaki [Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, Lockheed Martin Advanced Technology Centre, Palo Alto, CA 94304-1191 (United States); Bisi, Mario [Institute of Mathematics and Physics, Aberystwyth University, Ceredigion SY23 3BZ (United Kingdom); Eastwood, Jonathan; Forsyth, Robert [The Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Odstrcil, Dusan, E-mail: mat@igam.uni-graz.at [Computational and Data Sciences, George Mason University/NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Mail Code 674, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2012-04-10

    We study the interaction of two successive coronal mass ejections (CMEs) during the 2010 August 1 events using STEREO/SECCHI COR and heliospheric imager (HI) data. We obtain the direction of motion for both CMEs by applying several independent reconstruction methods and find that the CMEs head in similar directions. This provides evidence that a full interaction takes place between the two CMEs that can be observed in the HI1 field of view. The full de-projected kinematics of the faster CME from Sun to Earth is derived by combining remote observations with in situ measurements of the CME at 1 AU. The speed profile of the faster CME (CME2; {approx}1200 km s{sup -1}) shows a strong deceleration over the distance range at which it reaches the slower, preceding CME (CME1; {approx}700 km s{sup -1}). By applying a drag-based model we are able to reproduce the kinematical profile of CME2, suggesting that CME1 represents a magnetohydrodynamic obstacle for CME2 and that, after the interaction, the merged entity propagates as a single structure in an ambient flow of speed and density typical for quiet solar wind conditions. Observational facts show that magnetic forces may contribute to the enhanced deceleration of CME2. We speculate that the increase in magnetic tension and pressure, when CME2 bends and compresses the magnetic field lines of CME1, increases the efficiency of drag.

  4. PHYSICAL CONDITIONS OF CORONAL PLASMA AT THE TRANSIT OF A SHOCK DRIVEN BY A CORONAL MASS EJECTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Susino, R.; Bemporad, A.; Mancuso, S., E-mail: susino@oato.inaf.it [INAF–Turin Astrophysical Observatory, via Osservatorio 20, I-10025 Pino Torinese (Italy)

    2015-10-20

    We report here on the determination of plasma physical parameters across a shock driven by a coronal mass ejection using white light (WL) coronagraphic images and radio dynamic spectra (RDS). The event analyzed here is the spectacular eruption that occurred on 2011 June 7, a fast CME followed by the ejection of columns of chromospheric plasma, part of them falling back to the solar surface, associated with a M2.5 flare and a type-II radio burst. Images acquired by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/LASCO coronagraphs (C2 and C3) were employed to track the CME-driven shock in the corona between 2–12 R{sub ⊙} in an angular interval of about 110°. In this interval we derived two-dimensional (2D) maps of electron density, shock velocity, and shock compression ratio, and we measured the shock inclination angle with respect to the radial direction. Under plausible assumptions, these quantities were used to infer 2D maps of shock Mach number M{sub A} and strength of coronal magnetic fields at the shock's heights. We found that in the early phases (2–4 R{sub ⊙}) the whole shock surface is super-Alfvénic, while later on (i.e., higher up) it becomes super-Alfvénic only at the nose. This is in agreement with the location for the source of the observed type-II burst, as inferred from RDS combined with the shock kinematic and coronal densities derived from WL. For the first time, a coronal shock is used to derive a 2D map of the coronal magnetic field strength over intervals of 10 R{sub ⊙} altitude and ∼110° latitude.

  5. Hydrocode modeling of the spallation process during hypervelocity impacts: Implications for the ejection of Martian meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurosawa, Kosuke; Okamoto, Takaya; Genda, Hidenori

