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Sample records for eif4e cap-binding antagonist

  1. Distinct Features of Cap Binding by eIF4E1b Proteins

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    Kubacka, Dorota; Miguel, Ricardo Núñez; Minshall, Nicola; Darzynkiewicz, Edward; Standart, Nancy; Zuberek, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    eIF4E1b, closely related to the canonical translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E1a), cap-binding protein is highly expressed in mouse, Xenopus and zebrafish oocytes. We have previously characterized eIF4E1b as a component of the CPEB mRNP translation repressor complex along with the eIF4E-binding protein 4E-Transporter, the Xp54/DDX6 RNA helicase and additional RNA-binding proteins. eIF4E1b exhibited only very weak interactions with m7GTP-Sepharose and, rather than binding eIF4G, interacted with 4E-T. Here we undertook a detailed examination of both Xenopus and human eIF4E1b interactions with cap analogues using fluorescence titration and homology modeling. The predicted structure of eIF4E1b maintains the α + β fold characteristic of eIF4E proteins and its cap-binding pocket is similarly arranged by critical amino acids: Trp56, Trp102, Glu103, Trp166, Arg112, Arg157 and Lys162 and residues of the C-terminal loop. However, we demonstrate that eIF4E1b is 3-fold less well able to bind the cap than eIF4E1a, both proteins being highly stimulated by methylation at N7 of guanine. Moreover, eIF4E1b proteins are distinguishable from eIF4E1a by a set of conserved amino acid substitutions, several of which are located near to cap-binding residues. Indeed, eIF4E1b possesses several distinct features, namely, enhancement of cap binding by a benzyl group at N7 position of guanine, a reduced response to increasing length of the phosphate chain and increased binding to a cap separated by a linker from Sepharose, suggesting differences in the arrangement of the protein's core. In agreement, mutagenesis of the amino acids differentiating eIF4E1b from eIF4E1a reduces cap binding by eIF4E1a 2-fold, demonstrating their role in modulating cap binding. PMID:25463438

  2. The cap-binding translation initiation factor, eIF4E, binds a pseudoknot in a viral cap-independent translation element

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    Wang, Zhaohui; Parisien, Marc; Scheets, Kay; Miller, W. Allen

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Eukaryotic initiation factor eIF4E performs a key early step in translation by specifically recognizing the m7GpppN cap structure at the 5' end of cellular mRNAs. Many viral mRNAs lack a 5' cap and thus bypass eIF4E. In contrast, we reported a novel cap-independent translation element (PTE) in Pea enation mosaic virus RNA2 that binds and requires eIF4E for translation initiation. To understand how this uncapped RNA is bound tightly by eIF4E we employ SHAPE probing, phylogenetic comparisons with new PTEs discovered in panico- and carmoviruses, footprinting of the eIF4E binding site, and 3D RNA modeling using NAST, MC-Fold, and MC-Sym to predict a compact, three-dimensional structure of the RNA. We propose that the cap-binding pocket of eIF4E clamps around a pseudoknot, placing a highly SHAPE-reactive guanosine in the pocket in place of the normal m7GpppN cap. This reveals a new mechanism of mRNA recognition by eIF4E. PMID:21645857

  3. Sapovirus translation requires an interaction between VPg and the cap binding protein eIF4E.

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    Hosmillo, Myra; Chaudhry, Yasmin; Kim, Deok-Song; Goodfellow, Ian; Cho, Kyoung-Oh

    2014-11-01

    Sapoviruses of the Caliciviridae family of small RNA viruses are emerging pathogens that cause gastroenteritis in humans and animals. Molecular studies on human sapovirus have been hampered due to the lack of a cell culture system. In contrast, porcine sapovirus (PSaV) can be grown in cell culture, making it a suitable model for understanding the infectious cycle of sapoviruses and the related enteric caliciviruses. Caliciviruses are known to use a novel mechanism of protein synthesis that relies on the interaction of cellular translation initiation factors with the virus genome-encoded viral protein genome (VPg) protein, which is covalently linked to the 5' end of the viral genome. Using PSaV as a representative member of the Sapovirus genus, we characterized the role of the viral VPg protein in sapovirus translation. As observed for other caliciviruses, the PSaV genome was found to be covalently linked to VPg, and this linkage was required for the translation and the infectivity of viral RNA. The PSaV VPg protein was associated with the 4F subunit of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor (eIF4F) complex in infected cells and bound directly to the eIF4E protein. As has been previously demonstrated for feline calicivirus, a member of the Vesivirus genus, PSaV translation required eIF4E and the interaction between eIF4E and eIF4G. Overall, our study provides new insights into the novel mechanism of sapovirus translation, suggesting that sapovirus VPg can hijack the cellular translation initiation mechanism by recruiting the eIF4F complex through a direct eIF4E interaction. Sapoviruses, which are members of the Caliciviridae family, are one of the causative agents of viral gastroenteritis in humans. However, human sapovirus remains noncultivable in cell culture, hampering the ability to characterize the virus infectious cycle. Here, we show that the VPg protein from porcine sapovirus, the only cultivatable sapovirus, is essential for viral translation and functions via a direct interaction with the cellular translation initiation factor eIF4E. This work provides new insights into the novel protein-primed mechanism of calicivirus VPg-dependent translation initiation. Copyright © 2014 Hosmillo et al.

  4. Control of eIF4E cellular localization by eIF4E-binding proteins, 4E-BPs.

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    Rong, Liwei; Livingstone, Mark; Sukarieh, Rami; Petroulakis, Emmanuel; Gingras, Anne-Claude; Crosby, Katherine; Smith, Bradley; Polakiewicz, Roberto D; Pelletier, Jerry; Ferraiuolo, Maria A; Sonenberg, Nahum

    2008-07-01

    Eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF) 4E, the mRNA 5'-cap-binding protein, mediates the association of eIF4F with the mRNA 5'-cap structure to stimulate cap-dependent translation initiation in the cytoplasm. The assembly of eIF4E into the eIF4F complex is negatively regulated through a family of repressor proteins, called the eIF4E-binding proteins (4E-BPs). eIF4E is also present in the nucleus, where it is thought to stimulate nuclear-cytoplasmic transport of certain mRNAs. eIF4E is transported to the nucleus via its interaction with 4E-T (4E-transporter), but it is unclear how it is retained in the nucleus. Here we show that a sizable fraction (approximately 30%) of 4E-BP1 is localized to the nucleus, where it binds eIF4E. In mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) subjected to serum starvation and/or rapamycin treatment, nuclear 4E-BPs sequester eIF4E in the nucleus. A dramatic loss of nuclear 4E-BP1 occurs in c-Ha-Ras-expressing MEFs, which fail to show starvation-induced nuclear accumulation of eIF4E. Therefore, 4E-BP1 is a regulator of eIF4E cellular localization.

  5. Investigating the consequences of eIF4E2 (4EHP interaction with 4E-transporter on its cellular distribution in HeLa cells.

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    Dorota Kubacka

    Full Text Available In addition to the canonical eIF4E cap-binding protein, eukaryotes have evolved sequence-related variants with distinct features, some of which have been shown to negatively regulate translation of particular mRNAs, but which remain poorly characterised. Mammalian eIF4E proteins have been divided into three classes, with class I representing the canonical cap-binding protein eIF4E1. eIF4E1 binds eIF4G to initiate translation, and other eIF4E-binding proteins such as 4E-BPs and 4E-T prevent this interaction by binding eIF4E1 with the same consensus sequence YX 4Lϕ. We investigate here the interaction of human eIF4E2 (4EHP, a class II eIF4E protein, which binds the cap weakly, with eIF4E-transporter protein, 4E-T. We first show that ratios of eIF4E1:4E-T range from 50:1 to 15:1 in HeLa and HEK293 cells respectively, while those of eIF4E2:4E-T vary from 6:1 to 3:1. We next provide evidence that eIF4E2 binds 4E-T in the yeast two hybrid assay, as well as in pull-down assays and by recruitment to P-bodies in mammalian cells. We also show that while both eIF4E1 and eIF4E2 bind 4E-T via the canonical YX 4Lϕ sequence, nearby downstream sequences also influence eIF4E:4E-T interactions. Indirect immunofluorescence was used to demonstrate that eIF4E2, normally homogeneously localised in the cytoplasm, does not redistribute to stress granules in arsenite-treated cells, nor to P-bodies in Actinomycin D-treated cells, in contrast to eIF4E1. Moreover, eIF4E2 shuttles through nuclei in a Crm1-dependent manner, but in an 4E-T-independent manner, also unlike eIF4E1. Altogether we conclude that while both cap-binding proteins interact with 4E-T, and can be recruited by 4E-T to P-bodies, eIF4E2 functions are likely to be distinct from those of eIF4E1, both in the cytoplasm and nucleus, further extending our understanding of mammalian class I and II cap-binding proteins.

  6. Dissociation of eIF4E-binding protein 2 (4E-BP2 from eIF4E independent of Thr37/Thr46 phosphorylation in the ischemic stress response.

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    María I Ayuso

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF 4E-binding proteins (4E-BPs are translational repressors that bind specifically to eIF4E and are critical in the control of protein translation. 4E-BP2 is the predominant 4E-BP expressed in the brain, but their role is not well known. Here, we characterized four forms of 4E-BP2 detected by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DGE in brain. The form with highest electrophoretic mobility was the main form susceptible to phosphorylation at Thr37/Thr46 sites, phosphorylation that was detected in acidic spots. Cerebral ischemia and subsequent reperfusion induced dephosphorylation and phosphorylation of 4E-BP2 at Thr37/Thr46, respectively. The induced phosphorylation was in parallel with the release of 4E-BP2 from eIF4E, although two of the phosphorylated 4E-BP2 forms were bound to eIF4E. Upon long-term reperfusion, there was a decrease in the binding of 4E-BP2 to eIF4E in cerebral cortex, demonstrated by cap binding assays and 4E-BP2-immunoprecipitation experiments. The release of 4E-BP2 from eIF4E was without changes in 4E-BP2 phosphorylation or other post-translational modification recognized by 2-DGE. These findings demonstrated specific changes in 4E-BP2/eIF4E association dependent and independent of 4E-BP2 phosphorylation. The last result supports the notion that phosphorylation may not be the uniquely regulation for the binding of 4E-BP2 to eIF4E under ischemic stress.

  7. Understanding and Targeting the Eukaryotic Translation Initiation Factor eIF4E in Head and Neck Cancer

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    Biljana Culjkovic

    2009-01-01

    of human malignancies including HNSCC where its levels correlate with poor prognosis. Here, we discuss the biochemical and molecular underpinnings of the oncogenic potential of eIF4E. Studies in human leukemia specimens, and later in a mouse model of prostate cancer, strongly suggest that cells with elevated eIF4E develop an oncogene dependency to it, making them more sensitive to targeting eIF4E than normal cells. We describe several strategies that have been suggested for eIF4E targeting in the clinic: the use of a small molecule antagonist of eIF4E (ribavirin, siRNA or antisense oligonucleotide strategies, suicide gene therapy, and the use of a tissue-targeting 4EBP fusion peptide. The first clinical trial targeting eIF4E indicates that ribavirin effectively targets eIF4E in poor prognosis leukemia patients and more importantly leads to striking clinical responses including complete and partial remissions. Finally, we discuss the relevance of these findings to HNSCC.

  8. eIF4E Phosphorylation Influences Bdnf mRNA Translation in Mouse Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons

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    Jamie K. Moy

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Plasticity in dorsal root ganglion (DRG neurons that promotes pain requires activity-dependent mRNA translation. Protein synthesis inhibitors block the ability of many pain-promoting molecules to enhance excitability in DRG neurons and attenuate behavioral signs of pain plasticity. In line with this, we have recently shown that phosphorylation of the 5′ cap-binding protein, eIF4E, plays a pivotal role in plasticity of DRG nociceptors in models of hyperalgesic priming. However, mRNA targets of eIF4E phosphorylation have not been elucidated in the DRG. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF signaling from nociceptors in the DRG to spinal dorsal horn neurons is an important mediator of hyperalgesic priming. Regulatory mechanisms that promote pain plasticity via controlling BDNF expression that is involved in promoting pain plasticity have not been identified. We show that phosphorylation of eIF4E is paramount for Bdnf mRNA translation in the DRG. Bdnf mRNA translation is reduced in mice lacking eIF4E phosphorylation (eIF4ES209A and pro-nociceptive factors fail to increase BDNF protein levels in the DRGs of these mice despite robust upregulation of Bdnf-201 mRNA levels. Importantly, bypassing the DRG by giving intrathecal injection of BDNF in eIF4ES209A mice creates a strong hyperalgesic priming response that is normally absent or reduced in these mice. We conclude that eIF4E phosphorylation-mediated translational control of BDNF expression is a key mechanism for nociceptor plasticity leading to hyperalgesic priming.

  9. A unique phosphorylation-dependent eIF4E assembly on 40S ribosomes co-ordinated by hepatitis C virus protein NS5A that activates internal ribosome entry site translation.

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    Panda, Swarupa; Vedagiri, Dhiviya; Viveka, Thangaraj Soundara; Harshan, Krishnan Harinivas

    2014-09-01

    We previously reported that the HCV (hepatitis C virus) protein NS5A up-regulated mRNA cap binding eIF4F (eukaryotic initiation factor 4F) complex assembly through mTOR (mechanistic target of rapamycin)-4EBP1 (eIF4E-binding protein 1) pathway and that NS5A (non-structural protein 5A) physically interacted with translation apparatus. In the present study, we demonstrate that NS5A co-ordinates a unique assembly of the cap binding protein eIF4E and 40S ribosome to form a complex that we call ENR (eIF4E-NS5A-ribosome). Recruitment of NS5A and eIF4E to 40S ribosome was confirmed by polysome fractionation, subcellular fractionation and high-salt-wash immunoprecipitation. These observations were also confirmed in HCV-infected cells, validating its biological significance. eIF4E phosphorylation was critical for ENR assembly. 80S ribosome dissociation and RNase integrity assays revealed that, once associated, the ENR complex is stable and RNA interaction is dispensable. Both the N- and C-terminal regions of NS5A domain 1 were indispensable for this assembly and for the NS5A-induced HCV IRES (internal ribosome entry site) activation. The present study demonstrates that NS5A initially associates with phosphorylated eIF4E of eIF4F complex and subsequently recruits it to 40S ribosomes. This is the first time the interaction of viral protein with both eIF4E and ribosomes has been reported. We propose that this assembly would determine the outcome of HCV infection and pathogenesis through regulation of viral and host translation.

  10. Protein Phosphatase 2A Negatively Regulates Eukaryotic Initiation Factor 4E Phosphorylation and eIF4F Assembly through Direct Dephosphorylation of Mnk and eIF4E

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    Yikun Li

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E is frequently overexpressed in human cancers and is associated with cellular transformation, tumorigenesis, and metastatic progression. It is known that Mnks can phosphorylate eIF4E. Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A functions as a tumor suppressor, and it was previously suggested to regulate eIF4E phosphorylation. However, how PP2A regulates eIF4E phosphorylation has not been fully addressed. In this study, we have not only validated the role of PP2A in regulation of eIF4E phosphorylation but also demonstrated the mechanism underlying this process. Inhibition of PP2A using either okadaic acid or PP2A small interfering RNA (siRNA increased eIF4E phosphorylation, which could be abolished by the presence of the Mnk inhibitor CGP57380 or deficiency of Mnk genes. Thus, Mnks are involved in PP2A-mediated regulation of eIF4E phosphorylation. Moreover, a dephosphorylation assay revealed that PP2A could directly dephosphorylate Mnk1 and eIF4E. m7GTP pull-down assay detected more eIF4G and phospho-eIF4E and less 4EBP-1 in PP2A siRNA-transfected cells than in control siRNA-transfected cells, indicating an increased cap binding of eIF4F complex. Accordingly, okadaic acid treatment or PP2A knockdown increased the levels of c-Myc and Mcl-1, which are proteins known to be regulated by a cap-dependent translation mechanism. Taken together, we conclude that PP2A negatively regulates eIF4E phosphorylation and eIF4F complex assembly through dephosphorylation of Mnk and eIF4E, thus suggesting a novel mechanism by which PP2A exerts its tumor-suppressive function.

  11. Response to mTOR inhibition: activity of eIF4E predicts sensitivity in cell lines and acquired changes in eIF4E regulation in breast cancer

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    Bartlett John MS

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inhibitors of the kinase mTOR, such as rapamycin and everolimus, have been used as cancer therapeutics with limited success since some tumours are resistant. Efforts to establish predictive markers to allow selection of patients with tumours likely to respond have centred on determining phosphorylation states of mTOR or its targets 4E-BP1 and S6K in cancer cells. In an alternative approach we estimated eIF4E activity, a key effector of mTOR function, and tested the hypothesis that eIF4E activity predicts sensitivity to mTOR inhibition in cell lines and in breast tumours. Results We found a greater than three fold difference in sensitivity of representative colon, lung and breast cell lines to rapamycin. Using an assay to quantify influences of eIF4E on the translational efficiency specified by structured 5'UTRs, we showed that this estimate of eIF4E activity was a significant predictor of rapamycin sensitivity, with higher eIF4E activities indicative of enhanced sensitivity. Surprisingly, non-transformed cell lines were not less sensitive to rapamycin and did not have lower eIF4E activities than cancer lines, suggesting the mTOR/4E-BP1/eIF4E axis is deregulated in these non-transformed cells. In the context of clinical breast cancers, we estimated eIF4E activity by analysing expression of eIF4E and its functional regulators within tumour cells and combining these scores to reflect inhibitory and activating influences on eIF4E. Estimates of eIF4E activity in cancer biopsies taken at diagnosis did not predict sensitivity to 11-14 days of pre-operative everolimus treatment, as assessed by change in tumour cell proliferation from diagnosis to surgical excision. However, higher pre-treatment eIF4E activity was significantly associated with dramatic post-treatment changes in expression of eIF4E and 4E-binding proteins, suggesting that eIF4E is further deregulated in these tumours in response to mTOR inhibition. Conclusions Estimates of eIF4E activity predict sensitivity to mTOR inhibition in cell lines but breast tumours with high estimated eIF4E activity gain changes in eIF4E regulation in order to enhance resistance.

  12. eIF4E-Overexpression imparts perillyl alcohol and rapamycin-mediated regulation of telomerase reverse transcriptase.

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    Sundin, Tabetha; Peffley, Dennis; Hentosh, Patricia

    2013-08-01

    Translation is mediated partly by regulation of free eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) levels through PI3K-Akt-mTOR signaling. Cancer cells treated with the plant-derived perillyl alcohol (POH) or the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor rapamycin dephosphorylate eIF4E-binding protein (4E-BP1) and attenuate cap-dependent translation. We previously showed in cancer cell lines with elevated eIF4E that POH and rapamycin regulate telomerase activity through this pathway. Here, immortalized Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) control cells and CHO cells with forced eIF4E expression (rb4E) were used to elucidate eIF4E's role in telomerase regulation by POH and rapamycin. Despite 5-fold higher eIF4E amounts in rb4E, telomerase activity, telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) mRNA, and TERT protein were nearly equivalent in control and rb4E cells. In control cells, telomerase activity, TERT mRNA and protein levels were unaffected by either compound. In contrast, telomerase activity and TERT protein were both attenuated by either agent in rb4E cells, but without corresponding TERT mRNA decreases indicating a translational/post-translational process. S6K, Akt, and 4E-BP1 were modulated by mTOR mediators only in the presence of increased eIF4E. Thus, eIF4E-overexpression in rb4E cells enables inhibitory effects of POH and rapamycin on telomerase and TERT protein. Importantly, eIF4E-overexpression modifies cellular protein synthetic processes and gene regulation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Targeting eukaryotic translation in mesothelioma cells with an eIF4E-specific antisense oligonucleotide.

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    Blake A Jacobson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Aberrant cap-dependent translation is implicated in tumorigenesis in multiple tumor types including mesothelioma. In this study, disabling the eIF4F complex by targeting eIF4E with eIF4E-specific antisense oligonucleotide (4EASO is assessed as a therapy for mesothelioma. METHODS: Mesothelioma cells were transfected with 4EASO, designed to target eIF4E mRNA, or mismatch-ASO control. Cell survival was measured in mesothelioma treated with 4EASO alone or combined with either gemcitabine or pemetrexed. Levels of eIF4E, ODC, Bcl-2 and β-actin were assessed following treatment. Binding to a synthetic cap-analogue was used to study the strength of eIF4F complex activation following treatment. RESULTS: eIF4E level and the formation of eIF4F cap-complex decreased in response to 4EASO, but not mismatch control ASO, resulting in cleavage of PARP indicating apoptosis. 4EASO treatment resulted in dose dependent decrease in eIF4E levels, which corresponded to cytotoxicity of mesothelioma cells. 4EASO resulted in decreased levels of eIF4E in non-malignant LP9 cells, but this did not correspond to increased cytotoxicity. Proteins thought to be regulated by cap-dependent translation, Bcl-2 and ODC, were decreased upon treatment with 4EASO. Combination therapy of 4EASO with pemetrexed or gemcitabine further reduced cell number. CONCLUSION: 4EASO is a novel drug that causes apoptosis and selectively reduces eIF4E levels, eIF4F complex formation, and proliferation of mesothelioma cells. eIF4E knockdown results in decreased expression of anti-apoptotic and pro-growth proteins and enhances chemosensitivity.

  14. Tissue microarray analysis of eIF4E and its downstream effector proteins in human breast cancer

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    Clifford John

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E is elevated in many cancers and is a prognostic indicator in breast cancer. Many pro-tumorigenic proteins are selectively translated via eIF4E, including c-Myc, cyclin D1, ornithine decarboxylase (ODC, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and Tousled-like kinase 1B (TLK1B. However, western blot analysis of these factors in human breast cancer has been limited by the availability of fresh frozen tissue and the labor-intensive nature of the multiple assays required. Our goal was to validate whether formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues arranged in a tissue microarray (TMA format would be more efficient than the use of fresh-frozen tissue and western blot to test multiple downstream gene products. Results Breast tumor TMAs were stained immunohistochemically and quantitated using the ARIOL imaging system. In the TMAs, eIF4E levels correlated strongly with c-Myc, cyclin D1, TLK1B, VEGF, and ODC. Western blot comparisons of eIF4E vs. TLK1B were consistent with the immunohistochemical results. Consistent with our previous western blot results, eIF4E did not correlate with node status, ER, PR, or HER-2/neu. Conclusion We conclude that the TMA technique yields similar results as the western blot technique and can be more efficient and thorough in the evaluation of several products downstream of eIF4E.

  15. Improved eIF4E binding peptides by phage display guided design: plasticity of interacting surfaces yield collective effects.

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    Weizhuang Zhou

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF4E is over-expressed in many types of cancer such as breast, head and neck, and lung. A consequence of increased levels of eIF4E is the preferential translation of pro-tumorigenic proteins (e.g. c-Myc and vascular endothelial growth factor and as a result is regarded as a potential therapeutic target. In this work a novel phage display peptide has been isolated against eIF4E. From the phage sequence two amino acids were delineated which improved binding when substituted into the eIF4G1 sequence. Neither of these substitutions were involved in direct interactions with eIF4E and acted either via optimization of the helical capping motif or restricting the conformational flexibility of the peptide. In contrast, substitutions of the remaining phage derived amino acids into the eIF4G1 sequence disrupted binding of the peptide to eIF4E. Interestingly when some of these disruptive substitutions were combined with key mutations from the phage peptide, they lead to improved affinities. Atomistic computer simulations revealed that the phage and the eIF4G1 derivative peptide sequences differ subtly in their interaction sites on eIF4E. This raises the issue, especially in the context of planar interaction sites such as those exhibited by eIF4E, that given the intricate plasticity of protein surfaces, the construction of structure-activity relationships should account for the possibility of significant movement in the spatial positioning of the peptide binding interface, including significant librational motions of the peptide.

  16. Structure-based mutational analysis of eIF4E in relation to sbm1 resistance to pea seed-borne mosaic virus in pea.

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    Ashby, Jamie A; Stevenson, Clare E M; Jarvis, Gavin E; Lawson, David M; Maule, Andrew J

    2011-01-24

    Pea encodes eukaryotic translation initiation factor eIF4E (eIF4E(S)), which supports the multiplication of Pea seed-borne mosaic virus (PSbMV). In common with hosts for other potyviruses, some pea lines contain a recessive allele (sbm1) encoding a mutant eIF4E (eIF4E(R)) that fails to interact functionally with the PSbMV avirulence protein, VPg, giving genetic resistance to infection. To study structure-function relationships between pea eIF4E and PSbMV VPg, we obtained an X-ray structure for eIF4E(S) bound to m(7)GTP. The crystallographic asymmetric unit contained eight independent copies of the protein, providing insights into the structurally conserved and flexible regions of eIF4E. To assess indirectly the importance of key residues in binding to VPg and/or m(7)GTP, an extensive range of point mutants in eIF4E was tested for their ability to complement PSbMV multiplication in resistant pea tissues and for complementation of protein translation, and hence growth, in an eIF4E-defective yeast strain conditionally dependent upon ectopic expression of eIF4E. The mutants also dissected individual contributions from polymorphisms present in eIF4E(R) and compared the impact of individual residues altered in orthologous resistance alleles from other crop species. The data showed that essential resistance determinants in eIF4E differed for different viruses although the critical region involved (possibly in VPg-binding) was conserved and partially overlapped with the m(7)GTP-binding region. This overlap resulted in coupled inhibition of virus multiplication and translation in the majority of cases, although the existence of a few mutants that uncoupled the two processes supported the view that the specific role of eIF4E in potyvirus infection may not be restricted to translation. The work describes the most extensive structural analysis of eIF4E in relation to potyvirus resistance. In addition to defining functional domains within the eIF4E structure, we identified eIF4E alleles with the potential to convey novel virus resistance phenotypes.

  17. Antibiotic drug rifabutin is effective against lung cancer cells by targeting the eIF4E-β-catenin axis

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    Li, Ji; Huang, Yijiang [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Hainan General Hospital, Hainan Province (China); Gao, Yunsuo [Equipment Division, Hainan General Hospital, Hainan Province (China); Wu, Haihong; Dong, Wen [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Hainan General Hospital, Hainan Province (China); Liu, Lina, E-mail: echoliun@hotmail.com [Department of Ophthalmology, Hainan Eye Hospital, ZhongShan Ophthalmic Centre, Sun Yat-Sen University, Hainan Province (China)

    2016-04-01

    The essential roles of overexpression of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) and aberrant activation of β-catenin in lung cancer development have been recently identified. However, whether there is a direct connection between eIF4E overexpression and β-catenin activation in lung cancer cells is unknown. In this study, we show that antibiotic drug rifabutin targets human lung cancer cells via inhibition of eIF4E-β-catenin axis. Rifabutin is effectively against lung cancer cells in in vitro cultured cells and in vivo xenograft mouse model through inhibiting proliferation and inducing apoptosis. Mechanistically, eIF4E regulates β-catenin activity in lung cancer cells as shown by the increased β-catenin phosphorylation and activity in cells overexpressing eIF4E, and furthermore that the regulation is dependent on phosphorylation at S209. Rifabutin suppresses eIF4E phosphorylation, leads to decreased β-catenin phosphorylation and its subsequent transcriptional activities. Depletion of eIF4E abolishes the inhibitory effects of rifabutin on β-catenin activities and overexpression of β-catenin reverses the inhibitory effects of rifabutin on cell growth and survival, further confirming that rifabutin acts on lung cancer cells via targeting eIF4E- β-catenin axis. Our findings identify the eIF4E- β-catenin axis as a critical regulator of lung cancer cell growth and survival, and suggest that its pharmacological inhibition may be therapeutically useful in lung cancer. - Highlights: • Rifabutin targets EGFR-mutated lung cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. • eIF4E phosphorylation regulates β-catenin activity in lung cancer cells. • Rifabutin acts on lung cancer cells via eIF4E- β-catenin axis. • Rifabutin can be repurposed for lung cancer treatment.

  18. Loss-of-function analysis reveals distinct requirements of the translation initiation factors eIF4E, eIF4E-3, eIF4G and eIF4G2 in Drosophila spermatogenesis.

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    Sanjay Ghosh

    Full Text Available In eukaryotes, post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression has a key role in many cellular and developmental processes. Spermatogenesis involves a complex developmental program that includes changes in cell cycle dynamics and dramatic cellular remodeling. Translational control is critical for spermatogenesis in Drosophila as many mRNAs synthesized in the spermatocytes are translated only much later during spermatid differentiation. Testes-specific translation initiation factors eIF4E-3 and eIF4G2 are essential specifically for male fertility. However, details of their roles during different stages of spermatogenesis are unknown, and the role of canonical translation initiation factors in spermatogenesis remains unexplored. In this study, we addressed the functional role of eIF4E-1, eIF4E-3, eIF4G and eIF4G2 in testes development and formation of mature sperm. Using the UAS-Gal4 system and RNA interference, we systematically knocked down these four genes in different stages of germ cell development, and in the somatic cells. Our results show that eIF4E-1 function in early germ cells and the surrounding somatic cells is critical for spermatogenesis. Both eIF4E-1 and eIF4E-3 are required in spermatocytes for chromosome condensation and cytokinesis during the meiotic stages. Interestingly, we find that eIF4G knockdown did not affect male fertility while eIF4G2 has distinct functions during spermatogenesis; it is required in early germ cells for proper meiotic divisions and spermatid elongation while its abrogation in spermatocytes caused meiotic arrest. Double knockdown of eIF4G and eIF4G2 shows that these proteins act redundantly during the early stages of spermatogenesis. Taken together, our analysis reveals spatio-temporal roles of the canonical and testes-specific translation initiation factors in coordinating developmental programs during spermatogenesis.

  19. 4E-BPs require non-canonical 4E-binding motifs and a lateral surface of eIF4E to repress translation.

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    Igreja, Cátia; Peter, Daniel; Weiler, Catrin; Izaurralde, Elisa

    2014-09-02

    eIF4E-binding proteins (4E-BPs) are a widespread class of translational regulators that share a canonical (C) eIF4E-binding motif (4E-BM) with eIF4G. Consequently, 4E-BPs compete with eIF4G for binding to the dorsal surface on eIF4E to inhibit translation initiation. Some 4E-BPs contain non-canonical 4E-BMs (NC 4E-BMs), but the contribution of these motifs to the repressive mechanism--and whether these motifs are present in all 4E-BPs--remains unknown. Here, we show that the three annotated Drosophila melanogaster 4E-BPs contain NC 4E-BMs. These motifs bind to a lateral surface on eIF4E that is not used by eIF4G. This distinct molecular recognition mode is exploited by 4E-BPs to dock onto eIF4E-eIF4G complexes and effectively displace eIF4G from the dorsal surface of eIF4E. Our data reveal a hitherto unrecognized role for the NC4E-BMs and the lateral surface of eIF4E in 4E-BP-mediated translational repression, and suggest that bipartite 4E-BP mimics might represent efficient therapeutic tools to dampen translation during oncogenic transformation.

  20. HIV-1 Gag Blocks Selenite-Induced Stress Granule Assembly by Altering the mRNA Cap-Binding Complex

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    Alessandro Cinti

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Stress granules (SGs are dynamic accumulations of stalled preinitiation complexes and translational machinery that assemble under stressful conditions. Sodium selenite (Se induces the assembly of noncanonical type II SGs that differ in morphology, composition, and mechanism of assembly from canonical SGs. Se inhibits translation initiation by altering the cap-binding activity of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E-binding protein 1 (4EBP1. In this work, we show that human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 Gag is able to block the assembly of type II noncanonical SGs to facilitate continued Gag protein synthesis. We demonstrate that expression of Gag reduces the amount of hypophosphorylated 4EBP1 associated with the 5′ cap potentially through an interaction with its target, eIF4E. These results suggest that the assembly of SGs is an important host antiviral defense that HIV-1 has evolved for inhibition through several distinct mechanisms.

  1. eIF3d is an mRNA cap-binding protein required for specialized translation initiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Amy S.Y.; Kranzusch, Philip J.; Doudna, Jennifer A.; Cate, Jamie H.D.

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic mRNAs contain a 5' cap structure critical for recruitment of the translation machinery and initiation of protein synthesis. mRNA recognition is thought to require direct interactions between eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) and the mRNA cap. However, translation of numerous capped mRNAs remains robust during cellular stress, early development, and cell cycle progression1 despite eIF4E inactivation. Here we describe a new cellular cap-dependent pathway of translation initiation that relies on a previously unknown cap-binding activity of eIF3d, a subunit of the 800-kilodalton eukaryotic initiation factor 3 (eIF3) complex. A 1.4 Å crystal structure of the eIF3d cap-binding domain reveals unexpected homology to endonucleases involved in RNA turnover, and allows modeling of cap recognition by eIF3d. eIF3d makes specific contacts to the cap, as exemplified by cap analog competition, and these interactions are essential for assembly of translation initiation complexes on eIF3-specialized mRNAs2 such as the cell proliferation regulator c-Jun. The c-Jun mRNA further encodes an inhibitory RNA element that blocks eIF4E recruitment, thus enforcing alternative cap recognition by eIF3d. Our results reveal a new mechanism of cap-dependent translation independent of eIF4E, and illustrate how modular RNA elements work in concert to direct specialized forms of translation initiation. PMID:27462815

  2. Potyviral resistance derived from cultivars of Phaseolus vulgaris carrying bc-3 co-segregates with homozygotic presence of a mutated eIF4E allele

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naderpour, M; Lund, O Søgaard; Larsen, R

    2008-01-01

    -binding proteins, eIF4E, eIF(iso)4E and nCBP. In cultivars reported to carry bc-3 resistance, eIF4E was found to display non-silent mutations at codons 53, 65, 76 and 111 closely resembling a pattern of eIF4E mutations determining potyvirus resistance in other plant species. By application of a molecular marker...... in a segregating F2 population of P. vulgaris, BCMV resistance was found to co-segregate with homozygotic presence of the mutant eIF4E allele. , BCMV resistance was found to co-segregate with homozygotic presence of the mutant allele. Silent mutations were found in eIF(iso)4E, but without correspondence to P...

  3. Role of 3'UTRs in the translation of mRNAs regulated by oncogenic eIF4E--a computational inference.

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    Arti N Santhanam

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic cap-dependent mRNA translation is mediated by the initiation factor eIF4E, which binds mRNAs and stimulates efficient translation initiation. eIF4E is often overexpressed in human cancers. To elucidate the molecular signature of eIF4E target mRNAs, we analyzed sequence and structural properties of two independently derived polyribosome recruited mRNA datasets. These datasets originate from studies of mRNAs that are actively being translated in response to cells over-expressing eIF4E or cells with an activated oncogenic AKT: eIF4E signaling pathway, respectively. Comparison of eIF4E target mRNAs to mRNAs insensitive to eIF4E-regulation has revealed surprising features in mRNA secondary structure, length and microRNA-binding properties. Fold-changes (the relative change in recruitment of an mRNA to actively translating polyribosomal complexes in response to eIF4E overexpression or AKT upregulation are positively correlated with mRNA G+C content and negatively correlated with total and 3'UTR length of the mRNAs. A machine learning approach for predicting the fold change was created. Interesting tendencies of secondary structure stability are found near the start codon and at the beginning of the 3'UTR region. Highly upregulated mRNAs show negative selection (site avoidance for binding sites of several microRNAs. These results are consistent with the emerging model of regulation of mRNA translation through a dynamic balance between translation initiation at the 5'UTR and microRNA binding at the 3'UTR.

  4. Role of 3'UTRs in the translation of mRNAs regulated by oncogenic eIF4E--a computational inference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santhanam, Arti N; Bindewald, Eckart; Rajasekhar, Vinagolu K; Larsson, Ola; Sonenberg, Nahum; Colburn, Nancy H; Shapiro, Bruce A

    2009-01-01

    Eukaryotic cap-dependent mRNA translation is mediated by the initiation factor eIF4E, which binds mRNAs and stimulates efficient translation initiation. eIF4E is often overexpressed in human cancers. To elucidate the molecular signature of eIF4E target mRNAs, we analyzed sequence and structural properties of two independently derived polyribosome recruited mRNA datasets. These datasets originate from studies of mRNAs that are actively being translated in response to cells over-expressing eIF4E or cells with an activated oncogenic AKT: eIF4E signaling pathway, respectively. Comparison of eIF4E target mRNAs to mRNAs insensitive to eIF4E-regulation has revealed surprising features in mRNA secondary structure, length and microRNA-binding properties. Fold-changes (the relative change in recruitment of an mRNA to actively translating polyribosomal complexes in response to eIF4E overexpression or AKT upregulation) are positively correlated with mRNA G+C content and negatively correlated with total and 3'UTR length of the mRNAs. A machine learning approach for predicting the fold change was created. Interesting tendencies of secondary structure stability are found near the start codon and at the beginning of the 3'UTR region. Highly upregulated mRNAs show negative selection (site avoidance) for binding sites of several microRNAs. These results are consistent with the emerging model of regulation of mRNA translation through a dynamic balance between translation initiation at the 5'UTR and microRNA binding at the 3'UTR.

  5. Cap-binding complex (CBC)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gonatopoulos-Pournatzis, Thomas; Cowling, Victoria H

    2014-01-01

    .... One of the most important mediators of 7mG functions is CBC (cap-binding complex). CBC has a key role in several gene expression mechanisms, including transcription, splicing, transcript export and translation...

  6. The translation initiation factor eIF4E regulates the sex-specific expression of the master switch gene Sxl in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia L Graham

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In female fruit flies, Sex-lethal (Sxl turns off the X chromosome dosage compensation system by a mechanism involving a combination of alternative splicing and translational repression of the male specific lethal-2 (msl-2 mRNA. A genetic screen identified the translation initiation factor eif4e as a gene that acts together with Sxl to repress expression of the Msl-2 protein. However, eif4e is not required for Sxl mediated repression of msl-2 mRNA translation. Instead, eif4e functions as a co-factor in Sxl-dependent female-specific alternative splicing of msl-2 and also Sxl pre-mRNAs. Like other factors required for Sxl regulation of splicing, eif4e shows maternal-effect female-lethal interactions with Sxl. This female lethality can be enhanced by mutations in other co-factors that promote female-specific splicing and is caused by a failure to properly activate the Sxl-positive autoregulatory feedback loop in early embryos. In this feedback loop Sxl proteins promote their own synthesis by directing the female-specific alternative splicing of Sxl-Pm pre-mRNAs. Analysis of pre-mRNA splicing when eif4e activity is compromised demonstrates that Sxl-dependent female-specific splicing of both Sxl-Pm and msl-2 pre-mRNAs requires eif4e activity. Consistent with a direct involvement in Sxl-dependent alternative splicing, eIF4E is associated with unspliced Sxl-Pm pre-mRNAs and is found in complexes that contain early acting splicing factors--the U1/U2 snRNP protein Sans-fils (Snf, the U1 snRNP protein U1-70k, U2AF38, U2AF50, and the Wilms' Tumor 1 Associated Protein Fl(2d--that have been directly implicated in Sxl splicing regulation.

  7. Geographical Gradient of the eIF4E Alleles Conferring Resistance to Potyviruses in Pea (Pisum) Germplasm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konečná, Eva; Šafářová, Dana; Navrátil, Milan; Hanáček, Pavel; Coyne, Clarice; Flavell, Andrew; Vishnyakova, Margarita; Ambrose, Mike; Redden, Robert; Smýkal, Petr

    2014-01-01

    Background The eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E was shown to be involved in resistance against several potyviruses in plants, including pea. We combined our knowledge of pea germplasm diversity with that of the eIF4E gene to identify novel genetic diversity. Methodology/Principal findings Germplasm of 2803 pea accessions was screened for eIF4E intron 3 length polymorphism, resulting in the detection of four eIF4EA-B-C-S variants, whose distribution was geographically structured. The eIF4EA variant conferring resistance to the P1 PSbMV pathotype was found in 53 accessions (1.9%), of which 15 were landraces from India, Afghanistan, Nepal, and 7 were from Ethiopia. A newly discovered variant, eIF4EB, was present in 328 accessions (11.7%) from Ethiopia (29%), Afghanistan (23%), India (20%), Israel (25%) and China (39%). The eIF4EC variant was detected in 91 accessions (3.2% of total) from India (20%), Afghanistan (33%), the Iberian Peninsula (22%) and the Balkans (9.3%). The eIF4ES variant for susceptibility predominated as the wild type. Sequencing of 73 samples, identified 34 alleles at the whole gene, 26 at cDNA and 19 protein variants, respectively. Fifteen alleles were virologically tested and 9 alleles (eIF4EA-1-2-3-4-5-6-7, eIF4EB-1, eIF4EC-2) conferred resistance to the P1 PSbMV pathotype. Conclusions/Significance This work identified novel eIF4E alleles within geographically structured pea germplasm and indicated their independent evolution from the susceptible eIF4ES1 allele. Despite high variation present in wild Pisum accessions, none of them possessed resistance alleles, supporting a hypothesis of distinct mode of evolution of resistance in wild as opposed to crop species. The Highlands of Central Asia, the northern regions of the Indian subcontinent, Eastern Africa and China were identified as important centers of pea diversity that correspond with the diversity of the pathogen. The series of alleles identified in this study provides the basis to study the co-evolution of potyviruses and the pea host. PMID:24609094

  8. eIF3d is an mRNA cap-binding protein that is required for specialized translation initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Amy S; Kranzusch, Philip J; Doudna, Jennifer A; Cate, Jamie H D

    2016-08-04

    Eukaryotic mRNAs contain a 5′ cap structure that is crucial for recruitment of the translation machinery and initiation of protein synthesis. mRNA recognition is thought to require direct interactions between eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) and the mRNA cap. However, translation of numerous capped mRNAs remains robust during cellular stress, early development, and cell cycle progression despite inactivation of eIF4E. Here we describe a cap-dependent pathway of translation initiation in human cells that relies on a previously unknown cap-binding activity of eIF3d, a subunit of the 800-kilodalton eIF3 complex. A 1.4 Å crystal structure of the eIF3d cap-binding domain reveals unexpected homology to endonucleases involved in RNA turnover, and allows modelling of cap recognition by eIF3d. eIF3d makes specific contacts with the cap, as exemplified by cap analogue competition, and these interactions are essential for assembly of translation initiation complexes on eIF3-specialized mRNAs such as the cell proliferation regulator c-Jun (also known as JUN). The c-Jun mRNA further encodes an inhibitory RNA element that blocks eIF4E recruitment, thus enforcing alternative cap recognition by eIF3d. Our results reveal a mechanism of cap-dependent translation that is independent of eIF4E, and illustrate how modular RNA elements work together to direct specialized forms of translation initiation.

  9. Interaction patterns between potato virus Y and eIF4E-mediated recessive resistance in the Solanaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moury, Benoît; Janzac, Bérenger; Ruellan, Youna; Simon, Vincent; Ben Khalifa, Mekki; Fakhfakh, Hatem; Fabre, Frédéric; Palloix, Alain

    2014-09-01

    The structural pattern of infectivity matrices, which contains infection data resulting from inoculations of a set of hosts by a set of parasites, is a key parameter for our understanding of biological interactions and their evolution. This pattern determines the evolution of parasite pathogenicity and host resistance, the spatiotemporal distribution of host and parasite genotypes, and the efficiency of disease control strategies. Two major patterns have been proposed for plant-virus genotype infectivity matrices. In the gene-for-gene model, infectivity matrices show a nested pattern, where the host ranges of specialist virus genotypes are subsets of the host ranges of less specialized viruses. In contrast, in the matching-allele (MA) model, each virus genotype is specialized to infect one (or a small set of) host genotype(s). The corresponding infectivity matrix shows a modular pattern where infection is frequent for plants and viruses belonging to the same module but rare for those belonging to different modules. We analyzed the structure of infectivity matrices between Potato virus Y (PVY) and plant genotypes in the family Solanaceae carrying different eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E)-coding alleles conferring recessive resistance. Whereas this system corresponds mechanistically to an MA model, the expected modular pattern was rejected based on our experimental data. This was mostly because PVY mutations involved in adaptation to a particular plant genotype displayed frequent pleiotropic effects, conferring simultaneously an adaptation to additional plant genotypes with different eIF4E alleles. Such effects should be taken into account for the design of strategies of sustainable control of PVY through plant varietal mixtures or rotations. The interaction pattern between host and virus genotypes has important consequences on their respective evolution and on issues regarding the application of disease control strategies. We found that the structure of the interaction between Potato virus Y (PVY) variants and host plants in the family Solanaceae departs significantly from the current model of interaction considered for these organisms because of frequent pleiotropic effects of virus mutations. These mutational effects allow the virus to expand rapidly its range of host plant genotypes, make it very difficult to predict the effects of mutations in PVY infectivity factors, and raise concerns about strategies of sustainable management of plant genetic resistance to viruses. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  10. Potyviral resistance derived from cultivars of Phaseolus vulgaris carrying bc-3 is associated with the homozygotic presence of a mutated eIF4E allele

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naderpour, Masoud; Lund, Ole Søgaard; Larsen, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Eukaryotic translation initiation factors (eIFs) play a central role in potyviral infection. Accordingly, mutations in the gene encoding eIF4E have been identified as a source of recessive resistance in several plant species. In common bean, Phaseolus vulgaris, four recessive genes, bc-1, bc-2, bc......-3 and bc-u, have been proposed to control resistance to the potyviruses Bean common mosaic virus (BCMV) and Bean common mosaic necrosis virus. In order to identify molecular entities for these genes, we cloned and sequenced P. vulgaris homologues of genes encoding the eIF proteins eIF4E, eIF(iso)4E...... resistance and eIF4E genotype was subsequently analysed in an F2 population derived from the P. vulgaris all-susceptible genotype and a genotype carrying bc-3. F2 plants homozygous for the eIF4E mutant allele were found to display at least the same level of resistance to BCMV as the parental resistant...

  11. The putative tumor suppressor microRNA-497 modulates gastric cancer cell proliferation and invasion by repressing eIF4E

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Weidong; Jin, Xuejun; Deng, Xubin [Department of Medical Oncology, Affiliated Cancer Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University, Cancer Center of Guangzhou Medical University (CCGMU), Guangzhou (China); Zhang, Gong [Department of Radiotherapy, People’s Hospital of Shanxi Province, Taiyuan (China); Zhang, Bingqian [Cancer Research Institution, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou (China); Ma, Lei, E-mail: malei01@yeah.net [Department of Medical Oncology, Affiliated Cancer Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University, Cancer Center of Guangzhou Medical University (CCGMU), Guangzhou (China)

    2014-06-27

    Highlights: • MiR-497 expression was down-regulated in GC patients and GC cell lines. • MiR-497 inhibited cell proliferation and invasion of GC cells in vitro. • MiR-497 modulated eIF4E expression in GC cells. • Restoration of miR-497 decreased tumor growth and metastasis in vivo. - Abstract: Accumulating evidence has shown that microRNAs are involved in multiple processes in gastric cancer (GC) development and progression. Aberrant expression of miR-497 has been frequently reported in cancer studies; however, the role and mechanism of its function in GC remains unknown. Here, we reported that miR-497 was frequently downregulated in GC tissues and associated with aggressive clinicopathological features of GC patients. Further in vitro observations showed that the enforced expression of miR-497 inhibited cell proliferation by blocking the G1/S transition and decreased the invasion of GC cells, implying that miR-497 functions as a tumor suppressor in the progression of GC. In vivo study indicated that restoration of miR-497 inhibited tumor growth and metastasis. Luciferase assays revealed that miR-497 inhibited eIF4E expression by targeting the binding sites in the 3′-untranslated region of eIF4E mRNA. qRT-PCR and Western blot assays verified that miR-497 reduced eIF4E expression at both the mRNA and protein levels. A reverse correlation between miR-497 and eIF4E expression was noted in GC tissues. Taken together, our results identify a crucial tumor suppressive role of miR-497 in the progression of GC and suggest that miR-497 might be an anticancer therapeutic target for GC patients.

  12. Cap-binding complex (CBC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonatopoulos-Pournatzis, Thomas; Cowling, Victoria H.

    2013-01-01

    The 7mG (7-methylguanosine cap) formed on mRNA is fundamental to eukaryotic gene expression. Protein complexes recruited to 7mG mediate key processing events throughout the lifetime of the transcript. One of the most important mediators of 7mG functions is CBC (cap-binding complex). CBC has a key role in several gene expression mechanisms, including transcription, splicing, transcript export and translation. Gene expression can be regulated by signalling pathways which influence CBC function. The aim of the present review is to discuss the mechanisms by which CBC mediates and co-ordinates multiple gene expression events. PMID:24354960

  13. Adaptation to mTOR kinase inhibitors by amplification of eIF4E to maintain cap-dependent translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cope, Claire L; Gilley, Rebecca; Balmanno, Kathryn; Sale, Matthew J; Howarth, Karen D; Hampson, Mark; Smith, Paul D; Guichard, Sylvie M; Cook, Simon J

    2014-02-15

    The mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) protein kinase coordinates responses to nutrients and growth factors and is an anti-cancer drug target. To anticipate how cells will respond and adapt to chronic mTOR complex (mTORC)1 and mTORC2 inhibition, we have generated SW620 colon cancer cells with acquired resistance to the ATP-competitive mTOR kinase inhibitor AZD8055 (SW620:8055R). AZD8055 inhibited mTORC1 and mTORC2 signalling and caused a switch from cap-dependent to internal ribosome entry site (IRES)-dependent translation in parental SW620 cells. In contrast, SW620:8055R cells exhibited a loss of S6K signalling, an increase in expression of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor eIF4E and increased cap-dependent mRNA translation. As a result, the expression of CCND1 and MCL1, proteins encoded by eIF4E-sensitive and cap-dependent transcripts, was refractory to AZD8055 in SW620:8055R cells. RNAi-mediated knockdown of eIF4E reversed acquired resistance to AZD8055 in SW620:8055R cells; furthermore, increased expression of eIF4E was sufficient to reduce sensitivity to AZD8055 in a heterologous cell system. Finally, although the combination of MEK1/2 inhibitors with mTOR inhibitors is an attractive rational drug combination, SW620:8055R cells were actually cross-resistant to the MEK1/2 inhibitor selumetinib (AZD6244). These results exemplify the convergence of ERK1/2 and mTOR signalling at eIF4E, and the key role of eIF4E downstream of mTOR in maintaining cell proliferation. They also have important implications for therapeutic strategies based around mTOR and the MEK1/2-ERK1/2 pathway.

  14. Phosphorylation of eIF4E Confers Resistance to Cellular Stress and DNA-Damaging Agents through an Interaction with 4E-T: A Rationale for Novel Therapeutic Approaches.

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    Alba Martínez

    Full Text Available Phosphorylation of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor eIF4E is associated with malignant progression and poor cancer prognosis. Accordingly, here we have analyzed the association between eIF4E phosphorylation and cellular resistance to oxidative stress, starvation, and DNA-damaging agents in vitro. Using immortalized and cancer cell lines, retroviral expression of a phosphomimetic (S209D form of eIF4E, but not phospho-dead (S209A eIF4E or GFP control, significantly increased cellular resistance to stress induced by DNA-damaging agents (cisplatin, starvation (glucose+glutamine withdrawal, and oxidative stress (arsenite. De novo accumulation of eIF4E-containing cytoplasmic bodies colocalizing with the eIF4E-binding protein 4E-T was observed after expression of phosphomimetic S209D, but not S209A or wild-type eIF4E. Increased resistance to cellular stress induced by eIF4E-S209D was lost upon knockdown of endogenous 4E-T or use of an eIF4E-W73A-S209D mutant unable to bind 4E-T. Cancer cells treated with the Mnk1/2 inhibitor CGP57380 to prevent eIF4E phosphorylation and mouse embryonic fibroblasts derived from Mnk1/2 knockout mice were also more sensitive to arsenite and cisplatin treatment. Polysome analysis revealed an 80S peak 2 hours after arsenite treatment in cells overexpressing phosphomimetic eIF4E, indicating translational stalling. Nonetheless, a selective increase was observed in the synthesis of some proteins (cyclin D1, HuR, and Mcl-1. We conclude that phosphorylation of eIF4E confers resistance to various cell stressors and that a direct interaction or regulation of 4E-T by eIF4E is required. Further delineation of this process may identify novel therapeutic avenues for cancer treatment, and these results support the use of modern Mnk1/2 inhibitors in conjunction with standard therapy.

  15. A Case-Matched Gender Comparison Transcriptomic Screen Identifies eIF4E and eIF5 as Potential Prognostic Markers in Male Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, Matthew P; Sundara Rajan, Sreekumar; Droop, Alastair; Suleman, Charlotte A B; Carbone, Carmine; Nilsson, Cecilia; Honarpisheh, Hedieh; Cserni, Gabor; Dent, Jo; Fulford, Laura; Jordan, Lee B; Jones, J Louise; Kanthan, Rani; Litwiniuk, Maria; Di Benedetto, Anna; Mottolese, Marcella; Provenzano, Elena; Shousha, Sami; Stephens, Mark; Walker, Rosemary A; Kulka, Janina; Ellis, Ian O; Jeffery, Margaret; Thygesen, Helene H; Cappelletti, Vera; Daidone, Maria G; Hedenfalk, Ingrid A; Fjällskog, Marie-Louise; Melisi, Davide; Stead, Lucy F; Shaaban, Abeer M; Speirs, Valerie

    2017-05-15

    Purpose: Breast cancer affects both genders, but is understudied in men. Although still rare, male breast cancer (MBC) is being diagnosed more frequently. Treatments are wholly informed by clinical studies conducted in women, based on assumptions that underlying biology is similar.Experimental Design: A transcriptomic investigation of male and female breast cancer was performed, confirming transcriptomic data in silico Biomarkers were immunohistochemically assessed in 697 MBCs (n = 477, training; n = 220, validation set) and quantified in pre- and posttreatment samples from an MBC patient receiving everolimus and PI3K/mTOR inhibitor.Results: Gender-specific gene expression patterns were identified. eIF transcripts were upregulated in MBC. eIF4E and eIF5 were negatively prognostic for overall survival alone (log-rank P = 0.013; HR = 1.77, 1.12-2.8 and P = 0.035; HR = 1.68, 1.03-2.74, respectively), or when coexpressed (P = 0.01; HR = 2.66, 1.26-5.63), confirmed in the validation set. This remained upon multivariate Cox regression analysis [eIF4E P = 0.016; HR = 2.38 (1.18-4.8), eIF5 P = 0.022; HR = 2.55 (1.14-5.7); coexpression P = 0.001; HR = 7.04 (2.22-22.26)]. Marked reduction in eIF4E and eIF5 expression was seen post BEZ235/everolimus, with extended survival.Conclusions: Translational initiation pathway inhibition could be of clinical utility in MBC patients overexpressing eIF4E and eIF5. With mTOR inhibitors that target this pathway now in the clinic, these biomarkers may represent new targets for therapeutic intervention, although further independent validation is required. Clin Cancer Res; 23(10); 2575-83. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  16. Targeting Hsp27/eIF4E interaction with phenazine compound: a promising alternative for castration-resistant prostate cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajer, Ziouziou; Claudia, Andrieu; Erik, Laurini; Sara, Karaki; Maurizio, Fermeglia; Ridha, Oueslati; David, Taieb; Michel, Camplo; Olivier, Siri; Sabrina, Pricl; Maria, Katsogiannou; Palma, Rocchi

    2017-09-29

    The actual strategy to improve current therapies in advanced prostate cancer involves targeting genes activated by androgen withdrawal, either to delay or prevent the emergence of the castration-refractory phenotype. However, these genes are often implicated in several physiological processes, and long-term inhibition of survival proteins might be accompanied with cytotoxic effects. To avoid this problem, an alternative therapeutic strategy relies on the identification and use of compounds that disrupt specific protein-protein interactions involved in androgen withdrawal. Specifically, the interaction of the chaperone protein Hsp27 with the initiation factor eIF4E leads to the protection of protein synthesis initiation process and enhances cell survival during cell stress induced by castration or chemotherapy. Thus, in this work we aimed at i) identifying the interaction site of the Hsp27/eIF4E complex and ii) interfere with the relevant protein/protein association mechanism involved in castration-resistant progression of prostate cancer. By a combination of experimental and modeling techniques, we proved that eIF4E interacts with the C-terminal part of Hsp27, preferentially when Hsp27 is phosphorylated. We also observed that the loss of this interaction increased cell chemo-and hormone-sensitivity. In order to find a potential inhibitor of Hsp27/eIF4E interaction, BRET assays in combination with molecular simulations identified the phenazine derivative 14 as the compound able to efficiently interfere with this protein/protein interaction, thereby inhibiting cell viability and increasing cell death in chemo- and castration-resistant prostate cancer models in vitro and in vivo.

  17. Studying the Role of Eukaryotic Translation Initiation Factor 4E (eIF4E) Phosphorylation by MNK1/2 Kinases in Prostate Cancer Development and Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    defective in cullin neddylation 1, domain containing 5 ( Saccharomyces cerevisiae ) Pdgfra 1.57 Platelet derived growth factor receptor, alpha polypeptide...phosphorylation, MNKs, mTORC1, 4E-BPs, cellular senescence, anchorage-independent growth 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF...1990). Specifically, overexpression of eIF4E induces foci formation on a cell monolayer and allows for anchorage-independent growth . Moreover

  18. Barley yellow mosaic virus VPg is the determinant protein for breaking eIF4E-mediated recessive resistance in barley plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huangai Li

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigated the barley yellow mosaic virus (BaYMV, genus Bymovirus factor(s responsible for breaking eIF4E-mediated recessive resistance genes (rym4/5/6 in barley. Genome mapping analysis using chimeric infectious cDNA clones between rym5-breaking (JT10 and rym5-non-breaking (JK05 isolates indicated that genome-linked viral protein (VPg is the determinant protein for breaking the rym5 resistance. Likewise, VPg is also responsible for overcoming the resistances of rym4 and rym6 alleles. Mutational analysis identified that amino acids Ser-118, Thr-120 and His-142 in JT10 VPg are the most critical residues for overcoming rym5 resistance in protoplasts. Moreover, the rym5-non-breaking JK05 could accumulate in the rym5 protoplasts when eIF4E derived from a susceptible barley cultivar was expressed from the viral genome. Thus, the compatibility between VPg and host eIF4E determines the ability of BaYMV to infect barley plants.

  19. Sensitivity of global translation to mTOR inhibition in REN cells depends on the equilibrium between eIF4E and 4E-BP1.

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    Stefano Grosso

    Full Text Available Initiation is the rate-limiting phase of protein synthesis, controlled by signaling pathways regulating the phosphorylation of translation factors. Initiation has three steps, 43S, 48S and 80S formation. 43S formation is repressed by eIF2α phosphorylation. The subsequent steps, 48S and 80S formation are enabled by growth factors. 48S relies on eIF4E-mediated assembly of eIF4F complex; 4E-BPs competitively displace eIF4E from eIF4F. Two pathways control eIF4F: 1 mTORc1 phosphorylates and inactivates 4E-BPs, leading to eIF4F formation; 2 the Ras-Mnk cascade phosphorylates eIF4E. We show that REN and NCI-H28 mesothelioma cells have constitutive activation of both pathways and maximal translation rate, in the absence of exogenous growth factors. Translation is rapidly abrogated by phosphorylation of eIF2α. Surprisingly, pharmacological inhibition of mTORc1 leads to the complete dephosphorylation of downstream targets, without changes in methionine incorporation. In addition, the combined administration of mTORc1 and MAPK/Mnk inhibitors has no additive effect. The inhibition of both mTORc1 and mTORc2 does not affect the metabolic rate. In spite of this, mTORc1 inhibition reduces eIF4F complex formation, and depresses translocation of TOP mRNAs on polysomes. Downregulation of eIF4E and overexpression of 4E-BP1 induce rapamycin sensitivity, suggesting that disruption of eIF4F complex, due to eIF4E modulation, competes with its recycling to ribosomes. These data suggest the existence of a dynamic equilibrium in which eIF4F is not essential for all mRNAs and is not displaced from translated mRNAs, before recycling to the next.

  20. Functional markers for selection of potyvirus resistance alleles at the pvr2-eIF4E locus in pepper using tetra-primer ARMS-PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio, Manuel; Caranta, Carole; Palloix, Alain

    2008-09-01

    Functional markers targeted on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) responsible for phenotypic variation constitute optimal tools for marker-assisted selection (MAS) of resistance alleles with different specificities. Here, we used the tetra-primer ARMS-PCR procedure to assay SNP signatures of four distinct alleles at the pvr2-eIF4E locus, which controls pepper resistance to several potyviruses. These simple, economical, and codominant markers open the way for MAS of pepper genotypes resistant to the potyviral strains and species that are prevalent in distinct cultivation areas across the world.

  1. CAP binding proteins associated with the nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patzelt, E; Blaas, D; Kuechler, E

    1983-01-01

    Cap binding proteins of HeLa cells were identified by photo-affinity labelling using the cap analogue gamma-[32P]-[4-(benzoyl-phenyl)methylamido]-7-methylguanosine-5'- triphosphate. Photoreaction with whole cell homogenates resulted in specific labelling of five major polypeptides. The small molecular weight polypeptide appeared to be identical to the 24 000 to 26 000 dalton cap binding protein previously identified in initiation factors. A cap binding protein of 37 000 dalton was found in initiation factors as well as in preparations of crude nuclei. It was released from nuclei by washing with buffer of moderate salt concentration. Three high molecular weight cap binding proteins (approximately 120 000, approximately 89 000, approximately 80 000 dalton) were found in the nuclear fraction and were only partly released upon nuclease digestion and high salt extraction. Images PMID:6889136

  2. Notch signaling sustains the expression of Mcl-1 and the activity of eIF4E to promote cell survival in CLL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Falco, Filomena; Sabatini, Rita; Del Papa, Beatrice; Falzetti, Franca; Di Ianni, Mauro; Sportoletti, Paolo; Baldoni, Stefano; Screpanti, Isabella; Marconi, Pierfrancesco; Rosati, Emanuela

    2015-06-30

    In chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), Notch1 and Notch2 signaling is constitutively activated and contributes to apoptosis resistance. We show that genetic inhibition of either Notch1 or Notch2, through small-interfering RNA, increases apoptosis of CLL cells and is associated with decreased levels of the anti-apoptotic protein Mcl-1. Thus, Notch signaling promotes CLL cell survival at least in part by sustaining Mcl-1 expression. In CLL cells, an enhanced Notch activation also contributes to the increase in Mcl-1 expression and cell survival induced by IL-4.Mcl-1 downregulation by Notch targeting is not due to reduced transcription or degradation by caspases, but in part, to increased degradation by the proteasome. Mcl-1 downregulation by Notch targeting is also accompanied by reduced phosphorylation of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E), suggesting that this protein is another target of Notch signaling in CLL cells.Overall, we show that Notch signaling sustains CLL cell survival by promoting Mcl-1 expression and eIF4E activity, and given the oncogenic role of these factors, we underscore the therapeutic potential of Notch inhibition in CLL.

  3. Identification of gemin5 as a novel 7-methylguanosine cap-binding protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shelton S Bradrick

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available A unique attribute of RNA molecules synthesized by RNA polymerase II is the presence of a 7-methylguanosine (m(7G cap structure added co-transcriptionally to the 5' end. Through its association with trans-acting effector proteins, the m(7G cap participates in multiple aspects of RNA metabolism including localization, translation and decay. However, at present relatively few eukaryotic proteins have been identified as factors capable of direct association with m(7G.Employing an unbiased proteomic approach, we identified gemin5, a component of the survival of motor neuron (SMN complex, as a factor capable of direct and specific interaction with the m(7G cap. Gemin5 was readily purified by cap-affinity chromatography in contrast to other SMN complex proteins. Investigating the underlying basis for this observation, we found that purified gemin5 associates with m(7G-linked sepharose in the absence of detectable eIF4E, and specifically crosslinks to radiolabeled cap structure after UV irradiation. Deletion analysis revealed that an intact set of WD repeat domains located in the N-terminal half of gemin5 are required for cap-binding. Moreover, using structural modeling and site-directed mutagenesis, we identified two proximal aromatic residues located within the WD repeat region that significantly impact m(7G association.This study rigorously identifies gemin5 as a novel cap-binding protein and describes an unprecedented role for WD repeat domains in m(7G recognition. The findings presented here will facilitate understanding of gemin5's role in the metabolism of non-coding snRNAs and perhaps other RNA pol II transcripts.

  4. Clonagem e expressão da eIF4E de Echinococcus granulosus : utilização na purificação de mRNAs

    OpenAIRE

    Filipe Santos Pereira Dutra

    2016-01-01

    Com base na interação especifica entre o fator de iniciação eucariótico 4E (eIF4E) e o 5’ CAP monometilguanosina (MMGcap) do mRNA foi desenvolvido um eficiente sistema para purificação de mRNA usando um mutante da proteína humana eIF4E. Apesar de o MMGcap ser o mais comum nos mRNAs eucarióticos, em nematoides e platelmintos devido ao processo de trans-splicing há também a presença do 5’ CAP trimetilguanosina (TMGcap). Tendo em vista a capacidade única da eIF4E de helmintos em interagir com am...

  5. A C. elegans eIF4E-family member upregulates translation at elevated temperatures of mRNAs encoding MSH-5 and other meiotic crossover proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Anren; Labella, Sara; Korneeva, Nadejda L.; Keiper, Brett D.; Aamodt, Eric J.; Zetka, Monique; Rhoads, Robert E.

    2010-01-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans expresses five family members of the translation initiation factor eIF4E whose individual physiological roles are only partially understood. We report a specific role for IFE-2 in a conserved temperature-sensitive meiotic process. ife-2 deletion mutants have severe temperature-sensitive chromosome-segregation defects. Mutant germ cells contain the normal six bivalents at diakinesis at 20°C but 12 univalents at 25°C, indicating a defect in crossover formation. Analysis of chromosome pairing in ife-2 mutants at the permissive and restrictive temperatures reveals no defects. The presence of RAD-51-marked early recombination intermediates and 12 well condensed univalents indicate that IFE-2 is not essential for formation of meiotic double-strand breaks or their repair through homologous recombination but is required for crossover formation. However, RAD-51 foci in ife-2 mutants persist into inappropriately late stages of meiotic prophase at 25°C, similar to mutants defective in MSH-4/HIM-14 and MSH-5, which stabilize a critical intermediate in crossover formation. In wild-type worms, mRNAs for msh-4/him-14 and msh-5 shift from free messenger ribonucleoproteins to polysomes at 25°C but not in ife-2 mutants, suggesting that IFE-2 translationally upregulates synthesis of MSH-4/HIM-14 and MSH-5 at elevated temperatures to stabilize Holliday junctions. This is confirmed by an IFE-2-dependent increase in MSH-5 protein levels. PMID:20530576

  6. Isolation of Flavonoids from Deguelia duckeana and Their Effect on Cellular Viability, AMPK, eEF2, eIF2 and eIF4E

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena M. C. Cursino

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Preparations of Deguelia duckeana, known in Brazil as timbó, are used by indigenous people to kill fish. Reinvestigation of its extracts resulted in the isolation and identification of 11 known flavonoids identified as 3,5,4’-trimethoxy-4-prenylstilbene (1, 4-methoxyderricidine (2, lonchocarpine (3, 4-hydroxylonchocarpine (4, 4-methoxylonchocarpine (5, 5-hydroxy-4’,7-dimethoxy-6-prenylflavanone (6, 4’-hydroxyisolonchocarpine (7, 4’-methoxyisolonchocarpine (8, 3’,4’,7-trimethoxyflavone (9, 3’,4’-methylenedioxy-7-methoxyflavone (10, and 2,2-dimethyl-chromone-5,4’-hydroxy-5’-methoxyflavone (11. Except for 1, 3, and 4 all of these flavonoids have been described for the first time in D. duckeana and the flavanone 6 for the first time in nature. Compounds 2, 3, 4, 7, 9, and 10 were studied for their potential to induce cell death in neuronal SK-N-SH cells. Only the chalcone 4 and the flavanone 7 significantly induced lactate dehydrogenase (LDH release, which was accompanied by activation of caspase-3 and impairment of energy homeostasis in the MTT assay and may explain the killing effect on fish. Interestingly, the flavone 10 reduced cell metabolism in the MTT assay without inducing cytotoxicity in the LDH assay. Furthermore, the flavonoids 2, 3, 4, 7, and 10 induced phosphorylation of the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK and the eukaryotic elongation factor 2 (eEF2. The initiation factor eIF4E was dephosphorylated in the presence of these compounds. The initiation factor eIF2alpha was not affected. Further studies are needed to elucidate the importance of the observed effects on protein synthesis and potential therapeutic perspectives.

