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Sample records for effects intercellular transmission

  1. Bystander effects: intercellular transmission of radiation damage signals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Little, J.B.; Azzam, E.I.; Toledo, S.M. de; Nagasawa, H

    2002-07-01

    Biological effects were examined in confluent cultures of fibroblasts and epithelial cells exposed to very low mean doses of alpha radiation, doses by which only 1-2% of the cells were actually traversed by an alpha particle. Enhanced frequencies of sister chromatid exchanges and HPRT mutations occurred in the non-irradiation, 'bystander' cells associated with a similar increase in the frequency of micronuclei, indicating the induction of DNA damage in these cells. In order to gain information concerning molecular pathways, changes in gene expression were examined in bystander cells by western analysis and in situ immunofluorescence staining. The expression levels of p53, p21 and MDM2 were significantly modulated in bystander cells: the damage signals leading to these changes were transmitted from irradiated to bystander cells by gap junction mediated intracellular communication. The bystander response was suppressed by incubation with superoxide dismutase as well as an inhibitor of NADPH oxidase, suggesting the effect may be mediated by oxidative stress. To examine other signalling pathways responsive to oxidative stress, the activation of stress-related kinases and their downstream transcription factors were analysed in bystander cells by western blotting and electrophoretic mobility shift assays: a 2-4 fold increase in the phosphorylation levels of JNK, EPK1/2, p90RSK, Elk-1 and ATF2 was observed. These changes were detected by 15 min after irradiation and persisted for at least 1 h. These findings indicate the activation of multiple signal transduction pathways in bystander cells, involving signals arising from the plasma membrane as well as from DNA damage. (author)

  2. Effect of sound on gap-junction-based intercellular signaling: Calcium waves under acoustic irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deymier, P A; Swinteck, N; Runge, K; Deymier-Black, A; Hoying, J B

    2015-01-01

    We present a previously unrecognized effect of sound waves on gap-junction-based intercellular signaling such as in biological tissues composed of endothelial cells. We suggest that sound irradiation may, through temporal and spatial modulation of cell-to-cell conductance, create intercellular calcium waves with unidirectional signal propagation associated with nonconventional topologies. Nonreciprocity in calcium wave propagation induced by sound wave irradiation is demonstrated in the case of a linear and a nonlinear reaction-diffusion model. This demonstration should be applicable to other types of gap-junction-based intercellular signals, and it is thought that it should be of help in interpreting a broad range of biological phenomena associated with the beneficial therapeutic effects of sound irradiation and possibly the harmful effects of sound waves on health.

  3. Studies of Bystander Effect and Intercellular Communication in Human Epithelial Cell Cultures Irradiated with X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romppanen, E.; Trott, K. R.; Musatonen, R.; Leszcznski, D.; Belyakov, O.

    2004-01-01

    The bystander effect is a phenomenon whereby biological consequences of irradiation are expressed in nonexposed cells in the vicinity of exposed cells. Two main pathways have been proposed to mediate the bystander effect: Gap Junction Intercellular Communication (GJIC) and medium borne soluble factors dependent mechanisms. The present study was designed to evaluate the relative contributions of gap junction intercellular communication and of soluble extracellular factors on the bystander effects of low dose X-ray irradiation. HaCaT human epithelial cell monolayers were exposed to X-ray using specially constructed shield, which cover 95% or 56% or 0% of the cells from the radiation. To evaluate whether the GJIC is involved in transmission of the bystander signal from irradiated to nonirradiated cells, irradiations were performed in presence or absence of GJIC inhibitor lindane. The cytochalasin B block technique was used to quantify fractions of micronucleated cells 48 hours after the irradiation. Our results suggest that more micronucleated cells are induced in partially shielded monolayers than expected according to back extrapolation of the data from open field irradiation. Treatment with lindane considerably reduced amount of the bystander damage. We demonstrated that fraction of micronucleated cells after X-rays irradiation of 5% of cells with 1 Gy was 0.07±0.08 (without lindane) and 0.05±0.004 (in presence of lindane). Irradiation of 100% of cells with the same dose resulted in 0.023±0.04 /without lindane) and 0.013±0.02 (in presence of lindane) fractions of micronucleated cells. Comparison with open field data showed that the fraction of micronucleated cells after irradiation of 5% of the cell culture was 5-10 times greater than the estimated fraction assuming no bystander effect. Irradiation of 44% of cells ded not demonstrate a pronounced bystander effect. (Author) 20 refs

  4. Intercellular and intracellular signaling pathways mediating ionizing radiation-induced bystander effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamada, Nobuyuki; Hara, Takamitsu; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Matsumoto, Hideki

    2007-01-01

    A rapidly growing body of experimental evidence indicates that ionizing radiation induces biological effects in non-irradiated bystander cells that have received signals from adjacent or distant irradiated cells. This phenomenon, which has been termed the ionizing radiation-induced bystander effect, challenges the long-standing paradigm that radiation traversal through the nucleus of a cell is a prerequisite to elicit genetic damage or a biological response. Bystander effects have been observed in a number of experimental systems, and cells whose nucleus or cytoplasm is irradiated exert bystander responses. Bystander cells manifest a multitude of biological consequences, such as genetic and epigenetic changes, alterations in gene expression, activation of signal transduction pathways, and delayed effects in their progeny. Several mediating mechanisms have been proposed. These involve gap junction-mediated intercellular communication, secreted soluble factors, oxidative metabolism, plasma membrane-bound lipid rafts, and calcium fluxes. This paper reviews briefly the current knowledge of the bystander effect with a focus on proposed mechanisms. The potential benefit of bystander effects to cancer radiotherapy will also be discussed. (author)

  5. Effects of lead intoxication on intercellular junctions and biochemical alterations of the renal proximal tubule cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-Moreno, L G; Quintanar-Escorza, M A; González, S; Mondragón, R; Cerbón-Solorzáno, J; Valdés, J; Calderón-Salinas, J V

    2009-10-01

    Lead intoxication is a worldwide health problem which frequently affects the kidney. In this work, we studied the effects of chronic lead intoxication (500 ppm of Pb in drinking water during seven months) on the structure, function and biochemical properties of rat proximal tubule cells. Lead-exposed animals showed increased lead concentration in kidney, reduction of calcium and amino acids uptake, oxidative damage and glucosuria, proteinuria, hematuria and reduced urinary pH. These biochemical and physiological alterations were related to striking morphological modifications in the structure of tubule epithelial cells and in the morphology of their mitochondria, nuclei, lysosomes, basal and apical membranes. Interestingly, in addition to the nuclei, inclusion bodies were found in the cytoplasm and in mitochondria. The epithelial cell structure modifications included an early loss of the apical microvillae, followed by a decrement of the luminal space and the respective apposition and proximity of apical membranes, resulting in the formation of atypical intercellular contacts and adhesion structures. Similar but less marked alterations were observed in subacute lead intoxication as well. Our work contributes in the understanding of the physiopathology of lead intoxication on the structure of renal tubular epithelial cell-cell contacts in vivo.

  6. Effect of spironolactone on renal and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 expression in Type 2 diabetic rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Suwan; Li Sumei; Zhai Fei; Zhang Li; Zhang Rong; Ru Yan

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To observe the influence of spironolactone on the serum and urine intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) level, and the change of renal structure and function of type 2 diabetic rats. Methods: 30 healthy male SD rats were chosen 10 of them were randomly selected as normal controls (group NC) n=10; Then these rats were randomly divided into type 2 diabetes group (group DM) n=10 and type 2 diabetes + spironolactone treated group (group SPI) n=10. After 8 weeks, the levels of blood glucose, serum lipids, urine biochemical, renal pathological changes were examined; while the serum and urine ICAM-1 levels changes were also detected. Results: 1. Compared with group NC, the levels of fBG and HbA1c were significantly increased in group DM and group SPI (P 0.05). 2. After 8 weeks,the levels of ACR, URBP, UICAM-1, SICAM-1 and kidney/body weight ratio in group DM and group SPI were higher than group NC (P<0.05); the five indexes were significantly lower in group SPI compared with group DM (P<0.05). In addition, UICAM-1 excretion rate and SICAM-1 level showed positive correlations with ACR, URBP excretion rate and kidney/body weight ratio (P<0.01). 3. Pathology showed that the extent of glomerular lesions in rats in group SPI apparently reduced, ICAM-1 expression was decreased compared with that in group DM (P<0.01). Conclusion: Spironolactone can definitely protect type 2 diabetic kidney,and this protective effect was independent on the hypoglycemic effect. The mechanisms might be associated with its inhibition effect on ICAM-1 expression and its excretion. (authors)

  7. The effect of water saturation deficit on the volume of intercellular space in laeves

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    J. Czerski

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The volume of intercellular spaces in leaves at various stages of water saturation was determined by method of Czerski (1964, 1968. The investigation were performed with the following plant species: Vicia faba L., Nicotiana tabacum L. var. rustica, Solarium tuberosum L. var. Flisak, Helichrysum bracteatum Wild., Bmssica napus L. var. oleifera, Beta vulgaris L. var. saccharifera.

  8. Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1 Levels in Experimental Brain Injury and the Effects of Alpha-tocopherol

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    Nilgun Senol

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The mechanisms, responsible for the secondary injuries occuring after acute injury of the brain are; release of nitrous oxide which is an inflammatory mediator, abnormal formation of free oxygen radicals and excessive stimulation of excitatory aminoacids. In this study, it is aimed to investigate changes in intercellular adhesion molecule levels in the brain, that occur subsequent to blunt head trauma, and after administration of an antioxidant agent, vitamin E. Material and Method: In this study, rats were divided into 4 groups. In group A; rats had only skin incision, group B; rats were traumatized after the skin incision, group C; isotonic (30mg/kg was given intraperitoneally after 30 minutes of the trauma, group D; alpha-tocopherol (30mg/kg was given intraperitoneally, after 30 minutes of the trauma. All the rats in these groups were sacrified after 24 hours. Biparietal and bifrontal lobs were taken about 3x5x1mm tickness and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 levels were studied by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit. Results: As the result of the statistical analysis, it is detected that although there is an increase in intercellular adhesion molecule levels in brain parenchyma after trauma, it is statistically unsignificant. However, as the traumatized group and the group given alpha-tocopherol after trauma was compared, a statistically significant decrease in intercellular adhesion molecule-1 levels in the alpha-tocopherol given group was seen. Discussion: Alpha-tocopherol, an antioxidant agent, causes decrease in intercellular adhesion molecule levels, by decreasing inflammation.

  9. Electrotonic potentials in Aloe vera L.: Effects of intercellular and external electrodes arrangement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkov, Alexander G; Nyasani, Eunice K; Tuckett, Clayton; Scott, Jessenia M; Jackson, Mariah M Z; Greeman, Esther A; Greenidge, Ariane S; Cohen, Devin O; Volkova, Maia I; Shtessel, Yuri B

    2017-02-01

    Electrostimulation of plants can induce plant movements, activation of ion channels, ion transport, gene expression, enzymatic systems activation, electrical signaling, plant-cell damage, enhanced wound healing, and influence plant growth. Here we found that electrical networks in plant tissues have electrical differentiators. The amplitude of electrical responses decreases along a leaf and increases by decreasing the distance between polarizing Pt-electrodes. Intercellular Ag/AgCl electrodes inserted in a leaf and extracellular Ag/AgCl electrodes attached to the leaf surface were used to detect the electrotonic potential propagation along a leaf of Aloe vera. There is a difference in duration and amplitude of electrical potentials measured by electrodes inserted in a leaf and those attached to a leaf's surface. If the external reference electrode is located in the soil near the root, it changes the amplitude and duration of electrotonic potentials due to existence of additional resistance, capacitance, ion channels and ion pumps in the root. The information gained from this study can be used to elucidate extracellular and intercellular communication in the form of electrical signals within plants. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 expression in radiation otitis media murine model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Shengzi; Cheng Qingfang; Lu Shenbin; Liu Jianping; Wang Shuyi

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To characterize the dose- and time-dependent changes in intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) expression and the role of this molecule as a mediator of middle ear inflammation induced by radiation. Methods: Radiation-induced otitis media animal models were established by using guinea pigs after 60 Co irradiation with 3 Gy/fraction per day, 5 times per week to a total dose of 15, 30, 45 Gy. The expression of ICAM-1 was studied by SP immunohistochemistry with the relation between radiation dose and infiltration of leukocytes investigated. Results: ICAM-1 was not expressed in the normal epithelium of the middle ear mucosa. Mucosal epithelium strongly expressed ICAM-1 after having been administered with 45 Gy of irradiation showing a significant correlation between the expression of ICAM-1 and the infiltration of leukocytes. Conclusions: Irradiation increases the expression of ICAM-1 in the middle ear mucosa. ICAM-1 may be related to the inflammation in the middle ear after irradiation

  11. Effect of retinol and cigarette-smoke and condensate on dye-coupled intercellular communication between hamster tracheal epithelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutten, A.A.J.J.L.; Jongen, W.M.F.; Haan, L.H.J.de; Hendriksen, E.G.J.; Koeman, J.H.

    1988-01-01

    The dye-coupled intercellular communication across gap junctions in primary hamster tracheal epithelial cells has been studied in serum-free, hormone-supplemented medium. In the absence of vitamin A, non-cytotoxic concentrations of cigarette-smoke condensate (CSC) inhibited intercellular

  12. Modulatory effects of cAMP and PKC activation on gap junctional intercellular communication among thymic epithelial cells

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    Neves-dos-Santos Sandra

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We investigated the effects of the signaling molecules, cyclic AMP (cAMP and protein-kinase C (PKC, on gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC between thymic epithelial cells (TEC. Results Treatment with 8-Br-cAMP, a cAMP analog; or forskolin, which stimulates cAMP production, resulted in an increase in dye transfer between adjacent TEC, inducing a three-fold enhancement in the mean fluorescence of coupled cells, ascertained by flow cytometry after calcein transfer. These treatments also increased Cx43 mRNA expression, and stimulated Cx43 protein accumulation in regions of intercellular contacts. VIP, adenosine, and epinephrine which may also signal through cyclic nucleotides were tested. The first two molecules did not mimic the effects of 8-Br-cAMP, however epinephrine was able to increase GJIC suggesting that this molecule functions as an endogenous inter-TEC GJIC modulators. Stimulation of PKC by phorbol-myristate-acetate inhibited inter-TEC GJIC. Importantly, both the enhancing and the decreasing effects, respectively induced by cAMP and PKC, were observed in both mouse and human TEC preparations. Lastly, experiments using mouse thymocyte/TEC heterocellular co-cultures suggested that the presence of thymocytes does not affect the degree of inter-TEC GJIC. Conclusions Overall, our data indicate that cAMP and PKC intracellular pathways are involved in the homeostatic control of the gap junction-mediated communication in the thymic epithelium, exerting respectively a positive and negative role upon cell coupling. This control is phylogenetically conserved in the thymus, since it was seen in both mouse and human TEC preparations. Lastly, our work provides new clues for a better understanding of how the thymic epithelial network can work as a physiological syncytium.

  13. Effects of alpha-tocopherol on superoxide production and plasma intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and antibodies to oxidized LDL in chronic smokers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tits, van L.J.; Waart, de F.; Hak-Lemmers, H.L.M.; Heijst, P.; Graaf, de J.; Demacker, P.N.; Stalenhoef, A.F.

    2001-01-01

    Antioxidants have been postulated to exert beneficial effects in atherosclerosis. Atherosclerosis is associated with raised plasma levels of soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1) and autoantibodies against oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL). It is not known whether antioxidants

  14. Effects of anisodamine on the expressions of vascular endothelial growth factor and intercellular adhesion molecule 1 in experimental infusion phlebitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhen-Xiang; Wang, Peng; Zhang, Qiu-Shi; Pan, Xue; Zhao, Qing-Xia; Wang, Xiao-Kai

    2012-01-01

    Infusion phlebitis is the most common side effect of clinical intravenous drug therapy and several clinical studies have demonstrated that anisodamine can effectively prevent the occurrence of infusion phlebitis. This study was designed to investigate effects of anisodamine on the expressions of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) in a rabbit model of infusion phlebitis and to analyze the mechanisms of anisodamine effect on the prevention and treatment of experimental infusion phlebitis. Twenty-four specific pathogen-free male Japanese white rabbits were randomly assigned to the control group, the model group, the magnesium sulfate group and the anisodamine group. The rabbit model of infusion phlebitis, induced by intravenous administration, was established and expressions of VEGF and ICAM-1 were determined and contrasted with the control group treated with normal saline. We evaluated expression by histopathology, immunohistochemistry, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and Western blotting assay. Pathohistological changes of the model group were observed, such as loss of venous endothelial cells, inflammatory cell infiltration, edema and thrombus. The magnesium sulfate group and the anisodamine group showed significant protective effects on vascular congestion, inflammatory cell infiltration, proliferation, swelling of endothelium and perivascular hemorrhage. The model group showed the highest expressions of VEGF and ICAM-1 of the four groups (P 0.05). Anisodamine alleviates inflammatory damage by significantly reducing the expressions of VEGF and ICAM-1, and shows significant protective effects in an animal model of infusion phlebitis.

  15. Intercellular communication and cell proliferation in precision-cut rat liver slices : effect of medium composition and DDT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graaf, I.A.M.; Tajima, O.; Groten, J.P.; Wolterbeek, A.P.M.

    2000-01-01

    Gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) and cell proliferation were studied in control and 1,1'-bis(p-chlorophenyl)-2,2,2,-trichloroethane (DDT) treated precision-cut liver slices of rat by evaluating connexin 32 (Cx32) expression and 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation. In

  16. Effect of gamma-radiation on direct intercellular interaction (rosette formation) between thymus macrophages and thymocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belyakov, I.M.; Yarilin, A.A.

    1992-01-01

    In experiments with mice, the effect of radiation on resette formation between thymus macrophages (Th-MPh) and thymocytes (Thc) was studied on days 1, 4, 12, 30, and 60 following gamma-irradiation with doses of 0.5, 2, 4, and 8 Gy. gamma-Irradiation with doses of above 2 Gy was shown to cause a dose-dependent inhibition of rosette formation of Th-MPh with Thc in vitro. Two types of rosette-forming Th-MPh were identified: RFMPhII with low rate of binding to Thc and RFMPhII with high rate of binding to Thc. Radiation affects mainly the RFMPhII content. The total population of rosette-forming Th-MPh was restored on day 60 mainly due to cells with low rate of rosette formation. The EC supernatant promoted rosette formation of exposed Th-MPh with Thc. The effect was maximum at early times following irradiation of Th-MPh with a dose of 4 Gy

  17. Alterations of Intercellular Junctions in Peritoneal Mesothelial Cells from Patients Undergoing Dialysis: Effect of Retinoic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retana, Carmen; Sanchez, Elsa; Perez-Lopez, Alejandro; Cruz, Armando; Lagunas, Jesus; Cruz, Carmen; Vital, Socorro; Reyes, Jose L.