    2018-02-01

    Hypervelocity ejection of material by impact spallation is considered a plausible mechanism for material exchange between two planetary bodies. We have modeled the spallation process during vertical impacts over a range of impact velocities from 6 to 21 km/s using both grid- and particle-based hydrocode models. The Tillotson equations of state, which are able to treat the nonlinear dependence of density on pressure and thermal pressure in strongly shocked matter, were used to study the hydrodynamic-thermodynamic response after impacts. The effects of material strength and gravitational acceleration were not considered. A two-dimensional time-dependent pressure field within a 1.5-fold projectile radius from the impact point was investigated in cylindrical coordinates to address the generation of spalled material. A resolution test was also performed to reject ejected materials with peak pressures that were too low due to artificial viscosity. The relationship between ejection velocity veject and peak pressure Ppeak was also derived. Our approach shows that "late-stage acceleration" in an ejecta curtain occurs due to the compressible nature of the ejecta, resulting in an ejection velocity that can be higher than the ideal maximum of the resultant particle velocity after passage of a shock wave. We also calculate the ejecta mass that can escape from a planet like Mars (i.e., veject > 5 km/s) that matches the petrographic constraints from Martian meteorites, and which occurs when Ppeak = 30-50 GPa. Although the mass of such ejecta is limited to 0.1-1 wt% of the projectile mass in vertical impacts, this is sufficient for spallation to have been a plausible mechanism for the ejection of Martian meteorites. Finally, we propose that impact spallation is a plausible mechanism for the generation of tektites.

  6. Investigating pyroclast ejection dynamics using shock-tube experiments: temperature, grain size and vent geometry effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cigala, V.; Kueppers, U.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2015-12-01

    Explosive volcanic eruptions eject large quantities of gas and particles into the atmosphere. The portion directly above the vent commonly shows characteristics of underexpanded jets. Understanding the factors that influence the initial pyroclast ejection dynamics is necessary in order to better assess the resulting near- and far-field hazards. Field observations are often insufficient for the characterization of volcanic explosions due to lack of safe access to such environments. Fortunately, their dynamics can be simulated in the laboratory where experiments are performed under controlled conditions. We ejected loose natural particles from a shock-tube while controlling temperature (25˚ and 500˚C), overpressure (15MPa), starting grain size distribution (1-2 mm, 0.5-1 mm and 0.125-0.250 mm), sample-to-vent distance and vent geometry. For each explosion we quantified the velocity of individual particles, the jet spreading angle and the production of fines. Further, we varied the setup to allow for different sample-to-gas ratios and deployed four different vent geometries: 1) cylindrical, 2) funnel with a flaring of 30˚, 3) funnel with a flaring of 15˚ and 4) nozzle. The results showed maximum particle velocities up to 296 m/s, gas spreading angles varying from 21˚ to 37˚ and particle spreading angles from 3˚ to 40˚. Moreover we observed dynamically evolving ejection characteristics and variations in the production of fines during the course of individual experiments. Our experiments mechanistically mimic the process of pyroclast ejection. Thus the capability for constraining the effects of input parameters (fragmentation conditions) and conduit/vent geometry on ballistic pyroclastic plumes has been clearly established. These data obtained in the presence of well-documented conduit and vent conditions, should greatly enhance our ability to numerically model explosive ejecta in nature.

  7. Differing prognostic value of pulse pressure in patients with heart failure with reduced or preserved ejection fraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jackson, Colette E; Castagno, Davide; Maggioni, Aldo P

    2015-01-01

    ) and 5008 with HF-PEF (828 deaths). Pulse pressure was analysed in quintiles in a multivariable model adjusted for the previously reported Meta-Analysis Global Group in Chronic Heart Failure prognostic variables. Heart failure and reduced ejection fraction patients in the lowest pulse pressure quintile had...... in patients with HF-PEF [ejection fraction (EF) ≥ 50%] and HF-REF. METHODS AND RESULTS: Data from 22 HF studies were examined. Preserved left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was defined as LVEF ≥ 50%. All-cause mortality at 3 years was evaluated in 27 046 patients: 22 038 with HF-REF (4980 deaths......AIMS: Low pulse pressure is a marker of adverse outcome in patients with heart failure (HF) and reduced ejection fraction (HF-REF) but the prognostic value of pulse pressure in patients with HF and preserved ejection fraction (HF-PEF) is unknown. We examined the prognostic value of pulse pressure...