  7. Rapamycin-insensitive mTORC1 activity controls eIF4E:4E-BP1 binding [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/NM6hpo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Livingstone

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The recent development of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR kinase domain inhibitors and genetic dissection of rapamycin-sensitive and -insensitive mTOR protein complexes (mTORC1 and mTORC2 have revealed that phosphorylation of the mTOR substrate 4E-BP1 on amino acids Thr37 and/or Thr46 represents a rapamycin-insensitive activity of mTORC1. Despite numerous previous reports utilizing serine (Ser-to-alanine (Ala and threonine (Thr-to-Ala phosphorylation site mutants of 4E-BP1 to assess which post-translational modification(s directly regulate binding to eIF4E, an ambiguous understanding persists. This manuscript demonstrates that the initial, rapamycin-insensitive phosphorylation event at Thr46 is sufficient to prevent eIF4E:4E-BP1 binding. This finding is relevant, particularly as mTOR kinase domain inhibitors continue to be assessed for clinical efficacy, since it clarifies a difference between the action of these second-generation mTOR inhibitors and those of rapamycin analogues.

  8. Photoaffinity labeling of the messenger RNA cap-binding protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhoads, R.; Patzelt, E.; Blaas, D.; Kuechler, E.

    1986-05-01

    A photoaffinity derivative of a cap analogue, ..gamma..(/sup 32/P)-(4-(benzoylphenyl)methylamido)-7-methylguanosine 5'-triphosphate, was reacted with the 28-kDa messenger RNA cap-binding protein (CBP), purified by affinity chromatography from rabbit erythrocyte lysate. The predominant labeling was of the 28-kDa species. No labeling occurred without photoillumination or in the presence of 250 ..mu..M m/sup 7/GTP. In addition CBP, two polypeptides of 19 and 17kDa, present in the affinity-purified preparation, were specifically labeled. Another sample tested was the eIF-3 region of a sucrose gradient fractionation, in 100 mM KCl, of rabbit reticulocyte high salt ribosomal wash. The only polypeptide labeled was the 28-kDa CBP. Labeling was more intense than with an equivalent amount of affinity-purified CBP, suggesting the presence of stabilizing or stimulatory factors in the eIF-3 preparation.

  9. Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4G (eIF4G) coordinates interactions with eIF4A, eIF4B, and eIF4E in binding and translation of the barley yellow dwarf virus 3' cap-independent translation element (BTE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Pei; Liu, Qiao; Miller, W Allen; Goss, Dixie J

    2017-04-07

    Barley yellow dwarf virus RNA, lacking a 5' cap and a 3' poly(A) tail, contains a cap-independent translation element (BTE) in the 3'-untranslated region that interacts with host translation initiation factor eIF4G. To determine how eIF4G recruits the mRNA, three eIF4G deletion mutants were constructed: (i) eIF4G601-1196, containing amino acids 601-1196, including the putative BTE-binding region, and binding domains for eIF4E, eIF4A, and eIF4B; (ii) eIF4G601-1488, which contains an additional C-terminal eIF4A-binding domain; and (iii) eIF4G742-1196, which lacks the eIF4E-binding site. eIF4G601-1196 binds BTE tightly and supports efficient translation. The helicase complex, consisting of eIF4A, eIF4B, and ATP, stimulated BTE binding with eIF4G601-1196 but not eIF4G601-1488, suggesting that the eIF4A binding domains may serve a regulatory role, with the C-terminal binding site having negative effects. eIF4E binding to eIF4G601-1196 induced a conformational change, significantly increasing the binding affinity to BTE. A comparison of the binding of eIF4G deletion mutants with BTEs containing mutations showed a general correlation between binding affinity and ability to facilitate translation. In summary, these results reveal a new role for the helicase complex in 3' cap-independent translation element-mediated translation and show that the functional core domain of eIF4G plus an adjacent probable RNA-binding domain mediate translation initiation. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. The Nuclear Cap-Binding Complex Mediates Meiotic Silencing by Unpaired DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Logan M. Decker

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa, cross walls between individual cells are normally incomplete, making the entire fungal network vulnerable to attack by viruses and selfish DNAs. Accordingly, several genome surveillance mechanisms are maintained to help the fungus combat these repetitive elements. One of these defense mechanisms is called meiotic silencing by unpaired DNA (MSUD, which identifies and silences unpaired genes during meiosis. Utilizing common RNA interference (RNAi proteins, such as Dicer and Argonaute, MSUD targets mRNAs homologous to the unpaired sequence to achieve silencing. In this study, we have identified an additional silencing component, namely the cap-binding complex (CBC. Made up of cap-binding proteins CBP20 and CBP80, CBC associates with the 5′ cap of mRNA transcripts in eukaryotes. The loss of CBC leads to a deficiency in MSUD activity, suggesting its role in mediating silencing. As confirmed in this study, CBC is predominantly nuclear, although it is known to travel in and out of the nucleus to facilitate RNA transport. As seen in animals but not in plants, CBP20’s robust nuclear import depends on CBP80 in Neurospora. CBC interacts with a component (Argonaute of the perinuclear meiotic silencing complex (MSC, directly linking the two cellular factors.

  11. Characterization of the PB2 Cap Binding Domain Accelerates Inhibitor Design

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    Amanda E. Constantinides

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available X-ray crystallographic structural determinations of the PB2 cap binding domain (PB2cap have improved the conformational characterization of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase machinery (PA, PB2, and PB1 of the influenza virus. Geometrically, the catalytic PB1 subunit resembles the palm of a human hand. PA lies near the thumb region, and PB2 lies near the finger region. PB2 binds the cap moiety in the pre-mRNA of the host cell, while the endonuclease of PA cleaves the pre-mRNA 10–13 nucleotides downstream. The truncated RNA piece performs as a primer for PB1 to synthesize the viral mRNA. Precisely targeting PB2cap with a small molecule inhibitor will halt viral proliferation via interference of the cap-snatching activity. Wild-type and mutant PB2cap from A/California/07/2009 H1N1 were expressed in Escherichia coli, purified by nickel affinity and size exclusion chromatography, crystallized, and subjected to X-ray diffraction experiments. The crystal of mutant PB2cap liganded with m7GTP was prepared by co-crystallization. Structures were solved by the molecular replacement method, refined, and deposited in the Protein Data Bank (PDB. Structural determination and comparative analyses of these structures revealed the functions of Glu361, Lys376, His357, Phe404, Phe323, Lys339, His432, Asn429, Gln406, and Met401 in PB2cap, and the dissociation of the influenza A PB2cap C-terminal subdomain (residues 446–479 upon ligand binding. Understanding the role of these residues will aid in the ultimate development of a small-molecule inhibitor that binds both Influenza A and B virus PB2cap.

  12. The role of the poly(A) binding protein in the assembly of the Cap-binding complex during translation initiation in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallie, Daniel R

    2014-01-01

    Translation initiation in eukaryotes requires the involvement of multiple initiation factors (eIFs) that facilitate the binding of the 40 S ribosomal subunit to an mRNA and assemble the 80 S ribosome at the correct initiation codon. eIF4F, composed of eIF4E, eIF4A, and eIF4G, binds to the 5′-cap structure of an mRNA and prepares an mRNA for recruitment of a 40 S subunit. eIF4B promotes the ATP-dependent RNA helicase activity of eIF4A and eIF4F needed to unwind secondary structure present in a 5′-leader that would otherwise impede scanning of the 40 S subunit during initiation. The poly(A) binding protein (PABP), which binds the poly(A) tail, interacts with eIF4G and eIF4B to promote circularization of an mRNA and stimulates translation by promoting 40 S subunit recruitment. Thus, these factors serve essential functions in the early steps of protein synthesis. Their assembly and function requires multiple interactions that are competitive in nature and determine the nature of interactions between the termini of an mRNA. In this review, the domain organization and partner protein interactions are presented for the factors in plants which share similarities with those in animals and yeast but differ in several important respects. The functional consequences of their interactions on factor activity are also discussed. PMID:26779409

  13. Identification of eukaryotic mRNAs that are translated at reduced cap binding complex eIF4F concentrations using a cDNA microarray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannes, Gregg; Carter, Mark S.; Eisen, Michael B.; Brown, Patrick O.; Sarnow, Peter

    1999-01-01

    Although most eukaryotic mRNAs need a functional cap binding complex eIF4F for efficient 5′ end- dependent scanning to initiate translation, picornaviral, hepatitis C viral, and a few cellular RNAs have been shown to be translated by internal ribosome entry, a mechanism that can operate in the presence of low levels of functional eIF4F. To identify cellular mRNAs that can be translated when eIF4F is depleted or in low abundance and that, therefore, may contain internal ribosome entry sites, mRNAs that remained associated with polysomes were isolated from human cells after infection with poliovirus and were identified by using a cDNA microarray. Approximately 200 of the 7000 mRNAs analyzed remained associated with polysomes under these conditions. Among the gene products encoded by these polysome-associated mRNAs were immediate-early transcription factors, kinases, and phosphatases of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways and several protooncogenes, including c-myc and Pim-1. In addition, the mRNA encoding Cyr61, a secreted factor that can promote angiogenesis and tumor growth, was selectively mobilized into polysomes when eIF4F concentrations were reduced, although its overall abundance changed only slightly. Subsequent tests confirmed the presence of internal ribosome entry sites in the 5′ noncoding regions of both Cyr61 and Pim-1 mRNAs. Overall, this study suggests that diverse mRNAs whose gene products have been implicated in a variety of stress responses, including inflammation, angiogenesis, and the response to serum, can use translational initiation mechanisms that require little or no intact cap binding protein complex eIF4F. PMID:10557283

  14. Association of cap-binding protein with eucaryotic initiation factor 3 in initiation factor preparations from uninfected and poliovirus-infected HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, J; Etchison, D; Hershey, J W; Ehrenfeld, E

    1982-04-01

    Extracts from poliovirus-infected HeLa cells are unable to translate vesicular stomatitis virus or cellular mRNAs in vitro, probably reflecting the poliovirus-induced inhibition of host cell protein synthesis which occurs in vivo. Crude initiation factors from uninfected HeLa cells are able to restore translation of vesicular stomatitis virus mRNA in infected cell lysates. This restoring activity separates into the 0 to 40% ammonium sulfate fractional precipitate of ribosomal salt wash. Restoring activity is completely lacking in the analogous fractions prepared from poliovirus-infected cells. The 0 to 40% ammonium sulfate precipitates from both uninfected and infected cells contain eucaryotic initiation factor 3 (eIF-3), eIf-4B, and the cap-binding protein (CBP), which is detected by means of a cross-linking assay, as well as other proteins. The association of eIF-3 and cap binding protein was examined. The 0 to 40% ammonium sulfate precipitate of ribosomal salt wash from uninfected and infected cells was sedimented in sucrose gradients. Each fraction was examined for the presence of eIF-3 antigens by an antibody blot technique and for the presence of the CBP by cross-linking to cap-labeled mRNAs. From uninfected cells, a major proportion of the CBP cosedimented with eIF-3; however, none of the CBP from infected cells sedimented with eIF-3. The results suggest that the association of the CBP with eIF-3 into a functional complex may have been disrupted during the course of poliovirus infection.

  15. Demonstration in vitro that eucaryotic initiation factor 3 is active but that a cap-binding protein complex is inactive in poliovirus-infected HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etchison, D; Hansen, J; Ehrenfeld, E; Edery, I; Sonenberg, N; Milburn, S; Hershey, J W

    1984-01-01

    Protein synthesis initiation factor preparations from poliovirus-infected HeLa cells have reduced ability to initiate translation on capped mRNA. The defect in initiation factors has been variously attributed to inactivation of eucaryotic initiation factor 3 (eIF3), eIF4B, or a cap-binding protein (CBP) complex. We have developed a series of in vitro protein synthesis assays to show that eIF3 is active but a CBP complex activity is inactivated after poliovirus infection. eIF3 activity, when determined in the presence of purified CBP complex, is present in sucrose gradients of factors from both infected and uninfected cells. CBP complex activity, determined in the presence of eIF3 from poliovirus-infected cells, is present in uninfected cells only and comigrates on sucrose gradient with an activity which restores the ability of crude initiation factors from infected cells to translate capped globin mRNA. This is the first demonstration by a fractionated translation system that an activity which is attributable to CBP complex is inactivated in poliovirus-infected cells. The results also indicate that eIF3 is undetectable or has greatly reduced activity in the absence of CBP complex. Images PMID:6088805

  16. A Point Mutation in the Exon Junction Complex Factor Y14 Disrupts Its Function in mRNA Cap Binding and Translation Enhancement*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Tzu-Wei; Lee, Kuo-Ming; Lou, Yuan-Chao; Lu, Chia-Chen; Tarn, Woan-Yuh

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic mRNA biogenesis involves a series of interconnected steps mediated by RNA-binding proteins. The exon junction complex core protein Y14 is required for nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) and promotes translation. Moreover, Y14 binds the cap structure of mRNAs and inhibits the activity of the decapping enzyme Dcp2. In this report, we show that an evolutionarily conserved tryptophan residue (Trp-73) of Y14 is critical for its binding to the mRNA cap structure. A Trp-73 mutant (W73V) bound weakly to mRNAs and failed to protect them from degradation. However, this mutant could still interact with the NMD and mRNA degradation factors and retained partial NMD activity. In addition, we found that the W73V mutant could not interact with translation initiation factors. Overexpression of W73V suppressed reporter mRNA translation in vitro and in vivo and reduced the level of a set of nascent proteins. These results reveal a residue of Y14 that confers cap-binding activity and is essential for Y14-mediated enhancement of translation. Finally, we demonstrated that Y14 may selectively and differentially modulate protein biosynthesis. PMID:26887951

  17. The nuclear cap-binding complex interacts with the U4/U6·U5 tri-snRNP and promotes spliceosome assembly in mammalian cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabis, Marta; Neufeld, Noa; Steiner, Michaela C.; Bojic, Teodora; Shav-Tal, Yaron; Neugebauer, Karla M.

    2013-01-01

    The nuclear cap-binding complex (CBC) binds to the 7-methyl guanosine cap present on every RNA polymerase II transcript. CBC has been implicated in many aspects of RNA biogenesis; in addition to roles in miRNA biogenesis, nonsense-mediated decay, 3′-end formation, and snRNA export from the nucleus, CBC promotes pre-mRNA splicing. An unresolved question is how CBC participates in splicing. To investigate CBC’s role in splicing, we used mass spectrometry to identify proteins that copurify with mammalian CBC. Numerous components of spliceosomal snRNPs were specifically detected. Among these, three U4/U6·U5 snRNP proteins (hBrr2, hPrp4, and hPrp31) copurified with CBC in an RNA-independent fashion, suggesting that a significant fraction of CBC forms a complex with the U4/U6·U5 snRNP and that the activity of CBC might be associated with snRNP recruitment to pre-mRNA. To test this possibility, CBC was depleted from HeLa cells by RNAi. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and live-cell imaging assays revealed decreased cotranscriptional accumulation of U4/U6·U5 snRNPs on active transcription units, consistent with a requirement for CBC in cotranscriptional spliceosome assembly. Surprisingly, recruitment of U1 and U2 snRNPs was also affected, indicating that RNA-mediated interactions between CBC and snRNPs contribute to splicing. On the other hand, CBC depletion did not impair snRNP biogenesis, ruling out the possibility that decreased snRNP recruitment was due to changes in nuclear snRNP concentration. Taken together, the data support a model whereby CBC promotes pre-mRNA splicing through a network of interactions with and among spliceosomal snRNPs during cotranscriptional spliceosome assembly. PMID:23793891

  18. ACTH antagonists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian John Clark

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available ACTH acts via a highly selective receptor that is a member of the melanocortin receptor subfamily of type 1 G protein-coupled receptors. The ACTH receptor, also known as the melanocortin 2 receptor (MC2R is unusual in that it is absolutely dependent on a small accessory protein, melanocortin receptor accessory protein (MRAP for cell surface expression and function. ACTH is the only known naturally occurring agonist for this receptor. This lack of redundancy and high degree of ligand specificity suggests that antagonism of this receptor could provide a useful therapeutic aid and a potential investigational tool. Clinical situations in which this could be useful include (1 Cushing’s disease and ectopic ACTH syndrome – especially whilst preparing for definitive treatment of a causative tumour, or in refractory cases, or (2 congenital adrenal hyperplasia – as an adjunct to glucocorticoid replacement. A case for antagonism in other clinical situations in which there is ACTH excess can also be made. In this article we will explore the scientific and clinical case for an ACTH antagonist, and will review the evidence for existing and recently described peptides and modified peptides in this role.

  19. Polysomes of Trypanosoma brucei: Association with Initiation Factors and RNA-Binding Proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia Klein

    Full Text Available We report here the results of experiments designed to identify RNA-binding proteins that might be associated with Trypanosoma brucei polysomes. After some preliminary mass spectrometry of polysomal fractions, we investigated the distributions of selected tagged proteins using sucrose gradients and immunofluorescence. As expected, the polysomal fractions contained nearly all annotated ribosomal proteins, the translation-associated protein folding complex, and many translation factors, but also many other abundant proteins. Results suggested that cap-binding proteins EIF4E3 and EIF4E4 were associated with both free and membrane-bound polysomes. The EIF4E binding partners EIF4G4 and EIF4G3 were present but the other EIF4E and EIF4G paralogues were not detected. The dominant EIF4E in the polysomal fraction is EIF4E4 and very few polysomal mRNAs are associated with EIF4G. Thirteen potential mRNA-binding proteins were detected in the polysomes, including the known polysome-associated protein RBP42. The locations of two of the other proteins were tested after epitope tagging: RBP29 was in the nucleus and ZC3H29 was in the cytoplasm. Quantitative analyses showed that specific association of an RNA-binding protein with the polysome fraction in sucrose gradients will not be detected if the protein is in more than 25-fold molar excess over its target binding sites.

  20. Quantitative proteomics identifies Gemin5, a scaffolding protein involved in ribonucleoprotein assembly, as a novel partner for eukaryotic initiation factor 4E

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fierro-Monti, Ivo; Mohammed, Shabaz; Matthiesen, Rune

    2006-01-01

    Protein complexes are dynamic entities; identification and quantitation of their components is critical in elucidating functional roles under specific cellular conditions. We report the first quantitative proteomic analysis of the human cap-binding protein complex. Components and proteins...... levels of Gemin5:eIF4E complexes were found in phorbol ester treated HEK293 cells. Gemin5 and eIF4E co-localized to cytoplasmic P-bodies in human osteosarcoma U2OS cells. Interaction between eIF4E and Gemin5 and their co-localization to the P-bodies, may serve to recruit capped mRNAs to these RNP...... complexes, for functions related to RNP assembly, remodeling and/or transition from active translation to mRNA degradation. Our results demonstrate that our quantitative proteomic strategy can be applied to the identification and quantitation of protein complex components in human cells grown under...

  1. Opioid Antagonist Impedes Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merluzzi, Thomas V.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Thirty spider-phobic adults underwent exposure to 17 phobic-related, graded performance tests. Fifteen subjects were assigned to naltrexone, an opioid antagonist, and 15 were assigned to placebo. Naltrexone had a significant effect on exposure, with naltrexone subjects taking significantly longer to complete first 10 steps of exposure and with…

  2. p53-dependent translational control of senescence and transformation via 4E-BPs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petroulakis, Emmanuel; Parsyan, Armen; Dowling, Ryan J O; LeBacquer, Olivier; Martineau, Yvan; Bidinosti, Michael; Larsson, Ola; Alain, Tommy; Rong, Liwei; Mamane, Yaël; Paquet, Marilene; Furic, Luc; Topisirovic, Ivan; Shahbazian, David; Livingstone, Mark; Costa-Mattioli, Mauro; Teodoro, Jose G; Sonenberg, Nahum

    2009-11-06

    eIF4E, the mRNA 5' cap-binding translation initiation factor, is overexpressed in numerous cancers and is implicated in mechanisms underlying oncogenesis and senescence. 4E-BPs (eIF4E-binding proteins) inhibit eIF4E activity, and thereby act as suppressors of eIF4E-dependent pathways. Here, we show that tumorigenesis is increased in p53 knockout mice that lack 4E-BP1 and 4E-BP2. However, primary fibroblasts lacking 4E-BPs, but expressing p53, undergo premature senescence and resist oncogene-driven transformation. Thus, the p53 status governs 4E-BP-dependent senescence and transformation. Intriguingly, the 4E-BPs engage in senescence via translational control of the p53-stabilizing protein, Gas2. Our data demonstrate a role for 4E-BPs in senescence and tumorigenesis and highlight a p53-mediated mechanism of senescence through a 4E-BP-dependent pathway.

  3. Human 4E-T represses translation of bound mRNAs and enhances microRNA-mediated silencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamenska, Anastasiia; Lu, Wei-Ting; Kubacka, Dorota; Broomhead, Helen; Minshall, Nicola; Bushell, Martin; Standart, Nancy

    2014-03-01

    A key player in translation initiation is eIF4E, the mRNA 5' cap-binding protein. 4E-Transporter (4E-T) is a recently characterized eIF4E-binding protein, which regulates specific mRNAs in several developmental model systems. Here, we first investigated the role of its enrichment in P-bodies and eIF4E-binding in translational regulation in mammalian cells. Identification of the conserved C-terminal sequences that target 4E-T to P-bodies was enabled by comparison of vertebrate proteins with homologues in Drosophila (Cup and CG32016) and Caenorhabditis elegans by sequence and cellular distribution. In tether function assays, 4E-T represses bound mRNA translation, in a manner independent of these localization sequences, or of endogenous P-bodies. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction and northern blot analysis verified that bound mRNA remained intact and polyadenylated. Ectopic 4E-T reduces translation globally in a manner dependent on eIF4E binding its consensus Y30X4L site. In contrast, tethered 4E-T continued to repress translation when eIF4E-binding was prevented by mutagenesis of YX4L, and modestly enhanced the decay of bound mRNA, compared with wild-type 4E-T, mediated by increased binding of CNOT1/7 deadenylase subunits. As depleting 4E-T from HeLa cells increased steady-state translation, in part due to relief of microRNA-mediated silencing, this work demonstrates the conserved yet unconventional mechanism of 4E-T silencing of particular subsets of mRNAs.

  4. Excitatory amino acid receptor antagonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, T N; Frydenvang, Karla Andrea; Ebert, B

    1997-01-01

    We have previously shown that (RS)-2-amino-2-(5-tert-butyl-3-hydroxyisoxazol-4-yl)acetic acid (ATAA) is an antagonist at N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) and (RS)-2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazol-4-yl)propionic acid (AMPA) receptors. We have now resolved ATAA via diastereomeric salt formation...

  5. Antagonistic activity of marine sponges associated Actinobacteria

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dharmaraj, Selvakumar; Kandasamy, Dhevendaran

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To focus on the isolation and preliminary characterization of marine sponges associated Actinobacteria particularly Streptomyces species and also their antagonistic activities against bacterial and fungal pathogens. Methods...

  6. The MNK-eIF4E Signaling Axis Contributes to Injury-Induced Nociceptive Plasticity and the Development of Chronic Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moy, Jamie K; Khoutorsky, Arkady; Asiedu, Marina N; Black, Bryan J; Kuhn, Jasper L; Barragán-Iglesias, Paulino; Megat, Salim; Burton, Michael D; Burgos-Vega, Carolina C; Melemedjian, Ohannes K; Boitano, Scott; Vagner, Josef; Gkogkas, Christos G; Pancrazio, Joseph J; Mogil, Jeffrey S; Dussor, Gregory; Sonenberg, Nahum; Price, Theodore J

    2017-08-02

    Injury-induced sensitization of nociceptors contributes to pain states and the development of chronic pain. Inhibiting activity-dependent mRNA translation through mechanistic target of rapamycin and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways blocks the development of nociceptor sensitization. These pathways convergently signal to the eukaryotic translation initiation factor (eIF) 4F complex to regulate the sensitization of nociceptors, but the details of this process are ill defined. Here we investigated the hypothesis that phosphorylation of the 5' cap-binding protein eIF4E by its specific kinase MAPK interacting kinases (MNKs) 1/2 is a key factor in nociceptor sensitization and the development of chronic pain. Phosphorylation of ser209 on eIF4E regulates the translation of a subset of mRNAs. We show that pronociceptive and inflammatory factors, such as nerve growth factor (NGF), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and carrageenan, produce decreased mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity, decreased affective pain behaviors, and strongly reduced hyperalgesic priming in mice lacking eIF4E phosphorylation (eIF4E(S209A) ). Tests were done in both sexes, and no sex differences were found. Moreover, in patch-clamp electrophysiology and Ca(2+) imaging experiments on dorsal root ganglion neurons, NGF- and IL-6-induced increases in excitability were attenuated in neurons from eIF4E(S209A) mice. These effects were recapitulated in Mnk1/2(-/-) mice and with the MNK1/2 inhibitor cercosporamide. We also find that cold hypersensitivity induced by peripheral nerve injury is reduced in eIF4E(S209A) and Mnk1/2(-/-) mice and following cercosporamide treatment. Our findings demonstrate that the MNK1/2-eIF4E signaling axis is an important contributing factor to mechanisms of nociceptor plasticity and the development of chronic pain.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Chronic pain is a debilitating disease affecting approximately one in three Americans. Chronic pain is thought to be driven by changes in

  7. Human Management of a Wild Plant Modulates the Evolutionary Dynamics of a Gene Determining Recessive Resistance to Virus Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nils Poulicard

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This work analyses the genetic variation and evolutionary patterns of recessive resistance loci involved in matching-allele (MA host-pathogen interactions, focusing on the pvr2 resistance gene to potyviruses of the wild pepper Capsicum annuum glabriusculum (chiltepin. Chiltepin grows in a variety of wild habitats in Mexico, and its cultivation in home gardens started about 25 years ago. Potyvirus infection of Capsicum plants requires the physical interaction of the viral VPg with the pvr2 product, the translation initiation factor eIF4E1. Mutations impairing this interaction result in resistance, according to the MA model. The diversity of pvr2/eIF4E1 in wild and cultivated chiltepin populations from six biogeographical provinces in Mexico was analysed in 109 full-length coding sequences from 97 plants. Eleven alleles were found, and their interaction with potyvirus VPg in yeast-two-hybrid assays, plus infection assays of plants, identified six resistance alleles. Mapping resistance mutations on a pvr2/eIF4E1 model structure showed that most were around the cap-binding pocket and strongly altered its surface electrostatic potential, suggesting resistance-associated costs due to functional constraints. The pvr2/eIF4E1 phylogeny established that susceptibility was ancestral and resistance was derived. The spatial structure of pvr2/eIF4E1 diversity differed from that of neutral markers, but no evidence of selection for resistance was found in wild populations. In contrast, the resistance alleles were much more frequent, and positive selection stronger, in cultivated chiltepin populations, where diversification of pvr2/eIF4E1 was higher. This analysis of the genetic variation of a recessive resistance gene involved in MA host-pathogen interactions in populations of a wild plant show that evolutionary patterns differ according to the plant habitat, wild or cultivated. It also demonstrates that human management of the plant population has profound

  8. Human Management of a Wild Plant Modulates the Evolutionary Dynamics of a Gene Determining Recessive Resistance to Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulicard, Nils; Pacios, Luis Fernández; Gallois, Jean-Luc; Piñero, Daniel; García-Arenal, Fernando

    2016-08-01

    This work analyses the genetic variation and evolutionary patterns of recessive resistance loci involved in matching-allele (MA) host-pathogen interactions, focusing on the pvr2 resistance gene to potyviruses of the wild pepper Capsicum annuum glabriusculum (chiltepin). Chiltepin grows in a variety of wild habitats in Mexico, and its cultivation in home gardens started about 25 years ago. Potyvirus infection of Capsicum plants requires the physical interaction of the viral VPg with the pvr2 product, the translation initiation factor eIF4E1. Mutations impairing this interaction result in resistance, according to the MA model. The diversity of pvr2/eIF4E1 in wild and cultivated chiltepin populations from six biogeographical provinces in Mexico was analysed in 109 full-length coding sequences from 97 plants. Eleven alleles were found, and their interaction with potyvirus VPg in yeast-two-hybrid assays, plus infection assays of plants, identified six resistance alleles. Mapping resistance mutations on a pvr2/eIF4E1 model structure showed that most were around the cap-binding pocket and strongly altered its surface electrostatic potential, suggesting resistance-associated costs due to functional constraints. The pvr2/eIF4E1 phylogeny established that susceptibility was ancestral and resistance was derived. The spatial structure of pvr2/eIF4E1 diversity differed from that of neutral markers, but no evidence of selection for resistance was found in wild populations. In contrast, the resistance alleles were much more frequent, and positive selection stronger, in cultivated chiltepin populations, where diversification of pvr2/eIF4E1 was higher. This analysis of the genetic variation of a recessive resistance gene involved in MA host-pathogen interactions in populations of a wild plant show that evolutionary patterns differ according to the plant habitat, wild or cultivated. It also demonstrates that human management of the plant population has profound effects on the

  9. GABAA receptor partial agonists and antagonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krall, Jacob; Balle, Thomas; Krogsgaard-Larsen, Niels

    2015-01-01

    antagonists and describes the development of potent antagonists from partial agonists originally derived from the potent GABAAR agonist muscimol. In this process, several heterocyclic aromatic systems have been used in combination with structural models in order to map the orthosteric binding site...

  10. Translational control in early development: CPEB, P-bodies and germinal granules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standart, Nancy; Minshall, Nicola

    2008-08-01

    Selective protein synthesis in oocytes, eggs and early embryos of many organisms drives several critical aspects of early development, including meiotic maturation and entry into mitosis, establishment of embryonic axes and cell fate determination. mRNA-binding proteins which (usually) recognize 3'-UTR (untranslated region) elements in target mRNAs influence the recruitment of the small ribosomal subunit to the 5' cap. Probably the best studied such protein is CPEB (cytoplasmic polyadenylation element-binding protein), which represses translation in the oocyte in a cap-dependent manner, and activates translation in the meiotically maturing egg, via cytoplasmic polyadenylation. Co-immunoprecipitation and gel-filtration assays revealed that CPEB in Xenopus oocytes is in a very large RNP (ribonucleoprotein) complex and interacts with other RNA-binding proteins including Xp54 RNA helicase, Pat1, RAP55 (RNA-associated protein 55) and FRGY2 (frog germ cell-specific Y-box protein 2), as well as the eIF4E (eukaryotic initiation factor 4E)-binding protein 4E-T (eIF4E-transporter) and an ovary-specific eIF4E1b, which binds the cap weakly. Functional tests which implicate 4E-T and eIF4E1b in translational repression in oocytes led us to propose a model for the specific inhibition of translation of a target mRNA by a weak cap-binding protein. The components of the CPEB RNP complex are common to P-bodies (processing bodies), neuronal granules and germinal granules, suggesting that a highly conserved 'masking' complex operates in early development, neurons and somatic cells.

  11. S179D prolactin: antagonistic agony!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Ameae M

    2007-09-30

    The aims of this review are three-fold: first, to collate what is known about the production and activities of phosphorylated prolactin (PRL), the latter largely, but not exclusively, as illustrated through the use of the molecular mimic, S179D PRL; second, to apply this and related knowledge to produce an updated model of prolactin-receptor interactions that may apply to other members of this cytokine super-family; and third, to promote a shift in the current paradigm for the development of clinically important growth antagonists. This third aim explains the title since, based on results with S179D PRL, it is proposed that agents which signal to antagonistic ends may be better therapeutics than pure antagonists-hence antagonistic agony. Since S179D PRL is not a pure antagonist, we have proposed the term selective prolactin receptor modulator (SPeRM) for this and like molecules.

  12. The cardioprotective effects of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, T.N.A. van den; Rongen, G.A.P.J.M.; Frohlich, G.M.; Deinum, J.; Hausenloy, D.J.; Riksen, N.P.

    2014-01-01

    Despite state-of-the-art reperfusion therapy, morbidity and mortality remain significant in patients with an acute myocardial infarction. Therefore, novel strategies to limit myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury are urgently needed. Mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonists are attractive

  13. Benzodiazepine receptor antagonists for hepatic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Als-Nielsen, B; Gluud, L L; Gluud, C

    2004-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy may be associated with accumulation of substances that bind to a receptor-complex in the brain resulting in neural inhibition. Benzodiazepine receptor antagonists may have a beneficial effect on patients with hepatic encephalopathy.......Hepatic encephalopathy may be associated with accumulation of substances that bind to a receptor-complex in the brain resulting in neural inhibition. Benzodiazepine receptor antagonists may have a beneficial effect on patients with hepatic encephalopathy....

  14. Combining elements from two antagonists of formyl peptide receptor 2 generates more potent peptidomimetic antagonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovbakke, Sarah Line; Holdfeldt, Andre; Nielsen, Christina

    2017-01-01

    Structural optimization of a peptidomimetic antagonist of formyl peptide receptor 2 (FPR2) was explored by an approach involving combination of elements from the two most potent FPR2 antagonists described: a Rhodamine B-conjugated 10-residue gelsonin-derived peptide (i.e., PBP10, RhB-QRLFQVKGRR-O......Structural optimization of a peptidomimetic antagonist of formyl peptide receptor 2 (FPR2) was explored by an approach involving combination of elements from the two most potent FPR2 antagonists described: a Rhodamine B-conjugated 10-residue gelsonin-derived peptide (i.e., PBP10, Rh...

  15. Carbon adaptation influence the antagonistic ability of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Influences of carbon adaptation on antagonistic activities of three Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains V4, V7 and V10 against Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. melonis were determined in this study. Results from this study showed that the P. aeruginosa strains and their adapted strains significantly inhibited the growth of mycelium ...

  16. Neurokinin 1 receptor antagonists--current prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvaro, Giuseppe; Di Fabio, Romano

    2007-09-01

    The isolation of substance P (SP) in 1931, and the later discovery of its preferred neurokinin (NK)1 receptor, led to an intense research effort aimed at elucidating the biological role of SP, particularly within the central nervous system. There is now a large body of evidence to support the hypothesis that SP is one of the most important neurotransmitters and neuromodulators present in the brain. Its pharmacology has been intimately linked to the pathophysiology of several relevant neurological and psychiatric disorders, namely nociception, migraine, asthma, nausea, inflammatory bowel syndrome, urinary incontinence, anxiety and depression. This wide therapeutic potential triggered an unprecedented research effort, both preclinically and clinically, to identify appropriate NK1 receptor antagonists and transform them into effective drugs. To date, despite huge investments made by some of the largest pharmaceutical groups worldwide, aprepitant (MK-869, an anti-emetic agent) remains the only NK1 receptor antagonist on the market. Nevertheless, the 'NK1 receptor antagonist race' is not over, as witnessed by the significant number of patents and scientific publications claiming the discovery of new NK1 receptor antagonists issued in recent years. This review describes the most relevant results obtained in this field in the period 2005 to 2006.

  17. Carbon adaptation influence the antagonistic ability of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-10-24

    Oct 24, 2011 ... antagonistic ability of the adapted strains against Fom relative to the parental strains resulted from an altered ability to metabolize root exudates. Bacteria introduced into soil as agents for the biological control of plant pathogens must be capable of adaptation to a hostile environment in terms of both abiotic ...

  18. Antagonist potential of Trichoderma indigenous isolates for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-10-19

    Oct 19, 2009 ... isolates for biological control of Phytophthora palmivora the causative agent of black pod disease on cocoa (Theobroma cacao L.) in Côte d'Ivoire ... genus Hypocrea/Trichoderma were described as poten- tial antagonists of plant pathogens (Viterbo et al., 2002;. Benitez et al., 2004; Harman et al., 2004).

  19. Antagonistic parent-offspring co-adaptation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathias Kölliker

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In species across taxa, offspring have means to influence parental investment (PI. PI thus evolves as an interacting phenotype and indirect genetic effects may strongly affect the co-evolutionary dynamics of offspring and parental behaviors. Evolutionary theory focused on explaining how exaggerated offspring solicitation can be understood as resolution of parent-offspring conflict, but the evolutionary origin and diversification of different forms of family interactions remains unclear. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In contrast to previous theory that largely uses a static approach to predict how "offspring individuals" and "parental individuals" should interact given conflict over PI, we present a dynamic theoretical framework of antagonistic selection on the PI individuals obtain/take as offspring and the PI they provide as parents to maximize individual lifetime reproductive success; we analyze a deterministic and a stochastic version of this dynamic framework. We show that a zone for equivalent co-adaptation outcomes exists in which stable levels of PI can evolve and be maintained despite fast strategy transitions and ongoing co-evolutionary dynamics. Under antagonistic co-adaptation, cost-free solicitation can evolve as an adaptation to emerging preferences in parents. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We show that antagonistic selection across the offspring and parental life-stage of individuals favors co-adapted offspring and parental behavior within a zone of equivalent outcomes. This antagonistic parent-offspring co-adaptation does not require solicitation to be costly, allows for rapid divergence and evolutionary novelty and potentially explains the origin and diversification of the observed provisioning forms in family life.

  20. Antagonistic activity of marine sponges associated Actinobacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Selvakumar Dharmaraj; Dhevendaran Kandasamy

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To focus on the isolation and preliminary characterization of marine sponges associated Actinobacteria particularly Streptomyces species and also their antagonistic activities against bacterial and fungal pathogens. Methods: The sponges were collected from Kovalam and Vizhinjam port of south-west coast of Kerala, India. Isolation of strains was carried out from sponge extracts using international Streptomyces project media. For preliminary identification of the strai...

  1. Mutually-Antagonistic Interactions in Baseball Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Saavedra, Serguei; Powers, Scott; McCotter, Trent; Porter, Mason A.; Mucha, Peter J

    2009-01-01

    We formulate the head-to-head matchups between Major League Baseball pitchers and batters from 1954 to 2008 as a bipartite network of mutually-antagonistic interactions. We consider both the full network and single-season networks, which exhibit interesting structural changes over time. We find interesting structure in the network and examine their sensitivity to baseball's rule changes. We then study a biased random walk on the matchup networks as a simple and transparent way to compare the ...

  2. Calcium antagonists and the diabetic hypertensive patient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parving, H H; Rossing, P

    1993-01-01

    reduces albuminuria, delays the progression of nephropathy, and postpones renal insufficiency in diabetic nephropathy. Calcium antagonists and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors induce an acute increase in the glomerular filtration rate, renal plasma flow, and renal sodium excretion...... nephropathy alone and is rapidly rising. Increased arterial blood pressure is an early and common finding in incipient and overt diabetic nephropathy. Fluid and sodium retention with normal concentrations of active renin, angiotensin I and II, and aldosterone has been demonstrated in diabetic renal disease...

  3. Antagonistic neural networks underlying differentiated leadership roles

    OpenAIRE

    Richard Eleftherios Boyatzis; Kylie eRochford; Anthony Ian Jack

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of two distinct leadership roles, the task leader and the socio-emotional leader, has been documented in the leadership literature since the 1950’s. Recent research in neuroscience suggests that the division between task oriented and socio-emotional oriented roles derives from a fundamental feature of our neurobiology: an antagonistic relationship between two large-scale cortical networks -- the Task Positive Network (TPN) and the Default Mode Network (DMN). Neural activity in ...

  4. Pharmacological analysis of calcium antagonist receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynolds, I.J.

    1987-01-01

    This work focuses on two aspects of the action of calcium antagonist drugs, namely, the interaction of drugs with receptors for verapamil-like calcium antagonists, and the interactions of drugs with voltage-sensitive calcium fluxes in rat brain synaptosomes. From binding studies I have found that the ligand of choice for labeling the verapamil receptor is (-)(/sup 3/H)desmethoxy-verapamil. This drug labels potently, reversibly and stereoselectively two receptors in membranes prepared from rat brain and rabbit skeletal muscle tissues. In equilibrium studies dihydropyridine calcium antagonists interact in a non-competitive fashion, while many non-DHPs are apparently competitive. In-depth kinetic studies in skeletal muscle membranes indicate that the two receptors are linked in a negative heterotropic fashion, and that low-affinity binding of (-) (/sup 3/H)desmethoxy-verapamil may be to the diltiazem receptor. However, these studies were not able to distinguish between the hypothesis that diltiazem binds to spatially separate, allosterically coupled receptors, and the hypothesis that diltiazem binds to a subsite of the verapamil receptor.

  5. From the Cover: Glutamate antagonists limit tumor growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rzeski, Wojciech; Turski, Lechoslaw; Ikonomidou, Chrysanthy

    2001-05-01

    Neuronal progenitors and tumor cells possess propensity to proliferate and to migrate. Glutamate regulates proliferation and migration of neurons during development, but it is not known whether it influences proliferation and migration of tumor cells. We demonstrate that glutamate antagonists inhibit proliferation of human tumor cells. Colon adenocarcinoma, astrocytoma, and breast and lung carcinoma cells were most sensitive to the antiproliferative effect of the N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonist dizocilpine, whereas breast and lung carcinoma, colon adenocarcinoma, and neuroblastoma cells responded most favorably to the -amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate antagonist GYKI52466. The antiproliferative effect of glutamate antagonists was Ca2+ dependent and resulted from decreased cell division and increased cell death. Morphological alterations induced by glutamate antagonists in tumor cells consisted of reduced membrane ruffling and pseudopodial protrusions. Furthermore, glutamate antagonists decreased motility and invasive growth of tumor cells. These findings suggest anticancer potential of glutamate antagonists.

  6. Combination decongestion therapy in hospitalized heart failure: loop diuretics, mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists and vasopressin antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaduganathan, Muthiah; Mentz, Robert J; Greene, Stephen J; Senni, Michele; Sato, Naoki; Nodari, Savina; Butler, Javed; Gheorghiade, Mihai

    2015-01-01

    Congestion is the most common reason for admissions and readmissions for heart failure (HF). The vast majority of hospitalized HF patients appear to respond readily to loop diuretics, but available data suggest that a significant proportion are being discharged with persistent evidence of congestion. Although novel therapies targeting congestion should continue to be developed, currently available agents may be utilized more optimally to facilitate complete decongestion. The combination of loop diuretics, natriuretic doses of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists and vasopressin antagonists represents a regimen of currently available therapies that affects early and persistent decongestion, while limiting the associated risks of electrolyte disturbances, hemodynamic fluctuations, renal dysfunction and mortality.

  7. An isoform of eukaryotic initiation factor 4E from Chrysanthemum morifolium interacts with Chrysanthemum virus B coat protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Aiping; Lou, Wanghuai; Jiang, Jiafu; Chen, Sumei; Sun, Zuxia; Guan, Zhiyong; Fang, Weimin; Teng, Nianjun; Chen, Fadi

    2013-01-01

    Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) plays an important role in plant virus infection as well as the regulation of gene translation. Here, we describe the isolation of a cDNA encoding CmeIF(iso)4E (GenBank accession no. JQ904592), an isoform of eIF4E from chrysanthemum, using RACE PCR. We used the CmeIF(iso)4E cDNA for expression profiling and to analyze the interaction between CmeIF(iso)4E and the Chrysanthemum virus B coat protein (CVBCP). Multiple sequence alignment and phylogenetic tree analysis showed that the sequence similarity of CmeIF(iso)4E with other reported plant eIF(iso)4E sequences varied between 69.12% and 89.18%, indicating that CmeIF(iso)4E belongs to the eIF(iso)4E subfamily of the eIF4E family. CmeIF(iso)4E was present in all chrysanthemum organs, but was particularly abundant in the roots and flowers. Confocal microscopy showed that a transiently transfected CmeIF(iso)4E-GFP fusion protein distributed throughout the whole cell in onion epidermis cells. A yeast two hybrid assay showed CVBCP interacted with CmeIF(iso)4E but not with CmeIF4E. BiFC assay further demonstrated the interaction between CmeIF(iso)4E and CVBCP. Luminescence assay showed that CVBCP increased the RLU of Luc-CVB, suggesting CVBCP might participate in the translation of viral proteins. These results inferred that CmeIF(iso)4E as the cap-binding subunit eIF(iso)4F may be involved in Chrysanthemum Virus B infection in chrysanthemum through its interaction with CVBCP in spatial.

  8. An isoform of eukaryotic initiation factor 4E from Chrysanthemum morifolium interacts with Chrysanthemum virus B coat protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aiping Song

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E plays an important role in plant virus infection as well as the regulation of gene translation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we describe the isolation of a cDNA encoding CmeIF(iso4E (GenBank accession no. JQ904592, an isoform of eIF4E from chrysanthemum, using RACE PCR. We used the CmeIF(iso4E cDNA for expression profiling and to analyze the interaction between CmeIF(iso4E and the Chrysanthemum virus B coat protein (CVBCP. Multiple sequence alignment and phylogenetic tree analysis showed that the sequence similarity of CmeIF(iso4E with other reported plant eIF(iso4E sequences varied between 69.12% and 89.18%, indicating that CmeIF(iso4E belongs to the eIF(iso4E subfamily of the eIF4E family. CmeIF(iso4E was present in all chrysanthemum organs, but was particularly abundant in the roots and flowers. Confocal microscopy showed that a transiently transfected CmeIF(iso4E-GFP fusion protein distributed throughout the whole cell in onion epidermis cells. A yeast two hybrid assay showed CVBCP interacted with CmeIF(iso4E but not with CmeIF4E. BiFC assay further demonstrated the interaction between CmeIF(iso4E and CVBCP. Luminescence assay showed that CVBCP increased the RLU of Luc-CVB, suggesting CVBCP might participate in the translation of viral proteins. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results inferred that CmeIF(iso4E as the cap-binding subunit eIF(iso4F may be involved in Chrysanthemum Virus B infection in chrysanthemum through its interaction with CVBCP in spatial.

  9. Sexually antagonistic selection in human male homosexuality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Camperio Ciani

    Full Text Available Several lines of evidence indicate the existence of genetic factors influencing male homosexuality and bisexuality. In spite of its relatively low frequency, the stable permanence in all human populations of this apparently detrimental trait constitutes a puzzling 'Darwinian paradox'. Furthermore, several studies have pointed out relevant asymmetries in the distribution of both male homosexuality and of female fecundity in the parental lines of homosexual vs. heterosexual males. A number of hypotheses have attempted to give an evolutionary explanation for the long-standing persistence of this trait, and for its asymmetric distribution in family lines; however a satisfactory understanding of the population genetics of male homosexuality is lacking at present. We perform a systematic mathematical analysis of the propagation and equilibrium of the putative genetic factors for male homosexuality in the population, based on the selection equation for one or two diallelic loci and Bayesian statistics for pedigree investigation. We show that only the two-locus genetic model with at least one locus on the X chromosome, and in which gene expression is sexually antagonistic (increasing female fitness but decreasing male fitness, accounts for all known empirical data. Our results help clarify the basic evolutionary dynamics of male homosexuality, establishing this as a clearly ascertained sexually antagonistic human trait.

  10. Sexually Antagonistic Selection in Human Male Homosexuality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camperio Ciani, Andrea; Cermelli, Paolo; Zanzotto, Giovanni

    2008-01-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate the existence of genetic factors influencing male homosexuality and bisexuality. In spite of its relatively low frequency, the stable permanence in all human populations of this apparently detrimental trait constitutes a puzzling ‘Darwinian paradox’. Furthermore, several studies have pointed out relevant asymmetries in the distribution of both male homosexuality and of female fecundity in the parental lines of homosexual vs. heterosexual males. A number of hypotheses have attempted to give an evolutionary explanation for the long-standing persistence of this trait, and for its asymmetric distribution in family lines; however a satisfactory understanding of the population genetics of male homosexuality is lacking at present. We perform a systematic mathematical analysis of the propagation and equilibrium of the putative genetic factors for male homosexuality in the population, based on the selection equation for one or two diallelic loci and Bayesian statistics for pedigree investigation. We show that only the two-locus genetic model with at least one locus on the X chromosome, and in which gene expression is sexually antagonistic (increasing female fitness but decreasing male fitness), accounts for all known empirical data. Our results help clarify the basic evolutionary dynamics of male homosexuality, establishing this as a clearly ascertained sexually antagonistic human trait. PMID:18560521

  11. Application of tumor necrosis factor antagonists in hepatic disease treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHI Zhaochun

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available All tumor necrosis factor (TNF antagonists are associated with hepatotoxicity and thus induce liver injury, commonly manifested as hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus reactivation, acute hepatitis, drug-induced liver disease, cholestasis, serum liver enzyme activity elevation, and even acute liver failure. Hence, the application of TNF antagonists in hepatic disease treatment remains controversial. This review summarizes currently available data on the mechanism and application of TNF antagonists in hepatic disease treatment. Although TNF antagonists have been applied for many years, large randomized controlled trials are still recommended to assess its efficacy and safety and to achieve a consensus.

  12. Short Communication In vitro evaluation of antagonistic potential ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Short Communication In vitro evaluation of antagonistic potential activity and assay of culture filtrates of Trichoderma harzianum and Trichoderma viride against coffee wilt pathogen ( Gibberella xylarioides )

  13. ETA-receptor antagonists or allosteric modulators?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Mey, Jo G R; Compeer, Matthijs G; Lemkens, Pieter

    2011-01-01

    The paracrine signaling peptide endothelin-1 (ET1) is involved in cardiovascular diseases, cancer and chronic pain. It acts on class A G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) but displays atypical pharmacology. It binds tightly to ET receptor type A (ET(A)) and causes long-lasting effects. In resista......The paracrine signaling peptide endothelin-1 (ET1) is involved in cardiovascular diseases, cancer and chronic pain. It acts on class A G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) but displays atypical pharmacology. It binds tightly to ET receptor type A (ET(A)) and causes long-lasting effects......(A) and that ERAs and the physiological antagonist allosterically reduce ET(A) functions. Combining the two-state model and the two-domain model of GPCR function and considering receptor activation beyond agonist binding might lead to better anti-endothelinergic drugs. Future studies could lead to compounds...

  14. The Attractiveness of Opposites: Agonists and Antagonists.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Brien, Tony

    2015-02-02

    ABSTRACT Opioid-induced bowel dysfunction, of which constipation is the most common aspect, is a major limiting factor in the use of opioids for pain management. The availability of an oral, long-acting formulation of oxycodone and naloxone represents a highly significant development in pain management. The combination of an opioid analgesic with an opioid antagonist offers reliable pain control with a significant reduction in the burden of opioid-induced constipation. This report is adapted from paineurope 2014; Issue 3, ©Haymarket Medical Publications Ltd, and is presented with permission. paineurope is provided as a service to pain management by Mundipharma International, LTD and is distributed free of charge to healthcare professionals in Europe. Archival issues can be accessed via the website: http:\\/\\/www.paineurope.com at which European health professionals can register online to receive copies of the quarterly publication.

  15. Antagonistic activity of marine sponges associated Actinobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selvakumar Dharmaraj

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To focus on the isolation and preliminary characterization of marine sponges associated Actinobacteria particularly Streptomyces species and also their antagonistic activities against bacterial and fungal pathogens. Methods: The sponges were collected from Kovalam and Vizhinjam port of south-west coast of Kerala, India. Isolation of strains was carried out from sponge extracts using international Streptomyces project media. For preliminary identification of the strains, morphological (mycelial colouration, soluble pigments, melanoid pigmentation, spore morphology, nutritional uptake (carbon utilisation, amonoacids influence, sodium chloride tolerance, physiological (pH, temperature and chemotaxonomical characterization were done. Antimicrobial studies were also carried out for the selected strains. Results: With the help of the spicule structures, the collected marine sponges were identified as Callyspongia diffusa, Mycale mytilorum, Tedania anhelans and Dysidea fragilis. Nearly 94 strains were primarily isolated from these sponges and further they were sub-cultured using international Streptomyces project media. The strains exhibited different mycelial colouration (aerial and substrate, soluble and melanoid pigmentations. The strains possessed three types of sporophore morphology namely rectus flexibilis, spiral and retinaculiaperti. Among the 94 isolates, seven exhibited antibacterial and antifungal activities with maximal zone of inhibition of 30 mm. The nutritional, physiological and chemotaxonomical characteristic study helped in the conventional identification of the seven strains and they all suggest that the strains to be grouped under the genus Streptomyces. Conclusions: The present study clearly helps in the preliminary identification of the isolates associated with marine sponges. Antagonistic activities prove the production of antimicrobial metabolites against the pathogens. Marine sponges associated Streptomyces are

  16. Antagonistic properties of Trichoderma viride on post harvest ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antagonistic properties of Trichoderma viride on post harvest cassava root rot pathogens. ... Treatment with the antagonist and the subsequent storage resulted in a remarkable reduction in the frequency of occurrence of the normal root surface mycoflora and the pathogens over a 3 weeks storage period. Botryodiplodia ...

  17. Optimisation of GnRH antagonist use in ART

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamdine, O.

    2014-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the optimisation of controlled ovarian stimulation for IVF using exogenous FSH and GnRH antagonist co-treatment, by studying the timing of the initiation of GnRH antagonist co-medication and the role of ovarian reserve markers in optimising ovarian response and reproductive

  18. Gonadotrophin-releasing hormone antagonists for assisted reproductive technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Al-Inany, Hesham G.; Youssef, Mohamed A.; Ayeleke, Reuben Olugbenga; Brown, Julie; Lam, Wai Sun; Broekmans, Frank J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonists can be used to prevent a luteinizing hormone (LH) surge during controlled ovarian hyperstimulation (COH) without the hypo-oestrogenic side-effects, flare-up, or long down-regulation period associated with agonists. The antagonists

  19. Thrombin-receptor antagonist vorapaxar in acute coronary syndromes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tricoci, Pierluigi; Huang, Zhen; Held, Claes

    2012-01-01

    Vorapaxar is a new oral protease-activated-receptor 1 (PAR-1) antagonist that inhibits thrombin-induced platelet activation.......Vorapaxar is a new oral protease-activated-receptor 1 (PAR-1) antagonist that inhibits thrombin-induced platelet activation....

  20. Evaluation of antagonistic activities of trichoderma isolates against ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluation of antagonistic activities of trichoderma isolates against Fusarium wilt ( Fusarium oxysporum ) of tomato ( Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) isolates. ... The antagonistic effect of Trichoderma isolates against the test pathogen was tested both in vitro and in vivo conditions. From the three tomato varieties, Miya was ...

  1. Calcium antagonists protect mice against lethal doses of ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Floersheim, G.L. (University Hospitals, Basel (Switzerland). Dept. of Research)

    1992-11-01

    Currently available radioprotectors are poorly tolerated in man and the general use of aminothiol radioprotectors is compromised by side-effects. In a search for less toxic radioprotective agents, diltiazem, a calcium antagonist with a benzothiazepine structure, was found to protect mice against a lethal (LD[sub 100]) [gamma] radiation dose allowing survival of up to 93%. Dihydropyridine calcium antagonists such as nifedipine, nimodipine, isradipine and nitrendipine also provided radioprotection. Calcium antagonists might attenuate radiation-induced injury by inhibiting cellular calcium overload, subsequent to cell membrane damage caused by radiation-generated free radicals. In view of their good tolerance, calcium antagonists may be applied safely in situations of radiation exposure, including radiotherapy and internal radionuclide contamination. These calcium antagonists may also be viewed in other contexts where free radicals are implicated in pathological processes. (Author).

  2. Vitamin K antagonist use and mortality in dialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voskamp, Pauline W M; Rookmaaker, Maarten B; Verhaar, Marianne C; Dekker, Friedo W; Ocak, Gurbey

    2018-01-01

    The risk-benefit ratio of vitamin K antagonists for different CHA2DS2-VASc scores in patients with end-stage renal disease treated with dialysis is unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between vitamin K antagonist use and mortality for different CHA2DS2-VASc scores in a cohort of end-stage renal disease patients receiving dialysis treatment. We prospectively followed 1718 incident dialysis patients. Hazard ratios were calculated for all-cause and cause-specific (stroke, bleeding, cardiovascular and other) mortality associated with vitamin K antagonist use. Vitamin K antagonist use as compared with no vitamin K antagonist use was associated with a 1.2-fold [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.0-1.5] increased all-cause mortality risk, a 1.5-fold (95% CI 0.6-4.0) increased stroke mortality risk, a 1.3-fold (95% CI 0.4-4.2) increased bleeding mortality risk, a 1.2-fold (95% CI 0.9-1.8) increased cardiovascular mortality risk and a 1.2-fold (95% CI 0.8-1.6) increased other mortality risk after adjustment. Within patients with a CHA2DS2-VASc score ≤1, vitamin K antagonist use was associated with a 2.8-fold (95% CI 1.0-7.8) increased all-cause mortality risk as compared with no vitamin K antagonist use, while vitamin K antagonist use within patients with a CHA2DS2-VASc score ≥2 was not associated with an increased mortality risk after adjustment. Vitamin K antagonist use was not associated with a protective effect on mortality in the different CHA2DS2-VASc scores in dialysis patients. The lack of knowledge on the indication for vitamin K antagonist use could lead to confounding by indication.

  3. The human cap-binding complex is functionally connected to the nuclear RNA exosome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Peter Refsing; Domanski, Michal; Kristiansen, Maiken S

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear processing and quality control of eukaryotic RNA is mediated by the RNA exosome, which is regulated by accessory factors. However, the mechanism of exosome recruitment to its ribonucleoprotein (RNP) targets remains poorly understood. Here we report a physical link between the human exosome...... of combinatorial depletion of CBCN and exosome components underscore the functional relevance of CBC-exosome bridging at the level of target RNA. Specifically, CBCA suppresses read-through products of several RNA families by promoting their transcriptional termination. We suggest that the RNP 5' cap links...... transcription termination to exosomal RNA degradation through CBCN....

  4. IRES-dependent translational control during virus-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress and apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul eHanson

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Many virus infections and stresses can induce endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress response, a host self defense mechanism against viral invasion and stress. During this event, viral and cellular gene expression is actively regulated and often encounters a switching of the translation initiation from cap-dependent to IRES (internal ribosome entry sites-dependent. This switching is largely dependent on the mRNA structure of the 5’untranslated region (5’UTR and on the particular stress stimuli. Picornviruses and some other viruses contain an IRES within their 5’UTR of viral genome and employ an IRES-driven mechanism for translation initiation. Recently, a growing number of cellular genes involved in growth control, cell cycle progression and apoptosis were also found to contain one or more IRES within their long highly structured 5’UTRs. These genes initiate translation usually by a cap-dependent mechanism under normal physiological conditions; however, in certain environments, such as infection, starvation and heat shock they shift translation initiation to an IRES-dependent modality. Although the molecular mechanism is not entirely understood, a number of studies have revealed that several cellular biochemical processes are responsible for the switching of translation initiation to IRES-dependent. These include the cleavage of translation initiation factors by viral and/or host proteases, phosphorylation (inactivation of host factors for translation initiation, over-production of homologous proteins of cap-binding protein eIF4E, suppression of cap-binding protein eIF4E expression by specific microRNA, activation of enzymes for mRNA decapping, as well as others. Here, we summarize the recent advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms for the switching of translation initiation, particularly for the proteins involved in cell survival and apoptosis in the ER stress pathways during viral infections.

  5. Noradrenergic antagonists mitigate amphetamine-induced recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hylin, M J; Brenneman, M M; Corwin, J V

    2017-09-15

    Brain injury, including that due to stroke, leaves individuals with cognitive deficits that can disrupt daily aspect of living. As of now there are few treatments that shown limited amounts of success in improving functional outcome. The use of stimulants such as amphetamine have shown some success in improving outcome following brain injury. While the pharmacological mechanisms for amphetamine are known; the specific processes responsible for improving behavioral outcome following injury remain unknown. Understanding these mechanisms can help to refine the use of amphetamine as a potential treatment or lead to the use of other methods that share the same pharmacological properties. One proposed mechanism is amphetamine's impact upon noradrenaline (NA). In the current, study noradrenergic antagonists were administered prior to amphetamine to pharmacologically block α- and β-adrenergic receptors. The results demonstrated that the blockade of these receptors disrupted amphetamines ability to induce recovery from hemispatial neglect using an established aspiration lesion model. This suggests that amphetamine's ability to ameliorate neglect deficits may be due in part to noradrenaline. These results further support the role of noradrenaline in functional recovery. Finally, the development of polytherapies and combined therapeutics, while promising, may need to consider the possibility that drug interactions can negate the effectiveness of treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Antagonistic neural networks underlying differentiated leadership roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyatzis, Richard E; Rochford, Kylie; Jack, Anthony I

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of two distinct leadership roles, the task leader and the socio-emotional leader, has been documented in the leadership literature since the 1950s. Recent research in neuroscience suggests that the division between task-oriented and socio-emotional-oriented roles derives from a fundamental feature of our neurobiology: an antagonistic relationship between two large-scale cortical networks - the task-positive network (TPN) and the default mode network (DMN). Neural activity in TPN tends to inhibit activity in the DMN, and vice versa. The TPN is important for problem solving, focusing of attention, making decisions, and control of action. The DMN plays a central role in emotional self-awareness, social cognition, and ethical decision making. It is also strongly linked to creativity and openness to new ideas. Because activation of the TPN tends to suppress activity in the DMN, an over-emphasis on task-oriented leadership may prove deleterious to social and emotional aspects of leadership. Similarly, an overemphasis on the DMN would result in difficulty focusing attention, making decisions, and solving known problems. In this paper, we will review major streams of theory and research on leadership roles in the context of recent findings from neuroscience and psychology. We conclude by suggesting that emerging research challenges the assumption that role differentiation is both natural and necessary, in particular when openness to new ideas, people, emotions, and ethical concerns are important to success.

  7. Leukotriene Receptor Antagonists and Related Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sally E Wenzel

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Leukotrienes (LTs, lipid mediators of inflammation, have proved to be important biochemicals involved in the symptoms and physiological changes of asthma. In the past year and a half, the development of three new drugs that modulate the LT pathway has been completed. The first subclass of these drugs, leukotriene receptor antagonists (LTRA (zafirlukast and montelukast, blocks the interaction of the cysteinyl form of the LTs with the cell type bearing the receptor. The second subclass, the 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO inhibitors (zileuton inhibits the 5-LO enzyme, which prevents the formation of both cysteinyl LTs and LTB4. The LT modulators have shown efficacy in inhibiting the physiological changes occurring after allergen, acetylsalicylic acid and exercise challenge in asthmatics. In addition, they have shown efficacy in improving symptoms, beta-agonist use and forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1 in chronic, ‘day-to-day’ asthma in patients with mild disease. Comparison studies with low doses of inhaled corticosteroids suggest that LT modulators may have similar effects on symptom scores and beta-agonist use, but have lesser effects on FEV1. Finally, emerging data suggest that these drugs are beneficial in decreasing the dose of inhaled corticosteroids necessary to control more moderate to severe asthma. While long term studies will be helpful in determining the ‘disease modifying’ effects of these drugs, data suggest that these drugs are useful in the treatment of a broad range of asthmatic patients.

  8. Sexually antagonistic polymorphism in simultaneous hermaphrodites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Crispin Y.; Connallon, Tim

    2015-01-01

    In hermaphrodites, pleiotropic genetic tradeoffs between female and male reproductive functions can lead to sexually antagonistic (SA) selection, where individual alleles have conflicting fitness effects on each sex function. While an extensive theory of SA selection exists for dioecious species, these results have not been generalized to hermaphrodites. We develop population genetic models of SA selection in simultaneous hermaphrodites, and evaluate effects of dominance, selection on each sex function, self-fertilization, and population size, on the maintenance of polymorphism. Under obligate outcrossing, hermaphrodite model predictions converge exactly with those of dioecious populations. Self-fertilization in hermaphrodites generates three points of divergence with dioecious theory. First, opportunities for stable polymorphism decline sharply and become less sensitive to dominance with increased selfing. Second, selfing introduces an asymmetry in the relative importance of selection through male versus female reproductive functions, expands the parameter space favorable for the evolutionary invasion of female-beneficial alleles, and restricts invasion criteria for male-beneficial alleles. Finally, contrary to models of unconditionally beneficial alleles, selfing decreases genetic hitchhiking effects of invading SA alleles, and should therefore decrease these population genetic signals of SA polymorphisms. We discuss implications of SA selection in hermaphrodites, including its potential role in the evolution of “selfing syndromes”. PMID:25311368

  9. Antagonistic Neural Networks Underlying Differentiated Leadership Roles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Eleftherios Boyatzis

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of two distinct leadership roles, the task leader and the socio-emotional leader, has been documented in the leadership literature since the 1950’s. Recent research in neuroscience suggests that the division between task oriented and socio-emotional oriented roles derives from a fundamental feature of our neurobiology: an antagonistic relationship between two large-scale cortical networks -- the Task Positive Network (TPN and the Default Mode Network (DMN. Neural activity in TPN tends to inhibit activity in the DMN, and vice versa. The TPN is important for problem solving, focusing of attention, making decisions, and control of action. The DMN plays a central role in emotional self-awareness, social cognition, and ethical decision making. It is also strongly linked to creativity and openness to new ideas. Because activation of the TPN tends to suppress activity in the DMN, an over-emphasis on task oriented leadership may prove deleterious to social and emotional aspects of leadership. Similarly, an overemphasis on the DMN would result in difficulty focusing attention, making decisions and solving known problems. In this paper, we will review major streams of theory and research on leadership roles in the context of recent findings from neuroscience and psychology. We conclude by suggesting that emerging research challenges the assumption that role differentiation is both natural and necessary, in particular when openness to new ideas, people, emotions, and ethical concerns are important to success.

  10. Antagonistic neural networks underlying differentiated leadership roles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyatzis, Richard E.; Rochford, Kylie; Jack, Anthony I.

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of two distinct leadership roles, the task leader and the socio-emotional leader, has been documented in the leadership literature since the 1950s. Recent research in neuroscience suggests that the division between task-oriented and socio-emotional-oriented roles derives from a fundamental feature of our neurobiology: an antagonistic relationship between two large-scale cortical networks – the task-positive network (TPN) and the default mode network (DMN). Neural activity in TPN tends to inhibit activity in the DMN, and vice versa. The TPN is important for problem solving, focusing of attention, making decisions, and control of action. The DMN plays a central role in emotional self-awareness, social cognition, and ethical decision making. It is also strongly linked to creativity and openness to new ideas. Because activation of the TPN tends to suppress activity in the DMN, an over-emphasis on task-oriented leadership may prove deleterious to social and emotional aspects of leadership. Similarly, an overemphasis on the DMN would result in difficulty focusing attention, making decisions, and solving known problems. In this paper, we will review major streams of theory and research on leadership roles in the context of recent findings from neuroscience and psychology. We conclude by suggesting that emerging research challenges the assumption that role differentiation is both natural and necessary, in particular when openness to new ideas, people, emotions, and ethical concerns are important to success. PMID:24624074

  11. Fine Tuning of a Type 1 Interferon Antagonist.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Urin

    Full Text Available Type I interferons are multi-potent cytokines that serve as first line of defense against viruses and other pathogens, posses immunomudolatory functions and elicit a growth inhibitory response. In recent years it has been shown that interferons are also detrimental, for example in lupus, AIDS, tuberculosis and cognitive decline, highlighted the need to develop interferon antagonists. We have previously developed the antagonist IFN-1ant, with much reduced binding to the IFNAR1 receptor and enhanced binding to IFNAR2. Here, we further tune the IFN-1ant by producing three additional antagonists based on IFN-1ant but with altered activity profiles. We show that in all three cases the antiproliferative activity of interferons is blocked and the induction of gene transcription of immunomudolatory and antiproliferative associated genes are substantially decreased. Conversely, each of the new antagonists elicits a different degree of antiviral response, STAT phosphorylation and related gene induction. Two of the new antagonists promote decreased activity in relation to the original IFN-1ant, while one of them promotes increased activity. As we do not know the exact causes of the detrimental effects of IFNs, the four antagonists that were produced and analyzed provide the opportunity to investigate the extent of antagonistic and agonistic activity optimal for a given condition.

  12. Intractable pneumococcal meningoencephalitis associated with a TNF-α antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Seok-Jae; Kim, Hyun Young; Kim, Young Seo; Lee, Ha Neul; Kim, Hee Tae; Kim, Seung H

    2014-09-15

    A 34-year-old man was treated with a TNF-α antagonist for ankylosing spondylitis, and this subsequently developed a CNS infection. Magnetic resonance imaging showed diffuse subcortical white matter lesions. Streptococcus pneumoniae was cultured from the cerebrospinal fluid and blood. The patient died of multifocal widespread brain damage and subarachnoid hemorrhage, despite intensive antibacterial medication. Pneumococcal meningoencephalitis can occur in association with TNF-α antagonists. Clinicians should be aware of both the risk of fatal bacterial meningoencephalitis associated with TNF-α antagonists and the possibility of an unusual presentation of bacterial meningitis. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Multiple Targeting Approaches on Histamine H3 Receptor Antagonists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad eKhanfar

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available With the very recent market approval of pitolisant (Wakix®, the interest in clinical applications of novel multifunctional histamine H3 receptor antagonists has clearly increased. Since histamine H3 receptor antagonists in clinical development have been tested for a variety of different indications, the combination of pharmacological properties in one molecule for improved pharmacological effects and reduced unwanted side-effects is rationally based on the increasing knowledge on the complex neurotransmitter regulations. The polypharmacological approaches on histamine H3 receptor antagonists on different G-protein coupled receptors, transporters, enzymes as well as on NO-signaling mechanism are described, supported with some lead structures.

