WorldWideScience

Sample records for einstein effect

  1. Einstein

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Peter D

    2003-01-01

    Albert Einstein re-wrote the textbooks of science in 1905: physics since has been little more than a series of footnotes to the theories of a 26-year-old patent-office clerk. Einstein's science and emotional life come together in this vivid portrait of a rebellious and contradictory figure, a pacifist whose legendary equation E=mc2 opened scientists' eyes to the terrible power within every atom. 'To punish me for my contempt for authority,' he lamented, 'Fate has made me an authority myself.'

  2. The effective action in Einstein-Maxwell theory

    OpenAIRE

    Bastianelli, Fiorenzo; Davila, Jose Manuel; Schubert, Christian

    2008-01-01

    Considerable work has been done on the one-loop effective action in combined electromagnetic and gravitational fields, particularly as a tool for determining the properties of light propagation in curved space. After a short review of previous work, I present some recent results obtained using the worldline formalism. In particular, I will discuss various ways of generalizing the QED Euler-Heisenberg Lagrangian to the Einstein-Maxwell case.

  3. Effective equivalence of the Einstein-Cartan and Einstein theories of gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nester, J.M.

    1977-01-01

    I prove that, for any choice of minimally coupled source field Lagrangian for the Einstein-Cartan-Sciama-Kibble theory of gravity, there exists a related minimally coupled source field Lagrangian for the Einstein theory which produces the same field equations for the metric and source field. By using a standard first-order form for source Lagrangians, the converse is also demonstrated. This establishes a one-to-one correspondence between source Lagrangians for the two theories which clearly reveals their similarities and their differences. Because of this ''equivalence,'' one can view either theory, in terms of the other, as minimal coupling for a related Minkowski source Lagrangian or as nonminimal coupling for the same Minkowski source Lagrangian. Consequently the two theories are, in this sense, indistinguishable. Some other implications of this ''equivalence'' are discussed

  4. Josephson effects in a Bose–Einstein condensate of magnons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Troncoso, Roberto E.; Núñez, Álvaro S.

    2014-01-01

    A phenomenological theory is developed, that accounts for the collective dynamics of a Bose–Einstein condensate of magnons. In terms of such description we discuss the nature of spontaneous macroscopic interference between magnon clouds, highlighting the close relation between such effects and the well known Josephson effects. Using those ideas, we present a detailed calculation of the Josephson oscillations between two magnon clouds, spatially separated in a magnonic Josephson junction. -- Highlights: •We presented a theory that accounts for the collective dynamics of a magnon-BEC. •We discuss the nature of macroscopic interference between magnon-BEC clouds. •We remarked the close relation between the above phenomena and Josephson’s effect. •We remark the distinctive oscillations that characterize the Josephson oscillations

  5. Josephson effects in a Bose–Einstein condensate of magnons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Troncoso, Roberto E., E-mail: r.troncoso.c@gmail.com [Centro para el Desarrollo de la Nanociencia y la Nanotecnología, CEDENNA, Avda. Ecuador 3493, Santiago 9170124 (Chile); Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Físicas y Matemáticas, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 487-3, Santiago (Chile); Núñez, Álvaro S., E-mail: alnunez@dfi.uchile.cl [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Físicas y Matemáticas, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 487-3, Santiago (Chile)

    2014-07-15

    A phenomenological theory is developed, that accounts for the collective dynamics of a Bose–Einstein condensate of magnons. In terms of such description we discuss the nature of spontaneous macroscopic interference between magnon clouds, highlighting the close relation between such effects and the well known Josephson effects. Using those ideas, we present a detailed calculation of the Josephson oscillations between two magnon clouds, spatially separated in a magnonic Josephson junction. -- Highlights: •We presented a theory that accounts for the collective dynamics of a magnon-BEC. •We discuss the nature of macroscopic interference between magnon-BEC clouds. •We remarked the close relation between the above phenomena and Josephson’s effect. •We remark the distinctive oscillations that characterize the Josephson oscillations.

  6. Nonlocal Quantum Effects with Bose-Einstein Condensates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laloee, F.; Mullin, W. J.

    2007-01-01

    We study theoretically the properties of two Bose-Einstein condensates in different spin states, represented by a double Fock state. Individual measurements of the spins of the particles are performed in transverse directions, giving access to the relative phase of the condensates. Initially, this phase is completely undefined, and the first measurements provide random results. But a fixed value of this phase rapidly emerges under the effect of the successive quantum measurements, giving rise to a quasiclassical situation where all spins have parallel transverse orientations. If the number of measurements reaches its maximum (the number of particles), quantum effects show up again, giving rise to violations of Bell type inequalities. The violation of Bell-Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt inequalities with an arbitrarily large number of spins may be comparable (or even equal) to that obtained with two spins

  7. Einstein-aether as a quantum effective field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Withers, Benjamin

    2009-01-01

    The possibility that Lorentz symmetry is violated in gravitational processes is relatively unconstrained by experiment, in stark contrast with the level of accuracy to which Lorentz symmetry has been confirmed in the matter sector. One model of Lorentz violation in the gravitational sector is Einstein-aether theory, in which Lorentz symmetry is broken by giving a vacuum expectation value to a dynamical vector field. In this paper, we analyse the effective theory for quantized gravitational and aether perturbations. We show that this theory possesses a controlled effective expansion within dimensional regularization, that is, for any process there are a finite number of Feynman diagrams which will contribute to a given order of accuracy. We find that there is no log running of the 2-derivative phenomenological parameters, justifying the use of experimental constraints for these parameters obtained over many orders of magnitude in energy scale. Given the stringent experimental bounds on 2-derivative Lorentz-violating operators, we estimate the size of matter Lorentz violation which arises due to loop effects. This amounts to an estimation of the natural size of coefficients for Lorentz-violating dimension-6 matter operators, which in turn can be used to obtain a new bound on the 2-derivative parameters of this theory.

  8. Ghost-Free Massive $f(R)$ Theories Modelled as Effective Einstein Spaces and Cosmic Acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Vacaru, Sergiu I

    2014-01-01

    We study how massive ghost-free gravity $f(R)$-modified theories, MGFTs, can be encoded into generic off-diagonal Einstein spaces. Using "auxiliary" connections completely defined by the metric fields and adapted to nonholonomic frames with associated to nonlinear connection structure, we decouple and integrate in certain general forms the field equations in MGFT. Imposing additional nonholonomic constraints, we can generate Levi--Civita, LC, configurations and mimic MGFT effects via off-diagonal interactions of effective Einstein and/or Einstein-Cartan gravity with nonholonomically induced torsion. The cosmological evolution of ghost-free off--diagonal Einstein spaces is investigated. Certain compatibility of MGFT cosmology to small off-diagonal deformations of $\\Lambda $CDM models is established. %

  9. Quantum effects from topological conditions in solutions of Einstein equations

    CERN Document Server

    Patiño, L

    2003-01-01

    In this paper it is shown that Dirac's approach to the quantization of the electric charge can be extended to gravitational configurations by defining a phase-like object related to the curvature of the space-time. Using this phase-like object, Dirac's argument is applied to the Kerr-Newmann and the Taub-NUT solutions to Einstein equations. As a result of this procedure we obtain that certain functions of the parameters entering the metric become quantized. Also, the phase acquired by an observer traveling along a loop around a curvature singularity is quantized. (Author)

  10. Vilkovisky-DeWitt effective potential for Einstein gravity coupled to scalars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, H.T.; Department of Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210)

    1989-01-01

    The Vilkovisky-DeWitt one-loop effective potential is constructed for Einstein gravity coupled nonminimally to scalars, and is proved explicitly to be independent of gauge choice, for a class of covariant gauges. Explicit forms of the effective potential in three cases are given. The first two cases are used to show that the Vilkovisky-DeWitt formalism is not just a gauge-fixed version of the conventional one in general. The last case concerns the possibility of inducing Einstein gravity dynamically in a Brans-Dicke-type model

  11. Effective-mass analysis of Bose-Einstein condensates in optical lattices: Stabilization and levitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pu, H.; Zhang, W.; Meystre, P.; Baksmaty, L.O.; Bigelow, N.P.

    2003-01-01

    We investigate the time evolution of a Bose-Einstein condensate in a periodic optical potential. Using an effective mass formalism, we study the equation of motion for the envelope function modulating the Bloch states of the lattice potential. In particular, we show how the negative effective-mass affects the dynamics of the condensate

  12. Effect of light assisted collisions on matter wave coherence in superradiant Bose-Einstein condensates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampel, Nir Shlomo; Griesmaier, Axel Rudolf; Steenstrup, Mads Peter Hornbak

    2012-01-01

    We investigate experimentally the effects of light assisted collisions on the coherence between momentum states in Bose-Einstein condensates. The onset of superradiant Rayleigh scattering serves as a sensitive monitor for matter-wave coherence. A subtle interplay of binary and collective effects...

  13. Effective temperatures and the breakdown of the Stokes-Einstein relation for particle suspensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Carlos I; Santamaría-Holek, I; Pérez-Madrid, A

    2015-09-14

    The short- and long-time breakdown of the classical Stokes-Einstein relation for colloidal suspensions at arbitrary volume fractions is explained here by examining the role that confinement and attractive interactions play in the intra- and inter-cage dynamics executed by the colloidal particles. We show that the measured short-time diffusion coefficient is larger than the one predicted by the classical Stokes-Einstein relation due to a non-equilibrated energy transfer between kinetic and configuration degrees of freedom. This transfer can be incorporated in an effective kinetic temperature that is higher than the temperature of the heat bath. We propose a Generalized Stokes-Einstein relation (GSER) in which the effective temperature replaces the temperature of the heat bath. This relation then allows to obtain the diffusion coefficient once the viscosity and the effective temperature are known. On the other hand, the temporary cluster formation induced by confinement and attractive interactions of hydrodynamic nature makes the long-time diffusion coefficient to be smaller than the corresponding one obtained from the classical Stokes-Einstein relation. Then, the use of the GSER allows to obtain an effective temperature that is smaller than the temperature of the heat bath. Additionally, we provide a simple expression based on a differential effective medium theory that allows to calculate the diffusion coefficient at short and long times. Comparison of our results with experiments and simulations for suspensions of hard and porous spheres shows an excellent agreement in all cases.

  14. Bose-Einstein condensation in a general static homogeneous magnetic fieldinebreak and the effective action: The nonrelativistic ideal gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toms, D.J.

    1995-01-01

    We consider the problem of Bose-Einstein condensation for a system of nonrelativistic spin-0 bosons in a space of arbitrary dimension D. A general static homogeneous magnetic field is imposed. The effective action approach and ζ-function regularization are used. If D=2δ or 2δ+1, a constant magnetic field is characterized by δ independent components. If p≤δ of these components are nonzero, the condition for Bose-Einstein condensation to occur is D-2p≥3. This means that if D=2δ, then Bose-Einstein condensation never occurs for p=δ-1 or δ. If D=2δ+1, Bose-Einstein condensation never occurs for p=δ. For D-2p≥3, Bose-Einstein condensation does occur, and we show how it may be interpreted as symmetry breaking to give a ground state which is not constant

  15. Einstein's Cosmos (German Title: Einsteins Kosmos)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duerbeck, Hilmar W.; Dick, Wolfgang R.

    The different contributions of the present volume illuminate the interaction between Einstein and his colleagues when the foundations of modern cosmology were laid: First, the relativistic effects in the solar system, the gravitational redshift in the solar spectrum, and Einstein's relations with Freundlich and Eddington. Second, the cosmological models of Einstein, de Sitter, Friedmann, and Lemaître, which were discussed controversely till the end of the 1920s. Other scientists have also widened or critically questioned Einstein's insight and knowledge: Schwarzschild, Selety, Silberstein, and Mandl, whose life and work is discussed in separate articles. In those days, politics more than ever in history had influenced the lifes of scientists. Therefore, some comments on the ``political cosmos'' that has influenced decisively Einstein's life are also given. A special role in popularizing Einstein's world view was played by Archenhold Observatory in Berlin. A list of Einstein memorial places and a bibliographic list conclude the present book. All papers are written in German, and have English abstracts.

  16. Schwarzschild black hole in the background of the Einstein universe: some physical effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramachandra, B S; Vishveshwara, C V

    2002-01-01

    A prototype of an asymptotically non-flat black hole spacetime is that of a Schwarzschild black hole in the background of the Einstein universe, which is a special case of the representation of a black hole in a cosmological background given by Vaidya. Recently, this spacetime has been studied in detail by Nayak et al. They constructed a composite spacetime called the Vaidya-Einstein-Schwarzschild (VES) spacetime. We investigate some of the physical effects inherent to this spacetime. We carry out a background-black hole decomposition of the spacetime in order to separate out the effects due to the background spacetime and the black hole. The physical effects we study include the classical tests - the gravitational redshift, perihelion precession and light bending - and circular geodesics. A detailed classification of geodesics, in general, is also given

  17. Bose-Einstein correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zalewski, Kacper

    2000-01-01

    The effect of Bose-Einstein correlations on multiplicity distributions of identical pions is discussed. It is found that these correlations affect significantly the observed multiplicity distributions, but Einstein's condensation is unlikely to be achieved, unless 'cold spots', i.e. regions, where groups of pions with very small relative momenta are produced, occur in high energy heavy-ion collisions

  18. Traversable Lorentzian wormholes in the vacuum low energy effective string theory in Einstein and Jordan frames

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nandi, K.K.; Zhang Yuanzhong

    2004-01-01

    Three new classes (II-IV) of solutions of the vacuum low energy effective string theory in four dimensions are derived. Wormhole solutions are investigated in those solutions including the class I case both in the Einstein and in the Jordan (string) frame. It turns out that, of the eight classes of solutions investigated (four in the Einstein frame and four in the corresponding string frame), massive Lorentzian traversable wormholes exist in five classes. Nontrivial massless limit exists only in class I Einstein frame solution while none at all exists in the string frame. An investigation of test scalar charge motion in the class I solution in the two frames is carried out by using the Plebanski-Sawicki theorem. A curious consequence is that the motion around the extremal zero (Keplerian) mass configuration leads, as a result of scalar-scalar interaction, to a new hypothetical 'mass' that confines test scalar charges in bound orbits, but does not interact with neutral test particles

  19. Backreaction effects on the matter side of Einstein's field equations

    CERN Document Server

    Floerchinger, Stefan; Wiedemann, Urs Achim

    2015-01-01

    Recently, we have derived a novel and compact expression for how perturbations in the matter fields of the cosmological fluid can lead to deviations from the standard Friedmann equations. Remarkably, the dissipative damping of velocity perturbations by bulk and shear viscosity in the dark sector can modify the expansion history of the universe on arbitrarily large scales. In universes in which this effect is sufficiently sizeable, it could account for the acceleration of the cosmological expansion. But even if dark matter should be less viscous and if the effect would be correspondingly smaller, it may have observable consequences in the era of precision cosmology. Here, we review the origin of this backreaction effect and possibilities to constrain it further.

  20. Quantized Roentgen Effect in Bose-Einstein Condensates

    OpenAIRE

    Leonhardt, U.; Piwnicki, P.

    1998-01-01

    A classical dielectric moving in a charged capacitor can create a magnetic field (Roentgen effect). A quantum dielectric, however, will not produce a magnetization, except at vortices. The magnetic field outside the quantum dielectric appears as the field of quantized monopoles.

  1. Einstein today

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aspect, A.; Grangier, Ph.; Bouchet, F.R.; Brunet, E.; Derrida, B.; Cohen-Tannoudji, C.; Dalibard, J.; Laloe, F.; Damour, Th.; Darrigol, O.; Pocholle, J.P.

    2005-01-01

    The most important contributions of Einstein involve 5 fields of physics : the existence of quanta (light quanta, stimulated radiation emission and Bose-Einstein condensation), relativity, fluctuations (Brownian motion and thermodynamical fluctuations), the basis of quantum physics and cosmology (cosmological constant and the expansion of the universe). Diverse and renowned physicists have appreciated the development of modern physics from Einstein's ideas to the knowledge of today. This book is a collective book that gathers their work under 7 chapters: 1) 1905, a new beginning; 2) from the Einstein, Podolsky and Rosen's article to quantum information (cryptography and quantum computers); 3) the Bose-Einstein condensation in gases; 4) from stimulated emission to the today's lasers; 5) Brownian motion and the fluctuation-dissipation theory; 6) general relativity; and 7) cosmology. (A.C.)

  2. Strong field effects on binary systems in Einstein-aether theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foster, Brendan Z.

    2007-01-01

    'Einstein-aether' theory is a generally covariant theory of gravity containing a dynamical preferred frame. This article continues an examination of effects on the motion of binary pulsar systems in this theory, by incorporating effects due to strong fields in the vicinity of neutron star pulsars. These effects are included through an effective approach, by treating the compact bodies as point particles with nonstandard, velocity dependent interactions parametrized by dimensionless sensitivities. Effective post-Newtonian equations of motion for the bodies and the radiation damping rate are determined. More work is needed to calculate values of the sensitivities for a given fluid source; therefore, precise constraints on the theory's coupling constants cannot yet be stated. It is shown, however, that strong field effects will be negligible given current observational uncertainties if the dimensionless couplings are less than roughly 0.1 and two conditions that match the PPN parameters to those of pure general relativity are imposed. In this case, weak field results suffice. There then exists a one-parameter family of Einstein-aether theories with 'small-enough' couplings that passes all current observational tests. No conclusion can be reached for larger couplings until the sensitivities for a given source can be calculated

  3. Gluon transport equation with effective mass and dynamical onset of Bose–Einstein condensation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaizot, Jean-Paul; Jiang, Yin; Liao, Jinfeng

    2016-01-01

    We study the transport equation describing a dense system of gluons, in the small scattering angle approximation, taking into account medium-generated effective masses of the gluons. We focus on the case of overpopulated systems that are driven to Bose–Einstein condensation on their way to thermalization. The presence of a mass modifies the dispersion relation of the gluon, as compared to the massless case, but it is shown that this does not change qualitatively the scaling behavior in the vicinity of the onset.

  4. Einsteins dream

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parker, B.

    1986-01-01

    This book discusses the following topics: the search for meaning; Einstein's dream; curved space; Einstein and warped space-time and extreme wraping; early unified field theories; star death; beyond the white dwarf; the early universe; the hadron, Lepton, and Radiation eras; the redshift controversy; other universes; the final fate of the universe; the missing mass; bounce; fate of the open universe; the world of particles and fields; Dirac's equation; Yukawa; gauge theory; quantum chromodynamics; supergravity and superstrings; twistors and heaven; and the new Einstein

  5. Einstein's universe

    CERN Document Server

    Calder, Nigel

    1979-01-01

    This brilliantly written book unlocks the astounding implications of Einstein's revolutionary theories on the nature of science, time and motion. It far surpasses any previous explanation of Relativity for laymen.

  6. Celebrating Einstein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro Key, Joey; Yunes, Nicolas

    2013-04-01

    The Gravity Group at Montana State University (MSU) hosted Celebrating Einstein, a free public arts and multimedia event celebrating Einstein and his ideas in Bozeman, Montana April 2-6, 2013. The products of our efforts are now available to any party interested in hosting a similar event. Celebrating Einstein is a truly interdisciplinary effort including art, film, dance, music, physics, history, and education. Events included a black hole immersive art installation, a series of public talks by physicists, and Einstein lessons in the public schools leading up to a live free public multimedia performance including a professional dance company, a live interview with a renowned physicist, and an original score composed for the MSU student symphony to be performed with an original film produced by the Science and Natural History film program at MSU. This project is funded by the Montana Space Grant Consortium, Montana State University, and the National Science Foundation.

  7. Finite temperature effects in Bose-Einstein condensed dark matter halos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harko, Tiberiu; Madarassy, Enikö J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Once the critical temperature of a cosmological boson gas is less than the critical temperature, a Bose-Einstein Condensation process can always take place during the cosmic history of the universe. Zero temperature condensed dark matter can be described as a non-relativistic, Newtonian gravitational condensate, whose density and pressure are related by a barotropic equation of state, with barotropic index equal to one. In the present paper we analyze the effects of the finite dark matter temperature on the properties of the dark matter halos. We formulate the basic equations describing the finite temperature condensate, representing a generalized Gross-Pitaevskii equation that takes into account the presence of the thermal cloud. The static condensate and thermal cloud in thermodynamic equilibrium is analyzed in detail, by using the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov and Thomas-Fermi approximations. The condensed dark matter and thermal cloud density and mass profiles at finite temperatures are explicitly obtained. Our results show that when the temperature of the condensate and of the thermal cloud are much smaller than the critical Bose-Einstein transition temperature, the zero temperature density and mass profiles give an excellent description of the dark matter halos. However, finite temperature effects may play an important role in the early stages of the cosmological evolution of the dark matter condensates

  8. Einstein's error

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winterflood, A.H.

    1980-01-01

    In discussing Einstein's Special Relativity theory it is claimed that it violates the principle of relativity itself and that an anomalous sign in the mathematics is found in the factor which transforms one inertial observer's measurements into those of another inertial observer. The apparent source of this error is discussed. Having corrected the error a new theory, called Observational Kinematics, is introduced to replace Einstein's Special Relativity. (U.K.)

  9. Einstein's meanders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomnitz, C.

    2007-05-01

    What does Einstein have to do with subduction? Good question. Peaceful Lake Budi, lying at the heart of an Indian reservation in the Deep South of Chile, had subsided by two meters in the 1960 mega-thrust earthquake. This unique South American salt lake was hiding an awful secret: it was actually an oxbow, not a lake. But Einstein had realized in 1926 that meanders are natural freaks. Rivers will not flow uphill, yet - he claimed - they don't flow down the path of steepest descent either. This anomaly was put at the doorstep of a weak Coriolis Force. Thus Einstein problematized the dilemma of the earth sciences. How can a non-force produce margin-parallel compression in a convergent margin where extension is expected? In fact, where does the energy for meander formation come from? Good question . . . Even Wikipedia knows that Coriolis is not a “force” but an “effect”. So is the obliquity of plate convergence in subduction. Where did Einstein err, and where was he a pioneer? Coastal ablation plus alternating subsidence and emergence in giant earthquakes may yield an answer. Einstein, A. (1926). Die Ursache der Maeanderbildung der Flusslaeufe und das sogenannte Baersche Gesetz, Naturwissenschaften, 14, fascicle II.

  10. Electrical effects in superfluid helium. I. thermoelectric effect in Einstein's capacitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ledenyov, D.O.; Ledenyov, V.O.; Ledenyov, O.P.

    2014-01-01

    The Einstein's ideas about the thermodynamical fluctuational nature of some electrical phenomena and the difference of electrical potentials U in a capacitor at temperature T were proposed in 1906-1907. On base of these ideas we explain the experimental results, which were recently observed under the action of the second sound standing wave in the electrical capacitors which take placed in the superfluid Sup>4He and in the torsional mechanical resonator. The Einstein's approach, based on the interrelation of thermal, mechanical and electrical fluctuations, allows to obtain the quantitative results, coinciding with the experimental data for the correlations of the alternate low temperatures difference in second sound wave and alternate electric potentials difference between the capacitor plates in superfluid helium at as well as in the rotating mechanical oscillator

  11. Einstein's Mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjurchinovski, Aleksandar; Skeparovski, Aleksandar

    2008-01-01

    Reflection of light from a plane mirror in uniform rectilinear motion is a century-old problem, intimately related to the foundations of special relativity. The problem was first investigated by Einstein in his famous 1905 paper by using the Lorentz transformations to switch from the mirror's rest frame to the frame where the mirror moves at a…

  12. Einstein and Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broda, E.

    1979-01-01

    This text was written by Engelbert Broda in 1979 and is about Albert Einstein and his relation to Austria. This text is split in different sections which are amongst others: Einstein und Mach; Einstein und Boltzmann; Positivism, Atoms and Relativity; Einstein as an Austrian professor; Einstein’s visits to Austria; Einstein and Viennese friends; Einstein and Friedrich Adler; Einstein and the Austrian mentality; (nowak)

  13. Ambiguity in determining the effective action for string-corrected Einstein gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hochberg, D.; Shimada, T.

    1986-11-01

    The authors attempt to clarify some issues dealing with the determination of some of the coefficients appearing in the low-energy gravitational effective action for closed strings. In particular, the coefficients of the Rsub(μv) 2 and R 2 terms of the quadratic curvature corrections to the Einstein-Hilbert action are shown not to be determined by matching the on-shell S-matrices of the effective theory with that of the string theories. The mechanism responsible for the ambiguity of these coefficients is revealed as a cancellation among the contact, exchange and point-insertion terms contributing to the tree S-matrix of the effective local theory. Although ghost poles will appear in the graviton propagator for general quadratic curvature corrections, the effective theory remains unitary. The manifest absence of ghosts is achieved by choosing the Gauss-Bonnet combination of quadratic curvature terms, but the string does not single out this combination over any other. (author)

  14. Einstein for Schools and the General Public

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, K. E.; Kozma, C; Nilsson, Ch

    2006-01-01

    In April 2005 the World Year of Physics (Einstein Year in the UK and Ireland) was celebrated with an Einstein week in Stockholm House of Science. Seven experiments illustrated Einstein's remarkable work in 1905 on Brownian motion, the photoelectric effect and special relativity. Thirteen school classes with 260 pupils, 30 teachers and 25 members…

  15. Einstein's Mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjurchinovski, Aleksandar; Skeparovski, Aleksandar

    2008-10-01

    Reflection of light from a plane mirror in uniform rectilinear motion is a century-old problem, intimately related to the foundations of special relativity.1-4 The problem was first investigated by Einstein in his famous 1905 paper by using the Lorentz transformations to switch from the mirror's rest frame to the frame where the mirror moves at a constant velocity.5 Einstein showed an intriguing fact that the usual law of reflection would not hold in the case of a uniformly moving mirror, that is, the angles of incidence and reflection of the light would not equal each other. Later on, it has been shown that the law of reflection at a moving mirror can be obtained in various alternative ways,6-10 but none of them seems suitable for bringing this interesting subject into the high school classroom.

  16. Albert Einstein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    In a single year, 1905, Albert Einstein made several dramatic contributions to physics. He deduced the true nature of Brownian motion (doing much to underline the molecular and atomic nature of matter), he demonstrated the particle nature of light in a way which was accessible to experimental investigation (the work for which he received the Nobel prize) and, most dramatically of all, he conceived the special theory of relativity

  17. Beyond Einstein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertz, P.

    2003-03-01

    The Structure and Evolution of the Universe (SEU) theme within NASA's Office of Space Science seeks to explore and understand the dynamic transformations of energy in the Universe - the entire web of biological and physical interactions that determine the evolution of our cosmic habitat. This search for understanding will enrich the human spirit and inspire a new generation of explorers, scientists, and engineers. To that end, NASA's strategic planning process has generated a new Roadmap to enable those goals. Called "Beyond Einstein", this Roadmap identifies three science objectives for the SEU theme: (1) Find out what powered the Big Bang; (2) Observe how black holes manipulate space, time, and matter; and (3) Identify the mysterious dark energy pullingthe Universe apart. These objectives can be realized through a combination of large observatories (Constellation-X, LISA), moderate sized, PI-led missions (the Einstein Probes), and a contuinuing program of technology development, research and analysis, and education/public outreach. In this presentation, NASA's proposed Beyond Einstein Program will be described. The full Roadmap is available at http://universe.nasa.gov/.

  18. Isotopic spin effect in three-pion Bose-Einstein correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, N.

    1998-01-01

    Bose-Einstein (BE) correlations of identical particles in multiple production processes are extensively studied last years because they give an information on the space-time region of interaction. The basic effect is analogous to Hanbury-Brown - Twiss (HBT) interferometry in optics and suggests statistical production of the particles (mainly π mesons). The possible presence of coherent pionic component (for example, in the case of disoriented chiral condensate formation) modifies the HBT effect. On the other hand, the pions (contrary to photons) are subject to isotopic spin (and electric charge) conservation and so they can not be emitted independently. While the corresponding change of the statistical part is not essential for large multiplicities, the coherent part changes substantially when isotopic spin conservation is taken into account. BE correlations of the pions in the presence of both statistical and coherent components are reconsidered taking into account isotopic spin conservation in the coherent part. That will result in appearance of additional contribution to pionic correlation function. (author)

  19. Bouncing dynamics of Bose–Einstein condensates under the effects of gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekh, Golam Ali, E-mail: golamali.sekh@ba.infn.it [Department of Physics, University of Kashmir, Hazratbal, Srinagar-190006, J & K (India); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Sezione di Bari, I-70126 Bari (Italy)

    2017-03-03

    Bouncing dynamics of quasi-one dimensional Bose–Einstein condensates (BECs) falling under gravity on delta-function potentials is investigated. First, we consider a single component BEC in the presence of cubic-quintic nonlinearity and study dynamical behavior of different parameters of the system using variational and numerical approaches. We see that the quintic nonlinearity plays a dominant role over cubic nonlinear interaction to extend the bouncing dynamics in the non-linear regime. We find that a matter-wave performs bouncing motion only for certain discrete values of initial position above the reflecting potential. We then consider bouncing dynamics of binary BECs. It is shown that the pair of matter-waves bounces together if inter-species interaction is attractive. However, their pairing breaks down if the inter-species interaction is made repulsive. - Highlights: • Single and coupled BECs • Effects of inter-component interaction and gravity • Periodic and quasi-periodic dynamics • Fermi-type acceleration.

  20. Quantum Hall effect with small numbers of vortices in Bose-Einstein condensates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrnes, Tim; Dowling, Jonathan P.

    2015-08-01

    When vortices are displaced in Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs), the Magnus force gives the system a momentum transverse in the direction to the displacement. We show that BECs in long channels with vortices exhibit a quantization of the current response with respect to the spatial vortex distribution. The quantization originates from the well-known topological property of the phase around a vortex; it is an integer multiple of 2 π . In a way similar to that of the integer quantum Hall effect, the current along the channel is related to this topological phase and can be extracted from two experimentally measurable quantities: the total momentum of the BEC and the spatial distribution. The quantization is in units of m /2 h , where m is the mass of the atoms and h is Planck's constant. We derive an exact vortex momentum-displacement relation for BECs in long channels under general circumstances. Our results present the possibility that the configuration described here can be used as a novel way of measuring the mass of the atoms in the BEC using a topological invariant of the system. If an accurate determination of the plateaus are experimentally possible, this gives the possibility of a topological quantum mass standard and precise determination of the fine structure constant.

  1. Maja Winteler-Einstein

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Einstein. Articles written in Resonance – Journal of Science Education. Volume 5 Issue 4 April 2000 pp 111-120 Reflections. Albert Einstein: A Biographical Sketch · Maja Winteler-Einstein · More Details Fulltext PDF ...

  2. Einstein unmasked

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Brian

    2008-09-01

    This is a remarkable and, at times, bewilderingly diverse volume. Consisting of 20 essays that represent the proceedings of a conference held in 2005 in Berlin, Germany, during the International Year of Physics, it offers insights into Einstein's influence on a swathe of human activity. In the introduction the distinguished editors make some remarkable claims for the book, calling it "an unique attempt" and saying that "there is no better introduction to...string theory", while the first essay states "Not since Newton's Principia..." Clearly this is a volume that aspires to high standards.

  3. Bogoliubov theory of the Hawking effect in Bose-Einstein condensates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonhardt, U; Kiss, T; Oehberg, P

    2003-01-01

    Artificial black holes may demonstrate some of the elusive quantum properties of the event horizon, in particular Hawking radiation. One promising candidate is a sonic hole in a Bose-Einstein condensate. We clarify why Hawking radiation emerges from the condensate and how this condensed-matter analogue reflects some of the intriguing aspects of quantum black holes

  4. An Einstein-Goedel universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaidya, P.C.

    1978-01-01

    The metric for the standard static Einstein model of the universe can be expressed in coordinates for which a congruence of spacelike world lines of the model will be twisting. A method of 'shifting the twist' has been devised by which the twist on spacelike world lines is shifted onto the timelike world lines. The model universe then becomes Goedel's model. A combined Einstein-Goedel model containing a parameter epsilon is obtained. Switching epsilon from +1 to -1 will effect the shift of twist in the world lines and lead from the Einstein model to the Goedel model. (author)

  5. Einstein y la complejidad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jou, David

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available We study Einstein’s contributions to thermodynamics and statistical physics and their influence on some fields of physics which have led to current studies on complexity. We focus our attention on the use of fluctuations and entropy as a common framework for light and matter, whcich leds him to some of his fundamental contributions (phtoelectric effect, Brownian motion, specific heat of solids, stimulated light emission, Bose-Einstein condensation. We underline some aspects of Einstein’s research style: extrapolations, analogies, simplifications. We underline the relationship between light and matter as a common link of his researches in statistical physics.Presentamos las contribuciones de Einstein a la termodinámica y la mecánica estadística y su resonancia en ramas de la física que han conducido hasta la consideración actual de lo complejo. Nos referimos especialmente al uso de las fluctuaciones y de la entropía como marco común y nexo de unión entre luz y materia, que le conducen a algunas de sus aportaciones fundamentales (efecto fotoeléctrico, movimiento browniano, calor específico de los sólidos, emisión estimulada de la luz, condensación de Bose-Einstein. Consideramos también algunas facetas del estilo de investigación de Einstein, que se manifiestan con especial claridad en este campo: extrapolaciones, analogías, simplificaciones. Destacamos especialmente la importancia de la relación entre luz y materia en sus investigaciones.

  6. Einstein's Years in Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plendl, Hans S.

    2005-11-01

    Albert Einstein left Germany, the country of his birth, in 1894 and moved to Switzerland in 1895. He studied, worked and taught there, except for a year's stay in Prague, until1914. That year he returned to Germany, where he lived until his emigration to the United States in 1933. In 1905, while living with his wife Mileva and their first son Hans Albert in Bern and working as a technical expert at the Swiss Patent Office, he published his dissertation on the determination of molecular dimensions, his papers on Brownian Motion that helped to establish the Kinetic Theory of Heat and on the Photo-Electric Effect that validated the Quantum Theory of Light, and the two papers introducing the Special Theory of Relativity. How the young Einstein could help to lay the foundations of these theories while still working on his dissertation, holding a full-time job and helping to raise a family has evoked much discussion among his biographers. In this contribution, the extent to which living within Swiss society and culture could have made this feat possible will be examined. Old and recent photos of places in Switzerland where Einstein has lived and worked will be shown.

  7. Thermodynamics in Einstein's thought

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, M.J.

    1983-01-01

    The role of the thermodynamical approach in the Einstein's scientific work is analyzed. The Einstein's development of a notion about statistical fluctuations of thermodynamical systems that leads him to discovery of corpuscular-wave dualism is retraced

  8. Einstein's philosophy of physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seeger, R.J.

    1979-01-01

    Sources of Einstein's philosophical ideas are discussed. Einstein was indebted to Mach and Poincare, and espoused more or less a logical empiricism. He looked upon Nature as real, rational, and understandable, at least to an extent

  9. Einstein. A centenary volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    French, A.P.

    1979-01-01

    The subject is divided as follows: part 1, reminiscences (of Einstein and his life, by various authors); part 2, Einstein and his work (includes accounts of special and general relativity, gravitation, the development of quantum physics and concepts of space and time); part 3, Einstein's letters; part 4, Einstein's writings (including accounts of electrodynamics of moving bodies, general relativity, method of theoretical physics and an elementary derivation of the equivalence of mass and energy). (U.K.)

  10. From Einstein to AXAF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tananbaum, H.

    1990-01-01

    The presentations at the 10th Anniversary Einstein Symposium and the articles in this book cover a wide variety of scientific topics describing some of the important advances and discoveries made with the Einstein Observatory. The breadth and depth of science carried out with Einstein has made it essentially impossible to cover fully individual subdisciplines in single review talks and papers. Some of the major Einstein highlights are summarized and the scientific prospects for AXAF are assessed. (author)

  11. Einstein today; Einstein aujourd'hui

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aspect, A.; Grangier, Ph. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), Lab. Charles Fabry de l' Institut d' Optique a Orsay, 91 - Orsay (France); Bouchet, F.R. [Institut d' Astrophysique de Paris, CNRS, 75 - Paris (France); Brunet, E.; Derrida, B. [Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Ecole Normale Superieure, 75 - Paris (France); Cohen-Tannoudji, C. [Academie des Sciences, 75 - Paris (France); Dalibard, J.; Laloe, F. [Laboratoire Kastler Brossel. UMR 8552 (ENS, UPMC, CNRS), 75 - Paris (France); Damour, Th. [Institut des Hautes Etudes Scientifiques, 91 - Bures sur Yvette (France); Darrigol, O. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), Groupe Histoire des Sciences Rehseis, 75 - Paris (France); Pocholle, J.P. [Thales Research et Technology France, 91 - Palaiseau (France)

    2005-07-01

    The most important contributions of Einstein involve 5 fields of physics : the existence of quanta (light quanta, stimulated radiation emission and Bose-Einstein condensation), relativity, fluctuations (Brownian motion and thermodynamical fluctuations), the basis of quantum physics and cosmology (cosmological constant and the expansion of the universe). Diverse and renowned physicists have appreciated the development of modern physics from Einstein's ideas to the knowledge of today. This book is a collective book that gathers their work under 7 chapters: 1) 1905, a new beginning; 2) from the Einstein, Podolsky and Rosen's article to quantum information (cryptography and quantum computers); 3) the Bose-Einstein condensation in gases; 4) from stimulated emission to the today's lasers; 5) Brownian motion and the fluctuation-dissipation theory; 6) general relativity; and 7) cosmology. (A.C.)

  12. Conformal symmetry and the Higgs effect in the Einstein-Weinberg-Salam unified theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pervushin, V.N.; Smirichinski, V.I.; Pawlowski, M.M.

    1997-11-01

    We consider the unification of the Einstein theory of gravity with a conformal invariant version of the standard model for electroweak interaction without the Higgs potential. In this theory, the evolution of the Universe and the elementary particle masses have one and the same cosmological origin. In the flat space limit, we get the σ-model version of the standard model. The cosmological consequences of such a unification are studied. The red shift formula and Hubble law are obtained under the conventional Friedmann assumption of homogeneous matter distribution. We show that the considered theory leads to a very small vacuum density of the Higgs field ρ Cosmic φ = 10 -34 ρ cr in contrast with the theory with the Higgs potential ρ Higgs φ =0 54 ρ cr . (author)

  13. Effects of measurement backaction in the stabilization of a Bose-Einstein condensate through feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, S. D.; James, M. R.; Carvalho, A. R. R.; Hope, J. J.

    2007-01-01

    We apply quantum filtering and control to a particle in a harmonic trap under continuous position measurement, and show that a simple static feedback law can be used to cool the system. The final steady state is Gaussian and dependent on the feedback strength and coupling between the system and probe. In the limit of weak coupling, this final state becomes the ground state. An earlier model by Haine et al. [Phys. Rev. A 69, 13605 (2004)] without measurement backaction showed dark states: states that did not display error signals, thus remaining unaffected by the control. This paper shows that for a realistic measurement process this is not true, which indicates that a Bose-Einstein condensate may be driven toward the ground state from any arbitrary initial state

  14. Einstein was right!

    CERN Document Server

    Hess, Karl

    2014-01-01

    All modern books on Einstein emphasize the genius of his relativity theory and the corresponding corrections and extensions of the ancient space-time concept. However, Einstein's opposition to the use of probability in the laws of nature and particularly in the laws of quantum mechanics is criticized and often portrayed as outdated. The author of Einstein Was Right! takes a unique view and shows that Einstein created a ""Trojan horse"" ready to unleash forces against the use of probability as a basis for the laws of nature. Einstein warned that the use of probability would, in the final analys

  15. Einstein solvmanifolds and the pre-Einstein derivation

    OpenAIRE

    Nikolayevsky, Y.

    2008-01-01

    An Einstein nilradical is a nilpotent Lie algebra, which can be the nilradical of a metric Einstein solvable Lie algebra. The classification of Riemannian Einstein solvmanifolds (possibly, of all noncompact homogeneous Einstein spaces) can be reduced to determining, which nilpotent Lie algebras are Einstein nilradicals and to finding, for every Einstein nilradical, its Einstein metric solvable extension. For every nilpotent Lie algebra, we construct an (essentially unique) derivation, the pre...

  16. Einstein's theory recovered

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sebestyen, A.

    1980-11-01

    It is shown that a consequent treatment of local Lorentz invariance and of the group of translations as a gauge symmetry group necessarily leads to theories in which torsion has no place. It is also shown that the requirement of symmetry under Lorentz gauge tranformations leads to the emergence of the conventional √-gR additive term, responsible for the effects of gravitation, in the Lagrangian. It is thus proved that Einstein's general relativity is a unique consequence of the requirements of invariance under translations and Lorentz transformations. (author)

  17. Albert Einstein and 20th century's physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zajac, R.

    1979-01-01

    Albert Einstein's teaching and his three fundamental works are discussed dealing with the molecular theory of heat applied to the motion of suspended particles in liquids at rest, the photoelectric effect, and the theory of relativity. Albert Einstein's impact on contemporary physics is evaluated. (J.P.)

  18. Astrophysical observations: lensing and eclipsing Einstein's theories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Charles L

    2005-02-11

    Albert Einstein postulated the equivalence of energy and mass, developed the theory of special relativity, explained the photoelectric effect, and described Brownian motion in five papers, all published in 1905, 100 years ago. With these papers, Einstein provided the framework for understanding modern astrophysical phenomena. Conversely, astrophysical observations provide one of the most effective means for testing Einstein's theories. Here, I review astrophysical advances precipitated by Einstein's insights, including gravitational redshifts, gravitational lensing, gravitational waves, the Lense-Thirring effect, and modern cosmology. A complete understanding of cosmology, from the earliest moments to the ultimate fate of the universe, will require developments in physics beyond Einstein, to a unified theory of gravity and quantum physics.

  19. The dynamics of triple-well trapped Bose–Einstein condensates with atoms feeding and loss effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mu Aixia; Zhou Xiaoyan; Xue Jukui

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the macroscopic quantum tunnelling and self-trapping phenomena of Bose–Einstein condensates (BECs) with three-body recombination losses and atoms feeding from thermal cloud in triple-well potential. Using the three-mode approximation, three coupled Gross–Pitaevskii equations (GPEs), which describe the dynamics of the system, are obtained. The corresponding numerical results reveal some interesting characteristics of BECs for different scattering lengths. The self-trapping and quantum tunnelling both are found in zero-phase and π-phase modes. Furthermore, we observe the quantum beating phenomenon and the resonance character during the self-trapping and quantum tunnelling. It is also shown that the initial phase has a significant effect on the dynamics of the system

  20. A student's guide to Einstein's major papers

    CERN Document Server

    Kennedy, Robert E

    2012-01-01

    Our understanding of the physical universe underwent a revolution in the early twentieth century - evolving from the classical physics of Newton, Galileo, and Maxwell to the modern physics of relativity and quantum mechanics. The dominant figure in this revolutionary change was Albert Einstein. In a single year, 1905, Einstein produced breakthrough works in three areas of physics: on the size and the effects of atoms; on the quantization of the electromagnetic field; and on the special theory of relativity. In 1916 he produced a fourth breakthrough work, the general theory of relativity. A Student's Guide to Einstein's Major Papers focuses on Einstein's contributions, setting his major works into their historical context, and then takes the reader through the details of each paper, including the mathematics. This book helps the reader appreciate the simplicity and insightfulness of Einstein's ideas and how revolutionary his work was, and locate it in the evolution of scientific thought begun by the ancient...

  1. Einstein and relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cullwick, E.G.

    1979-01-01

    Einstein published his Special Theory of Relativity in 1905 and in 1915 his General Theory which predicted the bending of light rays passing near the sun. This prediction was apparently confirmed experimentally in 1919 bringing Einstein popular acclaim. Einstein's work is reviewed and the question of whether he was in fact first in the field is examined with especial reference to the work of Maxwell, Lorentz and Poincare. (U.K.)

  2. Neuromythology of Einstein's brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, Terence

    2014-07-01

    The idea that the brain of the great physicist Albert Einstein is different from "average" brains in both cellular structure and external shape is widespread. This belief is based on several studies examining Einstein's brain both histologically and morphologically. This paper reviews these studies and finds them wanting. Their results do not, in fact, provide support for the claim that the structure of Einstein's brain reflects his intellectual abilities. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The ultimate quotable Einstein

    CERN Document Server

    2011-01-01

    Here is the definitive new edition of the hugely popular collection of Einstein quotations that has sold tens of thousands of copies worldwide and been translated into twenty-five languages. The Ultimate Quotable Einstein features 400 additional quotes, bringing the total to roughly 1,600 in all. This ultimate edition includes new sections--"On and to Children," "On Race and Prejudice," and "Einstein's Verses: A Small Selection"--as well as a chronology of Einstein's life and accomplishments, Freeman Dyson's authoritative foreword, and new commentary by Alice Calaprice.

  4. Einstein and Prague

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bicak, J.

    1979-01-01

    A commemorative publication is submitted issued on the occasion of Albert Einstein's centenary remembering Einstein's sojourn and work in Prague. In addition to the article Ueber den Einfluss der Schwerkraft auf die Ausbreitung des Lichtes the publications contains the author's preface to the Czech edition of his Theory, the list of studies written by Einstein while in Prague, an assay on the great physicist's life and work, and extracts from the memoires of Philipp Frank published under the title Einstein, His Life and Times. (L.O.)

  5. Coherent tunneling of Bose-Einstein condensates: Exact solutions for Josephson effects and macroscopic quantum self-trapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raghavan, S.; Fantoni, S.; Shenoy, S.R.; Smerzi, A.

    1997-07-01

    We consider coherent atomic tunneling between two weakly coupled Bose-Einstein condensates (BEC) at T = 0 in (possibly asymmetric) double-well trap. The condensate dynamics of the macroscopic amplitudes in the two wells is modeled by two Gross-Pitaevskii equations (GPE) coupled by a tunneling matrix element. The evolution of the inter-well fractional population imbalance (related to the condensate phase difference) is obtained in terms of elliptic functions, generalizing well-known Josephson effects such as the 'ac' effect, the 'plasma oscillations', and the resonant Shapiro effect, to the nonsiusoidal regimes. We also present exact solutions for a novel 'macroscopic quantum self-trapping' effect arising from nonlinear atomic self-interaction in the GPE. The coherent BEC tunneling signatures are obtained in terms of the oscillations periods and the Fourier spectrum of the imbalance oscillations, as a function of the initial values of GPE parameters. Experimental procedures are suggested to make contact with theoretical predictions. (author). 44 refs, 8 figs

  6. Einstein Up in Smoke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisle, John

    2016-01-01

    Albert Einstein's biographers have not explained why he developed the abdominal aortic aneurysm that led to his death. Early conjectures proposed that it was caused by syphilis, without accurate evidence. The present article gives evidence to the contrary, and argues that the principal cause of Einstein's death was smoking.

  7. Albert Einsteins Wonderjaar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dieks, D.G.B.J.

    In het jaar 1905 publiceerde Albert Einstein een reeks artikelen die een omwenteling voor de wetenschap betekende. En toch bleef Einstein een kind van zijn tijd, van een eeuw die in het teken stond van dynamo’s, raderen en stoommachines.

  8. Einstein (1879-1955)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    In the first part of this book a historical review of Einstein life and works are presented. In the second part papers about different aspects of quantum mechanics are given. The third part is devoted to a round table on Einstein, Podolski and Rosen paradox [fr

  9. Einstein A to Z

    CERN Document Server

    Fox, Karen C

    2004-01-01

    Einstein was the twentieth century's most celebrated scientist - a man who developed the theory of relativity, revolutionised physics and became an iconic genius in the popular imagination. Essays range from the reasonably scientific including the theory of relativity, to the odd and engaging, such as Einstein's brain, his favourite jokes and films.