  8. Joint Force Quarterly. Number 2, Autumn 1993

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-09-01

    Typography and Design Division Government Printing Office Joint Force Quarterly is published by the Institute for National Strategic Studies, National...Decisions regard- ing the key force will affect many factors in the new environment. It determines reaction time, how much and what type of force to...shelters destroyed? Only indirectly. Attacks on shel- ters had forced a reaction by the Iraqis, one that caused the loss of their air arm as a force in

  9. Multi-thermal dynamics and energetics of a coronal mass ejection in the low solar atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannah, I. G.; Kontar, E. P.

    2013-05-01

    Aims: The aim of this work is to determine the multi-thermal characteristics and plasma energetics of an eruptive plasmoid and occulted flare observed by the Solar Dynamics Observatory's Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (SDO/AIA). Methods: We study a 2010 Nov. 3 event (peaking at 12:20 UT in GOES soft X-rays) of a coronal mass ejection and occulted flare that demonstrates the morphology of a classic erupting flux rope. The high spatial and time resolution and six coronal channels of the SDO/AIA images allows the dynamics of the multi-thermal emission during the initial phases of eruption to be studied in detail. The differential emission measure is calculated, using an optimized version of a regularized inversion method, for each pixel across the six channels at different times, resulting in emission measure maps and movies in a variety of temperature ranges. Results: We find that the core of the erupting plasmoid is hot (8-11, 11-14 MK) with a similarly hot filamentary "stem" structure connecting it to the lower atmosphere, which could be interpreted as the current sheet in the flux rope model, though is wider than these models suggest. The velocity of the leading edge of the eruption is 597-664 km s-1 in the temperature range ≥3-4 MK and between 1029-1246 km s-1 for ≤2-3 MK. We estimate the density (in 11-14 MK) of the erupting core and stem during the impulsive phase to be about 3 × 109 cm-3, 6 × 109 cm-3, 9 × 108 cm-3 in the plasmoid core, stem, and surrounding envelope of material. This gives thermal energy estimates of 5 × 1029 erg, 1 × 1029 erg, and 2 × 1030 erg. The kinetic energy for the core and envelope is slightly lower. The thermal energy of the core and current sheet grows during the eruption, suggesting continuous influx of energy presumably via reconnection. Conclusions: The combination of the optimized regularized inversion method and SDO/AIA data allows the multi-thermal characteristics (i.e. velocity, density, and thermal energies) of the

  10. Wave Forces on Windturbine Foundations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Brian Juul; Frigaard, Peter

    A testprogramme has been performed to determine the wave forces on two types of foundations for an offshore windturbine. the tested foundation types are a monopile and cone. Furthermore the shaft of the cone has been tested....

  11. Identification of linearized bearing characteristics of a rotating shaft from experimental synchronous forced responses. Application to the determination of unbalance change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Audebert, S.

    1996-03-01

    The monitoring of vibrations evolution of a rotating shaft is necessary for the early detection of a possible default. The recent investigations to improve the monitoring are now in a way which is both associating modeling and experimentation. The aim is to obtain mathematical models of rotors mounted on hydrodynamic bearings, which constitute a good initial representation of real rotating shafts, and permit identification of particular type of default. The feasibility of determining unbalances default, from synchronous responses of a rotating shaft located only at bearings stations, is investigated in two steps: first, motion of rotor journals relatively to two known unbalance excitations is used for linearized bearing characteristics determination; second, localisation and identification of unbalance change can be made, providing that measurements before and after the change has taken place are available. The method is tested on a two-bearing rotor system, added with a mass: randomly disturbed flexural displacements of rotor journals, characterised by four noise levels (0%, 5%, 10%, 15%), are successively considered in order to test the robustness of the method. The stiffness and damping identified characteristics are permitting a correct representation of the dynamic behaviour of the rotating shaft, even relatively to unbalance configurations not used for identification (MAC criterion is greater than 0.98 with 15% noise - disturbed data). Whatever the noise level considered, the localisation of the plane where the unbalance vector is supposed to be applied is correct. (author). 3 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs

