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Sample records for ehlers-danlos syndrome type

  1. Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Hypermobility Type

    Science.gov (United States)

    EHLERS-DANLOS SYNDROME HYPERMOBILITY TYPE Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type is a connective tissue disorder that mostly affects the bones and joints. People with this condition have loose joints ...

  2. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Germain Dominique P

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV, the vascular type of Ehlers-Danlos syndromes (EDS, is an inherited connective tissue disorder defined by characteristic facial features (acrogeria in most patients, translucent skin with highly visible subcutaneous vessels on the trunk and lower back, easy bruising, and severe arterial, digestive and uterine complications, which are rarely, if at all, observed in the other forms of EDS. The estimated prevalence for all EDS varies between 1/10,000 and 1/25,000, EDS type IV representing approximately 5 to 10% of cases. The vascular complications may affect all anatomical areas, with a tendency toward arteries of large and medium diameter. Dissections of the vertebral arteries and the carotids in their extra- and intra-cranial segments (carotid-cavernous fistulae are typical. There is a high risk of recurrent colonic perforations. Pregnancy increases the likelihood of a uterine or vascular rupture. EDS type IV is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait that is caused by mutations in the COL3A1 gene coding for type III procollagen. Diagnosis is based on clinical signs, non-invasive imaging, and the identification of a mutation of the COL3A1 gene. In childhood, coagulation disorders and Silverman's syndrome are the main differential diagnoses; in adulthood, the differential diagnosis includes other Ehlers-Danlos syndromes, Marfan syndrome and Loeys-Dietz syndrome. Prenatal diagnosis can be considered in families where the mutation is known. Choriocentesis or amniocentesis, however, may entail risk for the pregnant woman. In the absence of specific treatment for EDS type IV, medical intervention should be focused on symptomatic treatment and prophylactic measures. Arterial, digestive or uterine complications require immediate hospitalisation, observation in an intensive care unit. Invasive imaging techniques are contraindicated. Conservative approach is usually recommended when caring for a vascular

  3. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germain, Dominique P

    2007-01-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV, the vascular type of Ehlers-Danlos syndromes (EDS), is an inherited connective tissue disorder defined by characteristic facial features (acrogeria) in most patients, translucent skin with highly visible subcutaneous vessels on the trunk and lower back, easy bruising, and severe arterial, digestive and uterine complications, which are rarely, if at all, observed in the other forms of EDS. The estimated prevalence for all EDS varies between 1/10,000 and 1/25,000, EDS type IV representing approximately 5 to 10% of cases. The vascular complications may affect all anatomical areas, with a tendency toward arteries of large and medium diameter. Dissections of the vertebral arteries and the carotids in their extra- and intra-cranial segments (carotid-cavernous fistulae) are typical. There is a high risk of recurrent colonic perforations. Pregnancy increases the likelihood of a uterine or vascular rupture. EDS type IV is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait that is caused by mutations in the COL3A1 gene coding for type III procollagen. Diagnosis is based on clinical signs, non-invasive imaging, and the identification of a mutation of the COL3A1 gene. In childhood, coagulation disorders and Silverman's syndrome are the main differential diagnoses; in adulthood, the differential diagnosis includes other Ehlers-Danlos syndromes, Marfan syndrome and Loeys-Dietz syndrome. Prenatal diagnosis can be considered in families where the mutation is known. Choriocentesis or amniocentesis, however, may entail risk for the pregnant woman. In the absence of specific treatment for EDS type IV, medical intervention should be focused on symptomatic treatment and prophylactic measures. Arterial, digestive or uterine complications require immediate hospitalisation, observation in an intensive care unit. Invasive imaging techniques are contraindicated. Conservative approach is usually recommended when caring for a vascular complication in a patient suffering

  4. Ehlers- Danlos Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasanta Basak

    1989-01-01

    Full Text Available A female patient had Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type II since infancy, manifesting with hyperextensible skin and ciagarette paper scars at the sites of trauma. Treatment with vitamin C 1 gm a day seemed to be useful.

  5. [Ehler-Danlos syndrome type VIII].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciarloni, L; Perrigouard, C; Lipsker, D; Cribier, B

    2010-03-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) comprises a heterogeneous group of diseases involving genetic collagen fibre impairment. We describe a case of a patient presenting the rare type VIII, in which dermatitis ocre was associated with parodontal disease, and which was diagnosed late. A 29-year-old man consulted for a pretibial ulcer present for seven years, resulting from a post-traumatic haematoma that had failed to heal. In view of the longiliner morphology, it had previously been diagnosed as Marfan syndrome. Subsequently, edentation was observed as well as "alveolar bone fragility". Examination revealed a marfanoid morphotype, a pretibial ulcer set within long-standing bilateral dermatitis ocre and papyraceous scars, but no joint hyperlaxity or cutaneous hyperelasticity. The diagnosis was consequently corrected to EDS type VIII. Type VIII is a rare form of EDS, and the molecular mechanism is poorly understood. The involvement of parodontal connective tissue suggests impairment of collagen I and III proteins. It is important to identify this type of the disease since it involves parodontal disease for which early treatment is required in order to try to prevent edentation. The present case demonstrates the importance of diagnosis, which may be based upon appearance of bilateral dermatitis ocre from the age of 15 years associated with skin fragility. This sign is not part of the classical picture of Marfan syndrome, with which EDS type VIII is often confounded. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Ehlers-danlos Syndrome in Four Generations

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    H B Singh

    1983-01-01

    Full Text Available Thirteen cases of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome are being reported from a twentyfive member family. All had type 11 (mitis variety of Ehlers-danlos syndrome with autosomal dominant transmission.

  7. Endovascular repair of multiple infrageniculate aneurysms in a patient with vascular type Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domenick, Natalie; Cho, Jae S; Abu Hamad, Ghassan; Makaroun, Michel S; Chaer, Rabih A

    2011-09-01

    Patients with vascular type Ehler-Danlos syndrome can develop aneurysms in unusual locations. We describe the case of a 33-year-old woman with vascular type Ehlers-Danlos syndrome who developed metachronous tibial artery aneurysms that were sequentially treated with endovascular means. Copyright © 2011 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. [Ehler-Danlos syndrome (type V) with urethra bifida and polydactyly: an unusual combination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manna, R; Modugno, I; Pala, M A; Caputo, S; Caradonna, E; Greco, A V

    1981-06-30

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome is currently regarded as a connective tissue dysplasia. Its genetic, biochemical, histological and clinical features are described, together with a personal case in a patient who presented the fundamental symptoms, plus polydactyly and bifid urethra. This association had not been hitherto reported in the literature. The case itself is classed as Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type V.

  9. Ehlers-Danlos' Syndrom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leganger, Julie; Søborg, Marie-Louise Kulas; Farholt, Stense

    2016-01-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) comprises a group of diseases characterized by connective tissue fragility. The clinical symptoms primarily involve the skin, joints, blood vessels and internal organs. Diagnosing EDS is complicated because of the clinical variability, imprecise diagnostic criteria...

  10. Neuromuscular involvement in various types of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voermans, N.C.; Alfen, N. van; Pillen, S.; Lammens, M.M.Y.; Schalkwijk, J.; Zwarts, M.J.; Rooij, I.A.L.M. van; Hamel, B.C.J.; Engelen, B.G.M. van

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of heritable connective tissue disorders characterized by joint hypermobility, skin hyperextensibility, and tissue fragility. Muscle involvement is plausible based on recently discovered interactions between

  11. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhana Tahseen Taj

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS is a generalized disorder of one element of connective tissue manifesting clinically by fragility and hyperelasticity of the skin and joint laxity. It is a hereditary disorder, the inheritance being usually autosomal dominant with low penetrance. Autosomal recessive and X-linked recessive varieties are also known. First described by Hippocrates in 4 th century B.C., the various clinical types with variable penetrance have been described lately. The number of cases EDS reported in the literature is very meagre. With the available information only about six publications of classic EDS in siblings had been reported in Indian literature.

  12. Hypermobile Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (a.k.a. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome Type III and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type): Clinical description and natural history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinkle, Brad; Castori, Marco; Berglund, Britta; Cohen, Helen; Grahame, Rodney; Kazkaz, Hanadi; Levy, Howard

    2017-03-01

    The hypermobile type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (hEDS) is likely the most common hereditary disorder of connective tissue. It has been described largely in those with musculoskeletal complaints including joint hypermobility, joint subluxations/dislocations, as well as skin and soft tissue manifestations. Many patients report activity-related pain and some go on to have daily pain. Two undifferentiated syndromes have been used to describe these manifestations-joint hypermobility syndrome and hEDS. Both are clinical diagnoses in the absence of other causation. Current medical literature further complicates differentiation and describes multiple associated symptoms and disorders. The current EDS nosology combines these two entities into the hypermobile type of EDS. Herein, we review and summarize the literature as a better clinical description of this type of connective tissue disorder. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome

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    Wakhloo Tulika

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ehlers-Danlos syndrome is a group of clinically and genetically heterogeneous inherited connective tissue disorders with widespread manifestations. The prevalence of this syndrome is 1:5000 worldwide without gender, racial or ethnic associations. This syndrome is characterized by joint hypermobility, dermal hyperelasticity and tissue fragility caused by mutations in genes encoding collagen type I, III, V and enzymes involved in the posttranslational modifications of collagen. The oral manifestations include increased mucosal fragility, delayed wound healing, early onset generalized periodontitis and temporomandibular joint hypermobility. Children presenting with this syndrome are often misdiagnosed for hematological problem as they present with bruising, malignancy and/or child abuse. A thorough assessment of the patient is, therefore, essential for early diagnosis and patient referral. This paper reviews current literature, oral manifestations, diagnostic investigations and effective dental management.

  14. Type IV Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome: A Surgical Emergency? A Case of Massive Retroperitoneal Hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Stephen G; Pedro, Patrick; Yu, Mihae; Takanishi, Danny M

    2011-01-01

    Retroperitoneal hemorrhagic bleeding is a known manifestation of Type-IV Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome that is caused by loss-of-function mutations of the pro-alpha-1 chains of type III pro-collagen (COL3A1) resulting in vascular fragility. A number of previous reports describe futile surgical intervention for retroperitoneal bleeding in Type-IV Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome with high post-operative mortality, although the rarity of retroperitoneal bleeding associated with Type-IV Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome precludes an evidence-based approach to clinical management. We report a 23-year-old male with history of Type-IV Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome who presented with severe abdominal pain and tachycardia following an episode of vomiting. Further work-up of his abdominal pain revealed massive retroperitoneal bleeding by CT-scan of the abdomen. Given numerous cases of catastrophic injury caused by surgical intervention in Type-IV Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome, the patient was treated non-operatively, and the patient made a full recovery. This case suggests that even in cases of large retroperitoneal hemorrhages associated with Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome, it may not truly represent a surgical emergency. PMID:21966332

  15. Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Type VIIC: A Mexican Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Rosa Rincón-Sánchez

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS is a heterogeneous group of heritable connective tissue disorders whose primary clinical features include soft and extensible skin, articular hypermobility and tissue fragility. EDS type VIIC or ‘human dermatosparaxis’ is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by severe skin fragility and sagging redundant skin (major criteria with a soft, doughy texture, easy bruising, premature rupture of fetal membranes and large hernias (minor criteria. Dermatosparaxis (meaning ‘tearing of skin’, which has been described in several non-human species, is a disorder of the connective tissue resulting from a deficiency of the enzyme that cleaves the registration peptide off the N-terminal end of collagen after it has been secreted from fibroblasts. We describe a Mexican case from consanguineous parents with all the phenotypical characteristics previously described, plus skeletal abnormalities.

  16. Exercise beliefs and behaviours of individuals with Joint Hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome - hypermobility type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmonds, Jane V; Herbland, Anthony; Hakim, Alan; Ninis, Nelly; Lever, William; Aziz, Qasim; Cairns, Mindy

    2017-11-10

    To explore exercise beliefs and behaviours of individuals with Joint Hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome - hypermobility type and to explore patient experiences of physiotherapy. A cross sectional questionnaire survey design was used to collect quantitative and qualitative data from adult members of the Hypermobility Syndromes Association and Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Support UK. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to analyse the data. Qualitative data was analysed thematically. 946 questionnaires were returned and analysed. Participants who received exercise advice from a physiotherapist were 1.75 more likely to report high volumes of weekly exercise (odds ratio [OR] = 1.75, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.30-2.36, p Ehlers-Danlos syndrome - hypermobility type in this survey. Implications for rehabilitation Exercise is a cornerstone of treatment for Ehlers-Danlos syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome - hypermobility type. Pain, fatigue and fear of injury are frequently reported barriers to exercise. Advice from physiotherapists may significantly influence exercise behaviour. Physiotherapists with condition specific knowledge and good verbal and non-verbal communication facilitate a positive therapeutic experience.

  17. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, classical type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Jessica M; Sobey, Glenda J; Burrows, Nigel P; Colombi, Marina; Lavallee, Mark E; Malfait, Fransiska; Francomano, Clair A

    2017-03-01

    Classical EDS is a heritable disorder of connective tissue. Patients are affected with joint hypermobility, skin hyperextensibilty, and skin fragility leading to atrophic scarring and significant bruising. These clinical features suggest consideration of the diagnosis which then needs to be confirmed, preferably by genetic testing. The most recent criteria for the diagnosis of EDS were devised in Villefranche in 1997. [Beighton et al. (1998); Am J Med Genet 77:31-37]. The aims set out in the Villefranche Criteria were: to enable diagnostic uniformity for clinical and research purposes, to understand the natural history of each subtype of EDS, to inform management and genetic counselling, and to identify potential areas of research. The authors recognized that the criteria would need updating, but viewed the Villefranche nosology as a good starting point. Since 1997, there have been major advances in the molecular understanding of classical EDS. Previous question marks over genetic heterogeneity have been largely surpassed by evidence that abnormalities in type V collagen are the cause. Advances in molecular testing have made it possible to identify the causative mutation in the majority of patients. This has aided the further clarification of this diagnosis. The aim of this literature review is to summarize the current knowledge and highlight areas for future research. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Visceroptosis and the Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucera, Stephen; Sullivan, Stephen N

    2017-11-08

    The case of a patient with visceroptosis and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type (RDS-HT) is reported here. The literature on this unusual but probably under-recognized complication is reviewed.

  19. Gait Strategy in Patients with Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Hypermobility Type and Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigoldi, Chiara; Galli, Manuela; Cimolin, Veronica; Camerota, Filippo; Celletti, Claudia; Tenore, Nunzio; Albertini, Giorgio

    2012-01-01

    People suffering from Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) hypermobility type present a severe ligament laxity that results in difficulties in muscle force transmission. The same condition is present in people suffering from Down syndrome (DS) even if their clumsy movements are due to cerebral and cognitive impairments. The aim of this study was to…

  20. Severe conjunctivochalasis in association with classic type Ehlers-Danlos syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Whitaker John K

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inferior conjunctivochalasis is common, but is rarely severe enough to require conjunctival excision. This report describes a patient with severe conjunctivochalasis who was subsequently diagnosed with Ehlers Danlos Syndrome, Classic Type. Case presentation A patient suffering from foreign body sensation, frequent blinking and bilateral inferior conjunctivochalasis was referred and treated by topical ocular lubrication. However, no improvement was observed prompting potential excision of conjunctivochalasis. Following patient consultation and clinical diagnosis including hypermobile joints and skin elasticity, poor wound healing and wide scar morphology, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome was confirmed in the patient. Conclusion This case highlights the need for direct patient questioning and provides the first reported association between conjunctiovochalasis and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

  1. Metachronous Bilateral Posterior Tibial Artery Aneurysms in Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Type IV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagspiel, Klaus D.; Bonatti, Hugo; Sabri, Saher; Arslan, Bulent; Harthun, Nancy L.

    2011-01-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV is a life-threatening genetic connective tissue disorder. We report a 24-year-old woman with EDS-IV who presented with metachronous bilateral aneurysms/pseudoaneurysms of the posterior tibial arteries 15 months apart. Both were treated successfully with transarterial coil embolization from a distal posterior tibial approach.

  2. Genetics Home Reference: Ehlers-Danlos syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Ehlers-Danlos syndrome Ehlers-Danlos syndrome Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Ehlers-Danlos syndrome is a group of disorders that affect connective ...

  3. Cardiovascular profile in postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jem L; Au, Jason S; Guzman, Juan C; Morillo, Carlos A; MacDonald, Maureen J

    2017-04-01

    The cardiovascular profile of postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome + Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type (POTS + EDSIII) has not been described, despite suggestions that it plays a role in orthostatic intolerance. We studied nine individuals diagnosed with POTS + EDSIII and found that the arterial stiffness and cardiac profiles of patients with POTS + EDSIII were comparable to those of age- and sex-matched controls, suggesting an alternate explanation for orthostatic intolerance.

  4. Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome in Orthopaedics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirley, Eric D.; DeMaio, Marlene; Bodurtha, Joanne

    2012-01-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome is a heterogeneous connective tissue condition characterized by varying degrees of skin hyperextensibility, joint hypermobility, and vascular fragility. Joint dislocations, musculoskeletal pain, atrophic scars, easy bleeding, vessel/viscera rupture, severe scoliosis, and obstetric complications may occur. These manifestations are secondary to abnormal collagen, with specific molecular defects in types I, III, and V collagen; they may also be related to tenascin-X, which has been identified in some patients. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome has been classified into 6 types, with variable degrees of joint instability, skin hyperextensibility, wound healing difficulty, and vascular fragility. Diagnosis begins with recognition of the signs and symptoms of global hypermobility and referring appropriate patients for genetic consultation. It is important to accurately identify patients with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome to initiate appropriate musculoskeletal treatment, optimize anesthetic and postoperative management, perform appropriate vascular screening, and help families address their concerns with other families and advocacy groups. PMID:23016112

  5. Chronic fatigue in Ehlers-Danlos syndrome-Hypermobile type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakim, Alan; De Wandele, Inge; O'Callaghan, Chris; Pocinki, Alan; Rowe, Peter

    2017-03-01

    Chronic fatigue is an important contributor to impaired health-related quality of life in Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. There is overlap in the symptoms and findings of EDS and chronic fatigue syndrome. A proportion of those with CFS likely have EDS that has not been identified. The evaluation of chronic fatigue in EDS needs to include a careful clinical examination and laboratory testing to exclude common causes of fatigue including anemia, hypothyroidisim, and chronic infection, as well as dysfunction of major physiological or organ systems. Other problems that commonly contribute to fatigue in EDS include sleep disorders, chronic pain, deconditioning, cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction, bowel and bladder dysfunction, psychological issues, and nutritional deficiencies. While there is no specific pharmacological treatment for fatigue, many medications are effective for specific symptoms (such as headache, menstrual dysfunction, or myalgia) and for co-morbid conditions that result in fatigue, including orthostatic intolerance and insomnia. Comprehensive treatment of fatigue needs to also evaluate for biomechanical problems that are common in EDS, and usually involves skilled physical therapy and attention to methods to prevent deconditioning. In addition to managing specific symptoms, treatment of fatigue in EDS also needs to focus on maintaining function and providing social, physical, and nutritional support, as well as providing on-going medical evaluation of new problems and review of new evidence about proposed treatments. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Type VIII: A Rare Cause of Leg Ulcers in Young Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Ronceray

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type VIII (EDS-VIII is a very rare autosomal dominant disease characterized by early-onset periodontitis associated with features of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. We report a 32-year-old man whose chronic leg ulcer led to the diagnosis of EDS-VIII. He had severe periodontitis with complete loss of permanent teeth and skin fragility with thin skin, atrophic scars, and brownish atrophic pretibial plaques. Leg ulcer is not a prominent feature of EDS-VIII. We suggest adding EDS-VIII to the list of rare diseases accounting for chronic leg ulcers, if this case report prompts others to report leg ulcers associated with EDS-VIII.

  7. Stroke in Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Kyphoscoliotic Type: Dissection or Vasculitis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quade, Annegret; Wiesmann, Martin; Weis, Joachim; Kurth, Ingo; Jalaie, Houman; Rohrbach, Marianne; Häusler, Martin

    2017-09-01

    Patients with the kyphoscoliotic type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome have an increased risk of vascular complications such as aortic dissection and perforation. Cerebral ischemia has only rarely been documented. This 13-year-old girl with the kyphoscoliotic type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome experienced a large right middle cerebral artery distribution infarction. Full intravenous heparinization was started in response to presumed arterial dissection. Magnetic resonance imaging studies including magnetic resonance angiography and digital subtraction angiography, however, did not confirm dissection but suggested with cerebral vasculitis extending from the intradural right internal carotid artery to the M2 branches of the middle cerebral artery. Combined steroid and cyclophosphamide therapy was associated with clinical improvement. Two months later she died from hemorrhagic shock caused by a two-sided spontaneous rupture of the aortic artery. Cerebral vasculitis should be included in the differential diagnosis of vascular complications in kyphoscoliotic type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Features that exacerbate fatigue severity in joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome - hypermobility type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krahe, Anne Maree; Adams, Roger David; Nicholson, Leslie Lorenda

    2018-08-01

    To assess the prevalence, severity and impact of fatigue on individuals with joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS)/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome - hypermobility type (EDS-HT) and establish potential determinants of fatigue severity in this population. Questionnaires on symptoms and signs related to fatigue, quality of life, mental health, physical activity participation and sleep quality were completed by people with JHS/EDS-HT recruited through two social media sites. Multiple regression analysis was performed to identify predictors of fatigue in this population. Significant fatigue was reported by 79.5% of the 117 participants. Multiple regression analysis identified five predictors of fatigue severity, four being potentially modifiable, accounting for 52.3% of the variance in reported fatigue scores. Predictors of fatigue severity were: the self-perceived extent of joint hypermobility, orthostatic dizziness related to heat and exercise, levels of participation in personal relationships and community, current levels of physical activity and dissatisfaction with the diagnostic process and management options provided for their condition. Fatigue is a significant symptom associated with JHS/EDS-HT. Assessment of individuals with this condition should include measures of fatigue severity to enable targeted management of potentially modifiable factors associated with fatigue severity. Implications for rehabilitation Fatigue is a significant symptom reported by individuals affected by joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome - hypermobility type. Potentially modifiable features that contribute to fatigue severity in this population have been identified. Targeted management of these features may decrease the severity and impact of fatigue in joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome - hypermobility type.

  9. Chronic pain in hypermobility syndrome and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (hypermobility type): it is a challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheper, Mark C; de Vries, Janneke E; Verbunt, Jeanine; Engelbert, Raoul Hh

    2015-01-01

    Generalized joint hypermobility (GJH) is highly prevalent among patients diagnosed with chronic pain. When GJH is accompanied by pain in ≥4 joints over a period ≥3 months in the absence of other conditions that cause chronic pain, the hypermobility syndrome (HMS) may be diagnosed. In addition, GJH is also a clinical sign that is frequently present in hereditary diseases of the connective tissue, such as the Marfan syndrome, osteogenesis imperfecta, and the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. However, within the Ehlers-Danlos spectrum, a similar subcategory of patients having similar clinical features as HMS but lacking a specific genetic profile was identified: Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type (EDS-HT). Researchers and clinicians have struggled for decades with the highly diverse clinical presentation within the HMS and EDS-HT phenotypes (Challenge 1) and the lack of understanding of the pathological mechanisms that underlie the development of pain and its persistence (Challenge 2). In addition, within the HMS/EDS-HT phenotype, there is a high prevalence of psychosocial factors, which again presents a difficult issue that needs to be addressed (Challenge 3). Despite recent scientific advances, many obstacles for clinical care and research still remain. To gain further insight into the phenotype of HMS/EDS-HT and its mechanisms, clearer descriptions of these populations should be made available. Future research and clinical care should revise and create consensus on the diagnostic criteria for HMS/EDS-HT (Solution 1), account for clinical heterogeneity by the classification of subtypes within the HMS/EDS-HT spectrum (Solution 2), and create a clinical core set (Solution 3).

  10. [Ehlers Danlos type IV syndrome presenting with simultaneous dissection of both internal carotid and both vertebral arteries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondon, K; de Toffol, B; Georgesco, G; Cassarini, J-F; Machet, M-C; Cottier, J-P; Arbeille, B; Autret, A

    2004-04-01

    Dissection of cervical arteries is a frequent cause of stroke in young subjects. We report the case of a 34-year-old patient who experienced simultaneous dissection of both internal carotid arteries and both vertebral arteries leading to repeated motor deficit of the right half-body associated with persistent otalgia. Search for an etiology led to the diagnosis of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV. Search for the cause of cervical artery dissection must consider connective tIssue disease, particularly vascular forms of Ehler-Danlos syndrome. Diagnostic, therapeutic as well as prognostic aspects are discussed.

  11. Successful vaginal birth after caesarean section in patient with Ehler-Danlos syndrome type 2

    OpenAIRE

    Maraj, Hemant; Mohajer, Michelle; Bhattacharjee, Deepannita

    2011-01-01

    We present the case of a 31-year-old woman with Ehler-Danlos syndrome (EDS) type 2. She had a previous caesarean section and went on to have an uncomplicated vaginal birth in her last pregnancy. To our knowledge, this is the first case of a successful vaginal birth after caesarean section in a patient with EDS. EDS is a multisystem disorder involving a genetic defect in collagen and connective-tissue synthesis and structure. It is a heterogeneous group of 11 different inherited disorders. Obs...

  12. Joint Hypermobility Syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Hypermobility Type: a revision of the rehabilitative approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Celletti

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type (EDS-HT are two clinically overlapping heritable connective tissue disorders strongly associating with pain, fatigue and other secondary aspects. No specific treatment exist for this syndrome and rehabilitation play a role in the management of these patients. The aim of this paper is to evaluate what are the evidence in literature about rehabilitation. Research was done using database PUBMED and consist in a revision of the studies published in the last 15 years. All studies agree to the beneficial role of the rehabilitative treatment and physical therapy but it’s necessary to add more further studies to establish a high quality, evidence-based physical therapy for this specific population.

  13. Relationship between Fatigue and Gait Abnormality in Joint Hypermobility Syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Hypermobility Type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celletti, Claudia; Galli, Manuela; Cimolin, Veronica; Castori, Marco; Albertini, Giorgio; Camerota, Filippo

    2012-01-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of inherited connective tissue disorders characterised by joint hypermobility, skin hyperextensibility and tissue fragility. It has recently been shown that muscle weakness occurs frequently in EDS, and that fatigue is a common and clinically important symptom. The…

  14. Difficulty eating and significant weight loss in joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeza-Velasco, Carolina; Van den Bossche, Thomas; Grossin, Daniel; Hamonet, Claude

    2016-06-01

    Joint Hypermobility Syndrome, also known as Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Hypermobility Type (JHS/EDS-HT), is a heritable disorder of connective tissue, common but poorly known by the medical community. Although generalized joint hypermobility and fragility of tissues have been described as core features, recent research highlights the multisystemic nature of JHS/EDS-HT, which presents with a wide range of articular and extra-articular symptoms. Among these, gastrointestinal problems, temporomandibular disorders, and smell and taste abnormalities are common among those affected, having significant implications for eating. The present work reviews the literature linking JHS/EDS-HT and eating problems. Two illustrative case reports, in which JHS/EDS-HT manifestations contribute to developing and maintaining disturbed eating behaviors and significant weight loss, are presented.

  15. Vascular-type Ehlers-Danlos syndrome caused by a hitherto unknown genetic mutation: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kashizaki Fumihiro

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Vascular-type Ehlers-Danlos syndrome is an autosomal dominant disease that causes arterial spurting, intestinal perforation, uterine rupture and hemopneumothorax due to decreased production of type III collagen. The average age at death is 48 years old, and it is considered to be the most severe form of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. We report the case of a 64-year-old Japanese woman and her 38-year-old daughter who were diagnosed with this disease. Case presentation A 64-year-old Japanese woman was referred to our hospital because of right anterior chest pain following cough and pharyngeal discomfort. Pleurisy was suspected due to the presence of right pleural effusion, so the next day she was referred to our department, where a detailed examination led to the diagnosis of hemothorax. The bleeding that caused the right hemothorax was difficult to control, so our patient was transferred to the Department of Thoracic Surgery for hemostasis control. Our patient’s personal history of uterine hemorrhage and skin ulcers, as well as the finding of skin fragility during surgery, were indicative of a weak connective tissue disease; therefore, after improvement of the hemothorax, a genetic analysis was performed. This revealed a heterozygous missense mutation in COL3A1, c.2411 G>T p.Gly804Val (exon 36. A detailed investigation conducted at a later date revealed that her daughter also had the same genetic mutation. This led to the diagnosis of vascular-type Ehlers-Danlos syndrome characterized by a new gene mutation. Conclusion We report a new genetic mutation associated with vascular-type Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. We present the clinical and imaging findings, and the disease and treatment course in this patient. We believe this information will be important in treating future cases of vascular-type Ehlers-Danlos syndrome in patients with this mutation.

  16. [Contribution to Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuxa, G; Brandt, H P

    1975-02-01

    A case of Ehler-Danlos syndrome with the rare complication of ablatio retinae without myopia is described. The alterations of the eye be Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, which are available in literature are demonstrated.

  17. Osteogenesis imperfecta type III/Ehlers-Danlos overlap syndrome in a Chinese man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yanqin; Wang, Yanzhou; Rauch, Frank; Li, Hu; Zhang, Yao; Zhai, Naixiang; Zhang, Jian; Ren, Xiuzhi; Han, Jinxiang

    2018-02-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) are rare genetic disorders that are typically inherited in an autosomal dominant manner. Few cases of OI/EDS overlap syndrome have been documented. Described here is a 30-year-old Chinese male with OI type III and EDS. Sequencing of genomic DNA revealed a heterozygous COL1A1 mutation (c.671G>A, p.Gly224Asp) that affected the N-anchor domain of the alpha 1 chain of collagen type I. Ultrastructural analysis of a skin biopsy specimen revealed thin collagen fibers with irregular alignment of collagen fibers. These findings have expanded the genotypic spectrum of the OI/EDS overlap syndrome.

  18. Spine deformities in patients with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, type IV - late results of surgical treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tesiorowski Maciej

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spinal deformities in Ehlers-Danlos syndrome are usually progressive and may require operative treatment. There is limited number of studies describing late results of surgery in this disease. Methods This is a retrospective study of the records of 11 patients with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV, treated surgically between 1990 and 2007. All patients underwent surgical treatment for spinal deformity. Duration of operation, type of instrumentation, intraoperative blood loss, complications and number of additional surgeries were noted. Radiographic measurement was performed on standing AP and lateral radiographs acquired before surgery, just after and at final follow up. Results The mean follow up period was 5.5 ± 2.9 years (range 1-10 years. The mean preoperative thoracic and lumbar curve were 109.5 ± 19.9° (range 83° - 142° and 75.6 ± 26.7° (range 40° - 108° respectively. Posterior spine fusion alone was performed on 6 patients and combined anterior and posterior fusion (one- or two stage on 5 cases. Posterior segmental spinal instrumentation was applied with use of hooks, screws and wires. The mean postoperative thoracic and lumbar curve improved to 79.3 ± 16.1° (range 56° - 105° and 58.5 ± 27.7° (range 10° - 95° respectively, with a slight loss of correction during follow up. The average thoracic and lumbar correction was 26.4 ± 14.9% (range 5.3 - 50.4% and 26.3 ± 21.2% (range 7.9 - 75%. Postoperatively, the mean kyphosis was 79.5 ± 40.3° (range 21° -170°, and lordosis was 50.8 ± 18.6° (range 20° -79°. Hyperkyphosis increased during follow up while lordosis remained stable. Mean Th12-L2 angle was -3.5 ±9.9° (range -19° - 15° postoperatively and did not change significantly during follow up. Conclusions Huge spinal deformities in patients with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome require complex and extensive surgery. There is a big risk of sagittal imbalance in this group.

  19. Colonoscopic perforation leading to a diagnosis of Ehlers Danlos syndrome type IV: a case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfe John

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Colonoscopic perforation is a rare but serious complication of colonoscopy. Factors known to increase the risk of perforation include colonic strictures, extensive diverticulosis, and friable tissues. We describe the case of a man who was found to have perforation of the sigmoid colon secondary to an undiagnosed connective tissue disorder (Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV while undergoing surveillance for hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer. Case presentation A 33-year-old Caucasian man presented to our hospital with an acute abdomen following a colonoscopy five days earlier as part of hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer screening. His medical history included bilateral clubfoot. His physical examination findings suggested left iliac fossa peritonitis. A computed tomographic scan revealed perforation of the sigmoid colon and incidentally a right common iliac artery aneurysm as well. Hartmann's procedure was performed during laparotomy. The patient recovered well post-operatively and was discharged. Reversal of the Hartmann's procedure was performed six months later. This procedure was challenging because of dense adhesions and friable bowel. The histology of bowel specimens from this surgery revealed thinning and fibrosis of the muscularis externa. The patient was subsequently noted to have transparency of truncal skin with easily visible vessels. An underlying collagen vascular disorder was suspected, and genetic testing revealed a mutation in the collagen type III, α1 (COL3A1 gene, which is consistent with a diagnosis of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV. Conclusions Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV, the vascular type, is a rare disorder caused by mutations in the COL3A1 gene on chromosome 2q31. It is characterized by translucent skin, clubfoot, and the potentially fatal complications of spontaneous large vessel rupture, although spontaneous uterine and colonic perforations have also been reported in the

  20. Spontaneous Carotid-Cavernous Fistula in the Type IV Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong Gyun; Cho, Won-Sang; Kang, Hyun-Seung; Kim, Jeong Eun

    2014-02-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is a rare inherited connective disease. Among several subgroups, type IV EDS is frequently associated with spontaneous catastrophic bleeding from a vascular fragility. We report on a case of carotid-cavernous fistula (CCF) in a patient with type IV EDS. A 46-year-old female presented with an ophthalmoplegia and chemosis in the right eye. Subsequently, seizure and cerebral infarction with micro-bleeds occurred. CCF was completely occluded with transvenous coil embolization without complications. Thereafter, the patient was completely recovered. Transvenous coil embolization can be a good treatment of choice for spontaneous CCF with type IV EDS. However, every caution should be kept during invasive procedure.

  1. Pregnancy and Delivery in Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome (Hypermobility Type: Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indranil Dutta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS is a group of connective tissue disorders which are divided into various distinguishable phenotypes. The type of EDS determines the potential obstetric complications. Due to the spectrum of clinical manifestation and overlap between phenotypes, there are no standardised obstetric management guidelines. Existing literature illustrates different obstetric management in hypermobility type of EDS, including uneventful term vaginal deliveries as well as preterm cesarean section deliveries. This paper discusses obstetric management of a woman with EDS hypermobility type. Cesarean section was deemed the most appropriate delivery method in this patient due to the possible complications including risk of joint dislocation and pain morbidity. No obstetric complications were experienced, and good maternal and neonatal outcomes were achieved.

  2. Spontaneous Carotid-Cavernous Fistula in the Type IV Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong Gyun; Cho, Won-Sang; Kim, Jeong Eun

    2014-01-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is a rare inherited connective disease. Among several subgroups, type IV EDS is frequently associated with spontaneous catastrophic bleeding from a vascular fragility. We report on a case of carotid-cavernous fistula (CCF) in a patient with type IV EDS. A 46-year-old female presented with an ophthalmoplegia and chemosis in the right eye. Subsequently, seizure and cerebral infarction with micro-bleeds occurred. CCF was completely occluded with transvenous coil embolization without complications. Thereafter, the patient was completely recovered. Transvenous coil embolization can be a good treatment of choice for spontaneous CCF with type IV EDS. However, every caution should be kept during invasive procedure. PMID:24653803

  3. Caracterización del síndrome de Ehlers-Danlos tipo III Characterization of Type-III Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirta Caridad Campo Díaz

    2013-06-01

    agregación y la función plaquetaria.Introduction: Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome (EDS is a heterogeneous group of inherited connective tissue disorders, caused by mutations in the genes that codify fibrillar collagen or the enzymes implicated in modifying post-translational collagen that affects skin, joints and blood vessels. Frequently, the clinical picture presents articular hypermobility with hyperextension associated with cutaneous anomalies. Objective: to characterize Type-III Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome in Pinar del Rio province. Material and method: an applied, observational, descriptive and cross-sectional study that included 305 children (from 5 to 18 years old suffering from type-III Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome (EDS to the diagnosis of typical articular manifestations of the disease, along with an assessment that involved cardiology, ophthalmology, physical-therapy specialties; performing at the same time a coagulation assay and peripheral blood smear. Results: no sex prevalence was found and family history was present in more than the half of patients, where maternal line prevailed. Hemorrhagic familial trend was positive in 36 cases. The main manifestations found in these patients were described to this health condition, the existence of mucous-cutaneous bleeding predominated or as a consequence of invasive procedures in 181 children; which was associated with the presence of disorders associated with macro-platelets and the finding of disperse platelets in peripheral-blood smears. Conclusions: the results evidenced the presence of qualitative platelet disorders that must be evaluated by means of much more specific coagulation assays, not in existence in the province, which must include aggregation and platelet function.

  4. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with EDS generally have a normal life span. Intelligence is normal. Those with the rare vascular type ... 2018, A.D.A.M., Inc. Duplication for commercial use must be authorized in writing by ADAM ...

  5. Fatal Peritoneal Bleeding Following Embolization of a Carotid-Cavernous Fistula in Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Type IV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usinskiene, Jurgita; Mazighi, Mikael; Bisdorff, Annouk; Houdart, Emmanuel

    2006-01-01

    We report the case of a 25-year-old woman treated for a spontaneous carotid-cavernous fistula in a context of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV. Embolization with a transvenous approach was achieved without complications; however, the patient died 72 hr later of massive intraperitoneal bleeding. At autopsy, no lesion of the digestive arteries was identified. Possible causes of this bleeding are discussed

  6. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome(s) mimicking child abuse: Is there an impact on clinical practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castori, Marco

    2015-12-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome is a heterogeneous group of heritable connective tissue disorders characterized by increased fragility of various non-ossified tissues. It is usually ascertained due to abnormal skin texture, scarring complications, vascular fragility, or chronic symptoms, such as fatigue and musculoskeletal pain. Sometimes, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome remains undetected until the patient, usually in the pediatric age, shows extensive or severe mucocutaneous injuries after only minor traumas. In this scenario, the misdiagnosis of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome with child abuse is a possibility, as occasionally reported in the literature. Recently, more attention was posed by lay people between the possible association of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome and bone fragility. Literature and personal experience show a strong association between Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, generalized joint hypermobility and reduced bone mass density in older children and adults, especially fertile women. The existence of a true increased risk of fracture in Ehlers-Danlos syndrome is still a matter of debate in children and adults with little and conflicting evidence. In case of suspected child abuse, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome is certainly on the differential for bruising, especially in EDS types with marked cutaneous and capillary involvement. In suspected child abuse cases, careful examination of the index case and her/his extended family is routine, as well as exclusion of other disorders such as osteogenesis imperfecta. The hypothesis of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome as an alternative explanation for infantile fractures remains speculative. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. A recessive form of the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome caused by tenascin-X deficiency.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schalkwijk, J.; Zweers, M.C.; Steijlen, P.M.; Dean, W.B.; Taylor, G.; Vlijmen-Willems, I.M.J.J. van; Haren, B. van; Miller, W.L.; Bristow, J.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Ehlers-Danlos syndrome is a heritable connective-tissue disorder caused by defects in fibrillar-collagen metabolism. Mutations in the type V collagen genes account for up to 50 percent of cases of classic Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, but many other cases are unexplained. We investigated

  8. Ehlers danlos syndrome in two siblings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Das M

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Two cases of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome affecting two real brothers are being reported. Both of them presented with features of atrophy and hyperextensibility of skin, hypermobility of joints and scarring at the sites of trauma. The elder brother also had kyphoscoliosis and hypogonadism with testicular failure.

  9. Cardiac valve disease: an unreported feature in Ehlers Danlos syndrome arthrocalasia type?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melis Daniela

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Ehlers Danlos syndrome (EDS athrocalasia type (type VII, is characterized by joint hypermobility, skin hyperextensibility and tissue fragility. No heart involvement has been reported. Two forms have been described: type VII A and VII B. The abnormally processed collagen α2(I and the skipping of the exon 6 in COL1A2 gene are typically detected in EDS type VII B. We describe a seven-year old female, with a phenotype consistent with EDS type VII B and a diagnosis further confirmed by biochemical and molecular analyses. Cardiac ultrasound showed normal data in the first year of life. When she was 5 years old, the patient developed mitral valve regurgitation, and aortic and tricuspidal insufficiency at 7 years of age. To our knowledge, this is the first report of cardiac valvular involvement in EDS VII B. This feature probably has been underreported for the limited follow-up of the patients. Echocardiography might be warranted in the clinical assessment of EDS VII patients.

  10. Neurodevelopmental attributes of joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type: Update and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghibellini, Giulia; Brancati, Francesco; Castori, Marco

    2015-03-01

    In the last decade, increasing attention has been devoted to the extra-articular and extra-cutaneous manifestations of joint hypermobility syndrome, also termed Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type (i.e., JHS/EDS-HT). Despite the fact that the current diagnostic criteria for both disorders remain focused on joint hypermobility, musculoskeletal pain and skin changes, medical practice and research have started investigating a wide spectrum of visceral, neurological and developmental complications, which represent major burdens for affected individuals. In particular, children with generalized joint hypermobility often present with various neurodevelopmental issues and can be referred for neurological consultation. It is common that investigations in these patients yield negative or inconsistent results, eventually leading to the exclusion of any structural neurological or muscle disorder. In the context of specialized clinics for connective tissue disorders, a clear relationship between generalized joint hypermobility and a characteristic neurodevelopmental profile affecting coordination is emerging. The clinical features of these patients tend to overlap with those of developmental coordination disorder and can be associated with learning and other disabilities. Physical and psychological consequences of these additional difficulties add to the chief manifestations of the pre-existing connective tissue disorder, affecting the well-being and development of children and their families. In this review, particular attention is devoted to the nature of the link between joint hypermobility, coordination difficulties and neurodevelopmental issues in children. Presumed pathogenesis and management issues are explored in order to attract more attention on this association and nurture future clinical research. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Open angle glaucoma in a case of Type IV Ehler Danlos syndrome: a rarely reported association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Arijit; Ramakrishnan, R; Kader, Mohideen Abdul

    2014-08-01

    A 26-year-old male presented to us with defective vision in the left eye. He had best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) of hand movement (HM) in right eye and 6/9 in left eye. He had ptosis with ectropion in both eyes and relative afferent pupillary defect (RAPD) in right eye. Intraocular pressure (IOP) was 46 and 44 mmHg in right and left eye, respectively. Fundus showed glaucomatous optic atrophy (GOA) in right eye and cup disc ratio (CDR) of 0.75 with bipolar rim thinning in left eye. Systemic examination showed hyperextensible skin and joints, acrogeria, hypodontia, high arched palate, and varicose veins. He gave history of easy bruising and tendency to fall and history of intestinal rupture 5 years ago for which he had undergone surgery. He was diagnosed as a case of Type IV Ehler-Danlos syndrome (EDS) with open angle glaucoma. He underwent trabeculectomy in both eyes. This is a rare case that shows glaucoma in a patient of EDS Type IV. Very few such cases have been reported in literature.

  12. Open angle glaucoma in a case of Type IV Ehler Danlos syndrome: A rarely reported association

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arijit Mitra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 26-year-old male presented to us with defective vision in the left eye. He had best corrected visual acuity (BCVA of hand movement (HM in right eye and 6/9 in left eye. He had ptosis with ectropion in both eyes and relative afferent pupillary defect (RAPD in right eye. Intraocular pressure (IOP was 46 and 44 mmHg in right and left eye, respectively. Fundus showed glaucomatous optic atrophy (GOA in right eye and cup disc ratio (CDR of 0.75 with bipolar rim thinning in left eye. Systemic examination showed hyperextensible skin and joints, acrogeria, hypodontia, high arched palate, and varicose veins. He gave history of easy bruising and tendency to fall and history of intestinal rupture 5 years ago for which he had undergone surgery. He was diagnosed as a case of Type IV Ehler-Danlos syndrome (EDS with open angle glaucoma. He underwent trabeculectomy in both eyes. This is a rare case that shows glaucoma in a patient of EDS Type IV. Very few such cases have been reported in literature.

  13. Spontaneous Colon Perforations Associated with a Vascular Type of Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Yoneda

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, vascular type (vEDS (MIM #130050 is an autosomal dominant disorder caused by mutation in the type III collagen gene, COL3A1, leading to fragility of blood vessels, bowel and uterus that leads to spontaneous rupture. We report a previously undiagnosed vEDS patient with bowel complications. A 20-year-old female patient was referred to our hospital with abdominal pain. Computed tomography showed notable dilatation of the sigmoid colon with intraperitoneal fluid. Laparotomy revealed dilatation of the sigmoid colon, breakdown of serosa and muscularis propria of the sigmoid colon with impending perforation, and intra-abdominal hemorrhage caused by breakdown of the mesenterium. Resection of the sigmoid colon with Hartmann's pouch and an end colostomy were performed. Physical examination showed joint hypermobility, translucent skin with venous prominence and facial structure abnormalities. Genetic analysis using cDNA extracted from the patient's fibroblasts by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction direct sequencing showed a missense mutation within the triple helix region of COL3A1 (c.2150 G>A; Gly717Asp.

  14. Hemothorax in vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez, Kevin; Jordi, López; Jose Angel, Hernández

    2017-10-16

    Vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS IV) is a rare genetic disorder characterized by an alteration in the COL3A1 gene which encodes type III collagen. It is the most common type of collagen in vessels of medium size and certain organs such as the intestines and the uterus. The alteration of this type of collagen produces aneurisms and ruptures of vessels and organs. A high level of clinical suspicion is required for diagnosis. It is a complex disease whose management requires a multidisciplinary team to treat the different complications that may occur. We report the case of a 50-year-old man diagnosed with EDS IV detected incidentally after hemothorax secondary to a coughing spell. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  15. Vascular type Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome with fatal spontaneous rupture of a right common iliac artery dissection: case report and review of literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abayazeed, Aly; Hayman, Emily; Moghadamfalahi, Mana; Cain, Darren

    2014-01-01

    Vascular Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome (previously Ehlers-Danlos IV) is a rare autosomal dominant collagen vascular disorder caused by a 2q31 COL3A1 gene mutation encoding pro-alpha1 chain of type III collagen (in contrast to classic Ehlers-Danlos, caused by a COL5A1 mutation). The vascular type accounts for less than 4% of all Ehlers-Danlos cases and usually has a poor prognosis due to life threatening vascular ruptures and difficult, frequently unsuccessful surgical and vascular interventions. In 70% of cases, vascular rupture or dissection, gastrointestinal perforation, or organ rupture is a presenting sign. We present a case of genetically proven vascular Ehlers-Danlos with fatal recurrent retroperitoneal hemorrhages secondary to a ruptured right common iliac artery dissection in a 30-year-old male. This case highlights the need to suspect collagen vascular disorders when a young adult presents with unexplained retroperitoneal hemorrhage, even without family history of such diseases. PMID:24967021

  16. Shoulder function, pain and health related quality of life in adults with joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome-hypermobility type

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannessen, Elise Christine; Reiten, Helle Sundnes; Løvaas, Helene

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate shoulder function, pain and Health-Related Quality of life (HRQoL) among adults with joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome-hypermobility type (JHS/EDS-HT), compared with the general population (controls). Method In a cross-sectional study using postal survey...

  17. Successful vaginal birth after caesarean section in patient with Ehler-Danlos syndrome type 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maraj, Hemant; Mohajer, Michelle; Bhattacharjee, Deepannita

    2011-12-01

    We present the case of a 31-year-old woman with Ehler-Danlos syndrome (EDS) type 2. She had a previous caesarean section and went on to have an uncomplicated vaginal birth in her last pregnancy. To our knowledge, this is the first case of a successful vaginal birth after caesarean section in a patient with EDS. EDS is a multisystem disorder involving a genetic defect in collagen and connective-tissue synthesis and structure. It is a heterogeneous group of 11 different inherited disorders. Obstetric complications in these patients include miscarriages, stillbirths, premature rupture of the membranes, preterm labour, uterine prolapse, uterine rupture and severe postpartum haemorrhage. There has been much controversy over the appropriate mode of delivery. Abdominal deliveries are complicated by delayed wound healing and increased perioperative blood loss. Vaginal deliveries may be complicated by tissue friability causing extensive perineal tears, pelvic floor and bladder lesions. Our case highlights that in specific, controlled situations it is possible to have a vaginal delivery even after previous caesarean section in patients with EDS.

  18. Subjective health complaints and illness perception amongst adults with Joint Hypermobility Syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome-HypermobilityType - a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hope, Lena; Juul-Kristensen, Birgit; Løvaas, Helene; Løvvik, Camilla; Maeland, Silje

    2017-10-17

    To investigate the prevalence and severity of subjective health complaints and describe illness perception in a population of Joint Hypermobility Syndrome or Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome-Hypermobile Type. This study was a postal survey with a questionnaire battery on demographic data, subjective health complaints inventory, and illness perception. A total of 110 individuals diagnosed with Joint Hypermobility Syndrome or Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome-Hypermobile Type from two specialized hospitals in Norway were offered participation. Further, 140 gender- and age-matched healthy controls from statistics Norway representing the general population were sent the questionnaire for reference. Overall response rate was 30.4% (n = 76), with 44.5% (n = 49) in Joint Hypermobility Syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome-Hypermobile Type and 19.3% (n = 27) in controls. Subjective health complaints were significantly higher in Joint Hypermobility Syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome-Hypermobile Type - than in the controls (32.06 vs. 11.08; p Syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome-Hypermobile Type had low understanding of their illness and symptoms (understanding, mean: 3.93, SD 2.88), and reported to have moderate personal and treatment control over their illness. Adults with Joint Hypermobility Syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome-Hypermobile Type reported higher frequency and severity of subjective health complaints than the matched controls from the general adult population in Norway. Furthermore, Joint Hypermobility Syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome-Hypermobile Type reported low understanding of their illness and associated symptoms, and moderate belief that their illness can be kept under control through self-management or treatment. This may indicate one of the reasons why prognosis for these patients is poor. Implications for rehabilitation Awareness of the complexity of the subjective health complaints and inquiry into illness perception could contribute with valuable information about these

  19. Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome—Hypermobility Type and Hemorrhoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy P. Plackett

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ehlers-Danlos syndrome-hypermobility type (EDS-HT is a connective tissue disorder associated with chronic musculoskeletal pain. The diagnosis is based on simple clinical examination, although it is easily overlooked. Herein we present a case of EDS-HT associated with hemorrhoids and suggest that there may be an association between the two conditions.

  20. Spinal Anaesthesia for Cesarean Section in a Patient with Vascular Type Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey M. Carness

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the administration of spinal anaesthesia for cesarean delivery in a parturient with vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Parturients who genetically inherit this disorder are at risk for significant morbidity and mortality. Risks during pregnancy include premature labor, uterine prolapse, and uterine rupture. Additionally, such laboring parturients are at increased risk of hemodynamic volatility, vascular stress, and severe postpartum hemorrhage. Instrumented delivery and cesarean delivery bring additional risks. Nonpregnancy-related complications include excessive bleeding, intestinal rupture, cardiac valvular dysfunction, and arterial dissection. Despite the complexity of this condition, literature focusing on specific intraoperative anaesthetic management is sparse.

  1. Skin extensibility and consistency in patients with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome and benign joint hypermobility syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Remvig, L; Duhn, P H; Ullman, S

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The reproducibility of clinical tests for skin extensibility and consistency, essential for differentiating between types of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) and benign joint hypermobility syndrome (BJHS), is unknown. Paraclinical methods may provide objective differential diagnostic...

  2. Endovascular Treatment of a Carotid Dissecting Pseudoaneurysm in a Patient with Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Type IV with Fatal Outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Siok Ping; Duddy, Martin J.

    2008-01-01

    We present a patient with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV (EDS IV) with a carotid dissecting pseudoaneurysm causing severe carotid stenosis. This lesion was treated endovascularly. Unfortunately, the patient died of remote vascular catastrophes (intracranial hemorrhage and abdominal aortic rupture). This unique case illustrates the perils of endovascular treatment of EDS IV patients and the need for preoperative screening for concomitant lesions. It also shows that a dissecting pseudoaneurysm can feasibly be treated with a covered stent and that closure is effective using Angioseal in patients with EDS IV

  3. Living with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Berglund, Britta

    2003-01-01

    This thesis focuses on how individuals with the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS), an inherited connective-tissue disorder, experience and describe their daily lives with focus on physical and psychosocial problems. The syndrome primarily affects the skin, ligaments, joints and blood vessels and the symptoms in EDS vary from mild to more severe forms. Individuals with EDS were recruited via the Swedish National EDS Association. Paper (I). The aim was to explore how individuals wi...

  4. Peripheral nerve block in patients with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neice, Andrew E; Stubblefield, Eryn E; Woodworth, Glenn E; Aziz, Michael F

    2016-09-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is an inherited disease characterized by defects in various collagens or their post translational modification, with an incidence estimated at 1 in 5000. Performance of peripheral nerve block in patients with EDS is controversial, due to easy bruising and hematoma formation after injections as well as reports of reduced block efficacy. The objective of this study was to review the charts of EDS patients who had received peripheral nerve block for any evidence of complications or reduced efficacy. Case series, chart review. Academic medical center. Patients with a confirmed or probable diagnosis of EDS who had received a peripheral nerve block in the last 3 years were identified by searching our institutions electronic medical record system. The patients were classified by their subtype of EDS. Patients with no diagnosed subtype were given a probable subtype based on a chart review of the patient's symptoms. Patient charts were reviewed for any evidence of complications or reduced block efficacy. A total of 21 regional anesthetics, on 16 unique patients were identified, 10 of which had a EDS subtype diagnosis. The majority of these patients had a diagnosis of hypermobility-type EDS. No block complications were noted in any patients. Two block failures requiring repeat block were noted, and four patients reported uncontrolled pain on postoperative day one despite successful placement of a peripheral nerve catheter. Additionally, blocks were performed without incident in patients with classical-type and vascular-type EDS although the number was so small that no conclusions can be drawn about relative safety of regional anesthesia in these groups. This series fails to show an increased risk of complications of peripheral nerve blockade in patients with hypermobility-type EDS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction in Ehlers-Danlos syndrome-Hypermobile type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakim, Alan; O'Callaghan, Chris; De Wandele, Inge; Stiles, Lauren; Pocinki, Alan; Rowe, Peter

    2017-03-01

    Autonomic dysfunction contributes to health-related impairment of quality of life in the hypermobile type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (hEDS). Typical signs and symptoms include tachycardia, hypotension, gastrointestinal dysmotility, and disturbed bladder function and sweating regulation. Cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction may present as Orthostatic Intolerance, Orthostatic Hypotension, Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome, or Neurally Mediated Hypotension. The incidence, prevalence, and natural history of these conditions remain unquantified, but observations from specialist clinics suggest they are frequently seen in hEDS. There is growing understanding of how hEDS-related physical and physiological pathology contributes to the development of these conditions. Evaluation of cardiovascular symptoms in hEDS should include a careful history and clinical examination. Tests of cardiovascular function range from clinic room observation to tilt-table assessment to other laboratory investigations such as supine and standing catecholamine levels. Non-pharmacologic treatments include education, managing the environment to reduce exposure to triggers, improving cardiovascular fitness, and maintaining hydration. Although there are limited clinical trials, the response to drug treatments in hEDS is supported by evidence from case and cohort observational data, and short-term physiological studies. Pharmacologic therapy is indicated for patients with moderate-severe impairment of daily function and who have inadequate response or tolerance to conservative treatment. Treatment in hEDS often requires a focus on functional maintenance. Also, the negative impact of cardiovascular symptoms on physical and psycho-social well-being may generate a need for a more general evaluation and on-going management and support. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. The influence of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome - hypermobility type, on motherhood: A phenomenological, hermeneutical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Baets, Stijn; Vanhalst, Marieke; Coussens, Marieke; Rombaut, Lies; Malfait, Fransiska; Van Hove, Geert; Calders, Patrick; Vanderstraeten, Guy; van de Velde, Dominique

    2017-01-01

    The consequences of the Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome hypermobility type (EDS-HT) affect many aspects of daily life. "Living with limitations" is a central theme in the life of patients affected by this heritable disorder of connective tissue. The aim of the present study was to explore the lived experiences of women with EDS-HT concerning diagnosis, influence on daily life and becoming and being a mother. A phenomenological-hermeneutical study, using in-depth interviews. Patients were selected by a purposive sampling strategy. This study shows that the EDS-HT syndrome affects daily life. Ten woman between 31 and 65 years were interviewed. They have between 2 and 5 children. The data analysis results in six themes. (1) Getting a diagnosis is a relief and supports the choice to become a mother; (2) EDS-HT causes emotional distress, imposes a physical burden and has a major impact on social behavior; (3) EDS-HT demands a restructuring of everyday activities; (4) Children's and mothers' expectations do not correspond; (5) Having a supportive social and physical environment is of major importance; (6) The presence of the child reduces the feeling of illness of the mother. The diagnosis of EDS-HT is a catalysing factor in the choice of whether or not to become a mother. EDS-HT has a huge impact on bodily functions, which in turn influences activities and participation. This study gives insight in the activities of daily life of persons with EDS-HT. Health care professionals can be of great importance to help patients in (re)organizing their lives according to the available energy and in supporting their choices. They can help defining goals and setting priorities in daily life. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The Marfan and Ehlers-Danlos syndromes and pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Lind (Jan)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractThe Marfan and Ehlers-Danlos syndromes have always received great public interest and fascination. Individuals with the Marfan syndrome impress with their tall statlls, long extremities, hands and feet, and patients affected with the EhlersDanlos syndrome are known for their agility in

  8. [Temporomandibular disorders and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type: A case-control study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diep, D; Fau, V; Wdowik, S; Bienvenu, B; Bénateau, H; Veyssière, A

    2016-09-01

    The Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type (EDS-HT) is a rare genetic disease. Diagnosis is based on a combination of clinical criteria described in the classification of Villefranche. Diagnosis is difficult to make because of the lack of specific clinical signs and the absence of genetic testing. The EDS-TH manifests itself manly by musculoskeletal pain and joint hypermobility. Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) are also reported. Our aim was to objectify the presence and to qualify the type of TMD associated with the EDS-HT in order to propose an additional diagnostic argument. A prospective, monocenter case-control study, comparing a cohort of patients suffering from EDS-HT to a paired control group of healthy volunteers has been conducted. Clinical examination was standardized, including a general questioning, an oral examination and a temporomandibular joint examination following the TMD/RDC (temporomandibular disorders/research diagnostic criteria). Fourteen EDS-HT patients and 58 control patients were examined. The prevalence of TMDs (n=13; 92.9% vs. n=4; 6.9%; P=10(-11)) was significantly higher in the EDS-HT group. TMDs occurring in the EDS-HT group were complex, combining several mechanisms in contrast to the control group, where only one mechanism was found in all the patients (n=13; 92.9% vs. n=0; 0.0%). TMDs are strongly associated with RDS-HT. TMDs could therefore be used in the diagnosis of this disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Bowel perforation in type IV vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Masri, H; Loong, T-H; Meurette, G; Podevin, J; Zinzindohoue, F; Lehur, P-A

    2018-05-01

    Spontaneous gastrointestinal (GI) perforation is a well-known complication occurring in patients suffering from Type IV vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS IV). The aim of the present study was to review the current literature on spontaneous GI perforation in EDS IV and illustrate the surgical management and outcome when possible. A systematic review of all the published data on EDS IV patients with spontaneous GI perforation between January 2000 and December 2015 was conducted using three major databases PUBMED, EMBASE, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trails. References of the selected articles were screened to avoid missing main articles. Twenty-seven published case reports and four retrospective studies, including 31 and 527 cases, respectively, matched the search criteria. A case from our institution was added. Mean age was 26 years (range 6-64 years). The most frequent site of perforation was the colon, particularly the sigmoid, followed by small bowel, upper rectum, and finally stomach. The majority of cases were initially managed with Hartmann's procedure. In recurrent perforations, total colectomy was performed. The reperforation rate was considerably higher in the "partial colectomy with anastomosis" group than in the Hartmann group. Colonic perforation is the most common spontaneous GI perforation in EDS IV patients. An unexpected fragility of the tissues should raise the possibility of a connective tissue disorder and prompt further investigation with eventual management of these high-risk patients with a multidisciplinary team approach in dedicated centres. In the emergency setting, a Hartmann procedure should be performed.

  10. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV : unusual congenital anomalies in a mother and son with a COL3A1 mutation and a normal collagen III protein profile

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroes, HY; Pals, G; van Essen, AJ

    A mother and son with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) type IV and unusual congenital anomalies are described. The congenital anomalies include, in the mother, amniotic band-like constrictions on one hand, a unilateral clubfoot, and macrocephaly owing to normal-pressure hydrocephaly and, in the son, an

  11. Measuring Regularity of Human Postural Sway Using Approximate Entropy and Sample Entropy in Patients with Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Hypermobility Type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigoldi, Chiara; Cimolin, Veronica; Camerota, Filippo; Celletti, Claudia; Albertini, Giorgio; Mainardi, Luca; Galli, Manuela

    2013-01-01

    Ligament laxity in Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type (EDS-HT) patients can influence the intrinsic information about posture and movement and can have a negative effect on the appropriateness of postural reactions. Several measures have been proposed in literature to describe the planar migration of CoP over the base of support, and the…

  12. Gastrointestinal disorders in joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type: A review for the gastroenterologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckers, A B; Keszthelyi, D; Fikree, A; Vork, L; Masclee, A; Farmer, A D; Aziz, Q

    2017-08-01

    Joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS)/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type (EDS-HT) is the most common hereditary non-inflammatory disorder of connective tissue, characterized by a wide range of symptoms, mainly joint hyperextensibility and musculoskeletal symptoms. A majority of patients also experiences gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms. Furthermore, JHS/EDS-HT has specifically been shown to be highly prevalent in patients with functional GI disorders, such as functional dyspepsia and irritable bowel syndrome. The aim of this review was to examine the nature of GI symptoms and their underlying pathophysiology in JHS/EDS-HT. In addition, we consider the clinical implications of the diagnosis and treatment of JHS/EDS-HT for practicing clinicians in gastroenterology. Observations summarized in this review may furthermore represent the first step toward the identification of a new pathophysiological basis for a substantial subgroup of patients with functional GI disorders. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. The impaired proprioception in Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome-Hypermobility Type/Joint hypermobility Syndrome: the rehabilitation role

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo Camerota

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Hypermobility Type/Joint Hypermobility Syndrome (JHS/EDS-HT is an hereditary disorder of the connective tissue mainly manifesting with generalized joint hypermobility and skin hyperextensibility with an involvement of the connective tissue matrix proteins. Collagen alterations may influence the quality of movement in these patients but also movement has a role for the collagen quality: motion has a prevention role in the formation of contractures and adhesions. A poor sense of proprioception correlated with the collagenous connective tissues alterations could explain why people with JHS/EDS-HT become injured, having a lack of sensation of the joint at the end of the range. Rehabilitation approach may consider all these aspects.

  14. Ehler Danlos syndrome with cervical dislocation: An unusual case

    OpenAIRE

    Neeraj Awasthy; Karam Chand

    2008-01-01

    Ehler-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is heritable connective tissue disorders with varied manifestations whose primary clinical features include soft, hyperextensible skin, dystrophic scarring, easy bruising, and joint hypermobility. Os odontoideum describes a condition in which the dens is separated from the axis body. The exact frequency is unknown. Known cases are either incidentally detected or are diagnosed when patients become symptomatic. Cervical dislocation has been described with type VI les...