  10. When Art Meets Einstein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Science Scope, 2006

    2006-01-01

    This article deals with a pale blue sculpture entitled "A New World View", as an homage to the most famous scientist in modern history, Albert Einstein. It has 32 bas-relief squares composed of glass and steel that represent one aspect of the life and legacy of Albert Einstein. Images of children's faces peer out from behind the glass squares,…

  11. Albert Einstein a biography

    CERN Document Server

    Fölsing, Albrecht

    1997-01-01

    Albert Einstein's achievements are not just milestones in the history of science; decades ago they became an integral part of the twentieth-century world in which we live. Like no other modern physicist he altered and expanded our understanding of nature. Like few other scholars, he stood fully in the public eye. In a world changing with dramatic rapidity, he embodied the role of the scientist by personal example. Albrecht Folsing, relying on previously unknown sources and letters, brings Einstein's "genius" into focus. Whereas former biographies, written in the tradition of the history of science, seem to describe a heroic Einstein who fell to earth from heaven, Folsing attempts to reconstruct Einstein's thought in the context of the state of research at the turn of the century. Thus, perhaps for the first time, Einstein's surroundings come to light.

  12. Neutrinos and Einstein

    CERN Document Server

    Suzuki, Yoichiro

    2005-01-01

    A tiny neutrino mass is a clue to the physics beyond the standard model of elementary particle physics. The primary cosmic rays, mostly protons, are created and accelerated to the relativistic energy in supernova remnants. They traverse the universe and reach the earth. The incoming primary cosmic rays interact with the earth's atmosphere to produce secondary particles, which subsequently decay into neutrinos, called atmospheric neutrinos. The atmospheric neutrinos have shown the evidence of the finite neutrino masses through the phenomena called neutrino oscillations. Neutrinos are detected by large detectors underground like, for example, Super-Kamiokande, SNO and KamLAND. Those detectors use large photomultiplier tubes, which make use of the photo-electric effect to convert photons created by the interaction of neutrinos to electrons to form electric pulses. Neutrinos are therefore created and detected by "Einstein" and have step forward beyond the current physics. Neutrinos may also carry a hit to the ori...

  13. Coherent oscillations between two weakly coupled Bose-Einstein condensates: Josephson effects, π oscillations, and macroscopic quantum self-trapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raghavan, S.; Smerzi, A.; Fantoni, S.; Shenoy, S.R.

    2001-03-01

    We discuss the coherent atomic oscillations between two weakly coupled Bose-Einstein condensates. The weak link is provided by a laser barrier in a (possibly asymmetric) double-well trap or by Raman coupling between two condensates in different hyperfine levels. The boson Josephson junction (BJJ) dynamics is described by the two-mode nonlinear Gross-Pitaevskii equation that is solved analytically in terms of elliptic functions. The BJJ, being a neutral, isolated system, allows the investigations of dynamical regimes for the phase difference across the junction and for the population imbalance that are not accessible with superconductor Josephson junctions (SJJ's). These include oscillations with either or both of the following properties: (i) the time-averaged value of the phase is equal to π (π-phase oscillations); (ii) the average population imbalance is nonzero, in states with macroscopic quantum self-trapping. The (nonsinusoidal) generalization of the SJJ ac and plasma oscillations and the Shapiro resonance can also be observed. We predict the collapse of experimental data (corresponding to different trap geometries and the total number of condensate atoms) onto a single universal curve for the inverse period of oscillations. Analogies with Josephson oscillations between two weakly coupled reservoirs of 3 He-B and the internal Josephson effect in 3 He-A are also discussed. (author)

  14. Einstein and Planck

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilbron, John

    2005-03-01

    As an editor of the Annalen der Physik, Max Planck published Einstein's early papers on thermodynamics and on special relativity, which Planck probably was the first major physicist to appreciate. They respected one another not only as physicists but also, for their inspired creation of world pictures, as artists. Planck helped to establish Einstein in a sinecure at the center of German physics, Berlin. Despite their differences in scientific style, social life, politics, and religion, they became fast friends. Their mutual admiration survived World War I, during which Einstein advocated pacifism and Planck signed the infamous Manifesto of the 93 Intellectuals supporting the German invasion of Belgium. It also survived the Weimar Republic, which Einstein favored and Planck disliked. Physics drew them together, as both opposed the Copenhagen Interpretation; so did common decency, as Planck helped to protect Einstein from anti-semitic attacks. Their friendship did not survive the Nazis. As a standing secretary of the Berlin Academy, Planck had to advise Einstein to resign from it before his colleagues, outraged at his criticism of the new Germany from the safety of California, expelled him. Einstein never forgave his old friend and former fellow artist for not protesting publicly against his expulsion and denigration, and other enormities of National Socialism. .

  15. Einstein: A Historical Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kormos-Buchwald, Diana

    2015-04-01

    In late 1915, Albert Einstein (1879-1955) completed as series of papers on a generalized theory of gravitation that were to constitute a major conceptual change in the history of modern physics and the crowning achievement of his scientific career. But this accomplishment came after a decade of intense intellectual struggle and was received with muted enthusiasm. Einstein's previously unpublished writings and massive correspondence, edited by the Einstein Papers Project, provide vivid insights into the historical, personal, and scientific context of the formulation, completion, and reception of GR during the first decades of the 20th century.

  16. Einstein's statistical mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baracca, A; Rechtman S, R

    1985-08-01

    The foundation of equilibrium classical statistical mechanics were laid down in 1902 independently by Gibbs and Einstein. The latter's contribution, developed in three papers published between 1902 and 1904, is usually forgotten and when not, rapidly dismissed as equivalent to Gibb's. We review in detail Einstein's ideas on the foundations of statistical mechanics and show that they constitute the beginning of a research program that led Einstein to quantum theory. We also show how these ideas may be used as a starting point for an introductory course on the subject.

  17. Einstein's statistical mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baracca, A.; Rechtman S, R.

    1985-01-01

    The foundation of equilibrium classical statistical mechanics were laid down in 1902 independently by Gibbs and Einstein. The latter's contribution, developed in three papers published between 1902 and 1904, is usually forgotten and when not, rapidly dismissed as equivalent to Gibb's. We review in detail Einstein's ideas on the foundations of statistical mechanics and show that they constitute the beginning of a research program that led Einstein to quantum theory. We also show how these ideas may be used as a starting point for an introductory course on the subject. (author)

  18. An Einstein encyclopedia

    CERN Document Server

    Calaprice, Alice; Schulmann, Robert

    2015-01-01

    This is the single most complete guide to Albert Einstein’s life and work for students, researchers, and browsers alike. Written by three leading Einstein scholars who draw on their combined wealth of expertise gained during their work on the Collected Papers of Albert Einstein, this authoritative and accessible reference features more than one hundred entries and is divided into three parts covering the personal, scientific, and public spheres of Einstein’s life. An Einstein Encyclopedia contains entries on Einstein’s birth and death, family and romantic relationships, honors and awards, educational institutions where he studied and worked, citizenships and immigration to America, hobbies and travels, plus the people he befriended and the history of his archives and the Einstein Papers Project. Entries on Einstein’s scientific theories provide useful background and context, along with details about his assistants, collaborators, and rivals, as well as physics concepts related to his work. Coverage o...

  19. Once upon Einstein

    CERN Document Server

    Damour, Thibault

    2006-01-01

    It is well known that Einstein founded twentieth-century physics with his work on relativity and quanta, but what do we really know about these ground breaking ideas? How were they discovered? What should we retain today from the conceptual upheavals he initiated? Through a selection of concrete scenes taken from Einstein's life, the author offers a view into the formation of his theories, as well as reminders of the day-to-day applications of his ideas. Simultaneously the reader is lead through a reflection on their philosophical impact: How should we think of time according to the theory of relativity, which removes any meaningful "now" and shows that twins can have different ages? How should we think of reality when quantum theory predicts that spatially separated objects nevertheless remain connected through Einstein's notion of "entanglement," which has recently been verified through scientific observation? This book puts readers in Einstein's place, allowing them to share some of those particular moment...

  20. Herwig Schopper Einstein's Legacy

    CERN Multimedia

    Schneegans, Susan

    2005-01-01

    "Last June, the United Nations declared 2005 the International Year of Physics and invited UNESCO to take the lead in celebrating the hundreth anniversary of Albert Einstein's legandary articles on relativisty, quantum theory and Brownian motion" (3 pages)

  1. Einstein and cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gekman, O.

    1982-01-01

    The brief essay of the development of the main ideas of relativistic cosmology is presented. The Einstein's cosmological work about the Universe - ''Cosmological considerations in connection with the general relativity theory'' - gave the basis to all further treatments in this field. In 1922 A. Friedman's work appeared, in which the first expanding Universe model was proposed as a solution of the Einstein field equations. The model was spherically closed, but its curvature radius was a function of time. About 1955 the searches for anisotropic homogeneous solutions to Einstein field equation began. It turned out that isotropic cosmological models are unstable in general. The predominant part of them transform to anisotropic at insignificant breaking of isotropy. The discovery of isotropic background cosmic radiation in 1965, along with the Hubble low of the Universe expansion, served as the direct confirmation of cosmology based on the Einstein theory

  2. Development of Einstein's general theory of relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Datta, B.K.

    1980-01-01

    Starting from Poincare's Lorentz-invariant theory of gravity formulated in 1906, development of Einstein's general theory of relativity during 1906-1916 is discussed. Three stages in this development are recognised. In the first stage during 1907-1914, Einstein tried to extend the relativity principle of uniform motion to the frames in non-uniform motion. For this purpose, he introduced the principle of equivalence which made it possible to calculate the effect of homogeneous gravitational field on arbitrary physical processes. During the second stage comprising years 1912-1914 overlapping the first stage, Einstein and Grossmann were struggling to translate physical postulates into the language of the absolute differential calculus. In the period 1915-1916, Einstein formulated the field equations of general relativity. While discussing these developmental stages, theories of gravitation formulated by Abraham, Nordstroem and Mie are also discussed. (M.G.B.)

  3. Conformal Einstein spaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozameh, C.N.; Newman, E.T.; Tod, K.P.

    1985-01-01

    Conformal transformations in four-dimensional. In particular, a new set of two necessary and sufficient conditions for a space to be conformal to an Einstein space is presented. The first condition defines the class of spaces conformal to C spaces, whereas the last one (the vanishing of the Bach tensor) gives the particular subclass of C spaces which are conformally related to Einstein spaces. (author)

  4. Discrete Bose-Einstein spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlad, Valentin I.; Ionescu-Pallas, Nicholas

    2001-03-01

    The Bose-Einstein energy spectrum of a quantum gas, confined in a rigid cubic box, is shown to become discrete and strongly dependent on the box geometry (size L), temperature, T and atomic mass number, A at , in the region of small γ=A at TV 1/3 . This behavior is the consequence of the random state degeneracy in the box. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the total energy does not obey the conventional law any longer, but a new law, which depends on γ and on the quantum gas fugacity. This energy law imposes a faster decrease to zero than it is classically expected, for γ→0. The lighter the gas atoms, the higher the temperatures or the box size, for the same effects in the discrete Bose-Einstein regime. (author)

  5. Quantum ratchets, the orbital Josephson effect, and chaos in Bose-Einstein condensates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Lincoln D.; Heimsoth, Martin; Creffield, Charles E.; Sols, Fernando

    2014-03-01

    In a system of ac-driven condensed bosons we study a new type of Josephson effect occurring between states sharing the same region of space and the same internal atom structure. We first develop a technique to calculate the long-time dynamics of a driven interacting many-body system. For resonant frequencies, this dynamics can be shown to derive from an effective time-independent Hamiltonian which is expressed in terms of standard creation and annihilation operators. Within the subspace of resonant states, and if the undriven states are plane waves, a locally repulsive interaction between bosons translates into an effective attraction. We apply the method to study the effect of interactions on the coherent ratchet current of an asymmetrically driven boson system. We find a wealth of dynamical regimes which includes Rabi oscillations, self-trapping and chaotic behavior. In the latter case, a full quantum many-body calculation deviates from the mean-field results by predicting large quantum fluctuations of the relative particle number. Moreover, we find that chaos and entanglement, as defined by a variety of widely used and accepted measures, are overlapping but distinct notions. Funded by Spanish MINECO, the Ramon y Cajal program (CEC), the Comunidad de Madrid through Grant Microseres, the Heidelberg Center for Quantum Dynamics, and the NSF.

  6. Universal Themes of Bose-Einstein Condensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proukakis, Nick P.; Snoke, David W.; Littlewood, Peter B.

    2017-04-01

    Foreword; List of contributors; Preface; Part I. Introduction: 1. Universality and Bose-Einstein condensation: perspectives on recent work D. W. Snoke, N. P. Proukakis, T. Giamarchi and P. B. Littlewood; 2. A history of Bose-Einstein condensation of atomic hydrogen T. Greytak and D. Kleppner; 3. Twenty years of atomic quantum gases: 1995-2015 W. Ketterle; 4. Introduction to polariton condensation P. B. Littlewood and A. Edelman; Part II. General Topics: Editorial notes; 5. The question of spontaneous symmetry breaking in condensates D. W. Snoke and A. J. Daley; 6. Effects of interactions on Bose-Einstein condensation R. P. Smith; 7. Formation of Bose-Einstein condensates M. J. Davis, T. M. Wright, T. Gasenzer, S. A. Gardiner and N. P. Proukakis; 8. Quenches, relaxation and pre-thermalization in an isolated quantum system T. Langen and J. Schmiedmayer; 9. Ultracold gases with intrinsic scale invariance C. Chin; 10. Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless phase of a driven-dissipative condensate N. Y. Kim, W. H. Nitsche and Y. Yamamoto; 11. Superfluidity and phase correlations of driven dissipative condensates J. Keeling, L. M. Sieberer, E. Altman, L. Chen, S. Diehl and J. Toner; 12. BEC to BCS crossover from superconductors to polaritons A. Edelman and P. B. Littlewood; Part III. Condensates in Atomic Physics: Editorial notes; 13. Probing and controlling strongly correlated quantum many-body systems using ultracold quantum gases I. Bloch; 14. Preparing and probing chern bands with cold atoms N. Goldman, N. R. Cooper and J. Dalibard; 15. Bose-Einstein condensates in artificial gauge fields L. J. LeBlanc and I. B. Spielman; 16. Second sound in ultracold atomic gases L. Pitaevskii and S. Stringari; 17. Quantum turbulence in atomic Bose-Einstein condensates N. G. Parker, A. J. Allen, C. F. Barenghi and N. P. Proukakis; 18. Spinor-dipolar aspects of Bose-Einstein condensation M. Ueda; Part IV. Condensates in Condensed Matter Physics: Editorial notes; 19. Bose-Einstein

  7. Quantum effects on curve crossing in a Bose-Einstein condensate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yurovsky, V.A.; Ben-Reuven, A.; Julienne, P.S.

    2002-01-01

    Formation of atomic pairs by the dissociation of a molecular condensate or by inelastic collisions in an atomic condensate due to a time-dependent curve crossing process is studied beyond the mean-field approximation. The number of atoms formed by the spontaneous process is described by a Landau-Zener formula multiplied by an exponential amplification factor due to quantum many-body effects. Correlated atomic pairs are formed in squeezed states. The rate of stimulated processes depends on the relative phase of the two fields

  8. The Einstein almanac

    CERN Document Server

    Calaprice, Alice

    2005-01-01

    Albert Einstein was an exceptional human being. Perhaps nothing reflects the breadth and scope of his brilliance, his interests, and his influence better than his publications -- more than six hundred scientific papers, books, essays, reviews, and opinion pieces. Einstein began publishing in March 1901 with a scientific work that appeared in the German journal Annalen der Physik when he was twenty-two; the last publication was an editorial in the journal Common Cause which appeared a few months before his death in 1955. In the fifty-four-year interval, his published work ranged widely over relativity theory and quantum physics, nationalism, Judaism, war, peace, and education. Indeed, Einstein's literary output was so abundant that even many of his most informed admirers are not familiar with all of it. The Einstein Almanac takes a look at Einstein's year-by-year output, explaining his three-hundred most important publications and setting them into the context of his life, science, and world history. Concentr...

  9. Effect of interactions on the localization of a Bose-Einstein condensate in a quasi-periodic lattice

    OpenAIRE

    Lye, J. E.; Fallani, L.; Fort, C.; Guarrera, V.; Modugno, M.; Wiersma, D. S.; Inguscio, M.

    2006-01-01

    The transport properties of a Bose-Einstein condensate in a 1D incommensurate bichromatic lattice are investigated both theoretically and experimentally. We observe a blockage of the center of mass motion with low atom number, and a return of motion when the atom number is increased. Solutions of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation show how the localization due to the quasi-disorder introduced by the incommensurate bichromatic lattice is affected by the interactions.

  10. Einstein's Revolutionary Light-Quantum Hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuewer, Roger H.

    2005-05-01

    The paper in which Albert Einstein proposed his light-quantum hypothesis was the only one of his great papers of 1905 that he himself termed ``revolutionary.'' Contrary to widespread belief, Einstein did not propose his light-quantum hypothesis ``to explain the photoelectric effect.'' Instead, he based his argument for light quanta on the statistical interpretation of the second law of thermodynamics, with the photoelectric effect being only one of three phenomena that he offered as possible experimental support for it. I will discuss Einstein's light-quantum hypothesis of 1905 and his introduction of the wave-particle duality in 1909 and then turn to the reception of his work on light quanta by his contemporaries. We will examine the reasons that prominent physicists advanced to reject Einstein's light-quantum hypothesis in succeeding years. Those physicists included Robert A. Millikan, even though he provided convincing experimental proof of the validity of Einstein's equation of the photoelectric effect in 1915. The turning point came after Arthur Holly Compton discovered the Compton effect in late 1922, but even then Compton's discovery was contested both on experimental and on theoretical grounds. Niels Bohr, in particular, had never accepted the reality of light quanta and now, in 1924, proposed a theory, the Bohr-Kramers-Slater theory, which assumed that energy and momentum were conserved only statistically in microscopic interactions. Only after that theory was disproved experimentally in 1925 was Einstein's revolutionary light-quantum hypothesis generally accepted by physicists---a full two decades after Einstein had proposed it.

  11. Thomas precession: a kinematic effect of the algebra of Einstein's velocity addition law. Comments on 'Deriving relativistic momentum and energy: II. Three-dimensional case'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ungar, Abraham A

    2006-01-01

    The authors of a recently published paper (Sonego S and Pin M 2005 Eur. J. Phys. 26 851-6) have erroneously asserted that Einstein's velocity addition law is associative. Moreover, they have attributed the alleged associativity of Einstein's velocity addition law to 'The relativity principle[, which] requires that [Einstein's velocity addition] gives the composition law of a group'. Accordingly, we note that Einstein's velocity addition is non-associative and demonstrate that the breakdown of associativity and commutativity in Einstein's velocity addition law results from the presence of Thomas precession. (letters and comments)

  12. Albert Einstein memorial lectures

    CERN Document Server

    Mechoulam, Raphael; The Israel Academy for Sciences and Humanities

    2012-01-01

    This volume consists of a selection of the Albert Einstein Memorial Lectures presented annually at the Israel Academy of Sciences and Humanities. Delivered by eminent scientists and scholars, including Nobel laureates, they cover a broad spectrum of subjects in physics, chemistry, life science, mathematics, historiography and social issues. This distinguished memorial lecture series was inaugurated by the Israel Academy of Sciences and Humanities following an international symposium held in Jerusalem in March 1979 to commemorate the centenary of Albert Einstein's birth. Considering that Einstein's interests, activities and influence were not restricted to theoretical physics but spanned broad fields affecting society and the welfare of humankind, it was felt that these memorial lectures should be addressed to scientists, scholars and erudite laypersons rather than to physicists alone.

  13. A Note on Unified Statistics Including Fermi-Dirac, Bose-Einstein, and Tsallis Statistics, and Plausible Extension to Anisotropic Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christianto V.

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available In the light of some recent hypotheses suggesting plausible unification of thermostatistics where Fermi-Dirac, Bose-Einstein and Tsallis statistics become its special subsets, we consider further plausible extension to include non-integer Hausdorff dimension, which becomes realization of fractal entropy concept. In the subsequent section, we also discuss plausible extension of this unified statistics to include anisotropic effect by using quaternion oscillator, which may be observed in the context of Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation. Further observation is of course recommended in order to refute or verify this proposition.

  14. Conversations With Albert Einstein. II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankland, R. S.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses Einstein's views on the role of Michelson-Morley, Fizeau, and Miller experiments in the development of relativity and his attitude toward the theories of new quantum mechanics. Indicates that Einstein's opposition to quantum mechanics is beyond dispute. (CC)

  15. Einstein's essays in science

    CERN Document Server

    Einstein, Albert

    2009-01-01

    His name is synonymous with ""genius,"" but these essays by the renowned physicist and scholar are accessible to any reader. In addition to outlining the core of relativity theory in everyday language, Albert Einstein presents fascinating discussions of other scientific fields to which he made significant contributions. The Nobel Laureate also profiles some of history's most influential physicists, upon whose studies his own work was based.Assembled during Einstein's lifetime from his speeches and essays, this book marks the first presentation to the wider world of the scientist's accomplishme

  16. Einstein, Kant, and Taoism

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Y. S.

    2006-01-01

    It is said that Einstein's conceptual base for the theory of relativity was the philosophy formulated by Immanuel Kant. Then, is it possible to see how Kant played a role in Einstein's thinking without reading Kant's books? This question arises because it is not possible for physicists to read Kant's writings. Yes, it is possible if we use the method of physics. It is known also that Kant's mode of thinking was profoundly affected by the geography of Koenigsberg where he spent eighty years of...

  17. Sky surveys with Einstein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gioia, I.M.

    1990-01-01

    Since the early times after the launch of the Einstein Observatory, systematic studies of serendipitous Einstein x-ray sources have been carried out by several observers with interests in both galactic and extragalactic astronomy. The majority of these studies were not surveys in the strict sense of the word: in several cases no analyses requiring flux completeness were performed. However, these systematic searches for sources added much to our knowledge of the behaviour in the X-ray domain of the different classes of astronomical objects and in many instances led to the study of their properties at different wavebands. (author)

  18. Einstein and modern cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stabell, R.

    1979-01-01

    Einstein applied his gravitation theory to a universe model with positively curved space in 1917. In order to maintain a static universe he introduced the cosmological constant, which in the light of later nonstatic universe models, he described as his life's greatest mistake. The best known such model is the Einstein-de Sitter model, which is here discussed in some detail. The 'big bang' theory is also discussed leading to the cosmic background radiation. The early phase of the 'big bang' cosmology, the first ten seconds, and the first minutes are discussed, leading to the transparent stage. (JIW)

  19. Ceremony marking Einstein Year

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    Sunday 13th November at 10:00amat Geneva's St. Peter's Cathedral To mark Einstein Year and the importance of the intercultural dialogue of which it forms a part, a religious service will take place on Sunday 13 November at 10 a.m. in St. Peter's Cathedral, to which CERN members and colleagues are warmly welcomed. Pastor Henry Babel, senior minister at the Cathedral, will speak on the theme: 'God in Einstein's Universe'. Diether Blechschmidt will convey a message on behalf of the scientific community.

  20. Holonomy of Einstein Lorentzian manifolds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galaev, Anton S

    2010-01-01

    The classification of all possible holonomy algebras of Einstein and vacuum Einstein Lorentzian manifolds is obtained. It is shown that each such algebra appears as the holonomy algebra of an Einstein (resp. vacuum Einstein) Lorentzian manifold; the direct constructions are given. Also the holonomy algebras of totally Ricci-isotropic Lorentzian manifolds are classified. The classification of the holonomy algebras of Lorentzian manifolds is reviewed and a complete description of the spaces of curvature tensors for these holonomies is given.

  1. Mileva Maric Einstein vivre avec Albert Einstein

    CERN Document Server

    Milentijevic, Radmila

    2013-01-01

    Radmila Milentijevic n’est pas la première à écrire sur les relations entre le génial Albert Einstein et sa première épouse et précieuse collaboratrice durant ses années de recherches, la scientifique serbe Mileva Maric. Mais c’est la première fois qu’un ouvrage traite de cette idylle, puis de ce drame familial qui a duré près de cinquante années, sous une forme quasiment poétique, si rare dans l’historiographie scientifique.Professeur émérite d’histoire à l’université de New York, l’auteur propose ici une monographie riche et vivante, dévoilant une face cachée d’Albert Einstein, et faisant de sa compagne une figure historique de premier plan en même temps qu’un personnage romanesque dont le destin tragique ne laissera aucun lecteur indifférent.

  2. Bose-Einstein Condensation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaksch, D

    2003-01-01

    The Gross-Pitaevskii equation, named after one of the authors of the book, and its large number of applications for describing the properties of Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) in trapped weakly interacting atomic gases, is the main topic of this book. In total the monograph comprises 18 chapters and is divided into two parts. Part I introduces the notion of BEC and superfluidity in general terms. The most important properties of the ideal and the weakly interacting Bose gas are described and the effects of nonuniformity due to an external potential at zero temperature are studied. The first part is then concluded with a summary of the properties of superfluid He. In Part II the authors describe the theoretical aspects of BEC in harmonically trapped weakly interacting atomic gases. A short and rather rudimentary chapter on collisions and trapping of atomic gases which seems to be included for completeness only is followed by a detailed analysis of the ground state, collective excitations, thermodynamics, and vortices as well as mixtures of BECs and the Josephson effect in BEC. Finally, the last three chapters deal with topics of more recent interest like BEC in optical lattices, low dimensional systems, and cold Fermi gases. The book is well written and in fact it provides numerous useful and important relations between the different properties of a BEC and covers most of the aspects of ultracold weakly interacting atomic gases from the point of view of condensed matter physics. The book contains a comprehensive introduction to BEC for physicists new to the field as well as a lot of detail and insight for those already familiar with this area. I therefore recommend it to everyone who is interested in BEC. Very clearly however, the intention of the book is not to provide prospects for applications of BEC in atomic physics, quantum optics or quantum state engineering and therefore the more practically oriented reader might sometimes wonder why exactly an equation is

  3. Einstein was right!

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    For the first time scientists have succeeded in measuring the speed of gravity. They took advantage of a rare alignment of Jupiter against a far-off quasar to measure the fundamental constant described by Albert Einstein in his general theory of relativity (2 pages).

  4. Albert Einstein Centenary

    CERN Document Server

    Weisskopf, Victor Frederick; CERN. Geneva

    1979-01-01

    A socially engaged scientist by V. F. WEISSKOPF. On the origin of the Einstein-Russell statement on nuclear weapon by H. S. BURHOP. This week, we pay homage to Albert Einstein, the giant of twentieth-century physics born exactly 100 years ago on 14 March 1879 in Ulm, Germany. At the height of his career, Einstein made a whole series of monumental contributions to physics, including the elaborate theories of special and general relativity which revolutionized human thought and marked a major breakthrough in our understanding to the Universe. Along with quantum mechanics, relativity is one of the twin pillars of understanding which allow us here at CERN to study the behaviour of the tiniest components of matter. The development of quantum mechanics took the combined efforts of some of the greatest scientists the world has known, while relativity was developed almost single-handed by Einstein. The centenary of his birth is being commemorated all over the world. Exhibitions and symposia are being organized, books...

  5. Test of Einstein locality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roos, Matts

    1980-11-01

    Einstein locality imples that spacelike separated coherent quantum systems do not interfere, and that all interferences must propagate with at most the speed of light. It then follows that the reaction e + e - →K 0 antiK 0 must yield some Ksub(s)Ksuu(s) decays in apparent violation of P and C conservation. (author)

  6. 2011 Einstein Fellows Chosen

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    ASA has announced the selection of the 2011 Einstein Fellows who will conduct research related to NASA's Physics of the Cosmos program, which aims to expand our knowledge of the origin, evolution, and fate of the Universe. The Einstein Fellowship provides support to the awardees for three years, and the Fellows may pursue their research at a host university or research center of their choosing in the United States. The new Fellows will begin their programs in the fall of 2011. The new Einstein Fellows and their host institutions are listed below: * Akos Bogdan (Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, Cambridge, Mass.) * Samuel Gralla (University of Maryland, College Park, Md.) * Philip Hopkins (University of California at Berkeley) * Matthew Kunz (Princeton University, Princeton, N.J.) * Laura Lopez (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Mass.) * Amy Reines (National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, Virg.) * Rubens Reis (University of Michigan, Ann Arbor) * Ken Shen (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, Calif.) * Jennifer Siegal-Gaskins (California Institute of Technology, Pasadena) * Lorenzo Sironi (Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass.) NASA has two other astrophysics theme-based fellowship programs: the Sagan Fellowship Program, which supports research into exoplanet exploration, and the Hubble Fellowship Program, which supports research into cosmic origins. More information on the Einstein Fellowships can be found at: http://cxc.harvard.edu/fellows/

  7. Bose-Einstein Condensation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    absolute zero. These ideas had ... Everybody is talking about Bose-Einstein condensation. This discovery ... needed if we want to find the probability distribution of the x- ... Boltzmann took two approaches to the problem, both of them deep and ...

  8. From Newton to Einstein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryder, L. H.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the history of scientific thought in terms of the theories of inertia and absolute space, relativity and gravitation. Describes how Sir Isaac Newton used the work of earlier scholars in his theories and how Albert Einstein used Newton's theories in his. (CW)

  9. The Light of Einstein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Atkinson, David

    2005-01-01

    The Michelson-Morley experiment suggests the hypothesis that the two-way speed of light is constant,and this is consistent with a more general in variance than that of Lorentz. On adding the requirement that physical laws have the same form in all inertial frames, as Einstein did, the transformation

  10. Examining the Enigmatic Einstein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoon, Koh Aik

    2007-01-01

    Albert Einstein is the icon of scientific genius. His is one the most recognizable faces in the history of mankind. This paper takes a cursory look at the man who is commonly perceived to be the epitome of eccentricity. We manage to sum up his salient traits which are associated with his name. The traits are based on anecdotal evidence. This…

  11. Resonances for coupled Bose-Einstein condensates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haroutyunyan, H.L.; Nienhuis, G.

    2004-01-01

    The properties of a Bose-Einstein condensate in a two-well potential can be manipulated by periodic modulation of the potential parameters. We study the effects arising from modulating the barrier height and the difference in well depth. At certain modulation frequencies the system exhibits resonances, which may show up in an enhancement of the tunneling rate between the wells. Resonances can be used to control the particle distribution over the wells. Some of the effects occurring in the two-well system also arise for a Bose-Einstein condensate in an optical lattice

  12. Einstein and the quantum theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pais, A.

    1979-01-01

    The following topics are discussed: The light-quantum hypothesis and its gradual evolution into the photon concept. Early history of the photoelectric effect. The theoretical and experimental reasons why the resistance to the photon was stronger and more protracted than for any other particle proposed to date. Einstein's position regarding the Bohr--Kramers--Slater suggestion, the last bastion of resistance to the photon. Einstein's analysis of fluctuations around thermal equilibrium and his proposal of a duality between particles and waves, in 1909 for electromagnetic radiation (the first time this duality was ever stated) and in January 1925 for matter (prior to quantum mechanics and for reasons independent of those given earlier by de Broglie). His demonstration that long-known specific heat anomalies are quantum effects. His role in the evolution of the third law of thermodynamics. His new derivation of Planck's law in 1917 which also marks the beginning of his concern with the failure of classical causality. His role as one of the founders of quantum statistics and his discovery of the first example of a phase transition derived by using purely statistical methods. His position as a critic of quantum mechanics. Initial doubts on the consistency of quantum mechanics (1926--1930). His view maintained from 1930 until the end of his life: quantum mechanics is logically consistent and quite successful but it is incomplete. His attitude toward success. His criterion of objective reality. Differences in the roles relativity and quantum theory played in Einstein's life. His vision regarding quantum theory in the context of a unified field theory. His last autobiographical sketch, written a few months before his death, concluding with a statement about the quantum theory, a subject to which (by his own account) he had given more thought than even to general relativity

  13. Once Upon Einstein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giannetto, E [Dipartimento di Fisica ' A Volta' , via A Bassi 6, I-27100 Pavia (Italy)

    2007-07-20

    Thibault Damour is a theoretical physicist, and a member of the French Academy of Sciences. This book is the translation, by Eric Novak, of the original French Si Einstein m'etait conte (Le Cherche Midi, 2005). It is neither a book of theoretical physics nor a biography of Einstein. It is not a book of history nor philosophy of science. In Damour's words it was written to encourage the reader to share with Einstein 'those times when he understood some part of the hidden order of the universe'. It is a relatively short book, written in a very fluent style, but it deals with all the major problems and achievements of Einstein's works. Starting from special relativity, it continues with general relativity, quantum theories, unified field theory and a brief overview of the actual research related to Einstein's legacy. It is essentially a popular science book with some related exploration in history and philosophy to interpret physical theories. The most important problem discussed by Damour is the nature of time. On this subject, there is a very interesting short paragraph (pp 33--35) dedicated to the reception of the relativity idea by the great writer Marcel Proust and its counterpart within A la Recherche du Temps Perdu. A correct discussion of the implications of a relativistic time should imply the distinction of the different possible interpretations of this concept. Damour seems to conclude that only one interpretation is possible: 'time does not exist', flowing of time is an illusion. One has to know that Einstein's ideas on time were related to Spinoza's perspective of a knowledge sub specie aeternitatis. However, other interpretations are possible and are related to the idea of time as an actuality. Damour speaks about the controversy between Einstein and Bergson, but Bergson is considered as a philosopher who did not understand relativity. This philosophical problem of relativistic time is indeed related to a

  14. Once Upon Einstein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giannetto, E

    2007-01-01

    Thibault Damour is a theoretical physicist, and a member of the French Academy of Sciences. This book is the translation, by Eric Novak, of the original French Si Einstein m'etait conte (Le Cherche Midi, 2005). It is neither a book of theoretical physics nor a biography of Einstein. It is not a book of history nor philosophy of science. In Damour's words it was written to encourage the reader to share with Einstein 'those times when he understood some part of the hidden order of the universe'. It is a relatively short book, written in a very fluent style, but it deals with all the major problems and achievements of Einstein's works. Starting from special relativity, it continues with general relativity, quantum theories, unified field theory and a brief overview of the actual research related to Einstein's legacy. It is essentially a popular science book with some related exploration in history and philosophy to interpret physical theories. The most important problem discussed by Damour is the nature of time. On this subject, there is a very interesting short paragraph (pp 33--35) dedicated to the reception of the relativity idea by the great writer Marcel Proust and its counterpart within A la Recherche du Temps Perdu. A correct discussion of the implications of a relativistic time should imply the distinction of the different possible interpretations of this concept. Damour seems to conclude that only one interpretation is possible: 'time does not exist', flowing of time is an illusion. One has to know that Einstein's ideas on time were related to Spinoza's perspective of a knowledge sub specie aeternitatis. However, other interpretations are possible and are related to the idea of time as an actuality. Damour speaks about the controversy between Einstein and Bergson, but Bergson is considered as a philosopher who did not understand relativity. This philosophical problem of relativistic time is indeed related to a historical problem briefly discussed by Damour

  15. [Photoeffects, Einstein's light quanta and the history of their acceptance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiederkehr, Karl Heinrich

    2006-01-01

    It is generally supposed, that the discovery of the efficacy-quantum by Planck was the impetus to Einstein's hypothesis of lightquanta. With its help Einstein could explain the external light-electrical effect. But even years before Einstein had worked at the photoeffect and already made experiments on it. For that reason the article gives a short survey about the history of the lightelectric effects. Lenard's basical work about the release of the photoelectrons is dealt with in detail, without which Einstein would scarcely have found his lightquanta. Furthermore it is shown how difficult it was for the physicists to give up--at least partially--the traditional view of the undulation-nature of light, and how they searched to explain the great energies of the photoelectrons. On the other side it is set forth how Einstein's formula of lightquanta was gradually confirmed. The tragical development of Einstein's personal relations with Johannes Stark and Philipp Lenard are briefly described. Stark was one of the few who supported Einstein's ideas at the beginning. Only with the Compton-effect, which could only be quantitatively interpreted by means of lightquanta and the special theory of relativity 1923, the way was free for the general acceptance of the lightquanta. Einstein did not agree to the obtained dualism of undulation and corpuscle; he had a different solution in mind about the fusion of the two forms of appearance of light.

  16. Albert einstein - Illustrated biography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, K.

    1990-01-01

    A genius of science, but also a great-hearted man who fought his convictions all his life long. That is the Albert Einstein s portrait what draw the documents collected in this book: photographies, talks, letters and narrations, sometimes unpublished. With evidences and anecdotes is drawn a surprising personality of a man full of humor and originality who made his mark, as nobody else, in this tumultuous century. (N.C.)

  17. Simplifications of Einstein supergravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrara, S.; van Nieuwenhuizen, P.

    1979-01-01

    Using a new symmetry of the Einstein supergravity action and defining a new spin connection, the axial-vector auxiliary field cancels in the gauge action and in the gauge algebra. This explains why in some models a first-order formalism with minimal coupling of the spin connection and tensor calculus agree, while in other models only the tensor calculus gives the correct result but torsion does not

  18. Seeking an African Einstein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durrani, Matin

    2008-07-01

    A new postgraduate centre for maths and computer science is set to open in the Nigerian capital of Abuja this month as part of an ambitious plan to find the "next Einstein" in Africa. The centre will provide advanced training to graduate students from across Africa in maths and related fields. It will seek to attract the best young African scientists and nurture their talents as problem-solvers and teachers.

  19. The Sky at Einstein's Feet

    CERN Document Server

    Keel, William C

    2006-01-01

    The insights of relativity have illuminated a century of astronomical discovery, often going beyond the phenomena that Einstein lived to see. This book shows, in nonmathematical ways, how deeply these ways of viewing the Universe have informed our interpretations of it, and how many of the amazing discoveries of these decades have made sense only as part of Einstein's universe. The author brings together the ways in which we see the bizarre effects of relativity played out on a cosmic scale. None of this is particularly new to practicing astronomers, but much has yet to be seen outside technical journals. The presentation avoids mathematics (except for the most famous equation in all of physics!), and is designed to be accessible to the interested public. Gravitational lenses, the visible effects of light-travel delays, the search for black holes, the ways relativity in atomic nuclei makes stars shine, are all treated. In many cases, some of the principals are still alive and provided new commentary on the di...

  20. Einstein the searcher his work explained from dialogues with Einstein

    CERN Document Server

    Moszkowski, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    This volume, first published in 1921, presents a series of portraits of Einstein, thus offering glimpses in the character and private reflections of the man who changed the course of modern science. Intended neither as a biography, nor as a résumé of Einsteinian physics, Einstein: The Searcher instead focusses on Einstein's relationship with the scientific project as he himself conceived it, and so is still of contemporary significance for those puzzled by the spirit of scientific enquiry.

  1. Albert Einstein Centenary

    CERN Document Server

    Amati, Daniele; Weisskopf, Victor Frederick; CERN. Geneva

    1979-01-01

    The scientist and his work by D. AMATI and S. FUBINI. A socially engaged scientist by V. F. WEISSKOPF. This week, we pay homage to Albert Einstein, the giant of twentieth-century physics born exactly 100 years ago on 14 March 1879 in Ulm, Germany. At the height of his career, Einstein made a whole series of monumental contributions to physics, including the elaborate theories of special and general relativity which revolutionized human thought and marked a major breakthrough in our understanding to the Universe. Along with quantum mechanics, relativity is one of the twin pillars of understanding which allow us here at CERN to study the behaviour of the tiniest components of matter. The development of quantum mechanics took the combined efforts of some of the greatest scientists the world has known, while relativity was developed almost single-handed by Einstein. The centenary of his birth is being commemorated all over the world. Exhibitions and symposia are being organized, books published, postage stamps is...

  2. Albert Einstein, Analogizer Extraordinaire

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2007-01-01

    Where does deep insight in physics come from? It is tempting to think that it comes from the purest and most precise of reasoning, following ironclad laws of thought that compel the clear mind completely rigidly. And yet the truth is quite otherwise. One finds, when one looks closely at any major discovery, that the greatest of physicists are, in some sense, the most crazily daring and irrational of all physicists. Albert Einstein exemplifies this thesis in spades. In this talk I will describe the key role, throughout Albert Einstein's fabulously creative life, played by wild guesses made by analogy lacking any basis whatsoever in pure reasoning. In particular, in this year of 2007, the centenary of 1907, I will describe how over the course of two years (1905 through 1907) of pondering, Einstein slowly came, via analogy, to understand the full, radical consequences of the equation that he had first discovered and published in 1905, arguably the most famous equation of all time: E = mc2.

  3. Effects of impurity and Bose-Fermi interactions on the transition temperature of a dilute dipolar Bose-Einstein condensation in trapped Bose-Fermi mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavari, H.; Mokhtari, M.

    2014-03-01

    The effects of impurity and Bose-Fermi interactions on the transition temperature of a dipolar Bose-Einstein condensation in trapped Bose-Fermi mixture, by using the two-fluid model, are investigated. The shift of the transition temperature consists of four contributions due to contact, Bose-Fermi, dipole-dipole, and impurity interactions. We will show that in the presence of an anisotropic trap, the Bose-Fermi correction to the shift of transition temperature due to the excitation spectra of the thermal part is independent of anisotropy factor. Applying our results to trapped Bose-Fermi mixtures shows that, by knowing the impurity effect, the shift of the transition temperature due to Bose-Fermi interaction could be measured for isotropic trap (dipole-dipole contributions is zero) and Feshbach resonance technique (contact potential contribution is negligible).

  4. Einstein, Bohr, and Bell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellac, Michel Le

    2014-11-01

    The final form of quantum physics, in the particular case of wave mechanics, was established in the years 1925-1927 by Heisenberg, Schrödinger, Born and others, but the synthesis was the work of Bohr who gave an epistemological interpretation of all the technicalities built up over those years; this interpretation will be examined briefly in Chapter 10. Although Einstein acknowledged the success of quantum mechanics in atomic, molecular and solid state physics, he disagreed deeply with Bohr's interpretation. For many years, he tried to find flaws in the formulation of quantum theory as it had been more or less accepted by a large majority of physicists, but his objections were brushed away by Bohr. However, in an article published in 1935 with Podolsky and Rosen, universally known under the acronym EPR, Einstein thought he had identified a difficulty in the by then standard interpretation. Bohr's obscure, and in part beyond the point, answer showed that Einstein had hit a sensitive target. Nevertheless, until 1964, the so-called Bohr-Einstein debate stayed uniquely on a philosophical level, and it was actually forgotten by most physicists, as the few of them aware of it thought it had no practical implication. In 1964, the Northern Irish physicist John Bell realized that the assumptions contained in the EPR article could be tested experimentally. These assumptions led to inequalities, the Bell inequalities, which were in contradiction with quantum mechanical predictions: as we shall see later on, it is extremely likely that the assumptions of the EPR article are not consistent with experiment, which, on the contrary, vindicates the predictions of quantum physics. In Section 3.2, the origin of Bell's inequalities will be explained with an intuitive example, then they will be compared with the predictions of quantum theory in Section 3.3, and finally their experimental status will be reviewed in Section 3.4. The debate between Bohr and Einstein goes much beyond a

  5. Einstein algebras and general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heller, M.

    1992-01-01

    A purely algebraic structure called an Einstein algebra is defined in such a way that every spacetime satisfying Einstein's equations is an Einstein algebra but not vice versa. The Gelfand representation of Einstein algebras is defined, and two of its subrepresentations are discussed. One of them is equivalent to the global formulation of the standard theory of general relativity; the other one leads to a more general theory of gravitation which, in particular, includes so-called regular singularities. In order to include other types of singularities one must change to sheaves of Einstein algebras. They are defined and briefly discussed. As a test of the proposed method, the sheaf of Einstein algebras corresponding to the space-time of a straight cosmic string with quasiregular singularity is constructed. 22 refs

  6. Conformal anomalies and the Einstein field equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godazgar, Hadi [Max-Planck-Institut für Gravitationsphysik (Albert-Einstein-Institut), Mühlenberg 1, D-14476 Potsdam (Germany); Meissner, Krzysztof A. [Faculty of Physics, University of Warsaw, Pasteura 5, 02-093 Warsaw (Poland); Nicolai, Hermann [Max-Planck-Institut für Gravitationsphysik (Albert-Einstein-Institut), Mühlenberg 1, D-14476 Potsdam (Germany)

    2017-04-28

    We compute corrections to the Einstein field equations which are induced by the anomalous effective actions associated to the type A conformal anomaly, both for the (non-local) Riegert action, as well as for the local action with dilaton. In all cases considered we find that these corrections can be very large.

  7. Compton's Kinematics and Einstein - Ehrenfest's radiation theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barranco, A.V.; Franca, H.M.

    1988-09-01

    The Compton Kinematic relations are obtained from entirely classical arguments, that is, without the corpuscular concept of the photon. The calculations are nonrelativistic and result from Einstein and Ehrenfest's radiation theory modified in order to introduce the effects of the classical zero-point fileds characteristic of Stochastic Electrodynamics. (author) [pt

  8. How Einstein changed the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boudenot, J.C.

    2005-01-01

    This book allows the reader to understand in a simple but detailed way the importance of the work of Einstein and its implications in the physics of today. The author first draws a biography of Einstein, then outlines the knowledge of physics at the beginning of the twentieth century, then describes the major contributions of Einstein to the brownian motion, the mass-energy equivalence, relativity and the notion of quantum, and ends by showing that the life-long Einstein's quest for a unitarian theory is still a present-day issue. (A.C.)

  9. The Einstein dossiers science and politics - Einstein's Berlin period with an appendix on Einstein's FBI file

    CERN Document Server

    Grundmann, Siegfried

    2004-01-01

    In 1919 the Prussian Ministry of Science, Arts and Culture opened a dossier on "Einstein's Theory of Relativity." It was rediscovered by the author in 1961 and is used in conjunction with numerous other subsequently identified 'Einstein' files as the basis of this fascinating book. In particular, the author carefully scrutinizes Einstein's FBI file from 1950-55 against mostly unpublished material from European including Soviet sources and presents hitherto unknown documentation on Einstein's alleged contacts with the German Communist Party and the Comintern. Siegfried Grundmann's thorough study of Einstein's participation on a committee of the League of Nations, based on archival research in Geneva, is also new. This book outlines Einstein's image in politics and German science policy. It covers the period from his appointment as a researcher in Berlin to his fight abroad against the "boycott of German science" after World War I and his struggle at home against attacks on "Jewish physics" of which he was made...

  10. Einstein and the "Crucial" Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holton, Gerald

    1969-01-01

    Examines the widespread view that it was the crucial Michelson-Morley experiment that led Einstein to formulate the special relativity theory. From Einstein's writings, evidence is presented that no such direct genetic connection exists. The author suggests that the historian of science must resist the experimenticist's fallacy of imposing a…

  11. Albert Einstein 1879-1955.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Physics Today, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Celebrates the centennial of Einstein's birth with an eight-page pictorial biography and two special articles: (1) Einstein the catalyst; and (2) Unitary field theories. His special and general theories of relativity and his contributions to quantum physics and other topics are also presented. (HM)

  12. Albert Einstein: A Biographical Sketch

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 5; Issue 4. Albert Einstein: A Biographical Sketch. Maja Winteler-Einstein. Reflections Volume 5 Issue 4 April 2000 pp 111-120. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/005/04/0111-0120 ...

  13. Einstein from 'B' to 'Z'

    CERN Document Server

    Stachel, John

    2002-01-01

    John Stachel, the author of this collection of 37 published and unpublished articles on Albert Einstein, has written about Einstein and his work for over 40 years. Trained as a theoretical physicist specializing in the theory of relativity, he was chosen as the founding editor of The Collected papers of Albert Einstein 25 years ago, and is currently Director of the Boston University Center for Einstein Studies. Based on a detailed study of documentary evidence, much of which was newly discovered in the course of his work, Stachel debunks many of the old (and some new) myths about Einstein and offers novel insight into his life and work. Throughout the volume, a new, more human picture of Einstein is offered to replace the plaster saint of popular legend. In particular, a youthful Einstein emerges from the obscurity that previously shrouded his early years, and much new light is shed on the origins of the special and general theories of relativity. Also discussed in some detail are Einstein's troubled relatio...

  14. Solutions of Einstein's field equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomonaga, Y [Utsunomiya Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Education

    1978-12-01

    In this paper the author investigates the Einstein's field equations of the non-vacuum case and generalizes the solution of Robertson-Walker by the three dimensional Einstein spaces. In Section 2 the author shortly generalizes the dynamic space-time of G. Lemetre and A. Friedmann by a simple transformation.

