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Sample records for eichelmann agu laisk

  1. AGU Committees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Administrative Committees are responsible for those functions required for the overall performance or well-being of AGU as an organization. These committees are Audit and Legal Affairs, Budget and Finance*, Development, Nominations*, Planning, Statutes and Bylaws*, Tellers.Operating Committees are responsible for the policy direction and operational oversight of AGU's primary programs. The Operating Committees are Education and Human Resources, Fellows*, Information Technology, International Participation*, Meetings, Public Affairs, Public Information, Publications*.

  2. Enesetapp - rääkida või vaikida? / Gerda Kordemets, Mart Laisk ja Merike Sisask ; intervjueerinud Tiina Jõgeda

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kordemets, Gerda, 1960-

    2010-01-01

    Kas noorte enesetappudest rääkimine toob matkijaid või on teemast rääkimine vajalik? Suitsiiditeemaga kokku puutunud Mart Laisk, Eesti Televisiooni uue sarja "Klass: elu pärast" üks režissööre Gerda Kordemets ja suitsidoloog Merike Sisask arutlevad

  3. Influencing the future of AGU

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPhaden, Michael; Finn, Carol; McEntee, Chris

    2012-01-01

    Steve Jobs, visionary cofounder of Apple, Inc., once said, “Everyone here has the sense that right now is one of those moments when we are influencing the future.” This statement aptly describes AGU at this time as the Board of Directors and the Council continue to influence the future in exciting ways by advancing our strategic plan (http://www.agu.org/about/mission.shtml). Both governing bodies held meetings in San Francisco immediately preceding the 2011 AGU Fall Meeting. The agendas for both meetings, along with the key outcomes, are posted on AGU's Web site (http://www.agu.org/about/governance/).

  4. Why publish with AGU?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graedel, T. E.

    The most visible activity of the American Geophysical Union is its publication of scientific journals. There are eight of these: Journal of Geophysical Research—Space Physics (JGR I), Journal of Geophysical Research—Solid Earth (JGR II), Journal of Geophysical Research—Oceans and Atmospheres (JGR III), Radio Science (RS), Water Resources Research (WRR), Geophysical Research Letters (GRL), Reviews of Geophysics and Space Physics (RGSP), and the newest, Tectonics.AGU's journals have established solid reputations for scientific excellence over the years. Reputation is not sufficient to sustain a high quality journal, however, since other factors enter into an author's decision on where to publish his or her work. In this article the characteristics of AGU's journals are compared with those of its competitors, with the aim of furnishing guidance to prospective authors and a better understanding of the value of the products to purchasers.

  5. AGU hydrology publication outlets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeze, R. Allan

    In recent months I have been approached on several occasions by members of the hydrology community who asked me which of the various AGU journals and publishing outlets would be most suitable for a particular paper or article that they have prepared.Water Resources Research (WRR) is the primary AGU outlet for research papers in hydrology. It is an interdisciplinary journal that integrates research in the social and natural sciences of water. The editors of WRR invite original contributions in the physical, chemical and biological sciences and also in the social and policy sciences, including economics, systems analysis, sociology, and law. The editor for the physical sciences side of the journal is Donald R. Nielson, LAWR Veihmeyer Hall, University of California Davis, Davis, CA 95616. The editor for the policy sciences side of the journal is Ronald G. Cummings, Department of Economics, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131

  6. Inaugural AGU Science Policy Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhlenbrock, Kristan

    2012-01-01

    AGU will present its inaugural Science Policy Conference, 30 April to 3 May 2012, at the Ronald Reagan Building and International Trade Center, located in downtown Washington, D. C. This conference will bring together leading scientists, policy makers, industry professionals, press, and other stakeholders to discuss natural hazards, natural resources, oceans, and Arctic science and the role these sciences play in serving communities. To bridge the science and policy fields, AGU plans to host this conference every 2 years and focus on the applications of Earth and space sciences to serve local and national communities. "Our nation faces a myriad of challenges such as the sustainability of our natural resources, current and future energy needs, and the ability to mitigate and adapt to natural and manmade hazards," said Michael McPhaden, president of AGU. "It is essential that policies to address these challenges be built on a solid foundation of credible scientific knowledge."

  7. Georneys joins AGU's blog network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viñas, Maria-José

    2011-07-01

    A blog on geological musings, wanderings, and adventures, called Georneys, has joined AGU's network of Earth and space science blogs. With the addition of Georneys, on 11 July, the AGU Blogosphere (http://blogs.agu.org), as the network is known, has grown to showcase eight independent blogs since its launch last fall. “One reason I write this blog is to maintain my sanity as I finish up my Ph.D. In the midst of much stress, long days in lab, and long nights writing thesis chapters, I write to remind myself of why I love geology,” says Georneys blogger Evelyn Mervine. “I also write to document some of my geological adventures and to share my love of geology with others.”

  8. AGU honored for Antarctic book

    Science.gov (United States)

    AGU has won an honorable mention award at the Fifteenth Annual Awards Program for Excellence in Professional and Scholarly Publishing sponsored by the Association of American Publishers for the book Volcanoes of the Antarctic Plate and Southern Oceans. The book is part of AGU's Antarctic Research Series, an outgrowth of research done during the International Geophysical Year that was begun in 1963 with a grant from the National Science Foundation. The award was presented at the AAP Annual Awards Dinner on February 6 at the Ritz-Carlton Hotel in Washington, D.C. The award consists of a medallion and a plate on which the names of the publisher, title, and authors are engraved.

  9. AGU Student and Early Career Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, A. M.; Tamalavage, A.; Crumsey, J.; Klima, K.; Lechner, H. N.; LLera, K.; Oaida, C.; Okoro, M. H.; Riker, J.; van Emmerik, T. H. M.; Enderlein, C.

    2017-12-01

    The American Geophysical Union (AGU) is the largest single organization dedicated to the advancement of geophysics in order to promote discovery in Earth and space science for the benefit of humanity. AGU unites scientists across disciplines by promoting collaborative advances in Earth, atmospheric, oceanic, hydrologic, space, and planetary sciences. One critical strand of AGU is the volunteer leaders who work together with AGU staff to ensure that the voice of the AGU membership is heard in all forms of decision making within the organization. Volunteer leaders include the president and president elect of individual Section and Focus groups, and importantly Student and Early Career (S/EC) representatives from across the AGU landscape. Here, we will describe the roles of past and current AGU S/EC leaders and how these roles have evolved from the onset of student and early career scientist representation on the AGU Council. We will also discuss current plans for solidifying the relationship between S/EC leaders and other S/EC volunteers within AGU (e.g. those who sit on the executive committees of Section or Focus groups). We will describe the process for becoming an AGU S/EC leader and the roles that current S/EC leaders fulfill on the AGU Council, the Board, the Council Leadership Team, and on various committees that enable decision making and progress within AGU (e.g. the Governance Committee, the Centennial Committee, and the Ethics Committee). Including S/EC volunteers within AGU leadership ensures that the organization indeed progresses forward to achieve the vision of AGU: to galvanize a community of Earth and space scientists that collaboratively advances and communicates science and its power to ensure a sustainable future.

  10. AGU Panel meets on career topics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollister, Charles

    Graduate students and their career opportunities in ocean and earth sciences were the focus of the Education and Human Resources (E & HR) Committee meeting held at the 1982 AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco. A standing committee of AGU, the E & HR committee is responsible for matters concerning education in earth, ocean, and planetary sciences from precollege through graduate programs, including career guidance, academic preparation, student recruitment, and manpower supply and demand.At the meeting a draft of the AGU-sponsored Careers in Oceanography booklet by committee chairman C. Hollister was thoroughly discussed and a new draft will emerge soon for final approval. The booklet is designed to complement the Careers in Geophysics booklet recently published by AGU; the booklets contain information about planning a career, job opportunities, educational requirements, and a synopsis of where the prospective student might apply.

  11. Notification of upcoming AGU Council meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Billy

    2012-10-01

    The AGU Council will meet on Sunday, 2 December 2012, at the InterContinental Hotel in San Francisco, Calif. The meeting, which is open to all AGU members, will include discussions of AGU's new Grand Challenge Project (a project that will be introduced to members at the 2012 Fall Meeting), the proposed AGU scientific ethics policy, publishing strategies, future plans for honors and recognition, and leadership transition as new members join the Council. This year the Council experimented with a new approach to conducting business. By holding virtual meetings throughout the year, Council members have been able to act in a more timely manner and provide input on important membership and science issues on the Board of Directors' agenda. The Council Leadership Team—an elected subset of the Council—also experimented with a new approach, meeting every month to keep moving projects forward. This approach has increased communication and improved effectiveness in Council decision making.

  12. Newly established AGU awards and lecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paredes, Beth; Kumar, Mohi

    2012-05-01

    The Sulzman Award for Excellence in Education and Mentoring (Biogeosciences section) recognizes AGU members who have sustained an active research career in a field related to biogeosciences while excelling as teachers and serving as role models for the next generation of female scientists. This new award acknowledges the importance of female mentors in enhancing gender balance in physical science career paths. The award is being endowed to honor Elizabeth Sulzman, an isotope biogeochemist and soil scientist, whose enthusiasm for teaching awed many undergraduates at Oregon State University. Current plans are to present the first Sulzman award at the 2013 Fall Meeting. Applicants must be women who are within 15 years of receiving their Ph.D., and nomination packages should include a cover letter, resumé, and three letters of recommendation. As they become available, more details will be posted on the Biogeosciences section Web site (http://www.agu.org/sections/biogeo/). The award will provide up to $1000 to one successful nominee each year, although the exact monetary amount is yet to be determined. AGU is currently accepting donations to endow this award; contact Victoria Thompson (vthompson@agu.org) to get involved.

  13. Märt Agu käib isa Mait Agu jälgedes / Heili Sibrits

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Sibrits, Heili, 1977-

    2001-01-01

    Koreograafi ja tantsupedagoogi Mait Agu poeg Märt Agu on Eesti Tantsuagentuuri tantsija ja Pedagoogilise Instituudi tantsujuhtimise viimase kursuse üliõpilane, kes esineb revüüteatris "Bel-⁹tage"

  14. Major Changes in AGU Publication Fees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Bill

    2010-12-01

    Effective with any manuscript submitted after 31 December 2010, AGU is eliminating color charges in all formats. At the same time that we eliminate color charges, we are simplifying publication fees. Articles published in Journal of Geophysical Research; Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems; and Radio Science will each have a flat fee of $1000, and Geophysical Research Letters (GRL) articles will each have a flat fee of $500. These prices represent a small drop from the average cost currently paid by authors. We will retain the excess page charges for full articles longer than 13 pages (including Water Resources Research) and 4 pages for letters, comments, and replies. This simplification means we can streamline the “calculator” authors must use when submitting manuscripts to AGU.

  15. AGU Public Affairs: How to Get Involved in Science Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landau, E. A.; Hankin, E. R.; Uhlenbrock, K. M.

    2012-12-01

    AGU Public Affairs offers many ways for its members to get involved in science policy at different levels of participation, whether you would love to spend a year working as a resident science expert in a congressional office in Washington, D.C., or would rather simply receive email alerts about Earth and space science policy news. How you can get involved: Sign up for AGU Science Policy Alerts to receive the most relevant Earth and space science policy information delivered to your email inbox. Participate in one of AGU's Congressional Visits Days to speak with your legislators about important science issues. Attend the next AGU Science Policy Conference in spring 2013. Participate in events happening on Capitol Hill, and watch video of past events. Learn about AGU Embassy Lectures, where countries come together to discuss important Earth and space science topics. Learn how you can comment on AGU Position Statements. Apply to be an AGU Congressional Science Fellow, where you can work in a congressional office for one year and serve as a resident science expert, or to be an AGU Public Affairs Intern, where you can work in the field of science policy for three months. The AGU Public Affairs Team will highlight ways members can be involved as well as provide information on how the team is working to shape policy and inform society about the excitement of AGU science.

  16. The AGU Data Management Maturity Model Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, J. J.

    2015-12-01

    In September 2014, the AGU Board of Directors approved two initiatives to help the Earth and space sciences community address the growing challenges accompanying the increasing size and complexity of data. These initiatives are: 1) Data Science Credentialing: development of a continuing education and professional certification program to help scientists in their careers and to meet growing responsibilities and requirements around data science; and 2) Data Management Maturity (DMM) Model: development and implementation of a data management maturity model to assess process maturity against best practices, and to identify opportunities in organizational data management processes. Each of these has been organized within AGU as an Editorial Board and both Boards have held kick off meetings. The DMM model Editorial Board will recommend strategies for adapting and deploying a DMM model to the Earth and space sciences create guidance documents to assist in its implementation, and provide input on a pilot appraisal process. This presentation will provide an overview of progress to date in the DMM model Editorial Board and plans for work to be done over the upcoming year.

  17. New software system to improve AGU membership management

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEntee, Chris

    2012-06-01

    Almost 2 years ago, AGU began investigating how it could more efficiently manage member and customer records as well as support processes that currently run on multiple systems. I am pleased to announce that on 25 June, as the result of intense efforts, AGU will migrate to a new database software system that will house the majority of AGU operations. AGU staff will have more tools at their disposal to assist members, and members will have more intuitive and user-friendly options when using the online interface to update their profiles or make purchases. I am particularly excited about this major improvement to our infrastructure because it better positions AGU to achieve goals in its strategic plan.

  18. AGU's Updated Scientific Integrity and Professional Ethics Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPhaden, M. J.

    2017-12-01

    AGU'S mission is to promote discovery in Earth and space science for the benefit of humanity. This mission can only be accomplished if all those engaged in the scientific enterprise uphold the highest standards of scientific integrity and professional ethics. AGU's Scientific Integrity and Professional Ethics Policy provides a set of principles and guidelines for AGU members, staff, volunteers, contractors, and non-members participating in AGU sponsored programs and activities. The policy has recently been updated to include a new code of conduct that broadens the definition of scientific misconduct to include discrimination, harassment, and bullying. This presentation provides the context for what motivated the updated policy, an outline of the policy itself, and a discussion of how it is being communicated and applied.

  19. Exploration Station Brings AGU Science to Children and Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Paul

    2008-08-01

    More than 20 families from the Fort Lauderdale, Fla., area attended AGU's pilot family science event, ``Exploration Station,'' held on 26 May as part of the 2008 Joint Assembly. During the event-which was organized by AGU's education staff, the Association for Astronomy Education, and the Solar Physics Division of the American Astronomical Association-children and parents had the opportunity to discuss science with researchers and to get involved with many hands-on activities.

  20. Märt Agu: "Isa vari käib mul kogu aeg kannul" / Märt Agu ; interv. Aigi Viira

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Agu, Märt

    2006-01-01

    1. okt. tähistas oma 30-aastast sünnipäeva ja oma ellukutsuja Mait Agu 55-sünniaastapäeva Tallinna Ülikooli koreograafiaosakond. Sel puhul esitati Estonias Mait Agu tantsulavastus "Kodalased ja kaasaegsed", mille seadis uuesti lavale Märt Agu oma isa loodud koreograafia põhjal

  1. Entering a New ERA: Education Resources and AGU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karsten, J. L.; Johnson, R. M.

    2001-12-01

    Professional societies play a unique role in the on-going battle to improve public education in the Earth and space sciences. With guidance from its Committee on Education and Human Resources (CEHR), AGU has traditionally sponsored strong programs that provide mechanisms for linking its research membership with the formal/informal science education communities. Among the most successful of these are tutorials for K-12 teachers taught by AGU members during national meetings (e.g., GIFT - Geophysical Information For Teachers) and internships that allow teachers to experience geophysical science research first-hand (e.g., STaRS - Science Teacher and Research Scientist). AGU also co-sponsors major symposia to discuss and develop strategies for Earth science education reform (e.g., the NSF-sponsored Shaping the Future workshop) and provides an annual forum for the Heads and Chairs of undergraduate geoscience departments to discuss common problems and share solutions. In the fall of 2001, AGU expects to unveil a major new education and outreach website that will provide enhanced opportunities for communicating to students, teachers and the public about AGU members' research and new directions in geophysical science education. The most important contribution that AGU makes, however, is to validate and prominently endorse the education and outreach efforts of its members, both by sponsoring well-attended, education-related special sessions at AGU national meetings and by annually honoring individuals or groups with the Excellence in Geoscience Education award. Recent staff changes at AGU headquarters have brought new opportunities to expand upon these successful existing programs and move in other directions that capitalize on the strengths of the organization. Among new initiatives being considered are programs that partner education efforts with those being developed as part of several large research programs, curriculum modules that will promote teaching earth sciences

  2. Lanzerotti to Head New AGU Journal on Space Weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lifland, Jonathan

    Louis J. Lanzerotti has been named editor of a new AGU online publication devoted to the emerging field of near-Earth space conditions and their effects on technical systems. Space Weather: The International Journal of Research and Applications, will be the first journal dedicated solely to the subject, and will include peer-reviewed research, as well as news, features, and opinion articles. A quarterly magazine digest will also be published from the online edition and distributed free of charge to space weather professionals. Lanzerotti, a longtime AGU member who was elected an AGU Fellow in 1985, is currently a consulting physicist at Lucent Technologies Bell Laboratories, and a distinguished research professor at the New Jersey Institute of Technology. He also serves on the governing board of the American Institute of Physics. He is author or co-author of more than 500 publications, including many related to space weather and its effects on communications.

  3. Common interests bind AGU and geophysical groups around the globe

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEntee, Christine

    2012-02-01

    In continuation of our work to strengthen alliances with key organizations in the Earth and space science community, AGU president Michael McPhaden, president-elect Carol Finn, and I held a series of meetings with leaders from other science societies during the 2011 Fall Meeting. Over the course of 2 days we met with leaders from the Geophysical Society of America, European Geosciences Union, Japan Geosciences Union, Ethiopian Geophysical Union, Asia Oceania Geosciences Society, Chinese Geophysical Society, and Asociación Latinoamericana de Geofísica Espacial. This gave us a valued opportunity to discuss the common interests and challenges we all face and to learn from each other's experience. The meetings allowed AGU to strengthen existing cooperative agreements and reach new levels of understanding between us and other societies. Additionally, we met with representatives from the Korean Ocean Research and Development Institute to discuss their intention to establish a geophysical union modeled after AGU.

  4. Science policy events at the 2012 AGU Fall Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hankin, Erik

    2012-10-01

    Are you interested in the intersection of science and policy, looking to make an impact on Capitol Hill, or concerned about the increasing number of attacks against scientists and their academic freedom? AGU Public Affairs offers many events at the 2012 Fall Meeting to assist member involvement in political processes and inform scientists of their rights and options should their research come under legal fire. Learn how you can share your science with policy makers to help inform policy at two luncheon events at the Fall Meeting. If you have ever considered working as a science expert for a member of Congress or reporting science in a mass media outlet, then you should attend the first luncheon, How to be a Congressional Science Fellow or Mass Media Fellow. The event will feature current AGU Congressional Science Fellows detailing their experiences working in Congress as well as past AGU Mass Media Fellows sharing their stories of reporting for a news organization. The luncheon will be held on Tuesday, 4 December, from 12:30 to 1:30 P.M. at the Marriott Hotel, in room Golden Gate B. In addition, current and former fellows will be available for one-on-one interactions at the AGU Marketplace from 3:30 to 4:30 P.M. on Tuesday, 4 December, through Thursday, 6 December.

  5. New AGU Executive Director Outlines Goals and Priorities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showstack, Randy

    2010-04-01

    When Christine W. McEntee takes the helm at AGU as the new executive director on 30 August, she will bring with her a number of key qualities: more than 25 years of successful association leadership and management experience, a passion for the Earth and space sciences to benefit humanity, a commitment to working to ensure the planet's sustainability, a respect for AGU's distinguished legacy, and the desire and ability to help AGU grow to a higher level of effectiveness. “I have always liked to work in professional associations that are solid and strong and want to go to their next level of excellence—that is where my sweet spot is in being an association executive—and that is what AGU wants to do. So I am very excited about that: a match with what I really enjoy and get passionate about doing in an area that I really care about,” McEntee told Eos in an in-depth interview.

  6. Transcriptomic profile of aguR deletion mutant of Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris CECT 8666

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Rio, Beatriz; Linares, Daniel M.; Redruello, Begoña; Martin, Maria Cruz; Fernandez, Maria; de Jong, Anne; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Ladero, Victor; Alvarez, Miguel A.

    2015-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris CECT 8666 (formerly GE2-14) is a dairy strain that catabolizes agmatine (a decarboxylated derivative of arginine) into the biogenic amine putrescine by the agmatine deiminase (AGDI) pathway [1]. The AGDI cluster of L. lactis is composed by five genes aguR, aguB, aguD, aguA and aguC. The last four genes are responsible for the deamination of agmatine to putrescine and are co-transcribed as a single policistronic mRNA forming the catabolic operon aguBDAC[1]. aguR encodes a transmembrane protein that functions as a one-component signal transduction system that senses the agmatine concentration of the medium and accordingly regulates the transcription of aguBDAC[2], which is also transcriptionally regulated by carbon catabolic repression (CCR) via glucose, but not by other sugars such as lactose and galactose [1], [3]. Here we report the transcriptional profiling of the aguR gene deletion mutant (L. lactis subsp. cremoris CECT 8666 ∆aguR) [2] compared to the wild type strain, both grown in M17 medium with galactose as carbon source and supplemented with agmatine. The transcriptional profiling data of AguR-regulated genes were deposited in the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database under accession no. GSE59514. PMID:26697381

  7. Transcriptomic profile of aguR deletion mutant of Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris CECT 8666

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz del Rio

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris CECT 8666 (formerly GE2-14 is a dairy strain that catabolizes agmatine (a decarboxylated derivative of arginine into the biogenic amine putrescine by the agmatine deiminase (AGDI pathway [1]. The AGDI cluster of L. lactis is composed by five genes aguR, aguB, aguD, aguA and aguC. The last four genes are responsible for the deamination of agmatine to putrescine and are co-transcribed as a single policistronic mRNA forming the catabolic operon aguBDAC [1]. aguR encodes a transmembrane protein that functions as a one-component signal transduction system that senses the agmatine concentration of the medium and accordingly regulates the transcription of aguBDAC [2], which is also transcriptionally regulated by carbon catabolic repression (CCR via glucose, but not by other sugars such as lactose and galactose [1,3]. Here we report the transcriptional profiling of the aguR gene deletion mutant (L. lactis subsp. cremoris CECT 8666 ∆aguR [2] compared to the wild type strain, both grown in M17 medium with galactose as carbon source and supplemented with agmatine. The transcriptional profiling data of AguR-regulated genes were deposited in the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO database under accession no. GSE59514.

  8. AGU Cinema: Festival of short science films at Fall Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harned, Douglas A.

    2012-11-01

    New technologies have revolutionized the use of video as a means of science communication and have made it easier to create, distribute, and view. With video having become omnipresent in our culture, it sometime supplements or even replaces writing in many science and education applications. An inaugural science film festival sponsored by AGU at the 2012 Fall Meeting in San Francisco, Calif., in December will showcase short videos—30 minutes or less in length—developed to disseminate scientific results to various audiences and to enhance learning in the classroom. AGU Cinema will feature professionally produced, big budget films alongside low-budget videos aimed at niche audiences and made by amateurs. The latter category includes videos made by governmental agency scientists, educators, communications specialists within scientific organizations, and Fall Meeting oral and poster presenters.

  9. Bridging Science and Policy: The AGU Science Policy Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hankin, E. R.; Uhlenbrock, K.; Landau, E. A.

    2013-12-01

    In recent years, science has become inextricably linked to the political process. As such, it is more important now than ever for science to forge a better relationship with politics, for the health of both science and society. To help meet this need, the American Geophysical Union (AGU) strives to engage its members, shape policy, and inform society about the excitement of Earth and space science and its role in developing solutions for the sustainability of the planet. In June 2013, AGU held its second annual Science Policy Conference in Washington, D.C. The goal of the conference is to provide a new forum for diverse discussions and viewpoints on the challenges and opportunities of science policy, with a focus on applications of Earth and space science that serve local, national, and international communities. The meeting brought together more than 300 scientists, policy makers, industry professionals, members of the press, and other stakeholders to discuss the topics concerning the Arctic, climate change, oceans, energy, technology and infrastructure, and natural hazards science as they relate to challenges impacting society. Sessions such as 'The Water-Energy Nexus,' 'Potential for Megadisasters,' 'The Changing Ocean and Impacts on Human Health,' and 'Drowning and Drought: Agricultural Impacts of Climate Change' are examples of some of the intriguing and timely science policy issues addressed at the conference. The findings from the conference were used to develop a summary report. The report highlights key facts and figures to be used as a resource in discussions with policy makers and other stakeholders regarding the conference topics. This presentation will discuss the goals and outcomes of the conference and how the event represents one of the many ways AGU is approaching its 'Science and Society' priority objective as part of the Union's strategic plan; namely by increasing the effectiveness and recognition of AGU among policy makers as an authoritative

  10. Tantsuime: märjaks nutetud Märt Agu saab 8000 uut sõpra / Märt Agu ; intervjueerinud Rein Sikk

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Agu, Märt, 1980-

    2011-01-01

    11. Noorte tantsupeo "Maa ja ilm" üldjuht ja Tallinna Tantsuakadeemia kunstiline juht Märt Agu Tallinna lauluväljakul toimuvast tantsupeost, ülevaatustest, eesti meeste rahvatantsust, oma isast Mait Agust, tema tantsust "Põhjamaa", tantsuõpetaja elukutsest, eesti tantsust, Tallinna Tantsuakadeemiast. Andmeid Märt Agu loomingu kohta

  11. AGU candidates for office, 1998”2000, Union officers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcia K. McNutt. AGU member since 1976, Director of the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute. Major areas of interest are lithospheric tectonics and mantle geodynamics. B.A. in physics (Phi Beta Kappa, summa cum laude), 1973, Colorado College; Ph.D. in Earth science, 1978, Scripps Institution of Oceanography. Researcher at U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, 1979-1982semi Professor at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1982-1997. Member of American Association for the Advancement of Science. Authored 74 publications, 45 in AGU journals. Most important publications include The Superswell and mantle dynamics beneath the South Pacific, Science, 248, 969-975,1990semi Marine geodynamics: depth-age revisited, Rev. Geophys., U.S. National Report Supplement, 413-418,1995 Mapping the descent of Indian and Eurasian plates beneath the Tibetan plateau from gravity anomalies, J. Geophys. plume theory to explain multiple episodes of stress-triggered volcanism in the Austral Islands, Nature, in press, 1997. Awarded Macelwane Medal, 1988; Doctor of Science (honoris causa), Colorado College, 1988; NSF Visiting Professorship for Women, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, 1989-1990semi Griswold Professor of Geophysics, MIT, 1991-1997 Outstanding Alumni Award, The Blake Schools, Minneapolis, 1993; Capital Science Lecturer, Carnegie Institution, 1995; Phi Beta Kappa Visiting Scholar, 1996-1997 MIT School of Science Graduate Teaching Prize, 1996. AGU service as Associate Editor and Guest Editor of Journal of Geophysical Research-Solid Earth, member of Program, Budget and Finance, and Audit and Legal Affairs committeessemi; chair of Publications and Macelwane committees, and President of the Tectonophysics Section.

  12. AGU, Science and Engagement with the Energy Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leinen, M.; Davidson, E. A.

    2016-12-01

    The relationship between science and society evolves over time and the social, political, and economic factors shaping this relationship are complex. When problems facing society become more challenging, the public, NGOs, and policy makers call for science to more directly inform solutions, to assure accountability for the use of funds and to address conflicts of interest. But when policy solutions for such challenges require significant economic and societal tradeoffs, discussion of the science can become polarized and politicized. When this occurs, AGU's policies that uphold the highest standards of scientific integrity, address conflicts of interests and promote independence for members are even more important. These policies are implemented through processes for: a) control of science presented at meeting and in publications; b) requirements for data cited in publications to be publicly accessible, and c) an organizational support policy that prohibits sponsors from influencing science presented in AGU programs. The private sector wields vast influence on human behavior and governmental policy through commerce and lobbying. These actions can be controversial when the profit motive appears incongruent with other societal opinions of what is in the public interest. Climate change is an example of this tension, where the economic exploitation of fossil fuels has complex effects on food and energy security as well as on the environment. Nonetheless, the AGU Board unanimously agreed that given our mission to advance science to create a more sustainable earth, engagement of the private sector rather than disengagement is the best way to influence decision makers on all sides because we believe that the private sector needs to be part of any solutions. We plan to use our convening power and scientific authority to bring together diverse views on climate change solutions from the private, NGO, policy, decision-maker and scientific sectors to begin a substantial

  13. AGU education and public outreach programs: Empowering future Earth and space scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamec, Bethany; Asher, Pranoti

    2011-10-01

    The staff and leadership of AGU are committed to fostering excellence in Earth and space science education. While AGU's Strategic Plan does not specifically highlight primary or secondary education among its objectives, outreach in this area plays a significant role in developing and nurturing the next generation of Earth and space scientists. Several educational goals along with specific strategies will help AGU meet its goal related to workforce or talent pool development. Particular emphasis is being placed on building partnerships and collaborations that will increase the effectiveness of AGU's outreach efforts related to education.

  14. Ensuring Integrity in AGU Publications and Compliance With Dual Publication Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Praveen; Calais, Eric

    2011-03-01

    To ensure the highest standards for publication, AGU has begun screening manuscript submissions using CrossCheck (http://www.crossref.org/crosscheck.html) for possible verbatim use of previously published material. Water Resources Research and Geophysical Research Letters have tested this technology since summer 2010. It has proven very useful in ensuring the highest integrity in publication standards and compliance with the AGU dual publication policy (http://www.agu.org/pubs/authors/policies/dualpub_policy.shtml). According to Barbara Major, assistant director of journals, other AGU journals will adopt this screening process in the near future.

  15. Advancing diversity and inclusion through AGU's mentoring programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asher, P. M.; Marasco, L.; Hurtado, C.; Hanlon, S. M.; Ambrogio, O.

    2017-12-01

    AGU offers three separate mentoring programs at the Fall Meeting. These are the Undergraduate Mentoring Program, Career and Research Advice Mentorship (CRAM) sessions, and the Sharing Science mentoring program. While each of these have had an impact on students and mentors, these programs are limited in that the mentor and mentee interactions only occur during the Fall Meeting. To increase the impact of mentoring beyond the Fall Meeting, AGU is piloting a new program that is entirely virtual. This virtual program, called Mentoring365, is designed to have a diverse set of mentees and mentors interacting over a three-month period. Mentoring365 offers participants with a mentor that they can "meet and interact with" outside of Fall Meeting and potentially continue a relationship beyond the duration of the program. It is intended to build or add to a student's professional network and provide a student with additional support outside their research, academic, and/or graduate advisor. This presentation will highlight some of the features of the program as well as provide insight into the progress of the Mentoring365 pilot. The ultimate intent is to expand the program efficacy by collaborating across organizations in the Earth and space sciences to provide a robust and diverse pool of mentors and mentees.

  16. Transcriptomic profile of aguR deletion mutant of Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris CECT 8666

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Del Rio, Beatriz; Linares, Daniel M; Redruello, Begoña; Martin, Maria Cruz; Fernandez, Maria; de Jong, Anne; Kuipers, Oscar P; Ladero, Victor; Alvarez, Miguel A

    2015-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris CECT 8666 (formerly GE2-14) is a dairy strain that catabolizes agmatine (a decarboxylated derivative of arginine) into the biogenic amine putrescine by the agmatine deiminase (AGDI) pathway [1]. The AGDI cluster of L. lactis is composed by five genes aguR, aguB,

  17. Regulation of the alpha-glucuronidase-encoding gene (aguA) from Aspergillus niger

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, de R.P.; Vondervoort, van de P.J.I.; Hendriks, L.; Belt, van de M.; Visser, J.

    2002-01-01

    The !-glucuronidase gene aguA from Aspergillus niger was cloned and characterised. Analysis of the promoter region of aguA revealed the presence of four putative binding sites for the major carbon catabolite repressor protein CREA and one putative binding site for the transcriptional activator XLNR.

  18. CO2 Emissions Generated by a Fall AGU Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    osborn, G.; Malowany, K. S.; Samolczyk, M. A.

    2011-12-01

    The process of reporting on and discussing geophysical phenomena, including emissions of greenhouse gases, generates more greenhouse gases. At the 2010 fall meeting of the AGU, 19,175 delegates from 81 countries, including, for example, Eritrea, Nepal, and Tanzania, traveled a total of 156,000,000 km to congregate in San Francisco for five days. With data on home bases of participants provided by AGU, we estimated the CO2 emissions generated by travel and hotel stays of those participants. The majority of the emissions from the meeting resulted from air travel . In order to estimate the footprint of such travel, (a) distances from the largest airport in each country and American state (except Canada and California) to San Francisco were tabulated , (b) basic distances were converted to emissions using the TerraPass (TRX Travel Analytics) carbon calculator, (c) it was assumed that half the California participants would fly and half would drive, (d) it was assumed that half of Canadians would fly out of Toronto and half out of Vancouver, and (e) a fudge factor of 10% was added to air travel emissions to account for connecting flights made by some participants to the main airports in the respective countries (connecting flights are disproportionately significant because of high output during takeoff acceleration). Driving impacts were estimated with a Transport Direct/RAC Motoring Services calculator using a 2006 Toyota Corolla as a standard car. An average driving distance of 50 km to the departure airport, and from the airport upon return, was assumed. Train impacts were estimated using the assumption that all flying participants would take BART from SFO. Accomodation impacts were estimated using an Environmental Protection Agency calculator, an assumed average stay of 3 nights, and the assumption that 500 participants commuted from local residences or stayed with friends. The above assumptions lead to an estimate, which we consider conservative, of 19 million kg of

  19. Space Weather Research Presented at the 2007 AGU Fall Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Mohi

    2007-12-01

    AGU's 47th annual Fall Meeting, held 10-14 December 2007 in San Francisco, Calif., was the largest gathering of geoscientists in the Union's history. More than 14,600 people attended. The Space Physics and Aeronomy (SPA) sections sported excellent turnout, with more than 1300 abstracts submitted over 114 poster and oral sessions. Topics discussed that related to space weather were manifold: the nature of the Sun-Earth system revealed through newly launched satellites, observations and models of ionospheric convection, advances in the understanding of radiation belt physics, Sun-Earth coupling via energetic coupling, data management and archiving into virtual observatories, and the applications of all this research to space weather forecasting and prediction.

  20. Regulation of the alpha-glucuronidase-encoding gene ( aguA) from Aspergillus niger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, R P; van de Vondervoort, P J I; Hendriks, L; van de Belt, M; Visser, J

    2002-09-01

    The alpha-glucuronidase gene aguA from Aspergillus niger was cloned and characterised. Analysis of the promoter region of aguA revealed the presence of four putative binding sites for the major carbon catabolite repressor protein CREA and one putative binding site for the transcriptional activator XLNR. In addition, a sequence motif was detected which differed only in the last nucleotide from the XLNR consensus site. A construct in which part of the aguA coding region was deleted still resulted in production of a stable mRNA upon transformation of A. niger. The putative XLNR binding sites and two of the putative CREA binding sites were mutated individually in this construct and the effects on expression were examined in A. niger transformants. Northern analysis of the transformants revealed that the consensus XLNR site is not actually functional in the aguA promoter, whereas the sequence that diverges from the consensus at a single position is functional. This indicates that XLNR is also able to bind to the sequence GGCTAG, and the XLNR binding site consensus should therefore be changed to GGCTAR. Both CREA sites are functional, indicating that CREA has a strong influence on aguA expression. A detailed expression analysis of aguA in four genetic backgrounds revealed a second regulatory system involved in activation of aguA gene expression. This system responds to the presence of glucuronic and galacturonic acids, and is not dependent on XLNR.

  1. Fostering Diversity in the Earth and Space Sciences: The Role of AGU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, J. T.; Johnson, R. M.; Hall, F. R.

    2002-12-01

    In May 2002, AGU's Committee on Education and Human Resources (CEHR) approved a new Diversity Plan, developed in collaboration with the CEHR Subcommittee on Diversity. Efforts to develop a diversity plan for AGU were motivated by the recognition that the present Earth and space science community poorly represents the true diversity of our society. Failure to recruit a diverse scientific workforce in an era of rapidly shifting demographics could have severe impact on the health of our profession. The traditional base of Earth and space scientists in the US (white males) has been shrinking during the past two decades, but women, racial and ethnic minorities, and persons with disabilities are not compensating for this loss. The potential ramifications of this situation - for investigators seeking to fill classes and recruit graduate students, for institutions looking to replace faculty and researchers, and for the larger community seeking continued public support of research funding - could be crippling. AGU's new Diversity Plan proposes a long-term strategy for addressing the lack of diversity in the Earth and space sciences with the ultimate vision of reflecting diversity in all of AGU's activities and programs. Four key goals have been identified: 1) Educate and involve the AGU membership in diversity issues; 2) Enhance and foster the participation of Earth and space scientists, educators and students from underrepresented groups in AGU activities; 3) Increase the visibility of the Earth and space sciences and foster awareness of career opportunities in these fields for underrepresented populations; and 4) Promote changes in the academic culture that both remove barriers and disincentives for increasing diversity in the student and faculty populations and reward member faculty wishing to pursue these goals. A detailed implementation plan that utilizes all of AGU's resources is currently under development in CEHR. Supportive participation by AGU members and

  2. AGU Pathfinder: Career and Professional Development Resources for Earth and Space Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harwell, D. E.; Asher, P. M.; Hankin, E. R.; Janick, N. G.; Marasco, L.

    2017-12-01

    The American Geophysical Union (AGU) is committed to inspiring and educating present and future generations of diverse, innovative, and creative Earth and space scientists. To meet our commitment, AGU provides career and educational resources, webinars, mentoring, and support for students and professionals at each level of development to reduce barriers to achievement and to promote professional advancement. AGU is also working with other organizations and educational institutions to collaborate on projects benefiting the greater geoscience community. The presentation will include an overview of current Pathfinder efforts, collaborative efforts, and an appeal for additional partnerships.

  3. Space station astronauts discuss life in space during AGU interview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showstack, Randy

    2012-07-01

    Just one day after China's Shenzhou-9 capsule, carrying three Chinese astronauts, docked with the Tiangong-1 space lab on 18 June, Donald Pettit, a NASA astronaut on the International Space Station (ISS), said it is “a step in the right direction” that more people are in space. “Before they launched, there were six people in space,” he said, referring to those on ISS, “and there are 7 billion people on Earth.” The astronauts were “like one in a billion. Now there are nine people in space,” Pettit said during a 19 June interview that he and two other astronauts onboard ISS had with AGU. Pettit continued, “So the gradient of human beings going into space is moving in the right direction. We need to change these numbers so that more and more human beings can call space their home so we can expand off of planet Earth and move out into our solar system.”

  4. AGU Webinars: Leveraging 21st Century Technology to Level the Playing Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janick, N. G.; Harwell, D. E.; Hankin, E. R.; Asher, P. M.; Marasco, L.

    2017-12-01

    AGU Webinars offer weekly insights into topics in the Earth and space sciences presented by scientists and other experts every Thursday at 2:00 pm ET. Its monthly Professional Development series emphasizes essential soft skills, connections to experiential and learning opportunities, jobs outside of academia, and other career resources. Additional topics focus on science communication, science policy, special topics for Earth and space science department heads and chairs, technical highlights from AGU Meetings and Publications, among others. By offering these live sessions and recordings free of charge to all participants, AGU is removing barriers to entry and encouraging diversity in the global talent pool of Earth and space scientists. This presentation will look at the first year of the AGU Webinars program and explore its future goals and how we can achieve them together.

  5. Growing and Supporting the Student and Early Career Pipeline in Earth and Space Sciences - A Spotlight on New AGU Initiatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hankin, E. R.; Williams, B. M.; Asher, P. M.; Furukawa, H.; Holm Adamec, B.; Lee, M.; Cooper, P.

    2015-12-01

    The American Geophysical Union (AGU) is home to more than 60,000 scientists from 139 countries. Included in this membership are approximately 20,000 (34%) student and early career members. Many well-established programs within AGU provide a dynamic forum for Earth and Space scientists to advance research, collaborate across disciplines, and communicate the importance and impact of science to society regardless of career stage—programs such as AGU publications, scientific meetings and conferences, honors and recognition, and other educational and scientific forums. Additionally, many AGU program initiatives focusing specifically on supporting student and early career scientists and the global talent pool pipeline ones are actively underway. These include both new and long-standing programs. This presentation will describe (1) the overall demographics and needs in Earth and Space sciences, and (2) AGU's coordinated series of programs designed to help attract, retain and support student and early career scientists—with an emphasis on new programmatic activities and initiatives targeting improved diversity. Included in this presentation are a description of the AGU BrightSTaRS Program, the AGU Berkner Program for international students, a newly established AGU Student & Early Career Conference, the AGU Virtual Poster Showcase initiative, the AGU Meeting Mentor program, and GeoLEAD—an umbrella program being jointly built by a coalition of societies to help address Earth and space sciences talent pool needs.

  6. Riigi teaduspreemiad akadeemikutele

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2000-01-01

    Teaduspreemiad: tehnikateaduste alal Raimund-Johannes Ubarile; humanitaarteaduste alal Arvo Krikmannile; H. Küütsile kollektiivi koosseisus põllumajandusteaduste alal; täppisteaduste alal Ülo Lumistele; keemia ja molekulaarbioloogia alal Agu Laisk

  7. Scientific Integrity and Professional Ethics at AGU - The Establishment and Evolution of an Ethics Program at a Large Scientific Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPhaden, Michael; Leinen, Margaret; McEntee, Christine; Townsend, Randy; Williams, Billy

    2016-04-01

    The American Geophysical Union, a scientific society of 62,000 members worldwide, has established a set of scientific integrity and professional ethics guidelines for the actions of its members, for the governance of the union in its internal activities, and for the operations and participation in its publications and scientific meetings. This presentation will provide an overview of the Ethics program at AGU, highlighting the reasons for its establishment, the process of dealing ethical breaches, the number and types of cases considered, how AGU helps educate its members on Ethics issues, and the rapidly evolving efforts at AGU to address issues related to the emerging field of GeoEthics. The presentation will also cover the most recent AGU Ethics program focus on the role for AGU and other scientific societies in addressing sexual harassment, and AGU's work to provide additional program strength in this area.

  8. Rotational Seismology: AGU Session, Working Group, and Website

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, William H.K.; Igel, Heiner; Todorovska, Maria I.; Evans, John R.

    2007-01-01

    . Igel, W.H.K. Lee, and M. Todorovska during the 2006 AGU Fall Meeting. The goal of this session was to discuss rotational sensors, observations, modeling, theoretical aspects, and potential applications of rotational ground motions. The session was accompanied by the inauguration of an International Working Group on Rotational Seismology (IWGoRS) which aims to promote investigations of all aspects of rotational motions in seismology and their implications for related fields such as earthquake engineering, geodesy, strong-motion seismology, and tectonics, as well as to share experience, data, software, and results in an open Web-based environment. The primary goal of this article is to make the Earth Science Community aware of the emergence of the field of rotational seismology.

  9. Growing our capacity within AGU to better connect and engage with new and novel partners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vano, J. A.

    2017-12-01

    It is easy to give talks at AGU about the value of science. It is much harder, yet critical, to share the value of science with non-scientists. Yet through conversations and ultimately through partnerships with the communities and decision makers the science aims to serve, the value of the science can be elevated and research transformed to be more actionable. Throughout AGU, there is a growing recognition that we can do this better. This growing movement comes from all corners of the Union, as evidenced by increasing abstracts on the topic, and is bringing to light efforts with a common thread of researchers collaborating with practitioners to design, conduct, apply, and share research in ways that connect more closely to society's needs. This year, a team of AGU members came together to plan a series of Science to Action sessions, workshops, networking events, and more (see http://thrivingearthexchange.org/fall-meeting-2017 for updates). This presentation will provide an overview of these Science to Action activities, how they connect with current AGU resources, and, based on past discussions and a survey of participants, what future directions and resources would provide the biggest benefits to continue to improve AGU's capacity to foster more effective partnerships. Audience participation on ideas for future directions will be encouraged.

  10. The Updated AGU Ethics Policy: Supporting Inclusive and Diverse Field and Lab Environments within the Geosciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, B. M.; McPhaden, M. J.; Gundersen, L. C.

    2017-12-01

    The American Geophysical Union (AGU), a scientific society of >60,000 members worldwide, has established a set of scientific integrity and professional ethics guidelines for the actions of its members, for the governance of the union in its internal activities, and for the operations and participation in its publications and scientific meetings. More recently AGU has undertaken actions to help address the issue of harassment in the sciences and other work climate issues; and, where applied more broadly as a code of standard behavior, will help address tangential issues of diversity and inclusion. This presentation will highlight the proposed policy changes and additional resources now in place, as they apply to field and lab environments. Progress to date and remaining challenges of this effort will be discussed, including AGU's work to provide additional program strength in the areas of Ethics, Diversity and Inclusion.

  11. Assessing the efficacy of advancing underrepresented minority groups through AGU's Student Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marasco, L.; Hurtado, C.; Gottschall, H.; Meisenhelder, K.; Hankin, E. R.; Harwell, D. E.

    2017-12-01

    The American Geophysical Union (AGU) strives to cultivate a diverse and inclusive organization that uses its position to build the global talent pool in Earth and space science. To cultivate a diverse talent pool, AGU must also foster a diverse student member population. The two largest AGU programs serving students are the Outstanding Student Paper Award (OSPA) and the Student Grants programs. OSPA allows students to practice their presentation skills and receive valuable feedback from experienced scientists. Over 3,000 students participated in OSPA at Fall Meeting 2016. The Student Grants program includes a suite of 14 travel and research grant opportunities. Over 2,000 students applied for grant opportunities in 2016 and 246 grants and fellowships were awarded. The OSPA and Student Grants programs also engage non-student members through volunteering opportunities for program roles, such as OSPA judge or grant reviewer. This presentation will look at the temporal participation trends of underrepresented minority groups in AGU's OSPA and Student Grants programs. The participation of underrepresented minority groups will also be compared before and after the implementation of policy changes to the Student Grants program in 2012.

  12. Why AGU is important in Eastern Europe and should increase its role even more?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mocanu, V.

    2007-12-01

    After the fall of the ex-communist system about twenty years ago, the East European countries faced a significant, multilateral challenge in all aspects of their economical, financial, military, scientific and especially educational and professional life. They had a pretty robust tradition in classic education and research, but had to prepare their young generation and specialists for a hard competition for grad-, post grad- and professional level competing with colleagues from other parts of the world. They had to restructure their systems and re-discovered the professional societies. AGU represented a certain model of efficiency on handling various aspects of geoscientific activities: integration of geophysics with other related disciplines like atmospheric sciences, hydrology and hydrogeology, volcanism, geochemistry etc., from deep Earth to the intergalactic space. Close cooperation with other boundary sciences, regular and very well organized meetings dedicated more to Solid earth (AGU Fall Meeting) or Near-Surface Geophysics (AGU Spring Meetings), its very close cooperation with the sister societies from Europe, other North, Central and South American countries as well as the Far East and Australia, permanent opening towards a strong international cooperation with all countries and societies world- wide, very active interest in education and career orientation, strong publication policy represented a certain attraction and a very tempting model for the East European countries. Their very quick development has to be joined by transformation of their higher education and research system in such a way that they become more and more competitive with other countries worldwide. They have to develop their own system so that it attracts more and more youngsters to remain/return home and contribute to the advance of their home countries and, in close partnerships with other developed and developing countries, with the guidance of the professional societies like AGU

  13. AguR, a Transmembrane Transcription Activator of the Putrescine Biosynthesis Operon in Lactococcus lactis, Acts in Response to the Agmatine Concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, Daniel M; Del Rio, Beatriz; Redruello, Begoña; Ladero, Victor; Martin, M Cruz; de Jong, Anne; Kuipers, Oscar P; Fernandez, Maria; Alvarez, Miguel A

    2015-09-01

    Dairy industry fermentative processes mostly use Lactococcus lactis as a starter. However, some dairy L. lactis strains produce putrescine, a biogenic amine that raises food safety and spoilage concerns, via the agmatine deiminase (AGDI) pathway. The enzymatic activities responsible for putrescine biosynthesis in this bacterium are encoded by the AGDI gene cluster. The role of the catabolic genes aguB, aguD, aguA, and aguC has been studied, but knowledge regarding the role of aguR (the first gene in the cluster) remains limited. In the present work, aguR was found to be a very low level constitutively expressed gene that is essential for putrescine biosynthesis and is transcribed independently of the polycistronic mRNA encoding the catabolic genes (aguBDAC). In response to agmatine, AguR acts as a transcriptional activator of the aguB promoter (PaguB), which drives the transcription of the aguBDAC operon. Inverted sequences required for PaguB activity were identified by deletion analysis. Further work indicated that AguR is a transmembrane protein which might function as a one-component signal transduction system that senses the agmatine concentration of the medium and, accordingly, regulates the transcription of the aguBDAC operon through a C-terminal cytoplasmic DNA-binding domain typically found in LuxR-like proteins. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  14. Improving Diversity and Educational Outreach at the K-14 level: A Call to Action for the AGU Membership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, F. R.; Johnson, R.

    2002-12-01

    In 2002, the Subcommittee on Diversity (SD) of the Committee on Education and Human Resources (CEHR) submitted a Diversity Plan to the leadership of AGU. This plan outlines specific programs and goals that AGU can follow to help improve diversity in the Earth and space sciences. Diversity issues are key components to improve the human resource potential in the geosciences. As women are the majority population, and racial and ethnic minorities are experiencing the largest growing segment of the United States population, it is within our best interest to actively recruit and retain these populations into our dynamic fields of study. The SD recognizes that the strength of the AGU lies within its membership. Composed of some of the brightest and talented scientists in the world, the AGU members are leaders and pioneers in our understanding of the Earth System. Yet, many, if not most, people within underrepresented communities are not aware of the relevance that the Earth and space sciences play in their lives. In this discussion, we will discuss the importance of the AGU membership in the Diversity Plan. In addition, we will outline specific things that AGU members can do to improve access of US students and citizenry to Earth and space science education. These steps require that AGU members become active advocates in the public, especially at the K-14 level.

  15. [comment t[Comment on] “What is AGU's proper role in society?”] AGU's role in society: Duty to the public

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilshire, Howard

    Bravo to William Kaula and Don Anderson for their forthright opinion, “What Is AGU's Proper Role in Society?” (Eos, April 9, 1991). In hearing preliminaries about Mission to Planet Earth at the Geological Society of America's meeting in Phoenix in 1987, I was turned off by what seemed to me to be endless self-serving proposals to probe the Earth “with our steely knives,” but with hardly a mention of how we could use the information to assist the nation in making rational decisions about the future human occupancy of Earth. I concur with Kaula and Anderson that it is not only the duty of individual scientists to speak out on controversial issues of public concern, but also the duty of professional societies to influence the public policy decision-making process in areas where our special expertise is relevant.It does not matter that opinions within the professional societies differ. Opinions within the nation differ, too. But to take no position at all because of these differences of opinion is dereliction of our duty to the public that supports us. AGU already has a mechanism for presenting a Union-endorsed position on public issues (which could serve as a model for other professional societies whose best effort is to hide under the bed). This mechanism needs to be used more aggressively so that our expert knowledge (both of facts and hypotheses) is brought to bear on matters of critical human concern.

  16. AGU and Wiley-Blackwell to partner on publication of journals and books

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEntee, Chris

    2012-07-01

    AGU has signed a memorandum of understanding (MOU) with Wiley-Blackwell to partner in journal and book publishing. The agreement, effective 1 January 2013, is a significant step forward in transforming AGU publishing consistent with our strategic plan goal of scientific leadership and collaboration. Wiley-Blackwell is the international scientific, technical, medical, and scholarly publishing business of John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Family-owned and publicly traded on the New York Stock Exchange, the company is strong in every major academic and professional field and partners with many of the world's leading societies. Wiley-Blackwell, a leader in developing models for open access and providing developing nations with access to science, publishes nearly 1500 peer-reviewed journals and more than 1500 new books annually. The company publishes approximately 700 society titles.

  17. President's message: Dues increase will help build the foundation for AGU's future success

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPhaden, Michael J.

    2012-09-01

    The world is a very different place than it was 43 years ago. In 1969, Jimi Hendrix rocked the legendary Woodstock music festival, Neil Armstrong took the first steps on the Moon, and U.S. drivers paid an average of 35 cents a gallon for gas. Today, digital music files have replaced vinyl records, NASA's Curiosity rover is transmitting data and imagery from the surface of Mars, and a growing number of cars run on alternative fuels. In the same way, 43 years ago AGU was a very different organization. Membership hovered around 10,000, and the Fall Meeting was still in its infancy. Today, AGU's membership has increased to more than 61,000, Fall Meeting attendance has topped 20,000, and an entire generation of geoscientists who weren't even born in 1969 now comprises 28% of our current membership.

  18. AGU Committee on Education and Human Resources Sub-Committee on Diversity Program for the term 2004-2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, C. J.; Hiza, M.; Jenkins, G.; Karsten, J.; Molina, L.; Pyrtle, A.; Runyon, C.

    2004-12-01

    The American Geophysical Union (AGU) founded the Diversity Subcommittee in 2000 to address what the AGU felt were important issues for the future of the geoscience community. A recent AGU statement of commitment and concern about issues of diversity reads, in part: It is essential that new strategies for educating, recruiting, and retaining geoscientists from currently under-represented populations be developed (a) for individual investigators seeking students to fill classes or work in their research programs; (b) for institutions looking to replace faculty and researchers; (c) for the larger community looking to the public for continued research funding, and (d) for the future US membership of AGU. In an effort to fulfill its charge, the majority of the 2004-2006 sub-committee's activities will be directed towards: (1) Education of the AGU Membership, including the sub-committee itself, on the salient issues of Diversity; (2) Mentoring and supporting minority students in the pipeline of Earth and Space Science education as well as minority faculty seeking to establish successful collaborations; (3) Establishing a mechanism for quantitative assessment of (a) the AGU demographics, (b) member knowledge, and (c) success of programs in the area of Diversity; (4) Conducting the first ever Chapman Conference on the needs of investigators with disabilities (July, 2005); (5) Partnering with other agencies and societies to build bridges; (6) Creating mechanisms for marketing the Earth and Space sciences to minority audiences; (7) Nurturing of minority members already in the AGU; promoting these members for honors and awards within AGU. Details, goals, and milestones of this program will be presented.

  19. Research in rock deformation: Report of the Second Rock Deformation Colloquium, 1989 AGU Spring Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Harry

    In response to the considerable interest expressed at the first Rock Deformation Colloquium held at the Fall 1988 AGU meeting in San Francisco, a second dinner meeting was held on Monday evening, May 8, 1989, at the Omni Hotel in Baltimore. The principal business items were a report by Steve Kirby (U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, Calif.) concerning the meeting the previous day of the rock deformation steering committee and an after dinner presentation by Steve Freiman of the National Institute of Standards and Technology in Gaithersburg, Md., entitled “The Environmental Effects on Subcritical Crack Growth.” Kirby reported that a technical committee for rock deformation has been established within the Tectonophysics Section of AGU; the steering committee will attempt to establish constructive working relations with allied societies and disciplines, such as ceramics, metallurgy, materials science, structural geology, and surface science. Brian Evans of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Terry Tullis of Brown University in Providence, R.I., and Harry Green of the University of California at Davis agreed to be a subcommittee to propose a name for the technical committee, for discussion at the next steering committee meeting to be held before the 1989 Fall AGU meeting. Green also agreed to investigate the possibility of convening a special session at the Fall Meeting on the nature and mechanism of deep-focus earthquakes. (The session is Deep Slab Deformation and Faulting, T21B and T22A, organized by Harry and Ken Creager of the University of Washington, Seattle; it will be all day on Tuesday, December 5.)

  20. Charting a path forward: building AGU's capacity to help foster scientist-decision maker engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vano, J. A.; Behar, D. H.; Mote, P.; Ferguson, D. B.; Pandya, R.

    2016-12-01

    Most research proposals, papers, and presentation abstracts begin with the motivation that the new science presented will benefit society. Behind this, beyond making good on the promises to get funding, is a sincere effort to contribute our knowledge and talent to build a better (safer, sustainable, more resilient) world. For this to happen, however, the science needs to be connected to people in communities who make decisions. While this happens in a variety of ways, often for research to be most useful to society, engagement with decision makers should occur at the beginning and throughout the research process. Increasingly this is being recognized as important, as evidenced by the growing number of boundary organizations (e.g., U.S. Department of the Interior's Climate Science Centers, NOAA's Regional Integrated Sciences and Assessment programs). Even within AGU, in recent years there has been a number of new activities and networks that suggest a growing community of practice for those doing work at the science-society interface (e.g., The Thriving Earth Exchange, the Water and Society Technical Committee in the Hydrology Section). In this presentation, we highlight what these activities are and share insights from those involved. We evaluate trends (e.g., have the number of abstracts on this topic increased?) and present responses from AGU members to questions on where this community of practice should go next (e.g., What is the most important task the AGU community should do to improve decision maker-scientist engagement?). The goal of this presentation is to promote a conversation about how the AGU community can be better prepared to foster engagement with decision makers that will lead to more actionable science. This will help us ensure our science is useful to society, fulfilling our motivations, and arguably responsibilities, both individually and as a community. It will also serve to prepare new scientists for a broader range of careers beyond

  1. 7 years of MacGyver sessions at EGU and AGU: what happened?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hut, Rolf; Selker, John; Weijs, Steven; Luxemburg, Wim; Wickert, Andy; Blume, Theresa; Bamburger, Jan; Stoof, Cathelijne; Tauro, Flavia

    2016-04-01

    The session that this poster is in, the: "Self-made sensors and unintended use of measurement equipment", also known as the "MacGyver-session" has had 7 years of scientists contributing their self made devices, hacks and solutions with the hydrological community. In 2009, the first session was held at the AGU fall meeting and since 2011 a session is also organised at the EGU General Assembly. On this poster, and in the accompanying review paper, we will present an overview of the work presented in the last 7 years, cataloging the work of the inventive scientists who have contributed to these successful, and above all: fun, sessions.

  2. The AGU Hydrology Student Subcommittee (H3S) - fostering the Fall Meeting experience for young hydrologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claes, N.; Beria, H.; Brown, M. R. M.; Kumar, A.; Goodwell, A. E.; Preziosi-Ribero, A.; Morris, C. K.; Cheng, F. Y.; Gootman, K. S.; Welsh, M.; Khatami, S.; Knoben, W.

    2017-12-01

    The AGU Hydrology Section Student Subcommittee (H3S), the student body of the AGU hydrology section, caters to the needs of students and early career scientists whose research interests contain a hydrological component. The past two years, H3S organized a Student and Early Career Scientist conference addressing both the technical and research needs of young hydrologists. Over the past several years, H3S organized pop-up sessions in Water Sciences and Social Dimensions of Geosciences which allowed young hydrologists to share and learn from their collective experiences. Social events like the early career social mixer, co-organized with CUAHSI, led to increased networking opportunities among peers. Continuous social media engagement led to a general dialogue within the community over varied issues including research productivity, gender equality, etc. Ice-breaker events between junior and senior academics encouraged young hydrologists to talk with their academic crushes and continuously seek out mentorship opportunities. Collating our past experiences, we ponder over our accomplishments, failures, and opportunities to improve representation of early career hydrologists within the community.