  15. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome in a Zimbabwean child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olaosebikan, A; Wolf, B

    1993-01-01

    An isolated case of Ehler-Danlos syndrome, Type 1, in a two year old Zimbabwean boy is described. The patient presented with failure to thrive and inability to stand. Examination revealed hyperextensibility of the joints and skin, umbilical and inguinal hernias and a perimembranous ventricular septal defect. To the best of our knowledge this is the first pediatric case described in the African literature.

  16. Orthostatic intolerance and fatigue in the hypermobility type of Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Wandele, Inge; Rombaut, Lies; De Backer, Tine; Peersman, Wim; Da Silva, Hellen; De Mits, Sophie; De Paepe, Anne; Calders, Patrick; Malfait, Fransiska

    2016-08-01

    To investigate whether orthostatic intolerance (OI) is a significant predictor for fatigue in Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome, hypermobility type (EDS-HT). Eighty patients with EDS-HT and 52 controls participated in the first part of the study, which consisted of questionnaires. Fatigue was evaluated using the Checklist Individual Strength (CIS). As possible fatigue determinants OI [Autonomic Symptom Profile (ASP)], habitual physical activity (Baecke), affective distress [Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS)], pain (SF36), medication use and generalized hypermobility (5-point score of Grahame and Hakim regarding generalized joint hypermobility) were studied. Next, a 20 min head-up tilt (70°) was performed in a subsample of 39 patients and 35 controls, while beat-to-beat heart rate and blood pressure were monitored (Holter, Finometer Pro). Before and after tilt, fatigue severity was assessed using a numeric rating scale. Patients scored significantly higher on the CIS [total score: EDS: 98.2 (18.63) vs controls: 45.8 (16.62), P < 0.001] and on the OI domain of the ASP [EDS: 22.78 (7.16) vs controls: 6.5 (7.78)]. OI was prevalent in EDS-HT (EDS: 74.4%, controls: 34.3%, P = 0.001), and frequently expressed as postural orthostatic tachycardia (41.0% of the EDS group). Patients responded to tilt with a higher heart rate and lower total peripheral resistance (p < 0.001; p = 0.032). This altered response correlated with fatigue in daily life (CIS). In the EDS-HT group, tilt provoked significantly more fatigue [numeric rating scale increase: EDS: +3.1 (1.90), controls: +0.5 (1.24), P < 0.001]. Furthermore, the factors OI, pain, affective distress, decreased physical activity and sedative use explained 47.7% of the variance in fatigue severity. OI is an important determinant of fatigue in EDS-HT. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. New lethal disease involving type I and III collagen defect resembling geroderma osteodysplastica, De Barsy syndrome, and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome IV.

    OpenAIRE

    Jukkola, A; Kauppila, S; Risteli, L; Vuopala, K; Risteli, J; Leisti, J; Pajunen, L

    1998-01-01

    We describe the clinical findings and biochemical features of a male child suffering from a so far undescribed lethal connective tissue disorder characterised by extreme hypermobility of the joints, lax skin, cataracts, severe growth retardation, and insufficient production of type I and type III procollagens. His features are compared with Ehlers-Danlos type IV, De Barsy syndrome, and geroderma osteodysplastica, as these disorders show some symptoms and signs shared with our patient. The chi...

  18. Chronic pain in a patient with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (hypermobility type): The role of myofascial trigger point injections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tewari, Saipriya; Madabushi, Rajashree; Agarwal, Anil; Gautam, Sujeet K; Khuba, Sandeep

    2017-01-01

    Chronic widespread musculoskeletal pain is a cardinal symptom in hypermobility type of Ehler Danlos Syndrome (EDS type III). The management of pain in EDS, however, has not been studied in depth. A 30 year old female, known case of EDS, presented to the pain clinic with complaints of severe upper back pain for 6 months. Physical examination of the back revealed two myofascial trigger points over the left rhomboids and the left erector spinae. Local anaesthetic trigger point injections were given at these points, followed by stretching exercises under analgesic cover for the first week. After 1 week the patient reported 60-80% pain relief. This case highlights that we must keep a high index of suspicion for the more treatable causes of pain like myofascial pain syndrome in patients suffering from EDS, and should address it promptly and appropriately in order to maximise patient comfort. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Internal carotid artery dissection in a patient with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV: diagnosis and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Nasser

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS type IV, also known as vascular EDS, is an inherited connective tissue disorder with an estimated prevalence of 1/100,000 to 1/250,000. In EDS type IV, vascular complications may affect all anatomical areas, with a preference for large- and medium-sized arteries. Dissections of the vertebral and carotid arteries in their extra- and intra-cranial segments are typical. The authors report the case of a patient with EDS type IV for whom the diagnosis was established based on clinical signs and who developed internal carotid artery dissection at the age of 44 years. In the absence of a specific treatment for EDS type IV, medical interventions should focus on symptomatic relief, prophylactic measures, and genetic counseling. Invasive imaging techniques are contraindicated, and a conservative approach to vascular complications is usually recommended.

  20. Dermal Ultrastructure in Low Beighton Score Members of 17 Families with Hypermobile-Type Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermanns-Lê, Trinh; Reginster, Marie-Annick; Piérard-Franchimont, Claudine; Delvenne, Philippe; Piérard, Gérald E.; Manicourt, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    The distinction between the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobile type (EDSH) and the benign joint hypermobility syndrome (BJHS) is unclear. The aim of the present study was to compare skin ultrastructural abnormalities of EDSH and BJHS among different families. Skin of 23 EDSH, 27 BJHS, and 41 asymptomatic subjects from 17 families was examined using transmission electron microscopy. Similar ultrastructural abnormalities were found irrespective of the Beighton score. Flower-like collagen fibrils represented the key change and elastic fibers were altered as well. Beighton score is a clinical parameter rating joint mobility that appeared unrelated to quantitative and qualitative collagen ultrastructural alterations in the skin. Some EDSH family members fit with BJHS diagnosis. BJHS possibly represents a mild variant of EDSH. PMID:23091361

  1. Dermal Ultrastructure in Low Beighton Score Members of 17 Families with Hypermobile-Type Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trinh Hermanns-Lê

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The distinction between the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobile type (EDSH and the benign joint hypermobility syndrome (BJHS is unclear. The aim of the present study was to compare skin ultrastructural abnormalities of EDSH and BJHS among different families. Skin of 23 EDSH, 27 BJHS, and 41 asymptomatic subjects from 17 families was examined using transmission electron microscopy. Similar ultrastructural abnormalities were found irrespective of the Beighton score. Flower-like collagen fibrils represented the key change and elastic fibers were altered as well. Beighton score is a clinical parameter rating joint mobility that appeared unrelated to quantitative and qualitative collagen ultrastructural alterations in the skin. Some EDSH family members fit with BJHS diagnosis. BJHS possibly represents a mild variant of EDSH.

  2. Ehlers Danlos syndrome, kyphoscoliotic type due to Lysyl Hydroxylase 1 deficiency in two children without congenital or early onset kyphoscoliosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, Fleur S.; Mancini, Grazia M. S.; Maugeri, Alessandra; Cobben, Jan M.

    2017-01-01

    We report two children with Ehlers Danlos, kyphoscoliotic type confirmed by Lysyl Hydroxylase 1 deficiency due to bi-allelic PLOD1 mutations (kEDS-PLOD1) who were initially thought to have either a diagnosis of classical EDS (cEDS) or a neuromuscular disorder due to absence of (congenital)

  3. Peripheral nerve blocks in patients with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type: a report of 2 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patzkowski, Michael S

    2016-03-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome is an inherited disorder of collagen production that results in multiorgan dysfunction. Patients with hypermobility type display skin hyperextensibility and joint laxity, which can result in chronic joint instability, dislocation, peripheral neuropathy, and severe musculoskeletal pain. A bleeding diathesis can be found in all subtypes of varying severity despite a normal coagulation profile. There have also been reports of resistance to local anesthetics in these patients. Several sources advise against the use of regional anesthesia in these patients citing the 2 previous features. There have been reports of successful neuraxial anesthesia, but few concerning peripheral nerve blocks, none of which describe nerves of the lower extremity. This report describes 2 cases of successful peripheral regional anesthesia in the lower extremity. In case 1, a 16-year-old adolescent girl with hypermobility type presented for osteochondral grafting of tibiotalar joint lesions. She underwent a popliteal sciatic (with continuous catheter) and femoral nerve block under ultrasound guidance. She proceeded to surgery and tolerated the procedure under regional block and intravenous sedation. She did not require any analgesics for the following 15 hours. In case 2, an 18-year-old woman with hypermobility type presented for medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction for chronic patella instability. She underwent a saphenous nerve block above the knee with analgesia in the distribution of the saphenous nerve lasting for approximately 18 hours. There were no complications in either case. Prohibitions against peripheral nerve blocks in patients with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type, appear unwarranted. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Phenotypic variability of the kyphoscoliotic type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS VIA): clinical, molecular and biochemical delineation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background The kyphoscoliotic type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS VIA) (OMIM 225400) is a rare inheritable connective tissue disorder characterized by a deficiency of collagen lysyl hydroxylase 1 (LH1; EC 1.14.11.4) due to mutations in PLOD1. Biochemically this results in underhydroxylation of collagen lysyl residues and, hence, an abnormal pattern of lysyl pyridinoline (LP) and hydroxylysyl pyridinoline (HP) crosslinks excreted in the urine. Clinically the disorder is characterized by hypotonia and kyphoscoliosis at birth, joint hypermobility, and skin hyperelasticity and fragility. Severe hypotonia usually leads to delay in gross motor development, whereas cognitive development is reported to be normal. Methods We describe the clinical, biochemical and molecular characterisation, as well as electron microscopy findings of skin, in 15 patients newly diagnosed with this rare type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Results Age at diagnosis ranged from 5 months to 27 years, with only 1/3 of the patients been diagnosed correctly in the first year of life. A similar disease frequency was found in females and males, however a broad disease severity spectrum (intra- and interfamilial), independent of molecular background or biochemical phenotype, was observed. Kyphoscoliosis, one of the main clinical features was not present at birth in 4 patients. Importantly we also noted the occurrence of vascular rupture antenatally and postnatally, as well as developmental delay in 5 patients. Conclusion In view of these findings we propose that EDS VIA is a highly variable clinical entity, presenting with a broad clinical spectrum, which may also be associated with cognitive delay and an increased risk for vascular events. Genotype/phenotype association studies and additional molecular investigations in more extended EDS VIA populations will be necessary to further elucidate the cause of the variability of the disease severity. PMID:21699693

  5. Phenotypic variability of the kyphoscoliotic type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS VIA: clinical, molecular and biochemical delineation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kariminejad Ariana

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The kyphoscoliotic type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS VIA (OMIM 225400 is a rare inheritable connective tissue disorder characterized by a deficiency of collagen lysyl hydroxylase 1 (LH1; EC 1.14.11.4 due to mutations in PLOD1. Biochemically this results in underhydroxylation of collagen lysyl residues and, hence, an abnormal pattern of lysyl pyridinoline (LP and hydroxylysyl pyridinoline (HP crosslinks excreted in the urine. Clinically the disorder is characterized by hypotonia and kyphoscoliosis at birth, joint hypermobility, and skin hyperelasticity and fragility. Severe hypotonia usually leads to delay in gross motor development, whereas cognitive development is reported to be normal. Methods We describe the clinical, biochemical and molecular characterisation, as well as electron microscopy findings of skin, in 15 patients newly diagnosed with this rare type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Results Age at diagnosis ranged from 5 months to 27 years, with only 1/3 of the patients been diagnosed correctly in the first year of life. A similar disease frequency was found in females and males, however a broad disease severity spectrum (intra- and interfamilial, independent of molecular background or biochemical phenotype, was observed. Kyphoscoliosis, one of the main clinical features was not present at birth in 4 patients. Importantly we also noted the occurrence of vascular rupture antenatally and postnatally, as well as developmental delay in 5 patients. Conclusion In view of these findings we propose that EDS VIA is a highly variable clinical entity, presenting with a broad clinical spectrum, which may also be associated with cognitive delay and an increased risk for vascular events. Genotype/phenotype association studies and additional molecular investigations in more extended EDS VIA populations will be necessary to further elucidate the cause of the variability of the disease severity.

  6. Gait Strategy in Patients with Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Hypermobility Type: A Kinematic and Kinetic Evaluation Using 3D Gait Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galli, Manuela; Cimolin, Veronica; Rigoldi, Chiara; Castori, Marco; Celletti, Claudia; Albertini, Giorgio; Camerota, Filippo

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify the gait patterns of adults with joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (JHS/EDS-HT) hypermobility type, using Gait Analysis. We quantified the gait strategy in 12 JHS/EDS-HT adults individuals (age: 43.08 + 6.78 years) compared to 20 healthy controls (age: 37.23 plus or minus 8.91 years), in…

  7. Multiple contemporary arterial dissection in Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Rocci

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of multiple spontaneous arteries dissection in a 52-year-old female; the patient had a relevant family history of vascular complications and typical features so we hypothesized vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS that was confirmed by genetic analysis of COL3A1 gene. We adopted a conservative approach: the patient was treated with heparin in the acute phase followed by aspirin and then celiprolol was started on the basis of a recent trial that demonstrates a reduction in arterial events in EDS patient treated. A careful follow-up was done with Doppler ultrasound and computed tomography scan, as non-invasive diagnostic techniques are preferred in these patients, and no other vascular symptomatic events have occurred. We tested all living relatives: half of them had COL3A1 mutation, they were referred to another center specialized in rare diseases and EDS for long-term follow-up and genetic counseling. This case demonstrates as a careful evaluation of clinical signs, clinical history of the patient and his family has allowed a definitive diagnosis, proper management of the patient during the acute event and in terms of prophylaxis of recurrence.

  8. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome with monostotic fibrous dysplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rao A

    1979-01-01

    Full Text Available An unusual case of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome with monostotic fibrous dysplasia of the humorus is presented. The other orthopae-dic manifestations, its complications and associated features are re-viewed and summarised.

  9. Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Network C.A.R.E.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Email Newsletter List Email: Mission Statement What is Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome? This page was last updated: August 9, 2015 The Ehlers-Danlos syndromes are inherited in the genes that are passed ...

  10. Evaluation of Kinesiophobia and Its Correlations with Pain and Fatigue in Joint Hypermobility Syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Hypermobility Type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Celletti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type a. k. a. joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS/EDS-HT is a hereditary musculoskeletal disorder associating generalized joint hypermobility with chronic pain. Anecdotal reports suggest a prominent role for kinesiophobia in disease manifestations, but no study has systematically addressed this point. Objective. To investigate the impact of kinesiophobia and its relationship with pain, fatigue, and quality of life in JHS/EDS-HT. Design. Cross-sectional study. Subjects/Patients. 42 patients (40 female and 2 male with JHS/EDS-HT diagnosis following standardized diagnostic criteria were selected. Methods. Disease features were analyzed by means of specific questionnaires and scales evaluating kinesiophobia, pain, fatigue, and quality of life. The relationships among variables were investigated using the Spearman bivariate analysis. Results. Kinesiophobia resulted predominantly in the patients’ sample. The values of kinesiophobia did not correlate with intensity of pain, quality of life, and (or the single component of fatigue. A strong correlation was discovered between kinesiophobia and general severity of fatigue. Conclusions. In JHS/EDS-HT, the onset of pain-avoiding strategies is related to the presence of pain but not to its intensity. The clear-cut correlation between kinesiophobia and severity of fatigue suggests a direct link between musculoskeletal pain and fatigue. In JHS/EDS-HT, the underlying mechanism is likely to be facilitated by primary disease characteristics, including hypotonia.

  11. Low tendon stiffness and abnormal ultrastructure distinguish classic Ehlers-Danlos syndrome from benign joint hypermobility syndrome in patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rie Harboe; Couppé, Christian; Jensen, Jacob Kildevang

    2014-01-01

    There is a clinical overlap between classic Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (cEDS) and benign joint hypermobility syndrome (BJHS), with hypermobility as the main symptom. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of type V collagen mutations and tendon pathology in these 2 syndromes. In patients...... and abnormal ultrastructure distinguish classic Ehlers-Danlos syndrome from benign joint hypermobility syndrome in patients....

  12. Visceroptosis of the Bowel in the Hypermobility type of Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome: Presentation of a Rare Manifestation and Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinstein, Eyal; Pimentel, Mark; Pariani, Mitchel; Nemec, Stephen; Sokol, Thomas; Rimoin, David L

    2012-01-01

    Gastrointestinal complications are common in patients with Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome, affecting up to 50% of individuals depending on the subtype. The spectrum of gastrointestinal manifestations is broad and ranges from life threatening spontaneous perforation of the visceral organs to a more benign functional symptoms. Here we describe the clinical and radiographic manifestations of visceroptosis of the bowel, a rare complication of Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome that is characterized by prolapse of abdominal organs below their natural position. We further review the literature on gastrointestinal complications in the different forms of Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome. PMID:22781752

  13. Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome, Hypermobility Type: An Underdiagnosed Hereditary Connective Tissue Disorder with Mucocutaneous, Articular, and Systemic Manifestations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castori, Marco

    2012-01-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type, constituting a phenotypic continuum with or, perhaps, corresponding to the joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS/EDS-HT), is likely the most common, though the least recognized, heritable connective tissue disorder. Known for decades as a hereditary condition with predominant rheumatologic manifestations, it is now emerging as a multisystemic disorder with widespread manifestations. Nevertheless, the practitioners' awareness of this condition is generally poor and most patients await years or, perhaps, decades before reaching the correct diagnosis. Among the various sites of disease manifestations, skin and mucosae represent a neglected organ where the dermatologist can easily spot diagnostic clues, which consistently integrate joint hypermobility and other orthopedic/neurologic manifestations at physical examination. In this paper, actual knowledge on JHS/EDS-HT is summarized in various sections. Particular attention has been posed on overlooked manifestations, including cutaneous, mucosal, and oropharyngeal features, and early diagnosis techniques, as a major point of interest for the practicing dermatologist. Actual research progresses on JH/EDS-HT envisage an unexpected link between heritable dysfunctions of the connective tissue and a wide range of functional somatic syndromes, most of them commonly diagnosed in the office of various specialists, comprising dermatologists. PMID:23227356

  14. Recognizing the tenascin-X deficient type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome: a cross-sectional study in 17 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirdas, S; Dulfer, E; Robert, L; Kempers, M; van Beek, D; Micha, D; van Engelen, B G; Hamel, B; Schalkwijk, J; Loeys, B; Maugeri, A; Voermans, N C

    2017-03-01

    The tenascin-X (TNX) deficient type Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is similar to the classical type of EDS. Because of the limited awareness among geneticists and the challenge of the molecular analysis of the TNXB gene, the TNX-deficient type EDS is probably to be under diagnosed. We therefore performed an observational, cross-sectional study. History and physical examination were performed. Results of serum TNX measurements were collected and mutation analysis was performed by a combination of next-generation sequencing (NGS), Sanger sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA). Included were 17 patients of 11 families with autosomal recessive inheritance and childhood onset. All patients had hyperextensible skin without atrophic scarring. Hypermobility of the joints was observed in 16 of 17 patients. Deformities of the hands and feet were observed frequently. TNX serum level was tested and absent in 11 patients (seven families). Genetic testing was performed in all families; 12 different mutations were detected, most of which are suspected to lead to non-sense mRNA mediated decay. In short, patients with the TNX-deficient type EDS typically have generalized joint hypermobility, skin hyperextensibility and easy bruising. In contrast to the classical type, the inheritance pattern is autosomal recessive and atrophic scarring is absent. Molecular analysis of TNXB in a diagnostic setting is challenging. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Vascular type Ehlers-Danlos syndrome is associated with platelet dysfunction and low vitamin D serum concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, Albert; Hoffjan, Sabine; Bergmann, Frauke; Hartung, Birgit; Jung, Helena; Hanel, Daniela; Tzschach, Andeas; Kadar, Janos; von Kodolitsch, Yskert; Germer, Christoph-Thomas; Trobisch, Heiner; Strasser, Erwin; Wildenauer, René

    2016-08-03

    The vascular type represents a very rare, yet the clinically most fatal entity of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS). Patients are often admitted due to arterial bleedings and the friable tissue and the altered coagulation contribute to the challenge in treatment strategies. Until now there is little information about clotting characteristics that might influence hemostasis decisively and eventually worsen emergency situations. 22 vascular type EDS patients were studied for hemoglobin, platelet volume and count, Quick and activated partial thromboplastin time, fibrinogen, factor XIII, von Willebrand disease, vitamin D and platelet aggregation by modern standard laboratory methods. Results show a high prevalence of over 50 % for platelet aggregation disorders in vascular type EDS patients, especially for collagen and epinephrine induced tests, whereas the plasmatic cascade did not show any alterations. Additionally, more than half of the tested subjects showed low vitamin D serum levels, which might additionally affect vascular wall integrity. The presented data underline the importance of detailed laboratory screening methods in vascular type EDS patients in order to allow for targeted application of platelet-interacting substances that might be of decisive benefit in the emergency setting.

  16. Knowledge, assessment, and management of adults with joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type among Flemish physiotherapists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rombaut, Lies; Deane, Janet; Simmonds, Jane; De Wandele, Inge; De Paepe, Anne; Malfait, Fransiska; Calders, Patrick

    2015-03-01

    Physiotherapy plays a fundamental role in managing adults with the joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type (JHS/EDS-HT). However, it is a challenge for both the patient and the physiotherapist as the condition is poorly understood and treatment for JHS/EDS-HT is currently undefined. Insight into current practice is, therefore, necessary in order to establish baseline knowledge in this area and in the long term to improve the standard of patient care. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate current physiotherapists' knowledge of JHS/EDS-HT and to gain insight into current physiotherapy practice with emphasis on assessment, management, and treatment efficacy. Three hundred twenty-five Flemish physiotherapists participated in the study by filling out electronically a modified version of the "Hypermobility and Hypermobility Syndrome Questionnaire" (HHQ), which covered theoretical constructs such as general knowledge, assessment, management, and learning in relation to generalized joint hypermobility and JHS/EDS-HT. The results show that physiotherapists report a low level of confidence with regard to assessment and management of JHS/EDS-HT. Knowledge of hypermobility and JHS/EDS-HT is weak, especially regarding the features associated with JHS/EDS-HT. Many treatment approaches are used by physiotherapists with the majority showing preference for education, reassurance, muscle strengthening, proprioceptive and core stability training. Almost all approaches were perceived as being clinically effective by the physiotherapists, highlighting a lack of consensus. In conclusion, this study in Flemish physiotherapists confirms that JHS/EDS-HT is under-recognized, not well known and deemed difficult to treat. Further education is required and sought by the physiotherapists surveyed, and future research is needed. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Loss of Col3a1, the gene for Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV, results in neocortical dyslamination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Jin Jeong

    Full Text Available It has recently been discovered that Collagen III, the encoded protein of the type IV Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome (EDS gene, is one of the major constituents of the pial basement membrane (BM and serves as the ligand for GPR56. Mutations in GPR56 cause a severe human brain malformation called bilateral frontoparietal polymicrogyria, in which neurons transmigrate through the BM causing severe mental retardation and frequent seizures. To further characterize the brain phenotype of Col3a1 knockout mice, we performed a detailed histological analysis. We observed a cobblestone-like cortical malformation, with BM breakdown and marginal zone heterotopias in Col3a1⁻/⁻ mouse brains. Surprisingly, the pial BM appeared intact at early stages of development but starting as early as embryonic day (E 11.5, prominent BM defects were observed and accompanied by neuronal overmigration. Although collagen III is expressed in meningeal fibroblasts (MFs, Col3a1⁻/⁻ MFs present no obvious defects. Furthermore, the expression and posttranslational modification of α-dystroglycan was undisturbed in Col3a1⁻/⁻ mice. Based on the previous finding that mutations in COL3A1 cause type IV EDS, our study indicates a possible common pathological pathway linking connective tissue diseases and brain malformations.

  18. Central sensitization as the mechanism underlying pain in joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Stefano, G; Celletti, C; Baron, R; Castori, M; Di Franco, M; La Cesa, S; Leone, C; Pepe, A; Cruccu, G; Truini, A; Camerota, F

    2016-09-01

    Patients with joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type (JHS/EDS-HT) commonly suffer from pain. How this hereditary connective tissue disorder causes pain remains unclear although previous studies suggested it shares similar mechanisms with neuropathic pain and fibromyalgia. In this prospective study seeking information on the mechanisms underlying pain in patients with JHS/EDS-HT, we enrolled 27 consecutive patients with this connective tissue disorder. Patients underwent a detailed clinical examination, including the neuropathic pain questionnaire DN4 and the fibromyalgia rapid screening tool. As quantitative sensory testing methods, we included thermal-pain perceptive thresholds and the wind-up ratio and recorded a standard nerve conduction study to assess non-nociceptive fibres and laser-evoked potentials, assessing nociceptive fibres. Clinical examination and diagnostic tests disclosed no somatosensory nervous system damage. Conversely, most patients suffered from widespread pain, the fibromyalgia rapid screening tool elicited positive findings, and quantitative sensory testing showed lowered cold and heat pain thresholds and an increased wind-up ratio. While the lack of somatosensory nervous system damage is incompatible with neuropathic pain as the mechanism underlying pain in JHS/EDS-HT, the lowered cold and heat pain thresholds and increased wind-up ratio imply that pain in JHS/EDS-HT might arise through central sensitization. Hence, this connective tissue disorder and fibromyalgia share similar pain mechanisms. WHAT DOES THIS STUDY ADD?: In patients with JHS/EDS-HT, the persistent nociceptive input due to joint abnormalities probably triggers central sensitization in the dorsal horn neurons and causes widespread pain. © 2016 European Pain Federation - EFIC®

  19. Spectrum of mucocutaneous manifestations in 277 patients with joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castori, Marco; Dordoni, Chiara; Morlino, Silvia; Sperduti, Isabella; Ritelli, Marco; Valiante, Michele; Chiarelli, Nicola; Zanca, Arianna; Celletti, Claudia; Venturini, Marina; Camerota, Filippo; Calzavara-Pinton, Piergiacomo; Grammatico, Paola; Colombi, Marina

    2015-03-01

    Cutaneous manifestations are a diagnostic criterion of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type (EDS-HT) and joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS). These two conditions, originally considered different disorders, are now accepted as clinically indistinguishable and often segregate as a single-familial trait. EDS-HT and JHS are still exclusion diagnoses not supported by any specific laboratory test. Accuracy of clinical diagnosis is, therefore, crucial for appropriate patients' classification and management, but it is actually hampered by the low consistency of many applied criteria including the cutaneous one. We report on mucocutaneous findings in 277 patients with JHS/EDS-HT with both sexes and various ages. Sixteen objective and five anamnestic items were selected and ascertained in two specialized outpatient clinics. Feature rates were compared by sex and age by a series of statistical tools. Data were also used for a multivariate correspondence analysis with the attempt to identify non-causal associations of features depicting recognizable phenotypic clusters. Our findings identified a few differences between sexes and thus indicated an attenuated sexual dimorphism for mucocutaneous features in JHS/EDS-HT. Ten features showed significantly distinct rates at different ages and this evidence corroborated the concept of an evolving phenotype in JHS/EDS-HT also affecting the skin. Multivariate correspondence analysis identified three relatively discrete phenotypic profiles, which may represent the cutaneous counterparts of the three disease phases previously proposed for JHS/EDS-HT. These findings could be used for revising the cutaneous criterion in a future consensus for the clinical diagnosis of JHS/EDS-HT. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Generalized Hyperalgesia in Children and Adults Diagnosed With Hypermobility Syndrome and Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Hypermobility Type: A Discriminative Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheper, M C; Pacey, V; Rombaut, L; Adams, R D; Tofts, L; Calders, P; Nicholson, L L; Engelbert, R H H

    2017-03-01

    Lowered pressure-pain thresholds have been demonstrated in adults with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type (EDS-HT), but whether these findings are also present in children is unclear. Therefore, the objectives of the study were to determine whether generalized hyperalgesia is present in children with hypermobility syndrome (HMS)/EDS-HT, explore potential differences in pressure-pain thresholds between children and adults with HMS/EDS-HT, and determine the discriminative value of generalized hyperalgesia. Patients were classified in 1 of 3 groups: HMS/EDS-HT, hypermobile (Beighton score ≥4 of 9), and healthy controls. Descriptive data of age, sex, body mass index, Beighton score, skin laxity, and medication usage were collected. Generalized hyperalgesia was quantified by the average pressure-pain thresholds collected from 12 locations. Confounders collected were pain locations/intensity, fatigue, and psychological distress. Comparisons between children with HMS/EDS-HT and normative values, between children and adults with HMS/EDS-HT, and corrected confounders were analyzed with multivariate analysis of covariance. The discriminative value of generalized hyperalgesia employed to differentiate between HMS/EDS-HT, hypermobility, and controls was quantified with logistic regression. Significantly lower pressure-pain thresholds were found in children with HMS/EDS-HT compared to normative values (range -22.0% to -59.0%; P ≤ 0.05). When applying a threshold of 30.8 N/cm 2 for males and 29.0 N/cm 2 for females, the presence of generalized hyperalgesia discriminated between individuals with HMS/EDS-HT, hypermobility, and healthy controls (odds ratio 6.0). Children and adults with HMS/EDS-HT are characterized by hypermobility, chronic pain, and generalized hyperalgesia. The presence of generalized hyperalgesia may indicate involvement of the central nervous system in the development of chronic pain. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  1. Transcriptome-Wide Expression Profiling in Skin Fibroblasts of Patients with Joint Hypermobility Syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Hypermobility Type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiarelli, Nicola; Carini, Giulia; Zoppi, Nicoletta; Dordoni, Chiara; Ritelli, Marco; Venturini, Marina; Castori, Marco; Colombi, Marina

    2016-01-01

    Joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type (JHS/EDS-HT), is likely the most common systemic heritable connective tissue disorder, and is mostly recognized by generalized joint hypermobility, joint instability complications, minor skin changes and a wide range of satellite features. JHS/EDS-HT is considered an autosomal dominant trait but is still without a defined molecular basis. The absence of (a) causative gene(s) for JHS/EDS-HT is likely attributable to marked genetic heterogeneity and/or interaction of multiple loci. In order to help in deciphering such a complex molecular background, we carried out a comprehensive immunofluorescence analysis and gene expression profiling in cultured skin fibroblasts from five women affected with JHS/EDS-HT. Protein study revealed disarray of several matrix structural components such as fibrillins, tenascins, elastin, collagens, fibronectin, and their integrin receptors. Transcriptome analysis indicated perturbation of different signaling cascades that are required for homeostatic regulation either during development or in adult tissues as well as altered expression of several genes involved in maintenance of extracellular matrix architecture and homeostasis (e.g., SPON2, TGM2, MMP16, GPC4, SULF1), cell-cell adhesion (e.g., CDH2, CHD10, PCDH9, CLDN11, FLG, DSP), immune/inflammatory/pain responses (e.g., CFD, AQP9, COLEC12, KCNQ5, PRLR), and essential for redox balance (e.g., ADH1C, AKR1C2, AKR1C3, MAOB, GSTM5). Our findings provide a picture of the gene expression profile and dysregulated pathways in JHS/EDS-HT skin fibroblasts that correlate well with the systemic phenotype of the patients.

  2. Refining patterns of joint hypermobility, habitus, and orthopedic traits in joint hypermobility syndrome and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morlino, Silvia; Dordoni, Chiara; Sperduti, Isabella; Venturini, Marina; Celletti, Claudia; Camerota, Filippo; Colombi, Marina; Castori, Marco

    2017-04-01

    Joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS) and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type (EDS-HT) are two overlapping heritable disorders (JHS/EDS-HT) recognized by separated sets of diagnostic criteria and still lack a confirmatory test. This descriptive research was aimed at better characterizing the clinical phenotype of JHS/EDS-HT with focus on available diagnostic criteria, and in order to propose novel features and assessment strategies. One hundred and eighty-nine (163 females, 26 males; age: 2-73 years) patients from two Italian reference centers were investigated for Beighton score, range of motion in 21 additional joints, rate and sites of dislocations and sprains, recurrent soft-tissue injuries, tendon and muscle ruptures, body mass index, arm span/height ratio, wrist and thumb signs, and 12 additional orthopedic features. Rough rates were compared by age, sex, and handedness with a series of parametric and non-parametric tools. Multiple correspondence analysis was carried out for possible co-segregations of features. Beighton score and hypermobility at other joints were influenced by age at diagnosis. Rate and sites of joint instability complications did not vary according to age at diagnosis except for soft-tissue injuries. No major difference was registered by sex and dominant versus non-dominant body side. At multiple correspondence analysis, selected features tend to co-segregate in a dichotomous distribution. Dolichostenomelia and arachnodactyly segregated independently. This study pointed out a more protean musculoskeletal phenotype than previously considered according to available diagnostic criteria for JHS/EDS-HT. Our findings corroborated the need for a re-thinking of JHS/EDS-HT on clinical grounds in order to find better therapeutic and research strategies. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. The role of narrative medicine in the management of joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Isobel

    2015-03-01

    Joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type (JHS/EDS-HT) is a hereditary connective tissue disorder affecting every bodily system. It is largely underdiagnosed by many practitioners, with the result of a considerable delay in diagnosis and, consequently, in the onset of adequate management schedule and treatment. Patients may also experience to be misbelieved, erroneously considered affected by a psychiatric or psychosomatic disorders, and rejected by the medical profession, which can lead to feelings of anger and resentment. Patient journeys are often long and complicated, but if doctors allowed the patient time to tell the full story, and were more prepared to think holistically, there may be a far more positive outcome. Here, the patients' perspective is presented with a narrative medicine approach, illustrating the tri-dimensional experience of a JHS/EDS-HT patient, who is also a Bowen Practitioner and a medical writer/educator. Narrative medicine would be invaluable in working with JHS/EDS-HT so that the patient can tell the story, and offer the practitioner a whole picture of her/his suffering and, often, the key for understanding the cause(s). Once this has been achieved, it might be possible to build upon a more positive and therapeutic dialogue which would result in better treatment and more effective management. It is also important for doctors to communicate with JHS/EDS-HT experts who will ultimately improve the patient journey and treatment outcomes of such a complex connective tissue disorder. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Spontaneous Splenic Rupture in Vascular Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batagini, Nayara Cioffi; Gornik, Heather; Kirksey, Lee

    2015-01-01

    Vascular Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome (VEDS) is a rare autosomal dominant collagen vascular disorder. Different from other Ehler-Danlos Syndrome subtypes, VEDS has poor prognosis due to severe fragility of connective tissues and association with life-threatening vascular and gastrointestinal complications. Spontaneous splenic rupture is a rare but hazardous complication related to this syndrome. To date, only 2 cases have been reported in the literature. Here we present another case of this uncommon complication, occurring in a 54-year-old woman in clinical follow-up for VEDS who presented with sudden onset of abdominal pain and hypotension. © The Author(s) 2015.

  5. ABNORMAL TYPE-III COLLAGEN PRODUCED BY AN EXON-17-SKIPPING MUTATION OF THE COL3A1 GENE IN EHLERS-DANLOS SYNDROME TYPE-IV IS NOT INCORPORATED INTO THE EXTRACELLULAR-MATRIX

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    CHIODO, AA; SILLENCE, DO; COLE, WG; BATEMAN, JF

    1995-01-01

    A novel heterozygous mutation of the COL3Al gene that encodes the alpha 1(III) chains of type III collagen was identified in a family with the: acrogeric form of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV (EDS-IV). Cultured dermal fibroblasts produced normal and shortened alpha 1(III) chains. The triple helix

  6. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV and recurrent carotid-cavernous fistula: review of the literature, endovascular approach, technique and difficulties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desal, H.A.; Toulgoat, F.; Raoul, S.; Guillon, B.; Bommard, S.; Naudou-Giron, E.; Auffary-Calvier, E.; Kersaint-Gilly, A. de

    2005-01-01

    We report the follow-up of a previously published case (Forlodou et al. Neuroradiology 38:595-597, 1996) of carotido-cavernous fistulas (CCFs) in a patient presenting with type IV Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS 4) that were successfully treated twice by an endovascular approach. Initial treatment with a detachable balloon was in 1994 for a right CCF, and, 8 years later, a left CCF was treated by selective transarterial occlusion of the cavernous sinus with coils. Unfortunately, the patient suffered from a spontaneous post-operative intracranial haemorrhage in the left hemisphere and died. Review of the literature, technical considerations for bilateral CCF and complication are discussed

  7. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV and recurrent carotid-cavernous fistula: review of the literature, endovascular approach, technique and difficulties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desal, H.A.; Toulgoat, F.; Raoul, S.; Guillon, B.; Bommard, S.; Naudou-Giron, E.; Auffary-Calvier, E.; Kersaint-Gilly, A. de [Department of Neuroradiology, Laennec Hospital, University of Nantes (France); 1

    2005-04-01

    We report the follow-up of a previously published case (Forlodou et al. Neuroradiology 38:595-597, 1996) of carotido-cavernous fistulas (CCFs) in a patient presenting with type IV Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS 4) that were successfully treated twice by an endovascular approach. Initial treatment with a detachable balloon was in 1994 for a right CCF, and, 8 years later, a left CCF was treated by selective transarterial occlusion of the cavernous sinus with coils. Unfortunately, the patient suffered from a spontaneous post-operative intracranial haemorrhage in the left hemisphere and died. Review of the literature, technical considerations for bilateral CCF and complication are discussed.

  8. A New COL3A1 Mutation in Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Vascular Type With Different Phenotypes in the Same Family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortini, Francesca; Marinelli, Barbara; Romi, Silvia; Seresini, Agostino; Pesatori, Angela Cecilia; Seia, Manuela; Montano, Nicola; Bassotti, Alessandra

    2017-04-01

    Vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (vEDS) is a rare and severe connective tissue disorder caused by mutations in the collagen type III alpha I chain ( COL3A1) gene. We describe a pathogenetic heterozygous COL3A1 mutation c.3140 G>A, p. Gly1047Asp, identified using next-generation sequencing, in a 40-year-old Italian female. The genetic test performed on her relatives, which present different clinical phenotypes, confirmed that they carry the same mutation in heterozygous state. This finding confirms that mutations causing vEDS have an incomplete penetrance.

  9. EHLERS-DANLOS SENDROMU VE DİŞ HEKİMLİĞİ AÇISINDAN ÖNEMİ THE IMPORTANCE OF EHLERS-DANLOS SYNDROME IN DENTISTRY

    OpenAIRE

    Akyüz, Nevin; Doğan, Özen

    2012-01-01

    ÖZETBu makalede Ehlers-Danlos sendromu tanıtıldı. Hastalığın ağız bulguları hakkında bilgi verildi vc herhangi bir dİşscl girişimde dikkat edilmesi gereken noktalar üzerinde duruldu.Anahtar sözcük: Ehlers-Danlos SendromuABSTRACTIn [his article, Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome was presented. Oral symptoms of the syndrome were introduced and the details that should consideredKey word: Ehlers-Danlos Syndromeİna surgical operation were emphasized. 

  10. CE: Nursing Management of Patients with Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Linda K

    2015-07-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS), a hereditary connective tissue disorder, has historically been misunderstood and underdiagnosed by health care providers. Because of the high degree of phenotypic variability, patients are often correctly diagnosed only after years of seemingly unrelated but debilitating injuries and illnesses. Specific genetic mutations have been identified for some, but not all, EDS types; patients presenting with a high index of suspicion should be referred to a geneticist. As awareness and recognition of the syndrome improve, nurses are increasingly likely to care for patients with EDS. This article gives a brief overview of the syndrome and provides guidance on ways to manage symptoms, recognize and prevent serious complications, and improve patients' quality of life.

  11. Association between diverticular disease and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leganger, Julie; Søborg, Marie-Louise Kulas; Mortensen, Laura Quitzau

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to examine occurrence and consequences of diverticular disease in patients with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) compared with a matched cohort.  Methods: This nationwide population-based cohort study was conducted using data from medical registers in Denmark from...

  12. The natural history of children with joint hypermobility syndrome and Ehlers-Danlos hypermobility type: a longitudinal cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheper, Mark C; Nicholson, Lesley L; Adams, Roger D; Tofts, Louise; Pacey, Verity

    2017-12-01

    The objective of the manuscript was to describe the natural history of complaints and disability in children diagnosed with joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS)/Ehlers-Danlos-hypermobility type (EDS-HT) and to identify the constructs that underlie functional decline. One hundred and one JHS/EDS-HT children were observed over 3 years and assessed at three time points on the following: functional impairments, quality of life, connective tissue laxity, muscle function, postural control and musculoskeletal and multi-systemic complaints. Cluster analysis was performed to identify subgroups in severity. Clinical profiles were determined for these subgroups, and differences were assessed by multivariate analysis of covariance. Mixed linear regression models were used to determine the subsequent trajectories. Finally, an exploratory factor analysis was used to uncover the underlying constructs of functional impairment. Three clusters of children were identified in terms of functional impairment: mild, moderately and severely affected. Functional impairment at baseline was predictive of worsening trajectories in terms of reduced walking distance and decreased quality of life (P ⩽ 0.05) over 3 years. Multiple interactions between the secondary outcomes were observed, with four underlying constructs identified. All four constructs (multi-systemic effects, pain, fatigue and loss of postural control) contributed significantly to disability (P ⩽ 0.046). Children diagnosed with JHS/EDS-HT who have a high incidence of multi-systemic complaints (particularly, orthostatic intolerance, urinary incontinence and diarrhoea) and poor postural control in addition to high levels of pain and fatigue at baseline are most likely to have a deteriorating trajectory of functional impairment and, accordingly, warrant clinical prioritization. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please

  13. Single-catheter approach for ablation of the slow pathway in a patient with type IV Ehlers-Danlos syndrome and AV nodal reentrant tachycardia using a magnetic navigation system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Szili-Torok (Tamas); E. Jessurun; L.J.L.M. Jordaens (Luc)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractPatients with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV have thin-walled, friable arteries and veins. Invasive procedures carry a significantly increased risk for perforation of blood vessels. The aim of this case report is to demonstrate the feasibility and potential benefits of using a

  14. Linkage of the gene that encodes the alpha 1 chain of type V collagen (COL5A1) to type II Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loughlin, J; Irven, C; Hardwick, L J; Butcher, S; Walsh, S; Wordsworth, P; Sykes, B

    1995-09-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is a group of heritable disorders of connective tissue with skin, ligaments and blood vessels being the main sites affected. The commonest variant (EDS II) exhibits an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance and is characterized by joint hypermobility, cigarette paper scars, lax skin and excessive bruising. As yet no gene has been linked to EDS II, nor has linkage been established to a specific region of the genome. However, several candidate genes encoding proteins of the extracellular matrix have been excluded. Using an intragenic simple sequence repeat polymorphism, we report linkage of the COL5A1 gene, which encodes the alpha 1(V) chain of type V collagen, to EDS II. A maximum LOD score (Zmax) for linkage of 8.3 at theta = 0.00 was generated for a single large pedigree.

  15. [Two cases of rehabilitation in Ehler-Danlos syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Tallec, H; Lassalle, A; Khenioui, H; Durufle, A; Plassat, R; Gallien, P

    2006-03-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome is rare and little known. It comprises a heterogeneous group of heritable connective tissue disorders characterized by articular hypermobility, skin extensibility and tissue fragility. Diagnosis may be difficult and often delayed. Here we describe 2 cases of women with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. The first had scoliosis with back pain and joint hypermobility. The second presented with hypermobility and joint dislocation, which increased during pregnancy. In these 2 cases, rehabilitation management produced clinical improvement. Orthopaedic complications such joint pain, joint swelling, joint dislocation, back pain, with walking and hand function disability are the main problems in Ehlers-Danos syndrome. Surgery may be necessary to correct dislocated joints but is often not sufficient to resolve the handicap, and physical therapy has an important place in management. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome is an evolving disease that can lead to great impairment. Thus, physicians must be aware of this syndrome to offer the best management, with the appropriate use of orthotic devices, specific strengthening routines, education in proper body mechanics and assistive devices, to prevent joint dislocation and subluxations responsible for pain and handicap.

  16. Chronic pain in hypermobility syndrome and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (hypermobility type) : it is a challenge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheper, Mark C; de Vries, Janneke E; Verbunt, Jeanine; Engelbert, Raoul HH

    2015-01-01

    Generalized joint hypermobility (GJH) is highly prevalent among patients diagnosed with chronic pain. When GJH is accompanied by pain in ≥4 joints over a period ≥3 months in the absence of other conditions that cause chronic pain, the hypermobility syndrome (HMS) may be diagnosed. In addition, GJH

  17. Chronic pain in hypermobility syndrome and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (hypermobility type): it is a challenge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheper, Mark C.; de Vries, Janneke E.; Verbunt, Jeanine; Engelbert, Raoul H. H.

    2015-01-01

    Generalized joint hypermobility (GJH) is highly prevalent among patients diagnosed with chronic pain. When GJH is accompanied by pain in >= 4 joints over a period >= 3 months in the absence of other conditions that cause chronic pain, the hypermobility syndrome (HMS) may be diagnosed. In addition,

  18. Computed tomography in patients with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagino, Hiroshi; Sugitani, Akitoshi; Eda, Isematsu; Takashima, Sachio; Takeshita, Kenzo

    1985-01-01

    Three patients with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome were reported. Unusual findings on computed tomography were seen in two of the three patients. One case showed peculiar and marked dilatation of the 4th ventricle, supracerebellar cistern and lateral ventricle. The other case presented disproportionate enlargement of the anterior horn of the lateral ventricle. These CT findings in the two patients suggest that developmental abnormalities may constitute a structural defect. (orig.)

  19. Computed tomography in patients with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagino, Hiroshi; Sugitani, Akitoshi; Eda, Isematsu; Takashima, Sachio; Takeshita, Kenzo

    1985-09-01

    Three patients with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome were reported. Unusual findings on computed tomography were seen in two of the three patients. One case showed peculiar and marked dilatation of the 4th ventricle, supracerebellar cistern and lateral ventricle. The other case presented disproportionate enlargement of the anterior horn of the lateral ventricle. These CT findings in the two patients suggest that developmental abnormalities may constitute a structural defect.

  20. Giant epiphrenic diverticulum in a boy with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyohara, T.; Kaneko, T.; Araki, H.; Takahashi, K.; Nakamura, T.; Aso-Iizuka Hospital, Iizuka, Fukuoka; Aso-Iizuka Hospital, Iizuka, Fukuoka

    1989-01-01

    We treated a 12 year old boy with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. There were multiple diverticula in the oesophagus, stomach, colon and urinary bladder. Most prominent was the giant epiphrenic diverticulum of the oesophagus, a rare finding as a complication of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. (orig.)

  1. Giant epiphrenic diverticulum in a boy with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toyohara, T.; Kaneko, T.; Araki, H.; Takahashi, K.; Nakamura, T.

    1989-07-01

    We treated a 12 year old boy with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. There were multiple diverticula in the oesophagus, stomach, colon and urinary bladder. Most prominent was the giant epiphrenic diverticulum of the oesophagus, a rare finding as a complication of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. (orig.).

  2. Surgical and medical treatment of ocular disease in a dog with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasch, Søren N

    2017-06-01

    Correctional surgery was performed on a 3-year-old intact male shih tzu presenting with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, ocular disease, and skin fold dermatitis. A one-year follow-up showed that no further clinical corrections were needed. Therefore, surgery could be considered in some canine patients with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

  3. Cognitive, emotional, and behavioral considerations for chronic pain management in the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility-type: a narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeza-Velasco, Carolina; Bulbena, Antonio; Polanco-Carrasco, Roberto; Jaussaud, Roland

    2018-01-22

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) hypermobility-type is the most common hereditary disorder of the connective tissue. The tissue fragility characteristic of this condition leads to multi-systemic symptoms in which pain, often severe, chronic, and disabling, is the most experienced. Clinical observations suggest that the complex patient with EDS hypermobility-type is refractory toward several biomedical and physical approaches. In this context and in accordance with the contemporary conceptualization of pain (biopsychosocial perspective), the identification of psychological aspects involved in the pain experience can be useful to improve interventions for this under-recognized pathology. Review of the literature on joint hypermobility and EDS hypermobility-type concerning psychological factors linked to pain chronicity and disability. A comprehensive search was performed using scientific online databases and references lists, encompassing publications reporting quantitative and qualitative research as well as unpublished literature. Despite scarce research, psychological factors associated with EDS hypermobility-type that potentially affect pain chronicity and disability were identified. These are cognitive problems and attention to body sensations, negative emotions, and unhealthy patterns of activity (hypo/hyperactivity). As in other chronic pain conditions, these aspects should be more explored in EDS hypermobility-type, and integrated into chronic pain prevention and management programs. Implications for Rehabilitation Clinicians should be aware that joint hypermobility may be associated with other health problems, and in its presence suspect a heritable disorder of connective tissue such as the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) hypermobility-type, in which chronic pain is one of the most frequent and invalidating symptoms. It is necessary to explore the psychosocial functioning of patients as part of the overall chronic pain management in the EDS hypermobility-type

  4. Resolution of Large Azygos Vein Aneurysm Following Stent-Graft Shunt Placement in a Patient with Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Type IV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Souza, Estelle S.; Williams, David M.; Deeb, G.M.; Cwikiel, Wojciech

    2006-01-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) type IV is a rare connective tissue disorder associated with thin-walled, friable arteries and veins predisposing patients to aneurysm formation, dissection, fistula formation, and vessel rupture. Azygos vein aneurysm is an extremely rare condition which has not been reported in association with EDS in the literature. We present a patient with EDS type IV and interrupted inferior vena cava (IVC) with azygos continuation who developed an azygos vein aneurysm. In order to decrease flow through the azygos vein and reduce the risk of aneurysm rupture, a stent-graft shunt was created from the right hepatic vein to the azygos vein via a transhepatic, retroperitoneal route. At 6 month follow-up the shunt was open and the azygos vein aneurysm had resolved

  5. Mobile Cecum in a Young Woman with Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Hypermobility type: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Yoshihisa; Higuchi, Yusuke; Shinozaki, Kanae; Tanigawa, Yuji; Abe, Taro; Hanaoka, Nobuyoshi; Matsubayashi, Sunao; Yamaguchi, Tomomi; Kosho, Tomoki; Nakamichi, Koji

    2017-10-15

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type (EDS-HT) is unexpectedly common and is associated with a high rate of gastrointestinal manifestations. We herein report the first documented case of mobile cecum associated with EDS-HT. A 21-year-old woman with repeated right lower abdominal pain was initially diagnosed with EDS-HT. Abdominal examinations performed in the supine position, such as CT and ultrasonography, showed no gross abnormalities. In contrast, oral barium gastrointestinal transit X-ray images obtained with changes in the patient's body position revealed position-dependent cecal volvulus with mobile cecum. She was finally discharged with a dramatic resolution of her symptoms after laparoscopic cecopexy for mobile cecum.

  6. Matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor therapy to prevent complications as well as therapy for Ehler-Danlos syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sastry, P S R K

    2002-09-01

    Matrixmetalloproteinase inhibitors have been developed as anti-cancer agents. Their usage in pancreatic cancer and other such malignancies is under trial at present. An interesting undesired-effect of one of these agents is contracture of the hand. Ehler-Danlos syndrome is an inherited group of diseases with varying types. At present there is no known treatment or prevention for the complications associated with this inherited condition. Sometimes it is the adverse events of a drug, which provides an insight into its efficacy for another indication. It is hereby being hypothesized that the matrixmetalloproteinase inhibitors especially marimastat may be an effective drug for treatment of Ehler-Danlos syndrome and/or prevention of its major complications.

  7. Orthostatic Intolerance and Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome in Joint Hypermobility Syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome, Hypermobility Type: Neurovegetative Dysregulation or Autonomic Failure?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Celletti

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type (JHS/EDS-HT, is a hereditary connective tissue disorder mainly characterized by generalized joint hypermobility, skin texture abnormalities, and visceral and vascular dysfunctions, also comprising symptoms of autonomic dysfunction. This study aims to further evaluate cardiovascular autonomic involvement in JHS/EDS-HT by a battery of functional tests. Methods. The response to cardiovascular reflex tests comprising deep breathing, Valsalva maneuver, 30/15 ratio, handgrip test, and head-up tilt test was studied in 35 JHS/EDS-HT adults. Heart rate and blood pressure variability was also investigated by spectral analysis in comparison to age and sex healthy matched group. Results. Valsalva ratio was normal in all patients, but 37.2% of them were not able to finish the test. At tilt, 48.6% patients showed postural orthostatic tachycardia, 31.4% orthostatic intolerance, 20% normal results. Only one patient had orthostatic hypotension. Spectral analysis showed significant higher baroreflex sensitivity values at rest compared to controls. Conclusions. This study confirms the abnormal cardiovascular autonomic profile in adults with JHS/EDS-HT and found the higher baroreflex sensitivity as a potential disease marker and clue for future research.

  8. Orthostatic Intolerance and Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome in Joint Hypermobility Syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome, Hypermobility Type: Neurovegetative Dysregulation or Autonomic Failure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celletti, Claudia; Camerota, Filippo; Castori, Marco; Censi, Federica; Gioffrè, Laura; Calcagnini, Giovanni; Strano, Stefano

    2017-01-01

    Background . Joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type (JHS/EDS-HT), is a hereditary connective tissue disorder mainly characterized by generalized joint hypermobility, skin texture abnormalities, and visceral and vascular dysfunctions, also comprising symptoms of autonomic dysfunction. This study aims to further evaluate cardiovascular autonomic involvement in JHS/EDS-HT by a battery of functional tests. Methods . The response to cardiovascular reflex tests comprising deep breathing, Valsalva maneuver, 30/15 ratio, handgrip test, and head-up tilt test was studied in 35 JHS/EDS-HT adults. Heart rate and blood pressure variability was also investigated by spectral analysis in comparison to age and sex healthy matched group. Results . Valsalva ratio was normal in all patients, but 37.2% of them were not able to finish the test. At tilt, 48.6% patients showed postural orthostatic tachycardia, 31.4% orthostatic intolerance, 20% normal results. Only one patient had orthostatic hypotension. Spectral analysis showed significant higher baroreflex sensitivity values at rest compared to controls. Conclusions. This study confirms the abnormal cardiovascular autonomic profile in adults with JHS/EDS-HT and found the higher baroreflex sensitivity as a potential disease marker and clue for future research.

  9. Arterial complications of vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagleton, Matthew J

    2016-12-01

    Vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is a relatively rare genetic syndrome that occurs owing to disorders in the metabolism of fibrillary collagen. These defects affect the soft connective tissues resulting in abnormalities in the skin, joints, hollow organs, and blood vessels. Patients with these defects frequently present at a young age with spontaneous arterial complications involving the medium-sized arteries. Complications involving the hollow organs, such as spontaneous colonic perforation, are observed as well. Given the fragility of the soft tissue, open and endovascular intervention on patients with vascular EDS is fraught with high complication rates. A PubMed search was performed to identify manuscripts published related to vascular EDS. This search included more than 747 articles. These findings were cross-referenced using key terms, including endovascular, embolization, surgery, genetics, pathophysiology, connective tissue disorders, vascular complications, systematic review, type III collagen, and COL3A1. The references in key articles and review articles were evaluated for additional resources not identified in the PubMed search. Care must be taken to balance the risk of intervention vs the risk of continued observation. Life-threatening hemorrhage, however, mandates intervention. With careful, altered approaches to tissue handling, endovascular approaches may provide a safer option for managing the arterial complications observed in patients with vascular EDS. Additional hope may also be found in the use of pharmacologic agents that reduce the incidence and severity of the arterial complications. Copyright © 2016 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome, Hypermobility Type: Impact of Somatosensory Orthoses on Postural Control (A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma G. Dupuy

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Elhers-Danlos syndrome (EDS is the clinical manifestation of connective tissue disorders, and comprises several clinical forms with no specific symptoms and selective medical examinations which result in a delay in diagnosis of about 10 years. The EDS hypermobility type (hEDS is characterized by generalized joint hypermobility, variable skin hyperextensibility and impaired proprioception. Since somatosensory processing and multisensory integration are crucial for both perception and action, we put forth the hypothesis that somatosensory deficits in hEDS patients may lead, among other clinical symptoms, to misperception of verticality and postural instability. Therefore, the purpose of this study was twofold: (i to assess the impact of somatosensory deficit on subjective visual vertical (SVV and postural stability; and (ii to quantify the effect of wearing somatosensory orthoses (i.e., compressive garments and insoles on postural stability. Six hEDS patients and six age- and gender-matched controls underwent a SVV (sitting, standing, lying on the right side evaluation and a postural control evaluation on a force platform (Synapsys, with or without visual information (eyes open (EO/eyes closed (EC. These two latter conditions performed either without orthoses, or with compression garments (CG, or insoles, or both. Results showed that patients did not exhibit a substantial perceived tilt of the visual vertical in the direction of the body tilt (Aubert effect as did the control subjects. Interestingly, such differential effects were only apparent when the rod was initially positioned to the left of the vertical axis (opposite the longitudinal body axis. In addition, patients showed greater postural instability (sway area than the controls. The removal of vision exacerbated this instability, especially in the mediolateral (ML direction. The wearing of orthoses improved postural stability, especially in the eyes-closed condition, with a particularly

  11. Systemic Multiple Aneurysms Caused by Vascular Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, Xinyu; Li, Fangda; Wu, Lingeer; Zheng, Yuehong

    2016-07-01

    Systemic multiple aneurysms are rare and usually associated with collagen tissue disease, such as Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) or Marfan syndrome. In the present case, we describe a 39-year-old male patient with systemic multiple aneurysms and acute intraperitoneal hemorrhage who was clinically diagnosed with vascular EDS. Coil embolization of the distal segment of the common hepatic artery was performed, which resolved the patient's symptoms. With this case presentation, we aim to increase the awareness of vascular EDS among clinicians and emphasize the extreme fragility of the arteries in patients with vascular EDS. © The Author(s) 2016.

  12. Quality of life, unmet needs, and iatrogenic injuries in rehabilitation of patients with Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome hypermobility type/Joint Hypermobility Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovet, Claire; Carlson, Matthew; Taylor, Matthew

    2016-08-01

    Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome, hypermobility type (EDS-HT) and the joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS) are connective tissue disorders that form an overlapping clinical syndrome and are associated with frequent medical visits and substantial morbidity. EDS-HT/JHS-associated pain correlates with poor quality of life. While physical therapy is the recommended treatment for EDS-HT/JHS, little is known about therapy-related patient experiences and iatrogenic injuries. We studied 38 adult EDS-HT/JHS patients, eliciting health-related quality of life (HRQoL) from 28 patients through the RAND SF-36 questionnaire. We also explored physical therapy experiences through focus groups with 13 patients. Our patients displayed poor HRQoL, with 71% reporting worse health over the past year. SF-36 scores were significantly lower than the scores of the average American population (P < 0.001 for 8 of 10 categories assessed), but were comparable to EDS-HT/JHS populations in Belgium, the Netherlands, Sweden, and Italy. Focus groups identified factors associated with: negative past physical therapy experiences, iatrogenic joint injuries, positive treatment experiences, and unmet rehabilitation needs. This group of EDS-HT/JHS patients has significant decrements in HRQoL and many unmet treatment needs, as well as a risk for iatrogenic injuries. We identify several approaches to help meet patients' needs and improve joint rehabilitation in patients with EDS-HT/JHS. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Psychopathological manifestations of joint hypermobility and joint hypermobility syndrome/ Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type: The link between connective tissue and psychological distress revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinibaldi, Lorenzo; Ursini, Gianluca; Castori, Marco

    2015-03-01

    Psychological distress is a known feature of generalized joint hypermobility (gJHM), as well as of its most common syndromic presentation, namely Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type (a.k.a. joint hypermobility syndrome - JHS/EDS-HT), and significantly contributes to the quality of life of affected individuals. Most published articles dealt with the link between gJHM (or JHS/EDS-HT) and anxiety-related conditions, and a novel generation of studies is emerging aimed at investigating the psychopathologic background of such an association. In this paper, literature review was carried out with a semi-systematic approach spanning the entire spectrum of psychopathological findings in gJHM and JHS/EDS-HT. Interestingly, in addition to the confirmation of a tight link between anxiety and gJHM, preliminary connections with depression, attention deficit (and hyperactivity) disorder, autism spectrum disorders, and obsessive-compulsive personality disorder were also found. Few papers investigated the relationship with schizophrenia with contrasting results. The mind-body connections hypothesized on the basis of available data were discussed with focus on somatotype, presumed psychopathology, and involvement of the extracellular matrix in the central nervous system. The hypothesis of positive Beighton score and alteration of interoceptive/proprioceptive/body awareness as possible endophenotypes in families with symptomatic gJHM or JHS/EDS-HT is also suggested. Concluding remarks addressed the implications of the psychopathological features of gJHM and JHS/EDS-HT in clinical practice. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction in Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Williams

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This report details the reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament in an 18-year-old man with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS. The reduced mechanical properties of the tissue in EDS can pose a challenge to the orthopaedic surgeon. In this case, we describe the use of a hamstring autograft combined with a Ligament Advanced Reinforcement System (LARS. There was a good radiographical, clinical, and functional outcome after two years. This technique gave a successful outcome in the reconstruction of the ACL in a patient with EDS and therefore may help surgeons faced with the same clinical scenario.

  15. A case of vascular Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome with a cardiomyopathy and multi-system involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Nick Si Rui; Fietz, Michael; Pachter, Nicholas; Paul, Vincent; Playford, David

    Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome comprises a heterogeneous group of heritable connective tissue disorders resulting from various gene mutations. We present an unusual case of vascular Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome with distinctive physical characteristics and a cardiomyopathy with features suggesting isolated left ventricular non-compaction. The cardiac features represent the first report of a cardiomyopathy associated with a mutation in the COL3A1 gene. This case also illustrates the multi-system nature of Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome and the complexity of managing patients with the vascular subtype. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. New lethal disease involving type I and III collagen defect resembling geroderma osteodysplastica, De Barsy syndrome, and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jukkola, A; Kauppila, S; Risteli, L; Vuopala, K; Risteli, J; Leisti, J; Pajunen, L

    1998-06-01

    We describe the clinical findings and biochemical features of a male child suffering from a so far undescribed lethal connective tissue disorder characterised by extreme hypermobility of the joints, lax skin, cataracts, severe growth retardation, and insufficient production of type I and type III procollagens. His features are compared with Ehlers-Danlos type IV, De Barsy syndrome, and geroderma osteodysplastica, as these disorders show some symptoms and signs shared with our patient. The child died because of failure of the connective tissue structures joining the skull and the spine, leading to progressive spinal stenosis. The aortic valve was translucent and insufficient. The clinical symptoms and signs, together with histological findings, suggested a collagen defect. Studies on both skin fibroblast cultures and the patient's serum showed reduced synthesis of collagen types I and III at the protein and RNA levels. The sizes of the mRNAs and newly synthesised proteins were normal, excluding gross structural abnormalities. These findings are not in accordance with any other collagen defect characterised so far.