  15. Einstein's first paper on relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, H.M.

    1977-01-01

    Because of its exceptional significance in the history of great ideas in science, Einstein's first paper on relativity, especially its first part, deserves a more careful translation into English than presently exists. A new and annotated translation of this first part is presented here, together with a brief discussion of certain aspects of Einstein's paper

  16. Einstein, Entropy and Anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirtes, Daniel; Oberheim, Eric

    2006-11-01

    This paper strengthens and defends the pluralistic implications of Einstein's successful, quantitative predictions of Brownian motion for a philosophical dispute about the nature of scientific advance that began between two prominent philosophers of science in the second half of the twentieth century (Thomas Kuhn and Paul Feyerabend). Kuhn promoted a monistic phase-model of scientific advance, according to which a paradigm driven `normal science' gives rise to its own anomalies, which then lead to a crisis and eventually a scientific revolution. Feyerabend stressed the importance of pluralism for scientific progress. He rejected Kuhn's model arguing that it fails to recognize the role that alternative theories can play in identifying exactly which phenomena are anomalous in the first place. On Feyerabend's account, Einstein's predictions allow for a crucial experiment between two incommensurable theories, and are an example of an anomaly that could refute the reigning paradigm only after the development of a competitor. Using Kuhn's specification of a disciplinary matrix to illustrate the incommensurability between the two paradigms, we examine the different research strategies available in this peculiar case. On the basis of our reconstruction, we conclude by rebutting some critics of Feyerabend's argument.

  17. Einstein Inflationary Probe (EIP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinshaw, Gary

    2004-01-01

    I will discuss plans to develop a concept for the Einstein Inflation Probe: a mission to detect gravity waves from inflation via the unique signature they impart to the cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization. A sensitive CMB polarization satellite may be the only way to probe physics at the grand-unified theory (GUT) scale, exceeding by 12 orders of magnitude the energies studied at the Large Hadron Collider. A detection of gravity waves would represent a remarkable confirmation of the inflationary paradigm and set the energy scale at which inflation occurred when the universe was a fraction of a second old. Even a strong upper limit to the gravity wave amplitude would be significant, ruling out many common models of inflation, and pointing to inflation occurring at much lower energy, if at all. Measuring gravity waves via the CMB polarization will be challenging. We will undertake a comprehensive study to identify the critical scientific requirements for the mission and their derived instrumental performance requirements. At the core of the study will be an assessment of what is scientifically and experimentally optimal within the scope and purpose of the Einstein Inflation Probe.

  18. Einstein-Rosen gravitational waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astefanoaei, Iordana; Maftei, Gh.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we analyse the behaviour of the gravitational waves in the approximation of the far matter fields, considering the indirect interaction between the matter sources and the gravitational field, in a cosmological model based on the Einstein-Rosen solution, Because the properties of the gravitational waves obtained as the solutions of Einstein fields equations (the gravitational field equations) are most obvious in the weak gravitational fields we consider here, the gravitational field in the linear approximation. Using the Newman-Penrose formalism, we calculate in the null-tetradic base (e a ), the spin coefficients, the directional derivates and the tetradic components of Ricci and Weyl tensors. From the Einstein field equations we obtained the solution for b(z, t) what described the behaviour of gravitational wave in Einstein-Rosen Universe and in the particular case, when t → ∞, p(z, t) leads us to the primordial gravitational waves in the Einstein-Rosen Universe. (authors)

  19. Generalized Einstein-Aether theories and the Solar System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonvin, Camille; Durrer, Ruth; Ferreira, Pedro G.; Zlosnik, Tom G.; Starkman, Glenn

    2008-01-01

    It has been shown that generalized Einstein-Aether theories may lead to significant modifications to the nonrelativistic limit of the Einstein equations. In this paper we study the effect of a general class of such theories on the Solar System. We consider corrections to the gravitational potential in negative and positive powers of distance from the source. Using measurements of the perihelion shift of Mercury and time delay of radar signals to Cassini, we place constraints on these corrections. We find that a subclass of generalized Einstein-Aether theories is compatible with these constraints

  20. The Einstein tensor characterizing some Riemann spaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, M.S.

    1993-07-01

    A formal definition of the Einstein tensor is given. Mention is made of how this tensor plays a role of expressing certain conditions in a precise form. The cases of reducing the Einstein tensor to a zero tensor are studied on its merit. A lucid account of results, formulated as theorems, on Einstein symmetric and Einstein recurrent spaces is then presented. (author). 5 refs

  1. Correct Linearization of Einstein's Equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabounski D.

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Regularly Einstein's equations can be reduced to a wave form (linearly dependent from the second derivatives of the space metric in the absence of gravitation, the space rotation and Christoffel's symbols. As shown here, the origin of the problem is that one uses the general covariant theory of measurement. Here the wave form of Einstein's equations is obtained in the terms of Zelmanov's chronometric invariants (physically observable projections on the observer's time line and spatial section. The obtained equations depend on solely the second derivatives even if gravitation, the space rotation and Christoffel's symbols. The correct linearization proves: the Einstein equations are completely compatible with weak waves of the metric.

  2. Einstein: The Gourmet of Creativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Joel

    1979-01-01

    Reports a psychiatrist's analysis of Einstein's personal account of how he developed the theory of relativity. The psychiatrist cites Janusian thinking, actively conceiving two or more opposite concepts simultaneously, as a characteristic of much creative thought in general. (MA)

  3. Physics before and after Einstein

    CERN Document Server

    Capria, M Mamone

    2005-01-01

    It is now a century ago that one of the icons of modern physics published some of the most influential scientific papers of all times. With his work on relativity and quantum theory, Albert Einstein has altered the field of physics forever. It should not come as a surprise that looking back at Einstein''s work, one needs to rethink the whole scope of physics, before and after his time. This books aims to provide a perspective on the history of modern physics, spanning from the late 19th century up to today. It is not an encyclopaedic work, but it presents the groundbreaking and sometimes provocative main contributions by Einstein as marking the line between ''old'' and ''new'' physics, and expands on some of the developments and open issues to which they gave rise.

  4. Cosmic censorship in quantum Einstein gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonanno, A.; Koch, B.; Platania, A.

    2017-05-01

    We study the quantum gravity modification of the Kuroda-Papapetrou model induced by the running of the Newton’s constant at high energy in quantum Einstein gravity. We argue that although the antiscreening character of the gravitational interaction favours the formation of a naked singularity, quantum gravity effects turn the classical singularity into a ‘whimper’ singularity which remains naked for a finite amount of advanced time.

  5. Einstein and the twin paradox

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pesic, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Einstein was the first to discuss and resolve the 'twin paradox', which in 1905 he did not consider paradoxical and treated as a consequence of lack of simultaneity. He maintained this view until at least 1914. However, in 1918 Einstein brought forward arguments about accelerated frames of reference that tended to overshadow his initial resolution. His earlier arguments were gradually rediscovered during the subsequent controversy about this 'paradox'

  6. The NASA Beyond Einstein Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Nicholas E.

    2006-01-01

    Einstein's legacy is incomplete, his theory of General relativity raises -- but cannot answer --three profound questions: What powered the big bang? What happens to space, time, and matter at the edge of a black hole? and What is the mysterious dark energy pulling the Universe apart? The Beyond Einstein program within NASA's Office of Space Science aims to answer these questions, employing a series of missions linked by powerful new technologies and complementary approaches towards shared science goals. The Beyond Einstein program has three linked elements which advance science and technology towards two visions; to detect directly gravitational wave signals from the earliest possible moments of the BIg Bang, and to image the event horizon of a black hole. The central element is a pair of Einstein Great Observatories, Constellation-X and LISA. Constellation-X is a powerful new X-ray observatory dedicated to X-Ray Spectroscopy. LISA is the first spaced based gravitational wave detector. These powerful facilities will blaze new paths to the questions about black holes, the Big Bang and dark energy. The second element is a series of competitively selected Einstein Probes, each focused on one of the science questions and includes a mission dedicated resolving the Dark Energy mystery. The third element is a program of technology development, theoretical studies and education. The Beyond Einstein program is a new element in the proposed NASA budget for 2004. This talk will give an overview of the program and the missions contained within it.

  7. Ferroelectricity by Bose-Einstein condensation in a quantum magnet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, S; Kakihata, K; Sawada, Y; Watanabe, K; Matsumoto, M; Hagiwara, M; Tanaka, H

    2016-09-26

    The Bose-Einstein condensation is a fascinating phenomenon, which results from quantum statistics for identical particles with an integer spin. Surprising properties, such as superfluidity, vortex quantization or Josephson effect, appear owing to the macroscopic quantum coherence, which spontaneously develops in Bose-Einstein condensates. Realization of Bose-Einstein condensation is not restricted in fluids like liquid helium, a superconducting phase of paired electrons in a metal and laser-cooled dilute alkali atoms. Bosonic quasi-particles like exciton-polariton and magnon in solids-state systems can also undergo Bose-Einstein condensation in certain conditions. Here, we report that the quantum coherence in Bose-Einstein condensate of the magnon quasi particles yields spontaneous electric polarization in the quantum magnet TlCuCl 3 , leading to remarkable magnetoelectric effect. Very soft ferroelectricity is realized as a consequence of the O(2) symmetry breaking by magnon Bose-Einstein condensation. The finding of this ferroelectricity will open a new window to explore multi-functionality of quantum magnets.

  8. A Student's Guide to Einstein's Major Papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janssen, Michel

    2013-01-01

    The core of this volume is formed by four chapters (2–5) with detailed reconstructions of the arguments and derivations in four of Einstein's most important papers, the three main papers of his annus mirabilis 1905 (on the light quantum, Brownian motion, and special relativity) and his first systematic exposition of general relativity of 1916. The derivations are given in sufficient detail and in sufficiently modernized notation (without any serious distortion of the originals) for an undergraduate physics major to read and understand them with far less effort than it would take him or her to understand (English translations of) Einstein's original papers. Each of these four papers is accompanied by a detailed introduction, which covers the conceptual development of the relevant field prior to Einstein's contribution to it and corrects some of the myths surrounding these papers that still have not been fully eradicated among physicists. (One quibble: though Kennedy correctly points out that the goal of the light quantum paper was not to explain the photoelectric effect, it is also not quite right to say that 'it was written to explain the Wien region of blackbody radiation' (p. xv). Einstein used this explanatory feat as the central argument for his light quantum hypothesis.) These four chapters then are the most valuable part of the volume. They could be used, independently of one another, but preferably in conjunction with Einstein's original texts, in courses on quantum mechanics, statistical mechanics, electrodynamics, and general relativity, respectively, to add a historical component to such courses. As a historian of science embedded in a physics department who is regularly called upon to give guest lectures in such courses on the history of their subjects, I can highly recommend the volume for this purpose. However, I would not adopt this volume as (one of) the central text(s) for a course on the history of modern physics. For one thing, chapter 1, which

  9. The Einstein Slew Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elvis, Martin; Plummer, David; Schachter, Jonathan; Fabbiano, G.

    1992-01-01

    A catalog of 819 sources detected in the Einstein IPC Slew Survey of the X-ray sky is presented; 313 of the sources were not previously known as X-ray sources. Typical count rates are 0.1 IPC count/s, roughly equivalent to a flux of 3 x 10 exp -12 ergs/sq cm s. The sources have positional uncertainties of 1.2 arcmin (90 percent confidence) radius, based on a subset of 452 sources identified with previously known pointlike X-ray sources (i.e., extent less than 3 arcmin). Identifications based on a number of existing catalogs of X-ray and optical objects are proposed for 637 of the sources, 78 percent of the survey (within a 3-arcmin error radius) including 133 identifications of new X-ray sources. A public identification data base for the Slew Survey sources will be maintained at CfA, and contributions to this data base are invited.

  10. Finding Horndeski theories with Einstein gravity limits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McManus, Ryan; Lombriser, Lucas; Peñarrubia, Jorge, E-mail: ryanm@roe.ac.uk, E-mail: llo@roe.ac.uk, E-mail: jorpega@roe.ac.uk [Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Royal Observatory, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh, EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom)

    2016-11-01

    The Horndeski action is the most general scalar-tensor theory with at most second-order derivatives in the equations of motion, thus evading Ostrogradsky instabilities and making it of interest when modifying gravity at large scales. To pass local tests of gravity, these modifications predominantly rely on nonlinear screening mechanisms that recover Einstein's Theory of General Relativity in regions of high density. We derive a set of conditions on the four free functions of the Horndeski action that examine whether a specific model embedded in the action possesses an Einstein gravity limit or not. For this purpose, we develop a new and surprisingly simple scaling method that identifies dominant terms in the equations of motion by considering formal limits of the couplings that enter through the new terms in the modified action. This enables us to find regimes where nonlinear terms dominate and Einstein's field equations are recovered to leading order. Together with an efficient approximation of the scalar field profile, one can then further evaluate whether these limits can be attributed to a genuine screening effect. For illustration, we apply the analysis to both a cubic galileon and a chameleon model as well as to Brans-Dicke theory. Finally, we emphasise that the scaling method also provides a natural approach for performing post-Newtonian expansions in screened regimes.

  11. Bose-Einstein condensation of paraxial light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaers, J.; Schmitt, J.; Damm, T.; Vewinger, F.; Weitz, M.

    2011-10-01

    Photons, due to the virtually vanishing photon-photon interaction, constitute to very good approximation an ideal Bose gas, but owing to the vanishing chemical potential a (free) photon gas does not show Bose-Einstein condensation. However, this is not necessarily true for a lower-dimensional photon gas. By means of a fluorescence induced thermalization process in an optical microcavity one can achieve a thermal photon gas with freely adjustable chemical potential. Experimentally, we have observed thermalization and subsequently Bose-Einstein condensation of the photon gas at room temperature. In this paper, we give a detailed description of the experiment, which is based on a dye-filled optical microcavity, acting as a white-wall box for photons. Thermalization is achieved in a photon number-conserving way by photon scattering off the dye molecules, and the cavity mirrors both provide an effective photon mass and a confining potential-key prerequisites for the Bose-Einstein condensation of photons. The experimental results are in good agreement with both a statistical and a simple rate equation model, describing the properties of the thermalized photon gas.

  12. CERN physicist receives Einstein Medal

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    On 29 June the CERN theorist Gabriele Veneziano was awarded the prestigious Albert Einstein Medal for significant contributions to the understanding of string theory. This award is given by the Albert Einstein Society in Bern to individuals whose scientific contributions relate to the work of Einstein. Former recipients include exceptional physicists such as Murray Gell-Mann last year, but also Stephen Hawking and Victor Weisskopf. Gabriele Veneziano, a member of the integrated CERN Theory Team since 1977, led the Theory Division from 1994 to 1997 and has already received many prestigious prizes for his outstanding work, including the Enrico Fermi Prize (see CERN Courier, November 2005), the Dannie Heineman Prize for mathematical physics of the American Physical Society in 2004 (see Bulletin No. 47/2003), and the I. Ya. Pomeranchuk Prize of the Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics (Moscow) in 1999.

  13. The times of Albert Einstein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, S.M.W.

    1990-09-01

    ''The life of Albert Einstein has a dramatic quality that does not rest exclusively on his theory of relativity. The extravagant timing of history linked him with three shattering developments of the twentieth century: the rise and fall of Nazi Germany, the birth of nuclear weapons, and the birth of zionism (and Israel). Their impact on Einstein's genius combined to drive him into a contact with the affairs of the world for which Einstein had little taste''. This article is the result of my lecture delivered at ICTP on 17 August, 1990 before a knowledgable audience that included scientists from many countries including the third world countries. This one and half hour lecture was organised by Dr. A.M. Hamende and Dr. H.R. Dalafi. 10 refs

  14. The Influence of Ernst Mach and Ludwig Boltzmann on Albert Einstein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broda, E.

    1979-01-01

    This document, written by Engelbert Broda in 1979, analyses the influence of Ernst Mach and Ludwig Boltzmann on Albert Einstein. Broda describes how Einstein and his scientific thinking benefited from Mach’s criticism on classical mechanics and its basic concepts like absolute time and absolute space. This criticism encouraged Einstein in the time he worked on his special relativity. On the other side Broda writes about the influence of Ludwig Boltzman, an atomist, whose scientific work and research prepared the ground for Einsteins work on the quantum-structure of electromagnetic radiation or the discovery of the photoelectric effect. (nowak)

  15. Quantum theory and Einstein's general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borzeszkowski, H.H.v.; Treder, H.J.

    1984-01-01

    The paper concerns Einstein's general relativity, wave mechanics and the quantization of Einstein's gravitation equations. The principle of equivalence and its association with both wave mechanics and quantum gravity, is discussed. (U.K.)

  16. An exact solution in Einstein-Cartan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roque, W.L.

    1982-01-01

    The exact solution of the field equations of the Einstein-Cartan theory is obtained for an artificial dust of radially polarized spins, with spherical symmetry and static. For a best estimation of the effect due the spin, the energy-momentum metric tensor is considered null. The gravitational field dynamics is studied for several torsion strengths, through the massive and spinless test-particle moviment, in particular for null torsion Schwarzschild solutions is again obtained. It is observed that the gravitational effects related to the torsin (spin) sometimes are attractives sometimes are repulsives, depending of the torsion values and of the test-particle position and velocity. (L.C.) [pt

  17. Quenching of Einstein-coefficients by photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aumayr, F.; Skinner, C.H.; Suckewer, S.; Princeton Univ., NJ; Lee, W.

    1991-02-01

    Experimental evidence is presented for the change of Einstein's A-coefficients for spontaneous transitions from the upper laser level of an argon ion laser discharge due to the presence of the high-intensity laser flux. To demonstrate that this quenching effect cannot be attributed to a reduction in self-absorption of the strong spontaneous emission line, absorption and line profile measurements have been performed. Computer modelling of the reduction of self absorption due to Rabi splitting also indicated that this effect is too small to explain the observed quenching of spontaneous line emissions. 13 refs., 11 figs

  18. Quenching of Einstein-coefficients by photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aumayr, F.; Lee, W.; Skinner, C.H.; Suckewer, S.

    1991-03-01

    Experimental evidence is presented for the change of Einstein's A- coefficients for spontaneous transitions from the upper laser level of argon ion laser discharge due to the presence of the high- intensity laser flux. To demonstrate that this quenching effect cannot be attributed to a reduction in self-absorption of the strong spontaneous emission line, absorption and line profile measurements have been performed. Computer modelling of the reduction of self absorption due to Rabi splitting also indicated that this effect is too small to explain the observed quenching of spontaneous line emissions. 13 refs., 11 figs

  19. Exact Solutions for Einstein's Hyperbolic Geometric Flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Chunlei

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the Einstein's hyperbolic geometric flow and obtain some interesting exact solutions for this kind of flow. Many interesting properties of these exact solutions have also been analyzed and we believe that these properties of Einstein's hyperbolic geometric flow are very helpful to understanding the Einstein equations and the hyperbolic geometric flow

  20. Series expansion of the modified Einstein Procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seema Chandrakant Shah-Fairbank

    2009-01-01

    This study examines calculating total sediment discharge based on the Modified Einstein Procedure (MEP). A new procedure based on the Series Expansion of the Modified Einstein Procedure (SEMEP) has been developed. This procedure contains four main modifications to MEP. First, SEMEP solves the Einstein integrals quickly and accurately based on a series expansion. Next,...

  1. Einstein's Jury: The Race to Test Relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehlers, Juergen

    2007-01-01

    Vulcan hypothesis, Evershed's Earth effect, and D C Miller's ether drift experiments. In particular, the sections on the history of the Californian observatories, their leading personalities, the differing attitudes of American and European scientists, and the influence of World War 1 on science, add interesting and informative aspects to the narrative. Those sections which report logistic and instrumental details of, for example, eclipse expeditions, were (to me) somewhat tiring. A weakness seems to be that the scientific importance of relativity problems is not stated clearly. Thus readers looking for explanations of scientific statements in a historical context may be less satisfied. Those interested in the history and sociology of science, its organizations, the role of leading figures as well as their critics and the difficult process of how scientists establish 'facts', will enjoy reading this book and should profit from it. An 'Einstein's Jury' of today would have more evidence for a positive verdict, but also reasons for new skepticism. (book review)

  2. Dutch museum marks Einstein anniversary

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Calmthout, Matijn

    2016-01-01

    A new painting of Albert Einstein's field equation from his 1915 general theory of relativity was unveiled in a ceremony in November 2015 by the Dutch physicist Robbert Dijkgraaf, who is director of the Princeton Institute for Advanced Study in the US.

  3. Einstein's Legacy, at the Globe

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    One-hundred years on, Albert Einstein's theories continue to fuel the daily work of physicists. From research into gravity waves to the quest for grand unification in physics, today's researchers have not finished with the legacy of the most famous and iconic physicist of the 20th Century.

  4. Approaching Bose-Einstein Condensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Loris

    2011-01-01

    Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) is discussed at the level of an advanced course of statistical thermodynamics, clarifying some formal and physical aspects that are usually not covered by the standard pedagogical literature. The non-conventional approach adopted starts by showing that the continuum limit, in certain cases, cancels out the crucial…

  5. Effects of three-body interactions in the parametric and modulational instabilities of Bose–Einstein condensates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wamba, Etienne; Mohamadou, Alidou; Ekogo, Thierry B.; Atangana, Jacque; Kofane, Timoleon C.

    2011-01-01

    The parametric modulational instability for a discrete nonlinear Schrödinger equation with a cubic–quintic nonlinearity is analyzed. This model describes the dynamics of BECs, with both two- and three-body interatomic interactions trapped in an optical lattice. We identify and discuss the salient features of the three-body interaction in the parametric modulational instability. It is shown that the three-body interaction term can both, shift as well as narrow the window of parametric instability, and also change the behavior of a modulationally stable and parametrically unstable BEC with attractive two-body interaction. We explore this instability through the multiple-scale analysis and identify it numerically. The effect of the three body losses have also been investigated. -- Highlights: ► The parametric MI for the 1D GPE with a cubic–quintic nonlinearity is analyzed. ► The two- and three-body recombination and time-dependent scattering length is considered. ► We generate bright matter waves soliton through MI.

  6. Einstein equations and Fermion degrees of freedom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luetz, E.F.; Vasconcellos, C.A.Z.

    2001-01-01

    When Dirac derived the special relativistic quantum equation which brings his name, it became evident that the spin is a consequence of the space-time geometry. However, taking gravity into account (as for, instance, in the study of neutron stars), most authors do not take into account the relation between hyperbolic geometry and spin and derive an Einstein equation which implicitly takes into account only boson degrees of freedom. In this work we introduce a consistent quantum general relativistic formalism which allows us to study the effects of the existence of fermion degrees of freedom. (author)

  7. Einstein equations and Fermion degrees of freedom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luetz, E.F.; Vasconcellos, C.A.Z. [Rio Grande do Sul Univ., Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica

    2001-07-01

    When Dirac derived the special relativistic quantum equation which brings his name, it became evident that the spin is a consequence of the space-time geometry. However, taking gravity into account (as for, instance, in the study of neutron stars), most authors do not take into account the relation between hyperbolic geometry and spin and derive an Einstein equation which implicitly takes into account only boson degrees of freedom. In this work we introduce a consistent quantum general relativistic formalism which allows us to study the effects of the existence of fermion degrees of freedom. (author)

  8. BOOK REVIEW: A Student's Guide to Einstein's Major Papers A Student's Guide to Einstein's Major Papers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Michel

    2013-12-01

    The core of this volume is formed by four chapters (2-5) with detailed reconstructions of the arguments and derivations in four of Einstein's most important papers, the three main papers of his annus mirabilis 1905 (on the light quantum, Brownian motion, and special relativity) and his first systematic exposition of general relativity of 1916. The derivations are given in sufficient detail and in sufficiently modernized notation (without any serious distortion of the originals) for an undergraduate physics major to read and understand them with far less effort than it would take him or her to understand (English translations of) Einstein's original papers. Each of these four papers is accompanied by a detailed introduction, which covers the conceptual development of the relevant field prior to Einstein's contribution to it and corrects some of the myths surrounding these papers that still have not been fully eradicated among physicists. (One quibble: though Kennedy correctly points out that the goal of the light quantum paper was not to explain the photoelectric effect, it is also not quite right to say that 'it was written to explain the Wien region of blackbody radiation' (p. xv). Einstein used this explanatory feat as the central argument for his light quantum hypothesis.) These four chapters then are the most valuable part of the volume. They could be used, independently of one another, but preferably in conjunction with Einstein's original texts, in courses on quantum mechanics, statistical mechanics, electrodynamics, and general relativity, respectively, to add a historical component to such courses. As a historian of science embedded in a physics department who is regularly called upon to give guest lectures in such courses on the history of their subjects, I can highly recommend the volume for this purpose. However, I would not adopt this volume as (one of) the central text(s) for a course on the history of modern physics. For one thing, chapter 1, which in

  9. BOOK REVIEW: Once Upon Einstein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannetto, E.

    2007-07-01

    Thibault Damour is a theoretical physicist, and a member of the French Academy of Sciences. This book is the translation, by Eric Novak, of the original French Si Einstein m'etait conté (Le Cherche Midi, 2005). It is neither a book of theoretical physics nor a biography of Einstein. It is not a book of history nor philosophy of science. In Damour's words it was written to encourage the reader to share with Einstein `those times when he understood some part of the hidden order of the universe'. It is a relatively short book, written in a very fluent style, but it deals with all the major problems and achievements of Einstein's works. Starting from special relativity, it continues with general relativity, quantum theories, unified field theory and a brief overview of the actual research related to Einstein's legacy. It is essentially a popular science book with some related exploration in history and philosophy to interpret physical theories. The most important problem discussed by Damour is the nature of time. On this subject, there is a very interesting short paragraph (pp 33--35) dedicated to the reception of the relativity idea by the great writer Marcel Proust and its counterpart within À la Recherche du Temps Perdu. A correct discussion of the implications of a relativistic time should imply the distinction of the different possible interpretations of this concept. Damour seems to conclude that only one interpretation is possible: `time does not exist', flowing of time is an illusion. One has to know that Einstein's ideas on time were related to Spinoza's perspective of a knowledge sub specie aeternitatis. However, other interpretations are possible and are related to the idea of time as an actuality. Damour speaks about the controversy between Einstein and Bergson, but Bergson is considered as a philosopher who did not understand relativity. This philosophical problem of relativistic time is indeed related to a historical problem briefly discussed by Damour

  10. Einstein boundary conditions for the 3+1 Einstein equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frittelli, Simonetta; Gomez, Roberto

    2003-01-01

    In the 3+1 framework of the Einstein equations for the case of a vanishing shift vector and arbitrary lapse, we calculate explicitly the four boundary equations arising from the vanishing of the projection of the Einstein tensor along the normal to the boundary surface of the initial-boundary value problem. Such conditions take the form of evolution equations along (as opposed to across) the boundary for certain components of the extrinsic curvature and for certain space derivatives of the three-metric. We argue that, in general, such boundary conditions do not follow necessarily from the evolution equations and the initial data, but need to be imposed on the boundary values of the fundamental variables. Using the Einstein-Christoffel formulation, which is strongly hyperbolic, we show how three of the boundary equations up to linear combinations should be used to prescribe the values of some incoming characteristic fields. Additionally, we show that the fourth one imposes conditions on some outgoing fields

  11. Cosmological red shift in the Seeliger-Einstein stationary Universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kropotkin, P.N.

    1988-01-01

    A problem of Seeliger-Einstein stationary Universe is considered. Simple empirical relations between cosmological and physical constants to which attention was paid by Stanukovich K., Dikke R., Dirac P. testify to the supposition on stationary Universe. The Universe expansion being absent, a hypothesis of ''photon aging'' suggested in 1929 by Belopolskij A. and Zwicky F. must be accepted for explanation of Hubble effect. It is stated that abandon the Seeliger-Einstein stationary cosmological model would be premature. Study and comparison of different mechanisms suggested for validation of photon aging hypothesis is necessary

  12. The world-line. Albert Einstein and modern physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maalampi, Jukka

    2008-01-01

    This book is an entertaining and formula-free presentation of modern physics from the 19th century to present. The life of Albert Einstein and his scientific works are drawn as red fathom through the text. The author explains central terms and results of modern physics in populary-scientific form from the historical perspective. To the reader in humorous form an imagination is mediated how modern physics has been developed. We learn from the exciting effects of the ether, we hear from faraday and magnetic needles, from Maxwell's prediction of the electromagnetic waves, from heinrich Hertz and from the photoelectric effect. Was the Michelson-Morley experiment a measurement success or an unsuccess? Why has Einstein abandoned the ether? How has Einstein in the miraculous year 1905 revolutionated physics and why he has begged Newton for excusement? Exist atoms? What is motion? What is light and what is to be understood under ''now'' and ''here''? Light deviation or non-deviation? How act the tidal forces? And above all: How has Einstein answered these questions. We meet Poincare, Lorentz and Hilbert, Boltzmann and Bohr, Minkowski, Planck, de Broglie, Hubble and Weyl, Gamow, Hahn and Meitner, Kapiza and Landau, Fermi and many other famous scientists. What had Eddington against Chandrasekhar and what had Einstein against black holes? Why should space tourists and dream tourists make holiday not on the Loch Ness but on the safe side of a black hole? Why inveighed Pauli against Einstein? Is the concern with the atomic-bomb formula right? Smeared matter, big bang and cosmic background radiation, gravitational waves and double pulsars, the cosmological constant and the expansion of the universe are further themes, which keep the reader in breath and let no mental vacuum arise [de

  13. Einstein's impact on theoretical physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, C.N.

    1983-01-01

    There occurred in the early years of this century three conceptual revolutions that profoundly changed Man's understanding of the physical universe: the special theory of relativity (in 1905), the general theory of relativity (1915) and quantum mechanics (1925). Einstein personally was responsible for the first two of these revolutions, and influenced and helped to shape the third. But it is not about his work in these conceptual revolutions that he writes about here. Much has been written about that work already. Instead, he discusses, in general terms, Einstein's insights on the structure of theoretical physics and their relevance to the development of physics in the second half of this century. He divides the discussion into four sections which are, of course, very much related

  14. Albert Einstein, Cosmos and Religion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djokovic, V.; Grujic, P.

    2007-06-01

    We consider Einstein's attitude regarding religious as such, from both cosmological and epistemological points of view. An attempt to put it into a wider socio-historical perspective was made, with the emphasis on ethnic and religious background. It turns out that the great scientist was neither atheist nor believer in the orthodox sense and the closest labels one might stick to him in this respect would be pantheism/cosmism (ontological aspect) and agnosticism (epistemological aspect). His ideas on divine could be considered as a continuation of line traced by Philo of Alexandria, who himself followed Greek Stoics and (Neo-) Platonists and especially Baruch Spinoza. It turns out that Einstein's both scientific (rational aspects) and religious (intuitive aspects) thinking were deeply rooted in the Hellenic culture. His striving to unravel the secrets of the universe and the roots of cosmological order resembles much the ancient ideas of the role of knowledge in fathoming the divine as such, as ascribed to Gnostics.

  15. Unifying Einstein and Palatini gravities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amendola, Luca; Enqvist, Kari; Koivisto, Tomi

    2011-01-01

    We consider a novel class of f(R) gravity theories where the connection is related to the conformally scaled metric g μν =C(R)g μν with a scaling that depends on the scalar curvature R only. We call them C theories and show that the Einstein and Palatini gravities can be obtained as special limits. In addition, C theories include completely new physically distinct gravity theories even when f(R)=R. With nonlinear f(R), C theories interpolate and extrapolate the Einstein and Palatini cases and may avoid some of their conceptual and observational problems. We further show that C theories have a scalar-tensor formulation, which in some special cases reduces to simple Brans-Dicke-type gravity. If matter fields couple to the connection, the conservation laws in C theories are modified. The stability of perturbations about flat space is determined by a simple condition on the Lagrangian.

  16. Self Completeness of Einstein Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Dvali, Gia

    2010-01-01

    We argue, that in Einsteinian gravity the Planck length is the shortest length of nature, and any attempt of resolving trans-Planckian physics bounces back to macroscopic distances due to black hole formation. In Einstein gravity trans-Planckian propagating quantum degrees of freedom cannot exist, instead they are equivalent to the classical black holes that are fully described by lighter infra-red degrees of freedom and give exponentially-soft contribution into the virtual processes. Based on this property we argue that pure-Einstein (super)gravity and its high-dimensional generalizations are self-complete in deep-UV, but not in standard Wilsonian sense. We suggest that certain strong-coupling limit of string theory is built-in in pure Einstein gravity, whereas the role of weakly-coupled string theory limit is to consistently couple gravity to other particle species, with their number being set by the inverse string coupling. We also discuss some speculative ideas generalizing the notion of non-Wilsonian sel...

  17. The Stokes-Einstein relation at moderate Schmidt number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balboa Usabiaga, Florencio; Xie, Xiaoyi; Delgado-Buscalioni, Rafael; Donev, Aleksandar

    2013-12-07

    The Stokes-Einstein relation for the self-diffusion coefficient of a spherical particle suspended in an incompressible fluid is an asymptotic result in the limit of large Schmidt number, that is, when momentum diffuses much faster than the particle. When the Schmidt number is moderate, which happens in most particle methods for hydrodynamics, deviations from the Stokes-Einstein prediction are expected. We study these corrections computationally using a recently developed minimally resolved method for coupling particles to an incompressible fluctuating fluid in both two and three dimensions. We find that for moderate Schmidt numbers the diffusion coefficient is reduced relative to the Stokes-Einstein prediction by an amount inversely proportional to the Schmidt number in both two and three dimensions. We find, however, that the Einstein formula is obeyed at all Schmidt numbers, consistent with linear response theory. The mismatch arises because thermal fluctuations affect the drag coefficient for a particle due to the nonlinear nature of the fluid-particle coupling. The numerical data are in good agreement with an approximate self-consistent theory, which can be used to estimate finite-Schmidt number corrections in a variety of methods. Our results indicate that the corrections to the Stokes-Einstein formula come primarily from the fact that the particle itself diffuses together with the momentum. Our study separates effects coming from corrections to no-slip hydrodynamics from those of finite separation of time scales, allowing for a better understanding of widely observed deviations from the Stokes-Einstein prediction in particle methods such as molecular dynamics.

  18. The world-line. Albert Einstein and modern physics; Die Weltlinie. Albert Einstein und die moderne Physik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maalampi, Jukka [Jyvaeskylae Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Physics

    2008-07-01

    This book is an entertaining and formula-free presentation of modern physics from the 19th century to present. The life of Albert Einstein and his scientific works are drawn as red fathom through the text. The author explains central terms and results of modern physics in populary-scientific form from the historical perspective. To the reader in humorous form an imagination is mediated how modern physics has been developed. We learn from the exciting effects of the ether, we hear from faraday and magnetic needles, from Maxwell's prediction of the electromagnetic waves, from heinrich Hertz and from the photoelectric effect. Was the Michelson-Morley experiment a measurement success or an unsuccess? Why has Einstein abandoned the ether? How has Einstein in the miraculous year 1905 revolutionated physics and why he has begged Newton for excusement? Exist atoms? What is motion? What is light and what is to be understood under ''now'' and ''here''? Light deviation or non-deviation? How act the tidal forces? And above all: How has Einstein answered these questions. We meet Poincare, Lorentz and Hilbert, Boltzmann and Bohr, Minkowski, Planck, de Broglie, Hubble and Weyl, Gamow, Hahn and Meitner, Kapiza and Landau, Fermi and many other famous scientists. What had Eddington against Chandrasekhar and what had Einstein against black holes? Why should space tourists and dream tourists make holiday not on the Loch Ness but on the safe side of a black hole? Why inveighed Pauli against Einstein? Is the concern with the atomic-bomb formula right? Smeared matter, big bang and cosmic background radiation, gravitational waves and double pulsars, the cosmological constant and the expansion of the universe are further themes, which keep the reader in breath and let no mental vacuum arise. [German] Das Buch ist eine unterhaltsame und formelfreie Darstellung der modernen Physik vom 19. Jahrhundert bis zur Gegenwart. Das Leben Albert Einsteins

  19. Modelling Bose-Einstein correlations at LEP-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loennblad, L.

    1998-01-01

    Some pros and cons of different strategies for modelling Bose-Einstein correlations in event generators for fully hadronic WW events at LEP-2 are discussed. A few new algorithms based on shifting final-state momenta of identical bosons in WW events generated by PYTHIA are also presented and the resulting predictions for the effects on the W mass measurement are discussed. (author)

  20. Einstein's Jury The Race to Test Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Crelinsten, Jeffrey

    2006-01-01

    Einstein's Jury is the dramatic story of how astronomers in Germany, England, and America competed to test Einstein's developing theory of relativity. Weaving a rich narrative based on extensive archival research, Jeffrey Crelinsten shows how these early scientific debates shaped cultural attitudes we hold today. The book examines Einstein's theory of general relativity through the eyes of astronomers, many of whom were not convinced of the legitimacy of Einstein's startling breakthrough. These were individuals with international reputations to uphold and benefactors and shareholders to p

  1. The Routledge guidebook to Einstein's relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Trefil, James

    2015-01-01

    Albert Einstein, one of the most prolific scientists of the twentieth century, developed the theory of relativity which was crucial for the advancement of modern physics. Young Einstein identified a paradox between Newtonian Mechanics and Maxwell's equations which pointed to a flawed understanding of space and time by the scientists of the day. In Relativity, Einstein presents his findings using a minimal amount of mathematical language, but the text can still be challenging for readers who lack an extensive scientific background.The Routledge Guidebook to Einstein's Relativity expands on and

  2. Boltzmann, Einstein, Natural Law and Evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broda, E.

    1980-01-01

    Like Boltzmann, Einstein was a protagonist of atomistics. As a physicist, he has been called Boltzmann's true successor. Also in epistemology, after overcoming the positivist influence of Mach, Einstein approached Boltzmann. Any difference between Boltzmann's realism, or even materialism, and Einstein's pantheism may be merely a matter of emphasis. Yet a real difference exists in another respect. Boltzmann explained man's power of thinking and feeling, his morality and his esthetic sense, on an evolutionary, Darwinian, basis. In contrast, evolution had no role in Einstein's thought, though Darwin was accepted by him. This lack of appreciation of the importance of evolution is now attributed to socio-political factors. (author)

  3. Radiation in the Einstein universe and the cosmic background

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segal, I.E.

    1983-01-01

    It is shown that the cosmic background radiation is not at all uniquely or scientifically relatively economically indicative of a ''big bang.'' Specifically, essentially any temporally homogeneous theory in the Einstein universe is consistent with the existence of a cosmic background radiation (CBR) conforming to the Planck law; in particular, the chronometric cosmology is such. It is noted that the Einstein universe appears particularly natural as a habitat for photons by virtue of the absence of infrared divergences and of the absolute convergence of the trace for associated Gibbs-state density matrices. These features are connected with the closed character of space in the Einstein universe, and facilitate the use of the latter in modeling local phenomena, in place of Minkowski space with periodic boundary conditions or the like, with minimal loss of covariance or effect on the wave functions. In particular, the Einstein universe may be used in the analysis of the perturbation of a Planck-law spectrum due to a local nonvanishing isotropic angular momentum of the CBR, of whatever origin. The estimated distortion of the spectrum due to such a kinematically admissible effect is in very good agreement with that observed by Woody and Richards, which is opposite in direction to those earlier predicted by big-bang theories. The theoretical analysis involves a preliminary treatment of equilibria of linear quantum fields with supplementary quasilinear constraints

  4. Bose-Einstein condensation of excitons in Cu2O

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snoke, D.W.

    1990-01-01

    Free excitons provide the only experimental system other than helium in which the behavior of particles with mass is known to follow Bose-Einstein statistics. Experimental observations are presented of the kinetic energy distribution of excitons in the direct-gap semiconductor Cu 2 O, both the triplet orthoexciton state and the singlet paraexciton state. The density and temperature of the exciton gas closely follow the phase boundary for Bose-Einstein condensation. At the highest densities, the lower-lying paraexcitons take on an anomalous energy distribution with a sharp, high-energy edge. This odd distribution of particle energies may be associated with Bose-Einstein condensation into a state with nonzero momentum. Indeed, the excitons leave the region of their creation at supersonic velocities. In addition to the experimental observations, theoretical models are presented for several aspects of this nonequilibrium system. The equilibration of a nearly-ideal boson gas is modeled, finding that a significant time is required for the approach to condensation. The temperature and density of the excitons in steady state are modeled based on known classical kinetic effects in semiconductors, and the effects of Bose-Einstein statistics on these processes estimated

  5. Albert Einstein:. Opportunity and Perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chen Ning

    2013-05-01

    The year 1905 has been called Albert Einstein's "Annus Mirabilis." It was during that year that he caused revolutionary changes in man's primordial concepts about the physical world: space, time, energy, light and matter. How could a 26-year-old clerk, previously unknown, cause such profound conceptual changes, and thereby open the door to the era of modern scientific technological world? No one, of course, can answer that question. But one can, perhaps, analyze some factors that were essential to his stepping into such a historic role...

  6. Ultraviolet divergences of Einstein gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goroff, M.H.

    1986-01-01

    The author discuss a two-loop calculation showing that the S matrix of Einstein's theory of gravity contains nonrenormalizable ultraviolet divergences in four dimension. The author discusses the calculation in both background field and normal field theory. The author describes a new method for dealing with ghost fields in gauge theories by combining them with suitable extensions of the gauge fields in higher dimensions. The author shows how using subtracted integrals in the calculation of higher loop graphs simplifies the calculation in the background field method by eliminating the need for mixed counterterms. Finally, the author makes some remarks about the implications of the result for supergravity theories

  7. Albert Einstein, un hombre universal

    OpenAIRE

    Arias Arroyo, Gladys

    2014-01-01

    Albert Einstein, famoso por su teoría de la relatividad, que cambió toda las concepciones previas sobre la gravitación, el cosmos, la geometría y en general toda la ciencia moderna. Además de ser un genio científico, fue un gran humanista, partidario de la convivencia pacífica entre los pueblos, gran defensor de la libertad individual y del progreso. A pesar de que en su infancia y juventud tropezó con más inconvenientes que ventajas, tuvo la gran habilidad de conectar sus innegables dotes na...

  8. Einstein on Race and Racism

    CERN Document Server

    Jerome, Fred

    2005-01-01

    Nearly fifty years after his death, Albert Einstein remains one of America's foremost cultural icons. A thicket of materials, ranging from scholarly to popular, have been written, compiled, produced, and published about his life and his teachings. Among the ocean of Einsteinia-scientific monographs, biographies, anthologies, bibliographies, calendars, postcards, posters, and Hollywood films-however, there is a peculiar void when it comes to the connection that the brilliant scientist had with the African American community. Nowhere is there any mention of his close relationship with Pa

  9. Anomalous tunneling of collective excitations and effects of superflow in the polar phase of a spin-1 spinor Bose-Einstein condensate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watabe, Shohei; Ohashi, Yoji; Kato, Yusuke

    2011-01-01

    We investigate tunneling properties of collective modes in the polar phase of a spin-1 spinor Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC). This spinor BEC state has two kinds of gapless modes (i.e., Bogoliubov and spin-wave). Within the framework of mean-field theory at T=0, we show that these Goldstone modes exhibit perfect transmission in the low-energy limit. Their anomalous tunneling behavior still holds in the presence of superflow, except in the critical current state. In the critical current state, while the tunneling of Bogoliubov mode is accompanied by finite reflection, the spin wave still exhibits perfect transmission, unless the strengths of spin-dependent and spin-independent interactions take the same value. We discuss the relation between perfect transmission of a spin wave and underlying superfluidity through a comparison of wave functions of the spin wave and the condensate.

  10. Correspondence passed between Einstein and Schroedinger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balibar, F.

    1992-01-01

    The main points of the 26 year long correspondence between Einstein and Schroedinger are reviewed: from the de Broglie thesis and the Bose-Einstein statistics to the Schroedinger equation (1925-1926); from the EPR paradox to the cat parable (1935); a complete collaboration on unitary theories

  11. New details emerge from the Einstein files

    CERN Multimedia

    Overbye, D

    2002-01-01

    For many years the FBI spied on Einstein. New details of this surveilance are emerging in "The Einstein File: J. Edgar Hoover's Secret War Against the World's Most Famous Scientist," by Fred Jerome, who sued the government with the help of the Public Citizen Litigation Group to obtain a less censored version of the file (1 page).

  12. The Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen paradox

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, S.M.

    1980-01-01

    The celebrated arguments of Einstein, Podolsky and Rosen claiming that quantum mechanics cannot be a complete theory are reviewed. Recent research climaxed by Bell's theorem shows that Einstein's locality or ''no telepathy'' postulate conflicts with quantum theory. It adds a new dimension to the paradox by catapulting the problem from the domain of metaphysics into that of experimental physics. (auth.)

  13. Albert Einstein and the relativity theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlickova, E.

    1975-01-01

    A bibliography is presented of Albert Einstein's works, listing his correspondence, biographical literature, articles on A. Einstein published in Czech journals, principal relativity theory monographs and popular, historical and philosophical publications. The bibliographical records are listed alphabetically. Most references give the abbreviations of libraries where the publications are available. (J.P.)

  14. Einstein in love a scientific romance

    CERN Document Server

    Overbye, Dennis

    2000-01-01

    At its height, Einstein's marriage to Mileva was an extraordinary one - a colleague and often fierce adversary, Mileva was brilliantly matched with the scientific genius. Dennis Overbye seeks to present this scientific romance in a vivid light, telling the private story of the young Einstein.

  15. Books on Einstein--Collectors' Delight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoon, Koh Aik; Jalal, Azman; Abd-Shukor, R.; Yatim, Baharudin; Talib, Ibrahim Abu; Daud, Abdul Razak; Samat, Supian

    2009-01-01

    A survey of thirteen books on Einstein is presented. Its gives an idea on how much is written about the man and how frequent are the publications. The year 2005 saw the most publications. It is the centenary for the Miraculous Year. Interestingly some books can just sustain their readers' interest with just words. Einstein comes alive with the…

  16. What Einstein Can Teach Us about Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Denis

    2007-01-01

    People are more likely to associate Einstein with complex scientific theories and mathematical calculations than with education theory. In fact, Einstein's own experiences of schooling and his reflections on the meaning of life and the significance of education are profound and oddly relevant to the situation that pertains in England today. It is…

  17. Einstein as a Missionary of Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renn, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    The paper reviews Einstein's engagement as a mediator and popularizer of science. It discusses the formative role of popular scientific literature for the young Einstein, showing that not only his broad scientific outlook but also his internationalist political views were shaped by these readings. Then, on the basis of recent detailed…

  18. Albert Einstein, cosmos and religion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doković V.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider Einstein's attitude regarding religious as such, from both cosmological and epistemological points of view. An attempt to put it into a wider socio-historical perspective was made, with the emphasis on ethnic and religious background. It turns out that the great scientist was neither atheist nor believer in the orthodox sense and the closest labels one might stick to him in this respect would be pantheism/cosmism (ontological aspect and agnosticism (episte­mological aspect. His ideas on divine could be considered as a continuation of line traced by Philo of Alexandria, who himself followed Greek Stoics and (Neo- Platonists and especially Baruch Spinoza. It turns out that Einstein's both scientific (rational aspects and religious (intuitive aspects thinking were deeply rooted in the Hellenic culture. His striving to unravel the secrets of the universe and the roots of cosmological order resembles much the ancient ideas of the role of knowledge in fathoming the divine as such, as ascribed to Gnostics. .

  19. Einstein a hundred years of relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Robinson, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    "The eternal mystery of the world is its comprehensibility … The fact that it is comprehensible is a miracle." --Albert Einstein, 1936 Albert Einstein's universal appeal is only partially explained by his brilliant work in physics, as Andrew Robinson demonstrates in this authoritative, accessible, and richly illustrated biography. The main narrative is enriched by twelve essays by well-known scientists, scholars, and artists, including three Nobel Laureates. The book presents clearly the beautiful simplicity at the heart of Einstein's greatest discoveries, and explains how his ideas have continued to influence scientific developments such as lasers, the theory of the big bang, and "theories of everything." Einstein's life and activities outside of science are also considered, including his encounters with famous contemporaries such as Chaplin, Roosevelt, and Tagore, his love of music, and his troubled family life. The book recognizes that Einstein's striking originality was expressed in many ways, from hi...