    2015-01-01

    ♦ Background: Dialysis patients are classified according to their peritoneal permeability as low transporter (LT, low solute permeability) or high transporter (HT, high solute permeability). Tight junction (TJ) proteins are critical to maintain ions, molecules and water paracellular transport through peritoneum. Exposure to peritoneal dialysis solutions causes damage to TJ in human peritoneal mesothelial cells (HPMCs). We analyzed the quantity, distribution and function of TJ proteins: claudin-1, -2 and -8, ZO-1 and occludin, in HPMC cultures from LT and HT patients. Since all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) might modify the expression of TJ proteins, we studied its effect on HPMCs. ♦ Methods: Control HPMCs were isolated from human omentum, while HT or LT cells were obtained from dialysis effluents. Cells were cultured in presence of ATRA 0, 50 or 100 nM. Transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) measurement, immunostaining and Western blot analyses were performed. ♦ Results: HT exhibited lower TER than control and LT monolayers. Immunofluorescence for TJ was weak and discontinuous along the cell contour, in LT and HT. Furthermore, claudin-1, occludin and ZO-1 expressions were decreased. In all groups, claudin-2 was localized at nuclei. We observed that ATRA improved TJ distribution and increased TJ expression in HT. This retinoid did not modify claudin-2 and -8 expressions. All-trans retinoic acid decreased TER in HT, but had no effect in LT. ♦ Conclusions: Tight junctions were altered in HPMCs from dialyzed patients. The HT monolayer has lower TER than LT, which might be associated with the peritoneal permeability in these patients. ATRA might be a therapeutic alternative to maintain mesothelial integrity, since it improved TJ localization and expression. PMID:24584604

  18. Low dose/low fluence ionizing radiation-induced biological effects: The role of intercellular communication and oxidative metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzam, Edouard

    Mechanistic investigations have been considered critical to understanding the health risks of exposure to ionizing radiation. To gain greater insight in the biological effects of exposure to low dose/low fluence space radiations with different linear energy transfer (LET) properties, we examined short and long-term biological responses to energetic protons and high charge (Z) and high energy (E) ions (HZE particles) in human cells maintained in culture and in targeted and non-targeted tissues of irradiated rodents. Particular focus of the studies has been on mod-ulation of gene expression, proliferative capacity, induction of DNA damage and perturbations in oxidative metabolism. Exposure to mean doses of 1000 MeV/nucleon iron ions, by which a small to moderate proportion of cells in an exposed population is targeted through the nucleus by an HZE particle, induced stressful effects in the irradiated and non-irradiated cells in the population. Direct intercellular communication via gap-junctions was a primary mediator of the propagation of stressful effects from irradiated to non-irradiated cells. Compromised prolif-erative capacity, elevated level of DNA damage and oxidative stress evaluated by measurements of protein carbonylation, lipid peroxidation and activity of metabolic enzymes persisted in the progeny of irradiated and non-irradiated cells. In contrast, progeny of cells exposed to high or low doses from 150-1000 MeV protons retained the ability to form colonies and harbored similar levels of micronuclei, a surrogate form of DNA damage, as control, which correlated with normal reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. Importantly, a significant increase in the spontaneous neoplastic transformation frequency was observed in progeny of bystander mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) co-cultured with MEFs irradiated with energetic iron ions but not protons. Of particular significance, stressful effects were detected in non-targeted tissues of rats that received partial

  19. Effects of Chinese yellow wine on nitric oxide synthase and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 expressions in rat vascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Fei; Ji, Zheng; Chi, Jufang; Tang, Weiliang; Zhai, Xiaoya; Meng, Liping; Guo, Hangyuan

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study was to determine similarities in the effect of yellow wine as compared to statin and the possibility that yellow wine inhibits tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)-induced nitric oxide (NO) synthesis, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) in cultured rat vascular endothelial cells (VECs). We isolated VECs, and cultivated and purified Sprague Dawley (SD) rat thoracic aortas in vitro. We selected the optimal wine concentration using clonogenic and MTT assays to measure cell survival. Next, we divided the cells into 9 groups: (1) control, (2) TNF-α, (3) TNF-α + rosuvastatin (10 μmol/L), (4) TNF-α + ethanol 0.5%, (5) TNF-α + yellow wine 0.5%, (6) TNF-α + ethanol 1.0%, (7) TNF-α + yellow wine 1.0%, (8) TNF-α + ethanol 1.5%, and (9) TNF-α + yellow wine 1.5% and they were given the corresponding treatment for 24 h. We determined NO production with nitrate reductase. We then measured eNOS activity, and detected eNOS, iNOS, and ICAM-1 protein levels by Western blotting. Compared with the TNF-α group, NO production, eNOS activity, and eNOS protein expression in the rosuvastatin, and yellow wine 1.0%, and 1.5% groups were significantly increased. Protein expression of iNOS and ICAM-1 in the rosuvastatin, yellow wine 1.0%, and 1.5% groups were significantly decreased. Compared with the rosuvastatin group, eNOS, iNOS, and ICAM-1 protein expression in the yellow wine (0.5% -1.5%) groups were significantly different. Treatment with yellow wine increased NO production, eNOS activity, and eNOS protein expression, which decreases iNOS and ICAM-1 protein expression. We conclude that yellow wine may have similar beneficial effects as rosuvastatin on the cardiovascular system. These effects may be attributed to their anti-atherosclerotic actions.

  20. Direct and indirect inactivation of tumor cell protective catalase by salicylic acid and anthocyanidins reactivates intercellular ROS signaling and allows for synergistic effects.

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    Scheit, Katrin; Bauer, Georg

    2015-03-01

    Salicylic acid and anthocyanidins are known as plant-derived antioxidants, but also can provoke paradoxically seeming prooxidant effects in vitro. These prooxidant effects are connected to the potential of salicylic acid and anthocyanidins to induce apoptosis selectively in tumor cells in vitro and to inhibit tumor growth in animal models. Several epidemiological studies have shown that salicylic acid and its prodrug acetylsalicylic acid are tumor-preventive for humans. The mechanism of salicylic acid- and anthocyanidin-dependent antitumor effects has remained enigmatic so far. Extracellular apoptosis-inducing reactive oxygen species signaling through the NO/peroxynitrite and the HOCl signaling pathway specifically induces apoptosis in transformed cells. Tumor cells have acquired resistance against intercellular reactive oxygen species signaling through expression of membrane-associated catalase. Here, we show that salicylic acid and anthocyanidins inactivate tumor cell protective catalase and thus reactive apoptosis-inducing intercellular reactive oxygen species signaling of tumor cells and the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis Salicylic acid inhibits catalase directly through its potential to transform compound I of catalase into the inactive compound II. In contrast, anthocyanidins provoke a complex mechanism for catalase inactivation that is initiated by anthocyanidin-mediated inhibition of NO dioxygenase. This allows the formation of extracellular singlet oxygen through the reaction between H(2)O(2) and peroxynitrite, amplification through a caspase8-dependent step and subsequent singlet oxygen-mediated inactivation of catalase. The combination of salicylic acid and anthocyanidins allows for a remarkable synergistic effect in apoptosis induction. This effect may be potentially useful to elaborate novel therapeutic approaches and crucial for the interpretation of epidemiological results related to the antitumor effects of secondary plant compounds. © The

  1. Phenotype characterization of embryoid body structures generated by a crystal comet effect tail in an intercellular cancer collision scenario

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    Diaz JA

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Jairo A Diaz, Mauricio F MurilloDepartment of Pathology, Hospital Departmental Villavicencio, Hospital Departmental Granada, Medicine School, University Cooperative of Colombia, Villavicencio, Meta, ColombiaAbstract: Cancer is, by definition, the uncontrolled growth of autonomous cells that eventually destroy adjacent tissues and generate architectural disorder. However, this concept cannot be totally true. In three well documented studies, we have demonstrated that cancer tissues produce order zones that evolve over time and generate embryoid body structures in a space-time interval. The authors decided to revise the macroscopic and microscopic material in well-developed malignant tumors in which embryoid bodies were identified to determine the phenotype characterization that serves as a guideline for easy recognition. The factors responsible for this morphogenesis are physical, bioelectric, and magnetic susceptibilities produced by crystals that act as molecular designers for the topographic gradients that guide the surrounding silhouette and establish tissue head-tail positional identities. The structures are located in amniotic-like cavities and show characteristic somite-like embryologic segmentation. Immunophenotypic study has demonstrated exclusion factor positional identity in relation to enolase-immunopositive expression of embryoid body and human chorionic gonadotropin immunopositivity exclusion factor expression in the surrounding tissues. The significance of these observations is that they can also be predicted by experimental image data collected by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC accelerator at the European Organization for Nuclear Research, in which two-beam subatomic collision particles in the resulting debris show hyperorder domains similar to those identified by us in intercellular cancer collisions. Our findings suggest that we are dealing with true reverse biologic system information in an activated collective cancer stem cell

  2. Tanshinone IIA increases the bystander effect of herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase/ganciclovir gene therapy via enhanced gap junctional intercellular communication.

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    Jianyong Xiao

    Full Text Available The bystander effect is an intriguing phenomenon by which adjacent cells become sensitized to drug treatment during gene therapy with herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase/ganciclovir (HSV-tk/GCV. This effect is reported to be mediated by gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC, and therefore, we postulated that upregulation of genes that facilitate GJIC may enhance the HSV-tk/GCV bystander effect. Previous findings have shown Tanshinone IIA (Tan IIA, a chemical substance derived from a Chinese medicine herb, promotes the upregulation of the connexins Cx26 and Cx43 in B16 cells. Because gap junctions are formed by connexins, we hypothesized that Tan IIA might increase GJIC. Our results show that Tan IIA increased GJIC in B16 melanoma cells, leading to more efficient GCV-induced bystander killing in cells stably expressing HSV-tk. Additionally, in vivo experiments demonstrated that tumors in mice with 10% HSV-tk positive B16 cells and 90% wild-type B16 cells became smaller following treatment with the combination of GCV and Tan IIA as compared to GCV or Tan IIA alone. These data demonstrate that Tan IIA can augment the bystander effect of HSV-tk/GCV system through increased gap junction coupling, which adds strength to the promising strategy that develops connexins inducer to potentiate the effects of suicide gene therapy.

  3. Effects of anti-tumor necrosis factor-alpha and anti-intercellular adhesion molecule-1 antibodies on ischemia/reperfusion lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Chi-Huei

    2006-10-31

    Inhibition of neutrophil activation and adherence to endothelium by antibodies to tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and intercellular adhesion molecules (ICAM-1), respectively, might attenuate ischemia-reperfusion injury (I/R). I/R was conducted in an isolated rat lung model. Anti-TNF-alpha antibody and/or anti-ICAM-1 antibody were added before ischemia or after reperfusion. Hemodynamic changes, lung weight gain (LWG), capillary filtration coefficients (Kfc), and pathologic changes were assessed to evaluate the severity of I/R. The LWG, Kfc, pathological changes and lung injury score of treatment groups with anti-TNF-alpha antibody treatment, either pre-ischemia or during reperfusion, were less than those observed in control groups. Similar findings were found in group treated with anti-ICAM-1 antibody or combination therapy during reperfusion. In contrast, pre-I/R treatment with anti-ICAM-1 antibody induced severe lung edema and failure to complete the experimental procedure. No additional therapeutic effect was found in combination therapy. We conclude that TNF-alpha and ICAM-1 play important roles in I/R. Anti-TNF-alpha antibody has therapeutic and preventive effects on I/R. However, combined therapy with anti-TNF-alpha antibody and anti-ICAM-1 antibody may have no additive effect and need further investigation.

  4. Intercellular bridges in vertebrate gastrulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Caneparo

    Full Text Available The developing zebrafish embryo has been the subject of many studies of regional patterning, stereotypical cell movements and changes in cell shape. To better study the morphological features of cells during gastrulation, we generated mosaic embryos expressing membrane attached Dendra2 to highlight cellular boundaries. We find that intercellular bridges join a significant fraction of epiblast cells in the zebrafish embryo, reaching several cell diameters in length and spanning across different regions of the developing embryos. These intercellular bridges are distinct from the cellular protrusions previously reported as extending from hypoblast cells (1-2 cellular diameters in length or epiblast cells (which were shorter. Most of the intercellular bridges were formed at pre-gastrula stages by the daughters of a dividing cell maintaining a membrane tether as they move apart after mitosis. These intercellular bridges persist during gastrulation and can mediate the transfer of proteins between distant cells. These findings reveal a surprising feature of the cellular landscape in zebrafish embryos and open new possibilities for cell-cell communication during gastrulation, with implications for modeling, cellular mechanics, and morphogenetic signaling.

  5. Effectiveness of data collection and information transmission ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-12-24

    Dec 24, 2012 ... correctness of records, Health Management Information System records ... Conclusion: The health workers were not operating the DSN system in the State to optimal functionality. ... Key words: Data collection, disease notification, effectiveness, information transmission process .... facilities to support it.

  6. GAP junctional intercellular communication confers an enhanced bystander effect as well as a protective effect in HSV-TK/gancyclovir mediated cytotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wygoda, Marc R.; Rehemtulla, Alnawaz; Davis, Mary A.; Lawrence, Theodore S.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: The 'Bystander Effect' is the phenomenon by which cells which are not transduced with the Herpes Simplex Virus - Thymidine Kinase (HSV-TK) gene are killed by the guanosine analog Gancyclovir (GCV) when they are nearby HSV-TK positive cells. Since currently available gene transfer technologies have a low efficiency (typically less than 10% of cells are transduced), a better understanding of the mechanism underlying the bystander effect is crucial for the success of the HSV-TK/GCV enzyme prodrug gene therapy approach. Gap junctions, which are specialized cell membrane channels allowing the passage of molecules < 1000 daltons in size directly from cell to cell, have been proposed as a possible mediator of the bystander effect. In particular, gap junctions could permit the transfer of toxic metabolites from the HSV-TK positive cells to the bystander cells. Our aim was to assess the role of gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) in the bystander effect. Materials and Methods: Co-culture of an HSV-TK transduced rat liver epithelial cell line (WB-TK), with either its communication competent parental cell line (WB), or an isogenic cell line differing by its communication incompetence (aB1). The ratios of effector cells (WB-TK) to bystander cells (WB or aB1), were (100(0)), (50(50)), (5(95)), or(0(100)) . These various mixed populations were exposed for 24 hours to 10μM GCV and thereafter placed at clonal density into selective media, allowing for growth of either the bystander (TK negative) cells or the effector (TK-positive) cells. Results: 1) When the effector/bystander ratio was (50(50)) the surviving fraction of the bystander cells was 3.5% and 37% for the WB and aB1, respectively. When the effector/bystander ratio was (5(95)), the surviving fraction was 51% and 65% for the WB and aB1, respectively. Either cell line (WB or aB1) cultured alone was unaffected by GCV. These results demonstrate that the bystander effect is much higher when

  7. Intercellular signalling in Stigmatella aurantiaca.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaga, W; Ulrich, S H

    1999-12-01

    The myxobacterium Stigmatella aurantiaca is a prokaryotic model used to study intercellular signalling and the genetic determination of morphogenesis. Signalling factors and genes required for the generation of the elaborate multicellular fruiting body are to be identified. Recently, the structure of stigmolone, which is the pheromone necessary for fruiting body formation, was elucidated, and genes involved in development were characterised. Progress has also been made in the genetic accessibility of S. aurantiaca.

  8. Intercellular cancer collisions generate an ejected crystal comet tail effect with fractal interface embryoid body reassembly transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Díaz, Jairo A; Murillo, Mauricio F; Barrero, Alvaro

    2011-01-01

    We have documented self-assembled geometric triangular chiral crystal complexes (GTCHC) and a framework of collagen vascular invariant geometric attractors in cancer tissues. This article shows how this system evolves in time. These structures are incorporated together and evolve in different ways. When the geometric core is stable, and the tissue architecture collapses, fragmented components emerge, which reveal a hidden interior identifying how each molecule is reassembled into the original mold, using one common connection, ie, a fractal self-similarity that guided the system from the beginning. GTCHC complexes generate ejected crystal comet tail effects and produce strange helicity states that arise in the form of spin domain interactions. As the crystal growth vibration stage progresses, biofractal echo images converge in a master-built construction of embryoid bodies with enolase-selective immunopositivity in relation to clusters of triangular chiral cell organization. In our electro-optic collision model, we were able to predict and replicate all the characteristics of this complex geometry that connects a physical phenomenon with the signal patterns that generate biologic chaos. Intrinsically, fractal geometry makes spatial correction errors embrace the chaotic system in a way that permits new structures to emerge, and as a result, an ordered self-assembly of embryoid bodies with neural differentiation at the final stage of cancer development is a predictable process. We hope that further investigation of these structures will lead not only to a new way of thinking about physics and biology, but also to a rewarding area in cancer research

  9. Intercellular cancer collisions generate an ejected crystal comet tail effect with fractal interface embryoid body reassembly transformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Díaz JA

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Jairo A Díaz, Mauricio F Murillo, Alvaro BarreroDepartment of Pathology, Hospital Departmental Villavicencio, Hospital Departmental Granada, Medicine School, University Cooperative of Colombia, Villavicencio, Meta, ColombiaAbstract: We have documented self-assembled geometric triangular chiral crystal complexes (GTCHC and a framework of collagen vascular invariant geometric attractors in cancer tissues. This article shows how this system evolves in time. These structures are incorporated together and evolve in different ways. When the geometric core is stable, and the tissue architecture collapses, fragmented components emerge, which reveal a hidden interior identifying how each molecule is reassembled into the original mold, using one common connection, ie, a fractal self-similarity that guided the system from the beginning. GTCHC complexes generate ejected crystal comet tail effects and produce strange helicity states that arise in the form of spin domain interactions. As the crystal growth vibration stage progresses, biofractal echo images converge in a master-built construction of embryoid bodies with enolase-selective immunopositivity in relation to clusters of triangular chiral cell organization. In our electro-optic collision model, we were able to predict and replicate all the characteristics of this complex geometry that connects a physical phenomenon with the signal patterns that generate biologic chaos. Intrinsically, fractal geometry makes spatial correction errors embrace the chaotic system in a way that permits new structures to emerge, and as a result, an ordered self-assembly of embryoid bodies with neural differentiation at the final stage of cancer development is a predictable process. We hope that further investigation of these structures will lead not only to a new way of thinking about physics and biology, but also to a rewarding area in cancer research.Keywords: embryoid bodies, cancer, electro-optic collision model

  10. Effect of nuclear factor kappa B on intercellular adhesion molecule-1 expression and neutrophil infiltration in lung injury induced by intestinal ischemia/reperfusion in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Xiao-Feng; Yao, Ji-Hong; Li, Ying-Hua; Zhang, Xue-Song; Feng, Bing-An; Yang, Chun-Ming; Zheng, Shu-Sen

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) in the pathogenesis of lung injury induced by intestinal ischemia/reperfusion (I/R), and its effect on intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) expression and neutrophil infiltration. METHODS: Twenty-four Wistar rats were divided randomly into control, I/R and pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) treatment groups, n = 8 in each. I/R group and PDTC treatment group received superior mysenteric artery (SMA) occluding for 1 h and reperfusion for 2 h. PDTC group was administrated with intraperitoneal injection of 2% 100 mg/kg PDTC 1 h before surgery. Lung histology and bronchia alveolus lung fluid (BALF) protein were assayed. Serum IL-6, lung malondialdehyde (MDA) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) as well as the expression level of NF-κB and ICAM-1 were measured. RESULTS: Lung injury induced by intestinal I/R, was characterized by edema, hemorrhage and neutrophil infiltration as well as by the significant rising of BALF protein. Compared to control group, the levels of serum IL-6 and lung MDA and MPO increased significantly in I/R group (P = 0.001). Strong positive expression of NF-κB p65 and ICAM-1 was observed. After the administration of PDTC, the level of serum IL-6, lung MDA and MPO as well as NF-κB and ICAM-1 decreased significantly (P < 0.05) when compared to I/R group. CONCLUSION: The activation of NF-κB plays an important role in the pathogenesis of lung injury induced by intestinal I/R through upregulating the neutrophil infiltration and lung ICAM-1 expression. PDTC as an inhibitor of NF-κB can prevent lung injury induced by intestinal I/R through inhibiting the activity of NF-κB. PMID:16489637

  11. Environmental effects on underwater optical transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Peter C.; Breshears, Brian F.; Cullen, Alexander J.; Hammerer, Ross F.; Martinez, Ramon P.; Phung, Thai Q.; Margolina, Tetyana; Fan, Chenwu

    2017-05-01

    Optical communication/detection systems have potential to get around some limitations of current acoustic communications and detection systems especially increased fleet and port security in noisy littoral waters. Identification of environmental effects on underwater optical transmission is the key to the success of using optics for underwater communication and detection. This paper is to answer the question "What are the transfer and correlation functions that relate measurements of hydrographic to optical parameters?" Hydrographic and optical data have been collected from the Naval Oceanographic Office survey ships with the High Intake Defined Excitation (HIDEX) photometer and sea gliders with optical back scattering sensor in various Navy interested areas such as the Arabian Gulf, Gulf of Oman, east Asian marginal seas, and Adriatic Sea. The data include temperature, salinity, bioluminescence, chlorophyll-a fluorescence, transmissivity at two different wavelengths (TRed at 670 nm, TBlue at 490 nm), and back scattering coefficient (bRed at 700 nm, bBlue at 470 nm). Transfer and correlation functions between the hydrographic and optical parameters are obtained. Bioluminescence and fluorescence maxima, transmissivity minimum with their corresponding depths, red and blue laser beam peak attenuation coefficients are identified from the optical profiles. Evident correlations are found between the ocean mixed layer depth and the blue and red laser beam peak attenuation coefficients, bioluminescence and fluorescence maxima in the Adriatic Sea, Arabian Gulf, Gulf of Oman, and Philippine Sea. Based on the observational data, an effective algorithm is recommended for solving the radiative transfer equation (RTE) for predicting underwater laser radiance.