  12. Coriolis Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marciuc, Daly; Solschi, Viorel

    2017-04-01

    Understanding the Coriolis effect is essential for explaining the movement of air masses and ocean currents. The lesson we propose aims to familiarize students with the manifestation of the Coriolis effect. Students are guided to build, using the GeoGebra software, a simulation of the motion of a body, related to a rotating reference system. The mathematical expression of the Coriolis force is deduced, for particular cases, and the Foucault's pendulum is presented and explained. Students have the opportunity to deepen the subject, by developing materials related to topics such as: • Global Wind Pattern • Ocean Currents • Coriolis Effect in Long Range Shooting • Finding the latitude with a Foucault Pendulum

  13. Invisible force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panek, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Astronomers have compiled evidence that what we always thought of as the actual universe- all the planets, stars, galaxies and matter in space -represents a mere 4% of what's out there. The rest is dark: 23% is called dark matter, 73% dark energy. Scientists have ideas about what dark matter is, but hardly any understanding about dark energy. This has led to rethinking traditional physics and cosmology. Assuming the existence of dark matter and that the law of gravitation is universal, two teams of astrophysicists, from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the Australian National University, analysed the universe's growth and to their surprise both concluded that the universe expansion is not slowing but speeding up. If the dominant force of evolution isn't gravity what is it?

  14. Precise explosive force determination of the first A-bomb 70 years after the explosion; Genaue Sprengkraftbestimmung der ersten A-Bombe 70 Jahre nach der Explosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2016-11-01

    This short note provides a reference to an American magazine article [Susan K. Hanson et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 113, 8104 (2016) - 4933] in which an approach to measuring extinct fission products is described that would allow for the characterization of a nuclear test at any time. The isotopic composition of molybdenum in five samples of glassy debris from the 1945 Trinity nuclear test has been measured. Non-natural molybdenum isotopic compositions were observed, reflecting an input from the decay of the short-lived fission products {sup 95}Zr and {sup 97}Zr. By measuring both the perturbation of the {sup 95}Mo/{sup 96}Mo and {sup 97}Mo/{sup 96}Mo isotopic ratios and the total amount of molybdenum in the Trinity nuclear debris samples, it is possible to calculate the original concentrations of the {sup 95}Zr and {sup 97}Zr isotopes formed in the nuclear detonation. Together with a determination of the amount of plutonium in the debris, these measurements of extinct fission products allow for new estimates of the efficiency and yield of the historic Trinity test.

  15. A Stability-Indicating HPLC-DAD Method for Determination of Ferulic Acid into Microparticles: Development, Validation, Forced Degradation, and Encapsulation Efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Mendes Nadal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple stability-indicating HPLC-DAD method was validated for the determination of ferulic acid (FA in polymeric microparticles. Chromatographic conditions consisted of a RP C18 column (250 mm × 4.60 mm, 5 μm, 110 Å using a mixture of methanol and water pH 3.0 (48 : 52 v/v as mobile phase at a flow rate of 1.0 mL/min with UV detection at 320 nm. The developed method was validated as per ICH guidelines with respect to specificity, linearity, limit of quantification, limit of detection, accuracy, precision, and robustness provided suitable results regarding all parameters investigated. The calibration curve was linear in the concentration range of 10.0–70.0 μg/mL with a correlation coefficient >0.999. Precision (intraday and interday was demonstrated by a relative standard deviation lower than 2.0%. Accuracy was assessed by the recovery test of FA from polymeric microparticles (99.02% to 100.73%. Specificity showed no interference from the components of polymeric microparticles or from the degradation products derived from acidic, basic, and photolytic conditions. In conclusion, the method is suitable to be applied to assay FA as bulk drug and into polymeric microparticles and can be used for studying its stability and degradation kinetics.