  3. Millist eriala soovitate keskkoolilõpetajatele edasiõppimiseks? / Karmel Eikner, Reet Hääl, Agu Laanemets, Jaanus Laugus

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2010-01-01

    Küsimusele vastavad ettevõtja, Powered by Karmeli brändijuht Karmel Eikner, MTÜ Eesti Liisingühingute Liidu tegevdirektor Reet Hääl, OÜ Kvintessents juhatuse liige Agu Laanemets ja OÜ Uus Maa Kinnisvaragrupi juhatuse esimees Jaanus Laugus

  4. MO-FG-BRA-07: Theranostic Gadolinium-Based AGuIX Nanoparticles for MRI-Guided Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detappe, A; Rottmann, J; Kunjachan, S; Berbeco, R; Tillement, O

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: AGuIX are gadolinium-based nanoparticles, initially developed for MRI, that have a potential role in radiation therapy as a radiosensitizer. Our goal is to demonstrate that these nanoparticles can both be used as an MRI contrast agent, as well as to obtain local dose enhancement in a pancreatic tumor when delivered in combination with an external beam irradiation. Methods: We performed in vitro cell uptake and radiosensitization studies of a pancreatic cancer cell line in a low energy (220kVp) beam, a standard clinical 6MV beam (STD) and a flattening filter free clinical 6MV beam (FFF). After injection of 40mM of nanoparticles, a biodistribution study was performed in vivo on mice with subcutaneous xenograft pancreatic tumors. In vivo radiation therapy studies were performed at the time point of maximum tumor uptake. Results: The concentration of AGuIX nanoparticles in Panc-1 pancreatic cancer cells, determined in vitro by MRI and ICPMS, peaks after 30 minutes with 0.3% of the initial concentration (5mg/g). Clonogenic assays show a significant effect (p<0.05) when the AGuIX are coupled with MV photon irradiation (DEF20%=1.31). Similar AGuIX tumor uptake is found in vivo by both MRI and ICPMS 30 minutes after intravenous injection. For long term survival studies, the choice of the radiation dose is determined with 5 control groups (3mice/group) irradiated with 0, 5, 10, 15, and 20Gy. Afterwards, 4 groups (8mice/group) are used to evaluate the effect of the nanoparticles. A Logrank test is performed as a statistical test to evaluate the effect of the nanoparticles. Conclusion: The combination of the MRI contrast and radiosensitization properties of gadolinium nanoparticles reveals a strong potential for usage with MRI-guided radiation therapy

  5. Scientific Integrity and Professional Ethics at AGU - Strategies and Actions to Impact Sexual Harassment in Science and other Work Climate Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPhaden, Michael; Davidson, Eric; McEntee, Christine; Williams, Billy

    2017-04-01

    The American Geophysical Union (AGU), a scientific society of 62,000 members worldwide, has established a set of scientific integrity and professional ethics guidelines for the actions of its members, for the governance of the union in its internal activities, and for the operations and participation in its publications and scientific meetings. More recently AGU has undertaken strategies and actions to help address the issue of harassment in the sciences and other work climate issues. This presentation will provide an overview of the role of scientific societies in helping to address these important issues, as well as specific strategies and actions underway at AGU and other societies. Progress to date and remaining challenges of this effort will be discussed, including AGU's work to provide additional program strength in this area.

  6. Reply to Comments on “AGU Statement: Investigation of Scientists and Officials in L'Aquila, Italy, Is Unfounded”

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPhaden, Michael

    2010-10-01

    It is critical to recognize the benefits and limitations of scientific knowledge, particularly when it comes to predicting hazards. I agree with G. J. Wasserburg that AGU should help scientists communicate their work accurately and understandably so it can provide the greatest value to society. This objective is explicit in AGU's new strategic plan (http://www.agu.org/about/strategic_plan.shtml) and is consistent with our vision of both advancing and communicating Earth and space science to ensure a sustainable future. We as a community have an obligation to increase the role of science in informing policy to mitigate the impacts of natural disasters. Such efforts require an open exchange of ideas and information and a clear understanding of the limitations of our knowledge. In response to Flavio Dobran, I agree that scientists are not above the law and, like all citizens, must be held accountable for their actions. However, laws and lawmakers must also recognize what science can and cannot do. We cannot yet reliably predict precisely when earthquakes will occur.

  7. Expression of the agmatine deiminase pathway in Enterococcus faecalis is activated by the AguR regulator and repressed by CcpA and PTS(Man systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian Suárez

    Full Text Available Although the agmatine deiminase system (AgDI has been investigated in Enterococcus faecalis, little information is available with respect to its gene regulation. In this study we demonstrate that the presence of exogenous agmatine induces the expression of agu genes in this bacterium. In contrast to the homologous and extensively characterized AgDI system of S. mutants, the aguBDAC operon in E. faecalis is not induced in response to low pH. In spite of this, agmatine catabolism in this bacterium contributes by neutralizing the external medium while enhancing bacterial growth. Our results indicate that carbon catabolic repression (CCR operates on the AgDI system via a mechanism that involves interaction of CcpA and P-Ser-HPr with a cre site found in an unusual position considering the aguB promoter (55 nt upstream the +1 position. In addition, we found that components of the mannose phosphotransferase (PTS(Man system also contributed to CCR in E. faecalis since a complete relief of the PTS-sugars repressive effect was observed only in a PTS(Man and CcpA double defective strain. Our gene context analysis revealed that aguR is present in oral and gastrointestinal microorganisms. Thus, regulation of the aguBDAC operon in E. faecalis seems to have evolved to obtain energy and resist low pH conditions in order to persist and colonize gastrointestinal niches.

  8. Expression of the Agmatine Deiminase Pathway in Enterococcus faecalis Is Activated by the AguR Regulator and Repressed by CcpA and PTSMan Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blancato, Víctor S.; Magni, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Although the agmatine deiminase system (AgDI) has been investigated in Enterococcus faecalis, little information is available with respect to its gene regulation. In this study we demonstrate that the presence of exogenous agmatine induces the expression of agu genes in this bacterium. In contrast to the homologous and extensively characterized AgDI system of S. mutants, the aguBDAC operon in E. faecalis is not induced in response to low pH. In spite of this, agmatine catabolism in this bacterium contributes by neutralizing the external medium while enhancing bacterial growth. Our results indicate that carbon catabolic repression (CCR) operates on the AgDI system via a mechanism that involves interaction of CcpA and P-Ser-HPr with a cre site found in an unusual position considering the aguB promoter (55 nt upstream the +1 position). In addition, we found that components of the mannose phosphotransferase (PTSMan) system also contributed to CCR in E. faecalis since a complete relief of the PTS-sugars repressive effect was observed only in a PTSMan and CcpA double defective strain. Our gene context analysis revealed that aguR is present in oral and gastrointestinal microorganisms. Thus, regulation of the aguBDAC operon in E. faecalis seems to have evolved to obtain energy and resist low pH conditions in order to persist and colonize gastrointestinal niches. PMID:24155893

  9. EGS Richardson AGU Chapman NVAG3 Conference: Nonlinear Variability in Geophysics: scaling and multifractal processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Schertzer

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available 1. The conference The third conference on "Nonlinear VAriability in Geophysics: scaling and multifractal processes" (NVAG 3 was held in Cargese, Corsica, Sept. 10-17, 1993. NVAG3 was joint American Geophysical Union Chapman and European Geophysical Society Richardson Memorial conference, the first specialist conference jointly sponsored by the two organizations. It followed NVAG1 (Montreal, Aug. 1986, NVAG2 (Paris, June 1988; Schertzer and Lovejoy, 1991, five consecutive annual sessions at EGS general assemblies and two consecutive spring AGU meeting sessions. As with the other conferences and workshops mentioned above, the aim was to develop confrontation between theories and experiments on scaling/multifractal behaviour of geophysical fields. Subjects covered included climate, clouds, earthquakes, atmospheric and ocean dynamics, tectonics, precipitation, hydrology, the solar cycle and volcanoes. Areas of focus included new methods of data analysis (especially those used for the reliable estimation of multifractal and scaling exponents, as well as their application to rapidly growing data bases from in situ networks and remote sensing. The corresponding modelling, prediction and estimation techniques were also emphasized as were the current debates about stochastic and deterministic dynamics, fractal geometry and multifractals, self-organized criticality and multifractal fields, each of which was the subject of a specific general discussion. The conference started with a one day short course of multifractals featuring four lectures on a Fundamentals of multifractals: dimension, codimensions, codimension formalism, b Multifractal estimation techniques: (PDMS, DTM, c Numerical simulations, Generalized Scale Invariance analysis, d Advanced multifractals, singular statistics, phase transitions, self-organized criticality and Lie cascades (given by D. Schertzer and S. Lovejoy, detailed course notes were sent to participants shortly after the

  10. EGS Richardson AGU Chapman NVAG3 Conference: Nonlinear Variability in Geophysics: scaling and multifractal processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schertzer, D.; Lovejoy, S.

    1. The conference The third conference on "Nonlinear VAriability in Geophysics: scaling and multifractal processes" (NVAG 3) was held in Cargese, Corsica, Sept. 10-17, 1993. NVAG3 was joint American Geophysical Union Chapman and European Geophysical Society Richardson Memorial conference, the first specialist conference jointly sponsored by the two organizations. It followed NVAG1 (Montreal, Aug. 1986), NVAG2 (Paris, June 1988; Schertzer and Lovejoy, 1991), five consecutive annual sessions at EGS general assemblies and two consecutive spring AGU meeting sessions. As with the other conferences and workshops mentioned above, the aim was to develop confrontation between theories and experiments on scaling/multifractal behaviour of geophysical fields. Subjects covered included climate, clouds, earthquakes, atmospheric and ocean dynamics, tectonics, precipitation, hydrology, the solar cycle and volcanoes. Areas of focus included new methods of data analysis (especially those used for the reliable estimation of multifractal and scaling exponents), as well as their application to rapidly growing data bases from in situ networks and remote sensing. The corresponding modelling, prediction and estimation techniques were also emphasized as were the current debates about stochastic and deterministic dynamics, fractal geometry and multifractals, self-organized criticality and multifractal fields, each of which was the subject of a specific general discussion. The conference started with a one day short course of multifractals featuring four lectures on a) Fundamentals of multifractals: dimension, codimensions, codimension formalism, b) Multifractal estimation techniques: (PDMS, DTM), c) Numerical simulations, Generalized Scale Invariance analysis, d) Advanced multifractals, singular statistics, phase transitions, self-organized criticality and Lie cascades (given by D. Schertzer and S. Lovejoy, detailed course notes were sent to participants shortly after the conference). This

  11. Evaluation of a gadolinium-based nanoparticle (AGuIX) for contrast-enhanced MRI of the liver in a rat model of hepatic colorectal cancer metastases at 9.4 tesla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fries, P.; Morr, D.; Mueller, A.; Massmann, A.; Seidel, R.; Schneider, G.; Buecker, A. [Saarland University Medical Center, Homburg (Germany). Clinic of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Lux, F.; Tillement, O. [Universite Claude Bernard, Lyon (France). Laboratoire de Physico-Chimie des Materiaux Luminescents; Schaefer, T. [Saarland University Medical Center, Homburg (Germany). Dept. of General, Visceral and Pediatric Surgery; Menger, M.D. [Saarland University Medical Center, Homburg (Germany). Inst. for Clinical and Experimental Surgery

    2015-12-15

    The aim of this study was to compare a Gd-based nanoparticle (AGuIX) with a standard extracellular Gd-based contrast agent (Gd-DOTA) for MRI at 9.4 T in rats with hepatic colorectal cancer metastases. 12 rats with hepatic metastases were subjected to MRI using a 9.4 T animal scanner. T1w self-gated FLASH sequences (TR/TE=45/2.5 ms, alpha = 45 , TA=1: 23 min, FOV=5.12 x 5.12 cm{sup 2}, matrix = 256 x 256) were acquired before and at 10 time points after contrast injection. Each animal received 0.1 mmol/kg BW Gd-DOTA i.v. 2 days later AGuIX was applied at 0.01 mmol/kg BW (representing equal Gd doses). The SNR of normal liver (SNRliver), hyper- and hypoenhancing parts of tumors (SNRtumor, hyperenh/SNRtumor, hypoenhanc), erector spinae muscle (SNRmuscle), CNR and lesion enhancement (LE) were calculated based on ROI measurements. Mean SNRliver (Gd-DOTA: 14.6 ± 0.7; AGuIX: 28.2 ± 2.6, p < 0.001), SNRtumor, hyperenhanc (Gd-DOTA: 18.6 ± 1.2; AGuIX: 29.6 ± 2.8, p < 0.001), SNRtumor, hypoenhanc (Gd-DOTA: 12.0 ± 0.7; AGuIX: 15.4 ± 0.7, p < 0.001), SNRmuscle (Gd-DOTA: 12.3 ± 0.3; AGuIX: 14.0 ± 0.7, p < 0.001), mean CNR (Gd-DOTA: -2.5 ± 0.2; AGuIX: -7.5 ± 1.0, p < 0.001) and LE (Gd-DOTA: 3.8 ± 0.7; AGuIX: 14.9 ± 2.8, p=0.001) were significantly higher using AGuIX. Regardless of the larger molecular size, AGuIX demonstrates an early peak enhancement followed by a continuous washout. AGuIX provides better enhancement at 9.4 T compared to Gd-DOTA for equal doses of applied Gd. This is based on the molecule structure and the subsequent increased interaction with protons leading to a higher relaxivity. AGuIX potentially ameliorates the conspicuity of focal liver lesions and may improve the sensitivity in diagnostic imaging of malignant hepatic tumors.

  12. Evaluation of a gadolinium-based nanoparticle (AGuIX) for contrast-enhanced MRI of the liver in a rat model of hepatic colorectal cancer metastases at 9.4 tesla

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fries, P.; Morr, D.; Mueller, A.; Massmann, A.; Seidel, R.; Schneider, G.; Buecker, A.; Lux, F.; Tillement, O.; Schaefer, T.; Menger, M.D.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare a Gd-based nanoparticle (AGuIX) with a standard extracellular Gd-based contrast agent (Gd-DOTA) for MRI at 9.4 T in rats with hepatic colorectal cancer metastases. 12 rats with hepatic metastases were subjected to MRI using a 9.4 T animal scanner. T1w self-gated FLASH sequences (TR/TE=45/2.5 ms, alpha = 45 , TA=1: 23 min, FOV=5.12 x 5.12 cm 2 , matrix = 256 x 256) were acquired before and at 10 time points after contrast injection. Each animal received 0.1 mmol/kg BW Gd-DOTA i.v. 2 days later AGuIX was applied at 0.01 mmol/kg BW (representing equal Gd doses). The SNR of normal liver (SNRliver), hyper- and hypoenhancing parts of tumors (SNRtumor, hyperenh/SNRtumor, hypoenhanc), erector spinae muscle (SNRmuscle), CNR and lesion enhancement (LE) were calculated based on ROI measurements. Mean SNRliver (Gd-DOTA: 14.6 ± 0.7; AGuIX: 28.2 ± 2.6, p < 0.001), SNRtumor, hyperenhanc (Gd-DOTA: 18.6 ± 1.2; AGuIX: 29.6 ± 2.8, p < 0.001), SNRtumor, hypoenhanc (Gd-DOTA: 12.0 ± 0.7; AGuIX: 15.4 ± 0.7, p < 0.001), SNRmuscle (Gd-DOTA: 12.3 ± 0.3; AGuIX: 14.0 ± 0.7, p < 0.001), mean CNR (Gd-DOTA: -2.5 ± 0.2; AGuIX: -7.5 ± 1.0, p < 0.001) and LE (Gd-DOTA: 3.8 ± 0.7; AGuIX: 14.9 ± 2.8, p=0.001) were significantly higher using AGuIX. Regardless of the larger molecular size, AGuIX demonstrates an early peak enhancement followed by a continuous washout. AGuIX provides better enhancement at 9.4 T compared to Gd-DOTA for equal doses of applied Gd. This is based on the molecule structure and the subsequent increased interaction with protons leading to a higher relaxivity. AGuIX potentially ameliorates the conspicuity of focal liver lesions and may improve the sensitivity in diagnostic imaging of malignant hepatic tumors.

  13. aguA, the gene encoding an extracellular alpha-glucuronidase from Aspergillus tubingensis, is specifically induced on xylose and not on glucuronic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, R P; Poulsen, C H; Madrid, S; Visser, J

    1998-01-01

    An extracellular alpha-glucuronidase was purified and characterized from a commercial Aspergillus preparation and from culture filtrate of Aspergillus tubingensis. The enzyme has a molecular mass of 107 kDa as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and 112 kDa as determined by mass spectrometry, has a determined pI just below 5.2, and is stable at pH 6.0 for prolonged times. The pH optimum for the enzyme is between 4.5 and 6.0, and the temperature optimum is 70 degrees C. The alpha-glucuronidase is active mainly on small substituted xylo-oligomers but is also able to release a small amount of 4-O-methylglucuronic acid from birchwood xylan. The enzyme acts synergistically with endoxylanases and beta-xylosidase in the hydrolysis of xylan. The enzyme is N glycosylated and contains 14 putative N-glycosylation sites. The gene encoding this alpha-glucuronidase (aguA) was cloned from A. tubingensis. It consists of an open reading frame of 2,523 bp and contains no introns. The gene codes for a protein of 841 amino acids, containing a eukaryotic signal sequence of 20 amino acids. The mature protein has a predicted molecular mass of 91,790 Da and a calculated pI of 5.13. Multiple copies of the gene were introduced in A. tubingensis, and expression was studied in a highly overproducing transformant. The aguA gene was expressed on xylose, xylobiose, and xylan, similarly to genes encoding endoxylanases, suggesting a coordinate regulation of expression of xylanases and alpha-glucuronidase. Glucuronic acid did not induce the expression of aguA and also did not modulate the expression on xylose. Addition of glucose prevented expression of aguA on xylan but only reduced the expression on xylose.

  14. aguA, the Gene Encoding an Extracellular α-Glucuronidase from Aspergillus tubingensis, Is Specifically Induced on Xylose and Not on Glucuronic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Ronald P.; Poulsen, Charlotte H.; Madrid, Susan; Visser, Jaap

    1998-01-01

    An extracellular α-glucuronidase was purified and characterized from a commercial Aspergillus preparation and from culture filtrate of Aspergillus tubingensis. The enzyme has a molecular mass of 107 kDa as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and 112 kDa as determined by mass spectrometry, has a determined pI just below 5.2, and is stable at pH 6.0 for prolonged times. The pH optimum for the enzyme is between 4.5 and 6.0, and the temperature optimum is 70°C. The α-glucuronidase is active mainly on small substituted xylo-oligomers but is also able to release a small amount of 4-O-methylglucuronic acid from birchwood xylan. The enzyme acts synergistically with endoxylanases and β-xylosidase in the hydrolysis of xylan. The enzyme is N glycosylated and contains 14 putative N-glycosylation sites. The gene encoding this α-glucuronidase (aguA) was cloned from A. tubingensis. It consists of an open reading frame of 2,523 bp and contains no introns. The gene codes for a protein of 841 amino acids, containing a eukaryotic signal sequence of 20 amino acids. The mature protein has a predicted molecular mass of 91,790 Da and a calculated pI of 5.13. Multiple copies of the gene were introduced in A. tubingensis, and expression was studied in a highly overproducing transformant. The aguA gene was expressed on xylose, xylobiose, and xylan, similarly to genes encoding endoxylanases, suggesting a coordinate regulation of expression of xylanases and α-glucuronidase. Glucuronic acid did not induce the expression of aguA and also did not modulate the expression on xylose. Addition of glucose prevented expression of aguA on xylan but only reduced the expression on xylose. PMID:9440512

  15. Loss muinasjuturaamatust / Agu Veetamm

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Veetamm, Agu, 1953-

    2004-01-01

    Ballindaloch on üks väheseid Shoti losse, kus omanikud aastaringselt elavad. 450 aastat on loss kuulunud Macpherson-Grantide suguvõsale. Praegu on lossi omanikuks Clare Nancy Macpherson-Grant Russell, kelle kujundatud on kiviktaimla ja rosaarium. Lossi ajaloost, omanikest, ümberehitustest, ringkäigust lossis, pargist. 14 ill

  16. AGuIX, a theranostic nano-particle to improve image-guided radiation therapy: a proof of concept in pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detappe, Alexandre

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated AGuIX ability to act as an efficient radiosensitizer under the presence of preclinical radiations or monoenergetic radiation beams for multiple cancer models. The preclinical irradiation (220 kV) has been shown effective in activating high atomic number (Z) nanoparticles. The energy peak is close to the k-edge of the different high-Z elements used (50.2 keV for the gadolinium), leading to a strong photoelectric effect. Auger electrons generation and biological effects occur afterwards creating a local dose enhancement. However, clinical treatments use a higher energy beam (≥6 MV). At these energy ranges, the photoelectric probability is less important, decreasing the direct interaction of the nanoparticles with the incoming photons. We performed a proof of concept on a pancreatic tumor model, known for its low survival rates, with preclinical and clinical radiation beams to evaluate the efficacy of the AGuIX. To increase the efficacy of the clinical radiation beam without modifying the nanoparticle structure in order to obtain a dose enhancement close to the one observed with the preclinical beam, we evaluated key clinical beam parameters to understand and increase the mechanisms of interaction between the incident photons and the high-Z nanoparticles. Hence, we evaluated analytically the impact of the radiation beam under different conditions of irradiation, confirming the potential of the AGuIX with a preclinical beam, and finally shown their significant efficacy under a clinical setup. This study is the first to evaluate the potential of a high-Z nanoparticle to act as radiosensitizer following low dose intravenous injections. (author)

  17. Valik arvamusi läbi aastate / Ain-Elmar Kaasik

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kaasik, Ain-Elmar, 1934-

    2008-01-01

    Valik Eesti Teaduste Akadeemia Aastaraamatus rubriigis "Arvamusi akadeemikutelt" ilmunud kirjutisi, kus vabas vormis käsitletakse mitmesuguseid aktuaalseid küsimusi, eelkõige hariduse, teadustöö ning ühiskonna suhteid. Kokku on rubriigis avaldatud ligi kaks ja poolsada kirjutist. Siinse valiku autoriteks akadeemikud Raimund Hagelberg, Mart Saarma, Boris Tamm, Ene Ergma, Arvo Krikmann, Agu Laisk, Hans-Voldemar Trass, Harald Keres, Anto Raukas, Rein Küttner, Enn Tõugu, Raimund-Johannes Ubar, Ain-Elmar Kaasik

  18. AGU testifies on NASA Budget

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simarski, Lynn Teo

    Witnesses from outside the U.S. government—including Frank Eden, representing AGU—testified about the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's budget on March 12 before the House Science Committee's subcommittee on space. One major topic of the hearing was familiar: what should NASA's top priority be, space science or human exploration of space.“Obviously this committee has a huge job of trying to set priorities—consistent with the budget restraints—that will end up giving the American taxpayer the most bang for his buck, as well as providing direction for our space program,” said F. James Sensenbrenner, Jr. (R-Wis.), the subcommittee's ranking Republican. Another recurring topic, cited by the subcommittee's new chairman, Ralph M. Hall (D-Tex.), as well as by other committee members, was how to translate NASA-developed technologies into commercial gain for the U.S. in the global marketplace. Hall and others also posed a number of questions on a topic the chairman called a special concern of his: whether it would be economically and scientifically plausible for the U.S. to use the Soviet space station Mir for certain activities, such as medical applications.

  19. Pacific Northwest regional AGU meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyndman, Roy

    The 27th Annual Pacific Northwest Regional American Geophysical Union Meeting, held September 25 and 26, 1980, was hosted by the Pacific Geoscience Centre at the Institute of Ocean Sciences, near Victoria, British Columbia. A total of 79 papers was presented to the 150 registrants in six general sessions: seismology; electromagnetic induction; general geophysics; volcanology; hydrology; and oceanography, and in three special symposia: ‘The Queen Charlotte-Fairweather fault system and other active faults of the Pacific Northwest’ ‘Coastal circulation in the northeast Pacific’ and ‘Studies of the eruption of Mount St. Helens.’

  20. 1989”1990 AGU Congressional Fellow report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Barbara J.

    Describing the last 3 months on the Subcommittee on International Scientific Cooperation of the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Science, Space, and Technology is no easy task. I have learned a great deal about many issues and about the workings of Congress; yet this knowledge has not been gained in a necessarily straightforward or logical manner.Although my status on the Subcommittee is that of a Fellow, in effect I am expected to function as a regular staff member. I immediately became involved in the preparation of two hearings, the first on science and technology initiatives for Poland and Hungary, and the second on the Human Genome Project. At these hearings, I learned firsthand about important aspects of science-related issues that concern Congress, namely, intellectual property rights, U.S. competitiveness in the science and technology arena with other countries, Japan, in particular; and big science versus small science funding.

  1. AGU Mass Media Fellow Discovers ``Wow'' Factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Ben

    2008-04-01

    I clearly remember the first time I realized that something was amiss with my perception of science. It was the summer of 2001. I was a second-year graduate student studying hydrothermal chemistry at the University of Washington, in Seattle. At the moment of my realization, I was in New York exploring an exhibit about hydrothermal vents at the American Museum of Natural History. As I was inspecting an intricate diorama of a remotely operated vehicle diving on a vent field, my younger brother, fascinated by the setup, asked, ``How come when you talk about this stuff, it always sounds so complicated and boring?'' I didn't have a good answer.

  2. Teenetemärkide kandidaadid

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2000-01-01

    Esialgne, kinnitamata nimekiri isikutest, kellele presidendi kantselei ja riigiasutused taotlevad tänavu teenetemärke iseseisvuspäeva puhul. Vt. samas: vastulause, Eesti Päevaleht, 13. jaan. 2001, lk. 11. Valgetähe medal: Enn Tõugu; Ülo Lill; Arda-Maria Kirsel; Valgetähe orden I järk Hillar Aben; Valgetähe orden II järk: Õim, Haldur; Rätsep, Huno; Ross, Juhan; Ergma, Ene; Saarma, Mart; Liidja, Georg; Hižnjakov, Vladimir; Laisk, Agu; Valgetähe ordeni IV klass - Endel Valk-Falk, Valgetähe ordeni V klass - Anne Valmas. Ka bibliograaf Arvo Tering, raamatuloolane Kaljo-Olev Veskimägi, bibliograaf Ilmar Vene, TÜRi rmtk-hoidjad Kaljo Lepik ja Elsa Loorits, raamatuteadlane, TPÜ prof. emer. Mare Lott, TPÜ infoteaduste prof. Evi Rannap

  3. An update from AGU about the Virtual Poster Showcase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asher, P. M.; Furukawa, H.; Brown, V.

    2016-12-01

    The Virtual Poster Showcase (VPS), now in its second year of implementation, has garnered a lot of interest from the geoscience community. The platform enables both undergraduate and graduate students to present their research from anywhere in the world without having to travel to a national or international conference. The VPS platform is simple to use and consists of three steps which include submission of an abstract, uploading a poster and a short video presentation explaining the work, and judging three peer posters online and receiving feedback/comments on their own posters. Based on the completed showcases from 2015 and now 2016, students reported gains in confidence in both preparing and presenting research posters as well as the impact on their careers based on post-showcase evaluations. This presentation will discuss some statistics about the showcases and participants, student evaluation results, stories and anecdotes about the showcases impact on individual students and faculty, as well as plans for the coming year.

  4. Propaganda Aristotelesest tänapäevani / Agu Uudelepp

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Uudelepp, Agu, 1974-

    2005-01-01

    Propaganda peaeesmärk on suunata inimese tähelepanu eemale ratsionaalsetelt argumentidelt, kanaliseerida tema arusaamad emotsionaalsesse voolusängi ning panna ta selle abil propagandistile sobivalt käituma, väidab autor. Skeemid

  5. Lõputu sõda Sri Lankal / Agu Karelsohn

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Karelsohn, Agu

    2008-01-01

    Ülevaade Sri Lankal aastakümneid kestnud ja umbes 70 000 tapetut nõudnud kodusõjast, kus omavahel võitlevad võimul olevad singalid ja vähemuses olevad ning mässuliste organisatsiooniks Tamili Tiigrid koondunud tamilid. Kaart: Sri Lanka

  6. Citation for Vladimir Cermak: 1995 AGU Flinn Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollack, Henry N.; Cermák, Vladìmír

    “Vladimìr Cermák, Director of the Geophysical Institute of the Czech Academy of Sciences in Prague, has for many years played a most remarkable role in bringing Earth scientists from the Eastern and Western Bloc countries together for scientific interactions. However anachronistic the concept of East and West political divisions may seem today, there are many who remember the nearly insuperable obstacles that prevented scientific exchange between those groups for decades prior to 1989. Vladimìr Cermák, through his organizing of small conferences and workshops in Czechoslovakia, accomplished the impossible. Through some extraordinarily deft diplomacy, Cermák obtained funding, secured visas, and mastered arcane currency regulations to enable small groups to meet in splendid castles and elegant country homes in rural Bohemia, facilities without urban distractions which had been placed under the custodianship of the Czech Academy of Science to serve as scientific retreats. Three meetings in the course of a decade stand out: at Liblice in 1982, and at Bechyne in 1987 and 1991, all dealing in general with heat flow and thermal aspects of lithospheric structure. These meetings were not just for prominent senior scientists, though of course many were in attendance. Of special significance were the opportunities for younger researchers to surmount the barriers that had been erected by forces well beyond the sphere of science. As one West German remarked as a graduate student in 1982, ‘I remember well how impressed I was…to learn the details of the daily personal and scientific life of an east German colleague of my own age.’ Cermák knew intuitively that the future belonged to the young, and he wanted to nurture their enthusiasm and stimulate their creativity.

  7. Very Slow Speed Axial Motion Reluctance Motor | Agu | Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. This paper presents the scheme for a very slow speed linear machine which uses conventional laminations and with which speeds of the same low order as that of the screw-thread motor can be obtained.

  8. Communicating science: Reflections of an AGU public affairs intern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huth, Tyler

    2012-10-01

    This past summer, I read a biography of the geologist and anthropologist John Wesley Powell. Among his many important accomplishments, Powell was a legendary explorer of the then largely unknown American West, a leader in the founding of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and its second director, and the founder of the Cosmos Club in Washington, D. C. He was a student of the Earth from an early age, fought and lost an arm for the Union during the Civil War, advanced to the rank of major, led the first successful expedition down the entirety of the Grand Canyon, and then spent the rest of his life coupling scientific knowledge with public policy.

  9. Primary adenocarcinoma of the appendix: A review | Agu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adenocarcinoma of the vermiform appendix is rare constituting less than 0.5 % of all gastrointestinal tumours. It is most commonly seen after the fifth decade of life with a slight male preponderance. It stains positive for cytokeratin 20 which is utilized in immunohistochemical diagnosis. The commonest clinical presentation is ...

  10. Internship Experiences at AGU and AGI help train the next generations of geoscientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asher, P. M.; Wilson, C. E.

    2017-12-01

    Each year, the American Geosciences Institute (AGI) measures internship participation among recent geoscience graduates through AGI's Geoscience Student Exit Survey. Over the past four years, internship participation among geoscience graduates has been low, particularly among bachelor's and doctoral graduates. While participation rates have been lower than expected, those that participate in fully recognize the importance of these opportunities to their academic and professional development. Internships in policy, media, publishing, and workforce and talent pool areas at the American Geophysical Union and AGI exist to provide real life work experiences for students. Internships are offered each semester for a period of three months. The skills sets required by various internships vary within our respective organizations but they all recognize the importance of writing, communication, and critical thinking or research skills. This presentation will share some case studies of students who have participated in our internships over time, their post-internship pathways into the workforce or graduate school, and the impact of their internship on their careers as well as their contributions to the organizations.

  11. Neljas võim : omni- või impotentne? / Agu Uudelepp

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Uudelepp, Agu, 1974-

    2006-01-01

    Rahvaliidu teabejuhi arvates on Eesti ajakirjandus liiga skandaalikeskne ning kaotanud olulise rolli demokraatia tasakaalustaja ja valvurina. Autor tõdeb, et meedia survel ei ole ametist lahkunud ükski Eesti tipp-poliitik. Vastuseks vt. Priit Pulleritsu repliiki 12. apr. Postimees lk. 31

  12. EGS Richardson AGU Chapman NVAG3 Conference: Nonlinear Variability in Geophysics: scaling and multifractal processes

    OpenAIRE

    D. Schertzer; S. Lovejoy; S. Lovejoy

    1994-01-01

    1. The conference The third conference on "Nonlinear VAriability in Geophysics: scaling and multifractal processes" (NVAG 3) was held in Cargese, Corsica, Sept. 10-17, 1993. NVAG3 was joint American Geophysical Union Chapman and European Geophysical Society Richardson Memorial conference, the first specialist conference jointly sponsored by the two organizations. It followed NVAG1 (Montreal, Aug. 1986), NVAG2 (Paris, June 1988; Schertzer and Lovejoy, 1991), five consecutive annual ...

  13. EGS Richardson AGU Chapman NVAG3 Conference: Nonlinear Variability in Geophysics: scaling and multifractal processes

    OpenAIRE

    Schertzer , D; Lovejoy , S.

    1994-01-01

    International audience; 1. The conference The third conference on "Nonlinear VAriability in Geophysics: scaling and multifractal processes" (NVAG 3) was held in Cargese, Corsica, Sept. 10-17, 1993. NVAG3 was joint American Geophysical Union Chapman and European Geophysical Society Richardson Memorial conference, the first specialist conference jointly sponsored by the two organizations. It followed NVAG1 (Montreal, Aug. 1986), NVAG2 (Paris, June 1988; Schertzer and Lovejoy, 1991), five conse...

  14. Millist rahastamist vajab kodanikuühiskonna arendamine? / Urmo Kübar, Agu Laius

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kübar, Urmo, 1978-

    2007-01-01

    Rahastamine on avaliku võimu ja kodanikeühenduste koostöö vorm, mida tuleks käsitada vastastikuste huvide elluviimisena. Riigi, erasektori ja omatulude osa rahastamises, teiste riikide kogemusi. Kodanikuühiskonna sihtkapitali (KÜSK) eesmärgid ja ülesanded. Diagramm: Vabaühenduste sissetulekuallikad

  15. Planning for Sea Level Rise: An AGU Talk in the Form of a Co-Production Experiment Exploring Recent Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behar, D. H.; Kopp, R. E.; DeConto, R.; Weaver, C. P.; White, K. D.; May, K.; Bindschadler, R.

    2017-12-01

    Global sea level rise (SLR) may present the most urgent climate change adaptation challenge facing coastal communities today. The direction is clear, impacts are manifesting now, and the pace of rise is likely to accelerate. As a result, many coastal communities have begun planning their adaptation response and some are quite far along in the process. At the same time, evolving science provides new observations, models, and understanding of land-ocean dynamics that can increase clarity while also in many ways increase uncertainty about the scope, timing, and regional nature of SLR. The planning, design, and construction of water infrastructure has a relatively long timeline (up to 30 years), and thus the evolution of scientific knowledge presents challenges for communities already planning for SLR based on previous information. When does science become actionable for decision-makers? Are there characteristics or thresholds that could cause communities decide to move from one set of scenarios to another, or change approaches altogether? This talk focuses on two important studies different in kind but dominating the conversation about SLR adaptation planning today. First, DeConto and Pollard (2016) have suggested significantly higher upper end projections for Antarctic ice sheet melt, which increase both global and regional SLR above most previously assumed upper limits. Second, probabilistic projections using model output and expert elicitation as presented in Kopp et al (2014) are increasingly appearing in federal reports and planning-related documents. These two papers are pushing the boundaries of the science-to-planning interface, while the application of this work as actionable science is far from settled. This talk will present the outcome of recent conversations among our diverse author team. The authors are engaged in SLR planning related contexts from many angles and perspectives and include the aforementioned Kopp and DeConto as well as representatives of the City of San Francisco, Army Corps of Engineers, Environmental Protection Agency, and engineering consultant community. Attendees of this session will hear a presentation demonstrating co-production in process, including topics about which the authors have and have not agreed upon to date, with some attention to next steps in the process.

  16. Evaluating a new method to estimate the rate of leaf respiration in the light by analysis of combined gas exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yin, X.; Sun, Z.; Struik, P.C.; Gu, J.

    2011-01-01

    Day respiration (R(d)) is an important parameter in leaf ecophysiology. It is difficult to measure directly and is indirectly estimated from gas exchange (GE) measurements of the net photosynthetic rate (A), commonly using the Laisk method or the Kok method. Recently a new method was proposed to

  17. Vaheta vanaema suvepiiga vastu - üllatushinnad! / Tiia Penjam

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Penjam, Tiia, 1955-

    2009-01-01

    Vastukaja artiklile: Laisk, Mart. Dehumaniseeritud koolisüsteem. Postimees, 27.05.2009. Samas ka kultuuritusest ja lahmivast halvustamisest omakasupüüdlikel ajenditel TEA kirjastuse koduleheküljel. Samas ka Urmas Vadi luuletus "Vahetus", mis ilmus 28. mai "EE Areenis"

  18. Domesticando el despojo: palma africana, acaparamiento de tierras y género en el Bajo Aguán, Honduras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés León Araya

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Con base en el testimonio de vida de una familia campesina, este artículo explora la contrarreforma agraria, entendida como un proceso de acumulación primitiva, que se llevó a cabo a principios de los noventa en Honduras. Más específicamente, se busca recuperar la vivencia compartida de muchas mujeres campesinas a través de una perspectiva etnográfica y de género que proporcione ciertas luces sobre cómo opera el despojo, en tanto proceso permanente y constitutivo del capitalismo.

  19. Picturing the Earth: Geoscience in Public Art Abstract for AGU 2013: Geoscience through the Lens of Art. Author: Stacy Levy, Sere Ltd., Spring Mills, PA (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, S.

    2013-12-01

    Public places such as parks, urban plazas, transportation centers and educational institutions offer the opportunity to reach many people in the course of daily life. Yet these public spaces are often devoid of any substantive information about the local environment and natural processes that have shaped it. Art is a particularly effective means to visualize environmental phenomena. Art has the ability to translate the processes of nature into visual information that communicates with clarity and beauty. People often have no connection to the world through which they walk: no sense of their place in the local watershed or where the rainwater goes once it hits the ground. Creating an awareness of place is critical first step for people to understand the changes in their world. Art can be a gateway for understanding geo-scientific concepts that are not frequently made accessible in a visual manner And art requires scientific knowledge to inform an accurate visualization of nature. Artists must collaborate with scientists in order to create art that informs the public about environmental processes. There is a new current in the design world that combines art and technology to create artful solutions to site issues such as storm water runoff, periodic flooding and habitat destruction. Instead of being considered functionless, art is now given a chance to do some real work on the site. This new combination of function and aesthetic concerns will have a major impact on how site issues are perceived. Site concerns that were once considered obstacles can become opportunities to visualize and celebrate how problems can be solved. This sort of artful solutions requires teamwork across many disciplines. In my presentation I will speak about various ways of I have visualized the invisible processes of the natural world in my projects. I will share eight of my permanent and temporary art commissions that are collaborations with scientists and engineers. These works reveal wetland habitats, tides, prevailing winds, rain and microorganisms, and water pollution. In examining each project I will detail the essential collaborations with scientists and engineers that brought the projects to fruition. I will discuss how the cross-discipline approach of scientists, engineers and designers made effective and artful solutions to site issues, and created visually stimulating and educational places. I will also look at the role of truth and metaphor in art and compare how accuracy and data collection have differing thresholds in art and in science.

  20. Society News: Workshop helps new GJI authors; Free eBook for schools; EGU awards medal; AGU elects Fellow; Support your Society; New Fellows

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Early-career researchers and postgraduates are invited to attend an Author Workshop at the 2012 European Geosciences Union General Assembly in Vienna. The following were elected Fellows of the Society on 10 February 2012:

  1. AguR is a transmembrane transcription activator of the putrescine biosynthesis operon in Lactococcus lactis, and acts in response to agmatine concentration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linares, Daniel M; Del Rio, Beatriz; Redruello, Begoña; Ladero, Victor; Martin, Ma Cruz; de Jong, Anne; Kuipers, Oscar P; Fernandez, Maria; Alvarez, Miguel A

    2015-01-01

    Dairy industry fermentative processes mostly use Lactococcus lactis as a starter. However, some dairy L. lactis strains produce putrescine - a biogenic amine that raises food safety and spoilage concerns - via the agmatine deiminase pathway (AGDI). The enzymatic activities responsible for putrescine

  2. What's a Nice Hummingbird Like You Doing at an AGU Meeting Like This? (or, Operation RubyThroat Meets The GLOBE Program)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, B.

    2003-12-01

    "Operation RubyThroat: The Hummingbird Project" is an international cross-disciplinary initiative that uses Ruby-throated Hummingbirds (Archilochus colubris) as a hook to excite K-12 students (and adults) about science learning. In 2002, Operation RubyThroat affiliated with The GLOBE Program as the first GLOBE protocol that involves animal behavior. Through Operation RubyThroat, students make observations about hummingbird phenology, behavior, and ecology and correlate their data against traditional GLOBE observations of atmosphere, climate, land cover, soils, hydrology, and phenology. Although Ruby-throated Hummingbirds (RTHUs) breed throughout the eastern half of the United States and southern Canada and may be the most common and most widely distributed of all 338 hummingbird species, little is known about how abiotic environmental factors affect their migration, nesting activities, and everyday behavior. Operation RubyThroat participants in the U.S. and Canada log early arrival dates of RTHUs during spring migration, note their presence throughout the breeding season, and report the last date RTHUs are seen in autumn. Conversely, participants in Mexico and all seven Central American countries (the region in which RTHUs spend their non-breeding months) watch for early arrivals in fall and late departures in spring. Participants also attempt to estimate numbers of RTHUs in local populations by counting the number of visits hummingbirds make to feeders and/or flowers in a 45-minute time block. Optional activities include observations of RTHU nesting behaviors and determining RTHU preferences for various species of native and exotic nectar sources. Participating schools are encouraged to establish Schoolyard Hummingbird Habitats in which to make their observations, but data may be collected in backyards or at local parks, nature centers, botanical gardens, and other sites where RTHUs occur. Adults not affiliated with K-12 schools are invited to become certified in the hummingbird protocols and to submit Operation RubyThroat data to GLOBE. Participants report sightings of any RTHUs that are banded and color-marked with dye or that have unusual plumage (albinistic, leucistic, etc.). Participants in the eastern U.S. and Canada also report the occurrence of "winter vagrant" hummingbirds, i.e., species from the western U. S. and Mexico that from August through March seem to be wandering more frequently into the region. These unusual movements by western hummingbird species, as well as migration timing and winter occurrences of RTHUs, are correlated against GLOBE data to determine possible effects of atmosphere, climate, and land use, including the impact of global warming. As a new GLOBE protocol, Operation RubyThroat is just beginning to generate data for analysis. Operation RubyThroat's collaboration with GLOBE is funded by a grant from the National Science Foundation. Support for other aspects of the project comes from, among others, Agilent Technologies, ConocoPhillips (through National Fish and Wildlife Foundation), The Christensen Fund, and individual donors. Operation RubyThroat is an education, research, and conservation initiative of Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History (www.hiltonpond.org) in York, South Carolina USA.

  3. CRED Subsurface Temperature Recorder (STR); CNMI, AGU; Long: 145.53723, Lat: 14.84778 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 8.23m; Data Range: 20070518-20090410.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STR) provide a time series of...

  4. Transcriptome profiling of Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris CECT 8666 in response to agmatine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Del Rio, Beatriz; Redruello, Begoña; Martin, M Cruz; Fernandez, Maria; de Jong, Anne; Kuipers, Oscar P; Ladero, Victor; Alvarez, Miguel A

    2016-01-01

    The dairy strain Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris CECT 8666 (formerly GE2-14) synthesizes the biogenic amine putrescine from agmatine via the agmatine deiminase (AGDI) pathway [1]. The AGDI cluster of L. lactis is composed by five genes aguR, aguB, aguD, aguA and aguC. The last four genes are

  5. Kohtueelses menetluses antud ütluste kasutamine kohtumenetluses EV Riigikohtu ja Euroopa Inimõiguste Kohtu seisukohad ning SE 599 rakendunud muutused : [bakalaureusetöö] / Agu Aver ; Tartu Ülikool, õigusteaduskond ; juhendaja: Eerik Kergandberg

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Aver, Agu

    2012-01-01

    Eesti kriminaalmenetluse arengust, võistlevusest, Euroopa Inimõiguste ja Põhivabaduste kaitse konventsiooni artiklist 6 lõige 3 p (d), kohtueelses menetluses antud ütluste avaldamisest KrMS kohaselt, kuulduste keelust

  6. Decentralised CHP in a competitive market

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Henrik

    2004-01-01

    The article agues that decentralised CHP plants is an important part of energy supply in Denmark.......The article agues that decentralised CHP plants is an important part of energy supply in Denmark....

  7. Et oksad võiksid kasvada, selleks on juuri vaja : eesti teatrikostüüm Natalie Meist tänapäevani / Kustav-Agu Püüman, Pille Jänes, Liina Unt...[jt.] ; interv. Reet Varblane

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2000-01-01

    Eesti teatrikostüümist ja Natalie Mei rollist eesti kostüümikunstis. Kostüümikunstniku rollist ja haridusest, millest oleneb õige kostüümi loomine, trendid teatrikostüümis jm. L. Blumenfeldi kommentaar saadud e-posti teel.

  8. Developing Earth and Space Scientists for the Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manduca, Cathryn A.; Cifuentes, Inés

    2007-09-01

    As the world's largest organization of Earth and space scientists, AGU safeguards the future of pioneering research by ensuring that ``the number and diversity of Earth and space scientists continue to grow through the flow of young talent into the field'' (AGU Strategic Plan 2008, Goal IV). Achieving this goal is the focus of the AGU Committee on Education and Human Resources (CEHR), one of the Union's three outreach committees.

  9. Film kui mälestus / Alina Kurvits

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kurvits, Alina

    2003-01-01

    Dokumentaalfilm "Pildi sisse minek" kunstnik Agu Pildist : režissöör, operaator, monteerija Marianne Kõrver : produtsent Peeter Urbla : Exitfilm 2002. Lisatud "Dialoogid ühevaatuselisest näidendist "Anna mulle põhjus siia jäämiseks"", kus Alina Kurvits, Marianne Kõrver, Urmas Muru, Urve Eslas ja Agu Pilt vestlevad filmi tegemisest, kunstniku identiteedist

  10. Designing and Evaluating Tutoring Feedback Strategies for digital learning environments on the basis of the Interactive Tutoring Feedback Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Narciss

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the interactive tutoring feedback model (ITF-model; Narciss, 2006; 2008, and how it can be applied to the design and evaluation of feedback strategies for digital learning environments. The ITF-model conceptualizes formative tutoring feedback as a multidimensional instructional activity that aims at contributing to the regulation of a learning process in order to help learners acquire or improve the competencies needed to master learning tasks. It integrates findings from systems theory with recommendations of prior research on interactive instruction and elaborated feedback, on task analyses, on error analyses, and on tutoring techniques. Based on this multi-dimensional view of formative tutoring feedback methodological implications for designing and investigating multiple effects of feedback under multiple individual and situational conditions are described. Furthermore, the paper outlines how the implications of the ITF-model have been applied in several studies to the design and evaluation of tutoring feedback strategies for digital learning environments (e.g., Narciss, 2004; Narciss & Huth, 2006; Narciss, Schnaubert, Andres, Eichelmann, Goguadze, & Sosnovsky, 2013.

  11. New support line for members

    Science.gov (United States)

    AGU has recently established a new customer "support line"—solutions@agu.org—as the point of contact on AGU's staff for members and other individual constituents who have not been able to resolve issues or get questions answered promptly or to their satisfaction through customary channels.Over the past year, there have been many changes at AGU. Unfortunately—and perhaps as a result of these changes—communication with members and individual constituents has suffered. Some individuals report, for example, that e-mail messages are not answered to their satisfaction, or in a timely manner. Instructions on AGU's Web site are unclear in some areas. Problems related specifically to the transition to electronic publishing are cropping up.

  12. Transcriptome profiling of Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris CECT 8666 in response to agmatine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz del Rio

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The dairy strain Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris CECT 8666 (formerly GE2-14 synthesizes the biogenic amine putrescine from agmatine via the agmatine deiminase (AGDI pathway [1]. The AGDI cluster of L. lactis is composed by five genes aguR, aguB, aguD, aguA and aguC. The last four genes are co-transcribed as a single policistronic mRNA forming the catabolic operon aguBDAC, which encodes the proteins necessary for agmatine uptake and its conversion into putrescine [1,2]. The first gene of the cluster, aguR, encodes a transmembrane protein that functions as a one-component signal transduction system that senses the agmatine concentration of the medium and accordingly regulates the transcription of aguBDAC [2]. The catabolic operon aguBDAC is transcriptionally activated by agmatine [2] and transcriptionally regulated by carbon catabolite repression (CCR via glucose, but not by other sugars such as lactose or galactose [1,3]. On the contrary, the transcription of the aguR regulatory gene is not subject to CCR regulation [1,3] nor is regulated by agmatine [2]. In this study we report the transcriptional profiling of L. lactis subsp. cremoris CECT 8666 grown in M17 medium with galactose (GalM17 as carbon source and supplemented with agmatine, compared to that of the strain grown in the same culture medium without agmatine. The transcriptional profiling data of agmatine-regulated genes were deposited in the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO database under Accession no. GSE74808. Keywords: Lactococcus lactis, Biogenic amines, Putrescine, Agmatine deiminase, Agmatine

  13. Poster: A modern Python interface for the Generic Mapping Tools

    OpenAIRE

    Uieda, Leonardo; Wessel, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Poster presentation at the AGU Fall Meeting 2017.Abstract: IN51B-0018Inkscape source files for the poster and a Jupyter notebook with the demo are on the Github repository: github.com/leouieda/agu2017 The demo notebook can be run online using the MyBinder service: agu2017demo.gmtpython.xyzAbstractFigures generated by The Generic Mapping Tools (GMT) are present in countless publications across the Earth sciences. The command-line interface of GMT lends the tool its flexibility bu...

  14. Policy Statements Issued by Scientific Societies: Why Less can be More

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folger, P. F.

    2001-12-01

    The results of hydrological research are increasingly important to decision-makers grappling with problems as diverse as global climate change, non-point source pollution, extreme weather events, and damage from flooding. In some cases scientific aspects of these problems are interwoven with economic, political and social disputes, and policy makers often seek the consensus scientific opinion to help shape the debate. Policy or position statements issued by scientific societies like AGU can embody scientific consensus and thus inform the public and policy makers. But this is not always the case. The potential for creating public misunderstanding is ever present. Therefore, the process leading to a policy statement needs to be deliberative, inclusive to the extent possible, and circumspect. In contrast to advocacy organizations or trade groups, as a learned society AGU and members acting on its behalf should only advocate positions on political or social issues that are based solely on available geophysical data and recognized scientific debate. That does not mean that AGU and other scientific societies must refrain from entering a political debate. AGU has a responsibility to its members to adopt positions of advocacy on geophysical science issues based on their intrinsic merits and needs. However, a learned society like AGU should state only what is credible about the scientific aspects of a political debate and not overstep its authority as an objective source of analysis and commentary for the geophysical sciences. Before adopting an advocacy position, AGU's volunteers follow a process that includes checks and balances so that the final statement is based on sound scientific issues and reflects the interests of the Union as a whole. Any AGU member or committee can propose a position statement, but the Committee on Public Affairs (COPA) decides whether the proposal fall within the guidelines for advocacy. If it does and if COPA considers the issue worthy of an

  15. Fossilization of nanobes studied by transmission electron microscopy and constraints related to their population - Recent and Late Quaternary reefbanks (San Salvador Island, The Bahamas; Heron Island, Australia

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hladil, Jindřich; Gemperle, Antonín; Carew, J. L.; Bosák, Pavel; Slavík, Ladislav; Pruner, Petr; Charvatova, K.; Mylroie, J. E.; Jell, J. S.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 5, Abstracts of the Contributions of the EGS-AGU-EUG Joint Assembly Nice. (2003), s. Abstract Number 05312 ISSN 1029-7006. [EGS-AGU-EUG Joint Assembly. 06.04.2003-11.04.2003, EGS-AGU-EUG Joint Assembly] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA3013209 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3013912 Keywords : microbial diagenesis * carbonate platforms * Quaternary Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy http://www.cosis.net/abstracts/EAE03/05312/EAE03-J-05312-1.pdf

  16. Students fall for Fall Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smedley, Kara

    2012-02-01

    From Boston to Beijing, thousands of students traveled to San Francisco for the 2011 AGU Fall Meeting. Of those who participated, 183 students were able to attend thanks to AGU's student travel grant program, which assists students with travel costs and seeks to enrich the meeting through ethnic and gender diversity. Students at Fall Meeting enjoyed a variety of programs and activities designed to help them better network with their peers, learn about new fields, and disseminate their research to the interested public. More than 800 students attended AGU's first annual student mixer, sharing drinks and ideas with fellow student members and future colleagues as well as forging new friendships and intellectual relationships.

  17. New management structure at headquarters

    Science.gov (United States)

    On July 1, 1987, AGU Executive Director Fred Spilhaus informed the AGU staff that Judy C. Holoviak has been promoted to the position of Group Director. This is a new management position with responsibility for more than one division. Both the Publications Division and the newly formed Public Information and Marketing Division will report to Holoviak, as will the new Special Assistant for Nonprint Publications.Spilhaus explained that this new position will permit the headquarters management staff to be responsive to the current AGU growth. A stronger management structure is needed to take advantage of the many opportunities facing the Union. In pointing to the initiatives identified by the Planning Committee, he stated that continued growth is the only likely course for AGU.

  18. Tartu koolkond ajakirjade kujundajana 1930-1940 / Merle Talvik

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Talvik, Merle, 1971-

    2006-01-01

    Õppesüsteemist ja graafika õpetamisest Pallase Kõrgemas Kunstikoolis. Tartu kunstnikud ajakirjade kujundajana: Nikolai Triik, Ernst Kollom, Arkadio Laigu, Natalie Mei, Ado Vabbe, Ott Kangilaski, Hando Mugasto, Eduard Wiiralt, Peet Aren, Jaan Vahtra, Rudolf Paris, Agu Peerna jt

  19. Advantages of gadolinium based ultrasmall nanoparticles vs molecular gadolinium chelates for radiotherapy guided by MRI for glioma treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Le Duc, G.; Roux, S.; Paruta-Tuarez, A.; Dufort, S.; Bräuer, E.; Marais, A.; Truillet, C.; Sancey, L.; Perriat, P.; Lux, F.; Tillement, O.

    2014-01-01

    AGuIX nanoparticles are formed of a polysiloxane network surrounded by gadolinium chelates. They present several characteristics. They are easy to produce, they present very small hydrodynamic diameters (

  20. Täna kell 18 algab Pärnus Ammende villas E-kunstisalongi oksjon "Meistritöö"

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2005-01-01

    Oksjonivalikus on Adamson-Ericu 1926. a. valminud maal, O. Hoffmanni "Talumaja", J. W. Hagen-Schwarzi "Veneetsia kalur" ning E. Wiiralti, I. Anton-Agu, E. Kitse, J. Võerahansu, E. Kõksi, E. Pehapi jt. tööd

  1. Programming with Hierarchical Maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørbæk, Peter

    This report desribes the hierarchical maps used as a central data structure in the Corundum framework. We describe its most prominent features, ague for its usefulness and briefly describe some of the software prototypes implemented using the technology....

  2. "Hall mees" Linnateatris / Triin Sinissaar

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Sinissaar, Triin

    1999-01-01

    Tallinn Linnateatri ja Raadioteatri ühislavastus "Hall mees" Gill Adamsi näidendi järgi, lavastaja Eero Spriit, osades Helene Vannari ja Väino Laes, kunstnik Kustav - Agu Püüman. Esietendus 22. okt

  3. Korruptsioon ei valmista Eestis uuringu andmeil tõsist peavalu / Vahur Koorits

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Koorits, Vahur, 1981-

    2006-01-01

    Ilmunud ka: Postimees : na russkom jazõke 7. nov. lk. 5. Organisatsiooni Transparency International 2006. aasta korruptsiooni tajumise indeksist. Ühingu Korruptsioonivaba Eesti tegevjuht Agu Laius tutvustab uuringut. Diagramm: Eesti tõusis korruptsiooni tajumise tabelis

  4. VERY SLOW SPEED AXIAL MOTION RELUCTANCE MOTOR

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Obe

    1984-09-01

    Sep 1, 1984 ... VERY SLOW SPEED AXIAL MOTION RELUCTANCE MOTOR by. L. A. Agu ... order as that of the screw-thread motor can be obtained. LIST OF .... The n stator have equal non- magnetic spacers .... induction motor. An.

  5. Aafrika märgalad mõjutavad Eesti veelindude saatust / Silvia Paluoja

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Paluoja, Silvia, 1956-

    2005-01-01

    Linnuteadlane Agu Leivits osales Senegalis rahvusvahelisel kohtumisel. Kohtumise peateemaks oli ränd-veelindude kaitse ja kasutamise korraldamine kogu Aafrika-Euraasia rändteel ning kliimamuutuste mõju

  6. The Efforts of the American Geophysical Union Space Physics and Aeronomy Section Education and Public Outreach Committee to Use NASA Research in Education and Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bering, E. A., III; Dusenbery, P.; Gross, N. A.; Johnson, R.; Lopez, R. E.; Lysak, R. L.; Moldwin, M.; Morrow, C. A.; Nichols-Yehling, M.; Peticolas, L. M.; Reiff, P. H.; Scherrer, D. K.; Thieman, J.; Wawro, M.; Wood, E. L.

    2017-12-01

    The American Geophysical Union Space Physics and Aeronomy Section Education and Public Outreach Committee (AGU SPA-EPO Committee) was established in 1990 to foster the growth of a culture of outreach and community engagement within the SPA Section of the AGU. The SPA was the first AGU Section to establish an EPO Committee. The Committee has initiated several key Section EPO programs that have grown to become Union programs. NASA sponsored research is central to the mission of the SPE-EPO. Programs highlighting NASA research include the Student Paper Competition, Exploration Station, a precursor to the GIFT workshops, the Student mixer, and more. The Committee played a key role in coordinating the AGU's outreach activities relating to the International Heliophysical Year in 2007-2008. This paper will review the triumphs, the failures, and the lessons learned about recruiting colleagues to join with us from the last quarter century of effort.

  7. Miks mõned ettevõtjad ei soovi Euroopa Liitu astuda? / Raigo Neudorf

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Neudorf, Raigo

    2003-01-01

    Viru Kalatööstuse juhatuse esimees Agu Laanemets ja Lindal Grupi omanik Ramon Lindal põhjendavad oma EL-iga liitumise vastast seisukohta, nimetades peamiste argumentidena liidu bürokraatiat ning liigset kiirustamist

  8. Transition to electronic publishing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowning, Sam

    Previous communications have described some of the many changes that will occur in the next few months as AGU makes the transition to fully electronic publishing. With the advent of the new AGU electronic publishing system, manuscripts will be submitted, edited, reviewed, and published in electronic formats. This piece discusses how the electronic journals will differ from the print journals. Electronic publishing will require some adjustments to the ways we currently think about journals from our perspective of standard print versions. Visiting the Web site of AGU's Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems (G-Cubed) is a great way to get familiar with the look and feel of electronic publishing. However, protocols, especially for citations of articles, are still evolving. Some of the biggest changes for users of AGU publications may be the lack of page numbers, the use of a unique identifier (DOI),and changes in citation style.

  9. Effect Of Ecosystem Changes On Air-Borne And Vegetation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    dwelling arthropods was carried out in the Agu-Awka area of Awka, Anambra State capital. Areas investigated were roadsides, cultivated agricultural, built-up, uncultivated agricultural and forest sites using the sweep net for arthropods on ...

  10. Panel drafts position on U.S. science budget

    Science.gov (United States)

    The AGU panel charged with writing the Union position on the U.S. fiscal 1993 budget met at AGU Headquarters on February 27 to draft their statement and hear from representatives of federal science agencies. The panel's position statement is expected to be completed by the end of March, pending approval by the AGU Council.AGU has drafted positions on the U.S. science budget since 1990. This year's panel includes Terry E. Tullis (chair), Brown University; H. Frank Eden, General Electric Astro Space; Thomas E. Pyle, Joint Oceanographic Institutions, Inc.; Thomas Potemra, Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory; David W. Simpson, Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology; Steven W. Squyres, Cornell University; and Eric F. Wood, Princeton University.

  11. Some aspects of the role of intergranular fluids in the compositional ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    fluid, solubility in the fluid and mass balance between the various reservoirs. The model ... It is shown that a coupling of thermodynamics and kinetics controls the evolution of the system and the ...... systems. AGU Fall Meeting; EOS 78 F833.

  12. Ministry prepares to buy back rail company / Kairi Kurm

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kurm, Kairi

    2006-01-01

    Eesti valitsuse teatel on tehtud ettepanek osta tagasi 66 protsenti Eesti Raudtee osalusest. Omaniku Edward Burkhardt'i ja Eesti poliitikute seisukohad. Kommenteerivad: Agu Uudelepp, Toomas Raag, Meelis Atonen, Margus Tsahkna, Eiki Nestor

  13. Geophysicists adopt new approach to misconduct

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Michael

    2017-11-01

    Geophysicists found guilty of harassment, discrimination or bullying could be expelled from the American Geophysical Union (AGU) after it updated its ethics policy to define these misdemeanours as scientific misconduct.