  12. Terbinafine inhibits gap junctional intercellular communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ju Yeun; Yoon, Sei Mee; Choi, Eun Ju; Lee, Jinu

    2016-01-01

    Terbinafine is an antifungal agent that selectively inhibits fungal sterol synthesis by blocking squalene epoxidase. We evaluated the effect of terbinafine on gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC). Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) and I-YFP GJIC assays revealed that terbinafine inhibits GJIC in a reversible and dose-dependent manner in FRT-Cx43 and LN215 cells. Treatment with terbinafine did not affect Cx43 phosphorylation status or intracellular Ca 2+ concentration, well-known action mechanisms of various GJIC blockers. While a structurally related chemical, naftifine, attenuated GJIC, epigallocatechin gallate, another potent squalene epoxidase inhibitor with a different structure, did not. These results suggest that terbinafine inhibits GJIC with a so far unknown mechanism of action. - Highlights: • In vitro pharmacological studies were performed on FRT-Cx43 and LN215 cells. • Terbinafine inhibits gap junctional intercellular communication in both cell lines. • The inhibitory effect of terbinafine is reversible and dose-dependent. • Treatment of terbinafine does not alter Cx43 phosphorylation or cytosolic Ca 2+ concentration. • Inhibition of squalene epoxidase is not involved in this new effect of terbinafine.

  13. Terbinafine inhibits gap junctional intercellular communication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ju Yeun, E-mail: whitewndus@naver.com [College of Pharmacy, Yonsei Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Yonsei University, 85 Songdogwahak-ro, Yeonsu-gu, Incheon 21983 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Sei Mee, E-mail: sei_mee@naver.com [College of Pharmacy, Yonsei Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Yonsei University, 85 Songdogwahak-ro, Yeonsu-gu, Incheon 21983 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Integrated OMICS for Biomedical Sciences, Yonsei University, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Eun Ju, E-mail: yureas@naver.com [College of Pharmacy, Yonsei Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Yonsei University, 85 Songdogwahak-ro, Yeonsu-gu, Incheon 21983 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jinu, E-mail: jinulee@yonsei.ac.kr [College of Pharmacy, Yonsei Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Yonsei University, 85 Songdogwahak-ro, Yeonsu-gu, Incheon 21983 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    Terbinafine is an antifungal agent that selectively inhibits fungal sterol synthesis by blocking squalene epoxidase. We evaluated the effect of terbinafine on gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC). Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) and I-YFP GJIC assays revealed that terbinafine inhibits GJIC in a reversible and dose-dependent manner in FRT-Cx43 and LN215 cells. Treatment with terbinafine did not affect Cx43 phosphorylation status or intracellular Ca{sup 2+} concentration, well-known action mechanisms of various GJIC blockers. While a structurally related chemical, naftifine, attenuated GJIC, epigallocatechin gallate, another potent squalene epoxidase inhibitor with a different structure, did not. These results suggest that terbinafine inhibits GJIC with a so far unknown mechanism of action. - Highlights: • In vitro pharmacological studies were performed on FRT-Cx43 and LN215 cells. • Terbinafine inhibits gap junctional intercellular communication in both cell lines. • The inhibitory effect of terbinafine is reversible and dose-dependent. • Treatment of terbinafine does not alter Cx43 phosphorylation or cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} concentration. • Inhibition of squalene epoxidase is not involved in this new effect of terbinafine.

  14. Effectiveness of condoms in preventing HIV transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkerton, S D; Abramson, P R

    1997-05-01

    The consistent use of latex condoms continues to be advocated for primary prevention of HIV infection despite limited quantitative evidence regarding the effectiveness of condoms in blocking the sexual transmission of HIV. Although recent meta-analyses of condom effectiveness suggest that condoms are 60 to 70% effective when used for HIV prophylaxis, these studies do not isolate consistent condom use, and therefore provide only a lower bound on the true effectiveness of correct and consistent condom use. A reexamination of HIV seroconversion studies suggests that condoms are 90 to 95% effective when used consistently, i.e. consistent condom users are 10 to 20 times less likely to become infected when exposed to the virus than are inconsistent or non-users. Similar results are obtained utilizing model-based estimation techniques, which indicate that condoms decrease the per-contact probability of male-to-female transmission of HIV by about 95%. Though imperfect, condoms provide substantial protection against HIV infection. Condom promotion therefore remains an important international priority in the fight against AIDS.

  15. Radiation effects on optical data transmission systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leskovar, B.

    1989-01-01

    The state of the art of optical transmitters, low loss fiber waveguides and receivers in both steady state and pulsed radiation environments is reviewed and summarized. Emphasis is placed on the effects of irradiation on the performance of light emitting and laser diodes, optical fiber waveguides and photodiodes. The influence of radiation-induced attenuation of optical fibers due to total dose, dose rate, time after irradiation, temperature, radiation history, photobleaching, OH and impurity content, dopant type and concentration is described. The performance of candidate components of the transmission system intended for deployment in the Superconducting Super Collider Detector and primary beam tunnel nuclear environment is discussed

  16. Short-range intercellular calcium signaling in bone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Niklas Rye

    2005-01-01

    into biological effects in bone. Intercellular calcium waves are increases in intracellular calcium concentration in single cells, subsequently propagating to adjacent cells, and can be a possible mechanism for the coupling of bone formation to bone resorption. The aim of the present studies was to investigate...... whether bone cells are capable of communicating via intercellular calcium signals, and determine by which mechanisms the cells propagate the signals. First, we found that osteoblastic cells can propagate intercellular calcium transients upon mechanical stimulation, and that there are two principally...... different mechanisms for this propagation. One mechanism involves the secretion of a nucleotide, possibly ATP, acting in an autocrine action to purinergic P2Y2 receptors on the neighboring cells, leading to intracellular IP3 generation and subsequent release of calcium from intracellular stores. The other...

  17. Short-range intercellular calcium signaling in bone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Niklas R

    2005-01-01

    The regulation of bone turnover is a complex and finely tuned process. Many factors regulate bone remodeling, including hormones, growth factors, cytokines etc. However, little is known about the signals coupling bone formation to bone resorption, and how mechanical forces are translated...... into biological effects in bone. Intercellular calcium waves are increases in intracellular calcium concentration in single cells, subsequently propagating to adjacent cells, and can be a possible mechanism for the coupling of bone formation to bone resorption. The aim of the present studies was to investigate...... whether bone cells are capable of communicating via intercellular calcium signals, and determine by which mechanisms the cells propagate the signals. First, we found that osteoblastic cells can propagate intercellular calcium transients upon mechanical stimulation, and that there are two principally...

  18. Atmospheric effects on low elevation transmission measurements at EOPACE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Forand, J.L.; Duffy, M.; Zeisse, C.; Gathman, S.G.; Jong, A.N. de; Dion, D.

    1997-01-01

    An analysis is presented showing the effects of refraction, aerosol extinction, and molecular extinction on transmission measurements obtained during the EO Propagation Assessment in Coastal Environments (EOPACE) campaign carried out in San Diego during March and April 1996. Infrared transmission

  19. Terbinafine inhibits gap junctional intercellular communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ju Yeun; Yoon, Sei Mee; Choi, Eun Ju; Lee, Jinu

    2016-09-15

    Terbinafine is an antifungal agent that selectively inhibits fungal sterol synthesis by blocking squalene epoxidase. We evaluated the effect of terbinafine on gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC). Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) and I-YFP GJIC assays revealed that terbinafine inhibits GJIC in a reversible and dose-dependent manner in FRT-Cx43 and LN215 cells. Treatment with terbinafine did not affect Cx43 phosphorylation status or intracellular Ca(2+) concentration, well-known action mechanisms of various GJIC blockers. While a structurally related chemical, naftifine, attenuated GJIC, epigallocatechin gallate, another potent squalene epoxidase inhibitor with a different structure, did not. These results suggest that terbinafine inhibits GJIC with a so far unknown mechanism of action. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. [Effects of Chinese herbal compound for supplementing qi and activating blood circulation on actin, Cx43 expressions and gap junctional intercellular communication functions of myocardial cells in patients with Coxsackie virus B 3 viral myocarditis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ming-xue; He, Wei; Gu, Ping

    2010-08-01

    To observe the effect of Chinese herbal compound for supplementing qi and activating blood circulation (CHC) on the gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) function of myocardial cells in patients with Coxsackie virus B 3 (CVB3) viral myocarditis. Expressions of actin and connexin43 (Cx43) in myocardial cells of patients arranged in three groups (the normal control group, the viral infected group and the CHC treated group) were detected by immunohistochemical method; the fluorescence photobleaching recovery rate of cells was detected by laser scanning confocal microscope. As compared with the viral infected group, the expressions of actin and Cx43 were increased and the GJIC function was improved in the CHC treated group. CHC could antagonize viral injury on skeleton protein, and repair the structure of gap junction channel to improve the GJIC function of myocardial cells after being attacked by CVB3.

  1. Quantification of gap junctional intercellular communication based on digital image analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofgaard, Johannes P; Mollerup, Sarah; Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik

    2009-01-01

    Intercellular communication via gap junction channels can be quantified by several methods based on diffusion of fluorescent dyes or metabolites. Given the variation in intercellular coupling of cells, even under untreated control conditions, it is of essence to quantify the coupling between...... and in cells receiving dye by intercellular diffusion. The analysis performed is semiautomatic, and comparison with traditional cell counting shows that this method reliably determines the effect of uncoupling by several interventions. This new method of analysis yields a rapid and objective quantification...

  2. ANALYSIS AND SIMULATION OF MAIN MAGNET TRANSMISSION LINE EFFECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ZHANG,W.; MARNERIS, I.; SANDBERG, J.

    2007-06-25

    A main magnet chain forms a pair of transmission lines. Pulse-reflection-caused voltage and current differentiation throughout the magnet chain can have adverse effect on main magnet field quality. This effect is associated with magnet system configuration, coupling efficiency, and parasitic parameters. A better understanding of this phenomenon will help us in new design and existing system upgrade. In this paper, we exam the transmission line effect due to different input functions as well as configuration, coupling, and other parameters.

  3. Proximity effects of high voltage electric power transmission lines on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2010-08-18

    Aug 18, 2010 ... transmission lines on ornamental plant growth. Zeki Demir ... The effects of proximity to power-line on specific leaf area and seedling dbh were tested .... during vegetation season is about 72% and common wind blow.

  4. Ecological effects on arbovirus-mosquito cycles of transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabachnick, Walter J

    2016-12-01

    Mosquitoes transmit many viruses to a variety of hosts. Cycles of mosquito borne arbovirus transmission are the result of complex interactions between the mosquito, the arbovirus and the host that are influenced by genetic variations in a variety of traits in each that are all influenced by many environmental factors. R 0 , the basic reproduction number or mean number of individuals infected from a single infected individual, is a measure of mosquito borne arbovirus transmission. Understanding the causes for the distribution of R 0 in any transmission cycle is a daunting challenge due to the lack of information on the genetic and environmental variances that influence R 0 . Information about the major factors influencing R 0 for specific transmission cycles is essential to develop efficient and effective strategies to reduce transmission in different cycles and locations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Biologically Inspired Intercellular Slot Synchronization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Tyrrell

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The present article develops a decentralized interbase station slot synchronization algorithm suitable for cellular mobile communication systems. The proposed cellular firefly synchronization (CelFSync algorithm is derived from the theory of pulse-coupled oscillators, common to describe synchronization phenomena in biological systems, such as the spontaneous synchronization of fireflies. In order to maintain synchronization among base stations (BSs, even when there is no direct link between adjacent BSs, some selected user terminals (UTs participate in the network synchronization process. Synchronization emerges by exchanging two distinct synchronization words, one transmitted by BSs and the other by active UTs, without any a priori assumption on the initial timing misalignments of BSs and UTs. In large-scale networks with inter-BS site distances up to a few kilometers, propagation delays severely affect the attainable timing accuracy of CelFSync. We show that by an appropriate combination of CelFSync with the timing advance procedure, which aligns uplink transmission of UTs to arrive simultaneously at the BS, a timing accuracy within a fraction of the inter-BS propagation delay is retained.

  6. Potential Modes of Intercellular α-Synuclein Transmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dario Valdinocci

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Intracellular aggregates of the α-synuclein protein result in cell loss and dysfunction in Parkinson’s disease and atypical Parkinsonism, such as multiple system atrophy and dementia with Lewy bodies. Each of these neurodegenerative conditions, known collectively as α-synucleinopathies, may be characterized by a different suite of molecular triggers that initiate pathogenesis. The mechanisms whereby α-synuclein aggregates mediate cytotoxicity also remain to be fully elucidated. However, recent studies have implicated the cell-to-cell spread of α-synuclein as the major mode of disease propagation between brain regions during disease progression. Here, we review the current evidence for different modes of α-synuclein cellular release, movement and uptake, including exocytosis, exosomes, tunneling nanotubes, glymphatic flow and endocytosis. A more detailed understanding of the major modes by which α-synuclein pathology spreads throughout the brain may provide new targets for therapies that halt the progression of disease.

  7. Potential Modes of Intercellular α-Synuclein Transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdinocci, Dario; Radford, Rowan A W; Siow, Sue Maye; Chung, Roger S; Pountney, Dean L

    2017-02-22

    Intracellular aggregates of the α-synuclein protein result in cell loss and dysfunction in Parkinson's disease and atypical Parkinsonism, such as multiple system atrophy and dementia with Lewy bodies. Each of these neurodegenerative conditions, known collectively as α-synucleinopathies, may be characterized by a different suite of molecular triggers that initiate pathogenesis. The mechanisms whereby α-synuclein aggregates mediate cytotoxicity also remain to be fully elucidated. However, recent studies have implicated the cell-to-cell spread of α-synuclein as the major mode of disease propagation between brain regions during disease progression. Here, we review the current evidence for different modes of α-synuclein cellular release, movement and uptake, including exocytosis, exosomes, tunneling nanotubes, glymphatic flow and endocytosis. A more detailed understanding of the major modes by which α-synuclein pathology spreads throughout the brain may provide new targets for therapies that halt the progression of disease.

  8. Intercellular adhesion molecules (ICAMs) and spermatogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xiang; Mruk, Dolores D.; Cheng, C. Yan

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND During the seminiferous epithelial cycle, restructuring takes places at the Sertoli–Sertoli and Sertoli–germ cell interface to accommodate spermatogonia/spermatogonial stem cell renewal via mitosis, cell cycle progression and meiosis, spermiogenesis and spermiation since developing germ cells, in particular spermatids, move ‘up and down’ the seminiferous epithelium. Furthermore, preleptotene spermatocytes differentiated from type B spermatogonia residing at the basal compartment must traverse the blood–testis barrier (BTB) to enter the adluminal compartment to prepare for meiosis at Stage VIII of the epithelial cycle, a process also accompanied by the release of sperm at spermiation. These cellular events that take place at the opposite ends of the epithelium are co-ordinated by a functional axis designated the apical ectoplasmic specialization (ES)—BTB—basement membrane. However, the regulatory molecules that co-ordinate cellular events in this axis are not known. METHODS Literature was searched at http://www.pubmed.org and http://scholar.google.com to identify published findings regarding intercellular adhesion molecules (ICAMs) and the regulation of this axis. RESULTS Members of the ICAM family, namely ICAM-1 and ICAM-2, and the biologically active soluble ICAM-1 (sICAM-1) are the likely regulatory molecules that co-ordinate these events. sICAM-1 and ICAM-1 have antagonistic effects on the Sertoli cell tight junction-permeability barrier, involved in Sertoli cell BTB restructuring, whereas ICAM-2 is restricted to the apical ES, regulating spermatid adhesion during the epithelial cycle. Studies in other epithelia/endothelia on the role of the ICAM family in regulating cell movement are discussed and this information has been evaluated and integrated into studies of these proteins in the testis to create a hypothetical model, depicting how ICAMs regulate junction restructuring events during spermatogenesis. CONCLUSIONS ICAMs are crucial

  9. Understanding intercellular communication in the brain: Identified ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The transmission of information between nerve cells in the brain takes place at specialized sites of ... period of 10 days, and the giant chromosomes of larval salivary glands. ... extensive use of Drosophila in order to assay the effects of the genetic changes in ... the muscle responds only to a small percentage of the stimuli.

  10. Corruption's effect on growth and its transmission channels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pellegrini, L.; Gerlagh, R.