  16. [The determination of serological markers of the hepatitis B virus in high-risk areas of the Central Air Force Hospital of Peru].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valladares, G; Galarza, J; Espinoza, J; Nieri, A; Makino, R; Berrocal, A; Grados, N

    1989-01-01

    In the present paper, the serologic markers of Hepatitis B virus were studied in 123 people belonging to the Hospital Central de la Fuerza Aérea del Perú that had been working in areas of high risk to get contact with this virus. The determination was done with the enzyme immunoassay (EIA Abbot) and the results were the following: In 15 individuals (12.1%), at least one positive marker was found, evidence which proved to have been in contact with the virus in some moment of his life. Only one carrier (0.8%) was found, in 6 (4.8%) the presence of anti-HBc as only marker was found and in 8 (6.5%) the presence of anti-HBc and anti-HBs was observed which means post infection immunity. The great number of the individuals in which the markers were found, were male: 13 (16.0%) against only 2 (4.7%) female. There wasn't great difference with relation to the prevalence of markers according to the years of work like there has been observed in other greater series. It can be concluded that in this group the incidence of infection due to VHB was no greater than that of general population, which indicates us the little contact that they have had with the contaminating material during their professional life.

  17. Right ventricular ejection fraction: an indicator of increased mortality in patients with congestive heart failure associated with coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polak, J.F.; Holman, B.L.; Wynne, J.; Colucci, W.S.

    1983-01-01

    The predictive value of radionuclide ventriculography was studied in 34 patients with depressed left ventricular ejection fraction (less than 40%) and clinically evident congestive heart failure secondary to atherosclerotic coronary artery disease. In addition to left ventricular ejection fraction, right ventricular ejection fraction and extent of left ventricular paradox were obtained in an attempt to identify a subgroup at increased risk of mortality during the ensuing months. The 16 patients who were alive after a 2 year follow-up period had a higher right ventricular ejection fraction and less extensive left ventricular dyskinesia. When a right ventricular ejection fraction of less than 35% was used as a discriminant, mortality was significantly greater among the 21 patients with a depressed right ventricular ejection fraction (71 versus 23%), a finding confirmed by a life table analysis. It appears that the multiple factors contributing to the reduction in right ventricular ejection fraction make it a useful index not only for assessing biventricular function, but also for predicting patient outcome

  18. The burden and determinants of neck pain in workers: results of the Bone and Joint Decade 2000-2010 Task Force on Neck Pain and Its Associated Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Côté, Pierre; van der Velde, Gabrielle; Cassidy, J David; Carroll, Linda J; Hogg-Johnson, Sheilah; Holm, Lena W; Carragee, Eugene J; Haldeman, Scott; Nordin, Margareta; Hurwitz, Eric L; Guzman, Jaime; Peloso, Paul M

    2009-02-01

    Systematic review and best evidence synthesis. To describe the prevalence and incidence of neck pain and disability in workers; to identify risk factors for neck pain in workers; to propose an etiological diagram; and to make recommendations for future research. Previous reviews of the etiology of neck pain in workers relied on cross-sectional evidence. Recently published cohorts and randomized trials warrant a re-analysis of this body of research. We systematically searched Medline for literature published from 1980-2006. Retrieved articles were reviewed for relevance. Relevant articles were critically appraised. Articles judged to have adequate internal validity were included in our best evidence synthesis. One hundred and nine papers on the burden and determinants of neck pain in workers were scientifically admissible. The annual prevalence of neck pain varied from 27.1% in Norway to 47.8% in Québec, Canada. Each year, between 11% and 14.1% of workers were limited in their activities because of neck pain. Risk factors associated with neck pain in workers include age, previous musculoskeletal pain, high quantitative job demands, low social support at work, job insecurity, low physical capacity, poor computer workstation design and work posture, sedentary work position, repetitive work and precision work. We found preliminary evidence that gender, occupation, headaches, emotional problems, smoking, poor job satisfaction, awkward work postures, poor physical work environment, and workers' ethnicity may be associated with neck pain. There is evidence that interventions aimed at modifying workstations and worker posture are not effective in reducing the incidence of neck pain in workers. Neck disorders are a significant source of pain and activity limitations in workers. Most neck pain results from complex relationships between individual and workplace risk factors. No prevention strategies have been shown to reduce the incidence of neck pain in workers.

  19. Modeling Coronal Mass Ejections with EUHFORIA: A Parameter Study of the Gibson-Low Flux Rope Model using Multi-Viewpoint Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbeke, C.; Asvestari, E.; Scolini, C.; Pomoell, J.; Poedts, S.; Kilpua, E.