  20. Albert Einstein's Magic Mountain: An Aarau Education*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunziker, Herbert

    2015-03-01

    For economic reasons, the electrotechnical factory J. Einstein & Cie. (co-owned by Albert Einstein's father Hermann) had to be closed in the summer of 1894. While Albert's parents emigrated to Italy to build a new existence, he remained in Munich to complete his studies at the Gymnasium. Left behind, however, he had a difficult time with what he considered the rigid educational practices at the Munich Luitpold-Gymnasium and quit without a diploma. The present article discusses Einstein's richly winding path to the Aargau Cantonal School (Switzerland), especially its history and educational philosophy during the time of his stay in Aarau. There, Einstein met some outstanding teachers, who could serve him as models of scholars and human beings. In spite of Einstein's distinct independence of mind, these personalities may well have had a significant influence on the alignment of his inner compass.

  1. Einstein Ring in Distant Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-06-01

    Using ESO's Very Large Telescope, Rémi Cabanac and his European colleagues have discovered an amazing cosmic mirage, known to scientists as an Einstein Ring. This cosmic mirage, dubbed FOR J0332-3557, is seen towards the southern constellation Fornax (the Furnace), and is remarkable on at least two counts. First, it is a bright, almost complete Einstein ring. Second, it is the farthest ever found. ESO PR Photo 20a/05 ESO PR Photo 20a/05 Deep Image of a Region in Fornax (FORS/VLT) [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 434 pix - 60k] [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 867 pix - 276k] [Full Res - JPEG: 1859 x 2015 pix - 3.8M] ESO PR Photo 20b/05 ESO PR Photo 20b/05 Zoom-in on the Newly Found Einstein Ring (FORS/VLT) [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 575 pix - 168k] [Normal - JPEG: 630 x 906 pix - 880k] Caption: ESO PR Photo 20a/05 is a composite image taken in two bands (B and R) with VLT/FORS1 of a small portion of the sky (field-of-view 7x7' or 1/15th of the area of the full moon). The faintest object seen in the image has a magnitude 26, that is, it is 100 million times fainter than what can be observed with the unaided eye. The bright elliptical galaxy on the lower-left quadrant is a dwarf galaxy part of a large nearby cluster in the Fornax constellation. As for all deep images of the sky, this field shows a variety of objects, the brightest ponctual sources being stars from our Galaxy. By far the field is dominated by thousands of faint background galaxies the colours of which are related to the age of their dominant stellar population, their dust content and their distance. The newly found Einstein ring is visible in the top right part of the image. ESO PR Photo 20b/05 zooms-in on the position of the newly found cosmic mirage. ESO PR Photo 20c/05 ESO PR Photo 20c/05 Einstein Ring in Distant Universe (FORS/VLT) [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 584 pix - 104k] [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 1168 pix - 292k] [Full Res - JPEG: 1502 x 2192 pix - 684k] Caption of ESO PR Photo 20c/05: The left image is magnified and centred

  2. The Dark Universe Through Einstein's Lens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bard, Deborah [SLAC; Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology

    2013-07-23

    Bard's talk explains the phenomenon known as gravitational lensing and how astrophysicists use it to explore the 95 percent of the universe that remains unseen: dark matter and dark energy. One of the most surprising predictions made by Einstein's theory of relativity is that light doesn't travel through the universe in a straight line. The gravitational field of massive objects will deflect the path of light traveling past, giving some very dramatic effects. We see multiple images of quasars, galaxies smeared into arcs and circles and magnified images of the most distant objects in the universe. This explains how gravitational lensing was first observed and discusses how scientists use this phenomenon to study everything from exoplanets to dark matter to the structure of the universe and the mysterious dark energy.

  3. Emergent cosmos in Einstein-Cartan theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadi, H.; Heydarzade, Y.; Darabi, F.; Hashemi, M.

    2018-01-01

    Based on Padmanabhan's proposal, the accelerated expansion of the universe can be driven by the difference between the surface and bulk degrees of freedom in a region of space, described by the relation dV/dt = N sur - N bulk where N sur and N bulk = -N em + N de are the degrees of freedom assigned to the surface area and the matter-energy content inside the bulk such that the indices ''em'' and ''de'' represent energy-momentum and dark energy, respectively. In the present work, the dynamical effect of the Weyssenhoff perfect fluid with intrinsic spin and its corresponding spin degrees of freedom in the framework of Einstein-Cartan (EC) theory are investigated. Based on the modification of Friedmann equations due to the spin-spin interactions, a correction term for Padmanabhan's original relation dV/dt = N sur + N em - N de including the number of degrees of freedom related with these spin interactions is obtained through the modification in N bulk term as N bulk = -N em + N spin + N de leading to dV/dt = N sur + N em - N spin - N de in which N spin is the corresponding degrees of freedom related with the intrinsic spin of the matter content of the universe. Moreover, the validity of the unified first law and the generalized second law of thermodynamics for the Einstein-Cartan cosmos are investigated. Finally, by considering the covariant entropy conjecture and the bound resulting from the emergent scenario, a total entropy bound is obtained. Using this bound, it is shown that the for the universe as an expanding thermodynamical system, the total effective Komar energy never exceeds the square of the expansion rate with a factor of (3)/(4π). (orig.)

  4. The Einstein Postulates: 1905-2005 A Critical Review of the Evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Cahill, Reginald T.

    2004-01-01

    The Einstein postulates assert an invariance of the propagation speed of light in vacuum for any observer, and which amounts to a presumed absence of any preferred frame. The postulates appear to be directly linked to relativistic effects which emerge from Einstein's Special Theory of Relativity, which is based upon the concept of a flat spacetime ontology, and which then lead to the General Theory of Relativity with its curved spacetime model for gravity. While the relativistic effects are w...

  5. Revisiting Einstein's brain in Brain Awareness Week.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hao; Chen, Su; Zeng, Lidan; Zhou, Lin; Hou, Shengtao

    2014-10-01

    Albert Einstein's brain has long been an object of fascination to both neuroscience specialists and the general public. However, without records of advanced neuro-imaging of his brain, conclusions regarding Einstein's extraordinary cognitive capabilities can only be drawn based on the unique external features of his brain and through comparison of the external features with those of other human brain samples. The recent discovery of 14 previously unpublished photographs of Einstein's brain taken at unconventional angles by Dr. Thomas Stoltz Harvey, the pathologist, ignited a renewed frenzy about clues to explain Einstein's genius. Dr. Dean Falk and her colleagues, in their landmark paper published in Brain (2013; 136:1304-1327), described in such details about the unusual features of Einstein's brain, which shed new light on Einstein's intelligence. In this article, we ask what are the unique structures of his brain? What can we learn from this new information? Can we really explain his extraordinary cognitive capabilities based on these unique brain structures? We conclude that studying the brain of a remarkable person like Albert Einstein indeed provides us a better example to comprehensively appreciate the relationship between brain structures and advanced cognitive functions. However, caution must be exercised so as not to over-interpret his intelligence solely based on the understanding of the surface structures of his brain.

  6. Einstein's daughter the search for Lieserl

    CERN Document Server

    Zackheim, Michele

    1999-01-01

    A thoroughly gripping and groundbreaking investigation into the mysterious fate of Albert Einstein's illegitimate daughter. Albert Einstein fell in love with Mileva Maric, the woman who would become his first wife, when they were students at the Zurich Polytechnic Institute. When Maric conceived a child out of wedlock, she went home to her family in Serbia to have the child. Lieserl Maric Einstein was born in 1902. Though Einstein and Maric married the following year, Lieserl was left in the care of her grandparents and never became a part of the Einstein family. In fact, her very existence was unknown until the recent discovery of a cache of letters between Einstein and Maric. The final reference to Lieserl comes in a September 1903 letter, when, at the age of approximately eighteen months, she simply disappears. What happened to Einstein's daughter is the most potent mystery to emerge from the mythology that surrounds one of the century's legendary figures, owing in large part to the careful and apparent...

  7. A centennial gift from Einstein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oswalt, T. D.

    2017-06-01

    The 1919 detection of the apparent displacement of background stars near the edge of the eclipsed Sun's disk provided one of the first convincing proofs of Einstein's theory of general relativity (1, 2). Almost 100 years later, Sahu et al. report on page 1046 of this issue the first measurement of the gravitational deflection of starlight by a star other than the Sun (3). Using the superior angular resolution of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), they measured shifts in the apparent position of a distant background star as a nearby dense stellar remnant called a white dwarf passed almost in front of it in 2014. Because of the relative distances involved, the deflections they observed were about 1000 times smaller than those seen in 1919, but also in agreement with general relativity theory.

  8. Einstein wrote back my life in physics

    CERN Document Server

    Moffat, John W

    2012-01-01

    John W. Moffat was a poor student of math and science. That is, until he read Einstein's famous paper on general relativity. Realizing instantly that he had an unusual and unexplained aptitude for understanding the complex physics described in the paper, Moffat wrote a letter to Einstein that would change the course of his life. Einstein Wrote Back tells the story of Moffat's unusual entry into the world of academia and documents his career at the frontlines of twentieth-century physics as he worked and associated with some of the greatest minds in scientific history, including Niels Bohr,

  9. Quantum theory and Einstein's general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borzeszkowski, H. von; Treder, H.

    1982-01-01

    We dicusss the meaning and prove the accordance of general relativity, wave mechanics, and the quantization of Einstein's gravitation equations themselves. Firstly, we have the problem of the influence of gravitational fields on the de Broglie waves, which influence is in accordance with Einstein's weak principle of equivalence and the limitation of measurements given by Heisenberg's uncertainty relations. Secondly, the quantization of the gravitational fields is a ''quantization of geometry.'' However, classical and quantum gravitation have the same physical meaning according to limitations of measurements given by Einstein's strong principle of equivalence and the Heisenberg uncertainties for the mechanics of test bodies

  10. Einstein pictures the x-ray sky

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartline, B.K.

    1979-01-01

    The second High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO-2, Einstein) is revolutionizing x-ray astronomy just as its namesake revolutionized physics. Earlier x-ray observatories, including HEAO-1, were designed to scan the sky for x-ray emitters. With Einstein, the challenge has shifted from discovering x-ray sources to understanding the processes producing the x-rays. But having 500 times the sensitivity of previous detectors, Einstein makes more than its share of discoveries, too. For example, it sees distant quasars and clusters of galaxies that can barely be detected by the largest optical telescopes

  11. Entanglement Equilibrium and the Einstein Equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Ted

    2016-05-20

    A link between the semiclassical Einstein equation and a maximal vacuum entanglement hypothesis is established. The hypothesis asserts that entanglement entropy in small geodesic balls is maximized at fixed volume in a locally maximally symmetric vacuum state of geometry and quantum fields. A qualitative argument suggests that the Einstein equation implies the validity of the hypothesis. A more precise argument shows that, for first-order variations of the local vacuum state of conformal quantum fields, the vacuum entanglement is stationary if and only if the Einstein equation holds. For nonconformal fields, the same conclusion follows modulo a conjecture about the variation of entanglement entropy.

  12. Rediscovering Einstein's legacy: How Einstein anticipates Kuhn and Feyerabend on the nature of science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberheim, Eric

    2016-06-01

    Thomas Kuhn and Paul Feyerabend promote incommensurability as a central component of their conflicting accounts of the nature of science. This paper argues that in so doing, they both develop Albert Einstein's views, albeit in different directions. Einstein describes scientific revolutions as conceptual replacements, not mere revisions, endorsing 'Kant-on-wheels' metaphysics in light of 'world change'. Einstein emphasizes underdetermination of theory by evidence, rational disagreement in theory choice, and the non-neutrality of empirical evidence. Einstein even uses the term 'incommensurable' specifically to apply to challenges posed to comparatively evaluating scientific theories in 1949, more than a decade before Kuhn and Feyerabend. This analysis shows how Einstein anticipates substantial components of Kuhn and Feyerabend's views, and suggests that there are strong reasons to suspect that Kuhn and Feyerabend were directly inspired by Einstein's use of the term 'incommensurable', as well as his more general methodological and philosophical reflections. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. On some classes of super quasi-Einstein manifolds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozguer, Cihan

    2009-01-01

    Quasi-Einstein and generalized quasi-Einstein manifolds are the generalizations of Einstein manifolds. In this study, we consider a super quasi-Einstein manifold, which is another generalization of an Einstein manifold. We find the curvature characterizations of a Ricci-pseudosymmetric and a quasi-conformally flat super quasi-Einstein manifolds. We also consider the condition C ∼ .S=0 on a super quasi-Einstein manifold, where C ∼ and S denote the quasi-conformal curvature tensor and Ricci tensor of the manifold, respectively.

  14. Dynamical preparation of Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen entanglement in two-well Bose-Einstein condensates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opanchuk, B.; He, Q. Y.; Reid, M. D.; Drummond, P. D.

    2012-08-01

    We propose to generate Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) entanglement between groups of atoms in a two-well Bose-Einstein condensate using a dynamical process similar to that employed in quantum optics. A local nonlinear S-wave scattering interaction has the effect of creating spin squeezing at each well, while a tunneling coupling, analogous to a beam splitter in optics, introduces an interference between these fields that causes interwell entanglement. We consider two internal modes at each well so that the entanglement can be detected by measuring a reduction in the variances of the sums of local Schwinger spin observables. As is typical of continuous variable (CV) entanglement, the entanglement is predicted to increase with atom number. It becomes sufficiently strong at higher numbers of atoms so that the EPR paradox and steering nonlocality can be realized. The entanglement is predicted using an analytical approach and, for larger atom numbers, using stochastic simulations based on a truncated Wigner function approximation. We find generally that strong tunneling is favorable, and that entanglement persists and is even enhanced in the presence of realistic nonlinear losses.

  15. EDITORIAL: Squeeze transformation and optics after Einstein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young S.; Man'ko, Margarita A.; Planat, Michel

    2005-12-01

    and matter (which also take their origin in Einstein's paper of 1905), stationary and nonstationary Casimir effect, decoherence, new forms of uncertainty relations and their experimental verification, etc, can also be found in this issue. Many other contributions will be published in another special issue of the International Journal of Modern Physics B entitled `Quantum Information in Modern Optics'. This special issue is also the last issue of Journal of Optics B: Quantum and Semiclassical Optics. For the past 15 years this journal and its predecessors—Quantum Optics and Quantum and Semiclassical Optics—gained great respect among the quantum optics community. Many breakthrough papers were published in its pages during this period (see, for example, Schrade G, Man'ko V I, Schleich W P and Glauber R J 1995 Wigner Functions in the Paul trap Quantum Semiclass. Opt. 7 307). Since 1999, Journal of Optics B: Quantum and Semiclassical Optics has published a special issue for each ICSSUR meeting. This is the fourth issue of this series. We would like to thank Institute of Physics Publishing and the staff of Journal of Optics B: Quantum and Semiclassical Optics for providing the opportunity to pursue this programme, hoping that such a cooperation will continue in the future. We would also like to thank the many colleagues, who served as referees and whose efforts helped immensely in the preparation of this issue at such a high standard. The 10th ICSSUR conference will be organized for 2007 in Bradford, UK, by Professor A Vourdas. We invite readers to join us in two years.

  16. Einstein and General Relativity: Historical Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekhar, S.

    1979-01-01

    This paper presented in the 1978 Oppenheimer Memorial Lecture at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratories on August 17, 1978, discusses Einstein's contributions to physics, in particular, his discovery of the general theory of relativity. (HM)

  17. Covariant Conformal Decomposition of Einstein Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourgoulhon, E.; Novak, J.

    It has been shown1,2 that the usual 3+1 form of Einstein's equations may be ill-posed. This result has been previously observed in numerical simulations3,4. We present a 3+1 type formalism inspired by these works to decompose Einstein's equations. This decomposition is motivated by the aim of stable numerical implementation and resolution of the equations. We introduce the conformal 3-``metric'' (scaled by the determinant of the usual 3-metric) which is a tensor density of weight -2/3. The Einstein equations are then derived in terms of this ``metric'', of the conformal extrinsic curvature and in terms of the associated derivative. We also introduce a flat 3-metric (the asymptotic metric for isolated systems) and the associated derivative. Finally, the generalized Dirac gauge (introduced by Smarr and York5) is used in this formalism and some examples of formulation of Einstein's equations are shown.

  18. Vortex sorter for Bose-Einstein condensates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whyte, Graeme; Veitch, John; Courtial, Johannes; Oehberg, Patrik

    2004-01-01

    We have designed interferometers that sort Bose-Einstein condensates into their vortex components. The Bose-Einstein condensates in the two arms of the interferometer are rotated with respect to each other through fixed angles; different vortex components then exit the interferometer in different directions. The method we use to rotate the Bose-Einstein condensates involves asymmetric phase imprinting and is itself new. We have modeled rotation through fixed angles and sorting into vortex components with even and odd values of the topological charge of two-dimensional Bose-Einstein condensates in a number of states (pure or superposition vortex states for different values of the scattering length). Our scheme may have applications for quantum information processing

  19. How History Helped Einstein in Special Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Alberto

    2013-04-01

    I will discuss how the German intellectual movement known as ``critical history'' motivated several physicists in the late 1900s to radically analyze the fundamental principles of mechanics, leading eventually to Einstein's special theory of relativity. Eugen Karl Dühring, Johann Bernhard Stallo, Ludwig Lange, and Ernst Mach wrote critical histories of mechanics, some of which emphasized notions of relativity and observation, in opposition to old metaphysical concepts that seemed to infect the foundations of physics. This strand of critical history included the ``genetic method'' of analyzing how concepts develop over time, in our minds, by way of ordinary experiences, which by 1904 was young Albert Einstein's favorite approach for examining fundamental notions. Thus I will discuss how history contributed in Einstein's path to relativity, as well as comment more generally on Einstein's views on history.

  20. Bose-Einstein condensation and crystallization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suetoe, A.

    2008-01-01

    The paper describes history and state of art theory of Bose-Einstein condensation and crystallization as cases of breaking continuous symmetries. Emphasizes that these problems have not been solved exactly. (TRA)

  1. Recent developments in Bose-Einstein condensation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalman, G.

    1997-01-01

    This paper contains viewgraphs on developments on Bose-Einstein condensation. Some topics covered are: strongly coupled coulomb systems; standard response functions of the first and second kind; dynamical mean field theory; quasi localized charge approximation; and the main equations

  2. Recent developments in Bose-Einstein condensation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalman, G.

    1997-09-22

    This paper contains viewgraphs on developments on Bose-Einstein condensation. Some topics covered are: strongly coupled coulomb systems; standard response functions of the first and second kind; dynamical mean field theory; quasi localized charge approximation; and the main equations.

  3. Bose-Einstein correlations in WW pair production at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Van Remortel, N

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the latest results from the L3 and DELPHI collaborations concerning the measurement of Bose-Einstein correlations between identical bosons coming from different W's in fully hadronic WW decays. Using the same method, L3 sees no indication of any inter-W BEC effect, while DELPHI reports an indication of inter-W BEC between like-charged particles of the order of three standard deviations.

  4. Characterization of nonequilibrium states of trapped Bose–Einstein condensates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yukalov, V. I.; Novikov, A. N.; Bagnato, V. S.

    2018-06-01

    The generation of different nonequilibrium states in trapped Bose–Einstein condensates is studied by numerically solving the nonlinear Schrödinger equation. Inducing nonequilibrium states by shaking a trap creates the following states: weak nonequilibrium, the state of vortex germs, the state of vortex rings, the state of straight vortex lines, the state of deformed vortices, vortex turbulence, grain turbulence, and wave turbulence. A characterization of nonequilibrium states is advanced by introducing effective temperature, Fresnel number, and Mach number.

  5. Merging and splitting of Bose-Einstein condensates into two translating traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, B; Pindzola, M S

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the process of merging and splitting Bose-Einstein condensates into two slowly translating traps, analogous to a dual input atomic beam splitter. With the help of direct three-dimensional numerical simulations, we explore the dependence of population distributions on the initial relative phase and the trap moving speed. For non-interacting Bose-Einstein condensates, we find that our numerical results are in good agreement with a simple theoretical prediction. However, for interacting Bose-Einstein condensates, our results show striking differences with the non-interacting case: the Bose-Einstein condensates are always split towards 50:50 in the slow translation regime. This bosonic anti-bunching effect is interpreted as a consequence of complicated flow patterns due to atomic interactions.

  6. Bose-Einstein condensation in an ultra-hot gas of pumped magnons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serga, Alexander A; Tiberkevich, Vasil S; Sandweg, Christian W; Vasyuchka, Vitaliy I; Bozhko, Dmytro A; Chumak, Andrii V; Neumann, Timo; Obry, Björn; Melkov, Gennadii A; Slavin, Andrei N; Hillebrands, Burkard

    2014-03-11

    Bose-Einstein condensation of quasi-particles such as excitons, polaritons, magnons and photons is a fascinating quantum mechanical phenomenon. Unlike the Bose-Einstein condensation of real particles (like atoms), these processes do not require low temperatures, since the high densities of low-energy quasi-particles needed for the condensate to form can be produced via external pumping. Here we demonstrate that such a pumping can create remarkably high effective temperatures in a narrow spectral region of the lowest energy states in a magnon gas, resulting in strikingly unexpected transitional dynamics of Bose-Einstein magnon condensate: the density of the condensate increases immediately after the external magnon flow is switched off and initially decreases if it is switched on again. This behaviour finds explanation in a nonlinear 'evaporative supercooling' mechanism that couples the low-energy magnons overheated by pumping with all the other thermal magnons, removing the excess heat, and allowing Bose-Einstein condensate formation.

  7. On the stability of the Einstein universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soares, I.D.

    1983-01-01

    It is shown sthat the Einstein Universe is stable by a large class of exact perturbations, which are made starting from a detailed exam of the topology of the model, and which include perturbations of the type considered by Lemaitre. The problem is reduced to the one-dimensional motion of a particle, in a potential well whose minimum corresponds to the configuration of the Einstein Universe. (Author) [pt

  8. Stationary axisymmetric Einstein--Maxwell field equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catenacci, R.; Diaz Alonso, J.

    1976-01-01

    We show the existence of a formal identity between Einstein's and Ernst's stationary axisymmetric gravitational field equations and the Einstein--Maxwell and the Ernst equations for the electrostatic and magnetostatic axisymmetric cases. Our equations are invariant under very simple internal symmetry groups, and one of them appears to be new. We also obtain a method for associating two stationary axisymmetric vacuum solutions with every electrostatic known

  9. Einstein and solid-state physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aut, I.

    1982-01-01

    A connection between the development of solid-state physics and the works and activity of Albert Einstein is traced. A tremendous Einstein contribution to solid state physics is marked. A strict establishment of particle-wave dualism; a conclusion about the applicability of the Plank radiation law not only to black body radiation; finding out particles indistinguishability - all three discoveries have a principle significance for solid state physics too

  10. String Theory has Einstein's dream come true?

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2005-01-01

    After having outlined the difficulties that Einstein and others have encountered in trying to unify our understanding of macroscopic/classical and microscopic /quantum physics, I will explain in simple terms how the latest particle theory revolution, string theory, may finally offer a surprisingly simple realization of these long-standing dreams. Einstein thought that his difficulties stemmed from a clash between the classical and the quantum. Yet, paradoxically, superstrings appear to realize his dream thanks to -and not against- quantum mechanics.

  11. Radiating Kerr particle in Einstein universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaidya, P.C.; Patel, L.K.

    1989-01-01

    A generalized Kerr-NUT type metric is considered in connection with Einstein field equations corresponding to perfect fluid plus a pure radiation field. A general scheme for obtaining the exact solutions of these field equations is developed. Two physically meaningful particular cases are investigated in detail. One gives the field of a radiating Kerr particle embedded in the Einstein universe. The other solution may probably represent a deSitter-like universe pervaded by a pure radiation field. (author). 7 refs

  12. Gravitational curvature: an introduction to Einstein's theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frankel, T.

    1979-01-01

    The basic aspects of general relativity are presented from a geometric point of view. The content of the book is well indicated by chapter headings: aspects of special relativity, clocks and gravitational potential, a heuristic derivation of Einstein's equations, the geometry of Einstein's equations, the Schwarzschild solution, the classical motion of a continuum, the relativistic equations of motion, light rays and Fermat's principle, electromagnetism in three-space and Minkowski space, electromagnetism in general relativity, the interior solution, and cosmology. 28 figures

  13. The practical Einstein experiments, patents, inventions

    CERN Document Server

    Illy, József

    2012-01-01

    Albert Einstein may be best known as the wire-haired whacky physicist who gave us the theory of relativity, but that's just one facet of this genius' contribution to human knowledge and modern science. As Jozsef Illy expertly shows in this book, Einstein had an eminently practical side as well. As a youth, Einstein was an inveterate tinkerer in the electrical supply factory his father and uncle owned and operated. His first paid job was as a patent examiner. Later in life, Einstein contributed to many inventions, including refrigerators, microphones, and instruments for aviation. In published papers, Einstein often provided ways to test his theories and fundamental problems of the scientific community of his times. He delved deeply into a variety of technological innovations, most notably the gyrocompass, and consulted for industry in patent cases and on other legal matters. Einstein also provided explanations for common and mundane phenomena, such as the meandering of rivers. In these and other hands-on exam...

  14. Einstein before Israel Zionist icon or iconoclast?

    CERN Document Server

    Rosenkranz, Ze’ev

    2011-01-01

    Albert Einstein was initially skeptical and even disdainful of the Zionist movement, yet he affiliated himself with this controversial political ideology and today is widely seen as an outspoken advocate for a modern Jewish homeland in Palestine. What enticed this renowned scientist and humanitarian, who repeatedly condemned nationalism of all forms, to radically change his views? Was he in fact a Zionist? Einstein Before Israel traces Einstein's involvement with Zionism from his initial contacts with the movement at the end of World War I to his emigration from Germany in 1933 in the wake of Hitler's rise to power. Drawing on a wealth of rare archival evidence--much of it never before published--this book offers the most nuanced picture yet of Einstein's complex and sometimes stormy relationship with Jewish nationalism. Ze'ev Rosenkranz sheds new light on Einstein's encounters with prominent Zionist leaders, and reveals exactly what Einstein did and didn't like about Zionist beliefs, objectives, and methods...

  15. TV News Magazine Presentation: Einstein by Schweizer Fernsehen (2009)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2011-01-01

    In this episode of Einstein, students from the University of Zurich explain the LHC physics experiments with chocolate and coffee cups. Using these ordinary items, the young researchers demonstrate what happens when two protons collide and how they are measured and detected. They also visit the CMS and LHCb detectors. Other topics in this episode include studies of crash test dummies to determine the right kind of protection needed for winter sports, such as skiing and snowboarding; image researchers at the University of Zurich poll people on the effects of image verses hard facts; the enormous potential of LED lights as the source of light for the future; and scientists determine that our closest ancestors are not the chimpanzee or orangutan, but the common marmoset. Due to room issues last time, Einstein will be presented on Friday, 11 February from 13:00 to 14:00 in the Council Chamber Language: German  

  16. The role of Newton's constant in Einstein's gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    de Alfaro, V.

    1983-01-01

    The role of the Newton constant in Einstein particle physics is discussed. The troubles paguing the quantum theory of gravity, including the abscence of an effective cosmological constant, are discussed. The Planck length is studied. The key point is that gravity theory is invariant under general coordinate transformations (GCT). The law of transformations of a tensor under GCT, with attention on dilatations, is determined. The results are compared to the case of a conformal invariant theory in a flat space. The fields in the flat limit are redefined under this rule: in the flat limit the kinetic term must be invariant under conformal transformations. The procedure exhibits clearly the fundamental scale invariance of the Einstein theory

  17. Gravitational catalysis of merons in Einstein-Yang-Mills theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canfora, Fabrizio; Oh, Seung Hun; Salgado-Rebolledo, Patricio

    2017-10-01

    We construct regular configurations of the Einstein-Yang-Mills theory in various dimensions. The gauge field is of meron-type: it is proportional to a pure gauge (with a suitable parameter λ determined by the field equations). The corresponding smooth gauge transformation cannot be deformed continuously to the identity. In the three-dimensional case we consider the inclusion of a Chern-Simons term into the analysis, allowing λ to be different from its usual value of 1 /2 . In four dimensions, the gravitating meron is a smooth Euclidean wormhole interpolating between different vacua of the theory. In five and higher dimensions smooth meron-like configurations can also be constructed by considering warped products of the three-sphere and lower-dimensional Einstein manifolds. In all cases merons (which on flat spaces would be singular) become regular due to the coupling with general relativity. This effect is named "gravitational catalysis of merons".

  18. Einstein model for elementary particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, N.K.

    1975-01-01

    A group theoretical model unifying a space-time group (E) and an internal symmetry group (I) for strongly interacting particles is worked out. The space-time group is the one that pertains to the group of motions of static Einstein cosmological model implying the symmetry of the group E = O 4 logical operation of multiplication R. With the use of Gueret and Vigier prescription, the left coset R logical operation of multiplication O 4 is identified with the internal symmetry group I = U 1 β logical operation of multiplication (SU(2) logical operation of multiplication SU(2)) contains SU(4). The complete dynamical group (D) is then found to be D = E logical operation of multiplication I = (O logical operation of multiplication R) logical operation of multiplication U 1 β logical operation of multiplication (SU(2) logical operation of multiplication SU(2) contains SO(4,2). Physically useful representations of the space-time group (E) are worked out by solving the eigenvalue problem of Laplace-Beltmi operator. The internal quantum numbers are prescribed in accordance with the SU(2) logical operation of multiplication SU(2) model of Nakamura and Sato. A general mass formula is derived and its use for known baryons and mesons is discussed. (author)

  19. Zeeman en Einstein. Meeslepende metingen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ad Maas

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Zeeman and EinsteinThis article discusses an early example of interferometric, experimental research related to Einstein’s Special Theory of Relativity. This research concerned two series of experiments on the velocity of light in moving media, conducted between 1914 and 1921 by the Amsterdam physicist Pieter Zeeman. With the first of these series, on the velocity of light in moving water, Zeeman obtained an important result that validated the so called ‘dispersion term’ of the formula for the velocity of light in moving media. Less clear is the scientific objective of the second series, in which Zeeman measured the velocity of light in moving solid media. It seems that Zeeman’s interest in this second series was triggered mainly by the technical challenges posed by these experiments. In this way, they reveal the increasing tendency of Zeeman’s later research to be led by technical and experimental challenges, rather than by the actual scientific developments.

  20. Stochastic quantization of Einstein gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rumpf, H.

    1986-01-01

    We determine a one-parameter family of covariant Langevin equations for the metric tensor of general relativity corresponding to DeWitt's one-parameter family of supermetrics. The stochastic source term in these equations can be expressed in terms of a Gaussian white noise upon the introduction of a stochastic tetrad field. The only physically acceptable resolution of a mathematical ambiguity in the ansatz for the source term is the adoption of Ito's calculus. By taking the formal equilibrium limit of the stochastic metric a one-parameter family of covariant path-integral measures for general relativity is obtained. There is a unique parameter value, distinguished by any one of the following three properties: (i) the metric is harmonic with respect to the supermetric, (ii) the path-integral measure is that of DeWitt, (iii) the supermetric governs the linearized Einstein dynamics. Moreover the Feynman propagator corresponding to this parameter is causal. Finally we show that a consistent stochastic perturbation theory gives rise to a new type of diagram containing ''stochastic vertices.''

  1. Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen argument and Bell inequalities for Bose-Einstein spin condensates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laloee, F.; Mullin, W. J.

    2008-01-01

    We discuss the properties of two Bose-Einstein condensates in different spin states, represented quantum mechanically by a double Fock state. Individual measurements of the spins of the particles are performed in transverse directions (perpendicular to the spin quantization axis), giving access to the relative phase of the two macroscopically occupied states. Before the first spin measurement, the phase is completely undetermined; after a few measurements, a more and more precise knowledge of its value emerges under the effect of the quantum measurement process. This naturally leads to the usual notion of a quasiclassical phase (Anderson phase) and to an interesting transposition of the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen argument to macroscopic physical quantities. The purpose of this paper is to discuss this transposition, as well as situations where the notion of a quasiclassical phase is no longer sufficient to account for the quantum results, and where significant violations of Bell-type inequalities are predicted. Quantum mechanically, the problem can be treated exactly: the probability for all sequences of results can be expressed in the form of a double integral, depending on all parameters that define the experiment (number of particles, number and angles of measurements). We discuss the differences between this case and the usual two-spin case. We discuss the effect of the many parameters that the experimenters can adjust for their measurements, starting with a discussion of the effect of the angles of measurement (the 'settings'), and then envisaging various choices of the functions that are used to obtain violation of Bell-Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt inequalities. We then discuss how the 'sample bias loophole' (often also called 'efficiency loophole') can be closed in this case, by introducing a preliminary sequence of measurements to localize the particles into 'measurement boxes'. We finally show that the same nonlocal effects can be observed with distinguishable

  2. Bose–Einstein condensation in the Rindler space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shingo Takeuchi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Based on the Unruh effect, we calculate the critical acceleration of the Bose–Einstein condensation in a free complex scalar field at finite density in the Rindler space. Our model corresponds to an ideal gas performing constantly accelerating motion in a Minkowski space–time at zero-temperature, where the gas is composed of the complex scalar particles and it can be thought to be in a thermal-bath with the Unruh temperature. In the accelerating frame, the model will be in the Bose–Einstein condensation state at low acceleration; on the other hand, there will be no condensation at high acceleration by the thermal excitation brought into by the Unruh effect. Our critical acceleration is the one at which the Bose–Einstein condensation begins to appear in the accelerating frame when we decrease the acceleration gradually. To carry out the calculation, we assume that the critical acceleration is much larger than the mass of the particle.

  3. Focus on quantum Einstein gravity Focus on quantum Einstein gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambjorn, Jan; Reuter, Martin; Saueressig, Frank

    2012-09-01

    The gravitational asymptotic safety program summarizes the attempts to construct a consistent and predictive quantum theory of gravity within Wilson's generalized framework of renormalization. Its key ingredient is a non-Gaussian fixed point of the renormalization group flow which controls the behavior of the theory at trans-Planckian energies and renders gravity safe from unphysical divergences. Provided that the fixed point comes with a finite number of ultraviolet-attractive (relevant) directions, this construction gives rise to a consistent quantum field theory which is as predictive as an ordinary, perturbatively renormalizable one. This opens up the exciting possibility of establishing quantum Einstein gravity as a fundamental theory of gravity, without introducing supersymmetry or extra dimensions, and solely based on quantization techniques that are known to work well for the other fundamental forces of nature. While the idea of gravity being asymptotically safe was proposed by Steven Weinberg more than 30 years ago [1], the technical tools for investigating this scenario only emerged during the last decade. Here a key role is played by the exact functional renormalization group equation for gravity, which allows the construction of non-perturbative approximate solutions for the RG-flow of the gravitational couplings. Most remarkably, all solutions constructed to date exhibit a suitable non-Gaussian fixed point, lending strong support to the asymptotic safety conjecture. Moreover, the functional renormalization group also provides indications that the central idea of a non-Gaussian fixed point providing a safe ultraviolet completion also carries over to more realistic scenarios where gravity is coupled to a suitable matter sector like the standard model. These theoretical successes also triggered a wealth of studies focusing on the consequences of asymptotic safety in a wide range of phenomenological applications covering the physics of black holes, early

  4. Emergent cosmos in Einstein-Cartan theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadi, H. [Azarbaijan Shahid Madani University, Department of Physics, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Heydarzade, Y.; Darabi, F. [Azarbaijan Shahid Madani University, Department of Physics, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Research Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics of Maragha (RIAAM), Maragha (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hashemi, M. [Shahid Beheshti University, Department of Physics, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2018-01-15

    Based on Padmanabhan's proposal, the accelerated expansion of the universe can be driven by the difference between the surface and bulk degrees of freedom in a region of space, described by the relation dV/dt = N{sub sur} - N{sub bulk} where N{sub sur} and N{sub bulk} = -N{sub em} + N{sub de} are the degrees of freedom assigned to the surface area and the matter-energy content inside the bulk such that the indices ''em'' and ''de'' represent energy-momentum and dark energy, respectively. In the present work, the dynamical effect of the Weyssenhoff perfect fluid with intrinsic spin and its corresponding spin degrees of freedom in the framework of Einstein-Cartan (EC) theory are investigated. Based on the modification of Friedmann equations due to the spin-spin interactions, a correction term for Padmanabhan's original relation dV/dt = N{sub sur} + N{sub em} - N{sub de} including the number of degrees of freedom related with these spin interactions is obtained through the modification in N{sub bulk} term as N{sub bulk} = -N{sub em} + N{sub spin} + N{sub de} leading to dV/dt = N{sub sur} + N{sub em} - N{sub spin} - N{sub de} in which N{sub spin} is the corresponding degrees of freedom related with the intrinsic spin of the matter content of the universe. Moreover, the validity of the unified first law and the generalized second law of thermodynamics for the Einstein-Cartan cosmos are investigated. Finally, by considering the covariant entropy conjecture and the bound resulting from the emergent scenario, a total entropy bound is obtained. Using this bound, it is shown that the for the universe as an expanding thermodynamical system, the total effective Komar energy never exceeds the square of the expansion rate with a factor of (3)/(4π). (orig.)

  5. Correspondence passed between Einstein and Schroedinger; La correspondance entre Einstein et Schroedinger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balibar, F. [Paris-7 Univ., 75 (France)

    1992-12-31

    The main points of the 26 year long correspondence between Einstein and Schroedinger are reviewed: from the de Broglie thesis and the Bose-Einstein statistics to the Schroedinger equation (1925-1926); from the EPR paradox to the cat parable (1935); a complete collaboration on unitary theories.

  6. Bose-Einstein condensation of a charged relativistic ideal gas in a general homogeneous magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toms, D.J.

    1994-01-01

    It is shown how the effective action formalism and ζ-function regularization can be used to study Bose-Einstein condensation for a relativistic charged scalar field in a general homogeneous magnetic field in a spacetime of arbitrary dimension. In the special case where the magnetic field has only one component, Bose-Einstein condensation occurs at high temperature only for D≥5 where D is the spatial dimension. When Bose-Einstein condensation does occur the ground-state expectation value of the scalar field is not constant and we determine its value. If the magnetic field has p independent nonzero components we show that the condition for Bose-Einstein condensation is D≥3+2p. In particular, Bose-Einstein condensation can never occur if the magnetic field has all of its independent components nonzero. The problem of Bose-Einstein condensation in a cylindrical box in D spatial dimensions with a uniform magnetic field directed along the axis of the cylinder is also discussed

  7. G. Einstein matrix and nano-biophotonic treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przybyl-Einstein, George; Moratin, Holdy; Garcia, Eduardo

    2005-04-01

    The publication is presenting the Einstein Matrix Treatment Method and initial results for blood borne diseases on example of hepatitis, HIV and arthritis. The initial research was conducted at Einstein Clinical Laboratories S.A. on limited funds. The treatment and method is strongly recommended for specific viruses bacteria in blood borne diseases but also for treatment of none specific viruses and bacteria in emergency treatments as SARS or ANTHRAX to safe life of the human. In the past years the Individual's Safety is in jeopardy by natural viral infections as well as by engineering cultured viruses and bacteria. Viruses mutate and become more resistant to current known medical treatment, in many cases partially efficient. This event required new testing method to investigate the possibility of treatments and to create new vaccine for non-specific viral and bacteria or viruses infections that causes death to thousands adults and children. The authors present in this paper the possibility of treatment of the non-specific viral, bacterial infections of the blood in human body. This treatment has safe procedure and no known side effect up to this time for patients that were treated at Einstein Clinical Laboratories SA.

  8. The large numbers hypothesis and the Einstein theory of gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dirac, P.A.M.

    1979-01-01

    A study of the relations between large dimensionless numbers leads to the belief that G, expressed in atomic units, varies with the epoch while the Einstein theory requires G to be constant. These two requirements can be reconciled by supposing that the Einstein theory applies with a metric that differs from the atomic metric. The theory can be developed with conservation of mass by supposing that the continual increase in the mass of the observable universe arises from a continual slowing down of the velocity of recession of the galaxies. This leads to a model of the Universe that was first proposed by Einstein and de Sitter (the E.S. model). The observations of the microwave radiation fit in with this model. The static Schwarzchild metric has to be modified to fit in with the E.S. model for large r. The modification is worked out, and also the motion of planets with the new metric. It is found that there is a difference between ephemeris time and atomic time, and also that there should be an inward spiralling of the planets, referred to atomic units, superposed on the motion given by ordinary gravitational theory. These are effects that can be checked by observation, but there is no conclusive evidence up to the present. (author)

  9. Secrets of the old one Einstein, 1905

    CERN Document Server

    Bernstein, Jeremy

    2006-01-01

    In March 1905, at approximately eight week intervals, the Editor of the noted German physics journal, Annalen der Physik, received three hand-written manuscripts from a relatively unknown patent examiner in Bern, Switzerland. This patent examiner was the twenty-six year old Albert Einstein and the three papers would set the agenda for twentieth century physics. A fourth short paper was received in September 1905 and contained Einstein's derivation of the formula E=mc^2. These papers changed our lives in the twentieth century and beyond. While to a professional physicist the mathematics in these papers are quite straight forward, the ideas behind them are not. In fact, none of Einstein's contemporaries fully understood what he had done. In SECRETS OF THE OLD ONE: Einstein, 1905, renowned science writer Jeremy Bernstein makes these ideas accessible to a general reader with a limited background in mathematics. After reading this book, you will understand why 1905 is often designated as Einstein's miracle year.

  10. De Sitter en Einstein. ‘Het lijkt mij dat Einstein hier een vergissing begaan heeft’

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Guichelaar

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available De Sitter and EinsteinWillem de Sitter’s interest in gravity was based on his work on celestial mechanics, in particular on the four big moons of Jupiter. His work on cosmology was based on the general theory of relativity of Albert Einstein. De Sitter published in 1917, on request of Arthur Eddington to inform the English astronomers, a series of four articles in The Observatory and the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. Einstein developed his own cosmological models, containing mass. De Sitter found a different solution and described a universe without mass. Einstein could not accept De Sitter’s model and they ‘fought out’ two controversies in their correspondence. In theend Einstein had to confess De Sitter was mainly right in his criticisms. In 1932 Einstein and De Sitter published an article on a new model, the so-called Einstein-De Sitter Model of the universe. So, De Sitter was able to do fundamental work in classical celestial mechanics as well as in the new cosmological theories.

  11. The Chevreton tensor and Einstein-Maxwell spacetimes conformal to Einstein spaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergqvist, Goeran; Eriksson, Ingemar

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we characterize the source-free Einstein-Maxwell spacetimes which have a trace-free Chevreton tensor. We show that this is equivalent to the Chevreton tensor being of pure radiation type and that it restricts the spacetimes to Petrov type N or O. We prove that the trace of the Chevreton tensor is related to the Bach tensor and use this to find all Einstein-Maxwell spacetimes with a zero cosmological constant that have a vanishing Bach tensor. Among these spacetimes we then look for those which are conformal to Einstein spaces. We find that the electromagnetic field and the Weyl tensor must be aligned, and in the case that the electromagnetic field is null, the spacetime must be conformally Ricci-flat and all such solutions are known. In the non-null case, since the general solution is not known on a closed form, we settle by giving the integrability conditions in the general case, but we do give new explicit examples of Einstein-Maxwell spacetimes that are conformal to Einstein spaces, and we also find examples where the vanishing of the Bach tensor does not imply that the spacetime is conformal to a C-space. The non-aligned Einstein-Maxwell spacetimes with vanishing Bach tensor are conformally C-spaces, but none of them are conformal to Einstein spaces

  12. Einstein, Ethics and the Atomic Bomb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rife, Patricia

    2005-03-01

    Einstein voiced his ethical views against war as well as fascism via venues and alliances with a variety of organizations still debated today. In 1939, he signed a letter to President Roosevelt (drafted by younger colleagues Szilard, Wigner and others) warning the U.S.government about the danger of Nazi Germany gaining control of uranium in the Belgian-controlled Congo in order to develop atomic weapons, based on the discovery of fission by Otto Hahn and Lise Meitner. In 1945, he became a member of the Princeton-based ``Emergency Committee for Atomic Scientists'' organized by Bethe, Condon, Bacher, Urey, Szilard and Weisskopf. Rare Einstein slides will illustrate Dr.Rife's presentation on Albert Einstein's philosophic and ethical convictions about peace, and public stance against war (1914-1950).

  13. Bose-Einstein condensation in microgravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Zoest, T; Gaaloul, N; Singh, Y; Ahlers, H; Herr, W; Seidel, S T; Ertmer, W; Rasel, E; Eckart, M; Kajari, E; Arnold, S; Nandi, G; Schleich, W P; Walser, R; Vogel, A; Sengstock, K; Bongs, K; Lewoczko-Adamczyk, W; Schiemangk, M; Schuldt, T; Peters, A; Könemann, T; Müntinga, H; Lämmerzahl, C; Dittus, H; Steinmetz, T; Hänsch, T W; Reichel, J

    2010-06-18

    Albert Einstein's insight that it is impossible to distinguish a local experiment in a "freely falling elevator" from one in free space led to the development of the theory of general relativity. The wave nature of matter manifests itself in a striking way in Bose-Einstein condensates, where millions of atoms lose their identity and can be described by a single macroscopic wave function. We combine these two topics and report the preparation and observation of a Bose-Einstein condensate during free fall in a 146-meter-tall evacuated drop tower. During the expansion over 1 second, the atoms form a giant coherent matter wave that is delocalized on a millimeter scale, which represents a promising source for matter-wave interferometry to test the universality of free fall with quantum matter.

  14. Approximate radiative solutions of the Einstein equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuusk, P.; Unt, V.

    1976-01-01

    In this paper the external field of a bounded source emitting gravitational radiation is considered. A successive approximation method is used to integrate the Einstein equations in Bondi's coordinates (Bondi et al, Proc. R. Soc.; A269:21 (1962)). A method of separation of angular variables is worked out and the approximate Einstein equations are reduced to key equations. The losses of mass, momentum, and angular momentum due to gravitational multipole radiation are found. It is demonstrated that in the case of proper treatment a real mass occurs instead of a mass aspect in a solution of the Einstein equations. In an appendix Bondi's new function is given in terms of sources. (author)

  15. Static Einstein--Maxwell field equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, A.

    1979-01-01

    The static Einstein--Maxwell field equations are investigated in the presence of both electric and magnetic fields. The sources or bodies are assumed to be of finite size and to not affect the connectivity of the associated space. Furthermore, electromagnetic and metric fields are assumed to have reasonable differentiabilities. It is then proved that the electric and magnetic field vectors are constant multiples of one another. Moreover, the static Einstein--Maxwell equations reduce to the static magnetovac case. If, furthermore, the variational derivation of the Einstein--Maxwell equations is assumed, then both the total electric and magnetic charge of each body must vanish. As a physical consequence it is pointed out that if a suspended magnet be electrically charged then it must experience a purely general relativistic torque

  16. Restricted gravity: Abelian projection of Einstein's theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Y.M.

    2013-01-01

    Treating Einstein's theory as a gauge theory of Lorentz group, we decompose the gravitational connection Γμ into the restricted connection made of the potential of the maximal Abelian subgroup H of Lorentz group G and the valence connection made of G/H part of the potential which transforms covariantly under Lorentz gauge transformation. With this we show that Einstein's theory can be decomposed into the restricted gravity made of the restricted connection which has the full Lorentz gauge invariance which has the valence connection as gravitational source. The decomposition shows the existence of a restricted theory of gravitation which has the full general invariance but is much simpler than Einstein's theory. Moreover, it tells that the restricted gravity can be written as an Abelian gauge theory,

  17. Partially massless graviton on beyond Einstein spacetimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Laura; Deffayet, Cédric; Hinterbichler, Kurt; von Strauss, Mikael

    2017-06-01

    We show that a partially massless graviton can propagate on a large set of spacetimes which are not Einstein spacetimes. Starting from a recently constructed theory for a massive graviton that propagates the correct number of degrees of freedom on an arbitrary spacetime, we first give the full explicit form of the scalar constraint responsible for the absence of a sixth degree of freedom. We then spell out generic conditions for the constraint to be identically satisfied, so that there is a scalar gauge symmetry which makes the graviton partially massless. These simplify if one assumes that spacetime is Ricci symmetric. Under this assumption, we find explicit non-Einstein spacetimes (some, but not all, with vanishing Bach tensors) allowing for the propagation of a partially massless graviton. These include in particular the Einstein static Universe.