  17. The effects of neuromuscular taping on gait walking strategy in a patient with joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camerota, Filippo; Galli, Manuela; Cimolin, Veronica; Celletti, Claudia; Ancillao, Andrea; Blow, David; Albertini, Giorgio

    2015-02-01

    In this case study, biomechanical alterations induced by neuromuscular taping (NMT) were quantified, during walking, in a patient with joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type (JHS/EDS-HT). A female JHS/EDS-HT patient underwent NMT applications over the low back spine and bilaterally to the knee. Quantitative gait analyses were collected before the NMT application and at the end of the treatment (2 weeks after the first application of NMT). At the end of treatment following the NMT application, left step length showed improvements in cadence and velocity, the left knee showed a reduction in its flexed position at initial contact, and the right ankle joint improved its position at initial contact and in the swing phase. Improvements were also found in kinetics, in terms of the ankle moment and power. Results show that NMT seems to be a promising low-cost intervention for improving gait strategy in patients with JHS/EDS-HT. Further investigations are needed to assess the effects of this treatment intervention on pathological symptoms.

  18. Superior mesenteric artery aneurysm in a 9-year-old boy with classical Ehlers-Danlos syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Leeuw, K.; Goorhuis, J. F.; Tielliu, I. F. J.; Symoens, S.; Malfait, F.; de Paepe, A.; van Tintelen, J. P.; Hulscher, J. B. F.

    A 9-year-old boy with the classical type of EhlersDanlos syndrome (EDS) developed a symptomatic aneurysm of the superior mesenteric artery. His EDS diagnosis had been confirmed biochemically and genetically. Vascular complications are known to be associated with the vascular type of EDS, but this is

  19. Paralyse af nervus peroneus hos patient med Ehlers-Danlos syndrom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-Aubaidi, Zaid; Skov, Ole

    2011-01-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is a hereditary generalized connective tissue disorder characterized by skin hyperextensibility, joint hypermobility and tissue fragility. Peripheral neuropathy is described sporadically. Although the exact mechanism of the neuropathy is not well-known, excessive...

  20. Differential diagnosis and diagnostic flow chart of joint hypermobility syndrome/ehlers-danlos syndrome hypermobility type compared to other heritable connective tissue disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombi, Marina; Dordoni, Chiara; Chiarelli, Nicola; Ritelli, Marco

    2015-03-01

    Joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type (JHS/EDS-HT) is an evolving and protean disorder mostly recognized by generalized joint hypermobility and without a defined molecular basis. JHS/EDS-HT also presents with other connective tissue features affecting a variety of structures and organs, such as skin, eye, bone, and internal organs. However, most of these signs are present in variable combinations and severity in many other heritable connective tissue disorders. Accordingly, JHS/EDS-HT is an "exclusion" diagnosis which needs the absence of any consistent feature indicative of other partially overlapping connective tissue disorders. While both Villefranche and Brighton criteria include such an exclusion as a mandatory item, a systematic approach for reaching a stringent clinical diagnosis of JHS/EDS-HT is still lacking. The absence of a consensus on the diagnostic approach to JHS/EDS-HT concerning its clinical boundaries with similar conditions contribute to limit our actual understanding of the pathologic and molecular bases of this disorder. In this review, we revise the differential diagnosis of JHS/EDS-HT with those heritable connective tissue disorders which show a significant overlap with the former and mostly include EDS classic, vascular and kyphoscoliotic types, osteogenesis imperfecta, Marfan syndrome, Loeys-Dietz syndrome, arterial tortuosity syndrome, and lateral meningocele syndrome. A diagnostic flow chart is also offered with the attempt to support the less experienced clinician in stringently recognizing JHS/EDS-HT and stimulate the debate in the scientific community for both management and research purposes. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Human dermatosparaxis: a form of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome that results from failure to remove the amino-terminal propeptide of type I procollagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, L T; Wertelecki, W; Milstone, L M; Petty, E M; Seashore, M R; Braverman, I M; Jenkins, T G; Byers, P H

    1992-08-01

    Dermatosparaxis is a recessively inherited connective-tissue disorder that results from lack of the activity of type I procollagen N-proteinase, the enzyme that removes the amino-terminal propeptides from type I procollagen. Initially identified in cattle more than 20 years ago, the disorder was subsequently characterized in sheep, cats, and dogs. Affected animals have fragile skin, lax joints, and often die prematurely because of sepsis following avulsion of portions of skin. We recently identified two children with soft, lax, and fragile skin, which, when examined by transmission electron microscopy, contained the twisted, ribbon-like collagen fibrils characteristic of dermatosparaxis. Skin extracts from one child contained collagen precursors with amino-terminal extensions. Cultured fibroblasts from both children failed to cleave the amino-terminal propeptides from the pro alpha 1(I) and pro alpha 2(I) chains in type I procollagen molecules. Extracts of normal cells cleaved to collagen, the type I procollagen synthesized by cells from both children, demonstrating that the enzyme, not the substrate, was defective. These findings distinguish dermatosparaxis from Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type VII, which results from substrate mutations that prevent proteolytic processing of type I procollagen molecules.

  2. Postural tachycardia syndrome and other forms of orthostatic intolerance in Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roma, Maria; Marden, Colleen L; De Wandele, Inge; Francomano, Clair A; Rowe, Peter C

    2018-03-05

    To review the association between orthostatic intolerance syndromes and both joint hypermobility and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, and to propose reasons for identifying hereditary connective tissue disorders in those with orthostatic intolerance in the context of both clinical care and research. We searched the published peer-reviewed medical literature for papers reporting an association between joint hypermobility or Ehlers-Danlos syndrome and orthostatic intolerance. We identified 10 relevant papers. Although methodological variability between studies introduces some limitations, the published literature consistently identifies a significantly higher prevalence of orthostatic intolerance symptoms in patients with joint hypermobility or Ehlers-Danlos syndrome than in healthy controls, and a significantly higher prevalence of cardiovascular and autonomic abnormalities both at rest and during orthostatic challenge. Postural tachycardia syndrome is the most commonly recognized circulatory disorder. The severity of orthostatic symptoms in those with EDS correlates with impairments in quality of life. There is a strong association between several forms of cardiovascular dysfunction, most notably postural tachycardia syndrome, and joint hypermobility or Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. We propose that recognition of joint hypermobility and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome among those with orthostatic intolerance syndromes has the potential to improve clinical care and the validity of research findings. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Treatment of a direct carotid-cavernous fistula in a patient with type IV Ehlers-Danlos syndrome: a novel approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollands, J.K.; Santarius, T.; Kirkpatrick, P.J.; Higgins, J.N.

    2006-01-01

    We report a case of a 34-year-old female with type IV Ehlers-Danlos syndrome diagnosed with a carotid cavernous fistula presenting with progressive proptosis. Endovascular embolization using balloons or coils carries a high risk of complications in this group of patients, owing to the extreme fragility of the blood vessels. Initial treatment was conservative until an intracerebral haemorrhage occurred. To avoid transfemoral angiography, the ipsilateral carotid arteries and the internal jugular vein were surgically exposed for insertion of two endovascular sheaths. The patient was transferred from theatre to the angiography suite and the sheaths were used for embolization access. The fistula was closed, with preservation of the carotid artery, using Guglielmi detachable coils deployed in the cavernous sinus from the arterial and venous sides. Rapid resolution of symptoms and signs followed, which was sustained at 6-month follow-up. This technique offers alternative access for endovascular treatment, which may reduce the high incidence of mortality associated with catheter angiography in this condition. (orig.)

  4. Successful surgical treatment of intramural aortoatrial fistula, severe aortic regurgitation, mitral prolapse, and tricuspid insufficiency in a patient with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shengli; Gao, Changqing; Ren, Chonglei; Zhang, Tao

    2012-06-01

    Patients with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) type IV, an inherited connective tissue disorder, are predisposed to vascular and digestive ruptures, and arterial ruptures account for the majority of deaths. A 31-year-old man with EDS presented with an intramural aortoatrial fistula, severe aortic regurgitation, mitral valve prolapse, and severe tricuspid valve insufficiency combined with a severely dilated left ventricle. Determining the best surgical option for the patient was not easy, especially regarding the course of action for the aortic root with a tear in the sinus of Valsalva. The fistula tract was closed at the aorta with suture and with a patch in the right atrium, the mitral valve was repaired with edge-to-edge suture and then annuloplasty with a Cosgrove ring, the aortic valve was replaced with a mechanical prosthesis, and a modified De Vega technique was used for the tricuspid valvuloplasty. The postoperative course was uncomplicated, and the patient was discharged 2 weeks later. The considerations made to arrive at the chosen surgical course of action in this complex case are reviewed.

  5. Treatment of a direct carotid-cavernous fistula in a patient with type IV Ehlers-Danlos syndrome: a novel approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollands, J.K.; Santarius, T.; Kirkpatrick, P.J. [Addenbrooke' s Hospital, Department of Neurosurgery, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Higgins, J.N. [Addenbrooke' s Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2006-07-15

    We report a case of a 34-year-old female with type IV Ehlers-Danlos syndrome diagnosed with a carotid cavernous fistula presenting with progressive proptosis. Endovascular embolization using balloons or coils carries a high risk of complications in this group of patients, owing to the extreme fragility of the blood vessels. Initial treatment was conservative until an intracerebral haemorrhage occurred. To avoid transfemoral angiography, the ipsilateral carotid arteries and the internal jugular vein were surgically exposed for insertion of two endovascular sheaths. The patient was transferred from theatre to the angiography suite and the sheaths were used for embolization access. The fistula was closed, with preservation of the carotid artery, using Guglielmi detachable coils deployed in the cavernous sinus from the arterial and venous sides. Rapid resolution of symptoms and signs followed, which was sustained at 6-month follow-up. This technique offers alternative access for endovascular treatment, which may reduce the high incidence of mortality associated with catheter angiography in this condition. (orig.)

  6. Multimodal Chiropractic Care for Pain and Disability in a Patient Diagnosed With Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome-Hypermobility Type: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strunk, Richard G

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the clinical response to multimodal chiropractic treatment of a patient diagnosed with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type (EDS-HT), and chronic pain. A 22-year-old woman presented with severe chronic neck and low back pain, headaches, and bilateral hand pain and stiffness. In addition to these pain complaints, the patient had a family history of EDS, weekly or daily recurring joint dislocations, and upper and lower extremity joint hypermobility. As a result of her significant history and examination findings, which met the Brighton and Villefranche criteria, she was diagnosed with EDS-HT. Treatment primarily consisted of low force joint manipulative therapy and soft tissue therapy intermittently over 21 months concurrently with conventional and complementary medical care. Multiple outcome questionnaires were administered pragmatically at follow-up intervals of 3, 5½, 8½, 19, and 21 months, including but not limited to the Headache and Neck Disability Indices and the Oswestry Low Back Questionnaire. The patient had clinically meaningful improvements on the Neck Disability Index, the Headache Disability Index, and the Revised Oswestry after 3, 5½, 8½, and 21 months from baseline. This patient with EDS-HT had clinically meaningful decreases in disability, headache, and spine pain after a course of multimodal chiropractic care combined with conventional and complementary medical care.

  7. Next-generation sequencing and a novel COL3A1 mutation associated with vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome with severe intestinal involvement: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortini, Francesca; Marinelli, Barbara; Seia, Manuela; De Giorgio, Barbara; Pesatori, Angela Cecilia; Montano, Nicola; Bassotti, Alessandra

    2016-10-31

    The vascular type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome is an autosomal dominant connective tissue disorder caused by a mutation in the COL3A1 gene encoding pro-alpha1 chain of type III collagen. The vascular type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome causes severe fragility of connective tissues with arterial and intestinal ruptures and complications in surgical and radiological treatments. We present a case of a 38-year-old Italian woman who was diagnosed as having the vascular type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Genetic testing, conducted by Target Enrichment approach (Agilent Technologies), identified a new mutation c.1493G>A, p.G498D in exon 21 of COL3A1 gene (heterozygous state). This mutation disrupts the normal glycine-X-Y repetitions of type III procollagen by converting glycine to aspartic acid. We report a new genetic mutation associated with the vascular type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. We also describe clinical and genetic findings that are important to understand the genotype/phenotype correlation in patients with the vascular type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

  8. Recurrent Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia in Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, I.C.; Ko, S.F.; Shieh, C.S.; Huang, C.F.; Chien, S.J.; Liang, C.D.

    2006-01-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) includes a group of connective tissue disorders with abnormal collagen metabolism and a diverse clinical spectrum. We report two siblings with EDS who both presented with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH). The elder sister suffered from recurrent diaphragmatic hernia twice and EDS was overlooked initially. Echocardiography as well as contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) showed dilatation of the pulmonary artery, and marked elongation and tortuosity of the aorta and its branches. A diagnosis of EDS was eventually established when these findings were coupled with the clinical features of hyperelastic skin. Her younger brother also had similar features. This report emphasizes that EDS may present as CDH in a small child which could easily be overlooked. Without appropriate surgery, diaphragmatic hernia might occur. Echocardiographic screening is recommended in patients with CDH. Contrast-enhanced MRA can be helpful in delineation of abnormally tortuous aortic great vessels that are an important clue to the early diagnosis of EDS

  9. Cephalohematoma in a Patient with Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brent M Felton

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Ehlers-Danlos syndrome is a rarely encountered connective tissue disorder characterized by skin hyper-elasticity, joint hyper-flexibility, and vasculature fragility. We report a 41-year-old female presenting with scalp swelling following minor head trauma. The patient presented with a large cephalohematoma that despite compressive measures and Factor IX administration continued to progress, necessitating transfer for definitive surgical intervention. The patient underwent surgical evacuation of approximately 1 liter of blood, followed by drain placement and compression dressing. This case underscores the importance for emergency physicians to recognize the potential vascular catastrophes these patients may present with following even minor injury. [West J Emerg Med. 2013;14(5:419-420.

  10. Suspicious scars: physical child abuse vs Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadysinghe, Amal Nishantha; Wickramashinghe, Chatula Usari; Nanayakkara, Dineshi Nadira; Kaluarachchi, Chandishni Ishara

    2018-01-01

    Child abuse is a sensitive topic among many medical practitioners and the diagnosis of this entity requires awareness about conditions which can mimic physical child abuse. Here, the authors present a case of a 13-year-old school non-attendee who was referred due to multiple scars, over areas prone to accidental as well as non-accidental injury, who underwent medicolegal examination due to suspicion of physical child abuse. On further inquiry, it was discovered that she had easy bruising and poor wound healing. A diagnosis of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome was established and physical child abuse was excluded. This case emphasizes the importance of identifying conditions which may confound the diagnosis of physical child abuse. This is of utmost importance in avoiding adverse legal and psycho-social implications on the child, family and society.

  11. [The Ehlers-Danlos syndrome: hystory of a clinical hendiadys].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazzaventre, Cristina; Celletti, Claudia; Gobattoni, Paolo; Santilli, Valter; Camerota, Filippo

    2013-01-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of inherited connective tissue disorders characterized by joint hypermobility, skin hyperextensibility and tissue fragility, which results in easy bruising and abnormal scarring. The condition shows a phenotypic variance from milder to serious presentations. Complaints related to activity (hypermobility, dislocations, impaired balance), to pain (general pain, headache, jaw and tooth pain) and to skin (bruises, fragility, impaired wound healing) are frequent. It was first noted by Hippocrates in 400 BC in his writing 'Airs Water and Places' that the nomads Scythians had lax joints and multiple scars. Whereas the additional flexibility can give benefits in term of mobility and agility, adverse effects of tissue laxity and fragility can give rise to clinical consequences. We recognize that it is important that, in those hypermobility patients, who develop potentially debilitating symptoms of chronicfatigue or widespread pain, there should be prompt an appropriate intervention.

  12. Successful treatment of direct carotid-cavernous fistula in a patient with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV without arterial puncture: the transvenous triple-overlay embolization (TAILOREd) technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Thien J; Morton, Ryan P; Levitt, Michael R; Ghodke, Basavaraj V; Wink, Onno; Hallam, Danial K

    2017-08-18

    We report successful transvenous treatment of direct carotid-cavernous fistula in a patient with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV using a novel triple-overlay embolization (TAILOREd) technique without the need for arterial puncture, which is known to be highly risky in this patient group. The TAILOREd technique allowed for successful treatment using preoperative MR angiography as a three-dimensional overlay roadmap combined with cone beam CT and live fluoroscopy, precluding the need for an arterial puncture. 2017 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  13. Clinical Features of Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jui-Lung Yen

    2006-01-01

    Conclusion: The results of this study emphasize the importance of echocardiographic monitoring of aortic size and valvular condition, and assessment of bone mineral density in patients with EDS. Clinical evaluation and counseling should be undertaken prior to pregnancy in patients with EDS because of the risk from labor and vaginal delivery in patients with type IV and the inability to distinguish EDS subtypes in Taiwan due to the unavailability of biochemical assay or molecular mutation analysis as part of standard care.

  14. Gastrointestinal Surgery and Related Complications in Patients with Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, Jakob; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is a rare inherited group of connective tissue diseases characterized by joint hypermobility, skin hyperextensibility and bruising tendency. Common features of patients with EDS include vascular and gastrointestinal perforations. The purpose...... of this systematic review is to address gastrointestinal diseases and the complications associated with surgical treatment of diseases relating to the gastrointestinal system in patients with EDS. Methods: PubMed search including the Medical Subject Heading (MeSH) terms 'Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome' and 'Gastrointestinal...... Diseases', and an Embase search including the Map Term to Subject Heading 'Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome' with 'AND' function of the keyword 'Gastrointestinal'. Results: The literature search resulted in inclusion of 53 articles after application of eligibility criteria. The primary results drawn from...

  15. Pregnancy outcome in joint hypermobility syndrome and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundelin, Heléne E K; Stephansson, Olof; Johansson, Kari; Ludvigsson, Jonas F

    2017-01-01

    An increased risk of preterm birth in women with joint hypermobility syndrome or Ehlers-Danlos syndrome is suspected. In this nationwide cohort study from 1997 through 2011, women with either joint hypermobility syndrome or Ehlers-Danlos syndrome or both disorders were identified through the Swedish Patient Register, and linked to the Medical Birth Register. Thereby, 314 singleton births to women with joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome before delivery were identified. These births were compared with 1 247 864 singleton births to women without a diagnosis of joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. We used logistic regression, adjusted for maternal age, smoking, parity, and year of birth, to calculate adjusted odds ratios for adverse pregnancy outcomes. Maternal joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome was not associated with any of our outcomes: preterm birth (adjusted odds ratio = 0.6, 95% confidence interval 0.3-1.2), preterm premature rupture of membranes (adjusted odds ratio = 0.8; 95% confidence interval 0.3-2.2), cesarean section (adjusted odds ratio = 0.9, 95% confidence interval 0.7-1.2), stillbirth (adjusted odds ratio = 1.1, 95% confidence interval 0.2-7.9), low Apgar score (adjusted odds ratio = 1.6, 95% confidence interval 0.7-3.6), small for gestational age (adjusted odds ratio = 0.9, 95% confidence interval 0.4-1.8) or large for gestational age (adjusted odds ratio = 1.2, 95% confidence interval 0.6-2.1). Examining only women with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (n = 62), we found a higher risk of induction of labor (adjusted odds ratio = 2.6; 95% confidence interval 1.4-4.6) and amniotomy (adjusted odds ratio = 3.8; 95% confidence interval 2.0-7.1). No excess risks for adverse pregnancy outcome were seen in joint hypermobility syndrome. Women with joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome do not seem to be at increased risk of adverse pregnancy outcome. © 2016 Nordic Federation of

  16. The Evidence-Based Rationale for Physical Therapy Treatment of Children, Adolescents, and Adults Diagnosed With Joint Hypermobility Syndrome/Hypermobile Ehlers Danlos Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelbert, Raoul H. H.; Juul-Kristensen, Birgit; Pacey, Verity; de Wandele, Inge; Smeenk, Sandy; Woinarosky, Nicoleta; Sabo, Stephanie; Scheper, Mark C.; Russek, Leslie; Simmonds, Jane V.

    2017-01-01

    New insights into the phenotype of Joint Hypermobility Syndrome (JHS) and Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome-hypermobile type (hEDS) have raised many issues in relation to classification, diagnosis, assessment, and treatment. Within the multidisciplinary team, physical therapy plays a central role in management

  17. Functional adaptation of tendon and skeletal muscle to resistance training in three patients with genetically verified classic Ehlers Danlos Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Mathias Bech; Kjær, Michael; Svensson, René Brüggebusch

    2014-01-01

    undergoing muscle strength training. We investigated patients with classical Ehlers Danlos Syndrome (EDS) (collagen type V defect) who display articular hypermobility, skin extensibility and tissue fragility. METHODS: subjects underwent strength training 3 times a week for 4 months and were tested before...... and after intervention in regards to muscle strength, tendon mechanical properties, and muscle function. RESULTS: three subjects completed the scheduled 48 sessions and had no major adverse events. Mean isometric leg extension force and leg extensor power both increased by 8 and 11% respectively (358 to 397...... sway-area of the participants decreased by 26% (0.144 to 0.108 m(2)). On the subscale of CIS20 the participants lowered their average subjective fatigue score from 33 to 25. CONCLUSION: in this small pilot study, heavy resistance training was both feasible and effective in classic Ehlers Danlos...

  18. The 2017 international classification of the Ehlers-Danlos syndromes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malfait, Fransiska; Francomano, Clair; Byers, Peter H

    2017-01-01

    The Ehlers-Danlos syndromes (EDS) are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of heritable connective tissue disorders (HCTDs) characterized by joint hypermobility, skin hyperextensibility, and tissue fragility. Over the past two decades, the Villefranche Nosology, which delineated six s...... that the revised International EDS Classification will serve as a new standard for the diagnosis of EDS and will provide a framework for future research purposes. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc......., and mutations have been identified in an array of novel genes. The International EDS Consortium proposes a revised EDS classification, which recognizes 13 subtypes. For each of the subtypes, we propose a set of clinical criteria that are suggestive for the diagnosis. However, in view of the vast genetic...... revised the clinical criteria for hypermobile EDS in order to allow for a better distinction from other joint hypermobility disorders. To satisfy research needs, we also propose a pathogenetic scheme, that regroups EDS subtypes for which the causative proteins function within the same pathway. We hope...

  19. Open inferior capsular shift for multidirectional shoulder instability in adolescents with generalized ligamentous hyperlaxity or Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vavken, Patrick; Tepolt, Frances A; Kocher, Mininder S

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the outcome of open inferior capsular shift for multidirectional shoulder instability in patients with generalized ligamentous hyperlaxity or Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Data were obtained for 18 open inferior capsular shift surgeries in 15 adolescent patients with generalized ligamentous hyperlaxity or Ehlers-Danlos syndrome with a mean follow-up of 7.5 years. End points were subjective clinical outcome (pain, stability, satisfaction, return to sport), objective clinical outcome (recurrence, complications), and functional outcome scores (American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons, 11-item version of the Disabilities of Arm, Shoulder and Hand). Thirteen patients (87%) reported improved pain and stability and were satisfied with the procedure. Nine patients (64%) were able to return to sports. One patient (7%) was dissatisfied with continuous pain and recurrent instability and considered a surgical failure. Seven patients (47%) reported no further episodes of instability. The mean American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score at a mean of 7.5 years of follow-up was 88 ± 10 points, and the mean score for the 11-item version of the Disabilities of Arm, Shoulder and Hand was 14 ± 14 points. The management of multidirectional shoulder instability in adolescent patients with generalized ligamentous hyperlaxity or Ehlers-Danlos syndrome is challenging. Open inferior capsular shift results in improvement in subjective and objective shoulder function and stability in adolescent patients with ligamentous hyperlaxity or Ehlers-Danlos who have failed nonoperative treatment. We found no effect of the recalled number of prior dislocations, laterality, and type of hyperlaxity on subjective and objective clinical outcomes. Level IV; Case Series; Treatment Study. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Skin signs in Ehlers-Danlos syndrome: clinical tests and para-clinical methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Remvig, Lars; Duhn, Ph; Ullman, S

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The criteria for Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) and the hypermobility syndrome (HMS) should be reliable. Examination for general joint hypermobility has high reliability but there is only sparse information on the reliability of skin tests, and no information on the level of normal skin...

  1. Skin signs in Ehlers-Danlos syndrome: clinical tests and para-clinical methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Remvig, L; Duhn, Ph; Ullman, S

    2010-01-01

    The criteria for Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) and the hypermobility syndrome (HMS) should be reliable. Examination for general joint hypermobility has high reliability but there is only sparse information on the reliability of skin tests, and no information on the level of normal skin extensibility...

  2. Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome type IV: a multi-exon deletion in one of the two COL3A1 alleles affecting structure, stability, and processing of type III procollagen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Superti-Furga, A.; Gugler, E.; Gitzelmann, R.; Steinmann, B.

    1988-01-01

    The authors have studied a patient with severe, dominantly inherited Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV. The results indicate that this patient carries a deletion of 3.3 kilobase pairs in the triple helical coding domain of one of the two alleles for the pro-α-chains of type III collagen (COL3A1). His cultured skin fibroblasts contain equal amounts of normal length mRNA and of mRNA shortened by approximately 600 bases, and synthesize both normal and shortened pro-α1(III)-chains. In procollagen molecules containing one or more shortened chains, a triple helix is formed with a length of only about 780 amino acids. The mutant procollagen molecules have decreased thermal stability, are less efficiently secreted, and are not processed as their normal counterpart. The deletion in this family is the first mutation to be described in COL3A1

  3. The association between muscle strength and activity limitations in patients with the hypermobility type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome: the impact of proprioception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheper, Mark; Rombaut, Lies; de Vries, Janneke; De Wandele, Inge; van der Esch, Martin; Visser, Bart; Malfait, Franciska; Calders, Patrick; Engelbert, Raoul

    2017-07-01

    The patients diagnosed with Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Hypermobility Type (EDS-HT) are characterized by pain, proprioceptive inacuity, muscle weakness, potentially leading to activity limitations. In EDS-HT, a direct relationship between muscle strength, proprioception and activity limitations has never been studied. The objective of the study was to establish the association between muscle strength and activity limitations and the impact of proprioception on this association in EDS-HT patients. Twenty-four EDS-HT patients were compared with 24 controls. Activity limitations were quantified by Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ), Six-Minute Walk test (6MWT) and 30-s chair-rise test (30CRT). Muscle strength was quantified by handheld dynamometry. Proprioception was quantified by movement detection paradigm. In analyses, the association between muscle strength and activity limitations was controlled for proprioception and confounders. Muscle strength was associated with 30CRT (r = 0.67, p = <0.001), 6MWT (r = 0.58, p = <0.001) and HAQ (r = 0.63, p= <0.001). Proprioception was associated with 30CRT (r = 0.55, p < 0.001), 6MWT (r = 0.40, p = <0.05) and HAQ (r = 0.46, p < 0.05). Muscle strength was found to be associated with activity limitations, however, proprioceptive inacuity confounded this association. Muscle strength is associated with activity limitations in EDS-HT patients. Joint proprioception is of influence on this association and should be considered in the development of new treatment strategies for patients with EDS-HT. Implications for rehabilitation Reducing activity limitations by enhancing muscle strength is frequently applied in the treatment of EDS-HT patients. Although evidence regarding treatment efficacy is scarce, the current paper confirms the rationality that muscle strength is an important factor in the occurrence of activity limitations in EDS-HT patients. Although muscle strength is the most

  4. Establishment and baseline characteristics of a nationwide Danish cohort of patients with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kulas Søborg, Marie-Louise; Leganger, Julie; Quitzau Mortensen, Laura

    2017-01-01

    Objectives.: The aim of this study was to investigate national prevalence, general demographic characteristics and survival of Danish patients with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS). Method.: A population-based cohort study was conducted using a database consisting of the entire Danish population alive...

  5. A case of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome associated with abnormal cranial CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagino, Hiroshi; Sugitani, Akitoshi; Eda, Isematsu; Takakura, Hiroki.

    1984-01-01

    A 16-year-old girl having typical Ehlers-Danlos syndrome was reported. In this patient, although there were no specific neurological findings, cranial CT scanning revealed marked dilation and deformation of the whole forth ventricle, dilation of the superior cerebellar cistern, and the dilation and deformation of the quadrigeminal cistern and circumvolute cistern, suggesting morphological abnormalities of the vermian region. (Namekawa, K.)

  6. Postural Analysis in Time and Frequency Domains in Patients with Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galli, Manuela; Rigoldi, Chiara; Celletti, Claudia; Mainardi, Luca; Tenore, Nunzio; Albertini, Giorgio; Camerota, Filippo

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this work is to analyze postural control in Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) participants in time and frequency domain. This study considered a pathological group composed by 22 EDS participants performing a postural test consisting in maintaining standing position over a force platform for 30 s in two conditions: open eyes (OE) and closed…

  7. Case of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome associated with abnormal cranial CT findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagino, Hiroshi; Sugitani, Akitoshi (Matsue Seishi Gakuen, Shimane (Japan)); Eda, Isematsu; Takakura, Hiroki

    1984-01-01

    A 16-year-old girl having typical Ehlers-Danlos syndrome was reported. In this patient, although there were no specific neurological findings, cranial CT scanning revealed marked dilation and deformation of the whole forth ventricle, dilation of the superior cerebellar cistern, and the dilation and deformation of the quadrigeminal cistern and circumvolute cistern, suggesting morphological abnormalities of the vermian region.

  8. Neuromuscular properties of the thigh muscles in patients with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerrits, K.H.; Voermans, N.C.; Haan, A. de; Engelen, B.G.M. van

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS), a connective tissue disorder, may lead to impaired contractile function of lower limb muscles. METHODS: To test this hypothesis and to understand the possible mechanisms involved, isometric function of the thigh muscles was investigated at different joint

  9. Neuromuscular properties of the thigh muscles in patients with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerrits, K.H.L.; Voermans, N.C.; de Haan, A.; van Engelen, B.G.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS), a connective tissue disorder, may lead to impaired contractile function of lower limb muscles. Methods: To test this hypothesis and to understand the possible mechanisms involved, isometric function of the thigh muscles was investigated at different joint

  10. Tenascin-X, Collagen, Elastin and the Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bristow, James; Carey, William; Schalkwijk, Joost

    2005-08-31

    Tenascin-X is an extracellular matrix protein initially identified because of its overlap with the human CYP21B gene. Because studies of gene and protein function of other tenascins had been poorly predictive of essential functions in vivo, we used a genetic approach that critically relied on an understanding of the genomic locus to uncover an association between inactivating tenascin-X mutations and novel recessive and dominant forms of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Tenascin-X provides the first example of a gene outside of the fibrillar collagens and their processing enzymes that causes Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Tenascin-X null mice recapitulate the skin findings of the human disease, confirming a causative role for this gene in Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Further evaluation of these mice showed that tenascin-X is an important regulator of collagen deposition in vivo, suggesting a novel mechanism of disease in this form of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Further studies suggest that tenascin-X may do this through both direct and indirect interactions with the collagen fibril. Recent studies show that TNX effects on matrix extend beyond the collagen to the elastogenic pathway and matrix remodeling enzymes. Tenascin-X serves as a compelling example of how human experiments of nature can guide us to an understanding of genes whose function may not be evident from their sequence or in vitro studies of their encoded proteins.

  11. Fatigue is associated with muscle weakness in Ehlers-Danlos syndrome: an explorative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voermans, N.C.; Knoop, H.; Bleijenberg, G.; Engelen, B.G.M. van

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of inherited connective tissue disorders characterised by joint hypermobility, skin hyperextensibility and tissue fragility. It has recently been shown that muscle weakness occurs frequently in EDS, and that

  12. Bone involvement in adult patients affected with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eller-Vainicher, C; Bassotti, A; Imeraj, A; Cairoli, E; Ulivieri, F M; Cortini, F; Dubini, M; Marinelli, B; Spada, A; Chiodini, I

    2016-08-01

    The Ehlers-Danlos syndrome is characterized by abnormal connective tissue but bone involvement is debated. We found a reduced BMD and bone quality and increased prevalence of asymptomatic vertebral fractures in eugonadal patients with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. These findings suggest the need of a bone health evaluation in these patients. The Ehlers-Danlos (EDS) syndrome is characterized by abnormalities of the connective tissue leading to ligamentous laxity and skin and tissue fragility. We evaluated the bone metabolism, bone mineral density (BMD) and bone quality (measured by trabecular bone score, TBS), and the prevalence of vertebral fractures (VFx) in a group of eugonadal adult EDS patients. Fifty consecutive Caucasian patients, aged 30-50 years (36 females, 14 males) with classical or hypermobility EDS and 50 age-, gender-, and body mass index (BMI)-matched control subjects were enrolled. In all subjects' calcium-phosphorous metabolism, bone turnover, BMD at the lumbar spine (LS) and femur (femoral neck, FN and total femur, FT) and TBS by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, and the VFx presence by spine radiograph were assessed. Patients showed reduced BMD (Z-scores LS -0.45 ± 1.00, FN -0.56 ± 1.01, FT -0.58 ± 0.92) and TBS (1.299 ± 0.111) and increased prevalence of morphometric VFx (32 %) than controls (Z-scores LS 0.09 ± 1.22, FN 0.01 ± 0.97, FT 0.08 ± 0.89; TBS 1.382 ± 0.176; VFx 8 %, p <0.05 for all comparisons), while vitamin D levels, calcium-phosphorous metabolism, and bone turnover were comparable. Fractured EDS patients showed lower TBS values than non-fractured ones (1.245 ± 0.138 vs 1.325 ± 0.086, p < 0.05), despite comparable BMD. In EDS patients, the VFx presence was significantly associated with TBS even after adjusting for sex, age, BMD, EDS type, and falls frequency. EDS patients have reduced BMD and bone quality (as measured by TBS) and increased prevalence of VFx.

  13. Spontaneous Dissection of the Renal Artery in Vascular Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipa Pereira

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS is a rare heterogeneous group of connective tissue disorders. The vascular type (vEDS is an autosomal dominant disorder caused by heterozygous mutations in the COL3A1 gene predisposing to premature arterial, intestinal, or uterine rupture. We report a case of a 38-year-old woman with a recent diagnosis of vEDS admitted in the Emergency Department with a suspicion of a pyelonephritis that evolved to a cardiopulmonary arrest. A fatal retroperitoneal hematoma related with a haemorrhagic dissection of the right renal artery was found after emergency surgery. This case highlights the need to be aware of the particular characteristics of vEDS, such as a severe vascular complication that can lead to a fatal outcome.

  14. Total pleural covering technique for intractable pneumothorax in patient with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadota, Yoshihisa; Fukui, Eriko; Kitahara, Naoto; Okura, Eiji; Ohta, Mitsunori

    2016-07-01

    We report a patient with vascular-type Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (vEDS) who developed pneumothorax and was treated with a total pleural covering technique (TPC). A 24-year-old man developed repeat pneumothorax with intermittent hemo-sputum. Based on unusual radiological manifestations of lung lesions and physical findings, EDS was suspected as an underlying cause of the pneumothorax. Surgical treatment was performed using a mediastinal fat pad and TPC, and no relapse was seen up to 2 years after surgery. TPC is a less invasive surgical approach for selected patients with vEDS. Accurate underlying diagnosis of vEDS and systemic evaluation of vascular complications are necessary before planning surgery.

  15. Síndrome de Ehlers-Danlos e gravidez: relato de caso Ehlers-Danlos syndrome and pregnancy: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Luís Nomura

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available A síndrome de Ehlers-Danlos é doença do tecido conjuntivo cuja associação com a gestação é extremamente rara, mas com complicações potencialmente fatais no ciclo gravídico-puerperal, como roturas vasculares e intestinais. Pode estar associada a dor e frouxidão articular na mulher; quanto às alterações gestacionais, há risco maior de prematuridade, secundária a rotura prematura de membranas e/ou insuficiência cervical. Roturas e inversões uterinas também podem estar associadas a esta síndrome. Neste artigo, descrevemos o caso de uma grávida de 23 anos, com síndrome de Ehlers-Danlos tipo III, com evolução pré-natal favorável, sem complicações fetais e bom resultado perinatal.Ehlers-Danlos syndrome is a connective tissue disease that is rarely associated with pregnancy, but with potentially fatal complications during pregnancy and puerperium, such as vascular and intestinal ruptures. It can also be associated with joint laxity and pain in women; during pregnancy there is a greater risk of prematurity, because of premature rupture of membranes and/or cervical insufficiency. Uterine rupture and inversion can also be associated with this syndrome. In the present study, we describe the case of a pregnant woman with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, with a favorable evolution, without fetal complications and a good perinatal outcome.

  16. Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome, Hypermobility Type, Is Linked to Chromosome 8p22-8p21.1 in an Extended Belgian Family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delfien Syx

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Joint hypermobility is a common, mostly benign, finding in the general population. In a subset of individuals, however, it causes a range of clinical problems, mainly affecting the musculoskeletal system. Joint hypermobility often appears as a familial trait and is shared by several heritable connective tissue disorders, including the hypermobility subtype of the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS-HT or benign joint hypermobility syndrome (BJHS. These hereditary conditions provide unique models for the study of the genetic basis of joint hypermobility. Nevertheless, these studies are largely hampered by the great variability in clinical presentation and the often vague mode of inheritance in many families. Here, we performed a genome-wide linkage scan in a unique three-generation family with an autosomal dominant EDS-HT phenotype and identified a linkage interval on chromosome 8p22-8p21.1, with a maximum two-point LOD score of 4.73. Subsequent whole exome sequencing revealed the presence of a unique missense variant in the LZTS1 gene, located within the candidate region. Subsequent analysis of 230 EDS-HT/BJHS patients resulted in the identification of three additional rare variants. This is the first reported genome-wide linkage analysis in an EDS-HT family, thereby providing an opportunity to identify a new disease gene for this condition.

  17. Friable but treatable: coronary artery dissections in Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zago, Alexandre C; Matte, Bruno S

    2013-01-01

    Vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome is a rare connective tissue disorder associated with arterial dissection or rupture. Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is often critical in patients with this syndrome because their coronary arteries are prone to dissection, enhancing the risk of stent borders dissection when conventional stent deployment pressures are used. Coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) treatment for these patients may also raise concerns because the left internal mammary artery is probably friable. Therefore, coronary artery revascularization in vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome either using PCI or CABG is challenging due to the arteries friability. A small number of cases have been published describing the friability of the vessels and associated complications; nevertheless, the optimum treatment remains unclear. We report the case of a 54-year-old woman treated successfully with PCI and CABG in two different acute coronary syndrome episodes, in which specific technical issues related to both procedures were decisive. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. The evidence-based rationale for physical therapy treatment of children, adolescents, and adults diagnosed with joint hypermobility syndrome/hypermobile Ehlers Danlos syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelbert, Raoul H; Juul-Kristensen, Birgit; Pacey, Verity

    2017-01-01

    New insights into the phenotype of Joint Hypermobility Syndrome (JHS) and Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome-hypermobile type (hEDS) have raised many issues in relation to classification, diagnosis, assessment, and treatment. Within the multidisciplinary team, physical therapy plays a central role in managem......New insights into the phenotype of Joint Hypermobility Syndrome (JHS) and Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome-hypermobile type (hEDS) have raised many issues in relation to classification, diagnosis, assessment, and treatment. Within the multidisciplinary team, physical therapy plays a central role...... in management of individuals with hypermobility related disorders. However, many physical therapists are not familiar with the diagnostic criteria, prevalence, common clinical presentation, and management. This guideline aims to provide practitioners with the state of the art regarding the assessment...

  19. An Isolated Pulmonary Hematoma Mimicking a Lung Tumor as the Initial Finding of Vascular Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Eun Ju; Lee, Ki Nam; Choi, Pil Jo; Ki, Chang Seok

    2012-01-01

    The vascular type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (vEDS) is an uncommon inherited disorder characterized by abnormalities in type III collagen, presenting itself as arterial dissection or rupture. We report a case of an isolated pulmonary hematoma mimicking a lung tumor in an 18-year-old man which turned out to be the initial finding of vEDS. Pneumothorax and hemothorax occurred repeatedly for 15 months following the surgical removal of the mass, and were treated by repeated left upper and lower lobectomy and thoracotomy. The diagnosis of vEDS was confirmed by pathologic and genetic studies.

  20. An Isolated Pulmonary Hematoma Mimicking a Lung Tumor as the Initial Finding of Vascular Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Eun Ju; Lee, Ki Nam; Choi, Pil Jo [Dept. of Radiology, Dong-A University Medicine Center, Dong-A University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Ki, Chang Seok [Dept. of Radiology, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-15

    The vascular type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (vEDS) is an uncommon inherited disorder characterized by abnormalities in type III collagen, presenting itself as arterial dissection or rupture. We report a case of an isolated pulmonary hematoma mimicking a lung tumor in an 18-year-old man which turned out to be the initial finding of vEDS. Pneumothorax and hemothorax occurred repeatedly for 15 months following the surgical removal of the mass, and were treated by repeated left upper and lower lobectomy and thoracotomy. The diagnosis of vEDS was confirmed by pathologic and genetic studies.

  1. Gynecologic symptoms and the influence on reproductive life in 386 women with hypermobility type ehlers-danlos syndrome: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugon-Rodin, Justine; Lebègue, Géraldine; Becourt, Stéphanie; Hamonet, Claude; Gompel, Anne

    2016-09-13

    Hypermobile Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (hEDS), is probably the most common disease among heritable connective tissue disorders. It affects women more than men and causes symptoms in multiple organs. It is associated with chronic pain, skin fragility and abnormal bleeding. These characteristics may hamper reproductive life. We conducted a study to evaluate the gynecologic and obstetric outcomes in women with hEDS. We also explored a possible hormonal modulation of the hEDS symptoms. The gynecologic and obstetric history of 386 consecutive women diagnosed with hEDS was collected by a standardized questionnaire and a medical consultation performed by a senior gynecologist in an expert centre for hEDS between May 2012 and December 2014. We observed a high frequency of gynecologic complaints, specifically: menorrhagia (76 %), dysmenorrhea (72 %) and dyspareunia (43 %). Endometriosis was not highly prevalent in this population. The obstetric outcomes were similar to those of the general French population for deliveries by cesarean section (14.6 %) and premature births (6.2 %) but the incidence of multiple spontaneous abortion (13 %) and spontaneous abortion (28 %) were significantly higher. A subset of women were sensitive to hormonal fluctuations with more severe symptoms occurring during puberty, prior to menstruation, during the postpartum period as well as on oral contraception. Increased awareness of the gynecological symptomatology in women with hEDS can help discriminate between endometriosis and thus prevent useless, and potentially dangerous, surgery. This study also suggests that hormonal modulation may be an appropriate treatment for a subset of women with hEDS.

  2. Brugada Syndrome in a Patient with Vascular Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome: Sudden Death Risk Amplified.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Souza, Jason; Malhotra, Divyanshu; Goud, Aditya; Dahagam, Chanukya; Everett, George

    2017-04-19

    The vast majority of sudden cardiac arrests occur in patients with structural heart disease and in approximately 10% of the cases, it can occur in those with structurally normal hearts. Brugada syndrome is an autosomal dominant sodium channelopathy that has been implicated in sudden deaths. Given their low prevalence, our knowledge about Brugada syndrome is still evolving. Apart from schizophrenia, there have been no reports of associated medical conditions. We recently encountered a patient with vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome who was also found to have Brugada syndrome. Both these conditions share some common clinical presentations including a propensity for sudden death.

  3. Vascular Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Presenting as a Pulsatile Neck Mass: a Case Report and Review of Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maraj, Bharat; Harding-Theobald, Emily; Karaki, Fatima

    2018-04-26

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome refers to a spectrum of connective tissue disorders typically caused by mutations in genes responsible for the synthesis of collagen. Patients with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome often exhibit hyperflexibility of joints, increased skin elasticity, and tissue fragility. Vascular Ehlers-Danlos (vEDS) is a subtype of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome with a predilection to involve blood vessels. As such, it often manifests as vascular aneurysms and vessel rupture leading to hemorrhage. There are few reports describing primary prevention of aneurysms in the setting of undiagnosed, suspected vEDS. We present a case of a 30-year-old woman who presents with a pulsatile neck mass found to have multiple arterial aneurysms on imaging, hyperflexibility, and characteristic facial features consistent with vEDS. As described in this case, management of a suspected connective tissue disorder is a multidisciplinary approach including vascular surgery, medical therapy, and genetic testing to confirm the diagnosis. We review literature regarding the care of patients with vascular Ehlers-Danlos as it might pertain to hospitalized patients.

  4. Evaluation of a patient with classical Ehlers-Danlos syndrome due to a 9q34 duplication affecting COL5A1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Yukiko; Ohashi, Ikuko; Naruto, Takuya; Ida, Kazumi; Enomoto, Yumi; Saito, Toshiyuki; Nagai, Jun-Ichi; Kurosawa, Kenji

    2018-03-09

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome classical type is a connective tissue disorder characterized by skin hyperextensibility, atrophic scarring, and joint hypermobility. The condition typically results from mutations in COL5A1 or COL5A2 leading to the functional haploinsufficiency. Here, we report of a 24-year-old male with mild intellectual disability, dysmorphic features, and a phenotype consistent with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome classical type. A copy number variant-calling algorithm from panel sequencing data identified the deletions exons 2-11 and duplications of exons 12-67 within COL5A1. Array comparative genomic hybridization confirmed a 94 kb deletion at 9q34.3 involving exons 2-11 of COL5A1, and a 3.4 Mb duplication at 9q34.3 involving exons 12-67 of COL5A1. © 2018 Japanese Teratology Society.

  5. Ehlers Danlos Syndrome: An Unusual Presentation You Need to Know about

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amel Karaa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The Ehlers Danlos syndromes (EDS comprise a group of connective tissue disorders characterized by tissue fragility of the skin, ligaments, blood vessels and internal organs. Variable degrees of clinical severity and organ involvement are due to the molecular and biochemical heterogeneity of this group of disorders and have led to classification into well-characterized subtypes that are extending with the discovery of new genes and overlapping syndrome. Types include classical EDS (EDS I/II, hypermobility EDS (EDS III, vascular EDS (EDS IV, kyphoscoliosis EDS (EDS VI, arthrochalasia (EDS VIIA, B and Dermatospraxis (EDS VIIC. Even to the well trained professional, the diagnosis of EDS remains a challenge due to overlapping symptoms and cases can remain without a well-defined classification. Life altering complications of this group of disorders include vascular and hollow organ rupture and ligamentous laxity leading to chronic dislocation with ensuing pain and long term disability. Patients initially present to the general practitioner who is expected to recognize the symptoms of EDS and to proceed with appropriate referral for definitive diagnosis and management to prevent devastating complications. In this paper, we describe a male with classical EDS complicated by devastating vascular and orthopedic events.

  6. Small fiber neuropathy is a common feature of Ehlers-Danlos syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazzato, Daniele; Castori, Marco; Lombardi, Raffaella; Caravello, Francesca; Bella, Eleonora Dalla; Petrucci, Antonio; Grammatico, Paola; Dordoni, Chiara; Colombi, Marina

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the involvement of small nerve fibers in Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS). Methods: Patients diagnosed with EDS underwent clinical, neurophysiologic, and skin biopsy assessment. We recorded sensory symptoms and signs and evaluated presence and severity of neuropathic pain according to the Douleur Neuropathique 4 (DN4) and ID Pain questionnaires and the Numeric Rating Scale (NRS). Sensory action potential amplitude and conduction velocity of sural nerve was recorded. Skin biopsy was performed at distal leg and intraepidermal nerve fiber density (IENFD) obtained and referred to published sex- and age-adjusted normative reference values. Results: Our cohort included 20 adults with joint hypermobility syndrome/hypermobility EDS, 3 patients with vascular EDS, and 1 patient with classic EDS. All except one patient had neuropathic pain according to DN4 and ID Pain questionnaires and reported 7 or more symptoms at the Small Fiber Neuropathy Symptoms Inventory Questionnaire. Pain intensity was moderate (NRS ≥4 and <7) in 8 patients and severe (NRS ≥7) in 11 patients. Sural nerve conduction study was normal in all patients. All patients showed a decrease of IENFD consistent with the diagnosis of small fiber neuropathy (SFN), regardless of the EDS type. Conclusions: SFN is a common feature in adults with EDS. Skin biopsy could be considered an additional diagnostic tool to investigate pain manifestations in EDS. PMID:27306637

  7. Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Caused by Biallelic TNXB Variants in Patients with Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wuyan; Perritt, Ashley F; Morissette, Rachel; Dreiling, Jennifer L; Bohn, Markus-Frederik; Mallappa, Ashwini; Xu, Zhi; Quezado, Martha; Merke, Deborah P

    2016-09-01

    Some variants that cause autosomal-recessive congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) also cause hypermobility type Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) due to the monoallelic presence of a chimera disrupting two flanking genes: CYP21A2, encoding 21-hydroxylase, necessary for cortisol and aldosterone biosynthesis, and TNXB, encoding tenascin-X, an extracellular matrix protein. Two types of CAH tenascin-X (CAH-X) chimeras have been described with a total deletion of CYP21A2 and characteristic TNXB variants. CAH-X CH-1 has a TNXB exon 35 120-bp deletion resulting in haploinsufficiency, and CAH-X CH-2 has a TNXB exon 40 c.12174C>G (p.Cys4058Trp) variant resulting in a dominant-negative effect. We present here three patients with biallelic CAH-X and identify a novel dominant-negative chimera termed CAH-X CH-3. Compared with monoallelic CAH-X, biallelic CAH-X results in a more severe phenotype with skin features characteristic of classical EDS. We present evidence for disrupted tenascin-X function and computational data linking the type of TNXB variant to disease severity. © 2016 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  8. Complex Scapular Winging following Total Shoulder Arthroplasty in a Patient with Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John G. Skedros

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This is a unique case of a female patient with features of classical and hypermobile types of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS who developed complex scapular winging from spinal accessory and long thoracic neuropathies. These neurological problems became manifest after an uncomplicated total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA. The patient had a complex postoperative course with extensive work-up in addition to revision shoulder surgery and manipulations to treat shoulder stiffness. It was eventually suspected that the periscapular nerve impairments occurred during physical therapy sessions after her TSA. This interpretation was further supported by genetic evidence that, in addition to EDS, the patient had an unrecognized genetic propensity for nerve palsies from stretch or pressure (“hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies” (HNPP. By two years after the TSA the neuropathies had only partially improved, leaving the patient with persistent scapular winging and shoulder weakness. With this case we alert surgeons and physical therapists that patients with EDS can have not only a complicated course after TSA, but rare concurrent conditions that can further increase the propensity of neurological injuries that result in compromised shoulder function.

  9. Diagnosis, natural history, and management in vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byers, Peter H; Belmont, John; Black, James; De Backer, Julie; Frank, Michael; Jeunemaitre, Xavier; Johnson, Diana; Pepin, Melanie; Robert, Leema; Sanders, Lynn; Wheeldon, Nigel

    2017-03-01

    Vascular Ehlers Danlos syndrome (vEDS) is an uncommon genetic disorders characterized by arterial aneurysm, dissection and rupture, bowel rupture, and rupture of the gravid uterus. The frequency is estimated as 1/50,000-1/200,000 and results from pathogenic variants in COL3A1, which encodes the chains of type III procollagen, a major protein in vessel walls and hollow organs. Initial diagnosis depends on the recognitions of clinical features, including family history. Management is complex and requires multiple specialists who can respond to and manage the major complications. A summary of recommendations for management include: Identify causative variants in COL3A1 prior to application of diagnosis, modulate life style to minimize injury, risk of vessel/organ rupture, identify and create care team, provide individual plans for emergency care ("vascular EDS passport") with diagnosis and management plan for use when traveling, centralize management at centers of excellence (experience) when feasible, maintain blood pressure in the normal range and treat hypertension aggressively, surveillance of vascular tree by doppler ultrasound, CTA (low radiation alternatives) or MRA if feasible on an annual basis. These recommendations represent a consensus of an international group of specialists with a broad aggregate experience in the care of individuals with vascular EDS that will need to be assessed on a regular basis as new information develops. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. A multimodal physical therapy approach utilizing the Maitland concept in the management of a patient with cervical and lumbar radiculitis and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome-hypermobility type: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennetti, Adelina

    2018-07-01

    The purpose of this case report is to present a multimodal approach for patient management using the Maitland concept framework for cervical and lumbar radiculitis with an underlying diagnosis of Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome-Hypermobility Type (EDS-HT). This case presents care guided by evidence, patient values, and rationale for the selected course of physical therapy treatment provided by therapist experience. A 35-year-old female with a 2-year history of worsening lumbar and cervical pain was referred to physical therapy to address these musculoskeletal issues concurrent with diagnostic testing for EDS. A multimodal approach including manual therapy, therapeutic exercise, postural and body mechanics education, and a home exercise program was used. The patient specific functional scale (PSFS) was used to gauge patient's perceived improvements which were demonstrated by increased scores at reevaluation and at discharge. Following the Maitland concept framework, the physical therapist was able to make sound clinical decisions by tracking the logical flow of constant patient assessment. A 10-month course of treatment designed to maximize recovery of function was successful with a chronic history of pain and the EDS-HT diagnosis. The role of education and empowering the patient is shown to be of utmost importance. Optimizing therapeutic outcomes long-term for this patient population requires maintaining a home exercise program, adaptation and modifications of work and lifestyle activities.

  11. Single-Ventricle Palliation in a 4-Year-Old With Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBoard, Zach M; Eckhauser, Aaron W; Griffiths, Eric

    2018-01-01

    We report the case of a 4-year-old boy with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome undergoing single-ventricle palliation for an unbalanced atrioventricular canal defect. No reports of single-ventricle palliation in the setting of connective tissue disorders exist in the current literature. Unique findings on the patient's preoperative imaging included a disproportionately large neoaortic root and a regurgitant atrioventricular valve, which may foretell the need for future intervention. Copyright © 2018 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Nuss procedure for a case of asymmetric pectus excavatum associated with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazunori Masahata

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS is an inherited connective tissue disorder that is often associated with pectus excavatum (PE. The Nuss procedure, which is a minimally invasive approach for the treatment of PE achieves good functional and cosmetic outcomes. We experienced a case of EDS-associated asymmetric PE that was corrected by the Nuss procedure using chondrotomy of the costal cartilages. After this procedure, an excellent chest appearance was achieved. Our experience suggests that the repair of PE can be accomplished safely in EDS patients and that this procedure can achieve good cosmetic results in patients with asymmetric PE.

  13. Subclavian artery aneurysm in a patient with vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Shota; Imoto, Kiyotaka; Uchida, Keiji; Uranaka, Yasuko; Kurosawa, Kenji; Masuda, Munetaka

    2016-02-01

    We describe our experience of surgical treatment in a 28-year-old woman with vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. A right subclavian artery aneurysm was detected. The right vertebral artery arose from the aneurysm. Digital subtraction angiography showed interruption of the left vertebral artery. The aneurysm was excised and the right vertebral artery was anastomosed end-to-side to the right common carotid artery under deep hypothermia and circulatory arrest. The patient remained very well 4 years after surgery, with no late vascular complication. © The Author(s) 2014.

  14. Gait Pattern in Two Rare Genetic Conditions Characterized by Muscular Hypotonia: Ehlers-Danlos and Prader-Willi Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimolin, Veronica; Galli, Manuela; Vismara, Luca; Grugni, Graziano; Camerota, Filippo; Celletti, Claudia; Albertini, Giorgio; Rigoldi, Chiara; Capodaglio, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to quantify and compare the gait pattern in Ehlers-Danlos (EDS) and Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) patients to provide data for developing evidence-based rehabilitation strategies. Twenty EDS and 19 PWS adult patients were evaluated with an optoelectronic system and force platforms for measuring kinematic and kinetic parameters…

  15. The Academic and Psychosocial Impacts of Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome on Postsecondary Students: An Integrative Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giroux, Catherine M.; Corkett, Julie K.; Carter, Lorraine M.

    2016-01-01

    Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome (EDS) is a complex, often invisible, connective tissue disorder that has arguably profound psychosocial and academic impact on postsecondary students. It is an underdiagnosed and misunderstood condition that is the focus of little research, particularly within the social sciences. Several factors influence the academic…

  16. Pregnancy and mesenchimal dysplasias (Marfan syndrome, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radetskaya, L S; Makatsariya, A D; Bitsadze, V O; Khizroeva, J K

    2018-07-01

    The objective of this article is to attract the attention of clinical physicians to the rare but extremely relevant clinical pathology of mesenchymal dysplasias (Marfan syndrome, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia) and especially specific characteristics of such diseases during pregnancy. Connective tissue pathology can cover different organs and systems, symptoms of the same disease can vary in different patients thus making diagnostics significantly difficult. Here clinical diagnostic criteria and methods of molecular diagnostics of diseases are described. The pathogenesis of mesenchymal dysplasias is not currently well understood. For the patients with mesenchymal dysplasias pregnancy is fraught with high risk of life-threatening complications. The preferred delivery method for such patients is caesarean section.

  17. Síndrome de Ehlers Danlos: ¿subregistro clínico en ortopedia pediátrica? Ehlers Danlos syndrome: a clinical subregister in pediatric orthopedics?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George N. García Rodríguez

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCCIÓN. El comportamiento del síndrome de Ehlers Danlos hizo que se interpretara como un subregistro clínico, poco conocido y con escasas referencias. Esta genodermatosis generalmente está condenada a no tener un tratamiento específico. El objetivo del presente estudio fue, principalmente, describir la morbilidad de este síndrome, desde el punto de vista ortopédico. METÓDOS. Se realizó un estudio descriptivo prospectivo de 5 años, que incluyó a todos los pacientes con síndrome de Ehlers Danlos, atendidos en la consulta de ortopedia y traumatología entre julio de 2001 y julio del 2006, en el Hospital Pediátrico Docente «José Martí» (Sancti Spiritus, Cuba. Se consideró un tiempo mínimo de seguimiento de 6 meses para la validación de los resultados. RESULTADOS. Fueron estudiados 41 pacientes afectos de 72 enfermedades de origen ortopédico. La frecuencia estuvo próxima a 1,7 enfermedades por paciente, con predominio no significativo del sexo femenino (n = 24. Uno de los antecedentes perinatales más importantes fue la presencia de grados diversos de displasia de la cadera. La presencia de otras afecciones no ortopédicas no fue significativa. Los principales hallazgos ortopédicos fueron el pie plano flexible (37, el genus recurvatum (11 y la cifoescoliosis (9. La cirugía estética y la cirugía correctora ortopédica fueron las más utilizadas. CONCLUSIONES. La dispensarización de esta enfermedad y su tratamiento oportuno es un método de control eficaz que ayudaría a evitar la degeneración articular, generalmente antesala de la osteoartrosis.INTRODUCTION. The behavior of Ehlers Danlos syndrome caused it to be interpreted as a clinical subregister, little known, and with a few references. This genodermatosis is generally condemned not to have a specific treatment. The objective of this study was mainly to describe the morbidity of this syndrome from the orthopedic point of view. METHODS. A 5-year prospective and

  18. CHST14/D4ST1 deficiency: New form of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosho, Tomoki

    2016-02-01

    Carbohydrate sulfotransferase 14/dermatan 4-O-sulfotransferase-1 (CHST14/D4ST1) deficiency represents a specific form of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) caused by recessive loss-of-function mutations in CHST14. The disorder has been independently termed "adducted thumb-clubfoot syndrome", "EDS, Kosho type", and "EDS, musculocontractural type". To date, 31 affected patients from 21 families have been described. Clinically, CHST14/D4ST1 deficiency is characterized by multiple congenital malformations (craniofacial features including large fontanelle, hypertelorism, short and downslanting palpebral fissures, blue sclerae, short nose with hypoplastic columella, low-set and rotated ears, high palate, long philtrum, thin upper lip vermilion, small mouth, and micro-retrognathia; multiple congenital contractures including adduction-flexion contractures and talipes equinovarus as well as other visceral or ophthalmological malformations) and progressive multisystem fragility-related complications (skin hyperextensibility, bruisability, and fragility with atrophic scars; recurrent dislocations; progressive talipes or spinal deformities; pneumothorax or pneumohemothorax; large subcutaneous hematomas; and diverticular perforation). Etiologically, multisystem fragility is presumably caused by impaired assembly of collagen fibrils resulting from loss of dermatan sulfate (DS) in the decorin glycosaminoglycan side chain that promotes electrostatic binding between collagen fibrils. This is the first reported human disorder that specifically affects biosynthesis of DS. Its clinical characteristics indicate that CHST14/D4ST1 and, more fundamentally, DS, play a critical role in fetal development and maintenance of connective tissues in multiple organs. Considering that patients with CHST14/D4ST1 deficiency develop progressive multisystem fragility-related manifestations, establishment of a comprehensive and detailed natural history and health-care guidelines as well as further elucidation

  19. Congenital cervical kyphosis in an infant with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobets, Andrew J; Komlos, Daniel; Houten, John K

    2018-07-01

    Ehler-Danlos syndome (EDS) refers to a group of heritable connective tissue disorders; rare manifestations of which are cervical kyphosis and clinical myelopathy. Surgical treatment is described for the deformity in the thoracolumbar spine in adolescents but not for infantile cervical spine. Internal fixation for deformity correction in the infantile cervical spine is challenging due to the diminutive size of the bony anatomy and the lack of spinal instrumentation specifically designed for young children. We describe the first case of successful surgical treatment in an infant with a high cervical kyphotic deformity in EDS. A 15-month-old female with EDS presented with several months of regression in gross motor skills in all four extremities. Imaging demonstrated 45° of kyphosis from the C2-4 levels with spinal cord compression. Corrective surgery consisted of a C3 corpectomy and C2-4 anterior fusion with allograft block and anterior fixation with dual 2 × 2 hole craniofacial miniplates, supplemented by C2-4 posterior fusion using four craniofacial miniplates fixated to the lamina. Radiographs at 20 months post-surgery demonstrated solid fusion both anteriorly and posteriorly with maintenance of correction. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome may present in the pediatric population with congenital kyphosis from cervical deformity in addition to the more commonly seen thoracolumbar deformities.