    2004-01-01

    A common finding of recent theoretical and empirical literature is that corruption has a negative effect on economic growth. In the paper, through growth regression analysis, we estimate the direct and indirect effects of corruption on economic growth. The indirect transmission channels,

  11. Development of schizogenous intercellular spaces in plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimitsune eIshizaki

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Gas exchange is essential for multicellular organisms. In contrast to the circulatory systems of animals, land plants have tissues with intercellular spaces (ICSs, called aerenchyma, that are critical for efficient gas exchange. Plants form ICSs by two different mechanisms: schizogeny, where localized cell separation creates spaces; and lysogeny, where cells die to create intercellular spaces. In schizogenous ICS formation, specific molecular mechanisms regulate the sites of cell separation and coordinate extensive reorganization of cell walls. Emerging evidence suggests the involvement of extracellular signaling, mediated by peptide ligands and leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinases, in the regulation of cell wall remodeling during cell separation. Recent work on the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha has demonstrated a critical role for a plasma membrane-associated plant U-box E3 ubiquitin ligase in ICS formation. In this review, I discuss the mechanism of schizogenous ICS formation, focusing on the potential role of extracellular signaling in the regulation of cell separation.

  12. Electrical and Biological Effects of Transmission Lines: A Review.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jack M.

    1989-06-01

    This review describes the electrical properties of a-c and d-c transmission lines and the resulting effects on plants, animals, and people. Methods used by BPA to mitigate undesirable effects are also discussed. Although much of the information in this review pertains to high-voltage transmission lines, information on distribution lines and electrical appliances is included. The electrical properties discussed are electric and magnetic fields and corona: first for alternating-current (a-c) lines, then for direct current (d-c).

  13. Distinct moieties underlie biphasic H+ gating of connexin43 channels, producing a pH optimum for intercellular communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garciarena, Carolina D.; Malik, Akif; Swietach, Pawel; Moreno, Alonso P.; Vaughan-Jones, Richard D.

    2018-01-01

    Most mammalian cells can intercommunicate via connexin-assembled, gap-junctional channels. To regulate signal transmission, connexin (Cx) channel permeability must respond dynamically to physiological and pathophysiological stimuli. One key stimulus is intracellular pH (pHi), which is modulated by a tissue’s metabolic and perfusion status. Our understanding of the molecular mechanism of H+ gating of Cx43 channels—the major isoform in the heart and brain—is incomplete. To interrogate the effects of acidic and alkaline pHi on Cx43 channels, we combined voltage-clamp electrophysiology with pHi imaging and photolytic H+ uncaging, performed over a range of pHi values. We demonstrate that Cx43 channels expressed in HeLa or N2a cell pairs are gated biphasically by pHi via a process that consists of activation by H+ ions at alkaline pHi and inhibition at more acidic pHi. For Cx43 channel–mediated solute/ion transmission, the ensemble of these effects produces a pHi optimum, near resting pHi. By using Cx43 mutants, we demonstrate that alkaline gating involves cysteine residues of the C terminus and is independent of motifs previously implicated in acidic gating. Thus, we present a molecular mechanism by which cytoplasmic acid–base chemistry fine tunes intercellular communication and establishes conditions for the optimal transmission of solutes and signals in tissues, such as the heart and brain.—Garciarena, C. D., Malik, A., Swietach, P., Moreno, A. P., Vaughan-Jones, R. D. Distinct moieties underlie biphasic H+ gating of connexin43 channels, producing a pH optimum for intercellular communication. PMID:29183963

  14. Inter-cellular transport of ran GTPase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak Khuperkar

    Full Text Available Ran, a member of the Ras-GTPase superfamily, has a well-established role in regulating the transport of macromolecules across the nuclear envelope (NE. Ran has also been implicated in mitosis, cell cycle progression, and NE formation. Over-expression of Ran is associated with various cancers, although the molecular mechanism underlying this phenomenon is unclear. Serendipitously, we found that Ran possesses the ability to move from cell-to-cell when transiently expressed in mammalian cells. Moreover, we show that the inter-cellular transport of Ran is GTP-dependent. Importantly, Ran displays a similar distribution pattern in the recipient cells as that in the donor cell and co-localizes with the Ran binding protein Nup358 (also called RanBP2. Interestingly, leptomycin B, an inhibitor of CRM1-mediated export, or siRNA mediated depletion of CRM1, significantly impaired the inter-cellular transport of Ran, suggesting a function for CRM1 in this process. These novel findings indicate a possible role for Ran beyond nucleo-cytoplasmic transport, with potential implications in inter-cellular communication and cancers.

  15. HIV Infection: Transmission, Effects on Early Development, and Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowenthal, Barbara

    1997-01-01

    Describes the modes of transmission of HIV and the course of the disease in infants and toddlers. Information is provided on its effects on early development, medical screening and treatments, therapies, psychosocial assistance, and interventions, including nutritional therapy, occupational and physical therapies, and speech and language therapy.…

  16. Proximity effects of high voltage electric power transmission lines on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The proximity effects of high voltage electric power transmission lines on Leyland Cypress (xCupressocyparis leylandii (Dallim. and A.B. Jacks.) Dallim) and Japanese Privet (Ligustrum japonicum Thunb.) growth were examined in a private nursery located in Sakarya, Turkey. Five transect were randomly chosen in both ...

  17. Transmission Model of Hepatitis B Virus with the Migration Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Altaf Khan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis B is a globally infectious disease. Mathematical modeling of HBV transmission is an interesting research area. In this paper, we present characteristics of HBV virus transmission in the form of a mathematical model. We analyzed the effect of immigrants in the model to study the effect of immigrants for the host population. We added the following flow parameters: “the transmission between migrated and exposed class” and “the transmission between migrated and acute class.” With these new features, we obtained a compartment model of six differential equations. First, we find the basic threshold quantity Ro and then find the local asymptotic stability of disease-free equilibrium and endemic equilibrium. Furthermore, we find the global stability of the disease-free and endemic equilibria. Previous similar publications have not added the kind of information about the numerical results of the model. In our case, from numerical simulation, a detailed discussion of the parameters and their numerical results is presented. We claim that with these assumptions and by adding the migrated class, the model informs policy for governments, to be aware of the immigrants and subject them to tests about the disease status. Immigrants for short visits and students should be subjected to tests to reduce the number of immigrants with disease.

  18. Low dose gamma irradiation enhances defined signaling components of intercellular reactive oxygen-mediated apoptosis induction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, G

    2011-01-01

    Transformed cells are selectively removed by intercellular ROS-mediated induction of apoptosis. Signaling is based on the HOCl and the NO/peroxynitrite pathway (major pathways) and the nitryl chloride and the metal-catalyzed Haber-Weiss pathway (minor pathways). During tumor progression, resistance against intercellular induction of apoptosis is acquired through expression of membrane-associated catalase. Low dose radiation of nontransformed cells has been shown to enhance intercellular induction of apoptosis. The present study was performed to define the signaling components which are modulated by low dose gamma irradiation. Low dose radiation induced the release of peroxidase from nontransformed, transformed and tumor cells. Extracellular superoxide anion generation was strongly enhanced in the case of transformed cells and tumor cells, but not in nontransformed cells. Enhancement of peroxidase release and superoxide anion generation either increased intercellular induction of apoptosis of transformed cells, or caused a partial protection under specific signaling conditions. In tumor cells, low dose radiation enhanced the production of major signaling components, but this had no effect on apoptosis induction, due to the strong resistance mechanism of tumor cells. Our data specify the nature of low dose radiation-induced effects on specific signaling components of intercellular induction of apoptosis at defined stages of multistep carcinogenesis.

  19. Is there a relationship between hypoxia, contact resistance, and intercellular communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dertinger, H.; Guichard, M.; Malaise, E.P.

    1983-01-01

    This investigation addresses the shape of radiation survival curves of cells cultures as multicell spheroids. It is shown that spheroids of cells capable of intercellular communication by gap-junctions display survival curves lacking a radioresistant fraction of hypoxic cells. Compared to the corresponding monolayers, these spheriod survival curves exhibit a uniform increase in radioresistance due to the ''contact effect''. In contrast, biphasic survival curves indicative of hypoxic cells are obtained with non-communicating spheroids, however, without indication of a contact effect. Evidence is presented that this relationship between intercellular communication, hypoxia, and contact effect may possibly also hold for survival curves of solid tumors. (orig.)

  20. Intercellular protein-protein interactions at synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaofei; Hou, Dongmei; Jiang, Wei; Zhang, Chen

    2014-06-01

    Chemical synapses are asymmetric intercellular junctions through which neurons send nerve impulses to communicate with other neurons or excitable cells. The appropriate formation of synapses, both spatially and temporally, is essential for brain function and depends on the intercellular protein-protein interactions of cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) at synaptic clefts. The CAM proteins link pre- and post-synaptic sites, and play essential roles in promoting synapse formation and maturation, maintaining synapse number and type, accumulating neurotransmitter receptors and ion channels, controlling neuronal differentiation, and even regulating synaptic plasticity directly. Alteration of the interactions of CAMs leads to structural and functional impairments, which results in many neurological disorders, such as autism, Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia. Therefore, it is crucial to understand the functions of CAMs during development and in the mature neural system, as well as in the pathogenesis of some neurological disorders. Here, we review the function of the major classes of CAMs, and how dysfunction of CAMs relates to several neurological disorders.

  1. Gap Junctional Intercellular Communication and Breast Cancer Metastasis to Bone

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Donahue, Henry

    2001-01-01

    .... We found that: 1) expressing the metastasis suppressing gene BRMS1 in diverse cancer cell lines, including breast and melanoma, restores homotypic gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC); 2...

  2. [Inhibition of gap junctional intercellular communication protects astrocytes from hypoxia/reoxygenation injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Xu-Hui; Gu, Yu-Chen; Jiao, Hao; Yu, Li; Dong, Shu-Ying

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the effects of inhibiting gap junctional intercellular communication on hypoxia/reoxygenation injury in astrocytes. Primary cultured cerebral cortical astrocytes of neonate rats were divided into normal control group, hypoxia reoxygenation injury group and 18-α-glycyrrhetinic acid and oleamide (gap junctional intercellular channel inhibitors) group. The gap junction intercellular communication was determined by Parachute assay. The viability of astrocyes was detected by MTT assay. The apoptosis of astrocytes were detected with annexin V/PI and Hoechst 33258 staining. Compared with the normal control group, the gap junctional function of astrocytes was increased significantly in ischemia/reperfusion group (Pastrocytes decreased significantly (Pastrocytes in18-α-glycyrrhetinic acid and oleamide group decreased significantly (Pastrocytes increased significantly (Pastrocytes.

  3. Intercellular Ca2+ Waves: Mechanisms and Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderson, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Intercellular calcium (Ca2+) waves (ICWs) represent the propagation of increases in intracellular Ca2+ through a syncytium of cells and appear to be a fundamental mechanism for coordinating multicellular responses. ICWs occur in a wide diversity of cells and have been extensively studied in vitro. More recent studies focus on ICWs in vivo. ICWs are triggered by a variety of stimuli and involve the release of Ca2+ from internal stores. The propagation of ICWs predominately involves cell communication with internal messengers moving via gap junctions or extracellular messengers mediating paracrine signaling. ICWs appear to be important in both normal physiology as well as pathophysiological processes in a variety of organs and tissues including brain, liver, retina, cochlea, and vascular tissue. We review here the mechanisms of initiation and propagation of ICWs, the key intra- and extracellular messengers (inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate and ATP) mediating ICWs, and the proposed physiological functions of ICWs. PMID:22811430

  4. Inhibition of hepatocyte gap junctional intercellular communication by tumor promoters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruch, R.J.

    1988-01-01

    The mechanisms by which tumor promoters enhance neoplasia are poorly understood. One effect common to most tumor promoters is their ability to inhibit the cell-to-cell exchange of small molecules and ions through gap junctions, i.e., gap junctional intercellular communication (IC). IC maybe necessary for normal growth control and the loss of IC may predispose cells to enhanced growth. In the present studies, the effects of liver tumor promoters and other agents on IC between rodent hepatocytes in primary culture has been studied. IC was detected between hepatocytes: (1) autoradiographically following the passage and incorporation of [5- 3 H]uridine nucleotides from pre-labeled donor hepatocytes to non-labeled, adjacent recipient hepatocytes and (2) by fluorescence microscopy after microinjection of fluorescent Lucifer Yellow CH dye into hepatocytes and visualizing dye spread into adjacent hepatocytes

  5. Effect of the one-child policy on influenza transmission in China: a stochastic transmission model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengchen Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: China's one-child-per-couple policy, introduced in 1979, led to profound demographic changes for nearly a quarter of the world's population. Several decades later, the consequences include decreased fertility rates, population aging, decreased household sizes, changes in family structure, and imbalanced sex ratios. The epidemiology of communicable diseases may have been affected by these changes since the transmission dynamics of infectious diseases depend on demographic characteristics of the population. Of particular interest is influenza because China and Southeast Asia lie at the center of a global transmission network of influenza. Moreover, changes in household structure may affect influenza transmission. Is it possible that the pronounced demographic changes that have occurred in China have affected influenza transmission? METHODS AND FINDINGS: To address this question, we developed a continuous-time, stochastic, individual-based simulation model for influenza transmission. With this model, we simulated 30 years of influenza transmission and compared influenza transmission rates in populations with and without the one-child policy control. We found that the average annual attack rate is reduced by 6.08% (SD 2.21% in the presence of the one-child policy compared to a population in which no demographic changes occurred. There was no discernible difference in the secondary attack rate, -0.15% (SD 1.85%, between the populations with and without a one-child policy. We also forecasted influenza transmission over a ten-year time period in a population with a two-child policy under a hypothesis that a two-child-per-couple policy will be carried out in 2015, and found a negligible difference in the average annual attack rate compared to the population with the one-child policy. CONCLUSIONS: This study found that the average annual attack rate is slightly lowered in a population with a one-child policy, which may have resulted from a

  6. Inhibition of intercellular communication by airborne particulate matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heussen, G.A.H. (Landbouwhogeschool Wageningen (Netherlands). Dept. of Toxicology)

    1991-04-01

    To investigate the inhibition of gap junction mediated intercellular communication (IC) by extracts of airborne particulate matter (APM), V79 cells were incubated with extracts of APM and subsequently microinjected with the fluorescent dye Lucifer Yellow, after which the number of fluorescent (= communicating) cells was determined. To compare inhibitory effects on IC with mutagenicity, APM was also tested in the Salmonella microsome assay. Six different extracts were tested, two outdoor extracts representing a heavily polluted and a relatively clean sample, and four indoor extracts, taken either in livingrooms with or without wood combustion in an open fire place, or in a room with or without cigarette smoking. Non-cytotoxic doses of outdoor and indoor APM inhibited IC in V79 cells in dose- and time-dependent manner. Mutagenicity data and IC data were correlated. These results suggest that APM has tumor promoter activity in addition to mutagenic activity. (orig.).

  7. Effectively Communicating the Uncertainties Surrounding Ebola Virus Transmission.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andy Kilianski

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The current Ebola virus outbreak has highlighted the uncertainties surrounding many aspects of Ebola virus virology, including routes of transmission. The scientific community played a leading role during the outbreak-potentially, the largest of its kind-as many of the questions surrounding ebolaviruses have only been interrogated in the laboratory. Scientists provided an invaluable resource for clinicians, public health officials, policy makers, and the lay public in understanding the progress of Ebola virus disease and the continuing outbreak. Not all of the scientific communication, however, was accurate or effective. There were multiple instances of published articles during the height of the outbreak containing potentially misleading scientific language that spurred media overreaction and potentially jeopardized preparedness and policy decisions at critical points. Here, we use articles declaring the potential for airborne transmission of Ebola virus as a case study in the inaccurate reporting of basic science, and we provide recommendations for improving the communication about unknown aspects of disease during public health crises.

  8. Effectively Communicating the Uncertainties Surrounding Ebola Virus Transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilianski, Andy; Evans, Nicholas G

    2015-10-01

    The current Ebola virus outbreak has highlighted the uncertainties surrounding many aspects of Ebola virus virology, including routes of transmission. The scientific community played a leading role during the outbreak-potentially, the largest of its kind-as many of the questions surrounding ebolaviruses have only been interrogated in the laboratory. Scientists provided an invaluable resource for clinicians, public health officials, policy makers, and the lay public in understanding the progress of Ebola virus disease and the continuing outbreak. Not all of the scientific communication, however, was accurate or effective. There were multiple instances of published articles during the height of the outbreak containing potentially misleading scientific language that spurred media overreaction and potentially jeopardized preparedness and policy decisions at critical points. Here, we use articles declaring the potential for airborne transmission of Ebola virus as a case study in the inaccurate reporting of basic science, and we provide recommendations for improving the communication about unknown aspects of disease during public health crises.

  9. Mobile Transcripts and Intercellular Communication in Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saplaoura, E; Kragler, F

    2016-01-01

    Phloem serves as a highway for mobile signals in plants. Apart from sugars and hormones, proteins and RNAs are transported via the phloem and contribute to the intercellular communication coordinating growth and development. Different classes of RNAs have been found mobile and in the phloem exudate such as viral RNAs, small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), microRNAs, transfer RNAs, and messenger RNAs (mRNAs). Their transport is considered to be mediated via ribonucleoprotein complexes formed between phloem RNA-binding proteins and mobile RNA molecules. Recent advances in the analysis of the mobile transcriptome indicate that thousands of transcripts move along the plant axis. Although potential RNA mobility motifs were identified, research is still in progress on the factors triggering siRNA and mRNA mobility. In this review, we discuss the approaches used to identify putative mobile mRNAs, the transport mechanism, and the significance of mRNA trafficking. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Intra- and Intercellular Quality Control Mechanisms of Mitochondria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshimitsu Kiriyama

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria function to generate ATP and also play important roles in cellular homeostasis, signaling, apoptosis, autophagy, and metabolism. The loss of mitochondrial function results in cell death and various types of diseases. Therefore, quality control of mitochondria via intra- and intercellular pathways is crucial. Intracellular quality control consists of biogenesis, fusion and fission, and degradation of mitochondria in the cell, whereas intercellular quality control involves tunneling nanotubes and extracellular vesicles. In this review, we outline the current knowledge on the intra- and intercellular quality control mechanisms of mitochondria.

  11. Modeling the effect of comprehensive interventions on Ebola virus transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Mingwang; Xiao, Yanni; Rong, Libin

    2015-10-01

    Since the re-emergence of Ebola in West Africa in 2014, comprehensive and stringent interventions have been implemented to decelerate the spread of the disease. The effectiveness of interventions still remains unclear. In this paper, we develop an epidemiological model that includes various controlling measures to systematically evaluate their effects on the disease transmission dynamics. By fitting the model to reported cumulative cases and deaths in Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia until March 22, 2015, we estimate the basic reproduction number in these countries as 1.2552, 1.6093 and 1.7994, respectively. Model analysis shows that there exists a threshold of the effectiveness of isolation, below which increasing the fraction of latent individuals diagnosed prior to symptoms onset or shortening the duration between symptoms onset and isolation may lead to more Ebola infection. This challenges an existing view. Media coverage plays a substantial role in reducing the final epidemic size. The response to reported cumulative infected cases and deaths may have a different effect on the epidemic spread in different countries. Among all the interventions, we find that shortening the duration between death and burial and improving the effectiveness of isolation are two effective interventions for controlling the outbreak of Ebola virus infection.