  14. Public affairs events at Ocean Sciences Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhlenbrock, Kristan

    2012-02-01

    AGU public affairs will be cohosting two special events at Ocean Sciences 2012 that offer scientists opportunities to expand their communication, policy, and media experience. Join the conversations that highlight two important topics to connect science to society.

  15. Plaadid / Valner Valme

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Valme, Valner, 1970-

    2002-01-01

    Uutest plaatidest Liquido "Alarm!Alarm!", Van Morrison "Down The Road", "Eesti pop 2002", "Very Best of MTV Unplugged", Karavan "Agu Tammeoru laulud", Natalie Imbruglia "White Lilies Island", Ibizarre "Ambient Collection vol. 5", Jose Cura "Boleros"

  16. The Earth story: a facebook world in the geo-blogosphere

    OpenAIRE

    Redfern, Simon

    2013-01-01

    Presented at AGU 2013 Fall Meeting, San Francisco, December 10th 2013. In session: PA012. Social Media for Science: Challenges, Opportunities, and Maximizing Impact: PA31B-1829 "The Earth story ... a facebook world in the geo blogosphere"

  17. Kroll, Murakami, and Seneviratne Receive 2013 James B. Macelwane Medals: Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seneviratne, Sonia I.

    2014-01-01

    Thank you, Niki, for this very kind citation. Not only are you generous in your support, you are also an outstanding and inspiring scientist as well as a great colleague at ETH Zurich. I would also like to thank all those who supported my nomination and AGU's Macelwane committee for choosing me for this great honor. This means a lot to me: The first scientific conference I ever attended was organized by AGU and gave me a lasting motivation to work in science.

  18. Petition nominations for 1990-1992

    Science.gov (United States)

    The nominees listed below are those of the Union and section nominating committees and have been approved by the AGU Council.Nominations may also be made by membership petition. There are no age, nationality, residence or other analogous restrictions on who may serve as a n officer. Petitions should be sent to the General Secretary, AGU, 2000 Florida Avenue N.W., Washington, DC 20009. They must be received no later than July 7, 1989.

  19. Development of a Pseudomonas aeruginosa Agmatine Biosensor

    OpenAIRE

    Gilbertsen, Adam; Williams, Bryan

    2014-01-01

    Agmatine, decarboxylated arginine, is an important intermediary in polyamine production for many prokaryotes, but serves higher functions in eukaryotes such as nitric oxide inhibition and roles in neurotransmission. Pseudomonas aeruginosa relies on the arginine decarboxylase and agmatine deiminase pathways to convert arginine into putrescine. One of the two known agmatine deiminase operons, aguBA, contains an agmatine sensitive TetR promoter controlled by AguR. We have discovered that this pr...

  20. Evaluation of Novel 64Cu-Labeled Theranostic Gadolinium-Based Nanoprobes in HepG2 Tumor-Bearing Nude Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Pengcheng; Cheng, Dengfeng; Huang, Tao; Banizs, Anna B.; Xiao, Jie; Liu, Guobing; Chen, Quan; Wang, Yuenan; He, Jiang; Shi, Hongcheng

    2017-09-01

    Radiation therapy of liver cancer is limited by low tolerance of the liver to radiation. Radiosensitizers can effectively reduce the required radiation dose. AGuIX nanoparticles are small, multifunctional gadolinium-based nanoparticles that can carry radioisotopes or fluorescent markers for single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), positron emission tomography (PET), fluorescence imaging, and even multimodality imaging. In addition, due to the high atomic number of gadolinium, it can also serve as a tumor radiation sensitizer. It is critical to define the biodistribution and pharmacokinetics of these gadolinium-based nanoparticles to quantitate the magnitude and duration of their retention within the tumor microenvironment during radiotherapy. Therefore, in this study, we successfully labeled AGuIX with 64Cu through the convenient built-in chelator. The biodistribution studies indicated that the radiotracer 64Cu-AGuIX accumulates to high levels in the HepG2 xenograft of nude mice, suggesting that it would be a potential theranostic nanoprobe for image-guided radiotherapy in HCC. We also used a transmission electron microscope to confirm AGuIX uptake in the HepG2 cells. In radiation therapy studies, a decrease in 18F-FDG uptake was observed in the xenografts of the nude mice irradiated with AGuIX, which was injected 1 h before. These results provide proof-of-concept that AGuIX can be used as a theranostic radiosensitizer for PET imaging to guide radiotherapy for liver cancer.

  1. Elucidation of Environmental Fate of Artificial Sweetener, Aspartame by Determining Bimolecular Rate Constants with Hydroxyl Radical at Various pH and Temperature Conditions and Reaction By-Products Presentation type:Poster Section:Ocean Sciences Session:General Contribution Authors:Takashi Teraji (1) Takemitsu Arakaki (2) AGU# 10173629 (1) Graduate School of Engineering and Science, University of the Ryukyus, 1 Senbaru Nishihara-cho, Okinawa, 903-0123, Japan (a4269bj@yahoo.co.jp), (2) Department of Chemistry, Biology and Marine Science, Faculty of Science, University of the Ryukyus, 1 Senbaru Nishihara-cho, Okinawa, 903-0123, Japan (arakakit@sci.u-ryukyu.ac.jp)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teraji, T.; Arakaki, T.

    2011-12-01

    Use of artificial sweeteners in drinks and food has been rapidly increasing because of their non-calorie nature. In Japan, aspartame, acesulfame K and sucralose are among the most widely used artificial sweeteners. Because the artificial sweeteners are not metabolized in human bodies, they are directly excreted into the environment without chemical transformations. We initiated a study to better understand the fate of artificial sweeteners in the marine environment. In particular, we focused on the fate of aspartame by determining its bimolecular rate constants with hydroxyl radicals at various pH and temperature conditions and reaction by-products. The hydroxyl radical (OH), the most potent reactive oxygen species, reacts with various compounds and determines the environmental oxidation capacity and the life-time of many compounds. The steady-state OH concentration and the reaction rate constants between the compound and OH are used to estimate the life-time of the compound. In this study, we determine the bimolecular rate constants between aspartame and OH at various pH and temperature conditions using a competition kinetics technique. We use hydrogen peroxide as a photochemical source of OH. Bimolecular rate constant we obtained so far was (2.6±1.2)×109 M-1 s-1 at pH = 3.0. Little effect was seen by changing the temperatures between 15 and 40 °C. Activation energy (Ea) was calculated to be -1.0 kJ mol-1 at pH = 3.0, which could be regarded as zero. We will report reaction rate constants at different pHs and reaction by-products which will be analyzed by GC-MS. We will further discuss the fate of aspartame in the coastal environment.

  2. An agmatine-inducible system for the expression of recombinant proteins in Enterococcus faecalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, Daniel M; Perez, Marta; Ladero, Victor; Del Rio, Beatriz; Redruello, Begoña; Martin, M Cruz; Fernandez, María; Alvarez, Miguel A

    2014-12-04

    Scientific interest in Enterococcus faecalis has increased greatly over recent decades. Some strains are involved in food fermentation and offer health benefits, whereas others are vancomycin-resistant and cause infections that are difficult to treat. The limited availability of vectors able to express cloned genes efficiently in E. faecalis has hindered biotechnological studies on the bacterium's regulatory and pathogenicity-related genes. The agmatine deiminase (AGDI) pathway of E. faecalis, involved in the conversion of agmatine into putrescine, is driven by a response inducer gene aguR. This study describes that the exposure to the induction factor (agmatine) results in the transcription of genes under the control of the aguB promoter, including the aguBDAC operon. A novel E. faecalis expression vector, named pAGEnt, combining the aguR inducer gene and the aguB promoter followed by a cloning site and a stop codon was constructed. pAGEnt was designed for the overexpression and purification of a protein fused to a 10-amino-acid His-tag at the C-terminus. The use of GFP as a reporter of gene expression in E. faecalis revealed that under induction with 60 mM agmatine, fluorescence reached 40 arbitrary units compared to 0 in uninduced cells. pAGEnt vector can be used for the overexpression of recombinant proteins under the induction of agmatine in E. faecalis, with a close correlation between agmatine concentration and fluorescence when GFP was used as reporter.

  3. Sequencing and Transcriptional Analysis of the Biosynthesis Gene Cluster of Putrescine-Producing Lactococcus lactis ▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladero, Victor; Rattray, Fergal P.; Mayo, Baltasar; Martín, María Cruz; Fernández, María; Alvarez, Miguel A.

    2011-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis is a prokaryotic microorganism with great importance as a culture starter and has become the model species among the lactic acid bacteria. The long and safe history of use of L. lactis in dairy fermentations has resulted in the classification of this species as GRAS (General Regarded As Safe) or QPS (Qualified Presumption of Safety). However, our group has identified several strains of L. lactis subsp. lactis and L. lactis subsp. cremoris that are able to produce putrescine from agmatine via the agmatine deiminase (AGDI) pathway. Putrescine is a biogenic amine that confers undesirable flavor characteristics and may even have toxic effects. The AGDI cluster of L. lactis is composed of a putative regulatory gene, aguR, followed by the genes (aguB, aguD, aguA, and aguC) encoding the catabolic enzymes. These genes are transcribed as an operon that is induced in the presence of agmatine. In some strains, an insertion (IS) element interrupts the transcription of the cluster, which results in a non-putrescine-producing phenotype. Based on this knowledge, a PCR-based test was developed in order to differentiate nonproducing L. lactis strains from those with a functional AGDI cluster. The analysis of the AGDI cluster and their flanking regions revealed that the capacity to produce putrescine via the AGDI pathway could be a specific characteristic that was lost during the adaptation to the milk environment by a process of reductive genome evolution. PMID:21803900

  4. Putrescine biosynthesis in Lactococcus lactis is transcriptionally activated at acidic pH and counteracts acidification of the cytosol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Rio, Beatriz; Linares, Daniel; Ladero, Victor; Redruello, Begoña; Fernandez, Maria; Martin, Maria Cruz; Alvarez, Miguel A

    2016-11-07

    Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris CECT 8666 is a lactic acid bacterium that synthesizes the biogenic amine putrescine from agmatine via the agmatine deiminase (AGDI) pathway. The AGDI genes cluster includes aguR. This encodes a transmembrane protein that functions as a one-component signal transduction system, the job of which is to sense the agmatine concentration of the medium and accordingly regulate the transcription of the catabolic operon aguBDAC. The latter encodes the proteins necessary for agmatine uptake and its conversion into putrescine. This work reports the effect of extracellular pH on putrescine biosynthesis and on the genetic regulation of the AGDI pathway. Increased putrescine biosynthesis was detected at acidic pH (pH5) compared to neutral pH. Acidic pH induced the transcription of the catabolic operon via the activation of the aguBDAC promoter PaguB. However, the external pH had no significant effect on the activity of the aguR promoter PaguR, or on the transcription of the aguR gene. The transcriptional activation of the AGDI pathway was also found to require a lower agmatine concentration at pH5 than at neutral pH. Finally, the following of the AGDI pathway counteracted the acidification of the cytoplasm under acidic external conditions, suggesting it to provide protection against acid stress. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Earth in Space: A CD-ROM Version for Pre-College Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedigo, P.

    2003-12-01

    Earth in Space, a magazine about the Earth and space sciences for pre-college science teachers, was published by AGU between 1987 and 2001 (9 issues each year). The goal of Earth in Space was to make research at the frontiers of the geosciences accessible to teachers and students and engage them in thinking about scientific careers. Each issue contained two or three recent research articles, rewritten for a high school level audience from the original version published in peer-reviewed AGU journals, which were supplemented with short news items and biographic information about the authors. As part of a 2003 summer internship with AGU, sponsored by the AGU Committee on Education and Human Resources (CEHR) and the American Institute of Physics, this collection of Earth in Space magazines was converted into an easily accessible electronic resource for K-12 teachers and students. Every issue was scanned into a PDF file. The entire collection of articles was cataloged in a database indexed to key topic terms (e.g., volcanoes, global climate change, space weather). A front-page was designed in order to facilitate rapid access to articles concerning specific topics within the Earth and space sciences of particular interest to high school students. A compact CD-ROM version of this resource will be distributed to science teachers at future meetings of the National Science Teachers Association and will be made available through AGU's Outreach and Research Support program.

  6. President's message: We must remain committed to scientific integrity

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPhaden, Michael

    2012-02-01

    During the third week of February our global community of Earth and space scientists witnessed the shocking fall from grace of an accomplished AGU member who betrayed the principles of scientific integrity. In doing so he compromised AGU's credibility as a scientific society, weakened the public's trust in scientists, and produced fresh fuel for the unproductive and seemingly endless ideological firestorm surrounding the reality of the Earth's changing climate. Peter Gleick resigned as chair of AGU's Task Force on Scientific Ethics on 16 February, prior to admitting in a blog post that he obtained documents from the Heartland Institute under false pretenses. His transgression cannot be condoned, regardless of his motives. It is a tragedy that requires us to stop and reflect on what we value as scientists and how we want to be perceived by the public. Here are a few things that come immediately to mind:

  7. Production of water-soluble sago waste - HAMPAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norhazlin Zainuddin; Kamaruddin Hashim; Kamaruddin Bahari; Mansor Ahmad; Wan Md Zin Wan Yunus

    2002-01-01

    Carboxylmethyl sago waste (CMSW) was prepared in completely heterogeneous conditions as a product of the reaction of sago waste and sodium monochloroacetate (MCA) in mixed solution of isopropanol and sodium hydroxide (NaOH). The results showed that the DS values depend on the concentration of NaOH, ratio of MCA to anhydroglucose unit (AGU), (MCA:AGU), and also time and temperature of the reaction. DS value increased with increasing the concentration of NaOH and reaction temperature, but further increase will reduce the value of DS. Increasing the reaction time will increase the DS value and achieve a constant value after 2 hours. The study showed that the highest value of DS i.e. 1.04, could be achieved at 2:1 of MCA:AGU ratio, NaOh concentration of 25% and 2 hours reaction time at 55 degree C. (Author)

  8. Initiative of the citizen - cooperation by the citizen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haeusler, D.

    1978-01-01

    The position of Buerger initiatives in the social and the legal system of the FRG was the central subject of the 5th Environment Forum on Nov. 29, 1977 at Bremen, organized by the Arbeitsgemeinschaft fuer Umweltfragen (AGU), Bonn. 56 environment experts of groups represented in the AGU (environmental associations, employees, science, industry, Bundestag und Laender parliaments, administration, inidviduals) discussed the matter-of-course of Buerger initiatives,participation of joint boards in the possibility of introducing the action brought by joint boards. (orig./HP) [de

  9. Disease: H00422 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ria (AGU) [DS:H00145]; Fucosidosis [DS:H00141]; Schindler/ Kanzaki disease [DS:H00146] Glycoproteinoses is a...cosidase [HSA:2517] [KO:K01206] (Schindler/ Kanzaki) NAGA; alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase [HSA:4668] [KO:K0...PD:C00270] (alpha, beta-Mannosidosis, AGU, Fucosidosis, Schindler/ Kanzaki) Urine oligosaccharides, Vacuolat...g loss and mental retardation. (Fucosidosis) Type 1: a severe form. Type2: a mild form. (Schindler/ Kanzaki) Type1 (Schindle...lpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase deficiency (Schindler/Kanzaki disease). ... JOURNAL ... J Hum Genet 49:1-8 (2004) DOI:10.1007/s10038-003-0098-z ...

  10. Insight into glycoside hydrolases for debranched xylan degradation from extremely thermophilic bacterium Caldicellulosiruptor lactoaceticus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojing Jia

    Full Text Available Caldicellulosiruptor lactoaceticus 6A, an anaerobic and extremely thermophilic bacterium, uses natural xylan as carbon source. The encoded genes of C. lactoaceticus 6A for glycoside hydrolase (GH provide a platform for xylan degradation. The GH family 10 xylanase (Xyn10A and GH67 α-glucuronidase (Agu67A from C. lactoaceticus 6A were heterologously expressed, purified and characterized. Both Xyn10A and Agu67A are predicted as intracellular enzymes as no signal peptides identified. Xyn10A and Agu67A had molecular weight of 47.0 kDa and 80.0 kDa respectively as determined by SDS-PAGE, while both appeared as homodimer when analyzed by gel filtration. Xyn10A displayed the highest activity at 80 °C and pH 6.5, as 75 °C and pH 6.5 for Agu67A. Xyn10A had good stability at 75 °C, 80 °C, and pH 4.5-8.5, respectively, and was sensitive to various metal ions and reagents. Xyn10A possessed hydrolytic activity towards xylo-oligosaccharides (XOs and beechwood xylan. At optimum conditions, the specific activity of Xyn10A was 44.6 IU/mg with beechwood xylan as substrate, and liberated branched XOs, xylobiose, and xylose. Agu67A was active on branched XOs with methyl-glucuronic acids (MeGlcA sub-chains, and primarily generated XOs equivalents and MeGlcA. The specific activity of Agu67A was 1.3 IU/mg with aldobiouronic acid as substrate. The synergistic action of Xyn10A and Agu67A was observed with MeGlcA branched XOs and xylan as substrates, both backbone and branched chain of substrates were degraded, and liberated xylose, xylobiose, and MeGlcA. The synergism of Xyn10A and Agu67A provided not only a thermophilic method for natural xylan degradation, but also insight into the mechanisms for xylan utilization of C. lactoaceticus.

  11. Special awards lighten up SPR banquet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwickl, Ron; Baker, Dan; Reiff, Pat

    On December 8, 1982, Marcia Neugebauer, then president of the Solar and Planetary Relationships section, held the “First Occasional Awards Ceremony” in conjunction with the annual dinner banquet at the Fall AGU meeting. These awards were an attempt to add a little humor to our usually somber gatherings. This year we reincarnated Neugebauer's successful concept and presented a number of new and novel awards to our fellow scientists at the Fall AGU SPR dinner. Summarized for your enjoyment are the categories and the official winners, as announced at the December 6 banquet.

  12. Planning for giving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitten, Charles A.

    This ancient Chinese proverb stresses the importance of the role of AGU in the field of continuing education. When the Committee on Financial Resources made the recommendation that the Union should be on a firmer basis and the Council approved the 5-year fund drive, the vision was toward the future—decades at least—and far beyond ‘rice’ and ‘trees.’A large percentage of AGU members contribute regularly and liberally to their alma maters. This financial support to universities and colleges is essential. The donors are well rewarded with the knowledge that their gifts are to be used for education.

  13. Public affairs events at Fall Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhlenbrock, Kristan

    2012-02-01

    AGU's Public Affairs team presented two workshop luncheons and hosted 17 oral and poster sessions at the 2011 Fall Meeting. Topics ranged from defining the importance of the geosciences, to climate change science for communities and institutions. The workshop luncheon "How to Be a Congressional Science Fellow or Mass Media Fellow" was a well-attended event with more than 115 participants. The luncheon provided the opportunity for audience members to ask fellow scientists about their experiences working either in Congress or as a reporter for a news organization. For scientists looking to expand their expertise outside the academic environment, these AGU fellowships are fantastic opportunities.

  14. Evidence for a Role for NAD(P)H Dehydrogenase in Concentration of CO2 in the Bundle Sheath Cell of Zea mays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Richard B; Schultes, Neil P; McHale, Neil A; Zelitch, Israel

    2016-05-01

    Prior studies with Nicotiana and Arabidopsis described failed assembly of the chloroplastic NDH [NAD(P)H dehydrogenase] supercomplex by serial mutation of several subunit genes. We examined the properties of Zea mays leaves containing Mu and Ds insertions into nuclear gene exons encoding the critical o- and n-subunits of NDH, respectively. In vivo reduction of plastoquinone in the dark was sharply diminished in maize homozygous mutant compared to normal leaves but not to the extreme degree observed for the corresponding lesions in Arabidopsis. The net carbon assimilation rate (A) at high irradiance and saturating CO2 levels was reduced by one-half due to NDH mutation in maize although no genotypic effect was evident at very low CO2 levels. Simultaneous assessment of chlorophyll fluorescence and A in maize at low (2% by volume) and high (21%) O2 levels indicated the presence of a small, yet detectable, O2-dependent component of total linear photosynthetic electron transport in 21% O2 This O2-dependent component decreased with increasing CO2 level indicative of photorespiration. Photorespiration was generally elevated in maize mutant compared to normal leaves. Quantification of the proportion of total electron transport supporting photorespiration enabled estimation of the bundle sheath cell CO2 concentration (Cb) using a simple kinetic model of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase function. The A versus Cb relationships overlapped for normal and mutant lines consistent with occurrence of strictly CO2-limited photosynthesis in the mutant bundle sheath cell. The results are discussed in terms of a previously reported CO2 concentration model [Laisk A, Edwards GE (2000) Photosynth Res 66: 199-224]. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  15. Bilateral Epithelial Defects after Laser in situ Keratomileusis. Clinical Features, Management and Outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rao Srinivas

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To describe the preoperative characteristics, intraoperative details, management, and postoperative in patients with bilateral epithelial defects after laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK. METHODS: Retrospective non-comparative case series. RESULTS: Six patients with bilateral epithelial defects after LAISK were part of a cohort of 605 patients undergoing bilateral LASIK at our center from December 2001 to April 2003. The mean age of the patients (5M:1F was 28.5 7.9 years, and the average pretreatment myopic spherical equivalent (SE refraction was 7.3 0.7 D (-4, -12.25D. An epithelial flap was present in 6 eyes and an epithelial defect with a mean diameter of 3 mm (2mm, 6mm was seen in 6 eyes. In four patients the epithelial disturbance was bilaterally similar. All defects occurred in the inferior cornea and the epithelial flaps had the hinge positioned superiorly. None of the patients had ocular or systemic risk factors that could have resulted in this complication. A bandage contact lens was used in 6 eyes. At last follow-up of 5.5 9.5 months (0.25, 21 months, unaided visual acuity was 6/9 or better in 10 eyes. Best spectacle-corrected visual acuity (BSCVA was maintained in 8 eyes, while 4 eyes lost one line of BSCVA. Recurrent corneal erosions were not reported in the follow-up period. CONCLUSIONS: These patients represent a hitherto unrecognised group of individuals who appear to have a subclinical weakness of adhesion of the corneal epithelium to the underlying structures, which is not evident on clinical examination. This results in bilateral epithelial disturbances after LASIK. Appropriate management results in satisfactory clinical outcomes. Other options for treatment of the fellow eye of such patients include the use of a different microkeratome, release of suction during the reverse pass of the Hansatome microkeratome, and photorefractive keratectomy if the refractive error is low.

  16. An Incremental, Measurable Approach to Increased Seismic Safety in Latin America and the Caribbean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickey, J. S.

    2001-05-01

    Plans for a multiyear effort to assess and mitigate seismic risks in municipalities throughout Latin America and the Caribbean are being developed by a committee of scientists, engineers and public servants from throughout the region. Prompted by AGU and GeoHazards International, with start-up funding from the AGU Council through the AGU Committee on International Participation, the effort will involve scientists, engineers, architects, urban planners, civil defense authorities, municipal authorities, public health authorities, and commerical interests. With technical guidance provided by the project, teams of volunteers will assess risks in their own municipalities and will identify and adopt measures to reduce those risks. Planned by Latin Americans for the benefit of Latin America, the process, which is intended to run for a ten year period, will be iterative and incremental. Progress will be measurable and will be reported at triennial conferences. As an international organization, well-represented in the region and unencumbered by political or commercial relationships, AGU is able to provide effective administrative support for this challenging endeavor.

  17. Author Details

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Agu, KC. Vol 19, No 3 (2015) - Articles Influence of Spent-Engine Oil on Hematology, Renal and Liver Status of Auto- Mechanics of Benin-City, Nigeria Abstract PDF. ISSN: 1119-8362. AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL · AJOL's ...

  18. Hobune kolis Veneetsiasse / Tõnu Kaalep

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kaalep, Tõnu, 1966-2018

    2004-01-01

    Muljeid Veneetsia 9 rahvusvaheliselt arhitektuuribiennaalilt Arsenale hallides. Eestit esindavad sisearhitekt Kristajan Holm, arhitekt Agu Külm ja soome skulptor Jukka-Pekka Jalovaara näituseprojektiga, mis tugineb Madis Jürgeni raamatule "Hää koht" kuivkäimlatest. 7 ill

  19. Anneteparaad III / Karin Paulus

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Paulus, Karin, 1975-

    2008-01-01

    Tutvustatakse Tartu Kõrgema Kunstikooli diplomandide lõputöid: 1. Diana Hints "Ba-Rokk", 2. Maire Rebina "Alleshoitud naeratused", 3. Liis Pihlik "Unistused ehk hingele pai", 4. Ille Agu "Pitsiring - pruudipesu kollektsioon", 5. Ingwald Koser "Chaise Longue", 6. Kaisa Paluoja installatsioon "/....../", 7. Kaidi Ploomipuu arvutiga juhitavatel telgedel kootud sisustuskangas

  20. Presidendilossis pidutses ka üks Res Publica liige / Kadri Jakobson

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Jakobson, Kadri, 1970-

    2006-01-01

    SL Õhtulehele presidendilossis toimunud noortepidudest rääkinud neiu on Res Publica liige, kuid tema sõnul pole tema parteiline kuuluvus pidudega seotud. Arvamust avaldavad Res Publica juhatuse liige Andreas Kaju, erakonna esimees Taavi Veskimägi, ERL-i pressiesindaja Agu Uudelepp jt.

  1. Vabariigi presidendi iseseisvuspäeva kõne / Toomas Hendrik Ilves

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Ilves, Toomas Hendrik, 1953-

    2011-01-01

    Presidendi kõne Eesti Vabariigi 93. aastapäeva pidulikul kontserdil Estonias 24. veebruaril 2011. aastal. Vt. ka juhtkiri lk. 2: Isetehtud Eesti. Õhtulehes kommenteerivad Rainer Kattel, Olev Remsu, Agu Uudelepp ja Vitali Belobrovtsev. Õhtulehes vt. ka juhtkiri: Vaikne ja rahulik Põhjamaa? Äripäevas vt. ka juhtkiri lk. 2: Rohkem enesekindlust, rohkem eneseusaldust!

  2. Perspectives of Syncretism and its Modern Trend: A Case of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ike Odimegwu

    balance, most times, the Christian missions in Africa for instance, find ... religion colours all aspects of their lives (Agu, 1992). Long before the advent of missionaries, some negative notions dominated ... the goal of every missionary work is to plant Christian churches that ... It is the reformulation of Christian life and doctrine ...

  3. Japanese Language as an Organizational Barrier for International Students to Access to University Services: A Case of Aoyama Gakuin University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiratsuka, Hiroyoshi

    2016-01-01

    In 2011, Aoyama Gakuin University (AGU) started a government-funded degree program (taught in English) to accept international students with limited or no Japanese language proficiency. However, the students faced obstacles in accessing all of the university resources provided. In this article, I investigated Japanese language as an organizational…

  4. Author Details

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Agu, NN. Vol 8 (2010) - Articles Effects of mathematical game and instructional analogy as advance organizers on students' achievement in secondary school mathematics. Abstract PDF. ISSN: 2508-1128. AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about ...

  5. Creating Community for Early-Career Geoscientists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berghuijs, W.R.; Harrigan, S.; Kipnis, E.L.; Dogulu, N.; Floriancic, M.; Müller, H.; Pohle, I.; Saia, S.M.; Sedlar, F.; Smoorenburg, M.; Teutschbein, C.; Van Emmerik, T.H.M.

    2015-01-01

    The American Geophysical Union (AGU) and the European Geosciences Union (EGU) play central roles in nurturing the next generation of geoscientists. Students and young scientists make up about one quarter of the unions’ active memberships [American Geophysical Union, 2013; European Geosciences Union,

  6. Investigations on a large collection of cosmic dust from the central Indian Ocean.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Parashar, K.; ShyamPrasad, M.; Chauhan, S.S.S.

    of California, Los Angeles, 1983, pp. 152 T. Laevastu, O. Mellis, Trans. AGU 36, 385 (1955) S.G. Love, D.E. Brownlee, Science 262, 550 (1993) U.B. Marvin, M.T. Einaudi, Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 31, 1871 (1967) M. Maurette, C. Hammer, D.E. Brownlee, N. Reeh, H...

  7. In situ enzyme aided adsorption of soluble xylan biopolymers onto cellulosic material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chimphango, Annie F A; Görgens, J F; van Zyl, W H

    2016-06-05

    The functional properties of cellulose fibers can be modified by adsorption of xylan biopolymers. The adsorption is improved when the degree of biopolymers substitution with arabinose and 4-O-methyl-glucuronic acid (MeGlcA) side groups, is reduced. α-l-Arabinofuranosidase (AbfB) and α-d-glucuronidase (AguA) enzymes were applied for side group removal, to increase adsorption of xylan from sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum L) bagasse (BH), bamboo (Bambusa balcooa) (BM), Pinus patula (PP) and Eucalyptus grandis (EH) onto cotton lint. The AguA treatment increased the adsorption of all xylans by up to 334%, whereas, the AbfB increased the adsorption of the BM and PP by 31% and 44%, respectively. A combination of AguA and AbfB treatment increased the adsorption, but to a lesser extent than achieved with AguA treatment. This indicated that the removal of the glucuronic acid side groups provided the most significant increase in xylan adsorption to cellulose, in particular through enzymatic treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Modification of cellulose with succinic anhydride in TBAA/DMSO mixed solvent under catalyst-free conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homogeneous modification of cellulose with succinic anhydride was performed in tetrabutylammonium acetate (TBAA)/dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) mixed solvent. The molar ratio of succinic anhydride (SA) to free hydroxyl groups in the anhydroglucose units (AGU) and TBAA dosage were investigated as paramete...

  9. Director murrab pead : Kui sul on haamer, siis meenutavad kõik asjad naelu / Anni Hartikainen

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Hartikainen, Anni

    2008-01-01

    Mida teha, kui ettevõtte on langenud rutiini ning edasiminekuks oleks vaja kollektiivset ärkamist. Küsimusele otsivad vastust Ragn-Sells AS ärijuht Agu Remmelg. Siin ongi vaja kollektiivset obadust! ja Nixor Eesti AS arendusspetsialist Toomas Arula. Õppimise võlu ja valu

  10. Nigerian Journal of Chemical Research - Vol 18 (2013)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluation of nuclear reaction cross section of some isotopes of plutonium at energy range 10-20 MeV Using OPTMAN code · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. JA Bamikole, PO Akusu, MN Agu, MM Olorukooba, 19-32 ...

  11. Author Details

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Agu, MN. Vol 18 (2013) - Articles Evaluation of nuclear reaction cross section of some isotopes of plutonium at energy range 10-20 MeV Using OPTMAN code. Abstract PDF. ISSN: 1119-0221. AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL ...

  12. Author Details

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Agu, NN. Vol 3, No 4 (2009) - Articles Evaluating Students' Plagiarism in Higher Education Institutions Abstract PDF. ISSN: 2070-0083. AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL · AJOL's Partners · Terms and Conditions of Use · Contact AJOL ...

  13. Massive Multiplayer Online Gaming: A Research Framework for Military Training and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-03-01

    Effects of violent video games on aggressive behavior, aggressive cognition, physiological arousal, and prosocial behavior: A meta...Massive Multiplayer Online Games 2.1 Massive Multiplayer Online Games Defined Massive multiplayer online games (MMOGs) allow users to interact ...2002) suggested various principles for group design and interactions in “massively multiplayer games ” (p. 1). In particular, he agued that it

  14. Nigerian Journal of Technology - Vol 25, No 2 (2006)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A Novel Configuration of Feedback's Electric Machine Tutor (EMT) Model 180 as an Asynchronous Multiphase Reluctance Machine Without Rotor Conductors · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. LU Anih, LA Agu, 16-23 ...

  15. Distribution, Regulation and Role of the Agmatine Deiminase System in Mutans Streptococci

    OpenAIRE

    Griswold, Ann R.; Nascimento, Marcelle M.; Burne, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    The agmatine deiminase system was identified in seven strains of mutans streptococci. Genes encoding the AgDS of Streptococcus rattus FA-1 were sequenced and found to share homology with the agu genes of Streptococcus mutans UA159. Agmatine inhibited bacterial growth, suggesting that the AgDS degrades a deleterious substance into useful compounds.

  16. Vector Antenna and Maximum Likelihood Imaging for Radio Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-05

    398, 1994. [21] A. Nehorai, K. C. Ho, and B. T. G. Tan , “Minimum- 14 noise-variance beamformer with an electromagnetic vector sensor,” IEEE...G. Eslinger, A. Nicholas , and C. Pong, “The MicroMAS CubeSat Mission,” AGU Fall Meet. Abstr., vol. -1, p. 2162, Dec. 2012. [39] W. Blackwell, G

  17. Lõplike vastusteta kunstnikeportreed / Riin Kübarsepp

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kübarsepp, Riin, 1978-

    2004-01-01

    Dokumentaalfilmid kunstnikest - Kert Grünbergi "Uputus" fotograaf Peeter Lauritsast (Multi Kultuurimaja 2003), Marianne Kõrveri "Pildi sisse minek" kostüümikunstnik Agu Pildist (Exitfilm 2002) ja Meelis Salujärve "Erki Kasemets" (Rühm+0 2002)

  18. Jaime Urrutia Fucugauchi Receives 2013 International Award: Citation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomnitz, Cinna

    2014-01-01

    Jaime Urrutia Fucugauchi was born in Chihuahua, Mexico. His surname Urrutia means "distant" in Basque, and Fucugauchi means roughly "Good luck—come in!" in Japanese. And Jaime, of course, is "James" in Spanish. Thus, Jaime was international from birth. There could hardly have been a better candidate for the AGU International Award.

  19. Speaking Up For Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spilhaus, Fred

    2005-06-01

    The Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of Natural History in Washington D.C. is planning to show a film, "A Privileged Planet" that promotes creationism in the form of "intelligent design." The film is based on the book by Guillermo Gonzalez and Jay Wesley Richards, both affiliated with the Discovery Institute, which advocates teaching "intelligent design" as science in U.S. public schools. By associating with the Discovery Institute, the Smithsonian Institution will associate science with creationism and damage their credibility. The film is slated for airing on 23 June, unless the Smithsonian comes to its senses.Why is this important? Because the film promotes a long term strategy of the Discovery Institute (//www.discovery.org/csc/) to replace "materialistic science" with "intelligent design." The film fosters the idea that science should include the supernatural. This is unacceptable. AGU's position is clear, creationism is not science and AGU opposes all efforts to promote creationism as science, (The full text of the AGU position statement can be found at: //www.agu.org/sci_soc/policy/positions/evolution.shtml).

  20. CMO Site: Ocean Instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-02-01

    Precipitation , Lightning, Visibility 0150 A InterOcea Hawser Strain 1.. systems, inc. and more... n 1946 3540 aero court san diego ca 92123-1799 usa phone: (619...AGU’s Microgal culture Association, P.O. Box 1004, April 8-10, 1997-Underwater Gravimetry : Instruments, Observa- Niland, CA 92257; (619) 359-3474

  1. Toidukaupade eksport on takistatud Venemaa uute nõudmiste tõttu / Silva Männik, Kristina Traks

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Männik, Silva, 1974-

    2004-01-01

    Ilmunud ka: Delovõje Vedomosti 9. juuni lk. 7. Eesti kalatootjatel on takistatud kaubavedu Venemaale, kuna viimane ei aktsepteeri alates 1. juunist varem kooskõlastatud veterinaarsertifikaate. Tekkinud olukorda selgitavad nõustamisfirma Vaela juhataja Enno Aloe ja Viru Kalatööstuse juht Agu Laanemets

  2. Dayside ionosphere of Mars: Empirical model based on data from the MARSIS instrument

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Němec, F.; Morgan, D. D.; Gurnett, D. A.; Duru, F.; Truhlík, Vladimír

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 116, - (2011), E07003/1-E07003/14 ISSN 0148-0227 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : RADIO OCCULTATION MEASUREMENTS * GLOBAL SURVEYOR OBSERVATIONS * MARTIAN IONOSPHERE Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 3.021, year: 2011 http://www.agu.org/pubs/crossref/2011/2010JE003789.shtml

  3. Green starch conversions : Studies on starch acetylation in densified CO2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muljana, Henky; Picchioni, Francesco; Heeres, Hero J.; Janssen, Leon P. B. M.

    2010-01-01

    The acetylation of potato starch with acetic anhydride (AAH) and sodium acetate (NaOAc) as catalyst in densified CO2 was explored in a batch reactor setup. The effects of process variables such as pressure (6-9.8 MPa), temperature (40-90 degrees C), AAH to starch ratio (2-5 mol/mol AGU), NaOAc to

  4. Vana Baskini teater mängib suvelavastust / Andris Tammela

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Tammela, Andris

    2009-01-01

    Pärnu Kalevi staadionil ja Kilingi-Nõmme suveaias etenduvast Vana Baskini teatri suvekomöödiast "Hullem kui Hollywoodis". John Patricku näidendi lavastas Ivo Eensalu ja kujundas Kustav-Agu Püüman. Peaosas Helgi Sallo

  5. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 401 - 450 of 479 ... Vol 28, No 2 (2010), Proximate and sensory properties of fruit juice produced from varieties of watermelon (Citrullus lanatus). Abstract. O.Y Eziaghighala, M.O ... Vol 28, No 1 (2010), Quality Characteristics of bread made from Wheat and Fluted Pumpkin seed flour, Abstract. H.O Agu, J.A Ukonze, K.A ...

  6. Hayes Receives 2012 Ronald Greeley Early Career Award in Planetary Science: Citation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leshin, Laurie A.

    2013-10-01

    Alexander G. Hayes Jr. received the 2012 Ronald Greeley Early Career Award in Planetary Science at the 2012 AGU Fall Meeting, held 3-7 December in San Francisco, Calif. The award recognizes significant early-career contributions to planetary science.

  7. Reformierakonna "korrapidaja" riigikogus Rein Aidma: "Vajaliku hääletustulemuse saavutamisele eelneb peen mäng" / Rein Aidma ; interv. Erik Gamzejev

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Aidma, Rein, 1950-

    2007-01-01

    Ilmunud ka: Severnoje Poberezhje : Subbota, 28. juuli 2007, lk. 5. Ida-Virumaalt Riigikokku valitud Rein Aidma roll erakonna fraktsiooni aseesimehena, saadikute ja riigiametnike privileegidest, Reformierakonna populaarsusest, riigiraha jagamisest. Arvamust avaldavad Jaanus Rahumägi ja Agu Värimäe

  8. Romaanid ja trend / Teet Kallas

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kallas, Teet, 1943-

    2003-01-01

    Romaanivõistluse parimatest: Nikolai Baturini "Kentaur", Indrek Hargla "Vabaduse kõrgeim määr" ja Enn Põldroosi "Joonik kivi"; ka äramärgitud töödest: Sass Henno "Elu algab täna", Agu Tammeveski "Kas teie olite siis teistsugune?" ja Erik Tohvri "Tants läbi rukki"

  9. Author Details

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    dwelling arthropods in Agu-Awka are of Awka town. Abstract. ISSN: 1596-972X. AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL · AJOL's Partners · Terms and Conditions of ...

  10. Author Details

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Borne And Vegetation-Dwelling Arthropods In Agu-Awka Area Of Awka Abstract. ISSN: 1597-3115. AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL · AJOL's Partners ...

  11. Aesthetics of amalgamation / Francisco Martinez

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Martínez, Francisco, 1982-

    2016-01-01

    Parandamise esteetika kontseptsioonist näituste „Ehitamata. Visioonid uuest ühiskonnast 1986–1994“ Eesti Arhitektuurimuuseumis (kuraator Ingrid Ruudi) ja “Parandamise esteetika tänapäeva Gruusias” (kuraator Marika Agu) Tartu Kunstimuuseum valgusel

  12. Curiosity analyzes Martian soil samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showstack, Randy; Balcerak, Ernie

    2012-12-01

    NASA's Mars Curiosity rover has conducted its first analysis of Martian soil samples using multiple instruments, the agency announced at a 3 December news briefing at the AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco. "These results are an unprecedented look at the chemical diversity in the area," said NASA's Michael Meyer, program scientist for Curiosity.

  13. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 8501 - 8550 of 11090 ... Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. ... fruit and leaves with cabbage peels as a natural feedstuff in the diet of Achatina ... JC Obeta, CV Agu, OU Njoku, CC Okonkwo, EG Anaduaka ... Vol 10, No 81 (2011), Prediction of significant factors in the production of ethanol by ragi tapai ...

  14. Ragn-Sells jätkab Loode-Eesti prügila projekti / Eda Liiväär

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Liiväär, Eda

    2003-01-01

    Vaatamata Ääsmäe prügila projekti luhtumisele ei ole Rootsi jäätmekäitlusfirma Ragn-Sells loobunud kavast rajada Lääne-Harjumaale oma prügila. Kommentaarid firma arengudirektor Agu Remmelgalt ja Lääne-Harjumaa valdade esindajatelt. Tabel: Jäätmekeskuse ajalugu ja tulevik

  15. 10 aastat Eestis tegutsenud prügifirma Ragn-Sells loodab murda Ääsmäe elanike vastuseisu / Eda Liiväär

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Liiväär, Eda

    2002-01-01

    Ragn-Sells AS-i juhatuse esimees Rein Leipalu ja arendusdirektor Agu Remmelg rääkisid pressihommikul, mis muutub Eesti prügimajanduses EL-iga liitudes ja mis toimub Tallinna prügiäris ning Ääsmäe prügilast

  16. Author fees for online publication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Like the journals themselves, AGU publication fees have been restructured to accommodate the new online, publish-as-ready approach. The new fee structure is based on authors' providing electronic files of their text and art in acceptable formats (Word, WordPerfect, and LaTeX for text, and .eps or .tif for digital art). However, if you are unable to supply electronic files, you can opt for a higher-charge, full-service route in which AGU will create electronic files from hard copy. All authors for AGU journals are expected to support the journal archive through fees based on number as well as size of article files. The revenue from these fees is set aside for the "Perpetual Care Trust Fund," which will support the migration of the journal archive to new formats or media as technology changes. For several journals, excess length fees remain in place to encourage submission of concisely written articles. During this first transition year, most author fees are based on the number of print page equivalents (pdf) in an article; in the future, however, charges are expected to be associated with file size. The specific fees for each journal are posted on AGU's Web site under Publications-Tools for Authors.

  17. Modification of cellulose with succinic anhydride in TBAA/DMSO mixed solvent under catalyst-free conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ping-Ping Xin; Yao-Bing Huang; Chung-Yun Hse; Huai N. Cheng; Chaobo Huang; Hui. Pan

    2017-01-01

    Homogeneous modification of cellulose with succinic anhydride was performed using tetrabutylammonium acetate (TBAA)/dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) mixed solvent. The molar ratio of succinic anhydride (SA) to free hydroxyl groups in the anhydroglucose units (AGU), TBAA dosage, reaction temperature, and reaction time were investigated. The highest degree of substitution (DS)...

  18. COAL Conference Poster

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Taylor Alexander; McGibbney, Lewis John

    2017-01-01

    COAL Conference Poster This archive contains the COAL conference poster for the AGU Fall Meeting 2017 by Taylor Alexander Brown. The Inkscape SVG source is available at https://github.com/capstone-coal/coal-conference-poster/ under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International license.

  19. Putrescine production by Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris CECT 8666 is reduced by NaCl via a decrease in bacterial growth and the repression of the genes involved in putrescine production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Rio, Beatriz; Redruello, Begoña; Ladero, Victor; Fernandez, Maria; Martin, Maria Cruz; Alvarez, Miguel A

    2016-09-02

    The reduction of NaCl in food is a public health priority; high NaCl intakes have been associated with serious health problems. However, it is reported that reducing the NaCl content of cheeses may lead to an increase in the content of biogenic amines (BAs). The present work examines the effect of NaCl on the accumulation of putrescine (one of the BAs often detected at high concentration in cheese) in experimental Cabrales-like cheeses containing Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris CECT 8666, a dairy strain that catabolises agmatine to putrescine via the agmatine deiminase (AGDI) pathway. The genes responsible for this pathway are grouped in the AGDI cluster. This comprises a regulatory gene (aguR) (transcribed independently), followed by the catabolic genes that together form an operon (aguBDAC). Reducing the NaCl concentration of the cheese led to increased putrescine accumulation. In contrast, increasing the NaCl concentration of both pH-uncontrolled and pH-controlled (pH 6) cultures of L. lactis subsp. cremoris CECT 8666 significantly inhibited its growth and the production of putrescine. Such production appeared to be inhibited via a reduction in the transcription of the aguBDAC operon; no effect on the transcription of aguR was recorded. The present results suggest that low-sodium cheeses are at risk of accumulating higher concentrations of putrescine. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Presidendi valimine - erakondade konsensuspoliitika proovikivi / interv. Aivar Jarne

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2006-01-01

    Konsensuskandidaadi otsimisest ja presidendi valimise võimalikkusest Riigikogus, valimiskampaaniast, seostest kohalike ja Riigikogu valimistega, meedia rollist, presidendi institutsioonist tulevikus ning võimalustest muuta presidendi valimise korda. Vestlusringis osalevad: Rain Rosimannus, Eiki Nestor, Vello Pettai, Agu Uudelepp ja Argo Ideon. Valiku vestlusest tegi Riigikogu Toimetiste peatoimetaja Helle Ruusing

  1. Over-expression of xylanolytic ∝-glucuronidase from Thermotoga ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The GH67∝-glucuronidase encoded by aguA of Thermotoga maritima is one of the most ... to date and thus has considerable potential in industrial application. ... Enzymatic hydrolysis of corncob xylan examined by HPLC showed that more ...

  2. Eliminating the OUCH in OUtreaCH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karsten, J. L.; Manduca, C. A.

    2004-12-01

    ``I'm a scientist who knows how to conduct research, not an expert in teaching pre-college students!'' is a common complaint within the scientific community in response to recent funding agency mandates that research proposals explicitly address education, public outreach or other broader impacts. Yet, these new requirements address several important goals - fostering public support for research funding in the Earth and Space sciences, recruiting the next generation of talented geoscientists in the face of declining student enrollments, and educating the citizenry for informed decision making and advocacy, chief among them. Further, the phrase ``broader impacts'' is not meant to be synonymous with outreach to pre-college students and teachers - agency program managers actually encourage many different types of activity for meeting these obligations. AGU and its Committee on Education and Human Resources (CEHR) are committed to offering an array of programs that facilitate our members' ability to meet these new education, outreach, and broader impacts criteria in support of the research enterprise. CEHR has an on-going need for scientists willing to speak about their research in Geophysical Information for Teacher (GIFT) Workshops, sponsored lectures at annual and regional conventions of the National Science Teachers Association, special symposia for minority high school students attending annual AGU meetings, and career planning workshops for students and early career investigators. More extensive involvement as meeting mentors for minority undergraduate and graduate students is available through AGU's partnership with the new MSPHDS initiative (A. Pyrtle, P.I.). A new AGU outreach web site now under development will make available scientist biographies and abstracts derived from recent scientific articles originally published in AGU journals, which have been rewritten for a public audience. This resource is expected to serve as an important vehicle for AGU members

  3. WE-FG-BRA-07: Theranostic Nanoparticles Improve Clinical MR-Guided Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Detappe, A [Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Institut Lumiere-Matiere, Lyon, FR (France); Kunjachan, S; Berbeco, R [Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Sancey, L; Motto-Ros, V; Tillement, O [Institut Lumiere-Matiere, Lyon, FR (France)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: MR-guided radiation therapy is a current and emerging clinical reality. We have designed and tested a silica-based gadolinium chelates nanoparticle (AGuIX) for integration with MR-guided radiation therapy. The AGuIX nanoparticles used in this study are a dual-modality probe with radiosensitization properties and better MRI contrast than current FDA-approved gadolinium chelates. In advance of an approved Phase I clinical trial, we report on the efficacy and safety in multiple animal models and clinically relevant radiation conditions. By modeling our study on current clinic workflows, we show compatibility with modern patient care, thus heightening the translational significance of this research. Methods: The dual imaging and therapy functionality of AGuIX was investigated in mice with clinical radiation beams while safety was evaluated in mice, and nonhuman primates after systemic injection of 0.25 mg/g of nanoparticles. MRI/ICP-MS were used to measure tumor uptake and biodistribution. Due to their small size (2–3 nm), AGuIX have good renal clearance (t1/2=19min). We performed in vitro cell uptake quantification and radiosensitization studies (clonogenic assays and DNA damage quantification). In vivo radiation therapy studies were performed with both 6MV and 6MV-FFF clinical radiation beams. Histology was performed to measure the increase in DNA damage in the tumor and to evaluate the toxicity in healthy tissues. Results: In vitro and in vivo results demonstrate statistically significant increase (P < 0.01) in DNA damage, tumor growth supression and survival (+100 days) compared to radiation alone. Negligible toxicity was observed in all of the animal models. The combination of 6MV-FFF/AGuIX demonstrated a substantial dose enhancement compared to 6MV/AGuIX (DEF = 1.36 vs. 1.22) due to the higher proportion of low energy photons. Conclusion: With demonstrated efficacy and negligible toxicity in mice and non-human primates, AGuIX is a biocompatible

  4. WE-FG-BRA-07: Theranostic Nanoparticles Improve Clinical MR-Guided Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detappe, A; Kunjachan, S; Berbeco, R; Sancey, L; Motto-Ros, V; Tillement, O

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: MR-guided radiation therapy is a current and emerging clinical reality. We have designed and tested a silica-based gadolinium chelates nanoparticle (AGuIX) for integration with MR-guided radiation therapy. The AGuIX nanoparticles used in this study are a dual-modality probe with radiosensitization properties and better MRI contrast than current FDA-approved gadolinium chelates. In advance of an approved Phase I clinical trial, we report on the efficacy and safety in multiple animal models and clinically relevant radiation conditions. By modeling our study on current clinic workflows, we show compatibility with modern patient care, thus heightening the translational significance of this research. Methods: The dual imaging and therapy functionality of AGuIX was investigated in mice with clinical radiation beams while safety was evaluated in mice, and nonhuman primates after systemic injection of 0.25 mg/g of nanoparticles. MRI/ICP-MS were used to measure tumor uptake and biodistribution. Due to their small size (2–3 nm), AGuIX have good renal clearance (t1/2=19min). We performed in vitro cell uptake quantification and radiosensitization studies (clonogenic assays and DNA damage quantification). In vivo radiation therapy studies were performed with both 6MV and 6MV-FFF clinical radiation beams. Histology was performed to measure the increase in DNA damage in the tumor and to evaluate the toxicity in healthy tissues. Results: In vitro and in vivo results demonstrate statistically significant increase (P < 0.01) in DNA damage, tumor growth supression and survival (+100 days) compared to radiation alone. Negligible toxicity was observed in all of the animal models. The combination of 6MV-FFF/AGuIX demonstrated a substantial dose enhancement compared to 6MV/AGuIX (DEF = 1.36 vs. 1.22) due to the higher proportion of low energy photons. Conclusion: With demonstrated efficacy and negligible toxicity in mice and non-human primates, AGuIX is a biocompatible

  5. Candidates for office 2004-2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timothy L. Killeen. AGU member since 1981. Director of the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR); Senior Scientist, High Altitude Observatory; Adjunct Professor, University of Michigan. Major areas of interest include space physics and aeronomy remote sensing, and interdisciplinary science education. B.S., Physics and Astronomy (first class honors), 1972, University College London; Ph.D., Atomic and Molecular Physics, 1975, University College London. University of Michigan: Researcher and Professor of Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Space Sciences, 1978-2000 Director of the Space Physics Research Laboratory 1993-1998 Associate Vice-President for Research, 1997-2000. Visiting senior scientist at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, 1992. Program Committee, American Association for the Advancement of Science; Council Member, American Meteorological Society; Editor-in-Chief, Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics; Chair, Jerome K.Weisner National Policy Symposium on the Integration of Research and Education, 1999. Authored over 140 publications, 57 in AGU journals. Significant publications include: Interaction of low energy positrons with gaseous atoms and molecules, Atomic Physics, 4, 1975; Energetics and dynamics of the thermosphere, Reviews of Geophysics, 1987; The upper mesosphere and lower thermosphere, AGU Geophysical Monograph, 1995, Excellence in Teaching and Research awards, College of Engineering, University of Michigan; recipient of two NASA Achievement Awards; former chair, NASA Space Physics Subcommittee; former chair, National Science Foundation (NSF) Coupling, Energetics and Dynamics of Atmospheric Regions (CEDAR) program; former member, NSF Advisory Committee for Geosciences, and chair of NSF's Atmospheric Sciences Subcommittee, 1999-2002 member, NASA Earth Science Enterprise Advisory Committee; member of various National Academy of Science/National Research Council Committees; cochair, American Association for the Advancement of Science

  6. Bilateral Pulvinar Signal Intensity Decrease on T2-Weighted Images in Patients with Aspartylglucosaminuria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Autti, T.; Loennqvist, T.; Joensuu, R.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Aspartylglucosaminuria (AGU) is an autosomal recessive lysosomal disease caused by deficiency of aspartylglucosaminidase. A thalamic T2 signal intensity decrease is associated with lysosomal diseases. Purpose: To investigate thalamic signal intensity in AGU by performing a retrospective review of brain magnetic resonance (MR) imaging studies of AGU patients. Material and Methods: A total of 25 MR examinations were available for 11 patients aged between 3 and 32 years (four patients underwent bone marrow transplantation). Of these, 13 examinations were performed after bone marrow transplantation. Five patients had from two to six examinations, and six patients had one examination each. In every patient, the diagnosis of AGU was confirmed by blood and urine tests. Eighteen examinations were performed with a 1.0T imager including dual spin-echo T2 and proton density (PD) axial and coronal images, and 10 examinations also included T1-weighted images. Seven examinations were performed with a 1.5T imager including turbo spin-echo axial and coronal T2-weighted images and axial fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images; three examinations included T1-weighted three-dimensional magnetization-prepared rapid acquisition gradient-echo (3D MPRAGE) images. The signal intensity of the thalamus and pulvinar in every sequence was compared to that of the putamina. Results: In AGU, thalamic alterations were first detectable on T2-weighted images (25 examinations in 11 patients) from the age of 3 years 6 months, showing decreased signal intensity in 21 of 24 examinations. T1-weighted images (13 examinations) showed slightly increased thalamic signal intensity in five out of seven examinations from the age of 7 years, and PD images (19 examinations) showed decreased signal intensity from the age of 16 years (three examinations). The pulvinar showed decreased signal intensity on spin-echo T2-weighted images for 14 of 18 examinations or on FLAIR sequences for seven

  7. Data Visualization and Storytelling: Students Showcasing Innovative Work on the NASA Hyperwall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hankin, E. R.; Hasan, M.; Williams, B. M.; Harwell, D. E.

    2017-12-01

    Visual storytelling can be used to quickly and effectively tell a story about data and scientific research, with powerful visuals driving a deeper level of engagement. In 2016, the American Geophysical Union (AGU) launched a pilot contest with a grant from NASA to fund students to travel to the AGU Fall Meeting to present innovative data visualizations with fascinating stories on the NASA Hyperwall. This presentation will discuss the purpose of the contest and provide highlights. Additionally, the presentation will feature Mejs Hasan, one of the 2016 contest grand prize winners, who will discuss her award-winning research utilizing Landsat visual data, MODIS Enhanced Vegetation Index data, and NOAA nightlight data to study the effects of both drought and war on the Middle East.

  8. How Science and Hollywood Can Work Together Is Focus of Fall Meeting Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showstack, Randy

    2011-01-01

    Jon Amiel, director of the 2003 science fiction blockbuster movie The Core, told a room packed with geophysicists at the recent AGU Fall Meeting that he had a confession to make. The confession had nothing to do with what he called the “preposterous premises” of the movie, including that humans could start or stop the spinning of Earth's core. Rather, he told the crowd at the Tuesday evening presentation “Science and the Cinema: AGU Sciences Meet Hollywood” about his recurring dream of being on stage wearing nothing but a skimpy T-shirt. “This dream now has come true. Here I am, I'm talking to a whole room of geophysicists about The Core. I've never felt like the T-shirt was this short,” he said.

  9. Four are named Editors of Earth Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eric J. Barron of the Earth System Science Center at The Pennsylvania State University has been named chief editor of the new electronic journal, Earth Interactions. This journal will be co-published by AGU, the American Meteorological Society, and the Association of American Geographers. The three societies jointly agreed on the appointment of Barron. Each of the societies also appointed an editor to the board. George F. Hepner for AAG is from the Department of Geography at the University of Utah, David T. Sandwell for AGU is at the Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, and Kevin E. Trenberth for AMS is at the Climate and Global Dynamics Division at the National Center for Atmospheric Research.

  10. Press conference bring excitement of geophysical research to the public

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leifert, Harvey

    “A Flare to Remember.” “Starbucks for Starfish.” “Earth's Rotation Slows for El Niño.” What do these catchy headlines have in common? They all resulted from presentations at AGU's Spring Meeting in Boston, Mass. Yes, geophysical science can be big news when presented in a way that is interesting to general audiences.Proof? Well, the “Flare to Remember” headline (in the Dallas Morning News) reported the discovery, via the SOHO spacecraft, that a solar flare had produced, deep inside the Sun, seismic disturbances of a magnitude never experienced on Earth. Researchers Valentina Zharkova of Glasgow University and Alexander Kosovichev of Stanford gave media representatives a preview of their session, supported by visual aids, in the AGU press briefing room.

  11. Geophysics in the public eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papers given at the 1988 AGU Spring Meeting continue to make news. Representatives from 12 magazines, 5 newspapers, 2 wire services, and a TV station used the press room and attended the 6 news conferences. The journalists were attracted to the meeting, held May 16-20 in Baltimore, Md., by 6 press releases mailed out by the AGU public information staff in the 2 months before the meeting. Correspondents from as far as Sweden and Japan joined U.S. reporters from San Francisco, New York, Washington, D.C. and Baltimore.A count of clippings received by June 6 shows that by May 17, the second day of the meeting, newspapers in 36 states had published articles; that translates to a potential readership of 5 million. News clippings are still arriving, so figures are preliminary.

  12. Implementation of the agmatine-controlled expression system for inducible gene expression in Lactococcus lactis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, Daniel M; Alvarez-Sieiro, Patricia; del Rio, Beatriz; Ladero, Victor; Redruello, Begoña; Martin, Ma Cruz; Fernandez, Maria; Alvarez, Miguel A

    2015-12-30

    Lactococcus lactis has been safely consumed in fermented foods for millennia. This Gram-positive bacterium has now become of industrial importance as an expression host for the overproduction of lipopolysaccharide-free recombinant proteins used as food ingredients, therapeutic proteins and biotechnological enzymes. This paper reports an agmatine-controlled expression (ACE) system for L. lactis, comprising the lactococcal agmatine-sensor/transcriptional activator AguR and its target promoter P(aguB). The usefulness and efficiency of this system was checked via the reporter gene gfp and by producing PEP (Myxococcus xanthus prolyl-endopeptidase), an enzyme of biomedical interest able to degrade the immunotoxic peptides produced during the gastrointestinal breakdown of gluten. The ACE system developed in this work was suitable for the efficient expression of the functional recombinant proteins GFP and PEP. The expression system was tightly regulated by the agmatine concentration and allowed high protein production without leakiness.

  13. Supporting Members and Friends

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-10-01

    Thank you! Over the past year, AGU has received 12,104 gifts, both large and small, from members and friends. The Union has also received corporate contributions, National Science Foundation grants, and support from the National Oceanographic Partnership Program and National Association of Geoscience Teachers. Together their generosity has benefited AGU non revenue producing programs that are critical to our science and the future health of the Union. The following list gratefully acknowledges annual gifts of $100 or more and cumulative giving of $5,000 or more. The 1919 Society ($100,000 or more) and Benefactors ($5,000-$99,999) recognize single major gifts and cumulative contributions. Three circles acknowledge annual giving: President's Circle ($1,000 or more), Leadership Circle ($200-$999), and Supporters Circle ($100-$199). Supporting Life Members, who contribute a one-time gift of $1,200 in addition to lifetime dues, are among our most loyal Supporters.

  14. [Comment on “Ward Off?”] Ward Valley Report deserves better coverage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, George A.