  14. Recent Development of Non-Peptide GnRH Antagonists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng-Ling Tukun

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The decapeptide gonadotropin-releasing hormone, also referred to as luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone with the sequence (pGlu-His-Trp-Ser-Tyr-Gly-Leu-Arg-Pro-Gly-NH2 plays an important role in regulating the reproductive system. It stimulates differential release of the gonadotropins FSH and LH from pituitary tissue. To date, treatment of hormone-dependent diseases targeting the GnRH receptor, including peptide GnRH agonist and antagonists are now available on the market. The inherited issues associate with peptide agonists and antagonists have however, led to significant interest in developing orally active, small molecule, non-peptide antagonists. In this review, we will summarize all developed small molecule GnRH antagonists along with the most recent clinical data and therapeutic applications.

  15. GnRH antagonist versus long agonist protocols in IVF

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lambalk, C B; Banga, F R; Huirne, J A

    2017-01-01

    was not the only variable between the compared study arms. OBJECTIVE AND RATIONALE: The aim of the current study was to compare GnRH antagonist protocols versus standard long agonist protocols in couples undergoing IVF or ICSI, while accounting for various patient populations and treatment schedules. SEARCH...... METHODS: The Cochrane Menstrual Disorders and Subfertility Review Group specialized register of controlled trials and Pubmed and Embase databases were searched from inception until June 2016. Eligible trials were those that compared GnRH antagonist protocols and standard long GnRH agonist protocols...... the antagonist and agonist groups (RR 0.97, 95% CI 0.84-1.11 and RR 0.87, 95% CI 0.65-1.17, respectively). Subgroup analyses for various antagonist treatment schedules compared to the long protocol GnRH agonist showed a significantly lower ongoing pregnancy rate when the oral hormonal programming pill (OHP...

  16. Penicillium expansum versus antagonist yeasts and patulin degradation in vitro

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Coelho, Alexandre Rodrigo; Celli, Marcos Giovani; Ono, Elisabete Yurie Sataque; Wosiacki, Gilvan; Hoffmann, Fernando Leite; Pagnocca, Fernando Carlos; Hirooka, Elisa Yoko

    2007-01-01

    Taking into account the preliminary antagonistic/biodegradation property showed by Pichia membranifaciens and Sporobolomyces roseus, which decreased the initial patulin concentration of 588.4 to 290.0 µg/mL, ability of P...

  17. Complications of TNF-α antagonists and iron homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    TNF-α is a central regulator of inflammation and its blockade downregulates other proinflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors. Subsequently, TNF-α antagonists are currently used in treatment regimens directed toward several inflammatory diseases. Despite a beneficia...

  18. Secondary prevention with calcium antagonists after acute myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J F

    1992-01-01

    Experimental studies have demonstrated that the 3 calcium antagonists nifedipine, diltiazem, and verapamil have a comparable effect in the prevention of myocardial damage during ischaemia. Secondary prevention trials after acute myocardial infarction, which aimed at improving survival...

  19. DEFICIENCY OF INTERLEUKIN-1 RECEPTOR ANTAGONIST RESPONSIVE TO ANAKINRA

    Science.gov (United States)

    SCHNELLBACHER, CHARLOTTE; CIOCCA, GIOVANNA; MENENDEZ, ROXANNA; AKSENTIJEVICH, IVONA; GOLDBACH-MANSKY, RAPHAELA; DUARTE, ANAM.; RIVAS-CHACON, RAFAEL

    2012-01-01

    We describe a 3-month-old infant who presented to our institution with interleukin (IL)-1 receptor antagonist deficiency (DIRA), which consists of neutrophilic pustular dermatosis, periostitis, aseptic multifocal osteomyelitis, and persistently high acutephase reactants. Skin findings promptly improved upon initiation of treatment with anakinra (recombinant human IL-1 receptor antagonist), and the bony lesions and systemic inflammation resolved with continued therapy. PMID:22471702

  20. Serotonin and vasoactive intestinal peptide antagonists attenuate rotavirus diarrhoea

    OpenAIRE

    Kordasti, S; Sjövall, H; Lundgren, O; Svensson, L

    2004-01-01

    Background and aims: The mechanisms underlying intestinal secretion in rotavirus diarrhoea remain to be established. We previously reported that rotavirus evokes intestinal fluid and electrolyte secretion by activation of the enteric nervous system. We now report that antagonists for the 5-hydroxytryptamine 3 receptor (5-HT3) and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) receptor, but not antagonists for 5-hydroxytryptamine 4 receptor or the muscarinic receptor, attenuate rotavirus induced diarrhoea.

  1. Interleukin-2 receptor antagonists as induction therapy after heart transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Christian H; Gustafsson, Finn; Gluud, Christian

    2008-01-01

    About half of the transplantation centers use induction therapy after heart transplantation. Interleukin-2 receptor antagonists (IL-2Ras) are used increasingly for induction therapy. We conducted a systematic review of randomized trials assessing IL-2Ras.......About half of the transplantation centers use induction therapy after heart transplantation. Interleukin-2 receptor antagonists (IL-2Ras) are used increasingly for induction therapy. We conducted a systematic review of randomized trials assessing IL-2Ras....

  2. Platelet-activating factor (PAF)-antagonists of natural origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Preeti; Singh, Ishwari Narayan; Mondal, Sambhu Charan; Singh, Lubhan; Garg, Vipin Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Presently herbal medicines are being used by about 80% of the world population for primary health care as they stood the test of time for their safety, efficacy, cultural acceptability and lesser side effects. The discovery of platelet activating factor antagonists (PAF antagonists) during these decades are going on with different framework, but the researchers led their efficiency in studying in vitro test models. Since it is assumed that PAF play a central role in etiology of many diseases in humans such as asthma, neuronal damage, migraine, cardiac diseases, inflammatory, headache etc. Present days instinctively occurring PAF antagonist exists as a specific grade of therapeutic agents for the humans against these and different diseases either laid hold of immunological or non-immunological types. Ginkgolide, cedrol and many other natural PAF antagonists such as andrographolide, α-bulnesene, cinchonine, piperine, kadsurenone, different Piper species' natural products and marine origin plants extracts or even crude drugs having PAF antagonist properties are being used currently against different inflammatory pathologies. This review is an attempt to summarize the data on PAF and action of natural PAF antagonists on it, which were evaluated by in vivo and in vitro assays. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Endothelin receptor antagonists for pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, C; Chen, J

    2006-07-19

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a devastating disease, which leads to right heart failure and premature death. Pulmonary arterial hypertension can be classified into five categories according to Venice classification: (1) Idiopathic PAH; (2) Familial PAH; (3) PAH associated with collagen vascular disease, congenital systemic-to-pulmonary shunts, portal hypertension, HIV infection, drugs and toxins or other (thyroid disorders, glycogen storage disease, Gaucher disease, hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, hemoglobinopathies, myeloproliferative disorders, splenectomy); (4) PAH associated with significant venous or capillary involvement, which includes pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) and pulmonary capillary hemangiomatosis (PCH); (5) Persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn. PAH can also be secondary to chronic hypoxic lung disease as part of the "cor-pulmonale" syndrome, and also secondary to left sided heart disease, but these conditions are usually distinguished from those listed here. To evaluate the efficacy of endothelin receptor antagonists in pulmonary arterial hypertension. A search was carried out using the CENTRAL (Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials), MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the reference section of retrieved articles. Searches are current as of August 2005. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) or quasi-randomised controlled trials involving patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) were selected by two reviewers. Two reviewers independently selected studies; assessed study quality; and extracted data. We analysed outcomes as continuous and dichotomous data. In this updated version of the review, we added two RCTs. Altogether, five RCTs met the entry criteria of the review (reporting eight group comparisons). The studies were of short duration (12-16 weeks), recruiting a total of 482 participants. Three studies compared a non-selective ERA (bosentan) with placebo, one compared bosentan with sildenafil (a

  4. alpha2-Adrenoceptor antagonists reverse the 5-HT2 receptor antagonist suppression of head-twitch behavior in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, K; Mizowaki, M; Thongpraditchote, S; Murakami, Y; Watanabe, H

    1997-03-01

    The alpha2-adrenoceptor agonist clonidine, as well as 5-HT2 receptor antagonists, reportedly suppress 5-HT2 receptor-mediated head-twitch behavior. We investigated the effect of alpha2-adrenoceptor antagonists on the suppressive action of 5-HT2 receptor antagonists in mice pretreated with the noradrenaline toxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) or the 5-HT synthesis inhibitor p-chlorophenylalanine (p-CPA). In normal mice, idazoxan (0.08-0.2 mg/kg, IP) or yohimbine (0.2-2.0 mg/kg, IP), both alpha2-adrenoceptor antagonists, had no effect on the head-twitch response caused by 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine (5-MeO-DMT; 16 mg/kg, IP), but idazoxan significantly enhanced the response at 0.5 mg/kg. On the other hand, these alpha2-adrenoceptor antagonists, at doses that had no effect on the basal number of head-twitches (idazoxan 0.2 mg/kg and yohimbine 0.5 mg/kg), significantly attenuated not only the suppressive effect of clonidine (0.01 mg/kg, IP) on head-twitch response but also that of the 5-HT2 receptor antagonist ritanserin (0.03 mg/kg, IP). Moreover, idazoxan (0.2 mg/kg) also significantly reversed the inhibition by 0.01 mg/kg (IP) ketanserin, a selective 5-HT2 receptor antagonist. Pretreatment with 6-OHDA plus nomifensine but not with p-CPA significantly attenuated the effect of idazoxan (0.2-0.5 mg/kg) on the ritanserin inhibition of the head-twitch response. Prazosin, an alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonist, dose-dependently suppressed the response, and the effect of prazosin (1.25 mg/kg) was significantly attenuated by 0.5 mg/kg idazoxan. These results indicate that endogenous noradrenaline is involved in the apparent antagonistic interaction between selective alpha2-adrenoceptor antagonists and 5-HT2 receptor antagonists in the head-twitch response, and suggest that noradrenaline stimulation of alpha1-adrenoceptors may be involved in this apparent antagonism.

  5. Serotonin and vasoactive intestinal peptide antagonists attenuate rotavirus diarrhoea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordasti, S; Sjövall, H; Lundgren, O; Svensson, L

    2004-07-01

    The mechanisms underlying intestinal secretion in rotavirus diarrhoea remain to be established. We previously reported that rotavirus evokes intestinal fluid and electrolyte secretion by activation of the enteric nervous system. We now report that antagonists for the 5-hydroxytryptamine 3 receptor (5-HT(3)) and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) receptor, but not antagonists for 5-hydroxytryptamine 4 receptor or the muscarinic receptor, attenuate rotavirus induced diarrhoea. Neurotransmitter antagonists were administered to wild-type or neurokinin 1 receptor knockout mice infected with homologous (EDIM) or heterologous (RRV) rotavirus. While RRV infected mice had diarrhoea for 3.3 (0.2) days (95% confidence interval (CI) 3.04-3.56), the 5-HT(3) receptor antagonist (granisetron) and the VIP receptor antagonist (4Cl-D-Phe(6),Leu(17))-VIP both reduced the total number of days of RRV induced diarrhoea to 2.1 (0.3) (95% CI 1.31-2.9) (protavirus. On the other hand, rotavirus diarrhoea was not attenuated in the neurokinin 1 receptor knockout mice. Our results suggest that the neurotransmitters serotonin and VIP are involved in rotavirus diarrhoea; observations that could imply new principles for treatment of this disease with significant global impact.

  6. Cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonists in therapeutic and structural perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Jos H M; Kruse, Chris G

    2008-01-01

    The observed antiobesity effect of rimonabant (1) in a pharmacological rodent model 10 years ago has led to a surge in the search for novel cannabinoid CB1 antagonists as a new therapeutic target for the treatment of obesity. Rimonabant showed clinical efficacy in the treatment of obesity and also improved cardiovascular and metabolic risk factors. Cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonists have also good prospects in other therapeutic areas, including smoking and alcohol addiction as well as cognitive impairment. Solvay's research achievements in this fast-moving field are reported in relation with the current state of the art. Several medicinal chemistry strategies have been pursued. The application of the concept of conformational constraint led to the discovery of more rigid analogs of the prototypic CB1 receptor antagonist rimonabant. Replacement of the central heterocyclic pyrazole ring in rimonabant yielded imidazoles, triazoles, and thiazoles as selective CB1 receptor antagonists. Dedicated medium-throughput screening efforts delivered one 3,4-diarylpyrazoline hit. Its poor pharmacokinetic properties were successfully optimized which led to the discovery of orally active and highly CB1/CB2 receptor selective analogs in this series. Regioisomeric 1,5-diarylpyrazolines, 1,2-diarylimidazolines, and water-soluble imidazoles have been designed as novel CB1 receptor antagonist structure classes. Copyright 2008 The Japan Chemical Journal Forum and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Experimental evolution of a novel sexually antagonistic allele.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Dean

    Full Text Available Evolutionary conflict permeates biological systems. In sexually reproducing organisms, sex-specific optima mean that the same allele can have sexually antagonistic expression, i.e. beneficial in one sex and detrimental in the other, a phenomenon known as intralocus sexual conflict. Intralocus sexual conflict is emerging as a potentially fundamental factor for the genetic architecture of fitness, with important consequences for evolutionary processes. However, no study to date has directly experimentally tested the evolutionary fate of a sexually antagonistic allele. Using genetic constructs to manipulate female fecundity and male mating success, we engineered a novel sexually antagonistic allele (SAA in Drosophila melanogaster. The SAA is nearly twice as costly to females as it is beneficial to males, but the harmful effects to females are recessive and X-linked, and thus are rarely expressed when SAA occurs at low frequency. We experimentally show how the evolutionary dynamics of the novel SAA are qualitatively consistent with the predictions of population genetic models: SAA frequency decreases when common, but increases when rare, converging toward an equilibrium frequency of ∼8%. Furthermore, we show that persistence of the SAA requires the mating advantage it provides to males: the SAA frequency declines towards extinction when the male advantage is experimentally abolished. Our results empirically demonstrate the dynamics underlying the evolutionary fate of a sexually antagonistic allele, validating a central assumption of intralocus sexual conflict theory: that variation in fitness-related traits within populations can be maintained via sex-linked sexually antagonistic loci.

  8. MDM2 Antagonists Counteract Drug-Induced DNA Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna E. Vilgelm

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Antagonists of MDM2-p53 interaction are emerging anti-cancer drugs utilized in clinical trials for malignancies that rarely mutate p53, including melanoma. We discovered that MDM2-p53 antagonists protect DNA from drug-induced damage in melanoma cells and patient-derived xenografts. Among the tested DNA damaging drugs were various inhibitors of Aurora and Polo-like mitotic kinases, as well as traditional chemotherapy. Mitotic kinase inhibition causes mitotic slippage, DNA re-replication, and polyploidy. Here we show that re-replication of the polyploid genome generates replicative stress which leads to DNA damage. MDM2-p53 antagonists relieve replicative stress via the p53-dependent activation of p21 which inhibits DNA replication. Loss of p21 promoted drug-induced DNA damage in melanoma cells and enhanced anti-tumor activity of therapy combining MDM2 antagonist with mitotic kinase inhibitor in mice. In summary, MDM2 antagonists may reduce DNA damaging effects of anti-cancer drugs if they are administered together, while targeting p21 can improve the efficacy of such combinations.

  9. Simple sensitive radioreceptor assay for calcium antagonist drugs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gould, R.J.; Murphy, K.M.M.; Snyder, S.H.

    1983-12-26

    A radioreceptor assay for calcium channel antagonist drugs described here is based on the ability of these drugs to affect /sup 3/H-nitrendipine binding to calcium channels. All the known calcium channel antagonists may be assayed in this manner. The assay can detect 10-100 nM nimodipine, 10-100 nM nifedipine, 3-30 ..mu..M prenylamine, 0.1 - 1.0 ..mu..M verapamil and 3-30 ..mu..M diltiazem. These values cover the range of concentrations of calcium channel antagonists that are clinically important. As the radioreceptor assay detects active metabolites as well as the parent drugs, it should prove a useful adjunct in cardiovascular therapy. The method is more reproducible, simpler and less expensive than other methods such as high pressure liquid chromatography.

  10. First Irish birth following IVF therapy using antagonist protocol.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mocanu, E V

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: During in vitro fertilization (IVF), the prevention of a premature LH surge was traditionally achieved using a gonadotrophin releasing hormone agonist (GnRH-a), and more recently, a GnRH antagonist. AIMS: We report a case of a 37 year old treated using the GnRH antagonist in a second completed cycle of IVF. METHODS: IVF was performed for primary infertility of 5-year duration due to frozen pelvis secondary to endometriosis. RESULTS: Following controlled ovarian hyperstimulation, oocyte recovery and fertilization, cleavage and transfer of two zygotes, a pregnancy established. A twin gestation was diagnosed at 7-weeks scan and pregnancy ended with the delivery of twin girls by emergency caesarean section. CONCLUSION: This is a first report of a delivery following IVF using the antagonist protocol in Ireland. Such therapy is patient friendly and its use should be introduced on a larger scale in clinical practice.

  11. Histamine H4 receptor antagonists: the new antihistamines?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung-Leung, Wai-Ping; Thurmond, Robin L; Ling, Ping; Karlsson, Lars

    2004-11-01

    Antihistamines (histamine H1 receptor antagonists) are a mainstay treatment for atopic allergy, yet they are only partially effective in relieving the symptoms of the disease. They also have very limited value for the treatment of asthma, despite the well-characterized bronchoconstrictory effects of histamine. The recent discovery of a fourth histamine receptor (H4), and the realization that it is exclusively expressed on hematopoietic cell types that are most implicated in the development and symptomatology of allergy and asthma, suggests that pharmacological targeting of the H4 receptor, either alone or in combination with H1 receptor antagonists, may prove useful for treating both allergy and asthma. Here we review the known biology associated with the H4 receptor, as well the effects of a highly selective H1 receptor antagonist.

  12. ANTAGONISTIC BACTERIA AGAINST SCHIZOPHYLLUM COMMUNE FR. IN PENINSULAR MALAYSIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANTARJO DIKIN

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Schizophyllum commune Fr., is one of the important fungi, causes brown germ and seed rot of oil palm. Biodiversity of antagonistic bacteria from oil palm plantations in Peninsular Malaysia is expected to support in development of biopesticide. Isolation with liquid assay and screening antagonistic bacteria using dual culture assay were carried out in the bioexploration. A total of 265 bacterial isolates from plant parts of oil palm screened 52 antagonistic bacterial isolates against 5. commune. Bacterial isolates were identified by using Biolog* Identification System i.e. Bacillus macroccanus, B. thermoglucosidasius, Burkholderia cepacia, B. gladioli, B. multivorans, B pyrrocinia, B. spinosa, Corynebacterium agropyri, C. misitidis, Enterobacter aerogenes, Microbacterium testaceum, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, P. citronellolis, Rhodococcus rhodochrous, Serratia ficaria, Serratia sp., S. marcescens, Staphylococcus sciuri, Sternotrophomonas maltophilia.

  13. Clinical Development of Histamine H4 Receptor Antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurmond, Robin L; Venable, Jennifer; Savall, Brad; La, David; Snook, Sandra; Dunford, Paul J; Edwards, James P

    2017-01-01

    The discovery of the histamine H4 receptor (H4R) provided a new avenue for the exploration of the physiological role of histamine, as well as providing a new drug target for the development of novel antihistamines. The first step in this process was the identification of selective antagonists to help unravel the pharmacology of the H4R relative to other histamine receptors. The discovery of the selective H4R antagonist JNJ 7777120 was vital for showing a role for the H4R in inflammation and pruritus. While this compound has been very successful as a tool for understanding the function of the receptor, it has drawbacks, including a short in vivo half-life and hypoadrenocorticism toxicity in rats and dogs, that prevented advancing it into clinical studies. Further research let to the discovery of JNJ 39758979, which, similar to JNJ 7777120, was a potent and selective H4R antagonist and showed anti-inflammatory and anti-pruritic activity preclinically. JNJ 39758979 advanced into human clinical studies and showed efficacy in reducing experimental pruritus and in patients with atopic dermatitis. However, development of this compound was terminated due to the occurrence of drug-induced agranulocytosis. This was overcome by developing another H4R antagonist with a different chemical structure, toreforant, that does not appear to have this side effect. Toreforant has been tested in clinical studies in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, asthma, or psoriasis. In conclusions there have been many H4R antagonists reported in the literature, but only a few have been studied in humans underscoring the difficulty in finding ligands with all of the properties necessary for testing in the clinic. Nevertheless, the clinical data to date suggests that H4R antagonists can be beneficial in treating atopic dermatitis and pruritus.

  14. Hyperglycemia of Diabetic Rats Decreased by a Glucagon Receptor Antagonist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, David G.; Ulichny Goebel, Camy; Hruby, Victor J.; Bregman, Marvin D.; Trivedi, Dev

    1982-02-01

    The glucagon analog [l-Nα-trinitrophenylhistidine, 12-homoarginine]-glucagon (THG) was examined for its ability to lower blood glucose concentrations in rats made diabetic with streptozotocin. In vitro, THG is a potent antagonist of glucagon activation of the hepatic adenylate cyclase assay system. Intravenous bolus injections of THG caused rapid decreases (20 to 35 percent) of short duration in blood glucose. Continuous infusion of low concentrations of the inhibitor led to larger sustained decreases in blood glucose (30 to 65 percent). These studies demonstrate that a glucagon receptor antagonist can substantially reduce blood glucose levels in diabetic animals without addition of exogenous insulin.

  15. Novel thioamide derivatives as neutral CB1 receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boström, Jonas; Olsson, Roine I; Tholander, Joakim; Greasley, Peter J; Ryberg, Erik; Nordberg, Henrik; Hjorth, Stephan; Cheng, Leifeng

    2010-01-15

    A novel class of cannabinoid-1 (CB1) receptor antagonists for the treatment of obesity is presented. The carboxamide linker in a set of 5,6-diaryl-pyrazine-2-amide derivatives was transformed into the corresponding thioamide, by using a one-pot synthesis. The structural series of thioamides not only showed retained CB1 potency (below 10nM), but also showed improved solubility. In addition, the neutral antagonist 2c significantly reduced body weight in cafeteria diet obese mice. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Growth suppression activity of bradykinin antagonists in glioma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avdieiev S. S.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was Aimed at analyzing the effect of bradykinin (BK antagonists on proliferation of the human glioblastoma cells U373. Methods. MTT-based cell proliferation assay. Results. BKM-570 revealed a significant antiproliferative activity in the U373 cells with LC50 3,8 M. Conclusions. The antiproliferative properties of BK antagonists were shown in vitro using the glioma cells. Further investigations of the molecular mechanisms of their action and pre-clinical studies on animal models are needed for the evaluation of these compounds as new anti-cancer drugs.

  17. Interleukin-1-receptor antagonist in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Claus M; Faulenbach, Mirjam; Vaag, Allan

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The expression of interleukin-1-receptor antagonist is reduced in pancreatic islets of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, and high glucose concentrations induce the production of interleukin-1beta in human pancreatic beta cells, leading to impaired insulin secretion, decreased cell...... proliferation, and apoptosis. METHODS: In this double-blind, parallel-group trial involving 70 patients with type 2 diabetes, we randomly assigned 34 patients to receive 100 mg of anakinra (a recombinant human interleukin-1-receptor antagonist) subcutaneously once daily for 13 weeks and 36 patients to receive...

  18. The Effect of Antagonist Muscle Sensory Input on Force Regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanya Onushko

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to understand how stretch-related sensory feedback from an antagonist muscle affects agonist muscle output at different contraction levels in healthy adults. Ten young (25.3 ± 2.4 years, healthy subjects performed constant isometric knee flexion contractions (agonist at 6 torque levels: 5%, 10%, 15%, 20%, 30%, and 40% of their maximal voluntary contraction. For half of the trials, subjects received patellar tendon taps (antagonist sensory feedback during the contraction. We compared error in targeted knee flexion torque and hamstring muscle activity, with and without patellar tendon tapping, across the 6 torque levels. At lower torque levels (5%, 10%, and 15%, subjects produced greater knee torque error following tendon tapping compared with the same torque levels without tendon tapping. In contrast, we did not find any difference in torque output at higher target levels (20%, 30%, and 40% between trials with and without tendon tapping. We also observed a load-dependent increase in the magnitude of agonist muscle activity after tendon taps, with no associated load-dependent increase in agonist and antagonist co-activation, or reflex inhibition from the antagonist tapping. The findings suggest that at relatively low muscle activity there is a deficiency in the ability to correct motor output after sensory disturbances, and cortical centers (versus sub-cortical are likely involved.

  19. Antagonistic activity of selected strains of Bacillus thuringiensis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this work was to determine, in vitro, the antagonistic effectiveness of 60 strains of Bacillus thuringiensis against damping-off and root and stem rot caused by Rhizoctonia solani. The strains were obtained from the International Collection of Entomopathogenic Bacillus at the FCB-UANL. During the in vitro dual ...

  20. Antagonistic potential of fluorescent Pseudomonas and its impact on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study focused on the antagonistic potential of fluorescent Pseudomonas in vitro, and its inoculation effect on growth performance of Lycopersicon esculentum in Fusarium oxysporum and Rhizoctonia solani infested soil. Biochemical characteristics of fluorescent Pseudomonas showed that all ten isolates were positive ...

  1. Manumycin from a new Streptomyces strain shows antagonistic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Manumycin from a new Streptomyces strain shows antagonistic effect against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)/vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) strains from Korean Hospitals. Yun Hee Choi, Seung Sik Cho, Jaya Ram Simkhada, Chi Nam Seong, Hyo Jeong Lee, Hong Seop Moon, Jin Cheol Yoo ...

  2. Voltage-Gated Calcium Channel Antagonists and Traumatic Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce Lyeth

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI is a leading cause of death and disability in the United States. Despite more than 30 years of research, no pharmacological agents have been identified that improve neurological function following TBI. However, several lines of research described in this review provide support for further development of voltage gated calcium channel (VGCC antagonists as potential therapeutic agents. Following TBI, neurons and astrocytes experience a rapid and sometimes enduring increase in intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i. These fluxes in [Ca2+]i drive not only apoptotic and necrotic cell death, but also can lead to long-term cell dysfunction in surviving cells. In a limited number of in vitro experiments, both L-type and N-type VGCC antagonists successfully reduced calcium loads as well as neuronal and astrocytic cell death following mechanical injury. In rodent models of TBI, administration of VGCC antagonists reduced cell death and improved cognitive function. It is clear that there is a critical need to find effective therapeutics and rational drug delivery strategies for the management and treatment of TBI, and we believe that further investigation of VGCC antagonists should be pursued before ruling out the possibility of successful translation to the clinic.

  3. The Effect of Sympathetic Antagonists on the Antidepressant Action ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The interaction of three sympathetic receptor antagonists with benzodiazepines, which may impact the clinical use of alprazolam, was also studied. Behavioral despair was examined in six groups of albino mice. Drugs were administered intraperitoneally. The control group received only a single dose of 1% Tween 80.

  4. Bronchoprotection with a leukotriene receptor antagonist in asthmatic preschool children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, H; Nielsen, K G

    2000-01-01

    We hypothesized that a leukotriene receptor antagonist (LTRA) could provide bronchoprotection against the cold, dry air-induced response in asthmatic preschool children. In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study, we examined the effect of the specific LTRA montelukast at 5...

  5. Effects of calcium antagonists on hypertension and diastolic function ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Calcium antagonists are known to decrease blood pressure acutely and chronically in hypertensive patients with hypertensive heart disease, and also to improve their systolic function. However, disorders of diastolic function may occur early in hypertensive heart disease. The improvement of diastolic function by nifedipine ...

  6. Enhanced Chronic Pain Management Utilizing Chemokine Receptor Antagonists

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    treatment; Analgesia; Nociception; Antinociception; Inflammation; Chemokines; Chemokine receptor antagonists; Opioid analgesics; Animal models of pain...processes), affect the ability of opioid drugs to counteract pain. We predicted that one way of increasing the effectiveness of the pain-relieving...more chemokine receptors would not only diminish various types of pain, but could also increase the efficacy of given doses of opioid analgesics. Thus

  7. Role of muscarinic receptor antagonists in urgency and nocturia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michel, Martin C.; de La Rosette, Jean J. M. C. H.

    2005-01-01

    The overactive bladder (OAB) syndrome is defined as urgency, with or without urgency incontinence, usually accompanied by frequency and nocturia. Muscarinic receptor antagonists are the most established form of treatment for OAB, but until recently their effectiveness was only confirmed for symptoms

  8. Izalpinin from fruits of Alpinia oxyphylla with antagonistic activity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusions: Izalpinin exhibits inhibitory role of muscarinic receptor-related detrusor contractile activity, and it may be a promising lead compound to treat overactive bladder. Keywords: Izalpinin, rat bladder, muscarinic receptor, antagonistic action. Abbreviations: DMSO, dimethyl sulfoxide; pEC50, potency Negative ...

  9. Antagonistic peptide technology for functional dissection of CLE peptides revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czyzewicz, Nathan; Wildhagen, Mari; Cattaneo, Pietro; Stahl, Yvonne; Pinto, Karine Gustavo; Aalen, Reidunn B; Butenko, Melinka A; Simon, Rüdiger; Hardtke, Christian S; De Smet, Ive

    2015-08-01

    In the Arabidopsis thaliana genome, over 1000 putative genes encoding small, presumably secreted, signalling peptides can be recognized. However, a major obstacle in identifying the function of genes encoding small signalling peptides is the limited number of available loss-of-function mutants. To overcome this, a promising new tool, antagonistic peptide technology, was recently developed. Here, this antagonistic peptide technology was tested on selected CLE peptides and the related IDA peptide and its usefulness in the context of studies of peptide function discussed. Based on the analyses, it was concluded that the antagonistic peptide approach is not the ultimate means to overcome redundancy or lack of loss-of-function lines. However, information collected using antagonistic peptide approaches (in the broad sense) can be very useful, but these approaches do not work in all cases and require a deep insight on the interaction between the ligand and its receptor to be successful. This, as well as peptide ligand structure considerations, should be taken into account before ordering a wide range of synthetic peptide variants and/or generating transgenic plants. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  10. The Effect of Sympathetic Antagonists on the Antidepressant Action ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Alprazolam is an anti-anxiety drug shown to be effective in the treatment of depression. In this study, the effect of sympathetic receptor antagonists on alprazolam–induced antidepressant action was studied using a mouse model of forced swimming behavioral despair. The interaction of three sympathetic receptor ...

  11. Screening and Mechanism of Trapping Ligand Antagonist Peptide ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: The aim of the present study was to develop peptide H9 as an efficient antagonist of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) chemokine receptor US28. Methods: US28 gene was amplified from HCMV, and a stable expression system was constructed using NIH/3T3 cells. Interaction between peptide H9 and receptor ...

  12. Antagonistic bioactivity of endophytic strains isolated from Salvia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The antibiotic-producing potential of endophytic populations from medical plant of Salvia miltiorrhiza was examined. A total of 63 isolates was screened against five fungal and three bacterial species for the production of antimicrobial compounds. It showed that more isolates was antagonistic to fungi than to bacteria.

  13. Multiple sclerosis following treatment with a cannabinoid receptor-1 antagonist

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oosten, B. W.; Killestein, J.; Mathus-Vliegen, E. M. H.; Polman, C. H.

    2004-01-01

    Laboratory research including animal models of human disease suggests that cannabinoids might have therapeutic potential in multiple sclerosis (MS). We have recently seen a 46-year-old woman who developed MS after starting treatment with a cannabinoid receptor antagonist for obesity. The occurrence

  14. Calcium antagonists: a ready prescription for treating infectious diseases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Kevin B; Eisenstein, Edward M; Krahl, Scott E

    2013-01-01

    Emergence of new and medically resistant pathogenic microbes continues to escalate toward worldwide public health, wild habitat, and commercial crop and livestock catastrophes. Attempts at solving this problem with sophisticated modern biotechnologies, such as smart vaccines and microbicidal and microbistatic drugs that precisely target parasitic bacteria, fungi, and protozoa, remain promising without major clinical and industrial successes. However, discovery of a more immediate, broad spectrum prophylaxis beyond conventional epidemiological approaches might take no longer than the time required to fill a prescription at your neighborhood pharmacy. Findings from a growing body of research suggest calcium antagonists, long approved and marketed for various human cardiovascular and neurological indications, may produce safe, efficacious antimicrobial effects. As a general category of drugs, calcium antagonists include compounds that disrupt passage of Ca(2+) molecules across cell membranes and walls, sequestration and mobilization of free intracellular Ca(2+), and downstream binding proteins and sensors of Ca(2+)-dependent regulatory pathways important for proper cell function. Administration of calcium antagonists alone at current therapeutically relevant doses and schedules, or with synergistic compounds and additional antimicrobial medications, figures to enhance host immunoprotection by directly altering pathogen infection sequences, life cycles, homeostasis, antibiotic tolerances, and numerous other infective, survival, and reproductive processes. Short of being miracle drugs, calcium antagonists are welcome old drugs with new tricks capable of controlling some of the most virulent and pervasive global infectious diseases of plants, animals, and humans, including Chagas' disease, malaria, and tuberculosis.

  15. Evaluation of antagonistic fungi against charcoal rot of sunflower ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    virens on sclerotia of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum and a note on its host range. J. Phytopath., 116: 212-220. Rajappan K, Ramaraj B (1999). Evaluation of fungal and bacterial antagonists against Fusarium moniliforme causing wilt of cauliflower,. Ann. Plant Prot. Soc., 7(2): 205-207. Sharma PD (1996). Plant pathology. Rastogi ...

  16. Komplikationer til langtidsbehandling med vitamin K-antagonister

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    May, O; Garne, E; Mickley, H

    1990-01-01

    Long-term treatment with vitamin K antagonists (vKA) frequently involves complications. The commonest complication is haemorrhage and cases of serious haemorrhage are stated in the literature to occur with a frequency per 1,000 treatment years of 12-108, of which 2-17 are fatal. The majority...

  17. Diversity, distribution, and antagonistic activities of rhizobacteria of Panax notoginseng

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ze-Yan Fan

    2016-04-01

    Conclusion: The results suggest that diverse bacteria exist in the P. notoginseng rhizosphere soil, with differences in community in the same field, and antagonistic isolates may be good potential biological control agent for the notoginseng root-rot diseases caused by F. oxysporum, Fusarium solani, and Panax herbarum.

  18. Characterization of a novel non-steroidal glucocorticoid receptor antagonist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Qun-Yi; Zhang, Meng [The National Center for Drug Screening, Shanghai (China); State Key Laboratory of Drug Research, Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai (China); Hallis, Tina M.; DeRosier, Therese A. [Cell Systems Division, Invitrogen, Madison, WI (United States); Yue, Jian-Min; Ye, Yang [State Key Laboratory of Drug Research, Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai (China); Mais, Dale E. [The National Center for Drug Screening, Shanghai (China); MPI Research, Mattawan, MI (United States); Wang, Ming-Wei, E-mail: wangmw@mail.shcnc.ac.cn [The National Center for Drug Screening, Shanghai (China); State Key Laboratory of Drug Research, Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai (China)

    2010-01-15

    Selective antagonists of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) are desirable for the treatment of hypercortisolemia associated with Cushing's syndrome, psychic depression, obesity, diabetes, neurodegenerative diseases, and glaucoma. NC3327, a non-steroidal small molecule with potent binding affinity to GR (K{sub i} = 13.2 nM), was identified in a high-throughput screening effort. As a full GR antagonist, NC3327 greatly inhibits the dexamethasone (Dex) induction of marker genes involved in hepatic gluconeogenesis, but has a minimal effect on matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9), a GR responsive pro-inflammatory gene. Interestingly, the compound recruits neither coactivators nor corepressors to the GR complex but competes with glucocorticoids for the interaction between GR and a coactivator peptide. Moreover, NC3327 does not trigger GR nuclear translocation, but significantly blocks Dex-induced GR transportation to the nucleus, and thus appears to be a 'competitive' GR antagonist. Therefore, the non-steroidal compound, NC3327, may represent a new class of GR antagonists as potential therapeutics for a variety of cortisol-related endocrine disorders.

  19. Antagonistic dielectric elastomer actuator for biologically-inspired robotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conn, Andrew T.; Rossiter, Jonathan

    2011-04-01

    For optimal performance, actuators designed for biologically-inspired robotics applications need to be capable of mimicking the key characteristics of natural musculoskeletal systems. These characteristics include a large output stroke, high energy density, antagonistic operation and passive compliance. The actuation properties of dielectric elastomer actuators (DEAs) make them viable for use as an artificial muscle technology. However, much like the musculoskeletal system, rigid structures are needed to couple the compliant DEA layers to a load. In this paper, a cone DEA design is developed as an antagonistic, multi-DOF actuator, viable for a variety for biologically-inspired robotics applications. The design has the advantage of maintaining pre-strain through a support structure without substantially lowering the overall mass-specific power density. Prototype cone DEAs have been fabricated with VHB 4910 acrylic elastomer and have characteristic dimensions of 49mm (strut length) and 60mm (DEA diameter). Multi-DOF kinematical outputs of the cone DEAs were measured using a custom 3D motion tracking system. Experimental tests of the prototypes demonstrate antagonistic linear (+/-10mm), rotational (+/-25°) and combined multi-DOF strokes. Overall, antagonistic cone DEAs are shown to produce a complex multi-DOF output from a mass-efficient support structure and thus are well suited for being exploited in biologically-inspired robotics.

  20. Antagonistic bioactivity of an endophytic bacterium H-6

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GREGORY

    2010-09-13

    Sep 13, 2010 ... lower compared to P. capsici-inoculated and H-6-treated plants, which is an added advantage of the strain used as potential biocontrol agent in future. Key words: Endophytic bacterium, 16S rDNA gene, antagonistic activity, Huperzia serrata. INTRODUCTION. Soil-borne diseases are a serious concern in ...

  1. Risk for molars without antagonists: opinion of dental practitioners in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: The great majority of practitioners (92%) believed that unopposed molars overerupt markedly and majority (87%) recommends replacement of the missing antagonist with partial dentures while 13% preferred to wait and see. The main reasons for the suggested treatment were (1) to prevent overeruption of ...

  2. Antagonistic bioactivity of an endophytic bacterium H-6

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GREGORY

    2010-09-13

    Sep 13, 2010 ... growth in vitro of 6 plant pathogenic fungi, especially of Phytophthora capsici, Fusarium graminearumt ... Key words: Endophytic bacterium, 16S rDNA gene, antagonistic activity, Huperzia serrata. ..... Biological control of Phytophthora blight in red pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) using Bacillus subtilis.

  3. Gonadotrophin-releasing hormone antagonists for assisted reproductive technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Inany, Hesham G; Youssef, Mohamed Afm; Aboulghar, Mohamed; Broekmans, Frank; Sterrenburg, Monique; Smit, Janine; Abou-Setta, Ahmed M

    2011-05-11

    Gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonists can be used to prevent a luteinizing hormone (LH) surge during controlled ovarian hyperstimulation (COH) without the hypo-estrogenic side-effects, flare-up, or long down-regulation period associated with agonists. The antagonists directly and rapidly inhibit gonadotropin release within several hours through competitive binding to pituitary GnRH receptors. This property allows their use at any time during the follicular phase. Several different regimes have been described including multiple-dose fixed (0.25 mg daily from day six to seven of stimulation), multiple-dose flexible (0.25 mg daily when leading follicle is 14 to 15 mm), and single-dose (single administration of 3 mg on day 7 to 8 of stimulation) protocols, with or without the addition of an oral contraceptive pill. Further, women receiving antagonists have been shown to have a lower incidence of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS). Assuming comparable clinical outcomes for the antagonist and agonist protocols, these benefits would justify a change from the standard long agonist protocol to antagonist regimens. This is an update of a Cochrane review first published in 2001, and previously updated in 2006. To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonists with the standard long protocol of GnRH agonists for controlled ovarian hyperstimulation in assisted conception cycle We performed electronic searches of major databases, for example Cochrane Menstrual Disorders and Subfertility Group Specialised Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE (from 1987 to April 2010); and handsearched bibliographies of relevant publications and reviews, and abstracts of major scientific meetings, for example the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology (ESHRE) and American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM). A date limited search of Cochrane Menstrual Disorders and Subfertility Group Specialised Register, CENTRAL

  4. Shifting to a non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulation agent from vitamin K antagonist in atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fosbøl, Emil L; Vinding, Naja Emborg; Lamberts, Morten

    2017-01-01

    Aims: After non-vitamin K antagonist (VKA) oral anticoagulation agents (NOAC) have been approved for thrombo-embolic prophylaxis in non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF), utilization of oral anticoagulants (OAC) in NVAF has changed. Contemporary shifting from a VKA to a NOAC (dabigatran...

  5. Evolutionary Conservation and Diversification of the Translation Initiation Apparatus in Trypanosomatids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Zinoviev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosomatids are ancient eukaryotic parasites that migrate between insect vectors and mammalian hosts, causing a range of diseases in humans and domestic animals. Trypanosomatids feature a multitude of unusual molecular features, including polycistronic transcription and subsequent processing by trans-splicing and polyadenylation. Regulation of protein coding genes is posttranscriptional and thus, translation regulation is fundamental for activating the developmental program of gene expression. The spliced-leader RNA is attached to all mRNAs. It contains an unusual hypermethylated cap-4 structure in its 5 end. The cap-binding complex, eIF4F, has gone through evolutionary changes in accordance with the requirement to bind cap-4. The eIF4F components in trypanosomatids are highly diverged from their orthologs in higher eukaryotes, and their potential functions are discussed. The cap-binding activity in all eukaryotes is a target for regulation and plays a similar role in trypanosomatids. Recent studies revealed a novel eIF4E-interacting protein, involved in directing stage-specific and stress-induced translation pathways. Translation regulation during stress also follows unusual regulatory cues, as the increased translation of Hsp83 following heat stress is driven by a defined element in the 3 UTR, unlike higher eukaryotes. Overall, the environmental switches experienced by trypanosomatids during their life cycle seem to affect their translational machinery in unique ways.

  6. Oral mineralocorticoid antagonists for recalcitrant central serous chorioretinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin EK

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Eric K Chin, David RP Almeida, C Nathaniel Roybal, Philip I Niles, Karen M Gehrs, Elliott H Sohn, H Culver Boldt, Stephen R Russell, James C FolkDepartment of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USAPurpose: To evaluate the effect and tolerance of oral mineralocorticoid antagonists, eplerenone and/or spironolactone, in recalcitrant central serous chorioretinopathy.Methods: Retrospective consecutive observational case series. Primary outcome measures included central macular thickness (CMT, µm, macular volume (MV, mm3, Snellen visual acuity, and prior treatment failures. Secondary outcomes included duration of treatment, treatment dosage, and systemic side effects.Results: A total of 120 patients with central serous chorioretinopathy were reviewed, of which 29 patients were treated with one or more mineralocorticoid antagonists. The average age of patients was 58.4 years. Sixteen patients (69.6% were recalcitrant to other interventions prior to treatment with oral mineralocorticoid antagonists, with an average washout period of 15.3 months. The average duration of mineralocorticoid antagonist treatment was 3.9±2.3 months. Twelve patients (52.2% showed decreased CMT and MV, six patients (26.1% had increase in both, and five patients (21.7% had negligible changes. The mean decrease in CMT of all patients was 42.4 µm (range, -136 to 255 µm: 100.7 µm among treatment-naïve patients, and 16.9 µm among recalcitrant patients. The mean decrease in MV of all patients was 0.20 mm3 (range, -2.33 to 2.90 mm3: 0.6 mm3 among treatment-naïve patients, and 0.0 mm3 among recalcitrant patients. Median visual acuity at the start of therapy was 20/30 (range, 20/20–20/250, and at final follow-up it was 20/40 (range, 20/20–20/125. Nine patients (39.1% experienced systemic side effects, of which three patients (13.0% were unable to continue therapy.Conclusion: Mineralocorticoid antagonist treatment had a positive treatment

  7. Pituitary sensitizing effect of GnRH antagonists: a mechanism explaining LH escape during IVF?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Banga, F.R.; Huirne, J.A.F.; Korsen, T.; Homburg, R.R.; Hompes, P.G.A.; Lambalk, C.B.

    2010-01-01

    Background GnRH antagonists have been introduced to induce persistent LH suppression. Many studies show a gradual increase of LH levels after several days of GnRH antagonist administration, the so-called escape or rebound effect. We hypothesize that, under chronic GnRH antagonist administration, a

  8. Tactical Approaches to Interconverting GPCR Agonists and Antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dosa, Peter I; Amin, Elizabeth Ambrose

    2016-02-11

    There are many reported examples of small structural modifications to GPCR-targeted ligands leading to major changes in their functional activity, converting agonists into antagonists or vice versa. These shifts in functional activity are often accompanied by negligible changes in binding affinity. The current perspective focuses on outlining and analyzing various approaches that have been used to interconvert GPCR agonists, partial agonists, and antagonists in order to achieve the intended functional activity at a GPCR of therapeutic interest. An improved understanding of specific structural modifications that are likely to alter the functional activity of a GPCR ligand may be of use to researchers designing GPCR-targeted drugs and/or probe compounds, specifically in cases where a particular ligand exhibits good potency but not the preferred functional activity at the GPCR of choice.

  9. Antagonistic Coevolution of Marine Planktonic Viruses and Their Hosts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martiny, Jennifer B. H.; Riemann, Lasse; Marston, Marcia F.; Middelboe, Mathias

    2014-01-01

    The potential for antagonistic coevolution between marine viruses and their (primarily bacterial) hosts is well documented, but our understanding of the consequences of this rapid evolution is in its infancy. Acquisition of resistance against co-occurring viruses and the subsequent evolution of virus host range in response have implications for bacterial mortality rates as well as for community composition and diversity. Drawing on examples from a range of environments, we consider the potential dynamics, underlying genetic mechanisms and fitness costs, and ecological impacts of virus-host coevolution in marine waters. Given that much of our knowledge is derived from laboratory experiments, we also discuss potential challenges and approaches in scaling up to diverse, complex networks of virus-host interactions. Finally, we note that a variety of novel approaches for characterizing virus-host interactions offer new hope for a mechanistic understanding of antagonistic coevolution in marine plankton.

  10. Are peripheral opioid antagonists the solution to opioid side effects?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bates, John J

    2012-02-03

    Opioid medication is the mainstay of therapy for severe acute and chronic pain. Unfortunately, the side effects of these medications can affect patient comfort and safety, thus limiting their proven therapeutic potential. Whereas the main analgesic effects of opioids are centrally mediated, many of the common side effects are mediated via peripheral receptors. Novel peripheral opioid antagonists have been recently introduced that can block the peripheral actions of opioids without affecting centrally mediated analgesia. We review the clinical and experimental evidence of their efficacy in ameliorating opioid side effects and consider what further information might be useful in defining their role. IMPLICATIONS: The major analgesic effects of opioid medication are mediated within the brain and spinal cord. Many of the side effects of opioids are caused by activation of receptors outside these areas. Recently developed peripherally restricted opioid antagonists have the ability to block many opioid side effects without affecting analgesia.

  11. Potential Clinical Implications of the Urotensin II Receptor Antagonists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilie Kane

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Urotensin-II (UII, which binds to its receptor UT, plays an important role in the heart, kidneys, pancreas, adrenal gland and CNS. In the vasculature, it acts as a potent endothelium-independent vasoconstrictor and endothelium-dependent vasodilator. In disease states, this constriction-dilation equilibrium is disrupted. There is an upregulation of the UII system in heart disease, metabolic syndrome and kidney failure. The increase in UII release and UT expression suggest that UII system may be implicated in the pathology and pathogenesis of these diseases by causing an increase in ACAT-1 activity leading to SMC proliferation and foam cell infiltration, insulin resistance (DMII, as well as inflammation, high blood pressure and plaque formation. Recently, UT antagonists such as SB-611812, palosuran, and most recently a piperazino-isoindolinone based antagonist have been developed in the hope of better understanding the UII system and treating its associated diseases.

  12. Non-imidazole histamine NO-donor H3-antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosco, Paolo; Bertinaria, Massimo; Di Stilo, Antonella; Cena, Clara; Fruttero, Roberta; Gasco, Alberto

    2005-01-01

    Recently a series of H3-antagonists related to Imoproxifan was realised (I); in these products the oxime substructure of the lead was constrained in NO-donor furoxan systems and in the corresponding furazan derivatives. In this paper, a new series of compounds derived from I by substituting the imidazole ring with the ethoxycarbonylpiperazino moiety present in the non-imidazole H3-ligand A-923 is described. For all the products synthesis and preliminary pharmacological characterisation, as well as their hydrophilic-lipophilic balance, are reported. The imidazole ring replacement generally results in a decreased H3-antagonist activity with respect to the analogues of series I and, in some cases, induces relaxing effects on the electrically contracted guinea-pig ileum, probably due to increased affinity for other receptor systems.

  13. Spectrofluorimetric method for determination of some angiotensin II receptor antagonists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salwa R. El-Shaboury

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available A simple, rapid, accurate and highly sensitive spectrofluorimetric method has been developed for determination of some angiotensin II receptor antagonists (AIIRA's, namely Losartan potassium (Los-K, Irbesartan (Irb, Valsartan (Val and Candesartan cilexetil (Cand in pure forms as well as in their pharmaceutical dosage forms. All the variables affecting the relative fluorescence intensity (RFI were studied and optimized. Under the optimum conditions, linear relationships with good correlation coefficients (0.9982–0.9991 were obtained over the concentration range from 0.006 μg/mL to 1.7 μg/mL. Good accuracy and precision were successfully obtained for the analysis of tablets containing each drug alone or combined with hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ without interferences from the co-formulated HCTZ or the additives commonly present in tablets. Keywords: Angiotensin II receptor antagonists, Spectrofluorimetry, Determination

  14. Construction, purification, and characterization of a chimeric TH1 antagonist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier-González Luís

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background TH1 immune response antagonism is a desirable approach to mitigate some autoimmune and inflammatory reactions during the course of several diseases where IL-2 and IFN-γ are two central players. Therefore, the neutralization of both cytokines could provide beneficial effects in patients suffering from autoimmune or inflammatory illnesses. Results A chimeric antagonist that can antagonize the action of TH1 immunity mediators, IFN-γ and IL-2, was designed, engineered, expressed in E. coli, purified and evaluated for its in vitro biological activities. The TH1 antagonist molecule consists of the extracellular region for the human IFNγ receptor chain 1 fused by a four-aminoacid linker peptide to human 60 N-terminal aminoacid residues of IL-2. The corresponding gene fragments were isolated by RT-PCR and cloned in the pTPV-1 vector. E. coli (W3110 strain was transformed with this vector. The chimeric protein was expressed at high level as inclusion bodies. The protein was partially purified by pelleting and washing. It was then solubilized with strong denaturant and finally refolded by gel filtration. In vitro biological activity of chimera was demonstrated by inhibition of IFN-γ-dependent HLA-DR expression in Colo 205 cells, inhibition of IFN-γ antiproliferative effect on HEp-2 cells, and by a bidirectional effect in assays for IL-2 T-cell dependent proliferation: agonism in the absence versus inhibition in the presence of IL-2. Conclusion TH1 antagonist is a chimeric protein that inhibits the in vitro biological activities of human IFN-γ, and is a partial agonist/antagonist of human IL-2. With these attributes, the chimera has the potential to offer a new opportunity for the treatment of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases.

  15. Topics in clinical pharmacology: flumazenil, a benzodiazepine antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longmire, A W; Seger, D L

    1993-07-01

    Flumazenil is a central antagonist of the sedative effects of benzodiazepines. It has been used to reverse benzodiazepine effects in conscious sedation, general anesthesia, and overdose with restoration of alertness and psychomotor function within minutes of administration. Seizures have followed the use of flumazenil. Overdose patients who have co-ingested cyclic antidepressants are especially at risk for this complication. Flumazenil is administered intravenously in small, incremental doses.

  16. Calmodulin antagonists promote TRA-8 therapy of resistant pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Kaiyu; Yong, Sun; Xu, Fei; Zhou, Tong; McDonald, Jay M; Chen, Yabing

    2015-09-22

    Pancreatic cancer is highly malignant with limited therapy and a poor prognosis. TRAIL-activating therapy has been promising, however, clinical trials have shown resistance and limited responses of pancreatic cancers. We investigated the effects of calmodulin(CaM) antagonists, trifluoperazine(TFP) and tamoxifen(TMX), on TRA-8-induced apoptosis and tumorigenesis of TRA-8-resistant pancreatic cancer cells, and underlying mechanisms. TFP or TMX alone did not induce apoptosis of resistant PANC-1 cells, while they dose-dependently enhanced TRA-8-induced apoptosis. TMX treatment enhanced efficacy of TRA-8 therapy on tumorigenesis in vivo. Analysis of TRA-8-induced death-inducing-signaling-complex (DISC) identified recruitment of survival signals, CaM/Src, into DR5-associated DISC, which was inhibited by TMX/TFP. In contrast, TMX/TFP increased TRA-8-induced DISC recruitment/activation of caspase-8. Consistently, caspase-8 inhibition blocked the effects of TFP/TMX on TRA-8-induced apoptosis. Moreover, TFP/TMX induced DR5 expression. With a series of deletion/point mutants, we identified CaM antagonist-responsive region in the putative Sp1-binding domain between -295 to -300 base pairs of DR5 gene. Altogether, we have demonstrated that CaM antagonists enhance TRA-8-induced apoptosis of TRA-8-resistant pancreatic cancer cells by increasing DR5 expression and enhancing recruitment of apoptotic signal while decreasing survival signals in DR5-associated DISC. Our studies support the use of these readily available CaM antagonists combined with TRAIL-activating agents for pancreatic cancer therapy.

  17. Histamine-2 receptor antagonists as immunomodulators: new therapeutic views?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Jørgen

    1996-01-01

    Considerable evidence has emerged to suggest that histamine participates in the regulation of the inflammatory response, immune reaction, coagulation cascade, and cardiovascular function. Furthermore, histamine may play a major role in the growth of normal and malignant tissue as a regulator of p...... antagonists as adjuvant single drugs to reduce trauma-, blood transfusion- and sepsis-induced immunosuppression has led to research in combined treatment regimens in major surgery, particularly, of patients operated on for malignant diseases....

  18. Novel CXCR3 antagonists with a piperazinyl-piperidine core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuinness, Brian F; Carroll, Carolyn DiIanni; Zawacki, Lisa Guise; Dong, Guizhen; Yang, Cangming; Hobbs, Doug W; Jacob-Samuel, Biji; Hall, James W; Jenh, Chung-Her; Kozlowski, Joseph A; Anilkumar, Gopinadhan N; Rosenblum, Stuart B

    2009-09-01

    High-throughput screening of an encoded combinatorial aryl piperazine library led to the identification of a novel series of potent piperazinyl-piperidine based CXCR3 antagonists. Analogs of the initial hit were synthesized via solid and solution phase methods to probe the influence of structure on the CXCR3 binding of these molecules. Various functional groups were found to contribute to the overall potency and essential molecular features were identified.

  19. Correlated EMG Oscillations between Antagonists during Cocontraction in Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshitake, Yasuhide; Kanehisa, Hiroaki; Shinohara, Minoru

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the modulation of common low-frequency oscillations in pools of motor units across antagonistic muscles because of the difference in the activation level of pools of spinal motor neurons and the presence of neuromuscular fatigue during intended cocontraction. Ten healthy young men (21.8 ± 1.5 yr) performed intended steady cocontractions of elbow flexors and extensors at maximal and a submaximal (10% of maximal EMG) effort. The submaximal cocontraction was repeated after sustained maximal contraction of elbow flexors. Surface EMG was recorded from the biceps brachii and triceps brachii muscles. Correlated EMG oscillations between the antagonistic muscles were quantified by the cross-correlation function (CCF) using rectified EMG for the EMG for the 3- to 15-Hz bands. The positive CCF peak in rectified EMG EMG, a negative CCF peak (i.e., out-of-phase oscillations) during submaximal cocontraction was smaller compared with maximal cocontraction but increased after the sustained contraction. Across subjects, the degree of reduction in maximal EMG amplitude after the sustained contraction was correlated with the amount of change in the CCF peak in EMG oscillations between antagonistic muscles occur during intended cocontraction, and 2) the magnitude of these correlated oscillations increases with the activation level of pools of spinal motor neurons and neuromuscular fatigue.

  20. Non-genetic inheritance and the patterns of antagonistic coevolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostowy Rafal

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antagonistic species interactions can lead to coevolutionary genotype or phenotype frequency oscillations, with important implications for ecological and evolutionary processes. However, direct empirical evidence of such oscillations is rare. The rarity of observations is generally attributed to inherent difficulties of ecological and evolutionary long-term studies, to weak or absent interaction between species, or to the absence of negative frequency-dependence. Results Here, we show that another factor – non-genetic inheritance, mediated for example by epigenetic mechanisms – can completely eliminate oscillations in the presence of such negative frequency dependence, even if only a small fraction of offspring are affected. We analytically derive the threshold value of this fraction at which the dynamics change from oscillatory to stable, and investigate how selection, mutation and generation times differences between the two species affect the threshold value. These results strongly suggest that the lack of phenotype frequency oscillations should not be attributed to the lack of strong interactions between antagonistic species. Conclusions Given increasing evidence of non-genetic effects on the outcomes of antagonistic species interactions, we suggest that these effects should be incorporated into ecological and evolutionary models of interacting species.

  1. A selective imidazobenzodiazepine antagonist of ethanol in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzdak, P D; Glowa, J R; Crawley, J N; Schwartz, R D; Skolnick, P; Paul, S M

    1986-12-05

    Ethanol, at pharmacologically relevant concentrations of 20 to 100 mM, stimulates gamma-aminobutyric (GABA) receptor-mediated uptake of 36Cl-labeled chlorine into isolated brain vesicles. One drug that acts at GABA-benzodiazepine receptors, the imidazobenzodiazepine Ro15-4513, has been found to be a potent antagonist of ethanol-stimulated 36Cl- uptake into brain vesicles, but it fails to antagonize either pentobarbital- or muscimol-stimulated 36Cl- uptake. Pretreatment of rats with Ro15-4513 blocks the anticonflict activity of low doses of ethanol (but not pentobarbital) as well as the behavioral intoxication observed with higher doses of ethanol. The effects of Ro15-4513 in antagonizing ethanol-stimulated 36Cl- uptake and behavior are completely blocked by benzodiazepine receptor antagonists. However, other benzodiazepine receptor inverse agonists fail to antagonize the actions of ethanol in vitro or in vivo, suggesting a novel interaction of Ro15-4513 with the GABA receptor-coupled chloride ion channel complex. The identification of a selective benzodiazepine antagonist of ethanol-stimulated 36Cl- uptake in vitro that blocks the anxiolytic and intoxicating actions of ethanol suggests that many of the neuropharmacologic actions of ethanol may be mediated via central GABA receptors.

  2. Site-directed selection of oligonucleotide antagonists by competitive elution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridonneau, P; Chang, Y F; Buvoli, A V; O'Connell, D; Parma, D

    1999-02-01

    Oligonucleotide ligands that bind a protein or a small molecule of interest are readily isolated by in vitro selection and amplification of rare sequences from combinatorial libraries of sequence-randomized oligonucleotides (Gold et al., 1995). Classic systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) protocols are affinity based (Tuerk and Gold, 1990), but because many problems and applications require antagonists, protocols for selecting inhibitors are both desirable and valuable. A widely applicable approach for isolating inhibitors is competitive elution with a molecule that binds the targeted molecule's active or binding site. We have used this approach to isolate antagonists of wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) from a library of 2'NH2-pyrimidine, 2'OH-purine oligonucleotides by elution with N N' N"-triacetylchitotriose, (GlcNAc)3. The highest affinity aptamers have equilibrium dissociation constants of 1 nM-20 nM for WGA, a 10(3)-10(4)-fold improvement relative to (GlcNAc)3, and unlike the carbohydrate, are highly specific. In addition to competing for binding with (GlcNAc)3, aptamers inhibit WGA-mediated agglutination of sheep erythrocytes, demonstrating that they are able to compete with natural ligands presented on the surfaces of cells. These results illustrate the feasibility of isolating high-affinity, high-specificity antagonists by competitive elution with low molecular weight, relatively low-affinity, and low-specificity small molecules.

  3. Muscle agonist-antagonist interactions in an experimental joint model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorkovenko, Andrei V; Sawczyn, Stanislaw; Bulgakova, Natalia V; Jasczur-Nowicki, Jaroslaw; Mishchenko, Viktor S; Kostyukov, Alexander I

    2012-10-01

    The experiments presented here and performed in anaesthetized cats aimed at studying the dynamics of interactions between antagonist muscle groups. The tendons of triceps surae muscles of both hindlimbs were connected with an artificial joint (a pulley installed on a shaft). The muscles were activated by the distributed stimulation of five filaments of cut ventral roots L7-S1 on both sides of the spinal cord; movements were evoked by the rate-modulation of the stimulation trains. The study mostly compared programs of reciprocal activation and co-activation, including different changes in stimulation rates of muscle antagonists. The most common feature of the movements in both activation modes was hysteresis of the joint angle changes in dependence on stimulus rate. Reciprocal activation appeared suitable for a precise regulation of both amplitude and velocity of the movements in direction of the agonist shortening; maximal effectiveness was achieved during full switching off the antagonist stimulation at plateaus of the movement traces. The reverse movements during decrease of the agonist's stimulation rate demonstrated an explicit nonlinear form with pronounced initial phase of the joint angle fixation. The co-activation pattern distinctly reduced the hysteresis of joint movements and suppressed the stimulation after-effects, such as the lasting residual movements after fixation of the stimulation rates.

  4. Glutamate receptor antagonists with the potential for migraine treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Anna; Rustichelli, Cecilia; Baraldi, Carlo

    2017-12-01

    Preclinical, clinical, and other (e.g., genetic) evidence support the concept that migraine susceptibility may at least partially result from a glutamatergic system disorder. Therefore, the receptors of the glutamatergic system are considered relatively new targets for investigational drugs to treat migraine. Investigational and established glutamate receptor antagonists (GluRAs) have been shown to possess antinociceptive properties in preclinical models of trigeminovascular nociception and have been evaluated in clinical trials. This review focuses on preclinical and clinical studies of GluRAs for the treatment of migraine. Areas covered: A PubMed database search (from 1987 to December 2016) and a review of published studies on GluRAs in migraine were conducted. Expert opinion: All published clinical trials of investigational GluRAs have been unsuccessful in establishing benefit for acute migraine treatment. Clinical trial results contrast with the preclinical data, suggesting that glutamate (Glu) does not play a decisive role after the attack has already been triggered. These antagonists may instead be useful for migraine prophylaxis. Improving patient care requires further investigating and critically analyzing the role of Glu in migraine, designing experimental models to study more receptors and their corresponding antagonists, and identifying biomarkers to facilitate trials designed to target specific subgroups of migraine patients.

  5. Oral mineralocorticoid antagonists for recalcitrant central serous chorioretinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Eric K; Almeida, David Rp; Roybal, C Nathaniel; Niles, Philip I; Gehrs, Karen M; Sohn, Elliott H; Boldt, H Culver; Russell, Stephen R; Folk, James C

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the effect and tolerance of oral mineralocorticoid antagonists, eplerenone and/or spironolactone, in recalcitrant central serous chorioretinopathy. Retrospective consecutive observational case series. Primary outcome measures included central macular thickness (CMT, μm), macular volume (MV, mm(3)), Snellen visual acuity, and prior treatment failures. Secondary outcomes included duration of treatment, treatment dosage, and systemic side effects. A total of 120 patients with central serous chorioretinopathy were reviewed, of which 29 patients were treated with one or more mineralocorticoid antagonists. The average age of patients was 58.4 years. Sixteen patients (69.6%) were recalcitrant to other interventions prior to treatment with oral mineralocorticoid antagonists, with an average washout period of 15.3 months. The average duration of mineralocorticoid antagonist treatment was 3.9±2.3 months. Twelve patients (52.2%) showed decreased CMT and MV, six patients (26.1%) had increase in both, and five patients (21.7%) had negligible changes. The mean decrease in CMT of all patients was 42.4 μm (range, -136 to 255 μm): 100.7 μm among treatment-naïve patients, and 16.9 μm among recalcitrant patients. The mean decrease in MV of all patients was 0.20 mm(3) (range, -2.33 to 2.90 mm(3)): 0.6 mm(3) among treatment-naïve patients, and 0.0 mm(3) among recalcitrant patients. Median visual acuity at the start of therapy was 20/30 (range, 20/20-20/250), and at final follow-up it was 20/40 (range, 20/20-20/125). Nine patients (39.1%) experienced systemic side effects, of which three patients (13.0%) were unable to continue therapy. Mineralocorticoid antagonist treatment had a positive treatment effect in half of our patients. The decrease in CMT and MV was much less in the recalcitrant group compared to the treatment-naïve group. An improvement in vision was seen only in the treatment-naïve group. Systemic side effects, even at low doses, may limit its usage

  6. Abiotic conditions affect floral antagonists and mutualists of Impatiens capensis (Balsaminaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soper Gorden, Nicole L; Adler, Lynn S

    2013-04-01

    While the effect of abiotic factors on leaf herbivory is well known, the relative importance of abiotic conditions influencing both mutualists and antagonists is less well understood. Species interactions could enhance or reduce the direct effects of abiotic factors, depending on how mutualists and antagonists respond to abiotic conditions. We manipulated soil nutrients and shade in a factorial design and measured soil moisture in the annual Impatiens capensis. We then measured interactions with mutualists (two pollinating species) and antagonists (herbivores, florivores, nectar thieves, and flower bud gallers), as well as plant growth, floral rewards, and plant reproduction. Fertilizer increased plant growth, floral attractiveness, mutualist and antagonist interactions, and plant reproduction. Shade had no effects, and soil moisture was negatively associated with plant growth and reproduction. All effects were additive. Mutualist and antagonist floral interactions both increased on fertilized plants, but antagonists increased at a greater rate, leading to a larger ratio of antagonist to mutualist interactions on fertilized plants. Despite having more antagonists, fertilized plants still had significantly higher reproduction, suggesting higher tolerance to antagonists. Abiotic effects can have consistent effects on antagonists and mutualists, and on both floral and leaf antagonists. However, tolerance to antagonisms increased in favorable conditions. Thus, the direct positive effects of favorable abiotic conditions on plants outweighed negative indirect effects via increased antagonisms, which may lead to selection to grow in high-nutrient microsites in spite of increased herbivory.

  7. Antagonist-perturbation mechanism for activation function-2 fixed motifs: active conformation and docking mode of retinoid X receptor antagonists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Motonori

    2017-06-01

    HX531, which contains a dibenzodiazepine skeleton, is one of the first retinoid X receptor (RXR) antagonists. Functioning via RXR-PPARγ heterodimer, this compound is receiving a lot of attention as a therapeutic drug candidate for diabetic disease controlling differentiation of adipose tissue. However, the active conformation of HX531 for RXRs is not well established. In the present study, quantum mechanics calculations and molecular mechanical docking simulations were carried out to precisely study the docking mode of HX531 with the human RXRα ligand-binding domain, as well as to provide a new approach to drug design using a structure-based perspective. It was suggested that HX531, which has the R configuration for the bent dibenzodiazepine plane together with the equatorial configuration for the N-methyl group attached to the nitrogen atom in the seven-membered diazepine ring, is a typical activation function-2 (AF-2) fixed motif perturbation type antagonist, which destabilizes the formation of AF-2 fixed motifs. On the other hand, the docking simulations supported the experimental result that LG100754 is an RXR homodimer antagonist and an RXR heterodimer agonist.