  12. The effect of glycogen phosphorolysis on basal glutaminergic transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozrzymas, Jerzy; Szczęsny, Tomasz; Rakus, Darek

    2011-01-14

    Astrocytic glycogen metabolism sustains neuronal activity but its impact on basal glutamatergic synaptic transmission is not clear. To address this issue, we have compared the effect of glycogen breakdown inhibition on miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs) in rat hippocampal pure neuronal culture (PNC) and in astrocyte-neuronal co-cultures (ANCC). Amplitudes of mEPSC in ANCC were nearly twice as large as in PNC with no difference in current kinetics. Inhibition of glycogen phosphorylase reduced mEPSC amplitude by roughly 40% in ANCC being ineffective in PNC. Altogether, these data indicate that astrocyte-neuronal interaction enhances basal mEPSCs in ANCC mainly due to astrocytic glycogen metabolism. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Effect of hydrothermal treatment on light transmission of translucent zirconias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putra, Armand; Chung, Kwok-Hung; Flinn, Brian D; Kuykendall, Tuesday; Zheng, Cheng; Harada, Kosuke; Raigrodski, Ariel J

    2017-09-01

    Studies of the light transmission of translucent zirconias after hydrothermal treatment are limited. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of hydrothermal treatment on the light transmission of translucent zirconias for monolithic restorations. Four commercially available zirconia products, BruxZir Anterior Solid Zirconia (BruxAnt, BA), Lava Plus High Translucency (LPHT), Katana Zirconia Super Translucent (KST), and Katana Zirconia Ultra Translucent (KUT) were assessed and 1 type of lithium disilicate, e.max Press LT (LDLT) was used as a control. Plate specimens, 20×20×1 mm (n=80) for the translucency assessment were sectioned from postsintered zirconia bulk materials and ground with a #400-grit diamond wheel and coolant. The specimens were placed under hydrothermal conditions of 134°C at 0.2 MPa (n=5 per group at 0, 5, 50, and 100 hours). Percentage of total transmittance of light (T t %) of each specimen was measured using a spectrophotometer with an integrating sphere. X-ray diffraction analyses were used to measure tetragonal-monoclinic phase transformation. Surfaces were examined by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectrometry. Data were analyzed using 2-way ANOVA followed by the Tukey test (α=.05). The T t % ranged from 6.5% to 28.3%. Group LDLT obtained significantly higher transmittance than other tested groups, whereas groups KST and KUT had significantly higher T t % than groups BA and LPHT (Phydrothermal treatment for all tested translucent zirconias and a lithium disilicate glass-ceramic control. Hydrothermal treatment had minimal effects on the translucency of translucent zirconias. The tetragonal-monoclinic phase transformation rate of translucent zirconias was found to be low, except in group LPHT. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Effect of electrocautery on endothelial integrity of the internal thoracic artery: ultrastructural analysis with transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onan, Burak; Yeniterzi, Mehmet; Onan, Ismihan Selen; Ersoy, Burak; Gonca, Suheyla; Gelenli, Elif; Solakoglu, Seyhun; Bakir, Ihsan

    2014-10-01

    The internal thoracic artery (ITA) is typically harvested from the chest wall by means of conventional electrocautery. We investigated the effects of electrocautery on endothelial-cell and vessel-wall morphology at the ultrastructural level during ITA harvesting. Internal thoracic artery specimens from 20 patients who underwent elective coronary artery bypass grafting were investigated in 2 groups. The ITA grafts were sharply dissected with use of a scalpel and clips in the control group (n=10) and were harvested by means of electrocautery in the study group (n=10). Each sample was evaluated for intimal, elastic-tissue, muscular-layer, and adventitial changes. Free flow was measured intraoperatively. Light microscopic examinations were performed after hematoxylin-eosin and Masson's trichrome staining. Transmission electron microscopy was used to evaluate ultrastructural changes in the endothelial cells and vessel walls of each ITA. In the sharp-dissection group, the endothelial surfaces were lined with normal amounts of original endothelium, endothelial cells were distinctly attached to the basal lamina, cytoplasmic organelles were evident, and intercellular junctional complexes were intact. Conversely, in the electrocautery group, the morphologic integrity of endothelial cells was distorted, with some cell separations and splits, contracted cells, numerous large cytoplasmic vacuoles, and no visible cytoplasmic organelles. The subendothelial layer exhibited disintegration. Free ITA flow was higher in the sharp-dissection group (P=0.04). The integrity of endothelial cells can be better preserved when the ITA is mobilized by means of sharp dissection, rather than solely by electrocautery; we recommend a combined approach.

  15. Nonreciprocal light transmission based on the thermal radiative effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Li; Dong, Jianji; Ding, Yunhong

    2015-01-01

    Nonreciprocal light transmission is critical in building optical isolations and circulations in optical communication systems. Achieving high optical isolation and broad bandwidth with CMOS-compatibility are still difficult in silicon nano-photonics. Here we first experimentally demonstrate that ...

  16. Transmission of vibration through gloves: effects of contact area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Md Rezali, Khairil Anas; Griffin, Michael J

    2017-01-01

    For three samples of material (12.5, 25.0 and 37.5 mm diameter) from each of three gloves, the dynamic stiffnesses and the vibration transmissibilities of the materials (to both the palm of the hand and the thenar eminence) were measured at frequencies from 10 to 300 Hz. Additional measurements showed the apparent masses of the hand at the palm and the thenar eminence were independent of contact area at frequencies less than about 40 Hz, but increased with increasing area at higher frequencies. The stiffness and damping of the glove materials increased with increasing area. These changes caused material transmissibilities to the hand to increase with increasing area. It is concluded that the size of the area of contact has a large influence on the transmission of vibration through a glove to the hand. The area of contact should be well-defined and controlled when evaluating the transmission of vibration through gloves. Practitioner Summary: The transmission of vibration through gloves depends on both the dynamic stiffness of glove material and the dynamic response of the hand. Both of these depend on the size of the contact area between a glove material and the hand, which should be taken into account when assessing glove transmissibility.

  17. A transwell assay that excludes exosomes for assessment of tunneling nanotube-mediated intercellular communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thayanithy, Venugopal; O'Hare, Patrick; Wong, Phillip; Zhao, Xianda; Steer, Clifford J; Subramanian, Subbaya; Lou, Emil

    2017-11-13

    Tunneling nanotubes (TNTs) are naturally-occurring filamentous actin-based membranous extensions that form across a wide spectrum of mammalian cell types to facilitate long-range intercellular communication. Valid assays are needed to accurately assess the downstream effects of TNT-mediated transfer of cellular signals in vitro. We recently reported a modified transwell assay system designed to test the effects of intercellular transfer of a therapeutic oncolytic virus, and viral-activated drugs, between cells via TNTs. The objective of the current study was to demonstrate validation of this in vitro approach as a new method for effectively excluding diffusible forms of long- and close-range intercellular transfer of intracytoplasmic cargo, including exosomes/microvesicles and gap junctions in order to isolate TNT-selective cell communication. We designed several steps to effectively reduce or eliminate diffusion and long-range transfer via these extracellular vesicles, and used Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis to quantify exosomes following implementation of these steps. The experimental approach outlined here effectively reduced exosome trafficking by >95%; further use of heparin to block exosome uptake by putative recipient cells further impeded transfer of these extracellular vesicles. This validated assay incorporates several steps that can be taken to quantifiably control for extracellular vesicles in order to perform studies focused on TNT-selective communication.

  18. Intercellular K⁺ accumulation depolarizes Type I vestibular hair cells and their associated afferent nerve calyx.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contini, D; Zampini, V; Tavazzani, E; Magistretti, J; Russo, G; Prigioni, I; Masetto, S

    2012-12-27

    Mammalian vestibular organs contain two types of sensory receptors, named Type I and Type II hair cells. While Type II hair cells are contacted by several small afferent nerve terminals, the basolateral surface of Type I hair cells is almost entirely enveloped by a single large afferent nerve terminal, called calyx. Moreover Type I, but not Type II hair cells, express a low-voltage-activated outward K(+) current, I(K,L), which is responsible for their much lower input resistance (Rm) at rest as compared to Type II hair cells. The functional meaning of I(K,L) and associated calyx is still enigmatic. By combining the patch-clamp whole-cell technique with the mouse whole crista preparation, we have recorded the current- and voltage responses of in situ hair cells. Outward K(+) current activation resulted in K(+) accumulation around Type I hair cells, since it induced a rightward shift of the K(+) reversal potential the magnitude of which depended on the amplitude and duration of K(+) current flow. Since this phenomenon was never observed for Type II hair cells, we ascribed it to the presence of a residual calyx limiting K(+) efflux from the synaptic cleft. Intercellular K(+) accumulation added a slow (τ>100ms) depolarizing component to the cell voltage response. In a few cases we were able to record from the calyx and found evidence for intercellular K(+) accumulation as well. The resulting depolarization could trigger a discharge of action potentials in the afferent nerve fiber. Present results support a model where pre- and postsynaptic depolarization produced by intercellular K(+) accumulation cooperates with neurotransmitter exocytosis in sustaining afferent transmission arising from Type I hair cells. While vesicular transmission together with the low Rm of Type I hair cells appears best suited for signaling fast head movements, depolarization produced by intercellular K(+) accumulation could enhance signal transmission during slow head movements. Copyright

  19. The effect of Ontario's transmission system policies on cogeneration projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carr, J.

    1999-01-01

    The impact that the establishment of transmission tariffs would have on the viability of cogeneration projects in Ontario was discussed. The proposal to establish such tariffs on the basis of a 'postage stamp' rate would ensure that all electricity users have access to electricity at the same price. However, this would unfairly penalize short-haul transmission transactions and would possibly result in the inappropriate location of new generation facilities. Electricity users would ultimately be burdened with these inefficiencies. This presentation also discussed another public policy which proposes to determine what parts of the electricity system should have their costs recovered at postage stamp rates. The costs would include not only transmission charges but also distribution and generation costs. The restructuring of Ontario Hydro into the Ontario Power Generation Company (OPGC) and the Ontario Hydro Services Company (OHSC) and its impact on the cogeneration projects was also discussed

  20. Plasmodesmata: channels for intercellular signaling during plant growth and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevilem, Iris; Yadav, Shri Ram; Helariutta, Ykä

    2015-01-01

    Plants have evolved strategies for short- and long-distance communication to coordinate plant development and to adapt to changing environmental conditions. Plasmodesmata (PD) are intercellular nanochannels that provide an effective pathway for both selective and nonselective movement of various molecules that function in diverse biological processes. Numerous non-cell-autonomous proteins (NCAP) and small RNAs have been identified that have crucial roles in cell fate determination and organ patterning during development. Both the density and aperture size of PD are developmentally regulated, allowing formation of spatial symplastic domains for establishment of tissue-specific developmental programs. The PD size exclusion limit (SEL) is controlled by reversible deposition of callose, as well as by some PD-associated proteins. Although a large number of PD-associated proteins have been identified, many of their functions remain unknown. Despite the fact that PD are primarily membranous structures, surprisingly very little is known about their lipid composition. Thus, future studies in PD biology will provide deeper insights into the high-resolution structure and tightly regulated functions of PD and the evolution of PD-mediated cell-to-cell communication in plants.

  1. Modelling of intercellular synchronization in the Drosophila circadian clock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jun-Wei, Wang; Ai-Min, Chen; Jia-Jun, Zhang; Zhan-Jiang, Yuan; Tian-Shou, Zhou

    2009-01-01

    In circadian rhythm generation, intercellular signaling factors are shown to play a crucial role in both sustaining intrinsic cellular rhythmicity and acquiring collective behaviours across a population of circadian neurons. However, the physical mechanism behind their role remains to be fully understood. In this paper, we propose an indirectly coupled multicellular model for the synchronization of Drosophila circadian oscillators combining both intracellular and intercellular dynamics. By simulating different experimental conditions, we find that such an indirect coupling way can synchronize both heterogeneous self-sustained circadian neurons and heterogeneous mutational damped circadian neurons. Moreover, they can also be entrained to ambient light-dark (LD) cycles depending on intercellular signaling. (cross-disciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  2. Explanation of the Inverse Doppler Effect Observed in Nonlinear Transmission Lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozyrev, Alexander B.; Weide, Daniel W. van der

    2005-01-01

    The theory of the inverse Doppler effect recently observed in magnetic nonlinear transmission lines is developed. We explain the crucial role of the backward spatial harmonic in the occurrence of an inverse Doppler effect and draw analogies of the magnetic nonlinear transmission line to the backward wave oscillator

  3. Effect of screening of immigrants on tuberculosis transmission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verver, S.; van Soolingen, D.; Borgdorff, M. W.

    2002-01-01

    SETTING: In The Netherlands all immigrants from highly endemic countries undergo obligatory entry screening by X-ray, followed by voluntary half-yearly screening for 2 years. OBJECTIVE: To estimate the contribution of screening of immigrants to reductions in tuberculosis transmission. DESIGN: All

  4. The effects of online social networks on tacit knowledge transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hong-Miao; Zhang, Sheng-Tai; Jin, Zhen

    2016-01-01

    Due to the popular use of online social networks in today's world, how to propagate employees' tacit knowledge via online social networks has attracted managers' attention, which is critical to enhance the competitiveness of firms. In this paper, we propose a tacit knowledge transmission model on networks with even mixing based on the propagation property of tacit knowledge and the application of online social networks. We consider two routes of transmission, which are contact through online social networks and face-to-face physical contact, and derive the threshold that governs whether or not a kind of tacit knowledge can be shared in an organization with few initial employees who have acquired it. The impact of the degree distribution of the users' contact network on the transmission is investigated analytically. Some numerical simulations are presented to support the theoretical results. We perform the sensitivity analysis of the threshold in terms of the propagation parameters and confirm that online social networks contribute significantly to enhancing the transmission of tacit knowledge among employees.

  5. The effect of recruitment rate and other demographic parameters on the transmission of dengue disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supriatna, A. K.; Anggriani, N.

    2015-03-01

    One of important factors which always appears in most of dengue transmission mathematical model is the number of new susceptible recruited into the susceptible compartment. In this paper we discuss the effect of different rates of recruitment on the transmission of dengue disease. We choose a dengue transmission model with the most realistic form of recruitment rate and analyze the effect of environmental change to the transmission of dengue based on the selected model. We model the effect of environmental change by considering that it can alter the value of mosquito's carrying capacity and mosquito's death rate. We found that the most prevalent effect of the environmental change to the transmission of dengue is when it can alter the death rate of the mosquitoes.

  6. Efect of intercellular extracts from banana inoculated leaves with Mycosphaerella fijiensis Morelet, on chloroplast electronic transport of Grande naine (AAA cv.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Leiva-Mora

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Some foliar pathogens colonize intercellular spaces of damage tissues during infection process, mediated by toxins production and diffusion to kill adjacent healthy cells. Due to the absence of reliable bioassays, the physiologic effects of several phytotoxins are still ignored on cellular membranous systems of the affected cells. In the present work it was extracted the intercellular content from not inoculated and inoculated banana leaves with different Mycosphaerella fijiensis strains. Their effects on chloroplasts of Grande naine cv were evaluated by the absorbance evolution (595 nm of Hill reactive (DCPIP, mixture with 810 ì l of chloroplasts suspension and 99 ì l of the intercellular contents. The electronic exchange on chloroplasts suspension was inhibited by intercellular contents of inoculated leaves. The intercellular contents from leaves inoculated with I1 (high virulence strain had a major inhibiter effect respect to leaves inoculates with G1 strain (low virulence, showing a correspondence between the inhibiter effect of intercellular contents and the affection levels of affected tissues. The procedures used in this work will let to make studies concerned with Mycosphaerella fijiensis-Musa spp interactions and the future breeding programs. Key words: banana breeding, black Sigatoka, host pathogen interaction, physiological bioassays

  7. Intercellular communication via gap junctions affected by mechanical load in the bovine annulus fibrosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desrochers, Jane; Duncan, Neil A

    2014-01-01

    Cells in the intervertebral disc, as in other connective tissues including tendon, ligament and bone, form interconnected cellular networks that are linked via functional gap junctions. These cellular networks may be necessary to affect a coordinated response to mechanical and environmental stimuli. Using confocal microscopy with fluorescence recovery after photobleaching methods, we explored the in situ strain environment of the outer annulus of an intact bovine disc and the effect of high-level flexion on gap junction signalling. The in situ strain environment in the extracellular matrix of the outer annulus under high flexion load was observed to be non-uniform with the extensive cellular processes remaining crimped sometimes at flexion angles greater than 25°. A significant transient disruption of intercellular communication via functional gap junctions was measured after 10 and 20 min under high flexion load. This study illustrates that in healthy annulus fibrosus tissue, high mechanical loads can impede the functioning of the gap junctions. Future studies will explore more complex loading conditions to determine whether losses in intercellular communication can be permanent and whether gap junctions in aged and degenerated tissues become more susceptible to load. The current research suggests that cellular structures such as gap junctions and intercellular networks, as well as other cell-cell and cell-matrix interconnections, need to be considered in computational models in order to fully understand how macroscale mechanical signals are transmitted across scales to the microscale and ultimately into a cellular biosynthetic response in collagenous tissues.

  8. The intercellular synchronization of Ca2+ oscillations evaluates Cx36-dependent coupling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Bavamian

    Full Text Available Connexin36 (Cx36 plays an important role in insulin secretion by controlling the intercellular synchronization of Ca(2+ transients induced during stimulation. The lack of drugs acting on Cx36 channels is a major limitation in further unraveling the molecular mechanism underlying this effect. To screen for such drugs, we have developed an assay allowing for a semi-automatic, fluorimetric quantification of Ca(2+ transients in large populations of MIN6 cells. Here, we show that (1 compared to control cells, MIN6 cells with reduced Cx36 expression or function showed decreased synchrony of glucose-induced Ca(2+ oscillations; (2 glibenclamide, a sulphonylurea which promotes Cx36 junctions and coupling, increased the number of synchronous MIN6 cells, whereas quinine, an antimalarial drug which inhibits Cx36-dependent coupling, decreased this proportion; (3 several drugs were identified that altered the intercellular Ca(2+ synchronization, cell coupling and distribution of Cx36; (4 some of them also affected insulin content. The data indicate that the intercellular synchronization of Ca(2+ oscillations provides a reliable and non-invasive measurement of Cx36-dependent coupling, which is useful to identify novel drugs affecting the function of β-cells, neurons, and neuron-related cells that express Cx36.

  9. Phosphatidylinositol-bisphosphate regulates intercellular coupling in cardiac myocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofgaard, Johannes P; Banach, Kathrin; Mollerup, Sarah

    2008-01-01

    that agonist-induced changes in PIP(2) can result in a reduction of the functional coupling of cardiomyocytes and, consequently, in changes in conduction velocity. Intercellular coupling was measured by Lucifer Yellow dye transfer in cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes. Conduction velocity was measured...

  10. Levels Of Serum Intercellular And Vascular Adhesion Molecules In ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study evaluated the possible significant role of soluble intercellular and vascular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1 and sVCAM-1), sE-selectin and interluekin-1β in development nephropathy in patients with insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM). This study included 60 patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (IDDM) ...

  11. Modelling multi-site transmission of the human papillomavirus and its impact on vaccination effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Lemieux-Mellouki

    2017-12-01

    Conclusions: Modelling genital-site only transmission may overestimate vaccination impact if extragenital infections contribute to systemic natural immunity or underestimate vaccination impact if a high proportion of genital infections originate from extragenital infections. Under current understanding of heterosexual HPV transmission and immunity, a substantial bias from using uni-site models in predicting vaccination effectiveness against genital HPV infection is unlikely to occur.