  18. Classes of exact Einstein Maxwell solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komathiraj, K.; Maharaj, S. D.

    2007-12-01

    We find new classes of exact solutions to the Einstein Maxwell system of equations for a charged sphere with a particular choice of the electric field intensity and one of the gravitational potentials. The condition of pressure isotropy is reduced to a linear, second order differential equation which can be solved in general. Consequently we can find exact solutions to the Einstein Maxwell field equations corresponding to a static spherically symmetric gravitational potential in terms of hypergeometric functions. It is possible to find exact solutions which can be written explicitly in terms of elementary functions, namely polynomials and product of polynomials and algebraic functions. Uncharged solutions are regainable with our choice of electric field intensity; in particular we generate the Einstein universe for particular parameter values.

  19. Modified Einstein and Navier–Stokes Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulyzhenkov, I. É.

    2018-05-01

    The appearance of inertial rest mass-energy is associated with the kinematic slowing-down of time and with the vortex state of the elementary massive space with zero integral of its kinetic and potential energies. An analog of the Einstein equation is found for moving densities of a non-empty metric space in the concept of the Einstein-Infeld material field. The vector consequences of this tensor equation for a metric medium of overlapping elementary carriers of continuous mass-energies allow us to modify the Navier-Stokes equation under inertial motion of the matter of the nonlocal field in the nonrelativistic limit. The nonlocality of massenergy generates kinematic accelerations of feedback to Newtonian acceleration, which impedes asymptotic divergence of energy fluxes. Stabilization of inertial media by dynamic Bernoulli pressure corresponds to nonlocal self-organization of Einstein-Infeld non-empty space and invalidates Newtonian localization of masses in empty space.

  20. Einstein and interpretation of quantum field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashlyun, F.

    1982-01-01

    The main problems of the quantum theory, the basis of which was laid by Planck in 1900 as a result of the discovery of elementary quantum of action, are examined. The most important Einstein contributions to the quantum theory are enumerated. The Einstein work about the light quanta, proved wave-particle dualism, stated one of the most complicated problems to the physics. The work on the specific heat capacity of solids shows that the quantum theory should be beyond the limits of the narrow range of the problems on black radiation. The works on the equilibrium of radiation have convincingly demonstrates statistical character of the radiation processes and have marked the way to Heizenberg form of the quantum mechanics. Einstein generalized the idea of wave-particle dualism to the ordinary gas. It helped to prepare the Schroedinger form of quantum mechanics

  1. Modified Einstein and Navier-Stokes Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulyzhenkov, I. É.

    2018-05-01

    The appearance of inertial rest mass-energy is associated with the kinematic slowing-down of time and with the vortex state of the elementary massive space with zero integral of its kinetic and potential energies. An analog of the Einstein equation is found for moving densities of a non-empty metric space in the concept of the Einstein-Infeld material field. The vector consequences of this tensor equation for a metric medium of overlapping elementary carriers of continuous mass-energies allow us to modify the Navier-Stokes equation under inertial motion of the matter of the nonlocal field in the nonrelativistic limit. The nonlocality of massenergy generates kinematic accelerations of feedback to Newtonian acceleration, which impedes asymptotic divergence of energy fluxes. Stabilization of inertial media by dynamic Bernoulli pressure corresponds to nonlocal self-organization of Einstein-Infeld non-empty space and invalidates Newtonian localization of masses in empty space.

  2. Hundred years of the Einstein theory of photoeffect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amusia, M.Ya

    2005-01-01

    Full Text:Although H. Hertz discovered the photo-effect experimentally in 1887, the attempts to describe the results obtained in the frame of pre-Einstein theories failed. After publication of Einstein's paper in 1905 the laws of photo-effect became clear, opening new directions in research. The theory of photo-effect has been developed since at first by inclusion of new processes, such as Compton effect, photo-pair production and so on, in which conservation of both energy and momentum plays an equally important role. For many years the atomic photoionization theory was bound to one-electron model, starting with very simple potentials. But even the most sophisticated ones, such as Hartree - Fock approach, failed to describe the experimental findings at the middle of the 60th of the 20th century. It opened the door to the many - electron effects in photoionization. It appeared that along with modification of one-electron picture collective effects are decisively important. The discovery of atomic Giant resonances in photo-effect was a remarkable milestone in atomic photo-effects history. With prediction and observation of other resonances, such as auto-ionization, interference, intra-doublet and phase, the theory included interesting additional physics of electron correlations. Some of these resonances are very well seen in the partial cross-sections, the others require investigation of the dipole and non-dipole angular distribution and photoelectrons spin polarization. A separate domain became the photoionization of two or even three electrons by a single photon, which is until now not completely understood theoretically both in near threshold and in the high photon energy region, where its contribution is much less than that of Compton ionization. The theory of atomic photo-effect is not limited to atoms and ions, both positive and negative. As targets, it considers now multi-atomic formations, such as molecules, fullerenes, and metallic clusters, for all of

  3. Einstein's enigma or black holes in my bubble bath

    CERN Document Server

    Vishveshwara, C V

    2006-01-01

    A funny rendition of the story of gravitation theory from the early historic origins to the developments in astrophysics, focusing on Albert Einstein''s theory of general relativity and black-hole physics.

  4. Fermilab | Science | Questions for the Universe | Einstein's Dream of

    Science.gov (United States)

    newsletter Einstein's Dream of Unified Forces In this Section: Einstein's Dream of Unified Forces Are there dream of an ultimate explanation for everything from the tiniest quanta of particle physics to the

  5. Coherence, Abstraction, and Personal Involvement: Albert Einstein, Physicist and Humanist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ne'eman, Yuval

    1979-01-01

    Reviews Einstein's main contributions to physics, and analyzes the importance of a coherent body of theory. Einstein's involvement in nonscientific issues such as nuclear disarmament is also included. (HM)

  6. Einstein une biographie dessinée

    CERN Document Server

    Maier, Corinne

    2015-01-01

    « Je m'appelle Albert Einstein. En voulant comprendre l'univers, j'ai libéré des forces de destruction terrifiantes. Mais il faut continuer à chercher le grand secret du cosmos. » Albert Einstein (1879-1955) est un immense génie devenu, sans le vouloir, une star de la science. Avec ses théories de la relativité restreinte puis de la relativité générale, il a radicalement transformé nos vies. Voici le récit de son existence passionnée et de ses contributions fondamentales.

  7. Einstein and general relativity: historical perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandrasekhar, S.

    1978-01-01

    The place of Einstein in 20th-century physics is discussed. The basic ideas that led Einstein to his theory of gravitation by the sheer power of speculative thought are described in the most general terms. The prediction of the bending of starlight by the Sun and the eclipse expedition of 1919 are recounted. The author feels that ''the general theory of relativity is incredibly rich in its content;...one finds a glittering face at almost every turn.'' The prediction of black holes by general relativity is noted

  8. Mathematical implications of Einstein-Weyl causality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borchers, H.J.; Sen, R.N.

    2006-01-01

    The present work is the first systematic attempt at answering the following fundamental question: what mathematical structures does Einstein-Weyl causality impose on a point-set that has no other previous structure defined on it? The authors propose an axiomatization of Einstein-Weyl causality (inspired by physics), and investigate the topological and uniform structures that it implies. Their final result is that a causal space is densely embedded in one that is locally a differentiable manifold. The mathematical level required of the reader is that of the graduate student in mathematical physics. (orig.)

  9. Actuality of the Einstein theory of gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanenko, D.D.

    1982-01-01

    Problems of actuality of the Einstein theory of gravitation are lightened. The great Einstein theory of gravitation is shown to remain a reliable base of understanding of modern physical world pattern and its inevitable further inexhaustible precising. The main GRT difficulties are enumirated: determination of reference systems, presence of singularities in the theory, absence of consistent determination of the gravity energy, impossibility of accounting the relations between atomic, gravitational and cosmological characteristics. The attention is paid to gauge, twistor problems and to unified interaction theory. The great contribution of the soviet science in the theory of gravitation is stressed

  10. Beyond Einstein: Exploring the Extreme Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbier, Louis M.

    2005-01-01

    This paper will give an overview of the NASA Universe Division Beyond Einstein program. The Beyond Einstein program consists of a series of exploratory missions to investigate some of the most important and pressing problems in modern-day astrophysics - including searches for Dark Energy and studies of the earliest times in the universe, during the inflationary period after the Big Bang. A variety of new technologies are being developed both in the science instrumentation these missions will carry and in the spacecraft that will carry those instruments.

  11. Bohr vs. Einstein: Fortolkning af kvantemekanikken

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Christian Kraglund; Wade, Andrew Christopher James

    2013-01-01

    Siden 1913, da Bohr fremlagde sin kvantemekaniske model for atomet, har fysikere diskuteret, hvordan kvan- temekanikken skal fortolkes. Specielt aktive i denne diskussion var Bohr og Einstein, som havde modstridende opfattelser af, hvordan kvantemekanikken skulle forstås. Kan katte være både...... levende og døde på samme tid? Kan vi teleportere partikler mellem Månen og Jorden? Disse spørgsmål, og mange flere, forsøgte Bohr og Einstein at besvare, og det vil vi ligeledes i denne artikel....

  12. Einstein and a century of time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raine, D. J.

    2005-09-01

    In a world overabundant in information, a subject is defined by its iconography. Physics is the falling apple, the planetary atom, the laser, the mushroom cloud and the image of the later Einstein - images that represent, respectively, gravity, atomic theory, quantum theory, mass-energy and the scientist who had a hand in all four. It is therefore appropriate that World Year of Physics is called Einstein Year in the UK. Of course one can argue that progress in science depends on the contributions of many people; that there are other geniuses in physics, even some colourful personalities. Nevertheless there are fundamental reasons why Einstein's early achievements stand out even in their company. When at last the thought came to him that 'time itself was suspect', Einstein had found a new insight into the nature of the physical universe. It is this: that the universal properties of material objects tell us about the nature of space and time, and it is through these properties, not philosophical logic or common sense, that we discover the structure of spacetime. The later Einstein turned this successful formula on its head and sought to use the properties of spacetime to define those of material objects, thereby seeking to abolish matter entirely in favour of geometry. Before I introduce this special feature of European Journal of Physics I will say a few words about what is not here. Like all great geniuses Einstein can be seen as the climax of what went before him and the initiation of what was to follow. Looking back we can see the influence of Mach's positivism, according to which the role of science is to relate observations to other observations; hence only observations can tell us what is 'real'. But Einstein also grew up with the family electromechanical businesses, which testifies to the reality of the Maxwellian electromagnetic fields: thus only theory can tell us what is real! As is well known, Einstein himself refused to accept the full consequences of

  13. Bose-Einstein correlation of particles produced by expanding sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hama, Y.; Padula, S.S.

    1988-01-01

    Bose-Einstein correlation is discussed for particles produced by rapidly expanding sources, when kinematical effects hinder a direct relation between the observed correlations and the source dimensions. Some of these effects are illustrated by considering Landau's hydrodynamical model wherein each space-time point of the fluid with temperature T = T/sub c/≅m/sub π/ is taken as an independent and chaotic emitting center with a Planck spectral distribution. In particular, this model reproduces surprisingly well the observed π-π and K-K correlations at the CERN ISR

  14. On Einstein's kinematics and his derivation of Lorentz transformation equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulati, Shobha; Gulati, S.P.

    1981-01-01

    Recently the present authors have claimed that Einstein's historic derivation of 1905 of Lorentz transformation equations is a 'howler' - a correct result achieved through some incorrect steps. In the present contribution, this howler is fully resolved. Incidently, Einstein's kinematical considerations are found to be void of any new definitional elements or conventionality as unjustifiably claimed by Einstein and some other scientists. (author)

  15. Ethic and Evolution in Boltzmann's and Einstein's Thought

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broda, E.

    1980-01-01

    In physics and to a large extent in epistomology, Einstein was the natural successor to Boltzmann. But while Boltzmann was an ardent evolutionist, Einstein cared little for biology. Boltzmann applied Darwinian principles also to ethics, but remained aloof from politics. In contrast, Einstein's morality, though expressed in magnificent and selfless activity, lacked a firm theoretical basis. (author)

  16. Ethic and Evolution in Boltzmann's and Einstein's Thought

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broda, E.

    1980-07-01

    In physics and to a large extent in epistomology, Einstein was the natural successor to Boltzmann. But while Boltzmann was an ardent evolutionist, Einstein cared little for biology. Boltzmann applied Darwinian principles also to ethics, but remained aloof from politics. In contrast, Einstein's morality, though expressed in magnificent and selfless activity, lacked a firm theoretical basis. (author)

  17. Conceptual Development of Einstein's Mass-Energy Relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Chee Leong; Yap, Kueh Chin

    2005-01-01

    Einstein's special theory of relativity was published in 1905. It stands as one of the greatest intellectual achievements in the history of human thought. Einstein described the equivalence of mass and energy as "the most important upshot of the special theory of relativity" (Einstein, 1919). In this paper, we will discuss the evolution of the…

  18. Einstein 1905-1955: His Approach to Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damour, Thibault

    We review Einstein's epistemological conceptions, and indicate their philosophical roots. The particular importance of the ideas of Hume, Kant, Mach, and Poincaré is highlighted. The specific characteristics of Einstein's approach to physics are underlined. Lastly, we consider the practical application of Einstein's methodological principles to the two theories of relativity, and to quantum theory. We emphasize a Kantian approach to quantum theory.

  19. Die Leben Einsteins eine Reise durch die Geschichte der Physik

    CERN Document Server

    Fiami

    2005-01-01

    Jeder kennt die Namen Einstein, Newton oder Galilei. aber was weiss man über sie? Hier ein Porträt Einsteins anhand von sechs Meilensteinen aus der Geschichte der Physik. Einstein tritt auf als Protagonist in verschiedenen Epochen und bei verschiedenen Entdeckungen, die die Welt verändert haben.

  20. Horizon structure of rotating Einstein-Born-Infeld black holes and shadow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atamurotov, Farruh [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Tashkent (Uzbekistan); Inha University in Tashkent, Tashkent (Uzbekistan); Ulugh Beg Astronomical Institute, Tashkent (Uzbekistan); National University of Uzbekistan, Tashkent (Uzbekistan); Ghosh, Sushant G. [Jamia Millia Islamia, Centre for Theoretical Physics, New Delhi (India); University of Kwa-Zulu-Natal, Astrophysics and Cosmology Research Unit, School of Mathematical Sciences, Private Bag 54001, Durban (South Africa); Ahmedov, Bobomurat [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Tashkent (Uzbekistan); Ulugh Beg Astronomical Institute, Tashkent (Uzbekistan); National University of Uzbekistan, Tashkent (Uzbekistan)

    2016-05-15

    We investigate the horizon structure of the rotating Einstein-Born-Infeld solution which goes over to the Einstein-Maxwell's Kerr-Newman solution as the Born-Infeld parameter goes to infinity (β → ∞). We find that for a given β, mass M, and charge Q, there exist a critical spinning parameter a{sub E} and r{sub H}{sup E}, which corresponds to an extremal Einstein-Born-Infeld black hole with degenerate horizons, and a{sub E} decreases and r{sub H}{sup E} increases with increase of the Born-Infeld parameter β, while a < a{sub E} describes a non-extremal Einstein-Born-Infeld black hole with outer and inner horizons. Similarly, the effect of β on the infinite redshift surface and in turn on the ergo-region is also included. It is well known that a black hole can cast a shadow as an optical appearance due to its strong gravitational field. We also investigate the shadow cast by the both static and rotating Einstein-Born-Infeld black hole and demonstrate that the null geodesic equations can be integrated, which allows us to investigate the shadow cast by a black hole which is found to be a dark zone covered by a circle. Interestingly, the shadow of an Einstein-Born-Infeld black hole is slightly smaller than for the Reissner-Nordstrom black hole, which consists of concentric circles, for different values of the Born-Infeld parameter β, whose radius decreases with increase of the value of the parameter β. Finally, we have studied observable distortion parameter for shadow of the rotating Einstein-Born-Infeld black hole. (orig.)

  1. Horizon structure of rotating Einstein-Born-Infeld black holes and shadow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atamurotov, Farruh; Ghosh, Sushant G.; Ahmedov, Bobomurat

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the horizon structure of the rotating Einstein-Born-Infeld solution which goes over to the Einstein-Maxwell's Kerr-Newman solution as the Born-Infeld parameter goes to infinity (β → ∞). We find that for a given β, mass M, and charge Q, there exist a critical spinning parameter a E and r H E , which corresponds to an extremal Einstein-Born-Infeld black hole with degenerate horizons, and a E decreases and r H E increases with increase of the Born-Infeld parameter β, while a < a E describes a non-extremal Einstein-Born-Infeld black hole with outer and inner horizons. Similarly, the effect of β on the infinite redshift surface and in turn on the ergo-region is also included. It is well known that a black hole can cast a shadow as an optical appearance due to its strong gravitational field. We also investigate the shadow cast by the both static and rotating Einstein-Born-Infeld black hole and demonstrate that the null geodesic equations can be integrated, which allows us to investigate the shadow cast by a black hole which is found to be a dark zone covered by a circle. Interestingly, the shadow of an Einstein-Born-Infeld black hole is slightly smaller than for the Reissner-Nordstrom black hole, which consists of concentric circles, for different values of the Born-Infeld parameter β, whose radius decreases with increase of the value of the parameter β. Finally, we have studied observable distortion parameter for shadow of the rotating Einstein-Born-Infeld black hole. (orig.)

  2. You err, Einstein.. Newton, Einstein, Heisenberg, and Feynman discuss quantum physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritzsch, Harald

    2008-01-01

    Harald Fritzsch and his star physicists Einstein, Heisenberg, and Feynman explain the central concept of nowadays physics, quantum mechanics, without it nothing goes in modern world. And the great Isaac newton puts the questions, which all would put

  3. Some Einstein spaces and their global properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siklos, S.T.C.

    1981-01-01

    The global structure of a class of Einstein spaces is investigated. These spaces have algebraically special Weyl tensors and contain homogeneous hypersurfaces. It is found that they display simple examples of a variety of interesting configuration involving horizons and singularities. (author)

  4. Einstein and Infeld, Seen Through Their Correspondence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stachel, J.

    1999-01-01

    On the basis of material in the Einstein Archive and Infeld's writings, the story of their relationship between 1920 and 1955 is reconstructed. While the scientific side of their early contacts and later collaboration is discussed, the major emphasis is placed on the development of their personal relations, and their comments on various social, cultural and political questions. (author)

  5. The Excellence of Einstein's Theory of Gravitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirac, P. A. M.

    1979-01-01

    This article is adapted from a presentation made in 1978 at the symposium on the Impact of Modern Scientific Ideas on Society organized by UNESCO in Ulm, West Germany. It discusses Einstein's theory of gravitation and how it started a new line of activity for physicists. (HM)

  6. Einstein's lessons for energy accounting in LCA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frischknccht, Rolf; Heijungs, Reinout; Hofstetter, Patrick

    1998-01-01

    The role and meaning of accounting for energy, including feedstock energy, is reviewed in connection to Einstein's special theory of relativity. It is argued that there is only one unambiguous interpretation of the term energy-content: The one that corresponds to mc2. The implications for life cycle

  7. Einstein and the Special Theory of Relativity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    some detail how Einstein evolved this theory and get a glimpse of his unique ... The Principle of Relativity: The laws of physics are the same in all inertial frames. .... ing on the railway platform will see them occur at different places. However ...

  8. [Albert Einstein and his abdominal aortic aneurysm].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervantes Castro, Jorge

    2011-01-01

    The interesting case of Albert Einstein's abdominal aortic aneurysm is presented. He was operated on at age 69 and, finding that the large aneurysm could not be removed, the surgeon elected to wrap it with cellophane to prevent its growth. However, seven years later the aneurysm ruptured and caused the death of the famous scientist.

  9. Albert Einstein, guide spirituel du CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Sandraz, Raphaël

    2005-01-01

    The year 2005, proclaimed "World year of Physics" by UNESCO, dedicates the 100th anniversary of the theory of relativity and the 50th anniversary of the death of his discoverer: Albert Einstein. The CERN in Geneva applies every day his theories (1 page)

  10. Albert Einstein and the Quantum Riddle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lande, Alfred

    1974-01-01

    Derives a systematic structure contributing to the solution of the quantum riddle in Einstein's sense by deducing quantum mechanics from the postulates of symmetry, correspondence, and covariance. Indicates that the systematic presentation is in agreement with quantum mechanics established by Schroedinger, Born, and Heisenberg. (CC)

  11. On Einstein's opponents, and other crackpots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dongen, J.A.E.F.

    2010-01-01

    Einsteins Gegner: Die öffentliche Kontroverse um die Relativitätstheorie in den 1920er Jahren, Milena Wazeck. Campus Verlag, pp. 429, EUR 39.90. ISBN: 978-3593389141 “This world is a strange madhouse. Currently, every coachman and every waiter is debating whether relativity theory is correct. Belief

  12. New Information about Albert Einstein's Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, Dean

    2009-01-01

    In order to glean information about hominin (or other) brains that no longer exist, details of external neuroanatomy that are reproduced on endocranial casts (endocasts) from fossilized braincases may be described and interpreted. Despite being, of necessity, speculative, such studies can be very informative when conducted in light of the literature on comparative neuroanatomy, paleontology, and functional imaging studies. Albert Einstein's brain no longer exists in an intact state, but there are photographs of it in various views. Applying techniques developed from paleoanthropology, previously unrecognized details of external neuroanatomy are identified on these photographs. This information should be of interest to paleoneurologists, comparative neuroanatomists, historians of science, and cognitive neuroscientists. The new identifications of cortical features should also be archived for future scholars who will have access to additional information from improved functional imaging technology. Meanwhile, to the extent possible, Einstein's cerebral cortex is investigated in light of available data about variation in human sulcal patterns. Although much of his cortical surface was unremarkable, regions in and near Einstein's primary somatosensory and motor cortices were unusual. It is possible that these atypical aspects of Einstein's cerebral cortex were related to the difficulty with which he acquired language, his preference for thinking in sensory impressions including visual images rather than words, and his early training on the violin.

  13. The Foundations of Einstein's Theory of Gravitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freundlich, Erwin; Brose, Translated by Henry L.; Einstein, Preface by Albert; Turner, Introduction by H. H.

    2011-06-01

    Introduction; 1. The special theory of relativity as a stepping-stone to the general theory of relativity; 2. Two fundamental postulates in the mathematical formulation of physical laws; 3. Concerning the fulfilment of the two postulates; 4. The difficulties in the principles of classical mechanics; 5. Einstein's theory of gravitation; 6. The verification of the new theory by actual experience; Appendix; Index.

  14. Soliton resonance in bose-einstein condensate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zak, Michail; Kulikov, I.

    2002-01-01

    A new phenomenon in nonlinear dispersive systems, including a Bose-Einstein Condensate (BEC), has been described. It is based upon a resonance between an externally induced soliton and 'eigen-solitons' of the homogeneous cubic Schrodinger equation. There have been shown that a moving source of positive /negative potential induces bright /dark solitons in an attractive / repulsive Bose condensate.

  15. Traffic disruption route Einstein near building 170

    CERN Multimedia

    A Lopez - TS/CE

    2005-01-01

    The TS/CE Group informs you that, for the duration of the work at Building 170, there may be some disruption to traffic on route Einstein in the vicinity of Building 170. The work is due to take place from the 14th to 18th February. For more information, please contact 165029. A. Lopez TS/CE

  16. Skyrmion physics in Bose-Einstein ferromagnets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Al Khawaja, U.; Stoof, H.T.C.

    2001-01-01

    We show that a ferromagnetic Bose-Einstein condensate has not only line-like vortex excitations, but in general, also allows for pointlike topological excitations, i.e., skyrmions. We discuss the thermodynamic stability and the dynamic properties of these skyrmions for both spin-1/2 and

  17. Einstein and the Special Theory of Relativity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    picture books for children. Supurna Sinha ... no contact with other contemporary great thinkers. This isolation ... do not remember if I knew of it at all when I wrote my first paper .... words of R S Shankland: "I asked Professor Einstein how long.

  18. Albert Einstein the roads to pacifism

    CERN Document Server

    Anta, Claudio Giulio

    2017-01-01

    Albert Einstein (1879-1955) is universally known as the father of the theory of relativity; however, he was also one of the most eminent pacifists of the first half of the twentieth century. Through his active, pragmatic and nuanced breed of pacifism, he sought to confront the dilemmas and problems of his time.

  19. Albert Einstein: Radical Pacifist and Democrat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaraman, T.

    We draw attention here to the radical political grounding of Einstein's pacifism. We also drescribe some less commonly known aspects of his commitment to civil liberties, particularly in the context of the anti-l hysteria and anti-racism current in the United States of the late 1940s and 1950s. We also examine briefly his views on socialism.

  20. Bose-Einstein correlations between kaons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akesson, T.; Batley, R.; Breuker, H.; Dam, P.; Eidelman, S.; Fabian, C.W.; Frandsen, P.; Goerlach, U.; Heck, B.; Hilke, H.J.; Jeffreys, P.; Kalinovsky, A.; Kesseler, G.; Lans, J. van der; Lindsay, J.; Markou, A.; Mjoernmark, U.; Nielsen, B.S.; Olsen, L.H.; Rosselet, L.; Rosso, E.; Rudge, A.; Schindler, R.; Willis, W.J.; Witzeling, W.; Albrow, M.G.; Cockerill, D.; Evans, W.M.; Gibson, M.; Hiddleston, J.; MacCubbin, N.A.; Williamson, J.; Benary, O.; Dagan, S.; Lissauer, D.; Oren, Y.; Boeggild, H.; Botner, O.; Dahl-Jensen, E.; Dahl-Jensen, I.; Damgaard, G.; Hansen, K.H.; Hooper, J.; Moeller, R.; Brody, H.; Frankel, S.; Frati, W.; Molzon, W.; Vella, E.; Zajc, W.A.; Burkert, V.; Carter, J.R.; Cecil, P.; Chung, S.U.; Gordon, H.; Ludlam, T.; Winik, M.; Woody, C.; Cleland, W.E.; Kroeger, R.; Sullivan, M.; Thompson, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    Bose-Einstein correlations between identical charged kaons are observed in αα, pp, and panti p collisions at the CERN Intersecting Storage Rings. The average radial extension of the K-emitting region is found to be (2.4+-0.9) fm. (orig.)

  1. Type III Einstein-Yang-Mills solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fuster, A.; Holten, van J.W.

    2005-01-01

    Exact solutions of Einstein equations have always attracted much attention. It is somewhat surprising to find exact solutions of such nonlinear equations. Many of them were collected in the by now classic book by Kramer et al. which has recently been revised [1]. Among others one finds the

  2. Einstein Slew Survey: Data analysis innovations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elvis, Martin S.; Plummer, David; Schachter, Jonathan F.; Fabbiano, G.

    1992-01-01

    Several new methods were needed in order to make the Einstein Slew X-ray Sky Survey. The innovations which enabled the Slew Survey to be done are summarized. These methods included experimental approach to large projects, parallel processing on a LAN, percolation source detection, minimum action identifications, and rapid dissemination of the whole data base.

  3. The Einstein All-Sky Slew Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elvis, Martin S.

    1992-01-01

    The First Einstein IPC Slew Survey produced a list of 819 x-ray sources, with f(sub x) approximately 10(exp -12) - 10(exp -10) erg/sq cm s and positional accuracy of approximately 1.2 feet (90 percent radius). The aim of this program was to identify these x-ray sources.

  4. Einstein Observations of Galactic supernova remnants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seward, Frederick D.

    1990-01-01

    This paper summarizes the observations of Galactic supernova remnants with the imaging detectors of the Einstein Observatory. X-ray surface brightness contours of 47 remnants are shown together with gray-scale pictures. Count rates for these remnants have been derived and are listed for the HRI, IPC, and MPC detectors.

  5. Exact solutions of Einstein and Einstein-Maxwell equations in higher-dimensional spacetime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Dianyan; Beijing Univ., BJ

    1988-01-01

    The D-dimensional Schwarzschild-de Sitter metric and Reissner-Nordstrom-de-Sitter metric are derived directly by solving the Einstein and Einstein-Maxwell equations. The D-dimensional Kerr metric is rederived by using the complex coordinate transformation method and the D-dimensional Kerr-de Sitter metric is also given. The conjecture about the D-dimensional metric of a rotating charged mass is given at the end of this paper. (author)

  6. Investigation of the Bose–Einstein condensation based on fractality using fractional mathematics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Şirin, Hüseyin; Ertik, Hüseyin; Büyükkiliç, Fevzi; Demirhan, Doğan

    2010-01-01

    Although atomic Bose gases are investigated in the dilute gas regime, the physical properties of the Bose–Einstein condensates are affected by interparticle interactions and the fractal nature of the space where the Bose systems are evolving. Theoretical predictions of the traditional Bose–Einstein thermostatistics do not account for the deviations from the experimental results, which are related to internal energy, specific heat, transition temperature, etc. On the other hand, in this study, fractional calculus is introduced where effects of the fractality of space are taken into account. Meanwhile, the order of the fractional derivative α is handled as a measure of the fractality of space. In this content, some improvements which take into account the effects of the fractal nature of the system are made in the standard physical results of the Bose–Einstein condensation phenomena. As an example, for the dilute atomic gas 7 Li, the measured transition temperature of Bose–Einstein condensation could be obtained for the value of α ≈ 0.976, and one could predict that the interparticle interactions have a weak attractive nature consistent with experiment (Bradley et al 1995 Phys. Rev. Lett. 75 1687). Thus, a fractional mathematical theory is established in coherence with experimental results of Bose–Einstein condensation

  7. Piecewise linear manifolds: Einstein metrics and Ricci flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schrader, Robert

    2016-01-01

    This article provides an attempt to extend concepts from the theory of Riemannian manifolds to piecewise linear (p.l.) spaces. In particular we propose an analogue of the Ricci tensor, which we give the name of an Einstein vector field . On a given set of p.l. spaces we define and discuss (normalized) Einstein flows. p.l. Einstein metrics are defined and examples are provided. Criteria for flows to approach Einstein metrics are formulated. Second variations of the total scalar curvature at a specific Einstein space are calculated. (paper)

  8. Interprofessional student education: exchange program between Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Pacific College of Oriental Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Belinda J; Herron, Patrick D; Downie, Sherry A; Myers, Daniel C; Milan, Felise B; Olson, Todd R; Kligler, Ben E; Sierpina, Victor S; Kreitzer, Mary Jo

    2012-01-01

    The growing popularity of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), of which estimated 38% of adults in the United States used in 2007, has engendered changes in medical school curricula to increase students' awareness of it. Exchange programs between conventional medical schools and CAM institutions are recognized as an effective method of interprofessional education. The exchange program between Albert Einstein College of Medicine (Einstein, Yeshiva University) and Pacific College of Oriental Medicine, New York campus (PCOM-NY) is in its fifth year and is part of a broader relationship between the schools encompassing research, clinical training, interinstitutional faculty and board appointments, and several educational activities. The Einstein/PCOM-NY student education exchange program is part of the Einstein Introduction to Clinical Medicine Program and involves students from Einstein learning about Chinese medicine through a lecture, the experience of having acupuncture, and a four-hour preceptorship at the PCOM outpatient clinic. The students from PCOM learn about allopathic medicine training through an orientation lecture, a two-and-a-half-hour dissection laboratory session along side Einstein student hosts, and a tour of the clinical skills center at the Einstein campus. In the 2011/2012 offering of the exchange program, the participating Einstein and PCOM students were surveyed to assess the educational outcomes. The data indicate that the exchange program was highly valued by all students and provided a unique learning experience. Survey responses from the Einstein students indicated the need for greater emphasis on referral information, which has been highlighted in the literature as an important medical curriculum integrative medicine competency. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Quantum criticality in Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen, Wen-Yu

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the quantum Lifshitz criticality in a general background of Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton gravity. In particular, we demonstrate the existence of critical point with dynamic critical exponent z by tuning a nonminimal coupling to its critical value. We also study the effect of nonminimal coupling and exponent z to the Efimov states and holographic RG flow in the overcritical region. We have found that the nonminimal coupling increases the instability for a probe scalar to condensate and its back reaction is discussed. At last, we give a quantum mechanics treatment to a solvable system with z=2, and comment for generic z>2.

  10. Observation of Faraday Waves in a Bose-Einstein Condensate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engels, P.; Atherton, C.; Hoefer, M. A.

    2007-01-01

    Faraday waves in a cigar-shaped Bose-Einstein condensate are created. It is shown that periodically modulating the transverse confinement, and thus the nonlinear interactions in the BEC, excites small amplitude longitudinal oscillations through a parametric resonance. It is also demonstrated that even without the presence of a continuous drive, an initial transverse breathing mode excitation of the condensate leads to spontaneous pattern formation in the longitudinal direction. Finally, the effects of strongly driving the transverse breathing mode with large amplitude are investigated. In this case, impact-oscillator behavior and intriguing nonlinear dynamics, including the gradual emergence of multiple longitudinal modes, are observed

  11. Einstein SSS+MPC observations of Seyfert type galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, S. S.; Turner, T. J.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Weaver, K.

    1989-01-01

    The X-ray spectra of 27 Seyfert galaxies measured with the Solid State Spectrometer (SSS) onboard the Einstein Observatory is investigated. This new investigation features the utilization of simultaneous data from the Monitor Proportional Counter (MPC) and automatic correction for systematic effects in the SSS. The new results are that the best-fit single power law indices agree with those previously reported, but that soft excesses are inferred for at least 20 percent of the measured spectra. The soft excesses are consistent with either an approximately 0.25 keV black body or Fe-L line emission.

  12. The Maxwell-Einstein system, Ward identities and the Vilkovisky construction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, N. K.

    2012-01-01

    The gauge fixing dependence of the one-loop effective action of quantum gravity in the proper-time representation is investigated for a space of arbitrary curvature, and the investigation is extended to Maxwell-Einstein theory. The construction of Vilkovisky and DeWitt for removal of this depende......The gauge fixing dependence of the one-loop effective action of quantum gravity in the proper-time representation is investigated for a space of arbitrary curvature, and the investigation is extended to Maxwell-Einstein theory. The construction of Vilkovisky and DeWitt for removal...

  13. Einstein-Rosen 'bridge' needs lightlike brane source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guendelman, Eduardo; Kaganovich, Alexander; Nissimov, Emil; Pacheva, Svetlana

    2009-01-01

    The Einstein-Rosen 'bridge' wormhole solution proposed in the classic paper (Einstein and Rosen (1935) ) does not satisfy the vacuum Einstein equations at the wormhole throat. We show that the fully consistent formulation of the original Einstein-Rosen 'bridge' requires solving Einstein equations of bulk D=4 gravity coupled to a lightlike brane with a well-defined world-volume action. The non-vanishing contribution of Einstein-Rosen 'bridge' solution to the right-hand side of Einstein equations at the throat matches precisely the surface stress-energy tensor of the lightlike brane which automatically occupies the throat ('horizon straddling') - a feature triggered by the world-volume lightlike brane dynamics.

  14. q-deformed Einstein's model to describe specific heat of solid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guha, Atanu; Das, Prasanta Kumar

    2018-04-01

    Realistic phenomena can be described more appropriately using generalized canonical ensemble, with proper parameter sets involved. We have generalized the Einstein's theory for specific heat of solid in Tsallis statistics, where the temperature fluctuation is introduced into the theory via the fluctuation parameter q. At low temperature the Einstein's curve of the specific heat in the nonextensive Tsallis scenario exactly lies on the experimental data points. Consequently this q-modified Einstein's curve is found to be overlapping with the one predicted by Debye. Considering only the temperature fluctuation effect(even without considering more than one mode of vibration is being triggered) we found that the CV vs T curve is as good as obtained by considering the different modes of vibration as suggested by Debye. Generalizing the Einstein's theory in Tsallis statistics we found that a unique value of the Einstein temperature θE along with a temperature dependent deformation parameter q(T) , can well describe the phenomena of specific heat of solid i.e. the theory is equivalent to Debye's theory with a temperature dependent θD.

  15. Gravity: An Introduction to Einstein's General Relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabris, Julio C

    2004-01-01

    General relativity is one of the cornerstones of modern physics. In spite of this, the teaching of general relativity at undergraduate level remains quite marginal. The reasons for this particular situation are quite well known. We can quote, for example, two of them: general relativity requires specific mathematical tools that are somehow outside the mainstream of undergraduate technical development; moreover, this is a branch of physics whose observational and experimental applications have remained rare until recent times, and even though this scenario has changed dramatically in the last few years, the new situation has not yet been absorbed into undergraduate teaching. In this new book, Hartle attempts to address the difficulties that must be faced by anyone who teaches general relativity at undergraduate level. In order to not scare the student with the hard technical preparation needed to obtain the basic equations of general relativity, Einstein's equations, he simply gives up the idea of introducing these equations at the very beginning. Instead, he chooses to present Einstein's equations, with most of the mathematics needed to do them, in the last part of the book. This delicate (and of course dangerous) choice has the advantage of introducing the reader first to the physical aspects of general relativity. This approach can be dangerous because the relevant solutions of the equations necessary to discuss the physical content of general relativity are presented first without a formal derivation. The book is divided into three parts. In the first, covering five chapters of the 24 in the whole book, Newtonian physics and special relativity are reviewed. This review is done in a manner that prepares the reader for the subsequent discussion of general relativity itself. The principle of relativity, the variational principle, the geometrical content of Newtonian theory and the main ideas behind special relativity are all presented. The heart of the book is, in

  16. Optical analog of the Iordanskii force in a Bose-Einstein condensate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonhardt, U.; Oehberg, P.

    2003-01-01

    A vortex in a Bose-Einstein condensate generates the optical analog of the Aharonov-Bohm effect when illuminated with slow light. In contrast to the original Aharonov-Bohm effect the vortex will exchange forces with the light that leads to a measurable motion of the vortex

  17. Optical Analog of the Iordanskii Force in a Bose-Einstein Condensate

    OpenAIRE

    Leonhardt, U.; Ohberg, P.

    2001-01-01

    A vortex in a Bose-Einstein condensate generates the optical analog of the Aharonov-Bohm effect when illuminated with slow light. In contrast to the original Aharonov-Bohm effect the vortex will exchange forces with the light that lead to a measurable motion of the vortex.

  18. Perturbations and quasi-normal modes of black holes in Einstein-Aether theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konoplya, R.A.; Zhidenko, A.

    2007-01-01

    We develop a new method for calculation of quasi-normal modes of black holes, when the effective potential, which governs black hole perturbations, is known only numerically in some region near the black hole. This method can be applied to perturbations of a wide class of numerical black hole solutions. We apply it to the black holes in the Einstein-Aether theory, a theory where general relativity is coupled to a unit time-like vector field, in order to observe local Lorentz symmetry violation. We found that in the non-reduced Einstein-Aether theory, real oscillation frequency and damping rate of quasi-normal modes are larger than those of Schwarzschild black holes in the Einstein theory

  19. Study of Bose-Einstein correlations in e+e-→W+W- events at LEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbiendi, G.; Aimsley, C.; Aakesson, C.

    2004-01-01

    Bose-Einstein correlations between like-sign charged-particle pairs in e + e - →W + W - events recorded with the OPAL detector at LEP at centre-of-mass energies between 183 GeV and 209 GeV are studied. Recently proposed methods which allow direct searches for correlations in the data via distributions of test variables are used to investigate the presence of correlations between hadrons originating from different W bosons in W + W - →q anti qq anti q events. Within the statistics of the data sample no evidence for inter-WW Bose-Einstein correlations is obtained. The data are also compared with predictions of a recent implementation of Bose-Einstein correlation effects in the Monte Carlo model PYTHIA. (orig.)

  20. New facets of the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen paradox from elementary particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Home, Dipankar

    1988-01-01

    It is pointed out that the K 0 anti-K 0 and B 0 anti-B 0 systems provide a new arena for exploring the intricacies of the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) type example. This also provides clues for experimental discrimination between quantum mechanics and local realism. Consideration of the effect of CP non-invariance in the conext of such systems leads to the intriguing possibility, at least in principle, of an incompatibility between quantum mechanics and Einstein's locality condition at the statistical level. This calls for further investigations to clarify the subtleties involved. (author). 22 refs

  1. Cosmological reconstruction and Om diagnostic analysis of Einstein-Aether theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasqua, Antonio [Department of Physics, University of Trieste, Via Valerio 2, 34127 Trieste (Italy); Chattopadhyay, Surajit [Pailan College of Management and Technology, Bengal Pailan Park, Kolkata-700 104 (India); Momeni, Davood; Myrzakulov, Ratbay [Eurasian International Center for Theoretical Physics and Department of General and Theoretical Physics, Eurasian National University, Astana 010008 (Kazakhstan); Raza, Muhammad [Department of Mathematics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Sahiwal 57000 (Pakistan); Faizal, Mir, E-mail: toto.pasqua@gmail.com, E-mail: surajcha@iucaa.ernet.in, E-mail: d.momeni@yahoo.com, E-mail: mraza@zju.edu.cn, E-mail: rmyrzakulov@gmail.com, E-mail: mirfaizalmir@gmail.com [Irving K. Barber School of Arts and Sciences, University of British Columbia—Okanagan, Kelowna, British Columbia V1V 1V7 (Canada)

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, we analyze the cosmological models in Einstein-Aether gravity, which is a modified theory of gravity in which a time-like vector field breaks the Lorentz symmetry. We use this formalism to analyse different cosmological models with different behavior of the scale factor. In this analysis, we use a certain functional dependence of the Dark Energy (DE) on the Hubble parameter H . It will be demonstrated that the Aether vector field has a non-trivial effect on these cosmological models. We also perform the Om diagnostic in Einstein-Aether gravity and we fit the parameters of the cosmological models using recent observational data.

  2. The Origin of Gravitational Lensing: A Postscript to Einstein's 1936 Science Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renn; Sauer; Stachel

    1997-01-10

    Gravitational lensing, now taken as an important astrophysical consequence of the general theory of relativity, was found even before this theory was formulated but was discarded as a speculative idea without any chance of empirical confirmation. Reconstruction of some of Einstein's research notes dating back to 1912 reveals that he explored the possibility of gravitational lensing 3 years before completing his general theory of relativity. On the basis of preliminary insights into this theory, Einstein had already derived the basic features of the lensing effect. When he finally published the very same results 24 years later, it was only in response to prodding by an amateur scientist.

  3. Stability of the graviton Bose–Einstein condensate in the brane-world

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casadio, Roberto, E-mail: casadio@bo.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Bologna, via Irnerio 46, 40126 Bologna (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Bologna, viale B. Pichat 6, 40127 Bologna (Italy); Rocha, Roldão da, E-mail: roldao.rocha@ufabc.edu.br [CMCC, Universidade Federal do ABC, 09210-580, Santo André, SP (Brazil)

    2016-12-10

    We consider a solution of the effective four-dimensional Einstein equations, obtained from the general relativistic Schwarzschild metric through the principle of Minimal Geometric Deformation (MGD). Since the brane tension can, in general, introduce new singularities on a relativistic Eötvös brane model in the MGD framework, we require the absence of observed singularities, in order to constrain the brane tension. We then study the corresponding Bose–Einstein condensate (BEC) gravitational system and determine the critical stability region of BEC MGD stellar configurations. Finally, the critical stellar densities are shown to be related with critical points of the information entropy.

  4. Equivalence of Einstein and Jordan frames in quantized anisotropic cosmological models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Sachin; Pal, Sridip; Banerjee, Narayan

    2018-06-01

    The present work shows that the mathematical equivalence of the Jordan frame and its conformally transformed version, the Einstein frame, so as far as Brans-Dicke theory is concerned, survives a quantization of cosmological models, arising as solutions to the Brans-Dicke theory. We work with the Wheeler-deWitt quantization scheme and take up quite a few anisotropic cosmological models as examples. We effectively show that the transformation from the Jordan to the Einstein frame is a canonical one and hence two frames furnish equivalent description of same physical scenario.

  5. Can one tell Einstein's unimodular theory from Einstein's general relativity?

    OpenAIRE

    Alvarez, Enrique

    2005-01-01

    The so called unimodular theory of gravitation is compared with general relativity in the quadratic (Fierz-Pauli) regime, using a quite broad framework, and it is argued that quantum effects allow in principle to discriminate between both theories.

  6. Einstein's strugges with quantum theory a reappraisal

    CERN Document Server

    Home, Dipankar

    2007-01-01

    Einstein’s Struggles with Quantum Theory: A Reappraisal by Dipankar Home and Andrew Whitaker provides a detailed account of Albert Einstein’s thinking in regard to quantum physics. Until recently, most of Einstein’s views on quantum physics were dismissed and even ridiculed; some critics even suggested that Einstein was not able to grasp the complexities of the formalism of quantum theory and subtleties of the standard interpretation of this theory known as the Copenhagen interpretation put forward by Niels Bohr and his colleagues. But was that true? Modern scholarship argues otherwise, insist Drs. Home and Whitaker, who painstakingly explain the questions Einstein raised as well as offer a detailed discussion of Einstein’s position and major contributions to quantum theory, connecting them with contemporary studies on fundamental aspects of this theory. This unique book presents a mathematical as well as a non-mathematical route through the theories, controversies, and investigations, making the disc...

  7. It's about time understanding Einstein's relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Mermin, N David

    2005-01-01

    In It's About Time, N. David Mermin asserts that relativity ought to be an important part of everyone's education--after all, it is largely about time, a subject with which all are familiar. The book reveals that some of our most intuitive notions about time are shockingly wrong, and that the real nature of time discovered by Einstein can be rigorously explained without advanced mathematics. This readable exposition of the nature of time as addressed in Einstein's theory of relativity is accessible to anyone who remembers a little high school algebra and elementary plane geometry. The book evolved as Mermin taught the subject to diverse groups of undergraduates at Cornell University, none of them science majors, over three and a half decades. Mermin's approach is imaginative, yet accurate and complete. Clear, lively, and informal, the book will appeal to intellectually curious readers of all kinds, including even professional physicists, who will be intrigued by its highly original approach.

  8. Taming the nonlinearity of the Einstein equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harte, Abraham I

    2014-12-31

    Many of the technical complications associated with the general theory of relativity ultimately stem from the nonlinearity of Einstein's equation. It is shown here that an appropriate choice of dynamical variables may be used to eliminate all such nonlinearities beyond a particular order: Both Landau-Lifshitz and tetrad formulations of Einstein's equation are obtained that involve only finite products of the unknowns and their derivatives. Considerable additional simplifications arise in physically interesting cases where metrics become approximately Kerr or, e.g., plane waves, suggesting that the variables described here can be used to efficiently reformulate perturbation theory in a variety of contexts. In all cases, these variables are shown to have simple geometrical interpretations that directly relate the local causal structure associated with the metric of interest to the causal structure associated with a prescribed background. A new method to search for exact solutions is outlined as well.

  9. Bose-Einstein condensation of atomic gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anglin, J. R.; Ketterle, W.

    2003-01-01

    The early experiments on Bose-Einstein condensation in dilute atomic gases accomplished three longstanding goals. First, cooling of neutral atoms into their motional state, thus subjecting them to ultimate control, limited only by Heisenberg uncertainty relation. Second, creation of a coherent sample of atoms, in which all occupy the same quantum states, and the realization of atom lasers - devices that output coherent matter waves. And third, creation of gaseous quantum fluid, with properties that are different from the quantum liquids helium-3 and helium-4. The field of Bose-Einstein condensation of atomic gases has continued to progress rapidly, driven by the combination of new experimental techniques and theoretical advances. The family of quantum degenerate gases has grown, and now includes metastable and fermionic atoms. condensates have become an ultralow-temperature laboratory for atom optics, collisional physics and many-body physics, encompassing phonons, superfluidity, quantized vortices, Josephson junctions and quantum phase transitions. (author)

  10. Einstein metrics and Brans-Dicke superfields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marques, S.

    1988-01-01

    It is obtained here a space conformal to the Einstein space-time, making the transition from an internal bosonic space, constructed with the Majorana constant spinors in the Majorana representation, to a bosonic ''superspace,'' through the use of Einstein vierbeins. These spaces are related to a Grassmann space constructed with the Majorana spinors referred to above, where the ''metric'' is a function of internal bosonic coordinates. The conformal function is a scale factor in the zone of gravitational radiation. A conformal function dependent on space-time coordinates can be constructed in that region when we introduce Majorana spinors which are functions of those coordinates. With this we obtain a scalar field of Brans-Dicke type. 11 refs

  11. Generalization of Einstein's gravitational field equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulin, Frédéric

    2017-12-01

    The Riemann tensor is the cornerstone of general relativity, but as is well known it does not appear explicitly in Einstein's equation of gravitation. This suggests that the latter may not be the most general equation. We propose here for the first time, following a rigorous mathematical treatment based on the variational principle, that there exists a generalized 4-index gravitational field equation containing the Riemann curvature tensor linearly, and thus the Weyl tensor as well. We show that this equation, written in n dimensions, contains the energy-momentum tensor for matter and that of the gravitational field itself. This new 4-index equation remains completely within the framework of general relativity and emerges as a natural generalization of the familiar 2-index Einstein equation. Due to the presence of the Weyl tensor, we show that this equation contains much more information, which fully justifies the use of a fourth-order theory.