  8. The MNK–eIF4E Signaling Axis Contributes to Injury-Induced Nociceptive Plasticity and the Development of Chronic Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asiedu, Marina N.; Megat, Salim; Burton, Michael D.; Burgos-Vega, Carolina C.; Melemedjian, Ohannes K.; Boitano, Scott; Vagner, Josef; Pancrazio, Joseph J.; Mogil, Jeffrey S.; Dussor, Gregory

    2017-01-01

    Injury-induced sensitization of nociceptors contributes to pain states and the development of chronic pain. Inhibiting activity-dependent mRNA translation through mechanistic target of rapamycin and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways blocks the development of nociceptor sensitization. These pathways convergently signal to the eukaryotic translation initiation factor (eIF) 4F complex to regulate the sensitization of nociceptors, but the details of this process are ill defined. Here we investigated the hypothesis that phosphorylation of the 5′ cap-binding protein eIF4E by its specific kinase MAPK interacting kinases (MNKs) 1/2 is a key factor in nociceptor sensitization and the development of chronic pain. Phosphorylation of ser209 on eIF4E regulates the translation of a subset of mRNAs. We show that pronociceptive and inflammatory factors, such as nerve growth factor (NGF), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and carrageenan, produce decreased mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity, decreased affective pain behaviors, and strongly reduced hyperalgesic priming in mice lacking eIF4E phosphorylation (eIF4ES209A). Tests were done in both sexes, and no sex differences were found. Moreover, in patch-clamp electrophysiology and Ca2+ imaging experiments on dorsal root ganglion neurons, NGF- and IL-6-induced increases in excitability were attenuated in neurons from eIF4ES209A mice. These effects were recapitulated in Mnk1/2−/− mice and with the MNK1/2 inhibitor cercosporamide. We also find that cold hypersensitivity induced by peripheral nerve injury is reduced in eIF4ES209A and Mnk1/2−/− mice and following cercosporamide treatment. Our findings demonstrate that the MNK1/2–eIF4E signaling axis is an important contributing factor to mechanisms of nociceptor plasticity and the development of chronic pain. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Chronic pain is a debilitating disease affecting approximately one in three Americans. Chronic pain is thought to be driven by changes in

  9. Predictions of in vivo prolactin levels from in vitro k I values of d 2 receptor antagonists using an agonist-antagonist interaction model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petersson, K.J.; Vermeulen, A.M.J.; Friberg, L.E.

    2013-01-01

    Prolactin elevation is a side effect of all currently available D2 receptor antagonists used in the treatment of schizophrenia. Prolactin elevation is the result of a direct antagonistic D2 effect blocking the tonic inhibition of prolactin release by dopamine. The aims of this work were to assess

  10. The Translational Repressor 4E-BP1 Contributes to Diabetes-Induced Visual Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, William P; Mihailescu, Maria L; Yang, Chen; Barber, Alistair J; Kimball, Scot R; Jefferson, Leonard S; Dennis, Michael D

    2016-03-01

    The translational repressor 4E-BP1 interacts with the mRNA cap-binding protein eIF4E and thereby promotes cap-independent translation of mRNAs encoding proteins that contribute to diabetic retinopathy. Interaction of 4E-BP1 with eIF4E is enhanced in the retina of diabetic rodents, at least in part, as a result of elevated 4E-BP1 protein expression. In the present study, we examined the role of 4E-BP1 in diabetes-induced visual dysfunction, as well as the mechanism whereby hyperglycemia promotes 4E-BP1 expression. Nondiabetic and diabetic wild-type and 4E-BP1/2 knockout mice were evaluated for visual function using a virtual optomotor test (Optomotry). Retinas were harvested from nondiabetic and type 1 diabetic mice and analyzed for protein abundance and posttranslational modifications. Similar analyses were performed on cells in culture exposed to hyperglycemic conditions or an O-GlcNAcase inhibitor (Thiamet G [TMG]). Diabetes-induced visual dysfunction was delayed in mice deficient of 4E-BP1/2 as compared to controls. 4E-BP1 protein expression was enhanced by hyperglycemia in the retina of diabetic rodents and by hyperglycemic conditions in retinal cells in culture. A similar elevation in 4E-BP1 expression was observed with TMG. The rate of 4E-BP1 degradation was significantly prolonged by either hyperglycemic conditions or TMG. A PEST motif in the C-terminus of 4E-BP1 regulated polyubiquitination, turnover, and binding of an E3 ubiquitin ligase complex containing CUL3. The findings support a model whereby elevated 4E-BP1 expression observed in the retina of diabetic rodents is the result of O-GlcNAcylation of 4E-BP1 within its PEST motif.

  11. Enzymatic synthesis of RNAs capped with nucleotide analogues reveals the molecular basis for substrate selectivity of RNA capping enzyme: impacts on RNA metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moheshwarnath Issur

    Full Text Available RNA cap binding proteins have evolved to specifically bind to the N7-methyl guanosine cap structure found at the 5' ends of eukaryotic mRNAs. The specificity of RNA capping enzymes towards GTP for the synthesis of this structure is therefore crucial for mRNA metabolism. The fact that ribavirin triphosphate was described as a substrate of a viral RNA capping enzyme, raised the possibility that RNAs capped with nucleotide analogues could be generated in cellulo. Owing to the fact that this prospect potentially has wide pharmacological implications, we decided to investigate whether the active site of the model Paramecium bursaria Chlorella virus-1 RNA capping enzyme was flexible enough to accommodate various purine analogues. Using this approach, we identified several key structural determinants at each step of the RNA capping reaction and generated RNAs harboring various different cap analogues. Moreover, we monitored the binding affinity of these novel capped RNAs to the eIF4E protein and evaluated their translational properties in cellulo. Overall, this study establishes a molecular rationale for the specific selection of GTP over other NTPs by RNA capping enzyme It also demonstrates that RNAs can be enzymatically capped with certain purine nucleotide analogs, and it also describes the impacts of modified RNA caps on specific steps involved in mRNA metabolism. For instance, our results indicate that the N7-methyl group of the classical N7-methyl guanosine cap is not always indispensable for binding to eIF4E and subsequently for translation when compensatory modifications are present on the capped residue. Overall, these findings have important implications for our understanding of the molecular determinants involved in both RNA capping and RNA metabolism.

  12. Triazole-containing monophosphate mRNA cap analogs as effective translation inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piecyk, Karolina; Lukaszewicz, Maciej; Darzynkiewicz, Edward; Jankowska-Anyszka, Marzena

    2014-10-01

    Synthetic analogs of the 5' end of mRNA (cap structure) are widely used in molecular studies on mechanisms of cellular processes such as translation, intracellular transport, splicing, and turnover. The best-characterized cap binding protein is translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E). Recognition of the mRNA cap by eIF4E is a critical, rate-limiting step for efficient translation initiation and is considered a major target for anticancer therapy. Here, we report a facile methodology for the preparation of N2-triazole-containing monophosphate cap analogs and present their biological evaluation as inhibitors of protein synthesis. Five analogs possessing this unique hetero-cyclic ring spaced from the m7-guanine of the cap structure at a distance of one or three carbon atoms and/or additionally substituted by various groups containing the benzene ring were synthesized. All obtained compounds turned out to be effective translation inhibitors with IC50 similar to dinucleotide triphosphate m(7)GpppG. As these compounds possess a reduced number of phosphate groups and, thereby, a negative charge, which may support their cell penetration, this type of cap analog might be promising in terms of designing new potential therapeutic molecules. In addition, an exemplary dinucleotide from a corresponding mononucleotide containing benzyl substituted 1,2,3-triazole was prepared and examined. The superior inhibitory properties of this analog (10-fold vs. m(7)GpppG) suggest the usefulness of such compounds for the preparation of mRNA transcripts with high translational activity. © 2014 Piecyk et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  13. Smoothened antagonists reverse taxane resistance in ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steg, Adam D; Katre, Ashwini A; Bevis, Kerri S; Ziebarth, Angela; Dobbin, Zachary C; Shah, Monjri M; Alvarez, Ronald D; Landen, Charles N

    2012-07-01

    The hedgehog pathway has been implicated in the formation and maintenance of a variety of malignancies, including ovarian cancer; however, it is unknown whether hedgehog signaling is involved in ovarian cancer chemoresistance. The goal of this study was to determine the effects of antagonizing the hedgehog receptor, Smoothened (Smo), on chemotherapy response in ovarian cancer. Expression of hedgehog pathway members was assessed in three pairs of parental and chemotherapy-resistant ovarian cancer cell lines (A2780ip2/A2780cp20, SKOV3ip1/SKOV3TRip2, HeyA8/HeyA8MDR) using quantitative PCR and Western blot analysis. Cell lines were exposed to increasing concentrations of two different Smo antagonists (cyclopamine, LDE225) alone and in combination with carboplatin or paclitaxel. Selective knockdown of Smo, Gli1, or Gli2 was achieved using siRNA constructs. Cell viability was assessed by MTT assay. A2780cp20 and SKOV3TRip2 orthotopic xenografts were treated with vehicle, LDE225, paclitaxel, or combination therapy. Chemoresistant cell lines showed higher expression (>2-fold, P < 0.05) of hedgehog signaling components compared with their respective parental lines. Smo antagonists sensitized chemotherapy-resistant cell lines to paclitaxel, but not to carboplatin. LDE225 treatment also increased sensitivity of ALDH-positive cells to paclitaxel. A2780cp20 and SKOV3TRip2 xenografts treated with combined LDE225 and paclitaxel had significantly less tumor burden than those treated with vehicle or either agent alone. Increased taxane sensitivity seems to be mediated by a decrease in P-glycoprotein (MDR1) expression. Selective knockdown of Smo, Gli1, or Gli2 all increased taxane sensitivity. Smo antagonists reverse taxane resistance in chemoresistant ovarian cancer models, suggesting combined anti-hedgehog and chemotherapies could provide a useful therapeutic strategy for ovarian cancer. ©2012 AACR.

  14. Sexually antagonistic "zygotic drive" of the sex chromosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William R Rice

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Genomic conflict is perplexing because it causes the fitness of a species to decline rather than improve. Many diverse forms of genomic conflict have been identified, but this extant tally may be incomplete. Here, we show that the unusual characteristics of the sex chromosomes can, in principle, lead to a previously unappreciated form of sexual genomic conflict. The phenomenon occurs because there is selection in the heterogametic sex for sex-linked mutations that harm the sex of offspring that does not carry them, whenever there is competition among siblings. This harmful phenotype can be expressed as an antagonistic green-beard effect that is mediated by epigenetic parental effects, parental investment, and/or interactions among siblings. We call this form of genomic conflict sexually antagonistic "zygotic drive", because it is functionally equivalent to meiotic drive, except that it operates during the zygotic and postzygotic stages of the life cycle rather than the meiotic and gametic stages. A combination of mathematical modeling and a survey of empirical studies is used to show that sexually antagonistic zygotic drive is feasible, likely to be widespread in nature, and that it can promote a genetic "arms race" between the homo- and heteromorphic sex chromosomes. This new category of genomic conflict has the potential to strongly influence other fundamental evolutionary processes, such as speciation and the degeneration of the Y and W sex chromosomes. It also fosters a new genetic hypothesis for the evolution of enigmatic fitness-reducing traits like the high frequency of spontaneous abortion, sterility, and homosexuality observed in humans.

  15. Classification and virtual screening of androgen receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiazhong; Gramatica, Paola

    2010-05-24

    Computational tools, such as quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR), are highly useful as screening support for prioritization of substances of very high concern (SVHC). From the practical point of view, QSAR models should be effective to pick out more active rather than inactive compounds, expressed as sensitivity in classification works. This research investigates the classification of a big data set of endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs)-androgen receptor (AR) antagonists, mainly aiming to improve the external sensitivity and to screen for potential AR binders. The kNN, lazy IB1, and ADTree methods and the consensus approach were used to build different models, which improve the sensitivity on external chemicals from 57.1% (literature) to 76.4%. Additionally, the models' predictive abilities were further validated on a blind collected data set (sensitivity: 85.7%). Then the proposed classifiers were used: (i) to distinguish a set of AR binders into antagonists and agonists; (ii) to screen a combined estrogen receptor binder database to find out possible chemicals that can bind to both AR and ER; and (iii) to virtually screen our in-house environmental chemical database. The in silico screening results suggest: (i) that some compounds can affect the normal endocrine system through a complex mechanism binding both to ER and AR; (ii) new EDCs, which are nonER binders, but can in silico bind to AR, are recognized; and (iii) about 20% of compounds in a big data set of environmental chemicals are predicted as new AR antagonists. The priority should be given to them to experimentally test the binding activities with AR.

  16. Modulation of myometrium mitochondrial membrane potential by calmodulin antagonists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. G. Shlykov

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Influence of calmodulin antagonists on mitochondrial membrane potential was investigated using­ a flow cytometry method, confocal microscopy and fluorescent potential-sensitive probes TMRM and MTG. Influence of different concentrations of calmodulin antagonists on mitochondrial membrane potential was studied using flow cytometry method and a fraction of myometrium mitochondria of unpregnant rats. It was shown that 1-10 µМ calmidazolium gradually reduced mitochondria membrane potential. At the same time 10-100 µМ trifluope­razine influenced as follows: 10 µМ – increased polarization, while 100 µМ – caused almost complete depolarization of mitochondrial membranes. In experiments which were conducted with the use of confocal microscopy method and myometrium cells it was shown, that MTG addition to the incubation medium­ led to the appearance of fluorescence signal in a green range. Addition of the second probe (ТМRM resulted in the appearance of fluorescent signal in a red range. Mitochondrial membrane depolarization by 1µМ СССР or 10 mМ NaN3 was accompanied by the decline of “red” fluo­rescence intensity, “green” fluorescence was kept. The 10-15 minute incubation of myometrium cells in the presen­ce 10 µМ calmidazolium or 100 µМ trifluoperazine was accompanied by almost complete decrease of the TMRM fluorescent signal. Thus, with the use of potential-sensitive fluorescent probes TMRM and MTG it was shown, that calmodulin antagonists modulate mitochondrial membrane potential of myometrium cells.

  17. Effects of dopamine receptor antagonist antipsychotic therapy on blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonsai, N H; Amin, V H; Mendpara, C G; Speth, R; Hale, G M

    2017-11-08

    Hypertension, a major risk factor for adverse cardiovascular events, such as stroke and myocardial infarction, affects 80 million American adults. The aetiology of hypertension is multifaceted and difficult to identify. Dopamine receptors, especially those in the kidneys, play a role in blood pressure regulation, and alterations in their function can cause hypertension. The objective of this review was to investigate the association between the use of dopamine antagonists with hypertension focusing especially on second-generation antipsychotics, like clozapine that is D4 receptor antagonist. A literature review was conducted using MEDLINE, Ovid, Science Direct, Web of Science and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews databases with keywords:hypertension, hypotension, renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, dopaminergic receptors, blood pressure, antipsychotics. Inclusion criteria were human or animal studies, systematic reviews, meta-analyses, randomized controlled trials, case report/series, published in selected for inclusion. All 5 dopamine receptor subtypes (ie D1, D2, D3, D4 and D5) regulate sodium excretion and BP. The D1, D3 and D4 receptors interact directly with the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, whereas D2 and D5 receptors directly interact with the sympathetic nervous system to regulate BP. Use of dopaminergic agonists or antagonists could therefore disturb the regulation of BP by dopamine receptors. Based upon this review, individuals on antipsychotic agents, particularly clozapine, should be routinely monitored for hypertension, and addition of antihypertensive agents such as angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) is indicated if hypertension occurs. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. The Triticum Mosaic Virus 5' Leader Binds to Both eIF4G and eIFiso4G for Translation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robyn Roberts

    Full Text Available We recently identified a remarkably strong (739 nt-long IRES-like element in the 5' untranslated region (UTR of Triticum mosaic virus (TriMV, Potyviridae. Here, we define the components of the cap-binding translation initiation complex that are required for TriMV translation. Using bio-layer interferometry and affinity capture of the native translation apparatus, we reveal that the viral translation element has a ten-fold greater affinity for the large subunit eIF4G/eIFiso4G than to the cap binding protein eIF4E/eIFiso4E. This data supports a translation mechanism that is largely dependent on eIF4G and its isoform. The binding of both scaffold isoforms requires an eight base-pair-long hairpin structure located 270 nucleotides upstream of the translation initiation site, which we have previously shown to be crucial for IRES activity. Despite a weak binding affinity to the mRNA, eIFiso4G alone or in combination with eIFiso4E supports TriMV translation in a cap-binding factor-depleted wheat germ extract. Notably, TriMV 5' UTR-mediated translation is dependent upon eIF4A helicase activity, as the addition of the eIF4A inhibitor hippuristanol inhibits 5' UTR-mediated translation. This inhibition is reversible with the addition of recombinant wheat eIF4A. These results and previous observations demonstrate a key role of eIF4G and eIF4A in this unique mechanism of cap-independent-translation. This work provides new insights into the lesser studied translation mechanisms of plant virus-mediated internal translation initiation.

  19. Pharmacoepidemiological assessment of drug interactions with vitamin K antagonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pottegård, Anton; Christensen, Rene dePont; Wang, Shirley V

    2014-01-01

    PurposeWe present a database of prescription drugs and international normalized ratio (INR) data and the applied methodology for its use to assess drug-drug interactions with vitamin K antagonists (VKAs). We use the putative interaction between VKAs and tramadol as a case study. MethodsWe used...... definitions, and other drugs. ResultsWe identified 513 VKA users with at least 1 INR measurement 4.0 and concomitant tramadol and VKA exposure during the observation period. The overall IRR was 1.80 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.53-2.10), with a stronger association among users of phenprocoumon compared...

  20. 5-Hydroxytryptamine3 receptor antagonists and cardiac side effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brygger, Louise; Herrstedt, Jørn

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: 5-Hydroxytryptamine3-receptor antagonists (5-HT3-RA) are the most widely used antiemetics in oncology, and although tolerability is high, QTC prolongation has been observed in some patients. AREAS COVERED: The purpose of this article is to outline the risk of cardiac adverse events......, primarily in the group of 65-plus-year old. Therefore it will be crucial to address the incidence of cardiac AEs in cancer patients with known heart disease receiving chemotherapy and a 5-HT3 RA for the prophylaxis of CINV....

  1. Lymphocyte homing antagonists in the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saruta, Masayuki; Papadakis, Konstantinos A

    2014-09-01

    Lymphocyte homing antagonists represent promising therapeutic agents for the treatment of idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Several critical molecules involved in the recruitment of inflammatory cells in the intestine, including integrins and chemokine receptors, have been successfully targeted for the treatment of IBD. These agents have shown great promise for the induction and maintenance of remission for both Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis. This article discusses currently approved prototypic agents for the treatment of IBD (natalizumab, anti-α4 integrin; vedolizumab, anti-α4β7 integrin), and several other agents in the same class currently under development. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The role of H2 antagonists in perennial allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testa, B; Mesolella, C; Filippini, P; Campagnano, N; Testa, D; Mesolella, M; Sagnelli, E

    1993-09-01

    The biological effects of anti-H2 in allergic reactions are dose dependent: low doses enhance, and high doses significantly decrease the reaction of hypersensitivity. The administration of cimetidine H2 antagonist to 20 perennial allergic rhinitis patients brought about an abatement in the symptoms and a decrease in the total serum immunoglobulin E (IgE) levels in 72% of treated patients, but no variation was perceived in placebo-treated patients. These results strengthen the hypothesis of anti-H2-induced immunoregulatory effects and suggest a possible way of inhibiting IgE synthesis in vivo.

  3. The opiate antagonist, naltrexone, in the treatment of trichotillomania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grant, Jon E; Odlaug, Brian Lawrence; Schreiber, Liana R N

    2014-01-01

    Trichotillomania (TTM) is characterized by repetitive hair pulling resulting in hair loss. Data on the pharmacological treatment of TTM are limited. This study examined the opioid antagonist, naltrexone, in adults with TTM who had urges to pull their hair. Fifty-one individuals with TTM were...... improved with naltrexone (P = 0.026). Subjects taking naltrexone with a family history of addiction showed a greater numerical reduction in the urges to pull, although it was not statistically significant. Future studies will have to examine whether pharmacological modulation of the opiate system may...

  4. Does protein binding modulate the effect of angiotensin II receptor antagonists?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc P Maillard

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionAngiotensin II AT 1-receptor antagonists are highly bound to plasma proteins (≥ 99%. With some antagonists, such as DuP-532, the protein binding was such that no efficacy of the drug could be demonstrated clinically. Whether protein binding interferes with the efficacy of other antagonists is not known. We have therefore investigated in vitro how plasma proteins may affect the antagonistic effect of different AT1-receptor antagonists.MethodsA radio-receptor binding assay was used to analyse the interaction between proteins and the ability of various angiotensin II (Ang II antagonists to block AT1-receptors. In addition, the Biacore technology, a new technique which enables the real-time monitoring of binding events between two molecules, was used to evaluate the dissociation rate constants of five AT1-receptor antagonists from human serum albumin.ResultsThe in vitro AT 1-antagonistic effects of different Ang II receptor antagonists were differentially affected by the presence of human plasma, with rightward shifts of the IC50 ranging from one to several orders of magnitude. The importance of the shift correlates with the dissociation rate constants of these drugs from albumin. Our experiments also show that the way that AT1-receptor antagonists bind to proteins differs from one compound to another. These results suggest that the interaction with plasma proteins appears to modulate the efficacy of some Ang II antagonists.ConclusionAlthough the high binding level of Ang II receptor antagonist to plasma proteins appears to be a feature common to this class of compounds, the kinetics and characteristics of this binding is of great importance. With some antagonists, protein binding interferes markedly with their efficacy to block AT1-receptors.

  5. CCR9 Antagonists in the Treatment of Ulcerative Colitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekker, Pirow; Ebsworth, Karen; Walters, Matthew J.; Berahovich, Robert D.; Ertl, Linda S.; Charvat, Trevor T.; Punna, Sreenivas; Powers, Jay P.; Campbell, James J.; Sullivan, Timothy J.; Jaen, Juan C.; Schall, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    While it has long been established that the chemokine receptor CCR9 and its ligand CCL25 are essential for the movement of leukocytes into the small intestine and the development of small-intestinal inflammation, the role of this chemokine-receptor pair in colonic inflammation is not clear. Toward this end, we compared colonic CCL25 protein levels in healthy individuals to those in patients with ulcerative colitis. In addition, we determined the effect of CCR9 pharmacological inhibition in the mdr1a −/− mouse model of ulcerative colitis. Colon samples from patients with ulcerative colitis had significantly higher levels of CCL25 protein compared to healthy controls, a finding mirrored in the mdr1a −/− mice. In the mdr1a −/− mice, CCR9 antagonists significantly decreased the extent of wasting and colonic remodeling and reduced the levels of inflammatory cytokines in the colon. These findings indicate that the CCR9:CCL25 pair plays a causative role in ulcerative colitis and suggest that CCR9 antagonists will provide a therapeutic benefit in patients with colonic inflammation. PMID:26457007

  6. Diverse effects of calcium antagonists on glomerular hemodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arima, S; Ito, S; Omata, K; Tsunoda, K; Yaoita, H; Abe, K

    1996-06-01

    This study examined the direct effects of calcium antagonists on glomerular hemodynamics. Rabbit afferent (Af-) or efferent arterioles (Ef-Arts) were microperfused in vitro at constant pressure. Ef-Arts were perfused from the distal end of Af-Art through the glomerulus. Increasing doses (10(-10) to 10(-7) M) of nifedipine (Nif), nicardipine (Nic) or manidipine (Man) were added into the lumen of Af- or Ef-Arts preconstricted (by about 40%) with norepinephrine. Although Nif and Nic dilated Af-Arts in a dose-dependent manner, they did not cause any dilation in Ef-Arts. In contrast, Man dilated both Af- and Ef-Arts in a dose dependent manner; Man at 10(-7) M dilated Af- and Ef-Arts by 71 +/- 12% (N = 7) and 38 +/- 3% (N = 6), respectively. Although Man's dilator effect on Ef-Art was not affected by inhibiting nitric oxide (NO) synthesis (N = 6), it was markedly attenuated by eliminating the influence of glomerulus (14 +/- 3% by Man at 10(-7) M, N = 5). These results demonstrate that in addition to dilating Af-Art, Man, but not Nif or Nic, dilates Ef-Art through a glomerulus-derived vasodilator(s) other than NO. Such diverse actions should be taken into consideration when calcium antagonists are used in the treatment of patients with cardiovascular and renal diseases.

  7. A comprehensive comparative review of adenosine diphosphate receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Erin Y; Abraham, Teena; Saad, Nasser; Rapp, Jonathan H; Vastey, Fabienne L; Balmir, Eric

    2012-02-01

    Thrombosis risk necessitates dual antiplatelet therapy with aspirin and an adenosine diphosphate (ADP) receptor antagonist, in patients who have acute coronary syndrome. Current guidelines emphasize the critical role of dual antiplatelet therapy in both medical management and invasive strategy, especially in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention. With the availability of multiple ADP-receptor antagonists, it is crucial to select the most appropriate agent for each patient. The pertinent trials were identified through a MEDLINE search, in addition to a manual search from the articles retrieved. This review examines the differences between clopidogrel, prasugrel and ticagrelor in terms of their pharmacological/pharmacokinetic properties, clinical efficacy, drug interactions and safety parameters. Prasugrel and ticagrelor exhibit greater platelet inhibition and superior efficacy compared with clopidogrel, at the expense of higher bleeding risk. Prasugrel and ticagrelor should be preferred over clopidogrel in patients who are at a high risk of thrombotic events with low risk of bleeding. Additionally, these two agents may offer advantage over clopidogrel in those patients who might have risk for drug resistance due to CYP2C19 polymorphism. In selecting the ideal agent for patients, clinicians should tailor the antiplatelet regimen by considering individual risk factors and medication characteristics.

  8. NMDA receptor antagonists extend the sensitive period for imprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, C H; Rogers, L J

    2000-03-01

    Filial imprinting in the domestic chick occurs during a sensitive period of development. The exact timing of this period can vary according to the methods used to measure imprinting. Using our imprinting paradigm, we have shown that normal, dark-reared chicks lose the ability to imprint after the second day post-hatching. Further, we reported that chicks treated 10 h after hatching with a mixture of the noncompetitive NMDA receptor antagonist ketamine (55 mg/kg) and the alpha(2)-adrenergic receptor agonist xylazine (6 mg/kg) were able to imprint on day 8 after hatching, whereas controls treated with saline did not imprint. We now show that the effect of the ketamine-xylazine mixture can be mimicked by treating chicks with ketamine alone or with another noncompetitive NMDA receptor antagonist, MK-801 (5 mg/kg). Treating chicks with a single dose of ketamine (55 mg/kg) or with a single dose of xylazine (6 mg/kg) failed to produce the effect on the sensitive period. However, prolonging the action of ketamine by treating chicks with two doses of ketamine (at 10 and 12 h after hatching) did allow imprinting on day 8. In contrast, prolonging the action of xylazine had no effect on the sensitive period for imprinting. Chicks treated with MK-801 were also able to imprint on day 8. Thus, we have evidence that the NMDA receptor system is involved in the mechanisms that control the sensitive period for imprinting.

  9. Human Homosexuality: A Paradigmatic Arena for Sexually Antagonistic Selection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciani, Andrea Camperio; Battaglia, Umberto; Zanzotto, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Sexual conflict likely plays a crucial role in the origin and maintenance of homosexuality in our species. Although environmental factors are known to affect human homosexual (HS) preference, sibling concordances and population patterns related to HS indicate that genetic components are also influencing this trait in humans. We argue that multilocus, partially X-linked genetic factors undergoing sexually antagonistic selection that promote maternal female fecundity at the cost of occasional male offspring homosexuality are the best candidates capable of explaining the frequency, familial clustering, and pedigree asymmetries observed in HS male proband families. This establishes male HS as a paradigmatic example of sexual conflict in human biology. HS in females, on the other hand, is currently a more elusive phenomenon from both the empirical and theoretical standpoints because of its fluidity and marked environmental influence. Genetic and epigenetic mechanisms, the latter involving sexually antagonistic components, have been hypothesized for the propagation and maintenance of female HS in the population. However, further data are needed to truly clarify the evolutionary dynamics of this trait. PMID:25635045

  10. Emerging interleukin receptor antagonists for the treatment of asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Efraij, Khalid; FitzGerald, J Mark

    2017-09-01

    Asthma is a heterogeneous disease, usually characterized by chronic airway inflammation. Most patients with asthma can be well-controlled with inhaled corticosteroids and, if necessary, the addition of a long-acting beta agonist. Despite these therapies, 5% to 10% of patients with asthma have severe, uncontrolled asthma. Selecting patients based on peripheral eosinophil counts and a history of exacerbations has led to significant decreases in exacerbations and an improvement in asthma control with medications that target IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13/. Areas covered: This review will cover the definition of severe asthma, existing treatment options, biomarkers, and the emerging role of interleukin antagonists in the treatment of severe asthma. Expert opinion: IL antagonists are novel drugs targeting important inflammatory cytokines in asthma. Anti-IL-5 drugs provide the most promise as they have obtained regulatory approval and are available for use. Anti-IL-4 drug results are also promising. There is, however, uncertainty regarding the success of anti-IL-13 drugs development at this point. An ongoing focus of research is to significantly increase our understanding of the biology of asthma, and in particular severe asthma, making more and better targeted therapies. There may also be potential in the future to use these new drugs earlier in the development of asthma, as disease-modifying interventions that might be associated with remission or even cure.

  11. Anticarcinogenic, hypocholesterolemic, and antagonistic activities of Lactobacillus acidophilus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mital, B K; Garg, S K

    1995-01-01

    Lactobacillus acidophilus is considered to possess health-promoting attributes. These include anticarcinogenic and hypocholesterolemic properties and antagonistic action against intestinal and food-born pathogens. L. acidophilus can also survive the hostile environment and establish in the complex ecosystem of the gastrointestinal tract. Therefore, the beneficial effects of ingesting L. acidophilus accrue over a longer period than those organisms that cannot colonize the gut. However, the exact mechanisms of these attributes are not known. Presumably, the anticarcinogenic activity may be attributed to production of compounds and/or conditions that inhibit the proliferation of tumor cells, suppression of microorganisms that convert procarcinogens to carcinogens, and degradation of carcinogens formed. They hypocholesterolemic effect is probably exerted by inhibition of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase, which is a rate-limiting enzyme in endogenous cholesterol biosynthesis in the body and by promoting the excretion of dietary cholesterol in feces as a result of coprecipitation in the presence of deconjugated bile acids in the intestine and/or adsorption by the organisms. The antagonistic effect against pathogens and other organisms is possibly mediated by competition for nutrients and adhesion sites, formation of metabolites such as organic acids, hydrogen peroxide, and production of antibiotic-like compounds and bacteriocins.

  12. Human homosexuality: a paradigmatic arena for sexually antagonistic selection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camperio Ciani, Andrea; Battaglia, Umberto; Zanzotto, Giovanni

    2015-01-29

    Sexual conflict likely plays a crucial role in the origin and maintenance of homosexuality in our species. Although environmental factors are known to affect human homosexual (HS) preference, sibling concordances and population patterns related to HS indicate that genetic components are also influencing this trait in humans. We argue that multilocus, partially X-linked genetic factors undergoing sexually antagonistic selection that promote maternal female fecundity at the cost of occasional male offspring homosexuality are the best candidates capable of explaining the frequency, familial clustering, and pedigree asymmetries observed in HS male proband families. This establishes male HS as a paradigmatic example of sexual conflict in human biology. HS in females, on the other hand, is currently a more elusive phenomenon from both the empirical and theoretical standpoints because of its fluidity and marked environmental influence. Genetic and epigenetic mechanisms, the latter involving sexually antagonistic components, have been hypothesized for the propagation and maintenance of female HS in the population. However, further data are needed to truly clarify the evolutionary dynamics of this trait. Copyright © 2015 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  13. Rogue sperm indicate sexually antagonistic coevolution in nematodes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald E Ellis

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Intense reproductive competition often continues long after animals finish mating. In many species, sperm from one male compete with those from others to find and fertilize oocytes. Since this competition occurs inside the female reproductive tract, she often influences the outcome through physical or chemical factors, leading to cryptic female choice. Finally, traits that help males compete with each other are sometimes harmful to females, and female countermeasures may thwart the interests of males, which can lead to an arms race between the sexes known as sexually antagonistic coevolution. New studies from Caenorhabditis nematodes suggest that males compete with each other by producing sperm that migrate aggressively and that these sperm may be more likely to win access to oocytes. However, one byproduct of this competition appears to be an increased probability that these sperm will go astray, invading the ovary, prematurely activating oocytes, and sometimes crossing basement membranes and leaving the gonad altogether. These harmful effects are sometimes observed in crosses between animals of the same species but are most easily detected in interspecies crosses, leading to dramatically lowered fitness, presumably because the competitiveness of the sperm and the associated female countermeasures are not precisely matched. This mismatch is most obvious in crosses involving individuals from androdioecious species (which have both hermaphrodites and males, as predicted by the lower levels of sperm competition these species experience. These results suggest a striking example of sexually antagonistic coevolution and dramatically expand the value of nematodes as a laboratory system for studying postcopulatory interactions.

  14. Biological Control of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum in Lettuce Using Antagonistic Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bong-Goan Chon

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available To isolate antagonistic bacteria against sclerotinia rot of lettuce, caused by Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, soil samples were collected from the diseased greenhouse field in Namyangju city, Gyeong-gi province from 2007 to 2008. A total of 196 bacterial isolates were isolated using serial dilution method. In dual culture assay in vitro, 26 isolates showed more than 80% of inhibition rates of mycelial growth of S. sclerotiorum. Based on 16S rDNA sequence analysis, the 26 isolates were identified as Bacillus megaterium, B. cereus, B. subtilis, Arthrobacter nicotianae, A. ramosus, Pseudomonas filiscindens, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Brevibacterium frigoritolerans and Sphingobacterium faecium. The 26 isolates inhibited the mycelial growth of S. sclerotiorum up to 80% and the sclerotial germination 0−100%. In the greenhouse pot test of ten isolates conducted in summer, 2 isolates B. megaterium (DK6 and B. cereus (C210 showed control efficacy on sclerotia viability of S. sclerotiorum, 20% and 35%, respectively. In the greenhouse pot test in winter, the disease incidence of the control group was 80%, whereas those of 9 isolates among 26 were approximately 20%. From the result, the 9 isolates are expected as potentially antagonistic bacteria for biological control of sclerotinia rot of lettuce caused by S. sclerotiorum.

  15. The role of ecology, neutral processes and antagonistic coevolution in an apparent sexual arms race.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Jennifer C; Garroway, Colin J; Rowe, Locke

    2017-09-01

    Some of the strongest examples of a sexual 'arms race' come from observations of correlated evolution in sexually antagonistic traits among populations. However, it remains unclear whether these cases truly represent sexually antagonistic coevolution; alternatively, ecological or neutral processes might also drive correlated evolution. To investigate these alternatives, we evaluated the contributions of intersex genetic correlations, ecological context, neutral genetic divergence and sexual coevolution in the correlated evolution of antagonistic traits among populations of Gerris incognitus water striders. We could not detect intersex genetic correlations for these sexually antagonistic traits. Ecological variation was related to population variation in the key female antagonistic trait (spine length, a defence against males), as well as body size. Nevertheless, population covariation between sexually antagonistic traits remained substantial and significant even after accounting for all of these processes. Our results therefore provide strong evidence for a contemporary sexual arms race. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/CNRS.

  16. Pregnancy outcome of “delayed start” GnRH antagonist protocol versus GnRH antagonist protocol in poor responders: A clinical trial study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Aflatoonian

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Management of poor-responding patients is still major challenge in assisted reproductive techniques (ART. Delayed-start GnRH antagonist protocol is recommended to these patients, but little is known in this regards. Objective: The goal of this study was assessment of delayed-start GnRH antagonist protocol in poor responders, and in vitro fertilization (IVF outcomes. Materials and Methods: This randomized clinical trial included sixty infertile women with Bologna criteria for ovarian poor responders who were candidate for IVF. In case group (n=30, delayed-start GnRH antagonist protocol administered estrogen priming followed by early follicular-phase GnRH antagonist treatment for 7 days before ovarian stimulation with gonadotropin. Control group (n=30 treated with estrogen priming antagonist protocol. Finally, endometrial thickness, the rates of oocytes maturation, , embryo formation, and pregnancy were compared between two groups. Results: Rates of implantation, chemical, clinical, and ongoing pregnancy in delayed-start cycles were higher although was not statistically significant. Endometrial thickness was significantly higher in case group. There were no statistically significant differences in the rates of oocyte maturation, embryo formation, and IVF outcomes between two groups. Conclusion: There is no significant difference between delayed-start GnRH antagonist protocol versus GnRH antagonist protocol.

  17. Combination of 5-HT3 Antagonist and Dexamethasone Is Superior to 5-HT3 Antagonist Alone for PONV Prophylaxis After Laparoscopic Surgeries: A Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Som, Anirban; Bhattacharjee, Sulagna; Maitra, Souvik; Arora, Mahesh K; Baidya, Dalim Kumar

    2016-12-01

    5-Hydroxytryptamine type 3 (5-HT3) receptor antagonists are the most commonly used drugs for postoperative nausea vomiting (PONV) prophylaxis. Dexamethasone is another antiemetic with proven efficacy in reducing PONV. The aim of this study was to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to compare the combination of dexamethasone and 5-HT3 antagonist versus a 5-HT3 antagonist alone as prophylaxis of PONV in laparoscopic surgical patients. PubMed, PubMed Central, and CENTRAL databases were searched to identify those randomized trials that compared a 5-HT3 antagonist with the 5-HT3 antagonist and dexamethasone combination for PONV prophylaxis after laparoscopic surgeries. Data from 17 RCTs that evaluated 1402 patients were included. Results from our meta-analysis show that the combination of dexamethasone and a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist is more effective in preventing PONV than the 5-HT3 antagonist alone (odds ratio 0.38, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.27-0.54; number needed to treat = 6.6), with no statistical heterogeneity (I = 0) among studies. The need for rescue antiemetic is also decreased in patients receiving the combination (odds ratio 0.21, 99% CI 0.10-0.46; number needed to treat = 6), although data are insufficient to detect any significant difference in incidence of adverse effects. In addition, patients in the combination group complained of less pain after 24 hours (Weighted Mean Difference -0.67, 99% CI -1.27 to -0.08). Combination of a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist and dexamethasone is significantly more effective than 5-HT3 antagonist alone in preventing PONV after laparoscopic surgeries, with possible improvement in postoperative analgesia.

  18. 7-Chloroarctinone-b as a new selective PPARy antagonist potently blocks adipocyte differentiation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yong-tao LI Li LI Jing CHEN Tian-cen HU Jin HUANG Yue-wei GUO Hua-liang JIANG Xu SHEN

    2009-01-01

    .... In order to develop potent lead compounds for obesity treatment, we screened a natural product library for novel PPARy antagonists with inhibitory effects on adipocyte differentiation. Methods...

  19. Functionalized Congeners of P2Y1 Receptor Antagonists:

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Castro, Sonia [National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health; Maruoka, Hiroshi [National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health; Hong, Kunlun [ORNL; Kilbey, II, S Michael [ORNL; Costanzi, Stefano [National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health; Hechler, Béatrice [University of Strasbourg; Gachet, Christian [EFS-Alsace, Strasbourg, France; Harden, T. Kendall [University of North Carolina School of Medicine; Jacobson, Kenneth A. [National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health

    2010-01-01

    The P2Y{sub 1} receptor is a prothrombotic G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) activated by ADP. Preference for the North (N) ring conformation of the ribose moiety of adenine nucleotide 3',5'-bisphosphate antagonists of the P2Y{sub 1} receptor was established by using a ring-constrained methanocarba (a bicyclo[3.1.0]hexane) ring as a ribose substitute. A series of covalently linkable N{sup 6}-methyl-(N)-methanocarba-2'-deoxyadenosine-3',5'-bisphosphates containing extended 2-alkynyl chains was designed, and binding affinity at the human (h) P2Y{sub 1} receptor determined. The chain of these functionalized congeners contained hydrophilic moieties, a reactive substituent, or biotin, linked via an amide. Variation of the chain length and position of an intermediate amide group revealed high affinity of carboxylic congener 8 (K{sub i} 23 nM) and extended amine congener 15 (K{sub i} 132 nM), both having a 2-(1-pentynoyl) group. A biotin conjugate 18 containing an extended {epsilon}-aminocaproyl spacer chain exhibited higher affinity than a shorter biotinylated analogue. Alternatively, click coupling of terminal alkynes of homologous 2-dialkynyl nucleotide derivatives to alkyl azido groups produced triazole derivatives that bound to the P2Y{sub 1} receptor following deprotection of the bisphosphate groups. The preservation of receptor affinity of the functionalized congeners was consistent with new P2Y{sub 1} receptor modeling and ligand docking. Attempted P2Y{sub 1} antagonist conjugation to PAMAM dendrimer carriers by amide formation or palladium-catalyzed reaction between an alkyne on the dendrimer and a 2-iodopurine-derivatized nucleotide was unsuccessful. A dialkynyl intermediate containing the chain length favored in receptor binding was conjugated to an azide-derivatized dendrimer, and the conjugate inhibited ADP-promoted human platelet aggregation. This is the first example of attaching a strategically functionalized P2Y receptor

  20. Clinical experience in Europe with uroselective alpha1-antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debruyne, F M; Van der Poel, H G

    1999-01-01

    alpha1-Adrenoreceptors are thought to be involved in prostate smooth muscle contractions and could hence play a role in the dynamic component of intravesical obstruction associated with symptomatic BPH. Consequently, since the mid-eighties alpha receptor blocking agents have been used for the treatment of BPH. Non-selective alpha blockers are usually associated with systemic side-effects which resulted in an exclusion or withdrawal of many patients from this form of treatment. With the availability of so-called uroselective alpha blockers the management picture has changed since it was anticipated that these compounds cause lesser side-effects with at least the same, or even better, efficacy. Comparative clinical studies are essential for determining the eventual advantages of the uroselective alpha1-antagonists and a large number of such studies have been performed worldwide studying the various available compounds. European studies with terazosin showed clear superiority of the drug over the placebo while causing only limited side-effects. Various other studies using alpha-blocking agents such as doxazosin, tamsulosin and alfuzosin yielded identical results. Especially with tamsulosin and alfuzosin, the side-effects were comparable with those encountered in the placebo group. About 7% of the patients using tamsulosin experienced retrograde ejaculation in one study which did not occur in the alfuzosin studies. Important studies in Europe have also investigated the value of a combination of an alpha blocker with a 5alpha-reductase inhibitor. Comparable studies in which both alfuzosin and doxazosin were combined with the 5alpha-reductase inhibitor Proscar have shown that a combination is not superior to a blocker monotherapy and especially in the ALFIN study the results show that alfuzosin monotherapy is superior to Proscar in the management of symptomatic BPH. European studies have evaluated Quality of Life, sexuality as well as socio-economical outcome of the

  1. TNF-alpha antagonist induced lupus on three different agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudduluru, Bindu Madhavi; Shah, Shalin; Shamah, Steven; Swaminath, Arun

    2017-03-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha) antagonists are biologic agents used in the management of inflammatory conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis, seronegative spondyloarthropathies and inflammatory bowel disease. These agents have been recently shown to cause a syndrome called anti-TNF induced lupus (ATIL), a rare condition which has similar clinical manifestations to idiopathic systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Given that extra-intestinal manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease include arthritis, it can be difficult to separate arthritis due to underlying disease from drug-induced arthritis. We present a case of a 28-year-old female with Crohn's disease, who developed disabling arthritis as a clinical manifestation of ATIL following treatment with three anti-TNF agents, namely infliximab, adalimumab and certolizumab.

  2. PERSPECTIVE: CHASE-AWAY SEXUAL SELECTION: ANTAGONISTIC SEDUCTION VERSUS RESISTANCE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Brett; Rice, William R

    1998-02-01

    A model of sexual selection that leads to the evolution of exaggerated male display characters that is based on antagonistic coevolution between the sexes is described. The model is motivated by three lines of research: intersexual conflict with respect to mating, sensory exploitation, and the evolution of female resistance, as opposed to preference, for male display traits. The model generates unique predictions that permit its operation to be distinguished from other established models of sexual selection. One striking prediction is that females will frequently win the coevolutionary arms race with males, leaving them encumbered with costly ornaments that have little value except that their absence understimulates females. Examples from the literature suggest that the model may have broad application in nature. The chase-away model is a special case of the more general phenomenon of Interlocus Contest Evolution (ICE). © 1998 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  3. M sub 1 muscarinic antagonists interact with. sigma. recognition sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hudkins, R.L. (Virginia Commonwealth Univ., Richmond (United States)); DeHaven-Hudkins, D.L. (Sterling Research Group, Malvern, PA (United States))

    1991-01-01

    The M{sub 1}-selective muscarinic antagonists aprophen, caramiphen, carbetapentane, 2-DAEX, dicyclomine, hexahydrosiladifenidol, iodocaramiphen, nitrocaramiphen, oxybutynin and trihexyphenidyl potently inhibited binding to {sigma} sites in brain. Both basic ester and non-ester structural type compounds which exhibit affinity for the muscarinic receptor also demonstrated affinity for the {sigma} site, while the classical antimuscarinic agents atropine and QNB, and the tricyclic pirenzepine, were ineffective in binding to this site. The authors also observed a significant correlation between the K{sub i} values for {sigma}compounds to inhibit ({sup 3}H)pirenzepine binding and their IC{sub 50} values to inhibit carbachol-stimulated phosphoinositide turnover. These observations may aid in elucidating the relationship of {sigma} binding to inhibition of phosphoinositide turnover stimulated by cholinergic agonists.

  4. Identification of Bexarotene as a PPARγ Antagonist with HDX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David P. Marciano

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The retinoid x receptors (RXRs are the pharmacological target of Bexarotene, an antineoplastic agent indicated for the treatment of cutaneous T cell lymphoma (CTCL. The RXRs form heterodimers with several nuclear receptors (NRs, including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ, to regulate target gene expression through cooperative recruitment of transcriptional machinery. Here we have applied hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX mass spectrometry to characterize the effects of Bexarotene on the conformational plasticity of the intact RXRα:PPARγ heterodimer. Interestingly, addition of Bexarotene to PPARγ in the absence of RXRα induced protection from solvent exchange, suggesting direct receptor binding. This observation was confirmed using a competitive binding assay. Furthermore, Bexarotene functioned as a PPARγ antagonist able to alter rosiglitazone induced transactivation in a cell based promoter:reporter transactivation assay. Together these results highlight the complex polypharmacology of lipophilic NR targeted small molecules and the utility of HDX for identifying and characterizing these interactions.

  5. Effects of TNF antagonists on immune and neuroendocrine system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Cutolo

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In the article, the literature on the effects of TNFa-antagonists (etanercept, infliximab and adalimumab on the immune system is reviewed. These biologic agents are employed in chronic inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, seronegative spondyloarthritides, as well as psoriasis and Crohn’s disease. The differences of these drugs, testified by the different effects on the immune response, are discussed. These molecules exert their effect through cytokine inhibition, but they present striking differences since they can modulate macrophage activity, T cells apoptosis, leukocyte migration, and angiogenesis to a different degree. Some studies showed that these agents also affect the hypothalamo- pituitary-adrenal axis. The potential immunogenicity of these biologic agents is also discussed.

  6. Research progress of antagonistic interactions among root canal irrigations disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen QU

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Root canal therapy is the most effective way to treat various pulposis and periapical disease. Simple mechanical apparatus can not clean root canal thoroughly, but may affect tight filling instead. It can achieve a satisfactory cleansing effect only when it is combined with a chemical solution. Irrigation fluid for root canal should possess the properties of tissue dissolution, antimicrobial, lubrication, and removal of smear layer. So far, no solution is able to fulfill all these functions. Therefore, a combined use of multiple irrigation solutions is suggested. It can not only achieve good effect in cleaning and disinfection, also it can lower the concentration of different solutions, thus reducing the side effects. Nevertheless, some experiments proved that antagonism existed among the chemicals used for irrigations. The purpose of present article is to review the antagonistic effect among the chemicals used for irrigation when they are used together for root canal treatment.

  7. Emerging therapies for atopic dermatitis: TRPV1 antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonchak, Jonathan G; Swerlick, Robert A

    2018-03-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels are important mediators of somatosensory signaling throughout the body. Our understanding of the contribution of TRPs to a multitude of cutaneous physiologic processes has grown substantially in the past decade. TRP cation channel subfamily V member 1 (TRPV1), one of the better-understood members of this large family of ion channels, affects multiple pathways involved in pruritus. Further, TRPV1 appears to play a role in maintaining skin barrier function. Together, these properties make TRPV1 a ripe target for new therapies in atopic dermatitis. Neurokinin antagonists may affect similar pathways and have been studied to this effect. Early trials data suggest that these therapies are safe, but assessment of their efficacy in atopic dermatitis is pending as we await publication of phase II and III clinical trials data. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Identification of highly selective and potent orexin receptor 1 antagonists derived from a dual orexin receptor 1/2 antagonist based on the structural framework of pyrazoylethylbenzamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futamura, Aya; Nozawa, Dai; Araki, Yuko; Tamura, Yunoshin; Tokura, Seiken; Kawamoto, Hiroshi; Tokumaru, Yuichi; Kakihara, Sora; Aoki, Takeshi; Ohtake, Norikazu

    2017-10-15

    The design, synthesis, and structure activity relationships of the novel class of pyrazolylethylbenzamide orexin receptor 1-selective antagonists are described. Further derivatization of the prototype dual orexin receptor 1/2 antagonist lead (1) by installing a (S)-methyl group into the ethyl linker moiety between the pyrazole ring and benzamide resulted in an increase of the antagonist potency against orexin receptor 1/2 receptors. Optimization of the benzamide and pyrazole parts of compounds 2 and 9b led to the identification of N-ethyl-5-fluoro-N-{(2S)-1-[5-(4-fluorophenyl)-2H-tetrazol-2-yl]propan-2-yl}-2-(pyrimidin-2-yl)benzamide (24), which exhibited excellent antagonistic activity against orexin receptor 1 with an IC50 of 2.01nM and a 265-fold selectivity for orexin receptor 1 over orexin receptor 2. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Anticonvulsive effect of nonimidazole histamine H3 receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadek, Bassem; Kuder, Kamil; Subramanian, Dhanasekaran; Shafiullah, Mohamed; Stark, Holger; Lażewska, Dorota; Adem, Abdu; Kieć-Kononowicz, Katarzyna

    2014-06-01

    To determine the potential of histamine H3 receptor (H3R) ligands as new antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), aromatic ether, and diether derivatives (1-12) belonging to the nonimidazole class of ligands, with high in-vitro binding affinity at human H3R, were tested for their in-vivo anticonvulsive activity in the maximal electroshock (MES)-induced and pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-kindled seizure models in rats. The anticonvulsive effects of a systemic injection of 1-12 on MES-induced and PTZ-kindled seizures were evaluated against the reference AED phenytoin (PHT) and the structurally related H3R antagonist/inverse agonist pitolisant (PIT). Among the most promising ligands 2, 4, 5, and 11, there was a significant and dose-dependent reduction in the duration of tonic hind limb extension (THLE) in MES-induced seizure subsequent to administration of 4 and 5 [(5, 10, and 15 mg/kg, intraperitoneally (i.p.)]. The protective effects observed for the 1-(3-(3-(4-chlorophenyl)propoxy)propyl)-3-methylpiperidine derivative 11 at 10 mg/kg, i.p. were significantly greater than those of PIT, and were reversed by pretreatment with the central nervous system penetrant H1R antagonist pyrilamine (PYR) (10 mg/kg). Moreover, the protective action of the reference AED PHT, at a dose of 5 mg/kg (without considerable protection in the MES model), was significantly augmented when coadministered with derivative 11 (5 mg/kg, i.p.). Surprisingly, pretreatment with derivative 7 (10 mg/kg, i.p.), an ethylphenoxyhexyl-piperidine derivative without considerable protection in the MES model, potently altered PTZ-kindled seizure, significantly prolonged myoclonic latency time, and clearly shortened the total seizure time when compared with control, PHT, and PIT. These interesting results highlight the potential of H3R ligands as new AEDs or as adjuvants to available AED therapeutics.

  10. Opioid Receptor Antagonists in the Treatment of Alcoholism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serecigni, Josep Guardia

    2015-09-29

    On the basis of the recent advances in drug therapy of alcoholism, we conducted a review on opioid receptor antagonist drugs with approved indication for the treatment of alcoholism, such as naltrexone and nalmefene. We reviewed over 100 publications on peptides and opioid receptors, as well as studies conducted in experimental animals and in humans on the effect of opioid receptor antagonists on alcohol consumption in the treatment of alcoholism. We also reviewed the pharmacological characteristics of naltrexone and nalmefene, and the usefulness of these drugs in clinical practice. Much evidence has demonstrated the efficacy of naltrexone and nalmefene for the reduction of alcohol consumption, in experimental animals as well as in humans examined under experimental bar conditions; however, due to its different receptor profile, nalmefene has been associated with higher efficacy levels in reducing alcohol consumption in alcohol-dependent rats. In addition, a great number of controlled clinical trials have demonstrated the efficacy of naltrexone for relapse prevention in patients with an alcohol dependence disorder. Recent controlled clinical trials have demonstrated the efficacy of nalmefene "as-needed" in the reduction of alcohol consumption in subjects with mild alcohol dependence. Both naltrexone and nalmefene have proved to be safe, well tolerated, easy to manage, and efficient drugs for the treatment of alcohol dependence disorder (currently known as alcohol use disorder). On the basis of recent controlled clinical trials, nalmefene has been shown to result in a significant reduction of alcohol consumption, thereby representing a new objective that extends the therapeutic possibilities for those patients who do not wish for a continuous abstinence, but rather a reduction of alcohol consumption.

  11. Alpha antagonists and intraoperative floppy iris syndrome: A spectrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharif A Issa

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Sharif A Issa, Omar H Hadid, Oliver Baylis, Margaret DayanDepartment of Ophthalmology, Royal Victoria Infirmary, Newcastle upon Tyne, UKBackground: To determine occurrence of features of intraoperative floppy iris syndrome (IFIS during cataract surgery in patients taking systemic alpha-antagonists (AA.Methods: We prospectively studied patients on AA and who underwent phacoemulsification. The following were recorded: pupil diameter preoperatively, iris flaccidity, iris prolapse and peroperative miosis.Results: We studied 40 eyes of 31 subjects. Mean age was 78 years. Overall, 14 eyes (13 patients showed signs of IFIS: 9/13 (69% eyes of patients on tamsulosin, 1/18 (6% eyes in the doxazosin group, 2/2 prazosin patients, 1/4 eyes in the indoramin group, and 1/2 eyes in two patients on a combination of doxazosin and tamsulosin. Most cases (92% had only one or two signs of IFIS. Bilateral cataract surgery was undertaken in 9 patients but only one patient (on tamsulosin had features of IFIS in both eyes, while 4 patients (2 on tamsulosin and 2 on other AA showed signs of IFIS in one eye only, and 4 patients did not show IFIS in either eye.Conclusion: Most AA were associated with IFIS, but it tends to present as a spectrum of signs rather than full triad originally described. Tamsulosin was most likely to be associated with IFIS; however, its intake does not necessarily mean that IFIS will occur. For patients on AA, the behavior of the iris intraoperatively in one eye is a poor predictor of the other eye. Surgeons should anticipate the occurrence of IFIS in any patient on AA.Keywords: alpha blocker, alpha antagonist, cataract surgery, intraoperative floppy iris syndrome, tamsulosin.

  12. Antagonistic interactions between sodium hypochlorite, chlorhexidine, EDTA, and citric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi-Fedele, Giampiero; Doğramaci, Esma J; Guastalli, Andrea R; Steier, Liviu; de Figueiredo, Jose Antonio Poli

    2012-04-01

    Root canal irrigants play a significant role in the elimination of microorganisms, tissue dissolution, and the removal of debris and smear layer. No single solution is able to fulfill these actions completely; therefore, their association is required. The aim of this investigation was to review the antagonistic interactions occurring when sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), chlorhexidine (CHX), EDTA, and citric acid (CA) are used together during endodontic treatment. A search was performed in the electronic database Medline (articles published through 2011; English language; and the following search terms or combinations: "interaction AND root canal irrigant or endodontic irrigant or sodium hypochlorite or chlorhexidine," "sodium hypochlorite AND EDTA or ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid or citric acid or chelating agent or chlorhexidine," and "chlorhexidine AND EDTA or ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid or citric acid or chelating agent") to identify publications that studied unwanted chemical interactions between NaOCl, CHX, and EDTA and CA. The search identified 1,285 publications; 19 fulfilled the inclusion/exclusion criteria of the review. Their research methodology was classified as either in vitro or ex vivo. Antagonistic interactions included the loss of free available chlorine for NaOCl when in contact with chelators, which consequently reduced the tissue dissolution capability and to a lesser extent antimicrobial activities. When CHX and NaOCl are mixed, a precipitate forms that can present detrimental consequences for endodontic treatment, including a risk of discoloration and potential leaching of unidentified chemicals into the periradicular tissues. CHX and EDTA mixtures cause a precipitate, whereas CHX and CA do not exhibit interaction. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Concentric agonist-antagonist robots for minimally invasive surgeries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver-Butler, Kaitlin; Epps, Zane H.; Rucker, Daniel Caleb

    2017-03-01

    We present a novel continuum robot design concept, Concentric Agonist-Antagonist Robots (CAAR), that uses push-pull, agonist-antagonist action of a pair of concentric tubes. The CAAR tubes are designed to have noncentral, offset neutral axes, and they are fixed together at their distal ends. Axial base translations then induce bending in the device. A CAAR segment can be created by selectively cutting asymmetric notches into the profile of two stock tubes, which relocates the neutral bending plane away from the center of the inner lumen. Like conventional concentric-tube robots (CTRs) based on counter-rotating precurved tubes, a CAAR can be made at very small scales and contain a large, open lumen. In contrast with CTRs, the CAAR concept has no elastic stability issues, offers a larger range of motion, and has lower overall stiffness. Furthermore, by varying the position of the neutral axes along the length of each tube, arbitrary, variable curvature actuation modes can be achieved. Precurving the tubes can additionally increase the workspace of a single segment. A single two-tube assembly can be used to create 3 degree-of-freedom (DOF) robot segments, and multiple segments can be deployed concentrically. Both additive manufacturing and traditional machining of stock tubes can create and customize the geometry and performance of the CAAR. In this paper, we explore the CAAR concept, provide kinematic and static models, and experimentally evaluate the model with a both a straight and a precurved CAAR. We conclude with a discussion of the significance and our plans for future work.

  14. Survivin mRNA antagonists using locked nucleic acid, potential for molecular cancer therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fisker, Niels; Westergaard, Majken; Hansen, Henrik Frydenlund

    2007-01-01

    We have investigated the effects of different locked nucleic acid modified antisense mRNA antagonists against Survivin in a prostate cancer model. These mRNA antagonists were found to be potent inhibitors of Survivin expression at low nanomolar concentrations. Additionally there was a pronounced ...

  15. Anti-inflammatory properties of a novel peptide interleukin 1 receptor antagonist

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klementiev, Boris; Li, Shizhong; Korshunova, Irina

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin 1 (IL-1) is implicated in neuroinflammation, an essential component of neurodegeneration. We evaluated the potential anti-inflammatory effect of a novel peptide antagonist of IL-1 signaling, Ilantide.......Interleukin 1 (IL-1) is implicated in neuroinflammation, an essential component of neurodegeneration. We evaluated the potential anti-inflammatory effect of a novel peptide antagonist of IL-1 signaling, Ilantide....

  16. The muscarinic receptor antagonist propiverine exhibits α(1)-adrenoceptor antagonism in human prostate and porcine trigonum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wuest, Melinda; Witte, Lambertus P.; Michel-Reher, Martina B.; Propping, Stefan; Braeter, Manfred; Strugala, Gerhard J.; Wirth, Manfred P.; Michel, Martin C.; Ravens, Ursula

    2011-01-01

    Combination therapy of male lower urinary tract symptoms with α(1)-adrenoceptor and muscarinic receptor antagonists attracts increasing interest. Propiverine is a muscarinic receptor antagonist possessing additional properties, i.e., block of L-type Ca(2+) channels. Here, we have investigated

  17. INCREASED PLASMA-CONCENTRATIONS OF INTERLEUKIN-1 RECEPTOR ANTAGONIST IN NEONATAL SEPSIS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEBONT, ESJM; DELEIJ, LHFM; OKKEN, A; BAARSMA, R; KIMPEN, JLL

    Newborns are prone to severe infections and sepsis. Cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha and IL-1 beta play a major role in the initiation of the host response to infections. IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra) is a naturally occurring antagonist of IL-1 beta. we hypothesized that low IL-1ra

  18. Agar composition affects in vitro screening of biocontrol activity of antagonistic microorganisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosmans, Lien; De Bruijn, I.; de Mot, Rene; Readers, Hans; Lievens, Bart

    2016-01-01

    Agar-based screening assays are the method of choice when evaluating antagonistic potential of bacterial biocontrol-candidates against pathogens.Weshowed thatwhen using the samemedium, but different agar compositions, the activity of a bacterial antagonist against Agrobacteriumwas strongly affected.

  19. Epidemiology and management of bleeding in patients using vitamin K antagonists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levi, M. [=Marcel M.

    2009-01-01

    Vitamin K antagonists are effective in the prevention and treatment of a variety of arterial and venous thrombotic disorders, but are associated with an increased risk of serious bleeding complications. According to well documented studies of patients using vitamin K antagonists, the incidence of

  20. Agar composition affects in vitro screening of biocontrol activity of antagonistic microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosmans, L; De Bruijn, I; De Mot, R; Rediers, H; Lievens, B

    2016-08-01

    Agar-based screening assays are the method of choice when evaluating antagonistic potential of bacterial biocontrol-candidates against pathogens. We showed that when using the same medium, but different agar compositions, the activity of a bacterial antagonist against Agrobacterium was strongly affected. Consequently, results from in vitro screenings should be interpreted cautiously. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Discovery of indole alkaloids with cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonistic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitajima, Mariko; Iwai, Masumi; Kikura-Hanajiri, Ruri; Goda, Yukihiro; Iida, Mitsuru; Yabushita, Hisatoshi; Takayama, Hiromitsu

    2011-04-01

    Three indole alkaloids, voacamine (1), 3,6-oxidovoacangine (2), and a new alkaloid, 5-hydroxy-3,6-oxidovoacangine (3), isolated from Voacanga africana were found to exhibit potent cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonistic activity. This is the first example of CB1 antagonists derived from natural alkaloids. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Screening of antagonistic bacteria for biological control of nursery wilt of black pepper (Piper nigrum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anith, K N; Radhakrishnan, N V; Manomohandas, T P

    2003-01-01

    Bacterial antagonists of Phytophthora capsici were isolated from underground shoot portions of rooted cuttings of black pepper. Initially isolates were screened by dual culture on potato dextrose agar and carrot agar. Further, a screening was done on black pepper shoots for supression of lesion caused by the pathogen. Most of the antagonists showed varying levels of antagonism in the dual culture and the shoot assay. Isolate PN-026, showing the highest suppression of lesion development in the shoot assay was found to be the most efficient antagonist in reducing Phytophthora capsici induced nursery wilt of black pepper. This screening involving the host, pathogen, and the antagonist, performed on black pepper shoot (the planting material for this vegetatively propagated crop), could be used as a rapid and reliable method for the isolation of efficient bacterial antagonists of P. capsici.

  3. Antagonistic activity of autosimbionts А. viridans, B. subtilis and their probiotic association to conditionally microflora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stepansky D.A.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this research the data on examination of antagonist qualities of bioassotiantes A. viridans and strain B. subtilis 3 towards pathogenic and opportunistic pathogenic microflora isolated from oropharynx and nasopharynx of children who were in contact with patients with pulmonary tuberculosis (MBT + are submitted. The expressed antagonist activity of autosimbionts A. viridans towards pathogenic and opportunistic pathogenic microflora was shown. Common antagonist activity of A. viridans (k N 1 and B. subtilis 3 towards diverse strains of test-cultures is 1,5-2 times higher, than separate antagonist activity of A. viridans (k №1 and B. subtilis 3. Received research data showed the possibility of continuing work on development of probiotic associations, that contain representatives of normal microflora - bioassociants A. viridans and probiotic strains B. subtilis 3 with broadspectrum of antagonistic activity in relation to the various groups of bacterium.

  4. The regulation of protein synthesis and translation factors by CD3 and CD28 in human primary T lymphocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Proud Christopher G

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Activation of human resting T lymphocytes results in an immediate increase in protein synthesis. The increase in protein synthesis after 16–24 h has been linked to the increased protein levels of translation initiation factors. However, the regulation of protein synthesis during the early onset of T cell activation has not been studied in great detail. We studied the regulation of protein synthesis after 1 h of activation using αCD3 antibody to stimulate the T cell receptor and αCD28 antibody to provide the co-stimulus. Results Activation of the T cells with both antibodies led to a sustained increase in the rate of protein synthesis. The activities and/or phosphorylation states of several translation factors were studied during the first hour of stimulation with αCD3 and αCD28 to explore the mechanism underlying the activation of protein synthesis. The initial increase in protein synthesis was accompanied by activation of the guanine nucleotide exchange factor, eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF 2B, and of p70 S6 kinase and by dephosphorylation of eukaryotic elongation factor (eEF 2. Similar signal transduction pathways, as assessed using signal transduction inhibitors, are involved in the regulation of protein synthesis, eIF2B activity and p70 S6 kinase activity. A new finding was that the p38 MAPK α/β pathway was involved in the regulation of overall protein synthesis in primary T cells. Unexpectedly, no changes were detected in the phosphorylation state of the cap-binding protein eIF4E and the eIF4E-binding protein 4E-BP1, or the formation of the cap-binding complex eIF4F. Conclusions Both eIF2B and p70 S6 kinase play important roles in the regulation of protein synthesis during the early onset of T cell activation.

  5. Transgenic Brassica rapa plants over-expressing eIF(iso)4E variants show broad-spectrum Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV) resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jinhee; Kang, Won-Hee; Hwang, Jeena; Yang, Hee-Bum; Dosun, Kim; Oh, Chang-Sik; Kang, Byoung-Cheorl

    2014-08-01

    The protein-protein interaction between VPg (viral protein genome-linked) of potyviruses and eIF4E (eukaryotic initiation factor 4E) or eIF(iso)4E of their host plants is a critical step in determining viral virulence. In this study, we evaluated the approach of engineering broad-spectrum resistance in Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa) to Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV), which is one of the most important potyviruses, by a systematic knowledge-based approach to interrupt the interaction between TuMV VPg and B. rapa eIF(iso)4E. The seven amino acids in the cap-binding pocket of eIF(iso)4E were selected on the basis of other previous results and comparison of protein models of cap-binding pockets, and mutated. Yeast two-hybrid assay and co-immunoprecipitation analysis demonstrated that W95L, K150L and W95L/K150E amino acid mutations of B. rapa eIF(iso)4E interrupted its interaction with TuMV VPg. All eIF(iso)4E mutants were able to complement an eIF4E-knockout yeast strain, indicating that the mutated eIF(iso)4E proteins retained their function as a translational initiation factor. To determine whether these mutations could confer resistance, eIF(iso)4E W95L, W95L/K150E and eIF(iso)4E wild-type were over-expressed in a susceptible Chinese cabbage cultivar. Evaluation of the TuMV resistance of T1 and T2 transformants demonstrated that the over-expression of the eIF(iso)4E mutant forms can confer resistance to multiple TuMV strains. These data demonstrate the utility of knowledge-based approaches for the engineering of broad-spectrum resistance in Chinese cabbage. © 2014 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  6. Anticonvulsant effects of isomeric nonimidazole histamine H3 receptor antagonists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadek B

    2016-11-01

    , in which 3-piperidinopropan-1-ol in ligand 2 was replaced by (4-(3-(piperidin-1-ylpropoxyphenylmethanol, and its (S-enantiomer (4 significantly and in a dose-dependent manner reduced convulsions or exhibited full protection in MES and PTZ convulsions model, respectively. Interestingly, the protective effects observed for the (R-enantiomer (3 in MES model were significantly greater than those of the standard H3R inverse agonist/antagonist pitolisant, comparable with those observed for PHT, and reversed when rats were pretreated with the selective H3R agonist R-(α-methyl-histamine. Comparisons of the observed antagonistic in vitro affinities among the ligands 1–6 revealed profound stereoselectivity at human H3Rs with varying preferences for this receptor subtype. Moreover, the in vivo anticonvulsant effects observed in this study for ligands 1–6 showed stereoselectivity in different convulsion models in male adult rats. Keywords: histamine, H3 receptor, isomeric antagonists, anticonvulsant activity, stereo­selectivity

  7. Antagonistic studies and hyphal interactions of the new antagonist Aspergillus piperis against some phytopathogenic fungi in vitro in comparison with Trichoderma harzianum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Debaiky, Samah A

    2017-10-23

    The present study represents, for the first time, the detailed studies about the hyphal interactions of Aspergillus piperis, as a new antagonist, against some isolated plant pathogenic fungi (Alternaria alternata, Alternaria solani, Botrytis cinerea, Sclerotium cepivorum and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum) in vitro. The bio-controlling capability of A. piperis against the tested phytopathogens was tested using the dual culture method. This experiment revealed that A. piperis had antagonistic activity and reduced the growth of the tested phytopathogens and grew over their mycelia in the paired plates. Also, several antagonistic mechanisms were recorded, in this study, between A. piperis and the tested phytopathogens using the microscopic examination. The bio-controlling activity and the antagonistic mechanisms exhibited by the new antagonist, A. piperis were compared with those obtained by the common antagonist, Trichoderma harzianum against the same phytopathogens. The obtained results showed that, A. piperis was more effective than T. harzianum in inhibiting all the tested species in the dual culture plates. The best result was 81.85% inhibition percentage against S. sclerotiorum by A. piperis while, T. harzianum exhibits only 45.18%. Moreover, several antagonistic mechanisms and hyphal interactions were investigated among the hyphae of both A.piperis and T. harzianum and the hyphae of the tested phytopathogens. These mechanisms were summarized as; mycoparasitism (coiling and penetration of the hyphae) and antibiosis in the form of lysis of the hyphal cells and spores, denaturation and breaking of the hyphae. The indirect interaction (antibiosis) and the direct mycoparasitism were observed by A. piperis against all the tested phytopathogens, but it attacked the hyphae and conidiophores of A. alternata by only the antibiosis interaction. The microscopic examination revealed also that T. harzianum attacked the tested phytopathogens by both antibiosis and mycoparasitism

  8. Antagonistic and Biocontrol Potential of Trichoderma asperellum ZJSX5003 Against the Maize Stalk Rot Pathogen Fusarium graminearum

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Li, Yaqian; Sun, Ruiyan; Yu, Jia; Saravanakumar, Kandasamy; Chen, Jie

    2016-01-01

    ...) the causal agent of corn stalk rot of maize were in vitro for their antagonistic properties followed by statistical model of principal compound analysis to identify the beneficial antagonist T. asperellum strain...