  20. Recommendations for anesthesia and perioperative management in patients with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome(s)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS, ORPHA98249) comprises a group of clinically and genetically heterogeneous heritable connective tissue disorders, chiefly characterized by joint hypermobility and instability, skin texture anomalies, and vascular and soft tissue fragility. As many tissues can be involved, the underlying molecular defect can manifest itself in many organs and with varying degrees of severity, with widespread implications for anesthesia and perioperative management. This review focuses on issues relevant for anesthesia for elective and emergency surgery in EDS. We searched the literature for papers related to all EDS variants; at the moment most of the published data deals with the vascular subtype and, to a lesser extent, classic and hypermobility EDS. Knowledge is fragmented and consists mostly of case reports, small case series and expert opinion. Because EDS patients commonly require surgery, we have summarized some recommendations for general, obstetrical and regional anesthesia, as well as for hemostatic therapy. PMID:25053156

  1. Postural tachycardia in hypermobile Ehlers-Danlos syndrome: A distinct subtype?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miglis, Mitchell G; Schultz, Brittany; Muppidi, Srikanth

    2017-12-01

    It is not clear if patients with postural tachycardia syndrome (POTS) and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (hEDS) differ from patients with POTS due to other etiologies. We compared the results of autonomic testing and healthcare utilization in POTS patients with and without hEDS. Patients with POTS+hEDS (n=20) and POTS controls without hypermobility (n=20) were included in the study. All patients underwent autonomic testing, and the electronic medical records were reviewed to determine the number and types of medications patients were taking, as well as the number of outpatient, emergency department, and inpatient visits over the prior year. Patients with hEDS had twice as many outpatient visits (21 v. 10, p=0.012), were taking more prescription medications (8 vs. 5.5, p=0.030), and were more likely to see a pain physician (70% vs 25%, p=0.005). Autonomic testing demonstrated a slight reduction in heart rate variability and slightly lower blood pressures on tilt table testing in hEDS patients, however for most patients these variables remained within the range of normal. Orthostatic tachycardia on tilt table testing was greater in POTS controls (46bpm vs 39bpm, p=0.018). Abnormal QSweat responses were common in both groups (38% of POTS+hEDS and 36% of POTS controls). While autonomic testing results were not significantly different between groups, patients with POTS+hEDS took more medications and had greater markers of healthcare utilization, with chronic pain likely playing a prominent role. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Sleep Disorders and Their Management in Children With Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Referred to Sleep Clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domany, Keren Armoni; Hantragool, Sumalee; Smith, David F; Xu, Yuanfang; Hossain, Monir; Simakajornboon, Narong

    2018-04-15

    The nature of sleep disorders in children with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is unknown. We aimed to describe the type, the management, and the short-term outcome of sleep disorders in children with EDS referred to sleep clinics. This is a retrospective review of medical records and polysomnography tests of children with EDS younger than 18 years who were referred to the sleep clinic. Demographic information and medical history were collected, and polysomnography tests were reviewed. Questionnaires completed during previous clinic visits, including the Pediatrics Sleep Questionnaire (PSQ), Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), and Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL), were also evaluated. Sixty-five patients with EDS-hypermobility type were included. The mean age was 13.15 ± 3.9 years. There were 68% of patients who were female, and 91% of patients were Caucasian. The mean follow-up period was 1.14 ± 1.55 years. Common sleep diagnoses included insomnia (n = 14, 22%), obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) (n = 17, 26%), periodic limb movement disorder (PLMD) (n = 11, 17%), and hypersomnia (n = 10, 15%). In addition, 65% required pharmacologic treatment and 29% were referred to behavioral sleep medicine. For OSA, two patients required continuous positive airway pressure. A significant improvement was observed in the PSQ, ESS, and PedsQL scores during follow-up visits after treatment (n = 34; P = .0004, 0.03, and 0.01, respectively). There is a high prevalence of sleep disorders, including OSA, insomnia, PLMD, and hypersomnia in children with EDS referred to sleep clinics. Specific management can improve quality of life and questionnaire scores of this patient population. Our study emphasizes the importance of screening for sleep disorders in children with EDS. © 2018 American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

  3. Ehlers-danlos syndrome with platelet aggregation defect-presenting as mysterious bleeding disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sawhney M

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available A 7-year-old girl presented with recurrent episodes of petechiae, purpura and ecchymoses since six months of age and recurrent episodes of mild to severe epistaxis since two years of age requiring repeated blood transfusions. In April '99 while being investigated for a massive epistaxis, she was found to have platelet function defect with abnormal aggregation of platelets to ADP, epinephrine, collagen as well as to ristocetin. Further investigations ruled out the possibility of Glanzmann's disorder and von-Willebrand's disease as to its cause. In May 2001 she was referred to the dermatologist for evaluation of subcutaneous tumours, which had developed since the last six months. On clinical evaluation, she was found to be having mild hyperextensibility of the skin, joint hypermobility, atrophic scars over knee, spontaneous bruises over right forearm and left thigh and nontender firm to hard subcutaneous nodules over both wrists, both shoulders, right index finger and dorsum of right foot consistent with a clinical picture of a mild form of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS. Histopathology of the nodule from left wrist was consistent with molluscoid tumour of EDS and skin histopathology and ultrastructure studies showed thick irregular collagen fibrils. Only other sibling, a five-year-old male also had history of repeated mild to moderate epistaxis and on examination was found to have a milder variant of EDS. Born out of I degree consanguineous marriage of normal parents with mildly affected other sibling, she was diagnosed to be suffering from EDS with autosomal recessive inheritance, most probably EDS type X due to the associated platelet aggregation defect. Only one such family with EDS type X has been reported so far.

  4. Ehlers-danlos syndrome with platelet aggregation defect-presenting as mysterious bleeding disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sawhney M

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A 7-year-old girl presented with recurrent episodes of petechiae, purpura and ecchymoses since six months of age and recurrent episodes of mild to severe epistaxis since two years of age requiring repeated blood transfusions. In April '99 while being investigated for a massive epistaxis, she was found to have platelet function defect with abnormal aggregation of platelets to ADP, epinephrine, collagen as well as to ristocetin. Further investigations ruled out the possibility of Glanzmann's disorder and von-Willebrand's disease as to its cause. In May 2001 she was referred to the dermatologist for evaluation of subcutaneous tumours, which had developed since the last six months. On clinical evaluation, she was found to be having mild hyperextensibility of the skin, joint hypermobility, atrophic scars over knee, spontaneous bruises over right forearm and left thigh and nontender firm to hard subcutaneous nodules over both wrists, both shoulders, right index finger and dorsum of right foot consistent with a clinical picture of a mild form of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS. Histopathology of the nodule from left wrist was consistent with molluscoid tumour of EDS and skin histopathology and ultrastructure studies showed thick irregular collagen fibrils. Only other sibling, a five-year-old male also had history of repeated mild to moderate epistaxis and on examination was found to have a milder variant of EDS. Born out of I degree consanguineous marriage of normal parents with mildly affected other sibling, she was diagnosed to be suffering from EDS with autosomal recessive inheritance, most probably EDS type X due to the associated platelet aggregation defect. Only one such family with EDS type X has been reported so far.

  5. Six uneventful pregnancy outcomes in an extended vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baas, Annette F; Spiering, Wilko; Moll, Frans L; Page-Christiaens, Lieve; Beenakkers, Ingrid C M; Dooijes, Dennis; Vonken, Evert-Jan P A; van der Smagt, Jasper J; Knoers, Nine V; Koenen, Steven V; van Herwaarden, Joost A; Sieswerda, Gertjan Tj

    2017-02-01

    Vascular Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome (vEDS) is caused by heterozygous mutations in COL3A1 and is characterized by fragile vasculature and hollow organs, with a high risk of catastrophic events at a young age. During pregnancy and delivery, maternal mortality rates up until 25% have been reported. However, recent pedigree analysis reported a substantial lower pregnancy-related mortality rate of 4.9%. Here, we describe an extended vEDS family with multiple uneventful pregnancy outcomes. In the proband, a 37-year-old woman, DNA-analysis because of an asymptomatic iliac artery dissection revealed a pathogenic mutation in COL3A1 (c.980G>A; p. Gly327Asp). She had had three uneventful vaginal deliveries. At the time of diagnosis, her 33-year-old niece was 25 weeks pregnant. She had had one uneventful vaginal delivery. Targeted DNA-analysis revealed that she was carrier of the COL3A1 mutation. Ultrasound detected an aneurysm in the abdominal aorta with likely a dissection. An uneventful elective cesarean section was performed at a gestational age of 37 weeks. The 40-year-old sister of our proband had had one uneventful vaginal delivery and an active pregnancy wish. Cascade DNA-screening showed her to carry the COL3A1 mutation. Computed Tomography Angiography (CTA) of her aorta revealed a type B dissection with the most proximal entry tear just below the superior mesenteric artery. Pregnancy was therefore discouraged. This familial case illustrates the complexity and challenges of reproductive decision-making in a potentially lethal condition as vEDS, and highlights the importance of a multidisciplinary approach. Moreover, it suggests that previous pregnancy-related risks of vEDS may be overestimated. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome in a young woman with anorexia nervosa and complex somatic symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Michelle; Strand, Mattias

    2018-03-01

    The Ehler-Danlos syndromes (EDS) are a group of clinically heterogeneous connective tissue disorders characterized by joint hypermobility, hyperextensibility of the skin, and a general connective tissue fragility that can induce symptoms from multiple organ systems. We present a case of comorbid anorexia nervosa and EDS in a 23-year old woman with a multitude of somatic symptoms that were initially attributed to the eating disorder but that were likely caused by the underlying EDS. Various EDS symptoms, such as gastrointestinal complaints, smell and taste abnormalities, and altered somatosensory awareness may resemble or mask an underlying eating disorder, and vice versa. Because of the large clinical heterogeneity, correctly identifying symptoms of EDS presents a challenge for clinicians, who should be aware of this group of underdiagnosed and potentially serious syndromes. The Beighton Hypermobility Score is an easily applicable screening instrument in assessing potential EDS in patients with joint hypermobility. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Reduction of central neuropathic pain with ketamine infusion in a patient with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Tony Chung Tung; Yeung, Stephen Tung; Lee, Sujin; Skavinski, Kira; Liao, Solomon

    2016-01-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome frequently causes acute and chronic pain because of joint subluxations and dislocations secondary to hypermobility. Current treatments for pain related to Ehlers-Danlos syndrome and central pain syndrome are inadequate. This case report discusses the therapeutic use of ketamine intravenous infusion as an alternative. A 27-year-old Caucasian female with a history of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome and spinal cord ischemic myelopathy resulting in central pain syndrome, presented with severe generalized body pain refractory to multiple pharmacological interventions. After a 7-day course of ketamine intravenous infusion under controlled generalized sedation in the intensive care unit, the patient reported a dramatic reduction in pain levels from 7-8 out of 10 to 0-3 out of 10 on a numeric rating scale and had a significant functional improvement. The patient tolerated a reduction in her pain medication regimen, which originally included opioids, gabapentin, pregabalin, tricyclic antidepressants, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Ketamine infusion treatment has been used in various pain syndromes, including central neuropathic pain, ischemic pain, and regional pain syndrome. Reports have suggested that ketamine modulates pain by the regression of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor to a resting state. As such, propagation of nociceptive signal to brain is interrupted allowing for the restoration of physiological balance between pain inhibition and facilitation. The present report shows that this treatment option can be used in patients with refractory central pain syndrome in the setting of spinal cord myelopathy secondary to Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. In addition, as seen in this case, this protocol can potentially decrease the chronic use of pain medication, such as opioids.

  8. Fulminant myocardial bleeding: another clinical course of vascular Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokue, Masahide; Hara, Hidehiko; Kurosawa, Kenji; Nakamura, Masato

    2017-09-23

    Vascular Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome (vEDS) is a dominantly inherited connective tissue disorder characterised by colon rupture and arterial aneurysm, dissection and rupture. A patient was diagnosed with vEDS after a spontaneous colon rupture when he was brought to our institute because of sudden chest pain. An ECG revealed wide regional ST elevation, which was initially suggestive of acute myocarditis. On the second day, haemodynamics suddenly deteriorated because of a rapid accumulation of bloody pericardial effusion, and the patient died. Autopsy revealed an excessive spontaneous myocardial haemorrhage owing to fragility, which suggested an underlying disease-vEDS. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  9. Reverse-namaskar: A new sign in Ehlers-Danlos syndrome: A family pedigree study of four generations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Premalatha S

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome (EDS is a rare group of inheritable connective tissue disorder of defective collagen. Skin, joints and blood vessels are most commonly affected. Clinical signs such as Gorlin sign and Metenier sign have been described in this syndrome. We report another new clinical sign called ′Reverse-Namaskar′ sign as an important clinical finding in EDS, based on the family pedigree study of the proband.

  10. Differences in manifestations of Marfan syndrome, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, and Loeys-Dietz syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meester, Josephina A N; Verstraeten, Aline; Schepers, Dorien; Alaerts, Maaike; Van Laer, Lut; Loeys, Bart L

    2017-11-01

    Many different heritable connective tissue disorders (HCTD) have been described over the past decades. These syndromes often affect the connective tissue of various organ systems, including heart, blood vessels, skin, joints, bone, eyes, and lungs. The discovery of these HCTD was followed by the identification of mutations in a wide range of genes encoding structural proteins, modifying enzymes, or components of the TGFβ-signaling pathway. Three typical examples of HCTD are Marfan syndrome (MFS), Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS), and Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS). These syndromes show some degree of phenotypical overlap of cardiovascular, skeletal, and cutaneous features. MFS is typically characterized by cardiovascular, ocular, and skeletal manifestations and is caused by heterozygous mutations in FBN1 , coding for the extracellular matrix (ECM) protein fibrillin-1. The most common cardiovascular phenotype involves aortic aneurysm and dissection at the sinuses of Valsalva. LDS is caused by mutations in TGBR1/2 , SMAD2/3 , or TGFB2/3 , all coding for components of the TGFβ-signaling pathway. LDS can be distinguished from MFS by the unique presence of hypertelorism, bifid uvula or cleft palate, and widespread aortic and arterial aneurysm and tortuosity. Compared to MFS, LDS cardiovascular manifestations tend to be more severe. In contrast, no association is reported between LDS and the presence of ectopia lentis, a key distinguishing feature of MFS. Overlapping features between MFS and LDS include scoliosis, pes planus, anterior chest deformity, spontaneous pneumothorax, and dural ectasia. EDS refers to a group of clinically and genetically heterogeneous connective tissue disorders and all subtypes are characterized by variable abnormalities of skin, ligaments and joints, blood vessels, and internal organs. Typical presenting features include joint hypermobility, skin hyperextensibility, and tissue fragility. Up to one quarter of the EDS patients show aortic aneurysmal

  11. Differences in manifestations of Marfan syndrome, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, and Loeys-Dietz syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meester, Josephina A. N.; Verstraeten, Aline; Schepers, Dorien; Alaerts, Maaike; Van Laer, Lut

    2017-01-01

    Many different heritable connective tissue disorders (HCTD) have been described over the past decades. These syndromes often affect the connective tissue of various organ systems, including heart, blood vessels, skin, joints, bone, eyes, and lungs. The discovery of these HCTD was followed by the identification of mutations in a wide range of genes encoding structural proteins, modifying enzymes, or components of the TGFβ-signaling pathway. Three typical examples of HCTD are Marfan syndrome (MFS), Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS), and Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS). These syndromes show some degree of phenotypical overlap of cardiovascular, skeletal, and cutaneous features. MFS is typically characterized by cardiovascular, ocular, and skeletal manifestations and is caused by heterozygous mutations in FBN1, coding for the extracellular matrix (ECM) protein fibrillin-1. The most common cardiovascular phenotype involves aortic aneurysm and dissection at the sinuses of Valsalva. LDS is caused by mutations in TGBR1/2, SMAD2/3, or TGFB2/3, all coding for components of the TGFβ-signaling pathway. LDS can be distinguished from MFS by the unique presence of hypertelorism, bifid uvula or cleft palate, and widespread aortic and arterial aneurysm and tortuosity. Compared to MFS, LDS cardiovascular manifestations tend to be more severe. In contrast, no association is reported between LDS and the presence of ectopia lentis, a key distinguishing feature of MFS. Overlapping features between MFS and LDS include scoliosis, pes planus, anterior chest deformity, spontaneous pneumothorax, and dural ectasia. EDS refers to a group of clinically and genetically heterogeneous connective tissue disorders and all subtypes are characterized by variable abnormalities of skin, ligaments and joints, blood vessels, and internal organs. Typical presenting features include joint hypermobility, skin hyperextensibility, and tissue fragility. Up to one quarter of the EDS patients show aortic aneurysmal

  12. Síndroma de Ehlers-Danlos: Uma causa rara de pneumotórax espontâneo Ehlers-Danlos syndrome: A rare cause of spontaneous pneumothorax

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Lopes

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available A síndroma de Ehlers-Danlos (cutis hyperelastica, constitui uma patologia do tecido conjuntivo caracterizada por alterações da pele, ligamentos e órgãos internos. Apresenta transmissão hereditária, em geral autossómica dominante. Afecta primordialmente a síntese do colagéneo, pelo que a pele e os vasos sanguíneos se tornam extremamente elásticos e frágeis. A pele é macia, com consistência de borracha, e as equimoses surgem facilmente. As articulações são hiperextensíveis e têm mobilidade aumentada. Os autores apresentam o caso clínico de um doente de dezasseis anos, com história de hipermobilidade articular desde a infância e fractura esplénica, a quem foi feito o diagnóstico de síndroma de Ehlers-Danlos na sequência de pneumotórax espontâneo recidivante. Apresentam-se as complicações pulmonares mais frequentes desta síndroma e discute-se a importância de não esquecer as etiologias menos comuns, perante casos de pneumotórax espontâneo.Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (cutis hyperelastica, is a group of connective tissue disorders characterized by abnormalities of the skin, ligaments and internal organs. It is a hereditary syndrome, usually with autossomal dominant inheritance; that primarily affects the collagen synthesis. The skin and blood vessels are extremely fragile and elastic. The skin is soft with rubber consistency and easily bruising. There are hypermobile joints with increased extensibility. We summarize the case of a sixteen year old boy with a history of joint hypermobility since childhood and splenic fracture that was diagnosed with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome after the occurrence of recidivant spontaneous pneumothorax. We present the most common pulmonary complications of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome and discuss the importance of not forgetting the least commons etiologies of pneumothorax, in cases of spontaneous pneumothorax.

  13. Complexities of management of a urostomy in Ehlers-Danlos syndrome: a reflective account.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxenham, Julie

    Mary (pseudonym) is a 30-year-old woman who underwent a urinary diversion and formation of an ileal conduit/urostomy (urinary stoma) due to the formation of multiple bladder diverticula, which caused micturition difficulties and recurrent urinary tract infections with associated pain and discomfort. The bladder diverticula were caused by Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS), a hereditary disorder of the connective tissue or, particulary, defective collagen. Surgical intervention in patients with EDS is prone to complications due to poor wound healing, including issues of dehiscence, postoperative bleeding and poor uptake of anaesthesia and analgesia. After an initial presentation of the syndrome of EDS and Mary's history, this article offers a reflective account (informed by Gibbs' Reflective Cycle) and illustrates the complexities of caring for an individual with EDS who undergoes stoma formation. The author, a stoma care nurse, demonstrates how using purposeful reflection resulted in better understanding and awareness of caring for an individual with a rare syndrome and the nursing challenges this presented.

  14. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome: a cause of epilepsy and periventricular heterotopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verrotti, Alberto; Monacelli, Debora; Castagnino, Miriam; Villa, Maria Pia; Parisi, Pasquale

    2014-11-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) comprises a variety of inherited connective tissue disorders that have been described in association with various neurological features. Until now the neurological symptoms have not been studied in detail; therefore, the aim of this review is to analyze the possible association between EDS, epilepsy and periventricular heterotopia (PH). We have carried out a critical review of all cases of epilepsy in EDS patients with and without PH. Epilepsy is a frequent neurological manifestation of EDS; generally, it is characterized by focal seizures with temporo-parieto-occipital auras and the most common EEG findings epileptiform discharges and slow intermittent rhythm with delta-theta waves. Epilepsy in EDS patients is usually responsive to common antiepileptic therapy; very few cases of drug resistant focal epilepsy requested surgical treatment, with favorable results in terms of outcome. Epilepsy is the most common presenting neurological manifestation associated with PH in EDS patients. Abnormal anatomic circuitries (including heterotopic nodules) could generate epilepsy in patients with PH. Among the principal neurological manifestations, epilepsy and PH have a considerable importance and can influence the long-term evolution of these patients. We hypothesize that PH may determine the epileptic manifestations in patients with EDS; much remains to be learnt about the relationships between nodules and the epileptic manifestations in EDS syndrome. Copyright © 2014 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Treatment of periodontal disease in a patient with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. A case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Luis A; Al-Shammari, Khalaf F; Giannobile, William V; Wang, Hom-Lay

    2002-05-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) designates a heterogeneous group of connective tissue disorders characterized by skin elasticity, tissue fragility, and chronic joint pain. Dental findings have been reported with some types of EDS. This case report describes the periodontal findings in a patient with a previously undiagnosed EDS type VIII. Diagnostic aids utilized included microbial testing, histological examination, gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) analysis for the levels of C-telopeptide pyridinoline cross-links (ICTP), and genetic counseling. Periodontal treatment consisted of mechanical debridement and adjunctive antibiotic therapy. Genetic counseling and clinical presentation confirmed the diagnosis of EDS type VIII. Periodontal treatment led to marked clinical improvements and GCF levels of the bone resorptive marker ICTP were significantly reduced. The patient and her siblings are currently pursuing appropriate medical care and genetic counseling. Periodontal involvement may lead to the diagnosis of an underlying systemic condition. Identification of suspected etiological factors of periodontal disease may prove critical for the general well-being of some patients.

  16. A classical Ehlers-Danlos syndrome family with incomplete presentation diagnosed by molecular testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombi, Marina; Dordoni, Chiara; Cinquina, Valeria; Venturini, Marina; Ritelli, Marco

    2018-01-01

    The 2017 EDS revised nosology indicates that minimal criteria suggestive for classical Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (cEDS) are skin hyperextensibility plus atrophic scarring together with either generalized joint hypermobility (gJHM) and/or at least three minor criteria that include cutaneous features and gJHM complications. Confirmatory molecular testing is obligatory to reach a final diagnosis. Although the large majority of the patients presents with these clinical features, some do not and might remain undiagnosed or misdiagnosed. Here we describe a family with 2 affected members, a 23-year-old proposita and her 51-year-old mother, who presented subtle cutaneous signs, including a variable degree of skin hyperextensibility without extensive widened atrophic scars that apparently better fitted with the overlapping hypermobile EDS. The proposita also presented gastrointestinal symptoms secondary to aberrant mast cells mediators release, making the clinical picture even more puzzling. Both patients were diagnosed by molecular testing that revealed a COL5A1 splice mutation. This report highlights the relevance of molecular analysis in patients presenting rather mild signs of EDS, especially in familial cases, and the importance of clinical expertise to make such a diagnosis. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  17. Diagnosis of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome after a first shoulder dislocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nourissat, Geoffroy; Vigan, Marie; Hamonet, Claude; Doursounian, Levon; Deranlot, Julien

    2018-01-01

    Shoulder dislocation is often the first symptom of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS). Whether it occurs in early-onset EDS is unknown. In most cases, surgical failure leads to the diagnosis. We aimed to determine whether clinical symptoms can signal the presence of EDS at a first dislocation. In this retrospective study, we analyzed clinical and radiologic data for 27 patients with EDS and shoulder instability and a control population of 40 consecutive non-EDS patients undergoing surgery for an unstable shoulder. Data were collected on gender, age, single or bilateral disease, general hyperlaxity, shoulder hyperlaxity, number of dislocations or subluxations, nontraumatic onset, and pain specificity. Nerve and vascular injuries, joint disorders, and family history were recorded, and radiologic data were reported. Age 85°) did not differ between the groups. After a first dislocation in a young girl with global hyperlaxity but not necessarily shoulder hyperlaxity, painless atraumatic dislocation with pain after reduction can suggest EDS. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Vascular phenotypes in nonvascular subtypes of the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'hondt, Sanne; Van Damme, Tim; Malfait, Fransiska

    2018-01-01

    Purpose Within the spectrum of the Ehlers-Danlos syndromes (EDS), vascular complications are usually associated with the vascular subtype of EDS. Vascular complications are also observed in other EDS subtypes, but the reports are anecdotal and the information is dispersed. To better document the nature of vascular complications among “nonvascular” EDS subtypes, we performed a systematic review. Methods We queried three databases for English-language studies from inception until May 2017, documenting both phenotypes and genotypes of patients with nonvascular EDS subtypes. The outcome included the number and nature of vascular complications. Results A total of 112 papers were included and data were collected from 467 patients, of whom 77 presented with a vascular phenotype. Severe complications included mainly hematomas (53%), frequently reported in musculocontractural and classical-like EDS; intracranial hemorrhages (18%), with a high risk in dermatosparaxis EDS; and arterial dissections (16%), frequently reported in kyphoscoliotic and classical EDS. Other, more minor, vascular complications were reported in cardiac-valvular, arthrochalasia, spondylodysplastic, and periodontal EDS. Conclusion Potentially life-threatening vascular complications are a rare but important finding in several nonvascular EDS subtypes, highlighting a need for more systematic documentation. This review will help familiarize clinicians with the spectrum of vascular complications in EDS and guide follow-up and management. PMID:28981071

  19. Ex vivo nonlinear microscopy imaging of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome-affected skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, Norbert; Haluszka, Dóra; Lőrincz, Kende; Kuroli, Enikő; Hársing, Judit; Mayer, Balázs; Kárpáti, Sarolta; Fekete, György; Szipőcs, Róbert; Wikonkál, Norbert; Medvecz, Márta

    2018-07-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is the name for a heterogenous group of rare genetic connective tissue disorders with an overall incidence of 1 in 5000. The histological characteristics of EDS have been previously described in detail in the late 1970s and early 1980s. Since that time, the classification of EDS has undergone significant changes, yet the description of the histological features of collagen morphology in different EDS subtypes has endured the test of time. Nonlinear microscopy techniques can be utilized for non-invasive in vivo label-free imaging of the skin. Among these techniques, two-photon absorption fluorescence (TPF) microscopy can visualize endogenous fluorophores, such as elastin, while the morphology of collagen fibers can be assessed by second-harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy. In our present work, we performed TPF and SHG microscopy imaging on ex vivo skin samples of one patient with classical EDS and two patients with vascular EDS and two healthy controls. We detected irregular, loosely dispersed collagen fibers in a non-parallel arrangement in the dermis of the EDS patients, while as expected, there was no noticeable impairment in the elastin content. Based on further studies on a larger number of patients, in vivo nonlinear microscopic imaging could be utilized for the assessment of the skin status of EDS patients in the future.

  20. Postural analysis in time and frequency domains in patients with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galli, Manuela; Rigoldi, Chiara; Celletti, Claudia; Mainardi, Luca; Tenore, Nunzio; Albertini, Giorgio; Camerota, Filippo

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this work is to analyze postural control in Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) participants in time and frequency domain. This study considered a pathological group composed by 22 EDS participants performing a postural test consisting in maintaining standing position over a force platform for 30s in two conditions: open eyes (OE) and closed eyes (CE). In order to compare pathological group we acquired in the same conditions a control group composed by 20 healthy participants. The obtained center of pressure (COP) signal was analyzed in time and frequency domain using an AR model. Results revealed differences between pathological and control group: EDS participants pointed out difficulties in controlling COP displacements trying to keep it inside the BOS in AP direction and for this reason increased the use of ML mechanism in order to avoid the risk of fall. Also in CE conditions they demonstrated more difficulties in maintaining posture revealing the proprioceptive system is impaired, due to ligament laxity that characterized EDS participants. Frequency domain analysis showed no differences between the two groups, affirming that the changes in time domain reflected really the impairment to the postural control mechanism and not a different strategy assumed by EDS participants. These data could help in decision-making process to establish a correct rehabilitation approach, based on the reinforcing of muscle tone to supply the ligament laxity in order to prevent risks of falls and its consequences. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Dispersal of radioisotope labelled solution following deep dermal injection in Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, D W; Balan, K K; Burrows, N P; Hall, P N

    2000-06-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is the commonest inherited disorder of connective tissue, affecting around 10 000 patients in the UK. Patients with EDS have reported that local anaesthetic is often ineffective. Patients with less severe skin laxity often have the most problems. We have postulated that this resistance to local anaesthetics is not due to the lax connective tissues as is often assumed. This study used radioactively labelled solution ((99m)Tc-pertechnetate) administered as a deep dermal injection in the forearm. The rate of dispersal of isotope was measured over 60 min and found to be identical between six patients with EDS and three controls. The effects of local anaesthetics are complex and depend on the individual chemical properties of the agent and a number of tissue factors. This study would suggest that the lack of effectiveness of local anaesthetic solutions is not due to rapid dispersal of solution. It is unlikely therefore that its lack of effect can be compensated for by simply increasing the amount used. The diagnosis of EDS should be considered in any patient who complains unexpectedly of pain during their procedure, particularly when the surgeon knows that an adequate volume of local anaesthetic has been used. Copyright 2000 The British Association of Plastic Surgeons.

  2. Pregnancy with aortic dissection in Ehler-Danlos syndrome. Staged replacement of the total aorta (10-year follow-up).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babatasi, G; Massetti, M; Bhoyroo, S; Khayat, A

    1997-10-01

    Pregnancy complicated by aortic dissection in patients with hereditary disorder of connective tissue presents interesting considerations including management of caesarean section with the unexpected need for cardiac surgery in emergency. Generalizations can be made on management principles with long-term follow-up requiring an aggressive individualized approach by a multidisciplinary team. A 33-year-old parturient presenting an aortic dissection at 37 weeks gestation required prompt diagnosis of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome in combination with correct surgical therapy resulted in the survival of both the mother and infant. During the 10-year follow-up, multiple complex dissection required transverse aortic arch and thoracoabdominal aortic replacement.

  3. A novel missense mutation of COL5A2 in a patient with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Miki; Nakagawa, Ryuji; Naruto, Takuya; Kohmoto, Tomohiro; Suga, Ken-Ichi; Goji, Aya; Kagami, Shoji; Masuda, Kiyoshi; Imoto, Issei

    2016-01-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is a group of inherited connective tissue disorders characterized by hyperextensible skin, joint hypermobility and soft tissue fragility. For molecular diagnosis, targeted exome sequencing was performed on a 9-year-old male patient who was clinically suspected to have EDS. The patient presented with progressive kyphoscoliosis, joint hypermobility and hyperextensible skin without scars. Ultimately, classical EDS was diagnosed by identifying a novel, mono-allelic mutation in COL5A2 [NM_000393.3(COL5A2_v001):c.682G>A, p.Gly228Arg].

  4. The Effects of Muscle Hypotonia and Weakness on Balance: A Study on Prader-Willi and Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galli, Manuela; Cimolin, Veronica; Vismara, Luca; Grugni, Graziano; Camerota, Filippo; Celletti, Claudia; Albertini, Giorgio; Rigoldi, Chiara; Capodaglio, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) are two different genetical disorders both characterized, among other features, by muscular hypotonia. Postural control seems to be impaired in both conditions. The aim of the present study was to quantitatively compare postural control in adult PWS and EDS using stabilometric platform…

  5. Muscle characteristics and altered myofascial force transmission in tenascin-X-deficient mice, a mouse model of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijing, P.A.; Voermans, N.C.; Baan, G.C.; Buse, T.E.; Engelen, B.G.M. van; Haan, A. de

    2010-01-01

    The Ehlers-Danlos syndrome is a group of inherited connective tissue disorders caused by defects in collagens or tenascin-X (TNX). Muscle involvement can be expected based on interactions between muscle and extracellular matrix molecules; however, muscle function has not yet been investigated

  6. Human dermatosparaxis: a form of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome that results from failure to remove the amino-terminal propeptide of type I procollagen.

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, L T; Wertelecki, W; Milstone, L M; Petty, E M; Seashore, M R; Braverman, I M; Jenkins, T G; Byers, P H

    1992-01-01

    Dermatosparaxis is a recessively inherited connective-tissue disorder that results from lack of the activity of type I procollagen N-proteinase, the enzyme that removes the amino-terminal propeptides from type I procollagen. Initially identified in cattle more than 20 years ago, the disorder was subsequently characterized in sheep, cats, and dogs. Affected animals have fragile skin, lax joints, and often die prematurely because of sepsis following avulsion of portions of skin. We recently ide...

  7. Establishment and baseline characteristics of a nationwide Danish cohort of patients with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulas Søborg, Marie-Louise; Leganger, Julie; Quitzau Mortensen, Laura; Rosenberg, Jacob; Burcharth, Jakob

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate national prevalence, general demographic characteristics and survival of Danish patients with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS). A population-based cohort study was conducted using a database consisting of the entire Danish population alive at any given time between 1 January 2000 and 31 December 2012, based upon longitudinal Danish national registers. All patients with EDS were identified, and the cohort was described by disease prevalence, basic demographic characteristics, mean age at death and mortality for the observational period of 13 years. The cohort held 1427 unique persons with EDS, giving a national prevalence of 0.02%. The EDS population had a mean ( s . d .) age of 34.9 (18.6) years and comprised 73.9% females and 26.1% males. Of the cohort, 95.9% originated from Denmark and 57% were unmarried. We found that 31.6% of the cohort received state-granted subsidies, of which 77% were in the form of early retirement pension. Regarding educational status, 28.1% of the EDS cohort had completed primary education (⩽10th grade) as their highest educational level, while 71.9% had completed a higher level. During the observation period, 42 patients died, with a mean ( s . d .) age at death of 53.6 (21.7) years. This study confirmed a small national prevalence of patients diagnosed with EDS and showed that the majority of patients diagnosed are female. The EDS cohort had a lower educational level, mean age and life expectancy compared with the background population and showed a predisposition for receiving state-granted subsidies. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  8. Assessment of bone in Ehlers Danlos syndrome by ultrasound and densitometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, A L; Arden, N K; Grahame, R; Spector, T D

    1998-10-01

    Ehlers Danlos syndrome (EDS) is an inherited disorder of connective tissue characterised by hyperextensible skin, joint laxity, and easy bruising. There are phenotypic similarities with osteogenesis imperfecta, but in EDS a tendency to fracture or altered bone mass has not previously been considered to be a cardinal feature. This case-control design study investigates whether 23 patients with EDS had differences in fracture rates, bone mass, and calcaneal ultrasound parameters compared with age and sex matched controls. 23 cases of EDS (mean (SD) age 38.5 (15.5)) were compared with 23 controls (mean age 37.8 (14.5)). A significant reduction in bone density measured by dual energy x ray absorptiometry was found at the neck of femur by 0.9 SD, p = 0.05, and lumbar spine by 0.74 SD, p = 0.02. At the calcaneum, broad band ultrasound attenuation and speed of sound were significantly reduced compared with controls by 0.95 SD (p = 0.004) and 0.49 SD (p = 0.004) for broad band ultrasound attenuation and speed of sound respectively. Broad band ultrasound attenuation and speed of sound remained significantly reduced after adjusting for bone mineral density (BMD). After adjusting for functional status (HAQ), age and sex, hypermobility was inversely correlated with broad band ultrasound attenuation and SOS, but not BMD at hip or spine. Previous fracture was 10 times more common in EDS (p exercise. This is one of the first clinical studies to suggest ultrasound can detect structural differences in bone, independent of dual energy x ray absorptiometry.

  9. Oral phenotype and scoring of vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferré, François Côme; Frank, Michael; Gogly, Bruno; Golmard, Lisa; Naveau, Adrien; Chérifi, Hafida; Emmerich, Joseph; Gaultier, Frédérick; Berdal, Ariane; Jeunemaitre, Xavier; Fournier, Benjamin P J

    2012-01-01

    Vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (vEDS) is a rare genetic condition related to mutations in the COL3A1 gene, responsible of vascular, digestive and uterine accidents. Difficulty of clinical diagnosis has led to the design of diagnostic criteria, summarised in the Villefranche classification. The goal was to assess oral features of vEDS. Gingival recession is the only oral sign recognised as a minor diagnostic criterion. The authors aimed to check this assumption since bibliographical search related to gingival recession in vEDS proved scarce. Prospective case-control study. Dental surgery department in a French tertiary hospital. 17 consecutive patients with genetically proven vEDS, aged 19-55 years, were compared with 46 age- and sex-matched controls. Complete oral examination (clinical and radiological) with standardised assessment of periodontal structure, temporomandibular joint function and dental characteristics were performed. COL3A1 mutations were identified by direct sequencing of genomic or complementary DNA. Prevalence of gingival recession was low among patients with vEDS, as for periodontitis. Conversely, patients showed marked gingival fragility, temporomandibular disorders, dentin formation defects, molar root fusion and increased root length. After logistic regression, three variables remained significantly associated to vEDS. These variables were integrated in a diagnostic oral score with 87.5% and 97% sensitivity and specificity, respectively. Gingival recession is an inappropriate diagnostic criterion for vEDS. Several new specific oral signs of the disease were identified, whose combination may be of greater value in diagnosing vEDS.

  10. Fatigue is associated with muscle weakness in Ehlers-Danlos syndrome: an explorative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voermans, N C; Knoop, H; Bleijenberg, G; van Engelen, B G

    2011-06-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of inherited connective tissue disorders characterised by joint hypermobility, skin hyperextensibility and tissue fragility. It has recently been shown that muscle weakness occurs frequently in EDS, and that fatigue is a common and clinically important symptom. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between fatigue severity and subjective and objective measures of muscle weakness. Furthermore, the predictive value of muscle weakness for fatigue severity was determined, together with that of pain and physical activity. An explorative, cross-sectional, observational study. Thirty EDS patients, recruited from the Dutch patient association, were investigated at the neuromuscular outpatient department of a tertiary referral centre in The Netherlands. Muscle strength measured with manual muscle strength testing and hand-held dynamometry. Self-reported muscle weakness, pain, physical activity levels and fatigue were assessed with standardised questionnaires. Fatigue severity in EDS was significantly correlated with measured and self-reported muscle weakness (r=-0.408 for manual muscle strength, r=0.461 for hand-held dynamometry and r=0.603 for self-reported muscle weakness). Both muscle weakness and pain severity were significant predictors of fatigue severity in a multiple regression analysis. The results suggest a positive and direct relationship between fatigue severity and muscle weakness in EDS. Future research should focus on the relationship between fatigue, muscle weakness and objectively measured physical activity, preferably in a larger cohort of EDS patients. Copyright © 2010 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. [Severe Mast Cell Activation Syndrome in a 15-year-old patient with an hypermobile Ehlers-Danlos syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daens, S; Grossin, D; Hermanns-Lê, T; Peeters, D; Manicourt, D

    2018-02-01

    We report the history of a 15-year old patient with a hypermobile Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (hEDS) (his mother, his two brothers and his sister have the same phenotype as him). He suffers mainly from a severe mast cell activation syndrome (MCAS) with an overreaction of the skin to any kind of contact (water of the shower, clothes, bed sheets) but he has also fatigue, headaches, and rash. This impressive rash is exacerbated after the shower and he has the urge to rest («shower's sign»). We describe the MCAS and its easy, fast and very effective medication management, without any significant side effects as well as its frequent association with the hEDS. We finally introduce the original term of «MASED» to this MCAS, associated, linked or entangled to hEDS.

  12. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome with lethal cardiac valvular dystrophy in males carrying a novel splice mutation in FLNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritelli, Marco; Morlino, Silvia; Giacopuzzi, Edoardo; Carini, Giulia; Cinquina, Valeria; Chiarelli, Nicola; Majore, Silvia; Colombi, Marina; Castori, Marco

    2017-01-01

    Filamin A is an X-linked, ubiquitous actin-binding protein whose mutations are associated to multiple disorders with limited genotype-phenotype correlations. While gain-of-function mutations cause various bone dysplasias, loss-of-function variants are the most common cause of periventricular nodular heterotopias with variable soft connective tissue involvement, as well as X-linked cardiac valvular dystrophy (XCVD). The term "Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) with periventricular heterotopias" has been used in females with neurological, cardiovascular, integument and joint manifestations, but this nosology is still a matter of debate. We report the clinical and molecular update of an Italian family with an X-linked recessive soft connective tissue disorder and which was described, in 1975, as the first example of EDS type V of the Berlin nosology. The cutaneous phenotype of the index patient was close to classical EDS and all males died for a lethal cardiac valvular dystrophy. Whole exome sequencing identified the novel c.1829-1G>C splice variation in FLNA in two affected cousins. The nucleotide change was predicted to abolish the canonical splice acceptor site of exon 13 and to activate a cryptic acceptor site 15 bp downstream, leading to in frame deletion of five amino acid residues (p.Phe611_Gly615del). The predicted in frame deletion clusters with all the mutations previously identified in XCVD and falls within the N-terminus rod 1 domain of filamin A. Our findings expand the male-specific phenotype of FLNA mutations that now includes classical-like EDS with lethal cardiac valvular dystrophy, and offer further insights for the genotype-phenotype correlations within this spectrum. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Association between diverticular disease and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome: a 13-year nationwide population-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leganger, Julie; Søborg, Marie-Louise Kulas; Mortensen, Laura Quitzau; Gregersen, Rasmus; Rosenberg, Jacob; Burcharth, Jakob

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to examine occurrence and consequences of diverticular disease in patients with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) compared with a matched cohort. This nationwide population-based cohort study was conducted using data from medical registers in Denmark from year 2000 to 2012. The EDS cohort was identified using the specific diagnosis code for EDS and was randomly matched in a ratio of 1:20 by sex and date of birth (±1 year) with persons from the Danish general population. The occurrence of diverticular disease and the clinical characteristics of the initial diverticular event were compared between the EDS cohort and the comparison cohort. The first admission with diverticulitis was identified, and severity of diverticulitis, treatment, colonoscopies, length of stay, and 30-day mortality were investigated. We identified 1336 patients with EDS and matched a control cohort of 26,720 patients. The occurrence of diverticular disease in the EDS cohort (2.0 %) and the comparison cohort (0.68 %) differed significantly (p < 0.001). At the first diverticular event, the majority of patients were women (85 % for EDS and 87 % for the comparison cohort). Mean age, localization, and type of contact did not differ significantly. Admission with diverticulitis (1.0 % for EDS and 0.34 % for the comparison cohort) differed significantly (p < 0.001). We found no significant difference in severity of diverticulitis, treatment, length of stay, or 30-day mortality between the EDS and the comparison cohorts. Patients with EDS had an increased occurrence of overall diverticular events and admissions with diverticulitis compared with the general population.

  14. Increased Prevalence of Cerebrovascular Disease in Hospitalized Patients with Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sarasa T; Cloft, Harry; Flemming, Kelly D; Kallmes, David F; Lanzino, Giuseppe; Brinjikji, Waleed

    2017-08-01

    Small studies have suggested that Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is associated with a number of cerebrovascular complications. We sought to determine whether a clinical diagnosis of EDS is associated with a higher prevalence of cerebrovascular diseases than the general population by performing a case-control study of hospitalized patients in the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS). Using the 2000-2012 NIS, we performed a case-control study matching cases of EDS to controls without such a diagnosis. The prevalence of various cerebrovascular diseases between the 2 groups was compared, and multivariate logistic regression was used to adjust for suspected comorbidities. Between 2000 and 2012, there were a total of 9067 discharges carrying a diagnosis of EDS. On univariate analysis, patients with EDS were more likely to be hospitalized for carotid dissection (.2% versus .01%, odds ratio [OR] = 18.0, confidence interval [CI] = 2.41-135.12, P < .0001), vertebral dissection (.1% versus 0%, P = .008), cervical artery aneurysm (.1% versus .01%, OR = 9.01, CI = 1.14-71.11, P < .0001), cerebral aneurysm (.4% versus .09%, OR = 4.89, CI = 2.28-10.47, P < .0001), and cerebrovascular malformation (.1% versus .02%, OR = 5, CI = 1.10-22.85, P = .021), compared to the controls. On multivariate analysis adjusted for age, race, and comorbidities, EDS patients had significantly higher odds of carotid dissection (OR = 15.02, CI = 3.08-270.87, P < .0001), vertebral dissection (OR = 2406539.5, P = .0037), cervical artery aneurysm (OR = 11.75, CI = 2.11-220.71, P = .0026), cerebral aneurysm (OR = 5.59, CI = 2.69-13.18, P < .0001), and cerebrovascular malformation (OR = 4.67, CI = 1.20-30.87, P = .0243). Carotid and vertebral dissections, cervical and cerebral aneurysms, as well as other cerebrovascular malformations are more common in hospitalized patients with EDS compared to controls

  15. Vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome with cryptorchidism, recurrent pneumothorax, and pulmonary capillary hemangiomatosis-like foci: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Min A; Shin, So Youn; Kim, Young Jin; Park, Myung Jae; Lee, Seung Hyeun

    2017-11-01

    Vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (vEDS) is a rare autosomal dominant inherited collagen disorder caused by defects or deficiency of pro-alpha 1 chain of type III procollagen encoded by COL3A1. vEDS is characterized not only by soft tissue manifestations including hyperextensibility of skin and joint hypermobility but also by early mortality due to rupture of arteries or vital organs. Although pulmonary complications are not common, vEDS cases complicated by pneumothorax, hemothorax, or intrapulmonary hematoma have been reported. When a patient initially presents only with pulmonary complications, it is not easy for clinicians to suspect vEDS. We report a case of an 18-year-old high school student, with a past history of cryptorchidism, presenting with recurrent pneumothorax. Routine laboratory findings were unremarkable. Chest high resolution computed tomographic scan showed age-unmatched hyperinflation of both lungs, atypical cystic changes and multifocal ground glass opacities scattered in both lower lobes. His slender body shape, hyperflexible joints, and hyperextensible skin provided clue to suspicion of a possible connective tissue disorder. The histological examination of the lung lesions showed excessive capillary proliferation in the pulmonary interstitium and pleura allowing the diagnosis of pulmonary capillary hemangiomatosis (PCH)-like foci. Genetic study revealed COL3A1 gene splicing site mutation confirming his diagnosis as vEDS. Although his diagnosis vEDS is notorious for fatal vascular complication, there was no evidence of such complication at presentation. Fortunately, he has been followed up for 10 months without pulmonary or vascular complications. To the best of our knowledge, both cryptorchidism and PCH-like foci have never been reported yet as complications of vEDS, suggesting our case might be a new variant of this condition. This case emphasizes the importance of comprehensive physical examination and history-taking, and the clinical

  16. Neurological manifestations of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome(s): A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castori, Marco; C. Voermans, Nicol

    2014-01-01

    The term “Ehlers-Danlos syndrome” (EDS) groups together an increasing number of heritable connective tissue disorders mainly featuring joint hypermobility and related complications, dermal dysplasia with abnormal skin texture and repair, and variable range of the hollow organ and vascular dysfunctions. Although the nervous system is not considered a primary target of the underlying molecular defect, recently, increasing attention has been posed on neurological manifestations of EDSs, such as musculoskeletal pain, fatigue, headache, muscle weakness and paresthesias. Here, a comprehensive overview of neurological findings of these conditions is presented primarily intended for the clinical neurologist. Features are organized under various subheadings, including pain, fatigue, headache, stroke and cerebrovascular disease, brain and spine structural anomalies, epilepsy, muscular findings, neuropathy and developmental features. The emerging picture defines a wide spectrum of neurological manifestations that are unexpectedly common and potentially disabling. Their evaluation and correct interpretation by the clinical neurologist is crucial for avoiding superfluous investigations, wrong therapies, and inappropriate referral. A set of basic tools for patient’s recognition is offered for raising awareness among neurologists on this underdiagnosed group of hereditary disorders. PMID:25632331

  17. Pain control methods in use and perceived effectiveness by patients with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome: a descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, Karen; Caldwell, Karen; Forehand, Samantha; Davis, Keith

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the pain control methods in use by patients who have Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome (EDS), a group of connective tissue disorders, and their perceived effectiveness. This descriptive study involved 1179 adults diagnosed with EDS who completed an anonymous on-line survey. The survey consisted of demographics information, the Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) Pain-Behavior, PROMIS Pain-Interference, and Neuro QOL Satisfaction with Social Roles and Activities scales, as well as a modified version of the Pain Management Strategies Survey. Respondents reported having to seek out confirmation of their EDS diagnosis with multiple healthcare providers, which implies the difficulty many people with EDS face when trying to gain access to appropriate treatment. Patients with EDS experience higher levels of pain interference and lower satisfaction with social roles and activities compared to national norms. Among the treatment modalities in this study, those perceived as most helpful for acute pain control were opioids, surgical interventions, splints and braces, avoidance of potentially dangerous activities and heat therapy. Chronic pain treatments rated as most helpful were opioids, splints or braces and surgical interventions. For methods used for both acute and chronic pain, those perceived as most helpful were opioids, massage therapies, splints or braces, heat therapy and avoiding potentially dangerous activities. EDS is a complex, multi-systemic condition that can be difficult to diagnose and poses challenges for healthcare practitioners who engage with EDS patients in holistic care. Improved healthcare provider knowledge of EDS is needed, and additional research on the co-occurring diagnoses with EDS may assist in comprehensive pain management for EDS patients. Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome (EDS) is a group of connective tissue disorders associated with defective production of collagen, which can dramatically

  18. Alterations in collagen structure in hypermobility and Ehlers-Danlos syndromes detected by Raman spectroscopy in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Carina K.; Gniadecka, Monika; Ullman, Susanne; Halberg, Poul; Kobayasi, Takasi; Wulf, Hans Christian

    2000-11-01

    Patients with hypermobility syndrome (HS) and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) were investigated by means of in vivo near- infrared Fourier-transform Raman spectroscopy. HS is a benign and common condition (up to 5 percent of the population of the Western World). EDS is a rare, inherited connective tissue disease characterized by joint hypermobility, skin hyperextensibility, and other, occasionally serious, organ changes. EDS and HS may be related disorders. We investigated 13 patients with HS, 8 patients with EDS, and 24 healthy volunteers by means of in vivo Raman spectroscopy. The patients were classified according to Beighton and Holzberg et al. No difference in age between the three groups was found (HS 41 (33-49), EDS 36 (25-47), controls 37 (31-42); mean, 95% confidence intervals, respectively). Spectral differences were found in the intensity of the amide-III bands around 1245 and 1270 cm-1 in HS and EDS compared with healthy skin (Kruskal-Wallis, p equals 0,02 for intensity ratios (I1245/I1270) between the investigated groups). To elucidate the character of the alterations in the amide-III bands a curve fitting procedure was applied. In conclusion, Raman spectroscopy may aid in the diagnosis of HS and EDS. Moreover the technique may be useful for analyzing the molecular changes occurring in these syndromes.

  19. Endovascular repair of an iliac arteriovenous fistula secondary to perforation from a common iliac aneurysm in a patient with Ehler-Danlos syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sala Almonacil, Vicente Andrés; Zaragozá García, José Miguel; Gómez Palonés, Francisco Julián; Plaza Martínez, Ángel; Ortíz Monzón, Eduardo

    2012-08-01

    Type IV Ehler-Danlos syndrome (EDS) patients are prone to life-threatening vascular complications. Surgical management of those complications is challenging owing to vessel wall fragility, which may result in hemorrhagic events and high mortality rates. Here we report a case of left common iliac aneurysm perforation of the ipsilateral iliac vein repaired using endovascular technique in a patient with EDS. A 54-year-old patient presented with heart failure symptoms that evolved over 1 week in association with left leg edema and steal syndrome due to a perforation of the left iliac vein caused by a left common iliac aneurysm. A thrombosed right common iliac aneurysm and several other visceral and peripheral aneurysms were discovered on computed tomographic scan at admission. An aortouniiliac stent graft was used to seal the fistula. After 18 months of follow-up, the patient remained asymptomatic. We suggest that endovascular therapy is useful to manage vascular complications in patients with EDS. Copyright © 2012 Annals of Vascular Surgery Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A PELVIC MASS - BLADDER DIVERTICULUM WITH HEMORRHAGE IN EHLERS-DANLOS PATIENT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BADE, JJ; YPMA, AFGVM; VANELK, P; MENSINK, HJA

    We report on a case of haemorrhage in a large bladder diverticulum, impressing as a pelvic mass, in a patient with the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. A review of the literature revealed 14 other cases of bladder diverticula and the Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome. Conservative treatment is first choice, unless

  1. Nationwide population-based cohort study of celiac disease and risk of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome and joint hypermobility syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laszkowska, Monika; Roy, Abhik; Lebwohl, Benjamin; Green, Peter H R; Sundelin, Heléne E K; Ludvigsson, Jonas F

    2016-09-01

    Patients with celiac disease (CD) often have articular complaints, and small prior studies suggest an association with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS)/joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS). This study examines the risks of EDS/JHS in patients with CD. This cohort study compared all individuals in Sweden diagnosed with CD based on small intestinal biopsy between 1969-2008 (n=28,631) to 139,832 matched reference individuals, and to a second reference group undergoing biopsy without having CD (n=16,104). Rates of EDS/JHS were determined based on diagnostic codes in the Swedish Patient Register. Hazard ratios (HRs) for EDS/JHS were estimated through Cox regression. There are 45 and 148 cases of EDS/JHS in patients with CD and reference individuals, respectively. This corresponds to a 49% increased risk of EDS/JHS in CD (95%CI=1.07-2.07). The HR for EDS was 2.43 (95%CI=1.20-4.91) and for JHS 1.34 (95%CI=0.93-1.95). Compared to reference individuals undergoing intestinal biopsy, CD was not a risk factor for EDS/JHS. A stronger association was seen in patients initially diagnosed with EDS/JHS and subsequently diagnosed with CD (odds ratio=2.29; 95%CI=1.21-4.34). Individuals with CD have higher risk of EDS/JHS than the general population, which may be due to surveillance bias or factors intrinsic to celiac development. Copyright © 2016 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Spectrum of mucocutaneous, ocular and facial features and delineation of novel presentations in 62 classical Ehlers-Danlos syndrome patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombi, M; Dordoni, C; Venturini, M; Ciaccio, C; Morlino, S; Chiarelli, N; Zanca, A; Calzavara-Pinton, P; Zoppi, N; Castori, M; Ritelli, M

    2017-12-01

    Classical Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (cEDS) is characterized by marked cutaneous involvement, according to the Villefranche nosology and its 2017 revision. However, the diagnostic flow-chart that prompts molecular testing is still based on experts' opinion rather than systematic published data. Here we report on 62 molecularly characterized cEDS patients with focus on skin, mucosal, facial, and articular manifestations. The major and minor Villefranche criteria, additional 11 mucocutaneous signs and 15 facial dysmorphic traits were ascertained and feature rates compared by sex and age. In our cohort, we did not observe any mandatory clinical sign. Skin hyperextensibility plus atrophic scars was the most frequent combination, whereas generalized joint hypermobility according to the Beighton score decreased with age. Skin was more commonly hyperextensible on elbows, neck, and knees. The sites more frequently affected by abnormal atrophic scarring were knees, face (especially forehead), pretibial area, and elbows. Facial dysmorphism commonly affected midface/orbital areas with epicanthal folds and infraorbital creases more commonly observed in young patients. Our findings suggest that the combination of ≥1 eye dysmorphism and facial/forehead scars may support the diagnosis in children. Minor acquired traits, such as molluscoid pseudotumors, subcutaneous spheroids, and signs of premature skin aging are equally useful in adults. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Targeted next-generation sequencing makes new molecular diagnoses and expands genotype-phenotype relationship in Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weerakkody, Ruwan A; Vandrovcova, Jana; Kanonidou, Christina; Mueller, Michael; Gampawar, Piyush; Ibrahim, Yousef; Norsworthy, Penny; Biggs, Jennifer; Abdullah, Abdulshakur; Ross, David; Black, Holly A; Ferguson, David; Cheshire, Nicholas J; Kazkaz, Hanadi; Grahame, Rodney; Ghali, Neeti; Vandersteen, Anthony; Pope, F Michael; Aitman, Timothy J

    2016-11-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) comprises a group of overlapping hereditary disorders of connective tissue with significant morbidity and mortality, including major vascular complications. We sought to identify the diagnostic utility of a next-generation sequencing (NGS) panel in a mixed EDS cohort. We developed and applied PCR-based NGS assays for targeted, unbiased sequencing of 12 collagen and aortopathy genes to a cohort of 177 unrelated EDS patients. Variants were scored blind to previous genetic testing and then compared with results of previous Sanger sequencing. Twenty-eight pathogenic variants in COL5A1/2, COL3A1, FBN1, and COL1A1 and four likely pathogenic variants in COL1A1, TGFBR1/2, and SMAD3 were identified by the NGS assays. These included all previously detected single-nucleotide and other short pathogenic variants in these genes, and seven newly detected pathogenic or likely pathogenic variants leading to clinically significant diagnostic revisions. Twenty-two variants of uncertain significance were identified, seven of which were in aortopathy genes and required clinical follow-up. Unbiased NGS-based sequencing made new molecular diagnoses outside the expected EDS genotype-phenotype relationship and identified previously undetected clinically actionable variants in aortopathy susceptibility genes. These data may be of value in guiding future clinical pathways for genetic diagnosis in EDS.Genet Med 18 11, 1119-1127.

  4. Low- and high-anxious hypermobile Ehlers-Danlos syndrome patients: comparison of psychosocial and health variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeza-Velasco, Carolina; Bourdon, Caroline; Montalescot, Lucile; de Cazotte, Cécile; Pailhez, Guillem; Bulbena, Antonio; Hamonet, Claude

    2018-05-01

    Despite the frequent co-ocurrence of hypermobile Ehler-Danlos syndrome (hEDS) and pathological anxiety, little is known about the psychosocial and health implications of such comorbidity. Our aim was to explore the association between high levels of anxiety and psychosocial (catastrophizing, kinesiophobia, somatosensory amplification, social support and functioning), health (pain, fatigue, BMI, tobacco/alcohol use, depression, diagnosis delay, general health), and sociodemographic factors in people with hEDS. In this cross-sectional study, 80 hEDS patients were divided into two groups according to self-reported anxiety levels: low and high. Psychosocial, sociodemographic and health variables were compared between the groups. Forty-one participants reported a high level of anxiety (51.2%). No differences were found in the sociodemographic variables between high-anxious and low-anxious patients. The percentage of participants with severe fatigue and high depressive symptomatology was significantly higher in the high-anxious group (80.5 vs 56.4; 26.8 vs 12.8%, respectively). High-anxious hEDS patients also showed significantly higher levels of pain catastrophizing, somatosensory amplification as well as a poorer social functioning and general health. Multivariate analyses showed that somatosensory amplification, pain catastrophizing and poor social functioning are variables that increase the probability of belonging to the high-anxious group. Despite limitations, this first study comparing high-anxious versus low-anxious hEDS patients with respect to health aspects, highlight the importance of considering the psychosocial factors (many susceptible to modification), to improve the adjustment to this chronic condition and provide support to those affected through a biopsychosocial approach.

  5. Natural history of aortic root dilation through young adulthood in a hypermobile Ehlers-Danlos syndrome cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Alyssa; Atzinger, Carrie; Hays, Brandon; James, Jeanne; Shikany, Amy; Neilson, Derek; Martin, Lisa; Weaver, Kathryn Nicole

    2017-06-01

    Hypermobile Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (hEDS) is a common inherited connective tissue disorder characterized by joint hypermobility. The natural history of aortic root dilation (AoD), a potential complication of EDS, has not been well characterized in this population. We describe the natural history of aortic root size in a large cohort of patients with hEDS. A cohort of 325 patients with HEDS was identified at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center (CCHMC), including 163 patients from a previous study. Medical records were reviewed and each participant's height, weight, and aortic dimensions from up to four echocardiograms were documented. Aortic root z-scores were calculated using two established formulas based on age (Boston or Devereux). Overall prevalence of AoD and prevalence by age were calculated and longitudinal regression was performed. The prevalence of AoD with a z-score ≥ 2.0 was 14.2% (46/325) and with a z-score of ≥3.0 was 5.5% (18/325). No significant increases in z-score were seen over time for patients with multiple echocardiograms. Participants under the age of 15 years had an average decline of 0.1 standard deviations (SDs)/year. No significant change was found after 15 of age. Between the ages of 15 and 21 years, Boston z-scores were 0.96 higher than Devereux z-scores. The nearly 1 z-score unit difference between formulas indicates caution prior to diagnosing AoD in patients with hEDS. In light of the low prevalence and lack of progression of AoD, routine echocardiograms may not be warranted for pediatric patients with hEDS. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Vascular Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome With a Novel Missense COL3A1 Mutation Present With Pulmonary Complications and Iliac Arterial Dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Guangchao; Yang, Hang; Cui, Lijia; Fu, Yuanyuan; Li, Fangda; Zhou, Zhou; Zheng, Yuehong

    2018-02-01

    Vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (vEDS) is a life-threatening connective tissue disorder due to its high tendency of arterial and organ rupture. Pulmonary complications in vEDS are rare. We present a young male patient with vEDS who developed severe pulmonary complications and severe rupture of the iliac artery at different stages of his life. Vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome was diagnosed based on clinical manifestations and confirmed by the identification of COL3A1 gene mutation. Due to high bleeding tendency and weak cardiopulmonary capacity, conservative treatment was taken for him. To our knowledge, this is the first report of vEDS case in which the patient developed both pulmonary complications and dissection of large arteries. Our report emphasizes the importance of considering vEDS when an adolescent develops unexplained pulmonary cysts with fragility of lung tissues. Genetic counseling and close monitoring should be performed for earlier diagnosis and prevention of severe complications of large arteries. The typical presentations of vEDS were also discussed by means of a review of case reports on vEDS with pulmonary complications.