  12. Ritz, Einstein, and the Emission Hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Alberto A.

    . Just as Albert Einstein's special theory of relativity was gaining acceptance around 1908, the young Swiss physicist Walter Ritz advanced a competing though preliminary emission theory that sought to explain the phenomena of electrodynamics on the assumption that the speed of light depends on the motion of its source. I survey Ritz's unfinished work in this area and review the reasons why Einstein and other physicists rejected Ritz's and other emission theories. Since Ritz's emission theory attracted renewed attention in the 1960s, I discuss how the earlier observational evidence was misconstrued as telling against it more conclusively than actually was the case. Finally, I contrast the role played by evidence against Ritz's theory with other factors that led to the early rejection of his approach.

  13. Scattering amplitudes in N=2 Maxwell-Einstein and Yang-Mills/Einstein supergravity

    CERN Document Server

    Chiodaroli, Marco; Johansson, Henrik; Roiban, Radu

    2015-01-01

    We expose a double-copy structure in the scattering amplitudes of the generic Jordan family of N=2 Maxwell-Einstein and Yang-Mills/Einstein supergravity theories in four and five dimensions. The Maxwell-Einstein supergravity amplitudes are obtained through the color/kinematics duality as a product of two gauge-theory factors; one originating from pure N=2 super-Yang-Mills theory and the other from the dimensional reduction of a bosonic higher-dimensional pure Yang-Mills theory. We identify a specific symplectic frame in four dimensions for which the on-shell fields and amplitudes from the double-copy construction can be identified with the ones obtained from the supergravity Lagrangian and Feynman-rule computations. The Yang-Mills/Einstein supergravity theories are obtained by gauging a compact subgroup of the isometry group of their Maxwell-Einstein counterparts. For the generic Jordan family this process is identified with the introduction of cubic scalar couplings on the bosonic gauge-theory side, which th...

  14. Scattering amplitudes in N=2 Maxwell-Einstein and Yang-Mills/Einstein supergravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiodaroli, Marco; Günaydin, Murat; Johansson, Henrik; Roiban, Radu

    2015-01-01

    We expose a double-copy structure in the scattering amplitudes of the generic Jordan family of N=2 Maxwell-Einstein and Yang-Mills/Einstein supergravity theories in four and five dimensions. The Maxwell-Einstein supergravity amplitudes are obtained through the color/kinematics duality as a product of two gauge-theory factors; one originating from pure N=2 super-Yang-Mills theory and the other from the dimensional reduction of a bosonic higher-dimensional pure Yang-Mills theory. We identify a specific symplectic frame in four dimensions for which the on-shell fields and amplitudes from the double-copy construction can be identified with the ones obtained from the supergravity Lagrangian and Feynman-rule computations. The Yang-Mills/Einstein supergravity theories are obtained by gauging a compact subgroup of the isometry group of their Maxwell-Einstein counterparts. For the generic Jordan family this process is identified with the introduction of cubic scalar couplings on the bosonic gauge-theory side, which through the double copy are responsible for the non-abelian vector interactions in the supergravity theory. As a demonstration of the power of this structure, we present explicit computations at tree-level and one loop. The double-copy construction allows us to obtain compact expressions for the supergravity superamplitudes, which are naturally organized as polynomials in the gauge coupling constant.

  15. Einstein gravity emerging from quantum weyl gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zee, A.

    1983-01-01

    We advocate a conformal invariant world described by the sum of the Weyl, Dirac, and Yang-Mills action. Quantum fluctuations bring back Einstein gravity so that the long-distance phenomenology is as observed. Formulas for the induced Newton's constant and Eddington's constant are derived in quantized Weyl gravity. We show that the analogue of the trace anomaly for the Weyl action is structurally similar to that for the Yang-Mills action

  16. Genuine Multipartite Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen Steering

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Q. Y.; Reid, M. D.

    2013-12-01

    We develop the concept of genuine N-partite Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) steering. This nonlocality is the natural multipartite extension of the original EPR paradox. Useful properties emerge that are not guaranteed for genuine multipartite entangled states. In particular, there is a close link with the task of one-sided, device-independent quantum secret sharing. We derive inequalities to demonstrate multipartite EPR steering for Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger and Gaussian continuous variable states in loophole-free scenarios.

  17. Time symmetry and the Einstein paradox

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa de Beauregard, O.

    1977-01-01

    The characteristic difference between the paleoquantal calculation (addition of partial probabilities) and the neoquantal one (addition of partial amplitudes) for the correlation of photon polarizations in cascade transitions is derived in terms of elementary trigonometry. This deliberate use of simple formulae aims at a transparent rendering of the change in paradigm required by the so-called EPR paradox (which is truly the 1927 Einstein paradox), namely that 1) the two photons do not possess polarizations of their own when leaving the source C, but borrow one later, when interacting with the analysers L and N; 2) the die is thus not cast at C, but later, at L and N; 3) the correlation between the measurements at L and N is tied through C, in their common past. The tight connection between this ''Einstein nonseparability'' and the nonlocality in Feynman's ''theory of positrons'' is demonstrated through an analysis of the e + e - annihilation into two photons. Thus the Einstein paradox corresponds, in the ''new wavelike probability calculus'', to the Loschmid and Zermelo sort of paradox in the old probability calculus. That is, it contrasts the intrinsic time symmetry existing at the elementary level to the factlike macroscopic time asymmetry. The discussion deliberately by-passes the hidden-variable problem, the model in this being Einstein's by-passing of the mechanical aether when proposing special relativity. It is believed today, like in 1905, the problem is tayloring the wording after the (operationally good) mathematics. Moreover, that the change in paradigm, which is needed, comes through a victory of formalism over modelism. (author)

  18. Bose-Einstein correlation in Landau's model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hama, Y.; Padula, S.S.

    1986-01-01

    Bose-Einstein correlation is studied by taking an expanding fluid given by Landau's model as the source, where each space-time point is considered as an independent and chaotic emitting center with Planck's spectral distribution. As expected, the correlation depends on the relative angular positions as well as on the overall localization of the measuring system and it turns out that the average dimension of the source increases with the multiplicity N/sub ch/

  19. Bose-Einstein condensation of paraxial light

    OpenAIRE

    Klaers, J.; Schmitt, J.; Damm, T.; Vewinger, F.; Weitz, M.

    2011-01-01

    Photons, due to the virtually vanishing photon-photon interaction, constitute to very good approximation an ideal Bose gas, but owing to the vanishing chemical potential a (free) photon gas does not show Bose-Einstein condensation. However, this is not necessarily true for a lower-dimensional photon gas. By means of a fluorescence induced thermalization process in an optical microcavity one can achieve a thermal photon gas with freely adjustable chemical potential. Experimentally, we have obs...

  20. Sasaki-Einstein Manifolds and Volume Minimisation

    CERN Document Server

    Martelli, D; Yau, S T; Martelli, Dario; Sparks, James; Yau, Shing-Tung

    2006-01-01

    We study a variational problem whose critical point determines the Reeb vector field for a Sasaki-Einstein manifold. This extends our previous work on Sasakian geometry by lifting the condition that the manifolds are toric. We show that the Einstein-Hilbert action, restricted to a space of Sasakian metrics on a link L in a Calabi-Yau cone M, is the volume functional, which in fact is a function on the space of Reeb vector fields. We relate this function both to the Duistermaat-Heckman formula and also to a limit of a certain equivariant index on M that counts holomorphic functions. Both formulae may be evaluated by localisation. This leads to a general formula for the volume function in terms of topological fixed point data. As a result we prove that the volume of any Sasaki-Einstein manifold, relative to that of the round sphere, is always an algebraic number. In complex dimension n=3 these results provide, via AdS/CFT, the geometric counterpart of a-maximisation in four dimensional superconformal field theo...

  1. Einstein and the history of general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, D.; Stachel, J.

    1989-01-01

    This book is a collection of essays by the authors and other people that deal with scientific opinions that led Einstein and his contemporaries to their views of general relativity. Some of the essays explore Einstein's passage from the special theory through a sequence of gravitational theories to the discovery of the field equations of the grand theory in November 1915. Two other essays discuss Einstein's public and private exchanges with Max Abraham and Tullio Levi-Civita in 1913 and 1914. A sympathetic picture of H.A. Lorentz's reaction to the general theory of relativity is included, and a careful and insightful essay on the early understanding of the Schwarzschild-Droste solution to the field equations of general relativity is presented. One paper presents a discussion on the state of the enterprise of general relativity between 1925 and 1928, and a short essay details the history of steps toward quantum gravitational through canonical quantization. A discussion of the history of derivations of the geodesic equation of motion from the field equation and conservation laws of the general theory is presented. The early history of geometrical unified field theories is included

  2. Einstein's Gravity and Dark Energy/Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Sarfatti, J

    2003-01-01

    Should Einstein's general relativity be quantized in the usual way even though it is not renormalizable the way the spin 1/2 lepto-quark - spin 1 gauge force boson local field theories are? Condensed matter theorists using P.W. Anderson's "More is different" approach, consistent with Andrei Sakharov's idea of "metric elasticity" with gravity emergent out of quantum electrodynamic zero point vacuum fluctuations, is the approach I take in this paper. The QED vacuum in globally-flat Minkowski space-time is unstable due to exchange of virtual photons between virtual electrons and positron "holes" near the -mc2 Fermi surface well inside the 2mc2 energy gap. This results in a non-perturbative emergence of both Einstein's gravity and a unified dark energy/dark matter w = -1 exotic vacuum zero point fluctuation field controlled by the local macro-quantum vacuum coherent field. The latter is a Bose-Einstein condensate of virtual off-mass-shell bound electron-positron pairs. The dark matter exotic vacuum phase with pos...

  3. Vortex solitons in two-dimensional spin-orbit coupled Bose-Einstein condensates: Effects of the Rashba-Dresselhaus coupling and Zeeman splitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaguchi, Hidetsugu; Sherman, E Ya; Malomed, Boris A

    2016-09-01

    We present an analysis of two-dimensional (2D) matter-wave solitons, governed by the pseudospinor system of Gross-Pitaevskii equations with self- and cross attraction, which includes the spin-orbit coupling (SOC) in the general Rashba-Dresselhaus form, and, separately, the Rashba coupling and the Zeeman splitting. Families of semivortex (SV) and mixed-mode (MM) solitons are constructed, which exist and are stable in free space, as the SOC terms prevent the onset of the critical collapse and create the otherwise missing ground states in the form of the solitons. The Dresselhaus SOC produces a destructive effect on the vortex solitons, while the Zeeman term tends to convert the MM states into the SV ones, which eventually suffer delocalization. Existence domains and stability boundaries are identified for the soliton families. For physically relevant parameters of the SOC system, the number of atoms in the 2D solitons is limited by ∼1.5×10^{4}. The results are obtained by means of combined analytical and numerical methods.

  4. On solutions of Einstein and Einstein-Yang-Mills equations with (maximal) conformal subsymmetries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinzinkayo, S.; Demaret, J.

    1985-01-01

    The maximal subgroups of the conformal group (which have in common as a subgroup the group of pure spatial rotations) are considered as isometry groups of conformally flat space-times. The corresponding cosmological solutions of Einstein's field equations are identified. For each of them, the possibility is investigated that it could be generated by an SU(2) Yang-Mills field built, via the Corrigan-Fairlie-'t Hooft-Wilczek ansatz, from a scalar field identical with the square root of the conformal factor defining the space-time metric tensor. In particular, the Einstein cosmological model can be generated in this manner, but in the framework of strong gravity only, a micro-Einstein universe being then viewed as a possible model for a hadron. (author)

  5. Einstein's Materialism and Modern Tests of Quantum Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigier, J. P.

    After a presentation of Einstein's and Bohr's antagonistic point of view on the interpretation of Quantum Mechanics an illustration of their conflicting positions in the particular case of Young's double slit experiment is presented. It is then shown that in their most recent form (i. e. time dependent neutron interferometry) these experiments suggest (if one accepts absolute energymomentum conservation in all individual microprocesses) that Einstein was right in the Bohr-Einstein controversy.Translated AbstractEinsteins Materialismus und heutige Tests der QuantenmechanikNach einer Darstellung von Einsteins und Bohrs antagonistischen Standpunkten in der Interpretation der Quantenmechanik werden ihre widersprüchlichen Positionen im speziellen Fall des Youngschen Doppelspaltexperiments dargestellt. Es wird dann gezeigt, daß diese Experimente in ihrer neuesten Form (d. h. zeitabhängige Neutroneninterferometrie) Einstein in der Bohr-Einsteinkontroverse recht gaben (wenn man absolute Energie-Impulserhaltung bei allen individuellen Mikroprozessen annimmt).

  6. Construction of Einstein-Sasaki metrics in D≥7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lue, H.; Pope, C. N.; Vazquez-Poritz, J. F.

    2007-01-01

    We construct explicit Einstein-Kaehler metrics in all even dimensions D=2n+4≥6, in terms of a 2n-dimensional Einstein-Kaehler base metric. These are cohomogeneity 2 metrics which have the new feature of including a NUT-type parameter, or gravomagnetic charge, in addition to..' in addition to mass and rotation parameters. Using a canonical construction, these metrics all yield Einstein-Sasaki metrics in dimensions D=2n+5≥7. As is commonly the case in this type of construction, for suitable choices of the free parameters the Einstein-Sasaki metrics can extend smoothly onto complete and nonsingular manifolds, even though the underlying Einstein-Kaehler metric has conical singularities. We discuss some explicit examples in the case of seven-dimensional Einstein-Sasaki spaces. These new spaces can provide supersymmetric backgrounds in M theory, which play a role in the AdS 4 /CFT 3 correspondence

  7. Dispersion Engineering of Bose-Einstein Condensates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khamehchi, Mohammad Amin

    The subject of this dissertation is engineering the dispersion relation for dilute Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs). When a BEC is immersed into suitably tailored laser fields its dispersion can be strongly modified. Prominent examples for such laser fields include optical lattice geometries and Raman dressing fields. The ability to engineer the dispersion of a BEC allows for the investigation of a range of phenomena related to quantum hydrodynamics and condensed matter. In the first context, this dissertation studies the excitation spectrum of a spin-orbit coupled (SOC) BEC. The spin-orbit coupling is generated by " dressing" the atoms with two Raman laser fields. The excitation spectrum has a Roton-like feature that can be altered by tuning the Raman laser parameters. It is demonstrated that the Roton mode can be softened, but it does not reach the ground state energy for the experimental conditions we had. Furthermore, the expansion of SOC BECs in 1D is studied by relaxing the trap allowing the BEC to expand in the SOC direction. Contrary to the findings for optical lattices, it is observed that the condensate partially occupies quasimomentum states with negative effective mass, and therefore an abrupt deceleration is observed although the mean field force is along the direction of expansion. In condensed-matter systems, a periodic lattice structure often plays an important role. In this context, an alternative to the Raman dressing scheme can be realized by coupling the s- and p- bands of a static optical lattice via a weak moving lattice. The bands can be treated as pseudo-spin states. It is shown that similar to the dispersion relation of a Raman dressed SOC, the quasimomentum of the ground state is different from zero. Coherent coupling of the SOC dispersion minima can lead to the realization of the stripe phase even though it is not the thermodynamic ground state of the system. Along the lines of studying the hydrodynamics of BECs, three novel

  8. Einstein Universe Revisited and End of Dark ERA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurgaliev, Ildus S.

    2015-01-01

    Historically the earliest general relativistic cosmological solution was received by Einstein himself as homogenous, isotropic one. In accordance with European cosmology it was expected static. The Eternal Universe as scientific model is conflicting with the existed theological model of the Universe created by God, therefore, of the limited age. Christianity, younger Islam, older Judaism are based on creationism. Much older oriental traditions such us Hinduism and Buddhism are based on conceptions of eternal and cyclic Universe which are closer to scientific worldview. To have static universe Einstein needed a factor to counteract gravity and postulated cosmological term and considered it as a disadvantage of the theory. This aesthetic dissatisfaction was amplified by interpretation distance-redshift relationship as a cosmological expansion effect. Emerged scientific cosmological community (excluding Hubble himself - almost always) endorsed the concept of expanding Universe. At the same time, as it is shown in this report, a natural well known factors do exist to counteract gravity. They are inertial centrifugal and Coriolis forces finding their geometrical presentation in the relativity theory.

  9. Vortex-vortex interactions in toroidally trapped Bose-Einstein condensates

    OpenAIRE

    Schulte, T.; Santos, L.; Sanpera, A.; Lewenstein, M.

    2002-01-01

    We analyze the vortex dynamics and vortex-vortex interactions in Bose-Einstein condensates confined in toroidal traps. We show that this particular geometry strongly distorts the vortex dynamics. The numerically calculated vortex trajectories are well explained by an analytical calculation based on image method and conformal mapping. Finally, the dissipation effects are discussed.

  10. Exact solutions of Einstein and Einstein-scalar equations in 2+1 dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Virbhadra, K.S.

    1995-01-01

    A nonstatic and circularly symmetric exact solution of the Einstein equations (with a cosmological constant Λ and null fluid) in 2 + 1 dimensions is given. This is a nonstatic generalization of the uncharged spinless Bandos Teitelboim Zanelli (BTZ) metric. For Λ = 0, spacetime is though not flat, the Kretschmann invariant vanishes. The energy, momentum, and power output for this metric are obtained. Further a static and circularly symmetric exact solution of the Einstein-massless scalar equations is given, which has a curvature singularity at r=0 and the scalar field diverges at r=0 as well as at infinity. (author). 12 refs

  11. Solitons, gauge theories and the 'great Einstein theorem'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dresden, M.; Chen, S.F.

    1976-01-01

    A field theory is said to be of 'Einstein type' if it has the property that the field equations imply the equations of motion. It is known that general relativity is of Einstein type, it is demonstrated here that the Yang-Mills gauge theory is of Einstein type. The relationship between the singularities in the solutions of the field equations and soliton type is analyzed. (Auth.)

  12. A class of exact solutions to the Einstein field equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goyal, Nisha; Gupta, R K

    2012-01-01

    The Einstein-Rosen metric is considered and a class of new exact solutions of the field equations for stationary axisymmetric Einstein-Maxwell fields is obtained. The Lie classical approach is applied to obtain exact solutions. By using the Lie classical method, we are able to derive symmetries that are used for reducing the coupled system of partial differential equations into ordinary differential equations. From reduced differential equations we have derived some new exact solutions of Einstein-Maxwell equations. (paper)

  13. Classes of general axisymmetric solutions of Einstein-Maxwell equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krori, K.D.; Choudhury, T.

    1981-01-01

    An exact solution of the Einstein equations for a stationary axially symmetric distribution of mass composed of all types of multipoles is obtained. Following Ernst (1968), from this vacuum solution the corresponding solution of the coupled Einstein-Maxwell equations is derived. A solution of Einstein-Maxwell fields for a static axially symmetric system composed of all types of multipoles is also obtained. (author)

  14. Interactions of Ultracold Impurity Particles with Bose-Einstein Condensates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-23

    AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2015-0141 INTERACTIONS OF ULTRACOLD IMPURITY PARTICLES WITH BOSE- EINSTEIN CONDENSATES Georg Raithel UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN Final...SUBTITLE Interactions of ultracold impurity particles with Bose- Einstein Condensates 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA9550-10-1-0453 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c...Interactions of ultracold impurity particles with Bose- Einstein Condensates Contract/Grant #: FA9550-10-1-0453 Reporting Period: 8/15/2010 to 2/14

  15. Spectroscopy of dark soliton states in Bose-Einstein condensates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bongs, K; Burger, S; Hellweg, D; Kottke, M; Dettmer, S; Rinkleff, T; Cacciapuoti, L; Arlt, J; Sengstock, K; Ertmer, W

    2003-01-01

    Experimental and numerical studies of the velocity field of dark solitons in Bose-Einstein condensates are presented. The formation process after phase imprinting as well as the propagation of the emerging soliton are investigated using spatially resolved Bragg spectroscopy of soliton states in Bose-Einstein condensates of 87 Rb. A comparison of experimental data to results from numerical simulations of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation clearly identifies the flux underlying a dark soliton propagating in a Bose-Einstein condensate. The results allow further optimization of the phase imprinting method for creating collective excitations of Bose-Einstein condensates

  16. Domain wall universe in the Einstein-Born-Infeld theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Bum-Hoon; Lee, Wonwoo; Minamitsuji, Masato

    2009-01-01

    In this Letter, we discuss the dynamics of a domain wall universe embedded into the charged black hole spacetime of the Einstein-Born-Infeld (EBI) theory. There are four kinds of possible spacetime structures, i.e., those with no horizon, the extremal one, those with two horizons (as the Reissner-Nordstroem black hole), and those with a single horizon (as the Schwarzshild black hole). We derive the effective cosmological equations on the wall. In contrast to the previous works, we take the contribution of the electrostatic energy on the wall into account. By examining the properties of the effective potential, we find that a bounce can always happen outside the (outer) horizon. For larger masses of the black hole, the height of the barrier between the horizon and bouncing point in the effective potential becomes smaller, leading to longer time scales of bouncing process. These results are compared with those in the previous works.

  17. Modification of Einstein A Coefficient in Dissipative Gas Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Chang-Qi; Cao, Hui; Qin, Ke-Cheng

    1996-01-01

    Spontaneous radiation in dissipative gas medium such as plasmas is investigated by Langevin equations and the modified Weisskopf-Wigner approximation. Since the refractive index of gas medium is expected to be nearly unity, we shall first neglect the medium polarization effect. We show that absorption in plasmas may in certain case modify the Einstein A coefficient significantly and cause a pit in the A coefficient-density curves for relatively low temperature plasmas and also a pit in the A coefficient-temperature curves. In the next, the effect of medium polarization is taken into account in addition. To our surprise, its effect in certain case is quite significant. The dispersive curves show different behaviors in different region of parameters.

  18. Thermal equilibrium in Einstein's elevator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Rey, Bernardo; Chacón-Acosta, Guillermo; Dagdug, Leonardo; Cubero, David

    2013-05-01

    We report fully relativistic molecular-dynamics simulations that verify the appearance of thermal equilibrium of a classical gas inside a uniformly accelerated container. The numerical experiments confirm that the local momentum distribution in this system is very well approximated by the Jüttner function-originally derived for a flat spacetime-via the Tolman-Ehrenfest effect. Moreover, it is shown that when the acceleration or the container size is large enough, the global momentum distribution can be described by the so-called modified Jüttner function, which was initially proposed as an alternative to the Jüttner function.

  19. A one-to-one correspondence between the static Einstein-Maxwell and stationary Einstein-vacuum space-times

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandrasekhar, Subrahmanyan

    1989-01-01

    A one-to-one correspondence is established between the static solutions of the Einstein-Maxwell equations and the stationary solutions of the Einstein-vacuum equations, that enables one to directly write down a solution for the one from a known solution of the other, and conversely, by a simple transcription. The directness of the correspondence is achieved by writing the metric for static Einstein-Maxwell space-times in a coordinate system and a gauge adapted to the two-centre problem and the metric for stationary Einstein-vacuum space-times in a coordinate system and a gauge adapted to black holes with event horizons. (author)

  20. Einstein's cosmos how Albert Einstein's vision transformed our understanding of space and time

    CERN Document Server

    Kaku, Michio

    2004-01-01

    Few figures loom as large as Albert Einstein in our contemporary culture. It is truly remarkable that a man from such humble beginnings, an unemployed dreamer without a future or a job, who was written off by his professors as a hopeless loser, could to dare to scale the heights he reached. In this enlightening book Michio Kaku reasseses Einstein's work by centering on his three great theories - special relativity, general relativity and the Unified Field Theory. The first yielded the equation E =mc which is now such a fixture in our culture that it is practically a ubiquitous slogan. But the subsequent theories led to the Big Bang theory and have changed irrevocably the way we perceive time and space. Michio Kaku gives a new, refreshing look at the pioneering work of Einstein, giving a more accurate portrayal of his enduring legacy than previous biographies. As today's advanced physicists continue their intense search to fulfill Einstein's most cherished dream, a 'theory of everything', he is recognised as a...

  1. New Einstein-Sasaki and Einstein spaces from Kerr-de Sitter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cvetic, M.; Lue, H.; Pope, C.N.; Page, Don N.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, which is an elaboration of our results in Phys. Rev. Lett. 95:071101, 2005 (hep-th/0504225), we construct new Einstein-Sasaki spaces L p,q,r 1 ,...,r n-1 in all odd dimensions D = 2n+1 ≥ 5. They arise by taking certain BPS limits of the Euclideanised Kerr-de Sitter metrics. This yields local Einstein-Sasaki metrics of cohomogeneity n, with toric U(1) n+1 principal orbits, and n real non-trivial parameters. By studying the structure of the degenerate orbits we show that for appropriate choices of the parameters, characterised by the (n+1) coprime integers (p,q,r 1 ,...,r n-1 ), the local metrics extend smoothly onto complete and non-singular compact Einstein-Sasaki manifolds L p,q,r 1 ,...,r n-1 . We also construct new complete and non-singular compact Einstein spaces Λ p,q,r 1 ,...,r n in D = 2n+1 that are not Sasakian, by choosing parameters appropriately in the Euclideanised Kerr-de Sitter metrics when no BPS limit is taken.

  2. Unified Maxwell-Einstein and Yang-Mills-Einstein supergravity theories in five dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guenaydin, Murat; Zagermann, Marco

    2003-01-01

    Unified N = 2 Maxwell-Einstein supergravity theories (MESGTs) are supergravity theories in which all the vector fields, including the graviphoton, transform in an irreducible representation of a simple global symmetry group of the Lagrangian. As was established long time ago, in five dimensions there exist only four unified Maxwell-Einstein supergravity theories whose target manifolds are symmetric spaces. These theories are defined by the four simple euclidean Jordan algebras of degree three. In this paper, we show that, in addition to these four unified MESGTs with symmetric target spaces, there exist three infinite families of unified MESGTs as well as another exceptional one. These novel unified MESGTs are defined by non-compact (minkowskian) Jordan algebras, and their target spaces are in general neither symmetric nor homogeneous. The members of one of these three infinite families can be gauged in such a way as to obtain an infinite family of unified N = 2 Yang-Mills-Einstein supergravity theories, in which all vector fields transform in the adjoint representation of a simple gauge group of the type SU(N,1). The corresponding gaugings in the other two infinite families lead to Yang-Mills-Einstein supergravity theories coupled to tensor multiplets. (author)

  3. Lattice solitons in Bose-Einstein condensates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efremidis, Nikolaos K.; Christodoulides, Demetrios N.

    2003-01-01

    We systematically study the properties of lattice solitons in Bose-Einstein condensates with either attractive or repulsive atom interactions. This is done, by exactly solving the mean-field Gross-Pitaevskii equation in the presence of a periodic potential. We find new families of lattice soliton solutions that are characterized by the position of the energy eigenvalue within the associated band structure. These include lattice solitons in condensates with either attractive or repulsive atom interactions that exist in finite or semi-infinite gaps, as well as nonlinear modes that exhibit atomic population cutoffs

  4. Einstein-Yang-Mills-Lorentz black holes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cembranos, Jose A.R.; Gigante Valcarcel, Jorge [Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Departamento de Fisica Teorica I, Madrid (Spain)

    2017-12-15

    Different black hole solutions of the coupled Einstein-Yang-Mills equations have been well known for a long time. They have attracted much attention from mathematicians and physicists since their discovery. In this work, we analyze black holes associated with the gauge Lorentz group. In particular, we study solutions which identify the gauge connection with the spin connection. This ansatz allows one to find exact solutions to the complete system of equations. By using this procedure, we show the equivalence between the Yang-Mills-Lorentz model in curved space-time and a particular set of extended gravitational theories. (orig.)

  5. Bose-Einstein Condensation in Complex Networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bianconi, Ginestra; Barabasi, Albert-Laszlo

    2001-01-01

    The evolution of many complex systems, including the World Wide Web, business, and citation networks, is encoded in the dynamic web describing the interactions between the system's constituents. Despite their irreversible and nonequilibrium nature these networks follow Bose statistics and can undergo Bose-Einstein condensation. Addressing the dynamical properties of these nonequilibrium systems within the framework of equilibrium quantum gases predicts that the 'first-mover-advantage,' 'fit-get-rich,' and 'winner-takes-all' phenomena observed in competitive systems are thermodynamically distinct phases of the underlying evolving networks

  6. Wormholes in Einstein-Born-Infeld Gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Jin Young

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We introduce a new approach to construct wormholes without introducing exotic matters in Einstein-Born-Infeld gravity with a cosmological constant. Contary to the conventional approach, the throat is located at the place where the solutions can be joined smoothly. The metric and its derivatives are continuous so that the exotic matters are not needed there. The exoticity of the energy-momentum tensor is not essential to sustain the wormhole. We also present a method to check the stability of wormholes in the new approach.

  7. Bose-Einstein condensation in real space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valencia, J.J.; Llano, M. de; Solis, M.A.

    2004-01-01

    We show how Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) occurs not only in momentum space but also in coordinate (or real) space. Analogies between the isotherms of a van der Waals classical gas of extended (or finite-diameter) identical atoms and the point (or zero-diameter) particles of an ideal BE gas allow concluding that, in contrast with the classical case, the volume per particle vanishes in the pure BE condensate phase precisely because the boson diameters are zero. Thus a BE condensate forms in real space without exhibiting a liquid branch as does the classical gas. (Author)

  8. Neutrino fields in Einstein-Cartan theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffiths, J.B.

    1981-01-01

    The spin-coefficient formalism presented elsewhere is here applied to classical neutrino fields in Einstein-Cartan theory. It is shown that the neutrino current vector is tangent to an expansion-free null geodesic congruence with constant and equal twist and shear, which vanish if and only if the congruence is a repeated principal null congruence of the gravitational field. The geodesics are both extremals and autoparallels. All exact solutions for the case of pure radiation fields are obtained, and it is shown that the only possible ghost solutions have a plane wave metric. (author)

  9. The simplest group of Einstein supergravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogievetsky, V.I.; Sokatchev, E.S.

    1979-01-01

    The simplest supergroup of Einstein supergravity is considered. It is the complex supergroup of general coordinate transformations in left- and right-handed chiral conjugated superspaces restricted by the condition of left- and right- supervolume-preservation. The real part of the vector coordinate of the superspace is identified with the space-time coordinate xsup(m) and the imaginary one, with the axial gravitational superfield Hsup(m) (x, theta, anti theta). The transformations of the field components of Hsup(m) are studied in detail. The approach described is the geometrical basis of the so-called ''tensor calculus''

  10. Internal Einstein spaces and symmetry breaking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coquereaux, R.

    1984-01-01

    We first define a generalised gauge invariant Yang-Mills Lagrangian: the Killing metric -Ksub(αβ) on the group is replaced by a more general metric hsub(αβ)(x); the field hsub(αβ)(x) -a scalar from the space time point of view- is then covariantly coupled to the gauge field Asub(μ)sup(α) and is also self-coupled via a natural scalar potential (no parameters). Non trivial saddle points of this scalar potential, correspond to non standard Einstein metrics on the group C. the associated shifts lead to an entirely computable mass spectrum for the gauge field

  11. Einstein and the Changing Worldviews of Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Lehner, Christoph; Schemmel, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    This volume reviews conceptual conflicts at the foundations of physics now and in the past century. The focus is on the conditions and consequences of Einstein's pathbreaking achievements that sealed the decline of the classical notions of space, time, radiation, and matter, and resulted in the theory of relativity. Particular attention is paid to the implications of conceptual conflicts for scientific views of the world at large, thus providing the basis for a comparison of the demise of the mechanical worldview at the turn of the 20th century with the challenges presented by cosmology at the

  12. Strong Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen steering with unconditional entangled states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinlechner, Sebastian; Bauchrowitz, Jöran; Eberle, Tobias; Schnabel, Roman

    2013-02-01

    In 1935 Schrödinger introduced the terms entanglement and steering in the context of the famous gedanken experiment discussed by Einstein, Podolsky, and Rosen (EPR). Here, we report on a sixfold increase of the observed EPR-steering effect with regard to previous experiments, as quantified by the Reid criterion. We achieved an unprecedented low conditional variance product of about 0.04<1, where 1 is the upper bound below which steering is demonstrated. The steering effect was observed on an unconditional two-mode-squeezed entangled state that contained a total vacuum state contribution of less than 8%, including detection imperfections. Together with the achieved high interference contrast between the entangled state and a bright coherent laser field, our state is compatible with efficient applications in high-power laser interferometers and fiber-based networks for entanglement distribution.

  13. Dynamic wormhole solutions in Einstein-Cartan gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehdizadeh, Mohammad Reza; Ziaie, Amir Hadi

    2017-12-01

    In the present work, we investigate evolving wormhole configurations described by a constant redshift function in Einstein-Cartan theory. The matter content consists of a Weyssenhoff fluid along with an anisotropic matter which together generalize the anisotropic energy momentum tensor in general relativity in order to include the effects of intrinsic angular momentum (spin) of particles. Using a generalized Friedmann-Robertson-Walker spacetime, we derive analytical evolving wormhole geometries by assuming a particular equation of state for energy density and pressure profiles. We introduce exact asymptotically flat and anti-de Sitter spacetimes that admit traversable wormholes and respect energy conditions throughout the spacetime. The rate of expansion of these evolving wormholes is determined only by the Friedmann equation in the presence of spin effects.

  14. Excitations of Bose-Einstein condensates at finite temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rusch, M.

    2000-01-01

    Recent experimental observations of collective excitations of Bose condensed atomic vapours have stimulated interest in the microscopic description of the dynamics of a Bose-Einstein condensate confined in an external potential. We present a finite temperature field theory for collective excitations of trapped Bose-Einstein condensates and use a finite-temperature linear response formalism, which goes beyond the simple mean-field approximation of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation. The effect of the non-condensed thermal atoms we include using perturbation theory in a quasiparticle basis. This presents a simple scheme to understand the interaction between condensate and non-condensed atoms and enables us to include the effect the condensate has on collision dynamics. At first we limit our treatment to the case of a spatially homogeneous Bose gas. We include the effect of pair and triplet anomalous averages and thus obtain a gapless theory for the excitations of a weakly interacting system, which we can link to well known results for Landau and Beliaev damping rates. A gapless theory for trapped systems with a static thermal component follows straightforwardly. We then investigate finite temperature excitations of a condensate in a spherically symmetric harmonic trap. We avoid approximations to the density of states and thus emphasise finite size aspects of the problem. We show that excitations couple strongly to a restricted number of modes, giving rise to resonance structure in their frequency spectra. Where possible we derive energy shifts and lifetimes of excitations. For one particular mode, the breathing mode, the effects of the discreteness of the system are sufficiently pronounced that the simple picture of an energy shift and width fails. Experiments in spherical traps have recently become feasible and should be able to test our detailed quantitative predictions. (author)

  15. Einstein's Unification: General Relativity and the Quest for Mathematical Naturalness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dongen, J.A.E.F.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the thesis has been to understand Einstein's development and see the historical coherence in his later attitude in physics. The lesson we learned has been straightforward: the key that unlocks the later Einstein lies in the road by which he arrived at the field equations of general

  16. Albert Einstein's 1916 Review Article on General Relativity

    OpenAIRE

    Sauer, Tilman

    2004-01-01

    The first comprehensive overview of the final version of the general theory of relativity was published by Einstein in 1916 after several expositions of preliminary versions and latest revisions of the theory in November 1915. A historical account of this review paper is given, of its prehistory, including a discussion of Einstein's collaboration with Marcel Grossmann, and of its immediate reception.

  17. From the Classroom to Washington: Einsteins on Education Reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Kent H., Ed.; Byers, Elizabeth A., Ed.

    2010-01-01

    The Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars was delighted to host a group of current and former Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellows as they celebrated the 20th anniversary of the fellowship program. Outstanding math and science teachers in America's K-12 schools, the Einstein Fellows spend a year (or sometimes two) working on…

  18. Optical absorption in a degenerate Bose-Einstein gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yip, S.K.

    2002-01-01

    We develop a theory on optical absorption in a dilute Bose-Einstein gas at low temperatures. This theory is motivated by the Bogoliubov theory of elementary excitations for this system, and takes into account explicitly the modification of the nature and dispersion of elementary excitations due to Bose-Einstein condensation. Our results show important differences from existing theories

  19. Validity of the Einstein Relation in Disordered Organic Semiconductors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wetzelaer, G. A. H.; Koster, L. J. A.; Blom, P. W. M.

    2011-01-01

    It is controversial whether energetic disorder in semiconductors is already sufficient to violate the classical Einstein relation, even in the case of thermal equilibrium. We demonstrate that the Einstein relation is violated only under nonequilibrium conditions due to deeply trapped carriers, as in

  20. Calculation of thermodynamic properties of finite Bose-Einstein systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borrmann, P.; Harting, J.D.R.; Mülken, O.; Hilf, E.

    1999-01-01

    We derive an exact recursion formula for the calculation of thermodynamic functions of finite systems obeying Bose-Einstein statistics. The formula is applicable for canonical systems where the particles can be treated as noninteracting in some approximation, e.g., like Bose-Einstein condensates in

  1. Superenergy tensors in the Einstein-Cartan theory of gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garecki, J.

    1981-01-01

    In this paper we study systematically a generalization of the notion of ''superenergy tensors'' which has been introduced previously in the framework of the General Theory of Relativity on the Einstein-Cartan Theory of Gravitation. It is shown, by means of expansion in the normal coordinate system that the generalization is analytically simple only for the Einstein formulation of conservation laws. (author)

  2. On an uncorrelated jet model with Bose-Einstein statistics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilic, N.; Dadic, I.; Martinis, M.

    1978-01-01

    Starting from the density of states of an ideal Bose-Einstein gas, an uncorrelated jet model with Bose-Einstein statistics has been formulated. The transition to continuum is based on the Touschek invariant measure. It has been shown that in this model average multiplicity increases logarithmically with total energy, while the inclusive distribution shows ln s violation of scaling. (author)

  3. Ludwig Boltzmann, Albert Einstein and Franz Joseph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broda, E.

    1983-01-01

    Under the Emperor Francis Joseph (1848-1916) the natural sciences were less weIl supported in Austria than in other countries of Europe. This is explained by the fact that the German speaking middle classes accepted the preeminence of the feudal forces with their antiscientific attitude. The reason for this readiness to subordination was that those middle classes feIt threatened in their relatively favourable situation by Slavs and Latins. Francis Joseph was the typical representative of the aristocracy. Personally, he did his duty conscientiously and was not corrupt, but progressive ideas and scientific thought were alien to him. From his desk he treated Boltzmann benevolently, but he had no wish to meet personally the greatest mind of the Empire or in any respect to ask his views. Another famous subject of the Emperor, Albert Einstein, was apparently ignored altogether. The structural weakness of Austria, due to the national problems, led to immobilism in her scientific life, but also, up to a point, to tolerance. The impression of Victor Adler on Einstein is considered in this historical context. (author) [de

  4. Gravity Before Einstein and Schwinger Before Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimble, Virginia L.

    2012-05-01

    Julian Schwinger was a child prodigy, and Albert Einstein distinctly not; Schwinger had something like 73 graduate students, and Einstein very few. But both thought gravity was important. They were not, of course, the first, nor is the disagreement on how one should think about gravity that is being highlighted here the first such dispute. The talk will explore, first, several of the earlier dichotomies: was gravity capable of action at a distance (Newton), or was a transmitting ether required (many others). Did it act on everything or only on solids (an odd idea of the Herschels that fed into their ideas of solar structure and sunspots)? Did gravitational information require time for its transmission? Is the exponent of r precisely 2, or 2 plus a smidgeon (a suggestion by Simon Newcomb among others)? And so forth. Second, I will try to say something about Scwinger's lesser known early work and how it might have prefigured his "source theory," beginning with "On the Interaction of Several Electrons (the unpublished, 1934 "zeroth paper," whose title somewhat reminds one of "On the Dynamics of an Asteroid," through his days at Berkeley with Oppenheimer, Gerjuoy, and others, to his application of ideas from nuclear physics to radar and of radar engineering techniques to problems in nuclear physics. And folks who think good jobs are difficult to come by now might want to contemplate the couple of years Schwinger spent teaching elementary physics at Purdue before moving on to the MIT Rad Lab for war work.

  5. On Certain Conceptual Anomalies in Einstein's Theory of Relativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crothers S. J.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available There are a number of conceptual anomalies occurring in the Standard exposition of Einstein's Theory of Relativity. These anomalies relate to issues in both mathematics and in physics and penetrate to the very heart of Einstein's theory. This paper reveals and amplifies a few such anomalies, including the fact that Einstein's field equations for the so-called static vacuum configuration, $R_{mu u} = 0$, violates his Principle of Equivalence, and is therefore erroneous. This has a direct bearing on the usual concept of conservation of energy for the gravitational field and the conventional formulation for localisation of energy using Einstein's pseudo-tensor. Misconceptions as to the relationship between Minkowski spacetime and Special Relativity are also discussed, along with their relationships to the pseudo-Riemannian metric manifold of Einstein's gravitational field, and their fundamental geometric structures pertaining to spherical symmetry.

  6. Einstein, cientista e filósofo?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Paty

    1993-12-01

    Full Text Available A física, como prática filosófica, designa a escolha de ângulo de abordagem sob o qual é possível perceber características fundamentais da física. Assumimos que os papéis do físico e do filósofo não são tão demarcados e que a tarefa do físico é inseparavelmente enunciar a significação dos conceitos, estabelecendo sua identificação lógico-matemática, e ligá-los à experiência. Nesta perspectiva, a análise da atividade de Einstein, especialmente o exame da gênese da teoria da Relatividade restrita e das significações nos conceitos e enunciados da Relatividade restrita e geral nos leva à afirmação da tese expressa no epíteto Einstein filósofo. Para este percurso foi necessário então a crítica da corrente filosófica - Círculo de Viena - aparentemente mais próxima da atividade einsteniana, mas que só o tomou como referência na condição de físico. Em especial é analisada, e recusada, a tese de Reichenbach da separação entre o contexto de justificativa - ao qual se aplica a análise filosófica - e o contexto de descoberta - relegado exclusivamente ao campo da psicologia. Para esta crítica buscamos, nos processos de descoberta, não uma rígida estrutura lógica mas a noção mais ampla de racionalidade.Physics as philosophical practice points out the option of an approach which enables us to perceive fundamental features of physics. We maintain that the physicist and the philosopher play roles not so disjuncted and that the physicist's task is as much to enunciate the meaning of the concepts, establishing its logical and mathematic identification, as to link them to experience. With this point of view we analyze Einstein's activity with emphasis on the rise of Special Relativity Theory and the meaning of the concepts of Special and General Relativity. This analysis carries us to the thesis expressed in the title Einstein, philosopher. To this way we have needed to criticize that philosophical movement

  7. On the occurrence and detectability of Bose-Einstein condensation in helium white dwarfs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benvenuto, O.G.; Vito, M.A. De

    2011-01-01

    It has been recently proposed that helium white dwarfs may provide promising conditions for the occurrence of the Bose-Einstein condensation. The argument supporting this expectation is that in some conditions attained in the core of these objects, the typical De Broglie wavelength associated with helium nuclei is of the order of the mean distance between neighboring nuclei. In these conditions the system should depart from classical behavior showing quantum effects. As helium nuclei are bosons, they are expected to condense. In order to explore the possibility of detecting the Bose-Einstein condensation in the evolution of helium white dwarfs we have computed a set of models for a variety of stellar masses and values of the condensation temperature. We do not perform a detailed treatment of the condensation process but mimic it by suppressing the nuclei contribution to the equation of state by applying an adequate function. As the cooling of white dwarfs depends on average properties of the whole stellar interior, this procedure should be suitable for exploring the departure of the cooling process from that predicted by the standard treatment. We find that the Bose-Einstein condensation has noticeable, but not dramatic effects on the cooling process only for the most massive white dwarfs compatible with a helium dominated interior ( ≈ 0.50M s un) and very low luminosities (say, Log(L/L s un) < −4.0). These facts lead us to conclude that it seems extremely difficult to find observable signals of the Bose-Einstein condensation. Recently, it has been suggested that the population of helium white dwarfs detected in the globular cluster NGC 6397 is a good candidate for detecting signals of the Bose-Einstein condensation. We find that these stars have masses too low and are too bright to have an already condensed interior

  8. Holographic Fermions in Anisotropic Einstein-Maxwell-Dilaton-Axion Theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuang, Xiao-Mei; Fang, Li-Qing

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the properties of the holographic Fermionic system dual to an anisotropic charged black brane bulk in Einstein-Maxwell-Dilaton-Axion gravity theory. We consider the minimal coupling between the Dirac field and the gauge field in the bulk gravity theory and mainly explore the dispersion relation exponents of the Green functions of the dual Fermionic operators in the dual field theory. We find that along both the anisotropic and the isotropic directions the Fermi momentum will be effected by the anisotropy of the bulk theory. However, the anisotropy has influence on the dispersion relation which is almost linear for massless Fermions with charge q=2. The universal properties that the mass and the charge of the Fermi possibly correspond to nonlinear dispersion relation are also investigated

  9. Spontaneous compactification in six-dimensional Einstein-Maxwell theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randjbar-Daemi, S.; Salam, A.; Strathdee, J.

    1982-10-01

    A discrete set of solutions to the classical Einstein-Maxwell equations in six-dimensional spacetime is considered. These solutions have the form of a product of four-dimensional constant curvature spacetime with a 2-sphere. The Maxwell field has support on the 2-sphere where it represents a monopole of magnetic charge, n = +-1, +-2,... The spectrum of massless and massive states is obtained for the special case of the flat 4-space, and the solution is shown to be classically stable. The limiting case where the radius of the 2-sphere becomes small is considered and a dimensionally reduced effective Lagrangian for the long range modes is derived. This turns out to be an SU(2) x U(1) gauge theory with chiral couplings. (author)

  10. Are Einstein's transition probabilities for spontaneous emission constant in plasmas?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griem, H. R.; Huang, Y. W.; Wang, J.-S.; Moreno, J. C.

    1991-01-01

    An investigation is conducted with a ruby laser to experimentally confirm the quenching of spontaneous emission coefficients and propose a mechanism for the phenomenon. Results of previous experiments are examined to determine the consistency and validity of interpretations of the spontaneous emissions. For the C IV 3s-3p and 2s-3p transitions, the line-intensity ratios are found to be dependent on the separation of the laser from the target. Density gradients and Stark broadening are proposed to interpret the results in a way that does not invalidate the Einstein A values. The interpretation is extended to C III and N V, both of which demonstrate similar changes in A values in previous experiments. The apparent quenching of Ar II by photon collisions is explained by Rabi oscillations and power broadening in the argon-ion laser cavity. It is concluded that the changes in A values cannot result from dense plasma effects.