  9. Antagonistic Activity of Lactobacillus Isolates against Salmonella typhi In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Daim, Amira; Hassouna, Nadia; Hafez, Mohamed; Ashor, Mohamed Seif Aldeen; Aboulwafa, Mohammad M.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Enteric fever is a global health problem, and rapidly developing resistance to various drugs makes the situation more alarming. The potential use of Lactobacillus to control typhoid fever represents a promising approach, as it may exert protective actions through various mechanisms. Methods. In this study, the probiotic potential and antagonistic activities of 32 Lactobacillus isolates against Salmonella typhi were evaluated. The antimicrobial activity of cell free supernatants of Lactobacillus isolates, interference of Lactobacillus isolates with the Salmonella adherence and invasion, cytoprotective effect of Lactobacillus isolates, and possibility of concurrent use of tested Lactobacillus isolates and antibiotics were evaluated by testing their susceptibilities to antimicrobial agents, and their oxygen tolerance was also examined. Results. The results revealed that twelve Lactobacillus isolates could protect against Salmonella typhi infection through interference with both its growth and its virulence properties, such as adherence, invasion, and cytotoxicity. These Lactobacillus isolates exhibited MIC values for ciprofloxacin higher than those of Salmonella typhi and oxygen tolerance and were identified as Lactobacillus plantarum. Conclusion. The tested Lactobacillus plantarum isolates can be introduced as potential novel candidates that have to be subjected for in vivo and application studies for treatment and control of typhoid fever. PMID:24191248

  10. Torque values of antagonistic muscles of the hipjoint. Pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derewiecki, Tomasz; Duda, Marta; Majcher, Piotr; Mroczek, Krzysztof

    2012-01-01

    The hip joint is a multiaxial articulation and the most mobile joint of the lower extremity. It can be subject to overloading by the repetition of a motor pattern produced by imbalanced muscle groups. To determine mean torque values of the external forces acting on the hip joint in various age groups; to compare the relations between the torque values of antagonistic hip muscles; to correlate changes in mean torque values of the hip muscles with age. The study involved a group of 120 women aged 19-85 years divided into 6 age groups of 20 subjects each. The presence of knee or hip pathology was an exclusion criterion. The tests were carried out in the Zamość Rehabilitation Department of CMPA in an SPB2-FM unit. The highest mean torque values for all muscle groups were seen in women aged 19-25 years. The values gradually decreased with age. 1. The SPB2-FM unit is an objective tool for evaluating torques of the hip muscles and makes it possible to monitor changes occurring in the process of rehabilitation, as well as to diagnose risks resulting from a decrease in hip muscle strength. 2. The present study of healthy subjects provides baseline data for further comparisons with patients suffering from hip pathology and preliminary input for determining reference values of pelvic girdle muscle strength.

  11. [Vascular calcifications, the hidden side effects of vitamin K antagonists].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennis, Youssef; Vengadessane, Subashini; Bodeau, Sandra; Gras, Valérie; Bricca, Giampiero; Kamel, Saïd; Liabeuf, Sophie

    2016-09-01

    Despite the availability of new oral anticoagulants, vitamin K antagonists (VKA, such as fluindione, acenocoumarol or warfarin) remain currently the goal standard medicines for oral prevention or treatment of thromboembolic disorders. They inhibit the cycle of the vitamin K and its participation in the enzymatic gamma-carboxylation of many proteins. The VKA prevent the activation of the vitamin K-dependent blood clotting factors limiting thus the initiation of the coagulation cascade. But other proteins are vitamin K-dependent and also remain inactive in the presence of VKA. This is the case of matrix Gla-protein (MGP), a protein that plays a major inhibitory role in the development of vascular calcifications. Several experimental and epidemiological results suggest that the use of the VKA could promote the development of vascular calcifications increasing thus the cardiovascular risk. This risk seems to be higher in patients with chronic kidney disease or mellitus diabetes who are more likely to develop vascular calcifications, and may be due to a decrease of the MGP activity. This review aims at summarizing the data currently available making vascular calcifications the probably underestimated side effects of VKA. Copyright © 2016 Société française de pharmacologie et de thérapeutique. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Intraguild predation provides a selection mechanism for bacterial antagonistic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leisner, J. J.; Haaber, J.

    2012-01-01

    Bacteriocins are bacterial proteinaceous toxins with bacteriostatic or bacteriocidal activity towards other bacteria. The current theory on their biological role concerns especially colicins, with underlying social interactions described as an example of spite. This leads to a rock–paper–scissors game between colicin producers and sensitive and resistant variants. The generality of this type of selection mechanism has previously been challenged with lactic acid bacterial (LAB) bacteriocins as an example. In the natural environment of LAB, batch cultures are the norm opposed to the natural habitats of Escherichia coli where continuous cultures are prevailing. This implies that fitness for LAB, to a large degree, is related to survival rates (bottleneck situations) rather than to growth rates. We suggest that the biological role of LAB bacteriocins is to enhance survival in the stationary growth phase by securing a supply of nutrients from lysed target cells. Thus, this social interaction is an example of selfishness rather than of spite. Specifically, it fits into an ecological model known as intraguild predation (IGP), which is a combination of competition and predation where the predator (LAB bacteriocin producer) and prey (bacteriocin susceptible bacteria) share similar and often limited resources. We hypothesize that IGP may be a common phenomenon promoting microbial production of antagonistic compounds. PMID:22951735

  13. Mineralocorticoid Receptor Antagonists for Treatment of Hypertension and Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sica, Domenic A

    2015-01-01

    Spironolactone and eplerenone are both mineralocorticoid-receptor antagonists. These compounds block both the epithelial and nonepithelial actions of aldosterone, with the latter assuming increasing clinical relevance. Spironolactone and eplerenone both affect reductions in blood pressure either as mono- or add-on therapy; moreover, they each afford survival benefits in diverse circumstances of heart failure and the probability of renal protection in proteinuric chronic kidney disease. However, as use of mineralocorticoid-blocking agents has expanded, the hazards inherent in taking such drugs have become more apparent. Whereas the endocrine side effects of spironolactone are in most cases little more than a cosmetic annoyance, the potassium-sparing effects of both spironolactone and eplerenone can prove disastrous, even fatal, if sufficient degrees of hyperkalemia emerge. For most patients, however, the risk of developing hyperkalemia in and of itself should not discourage the sensible clinician from bringing these compounds into play. Hyperkalemia should always be considered a possibility in patients receiving either of these medications; therefore, anticipatory steps should be taken to minimize the likelihood of its occurrence if long-term therapy of these agents is being considered.

  14. Locomotor adaptation to a soleus EMG-controlled antagonistic exoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Keith E; Kinnaird, Catherine R; Ferris, Daniel P

    2013-04-01

    Locomotor adaptation in humans is not well understood. To provide insight into the neural reorganization that occurs following a significant disruption to one's learned neuromuscular map relating a given motor command to its resulting muscular action, we tied the mechanical action of a robotic exoskeleton to the electromyography (EMG) profile of the soleus muscle during walking. The powered exoskeleton produced an ankle dorsiflexion torque proportional to soleus muscle recruitment thus limiting the soleus' plantar flexion torque capability. We hypothesized that neurologically intact subjects would alter muscle activation patterns in response to the antagonistic exoskeleton by decreasing soleus recruitment. Subjects practiced walking with the exoskeleton for two 30-min sessions. The initial response to the perturbation was to "fight" the resistive exoskeleton by increasing soleus activation. By the end of training, subjects had significantly reduced soleus recruitment resulting in a gait pattern with almost no ankle push-off. In addition, there was a trend for subjects to reduce gastrocnemius recruitment in proportion to the soleus even though only the soleus EMG was used to control the exoskeleton. The results from this study demonstrate the ability of the nervous system to recalibrate locomotor output in response to substantial changes in the mechanical output of the soleus muscle and associated sensory feedback. This study provides further evidence that the human locomotor system of intact individuals is highly flexible and able to adapt to achieve effective locomotion in response to a broad range of neuromuscular perturbations.

  15. Gingivitis and periodontitis as antagonistic modulators of gingival perfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Martínez, Manuel; Patiño-Marín, Nuria; Loyola-Rodríguez, Juan Pablo; Brito-Orta, Ma Dolores

    2006-10-01

    We explore the possible association between the extent of gingivitis or periodontitis and an index of gingival microvascular perfusion response to compression of alveolar mucosa, called the gingival perfusion index (GIPI). A cross-sectional analytical study was done in a sample of 60 adults, including healthy and non-insulin-dependent diabetic subjects of either gender, with teeth in the anteromandibular sextant with or without gingivitis and with or without periodontitis at the lower-left lateral incisor (LLLI). A sample was selected by convenience non-probability sampling. Gingival perfusion was evaluated at labial LLLI attached gingiva. Two perfusion recordings were done 5 minutes apart, each one consisting of a 40-second control phase, a 22-second compression phase, and a 40-second postcompression phase. LLLI alveolar mucosa was compressed with a wood-mounted cotton swab until reaching about one-fifth of the control perfusion value. GIPI was used as response dependent variable. The gingival index and probing depth were used as measures of the extent of gingivitis and periodontitis, respectively. By analysis of covariance and multiple regression analysis, it was found that only the probing depth (negatively) and gingival index (positively) predicted GIPI (R(2) adjusted = 0.5194, P gingivitis and periodontitis operate as antagonistic modulators of gingival perfusion. The major practical implication of our findings is that an increase or decrease in this index (GIPI) at a given attached gingiva site could indicate, respectively, the clinical predominance of gingivitis or periodontitis in such a site.

  16. Anaphylactic shock: catecholamine actions in the responses to opioid antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amir, S

    1988-01-01

    The pathophysiological consequences of endorphin release in anaphylactic shock were investigated through pharmacological studies using opiate antagonists (naloxone, naltrexone, natrexone methyl bromide) as well as agonists (morphine, beta-endorphin). These studies suggest that induction of anaphylaxis provokes the release of endogenous opioids, possibly from the hypothalamus, which contribute to the shock process by stimulating opiate receptors in the CNS. The mechanism of pathophysiologic action of endorphin in anaphylaxis involves, at least in part, inhibition of the central component of the sympatho-adrenalmedullary system. This results in reduced effectiveness of the sympathetic system to physiologically reverse the circulatory effects of the toxic mediators of anaphylaxis. Naloxone, by blocking endorphin action at CNS opiate receptors located at autonomic regulatory centers (e.g. hypothalamus), reverses the sympatho-inhibitory effect of the endorphin peptides. This results in increased central sympathetic outflow to peripheral sympathetic neuroeffector mechanisms; it affords improved sympathetic compensatory responses and increases survival. TRH and DT gamma E physiologically oppose the action of endorphins upon the autonomic system. They stimulate central sympathetic mechanisms through their own receptor systems and increase outflow to peripheral sympathetic effectors. This also results in improved circulatory function and survival.

  17. Bovine pancreatic polypeptide as an antagonist of muscarinic cholinergic receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, G.Z.; Lu, L.; Qian, J.; Xue, B.G.

    1987-03-01

    In dispersed acini from rat pancreas, it was found that bovine pancreatic polypeptide (BPP) and its C-fragment hexapeptide amide (PP-6), at concentrations of 0.1 and 30 ..mu..M, respectively, could significantly inhibit amylase secretion stimulated by carbachol, and this inhibition by BPP was dose dependent. /sup 45/Ca outflux induced by carbachol was also inhibited by BPP or PP-6, but they had no effect on cholecystokinin octapeptide- (CCK-8) or A23187-stimulated /sup 45/Ca outflux. BPP was also capable of displacing the specific binding of (/sup 3/H)-quinuclidinyl benzilate to its receptors, and it possessed a higher affinity (K/sub i/35nM) than carbachol (K/sub i/ 1.8 ..mu..M) in binding with M-receptors. It is concluded from this study that BPP acts as an antagonist of muscarinic cholinergic receptors in rat pancreatic acini. In addition, BPP inhibited the potentiation of amylase secretion caused by the combination of carbachol plus secretin or vasoactive intestinal peptide. This may be a possible explanation of the inhibitory effect of BPP on secretin-induced pancreatic enzyme secretion shown in vivo, since pancreatic enzyme secretion stimulated by secretin under experimental conditions may be the result of potentiation of enzyme release produced by the peptide in combination with a cholinergic stimulant.

  18. Effect of platelet activating factor antagonist treatment on gentamicin nephrotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Rodriguez-Barbero

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available To assess whether PAF could be involved in the gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity, we have studied the effect of PAF antagonist BN-52021 on renal function in rats after gentamicin (GENTA treatment. Experiments were completed in 21 Wistar rats divided into three groups: group GENTA was injected with gentamicin 100 mg kg−1 body wt/day s.c. for 6 days. Group GENTA + BN received gentamicin and BN-52021 i.p. 5 mg kg−1 body wt/day. A third group served as control. Rats were placed in meta-bolic cages and plasma creatinine and creatinine clearance were measured daily. GENTA group showed a progressive increase in plasma creatinine, a drop in creatinine clearance and an increase in urinary excretion of N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase and alkaline phosphatase. GENTA + BN group showed a lesser change in plasma creatinine and a creatinine clearance, but no difference with GENTA group in urinary excretion of NAG and AP were observed. Histological examination revealed a massive cortical tubular necrosis in rats treated with gentamicin, whereas in BN-52021 injected animals tubular damage was markedly attenuated. The present results suggest a role for PAF in the gentamicininduced nephro-toxicity.

  19. Discovery and Characterization of an Endogenous CXCR4 Antagonist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onofrio Zirafi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available CXCL12-CXCR4 signaling controls multiple physiological processes and its dysregulation is associated with cancers and inflammatory diseases. To discover as-yet-unknown endogenous ligands of CXCR4, we screened a blood-derived peptide library for inhibitors of CXCR4-tropic HIV-1 strains. This approach identified a 16 amino acid fragment of serum albumin as an effective and highly specific CXCR4 antagonist. The endogenous peptide, termed EPI-X4, is evolutionarily conserved and generated from the highly abundant albumin precursor by pH-regulated proteases. EPI-X4 forms an unusual lasso-like structure and antagonizes CXCL12-induced tumor cell migration, mobilizes stem cells, and suppresses inflammatory responses in mice. Furthermore, the peptide is abundant in the urine of patients with inflammatory kidney diseases and may serve as a biomarker. Our results identify EPI-X4 as a key regulator of CXCR4 signaling and introduce proteolysis of an abundant precursor protein as an alternative concept for chemokine receptor regulation.

  20. Antagonist effects of calcium on borosilicate glass alteration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mercado-Depierre, S. [CEA Marcoule, DTCD SPDE LCLT, 30207 Bagnols sur Cèze (France); Angeli, F., E-mail: frederic.angeli@cea.fr [CEA Marcoule, DTCD SPDE LCLT, 30207 Bagnols sur Cèze (France); Frizon, F. [CEA Marcoule, DTCD SECM LP2C, 30207 Bagnols sur Cèze (France); Gin, S. [CEA Marcoule, DTCD SPDE LCLT, 30207 Bagnols sur Cèze (France)

    2013-10-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted -- Highlights: •Kinetic study of glass alteration is investigated in calcium-enriched solutions. •New insights into silicon–calcium interactions in glass/cement systems are proposed. •Glass alteration is controlled by pH, Ca concentration and reaction progress. •Evidence of antagonist effects according to the importance of these parameters. -- Abstract: Numerous studies have been conducted on glass and cement durability in contact with water, but very little work to date has focused directly on interactions between the two materials. These interactions are mostly controlled by silicon–calcium reactivity. However, the physical and chemical processes involved remain insufficiently understood to predict the evolution of coupled glass–cement systems used in several industrial applications. Results are reported from borosilicate glass alteration in calcium-rich solutions. Our data show that four distinct behaviors can be expected according to the relative importance of three key parameters: the pH, the reaction progress (short- or long-term alteration) and the calcium concentration. Glass alteration is thus controlled by specific mechanisms depending on the solution chemistry: calcium complexation at the glass surface, precipitation of calcium silicate hydrates (C–S–H) or calcium incorporation in the altered layer. These findings highlight the impact of silicon–calcium interactions on glass durability and open the way for a better understanding of glass–cement mixing in civil engineering applications as well as in nuclear waste storage.

  1. A new class of NO-donor H3-antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosco, Paolo; Bertinaria, Massimo; Di Stilo, Antonella; Marini, Elisabetta; Rolando, Barbara; Sorba, Giovanni; Fruttero, Roberta; Gasco, Alberto

    2004-05-01

    Synthesis and pharmacological characterisation of a series of compounds obtained by joining, through appropriate spacers, NO-donor furoxan and nitrooxy moieties to the imidazole ring, as well as their structurally related analogues devoid of NO-donating properties are described. All the products were studied for their capacity to interact with H3-receptors present on the guinea-pig ileum and with H2-receptors present on guinea-pig right atrium. The whole series of products displayed reversible H3-antagonistic activity. No activity on H2-receptors was observed when the products were tested at 10 microM concentration. Many of the products were also able to induce partial relaxation when added to the bath after electrical contraction of the guinea-pig ileum during the study of their H3-antagonism. This phenomenon seems to be dependent on various factors; for some compounds it proved to be dependent on NO-mediated sGC activation, for other products it could be due to their weak M3-antagonism. The investigation of the lipophilic-hydrophilic balance of all the products indicates, for many of them, an ideal value to cross the blood-brain barrier. Copyright 2004 Elsevier SAS

  2. Orexin receptor antagonists as therapeutic agents for insomnia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Clementina Equihua

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Insomnia is a common clinical condition characterized by difficulty initiating or maintaining sleep, or non-restorative sleep with impairment of daytime functioning.Currently, treatment for insomnia involves a combination of cognitive behavioral therapy and pharmacological therapy. Among pharmacological interventions, the most evidence exists for benzodiazepine receptor agonist drugs (GABAA receptor, although concerns persist regarding their safety and their limited efficacy. The use of these hypnotic medications must be carefully monitored for adverse effects.Orexin (hypocretin neuropeptides have been shown to regulate transitions between wakefulness and sleep by promoting cholinergic/monoaminergic neural pathways. This has led to the development of a new class of pharmacological agents that antagonize the physiological effects of orexin. The development of these agents may lead to novel therapies for insomnia without the side effect profile of hypnotics (e.g. impaired cognition, disturbed arousal, and motor balance difficulties. However, antagonizing a system that regulates the sleep-wake cycle may create an entirely different side effect profile. In this review, we discuss the role of orexin and its receptors on the sleep-wake cycle and that of orexin antagonists in the treatment of insomnia.

  3. Vasopressin receptor antagonists and their role in clinical medicine

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    Girish Narayen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyponatremia is the most common electrolyte abnormality in hospitalized patients. Its treatment is based not only on extracellular fluid volume status of patients but also on its pathogenetic mechanisms. Conventional treatment of hyponatremia like fluid restriction, which is useful in euvolemic and hypervolemic hyponatremia, has very poor patient compliance over long term. Vasopressin receptor antagonists (Vaptans are a new group of nonpeptide drugs which have been used in various clinical conditions with limited success. Whereas conivaptan is to be administered intravenously, the other vaptans like tolvaptan, lixivaptan, and satavaptan are effective as oral medication. They produce aquaresis by their action on vasopressin type 2 (V2R receptors in the collecting duct and thus increase solute free water excretion. Vaptans are being used as an alternative to fluid restriction in euvolemic and hypervolemic hyponatremic patients. Efficacy of vaptans is now well accepted for management of correction of hyponatremia over a short period. However, its efficacy in improving the long-term morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic hyponatremia due to cirrhosis and heart failure is yet to be established. Vaptans have not become the mainstay treatment of hyponatremia yet.

  4. The Role of α1-Adrenoceptor Antagonists in the Treatment of Prostate and Other Cancers

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    Mallory Batty

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This review evaluates the role of α-adrenoceptor antagonists as a potential treatment of prostate cancer (PCa. Cochrane, Google Scholar and Pubmed were accessed to retrieve sixty-two articles for analysis. In vitro studies demonstrate that doxazosin, prazosin and terazosin (quinazoline α-antagonists induce apoptosis, decrease cell growth, and proliferation in PC-3, LNCaP and DU-145 cell lines. Similarly, the piperazine based naftopidil induced cell cycle arrest and death in LNCaP-E9 cell lines. In contrast, sulphonamide based tamsulosin did not exhibit these effects. In vivo data was consistent with in vitro findings as the quinazoline based α-antagonists prevented angiogenesis and decreased tumour mass in mice models of PCa. Mechanistically the cytotoxic and antitumor effects of the α-antagonists appear largely independent of α 1-blockade. The proposed targets include: VEGF, EGFR, HER2/Neu, caspase 8/3, topoisomerase 1 and other mitochondrial apoptotic inducing factors. These cytotoxic effects could not be evaluated in human studies as prospective trial data is lacking. However, retrospective studies show a decreased incidence of PCa in males exposed to α-antagonists. As human data evaluating the use of α-antagonists as treatments are lacking; well designed, prospective clinical trials are needed to conclusively demonstrate the anticancer properties of quinazoline based α-antagonists in PCa and other cancers.

  5. Histamine H4 receptor antagonists are superior to traditional antihistamines in the attenuation of experimental pruritus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunford, Paul J; Williams, Kacy N; Desai, Pragnya J; Karlsson, Lars; McQueen, Daniel; Thurmond, Robin L

    2007-01-01

    Histamine is a potent mediator of itch in humans, yet histamine H(1) receptor antagonists have been shown to be of limited use in the treatment of certain chronic pruritic diseases. The histamine H(4) receptor is a recently described histamine receptor, expressed on hematopoietic cells, linked to the pathology of allergy and asthma. The contribution of the novel histamine H(4) receptor to histaminergic and allergic pruritus was investigated. Histamine and a selective histamine H(4) receptor agonist caused scratching responses in mice, which were almost completely attenuated in histamine H(4) receptor knockout mice or by pretreatment with the selective histamine H(4) receptor antagonist, JNJ 7777120. Pruritus induced by allergic mechanisms was also potently inhibited with histamine H(4) receptor antagonist treatment or in histamine H(4) receptor knockout mice. In all cases, the inhibitory effect of histamine H(4) receptor antagonist was greater than those observed with histamine H(1) receptor antagonists. The histamine H(4) receptor-mediated pruritus was shown to be independent of mast cells or other hematopoietic cells and may result from actions on peripheral neurons. These results demonstrate that the histamine H(4) receptor is involved in pruritic responses in mice to a greater extent than the histamine H(1) receptor. Histamine H(4) receptor antagonists may have therapeutic utility for treating chronic pruritic diseases in humans where histamine H(1) receptor antagonists are not effective.

  6. FGFR antagonist induces protective autophagy in FGFR1-amplified breast cancer cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yi [The School of Biomedical Sciences, Chengdu Medical College, Chengdu 610083 (China); Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China); Xie, Xiaoyan; Li, Xinyi; Wang, Peiqi [State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, West China College of Stomatology, Sichuan University (China); Jing, Qian; Yue, Jiaqi; Liu, Yang [The School of Biomedical Sciences, Chengdu Medical College, Chengdu 610083 (China); Cheng, Zhong [Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China); Li, Jingyi, E-mail: li--jingyi@hotmail.com [The School of Biomedical Sciences, Chengdu Medical College, Chengdu 610083 (China); Song, Haixing [The School of Biomedical Sciences, Chengdu Medical College, Chengdu 610083 (China); Li, Guoyu, E-mail: liguoyulisa@163.com [School of Pharmacy, Shihezi University, Shihezi 832003 (China); Liu, Rui, E-mail: liurui_scu@hotmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, West China College of Stomatology, Sichuan University (China); Wang, Jinhui [School of Pharmacy, Shihezi University, Shihezi 832003 (China)

    2016-05-20

    Breast cancer, representing approximately 30% of all gynecological cancer cases diagnosed yearly, is a leading cause of cancer-related mortality for women. Amplification of FGFR1 is frequently observed in breast cancers and is associated with poor prognosis. Though FGFRs have long been considered as anti-cancer drug targets, and a cluster of FGFR antagonists are currently under clinical trials, the precise cellular responses under the treatment of FGFR antagonists remains unclear. Here, we show that PD166866, an FGFR1-selective inhibitor, inhibits proliferation and triggers anoikis in FGFR1-amplified breast cancer cell lines. Notably, we demonstrate that PD166866 induces autophagy in FGFR1-amplified breast cancer cell lines, while blockage of autophagy by Atg5 knockdown further enhances the anti-proliferative activities of PD166866. Moreover, mechanistic study reveals that PD166866 induces autophagy through repressing Akt/mTOR signaling pathway. Together, the present study provides new insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying the anti-tumor activities of FGFR antagonists, and may further assist the FGFRs-based drug discovery. -- Highlights: •FGFR1 antagonist inhibits cell viability in FGFR1-amplified breast cancer cells. •FGFR1 antagonist induces autophagy in FGFR1-amplified breast cancer cells. •FGFR1 antagonist-induced autophagy is protective. •FGFR1 antagonist induces autophagy by inhibiting Akt/mTOR pathway.

  7. Impaired antagonist inhibition may contribute to akinesia and bradykinesia in Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vugt, J P P; Stijl, M; Roos, R A C; van Dijk, J G

    2003-02-01

    To test the hypothesis that besides impaired agonist facilitation, impaired antagonist inhibition also contributes to delayed initiation (akinesia) and slow execution (bradykinesia) of voluntary movements in Huntington's disease. Fifteen patients with Huntington's disease and 11 age-matched controls participated in the study. The amount of agonist facilitation was measured as the increase in soleus H-reflex amplitude prior to ballistic voluntary plantar flexion (soleus contraction). Antagonist inhibition was measured as the decrease in soleus H-reflex prior to ballistic dorsiflexion (tibialis anterior (TA) contraction). The amount of agonist facilitation and antagonist inhibition was correlated with the time needed for motor initiation (reaction time) and movement execution (movement time). Starting 50ms prior to soleus contraction, soleus H-reflex increased in control subjects but less so in patients. Soleus H-reflexes decreased in controls 25ms prior to TA contraction, while this antagonist inhibition was completely lacking in patients. Thus, patients with Huntington's disease not only displayed reduced agonist facilitation, but impaired antagonist inhibition as well. Moreover, more impairment of antagonist inhibition correlated significantly with more severe akinesia and bradykinesia. Antagonist inhibition prior to and during agonist contractions is markedly impaired in Huntington's disease. This impairment might contribute to motor slowness in these patients.

  8. Isolation and characterization of antagonistic fungi against potato scab pathogens from potato field soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagawa, Masahiro; Tamaki, Hideyuki; Manome, Akira; Koyama, Osamu; Kamagata, Yoichi

    2010-04-01

    Potato scab is a serious plant disease caused by several Streptomyces sp., and effective control methods remain unavailable. Although antagonistic bacteria and phages against potato scab pathogens have been reported, to the best of our knowledge, there is no information about fungi that are antagonistic to the pathogens. The aim of this study was to isolate fungal antagonists, characterize their phylogenetic positions, determine their antagonistic activities against potato scab pathogens, and highlight their potential use as control agents under lower pH conditions. Fifteen fungal stains isolated from potato field soils were found to have antagonistic activity against three well-known potato scab pathogens: Streptomyces scabiei, Streptomyces acidiscabiei, and Streptomyces turgidiscabiei. These 15 fungal strains were phylogenetically classified into at least six orders and nine genera based on 18S rRNA gene sequencing analysis. These fungal isolates were related to members of the genera Penicillium, Eupenicillium, Chaetomium, Fusarium, Cladosporium, Mortierella, Kionochaeta, Pseudogymnoascus, and Lecythophora. The antagonistic activities of most of the fungal isolates were highly strengthened under the lower pH conditions, suggesting the advantage of combining their use with a traditional method such as soil acidification. This is the first report to demonstrate that phylogenetically diverse fungi show antagonistic activity against major potato scab pathogens. These fungal strains could be used as potential agents to control potato scab disease.

  9. Agonist antagonist interactions at the rapidly desensitizing P2X3 receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nick Helms

    Full Text Available P2X3 receptors (P2XRs, as members of the purine receptor family, are deeply involved in chronic pain sensation and therefore, specific, competitive antagonists are of great interest for perspective pain management. Heretofore, Schild plot analysis has been commonly used for studying the interaction of competitive antagonists and the corresponding receptor. Unfortunately, the steady-state between antagonist and agonist, as a precondition for this kind of analysis, cannot be reached at fast desensitizing receptors like P2X3R making Schild plot analysis inappropriate. The aim of this study was to establish a new method to analyze the interaction of antagonists with their binding sites at the rapidly desensitizing human P2X3R. The patch-clamp technique was used to investigate the structurally divergent, preferential antagonists A317491, TNP-ATP and PPADS. The P2X1,3-selective α,β-methylene ATP (α,β-meATP was used as an agonist to induce current responses at the wild-type (wt P2X3R and several agonist binding site mutants. Afterwards a Markov model combining sequential transitions of the receptor from the closed to the open and desensitized mode in the presence or absence of associated antagonist molecules was developed according to the measured data. The P2X3R-induced currents could be fitted correctly with the help of this Markov model allowing identification of amino acids within the binding site which are important for antagonist binding. In conclusion, Markov models are suitable to simulate agonist antagonist interactions at fast desensitizing receptors such as the P2X3R. Among the antagonists investigated, TNP-ATP and A317491 acted in a competitive manner, while PPADS was identified as a (pseudoirreversible blocker.

  10. ASSESSMENT OF EFFICACY OF LEUKOTRIENE RECEPTOR ANTAGONISTS IN THERAPY OF BRONCHIAL ASTHMA IN CHILDREN

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    Yu.G. Levina

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The article provides data regarding the clinical efficacy and safety of leukotriene receptor antagonists in treatment of bronchial asthma in children. The only representative of this group that is allowed in Russia for treatment of children over 6 years of age is Montelukast. Approval of new 4 mg dosage of Montelukast for children from 2 years of age is expected in Russia in July 2009. Leukotriene receptor antagonists have a high safety profile and can be used as an alternative first-line therapy for persistent asthma.Key words: leukotriene receptor antagonists, montelukast, bronchial asthma, children.

  11. Development of psoriasis in IBD patients under TNF-antagonist therapy is associated neither with anti-TNF-antagonist antibodies nor trough levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protic, Marijana; Schoepfer, Alain; Yawalkar, Nikhil; Vavricka, Stephan; Seibold, Frank

    2016-12-01

    The cause of anti-TNF-induced psoriasis is still unknown. We aimed to evaluate if the appearance of psoriasis under anti-TNF therapy is associated with anti-TNF antibody levels and TNF-antagonist trough levels. In this case-control study we identified 23 patients (21 with Crohn's disease [CD], two with ulcerative colitis [UC]) who developed psoriasis under infliximab (IFX, n = 20), adalimumab (ADA, n = 2), and certolizumab pegol (CZP, n= 1) and compared them regarding the anti-TNF-antagonist antibody levels with 85 IBD patients (72 with CD, 13 with UC) on anti-TNF therapy without psoriasis. Median disease duration was not different between the two groups (7 years in the group with psoriasis under TNF-antagonists vs. 10 years in the control group, p = 0.072). No patient from the psoriasis group had antibodies against TNF-antagonists compared to 10.6% in the control group (p = 0.103). No difference was found in IFX trough levels in the group of patients with psoriasis compared to the control group (2.6 μg/mL [IQR 0.9-5.5] vs. 3.4 μg/mL [IQR 1.4-8.1], p = 0.573). TNF-antagonist therapy could be continued in 91.3% of patients with TNF-antagonist related psoriasis and most patients responded to topical therapies. Anti-TNF-induced psoriasis seems to be independent of anti-TNF antibodies and trough levels. Interruption of Anti-TNF therapy is rarely necessary.

  12. Adenosine versus intravenous calcium channel antagonists for supraventricular tachycardia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alabed, Samer; Sabouni, Ammar; Providencia, Rui; Atallah, Edmond; Qintar, Mohammed; Chico, Timothy Ja

    2017-10-12

    People with supraventricular tachycardia (SVT) frequently are symptomatic and present to the emergency department for treatment. Although vagal manoeuvres may terminate SVT, they often fail, and subsequently adenosine or calcium channel antagonists (CCAs) are administered. Both are known to be effective, but both have a significant side effect profile. This is an update of a Cochrane review previously published in 2006. To review all randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that compare effects of adenosine versus CCAs in terminating SVT. We identified studies by searching CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, and two trial registers in July 2017. We checked bibliographies of identified studies and applied no language restrictions. We planned to include all RCTs that compare adenosine versus a CCA for patients of any age presenting with SVT. We used standard methodological procedures as expected by Cochrane. Two review authors independently checked results of searches to identify relevant studies and resolved differences by discussion with a third review author. At least two review authors independently assessed each included study and extracted study data. We entered extracted data into Review Manager 5. Primary outcomes were rate of reversion to sinus rhythm and major adverse effects of adenosine and CCAs. Secondary outcomes were rate of recurrence, time to reversion, and minor adverse outcomes. We measured outcomes by calculating odds ratios (ORs) and assessed the quality of primary outcomes using the GRADE approach through the GRADEproGDT website. We identified two new studies for inclusion in the review update; the review now includes seven trials with 622 participants who presented to an emergency department with SVT. All included studies were RCTs, but only three described the randomisation process, and none had blinded participants, personnel, or outcome assessors to the intervention given. Moderate-quality evidence shows no differences in the number of people reverting to

  13. Statin use decreases coagulation in users of vitamin K antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rein, Nienke; Biedermann, J S; Bonafacio, S M; Kruip, M J H A; van der Meer, F J M; Lijfering, W M

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of the study is to determine the immediate and long-term effect of statins on coagulation in patients treated with vitamin K antagonists (VKAs). We selected patients on VKAs of two Dutch anticoagulation clinics who initiated treatment with a statin between 2009 and 2013. Patients who initiated or stopped concomitant drugs that interact with VKAs or were hospitalised during follow-up were excluded. The VKA dosage (mg/day) after statin initiation was compared with the last VKA dosage before the statin was started. Immediate and long-term differences in VKA dosage (at 6 and 12 weeks) were calculated with a paired student t test. Four hundred thirty-five phenprocoumon users (mean age 70 years, 60 % men) and 303 acenocoumarol users (mean age 69 years, 58 % men) were included. After start of statin use, the immediate phenprocoumon dosage was 0.02 mg/day (95 % CI, 0.00 to 0.03) lower. At 6 and 12 weeks, these phenprocoumon dosages were 0.03 (95 % CI, 0.01 to 0.05) and 0.07 mg/day (95 % CI, 0.04 to 0.09) lower as compared with the dosage before first statin use. In acenocoumarol users, VKA dosage was 0.04 mg/day (95%CI, 0.01 to 0.07) (immediate effect), 0.10 (95 % CI, 0.03 to 0.16) (at 6 weeks), and 0.11 mg/day (95 % CI, 0.04 to 0.18) (after 12 weeks) lower. Initiation of statin treatment was associated with an immediate and long-term minor although statistically significant decrease in VKA dosage in both phenprocoumon and acenocoumarol users, which suggests that statins may have anticoagulant properties.

  14. Update on leukotriene receptor antagonists in preschool children wheezing disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montella Silvia

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Asthma is the most common chronic disease in young children. About 40% of all preschool children regularly wheeze during common cold infections. The heterogeneity of wheezing phenotypes early in life and various anatomical and emotional factors unique to young children present significant challenges in the clinical management of this problem. Anti-inflammatory therapy, mainly consisting of inhaled corticosteroids (ICS, is the cornerstone of asthma management. Since Leukotrienes (LTs are chemical mediators of airway inflammation in asthma, the leukotriene receptor antagonists (LTRAs are traditionally used as potent anti-inflammatory drugs in the long-term treatment of asthma in adults, adolescents, and school-age children. In particular, montelukast decreases airway inflammation, and has also a bronchoprotective effect. The main guidelines on asthma management have confirmed the clinical utility of LTRAs in children older than five years. In the present review we describe the most recent advances on the use of LTRAs in the treatment of preschool wheezing disorders. LTRAs are effective in young children with virus-induced wheeze and with multiple-trigger disease. Conflicting data do not allow to reach definitive conclusions on LTRAs efficacy in bronchiolitis or post-bronchiolitis wheeze, and in acute asthma. The excellent safety profile of montelukast and the possibility of oral administration, that entails better compliance from young children, represent the main strengths of its use in preschool children. Montelukast is a valid alternative to ICS especially in poorly compliant preschool children, or in subjects who show adverse effects related to long-term steroid therapy.

  15. Hepcidin antagonists for potential treatments of disorders with hepcidin excess

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    Poli eMaura

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of hepcidin clarified the basic mechanism of the control of systemic iron homeostasis. Hepcidin is mainly produced by the liver as a propeptide and processed by furin into the mature active peptide. Hepcidin binds ferroportin, the only cellular iron exporter, causing the internalization and degradation of both. Thus hepcidin blocks iron export from the key cells for dietary iron absorption (enterocytes, recycling of haemoglobin iron (the macrophages and the release of storage iron from hepatocytes, resulting in the reduction of systemic iron availability. The BMP/HJV/SMAD pathway is the major regulator of hepcidin expression that responds to iron status. Also inflammation stimulates hepcidin via the IL6/STAT3 pathway with a support of an active BMP/HJV/SMAD pathway. In some pathological conditions hepcidin level is inadequately elevated and reduces iron availability in the body, resulting in anemia. These conditions occur in the genetic Iron Refractory Iron Deficiency Anemia (IRIDA and the common Anemia of Chronic Disease (ACD or Anemia of Inflammation. Currently, there is no definite treatment for ACD. Erythropoiesis stimulating agents and intravenous iron have been proposed in some cases but they are scarcely effective and may have adverse effects. Alternative approaches aimed to a pharmacological control of hepcidin expression have been attempted, targeting different regulatory steps. They include hepcidin sequestering agents (antibodies, anticalins and aptamers, inhibitors of BMP/SMAD or of IL6/STAT3 pathway or of hepcidin transduction (siRNA/shRNA or ferroportin stabilizers. In this review we summarized the biochemical interactions of the proteins involved in the BMP/HJV/SMAD pathway and its natural inhibitors, the murine and rat models with high hepcidin levels currently available and finally the progresses in the development of hepcidin antagonists, with particular attention to the role of heparins and heparin sulphate

  16. Calcium antagonist properties of the bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid cycleanine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, J A; Bello, A; Rubio, L L; Rodríguez, C; Galán, L; Caudales, E; Alvarez, J L

    1998-01-01

    The alkaloid cycleanine ([12aR-(12aR,24aR)]-2,3,12a,13,14,15,24,24a-octa hydro-5,6,17,18- tetramethoxy-1,13-dimethyl-8, 11:20,23-dietheno-1H,12H [1,10]dioxacyclooctadecino[2,3,4-ij:11,12,13-i'j']diisoquinolin e) was extracted from the bulbs of Stephania glabra (Roxb) Miers and its effects on cardiac and smooth muscle preparations were studied and compared to those of nifedipine (1,4-dihydro-2, 6-dimethyl-4-(2-nitrophenyl)-3,5-pyridine dicarboxylic acid dimethylesther). Cycleanine inhibited the KCl-induced contraction of rabbit aortic rings with higher potency than nifedipine. IC50s for cycleanine and nifedipine were 0.8 and 7.10(-9) M respectively. Cycleanine had minor effects on the norepinephrine-induced contraction of rabbit aortic rings. Cycleanine and nifedipine also depressed the contraction of rat ventricular preparations but with lower potency (IC50 = 3 and 0.03.10(-6) M respectively). Action potential duration of rat right ventricular strips was decreased by both compounds. L-type Ca-current (ICaL) of single rat ventricular cardiomyocytes was inhibited by cycleanine in a voltage- and frequency-dependent manner. With a higher potency nifedipine inhibited ICaL in a tonic and almost frequency-independent manner. The results suggest that cycleanine can act as a potent vascular selective Ca-antagonist.

  17. Endothelin receptor antagonist and airway dysfunction in pulmonary arterial hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borst Mathias M

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH, peripheral airway obstruction is frequent. This is partially attributed to the mediator dysbalance, particularly an excess of endothelin-1 (ET-1, to increased pulmonary vascular and airway tonus and to local inflammation. Bosentan (ET-1 receptor antagonist improves pulmonary hemodynamics, exercise limitation, and disease severity in IPAH. We hypothesized that bosentan might affect airway obstruction. Methods In 32 IPAH-patients (19 female, WHO functional class II (n = 10, III (n = 22; (data presented as mean ± standard deviation pulmonary vascular resistance (11 ± 5 Wood units, lung function, 6 minute walk test (6-MWT; 364 ± 363.7 (range 179.0-627.0 m, systolic pulmonary artery pressure, sPAP, 79 ± 19 mmHg, and NT-proBNP serum levels (1427 ± 2162.7 (range 59.3-10342.0 ng/L were measured at baseline, after 3 and 12 months of oral bosentan (125 mg twice per day. Results and Discussion At baseline, maximal expiratory flow at 50 and 25% vital capacity were reduced to 65 ± 25 and 45 ± 24% predicted. Total lung capacity was 95.6 ± 12.5% predicted and residual volume was 109 ± 21.4% predicted. During 3 and 12 months of treatment, 6-MWT increased by 32 ± 19 and 53 ± 69 m, respectively; p Conclusion This study gives first evidence in IPAH, that during long-term bosentan, improvement of hemodynamics, functional parameters or serum biomarker occur independently from persisting peripheral airway obstruction.

  18. Antimüllerian hormone in gonadotropin releasing-hormone antagonist cycles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arce, Joan-Carles; La Marca, Antonio; Mirner Klein, Bjarke

    2013-01-01

    To assess the relationships between serum antimüllerian hormone (AMH) and ovarian response and treatment outcomes in good-prognosis patients undergoing controlled ovarian stimulation using a gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonist protocol....

  19. Epimuscular myofascial force transmission between antagonistic and synergistic muscles can explain movement limitation in spastic paresis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijing, P.A.J.B.M.

    2007-01-01

    Details and concepts of intramuscular, extramuscular and intermuscular myofascial force transmission are reviewed. Some new experimental data are added regarding myofascial force transmission between antagonistic muscles across the interosseal membrane of the lower hind limb of the rat. Combined

  20. Muscarinic receptor antagonists for overactive bladder treatment: does one fit all?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witte, Lambertus P. W.; Mulder, Wilhelmina M. C.; de La Rosette, Jean J. M. C. H.; Michel, Martin C.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose of review To review evidence and regulatory dosing recommendations for muscarinic receptor antagonists used in the treatment of overactive bladder symptom complex (darifenacin, fesoterodine oxybutynin propiverine solifenacin tolterodine trospium) in special patient populations. Recent

  1. The relationship between maintenance dosages of three vitamin K antagonists : Acenocoumarol, warfarin and phenprocoumon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, Yvonne; Rosendaal, Frits R; van der Meer, Felix J M

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Vitamin K antagonists of the coumarin type are widely used oral anticoagulants. OBJECTIVE: We developed a transition algorithm for the maintenance dosages of three frequently used coumarins: warfarin, phenprocoumon and acenocoumarol. METHODS: The study was conducted at the Leiden

  2. Effect of beta-adrenergic receptor antagonists on nicotine-induced tail-tremor in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suemaru, K; Gomita, Y; Furuno, K; Araki, Y

    1993-09-01

    The effects of various beta-adrenergic receptor antagonists on nicotine-induced tail-tremor were investigated in rats. Atenolol (5 and 10 mg/kg, IP), arotinolol (5 and 10 mg/kg, IP), and carteolol (5 and 10 mg/kg, IP), hydrophilic beta-adrenergic receptor antagonists, did not affect the tail-tremor induced by nicotine given at a dose of 0.5 mg/kg SC. However, propranolol (5-20 mg/kg, IP) and pindolol (5-20 mg/kg, IP), nonselective and lipophilic beta-adrenergic receptor antagonists, did suppress the tail-tremor dose dependently. In contrast, metoprolol (5-20 mg/kg, IP), lipophilic and beta 1-selective adrenergic receptor antagonists, did not show such an effect. These results suggest that nicotine-induced tail-tremors may be mediated through central beta 2-adrenergic receptors as an appearance and developmental mechanism.

  3. Melanin concentrating hormone receptor 1 (MCHR1) antagonists - Still a viable approach for obesity treatment?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Högberg, T.; Frimurer, T.M.; Sasmal, P.K.

    2012-01-01

    Obesity is a global epidemic associated with multiple severe diseases. Several pharmacotherapies have been investigated including the melanin concentrating hormone (MCH) and its receptor 1. The development of MCHR1 antagonists are described with a specific perspective on different chemotypes...

  4. Antagonist muscle moment is increased in ACL deficient subjects during maximal dynamic knee extension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alkjær, Tine; Simonsen, Erik B; Magnusson, S Peter

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Coactivation of the hamstring muscles during dynamic knee extension may compensate for increased knee joint laxity in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) deficient subjects. This study examined if antagonist muscle coactivation during maximal dynamic knee extension was elevated...... in subjects with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) deficiency compared to age-matched healthy controls. METHODS: Electromyography (EMG) and net knee joint moments were recorded during maximal concentric quadriceps and eccentric hamstring contractions, performed in an isokinetic dynamometer (ROM: 90......-10°, angular speed: 30°/s). Hamstring antagonist EMG recorded during concentric quadriceps contraction was converted into antagonist moment based on the EMG-moment relationship observed during eccentric agonist contractions. RESULTS: The magnitude of antagonist hamstring EMG was 65.5% higher in ACL deficient...

  5. General anaesthesia does not improve outcome in opioid antagonist detoxification treatment : a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Jong, Cor A J; Laheij, Robert J F; Krabbe, Paul F M

    AIM: Opioid detoxification by administering opioid-antagonists under general anaesthesia has caused considerable controversy. This study is conducted to determine whether rapid detoxification under general anaesthesia results in higher levels of opioid abstinence than rapid detoxification without

  6. General anaesthesia does not improve outcome in opioid antagonist detoxification treatment: a randomized controlled trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, C.A.J. de; Laheij, R.J.F.; Krabbe, P.F.M.

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Opioid detoxification by administering opioid-antagonists under general anaesthesia has caused considerable controversy. This study is conducted to determine whether rapid detoxification under general anaesthesia results in higher levels of opioid abstinence than rapid detoxification without

  7. A novel antagonistic role of natural compound icariin on neurotoxicity of amyloid β peptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhui Liu

    2015-01-01

    Interpretation & conclusions: The results indicated a novel antagonistic role of icariin in the neurotoxicity of Aβ1-42 via inhibiting its aggregation, suggesting that icariin might have potential therapeutic benefits to delay or modify the progression of AD.

  8. Development of TRPM8 Antagonists to Treat Chronic Pain and Migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyer, Andy D; Lehto, Sonya G

    2017-03-30

    A review. Development of pharmaceutical antagonists of transient receptor potential melastatin 8 (TRPM8) have been pursued for the treatment of chronic pain and migraine. This review focuses on the current state of this progress.

  9. The risk of tuberculosis related to tumour necrosis factor antagonist therapies: a TBNET consensus statement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solovic, I; Sester, M; Gomez-Reino, J J

    2010-01-01

    of bacille Calmette-Guérin vaccination, tuberculin skin testing is recommended to screen all adult candidates for TNF antagonist treatment for the presence of latent infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Moreover, paediatric practice suggests concomitant use of both the tuberculin skin test...... reduces the risk of progression to TB. This TBNET consensus statement summarises current knowledge and expert opinions and provides evidence-based recommendations to reduce the TB risk among candidates for TNF antagonist therapy....

  10. The Effect of Sympathetic Antagonists on the Antidepressant Action of Alprazolam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorash ZM

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Alprazolam is an anti-anxiety drug shown to be effective in the treatment of depression. In this study, the effect of sympathetic receptor antagonists on alprazolam–induced antidepressant action was studied using a mouse model of forced swimming behavioral despair. The interaction of three sympathetic receptor antagonists with benzodiazepines, which may impact the clinical use of alprazolam, was also studied. Behavioral despair was examined in six groups of albino mice. Drugs were administered intraperitoneally. The control group received only a single dose of 1% Tween 80. The second group received a single dose of alprazolam, and the third group received an antagonist followed by alprazolam. The fourth group was treated with imipramine, and the fifth group received an antagonist followed by imipramine. The sixth group was treated with a single dose of an antagonist alone (atenolol, a β1-selective adrenoceptor antagonist; propranolol, a non selective β-adrenoceptor antagonist; and prazocin, an α1-adrenoceptor antagonist. Results confirmed the antidepressant action of alprazolam and imipramine. Prazocin treatment alone produced depression, but it significantly potentiated the antidepressant actions of imipramine and alprazolam. Atenolol alone produced an antidepressant effect and potentiated the antidepressant action of alprazolam. Propranolol treatment alone produced depression, and antagonized the effects of alprazolam and imipramine, even producing depression in combined treatments. In conclusion, our results reveal that alprazolam may produce antidepressant effects through the release of noradrenaline, which stimulates β2 receptors to produce an antidepressant action. Imipramine may act by activating β2 receptors by blocking or down-regulating β1 receptors.

  11. Acute Effects of Antagonist Stretching on Jump Height and Knee Extension Peak Torque

    OpenAIRE

    Sandberg, John B.

    2012-01-01

    A great deal of research has shown decrements in force and power following static stretching. There has been little research investigating the acute effects of static stretching of the antagonist on the expression of strength and power. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of static stretching of the antagonist muscles on a variety of strength and power measures. Sixteen active males were tested for vertical jump height and isokinetic torque production in a slow knee exten...

  12. Meiotic drive influences the outcome of sexually antagonistic selection at a linked locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patten, M M

    2014-11-01

    Most meiotic drivers, such as the t-haplotype in Mus and the segregation distorter (SD) in Drosophila, act in a sex-specific manner, gaining a transmission advantage through one sex although suffering only the fitness costs associated with the driver in the other. Their inheritance is thus more likely through one of the two sexes, a property they share with sexually antagonistic alleles. Previous theory has shown that pairs of linked loci segregating for sexually antagonistic alleles are more likely to remain polymorphic and that linkage disequilibrium accrues between them. I probe this similarity between drive and sexual antagonism and examine the evolution of chromosomes experiencing these selection pressures simultaneously. Reminiscent of previous theory, I find that: the opportunity for polymorphism increases for a sexually antagonistic locus that is physically linked to a driving locus; the opportunity for polymorphism at a driving locus also increases when linked to a sexually antagonistic locus; and stable linkage disequilibrium accompanies any polymorphic equilibrium. Additionally, I find that drive at a linked locus favours the fixation of sexually antagonistic alleles that benefit the sex in which drive occurs. Further, I show that under certain conditions reduced recombination between these two loci is selectively favoured. These theoretical results provide clear, testable predictions about the nature of sexually antagonistic variation on driving chromosomes and have implications for the evolution of genomic architecture. © 2014 European Society For Evolutionary Biology. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2014 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  13. Pseudomonas orientalis F9: A Potent Antagonist against Phytopathogens with Phytotoxic Effect in the Apple Flower

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika Zengerer

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In light of public concerns over the use of pesticides and antibiotics in plant protection and the subsequent selection for spread of resistant bacteria in the environment, it is inevitable to broaden our knowledge about viable alternatives, such as natural antagonists and their mode of action. The genus Pseudomonas is known for its metabolic versatility and genetic plasticity, encompassing pathogens as well as antagonists. We characterized strain Pseudomonas orientalis F9, an isolate from apple flowers in a Swiss orchard, and determined its antagonistic activity against several phytopathogenic bacteria, in particular Erwinia amylovora, the causal agent of fire blight. P. orientalis F9 displayed antagonistic activity against a broad suite of phytopathogenic bacteria in the in vitro tests. The promising results from this analysis led to an ex vivo assay with E. amylovora CFBP1430Rif and P. orientalis F9 infected detached apple flowers. F9 diminished the fire blight pathogen in the flowers but also revealed phytotoxic traits. The experimental results were discussed in light of the complete genome sequence of F9, which revealed the strain to carry phenazine genes. Phenazines are known to contribute to antagonistic activity of bacterial strains against soil pathogens. When tested in the cress assay with Pythium ultimum as pathogen, F9 showed results comparable to the known antagonist P. protegens CHA0.

  14. Crystal Structures of Human Orexin 2 Receptor Bound to the Subtype-Selective Antagonist EMPA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suno, Ryoji; Kimura, Kanako Terakado; Nakane, Takanori; Yamashita, Keitaro; Wang, Junmei; Fujiwara, Takaaki; Yamanaka, Yasuaki; Im, Dohyun; Horita, Shoichiro; Tsujimoto, Hirokazu; Tawaramoto, Maki S; Hirokawa, Takatsugu; Nango, Eriko; Tono, Kensuke; Kameshima, Takashi; Hatsui, Takaki; Joti, Yasumasa; Yabashi, Makina; Shimamoto, Keiko; Yamamoto, Masaki; Rosenbaum, Daniel M; Iwata, So; Shimamura, Tatsuro; Kobayashi, Takuya

    2018-01-02

    Orexin peptides in the brain regulate physiological functions such as the sleep-wake cycle, and are thus drug targets for the treatment of insomnia. Using serial femtosecond crystallography and multi-crystal data collection with a synchrotron light source, we determined structures of human orexin 2 receptor in complex with the subtype-selective antagonist EMPA (N-ethyl-2-[(6-methoxy-pyridin-3-yl)-(toluene-2-sulfonyl)-amino]-N-pyridin-3-ylmethyl-acetamide) at 2.30-Å and 1.96-Å resolution. In comparison with the non-subtype-selective antagonist suvorexant, EMPA contacted fewer residues through hydrogen bonds at the orthosteric site, explaining the faster dissociation rate. Comparisons among these OX 2 R structures in complex with selective antagonists and previously determined OX 1 R/OX 2 R structures bound to non-selective antagonists revealed that the residue at positions 2.61 and 3.33 were critical for the antagonist selectivity in OX 2 R. The importance of these residues for binding selectivity to OX 2 R was also revealed by molecular dynamics simulation. These results should facilitate the development of antagonists for orexin receptors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Antagonist Models for Relapse Prevention and Reducing HIV Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woody, George E; Krupitsky, Evgeny; Zvartau, Edwin

    2016-09-01

    Naltrexone is an antagonist that binds tightly to μ-opioid receptors and blocks the subjective and analgesic effects of opioids. It does not produce physiologic dependence and precipitates withdrawal if administered to an opioid dependent person, thus starting it must begin with detoxification. It was first available in the mid-1970s as a 50 mg tablet that blocked opioids for 24-36 h if taken daily, or every 2-3 days at higher doses - for example: 100 mg Monday and Wednesday, 150 mg on Friday. From a pharmacological perspective it worked very well and was hoped to be an effective treatment but results were disappointing due to low patient interest and high dropout followed by relapse. Interest in it waned but rose again in the late 1990's when injecting opioid use and the rapid spread of HIV in the Russian Federation converged with an international interest in reducing the spread of HIV. One result was a series of meetings sponsored by the U.S. National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) and Pavlov State Medical University in St. Petersburg, Russian Federation, on ways to reduce the spread of HIV in that country. Addiction treatment was a clear priority and discussions showed that naltrexone could have a role since agonist treatment is against Russian law but naltrexone is approved and the government funds over 25,000 beds for detoxification, which is the first step in starting naltrexone treatment. These meetings were followed by NIDA studies that showed better compliance to oral naltrexone than in prior U.S. studies with the expected reductions in HIV injecting risk for those that stayed in treatment. These events and findings provided a background and identified an infrastructure for the study that led to FDA approval of extended release injectable naltrexone for preventing relapse to opioid dependence. This paper will briefly review findings from these studies and end with comments on the potential role of extended release naltrexone as a meaningful addition

  16. Antagonistic Donor Density Effect Conserved in Multiple Enterococcal Conjugative Plasmids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, Arpan; O'Brien, Sofie; Frank, Kristi L.; Dunny, Gary M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Enterococcus faecalis, a common causative agent of hospital-acquired infections, is resistant to many known antibiotics. Its ability to acquire and transfer resistance genes and virulence determinants through conjugative plasmids poses a serious concern for public health. In some cases, induction of transfer of E. faecalis plasmids results from peptide pheromones produced by plasmid-free recipient cells, which are sensed by the plasmid-bearing donor cells. These plasmids generally encode an inhibitory peptide that competes with the pheromone and suppresses self-induction of donors. We recently demonstrated that the inhibitor peptide encoded on plasmid pCF10 is part of a unique quorum-sensing system in which it functions as a “self-sensing signal,” reducing the response to the pheromone in a density-dependent fashion. Based on the similarities between regulatory features controlling conjugation in pAD1 and pAM373 and those controlling conjugation in pCF10, we hypothesized that these plasmids are likely to exhibit similar quorum-sensing behaviors. Experimental findings indicate that for both pAD1 and pAM373, high donor densities indeed resulted in decreased induction of the conjugation operon and reduced conjugation frequencies. This effect was restored by the addition of exogenous inhibitor, confirming that the inhibitor serves as an indicator for donor density. Donor density also affects cross-species conjugative plasmid transfer. Based on our experimental results, we propose models for induction and shutdown of the conjugation operon in pAD1 and pAM373. IMPORTANCE Enterococcus faecalis is a leading cause of hospital-acquired infections. Its ability to transfer antibiotic resistance and virulence determinants by sharing its genetic material with other bacteria through direct cell-cell contact via conjugation poses a serious threat. Two antagonistic signaling peptides control the transfer of plasmids pAD1 and pAM373: a peptide pheromone produced by

  17. Penicillium expansum versus antagonist yeasts and patulin degradation in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Rodrigo Coelho

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Taking into account the preliminary antagonistic/biodegradation property showed by Pichia membranifaciens and Sporobolomyces roseus, which decreased the initial patulin concentration of 588.4 to 290.0 µg/mL, ability of P. ohmeri 158 in biocontrol against Penicillium expansum and patulin decrease in vitro was performed. The culture supernatant of P. ohmeri 158 was effective against 66.17% micelial growth, indicating antibiosis related with the killer phenomenon. The initial patulin concentration of 223 µg in the presence of P. ohmeri 158 cells was decreased over 83% of the original concentration, when incubated at 25ºC/2 days and > 99% after 5 days incubation time, with undetectable patulin level after 15 days. The initial pH 4.0 decreased to pH 3.3 along 15 days experiment, suggesting that patulin decrease was an active process and a consequence of yeast metabolism. The results suggested that P. ohmeri 158 could be a promising alternative for the inhibition of P. expansum growth and patulin degradation.Considerando o antagonismo e degradação de patulina detectados em Pichia membranifaciens e Sporobolomyces roseus no estudo preliminar, este trabalho avaliou o efeito antagônico de Pichia ohmeri 158 no desenvolvimento de Penicillium expansum e a degradação de patulina "in vitro". O sobrenadante do cultivo de P. ohmeri 158 inibiu 66,17% do desenvolvimento micelial, indicando antibiose relacionada ao fator killer. A concentração inicial de patulina (223 µg na presença de células íntegras de P. ohmeri foi reduzida em mais de 83% após dois dias de incubação a 25ºC e superior a 99% após 5 dias, com níveis indetectáveis no 15º dia. O decréscimo do pH 4,0 inicial para pH 3,3 sugeriu que a eliminação de patulina é um processo ativo e uma conseqüência do metabolismo da levedura. Os resultados obtidos concluem que P. ohmeri 158 é uma alternativa promissora na inibição do desenvolvimento de P. expansum e na degradação de

  18. Molecular mechanisms of 5-HT(3) and NK(1) receptor antagonists in prevention of emesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Camilo; Raje, Mithun; Tsukamoto, Takashi; Slusher, Barbara S

    2014-01-05

    Nausea and vomiting are major side effects of chemotherapy and one key reason for non-compliance with cancer treatment. The introduction of 5-HT3 receptor antagonists in the 1990s was a major advance in the prevention of acute emesis, and highlighted the critical role of serotonin in the emetic response. The next major advance in the treatment of chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) occurred in 2003 with the introduction of aprepitant, a tachykinin 1 (NK1) receptor antagonist. Aprepitant not only reduced acute emesis but also helped in the reduction of delayed emesis. Also in 2003, palonosetron, a second generation 5-HT3 receptor antagonist became available. Unlike the first generation 5-HT3 receptor antagonists, palonosetron demonstrated efficacy in preventing both acute and delayed emesis. This review focuses on the mechanism of action of 5-HT3 and NK1 receptor antagonists in acute and delayed CINV prevention. We discuss first, the medicinal chemistry that led to the discovery of these antagonists to underline their common structural features. Second, we discuss their performance in the clinic and what it tells us about the emetic response. Finally, we present recent mechanistic studies that help provide a rationale for efficacy differences between palonosetron and other 5-HT3 receptor antagonists in the clinic. In vitro and in vivo experiments have shown that palonosetron can inhibit substance P-mediated responses, presumably through its unique interactions with the 5-HT3 receptor. The crossroads of acute and delayed emesis seem to include interactions among the 5-HT3 and NK1 receptor signaling pathways and inhibitions of these interactions could lead to improved treatment of CINV. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Inhibition of rabbit platelet activation in vitro by antagonists of platelet-activating factor (PAF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cox, C.P.; Wood, K.L.

    1986-03-05

    The authors used washed, (/sup 3/H)serotonin-labeled rabbit platelets to study the in vitro aggregation and secretion responses induced by graded doses of PAF in the presence or absence of specific antagonists of PAF. These antagonists included CV-3988, L-652,731, triazolam and alprazolam. Platelets were pretreated with either an antagonist or the appropriate diluent for 60 sec prior to the addition of PAF (2 x 10/sup -10/ to 2 x 10/sup -7/ M). Aggregation was monitored continuously and recorded as the height of the aggregation tracing at 60 sec post-PAF. Secretion of (/sup 3/H)-serotonin was measured in a sample of the platelets removed at 60 sec post-PAF. When 2 x 10/sup -10/ M PAF was used as the stimulus, the concentration of antagonist needed for 50% inhibition (IC/sub 50/) of secretion was obtained at 0.05 ..mu..M, 0.15 ..mu..M, 0.6 ..mu..M and 2.5 ..mu..M, respectively, for L-652,731, CV-3988, triazolam and alprazolam. The corresponding IC/sub 50/ for aggregation was obtained at 0.2 ..mu..M, 0.1 ..mu..M, 1.5 ..mu..M and 6.5 ..mu..M, respectively. The inhibitory effects of these antagonists could be overcome by increasing the dose of PAF used. Although all of the antagonists were capable of completely inhibiting platelet aggregation and secretion, L-652,731 was the most potent PAF antagonist on a molar basis.

  20. Palliation of bone cancer pain by antagonists of platelet-activating factor receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuya Morita

    Full Text Available Bone cancer pain is the most severe among cancer pain and is often resistant to current analgesics. Thus, the development of novel analgesics effective at treating bone cancer pain are desired. Platelet-activating factor (PAF receptor antagonists were recently demonstrated to have effective pain relieving effects on neuropathic pain in several animal models. The present study examined the pain relieving effect of PAF receptor antagonists on bone cancer pain using the femur bone cancer (FBC model in mice. Animals were injected with osteolytic NCTC2472 cells into the tibia, and subsequently the effects of PAF receptor antagonists on pain behaviors were evaluated. Chemical structurally different type of antagonists, TCV-309, BN 50739 and WEB 2086 ameliorated the allodynia and improved pain behaviors such as guarding behavior and limb-use abnormalities in FBC model mice. The pain relieving effects of these antagonists were achieved with low doses and were long lasting. Blockade of spinal PAF receptors by intrathecal injection of TCV-309 and WEB 2086 or knockdown of the expression of spinal PAF receptor protein by intrathecal transfer of PAF receptor siRNA also produced a pain relieving effect. The amount of an inducible PAF synthesis enzyme, lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase 2 (LPCAT2 protein significantly increased in the spinal cord after transplantation of NCTC 2472 tumor cells into mouse tibia. The combination of morphine with PAF receptor antagonists develops marked enhancement of the analgesic effect against bone cancer pain without affecting morphine-induced constipation. Repeated administration of TCV-309 suppressed the appearance of pain behaviors and prolonged survival of FBC mice. The present results suggest that PAF receptor antagonists in combination with, or without, opioids may represent a new strategy for the treatment of persistent bone cancer pain and improve the quality of life of patients.

  1. Serum progranulin levels in Hispanic rheumatoid arthritis patients treated with TNF antagonists: a prospective, observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jennifer; Yeter, Karen; Rajbhandary, Rosy; Neal, Rebekah; Tian, Qingyun; Jian, Jinlong; Fadle, Natalie; Thurner, Lorenz; Liu, Chuanju; Stohl, William

    2017-03-01

    Since progranulin (PGRN) is a natural ligand of TNF receptors, we assessed whether serum PGRN levels predict and/or reflect responsiveness of RA patients to TNF-antagonist therapy. TNF-antagonist-naïve RA patients (N = 35) were started on TNF-antagonist therapy. At baseline and at follow-up visits, DAS28-ESR, DAS28-CRP, and CDAI were calculated, and venous blood was collected for serum PGRN determination. Disease activity and clinical response were based on EULAR criteria. Baseline serum PGRN levels varied considerably and correlated with ESR and CRP. DAS28-ESR, DAS28-CRP, and CDAI were greater in "PGRN-high" than in "PGRN-low". Baseline serum PGRN levels did not predict clinical responsiveness to TNF-antagonist therapy. Nevertheless, changes in serum PGRN levels at 274+ days following initiation of TNF-antagonist therapy correlated with changes in ESR, CRP, DAS28-ESR, DAS28-CRP, and CDAI. At this time, DAS28-ESR, DAS28-CRP, and CDAI in PGRN-high and PGRN-low equalized, but serum PGRN levels remained greater in PGRN-high than in PGRN-low. To our knowledge, the present report is the first prospective study to longitudinally assess changes in serum PGRN levels following initiation of TNF-antagonist therapy. Although pre-treatment serum PGRN levels may not predict clinical responsiveness to TNF-antagonist therapy, changes in serum PGRN levels correlate with changes in disease metrics over time. By inference, administration of PGRN may represent an effective therapeutic option for development in RA patients.