  7. Collagen V haploinsufficiency in a murine model of classic Ehlers-Danlos syndrome is associated with deficient structural and mechanical healing in tendons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Jessica M; Connizzo, Brianne K; Shetye, Snehal S; Robinson, Kelsey A; Huegel, Julianne; Rodriguez, Ashley B; Sun, Mei; Adams, Sheila M; Birk, David E; Soslowsky, Louis J

    2017-12-01

    Classic Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) patients suffer from connective tissue hyperelasticity, joint instability, skin hyperextensibility, tissue fragility, and poor wound healing due to heterozygous mutations in COL5a1 or COL5a2 genes. This study investigated the roles of collagen V in establishing structure and function in uninjured patellar tendons as well as in the injury response using a Col5a1 +/- mouse, a model for classic EDS. These analyses were done comparing tendons from a classic EDS model (Col5a1 +/- ) with wild-type controls. Tendons were subjected to mechanical testing, histological, and fibril analysis before injury as well as 3 and 6 weeks after injury. We found that Col5a1 +/- tendons demonstrated diminished recovery of mechanical competency after injury as compared to normal wild-type tendons, which recovered their pre-injury values by 6 weeks post injury. Additionally, the Col5a1 +/- tendons demonstrated altered fibril morphology and diameter distributions compared to the wild-type tendons. This study indicates that collagen V plays an important role in regulating collagen fibrillogenesis and the associated recovery of mechanical integrity in tendons after injury. In addition, the dysregulation with decreased collagen V expression in EDS is associated with a diminished injury response. The results presented herein have the potential to direct future targeted therapeutics for classic EDS patients. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:2707-2715, 2017. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Defect in dermatan sulfate in urine of patients with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome caused by a CHST14/D4ST1 deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizumoto, Shuji; Kosho, Tomoki; Hatamochi, Atsushi; Honda, Tomoko; Yamaguchi, Tomomi; Okamoto, Nobuhiko; Miyake, Noriko; Yamada, Shuhei; Sugahara, Kazuyuki

    2017-08-01

    Dermatan sulfate (DS) plays a number of roles in a wide range of biological activities such as cell signaling and tissue morphogenesis through interactions with various extracellular matrix proteins including collagen. Mutations in the carbohydrate sulfotransferase 14 gene (CHST14) encoding CHST14/dermatan 4-O-sulfotransferase-1 (D4ST1), which is responsible for the biosynthesis of DS, cause a recently delineated form of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS, musculocontractural type 1), an autosomal recessive connective tissue disorder characterized by congenital malformations (specific craniofacial features, and congenital multiple contractures) and progressive fragility-related complications (skin hyperextensibility, bruisability, and fragility with atrophic scars; recurrent dislocations; progressive talipes or spinal deformities; and large subcutaneous hematomas). In an attempt to develop a diagnostic screening method for this type of EDS, the amount of DS in the urine of patients was analyzed. Urinary DS was quantified by an anion-exchange chromatography after treatment with DS-specific degrading enzyme. DS was not detected in the urine of patients with homo- or compound heterozygous mutations in CHST14. These results suggest that the quantification of DS in urine is applicable to an initial diagnosis of DS-defective EDS. This is the first study to perform a urinary disaccharide compositional analysis of chondroitin sulfate (CS)/DS chains in patients with EDS caused by a CHST14/D4ST1 deficiency, and demonstrated the absence of DS chains. This result suggests systemic DS depletion in this disorder, and also proposes the usefulness of a urinary disaccharide compositional analysis of CS/DS chains as a non-invasive screening method for this disorder. Copyright © 2017 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Transcriptome analysis of skin fibroblasts with dominant negative COL3A1 mutations provides molecular insights into the etiopathology of vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiarelli, Nicola; Carini, Giulia; Zoppi, Nicoletta; Ritelli, Marco; Colombi, Marina

    2018-01-01

    Vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (vEDS) is a dominantly inherited connective tissue disorder caused by mutations in the COL3A1 gene that encodes type III collagen (COLLIII), which is the major expressed collagen in blood vessels and hollow organs. The majority of disease-causing variants in COL3A1 are glycine substitutions and in-frame splice mutations in the triple helix domain that through a dominant negative effect are associated with the severe clinical spectrum potentially lethal of vEDS, characterized by fragility of soft connective tissues with arterial and organ ruptures. To shed lights into molecular mechanisms underlying vEDS, we performed gene expression profiling in cultured skin fibroblasts from three patients with different structural COL3A1 mutations. Transcriptome analysis revealed significant changes in the expression levels of several genes involved in maintenance of cell redox and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) homeostasis, COLLs folding and extracellular matrix (ECM) organization, formation of the proteasome complex, and cell cycle regulation. Protein analyses showed that aberrant COLLIII expression is associated with the disassembly of many structural ECM constituents, such as fibrillins, EMILINs, and elastin, as well as with the reduction of the proteoglycans perlecan, decorin, and versican, all playing an important role in the vascular system. Furthermore, the altered distribution of the ER marker protein disulfide isomerase PDI and the strong reduction of the COLLs-modifying enzyme FKBP22 are consistent with the disturbance of ER-related homeostasis and COLLs biosynthesis and post-translational modifications, indicated by microarray analysis. Our findings add new insights into the pathophysiology of this severe vascular disorder, since they provide a picture of the gene expression changes in vEDS skin fibroblasts and highlight that dominant negative mutations in COL3A1 also affect post-translational modifications and deposition into the ECM of

  10. Transcriptome analysis of skin fibroblasts with dominant negative COL3A1 mutations provides molecular insights into the etiopathology of vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Chiarelli

    Full Text Available Vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (vEDS is a dominantly inherited connective tissue disorder caused by mutations in the COL3A1 gene that encodes type III collagen (COLLIII, which is the major expressed collagen in blood vessels and hollow organs. The majority of disease-causing variants in COL3A1 are glycine substitutions and in-frame splice mutations in the triple helix domain that through a dominant negative effect are associated with the severe clinical spectrum potentially lethal of vEDS, characterized by fragility of soft connective tissues with arterial and organ ruptures. To shed lights into molecular mechanisms underlying vEDS, we performed gene expression profiling in cultured skin fibroblasts from three patients with different structural COL3A1 mutations. Transcriptome analysis revealed significant changes in the expression levels of several genes involved in maintenance of cell redox and endoplasmic reticulum (ER homeostasis, COLLs folding and extracellular matrix (ECM organization, formation of the proteasome complex, and cell cycle regulation. Protein analyses showed that aberrant COLLIII expression is associated with the disassembly of many structural ECM constituents, such as fibrillins, EMILINs, and elastin, as well as with the reduction of the proteoglycans perlecan, decorin, and versican, all playing an important role in the vascular system. Furthermore, the altered distribution of the ER marker protein disulfide isomerase PDI and the strong reduction of the COLLs-modifying enzyme FKBP22 are consistent with the disturbance of ER-related homeostasis and COLLs biosynthesis and post-translational modifications, indicated by microarray analysis. Our findings add new insights into the pathophysiology of this severe vascular disorder, since they provide a picture of the gene expression changes in vEDS skin fibroblasts and highlight that dominant negative mutations in COL3A1 also affect post-translational modifications and deposition

  11. A novel mutation in the lysyl hydroxylase 1 gene causes decreased lysyl hydroxylase activity in an ehlers-danlos VIA patient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walker, L.C.; Overstreet, M.A.; Siddiqui, A.; Paepe, A. de; Ceylaner, G.; Malfait, F.; Symoens, S.; Atsawasuwan, P.; Yamauchi, M.; Ceylaner, S.; Bank, R.A.; Yeowell, H.N.

    2005-01-01

    The clinical diagnosis of a patient with the phenotype of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type VI was confirmed biochemically by the severely diminished level of lysyl hydroxylase (LH) activity in the patient's skin fibroblasts. A novel homozygous mutation, a single base change of T1360 → G in exon 13 of the

  12. Vertebral Column Resection for Kyphoscoliosis in a Patient with Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome: An Intraoperative Neurophysiological Monitoring Alert.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahangiri, Faisal R; Al Eissa, Sami; Sayegh, Samir; Al Helal, Fahad; Al-Sharif, Shomoukh A; Annaim, Monerah M; Muhammad, Sheryar; Aziz, Tanweer

    2016-08-31

    A 16-year-old male patient with Ehler-Danlos syndrome (EDS) and a back deformity since birth presented with severe kyphoscoliosis. The patient was neurologically intact but had respiratory and cardiac insufficiencies. A two-stage vertebral column resection (VCR) at T9-T10 with multiple level fusion with multimodality intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring (IONM) was planned.  During the first stage, pedicle screws were placed at multiple spinal levels above and below the VCR level. Upper and lower somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEP), transcranial electrical motor evoked potentials (TCeMEP), and electromyography were monitored continuously and showed no significant changes. The second stage was performed one week later. Baseline SSEP and TCeMEP responses were present in all extremities. The surgeon was informed of a sudden 70% amplitude drop in TCeMEP in the lower limbs with stable SSEP after ligating one of the left nerves/vessels fully stretching the spinal cord. The surgeon removed the ligation, and an improvement in motor responses followed. Surgery proceeded with the highest levels of caution. Later, there was a sudden loss of TCeMEP and SSEP in the lower limbs bilaterally. The correction was released, mean arterial pressure was increased, and intravenous dexamethasone was administered. The surgical correction was aborted, and the decision was made to close the site. Lower SSEP and TCeMEP responses remained absent until closing, while upper SSEP and TCeMEP responses remained stable. A wake-up test was done after closing. The patient moved his upper limbs but was unable to move his lower limbs bilaterally. The patient was sent for a magnetic resonance imaging scan while intubated and then sent to the intensive care unit. At 24 hours and 36 hours post-operation, the patient had no sensory and motor function below the T8 level. Forty-eight hours post-operation, the patient started to feel sensory stimuli at the T10 level. At one week post-operation, the

  13. Further delineation of FKBP14-related Ehlers-Danlos syndrome: A patient with early vascular complications and non-progressive kyphoscoliosis, and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dordoni, Chiara; Ciaccio, Claudia; Venturini, Marina; Calzavara-Pinton, Piergiacomo; Ritelli, Marco; Colombi, Marina

    2016-08-01

    FKBP14-related Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is an extremely rare recessive connective tissue disorder described for the first time in 2012 by Baumann and coworkers. The causal gene, FKBP14, encodes a member of the F506-binding family of peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerases. The paucity of patients described so far makes this disorder poorly defined at clinical level. Here, we report an additional pediatric patient, who is compound heterozygous for a recurrent and a novel FKBP14 mutation, and compare his phenotype with those available in literature. This evaluation confirms that kyphoscoliosis (either progressive or non-progressive), myopathy, joint hypermobility, and congenital hearing loss (sensorineural, conductive, or mixed) are the typical features of the syndrome. Since the patient showed a severe cardiovascular event in childhood and atlantoaxial instability, this report expands the phenotype of the disorder and the allelic repertoire of FKBP14. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Operative and endovascular management of extracranial vertebral artery aneurysm in Ehlers-Danlos syndrome:a clinical dilemma--case report and literature review.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sultan, Sherif

    2002-01-01

    The most prevalent lesion of the vertebral artery is an atheromatous plaque located at its origin from the subclavian artery. A case of successful management of a symptomatic vertebral artery aneurysm due to Ehlers-Danlos syndrome is reported. The patient had asymptomatic posterior intracerebral artery dissection on the contralateral side. A common carotid artery to V-3 segment bypass using reversed saphenous vein graft was carried out. Avulsion of the V-2 segment occurred peroperatively and endovascular coil embolization of the vertebral artery aneurysm was performed. Endovascular equipment and training must be in the armamentarium of vascular surgeons as more complex cases are being treated, which demands new approaches for ultimate clinical success. This unique case outlines what might unexpectedly occur. Endovascular intervention as an adjuvant procedure provides a satisfactory outcome in what could have been a catastrophe.

  15. Expanding the clinical and mutational spectrum of B4GALT7-spondylodysplastic Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritelli, Marco; Dordoni, Chiara; Cinquina, Valeria; Venturini, Marina; Calzavara-Pinton, Piergiacomo; Colombi, Marina

    2017-09-07

    Spondylodysplastic EDS (spEDS) is a rare connective tissue disorder that groups the phenotypes caused by biallelic B4GALT7, B3GALT6, and SLC39A13 mutations. In the 2017 EDS nosology, minimal criteria (general and gene-specific) for a clinical suspicion of spEDS have been proposed, but molecular analysis is required to reach a definite diagnosis. The majority of spEDS patients presented with short stature, skin hyperextensibility, facial dysmorphisms, peculiar radiological findings, muscle hypotonia and joint laxity and/or its complications. To date only 7 patients with β4GALT7-deficiency (spEDS-B4GALT7) have been described and their clinical data suggested that, in addition to short stature and muscle hypotonia, radioulnar synostosis, hypermetropia, and delayed cognitive development might be a hallmark of this specific type of spEDS. Additional 22 patients affected with an overlapping phenotype, i.e., Larsen of Reunion Island syndrome, all carrying a homozygous B4GALT7 mutation, are also recognized. Herein, we report on a 30-year-old Moroccan woman who fitted the minimal criteria to suspect spEDS, but lacked radioulnar synostosis and intellectual disability and presented with neurosensorial hearing loss and limb edema of lymphatic origin. Sanger sequencing of B4GALT7 was performed since the evaluation of the spEDS gene-specific minor criteria suggested this specific subtype. Mutational screening revealed the homozygous c.829G>T, p.Glu277* pathogenetic variant leading to aberrant splicing. Our findings expand both the clinical and mutational spectrum of this ultrarare connective tissue disorder. The comparison of the patient's features with those of the other spEDS and Larsen of Reunion Island syndrome patients reported up to now offers future perspectives for spEDS nosology and clinical research in this field.

  16. Importance of recognizing Ehlers Danlos syndrome by dentists: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Jamali

    1994-06-01

    Full Text Available This syndrome is a genetical disorder with symptoms result from deficit in the formation of connective tissue, especially collagen fiber biosynthesis. In these patients, there is hyperelasticity and fragility of the skin and mucosa. Injuries sever bleeding, internal bleeding and hemartrosis may be seen in these patients. Wounds leave scars after healing. There is recurrent dislocation of the joints, especially knee and temporomandibular joints. Dentists should know the symptoms of this syndrome and its complications during dental treatments.

  17. Skeletal muscle morphology, protein synthesis and gene expression in Ehlers Danlos Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygaard, Rie H; Jensen, Jacob K; Voermans, Nicol C

    2017-01-01

    skeletal muscle biopsies in patients with classic EDS (cEDS, n=5 (Denmark)+ 8 (The Netherlands)) and vascular EDS (vEDS, n=3) and analyzed muscle fiber morphology and content (Western blotting and muscle fiber type/area distributions) and muscle mRNA expression and protein synthesis rate (RT-PCR and stable...... isotope technique). RESULTS: The cEDS patients did not differ from healthy controls (n = 7-11) with regard to muscle fiber type/area, myosin/α-actin ratio, muscle protein synthesis rate or mRNA expression. In contrast, the vEDS patients demonstrated higher expression of matrix proteins compared to c......EDS patients (fibronectin and MMP-2). DISCUSSION: The cEDS patients had surprisingly normal muscle morphology and protein synthesis, whereas vEDS patients demonstrated higher mRNA expression for extracellular matrix remodeling in skeletal musculature compared to cEDS patients....

  18. Pain in Ehlers-Danlos syndrome: a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Celletti

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available EDS patients shows chronic and frequently debilitating pain described from different authors as multifactorial. Pain has been described as neuropathic in some individuals but probably the persistent nociceptive input due to joint abnormalities probably triggers central sensitization in the dorsal horn neurons and causes widespread pain. The knowledge of the correct type of pain is necessary for the correct management in particular for the rehabilitative approach.

  19. Ehlers-Danlos' syndrom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leganger, Julie; Søborg, Marie-Louise Kulas; Farholt, Stense

    2016-01-01

    diagnostic criteria, and because physicians may lack knowledge of this rare disease. The aim of this article is to provide an overview of the clinical symptoms and to provide recommendations on diagnosis and treatment. Referring patients to one of the national centres for rare diseases is important....

  20. Ehlers-Danlos syndrom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leganger, Julie; Søborg, Marie-Louise Kulas; Farholt, Stense

    2016-01-01

    , and because physicians may lack knowledge of this rare disease. The aim of this article is to provide an overview of the clinical symptoms and to provide recommendations on diagnosis and treatment. Referring patients to one of the national centres for rare diseases is important....

  1. Nationwide population-based cohort study of psychiatric disorders in individuals with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome or hypermobility syndrome and their siblings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cederlöf, Martin; Larsson, Henrik; Lichtenstein, Paul; Almqvist, Catarina; Serlachius, Eva; Ludvigsson, Jonas F

    2016-07-04

    To assess the risk of psychiatric disorders in Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) and hypermobility syndrome. Nationwide population-based matched cohort study. EDS, hypermobility syndrome and psychiatric disorders were identified through Swedish national registries. Individuals with EDS (n = 1,771) were matched with comparison individuals (n = 17,710). Further, siblings to individuals with EDS who did not have an EDS diagnosis themselves were compared with matched comparison siblings. Using conditional logistic regression, risk of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), bipolar disorder, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), depression, attempted suicide, suicide and schizophrenia were estimated. The same analyses were conducted in individuals with hypermobility syndrome (n = 10,019) and their siblings. EDS was associated with ASD: risk ratio (RR) 7.4, 95 % confidence interval (95 % CI) 5.2-10.7; bipolar disorder: RR 2.7, CI 1.5-4.7; ADHD: RR 5.6, CI 4.2-7.4; depression: RR 3.4, 95 % CI 2.9-4.1; and attempted suicide: RR 2.1, 95 % CI 1.7-2.7, but not with suicide or schizophrenia. EDS siblings were at increased risk of ADHD: RR 2.1, 95 % CI 1.4-3.3; depression: RR 1.5, 95 % CI 1.1-1.8; and suicide attempt: RR 1.8, 95 % CI 1.4-2.3. Similar results were observed for individuals with hypermobility syndrome and their siblings. Individuals with EDS and hypermobility syndrome are at increased risks of being diagnosed with psychiatric disorders. These risk increases may have a genetic and/or early environmental background as suggested by evidence showing that siblings to patients have elevated risks of certain psychiatric disorders.

  2. Juvenile muscular atrophy of the distal upper extremities associated with x-linked periventricular heterotopia with features of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hommel, Alyson L; Jewett, Tamison; Mortenson, Megan; Caress, James B

    2016-10-01

    Juvenile muscular atrophy of the distal upper extremities (JMADUE) is a rare, sporadic disorder that affects adolescent males and is characterized by progressive but self-limited weakness of the distal upper extremities. The etiology is unknown, but cervical hyperflexion has been hypothesized. We report a case of an adolescent male who presented with typical JMADUE but also had joint hypermobility and multiple congenital anomalies, including periventricular heterotopias, suggesting a multisystem syndrome. Subsequent diagnostic testing confirmed a diagnosis of JMADUE, and sequencing of the filamin-A gene showed a novel, pathogenic mutation that confirmed an additional diagnosis of X-linked periventricular heterotopias with features of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (XLPH-EDS). The concurrent diagnosis of these 2 rare conditions suggests a pathogenic connection. It is likely that the joint hypermobility from XLPH-EDS predisposed this patient to developing JMADUE. This supports the cervical hyperflexion theory of pathogenesis. This case also expands the phenotype associated with FLNA mutations. Muscle Nerve 54: 794-797, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Bi-allelic Alterations in AEBP1 Lead to Defective Collagen Assembly and Connective Tissue Structure Resulting in a Variant of Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome

    KAUST Repository

    Blackburn, Patrick R.; Xu, Zhi; Tumelty, Kathleen E.; Zhao, Rose W.; Monis, William J.; Harris, Kimberly G.; Gass, Jennifer M.; Cousin, Margot A.; Boczek, Nicole J.; Mitkov, Mario V.; Cappel, Mark A.; Francomano, Clair A.; Parisi, Joseph E.; Klee, Eric W.; Faqeih, Eissa; Alkuraya, Fowzan S.; Layne, Matthew D.; McDonnell, Nazli B.; Atwal, Paldeep S.

    2018-01-01

    AEBP1 encodes the aortic carboxypeptidase-like protein (ACLP) that associates with collagens in the extracellular matrix (ECM) and has several roles in development, tissue repair, and fibrosis. ACLP is expressed in bone, the vasculature, and dermal tissues and is involved in fibroblast proliferation and mesenchymal stem cell differentiation into collagen-producing cells. Aebp1 mice have abnormal, delayed wound repair correlating with defects in fibroblast proliferation. In this study, we describe four individuals from three unrelated families that presented with a unique constellation of clinical findings including joint laxity, redundant and hyperextensible skin, poor wound healing with abnormal scarring, osteoporosis, and other features reminiscent of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS). Analysis of skin biopsies revealed decreased dermal collagen with abnormal collagen fibrils that were ragged in appearance. Exome sequencing revealed compound heterozygous variants in AEBP1 (c.1470delC [p.Asn490_Met495delins(40)] and c.1743C>A [p.Cys581]) in the first individual, a homozygous variant (c.1320_1326del [p.Arg440Serfs3]) in the second individual, and a homozygous splice site variant (c.1630+1G>A) in two siblings from the third family. We show that ACLP enhances collagen polymerization and binds to several fibrillar collagens via its discoidin domain. These studies support the conclusion that biallelic pathogenic variants in AEBP1 are the cause of this autosomal-recessive EDS subtype.

  4. Bi-allelic Alterations in AEBP1 Lead to Defective Collagen Assembly and Connective Tissue Structure Resulting in a Variant of Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome

    KAUST Repository

    Blackburn, Patrick R.

    2018-03-29

    AEBP1 encodes the aortic carboxypeptidase-like protein (ACLP) that associates with collagens in the extracellular matrix (ECM) and has several roles in development, tissue repair, and fibrosis. ACLP is expressed in bone, the vasculature, and dermal tissues and is involved in fibroblast proliferation and mesenchymal stem cell differentiation into collagen-producing cells. Aebp1 mice have abnormal, delayed wound repair correlating with defects in fibroblast proliferation. In this study, we describe four individuals from three unrelated families that presented with a unique constellation of clinical findings including joint laxity, redundant and hyperextensible skin, poor wound healing with abnormal scarring, osteoporosis, and other features reminiscent of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS). Analysis of skin biopsies revealed decreased dermal collagen with abnormal collagen fibrils that were ragged in appearance. Exome sequencing revealed compound heterozygous variants in AEBP1 (c.1470delC [p.Asn490_Met495delins(40)] and c.1743C>A [p.Cys581]) in the first individual, a homozygous variant (c.1320_1326del [p.Arg440Serfs3]) in the second individual, and a homozygous splice site variant (c.1630+1G>A) in two siblings from the third family. We show that ACLP enhances collagen polymerization and binds to several fibrillar collagens via its discoidin domain. These studies support the conclusion that biallelic pathogenic variants in AEBP1 are the cause of this autosomal-recessive EDS subtype.

  5. Functional digestive symptoms and quality of life in patients with Ehlers-Danlos syndromes: results of a national cohort study on 134 patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-David Zeitoun

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Ehlers-Danlos syndromes (EDS are a heterogeneous group of heritable connective tissue disorders. Gastrointestinal manifestations in EDS have been described but their frequency, nature and impact are poorly known. We aimed to assess digestive features in a national cohort of EDS patients. METHODS: A questionnaire has been sent to 212 EDS patients through the French patient support group, all of which had been formally diagnosed according to the Villefranche criteria. The questionnaire included questions about digestive functional symptoms, the GIQLI (Gastrointestinal Quality of Life Index, KESS scoring system and the Rome III criteria. RESULTS: Overall, 135 patients (64% response rate completed the questionnaire and 134 were analyzable (123 women; 91%. Mean age and Body Mass Index were respectively 35±14.7 years and 24.3±6.1 kg/m(2. The most common EDS subtype was hypermobility form (n=108; 80.6%. GIQLI and KESS median values were respectively 63.5 (27-117 and 19 [13.5-22]. Eighty four percent of patients had functional bowel disorders (FBD according to the Rome III criteria. An irritable bowel syndrome according to the same criteria was observed in 64 patients (48% and 48 patients (36% reported functional constipation. A gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD was reported in 90 patients (68.7%, significantly associated with a poorer GIQLI (60.5±16.8 versus 75.9±20.3; p<0.0001. GIQLI was also negatively impacted by the presence of an irritable bowel syndrome or functional constipation (p=0.007. There was a significant correlation between FBD and GERD. CONCLUSIONS: Natural frequency of gastrointestinal manifestations in EDS seems higher than previously assessed. FBD and GERD are very common in our study population, the largest ever published until now. Their impact is herein shown to be important. A systematic clinical assessment of digestive features should be recommended in EDS.

  6. [Bilateral spontaneous carotid-cavernous fistula revealing Ehler-Danlos disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girardin, M; Puzenat, E; Humbert, P; Aubin, F

    2013-04-01

    A 34-year-old woman with an extensive surgical history developed two spontaneous carotido-cavernous fistula bilaterally. Skin examination revealed an acrogeric form of vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome and this diagnosis was confirmed by genetic analysis. Vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant genetic disease that may be suspected on the grounds of clinical symptoms. Severe complications can occur in early life and are associated with a high mortality rate. The prognosis of vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome has been radically changed by the use of beta-blockers. The originality of our observation lies in the long time to onset of the initial complications in the absence of any problems during the numerous operations undergone by the patient, as well as the two childbirths. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Bi-allelic Alterations in AEBP1 Lead to Defective Collagen Assembly and Connective Tissue Structure Resulting in a Variant of Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackburn, Patrick R; Xu, Zhi; Tumelty, Kathleen E; Zhao, Rose W; Monis, William J; Harris, Kimberly G; Gass, Jennifer M; Cousin, Margot A; Boczek, Nicole J; Mitkov, Mario V; Cappel, Mark A; Francomano, Clair A; Parisi, Joseph E; Klee, Eric W; Faqeih, Eissa; Alkuraya, Fowzan S; Layne, Matthew D; McDonnell, Nazli B; Atwal, Paldeep S

    2018-04-05

    AEBP1 encodes the aortic carboxypeptidase-like protein (ACLP) that associates with collagens in the extracellular matrix (ECM) and has several roles in development, tissue repair, and fibrosis. ACLP is expressed in bone, the vasculature, and dermal tissues and is involved in fibroblast proliferation and mesenchymal stem cell differentiation into collagen-producing cells. Aebp1 -/- mice have abnormal, delayed wound repair correlating with defects in fibroblast proliferation. In this study, we describe four individuals from three unrelated families that presented with a unique constellation of clinical findings including joint laxity, redundant and hyperextensible skin, poor wound healing with abnormal scarring, osteoporosis, and other features reminiscent of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS). Analysis of skin biopsies revealed decreased dermal collagen with abnormal collagen fibrils that were ragged in appearance. Exome sequencing revealed compound heterozygous variants in AEBP1 (c.1470delC [p.Asn490_Met495delins(40)] and c.1743C>A [p.Cys581 ∗ ]) in the first individual, a homozygous variant (c.1320_1326del [p.Arg440Serfs ∗ 3]) in the second individual, and a homozygous splice site variant (c.1630+1G>A) in two siblings from the third family. We show that ACLP enhances collagen polymerization and binds to several fibrillar collagens via its discoidin domain. These studies support the conclusion that bi-allelic pathogenic variants in AEBP1 are the cause of this autosomal-recessive EDS subtype. Copyright © 2018 American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Delineation of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome phenotype due to the c.934C>T, p.(Arg312Cys) mutation in COL1A1: Report on a three-generation family without cardiovascular events, and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombi, Marina; Dordoni, Chiara; Venturini, Marina; Zanca, Arianna; Calzavara-Pinton, Piergiacomo; Ritelli, Marco

    2017-02-01

    Classical Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (cEDS) is a rare connective tissue disorder primarily characterized by hyperextensible skin, defective wound healing, abnormal scars, easy bruising, and generalized joint hypermobility; arterial dissections are rarely observed. Mutations in COL5A1 and COL5A2 encoding type V collagen account for more than 90% of the patients so far characterized. In addition, cEDS phenotype was reported in a small number of patients carrying the c.934C>T mutation in COL1A1 that results in an uncommon substitution of a non-glycine residue in one Gly-Xaa-Yaa repeat of the pro-α1(I)-chain p.(Arg312Cys), which leads to disturbed collagen fibrillogenesis due to delayed removal of the type I procollagen N-propeptide. This specific mutation has been associated with propensity to arterial rupture in early adulthood; indeed, in literature the individuals harboring this mutation are also referred to as "(classic) vascular-like" EDS patients. Herein, we describe a three-generation cEDS family with six adults carrying the p.(Arg312Cys) substitution, which show a variable and prevalent cutaneous involvement without any major vascular event. These data, together with those available in literature, suggest that vascular events are not a diagnostic handle to differentiate patients with the p.(Arg312Cys) COL1A1 mutation from those with COL5A1 and COL5A2 defects, and highlight that during the diagnostic process the presence of at least the p.(Arg312Cys) substitution in COL1A1 should be investigated in cEDS patients without type V collagen mutations. Nevertheless, for these patients, as well as for those affected with cEDS, a periodical vascular surveillance should be carried out together with cardiovascular risk factors monitoring. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Musculocontractural Ehlers-Danlos syndrome and neurocristopathies: dermatan sulfate is required for Xenopus neural crest cells to migrate and adhere to fibronectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouignard, Nadège; Maccarana, Marco; Strate, Ina; von Stedingk, Kristoffer; Malmström, Anders; Pera, Edgar M

    2016-06-01

    Of all live births with congenital anomalies, approximately one-third exhibit deformities of the head and face. Most craniofacial disorders are associated with defects in a migratory stem and progenitor cell population, which is designated the neural crest (NC). Musculocontractural Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (MCEDS) is a heritable connective tissue disorder with distinct craniofacial features; this syndrome comprises multiple congenital malformations that are caused by dysfunction of dermatan sulfate (DS) biosynthetic enzymes, including DS epimerase-1 (DS-epi1; also known as DSE). Studies in mice have extended our understanding of DS-epi1 in connective tissue maintenance; however, its role in fetal development is not understood. We demonstrate that DS-epi1 is important for the generation of isolated iduronic acid residues in chondroitin sulfate (CS)/DS proteoglycans in early Xenopus embryos. The knockdown of DS-epi1 does not affect the formation of early NC progenitors; however, it impairs the correct activation of transcription factors involved in the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and reduces the extent of NC cell migration, which leads to a decrease in NC-derived craniofacial skeleton, melanocytes and dorsal fin structures. Transplantation experiments demonstrate a tissue-autonomous role for DS-epi1 in cranial NC cell migration in vivo Cranial NC explant and single-cell cultures indicate a requirement of DS-epi1 in cell adhesion, spreading and extension of polarized cell processes on fibronectin. Thus, our work indicates a functional link between DS and NC cell migration. We conclude that NC defects in the EMT and cell migration might account for the craniofacial anomalies and other congenital malformations in MCEDS, which might facilitate the diagnosis and development of therapies for this distressing condition. Moreover, the presented correlations between human DS-epi1 expression and gene sets of mesenchymal character, invasion and metastasis in

  10. The Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1974-04-13

    Apr 13, 1974 ... determined disorder of connective tissue. Affected indi- viduals have the unique ... tic events. The lacerations gaped widely, but did not bleed to any extent. Surgical closure was difficult since the sutures tended to tear out of the wound edges and healing was usually slow. During late childhood a blow on his ...

  11. Dermal fibroblast-to-myofibroblast transition sustained by αvß3 integrin-ILK-Snail1/Slug signaling is a common feature for hypermobile Ehlers-Danlos syndrome and hypermobility spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoppi, Nicoletta; Chiarelli, Nicola; Binetti, Silvia; Ritelli, Marco; Colombi, Marina

    2018-04-01

    Hypermobile Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (hEDS) is a heritable connective tissue disorder with unknown molecular basis mainly characterized by generalized joint hypermobility, joint instability complications, and minor skin changes. The phenotypic spectrum is broad and includes multiple associated symptoms shared with chronic inflammatory systemic diseases. The stricter criteria defined in the 2017 EDS nosology leave without an identity many individuals with symptomatic joint hypermobility and/or features of hEDS; for these patients, the term Hypermobility Spectrum Disorders (HSD) was introduced. We previously reported that in vitro cultured hEDS and HSD patients' skin fibroblasts show a disarray of several extracellular matrix (ECM) components and dysregulated expression of genes involved in connective tissue homeostasis and inflammatory/pain/immune responses. Herein, we report that hEDS and HSD skin fibroblasts exhibit in vitro a similar myofibroblast-like phenotype characterized by the organization of α-smooth muscle actin cytoskeleton, expression of OB-cadherin/cadherin-11, enhanced migratory capability associated with augmented levels of the ECM-degrading metalloproteinase-9, and altered expression of the inflammation mediators CCN1/CYR61 and CCN2/CTGF. We demonstrate that in hEDS and HSD cells this fibroblast-to-myofibroblast transition is triggered by a signal transduction pathway that involves αvβ3 integrin-ILK complexes, organized in focal adhesions, and the Snail1/Slug transcription factor, thus providing insights into the molecular mechanisms related to the pathophysiology of these protean disorders. The indistinguishable phenotype identified in hEDS and HSD cells resembles an inflammatory-like condition, which correlates well with the systemic phenotype of patients, and suggests that these multisystemic disorders might be part of a phenotypic continuum rather than representing distinct clinical entities. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Multiple fractures in infants who have Ehlers-Danlos/hypermobility syndrome and or vitamin D deficiency: A case series of 72 infants whose parents were accused of child abuse and neglect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossein-Nezhad, A.; Tabatabaei, F.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To increase the level of awareness that Ehlers-Danlos/hypermobility syndrome (EDS) and vitamin D deficiency are associated with infantile fragility fractures and radiologic features that may be mistakenly reported to be caused by non-accidental trauma due to Child Abuse and Neglect (CAN). Patients and Methods: We constructed a case series, the largest to date, of infants with EDS who were vitamin D sufficient, insufficient and deficient and infants without EDS but with documented vitamin D deficiency and radiologic evidence of rickets who presented with multiple fractures originally diagnosed as being non-accidental and caused by child abuse. These infants were referred to the outpatient Bone Health Care Clinic at Boston University Medical Campus over a 6-year (2010–2015) period. We also present 6 index cases in which the court concluded that there was no convincing evidence of child abuse and the infants were returned to their parents. Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval was obtained. Results: We present 72 cases of infants with multiple fractures diagnosed to be caused by non-accidental trauma. All infants were younger than one year of age. Among them, 93%(67) had clinical evidence of EDS and/or a family history with a confirmed clinical diagnosis of at least one parent having EDS and the other 7%(5) without evidence of EDS had vitamin D deficiency/infantile rickets. Three of the EDS infants were diagnosed as osteogenesis imperfecta (OI)/EDS overlap syndrome. The most common fractures noted at diagnosis were ribs and extremity fractures (including classic metaphyseal lesions). Serum levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] were reported in 48 infants (18.0 ± 8.5 ng/ml) and in 30 mothers (21.3 ± 11.7 ng/ml). Sixty-three percent (27) of the EDS infants who had their serum 25(OH)D measured were vitamin D deficient 25(OH)D30 ng/ml. The mean serum level for infants with vitamin D deficiency/rickets was (10.2 ± 3.0 ng/ml) Conclusion: EDS

  13. Open angle glaucoma in a case of Type IV Ehler Danlos syndrome: A rarely reported association

    OpenAIRE

    Mitra, Arijit; Ramakrishnan, R.; Kader, Mohideen Abdul

    2014-01-01

    A 26-year-old male presented to us with defective vision in the left eye. He had best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) of hand movement (HM) in right eye and 6/9 in left eye. He had ptosis with ectropion in both eyes and relative afferent pupillary defect (RAPD) in right eye. Intraocular pressure (IOP) was 46 and 44 mmHg in right and left eye, respectively. Fundus showed glaucomatous optic atrophy (GOA) in right eye and cup disc ratio (CDR) of 0.75 with bipolar rim thinning in left eye. Systemi...

  14. Clinical Heterogeneity in Patients with the Hypermobility Type of Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Wandele, Inge; Rombaut, Lies; Malfait, Fransiska; De Backer, Tine; De Paepe, Anne; Calders, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    EDS-HT is a connective tissue disorder characterized by large inter-individual differences in the clinical presentation, complicating diagnosis and treatment. We aim to describe the clinical heterogeneity and to investigate whether differences in the symptom profile are also reflected as disparity in functional impairment and pain experience. In…

  15. Síndroma de Ehlers-Danlos – Uma causa rara de pneumotórax espontâneo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Lopes

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Resumo: A síndroma de Ehlers-Danlos (cutis hyperelastica, constitui uma patologia do tecido conjuntivo caracterizada por alterações da pele, ligamentos e órgãos internos.Apresenta transmissão hereditária, em geral autossómica dominante. Afecta primordialmente a síntese do colagéneo, pelo que a pele e os vasos sanguíneos se tornam extremamente elásticos e frágeis. A pele é macia, com consistência de borracha, e as equimoses surgem facilmente. As articulações são hiperextensíveis e têm mobilidade aumentada.Os autores apresentam o caso clínico de um doente de dezasseis anos, com história de hipermobilidade articular desde a infância e fractura esplénica, a quem foi feito o diagnóstico de síndroma de Ehlers-Danlos na sequência de pneumotórax espontâneo recidivante.Apresentam-se as complicações pulmonares mais frequentes desta síndroma e discute-se a importância de não esquecer as etiologias menos comuns, perante casos de pneumotórax espontâneo. Abstract: Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (cutis hyperelastica, is a group of connective tissue disorders characterized by abnormalities of the skin, ligaments and internal organs.It is a hereditary syndrome, usually with autossomal dominant inheritance; that primarily affects the collagen synthesis. The skin and blood vessels are extremely fragile and elastic. The skin is soft with rubber consistency and easily bruising. There are hypermobile joints with increased extensibility.We summarize the case of a sixteen year old boy with a history of joint hypermobility since childhood and splenic fracture that was diagnosed with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome after the occurrence of recidivant spontaneous pneumothorax.We present the most common pulmonary complications of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome and discuss the importance of not forgetting the least commons etiologies of pneumothorax, in cases of spontaneous pneumothorax

  16. Chronic type B aortic dissection in association with Hemolyticuremic syndrome in a child

    OpenAIRE

    Gera, D. N.; Ghuge, P. P.; Gandhi, S.; Vanikar, A. V.; Shrimali, J. D.; Kute, V. B.; Trivedi, H. L.

    2013-01-01

    Aortic dissection (AD) is a potentially life-threatening medical emergency usually encountered in the elderly. Here, we report a 9-year-old child who was incidentally detected to have asymptomatic chronic type B dissecting aneurysm of aorta when he presented with relapse of Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) without any genetic abnormalities like Marfan or Ehler-Danlos syndrome. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of AD associated with HUS in a child without any known associated...

  17. Lack of consensus on tests and criteria for generalized joint hypermobility, Ehlers–Danlos syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Remvig, Lars; Flycht, Lise; Christensen, Karl Bang

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to register clinicians performance and opinion of importance of clinical tests for generalized joint hypermobility (GJH), Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type (EDS-HT) and joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS), and to reach a consensus among clinicians...

  18. Hypermobility syndromes in paediatrics: progressions in assessment and management

    OpenAIRE

    Mooney, Alice Margaret

    2016-01-01

    Joint Hypermobility Syndrome (JHS) and Ehlers Danlos Syndrome-Hypermobility Type (EDS-HM) referred to collectively as Hypermobility Syndromes (HMS), are heritable disorders of connective tissue comprising symptomatic joint hypermobility predisposing to arthralgia, soft-tissue injury and joint instability which if not managed effectively result in ongoing cycles of disability. How HMS affects paediatric patients and how physiotherapists approach the condition in this population ...

  19. Chronic type B aortic dissection in association with Hemolyticuremic syndrome in a child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gera, D N; Ghuge, P P; Gandhi, S; Vanikar, A V; Shrimali, J D; Kute, V B; Trivedi, H L

    2013-11-01

    Aortic dissection (AD) is a potentially life-threatening medical emergency usually encountered in the elderly. Here, we report a 9-year-old child who was incidentally detected to have asymptomatic chronic type B dissecting aneurysm of aorta when he presented with relapse of Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) without any genetic abnormalities like Marfan or Ehler-Danlos syndrome. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of AD associated with HUS in a child without any known associated genetic or inherited risk factors.

  20. Chronic type B aortic dissection in association with Hemolyticuremic syndrome in a child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D N Gera

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aortic dissection (AD is a potentially life-threatening medical emergency usually encountered in the elderly. Here, we report a 9-year-old child who was incidentally detected to have asymptomatic chronic type B dissecting aneurysm of aorta when he presented with relapse of Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS without any genetic abnormalities like Marfan or Ehler-Danlos syndrome. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of AD associated with HUS in a child without any known associated genetic or inherited risk factors.

  1. Decreased expression of lysyl hydroxylase 2 (LH2) in skin fibroblasts from three Ehlers-Danlos patients does not result from mutations in either the coding or proximal promoter region of the LH2 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, L C; Teebi, A S; Marini, J C; De Paepe, A; Malfait, F; Atsawasuwan, P; Yamauchi, M; Yeowell, H N

    2004-12-01

    The Ehlers-Danlos syndromes (EDS) are a heterogeneous group of inherited connective tissue disorders characterized by tissue fragility, hyperelasticity of the skin and joint hypermobility. This phenotype, accompanied by kyphoscoliosis and/or ocular fragility, is present in patients with the autosomal recessive type VI form of EDS. These patients have significantly decreased levels of lysyl hydroxylase (LH) activity, due to mutations in the LH1 gene. LH hydroxylates specific lysine residues in the collagen molecule that are precursors for the formation of cross-links which provide collagen with its tensile strength. No disorder has been directly linked to decreased expression of LH2 and LH3, two other isoforms of LH. This study describes 3 patients with mixed phenotypes of EDS, who have significantly decreased mRNAs for LH2, but normal levels of LH1 and LH3 mRNAs, in their skin fibroblasts. In contrast to the effect of LH1 deficiency in EDS VI patients, the decreased expression of LH2 does not affect LH activity, bifunctional collagen cross-links (measured after reduction as dihydroxylysinonorleucine (DHLNL) and hydroxylysinonorleucine (HLNL)), or helical lysine hydroxylation in these cell lines. Sequence analysis of full length LH2 cDNAs and 1kb of the promoter region of LH2 does not show mutations that could explain the decreased expression of LH2. These results suggest that the deficiency of LH2 in these fibroblasts may be caused by changes in other factors required for the expression of LH2.

  2. Vascular complications (splenic and hepatic artery aneurysms) in the occipital horn syndrome: report of a patient and review of the literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mentzel, H.-J.; Seidel, J.; Vogt, L.; Vogt, S.; Kaiser, W.A.

    1999-01-01

    We report an 18-year-old boy with occipital horn syndrome who developed aneurysms of the splenic and hepatic arteries. Occipital horn syndrome, also called X-linked cutis laxa or Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) type IX, is characterised by a skeletal dysplasia which includes occipital horns, broad clavicles, deformed radii, ulnae and humeri, narrow rib cage, undercalcified long bones and coxa valga. Distinctive features common to all patients are unusual facial appearance, hypermobility of finger joints, limitation of extension of elbows, chronic diarrhoea and genitourinary abnormalities. In this case report we describe the difficulties encountered in the diagnostic management of patients with EDS-related vascular lesions. (orig.)

  3. Síndrome de Ehlers Danlos: ¿subregistro clínico en ortopedia pediátrica?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George N. García Rodríguez

    Full Text Available INTRODUCCIÓN. El comportamiento del síndrome de Ehlers Danlos hizo que se interpretara como un subregistro clínico, poco conocido y con escasas referencias. Esta genodermatosis generalmente está condenada a no tener un tratamiento específico. El objetivo del presente estudio fue, principalmente, describir la morbilidad de este síndrome, desde el punto de vista ortopédico. METÓDOS. Se realizó un estudio descriptivo prospectivo de 5 años, que incluyó a todos los pacientes con síndrome de Ehlers Danlos, atendidos en la consulta de ortopedia y traumatología entre julio de 2001 y julio del 2006, en el Hospital Pediátrico Docente «José Martí» (Sancti Spiritus, Cuba. Se consideró un tiempo mínimo de seguimiento de 6 meses para la validación de los resultados. RESULTADOS. Fueron estudiados 41 pacientes afectos de 72 enfermedades de origen ortopédico. La frecuencia estuvo próxima a 1,7 enfermedades por paciente, con predominio no significativo del sexo femenino (n = 24. Uno de los antecedentes perinatales más importantes fue la presencia de grados diversos de displasia de la cadera. La presencia de otras afecciones no ortopédicas no fue significativa. Los principales hallazgos ortopédicos fueron el pie plano flexible (37, el genus recurvatum (11 y la cifoescoliosis (9. La cirugía estética y la cirugía correctora ortopédica fueron las más utilizadas. CONCLUSIONES. La dispensarización de esta enfermedad y su tratamiento oportuno es un método de control eficaz que ayudaría a evitar la degeneración articular, generalmente antesala de la osteoartrosis.

  4. The osteoporosis pseudoglioma syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swoboda, W.; Grill, F.

    1988-01-01

    Two siblings (male, 29 years, and female, 13 years) with the rare autosomal recessive osteoporosis pseudoglioma syndrome are reported in detail. All essential signs and symptoms of the full clinical picture were present and are documented by impressive X-ray pictures. Some aspects of our patients are compared with relevant findings of previous reports. Collagen studies (skin biopsies) failed to reveal any significant disorder of the main collagen types composition. Striking similarities with established genetic disorders of collagen (like the osteogenesis imperfecta group and the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome) suggest, however, that the OPS could be a primary collagen disorder. Genetic counselling and devoted socio-medical care for these handicapped children is presently the only help which can be offered. (orig.)

  5. Establishment and baseline characteristics of a nationwide Danish cohort of patients with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kulas Søborg, Marie-Louise; Leganger, Julie; Quitzau Mortensen, Laura

    2017-01-01

    at any given time between 1 January 2000 and 31 December 2012, based upon longitudinal Danish national registers. All patients with EDS were identified, and the cohort was described by disease prevalence, basic demographic characteristics, mean age at death and mortality for the observational period...

  6. A novel truncating mutation in FLNA causes periventricular nodular heterotopia, Ehlers-Danlos-like collagenopathy and macrothrombocytopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ieda, Daisuke; Hori, Ikumi; Nakamura, Yuji; Ohshita, Hironori; Negishi, Yutaka; Shinohara, Tsutomu; Hattori, Ayako; Kato, Takenori; Inukai, Sachiko; Kitamura, Katsumasa; Kawai, Tomoki; Ohara, Osamu; Kunishima, Shinji; Saitoh, Shinji

    2018-06-01

    Filamin A (FLNA) is located in Xq28, and encodes the actin binding protein, filamin A. A mutation in FLNA is the most common cause of periventricular nodular heterotopia (PVNH), but a clear phenotype-genotype correlation has not been established. Indeed, some patients with a FLNA mutation have recently been shown to additionally have Ehlers-Danlos-like collagenopathy or macrothrombocytopenia. In an attempt to establish a clearer correlation between clinical symptoms and genotype, we have investigated a phenotype that involves thrombocytopenia in a patient with a truncation of the FLNA gene. We present the case of a 4-year-old girl who, at birth, showed a ventral hernia. At 2 months of age, she was diagnosed with patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) and aortic valve regurgitation. At 11 months, she underwent ligation of the PDA. She was also diagnosed with diaphragmatic eventration by a preoperative test. At 19 months, motor developmental delay was noted, and brain MRI revealed bilateral PVNH with mega cisterna magna. Presently, there is no evidence of epilepsy, intellectual disability or motor developmental delay. She has chronic, mild thrombocytopenia, and a platelet count that transiently decreases after viral infection. Dilation of the ascending aorta is progressing gradually. Genetic testing revealed a de novo nonsense heterozygous mutation in FLNA (NM_001456.3: c.1621G > T; p.Glu541Ter). Immunofluorescence staining of a peripheral blood smear showed a lack of filamin A expression in 21.1% of her platelets. These filamin A-negative platelets were slightly larger than her normal platelets. Our data suggests immunofluorescence staining of peripheral blood smears is a convenient diagnostic approach to identify patients with a FLNA mutation, which will facilitate further investigation of the correlation between FLNA mutations and patient phenotype. Copyright © 2018 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Osteoporosis pseudoglioma syndrome. Update and report on two affected siblings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swoboda, W.; Grill, F.

    1988-07-01

    Two siblings (male, 29 years, and female, 13 years) with the rare autosomal recessive osteoporosis pseudoglioma syndrome are reported in detail. All essential signs and symptoms of the full clinical picture were present and are documented by impressive X-ray pictures. Some aspects of our patients are compared with relevant findings of previous reports. Collagen studies (skin biopsies) failed to reveal any significant disorder of the main collagen types composition. Striking similarities with established genetic disorders of collagen (like the osteogenesis imperfecta group and the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome) suggest, however, that the OPS could be a primary collagen disorder. Genetic counselling and devoted socio-medical care for these handicapped children is presently the only help which can be offered.

  8. Cardiopatía valvular en fase dilatada en paciente con Síndrome de Ehlers-Danlos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belkis J. Menoni-Blanco

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available El Síndrome de Ehlers-Danlos (SED es una alteración hereditaria del tejido conjuntivo, presentada en 1 de 5000 nacidos. Las principales alteraciones cardiovasculares descritas son insuficiencia de la válvula mitral y debilidad de vasos sanguíneos de gran calibre. En este reporte se presenta paciente de 25 años de edad, con diagnósticos de SED e insuficiencia mitral desde 2007, asociado con patrón de disnea a moderados esfuerzos (Clase funcional II. En mayo de 2009 consulta por presentar cambio en el patrón de disnea por lo que es ingresada al Servicio de Cardiología del Hospital Universitario de Caracas con los diagnósticos de SDE y cardiopatía dilatada con insuficiencia mitral severa e insuficiencia tricuspídea moderada en insuficiencia cardíaca clase funcional IV. En el examen físico se evidencia pulso venoso yugular con onda v sistólica a +5cm, pulso carotídeo parvus y céler, latido sistólico, ápex hiperquinético, ruidos rítmicos y regulares, soplo holosistólico mitral 2/4 y soplo holosistólico tricuspídeo 2/4, modificable con la inspiración. El tratamiento planteado es reemplazo valvular mitral para mejorar la sintomatología. La complicación valvular en este síndrome es poco frecuente, siendo resaltante en el caso, la alteración de dos válvulas cardíacas y además, la presencia de un evento tromboembólico de origen cardiogénico hacia sistema nervioso central como antecedente. La valoración de esta paciente permite la identificación de elementos particulares de su patología, que pueden ser descritos como factores de riesgo en la evolución hacia una cardiopatía avanzada.

  9. Vascular complications (splenic and hepatic artery aneurysms) in the occipital horn syndrome: report of a patient and review of the literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mentzel, H.-J. [Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University of Jena (Germany)]|[Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Bachstrasse 18, D-07 740 Jena (Germany); Seidel, J.; Vogt, L. [Department of Paediatrics, University of Jena, Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena, Jena/Thueringen (Germany); Vogt, S.; Kaiser, W.A. [Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University of Jena (Germany)

    1999-01-01

    We report an 18-year-old boy with occipital horn syndrome who developed aneurysms of the splenic and hepatic arteries. Occipital horn syndrome, also called X-linked cutis laxa or Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) type IX, is characterised by a skeletal dysplasia which includes occipital horns, broad clavicles, deformed radii, ulnae and humeri, narrow rib cage, undercalcified long bones and coxa valga. Distinctive features common to all patients are unusual facial appearance, hypermobility of finger joints, limitation of extension of elbows, chronic diarrhoea and genitourinary abnormalities. In this case report we describe the difficulties encountered in the diagnostic management of patients with EDS-related vascular lesions. (orig.) With 5 figs., 2 tabs., 12 refs.

  10. Syndromes with supernumerary teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubinsky, Mark; Kantaputra, Piranit Nik

    2016-10-01

    While most supernumerary teeth are idiopathic, they can be associated with a number of Mendelian syndromes. However, this can also be a coincidental finding, since supernumerary teeth occur in 6% or more of the normal population. To better define this relationship, we analyzed the evidence for specific associations. We excluded conditions with a single affected patient reported, supernumerary teeth adjacent to clefts or other forms of alveolar disruption (as secondary rather than primary findings), and natal teeth, which can involve premature eruption of a normal tooth. Since, the cause of supernumerary teeth shows considerable heterogeneity, certain findings are less likely to be coincidental, such as five or more supernumerary teeth in a single patient, or locations outside of the premaxilla. We found only eight genetic syndromes with strong evidence for an association: cleidocranial dysplasia; familial adenomatous polyposis; trichorhinophalangeal syndrome, type I; Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome; Nance-Horan syndrome; Opitz BBB/G syndrome; oculofaciocardiodental syndrome; and autosomal dominant Robinow syndrome. There is also suggestive evidence of an association with two uncommon disorders, Kreiborg-Pakistani syndrome (craniosynostosis and dental anomalies), and insulin-resistant diabetes mellitus with acanthosisnigricans. An association of a Mendelian disorder with a low frequency manifestation of supernumerary teeth is difficult to exclude without large numbers, but several commonly cited syndromes lacked evidence for clear association, including Hallermann-Streiff syndrome, Fabry disease, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, Apert and Crouzon syndromes, Zimmermann-Laband syndrome, and Ellis-van Creveld syndrome. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. [The genetics of collagen diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, J; Maroteaux, P; Frezal, J

    1986-01-01

    Heritable disorders of collagen include Ehler-Danlos syndromes (11 types are actually known), Larsen syndrome and osteogenesis imperfecta. Their clinical, genetic and biochemical features are reviewed. Marfan syndrome is closely related to heritable disorders of collagen.

  12. AORTIC ANEURYSM: A RARE CAUSE OF ORTNER’S SYNDROME

    OpenAIRE

    Sukanta; Biswal Pradipta; Swetapadma; Jyoti; Manoranjan

    2014-01-01

    A 60 year old male patient presented with hoarseness of voice lasting for 2 months. First he was examined by the otorhinolaryngologist of our hospital, who noticed absence of movements of the left vocal cord. Chest X-ray showed a large opacity in the left upper zone and the patient was referred to the pulmonologist. His general physical examination was unremarkable not having any stigmata of Marfan's or Ehler Danlos syndrome. On chest auscultation, a systolic flow murmur was ...

  13. Repair of an aneurysm of the ascending aorta and arch in an infant with Loeys-Dietz syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaiswal, Pratiksha; Shetty, Varun; Patel, Ebrahim; Shetty, Deviprasad

    2018-05-01

    Aortic aneurysms in childhood are rare disease entities and are usually seen in patients with genetic connective tissue disorders such as Marfans, Ehler-Danlos, and Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS). Patients affected with LDS present early in life and have a rapid disease progression. We report a case of repair of an ascending and aortic arch aneurysm in an infant with Loeys-Dietz syndrome. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Increased Need for Gastrointestinal Surgery and Increased Risk of Surgery-Related Complications in Patients with Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kulas Søborg, Marie-Louise; Leganger, Julie; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2017-01-01

    . The purpose of this systematic review was to assess the causes of GI-related surgery and related mortality and morbidity in patients with EDSs. METHODS: A systematic search was conducted in PubMed, Embase, and Scopus to identify relevant studies. Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta...

  15. High Prevalence of Hypermobility and Benign Joint Hypermobility Syndrome (BJHS) in Oman

    OpenAIRE

    Clark, Carol J.; Simmonds, Jane V.

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE: To ascertain the prevalence of hypermobility and BJHS in a female patient population with musculoskeletal pain and compare the associated features with a pain free control group. RELEVANCE: Hypermobility is linked with increased musculoskeletal signs and symptoms. The existence of hypermobility with pain may indicate the presence of BJHS, which is a heritable connective tissue disorder synonymous with Ehlers-Danlos type III. Hypermobility is known to be race dependant with Asians and...

  16. Loeys-Dietz syndrome type I and type II: clinical findings and novel mutations in two Italian patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calzavara-Pinton Pier

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS is a rare autosomal dominant disorder showing the involvement of cutaneous, cardiovascular, craniofacial, and skeletal systems. In particular, LDS patients show arterial tortuosity with widespread vascular aneurysm and dissection, and have a high risk of aortic dissection or rupture at an early age and at aortic diameters that ordinarily are not predictive of these events. Recently, LDS has been subdivided in LDS type I (LDSI and type II (LDSII on the basis of the presence or the absence of cranio-facial involvement, respectively. Furthermore, LDSII patients display at least two of the major signs of vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. LDS is caused by mutations in the transforming growth factor (TGF beta-receptor I (TGFBR1 and II (TGFBR2 genes. The aim of this study was the clinical and molecular characterization of two LDS patients. Methods The exons and intronic flanking regions of TGFBR1 and TGFBR2 genes were amplified and sequence analysis was performed. Results Patient 1 was a boy showing dysmorphic signs, blue sclerae, high-arched palate, bifid uvula; skeletal system involvement, joint hypermobility, velvety and translucent skin, aortic root dilatation, tortuosity and elongation of the carotid arteries. These signs are consistent with an LDSI phenotype. The sequencing analysis disclosed the novel TGFBR1 p.Asp351Gly de novo mutation falling in the kinase domain of the receptor. Patient 2 was an adult woman showing ascending aorta aneurysm, with vascular complications following surgery intervention. Velvety and translucent skin, venous varicosities and wrist dislocation were present. These signs are consistent with an LDSII phenotype. In this patient and in her daughter, TGFBR2 genotyping disclosed in the kinase domain of the protein the novel p.Ile510Ser missense mutation. Conclusion We report two novel mutations in the TGFBR1 and TGFBR2 genes in two patients affected with LDS and showing marked

  17. Preterm labor and premature birth: Are you at risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and premature birth, including: Connective tissue disorders, like Ehlers-Danlos syndromes (also called EDS) and vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (also called vEDS). Connective tissue is tissue that ...

  18. Hyperelastic skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is most often seen in people who have Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. People with this disorder have very elastic skin. ... any member of your family been diagnosed with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome? What other symptoms are present? Genetic counseling may ...

  19. Skin turgor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are: Connective tissue disorders such as scleroderma and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome These connective tissue disorders do not have to ... ed. Elsevier Mosby; 2015:chap 8. Ferri FF. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. In: Ferri FF, ed. Ferri's Clinical Advisor 2016 . ...

  20. Putting a Face on Rare Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... who have a rare and potentially dangerous disease, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Photo Courtesy of: Patricia Weltin That has been ... daughters with a rare and potentially dangerous disease, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS), a connective tissue disorder causing joint dislocations, ...

  1. Thoracic aortic aneurysm

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... age Connective tissue disorders such as Marfan or Ehlers-Danlos syndrome Inflammation of the aorta Injury from falls or ... of connective tissue disorders (such as Marfan or Ehlers-Danlos syndrome) Chest or back discomfort Prevention To prevent atherosclerosis: ...

  2. Tissue-specific mosaicism for a lethal osteogenesis imperfecta COL1A1 mutation causes mild OI/EDS overlap syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symoens, Sofie; Steyaert, Wouter; Demuynck, Lynn; De Paepe, Anne; Diderich, Karin E M; Malfait, Fransiska; Coucke, Paul J

    2017-04-01

    Type I collagen is the predominant protein of connective tissues such as skin and bone. Mutations in the type I collagen genes (COL1A1 and COL1A2) mainly cause osteogenesis imperfecta (OI). We describe a patient with clinical signs of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS), including fragile skin, easy bruising, recurrent luxations, and fractures resembling mild OI. Biochemical collagen analysis of the patients' dermal fibroblasts showed faint overmodification of the type I collagen bands, a finding specific for structural defects in type I collagen. Bidirectional Sanger sequencing detected an in-frame deletion in exon 44 of COL1A1 (c.3150_3158del), resulting in the deletion of three amino acids (p.Ala1053_Gly1055del) in the collagen triple helix. This COL1A1 mutation was hitherto identified in four probands with lethal OI, and never in EDS patients. As the peaks on the electropherogram corresponding to the mutant allele were decreased in intensity, we performed next generation sequencing of COL1A1 to study mosaicism in skin and blood. While approximately 9% of the reads originating from fibroblast gDNA harbored the COL1A1 deletion, the deletion was not detected in gDNA from blood. Most likely, the mild clinical symptoms observed in our patient can be explained by the mosaic state of the mutation. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Connective Tissue Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of connective tissue. Over 200 disorders that impact connective tissue. There are different types: Genetic disorders, such as Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, Marfan syndrome, and osteogenesis imperfecta Autoimmune disorders, such as lupus and scleroderma Cancers, like some types of soft tissue sarcoma Each ...

  4. The neuromuscular differential diagnosis of joint hypermobility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donkervoort, S.; Bonnemann, C.G.; Loeys, B.L.; Jungbluth, H.; Voermans, N.C.

    2015-01-01

    Joint hypermobility is the defining feature of various inherited connective tissue disorders such as Marfan syndrome and various types of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome and these will generally be the first conditions to be considered by geneticists and pediatricians in the differential diagnosis of a

  5. Intraabdominal Hemorrhage Due to Spontaneous Rupture of Superior Mesenteric Artery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onder Ozden

    2014-04-01

    Ehlers Danlos Syndrome Type IV should be kept in mind in cases of abdominal apoplexy. Repair of vascular complications could be impossible due to abnormal type III collagen leaded vascular fragility. [Cukurova Med J 2014; 39(2.000: 408-411

  6. MULTIMODAL IMAGING OF ANGIOID STREAKS ASSOCIATED WITH TURNER SYNDROME.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Bing Q; Tsui, Edmund; Hussnain, Syed Amal; Barbazetto, Irene A; Smith, R Theodore

    2018-02-13

    To report multimodal imaging in a novel case of angioid streaks in a patient with Turner syndrome with 10-year follow-up. Case report of a patient with Turner syndrome and angioid streaks followed at Bellevue Hospital Eye Clinic from 2007 to 2017. Fundus photography, fluorescein angiography, and optical coherence tomography angiography were obtained. Angioid streaks with choroidal neovascularization were noted in this patient with Turner syndrome without other systemic conditions previously correlated with angioid streaks. We report a case of angioid streaks with choroidal neovascularization in a patient with Turner syndrome. We demonstrate that angioid streaks, previously associated with pseudoxanthoma elasticum, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, Paget disease of bone, and hemoglobinopathies, may also be associated with Turner syndrome, and may continue to develop choroidal neovascularization, suggesting the need for careful ophthalmic examination in these patients.

  7. Disease: H00802 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available (EDS7A/7B); EDS dermatospraxis type (EDS7C); EDS autosomal recessive cardiac valvular form (EDSCV); EDS musculocontract...have been identified with molecular and biochemical abnormalities: cardiac valvular form, musculocontractura...moto N ... TITLE ... A new Ehlers-Danlos syndrome with craniofacial characteristics, multiple congenital contract

  8. Aortic Disease in the Young: Genetic Aneurysm Syndromes, Connective Tissue Disorders, and Familial Aortic Aneurysms and Dissections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Cury

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available There are many genetic syndromes associated with the aortic aneurysmal disease which include Marfan syndrome (MFS, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS, Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS, familial thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections (TAAD, bicuspid aortic valve disease (BAV, and autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD. In the absence of familial history and other clinical findings, the proportion of thoracic and abdominal aortic aneurysms and dissections resulting from a genetic predisposition is still unknown. In this study, we propose the review of the current genetic knowledge in the aortic disease, observing, in the results that the causative genes and molecular pathways involved in the pathophysiology of aortic aneurysm disease remain undiscovered and continue to be an area of intensive research.

  9. Linkage mapping of the gene for Type III collagen (COL3A1) to human chromosome 2q using a VNTR polymorphism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiller, G.E.; Polumbo, P.A.; Summar, M.L. (Vanderbilt Univ. Medical Center, Nashville, TN (United States))

    1994-03-15

    The gene for the [alpha]1(III) chain of type III collagen, COL3A1, has been previously mapped to human chromosome 2q24.3-q31 by in situ hybridization. Physical mapping by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis has demonstrated that COL3A1 lies within 35 kb of COL5A2. The authors genotyped the CEPH families at the COL3A2 locus using a pentanucleotide repeat polymorphism within intron 25. They demonstrated significant linkage to 18 anonymous markers as well as the gene for carbamyl phosphate synthetase (CPSI), which had been previously mapped to this region. No recombination was seen between COL3A1 and COL5A2 (Z = 9.93 at [theta] = 0) or D2S24 (Z = 10.55 at [theta] = 0). The locus order is (D2S32-D2S138-D2S148)-(D2S24-COL5A2-COL3A1)-(D2S118-D2S161), with odds of 1:2300 for the next most likely order. These relationships are consistent with the physical mapping of COL3A1 to the distal portion of 2q and place it proximal to CPSI by means of multipoint analysis. These linkage relationships should prove useful in further studies of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV and carbamyl phosphate synthetase I deficiency and provide an additional framework for localizing other genes in this region. 13 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Aortic dissection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Connective tissue disorders (such as Marfan syndrome and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome) and rare genetic disorders Heart surgery or procedures ... If you have been diagnosed with Marfan or Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, making sure you regularly follow-up with your ...