    Eos, Transactions, AGU, which is bannered as “The Newspaper of the Geophysical Sciences,” carried an “In Brief” article in the issue of May 23 that does a serious disservice to the geophysical sciences. It was written in a flip editorial style that questioned the usefulness of the Ward Valley report (Secretary Babbitt found it useful enough to act decisively) and the integrity of the NAS/NRC committee members who wrote it.The 17 committee members, most of whom are AGU members, studied the issues as a public service at the request of the NAS in response to Babbitt's request. They documented the evidence and conclusions thoroughly in a report of over 200 pages. Surely, scientific input is needed for decisions about complex issues in our society.

  15. Writing memorable geophysical papers: The need for proper author coalitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Daniel N.

    A primary function of Eos is to serve the geophysical community. It does this by publishing meeting announcements, book reviews, advertisements for jobs, scientific news items, and the like. Recent articles have helped the membership assess the stage of their careers (Eos, 60, 1024, 1979), informed them of the advantages of having names near the beginning of the alphabet (Eos, 59, 118, 1978), and helped them maximize information transfer during scientific meetings (Eos, 62, 179, 1981). However, no one has dealt with the very difficult problem of making papers memorable. Some techniques, such as long author lists, are now passé. Everyone is doing it. Other techniques, such as writing a very short paper or a humorous paper, are beyond the ken of most AGU members. Fortunately, there remains one technique that can be used by a surprisingly large number of AGU members.

  16. Foundation-Level Gulf Arab Student Response to Self-Access Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane Malcolm

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the role of the self-access centre at Arabian Gulf University (AGU in helping low proficiency students in our foundation year achieve the skills in English they will need to succeed in our medical college. Students’ previous training and expectations are described as well as some of the practices developed at AGU to monitor and encourage student participation in the centre. While students have generally responded well to their self-access work in our facility and endorse its role in developing their skills, they have also highlighted some areas for improvement. Although our centre is small and serves a specialized group of learners, some of the issues we face may be similar to those experienced by others in different settings and some of the solutions we have tried to find may be of interest.

  17. The last SPR dinner awards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsurutani, Bruce

    1992-03-01

    Because the Solar-Planetary Relationships section of AGU has officially changed its name to Space Physics and Aeronomy (SPA), the December 10, 1991, section dinner award ceremony at the AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco was the last of the series. Presumably an SPA dinner award series will be started under President-elect Andy Nagy.We have followed our tradition of recognizing the special talents of section members at the annual dinner. This year we had eight awardees. These awards are given in fun and are intended to be humorous. The selection committee defining the awards (the awards are changed regularly to keep people from trying to win one) and selecting the awardees will have to remain anonymous. (The committee is similar to Skull and Bones, but we are politically correct in that we allow women as members.)

  18. Committees review activities at December meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Education and Human Resources Committee reported having approved participation in the Association for Women Geoscientist's (AWG) national survey. During the summer of 1983 the AWG designed a 75-question survey targeted to women but also applicable to men. The survey consisted of five sections (in addition to such demographics as age, salary, education, job area, and society membership): feelings and attitude toward job, career/family balance, sexual harassment and discrimination, opinions on national energy and conservation policy, and attitude toward AWG. The questionnaire was mailed to AWG members (just over 1000) and to AGU female members (about 1300). Survey participants were asked to give copies to their male colleagues to create a comparison group. About 25% of the 800 responses were from men. The responses were split about 50/50 between AWG and AGU members. The Education and Human Resources Committee will have the results from the survey presented at their next meeting in Cincinnati, May 15.

  19. Videos, tweet-ups, and training unite scientist communicators at Fall Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Mary Catherine; Ramsayer, Kate

    2012-02-01

    AGU's public information office held several events at the 2011 Fall Meeting designed to train, recognize, and reward member scientists who communicate with, or want to communicate with, nonscience audiences. On Sunday, about 90 researchers gathered at the Marriott Marquis hotel for an all-day science communications training event covering topics including journalism from the insider's perspective, storytelling, and using humor to share science. On Wednesday a communications panel focusing specifically on climate science shared tips on communicating with audiences via TV and the Web, among other outlets. At a social media soiree Monday evening, geobloggers, Facebook fans, Twitter followers, and others met in person and talked about how to share news and research across the many platforms of the Internet. Later in the week, bloggers from AGU's blogosphere and other sites met for lunch to discuss the online Earth and space science community.

  20. Incorporating Floating Surface Objects into a Fully Dispersive Surface Wave Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-19

    Bateman c , Joseph Calantoni c , James T. Kirby b a NRL Code 7320, 1009 Balch Blvd, Stennis Space Center, MS 39529 USA b Center for Applied Coastal...wave prop- agation. J. Waterway Port Coast. Ocean Eng. 119, 618–638 . rzech, M., Shi, F., Calantoni, J., Bateman , S., Veeramony, J., 2014. Small-scale...F., Bateman , S., Calantoni, J., 2016. Modeling small- scale physics of waves and ice in the MIZ. AGU 2016 Ocean Sciences Meeting, Session 9483

  1. Kultuuritehas : masinad, naised, muusika / Rednar Annus

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Annus, Rednar, 1970-

    2006-01-01

    Kultuuritehase festival 18.-27.augustini 2006 a. Kultuuritehases Polymer. Lähemalt Erik Alalooga tööst "Väga mõnusad masinad", Inna Joosti töödest "Orkaan Katrina" ja "Maakera", Taavi Piibemanni fotoseeriast "Morbiid lendas üle", Kadri Metstaki, Edith Karlsoni, Marje Mee ja Delina Reissi kipsskulptuurist "Linda", Raul Viitungi fotonäitusest "Aborigeenid", Maiu Kurvitsa fotoseeriast "Kollanemees - kangelane, kes võidab naeratusega maailma", Ed Labetski ja Agu Visaku installatsioonist "Korrektne?"

  2. Outbreak of Staphylococcal food poisoning due to SEA-producing Staphylococcus aureus

    OpenAIRE

    Johler, S; Tichaczek-Dischinger, P; Rau, J; Sihto, H M; Lehner, A; Adam, M; Stephan, R

    2013-01-01

    In 2008, 150 people gathered for a wedding celebration in Baden-Württemberg, Germany. Three hours after ingestion of a variety of foods including pancakes filled with minced chicken, several guests exhibited symptoms of acute gastroenteritis such as vomiting, diarrhea, fever, and ague. Twelve guests were reported to have fallen ill, with nine of these seeking medical care in hospitals. At least four patients were admitted to the hospital and received inpatient treatment, among them a 2-year-o...

  3. Outbreak of staphylococcal food poisoning due to SEA-producing Staphylococcus aureus

    OpenAIRE

    Johler S. Tichaczek-Dischinger P. Rau J. Sihto H-M. Lehner A. Stephan R.

    2013-01-01

    In 2008 150 people gathered for a wedding celebration in Baden Württemberg Germany. Three hours after ingestion of a variety of foods including pancakes filled with minced chicken several guests exhibited symptoms of acute gastroenteritis such as vomiting diarrhea fever and ague. Twelve guests were reported to have fallen ill with nine of these seeking medical care in hospitals. At least four patients were admitted to the hospital and received inpatient treatment among them a 2 year old child...

  4. Space Particle Hazard Measurement and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    CRRES observations, AGU fall meeting 2010, abstract #SM33C-1925. 2011 – Co-developed and tested principal component inversion algorithm for inverting ...angle and energy diffusion, were described [16]. A useful approximation of the resulting precipitation lifetime was developed [17] and exact lifetimes ...of Lifetimes Against Pitch Angle Diffusion, J. Atmos. Solar-Terr. Phys., 71, 1647, doi:10.1016/j.jastp.2008.07.004, 2009. [18] Meredith, N. P., et

  5. Quasi-trapped ion and electron populations at Mercury

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schriver, D.; Trávníček, Pavel M.; Anderson, B.J.; Ashour-Abdalla, M.; Baker, D. N.; Benna, M.; Boardsen, S.A.; Gold, R.E.; Hellinger, Petr; Ho, G.C.; Korth, H.; Krimigis, S.M.; McNutt, Jr., R.L.; Raines, J.M.; Richard, R. L.; Slavin, J.A.; Solomon, S.C.; Starr, R.D.; Zurbuchen, T.H.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 38, - (2011), L23103/1-L23103/6 ISSN 0094-8276 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ME09009 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10030501; CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : MESSENGERS 1ST FLYBY * MAGNETIC-FIELD * MAGNETOSPHERE * INSTRUMENT * PROTONS Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 3.792, year: 2011 http://www.agu.org/pubs/crossref/2011/2011GL049629.shtml

  6. Implementing and Sustaining Data Lifecycle best Practices: a Framework for Researchers and Repositories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stall, S.

    2016-02-01

    Emerging data management mandates in conjunction with cross-domain international interoperability are posing new challenges for researchers and repositories. Domain repositories are serving in this critical, growing role monitoring and leading data management standards and capability within their own repository and working on mappings between repositories internationally. Leading research institutions and companies will also be important as they develop and expand data curation efforts. This landscape poses a number of challenges for developing and ensuring the use of best practices in curating research data, enabling discovery, elevating quality across diverse repositories, and helping researchers collect and organize it through the full data life cycle. This multidimensional challenge will continue to grow in complexity. The American Geophysical Union (AGU) is developing two programs to help researchers and data repositories develop and elevate best practices and address these challenges. The goal is to provide tools for the researchers and repositories, whether domain, institutional, or other, that improve performance throughout the data lifecycle across the Earth and space science community. For scientists and researchers, AGU is developing courses around handling data that can lead toward a certification in geoscience data management. Course materials will cover metadata management and collection, data analysis, integration of data, and data presentation. The course topics are being finalized by the advisory board with the first one planned to be available later this year. AGU is also developing a program aimed at helping data repositories, large and small, domain-specific to general, assess and improve data management practices. AGU has partnered with the CMMI® Institute to adapt their Data Management Maturity (DMM)SM framework within the Earth and space sciences. A data management assessment using the DMMSM involves identifying accomplishments and

  7. The Role of the Agulhas System in Regional and Global Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Ruijter, Wilhelmus P. M.; Beal, Lisa; Biastoch, Arne; Zahn, Rainer

    2013-03-01

    The AGU Chapman Conference on the Agulhas system was the first held on the African continent. There was a feeling of excitement among participants about the great diversity of ongoing research related to the Agulhas Current system, including its role in global and regional climate, its possible influence on human origins in southern Africa, its link to the Madagascar phytoplankton bloom, and its influence on South Atlantic hurricane development (Catarina) through warming related to Agulhas leakage over the past decades.

  8. Kuidas matemaatikat õpilasele kergemaks ja põnevamaks õppeaineks muuta? / Raivo Juurak

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Juurak, Raivo, 1949-

    2016-01-01

    Vestlusring toimus videokonverentsina ning selles osalesid matemaatikaõpetajad Hele Kiisel Treffneri gümnaasiumist, Agu Ojasoo GAG-ist ja Maksim Ivanov Annelinna gümnaasiumist (viimasest osales ka õppealajuhataja Jelena Bitova), matemaatika õppejõud Terje Hõim ning interneti kaudu Sirje Pihlap TÜ-st, Tiia Lister koolituskeskusest Tulevikuhariduse PIRN, Aado Luik tarbijakaitsest, Kaja Jakobson SA Innovest ning Pille Liblik, Mariann Rikka ja Aivar Ots HTM-ist

  9. Microbially induced magnetosusceptibility anomalies below the surface of emerged carbonate banks - observed pathway of their origin (San Salvador Island, The Bahamas

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hladil, Jindřich; Bosák, Pavel; Carew, J. L.; Zawidzki, P.; Lacka, B.; Charvátová, K.; Mylroie, J. E.; Langrová, Anna; Galle, Arnošt

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 5, - (2003), s. Abstract Number 06936 ISSN 1029-7006. [EGS-AGU-EUG Joint Assembly. 06.04.2003-11.04.2003, Nice] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA3013209 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3013912 Keywords : microbial diagenesis * carbonate platforms * Quaternary Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy http://www.cosis.net/abstracts/EAE03/06936/EAE03-J-06936.pdf

  10. Tickle with a feather | Warner | South African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Do you suffer from ague? Well, here's the cure - it's a favourite and considered most efficacious, and I bet granddad enjoyed it: beat up a new-laid egg in a glass of brandy and take on going to bed. Equally popular was 3 grams of snake root, 40 grams of wormwood, and '/2 oz of best powdered Jesuit bark - taken in a half ...

  11. Review Of Clinical Features Of Malaria | Onyenekwe | Orient Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the early 17th century, the “Peruvian Bark” or Jesuits Powder” was discovered to be of value in the treatment of certain fevers. The tree was later to be named cinchona from which quinine was extracted in 1820. Such fever was known as the agues in England, in Italy as mal'aria and in France as Palludisme due to their ...

  12. Ionospheric density variations recorded before the 2010 Mw 8.8 earthquake in Chile

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Píša, David; Parrot, M.; Santolík, Ondřej

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 116, - (2011), A08309/1-A08309/8 ISSN 0148-0227 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ME09107 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : DEMETER satellite * pre- seismic activity * Offshore Bio-bio earthquake Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 3.021, year: 2011 http://www.agu.org/pubs/crossref/2011/2011JA016611.shtml

  13. In Memoriam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorge Lomnitz-Adler died on December 17, 1993, at age 39. He had been a member of AGU (Seismology) since 1989. He was an associate editor of the Journal of Geophysical Research and a director of the Association of Seismology and Physics of the Earth's Interior. Weeks before his death, he was awarded the Prize for Young Academics from his institution, the National University of Mexico (UNAM). He was cited for his contributions to earthquake prediction, using avalanche and percolation models.

  14. Aasta kordaminekud ja vajakajäämised maakonna nimekate inimeste pilgu läbi / interv. Marek Pihlak

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2005-01-01

    Valga maavanem Georg Trashanov, Valga linnapea Margus Lepik, Tõrva linnapea Agu Kabrits, Otepää vallavanem Jaanus Raidal, Valgamaa päästeteenistuse direktor Väino Rimm, AS-i Valga Haigla juhataja Riho Tapfer, Valga politseijaoskonna ülemkomissar Tõnu Kürsa ja MRP ärigrupi juhatuse liige Valter Malm vastavad küsimustele, mis puudutavad kordaminekuid ja vajakajäämisi maakonnas 2005. aastal ning nimetavad eeskuju väärivaid valgamaalasi

  15. Presentation: 3D magnetic inversion by planting anomalous densities

    OpenAIRE

    Uieda, Leonardo; Barbosa, Valeria C. F.

    2013-01-01

    Slides for the presentation "3D magnetic inversion by planting anomalous densities" given at the 2013 AGU Meeting of the Americas in Cancun, Mexico.   Note: There was an error in the title of the talk. The correct title should be "3D magnetic inversion by planting anomalous magnetization"   Abstract: We present a new 3D magnetic inversion algorithm based on the computationally efficient method of planting anomalous densities. The algorithm consists of an iterative growth of the an...

  16. 20. X avati arhitektuuri- ja disainigaleriis...

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2004-01-01

    Väljapanek "Vaateaken Eesti ekspositsioonile Veneetsia arhitektuuribiennaalil". Eestit esindab 9. Veneetsia arhitektuuribiennaalil Eesti Arhitektide Liidu projekt "Aeg-maha-arhitektuur", idee autor Kristjan Holm, kaasautorid Liina Jänes ja Pille Epner. Kabli rannast Veneetsiasse teisaldatud puust hobusekujulise välikäimla on loonud Agu Külm ja Jukka-Pekka Jalovaara. Ku-Ku klubis esilinastus Marianne Kõrveri, Rain Tolgi ja Andres Maimiku dokumentaalfilm "Surm Veneetsias"

  17. Food sovereignty as multiple resistances: the Honduran movement in global context

    OpenAIRE

    Gies, Heather Marie

    2014-01-01

    Food sovereignty reconciles the local and global in its creative political imaginary of the meaning of sovereignty that justifies “multiple resistances.” This research explores this reconciliation of local and global through the case study of the food sovereignty project being advanced by campesino organizations in the Aguán Valley, Honduras, as situated within the dynamic nexus of local and global discourses, movements, and material realities. I argue that food sovereignty reconceives sovere...

  18. Solar flux variation of the electron temperature morning overshoot in the equatorial F region

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stolle, C.; Liu, H.; Truhlík, Vladimír; Lühr, H.; Richards, G.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 116, - (2011), A04308/1-A04308/13 ISSN 0148-0227 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP209/10/2086 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : IONOSPHERIC PHOTOELECTRON FLUX * MODEL * DENSITY * ATMOSPHERE * ION Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology Impact factor: 3.021, year: 2011 http://www.agu.org/pubs/crossref/2011/2010JA016235.shtml

  19. Elupäästjate lood ja päästeteenistuse aumärkide saajad

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2011-01-01

    Septembris 2001 aumärgid saanud päästjate nimekirjad. Pikemalt on kirjutatud järgmistest päästjatest: Aivar Issaev, Sulev Kase, Nail Beljalov, Lea Bärenson, Maidu Eru, Viktor Perets, Dmitri Bažura, Tarmo Klooster, Andres Leppenen, Tarmo Voltein, Karl Koort, Agu Annuk, Tiit Naan, Aare Ilves, Valentin Lossev, Oleg Kurilov, Vassili Sokolov, Alexander Soonvald, Alar Laanemägi, Tõivo Tim Nõlvak, Birko Kallas, Roland Kohv, Jevgeni Novikov

  20. Täppispalkamine / Claudio Fernandez-Araoz

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Fernandez-Araoz, Claudio

    2005-01-01

    10 peamist viga, mis tehakse uute töötajate tööle värbamisel ning vigade võimalikest lahendustest. Kommenteerivad Agu Vaher, Terje Tiiman ja Ille Einmann. Vt. samas: Kas teie firma vajaks uue inimese töölevärbamisel välist abi?; Midagi enamat kui vestlus - struktureeritud intervjuu; Kumba valida - armastusväärne tossike või kurjamist proff?

  1. Association of Polar Early Career Scientists Promotes Professional Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Allen; Fugmann, Gerlis; Kruse, Frigga

    2014-06-01

    As a partner organization of AGU, the Association of Polar Early Career Scientists (APECS; http://www.apecs.is) fully supports the views expressed in Wendy Gordon's Forum article "Developing Scientists' `Soft' Skills" (Eos, 95(6), 55, doi:10.1002/2014EO060003). Her recognition that beyond research skills, people skills and professional training are crucial to the success of any early-career scientist is encouraging.

  2. Trusted Sources: The Role Scientific Societies Can Play in Improving Public Opinions on Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEntee, C.; Cairns, A.; Buhrman, J.

    2012-12-01

    Public acceptance of the scientific consensus regarding climate change has eroded and misinformation designed to confuse the public is rapidly proliferating. Those issues, combined with an increase of politically motivated attacks on climate scientists and their research, have led to a place where ideology can trump scientific consensus as the foundation for developing policy solutions. The scientific community has been, thus far, unprepared to respond effectively to these developments. However, as a scientific society whose members engage in climate science research, and one whose organizational mission and vision are centered on the concepts of science for the benefit of humanity and ensuring a sustainable future, the American Geophysical Union can, and should, play an important role in reversing this trend. To that end, in 2011, AGU convened a Leadership Summit on Climate Science Communication, in which presidents, executive directors, and senior public policy staff from 17 scientific organizations engaged with experts in the social sciences regarding effective communication of climate science and with practitioners from agriculture, energy, and the military. The discussions focused on three key issues: the environment of climate science communication; public understanding of climate change; and the perspectives of consumers of climate science-based information who work with specific audiences. Participants diagnosed previous challenges and failings, enumerated the key constituencies that need to be effectively engaged, and identified the critical role played by cultural cognition—the influence of group values, particularly around equality and authority, individualism, and community; and the perceptions of risk. Since that meeting, AGU has consistently worked to identify and explore ways that it, and its members, and improve the effectiveness of their communication with the public about climate change. This presentation will focus on the insights AGU has

  3. Progress in observations and simulations of global change in the upper atmosphere

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Qian, L.; Laštovička, Jan; Roble, R. G.; Solomon, S.C.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 116, - (2011), A00H03/1-A00H03/16 ISSN 0148-0227 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP209/10/1792 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : Long-term trends * upper atmosphere * ionosphere Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology Impact factor: 3.021, year: 2011 http://www.agu.org/pubs/crossref/2011/2010JA016317.shtml

  4. Ion cyclotron harmonics in the Saturn downward current auroral region

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Menietti, J. D.; Schippers, P.; Santolík, Ondřej; Gurnett, D. A.; Crary, F.; Coates, A. J.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 116, - (2011), A12234/1-A12234/6 ISSN 0148-0227 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ME10001 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : ELECTRON-BEAMS * WAVES * WAVES * PRECIPITATION * PLASMA * ASSOCIATION Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 3.021, year: 2011 http://www.agu.org/pubs/crossref/2011/2011JA017102.shtml

  5. Western North Pacific Monsoon Depressions: Formation, Structure, and Transition to Tropical Cyclones

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    produced total rainfall accumulations approaching 3,000 mm in the Central Mountain Range. This record-breaking rainfall caused landslides over the...mountains, including one landslide that destroyed the entire Shiao-Lin village, resulting in more than 650 deaths and causing severe flooding over most...Online analysis enhances use of NASA Earth science data. Eos, Trans. AGU, 88, 14–17. Beattie, J. C., and R. L. Elsberry, 2010: Conceptual model of

  6. Does gender bias influence awards given by societies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Mary Anne; Asher, Pranoti; Farrington, John; Fine, Rana; Leinen, Margaret S.; LeBoy, Phoebe

    2011-11-01

    AGU is a participant in a U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded project called Advancing Ways of Awarding Recognition in Disciplinary Societies (AWARDS), which seeks to examine whether gender bias affects selection of recipients of society awards. AGU is interested in learning why there is a higher proportion of female recipients of service and education awards over the past 2 decades. Combined with a lower rate of receipt of research awards, these results suggest that implicit (subconscious) bias in favor of male candidates still influences awardee selection. Six other professional societies (American Chemical Society, American Mathematical Society, American Society of Anesthesiologists, Mathematical Association of America, Society for Neuroscience, and Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics) are participating in the project. Volunteers from each participant society attended an Association for Women in Science (AWIS)-sponsored workshop in May 2010 to examine data and review literature on best practices for fair selection of society awardees. A draft proposal for implementing these practices will be brought before the AGU Council and the Honors and Recognition Committee at their upcoming meetings.

  7. Kamide reflects on JGR and the role of editor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Peter

    After serving the space physics community for more than 11 years, Y. Kamide of the Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory at Nagoya University in Toyokawa, Japan, retired as editor of the Journal of Geophysical Research-Space Physics for the Asian/Pacific region. He had been a JGR editor since AGU first opened two editorial offices in Europe and the Asian/Pacific region in 1989. Even as the initial JGR editor in Asia, Kamide was not new to AGU editorial business. Before accepting the JGR position, Kamide served 3 years as the editor in Japan for Geophysical Research Letters.According to Kamide, over the last 5 years, the number of high-quality submissions to JGR in the Asian/Pacific region has increased dramatically, by a factor of 2.5. This increase came mostly from the younger generation of scientists, which bodes well for the future of JGR and space physics in general. Together with the substantial contributions to JGR from the European community, this achievement has been recognized by AGU as proof that JGR is truly an international journal of the highest editorial standards.

  8. An investment in AGU—A comment from a federal scientist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostenso, Ned A.

    In our country, progress in the geophysical sciences has been closely interwoven with progress of the many geophysical activities within the federal government. Substantial numbers of geophysicists traditionally have found their life's work in the ranks of the federal service, where they pursue scientific advancement in their field of work, in laboratory research, and in the management of geophysical science programs.To this large body of scientists the American Geophysical Union has always been a helpful and needed scientific organization. Access to high-quality journals is undoubtedly 1985 the most useful and cherished AGU benefit provided to the federal employees. Next in importance may be the many, many benefits that come by participation in the AGU scientific meetings. This is followed by opportunities afforded federal scientists to serve in policy and administrative roles on the committees and council of the Union. These AGU benefits, and many more not enumerated here, can bring an abundance of national recognition, intellectual maturity, and self-esteem to federal scientists, thus encouraging us to become better scientists and more proficient employees.

  9. Policy offers protection from harassment

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNutt, Marcia

    We face a number of legal and ethical issues in our work as scientists and as AGU members. To uphold the highest ethical standards in our professional activities, the Council has adopted policies on free access to published material, ethics in publishing, and misconduct in science. But what about guidelines to govern the personal behavior that constitutes harassment, sexual or otherwise?For years the AGU headquarters staff has had a policy that offers protection from harassment and rules for dealing with it, but the membership went without one until 1994. That year the Council adopted a policy that extends to the membership as well as to the staff and the vendors they encounter at meetings. The law only requires a policy to prevent harassment in the workplace, but the Council felt that a harassment policy was particularly important for members because the subtle behavior that can constitute harassment is most likely to occur at events that combine work and social interaction, such as the meetings, conferences, and training seminars that AGU members attend.

  10. Honors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-01

    More than a dozen AGU members are among 94 researchers announced by U.S. president Barack Obama on 26 September as recipients of the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers. The award, which is coordinated by the Office of Science and Technology Policy within the Executive Office of the President, is considered the highest honor bestowed by the U.S. government on science and engineering professionals in the early stages of their independent research careers. This year's recipients include Jeffrey Book, Naval Research Laboratory; Jonathan Cirtain, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center; Fotini Katopodes Chow, University of California, Berkeley; Elizabeth Cochran, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS); Ian Howat, Ohio State University; Christiane Jablonowski, University of Michigan; Justin Kasper, Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory; Elena Litchman, Michigan State University; James A. Morris Jr., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA); Erin M. Oleson, NOAA; Victoria Orphan, California Institute of Technology; Sasha Reed, USGS; David Shelly, USGS; and Feng Wang, University of California, Berkeley. Five AGU members are among 10 U.S. representatives recently selected for International Arctic Science Committee working groups. The AGU members, chosen as representatives through the U.S. National Academies review process, are Atmosphere Working Group member James Overland, Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, NOAA; Cryosphere Working Group members Walter Meier, University of Colorado at Boulder, and Elizabeth Hunke, Los Alamos National Laboratory; Marine Working Group member Mary-Louise Timmermans, Yale University; and Terrestrial Working Group member Vanessa Lougheed, University of Texas at El Paso.

  11. Looking at the vintage of 1949

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fifty years ago, as 1949 began, AGU dues had been raised from $5 to $7 per year. James Bernard Macelwane had just received the William Bowie Medal. Walter H. Bucher was about to become president, and H. U-.Sverdrup was vice-president.The Union's 4,500 members could choose among eight sections: Geodesy, Seismology, Meteorology, Terrestrial Magnetism and Electricity, Oceanography, Volcanology Hydrology, and Tectonophysics. Of the approximately 200 new members that joined AGU in 1949, 34 are celebrating 50 years of membership this year.The individuals listed below join the distinguished ranks of the other 50-year members. Their continuing commitment to AGU is deeply appreciated. Stephen E. Blewett, William E. Bonini, William M. Cameron, Robert A. Clark, John C. Cook, Joseph S. Cragwall, Jr., Richard C. Culler, Martin M. Fogel, Joseph B. Franzini, Thomas A. Gleeson, O. Milton Hackett, Arthur FHasbrook, James W. Hood, Shragga Irmay William W. Kellogg, Elizabeth R. King, Howard Klein, Finley B. Laverty Heinz H. Lettau, Kurt E. Lowe, Arthur R. Miller, Joseph W Mixsell, Carlo Morelli, Jack E. Oliver, B. H. Olsson, George L. Pickard, John L. Rosenfeld, Thorndike Saville, Jr., John W. Siegmund, James E. Slosson, John Summersett, Harold A. Thomas, Jr., Charles M. Weiss, and Glenn C. Werth.

  12. Demographic Change in the American Geophysical Union's United States Membership, 2006-2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, D. D.

    2014-12-01

    AGU's demographic characteristics changed during the period 2006-2014 in response to the aging of the Baby Boom generation and an increase in the number of women geoscientists. This analysis deals only with the portion of AGU's membership with mailing addresses within the US, a group that comprised 65% of the worldwide total in 2006 and 61% of the total membership in 2014. Using the US membership data that include both the members' birthdate and gender, a comparison of the population structures in 2006 and 2014 reveals characteristics of the changing US workforce. Since 2006, the percent of the US membership represented by the Baby Boom has decreased 5.2%, from 37.2% to 32.0%. That trend will continue for the next 20 years and the rate will accelerate before slowing again. At the same time the Boomers are decreasing in number, the percentage of the membership represented by the more recent age-cohorts (born 1965-1989) has grown. For example, in 2006, the 1985-1989 cohort was barely represented (0.14%). By February 2014, the cohort had become 8.25% of the U.S. membership. The four cohorts covering birth years 1965 through 1984, each increased slightly in size. In addition, each had a larger number of women, reflecting AGU's increased female membership from 22.5% to 25.3%. The 1985-1989 cohort is somewhat smaller than the previous four cohorts. If the smaller size of this represents a reversal of the growth trend over the last 25 years, the implications for the size of the US workforce are important. Perhaps the most significant change in the demographic structure of AGU's US membership is that the general shape of the age-gender diagram, while still asymmetrical because of the larger number of men, is becoming more straight sided due to the similar size of recent cohorts. This shape is characteristic of stable populations when dealing with self-reproducing groups. The implications for the future of a scientific society are less clear, but the cause reflects a period

  13. Changes in the Demographic Characteristics of the American Geophysical Union Membership, 2006-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, D. D.

    2010-12-01

    Significant change occurred in the demographic properties of the American Geophysical Union membership during the period April 2006- January 2010. During this period AGU membership decreased from 48,332 to 38,847, a drop of 19.6%. Most of the change appears to have been driven by the aging membership of the Union, especially in the United States, and the effects of the global economic crisis on employment in all sectors of economy. Of the 38,847 members in January 2010, data on the birth year and gender were available for 33,610 members including 21,567 who reside in the United States. These data were compared to a similar data set captured in April 2006. The following observations are based on this subset of the total AGU membership for who country of residence and both age and gender are known. The number of AGU members residing in the United States decreased by 18.6% during the study period. As should be expected, the changes were not spread evenly between the genders or across birth-year cohorts. Membership among males decreased by 19%, while there were 17% fewer female members. The female cohorts that experienced the greatest losses were those including women from 30-40 years old (born 1970-1979). These data appear to echo multiple studies that show women leaving the sciences for gender-specific reasons. For the purposes of this analysis, the birth-year cohorts are divided into three groups. Members born prior to 1945 compose the oldest cohort. The Baby-Boom generation includes members born between 1945 and 1964. The youngest group includes members born from 1965 onward. Because of the very small number of women in the oldest group (only 4.7%) most of the change occurred among males. The total membership loss from this group was 1,140 members, 23% of the total. The largest change occurred among Baby Boomers. The group decreased by 2,760 members, accounting for 56% of the total decline in membership among US residents. Males accounted for most of the change (2

  14. Formulating the American Geophysical Union's Scientific Integrity and Professional Ethics Policy: Challenges and lessons learned: Chapter 8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundersen, Linda C.; Townsend, Randy

    2017-01-01

    Creating an ethics policy for a large, diverse geosciences organization is a challenge, especially in the midst of the current contentious dialogue in the media related to such issues as climate change, sustaining natural resources, and responding to natural hazards. In 2011, the American Geophysical Union (AGU) took on this challenge, creating an Ethics Task Force to update their ethics policies to better support their new Strategic Plan and respond to the changing scientific research environment. Dialogue with AGU members and others during the course of creating the new policy unveiled some of the following issues to be addressed. Scientific results and individual scientists are coming under intense political and public scrutiny, with the efficacy of the science being questioned. In some cases, scientists are asked to take sides and/or provide opinions on issues beyond their research, impacting their objectivity. Pressure related to competition for funding and the need to publish high quality and quantities of papers has led to recent high profile plagiarism, data fabrication, and conflict of interest cases. The complexities of a continuously advancing digital environment for conducting, reviewing, and publishing science has raised concerns over the ease of plagiarism, fabrication, falsification, inappropriate peer review, and the need for better accessibility of data and methods. Finally, students and scientists need consistent education and encouragement on the importance of ethics and integrity in scientific research. The new AGU Scientific Integrity and Ethics Policy tries to address these issues and provides an inspirational code of conduct to encourage a responsible, positive, open, and honest scientific research environment.

  15. Rapid Epidemiological Assessment of Onchocerciasis in a Tropical Semi-Urban Community, Enugu State, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JE Eyo

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study was carried out in Opi-Agu a tropical semi-urban autonomous community comprising of three villages in Enugu State, Nigeria, between the months of April and June 2010. It was designed to determine the prevalence of Onchocerca volvulus infection and assess the perception of the disease among the inhabitants of this community.Methods: A total number of 305 individuals comprising of 148 males and 157 females were ex­amined for various manifestations of onchocerciasis symptoms using rapid epidemiological assess­ment (REA method.Results: Out of this number, 119 (39.02% individuals were infected. Prevalence of infection among age groups and villages varied. Age group 41 yr and above had the highest (31.00% prevalence, while among the villages, Ogbozalla village ranked higher (45.71% than the other villages. Overall the prevalence of infection among the sexes revealed that males were more infected (43.24% than the females (35.03%. Lichenified onchodermatitis (LOD was the most prevalent (35.29% onchocercia­sis symptom among others identified in the area, while leopard skin (LS had the lowest (20.17% occurrence and blindness (0.00% which is the most devastating effect of O. volvulus infec­tion was not observed. Questionnaire responses from 410 individuals revealed that 34.8% respon­dent from Idi village and 28.1% from Ibeku village believed that O. volvulus infection occurs through poor personal hygiene. Bite of blackfly ranked least (10.6% among the respondent’s knowledge of the causes of onchocerciasis in Opi-Agu community.Conclusion: Opi-Agu community members had poor knowledge of onchocerciasis, the vector and of its etiologic organism. There is need for integration of community health education with mass chemo­therapy

  16. Harassment as an Ethics Issue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Mary Anne; Marin-Spiotta, Erika; Schneider, Blair

    2017-04-01

    Harassment, sexual and otherwise, including bullying and discrimination, remains an ongoing problem in the science workforce. In response to monthly revelations of harassment in academic science in the U.S. in 2016, the American Geophysical Union (AGU) convened a workshop to discuss strategies for professional societies to address this pernicious practice. Participants included researchers on this topic and members from professional science societies, academia, and U.S. federal government agencies. We agreed on the following principles: - Harassment, discrimination and bullying most often occur between a superior (e.g., an advisor, professor, supervisor) and a student or early career professional, representing a power difference that disadvantages the less-powerful scientist. - Harassment drives excellent potential as well as current scientists from the field who would otherwise contribute to the advancement of science, engineering and technology. - Harassment, therefore, represents a form of scientific misconduct, and should be treated as plagiarism, falsification, and other forms of scientific misconduct are treated, with meaningful consequences. To address harassment and to change the culture of science, professional societies can and should: ensure that their Code of Ethics and/or Code of Conduct addresses harassment with clear definitions of what constitutes this behavior, including in academic, professional, conference and field settings; provide a clear and well-disseminated mechanism for reporting violations to the society; have a response person or team in the society that can assist those who feel affected by harassment; and provide a mechanism to revisit and update Codes on a regular basis. The Code should be disseminated widely to members and apply to all members and staff. A revised Code of Ethics is now being constructed by AGU, and will be ready for adoption in 2017. See http://harassment.agu.org/ for information updates.

  17. Methodology to Calculate the Costs of a Floating Offshore Renewable Energy Farm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Castro-Santos

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper establishes a general methodology to calculate the life-cycle cost of floating offshore renewable energy devices, applying it to wave energy and wind energy devices. It is accounts for the contributions of the six main phases of their life-cycle: concept definition, design and development, manufacturing, installation, exploitation and dismantling, the costs of which have been defined. Moreover, the energy produced is also taken into account to calculate the Levelized Cost of Energy of a floating offshore renewable energy farm. The methodology proposed has been applied to two renewable energy devices: a floating offshore wave energy device and a floating offshore wind energy device. Two locations have been considered: Aguçadoura and São Pedro de Moel, both in Portugal. Results indicate that the most important cost in terms of the life-cycle of a floating offshore renewable energy farm is the exploitation cost, followed by the manufacturing and the installation cost. In addition, the best area in terms of costs is the same independently of the type of floating offshore renewable energy considered: Aguçadoura. However, the results in terms of Levelized Cost of Energy are different: Aguçadoura is better when considering wave energy technology and the São Pedro de Moel region is the best option when considering floating wind energy technology. The method proposed aims to give a direct approach to calculate the main life-cycle cost of a floating offshore renewable energy farm. It helps to assess its feasibility and evaluating the relevant characteristics that influence it the most.

  18. Improving Communication Skills in Early Career Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saia, S. M.

    2013-12-01

    The AGU fall meeting is a time for scientists to share what we have been hard at work on for the past year, to share our trials and tribulations, and of course, to share our science (we hope inspirational). In addition to sharing, the AGU fall meeting is also about collaboration as it brings old and new colleagues together from diverse communities across the planet. By sharing our ideas and findings, we build new relationships with the potential to cross boundaries and solve complex and pressing environmental issues. With ever emerging and intensifying water scarcity, extreme weather, and water quality issues across the plant, it is especially important that scientists like us share our ideas and work together to put these ideas into action. My vision of the future of water sciences embraces this fact. I believe that better training is needed to help early career scientists, like myself, build connections within and outside of our fields. First and foremost, more advanced training in effective storytelling concepts and themes may improve our ability to provide context for our research. Second, training in the production of video for internet-based media (e.g. YouTube) may help us bring our research to audiences in a more personalized way. Third, opportunities to practice presenting at highly visible public events such as the AGU fall meeting, will serve to prepare early career scientists for a variety of audiences. We hope this session, ';Water Sciences Pop-Ups', will provide the first steps to encourage and train early career scientists as they share and collaborate with scientists and non-scientists around the world.

  19. Understanding Preclerkship Medical Students' Poor Performance in Prescription Writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Henry; Al Khaja, Khalid A J; Tayem, Yasin I; Veeramuthu, Sindhan; Sequeira, Reginald P

    2016-05-01

    This study aimed to explore reasons for poor performance in prescription writing stations of the objective structured practical examination (OSPE) and absenteeism in prescription writing sessions among preclerkship medical students at the Arabian Gulf University (AGU) in Manama, Bahrain. This descriptive study was carried out between September 2014 and June 2015 among 157 preclerkship medical students at AGU. Data were collected using focus group discussions and a questionnaire with closed- and open-ended items. All 157 students participated in the study (response rate: 100.0%). The most frequently cited reasons for poor performance in OSPE stations were an inability to select the correct drugs (79.6%), treatment duration (69.4%), drug quantity (69.4%) and drug formulation (68.2%). Additionally, students reported inadequate time for completing the stations (68.8%). During focus group discussions, students reported other reasons for poor performance, including examination stress and the difficulty of the stations. Absenteeism was attributed to the length of each session (55.4%), lack of interest (50.3%), reliance on peers for information (48.4%) and optional attendance policies (47.1%). Repetitive material, large group sessions, unmet student expectations and the proximity of the sessions to summative examinations were also indicated to contribute to absenteeism according to open-ended responses or focus group discussions. This study suggests that AGU medical students perform poorly in prescription writing OSPE stations because of inadequate clinical pharmacology knowledge. Participation in prescription writing sessions needs to be enhanced by addressing the concerns identified in this study. Strategies to improve attendance and performance should take into account the learner-teacher relationship.

  20. Understanding Preclerkship Medical Students’ Poor Performance in Prescription Writing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry James

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study aimed to explore reasons for poor performance in prescription writing stations of the objective structured practical examination (OSPE and absenteeism in prescription writing sessions among preclerkship medical students at the Arabian Gulf University (AGU in Manama, Bahrain. Methods: This descriptive study was carried out between September 2014 and June 2015 among 157 preclerkship medical students at AGU. Data were collected using focus group discussions and a questionnaire with closed- and open-ended items. Results: All 157 students participated in the study (response rate: 100.0%. The most frequently cited reasons for poor performance in OSPE stations were an inability to select the correct drugs (79.6%, treatment duration (69.4%, drug quantity (69.4% and drug formulation (68.2%. Additionally, students reported inadequate time for completing the stations (68.8%. During focus group discussions, students reported other reasons for poor performance, including examination stress and the difficulty of the stations. Absenteeism was attributed to the length of each session (55.4%, lack of interest (50.3%, reliance on peers for information (48.4% and optional attendance policies (47.1%. Repetitive material, large group sessions, unmet student expectations and the proximity of the sessions to summative examinations were also indicated to contribute to absenteeism according to open-ended responses or focus group discussions. Conclusion: This study suggests that AGU medical students perform poorly in prescription writing OSPE stations because of inadequate clinical pharmacology knowledge. Participation in prescription writing sessions needs to be enhanced by addressing the concerns identified in this study. Strategies to improve attendance and performance should take into account the learner-teacher relationship.

  1. EMI Execution Service Specification 1.0

    CERN Document Server

    Schuller, B. (JUELICH); Smirnova, O (Lund University); Konstantinov, A. (Oslo University); Skou Andersen, M. (University of Copenhagen); Riedel, M. (JUELICH); Memon, A.S. (JUELICH); Memon, M.S. (JUELICH); Zangrando, L. (INFN); Sgaravatto, M. (INFN); Frizziero, E. (INFN)

    2010-01-01

    This document provides the interface specification, including related data models such as state model, activity description, resource and activity information, of an execution service, matching the needs of the EMI production middleware stack composed of ARC, gLite and UNICORE components. This service therefore is referred to as the EMI Execution Service (or “ES” for short). This document is a continuation of the work previously known as the GENEVA, then AGU (“ARC, gLite UNICORE”), then PGI execution service.

  2. EMI Execution Service (EMI-ES) Specification

    CERN Document Server

    Schuller, B

    2010-01-01

    This document provides the interface specification, including related data models such as state model, activity description, resource and activity information, of an execution service, matching the needs of the EMI production middleware stack composed of ARC, gLite and UNICORE components. This service therefore is referred to as the EMI Execution Service (or “ES” for short). This document is a continuation of the work previously know as the GENEVA, then AGU (“ARC, gLite UNICORE”), then PGI execution service. As a starting point, the v0.42 of the “PGI Execution Service Specification” (doc15839) was used.

  3. Reproducción de Eisenia foetida en suelos agrícolas de áreas mineras contaminadas por cobre y arsênico.

    OpenAIRE

    ÁVILA, G.; GAETE, H.; MORALES, M.; NEAMAN, A.

    2008-01-01

    El objetivo del trabajo fue evaluar la toxicidad del cobre y arsénico en suelos agrícolas, mediante bioensayos estandarizados de toxicidad aguda y crónica sobre Eisenia foetida y relacionar la respuesta de ésta con las concentraciones de cobre y arsénico en los suelos. Los suelos agrícolas fueram muestreados en las inmediaciones de áreas mineras en la cuenca del río Aconcagua, Chile. E. foetida expuesta a los suelos estudiados mostró una baja mortalidad, indicando la ausencia de toxicidad agu...

  4. 1990 Fall Meeting Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, David S.

    The AGU 1990 Fall Meeting, held in San Francisco December 3-7, continued the steady growth trend for the western meeting set over the last decade. About 5200 members registered for the meeting and 3836 papers were given. The scientific kickoff to the meeting was provided by a Union session on initial results of the current Magellan mission to Venus. The mission was also the focus of a public lecture and short film on highlights of the mission and an extensive Union poster session.

  5. PROPOSTA DE IMPLANTAÇÃO DE UM JARDIM SENSORIAL COMO FERRAMENTA DE ENSINO NAS ESCOLAS DO ENSINO FUNDAMENTAL II.

    OpenAIRE

    Ariane Araújo Ferreira; Walderez Moreira Joaquim

    2017-01-01

    Jardim sensorial é um espaço para aguçar os cinco sentidos. Objetivou-se elaborar um manual para docentes do ensino fundamental II, propondo a implantação de um Jardim Sensorial como atividade lúdica e como ferramenta no processo de ensino-aprendizagem dos conteúdos de morfologia vegetal. Foi realizado um levantamento bibliográfico sobre jardim sensorial, ensino de ciências e botânica. O manual é constituído por cinco partes: 1) O que é um Jardim Sensorial, 2) Construção do Jardim Sensorial, ...

  6. Rethinking Russia

    OpenAIRE

    Paulauskas, Kęstutis

    2005-01-01

    The article argues that the period of “high” politics in the ever-problematic relations between Lithuania and Russia is over. At the same time, it is agued that tensions remain at the level of “low” politics, when the agenda of bilateral relations is dominated by the security interests related to Kaliningrad Oblast and Russia’s energy policy. The author claims that Lithuania should take a more pragmatic approach in her day-to-day relations with Russia and follow a more flexible policy towards...

  7. Huss Receives 2013 Cryosphere Young Investigator Award: Citation: Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huss, Matthias

    2014-07-01

    I would like to thank the AGU Cryosphere focus group for this award. Gaining such an important recognition at this stage of a scientific career is indeed both a great honor and a motivation to me. I was a little child when I first stepped onto a glacier. There was an unforgettable sensation of attraction and interest that touched me—one might call it a magic moment. Back then, I would never have imagined being a glaciologist one day. But it feels right, and I am grateful to have received the opportunity of exploring this wonderful element of nature.

  8. Water Resources Research supports water economics submissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Ronald C.

    2012-09-01

    AGU's international interdisciplinary journal Water Resources Research (WRR) publishes original contributions in hydrology; the physical, chemical, and biological sciences; and the social and policy sciences, including economics, systems analysis, sociology, and law. With the rising relevance of water economics and related social sciences, the editors of WRR continue to encourage submissions on economics and policy. WRR was originally founded in the mid 1960s by Walter Langbein and economist Allen Kneese. Several former WRR editors have been economists—including David Brookshire, Ron Cummings, and Chuck Howe—and many landmark articles in water economics have been published in WRR.

  9. Kultuurkapitali aastapreemiad 2004 / Sverre Laanjärv

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Laanjärv, Sverre

    2005-01-01

    Eesti Kultuurkapitali peapreemia sai Toomas Rank Rägavere mõisa ennistamise eest. Arhitektuuri sihtkapitali renoveerimispreemia - Mari Kurismaa, Eesti Draamateatri interjööride renoveerimine; objektipreemia - Martin Aunin, Ülemiste hotell; interjööripreemia - Jan Joonas Graps, Ken-Kristjan Ruut, "Jungenti" büroo; arhitektuurse tegevuse preemia - Veneetsia biennaali Eesti väljapaneku "Time Out Architecture" autorid (Kristjan Holm ning Liina Jänes, Agu Külm, Jukka-Pekka Jalovaara, Pille Epner, Madis Jürgen, Tõnu Kaalep, Ingmar Muusikus)

  10. Talent beyond Earth and space, careers that are out of this world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Paul

    2011-09-01

    If you are looking for a job or looking to hire, the AGU Career Center will save you time, money, and effort. The job listings showcase fulfilling opportunities across many employment areas and many disciplines. The resumé database is brimming with highly skilled people. Browse the listings or set up search terms so that you will be notified as soon as new jobs that meet your criteria get posted. Likewise, if you're looking to fill a position, you can create criteria that will let you know when a suitable resumé gets deposited in the database.

  11. Dinâmica discursiva e o ensino de física: análise de um episódio de ensino envolvendo o uso de um texto alternativo

    OpenAIRE

    Assis, Alice; Teixeira, Odete Pacubi Baierl

    2009-01-01

    Resumo: Este artigo enfoca a análise da dinâmica discursiva entre alunos e professor mediados pelo uso de um texto alternativo intitulado "Nosso Universo", em aulas de Física, em uma sala de educação de jovens e adultos. Para tal, é destacado um episódio de ensino cuja abordagem centra-se na discussão de conceitos físicos. Os resultados evidenciaram que o referido texto mostrou-se potencialmente significativo para os alunos, aguçando a curiosidade e o interesse dos mesmos, que relacionaram os...

  12. An unusual case: Renal candidiasis; Der besondere Fall: Renale Candidiasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pautz, Doerthe [Medizinische Hochschule Hannover (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologie

    2009-03-15

    A 39-year old female patient suffering from congenital spastic tetraparesis, bilateral hip dysplasia and diabetes was hospitalized as an emergency because of violent pains in the right flank which emanated paravertebrally and into the pelvis. There was no fever or ague. The anamnesis included urolithiasis on the right side 5 years ago and an ileum conduit operation after a neurogenic disturbance of micturition 22 years ago. The sonographic pictures indicated no congestion of the kidneys. To exclude urolithiasis, a low-dose CT was carried out, followed by CT after application of a contrast medium. (orig.)

  13. Horton Grantee gets AAG Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffrey McDonnell, an assistant professor of forest hydrology at Utah State University, Logan, received the J. Warren Nystrom Award from the Association of American Geographers for his doctoral dissertation, “The Age, Origin and Pathway of Subsurface Stormflow in a Steep Humid Headwater Catchment.” In 1987, McDonnell was awarded AGU's Horton Research Grant for his thesis proposal.McDonnell received his Ph.D. in 1989 from the University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand. His dissertation was supervised by I. F. Owens, Department of Geography, University of Canterbury and A. J. Pearce, New Zealand Forest Research Institute.

  14. On innovation patterns and value-tensions in public services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuglsang, Lars; Rønning, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    to the possibility of intertwined innovation patterns. Focusing public sector services, this paper agues that intertwined innovation patterns emerge within public services as a response to value-tensions. Values can be defined as measures for beneficial behaviour that guide innovation. Value-tensions in public...... services include tensions between the political, economic, communal, aesthetic and intellectual values. The contribution of the paper to service innovation research is the emphasis on the concept of intertwined innovation patterns, such as the intertwinement of science driven and task driven innovation....... Further, the paper contributes by pinpointing how varied values guide innovation in public services....

  15. AIP salary report

    Science.gov (United States)

    “1987 Salaries Society Membership Survey,” the fifth in a series of salary reports produced by the Education and Employment Statistics Division of the American Institute of Physics has recently been released. The data are based on a random sample survey of one-sixth of the U.S. and Canadian membership of the AIP Membership Societies, which include AGU, American Physical Society, Optical Society of America, Acoustical Society of America, Society of Rheology, American Association of Physics Teachers, American Crystallographic Association, American Astronomical Society, American Association of Physicists in Medicine, and the American Vacuum Society.

  16. Lin Receives 2010 Natural Hazards Focus Group Award for Graduate Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-01

    Ning Lin has been awarded the Natural Hazards Focus Group Award for Graduate Research, given annually to a recent Ph.D. recipient for outstanding contributions to natural hazards research. Lin's thesis is entitled “Multi-hazard risk analysis related to hurricanes.” She is scheduled to present an invited talk in the Extreme Natural Events: Modeling, Prediction, and Mitigation session (NH20) during the 2010 AGU Fall Meeting, held 13-17 December in San Francisco, Calif. Lin will be formally presented with the award at the Natural Hazards focus group reception on 14 December 2010.

  17. Outstanding Student Paper Awards

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-04-01

    The following members in the Space Physics & Aeronomy Section received Outstanding Student Paper Awards at the 2003 AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco, California. Arve Aksnes; Aroh Barjatya; Jacob Bortnik; Amir Caspi; Ruben Delgado; Galen Fowler; Paul G. Hanlon; Sid Henderson; Tara B. Hiebert; Chia-Lin Huang; Steven P. Joy; Eun-Hwa Kim; Colby Lemon; Yingjuan Ma; Elizabeth A. MacDonald; Jaco Minnie; Mitsuo Oka; Yoshitaka Okazaki; Erin J. Rigler; Ina P. Robertson; Patrick A. Roddy; Sang-Il Roh; Albert Y. Shih; Christopher Smithtro; Emma Spanswick; Maria Spasojevic; Hiroki Tanaka; Linghua Wang; Deirdre E. Wendel; Jichun Zhang>

  18. Multispacecraft observations of chorus emissions as a tool for the plasma density fluctuations’ remote sensing

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Agapitov, O.; Krasnoselskikh, V.; de Wit, T. D.; Khotyaintsev, Y.; Pickett, J. S.; Santolík, Ondřej; Rolland, G.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 106, - (2011), A09222/1-A09222/12 ISSN 0148-0227 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP205/10/2279; GA MŠk(CZ) ME10001; GA MŠk(CZ) LH11122 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : STORM-TIME CHORUS * SOURCE REGION * OUTER MAGNETOSPHERE * CLUSTER * WAVE * PROPAGATION * GENERATION * GEOTAIL * FIELD Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 3.021, year: 2011 http://www.agu.org/pubs/crossref/2011/2011JA016540.shtml

  19. Intense plasma wave emissions associated with Saturn's moon Rhea

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Santolík, Ondřej; Gurnett, D. A.; Jones, G. H.; Schippers, P.; Crary, F. J.; Leisner, J. S.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Kurth, W. S.; Russell, C. T.; Dougherty, M. K.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 38, - (2011), L19204/1-L19204/7 ISSN 0094-8276 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP205/10/2279; GA MŠk(CZ) ME10001; GA MŠk(CZ) LH11122 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : III RADIO-BURSTS * LANGMUIR-WAVES * ICY MOON * CASSINI * ELECTRONS Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 3.792, year: 2011 http://www.agu.org/pubs/crossref/2011/2011GL049219.shtml

  20. Call for petition nominations for 1996-1998 Elections

    Science.gov (United States)

    The nominees listed below are those of the Union and Section nominating committees and have been approved by the AGU Council.Additional nominations may be made by membership petition. All nominees must be Members or Fellows of the Union. Each petition must be accompanied by a letter in which the proposed nominee agrees to be a candidate and to serve if elected. There are no age, nationality, residence, or other analogous restrictions on who may serve as an officer. Petitions should be sent to the General Secretary, American Geophysical Union, 2000 Florida Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20009. They must be received no later than July 21, 1995.

  1. Quasi-coherent chorus properties: 1. Implications for wave-particle interactions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tsurutani, B. T.; Falkowski, B. J.; Verkhoglyadova, O. P.; Pickett, J. S.; Santolík, Ondřej; Lakhina, D. G.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 116, - (2011), A09210/1-A09210/18 ISSN 0148-0227 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP205/10/2279; GA MŠk(CZ) ME10001 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : WHISTLER-MODE CHORUS * RELATIVISTIC ELECTRON MICROBURSTS * PITCH ANGLE SCATTERING * RADIATION BELT * AURORAL-ZONE * RESONANT DIFFUSION * MAGNETIC STORMS * GENDRIN MODE * VLF WAVES * MAGNETOSPHERE Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 3.021, year: 2011 http://www.agu.org/pubs/crossref/2011/2010JA016237.shtml

  2. Statistical investigation of horizontal propagation of gravity waves in the ionosphere over Europe and South Africa

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chum, Jaroslav; Athieno, R.; Baše, Jiří; Burešová, Dalia; Hruška, František; Laštovička, Jan; McKinnell, L.- A.; Šindelářová, Tereza

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 117, - (2012), A03312/1-A03312/13 ISSN 0148-0227 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/09/1253; GA ČR GA205/07/1367 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : Horizontal velocities * Doppler sounding * GWs * Europe * South Africa Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 3.174, year: 2012 http://www.agu.org/pubs/crossref/2012/2011JA017161.shtml

  3. Bollasina Receives 2013 James R. Holton Junior Scientist Award: Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollasina, Massimo A.

    2014-08-01

    I am deeply honored to have been selected as this year's recipient of the James R. Holton Junior Scientist Award, and I receive it with heartfelt gratitude and humility. I clearly remember Peter Webster's call announcing the amazing news and how I literally remained speechless and overwhelmed. I would like to express my sincere appreciation to the Atmospheric Sciences section of AGU and the members of the award committee. I am even more appreciative to have been presented this award handed by two outstanding scientists—Peter Webster and Bill Lau—who have remarkably contributed to our understanding of the Asian monsoon and tropical climate, my area of expertise.

  4. An unusual case: Renal candidiasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pautz, Doerthe

    2009-01-01

    A 39-year old female patient suffering from congenital spastic tetraparesis, bilateral hip dysplasia and diabetes was hospitalized as an emergency because of violent pains in the right flank which emanated paravertebrally and into the pelvis. There was no fever or ague. The anamnesis included urolithiasis on the right side 5 years ago and an ileum conduit operation after a neurogenic disturbance of micturition 22 years ago. The sonographic pictures indicated no congestion of the kidneys. To exclude urolithiasis, a low-dose CT was carried out, followed by CT after application of a contrast medium. (orig.)

  5. U.S. Senate confirms new USGS director

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showstack, Randy

    Shortly before adjourning in October, the U.S. Senate confirmed Charles Groat as the new director of the U.S. Geological Survey. Interior Secretary Bruce Babbitt is expected to swear him in shortly as the agency's 13th director. Groat takes over from Thomas Casadevall, who has served as acting director since Gordon Eaton resigned in September 1997.Groat, an AGU member, has more than 25 years of experience in the Earth science fields, including energy and minerals resource assessment, groundwater occurrence and protection, geomorphic processes and landform evolution in desert areas, and coastal studies.

  6. Attitudes toward genetic testing among the general population and relatives of patients with a severe genetic disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hietala, M; Hakonen, A; Aro, A R

    1995-01-01

    evaluated attitudes toward gene tests in general and also respondents' preparedness to undergo gene tests for predictive testing, carrier detection, prenatal diagnosis, and selective abortion, in theoretical situations. The results of the study indicate that both the Finnish population in general and family...... members of AGU patients have a favorable attitude toward genetic testing. However, a commonly expressed reason against testing was that test results might lead to discrimination in employment or insurance policies. Based on the responses, we predict that future genetic testing programs will most probably...

  7. Biological Evolution and the History of the Earth Are Foundations of Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    AGU affirms the central importance of including scientific theories of Earth history and biological evolution in science education. Within the scientific community, the theory of biological evolution is not controversial, nor have ``alternative explanations'' been found. This is why no competing theories are required by the U.S. National Science Education Standards. Explanations of natural phenomena that appeal to the supernatural or are based on religious doctrine-and therefore cannot be tested through scientific inquiry-are not scientific, and have no place in the science classroom.

  8. U.S. Senate may consider Law of the Sea treaty again

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showstack, Randy

    2012-05-01

    U.S. ambassador David Balton hopes that the third time will be the charm. The U.S. Senate's Committee on Foreign Relations currently is considering holding hearings for a third time regarding U.S. accession to the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea, a framework governing uses of the world's oceans. The committee could hold hearings as early as this month, Balton, deputy assistant secretary for oceans and fisheries at the U.S. Department of State, said at the AGU Science Policy Conference on 2 May.

  9. 2680-IJBCS-Article-Arthur H Attingli

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hp

    Les perceptions endogènes des pêcheurs de l'influence des changements climatiques sur la pêche dans la basse vallée de l'Ouémé ont été étudiées. Ces perceptions ont été recueillies à l'aide d'un questionnaire administré à 266 pêcheurs d'au moins 20 ans d'expérience, exerçant la pêche dans Aguégués, Dangbo,.

  10. Magnetic Signatures of Impact Fractured Rocks from Sierra Madera, Texas, USA - Implications to Magnetic Anomalies on Mars

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Adachi, T.; Kletetschka, Günther; Wasilewski, P. J.; Mikula, V.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 88, č. 23 (2007), P41A-02 ISSN 0096-3941. [2007 Joint Assembly. 22.05.2007-25.05.2007, Acapulco] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30130516 Keywords : shatter cones * impact * Sierra Madera Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics http://www.agu.org/cgi-bin/SFgate/SFgate?&listenv=table&multiple=1&range=1&directget=1&application=sm07&database=%2Fdata%2Fepubs%2Fwais%2Findexes%2Fsm07%2Fsm07&maxhits=200&="P41A-02"

  11. First test results for an adjustable phase undulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carr, R.; Nuhn, H.D.; Corbett, J.