  2. The splicing factor SF2/ASF regulates translation initiation by enhancing phosphorylation of 4E-BP1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michlewski, Gracjan; Sanford, Jeremy R; Cáceres, Javier F

    2008-04-25

    The SR protein SF2/ASF has been initially characterized as a splicing factor but has also been shown to mediate postsplicing activities such as mRNA export and translation. Here we demonstrate that SF2/ASF promotes translation initiation of bound mRNAs and that this activity requires the presence of the cytoplasmic cap-binding protein eIF4E. SF2/ASF promotes translation initiation by suppressing the activity of 4E-BP, a competitive inhibitor of cap-dependent translation. This activity is mediated by interactions of SF2/ASF with both mTOR and the phosphatase PP2A, two key regulators of 4E-BP phosphorylation. These findings suggest the model whereby SF2/ASF functions as an adaptor protein to recruit the signaling molecules responsible for regulation of cap-dependent translation of specific mRNAs. Taken together, these data suggest a novel mechanism for the activation of translation initiation of a subset of mRNAs bound by the shuttling protein SF2/ASF.

  3. CRISPR-Mediated Drug-Target Validation Reveals Selective Pharmacological Inhibition of the RNA Helicase, eIF4A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Chu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Targeting translation initiation is an emerging anti-neoplastic strategy that capitalizes on de-regulated upstream MAPK and PI3K-mTOR signaling pathways in cancers. A key regulator of translation that controls ribosome recruitment flux is eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF 4F, a hetero-trimeric complex composed of the cap binding protein eIF4E, the scaffolding protein eIF4G, and the RNA helicase eIF4A. Small molecule inhibitors targeting eIF4F display promising anti-neoplastic activity in preclinical settings. Among these are some rocaglate family members that are well tolerated in vivo, deplete eIF4F of its eIF4A helicase subunit, have shown activity as single agents in several xenograft models, and can reverse acquired resistance to MAPK and PI3K-mTOR targeted therapies. Herein, we highlight the power of using genetic complementation approaches and CRISPR/Cas9-mediated editing for drug-target validation ex vivo and in vivo, linking the anti-tumor properties of rocaglates to eIF4A inhibition.

  4. RNA-binding proteins to assess gene expression states of co-cultivated cells in response to tumor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penalva Luiz OF

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tumors and complex tissues consist of mixtures of communicating cells that differ significantly in their gene expression status. In order to understand how different cell types influence one another's gene expression, it will be necessary to monitor the mRNA profiles of each cell type independently and to dissect the mechanisms that regulate their gene expression outcomes. Results In order to approach these questions, we have used RNA-binding proteins such as ELAV/Hu, poly (A binding protein (PABP and cap-binding protein (eIF-4E as reporters of gene expression. Here we demonstrate that the epitope-tagged RNA binding protein, PABP, expressed separately in tumor cells and endothelial cells can be used to discriminate their respective mRNA targets from mixtures of these cells without significant mRNA reassortment or exchange. Moreover, using this approach we identify a set of endothelial genes that respond to the presence of co-cultured breast tumor cells. Conclusion RNA-binding proteins can be used as reporters to elucidate components of operational mRNA networks and operons involved in regulating cell-type specific gene expression in tissues and tumors.

  5. Gemin5: A Multitasking RNA-Binding Protein Involved in Translation Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Piñeiro

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Gemin5 is a RNA-binding protein (RBP that was first identified as a peripheral component of the survival of motor neurons (SMN complex. This predominantly cytoplasmic protein recognises the small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs through its WD repeat domains, allowing assembly of the SMN complex into small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs. Additionally, the amino-terminal end of the protein has been reported to possess cap-binding capacity and to interact with the eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E. Gemin5 was also shown to downregulate translation, to be a substrate of the picornavirus L protease and to interact with viral internal ribosome entry site (IRES elements via a bipartite non-canonical RNA-binding site located at its carboxy-terminal end. These features link Gemin5 with translation control events. Thus, beyond its role in snRNPs biogenesis, Gemin5 appears to be a multitasking protein cooperating in various RNA-guided processes. In this review, we will summarise current knowledge of Gemin5 functions. We will discuss the involvement of the protein on translation control and propose a model to explain how the proteolysis fragments of this RBP in picornavirus-infected cells could modulate protein synthesis.

  6. GRPR antagonist protects from drug-induced liver injury by impairing neutrophil chemotaxis and motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czepielewski, Rafael S; Jaeger, Natália; Marques, Pedro E; Antunes, Maísa M; Rigo, Maurício M; Alvarenga, Débora M; Pereira, Rafaela V; da Silva, Rodrigo D; Lopes, Tiago G; da Silva, Vinícius D; Porto, Bárbara N; Menezes, Gustavo B; Bonorino, Cristina

    2017-04-01

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is a major cause of acute liver failure (ALF), where hepatocyte necrotic products trigger liver inflammation, release of CXC chemokine receptor 2 (CXCR2) ligands (IL-8) and other neutrophil chemotactic molecules. Liver infiltration by neutrophils is a major cause of the life-threatening tissue damage that ensues. A GRPR (gastrin-releasing peptide receptor) antagonist impairs IL-8-induced neutrophil chemotaxis in vitro. We investigated its potential to reduce acetaminophen-induced ALF, neutrophil migration, and mechanisms underlying this phenomenon. We found that acetaminophen-overdosed mice treated with GRPR antagonist had reduced DILI and neutrophil infiltration in the liver. Intravital imaging and cell tracking analysis revealed reduced neutrophil mobility within the liver. Surprisingly, GRPR antagonist inhibited CXCL2-induced migration in vivo, decreasing neutrophil activation through CD11b and CD62L modulation. Additionally, this compound decreased CXCL8-driven neutrophil chemotaxis in vitro independently of CXCR2 internalization, induced activation of MAPKs (p38 and ERK1/2) and downregulation of neutrophil adhesion molecules CD11b and CD66b. In silico analysis revealed direct binding of GRPR antagonist and CXCL8 to the same binding spot in CXCR2. These findings indicate a new potential use for GRPR antagonist for treatment of DILI through a mechanism involving adhesion molecule modulation and possible direct binding to CXCR2. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Evaluation of the protagonist-antagonist dichotomy in Spanish television content targeting children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José A. García-Castillo, Ph.D.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study is to analyse the profile of the protagonist-antagonist dichotomy in all children’s television content, of all genres, offered by Spanish television channels. The analysis of protagonist and antagonist characters focuses on variables such as: type and number, age, gender, nationality, skills, relationship between the characters, characterisation, means used to achieve goals, consequences of the action of the antagonist over the antagonist and vice versa. The sample consists of 168 series that were analysed using descriptive content analysis and multivariate analysis. The results showed that over 50% of the series do not have an antagonist and that when there is one the most common type is a single human, which appears in more than 15% of the analysed series, followed by the fantastic creature type, which is present in just 10%. In 80% of the series the skills of the protagonists are social and human, and in 45.24% the exhibited skill is intelligence.

  8. CB1 cannabinoid antagonists: structure-activity relationships and potential therapeutic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagerovic, Nadine; Fernandez-Fernandez, Cristina; Goya, Pilar

    2008-01-01

    During the last decade there has been a growing interest towards the modulation of the cannabinoid CB1 receptor. The identification of CB1 cannabinoid receptor antagonists has been one of the major advances in cannabinoid research. Thus, the development of these ligands has opened new therapeutic applications. Since the discovery of the first cannabinoid receptor antagonist, rimonabant, by Sanofi in 1994, a large number of structural variations within this chemical series of 1,5-diarylpyrazoles have been described. So far, all attempts to identify novel structures for CB1 antagonists have been based on one or more pharmacophoric elements of the rimonabant structure. The advanced clinical trials of rimonabant confirm the therapeutic potential value of CB1 antagonists for the treatment of obesity. In addition, the results of pharmacological and clinical studies reveal other effective pharmacotherapeutic applications. The current review will mainly focus on the structure-activity relationships that have been established for antagonists/inverse agonists that bind to the CB1 cannabinoid receptors and on their therapeutic applications.

  9. Orexin 1 receptor antagonists in compulsive behavior and anxiety: possible therapeutic use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlo Pich, Emilio; Melotto, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    Fifteen years after the discovery of hypocretin/orexin a large body of evidence has been collected supporting its critical role in the modulation of several regulatory physiological functions. While reduced levels of hypocretin/orexin were initially associated with narcolepsy, increased levels have been linked in recent years to pathological states of hypervigilance and, in particular, to insomnia. The filing to FDA of the dual-activity orexin receptor antagonist (DORA) suvorexant for the indication of insomnia further corroborates the robustness of such evidences. However, as excessive vigilance is also typical of anxiety and panic episodes, as well as of abstinence and craving in substance misuse disorders. In this review we briefly discuss the evidence supporting the development of hypocretin/orexin receptor 1 (OX1) antagonists for these indications. Experiments using the OX1 antagonist SB-334867 and mutant mice have involved the OX1 receptor in mediating the compulsive reinstatement of drug seeking for ethanol, nicotine, cocaine, cannabinoids and morphine. More recently, data have been generated with the novel selective OX1 antagonists GSK1059865 and ACT-335827 on behavioral and cardiovascular response to stressors and panic-inducing agents in animals. Concluding, while waiting for pharmacologic data to become available in humans, risks and benefits for the development of an OX1 receptor antagonist for Binge Eating and Anxiety Disorders are discussed.

  10. Orexin 1 receptor antagonists in compulsive behaviour and anxiety: possible therapeutic use.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilio eMerlo-Pich

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Fifteen years after the discovery of hypocretin/orexin a large body of evidence has been collected supporting its critical role in the modulation of several regulatory physiological functions. While reduced levels of hypocretin/orexin were early on associated with narcolepsy, increased levels have been linked in recent years to pathological states of hypervigilance and, in particular, to insomnia. The filing to FDA of the dual-activity orexin receptor antagonist (DORA suvorexant for the indication of insomnia further corroborates the robustness of such evidences. However, as excessive vigilance is also typical of anxiety and panic episodes, as well as of abstinence and craving in substance misuse disorders, in this review we briefly discuss the evidence supporting the development of hypocretin/orexin receptor 1 (OX1 antagonists for these indications. Experiments using the OX1 antagonist SB-334867 and mutant mice have involved the OX1 receptor in mediating the compulsive reinstatement of drug seeking for ethanol, nicotine, cocaine, cannabinoids and morphine. More recently, data have been generated with the novel selective OX1 antagonists GSK1059865 and ACT-335827 on behavioural and cardiovascular response to stressors and panic-inducing agents in animals. Concluding, while waiting for pharmacologic data to become available in humans, risks and benefits for the development of an OX1 receptor antagonist for Binge Eating and Anxiety Disorders are discussed.

  11. Wear Behavior of Ceramic CAD/CAM Crowns and Natural Antagonists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ella A. Naumova

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Evaluation of wear behavior of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM crowns from various restorative materials and natural antagonists. Method: Full CAD/CAM crowns fabricated with nanoceramic resin (Lava Ultimate (LU, a glass ceramic in a resin interpenetrating matrix (Vita Enamic (VE and a lithium silicate reinforced ceramic enriched with zirconia (Vita Suprinity (VS were cemented on human molars. The crown and antagonists were subjected to simulated chewing. 3D data sets, before and after the chewing simulation, were generated and matched. Occlusal surface roughness, vertical and volume loss of the crowns and antagonists were analyzed. Results: Crown roughness was significantly different between the LU and VE groups after chewing simulation. Crown vertical loss differed in all groups. The highest crown volume loss was found in the LU group, and the lowest in the VE group. Comparisons between the LU and VE groups and the LU and VS groups were significantly different. The highest antagonist volume loss was reached in the VE group, the lowest was in the LU group. Conclusion: Roughness increased after chewing simulation. LU crowns are the most natural antagonist-friendly; these were the most susceptible to vertical and volume loss. Of the tested materials, the VE crowns are the most stable regarding occlusion.

  12. Wear Behavior of Ceramic CAD/CAM Crowns and Natural Antagonists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumova, Ella A.; Schneider, Stephan; Arnold, Wolfgang H.; Piwowarczyk, Andree

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Evaluation of wear behavior of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) crowns from various restorative materials and natural antagonists. Method: Full CAD/CAM crowns fabricated with nanoceramic resin (Lava Ultimate (LU)), a glass ceramic in a resin interpenetrating matrix (Vita Enamic (VE)) and a lithium silicate reinforced ceramic enriched with zirconia (Vita Suprinity (VS)) were cemented on human molars. The crown and antagonists were subjected to simulated chewing. 3D data sets, before and after the chewing simulation, were generated and matched. Occlusal surface roughness, vertical and volume loss of the crowns and antagonists were analyzed. Results: Crown roughness was significantly different between the LU and VE groups after chewing simulation. Crown vertical loss differed in all groups. The highest crown volume loss was found in the LU group, and the lowest in the VE group. Comparisons between the LU and VE groups and the LU and VS groups were significantly different. The highest antagonist volume loss was reached in the VE group, the lowest was in the LU group. Conclusion: Roughness increased after chewing simulation. LU crowns are the most natural antagonist-friendly; these were the most susceptible to vertical and volume loss. Of the tested materials, the VE crowns are the most stable regarding occlusion. PMID:28772602

  13. The role of gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonists in in vitro fertilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diedrich, K; Ludwig, M; Felberbaum, R E

    2001-09-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH)-antagonists can suppress the pituitary hormone secretion completely within a few hours, allowing the avoidance of premature luteinization within controlled ovarian hyperstimulation (COH) for assisted reproductive technologies (ART) by midcycle administration. Two different protocols were described, which were widely used in COH in several phase II and III studies as well as in clinical practice since the GnRH-antagonists Cetrorelix (Cetrotidesound recording copyright sign; Serono International S.A., Geneva, Switzerland) and Ganirelix (Orgalutansound recording copyright sign, Antagonsound recording copyright sign; Organon, Oss, The Netherlands) are available on the market. Cetrorelix was applied in single- and multiple-dose protocols; Ganirelix was used until now only according to the multiple-dose protocol. Fertilization rates of >60% as well as clinical pregnancy rates of about 30% per transfer sound most promising. Estradiol secretion is not compromised by the GnRH-antagonists using recombinant follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) for COH. The incidence of a premature leutinizing hormone (LH) surge is far below 2% while the pituitary response remains preserved, allowing the induction of ovulation by GnRH or GnRH-agonists. However, luteal phase support remains mandatory. The incidence of severe ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS) seems to be lower under antagonist treatment than in the long agonistic protocol. Treatment time is significantly shortened. Without any doubt GnRH-antagonists have the potential to become the new standard for controlled ovarian hyperstimulation.

  14. Inhibition of murine neutrophil recruitment in vivo by CXC chemokine receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McColl, S R; Clark-Lewis, I

    1999-09-01

    In this study, we have examined the ability of chemokine receptor antagonists to prevent neutrophil extravasation in the mouse. Two murine CXC chemokines, macrophage-inflammatory protein (MIP)-2 and KC, stimulated the accumulation of leukocytes into s.c. air pouches, although MIP-2 was considerably more potent. The leukocyte infiltrate was almost exclusively neutrophilic in nature. A human CXC chemokine antagonist, growth-related oncogene (GRO)-alpha(8-73), inhibited calcium mobilization induced by MIP-2, but not by platelet-activating factor in leukocytes isolated from the bone marrow, indicating that this antagonist inhibits MIP-2 activity toward murine leukocytes. Pretreatment of mice with GROalpha(8-73) inhibited, in a dose-dependent manner, the MIP-2-induced influx of neutrophils to levels that were not significantly different from control values. Moreover, this antagonist was also effective in inhibiting the leukocyte recruitment induced by TNF-alpha, LPS, and IL-1beta. Leukocyte infiltration into the peritoneal cavity in response to MIP-2 was also inhibited by prior treatment of mice with GROalpha(8-73) or the analogue of platelet factor 4, PF4(9-70). The results of this study indicate 1) that the murine receptor for MIP-2 and KC, muCXCR2, plays a major role in neutrophil recruitment to s.c. tissue and the peritoneal cavity in response to proinflammatory agents and 2) that CXCR2 receptor antagonists prevent acute inflammation in vivo.

  15. 5-HT2B Receptor Antagonists Inhibit Fibrosis and Protect from RV Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiebke Janssen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The serotonin (5-HT pathway was shown to play a role in pulmonary hypertension (PH, but its functions in right ventricular failure (RVF remain poorly understood. The aim of the current study was to investigate the effects of Terguride (5-HT2A and 2B receptor antagonist or SB204741 (5-HT2B receptor antagonist on right heart function and structure upon pulmonary artery banding (PAB in mice. Methods. Seven days after PAB, mice were treated for 14 days with Terguride (0.2 mg/kg bid or SB204741 (5 mg/kg day. Right heart function and remodeling were assessed by right heart catheterization, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, and histomorphometric methods. Total secreted collagen content was determined in mouse cardiac fibroblasts isolated from RV tissues. Results. Chronic treatment with Terguride or SB204741 reduced right ventricular fibrosis and showed improved heart function in mice after PAB. Moreover, 5-HT2B receptor antagonists diminished TGF-beta1 induced collagen synthesis of RV cardiac fibroblasts in vitro. Conclusion. 5-HT2B receptor antagonists reduce collagen deposition, thereby inhibiting right ventricular fibrosis. Chronic treatment prevented the development and progression of pressure overload-induced RVF in mice. Thus, 5-HT2B receptor antagonists represent a valuable novel therapeutic approach for RVF.

  16. Vitamin K Antagonist Therapy Is a Risk Factor for Ulcer Development and Death Among Dialyzed Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Mauri, Andreana; Torreggiani, Massimo; Brambilla, Marco; Chiarinotti, Doriana

    2017-04-01

    Peripheral artery disease is a common complication among dialyzed patients. Since Vitamin K antagonists promote metastatic calcifications and these are the main determinants of vascular damage, we investigated their role in the development of lower limb ulcers in dialyzed patients. We retrospectively enrolled 316 dialyzed patients, aged 68 ± 15 years, 65% male, 32% diabetic, 43% with ischemic heart disease and followed them for 36 ± 25 months. 60 patients assumed Vitamin K antagonists: they were older, with a higher prevalence of heart disease, at greater risk of death and they developed more ulcers and underwent more lower limb amputations compared to the rest of our cohort. Peripheral artery disease, Vitamin K antagonists and diabetes were independent risk factors for foot lesions. In addition, Vitamin K antagonists were also an independent risk factor for death. Vitamin K antagonists are a potent independent risk factor for the development of the uremic foot syndrome and death. © 2017 International Society for Apheresis, Japanese Society for Apheresis, and Japanese Society for Dialysis Therapy.

  17. Structurally diverse MDM2-p53 antagonists act as modulators of MDR-1 function in neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, L; Zhao, Y; Halliday, G C; Berry, P; Rousseau, R F; Middleton, S A; Nichols, G L; Del Bello, F; Piergentili, A; Newell, D R; Lunec, J; Tweddle, D A

    2014-08-12

    A frequent mechanism of acquired multidrug resistance in human cancers is overexpression of ATP-binding cassette transporters such as the Multi-Drug Resistance Protein 1 (MDR-1). Nutlin-3, an MDM2-p53 antagonist, has previously been reported to be a competitive MDR-1 inhibitor. This study assessed whether the structurally diverse MDM2-p53 antagonists, MI-63, NDD0005, and RG7388 are also able to modulate MDR-1 function, particularly in p53 mutant neuroblastoma cells, using XTT-based cell viability assays, western blotting, and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. Verapamil and the MDM2-p53 antagonists potentiated vincristine-mediated growth inhibition in a concentration-dependent manner when used in combination with high MDR-1-expressing p53 mutant neuroblastoma cell lines at concentrations that did not affect the viability of cells when given alone. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analyses showed that verapamil, Nutlin-3, MI-63 and NDD0005, but not RG7388, led to increased intracellular levels of vincristine in high MDR-1-expressing cell lines. These results show that in addition to Nutlin-3, other structurally unrelated MDM2-p53 antagonists can also act as MDR-1 inhibitors and reverse MDR-1-mediated multidrug resistance in neuroblastoma cell lines in a p53-independent manner. These findings are important for future clinical trial design with MDM2-p53 antagonists when used in combination with agents that are MDR-1 substrates.

  18. Can we use calcium antagonist better in antihypertensive therapy? Circadian consideration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, W

    1996-01-01

    On the basis of theoretical reasoning, it has been thought that calcium antagonists should be better than other classes of antihypertensive agents. However in several large scale clinical trials, the benefits have been smaller than expected. Meta-analysis has indicated that dihydropyridine calcium antagonists failed to reduce cardiac mortality and morbidity. The reason for this is probably multifactorial. Reflex activation of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) secondary to the reduction of blood pressure by calcium antagonists may play a very important role. It has been documented that the cardiovascular system has circadian rhythm and that most of the cardiovascular events in the general population happen in the morning, when the SNS is at its most active. Thus intrinsic activation of SNS set by circadian rhythm and extrinsic activation secondary to direct vasodilatation induced by calcium antagonists may overlap, which could increase cardiovascular risks and therefore result in poor clinical outcome. Antihypertensive therapy with calcium antagonists could be improved if it were possible to avoid the reflex activation and inhibit the intrinsic activation of SNS. A new chronotherapy is suggested, of which the basic principle is: to choose two classes of drugs with different mechanisms of action and use them at different periods of time during the day. By appropriate choice of the drugs and their acting time, not only the adverse effects, but also the risk during the vulnerable period could be reduced. Clinical research is needed to test this hypothesis.

  19. Antagonistic and Biocontrol Potential of Trichoderma asperellum ZJSX5003 Against the Maize Stalk Rot Pathogen Fusarium graminearum

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Yaqian; Sun, Ruiyan; Yu, Jia; Saravanakumar, Kandasamy; Chen, Jie

    2016-01-01

    The efficacy of seven strains of Trichodermaasperellum collected from the fields in Southern China was assessed against Fusarium graminearum (FG) the causal agent of corn stalk rot of maize were in vitro for their antagonistic properties followed by statistical model of principal compound analysis to identify the beneficial antagonist T.asperellum strain. The key factors of antagonist activity were attributed to a total of 13 factors including cell wall degrading enzymes (chitnase, protease a...

  20. Identification of spirooxindole and dibenzoxazepine motifs as potent mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotesta, Stephen D; Marcus, Andrew P; Zheng, Yajun; Leftheris, Katerina; Noto, Paul B; Meng, Shi; Kandpal, Geeta; Chen, Guozhou; Zhou, Jing; McKeever, Brian; Bukhtiyarov, Yuri; Zhao, Yi; Lala, Deepak S; Singh, Suresh B; McGeehan, Gerard M

    2016-03-15

    Mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonists continue to be a prevalent area of research in the pharmaceutical industry. Herein we report the discovery of various spirooxindole and dibenzoxazepine constructs as potent MR antagonists. SAR analysis of our spirooxindole hit led to highly potent compounds containing polar solubilizing groups, which interact with the helix-11 region of the MR ligand binding domain (LBD). Various dibenzoxazepine moieties were also prepared in an effort to replace a known dibenzoxepane system which interacts with the hydrophobic region of the MR LBD. In addition, an X-ray crystal structure was obtained from a highly potent compound which was shown to exhibit both partial agonist and antagonist modes of action against MR. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Binding and functional pharmacological characteristics of gepant-type antagonists in rat brain and mesenteric arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sheykhzade, Majid; Amandi, Nilofar; Pla, Monica Vidal

    2017-01-01

    and antagonistic characteristics of small non-peptide CGRP receptor antagonists (i.e. gepants) in isolated rat brain and mesenteric resistance arteries. METHODS: The antagonistic behavior of gepants was investigated in isolated rat mesenteric arteries using a wire myograph setup while binding of gepants to CGRP...... receptors was investigated in rat brain membranes using a radioligand competitive binding assay. Furthermore, the histological location of the key components of CGRP receptor (RAMP1 and CLR) was assessed by immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: Our functional studies clearly show that all gepants are reversible...... in rat brain and mesenteric arteries, the exception being rimegepant which had 50-fold lower affinity in brain than mesenteric arteries. CLR and RAMP1 were shown to be located in both vascular smooth muscle and endothelial cells of rat mesenteric arteries by immunohistochemistry. CONCLUSION: The present...

  2. Effect of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists on proteinuria and progression of chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Currie, Gemma; Taylor, Alison H M; Fujita, Toshiro

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hypertension and proteinuria are critically involved in the progression of chronic kidney disease. Despite treatment with renin angiotensin system inhibition, kidney function declines in many patients. Aldosterone excess is a risk factor for progression of kidney disease. Hyperkalaemia...... is a concern with the use of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists. We aimed to determine whether the renal protective benefits of mineralocorticoid antagonists outweigh the risk of hyperkalaemia associated with this treatment in patients with chronic kidney disease. METHODS: We conducted a meta......-analysis investigating renoprotective effects and risk of hyperkalaemia in trials of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists in chronic kidney disease. Trials were identified from MEDLINE (1966-2014), EMBASE (1947-2014) and the Cochrane Clinical Trials Database. Unpublished summary data were obtained from investigators...

  3. Orexin Receptor Antagonists: New Therapeutic Agents for the Treatment of Insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roecker, Anthony J; Cox, Christopher D; Coleman, Paul J

    2016-01-28

    Since its discovery in 1998, the orexin system, composed of two G-protein coupled receptors, orexins 1 and 2, and two neuropeptide agonists, orexins A and B, has captured the attention of the scientific community as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of obesity, anxiety, and sleep/wake disorders. Genetic evidence in rodents, dogs, and humans was revealed between 1999 and 2000, demonstrating a causal link between dysfunction or deletion of the orexin system and narcolepsy, a disorder characterized by hypersomnolence during normal wakefulness. These findings encouraged efforts to discover agonists to treat narcolepsy and, alternatively, antagonists to treat insomnia. This perspective will focus on the discovery and development of structurally diverse orexin antagonists suitable for preclinical pharmacology studies and human clinical trials. The work described herein culminated in the 2014 FDA approval of suvorexant as a first-in-class dual orexin receptor antagonist for the treatment of insomnia.

  4. Development of prolactin receptor antagonists with reduced pH-dependence of receptor binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mathilde Johanne Kaas; Olsen, Johan Gotthardt; Bernichtein, Sophie

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The cytokine hormone prolactin has a vast number of diverse functions. Unfortunately, it also exhibits tumor growth promoting properties, which makes the development of prolactin receptor antagonists a priority. Prolactin binds to its cognate receptor with much lower affinity at low p....... From evaluation of known molecular structures of human prolactin, of the prolactin receptor and of different complexes of the two, three histidine residues in the hormone-receptor binding site 1 were selected for mutational studies. We analyzed 10 variants by circular dichroism spectroscopy, affinity...... antagonists were developed earlier and the histidine mutations were introduced within such background. The antagonistic properties were maintained and the high affinity at low pH conserved. The implications of these findings may open new areas of research in the field of prolactin cancer biology. Copyright...

  5. Novel selective thiazoleacetic acids as CRTH2 antagonists developed from in silico derived hits. Part 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rist, Oystein; Grimstrup, Marie; Receveur, Jean-Marie

    2009-01-01

    Structure-activity relationships of three related series of 4-phenylthiazol-5-ylacetic acids, derived from two hits emanating from a focused library obtained by in silico screening, have been explored as CRTH2 (chemoattractant receptor-homologous molecule expressed on Th2 cells) antagonists....... Several compounds with double digit nanomolar binding affinity and full antagonistic efficacy for human CRTH2 receptor were obtained in all subclasses. The most potent compound was [2-(4-chloro-benzyl)-4-(4-phenoxy-phenyl)-thiazol-5-yl]acetic acid having an binding affinity of 3.7nM and functional...... antagonistic effect of 66nM in a BRET and 12nM in a cAMP assay with no functional activity for the other PGD2 DP receptor (27muM in cAMP)....

  6. Discovery of a Novel CCR5 Antagonist Lead Compound Through Fragment Assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hualiang Jiang

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available CCR5, as the major co-receptor for HIV-1 entry, is an attractive novel target for the pharmaceutical industry in the HIV-1 therapeutic area. In this study, based on the structures of maraviroc and 1,4-bis(4-(7-chloroquinolin-4-ylpiperazin-1-ylbutane-1,4-dione (1, which was identified using structure-based virtual screening in conjunction with a calcium mobilization assay, a series of novel small molecule CCR5 antagonists have been designed and synthesized through fragment assembly. Preliminary SARs were obtained, which are in good agreement with the molecular binding model and should prove helpful for future antagonist design. The novel scaffold presented here might also be useful in the development of maraviroc-derived second generation CCR5 antagonists.

  7. Role of leukotriene antagonists and antihistamines in the treatment of allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobanoğlu, Bengü; Toskala, Elina; Ural, Ahmet; Cingi, Cemal

    2013-04-01

    Allergic rhinitis is the most common atopic disorder seen in ENT clinics. It is diagnosed by history, physical exam and objective testing. Patient education, environmental control measures, pharmacotherapy, and allergen-specific immunotherapy are the cornerstones of allergic rhinitis treatment and can significantly reduce the burden of disease. Current treatment guidelines include antihistamines, intranasal corticosteroids, oral and intranasal decongestants, intranasal anticholinergics, intranasal cromolyn, and leukotriene receptor antagonists. In the mechanism of allergic rhinitis, histamine is responsible for major allergic rhinitis symptoms such as rhinorrhea, nasal itching and sneezing. Its effect on nasal congestion is less evident. In contrast, leukotrienes result in increase in nasal airway resistance and vascular permeability. Antihistamines and leukotriene receptor antagonists are commonly used in the treatment of allergic rhinitis. The published literature about combined antihistamines and leukotriene antagonists in mono- or combination therapy is reviewed and presented.

  8. Recent progress in the development of small-molecule glucagon receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammons, Matthew F; Lee, Esther C Y

    2015-10-01

    The endocrine hormone glucagon stimulates hepatic glucose output via its action at the glucagon receptor (GCGr) in the liver. In the diabetic state, dysregulation of glucagon secretion contributes to abnormally elevated hepatic glucose output. The inhibition of glucagon-induced hepatic glucose output via antagonism of the GCGr using small-molecule ligands is a promising mechanism for improving glycemic control in the diabetic state. Clinical data evaluating the therapeutic potential of small-molecule GCGr antagonists is currently emerging. Recently disclosed clinical data demonstrates the potential efficacy and possible therapeutic limitations of small-molecule GCGr antagonists. Recent pre-clinical work on the development of GCGr antagonists is also summarized. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Serotonin (5-HT3 receptor antagonists for the reduction of symptoms of low anterior resection syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itagaki R

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Ryohei Itagaki, Keiji Koda, Masato Yamazaki, Kiyohiko Shuto, Chihiro Kosugi, Atsushi Hirano, Hidehito Arimitsu, Risa Shiragami, Yukino Yoshimura, Masato Suzuki Department of Surgery, Teikyo University Chiba Medical Center, Anesaki, Ichihara, Chiba, Japan Purpose: Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine [5-HT]3 receptor antagonists are effective for the treatment of diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-D, in which exaggerated intestinal/colonic hypermotility is often observed. Recent studies have suggested that the motility disorder, especially spastic hypermotility, seen in the neorectum following sphincter-preserving operations for rectal cancer may be the basis of the postoperative defecatory malfunction seen in these patients. We investigated the efficacy of 5-HT3 receptor antagonists in patients suffering from severe low anterior resection syndrome. Patients and methods: A total of 25 male patients with complaints of uncontrollable urgency or fecal incontinence following sphincter-preserving operations were enrolled in this study. Defecatory status, assessed on the basis of incontinence score (0–20, urgency grade (0–3, and number of toilet visits per day, was evaluated using a questionnaire before and 1 month after the administration of the 5-HT3 antagonist ramosetron. Results: All the parameters assessed improved significantly after taking ramosetron for 1 month. The effect was more prominent in cases whose anastomotic line was lower, ie, inside the anal canal. Defecatory function was better in patients who commenced ramosetron therapy within 6 months postoperatively, as compared to those who were not prescribed ramosetron for more than 7 months postoperatively. Conclusion: These results suggest that 5-HT3 antagonists are effective for the treatment of low anterior resection syndrome, as in diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome. The improvement in symptoms is not merely time dependent, but it is related to treatment with 5

  10. Behavioral, biological, and chemical perspectives on targeting CRF1 receptor antagonists to treat alcoholism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorrilla, Eric P.; Heilig, Markus; de Wit, Harriet; Shaham, Yavin

    2013-01-01

    Background Alcohol use disorders are chronic disabling conditions for which existing pharmacotherapies have only modest efficacy. In the present review, derived from the 2012 Behavior, Biology and Chemistry “Translational Research in Addiction” symposium, we summarize the anti-relapse potential of corticotropin-releasing factor type 1 (CRF1) receptor antagonists to reduce negative emotional symptoms of acute and protracted alcohol withdrawal and stress-induced relapse to alcohol seeking. Methods We review the biology of CRF1 systems, the activity of CRF1 receptor antagonists in animal models of anxiolytic and antidepressant activity, and experimental findings in alcohol addiction models. We also update the clinical trial status of CRF1 receptor antagonists, including pexacerfont (BMS-562086), emicerfont (GW876008), verucerfont (GSK561679), CP316311, SSR125543A, R121919/NBI30775, R317573/19567470/CRA5626, and ONO-2333Ms. Finally, we discuss the potential heterogeneity and pharmacogenomics of CRF1 receptor pharmacotherapy for alcohol dependence. Results The evidence suggests that brain penetrant-CRF1 receptor antagonists have therapeutic potential for alcohol dependence. Lead compounds with clinically desirable pharmacokinetic properties now exist, and longer receptor residence rates (i.e., slow dissociation) may predict greater CRF1 receptor antagonist efficacy. Functional variants in genes that encode CRF system molecules, including polymorphisms in Crhr1 (rs110402, rs1876831, rs242938) and Crhbp genes (rs10055255, rs3811939) may promote alcohol seeking and consumption by altering basal or stress-induced CRF system activation. Conclusions Ongoing clinical trials with pexacerfont and verucerfont in moderately to highly severe dependent anxious alcoholics may yield insight as to the role of CRF1 receptor antagonists in a personalized medicine approach to treat drug or alcohol dependence. PMID:23294766

  11. Aldosterone and aldosterone receptor antagonists in patients with chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nappi, Jean M; Sieg, Adam

    2011-01-01

    Aldosterone is a mineralocorticoid hormone synthesized by the adrenal glands that has several regulatory functions to help the body maintain normal volume status and electrolyte balance. Studies have shown significantly higher levels of aldosterone secretion in patients with congestive heart failure compared with normal patients. Elevated levels of aldosterone have been shown to elevate blood pressure, cause left ventricular hypertrophy, and promote cardiac fibrosis. An appreciation of the true role of aldosterone in patients with chronic heart failure did not become apparent until the publication of the Randomized Aldactone Evaluation Study. Until recently, the use of aldosterone receptor antagonists has been limited to patients with severe heart failure and patients with heart failure following myocardial infarction. The Eplerenone in Mild Patients Hospitalization and Survival Study in Heart Failure (EMPHASIS-HF) study added additional evidence to support the expanded use of aldosterone receptor antagonists in heart failure patients. The results of the EMPHASIS-HF trial showed that patients with mild-to-moderate (New York Heart Association Class II) heart failure had reductions in mortality and hospitalizations from the addition of eplerenone to optimal medical therapy. Evidence remains elusive about the exact mechanism by which aldosterone receptor antagonists improve heart failure morbidity and mortality. The benefits of aldosterone receptor antagonist use in heart failure must be weighed against the potential risk of complications, ie, hyperkalemia and, in the case of spironolactone, possible endocrine abnormalities, in particular gynecomastia. With appropriate monitoring, these risks can be minimized. We now have evidence that patients with mild-to-severe symptoms associated with systolic heart failure will benefit from the addition of an aldosterone receptor antagonist to the standard therapies of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and beta

  12. Radiolabelled GLP-1 receptor antagonist binds to GLP-1 receptor-expressing human tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waser, Beatrice; Reubi, Jean Claude [University of Berne, Division of Cell Biology and Experimental Cancer Research, Institute of Pathology, PO Box 62, Berne (Switzerland)

    2014-06-15

    Radiolabelled glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists have recently been shown to successfully image benign insulinomas in patients. For the somatostatin receptor targeting of tumours, however, it was recently reported that antagonist tracers were superior to agonist tracers. The present study therefore evaluated various forms of the {sup 125}iodinated-Bolton-Hunter (BH)-exendin(9-39) antagonist tracer for the in vitro visualization of GLP-1 receptor-expressing tissues in rats and humans and compared it with the agonist tracer {sup 125}I-GLP-1(7-36)amide. Receptor autoradiography studies with {sup 125}I-GLP-1(7-36)amide agonist or {sup 125}I-BH-exendin(9-39) antagonist radioligands were performed in human and rat tissues. The antagonist {sup 125}I-BH-exendin(9-39) labelled at lysine 19 identifies all human and rat GLP-1 target tissues and GLP-1 receptor-expressing tumours. Binding is of high affinity and is comparable in all tested tissues in its binding properties with the agonist tracer {sup 125}I-GLP-1(7-36)amide. For comparison, {sup 125}I-BH-exendin(9-39) with the BH labelled at lysine 4 did identify the GLP-1 receptor in rat tissues but not in human tissues. The GLP-1 receptor antagonist exendin(9-39) labelled with {sup 125}I-BH at lysine 19 is an excellent GLP-1 radioligand that identifies human and rat GLP-1 receptors in normal and tumoural tissues. It may therefore be the molecular basis to develop suitable GLP-1 receptor antagonist radioligands for in vivo imaging of GLP-1 receptor-expressing tissues in patients. (orig.)

  13. Development of NMDAR antagonists with reduced neurotoxic side effects: a study on GK11.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delphine Vandame

    Full Text Available The NMDAR glutamate receptor subtype mediates various vital physiological neuronal functions. However, its excessive activation contributes to neuronal damage in a large variety of acute and chronic neurological disorders. NMDAR antagonists thus represent promising therapeutic tools that can counteract NMDARs' overactivation. Channel blockers are of special interest since they are use-dependent, thus being more potent at continuously activated NMDARs, as may be the case in pathological conditions. Nevertheless, it has been established that NMDAR antagonists, such as MK801, also have unacceptable neurotoxic effects. Presently only Memantine is considered a safe NMDAR antagonist and is used clinically. It has recently been speculated that antagonists that preferentially target extrasynaptic NMDARs would be less toxic. We previously demonstrated that the phencyclidine derivative GK11 preferentially inhibits extrasynaptic NMDARs. We thus anticipated that this compound would be safer than other known NMDAR antagonists. In this study we used whole-genome profiling of the rat cingulate cortex, a brain area that is particularly sensitive to NMDAR antagonists, to compare the potential adverse effects of GK11 and MK801. Our results showed that in contrast to GK11, the transcriptional profile of MK801 is characterized by a significant upregulation of inflammatory and stress-response genes, consistent with its high neurotoxicity. In addition, behavioural and immunohistochemical analyses confirmed marked inflammatory reactions (including astrogliosis and microglial activation in MK801-treated, but not GK11-treated rats. Interestingly, we also showed that GK11 elicited less inflammation and neuronal damage, even when compared to Memantine, which like GK11, preferentially inhibits extrasynaptic NMDAR. As a whole, our study suggests that GK11 may be a more attractive therapeutic alternative in the treatment of CNS disorders characterized by the overactivation

  14. Effects of α-adrenoceptor antagonists on ABCG2/BCRP-mediated resistance and transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takara, Kohji; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Matsubara, Mika; Minegaki, Tetsuya; Takahashi, Minoru; Yokoyama, Teruyoshi; Okumura, Katsuhiko

    2012-01-01

    Acquired resistance of cancer cells to various chemotherapeutic agents is known as multidrug resistance, and remains a critical factor in the success of cancer treatment. It is necessary to develop the inhibitors for multidrug resistance. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of eight α-adrenoceptor antagonists on ABCG2/BCRP-mediated resistance and transport. Previously established HeLa/SN100 cells, which overexpress ABCG2/BCRP but not ABCB1/MDR1, were used. The effects of the antagonists on sensitivity to mitoxantrone and the transport activity of Hoehst33342, both substrates for ABCG2/BCRP, were evaluated using the WST-1 assay and cellular kinetics, respectively. ABCG2/BCRP mRNA expression and the cell cycle were also examined by real-time RT-PCR and flow cytometry, respectively. Sensitivity to mitoxantrone was reversed by the α-adrenoceptor antagonists in a concentration-dependent manner, although such effects were also found in the parental HeLa cells. Levels of ABCG2/BCRP mRNA expression were not influenced by the antagonists. The transport activity of Hoechst33342 was decreased by doxazosin and prazosin, but unaffected by the other antagonists. In addition, doxazosin and prazosin increased the proportion of S phase cells in the cultures treated with mitoxantrone, whereas the other α-adrenoceptor antagonists increased the percentage of cells in G(2)/M phase. These findings suggested that doxazosin and prazosin reversed resistance mainly by inhibiting ABCG2/BCRP-mediated transport, but the others affected sensitivity to mitoxantrone via a different mechanism.

  15. Effects of α-adrenoceptor antagonists on ABCG2/BCRP-mediated resistance and transport.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohji Takara

    Full Text Available Acquired resistance of cancer cells to various chemotherapeutic agents is known as multidrug resistance, and remains a critical factor in the success of cancer treatment. It is necessary to develop the inhibitors for multidrug resistance. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of eight α-adrenoceptor antagonists on ABCG2/BCRP-mediated resistance and transport. Previously established HeLa/SN100 cells, which overexpress ABCG2/BCRP but not ABCB1/MDR1, were used. The effects of the antagonists on sensitivity to mitoxantrone and the transport activity of Hoehst33342, both substrates for ABCG2/BCRP, were evaluated using the WST-1 assay and cellular kinetics, respectively. ABCG2/BCRP mRNA expression and the cell cycle were also examined by real-time RT-PCR and flow cytometry, respectively. Sensitivity to mitoxantrone was reversed by the α-adrenoceptor antagonists in a concentration-dependent manner, although such effects were also found in the parental HeLa cells. Levels of ABCG2/BCRP mRNA expression were not influenced by the antagonists. The transport activity of Hoechst33342 was decreased by doxazosin and prazosin, but unaffected by the other antagonists. In addition, doxazosin and prazosin increased the proportion of S phase cells in the cultures treated with mitoxantrone, whereas the other α-adrenoceptor antagonists increased the percentage of cells in G(2/M phase. These findings suggested that doxazosin and prazosin reversed resistance mainly by inhibiting ABCG2/BCRP-mediated transport, but the others affected sensitivity to mitoxantrone via a different mechanism.

  16. Synthesis and structure-activity relationships of TEI-9647 derivatives as Vitamin D3 antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takenouchi, Kazuya; Sogawa, Ryo; Manabe, Kenji; Saitoh, Hiroshi; Gao, Qingzhi; Miura, Daishiro; Ishizuka, Seiichi

    2004-05-01

    The Vitamin D(3) lactone analogues, (23S)- and (23R)-25-dehydro-1alpha-hydroxyvitamin D(3)-26,23-lactone (TEI-9647 and TEI-9648) are antagonists of the 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) (1alpha,25-(OH)(2)D(3)) nuclear receptor (VDR)-mediated differentiation of human leukemia (HL-60) cells. In order to clarify the structure-Vitamin D antagonistic activity relationship, we paid attention to the unique lactone moiety of TEI-9647 and TEI-9648: alpha-exo-methylene-gamma-lactone structure. We synthesized the exo-methylene-modified analogues (methylene saturated, endo-methylene, methylene-deleted, methyl-substituted, dimethyl-substituted, methylene-replaced with dimethyl and cyclopropane) and oxygen-modified analogues (oxygen atom replaced with nitrogen and carbon atom) by convergent method using palladium-catalyzed coupling reaction or direct modification of VD(3) skeleton. The antagonistic activity in HL-60 cell differentiation evaluating system of these analogues revealed that any exo-methylene-modified analogues and nitrogen analogue did not have the antagonistic activity, on the other hand carbon analogue did show. The results suggest that "alpha-exo-methylene carbonyl" structure of VD(3) side-chain is crucial for antagonistic activity. The structure is integral building block of many natural products which have interesting biological and it is thought that Michael-type addition of alpha-exo-methylene carbonyl structure with protein nucleophiles such as cysteine would play an important role for the activities. According to this theory, Michael-type reaction of TEI-9647 and TEI-9648 with cysteine residue in protein related to VDR/VDRE-mediated genomic actions such as VDR would be essential step of the antagonistic action.

  17. Active tuberculosis in psoriasis patients treated with TNF antagonists: a French nationwide retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guinard, E; Bulai Livideanu, C; Barthélémy, H; Viguier, M; Reguiai, Z; Richard, M A; Jullien, D; Beneton, N; Bara, C; Vabres, P; Grandvuillemin, A; Marguery, M C; Amelot, F; Konstantinou, M P; Bagheri, H; Paul, C

    2016-08-01

    There is limited information about active tuberculosis (TB) occurring in psoriasis patients treated with Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) antagonists. To describe the clinical characteristics of TB in psoriasis patients treated with TNF antagonists. Nationwide retrospective study of psoriasis patients having experienced TB. Cases of TB were collected via three methods: search in the national pharmacosurveillance database, questionnaire to members of the French psoriasis research group, the college of French dermatology professors. We collected demographic data, TNF antagonist used, screening for latent tuberculosis infection, median time between TNF antagonists introduction and first symptoms, tests used for diagnosing TB infection, clinical features of tuberculosis and outcome. Eight centres reported 12 cases of TB between 2006 and 2014. They were nine men and three women with mean age of 49 years. All patients had adequate screening for latent tuberculosis. Three patients had stayed in endemic areas, three reported contact with a patient with TB. Tuberculosis presentation was extrapulmonary in 10 patients. Seven patients were treated with infliximab, four with adalimumab and one with certolizumab. The median time between TNF antagonist introduction and first symptoms of tuberculosis was 23.4 weeks (2-176). Six of the 12 patients had a positive direct examination and/or positive culture for Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Histological samples of affected organs taken from seven patients showed granulomatous inflammation in six, with caseating necrosis in five. Two of the 12 patients died of disseminated TB. This study shows tuberculosis in patients treated with TNF antagonists still occurs despite adherence to tuberculosis prevention guidelines. Prophylactic measures do not fully prevent the occurrence of tuberculosis. Rapid initiation of effective anti-tuberculosis treatment is important even in patients with negative mycobacteriological examination presenting with

  18. Behavioral, biological, and chemical perspectives on targeting CRF(1) receptor antagonists to treat alcoholism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorrilla, Eric P; Heilig, Markus; de Wit, Harriet; Shaham, Yavin

    2013-03-01

    Alcohol use disorders are chronic disabling conditions for which existing pharmacotherapies have only modest efficacy. In the present review, derived from the 2012 Behavior, Biology and Chemistry "Translational Research in Addiction" symposium, we summarize the anti-relapse potential of corticotropin-releasing factor type 1 (CRF(1)) receptor antagonists to reduce negative emotional symptoms of acute and protracted alcohol withdrawal and stress-induced relapse to alcohol seeking. We review the biology of CRF(1) systems, the activity of CRF(1) receptor antagonists in animal models of anxiolytic and antidepressant activity, and experimental findings in alcohol addiction models. We also update the clinical trial status of CRF(1) receptor antagonists, including pexacerfont (BMS-562086), emicerfont (GW876008), verucerfont (GSK561679), CP316311, SSR125543A, R121919/NBI30775, R317573/19567470/CRA5626, and ONO-2333Ms. Finally, we discuss the potential heterogeneity and pharmacogenomics of CRF(1) receptor pharmacotherapy for alcohol dependence. The evidence suggests that brain penetrant-CRF(1) receptor antagonists have therapeutic potential for alcohol dependence. Lead compounds with clinically desirable pharmacokinetic properties now exist, and longer receptor residence rates (i.e., slow dissociation) may predict greater CRF(1) receptor antagonist efficacy. Functional variants in genes that encode CRF system molecules, including polymorphisms in Crhr1 (rs110402, rs1876831, rs242938) and Crhbp genes (rs10055255, rs3811939) may promote alcohol seeking and consumption by altering basal or stress-induced CRF system activation. Ongoing clinical trials with pexacerfont and verucerfont in moderately to highly severe dependent anxious alcoholics may yield insight as to the role of CRF(1) receptor antagonists in a personalized medicine approach to treat drug or alcohol dependence. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Distinctions between non-peptide angiotensin II AT1-receptor antagonists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georges Vauquelin

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available A far-reaching understanding of the molecular action mechanism of AT1-receptor antagonists (AIIAs was obtained by using CHO cells expressing transfected human AT 1-receptors. In this model, direct [3H]-antagonist binding and inhibition of agonist-induced responses (inositol phosphate accumulation can be measured under identical experimental conditions. Whereas preincubation with a surmountable AIIA (losartan causes parallel shifts of the angiotensin II (Ang II concentration-response curve, insurmountable antagonists also cause partial (i.e., 30% for irbesartan, 50% for valsartan, 70% for EXP3174, to almost complete (95% for candesartan reductions of the maximal response. The main conclusions are that all investigated antagonists are competitive with respect to Ang II. They bind to a common or overlapping site on the receptor in a mutually exclusive way. Insurmountable inhibition is related to the slow dissociation rate of the antagonist-receptor complex (t 1/2 of 7 minutes for irbesartan, 17 minutes for valsartan, 30 minutes for EXP3174 and 120 minutes for candesartan. Antagonist-bound AT1-receptors can adopt a fast and a slow reversible state. This is responsible for the partial nature of the insurmountable inhibition. The long-lasting effect of candesartan, the active metabolite of candesartan cilexetil, in vascular smooth muscle contraction studies, as well as in in vivo experiments on rat and in clinical studies, is compatible with its slow dissociation from, and continuous recycling between AT1-receptors. This recycling, or `rebinding' takes place because of the very high affinity of candesartan for the AT1-receptor.

  20. Isolation, identification, and biocontrol of antagonistic bacterium against Botrytis cinerea after tomato harvest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Feng Shi

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Tomato is one of the most important vegetables in the world. Decay after harvest is a major issue in the development of tomato industry. Currently, the most effective method for controlling decay after harvest is storage of tomato at low temperature combined with usage of chemical bactericide; however, long-term usage of chemical bactericide not only causes pathogen resistance but also is harmful for human health and environment. Biocontrol method for the management of disease after tomato harvest has great practical significance. In this study, antagonistic bacterium B-6-1 strain was isolated from the surface of tomato and identified as Enterobacter cowanii based on morphological characteristics and physiological and biochemical features combined with sequence analysis of 16SrDNA and ropB gene and construction of dendrogram. Effects of different concentrations of antagonistic bacterium E. cowanii suspension on antifungal activity after tomato harvest were analyzed by mycelium growth rate method. Results revealed that antifungal activity was also enhanced with increasing concentrations of antagonistic bacterium; inhibitory rates of 1 × 105 colony-forming units (cfu/mL antagonistic bacterial solution on Fusarium verticillioides, Alternaria tenuissima, and Botrytis cinerea were 46.31%, 67.48%, and 75.67%, respectively. By using in vivo inoculation method, it was further confirmed that antagonistic bacterium could effectively inhibit the occurrence of B. cinerae after tomato harvest, biocontrol effect of 1 × 109 cfu/mL zymotic fluid reached up to 95.24%, and antagonistic bacterium E. cowanii has biocontrol potential against B. cinerea after harvest of fruits and vegetables.

  1. Data on the oral CRTh2 antagonist QAW039 (fevipiprant in patients with uncontrolled allergic asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veit J. Erpenbeck

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This article contains data on clinical endpoints (Peak Flow Expiratory Rate, fractional exhaled nitric oxide and total IgE serum levels and plasma pharmacokinetic parameters concerning the use of the oral CRTh2 antagonist QAW039 (fevipiprant in mild to moderate asthma patients. Information on experimental design and methods on how this data was obtained is also described. Further interpretation and discussion of this data can be found in the article “The oral CRTh2 antagonist QAW039 (fevipiprant: a phase II study in uncontrolled allergic asthma” (Erpenbeck et al., in press [1].

  2. Transport of beta-blockers and calcium antagonists by diffusion in cat myocardium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haunsø, Stig; Sejrsen, Per; Svendsen, Jesper Hastrup

    1991-01-01

    Beta-blockers and calcium antagonists have been claimed to possess cardioprotective properties. This study addresses the question of whether a significant amount of these drugs will reach the cardiac myocytes during no-flow ischemia, where solute transport depends solely on diffusion. In anesthet......Beta-blockers and calcium antagonists have been claimed to possess cardioprotective properties. This study addresses the question of whether a significant amount of these drugs will reach the cardiac myocytes during no-flow ischemia, where solute transport depends solely on diffusion...

  3. Identification and hit-to-lead optimization of a novel class of CB1 antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letourneau, Jeffrey J; Jokiel, Patrick; Olson, John; Riviello, Christopher M; Ho, Koc-Kan; McAleer, Lihong; Yang, Jingchun; Swanson, Robert N; Baker, James; Cowley, Phillip; Edwards, Darren; Ward, Nick; Ohlmeyer, Michael H J; Webb, Maria L

    2010-09-15

    The discovery, synthesis and preliminary structure-activity relationships (SARs) of a novel class of CB1 antagonists is described. Initial optimization of benzimidazole-based screening hit 4 led to the identification of 'inverted' indole-based lead compound 18c with improved properties versus compound 4 including reduced AlogP, improved microsomal stability and improved aqueous solubility. Compound 18c demonstrates in vivo CB1 antagonist efficacy (CB1 agonist induced hypothermia model) and is orally bioavailable in rat. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Identification of a nonbasic melanin hormone receptor 1 antagonist as an antiobesity clinical candidate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washburn, William N; Manfredi, Mark; Devasthale, Pratik; Zhao, Guohua; Ahmad, Saleem; Hernandez, Andres; Robl, Jeffrey A; Wang, Wei; Mignone, James; Wang, Zhenghua; Ngu, Khehyong; Pelleymounter, Mary Ann; Longhi, Daniel; Zhao, Rulin; Wang, Bei; Huang, Ning; Flynn, Neil; Azzara, Anthony V; Barrish, Joel C; Rohrbach, Kenneth; Devenny, James J; Rooney, Suzanne; Thomas, Michael; Glick, Susan; Godonis, Helen E; Harvey, Susan J; Cullen, Mary Jane; Zhang, Hongwei; Caporuscio, Christian; Stetsko, Paul; Grubb, Mary; Maxwell, Brad D; Yang, Hong; Apedo, Atsu; Gemzik, Brian; Janovitz, Evan B; Huang, Christine; Zhang, Lisa; Freeden, Chris; Murphy, Brian J

    2014-09-25

    Identification of MCHR1 antagonists with a preclinical safety profile to support clinical evaluation as antiobesity agents has been a challenge. Our finding that a basic moiety is not required for MCHR1 antagonists to achieve high affinity allowed us to explore structures less prone to off-target activities such as hERG inhibition. We report the SAR evolution of hydroxylated thienopyrimidinone ethers culminating in the identification of 27 (BMS-819881), which entered obesity clinical trials as the phosphate ester prodrug 35 (BMS-830216).

  5. Discovery of LAS101057: A Potent, Selective, and Orally Efficacious A2B Adenosine Receptor Antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastwood, Paul; Esteve, Cristina; González, Jacob; Fonquerna, Silvia; Aiguadé, Josep; Carranco, Inés; Doménech, Teresa; Aparici, Mònica; Miralpeix, Montserrat; Albertí, Joan; Córdoba, Mónica; Fernández, Raquel; Pont, Mercè; Godessart, Núria; Prats, Neus; Loza, María Isabel; Cadavid, María Isabel; Nueda, Arsenio; Vidal, Bernat

    2011-03-10

    The structure-activity relationships for a series of pyrazine-based A2B adenosine receptor antagonists are described. From this work, LAS101057 (17), a potent, selective, and orally efficacious A2B receptor antagonist, was identified as a clinical development candidate. LAS101057 inhibits agonist-induced IL-6 production in human fibroblasts and is active in an ovalbumin (OVA)-sensitized mouse model after oral administration, reducing airway hyperresponsiveness to methacholine, Th2 cytokine production, and OVA-specific IgE levels.

  6. Unprecedented NES non-antagonistic inhibitor for nuclear export of Rev from Sida cordifolia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Satoru; Kaneko, Masafumi; Shiomi, Atsushi; Yang, Guang-Ming; Yamaura, Toshiaki; Murakami, Nobutoshi

    2010-03-15

    Bioassay-guided separation from the MeOH extract of the South American medicinal plant Sida cordifolia resulted in isolation of (10E,12Z)-9-hydroxyoctadeca-10,12-dienoic acid (1) as an unprecedented NES non-antagonistic inhibitor for nuclear export of Rev. This mechanism of action was established by competitive experiment by the biotinylated probe derived from leptomycin B, the known NES antagonistic inhibitor. Additionally, structure-activity relationship analysis by use of the synthesized analogs clarified cooperation of several functionalities in the Rev-export inhibitory activity of 1. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Risk of major bleeding and stroke associated with the use of vitamin K antagonists, nonvitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants and aspirin in patients with atrial fibrillation: a cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gieling, E.M.; Ham, H.A. van den; Onzenoort, H. van; Bos, J.; Kramers, C.; Boer, A. de; Vries, F de; Burden, A.M.

    2017-01-01

    AIMS: Nonvitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) are now available for the prevention of stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) as an alternative to vitamin K antagonists (VKA) and aspirin. The comparative effectiveness and safety in daily practice of these different drug classes

  8. Opioid analgesics as noncompetitive N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) antagonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebert, B; Thorkildsen, C; Andersen, S

    1998-01-01

    , in order to obtain complete analgesia, a combination of an NMDA receptor antagonist and an opioid receptor agonist is needed. Recent in vitro data have demonstrated that methadone, ketobemidone, and dextropropoxyphene, in addition to being opioid receptor agonists, also are weak noncompetitive NMDA...

  9. Bartonella quintana lipopolysaccharide is a natural antagonist of Toll-like receptor 4.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Popa, C.; Abdollahi-Roodsaz, S.; Joosten, L.A.B.; Takahashi, N.; Sprong, T.; Matera, G.; Liberto, M.C.; Foca, A.; Deuren, M. van; Kullberg, B.J.; Berg, W.B. van den; Meer, J.W.M. van der; Netea, M.G.

    2007-01-01

    Bartonella quintana is a gram-negative microorganism that causes trench fever and chronic bacteremia. B. quintana lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was unable to induce the production of proinflammatory cytokines in human monocytes. Interestingly, B. quintana LPS is a potent antagonist of Toll-like receptor

  10. Therapeutic efficacy and immunological response of CCL5 antagonists in models of contact skin reaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Canavese

    Full Text Available Skin-infiltrating T-cells play a predominant role in allergic and inflammatory skin diseases such as atopic dermatitis, psoriasis and allergic contact dermatitis. These T-cells are attracted by several chemotactic factors including the chemokine CCL5/RANTES, a CC chemokine inducing both the migration and activation of specific leukocyte subsets. CCL5 has been found to be associated with various cell-mediated hypersensitive disorders such as psoriasis, atopic dermatitis and irritant contact dermatitis. We have used two antagonists, the first, Met-CCL5, a dual CCR1/CCR5 antagonist and the second, a variant in which GAG binding is abrogated, (44AANA(47-CCL5, which acts as a dominant negative inhibitor of CCL5. The antagonists were tested in two models of contact skin reaction. The first, irritant contact dermatitis (ICD is a pathological non-specific inflammatory skin condition arising from the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines by keratinocytes in response to haptens, usually chemicals. The second, contact hypersensitivity (CHS is a T-cell dependent model, mimicking in part the T-cell-mediated skin diseases such as psoriasis. In both models, the CCL5 antagonists showed therapeutic efficacy by reducing swelling by 50% as well as the reduction of soluble mediators in homogenates derived from challenged ears. These results demonstrate that blocking the receptor or the ligand are both effective strategies to inhibit skin inflammation.

  11. The Tunisian oasis ecosystem is a source of antagonistic Bacillus spp. producing diverse antifungal lipopeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Arbi, Amel; Rochex, Alice; Chataigné, Gabrielle; Béchet, Max; Lecouturier, Didier; Arnauld, Ségolène; Gharsallah, Néji; Jacques, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    The use of microbial products has become a promising alternative approach to controlling plant diseases caused by phytopathogenic fungi. Bacteria isolated from the date palm tree rhizosphere of the Tunisian oasis ecosystem could provide new biocontrol microorganisms adapted to extreme conditions, such as drought, salinity and high temperature. The aim of this study was to screen bacteria isolated from the rhizosphere of the date palm tree for their ability to inhibit phytopathogenic fungi, and to identify molecules responsible for their antifungal activity. Screening for antifungal activity was performed on twenty-eight isolates. Five antagonistic isolates were selected and identified as different species of Bacillus using phenotypical methods and a molecular approach. The five antagonistic Bacillus isolated showed tolerance to abiotic stresses (high temperature, salinity, drought). Their ability to produce lipopeptides was investigated using a combination of two techniques: PCR amplification and MALDI-ToF mass spectrometry. Analyses revealed that the antagonistic isolates produced a high diversity of lipopeptides that belonged to surfactin, fengycin, iturin and kurstakin families. Their antagonistic activity, related to their capacity for producing diverse antifungal lipopeptides and their tolerance to abiotic stresses, highlighted Bacillus strains isolated from the rhizosphere of the date palm tree as potential biocontrol agents for combatting plant diseases in extreme environments. Copyright © 2015 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. The substance P/NK-1 receptor system: NK-1 receptor antagonists ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-04-27

    Apr 27, 2015 ... This overexpression suggests the possibility of specific treatment against tumour cells using. NK-1 receptor ... NK-1 receptor may be a promising target in the treatment of cancer; NK-1 receptor antagonists could act as specific drugs against tumour cells; ... agents and stem cell research). Thus, it remains ...

  13. The antagonistic activity of Trichoderma virens strain TvSUT10 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this current study, the beneficial filamentous fungi, Trichoderma virens, isolated from cassava field were investigated for antagonistic mode of action against Lasiodiplodia theobromae, the causal agent of cassava stem rot in Thailand. In vitro screening using the dual culture technique was undertaken to assess the ...

  14. Extended studies on the effect of glutamate antagonists on ischemic CA-1 damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diemer, Nils Henrik; Balchen, T; Bruhn, T

    1996-01-01

    Glutamate receptors are numerous on the ischemia vulnerable CA-1 pyramidal cells. Postischemic use of the AMPA antagonist NBQX has shown up to 80% protection against cell death. Three aspects of this were studied: In the first study, male Wistar rats were given NBQX (30 mg/kg x 3) either 20 hours...

  15. The risk of tuberculosis related to tumour necrosis factor antagonist therapies: a TBNET consensus statement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solovic, I.; Sester, M.; Gomez-Reino, J.J.

    2010-01-01

    Anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF) monoclonal antibodies or soluble TNF receptors have become an invaluable treatment against chronic inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease and psoriasis. Individuals who are treated with TNF antagonists are at an increased ...

  16. The Oxytocin-Oxytocin Receptor System and Its Antagonists as Tocolytic Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaos Vrachnis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxytocin, a hormone involved in numerous physiologic processes, plays a central role in the mechanisms of parturition and lactation. It acts through its receptor, which belongs to the G-protein-coupled receptor superfamily, while Gq/phospholipase C (PLC/inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (InsP3 is the main pathway via which it exerts its action in the myometrium. Changes in receptor levels, receptor desensitization, and locally produced oxytocin are factors that influence the effect of oxytocin on uterine contractility in labor. Activation of oxytocin receptor causes myometrial contractions by increasing intracellular Ca+2 and production of prostaglandins. Since oxytocin induces contractions, the inhibition of its action has been a target in the management of preterm labor. Atosiban is today the only oxytocin receptor antagonist that is available as a tocolytic. However, the quest for oxytocin receptor antagonists with a better pharmacological profile has led to the synthesis of peptide and nonpeptide molecules such as barusiban, retosiban, L-368,899, and SSR-126768A. Many of these oxytocin receptor antagonists are used only as pharmacological tools, while others have tocolytic action. In this paper, we summarize the action of oxytocin and its receptor and we present an overview of the clinical and experimental data of oxytocin antagonists and their tocolytic action.

  17. The risk of tuberculosis related to tumour necrosis factor antagonist therapies : a TBNET consensus statement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Solovic, I.; Sester, M.; Gomez-Reino, J. J.; Rieder, H. L.; Ehlers, S.; Milburn, H. J.; Kampmann, B.; Hellmich, B.; Groves, R.; Schreiber, S.; Wallis, R. S.; Sotgiu, G.; Scholvinck, E. H.; Goletti, D.; Zellweger, J. P.; Diel, R.; Carmona, L.; Bartalesi, F.; Ravn, P.; Duarte, R.; Erkens, C.; Clark, J.; Migliori, G. B.; Lange, C.

    2010-01-01

    Anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF) monoclonal antibodies or soluble TNF receptors have become an invaluable treatment against chronic inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease and psoriasis. Individuals who are treated with TNF antagonists are at an increased

  18. The effects of the CXCR2 antagonist, MK-7123, on bone marrow functions in healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hastrup, Nina; Khalilieh, Sauzanne; Dale, David C.

    2015-01-01

    ; or bone marrow fat to cell balance as assessed by MRI. MK-7123 was generally well tolerated with neutropenia being the most common adverse event; however, there were no clinical symptoms associated with decreased ANCs. These findings indicate that the CXCR2 antagonist MK-7123 causes rapidly reversible...

  19. Study of the n-methyl-d-aspartate antagonistic properties of anticholinergic drugs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonough, J.H.; Shih, T.M.

    1995-12-31

    A study of the N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonistic properties of anticholinergic drugs. PHARMACOL BIOCHEM BEHAV. 51(2/3) 249-253, 1995. Drugs that act at the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor complex have the ability to terminate nerve agent-induced seizures and modulate the neuropathologic consequences of agent exposure. Drugs with mixed anticholinergic and anti-NMDA properties potentially provide an ideal class of compounds for development as anticonvulsant treatments for nerve agent casualties. The present experiment evaluated the potential NMDA antagonist activity of 11 anticholinergic drugs by determining whether pretreatment with the compound was capable of protecting mice from the lethal effects of NMDA. The following anticholinergic drugs antagonized NMDA lethality and are ranked according to their potency: mecamylamine > procyclidine = benactyzine > biperiden > tribexyphenidyl. The anticholinergics atropine, aprophen, azaprophen, benztropine, 3-quinudidinyl benzilate (QNB), and scopolamine failed to show NMDA antagonist properties. In addition, and unexpectedly, diazepam, ethanol, and pentobarbital were also shown to be capable of antagonizing NMDA lethality over a certain range of doses. The advantages and limitations of using antagonism of NMDA lethality in mice as a bioassay for determining the NMDA antagonist properties of drugs are also discussed.

  20. Muscarinic receptor antagonists, from folklore to pharmacology; finding drugs that actually work in asthma and COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulton, Bart C; Fryer, Allison D

    2011-05-01

    In the lungs, parasympathetic nerves provide the dominant control of airway smooth muscle with release of acetylcholine onto M3 muscarinic receptors. Treatment of airway disease with anticholinergic drugs that block muscarinic receptors began over 2000 years ago. Pharmacologic data all indicated that antimuscarinic drugs should be highly effective in asthma but clinical results were mixed. Thus, with the discovery of effective β-adrenergic receptor agonists the use of muscarinic antagonists declined. Lack of effectiveness of muscarinic antagonists is due to a variety of factors including unwanted side effects (ranging from dry mouth to coma) and the discovery of additional muscarinic receptor subtypes in the lungs with sometimes competing effects. Perhaps the most important problem is ineffective dosing due to poorly understood differences between routes of administration and no effective way of testing whether antagonists block receptors stimulated physiologically by acetylcholine. Newer muscarinic receptor antagonists are being developed that address the problems of side effects and receptor selectivity that appear to be quite promising in the treatment of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. © 2011 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2011 The British Pharmacological Society.

  1. The effect of the benzodiazepine antagonist flumazenil on regional cerebral blood flow in human volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolf, J; Friberg, L; Jensen, J

    1990-01-01

    The influence of the benzodiazepine antagonist flumazenil on regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was investigated in ten healthy, alert volunteers. The design was a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, cross-over study. rCBF was measured by 133-Xe inhalation and single photon emission...