  11. Longitudinal Changes in Segmental Aortic Stiffness Determined by Cardiac Magnetic Resonance in Children and Young Adults With Connective Tissue Disorders (the Marfan, Loeys-Dietz, and Ehlers-Danlos Syndromes, and Nonspecific Connective Tissue Disorders).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlocco, Anthony; Lacro, Ronald V; Gauvreau, Kimberlee; Rabideau, Nicole; Singh, Michael N; Prakash, Ashwin

    2017-10-01

    Aortic stiffness measured by cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) in connective tissue disorder (CTD) patients has been previously shown to be abnormal and to be associated with adverse aortic outcomes. The rate of increase in aortic stiffness with normal aging has been previously described. However, longitudinal changes in aortic stiffness have not been characterized in CTD patients. We examined longitudinal changes in CMR-derived aortic stiffness in children and young adults with CTDs. A retrospective analysis of 50 children and young adults (median age, 20 years; range, 0.2 to 49; 40% age, whereas the β stiffness index increased at all aortic segments. The average rates of decline in distensibility (x10 -3  mm Hg -1 per 10-year increase in age) were 0.7, 1.3, and 1 at the AoR, ascending aorta, and descending aorta, respectively. The rates of decline in distensibility were not associated with the rates of AoR dilation or surgical AoR replacement. In conclusion, on serial CMR measurements in children and young adults with CTDs, aortic stiffness progressively increased with age, with rates of change only slightly higher than those previously reported in healthy adults. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Williams-Beuren's Syndrome: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, Hassan; Babazadeh, Kazem; Fattahi, Saeid; Mokhtari-Esbuie, Farzad

    2012-01-01

    Williams-Beuren syndrome is a rare familial multisystem disorder occurring in 1 per 20,000 live births. It is characterized by congenital heart defects (CHD), skeletal and renal anomalies, cognitive disorder, social personality disorder and dysmorphic facies. We present a case of Williams syndrome that presented to us with heart murmur and cognitive problem. A 5-year-old girl referred to pediatric cardiologist because of heart murmurs. She had a systolic murmur (2-3/6) in right upper sternal border with radiation to right cervical region. She also had a bulge forehead. Angiography showed mild supra valvular aortic stenosis and mild multiple peripheral pulmonary stenosis. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) was performed and the result was: 46.XX, ish del (7q11.2) (ELN X1) (7q22 X2) ELN deletion compatible with Williams syndrome. Peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis is associated with Noonan syndrome, Alagille syndrome, Cutis laxa, Ehler-Danlos syndrome, and Silver-Russel syndrome. The patient had peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis, but no other signs of these syndromes were present, and also she had a supravalvular aortic stenosis which was not seen in other syndromes except Williams syndrome. Conclusion. According to primary symptoms, paraclinical and clinical finding such as dysmorphic facies, cognitive disorder and congenital heart defect, Williams syndrome was the first diagnosis. We suggest a more attention for evaluating heart murmur in childhood period, especially when the patient has abnormal facial features or mental problem.

  13. Williams-Beuren's Syndrome: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Zamani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Williams-Beuren syndrome is a rare familial multisystem disorder occurring in 1 per 20,000 live births. It is characterized by congenital heart defects (CHD, skeletal and renal anomalies, cognitive disorder, social personality disorder and dysmorphic facies. We present a case of Williams syndrome that presented to us with heart murmur and cognitive problem. A 5-year-old girl referred to pediatric cardiologist because of heart murmurs. She had a systolic murmur (2-3/6 in right upper sternal border with radiation to right cervical region. She also had a bulge forehead. Angiography showed mild supra valvular aortic stenosis and mild multiple peripheral pulmonary stenosis. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH was performed and the result was: 46.XX, ish del (7q11.2 (ELN X1 (7q22 X2 ELN deletion compatible with Williams syndrome. Peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis is associated with Noonan syndrome, Alagille syndrome, Cutis laxa, Ehler-Danlos syndrome, and Silver-Russel syndrome. The patient had peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis, but no other signs of these syndromes were present, and also she had a supravalvular aortic stenosis which was not seen in other syndromes except Williams syndrome. Conclusion. According to primary symptoms, paraclinical and clinical finding such as dysmorphic facies, cognitive disorder and congenital heart defect, Williams syndrome was the first diagnosis. We suggest a more attention for evaluating heart murmur in childhood period, especially when the patient has abnormal facial features or mental problem.

  14. The neuromuscular differential diagnosis of joint hypermobility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donkervoort, S; Bonnemann, C G; Loeys, B; Jungbluth, H; Voermans, N C

    2015-03-01

    Joint hypermobility is the defining feature of various inherited connective tissue disorders such as Marfan syndrome and various types of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome and these will generally be the first conditions to be considered by geneticists and pediatricians in the differential diagnosis of a patient presenting with such findings. However, several congenital and adult-onset inherited myopathies also present with joint hypermobility in the context of often only mild-to-moderate muscle weakness and should, therefore, be included in the differential diagnosis of joint hypermobility. In fact, on the molecular level disorders within both groups represent different ends of the same spectrum of inherited extracellular matrix (ECM) disorders. In this review we will summarize the measures of joint hypermobility, illustrate molecular mechanisms these groups of disorders have in common, and subsequently discuss the clinical features of: 1) the most common connective tissue disorders with myopathic or other neuromuscular features: Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, Marfan syndrome and Loeys-Dietz syndrome; 2) myopathy and connective tissue overlap disorders (muscle extracellular matrix (ECM) disorders), including collagen VI related dystrophies and FKBP14 related kyphoscoliotic type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome; and 3) various (congenital) myopathies with prominent joint hypermobility including RYR1- and SEPN1-related myopathy. The aim of this review is to assist clinical geneticists and other clinicians with recognition of these disorders. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Peroneal Arteriovenous Fistula and Pseudoaneurysm: An Unusual Presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin C. Ching

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Peroneal artery arteriovenous fistulas and pseudoaneurysms are extremely rare with the majority of reported cases due to penetrating, orthopedic, or iatrogenic trauma. Failure to diagnose this unusual vascular pathology may lead to massive hemorrhage or limb threatening ischemia. We report an interesting case of a 14-year-old male who presented with acute musculoskeletal pain of his lower extremity. Initial radiographs were negative. Further imaging workup revealed a peroneal arteriovenous fistula with a large pseudoaneurysm. After initial endovascular intervention was unsuccessful, the vessels were surgically ligated in the operating room. Pathology revealed papillary endothelial hyperplasia consistent with an aneurysm and later genetic testing was consistent with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome Type IV. This case illustrates an unusual cause of acute atraumatic musculoskeletal pain and uncommon presentation of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

  16. A Retrospective 2D Morphometric Analysis of Adult Female Chiari Type I Patients with Commonly Reported and Related Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maggie S. Eppelheimer

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Researchers have sought to better understand Chiari type I malformation (CMI through morphometric measurements beyond tonsillar position (TP. Soft tissue and bone structures within the brain and craniocervical junction have been shown to be different for CMI patients compared to healthy controls. Yet, several morphological characteristics have not been consistently associated with CMI. CMI is also associated with different prevalent conditions (PCs such as syringomyelia, pseudotumor, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS, scoliosis, and craniocervical instability. The goal of this study was two-fold: (1 to identify unique morphological characteristics of PCs, and (2 to better explain inconsistent results from case-control comparisons of CMI.Methods: Image, demographic, and PC information was obtained through the Chiari1000, a self-report web-accessed database. Twenty-eight morphometric measurements (MMs were performed on the cranial MR images of 236 pre-surgery adult female CMI participants and 140 female healthy control participants. Custom software was used to measure 28 structures within the posterior cranial fossa (PCF compartment, craniocervical junction, oral cavity, and intracranial area on midsagittal MR images for each participant.Results: Morphometric analysis of adult females indicated a smaller McRae line length in CMI participants with syringomyelia compared to those without syringomyelia. TP was reduced in CMI participants with EDS than those without EDS. Basion to posterior axial line was significantly longer in CMI participants with scoliosis compared to those without scoliosis. No additional MMs were found to differ between CMI participants with and without a specific PC. Four morphometric differences were found to be consistently different between CMI participants and healthy controls regardless of PC: larger TP and a smaller clivus length, fastigium, and corpus callosum height in CMI participants.Conclusion: Syringomyelia, EDS

  17. Diagnosis of Van den Ende-Gupta syndrome: Approach to the Marden-Walker-like spectrum of disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niederhoffer, Karen Y; Fahiminiya, Somayyeh; Eydoux, Patrice; Mawson, John; Nishimura, Gen; Jerome-Majewska, Loydie A; Patel, Millan S

    2016-09-01

    Marden-Walker syndrome is challenging to diagnose, as there is significant overlap with other multi-system congenital contracture syndromes including Beals congenital contractural arachnodactyly, D4ST1-Deficient Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (adducted thumb-clubfoot syndrome), Schwartz-Jampel syndrome, Freeman-Sheldon syndrome, Cerebro-oculo-facio-skeletal syndrome, and Van den Ende-Gupta syndrome. We discuss this differential diagnosis in the context of a boy from a consanguineous union with Van den Ende-Gupta syndrome, a diagnosis initially confused by the atypical presence of intellectual disability. SNP microarray and whole exome sequencing identified a homozygous frameshift mutation (p.L870V) in SCARF2 and predicted damaging mutations in several genes, most notably DGCR2 (p.P75L) and NCAM2 (p.S147G), both possible candidates for this child's intellectual disability. We review distinguishing features for each Marden-Walker-like syndrome and propose a clinical algorithm for diagnosis among this spectrum of disorders. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Hernier som medicinsk sygdom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, J.; Rosenberg, J.

    2008-01-01

    include patients with Ehlers-Danlos, Marfans syndrome, osteogenesis imperfecta, cutis laxa, and patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms, colonic diverticula or stress urinary incontinence. Looking ahead, the perspective may be individualization of the operative technique for patients with a hernia...

  19. Compound heterozygous mutations of the TNXB gene cause primary myopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Penisson-Besnier, I.; Allamand, V.; Beurrier, P.; Martin, L.; Schalkwijk, J.; Vlijmen-Willems, I. van; Gartioux, C.; Malfait, F.; Syx, D.; Macchi, L.; Marcorelles, P.; Arbeille, B.; Croue, A.; Paepe, A. de; Dubas, F.

    2013-01-01

    Complete deficiency of the extracellular matrix glycoprotein tenascin-X (TNX) leads to recessive forms of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, clinically characterized by hyperextensible skin, easy bruising and joint hypermobility. Clinical and pathological studies, immunoassay, and molecular analyses were

  20. Pigment dispersion syndrome associated with spontaneous subluxation of crystalline lens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikas Veerwal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Pigment dispersion syndrome (PDS is an ocular condition characterized by a dispersion of iris pigment throughout the eye. This pigment is deposited in a characteristic manner on the corneal endothelium as Krukenberg's spindle, anterior surface of the iris, in the trabecular meshwork, on the lens and zonule and occasionally on the anterior hyaloid face. Even with deposition of pigment on zonular fibers, no zonular weakness, or zonular dehiscence has been reported in these cases. We report a unique case of PDS with bilateral spontaneous subluxation of crystalline lens. With characteristic findings of pigment distribution in both his eyes, the patient had concave iris configuration with heavily pigmented trabecular meshwork confirming the diagnosis of PDS. The patient had bilateral 180° temporal subluxation of crystalline lens in both his eyes. The usual cause of lens subluxation such as Marfan's Syndrome and Ehler's Danlos Syndrome was ruled out. The patient underwent right eye followed by left eye intracapsular cataract extraction with ab-interno technique with postoperative best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA of 6/9 in both eyes. Spontaneous subluxation of crystalline lens in isolated PDS is not known to occur and has been reported by means of this case. We recommend a thorough assessment of zonular status in all cases of PDS.

  1. Pigment dispersion syndrome associated with spontaneous subluxation of crystalline lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veerwal, Vikas; Goyal, Jawahar Lal; Jain, Parul; Arora, Ritu

    2017-01-01

    Pigment dispersion syndrome (PDS) is an ocular condition characterized by a dispersion of iris pigment throughout the eye. This pigment is deposited in a characteristic manner on the corneal endothelium as Krukenberg's spindle, anterior surface of the iris, in the trabecular meshwork, on the lens and zonule and occasionally on the anterior hyaloid face. Even with deposition of pigment on zonular fibers, no zonular weakness, or zonular dehiscence has been reported in these cases. We report a unique case of PDS with bilateral spontaneous subluxation of crystalline lens. With characteristic findings of pigment distribution in both his eyes, the patient had concave iris configuration with heavily pigmented trabecular meshwork confirming the diagnosis of PDS. The patient had bilateral 180° temporal subluxation of crystalline lens in both his eyes. The usual cause of lens subluxation such as Marfan's Syndrome and Ehler's Danlos Syndrome was ruled out. The patient underwent right eye followed by left eye intracapsular cataract extraction with ab-interno technique with postoperative best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) of 6/9 in both eyes. Spontaneous subluxation of crystalline lens in isolated PDS is not known to occur and has been reported by means of this case. We recommend a thorough assessment of zonular status in all cases of PDS.

  2. Fibrillin abnormalities and prognosis in Marfan syndrome and related disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoyama, T.; Furthmayr, H.; Francke, U.; Gasner, C. [Stanford Univ. Medical Center, CA (United States)

    1995-08-28

    Marfan syndrome (MFS), a multisystem autosomal-dominant disorder, is characterized by mutations of the fibrillin-1 (FBN1) gene and by abnormal patterns of synthesis, secretion, and matrix deposition of the fibrillin protein. To determine the sensitivity and specificity of fibrillin protein abnormalities in the diagnosis of MFS, we studied dermal fibroblasts from 57 patients with classical MFS, 15 with equivocal MFS, 8 with single-organ manifestations, and 16 with other connective tissue disorders including homocystinuria and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Abnormal fibrillin metabolism was identified in 70 samples that were classified into four different groups based on quantitation of fibrillin synthesis and matrix deposition. Significant correlations were found for phenotypic features including arachnodactyly, striae distensae, cardiovascular manifestations, and fibrillin groups II and IV, which included 70% of the MFS patients. In addition, these two groups were associated with shortened {open_quotes}event-free{close_quotes} survival and more severe cardiovascular complications than groups I and III. The latter included most of the equivocal MFS/single manifestation patients with fibrillin abnormalities. Our results indicate that fibrillin defects at the protein level per se are not specific for MFS, but that the drastically reduced fibrillin deposition, caused by a dominant-negative effect of abnormal fibrillin molecules in individuals defined as groups II and IV, is of prognostic and possibly diagnostic significance. 25 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

  3. Widening of the spinal canal and dural ectasia in Marfan's syndrome: assessment by CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villeirs, G.M.; Verstraete, K.L.; Kunnen, M.F.; Tongerloo, A.J. van; Paepe, A.M. de

    1999-01-01

    We describe a method for diagnosing dural ectasia (DE) and spinal canal widening (SCW) using CT. We examined 23 patients with Marfan's syndrome (MFS), 17 with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) and 29 normal subjects, using six axial slices at the level of the L1-S1 pedicles. Transverse diameters of the vertebral bodies, spinal canal and dural sac were measured and indices were defined to differentiate patients with DE and SCW from normal. Statistical significance was assessed using Student's t -test, χ 2 -test and Pearson's correlation coefficient. DE and SCW occurred in 69.6 % and 60.9 % of cases of MFS and in 23.5 % and 35.3 % of EDS respectively. In MFS, prevalence was significantly higher than in the control group. DE was significantly more frequent in MFS than in EDS. A strong correlation existed between DE and SCW in MFS and the control group, but not in EDS. Our system enables quantitative assessment of SCW and DE. The latter is particularly important in subjects suspected of having MFS, in whom it is a common and characteristic sign. (orig.)

  4. Brain strokes related to aortic aneurysma – the analysis of three cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pastuszak Żanna

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Brain stroke connected with aortic blood flow disturbances is a rare disease and its incidence is difficult to assume. Nevertheless, 10-50% of patients with aortic dissection may not experience any pain. In case of 18-30% patients with aortic dissection neurological signs are first disease presentation and among them ischemic stroke is the most common. The most popular aortic dissection classification is with use of Stanford system. Type A involves the ascending aorta and type B is occurring distal to the subclavian artery. Aortic dissection risk factors include hypertension, cystic medionecrosis, bicuspid aortic valve and Marfan’s or Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

  5. Hemodynamic Instability after Low-Energy Thigh Contusion Caused by Injury to the Femoral Artery: A Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Miguel Rodríguez-Roiz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute vascular injuries have been described in relation to high-energy trauma accidents or in patients undergoing surgery in the femoral area. We describe a healthy patient who sustained a direct, low-energy contusion in the thigh and presented haemodynamic instability. Arteriography was used to locate the point of bleeding, and embolisation and vessel occlusion were carried out to stop the haemorrhage. The genetic study identified the COL3A1 gene mutation; accordingly, the patient was diagnosed with the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV (vascular type.

  6. Widening of the spinal canal and dural ectasia in Marfan's syndrome: assessment by CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villeirs, G.M.; Verstraete, K.L.; Kunnen, M.F. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. Hospital, Gent (Belgium); Tongerloo, A.J. van; Paepe, A.M. de [Dept. of Medical Genetics, Univ. Hospital, Gent (Belgium)

    1999-11-01

    We describe a method for diagnosing dural ectasia (DE) and spinal canal widening (SCW) using CT. We examined 23 patients with Marfan's syndrome (MFS), 17 with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) and 29 normal subjects, using six axial slices at the level of the L1-S1 pedicles. Transverse diameters of the vertebral bodies, spinal canal and dural sac were measured and indices were defined to differentiate patients with DE and SCW from normal. Statistical significance was assessed using Student's t -test, {chi} {sup 2}-test and Pearson's correlation coefficient. DE and SCW occurred in 69.6 % and 60.9 % of cases of MFS and in 23.5 % and 35.3 % of EDS respectively. In MFS, prevalence was significantly higher than in the control group. DE was significantly more frequent in MFS than in EDS. A strong correlation existed between DE and SCW in MFS and the control group, but not in EDS. Our system enables quantitative assessment of SCW and DE. The latter is particularly important in subjects suspected of having MFS, in whom it is a common and characteristic sign. (orig.)

  7. Duane retraction syndrome type 1 with Usher syndrome type 2: an unreported association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurana, Bhawna Piplani; Khurana, Aruj Kumar; Grover, Sumit

    2015-05-07

    Duane retraction syndrome is characterized by globe retraction and palpebral fissure narrowing on adduction, with restriction of abduction, adduction, or both. Usher syndrome type 2 consists of congenital bilateral sensorineural hearing loss and retinitis pigmentosa. The authors present a case with a yet unreported association between Duane retraction syndrome type 1 and Usher syndrome type 2. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  8. [Mania associated with Usher syndrome type II].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praharaj, Samir Kumar; Acharya, Mahima; Sarvanan, Arul; Kongasseri, Sreejayan; Behere, Rishikesh V; Sharma, P S V N

    2012-01-01

    Usher syndrome (or Hallgren syndrome) is an autosomal recessive genetic disorder characterized by sensorineural deafness, retinitis pigmentosa, and variable vestibular deficit; Usher syndrome type II is the most common form. Various neuropsychiatric disorders have been reported to occur in those with Usher syndrome, including schizophrenia-like disorder, atypical psychosis, recurrent depressive illness, neurotic disorder, and mental retardation; however, bipolar disorder is not common in those with Usher syndrome. Herein we describe a 30-year-old male with Usher syndrome type II that developed features indicative of a probable manic episode. The patient had complete remission of symptoms in response to treatment with olanzapine 20 mg d-1. In persons with dual sensory impairment there are inherent problems with assessment and diagnosis is difficult due to their limited communication abilities. The diagnosis of Usher syndrome depends heavily on behavioral observation and disturbances in vegetative functions.

  9. Pathogenetic Basis of Aortopathy and Aortic Valve Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-19

    Aortopathies; Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm; Aortic Valve Disease; Thoracic Aortic Disease; Thoracic Aortic Dissection; Thoracic Aortic Rupture; Ascending Aortic Disease; Descending Aortic Disease; Ascending Aortic Aneurysm; Descending Aortic Aneurysm; Marfan Syndrome; Loeys-Dietz Syndrome; Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome; Shprintzen-Goldberg Syndrome; Turner Syndrome; PHACE Syndrome; Autosomal Recessive Cutis Laxa; Congenital Contractural Arachnodactyly; Arterial Tortuosity Syndrome

  10. Genetics Home Reference: type A insulin resistance syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Conditions Type A insulin resistance syndrome Type A insulin resistance syndrome Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable ... view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Type A insulin resistance syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by severe ...

  11. Genetics Home Reference: Ohdo syndrome, Maat-Kievit-Brunner type

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... blepharophimosis-mental retardation syndrome, Maat-Kievit-Brunner type BMRS, MKB type Ohdo syndrome, MKB type X-linked ... D, Brunner H, Bitoun P. Blepharophimosis-mental retardation (BMR) syndromes: A proposed clinical classification of the so- ...

  12. Genetic heterogeneity of Usher syndrome type II.

    OpenAIRE

    Pieke Dahl, S; Kimberling, WJ; Gorin, MB; Weston, MD; Furman, JM; Pikus, A; Moller, C

    1993-01-01

    Usher syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterised by retinitis pigmentosa and congenital sensorineural hearing loss. A gene for Usher syndrome type II (USH2) has been localised to chromosome 1q32-q41. DNA from a family with four of seven sibs affected with clinical characteristics of Usher syndrome type II was genotyped using markers spanning the 1q32-1q41 region. These included D1S70 and D1S81, which are believed to flank USH2. Genotypic results and subsequent linkage analysis ...

  13. Pfeiffer syndrome type 2: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Kiyoko Oyamada

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To report on a case of Pfeiffer Syndrome, with a discussion of the diagnostic characteristics and features of disease types and the differential diagnosis. DESCRIPTION: The authors describe a newborn with cloverleaf skull, extreme bilateral exorbitism and choanal atresia, partial syndactyly of the second and third toes and broad medially-deviated big toes. The case reported was Pfeiffer Syndrome type 2, which usually has a poor prognosis. COMMENTS: Pfeiffer Syndrome is a clinically variable disorder and consists of an autosomal dominantly-inherited osteochondrodysplasia with craniosynostosis. It has been divided into three types. Type 1 is commonly associated with normal intelligence and generally good outcome. Types 2 and 3 generally have severe neurological compromise, poor prognosis, early death and sporadic occurrence. Potential for prolonged useful survival outcome can be achieved in some cases with early aggressive medical and surgical management according to recent literature.

  14. Bartter's Syndrome with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting-Ting See

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available We report a rare case of Bartter's syndrome in a 35-year-old woman with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The patient presented with leg weakness, fatigue, polyuria and polydipsia. Hypokalemia, metabolic alkalosis, and high renin and aldosterone concentrations were present, but the patient was normotensive. Gitelman's syndrome was excluded because of the presence of hypercalciuria, secondary hyperparathyroidism and bilateral nephrocalcinosis. The patient's condition improved upon administration of a prostaglandin synthetase inhibitor (acemetacin, oral potassium chloride and potassium-sparing diuretics. Five months later, the patient discontinued acemetacin because of epigastric discomfort; at the same time, severe hypokalemia and hyperglycemia developed. Glucagon stimulation and water deprivation tests were performed. Type 2 diabetes mellitus with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus was diagnosed. To avoid further gastrointestinal complications, the patient was treated with celecoxib, a selective cyclooxygenase 2 inhibitor. This case serves as a reminder that Bartter's syndrome is associated with various metabolic derangements including nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, nephrocalcinosis and diabetes mellitus. When treating Bartter's syndrome, it is also prudent to remember that the long-term use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and potassium-sparing diuretics may result in serious adverse reactions.

  15. Usher syndrome type III can mimic other types of Usher syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennings, Ronald J E; Fields, Randall R; Huygen, Patrick L M; Deutman, August F; Kimberling, William J; Cremers, Cor W R J

    2003-06-01

    Clinical and genetic characteristics are presented of 2 patients from a Dutch Usher syndrome type III family who have a new homozygous USH3 gene mutation: 149-152delCAGG + insTGTCCAAT. One individual (IV:1) is profoundly hearing impaired and has normal vestibular function and retinitis punctata albescens (RPA). The other individual is also profoundly hearing impaired, but has well-developed speech, vestibular areflexia, and retinitis pigmentosa sine pigmento (RPSP). These findings suggest that Usher syndrome type III can be clinically misdiagnosed as either Usher type I or II; that Usher syndrome patients who are profoundly hearing impaired and have normal vestibular function should be tested for USH3 mutations; and that RPA and RPSP can occur as fundoscopic manifestations of pigmentary retinopathy in Usher syndrome.

  16. Resource Centres for Rare Oral Diseases – Why?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daugaard-Jensen, Jette; Gjørup, Hans

    2010-01-01

    .5-73) and the male/female ratio was equal (1.06) Results: A: Oligodontia (N=154 ) and Amelogenesis Imperfecta (N=146 ) were the most frequently diagnosed dental anomalies. B: Osteogenesis Imperfecta (N=88), Ectodermal Dysplasia (N=81), Ehlers Danlos Syndrome (61) and Marfan Syndrome (N=44) were the largest groups...

  17. A rare type of Usher's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunica, Antonela Gverović; Kastelan, Snjezana; Bućan, Kajo; Ivanković, Mira; Radman, Maja; Karaman, Ksenija

    2013-12-01

    A case is presented of a very rare type of Usher's syndrome detected in a 30-year-old woman in her 28th week of pregnancy. She reported left eye visual impairment with a one-month history. She underwent standard ophthalmologic examination with additional procedures scheduled after childbirth, including fluorescein angiography, visual field (Goldman and Octopus) and electroretinography. Fundus examination revealed pallor of the optic disk, diffuse retinal blood vessel narrowing, no retinal pigmentation, left macular edema, vitreous liquefaction, and posterior vitreous detachment. Goldman perimetry showed narrowing of all isopters to 10 degrees, and Octopus perimetry showed peripheral decrease of retinal sensitivity. Electroretinography confirmed the diagnosis of retinitis pigmentosa sine pigmento. Upon collecting case history records, hearing disorders originating from childhood were discovered. To our knowledge, this type of retinitis in Usher's syndrome has been reported only once in the available literature.

  18. Aase-Smith Syndrome type II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soker, Murat; Ayyildiz, Orhan; Isikdogan, Abdurrahman

    2004-01-01

    Aase-Smith syndrome type II is a rare in childhood and there a few reported cases. Here, we report an 8-months-old boy with congenital red cell aplasia and triphalangeal thumbs. In addition to thumb anomalies. He presented with growth failure, hypertelorism and novel osseous radiologic abnormalities, large fontanelles and micrognathia as extraordinary. Some clinical symptoms had complete clinical remission with deflazacort treatment. (author)

  19. [Type 2 autoimmune polyendocrine syndromes (APS-2)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vialettes, Bernard; Dubois-Leonardon, Noémie

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 autoimmune polyendocrine syndromes (APS-2) are the most frequent disorders associating several organ-specific autoimmune diseases. Their high prevalence is due to the fact that the main manifestations of APS-2, such as thyroidal autoimmunity, type 1 diabetes, autoimmune gastric atrophy and vitiligo, are common diseases. APS-2 represents a clinical model that can serve to help unravel the mechanisms underlying autoimmunity. Diagnosis of APS-2 is a challenge for the clinician, especially in poorly symptomatic forms, and may require systematic screening based on measurement of autoantibodies and functional markers.

  20. Brain stem type neuro-Behcet's syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kataoka, Satoshi; Hirose, Genjiro; Kosoegawa, Hiroshi; Oda, Rokuhei; Yoshioka, Akira

    1987-01-01

    Two cases of brain stem type Neuro-Behcet's syndrome were evaluated by brain CT and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (Super-conducting type, 0.5 tesla) to correlate with the neurological findings. In the acute phase, low density area with peripheral enhancement effect and mass effect were seen at the brain stem in brain CT. MRI revealed a extensive high intensity signal area mainly involving the corticospinal tract in the meso-diencephalon as well as pons by T 2 weighted images (spin echo, TR = 1, 600 msec, TE = 90 msec) and the value of T 1 , T 2 , at the brain stem lesion were prolonged moderately. After high dose steroid treatment, the low density area in brain CT and high signal area in MRI were gradually reduced in its size. Peripheral enhancement effect in brain CT disappeared within 10 months in case 1, one month in the other case. In the chronic stage, the reduction of low density area and atrophy of brain stem were noted in brain CT. The lesion in chronic stage had low intensity in T 1 , T 2 weighted images and the T 1 , T 2 values at the lesion were mildly prolonged in MRI. Sequentially CT with enhancement and MRI examinations with T 1 , T 2 weighted images were useful to detect the lesion and to evaluate the activity, evolution of brain stem type Neuro-Behcet's syndrome. (author)

  1. Lysyl oxidase activity is required for ordered collagen fibrillogenesis by tendon cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herchenhan, Andreas; Uhlenbrock, Franziska Katharina; Eliasson, Pernilla

    2015-01-01

    to structurally abnormal collagen fibrils with irregular profiles and widely dispersed diameters. Of special interest, the abnormal fibril profiles resembled those seen in some Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome phenotypes. Importantly, the total collagen content developed normally, and there was no difference in COL1A1 gene...

  2. My Dog's Cheeks: A PBL Project on Collagen for Cell Biology and Genetics Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casla, Alberto Vicario; Zubiaga, Isabel Smith

    2010-01-01

    Students often have an oversimplified view of biological facts, which may hinder subsequent understanding when conceptual complexity gives rise to cognitive conflicts. To avoid this situation here, we present a PBL approach for the analysis of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS), which integrates a variety of topics in cell biology, genetics, and…

  3. Application of Mesh Plug Technique in The Repair of Difficult Cases ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    xp

    cystic fibrosis patients and those with ventriculoperitoneal shunts or peritoneal dialysis catheters are at higher risk for recurrence. Patients with connective tissue disorders such as mucopolysaccharidoses and Ehlers-Danlos or Marfan syndrome are also at higher risk for recurrence. Patients with irreducible incarcerated ...

  4. Molecular and Genetic Basis of Hereditary Connective-Tissue Diseases Accompanied by Frequent Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. T. Yakhyaeva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Frequent bone fractures in infancy require the elimination of a large number (> 100 of genetic disorders. The modern diagnostic method of hereditary diseases characterized by debilitating course is a new generation sequencing. The article presents the results of molecular-genetic study conducted in 18 patients with clinical symptoms of connective tissue disorders. 10 (56% patients had mutations in the genes encoding type I collagen chains, leading to the development of osteogenesis imperfecta, 5 (28% — mutations in IV and V type collagen genes that are responsible for the development of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. 3 (17% patients had mutations in the gene encoding fibrillin-1 protein, deficiency of which is manifested by Marfan syndrome. However, the correlation between patient's phenotype and discovered mutations in the investigated gene is established not in all cases.

  5. Usher syndrome type III can mimic other types of Usher syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pennings, R.J.E.; Fields, R.R.; Huygen, P.L.M.; Deutman, A.F.; Kimberling, W.J.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.

    2003-01-01

    Clinical and genetic characteristics are presented of 2 patients from a Dutch Usher syndrome type III family who have a new homozygous USH3 gene mutation: 149-152delCAGG + insTGTCCAAT. One individual (IV:1) is profoundly hearing impaired and has normal vestibular function and retinitis punctata

  6. Nephrocalcinosis as adult presentation of Bartter syndrome type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, L; Luiken, G P M; van Riemsdijk, I C; Petrij, F; Zandbergen, A A M; Dees, A

    2014-02-01

    Bartter syndrome consists a group of rare autosomal-recessive renal tubulopathies characterised by renal salt wasting, hypokalaemic metabolic alkalosis, hypercalciuria and hyperreninaemic hyperaldosteronism. It is classified into five types. Mutations in the KCNJ1 gene (classified as type II) usually cause the neonatal form of Bartter syndrome. We describe an adult patient with a homozygous KCNJ1 mutation resulting in a remarkably mild phenotype of neonatal type Bartter syndrome.

  7. Mutations in Biosynthetic Enzymes for the Protein Linker Region of Chondroitin/Dermatan/Heparan Sulfate Cause Skeletal and Skin Dysplasias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuji Mizumoto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Glycosaminoglycans, including chondroitin, dermatan, and heparan sulfate, have various roles in a wide range of biological events such as cell signaling, cell proliferation, tissue morphogenesis, and interactions with various growth factors. Their polysaccharides covalently attach to the serine residues on specific core proteins through the common linker region tetrasaccharide, -xylose-galactose-galactose-glucuronic acid, which is produced through the stepwise addition of respective monosaccharides by four distinct glycosyltransferases. Mutations in the human genes encoding the glycosyltransferases responsible for the biosynthesis of the linker region tetrasaccharide cause a number of genetic disorders, called glycosaminoglycan linkeropathies, including Desbuquois dysplasia type 2, spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, and Larsen syndrome. This review focused on recent studies on genetic diseases caused by defects in the biosynthesis of the common linker region tetrasaccharide.

  8. Disability in Adolescents and Adults Diagnosed With Hypermobility-Related Disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheper, Mark C; Juul-Kristensen, Birgit; Rombaut, Lies

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To (1) establish the association of the most common reported symptoms on disability; and (2) study the effectiveness of treatment on disability in patients with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome-hypermobility type (EDS-HT)/hypermobility syndrome (HMS). DATA SOURCES: An electronic search (Medical...... Subject Headings and free-text terms) was conducted in bibliographic databases CENTRAL/MEDLINE. STUDY SELECTION: Comparative, cross-sectional, longitudinal cohort studies and (randomized) controlled trials including patients with HMS/EDS-HT aged ≥17 years were considered for inclusion. A class of symptoms...... collaboration. Z-score transformations were applied to classify the extent of disability in comparison with healthy controls and to ensure comparability between studies. DATA SYNTHESIS: Initially, the electronic search yielded 714 publications, and 21 articles remained for analysis after selection...

  9. Current Understanding of Usher Syndrome Type II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jun; Wang, Le; Song, Hongman; Sokolov, Maxim

    2012-01-01

    Usher syndrome is the most common deafness-blindness caused by genetic mutations. To date, three genes have been identified underlying the most prevalent form of Usher syndrome, the type II form (USH2). The proteins encoded by these genes are demonstrated to form a complex in vivo. This complex is localized mainly at the periciliary membrane complex in photoreceptors and the ankle-link of the stereocilia in hair cells. Many proteins have been found to interact with USH2 proteins in vitro, suggesting that they are potential additional components of this USH2 complex and that the genes encoding these proteins may be the candidate USH2 genes. However, further investigations are critical to establish their existence in the USH2 complex in vivo. Based on the predicted functional domains in USH2 proteins, their cellular localizations in photoreceptors and hair cells, the observed phenotypes in USH2 mutant mice, and the known knowledge about diseases similar to USH2, putative biological functions of the USH2 complex have been proposed. Finally, therapeutic approaches for this group of diseases are now being actively explored. PMID:22201796

  10. The differential diagnosis of children with joint hypermobility: a review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elliott Elizabeth J

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In this study we aimed to identify and review publications relating to the diagnosis of joint hypermobility and instability and develop an evidence based approach to the diagnosis of children presenting with joint hypermobility and related symptoms. Methods We searched Medline for papers with an emphasis on the diagnosis of joint hypermobility, including Heritable Disorders of Connective Tissue (HDCT. Results 3330 papers were identified: 1534 pertained to instability of a particular joint; 1666 related to the diagnosis of Ehlers Danlos syndromes and 330 related to joint hypermobility. There are inconsistencies in the literature on joint hypermobility and how it relates to and overlaps with milder forms of HDCT. There is no reliable method of differentiating between Joint Hypermobility Syndrome, familial articular hypermobility and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (hypermobile type, suggesting these three disorders may be different manifestations of the same spectrum of disorders. We describe our approach to children presenting with joint hypermobility and the published evidence and expert opinion on which this is based. Conclusion There is value in identifying both the underlying genetic cause of joint hypermobility in an individual child and those hypermobile children who have symptoms such as pain and fatigue and might benefit from multidisciplinary rehabilitation management. Every effort should be made to diagnose the underlying disorder responsible for joint hypermobility which may only become apparent over time. We recommend that the term "Joint Hypermobility Syndrome" is used for children with symptomatic joint hypermobility resulting from any underlying HDCT and that these children are best described using both the term Joint Hypermobility Syndrome and their HDCT diagnosis.

  11. Histopathological types in adult nephrotic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Ghulam Yusuf

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In Bangladesh, there are very few studies about biopsy proven adult Nephrotic syndrome (NS with histological types and their clinical findings. To determine the histological types of glomerulonephritis (GN in adult NS and correlate them with the clinical presentations and biochemical parameters, we studied 100 biopsies in 87 patients who underwent ultrasonography- guided renal biopsy in Rangpur Medical College and Hospital from July 2010 to June 2012. The mean age of the patients was 32.8 ± 13.2 years; male was preponderance (72.4% and most of the patients (67.8% came from rural areas. Membranoproliferative GN (MPGN was the most common underlying cause that was found in 32 (36.8% patients followed by mesangial prolife- rative GN in 27 (31% patients, membranous GN in 16 (18.4% cases, minimal change disease in four (4.6% patients, diffuse proliferative GN in four (4.6% patients, focal segmental GN, and focal proliferative GN in two (2.4% patients each. High proteinuria level was found in minimal change disease, which was 7.59 ± 0.24 g/24 h (mean ± standard deviation. The most common symptoms were oliguria (92% and edema (86.2% followed by hematuria (dark urine (72.4% and hypertension (35.6%. MPGN was the most common histological type of adult NS in Rangpur.

  12. Accentuated hyperparathyroidism in type II Bartter syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landau, Daniel; Gurevich, Evgenia; Sinai-Treiman, Levana; Shalev, Hannah

    2016-07-01

    Bartter syndrome (BS) may be associated with different degrees of hypercalciuria, but marked parathyroid hormone (PTH) abnormalities have not been described. We compared clinical and laboratory data of patients with either ROMK-deficient type II BS (n = 14) or Barttin-deficient type IV BS (n = 20). Only BS-IV patients remained mildly hypokalemic in spite of a higher need for potassium supplementation. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was mildly decreased in only four BS-IV patients. Average PTH values were significantly higher in BS-II (160.6 ± 85.8 vs. 92.5 ± 48 pg/ml in BS-IV, p = 0.006). In both groups, there was a positive correlation between age and log(PTH). Levels of 25(OH) vitamin D were not different. Total serum calcium was lower (within normal limits) and age-related serum phosphate (Pi)-SDS was increased in BS-II (1.19 ± 0.71 vs. 0.01 ± 1.04 in BS-IV, p < 0.001). The GFR threshold for Pi reabsorption was higher in BS-II (5.63 ± 1.25 vs. 4.36 ± 0.98, p = 0.002). Spot urine calcium/creatinine ratio and nephrocalcinosis rate (100 vs. 16 %) were higher in the BS-II group. PTH, serum Pi levels, and urinary threshold for Pi reabsorption are significantly elevated in type II vs. type IV BS, suggesting a PTH resistance state. This may be a response to more severe long-standing hypercalciuria, leading to a higher rate of nephrocalcinosis in BS-II.

  13. Late-onset Bartter syndrome type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gollasch, Benjamin; Anistan, Yoland-Marie; Canaan-Kühl, Sima; Gollasch, Maik

    2017-10-01

    Mutations in the ROMK1 potassium channel gene ( KCNJ1 ) cause antenatal/neonatal Bartter syndrome type II (aBS II), a renal disorder that begins in utero , accounting for the polyhydramnios and premature delivery that is typical in affected infants, who develop massive renal salt wasting, hypokalaemic metabolic alkalosis, secondary hyperreninaemic hyperaldosteronism, hypercalciuria and nephrocalcinosis. This BS type is believed to represent a disorder of the infancy, but not in adulthood. We herein describe a female patient with a remarkably late-onset and mild clinical manifestation of BS II with compound heterozygous KCNJ1 missense mutations, consisting of a novel c.197T > A (p.I66N) and a previously reported c.875G > A (p.R292Q) KCNJ1 mutation. We implemented and evaluated the performance of two different bioinformatics-based approaches of targeted massively parallel sequencing [next generation sequencing (NGS)] in defining the molecular diagnosis. Our results demonstrate that aBS II may be suspected in patients with a late-onset phenotype. Our experimental approach of NGS-based mutation screening combined with Sanger sequencing proved to be a reliable molecular approach for defining the clinical diagnosis in our patient, and results in important differential diagnostic and therapeutic implications for patients with BS. Our results could have a significant impact on the diagnosis and methodological approaches of genetic testing in other patients with clinical unclassified phenotypes of nephrocalcinosis and congenital renal electrolyte abnormalities.

  14. Visual impairment in Finnish Usher syndrome type III.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plantinga, R.F.; Pennings, R.J.E.; Huygen, P.L.M.; Sankila, E.M.; Tuppurainen, K.; Kleemola, L.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.; Deutman, A.F.

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate visual impairment in Finnish Usher syndrome type 3 (USH3) and compare this with visual impairment in Usher syndrome types 1b (USH1b) and 2a (USH2a). METHODS: We carried out a retrospective study of 28 Finnish USH3 patients, 24 Dutch USH2a patients and 17 Dutch USH1b patients.

  15. Waardenburg syndrome type 2: an orthodontic perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şuhani, Raluca Diana; Şuhani, Mihai Flaviu; Muntean, Alexandrina; Mesaroş, Michaela Florica; Badea, Mîndra Eugenia

    2015-01-01

    Waardenburg syndrome is a rare form of neurocristopathy. It is a disorder in the development of neural crest cells, caused by an altered cellular migration during the embryonic phase. That alteration causes an association of different abnormalities such as pigmentary disturbances of the hair, iris, skin, stria vascularis of the cochlea, dystopia canthorum and sensorineural hearing loss. We report a case of a 14-year-old Romanian male, with a family history of Waardenburg syndrome (mother) and Usher syndrome (father - congenitally sensorineural hearing loss and retinal degeneration). The case particularities are: the correlation between malocclusion and Waardenburg syndrome due to hypoplastic alae nasi and also factors that produced hearing loss, which could be Waardenburg syndrome, Usher syndrome or the presence of the connexin 26 (W24X) gene mutation.

  16. Factitious aortic dissection leading to thoracotomy in a 20-year-old man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, Elise; Yager, Joel; Apfeldorf, William; Camps-Romero, Eduardo

    2007-01-01

    A 20-year-old man presented to an emergency department with dramatic, sudden-onset, tearing chest pain. He also claimed to have been previously diagnosed with Ehler-Danlos syndrome and a previous Type I aortic dissection (intimal tear of ascending aorta), rapidly increasing his treating physician's suspicion of an emergent aortic dissection. The patient was quickly transferred to a large university hospital, where he underwent a median sternotomy and thoracotomy, with no aortic pathology found on operation and biopsy. After the patient's postoperative recovery, he was treated at a mental health facility, where he remained ambivalent about his psychiatric condition and did not respond well to treatment. This case report describes a unique case of factitious disorder that led to a serious operative intervention and subsequent psychiatric care and assesses factors that might have contributed to his hospital course.

  17. Longterm visual prognosis in Usher syndrome types 1 and 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, André M; Eriksson, Kristina; Kimberling, William J; Sjöström, Anders; Möller, Claes

    2006-08-01

    To estimate the age at diagnosis of retinitis pigmentosa and to determine visual acuity deterioration, visual field impairment and the frequency of cataracts in Usher syndrome types 1 and 2. We carried out a retrospective study of 328 affected subjects with Usher syndrome types 1 and 2. Study subjects were divided into seven different age groups by decade. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics, general linear model anova and survival analysis. Retinitis pigmentosa was diagnosed significantly earlier in subjects with Usher syndrome type 1 than in those with type 2. Visual acuity was significantly more impaired in affected subjects with Usher syndrome type 1 than in those with type 2 from 50 years of age onwards. Survival analysis revealed a significant difference in visual field loss (type 2 subjects tending to be more impaired, while comparison indicated no significant differences between the groups in any of the other visual field categories. Cataract was found to be generally more common in Usher syndrome type 1 than type 2. Progressive loss of visual acuity and visual field begins to be substantial between the second and third decades of life in both Usher types. The rate of degeneration varies between individuals in both groups. The data are useful for the counselling of affected subjects with Usher syndrome types 1 and 2.

  18. Uterine dysfunction in biglycan and decorin deficient mice leads to dystocia during parturition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiping Wu

    Full Text Available Cesarean birth rates are rising. Uterine dysfunction, the exact mechanism of which is unknown, is a common indication for Cesarean delivery. Biglycan and decorin are two small leucine-rich proteoglycans expressed in the extracellular matrix of reproductive tissues and muscle. Mice deficient in biglycan display a mild muscular dystrophy, and, along with mice deficient in decorin, are models of Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome, a connective tissue anomaly associated with uterine rupture. As a variant of Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome is caused by a genetic mutation resulting in abnormal biglycan and decorin secretion, we hypothesized that biglycan and decorin play a role in uterine function. Thus, we assessed wild-type, biglycan, decorin and double knockout pregnancies for timing of birth and uterine function. Uteri were harvested at embryonic days 12, 15 and 18. Nonpregnant uterine samples of the same genotypes were assessed for tissue failure rate and spontaneous and oxytocin-induced contractility. We discovered that biglycan/decorin mixed double-knockout dams displayed dystocia, were at increased risk of delayed labor onset, and showed increased tissue failure in a predominantly decorin-dependent manner. In vitro spontaneous uterine contractile amplitude and oxytocin-induced contractile force were decreased in all biglycan and decorin knockout genotypes compared to wild-type. Notably, we found no significant compensation between biglycan and decorin using quantitative real time PCR or immunohistochemistry. We conclude that the biglycan/decorin mixed double knockout mouse is a model of dystocia and delayed labor onset. Moreover, decorin is necessary for uterine function in a dose-dependent manner, while biglycan exhibits partial compensatory mechanisms in vivo. Thus, this model is poised for use as a model for testing novel targets for preventive or therapeutic manipulation of uterine dysfunction.

  19. Uterine Dysfunction in Biglycan and Decorin Deficient Mice Leads to Dystocia during Parturition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhiping; Aron, Abraham W.; Macksoud, Elyse E.; Iozzo, Renato V.; Hai, Chi-Ming; Lechner, Beatrice E.

    2012-01-01

    Cesarean birth rates are rising. Uterine dysfunction, the exact mechanism of which is unknown, is a common indication for Cesarean delivery. Biglycan and decorin are two small leucine-rich proteoglycans expressed in the extracellular matrix of reproductive tissues and muscle. Mice deficient in biglycan display a mild muscular dystrophy, and, along with mice deficient in decorin, are models of Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome, a connective tissue anomaly associated with uterine rupture. As a variant of Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome is caused by a genetic mutation resulting in abnormal biglycan and decorin secretion, we hypothesized that biglycan and decorin play a role in uterine function. Thus, we assessed wild-type, biglycan, decorin and double knockout pregnancies for timing of birth and uterine function. Uteri were harvested at embryonic days 12, 15 and 18. Nonpregnant uterine samples of the same genotypes were assessed for tissue failure rate and spontaneous and oxytocin-induced contractility. We discovered that biglycan/decorin mixed double-knockout dams displayed dystocia, were at increased risk of delayed labor onset, and showed increased tissue failure in a predominantly decorin-dependent manner. In vitro spontaneous uterine contractile amplitude and oxytocin-induced contractile force were decreased in all biglycan and decorin knockout genotypes compared to wild-type. Notably, we found no significant compensation between biglycan and decorin using quantitative real time PCR or immunohistochemistry. We conclude that the biglycan/decorin mixed double knockout mouse is a model of dystocia and delayed labor onset. Moreover, decorin is necessary for uterine function in a dose-dependent manner, while biglycan exhibits partial compensatory mechanisms in vivo. Thus, this model is poised for use as a model for testing novel targets for preventive or therapeutic manipulation of uterine dysfunction. PMID:22253749

  20. Localization of Usher syndrome type II to chromosome 1q.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimberling, W J; Weston, M D; Möller, C; Davenport, S L; Shugart, Y Y; Priluck, I A; Martini, A; Milani, M; Smith, R J

    1990-06-01

    Usher syndrome is characterized by congenital hearing loss, progressive visual impairment due to retinitis pigmentosa, and variable vestibular problems. The two subtypes of Usher syndrome, types I and II, can be distinguished by the degree of hearing loss and by the presence or absence of vestibular dysfunction. Type I is characterized by a profound hearing loss and totally absent vestibular responses, while type II has a milder hearing loss and normal vestibular function. Fifty-five members of eight type II Usher syndrome families were typed for three DNA markers in the distal region of chromosome 1q: D1S65 (pEKH7.4), REN (pHRnES1.9), and D1S81 (pTHH33). Statistically significant linkage was observed for Usher syndrome type II with a maximum multipoint lod score of 6.37 at the position of the marker THH33, thus localizing the Usher type II (USH2) gene to 1q. Nine families with type I Usher syndrome failed to show linkage to the same three markers. The statistical test for heterogeneity of linkage between Usher syndrome types I and II was highly significant, thus demonstrating that they are due to mutations at different genetic loci.

  1. Metabolic Syndrome among Type-2 Diabetic Patients in Benghazi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of three out of five conditions that are due to hyperinsulinemia: abdominal obesity, atherogenic dyslipidemia (high triglycerides and/or low HDL), elevated blood pressure, and elevated plasma glucose. The syndrome is highly prevalent in patients with type-2 diabetes mellitus ...

  2. Prevalence of the metabolic syndrome among patients with type 2 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The metabolic syndrome is a cluster of risk factors that is responsible for most of the excess cardiovascular morbidity amongst persons with type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (DM). The metabolic syndrome increases the risk for coronary heart disease and stroke by three-fold with a marked increase in cardiovascular ...

  3. [Atypical manifestations in familial type 1 Waardenburg syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sans, B; Calvas, P; Bazex, J

    1998-01-01

    Waardenburg syndrome is an uncommon genetic disorder. Four clinical types are recognized. Three responsible genes have been identified (PAX 3: for type I syndrome, MITF and EDN3 for types II and IV respectively). We report the case of a patient with Waardenburg type I morphotype who had atypical neurological manifestations. Decisive elements for diagnosis were the presence of Waardenburg syndrome in the family and, in affected kin, a mutation causing a shift in PAX 3 gene reading. This case confirms the variability of Waardenburg signs within one family. The association of unusual neurological manifestations in the proband suggested that Vogt Koyanagi Harada disease may have been associated and may show some relationship with familial Waardenburg syndrome.

  4. Unusual case of failure to thrive: Type III Bartter syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, S; Subedi, K; Ray, P; Rayamajhi, A

    2016-09-01

    Bartter syndrome Type III is a rare autosomal recessive disorder resulting from an inherited defect in the thick ascending limb of the loop of henle of the nephrons in kidney. The typical clinical manifestations in childhood are failure to thrive and recurrent episodes of vomiting. Typical laboratory findings which help in the diagnosis are hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis, hypomagnesemia and hypercalciuria. We report a case of Type III Bartter syndrome not responding to repeated conventional treatment of failure to thrive.

  5. [Problem and assignment for distinguishing the Usher syndrome type].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, Satoshi; Yoshimura, Hidekane; Takeichi, Norito; Satou, Hiroaki; Ishikawa, Kotaro; Kaga, Kimitaka; Kumakawa, Kozou; Nagai, Kyoko; Furuya, Nobuhiko; Ikezono, Tetsuo; Nakanishi, Hiroshi; Naitou, Yasu; Fukushima, Kunihiro; Tono, Tetsuya; Kimitsuki, Takashi; Nishio, Shinya; Takumi, Yutaka; Usami, Shinichi

    2012-10-01

    Usher syndrome is an autosomal-recessive disorder that causes bilateral sensorineural hearing loss, retinitis pigmentosa (RP), and occasionally vestibular dysfunction. Usher syndrome types 1, 2, and 3 can be distinguished by differences in audiovestibular features. The objectives of this retrospective study were to evaluate 26 patients with Usher syndrome clinically. The 26 patients (male: 12 cases, female: 14 cases) with Usher syndrome, with a clinical diagnosis based on symptoms of bilateral sensorineural hearing loss and RP, had been registered from 13 hospitals as a multicenter study. We assessed the clinical history and performed audiovestibular and ophthalmologic examinations, and genetic testing. Eleven of the patients were classified as having Usher type 1 (38.5%), 6 with Usher type 2 (23.1%), and 9 with Usher type 3 (38.5%). However, many patients with atypical Usher type 1 (70%) and type 2 (83.3%) were found compared with Usher type 3 (10%). The conductive rate of vestibular examinations including the caloric test (50%) was low. There were many variations in the clinical symptoms in Usher syndrome patients, therefore the classification of Usher types 1, 2, and 3 has been complicated. We have proposed a flowchart for the diagnosis of Usher types 1, 2, and 3.

  6. The risk for type B aortic dissection in Marfan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Hartog, Alexander W; Franken, Romy; Zwinderman, Aeilko H; Timmermans, Janneke; Scholte, Arthur J; van den Berg, Maarten P; de Waard, Vivian; Pals, Gerard; Mulder, Barbara J M; Groenink, Maarten

    2015-01-27

    Aortic dissections involving the descending aorta are a major clinical problem in patients with Marfan syndrome. The purpose of this study was to identify clinical parameters associated with type B aortic dissection and to develop a risk model to predict type B aortic dissection in patients with Marfan syndrome. Patients with the diagnosis of Marfan syndrome and magnetic resonance imaging or computed tomographic imaging of the aorta were followed for a median of 6 years for the occurrence of type B dissection or the combined end point of type B aortic dissection, distal aortic surgery, and death. A model using various clinical parameters as well as genotyping was developed to predict the risk for type B dissection in patients with Marfan syndrome. Between 1998 and 2013, 54 type B aortic dissections occurred in 600 patients with Marfan syndrome (mean age 36 ± 14 years, 52% male). Independent variables associated with type B aortic dissection were prior prophylactic aortic surgery (hazard ratio: 2.1; 95% confidence interval: 1.2 to 3.8; p = 0.010) and a proximal descending aorta diameter ≥27 mm (hazard ratio: 2.2; 95% confidence interval: 1.1 to 4.3; p = 0.020). In the risk model, the 10-year occurrence of type B aortic dissection in low-, moderate-, and high-risk patients was 6%, 19%, and 34%, respectively. Angiotensin II receptor blocker therapy was associated with fewer type B aortic dissections (hazard ratio: 0.3; 95% confidence interval: 0.1 to 0.9; p = 0.030). Patients with Marfan syndrome with prior prophylactic aortic surgery are at substantial risk for type B aortic dissection, even when the descending aorta is only slightly dilated. Angiotensin II receptor blocker therapy may be protective in the prevention of type B aortic dissections. Copyright © 2015 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. A case of oral-facial-digital syndrome with overlapping manifestations of type V and type VI: a possible new OFD syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung Wongyiu; Chung Laupo

    1999-01-01

    We report a child with clinical and radiological manifestations characteristic of both V'aradi syndrome (oral-facial-digital syndrome type VI) and Thurston syndrome (oral-facial-digital syndrome type V). The findings have not been reported previously, and we believe that it represents a new variant. (orig.)

  8. Scalloping at the lumbosacral canal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinhardt, R.

    1987-07-01

    Scalloping is an indentation of the dorsal side of the vertebral body (anterior wall of the lumbosacral or sacral canal) which typically involves several adjacent lumbal vertebral body segments and the anterior wall of the canalis sacralis. Occurrence without underlying disease is rare; it occurs most frequently with chondrodystrophy, neurofibromatosis, Morquio's syndrome, Hurler's syndrome, acromegaly, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, Marfan's syndrome, cysts, tumors and in peridural lipomas.

  9. Scalloping at the lumbosacral canal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinhardt, R.

    1987-01-01

    Scalloping is an indentation of the dorsal side of the vertebral body (anterior wall of the lumbosacral or sacral canal) which typically involves several adjacent lumbal vertebral body segments and the anterior wall of the canalis sacralis. Occurrence without underlying disease is rare; it occurs most frequently with chondrodystrophy, neurofibromatosis, Morquio's syndrome, Hurler's syndrome, acromegaly, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, Marfan's syndrome, cysts, tumors and in peridural lipomas. (orig.) [de

  10. [Types of dislipidemia in children with metabolic syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hromnats'ka, N M

    2014-01-01

    To study dyslipidemia types in children with metabolic syndrome. From 1520 children of total population 155 children aged from 9 to 18 years were selected, who formed 2 groups: 1 group--85 children with metabolic syndrome, 2 group--54 children with normal body mass. Anthropometry, blood pressure measurement, estimation of total cholesterol, low density cholesterol, very low density cholesterol, high density cholesterol, tryglicerides in blood were done. The total cholesterol level was 1,1 times higher (p = 0.001), low density cholesterol 1,4 times higher (p = 0.001), very low density cholesterol 1,1 times higher (p= 0.015), tryglicerides 1,1 times higher (p = 0.020) in children with metabolic syndrome than in children of control group. In children with metabolic syndrome sensitively more often IIa, IV dislipidemia types and isolated hypercholesterolemia and less often IIb, III dislipidemia types and high density cholesterol isolated decrease were diagnosed. So children with metabolic syndrome were characterized by atherogenic types of dislipidemias which determine early atherosclerosis development. Children with metabolic syndrome must be examined on the lipid metabolism violation with the aim of its prevention and correction.

  11. Kenny-Caffey syndrome type 1 in an Egyptian girl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotb Abbass Metwalley

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Kenny-Caffey syndrome type 1 (KCS1 (OMIM 244460 is a rare syndrome characterized by growth retardation, uniformly small slender long bones with medullary stenosis, thickened cortex of the long bones, hypocalcemia possibly with tetany at an early age and normal intelligence. The primary outcome of KCS1 is short stature. We present here an Egyptian girl aged 32 months with typical feature of KCS1.

  12. Genotype-Phenotype Aspects of Type 2 Long QT Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shimizu, Wataru; Moss, Arthur J.; Wilde, Arthur A. M.; Towbin, Jeffrey A.; Ackerman, Michael J.; January, Craig T.; Tester, David J.; Zareba, Wojciech; Robinson, Jennifer L.; Qi, Ming; Vincent, G. Michael; Kaufman, Elizabeth S.; Hofman, Nynke; Noda, Takashi; Kamakura, Shiro; Miyamoto, Yoshihiro; Shah, Samit; Amin, Vinit; Goldenberg, Ilan; Andrews, Mark L.; McNitt, Scott

    2009-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of location, coding type, and topology of KCNH2(hERG) mutations on clinical phenotype in type 2 long QT syndrome (LQTS). Background Previous studies were limited by population size in their ability to examine phenotypic effect of

  13. Physiotherapy Intervention for Joint Hypermobility in Three Cases with Heritable Connective Tissue Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Kaux, Jean-François; Foidart-Dessalle, Marguerite; Croisier, Jean-Louis; Toussaint, Geoffrey; Forthomme, Bénédicte; Crielaard, Jean-Michel

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: In Joint Hypermobility Syndromes, chronic pain is the most disabling symptom. Its origin can be multiple (i.e. subluxations, sprains, pathologies of tendons, ligaments, peripheral nerves, multiple operations). The goal of this article was intended to discuss appropriate physiotherapy in hyperlax patients. Patients and Method: The recovery process was analyzed in three cases (Marfan Syndrome, Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome and Osteogenesis Imperfecta). Hypermobility was assessed using...

  14. [Coexistence of autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 3 with diabetes insipidus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krysiak, Robert; Okopień, Bogusław

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune polyglandular syndromes are conditions characterized by the combination of two or more organ-specific disorders. The underestimation oftheir real frequency probable results from physicians' inadequate knowledge of these clinical entities and sometimes their atypical clinical presentation. Because they comprise a wide spectrum of autoimmune disorders, autoimmune polyglandular syndromes are divided into four types, among which type-3 is the most common one. In this article, we report the case of a young female, initially diagnosed with diabetes mellitus who several years later developed full-blown autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 3 consisting of autoimmune thyroid disorder and latent autoimmune diabetes in adults.The discussed case suggests that in selected patients diabetes insipidus may coexist with autoimmune endocrinopathies and nonendocrine autoimmunopathies, as well as that in some patients idiopathic diabetes insipidus may be secondary to lymphocytic infiltration and destruction of the hypothalamic supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei and/or the supraoptic-hypophyseal tract

  15. Previously unreported abnormalities in Wolfram Syndrome Type 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akturk, Halis Kaan; Yasa, Seda

    2017-01-01

    Wolfram syndrome (WFS) is a rare autosomal recessive disease with non-autoimmune childhood onset insulin dependent diabetes and optic atrophy. WFS type 2 (WFS2) differs from WFS type 1 (WFS1) with upper intestinal ulcers, bleeding tendency and the lack ofdiabetes insipidus. Li-fespan is short due to related comorbidities. Only a few familieshave been reported with this syndrome with the CISD2 mutation. Here we report two siblings with a clinical diagnosis of WFS2, previously misdiagnosed with type 1 diabetes mellitus and diabetic retinopathy-related blindness. We report possible additional clinical and laboratory findings that have not been pre-viously reported, such as asymptomatic hypoparathyroidism, osteomalacia, growth hormone (GH) deficiency and hepatomegaly. Even though not a requirement for the diagnosis of WFS2 currently, our case series confirm hypogonadotropic hypogonadism to be also a feature of this syndrome, as reported before. © Polish Society for Pediatric Endocrinology and Diabetology.

  16. Cardiorenal Syndrome Type 1: Definition, Etiopathogenesis, Diagnostics and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolic Tomislav

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Cardiorenal Syndrome Type 1 (CRS-1 is defined as an acute worsening of heart function leading to acute kidney injury and/or dysfunction. It is an important cause of hospitalization which affects the diagnosis as well as the prognosis and treatment of patients. The purpose of this paper is to analyze causes that lead to the development of cardiorenal syndrome type 1 and its clinical consequences, as well as to emphasize the clinical importance of its early detection. The clinical studies and professional papers dealing with etiopathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment of cardiorenal syndrome type 1, have been analyzed. The most important role in the occurrence of cardio renal syndrome type 1 is played by hemodynamic mechanisms, activation of neurohumoral systems, inflammation and imbalance between the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS and nitric oxide (NO. Diagnosis of cardiorenal syndrome type 1 involves biomarkers of acute renal injury among which the most important are: neutrophil gelatinaseassociated lipocalin (NGAL, cystatin C, kidney injury molecule 1 (KIM-1, liver-type fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP, IL-18 and the values of nitrogen compounds in serum. In addition to a pharmacological therapy, various modalities of extracorporeal ultrafiltration are applied in treatment of CRS-1, particularly if there is resistance to the use of diuretic therapy. As opposed to the experimental models, in clinical practice acute renal injury is often diagnosed late so that the measures taken do not give the expected results and the protective role shown in experimental conditions do not give the same results. For all these reasons, it is necessary to analyze the pathophysiology of renal impairment in cardiorenal syndrome as well as detect early indicators of kidney injury that could have clinical benefit and positive impact on reducing the cost of treatment.