  12. Low Elevation Transmission Measurements at EOPACE Part I: Molecular and Aerosol Effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeisse, C.; Gathman, S.G.; Jensen, D.R.; Littfin, K.; Moision, B.; Davidson, K.L.; Frederickson, P.A.; Jong, A.N. de; Fritz, P.J.; Leeuw, G. de; Luc Forand, J.; Dion, D.

    1997-01-01

    An analysis is presented showing the effects of molecules and aerosols on atmospheric transmission data obtained during the Electro-Optical Propagation Assessment in Coastal Environments (EOPACE) campaign carried out in San Diego during March and April, 1996. Mid wave infrared transmission was

  13. Induction effect of an electromagnetic pulse on transmission line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pazirandeh, A.; Maleki, P.; Sardari, D.

    2004-01-01

    Ever increasing demand for and vital importance of communication systems and power transmission to our industries, transportation to work, hospitals, and many other important places deemed necessary to have safety based design considerations. Many natural phenomena and man-made devices may generate powerful and intensive EMP, which is very harmful to the safe mode operation of electrical and communicational systems. In this paper we have calculated induced electric field and power induction due to lightening, nuclear explosion and similar events to the aerial and underground cables

  14. Effectiveness of reactive case detection for malaria elimination in three archetypical transmission settings: a modelling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerardin, Jaline; Bever, Caitlin A; Bridenbecker, Daniel; Hamainza, Busiku; Silumbe, Kafula; Miller, John M; Eisele, Thomas P; Eckhoff, Philip A; Wenger, Edward A

    2017-06-12

    reactive case detection or mass drug campaigns. Reactive case detection is recommended only for settings where transmission has recently been reduced rather than all low-transmission settings. This is demonstrated in a modelling framework with strong out-of-sample accuracy across a range of transmission settings while including methodologies for understanding the most resource-effective allocations of health workers. This approach generalizes to providing a platform for planning rational scale-up of health systems based on locally-optimized impact according to simplified stratification.

  15. Effect of Ebola progression on transmission and control in Liberia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamin, Dan; Gertler, Shai; Ndeffo-Mbah, Martial L; Skrip, Laura A; Fallah, Mosoka; Nyenswah, Tolbert G; Altice, Frederick L; Galvani, Alison P

    2015-01-06

    The Ebola outbreak that is sweeping across West Africa is the largest, most volatile, and deadliest Ebola epidemic ever recorded. Liberia is the most profoundly affected country, with more than 3500 infections and 2000 deaths recorded in the past 3 months. To evaluate the contribution of disease progression and case fatality on transmission and to examine the potential for targeted interventions to eliminate the disease. Stochastic transmission model that integrates epidemiologic and clinical data on incidence and case fatality, daily viral load among survivors and nonsurvivors evaluated on the basis of the 2000-2001 outbreak in Uganda, and primary data on contacts of patients with Ebola in Liberia. Montserrado County, Liberia, July to September 2014. Ebola incidence and case-fatality records from 2014 Liberian Ministry of Health and Social Welfare. The average number of secondary infections generated throughout the entire infectious period of a single infected case, R, was estimated as 1.73 (95% CI, 1.66 to 1.83). There was substantial stratification between survivors (RSurvivors), for whom the estimate was 0.66 (CI, 0.10 to 1.69), and nonsurvivors (RNonsurvivors), for whom the estimate was 2.36 (CI, 1.72 to 2.80). The nonsurvivors had the highest risk for transmitting the virus later in the course of disease progression. Consequently, the isolation of 75% of infected individuals in critical condition within 4 days from symptom onset has a high chance of eliminating the disease. Projections are based on the initial dynamics of the epidemic, which may change as the outbreak and interventions evolve. These results underscore the importance of isolating the most severely ill patients with Ebola within the first few days of their symptomatic phase. National Institutes of Health.

  16. Modeling effective transmission pathways and control of the world's most successful parasite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Matthew; Lenhart, Suzanne; Rosenthal, Benjamin; Zhao, Xiaopeng

    2013-06-01

    Toxoplasma gondii(T. gondii) is a single-celled, intracellular protozoan responsible for the disease toxoplasmosis. The parasite is prevalent worldwide, and it infects all warm-blooded vertebrates. Consumption of meats in which this parasite has encysted confers risk of infection to people and other animals, as does ingestion of water or foods contaminated with environmentally resistant oocysts excreted by cats. Vertical transmission (from mother to offspring) is also possible, leading to disease risk and contributing additional means of ensuring perpetuation of transmission. In this work, we adopt a differential equation model to investigate the effective transmission pathways of T. gondii, as well as potential control mechanisms. Detailed analyses are carried out to examine the significance of transmission routes, virulence, vertical transmission, parasite-induced changes in host behavior, and controls based on vaccination and harvesting. Modeling and analysis efforts may shed insights into understanding the complex life cycle of T. gondii. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of 7-NI and ODQ on memory in the passive avoidance, novel object recognition, and social transmission of food preference tests in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akar, Furuzan; Mutlu, Oguz; Komsuoglu Celikyurt, Ipek; Bektas, Emine; Tanyeri, Pelin; Ulak, Guner; Erden, Faruk

    2014-03-19

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an intercellular messenger that plays a critical role in learning and memory processes. Effects of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitors and guanylate cyclase (GC) inhibitors on cognitive function remain controversial. The aim of this study was to investigate effects of an NOS inhibitor, 7-nitroindazole (7-NI), and a GC inhibitor, 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ), on different aspects of memory in passive avoidance (PA), novel object recognition (NOR), and social transmission of food preference (STFP) tests. Male Balb-c mice were treated intraperitoneally with 7-NI (15 mg/kg), ODQ (3,10 mg/kg), L-arginine (100 mg/kg) + 7-NI (15 mg/kg), or physiological saline. ODQ (10 mg/kg) and 7-NI (15 mg/kg) significantly decreased second-day latency in PA test. 7-NI (15 mg/kg) and ODQ (10 mg/kg) significantly decreased the ratio index in the NOR test. 7-NI and ODQ (10 mg/kg) decreased cued/non-cued food eaten in STFP test. Amount of time spent in center zone significantly increased in ODQ (10 mg/kg) and 7-NI (15 mg/kg) groups in open field test, but there was no effect on total distance moved and speed of animals. ODQ (10 mg/kg) significantly increased number of entries into new compartments in exploratory activity apparatus, while 7-NI had no effect. Administration of L-arginine (100 mg/kg) before 7-NI reversed 7-NI-induced effects, supporting the role of NO in cognition. Our results confirm that inhibition of NO/cGMP/GS pathway might disturb emotional, visual, and olfactory memory in mice. Also, 7-NI and ODQ had anxiolytic effects in open field test, and ODQ also enhanced exploratory activity.

  18. Multicellular models of intercellular synchronization in circadian neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henson, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    The circadian clock generates 24 h rhythms that drive physiological and behavioral processes in a diverse range of organisms including microbes, plants, insects, and mammals. Recent experimental advances have produced improved understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in circadian rhythm generation at the single cell level. However, the intercellular mechanisms that allow large populations of coupled pacemaker cells to synchronize and coordinate their rhythms remain poorly understood. The purpose of this article is to review recent progress in dynamic modeling of the circadian clock with a focus on multicellular models required to describe cell population synchronization. Mammalian systems are emphasized to illustrate the highly heterogeneous structure and rich dynamical behavior of multicellular circadian systems. Available multicellular models are characterized with respect to their single cell descriptions, intercellular coupling mechanisms, and network topologies. Examples drawn from our own research are used to demonstrate the advantages associated with integrating detailed single cell models within realistic multicellular networks for prediction of mammalian system dynamics. Mathematical modeling is shown to represent a powerful tool for understanding the intracellular and intercellular mechanisms utilized to robustly synchronize large populations of highly heterogeneous and sparsely coupled single cell oscillators. The article concludes with some possible directions for future research

  19. The effect of different electrodes on the electronic transmission of benzene junctions: Analytical approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohebbi, Razie; Seyed-Yazdi, Jamileh, E-mail: j.seyedyazdi@vru.ac.ir

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we have investigated the electronic transmission of systems electrode–benzene–electrode using the Landauer approach. The effect of different electrodes made of metal (Au) and semiconductors (Si, TiO{sub 2}) is investigated. These three electrodes are compared between them and the results show that the electronic transmission of benzene junctions, when using semiconductor electrodes, is associated to a gap in transmission which is due to the electrodes band gap. As a consequence, a threshold voltage is necessary to obtain conducting channels.

  20. STUDY OF TRANSMISSION LINES EFFECT ON THE SYSTEM OPERATIONON OF CONTINUOUS AUTOMATIC CAB SIGNALLING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. O. Hololobova

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To conduct an effect research of the electromagnetic field of high-voltage transmission lines (HVTL (750 kV, 50 Hz on the track circuits and continuous automatic cab signalling (CACS with a signal current of 50 Hz in the areas of convergence and intersection with the transmission lines and to propose possible methods to improve noise immunity of CACS. Methodology. The measurements were performed both by means of car-laboratory and directly on rail lines. During the study the electric field strength in the range of industrial frequency directly under the transmission lines and at the distance from it to the railway lines was measured, as well as the time dependence of CACS codes with signal current frequency of 50 Hz directly under the transmission lines and at a distance from it in the absence of the train and its passing. Findings. The root causes analysis of CACS faults and failures was carried out. The effect of the electromagnetic field of high-voltage transmission lines (750 kV, 50 Hz on the track circuit and CACS with signal current of 50 Hz in the areas of convergence and intersection with the transmission line was investigated. Possible methods to improve noise immunity of CACS were considered. Originality. The effect research of transmission lines (750 kV on the operation of the automatic cab signalling on spans Prishib-Burchatsk and Privolnoye-Yelizarovo, Pridneprovsk railway in places of oblique railroads crossing and transmission lines (750 kV, 50 Hz was conducted. Electric field strength in the range of industrial frequency directly under the transmission lines and at a distance from it to the railway line, as well as the time dependences of ALSN codes with signal current frequency of 50 Hz directly under the transmission lines and at a distance from it in the absence of the train and as its passing were measured. It was found that CACS codes in track circuits under transmission lines are strongly distorted, as strength

  1. Transmission capacity and market power: the effect on a dominant generation firm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quick, David M.; Carey, Janis M.

    2002-01-01

    We examine the effect of transmission on a firm's market power by analyzing the optimal dispatch for a dominant firm in a short-run regional electricity generation market. Application of our research to Colorado shows that the dominant firm can strategically congest transmission into the region to receive a maximum price 54.9% of the time. When it does not get the maximum price, the dominant firm can receive an 11.6% average markup over the competitive price. We show how the threat of entry across an enhanced transmission grid can increase competition and limit market power in Colorado. (Author)

  2. The Effects of Average Revenue Regulation on Electricity Transmission Investment and Pricing

    OpenAIRE

    Isamu Matsukawa

    2005-01-01

    This paper investigates the long-run effects of average revenue regulation on an electricity transmission monopolist who applies a two- part tariff comprising a variable congestion price and a non-negative fixed access fee. A binding constraint on the monopolist fs expected average revenue lowers the access fee, promotes transmission investment, and improves consumer surplus. In a case of any linear or log-linear electricity demand function with a positive probability that no congestion occur...

  3. Low pressure electrospray ionization system and process for effective transmission of ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Keqi [Richland, WA; Page, Jason S [Kennewick, WA; Kelly, Ryan T [Wet Richland, WA; Smith, Richard D [Richland, WA

    2010-03-02

    A system and method are disclosed that provide up to complete transmission of ions between coupled stages with low effective ion losses. A novel "interfaceless" electrospray ionization system is further described that operates the electrospray at a reduced pressure such that standard electrospray sample solutions can be directly sprayed into an electrodynamic ion funnel which provides ion focusing and transmission of ions into a mass analyzer.

  4. Studying influence of two effective parameters on network losses in transmission expansion planning using DCGA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shayeghi, H.; Jalilzadeh, S.; Mahdavi, M.; Hadadian, H.

    2008-01-01

    Transmission network expansion planning (TNEP) is a basic part of power network planning that determines where, when and how many new transmission lines should be added to the network. Its task is to minimize the network construction and operational cost, while meeting imposed technical, economic and reliability constraints. Up till now, various methods have been proposed for solution of the static transmission network expansion planning (STNEP) problem. But, in all of them, the effect of two important parameters i.e., inflation rate and load growth factor on network losses has not been investigated. Thus, in this paper, STNEP is being studied considering the effect of inflation rate and load growth factor on the network losses in a transmission network with different voltage levels using a decimal codification genetic algorithm (DCGA). The effectiveness of the proposed idea is tested on the Garver's six-bus network. The results evaluation reveals that the inflation rate and load growth factor have important effect on the network losses and subsequent network arrangement. In addition, considering the effect of two above-mentioned parameters (inflation rate and load growth factor) in expansion planning of transmission networks with various line voltage levels is caused that the total expansion cost of the network (expansion costs and the operational cost) is calculated more exactly and therefore the network satisfies the requirements of delivering electric power more safely and reliably to load centers

  5. Gap junction mediated intercellular metabolite transfer in the cochlea is compromised in connexin30 null mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Chang

    Full Text Available Connexin26 (Cx26 and connexin30 (Cx30 are two major protein subunits that co-assemble to form gap junctions (GJs in the cochlea. Mutations in either one of them are the major cause of non-syndromic prelingual deafness in humans. Because the mechanisms of cochlear pathogenesis caused by Cx mutations are unclear, we investigated effects of Cx30 null mutation on GJ-mediated ionic and metabolic coupling in the cochlea of mice. A novel flattened cochlear preparation was used to directly assess intercellular coupling in the sensory epithelium of the cochlea. Double-electrode patch clamp recordings revealed that the absence of Cx30 did not significantly change GJ conductance among the cochlear supporting cells. The preserved electrical coupling is consistent with immunolabeling data showing extensive Cx26 GJs in the cochlea of the mutant mice. In contrast, dye diffusion assays showed that the rate and extent of intercellular transfer of multiple fluorescent dyes (including a non-metabolizable D-glucose analogue, 2-NBDG among cochlear supporting cells were severely reduced in Cx30 null mice. Since the sensory epithelium in the cochlea is an avascular organ, GJ-facilitated intercellular transfer of nutrient and signaling molecules may play essential roles in cellular homeostasis. To test this possibility, NBDG was used as a tracer to study the contribution of GJs in transporting glucose into the cochlear sensory epithelium when delivered systemically. NBDG uptake in cochlear supporting cells was significantly reduced in Cx30 null mice. The decrease was also observed with GJ blockers or glucose competition, supporting the specificity of our tests. These data indicate that GJs facilitate efficient uptake of glucose in the supporting cells. This study provides the first direct experimental evidence showing that the transfer of metabolically-important molecules in cochlear supporting cells is dependent on the normal function of GJs, thereby suggesting a

  6. The Effects of Parental Divorce on the Intergenerational Transmission of Crime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve G.A. van de Weijer

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This study first examines the effects of parental divorce and paternal crime on offspring offending. Then, it tests whether parental divorce moderates the intergenerational transmission of crime. Diversity within the offending population is taken into account by examining whether effects are different for fathers who commit crimes at different points of the life-course and by distinguishing between violent and non-violent offending. A sample of 2374 individuals from three consecutive generations from 198 Dutch families was used. The results show that parental divorce increases offspring non-violent offending, but does not increase offspring violence after controlling for parental violence. Moreover, the intergenerational transmission of violence is moderated by parental divorce: empirical evidence for intergenerational transmission of violence is only found for children who did not experience parental divorce during their youth. This moderating effect of parental divorce is even stronger if the father committed violent crimes during the child’s youth. The moderating influence of parental divorce on the intergenerational transmission of non-violent crime is less clear, and the effects are overall stronger for violent crime than for non-violent crime. These results suggest that social learning mechanisms play an important role in the intergenerational transmission of violent crime, although genetic influences cannot be ruled out.

  7. Phloroglucinol functions as an intracellular and intercellular chemical messenger influencing gene expression in Pseudomonas protegens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifford, Jennifer C; Buchanan, Alex; Vining, Oliver; Kidarsa, Teresa A; Chang, Jeff H; McPhail, Kerry L; Loper, Joyce E

    2016-10-01

    Bacteria can be both highly communicative and highly competitive in natural habitats and antibiotics are thought to play a role in both of these processes. The soil bacterium Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5 produces a spectrum of antibiotics, two of which, pyoluteorin and 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol (DAPG), function in intracellular and intercellular communication, both as autoinducers of their own production. Here, we demonstrate that phloroglucinol, an intermediate in DAPG biosynthesis, can serve as an intercellular signal influencing the expression of pyoluteorin biosynthesis genes, the production of pyoluteorin, and inhibition of Pythium ultimum, a phytopathogenic oomycete sensitive to pyoluteorin. Through analysis of RNAseq data sets, we show that phloroglucinol had broad effects on the transcriptome of Pf-5, significantly altering the transcription of more than two hundred genes. The effects of nanomolar versus micromolar concentrations of phloroglucinol differed both quantitatively and qualitatively, influencing the expression of distinct sets of genes or having opposite effects on transcript abundance of certain genes. Therefore, our results support the concept of hormesis, a phenomenon associated with signalling molecules that elicit distinct responses at different concentrations. Phloroglucinol is the first example of an intermediate of antibiotic biosynthesis that functions as a chemical messenger influencing gene expression in P. protegens. © 2015 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Transmission Channels and Spillover Effects in a Globalised World

    OpenAIRE

    Fries, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    The first study readdresses the determinants of business cycle synchronisation to test, on the one hand, whether FDI promoting policies may have consequences for the business cycle comovement between countries, and on the other hand, whether more plausible identification strategies change previous results. Our results suggest that linkages through foreign direct investment contribute in most cases positively to the synchronisation between country pairs. In contrast, the beneficial effects of ...

  9. Effects of preferential concentration on direct radiation transmission in a turbulent duct flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villafane, Laura; Banko, Andrew; Kim, Ji Hoon; Elkins, Chris; Eaton, John

    2017-11-01

    Inertial particles in turbulent flows preferentially concentrate, giving rise to spatial and temporal fluctuations of particle number density that affect radiation transmission through the medium. Positive particle correlations enhance direct transmission when compared to the exponential attenuation predicted by the Beer's Law for randomly distributed particles. In the context of a particle based solar receiver, this work studies the effects of preferential concentration and optical depth on direct transmission through a particle laden turbulent duct flow. Time resolved measurements of transmission through the mixture were performed for various particle loadings and Reynolds numbers, thus varying particle correlation lengths, optical depth and concentration fluctuations. These measurements were made using a photodiode to record the transmission of a collimated laser beam along the wall bisector of the duct. A synchronized high-speed camera provided particle positions along most of the beam path. Average and fluctuating radiation transmission results are compared to predictions derived from the imaged number density fields and to simplified analytical models. Simplified models are able to capture the correct trends with varying loading and preferential concentration. This work is funded by the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration, Grant #DE-NA0002373-1.