  2. Exploratory Studies on Development of the Chemokine Receptor CXCR4 Antagonists Toward Downsizing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamamura, Hirokazu; Tsutsumi, Hiroshi; Nomura, Wataru; Fujii, Nobutaka

    2008-01-01

    Seven transmembrane (7TM) G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) families are important targets for drug discovery, and specific antagonists for GPCR can accelerate research in the field of medicinal chemistry. The chemokine receptor CXCR4 is a GPCR that possesses a unique ligand CXCL12/stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1). The interaction between CXCL12 and CXCR4 is essential for the migration of progenitor cells during embryonic development of the cardiovascular, hemopoietic and central nervous systems, and also involved in several intractable disease processes, including HIV infection, cancer cell metastasis, progression of acute and chronic leukemias, rheumatoid arthritis and pulmonary fibrosis. Thus, CXCR4 may be an important therapeutic target in all of these diseases, and various CXCR4 antagonists have been proposed as potential drugs. Fourteen-mer peptides, T140 and its analogs, and downsized cyclic pentapeptides have been developed by us as potent CXCR4 antagonists. This article describes the development of a number of specific CXCR4 antagonists in our laboratory, including downsizing. PMID:19787093

  3. Effects of combining opioids and clinically available NMDA receptor antagonists in the treatment of pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snijdelaar, D.G.

    2005-01-01

    This thesis concerns the effects of combining opioids with clinically available NMDA receptor antagonists in the treatment of acute and chronic pain. There are a number of problems with the use of opioids, such as, the development of tolerance/hyperalgesia, the reduced effectiveness in (central)

  4. N-Oxide analogs of WAY-100635 : new high affinity 5-HT (1A) receptor antagonists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oberwinkler - Marchais, Sandrine; Nowicki, B; Pike, VW; Halldin, C; Sandell, J; Chou, YH; Gulyas, B; Brennum, LT; Farde, L; Wikstrom, H V

    2005-01-01

    WAY-100635 [N-(2-(1-(4-(2-methoxyphenyl)piperazinyl)ethyl))-N-(2-pyridinyl)cyclohexanecarboxamide] 1 and its O-des-methyl derivative DWAY 2 are well-known high affinity 5-HT1A receptor antagonists. which when labeled with carbon-II (beta(+): t(1/2) 20.4min) in the carbonyl group are effective

  5. Is the use of a GnRH antagonist effective in patients with polycystic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    offered controlled ovarian stimulation (COS) and in vitro fertilisation (IVF) technology. Aim. The aim of this study was to assess whether there was a difference in the pregnancy outcomes of women with PCOS when a standard gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonist (cetrorelix) protocol was used for ovarian ...

  6. Investigational glucagon receptor antagonists in Phase I and II clinical trials for diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheen, André J; Paquot, Nicolas; Lefèbvre, Pierre J

    2017-12-01

    Despite type 2 diabetes (T2D) being recognized as a bihormonal pancreatic disease, current therapies are mainly focusing on insulin, while targeting glucagon has been long dismissed. However, glucagon receptor (GCGr) antagonists are currently investigated in clinical trials. Area covered: Following a brief description of the rationale for antagonizing GCGr in T2D, lessons from GCGr knock-out mice and pharmacological means to antagonize GCGr, a detailed description of the main results obtained with GCGr antagonists in Phase I-II clinical trials is provided. The development of several small molecules has been discontinued, while new ones are currently considered as well as innovative approaches such as monoclonal antibodies or antisense oligonucleotides inhibiting GCGr gene expression. Their potential benefits but also limitations are discussed. Expert opinion: The proof-of-concept that antagonizing GCGr improves glucose control in T2D has been confirmed in humans. Nevertheless, some adverse events led to stopping the development of some of these GCGr antagonists. New approaches seem to have a better benefit/risk balance, although none has progressed to Phase III clinical trials so far. Pharmacotherapy of T2D is becoming a highly competitive field so that GCGr antagonists should provide clear advantages over numerous existing glucose-lowering medications before eventually reaching clinical practice.

  7. HETEROGENEOUS RECEPTOR-BINDING OF CLASSICAL QUATERNARY MUSCARINIC ANTAGONISTS .2. MODULATION IN BOVINE BRAIN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ROFFEL, AF; ENSING, K; ELZINGA, CRS; INTHOUT, WG; VANTINTELEN, EJJ; DEZEEUW, RA; ZAAGSMA, J

    1991-01-01

    The heterogeneous binding behavior exhibited by classical quaternary muscarinic antagonists was further investigated in order to establish possible molecular and/or environmental differences between the high (Q1) and low (Q2) affinity binding sites. Using agents that are known to modulate

  8. Cannabinoid-1 receptor antagonist rimonabant (SR141716) increases striatal dopamine D2 receptor availability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crunelle, Cleo L.; van de Giessen, Elsmarieke; Schulz, Sybille; Vanderschuren, Louk J. M. J.; de Bruin, Kora; van den Brink, Wim; Booij, Jan

    2013-01-01

    The cannabinoid 1 receptor antagonist rimonabant (SR141716) alters rewarding properties and intake of food and drugs. Additionally, striatal dopamine D2 receptor (DRD2) availability has been implicated in reward function. This study shows that chronic treatment of rats with rimonabant (1.0 and

  9. Cladosporium cladosporioides H39: A new antagonist for biological control of apple scab

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kohl, J.; Molhoek, W.M.L.; Groenenboom-de Haas, L.; Goossen-van de Geijn, H.M.; Eiben, U.

    2008-01-01

    Apple scab caused by Venturia inaequalis is a major disease in apple production. Scab epidemics during summer are driven by conidia produced only on apple leaves. In this situation, antagonists present in the phyllosphere may interfere with conidia of the pathogen during sporulation or infection.

  10. Novel neurokinin-1 antagonists as antiemetics for the treatment of chemotherapy-induced emesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, G Kesava; Gralla, Richard J; Hesketh, Paul J

    2006-04-01

    Despite significant advances in supportive care in oncology, many patients with cancer still experience chemotherapy- induced nausea and vomiting (CINV). Historically, there were only 3 neurotransmitter receptors (dopamine D2, cannabinoid- 1, and 5-hydroxytryptamine-3) that were the known targets for antiemetic therapy. Major advances in the management of chemotherapy-induced emesis were seen with the introduction of 5-hydroxytryptamine-3 receptor antagonists, which include palonosetron, ondansetron, tropisetron, dolasetron, and granisetron. However, recently, selective inhibitors of substance P have shown promising activity in the management of CINV in patients with cancer. Substance P mediates a number of biologic effects by binding to a specific neuroreceptor, neurokinin-1 (NK-1). Among the NK-1 receptor antagonists, aprepitant has been approved for the treatment of CINV. Currently, several other NK-1 receptor antagonists, including casopitant, vestipitant, netupitant, and SCH619734, are undergoing clinical evaluation for the prevention of CINV in patients with a variety of malignancies. The clinical potential of these novel NK-1 receptor antagonists and their respective ongoing clinical trials for the management of chemotherapy-induced emesis are discussed briefly herein.

  11. The substance P/NK-1 receptor system: NK-1 receptor antagonists ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The substance P (SP)/neurokinin (NK)-1 receptor system plays an important role in cancer. SP promotes the proliferation of tumour cells, angiogenesis and the migration of tumour cells. We review the involvement of SP, the NK-1 receptor and NK-1 receptor antagonists in cancer. Tumour cells overexpress NK-1 receptors, ...

  12. Hemodynamic and biochemical effects of the AT1 receptor antagonist irbesartan in hypertension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.J.J. Admiraal (Peter Jan Jacobus); J.A.M.J.L. Janssen (Joseph); J.M. Kroodsma; W.A. de Ronde (Willem); F. Boomsma (Frans); J. Sissmann; P.J. Blankestijn (Peter); P.G.H. Mulder (Paul); A.J. Man in 't Veld (Arie); A.H. van den Meiracker (Anton)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractWe studied the hemodynamic, neurohumoral, and biochemical effects of the novel angiotensin type 1 (AT1) receptor antagonist irbesartan in 86 untreated patients with essential hypertension on a normal sodium diet. According to a double-blind parallel group trial,

  13. Synthesis and pharmacological evaluation of DHβE analogs as neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Tue H.; Jensen, Anders A.; Lund, Mads Henrik

    2014-01-01

    Dihydro-β-erythroidine (DHβE) is a member of the Erythrina family of alkaloids and a potent competitive antagonist of the α4β2-subtype of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Guided by an X-ray structure of DHβE in complex with an ACh binding protein, we detail the design, synthesis...

  14. Effect of the Urotensin Receptor Antagonist Palosuran in Hypertensive Patients With Type 2 Diabetic Nephropathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogt, Liffert; Chiurchiu, Carlos; Chadha-Boreham, Harbajan; Danaietash, Parisa; Dingemanse, Jasper; Hadjadj, Samy; Krum, Henry; Navis, Gerjan; Neuhart, Eric; Parvanova, Aneliya I.; Ruggenenti, Piero; Woittiez, Arend Jan; Zimlichman, Reuven; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; de Zeeuw, Dick

    2010-01-01

    The urotensin system has been hypothesized to play an important role in the pathophysiology of diabetic nephropathy. In this multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, 2-period crossover study, the effects of the urotensin receptor antagonist palosuran on urinary albumin excretion

  15. Effect of the Urotensin Receptor Antagonist Palosuran in Hypertensive Patients With Type 2 Diabetic Nephropathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogt, Liffert; Chiurchiu, Carlos; Chadha-Boreham, Harbajan; Danaietash, Parisa; Dingemanse, Jasper; Hadjadj, Samy; Krum, Henry; Navis, Gerjan; Neuhart, Eric; Parvanova, Aneliya I.; Ruggenenti, Piero; Woittiez, Arend Jan; Zimlichman, Reuven; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; de Zeeuw, Dick

    The urotensin system has been hypothesized to play an important role in the pathophysiology of diabetic nephropathy. In this multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, 2-period crossover study, the effects of the urotensin receptor antagonist palosuran on urinary albumin excretion

  16. Mercury antagonists: protection of plants against vapor injury by thiamine and other compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siegel, S.M.; Siegel, B.Z.; Sheldon, L.; Yeager, E.; Chang, D.

    1986-01-01

    Mercury vapor-induced abscission of Coleus cuttings was prevented by thiamine, other organo-S compounds and selenite, but not by common sugar metabolites, amino acids, non-auxin growth regulators and selenate. Protection was also afforded to other plants including ferns and gymnosperms. Thus the compounds that protect plants against Hg intoxication correspond to the Hg antagonists known in animals including man.

  17. Effect of calmodulin antagonists on contraction and45Ca movements in rat aorta

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wermelskirchen, D.; Koch, P.; Wilhelm, D.; Nebel, U.; Leidig, A.; Wilffert, B.; Peters, Thies

    1989-01-01

    To study the selectivity of calmodulin antagonists it was assumed that they should inhibit noradrenaline (NA)- and K+-induced contractions similarly without an accompanying inhibition of45Ca uptake. Therefore, in isolated rat aorta the effects of W-7, calmidazolium and trifluoperazine on contraction

  18. I. Effects of a Dopamine Receptor Antagonist on Fathead Minnow, Pimephales promelas ,Reproduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study used a 21 d fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) reproduction assay to test the hypothesis that exposure to the dopamine 2 receptor (D2R) antagonist, haloperidol, would impair fish reproduction. Additionally, a 96 h experiment with fathead minnows and zebrafish (Danio ...

  19. Integrated Psychosocial and Opioid-Antagonist Treatment for Alcohol Dependence: A Systematic Review of Controlled Evaluations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughn, Michael G.; Howard, Matthew O.

    2004-01-01

    Methodological characteristics and outcomes of 14 controlled clinical investigations of integrated psychosocial and opioid-antagonist alcohol dependence treatment were evaluated. The 14 studies were identified through computerized bibliographic and manual literature searches. Clients receiving integrated psychosocial and opioid-antagonist…

  20. Synthesis and structure-activity relationships of piperidinylpyrrolopyridine derivatives as potent and selective H1 antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonquerna, Silvia; Miralpeix, Montse; Pagès, Lluís; Puig, Carles; Cardús, Arantxa; Antón, Francisca; Vilella, Dolors; Aparici, Mónica; Prieto, José; Warrellow, Graham; Beleta, Jorge; Ryder, Hamish

    2005-02-15

    The synthesis and structure-activity relationships of piperidinylpyrrolopyridines as potent and selective H(1) antagonists are discussed. It was found that the nature of the acid chain bonded to piperidine was a key feature for maintaining both the duration of action in vivo and lack of sedative properties.

  1. Knee extension and flexion weakness in people with knee osteoarthritis: is antagonist cocontraction a factor?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiden, Tamika L; Lloyd, David G; Ackland, Timothy R

    2009-11-01

    Controlled laboratory study, cross-sectional data. To investigate isometric knee flexion and extension strength, failure of voluntary muscle activation, and antagonist cocontraction of subjects with knee osteoarthritis (OA) compared with age-matched asymptomatic control subjects. Quadriceps weakness is a common impairment in individuals with knee OA. Disuse atrophy, failure of voluntary muscle activation, and antagonist muscle cocontraction are thought to be possible mechanisms underlying this weakness; but antagonist cocontraction has not been examined during testing requiring maximum voluntary isometric contraction. Fifty-four subjects with knee OA (mean +/- SD age, 65.6 +/- 7.6 years) and 27 similarly aged control subjects (age, 64.2 +/- 5.1 years) were recruited for this study. Isometric knee flexion and extension strength were measured, and electromyographic data were recorded, from 7 muscles crossing the knee and used to calculate cocontraction ratios during maximal effort knee flexion and extension trials. The burst superimposition technique was used to measure failure of voluntary activation. Knee extension strength of subjects with knee OA (mean +/- SD, 115.9 +/- 6.7 Nm) was significantly lower than for those in the control group (152.3 +/- 9.6 Nm). No significant between-group difference was found for failure of voluntary muscle activation, or the cocontraction ratios during maximum effort knee flexion or extension. These results demonstrate that the reduction in isometric extension strength, measured with a 90 degrees knee flexion angle, in subjects with knee OA is not associated with increased antagonist cocontraction.

  2. Probable interaction between an oral vitamin K antagonist and turmeric (Curcuma longa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daveluy, Amélie; Géniaux, Hélène; Thibaud, Lucile; Mallaret, Michel; Miremont-Salamé, Ghada; Haramburu, Françoise

    2014-01-01

    We report a probable interaction between a vitamin K antagonist, fluindione, and the herbal medicine turmeric that resulted in the elevation of the international normalized ratio (INR). The case presented here underlines the importance of considering potential exposure to herbal medications when assessing adverse effects. © 2014 Société Française de Pharmacologie et de Thérapeutique.

  3. Novel 3-carboxy- and 3-phosphonopyrazoline amino acids as potent and selective NMDA receptor antagonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conti, Paola; Pinto, Andrea; Tamborini, Lucia

    2010-01-01

    identified two highly potent and selective competitive NMDA receptor antagonists, (5S,alphaR)-1 and (5S,alphaR)-4, which exhibit good in vitro neuroprotective activity and in vivo anticonvulsant activity by i.p. administration, suggesting that these molecules may have potential use as therapeutic agents....

  4. Combined action of estrogen receptor agonists and antagonists in two-hybrid recombinant yeast in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Rong; Li, Na; Rao, Kaifeng; Ma, Mei; Wang, Zijian

    2015-01-01

    Estrogen receptor (ER) antagonistic chemicals in aquatic environments are believed to influence the binding of both endogenous and exogenous estrogens to ERs in aquatic organisms. Although the combined effects of estrogenic compounds have attracted much scientific concern, little work has been done on the influence of such antiestrogens on the biological effects of estrogens. This study focused on how the presence of different amounts of antagonists affects the results of ER agonist activity tests. To achieve this, three questions were stated and answered in sequence. A two-hybrid recombinant yeast assay mediated by ER was adopted, providing a single mode of action and single target of action for this study. Mixtures created by an ER agonist and three antagonists following the fixed-ratio principle were assessed. The concentration of 17β-estradiol causing maximum induction was set as the fixed dose of estrogen in the antagonist activity test (question 1). When the two classes of chemicals coexisted, antiestrogens, which as a whole behaved according to the concentration addition model (question 2), decreased the response of estrogen and compressed the concentration-response curves along the y-axis in the agonist activity test (question 3). This may cause the estradiol equivalent to be underestimated and potentially mask the action of estrogenic effects in toxicity evaluation of environmental samples. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Bacteremia in patients receiving TNF-alpha antagonists--a prospective multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loulergue, Pierre; Tubach, Florence; Salmon, Dominique; Dellamonica, Pierre; Taillan, Bruno; Thorel, Jean-Baptiste; Marteau, Philippe; Bressot, Christian; Ravaud, Philippe; Mariette, Xavier; Lortholary, Olivier

    2013-12-01

    TNF-alpha antagonists have changed the outcome of various chronic inflammatory diseases. Their use has spread widely and many patients receive those treatments for years. Previous reports found that the use of TNF-alpha antagonists may be associated with an increased risk of serious bacterial infections. We report 47 prospective bacteremia cases from the RATIO registry. A national prospective study was conducted in France between 2004 and 2007 to collect severe bacterial infections in patients receiving TNF-alpha antagonists. All reported cases of bacteremia were validated by an expert committee. Forty-seven bacteremic episodes were reported. Staphylococcus aureus represented the most frequent causative pathogen (40%) and was mostly associated with bones and/or joints infections (68%) and with a worse outcome compared to that observed with other bacterial pathogens. Patients receiving TNF-alpha antagonists may develop bacteremia and S. aureus has to be included in the spectrum of the initial empiric antimicrobial therapy. Copyright © 2013 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Chemogenomic discovery of allosteric antagonists at the GPRC6A receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gloriam, David E.; Wellendorph, Petrine; Johansen, Lars Dan

    2011-01-01

     pharmacological activity across GPCR families provides proof-of-concept for in silico approaches against Family C targets based on Family A templates, greatly expanding the prospects of successful drug design and discovery. The antagonists were tested against a panel of seven Family A and C G protein-coupled receptors...

  7. Designing nanomolar antagonists of DC-SIGN-mediated HIV infection: ligand presentation using molecular rods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordanini, Stefania; Varga, Norbert; Porkolab, Vanessa; Thépaut, Michel; Belvisi, Laura; Bertaglia, Andrea; Palmioli, Alessandro; Berzi, Angela; Trabattoni, Daria; Clerici, Mario; Fieschi, Franck; Bernardi, Anna

    2015-03-04

    DC-SIGN antagonists were designed combining one selective monovalent glycomimetic ligand with trivalent dendrons separated by a rigid core of controlled length. The design combines multiple multivalency effects to achieve inhibitors of HIV infection, which are active in nanomolar concentration.

  8. Effect of the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonist telcagepant in human cranial arteries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Edvinsson (Lars); K.Y. Chan (Kayi); S. Eftekhari; E. Nilsson (Elisabeth); R. de Vries (René); H. Säveland (Hans); C.M.F. Dirven (Clemens); A.H.J. Danser (Jan)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a neuronal messenger in intracranial sensory nerves and is considered to play a significant role in migraine pathophysiology. Materials and methods: We investigated the effect of the CGRP receptor antagonist, telcagepant, on

  9. Design and synthesis of silicon-containing steroid sulfatase inhibitors possessing pro-estrogen antagonistic character.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajita, Daisuke; Nakamura, Masaharu; Matsumoto, Yotaro; Makishima, Makoto; Hashimoto, Yuichi

    2014-04-01

    Steroid sulfatase (STS) is a potential target for treatment of postmenopausal hormone-dependent breast cancer. Several steroidal STS inhibitors have been reported, but steroidal compounds are difficult to optimize and may interact with other targets. On the other hand, we have shown that diphenylmethane (DPM) derivatives act as estrogen receptor (ER) agonists and antagonists. Here, we aimed to design and synthesize non-steroidal DPM-type STS inhibitors that would also serve as pro-estrogen antagonists, releasing a metabolite with ERα-antagonistic activity upon hydrolysis by STS. We synthesized a series of compounds and evaluated their biological activities by means of STS-inhibitory activity assay and ER reporter gene assay. Among them, silicon-containing compound 16a showed strong STS-inhibitory activity (IC50=0.17μM). Further, its putative metabolite (12a) exhibited potent ERα-antagonistic activity (IC50=29.7nM). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Temporal trends in the prescription of vitamin K antagonists in patients with atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friberg, J; Gislason, G H; Gadsbøll, N

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Anticoagulation therapy is recommended in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) and risk factors for stroke. We studied the temporal trends in the prescription of vitamin K antagonists (VKA) in patients with a first hospital diagnosis of AF in Denmark, 1995-2002. DESIGN: The Danish...

  11. Non-Vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulation usage according to age among patients with atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staerk, L.; Fosbøl, E L; Gadsbøll, K.

    2016-01-01

    Among atrial fibrillation (AF) patients, Danish nationwide registries (2011-2015) were used to examine temporal trends of initiation patterns of oral anticoagulation (OAC) treatment according to age. Overall, 43,299 AF patients initiating vitamin K antagonists (VKA) (42%), dabigatran (29...

  12. Structure-activity relationship studies of the aromatic positions in cyclopentapeptide CXCR4 antagonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mungalpara, Jignesh; Zachariassen, Zack G; Thiele, Stefanie

    2013-01-01

    The cyclopentapeptide CXCR4 antagonist FC131 (cyclo(-Arg(1)-Arg(2)-2-Nal(3)-Gly(4)-D-Tyr(5)-), 2; 2-Nal = 3-(2-naphthyl)alanine) represents an excellent starting point for development of novel drug-like ligands with therapeutic potential in HIV, cancer, stem-cell mobilization, inflammation, and a...

  13. 4-Acylamino-and 4-ureidobenzamides as melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) receptor 1 antagonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Receveur, Jean-Marie; Bjurling, Emelie; Ulven, Trond

    2004-01-01

    Synthesis, in vitro biological evaluation and structure-activity relationships of 4-acylamino-and 4-ureidobenzamides as novel hMCH1R-antagonists are disclosed. The nature of the amine side chains could be varied considerably in contrast to the central benzamide scaffold and aromatic substituents....

  14. GnRH-agonist versus GnRH-antagonist IVF cycles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papanikolaou, E G; Pados, G; Grimbizis, G

    2012-01-01

    In view of the current debate concerning possible differences in efficacy between the two GnRH analogues used in IVF stimulated cycles, the current study aimed to explore whether progesterone control in the late follicular phase differs when GnRH antagonist is used as compared with GnRH agonist...

  15. Quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) of competitive N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) antagonists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkut, Anil; Varnali, Tereza

    Glutamic acid is an excitatory amino acid neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system and the NMDA molecule binds to NMDA-type glutamic acid receptors as a glutamic acid analogue, in vitro. The NMDA-type glutamic acid receptors are known for their function in many neural processes, such as neural plasticity, learning and memory. In addition, excessive NMDA receptor activity has been shown to be related to neurodegenerative diseases like epilepsy so the design of new NMDA antagonists has extra importance as potent drugs for various neural diseases. Potential antagonist molecules are usually synthesized and their activity is measured by experimental techniques. Here, computational chemistry methods are applied to develop a model, which allows one to predict the activity of potent competitive NMDA antagonists. First, various molecular parameters are calculated for a series of competitive NMDA antagonists with known activity values and those parameters are used to make a regression analysis which provides a model that relates the computationally calculated parameters to experimentally determined activity values. By the quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) model developed here, it is possible to predict the activity of a potent drug before its synthesis since only theoretically determined molecular parameters are used for the prediction.

  16. Cholecystokinin receptor antagonist halts progression of pancreatic cancer precursor lesions and fibrosis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jill P; Cooper, Timothy K; McGovern, Christopher O; Gilius, Evan L; Zhong, Qing; Liao, Jiangang; Molinolo, Alfredo A; Gutkind, J Silvio; Matters, Gail L

    2014-10-01

    Exogenous administration of cholecystokinin (CCK) induces hypertrophy and hyperplasia of the pancreas with an increase in DNA content. We hypothesized that endogenous CCK is involved in the malignant progression of pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) lesions and the fibrosis associated with pancreatic cancer. The presence of CCK receptors in early PanIN lesions was examined by immunohistochemistry in mouse and human pancreas. Pdx1-Cre/LSL-Kras transgenic mice were randomized to receive either untreated drinking water or water supplemented with a CCK receptor antagonist (proglumide, 0.1 mg/mL). Pancreas from the mice were removed and examined histologically for number and grade of PanINs after 1, 2, or 4 months of antagonist therapy. Both CCK-A and CCK-B receptors were identified in early stage PanINs from mouse and human pancreas. The grade of PanIN lesions was reversed, and progression to advanced lesions arrested in mice treated with proglumide compared with the controls (P = 0.004). Furthermore, pancreatic fibrosis was significantly reduced in antagonist-treated animals compared with vehicle (P pancreatic cancer. The use of CCK receptor antagonists may have a role in cancer prophylaxis in high-risk subjects and may reduce fibrosis in the microenvironment.

  17. Crystal structure of the human urokinase plasminogen activator receptor bound to an antagonist peptide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Llinas, Paola; Le Du, Marie Hélène; Gårdsvoll, Henrik

    2005-01-01

    . This knowledge combined with the discovery of a convergent binding motif shared by the antagonist peptide and uPA allowed us to build a model of the human uPA-uPAR complex. This model reveals that the receptor-binding module of uPA engages the uPAR central cavity, thus leaving the external receptor surface...

  18. Non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulation usage according to age among patients with atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staerk, Laila; Fosbøl, Emil Loldrup; Gadsbøll, Kasper

    2016-01-01

    Among atrial fibrillation (AF) patients, Danish nationwide registries (2011-2015) were used to examine temporal trends of initiation patterns of oral anticoagulation (OAC) treatment according to age. Overall, 43,299 AF patients initiating vitamin K antagonists (VKA) (42%), dabigatran (29...

  19. antagonistic effect of native bacillus isolates against black root rot of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    objective of this study was to evaluate the biological control ability of native Bacillus species on the basis of their antagonistic effects against F. ... isolates significantly (P<0.05) reduced radial mycelial growth of the pathogen. Seven bacterial isolates ..... in the biological control of plant pathogens (Asaka and Shoda, 1996;.

  20. Biological control of fusarium wilt of tomato by antagonist fungi and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Biological control of fusarium wilt of tomato by antagonist fungi and cyanobacteria. ... technique showed that Aspergillus niger, Penicillium citrinum, Penicillium sp. and Trichoderma harzianum inhibited the radial colony growth of the test pathogen. ... Similar results were observed in chlorophyll (a+b) content of treated plants.

  1. Renal protection in diabetes--an emerging role for calcium antagonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parving, H H; Tarnow, L; Rossing, P

    1997-01-01

    , 103 (SD 9) and 101 (SD 11) mm Hg in the two groups. Furthermore, a recent 5-year randomized open study in hypertensive noninsulin-dependent patients with diabetic nephropathy has revealed the same beneficial effect of a calcium antagonist and ACE inhibition on the progression of nephropathy...

  2. Antagonistic rhizobacteria and jasmonic acid induce resistance against tomato bacterial spot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélvio Gledson Maciel Ferraz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available AbstractTomato bacterial spot on tomato may be caused by four species of Xanthomonas and among them X. gardneri(Xg is the most destructive one, especially in areas irrigated using a center pivot system in Minas Gerais state and the midwest region of Brazil. Due to the ineffectiveness of chemical control and the lack of cultivars with high levels of genetic resistance, this study investigated the potential of three antagonists (Streptomyces setonii (UFV618, Bacillus cereus (UFV592 and Serratia marcescens (UFV252, and the hormone jasmonic acid (JA as a positive control, to reduce bacterial spot symptoms and to potentiate defense enzymes in the leaves of tomato plants infected by Xg. Tomato seeds were microbiolized with each antagonist, and the soil was drenched with these bacteria. The plants were sprayed with JA 48 h before Xginoculation. The final average severity on the tomato plants was reduced by 29.44, 59.26 and 61.33% in the UFV592, UFV618 and JA treatments, respectively. The UFV618 antagonist was as effective as JA in reducing bacterial spot symptoms on tomatoes, which can be explained by the greater activities of defense enzymes that are commonly involved in host resistance against bacterial diseases. These results suggest that JA and the UFV618 antagonist can be used in the integrated management of bacterial spot on tomatoes.

  3. Vascular effects of calcium antagonists: implications for hypertension and other risk factors for coronary heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zwieten, P. A.

    1989-01-01

    All calcium antagonists (CAs) so far developed are vasodilators, and this property is a most important component of their therapeutic potency in hypertension and angina pectoris. At a cellular level, the specific interaction of CAs with transmembranous calcium fluxes involves both potential and

  4. Effects of manidipine and other calcium antagonists on rat renal arcuate arteries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pfaffendorf, M.; Mathy, M. J.; van Zwieten, P. A.

    1993-01-01

    We investigated the effect of 1,4-dihydropyridine calcium antagonists (nifedipine, nisoldipine, and manidipine) on serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine [5-HT])- and KCl (120 mmol/L)-induced contractions of rat isolated renal arcuate arteries. The preparation showed the well-known biphasic response to

  5. Pre- and postsynaptic inhibitory potencies of the angiotensin AT(1) receptor antagonists eprosartan and candesartan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nap, Alexander; Mathy, Marie-Jeanne; Balt, Jippe C.; Pfaffendorf, Martin; van Zwieten, Pieter A.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the inhibitory potency of two selective angiotensin AT, receptor antagonists, eprosartan and candesartan, at the level of the sympathetic nerve terminal and the vascular smooth muscle. Male New Zealand White rabbits, weighing 2100-2550 g, were used. To

  6. Anti-HIV Effect of Liposomes Bearing CXCR4 Receptor Antagonist ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate lymphatic system targeting and inhibitory ability of N15P nano-liposomal preparation (naLipo-N15P) of CXCR4 receptor antagonist in HIV infection. Methods: Chemotactic and chemotaxic inhibition activity assays were used to analyze the biological activity of naLipo-N15P. The anti-HIV potential of ...

  7. Regulation of structural plasticity and neurogenesis during stress and diabetes; protective effects of glucocorticoid receptor antagonists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lucassen, P.J.; Fitzsimons, C.P.; Vreugdenhil, E.; Hu, P.; Oomen, C.; Revsin, Y.; Joëls, M.; de Kloet, E.R.; Gravanis, A.G.; Mellon, S.H.

    2011-01-01

    In this chapter, we will review changes in structural plasticity of the adult hippocampus during stress and exposure to glucocorticoids (GCs). We further discuss the protective and normalizing role of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonist treatment under these conditions and its implications for

  8. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist versus HCG for oocyte triggering in antagonist assisted reproductive technology cycles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Youssef, Mohamed A. F. M.; van der Veen, Fulco; Al-Inany, Hesham G.; Griesinger, Georg; Mochtar, Monique H.; van Wely, Madelon

    2010-01-01

    Background Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonist protocols for pituitary down regulation in in vitro fertilisation (IVF) and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) allow the use of GnRH agonists for triggering final oocyte maturation. Currently, human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) is

  9. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist versus HCG for oocyte triggering in antagonist assisted reproductive technology cycles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Youssef, Mohamed A. F. M.; van der Veen, Fulco; Al-Inany, Hesham G.; Griesinger, Georg; Mochtar, Monique H.; van Wely, Madelon

    2010-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonist protocols for pituitary down regulation in in vitro fertilisation (IVF) and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) allow the use of GnRH agonists for triggering final oocyte maturation. Currently, human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) is still the

  10. SELECTIVITY PROFILE OF SOME RECENT MUSCARINIC ANTAGONISTS IN BOVINE AND GUINEA-PIG TRACHEA AND HEART

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ROFFEL, AF; HAMSTRA, JJ; ELZINGA, CRS; ZAAGSMA, J

    1994-01-01

    The functional affinities of some recently developed subtype-selective muscarinic antagonists towards bovine tracheal smooth muscle muscarinic M(3) receptors were established and compared to binding affinities for bovine cardiac M(2) and functional affinities for guinea-pig tracheal smooth muscle

  11. Antagonists of chemoattractants reveal separate receptors for cAMP, folic acid and pterin in Dictyostelium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haastert, Peter J.M. van; Wit, René J.W. de; Konijn, Theo M.

    1982-01-01

    Adenosine 3’,5’-monophosphate (cAMP), folic acid and pterin are chemoattractants in the cellular slime molds. The cAMP analog, 3’-amino-cAMP, inhibits a chemotactic reaction to cAMP at a concentration at which the analog is chemotactically inactive. The antagonistic effect of 3’-amino-cAMP on the

  12. Pyrazolo Derivatives as Potent Adenosine Receptor Antagonists: An Overview on the Structure-Activity Relationships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siew Lee Cheong

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the past few decades, medicinal chemistry research towards potent and selective antagonists of human adenosine receptors (namely, A1, A2A, A2B, and A3 has been evolving rapidly. These antagonists are deemed therapeutically beneficial in several pathological conditions including neurological and renal disorders, cancer, inflammation, and glaucoma. Up to this point, many classes of compounds have been successfully synthesized and identified as potent human adenosine receptor antagonists. In this paper, an overview of the structure-activity relationship (SAR profiles of promising nonxanthine pyrazolo derivatives is reported and discussed. We have emphasized the SAR for some representative structures such as pyrazolo-[4,3-e]-1,2,4-triazolo-[1,5-c]pyrimidines; pyrazolo-[3,4-c] or -[4,3-c]quinolines; pyrazolo-[4,3-d]pyrimidinones; pyrazolo-[3,4-d]pyrimidines and pyrazolo-[1,5-a]pyridines. This overview not only clarifies the structural requirements deemed essential for affinity towards individual adenosine receptor subtypes, but it also sheds light on the rational design and optimization of existing structural templates to allow us to conceive new, more potent adenosine receptor antagonists.

  13. Examining SLV-323, a novel NK1 receptor antagonist, in a chronic psychosocial stress model for depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Czeh, B; Pudovkina, O; van der Hart, MGC; Simon, M; Heilbronner, U; Michaelis, T; Watanabe, T; Frahm, J; Fuchs, E

    Rationale: Substance P antagonists have been proposed as candidates for a new class of antidepressant compounds. Objectives: We examined the effects of SLV-323, a novel neurokinin 1 receptor (NK1R) antagonist, in the chronic psychosocial stress paradigm of adult male tree shrews. Methods: Animals

  14. Design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of scaffold-based tripeptidomimetic antagonists for CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zachariassen, Zack G; Thiele, Stefanie; Berg, Erik A

    2014-01-01

    antagonists. Starting by dissecting the cyclopentapeptide structure and reintroducing cyclic constraints in a stepwise manner, we here report a novel class of scaffold-based tripeptidomimetic CXCR4 antagonists based on the d-Arg-Arg-2-Nal motif. Biological testing of the prototype compounds showed...

  15. PR130 is a modulator of the Wnt-signaling cascade that counters repression of the antagonist Naked cuticle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Creyghton, M.P.; Roël, G.; Eichhorn, P.J.A.; Vredeveld, L.C.; Destrée, O.; Bernards, R.A.

    2006-01-01

    The Wnt-signaling cascade is required for several crucial steps during early embryogenesis, and its activity is modulated by various agonists and antagonists to provide spatiotemporal-specific signaling. Naked cuticle is a Wnt antagonist that itself is induced by Wnt signaling to keep Wnt signaling

  16. THE INTERACTION OF SELECTIVE AND NONSELECTIVE ANTAGONISTS WITH PREJUNCTIONAL AND POSTJUNCTIONAL MUSCARINIC RECEPTOR SUBTYPES IN THE GUINEA-PIG TRACHEA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    TENBERGE, REJ; ROFFEL, AF; ZAAGSMA, J

    1993-01-01

    Muscarinic receptor antagonists were used to study prejunctional M2 and postjunctional M3 receptors in the isolated guinea pig trachea. The effects of four M2-selective muscarinic receptor antagonists (gallamine, methoctramine, AQ-RA 741 and AF-DX 116) were studied on twitch contractions, elicited

  17. The effect of antagonistic micro-organisms on the brood of honeybees (Apis mellifera) and bumblebees (Bombus terrestris) 2003

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steen, van der J.J.M.; Dik, A.J.

    2002-01-01

    Several plant pathogenic fungi enter the plant trough open flowers. Spores of antagonistic micro-organisms present on the flowers can successfully compete with the possible pathogens. Honeybees and bumblebees can be used for transporting these antagonistic micro-organisms from the hive into flowers

  18. A Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Study of the Glucocorticoid Receptor Antagonist Mifepristone Combined with Enzalutamide in Castrate Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0021 TITLE: A Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Study of the Glucocorticoid Receptor Antagonist Mifepristone Combined...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER A Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Study of the Glucocorticoid Receptor Antagonist Mifepristone Combined...way it adapts is by upregulating another hormone receptor, the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), which may compensate for diminished AR activity. The

  19. Endothelin receptor B antagonists decrease glioma cell viability independently of their cognate receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patterson Paul H

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Endothelin receptor antagonists inhibit the progression of many cancers, but research into their influence on glioma has been limited. Methods We treated glioma cell lines, LN-229 and SW1088, and melanoma cell lines, A375 and WM35, with two endothelin receptor type B (ETRB-specific antagonists, A-192621 and BQ788, and quantified viable cells by the capacity of their intracellular esterases to convert non-fluorescent calcein AM into green-fluorescent calcein. We assessed cell proliferation by labeling cells with carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester and quantifying the fluorescence by FACS analysis. We also examined the cell cycle status using BrdU/propidium iodide double staining and FACS analysis. We evaluated changes in gene expression by microarray analysis following treatment with A-192621 in glioma cells. We examined the role of ETRB by reducing its expression level using small interfering RNA (siRNA. Results We report that two ETRB-specific antagonists, A-192621 and BQ788, reduce the number of viable cells in two glioma cell lines in a dose- and time-dependent manner. We describe similar results for two melanoma cell lines. The more potent of the two antagonists, A-192621, decreases the mean number of cell divisions at least in part by inducing a G2/M arrest and apoptosis. Microarray analysis of the effects of A-192621 treatment reveals up-regulation of several DNA damage-inducible genes. These results were confirmed by real-time RT-PCR. Importantly, reducing expression of ETRB with siRNAs does not abrogate the effects of either A-192621 or BQ788 in glioma or melanoma cells. Furthermore, BQ123, an endothelin receptor type A (ETRA-specific antagonist, has no effect on cell viability in any of these cell lines, indicating that the ETRB-independent effects on cell viability exhibited by A-192621 and BQ788 are not a result of ETRA inhibition. Conclusion While ETRB antagonists reduce the viability of glioma cells

  20. Aldosterone and aldosterone receptor antagonists in patients with chronic heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nappi J

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Jean M Nappi, Adam SiegClinical Pharmacy and Outcome Sciences, South Carolina College of Pharmacy, Medical University of South Carolina Campus, Charleston, SC, USAAbstract: Aldosterone is a mineralocorticoid hormone synthesized by the adrenal glands that has several regulatory functions to help the body maintain normal volume status and electrolyte balance. Studies have shown significantly higher levels of aldosterone secretion in patients with congestive heart failure compared with normal patients. Elevated levels of aldosterone have been shown to elevate blood pressure, cause left ventricular hypertrophy, and promote cardiac fibrosis. An appreciation of the true role of aldosterone in patients with chronic heart failure did not become apparent until the publication of the Randomized Aldactone Evaluation Study. Until recently, the use of aldosterone receptor antagonists has been limited to patients with severe heart failure and patients with heart failure following myocardial infarction. The Eplerenone in Mild Patients Hospitalization and Survival Study in Heart Failure (EMPHASIS-HF study added additional evidence to support the expanded use of aldosterone receptor antagonists in heart failure patients. The results of the EMPHASIS-HF trial showed that patients with mild-to-moderate (New York Heart Association Class II heart failure had reductions in mortality and hospitalizations from the addition of eplerenone to optimal medical therapy. Evidence remains elusive about the exact mechanism by which aldosterone receptor antagonists improve heart failure morbidity and mortality. The benefits of aldosterone receptor antagonist use in heart failure must be weighed against the potential risk of complications, ie, hyperkalemia and, in the case of spironolactone, possible endocrine abnormalities, in particular gynecomastia. With appropriate monitoring, these risks can be minimized. We now have evidence that patients with mild-to-severe symptoms

  1. ACE inhibitors and AII receptor antagonists in the treatment and prevention of bone marrow transplant nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulder, J E; Fish, B L; Cohen, E P

    2003-01-01

    Radiation nephropathy has emerged as a major complication of bone marrow transplantation (BMT) when total body irradiation (TBI) is used as part of the regimen. Classically, radiation nephropathy has been assumed to be inevitable, progressive, and untreatable. However, in the early 1990's, it was demonstrated that experimental radiation nephropathy could be treated with a thiol-containing ACE inhibitor, captopril. Further studies showed that enalapril (a non-thiol ACE inhibitor) was also effective in the treatment of experimental radiation nephropathy, as was an AII receptor antagonist. Studies also showed that ACE inhibitors and AII receptor antagonists were effective in the prophylaxis of radiation nephropathy. Interestingly, other types of antihypertensive drugs were ineffective in prophylaxis, but brief use of a high-salt diet in the immediate post-irradiation period decreased renal injury. A placebo-controlled trial of captopril to prevent BMT nephropathy in adults is now underway. Since excess activity of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) causes hypertension, and hypertension is a major feature of radiation nephropathy; an explanation for the efficacy of RAS antagonism in the prophylaxis of radiation nephropathy would be that radiation leads to RAS activation. However, current studies favor an alternative explanation, namely that the normal activity of the RAS is deleterious in the presence of radiation injury. On-going studies suggest that efficacy of RAS antagonists may involve interactions with a radiation-induced decrease in renal nitric oxide activity or with radiation-induced tubular cell proliferation. We hypothesize that while prevention (prophylaxis) of radiation nephropathy with ACE inhibitors, AII receptor antagonists, or a high-salt diet work by suppression of the RAS, the efficacy of ACE inhibitors and AII receptor antagonists in treatment of established radiation nephropathy depends on blood pressure control.

  2. The Effect of Coasting on Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection Outcome in Antagonist and Agonist Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İltemir Duvan Z.Candan,

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Coasting can reduce the ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS risk in ovulation induction cycles before intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI. This study aimed to investigate the effect of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH agonist and GnRH antagonist protocols to controlled ovarian hyperstimulation (COH cycles with coasting on the parameters of ICSI cycles and the outcome. Materials and Methods In a retrospective cohort study, 117 ICSI cycles were per- formed and coasting was applied due to hyperresponse, between 2006 and 2011. The ICSI outcomes after coasting were then compared between the GnRH agonist group (n=91 and the GnRH antagonist group (n=26. Results The duration of induction and the total consumption of gonadotropins were found to be similar. Estradiol (E2 levels on human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG day were found higher in the agonist group. Coasting days were similar when the two groups were compared. The number of mature oocytes and the fertilization rates were similar in both groups; however, the number of grade 1 (G1 embryos and the number of transferred embryos were higher in the agonist group. Implantation rates were significantly higher in the antagonist group compared to the agonist group. Pregnancy rates/embryo transfer rates were higher in the antagonist group; however, this difference was not statistically significant (32.8% for agonist group vs. 39.1% for antagonist group, P>0.05. Conclusion The present study showed that applying GnRH-agonist and GnRH-antago- nist protocols to coasted cycles did not result in any differences in cycle parameters and clinical pregnancy rates.

  3. A novel "delayed start" protocol with gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist improves outcomes in poor responders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakmak, Hakan; Tran, Nam D; Zamah, A Musa; Cedars, Marcelle I; Rosen, Mitchell P

    2014-05-01

    To investigate whether delaying the start of ovarian stimulation with GnRH antagonist improves ovarian response in poor responders. Retrospective study. Academic medical center. Thirty patients, who responded poorly and did not get pregnant with conventional estrogen priming antagonist IVF protocol. Delayed-start antagonist protocol (estrogen priming followed by early follicular-phase GnRH antagonist treatment for 7 days before ovarian stimulation). Number of dominant follicles and mature oocytes retrieved, mature oocyte yield, and fertilization rate. The number of patients who met the criteria to proceed to oocyte retrieval was significantly higher in the delayed-start protocol [21/30 (70%)] compared with the previous conventional estrogen priming antagonist cycle [11/30 (36.7%)]. The number of dominant follicles was significantly higher in the delayed-start (4.2 ± 2.7) compared with conventional (2.4 ± 1.3) protocol. In patients who had oocyte retrieval after both protocols (n = 9), the delayed start resulted in shorter ovarian stimulation (9.4 ± 1.4 days vs. 11.1 ± 2.0 days), higher number of mature oocytes retrieved (4.9 ± 2.0 vs. 2.2 ± 1.1), and a trend toward increased fertilization rates with intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI; 86 ± 17% vs. 69 ± 21%) compared with conventional protocol. After delayed start, the average number of embryos transferred was 2.8 ± 1.4 with implantation rate of 9.8% and clinical pregnancy rate of 23.8%. The delayed-start protocol improves ovarian response in poor responders by promoting and synchronizing follicle development without impairing oocyte developmental competence. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. CysLT(1)R antagonists inhibit tumor growth in a xenograft model of colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savari, Sayeh; Liu, Minghui; Zhang, Yuan; Sime, Wondossen; Sjölander, Anita

    2013-01-01

    The expression of the inflammatory G-protein coupled receptor CysLT1R has been shown to be upregulated in colon cancer patients and associated with poor prognosis. The present study investigated the correlation between CysLT1R and colon cancer development in vivo using CysLT1R antagonists (ZM198,615 or Montelukast) and the nude mouse xenograft model. Two drug administration regimens were established. The first regimen was established to investigate the importance of CysLT1R in tumor initiation. Nude mice were inoculated with 50 µM CysLT1R antagonist-pretreated HCT-116 colon cancer cells and received continued treatment (5 mg/kg/day, intraperitoneally). The second regimen aimed to address the role of CysLT1R in tumor progression. Nude mice were inoculated with non-pretreated HCT-116 cells and did not receive CysLT1R antagonist treatment until recordable tumor appearance. Both regimens resulted in significantly reduced tumor size, attributed to changes in proliferation and apoptosis as determined by reduced Ki-67 levels and increased levels of p21(WAF/Cip1) (Pcolon cancer cell line HCT-116 and CysLT1R antagonists. In addition to significant reductions in cell proliferation, adhesion and colony formation, we observed induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. The ability of Montelukast to inhibit growth of human colon cancer xenograft was further validated by using two additional colon cancer cell lines, SW-480 and HT-29. Our results demonstrate that CysLT1R antagonists inhibit growth of colon cancer xenografts primarily by reducing proliferation and inducing apoptosis of the tumor cells.

  5. Differential effects of calcium antagonist subclasses on markers of nephropathy progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakris, George L; Weir, Matthew R; Secic, Michelle; Campbell, Brett; Weis-McNulty, Annette

    2004-06-01

    Numerous studies suggest that the dihydropyridine calcium antagonists (DCAs) and nondihydropyridine calcium antagonists (NDCAs) have differential antiproteinuric effects. Proteinuria reduction is a correlate of the progression of renal disease. In an earlier systematic review, calcium antagonists were shown as effective antihypertensive drugs, but there was uncertainty about their renal benefits in patients with proteinuria and renal insufficiency. A systematic review was conducted to assess the differential effects of DCAs and NDCAs on proteinuria in hypertensive adults with proteinuria, with or without diabetes, and to determine whether these differential effects translate into altered progression of nephropathy. Studies included in the review had to be randomized clinical trials with at least 6 months of treatment, include a DCA or NDCA treatment arm, have one or more renal end points, and have been initiated after 1986. Summary data were extracted from 28 studies entered into two identical but separate databases, which were compared and evaluated by independent reviewers. The effects of each drug class on blood pressure (N= 1338) and proteinuria (N= 510) were assessed. After adjusting for sample size, study length, and baseline value, there were no statistically significant differences in the ability of either class of calcium antagonist to decrease blood pressure. The mean change in proteinuria was +2% for DCAs and -30% for NDCAs (95% CI, 10% to 54%, P= 0.01). Consistently greater reductions in proteinuria were associated with the use of NDCAs compared with DCAs, despite no significant differences in blood pressure reduction or presence of diabetes. This analysis supports (1) similar efficacy between subclasses of calcium antagonists to lower blood pressure, and (2) greater reductions in proteinuria by NDCAs compared to DCAs in the presence or absence of diabetes. Based on these findings, NDCAs, alone or in combination with an angiotensin-converting enzyme

  6. Kinetics of human cannabinoid 1 (CB1) receptor antagonists: Structure-kinetics relationships (SKR) and implications for insurmountable antagonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Lizi; de Vries, Henk; Yang, Xue; Lenselink, Eelke B; Kyrizaki, Athina; Barth, Francis; Louvel, Julien; Dreyer, Matthias K; van der Es, Daan; IJzerman, Adriaan P; Heitman, Laura H

    2017-11-02

    While equilibrium binding affinities and in vitro functional antagonism of CB1 receptor antagonists have been studied in detail, little is known on the kinetics of their receptor interaction. In this study, we therefore conducted kinetic assays for nine 1-(4,5-diarylthiophene-2-carbonyl)-4-phenylpiperidine-4-carboxamide derivatives and included the CB1 antagonist rimonabant as a comparison. For this we newly developed a dual-point competition association assay with [3H]CP55940 as the radioligand. This assay yielded Kinetic Rate Index (KRI) values from which structure-kinetics relationships (SKR) of hCB1 receptor antagonists could be established. The fast dissociating antagonist 6 had a similar receptor residence time (RT) as rimonabant, i.e. 19 and 14 min, respectively, while the slowest dissociating antagonist (9) had a very long RT of 2222 min, i.e. pseudo-irreversible dissociation kinetics. In functional assays, 9 displayed insurmountable antagonism, while the effects of the shortest RT antagonist 6 and rimonabant were surmountable. Taken together, this study shows that hCB1 receptor antagonists can have very divergent RTs, which are not correlated to their equilibrium affinities. Furthermore, their RTs appear to define their mode of functional antagonism, i.e. surmountable vs. insurmountable. Finally, based on the recently resolved hCB1 receptor crystal structure, we propose that the differences in RT can be explained by a different binding mode of antagonist 9 from short RT antagonists that is able to displace unfavorable water molecules. Taken together, these findings are of importance for future design and evaluation of potent and safe hCB1 receptor antagonists. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Hypersensitivity reaction to ranitidine: Two case reports and review of the use of H2-antagonists in prophylactic treatment against hypersensitivity reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wielema, M.L.; DeGraaf, D.; De Groot, J.; Passier, J.L.M.; Van Roon, E.N.

    2013-01-01

    Early clinical development of paclitaxel was complicated by life-threatening hypersensitivity reactions (HSRs) manifested by hypotension, dyspnoea, angiooedema and urticaria. Prolongation of paclitaxel infusion time and empiric pretreatment with steroids, H1-antagonists and H 2-antagonists were

  8. POST-NOAC: Portuguese observational study of intracranial hemorrhage on non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques-Matos, Cláudia; Alves, José Nuno; Marto, João Pedro; Ribeiro, Joana Afonso; Monteiro, Ana; Araújo, José; Silva, Fernando; Grenho, Fátima; Viana-Baptista, Miguel; Sargento-Freitas, João; Pinho, João; Azevedo, Elsa

    2017-08-01

    Background There is a lower reported incidence of intracranial hemorrhage with non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants compared with vitamin K antagonist. However, the functional outcome and mortality of intracranial hemorrhage patients were not assessed. Aims To compare the outcome of vitamin K antagonists- and non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants-related intracranial hemorrhage. Methods We included consecutive patients with acute non-traumatic intracranial hemorrhage on oral anticoagulation therapy admitted between January 2013 and June 2015 at four university hospitals. Clinical and demographic data were obtained from individual medical records. Intracranial hemorrhage was classified as intracerebral, extra-axial, or multifocal using brain computed tomography. Three-month functional outcome was assessed using the modified Rankin Scale. Results Among 246 patients included, 24 (9.8%) were anticoagulated with a non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants and 222 (90.2%) with a vitamin K antagonists. Non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants patients were older (81.5 vs. 76 years, p = 0.048) and had intracerebral hemorrhage more often (83.3% vs. 63.1%, p = 0.048). We detected a non-significant trend for larger intracerebral hemorrhage volumes in vitamin K antagonists patients ( p = 0.368). Survival analysis adjusted for age, CHA2DS2VASc, HAS-BLED, and anticoagulation reversal revealed that non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants did not influence three-month mortality (hazard ratio (HR) = 0.83, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.39-1.80, p = 0.638). Multivariable ordinal regression for three-month functional outcome did not show a significant shift of modified Rankin Scale scores in non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants patients (odds ratio (OR) 1.26, 95%CI 0.55-2.87, p = 0.585). Conclusions We detected no significant differences in the three-month outcome between non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants- and

  9. NK1 receptor antagonists for depression: Why a validated concept was abandoned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupniak, Nadia M J; Kramer, Mark S

    2017-12-01

    NK1 receptor antagonists were abandoned despite antidepressant efficacy in five randomized clinical trials. The loss of confidence may be attributed to the failure of a Phase III clinical program with the NK1 receptor antagonist aprepitant in Major Depression. This review examines how PET receptor occupancy was used to select doses for aprepitant and that these may not have achieved adequate exposure. PubMed, Google Scholar, and FDA databases were searched for articles concerning NK1 receptor antagonists, human PET receptor occupancy and clinical trials in Major Depression. Antidepressant efficacy was initially demonstrated with three NK1 receptor antagonists, including aprepitant. A nanoparticle formulation of aprepitant was then developed to improve oral bioavailability. In PET studies, doses of 80 and 160mg achieved a high level (~ 90%) of occupancy of NK1 receptors in the human brain and were selected for Phase III. The efficacy of these doses of the nanoparticle formulation may not have been established in depressed patients prior to Phase III, and previous formulations required a dose of 300mg of aprepitant for efficacy. No antidepressant effect of 80 or 160mg of aprepitant was found, and it was concluded that the NK1 antagonist concept was flawed. However, subsequent studies with other compounds showed that a higher level of NK1 receptor occupancy (100%) was required for antidepressant efficacy. Key data concerning the bioequivalence of different formulations of aprepitant have not been published. The importance of NK1 antagonists for pharmacotherapy of depression and other psychiatric disorders has not been established in clinical practice. Aprepitant may have failed in Phase III because of an inadequate understanding of the relationship between brain NK1 receptor occupancy and clinical response. A validated and novel mechanistic approach to treat depression has been misperceived as ineffective and abandoned. Caution should be exercised in the appropriate

  10. Detection of retinoic acid receptor antagonist contamination in the aquatic environment of the Kinki region of Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Daisuke; Sawada, Kazuko; Sei, Kazunari; Ike, Michihiko

    2016-10-15

    Retinoic acid receptor (RAR) antagonists are potential toxic compounds that can cause teratogenesis in vertebrates. This study was conducted to evaluate the occurrence of RAR antagonist contamination in aquatic environments and identify its potential sources in detail. To accomplish this, the RAR antagonistic activities of surface waters of two rivers (the Yodo River and the Ina River) and influents and effluents of municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) in the Kinki region of Japan were investigated using a yeast two-hybrid assay. In the investigated rivers, remarkable RAR antagonistic activities were detected relatively consistently in specific regions, although the levels varied with time, and tended to increase downstream of municipal WWTPs. Investigations of WWTPs also revealed that RAR antagonists were present at remarkably high levels in municipal wastewater, and that RAR antagonist contamination remained in effluent after activated sludge treatments. Comparison of the concentration factors that reduced 50% of the RAR agonistic activity of 10(-7) M all-trans retinoic acid (IC50) for selected river water and WWTP effluent samples revealed that the contamination levels were greater in effluent (IC50: concentration factors of 92-313) than river water (IC50: concentration factors of 10.2-68.9). These results indicate that municipal WWTPs could be an important source of RAR antagonist contamination in the receiving rivers. Fractionations with high-performance liquid chromatography directed by the bioassay indicated that there were multiple RAR antagonists in municipal wastewater. Although a trial to identify the causative compounds in municipal wastewater was not completed, multiple bioactive peaks that should be studied further were isolated. This study clarified the occurrence of novel endocrine disrupting chemicals (i.e., RAR antagonists) in the aquatic environment at the watershed level and identified their possible source for the first time, which

  11. Influence of agonist efficacy and receptor phosphorylation on antagonist affinity measurements: differences between second messenger and reporter gene responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Jillian G; Hall, Ian P; Hill, Stephen J

    2003-09-01

    The ability of an antagonist to bind to a receptor is an innate property of that ligand-receptor chemical interaction. Provided no change in the antagonist or receptor chemical nature occurs, this affinity should remain constant for a given antagonist-receptor interaction, regardless of the agonists used. This fundamental assumption underpins the classification of receptors. Here, measurements of beta2-adrenoceptor-mediated cAMP accumulation and cAMP response-element (CRE)-mediated reporter-gene transcription revealed differences in antagonist affinity that depended upon agonist incubation time and the efficacy of the competing agonist. In cAMP accumulation studies (10-min agonist incubation), antagonist affinities were the same regardless of the agonist used. The CRE-reporter gene assay (5 h of incubation) antagonist affinities were 10-fold lower in the presence of isoprenaline and adrenaline than when salbutamol or terbutaline were present (e.g., log KD propranolol -8.65 +/- 0.08, n = 22, and -9.68 +/- 0.07, n = 17, for isoprenaline and salbutamol-induced responses, respectively). Isoprenaline and adrenaline were more efficacious in functional studies, and their ability to internalize GFP-tagged human beta2-adrenoceptors. Longer-term cAMP studies also showed significant differences in KD values moving toward that seen with gene transcription. Agonist-dependent differences in antagonist affinity were reduced for reporter-gene responses when a phosphorylation-deficient mutant of the beta2-adrenoceptor was used. This study suggests that high-efficacy agonists induce a chemical modification in beta2-adrenoceptors (via phosphorylation) that reduces antagonist affinities. Because reporter-gene assays are used for high-throughput screening in drug discovery, less efficacious or partial agonists may be more reliable than highly efficacious agonists when reporter-gene techniques are used to estimate antagonist affinity.

  12. Sugar beet-associated bacterial and fungal communities show a high indigenous antagonistic potential against plant pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachow, Christin; Tilcher, Ralf; Berg, Gabriele

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze microbial communities in/on sugar beet with special focus on antagonists toward plant pathogens. For this purpose, the composition of microorganisms isolated from the rhizosphere, phyllosphere, endorhiza, and endosphere of field-grown sugar beet plants was analyzed by a multiphasic approach at three different plant development stages at six locations in Europe. The analysis of microbial communities by Single Strand Conformation Polymorphism (SSCP) of 16S/18S rRNA clearly revealed the existence of discrete microenvironment- and site-specific patterns. A total of 1952 bacterial and 1344 fungal isolates screened by dual testing for antagonism toward the pathogens Aphanomyces cochlioides, Phoma betae, Pythium ultimum, and Rhizoctonia solani resulted in 885 bacterial (=45%) and 437 fungal (=33%) antagonists. In general, the indigenous antagonistic potential was very high and influenced by (a) the location, (b) the plant developmental stage, and (3) the microenvironment. Furthermore, we showed for the first time that the antagonistic potential was highly specific for each target pathogen. The majority of antagonistic microorganisms suppressed only one pathogen (bacteria: 664 = 75%; fungi: 256 = 59%), whereas the minority showed a broad host range (bacteria: 4 = 0.5%; fungi: 7 = 1.6%). The bacterial communities harbored the highest antagonistic potential against P. ultimum, whereas the fungal communities contained more antagonists against A. cochlioides and R. solani. In contrast to their high proportion, only a low diversity of antagonists at genotypic and species level was found. Novel antagonistic species, e.g., Subtercola pratensis or Microbacterium testaceum were found in the internal part of the sugar beet body.

  13. Glycine antagonist action of 1-aminocyclobutane-1-carboxylate (ACBC) in Xenopus oocytes injected with rat brain mRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, G B; Bolanowski, M A; Baganoff, M P; Deppeler, C L; Lanthorn, T H

    1989-08-22

    ACBC has been reported to have the binding profile of an antagonist at the glycine site of the NMDA receptor. In Xenopus oocytes injected with rat brain mRNA, we have confirmed the antagonist action of ACBC on NMDA responses. ACBC and HA-966, a known glycine antagonist, blocked NMDA responses in a non-competitive manner and blocked the potentiation of NMDA responses by glycine in a competitive manner. We conclude that ACBC blocks NMDA responses via a competitive interaction at the glycine modulatory site.

  14. Crystal structure of the adenosine A2A receptor bound to an antagonist reveals a potential allosteric pocket

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Bingfa; Bachhawat, Priti; Chu, Matthew Ling-Hon; Wood, Martyn; Ceska, Tom; Sands, Zara A.; Mercier, Joel; Lebon, Florence; Kobilka, Tong Sun; Kobilka, Brian K.

    2017-01-01

    The A2AR is a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that plays important roles in cardiovascular physiology and immune function. The A2AR is also a target for the treatment of Parkinson?s disease, where A2AR antagonists have been shown to enhance signaling through the D2 dopamine receptor. Here we present the crystal structure of the A2AR bound to a novel bitopic antagonist. As a result of structural changes needed to accommodate the bound antagonist, crystals could not be grown in lipidic cubic ...

  15. Regulation of the adrenoleukodystrophy-related gene (ABCD2): focus on oxysterols and LXR antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trompier, Doriane; Gondcaille, Catherine; Lizard, Gérard; Savary, Stéphane

    2014-04-11

    The regulation of the ABCD2 gene is recognized as a possible therapeutic target for X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy, a rare neurodegenerative disease caused by mutations in the ABCD1 gene. Up-regulation of ABCD2 expression has indeed been demonstrated to compensate for ABCD1 deficiency, restoring peroxisomal β-oxidation of very-long-chain fatty acids. Besides the known inducers of the ABCD2 gene (phenylbutyrate and histone deacetylase inhibitors, fibrates, dehydroepiandrosterone, thyroid hormone and thyromimetics), this review will focus on LXR antagonists and 22S-hydroxycholesterol, recently described as inducers of ABCD2 expression. Several LXR antagonists have been identified and their possible indication for neurodegenerative disorders will be discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Facilitation of soleus but not tibialis anterior motor evoked potentials before onset of antagonist contraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geertsen, Svend Sparre; Zuur, Abraham Theodore; Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2008-01-01

    as evidenced by a depression of the soleus H-reflex. The objective of this study was to investigate if motor evoked potentials (MEPs) evoked by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) show a similar depression prior to and at the onset of contraction of muscles that are antagonists to the muscle in which......Objective: It is well documented that corticospinal projections to motoneurons of one muscle inhibit antagonist motoneurons through collaterals to reciprocally organized spinal inhibitory interneurons. During and just prior to dorsiflexion of the ankle, soleus motoneurons are thus inhibited...... the MEP is evoked. Methods: Seated subjects (n=11) were instructed to react to an auditory cue by contracting either the tibialis anterior (TA) or soleus muscle of the left ankle to 30% of their maximal dorsiflexion voluntary contraction (MVC) or plantar flexion MVC, respectively. Focal TMS at 1.2 x motor...

  17. Radiolabeling with fluorine-18 of a protein, interleukin-1 receptor antagonist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prenant, C., E-mail: cprenant@cyclopharma.f [Wolfson Molecular Imaging Centre, University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom); Cawthorne, C. [Academic Department of Radiation Oncology, Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester (United Kingdom); Fairclough, M. [Wolfson Molecular Imaging Centre, University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom); Rothwell, N.; Boutin, H. [Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom)

    2010-09-15

    IL-1RA is a naturally occurring antagonist of the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1 (IL-1) with high therapeutic promise, but its pharmacokinetic remains poorly documented. In this report, we describe the radiolabeling of recombinant human interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (rhIL-1RA) with fluorine-18 to allow pharmacokinetic studies by positron emission tomography (PET). rhIL-1RA was labeled randomly by reductive alkylation of free amino groups (the {epsilon}-amino group of lysine residues or amino-terminal residues) using [{sup 18}F]fluoroacetaldehyde under mild reaction conditions. Radiosyntheses used a remotely controlled experimental rig within 100 min and the radiochemical yield was in the range 7.1-24.2% (decay corrected, based on seventeen syntheses). We showed that the produced [{sup 18}F]fluoroethyl-rhIL-1ra retained binding specificity by conducting an assay on rat brain sections, allowing its pharmakokinetic study using PET.

  18. Functional antagonistic properties of clozapine at the 5-HT3 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, B; Wetzel, C H; Pestel, E; Zieglgänsberger, W; Holsboer, F; Rupprecht, R

    1996-08-23

    The atypical neuroleptic clozapine is thought to exert its psychopharmacological actions through a variety of neurotransmitter receptors. It binds preferentially to D4 and 5-HT2 receptors; however, little is known on it's interaction with the 5-HT3 receptor. Using a cell line stably expressing the 5-HT3 receptor, whole-cell voltage-clamp analysis revealed functional antagonistic properties of clozapine at low nanomolar concentrations in view of a binding affinity in the upper nanomolar range. Because the concentration of clozapine required for an interaction with the 5-HT3 receptor can be achieved with therapeutical doses, functional antagonistic properties at this ligand-gated ion channel may contribute to its unique psychopharmacological profile.

  19. Design of a Potent CB1 Receptor Antagonist Series: Potential Scaffold for Peripherally-Targeted Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dow, Robert L; Carpino, Philip A; Gautreau, Denise; Hadcock, John R; Iredale, Philip A; Kelly-Sullivan, Dawn; Lizano, Jeffrey S; O'Connor, Rebecca E; Schneider, Steven R; Scott, Dennis O; Ward, Karen M

    2012-05-10

    Antagonism of cannabinoid-1 (CB1) receptor signaling has been demonstrated to inhibit feeding behaviors in humans, but CB1-mediated central nervous system (CNS) side effects have halted the marketing and further development of the lead drugs against this target. However, peripherally restricted CB1 receptor antagonists may hold potential for providing the desired efficacy with reduced CNS side effect profiles. In this report we detail the discovery and structure-activity-relationship analysis of a novel bicyclic scaffold (3) that exhibits potent CB1 receptor antagonism and oral activity in preclinical feeding models. Optimization of physical properties has led to the identification of analogues which are predicted to have reduced CNS exposure and could serve as a starting point for the design of peripherally targeted CB1 receptor antagonists.

  20. The safety of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (anakinra in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Riente

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The safety profile of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (anakinra has been studied with randomised, placebo-controlled trials involving 2932 patients affected by rheumatoid arthritis. The most frequently reported adverse events were represented by injection site reactions (71% and headache (13.6%. No statistically significant difference in the incidence of infections was observed among the patients treated with the interleukin-1 receptor antagonist and the patients receiving placebo. In particular, the incidence of serious infections was 1,8% in rheumatoid arthritis patients on anakinra therapy and 0,7% in patients on placebo. The reported serious infections consisted of pneumonia, cellulitis, bone and joint infections, bursitis. No case of opportunistic infections or tubercolosis was observed. The results of clinical studies suggest that anakinra is a new well-tolerated drug for the treatment of patients affected by rheumatoid arthritis.

  1. Adenosine receptor antagonists for cognitive dysfunction: a review of animal studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Reinaldo Naoto; Pamplona, Fabricio Alano; Prediger, Rui Daniel Schroder

    2008-01-01

    Over the last decade, adenosine receptors in the central nervous system have been implicated in the modulation of cognitive functions. Despite the general view that endogenous adenosine modulates cognition through the activation of adenosine A1 receptors, evidence is now emerging on a possible role of A2A receptors in learning and memory. The present review attempts to examine results reported in different studies using diverse animal models, to provide a comprehensive picture of the recent evidence of a relationship between adenosinergic function and memory deficits. The present data suggest that caffeine (a nonselective adenosine receptor antagonist) and selective adenosine A2A receptor antagonists can improve memory performance in rodents evaluated through different tasks. They might also afford protection against memory dysfunction elicited in experimental models of aging, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and, in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR), a putative genetic model of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

  2. Couple Control Model Implementation on Antagonistic Mono- and Bi-Articular Actuators

    CERN Document Server

    Prattico, Flavio; Yamamoto, Shin-ichiroh

    2014-01-01

    Recently, robot assisted therapy devices are increasingly used for spinal cord injury (SCI) rehabilitation in assisting handicapped patients to regain their impaired movements. Assistive robotic systems may not be able to cure or fully compensate impairments, but it should be able to assist certain impaired functions and ease movements. In this study, a couple control model for lower-limb orthosis of a body weight support gait training system is proposed. The developed leg orthosis implements the use of pneumatic artificial muscle as an actuation system. The pneumatic muscle was arranged antagonistically to form two pair of mono-articular muscles (i.e., hip and knee joints), and a pair of bi-articular actuators (i.e., rectus femoris and hamstring). The results of the proposed couple control model showed that, it was able to simultaneously control the antagonistic mono- and bi-articular actuators and sufficiently performed walking motion of the leg orthosis.