    1992-01-01

    An Adjustable Phase Undulator (APU) was installed and tested on the beamline 5 of the SPEAR storage ring. The APU has the same magnetic structure as a conventional adjustable gap undulator (AGU), but its magnetic field is varied by changing the longitudinal position between the rows of magnets, while keeping the gap between them fixed. The tests described here show that this undulator performs according to theoretical predictions and numerical models. The main reason to consider a phase adjustable design is the substantial reduction in size, complexity, and cost over comparable conventional designs. (author) 4 refs.; 3 figs

  12. Spring 1991 Meeting outstanding papers

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Atmospheric Sciences Committee has presented Kaye Brubaker and Jichun Shi with Outstanding Student Paper awards for presentations given at the AGU 1991 Spring Meeting, held in Baltimore May 28-31.Brubaker's paper, “Precipitation Recycling Estimated from Atmospheric Data,” presented quantitative estimates of the contribution of locallyevaporated moisture to precipitation over several large continental regions. Recycled precipitation is defined as water that evaporates from the land surface of a specified region and falls again as precipitation within the region. Brubaker applied a control volume analysis based on a model proposed by Budyko.

  13. Hayes Receives 2012 Ronald Greeley Early Career Award in Planetary Science: Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Alexander G.

    2013-10-01

    I am deeply honored to be the inaugural recipient of the Ronald Greeley Early Career Award. Ron was an icon in the field of planetary science, and the establishment of this award is a fitting way to pay tribute to his legacy. I applaud Laurie Leshin, Bill McKinnon, and the rest of the AGU Planetary Science section officers and selection committee for taking the time to organize this memorial. Ron is remembered not only for his fundamental scientific contributions but also for his mentorship and support of early-career scientists, both his own students and postdocs and those of his colleagues.

  14. Toomas Hendrik Ilvese nägemus presidendi esmastest ülesannetest / Toomas Hendrik Ilves

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Ilves, Toomas Hendrik, 1953-

    2006-01-01

    Toomas Hendrik Ilvese põhimõtted, millest lähtuks tema tegevus presidendiks saades. Kommenteerib Rahvaliidu esimees Villu Reiljan. Ilmunud ka: Põhjarannik, Severnoje Poberezhje 16. sept. 2006, lk. 2,2; Äripäev 18. sept. 2006, lk. 35, pealk.: Vaade tulevikku; Pärnu Postimees, Hiiu Leht, Sakala 19. sept. 2006, lk. 15,4,2, pealk.: Vaade tulevikku; Koit 19. sept. 2006, lk. 6, pealk.: Vaade on suunatud tulevikku; Meie Maa 20. sept. 2006, lk. 2, pealk.: Vaade tulevikku; Vesti Nedeli Den za Dnjom 22. sept. 2006, lk. 20. Ajal. Koit kommenteerib Rahvaliidu teabejuht Agu Uudelepp

  15. The Community-based Whole Magnetosphere Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-15

    2008. Colloquia A.J. Ridley Y. Yu, M. W. Liemohn, A. M. Dodger , Understanding the geoeffective proper- ties of rapid changes in the solar wind and in...enhancement, 2010 AGU Fall Meeting, San Francisco, CA, December 13-17, 2010. A. M. Dodger , A.J. Ridley Comparing a Cou- pled Ionosphere-Plasmasphere Model to...Meeting, San Francisco, CA, December 13-17, 2010. CWMM-20 Ridley CWMM Final Report A. M. Jorgensen, A.J. Ridley A. M. Dodger , J. Lichtenberger

  16. Proton core-beam system in the expanding solar wind: Hybrid simulations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hellinger, Petr; Trávníček, Pavel M.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 116, A11 (2011), A11101/1-A11101/13 ISSN 0148-0227 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA300420702 Grant - others:European Space Agency(XE) PECS contract No. 98068; European Commissions(XE) SWIFF (project 263340) Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517; CEZ:AV0Z10030501 Keywords : ELECTROMAGNETIC PROTON/PROTON INSTABILITIES * VELOCITY SPACE DIFFUSION * WAVE-WAVE SCATTERING * TEMPERATURE ANISOTROPY * PLASMA * DRIFT * DISTRIBUTIONS Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 3.021, year: 2011 http://www.agu.org/pubs/crossref/2011/2011JA016940.shtml

  17. The Agricultural Model Intercomparison and Improvement Project (AgMIP) Town Hall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruane, Alex; Rosenzweig, Cynthia; Kyle, Page; Basso, Bruno; Winter, Jonathan; Asseng, Senthold

    2015-01-01

    AgMIP (www.agmip.org) is an international community of climate, crop, livestock, economics, and IT experts working to further the development and application of multi-model, multi-scale, multi-disciplinary agricultural models that can inform policy and decision makers around the world. This meeting will engage the AGU community by providing a brief overview of AgMIP, in particular its new plans for a Coordinated Global and Regional Assessment of climate change impacts on agriculture and food security for AR6. This Town Hall will help identify opportunities for participants to become involved in AgMIP and its 30+ activities.

  18. In memoriam 1998

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    1999-01-01

    1998. a. surnud kunstnikke maailmas: César (César Baldaccini; 1. I 1921-6. XII), Lucio Costa (27. II 1902-13.VI), Egill Jacobsen(16. XII 1910-21. IV), Victor Pasmore (3. XII 1908-23. I), Antonio Saura (22. IX 1930-22. VII); Eestis: Eugen Kask (18. I 1918-11. V), Kaja Kärner (3. VIII 1920-1. VII), Agu Pihelga (3. VIII 1910-5. I), Emilda Trepp (21. VII 1912-30. I)

  19. Arhitektuuriaasta 2004 = The year in architecture 2004 / Epp Lankots

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Lankots, Epp, 1976-

    2005-01-01

    Arhitektuuriauhindade nominentidest ja premeeritutest. Eesti Kultuurkapitali aastapreemia sai Toomas Rank Rägavere mõisa renoveerimise eest. Arhitektuuri sihtkapitali renoveerimispreemia - Mari Kurismaa, Eesti Draamateatri interjööride renoveerimine; objektipreemia - Martin Aunin, Ülemiste hotell; interjööripreemia - Jan Joonas Graps, Ken-Kristjan Ruut, "Jungenti" büroo; arhitektuurse tegevuse preemia - Kristjan Holm, Liina Jänes, Agu Külm, Jukka-Pekka Jalovaara, Pille Epner, Madis Jürgen, Tõnu Kaalep, Ingmar Muusikus, Eesti ekspositsioon "Aeg-maha-arhitektuur" Veneetsia arhitektuuribiennaalil

  20. Sacarificación enzimática para la producción de jarabe glucosado

    OpenAIRE

    Flórez Franco, Olga Elena; Uribe Restrepo, Nora Dabeiba

    2001-01-01

    En este trabajo se evaluó la producción de jarabe glucosado a partir de la sacarificación de maltodextrina con enzima glucoamilasa libre, para tres concentraciones de maltodextrina (20, 40 y 60 g/l) y tres concentraciones de enzima glucoamilasa (0,75000; 0,43125 y 0,11250 AGU/ml), con un diseño experimental tres factorial, a temperatura de 60 ºC y pH 4,3. El propósito era encontrar las concentraciones óptimas de producción de glucosa, teniendo como variables de respuesta el equivalente de dex...

  1. Analyzing Earth Science Research Networking through Visualizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasnain, S.; Stephan, R.; Narock, T.

    2017-12-01

    Using D3.js we visualize collaboration amongst several geophysical science organizations, such as the American Geophysical Union (AGU) and the Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (ESIP). We look at historical trends in Earth Science research topics, cross-domain collaboration, and topics of interest to the general population. The visualization techniques used provide an effective way for non-experts to easily explore distributed and heterogeneous Big Data. Analysis of these visualizations provides stakeholders with insights into optimizing meetings, performing impact evaluation, structuring outreach efforts, and identifying new opportunities for collaboration.

  2. Physics of Earthquake Rupture Propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shiqing; Fukuyama, Eiichi; Sagy, Amir; Doan, Mai-Linh

    2018-05-01

    A comprehensive understanding of earthquake rupture propagation requires the study of not only the sudden release of elastic strain energy during co-seismic slip, but also of other processes that operate at a variety of spatiotemporal scales. For example, the accumulation of the elastic strain energy usually takes decades to hundreds of years, and rupture propagation and termination modify the bulk properties of the surrounding medium that can influence the behavior of future earthquakes. To share recent findings in the multiscale investigation of earthquake rupture propagation, we held a session entitled "Physics of Earthquake Rupture Propagation" during the 2016 American Geophysical Union (AGU) Fall Meeting in San Francisco. The session included 46 poster and 32 oral presentations, reporting observations of natural earthquakes, numerical and experimental simulations of earthquake ruptures, and studies of earthquake fault friction. These presentations and discussions during and after the session suggested a need to document more formally the research findings, particularly new observations and views different from conventional ones, complexities in fault zone properties and loading conditions, the diversity of fault slip modes and their interactions, the evaluation of observational and model uncertainties, and comparison between empirical and physics-based models. Therefore, we organize this Special Issue (SI) of Tectonophysics under the same title as our AGU session, hoping to inspire future investigations. Eighteen articles (marked with "this issue") are included in this SI and grouped into the following six categories.

  3. The synthesis conditions, characterizations and thermal degradation studies of an etherified starch from an unconventional source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawal, O.S.; Lechner, M.D.; Kulicke, W.M.

    2008-05-01

    Starch isolated from an under-utilized legume plant (pigeon pea) was carboxymethylated. Influences of reaction parameters were investigated on the degree of substitution (DS) and the reaction efficiency (RE). Studies showed that optimal DS of 1.12 could be reached at reaction efficiency of 80.6 % in isopropanol-water reaction medium (40 deg. C, 3h). The scanning electron microscopy showed that after carboxymethylation, the granular appearance of the native starch was distorted. Wide-angle X-ray diffractometry revealed that crystallinity was reduced significantly after carboxymethylation. The infrared spectra revealed new bands in the carboxymethyl starch at ν =1600, 1426 and 1324 cm -1 and they were attributed to carbonyl functional groups vibration, -CH2 scissoring and OH bending vibration respectively. Broad band 13 C NMR of carboxymethyl starch showed intense peak at δ 180.3 ppm and it was assigned for carbonyl carbon on the carboxymethyl substituent on the AGU (Anhydroglucose Unit). DEPT (Distortionless Enhancement by Polarization Transfer) 135 NMR showed negative signals which correspond to methylene carbons on the AGU. The differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) suggests loss of crystallinity after carboxymethylation. Thermogravimetry (TG), Derivative Thermogravimetry (DTG) and Differential Thermal Analysis (DTA) show that thermal stability improved after carboxymethylation. The study provides information on the preparation and characterization of a biomaterial from a new source which could be used alone or in the preparation of other functional polymers for diverse polymer applications. (author)

  4. Buying Renewable Electric Power in Montgomery County, Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cember, Richard P.

    2008-08-01

    From mid-August 2007 until mid-August 2008, my home electricity supply was 100% wind-generated. My experience in switching to wind-generated electric power may be of interest to fellow AGU members for three reasons. First, Montgomery County, Md., where I live, is one of the few jurisdictions in the United States that has both an electric power tax and a renewable energy credit. The county is therefore a case study in price-based public policy for greenhouse gas emissions control. Second, I was surprised by the comparatively small price difference (or ``price premium'') between wind-generated and conventionally generated power in the county, and I believe that Eos readers will be similarly surprised. Third, because so many U.S. federal agencies concerned with Earth science are based in the Washington, D. C., area, a high concentration of AGU members live in Montgomery County and may be personally interested in evaluating the price of reducing carbon dioxide emissions from the generation of their own residential electricity.

  5. Thomas J. Ahrens (1936-2010)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeanloz, Raymond

    2011-03-01

    Thomas J. Ahrens, a leader in the study of high-pressure shock wave and planetary impact phenomena, died at his home in Pasadena, Calif., on 24 November 2010 at the age of 74. He was the California Institute of Technology's Fletcher Jones Professor of Geophysics, emeritus since 2005 but professionally active to the end. He had been president of AGU's Tectonophysics section, editor of Journal of Geophysical Research, founding member of both the Mineral and Rock Physics and Study of the Earth's Deep Interior focus groups, and editor—more like key driving force—for AGU's Handbook of Physical Constants. Tom was a pioneer in experimental and numerical studies of the effects of projectiles hitting a target at velocities exceeding the speed of sound (hypervelocity impact), arguably the most important geophysical process in the formation, growth, and, in many cases, surface evolution of planets. As a professor at Caltech, he established the foremost university laboratory for shock wave experiments, where students and research associates from around the world pursued basic research in geophysics, planetary science, and other disciplines. Previously, high-pressure shock experiments were conducted primarily in national laboratories, where they were initially associated with the development of nuclear weapons.

  6. Geophysical events

    Science.gov (United States)

    This is a summary of SEAN Bulletin, 13(3), March 31, 1988, a publication of the Smithsonian Institution's Scientific Event Alert Network. The complete bulletin is available in the microfiche edition of Eos as a microfiche supplement or as a paper reprint. For the microfiche, order document E88-002 at $2.50 (U.S.) by writing to AGU Orders, 2000 Florida Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20009 or by calling toll free on 800-424-2488. For the paper reprint, order SEAN Bulletin (giving volume and issue numbers and issue date) through the same address; the price is $3.50 for one copy of each issue number for those who do not have a deposit account, $2 for those who do; additional copies of each issue number are $1. Subscriptions to SEAN Bulletin are also available from AGU-Orders; the price is $18 for 12 monthly issues mailed to a U.S. address, $28 if mailed elsewhere, and must be prepaid.

  7. F. Sherwood “Sherry” Rowland (1927-2012)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Donald R.; Simpson, Isobel J.

    2012-10-01

    Frank Sherwood Rowland, known to his friends and colleagues as Sherry, died at his home in Corona del Mar, Calif., on 10 March 2012. He was 84. A Nobel Prize-winning atmospheric chemist, Sherry codiscovered the role of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) in stratospheric ozone depletion, researched the accumulation of greenhouse gases on a planetary scale, and tirelessly communicated the global consequences of human activity to policy makers and the public. Sherry had a calm, gentle demeanor and was as respected for his integrity and humility as for his groundbreaking scientific achievements. Sherry was a long-time member and Fellow (1980) of AGU and received the AGU Roger Revelle Medal in 1994 for his substantial contributions to the awareness of global change. The following year, he shared the Nobel Prize in Chemistry with Mario Molina and Paul Crutzen for their pioneering contributions to atmospheric chemistry, particularly the formation and decomposition of stratospheric ozone. In its citation, the Nobel Committee commended them for contributing to "our salvation from a global environmental problem that could have catastrophic consequences."

  8. Embracing the Importance of FAIR Research Products - Findable, Accessible, Interoperable, and Reusable

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stall, S.

    2017-12-01

    Integrity and transparency within research is solidified by a complete set of research products that are findable, accessible, interoperable, and reusable. In other words, they follow the FAIR Guidelines developed by FORCE11.org. Your datasets, images, video, software, scripts, models, physical samples, and other tools and technology are an integral part of the narrative you tell about your research. These research products increasingly are being captured through workflow tools and preserved and connected through persistent identifiers across multiple repositories that keep them safe. They help secure, with your publications, the supporting evidence and integrity of the scientific record. This is the direction that Earth and space science as well as other disciplines is moving. Within our community, some science domains are further along, and others are taking more measured steps. AGU as a publisher is working to support the full scientific record with peer reviewed publications. Working with our community and all the Earth and space science journals, AGU is developing new policies to encourage researchers to plan for proper data preservation and provide data citations along with their research submission and to encourage adoption of best practices throughout the research workflow and data life cycle. Providing incentives, community standards, and easy-to-use tools are some important factors for helping researchers embrace the FAIR Guidelines and support transparency and integrity.

  9. Geophysics in the public eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    The 1988 AGU Fall Meeting was attended by a record number of reporters from all types of media (see inset). Five news releases mailed before the meeting and seven scheduled news conferences drew reporters to the meeting, held December 5-9 in San Francisco. About 25 public information offices and individual scientists contributed 45 news releases for distribution at the meeting.Media liaisons were appointed by AGU section presidents to act as contacts between scientists and journalists. The liaisons assisted with news conferences, arranged interviews, and directed reporters to interesting papers. The section liaisons were Union, Christopher Harrison (Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science, Miami, Fla.); Atmospheric Sciences, William H. Beasley (National Science Foundation, Washington, D.C.); Geodesy, Randolph Ware (University of Colorado, Boulder); Geomagnetism and Paleomagnetism, Kenneth Verosub (University of Calfornia, Davis); Hydrology, George Leavesley (U.S. Geological Survey, Lakewood, Colo.); Planetology, Torrence Johnson (Jet Propulsion Lab, Pasadena, Calif.); Seismology, Jan Garmany (University of Texas, Austin); Solar- Planetary Relationships, Vincent Wickwar (Utah State University, Logan); and Tectonophysics, Paul Segall (U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, Calif.).

  10. Comment on “Policy offers protection from harassment” [by Marcia McNutt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickman, Martha H.

    Regarding “Policy Offers Protection From Harassment” (Eos, October 15, 1996), I am disturbed that the AGU has extended its harassment policy to its membership at “events that combine work and social interaction, such as the meetings, conferences, and seminars that AGU members attend.” As a woman, I have always found the so-called protections extended to females and other supposedly vulnerable groups to be intrusive and patronizing, but this policy in particular goes too far by trying to sponsor aspects of members' social behavior.I am old enough to remember the days when one responded to uncomfortable situations by drawing on one's own resources. A sense of one's inviolable self developed over time, and meaningful self-esteem derived from an ability to cope with the world. Now, cowering from jokes and recoiling from eye contact, the modern geoscientist apparently requires a patron for protection—a shining knight in the form of this new policy.

  11. Development of a Pseudomonas aeruginosa Agmatine Biosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Gilbertsen

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Agmatine, decarboxylated arginine, is an important intermediary in polyamine production for many prokaryotes, but serves higher functions in eukaryotes such as nitric oxide inhibition and roles in neurotransmission. Pseudomonas aeruginosa relies on the arginine decarboxylase and agmatine deiminase pathways to convert arginine into putrescine. One of the two known agmatine deiminase operons, aguBA, contains an agmatine sensitive TetR promoter controlled by AguR. We have discovered that this promoter element can produce a titratable induction of its gene products in response to agmatine, and utilized this discovery to make a luminescent agmatine biosensor in P. aeruginosa. The genome of the P. aeruginosa lab strain UCBPP-PA14 was altered to remove both its ability to synthesize or destroy agmatine, and insertion of the luminescent reporter construct allows it to produce light in proportion to the amount of exogenous agmatine applied from ~100 nM to 1mM. Furthermore it does not respond to related compounds including arginine or putrescine. To demonstrate potential applications the biosensor was used to detect agmatine in spent supernatants, to monitor the development of arginine decarboxylase over time, and to detect agmatine in the spinal cords of live mice.

  12. Recreational Industry in the North of European Russia: Case Assessment, Komi Republic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakovleva, M. P.; Kuchkina, E.; Iyevlev, N.; Lyaskovsky, S.

    2012-12-01

    At the past AGU Annual Meeting in 2011, we presented information about development of the recreation industry in European Russia within the "Silver Ring" Project (http://neespi.org/web-content/meetings/AGU_2011/Yakovleva-poster.pdf). This Project can be considered as a system of actions directed to a comprehensive socio-economic development of the Northwest of the Russian Federation that includes 11 provinces ("oblast", "republic", "okrug") of the country. Among the provinces included in the Project, The Komi Republic is one of the most interesting regions. The Komi Republic is located in the North of European Russia within the gridbox restricted by 59N - 69N latitudes and 45E - 66E longitudes. The region is populated by indigenous northern nations: Komi, Russians, Karels, Ved', Permyaks, and others. It is characterized as an ecologically clean territory, has a small population density, is rich with natural reserves, and has abundant forest and water resources. Flora and fauna of the Republic are unique and attractive. Rich biodiversity and abundance of fish and game allow hunting and sport fishing. As of January 1, 2010, The Komi Republic has 240 territories of special environmental protection ("zakazniki") with restricted human activity. This allows a diversity of field trips devoted to in-depth studies of regional ecosystems as well as tourist visits aiming to enjoy unique nature and ethnic-cultures of the North.

  13. DISCUSSION: When and How did Plate Tectonics Begin, What Came Before, and Why is this Controversy important for Understanding the Earth and Exoplanets?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, R. J.; Gerya, T.; Sobolev, S. V.; Tackley, P.

    2015-12-01

    Because all 5 presentations in the Union session "When and How did Plate Tectonics Begin, What Came Before, and Why is this Controversy important for Understanding the Earth and Exoplanets?" will have 5 minute discussion periods, the scheduled 15 minute end-of-session discussion period is intended to allow other perspectives to be presented by the scientific community. We invite brief (2 powerpoint slides) comments from the community about any aspect of the topic at hand. We encourage anyone who has something pertinent or interesting to say to submit 2 powerpoint slides directly to any one of the four co-convenors listed on this abstract. The first slide should be a simple title with the name and affiliation of the commenter. The second slide should be the content of the comment. The convenors will compile all of these that are submitted up to the noon on the day before the session occurs, when we will upload the compiled files in the order that they were received (if we have received digital scans of signed waivers by that time, see below). During the discussion, we will call on those who have submitted 2 slides to the podium to make their points in 2 minutes or less (total time from being called to leaving the podium). Because this AGU Union session including the discussion period will be live-streamed and recorded, all Discussion Session commenters will be required to sign an AGU waiver acknowledging this and giving permission to be recorded. These will be sent via e-mail to those who submit 2 slide powerpoints. Commenters that do not sign and return the waiver will be scheduled after all commenters who have returned signed waivers and AGU will terminate live streaming and recording accordingly. If no one submits anything then we will have open discussion from the floor. We will also advertise the Monte Verita conference in Locarno Switzerland 17-22 July 2016. This conference will explore in greater detail the 5 key aspects of Plate Tectonic evolution briefly

  14. So You Want to Be Trustworthy: A Repository's Guide to Taking Reasonable Steps Towards Achieving ISO 16363

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stall, S.

    2016-12-01

    To be trustworthy is to be reliable, dependable, honest, principled, ethical, incorruptible, and more. A trustworthy person demonstrates these qualities over time and under all circumstances. A trustworthy repository demonstrates these qualities through the team that manages the repository and its responsible organization. The requirements of a Trusted Digital Repository (TDR) in ISO 16363 can be tough to reach and tough to maintain. Challenges include: limited funds, limited resources and/or skills, and an unclear path to successfully achieve the requirements. The ISO standard defines each requirement separately, but a successful certification recognizes that there are many cross-dependencies among the requirements. Understanding these dependencies leads to a more efficient path towards success. At AGU we recognize that reaching the goal of the TDR ISO standard, or any set of data management objectives defined by an organization, has a better chance at success if the organization clearly knows their current capability, the improvements that are needed, and the best way to make (and maintain) those changes. AGU has partnered with the CMMI® Institute to adapt their Data Management Maturity (DMM)SM model within the Earth and space sciences. Using the DMM, AGU developed a new Data Management Assessment Program aimed at helping data repositories, large and small, domain-specific to general, assess and improve data management practices to meet their goals - including becoming a Trustworthy Digital Repository. The requirements to achieve the TDR ISO standard are aligned to the data management best practices defined in the Data Management Maturity (DMM)SM model. Using the DMM as a process improvement tool in conjunction with the Data Management Assessment method, a team seeking the objective of the TDR ISO standard receives a clear road map to achieving their goal as an outcome of the assessment. Publishers and agencies are beginning to recommend or even require that

  15. The Arabian Gulf University College of Medicine and Medical Sciences: a successful model of a multinational medical school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdy, Hossam; Anderson, M Brownell

    2006-12-01

    In the late 1970s, leaders of the Arabian [corrected] Gulf countries proposed a novel idea of a joint educational and cultural venture: establishing a new regional university based in the Kingdom of Bahrain that would be managed as a multinational consortium of Gulf countries including Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, and Bahrain. It was intended to promote higher education and research in the Gulf region; to serve the development needs of the region; to reflect the unique economic, social, and cultural attributes of the Gulf communities and their environments; and to respond to the health care needs of the member countries. Since its inception in 1982, the College of Medicine and Medical Sciences (CMMS) at Arabian Gulf University (AGU) has adopted the educational philosophy of problem-based learning (PBL) and self-directed, student-centered education. The curriculum is integrated, with early introduction of education to foster clinical skills and professional competencies. The strategic alliance with the health care systems in Bahrain and other Gulf regions has created a successful model of efficient and effective initialization of health care resources in the community. The experience that has accumulated at the AGU-CMMS from introducing innovative medical education has allowed it to take a leadership position in medical education in the Gulf region. The original goals of this unique experiment have been realized along with unanticipated outcomes of spearheading changes in medical education in the Gulf region. Old and new medical schools have adopted several characteristics of the AGU educational program. Several elements contributed to its success: a clear vision of providing quality medical education and realizing and sustaining this vision by a supportive leadership at the university and college levels; an alliance with the regional health care systems; a dedicated faculty who have been able to work as a team while continually

  16. Role of Public Outreach in the University Science Mission: Publishing K-12 Curriculum, Organizing Tours, and Other Methods of Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittrich, T. M.

    2015-12-01

    Much attention has been devoted in recent years to the importance of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) education in K-12 curriculum for developing a capable workforce. Equally important is the role of the voting public in understanding STEM-related issues that impact public policy debates such as the potential impacts of climate change, hydraulic fracturing in oil and gas exploration, mining impacts on water quality, and science funding. Since voted officials have a major impact on the future of these policies, it is imperative that the general public have an understanding of the basic science behind these issues. By engaging with the public in a more fundamental way, university students can play an important role in educating the public while at the same time enhancing their communication skills and gaining valuable teaching experience. I will talk about my own experiences in (1) evaluating and publishing water chemistry and hazardous waste cleanup curriculum on the K-12 engineering platform TeachEngineering.org, (2) organizing public tours of water and energy sites (e.g., abandoned mine sites, coal power plants, wastewater treatment plants, hazardous waste treatment facilities), and (3) other outreach and communication activities including public education of environmental issues through consultations with customers of a landscaping/lawn mowing company. The main focus of this presentation will be the role that graduate students can play in engaging and educating their local community and lessons learned from community projects (Dittrich, 2014; 2012; 2011). References: Dittrich, T.M. 2014. Adventures in STEM: Lessons in water chemistry from elementary school to graduate school. Abstract ED13E-07 presented at 2014 Fall Meeting, AGU, San Francisco, Calif., 15-19 Dec. Dittrich, T.M. 2012. Collaboration between environmental water chemistry students and hazardous waste treatment specialists on the University of Colorado-Boulder campus. Abstract ED53C

  17. Building a Community for Art and Geoscience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, S. C.; Ellins, K. K.

    2014-12-01

    Several new avenues are in place for building and supporting a community of people interested in the art and geoscience connections. Although sessions advocating for art in teaching geoscience have been scattered through geoscience professional meetings for several decades, there is now a sustained presence of artists and geoscientists with their research and projects at the annual meeting of the American Geophysical Union. In 2011, 13 abstracts were submitted and, in 2013, 20 talks and posters were presented at the annual meeting. Participants have requested more ways to connect with each other as well as advocate for this movement of art and science to others. Several words can describe new initiatives to do this: Social, Collaborative, Connected, Informed, Networked, and Included. Social activities of informal dinners, lunches, and happy hour for interested people in the past year have provided opportunity for presenters at AGU to spend time getting to know one another. This has resulted in at least two new collaborative projects. The nascent Bella Roca and more established Geology in Art websites and their associated blogs at www.bellaroca.org and http://geologyinart.blogspot.com, respectively are dedicated to highlighting the work of artists inspired by the geosciences, connecting people and informing the community of exhibits and opportunities for collaboration. Bella Roca with its social media of Facebook (Bella Roca) and Twitter (@BellRocaGeo), is a direct outgrowth of the recent 2012 and 2013 AGU sessions and, hopefully, can be grown and sustained for this community. Articles in professional journals will also help inform the broader geoscience community of the benefit of engaging with artists and designers for both improved science knowledge and communication. Organizations such as Leonardo, the International Society for the Arts, Sciences and Technology, the Art Science Gallery in Austin, Texas also promote networking among artists and scientists with

  18. NESTA Revolutionizing Teacher's Experiences at NSTA Conventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ireton, F.

    2002-05-01

    National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) conventions are traditionally composed of short workshops, half or full day workshops, and lectures on science teaching or education research. Occasional science lectures such as the AGU lecture offer science content information. The National Earth Science Teachers Association (NESTA) will join the National Association of Geoscience Teachers (NAGT), American Geophysical Union (AGU), and the American Geological Institute (AGI) to bring teachers a suite of exciting and informative events at the (NSTA) 2002 convention. Events begin with a guided learning field trip to Mission Trails Regional Park and Torrey Pines State Reserve where Earth and space science teachers experience a model of constructivist leaning techniques. Most field trips are a "show and tell" experience, designed to transmit knowledge from the field trip leader to the field trip participants. In the "guided learning" environment, the leader serves as a facilitator, asking questions, guiding participants to discover concepts for themselves. Participants examine selected processes and features that constitute a constructivist experience in which knowledge acquired at any given location builds on knowledge brought to the site. Employing this strategy involves covering less breadth but greater depth, modeling the concept of "less is more." On Thursday NESTA will host two Share-a-thons. These are not what a person would think of as a traditional workshop where presenter makes a presentation then the participants work on an activity. They could be called the flea market of teaching ideas. Tables are set around the perimeter of a room where the presenters are stationed. Teachers move from table to table picking up information and watching short demonstrations. The Earth and Space Science Resource Day on Friday will focus on teachers needs. Starting with breakfast, teachers will hear from Soames Summerhays, Naturalist and President of Summerhays Films, about how he

  19. Meeting the Challenges for Gender Diversity in the Geosciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, R. E.; Cane, M. A.; Kastens, K. A.; Miller, R. B.; Mutter, J. C.; Pfirman, S. L.

    2003-12-01

    Women are now routinely chief scientists on major cruises, lead field parties to all continents, and have risen to leadership positions in professional organizations, academic departments and government agencies including major funding agencies. They teach at all levels, advise research students, make research discoveries and receive honors in recognition of their achievements. Despite these advances, women continue to be under-represented in the earth, ocean, and atmospheric sciences. As of 1997 women received only 29% of the doctorates in the earth, atmospheric, and oceanographic sciences and accounted for only 13% of employed Ph.D.s in these fields. Women's salaries also lag: the median annual salary for all Ph.D. geoscientists was \\60,000; for women the figure is \\47,000. Solving the problem of gender imbalance in the geosciences requires understanding of the particular obstacles women face in our field. The problem of under-representation of women requires that earth science departments, universities and research centers, funding agencies, and professional organizations like AGU take constructive action to recognize the root causes of the evident imbalance, and enact corrective policies. We have identified opportunities and challenges for each of these groups. A systematic study of the flux of women at Columbia University enabled a targeted strategy towards improving gender diversity based on the observed trends. The challenge for academic institutions is to document the flux of scientists and develop an appropriate strategy to balance the geoscience demographics. Based on the MIT study, an additional challenge faces universities and research centers. To enhance gender diversity these institutions need to develop transparency in promotion processes and open distribution of institutional resources. The challenge for granting agencies is to implement policies that ease the burden of extensive fieldwork on parents. Many fields of science require long work hours

  20. ``An Earth-Shaking Experience''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achenbach, Joel

    2005-03-01

    Last month's annual meeting of the American Geophysical Union in San Francisco drew an estimated 11,000 scientists, teachers, journalists and geophysics groupies. The schedule of talks could be found in a bound volume as thick as a phone book. You never see a geophysicist in ordinary life, but apparently the world is crawling with them. They came to talk about everything from the ozone layer to the big wad of iron at the center of the Earth. Also about other planets. And magnetic fields. Solar wind. Water on Mars. To be at this convention was to be immersed to the eyebrows in scientific knowledge. It is intellectually fashionable to fetishize the unknown, but at AGU, a person will get the opposite feeling-that science is a voracious, relentless and tireless enterprise, and that soon there may not remain on this Earth an unturned stone.

  1. In memoriam 2002

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2003-01-01

    Maailm: Kenneth Armitage (18. VII 1916-22. I), Eduardo Chillida (10. I 1924-19. VIII), Ruth Handler (4. IV 1916-27. IV), Yousuf Karsh (23. XII 1908-14. VII), Roberto Matta (11. XI 1911-23. XI). Eesti: Endel Kaldmäe (12. VII 1918-15. XII), Tiia Kelomees-Johannson (8. IX 1965-11. VI), Salme Kirsimäe (6. XI 1919-1. IV), Maret Kuke (9. X 1926-2. VII), Diana Laev (21. XI 1919-31. VIII), Pauline Leps (16. XI 1903-5. III), Avo-Himm Looveer (16. VIII 1941- 1. V), Jüri Palm (14. IV 1937-27. IV), Agu Pilt (26. VIII 1951-11. III), Valve Pormeister (13. IV 1922-27. X), Eugen Sacharias (21. IV 1906-13. III), Lilian Schönberg (25. IV 1934-10. X), Laine Sisa (12. II 1931-20. II)

  2. Navigating graduate school and beyond: A career guide for graduate students and a must read for every advisor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Colin

    2012-05-01

    Beginning his scientific career as an engineering student at PSG College of Technology, in Coimbatore, India, Sundar A. Christopher has negotiated and navigated the higher-education system to become the chairman of the Department of Atmospheric Sciences at the University of Alabama in Huntsville. Drawing on his own experiences and on insights gleaned from the students who have passed through his graduate-level professional development course, Christopher takes a lighthearted look at peer review, proposal writing, managing budgets, and making the most of conferences in the AGU bookNavigating Graduate School and Beyond: A Career Guide for Graduate Students and a Must Read for Every Advisor. In this interview, Eos speaks to Christopher about overcoming the bureaucratic, logistical, and personal hurdles that too often lead students to disillusionment and conflict.

  3. Fire activity increasing as climate changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcerak, Ernie; Showstack, Randy

    2013-01-01

    Analysis of images from NASA's Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellites shows that more than 2.5 million hectares were burned in 2012 from January through August in the United States. The amount is less than a record 3.2 million hectares in 2011 but greater than the area burned in 12 of 15 years since satellite monitoring began, scientists reported at the AGU Fall Meeting. With satellites "we can detect fires as they're actively burning," said Louis Giglio of the University of Maryland, College Park, at a press conference on 4 December. "We can also map the cumulative area burned on the landscape after the fire's over." He noted that "2012 has been a particularly big fire year" in the United States.

  4. Defense bill: Earmarking as usual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earmarked funds in the $268 billion defense appropriations bill for fiscal year 1991 stirred congressional debate in late October. Senator Sam Nunn (D-Ga.), chairman of the Senate Armed Services Committee, charged that the defense bill contains questionable projects totaling tens of millions of dollars. AGU opposes legislative earmarking of money for particular institutions, maintaining that the practice prevents the best use of federal funding by circumventing competitive review. Nunn noted on the Senate floor that the appropriations bill provided specific funds for cited institutions—contravening a federal law promoting competition. “ If these programs have merit, they will succeed in a fair and competent review in competition,” Nunn said. “If no other institution in the country is able to compete, there should be no fear whatever of competition… But no one else in the world is allowed to compete to work on these projects.”

  5. Role of magmatism in continental lithosphere extension: an introduction to tectnophysics special issue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Wijk, Jolante W [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    The dynamics and evolution of rifts and continental rifted margins have been the subject of intense study and debate for many years and still remain the focus of active investigation. The 2006 AGU Fall Meeting session 'Extensional Processes Leading to the Formation of Basins and Rifted Margins, From Volcanic to Magma-Limited' included several contributions that illustrated recent advances in our understanding of rifting processes, from the early stages of extension to breakup and incipient seafloor spreading. Following this session, we aimed to assemble a multi-disciplinary collection of papers focussing on the architecture, formation and evolution of continental rift zones and rifted margins. This Tectonophysics Special Issue 'Role of magmatism in continental lithosphere extension' comprises 14 papers that present some of the recent insights on rift and rifted margins dynamics, emphasising the role of magmatism in extensional processes. The purpose of this contribution is to introduce these papers.

  6. How Many Disciplines Does It Take to Tackle Climate Change?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, S.; Calderazzo, J.

    2015-12-01

    Through my involvement in two multidisciplinary climate change education and outreach projects, the website 100 Views of Climate Change and Changing Climates @ Colorado State, I have come to understand that just as this problem is everybody's business, almost everybody has something to contribute to understanding and dealing with it. This is certainly true of the academic disciplines represented on college campuses, where faculty from nearly every department have relevant things to teach their students: speakers in a climate-change lecture series we organized came from 27 departments in 8 colleges, plus numerous other campus and local entities, and more could have been included. As one convener of this AGU session, I have worked to include a good sample of these varied and complementary disciplinary perspectives. Inevitably, though, this sample leaves significant gaps in what would constitute a robust cross-campus climate literacy, and I will talk about some of these missing disciplinary perspectives and why they are important.

  7. IAU Symposium No. 32

    CERN Document Server

    Guinot, B

    1968-01-01

    AGU American Geophysical Union BIH Bureau International de l'Heure FAGS Federation of Astronomical and Geophysical Services lAG International Association of Geodesy IAU International Astronomical Union ICSU International Council of Scientific Unions ILS International Latitude Service IPMS International Polar Motion Service International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics IUGG PZT Photographic Zenith Tube UNESCO United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization INTRODUCTION The hypothesis of continental drift has become of increasing interest to geophysicists in recent years. The IUGG Upper Mantle Committee has stated that the hypothesis of continental drift envisages horizontal displacements of the continents over th- sands of kilometers, and that it is a principal objective of the Upper Mantle Project to prove whether or not continental drift has occurred. The origin of the hypothesis may be traced to the close similarity in outlines of the coasts on the two sides of the Atlantic Ocean. The theor...

  8. Thomson Reuters to release Book Citation Index later this year

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldred, Maxine

    2011-08-01

    Thomson Reuters will launch its new Book Citation Index later this year. Projected to include 25,000 volumes from major publishers and university presses in science, social science, and the humanities, the Book Citation Index will cover scholarly books (both series and nonseries) that present original research or literature reviews. The current effort regarding the science section is focused on books published from 2005 to the present. AGU has sent copies of its catalog for inclusion in the Book Citation Index, but the final selection will be made by Thomson Reuters, using its internal selection criteria, which may be found at http://wokinfo.com/wok/media/pdf/BKCI-SelectionEssay_web.pdf.

  9. DINÂMICA DISCURSIVA E O ENSINO DE FÍSICA: ANÁLISE DE UM EPISÓDIO DE ENSINO ENVOLVENDO O USO DE UM TEXTO ALTERNATIVO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Assis

    Full Text Available Resumo: Este artigo enfoca a análise da dinâmica discursiva entre alunos e professor mediados pelo uso de um texto alternativo intitulado "Nosso Universo", em aulas de Física, em uma sala de educação de jovens e adultos. Para tal, é destacado um episódio de ensino cuja abordagem centra-se na discussão de conceitos físicos. Os resultados evidenciaram que o referido texto mostrou-se potencialmente significativo para os alunos, aguçando a curiosidade e o interesse dos mesmos, que relacionaram os conteúdos abordados com os seus conhecimentos prévios. Esse fator vinculado ao papel mediador do professor, que assumiu uma postura dialógica, resultou na facilitação da aprendizagem significativa crítica por parte dos estudantes.

  10. (Recreating the community: The use of customary authority to resolve the Casamance conflict in Senegal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda J. Beck

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Customary approaches have made important contributions to efforts to resolve the decades-old Casamance conflict, though not always in the way intended or claimed by their proponents or outside observers. In this paper, three customary approaches are discussed: highly localised efforts by customary leaders or institutions (for instance, the Jola-Huluf king; attempts to utilise or expand their authority (Usana priestesses; and efforts to (reinvent a mythic-history as a customary basis for a harmonious community (the Association Culturelle Aguène-Diambogne. By offering a mixed assessment as to the extent to which these approaches succeeded in promoting conflict resolution in Casamance, we analyse the contexts in which customary approaches can promote peace, while arguing that they are more likely to complement conventional forms of conflict resolution than constitute an alternative to them.

  11. USGEO DMWG Cloud Computing Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Beaujardiere, J.; McInerney, M.; Frame, M. T.; Summers, C.

    2017-12-01

    The US Group on Earth Observations (USGEO) Data Management Working Group (DMWG) has been developing Cloud Computing Recommendations for Earth Observations. This inter-agency report is currently in draft form; DMWG hopes to have released the report as a public Request for Information (RFI) by the time of AGU. The recommendations are geared toward organizations that have already decided to use the Cloud for some of their activities (i.e., the focus is not on "why you should use the Cloud," but rather "If you plan to use the Cloud, consider these suggestions.") The report comprises Introductory Material, including Definitions, Potential Cloud Benefits, and Potential Cloud Disadvantages, followed by Recommendations in several areas: Assessing When to Use the Cloud, Transferring Data to the Cloud, Data and Metadata Contents, Developing Applications in the Cloud, Cost Minimization, Security Considerations, Monitoring and Metrics, Agency Support, and Earth Observations-specific recommendations. This talk will summarize the recommendations and invite comment on the RFI.

  12. McNutt to Be Nominated to Lead U.S. Geological Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showstack, Randy

    2009-07-01

    U.S. President Barack Obama announced on 9 July his intention to nominate Marcia McNutt as director of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and science advisor to the Secretary of the Interior. McNutt, who served as AGU president from 2000 to 2002, currently is president and chief executive officer of the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, in Moss Landing, Calif. “Scientific information from the U.S. Geological Survey is crucial to solving the most important problems facing society—finding sufficient supplies of fresh water and clean energy and providing accurate information that allows citizens to prepare intelligently for climate change. I look forward to leading such a respected institution at this critical time,” McNutt said.

  13. Experiment.com's first $1M - case studies and trends in online scientific crowdfunding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, D.

    2014-12-01

    Experiment is an online platform for connecting scientists and communities of online donors. After funding nearly 200 projects in topic areas ranging from life science to social science, we've amassed some knowledge about how science is kickstarted. As online crowdfunding and science communication on the internet continues to grow, we'd like to share some historical data as well as forecast the future of science funding. We'd like to present several successful case studies of scientists conducting their research online and in the open. Successful projects include spin-off startups, undergraduate and graduate student projects, and some of AGU's own scientists and faculty. If this absract is accepted, interested parties can submit questions or requests for figures in advance to denny@experiment.com. Also, we hope this talk will be entertaining.

  14. Electron microprobe analyses of glasses from Kīlauea tephra units, Kīlauea Volcano, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helz, Rosalind L.; Clague, David A.; Mastin, Larry G.; Rose, Timothy R.

    2014-01-01

    This report presents approximately 2,100 glass analyses from three tephra units of Kīlauea Volcano: the Keanakākoʻi Tephra, the Kulanaokuaiki Tephra, and the Pāhala Ash. It also includes some new analyses obtained as part of a re-evaluation of the MgO contents of glasses in two of the three original datasets; this re-evaluation was conducted to improve the consistency of glass MgO contents among the three datasets. The glass data are a principal focus of Helz and others (in press), which will appear in the AGU Monograph Hawaiian Volcanoes—From Source to Surface. The report is intended to support this publication, in addition to making the data available to the scientific community.

  15. Derecho ambiental legislación nacional e internacional sobre calidad de aguas

    OpenAIRE

    Gastón Casaux

    2015-01-01

    Contenido: Antecedentes. Principios esenciales. El criterio general de Naciones Unidas. La costumbre en Uruguay. Competencias nacionales. Código Civil y Código Penal. Código Rural. Código de Aguas. Ley 13.667 de 18.6.68 sobre Suelos y Aguas y su modificativa decreto-ley 15.239 de 23-12-81 o Ley de Suelos. Ley de Riego Nº16.858 y reglamentación posterior. Ministerio de Transporte y Obras Públicas (Dirección de Hidrografía), Ministerio de Ganadería, Agricultura y Pesca (Dirección de Suelos yAgu...

  16. Leveraging Crowdsourcing and Linked Open Data for Geoscience Data Sharing and Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narock, T. W.; Rozell, E. A.; Hitzler, P.; Arko, R. A.; Chandler, C. L.; Wilson, B. D.

    2013-12-01

    Data citation standards can form the basis for increased incentives, recognition, and rewards for scientists. Additionally, knowing which data were utilized in a particular publication can enhance discovery and reuse. Yet, a lack of data citation information in existing publications as well as ambiguities across datasets can limit the accuracy of automated linking approaches. We describe a crowdsourcing approach, based on Linked Open Data, in which AGU abstracts are linked to the data used in those presentations. We discuss our efforts to incentivize participants through promotion of their research, the role that the Semantic Web can play in this effort, and how this work differs from existing platforms such as Mendeley and ResearchGate. Further, we discuss the benefits and challenges of Linked Open Data as a technical solution including the role of provenance, trust, and computational reasoning.

  17. Weather extremes could affect agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2012-05-01

    As Earth's climate warms, agricultural producers will need to adapt. Changes, especially increases in extreme events, are already having an impact on food production, according to speakers at a 1 May session on agriculture and food security at the AGU Science Policy Conference. Christopher Field, director of the Department of Global Ecology at the Carnegie Institution for Science of Washington, D. C., pointed out the complex factors that come into play in understanding food security, including spatially varying controls and stresses, incomplete models, and the potential for threshold responses. Factors that are likely to cause problems include increasing population; increasing preference for meat, which needs more land and energy inputs to produce; climate change; and increasing use of agricultural lands for biomass energy.

  18. Focal points of environmental policy at the beginning of the Eighties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    This speech was held by the Federal Home Secretary Baum in front of the Arbeitsgemeinschaft fuer Umweltfragen (AGU) on 3rd February 1981. He said that environmental policy must be determined even more by the principle of providence in this decade; the main issue is the orientation towards the future in German economic, social, and welfare policy. Vehicles and environment, vehicle noise, advantageous conditions in competition for environmentally-minded and energy conserving vehicles, nuclear energy etc., and international pollution protection are considered focal points of future environmental policy. According to his opinion, the consumption situation and compatibility tests as to environmental conditions are necessary. Increasing pollution protection ought to be promoted by special financing programmes and model projects of the Federal Government. (HSCH) [de

  19. Stephen Hall Receives 2012 Walter Sullivan Award for Excellence in Science Journalism-Features: Citation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Helen

    2013-01-01

    Stephen Hall, a freelance science writer and science-communication teacher, received the Walter Sullivan Award for Excellence in Science Journalism-Features at the AGU Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony, held on 5 December 2012 in San Francisco, Calif. Hall was honored for the article "At Fault?" published 15 September 2011 in Nature. The article examines the legal, personal, and political repercussions from a 2009 earthquake in L'Aquila, Italy for seismologists who had attempted to convey seismic risk assessments to the public. The 6.3 magnitude quake devastated the medieval town and caused more than 300 deaths. Six scientists and one government official were subsequently convicted of manslaughter and sentenced to prison for inadequately assessing and mischaracterizing the risks to city residents, despite the inexact nature of seismic risk assessment. The Sullivan award is for work published with a deadline pressure of more than 1 week.

  20. A Climate Change Minor that gets Physics Students talking to Philosophy Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Running, S. W.; Phear, N.

    2015-12-01

    We started a Climate Change Studies Minor at the University of Montana in 2008. The curriculum is divided into three Sections: Science, Society and Solutions. Faculty from at least 8 different departments offer courses. The Science curriculum is what you would expect, however we worked hard to build the Society Section to include courses in political science, ethics, economics, communication, international policy. The Solutions Section introduces a variety of sustainability, renewable energy and green business courses, and internships and practicums with local organizations and businesses. Our goal has been a Minor that can be taken by students from any major on campus. The high point for me is watching the AGU type geeks interacting with philosophy majors, business students, and pre-law students.

  1. Morel Receives 2005 Maurice Ewing Medal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrag, Daniel P.; Morel, François M. M.

    2006-02-01

    François M. M. Morel received the Ewing Medal at the AGU Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony, which was held on 7 December 2005, in San Francisco, Calif. The medal is given for significant original contributions to the scientific understanding of the processes in the ocean; for the advancement of oceanographic engineering, technology, and instrumentation; and for outstanding service to marine sciences. François Morel has led the search to understand the role of metals in the ocean, starting with a focus on inorganic processes and aquatic chemistry, and leading to a blend of geochemistry, microbiology, biochemistry, and genetics. His influence comes from his research and from the way he has educated an entire community of scientists with his textbooks, with his teaching, and through his former students and postdocs who hold faculty positions at universities throughout the world.

  2. 1999 Horton Research Grants awarded

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Horton (Hydrology) Research Grant Committee presented three grants at the 1999 AGU Spring Meeting in Boston, Massachusetts, last June. S. Jean Birks is currently a Ph.D. candidate in the Earth Sciences Department at the University of Waterloo under the supervision of Tom Edwards and Victoria Remenda (Queen's University). The title of her Ph.D. dissertation is “Long-term Natural Tracer Migration in Thick Unfractured Clay: Implications for Reconstructing the Post-glacial Isotopic History of Precipitation from Aquitards in the Northern Great Plains.” Jean received her B.Sc. in geography and environmental science from McMaster University and her M.Sc. in hydrogeology from Queen's University.

  3. Honors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    Marshall Shepherd, professor of geography in the University of Georgia's Franklin College of Arts and Sciences, Athens, began a 1-year term as president-elect of the American Meteorological Society (AMS) on 22 January. In 2013 he will assume the presidency of the society. Also, five AGU members recently were elected as AMS councilors, with terms expiring in 2015: José Fuentes, Department of Meteorology, Pennsylvania State University, University Park; Richard Johnson, Atmospheric Science Department, Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Christa Peters-Lidard, Hydrological Sciences Branch at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.; Wassila Thiaw, Climate Prediction Center, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Camp Springs, Md.; and Chidong Zhang, Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, University of Miami, Miami, Fla.

  4. White House nominates nuclear commissioner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showstack, Randy

    2012-06-01

    Just 3 days after U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission chairman Gregory Jaczko announced his intention to resign (Eos, 93(22), 211, doi:10.1029/2012EO220005, 2012), President Barack Obama nominated Allison Macfarlane to serve out the remainder of Jaczko's term, through June 2013. The White House announced that upon her appointment, Macfarlane would be designated as chair of the commission. Macfarlane is an associate professor of environmental science and policy at George Mason University. A member of the Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future from March 2010 to January 2012, she is also the author of the 2006 book Uncertainty Underground: Yucca Mountain and the Nation's High-Level Nuclear Waste and is an AGU member.

  5. Fixing the Sky: Why the History of Climate Engineering Matters (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, J. R.

    2010-12-01

    What shall we do about climate change? Is a planetary-scale technological fix possible or desirable? The joint AMS and AGU “Policy Statement on Geoengineering the Climate System” (2009) recommends “Coordinated study of historical, ethical, legal, and social implications of geoengineering that integrates international, interdisciplinary, and intergenerational issues and perspectives and includes lessons from past efforts to modify weather and climate.” I wrote Fixing the Sky: The Checkered History of Weather and Climate Control (Columbia University Press, 2010) with this recommendation in mind, to be fully accessible to scientists, policymakers, and the general public, while meeting or exceeding the scholarly standards of history. It is my intent, with this book, to bring history to bear on public policy issues.

  6. Impacto del lixiviado generado en el relleno sanitario municipal de Linares (Nuevo León) sobre la calidad del agua superficial y subterránea

    OpenAIRE

    León-Gómez, Héctor de; Cruz-Vega, Carlos R.; Dávila-Pórcel, René Alberto; Velasco-Tapia, Fernando; Chapa-Guerrero, José R.

    2015-01-01

    Resumen La presente investigación trata sobre la calidad de las aguas naturales afectadas por la contaminación de los lixiviados originados en el relleno sanitario municipal (RSM) de la ciudad de Linares, Nuevo León., en el NE de México. El RSM cuenta con más de 17 años de servicio y recibe más de 50 ton/día de desechos sólidos urbanos. Se aplicaron métodos geológicos (perfiles geológico-estructurales), hidrogeológicos (cartas piezométricas) e hidrogeoquímicos (clasificación de calidad de agu...

  7. Criatividade em ação: ser criativo é ser criança

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Mendes Silva Filho

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Todo ser humano é criativo e isso decorre da capacidade de imaginação. Essa capacidade é acentuada quando você tem a possibilidade de explorar e a curiosidade aguçada. Não exemplo melhor do que uma criança. Ser criativo é ser criança. Esta capacidade alcança o ápice quando se busca criar como criança fazendo uso de sagacidade, persistência, desorganização e com a possibilidade de errar. Isso é explorar e experimentar, deixando o cérebro livre e sem pressão, agindo despreocupadamente em determinado período de tempo. Nesse sentido, este artigo explora a importancia dar oportunidade do ser humano explorar sua capacidade de criar via imaginação

  8. Handman and Senson Receive 2003 Walter Sullivan Award for Excellence in Science Journalism-Features

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Bob; Handman, Jim; Senson, Pat

    2004-03-01

    Patric Senson and James Handman received the Sullivan Award at AGU Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony, which was held on 10 December 2003, in San Francisco, California. The award honors ``a single article or radio/television report that makes geophysical material accessible and interesting to the general public.'' ``Jim Handman is one of the best kept secrets at CBC Radio. For more than 20 years he has been a bastion of integrity and an endless source of wit and has consistently produced award-winning programs in radio news and current affairs. ``Jim is currently the senior producer of Quirks & Quarks, our national science radio program, now in its 27th season, but this role is only one of many over the course of his extensive broadcasting career.

  9. Mitchell Receives 2013 Ronald Greeley Early Career Award in Planetary Science: Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Jonathan L.

    2014-07-01

    I am honored to receive this award in memory of Ron Greeley. Although I did not have the opportunity to know him, I had the pleasure of getting to know his wife, Cynthia, at a luncheon prior to the special awards session at the AGU Fall Meeting. Cynthia is an intelligent and elegant southern woman with a confident gaze. She spoke fondly of Ron and of her sincere respect for his work ethic and dedication to planetary science. What most impressed me, though, was the respect Ron showed to her and the kids by always "giving them the evenings"; no matter how busy things got, Ron always kept his evenings open for Cynthia. This clearly meant the world to her. As a family man, I can only hope that my wife and kids will speak so kindly of me many years from now. I would like to dedicate this award to them in gratitude for their seemingly unconditional love and support.

  10. Up-Scaling Production of Carboxymethyl Starch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Hafiz Abdul Nasir; Zainon Othman; Kamaruddin Hashim; Siti Khadijah Abu Hadin; Nurul Nadia Shaaban

    2015-01-01

    Carboxymethyl starch (CMS) is a starch derivative formed by its reaction with sodium monochloroacetate which consist of OH-groups that are partially or completely replaced by ether substitution. Characteristic of CMSS defined by the degree of substitution (DS). DS is defined as the average number of substituents per anhydro glucose unit (AGU), the monomer unit of starch. The upgrading of CMSS production from 10L to 30L requires several experiments with different variable such as amount NaOH, amount of Sago Starch and reaction time. Each will give different DS. Quality control for the product cover moisture, viscosity and paste clarity. Therefore, SOP has been established to control the quality final product. (author)

  11. A. E. “Ted” Ringwood (1930-1993)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfred E. (“Ted”) Ringwood died on November 12 at age 63. In 1974, he was awarded AGU's William Bowie Medal, given for outstanding contributions to fundamental geophysics and for unselfish cooperation in research. In his citation for the Bowie Medal, Francis R. Boyd said that Ringwood's “personal approach in Earth sciences has been to blend petrological, geophysical, geochemical, and cosmological data into detailed models of the mantle, the Earth as a whole, and the Moon.” These models stimulated and organized the thinking of many Earth scientists, Boyd noted. Ringwood was the 1993 Hess Medalist, in recognition of his outstanding achievements in research in the constitution and evolution of Earth and sister planets.

  12. Panel established to revise position statement on climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    President Robert Dickinson has appointed a panel to review the current AGU position statement on climate change and greenhouse gases, and to consider revising the statement to reflect scientific progress over the last four years. Marvin Geller of the State University of New York-Stonybrook chairs the panel.Other panel members include: Andre Berger, George Lemaître Catholic University of Louvain, Belgium; Anny Cazenave, Observatoire Midi-Pyrénées, Toulouse, France; John Christy, University of Alabama, Huntsville; Ellen Druffel, University of California, Irvine; Jack Fellows, University Consortium for Atmospheric Research, Boulder; Hiroshi Kanzawa, Nagoya University, Japan; William Schlesinger, Duke University, Durham; William (Jim) Shuttleworth, University of Arizona; Eric Sundquist, U.S. Geological Survey, Woods Hole; Richard Turco, University of California, Los Angeles; Ilana Wainer, Universidade Cidade Sao Paulo, Brazil.

  13. Satellite instrument provides nighttime sensing capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showstack, Randy

    2012-12-01

    "This is not your father's low-light sensor," Steve Miller, senior research scientist and deputy director of the Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere at Colorado State University, Fort Collins, said at a 5 December news briefing at the AGU Fall Meeting. He and others at the briefing were showing off the nighttime sensing capability of the day/night band of the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) of instruments onboard the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP) Earth-observing research satellite, a joint NASA and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) satellite that was launched on 28 October 2011. Noting that low-light satellite technology has been available for about 40 years, Miller said that the VIIRS day/night band "is truly a paradigm shift in the technology and capability."

  14. El loco Concholepas concholepas (Bruguière, 1789) (Mollusca: Gastropoda: Muricidae) como recurso durante el Holoceno Temprano-Medio en Los Vilos, Chile central

    OpenAIRE

    Báez, Pedro; Arata, Javier; Jackson, Donald

    2004-01-01

    Se estudió la abundancia relativa del loco, Concholepas concholepas, y las causas posibles de su variabilidad en los conchales culturales más antiguos del Holoceno Temprano-Medio del litoral de Los Vilos (31º55'S, 71º32'W). Las muestras se obtuvieron en excavaciones arqueológicas de cinco sitios y se dataron con C14: Punta Purgatorio (LV079: 10.040 ± 70 años antes del presente, a.a.p.), Caleta Ñagué (LV098: 10.120 ± 80 a.a.p.), Dunas de Agua Amarilla (LV166: 6.700 ± 60 a.a.p.), Borde Norte de...

  15. Reply [to “Comment on ‘Policy offers protection from harassment” by Marcia McNutt”

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNutt, Marcia

    I certainly agree with the second paragraph of the accompanying reply. I cringe when a friend says that he would have liked to comment on a female colleague's stunning blue jacket, but feared that his compliment would be misinterpreted. Or when an AGU member hesitates to walk his female dinner companion back to her hotel for fear that she would resent being considered a potential victim. I think that the entire country has lost its common sense when it comes to male/female issues. I hope my male coworkers will always feel comfortable offering to carry my new computer if I cannot lift it, and I hope that they will not be offended if I insist on actually wiring it up.

  16. Ionospheric drift measurements: Skymap points selection

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kouba, Daniel; Boška, Josef; Galkin, I. A.; Santolík, Ondřej; Šauli, Petra

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 43, č. 1 (2008), RS1S90/1-RS1S90/11 ISSN 0048-6604 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/06/1619; GA ČR GA205/06/1267; GA AV ČR IAA300420504 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) OC 296; MIERS(XE) COST 296 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : digisonde drift measurement * plasma drift * radio sounding * ionosphere * Doppler shift * skymap processing Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 1.092, year: 2008 http://www.agu.org/pubs/crossref/2008/2007RS003633.shtml

  17. Water quality issues associated with agricultural drainage in semiarid regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylvester, Marc A.

    High incidences of mortality, birth defects, and reproductive failure in waterfowl using Kesterson Reservoir in the San Joaquin Valley, Calif., have occurred because of the bioaccumulation of selenium from irrigation drainage. These circumstances have prompted concern about the quality of agriculture drainage and its potential effects on human health, fish and wildlife, and beneficial uses of water. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, University of California (Berkeley, Calif.) organized a 1-day session at the 1986 AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco, Calif., to provide an interdisciplinary forum for hydrologists, geochemists, and aquatic chemists to discuss the processes controlling the distribution, mobilization, transport, and fate of trace elements in source rocks, soils, water, and biota in semiarid regions in which irrigated agriculture occurs. The focus of t h e session was the presentation of research results on the source, distribution, movement, and fate of selenium in agricultural drainage.

  18. Time to quit my day job? My not-so-quiet crusade to become the funniest climate scientist at NASA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, G. A.; Pulwarty, R. S.; Willis, J. K.