  10. CRLH Transmission Lines for Telecommunications: Fast and Effective Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juanjuan Gao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A different parameter extraction approach based on zero immittances for composite right/left-handed (CRLH structure is presented. For lossless unit cell equivalent circuit model, LC parameters of series and parallel branches are extracted according to series resonance frequency and parallel resonance frequency, respectively. This approach can be applied to symmetric and unbalanced CRLH structures. The parameter extraction procedure is provided and validated by T-type unit cell model. The responses of distributed prototype and extracted equivalent LC circuit model are in good agreement. The equivalent circuit modeling can improve the degree of freedom in the CRLH TLs design. This parameter extraction method provides an effective and straightforward way in CRLH metamaterials design and applications in telecommunication systems.

  11. Methylmercury inhibits gap junctional intercellular communication in primary cultures of rat proximal tubular cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Minoru; Sumi, Yawara [Department of Chemistry, St. Marianna University School of Medicine, Kawasagi (Japan); Kujiraoka, Toru [Department of Physiology, St. Marianna University School of Medicine, Kawasagi (Japan); Hara, Masayuki [Department of Anatomy, St. Marianna University School of Medicine, Kawasagi (Japan); Nakazawa, Hirokazu [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, Meisei University (Japan)

    1998-03-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) causes renal injury in addition to central and peripheral neuropathy. To clarify the mechanism of nephrotoxicity by MeHg, we investigated the effect of this compound on intercellular communication through gap junction channels in primary cultures of rat renal proximal tubular cells. Twenty minutes after exposure to 30 {mu}M MeHg, gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC), which was assessed by dye coupling, was markedly inhibited before appearance of cytotoxicity. When the medium containing MeHg was exchanged with MeHg-free medium, dye coupling recovered abruptly. However, the dye-coupling was abolished again 30 min after replacement with control medium, and the cells were damaged. Intracellular calcium concentration, [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}, which modulates the function of gap junctions, significantly increased following exposure of the cells to 30 {mu}M MeHg and returned to control level following replacement with MeHg-free medium. These results suggest that the inhibiting effect of MeHg on GJIC is related to the change in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}, and may be involved in the pathogenesis of renal dysfunction. (orig.) With 5 figs., 23 refs.

  12. Effect of calcium on excitatory neuromuscular transmission in the crayfish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracho, H.; Orkand, R. K.

    1970-01-01

    1. The effects of varying the external Ca concentration from 1·8 to 30 mM/l. (⅛-2 times normal) have been studied at the in vitro crayfish excitatory neuromuscular junction. Electrophysiological techniques were used to record transmembrane junctional potentials from muscle fibres and extracellular junctional currents from the vicinity of nerve terminals. 2. The excitatory junctional potential amplitude was proportional to [Ca]0n, where n varied between 0·68 and 0·94 (mean 0·82) when [Ca]0 was varied from 1·8 to 15 mM/l. 3. The increase in junctional potential amplitude on raising [Ca]0 resulted primarily from an increase in the average number of quanta of excitatory transmitter released from the presynaptic nerve terminal by the nerve impulse. 4. The size of the quanta, synaptic delay, presynaptic potential and electrical properties of the muscle membrane were little affected by changes in calcium concentration in the range studied. PMID:5498460

  13. Stomatal responses to flooding of the intercellular air spaces suggest a vapor-phase signal between the mesophyll and the guard cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibbernsen, Erik; Mott, Keith A

    2010-07-01

    Flooding the intercellular air spaces of leaves with water was shown to cause rapid closure of stomata in Tradescantia pallida, Lactuca serriola, Helianthus annuus, and Oenothera caespitosa. The response occurred when water was injected into the intercellular spaces, vacuum infiltrated into the intercellular spaces, or forced into the intercellular spaces by pressurizing the xylem. Injecting 50 mm KCl or silicone oil into the intercellular spaces also caused stomata to close, but the response was slower than with distilled water. Epidermis-mesophyll grafts for T. pallida were created by placing the epidermis of one leaf onto the exposed mesophyll of another leaf. Stomata in these grafts opened under light but closed rapidly when water was allowed to wick between epidermis and the mesophyll. When epidermis-mesophyll grafts were constructed with a thin hydrophobic filter between the mesophyll and epidermis stomata responded normally to light and CO(2). These data, when taken together, suggest that the effect of water on stomata is caused partly by dilution of K(+) in the guard cell and partly by the existence of a vapor-phase signal that originates in the mesophyll and causes stomata to open in the light.

  14. Stomatal Responses to Flooding of the Intercellular Air Spaces Suggest a Vapor-Phase Signal Between the Mesophyll and the Guard Cells1[OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibbernsen, Erik; Mott, Keith A.

    2010-01-01

    Flooding the intercellular air spaces of leaves with water was shown to cause rapid closure of stomata in Tradescantia pallida, Lactuca serriola, Helianthus annuus, and Oenothera caespitosa. The response occurred when water was injected into the intercellular spaces, vacuum infiltrated into the intercellular spaces, or forced into the intercellular spaces by pressurizing the xylem. Injecting 50 mm KCl or silicone oil into the intercellular spaces also caused stomata to close, but the response was slower than with distilled water. Epidermis-mesophyll grafts for T. pallida were created by placing the epidermis of one leaf onto the exposed mesophyll of another leaf. Stomata in these grafts opened under light but closed rapidly when water was allowed to wick between epidermis and the mesophyll. When epidermis-mesophyll grafts were constructed with a thin hydrophobic filter between the mesophyll and epidermis stomata responded normally to light and CO2. These data, when taken together, suggest that the effect of water on stomata is caused partly by dilution of K+ in the guard cell and partly by the existence of a vapor-phase signal that originates in the mesophyll and causes stomata to open in the light. PMID:20472750

  15. Dynamic investigation of a locomotive with effect of gear transmissions under tractive conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zaigang; Zhai, Wanming; Wang, Kaiyun

    2017-11-01

    Locomotive is used to drag trailers to move or supply the braking forces to slow the running speed of a train. The electromagnetic torque of the motor is always transmitted by the gear transmission system to the wheelset for generation of the tractive or braking forces at the wheel-rail contact interface. Consequently, gear transmission system is significant for power delivery of a locomotive. This paper develops a comprehensive locomotive-track vertical-longitudinal coupled dynamics model with dynamic effect of gear transmissions. This dynamics model enables considering the coupling interactions between the gear transmission motion, the vertical and the longitudinal motions of the vehicle, and the vertical vibration of the track structure. In this study, some complicated dynamic excitations, such as the gear time-varying mesh stiffness, nonlinear gear tooth backlash, the nonlinear wheel-rail normal contact force and creep force, and the rail vertical geometrical irregularity, are considered. Then, the dynamic responses of the locomotive under the tractive conditions are demonstrated by numerical simulations based on the established dynamics model and by experimental test. The developed dynamics model is validated by the good agreement between the experimental and the theoretical results. The calculated results reveal that the gear transmission system has strong dynamic interactions with the wheel-rail contact interface including both the vertical and the longitudinal motions, and it has negligible effect on the vibrations of the bogie frame and carbody.

  16. Intercellular Communication in Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma: Properties of Tunneling Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin William Ady

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Malignant pleural mesothelioma is a particularly aggressive and locally invasive malignancy with a poor prognosis despite advances in understanding of cancer cell biology and development of new therapies. At the cellular level, cultured mesothelioma cells present a mesenchymal appearance and a strong capacity for local cellular invasion. One important but underexplored area of mesothelioma cell biology is intercellular communication. Our group has previously characterized in multiple histological subtypes of mesothelioma a unique cellular protrusion known as tunneling nanotubes (TnTs. TnTs are long, actin filament-based, narrow cytoplasmic extensions that are non-adherent when cultured in vitro and are capable of shuttling cellular cargo between connected cells. Our prior work confirmed the presence of nanotube structures in tumors resected from patients with human mesothelioma. In our current study, we quantified the number of TnTs/cell among various mesothelioma subtypes and normal mesothelial cells using confocal microscopic techniques. We also examined TnT length among adherent cells and cells in suspension. We further examined potential approaches to the in vivo study of TnTs in animal models of cancer. We have developed novel approaches to study TnTs in aggressive solid tumor malignancies and define fundamental characteristics of TnTs in malignant mesothelioma. There is mounting evidence that TnTs play an important role in intercellular communication in mesothelioma and thus merit further investigation of their role in vivo.

  17. Coupling and corona effects research plan for transmission lines. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bridges, J E; Formanek, V C

    1976-06-01

    Concern has arisen over the possible effects of electric and magnetic fields produced by EHV-UHV transmission lines. Past and ongoing research concerning the electric and magnetic field effects from EHV-UHV transmission lines was reviewed as it pertains to the following areas: (1) electromagnetic interference, (2) acoustic noise, (3) generation of gaseous effluents, and (4) safety considerations of induced voltages and currents. The intent of this review was to identify the short and long range research projects required to address these areas. The research plan identifies and gives priority to twenty programs in corona and coupling effects. In the case of the corona effects, a number of programs were recommended for acoustic noise and electromagnetic interference to delineate improved power line design criteria in terms of social, meteorological, geographical and cost constraints. Only one project is recommended in the case of ozone generation, because the results of comprehensive analyses, laboratory studies and field measurements have demonstrated that power lines do not contribute significant quantities of ozone. In the case of the coupling effects, a number of programs are recommended for HVAC transmission lines to improve the theoretically developed design guidelines by considering practical constraints. For HVDC transmission lines, programs are suggested to engender a better theoretical understanding and practical measurements capability for the coupling mechanisms of the dc electric and magnetic field with nearby objects. The interrelationship of the programs and their role in a long-term research plan is also discussed.

  18. Identification and characterization of RBM44 as a novel intercellular bridge protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tokuko Iwamori

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Intercellular bridges are evolutionarily conserved structures that connect differentiating germ cells. We previously reported the identification of TEX14 as the first essential intercellular bridge protein, the demonstration that intercellular bridges are required for male fertility, and the finding that intercellular bridges utilize components of the cytokinesis machinery to form. Herein, we report the identification of RNA binding motif protein 44 (RBM44 as a novel germ cell intercellular bridge protein. RBM44 was identified by proteomic analysis after intercellular bridge enrichment using TEX14 as a marker protein. RBM44 is highly conserved between mouse and human and contains an RNA recognition motif of unknown function. RBM44 mRNA is enriched in testis, and immunofluorescence confirms that RBM44 is an intercellular bridge component. However, RBM44 only partially localizes to TEX14-positive intercellular bridges. RBM44 is expressed most highly in pachytene and secondary spermatocytes, but disappears abruptly in spermatids. We discovered that RBM44 interacts with itself and TEX14 using yeast two-hybrid, mammalian two-hybrid, and immunoprecipitation. To define the in vivo function of RBM44, we generated a targeted deletion of Rbm44 in mice. Rbm44 null male mice produce somewhat increased sperm, and show enhanced fertility of unknown etiology. Thus, although RBM44 localizes to intercellular bridges during meiosis, RBM44 is not required for fertility in contrast to TEX14.

  19. Xenobiotic Modulation of Human Mammary Epithelial Cell Gap Junctional Intercellular Communication and Growth

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ruch, Randall

    1999-01-01

    .... These agents also inhibit gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC). This inhibition may contribute to the enhancement of breast epithelial growth and breast cancer formation by xenobiotics...

  20. Labor-intensive jobs for women and development: Intrahousehold welfare effects and its transmission channels

    OpenAIRE

    Getahun, Tigabu D.; Villanger, Espen

    2015-01-01

    We examine the welfare impacts of women getting low-skilled jobs and find large positive effects, both at the household and the individual level. However, the women workers, their husbands and their oldest daughters reduced their leisure, but women to a much larger extent than the others. The leisure of the oldest son did not change. Investigating the transmission mechanisms suggests that the impacts did not only go through income and substitution effects, but also through a bargaining effect...

  1. Effect of condensation on light transmission and energy budget of seven greenhouse cover materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stanghellini, C.; Bruins, M.A.; Mohammadkhani, V.; Swinkels, G.L.A.M.; Sonneveld, P.J.

    2012-01-01

    Model calculations and the few data that are available show that over 100 L water condense yearly on each square meter of a greenhouse cover. It is known that the presence of condensate reduces light transmission. This effect is suppressed to some extent by adding film-forming (anti-drop) additives

  2. Effect of condensation on light transmission and energy budget of seven greenhouse cover materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V. Mohammadkhani; Gert-Jan Swinkels; C. Stanghellini; Piet Sonneveld; M.A. Bruins

    2011-01-01

    Model calculations and the few data that are available show that over 100 L water condense yearly on each square meter of a greenhouse cover. It is known that the presence of condensate reduces light transmission. This effect is suppressed to some extent by adding film-forming (anti-drop) additives

  3. Effect of talker and speaking style on the Speech Transmission Index (L)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijngaarden, S.J. van; Houtgast, T.

    2004-01-01

    The Speech Transmission Index (STI) is routinely applied for predicting the intelligibility of messages (sentences) in noise and reverberation. Despite clear evidence that the STI is capable of doing so accurately, recent results indicate that the STI sometimes underestimates the effect of

  4. The effects of average revenue regulation on electricity transmission investment and pricing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsukawa, Isamu

    2008-01-01

    This paper investigates the long-run effects of average revenue regulation on an electricity transmission monopolist who applies a two-part tariff comprising a variable congestion price and a non-negative fixed access fee. A binding constraint on the monopolist's expected average revenue lowers the access fee, promotes transmission investment, and improves consumer surplus. In a case of any linear or log-linear electricity demand function with a positive probability that no congestion occurs, average revenue regulation is allocatively more efficient than a Coasian two-part tariff if the level of capacity under average revenue regulation is higher than that under a Coasian two-part tariff. (author)

  5. Effect of perforation on the sound transmission through a double-walled cylindrical shell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qunlin; Mao, Yijun; Qi, Datong

    2017-12-01

    An analytical model is developed to study the sound transmission loss through a general double-walled cylindrical shell system with one or two walls perforated, which is excited by a plane wave in the presence of external mean flow. The shell motion is governed by the classical Donnell's thin shell theory, and the mean particle velocity model is employed to describe boundary conditions at interfaces between the shells and fluid media. In contrast to the conventional solid double-walled shell system, numerical results show that perforating the inner shell in the transmission side improves sound insulation performance over a wide frequency band, and removes fluctuation of sound transmission loss with frequency at mid-frequencies in the absence of external flow. Both the incidence and azimuthal angles have nearly negligible effect on the sound transmission loss over the low and middle frequency range when perforating the inner shell. Width of the frequency band with continuous sound transmission loss can be tuned by the perforation ratio.

  6. Does interspecific competition have a moderating effect on Taenia solium transmission dynamics in Southeast Asia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conlan, James V; Vongxay, Khamphouth; Fenwick, Stanley; Blacksell, Stuart D; Thompson, R C Andrew

    2009-09-01

    It is well understood that sociocultural practices strongly influence Taenia solium transmission; however, the extent to which interspecific parasite competition moderates Taenia transmission has yet to be determined. This is certainly the case in Southeast Asia where T. solium faces competition in both the definitive host (people) and the intermediate host (pigs). In people, adult worms of T. solium, T. saginata and T. asiatica compete through density-dependent crowding mechanisms. In pigs, metacestodes of T. solium, T. hydatigena and T. asiatica compete through density-dependent immune-mediated interactions. Here, we describe the biological and epidemiological implications of Taenia competition and propose that interspecific competition has a moderating effect on the transmission dynamics of T. solium in the region. Furthermore, we argue that this competitive ecological scenario should be considered in future research and surveillance activities examining T. solium cysticercosis and taeniasis in Southeast Asia.

  7. Effectiveness of compressed sensing and transmission in wireless sensor networks for structural health monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Takahiro; Uchiito, Haruki; Tokairin, Tomoya; Kawai, Hiroyuki

    2017-04-01

    Regarding Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) for seismic acceleration, Wireless Sensor Networks (WSN) is a promising tool for low-cost monitoring. Compressed sensing and transmission schemes have been drawing attention to achieve effective data collection in WSN. Especially, SHM systems installing massive nodes of WSN require efficient data transmission due to restricted communications capability. The dominant frequency band of seismic acceleration is occupied within 100 Hz or less. In addition, the response motions on upper floors of a structure are activated at a natural frequency, resulting in induced shaking at the specified narrow band. Focusing on the vibration characteristics of structures, we introduce data compression techniques for seismic acceleration monitoring in order to reduce the amount of transmission data. We carry out a compressed sensing and transmission scheme by band pass filtering for seismic acceleration data. The algorithm executes the discrete Fourier transform for the frequency domain and band path filtering for the compressed transmission. Assuming that the compressed data is transmitted through computer networks, restoration of the data is performed by the inverse Fourier transform in the receiving node. This paper discusses the evaluation of the compressed sensing for seismic acceleration by way of an average error. The results present the average error was 0.06 or less for the horizontal acceleration, in conditions where the acceleration was compressed into 1/32. Especially, the average error on the 4th floor achieved a small error of 0.02. Those results indicate that compressed sensing and transmission technique is effective to reduce the amount of data with maintaining the small average error.

  8. Risk adapted transmission prophylaxis to prevent vertical HIV–1 transmission: Effectiveness and safety of an abbreviated regimen of postnatal oral Zidovudine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neubert Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antiretroviral drugs including zidovudine (ZDV are effective in reducing HIV mother to child transmission (MTCT, however safety concern remains. The optimal duration of postnatal ZDV has not been established in clinical studies and there is a lack of consensus regarding optimal management. The objective of this study was to investigate the effectiveness and safety of a risk adapted two week course of oral postnatal ZDV as part of a combined intervention to reduce MTCT. Methods 118 mother infant pairs were treated according to the German-Austrian recommendations for HIV therapy in pregnancy and in HIV exposed newborns between 2000–2010. In the absence of factors associated with an increased HIV–1 transmission risk, children were assigned to the low risk group and treated with an abbreviated postnatal regimen with oral ZDV for 2 weeks. In the presence of risk factors, postnatal ZDV was escalated accordingly. Results Of 118 mother-infant pairs 79 were stratified to the low risk group, 27 to the high risk group and 11 to the very high risk group for HIV–1 MTCT. 4 children were lost to follow up. Overall Transmission risk in the group regardless of risk factors and completion of prophylaxis was 1.8% (95% confidence interval (CI 0.09–6.6. If transmission prophylaxis was complete, transmission risk was 0.9% (95% CI 0.01-5.7. In the low risk group receiving two week oral ZDV transmission risk was 1.4% (95% CI 0.01–8.4 Conclusion These data demonstrate the effectiveness of a short neonatal ZDV regimen in infants of women on stable ART and effective HIV–1 suppression. Further evaluation is needed in larger studies.