  3. Exploring Western Ghats microbial diversity for antagonistic microorganisms against fungal phytopathogens of pepper and chickpea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.N. RAMKUMAR

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Newly isolated microbial cultures from Western Ghat soil samples of Kerala region in India were screened for antagonistic activity by well diffusion and dual culture plating against Phytophthora capsici and Rhizoctonia solani, infecting pepper and chickpea, respectively. Bioactive samples were made by varying solvent extraction of the culture broths of the potent isolates belongs to Actinomycetes, Pseudomonas, Bacillus and Trichoderma. The efficacy of the isolates to produce other potent antifungal metabolites such as cell wall degrading enzymes, HCN and volatile compounds were also checked. Treatment with antagonistic isolates in vivo under greenhouse conditions revealed significant reduction of the disease intensity of foot rot disease of black pepper and collar rot of chick pea.

  4. Synthesis and structure-activity relationships of novel histamine H1 antagonists: indolylpiperidinyl benzoic acid derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonquerna, Silvia; Miralpeix, Montse; Pagès, Lluís; Puig, Carles; Cardús, Arantxa; Antón, Francisca; Cárdenas, Alvaro; Vilella, Dolors; Aparici, Mónica; Calaf, Elena; Prieto, José; Gras, Jordi; Huerta, Josep M; Warrellow, Graham; Beleta, Jorge; Ryder, Hamish

    2004-12-02

    A series of indolylpiperidinyl derivatives were prepared and evaluated for their activity as histamine H(1) antagonists. Structure-activity relationship studies were directed toward improving in vivo activity and pharmacokinetic profile of our first lead (1). Substitution of fluorine in position 6 on the indolyl ring led to higher in vivo activity in the inhibition of histamine-induced cutaneous vascular permeability assay but lower selectivity toward 5HT(2) receptor. Extensive optimization was carried out within this series and a number of histamine H(1) antagonists showing potency and long duration of action in vivo and low brain penetration or cardiotoxic potential were identified. Within this novel series, indolylpiperidines 15, 20, 48,51 and 52 exhibited a long half-life in rat and have been selected for further preclinical evaluation.

  5. A RNA antagonist of hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha, EZN-2968, inhibits tumor cell growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greenberger, Lee M; Horak, Ivan D; Filpula, David

    2008-01-01

    pathways, is associated with poor prognosis in many types of cancer. Therefore, down-regulation of HIF-1alpha protein by RNA antagonists may control cancer growth. EZN-2968 is a RNA antagonist composed of third-generation oligonucleotide, locked nucleic acid, technology that specifically binds and inhibits......-regulation of endogenous HIF-1alpha and vascular endothelial growth factor in the liver. The effect can last for days after administration of single dose of EZN-2968 and is associated with long residence time of locked nucleic acid in certain tissues. In efficacy studies, tumor reduction was found in nude mice implanted...... with DU145 cells treated with EZN-2968. Ongoing phase I studies of EZN-2968 in patients with advanced malignancies will determine optimal dose and schedule for the phase II program....

  6. PAF receptor antagonist Ginkgolide B inhibits tumourigenesis and angiogenesis in colitis-associated cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lei; He, Zhen; Ke, Jia; Li, Senmao; Wu, Xianrui; Lian, Lei; He, Xiaowen; He, Xiaosheng; Hu, Jiancong; Zou, Yifeng; Wu, Xiaojian; Lan, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Platelet activating factor (PAF), a potent pro-inflammatory phospholipid, has been found to trigger tumor growth and angiogenesis through its G-protein coupled receptor (PAFR). This study was aimed to investigate the potential role of PAF in azoxymethane (AOM)/dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) induced colitis-associated cancer (CAC), using PAFR antagonist Ginkgolide B (GKB). We found GKB up-regulated serum level of PAF-AH activity. As assessed by disease activity index (DAI), histological injury scores, leukocytes infiltration, and expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, GKB ameliorated colonic inflammation and decreased tumor number and load in mice. GKB also decreased expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and microvessel density (MVD) in tumor. These results suggest that PAFR antagonist might be a potential therapeutic strategy for CAC.

  7. Immunoactive effects of cannabinoids: considerations for the therapeutic use of cannabinoid receptor agonists and antagonists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greineisen, William E.; Turner., Helen

    2013-01-01

    The active constituents of Cannabis sativa have been used for centuries as recreational drugs and medicinal agents. Today, marijuana is the most prevalent drug of abuse in the United States and, conversely, therapeutic use of marijuana constituents are gaining mainstream clinical and political acceptance. Given the documented contributions of endocannabinoid signaling to a range of physiological systems, including cognitive function, and the control of eating behaviors, it is unsurprising that cannabinoid receptor agonists and antagonists are showing significant clinical potential. In addition to the neuroactive effects of cannabinoids, an emerging body of data suggests that both endogenous and exogenous cannabinoids are potently immunoactive. The central premise of this review article is that the immunological effects of cannabinoids should be considered in the context of each prescribing decision. We present evidence that the immunological effects of cannabinoid receptor agonists and antagonists are highly relevant to the spectrum of disorders for which cannabinoid therapeutics are currently offered. PMID:20219697

  8. Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) receptor antagonists as anti-diabetic agents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gasbjerg, Lærke Smidt; Gabe, Maria Buur Nordskov; Hartmann, Bolette

    2018-01-01

    Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) is an intestinal hormone with a broad range of physiological actions. In the postprandial state, the hormone stimulates insulin secretion and during eu- and hypoglycemia, it stimulates glucagon secretion. In addition, GIP increases triacylglycerol...... peptide, was shown to block the GIPR in humans and decrease GIP-induced insulin secretion as well as adipose tissue blood flow and TAG uptake. So far, there are no studies with a GIPR antagonist in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D), but because the elevations in fasting plasma glucagon and paradoxical...... postprandial glucagon excursions, seen in patients with T2D, are aggravated by GIP, a GIPR antagonist could partly alleviate this and possibly improve the fasting and postprandial glycemia. Since the majority of patients with T2D are overweight, inhibition of GIP-induced fat deposition may be beneficial...

  9. The architecture of antagonistic networks: Node degree distribution, compartmentalization and nestedness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savannah Nuwagaba

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Describing complex ecosystems as networks of interacting components has proved fruitful - revealing many distinctive patterns and dynamics of ecological systems. Of these patterns, three have often been brought up in literature, including species degree distribution, compartmentalization and nestedness, due largely to their implications for the functionality and stability of communities. Here, using 61 empirical antagonistic networks, we aim to settle the inconsistency in literature by (i fitting their node degree distributions to five different parametric models and identifying the one fits the best, (ii measuring the levels of nestedness and compartmentalization of these 61 networks and testing their significance using different null models, and (iii exploring how network connectance affects these three network architecture metrics. This research showed that most antagonistic networks do not display power law degree distributions and that resource species are generally uniformly distributed. We also clearly showed that the conclusion of whether a network is significantly compartmentalized or nested depends largely on the null model used.

  10. Assembly of high-affinity insulin receptor agonists and antagonists from peptide building blocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäffer, Lauge; Brissette, Renee E.; Spetzler, Jane C.; Pillutla, Renuka C.; Østergaard, Søren; Lennick, Michael; Brandt, Jakob; Fletcher, Paul W.; Danielsen, Gillian M.; Hsiao, Ku-Chuan; Andersen, Asser S.; Dedova, Olga; Ribel, Ulla; Hoeg-Jensen, Thomas; Hertz Hansen, Per; Blume, Arthur J.; Markussen, Jan; Goldstein, Neil I.

    2003-04-01

    Insulin is thought to elicit its effects by crosslinking the two extracellular -subunits of its receptor, thereby inducing a conformational change in the receptor, which activates the intracellular tyrosine kinase signaling cascade. Previously we identified a series of peptides binding to two discrete hotspots on the insulin receptor. Here we show that covalent linkage of such peptides into homodimers or heterodimers results in insulin agonists or antagonists, depending on how the peptides are linked. An optimized agonist has been shown, both in vitro and in vivo, to have a potency close to that of insulin itself. The ability to construct such peptide derivatives may offer a path for developing agonists or antagonists for treatment of a wide variety of diseases.

  11. Screening of antagonistic activity of microorganisms against Colletotrichum acutatum and Colletotrichum gloeosporioides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Živković Svetlana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The antagonistic activities of five biocontrol agents: Trichoderma harzianum, Gliocladium roseum, Bacillus subtilis, Streptomyces noursei and Streptomyces natalensis, were tested in vitro against Colletotrichum acutatum and Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, the causal agents of anthracnose disease in fruit crops. The microbial antagonists inhibited mycelial growth in the dual culture assay and conidial germination of Colletotrichum isolates. The two Streptomyces species exhibited the strongest antagonism against isolates of C. acutatum and C. gloeosporioides. Microscopic examination showed that the most common mode of action was antibiosis. The results of this study identify T. harzianum, G. roseum, B. subtilis, S. natalensis and S. noursei as promising biological control agents for further testing against anthracnose disease in fruits. .

  12. Discovery of Potent and Highly Selective A2B Adenosine Receptor Antagonist Chemotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Maatougui, Abdelaziz; Azuaje, Jhonny; González-Gómez, Manuel; Miguez, Gabriel; Crespo, Abel; Carbajales, Carlos; Escalante, Luz; García-Mera, Xerardo; Gutiérrez-de-Terán, Hugo; Sotelo, Eddy

    2016-03-10

    Three novel families of A2B adenosine receptor antagonists were identified in the context of the structural exploration of the 3,4-dihydropyrimidin-2(1H)-one chemotype. The most appealing series contain imidazole, 1,2,4-triazole, or benzimidazole rings fused to the 2,3-positions of the parent diazinone core. The optimization process enabled identification of a highly potent (3.49 nM) A2B ligand that exhibits complete selectivity toward A1, A2A, and A3 receptors. The results of functional cAMP experiments confirmed the antagonistic behavior of representative ligands. The main SAR trends identified within the series were substantiated by a molecular modeling study based on a receptor-driven docking model constructed on the basis of the crystal structure of the human A2A receptor.

  13. LINGO-1 antagonists as therapy for multiple sclerosis: in vitro and in vivo evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudick, Richard A; Mi, Sha; Sandrock, Alfred W

    2008-10-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory disease of the CNS that causes progressive neurological disability in most patients. Certain alleles of immunity-associated genes increase risk of MS, confirming a role for autoimmune mechanisms in pathogenesis. Activated mononuclear cells infiltrate the CNS and trigger an inflammatory cascade, resulting in demyelination and axonal injury. Non-inflammatory mechanisms also appear to be involved in axonal degeneration but are not fully elucidated. Current therapies are anti-inflammatory, and no available therapy is known to promote myelin repair or maintenance. Leucine-rich repeats and Ig domain-containing, neurite outgrowth inhibitor (Nogo) receptor-interacting protein-1 (LINGO-1) is a potent negative regulator of axonal myelination. This article provides an overview of the available data on the effects of LINGO-1 antagonists on oligodendrocyte differentiation and remyelination. LINGO-1 is a potential target for neuroprotective therapy in that antagonists may promote remyelination in diseases such as MS.

  14. Lisuride hydrogen maleate: an ergoline with beta-adrenergic antagonist activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cote, T; Munemura, M; Kebabian, J

    1979-11-16

    Lisuride hydrogen maleate is identified as a potent beta-adrenergic antagonist using a hormone-sensitive adenylate cyclase system and [3H]dihydroalprenolol binding in cell free homogenates of rabbit cerebellum. Lisuride and two other ergolines, lergotrile and bromocriptine, and the phenothiazine, fluphenazine, all interact with spiroperidol binding sites (dopamine receptors) in the anterior pituitary; however, among these compounds lisuride is unique in its ability to antagonize the beta-adrenoceptor.

  15. Antagonist profile of ibodutant at the tachykinin NK(2) receptor in guinea pig isolated bronchi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santicioli, Paolo; Meini, Stefania; Giuliani, Sandro; Lecci, Alessandro; Maggi, Carlo Alberto

    2013-11-15

    In this study we have characterized the pharmacological profile of the non-peptide tachykinin NK(2) receptor antagonist ibodutant (MEN15596) in guinea pig isolated main bronchi contractility. The antagonist potency of ibodutant was evaluated using the selective NK(2) receptor agonist [βAla8]NKA(4-10)-mediated contractions of guinea pig isolated main bronchi. In this assay ibodutant (30, 100 and 300 nM) induced a concentration-dependent rightward shift of the [βAla8]NKA(4-10) concentration-response curves without affecting the maximal contractile effect. The analysis of the results yielded a Schild-plot linear regression with a slope not different from unity (0.95, 95% c.l. 0.65-1.25), thus, indicating a surmountable behavior. The calculated apparent antagonist potency as pK(B) value was 8.31 ± 0.05. Ibodutant (0.3-100 nM) produced a concentration-dependent inhibition of the nonadrenergic-noncholinergic (NANC) contractile response induced by electrical field stimulation (EFS) of intrinsic airway nerves in guinea pig isolated main bronchi. At the highest concentration tested (100 nM) ibodutant almost abolished the EFS-induced bronchoconstriction (95 ± 4% inhibition), the calculated IC(50) value was 2.98 nM (95% c.l. 1.73-5.16 nM). In bronchi from ovalbumin (OVA) sensitized guinea pigs ibodutant (100 nM) did not affect the maximal contractile response to OVA, but completely prevented the slowing in the fading of the motor response induced by phosphoramidon pretreatment linked to the endogenous neurokinin A release. Altogether, the present study demonstrates that ibodutant is a potent NK(2) receptor antagonist in guinea pig airways.

  16. Using a Cocontraction Ratio to Predict Antagonistic Behavior During Elbow Motion

    CERN Document Server

    Pontonnier, Charles

    2012-01-01

    Inverse dynamics methods for muscle forces prediction are globally unable to predict antagonistic activity during a joint motion. This is due to a lack of physiological information describing how forces are shared between flexors and extensors. The aim of this study is the definition and the use of a new EMG-based cocontraction ratio in an inverse dynamics muscle forces prediction approach applied to the elbow flexion motion. Results show the relevance of the ratio.

  17. Identification of PCTA, a TGIF antagonist that promotes PML function in TGF-β signalling

    OpenAIRE

    Faresse, Nourdine; Colland, Frédéric; Ferrand, Nathalie; Prunier, Céline; Bourgeade, Marie-Francoise; Atfi, Azeddine

    2008-01-01

    The TGIF homoeodomain protein functions as an important negative regulator in the TGF-β signalling pathway. The inhibitory function of TGIF is executed in part through its ability to sequester the tumour suppressor cytoplasmic promyelocytic leukaemia (cPML) in the nucleus, thereby preventing the phosphorylation of Smad2 by the activated TGF-β type I receptor. Here, we report on the identification of PCTA (PML competitor for TGIF association), a TGIF antagonist that promotes TGF-β-induced tran...

  18. Pathophysiology of the cysteinyl leukotrienes and effects of leukotriene receptor antagonists in asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, H

    2001-01-01

    and pranlukast inhibit bronchoconstriction in asthmatic patients undergoing allergen, exercise, cold air or aspirin challenge. They attenuate the hallmarks of asthmatic inflammation, including eosinophilia in the airway mucosa and peripheral blood. Moreover, exhaled nitric oxide concentrations, another correlate...... of airway inflammation, are decreased during montelukast treatment in children. Cysteinyl leukotriene synthesis is not blocked by corticosteroid therapy. This important observation suggests that the leukotriene receptor antagonists represent a novel therapeutic approach, one that may provide benefits...

  19. Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationships and Docking Studies of Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide Antagonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jenssen, Håvard; Mehrabian, Mohadeseh; Kyani, Anahita

    2012-01-01

    of calcitonin gene-related peptide antagonists was performed using a panel of physicochemical descriptors. The computational studies evaluated different variable selection techniques and demonstrated shuffling stepwise multiple linear regression to be superior over genetic algorithm-multiple linear regression....... The linear quantitative structure-activity relationship model revealed better statistical parameters of cross-validation in comparison with the non-linear support vector regression technique. Implementing only five peptide descriptors into this linear quantitative structure-activity relationship model...

  20. The interleukin (IL)-1 cytokine family--Balance between agonists and antagonists in inflammatory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomo, Jennifer; Dietrich, Damien; Martin, Praxedis; Palmer, Gaby; Gabay, Cem

    2015-11-01

    The interleukin (IL)-1 family of cytokines comprises 11 members, including 7 pro-inflammatory agonists (IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-18, IL-33, IL-36α, IL-36β, IL-36γ) and 4 defined or putative antagonists (IL-1R antagonist (IL-1Ra), IL-36Ra, IL-37, and IL-38) exerting anti-inflammatory activities. Except for IL-1Ra, IL-1 cytokines do not possess a leader sequence and are secreted via an unconventional pathway. In addition, IL-1β and IL-18 are produced as biologically inert pro-peptides that require cleavage by caspase-1 in their N-terminal region to generate active proteins. N-terminal processing is also required for full activity of IL-36 cytokines. The IL-1 receptor (IL-1R) family comprises 10 members and includes cytokine-specific receptors, co-receptors and inhibitory receptors. The signaling IL-1Rs share a common structure with three extracellular immunoglobulin (Ig) domains and an intracellular Toll-like/IL-1R (TIR) domain. IL-1 cytokines bind to their specific receptor, which leads to the recruitment of a co-receptor and intracellular signaling. IL-1 cytokines induce potent inflammatory responses and their activity is tightly controlled at the level of production, protein processing and maturation, receptor binding and post-receptor signaling by naturally occurring inhibitors. Some of these inhibitors are IL-1 family antagonists, while others are IL-1R family members acting as membrane-bound or soluble decoy receptors. An imbalance between agonist and antagonist levels can lead to exaggerated inflammatory responses. Several genetic modifications or mutations associated with dysregulated IL-1 activity and autoinflammatory disorders were identified in mouse models and in patients. These findings paved the road to the successful use of IL-1 inhibitors in diseases that were previously considered as untreatable. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Effects of Olopatadine Hydrochloride, a Histamine H 1 Receptor Antagonist, on Histamine-Induced Skin Responses

    OpenAIRE

    Takashi Hashimoto; Norito Ishii; Takahiro Hamada; Teruki Dainichi; Tadashi Karashima; Takekuni Nakama; Shinichiro Yasumoto

    2010-01-01

    Effects of olopatadine hydrochloride, a histamine H1 receptor antagonist, on histamine-induced skin responses were evaluated in 10 healthy subjects in comparison with placebo, fexofenadine hydrochloride, and bepotastine besilate. Olopatadine significantly suppressed histamine-induced wheal, flare, and itch, starting 30 minutes after oral administration. Olopatadine was more effective than fexofenadine and bepotastine. None of the drugs studied impaired performance of word processing tasks. Th...

  2. Effects of olopatadine hydrochloride, a histamine h(1) receptor antagonist, on histamine-induced skin responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Takashi; Ishii, Norito; Hamada, Takahiro; Dainichi, Teruki; Karashima, Tadashi; Nakama, Takekuni; Yasumoto, Shinichiro

    2010-01-01

    Effects of olopatadine hydrochloride, a histamine H(1) receptor antagonist, on histamine-induced skin responses were evaluated in 10 healthy subjects in comparison with placebo, fexofenadine hydrochloride, and bepotastine besilate. Olopatadine significantly suppressed histamine-induced wheal, flare, and itch, starting 30 minutes after oral administration. Olopatadine was more effective than fexofenadine and bepotastine. None of the drugs studied impaired performance of word processing tasks. These results suggest that olopatadine can suppress skin symptoms caused by histamine soon after administration.

  3. Effects of Olopatadine Hydrochloride, a Histamine H1 Receptor Antagonist, on Histamine-Induced Skin Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Takashi; Ishii, Norito; Hamada, Takahiro; Dainichi, Teruki; Karashima, Tadashi; Nakama, Takekuni; Yasumoto, Shinichiro

    2010-01-01

    Effects of olopatadine hydrochloride, a histamine H1 receptor antagonist, on histamine-induced skin responses were evaluated in 10 healthy subjects in comparison with placebo, fexofenadine hydrochloride, and bepotastine besilate. Olopatadine significantly suppressed histamine-induced wheal, flare, and itch, starting 30 minutes after oral administration. Olopatadine was more effective than fexofenadine and bepotastine. None of the drugs studied impaired performance of word processing tasks. These results suggest that olopatadine can suppress skin symptoms caused by histamine soon after administration. PMID:20886023

  4. Don't stress about CRF: assessing the translational failures of CRF1antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spierling, Samantha R; Zorrilla, Eric P

    2017-05-01

    Dr. Athina Markou sought treatments for a common neural substrate shared by depression and drug dependence. Antagonists of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) receptors, a target of interest to her, have not reached the clinic despite strong preclinical rationale and sustained translational efforts. We explore potential causes for the failure of CRF 1 antagonists and review recent findings concerning CRF-CRF 1 systems in psychopathology. Potential causes for negative outcomes include (1) poor safety and efficacy of initial drug candidates due to bad pharmacokinetic and physicochemical properties, (2) specificity problems with preclinical screens, (3) the acute nature of screens vs. late-presenting patients, (4) positive preclinical results limited to certain models and conditions with dynamic CRF-CRF 1 activation not homologous to tested patients, (5) repeated CRF 1 activation-induced plasticity that reduces the importance of ongoing CRF 1 agonist stimulation, and (6) therapeutic silencing which may need to address CRF 2 receptor or CRF-binding protein molecules, constitutive CRF 1 activity, or molecules that influence agonist-independent activity or to target structural regions other than the allosteric site bound by all drug candidates. We describe potential markers of activation towards individualized treatment, human genetic, and functional data that still implicate CRF 1 systems in emotional disturbance, sex differences, and suggestive clinical findings for CRF 1 antagonists in food craving and CRF-driven HPA-axis overactivation. The therapeutic scope of selective CRF 1 antagonists now appears narrower than had been hoped. Yet, much remains to be learned about CRF's role in the neurobiology of dysphoria and addiction and the potential for novel anti-CRF therapies therein.

  5. "Mirror image" antagonists of thrombin-induced platelet activation based on thrombin receptor structure.

    OpenAIRE

    Hung, D T; Vu, T K; Wheaton, V I; Charo, I F; Nelken, N A; Esmon, N.; Esmon, C T; Coughlin, S R

    1992-01-01

    Platelet activation by thrombin plays a critical role in hemostasis and thrombosis. Based on structure-activity studies of a cloned platelet thrombin receptor, we designed two "mirror image" antagonists of thrombin and thrombin receptor function. First, "uncleavable" peptides mimicking the receptor domain postulated to interact with thrombin were found to be potent thrombin inhibitors. Second, proteolytically inactive mutant thrombins designed to bind but not cleave the thrombin receptor were...

  6. beta-Adrenoreceptor antagonists reduce cancer cell proliferation, invasion, and migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Işeri, Ozlem Darcansoy; Sahin, Feride Iffet; Terzi, Yunus Kasım; Yurtcu, Erkan; Erdem, S Remzi; Sarialioglu, Faik

    2014-11-01

    Propranolol, atenolol, and ICI118,551 are non-selective β-adrenergic receptor (AR), β1-AR, and β2-AR antagonists, respectively. We investigated the efficacy of propranolol, atenolol, and ICI118,551 on proliferation, migration, and invasion of non-stimulated breast (MCF7), colon (HT-29), and hepatocellular (HepG2) cancer cells. β-AR expression profiling of cells was performed by real time PCR. Cell proliferation was determined by MTT. Boyden chamber and scratch assays were performed to evaluate invasion and migration. All cell lines expressed β-ARs. ICI118,551 was the most cytotoxic, whereas atenolol was the least effective β-AR antagonist for 24, 48, and 72 h. Cell invasion was inhibited by ICI118,551 (45, 46, and 50% for MCF7, HT29, and HepG2, respectively) and propranolol (72, 65, and 90% for MCF7, HT29, and HepG2, respectively). Propranolol, atenolol, and ICI118,551 reduced migration of MCF7, HT-29, and HepG2 cells to varying extents depending on the application concentration and duration. Propranolol and atenolol reduced migration of MCF7 and HT-29 in a concentration-dependent manner, whereas migration of these cells decreased after 48 and 72 h of ICI118,551 applications. Beta2-AR antagonist seemed to be the most cytotoxic β-blocker on non-stimulated cancer cells. Propranolol and ICI118,551 were more effective than atenolol in inhibiting invasion and migration of non-stimulated MCF7 and HT-29 cells; ICI118,551 being the most potent. Concordantly, β2-selective blockage seemed to be more effective for non-stimulated cells. Effect of the selective β-AR antagonists showed variation depending on the concentration, incubation time, and histological origin of cells.

  7. Employment of vasopressin receptor antagonists in management of hyponatraemia and volume overload in some clinical conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urso, C; Brucculeri, S; Caimi, G

    2015-08-01

    Hyponatraemia, the most common electrolyte imbalance occurring in hospitalized subjects, is usually classified as hypovolaemic, euvolaemic or hypervolaemic. Hyponatraemia is a predictor of death among subjects with chronic heart failure and cirrhosis. The inappropriate secretion of the antidiuretic hormone (AVP) seems to be of pivotal importance in the decline of serum sodium concentration in these clinical conditions. The objective of this review was to summarize recent progress in management of hyponatraemia in SIADH, cirrhosis and heart failure. Literature searches were conducted on the topics of hyponatraemia and vasopressin receptor antagonists, using PubMed, pharmaceutical company websites and news reports. The information was evaluated for relevance and quality, critically assessed and summarized. The initial treatment of severe hyponatraemia is directed towards the prevention or management of neurological manifestations and consists of an intravenous infusion of hypertonic saline. Fluid restriction is indicated in oedematous states. Diuretics alone or in combination with other specific drugs remain the main strategy in the management of volume overload in heart failure. In resistant cases, ultrafiltration can lead to effective removal of isotonic fluid preventing new episodes of decompensation; however, aquapheresis is associated with increased costs and other limits. In several trials, the efficacy of vasopressin receptor antagonists in euvolaemic patients (inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion) or in hypervolaemic hyponatraemia (chronic heart failure, cirrhosis) has been evaluated. It was found that vaptans, which promote aquaresis, were superior to a placebo in raising and maintaining serum sodium concentrations in these subjects. Combined with conventional therapy, vasopressin receptor antagonists (AVP-R antagonists) are able to increase the excretion of electrolyte-free water and the sodium concentration. Further studies are needed to assess

  8. Conjugation of ß-Adrenergic Antagonist Alprenolol to Implantable Polymer-Aescin Matrices for Local Delivery

    OpenAIRE

    Oledzka, Ewa; Pachowska, Dagmara; Sobczak, Marcin; Lis-Cieplak, Agnieszka; Nalecz-Jawecki, Grzegorz; Zgadzaj, Anna; Kolodziejski, Waclaw

    2015-01-01

    The sustained release of alprenolol, a ß-adrenergic antagonist, could be beneficial for the treatment of various heart diseases while reducing the side effects resulting from its continuous use. The novel and branched copolymers uniquely composed of biodegradable components (lactide and glycolide) have been synthesized using natural and therapeutically-efficient ß-aescin-initiator, and consequently characterized to determine their structures and physicochemical properties. The obtained matric...

  9. Variability of platelet aggregate dispersal with glycoprotein IIb-IIIa antagonists eptifibatide and abciximab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speich, H E; Earhart, A D; Hill, S N; Cholera, S; Kueter, T J; Smith, J N; White, M M; Jennings, L K

    2009-06-01

    Utilization of glycoprotein IIb-IIIa (GPIIb-IIIa) inhibitors improves outcomes of patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS), including those undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). These results may be related to the ability of the inhibitors to destabilize coronary thrombi, reduce microembolization, and restore vessel patency. To evaluate in vitro the ability of GPIIb-IIIa antagonists, abciximab and eptifibatide, to promote the disaggregation of platelet-rich thrombus. Antagonist-induced disaggregation was assayed in plasma by aggregometry, as well as in whole blood by point of care and capillary perfusion systems. Fibrinogen dissociation from the platelet surface was quantified by flow cytometry. Significant disaggregation of 5 microm ADP-induced aggregates was observed after addition of either agent. The maximum extent and rate of disaggregation were significantly higher with eptifibatide than with abciximab. Both antagonists also dispersed 2 microg mL(-1) collagen-induced aggregates, again with eptifibatide having a greater effect. Eptifibatide, but not abciximab (up to 10 microg mL(-1)), was efficient at dissociating aggregates to single platelets in whole blood and dispersing aggregates that had been aged for 30 min before treatment. Eptifibatide also reduced existing thrombus burden in the perfusion model under arterial flow conditions. A key mechanism of aggregate dispersal was antagonist-induced displacement of platelet-bound fibrinogen, which was greater with eptifibatide, a competitive inhibitor of fibrinogen binding, than with the noncompetitive inhibitor, abciximab. These results suggest that drug concentration and residence time, along with thrombus extent and age, may be critical determinants in promoting timely recanalization.

  10. Effects of autacoid inhibitors and of an antagonist on malaria infection in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.O. Iwalewa

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available The effects of p-chlorophenylalanine, an inhibitor of serotonin synthesis, indomethacin, an inhibitor of prostaglandin synthesis, cyproheptadine, a serotonin, bradykinin and histamine antagonist, were assessed separately and in combination with chloroquine (CQ in Vom strains of Swiss albino mice (18-22 g of either sex infected intraperitoneally with 1 x 10(7 Plasmodium yoelii nigeriensis-induced malaria. As prophylactic, these agents reduced from 31.9 ± 4.5 to 16.1 ± 8.1% the level of parasitemia relative to control but had no appreciable activity as curative agents when administered subcutaneously once daily for 4 days after 72 h of parasites innoculum in vivo. However, CQ alone and the combination of these agents with CQ in curative and prophylactic treatments significantly reduced (from 50.3 ± 5.8 to 4.9 ± 0.75% the level of parasitemia (P < 0.05, which was taken only once 72 h after the parasites innoculum. The prophylactic result was shown to produce better results than the curative treatment. The data indicate that inhibitors and an antagonist can reduce the parasitemia load (the extent of damage and the severity of infection as well as enhance the effects of CQ when combined with it for malaria therapy. The study reveals that the production of autacoids in established infection renders autacoid inhibitors and an antagonist ineffective for radical cure in malarial mice; however, selective inhibition of local hormones implicated in the pathological manifestations of malaria infection by autacoid inhibitors and an antagonist may be a possible pathway to reduce the severity of infection and the associated tissue damage and to enhance the efficacy of available anti-malarials.

  11. Effects of Suvorexant, a Dual Orexin/Hypocretin Receptor Antagonist, on Impulsive Behavior Associated with Cocaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentile, Taylor A; Simmons, Steven J; Watson, Mia N; Connelly, Krista L; Brailoiu, Eugen; Zhang, Yanan; Muschamp, John W

    2017-07-25

    Hypothalamic hypocretin (orexin) peptides mediate arousal, attention, and reward processing. Fibers containing orexins project to brain structures that govern motivated behavior, including the ventral tegmental area (VTA). A number of psychiatric conditions, including attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and substance use disorders, are characterized by deficits in impulse control, however the relationship between orexin and impulsive behavior is incompletely characterized. The effects of systemic or centrally administered orexin receptor (OXR) antagonists on measures of impulsive-like behavior in rats were evaluated using the five-choice serial reaction time task (5-CSRTT) and delay discounting procedures. These paradigms were also used to test the capacity of OXR antagonists to attenuate acute cocaine-evoked impulsivity. Finally, immunohistochemistry and calcium imaging were used to assess potential cellular mechanisms by which OXR blockade may influence motor impulsivity. Suvorexant, a dual (OX1/2R) orexin receptor antagonist, reduced cocaine-evoked premature responses in 5-CSRTT when administered systemically or directly into VTA. Neither suvorexant nor OX1R- or OX2R-selective compounds (SB334867 or TCS-OX2-29, respectively) altered delay discounting. Finally, suvorexant did not alter Fos-immunoreactivity within tyrosine hydroxylase-immunolabeled neurons of VTA, but did attenuate cocaine- and orexin-induced increases in calcium transient amplitude within neurons of VTA. Results from the present studies suggest potential therapeutic utility of OXR antagonists in reducing psychostimulant-induced motor impulsivity. These findings also support the view that orexin transmission is closely involved in executive function in normal and pathological conditions.Neuropsychopharmacology advance online publication, 16 August 2017; doi:10.1038/npp.2017.158.

  12. Minor Bleeds Alert for Subsequent Major Bleeding in Patients Using Vitamin K Antagonists.

    OpenAIRE

    Veeger, Nic J.G.M.; Piersma-Wichers, Margriet; Meijer, Karina; Hillege, Hans L

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Vitamin K antagonists (VKA) have shown to be effective in primary and secondary prevention of thromboembolism, but the associated risk of bleeding is an important limitation. The majority of the bleeds are clinically mild. In this study, we assessed whether these minor bleeds are associated with major bleeding, when controlling for other important risk indicators, including the achieved quality of anticoagulation. For this, 5898 patients of a specialised anticoagulation cl...

  13. Apoptotic death of prostate cancer cells by a gonadotropin-releasing hormone-II antagonist.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumi Park

    Full Text Available Gonadotropin-releasing hormone-I (GnRH-I has attracted strong attention as a hormonal therapeutic tool, particularly for androgen-dependent prostate cancer patients. However, the androgen-independency of the cancer in advanced stages has spurred researchers to look for new medical treatments. In previous reports, we developed the GnRH-II antagonist Trp-1 to inhibit proliferation and stimulate the autophagic death of various prostate cancer cells, including androgen-independent cells. We further screened many GnRH-II antagonists to identify molecules with higher efficiency. Here, we investigated the effect of SN09-2 on the growth of PC3 prostate cancer cells. SN09-2 reduced the growth of prostate cancer cells but had no effect on cells derived from other tissues. Compared with Trp-1, SN09-2 conspicuously inhibited prostate cancer cell growth, even at low concentrations. SN09-2-induced PC3 cell growth inhibition was associated with decreased membrane potential in mitochondria where the antagonist was accumulated, and increased mitochondrial and cytosolic reactive oxygen species. SN09-2 induced lactate dehydrogenase release into the media and annexin V-staining on the PC3 cell surface, suggesting that the antagonist stimulated prostate cancer cell death by activating apoptotic signaling pathways. Furthermore, cytochrome c release from mitochondria to the cytosol and caspase-3 activation occurred in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. SN09-2 also inhibited the growth of PC3 cells xenotransplanted into nude mice. These results demonstrate that SN09-2 directly induces mitochondrial dysfunction and the consequent ROS generation, leading to not only growth inhibition but also apoptosis of prostate cancer cells.

  14. Random-start GnRH antagonist for emergency fertility preservation: a self-controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Checa, Miguel A; Brassesco, Mario; Sastre, Margalida; Gómez, Manuel; Herrero, Julio; Marque, Laura; Brassesco, Arturo; Espinós, Juan José

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the feasibility and safety of random-start controlled ovarian hyperstimulation (COH) for emergency fertility preservation, regardless of the phase of the menstrual cycle. A self-controlled pilot clinical trial (NCT01385332) was performed in an acute-care teaching hospital and in two private reproductive centers in Barcelona, Spain. Eleven egg donors participated in the study. Two random-start gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonist protocols were assessed in which ganirelix was initiated on either day 10 (protocol B) or on day 20 (protocol C) of the menstrual cycle and was continued until estradiol levels were below 60 pg/dL. These protocols were compared with a standard protocol (protocol A). The main outcome of interest was the number of metaphase 2 oocytes retrieved. Results from this study show that the number of mature oocytes retrieved was comparable across the different protocols (14.3±4.6 in the standard protocol versus 13.0±9.1 and 13.2±5.2 in protocols B and C, respectively; values expressed as mean ± standard deviation). The mean number of days needed for a GnRH antagonist to lower estradiol levels, as well as the ongoing pregnancy rates, were also similar when protocols B (stimulation in follicular phase) and C (stimulation on luteal phase) were compared with protocol A (standard stimulation). GnRH antagonists can be effectively used for random-start controlled ovarian hyperstimulation with an ovarian response similar to that of standard protocols, and the antagonists appear suitable for emergency fertility preservation in cancer patients. PMID:25709506

  15. III. Identification of novel CXCR3 chemokine receptor antagonists with a pyrazinyl-piperazinyl-piperidine scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seong Heon; Anilkumar, Gopinadhan N; Zawacki, Lisa Guise; Zeng, Qingbei; Yang, De-Yi; Shao, Yuefei; Dong, Guizhen; Xu, Xiaolian; Yu, Wensheng; Jiang, Yueheng; Jenh, Chung-Her; Hall, James W; Carroll, Carolyn Diianni; Hobbs, Doug W; Baldwin, John J; McGuinness, Brian F; Rosenblum, Stuart B; Kozlowski, Joseph A; Shankar, Bandarpalle B; Shih, Neng-Yang

    2011-12-01

    The SAR of a novel pyrazinyl-piperazinyl-piperidine scaffold with CXCR3 receptor antagonist activity was explored. Optimization of the DMPK profile and reduction of hERG inhibition is described. Compound 16e with single-digit CXCR3 affinity, good rat PK and hERG profiles has been identified as a lead for further study. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Activins and activin antagonists in the human ovary and ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reader, Karen L; Gold, Elspeth

    2015-11-05

    Activins are members of the transforming growth factor β superfamily that play an important role in controlling cell proliferation and differentiation in many organs including the ovary. It is essential that activin signalling be tightly regulated as imbalances can lead to uncontrolled cell proliferation and cancer. This review describes the expression and function of the activins and their known antagonists in both normal and cancerous human ovaries. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Early Determination of the Periodontal Domain by the Wnt-Antagonist Frzb/Sfrp3

    OpenAIRE

    Thimios A. Mitsiadis; Pierfrancesco Pagella; Claudio Cantù

    2017-01-01

    Odontogenesis results from the continuous and reciprocal interaction between cells of the oral epithelium and cranial neural crest-derived mesenchyme. The canonical Wnt signaling pathway plays a fundamental role in mediating these interactions from the earliest stages of tooth development. Here we analyze by in situ hybridization the expression patterns of the extracellular Wnt antagonist Frzb/Sfrp3. Although Frzb is expressed in dental mesenchymal cells from the earliest stages of odontogene...

  18. Development of screening assays to test novel integrin antagonists in allergic inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Spartà, Antonino Maria

    2009-01-01

    Aim of the research: to develop a prototype of homogeneous high-throughput screening (HTS) for identification of novel integrin antagonists for the treatment of ocular allergy and to better understand the mechanisms of action of integrin-mediated levocabastine antiallergic action. Results: This thesis provides evidence that adopting scintillation proximity assay (SPA) levocabastine (IC50=406 mM), but not the first-generation antihistamine chlorpheniramine, displaces [125I]fibronectin (F...

  19. Identification and mechanism of action of the acylguanidine MRT-83, a novel potent Smoothened antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roudaut, Hermine; Traiffort, Elisabeth; Gorojankina, Tatiana; Vincent, Ludwig; Faure, Helene; Schoenfelder, Angele; Mann, Andre; Manetti, Fabrizio; Solinas, Antonio; Taddei, Maurizio; Ruat, Martial

    2011-03-01

    There is a clear need to develop novel pharmacological tools to improve our understanding of Smoothened (Smo) function in normal and pathological states. Here, we report the discovery, the mechanism of action, and the in vivo activity of N-(2-methyl-5-(3-(3,4,5-trimethoxybenzoyl)guanidino)phenyl)biphenyl-4-carboxamide (MRT-83), a novel potent antagonist of Smo that belongs to the acylguanidine family of molecules. MRT-83 fits to a proposed pharmacophoric model for Smo antagonists with three hydrogen bond acceptor groups and three hydrophobic regions. MRT-83 blocks Hedgehog (Hh) signaling in various assays with an IC50 in the nanomolar range, showing greater potency than the reference Smo antagonist cyclopamine. MRT-83 inhibits Bodipy-cyclopamine binding to human and mouse Smo but does not modify Wnt signaling in human embryonic kidney 293 transiently transfected with a Tcf/Lef-dependent Firefly luciferase reporter together with a Renilla reniformis luciferase control reporter. MRT-83 abrogates the agonist-induced trafficking of endogenous mouse or human Smo to the primary cilium of C3H10T1/2 or NT2 cells that derive from a pluripotent testicular carcinoma. Stereotaxic injection into the lateral ventricle of adult mice of MRT-83 but not of a structurally related compound inactive at Smo abolished up-regulation of Patched transcription induced by Sonic Hedgehog in the neighboring subventricular zone. These data demonstrate that MRT-83 efficiently antagonizes Hh signaling in vivo. All together, these molecular, functional and biochemical studies provide evidence that MRT-83 interacts with Smo. Thus, this novel Smo antagonist will be useful for manipulating Hh signaling and may help develop new therapies against Hh-pathway related diseases.

  20. Cannabinoid antagonist SLV326 induces convulsive seizures and changes in the interictal EEG in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perescis, Martin F J; de Bruin, Natasja; Heijink, Liesbeth; Kruse, Chris; Vinogradova, Lyudmila; Lüttjohann, Annika; van Luijtelaar, Gilles; van Rijn, Clementina M

    2017-01-01

    Cannabinoid CB1 antagonists have been investigated for possible treatment of e.g. obesity-related disorders. However, clinical application was halted due to their symptoms of anxiety and depression. In addition to these adverse effects, we have shown earlier that chronic treatment with the CB1 antagonist rimonabant may induce EEG-confirmed convulsive seizures. In a regulatory repeat-dose toxicity study violent episodes of "muscle spasms" were observed in Wistar rats, daily dosed with the CB1 receptor antagonist SLV326 during 5 months. The aim of the present follow-up study was to investigate whether these violent movements were of an epileptic origin. In selected SLV326-treated and control animals, EEG and behavior were monitored for 24 hours. 25% of SLV326 treated animals showed 1 to 21 EEG-confirmed generalized convulsive seizures, whereas controls were seizure-free. The behavioral seizures were typical for a limbic origin. Moreover, interictal spikes were found in 38% of treated animals. The frequency spectrum of the interictal EEG of the treated rats showed a lower theta peak frequency, as well as lower gamma power compared to the controls. These frequency changes were state-dependent: they were only found during high locomotor activity. It is concluded that long term blockade of the endogenous cannabinoid system can provoke limbic seizures in otherwise healthy rats. Additionally, SLV326 alters the frequency spectrum of the EEG when rats are highly active, suggesting effects on complex behavior and cognition.

  1. Comparative analysis of microsatellites in five different antagonistic Trichoderma species for diversity assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Shalini; Kashyap, Prem Lal; Kumar, Sudheer; Srivastava, Alok Kumar; Ramteke, Pramod W

    2016-01-01

    Microsatellites provide an ideal molecular markers system to screen, characterize and evaluate genetic diversity of several fungal species. Currently, there is very limited information on the genetic diversity of antagonistic Trichoderma species as determined using a range of molecular markers. In this study, expressed and whole genome sequences available in public database were used to investigate the occurrence, relative abundance and relative density of SSRs in five different antagonistic Trichoderma species: Trichoderma atroviride, T. harzianum, T. reesei, T. virens and T. asperellum. Fifteen SSRs loci were used to evaluate genetic diversity of twenty isolates of Trichoderma spp. from different geographical regions of India. Results indicated that relative abundance and relative density of SSRs were higher in T. asperellum followed by T. reesei and T. atroviride. Tri-nucleotide repeats (80.2%) were invariably the most abundant in all species. The abundance and relative density of SSRs were not influenced by the genome sizes and GC content. Out of eighteen primer sets, only 15 primer pairs showed successful amplification in all the test species. A total of 24 alleles were detected and five loci were highly informative with polymorphism information content values greater than 0.40, these markers provide useful information on genetic diversity and population genetic structure, which, in turn, can exploit for establishing conservation strategy for antagonistic Trichoderma isolates.

  2. Identification of a New Morpholine Scaffold as a P2Y12 Receptor Antagonist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Ha Ahn

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The P2Y12 receptor is critical for platelet activation and is an attractive drug target for the prevention of atherothrombotic events. Despite the proven antithrombotic efficacy of P2Y12 inhibitors, these thienopyridine scaffolds are prodrugs that lack important features of the ideal antithrombotic agent. For this reason, ticagrelor—a new chemical class of P2Y12 receptor antagonist—was developed, but it can cause shortness of breath and various types of bleeding. Moreover, ticagrelor is a cytochrome P450 3A4 substrate/inhibitor and, therefore, caution should be exercised when it is used concomitantly with strong CYP3A4 inducers/inhibitors. There is a need for novel P2Y12 receptor antagonist scaffolds that are reversible and have high efficacy without associated side effects. Here, we describe a novel antagonist containing a morpholine moiety that was identified by screening libraries of commercially available compounds. The molecule, Compound E, acted on P2Y12, but not P2Y1 and P2Y13, and exhibited pharmacological characteristics that were distinct from those of ticagrelor, acting instead on P2Y12 via an allosteric mechanism. These results provide a basis for the development/optimization of a new class of P2Y12 antagonists.

  3. Ticagrelor: a P2Y12 antagonist for use in acute coronary syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijeyeratne, Yanushi Dullewe; Joshi, Rashi; Heptinstall, Stan

    2012-05-01

    Agents that inhibit platelet function are used routinely in the treatment and prevention of acute coronary syndromes. The main antiplatelet treatments used combine aspirin with one of the thienopyridine P2Y(12) antagonists, either clopidogrel or prasugrel. By blocking the synthesis of thromboxane A(2) in platelets and by blocking the effects of ADP, respectively, these agents reduce platelet activity, platelet aggregation and thrombus formation. Ticagrelor (marketed by AstraZeneca as Brilinta™ in the USA, and as Brilique(®) or Possia(®) in Europe) is a cyclopentyl-triazolo-pyrimidine, a new chemical class of P2Y(12) antagonist that is now approved for use in the wide spectrum of acute coronary syndromes. In this article we provide an overview of ticagrelor. We discuss the differences in mode of action compared with other P2Y(12) antagonists, examine its pharmacodynamic, pharmacokinetic and safety profile, and summarize the various clinical trials that have provided information on its efficacy in combination with aspirin. Ticagrelor appears to overcome some of the difficulties that have been encountered with other antiplatelet treatments, clopidogrel in particular.

  4. Dynamics of the Development of Amnesia Caused by Disruption of Memory Reconsolidation by Neurotransmitter Receptors Antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitin, V P; Solntseva, S V; Kozyrev, S A

    2016-03-01

    The dynamics of amnesia development under conditions of memory reconsolidation disruption by serotonin receptor antagonist methiothepin or NMDA glutamate receptor antagonist MK-801 was studied in snails trained in conventional food aversion. In 2 days after training, injection of methiothepin or MK-801 before reminder induced amnesia development. During repeated training in 3 days after amnesia induction, the skill was formed more rapidly than during the initial training. During repeated training in 10 days after administration of methiothepin and reminder, the dynamics of habit formation was similar to that during initial learning. At the same time, repeated training in 10 days after MK-801 administration and reminder did not result in long-term memory formation. Disruption of reconsolidation of conditioned food aversion memory by antagonists of serotonin or NMDA glutamate receptors led to the development of different types of amnesia that had similar strengthening gradient at the early stages, but differed by the possibility of memory formation during re-training at the late stage.

  5. Diversity and Antagonistic Activity of Actinomycete Strains From Myristica Swamp Soils Against Human Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varghese Rlnoy

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Under the present investigation Actinomycetes were isolated from the soils of Myristica swamps of southern Western Ghats and the antagonistic activity against different human bacterial pathogens was evaluated. Results of the present study revealed that Actinomycetes population in the soils of Myristica swamp was spatially and seasonally varied. Actinomycetes load was varied from 24×104 to 71×103, from 129×103 to 40×103 and from 31×104 to 84×103 in post monsoon, monsoon and pre monsoon respectively. A total of 23 Actinomycetes strains belonging to six genera were isolated from swamp soils. Identification of the isolates showed that most of the isolates belonged to the genus Streptomyces (11, followed by Nocardia (6, Micromonospora (3, Pseudonocardia (1, Streptosporangium (1, and Nocardiopsis (1. Antagonistic studies revealed that 91.3% of Actinomycete isolates were active against one or more tested pathogens, of that 56.52% exhibited activity against Gram negative and 86.95% showed activity against Gram positive bacteria. 39.13% isolates were active against all the bacterial pathogens selected and its inhibition zone diameter was also high. 69.5% of Actinomycetes were exhibited antibacterial activity against Listeria followed by Bacillus cereus (65.21%, Staphylococcus (60.86%, Vibrio cholera (52.17%, Salmonella (52.17% and E. coli (39.13%. The results indicate that the Myristica swamp soils of Southern Western Ghats might be a remarkable reserve of Actinomycetes with potential antagonistic activity.

  6. The activin A antagonist follistatin inhibits cystic fibrosis-like lung inflammation and pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Charles L; King, Susannah J; Mifsud, Nicole A; Hedger, Mark P; Phillips, David J; Mackay, Fabienne; de Kretser, David M; Wilson, John W; Rolland, Jennifer M; O'Hehir, Robyn E

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most common life-limiting genetically acquired respiratory disorder. Patients with CF have thick mucus obstructing the airways leading to recurrent infections, bronchiectasis and neutrophilic airway inflammation culminating in deteriorating lung function. Current management targets airway infection and mucus clearance, but despite recent advances in care, life expectancy is still only 40 years. We investigated whether activin A is elevated in CF lung disease and whether inhibiting activin A with its natural antagonist follistatin retards lung disease progression. We measured serum activin A levels, lung function and nutritional status in CF patients. We studied the effect of activin A on CF lung pathogenesis by treating newborn CF transgenic mice (β-ENaC) intranasally with the natural activin A antagonist follistatin. Activin A levels were elevated in the serum of adult CF patients, and correlated inversely with lung function and body mass index. Follistatin treatment of newborn β-ENaC mice, noted for respiratory pathology mimicking human CF, decreased the airway activin A levels and key features of CF lung disease including mucus hypersecretion, airway neutrophilia and levels of mediators that regulate inflammation and chemotaxis. Follistatin treatment also increased body weight and survival of β-ENaC mice, with no evidence of local or systemic toxicity. Our findings demonstrate that activin A levels are elevated in CF and provide proof-of-concept for the use of the activin A antagonist, follistatin, as a therapeutic in the long-term management of lung disease in CF patients. PMID:25753271

  7. Behavioral consequences of NMDA antagonist-induced neuroapoptosis in the infant mouse brain.

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    Carla M Yuede

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to NMDA glutamate antagonists during the brain growth spurt period causes widespread neuroapoptosis in the rodent brain. This period in rodents occurs during the first two weeks after birth, and corresponds to the third trimester of pregnancy and several years after birth in humans. The developing human brain may be exposed to NMDA antagonists through drug-abusing mothers or through anesthesia.We evaluated the long-term neurobehavioral effects of mice exposed to a single dose of the NMDA antagonist, phencyclidine (PCP, or saline, on postnatal day 2 (P2 or P7, or on both P2 and P7. PCP treatment on P2 + P7 caused more severe cognitive impairments than either single treatment. Histological examination of acute neuroapoptosis resulting from exposure to PCP indicated that the regional pattern of degeneration induced by PCP in P2 pups was different from that in P7 pups. The extent of damage when evaluated quantitatively on P7 was greater for pups previously treated on P2 compared to pups treated only on P7.These findings signify that PCP induces different patterns of neuroapoptosis depending on the developmental age at the time of exposure, and that exposure at two separate developmental ages causes more severe neuropathological and neurobehavioral consequences than a single treatment.

  8. Study of Positive and Negative Consequences of Using GnRH Antagonist in Intrauterine Insemination Cycles

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    Maryam Bagheri

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: To assess the usefulness of premature luteinization hormone (LH surge preventionin an intrauterine insemination (IUI cycle by GnRH antagonist administration.Materials and Methods: Sixty patients with unexplained or mild male infertility or minimalto mild endometriosis were enrolled in this prospective randomized controlled trial. There weretwenty patients in group A (with GnRH antagonist and 40 patients in group B (without GnRHantagonist.In all of the participants, clomiphene citrate and human menopausal gonadotropin (CC+HMG wereused for ovarian stimulation. When at least one follicle with ≥ 16 mm diameter was seen, LH surgewas checked by a urinary LH kit. In patients with negative results, human chorionic gonadotropinwas continued in both groups, but in group A 0.25 mg Ganirelix SQ was administered for two days,,then in both groups human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG was injected on the third day and IUIwas done 36-40 hours later. Ongoing pregnancy was the primary outcome.Results: Baseline characters and clinical parameters were similar in both groups with the exceptionof ≥14 mm follicles which were higher in group A (p value= 0.003. The pregnancy rate in bothgroups was not significantly different, although it was higher in group B (10% in group A and 15%in group B.Conclusion: At least in CC+HMG stimulated cycles for IUI, the occurrence of premature LHsurge could have a useful rule and GnRH antagonist administration could be an inappropriateintervention.

  9. Promotion of sleep by suvorexant-a novel dual orexin receptor antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winrow, Christopher J; Gotter, Anthony L; Cox, Christopher D; Doran, Scott M; Tannenbaum, Pamela L; Breslin, Michael J; Garson, Susan L; Fox, Steven V; Harrell, Charles M; Stevens, Joanne; Reiss, Duane R; Cui, Donghui; Coleman, Paul J; Renger, John J

    2011-03-01

    Orexins/hypocretins are key neuropeptides responsible for regulating central arousal and reward circuits. Two receptors respond to orexin signaling, orexin 1 receptor (OX(1)R) and orexin 2 receptor (OX(2)R) with partially overlapping nervous system distributions. Genetic studies suggest orexin receptor antagonists could be therapeutic for insomnia and other disorders with disruptions of sleep and wake. Suvorexant (MK-4305) is a potent, selective, and orally bioavailable antagonist of OX(1)R and OX(2)R currently under clinical investigation as a novel therapy for insomnia. Examination of Suvorexant in radioligand binding assays using tissue from transgenic rats expressing the human OX(2)R found nearly full receptor occupancy (>90%) at plasma exposures of 1.1 μM. Dosed orally Suvorexant significantly and dose-dependently reduced locomotor activity and promoted sleep in rats (10, 30, and 100 mg/kg), dogs (1 and 3 mg/kg), and rhesus monkeys (10 mg/kg). Consistent cross-species sleep/wake architecture changes produced by Suvorexant highlight a unique opportunity to develop dual orexin antagonists as a novel therapy for insomnia.

  10. Enantiopure Indolo[2,3-a]quinolizidines: Synthesis and Evaluation as NMDA Receptor Antagonists

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    Nuno A. L. Pereira

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Enantiopure tryptophanol is easily obtained from the reduction of its parent natural amino acid trypthophan (available from the chiral pool, and can be used as chiral auxiliary/inductor to control the stereochemical course of a diastereoselective reaction. Furthermore, enantiopure tryptophanol is useful for the syntheses of natural products or biological active molecules containing the aminoalcohol functionality. In this communication, we report the development of a small library of indolo[2,3-a]quinolizidines and evaluation of their activity as N-Methyl d-Aspartate (NMDA receptor antagonists. The indolo[2,3-a]quinolizidine scaffold was obtained using the following key steps: (i a stereoselective cyclocondensation of (S- or (R-tryptophanol with appropriate racemic δ-oxoesters; (ii a stereocontrolled cyclization on the indole nucleus. The synthesized enantiopure indolo[2,3-a]quinolizidines were evaluated as NMDA receptor antagonists and one compound was identified to be 2.9-fold more potent as NMDA receptor blocker than amantadine (used in the clinic for Parkinson’s disease. This compound represents a hit compound for the development of novel NMDA receptor antagonists with potential applications in neurodegenerative disorders associated with overactivation of NMDA receptors.

  11. Personalized medicine: theranostics (therapeutics diagnostics) essential for rational use of tumor necrosis factor-alpha antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendtzen, Klaus

    2013-04-01

    With the discovery of the central pathogenic role of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha in many immunoinflammatory diseases, specific inhibition of this pleiotropic cytokine has revolutionized the treatment of patients with several non-infectious inflammatory disorders. As a result, genetically engineered anti-TNF-alpha antibody constructs now constitute one of the heaviest medicinal expenditures in many countries. All currently used TNF antagonists may dramatically lower disease activity and, in some patients, induce remission. Unfortunately, however, not all patients respond favorably, and safety can be severely impaired by immunogenicity, i.e., the ability of a drug to induce anti-drug antibodies (ADA). Assessment of ADA is therefore an important component of the evaluation of drug safety in both pre-clinical and clinical studies and in the process of developing less immunogenic and safer biopharmaceuticals. Therapeutics diagnostics, also called theranostics, i.e., monitoring functional drug levels and neutralizing ADA in the circulation, is central to more effective use of biopharmaceuticals. Hence, testing-based strategies rather than empirical dose-escalation may provide more cost-effective use of TNF antagonists as this allows therapies tailored according to individual requirements rather than the current universal approach to diagnosis. The objective of the present review is to discuss the reasons for recommending theranostics to implement an individualized use of TNF antagonists and to highlight some of the methodological obstacles that have obscured cost-effective ways of using these therapies.

  12. Investigation of CGRP receptors and peptide pharmacology in human coronary arteries. Characterization with a nonpeptide antagonist

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasbak, Philip; Saetrum Opgaard, Ole; Eskesen, Karen

    2003-01-01

    .8, and 6.3 M, respectively. Preincubation with alphaCGRP(8-37) (10(-7) -10(-5) M) and a novel nonpeptide CGRP antagonist "Compound 1" (WO98/11128) (10(-7)-10(-5) M) caused a dose-dependent rightward shift of the concentration-response curves for alphaCGRP with pA(2) values of 7.0 and 7.1, respectively....... Preincubation with alphaCGRP(8-37) (10(-6) M) and Compound 1 (10(-6) M) caused significant rightward shift of the concentration-response curves for AM and amylin as well with pK B values between 6.6 and 7.5. Preincubation with AM(22-52) had no antagonistic effect on the AM and amylin response, neither did....... Compound 1 acted as a nonpeptide antagonist at the CGRP1 receptor and could thus become a tool for the study of CGRP-mediated functional responses in human tissue....

  13. Extended N-Arylsulfonylindoles as 5-HT6 Receptor Antagonists: Design, Synthesis & Biological Evaluation

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    Gonzalo Vera

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Based on a known pharmacophore model for 5-HT6 receptor antagonists, a series of novel extended derivatives of the N-arylsulfonyindole scaffold were designed and identified as a new class of 5-HT6 receptor modulators. Eight of the compounds exhibited moderate to high binding affinities and displayed antagonist profile in 5-HT6 receptor functional assays. Compounds 2-(4-(2-methoxyphenylpiperazin-1-yl-1-(1-tosyl-1H-indol-3-ylethanol (4b, 1-(1-(4-iodophenylsulfonyl-1H-indol-3-yl-2-(4-(2-methoxyphenylpiperazin-1-ylethanol (4g and 2-(4-(2-methoxyphenylpiperazin-1-yl-1-(1-(naphthalen-1-ylsulfonyl-1H-indol-3-ylethanol (4j showed the best binding affinity (4b pKi = 7.87; 4g pKi = 7.73; 4j pKi = 7.83. Additionally, compound 4j was identified as a highly potent antagonist (IC50 = 32 nM in calcium mobilisation functional assay.

  14. Plasma DNA methylation of Wnt antagonists predicts recurrence of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ji-Bin; Qiang, Fu-Lin; Dong, Jing; Cai, Jin; Zhou, Shu-Hui; Shi, Min-Xin; Chen, Ke-Ping; Hu, Zhi-Bin

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To detect the effects of plasma DNA methylation of Wnt antagonists/inhibitors on recurrence of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). METHODS: We used methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction to detect hypermethylation of the promoter of four Wnt antagonists/inhibitors (SFRP-1, WIF-1, DKK-3 and RUNX3) using DNA from the plasma of ESCC patients (n = 81) and analyzed the association between promoter hypermethylation of Wnt pathway modulator genes and the two-year recurrence of ESCC. RESULTS: Hypermethylation of SFRP-1, DKK-3 and RUNX-3 was significantly associated with an increased risk of ESCC recurrence (P = 0.001, 0.003 and 0.001 for SFRP-1, DKK-3 and RUNX3, respectively). Patients carrying two to three methylated genes had a significantly elevated risk of recurrence compared with those not carrying methylated genes (odds ratio = 15.69, 95% confidential interval: 2.97-83). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was 77.1 for ESCC recurrence prediction (sensitivity = 66.67 and specificity = 83.3). When combining methylated genes and the clinical stage, the AUC was 83.69, with a sensitivity of 76.19 and a specificity of 83.3. CONCLUSION: The status of promoter hypermethylation of Wnt antagonists/inhibitors in plasma may serve as a non-invasive prognostic biomarker for ESCC. PMID:22171134

  15. Antagonistic activity Trichoderma harzianum Rifai on the causal agent of rice blast (Pyricularia grisea Sacc.

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    Ernesto Juniors Pérez Torres

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available With the objective to evaluate the antagonistic activity of T. harzianum (strain A-34 on the causal agent of rice blast (P. grisea, were developed several in vitro experiments. It was evaluated the biocontrol mechanisms such as competition through mounted the percent inhibition of radial growth of hyphae of P. grisea from 24 to 240 hours and the antagonistic capacity. In addition, was evaluated micoparasitism to inclination the observation of events Microscopy winding, penetration, vacuolization, lysis, and antibiosis by observing 24 hours a confrontation between the hyphae of the phytopathogenic fungus and biological control agent. It was obtained at 120 hours 100 % inhibition of micelial growth of causal agent, what corresponded with the degree 1 of antagonistic capacity (scale and is recorded as a hyperparasitic action on P. grisea. It was evidenced an antibiotic effect of metabolites produced by T. harzianum (strain A-34 to 24 hours of confrontation, where there was time interaction between the hyphae of microorganisms with 14,3 % inhibition, also was evidence the micoparasitism events by penetration, vacuolization and lysis in the cells of phytopathogenic fungus. These results demonstrated the ability of T. harzianum (strain A-34 on causal agent of rice blast (P. grisea.

  16. Tetrazolyl isoxazole amino acids as ionotropic glutamate receptor antagonists: synthesis, modelling and molecular pharmacology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frølund, Bente; Greenwood, Jeremy R; Holm, Mai Marie

    2005-01-01

    Two 3-(5-tetrazolylmethoxy) analogues, 1a and 1b, of (RS)-2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolyl)propionic acid (AMPA), a selective AMPA receptor agonist, and (RS)-2-amino-3-(5-tert-butyl-3-hydroxy-4-isoxazolyl)propionic acid (ATPA), a GluR5-preferring agonist, were synthesized. Compounds 1a....... Both analogues proved to be antagonists at all AMPA receptor subtypes, showing potencies (Kb=38-161 microM) similar to that of the AMPA receptor antagonist (RS)-2-amino-3-[3-(carboxymethoxy)-5-methyl-4-isoxazolyl]propionic acid (AMOA) (Kb=43-76 microM). Furthermore, the AMOA analogue, 1a, blocked two...... kainic acid receptor subtypes (GluR5 and GluR6/KA2), showing sevenfold preference for GluR6/KA2 (Kb=19 microM). Unlike the iGluR antagonist (S)-2-amino-3-[5-tert-butyl-3-(phosphonomethoxy)-4-isoxazolyl]propionic acid [(S)-ATPO], the corresponding tetrazolyl analogue, 1b, lacks kainic acid receptor...

  17. Antagonistic activity of Lactobacillus acidophilus LA10 against Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis SE86 in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane Scapin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis is one of the main pathogens responsible for foodborne illness in Brazil. Probiotic bacteria can play a role in defense and recovery from enteropathogenic -infections. In this study, the ability of Lactobacillus acidophilus LA10 to colonise and exert anta-gonistic effects in the gastrointestinal tract was tested before and during experimental infection in conventional mice contaminated with S. Enteritidis (SE86. A dose of 0.1 mL containing 10(8 viable cells of SE86 and L. acidophilus LA10 was orally administered by gavage to mice. The experiment was divided into groups. As a negative control, Group 1 was administered only sterile saline solution. As a positive control, Group 2 was administered only SE86. Group 3 was first administered SE86, and after 10 days, treated with L. acidophilus LA10. Group 4 was first administered L. acidophilus LA10,and after 10 days, challenged with SE86.The results demonstrated that a significant number of SE86 cells were able to colonize the gastrointestinal tract of mice, specifically in the colon and ileum. L. acidophilus LA10 demonstrated an antagonistic effect against SE86, with better results observed for Group 3 over Group 4. Thus, L. acidophilus LA10 shows potential antagonistic effects against S. Enteritidis SE86, especially if administered after infection.

  18. Biological Control of Patulin by Antagonistic Yeast: A case study and possible model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahunu, Gustav Komla; Zhang, Hongyin; Yang, Qiya; Li, Chaolan; Zheng, Xiangfeng

    2016-08-01

    The occurrence of patulin in fresh apples and apple products is a great burden from health, safety and economic perspectives. Attempts to prevent patulin accumulation in fruits might lead to the excessive use of fungicides. Therefore, guaranteeing the safety of apple foods is crucial for the international apple industry. Recently, literature revealed that application of antagonistic yeasts and other BCAs have been able to disrupt the process of fungal infection and patulin production in apples. Although, over the years the effect of interaction between BCAs and fungi on patulin production has been reported, the exact mechanism(s) of their action remain unclear. Here, the review focused on toxicology and occurrence of PAT; research advances made over the past few years on the interaction between antagonistic yeast, fruits and patulin-producing fungi; the prevalence of patulin in apple fruits and products and the implications of synthetic-fungicide applications. In addition, attention was focused on the mechanism(s) and the enhancement of the biocontrol efficacy of antagonistic for patulin control.

  19. AM-37 and ST-36 Are Small Molecule Bombesin Receptor Antagonists

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    Terry W. Moody

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available While peptide antagonists for the gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (BB2R, neuromedin B receptor (BB1R, and bombesin (BB receptor subtype-3 (BRS-3 exist, there is a need to develop non-peptide small molecule inhibitors for all three BBR. The BB agonist (BA1 binds with high affinity to the BB1R, BB2R, and BRS-3. In this communication, small molecule BBR antagonists were evaluated using human lung cancer cells. AM-37 and ST-36 inhibited binding to human BB1R, BB2R, and BRS-3 with similar affinity (Ki = 1.4–10.8 µM. AM-13 and AM-14 were approximately an order of magnitude less potent than AM-37 and ST-36. The ability of BA1 to elevate cytosolic Ca2+ in human lung cancer cells transfected with BB1R, BB2R, and BRS-3 was antagonized by AM-37 and ST-36. BA1 increased tyrosine phosphorylation of the EGFR and ERK in lung cancer cells, which was blocked by AM-37 and ST-36. AM-37 and ST-36 reduced the growth of lung cancer cells that have BBR. The results indicate that AM-37 and ST-36 function as small molecule BB receptor antagonists.

  20. Stress tolerance and biocontrol performance of the yeast antagonist, Candida diversa, change with morphology transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guangkun; Chi, Mengshan; Chen, Huizhen; Sui, Yuan; Li, Yan; Liu, Yongsheng; Zhang, Xiaojing; Sun, Zhiqiang; Liu, Guoqing; Wang, Qi; Liu, Jia

    2016-02-01

    As an eco-friendly management method, biological control of postharvest diseases, utilizing antagonistic yeasts, is a research topic receiving considerable attention. Detailed knowledge on the biology of yeast antagonists is crucial when considering their potential application and development as biocontrol products. Changes in the growth form, such as single-cell to pseudohyphae, have been associated with the mode of action in postharvest biocontrol yeasts. In this study, the antagonistic yeast, Candida diversa, reversibly shifted from a single-cell morphology on yeast peptone dextrose (YPD) medium with 2 % agar to a pseudohyphal morphology on YPD with 0.3 % agar. The tolerance of the pseudohyphal form to heat and oxidative stresses, as well as the biocontrol efficacy against Botrytis cinerea on apple and kiwifruit stored at 25 and 4 °C, was significantly higher as compared to the single-cell form. This study provides new information on the ability of C. diversa to change its morphology and the impact of the morphology shift on stress tolerance and biocontrol performance.