    2017-12-01

    The first time I showed a funny slide at AGU, it bombed. Badly. "What causes global warming?" I asked an audience of 100 learned colleagues. I pushed the space bar. Up popped a photo-shopped picture of a gigantic Al Gore breathing fire on the Earth…. Silence. Complete silence. Even the crickets were judging me. Since that time, I've completed an entire curriculum at a world-renowned school of funny (The Conservatory Program at Second City, Hollywood), written sketch shows, told funny stories, acted in short and full-length feature films, and practiced. Mostly practiced. A lot. So, did I get better at making global warming funny? Come find out. In this presentation I will tell some jokes, talk about my experience trying to use comedy in public communications, and show at least one video that educates people about climate change, and is also funny. At least—I think it's funny.

  19. Global patterns of phytoplankton dynamics in coastal ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paerl, H.; Yin, Kedong; Cloern, J.

    2011-01-01

    Scientific Committee on Ocean Research Working Group 137 Meeting; Hangzhou, China, 17-21 October 2010; Phytoplankton biomass and community structure have undergone dramatic changes in coastal ecosystems over the past several decades in response to climate variability and human disturbance. These changes have short- and long-term impacts on global carbon and nutrient cycling, food web structure and productivity, and coastal ecosystem services. There is a need to identify the underlying processes and measure the rates at which they alter coastal ecosystems on a global scale. Hence, the Scientific Committee on Ocean Research (SCOR) formed Working Group 137 (WG 137), "Global Patterns of Phytoplankton Dynamics in Coastal Ecosystems: A Comparative Analysis of Time Series Observations" (http://wg137.net/). This group evolved from a 2007 AGU-sponsored Chapman Conference entitled "Long Time-Series Observations in Coastal Ecosystems: Comparative Analyses of Phytoplankton Dynamics on Regional to Global Scales.".

  20. A cachaça como patrimônio: turismo, cultura e sabor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Vinicius Fernandes Braga

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A Cachaça é uma bebida originalmente brasileira, descoberta de forma acidental logo nas primeiras décadas da história do país. Enfrentou o preconceito das elites e a proibição de sua fabricação. Todavia como uma legítima representante popular brasileira resistiu bravamente aos entraves impostos a sua existência, alcançou os paladares mais exigentes e se popularizou no país, se consolidando também pelo mundo, como o destilado de cana-de-açúcar do Brasil. Chamada de Pinga, branquinha, amansa corno, água santa, entre outros nomes, foi utilizada como remédio fortificante, moeda de troca, além de ter sido um símbolo de patriotismo, de luta e de resistência, incentivou as artes, aguçou e ainda aguça a criatividade do povo. Um produto nacional de muitas histórias e valor cultural, democrática desde suas raízes, uma legítima representante nacional, um patrimônio histórico, cultural e imaterial, que apresenta muitas potencialidades ainda a ser descobertas, como sua utilização na gastronomia, seja nos preparos mais populares ou sofisticados e a exploração de sua história e dos espaços de produção, assim como, na preservação de suas memórias, como atrativo para a prática do turismo cultural e outras modalidades do turismo em paralelo.

  1. Preparing for the Great American Eclipse of Aug. 21: for Yourself, and for Holding an Event for the Public and Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, D. K.

    2016-12-01

    On Aug. 21, 2017 a Total Eclipse of the Sun will cross the US. For the first time in 40 years every state will have at least 80% of the sun covered by the moon, and lucky people from Oregon to South Carolina will see the beauty of the total eclipse and remember it all their lives. It is as difficult to convey the impression of a total eclilpse as it is to convey what the Grand Canyon is like. Words cannot do it justice. It looks like the end of the world as the flames of solar prominances rise from the edge of the "black hole" of the eclipsed sun, and silver streamers of the sun's corona stretch across the sky. People scream, applaud, or cry. Animals do strange things. At a total eclipse in the Galapagos dozens of whales and dolphins surfaced at the time of the total elcipse, surrounded our boat, and after the eclipse swam away. At a partial eclipse, even a 99% eclipse, those spectacular aspects are not seen, so it is a good idea to make plans to go to where the eclipse is total. This session will use examples from 10 total eclipses the author has viewed and made available to the public, since March 7, 1970, to suggest practical preparations for the evnt. Advice will be given on how and where to see the eclipse yourself, and how to help the public, teachers, and students where you live enjoy the spectacle and raise their interest in science. It is hoped that by the time of the AGU meeting "Kits" of educational materials and safe eclipse-watching glasses will be available to AGU members. This will be discussed. A Public Service Announcement suitable for use on television, the Internet, or in schools should also be available.

  2. Earth and Space Science Ph.D. Class of 2003 Report released

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keelor, Brad

    AGU and the American Geological Institute (AGI) released on 26 July an employment study of 180 Earth and space science Ph.D. recipients who received degrees from U.S. universities in 2003. The AGU/AGI survey asked graduates about their education and employment, efforts to find their first job after graduation, and experiences in graduate school. Key results from the study include: The vast majority (87%) of 2003 graduates found work in the Earth and space sciences, earning salaries commensurate with or slightly higher than 2001 and 2002 salary averages. Most (64%) graduates were employed within academia (including postdoctoral appointments), with the remainder in government (19%), industry (10%), and other (7%) sectors. Most graduates were positive about their employment situation and found that their work was challenging, relevant, and appropriate for someone with a Ph.D. The percentage of Ph.D. recipients accepting postdoctoral positions (58%) increased slightly from 2002. In contrast, the fields of physics and chemistry showed significant increases in postdoctoral appointments for Ph.D.s during the same time period. As in previous years, recipients of Ph.D.s in the Earth, atmospheric, and ocean sciences (median age of 32.7 years) are slightly older than Ph.D. recipients in most other natural sciences (except computer sciences), which is attributed to time taken off between undergraduate and graduate studies. Women in the Earth, atmospheric,and ocean sciences earned 33% of Ph.D.s in the class of 2003, surpassing the percentage of Ph.D.s earned by women in chemistry (32%) and well ahead of the percentage in computer sciences (20%), physics (19%), and engineering (17%). Participation of other underrepresented groups in the Earth, atmospheric, and ocean sciences remained extremely low.

  3. Retrospective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, David A.

    Charting a course toward an uncertain future is always a risky business, especially among shoals of fiscal restraint or national tragedy, and the prudent navigator is well advised to remember where he's been as he looks ahead. The ocean and space sciences are poised for grand joint adventures, but shrinking budgets and the lingering Challenger numbness are restrictive lee shores that must be considered when laying plans. To sharpen the focus on future choices, it may be helpful to glance in the geophysical rearview mirror and remember some of the challenges and opportunities of a different era.A quarter century is a long time, but many images from 25 years ago can still be recalled in crisp detail, like photographs in a scrapbook. In 1961, results from the International Geophysical Year (IGY) filled the pages of the Transactions of the American Geophysical Union, and the U.S. program of space exploration finally was underway with conviction. The Indian Ocean Expedition, conceived during the IGY, ushered in a new era of international oceanography. The TIROS III satellite beamed to earth fuzzy pictures of tropical storms and revealed the intricate writhings of the Gulf Stream. Forecasters and fluid dynamicists suddenly saw new horizons, and geophysical turbulence became a major topic at the IUGG Symposium in Marseilles, France. Papers with prescient themes were presented at the AGU Ocean Section meeting: June Pattullo (then at Oregon State College, Corvallis) on heat storage in the Pacific; Ferris Webster (then at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, Mass.) on Gulf Stream meanders. Polar oceanography was well represented in AGU journals: Kenneth Hunkins (at what was then called the Lamont Geological Observatory, Palisades, N.Y.) described the Alpha Rise, discovered from a drifting Arctic ice island, and Edward Thiel (then at the University of Minnesota, Minneapolis) and his co-workers discussed open ocean tides, gravimetrically measured from Antarctic

  4. Potential Fuel Loadings, Fire Ignitions, and Smoke Emissions from Nuclear Bursts in Megacities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turco, R. P.; Toon, O. B.; Robock, A.; Bardeen, C.; Oman, L.; Stenchikov, G. L.

    2006-12-01

    We consider the effects of "small" nuclear detonations in modern "megacities," focusing on the possible extent of fire ignitions, and the properties of corresponding smoke emissions. Explosive devices in the multi-kiloton yield range are being produced by a growing number of nuclear states (Toon et al., 2006), and such weapons may eventually fall into the hands of terrorists. The numbers of nuclear weapons that might be used in a regional conflict, and their potential impacts on population and infrastructure, are discussed elsewhere. Here, we estimate the smoke emissions that could lead to widespread environmental effects, including large-scale climate anomalies. We find that low-yield weapons, which emerging nuclear states have been stockpiling, and which are likely to be targeted against cities in a regional war, can generate up to 100 times as much smoke per kiloton of yield as the high-yield weapons once associated with a superpower nuclear exchange. The fuel loadings in modern cities are estimated using a variety of data, including extrapolations from earlier detailed studies. The probability of ignition and combustion of fuels, smoke emission factors and radiative properties, and prompt scavenging and dispersion of the smoke are summarized. We conclude that a small regional nuclear war might generate up to 5 teragrams of highly absorbing particles in urban firestorms, and that this smoke could initially be injected into the middle and upper troposphere. These results are used to develop smoke emission scenarios for a climate impact analysis reported by Oman et al. (2006). Uncertainties in the present smoke estimates are outlined. Oman, L., A. Robock, G. L. Stenchikov, O. B. Toon, C. Bardeen and R. P. Turco, "Climatic consequences of regional nuclear conflicts," AGU, Fall 2006. Toon, O. B., R. P. Turco, A. Robock, C. Bardeen, L. Oman and G. L. Stenchikov, "Consequences of regional scale nuclear conflicts and acts of individual nuclear terrorism," AGU, Fall

  5. Engaging High School Students in Investigative STEM Activities Based on Field Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, J.; Sheriff, M. M.; Washington, D. S.; Putnam, A. E.; Strand, P.; Radue, M. J.

    2017-12-01

    The lead author, an Environmental Science teacher at Gary Comer High School (GCHS), a public charter on the South Side of Chicago, accompanied two students over the course of two summers to conduct field research in remote mountain ranges of interior Asia. The expeditions were funded by the National Science Foundation and orchestrated collaboratively with PI Putnam with the purposes of bringing along high school students and teachers (1) to introduce students from urban areas to practical Earth Science and (2) to bolster the Environmental Science curriculum at GCHS by providing real world events to relate to classroom learning. During the first field trip, a student from GCHS and the lead author traveled to western Mongolia to participate in collecting samples for cosmogenic-nuclide dating of glacial landforms. The student performed all parts of sample collection and used the data to create a poster analyzing the rate of recession of the Potanin Glacier. She went on to present her findings at the AGU Fall Meeting 2016. At GCHS, she assisted the teacher in lessons about climate change. Next year she will be attending the University of Vermont to pursue a major in a STEM field. The second student traveled to the Tibetan Plateau in China and also participated fully in sampling activities. She plans on presenting her project on creating 3D models of sample boulders at the AGU Meeting in 2017. She will present her findings to the rest of the student body at GCHS, assist with pertinent Environmental Science lessons for Freshmen, and explain her experience at the Gary Comer Middle School. The lead author faced several restrictions in the classroom due to standardized testing requirements, leading to more focus on testing skills rather than investigative learning. Next year the focus will switch from ACT to SAT standards, allowing more freedom to pursue investigative lessons. The success of adding information on the field experience will be assessed at the end of the 2017

  6. Preface: Multiscale feedbacks in ecogeomorphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheaton, Joseph M.; Gibbins, Chris; Wainwright, John; Larsen, Laurel G.; McElroy, Brandon

    2011-01-01

    Geomorphic systems are known to exhibit nonlinear responses to physical–biological feedbacks (Thornes, 1985; Baas, 2002; Reinhardt et al., 2010). These responses make understanding and/or predicting system response to change highly challenging. With growing concerns over ecosystem health, a pressing need exists for research that tries to elucidate these feedbacks (Jerolmack, 2008; Darby, 2010; National Research Council, 2010). A session was convened at the Fall 2008 meeting of the American Geophysical Union (AGU) to provide an outlet for some of this truly interdisciplinary and original research, which is central to understanding geomorphic and ecological dynamics. The session attracted over 39 contributions, which were divided into two well-attended oral sessions and a very busy poster session. This special issue presents new research from the AGU session, which highlights clear physical–biological feedbacks. The aim is to bring together contrasting perspectives on biological and geomorphic feedbacks in a diversity of physiographic settings, ranging from wetlands and estuaries, through rivers, to uplands. These papers highlight biological and physical feedbacks which involve the modulation or amplification of geomorphic processes. These papers will be of interest to a core geomorphology audience, and should also draw attention from the fields of ecohydraulics, hydroecology, ecohydrology, ecomorphology, biogeochemistry and biogeography, and biogeomorphology as well as the more traditional fields of hydrology, ecology and biology. In this preface to the special issue, we a) review past contributions to the emerging field of ecogeomorphology and related disciplines, b) provide some context for how this topical special issue came to fruition, and c) summarize the contributions to this special issue.

  7. Meaningful Engagement of Organizational and Agency Partnerships to Enhance Diversity within the Earth System Science Community: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyrtle, A. J.; Whitney, V. W.; Powell, J. M.; Bailey, K. L.

    2006-12-01

    The Minorities Striving and Pursuing Higher Degrees of Success in Earth System Science Initiative (MS PHD'S) was established by and for underrepresented minorities to facilitate increased and sustained participation in Earth system science community. The MS PHD'S launched its pilot program in 2003 with twenty professional organizations, agencies and institutions as partners. Each year partnership alliances have grown. In the second year or programming, thirty-one partnering agencies/institutions supported involvement of MS PHD'S student participants and for 2005-2006, representatives from forty-five agencies and institutions have provided similar support and exposure to the third cohort of student participants. Nineteen scientists served as meeting mentors during the MS PHD'S pilot program in 2003. By the following year, twenty-two additional scientists partnered with MS PHD'S mentees. During 2005-2006, twenty-one new scientists served as program mentors. Thus far, the MS PHD'S program has successfully engaged sixty-two minority and non-minority scientists as mentors to MS PHD'S student participants. AGU, AMS, ASLO, ESA, TOS, NAS OSB and JOI continue to serve as MS PHD'S Society Partners and hosts for MS PHD'S student activities in conjunction with their meetings. Each of the five professional society partners provided assistance in identifying mentors, provided complimentary memberships and meeting registrations for MS PHD'S student participants. AGU, AMS, ASLO, JOI and TOS have sponsored more than 90 conference registration and travel awards for the purpose of student participants engaging in MS PHD'S Professional Development Program Phase 2 activities at their international meetings. How did MS PHD'S establish meaningful engagement of organizational and agency partnerships to enhance diversity within the Earth system science community? This case study reveals replicable processes and constructs to enhance the quality of meaningful collaboration and engagement

  8. Drugs Related to Oropharyngeal Dysphagia in Older People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miarons, Marta; Campins, Lluís; Palomera, Elisabet; Serra-Prat, Mateu; Cabré, Mateu; Rofes, Laia

    2016-10-01

    Scientific evidence on the impact of medication on the physiology of swallowing is scarce and mainly based on clinical case reports. To evaluate the association between oropharyngeal dysphagia (OD) and chronic exposure to medication in older patients admitted to the acute geriatric unit (AGU) of a secondary hospital, we performed a retrospective cross-sectional study of 966 patients admitted to an AGU from 2008 to 2011. We reviewed (a) diagnosis of OD (assessed with the volume-viscosity swallow test, V- VST); (b) chronic patient medication classified by anatomical, therapeutic, chemical codes; and (c) demographic and clinical data. A univariate analysis was performed to determine which medications were associated with OD. A multivariate analysis adjusting for confounding clinical factors was performed to identify which of those medications were independently associated with OD. The age of patients included was 85.3 ± 6.37 years and 59.4 % were women. A total of 41.9 % presented OD. We found a possible protective effect of beta blocking agents on OD after the multivariate analysis (OR 0.54, 95 % CI 0.35-0.85). None of the categories of drugs was associated with an altered swallowing function after adjusting for confounding variables. The present study is the first one to widely investigate the association between drugs and OD, increasing understanding of their association. The role of beta blockers in OD needs to be further studied as their potentially beneficial effects on the swallowing function in older patients could help to prevent complications.

  9. El Nino, La Nina and VLBI Measured LOD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Thomas A.; Gipson, J. M.; Ma, C.

    1998-01-01

    VLBI is one of the most important techniques for measuring Earth orientation parameters (EOP), and is unique in its ability to make high accuracy measurements of UT1, and its time derivative, which is related to changes in the length of day, conventionally called LOD. These measurements of EOP give constraints on geophysical models of the solid-Earth, atmosphere and oceans. Changes in EOP are due either to external torques from gravitational forces, or to the exchange of angular momentum between the Earth, atmosphere and oceans. The effect of the external torques is strictly harmonic and nature, and is therefore easy to remove. We analyze an LOD time series derived from VLBI measurements with the goal of comparing this to predictions from AAM, and various ENSO indices. Previous work by ourselves and other investigators demonstrated a high degree of coherence between atmospheric angular momentum (AAM) and EOP. We continue to see this. As the angular momentum of the atmosphere increases, the rate of rotation of the Earth decreases, and vice versa. The signature of the ENSO is particularly strong. At the peak of the 1982-83 El Nino increased LOD by almost 1 ms. This was subsequently followed by a reduction in LOD of 0.75 ms. At its peak, in February of 1998, the 1997-98 El Nino increased LOD by 0.8 msec. As predicted at the 1998 Spring AGU, this has been followed by an abrupt decrease in LOD which is currently -0.4 ms. At this time (August, 1998) the current ENSO continues to develop in new and unexpected ways. We plan to update our analysis with all data available prior to the Fall AGU.

  10. Efficient Reassignment of a Frequent Serine Codon in Wild-Type Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Joanne M; Reynolds, Noah M; Rivera, Keith; Connolly, Morgan; Guo, Li-Tao; Ling, Jiqiang; Pappin, Darryl J; Church, George M; Söll, Dieter

    2016-02-19

    Expansion of the genetic code through engineering the translation machinery has greatly increased the chemical repertoire of the proteome. This has been accomplished mainly by read-through of UAG or UGA stop codons by the noncanonical aminoacyl-tRNA of choice. While stop codon read-through involves competition with the translation release factors, sense codon reassignment entails competition with a large pool of endogenous tRNAs. We used an engineered pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetase to incorporate 3-iodo-l-phenylalanine (3-I-Phe) at a number of different serine and leucine codons in wild-type Escherichia coli. Quantitative LC-MS/MS measurements of amino acid incorporation yields carried out in a selected reaction monitoring experiment revealed that the 3-I-Phe abundance at the Ser208AGU codon in superfolder GFP was 65 ± 17%. This method also allowed quantification of other amino acids (serine, 33 ± 17%; phenylalanine, 1 ± 1%; threonine, 1 ± 1%) that compete with 3-I-Phe at both the aminoacylation and decoding steps of translation for incorporation at the same codon position. Reassignments of different serine (AGU, AGC, UCG) and leucine (CUG) codons with the matching tRNA(Pyl) anticodon variants were met with varying success, and our findings provide a guideline for the choice of sense codons to be reassigned. Our results indicate that the 3-iodo-l-phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase (IFRS)/tRNA(Pyl) pair can efficiently outcompete the cellular machinery to reassign select sense codons in wild-type E. coli.

  11. Strategic Map for Achieving Enceladus Ocean Exploration in Our Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, B.

    2015-12-01

    At AGU 2014, the author presented a decomposition and sequencing of science questions and technical capabilities that define viable programmatic pathways to enable sample return and advanced in situ exploration of the Enceladan ocean, consistent with NASA mission-opportunity constraints. Elaborated and refined in 2015 via JpGU, AbSciCon, IAC, and COSPAR Water, this plan is now specific: discrete and integrated analyses and coordination actions that, if acted on by the community over the next 45 months, could result in Enceladus ocean exploration appearing in the next Planetary Decadal Survey's mission priorities, issued in 2021. At AGU 2015, a product-based, outcome-measurable, stepwise milestone plan is presented to catalyze the next level of community discussion. Topics covered by the action plan include: hypothesis-driven science questions; mission cost as a function of mission capability; mission selectability as a function of programmatic constraints and evaluation process; exploration technologies as a function of funding and schedule; international consensus on forward and backward planetary protection requirements and solutions for exploring worlds with astrobiologically significant liquid water; and strategic balance among major NASA planetary science initiatives. Key Decadal-runup milestones are analyzed with respect to stakeholders, success criteria, and - critically - calendar and precedence. These results then inform a multi-year action plan to generate, vet, and socialize throughout the community a set of technically and fiscally viable mission concepts, respectively enabled by an achievable technology development roadmap also detailed in the presentation. This can begin to align advocate actions toward a broad community goal of exploring the Enceladan ocean. Without such coordination, which must reach fruition by Sep 2019, the probability that the next Decadal could explicitly prioritize mission objectives for Enceladus ocean exploration - as one of

  12. VIP Data Explorer: A Tool for Exploring 30 years of Vegetation Index and Phenology Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreto-munoz, A.; Didan, K.; Rivera-Camacho, J.; Yitayew, M.; Miura, T.; Tsend-Ayush, J.

    2011-12-01

    Continuous acquisition of global satellite imagery over the years has contributed to the creation of long term data records from AVHRR, MODIS, TM, SPOT-VGT and other sensors. These records account for 30+ years, as these archives grow, they become invaluable tools for environmental, resources management, and climate studies dealing with trends and changes from local, regional to global scale. In this project, the Vegetation Index and Phenology Lab (VIPLab) is processing 30 years of daily global surface reflectance data into an Earth Science Data Record of Vegetation Index and Phenology metrics. Data from AVHRR (N07,N09,N11 and N14) and MODIS (AQUA and TERRA collection 5) for the periods 1981-1999 and 2000-2010, at CMG resolution were processed into one seamless and sensor independent data record using various filtering, continuity and gap filling techniques (Tsend-Ayush et al., AGU 2011, Rivera-Camacho et al, AGU 2011). An interactive online tool (VIP Data Explorer) was developed to support the visualization, qualitative and quantitative exploration, distribution, and documentation of these records using a simple web 2.0 interface. The VIP Data explorer (http://vip.arizona.edu/viplab_data_explorer) can display any combination of multi temporal and multi source data, enable the quickly exploration and cross comparison of the various levels of processing of this data. It uses the Google Earth (GE) model and was developed using the GE API for images rendering, manipulation and geolocation. These ESDRs records can be quickly animated in this environment and explored for visual trends and anomalies detection. Additionally the tool enables extracting and visualizing any land pixel time series while showing the different levels of processing it went through. User can explore this ESDR database within this data explorer GUI environment, and any desired data can be placed into a dynamic "cart" to be ordered and downloaded later. More functionalities are planned and will be

  13. More than just a catchy title: The rewards and challenges of geoscience blogging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, J. L.

    2011-12-01

    Social media have become increasingly important tools for communication, and no less so in the world of the Earth sciences. The "geoblogosphere", a collection of blogs written by geoscientists, began to grow quickly about four years ago and now encompasses more than three hundred blogs in multiple languages. The blog Magma Cum Laude (http://blogs.agu.org/magmacumlaude) was first published in 2007 among some of the earliest geoblogs, and is now part of the AGU Blogosphere, a widely read and lively blogging network. Originally intended as a chronicle of the author's time in graduate school and interest in volcanology, Magma Cum Laude's content has expanded to include science outreach, philanthropic ventures and interdisciplinary communication. In the process, the author has learned a great deal about how to develop and maintain a science blog, and how to integrate blogging with the demands of being a student and geoscientist. Geoblogging can be rewarding and fun, but it should also be approached with concrete goals and a clear understanding of potential drawbacks and difficulties. Geoscientists using social media have created new pathways for collaboration, peer review, science communication, and commentary on current events, making geoblogs a powerful supplement to 'traditional' research processes. In addition, geoblogging breaks down barriers between scientists and the public, demystifying research and giving the scientific community an opportunity to prove why its work is important. Geoblogs also have a lighter side - at any given time, there are a number of lively competitions, memes and conversations going on in the geoblogosphere. But like any social media outlet, blogging can present challenges, such as maintaining a good flow of content, integrating posting into a busy schedule, and dealing with interpersonal, employer and public responses. It is important to understand what these challenges entail, and how to deal with them, in order to utilize geoblogging

  14. Chair Talk: Resources to Maximize Administrative Efforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, H.; Chan, M. A.; Bierly, E. W.; Manduca, C. A.; Ormand, C. J.

    2009-12-01

    Earth science department chairs are generally scientists who have little/no formal administrative training. The common rotation of faculty members in three-six year cycles distributes the heavy leadership responsibilities but involves little preparation beforehand to deal with budgets, fundraising, personnel issues, confrontations, and crises. The amount of information exchange and support upon exit and handoff to the next chair is variable. Resources for chairs include workshops, meetings (ranging from annual meetings of geoscience chairs to monthly meetings of small groups of chairs from various disciplines on a campus), discussions, and online resources. These resources, some of which we designed in the past several years, provide information and support for chairs, help them share best practices, and reduce time spent “reinventing the wheel”. Most of these resources involve groups of chairs in our discipline who meet together. The AGU Board of Heads and Chairs of Earth and Space Science Departments offers annual one-day workshops at the Fall AGU meeting. The specific topics vary from year to year; they have included goals and roles of heads and chairs, fundraising and Advisory Boards, student recruitment, interdisciplinarity, dual-career couples, and undergraduate research. The workshop provides ample opportunities for open discussion. Annual one-two day meetings of groups of geoscience department chairs (e.g., research universities in a particular region) provide an opportunity for chairs to share specific data about their departments (e.g., salaries, graduate student stipends, information about facilities) and discuss strategies. At the College of William and Mary, a small group of chairs meets monthly throughout the year; each session includes time for open discussion as well as a more structured discussion on a particular topic (e.g., merit review, development and fundraising, mentoring early career faculty and the tenure process, leadership styles

  15. Impacts of conflict on land use and land cover in the Imatong Mountain region of South Sudan and northern Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorsevski, Virginia B.

    The Imatong Mountain region of South Sudan makes up the northern most part of the Afromontane conservation 'biodiversity hotspot' due to the numerous species of plants and animals found here, some of which are endemic. At the same time, this area (including the nearby Dongotana Hills and the Agoro-Agu region of northern Uganda) has witnessed decades of armed conflict resulting from the Sudan Civil War and the presence of the Ugandan Lord's Resistance Army (LRA). The objective of my research was to investigate the impact of war on land use and land cover using a combination of satellite remote sensing data and semi-structured interviews with local informants. Specifically, I sought to (1) assess and compare changes in forest cover and location during both war and peace; (2) compare trends in fire activity with human population patterns; and (3) investigate the underlying causes influencing land use patterns related to war. I did this by using a Disturbance Index (DI), which isolates un-vegetated spectral signatures associated with deforestation, on Landsat TM and ETM+ data in order to compare changes in forest cover during conflict and post-conflict years, mapping the location and frequency of fires in subsets of the greater study area using MODIS active fire data, and by analyzing and summarizing information derived from interviews with key informants. I found that the rate of forest recovery was significantly higher than the rate of disturbance both during and after wartime in and around the Imatong Central Forest Reserve (ICFR) and that change in net forest cover remained largely unchanged for the two time periods. In contrast, the nearby Dongotana Hills experienced relatively high rates of disturbance during both periods; however, post war period losses were largely offset by gains in forest cover, potentially indicating opposing patterns in human population movements and land use activities within these two areas. For the Agoro-Agu Forest Reserve (AFR) region

  16. Recruitment Strategies for Geoscience Majors: Conceptual Framework and Practical Suggestions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, R. M.; Eyles, C.; Ormand, C. J.

    2009-12-01

    One characteristic of strong geoscience departments is that they recruit and retain quality students. In a survey to over 900 geoscience departments in the US and Canada several years ago nearly 90% of respondents indicated that recruiting and retaining students was important. Two years ago we offered a pre-GSA workshop on recruiting and retaining students that attracted over 30 participants from over 20 different institutions, from liberal arts colleges to state universities to research intensive universities. Since then we have sought additional feedback from a presentation to the AGU Heads & Chairs at a Fall AGU meeting, and most recently from a workshop on strengthening geoscience programs in June 2009. In all of these settings, a number of themes and concrete strategies have emerged. Key themes included strategies internal to the department/institution; strategies that reach beyond the department/institution; determining how scalable/transferable strategies that work in one setting are to your own setting; identifying measures of success; and developing or improving on an existing action plan specific to your departmental/institutional setting. The full results of all of these efforts to distill best practices in recruiting students will be shared at the Fall AGU meeting, but some of the best practices for strategies local to the department/institution include: 1) focusing on introductory classes (having the faculty who are most successful in that setting teach them, having one faculty member make a common presentation to all classes about what one can do with a geoscience major, offering topical seminars, etc.); 2) informing students of career opportunities (inviting alumni back to talk to students, using AGI resources, etc.,); 3) creating common space for students to work, study, and be a community; 4) inviting all students earning an ‘A’ (or ‘B’) in introductory classes to a departmental event just for them; and 5) creating a field trip for incoming

  17. Vice Presidents' Foreword

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dear Reader, In the early sixties, the eminent American hydrologist, Walter Langbein, founded Water Resources Research on behalf of the Section of Hydrology of the American Geophysical Union (AGU). Today, Water Resources Research is undisputed as the leading international journal in its field, and the key factors in its success are: * sustained emphasis on high quality papers; * the reviewing, editing, and management processes are all controlled by the scientists; * the allegiance of the AGU community to WRR; * a verv reasonable cost both to institutions and members; * financial benefits from the sales of the journal are fed back to the AGU, to the benefit of the members. In Europe, we now have a well established community of hydrologists in EGS, and the need for a high quality journal was addressed initially by adopting the already well established Elsevier journal of Hydrology as the official journal of the Hydrological Sciences Section. However, it became apparent that several of the factors associated with WRR's success were not working in the Society's favour, and so it has been decided to establish a new journal which, we hope, can emulate the success of WRR in the fullness of time. Much has been written over the past decade about the need to establish a strong identity for hydrology as a distinct geoscience alongside the atmospheric, ocean and solid earth sciences. The aims and scope of Hydrology and Earth System Sciences (HESS) have been designed to give full expression to this goal, and have been strongly influenced by 'Opportunities in the Hydrologic Sciences' (National Academy Press,1991). The functioning of the hydrological cycle within an earth system undergoing global change is currently the focus of research by many leading scientists and it is hoped that HESS will become a major forum for the publication and discussion of such research, as well as all new findings which enhance the position of hydrology as a geoscience. The success of a new journal

  18. Is The Water Shortage Crisis Really One of the Most Dangerous?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, M.

    2010-12-01

    Author of the 1998 book, Last Oasis: Facing Water Scarcity, Dr. Sandra Postel predicts big water availability problems as populations of so-called “water-stressed” countries jump perhaps six fold over the next 30 years. The author has reported on this in his previous AGU presentations. In the next four decades, more than half of the world’s population will have to deal with sever water shortages. The United States has been blessed with several large fresh water lakes. In spite of having this fresh water supply, some states like Arizona could be facing sever fresh water shortages in the next couple of decades. Sid Wilson, general manager of the Central Arizona Project has indicated "It's not a question of if there is a water shortage anymore. It is in reality, when there will be a water shortage. " Several states share water from the Colorado river. The river has limited water supply to cater to the needs of Arizona, Nevada, California, Colorado, New Mexico, Utah and Wyoming. World Health Organization, NASA, Department of the Interior, NOAA and several organizations have observed that there is a real water shortage crisis. This is because the world’s population has tripled in the twentieth century. This has resulted in a six-fold increase of water usage. Fresh water supply is limited. This is because water cannot be replaced with an alternative. It is important to observe that petroleum can be replaced with alternative fuel resources. It is necessary to recognize that fact that irrigation necessitates almost 65% to 70% of water withdrawal. Industry may utilize about 20% and domestic consumption is about 10% Evaporation from reservoirs is also a major factor, depending upon the climate and environment. Therefore there is an urgent need for all the countries to establish a strong, sound, sensible and sustainable management program for utilizing the available water supplies efficiently (Narayanan, 2008). References: Narayanan, Mysore. (2008). Hydrology, Water

  19. Experimental Melting Study of Basalt-Peridotite Hybrid Source: Melting model of Hawaiian plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, E.; Gao, S.

    2015-12-01

    Eclogite component entrained in ascending plume is considered to be essentially important in producing flood basalts (e.g., Columbia River basalt, Takahashi et al., 1998 EPSL), alkalic OIBs (e.g., Kogiso et al.,2003), ferro-picrites (Tuff et al.,2005) and Hawaiian shield lavas (e.g., Hauri, 1996; Takahashi & Nakajima, 2002, Sobolev et al.,2005). Size of the entrained eclogite, which controls the reaction rates with ambient peridotite, however, is very difficult to constrain using geophysical observation. Among Hawaiian shield volcanoes, Koolau is the most enriched end-member in eclogite component (Frey et al, 1994). Reconstruction of Koolau volcano based on submarine study on Nuuanu landslide (AGU Monograph vol.128, 2002, Takahashi Garcia Lipman eds.) revealed that silica-rich tholeiite appeared only at the last stage (Makapuu stage) of Koolau volcano. Chemical compositions of lavas as well as isotopes change abruptly and coherently across a horizon (Shinozaki et al. and Tanaka et al. ibid.). Based on these observation, Takahashi & Nakajima (2002 ibid) proposed that the Makapuu stage lava in Koolau volcano was supplied from a single large eclogite block. In order to study melting process in Hawaiian plume, high-pressure melting experiments were carried out under dry and hydrous conditions with layered eclogite/peridotite starting materials. Detail of our experiments will be given by Gao et al (2015 AGU). Combined previous field observation with new set of experiments, we propose that variation in SiO2 among Hawaiian tholeiites represent varying degree of wall-rock interaction between eclogite and ambient peridotite. Makapuu stage lavas in Koolau volcano represents eclogite partial melts formed at ~3 GPa with various amount of xenocrystic olivines derived from Pacific plate. In other words, we propose that "primary magma" in the melting column of Hawaiian plume ranges from basaltic andesite to ferro-picrite depending on the lithology of the source. Solidus of

  20. Migration to Earth Observation Satellite Product Dissemination System at JAXA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikehata, Y.; Matsunaga, M.

    2017-12-01

    JAXA released "G-Portal" as a portal web site for search and deliver data of Earth observation satellites in February 2013. G-Portal handles ten satellites data; GPM, TRMM, Aqua, ADEOS-II, ALOS (search only), ALOS-2 (search only), MOS-1, MOS-1b, ERS-1 and JERS-1 and archives 5.17 million products and 14 million catalogues in total. Users can search those products/catalogues in GUI web search and catalogue interface(CSW/Opensearch). In this fiscal year, we will replace this to "Next G-Portal" and has been doing integration, test and migrations. New G-Portal will treat data of satellites planned to be launched in the future in addition to those handled by G - Portal. At system architecture perspective, G-Portal adopted "cluster system" for its redundancy, so we must replace the servers into those with higher specifications when we improve its performance ("scale up approach"). This requests a lot of cost in every improvement. To avoid this, Next G-Portal adopts "scale out" system: load balancing interfaces, distributed file system, distributed data bases. (We reported in AGU fall meeting 2015(IN23D-1748).) At customer usability perspective, G-Portal provides complicated interface: "step by step" web design, randomly generated URLs, sftp (needs anomaly tcp port). Customers complained about the interfaces and the support team had been tired from answering them. To solve this problem, Next G-Portal adopts simple interfaces: "1 page" web design, RESTful URL, and Normal FTP. (We reported in AGU fall meeting 2016(IN23B-1778).) Furthermore, Next G-Portal must merge GCOM-W data dissemination system to be terminated in the next March as well as the current G-Portal. This might arrise some difficulties, since the current G-Portal and GCOM-W data dissemination systems are quite different from Next G-Portal. The presentation reports the knowledge obtained from the process of merging those systems.

  1. Exemplary Programs Supporting Teacher Professional Development in the U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passow, Michael J.

    2015-04-01

    that utilize the AMNH collections in New York City. Each year at the American Geophysical Union Meeting, teachers find out about "Hot Topics in Science" through the GIFT Workshops (http://education.agu.org/education-activities-at-agu-meetings/gift/). Field experiences aboard the scientific ocean drilling vessel, "JOIDES Resolution," have enhanced the knowledge and skills of teachers from the USA and Europe (http://joidesresolution.org/node/3002). Many teachers also connect with each other through the ESPRIT list-serv and others (http://external.oneonta.edu/mentor/listserv.html). These are just a sample of the many programs offered to provide life-long professional development for Earth Science educators and promote 'Science in Tomorrow's Classroom.'

  2. Geochemical Evolution of the Louisville Seamount Chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderkluysen, L.; Mahoney, J. J.; Koppers, A. A.; Lonsdale, P. F.

    2007-12-01

    The Louisville seamount chain is a 4300 km long chain of submarine volcanoes in the southwestern Pacific that is commonly thought to represent a hotspot track. It spans an ~80 Myr age range, comparable to that of the Hawaiian-Emperor chain (Koppers et al., G-cubed, 5 (6), 2004). The few previously dredged igneous samples are dominantly basaltic and alkalic, and have been inferred to represent post-shield volcanism (Hawkins et al., AGU Monograph, 43, 235, 1987). Their isotope and trace element signatures suggest an unusually homogenous mantle source (Cheng et al., AGU Monograph, 43, 283, 1987). Dredging in 2006, during the AMAT02RR cruise of the R.V. Revelle, was carried out in the hope of recovering both shield and post-shield samples and of exploring the geochemical evolution of the chain. Igneous rocks were recovered from 33 stations on 23 seamounts covering some 47 Myr of the chain's history. Our study, focusing on the major and trace element and Sr, Nd and Pb isotopic characteristics of these samples, shows that all are alkalic basalts, basanites and tephrites containing normative nepheline. Variations in major and trace elements appear to be controlled predominantly by variable extents of melting and fractional crystallization, with little influence from mantle source heterogeneity. Indeed, age-corrected isotopic values define only a narrow range, in agreement with long-term source homogeneity relative to the scale of melting; e.g., ɛNd varies from +4.1 to +5.7, 206Pb/204Pb from 19.048 to 19.281, and 87Sr/86Sr from 0.70362 to 0.70398. These values broadly fall within the fields of the proposed "C" or "FOZO" mantle end-members. However, small variations are present, with less radiogenic Nd and Pb isotope ratios at the older, western end of the chain, defining a trend toward a broadly EM2-like composition. Although some workers have postulated that the Louisville hotspot was the source of the ~120 Myr Ontong Java Plateau, our samples are isotopically distinct

  3. Hollow Nodules Gas Escape Sedimentary Structures in Lacustrine Deposits on Earth and Gale Crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaccorsi, R.; Willson, D.; Fairen, A. G.; Baker, L.; McKay, C.; Zent, A.; Mahaffy, P. R.

    2015-12-01

    ] Grotzinger J.P. et al. (2014), Science 343, 124277. [2] Stack et al. (2014) JGR,Planets 119343. [4] Bonaccorsi R. et al. (2012) AGU Fall Meeting, Abstract #P11B-1839. [5] Bonaccorsi, R. et al. (2014) AGU Fall Meeting, Paper #EP53A-3632. [6] McLennan, S.M. et al. (2014) Science 343, 1244734. [7] Ming D.W. et al. (2014) Science, 343, 1245267.

  4. Girls InSpace project: A new space physics outreach initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe Pacini, A.; Tegbaru, D.; Max, A., Sr.

    2017-12-01

    Sciences. The AGU has since challenged the scientific community to act and support gender balance initiatives as crucial path to progress. This project aligns well with AGU's mission and similar-thinking organizations, and aims to educate and promote development of young girls in underrepresented communities.

  5. Multi-Scale Particle Size Distributions of Mars, Moon and Itokawa based on a time-maturation dependent fragmentation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charalambous, C. A.; Pike, W. T.

    2013-12-01

    ." Geophysical Research Letters 38.24 (2011). C. A. Charalambous and W. T. Pike (2013). 'Evolution of Particle Size Distributions in Fragmentation Over Time' Abstract Submitted to the AGU 46th Fall Meeting. Charalambous, C., Pike, W. T., Goetz, W., Hecht, M. H., & Staufer, U. (2011, December). 'A Digital Martian Soil based on In-Situ Data.' In AGU Fall Meeting Abstracts (Vol. 1, p. 1669). Golombek, M., & Rapp, D. (1997). 'Size-frequency distributions of rocks on Mars and Earth analog sites: Implications for future landed missions.' Journal of Geophysical Research, 102(E2), 4117-4129. Golombek, M., Huertas, A., Kipp, D., & Calef, F. (2012). 'Detection and characterization of rocks and rock size-frequency distributions at the final four Mars Science Laboratory landing sites.' Mars, 7, 1-22.

  6. Looking Backward and Forward: A Decadal View of Volcanology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, J. H.

    2010-12-01

    In many scientific fields, decades are the time intervals of choice for retrospective and prospective reflections and speculations. AGU Session V02 seeks to apply this perspective to the assessment of where volcanology has been since 2000 and where it is headed in the next ten years. Most sciences progress through incremental observational, experimental and theoretical steps, accelerated by the identification of new socially-relevant applications, technological breakthroughs or conceptual insights, and jolted by largely unanticipated events. Volcanology is unusual in the dominant role that unpredictable eruptive observations play in controlling the evolution of the discipline. As a result, the most important constraints on how the field will change are virtually unknowable. At a session at the Fall AGU meeting in 2000 on "Volcanology 2010" a dozen talks sought to forecast how volcano science and policy would change in the next ten years, focusing on such topics as seismology, petrology, remote sensing, deformation, volcano-tectonic interactions, communications, graduate education, international cooperation, numerical modeling, database querying, and networking of observatories. While progress occurred in many of these areas, what was perhaps the most important influence on volcanology was not mentioned: for the first 9.5 years of the decade, there were no eruptions disastrous or novel enough to garner global public or political attention, with associated prioritization by funding agencies. The notable exception was the eruption of Eyjafjallajökull in mid-2010, which captured the western world’s attention due to the magnitude of the disruption, the frustrating inability of scientists to provide guidance, and the fortunate lack of casualties. We can expect continuing technical advances in all aspects of geoscience to improve the understanding of volcanic processes in the coming decade. However, another natural disaster in 2010 might hold more relevance for how

  7. Sustainable Seas Student Intertidal Monitoring Project, Duxbury Reef, Bolinas, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soave, K.; Dean, A.; Prescutti, K.; Ball, O.; Chang, E.; Darakananda, K.; Jessup, K.; Poutian, J.; Schwalbe, H.; Storm, E.

    2008-12-01

    include intertidal abiotic factors to enhance insights into the workings of the Duxbury Reef ecosystem. Kathy Soave The Branson School 39 Fernhill Rd. Ross, CA 94957 (415) 454-3612 x 323 Amy Dean Farallones Marine Sanctuary Association, PO Box 29386 San Francisco, CA 94129, 415-561-6625 x 303 AGU Sponsor, Ines Cifuentes, AGU membership number 10189667

  8. Estimation and Simulation of Inter-station Green's Functions in the Beppu-Bay Area, Oita Prefecture, Southwest Japan: the Effect of Sedimentary Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashida, T.; Yoshimi, M.; Komatsu, M.; Takenaka, H.

    2017-12-01

    Continuous long-term observations of ambient noise (microseisms) were performed from August 2014 to February 2017 in the Beppu-Bay area, Oita prefecture, to investigate S-wave velocity structure of deep sedimentary basin (Hayashida et al., 2015SSJ; Yoshimi and Hayashida, 2017WCEE). The observation array consists of 12 broadband stations with an average spacing of 12 km. We applied the seismic interferometry technique to the ambient noise data and derived nine-component ambient noise cross-correlation functions (Z-R, Z-T, Z-Z, R-R, R-T, R-Z, T-R, T-T, and T-Z components) between 66 pairs of stations (distance of 6.4 km to 65.2 km). We assumed the stacked cross-correlation functions as "observed Green's functions" between two stations and estimated group velocities of Rayleigh and Love waves in the frequency between 0.2 and 0.5 Hz (Hayashida et al., 2017AGU-JpGU). Theoretical Green's functions for all stations pairs were also calculated using the finite difference method (HOT-FDM, Nakamura et al., 2012BSSA), with an existing three-dimensional basin structure model (J-SHIS V2) with land and seafloor topography and a seawater layer (Okunaka et al., 2016JpGU) and a newly constructed basin structure model of the target area (Yoshimi et al., 2017AGU). The comparisons between observed and simulated Green's functions generally show good agreements in the frequency range between 0.2 and 0.5 Hz. On the other hand, both observed and simulated Green's functions for some station pairs whose traverse lines run across the deeper part of the sedimentary basin (> 2000 m) show prominent later phases that might be generated and propagated inside the basin. This indicates that the understanding of the phase generation and propagation processes can be a key factor to validate the basin structure model and we investigated the characteristics of the later phases, such as its particle motions and arrival times, using observed and simulated Green's functions in detail. Acknowledgements

  9. Emissions of Volatile Organic Compounds from Oil and Gas Operations in Northeastern Oklahoma - Wintertime Ambient Air Studies from Three Consecutive Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, B.

    2017-12-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are emitted into the atmosphere from a variety of sources including oil and gas (O&G) operations, vehicle exhausts, industrial processes, and biogenic sources. Understanding of emission sources and their air quality impact is crucial for effective environmental policymaking and its implementation. Three consecutive wintertime campaigns to study ambient air were conducted in Northeastern Oklahoma during February-March of 2015, 2016, and 2017. The goals of these campaigns were to study ambient VOCs in the region, estimate their air quality impact, and understand how the impact changes over a span of three years. This presentation highlights results from the 2017 campaign. In-situ measurements of methane, ethane, and CO were conducted by an Aerodyne Dual QCL Analyzer while ozone and NOx were measured using Teledyne monitors. In addition, 392 whole air samples were collected and non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) in the samples were analyzed using GC-MS (Agilent). High levels of methane (> 8 ppm) were observed during the study. Correlation with ethane indicated that methane primarily originated from O&G operations with little biogenic contributions. Among NMHCs, C2-C5 alkanes were the most dominant with mean mixing ratios ranging from 0.9 to 6.8 ppb. Chemical tracers (propane, ethyne, CO) and isomeric ratios (iC5/nC5, Figure 1) identified oil and gas activity as the primary source of NMHCs. Photochemical age was calculated to estimate emission source composition. Ozone showed strong diurnal variation characteristic of photochemical production with a maximum mixing ratio of 58 ppb. The results from the 2017 study will be compared with results from studies in 20151 and 20162 and their significance on local air quality will be discussed. References Ghosh, B.; Volatile Organic Compound Emissions from Oil and Gas Production Sources: A Pilot Study in Northeastern Oklahoma; Poster presentation at AGU Fall Meeting; 2015; A11M-0249; (Link) Ghosh

  10. Sustainable Outreach: Lessons Learned from Space Update and Discovery Dome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiff, P. H.; Sumners, C.; Law, C. C.

    2009-12-01

    A sustainable program lives on past its initial funding cycle, and develops a network of users that ensures continued life, either by fees, advertising revenue, or by making the program more successful in later sponsored grants. Teachers like free things, so having a sponsor for products such as lithographs or CD-Roms is key to wide distribution. In 1994 we developed “Space Update®”, under the NASA “Public Use of the Internet” program. It has new editions annually, with over 40,000 distributed so far (many purchased but most free at teacher and student workshops). In 1996 we created a special edition “Space Weather®”, which includes the space weather module from Space Update plus other resources. Initially developed with funding from the IMAGE mission, it is now sponsored by Cluster and MMS. A new edition is published annually and distributed in the “Sun-Earth Day” packet; total distribution now exceeds 180,000. “Earth Update” was created in 1999 under cooperative agreement “Museums Teaching Planet Earth”. It now has a total distribution of over 20,000. Both Earth Update and Space Update were developed to be museum kiosk software, and more than 15 museums have them on display. Over 4,000 users are active in our e-Teacher network and 577 in our museum educator network. Although these can certainly be considered successful because of their longevity and user base, we have had a far more dramatic sustainable program arise in the last six years… the “Discovery Dome®”. Invented at HMNS and developed under NASA Cooperative Agreement “Immersive Earth”, this dome was the first digital portable planetarium that also showed fulldome movies with an interactive interface (first shown to the public at the Dec 2003 AGU meeting). The Discovery Dome network (tinyurl.com/DiscDome) has spun those initial 6 NASA-funded domes into over 90 installations in 22 states and 23 countries. Creating high quality content is quite expensive and so needs

  11. Spatiotemporal distribution of interplate slip following the 2003 Tokachi-oki earthquake deduced from ocean bottom pressure gauges and onland GNSS data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Y.; Nishimura, T.; Ariyoshi, K.; Matsumoto, H.

    2017-12-01

    The 2003 Tokachi-oki earthquake (Mw 8.0) is an interplate earthquake along the Kurile trench. Its co- and post-seismic deformation has been observed by onland GNSS [e.g., Miyazaki et al. 2004] and modeled with afterslip and/or viscoelastic relaxation [e.g., Itoh and Nishimura 2016]. In the offshore region, two ocean bottom pressure gauges (OBPs) are operated by JAMSTEC since July 1999 [Hirata et al. 2002] and they have continuously observed the pre-, co- and post-seismic pressure change of the 2003 event [Baba et al. 2006]. The observed pressure change can be interpreted as vertical displacement, and the resolution of slip beneath the seafloor far from the land was improved by incorporating these pressure data into onland GNSS data [Baba et al. 2006]. However, no previous studies used postseismic pressure data for several years to estimate an interplate slip. Because, in this region, an M8 class event similar to the 2003 event has occurred in 1952, it is important to clarify a healing process of an interplate coupling which may lead to a next M8 class event in terms of the earthquake cycle. Itoh and Nishimura [2017, JpGU-AGU Joint Meeting] estimated it but used only onland GNSS data. In this study, we use both onland GNSS and OBP data. For OBP data analysis, we first removed the tidal component using BAYTAP08 [Tamura et al. 1991; Tamura and Agnew 2008]. Next, we corrected the temporal fluctuation of data correlating with temperature [Baba et al. 2006]. We estimated the linear trend before the 2003 event using the corrected time series from 2002 Jan. 1 to 2003 Sep. 1 and remove the estimated trend from the data after the 2003 event. Here, we assumed a non-linear drift could be ignored. Finally, we down-sampled the remained time series with an interval of 1 month. For the onland GNSS data, we used the same data set of Itoh and Nishimura [2017, JpGU-AGU Joint Meeting]. We constructed the model consisting of coseismic slip of the 2003 and M6-7 events in the postseismic

  12. Persistent Identifiers, Discoverability and Open Science (Communication)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Fiona; Lehnert, Kerstin; Hanson, Brooks

    2016-04-01

    Early in 2016, the American Geophysical Union announced it was incorporating ORCIDs into its submission workflows. This was accompanied by a strong statement supporting the use of other persistent identifiers - such as IGSNs, and the CrossRef open registry 'funding data'. This was partly in response to funders' desire to track and manage their outputs. However the more compelling argument, and the reason why the AGU has also signed up to the Center for Open Science's Transparency and Openness Promotion (TOP) Guidelines (http://cos.io/top), is that ultimately science and scientists will be the richer for these initiatives due to increased opportunities for interoperability, reproduceability and accreditation. The AGU has appealed to the wider community to engage with these initiatives, recognising that - unlike the introduction of Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs) for articles by CrossRef - full, enriched use of persistent identifiers throughout the scientific process requires buy-in from a range of scholarly communications stakeholders. At the same time, across the general research landscape, initiatives such as Project CRediT (contributor roles taxonomy), Publons (reviewer acknowledgements) and the forthcoming CrossRef DOI Event Tracker are contributing to our understanding and accreditation of contributions and impact. More specifically for earth science and scientists, the cross-functional Coalition for Publishing Data in the Earth and Space Sciences (COPDESS) was formed in October 2014 and is working to 'provide an organizational framework for Earth and space science publishers and data facilities to jointly implement and promote common policies and procedures for the publication and citation of data across Earth Science journals'. Clearly, the judicious integration of standards, registries and persistent identifiers such as ORCIDs and International Geo Sample Numbers (IGSNs) to the research and research output processes is key to the success of this venture

  13. Standing at the Shore of the Atmospheric Radiation Study and Climate Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, T.

    2017-12-01

    I thank AGU for selecting me as an AGU fellow. I feel very honored. Taking this opportunity let me talk about my small adventure on the river of science; sometimes slow and sometimes dramatic. My story starts in early 1980s when I analyzed the data of aerosol phase function measured by a polar nephelometer in the laboratory of Prof. M. Tanaka, my thesis adviser, and got a large imaginary part of the aerosol refractive index more than 0.01. Although this large value was not a common knowledge at that time, Oleg Dubovik showed after 20 years by his advanced AERONET data analysis that such a large absorption index is ubiquitous globally caused by black carbon. I feel happy that I contributed to developing the skyradiometer technology, in the early phase of AERONET and later for SKYNET, and a series of radiative transfer algorithms such as the matrix method of the coupled atmosphere-ocean system, a symmetric matrix representation of the DOM method, and TMS/IMS formulae with truncated phase functions for rapid radiance computation, which became the basis of the STAR radiation library. This story was followed in 1990s, after my stay at the laboratory of Michael King, NASA GSFC, by development of satellite retrieval algorithms of cloud and aerosol microphysical parameters, i.e. cloud optical thickness (COT) and effective particle radius (RE), and aerosol optical thickness (AOT) and a particle size index called Ångström Exponent (AE). We showed the product of AOT and AE is a good proxy of the column aerosol number and can be used to quantify the strength of aerosol-cloud interaction. It was a quite impressive to see, later in 2000s, these findings were successfully simulated by the aerosol transport models including SPRINTARS developed in our laboratory. Those studies indicated that a cloud lifetime effect of aerosols makes the column cloud water insensitive to the aerosol loading as compared to a slightly negative correlation in the Twomey effect case. Also another

  14. GES DISC Datalist Improves Earth Science Data Discoverability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, A.; Teng, W.; Hegde, M.; Petrenko, M.; Shen, S.; Shie, C.; Liu, Z.; Hearty, T.; Bryant, K.; Vollmer, B.; hide

    2017-01-01

    At American Geophysical Union(AGU) 2016 Fall Meeting, Goddard Earth Sciences Data Information Services Center (GES DISC) unveiled a novel way to access data: Datalist. Currently, datalist is a collection of predefined data variables from one or more archived datasets, curated by our subject matter expert (SME). Our science support team has curated a predefined Hurricane Datalist and received very positive feedback from the user community. Datalist uses the same architecture our new website uses and have the same look and feel as other datasets on our web site. and also provides a one-stop shopping for data, metadata, citation, documentation, visualization and other available services. Since the last AGU Meeting, we have further developed a few new datalists corresponding to the Big Earth Data Initiative (BEDI) Societal Benefit Areas and A-Train data. We now have four datalists: Hurricane, Wind Energy, Greenhouse Gas and A-Train. We have also started working with our User Working Group members to create their favorite datalists and working with other DAAC to explore the possibility to include their products in our datalists that may also lead to a future of potential federated (cross-DAAC) datalists. Since our datalist prototype effort was a success, we are planning to make datalist operational. It's extremely important to have a common metadata model to support datalist, this will also be the foundation of federated datalist. We mapped our datalist metadata model to the unpublished UMM(Universal Metadata Model)-Var (Variable) (June version) and found that the UMM-var together with UMM-C (Collection) and possible UMM-S (Service) will meet our basic requirements. For example: Dataset shortname, and version are already specified in UMM-C, variable name, long name, units, dimensions are all specified in UMM-Var. UMM-Var also facilitates Science Keywords to allow tagging at variable level and Characteristics for optional variable characteristics. Measurements is useful

  15. Geoethics: what can we learn from existing bio-, ecological, and engineering ethics codes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieffer, Susan W.; Palka, John

    2014-05-01

    Many scientific disciplines are concerned about ethics, and codes of ethics for these professions exist, generally through the professional scientific societies such as the American Geophysical Union (AGU), American Geological Institute (AGI), American Association of Petroleum Engineers (AAPE), National Society of Professional Engineers (NSPE), Ecological Society of America (ESA), and many others worldwide. These vary considerably in depth and specificity. In this poster, we review existing codes with the goal of extracting fundamentals that should/can be broadly applied to all geo-disciplines. Most of these codes elucidate a set of principles that cover practical issues such as avoiding conflict of interest, avoiding plagiarism, not permitting illegitimate use of intellectual products, enhancing the prestige of the profession, acknowledging an obligation to perform services only in areas of competence, issuing public statements only in an objective manner, holding paramount the welfare of the public, and in general conducting oneself honorably, responsibly, and lawfully. It is striking that, given that the work of these societies and their members is relevant to the future of the earth, few discuss in any detail ethical obligations regarding our relation to the planet itself. The AGU code, for example, only states that "Members have an ethical obligation to weigh the societal benefits of their research against the costs and risks to human and animal welfare and impacts on the environment and society." The NSPE and AGI codes go somewhat further: "Engineers are encouraged to adhere to the principles of sustainable development in order to protect the environment for future generations," and "Geoscientists should strive to protect our natural environment. They should understand and anticipate the environmental consequences of their work and should disclose the consequences of recommended actions. They should acknowledge that resource extraction and use are necessary

  16. Talking Climate: Why Facts are Not Enough

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayhoe, K.

    2014-12-01

    The challenge posed by human-induced climate change to society and the natural environment has been established by thousands of peer-reviewed studies, many of which have appeared in AGU journals and have been presented at AGU meetings such as this one. This literature has in turn been carefully and methodically summarized by decades' worth of exhaustive reports by Royal Societies, National Academies, federal agencies, and the IPCC, many of which clearly document the solid science, the emerging consequences, and the future risks of climate change at the global, national, and even regional scale. In the U.S., the most recent Third National Climate Assessment vividly illustrates how warming temperatures, shifting precipitation patterns, rising sea levels, and increasing risk of weather extremes are already affecting agriculture, infrastructure, human health, natural resources, and water supplies. In many sectors, the risk of severe and even potentially dangerous impacts increases with higher levels of carbon emissions and global warming. As the scientific evidence builds, however, public and political opinion in the U.S.—as well as in other developed nations including Australia, the U.K., and Canada—remains sharply divided. Social science has established that this divergence in opinions on global warming tends to run along ideological, socio-economic, religious, and even racial lines. Polling has also shown how public polarization on climate change has increased, rather than decreased, over time. Understanding the reasons that have created and fed this polarization is crucial to the success of outreach efforts that attempt to bridge this divide. The main reason for this divergence is not a deficit of information or knowledge among the public. Instead, there are a plethora of causes that can be variously categorized as psychological, societal, political, and economic. The diversity of these barriers helps explain why no single message or campaign has been able to

  17. “Dios nos mejore las horas si nos conviene”: La salud y la enfermedad de una familia montañesa del siglo XIX a través del estudio de las escrituras del yo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubalcaba Pérez, Carmen

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available From birth in the seventies of the twentieth century of the so-called Anthropology of Health and Disease, the recognition of health and disease as cultural phenomena was introduced and anthropologists began to deepen in understanding how to develop the concepts of healthy and sick. The social history of literacy through the study of written records of the past, constitutes an irreplaceable resource for analyzing the social and cultural dimensions of disease process in its historical dimension. Through the analysis of private handwritten documents —personal correspondence and records in accounting books— of a small wealthy landowner, Pedro Jado Agüero (1815-1891, we know how the disease is not just a biological dysfunction, but also an array of culturally established meanings that we must try to unravel. Discovering the symbolism of the disease through the analysis of all the experiences, words and feelings used or described by members of a culture means to move further to the knowledge of the structure of meanings of the same culture.

    A partir del nacimiento, en los años setenta del siglo XX, de la denominada antropología de la salud y la enfermedad, se inició el reconocimiento de ambos estados como fenómenos culturales y los antropólogos comenzaron a sumergirse en la comprensión de la manera en que se elaboran los conceptos de sano y enfermo. La historia social de la cultura escrita, a través del estudio de los testimonios escritos del pasado, se constituye en un recurso insustituible para analizar las dimensiones sociales y culturales del proceso de enfermar en su dimensión histórica. A través del análisis de la documentación autógrafa de carácter privado —correspondencia y anotaciones personales en libros de cuentas— de un pequeño propietario rural acomodado, Pedro Jado Agüero (1815- 1891, se muestra cómo la enfermedad no consiste sólo en una disfunción biológica, sino también en una matriz de

  18. GES DISC Datalist Improves Earth Science Data Discoverbility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, A.; Teng, W. L.; Hegde, M.; Petrenko, M.; Shen, S.; Shie, C. L.; Liu, Z.; Hearty, T.; Bryant, K.; Vollmer, B.; Meyer, D. J.