  17. A Rare Cause of Pheochromocytoma; Neurofibromatosis Type 1-Noonan Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazhar Müslüm Tuna

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Neurofibromatosis (NF Type 1 (NF-1 is an autosomal dominant disease with a prevalence of about 1/3000. NF-1 is a neurocutaneous syndrome characterized by cafe au lait macules, neurofibroma, optic glioma, lisch nodules, and symptoms involving other systems. Noonan syndrome (NS is a clinically heterogeneous disorder predominantly characterized by dysmorphic facial features, congenital heart disease, proportionate post-natal short stature, neck abnormalities, and chest deformities. NF-NS is a very rare overlapping syndrome sharing many features of both syndromes. Coexistence of pheochromocytoma, which can be life-threatening if not treated properly, is also a very rare complication of this disorder. Here, we report a patient who was admitted with a mass in the right upper quadrant and was diagnosed with pheochromocytoma and NFNS. (The Me­di­cal Bul­le­tin of Ha­se­ki 2014; 52: 227-31

  18. Frequency of metabolic syndrome in patients with type-2 diabetes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, N.; Ahmad, T.; Hussain, S.J.; Javed, M.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Diabetes, Hypertension, Obesity and Ischaemic Heart Disease have become a problem of public health magnitude with substantial economic burden both in the developed as well as the developing countries. Obesity is quite frequent in Type 2 diabetics and also plays a central role in causing Metabolic Syndrome (MetS). Metabolic Syndrome significantly increases the incidence of cardiovascular complications. This study was done to determine the frequency of MetS in our Type 2 diabetic patients as most of the components of MetS can be modified and identifying/managing these at an early stage might be of considerable help in reducing cardiovascular complications. Methods: This cross-sectional study was done in Medical B and Medical A wards of Ayub Teaching Hospital, Abbottabad from Nov, 08 to April, 09. Type 2 Diabetic patients aged above 40 years who gave informed consent were included in the study. Data was collected through a structured proforma. Frequency of Metabolic Syndrome was estimated according to the IDF consensus worldwide definition of the MetS. Results: Of the 100 patients enrolled in this study 56 were females and 44 were males with a mean age of 59.9 years. Out of these 100 participants seventy six (76%) were diagnosed to have metabolic syndrome. Of the 56 females, forty eight (85.71%) were having metabolic syndrome while twenty eight (63.63%) of the 44 male participants were having the syndrome. The difference was statistically significant (p<0.05). Conclusion: Frequency of MetS was found to be significantly high in this study with female preponderance. All the components, except Hypertension were more frequent in females. Diabetic patients with metabolic syndrome need more aggressive approach in management so as to decrease the incidence of cardiovascular complications. (author)

  19. Hearing loss in Usher syndrome type II is nonprogressive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisser, Christoph F V; Kimberling, William J; Otterstedde, Christian R

    2002-12-01

    Usher syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by sensorineural hearing loss and progressive visual loss secondary to retinitis pigmentosa. In the literature, a possible progression of the moderate to severe hearing loss in Usher syndrome type II (Usher II) is controversial. We studied the development of the hearing loss of 125 patients with a clinical diagnosis of Usher syndrome type II intraindividually and interindividually by repeatedly performing complete audiological and neuro-otologic examinations. Our data show a very characteristic slope of the hearing curve in all Usher II patients and no clinically relevant progression of the hearing loss over up to 17 years. The subjective impression of a deterioration of the communicative abilities of Usher II patients must therefore be attributed to the progressive visual loss. The patients should be reassured that changes in their hearing abilities are unlikely and should be provided with optimally fitted modern hearing aids.

  20. Reflex sympathetic dystrophy/complex regional pain syndrome, type 1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enrique

    with MRI every 3 months and the bone marrow oedema disappeared after 6 months. Introduction ... SA JOURNAL OF RADIOLOGY • August 2004. Reflex sympathetic dystrophy/complex regional pain syndrome, type 1 ... may be either trauma of external origin or iatrogenic, post surgery. In some patients particularly children ...

  1. [Complex regional pain syndrome type 1: negating the myth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frolke, J.P.M.; Dongen, R.T.M. van; Meent, H. van de

    2015-01-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome type 1 (CRPS-1) was identified in the Netherlands more than 30 years ago, but since then the arguments supporting this diagnosis have become weaker. Incidence has decreased, it is often not possible to make a definite diagnosis, the pathophysiology remains unclear and

  2. Evidence based guidelines for complex regional pain syndrome type 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perez, R.S.G.M.; Zollinger, P.E.; Dijkstra, P.U.; Thomassen-Hilgersom, I.L.; Zuurmond, W.W.A.; Rosenbrand, C.J.G.M.; Geerzen, J.H.B.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Treatment of complex regional pain syndrome type I (CRPS-I) is subject to discussion. The purpose of this study was to develop multidisciplinary guidelines for treatment of CRPS-I.Method: A multidisciplinary task force graded literature evaluating treatment effects for CRPS-I according

  3. Evidence based guidelines for complex regional pain syndrome type 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perez, Roberto S.; Zollinger, Paul E.; Dijkstra, Pieter U.; Thomassen-Hilgersom, Ilona L.; Zuurmond, Wouter W.; Rosenbrand, Kitty C. J.; Geertzen, Jan H.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Treatment of complex regional pain syndrome type I (CRPS-I) is subject to discussion. The purpose of this study was to develop multidisciplinary guidelines for treatment of CRPS-I. Method: A multidisciplinary task force graded literature evaluating treatment effects for CRPS-I according

  4. Renal aneurysm and arteriovenous fistula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savastano, S.; Feltrin, G.P.; Miotto, D.; Chiesura-Corona, M.; Padua Univ.

    1990-01-01

    Embolization was performed in six patients with renal artery aneurysms (n=2) and arteriovenous fistulas (AVF) (n=5). The aneurysms were observed in one patient with fibromuscular dysplasia and in another with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. All the AVFs were intraparenchymal and secondary to iatrogenic trauma. Elective embolization was performed in five patients with good clinical results at follow-up between 1 and 9 years. Because of rupture of the aneurysm emergency embolization was attempted without success in the patient with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, and nephrectomy was carried out. A postembolization syndrome complicated three procedures in which Gelfoam and polyvinyl alcohol were used; in two of these cases unexpected reflux of the particulate material occurred, resulting in limited undesired ablation of the ipsilateral renal parenchyma. Embolization is the most reliable and effective treatment for intrarenal vascular abnormalities since it minimizes the parenchymal damage. (orig.)

  5. Renal aneurysm and arteriovenous fistula; Management with transcatheter embolization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savastano, S.; Feltrin, G.P.; Miotto, D.; Chiesura-Corona, M. (Padua Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Radiologia Padua Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Fisioterapia)

    1990-01-01

    Embolization was performed in six patients with renal artery aneurysms (n=2) and arteriovenous fistulas (AVF) (n=5). The aneurysms were observed in one patient with fibromuscular dysplasia and in another with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. All the AVFs were intraparenchymal and secondary to iatrogenic trauma. Elective embolization was performed in five patients with good clinical results at follow-up between 1 and 9 years. Because of rupture of the aneurysm emergency embolization was attempted without success in the patient with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, and nephrectomy was carried out. A postembolization syndrome complicated three procedures in which Gelfoam and polyvinyl alcohol were used; in two of these cases unexpected reflux of the particulate material occurred, resulting in limited undesired ablation of the ipsilateral renal parenchyma. Embolization is the most reliable and effective treatment for intrarenal vascular abnormalities since it minimizes the parenchymal damage. (orig.).

  6. Oro-facial-digital syndrome Type 1: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanika Singh Dhull

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Oro-Facial Digital Syndrome (OFDS is a generic term for group of apparently distinctive genetic diseases that affect the development of the oral cavity, facial features, and digits. One of these is OFDS type I (OFDS-I which has rarely been reported in Asian countries. This is the case report of a 13 year old patient with OFDS type I who reported to the Department of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry, with the complaint of discolored upper front teeth.

  7. Myositis in Griscelli syndrome type 2 treated with hematopoietic cell transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Born, Alfred Peter; Müller, Klaus; Marquart, Hanne Vibeke

    2010-01-01

    Griscelli syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by pigmentary dilution and is occasionally associated with a hemophagocytic syndrome (type 2). We present a 13-year-old girl with Griscelli syndrome type 2, who developed a hemophagocytic syndrome along with marked muscle weaknes...

  8. [SPECIFIC CLINICAL FEATURES OF TYPE 1 AUTOIMMUNE POLYGLANDULAR SYNDROME].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhina, M S; Molashenko, N V; Troshina, E A; Orlova, E M; Sozaeva, L S; Eystein, S H; Breivik, S

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome is a primary autoimmune disorder affecting two or more peripheral endocrine glands and responsible for their incompetence. It is frequently combined with various organ-specific non-endocrine diseases. Patients with this pathology need life-long replacement therapy and dynamic observation by endocrinologists and other specialists to monitor the effectiveness of the treatment and detect new components of the disease. We report a variant of type 1 autoimmune polyglandular syndrome. Special emphasis is laid on the importance of succession of actions of endocrinologists and specialists in related medical disciplines dealing with children and adult patients.

  9. Burning mouth syndrome due to herpes simplex virus type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, Maria A; Choe, Alexander; Traktinskiy, Igor; Gilden, Don

    2015-04-01

    Burning mouth syndrome is characterised by chronic orofacial burning pain. No dental or medical cause has been found. We present a case of burning mouth syndrome of 6 months duration in a healthy 65-year-old woman, which was associated with high copy numbers of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) DNA in the saliva. Her pain resolved completely after antiviral treatment with a corresponding absence of salivary HSV-1 DNA 4 weeks and 6 months later. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  10. Kindler syndrome - a rare type of hereditary epidermolysis bullosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Albanova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Kindler syndrome is one of the types of hereditary epidermolysis bullosa with its onset related to mutations of the KIND1 gene. The authors describe a case of a family with three members suffering from this rare disease. All of these patients have typical clinical manifestations of the Kindler syndrome such as the formation of blisters on the skin and mucous membranes right after the birth, scarring with the formation of contractures, pseudosyndactyly, microstomia and ankyloglossia, progressive poikiloderma, photosensibility, affections of the gastrointestinal tract - dysphagia, esophagostenosis, stool disorders, dental pathology, phimosis vaginalis in women.

  11. Adult presentation of Bartter syndrome type IV with erythrocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilberg, Ita Pfeferman; Tótoli, Cláudia; Calado, Joaquim Tomaz

    2015-01-01

    Bartter syndrome comprises a group of rare autosomal-recessive salt-losing disorders with distinct phenotypes, but one unifying pathophysiology consisting of severe reductions of sodium reabsorption caused by mutations in five genes expressed in the thick ascending limb of Henle, coupled with increased urinary excretion of potassium and hydrogen, which leads to hypokalemic alkalosis. Bartter syndrome type IV, caused by loss-of-function mutations in barttin, a subunit of chloride channel CLC-Kb expressed in the kidney and inner ear, usually occurs in the antenatal-neonatal period. We report an unusual case of late onset presentation of Bartter syndrome IV and mild phenotype in a 20 years-old man who had hypokalemia, deafness, secondary hyperparathyroidism and erythrocytosis.

  12. Polyglandular Autoimmune Syndrome Type III with Primary Hypoparathyroidism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Jin Kim

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Polyglandular autoimmune syndrome is defined as multiple endocrine gland insufficiencies accompanied by autoimmune diseases of the endocrine and nonendocrine system. After Schmidt introduced a case of nontuberculosis adrenal gland dysfunction with thyroiditis in 1926, Neufeld defined polyglandular autoimmune syndrome by I, II, and III subtypes in 1980 by their presentation of occurrence age, heredity methods, relationship with human leukocyte antigen, and accompanying diseases. We report a case of a 32-year-old female with polyglandular autoimmune syndrome III accompanied by type 1 diabetes mellitus that was treated with insulin (36 units per day for 11 years. She had insulin deficiency and Hashimoto thyroiditis as an autoimmune disorder. In addition, she had several features similar to Albright's hereditary osteodystrophy including short stature, truncal obesity, round face, short neck, low intelligence (full IQ 84, and decreased memory. Although Albright's hereditary osteodystrophy is morphological evidence of pseudohypoparathyroidism or pseudopseudohypoparathyroidism, she had primary hypoparathyroidism on laboratory results. Here, we report a case of polyglandular autoimmune syndrome III with type 1 diabetes mellitus, autoimmune thyroiditis, and primary hypoparathyroidism, accompanied by clinical features similar to Albright's hereditary osteodystrophy.

  13. Bartter Syndrome Type 1 Presenting as Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluca Vergine

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Bartter syndrome (BS type 1 (OMIM #601678 is a hereditary salt-losing renal tubular disorder characterized by hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis, hypercalciuria, nephrocalcinosis, polyuria, recurrent vomiting, and growth retardation. It is caused by loss-of-function mutations of the SLC12A1 gene, encoding the furosemide-sensitive Na-K-Cl cotransporter. Recently, a phenotypic variability has been observed in patients with genetically determined BS, including absence of nephrocalcinosis, hypokalemia, and/or metabolic alkalosis in the first year of life as well as persistent metabolic acidosis mimicking distal renal tubular acidosis. We report the case of a child with a genetically determined diagnosis of Bartter syndrome type 1 who presented with a phenotype of nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, with severe hypernatremia and urinary concentrating defect. In these atypical cases, molecular analysis is mandatory to define the diagnosis, in order to establish the correct clinical and therapeutic management.

  14. Bartter Syndrome Type 1 Presenting as Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergine, Gianluca; Fabbri, Elena; Pedini, Annalisa; Tedeschi, Silvana; Borsa, Niccolò

    2018-01-01

    Bartter syndrome (BS) type 1 (OMIM #601678) is a hereditary salt-losing renal tubular disorder characterized by hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis, hypercalciuria, nephrocalcinosis, polyuria, recurrent vomiting, and growth retardation. It is caused by loss-of-function mutations of the SLC12A1 gene, encoding the furosemide-sensitive Na-K-Cl cotransporter. Recently, a phenotypic variability has been observed in patients with genetically determined BS, including absence of nephrocalcinosis, hypokalemia, and/or metabolic alkalosis in the first year of life as well as persistent metabolic acidosis mimicking distal renal tubular acidosis. We report the case of a child with a genetically determined diagnosis of Bartter syndrome type 1 who presented with a phenotype of nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, with severe hypernatremia and urinary concentrating defect. In these atypical cases, molecular analysis is mandatory to define the diagnosis, in order to establish the correct clinical and therapeutic management.

  15. Clinical Aspects of Type 3 Long-QT Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilde, Arthur A M; Moss, Arthur J; Kaufman, Elizabeth S

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: -Risk stratification in patients with type 3 long QT syndrome (LQT3) by clinical and genetic characteristics and effectiveness of ß-blocker therapy have not been studied previously in a large LQT3 population. METHODS: -The study population included 406 LQT3 patients with 51 different......-blocker therapy reduces this risk in females, but efficacy in males could not be conclusively determined due to low number of events....

  16. Short rib-polydactyly syndrome, type Verma-Naumoff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belloni, C.; Beluffi, G.

    1981-04-01

    A case of perinatal lethal dwarfism is described: owing to its clinical, radiological and histologic features the case can be classified as SRP syndrome type III (Verma-Naumoff). On the basis of the radiological features and - particularly - of those of the growing cartilage, stress is laid on the importance of these studies for a proper classification of such rare and not completely known chondrodysplastic dwarfisms.

  17. Short rib-polydactyly syndrome, type Verma-Naumoff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belloni, C.; Beluffi, G.; Ospedale Maggiore, Lodi

    1981-01-01

    A case of perinatal lethal dwarfism is described: owing to its clinical, radiological and histologic features the case can be classified as SRP syndrome type III (Verma-Naumoff). On the basis of the radiological features and - particularly - of those of the growing cartilage, stress is laid on the importance of these studies for a proper classification of such rare and not completely known chondrodysplastic dwarfisms. (orig.) [de

  18. Tractional retinal detachment in Usher syndrome type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rani, Alka; Pal, Nikhil; Azad, Raj Vardhan; Sharma, Yog Raj; Chandra, Parijat; Vikram Singh, Deependra

    2005-08-01

    Retinal detachment is a rare complication in patients with retinitis pigmentosa. A case is reported of tractional retinal detachment in a patient with retinitis pigmentosa and sensorineural hearing loss, which was diagnosed as Usher syndrome type II. Because of the poor visual prognosis, the patient refused surgery in that eye. Tractional retinal detachment should be added to the differential diagnoses of visual loss in patients with retinitis pigmentosa.

  19. Clinical and Genetic Spectrum of Bartter Syndrome Type 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seys, Elsa; Andrini, Olga; Keck, Mathilde; Mansour-Hendili, Lamisse; Courand, Pierre-Yves; Simian, Christophe; Deschenes, Georges; Kwon, Theresa; Bertholet-Thomas, Aurélia; Bobrie, Guillaume; Borde, Jean Sébastien; Bourdat-Michel, Guylhène; Decramer, Stéphane; Cailliez, Mathilde; Krug, Pauline; Cozette, Paul; Delbet, Jean Daniel; Dubourg, Laurence; Chaveau, Dominique; Fila, Marc; Jourde-Chiche, Noémie; Knebelmann, Bertrand; Lavocat, Marie-Pierre; Lemoine, Sandrine; Djeddi, Djamal; Llanas, Brigitte; Louillet, Ferielle; Merieau, Elodie; Mileva, Maria; Mota-Vieira, Luisa; Mousson, Christiane; Nobili, François; Novo, Robert; Roussey-Kesler, Gwenaëlle; Vrillon, Isabelle; Walsh, Stephen B; Teulon, Jacques; Blanchard, Anne; Vargas-Poussou, Rosa

    2017-08-01

    Bartter syndrome type 3 is a clinically heterogeneous hereditary salt-losing tubulopathy caused by mutations of the chloride voltage-gated channel Kb gene ( CLCNKB ), which encodes the ClC-Kb chloride channel involved in NaCl reabsorption in the renal tubule. To study phenotype/genotype correlations, we performed genetic analyses by direct sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification and retrospectively analyzed medical charts for 115 patients with CLCNKB mutations. Functional analyses were performed in Xenopus laevis oocytes for eight missense and two nonsense mutations. We detected 60 mutations, including 27 previously unreported mutations. Among patients, 29.5% had a phenotype of ante/neonatal Bartter syndrome (polyhydramnios or diagnosis in the first month of life), 44.5% had classic Bartter syndrome (diagnosis during childhood, hypercalciuria, and/or polyuria), and 26.0% had Gitelman-like syndrome (fortuitous discovery of hypokalemia with hypomagnesemia and/or hypocalciuria in childhood or adulthood). Nine of the ten mutations expressed in vitro decreased or abolished chloride conductance. Severe (large deletions, frameshift, nonsense, and essential splicing) and missense mutations resulting in poor residual conductance were associated with younger age at diagnosis. Electrolyte supplements and indomethacin were used frequently to induce catch-up growth, with few adverse effects. After a median follow-up of 8 (range, 1-41) years in 77 patients, chronic renal failure was detected in 19 patients (25%): one required hemodialysis and four underwent renal transplant. In summary, we report a genotype/phenotype correlation for Bartter syndrome type 3: complete loss-of-function mutations associated with younger age at diagnosis, and CKD was observed in all phenotypes. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  20. Usher syndrome type 1: early detection of electroretinographic changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Guevara, Roberto; Renault, Francis; Loundon, Natalie; Marlin, Sandrine; Pelosse, Béatrice; Momtchilova, Martha; Auzoux-Chevé, Monique; Vermersch, Anne Isabelle; Richard, Pascal

    2009-11-01

    Usher syndrome type 1 needs to be diagnosed at early age in order to timely manage speech therapy, cochlear implantation, and genetic counseling. Few data are available regarding electroretinographic testing before the age of six years. To describe electroretinographic changes in young children with Usher syndrome type 1. Retrospective study of fourteen patients. Age at first neurophysiologic testing was between 17 months and 5 years 4 months. Electroretinogram was performed using flash stimulation in mesopic conditions in the conscious child. Analysis was focused on the amplitudes and latencies of a- and b-waves. Whatever the age, an abnormal fundus was always confirmed with an absent electroretinogram. The youngest patient with absent electroretinogram was 17 month-old. When recorded on and after the 29th month of age, electroretinogram was absent in all cases, including 6 patients with normal fundus. In three patients a low-amplitude electroretinogram was present at first recording within the 26th and 27th months. Electroretinogram showed retinopathy in young children with Usher syndrome type 1, even in the absence of fundoscopic signs of retinal degeneration.

  1. Percutaneous treatment of a ruptured superior mesenteric artery aneurysm in a child

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oechsle, Susanne; Vollert, Kurt; Buecklein, Wolfgang; Michl, Wolfgang; Roemer, Frank W.

    2006-01-01

    Splanchnic artery aneurysms are very rare in children. We report a 10-year-old girl with a large atraumatic ruptured superior mesenteric artery aneurysm that was considered inoperable. She was ultimately treated with two percutaneous US-guided thrombin injections, which led to complete occlusion of the aneurysm. The aetiology of the aneurysm remained unclear, but a family history was suggestive of a congenital connective tissue disease such as Ehlers-Danlos syndrome subtype IV. (orig.)

  2. Multiple arterial anomalies in the newborn infant. Echocardiographic and angiographic diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Romero Rivera

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available Multiple arterial anomalies characterized by tortuosity and rolling of the pulmonary arteries and aorta were diagnosed on echocardiography in an asymptomatic newborn infant with a phenotype suggesting Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. These changes were later confirmed on angiography, which also showed peripheral vascular abnormalities. The electrocardiogram showed a probable hemiblock of the left anterosuperior branch, and the chest x-ray showed an excavated pulmonary trunk with normal pulmonary flow.

  3. Percutaneous treatment of a ruptured superior mesenteric artery aneurysm in a child

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oechsle, Susanne; Vollert, Kurt; Buecklein, Wolfgang; Michl, Wolfgang; Roemer, Frank W. [Klinikum Augsburg, Department of Radiology, Augsburg (Germany)

    2006-03-15

    Splanchnic artery aneurysms are very rare in children. We report a 10-year-old girl with a large atraumatic ruptured superior mesenteric artery aneurysm that was considered inoperable. She was ultimately treated with two percutaneous US-guided thrombin injections, which led to complete occlusion of the aneurysm. The aetiology of the aneurysm remained unclear, but a family history was suggestive of a congenital connective tissue disease such as Ehlers-Danlos syndrome subtype IV. (orig.)

  4. Achalasia in a Patient with Polyglandular Autoimmune Syndrome Type II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bashar S. Amr

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Achalasia is a rare disease characterized by aperistalsis of the esophageal body and failure of the lower esophageal sphincter to relax. The etiology of this disease remains unknown. Polyglandular autoimmune syndrome type II is a well-identified disease characterized by the occurrence of autoimmune Addison's disease in combination with autoimmune thyroid disease and/or type 1 diabetes mellitus. We report a case that suggests autoimmunity and immunogenicity as a probable contributing factor for association of these two rare disorders.

  5. DRESS syndrome associated with type 2 diabetes in a child

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdem, Semiha Bahceci; Bag, Ozlem; Karkiner, Canan Sule Unsal; Korkmaz, Huseyin Anil; Can, Demet

    2016-01-01

    Drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) syndrome is an uncommon, life-threatening drug reaction. The basic findings are skin rash, multiorgan involvement, and eosinophilia. Most of the aromatic anticonvulsants, such as phenytoin, phenobarbital and carbamazepine can induce DRESS. Herein we report a 14-year-old patient with DRESS syndrome related to carbamazepine use. The patient presented with signs of involvement of the skin, lungs, liver, and microscopic hematuria. Carbamazepine treatment was discontinued; antihistamines and steroids were started. Hyperglycemia, commencing on the first dose of the steroid given, persisted even after the discontinuation of steroids and improvement of other signs. There were no signs of pancreatitis or type 1 diabetes clinically in laboratory tests. Her blood glucose levels were regulated at first with insulin and later with metformin. Within 1 year of follow-up, still regulated with oral antidiabetics, she has been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Formerly, long-term sequelae related to “drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms syndrome” such as hepatic and renal failure, type 1 diabetes mellitus, Grave's disease, autoimmune hemolytic anemia, and lupus have also been reported. However, up to date, no cases with type 2 diabetes have been reported as long-term sequelae. To our knowledge, this is the first case in the literature presenting with type 2 diabetes as long-term sequelae. PMID:26862317

  6. Visual impairment in Finnish Usher syndrome type III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plantinga, Rutger F; Pennings, Ronald J E; Huygen, Patrick L M; Sankila, Eeva-Marja; Tuppurainen, Kaija; Kleemola, Leenamaija; Cremers, Cor W R J; Deutman, August F

    2006-02-01

    To evaluate visual impairment in Finnish Usher syndrome type 3 (USH3) and compare this with visual impairment in Usher syndrome types 1b (USH1b) and 2a (USH2a). We carried out a retrospective study of 28 Finnish USH3 patients, 24 Dutch USH2a patients and 17 Dutch USH1b patients. Cross-sectional regression analyses of the functional acuity score (FAS), functional field score (FFS*) and functional vision score (FVS*) related to age were performed for all patients. The FFS* and FVS* were calculated using the isoptre V-4 test target instead of the usual III-4 target. Statistical tests relating to regression lines and Student's t-test were used to compare between USH3 patients and the other genetic subtypes of Usher syndrome. Cross-sectional analyses revealed significant deterioration in the FAS (1.3% per year), FFS* (1.4% per year) and FVS* (1.8% per year) with advancing age in the USH3 patient group. At a given age the USH3 patients showed significantly poorer visual field function than the USH2a patients. The rate of deterioration in visual function in Finnish USH3 patients was fairly similar to that in Dutch USH1b or USH2a patients. At a given age, visual field impairment in USH3 patients was similar to that in USH1b patients but poorer than in USH2a patients.

  7. [Discussion of Chinese syndrome typing in acute hepatic failure model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jin-liang; Zeng, Hui; Wang, Xian-bo

    2011-05-01

    To study Chinese syndrome typing of acute hepatic failure (AHF) mice model by screening effective formulae. Lipoplysaccharides (LPS)/D-galactosamine (D-GaIN) was intraperitoneally injected to mice to establish the AHF mice model. Yinchenhao Decoction, Huanglian Jiedu Decoction, Buzhong Yiqi Decoction, and Xijiao Dihuang Decoction were administered to model mice respectively by gastrogavage. The behavior and the survival rate were monitored. The liver function and pathological changes of liver tissues were detected. In all the tested classic recipes, the survival rate was elevated from 10% to 60% by administration of Xijiao Dihuang Decoction. Five h after modeling, the serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) level was (183.95 +/- 52.00) U/L, and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) (235.70 +/- 34.03) U/L in Xijiao Di-huang Decoction Group, lower than those of the model control group, but with insignificant difference (ALT: 213.32 +/- 71.93 U/L; AST: 299.48 +/- 70.56 U/L, both P > 0.05). Xijiao Dihuang Decoction could obviously alleviate the liver injury. Xijiao Dihuang Decoction was an effective formula for LPS/D-GaIN induced AHF model. According to syndrome typing through formula effect, heat toxin and blood stasis syndrome dominated in the LPS/D-GalN induced AHF mice model.

  8. Macrophage activation syndrome associated with griscelli syndrome type 2: case report and review of literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sefsafi, Zakia; Hasbaoui, Brahim El; Kili, Amina; Agadr, Aomar; Khattab, Mohammed

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) is a severe and potentially fatal life-threatening condition associated with excessive activation and expansion of T cells with macrophages and a high expression of cytokines, resulting in an uncontrolled inflammatory response, with high levels of macrophage colony-stimulating factor and causing multiorgan damage. This syndrome is classified into primary (genetic/familial) or secondary forms to several etiologies, such as infections, neoplasias mainly hemopathies or autoimmune diseases. It is characterised clinically by unremitting high fever, pancytopaenia, hepatosplenomegaly, hepatic dysfunction, encephalopathy, coagulation abnormalities and sharply increased levels of ferritin. The pathognomonic feature of the syndrome is seen on bone marrow examination, which frequently, though not always, reveals numerous morphologically benign macrophages exhibiting haemophagocytic activity. Because MAS can follow a rapidly fatal course, prompt recognition of its clinical and laboratory features and immediate therapeutic intervention are essential. However, it is difficult to distinguish underlying disease flare, infectious complications or medication side effects from MAS. Although, the pathogenesis of MAS is unclear, the hallmark of the syndrome is an uncontrolled activation and proliferation of T lymphocytes and macrophages, leading to massive hypersecretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Mutations in cytolytic pathway genes are increasingly being recognised in children who develop MAS in his secondary form. We present here a case of Macrophage activation syndrome associated with Griscelli syndrome type 2 in a 3-years-old boy who had been referred due to severe sepsis with non-remitting high fever, generalized lymphoadenopathy and hepato-splenomegaly. Laboratory data revealed pancytopenia with high concentrations of triglycerides, ferritin and lactic dehydrogenase while the bone marrow revealed numerous morphologically benign

  9. Complex regional pain syndrome type I following pacemaker implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangita Kamath

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A 70-year-old woman presented with burning pain and swelling over dorsum of right hand and small joints of the fingers, associated with redness, feeling of warmth, and stiffness of the fingers, with inability to bend the fingers since 2 months. The symptoms were progressively increasing in intensity for the past 1 month. There was no history of fever or trauma to the hand. Two months before her symptoms started, she had permanent pacemaker implanted for complete heart block with syncope. She was hypertensive and was on regular medication. Her X-ray of right hand showed decreased bone density (demineralisation, suggestive of osteopenia. A diagnosis of reflex sympathetic dystrophy syndrome or complex regional pain syndrome type I induced by pacemaker insertion was made. She was treated with amitriptyline and steroids, after which her symptoms improved dramatically.

  10. Successful Pregnancy Outcome In Maternal Crigler Najjar Syndrome Type II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shakuntala PN

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Estimated incidence of Crigler-Najjar syndrome(CNS is 1 case per 1,000,000 births(1 million. The overall prevalence of CN syndrome is unknown, with only several hundred people reported to have this disease. It is interestingly very rare to encounter a pregnant adult women with congenital jaundice. Pregnancy in CN type II patients is a diagnostic and a therapeutic challenge because of the high risk of bilirubin encephalopathy with serious neurological damage as life-threatening complications for the fetus. To date 8 pregnancy outcome have been reported from 5 women and we report the6 woman with a successful 9 th pregnancy outcome. We have discussed detail history, presentation and management during pregnancy and care of the new born.

  11. The congenital long QT syndrome Type 3: An update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Ricardo Pérez-Riera

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital long QT syndrome type 3 (LQT3 is the third in frequency compared to the 15 forms known currently of congenital long QT syndrome (LQTS. Cardiac events are less frequent in LQT3 when compared with LQT1 and LQT2, but more likely to be lethal; the likelihood of dying during a cardiac event is 20% in families with an LQT3 mutation and 4% with either an LQT1 or an LQT2 mutation. LQT3 is consequence of mutation of gene SCN5A which codes for the Nav1.5 Na+ channel α-subunit and electrocardiographically characterized by a tendency to bradycardia related to age, prolonged QT/QTc interval (mean QTc value 478 ± 52 ms, accentuated QT dispersion consequence of prolonged ST segment, late onset of T wave and frequent prominent U wave because of longer repolarization of the M cell across left ventricular wall.

  12. Type IV neonatal Bartter syndrome complicated with congenital chloride diarrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakallı, Hale; Bucak, Hakan İbrahim

    2012-01-01

    Pseudo-Bartter syndrome encompasses a heterogenous group of disorders similar to Bartter syndrome. Sometimes a few status may be nested, as in our case presented here. An 8-month-old boy was referred to our hospital with of intractable diarrhea, polyuria, persistent hypokalemia, abdominal distension and failure to thrive. He was born in the 34 6/7 gestational week (GW) to consanguineous parents. In the 30(th) GW polyhydramnios was verified by ultrasonography. The laboratory results showed hypokalemic-hypochloremic metabolic alkalosis, hyponatremia, and increased urinary loss of chloride, potassium and calcium. An audiogram test revealed complete sensorineural deafness. Ultrasonography revealed medullary nephrocalcinosis in both kidneys. Elevated plasma renin activity and aldosterone were found and a provisional diagnosis of type-IV neonatal Bartter syndrome was made. Treatment with indomethacin, spironolactone and additional intake of NaCl/KCl was initiated. Despite these therapies, the child's diarrhea persisted but serum potassium concentration normalized, and hypercalciuria and urine output reduced. After determining the high fecal chloride concentration, there was an immediate decompensation of the disease on indomethacin withdrawal, thus a diagnosis of type IV neonatal Bartter syndrome complicated with congenital chloride diarrhea was considered. Indomethacin, spironolactone and supplementary therapies with NaCl/KCl were continued, which resulted in the normalization of serum electrolytes as well as his physical development, but high contents of chloride in urine and faeces and nephrocalcinosis remains unchanged during 1-year follow-up. Because of the clinical and laboratory simulations between the various diseases that lead to hypokalemic-hypochloremic metabolic alkalosis, patients must be evaluated carefully.

  13. The ophthalmological course of Usher syndrome type III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakarinen, L; Tuppurainen, K; Laippala, P; Mäntyjärvi, M; Puhakka, H

    Usher syndrome is a recessive hereditary disease group with clinical and genetical heterogeneity leading to handicapped hearing and visual loss until middle age. It is the most common cause for deaf-blindness. Three distinct phenotypes and five distinct genotypes are already known. In Finland the distribution of known Usher types is different than elsewhere. Usher syndrome type III (USH3) is common in Finland and it is thought to include 40% of patients. Progressive hearing loss is characteristic of USH3. Elsewhere USH3 has been regarded as a rarity covering only several percent of the whole Usher population. The aim of this paper is to describe, for the first time, the course of visual handicap and typical refractive errors in USH3 and compare it with other USH types. From a total patient sample consisting of 229 Finnish USH patients, 200 patients' visual findings were analyzed in a multicenter retrospective follow-up study. The average progress rate during a 10-year follow-up period in different USH types was similar. The essential progress occurred below the age of 40 and was continuous up to that age. Visual acuity dropped below 0.05 (severely impaired) at the age of 37 and the visual fields were of tubular shape without any peripheric islands at the average age of 30. Clinically significant hypermetropia with astigmatism seems to be a pathognomonic clinical sign of USH3.

  14. Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 1 in a 12-year-old ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 1 in a 12-year-old Ugandan girl. ... Journal of Endocrinology, Metabolism and Diabetes of South Africa ... Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 1 (APS-1), also known as autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasisectodermal dystrophy syndrome, is a very rare disorder of ...

  15. Oral and dental findings of griscelli syndrome type 3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozlem Marti Akgun

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Griscelli syndrome (GS is a rare autosomal recessive genetic disorder characterized by variable immunodeficiency, partial albinism, abnormal accumulation of melanosomes in melanocytes, pigmentary dilution of the skin, and shiny silver-gray hair. GS has three types, with the first and second types caused by mutations in two genes being located at band 15q21: RAB27A and MYO5A. The expression of the third form of GS is restricted to the characteristic hypopigmentation of GS, and results from mutation in the gene that encodes melanophilin MLPH. It has also been shown that an identical phenotype can result from the deletion of the MYO5A F-exon. The aim of this case report is the presentation of oral and dental features and SEM images of the hair of a 12-year-old girl with GS type 3. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2015; 4(3.000: 164-167

  16. [Cochlear implantation in patients with Waardenburg syndrome type II].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Liangcai; Guo, Menghe; Chen, Shuaijun; Liu, Shuangriu; Chen, Hao; Gong, Jian

    2010-05-01

    To describe the multi-channel cochlear implantation in patients with Waardenburg syndrome including surgeries, pre and postoperative hearing assessments as well as outcomes of speech recognition. Multi-channel cochlear implantation surgeries have been performed in 12 cases with Waardenburg syndrome type II in our department from 2000 to 2008. All the patients received multi-channel cochlear implantation through transmastoid facial recess approach. The postoperative outcomes of 12 cases were compared with 12 cases with no inner ear malformation as a control group. The electrodes were totally inserted into the cochlear successfully, there was no facial paralysis and cerebrospinal fluid leakage occurred after operation. The hearing threshold in this series were similar to that of the normal cochlear implantation. After more than half a year of speech rehabilitation, the abilities of speech discrimination and spoken language of all the patients were improved compared with that of preoperation. Multi-channel cochlear implantation could be performed in the cases with Waardenburg syndrome, preoperative hearing and images assessments should be done.

  17. Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome, type 2 associated with myasthenia gravis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pejin Radoslav

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 2 is defined as adrenal insufficiency associated with autoimmune primary hypothyroidism and/or with autoimmune type 1 diabetes mellitus, but very rare with myasthenia gravis. Case report. We presented a case of an autoimmune polyglandular syndrome, type 2 associated with myasthenia gravis. A 49-year-old female with symptoms of muscle weakness and low serum levels of cortisol and aldosterone was already diagnosed with primary adrenal insufficiency. Primary hypothyroidism was identified with low values of free thyroxine 4 (FT4 and raised values of thyroidstumulating hormone (TSH. The immune system as a cause of hypothyroidism was confirmed by the presence of thyroid antibodies to peroxidase and TSH receptors. Myasthenia gravis was diagnosed on the basis of a typical clinical feature, positive diagnostic tests and an increased titre of antibodies against the acetylcholine receptors. It was not possible to confirm the immune nature of adrenal insufficiency by the presence of antibodies to 21- hydroxylase. The normal morphological finding of the adrenal glands was an indirect confirmation of the condition as well as the absence of other diseases that might have led to adrenal insufficiency and low levels of both serum cortisol and aldosterone. Hormone replacement therapy, anticholinergic therapy and corticosteroid therapy for myasthenia gravis improved the patient’s general state of health and muscle weakness. Conclusion. This case report indicates a need to examine each patient with an autoimmune disease carefully as this condition may be associated with another autoimmune diseases.

  18. Type 1 diabetes and polyglandular autoimmune syndrome: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Martin P; Matheis, Nina; Kahaly, George J

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disorder caused by inflammatory destruction of the pancreatic tissue. The etiopathogenesis and characteristics of the pathologic process of pancreatic destruction are well described. In addition, the putative susceptibility genes for T1D as a monoglandular disease and the relation to polyglandular autoimmune syndrome (PAS) have also been well explored. The incidence of T1D has steadily increased in most parts of the world, especially in industrialized nations. T1D is frequently associated with autoimmune endocrine and non-endocrine diseases and patients with T1D are at a higher risk for developing several glandular autoimmune diseases. Familial clustering is observed, which suggests that there is a genetic predisposition. Various hypotheses pertaining to viral- and bacterial-induced pancreatic autoimmunity have been proposed, however a definitive delineation of the autoimmune pathomechanism is still lacking. In patients with PAS, pancreatic and endocrine autoantigens either colocalize on one antigen-presenting cell or are expressed on two/various target cells sharing a common amino acid, which facilitates binding to and activation of T cells. The most prevalent PAS phenotype is the adult type 3 variant or PAS type III, which encompasses T1D and autoimmune thyroid disease. This review discusses the findings of recent studies showing noticeable differences in the genetic background and clinical phenotype of T1D either as an isolated autoimmune endocrinopathy or within the scope of polyglandular autoimmune syndrome. PMID:25685279

  19. Waardenburg syndrome type 2 in an african patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Otman S

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A thirty six year-old African man, born in the Southern part of Libya, presented with congenital deafness and white forelock, variable-sized hypopigmented, depigmented patches and hyperpigmented islands within the areas of hypomelanosis affecting the upper parts of the trunk, both arms and forearms. The nasal root was hypertrophied, but there was a lack of lateral displacement of medial canthi. We report this case of Waardenburg syndrome type 2 (WS 2. As no treatment is available for patients with WS 2, prompt diagnosis and referral to a hearing specialist are crucial for the normal development of patients affected with this condition.

  20. Griscelli syndrome type 2: A rare and fatal syndrome in a South Indian boy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Rajyalakshmi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Griscelli syndrome (GS is a rare autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutation in the MYO5A (GS1, RAB27A (GS2, and MLPH (GS3 genes, characterized by a common feature, partial albinism. The common variant of three, GS type 2, in addition, shows primary immunodeficiency which leads to recurrent infections and hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis. We, herewith, describe a case of GS type 2, in a 4-year-old male child who presented with chronic and recurrent fever, lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly, and secondary neurological deterioration; highlighting the cytological and histopathological features of lymph nodes. Hair shaft examination of the child confirmed the diagnosis.

  1. Frequency of metabolic syndrome in type-2 diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiani, I.G.; Khan, A.N.; Yasir, S.; Baluch, U.T.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a cluster of coronary risk factors such as diabetes and pre-diabetes, abdominal obesity, high triglyceride (TG), low high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c) levels and high blood pressure (BP). It is estimated that around a quarter of the world adult population have MetS and they are twice as likely to die from it and three times as likely to have a coronary event or stroke compared with people without the syndrome. Methods: This observational descriptive study was conducted at the Department of General Medicine, Federal Government Polyclinic Islamabad. All type-2 diabetics presenting in the outpatient and inpatient department during 11 months between the ages of 30-80 were enrolled. They were interviewed, blood pressure, waist circumference, fasting blood glucose, and lipid profiles were checked. Results: Of the 300 patients 165 (55 percentage) were females and 135 (45 percentage) were males with mean age 52.47±11.24 years. The mean duration of Diabetes Mellitus was 7.38±3.85 years. Metabolic Syndrome was present in 83 percentage of the study population, 129 (43 percentage) were male and 171 (57 percentage) were female. The p-value was statistically significant on comparing the presence of the Metabolic Syndrome with waist circumference, serum triglyceride levels, and blood pressure as it was <0.05. The most commonly occurring finding was a decreased HDL-cholesterol in both genders. Conclusions: The MetS was present in 83 percentage of the diabetic population, mostly in females with decreased HDL-cholesterol being the most common in both genders. (author)

  2. Myositis in Griscelli syndrome type 2 treated with hematopoietic cell transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Born, Alfred Peter; Müller, Klaus; Marquart, Hanne Vibeke

    2010-01-01

    Griscelli syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by pigmentary dilution and is occasionally associated with a hemophagocytic syndrome (type 2). We present a 13-year-old girl with Griscelli syndrome type 2, who developed a hemophagocytic syndrome along with marked muscle weakness...... and elevated plasma creatine kinase. Muscle biopsy showed massive inflammatory changes in some fascicles, while other fascicles were relatively spared. Clinical symptoms and biopsy changes resolved after immunosuppression and allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation. Our results suggest that muscle...

  3. Anisometropic amblyopia in a case of type 2 Waardenburg syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akal, Ali; Göncü, Tugba; Boyaci, Nurefsan; Yılmaz, Ömer Faruk

    2013-01-01

    This study presents a case of an 8-year-old boy with iris heterochromia and anisometropic amblyopia who was diagnosed with Waardenburg syndrome (WS) type 2. An ophthalmic examination revealed iris heterochromia and anisometropic amblyopia in our patient. In the systemic examination, a white forelock and vitiligo on the arms and body were observed and neurosensory hearing loss was revealed, for which the patient used hearing aids. Identification and typing of patients with WS is crucial to address neurosensory hearing loss, glaucoma and fundus changes. While it might be challenging to communicate with a patient with speech and hearing problems, visual acuity should be examined carefully and probable amblyopia should be identified. Anterior segment changes and signs of glaucoma should also be evaluated in detail. PMID:24351514

  4. Anisometropic amblyopia in a case of type 2 Waardenburg syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akal, Ali; Göncü, Tugba; Boyaci, Nurefsan; Yılmaz, Ömer Faruk

    2013-12-18

    This study presents a case of an 8-year-old boy with iris heterochromia and anisometropic amblyopia who was diagnosed with Waardenburg syndrome (WS) type 2. An ophthalmic examination revealed iris heterochromia and anisometropic amblyopia in our patient. In the systemic examination, a white forelock and vitiligo on the arms and body were observed and neurosensory hearing loss was revealed, for which the patient used hearing aids. Identification and typing of patients with WS is crucial to address neurosensory hearing loss, glaucoma and fundus changes. While it might be challenging to communicate with a patient with speech and hearing problems, visual acuity should be examined carefully and probable amblyopia should be identified. Anterior segment changes and signs of glaucoma should also be evaluated in detail.

  5. Audiological findings in Usher syndrome types IIa and II (non-IIa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, Mehdi; Cohn, Edward S; Kelly, William J; Kimberling, William J; Tranebjoerg, Lisbeth; Möller, Claes

    2004-03-01

    The aim was to define the natural history of hearing loss in Usher syndrome type IIa compared to non-IIa. People with Usher syndrome type II show moderate-to-severe hearing loss, normal balance and retinitis pigmentosa. Several genes cause Usher syndrome type II. Our subjects formed two genetic groups: (1) subjects with Usher syndrome type IIa with a mutation and/or linkage to the Usher IIa gene; (2) subjects with the Usher II phenotype with no mutation and/or linkage to the Usher IIa gene. Four hundred and two audiograms of 80 Usher IIa subjects were compared with 435 audiograms of 87 non-IIa subjects. Serial audiograms with intervals of > or = 5 years were examined for progression in 109 individuals Those with Usher syndrome type IIa had significantly worse hearing thresholds than those with non-IIa Usher syndrome after the second decade. The hearing loss in Usher syndrome type IIa was found to be more progressive, and the progression started earlier than in non-IIa Usher syndrome. This suggests an auditory phenotype for Usher syndrome type IIa that is different from that of other types of Usher syndrome II. Thus, this is to our knowledge one of the first studies showing a genotype-phenotype auditory correlation.

  6. Genetic analysis of a Chinese family with members affected with Usher syndrome type II and Waardenburg syndrome type IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xueling; Lin, Xiao-Jiang; Tang, Xiangrong; Chai, Yong-Chuan; Yu, De-Hong; Chen, Dong-Ye; Wu, Hao

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the genetic causes of a family presenting with multiple symptoms overlapping Usher syndrome type II (USH2) and Waardenburg syndrome type IV (WS4). Targeted next-generation sequencing including the exon and flanking intron sequences of 79 deafness genes was performed on the proband. Co-segregation of the disease phenotype and the detected variants were confirmed in all family members by PCR amplification and Sanger sequencing. The affected members of this family had two different recessive disorders, USH2 and WS4. By targeted next-generation sequencing, we identified that USH2 was caused by a novel missense mutation, p.V4907D in GPR98; whereas WS4 due to p.V185M in EDNRB. This is the first report of homozygous p.V185M mutation in EDNRB in patient with WS4. This study reported a Chinese family with multiple independent and overlapping phenotypes. In condition, molecular level analysis was efficient to identify the causative variant p.V4907D in GPR98 and p.V185M in EDNRB, also was helpful to confirm the clinical diagnosis of USH2 and WS4. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Delineation and Diagnostic Criteria of Oral-Facial-Digital Syndrome Type VI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poretti, Andrea; Vitiello, Giuseppina; Hennekam, Raoul C. M.; Arrigoni, Filippo; Bertini, Enrico; Borgatti, Renato; Brancati, Francesco; D'Arrigo, Stefano; Faravelli, Francesca; Giordano, Lucio; Huisman, Thierry A. G. M.; Iannicelli, Miriam; Kluger, Gerhard; Kyllerman, Marten; Landgren, Magnus; Lees, Melissa M.; Pinelli, Lorenzo; Romaniello, Romina; Scheer, Ianina; Schwarz, Christoph E.; Spiegel, Ronen; Tibussek, Daniel; Valente, Enza Maria; Boltshauser, Eugen

    2012-01-01

    Oral-Facial-Digital Syndrome type VI (OFD VI) represents a rare phenotypic subtype of Joubert syndrome and related disorders (JSRD). In the original report polydactyly, oral findings, intellectual disability, and absence of the cerebellar vermis at post-mortem characterized the syndrome.

  8. Acromion types and role of corticosteroid with shoulder impingement syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akram, M.; Gillani, S.F.U.S.; Awais, S.M.

    2016-01-01

    To determine the association between shoulder impingement and morphological characteristics of acromion and the role of sub-acromial injection of methylprednisolone in the short-term treatment for relieving pain and improve functional disability of these patients. Study Design: A descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Orthopedic Surgery and Traumatology Unit-I (DOST-I), Mayo Hospital, Lahore, between November 2013 to June 2014. Methodology: All patients presented in OPD with shoulder pain were included as subjects and evaluated by clinical test and categorised using X-ray scapula Y-view. Patients with impingement syndrome were correlated with Bigliani types and offered intra-lesional injection into sub-acromial space with 2ml of xylocaine 2% and 40 mg of methylprednisolone using 22 gauge needle. The effectiveness was assessed in terms of relieving pain and good functional outcomes; and rotator cuff tear was clinically assessed among impingement positive patient. The pain was assessed using visual analogue score before and after the administration of the injection. Demographic variables for frequencies and their associations were analysed using SPSS version 20.0. Significance level was p<0.05. Among the 101 cases, there was no case of tear of rotator cuff tendon on clinical assessment. Majority of the patients (58.4%) were females with mean age of 31.38 +-1.13 years. Majority 57 (56.4%) of the patients had acromion type II (curved), which was the most common cause of shoulder impingement. Most had moderate pain. Thirty-four patients required intralesional steroid, which relieved the pain in 31 of them. Conclusion: Shoulder impingement syndrome without tear of rotator cuff tendon was found in younger age group between 40 to 45 years, which was relieved by intralesional corticosteroid administration. These patients had type II (curved) acromion, according to Bigliani classification. (author)

  9. Type V Pouch Colon, Prune Belly Syndrome, and Congenital Anterior Urethrocutaneous Fistula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, Prince; Birua, Hirendra

    2017-01-01

    Congenital pouch colon (CPC) or short colon syndrome is a rare type of anorectal malformation(ARM). Type V is the rarest form of CPC. We present a 1-day-old male child with type V CPC with prune belly syndrome and congenital anterior urethrocutaneous fistula (CAUF).

  10. Chronic pain in hypermobility syndrome and Ehlers–Danlos syndrome (hypermobility type: it is a challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scheper MC

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Mark C Scheper,1,2 Janneke E de Vries,1–3 Jeanine Verbunt,3,4 Raoul HH Engelbert1,2 1School of Physiotherapy, Amsterdam University of Applied Sciences, Amsterdam, 2Department of Rehabilitation, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, 3Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, CAPHRI School for Public Health and Primary Care, Maastricht University, Maastricht; 4Adelante, Center of expertise in Rehabilitation and Audiology, Hoensbroek, the Netherlands Abstract: Generalized joint hypermobility (GJH is highly prevalent among patients diagnosed with chronic pain. When GJH is accompanied by pain in ≥4 joints over a period ≥3 months in the absence of other conditions that cause chronic pain, the hypermobility syndrome (HMS may be diagnosed. In addition, GJH is also a clinical sign that is frequently present in hereditary diseases of the connective tissue, such as the Marfan syndrome, osteogenesis imperfecta, and the Ehlers–Danlos syndrome. However, within the Ehlers–Danlos spectrum, a similar subcategory of patients having similar clinical features as HMS but lacking a specific genetic profile was identified: Ehlers–Danlos syndrome hypermobility type (EDS-HT. Researchers and clinicians have struggled for decades with the highly diverse clinical presentation within the HMS and EDS-HT phenotypes (Challenge 1 and the lack of understanding of the pathological mechanisms that underlie the development of pain and its persistence (Challenge 2. In addition, within the HMS/EDS-HT phenotype, there is a high prevalence of psychosocial factors, which again presents a difficult issue that needs to be addressed (Challenge 3. Despite recent scientific advances, many obstacles for clinical care and research still remain. To gain further insight into the phenotype of HMS/EDS-HT and its mechanisms, clearer descriptions of these populations should be made available. Future research and clinical care should revise and create consensus on the

  11. Vasculitis mimics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molloy, Eamonn S; Langford, Carol A

    2008-01-01

    There are many disorders that may closely resemble the clinical, radiologic and/or pathologic features of the primary vasculitides. In this review, we focus on recently described and under-recognized syndromes that may mimic vasculitis. Hereditary causes of large-artery aneurysms such as Marfan's syndrome have long been recognized; recent years have seen a greater understanding of the genetics of Marfan's and other such disorders, including Loeys-Dietz syndrome and Ehler-Danlos syndrome type IV. Under-recognized mimics of medium-vessel vasculitis include segmental arterial mediolysis and Grange syndrome. A large number of entities can mimic small-vessel vasculitis. Recent descriptions of antibodies to human neutrophil elastase have provided insight into the occurrence of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies in cocaine-induced midline destructive lesions. The differential diagnosis of cerebral vasculitis can be particularly difficult. Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndromes represent an important class of entities that can readily mimic cerebral vasculitis but have a very different management approach and outcome. The diagnosis of vasculitis requires careful assessment of all available clinical, laboratory, radiologic and pathologic information, and consideration of many competing differential diagnoses. Awareness of noninflammatory mimics of vasculitis is essential to avoid unnecessary and potentially harmful treatment with immunosuppressive agents.

  12. Pseudotumor cerebri syndrome in a patient with narcolepsy type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossor, Thomas; Lim, Ming; VanDenEshof, Kirandeep; Gringras, Paul

    2018-01-01

    Type 1 narcolepsy (NT1) is a chronic primary disorder of hypersomnolence characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness, cataplexy, sleep paralysis, hypnagogic hallucinations and disrupted nocturnal sleep. NT1 is linked to hypothalamic hypocretin deficiency, strongly associated with Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) marker DQB1*06:02 and of probable autoimmune origin. NT1 is usually associated with increased rates of overweight and obesity, and sometimes with increases in overnight blood pressure and increased rates of hypoventilation with raised CO 2 levels overnight. Many of these are predisposing factors for pseudotumor cerebri syndrome (PTCS). We present a case of a young girl with both NT1 and PTCS that responded well to treatment with acetazolamide after early identification, with improvement of headache and resolution of hypoventilation. Copyright © 2017 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Type III Mixed Cryoglobulinemia and Antiphospholipid Syndrome in a Patient With Partial DiGeorge Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice D. Chang

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We studied a 14 year-old boy with partial DiGeorge syndrome (DGS, status post complete repair of Tetralogy of Fallot, who developed antiphospholipid syndrome (APS and type III mixed cryoglobulinemia. He presented with recurrent fever and dyspnea upon exertion secondary to right pulmonary embolus on chest computed tomography (CT. Coagulation studies revealed homozygous methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase 677TT mutations, elevated cardiolipin IgM antibodies, and elevated β2-glycoprotein I IgM antibodies. Infectious work-up revealed only positive anti-streptolysin O (ASO and anti-DNAse B titers. Autoimmune studies showed strongly positive anti-platelet IgM, elevated rheumatoid factor (RF, and positive cryocrit. Renal biopsy for evaluation of proteinuria and hematuria showed diffuse proliferative glomerulonephritis (DPGN with membranoproliferative features consistent with cryoglobulinemia. Immunofixation showed polyclonal bands. Our patient was treated successfully with antibiotics, prednisone, and mycophenolate mofetil (MMF. This is the first report of a patient with partial DGS presenting with APS and type III mixed cryoglobulinemia possibly due to Streptococcal infection.

  14. Genetic heterogeneity in patients with Bartter syndrome type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Mingran; Ning, Jing; Xu, Weihong; Zhang, Han; Zhao, Kaishu; Li, Wenfu; Li, Guiying; Li, Shibo

    2017-02-01

    Bartter syndrome (BS) type 1 is an autosomal recessive kidney disorder caused by loss‑of‑function mutations in the solute carrier family 12 member 1 (SLC12A1) gene. To date, 72 BS type 1 patients harboring SLC12A1 mutations have been documented. Of these 144 alleles studied, 68 different disease‑causing mutations have been detected in 129 alleles, and no mutation was detected in the remaining 15 alleles. The mutation types included missense/nonsense mutations, splicing mutations and small insertions and deletions ranging from 1 to 4 nucleotides. A large deletion encompassing a whole exon in the SLC12A1 gene has not yet been reported. The current study initially identified an undocumented homozygous frameshift mutation (c.1833delT) by Sanger sequencing analysis of a single infant with BS type 1. However, in a subsequent analysis, the mutation was detected only in the father's DNA. Upon further investigation using a next‑generation sequencing approach, a deletion in exons 14 and 15 in both the patient and patient's mother was detected. The deletion was subsequently confirmed by use of a long‑range polymerase chain reaction and was determined to be 3.16 kb in size based on sequencing of the junction fragment. The results of the present study demonstrated that pathogenic variants of SLC12A1 are heterogeneous. Large deletions appear to serve an etiological role in BS type 1, and may be more prevalent than previously thought.

  15. Metabolic Syndrome and Cardiovascular Risk Factors after Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in Severe Mucopolysaccharidosis Type I (Hurler Syndrome).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braunlin, Elizabeth; Steinberger, Julia; DeFor, Todd; Orchard, Paul; Kelly, Aaron S

    2018-02-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation is a life-saving procedure, but one associated with increasing long-term cardiovascular risk requiring frequent long-term follow-up. This therapy has significantly lengthened survival in mucopolysaccharidosis type IH (Hurler syndrome), a disease with known coronary artery involvement. Metabolic syndrome-a constellation of central obesity, high blood pressure, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, elevated triglycerides, and fasting blood glucose-is associated with increased cardiovascular risk, and occurs when any 3 or more of these 5 components is present within a single individual. The incidence of metabolic syndrome and its components is poorly defined after transplantation for Hurler syndrome. Chart review of all long-term survivors of hematopoietic cell transplantation for Hurler syndrome ≥9 years of age for factors comprising the metabolic syndrome: obesity, high blood pressure, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, elevated triglycerides, and fasting blood glucose. Sixty-three patients were evaluated, 20 of whom had components of the metabolic syndrome available for review. There was no significant difference in age at transplantation, sex, number of transplants, pretransplant radiation, or percent engraftment between those with and without these data. Median follow-up after transplantation for the 20 patients with data was 14.3 years. Only 1 (5%) patient of this group fulfilled the criteria for metabolic syndrome. Fifty-three percent of the patients had 1 or more components of metabolic syndrome: the most common was high blood pressure occurring in 40%. Metabolic syndrome is uncommon in this cohort of long-term survivors of hematopoietic cell transplantation for Hurler syndrome but almost half of the patients had 1 or more components of the syndrome, with high blood pressure being the most common. Further studies are needed to develop guidelines in this diagnosis as well as other nonmalignant diseases of children

  16. Hyperuricaemia and the metabolic syndrome in type 2 DM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogbera Anthonia O

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Elevated serum uric acid levels (SUA have been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular diseases and the metabolic syndrome (MetS and are often reported to be higher in females than in males. The aim of this report is to determine the prevalence and clinical correlates of hyperuricaemia and also to evaluate associations with the MetS in people with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM. Methods This was a cross-sectional study conducted in people with type 2 DM in Lagos, Nigeria. Hyperuricaemia was defined by cut-off values of > 7 mg/dl for men and > 6 mg/dl for women. The diagnosis of MetS was made using the new definition by the American Heart Association and other related bodies. Clinical and biochemical parameters were compared between subjects with hyperuricaemia and normouricaemia. Statistical analysis included usage of Student's t test, Pearson correlation coefficients, multivariate regression analysis and chi square. Results 601 patients with type 2 DM aged between 34-91 years were recruited for the study. The prevalence rates of hyperuricaemia and the MetS were 25% and 60% respectively. The frequency of occurrence of hyperuricaemia was comparable in both genders (59% vs 41%, p = 0.3. Although, the prevalence of the MetS in subjects with hyperuricaemia and normouricaemia was comparable (61 vs 56%, p = 0.1, a higher proportion of hyperuricaemic subjects had 3 or more components of the Mets compared with normouricaemic subjects. Possible predictors of hyperuricaemia include central obesity, smoking and elevated serum triglycerides (TG. SUA levels were found to be positively and significantly associated with serum TG (r = 0.2, p = 0.0001 and total cholesterol (r = 13, p = 0.001. Conclusion The prevalence of hyperuricaemia in subjects with type 2 DM is comparable in both genders and possible predictors of hyperuricaemia are potentially modifiable. SUA is positively and significantly associated with serum TG and total

  17. Targeted exon sequencing in Usher syndrome type I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bujakowska, Kinga M; Consugar, Mark; Place, Emily; Harper, Shyana; Lena, Jaclyn; Taub, Daniel G; White, Joseph; Navarro-Gomez, Daniel; Weigel DiFranco, Carol; Farkas, Michael H; Gai, Xiaowu; Berson, Eliot L; Pierce, Eric A

    2014-12-02

    Patients with Usher syndrome type I (USH1) have retinitis pigmentosa, profound congenital hearing loss, and vestibular ataxia. This syndrome is currently thought to be associated with at least six genes, which are encoded by over 180 exons. Here, we present the use of state-of-the-art techniques in the molecular diagnosis of a cohort of 47 USH1 probands. The cohort was studied with selective exon capture and next-generation sequencing of currently known inherited retinal degeneration genes, comparative genomic hybridization, and Sanger sequencing of new USH1 exons identified by human retinal transcriptome analysis. With this approach, we were able to genetically solve 14 of the 47 probands by confirming the biallelic inheritance of mutations. We detected two likely pathogenic variants in an additional 19 patients, for whom family members were not available for cosegregation analysis to confirm biallelic inheritance. Ten patients, in addition to primary disease-causing mutations, carried rare likely pathogenic USH1 alleles or variants in other genes associated with deaf-blindness, which may influence disease phenotype. Twenty-one of the identified mutations were novel among the 33 definite or likely solved patients. Here, we also present a clinical description of the studied cohort at their initial visits. We found a remarkable genetic heterogeneity in the studied USH1 cohort with multiplicity of mutations, of which many were novel. No obvious influence of genotype on phenotype was found, possibly due to small sample sizes of the genotypes under study. Copyright 2014 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

  18. Complex regional pain syndromes (CRPS type 1 validating case histories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Berger

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of patients with complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS type 1 is challenging and unpredictable as the condition presents with vascular and neuropathic symptoms after nil or even minor injury to a peripheral nerve. The condition is one of a pain and motor dysfunction. The pathophysiology is not well understood and the relief of symptoms may change from being sympathetically mediated to sympathetically independent during  the course of the disease. At any stage physiotherapy has been advocated as the corner stone and most important aspect of treatment in the rehabilitation of these individuals but unfortunately it has been difficult to execute when pain is exacerbated due to allodynia (unbearable to touch or move and hyperalgesia. Best results have been obtained if the patients are recognised and treated in the early or acute phase and it has been found that through careful assessment and analysis these patients can be recognised by previous events that have occurred in their initial case history. The treatment in the acute stage with physiotherapy modalities such as electrical stimulation and acupuncture will produce an early cessation of the symptoms and prevention of the disease developing into the fully blown CRPS type 1 with irreversible and possibly atrophic consequences. Case histories have been presented that illustrate these important aspects and demonstrate  the value of early and the appropriate physiotherapy that may be more successful than other pharmacological and physical interventions in this disease.

  19. Reflex sympathetic dystrophy/complex regional pain syndrome, type 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.H. Botha

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Complex regional pain syndrome (CPRS, type 1 is a pain disorder that develops unpredictably and can follow a minor injury. A 12-year-old boy presented with severe pain in the feet and could not walk or stand weight bearing. Normal X-rays showed osteopenic changes and radiolucent lines, which appeared to be stress fractures. Three-phase bone scintigraphy showed no uptake in the left lower leg on the blood pool phase or on the immediate or delayed images. This indicated typical CPRS type 1 in children. The uptake in the right foot was increased and the stress fracture and other illness could not be differentiated. Computed tomography was done to exclude stress fractures. Only osteopenic changes in both calcaneus bones were found and there was no evidence of cortical stress fractures. Magnetic resonance images revealed oedema in the calcaneus and talus bones of both feet. The patient received epidural narcotic infusion with sympathetic blockage for 1 week combined with extensive physiotherapy. The blood pool phase of the bone scan became normal within 2 weeks, and increased uptake in both feet was noticed. The patient was followed up with MRI every 3 months and the bone marrow oedema disappeared after 6 months.

  20. Usher syndrome type I associated with bronchiectasis and immotile nasal cilia in two brothers.

    OpenAIRE

    Bonneau, D; Raymond, F; Kremer, C; Klossek, J M; Kaplan, J; Patte, F

    1993-01-01

    Usher syndrome type I is an autosomal recessive disease characterised by congenital sensorineural deafness, involvement of the vestibular system, and progressive visual loss owing to retinitis pigmentosa. Here we report the association of this disease with bronchiectasis, chronic sinusitis, and reduced nasal mucociliary clearance in two sibs and we suggest Usher syndrome type I could be a primary ciliary disorder.