  11. Quenching of Einstein A-Coefficients in plasmas and lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suckewer, S.; Princeton Univ., NJ

    1991-03-01

    The coefficient of spontaneous emission (Einstein A-coefficient) is considered to be one of the basic constants of a given transition in atom or ion. The formula for the Einstein A-coefficient was derived in the pioneering works of Weisskopf and Wigner (WW) based on Dirac's theory of light. More recently, however, it was noted in several papers that the rate of spontaneous radiative decay can deviate significantly from the WW expression in certain conditions, for example in a laser cavity. A different type of change in A- coefficients was inferred from measurements of changes in the intensity branching ratio of spectral lines in a plasma. A change of branching ratio of up to a factor of 10 was observed in CIV for 3p-3s (580.1--581.2nm) and 3p-2s (31.2-nm) transitions when the electron density changed from approximately N e ∼ 1 x 10 18 to 5 x 10 18 cm -3 . This effect was also observed in CIII and NV. An initial theoretical approach to the problem based on the integration of the Schroedinger equation with the ion Coulomb potential modified by the electron cloud within the Debye radius was unsuccessfully in predicting the experimental observations. The effect of quenching of spontaneous emission coefficients was observed also in an Ar-ion laser as a function of the intracavity power density (photon density) for lines originating from the same upper level as the lasing line. Measurements of these line profiles absorption for different lasing conditions and related discussions are also presented. 14 refs., 6 figs

  12. Einstein's cosmology review of 1933: a new perspective on the Einstein-de Sitter model of the cosmos

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Raifeartaigh, Cormac; O'Keeffe, Michael; Nahm, Werner; Mitton, Simon

    2015-09-01

    We present a first English translation and analysis of a little-known review of relativistic cosmology written by Albert Einstein in late 1932. The article, which was published in 1933 in a book of Einstein papers translated into French, contains a substantial review of static and dynamic relativistic models of the cosmos, culminating in a discussion of the Einstein-de Sitter model. The article offers a valuable contemporaneous insight into Einstein's cosmology in the early 1930s and confirms that his interest lay in the development of the simplest model of the cosmos that could account for observation. The article also confirms that Einstein did not believe that simplified relativistic models could give an accurate description of the early universe.

  13. Einstein boundary conditions in relation to constraint propagation for the initial-boundary value problem of the Einstein equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frittelli, Simonetta; Gomez, Roberto

    2004-01-01

    We show how the use of the normal projection of the Einstein tensor as a set of boundary conditions relates to the propagation of the constraints, for two representations of the Einstein equations with vanishing shift vector: the Arnowitt-Deser-Misner formulation, which is ill posed, and the Einstein-Christoffel formulation, which is symmetric hyperbolic. Essentially, the components of the normal projection of the Einstein tensor that act as nontrivial boundary conditions are linear combinations of the evolution equations with the constraints that are not preserved at the boundary, in both cases. In the process, the relationship of the normal projection of the Einstein tensor to the recently introduced 'constraint-preserving' boundary conditions becomes apparent

  14. EINSTEIN EQUATIONS FOR TETRAD FIELDS ECUACIONES DE EINSTEIN PARA CAMPOS TETRADOS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héctor Torres-Silva

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Every metric tensor can be expressed by the inner product of tetrad fields. We prove that Einstein's equations for these fields have the same form as the stress-energy tensor of electromagnetism if the total external current . Using the Evans' unified field theory, we show that the true unification of gravity and electromagnetism is with source-free Maxwell equations.Todo tensor métrico puede ser expresado por el producto interno de campos tetrados. Se prueba que las ecuaciones de Einstein para esos campos tienen la misma forma que el tensor electromagnético de momento-energía si la corriente externa total es igual a cero. Usando la teoría de campo unificado de Evans se muestra que la verdadera unificación de la gravedad y el electromagnetismo es con las ecuaciones de Maxwell sin fuentes.

  15. Spatial entanglement patterns and Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen steering in Bose-Einstein condensates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadel, Matteo; Zibold, Tilman; Décamps, Boris; Treutlein, Philipp

    2018-04-01

    Many-particle entanglement is a fundamental concept of quantum physics that still presents conceptual challenges. Although nonclassical states of atomic ensembles were used to enhance measurement precision in quantum metrology, the notion of entanglement in these systems was debated because the correlations among the indistinguishable atoms were witnessed by collective measurements only. Here, we use high-resolution imaging to directly measure the spin correlations between spatially separated parts of a spin-squeezed Bose-Einstein condensate. We observe entanglement that is strong enough for Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen steering: We can predict measurement outcomes for noncommuting observables in one spatial region on the basis of corresponding measurements in another region with an inferred uncertainty product below the Heisenberg uncertainty bound. This method could be exploited for entanglement-enhanced imaging of electromagnetic field distributions and quantum information tasks.

  16. Bose-Einstein condensation and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaksch, D.H.

    1999-10-01

    After a short introduction on recent developments in the field of Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) with weakly interacting neutral atoms in the first part of my thesis I investigate the properties of a BEC in its stationary state with the help of quantum kinetic theory in the second part. Especially, I consider the particle number and phase fluctuations of a BEC emerging from the interaction of the condensed particles with the thermal cloud of atoms. In the third part of my thesis I show how one might realize the Bose-Hubbard model in optical lattices by making use of BEC. In the last part of my work I show how one can realize quantum logic with neutral atoms trapped in either optical lattices or in magnetic microtraps. (author)

  17. Faraday waves in Bose-Einstein condensates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolin, Alexandru I.; Carretero-Gonzalez, R.; Kevrekidis, P. G.

    2007-01-01

    Motivated by recent experiments on Faraday waves in Bose-Einstein condensates we investigate both analytically and numerically the dynamics of cigar-shaped Bose-condensed gases subject to periodic modulation of the strength of the transverse confinement. We offer a fully analytical explanation of the observed parametric resonance, based on a Mathieu-type analysis of the non-polynomial Schroedinger equation. The theoretical prediction for the pattern periodicity versus the driving frequency is directly compared to the experimental data, yielding good qualitative and quantitative agreement between the two. These results are corroborated by direct numerical simulations of both the one-dimensional non-polynomial Schroedinger equation and of the fully three-dimensional Gross-Pitaevskii equation

  18. Revealing Hidden Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen Nonlocality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walborn, S. P.; Salles, A.; Gomes, R. M.; Toscano, F.; Souto Ribeiro, P. H.

    2011-04-01

    Steering is a form of quantum nonlocality that is intimately related to the famous Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) paradox that ignited the ongoing discussion of quantum correlations. Within the hierarchy of nonlocal correlations appearing in nature, EPR steering occupies an intermediate position between Bell nonlocality and entanglement. In continuous variable systems, EPR steering correlations have been observed by violation of Reid’s EPR inequality, which is based on inferred variances of complementary observables. Here we propose and experimentally test a new criterion based on entropy functions, and show that it is more powerful than the variance inequality for identifying EPR steering. Using the entropic criterion our experimental results show EPR steering, while the variance criterion does not. Our results open up the possibility of observing this type of nonlocality in a wider variety of quantum states.

  19. Energy in the Einstein-aether theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eling, Christopher

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the energy of a theory with a unit vector field (the aether) coupled to gravity. Both the Weinberg and Einstein type energy-momentum pseudotensors are employed. In the linearized theory we find expressions for the energy density of the 5 wave modes. The requirement that the modes have positive energy is then used to constrain the theory. In the fully nonlinear theory we compute the total energy of an asymptotically flat spacetime. The resulting energy expression is modified by the presence of the aether due to the nonzero value of the unit vector at infinity and its 1/r falloff. The question of nonlinear energy positivity is also discussed, but not resolved

  20. Twistor theory and the Einstein equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Law, P.R.

    1985-01-01

    R. Penrose has argued that the goal of twistor theory with regard to the vacuum Einstein equations ought to consist of some kind of unification of twistor-theoretic description of anti-self-dual (a.s.d.) and self-dual (s.d.) space-times. S.d. space-times currently possess a description only in terms of dual twistor space, however, rather than twistor space. In this paper, suggestions due to Penrose for providing a purely twistor space description of s.d. space-times are investigated. It is shown how the points of certain s.d. space-times define mappings on twistor space and the geometry of these mappings is studied. The families of mappings for two particular s.d. space-times are presented explicitly. (author)

  1. Feynman graph derivation of Einstein quadrupole formula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dass, N.D.H.; Soni, V.

    1980-11-01

    The one graviton transition operator, and consequently, the classical energy loss formula for gravitational radiation are derived from the Feynman graphs of helicity +- 2 theories of gravitation. The calculations are done both for the case of electromagnetic and gravitational scattering. The departure of the in and out states from plane waves owing to the long range nature of gravitation is taken into account to improve the Born approximation calculations. This also includes a long range modification of the graviton wave function which is shown to be equivalent to the classical problem of the true light cones deviating logarithmically at large distances from the flat space light cones. The transition from the S-matrix elements calculated graphically to the graviton transition operator is done by using complimentarity of space-time and momentum descriptions. The energy loss formula derived originally by Einstein is shown to be correct. (Auth.)

  2. Bose-Einstein condensation and superfluidity

    CERN Document Server

    Pitaevskii, Lev

    2016-01-01

    This volume introduces the basic concepts of Bose–Einstein condensation and superfluidity. It makes special reference to the physics of ultracold atomic gases; an area in which enormous experimental and theoretical progress has been achieved in the last twenty years. Various theoretical approaches to describing the physics of interacting bosons and of interacting Fermi gases, giving rise to bosonic pairs and hence to condensation, are discussed in detail, both in uniform and harmonically trapped configurations. Special focus is given to the comparison between theory and experiment, concerning various equilibrium, dynamic, thermodynamic, and superfluid properties of these novel systems. The volume also includes discussions of ultracold gases in dimensions, quantum mixtures, and long-range dipolar interactions.

  3. Einstein, quantum spook, and the world formula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mischler, Janick P.

    2012-01-01

    This books explains the mysteries of modern physics in a simple and entertaining way. Did you know that your car fits in each garage if you only drive in fastly enough? Or you park in the ditch, if your GPS understands no relativity theory? Or that you don't need to open the door in order to leave the house? Or that your watch goes slower on the moon than on the earth? No? Then you should relatively surely read this book and learn what is going on to be with Einstein's legacy and the strange world of quantum physics. For strange phenomena like the fourth dimension, time voyages, antimatter, or the spooky action at a distance exist really.Learn, what we already today know about our universe. You will be amazed, how strange, tremendous, and revolutionary the knowledges are, which has modern physics made in the last years.

  4. Vortices in trapped Bose-Einstein condensates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, B.

    2000-09-01

    In this thesis we solve the Gross-Pitaevskii equation numerically in order to model the response of trapped Bose-Einstein condensed gases to perturbations by electromagnetic fields. First, we simulate output coupling of pulses from the condensate and compare our results to experiments. The excitation and separation of eigenmodes on flow through a constriction is also studied. We then move on to the main theme of this thesis: the important subject of quantised vortices in Bose condensates, and the relation between Bose-Einstein condensation and superfluidity. We propose methods of producing vortex pairs and rings by controlled motion of objects. Full three-dimensional simulations under realistic experimental conditions are performed in order to test the validity of these ideas. We link vortex formation to drag forces on the object, which in turn is connected with energy transfer to the condensate. We therefore argue that vortex formation by moving objects is intimately related to the onset of dissipation in superfluids. We discuss this idea in the context of a recent experiment, using simulations to provide evidence of vortex formation in the experimental scenario. Superfluidity is also manifest in the property of persistent currents, which is linked to vortex stability and dynamics. We simulate vortex line and ring motion, and find in both cases precessional motion and thermodynamic instability to dissipation. Strictly speaking, the Gross-Pitaevskii equation is valid only for temperatures far below the BEC transition. We end the thesis by describing a simple finite-temperature model to describe mean-field coupling between condensed and non-condensed components of the gas. We show that our hybrid Monte-Carlo/FFT technique can describe damping of the lowest energy excitations of the system. Extensions to this model and future research directions are discussed in the conclusion. (author)

  5. INFLUENCE OF THE HIGHER ORDER DERIVATIVES ON THE PLANET PERIHELION PRECESSION IN THE EINSTEIN FIELD EQUATIONS FOR VACUUM CONDITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teguh Budi Prayitno

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the effect of higher order derivative tensor in the Einstein field equations for vacuum condition on the planet perihelion precession. This tensor was initially proposed as the space-time curvature tensor by Deser and Tekin on discussions about the energy effects caused by this tensor. However, they include this tensor to Einstein field equations as a new model in general relativity theory. This is very interesting since there are some questions in cosmology and astrophysics that have no answers. Thus, they hoped this model could solve those problems by finding analytical or perturbative solution and interpreting it. In this case, the perturbative solution was used to find the Schwarzschild solution and it was also applied to consider the planetary motion in the solar gravitational field. Furthermore, it was proven that the tensor is divergence-free in order to keep the Einstein field equations remain valid.

  6. What about Albert Einstein? Using Biographies to Promote Students' Scientific Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fingon, Joan C.; Fingon, Shallon D.

    2009-01-01

    Who hasn't heard of Einstein? Science educators everywhere are familiar with Einstein's genius and general theory of relativity. Students easily recognize Einstein's image by his white flyaway hair and bushy mustache. It is well known that Einstein was a brilliant physicist and an abstract thinker who often used his creativity and imagination in…

  7. The Einstein Genome Gateway using WASP - a high throughput multi-layered life sciences portal for XSEDE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Aaron; McLellan, Andrew S; Dubin, Robert A; Jing, Qiang; O Broin, Pilib; Moskowitz, David; Zhang, Zhengdong; Suzuki, Masako; Hargitai, Joseph; Calder, R Brent; Greally, John M

    2012-01-01

    Massively-parallel sequencing (MPS) technologies and their diverse applications in genomics and epigenomics research have yielded enormous new insights into the physiology and pathophysiology of the human genome. The biggest hurdle remains the magnitude and diversity of the datasets generated, compromising our ability to manage, organize, process and ultimately analyse data. The Wiki-based Automated Sequence Processor (WASP), developed at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine (hereafter Einstein), uniquely manages to tightly couple the sequencing platform, the sequencing assay, sample metadata and the automated workflows deployed on a heterogeneous high performance computing cluster infrastructure that yield sequenced, quality-controlled and 'mapped' sequence data, all within the one operating environment accessible by a web-based GUI interface. WASP at Einstein processes 4-6 TB of data per week and since its production cycle commenced it has processed ~ 1 PB of data overall and has revolutionized user interactivity with these new genomic technologies, who remain blissfully unaware of the data storage, management and most importantly processing services they request. The abstraction of such computational complexity for the user in effect makes WASP an ideal middleware solution, and an appropriate basis for the development of a grid-enabled resource - the Einstein Genome Gateway - as part of the Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE) program. In this paper we discuss the existing WASP system, its proposed middleware role, and its planned interaction with XSEDE to form the Einstein Genome Gateway.

  8. An Einstein-Cartan Fine Structure Constant Definition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stone R. A. Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The fine structure constant definition given in Stone R.A. Jr. Progress in Physics, 2010, v.1, 11-13 is compared to an Einstein-Cartan fine structure constant definition. It is shown that the Einstein-Cartan definition produces the correct pure theory value, just not the measure value. To produce the measured value, the pure theory Einstein-Cartan fine structure constant requires only the new variables and spin coupling of the fine structure constant definition in [1].

  9. Einstein's pathway to the special theory of relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Weinstein, Galina

    2015-01-01

    This book pieces together the jigsaw puzzle of Einstein's journey to discovering the special theory of relativity. Between 1902 and 1905, Einstein sat in the Patent Office and may have made calculations on old pieces of paper that were once patent drafts. One can imagine Einstein trying to hide from his boss, writing notes on small sheets of paper, and, according to reports, seeing to it that the small sheets of paper on which he was writing would vanish into his desk-drawer as soon as he heard footsteps approaching his door. He probably discarded many pieces of papers and calculations and flu

  10. The large number hypothesis and Einstein's theory of gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun-Kau Lau

    1985-01-01

    In an attempt to reconcile the large number hypothesis (LNH) with Einstein's theory of gravitation, a tentative generalization of Einstein's field equations with time-dependent cosmological and gravitational constants is proposed. A cosmological model consistent with the LNH is deduced. The coupling formula of the cosmological constant with matter is found, and as a consequence, the time-dependent formulae of the cosmological constant and the mean matter density of the Universe at the present epoch are then found. Einstein's theory of gravitation, whether with a zero or nonzero cosmological constant, becomes a limiting case of the new generalized field equations after the early epoch

  11. Einstein at the beach. Relativity in a deck chair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lachieze-Rey, Marc; Ligot, Ludovic; Marai, Rachid

    2015-01-01

    The author introduces the relativistic theory developed by Einstein. He describes how the need for a new theory emerged to solve some problems faced by conventional (or Newtonian) physics, and resulted in the special theory of relativity which then revealed a new geometry of the universe. He describes and comments the various tests performed to test the Einstein theory, outlines the differences between the Newton and Einstein frameworks to study and understand the cosmos. The author then describes the history of the Universe, comments the developments of cosmology and astrophysics, of the knowledge on light. In the last chapter, he describes cosmic manifestations of relativity

  12. Einstein's Approach to Statistical Mechanics: The 1902-04 Papers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peliti, Luca; Rechtman, Raúl

    2017-05-01

    We summarize the papers published by Einstein in the Annalen der Physik in the years 1902-1904 on the derivation of the properties of thermal equilibrium on the basis of the mechanical equations of motion and of the calculus of probabilities. We point out the line of thought that led Einstein to an especially economical foundation of the discipline, and to focus on fluctuations of the energy as a possible tool for establishing the validity of this foundation. We also sketch a comparison of Einstein's approach with that of Gibbs, suggesting that although they obtained similar results, they had different motivations and interpreted them in very different ways.

  13. Einstein's physics atoms, quanta, and relativity : derived, explained, and appraised

    CERN Document Server

    Cheng, Ta-Pei

    2013-01-01

    Many regard Albert Einstein as the greatest physicist since Newton. What exactly did he do that is so important in physics? We provide an introduction to his physics at a level accessible to an undergraduate physics student. All equations are worked out in detail from the beginning. Einstein's doctoral thesis and his Brownian motion paper were decisive contributions to our understanding of matter as composed of molecules and atoms. Einstein was one of the founding fathers of quantum theory: his photon proposal through the investigation of blackbody radiation, his quantum theory of photoelectri

  14. Einstein constraints in the Yang-Mills form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashtekar, A.

    1987-01-01

    It is pointed out that constraints of Einstein's theory play a powerful role in both classical and quantum theory because they generate motions in spacetime, rather than in an internal space. New variables are then introduced on the Einstein phase space in terms of which constraints simplify considerably. In particular, the use of these variables enables one to imbed the constraint surface of Einstein's theory into that of Yang-Mills. The imbedding suggests new lines of attack to a number of problems in classical and quantum gravity and provides new concepts and tools to investigate the microscopic structure of space-time geometry

  15. Competition between Bose-Einstein Condensation and Spin Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naylor, B; Brewczyk, M; Gajda, M; Gorceix, O; Maréchal, E; Vernac, L; Laburthe-Tolra, B

    2016-10-28

    We study the impact of spin-exchange collisions on the dynamics of Bose-Einstein condensation by rapidly cooling a chromium multicomponent Bose gas. Despite relatively strong spin-dependent interactions, the critical temperature for Bose-Einstein condensation is reached before the spin degrees of freedom fully thermalize. The increase in density due to Bose-Einstein condensation then triggers spin dynamics, hampering the formation of condensates in spin-excited states. Small metastable spinor condensates are, nevertheless, produced, and they manifest in strong spin fluctuations.

  16. On gravitational wave energy in Einstein gravitational theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Folomeshkin, V.N.; Vlasov, A.A.

    1978-01-01

    By the example of precise wave solutions for the Einstein equations it is shown that a standard commonly adopted formulation of energy-momentum problem with pseudotensors provides us either with a zero or sign-variable values for the energy of gravitational waves. It is shown that if in the Einstein gravitational theory a strict transition to the limits of weak fields is realised then the theory gives us an unambiguous zero result for weak gravitational waves. The well-known non-zero result arises due to incorrect transition to weak field approximation in the Einstein gravitation theory

  17. Interferometer tests for quantum non-locality using Bose-Einstein condensates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mullin, W J [Department of Physics, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003 (United States); Laloe, F [Laboratoire Kastler Brossel, ENS, UPMC, CNRS, 24 rue Lhomond, 75005 Paris (France)], E-mail: mullin@physics.umass.edu, E-mail: laloe@lkb.ens.fr

    2009-02-01

    In conventional Einstein-Rosen-Podolsky (EPR) experiments that violate local realism, particles are placed in very particular entangled states. We propose here to use two or three spinless Fock-state Bose-Einstein condensates as independent sources in interferometery experiments. While these states do not seem to be entangled, nevertheless we show that interferometers can be constructed that demonstrate a large variety of different violations local reality. We find violations of Bell inequalities, new Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) contradictions, and Hardy impossibilities. These violations continue to arbitrarily large particle numbers. A necessary condition to observe the quantum effects is that all particles should be observed; if some are missed, the quantum effects disappear.

  18. Bose-Einstein Condensation of Long-Lifetime Polaritons in Thermal Equilibrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yongbao; Wen, Patrick; Yoon, Yoseob; Liu, Gangqiang; Steger, Mark; Pfeiffer, Loren N; West, Ken; Snoke, David W; Nelson, Keith A

    2017-01-06

    The experimental realization of Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) with atoms and quasiparticles has triggered wide exploration of macroscopic quantum effects. Microcavity polaritons are of particular interest because quantum phenomena such as BEC and superfluidity can be observed at elevated temperatures. However, polariton lifetimes are typically too short to permit thermal equilibration. This has led to debate about whether polariton condensation is intrinsically a nonequilibrium effect. Here we report the first unambiguous observation of BEC of optically trapped polaritons in thermal equilibrium in a high-Q microcavity, evidenced by equilibrium Bose-Einstein distributions over broad ranges of polariton densities and bath temperatures. With thermal equilibrium established, we verify that polariton condensation is a phase transition with a well-defined density-temperature phase diagram. The measured phase boundary agrees well with the predictions of basic quantum gas theory.

  19. Almost Kaehler Ricci Flows and Einstein and Lagrange-Finsler Structures on Lie Algebroids

    CERN Document Server

    Vacaru, Sergiu I

    2015-01-01

    In this work we investigate Ricci flows of almost Kaehler structures on Lie algebroids when the fundamental geometric objects are completely determined by (semi) Riemannian metrics, or effective) regular generating Lagrange/ Finsler, functions. There are constructed canonical almost symplectic connections for which the geometric flows can be represented as gradient ones and characterized by nonholonomic deformations of Grigory Perelman's functionals. The first goal of this paper is to define such thermodynamical type values and derive almost K\\"ahler - Ricci geometric evolution equations. The second goal is to study how fixed Lie algebroid, i.e. Ricci soliton, configurations can be constructed for Riemannian manifolds and/or (co) tangent bundles endowed with nonholonomic distributions modelling (generalized) Einstein or Finsler - Cartan spaces. Finally, there are provided some examples of generic off-diagonal solutions for Lie algebroid type Ricci solitons and (effective) Einstein and Lagrange-Finsler algebro...

  20. Structure of the space of solutions of Einstein's equations II: Several killing fields and the Einstein-Yang-Mills equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arms, J.M.; Marsden, J.E.; Moncrief, V.

    1982-01-01

    The space of solutions of Einstein's vacuum equations is shown to have conical singularities at each spacetime possessing a compact Cauchy surface of constant mean curvature and a nontrivial set of Killing fields. Similar results are shown for the coupled Einstein-Yang-Mills system. Combined with an appropriate slice theorem, the results show that the space of geometrically equivalent solutions is a stratified manifold with each stratum being a symplectic manifold characterized by the symmetry type of its members. Contents: Introduction 1. The Kuranishi map and its properties. 2. The momentum constraints. 3. The Hamiltonian constraints. 4. The Einstein-Yang-Mills system. 5. Discussion and examples

  1. On static black holes solutions in Einstein and Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity with topology [Formula: see text].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadhich, Naresh; Pons, Josep M

    We study static black hole solutions in Einstein and Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity with the topology of the product of two spheres, [Formula: see text], in higher dimensions. There is an unusual new feature of the Gauss-Bonnet black hole: the avoidance of a non-central naked singularity prescribes a mass range for the black hole in terms of [Formula: see text]. For an Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet black hole a limited window of negative values for [Formula: see text] is also permitted. This topology encompasses black strings, branes, and generalized Nariai metrics. We also give new solutions with the product of two spheres of constant curvature.

  2. Study of Bose-Einstein Correlations in $e^{+}e^{-}\\to W^{+}W^{-}$ events at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Akesson, P.F.; Alexander, G.; Allison, John; Amaral, P.; Anagnostou, G.; Anderson, K.J.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Bailey, I.; Barberio, E.; Barillari, T.; Barlow, R.J.; Batley, R.J.; Bechtle, P.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bell, P.J.; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Benelli, G.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Boeriu, O.; Bock, P.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Buesser, K.; Burckhart, H.J.; Campana, S.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, D.G.; Ciocca, C.; Csilling, A.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Donkers, M.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Feld, L.; Ferrari, P.; Fiedler, F.; Fleck, I.; Ford, M.; Frey, A.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, John William; Gaycken, G.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giunta, Marina; Goldberg, J.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Gunther, P.O.; Gupta, A.; Hajdu, C.; Hamann, M.; Hanson, G.G.; Harel, A.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hoffman, Kara Dion; Horvath, D.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Ishii, K.; Jeremie, H.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanaya, N.; Kanzaki, J.; Karlen, D.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kluth, S.; Klein, K.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kramer, T.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kruger, K.; Kuhl, T.; Kupper, M.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Layter, J.G.; Lellouch, D.; Lettso, J.; Levinson, L.; Lillich, J.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, A.; Ludwig, J.; Mader, W.; Marcellini, S.; Martin, A.J.; Masetti, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McKenna, J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menges, W.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, Niels T.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Moed, S.; Mohr, W.; Mori, T.; Mutter, A.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Nanjo, H.; Neal, H.A.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oh, A.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Pahl, C.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poli, B.; Pooth, O.; Przybycien, M.; Quadt, A.; Rabbertz, K.; Rembser, C.; Renkel, P.; Roney, J.M.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sarkisyan, E.K.G.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Scott, W.G.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Sherwood, P.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spano, F.; Stahl, A.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Tarem, S.; Tasevsky, M.; Teuscher, R.; Thomson, M.A.; Torrence, E.; Toya, D.; Tran, P.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Ujvari, B.; Vollmer, C.F.; Vannerem, P.; Vertesi, R.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Vossebeld, J.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wolf, G.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Zer-Zion, D.; Zivkovic, Lidija

    2004-01-01

    Bose-Einstein correlation between like-sign charged-particle pairs in e+e- -> W+W- events recorded with the OPAL detector at LEP at centre-of-mass energies between 183 GeV and 209 GeV are studied. Recently proposed methods which allow direct searches for correlations in the data via distributions of test variables are used to investigate the presence of correlations between hadrons originating from different W bosons in W+W- -> qqqq events. Within the statistics of the data sample no evidence for inter-WW Bose-Einstein correlations is obtained. The data are also compared with predictions of a recent implementation of Bose-Einstein correlation effects in the Monte Carlo model PYTHIA.

  3. Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen paradox and measurement of quantum system

    OpenAIRE

    Kladko, Konstantin

    1999-01-01

    Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) paradox is considered in a relation to a measurement of an arbitrary quantum system . It is shown that the EPR paradox always appears in a gedanken experiment with two successively joined measuring devices.

  4. Was Einstein wrong? Space station research may find out

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Experiments using ultra-precise clocks on the International Space Station will attempt to check if Einstein's Special Theory of Relativity is correct. Future experiments may also yield evidence of string theory (1 page).

  5. The Einstein-Vlasov System/Kinetic Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andréasson, Håkan

    2011-01-01

    The main purpose of this article is to provide a guide to theorems on global properties of solutions to the Einstein-Vlasov system. This system couples Einstein's equations to a kinetic matter model. Kinetic theory has been an important field of research during several decades in which the main focus has been on non-relativistic and special relativistic physics, i.e., to model the dynamics of neutral gases, plasmas, and Newtonian self-gravitating systems. In 1990, Rendall and Rein initiated a mathematical study of the Einstein-Vlasov system. Since then many theorems on global properties of solutions to this system have been established. This paper gives introductions to kinetic theory in non-curved spacetimes and then the Einstein-Vlasov system is introduced. We believe that a good understanding of kinetic theory in non-curved spacetimes is fundamental to a good comprehension of kinetic theory in general relativity.

  6. Academic Training: Einstein and beyond: Introduction to General relativity

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2005-01-01

    2005-2006 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME LECTURE SERIES 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 October from 11:00 to 12:00 - Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 Einstein and beyond: Introduction to General relativity by N. Straumann / Institut fur theoretische physics, Univ. Zürich We review the enduring achievements of Einstein's papers of 1905 and their impact on the further developments in physics. Program : Lectures I and II:Einstein's Contributions to Statistical Mechanics and Quantum Theory Lecture III:Einstein's Thesis at the University of Zürich Lecture IV: From Special to General Relativity Lecture V: The History and the Mystery of the Cosmological Constant ENSEIGNEMENT ACADEMIQUE ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz 73127 academic.training@cern.ch

  7. Einstein's conversion from his static to an expanding universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nussbaumer, Harry

    2014-02-01

    In 1917 Einstein initiated modern cosmology by postulating, based on general relativity, a homogenous, static, spatially curved universe. To counteract gravitational contraction he introduced the cosmological constant. In 1922 Alexander Friedman showed that Albert Einstein's fundamental equations also allow dynamical worlds, and in 1927 Georges Lemaître, backed by observational evidence, concluded that our universe was expanding. Einstein impetuously rejected Friedman's as well as Lemaître's findings. However, in 1931 he retracted his former static model in favour of a dynamic solution. This investigation follows Einstein on his hesitating path from a static to the expanding universe. Contrary to an often advocated belief the primary motive for his switch was not observational evidence, but the realisation that his static model was unstable.

  8. Einstein's equivalence principle instead of the inertia forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herreros Mateos, F.

    1997-01-01

    In this article I intend to show that Einstein's equivalence principle substitutes advantageously the inertia forces in the study and resolution of problems in which non-inertial systems appear. (Author) 13 refs

  9. Linear Einstein equations and Kerr-Schild maps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gergely, Laszlo A

    2002-01-01

    We prove that given a solution of the Einstein equations g ab for the matter field T ab , an autoparallel null vector field l a and a solution (l a l c , T ac ) of the linearized Einstein equation on the given background, the Kerr-Schild metric g ac + λl a l c (λ arbitrary constant) is an exact solution of the Einstein equation for the energy-momentum tensor T ac + λT ac + λ 2 l (a T c)b l b . The mixed form of the Einstein equation for Kerr-Schild metrics with autoparallel null congruence is also linear. Some more technical conditions hold when the null congruence is not autoparallel. These results generalize previous theorems for vacuum due to Xanthopoulos and for flat seed spacetime due to Guerses and Guersey

  10. Reflections The Early life of Albert Einstein: Seeking the Mature ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Einstein's formal education began in Munich when he was enrolled in the Luitpold. Gymnasium in ... To quote from his address: " .. in modern times, the Greeks and. Romans are .... and instruction. It was a freedom traditional at Aarau and,.

  11. Albert Einstein and the problem of unification of fundamental interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arodz, H.

    1986-01-01

    Albert Einstein's attempts to construct a unified field theory of electromagnetic and gravitational interactions are presented and commented from the standpoint of the present day physics. 16 refs. (author)

  12. Relativity and Gravitation : 100 Years After Einstein in Prague

    CERN Document Server

    Ledvinka, Tomáš; General Relativity, Cosmology and Astrophysics : Perspectives 100 Years After Einstein's Stay in Prague

    2014-01-01

    In early April 1911 Albert Einstein arrived in Prague to become full professor of theoretical physics at the German part of Charles University. It was there, for the first time, that he concentrated primarily on the problem of gravitation. Before he left Prague in July 1912 he had submitted the paper “Relativität und Gravitation: Erwiderung auf eine Bemerkung von M. Abraham” in which he remarkably anticipated what a future theory of gravity should look like. At the occasion of the Einstein-in-Prague centenary an international meeting was organized under a title inspired by Einstein's last paper from the Prague period: "Relativity and Gravitation, 100 Years after Einstein in Prague". The main topics of the conference included: classical relativity, numerical relativity, relativistic astrophysics and cosmology, quantum gravity, experimental aspects of gravitation, and conceptual and historical issues. The conference attracted over 200 scientists from 31 countries, among them a number of leading experts in ...

  13. Linearized analysis of (2+1)-dimensional Einstein-Maxwell theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soda, Jiro.

    1989-08-01

    On the basis of previous result by Hosoya and Nakao that (2+1)-dimensional gravity reduces the geodesic motion in moduli space, we investigate the effects of matter fields on the geodesic motion using the linearized theory. It is shown that the transverse-traceless parts of energy-momentum tensor make the deviation from the geodesic motion. This result is important for the Einstein-Maxwell theory due to the existence of global modes of Maxwell fields on torus. (author)

  14. Optical orientation of the homogeneous non-equilibrium Bose-Einstein condensate of bright excitons (polaritons)

    OpenAIRE

    Korenev, V. L.

    2011-01-01

    A simple model, describing the dynamics of the non-equilibrium pseudospin of a homogeneous Bose-Einstein condensate of exciton polaritons, has been formulated. It explains the suppression of spin splitting of a non-equilibrium polariton condensate in an external magnetic field, the optical alignment, and the conversion of alignment into orientation of polaritons. It has been shown that inverse effects are possible, to wit, the spontaneous circular polarization and the enhancement of spin spli...

  15. Einstein and Rastall theories of gravitation in comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darabi, F.; Moradpour, H.; Licata, I.; Heydarzade, Y.; Corda, C.

    2018-01-01

    We profit by a recent paper of Visser claiming that Rastall gravity is equivalent to Einstein gravity to compare the two gravitational theories in a general way. Our conclusions are different from Visser's ones. We indeed argue that these two theories are not equivalent. In fact, Rastall theory of gravity is an "open" theory when compared to Einstein general theory of relativity. Thus, it is ready to accept the challenges of observational cosmology and quantum gravity.

  16. Possible Experiments to test Einstein's Special Relativity Theory

    OpenAIRE

    de Haan, Victor Otto

    2011-01-01

    All of the experiments supporting Einstein's Special Relativity Theory are also supportive of the Lorentz ether theory, or many other ether theories. However, a growing number of experiments show deviations from Einstein's Special Relativity Theory, but are supporting more extended theories. Some of these experiments are reviewed and analyzed. Unfortunately, many experiments are not of high quality, never repeated and mostly both. It is proposed that the most promising experiments should be r...

  17. Higher order Bose-Einstein correlations in identical particle production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biyajima, M.

    1990-01-01

    A diagram technique to calculate the higher order Bose-Einstein correlations is formulated. This technique is applied to derive explicit expressions for the n-pion correlation functions for n = 2, 3, 4, and 5, and numerical predictions are given. In a comparison with the AFS and NA23 data on two-pion and three-pion Bose-Einstein correlations good agreement is obtained. 21 refs., 5 figs. (Authors)

  18. A complete public archive for the Einstein IPC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfand, David J.

    1995-01-01

    This report documents progress made in the period 24 Sept. 1993 - 23 Sept. 1995 on the project described in our proposal 'A Complete Public Archive for the Einstein IPC' which was approved under the Astrophysics Data Program in 1992. We have completed most of the principal objectives of the original proposal; a NFE was recently approved so that costs for publications in press can be covered and we can complete the public record for the Einstein IPC database.

  19. Einstein gravity with torsion induced by the scalar field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özçelik, H. T.; Kaya, R.; Hortaçsu, M.

    2018-06-01

    We couple a conformal scalar field in (2+1) dimensions to Einstein gravity with torsion. The field equations are obtained by a variational principle. We could not solve the Einstein and Cartan equations analytically. These equations are solved numerically with 4th order Runge-Kutta method. From the numerical solution, we make an ansatz for the rotation parameter in the proposed metric, which gives an analytical solution for the scalar field for asymptotic regions.

  20. Einstein-Friedmann equation, nonlinear dynamics and chaotic behaviours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Yosuke; Nakano, Shingo; Ohta, Shigetoshi; Mori, Keisuke; Horiuchi, Tanji

    2009-01-01

    We have studied the Einstein-Friedmann equation [Case 1] on the basis of the bifurcation theory and shown that the chaotic behaviours in the Einstein-Friedmann equation [Case 1] are reduced to the pitchfork bifurcation and the homoclinic bifurcation. We have obtained the following results: (i) 'The chaos region diagram' (the p-λ plane) in the Einstein-Friedmann equation [Case 1]. (ii) 'The chaos inducing chart' of the homoclinic orbital systems in the unforced differential equations. We have discussed the non-integrable conditions in the Einstein-Friedmann equation and proposed the chaotic model: p=p 0 ρ n (n≥0). In case n≠0,1, the Einstein-Friedmann equation is not integrable and there may occur chaotic behaviours. The cosmological constant (λ) turns out to play important roles for the non-integrable condition in the Einstein-Friedmann equation and also for the pitchfork bifurcation and the homoclinic bifurcation in the relativistic field equation. With the use of the E-infinity theory, we have also discussed the physical quantities in the gravitational field equations, and obtained the formula logκ=-10(1/φ) 2 [1+(φ) 8 ]=-26.737, which is in nice agreement with the experiment (-26.730).

  1. Ehrenfest en Einstein. Menselijke katalysator van het heldere denken

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marijn J. Hollestelle

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Ehrenfest and EinsteinEhrenfest and Einstein met just before Ehrenfest became professor at Leiden University. They had much in common and became best friends. Ehrenfest shed light on some problematic aspects of Einstein’s work and during the years acted as an important sparring partner for Einstein. Ehrenfest also explained difficult aspects of Einstein’s work to the physics community. He set others on the track of working on general relativity and made Leiden an international centre for these developments during the years 1912–1920. Ehrenfest made sure Einstein was appointed part-time professor at Leiden, from which Leiden physics profited. He also aided Bohr and Einstein during their notorious debates. Ehrenfest struggled with depression his whole life. The rapid developments and mathematicising of quantum physics, Hitler’s appointment as Reichs Chancellor, money and marriage problems worsened his depressions. In 1933 Ehrenfest committed suicide, and Einstein moved to the United States and away from the study on quantum physics.

  2. The second postulate of Einstein's theory of special relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMorris, M.N.

    1979-01-01

    This paper argues that Einstein in his original publication on special relativity uses two separate principles concerning the velocity of light: (i) its value, c(s), is independent of the motion of its source; (ii) its value, c(o), is independent of the motion of the observer. Where commentators have not been plainly ignorant of the existence of both principles in Einstein's work, they have been uncertain as to which one should be put forward. Uncertainty has arisen in the literature because Einstein occassionally uses constant velocity of light without any qualification. This paper sets out specifically to clear up the uncertainty as to whether c(s) or c(o) is being referred to in the early sections. It is established that c(s) is used right up to the middle of the third section, when c(o) is introduced for the first time. The paper also emphasises that there was no need to introduce c(o) before this point. It clarifies another (neglected) point also, that in so far as Einstein uses c(s), this constancy of the wave propagation is not peculiar to light; but in so far as he uses c(o) it is. The occassion is also taken to point out a contradiction and a logical infelicity occurring in Einstein's paper. The intention here is to show that Einstein's original oaper, at least up to the derivation of the Lorentz transformation equations, was not as satisfactory as it could have been. (auth.)

  3. Bose-Einstein correlation and Q-υKυ(Q) distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai Qirun; Zhao Shusong

    1995-01-01

    Bose-Einstein correlation is one of the most useful means to study the source emitting hadrons. Based on the non-perturbative theory of quantum fields, we have proposed a kind of source distribution, i.e., the Q -υ K υ (Q) distribution, which is applied to calculate single inclusion distribution of P // , P perpecular , N, Y and the correlation with each other, i.e., Seagull effect. The results have a better approximation to the corresponding experimental data. The paper emphasizes the calculation of Bose-Einstein correlation for inclusive two particle based on the Q -υ K υ (Q) distribution. The fitted curves agree with experimental data, especially, in the small Q range. The Q -υ K υ (Q) distribution is a more advanced theory as compared with Gauss source and K-P source distribution

  4. Transformations between Jordan and Einstein frames: Bounces, antigravity, and crossing singularities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamenshchik, Alexander Yu.; Pozdeeva, Ekaterina O.; Vernov, Sergey Yu.; Tronconi, Alessandro; Venturi, Giovanni

    2016-09-01

    We study the relation between the Jordan-Einstein frame transition and the possible description of the crossing of singularities in flat Friedmann universes, using the fact that the regular evolution in one frame can correspond to crossing singularities in the other frame. We show that some interesting effects arise in simple models such as one with a massless scalar field or another wherein the potential is constant in the Einstein frame. The dynamics in these models and in their conformally coupled counterparts are described in detail, and a method for the continuation of such cosmological evolutions beyond the singularity is developed. We compare our approach with some other, recently developed, approaches to the problem of the crossing of singularities.

  5. Disorder Induced Dynamic Equilibrium Localization and Random Phase Steps of Bose—Einstein Condensates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duan Ya-Fan; Xu Zhen; Qian Jun; Sun Jian-Fang; Jiang Bo-Nan; Hong Tao

    2011-01-01

    We numerically analyze the dynamic behavior of Bose—Einstein condensate (BEC) in a one-dimensional disordered potential before it completely loses spatial quantum coherence. We find that both the disorder statistics and the atom interactions produce remarkable effects on localization. We also find that the single phase of the initial condensate is broken into many small pieces while the system approaches localization, showing a counter-intuitive step-wise phase but not a thoroughly randomized phase. Although the condensates as a whole show less flow and expansion, the currents between adjacent phase steps retain strong time dependence. Thus we show explicitly that the localization of a finite size Bose—Einstein condensate is a dynamic equilibrium state. (general)

  6. Ludwig Boltzmann, Albert Einstein and Franz Joseph; Ludwig Boltzmann, Albert Einstein und Franz Joseph

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broda, E.

    1983-07-01

    Under the Emperor Francis Joseph (1848-1916) the natural sciences were less weIl supported in Austria than in other countries of Europe. This is explained by the fact that the German speaking middle classes accepted the preeminence of the feudal forces with their antiscientific attitude. The reason for this readiness to subordination was that those middle classes feIt threatened in their relatively favourable situation by Slavs and Latins. Francis Joseph was the typical representative of the aristocracy. Personally, he did his duty conscientiously and was not corrupt, but progressive ideas and scientific thought were alien to him. From his desk he treated Boltzmann benevolently, but he had no wish to meet personally the greatest mind of the Empire or in any respect to ask his views. Another famous subject of the Emperor, Albert Einstein, was apparently ignored altogether. The structural weakness of Austria, due to the national problems, led to immobilism in her scientific life, but also, up to a point, to tolerance. The impression of Victor Adler on Einstein is considered in this historical context. (author) [German] Die Naturwissenschaften wurden in Österreich unter Franz Joseph (1848-1916) weniger gefördert als in anderen Staaten Europas. Dies wird darauf zurückgeführt, daß das deutschsprechende Bürgertum sich mit der Vorherrschaft der feudalen Kräfte abfand, die nicht wissenschafts-freundlich waren. Für die Bereitschaft zur Unterordnung unter die Feudalen war maßgebend, daß das deutschsprechende Bürgertum sich durch Slawen und Romanen in seiner relativen Vorzugsstellung bedroht sah. Franz Joseph war der typische Repräsentant des konservativen Feudalismus. Er war persönlich pflichtbewußt und integer, doch waren ihm fortschrittliche Gedanken und wissenschaftliche Denkweise fremd. Boltzmann behandelte er von seinem Schreibtisch aus wohlwollend, doch hegte er keinen Wunsch, den größten Geist seines Reiches persönlich kennen zu lernen oder ihn in

  7. Michelson-Morley in Einstein's elevators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Fred; Pierce, Ayal

    2010-02-01

    Experiments are proposed in which a Michelson-Morley interferometer is placed in Einstein's thought experiments where elevators are subjected to varied accelerated fields. Unbeknownst to the observers inside the elevators, they are placed in different circumstances: on the surface of the Earth, in free fall, in space distant from any mass, and inside a rotating space station. By use of not one, but two objects, the observer will be challenged to determine the nature and shape of the accelerated field, if any, inside the elevator. It will be demonstrated that the nature of the accelerated field can be determined easily from inside the elevator by the motion of the two objects released by the observer. It will also be shown that, for the elevator on the space station which is generating an ``artificial gravity'' field by rotation, Michelson-Morley would have the same null result as on Earth. However, the Michelson-Morley experiment is adapted so that in addition to the two horizontal arms of the interferometer (parallel to the floor of the elevator) a vertical arm is added perpendicular to the floor facing towards the ceiling. Such a vertical arm added to the Michelson-Morley experiment adds a new dimension to examining each accelerated field, including gravity. )

  8. Discrete breathers in Bose–Einstein condensates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franzosi, Roberto; Politi, Antonio; Livi, Roberto; Oppo, Gian-Luca

    2011-01-01

    Discrete breathers, originally introduced in the context of biopolymers and coupled nonlinear oscillators, are also localized modes of excitation of Bose–Einstein condensates (BEC) in periodic potentials such as those generated by counter-propagating laser beams in an optical lattice. Static and dynamical properties of breather states are analysed in the discrete nonlinear Schrödinger equation that is derived in the limit of deep potential wells, tight-binding and the superfluid regime of the condensate. Static and mobile breathers can be formed by progressive re-shaping of initial Gaussian wave-packets or by transporting atomic density towards dissipative boundaries of the lattice. Static breathers generated via boundary dissipations are determined via a transfer-matrix approach and discussed in the two analytic limits of highly localized and very broad profiles. Mobile breathers that move across the lattice are well approximated by modified analytical expressions derived from integrable models with two independent parameters: the core-phase gradient and the peak amplitude. Finally, possible experimental realizations of discrete breathers in BEC in optical lattices are discussed in the presence of residual harmonic trapping and in interferometry configurations suitable to investigate discrete breathers' interactions. (invited article)

  9. Cosmological models in the generalized Einstein action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arbab, A.I.

    2007-12-01

    We have studied the evolution of the Universe in the generalized Einstein action of the form R + β R 2 , where R is the scalar curvature and β = const. We have found exact cosmological solutions that predict the present cosmic acceleration. These models predict an inflationary de-Sitter era occurring in the early Universe. The cosmological constant (Λ) is found to decay with the Hubble constant (H) as, Λ ∝ H 4 . In this scenario the cosmological constant varies quadratically with the energy density (ρ), i.e., Λ ∝ ρ 2 . Such a variation is found to describe a two-component cosmic fluid in the Universe. One of the components accelerated the Universe in the early era, and the other in the present era. The scale factor of the Universe varies as a ∼ t n = 1/2 in the radiation era. The cosmological constant vanishes when n = 4/3 and n =1/2. We have found that the inclusion of the term R 2 mimics a cosmic matter that could substitute the ordinary matter. (author)

  10. Einstein's greatest mistake abandonment of the aether

    CERN Document Server

    Deutsch, Sid

    2006-01-01

    If a child wants proof, we can think of 10 different ways to show that we are surrounded by air, but we are, of course, normally unaware that we live at the bottom of an “ocean” of air. It is claimed, in this book, that we are unaware, similarly, that we are surrounded by an atmosphere of aether. There is one major difference, however: We have not been able to detect the aether. Nevertheless, the aether provides a solution to the following mystery: How can light, or any electromagnetic wave, travel for billions of years across the vastness of the Universe, without losing any energy? The answer is that the Universe is filled with a light-transmitting medium, The Aether. The proof that there is an aether is the subject of the present book. An intriguing…exploration of a fringe scientific theory. Luminiferous aether—or "light-bearing aether," a theory first postulated by Isaac Newton in the 18th century, later refined by James Clerk Maxwell in the 19th century and ultimately replaced by Albert Einstein'...

  11. Scientists present their design for Einstein Telescope

    CERN Multimedia

    ASPERA Press Release

    2011-01-01

    Plans shape up for a revolutionary new observatory that will explore black holes and the Big Bang. This detector will ‘see’ the Universe in gravitational waves.   A new era in astronomy will come a step closer when scientists from across Europe present their design study today for an advanced observatory capable of making precision measurements of gravitational waves – minute ripples in the fabric of spacetime – predicted to emanate from cosmic catastrophes such as merging black holes and collapsing stars and supernovae. It also offers the potential to probe the earliest moments of the Universe just after the Big Bang, which are currently inaccessible. The Einstein Observatory (ET) is a so-called third-generation gravitational-wave (GW) detector, which will be 100 times more sensitive than current instruments. Like the first two generations of GW detectors, it is based on the measurement of tiny changes (far less than the size of an atomic nucleus) in the le...