    2017-12-01

    Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) are one of the big influencers on the coronal and interplanetary dynamics. Understanding their origin and evolution from the Sun to the Earth is crucial in order to determine the impact on our Earth and society. One of the key parameters that determine the geo-effectiveness of the coronal mass ejection is its internal magnetic configuration. We present a detailed parameter study of the Gibson-Low flux rope model. We focus on changes in the input parameters and how these changes affect the characteristics of the CME at Earth. Recently, the Gibson-Low flux rope model has been implemented into the inner heliosphere model EUHFORIA, a magnetohydrodynamics forecasting model of large-scale dynamics from 0.1 AU up to 2 AU. Coronagraph observations can be used to constrain the kinematics and morphology of the flux rope. One of the key parameters, the magnetic field, is difficult to determine directly from observations. In this work, we approach the problem by conducting a parameter study in which flux ropes with varying magnetic configurations are simulated. We then use the obtained dataset to look for signatures in imaging observations and in-situ observations in order to find an empirical way of constraining the parameters related to the magnetic field of the flux rope. In particular, we focus on events observed by at least two spacecraft (STEREO + L1) in order to discuss the merits of using observations from multiple viewpoints in constraining the parameters.

  20. Effect of Nebivolol on MIBG Parameters and Exercise in Heart Failure with Normal Ejection Fraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Messias, Leandro Rocha, E-mail: lmessias@cardiol.br; Ferreira, Aryanne Guimarães; Miranda, Sandra Marina Ribeiro de; Teixeira, José Antônio Caldas [Universidade Federal Fluminense, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Azevedo, Jader Cunha de [Universidade Federal Fluminense, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Hospital Procardíaco, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Messias, Ana Carolina Nader Vasconcelos [Hospital Federal dos Servidores do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Maróstica, Elisabeth [Universidade Federal Fluminense, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Mesquita, Claudio Tinoco [Universidade Federal Fluminense, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Hospital Procardíaco, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2016-05-15

    More than 50% of the patients with heart failure have normal ejection fraction (HFNEF). Iodine-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine (123I-MIBG) scintigraphy and cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET) are prognostic markers in HFNEF. Nebivolol is a beta-blocker with vasodilating properties. To evaluate the impact of nebivolol therapy on CPET and123I-MIBG scintigraphic parameters in patients with HFNEF. Twenty-five patients underwent 123I-MIBG scintigraphy to determine the washout rate and early and late heart-to-mediastinum ratios. During the CPET, we analyzed the systolic blood pressure (SBP) response, heart rate (HR) during effort and recovery (HRR), and oxygen uptake (VO{sub 2}). After the initial evaluation, we divided our cohort into control and intervention groups. We then started nebivolol and repeated the tests after 3 months. After treatment, the intervention group showed improvement in rest SBP (149 mmHg [143.5-171 mmHg] versus 135 mmHg [125-151 mmHg, p = 0.016]), rest HR (78 bpm [65.5-84 bpm] versus 64.5 bpm [57.5-75.5 bpm, p = 0.028]), peak SBP (235 mmHg [216.5-249 mmHg] versus 198 mmHg [191-220.5 mmHg], p = 0.001), peak HR (124.5 bpm [115-142 bpm] versus 115 bpm [103.7-124 bpm], p= 0.043), HRR on the 1st minute (6.5 bpm [4.75-12.75 bpm] versus 14.5 bpm [6.7-22 bpm], p = 0.025) and HRR on the 2nd minute (15.5 bpm [13-21.75 bpm] versus 23.5 bpm [16-31.7 bpm], p = 0.005), but no change in peak VO{sub 2} and 123I-MIBG scintigraphic parameters. Despite a better control in SBP, HR during rest and exercise, and improvement in HRR, nebivolol failed to show a positive effect on peak VO2 and 123I-MIBG scintigraphic parameters. The lack of effect on adrenergic activity may be the cause of the lack of effect on functional capacity.