  1. Bartter syndrome type III and congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract: an antenatal presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westland, Rik; Hack, Wilfried W; van der Horst, Henricus J R; Uittenbogaard, Lukas B; van Hagen, Johanna M; van der Valk, Paul; Kamsteeg, Erik J; van den Heuvel, Lambert P; van Wijk, Joanna A E

    2012-12-01

    Bartter syndrome encompasses a variety of inheritable renal tubular transport disorders characterized by hypokalemia and hypochloremic metabolic alkalosis. Bartter syndrome Type III is caused by genetic alterations in the chloride channel kidney B (CLCNKB) gene and often presents in the first 2 years of life, known as classic Bartter syndrome. However, in rare cases Bartter syndrome Type III has an antenatal presentation with polyhydramnios, premature delivery and severe dehydration in the first weeks of life. Associations between congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract and Bartter syndrome are extremely rare. This case report presents a girl with Bartter syndrome Type III due to a homozygous CLCNKB mutation and bilateral congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract. In addition, we describe the antenatal presentation as well as its perinatal management.

  2. Hearing dysfunction in heterozygous Mitf(Mi-wh) /+ mice, a model for Waardenburg syndrome type 2 and Tietz syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Christina; Zhang, Deming; Beyer, Lisa A; Halsey, Karin E; Fukui, Hideto; Raphael, Yehoash; Dolan, David F; Hornyak, Thomas J

    2013-01-01

    The human deafness-pigmentation syndromes, Waardenburg syndrome (WS) type 2a, and Tietz syndrome are characterized by profound deafness but only partial cutaneous pigmentary abnormalities. Both syndromes are caused by mutations in MITF. To illuminate differences between cutaneous and otic melanocytes in these syndromes, their development and survival in heterozygous Microphthalmia-White (Mitf(Mi-wh) /+) mice were studied and hearing function of these mice characterized. Mitf(Mi-wh) /+ mice have a profound hearing deficit, characterized by elevated auditory brainstem response thresholds, reduced distortion product otoacoustic emissions, absent endocochlear potential, loss of outer hair cells, and stria vascularis abnormalities. Mitf(Mi-wh) /+ embryos have fewer melanoblasts during embryonic development than their wild-type littermates. Although cochlear melanocytes are present at birth, they disappear from the Mitf(Mi-wh) /+ cochlea between P1 and P7. These findings may provide insight into the mechanism of melanocyte and hearing loss in human deafness-pigmentation syndromes such as WS and Tietz syndrome and illustrate differences between otic and follicular melanocytes. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  3. Usher syndrome clinical types I and II: could ocular symptoms and signs differentiate between the two types?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsilou, Ekaterini T; Rubin, Benjamin I; Caruso, Rafael C; Reed, George F; Pikus, Anita; Hejtmancik, James F; Iwata, Fumino; Redman, Joy B; Kaiser-Kupfer, Muriel I

    2002-04-01

    Usher syndrome types I and II are clinical syndromes with substantial genetic and clinical heterogeneity. We undertook the current study in order to identify ocular symptoms and signs that could differentiate between the two types. Sixty-seven patients with Usher syndrome were evaluated. Based on audiologic and vestibular findings, patients were classified as either Usher type I or II. The severity of the ocular signs and symptoms present in each type were compared. Visual acuity, visual field area, electroretinographic amplitude, incidence of cataract and macular lesions were not significantly different between Usher types I and II. However, the ages when night blindness was perceived and retinitis pigmentosa was diagnosed differed significantly between the two types. There seems to be some overlap between types I and II of Usher syndrome in regard to the ophthalmologic findings. However, night blindness appears earlier in Usher type I (although the difference in age of appearance appears to be less dramatic than previously assumed). Molecular elucidation of Usher syndrome may serve as a key to understanding these differences and, perhaps, provide a better tool for use in clinical diagnosis, prognosis and genetic counseling.

  4. Meretoja’s Syndrome: Lattice Corneal Dystrophy, Gelsolin Type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Casal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Lattice corneal dystrophy gelsolin type was first described in 1969 by Jouko Meretoja, a Finnish ophthalmologist. It is caused by an autosomal dominant mutation in gelsolin gene resulting in unstable protein fragments and amyloid deposition in various organs. The age of onset is usually after the third decade of life and typical diagnostic triad includes progressive bilateral facial paralysis, loose skin, and lattice corneal dystrophy. We report a case of a 53-year-old female patient referred to our Department of Ophthalmology by severe dry eye and incomplete eyelid closure. She had severe bilateral facial paresis, significant orbicularis, and perioral sagging as well as hypoesthesia of extremities and was diagnosed with Meretoja’s syndrome at the age of 50, confirmed by the presence of gelsolin mutation. At our observation she had bilateral diminished tear film break-up time and Schirmer test, diffuse keratitis, corneal opacification, and neovascularization in the left eye. She was treated with preservative-free lubricants and topical cyclosporine, associated with nocturnal complete occlusion of both eyes, and underwent placement of lacrimal punctal plugs. Ocular symptoms are the first to appear and our role as ophthalmologists is essential for the diagnosis, treatment, and monitoring of ocular alterations in these patients.

  5. [Oral diseases in auto-immune polyendocrine syndrome type 1].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proust-Lemoine, Emmanuelle; Guyot, Sylvie

    2017-09-01

    Auto-immune polyendocrine syndrome type 1 (APS1) also called Auto-immune Polyendocrinopathy Candidiasis Ectodermal Dystrophy (APECED) is a rare monogenic childhood-onset auto-immune disease. This autosomal recessive disorder is caused by mutations in the auto-immune regulator (AIRE) gene, and leads to autoimmunity targeting peripheral tissues. There is a wide variability in clinical phenotypes in patients with APSI, with auto-immune endocrine and non-endocrine disorders, and chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis. These patients suffer from oral diseases such as dental enamel hypoplasia and candidiasis. Both are frequently described, and in recent series, enamel hypoplasia and candidiasis are even the most frequent components of APS1 together with hypoparathyroidism. Both often occur during childhood (before 5 years old for canrdidiasis, and before 15 years old for enamel hypoplasia). Oral candidiasis is recurrent all life long, could become resistant to azole antifungal after years of treatment, and be carcinogenic, leading to severe oral squamous cell carcinoma. Oral components of APS1 should be diagnosed and rigorously treated. Dental enamel hypoplasia and/or recurrent oral candidiasis in association with auto-immune diseases in a young child should prompt APS1 diagnosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Evidence based guidelines for complex regional pain syndrome type 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomassen-Hilgersom Ilona L

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Treatment of complex regional pain syndrome type I (CRPS-I is subject to discussion. The purpose of this study was to develop multidisciplinary guidelines for treatment of CRPS-I. Method A multidisciplinary task force graded literature evaluating treatment effects for CRPS-I according to their strength of evidence, published between 1980 to June 2005. Treatment recommendations based on the literature findings were formulated and formally approved by all Dutch professional associations involved in CRPS-I treatment. Results For pain treatment, the WHO analgesic ladder is advised with the exception of strong opioids. For neuropathic pain, anticonvulsants and tricyclic antidepressants may be considered. For inflammatory symptoms, free-radical scavengers (dimethylsulphoxide or acetylcysteine are advised. To promote peripheral blood flow, vasodilatory medication may be considered. Percutaneous sympathetic blockades may be used to increase blood flow in case vasodilatory medication has insufficient effect. To decrease functional limitations, standardised physiotherapy and occupational therapy are advised. To prevent the occurrence of CRPS-I after wrist fractures, vitamin C is recommended. Adequate perioperative analgesia, limitation of operating time, limited use of tourniquet, and use of regional anaesthetic techniques are recommended for secondary prevention of CRPS-I. Conclusions Based on the literature identified and the extent of evidence found for therapeutic interventions for CRPS-I, we conclude that further research is needed into each of the therapeutic modalities discussed in the guidelines.

  7. Functional evolution of ADAMTS genes: Evidence from analyses of phylogeny and gene organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Meir Erwin G

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ADAMTS (A Disintegrin-like and Metalloprotease with Thrombospondin motifs proteins are a family of metalloproteases with sequence similarity to the ADAM proteases, that contain the thrombospondin type 1 sequence repeat motifs (TSRs common to extracellular matrix proteins. ADAMTS proteins have recently gained attention with the discovery of their role in a variety of diseases, including tissue and blood disorders, cancer, osteoarthritis, Alzheimer's and the genetic syndromes Weill-Marchesani syndrome (ADAMTS10, thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (ADAMTS13, and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type VIIC (ADAMTS2 in humans and belted white-spotting mutation in mice (ADAMTS20. Results Phylogenetic analysis and comparison of the exon/intron organization of vertebrate (Homo, Mus, Fugu, chordate (Ciona and invertebrate (Drosophila and Caenorhabditis ADAMTS homologs has elucidated the evolutionary relationships of this important gene family, which comprises 19 members in humans. Conclusions The evolutionary history of ADAMTS genes in vertebrate genomes has been marked by rampant gene duplication, including a retrotransposition that gave rise to a distinct ADAMTS subfamily (ADAMTS1, -4, -5, -8, -15 that may have distinct aggrecanase and angiogenesis functions.

  8. Multiple long bone cysts revealed by MRI in trichorhinophalangeal syndrome type II predisposing to pathological fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konala, Praveen; Cassar-Pullicino, Victor N. [The Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt Orthopaedic Hospital, Department of Radiology, Oswestry (United Kingdom); Kiely, Nigel [The Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt Orthopaedic Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Oswestry (United Kingdom); Noakes, Charlotte [Oxford University Hospital, The Oxford Genetics Laboratories, Oxford (United Kingdom); Blair, Edward [Oxford University Hospital, Department of Clinical Genetics, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2017-07-15

    Trichorhinophalangeal syndrome type II is a rare genetic disorder with the few published case reports mainly reporting the radiographic skeletal manifestations. There are no published imaging reports of long bone cysts involving multiple bones in this condition. We report a unique case of bone cysts involving multiple long bones detected with MRI in a patient with trichorhinophalangeal syndrome type II complicated by a subsequent pathological fracture. It is possible that the bone cysts are a previously undescribed feature of this syndrome; however, the evidence is insufficient to establish a definite association. Chromosomal abnormality identified in this patient is consistent with trichorhinophalangeal syndrome type II with no unusual features. Although the nature of these bone cysts is unclear, they are one of the causes of the known increased fracture risk observed in this syndrome. (orig.)

  9. Prevalence of the metabolic syndrome among patients with type 2 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DM), there is a multiple set of risk factors that commonly appear together forming what is now known as the 'Metabolic Syndrome' (MS). This 'clustering' of metabolic abnormalities that occur in the same individual appear to confer substantial ...

  10. (GPR98) gene in an Iranian family with Usher syndrome type II

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-12-04

    Dec 4, 2014 ... Genetics Research Center, University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences, Tehran 1985713834, Iran. [Kahrizi K. ... Usher syndrome (USH) is an autosomal recessive disease .... missense variants on the protein structures, pathogen severity .... genes to a Spanish Usher syndrome type 2 cohort.

  11. Serum Progranulin Levels in Type 2 Diabetic Patients with Metabolic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shafaei Azam

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The role of progranulin in individuals with metabolic syndrome is not exactly clear.We aimed to assess the serum level of progranulin in type 2 diabetic patients with and without metabolic syndrome and compare them with healthy controls.

  12. Serum Progranulin Levels in Type 2 Diabetic Patients with Metabolic Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafaei, Azam; Marjani, Abdoljalal; Khoshnia, Masoud

    2016-12-01

    The role of progranulin in individuals with metabolic syndrome is not exactly clear.We aimed to assess the serum level of progranulin in type 2 diabetic patients with and without metabolic syndrome and compare them with healthy controls. The study included 60 patients with type 2 diabetes and 30 healthy individuals as control groups. Biochemical parameters and progranulin levels were determined. Subjects with metabolic syndrome showed significantly higher levels of triglyceride, waist circumference, BMI, systolic and diastolic blood pressure than subjects without metabolic syndrome and the control groups, while HDL-cholesterol level was significantly lower in subjects with metabolic syndrome. Fasting blood sugar was significantly higher in type 2 diabetic patients than in the control groups. Serum level of progranulin was slightly increased in subjects with metabolic syndrome. Serum progranulin level had no significant relationship with metabolic syndrome components. Serum progranulin was also not dependent on cardiometabolic risk factors for subjects with metabolic syndrome, but it could be considered for the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Further studies are recommended to explain the effect of progranulin on the pathogenesis of metabolic risk factors.

  13. Clinical presentation of Griscelli syndrome type 2 and spectrum of RAB27A mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meeths, Marie; Bryceson, Yenan T; Rudd, Eva

    2010-01-01

    Griscelli syndrome type 2 (GS2) is an autosomal-recessive immunodeficiency caused by mutations in RAB27A, clinically characterized by partial albinism and haemophagocytic lymphohistocytosis (HLH). We evaluated the frequency of RAB27A mutations in 21 unrelated patients with haemophagocytic syndromes...

  14. The metabolic syndrome in type 2 diabetic subjects in Gorgan, Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marjani, A.; Mojerloo, M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To assess the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome in subjects diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes in Gorgan, Iran. Methods: Data were collected from 200 subjects with Type 2 diabetes mellitus and they were categorized as with or without the metabolic syndrome. Metabolic syndrome was diagnosed using Adult Treatment Panel-III (ATP-III) guidelines. Results: The overall metabolic syndrome prevalence was 51.50%. The mean age of all the subjects was 53.65+-9.50 years. There were 122 females and 78 males of whom 65 females and 38 males had the metabolic syndrome. The mean duration of diabetes was 7.70+-1.29 years. Mean triglycerides were 185.15+-56.63 mg/dl, and fasting blood glucose 153 +-19.6 mg/dl. These levels were significantly higher in the subjects with type-2 diabetes with metabolic syndrome, but the mean HDL-cholesterol was 37.96+-5.09 mg/dl and this was lower (p< 0.001). Female and male subjects with metabolic syndrome had significantly longer (except HDL-cholesterol) duration of diabetes, higher Triglyceride, and fasting blood glucose levels (p < 0.001, p < 0.05). Conclusion: This study showed a high prevalence of the metabolic syndrome in subjects with type 2 diabetes. Females were more affected than males. (author)

  15. Bartter syndrome Type III and congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract: an antenatal presentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westland, R.; Hack, W.W.; van der Horst, H.J.; Uittenbogaard, L.B.; van Hagen, J.M.; van der Valk, P.; Kamsteeg, E.J.; Heuvel, L.P.W.J. van den; van Wijk, J.A.

    2012-01-01

    Bartter syndrome encompasses a variety of inheritable renal tubular transport disorders characterized by hypokalemia and hypochloremic metabolic alkalosis. Bartter syndrome Type III is caused by genetic alterations in the chloride channel kidney B (CLCNKB) gene and often presents in the first 2

  16. Waardenburg syndrome: clinical differentiation between types I and II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardono, Eliete; van Bever, Yolande; van den Ende, Jenneke; Havrenne, Poti C; Iughetti, Paula; Maestrelli, Sylvia R P; Costa F, Orozimbo; Richieri-Costa, Antonio; Frota-Pessoa, Oswaldo; Otto, Paulo A

    2003-03-15

    Here we present the results of a study performed on 59 patients affected by Waardenburg syndrome (WS), 30 with the I variant, 21 having the type II, and 8 of them being isolated cases without telecanthus. These patients belong to 37 families; the main contributions and conclusions are based on the detailed study of 25 of these families, examined using standard procedures. All patients were examined as to the presence of eight cardinal signs important for the diagnosis of the condition; from each patient, from many of his/her normal relatives, and from a control sample of 300 normal individuals stratified by age and sex, 23 different craniofacial measurements were obtained. We also estimated, using our own data as well those collected from the literature, the frequencies of the cardinal signs, based on a total sample of 461 affected individuals with WSI and 121 with WSII. In order to originate discriminant functions to separate individuals affected by one of the two variants, both metric (from craniofacial measurements) as well as categoric data (based on the frequencies of the cardinal signs or symptoms) were used. Discriminant analysis based on the frequency of the eight cardinal signs can improve the separation of WSI patients without telecanthus from those presenting the variant II. We present also a Table with the conditional probabilities favoring the diagnosis of WSI for suspect subjects without telecanthus and any combination of the other seven signs/symptoms. The discriminant function based on the four ocular measurements (inner and outer intercanthal, interpupillary, and inferior lacrymal distances), on the other side, perfectly classifies patients affected by one of the variants of WS, the same taking place when the average values of the W index of all affected individuals per family are used. The discriminant function based solely in the individual W index values of patients correctly classifies 93% of WSII subjects, but only 60% of the patients with the

  17. A case report of a patient with Ribbing disease underlines the connections between the skeletal and cardiovascular complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Cocco

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available A 69-year-old woman suffered from Ribbing disease, a hereditary X autosomal dominant disease with multiple sclerosing dysplasias. However, it is less known that the genetic mutation can often induce cardiovascular complications. The patient had a hypertensive cardiopathy and had been treated with percutaneous coronary angioplasty and stenting because of a myocardial infarction. She was seen because of dyspnea and we detected an aneurysm of the ascending thoracic aorta. The patient underwent surgical repair. In Ribbing disease an up-regulation of genes interferes with the production, processing, or formation of collagen type II and XI. These genetic effects are thought to be specific for osteoblasts and are responsible for the skeletal pathology. However, the defective synthesis of collagen can also induce cardiovascular complications which may be similar to those described in patients with type III Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, with type IV Marfan syndrome, and with osteogenesis imperfecta. Rheumatologists who treat patients with Ribbing disease should seek the advice of cardiologists for the occurrence of cardiovascular complications.

  18. A case report of a patient with Ribbing disease underlines the connections between the skeletal and cardiovascular complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Cocco

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available A 69-year-old woman suffered from Ribbing disease, a hereditary X autosomal dominant disease with multiple sclerosing dysplasias. However, it is less known that the genetic mutation can often induce cardiovascular complications. The patient had a hypertensive cardiopathy and had been treated with percutaneous coronary angioplasty and stenting because of a myocardial infarction. She was seen because of dyspnea and we detected an aneurysm of the ascending thoracic aorta. The patient underwent surgical repair. In Ribbing disease an up-regulation of genes interferes with the production, processing, or formation of collagen type II and XI. These genetic effects are thought to be specific for osteoblasts and are responsible for the skeletal pathology. However, the defective synthesis of collagen can also induce cardiovascular complications which may be similar to those described in patients with type III Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, with type IV Marfan syndrome, and with osteogenesis imperfecta. Rheumatologists who treat patients with Ribbing disease should seek the advice of cardiologists for the occurrence of cardiovascular complications.

  19. Joint hypermobility and headache: the glue that binds the two together--part 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Vincent T; Neilson, Derek

    2014-09-01

    Past studies have reported that connective tissue disorders (CTDs) are more common in patients with specific types of headache disorders. The objectives of this study are (1) to review and critique the clinical studies reporting an association between joint hypermobility, CTDs and headache and (2) to postulate mechanisms though which CTDs might predispose to headache disorders. PubMed was searched for relevant articles with search terms that included joint hypermobility, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, Marfan syndrome, and specific headache disorders. A narrative review was performed of these articles as well as those identified from the bibliography of these articles. Case reports and case control studies confirm an association between CTDs and migraine, coat-hanger headaches, carotid arterial dissections, intracranial hypotension, Arnold Chiari malformations-type 1, cervical spine disorders, and temporomandibular joint disorders. Observational cross-sectional studies suggest that the prevalence of CTDs is increased in patients with specific types of headache disorders. It is unknown if the CTDs directly cause these headaches disorders or are associated with them through other mechanisms. © 2014 American Headache Society.

  20. Stickler Syndrome Type 1 with Short Stature and Atypical Ocular Manifestations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manisha Goyal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Stickler syndrome or hereditary progressive arthroophthalmopathy is a heterogeneous group of collagen tissue disorders, characterized by orofacial features, ophthalmological features (high myopia, vitreoretinal degeneration, retinal detachment, and presenile cataracts, hearing impairment, mild spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia, and/or early onset arthritis. Stickler syndrome type I (ocular form is caused by mutation in the COL2A1 gene. Ptosis and uveitis are relatively rare ophthalmological manifestations of this syndrome. We report an Indian boy having 2710C>T mutation in COL2A1 gene demonstrating short stature, ptosis, and uveitis with Stickler syndrome.

  1. Scaffold protein harmonin (USH1C) provides molecular links between Usher syndrome type 1 and type 2.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reiners, J.; Wijk, E. van; Marker, T.; Zimmermann, U.; Jurgens, K.; Brinke, H. te; Overlack, N.; Roepman, R.; Knipper, M.; Kremer, J.M.J.; Wolfrum, U.

    2005-01-01

    Usher syndrome (USH) is the most frequent cause of combined deaf-blindness in man. USH is clinically and genetically heterogeneous with at least 11 chromosomal loci assigned to the three USH types (USH1A-G, USH2A-C, USH3A). Although the different USH types exhibit almost the same phenotype in human,

  2. Novel and recurrent MYO7A mutations in Usher syndrome type 1 and type 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Weining; Chen, Xue; Zhao, Kanxing; Liu, Yani; Liu, Xiaoxing; Ha, Shaoping; Liu, Wenzhou; Kang, Xiaoli; Sheng, Xunlun; Zhao, Chen

    2014-01-01

    Usher syndrome (USH) is a group of disorders manifested as retinitis pigmentosa and bilateral sensorineural hearing loss, with or without vestibular dysfunction. Here, we recruited three Chinese families affected with autosomal recessive USH for detailed clinical evaluations and for mutation screening in the genes associated with inherited retinal diseases. Using targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) approach, three new alleles and one known mutation in MYO7A gene were identified in the three families. In two families with USH type 1, novel homozygous frameshift variant p.Pro194Hisfs*13 and recurrent missense variant p.Thr165Met were demonstrated as the causative mutations respectively. Crystal structural analysis denoted that p.Thr165Met would very likely change the tertiary structure of the protein encoded by MYO7A. In another family affected with USH type 2, novel biallelic mutations in MYO7A, c.[1343+1G>A];[2837T>G] or p.[?];[Met946Arg], were identified with clinical significance. Because MYO7A, to our knowledge, has rarely been correlated with USH type 2, our findings therefore reveal distinguished clinical phenotypes associated with MYO7A. We also conclude that targeted NGS is an effective approach for genetic diagnosis for USH, which can further provide better understanding of genotype-phenotype relationship of the disease.

  3. Novel and recurrent MYO7A mutations in Usher syndrome type 1 and type 2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weining Rong

    Full Text Available Usher syndrome (USH is a group of disorders manifested as retinitis pigmentosa and bilateral sensorineural hearing loss, with or without vestibular dysfunction. Here, we recruited three Chinese families affected with autosomal recessive USH for detailed clinical evaluations and for mutation screening in the genes associated with inherited retinal diseases. Using targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS approach, three new alleles and one known mutation in MYO7A gene were identified in the three families. In two families with USH type 1, novel homozygous frameshift variant p.Pro194Hisfs*13 and recurrent missense variant p.Thr165Met were demonstrated as the causative mutations respectively. Crystal structural analysis denoted that p.Thr165Met would very likely change the tertiary structure of the protein encoded by MYO7A. In another family affected with USH type 2, novel biallelic mutations in MYO7A, c.[1343+1G>A];[2837T>G] or p.[?];[Met946Arg], were identified with clinical significance. Because MYO7A, to our knowledge, has rarely been correlated with USH type 2, our findings therefore reveal distinguished clinical phenotypes associated with MYO7A. We also conclude that targeted NGS is an effective approach for genetic diagnosis for USH, which can further provide better understanding of genotype-phenotype relationship of the disease.

  4. Cushing's syndrome in type 2 diabetes patients with poor glycemic control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gungunes, Askin; Sahin, Mustafa; Demirci, Taner; Ucan, Bekir; Cakir, Evrim; Arslan, Muyesser Sayki; Unsal, Ilknur Ozturk; Karbek, Basak; Calıskan, Mustafa; Ozbek, Mustafa; Cakal, Erman; Delibasi, Tuncay

    2014-12-01

    Cushing's syndrome may be more frequent in some specific patient groups such as type 2 diabetes and obesity. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of Cushing's syndrome in outpatients with type 2 diabetes with poor glycemic control despite at least 3-months insulin therapy. Outpatients with type 2 diabetes whose glycemic control is poor (Hb Alc value >7 %) despite receiving at least 3-months long insulin treatment (insulin alone or insulin with oral antidiabetics) were included. Patients with classic features of Cushing's syndrome were excluded. Overnight 1 mg dexamethasone suppression test (DST) was performed as a screening test. A total of 277 patients with type 2 diabetes whose glycemic control is poor (Hb Alc value >7 %) despite insulin therapy were included. Two of the 277 patients with type 2 diabetes were diagnosed with Cushing's syndrome (0.72 %). Hypertension was statistically more frequent in the patients with cortisol levels ≥1.8 μg/dL than the patients with cortisol levels Cushing's syndrome among patients with type 2 diabetes with poor glycemic control despite insulin therapy is much higher than in the general population. The patients with type 2 diabetes with poor glycemic control despite at least three months of insulin therapy should be additionally tested for Cushing's syndrome if they have high dose insülin requirements.

  5. Features of burnout syndrome development in healthcare workers with different types of work motivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vezhnovets T.A.

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of researches of peculiarities of burnout syndrome formation in healthcare workers with different types of work motivation. It is discovered that the syndrome is formed for each motivational type as mechanism of psychological protection against the action of certain stressful factors, namely: for instrumental type – an excessive concentration on obtaining material rewards; for professional type – an excessive control of emotions in substantial professional communications and high psycho-emotional overload; for patriotic type – high level of dependence on social approval, a high level of communicative activity, a high level of psycho-emotional overload, for economical type – distrust, for lumpenized – any labor. Prevention of burnout syndrome in healthcare workers has to be realized taking into account peculiarities of psycho-traumatic factors depending on the type of work motivation.

  6. Oral–Facial–Digital Syndrome type VI with self mutilations

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rabah M. Shawky

    2014-06-24

    Jun 24, 2014 ... associated with Joubert Syndrome and related disorders ... types of the JSRD spectrum have been recently defined: (1) .... family history of a similar condition. .... [21] Holroyd S, Reiss A, Bryan N. Autistic features in Joubert.

  7. The Genetics of Aortopathies in Clinical Cardiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Goyal

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Aortopathies pose a significant healthcare burden due to excess early mortality, increasing incidence, and underdiagnosis. Understanding the underlying genetic causes, early diagnosis, timely surveillance, prophylactic repair, and family screening are keys to addressing these diseases. Next-generation sequencing continues to expand our understanding of the genetic causes of heritable aortopathies, rapidly clarifying their underlying molecular pathophysiology and suggesting new potential therapeutic targets. This review will summarize the pathogenetic mechanisms and management of heritable genetic aortopathies with attention to specific forms of both syndromic and nonsyndromic disorders, including Marfan syndrome, Loeys-Dietz syndrome, vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, and familial thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection.

  8. Sirenomelia: a new type, showing VACTERL association with Thomas syndrome and a review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lhuaire, Martin; Jestin, Agnès; Boulagnon, Camille; Loock, Mélanie; Doco-Fenzy, Martine; Gaillard, Dominique; Diebold, Marie-Danièle; Avisse, Claude; Labrousse, Marc

    2013-03-01

    Sirenomelia or "mermaid syndrome" is a rare congenital anomaly known since antiquity. This congenital anomaly is defined as a polymalformative syndrome that associates major muscle and skeleton abnormalities (unique lower limbs) with visceral abnormalities (unilateral or bilateral renal agenesis, anomalies of the abdominal vascularisation). This phenotype, typical of sirenomelia syndrome, may be more or less severe. The pathogenic mechanisms of this syndrome are still debated and its etiology remains unknown. We report here a new type of sirenomelia that we observed in a fetus belonging to the collection of the Department of Anatomy of Reims, which led us to perform a comprehensive review of the literature on the subject: this type has never been reported and cannot be classified according to the Stocker and Heifetz classification. Moreover, this case also presents a VACTERL association with Thomas syndrome. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Choroidal Thickness Analysis in Patients with Usher Syndrome Type 2 Using EDI OCT

    OpenAIRE

    Colombo, L.; Sala, B.; Montesano, G.; Pierrottet, C.; De Cillà, S.; Maltese, P.; Bertelli, M.; Rossetti, L.

    2015-01-01

    To portray Usher Syndrome type 2, analyzing choroidal thickness and comparing data reported in published literature on RP and healthy subjects. Methods. 20 eyes of 10 patients with clinical signs and genetic diagnosis of Usher Syndrome type 2. Each patient underwent a complete ophthalmologic examination including Best Corrected Visual Acuity (BCVA), intraocular pressure (IOP), axial length (AL), automated visual field (VF), and EDI OCT. Both retinal and choroidal measures were measured. Stati...

  10. Distinct Gene Expression Signatures in Lynch Syndrome and Familial Colorectal Cancer Type X

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valentin, Mev; Therkildsen, Christina; Veerla, Srinivas

    2013-01-01

    Heredity is estimated to cause at least 20% of colorectal cancer. The hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer subset is divided into Lynch syndrome and familial colorectal cancer type X (FCCTX) based on presence of mismatch repair (MMR) gene defects.......Heredity is estimated to cause at least 20% of colorectal cancer. The hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer subset is divided into Lynch syndrome and familial colorectal cancer type X (FCCTX) based on presence of mismatch repair (MMR) gene defects....

  11. Association between habitual coffee consumption and metabolic syndrome in type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stutz, B; Ahola, A J; Harjutsalo, V; Forsblom, C; Groop, P-H

    2018-05-01

    In the general population, habitual coffee consumption is inversely associated with the metabolic syndrome, a syndrome that is rather common also in patients with type 1 diabetes. However, whether coffee intake is beneficially related to the metabolic syndrome also in type 1 diabetes, is not known. We, therefore, studied the potential association between coffee consumption and the metabolic syndrome in a large population of individuals with type 1 diabetes. Furthermore, we investigated whether coffee consumption is associated with insulin resistance (estimated glucose disposal rate, eGDR), kidney function (estimated glomerular filtration rate, eGFR), and low-grade chronic inflammation (high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, hsCRP). Data from 1040 participants in the Finnish Diabetic Nephropathy Study were included in these cross-sectional analyses. Metabolic syndrome was assumed if at least 3 of the following cardiovascular risk factors were present: central obesity, high blood pressure, low HDL-cholesterol concentration, high triglyceride concentration, and hyperglycaemia. Subjects were categorized based on self-reported daily coffee intake: non-consumers (metabolic syndrome. Moreover, any level of coffee consumption was associated with increased risk of the blood pressure-component. An increasing trend was observed in the eGFR with increasing coffee consumption. In type 1 diabetes, high coffee intake is associated with the metabolic syndrome, and especially its blood pressure-component. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Insulin gene polymorphisms in type 1 diabetes, Addison's disease and the polyglandular autoimmune syndrome type II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hahner Stefanie

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polymorphisms within the insulin gene can influence insulin expression in the pancreas and especially in the thymus, where self-antigens are processed, shaping the T cell repertoire into selftolerance, a process that protects from β-cell autoimmunity. Methods We investigated the role of the -2221Msp(C/T and -23HphI(A/T polymorphisms within the insulin gene in patients with a monoglandular autoimmune endocrine disease [patients with isolated type 1 diabetes (T1D, n = 317, Addison's disease (AD, n = 107 or Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT, n = 61], those with a polyglandular autoimmune syndrome type II (combination of T1D and/or AD with HT or GD, n = 62 as well as in healthy controls (HC, n = 275. Results T1D patients carried significantly more often the homozygous genotype "CC" -2221Msp(C/T and "AA" -23HphI(A/T polymorphisms than the HC (78.5% vs. 66.2%, p = 0.0027 and 75.4% vs. 52.4%, p = 3.7 × 10-8, respectively. The distribution of insulin gene polymorphisms did not show significant differences between patients with AD, HT, or APS-II and HC. Conclusion We demonstrate that the allele "C" of the -2221Msp(C/T and "A" -23HphI(A/T insulin gene polymorphisms confer susceptibility to T1D but not to isolated AD, HT or as a part of the APS-II.

  13. Biological functions of iduronic acid in chondroitin/dermatan sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thelin, Martin A; Bartolini, Barbara; Axelsson, Jakob; Gustafsson, Renata; Tykesson, Emil; Pera, Edgar; Oldberg, Åke; Maccarana, Marco; Malmstrom, Anders

    2013-05-01

    The presence of iduronic acid in chondroitin/dermatan sulfate changes the properties of the polysaccharides because it generates a more flexible chain with increased binding potentials. Iduronic acid in chondroitin/dermatan sulfate influences multiple cellular properties, such as migration, proliferation, differentiation, angiogenesis and the regulation of cytokine/growth factor activities. Under pathological conditions such as wound healing, inflammation and cancer, iduronic acid has diverse regulatory functions. Iduronic acid is formed by two epimerases (i.e. dermatan sulfate epimerase 1 and 2) that have different tissue distribution and properties. The role of iduronic acid in chondroitin/dermatan sulfate is highlighted by the vast changes in connective tissue features in patients with a new type of Ehler-Danlos syndrome: adducted thumb-clubfoot syndrome. Future research aims to understand the roles of the two epimerases and their interplay with the sulfotransferases involved in chondroitin sulfate/dermatan sulfate biosynthesis. Furthermore, a better definition of chondroitin/dermatan sulfate functions using different knockout models is needed. In this review, we focus on the two enzymes responsible for iduronic acid formation, as well as the role of iduronic acid in health and disease. © 2013 The Authors Journal compilation © 2013 FEBS.

  14. Blepharophimosis, ptosis, epicanthus inversus syndrome type 2 with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Our patient had normal psychomotor development. His father was similarly affected suggesting autosomal dominant inheritance. The patient had red brown hair, lymphedema of lower limbs and kidney stones which were not reported before with this syndrome. Most probably these additional features are associations with ...

  15. Acute coronary syndromes amongst type 2 diabetics with ischaemic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Majority had three coronary artery disease (CAD) risk factors: obesity 86%, elevated LDL 73% and hypertension 60%. Therapy in use was OHA 43%, insulin 42%, insulin and OHA 1%; prophylactic aspirin 14.7% and statins 8.4%. Thirty four (35.8%) were classified as acute coronary syndrome (ACS); 29 ( 30.5%) acute ...

  16. People with Usher Syndrome, Type II: Issues and Adaptations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miner, I. D.

    1997-01-01

    Describes the experiences of individuals with Usher Syndrome, discusses the lack of appropriate services and the failure of professionals to provide sufficient information on the condition, and stresses the importance of access to information and the acquisition of new skills before the visual impairment becomes severe. (Author/CR)

  17. Importance of genetic factors in the occurrence of epilepsy syndrome type: a twin study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corey, Linda A; Pellock, John M; Kjeldsen, Marianne J

    2011-01-01

    not appear to play an important role in determining risk for frontal, occipital or temporal lobe epilepsy. These results suggest that, while genetic factors contribute to risk for major syndrome types, determined when possible, their contribution to risk for localization-related syndrome sub......Although there is strong evidence that genetic factors contribute to risk for epilepsy, their role in the determination of syndrome type is less clear. This study was undertaken to address this question. Information related to epilepsy was obtained from twins included in 455 monozygotic and 868...... dizygotic pairs ascertained from population-based twin registries in Denmark, Norway and the United States. Syndrome type was determined based on medical record information and detailed clinical interviews and classified using the International Classification Systems for the Epilepsies and Epileptic...

  18. Klinefelter's Syndrome with Seizure, Pseudohypoparathyroidism Type Ib and Multiple Endocrine Dysfunctions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chwen-Yi Yang

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Klinefelter's syndrome is rarely associated with hypocalcemia, especially pseudohypoparathyroidism (PHP type Ib. We describe a case of Klinefelter's syndrome associated with seizure, PHP type Ib and multiple endocrine dysfunctions. A 19-year-old Taiwanese male was admitted due to seizures with loss of consciousness. He had been diagnosed with Klinefelter's syndrome with seizure disorder and hypocalcemia 3 months previously. Physical examination revealed eunuchoidism but no osteodystrophy, while laboratory data revealed severe hypocalcemia, hyperphosphatemia, and elevated parathyroid hormone. Chromosomal study showed 47, XXY. Osteoporosis was found on chest and abdominal radiography. Dense calcification in the cerebrum and cerebellum was shown on brain computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Elevation of the patient's serum calcium level was noted after vitamin D and calcium carbonate supplements were given. Klinefelter's syndrome is rarely associated with PHP type Ib; our patient's hypocalcemia improved after long-term aggressive treatment.

  19. Germinal mosaicism of PAX3 mutation caused Waardenburg syndrome type I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kaitian; Zhan, Yuan; Wu, Xuan; Zong, Ling; Jiang, Hongyan

    2018-01-01

    Waardenburg syndrome mutations are most often recurrent or de novo. The rate of familial recurrence is low and families with several affected children are extremely rare. In this study, we aimed to clarify the underlying hereditary cause of Waardenburg syndrome type I in two siblings in a Chinese family, with a mother affected by prelingual mild hearing loss and a father who was negative for clinical symptoms of Waardenburg syndrome and had a normal hearing threshold. Complete characteristic features of the family members were recorded and genetic sequencing and parent-child relationship analyses were performed. The two probands were found to share double mutations in the PAX3/GJB2 genes that caused concurrent hearing loss in Waardenburg syndrome type I. Their mother carried the GJB2 c.109G > A homozygous mutation; however, neither the novel PAX3 c.592delG mutation, nor the Waardenburg syndrome phenotype, was observed in either parent. These previously unreported digenic mutations in PAX3/GJB2 resulted in deafness associated with Waardenburg syndrome type I in this family. To our knowledge, this is the first report describing germinal mosaicism in Waardenburg syndrome. This concept is important because it complicates genetic counseling of this family regarding the risk of recurrence of the mutations in subsequent pregnancies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Depression is associated with the metabolic syndrome among patients with type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahola, Aila J; Thorn, Lena M; Saraheimo, Markku; Forsblom, Carol; Groop, Per-Henrik

    2010-10-01

    Both depression and the metabolic syndrome are frequently found among patients with type 1 diabetes, but their potential association has not yet been investigated. In this paper the relationship between depression and the metabolic syndrome among patients with type 1 diabetes was evaluated. A total of 1226 patients participating in the Finnish Diabetic Nephropathy Study between 2003 and 2009 were included. Depression was defined as use of antidepressive medication or Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) score ≥16. The metabolic syndrome was defined using the criteria established by the International Diabetes Federation Task Force on Epidemiology and Prevention (IDF); National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI); American Heart Association (AHA); World Heart Federation (WHF); International Atherosclerosis Society (IAS); and International Association for the Study of Obesity (IASO). The metabolic syndrome was more frequently observed among depressed patients (57% versus 46%, P = 0.008). Of the individual components of the metabolic syndrome, waist, triglyceride, and HDL components were more frequently fulfilled among patients with depression. The BDI score increased with the number of components of the metabolic syndrome present. The BDI score was independently associated with the waist component (odds ratio 1.03, 95% confidence interval 1.01-1.05) when adjusted for gender, age, socio-economic status, smoking, nephropathy, and HbA(1c). The metabolic syndrome is frequently found among depressed patients with type 1 diabetes. Whether this association influences the development of diabetic complications is not known.

  1. Neuroendocrine-type prostatic adenocarcinoma with microsatellite instability in a patient with lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, David G; Gatalica, Zoran; Lynch, Henry T; Kohl, Shane; Johansson, Sonny L; Lele, Subodh M

    2010-12-01

    Lynch syndrome is an autosomal-dominant cancer syndrome that can be identified with microsatellite instability molecular tests or immunohistochemical stains on pathologic material from patients who meet the Amsterdam Criteria II. The development of prostatic carcinoma in situ or invasive small cell carcinoma (SCC) of the prostate has not been previously reported in a patient with this syndrome. In this report, an 87-year-old White man with the Lynch syndrome had a prostate biopsy that revealed a mixed high-grade conventional adenocarcinoma and SCC of the prostate with high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia of the small cell neuroendocrine-type (HGPIN-NE), all showing MSH2 microsatellite instability and loss of MSH2 expression, a finding not previously published. These findings suggest that HGPIN-NE is a precursor of invasive SCC and also that prostatic SCC can develop in a patient with the Lynch syndrome.

  2. Wolfram syndrome: A rare mimic of type 1 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish Gutch

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Wolfram syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by a constellation of disorders also known as diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus (DM, optic atrophy, and deafness. Patients present with DM and optic atrophy in the first decade, diabetes insipidus and sensorineural deafness in the second decade, and renal outflow tract anomalies and other neurological manifestations later in life. We report a case of a 14-year-old boy who was diagnosed with insulin-dependent DM and subsequently discovered to have optic atrophy, sensorineural hearing loss, and cardiovascular defect with a positive family history. Such cases need to be evaluated thoroughly with respect to Wolfram syndrome and its associated anomalies.

  3. Albumin treatment regimen for type 1 hepatorenal syndrome: a dose-response meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salerno, Francesco; Navickis, Roberta J; Wilkes, Mahlon M

    2015-11-25

    Recommended treatment for type 1 hepatorenal syndrome consists of albumin and vasoconstrictor. The optimal albumin dose remains poorly characterized. This meta-analysis aimed to determine the impact of albumin dose on treatment outcomes. Clinical studies of type 1 hepatorenal syndrome treatment with albumin and vasoconstrictor were sought. Search terms included: hepatorenal syndrome; albumin; vasoconstrictor; terlipressin; midodrine; octreotide; noradrenaline; and norepinephrine. A meta-analysis was performed of hepatorenal syndrome reversal and survival in relation to albumin dose. Nineteen clinical studies with 574 total patients were included, comprising 8 randomized controlled trials, 8 prospective studies and 3 retrospective studies. The pooled percentage of patients achieving hepatorenal syndrome reversal was 49.5% (95% confidence interval, 40.0-59.1%). Increments of 100 g in cumulative albumin dose were accompanied by significantly increased survival (hazard ratio, 1.15; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.31; p = 0.023). A non-significant increase of similar magnitude in hepatorenal syndrome reversal was also observed (odds ratio, 1.15; 95% confidence interval, 0.97-1.37; p = 0.10). Expected survival rates at 30 days among patients receiving cumulative albumin doses of 200, 400 and 600 g were 43.2% (95% confidence interval, 36.4-51.3%), 51.4% (95% confidence interval, 46.3-57.1%) and 59.0% (95% confidence interval, 51.9-67.2), respectively. Neither survival nor hepatorenal syndrome reversal was significantly affected by vasoconstrictor dose or type, treatment duration, age, baseline serum creatinine, bilirubin or albumin, baseline mean arterial pressure, or study design, size or time period. This meta-analysis suggests a dose-response relationship between infused albumin and survival in patients with type 1 hepatorenal syndrome. The meta-analysis provides the best current evidence on the potential role of albumin dose selection in improving outcomes of

  4. Bartter Syndrome Type 3: Phenotype-Genotype Correlation and Favorable Response to Ibuprofen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuejun Yang

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the phenotype-genotype correlation in different genetic kinds of Bartter syndrome type 3 in children.Methods: Clinical and genetic data of 2 patients with different mutations in Bartter syndrome type 3 was analyzed while the prognosis was compared after a 6-year follow-up or 2-year follow-up, respectively.Results: Bartter syndrome is a kind of autosomal recessive inherited renal disorder. The manifestation and prognosis of Bartter syndrome change with mutation types, and severe mutation were often accompanied with unfavorable prognosis. Comprehensive therapy with ibuprofen, antisterone, captopril, and potassium have remarkable effect, while ibuprofen may improve growth retardation partly.Conclusion: Bartter syndrome should be considered when children have unreasonable continuous electrolyte disturbance, metabolic alkalosis and growth retardation.As a genetic disease, its clinical features depend on the mutation type. It can be ameliorated by electrolyte supplementation, prostaglandin synthetase inhibitors, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and potassium-sparing diuretic. Considering the following electrolyte disturbances, infections, growth retardation, kidney failure and even death, Bartter syndrome need lifelong treatment, early diagnosis and treatment is the most important.

  5. Mutation Profile of the CDH23 Gene in 56 Probands with Usher Syndrome Type I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshima, A.; Jaijo, T.; Aller, E.; Millan, J.M.; Carney, C.; Usami, S.; Moller, C.; Kimberling, W.J.

    2008-01-01

    Mutations in the human gene encoding cadherin 23 (CDH23) cause Usher syndrome type 1D (USH1D) and nonsyndromic hearing loss. Individuals with Usher syndrome type I have profound congenital deafness, vestibular areflexia and usually begin to exhibit signs of RP in early adolescence. In the present study, we carried out the mutation analysis in all 69 exons of the CDH23 gene in 56 Usher type 1 probands already screened for mutations in MYO7A. A total of 18 of 56 subjects (32.1%) were observed to have one or two CDH23 variants that are presumed to be pathologic. Twenty one different pathologic genome variants were observed of which 15 were novel. Out of a total of 112 alleles, 31 (27.7%) were considered pathologic. Based on our results it is estimated that about 20% of patients with Usher syndrome type I have CDH23 mutations. PMID:18429043

  6. Cognitive capacities and composite cognitive skills in individuals with Usher syndrome type 1 and 2

    OpenAIRE

    Henricson, Cecilia

    2015-01-01

    The present thesis belongs to the research area disability research and deal with specific aspects of cognition in individuals with Usher syndrome type 1 and 2. The subject has been investigated and is discussed within an interdisciplinary framework, though the theories applied and described are derived from the area of cognitive psychology. Usher syndrome is a rare genetic condition causing a combination of visual and hearing impairment: deafblindness. There is a congenital hearing loss that...

  7. Microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II (MOPD II) with multiple vascular complications misdiagnosed as Dubowitz syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Dieks, Jana-Katharina; Baumer, Alessandra; Wilichowski, Ekkehard; Rauch, Anita; Sigler, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    To date, the genetic basis of Dubowitz syndrome (short stature, microcephaly, facial abnormalities, eczema) is unknown and vascular complications are not known to be associated with this syndrome. In microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II (MOPD II; disproportionate short statue, microcephaly, facial abnormalities), however, cerebral aneurysms and other vascular abnormalities are frequent complications. MOPD II is a genetic disorder caused by mutations in the pericentrin (PC...

  8. Quality of life and cochlear implantation in Usher syndrome type I.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damen, G.W.J.A.; Pennings, R.J.E.; Snik, A.F.M.; Mylanus, E.A.M.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The objectives of this descriptive, retrospective study were to evaluate quality of life, hearing, and vision in patients with Usher syndrome type I with and without cochlear implant. METHODS: Quality of life (QoL) of 14 patients with Usher type I (USH1) with a cochlear implant (CI)

  9. Two families from New England with usher syndrome type IC with distinct haplotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeAngelis, M M; McGee, T L; Keats, B J; Slim, R; Berson, E L; Dryja, T P

    2001-03-01

    To search for patients with Usher syndrome type IC among those with Usher syndrome type I who reside in New England. Genotype analysis of microsatellite markers closely linked to the USH1C locus was done using the polymerase chain reaction. We compared the haplotype of our patients who were homozygous in the USH1C region with the haplotypes found in previously reported USH1C Acadian families who reside in southwestern Louisiana and from a single family residing in Lebanon. Of 46 unrelated cases of Usher syndrome type I residing in New England, two were homozygous at genetic markers in the USH1C region. Of these, one carried the Acadian USH1C haplotype and had Acadian ancestors (that is, from Nova Scotia) who did not participate in the 1755 migration of Acadians to Louisiana. The second family had a haplotype that proved to be the same as that of a family with USH1C residing in Lebanon. Each of the two families had haplotypes distinct from the other. This is the first report that some patients residing in New England have Usher syndrome type IC. Patients with Usher syndrome type IC can have the Acadian haplotype or the Lebanese haplotype compatible with the idea that at least two independently arising pathogenic mutations have occurred in the yet-to-be identified USH1C gene.

  10. Cytokine expression in patients with bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis ESSIC type 3C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logadottir, Yr; Delbro, Dick; Fall, Magnus; Gjertsson, Inger; Jirholt, Pernilla; Lindholm, Catharina; Peeker, Ralph

    2014-11-01

    Bladder wall nitric oxide production in patients with bladder pain syndrome type 3C is increased compared to undetectable nitric oxide in patients with nonHunner bladder pain syndrome and healthy controls. However, the underlying mechanism/s of the increased nitric oxide production is largely unknown. We compared mRNA expression of a select group of cytokines in patients with bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis type 3C and in pain-free controls. Cold cup biopsies from 7 patients with bladder pain syndrome type 3C and 6 healthy subjects were analyzed. mRNA expression of IL-4, 6, 10 and 17A, iNOS, TNF-α, TGF-β and IFN-γ was estimated by real-time polymerase chain reaction. IL-17 protein expression was determined by immunohistochemistry. Mast cells were labeled with tryptase to evaluate cell appearance and count. IL-6, 10 and 17A, and iNOS mRNA levels as well as the number of mast cells infiltrating the bladder mucosa were significantly increased in patients with bladder pain syndrome type 3C compared to healthy controls. TNF-α, TGF-β and IFN-γ mRNA levels were similar in patients and controls. IL-17A expression at the protein level was up-regulated and localized to inflammatory cells and urothelium in patients with bladder pain syndrome type 3C. Patients with bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis had increased mRNA levels of IL-17A, 10 and 6, and iNOS. IL-17A might be important in the inflammatory process. To our knowledge the increase in IL-17A is a novel finding that may have new treatment implications. Copyright © 2014 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Utility of bone scintigraphy in the study of hereditary disorders of the connective tissues (HDCT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bravo, J.F; Arteaga M P; Coelho, L

    2003-01-01

    Introduction: Collagen fiber genetic alterations predispose to pain and instability of joints, with a tendency to osteoarthritis, and may also cause fragility of other tissues. Objective: To demonstrate that Bone Scintigraphy is useful in the diagnosis of Heritable Disorders of Connective Tissues (HDCT). Material and methods: We studied the scintigraphic changes of wrists, carpal bones and hands of 22 adult patients with HDCT who were diagnosed clinically using both the Brighton Criteria(1), as well as own criteria**. We compared them to 22 controls with similar age and sex, who had a bone scintigram done for other purposes. Results: Statistically significant scintigraphic positivity was found in the areas studied in the patients as compared to controls (p ≤ 0.05), with a sensitivity of 95% and specificity of 73%. There was no correlation of the degree of positivity with age, sex or type of HDCT studied. A scintigraphic positivity was seen both in patients with lax joints, as well as in those with a lesser degree of joint mobility. Conclusions: We concluded that bone scintigraphic studies are useful in the diagnosis of adult HDCT patients (including Benign Joint Hyper mobility Syndrome (BJHS) and other forms of Ehlers-Danlos). We suggest that not only hypermobility of joints, but also cartilage fragility are important pathogenic factors in the genesis of these alterations. We formulate a new hypothesis of the importance of low folic acid intake during pregnancy, as a cause for mutations that would give rise to HDCT (Au)

  12. Genetics of ischaemic stroke; single gene disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flossmann, Enrico

    2006-08-01

    Examples of single gene disorders have been described for all major subtypes of ischaemic stroke: accelerated atherosclerosis and subsequent thrombo-embolism (e.g. homocysteinuria), weakening of connective tissue resulting in arterial dissections (e.g. Ehler-Danlos type IV), disorders of cerebral small vessels (e.g. cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy and the collagen COL4A1 mutation), disorders increasing the thrombogenic potential of the heart through affecting the myocardium or the heart valves or through disturbance of the heart rhythm (e.g. hypertrophic cardiomyopathy), mitochondrial cytopathies increasing cerebral tissue susceptibility to insults (e.g. mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes), and finally disorders of coagulation that can either directly cause stroke or act synergistically with the aforementioned abnormalities (e.g. sickle cell disease). Most of these disorders are rare but they are important to consider particularly in young patients with stroke, those with a family history or those who have other characteristics of a particular syndrome.

  13. Carotid-cavernous fistula after functional endoscopic sinus surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaman, Emin; Isildak, Huseyin; Haciyev, Yusuf; Kaytaz, Asim; Enver, Ozgun

    2009-03-01

    Carotid-cavernous fistulas (CCFs) are anomalous communications between the carotid arterial system and the venous cavernous sinus. They can arise because of spontaneous or trauma causes. Most caroticocavernous fistulas are of spontaneous origin and unknown etiology. Spontaneous CCF may also be associated with cavernous sinus pathology such as arteriosclerotic changes of the arterial wall, fibromuscular dysplasia, or Ehler-Danlos syndrome. Traumatic CCFs may occur after either blunt or penetrating head trauma. Their clinical presentation is related to their size and to the type of venous drainage, which can lead to a variety of symptoms, such as visual loss, proptosis, bruit, chemosis, cranial nerve impairment, intracranial hemorrhage (rare), and so on. Treatment by endovascular transarterial embolization with electrolytically detachable coils is a very effective method for CCF with good outcomes. Carotid-cavernous fistulas have been rarely reported after craniofacial surgery and are uncommon pathologies in otolaryngology practice. In this study, we report a 40-year-old woman with CCF secondary to blunt trauma of functional endoscopic sinus surgery.

  14. Endovascular therapy of arteriovenous fistulae with electrolytically detachable coils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansen, O.; Doerfler, A.; Forsting, M.; Hartmann, M.; Kummer, R. von; Tronnier, V.; Sartor, K. [Dept. of Neuroradiology, University of Heidelberg Medical School (Germany)

    1999-12-01

    We report our experience in using Guglielmi electrolytically detachable coils (GDC) alone or in combination with other materials in the treatment of intracranial or cervical high-flow fistulae. We treated 14 patients with arteriovenous fistulae on brain-supplying vessels - three involving the external carotid or the vertebral artery, five the cavernous sinus and six the dural sinuses - by endovascular occlusion using electrolytically detachable platinum coils. The fistula was caused by trauma in six cases. In one case Ehlers-Danlos syndrome was the underlying disease, and in the remaining seven cases no aetiology could be found. Fistulae of the external carotid and vertebral arteries and caroticocavernous fistulae were reached via the transarterial route, while in all dural fistulae a combined transarterial-transvenous approach was chosen. All fistulae were treated using electrolytically detachable coils. While small fistulae could be occluded with electrolytically detachable coils alone, large fistulae were treated by using coils to build a stable basket for other types of coil or balloons. In 11 of the 14 patients, endovascular treatment resulted in complete occlusion of the fistula; in the remaining three occlusion was subtotal. Symptoms and signs were completely abolished by this treatment in 12 patients and reduced in 2. On clinical and neuroradiological follow-up (mean 16 months) no reappearance of symptoms was recorded. (orig.)

  15. Myofibroblast Expression in Skin Wounds Is Enhanced by Collagen III Suppression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed M. Al-Qattan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Generally speaking, the excessive expression of myofibroblasts is associated with excessive collagen production. One exception is seen in patients and animal models of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV in which the COL3A1 gene mutation results in reduced collagen III but with concurrent increased myofibroblast expression. This paradox has not been examined with the use of external drugs/modalities to prevent hypertrophic scars. In this paper, we injected the rabbit ear wound model of hypertrophic scarring with two doses of a protein called nAG, which is known to reduce collagen expression and to suppress hypertrophic scarring in that animal model. The higher nAG dose was associated with significantly less collagen III expression and concurrent higher degree of myofibroblast expression. We concluded that collagen III content of the extracellular matrix may have a direct or an indirect effect on myofibroblast differentiation. However, further research is required to investigate the pathogenesis of this paradoxical phenomenon.

  16. Mutations in B3GALT6, which encodes a glycosaminoglycan linker region enzyme, cause a spectrum of skeletal and connective tissue disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Masahiro; Mizumoto, Shuji; Miyake, Noriko; Kogawa, Ryo; Iida, Aritoshi; Ito, Hironori; Kitoh, Hiroshi; Hirayama, Aya; Mitsubuchi, Hiroshi; Miyazaki, Osamu; Kosaki, Rika; Horikawa, Reiko; Lai, Angeline; Mendoza-Londono, Roberto; Dupuis, Lucie; Chitayat, David; Howard, Andrew; Leal, Gabriela F; Cavalcanti, Denise; Tsurusaki, Yoshinori; Saitsu, Hirotomo; Watanabe, Shigehiko; Lausch, Ekkehart; Unger, Sheila; Bonafé, Luisa; Ohashi, Hirofumi; Superti-Furga, Andrea; Matsumoto, Naomichi; Sugahara, Kazuyuki; Nishimura, Gen; Ikegawa, Shiro

    2013-06-06

    Proteoglycans (PGs) are a major component of the extracellular matrix in many tissues and function as structural and regulatory molecules. PGs are composed of core proteins and glycosaminoglycan (GAG) side chains. The biosynthesis of GAGs starts with the linker region that consists of four sugar residues and is followed by repeating disaccharide units. By exome sequencing, we found that B3GALT6 encoding an enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of the GAG linker region is responsible for a severe skeletal dysplasia, spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia with joint laxity type 1 (SEMD-JL1). B3GALT6 loss-of-function mutations were found in individuals with SEMD-JL1 from seven families. In a subsequent candidate gene study based on the phenotypic similarity, we found that B3GALT6 is also responsible for a connective tissue disease, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (progeroid form). Recessive loss-of-function mutations in B3GALT6 result in a spectrum of disorders affecting a broad range of skeletal and connective tissues characterized by lax skin, muscle hypotonia, joint dislocation, and spinal deformity. The pleiotropic phenotypes of the disorders indicate that B3GALT6 plays a critical role in a wide range of biological processes in various tissues, including skin, bone, cartilage, tendon, and ligament. Copyright © 2013 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Utility of bone scintigraphy in the study of hereditary disorders of the connective tissues (HDCT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bravo, J F; P, Arteaga M; Coelho, L [Departments of Rheumatology and Nuclear Medicine. Clinica Arauco. Santiago (Chile)

    2003-10-01

    Introduction: Collagen fiber genetic alterations predispose to pain and instability of joints, with a tendency to osteoarthritis, and may also cause fragility of other tissues. Objective: To demonstrate that Bone Scintigraphy is useful in the diagnosis of Heritable Disorders of Connective Tissues (HDCT). Material and methods: We studied the scintigraphic changes of wrists, carpal bones and hands of 22 adult patients with HDCT who were diagnosed clinically using both the Brighton Criteria(1), as well as own criteria**. We compared them to 22 controls with similar age and sex, who had a bone scintigram done for other purposes. Results: Statistically significant scintigraphic positivity was found in the areas studied in the patients as compared to controls (p {<=} 0.05), with a sensitivity of 95% and specificity of 73%. There was no correlation of the degree of positivity with age, sex or type of HDCT studied. A scintigraphic positivity was seen both in patients with lax joints, as well as in those with a lesser degree of joint mobility. Conclusions: We concluded that bone scintigraphic studies are useful in the diagnosis of adult HDCT patients (including Benign Joint Hyper mobility Syndrome (BJHS) and other forms of Ehlers-Danlos). We suggest that not only hypermobility of joints, but also cartilage fragility are important pathogenic factors in the genesis of these alterations. We formulate a new hypothesis of the importance of low folic acid intake during pregnancy, as a cause for mutations that would give rise to HDCT (Au)

  18. Albuminuria and Glomerular Filtration Rate in Individuals with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus: Contribution of Metabolic Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uribe-Wiechers, Ana Cecilia; Janka-Zires, Marcela; Almeda-Valdés, Paloma; López-Gutiérrez, Joel; Gómez-Pérez, Francisco J

    2015-01-01

    The development of metabolic syndrome has been described in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus as the disease progresses over time. The purpose of this study is to assess the relationship between metabolic syndrome, albuminuria, and glomerular filtration rate, as well as to determine the prevalence of metabolic syndrome, in a group of Mexican patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus. We conducted a cross-sectional study that included patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus who were diagnosed over 10 years ago and who are seen at the Diabetes Intensive Control Clinic of the Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran in Mexico City. The presence of metabolic syndrome was determined by using the National Cholesterol Education Program-Adult Treatment Panel III (ATP III) criteria. A total of 81 individuals were studied. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome was 18.5% (n = 15). A higher albuminuria was found in subjects with metabolic syndrome (34.9 mg/24 hours; 8.3-169.3) than in those without metabolic syndrome (9.0 mg/24 hours; 5.0-27.0; p = 0.02). Glomerular filtration rate was lower in patients with metabolic syndrome (95.3 ml/minute; [64.9-107.2] vs. 110.2 ml/minute [88.1-120.3]; p = 0.04). After classifying the population according to the number of metabolic syndrome criteria, a progressive increase in albuminuria and a progressive decrease in glomerular filtration rate were found with each additional metabolic syndrome criterion (p = 0.008 and p = 0.032, respectively). After adjusting for age, time from diagnosis, systolic blood pressure, triglycerides, HDL-cholesterol, and treatment with angiotensin receptor blockers or angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, we found that age, time from diagnosis, triglycerides, and HDL-cholesterol were independent factors associated with glomerular filtration rate (R2 = 0.286; p diabetes mellitus. Metabolic syndrome was present in 18.5% of this group of Mexican individuals with type 1 diabetes

  19. Multiple aneurysm of unknown aetiology in childhood: Complications and diagnostic possibilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanfermann, H.; Benz-Bohm, G.; Schaper, J.; Gross-Fengels, W.

    1990-01-01

    A 6,5-year old boy with already known multiple aneurysm of all major arteries presented with acute abdominal pain. As demonstrated by ultrasound a big aneurysm of the left renal artery thrombosed in the course of three days. As a result, the left kidney developed severe ischaemia. Although computed tomography and scintigraphy were applied, a plan for a definitive therapeutic procedere could be established only by arterial angiography. Both Ehlers-Danlos' syndrome and Kawasaki's syndrome were excluded. There were no facts suggesting an infective aetiology. Four other cases with multiple aneurysms of unknown aetiology in childhood have so far been described in literature. (orig.) [de

  20. Canagliflozin improves risk factors of metabolic syndrome in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davies MJ

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Michael J Davies,1 Katherine W Merton,1 Ujjwala Vijapurkar,2 Dainius A Balis,2 Mehul Desai2 1Janssen Scientific Affairs, LLC, Titusville, NJ, USA; 2Janssen Research & Development, LLC, Raritan, NJ, USA Objective: Metabolic syndrome refers to a collection of risk factors associated with the development of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. Canagliflozin, a sodium glucose co-transporter 2 inhibitor, improves glycemic control and reduces body weight and blood pressure (BP in a broad range of patients with T2DM. This post hoc analysis assessed the effects of canagliflozin on the components of metabolic syndrome in patients with T2DM and metabolic syndrome.Methods: This analysis was based on data from 2 head-to-head studies of canagliflozin in patients with T2DM on background metformin versus glimepiride (study 1 and background metformin plus sulfonylurea versus sitagliptin 100 mg (study 2. Changes from baseline in glycemic efficacy, anthropometric measures, BP, and lipids were evaluated with canagliflozin versus glimepiride and sitagliptin at week 52 in patients who met ≥2 of the criteria for metabolic syndrome (in addition to T2DM: triglycerides ≥1.7 mmol/L; high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C <1.0 mmol/L (men or <1.3 mmol/L (women; waist circumference ≥102 cm (non-Asian men, ≥88 cm (non-Asian women, >90 cm (Asian men, or >80 cm (Asian women; diagnosis of hypertension or meeting BP-related criteria (systolic BP ≥130 mmHg or diastolic BP ≥85 mmHg. Safety was assessed based on adverse event reports.Results: In study 1, canagliflozin 100 and 300 mg provided similar and greater HbA1c reductions versus glimepiride, respectively. In study 2, canagliflozin 300 mg provided greater HbA1c lowering versus sitagliptin 100 mg. Canagliflozin also reduced fasting plasma glucose, body weight, body mass index, waist circumference, BP, and triglycerides, and increased HDL-C and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol versus