  12. Unique Stellar System Gives Einstein a Thumbs-Up

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-07-01

    Taking advantage of a unique cosmic coincidence, astronomers have measured an effect predicted by Albert Einstein's theory of General Relativity in the extremely strong gravity of a pair of superdense neutron stars. The new data indicate that the famed physicist's 93-year-old theory has passed yet another test. Double Pulsar Graphic Artist's Conception of Double Pulsar System PSR J0737-3039A/B CREDIT: Daniel Cantin, DarwinDimensions, McGill University Click on image for more graphics. The scientists used the National Science Foundation's Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) to make a four-year study of a double-star system unlike any other known in the Universe. The system is a pair of neutron stars, both of which are seen as pulsars that emit lighthouse-like beams of radio waves. "Of about 1700 known pulsars, this is the only case where two pulsars are in orbit around each other," said Rene Breton, a graduate student at McGill University in Montreal, Canada. In addition, the stars' orbital plane is aligned nearly perfectly with their line of sight to the Earth, so that one passes behind a doughnut-shaped region of ionized gas surrounding the other, eclipsing the signal from the pulsar in back. "Those eclipses are the key to making a measurement that could never be done before," Breton said. Einstein's 1915 theory predicted that, in a close system of two very massive objects, such as neutron stars, one object's gravitational tug, along with an effect of its spinning around its axis, should cause the spin axis of the other to wobble, or precess. Studies of other pulsars in binary systems had indicated that such wobbling occurred, but could not produce precise measurements of the amount of wobbling. "Measuring the amount of wobbling is what tests the details of Einstein's theory and gives a benchmark that any alternative gravitational theories must meet," said Scott Ransom of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory. The eclipses allowed the astronomers to pin

  13. Vortices in spin-orbit-coupled Bose-Einstein condensates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radic, J.; Sedrakyan, T. A.; Galitski, V.; Spielman, I. B.

    2011-01-01

    Realistic methods to create vortices in spin-orbit-coupled Bose-Einstein condensates are discussed. It is shown that, contrary to common intuition, rotation of the trap containing a spin-orbit condensate does not lead to an equilibrium state with static vortex structures but gives rise instead to nonequilibrium behavior described by an intrinsically time-dependent Hamiltonian. We propose here the following alternative methods to induce thermodynamically stable static vortex configurations: (i) to rotate both the lasers and the anisotropic trap and (ii) to impose a synthetic Abelian field on top of synthetic spin-orbit interactions. Effective Hamiltonians for spin-orbit condensates under such perturbations are derived for most currently known realistic laser schemes that induce synthetic spin-orbit couplings. The Gross-Pitaevskii equation is solved for several experimentally relevant regimes. The new interesting effects include spatial separation of left- and right-moving spin-orbit condensates, the appearance of unusual vortex arrangements, and parity effects in vortex nucleation where the topological excitations are predicted to appear in pairs. All these phenomena are shown to be highly nonuniversal and depend strongly on a specific laser scheme and system parameters.

  14. Bose-Einstein correlations in e+e- collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juricic, I.

    1987-12-01

    The MARK II detector is used to study the Bose-Einstein correlation between pairs and triplets of charged pions produced in hadronic decays of the J/psi/, the √s = 4 to 7 GeV continuum above the J/psi/, two photon events at √s = 29 GeV, and e/sup /plus//e/sup /minus// annihilation events at √s = 29 GeV as a function of Q 2 , the four-momentum transfer squared. After corrections for Coulomb effects and pion misidentification, we find a nearly full Bose-Einstein enhancement α in the J/psi/ and the two photon data and about half the maximum value in the other two data sets. The radius parameter /tau/(an average over space and time) given by pion pair analyses lies within a band of +-0.10 fm around 0.73 fm and is the same, within errors, for all four data sets. Pion triplet analyses also give a consistent radius of ∼ 0.54 fm. fits to two-dimensional distributions R(q/sub T/ 2 , q/sub C/ 2 ) of invariant components of Q 2 = q/sub T/ 2 /plus/ q/sub C/ 2 give /tau//sub T/ ∼ /tau/C ∼ /tau/, where q/sub T/ is the transverse three-momentum difference calculated with respect to the net pair three-momentum, and q/sub C/ is in effect the longitudinal three-momentum difference in the pion pair rest frame. When q/sub T/ is calculated with respect to the jet axis for two-jet events in the e/sup /plus//e/sup /minus// annihilation data at √s = 29 GeV, a fit to R(q/sub T/ 2 , q/sub C/ 2 ) also gives /tau//sub T/ ∼ /tau//sub C/ ∼ /tau/. Noting that q/sub L/ and q 0 are not invariant, we make fits to R(/sub T//sup T/, q/sub L/ 2 ) and to R(q/sub T/ 2 , q 0 2 ) (Kopylov formulation), and we find /tau/ 0 ∼ /tau//sub L/ ∼ /23//tau//sub T/ to /12//tau//sub T/. 44 refs., 43 figs., 15 tabs

  15. Bell Inequality, Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen Steering, and Quantum Metrology with Spinor Bose-Einstein Condensates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasak, Tomasz; Chwedeńczuk, Jan

    2018-04-01

    We propose an experiment, where the Bell inequality is violated in a many-body system of massive particles. The source of correlated atoms is a spinor F =1 Bose-Einstein condensate residing in an optical lattice. We characterize the complete procedure—the local operations, the measurements, and the inequality—necessary to run the Bell test. We show how the degree of violation of the Bell inequality depends on the strengths of the two-body correlations and on the number of scattered pairs. We show that the system can be used to demonstrate the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen paradox. Also, the scattered pairs are an excellent many-body resource for the quantum-enhanced metrology. Our results apply to any multimode system where the spin-changing collision drives the scattering into separate regions. The presented inquiry shows that such a system is versatile as it can be used for the tests of nonlocality, quantum metrology, and quantum information.

  16. Spatial entanglement patterns and Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen steering in Bose-Einstein condensates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadel, Matteo; Zibold, Tilman; Décamps, Boris; Treutlein, Philipp

    2018-04-27

    Many-particle entanglement is a fundamental concept of quantum physics that still presents conceptual challenges. Although nonclassical states of atomic ensembles were used to enhance measurement precision in quantum metrology, the notion of entanglement in these systems was debated because the correlations among the indistinguishable atoms were witnessed by collective measurements only. Here, we use high-resolution imaging to directly measure the spin correlations between spatially separated parts of a spin-squeezed Bose-Einstein condensate. We observe entanglement that is strong enough for Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen steering: We can predict measurement outcomes for noncommuting observables in one spatial region on the basis of corresponding measurements in another region with an inferred uncertainty product below the Heisenberg uncertainty bound. This method could be exploited for entanglement-enhanced imaging of electromagnetic field distributions and quantum information tasks. Copyright © 2018 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  17. Bell Inequality, Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen Steering, and Quantum Metrology with Spinor Bose-Einstein Condensates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasak, Tomasz; Chwedeńczuk, Jan

    2018-04-06

    We propose an experiment, where the Bell inequality is violated in a many-body system of massive particles. The source of correlated atoms is a spinor F=1 Bose-Einstein condensate residing in an optical lattice. We characterize the complete procedure-the local operations, the measurements, and the inequality-necessary to run the Bell test. We show how the degree of violation of the Bell inequality depends on the strengths of the two-body correlations and on the number of scattered pairs. We show that the system can be used to demonstrate the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen paradox. Also, the scattered pairs are an excellent many-body resource for the quantum-enhanced metrology. Our results apply to any multimode system where the spin-changing collision drives the scattering into separate regions. The presented inquiry shows that such a system is versatile as it can be used for the tests of nonlocality, quantum metrology, and quantum information.

  18. A connection between the Einstein and Yang-Mills equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, L.J.; Newman, E.T.

    1989-01-01

    It is our purpose here to show an unusual relationship between the Einstein equations and the Yang-Mills equations. We give a correspondence between solutions of the self-dual Einstein vacuum equations and the self-dual Yang-Mills equations with a special choice of gauge group. The extension of the argument to the full Yang-Mills equations yields Einstein's unified equations. We try to incorporate the full Einstein vacuum equations, but the approach is incomplete. We first consider Yang-Mills theory for an arbitrary Lie-algebra with the condition that the connection 1-form and curvature are constant on Minkowski space. This leads to a set of algebraic equations on the connection components. We then specialize the Lie-algebra to be the (infinite dimensional) Lie algebra of a group of diffeomorphisms of some manifold. The algebraic equations then become differential equations for four vector fields on the manifold on which the diffeomorphisms act. In the self-dual case, if we choose the connection components from the Lie-algebra of the volume preserving 4-dimensional diffeomorphism group, the resulting equations are the same as those obtained by Ashtekar, Jacobsen and Smolin, in their remarkable simplification of the self-dual Einstein vacuum equations. (An alternative derivation of the same equations begins with the self-dual Yang-Mills connection now depending only on the time, then choosing the Lie-algebra as that of the volume preserving 3-dimensional diffeomorphisms). When the reduced full Yang-Mills equations are used in the same context, we get Einstein's equations for his unified theory based on absolute parallelism. To incorporate the full Einstein vacuum equations we use as the Lie group the semi-direct product of the diffeomorphism group of a 4-dimensional manifold with the group of frame rotations of an SO(1, 3) bundle over the 4-manifold. This last approach, however, yields equations more general than the vacuum equations. (orig.)

  19. Entanglement, Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen correlations, Bell nonlocality, and steering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, S. J.; Wiseman, H. M.; Doherty, A. C.

    2007-01-01

    In a recent work [Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 140402 (2007)] we defined 'steering', a type of quantum nonlocality that is logically distinct from both nonseparability and Bell nonlocality. In the bipartite setting, it hinges on the question of whether Alice can affect Bob's state at a distance through her choice of measurement. More precisely and operationally, it hinges on the question of whether Alice, with classical communication, can convince Bob that they share an entangled state under the circumstances that Bob trusts nothing that Alice says. We argue that if she can, then this demonstrates the nonlocal effect first identified in the famous Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen paper [Phys. Rev. 47, 777 (1935)] as a universal effect for pure entangled states. This ability of Alice to remotely prepare Bob's state was subsequently called steering by Schroedinger, whose terminology we adopt. The phenomenon of steering has been largely overlooked, and prior to our work had not even been given a rigorous definition that is applicable to mixed states as well as pure states. Armed with our rigorous definition, we proved that steerable states are a strict subset of the entangled states, and a strict superset of the states that can exhibit Bell nonlocality. In this work we expand on these results and provide further examples of steerable states. We also elaborate on the connection with the original EPR paradox

  20. Entanglement, Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen correlations, Bell nonlocality, and steering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, S. J.; Wiseman, H. M.; Doherty, A. C.

    2007-11-01

    In a recent work [Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 140402 (2007)] we defined “steering,” a type of quantum nonlocality that is logically distinct from both nonseparability and Bell nonlocality. In the bipartite setting, it hinges on the question of whether Alice can affect Bob’s state at a distance through her choice of measurement. More precisely and operationally, it hinges on the question of whether Alice, with classical communication, can convince Bob that they share an entangled state under the circumstances that Bob trusts nothing that Alice says. We argue that if she can, then this demonstrates the nonlocal effect first identified in the famous Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen paper [Phys. Rev. 47, 777 (1935)] as a universal effect for pure entangled states. This ability of Alice to remotely prepare Bob’s state was subsequently called steering by Schrödinger, whose terminology we adopt. The phenomenon of steering has been largely overlooked, and prior to our work had not even been given a rigorous definition that is applicable to mixed states as well as pure states. Armed with our rigorous definition, we proved that steerable states are a strict subset of the entangled states, and a strict superset of the states that can exhibit Bell nonlocality. In this work we expand on these results and provide further examples of steerable states. We also elaborate on the connection with the original EPR paradox.

  1. Reduction of entanglement degradation in Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasr Esfahani, B.; Shamirzaie, M.; Soltani, M.

    2011-01-01

    Bipartite entanglement for states of a noninteracting bosonic or fermionic field in the spacetime of a spherically symmetric black hole of Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity is investigated. Although the initial state is chosen to be maximally entangled as the Bell states, the Hawking-Unruh effect causes the state to be mixed and the entanglement degrades, but with different asymptotic behaviors for the fermionic and bosonic fields. The Gauss-Bonnet term with positive α can play an antigravitation role and so this causes a decrease in the Hawking-Unruh effect and consequently reduces the entanglement degradation. On the other hand, the suggested higher dimensions for the spacetime lead to increased entanglement degradation by increasing the dimension. There is a dramatic difference between the behaviors of the entanglement in terms of the radius of the horizon for a five-dimensional black hole and that for higher dimensional black holes. Both bosonic and fermionic fields entanglements are treated beyond the single-mode approximation. Also, the cases where the accelerating observers located at regions near and far from the event horizon of black hole are studied separately.

  2. Dynamics of Bose-Einstein condensates in novel optical potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kueber, Johannes

    2014-07-21

    Matter wave interferometry offers a novel approach for high precision measurements, such as the determination of physical constants like the local gravity constant g or the fine-structure constant. Since its early demonstration, it has become an important tool in the fields of fundamental and applied physics. The present work covers the implementation of matter wave interferometers as well as the creation of novel guiding potentials for ultra-cold ensembles of atoms and Bose-Einstein condensates for this purpose. In addition, novel techniques for the manipulation of atoms with Bragg lattices are presented, serving as elements for interferometry. The measurements in this work are performed with a Bose-Einstein condensate of 25000 {sup 87}rubidium atoms created in a crossed optical dipole trap. The crossed optical dipole trap is loaded from a magneto-optical trap and allows a measurement every 25 s. This work introduces the novel technique of double Bragg diffraction as a tool for atom optics for the first time experimentally. The creation of beamsplitters and mirrors for advanced interferometric measurements is characterized. An in depth discussion on the momentum distribution of atomic clouds and its influence on double Bragg diffraction is given. Additionally experimental results for higher-order Bragg diffraction are explained and double Bragg diffraction is used to implement a full Ramsey-type interferometer. A second central result of this work is the implementation of novel guiding structures for ultra-cold atoms. These structures are created with conical refraction, an effect that occurs when light is guided along one of the optical axis of a bi-axial crystal. The conical refraction crystal used to operate the novel trapping geometries is a KGd(WO{sub 4}){sub 2} crystal that has been specifically cut orthogonal to one of the optical axis. Two regimes are discussed in detail: the creation of a toroidal matter wave guide and the implementation of a three

  3. On the trace-free Einstein equations as a viable alternative to general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, George F R; Van Elst, Henk; Murugan, Jeff; Uzan, Jean-Philippe

    2011-01-01

    The quantum field theoretical prediction for the vacuum energy density leads to a value for the effective cosmological constant that is incorrect by between 60 and 120 orders of magnitude. We review an old proposal of replacing Einstein's field equations by their trace-free part (the trace-free Einstein equations), together with an independent assumption of energy-momentum conservation by matter fields. While this does not solve the fundamental issue of why the cosmological constant has the value that is observed cosmologically, it is indeed a viable theory that resolves the problem of the discrepancy between the vacuum energy density and the observed value of the cosmological constant. However, one has to check that, as well as preserving the standard cosmological equations, this does not destroy other predictions, such as the junction conditions that underlie the use of standard stellar models. We confirm that no problems arise here: hence, the trace-free Einstein equations are indeed viable for cosmological and astrophysical applications. (papers)

  4. Bose-Einstein condensation of photons in a 'white-wall' photon box

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klaers, Jan; Schmitt, Julian; Vewinger, Frank; Weitz, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Bose-Einstein condensation, the macroscopic ground state occupation of a system of bosonic particles below a critical temperature, has been observed in cold atomic gases and solid-state physics quasiparticles. In contrast, photons do not show this phase transition usually, because in Planck's blackbody radiation the particle number is not conserved and at low temperature the photons disappear in the walls of the system. Here we report on the realization of a photon Bose-Einstein condensate in a dye-filled optical microcavity, which acts as a 'white-wall' photon box. The cavity mirrors provide a trapping potential and a non-vanishing effective photon mass, making the system formally equivalent to a two-dimensional gas of trapped massive bosons. Thermalization of the photon gas is reached in a number conserving way by multiple scattering off the dye molecules. Signatures for a BEC upon increased photon density are: a spectral distribution that shows Bose-Einstein distributed photon energies with a macroscopically populated peak on top of a broad thermal wing, the observed threshold of the phase transition showing the predicted absolute value and scaling with resonator geometry, and condensation appearing at the trap centre even for a spatially displaced pump spot.

  5. Bose-Einstein condensation of photons in a 'white-wall' photon box

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klärs, Jan; Schmitt, Julian; Vewinger, Frank; Weitz, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Bose-Einstein condensation, the macroscopic ground state occupation of a system of bosonic particles below a critical temperature, has been observed in cold atomic gases and solid-state physics quasiparticles. In contrast, photons do not show this phase transition usually, because in Planck's blackbody radiation the particle number is not conserved and at low temperature the photons disappear in the walls of the system. Here we report on the realization of a photon Bose-Einstein condensate in a dye-filled optical microcavity, which acts as a "white-wall" photon box. The cavity mirrors provide a trapping potential and a non-vanishing effective photon mass, making the system formally equivalent to a two-dimensional gas of trapped massive bosons. Thermalization of the photon gas is reached in a number conserving way by multiple scattering off the dye molecules. Signatures for a BEC upon increased photon density are: a spectral distribution that shows Bose-Einstein distributed photon energies with a macroscopically populated peak on top of a broad thermal wing, the observed threshold of the phase transition showing the predicted absolute value and scaling with resonator geometry, and condensation appearing at the trap centre even for a spatially displaced pump spot.

  6. The ideal Bose-Einstein gas, revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziff, R.M.; Uhlenbeck, G.E.; Kac, M.

    1977-01-01

    Some questions concerning the ideal Bose-Einstein gas are reviewed and examined further. The bulk behavior including the condensation phenomenon is characterized by the thermodynamical properties, occupations of the states and their fluctuations, and the properties of the density matrices, including the diagonal and off-diagonal long range orders. Particular attention is focused on the difference between the canonical and grand canonical ensembles and a case is made that the latter does not represent any physical system in the condensed region. The properties in a finite region are also examined to study the approach to the bulk limit and secondly to derive the surface properties such as the surface tension (due to the boundary). This is mainly done for the special case of a rectangular parallelopiped (box) for various boundary conditions. The question of the asymptotic behavior of the fluctuations in the occupation of the ground state in the condensed region in the canonical ensemble is examined for these systems. Finally, the local properties near the wall of a half infinite system are calculated and discussed. The surface properties also follow this way and agree with the strictly thermodynamic result. Although it is not intended to be a complete review, it is largely self-contained, with the first section containing the basic formulas and a discussion of some general concepts which will be needed. Especially discussed in detail are the extra considerations that are needed in thermodynamics and statistical mechanics to include the surface properties, and the quantum hierarchy of the density matrices and local conservation laws. In the concluding remarks several problems are mentioned which need further analysis and clarification. (Auth.)

  7. Derivation of Einstein-Cartan theory from general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petti, Richard

    2015-04-01

    General relativity cannot describe exchange of classical intrinsic angular momentum and orbital angular momentum. Einstein-Cartan theory fixes this problem in the least invasive way. In the late 20th century, the consensus view was that Einstein-Cartan theory requires inclusion of torsion without adequate justification, it has no empirical support (though it doesn't conflict with any known evidence), it solves no important problem, and it complicates gravitational theory with no compensating benefit. In 1986 the author published a derivation of Einstein-Cartan theory from general relativity, with no additional assumptions or parameters. Starting without torsion, Poincaré symmetry, classical or quantum spin, or spinors, it derives torsion and its relation to spin from a continuum limit of general relativistic solutions. The present work makes the case that this computation, combined with supporting arguments, constitutes a derivation of Einstein-Cartan theory from general relativity, not just a plausibility argument. This paper adds more and simpler explanations, more computational details, correction of a factor of 2, discussion of limitations of the derivation, and discussion of some areas of gravitational research where Einstein-Cartan theory is relevant.

  8. The intellectual quadrangle: Mach-Boltzmann-Planck-Einstein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broda, E.

    1981-01-01

    These four men were influential in the transition from classical to modern physics. They interacted as scientists, often antagonistically. Thus Boltzmann was the greatest champion of the atom, while Mach remained unconvinced all his life. As a aphysicist, Einstein was greatly influenced by both Mach and Boltzmann, although Mach in the end rejected relativity as well. Because of his work on statistical mechanics, fluctuations, and quantum theory, Einstein has been called the natural successor to Boltzmann. Planck also was influenced by Mach at first. Hence he and Boltzmann were adversaries antil Planck converted to atomistics in 1900 and used the statistical interpretation of entropy to establish his radiation law. Planck accepted relativity early, but in quantum theory he was for a long time partly opposed to Einstein, and vice versa - Einstein considered Planck's derivation of his radiation law as unsound, while Planck could not accept the light quantum. In the case of all four physicists, science was interwoven with philosophy. Boltzmann consistently fought Mach's positivism, while Planck and Einstein moved from positivism to realism. All were also, though in very different ways, actively interested in public affairs. (orig.)

  9. Linearized pseudo-Einstein equations on the Heisenberg group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barletta, Elisabetta; Dragomir, Sorin; Jacobowitz, Howard

    2017-02-01

    We study the pseudo-Einstein equation R11bar = 0 on the Heisenberg group H1 = C × R. We consider first order perturbations θɛ =θ0 + ɛ θ and linearize the pseudo-Einstein equation about θ0 (the canonical Tanaka-Webster flat contact form on H1 thought of as a strictly pseudoconvex CR manifold). If θ =e2uθ0 the linearized pseudo-Einstein equation is Δb u - 4 | Lu|2 = 0 where Δb is the sublaplacian of (H1 ,θ0) and L bar is the Lewy operator. We solve the linearized pseudo-Einstein equation on a bounded domain Ω ⊂H1 by applying subelliptic theory i.e. existence and regularity results for weak subelliptic harmonic maps. We determine a solution u to the linearized pseudo-Einstein equation, possessing Heisenberg spherical symmetry, and such that u(x) → - ∞ as | x | → + ∞.

  10. Universality of an Impurity in a Bose-Einstein Condensate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuhei M. Yoshida

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available We consider the ground-state properties of an impurity particle (“polaron” resonantly interacting with a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC. Focusing on the equal-mass system, we use a variational wave function for the polaron that goes beyond previous work and includes up to three Bogoliubov excitations of the BEC, thus allowing us to capture both Efimov trimers and associated tetramers. We find that the length scale associated with Efimov trimers (i.e., the three-body parameter can strongly affect the polaron’s behavior, even at densities where there are no well-defined Efimov states. However, by comparing our results with recent quantum Monte Carlo calculations, we argue that the polaron energy is a universal function of the Efimov three-body parameter for sufficiently low boson densities. We further support this conclusion by showing that the energies of the deepest bound Efimov trimers and tetramers at unitarity are universally related to one another, regardless of the microscopic model. On the other hand, we find that the quasiparticle residue and effective mass sensitively depend on the coherence length ξ of the BEC, with the residue tending to zero as ξ diverges, in a manner akin to the orthogonality catastrophe.

  11. M dwarfs from the Einstein extended medium sensitivity survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleming, T.A.; Liebert, J.; Gioia, I.M.; Maccacaro, T.

    1988-01-01

    A complete sample of X-ray selected M dwarfs are presented which were serendipitously detected in the extended Einstein Observatory Medium Sensitivity Survey (MSS). The MSS detected only early M dwarfs (type MO through M5), 84 percent of which were emission stars (i.e., type Me V). It was calculated that the X-ray luminosity function for early M dwarfs with a log Lx greater than 27.6 and, by comparison to optical luminosity functions, find that about 25 percent of all early M dwarfs emit X-rays at a level greater than log Lx = 27.6. This result is compared to luminosity function estimates from optically selected samples and discussed in light of the sample's kinematic and mean age. Also presented is H alpha and Ca II K line fluxes for each member of the sample and it is shown that the surface H alpha and Ca II K luminosities do indeed correlate with Lx. The significance of this effect to theories of chromospheric and coronal heating is explained. 76 references

  12. Einstein gravity 3-point functions from conformal field theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afkhami-Jeddi, Nima; Hartman, Thomas; Kundu, Sandipan; Tajdini, Amirhossein

    2017-12-01

    We study stress tensor correlation functions in four-dimensional conformal field theories with large N and a sparse spectrum. Theories in this class are expected to have local holographic duals, so effective field theory in anti-de Sitter suggests that the stress tensor sector should exhibit universal, gravity-like behavior. At the linearized level, the hallmark of locality in the emergent geometry is that stress tensor three-point functions 〈 T T T 〉, normally specified by three constants, should approach a universal structure controlled by a single parameter as the gap to higher spin operators is increased. We demonstrate this phenomenon by a direct CFT calculation. Stress tensor exchange, by itself, violates causality and unitarity unless the three-point functions are carefully tuned, and the unique consistent choice exactly matches the prediction of Einstein gravity. Under some assumptions about the other potential contributions, we conclude that this structure is universal, and in particular, that the anomaly coefficients satisfy a ≈ c as conjectured by Camanho et al. The argument is based on causality of a four-point function, with kinematics designed to probe bulk locality, and invokes the chaos bound of Maldacena, Shenker, and Stanford.

  13. Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen-entangled motion of two massive objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnabel, Roman

    2015-07-01

    In 1935, Einstein, Podolsky, and Rosen (EPR) considered two particles in an entangled state of motion to illustrate why they questioned the completeness of quantum theory. In past decades, microscopic systems with entanglement in various degrees of freedom have successfully been generated, representing compelling evidence to support the completeness of quantum theory. Today, the generation of an EPR-entangled state of motion of two massive objects of up to the kilogram scale seems feasible with state-of-the-art technology. Recently, the generation and verification of EPR-entangled mirror motion in interferometric gravitational wave detectors was proposed, with the aim of testing quantum theory in the regime of macroscopic objects, and to make available nonclassical probe systems for future tests of modified quantum theories that include (nonrelativistic) gravity. The work presented here builds on these earlier results and proposes a specific Michelson interferometer that includes two high-quality laser mirrors of about 0.1 kg mass each. The mirrors are individually suspended as pendula and located close to each other, and cooled to about 4 K. The physical concepts for the generation of the EPR-entangled center-of-mass motion of these two mirrors are described. Apart from a test of quantum mechanics in the macroscopic world, the setup is envisioned to test predictions of yet-to-be-elaborated modified quantum theories that include gravitational effects.

  14. Observation of one-way Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen steering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Händchen, Vitus; Eberle, Tobias; Steinlechner, Sebastian; Samblowski, Aiko; Franz, Torsten; Werner, Reinhard F.; Schnabel, Roman

    2012-09-01

    The distinctive non-classical features of quantum physics were first discussed in the seminal paper by A. Einstein, B. Podolsky and N. Rosen (EPR) in 1935. In his immediate response, E. Schrödinger introduced the notion of entanglement, now seen as the essential resource in quantum information as well as in quantum metrology. Furthermore, he showed that at the core of the EPR argument is a phenomenon that he called steering. In contrast to entanglement and violations of Bell's inequalities, steering implies a direction between the parties involved. Recent theoretical works have precisely defined this property, but the question arose as to whether there are bipartite states showing steering only in one direction. Here, we present an experimental realization of two entangled Gaussian modes of light that in fact shows the steering effect in one direction but not in the other. The generated one-way steering gives a new insight into quantum physics and may open a new field of applications in quantum information.

  15. Einstein-aether theory with a Maxwell field: General formalism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balakin, Alexander B., E-mail: Alexander.Balakin@kpfu.ru [Department of General Relativity and Gravitation, Institute of Physics, Kazan Federal University, Kremlevskaya str. 18, Kazan 420008 (Russian Federation); Lemos, José P.S., E-mail: joselemos@ist.utl.pt [Centro Multidisciplinar de Astrofísica-CENTRA, Departamento de Física, Instituto Superior Técnico-IST, Universidade de Lisboa-UL, Avenida Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2014-11-15

    We extend the Einstein-aether theory to include the Maxwell field in a nontrivial manner by taking into account its interaction with the time-like unit vector field characterizing the aether. We also include a generic matter term. We present a model with a Lagrangian that includes cross-terms linear and quadratic in the Maxwell tensor, linear and quadratic in the covariant derivative of the aether velocity four-vector, linear in its second covariant derivative and in the Riemann tensor. We decompose these terms with respect to the irreducible parts of the covariant derivative of the aether velocity, namely, the acceleration four-vector, the shear and vorticity tensors, and the expansion scalar. Furthermore, we discuss the influence of an aether non-uniform motion on the polarization and magnetization of the matter in such an aether environment, as well as on its dielectric and magnetic properties. The total self-consistent system of equations for the electromagnetic and the gravitational fields, and the dynamic equations for the unit vector aether field are obtained. Possible applications of this system are discussed. Based on the principles of effective field theories, we display in an appendix all the terms up to fourth order in derivative operators that can be considered in a Lagrangian that includes the metric, the electromagnetic and the aether fields.

  16. The Bose-Einstein correlations in CDFII experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lovás, Lubomír [Comenius Univ., Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2008-01-01

    We present the results of a study of p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV collected by the CDF-II experiment at Tevatron collider. The Bose-Einstein correlations of the π±π± two boson system have been studied in the minimum-bias high-multiplicity events. The research was carried out on the sample at the size of 173761 events. The two pion correlations have been retrieved. The final results were corrected to the coulomb interactions. Two different reference samples were compared and discussed. A significant two-pion correlation enhancement near origin is observed. This enhancement effect has been used to evaluate the radius of the two-pion emitter source. We have used the TOF detector to distinguish between π and K mesons. The C2(Q) function parameters have also been retrieved for the sample containing only tagged π mesons. A comparison between four different parametrizations based on two diff t theoretical approaches of the C2(Q) function is given.

  17. Going Beyond Einstein with the Constellation-X Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Nicholas

    2007-01-01

    The Constellation-X mission will address the questions: "What happens to matter close to a black hole?" and "What is Dark Energy?" These questions are central to the NASA Beyond Einstein Program, where Constellation-X plays a central role. The mission will address these questions by using high throughput X-ray spectroscopy to observe the effects of strong gravity close to the event horizon of black holes, and to observe the formation and evolution of clusters of galaxies in order to precisely determine Cosmological parameters. To achieve these primary science goals requires a factor of 25-100 increase in sensitivity for high resolution X-ray spectroscopy.'The mission will also perform routine high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy of faint 2nd extended X-ray source populations. This will provide diagnostic information such as density, elemental abundances, velocity; and ionization state for a wide range of astrophysical problems, including new constraints on the Neutron Star equation of state.

  18. Atomic interactions in precision interferometry using Bose-Einstein condensates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamison, Alan O.; Gupta, Subhadeep; Kutz, J. Nathan

    2011-01-01

    We present theoretical tools for predicting and reducing the effects of atomic interactions in Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) interferometry experiments. To address mean-field shifts during free propagation, we derive a robust scaling solution that reduces the three-dimensional Gross-Pitaevskii equation to a set of three simple differential equations valid for any interaction strength. To model the other common components of a BEC interferometer--condensate splitting, manipulation, and recombination--we generalize the slowly varying envelope reduction, providing both analytic handles and dramatically improved simulations. Applying these tools to a BEC interferometer to measure the fine structure constant, α[S. Gupta, K. Dieckmann, Z. Hadzibabic, and D. E. Pritchard, Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 140401 (2002)], we find agreement with the results of the original experiment and demonstrate that atomic interactions do not preclude measurement to better than part-per-billion accuracy, even for atomic species with relatively large scattering lengths. These tools help make BEC interferometry a viable choice for a broad class of precision measurements.

  19. Atom loss resonances in a Bose-Einstein condensate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langmack, Christian; Smith, D Hudson; Braaten, Eric

    2013-07-12

    Atom loss resonances in ultracold trapped atoms have been observed at scattering lengths near atom-dimer resonances, at which Efimov trimers cross the atom-dimer threshold, and near two-dimer resonances, at which universal tetramers cross the dimer-dimer threshold. We propose a new mechanism for these loss resonances in a Bose-Einstein condensate of atoms. As the scattering length is ramped to the large final value at which the atom loss rate is measured, the time-dependent scattering length generates a small condensate of shallow dimers coherently from the atom condensate. The coexisting atom and dimer condensates can be described by a low-energy effective field theory with universal coefficients that are determined by matching exact results from few-body physics. The classical field equations for the atom and dimer condensates predict narrow enhancements in the atom loss rate near atom-dimer resonances and near two-dimer resonances due to inelastic dimer collisions.

  20. Einstein's photoemission emission from heavily-doped quantized structures

    CERN Document Server

    Ghatak, Kamakhya Prasad

    2015-01-01

    This monograph solely investigates the Einstein's Photoemission(EP) from Heavily Doped(HD) Quantized Structures on the basis of newly formulated electron dispersion laws. The materials considered are quantized structures of HD non-linear optical, III-V, II-VI, Ge, Te, Platinum Antimonide, stressed materials, GaP, Gallium Antimonide, II-V, Bismuth Telluride together with various types of HD superlattices and their Quantized counterparts respectively. The EP in HD opto-electronic materials and their nanostructures is studied in the presence of strong light waves and intense electric fields  that control the studies of such quantum effect devices. The suggestions for the experimental determinations of different important physical quantities in HD 2D and 3D materials  and the importance of measurement of band gap in HD optoelectronic materials under intense built-in electric field in nano devices and strong external photo excitation (for measuring   physical properties in the presence of intense light waves w...

  1. Spinning higher dimensional Einstein-Yang-Mills black holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, Sushant G.; Papnoi, Uma

    2014-01-01

    We construct a Kerr-Newman-like spacetime starting from higher dimensional (HD) Einstein-Yang-Mills black holes via complex transformations suggested by Newman-Janis. The new metrics are a HD generalization of Kerr-Newman spacetimes which has a geometry that is precisely that of Kerr-Newman in 4D corresponding to a Yang-Mills (YM) gauge charge, but the sign of the charge term gets flipped in the HD spacetimes. It is interesting to note that the gravitational contribution of the YM gauge charge, in HD, is indeed opposite (attractive rather than repulsive) to that of the Maxwell charge. The effect of the YM gauge charge on the structure and location of static limit surface and apparent horizon is discussed. We find that static limit surfaces become less prolate with increase in dimensions and are also sensitive to the YM gauge charge, thereby affecting the shape of the ergosphere. We also analyze some thermodynamical properties of these BHs. (orig.)

  2. Spinning higher dimensional Einstein-Yang-Mills black holes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Sushant G. [Jamia Millia Islamia, Centre for Theoretical Physics, New Delhi (India); University of Kwa-Zulu-Natal, Astrophysics and Cosmology Research Unit, School of Mathematical Sciences, Private Bag 54001, Durban (South Africa); Papnoi, Uma [Jamia Millia Islamia, Centre for Theoretical Physics, New Delhi (India)

    2014-08-15

    We construct a Kerr-Newman-like spacetime starting from higher dimensional (HD) Einstein-Yang-Mills black holes via complex transformations suggested by Newman-Janis. The new metrics are a HD generalization of Kerr-Newman spacetimes which has a geometry that is precisely that of Kerr-Newman in 4D corresponding to a Yang-Mills (YM) gauge charge, but the sign of the charge term gets flipped in the HD spacetimes. It is interesting to note that the gravitational contribution of the YM gauge charge, in HD, is indeed opposite (attractive rather than repulsive) to that of the Maxwell charge. The effect of the YM gauge charge on the structure and location of static limit surface and apparent horizon is discussed. We find that static limit surfaces become less prolate with increase in dimensions and are also sensitive to the YM gauge charge, thereby affecting the shape of the ergosphere. We also analyze some thermodynamical properties of these BHs. (orig.)

  3. Contravariant gravity on Poisson manifolds and Einstein gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneko, Yukio; Watamura, Satoshi; Muraki, Hisayoshi

    2017-01-01

    A relation between gravity on Poisson manifolds proposed in Asakawa et al (2015 Fortschr. Phys . 63 683–704) and Einstein gravity is investigated. The compatibility of the Poisson and Riemann structures defines a unique connection, the contravariant Levi-Civita connection, and leads to the idea of the contravariant gravity. The Einstein–Hilbert-type action yields an equation of motion which is written in terms of the analog of the Einstein tensor, and it includes couplings between the metric and the Poisson tensor. The study of the Weyl transformation reveals properties of those interactions. It is argued that this theory can have an equivalent description as a system of Einstein gravity coupled to matter. As an example, it is shown that the contravariant gravity on a two-dimensional Poisson manifold can be described by a real scalar field coupled to the metric in a specific manner. (paper)

  4. Einstein's Equivalence Principle and Invalidity of Thorne's Theory for LIGO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lo C. Y.

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available The theoretical foundation of LIGO's design is based on the equation of motion derived by Thorne. His formula, motivated by Einstein's theory of measurement, shows that the gravitational wave-induced displacement of a mass with respect to an object is proportional to the distance from the object. On the other hand, based on the observed bending of light and Einstein's equivalence principle, it is concluded that such induced displacement has nothing to do with the distance from another object. It is shown that the derivation of Thorne's formula has invalid assumptions that make it inapplicable to LIGO. This is a good counter example for those who claimed that Einstein's equivalence principle is not important or even irrelevant.

  5. Albert Einstein for beginners. 12. enl. and rev. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karamanolis, Stratis

    2008-01-01

    He was called the most important jew since the birth of Christus. Others however believed however he has came like no other nearer to the gods. Thought is Albrt Einstein, the scientific work of him and especially his relativity theory has the world changed radically both in scientific and in political regard. The present 12th extended and strongly revised edition of the book, which came out firstly above 20 years ago and until today thousands of readers - young and old - has always enthused, describes not only the relativity theory but also the role, which Einstein played in the development of the first atomic bomb. A short biographical part mediates to the reader also something about the man Einstein

  6. Einstein-Weyl spaces and third-order differential equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tod, K. P.

    2000-08-01

    The three-dimensional null-surface formalism of Tanimoto [M. Tanimoto, "On the null surface formalism," Report No. gr-qc/9703003 (1997)] and Forni et al. [Forni et al., "Null surfaces formation in 3D," J. Math Phys. (submitted)] are extended to describe Einstein-Weyl spaces, following Cartan [E. Cartan, "Les espaces généralisées et l'integration de certaines classes d'equations différentielles," C. R. Acad. Sci. 206, 1425-1429 (1938); "La geometria de las ecuaciones diferenciales de tercer order," Rev. Mat. Hispano-Am. 4, 1-31 (1941)]. In the resulting formalism, Einstein-Weyl spaces are obtained from a particular class of third-order differential equations. Some examples of the construction which include some new Einstein-Weyl spaces are given.

  7. More accurate theory for Bose-Einstein condensation fraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biswas, Shyamal

    2008-01-01

    Bose-Einstein statistics is derived in the thermodynamic limit when the ratio of system size to thermal de Broglie wavelength goes to infinity. However, according to the experimental setup of Bose-Einstein condensation of harmonically trapped Bose gas of alkali atoms, the ratio near the condensation temperature (T o ) is 30-50. And, at ultralow temperatures well below T o , this ratio becomes comparable to 1. We argue that finite size as well as the ultralow temperature induces corrections to Bose-Einstein statistics. From the corrected statistics we plot condensation fraction versus temperature graph. This theoretical plot satisfies well with the experimental plot [A. Griesmaier et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 94 (2005) 160401

  8. From Petrov-Einstein to Navier-Stokes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lysov, Vyacheslav

    The fluid/gravity correspondence relates solutions of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equation to metrics which solve the Einstein equations. We propose propose two possible approaches to establish this correspondence: perturbative expansion for shear modes and large mean curvature expansion for algebraically special metrics. We show by explicit construction that for every solution of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equation in p+1 dimensions, there is an associated "dual" solution of the vacuum Einstein equations in p+2 dimensions. The dual geometry has an intrinsically flat time-like boundary segment whose extrinsic curvature is given by the stress tensor of the Navier-Stokes fluid. We consider a "near-horizon" limit in which hypersurface becomes highly accelerated. The near-horizon expansion in gravity is shown to be mathematically equivalent to the hydrodynamic expansion in fluid dynamics, and the Einstein equation reduces to the incompressible Navier-Stokes equation. It is shown that imposing a Petrov type I condition on the hypersurface geometry reduces the degrees of freedom in the extrinsic curvature to those of a fluid. Moreover, expanding around a limit in which the mean curvature of the embedding diverges, the leading-order Einstein constraint equations on hypersurface are shown to reduce to the non-linear incompressible Navier-Stokes equation for a fluid moving in hypersurface. We extend the fluid/gravity correspondence to include the magnetohydrodynamics/gravity correspondence, which translates solutions of the equations of magnetohydrodynamics (describing charged fluids) into geometries that satisfy the Einstein-Maxwell equations. We present an explicit example of this new correspondence in the context of flat Minkowski space. We show that a perturbative deformation of the Rindler wedge satisfies the Einstein-Maxwell equations provided that the parameters appearing in the expansion, which we interpret as fluid fields, satisfy the

  9. Dirichlet problem for Hermitian-Einstein equations over almost Hermitian manifolds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xi Zhang

    2004-07-01

    In this paper, we investigate the Dirichlet problem for Hermitian-Einstein equations on complex vector bundle over almost Hermitian manifolds, and we obtain the unique solubility of the Dirichlet problem for Hermitian-Einstein equations. (author)

  10. Solution of Deformed Einstein Equations and Quantum Black Holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dil, Emre; Kolay, Erdinç

    2016-01-01

    Recently, one- and two-parameter deformed Einstein equations have been studied for extremal quantum black holes which have been proposed to obey deformed statistics by Strominger. In this study, we give a deeper insight into the deformed Einstein equations and consider the solutions of these equations for the extremal quantum black holes. We then represent the implications of the solutions, such that the deformation parameters lead the charged black holes to have a smaller mass than the usual Reissner-Nordström black holes. This reduction in mass of a usual black hole can be considered as a transition from classical to quantum black hole regime.

  11. On the deformed Einstein equations and quantum black holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dil, E; Ersanli, C C; Kolay, E

    2016-01-01

    Recently q -deformed Einstein equations have been studied for extremal quantum black holes which have been proposed to obey deformed statistics by Strominger. In this study, we give the solutions of deformed Einstein equations by considering these equations for the charged black holes. Also we present the implications of the solutions, such as the deformation parameters lead the charged black holes to have a smaller mass than the classical Reissner- Nordstrom black holes. The reduction in mass of a classical black hole can be viewed as a transition from classical to quantum black hole regime. (paper)

  12. Einstein and the Quantum: The Secret Life of EPR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fine, Arthur

    2006-05-01

    Locality, separation and entanglement -- 1930s style. Starting with Solvay 1927, we'll explore the background to the 1935 paper by Einstein, Podolsky and Rosen: how it was composed, the actual argument and principles used, and how the paper was received by Schroedinger, and others. We'll also look at Bohr's response: the extent to which Bohr connects with what Einstein was after in EPR and the extent to which EPR marks a shift in Bohr's thinking about the quantum theory. Time permitting, we will contrast EPR with Bell's theorem.

  13. Einstein and Rastall theories of gravitation in comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darabi, F.; Heydarzade, Y. [Research Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics of Maragha (RIAAM), Maragha (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Azarbaijan Shahid Madani University, Department of Physics, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Moradpour, H.; Corda, C. [Research Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics of Maragha (RIAAM), Maragha (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Licata, I. [ISEM, Institute for Scientific Methodology, Palermo, PA (Italy); School of Advanced International Studies on Applied Theoretical and Non Linear Methodologies in Physics, Bari (Italy)

    2018-01-15

    We profit by a recent paper of Visser claiming that Rastall gravity is equivalent to Einstein gravity to compare the two gravitational theories in a general way. Our conclusions are different from Visser's ones. We indeed argue that these two theories are not equivalent. In fact, Rastall theory of gravity is an ''open'' theory when compared to Einstein general theory of relativity. Thus, it is ready to accept the challenges of observational cosmology and quantum gravity. (orig.)

  14. Einstein's Enigma of black holes in my bubble bath

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vishveshwara, C.

    2006-01-01

    Einstein's Enigma or Black Holes in My Bubble Bath is a humorous and informal rendition of the story of gravitation theory from the early historic origins to the latest developments in astrophysics, focusing on Albert Einstein's theory of general relativity and black-hole physics. Through engaging conversations and napkin-scribbled diagrams come tumbling the rudiments of relativity, spacetime and much of modern physics, narrated with high didactic and literary talent, and each embedded in casual lessons given by a worldly astrophysicist to his friend. Join the intellectual fun and exalt in the frothy ideas while vicariously taking relaxing baths in this magical bathtub. (orig.)

  15. Einstein: His Impact on Accelerators; His Impact on the World

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sessler, A.

    2005-01-01

    The impact of the work of Albert Einstein on accelerator physics is described. Because of the limit of time, and also because the audience knows the details, the impact is described in broad strokes. Nevertheless, it is seen how his work has affected many different aspects of accelerator physics. In the second half of the talk, Albert Einstein's impact on the world will be discussed; namely his work on world peace (including his role as a pacifist, in the atomic bomb, and in arms control) and his efforts as a humanitarian (including his efforts on social justice, anti-racism, and civil rights)

  16. Bose-Einstein condensates in atomic gases: simple theoretical results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castin, Y.

    2001-01-01

    The author presents the theory of the Bose-Einstein condensation along with a discussion of experimental tests. The author deals successively with the following topics: - the ideal Bose gas in a trap (first in a harmonic trap and then in a more general trap), - a model for the atomic interaction, - interacting Bose gas in the Hartree-Fock approximation, - properties of the condensate wavefunction, - the Gross-Pitaevskii equation, - Bogoliubov approach and thermodynamical stability, - phase coherence properties at the Bose-Einstein condensate, and - symmetry-breaking description of condensates. (A.C.)

  17. Albert Einstein, the human side glimpses from his archives

    CERN Document Server

    Einstein, Albert; Hoffmann, Banesh

    2013-01-01

    Modesty, humor, compassion, and wisdom are the traits most evident in this illuminating selection of personal papers from the Albert Einstein Archives. The illustrious physicist wrote as thoughtfully to an Ohio fifth-grader, distressed by her discovery that scientists classify humans as animals, as to a Colorado banker who asked whether Einstein believed in a personal God. Witty rhymes, an exchange with Queen Elizabeth of Belgium about fine music, and expressions of his devotion to Zionism are but some of the highlights found in this warm and enriching book.

  18. Einstein's Relativity The Ultimate Key to the Cosmos

    CERN Document Server

    Cooperstock, Fred I

    2012-01-01

    This richly illustrated book is unique in bringing Einstein's relativity to a higher level for the non-specialist than has ever been attempted before, using nothing more than grade-school algebra. Bondi's approach with spacetime diagrams is simplified and expanded, clarifying the famous asymmetric aging-of-twins paradox. Einstein's theory of gravity, general relativity, is simplified for the reader using spacetime diagrams. The theory is applied to important topics in physics such as gravitational waves, gravitational collapse and black holes, time machines, the relationship to the quantum world, galactic motions and cosmology.

  19. Einstein's legacy the unity of space and time

    CERN Document Server

    Schwinger, Julian Seymour

    1986-01-01

    In this splendidly lucid and profusely illustrated book, a Nobel laureate relates the fascinating story of Einstein, the general and special theories of relativity, and the scientists before and since who influenced relativity's genesis and development. Eschewing technical terms in favor of ordinary language, the book offers a perfect introduction to relativity for readers without specialized knowledge of mathematics and science.The author follows Einstein's own dictum to make explanations ""as simple as possible, but not more so."" His periodic use of equations as points of clarification inv

  20. Nonlinear dynamics in the Einstein-Friedmann equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Yosuke; Mizuno, Yuji; Ohta, Shigetoshi; Mori, Keisuke; Horiuchi, Tanji

    2009-01-01

    We have studied the gravitational field equations on the basis of general relativity and nonlinear dynamics. The space component of the Einstein-Friedmann equation shows the chaotic behaviours in case the following conditions are satisfied: (i)the expanding ratio: h=x . /x max = +0.14) for the occurrence of the chaotic behaviours in the Einstein-Friedmann equation (0 ≤ λ ≤ +0.14). The numerical calculations are performed with the use of the Microsoft EXCEL(2003), and the results are shown in the following cases; λ = 2b = +0.06 and +0.14.