    2017-12-01

    At American Geophysical Union(AGU) 2016 Fall Meeting, Goddard Earth Sciences Data Information Services Center (GES DISC) unveiled a novel way to access data: Datalist. Currently, datalist is a collection of predefined data variables from one or more archived datasets, curated by our subject matter expert (SME). Our science support team has curated a predefined Hurricane Datalist and received very positive feedback from the user community. Datalist uses the same architecture our new website uses and have the same look and feel as other datasets on our web site. and also provides a one-stop shopping for data, metadata, citation, documentation, visualization and other available services. Since the last AGU Meeting, we have further developed a few new datalists corresponding to the Big Earth Data Initiative (BEDI) Societal Benefit Areas and A-Train data. We now have four datalists: Hurricane, Wind Energy, Greenhouse Gas and A-Train. We have also started working with our User Working Group members to create their favorite datalists and working with other DAAC to explore the possibility to include their products in our datalists that may also lead to a future of potential federated (cross-DAAC) datalists. Since our datalist prototype effort was a success, we are planning to make datalist operational. It's extremely important to have a common metadata model to support datalist, this will also be the foundation of federated datalist. We mapped our datalist metadata model to the unpublished UMM(Universal Metadata Model)-Var (Variable) (June version) and found that the UMM-var together with UMM-C (Collection) and possible UMM-S (Service) will meet our basic requirements. For example: Dataset shortname, and version are already specified in UMM-C, variable name, long name, units, dimensions are all specified in UMM-Var. UMM-Var also facilitates ScienceKeywords to allow tagging at variable level and Characteristics for optional variable characteristics. Measurements is useful

  19. An Application of the Geo-Semantic Micro-services in Seamless Data-Model Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, P.; Elag, M.; Kumar, P.; Liu, R.; Hu, Y.; Marini, L.; Peckham, S. D.; Hsu, L.

    2016-12-01

    We are applying machine learning (ML) techniques to continuous acoustic emission (AE) data from laboratory earthquake experiments. Our goal is to apply explicit ML methods to this acoustic datathe AE in order to infer frictional properties of a laboratory fault. The experiment is a double direct shear apparatus comprised of fault blocks surrounding fault gouge comprised of glass beads or quartz powder. Fault characteristics are recorded, including shear stress, applied load (bulk friction = shear stress/normal load) and shear velocity. The raw acoustic signal is continuously recorded. We rely on explicit decision tree approaches (Random Forest and Gradient Boosted Trees) that allow us to identify important features linked to the fault friction. A training procedure that employs both the AE and the recorded shear stress from the experiment is first conducted. Then, testing takes place on data the algorithm has never seen before, using only the continuous AE signal. We find that these methods provide rich information regarding frictional processes during slip (Rouet-Leduc et al., 2017a; Hulbert et al., 2017). In addition, similar machine learning approaches predict failure times, as well as slip magnitudes in some cases. We find that these methods work for both stick slip and slow slip experiments, for periodic slip and for aperiodic slip. We also derive a fundamental relationship between the AE and the friction describing the frictional behavior of any earthquake slip cycle in a given experiment (Rouet-Leduc et al., 2017b). Our goal is to ultimately scale these approaches to Earth geophysical data to probe fault friction. References Rouet-Leduc, B., C. Hulbert, N. Lubbers, K. Barros, C. Humphreys and P. A. Johnson, Machine learning predicts laboratory earthquakes, in review (2017). https://arxiv.org/abs/1702.05774Rouet-LeDuc, B. et al., Friction Laws Derived From the Acoustic Emissions of a Laboratory Fault by Machine Learning (2017), AGU Fall Meeting Session S025

  20. Calibration of the seismic velocity structure and understanding of the fault formation in the environs of the Orkney M5.5 earthquake, South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogasawara, H.; Manzi, M. S.; Durrheim, R. J.; Ogasawara, H.

    2017-12-01

    In August 2014, the largest seismic event (M5.5) to occur in a South African gold mining district took place near Orkney. The M5.5 event and aftershocks were recorded by strainmeters installed at 3 km depth hundreds of meters above the M5.5 fault, 46 in-mine 4.5Hz triaxial geophone stations at depths of 2-3 km within a hypocentral radius of 2-3 km, and 17 surface strong motion stations (South African Seismograph Network; SANSN) within an epicentral radius of 25 km. Aftershocks were distributed on a nearly vertical plane striking NNW-SSE. The upper edge of this fault was hundreds of meters below the deepest level of the mine. ICDP approved a project "Drilling into seismogenic zones of M2.0-5.5 earthquakes in South African gold mines" to elucidate the details of the events (DSeis; Yabe et al. invited talk in S020 in this AGU). On 1 August 2017 drilling was within a few hundreds of meters of intersecting the M5.5 fault zone. To locate the drilling target accurately it is very important to determine the velocity structure between the seismic events and sensors. We do this by using the interval velocities used to migrate 3D-reflection seismic data that was previously acquired by a mining company to image the gold-bearing reef and any fault structures close to the mining horizon. Less attention was given to the velocities below the mining horizon, as accurate imaging of the geological structure was not as important and very little drilling information was available. We used the known depths of prominent reflectors above the mining horizon to derive the interval velocities needed to convert two-way-travel-time to depth. We constrain the velocity below the mining horizon by comparing the DSeis drilling results with the 3D seismic cube. The geometric data is crucial for the kinematic modeling that Ogasawara et al. (S018 in this AGU) advocates. The efforts will result in a better understanding of the main rupture and aftershocks.

  1. "EARTH: The Operators' Manual" - a hybrid model (TV+online+in-person) to effectively communicate climate change science alongside sustainable energy solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines-stiles, G.; Alley, R. B.; Akuginow, E.

    2011-12-01

    Recent public opinion surveys have found that Americans underestimate the degree of agreement by climate scientists about global warming and climate change, and - despite growing evidence of ice sheet loss, ocean acidification, sea level rise and extreme weather events - believe less in warming trends in 2011 than they did earlier. The issue has become politicized and controversial. "EARTH: The Operators' Manual" is an informal science education project supported by NSF, the National Science Foundation. Its ambitious goal is to use a hybrid mix of broadcast programs appearing on public television and hosted by Penn State geoscientist, Richard Alley, together with on-site outreach events and online resources and tools, to present core climate science in engaging ways, and to combine that presentation of objective research with an overview of sustainable energy solutions. The project's content and communication strategies have been shaped in response to analyses of public opinion such as the SIX AMERICAS study and aim to address common "skeptic" arguments and share essential climate science. Social science research has also found that audiences seem more open to scientific information where the possibility of a positive response is also offered. The first hour-long PBS program aired nationally in April 2011, has since been re-broadcast, and is also available online. Two more programs will air in 2012, and the presentation at the Fall AGU Conference will preview segments from both programs. Five regionally-diverse science centers (in San Diego, Raleigh NC, St. Paul MN, Fort Worth TX and Portland OR) have hosted outreach events, with Richard Alley and other project participants, and will continue with additional activities through summer 2012. The project's website includes video clips, case studies of energy-saving initiatives world-wide and across the USA, plus an interactive "Energy Gauge" inviting users to assess their current Home, Travel, Food, and Goods and

  2. Machine Learning of Fault Friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, P. A.; Rouet-Leduc, B.; Hulbert, C.; Marone, C.; Guyer, R. A.

    2017-12-01

    We are applying machine learning (ML) techniques to continuous acoustic emission (AE) data from laboratory earthquake experiments. Our goal is to apply explicit ML methods to this acoustic datathe AE in order to infer frictional properties of a laboratory fault. The experiment is a double direct shear apparatus comprised of fault blocks surrounding fault gouge comprised of glass beads or quartz powder. Fault characteristics are recorded, including shear stress, applied load (bulk friction = shear stress/normal load) and shear velocity. The raw acoustic signal is continuously recorded. We rely on explicit decision tree approaches (Random Forest and Gradient Boosted Trees) that allow us to identify important features linked to the fault friction. A training procedure that employs both the AE and the recorded shear stress from the experiment is first conducted. Then, testing takes place on data the algorithm has never seen before, using only the continuous AE signal. We find that these methods provide rich information regarding frictional processes during slip (Rouet-Leduc et al., 2017a; Hulbert et al., 2017). In addition, similar machine learning approaches predict failure times, as well as slip magnitudes in some cases. We find that these methods work for both stick slip and slow slip experiments, for periodic slip and for aperiodic slip. We also derive a fundamental relationship between the AE and the friction describing the frictional behavior of any earthquake slip cycle in a given experiment (Rouet-Leduc et al., 2017b). Our goal is to ultimately scale these approaches to Earth geophysical data to probe fault friction. References Rouet-Leduc, B., C. Hulbert, N. Lubbers, K. Barros, C. Humphreys and P. A. Johnson, Machine learning predicts laboratory earthquakes, in review (2017). https://arxiv.org/abs/1702.05774Rouet-LeDuc, B. et al., Friction Laws Derived From the Acoustic Emissions of a Laboratory Fault by Machine Learning (2017), AGU Fall Meeting Session S025

  3. The Hydrologic Ensemble Prediction Experiment (HEPEX)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Andy; Wetterhall, Fredrik; Ramos, Maria-Helena

    2015-04-01

    The Hydrologic Ensemble Prediction Experiment was established in March, 2004, at a workshop hosted by the European Center for Medium Range Weather Forecasting (ECMWF), and co-sponsored by the US National Weather Service (NWS) and the European Commission (EC). The HEPEX goal was to bring the international hydrological and meteorological communities together to advance the understanding and adoption of hydrological ensemble forecasts for decision support. HEPEX pursues this goal through research efforts and practical implementations involving six core elements of a hydrologic ensemble prediction enterprise: input and pre-processing, ensemble techniques, data assimilation, post-processing, verification, and communication and use in decision making. HEPEX has grown through meetings that connect the user, forecast producer and research communities to exchange ideas, data and methods; the coordination of experiments to address specific challenges; and the formation of testbeds to facilitate shared experimentation. In the last decade, HEPEX has organized over a dozen international workshops, as well as sessions at scientific meetings (including AMS, AGU and EGU) and special issues of scientific journals where workshop results have been published. Through these interactions and an active online blog (www.hepex.org), HEPEX has built a strong and active community of nearly 400 researchers & practitioners around the world. This poster presents an overview of recent and planned HEPEX activities, highlighting case studies that exemplify the focus and objectives of HEPEX.

  4. Electron Heat Flux in Pressure Balance Structures at Ulysses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, Yohei; Suess, Steven T.; Sakurai, Takashi; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Pressure balance structures (PBSs) are a common feature in the high-latitude solar wind near solar minimum. Rom previous studies, PBSs are believed to be remnants of coronal plumes and be related to network activity such as magnetic reconnection in the photosphere. We investigated the magnetic structures of the PBSs, applying a minimum variance analysis to Ulysses/Magnetometer data. At 2001 AGU Spring meeting, we reported that PBSs have structures like current sheets or plasmoids, and suggested that they are associated with network activity at the base of polar plumes. In this paper, we have analyzed high-energy electron data at Ulysses/SWOOPS to see whether bi-directional electron flow exists and confirm the conclusions more precisely. As a result, although most events show a typical flux directed away from the Sun, we have obtained evidence that some PBSs show bi-directional electron flux and others show an isotropic distribution of electron pitch angles. The evidence shows that plasmoids are flowing away from the Sun, changing their flow direction dynamically in a way not caused by Alfven waves. From this, we have concluded that PBSs are generated due to network activity at the base of polar plumes and their magnetic structures axe current sheets or plasmoids.

  5. Inovação requer um processo criativo dinâmico e entusiasmo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Mendes Silva Filho

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Imaginar é uma das características do ser humano e essa característica é ilimitada. A imaginação é um combustível essencial à criatividade e inovação. Junto com a imaginação, três D’s que compreendem dados, desejo e determinação têm papel crucial para ocorrência de um momento criativo e produção de soluções e inovação. Mas, isso é peculiar a todo ser humano? Sim. Todo ser humano é criativo. Essa capacidade pode ser estimulada ou desestimulada e decorre, em parte, da liberdade que você tem (no âmbito corporativo, profissional ou pessoal de explorar e de responder às curiosidades. Portanto, curiosidade aguçada é um ‘plus’. Não há exemplo melhor de liberdade e ser criativo que uma criança. Nesse sentido, este artigo explora características humanas que podem fomentar ou afugentar as oportunidade do ser humano explorar sua capacidade de imaginar, de criar e de inovar

  6. Gastronomia na Tela: As Representações da Comida no Cinema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Roberto Yasoshima

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A história da gastronomia se funde com a própria história do homem pois, a comida está presente em sua vida desde o seu nascimento até sua morte. Representada na pintura, na escultura, na fotografia, a comida tem despertado também o interesse da sétima arte que, se não é capaz de sensibilizar o nosso paladar através da imagem, aguça o nosso apetite e nosso desejo. Com uma produção crescente nas últimas três décadas, os filmes gastronômicos tem abordado a comida ou como metáfora, ou como metonímia, assim como as relações e emoções do ato de cozinhar, com representações de chefes de cozinha, de pratos cuidadosamente elaborados, de técnicas de cozinha, de defesa do patrimônio gastronômico e, até, das patologias relacionadas. Através de uma metodologia de pesquisa documental de fontes não escrita foi feita uma análise dos filmes gastronômicos procurando as suas principais características relacionadas com a gastronomia. Destarte, os chamados filmes gastronômicos ou food films abrem um novo campo de interesse para estudos e pesquisas. 

  7. Al Gore attends Fall Meeting session on Earth observing satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    2011-12-01

    Former U.S. vice president Al Gore, making unscheduled remarks at an AGU Fall Meeting session, said, "The reason you see so many pictures" of the Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR) satellite at this session is "that it already has been built." However, "because one of its primary missions was to help document global warming, it was canceled. So for those who are interested in struggling against political influence," Gore said, "the benefits have been documented well here." Gore made his comments after the third oral presentation at the 8 December session entitled "Earth Observations From the L1 (Lagrangian Point No. 1)," which focused on the capabilities of and progress on refurbishing DSCOVR. The satellite, formerly called Triana, had been proposed by Gore in 1998 to collect climate data. Although Triana was built, it was never launched: Congress mandated that before the satellite could be sent into space the National Academies of Science needed to confirm that the science it would be doing was worthwhile. By the time the scientific validation was complete, the satellite "was no longer compatible with the space shuttle manifest," Robert C. Smith, program manager for strategic integration at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, told Eos.

  8. Including Media in Field Research and Becoming Part of the Science Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelto, M. S.

    2015-12-01

    There are two primary strategies that I have pursued over the last decade to engage the media, policy makers, and public; after two decades of typical scientific publication methods. An effective method to engage the media with our ongoing 32 year glacier field research program has been to invite media members to join us in the field. From climate videographers to traditional reporters we have had a member of the media with us in nine of the last ten field seasons; two in 2015. The resulting stories have led to several awards for the journalists and an ongoing relationship with our research program. The second part of this science research communication strategy is to have readily available material on specific topics for the media to utilize; this requires social media outreach. The primary outlet media find is the AGU Blog: From a Glacier's Perspective. This blog pubishes two articles a week on a specific glacier's response to climate change. The blog yields on average a media contact on every fourth blog post in 2015. The contacts revolve around specific local glacier information published on the blog. The goal of each blog post is to tell a story about how each glacier is impacted by climate change.

  9. The Virtual Solar Observatory: Still a Small Box

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurman, J. B.; Bogart, R. S.; Davey, A. R.; Dimitoglou, G.; Hill, F.; Hourcle, J. A.; Martens, P. C.; Surez-Sola, I.; Tian, K. Q.; Wampler, S.

    2005-01-01

    Two and a half years after a design study began, and a year and a half after development commenced, version 1.0 of the Virtual Solar Observatory (VSO) was released at the 2004 Fall AGU meeting. Although internal elements of the VSO have changed, the basic design has remained the same, reflecting the team's belief in the importance of a simple, robust mechanism for registering data provider holdings, initiating queries at the appropriate provider sites, aggregating the responses, allowing the user to iterate before making a final selection, and enabling the delivery of data directly from the providers. In order to make the VSO transparent, lightweight, and portable, the developers employed XML for the registry, SOAP for communication between a VSO instance and data services, and HTML for the graphic user interface (GUI's). We discuss the internal data model, the API, and user responses to various trial GUI's as typical design issues for any virtual observatory. We also discuss the role of the "small box" of data search, identification, and delivery services provided by the VSO in the larger, Sun-Solar System Connection virtual observatory (VxO) scheme.

  10. Disturbance Hydrology: Preparing for an Increasingly Disturbed Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirus, Benjamin B.; Ebel, Brian A.; Mohr, Christian H.; Zegre, Nicolas

    2017-12-01

    This special issue is the result of several fruitful conference sessions on disturbance hydrology, which started at the 2013 AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco and have continued every year since. The stimulating presentations and discussions surrounding those sessions have focused on understanding both the disruption of hydrologic functioning following discrete disturbances, as well as the subsequent recovery or change within the affected watershed system. Whereas some hydrologic disturbances are directly linked to anthropogenic activities, such as resource extraction, the contributions to this special issue focus primarily on those with indirect or less pronounced human involvement, such as bark-beetle infestation, wildfire, and other natural hazards. However, human activities are enhancing the severity and frequency of these seemingly natural disturbances, thereby contributing to acute hydrologic problems and hazards. Major research challenges for our increasingly disturbed planet include the lack of continuous pre and postdisturbance monitoring, hydrologic impacts that vary spatially and temporally based on environmental and hydroclimatic conditions, and the preponderance of overlapping or compounding disturbance sequences. In addition, a conceptual framework for characterizing commonalities and differences among hydrologic disturbances is still in its infancy. In this introduction to the special issue, we advance the fusion of concepts and terminology from ecology and hydrology to begin filling this gap. We briefly explore some preliminary approaches for comparing different disturbances and their hydrologic impacts, which provides a starting point for further dialogue and research progress.

  11. Science meets public service in Washington, D.C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasavada, Ashwin R.

    Same planet, different worlds—that's how many scientists see the relationship between science and government. Yet science and technology have become so infused into society that those worlds are colliding. Today, a number of national issues share a strong connection to science, from stem cells to climate change and energy to bioterrorism. For scientists who can adapt to the culture of politics, working in the collision zone can be an exciting and rewarding way to spend a year or even a career.This past year, I was one of 35 scientists in Washington serving as Congressional Science and Technology Fellows, sponsored by a number of scientific societies, including AGU. The Fellows vary widely in age and carry resumes listing Ph.D.s in not only physics, biology, and chemistry but also in Earth science, food safety, psychology, and veterinary medicine. With a group like that, weekly lunches and happy hours become the kind of broadening experience that one rarely gets in focused academic departments. And then there's the politics.

  12. Strengthening International Collaboration: Geosciences Research and Education in Developing Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fucugauchi, J. U.

    2009-05-01

    Geophysical research increasingly requires global multidisciplinary approaches and global integration. Global warming, increasing CO2 levels and increased needs of mineral and energy resources emphasize impact of human activities. The planetary view of our Earth as a deeply complex interconnected system also emphasizes the need of international scientific cooperation. International collaboration presents an immense potential and is urgently needed for further development of geosciences research and education. In analyzing international collaboration a relevant aspect is the role of scientific societies. Societies organize meetings, publish journals and books and promote cooperation through academic exchange activities and can further assist communities in developing countries providing and facilitating access to scientific literature, attendance to international meetings, short and long-term stays and student and young researcher mobility. Developing countries present additional challenges resulting from limited economic resources and social and political problems. Most countries urgently require improved educational and research programs. Needed are in-depth analyses of infrastructure and human resources and identification of major problems and needs. Questions may include what are the major limitations and needs in research and postgraduate education in developing countries? what and how should international collaboration do? and what are the roles of individuals, academic institutions, funding agencies, scientific societies? Here we attempt to examine some of these questions with reference to case examples and AGU role. We focus on current situation, size and characteristics of research community, education programs, facilities, economic support, and then move to perspectives for potential development in an international context.

  13. Maurice Ewing Medalist: Xavier Le Pichon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, John I.; Le Pichon, Xavier

    1984-04-01

    Mr. President, fellow members of the American Geophysical Union, and members of the U.S. Navy, it gives me great pleasure to present the citation for the 1984 AGU/USN Maurice Ewing Medal, to be awarded to Dr. Xavier Le Pichon.After receiving diplomas in several disciplines of geology, physics, and geophysics from the University of Strasbourg during the 1950s, Xavier came to the Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory as a visiting scientist where he put his knowledge to practice until 1968. In 1966 he received the Doctor of Sciences degree from the University of Strasbourg. Returning to France in 1968, Xavier spent the next five years at the Centre Océanologique de Bretagne in Brest where he founded the Research Group. From Brest he moved to the headquarters of CNEXO in Paris for 5 years and then to the University of Paris to found the new Laboratoire de Géodynamique. From his present position of professor at the university he will move next year to become director of the Geology Laboratory in the Ecole Normale Supérieure, one of the French Grandes Ecoles.

  14. Want change? Call your representative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischhoff, Ilya R.

    2011-07-01

    During my tenure as an AGU Congressional Science Fellow, which began in September 2010 and continues until November 2011, my time has been shared between working with the U.S. House of Representatives Natural Resource Committee Democratic staff and in the office of Rep. Ed Markey (D-Mass., ranking Democrat on the committee). I appreciate getting to work with staff, fellows, and interns who inspire me, make me laugh, and know their issues cold. Much of my work on the committee is related to fish, wildlife, oceans, lands, and water issues and is directly related to my background in ecology and evolutionary biology (I studied zebra ecology and behavior in Kenya). My assignments have included asking the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) about why it has not changed the allowed usage of certain pesticides that the National Marine Fisheries Service has found to jeopardize the recovery of endangered Pacific salmon; helping to identify research needs and management options to combat the swiftly spreading and catastrophic white nose syndrome in North American bats; and inquiring as to whether a captive-ape welfare bill, if passed without amendment, could thwart development of a vaccine to stop the Ebola virus from continuing to cause mass mortality in endangered wild apes.

  15. Observations of Magnetosphere-Ionosphere Coupling Processes in Jupiter's Downward Auroral Current Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, G. B.; Mauk, B.; Allegrini, F.; Bagenal, F.; Bolton, S. J.; Bunce, E. J.; Connerney, J. E. P.; Ebert, R. W.; Gershman, D. J.; Gladstone, R.; Haggerty, D. K.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Kotsiaros, S.; Kollmann, P.; Kurth, W. S.; Levin, S.; McComas, D. J.; Paranicas, C.; Rymer, A. M.; Saur, J.; Szalay, J. R.; Tetrick, S.; Valek, P. W.

    2017-12-01

    Our view and understanding of Jupiter's auroral regions are ever-changing as Juno continues to map out this region with every auroral pass. For example, since last year's Fall AGU and the release of publications regarding the first perijove orbit, the Juno particles and fields teams have found direct evidence of parallel potential drops in addition to the stochastic broad energy distributions associated with the downward current auroral acceleration region. In this region, which appears to exist in an altitude range of 1.5-3 Jovian radii, the potential drops can reach as high as several megavolts. Associated with these potentials are anti-planetward electron angle beams, energetic ion conics and precipitating protons, oxygen and sulfur. Sometimes the potentials within the downward current region are structured such that they look like the inverted-V type distributions typically found in Earth's upward current region. This is true for both the ion and electron energy distributions. Other times, the parallel potentials appear to be intermittent or spatially structured in a way such that they do not look like the canonical diverging electrostatic potential structure. Furthermore, the parallel potentials vary grossly in spatial/temporal scale, peak voltage and associated parallel current density. Here, we present a comprehensive study of these structures in Jupiter's downward current region focusing on energetic particle measurements from Juno-JEDI.

  16. Russian Science and Russian State: Image of a Scientist in Modern Russian Cinema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana M. Medvedeva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article analyses the image of a scientist represented in recent Russian movies. The article discusses two groups of questions: (1 nature and role of popular science in the life of society; (2 national features of scientific cultures. The article agues that popular science should not be conceived as a week copy of the real science. On the contrary, modern models of science communication assume that popular science have its own value and is able to influence scientific practices. Simultaneously we assume, that since popular science is less integrated with international scientific norms, it can easer reveal national traditions of scientific life. As a result, the analyze of recent Russian movies shows that the tradition established in Peter I times for Russian scientists to work out their self-identity in concern with Russian state still exists (scientist- state supporter/scientist- oppositionist. Actually the modern interpretation of dilemma between state patriotism and liberalism given by modern movies shows that Russian scientist don't have real choice, because they loose anyway whereas the state always wins. So owing to recent movies this representation of hopeless destiny of a scientist is becoming widespread in Russian public culture.

  17. First Impressions of a Scintrex CG-6 Portable Gravimeter in an Extensive Field Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Westrum, D.; Kanney, J.

    2017-12-01

    First Impressions of a Scintrex CG-6 Portable Gravimeter in an Extensive Field Campaign AGU Fall Meeting 2017 Derek van Westrum and Jeff Kanney NOAA's National Geodetic Survey conducted its third and final Geoid Slope Validation Survey (GSVS) this past summer in the rugged mountains of southern Colorado. In addition to leveling, long period GPS, and defelction of vertical observations, absolute gravity and vertical gravity gradients were measured at 235 bench marks (approximately 1.5 km spacing) along US-160 between Durango and Walsenburg, Colorado. In previous surveys (Texas-2011 and Iowa-2014), an A10 absolute gravimeter was used to measure graivty at approximately 10-15% of the bench marks. The remaining marks were determined by using LaCoste & Romberg relative gravimeters. The same relative instruments were also used to measure two-tier (linear) vertical gravity gradients at the A10 sites. In the current work - becuase of the rapidly changing terrain in the Rocky Mountains - it was decided to employ the A10 at all 235 bench marks, and acquire three-tier (quadratic) gradients at every bench mark using the new Scintrex CG-6 Autograv relative gravimeter. Using these results, we will provide a real worldsummary of the CG-6's behavior by examining noise levels, repeatability, and acquisition rates. In addition, the coincident A10 absolute data set allows us to evaluate the CG-6's accuracy, and allows us to simulate and discuss various relative gravity survey designs.

  18. Career Planning Workshop offers advice on landing a job

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiske, Peter S.

    As part of a continuing program on career planning and job hunting skills for geoscientists, AGU sponsored a career workshop at the Fall 1994 meeting in San Francisco. Over 100 attended the 2-hour seminar led by Peter Fiske, a post-doc at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and Al Levin, assistant director of graduate counseling and programs at Stanford University's Career Planning and Placement Center. The purpose of the seminar was to help Ph.D.s identify the transferable skills they possess and to outline the basic steps in making the often difficult transition to a new career outside of research science. According to Fiske and Levin, scientists tend to start their career change by searching for specific jobs and organizations they think might be a good match for their technical training and tend to assume that a technical position is the only good match for them. In fact, research-trained scientists possess a number of transferable skills that are valued in a wide variety of work environments, such as good communication, organizational, and team work skills, and independence.

  19. Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Held, Isaac [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Balaji, V. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Fueglistaler, Stephan [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    2016-09-19

    We have constructed and analyzed a series of idealized models of tropical convection interacting with large-scale circulations, with 25-50km resolution and with 1-2km cloud resolving resolution to set the stage for rigorous tests of convection closure schemes in high resolution global climate models. Much of the focus has been on the climatology of tropical cyclogenesis in rotating systems and the related problem of the spontaneous aggregation of convection in non-rotating systems. The PI (Held) will be delivering the honorary Bjerknes lecture at the Fall 2016 AGU meeting in December on this work. We have also provided new analyses of long-standing issues related to the interaction between convection and the large-scale circulation: Kelvin waves in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere, water vapor transport into the stratosphere, and upper tropospheric temperature trends. The results of these analyses help to improve our understanding of processes, and provide tests for future high resolution global modeling. Our final goal of testing new convections schemes in next-generation global atmospheric models at GFDL has been left for future work due to the complexity of the idealized model results meant as tests for these models uncovered in this work and to computational resource limitations. 11 papers have been published with support from this grant, 2 are in review, and another major summary paper is in preparation.

  20. Scientific papers: A new paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, George C.

    The problem of how to organize and write a scientific paper is a very basic one for most of us. A scientific paper is, after all, the only tangible product of a research scientist and, like all products, will be a failure if not marketed properly to reach its potential buyers. I think that a lack of attention to this “marketing and sales” aspect of research is a serious fault in our community, by which I mean those of us who publish in AGU journals.The potential audience for a scientific paper can be divided roughly into three distinct categories. The first group is usually rather small in number, consisting of fellow scientists working in a very closely related field, and to whom the details of the work are of major importance. The second group is also fellow scientists, but their interest is less sharply focused, and they are concerned with the broad outlines of the work and essential results. The third group is the sponsors and the people who actually pay for the work, whose interest in the details is minimal and they, sadly enough, are often concerned only with the fact that a paper has been published rather than its content.

  1. An Analysis of Gender Differences in Recent Earth and Space Science PhD Graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giesler, J.

    2001-12-01

    The American Geophysical Union (AGU) and the American Geological Institute (AGI) have been collecting data on recent PhDs in the geosciences for 5 years (1996-2000). The 1999-2000 PhD classes were combined for an increased sample size and analyzed for gender differences. Other than salary, place of employment, and job search methodology no differences were found. Females had salaries that were slightly lower than those of their male counterparts. This might be due to the fact that there are a greater number of female postdoctoral candidates 47% compared to males 40%. Place of employment tended to be similar with fewer women in industry and a higher number of recent female PhD graduates in the academic sector. Interestingly, men and women differed in the ways in which they found their first job. A higher percent of men reported they felt their advisor was helpful in their job search (52% for men and 50% for women). Women used electronic resources at a higher rate (17.3%) than men (12.1%) and 33.6% of the women felt their scientific society was helpful in their job search, compared to only 24.1% of the men.

  2. A scientist's guide to engaging decision makers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vano, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    Being trained as a scientist provides many valuable tools needed to address society's most pressing environmental issues. It does not, however, provide training on one of the most critical for translating science into action: the ability to engage decision makers. Engagement means different things to different people and what is appropriate for one project might not be for another. However, recent reports have emphasized that for research to be most useful to decision making, engagement should happen at the beginning and throughout the research process. There are an increasing number of boundary organizations (e.g., NOAA's Regional Integrated Sciences and Assessment program, U.S. Department of the Interior's Climate Science Centers) where engagement is encouraged and rewarded, and scientists are learning, often through trial and error, how to effectively include decision makers (a.k.a. stakeholders, practitioners, resource managers) in their research process. This presentation highlights best practices and practices to avoid when scientists engage decision makers, a list compiled through the personal experiences of both scientists and decision makers and a literature review, and how this collective knowledge could be shared, such as through a recent session and role-playing exercise given at the Northwest Climate Science Center's Climate Boot Camp. These ideas are presented in an effort to facilitate conversations about how the science community (e.g., AGU researchers) can become better prepared for effective collaborations with decision makers that will ultimately result in more actionable science.

  3. Viana, V.; Tagnin, S. E. O. (orgs.. Corpora no ensino de línguas estrangeiras DOI: 10.5007/2175-7968.2011v1n27p294

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leticia Rebollo Couto

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Os trabalhos agrupados neste volume exploram através do viés da Linguística de Corpus, aplicações para o ensino de línguas e de tradução, além de oferecerem subsídios teóricos e reflexões sobre essa emergente subárea dos estudos lingüísticos. Corpora no Ensino de Línguas Estrangeiras é o primeiro volume de seu gênero no mercado editorial brasileiro e inova pelo tema e por congregar pesquisadores experientes e professores de línguas que juntos oferecem ao leitor elementos para aguçar a sua curiosidade e colocar em prática, na sua sala de aula, algumas das sugestões oferecidas pelos autores. O livro, além de estabelecer mais firmemente o perfil da pesquisa e das aplicações da Linguística de Corpus no Brasil, é de interesse para professores de línguas, tradutores, lingüistas e outros profissionais da área de Letras, que certamente nele encontrarão o alicerce para o desenvolvimento de suas competências nas metodologias e aplicações desse estimulante campo do saber.

  4. Communicating the Science of Global Warming — the Role of Astronomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Jeffrey

    2018-06-01

    Global Warming is one of the most important and issues of our times, yet it is widely misunderstood among the general public (and politicians!). The American Astronomical Society has already joined many other scientific organizations in advocating for action on global warming (by supporting the AGU statement on global warming), but we as astronomers can do much more. The high public profile of astronomy gives us a unique platform — and credibility as scientists — for doing our part to educate the public about the underlying science of global warming. And while astronomers are not climate scientists, we use the same basic physics, and many aspects of global warming science come directly from astronomy, including the ways in which we measure the heat-absorbing potential of carbon dioxide and the hard evidence of greenhouse warming provided by studies of Venus. In this session, I will briefly introduce a few methods for communicating about global warming that I believe you will find effective in your own education efforts.

  5. Honors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    A number of AGU members were honored during the European Geosciences Union's (EGU) General Assembly, held on 22-27 April in Vienna. EGU Union awards were presented to the following people: Vincent Courtillot, University of Paris Diderot, France, received the 2012 Arthur Holmes Medal and EGU honorary membership for seminal contributions to geomagnetism and the geodynamics of mantle hot spots. Michael Ghil, University of California, Los Angeles, and École Normale Supérieure, France, received the 2012 Alfred Wegener Medal and EGU honorary membership for his leading contributions to theoretical climate dynamics; his innovative observational studies involving model assimilation of satellite data in meteorology, oceanography, and space physics; the breadth of his interdisciplinary studies, including macroeconomics; and his extensive supervision and mentoring of scores of graduate and postdoctoral students. Robin Clarke, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, received the 2012 Alexander von Humboldt Medal for fundamental contributions in statistical analysis and modeling of hydrological processes. Angioletta Coradini, Istituto Nazionale di Astrofsica, Italy, received the 2012 Jean Dominique Cassini Medal and EGU honorary membership in recognition of her important and wide range of work in planetary sciences and solar system formation and for her leading role in the development of space infrared instrumentation for planetary exploration.

  6. A new, accurate, global hydrography data for remote sensing and modelling of river hydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, D.

    2017-12-01

    A high-resolution hydrography data is an important baseline data for remote sensing and modelling of river hydrodynamics, given the spatial scale of river network is much smaller than that of land hydrology or atmosphere/ocean circulations. For about 10 years, HydroSHEDS, developed based on the SRTM3 DEM, has been the only available global-scale hydrography data. However, the data availability at the time of HydroSHEDS development limited the quality of the represented river networks. Here, we developed a new global hydrography data using latest geodata such as the multi-error-removed elevation data (MERIT DEM), Landsat-based global water body data (GSWO & G3WBM), cloud-sourced open geography database (OpenStreetMap). The new hydrography data covers the entire globe (including boreal regions above 60N), and it represents more detailed structure of the world river network and contains consistent supplementary data layers such as hydrologically adjusted elevations and river channel width. In the AGU meeting, the developing methodology, assessed quality, and potential applications of the new global hydrography data will be introduced.

  7. Data at Risk and Research Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, S.

    2017-12-01

    Research libraries have recently engaged in data rescue events amidst growing concerns about access to federal data sets. While these efforts are well intentioned, libraries run the risk of ignoring a long established history of activities and accomplishments by other communities focused on data at risk, many of which are represented at forums such as AGU. Under the auspices of the Data Conservancy, the Sheridan Libraries at Johns Hopkins University hosted an event in July 2017 that convened members of various communities including ESIP, RDA, Data Rescue Boulder, Association of Research Libraries, the Fedora repository platform, the Open Science Framework and the Interplanetary File System or IPFS (via the Data Together Network). This group identified a potential role for research libraries to partner with existing players in the data at risk community by focusing on a distributed preservation network as part of a coordinated collection development program. This session will offer an opportunity to hear about this potential role for research libraries and to provide feedback about its viability and utility.

  8. A study on workplace violence against health workers in a Nigerian tertiary hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogbonnaya, G U; Ukegbu, A U; Aguwa, E N; Emma-Ukaegbu, U

    2012-01-01

    Workplace violence is a common phenomenon which cuts across all work settings. Its prevalence is particularly high in the health sector and adversely affected service delivery. However, in Nigeria there are limited data on the magnitude of the problem. In this study, we aim to describe the prevalence of workplace violence against health workers in a tertiary hospital located in Abia state, Nigeria. In this descriptive cross-sectional study, data was collected using self-administered questionnaires distributed to 395 health workers of the clinical services division of the hospital to assess their experience of workplace violence in the preceding year. The response of 303 was returned and analyzed. Most (88.1%) of the respondents had experienced workplace violence with more than half (54.4%) of all violent incidents occurring in the wards. Psychological violence was more prevalent than physical violence. Verbal abuse (85.4%) was the most prevalent while sexual harassment (4.5%) was the least. Approximately one quarter (25.1%) of all the respondents had been physically assaulted in the preceding year. Patients and their relations were the main perpetrators of physical assault and threats. Senior colle agues were the main workplace bullies. The prevalence of workplace violence was high in this hospital.

  9. New service of Earth Interactions offers sneak peek at work in progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new service of the all-electronic journal Earth Interactions (Web site http://EarthInter-actions.org) now provides online access to abstracts or preprints of selected papers being presented at various Earth system science conferences. The new service, “Earth Abstractions,” is separate from the peer-reviewed articles in Earth Interactions. The editors select the sessions that will be featured. AGU Spring Meeting abstracts are now highlighted on the site.The abstract titles in Earth Abstractions will link directly to online extended abstracts or preprints located on the authors' home servers if such abstracts are made available. As the author updates the preprint and posts it to the same URL, Earth Abstractions will continue to feature the most recent information from the author related to that work. Readers can preview an author's work as it evolves prior to the meeting as well as refer to it for a year after the meeting has ended. This exchange also provides a means for authors to receive positive feedback on their papers independent of the conference session, which may help those who plan to submit papers about their work to a peer-reviewed journal.

  10. How Do You Define an Internship?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, C. E.; Keane, C.

    2017-12-01

    According to the American Geosciences Institute's Geoscience Student Exit Survey, internship participation rates over the past four years have been low, particularly among bachelor's and doctoral graduates. In 2016, 65% of bachelor's graduates, 44% of master's graduates, and 57% of doctoral graduates did not participate in an internship while working on their degree. When asked if they submitted applications for internship opportunities, 42% of bachelor's graduates, 23% of master's graduates, and 46% of doctoral graduates claimed to not submit any applications. These statistics have raised concern at AGI because internships provide experiences that help develop critical professional skills and industry connections that can lead to jobs after graduation. However, when internships are discussed among various representatives in geoscience industries, there are disagreements in how an internship experience is defined. For example, opinions differ on whether REUs or other research experiences count as an internship. Clear definitions of internship opportunities may help academic faculty and advisors direct students towards these opportunities and help develop a collection of resources for finding future internships. This presentation will present some of the recent statistics on internship participation among geoscience graduates and present a series of questions to ascertain defining features of internships among AGU attendees and where help is needed to increase participation in internships among current geoscience students.

  11. The Benefits of Peer-to-Peer Mentoring: Lessons from The Earth Science Women's Network (ESWN)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, T.; Steiner, A.; Fiore, A.; Hastings, M.; McKinley, G.; Staudt, A.; Wiedinmyer, C.

    2007-12-01

    The Earth Science Women's Network (ESWN) is a grassroots organization that began with the meeting of six women graduate students and recent Ph.D.s at the Spring 2002 AGU meeting in Washington, DC. Since then, the group has grown to over 400 members, completely by word of mouth. We provide an informal, peer-to-peer network developed to promote and support careers of women in the Earth sciences. Through the network, women have found jobs, established research collaborations, shared strategies on work/life balance, and built a community stretching around the world. We maintain an email list for members to develop an expanded peer network outside of their own institution, and we have recently launched a co-ed jobs list to benefit the wider geoscience community. We will present a summary of strategies that have been discussed by group members on how to transition to a new faculty position, build a research group, develop new research collaborations, and balance career and family.

  12. Learner Involvement at Arabian Gulf University Self-Access Centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane Malcolm

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Arabian Gulf University (AGU College of Medicine and Medical Sciences was established around 25 years ago to train students in the Arab Gulf states, including Bahrain, where it is located, Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Qatar, the United Arab Emirates, and Oman to become doctors of medicine (MDs using the problem-based learning approach (PBL. As is the case in most regional higher education institutions, entering students are expected to be proficient in English, the language through which course content is delivered. In reality, many students do not achieve the desired standard in English, thus must take one or more semesters of English language training before beginning their academic studies. IAGU has an annual intake of around 150 students of widely varying English proficiency levels, but has only recently begun to accept some students to a foundation English programme. Before that, our small English unit had to find ways of helping the least proficient improve their English skills, while providing a basis in English for medical purposes for all students, within the same course framework. Our self-access centre (SAC, though small and definitely not state of the art, has had an important role to play in accommodating the different students’ needs and interests, supplementing their course material and providing opportunities for increased language exposure.

  13. Institutional initiatives in professional scientific ethics: three case studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickless, Edmund; Bilham, Nic

    2015-04-01

    Learned and professional scientific bodies can play a vital role in promoting ethical behaviours, giving practical substance to theoretical consideration of geoethical principles and complementing the efforts of individual scientists and practitioners to behave in a professional and ethical manner. Institutions may do this through mandatory professional codes of conduct, by developing guidelines and initiatives to codify and stimulate the uptake of best practice, and through wider initiatives to engender a culture conducive to such behaviours. This presentation will outline three current institutional initiatives which directly or indirectly address scientific ethics: i. The UK Science Council's Declaration on Diversity, Equality and Inclusion. ii. Development and promulgation of the American Geosciences Institute's (AGI) Guidelines for Ethical Professional Conduct. iii. The American Geophysical Union's (AGU) Scientific Code of Conduct and Professional Ethics. The focus of the Science Council and its member bodies (including the Geological Society of London) on diversity is of central importance when considering ethical behaviours in science. First, improving equality and diversity in the science workforce is at the heart of ethical practice, as well as being essential to meeting current and future skills needs. Second, in addition to demographic diversity (whether in terms of gender, race, economic status, sexuality or gender identity, etc), an important dimension of diversity in science is to allow space for a plurality of scientific views, and to nurture dissenting voices - essential both to the development of scientific knowledge and to its effective communication to non-technical audiences.

  14. Solar-system Education for the 2017 Total Solar Eclipse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasachoff, Jay M.

    2017-10-01

    I describe an extensive outreach program about the Sun, the silhouette of the Moon, and the circumstances both celestial and terrestrial of the August 21, 2017, total solar eclipse. Publications included a summary of the last decade of solar-eclipse research for Nature Astronomy, a Resource Letter on Observing Solar Eclipses for the American Journal of Physics, and book reviews for Nature and for Phi Beta Kappa's Key Reporter. Symposia arranged include sessions at AAS, APS, AGU, and AAAS. Lectures include all ages from pre-school through elementary school to high school to senior-citizen residences. The work, including the scientific research about the solar corona that is not part of this abstract, was supported by grants from the Solar Terrestrial Program of the Atmospheric and Geospace Sciences Division of NSF and from the Committee for Research and Exploration of the National Geographic Society. Additional student support was received from NSF, NASA's Massachusetts Space Grant Consortium, the Honorary Research Society Sigma Xi, the Clare Booth Luce Foundation, and funds at Williams College.

  15. An interdisciplinary approach to study Pre-Earthquake processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouzounov, D.; Pulinets, S. A.; Hattori, K.; Taylor, P. T.

    2017-12-01

    We will summarize a multi-year research effort on wide-ranging observations of pre-earthquake processes. Based on space and ground data we present some new results relevant to the existence of pre-earthquake signals. Over the past 15-20 years there has been a major revival of interest in pre-earthquake studies in Japan, Russia, China, EU, Taiwan and elsewhere. Recent large magnitude earthquakes in Asia and Europe have shown the importance of these various studies in the search for earthquake precursors either for forecasting or predictions. Some new results were obtained from modeling of the atmosphere-ionosphere connection and analyses of seismic records (foreshocks /aftershocks), geochemical, electromagnetic, and thermodynamic processes related to stress changes in the lithosphere, along with their statistical and physical validation. This cross - disciplinary approach could make an impact on our further understanding of the physics of earthquakes and the phenomena that precedes their energy release. We also present the potential impact of these interdisciplinary studies to earthquake predictability. A detail summary of our approach and that of several international researchers will be part of this session and will be subsequently published in a new AGU/Wiley volume. This book is part of the Geophysical Monograph series and is intended to show the variety of parameters seismic, atmospheric, geochemical and historical involved is this important field of research and will bring this knowledge and awareness to a broader geosciences community.

  16. Highlights from the First Ever Demographic Study of Solar Physics, Space Physics, and Upper Atmospheric Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moldwin, M.; Morrow, C. A.; White, S. C.; Ivie, R.

    2014-12-01

    Members of the Education & Workforce Working Group and the American Institute of Physics (AIP) conducted the first ever National Demographic Survey of working professionals for the 2012 National Academy of Sciences Solar and Space Physics Decadal Survey to learn about the demographics of this sub-field of space science. The instrument contained questions for participants on: the type of workplace; basic demographic information regarding gender and minority status, educational pathways (discipline of undergrad degree, field of their PhD), how their undergraduate and graduate student researchers are funded, participation in NSF and NASA funded spaceflight missions and suborbital programs, and barriers to career advancement. Using contact data bases from AGU, the American Astronomical Society's Solar Physics Division (AAS-SPD), attendees of NOAA's Space Weather Week and proposal submissions to NSF's Atmospheric, Geospace Science Division, the AIP's Statistical Research Center cross correlated and culled these data bases resulting in 2776 unique email addresses of US based working professionals. The survey received 1305 responses (51%) and generated 125 pages of single space answers to a number of open-ended questions. This talk will summarize the highlights of this first-ever demographic survey including findings extracted from the open-ended responses regarding barriers to career advancement which showed significant gender differences.

  17. Simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) of very high gravity (VHG) potato mash for the production of ethanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srichuwong, Sathaporn; Fujiwara, Maki; Wang, Xiaohui; Seyama, Tomoko; Shiroma, Riki; Arakane, Mitsuhiro; Tokuyasu, Ken [National Food Research Institute, National Agriculture and Food Research Organization (NARO), 2-1-12 Kannondai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8642 (Japan); Mukojima, Nobuhiro [National Agricultural Research Center for Hokkaido Region, NARO, 9-4 Shinsei-minami, Memuro-cho, Kasai-gun, Hokkaido 082-0071 (Japan)

    2009-05-15

    Simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) of very high gravity (VHG) potato mash, containing 304 g L{sup -1} of dissolved carbohydrates, was carried out for ethanol production. Potato tubers were ground into a mash, which was highly viscous. Mash viscosity was reduced by the pretreatment with mixed enzyme preparations of pectinase, cellulase and hemicellulase. The enzymatic pretreatment established the use of VHG mash with a suitable viscosity. Starch in the pretreated mash was liquefied to maltodextrins by the action of thermo-stable {alpha}-amylase at 85 C. SSF of liquefied mash was performed at 30 C with the simultaneous addition of glucoamylase, yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and ammonium sulfate as a nitrogen source for the yeast. The optimal glucoamylase loading, ammonium sulfate concentration and fermentation time were 1.65 AGU g{sup -1}, 30.2 mM and 61.5 h, respectively, obtained using the response surface methodology (RSM). Ammonium sulfate supplementation was necessary to avoid stuck fermentation under VHG condition. Using the optimized condition, ethanol yield of 16.61% (v/v) was achieved, which was equivalent to 89.7% of the theoretical yield. (author)

  18. New initiative in studies of Earth's deep interior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lay, Thorne

    A multidisciplinary U.S. research community is undertaking a new coordinated effort to study the state and dynamics of the Earth's deep mantle and core. At an open meeting held at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, from September 11 to 12, 1992, over 120 Earth scientists gathered to discuss this new program, which is an outgrowth of activity during the previous year by an ad hoc steering committee. The research program will be coordinated by a community-based scientific organization and supported through competitive research proposals submitted to the National Science Foundation with the aim of facilitating cooperative research projects cutting across traditional disciplinary and institutional boundaries.The new organization is the U.S. Studies of the Earth's Deep Interior (SEDI) Coordinating Committee. This committee will facilitate communication among the U.S. SEDI research community, federal funding agencies, the AGU Committee for Studies of the Earth's Interior (SEI), the Union SEDI Committee of the International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics, and the general public (Figure 1).

  19. The Virtual Poster Showcase: Opportunities for students to present their research from anywhere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asher, P. M.; Furukawa, H.; Williams, B. M.; Holm Adamec, B.

    2015-12-01

    Although many students conduct research with faculty in organized summer programs or as part of their course work or their degree work, they often face barriers to traveling to present that research, especially at national or international conferences. This is especially true for students who are members of underrepresented minority populations and students studying outside of the United States. A new and exciting opportunity for undergraduate as well as graduate students to showcase their work is now available. AGU piloted three opportunities for an undergraduate and graduate virtual poster showcase in the fall of 2015. Student participants were recruited from a diverse array of groups including minority-serving organizations, two-year colleges, and internship programs at federal agencies and national laboratories. Students uploaded an abstract, poster, and short video explain their research, and then participated in Q&A sessions with peers as well as expert judges. This presentation will share characteristics of participating groups, lessons learned from this new program, and preliminary evaluation findings as well as plans for the future.

  20. Steltzer Receives 2013 Sulzman Award for Excellence in Education and Mentoring: Citation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weintraub, Michael N.

    2014-07-01

    Heidi Steltzer, an assistant professor at Fort Lewis College, received the 2013 Sulzman Award for Excellence in Education and Mentoring at the 2013 Fall Meeting. This award "recognizes women in AGU who have sustained an active research career in a field related to biogeosciences, while excelling in teaching and especially in mentoring young scientists." Awardees are to serve as critical role models for the next generation of female scientists by sharing their passion for the natural world. Those who know her best agree that Heidi's passion for teaching and training the next generation of researchers truly embodies the spirit of the Sulzman award. According to one nominator, "Heidi single-handedly pushed [her] department toward a more modern and integrated view of the biological sciences, revamping curricula in both majors' and non-majors' courses to include citizen science, cross-disciplinary investigation techniques, and thought-provoking forays into real-world/real-time problems." Another nominator commented that "Heidi has made an incredibly strong impact on the careers of countless students through both compassionate and enthusiastic mentoring, as well as leadership in institutional and programmatic efforts that foster student professional development and that provide research experiences. I think it is extraordinary that at this relatively early point in her career, she has already achieved a lasting legacy."

  1. Heterogenic expression of genes encoding secreted proteins at the periphery of Aspergillus niger colonies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinck, Arman; de Bekker, Charissa; Ossin, Adam; Ohm, Robin A; de Vries, Ronald P; Wösten, Han A B

    2011-01-01

    Colonization of a substrate by fungi starts with the invasion of exploring hyphae. These hyphae secrete enzymes that degrade the organic material into small molecules that can be taken up by the fungus to serve as nutrients. We previously showed that only part of the exploring hyphae of Aspergillus niger highly express the glucoamylase gene glaA. This was an unexpected finding since all exploring hyphae are exposed to the same environmental conditions. Using GFP as a reporter, we here demonstrate that the acid amylase gene aamA, the α-glucuronidase gene aguA, and the feruloyl esterase gene faeA of A. niger are also subject to heterogenic expression within the exploring mycelium. Coexpression studies using GFP and dTomato as reporters showed that hyphae that highly express one of these genes also highly express the other genes encoding secreted proteins. Moreover, these hyphae also highly express the amylolytic regulatory gene amyR, and the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene gpdA. In situ hybridization demonstrated that the high expressers are characterized by a high 18S rRNA content. Taken together, it is concluded that two subpopulations of hyphae can be distinguished within the exploring mycelium of A. niger. The experimental data indicate that these subpopulations differ in their transcriptional and translational activity. © 2010 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. A melancolia, a narrativa melancólica e sua abdução pela mídia sob os auspícios do discurso do capitalista

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernesto Sohnle

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pretendemos, partindo da caracterização estrutural da melancolia em Freud, Lacan e seus leitores, apontar os ecos estilísticos da mania na narrativa melancólica de Louis-Ferdinand Céline. Para tal, confrontamos o desespero degradante em Céline, com a forma shandiana assumida pelo Machado maduro, onde a ficção melancólica produz, paradoxalmente, um saber/satisfazer-se com a vida. Na sequência, examinamos os efeitos melancolizantes articulados à invenção do significante depressão, abduzido pelo discurso da ciência e difundido pela mídia, sob os auspícios do discurso do capitalista. O que nos confronta com uma ideologia da depressão, antecipada pela melancolia poética dos Paraísos artificiais. Tal ilusão de sociedade sem mal-estar, quando cooptada pela biopolítica, seria capaz de aguçar certas tendências narcotizantes no laço social, que vão da toxicomania medicamentosa, compatível com a sociedade de consumo, até o apetite desagregador pelas drogas ilícitas.

  3. Jean Francheteau (1943-2010)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sclater, John; Le Pichon, Xavier

    2010-12-01

    Jean Francheteau, pioneering marine geologist and geophysicist, AGU Fellow, and emeritus professor at the University of Brest (Université de Bretagne Occidentale), died on 21 July in St-Renan, Brittany, France, at the age of 67 after a long illness. With his passing, the field of Earth sciences lost a major contributor to the development of a definitive theory of plate tectonics and one of the first to make visual geological observations on the deep seafloor. Such scientific accomplishments, coupled with his personal charm and the ability to collaborate with researchers from many institutions, ensured that he had a huge influence not only on the world of research but also on teaching and the application of ethics to science. Jean arrived at Scripps Institution of Oceanography in La Jolla, Calif., in 1966 after obtaining a diploma in mining engineering at the prestigious Éole Nationale Supérieure de la Métallurgie et de l'Industrie des Mines in Nancy, France. He chose Victor Vacquier as his thesis supervisor and began working in Vic's lab with John Sclater, ostensibly on heat flow measurements.

  4. The NSF and the geosciences community: Rotating program officers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batiza, Rodey; Rea, David K.; Rumble, Douglas, III

    The National Science Foundation (NSF) is a federal agency charged with the care and feeding of basic scientific research in U.S. colleges and universities. NSF is a major contributor toward the support of research in Earth, ocean, and atmospheric sciences, disciplines of great importance to AGU members.NSF makes a regular practice of employing scientists from universities, nonprofit research organizations, industry, and state or local governments as temporary program officers (“rotators”) with terms of service from 1 to 2 years. There are several reasons for the use of rotators: It brings to NSF people who have firsthand, recent knowledge of "what it is really like" beyond the Washington, D.C. beltway. Knowledge of new ideas, recent graduates, and a fresh look at the system are worth considerably more than the problems that arise owing to inexperienced program officers.It sheds some sunshine on internal NSF procedures when the rotator returns with his tales to his home institution.It provides NSF management with considerable flexibility in coping with changing staff requirements.

  5. Time Dilation And Changes Of Material Properties Of An Atom (Body) In Speed Of Near Light Speed Based On The ``Substantial Motion'' Theory of Iranian Philosopher, Mulla Sadra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholibeigian, Hassan; Gholibeigian, Kazem

    Iranian Philosopher, Sadr-ol-Moteallehin (1571-1640) said in his famous book, Asfar: ''the Universe moves in its entity... and time is its fourth dimension, and time is magnitude of the motion (momentum) of the matter in its entity''. In other words, time for each atom is momentum of its involved fundamental particles, [APS March Meeting 2015, abstract #V1.023]. When an atom (body) moves in speed of near light speed, speed of its involved fundamental particles become slow, and consequently the magnitude of its momentum (time) will decrease. On the other hands, when the spin and orbital angular momentum of an atom changed, it means that its properties, mass, strength of its electromagnetic field and its interaction with momentum changed. As a result, each atom (body) which moves in light speed, lower or faster than that, will get a new identity and vice versa. The special relativity can be the special form of this theory. In this way, black holes will be lighter than their involved masses at rest (a paradox with general relativity). Dark matter/energy may be created at first in B.B (Convection Bang) [AGU Fall Meeting 2015, abstract ID: 58425], in more than light speed, so, if we speed protons to more than light speed (in LHC), we may see dark mater/energy in new space-time. AmirKabir University of Technology.

  6. Big Data Discovery and Access Services through NOAA OneStop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, K. S.; Neufeld, D.; Ritchey, N. A.; Relph, J.; Fischman, D.; Baldwin, R.

    2017-12-01

    The NOAA OneStop Project was created as a pathfinder effort to to improve the discovery of, access to, and usability of NOAA's vast and diverse collection of big data. OneStop is led by the NOAA/NESDIS National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI), and is seen as a key NESDIS contribution to NOAA's open data and data stewardship efforts. OneStop consists of an entire framework of services, from storage and interoperable access services at the base, through metadata and catalog services in the middle, to a modern user interface experience at the top. Importantly, it is an open framework where external tools and services can connect at whichever level is most appropriate. Since the beta release of the OneStop user interface at the 2016 Fall AGU meeting, significant progress has been made improving and modernizing many NOAA data collections to optimize their use within the framework. In addition, OneStop has made progress implementing robust metadata management and catalog systems at the collection and granule level and improving the user experience with the web interface. This progress will be summarized and the results of extensive user testing including professional usability studies will be reviewed. Key big data technologies supporting the framework will be presented and a community input sought on the future directions of the OneStop Project.

  7. Your Personal Analysis Toolkit - An Open Source Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, T.

    2009-12-01

    Open source software is commonly known for its web browsers, word processors and programming languages. However, there is a vast array of open source software focused on geographic information management and geospatial application building in general. As geo-professionals, having easy access to tools for our jobs is crucial. Open source software provides the opportunity to add a tool to your tool belt and carry it with you for your entire career - with no license fees, a supportive community and the opportunity to test, adopt and upgrade at your own pace. OSGeo is a US registered non-profit representing more than a dozen mature geospatial data management applications and programming resources. Tools cover areas such as desktop GIS, web-based mapping frameworks, metadata cataloging, spatial database analysis, image processing and more. Learn about some of these tools as they apply to AGU members, as well as how you can join OSGeo and its members in getting the job done with powerful open source tools. If you haven't heard of OSSIM, MapServer, OpenLayers, PostGIS, GRASS GIS or the many other projects under our umbrella - then you need to hear this talk. Invest in yourself - use open source!

  8. What Can The Engineering for Climate Extremes Partnership Do For Global Resilience?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruyere, C. L.; Tye, M. R.; Holland, G. J.

    2015-12-01

    ECEP is an interdisciplinary partnership that brings together academia, industry, commerce, societal groups and government to develop robust, well-communicated predictions and advice on the impacts of weather and climate extremes using cutting-edge science. A feature of the partnership is the manner in which basic and applied research and development is conducted in direct collaboration with the end user. ECEP was formally launched at the AGU Fall Meeting in December 2014, and has gained rapid momentum in the subsequent year. Integral to the ECEP approach to resilience is the concept of 'Graceful Failure'. By acknowledging that all designs will fail at some level, and instead adopting flexible designs that combine engineering or network strengths with a plan for efficient, systematic failure and avoid delayed recovery. Such an approach enables optimal planning for both known and future scenarios, and their assessed uncertainty. This presentation will use the Boulder and North Colorado floods of September 2013 as a case study of how Graceful Failure improves resilience to extreme weather.

  9. Updated Results from the Michigan Titan Thermospheric General Circulation Model (TTGCM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, J. M.; Bougher, S. W.; de Lahaye, V.; Waite, J. H.; Ridley, A.

    2006-05-01

    This paper presents updated results from the Michigan Titan Thermospheric General Circulation Model (TTGCM) that was recently unveiled in operational form (Bell et al 2005 Spring AGU). Since then, we have incorporated a suite of chemical reactions for the major neutral constituents in Titan's upper atmosphere (N2, CH4). Additionally, some selected minor neutral constituents and major ionic species are also supported in the framework. At this time, HCN, which remains one of the critical thermally active species in the upper atmosphere, remains specified at all altitudes, utilizing profiles derived from recent Cassini-Huygen's measurements. In addition to these improvements, a parallel effort is underway to develop a non-hydrostatic Titan Thermospheric General Circulation Model for further comparisons. In this work, we emphasize the impacts of self-consistent chemistry on the results of the updated TTGCM relative to its frozen chemistry predecessor. Meanwhile, the thermosphere's thermodynamics remains determined by the interplay of solar EUV forcing and HCN rotational cooling, which is calculated by a full line- by-line radiative transfer routine along the lines of Yelle (1991) and Mueller-Wodarg (2000, 2002). In addition to these primary drivers, a treatment of magnetospheric heating is further tested. The model's results will be compared with both the Cassini INMS data and the model of Mueller-Wodarg (2000,2002).

  10. ASCENSÃO E CRISE DO GOVERNO DILMA ROUSSEFF E O GOLPE DE 2016: PODER ESTRUTURAL, CONTRADIÇÃO E IDEOLOGIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Paulo Zahluth Bastos

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available RESUMO O artigo procura entender o governo Dilma Rousseff e o Golpe de 2016 levando em consideração o poder estrutural do capital financeiro e as contradições inerentes aos modelos de crescimento econômico e coalizão política observados desde o governo Lula. Argumenta-se que o projeto econômico do governo Rousseff procurava superar algumas destas contradições. O governo, contudo, não foi capaz de realizar nem as reformas institucionais nem as repactuações políticas necessárias para o sucesso de seu projeto, em contexto de desaceleração cíclica e aguçamento da concorrência internacional e dos conflitos sociais no Brasil. A política econômica é avaliada desde a austeridade de 2011 até a de 2015, passando pela chamada Nova Matriz Econômica e seu desmonte gradual em 2013. Analisa-se as origens da unificação da burguesia em torno a um programa neoliberal em 2016, assim como a relação entre a revolta das camadas médias e o ataque político-judicial resultante no Golpe de 2016.

  11. Obituary: Thomas Julian Ahrens (1936-2010)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeanloz, Raymond; Asimow, Paul

    2011-12-01

    -bearing minerals, and applying the results to understanding the formation of oceans and atmospheres; conducting the first dynamic-compression experiments on molten silicates, with applications to characterizing the maximum depth of volcanism on terrestrial planets, as well as the crystallization sequence of magma oceans; performing the first thermodynamic calculations delineating the impact-shock conditions for melting and vaporization of planetary materials; carrying out the first smoothed particle hydrodynamic calculations to investigate energy partitioning upon impact in self-gravitating planetary systems; and conducting the first quantitative tensile failure studies for brittle media, relating crack-density to elastic velocity deficits and the onset of damage. Tom was also Co-Investigator on the NASA Cosmic Dust Analyzer Experiment, and the NASA/ESA Cassini Mission to Saturn. Honors included the AGU Hess Medal, Geological Society of America Day Medal, Meteoritical Society Barringer Medal, APS Shock Compression of Condensed Matter' Topical Groups's Duvall Medal and AAAS Newcomb-Cleveland Prize. He had been President of AGU's Tectonophysics Section, Editor of Journal of Geophysical Research, founding member of both the Mineral and Rock Physics and Study of Earth's Deep Interior focus groups, and Editor - more like key driving force - for AGU's Handbook of Physical Constants. He was a fellow of the AGU, American Academy of Arts and Sciences, American Association for the Advancement of Science, and Geochemical Society; and member of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences, as well as Foreign Associate of the Russian Academy of Sciences. Main-belt asteroid 4739 Tomahrens (1985 TH1) was named after him. Tom made it clear, however, that it was his students (more than 30), research associates (15 or more) and many collaborators who were the real mark of success. No doubt driven by the need to sustain a major, expensive research facility, as well as to satisfy an inner drive, he

  12. Esta que "é uma das delícias, e mimos desta terra...": o uso indígena do tabaco (N. rustica e N. tabacum nos relatos de cronistas, viajantes e filósofos naturais dos séculos XVI e XVII

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Fausto Moraes dos Santos

    Full Text Available O tabaco (Nicotiana sp. foi um dos elementos botânicos do Novo Mundo que mais aguçaram a curiosidade de diversos viajantes, eruditos, médicos e filósofos naturais em ambos os lados do Atlântico. As plantas do gênero Nicotiana rapidamente ganharam notoriedade entre homens de letras. O hiato entre as primeiras descrições sobre os diversos predicados do tabaco e sua introdução na Europa foi consideravelmente curto. É provável que os rumores a respeito das propriedades das plantas de Nicotiana tenham chegado à Europa concomitantente às primeiras folhas ou sementes. Muitos destes relatos incluíam informações a respeito de seu uso pelos povos indígenas. Sua relevância, em meio aos ameríndios, suscitou nos europeus, mesmo com todas as barreiras culturais, um considerável interesse por suas possíveis aplicações e uma irresistível disposição em justificar seu uso.

  13. Improvements to Web Toolkits for Antelope-based Real-time Monitoring Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindquist, K. G.; Newman, R. L.; Vernon, F. L.; Hansen, T. S.; Orcutt, J.

    2005-12-01

    The Antelope Environmental Monitoring System (http://www.brtt.com) is a robust middleware architecture for near-real-time data collection, analysis, archiving and distribution. Antelope has an extensive toolkit allowing users to interact directly with their datasets. A rudimentary interface was developed in previous work between Antelope and the web-scripting language PHP (The PHP language is described in more detail at http://www.php.net). This interface allowed basic application development for remote access to and interaction with near-real-time data through a World Wide Web interface. We have added over 70 new functions for the Antelope interface to PHP, providing a solid base for web-scripting of near-real-time Antelope database applications. In addition, we have designed a new structure for web sites to be created from the Antelope platform, including PHP applications and Perl CGI scripts as well as static pages. Finally we have constructed the first version of the dbwebproject program, designed to dynamically create and maintain web-sites from specified recipes. These tools have already proven valuable for the creation of web tools for the dissemination of and interaction with near-real-time data streams from multi-signal-domain real-time sensor networks. We discuss current and future directions of this work in the context of the ROADNet project. Examples and applications of these core tools are elaborated in a companion presentation in this session (Newman et al., AGU 2005, session IN06).

  14. The Relationship among Tyrosine Decarboxylase and Agmatine Deiminase Pathways in Enterococcus faecalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Perez

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Enterococci are considered mainly responsible for the undesirable accumulation of the biogenic amines tyramine and putrescine in cheeses. The biosynthesis of tyramine and putrescine has been described as a species trait in Enterococcus faecalis. Tyramine is formed by the decarboxylation of the amino acid tyrosine, by the tyrosine decarboxylase (TDC route encoded in the tdc cluster. Putrescine is formed from agmatine by the agmatine deiminase (AGDI pathway encoded in the agdi cluster. These biosynthesis routes have been independently studied, tyrosine and agmatine transcriptionally regulate the tdc and agdi clusters. The objective of the present work is to study the possible co-regulation among TDC and AGDI pathways in E. faecalis. In the presence of agmatine, a positive correlation between putrescine biosynthesis and the tyrosine concentration was found. Transcriptome studies showed that tyrosine induces the transcription of putrescine biosynthesis genes and up-regulates pathways involved in cell growth. The tyrosine modulation over AGDI route was not observed in the mutant Δtdc strain. Fluorescence analyses using gfp as reporter protein revealed PaguB (the promoter of agdi catabolic genes was induced by tyrosine in the wild-type but not in the mutant strain, confirming that tdc cluster was involved in the tyrosine induction of putrescine biosynthesis. This study also suggests that AguR (the transcriptional regulator of agdi was implicated in interaction among the two clusters.

  15. Well-being and excellence in the Earth sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Charles L.

    In the symposium on Earth Sciences and Society at the Spring AGU Meeting May 29-June 1, Baltimore, Md.), I was assigned to speak on the maintenance of excellence and national well-being in the Earth sciences. I developed serious writer's block every time I approached the topic until I remembered a paragraph at the beginning of Doug Adams' great text, The Restaurant at the End of the Universe [Adams, 1982]. It tells how [A race of highly intelligent pan-dimensional beings once built themselves a gigantic supercomputer called Deep Thought to calculate once and for all the Answer to the Ultimate Question of Life, Universe and Everything. For seven and a half million years, Deep Thought computed and calculated, and in the end announced that the answer was in fact Forty-two—and so another, even bigger, computer had to be built to find out what the actual question was. And this computer, which was called the Earth, was so large that it was frequently mistaken for a planet-especially by the strange apelike beings who roamed its surface, totally unaware that they were simply part of a gigantic computer program. And this is very odd, because without that fairly simple and obvious piece of knowledge, nothing that ever happened on the Earth could possibly make the slightest bit of sense.

  16. Copyright case a victory for science publishing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Stephen

    An important victory for the financial health and future of scientific journals was won July 23 when Judge Pierre Leval of the Federal District Court in New York handed down his decision on the copyright infringement suit, American Geophysical Union, et al. v. Texaco Inc. Leval ruled that profit-making companies cannot photocopy copyrighted journal articles without permission and without compensating the copyright holder.The class action suit was brought in 1985 by AGU and six other scientific publishers on behalf of 8500 publishers worldwide who make their titles available for legal copying under licenses granted by the Copyright Clearance Center, Inc. This licensing system was designed in cooperation with major corporations to facilitate compliance with the 1976 Copyright Act. Although more than 200 companies now use the center, some corporations, such as Texaco, have not. The suit was initiated to force compliance with copyright law. The current decision is very important because it establishes legal precedents on the “fair use” issue.

  17. Carboxymethyl Cellulose (CMC) from Oil Palm Empty Fruit Bunch (OPEFB) in the new solvent Dimethyl Sulfoxide (DMSO)/Tetrabutylammonium Fluoride (TBAF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliza, M. Y.; Shahruddin, M.; Noormaziah, J.; Rosli, W. D. Wan

    2015-06-01

    The surplus of Oil Palm is the most galore wastes in Malaysia because it produced about half of the world palm oil production, which contributes a major disposal problem Synthesis from an empty fruit bunch produced products such as Carboxymethyl Cellulose (CMC), could apply in diverse application such as for paper coating, food packaging and most recently, the potential as biomaterials has been revealed. In this study, CMC was prepared by firstly dissolved the bleached pulp from OPEFB in mixture solution of dimethyl sulfoxide(DMSO)/tetrabutylammonium fluoride (TBAF) without any prior chemical modification. It took only 30 minutes to fully dissolve at temperature 60°C before sodium hydroxide (NaOH) were added for activation and monochloroacetateas terrifying agent. The final product is appeared in white powder, which is then will be analyzedby FTIR analysis. FTIR results show peaks appeared at wavenumber between 1609 cm-1 to 1614 cm-1 proved the existence of carboxymethyl groups which substitute OH groups at anhydroglucose(AGU) unit. As a conclusion, mixture solution of DMSO/TBAF is the suitable solvent used for dissolved cellulose before modifying it into CMC with higher Degree of Substitution (DS). Furthermore, the dissolution of the OPEFB bleached pulp was easy, simple and at a faster rate without prior chemical modification at temperature as low as 60°C.

  18. Effective Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Public Health Impacts of Heatwaves for Brookline, MA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalalzadeh Fard, B.; Hassanzadeh, H.; Bhatia, U.; Ganguly, A. R.

    2016-12-01

    Studies on urban areas show a significant increase in frequency and intensity of heatwaves over the past decades, and predict the same trend for future. Since heatwaves have been responsible for a large number of life losses, urgent adaptation and mitigation strategies are required in the policy and decision making level for a sustainable urban planning. The Sustainability and Data Sciences Laboratory at Northeastern University, under the aegis of Thriving Earth Exchange of AGU, is working with the town of Brookline to understand the potential public health impacts of anticipated heatwaves. We consider the most important social and physical factors to obtain vulnerability and exposure parameters for each census block group of the town. Utilizing remote sensing data, we locate Urban Heat Islands (UHIs) during a recent heatwave event, as the hazard parameter. We then create priority risk map using the risk framework. Our analyses show spatial correlations between the UHIs and social factors such as poverty, and physical factors such as land cover variations. Furthermore, we investigate the future heatwave frequency and intensity increases by analyzing the climate models predictions. For future changes of UHIs, land cover changes are investigated using available predictive data. Also, socioeconomic predictions are carried out to complete the futuristic models of heatwave risks. Considering plausible scenarios for Brookline, we develop different risk maps based on the vulnerability, exposure and hazard parameters. Eventually, we suggest guidelines for Heatwave Action Plans for prioritizing effective mitigation and adaptation strategies in urban planning for the town of Brookline.

  19. The role of sexuality in sadism: object relations and drive theory perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juni, Samuel

    2009-12-01

    The sexual components of sadism are conceptualized within the contexts of different forms of sadism. In aggression-drive sadism, sexuality is seen as a generalization of instinctual reactivity. Parallels are presented of such spillover between aggression and anxiety and even between aggression and oral impulses, with the notion that any areas of excitation or partial impulses can be energized by the acute release of energy in another domain. Another dynamic is presented for re-enactment sadists, in which the sexuality has a relational meaning. In such cases, sexuality is intertwined with the aggression, as the sadistic ritual actually re-evokes an original trauma that features these elements. It is further agued that the sexuality in these two sadistic modes is not consistent. The instinctual spillover that occurs in hostile psychopathy is psychosexually rooted in phallic functioning, in which relational implications are absent, while the sexuality in re-enacted sadism is genitally based, and is intrinsically linked to an imagined emotional relationship with the victim that is intended to ameliorate and undo past trauma that haunt the perpetrator.

  20. Farewell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinze, William J.

    1997-01-01

    I am pleased to welcome Paul M. Davis, Professor of Geophysics at the University of California, Los Angeles, as the new Senior Editor of the Journal of Geophysical Research-Solid Earth for a 4-year term commencing January 1,1997. Dr. Davis is a world renowned seismologist who brings a broad geophysical background to his new duties. I am especially pleased because I am convinced that he is dedicated to improving the quality and readability of our journal and in maximizing its service to the geophysical research community. My 5 years at the helm of JGR-Solid Earth have been much more enjoyable and rewarding than I anticipated. The task has been eased by an extremely competent, dedicated, and forgiving office staff, Deborah Gray, Melanie King, and Lois Gast; by an encouraging group of colleagues and the Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences at Purdue University; by cooperative co workers in the AGU office; and by a superb cadre of referees and Associate Editors. The Associate Editors have done an outstanding job of maintaining the quality of our journal. The tasks they perform are time-consuming and thus have taken valuable professional time that could have been spent on more professionally visible activities. I thank all those who served, but I especially want to recognize the following geophysicists who have acted as Associate Editors in 1996. I thank them for the time devoted to the journal and for the uniformly high quality of editing.

  1. Comment on ``Communicating Government Science''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lins, Harry F.

    2006-05-01

    Soroosh Sorooshian's editorial in the 18 April issue of Eos (87(16) 2005) is a timely reminder of the need for unambiguous guidelines governing the interactions between government scientists and the media. His comments implicitly recognize the central role that science plays in a modern democratic society, which includes informing policy at the highest levels of government and educating the general public about the world we inhabit. Federal research scientists, who constitute approximately 15 percent of the AGU's U.S. membership, have a unique public responsibility. They would welcome a consistent policy for the review and approval of publications, oral presentations, and media communications. An example of the value and success that such a policy can have to both science and the nation is evident in the operations of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). For more than a century, the USGS has had clear policies and procedures for ensuring the communication of accurate, high-quality, and impartial scientific information. These policies and procedures are set forth in the USGS Manual under sections entitled ``Approval by the director for outside publication and oral presentation,'' ``Review of USGS publications and abstracts of oral presentations for policy-sensitive issues,'' and ``News release and media relations policy.'' These policies are available online at http:// www.usgs.gov/usgs-manual/500/500-9.html (.../500-8.html and .../500 5.html).

  2. The teaching of geophysics in Latin America: An updated assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencio, Daniel A.; Schneider, Otto

    The situation of geophysics in developing countries has been the subject of discussions and analysis by diverse international organizations. It was also discussed in some articles in Eos [e.g., Lomnitz, 1982; Urrutia Fucugauchi, 1982; Bolt, 1982]. We have been requested to contribute a current evaluation of the problem, with particular reference to geophysical education in Latin America.In the following report on specialized training of geophysicists in Latin American countries, we consider the “exact earth sciences” in the broader sense, i.e., the mathematical and physical (and, to a certain extent, chemical) aspects of the planet earth as a whole, including its fluid portions, as opposed to the more restricted concept of just solid earth geophysics. In other words, our inquiry follows the scope of both AGU and the International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics (IUGG), so geodesy, although not explicitly covered, will still be mentioned occasionally. We will also consider the applied branches, especially exploration geophysics, since these areas furnish powerful motivation for fostering our sciences, both in the governmental circles of developing countries and among the young people looking for a promising professional future.

  3. Transforming networking within the ESIP Federation using ResearchBit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, E.

    2015-12-01

    Geoscientists increasingly need interdisciplinary teams to solve their research problems. Currently, geoscientists use Research Networking (RN) systems to connect with each other and find people of similar and dissimilar interests. As we shift to digitally mediated scholarship, we need innovative methods for scholarly communication. Formal methods for scholarly communication are undergoing vast transformation owing to the open-access movement and reproducible research. However, informal scholarly communication that takes place at professional society meetings and conferences, like AGU, has received limited research attention relying primarily on serendipitous interaction. The ResearchBit project aims to fundamentally improve informal methods of scholarly communication by leveraging the serendipitous interactions of researchers and making them more aware of co-located potential collaborators with mutual interests. This presentation will describe our preliminary hardware testing done at the Federation for Earth Science Information Partners (ESIP) Summer meeting this past July and the initial recommendation system design. The presentation will also cover the cultural shifts and hurdles to introducing new technology, the privacy concerns of tracking technology and how we are addressing those new issues.

  4. Measurement of energetic radiation caused by thunderstorm activities by a sounding balloon and ground observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torii, T.

    2015-12-01

    Energetic radiation caused by thunderstorm activity is observed at various places, such as the ground, high mountain areas, and artificial satellites. In order to investigate the radiation source and its energy distribution, we measured energetic radiation by a sounding balloon, and the ground observation. On the measurement inside/above the thundercloud, we conducted a sounding observation using a radiosonde mounted two GM tubes (for gamma-rays, and for beta/gamma-rays), in addition to meteorological instruments. The balloon passed through a region of strong echoes in a thundercloud shown by radar image, at which time an increase in counting rate of the GM tube about 2 orders of magnitude occurred at the altitude from 5 km to 7.5 km. Furthermore, the counting rate of two GM tubes indicated the tendency different depending on movement of a balloon. This result suggests that the ratio for the gamma-rays (energetic photons) of the beta-rays (energetic electrons) varies according to the place in the thundercloud. Furthermore, we carried out a ground observation of the energetic gamma rays during winter thunderstorm at a coastal area facing the Sea of Japan. Two types of the energetic radiation have been observed at this time. We report the outline of these measurements and analysis in the session of the AGU meeting.

  5. Covering Science as a Mass Media Fellow

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMeeking, Gavin R.

    2006-03-01

    I remember my first unpleasant biology lab dissection in high school. I am not sure if the experience was worse for me or for the unfortunate fetal pig we dissected that day. The sights and smells of that fateful morning forever put me on a path toward the physical sciences, and probably have a lot to do with my ending up as a graduate student in atmospheric chemistry instead of at some medical school cutting up dead bodies. So imagine my horror after encountering the leg of a dead horse as I walked into a bioengineering laboratory to report on a story about artificial joint research. Subjecting myself to such biological horrors, though, was part of my duties as an AGU-sponsored American Association for the Advancement of Science Mass Media Fellow. The program places graduate students and recent graduates from scientific fields in major media outlets throughout the country. The aim of the program is to give science-trained individuals a taste of a career in science journalism as well as to help scientists develop better communication skills.

  6. Honors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anonymous

    2012-05-01

    A number of AGU members were honored during the European Geosciences Union's (EGU) General Assembly, held on 22-27 April in Vienna. EGU Union awards were presented to the following people: Vincent Courtillot, University of Paris Diderot, France, received the 2012 Arthur Holmes Medal and EGU honorary membership for seminal contributions to geomagnetism and the geodynamics of mantle hot spots.Michael Ghil, University of California, Los Angeles, and École Normale Supérieure, France, received the 2012 Alfred Wegener Medal and EGU honorary membership for his leading contributions to theoretical climate dynamics; his innovative observational studies involving model assimilation of satellite data in meteorology, oceanography, and space physics; the breadth of his interdisciplinary studies, including macroeconomics; and his extensive supervision and mentoring of scores of graduate and postdoctoral students. Robin Clarke, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, received the 2012 Alexander von Humboldt Medal for fundamental contributions in statistical analysis and modeling of hydrological processes.Angioletta Coradini, Istituto Nazionale di Astrofsica, Italy, received the 2012 Jean Dominique Cassini Medal and EGU honorary membership in recognition of her important and wide range of work in planetary sciences and solar system formation and for her leading role in the development of space infrared instrumentation for planetary exploration.

  7. Data Science Careers: A Sampling of Successful Strategies, Pitfalls, and Persistent Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocks, K. I.; Duerr, R.; Wyborn, L. A.; Yarmey, L.

    2015-12-01

    Data Scientists do not have a single career trajectory or preparatory pathway. Successful data scientists have come from domain sciences, computer science, library science, and other diverse fields. They have worked up from entry-level staff positions, have started as academics with doctoral degrees, and have established themselves as management professionals. They have positions in government, industry, academia, and NGO's, and their responsibilities range from highly specialized, to generalists, to high-level leadership. This presents a potentially confusing landscape for students interested in the field: how to decide among the varied options to have the best chance at fulfilling employment? What are the mistakes to avoid? Many established data scientist, both old-timers and early career professionals, expressed interest in presenting in this session but were unable to justify using their one AGU abstract for something other than their funded projects. As the session chairs we interviewed them, plus our extended network of colleagues, to ask for their best advice on what was most critical to their success in their current position, what pitfalls to avoid, what ongoing challenges they see, and what advice they would give themselves, if they could do it all over again starting now. Here we consolidate those interviews with our own perspectives to present some of the common themes and standout advice.

  8. MMI's Metadata and Vocabulary Solutions: 10 Years and Growing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graybeal, J.; Gayanilo, F.; Rueda-Velasquez, C. A.

    2014-12-01

    The Marine Metadata Interoperability project (http://marinemetadata.org) held its public opening at AGU's 2004 Fall Meeting. For 10 years since that debut, the MMI guidance and vocabulary sites have served over 100,000 visitors, with 525 community members and continuous Steering Committee leadership. Originally funded by the National Science Foundation, over the years multiple organizations have supported the MMI mission: "Our goal is to support collaborative research in the marine science domain, by simplifying the incredibly complex world of metadata into specific, straightforward guidance. MMI encourages scientists and data managers at all levels to apply good metadata practices from the start of a project, by providing the best guidance and resources for data management, and developing advanced metadata tools and services needed by the community." Now hosted by the Harte Research Institute at Texas A&M University at Corpus Christi, MMI continues to provide guidance and services to the community, and is planning for marine science and technology needs for the next 10 years. In this presentation we will highlight our major accomplishments, describe our recent achievements and imminent goals, and propose a vision for improving marine data interoperability for the next 10 years, including Ontology Registry and Repository (http://mmisw.org/orr) advancements and applications (http://mmisw.org/cfsn).

  9. Postoperative complications of liver transplant: evidence for the optimization of nursing care Complicações pós-operatórias do transplante hepático: evidências para otimização da assistência de enfermagem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelyn Nascimento de Morais

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: investigar as principais complicações mais frequentes no pós-operatório do transplante hepático e apontar as evidências para a detecção precoce e otimização da assistência de enfermagem. Método: trata-se de um estudo com abordagem quantitativa do tipo descritiva, foram analisados todos os prontuários eletrônicos disponíveis no sistema MvPep do período de janeiro de 2012 a janeiro de 2014. Os dados foram coletados por meio de um formulário esquematizado, e para a análise foram transportados para Microsoft Office Excel 2007, transcritos em forma de tabelas e feito gráficos para melhor visualização dos dados. Resultados: destacaram-se diversas complicações como as neurológicas, pulmonares, respiratórias, cardíacas, hematológicas, vasculares, biliares, as do próprio enxerto, intestinais, peritoneais, cirúrgicas, infecciosas e renais. Conclusão: evidenciou-se a necessidade de uma assistência diferenciada e individualizada aos transplantados, com um olhar aguçado e minucioso, sendo o enfermeiro o responsável por planejá-la.

  10. Assessing Student-Mentor Interaction During a Summer REU for Two Year College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doser, D. I.; Olivarez, A.; Rohrbaugh, R.; Villalobos, J. I.

    2017-12-01

    UTEP-ROCCS (Research Opportunities for Community College Students) is a summer REU program designed exclusively for two-year college students. The program differs from other summer REU's in several ways. First, the participants are only in El Paso during the month of June to begin their research projects, with subsequent research carried out at their home institutions with intensive virtual mentoring in July. Second, the mentoring team is a unique mix of 2-year and 4-year college faculty and undergraduate juniors and seniors. Our first cohort of 6 ROCCS students began their research in June 2017 supported by 2 UTEP undergraduate mentors and 5 faculty mentors. Preliminary results of a series of 4 weekly road checks indicate that 95% of the time the participants felt the faculty and student mentors were supportive, encouraging, and able to respond to their questions and concerns. All felt they received constructive, useful critiques of their field and research work, were motivated by the mentors to learn more and were challenged to extend their abilities and skills for the success of their research projects. Over 70% of the time they felt the mentors encouraged them by suggesting appropriate and available resources when they were struggling. And, most importantly, over 96% of the time they felt the experience stimulated their interest in geology as a future career. We hope to observe similar trends in the road checks of July 2017 as participants prepare their results for the AGU's fall virtual undergraduate poster session.

  11. Cellulose-polyhydroxylated fatty acid ester-based bioplastics with tuning properties: Acylation via a mixed anhydride system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heredia-Guerrero, José A; Goldoni, Luca; Benítez, José J; Davis, Alexander; Ceseracciu, Luca; Cingolani, Roberto; Bayer, Ilker S; Heinze, Thomas; Koschella, Andreas; Heredia, Antonio; Athanassiou, Athanassia

    2017-10-01

    The synthesis of microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) and 9,10,16-hydroxyhexadecanoic (aleuritic) acid ester-based bioplastics was investigated through acylation in a mixed anhydride (trifluoroacetic acid (TFA)/trifluoroacetic acid anhydride (TFAA)), chloroform co-solvent system. The effects of chemical interactions and the molar ratio of aleuritic acid to the anhydroglucose unit (AGU) of cellulose were investigated. The degree of substitution (DS) of new polymers were characterized by two-dimensional solution-state NMR and ranged from 0.51 to 2.60. The chemical analysis by attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) confirmed the presence of aleuritate groups in the structure induces the formation of new H-bond networks. The tensile analysis and the contact angle measurement confirmed the ductile behavior and the hydrophobicity of the prepared bioplastics. By increasing the aleuritate amounts, the glass transition temperature decreased and the solubility of bioplastic films in most common solvents was improved. Furthermore, this new polymer exhibits similar properties compared to commercial cellulose derivatives. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Building a Dashboard of the Planet with Google Earth and Earth Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R. T.; Hancher, M.

    2016-12-01

    In 2005 Google Earth, a popular 3-D virtual globe, was first released. Scientists immediately recognized how it could be used to tell stories about the Earth. From 2006 to 2009, the "Virtual Globes" sessions of AGU included innovative examples of scientists and educators using Google Earth, and since that time it has become a commonplace tool for communicating scientific results. In 2009 Google Earth Engine, a cloud-based platform for planetary-scale geospatial analysis, was first announced. Earth Engine was initially used to extract information about the world's forests from raw Landsat data. Since then, the platform has proven highly effective for general analysis of georeferenced data, and users have expanded the list of use cases to include high-impact societal issues such as conservation, drought, disease, food security, water management, climate change and environmental monitoring. To support these use cases, the platform has continuously evolved with new datasets, analysis functions, and user interface tools. This talk will give an overview of the latest Google Earth and Earth Engine functionality that allow partners to understand, monitor and tell stories about of our living, breathing Earth. https://earth.google.com https://earthengine.google.com

  13. Iain Stewart Receives 2013 Athelstan Spilhaus Award: Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Iain

    2014-01-01

    It is really wonderful to receive this award and the recognition of AGU for my work. I've been a member of the Union since my Ph.D. days, 25 years or so ago, when I was working on earthquake faulting in Greece and Turkey. Its meetings were always the place that showcased geoscience at its most novel and exciting. It was the breadth of what was on offer that was so exhilarating. My doctoral studies had already opened up fairly wide vistas for me since my interest in Holocene earthquake activity also required an understanding of the Mediterranean's rich cultural history and the vagaries of millennial-scale climate fluctuations. Later, my research would distract me into farther-flung realms, such as volcanic faulting on Mount Etna, paleotsunamis along Aegean shores, even postglacial earthquakes in northern Scotland! Kindly colleagues would occasionally advise me to focus my efforts on a single substantive area of research, cautioning that my flighty research forays weren't conducive to climbing the academic ladder. I'm sure they were correct. Or would have been proved so if I hadn't been rescued by television.

  14. Ionospheric Electron/Ion Densities Temperatures on CD-ROM and WWW

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilitza, Dieter; Papitashvili, Natasha; Schar, Bill; Grebowsky, Joseph

    2002-01-01

    As part of this project a large volume of ionospheric satellite insitu data from the sixties, seventies and early eighties were made accessible online in ASCII format for public use. This includes 14 data sets from the BE-B, Alouette 2, DME-A, AE-B, ISIS-1, ISIS-2, OGO-6, DE-2, AEROS-A, AE-C, AE-D, AE-E, and Hinotori satellites. The original data existed in various machine-specific, highly compressed, binary encoding on 7-, or 9-track magnetic tapes. The data were decoded and converted to a common ASCII data format, solar and magnetic indices were added, and some quality control measures were taken. The original intent of producing CD-ROMs with these data was overtaken by the rapid development of the Internet. Most users now prefer to obtain the data directly online and greatly value WWW-interfaces to browse, plot and subset the data. Accordingly the data were made available online on the anonymous ftp site of NASA's National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC) at ftp://nssdcftp.gsfc.nasa.gov/spacecraft data/ and on NSSDC's ATMOWeb (http://nssdc.gsfc.nasa.gov/atmoweb/), a WWW-interface for plotting, subsetting, and downloading the data. Several new features were implemented into ATMOWeb as part of this project including a filtering and scatter plot capability. The availability of this new database and WWW system was announced through several electronic mailer (AGU, CEDAR, IRI, etc) and through talks and posters during scientific meetings.

  15. Os Novos Movimentos Religiosos Católicos e a reação à pós-modernidade.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Luiz Cae

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available : É amplamente reconhecida a capacidade da Igreja Católica de se renovar a partir dos desafios que lhe são impostos pela história. Essa habilidade de ler os “sinais dos tempos” e se adaptar é destacada como uma das justificativas para sua longevidade e vitalidade. Nas últimas décadas, essa característica da Igreja volta a ser ressaltada, à medida que os desafios trazidos pela sociedade pós-moderna aguçam seu sentido de sobrevivência e reação e a fazem retomar práticas que pareciam esquecidas e que, neste momento, lhe restituem o vigor. Enfrentando no Brasil, como também em todo Ocidente, a perda de fiéis, o catolicismo se renova e retoma alguns elementos de seu antigo fervor. Nesse sentido, trataremos aqui de um dos componentes mais significativos dessa renovação que é o movimento de “Novas Comunidades”, cujo principal representante no Brasil é a “Canção Nova”. Antes, porém, de analisarmos esse movimento, procuraremos estabelecer os aspectos históricos da ação da Igreja em relação à modernidade, para compreendermos sua posição atual no quadro da pós-modernidade.

  16. An Experiment to Study Sporadic Atom Layers in the Earth's Mesosphere and Lower Thermosphere (SAL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Michael C.

    1999-01-01

    The Sudden Atom Layer (SAL) Rocket was successfully launched in February 1998. All instruments worked well except those supplied by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. (A dummy weight was launched for the neutral mass spectrometer and the ion version died shortly after lift-off.) A paper has already been published in GRL concerning the dust layer detected by an on board instrument and compared to ground-based observations made at the Arecibo Observatory by Cornell graduate student S. Collins (lidar) and Q. Zhou (radar). Collins presented a comparison of the sodium lidar data and onboard observations with a theoretical model by Plane and Cox at the Fan AGU Meeting. In addition Gelinas and Kelley presented a review paper dealing with the entire SAL instrument complement at the same meeting. An unexpected new explanation for the outer scale of E region plasma irregularities has come out of the data set. We anticipate at least a total of four papers will be published within a year of launch.

  17. OntoSoft: A Software Commons for Geosciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The goal of the EarthCube OntoSoft project is to enable the creation of a germinal ecosystem for software stewardship in geosciences that will empower scientists to manage their software as valuable scientific assets in an open transparent mode that enables broader access to that software by other scientists, software professionals, students, and decision makers. Our work to date includes: 1) an ontology for describing scientific software metadata, 2) a scientific software repository that contains more than 600 entries that can be searched and compared across metadata fields, 3) an intelligent user interface that guides scientists to publish software. We have also developed a training program where scientists learn to describe and cite software in their papers in addition to data and provenance. This training program is part of a Geoscience Papers of the Future Initiative, where scientists learn as they are writing a journal paper that can be submitted to a Special Section of the AGU Earth and Space Science Journal.

  18. New GES DISC Services Shortening the Path in Science Data Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Angela; Shie, Chung-Lin; Petrenko, Maksym; Hegde, Mahabaleshwa; Teng, William; Liu, Zhong; Bryant, Keith; Shen, Suhung; Hearty, Thomas; Wei, Jennifer; hide

    2017-01-01

    The Current GES DISC available services only allow user to select variables from a single dataset at a time and too many variables from a dataset are displayed, choice is hard. At American Geophysical Union (AGU) 2016 Fall Meeting, Goddard Earth Sciences Data Information Services Center (GES DISC) unveiled a new service: Datalist. A Datalist is a collection of predefined or user-defined data variables from one or more archived datasets. Our science support team curated predefined datalist and provided value to the user community. Imagine some novice user wants to study hurricane and typed in hurricane in the search box. The first item in the search result is GES DISC provided Hurricane Datalist. It contains scientists recommended variables from multiple datasets like TRMM, GPM, MERRA, etc. Datalist uses the same architecture as that of our new website, which also provides one-stop shopping for data, metadata, citation, documentation, visualization and other available services.We implemented Datalist with new GES DISC web architecture, one single web page that unified all user interfaces. From that webpage, users can find data by either type in keyword, or browse by category. It also provides user with a sophisticated integrated data and services package, including metadata, citation, documentation, visualization, and data-specific services, all available from one-stop shopping.

  19. Imaging the Transport of Silver Nanoparticles Through Soil With Synchrotron X-ray Microtomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnar, I. L.; Gerhard, J.; O'Carroll, D. M.; Willson, C. S.

    2012-12-01

    Synchrotron x-ray computed microtomography (SXCMT) offers the ability to examine the spatial distribution of contaminants within the pore space of a porous medium; examples include the distribution of nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) and micro-sized colloids. Recently presented was a method, based upon the application of the Beer-Lambert law and K-edge imaging, for using SXCMT to accurately determine the distribution of silver nanoparticles in a porous medium (Molnar et al., AGU Fall Meeting, H53B-1418, 2011). By capturing a series of SXCMT images of a single sample evolving over time, this technique can study the changing distribution of nanoparticles throughout the pore-network and even within individual pores. While previous work on this method focused on accuracy, precision and its potential applications, this study will provide an in-depth analysis of the results of multiple silver nanoparticle transport experiments imaged using this new technique. SXCMT images were collected at various stages of silver nanoparticle injection into columns packed with well graded and poorly graded quartz sand, iron oxide sand and glass bead porous media. The collected images were used to explore the influences of grain type, size and shape on the transport of silver nanoparticles through soil. The results of this analysis illustrate how SXCMT can collect hitherto unobtainable data which can yield valuable insights into the factors affecting nanoparticle transport through soil.

  20. Robots could assist scientists working in Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showstack, Randy

    2011-07-01

    GREENLAND—Tom Lane and Suk Joon Lee, recent graduates of Dartmouth University's Thayer School of Engineering, in Hanover, N. H., are standing outside in the frigid cold testing an autonomous robot that could help with scientific research and logistics in harsh polar environments. This summer, Lane, Lee, and others are at Summit Station, a U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF)-sponsored scientific research station in Greenland, fine-tuning a battery-powered Yeti robot as part of a team working on the NSF-funded Cool Robot project. The station, also known as Summit Camp, is located on the highest point of the Greenland Ice Sheet (72°N, 38°W, 3200 meters above sea level) near the middle of the island. It is a proving ground this season for putting the approximately 68-kilogram, 1-cubic-meter robot through its paces, including improving Yeti's mobility capabilities and field-testing the robot. (See the electronic supplement to this Eos issue for a video of Yeti in action (http://www.agu.org/eos_elec/).) During field-testing, plans call for the robot to collect data on elevation and snow surface characteristics, including accumulation. In addition, the robot will collect black carbon and elemental carbon particulate matter air samples around Summit Camp's power generator to help study carbon dispersion over snow.

  1. Challenges in the Management and Stewardship of Airborne Observational Data at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Earth Observing Laboratory (EOL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquino, J.; Daniels, M. D.

    2015-12-01

    The National Science Foundation (NSF) provides the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Earth Observing Laboratory (EOL) funding for the operation, maintenance and upgrade of two research aircraft: the NSF/NCAR High-performance Instrumented Airborne Platform for Environmental Research (HIAPER) Gulfstream V and the NSF/NCAR Hercules C-130. A suite of in-situ and remote sensing airborne instruments housed at the EOL Research Aviation Facility (RAF) provide a basic set of measurements that are typically deployed on most airborne field campaigns. In addition, instruments to address more specific research requirements are provided by collaborating participants from universities, industry, NASA, NOAA or other agencies (referred to as Principal Investigator, or PI, instruments). At the 2014 AGU Fall Meeting, a poster (IN13B-3639) was presented outlining the components of Airborne Data Management included field phase data collection, formats, data archival and documentation, version control, storage practices, stewardship and obsolete data formats, and public data access. This talk will cover lessons learned, challenges associated with the above components, and current developments to address these challenges, including: tracking data workflows for aircraft instrumentation to facilitate identification, and correction, of gaps in these workflows; implementation of dataset versioning guidelines; and assignment of Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs) to data and instrumentation to facilitate tracking data and facility use in publications.

  2. OntoSoft: A Software Registry for Geosciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garijo, D.; Gil, Y.

    2017-12-01

    The goal of the EarthCube OntoSoft project is to enable the creation of an ecosystem for software stewardship in geosciences that will empower scientists to manage their software as valuable scientific assets. By sharing software metadata in OntoSoft, scientists enable broader access to that software by other scientists, software professionals, students, and decision makers. Our work to date includes: 1) an ontology for describing scientific software metadata, 2) a distributed scientific software repository that contains more than 750 entries that can be searched and compared across metadata fields, 3) an intelligent user interface that guides scientists to publish software and allows them to crowdsource its corresponding metadata. We have also developed a training program where scientists learn to describe and cite software in their papers in addition to data and provenance, and we are using OntoSoft to show them the benefits of publishing their software metadata. This training program is part of a Geoscience Papers of the Future Initiative, where scientists are reflecting on their current practices, benefits and effort for sharing software and data. This journal paper can be submitted to a Special Section of the AGU Earth and Space Science Journal.

  3. Investigation of source location determination from Magsat magnetic anomalies: The Euler method approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravat, Dhananjay

    1996-01-01

    The applicability of the Euler method of source location determination was investigated on several model situations pertinent to satellite-data scale situations as well as Magsat data of Europe. Our investigations enabled us to understand the end-member cases for which the Euler method will work with the present satellite magnetic data and also the cases for which the assumptions implicit in the Euler method will not be met by the present satellite magnetic data. These results have been presented in one invited lecture at the Indo-US workshop on Geomagnetism in Studies of the Earth's Interior in August 1994 in Pune, India, and at one presentation at the 21st General Assembly of the IUGG in July 1995 in Boulder, CO. A new method, called Anomaly Attenuation Rate (AAR) Method (based on the Euler method), was developed during this study. This method is scale-independent and is appropriate to locate centroids of semi-compact three dimensional sources of gravity and magnetic anomalies. The method was presented during 1996 Spring AGU meeting and a manuscript describing this method is being prepared for its submission to a high-ranking journal. The grant has resulted in 3 papers and presentations at national and international meetings and one manuscript of a paper (to be submitted shortly to a reputable journal).

  4. Experimental warming effects on the bacterial community structure and diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, W.; Han, S.; Adams, J.; Son, Y.

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the responses of soil bacterial community to future temperature increase by conducting open-field warming experiment. We conducted an open-field experimental warming system using infra-red heater in 2011 and regulated the temperature of warmed plots by 3oC higher than that of control plots constantly. The seeds of Pinus densiflora, Abies holophylla, Abies koreana, Betula costata, Quercus variabilis, Fraxinus rhynchophylla, and Zelkova serrata were planted in each 1 m × 1 m plot (n=3) in April, 2012. We collected soil samples from the rhizosphere of 7 tree species. DNA was extracted and PCR-amplified for the bacterial 16S gene targeting V1-V3 region. The paired-end sequencing was performed at Beijing Genome Institute (BGI, Hong Kong, China) using 2× 100 bp Hiseq2000 (Illumina). This study aimed to answer the following prediction/hypothesis: 1) Experimental warming will change the structure of soil bacterial community, 2) There will be distinct 'indicator group' which response to warming treatment relatively more sensitive than other groups. 3) Warming treatment will enhance the microbial activity in terms of soil respiration. 4) The rhizoplane bacterial communities for each of 7 tree species will show different response pattern to warming treatment. Since the sequence data does not arrive before the submission deadline, therefore, we would like to present the results and discussions on December 2014, AGU Fall Meeting.

  5. A vision for Water Resources Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, M. P.

    2017-12-01

    Water Resources Research (WRR) plays a leading role in advancing hydrologic science. As AGU's hydrology journal, WRR has nurtured and published major breakthroughs in hydrologic process understanding and prediction capabilities, accomplished through innovative measurement campaigns, novel data analysis techniques, and elegant computational methods. Developing synergies between process-oriented and applications-oriented science is becoming more important as large changes in coupled human-natural systems impose new stresses on hydrologic systems and create new needs for hydrologic process understanding and prediction. In this presentation I will summarize some major opportunities for WRR, such as the growth of interdisciplinary science and the need for greater international cooperation through sharing of data and model source codes. I will discuss these opportunities in the context of major external trends, especially (1) changes in the perceived value of science to address societal problems, (2) the explosive global growth in science over the past decade, and (3) the transition to a more diffuse publishing landscape. This presentation is intended to foster discussion on ways that WRR can enhance the quality and impact of hydrologic science.

  6. ETHNO-VETERINARY MEDICINAL USAGE OF FLORA OF GREATER CHOLISTAN DESERT (PAKISTAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FRAZ M. KHAN

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available A study on the ethno-veterinary usage of wild medicinal plants of Greater Cholistan desert of Pakistan was conducted from January, 2007 to December, 2008. Information regarding 35 plant species was collected. According to the results, Blepharis sindica was used as galactagogue. Butea monosperma, Calotropis procera and Phyllanthus nirurii were used as emollient, demulcent and antiphlogistic. Amaranthus trilocular, Capparis decidua, Clerodendron phlomoides, Phyllanthus nirurii and Ricinus communis were used as carminative and stomachic. Capparis decidua and Calotropis procera were used as appetizer. Prosopis glandulosa had anodyne properties, Achyranthes aspera had antilithic, while Pedalium murex, Tribulus terrestris and Barleria prionites had diuretic value. Achyranthes aspera, Argemone mexicana, Balanites aegyptiaca, Butea monosperma, Cassia senna, Citrullus colocynthis and Vitex negundo were used as vermifuge. Alhagi camelorum and Balanites aegyptiaca had aperient properties. Barleria prionites and Mollugo nudicaulis had their role in the ripening of an abscess. Ricinus communis and Salvadora oleoides aided in the removal of placenta and lochia. Anamitra cocculus and Argemone mexicana were used as febrifuge. Aerva javanica, Ailanthus excelsa, Amaranthus trilocular, Capparis decidua were used in diarrhoea and dysentery. Argemone mexicana and Ailanthus excelsa were used in ague.

  7. An ARM data-oriented diagnostics package to evaluate the climate model simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, C.; Xie, S.

    2016-12-01

    A set of diagnostics that utilize long-term high frequency measurements from the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program is developed for evaluating the regional simulation of clouds, radiation and precipitation in climate models. The diagnostics results are computed and visualized automatically in a python-based package that aims to serve as an easy entry point for evaluating climate simulations using the ARM data, as well as the CMIP5 multi-model simulations. Basic performance metrics are computed to measure the accuracy of mean state and variability of simulated regional climate. The evaluated physical quantities include vertical profiles of clouds, temperature, relative humidity, cloud liquid water path, total column water vapor, precipitation, sensible and latent heat fluxes, radiative fluxes, aerosol and cloud microphysical properties. Process-oriented diagnostics focusing on individual cloud and precipitation-related phenomena are developed for the evaluation and development of specific model physical parameterizations. Application of the ARM diagnostics package will be presented in the AGU session. This work is performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344, IM release number is: LLNL-ABS-698645.

  8. Toward the second 50 years of Water Resources Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajaram, H.

    2014-12-01

    Since the first issue in 1965, 49 volumes and 464 issues of Water Resources Research (WRR) have been published, including more than 13,800 contributions that received more than 380,000 citations. WRR has always maintained a forward-looking vision, providing an interdisciplinary platform to nurture the initiation and development of numerous sub-disciplines and research themes in hydrology, water resources, and earth sciences and over the last 50 years. This vision, supported in no small measure by a dedicated community of researchers who submitted their best research to WRR, have helped the journal maintain its international leadership in this field. As we enter the second 50 years of WRR, new trends in scientific publishing, open access publication and web-based discussion forums, pose challenges (and opportunities) for sustaining WRR's leadership role. In this presentation, we will present the vision of the present editorial board for the future of WRR, and discuss several steps we are undertaking to adapt the journal to modern trends in communicating scientific research. This includes the introduction of new article types, such as the forthcoming "Debates on Water Resources", targeted special sections, and efforts to improve the timeliness of the review process. We humbly stand on the shoulders of the thirty-four dedicated previous editors of WRR, and remain open to receiving suggestions from the AGU hydrologic community.

  9. Global OpenSearch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, D. J.; Mitchell, A. E.

    2015-12-01

    At AGU 2014, NASA EOSDIS demonstrated a case-study of an OpenSearch framework for Earth science data discovery. That framework leverages the IDN and CWIC OpenSearch API implementations to provide seamless discovery of data through the 'two-step' discovery process as outlined by the Federation for Earth Sciences (ESIP) OpenSearch Best Practices. But how would an Earth Scientist leverage this framework and what are the benefits? Using a client that understands the OpenSearch specification and, for further clarity, the various best practices and extensions, a scientist can discovery a plethora of data not normally accessible either by traditional methods (NASA Earth Data Search, Reverb, etc) or direct methods (going to the source of the data) We will demonstrate, via the CWICSmart web client, how an earth scientist can access regional data on a regional phenomena in a uniform and aggregated manner. We will demonstrate how an earth scientist can 'globalize' their discovery. You want to find local data on 'sea surface temperature of the Indian Ocean'? We can help you with that. 'European meteorological data'? Yes. 'Brazilian rainforest satellite imagery'? That too. CWIC allows you to get earth science data in a uniform fashion from a large number of disparate, world-wide agencies. This is what we mean by Global OpenSearch.

  10. As Bruxas no Divã: o desafio de ser criativo e ousar no ensino de artes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Rossa

    2012-11-01

    Este artigo relata o projeto “As Bruxas no Divã”, que consiste na produção de um filme no Instituto Estadual de Educação (IEE escola da rede estadual de ensino de SC. Nele introduziu-se a linguagem cinematográfica na Educação Infantil, contribuindo no processo de ensino e aprendizagem de Artes. O objetivo deste projeto foi desenvolver uma vivência dentro das diversas linguagens artísticas, bem como aguçar a reflexão sobre questões existenciais da vida. O projeto oportunizou a utilização de diversas linguagens artísticas bem como as novas tecnologias. A motivação para seu desenvolvimento foi à literatura e a produção de cinema amador infantil e se mostraram uma forma de comunicação apta a estabelecer interdisciplinaridade de várias áreas do conhecimento de forma criativa e harmoniosa.

  11. Shock recovery experiments in the range of 10 to 45 GPa - comparison of results of synthetic magnetite and terrestrial diabase

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kohout, Tomáš; Pesonen, L.; Deutsch, A.; Honnermann, U.

    89 /53/, Fall Meeting Supplement (2008), , GP21C-0790-GP21C-0790 ISSN 0096-3941. [American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting. 15.12.2008-19.12.2008, San Francisco] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30130516 Keywords : shock experiments * magnetite * diabase Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography http://www.agu.org/cgi-bin/SFgate/SFgate?language=English&verbose=0&listenv=table&application=fm08&convert=&converthl=&refinequery=&formintern=&formextern=&transquery=kohout&_lines=&multiple=0&descriptor=%2fdata%2fepubs%2fwais%2findexes%2ffm08%2ffm08%7c766%7c5433%7cShock%20recovery%20experiments%20in%20the%20range%20of%2010%20to%2045%20GPa%20-%20comparison%20of%20results%20of%20synthetic%20magnetite%20and%20terrestrial%20diabase%7cHTML%7clocalhost:0%7c%2fdata%2fepubs%2fwais%2findexes%2ffm08%2ffm08%7c19257669%2019263102%20%2fdata2%2fepubs%2fwais%2fdata%2ffm08%2ffm08.txt

  12. Determination of mole fractions of ethyl-cellulose-containing monomers by NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kono, Hiroyuki

    2017-06-05

    Three samples of ethyl cellulose (EC) with different degrees of substitution (DS)-0.51, 1.41, and 2.28-were prepared by a slurry method using ethyl bromide as the etherification reagent. 1 H- 13 C HSQC and HSQC-TOCSY NMR spectral analysis allowed for complete assignment of the 1 H and 13 C chemical shifts, respectively, of eight anhydroglucose units (AGUs) comprising EC chains-un-, 2-mono-, 3-mono-, 6-mono-, 2,3-di-, 2,6-di-, 3,6-di-, and 2,3,6-tri-substituted AGUs. In addition, the lineshape of the quantitative 13 C NMR spectra of the three EC samples provided change in the mole fractions of these AGUs against DS, making it possible to estimate the reaction mechanism for the production of EC, elucidating reactivities of the hydroxyl groups at the 2, 3, and 6 positions of cellulose and interactions between the substituent groups within the same AGU and vicinal AGUs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The Hydrologic Ensemble Prediction Experiment (HEPEX)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, A. W.; Thielen, J.; Pappenberger, F.; Schaake, J. C.; Hartman, R. K.

    2012-12-01

    The Hydrologic Ensemble Prediction Experiment was established in March, 2004, at a workshop hosted by the European Center for Medium Range Weather Forecasting (ECMWF). With support from the US National Weather Service (NWS) and the European Commission (EC), the HEPEX goal was to bring the international hydrological and meteorological communities together to advance the understanding and adoption of hydrological ensemble forecasts for decision support in emergency management and water resources sectors. The strategy to meet this goal includes meetings that connect the user, forecast producer and research communities to exchange ideas, data and methods; the coordination of experiments to address specific challenges; and the formation of testbeds to facilitate shared experimentation. HEPEX has organized about a dozen international workshops, as well as sessions at scientific meetings (including AMS, AGU and EGU) and special issues of scientific journals where workshop results have been published. Today, the HEPEX mission is to demonstrate the added value of hydrological ensemble prediction systems (HEPS) for emergency management and water resources sectors to make decisions that have important consequences for economy, public health, safety, and the environment. HEPEX is now organised around six major themes that represent core elements of a hydrologic ensemble prediction enterprise: input and pre-processing, ensemble techniques, data assimilation, post-processing, verification, and communication and use in decision making. This poster presents an overview of recent and planned HEPEX activities, highlighting case studies that exemplify the focus and objectives of HEPEX.

  14. Disturbance hydrology: Preparing for an increasingly disturbed future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirus, Benjamin B.; Ebel, Brian A.; Mohr, Christian H.; Zegre, Nicolas

    2017-01-01

    This special issue is the result of several fruitful conference sessions on disturbance hydrology, which started at the 2013 AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco and have continued every year since. The stimulating presentations and discussions surrounding those sessions have focused on understanding both the disruption of hydrologic functioning following discrete disturbances, as well as the subsequent recovery or change within the affected watershed system. Whereas some hydrologic disturbances are directly linked to anthropogenic activities, such as resource extraction, the contributions to this special issue focus primarily on those with indirect or less pronounced human involvement, such as bark-beetle infestation, wildfire, and other natural hazards. However, human activities are enhancing the severity and frequency of these seemingly natural disturbances, thereby contributing to acute hydrologic problems and hazards. Major research challenges for our increasingly disturbed planet include the lack of continuous pre- and post-disturbance monitoring, hydrologic impacts that vary spatially and temporally based on environmental and hydroclimatic conditions, and the preponderance of overlapping or compounding disturbance sequences. In addition, a conceptual framework for characterizing commonalities and differences among hydrologic disturbances is still in its infancy. In this introduction to the special issue, we advance the fusion of concepts and terminology from ecology and hydrology to begin filling this gap. We briefly explore some preliminary approaches for comparing different disturbances and their hydrologic impacts, which provides a starting point for further dialogue and research progress.

  15. Unrecognized clozapine-related constipation leading to fatal intra-abdominal sepsis – a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oke V

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Vikram Oke, Frances Schmidt, Bikash Bhattarai, Md Basunia, Chidozie Agu, Amrit Kaur, Danilo Enriquez, Joseph Quist, Divya Salhan, Vijay Gayam, Prajakta Mungikar Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Interfaith Medical Center, NY, USA Abstract: Clozapine is the preferred antipsychotic used for the treatment of resistant schizophrenia with suicidal ideation. The drug is started at a low dose and gradually increased to a target dose of 300–450 mg/day. It is well known to cause agranulocytosis and neutropenia. Several cases of fatal sepsis have been reported in neutropenic patients and emphasis is placed on monitoring for agranulocytosis; however, clozapine also causes intestinal hypomotility and constipation, which if unrecognized can lead to intestinal obstruction, bowel necrosis, and intra-abdominal sepsis. Reduced behavioral pain reactivity in schizophrenics may alter the ability to express pain, potentially leading to a delay in the presentation for medical attention. We report a case of fatal intra-abdominal sepsis secondary to an unrecognized case of clozapine-related constipation. Keywords: antipsychotics, clozapine, schizophrenia, syncope, constipation, sepsis

  16. Literatura, indústria cultural e formação humana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fhiladelfio Joana Alves

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho aborda questões referentes à literatura e aos produtos da indústria cultural, especialmente aos chamados romances "cor-de-rosa", focalizando as potencialidades de diferentes discursos na formação da subjetividade. As protagonistas dos romances O Quinze e As Três Marias, de Rachel de Queiroz são utilizadas como referência. Nesta perspectiva, evidencia-se a impregnação das criações ficcionais, atuando, de forma subconsciente e inconsciente, nas camadas profundas da personalidade, que pode em alguns casos, ampliar o conhecimento e a experiência humanos, aguçar os meios de expressão, despertar o senso crítico, mas em outros, reforçar a alienação da realidade. Conclui que enquanto a literatura oferece a possibilidade de libertar, os produtos da indústria cultural, ou seja, a literatura de massas, constituem um convite à alienação, ao conformismo, uma vez que tendem a inculcar estereótipos e preconceitos.

  17. Observing Human-induced Linkages between Urbanization and Earth's Climate System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, J. Marshall; Jin, Menglin

    2004-01-01

    Urbanization is one of the extreme cases of land use change. Most of world s population has moved to urban areas. Although currently only 1.2% of the land is considered urban, the spatial coverage and density of cities are expected to rapidly increase in the near future. It is estimated that by the year 2025, 60% of the world s population will live in cities. Human activity in urban environments also alters atmospheric composition; impacts components of the water cycle; and modifies the carbon cycle and ecosystems. However, our understanding of urbanization on the total Earth-climate system is incomplete. Better understanding of how the Earth s atmosphere-ocean-land-biosphere components interact as a coupled system and the influence of the urban environment on this climate system is critical. The goal of the 2003 AGU Union session Human-induced climate variations on urban areas: From observations to modeling was to bring together scientists from interdisciplinary backgrounds to discuss the data, scientific approaches and recent results on observing and modeling components of the urban environment with the intent of sampling our current stand and discussing future direction on this topic. Herein, a summary and discussion of the observations component of the session are presented.

  18. Processo de busca e recuperação de informação em ambientes organizacionais: uma reflexão teórica sobre a subjetividade da informação

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiciane Mary Carvalho Teixeira

    Full Text Available RESUMO A recuperação eficiente de informações relevantes para o negócio organizacional ainda se constitui em um desafio para os gestores de informação, principalmente se o objetivo for incentivar e possibilitar o amplo acesso às informações geradas internamente e externamente à organização, visando realizar ações estratégicas. Nessa perspectiva, o gerenciamento da informação passou a ser uma atividade imprescindível para as organizações, ou seja, prospectar e monitorar informações que propiciem decisões e ações estratégicas, de maneira a propiciar diferenciais competitivos organizacionais. As condições de acesso e busca para a apropriação e uso de informações no contexto organizacional tornou-se uma atividade complexa devido à subjetividade da informação, característica esta que impõe ao gestor da informação desenvolver uma percepção aguçada no que tange ao mundo informacional, de maneira a atender as necessidades e demandas informacionais eficazmente.

  19. Historical Reveiw of Interstellar Probe Concepts and Examination of Payload Mass Considerations for Different System Architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, K.

    2017-12-01

    The ability to send a space probe beyond the Voyager probes, through the interstellar medium and towardsthe distant stars, has long been the ambition of both the science ction literature but also a small community ofadvocates that have argued for a broader and deeper vision of space exploration that goes outside of our SolarSystem. In this paper we discuss some of the historical interstellar probe concepts which are propelled usingdierent types of propulsion technology, from energetic reaction engines to directed energy beaming, and considerthe payload mass associated with such concepts. We compare and contrast the dierent design concepts, payloadmass fractions, powers and energies and discuss the implications for robotic space exploration within the stellarneighbourhood. Finally, we consider the Breakthrough Starshot initiative, which proposes to send a Gram-scalelaser driven spacecraft to the Alpha Centauri system in a 20 year mission travelling at v 0.2c. We show howthis is a good start in pushing our robotic probes towards interstellar destinations, but also discuss the potentialfor scaling up this systems architecture to missions closer at home, or higher mass missions wider aeld. This is apresentation for the American Geophysical Union at the AGU Fall meeting, New Orleans, 11-15 December 2017,Special Session on the Interstellar Probe Missions.Keywords: Interstellar Probe, Breakthrough Starshot

  20. Lactose-mediated carbon catabolite repression of putrescine production in dairy Lactococcus lactis is strain dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Rio, Beatriz; Ladero, Victor; Redruello, Begoña; Linares, Daniel M; Fernández, Maria; Martín, Maria Cruz; Alvarez, Miguel A

    2015-06-01

    Lactococcus lactis is the lactic acid bacterial (LAB) species most widely used as a primary starter in the dairy industry. However, several strains of L. lactis produce the biogenic amine putrescine via the agmatine deiminase (AGDI) pathway. We previously reported the putrescine biosynthesis pathway in L. lactis subsp. cremoris GE2-14 to be regulated by carbon catabolic repression (CCR) via glucose but not lactose (Linares et al., 2013). The present study shows that both these sugars repress putrescine biosynthesis in L. lactis subsp. lactis T3/33, a strain isolated from a Spanish artisanal cheese. Furthermore, we demonstrated that both glucose and lactose repressed the transcriptional activity of the aguBDAC catabolic genes of the AGDI route. Finally, a screening performed in putrescine-producing dairy L. lactis strains determined that putrescine biosynthesis was repressed by lactose in all the L. lactis subsp. lactis strains tested, but in only one L. lactis subsp. cremoris strain. Given the obvious importance of the lactose-repression in cheese putrescine accumulation, it is advisable to consider the diversity of L. lactis in this sense and characterize consequently the starter cultures to select the safest strains. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.