  9. Joint effects of climate variability and socioecological factors on dengue transmission: epidemiological evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akter, Rokeya; Hu, Wenbiao; Naish, Suchithra; Banu, Shahera; Tong, Shilu

    2017-06-01

    To assess the epidemiological evidence on the joint effects of climate variability and socioecological factors on dengue transmission. Following PRISMA guidelines, a detailed literature search was conducted in PubMed, Web of Science and Scopus. Peer-reviewed, freely available and full-text articles, considering both climate and socioecological factors in relation to dengue, published in English from January 1993 to October 2015 were included in this review. Twenty studies have met the inclusion criteria and assessed the impact of both climatic and socioecological factors on dengue dynamics. Among those, four studies have further investigated the relative importance of climate variability and socioecological factors on dengue transmission. A few studies also developed predictive models including both climatic and socioecological factors. Due to insufficient data, methodological issues and contextual variability of the studies, it is hard to draw conclusion on the joint effects of climate variability and socioecological factors on dengue transmission. Future research should take into account socioecological factors in combination with climate variables for a better understanding of the complex nature of dengue transmission as well as for improving the predictive capability of dengue forecasting models, to develop effective and reliable early warning systems. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Transmission eigenvalues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakoni, Fioralba; Haddar, Houssem

    2013-10-01

    iterative least square method to identify the spherically stratified index of refraction from transmission eigenvalues. On the characterization of transmission eigenvalues in terms of far-field measurements, a promising new result is obtained by Kirsch and Lechleiter [21] showing how one can identify the transmission eigenvalues using the eigenvalues of the scattering operator which are available in terms of measured scattering data. In the paper by Kleefeld [22], an accurate method for computing transmission eigenvalues based on a surface integral formulation of the interior transmission problem and numerical methods for nonlinear eigenvalue problems is proposed and numerically validated for the scalar problem in three dimensions. On the other hand, the paper by Sun and Xu [23] investigates the computation of transmission eigenvalues for Maxwell's equations using a standard iterative method associated with a variational formulation of the interior transmission problem with an emphasis on the effect of anisotropy on transmission eigenvalues. From the perspective of using transmission eigenvalues in non-destructive testing, the paper by Cakoni and Moskow [24] investigates the asymptotic behavior of transmission eigenvalues with respect to small inhomogeneities. The paper by Nakamura and Wang [25] investigates the linear sampling method for the time dependent heat equation and analyses the interior transmission problem associated with this equation. Finally, in the paper by Finch and Hickmann [26], the spectrum of the interior transmission problem is related to the unique determination of the acoustic properties of a body in thermoacoustic imaging. We hope that this collection of papers will stimulate further research in the rapidly growing area of transmission eigenvalues and inverse scattering theory.

  11. Effective seat-to-head transmissibility in whole-body vibration: Effects of posture and arm position

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmatalla, Salam; DeShaw, Jonathan

    2011-12-01

    Seat-to-head transmissibility is a biomechanical measure that has been widely used for many decades to evaluate seat dynamics and human response to vibration. Traditionally, transmissibility has been used to correlate single-input or multiple-input with single-output motion; it has not been effectively used for multiple-input and multiple-output scenarios due to the complexity of dealing with the coupled motions caused by the cross-axis effect. This work presents a novel approach to use transmissibility effectively for single- and multiple-input and multiple-output whole-body vibrations. In this regard, the full transmissibility matrix is transformed into a single graph, such as those for single-input and single-output motions. Singular value decomposition and maximum distortion energy theory were used to achieve the latter goal. Seat-to-head transmissibility matrices for single-input/multiple-output in the fore-aft direction, single-input/multiple-output in the vertical direction, and multiple-input/multiple-output directions are investigated in this work. A total of ten subjects participated in this study. Discrete frequencies of 0.5-16 Hz were used for the fore-aft direction using supported and unsupported back postures. Random ride files from a dozer machine were used for the vertical and multiple-axis scenarios considering two arm postures: using the armrests or grasping the steering wheel. For single-input/multiple-output, the results showed that the proposed method was very effective in showing the frequencies where the transmissibility is mostly sensitive for the two sitting postures and two arm positions. For multiple-input/multiple-output, the results showed that the proposed effective transmissibility indicated higher values for the armrest-supported posture than for the steering-wheel-supported posture.

  12. Quantifying Transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolhouse, Mark

    2017-07-01

    Transmissibility is the defining characteristic of infectious diseases. Quantifying transmission matters for understanding infectious disease epidemiology and designing evidence-based disease control programs. Tracing individual transmission events can be achieved by epidemiological investigation coupled with pathogen typing or genome sequencing. Individual infectiousness can be estimated by measuring pathogen loads, but few studies have directly estimated the ability of infected hosts to transmit to uninfected hosts. Individuals' opportunities to transmit infection are dependent on behavioral and other risk factors relevant given the transmission route of the pathogen concerned. Transmission at the population level can be quantified through knowledge of risk factors in the population or phylogeographic analysis of pathogen sequence data. Mathematical model-based approaches require estimation of the per capita transmission rate and basic reproduction number, obtained by fitting models to case data and/or analysis of pathogen sequence data. Heterogeneities in infectiousness, contact behavior, and susceptibility can have substantial effects on the epidemiology of an infectious disease, so estimates of only mean values may be insufficient. For some pathogens, super-shedders (infected individuals who are highly infectious) and super-spreaders (individuals with more opportunities to transmit infection) may be important. Future work on quantifying transmission should involve integrated analyses of multiple data sources.

  13. The Monetary Transmission Mechanism and the Effectiveness of the Credit Channel: The Case of Turkey

    OpenAIRE

    ÇOBAN, Orhan; ÇOBAN, Ayşe; İNAN, Selçuk

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the monetary transmission mechanism and the effectiveness of the credit channel have been analyzed. According to the analysis results, the most important instrument in the applications of the monetary policy in Turkey is variable interest rates. Interest rates are the most significant main effectives for all other variables and they influence the total deposit, the total credits and the size of the total security. While an increase in deposits raise the size of loanable fund by...

  14. The Effects of Parental Divorce on the Intergenerational Transmission of Crime

    OpenAIRE

    Steve G.A. van de Weijer; Terence P. Thornberry; Catrien C.J.H. Bijleveld; Arjan A.J. Blokland

    2015-01-01

    This study first examines the effects of parental divorce and paternal crime on offspring offending. Then, it tests whether parental divorce moderates the intergenerational transmission of crime. Diversity within the offending population is taken into account by examining whether effects are different for fathers who commit crimes at different points of the life-course and by distinguishing between violent and non-violent offending. A sample of 2374 individuals from three consecutive generat...

  15. Transmission Creep: Media Effects Theories and Journalism Studies in a Digital Era

    OpenAIRE

    Singer, J.

    2016-01-01

    The nature of digital media challenges the explanatory power of effects theories that rest on a transmission model of communication. As essentially linear conceptualizations reliant on identification and measurement of discrete message components, these twentieth-century theories are poorly suited to contemporary journalistic structures and forms. This article adds to the call for a more richly theorized concept of relationship effects suitable to an immersive, iterative, and interconnected e...

  16. Methoxychlor and Vinclozolin Induce Rapid Changes in Intercellular and Intracellular Signaling in Liver Progenitor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babica, Pavel; Zurabian, Rimma; Kumar, Esha R; Chopra, Rajus; Mianecki, Maxwell J; Park, Joon-Suk; Jaša, Libor; Trosko, James E; Upham, Brad L

    2016-09-01

    Methoxychlor (MXC) and vinclozolin (VIN) are well-recognized endocrine disrupting chemicals known to alter epigenetic regulations and transgenerational inheritance; however, non-endocrine disruption endpoints are also important. Thus, we determined the effects of MXC and VIN on the dysregulation of gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) and activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in WB-F344 rat liver epithelial cells. Both chemicals induced a rapid dysregulation of GJIC at non-cytotoxic doses, with 30 min EC50 values for GJIC inhibition being 10 µM for MXC and 126 µM for VIN. MXC inhibited GJIC for at least 24 h, while VIN effects were transient and GJIC recovered after 4 h. VIN induced rapid hyperphosphorylation and internalization of gap junction protein connexin43, and both chemicals also activated MAPK ERK1/2 and p38. Effects on GJIC were not prevented by MEK1/2 inhibitor, but by an inhibitor of phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C (PC-PLC), resveratrol, and in the case of VIN, also, by a p38 inhibitor. Estrogen (ER) and androgen receptor (AR) modulators (estradiol, ICI 182,780, HPTE, testosterone, flutamide, VIN M2) did not attenuate MXC or VIN effects on GJIC. Our data also indicate that the effects were elicited by the parental compounds of MXC and VIN. Our study provides new evidence that MXC and VIN dysregulate GJIC via mechanisms involving rapid activation of PC-PLC occurring independently of ER- or AR-dependent genomic signaling. Such alterations of rapid intercellular and intracellular signaling events involved in regulations of gene expression, tissue development, function and homeostasis, could also contribute to transgenerational epigenetic effects of endocrine disruptors. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Study of light transmission through gauze pad effected by blood or liquids to detect needle dislodgement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Akihiro; Ishida, Kai; Morohoshi, Yasuo; Shinbo, Toshihiro; Hirose, Minoru; Ikeda, Noriaki

    2010-02-01

    Serious accidents during hemodialysis such as a large amount of blood loss are often caused by venous needle dislodgement. To develop a bleeding sensor based on a photo sensor for monitoring the needle sites, we studied effects of liquids and porcine blood on light transmission through a thin gauze pad with a basic photo sensor. The photo sensor consisted of an ordinary electrical circuit, a light emitting diode (LED, lambda max = 645 nm), a photo diode (PD), and a thin gauze pad placed between the LED and PD that were tightly attached to the edges of a plastic clip. The light transmitted through the gauze pad, soaked with liquids or porcine blood dropped on it, was measured with a digital voltmeter. The liquids were reverse osmosis water, physiological saline, glucose in water at 5, 10, 20, 40 and 50%, porcine plasma, and porcine blood (Hct 40, 30 and 20%). The liquids on a tight-weave gauze pad, significantly increased the voltage (light transmission) from 0.412 +/- 0.003 V (SD) to 0.794 +/- 0.025 V (minimum, by reverse osmosis water) and to 0.945 +/- 0.011 V (maximum, by 50% glucose). The porcine blood significantly decreased the voltage from 0.412 to 0.195 +/- 0.030 V in Hct 40%, to 0.334 +/- 0.035 in Hct 30%, to 0.397 +/- 0.007 V in Hct 20%. The higher the concentration of glucose, the more the light transmission increased. The higher concentration of Hct, the more the light transmission decreased. Similar results were also shown for the loose-weave pad. Using two types of gauze pads, we confirmed that liquids significantly increased light transmission through gauze pad, but porcine blood decreased light transmission. This opposite response can be used to distinguish liquids from blood on a gauze pad.

  18. Ground-Wave Propagation Effects on Transmission Lines through Error Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uribe-Campos Felipe Alejandro

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Electromagnetic transient calculation of overhead transmission lines is strongly influenced by the natural resistivity of the ground. This varies from 1-10K (Ω·m depending on several media factors and on the physical composition of the ground. The accuracy on the calculation of a system transient response depends in part in the ground return model, which should consider the line geometry, the electrical resistivity and the frequency dependence of the power source. Up to date, there are only a few reports on the specialized literature about analyzing the effects produced by the presence of an imperfectly conducting ground of transmission lines in a transient state. A broad range analysis of three of the most often used ground-return models for calculating electromagnetic transients of overhead transmission lines is performed in this paper. The behavior of modal propagation in ground is analyzed here into effects of first and second order. Finally, a numerical tool based on relative error images is proposed in this paper as an aid for the analyst engineer to estimate the incurred error by using approximate ground-return models when calculating transients of overhead transmission lines.

  19. Cultural Transmission on the Taskscape: Exploring the Effects of Taskscape Visibility on Cultural Diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premo, L S; Tostevin, Gilbert B

    2016-01-01

    Culturally transmitted behavior can be structured in its performance both geographically and temporally, in terms of where and when implements are made and used on the landscape (what Ingold calls "the taskscape"). Yet cultural transmission theory has not yet explored the consequences of behaviors transmitted differently due to their enactment at different taskscape locations, what Tostevin calls "taskscape visibility." Here, we use computer simulations to explore how taskscape visibility and forager mobility affect the diversity of two selectively neutral culturally transmitted traits within a single population of social learners. The trait that can be transmitted from residential bases only (lower taskscape visibility) shows greater diversity than the trait that can be transmitted from residential bases and logistical camps (higher taskscape visibility). In addition, increased logistical mobility has a positive effect on the diversity of the trait with the lower taskscape visibility while it generally shows little to no effect on the diversity of the trait with higher taskscape visibility. Without an appreciation for the ways in which taskscape visibility and mobility can structure cultural transmission in space and through time, the difference in the observed equilibrium diversity levels of the two traits might be incorrectly interpreted as resulting from qualitatively different forms of biased cultural transmission. The results of our simulation experiment suggest that researchers may need to take the taskscape visibility into account when inferring cultural transmission from archaeological data.

  20. Na,K-pump modulates intercellular communication in vascular wall

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matchkov, Vladimir; Nilsson, Holger; Aalkjær, Christian

      Ouabain, a specific inhibitor of the Na,K-pump, has previously been shown to interfere with intercellular communication. Here we test the hypothesis that the communication between vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) is regulated through an interaction between the Na,K-pump and the Na...... were used as a model for electrical coupling of SMCs by measuring membrane capacitance (Cm). SMCs were uncoupled (evaluated by inhibition of vasomotion and desynchronization of calcium transients in vascular wall, or by reduction to half of Cm measured in paired A7r5 cells) when the Na,K-pump...... was inhibited either by a low concentration of ouabain or by ATP depletion. Uncoupling with ouabain was associated with a localized increase of intracellular calcium in discrete sites near the plasma membrane. Reduction of Na,K-pump activity by removal of extracellular potassium also uncoupled cells, but only...

  1. Na,K-pump modulates intercellular communication in vascular wall

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matchkov, Vladimir

    were used as a model for electrical coupling of SMCs by measuring membrane capacitance (Cm). SMCs were uncoupled (evaluated by inhibition of vasomotion and desynchronization of calcium transients in vascular wall, or by reduction to half of Cm measured in paired A7r5 cells) when the Na......  Ouabain, a specific inhibitor of the Na,K-pump, has previously been shown to interfere with intercellular communication. Here we test the hypothesis that the communication between vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) is regulated through an interaction between the Na,K-pump and the Na......,Ca-exchanger leading to an increase in the intracellular calcium concentration in discrete areas near the plasma membrane. The intracellular calcium concentration in individual SMCs was imaged in cultured rat aortic SMCs (A7r5) and simultaneously with isometric force in rat mesenteric small arteries. Paired A7r5 cells...

  2. Robust synchronization analysis in nonlinear stochastic cellular networks with time-varying delays, intracellular perturbations and intercellular noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Po-Wei; Chen, Bor-Sen

    2011-08-01

    Naturally, a cellular network consisted of a large amount of interacting cells is complex. These cells have to be synchronized in order to emerge their phenomena for some biological purposes. However, the inherently stochastic intra and intercellular interactions are noisy and delayed from biochemical processes. In this study, a robust synchronization scheme is proposed for a nonlinear stochastic time-delay coupled cellular network (TdCCN) in spite of the time-varying process delay and intracellular parameter perturbations. Furthermore, a nonlinear stochastic noise filtering ability is also investigated for this synchronized TdCCN against stochastic intercellular and environmental disturbances. Since it is very difficult to solve a robust synchronization problem with the Hamilton-Jacobi inequality (HJI) matrix, a linear matrix inequality (LMI) is employed to solve this problem via the help of a global linearization method. Through this robust synchronization analysis, we can gain a more systemic insight into not only the robust synchronizability but also the noise filtering ability of TdCCN under time-varying process delays, intracellular perturbations and intercellular disturbances. The measures of robustness and noise filtering ability of a synchronized TdCCN have potential application to the designs of neuron transmitters, on-time mass production of biochemical molecules, and synthetic biology. Finally, a benchmark of robust synchronization design in Escherichia coli repressilators is given to confirm the effectiveness of the proposed methods. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Intercellular contact: its influence on the Dsub(q) of mammalian cell survival curves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durand, R.E.; Sutherland, R.M.

    1975-01-01

    Cell survival in tissues exposed to a given dose of ionizing radiation is usually greater than that of similar cells grown individually in vitro, despite the fact that the radiosensitivities (D 0 ) are virtually identical under the two conditions. An analogous increase in cell survival is observed when Chinese hamster V79-171 cells are grown in suspension culture and irradiated as multicell spheroids. Unfortunately, the information gained from the survival curves so obtained is limited by the inhomogeneity of the cell population with respect to both degree of contact and cell cycle position. The latter can be studied using synchronized small spheroids. The ratio of Dsub(q) of spheroid cells to Dsub(q) of single cells increased as the cells progressed through the cell cycle, from a minimum of 1.3 for G 1 phase cells to a maximum of 2.2 for late S-phase cells. The enhanced survival, or 'contact effect', developed slowly as the spheroids grew, after an initial latent period of about one generation cycle of the cells. A second effect of intercellular contact on mammalian cell survival has also been observed. When cells are assayed under conditions in which intercellular contact is maintained, the net cellular survival is increased further. This effect is different from the usual repair of potentially lethal damage, in that it occurs much more slowly and results in modification of the survival-curve shoulder. Not all cell types tested have shown enhanced survival when grown as spheroids. Several MNNG-induced mutants of the Chinese hamster V79-171 line have been isolated and sublines which do and do not show the contact effect are now available. These may permit study of the mechanism(s) of contact effects. (author)

  4. Diversity of life. Effects of power generation and transmission on biodiversity difficult to assess

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hongisto, M.; Nikula, A.

    1996-11-01

    Scientific theories do not necessarily enable us to forecast the consequences of our actions on wildlife. Presumably, nature is able to adapt to environmental changes through variations on the genetic, species and ecosystem level; i.e. by means of biodiversity. The first studies conducted within the electricity sector show that the effects of emissions form an individual power plant on biodiversity are extremely difficult to assess because of long-range dispersion of the emission and many other factors simultaneously acting on the environment. Some concrete information about the impact of power transmission lines on biodiversity was obtained. These effects were primarily reversible. Some transmission line zones may even have favourable effects on biodiversity and on the living conditions of certain endangered species. (orig.)

  5. Diversity of life. Effects of power generation and transmission on biodiversity difficult to assess

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hongisto, M.; Nikula, A.

    1996-01-01

    Scientific theories do not necessarily enable us to forecast the consequences of our actions on wildlife. Presumably, nature is able to adapt to environmental changes through variations on the genetic, species and ecosystem level; i.e. by means of biodiversity. The first studies conducted within the electricity sector show that the effects of emissions form an individual power plant on biodiversity are extremely difficult to assess because of long-range dispersion of the emission and many other factors simultaneously acting on the environment. Some concrete information about the impact of power transmission lines on biodiversity was obtained. These effects were primarily reversible. Some transmission line zones may even have favourable effects on biodiversity and on the living conditions of certain endangered species. (orig.)

  6. On the involvement of host proteins in Cowpea mosaic virus intercellular spread

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hollander, den P.W.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract of thesis Paulus den Hollander entitled “On the involvement of host proteins in Cowpea mosaic virus intercellular spread”.

    Defence: 18th of November 13.30 h

    Abstract

    Intercellular spread of Cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) occurs via movement

  7. Proteins mediating intra- and intercellular transport of lipids and lipid-modified proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neumann, S.

    2008-01-01

    Proteins mediating intra- and intercellular transport of lipids and lipid-modified proteins In this thesis, I studied the intra- and intercellular transport of lipidic molecules, in particular glycosphingolipids and lipid-modified proteins. The first part focuses on the intracellular transport of

  8. The Simultaneous Effects of Spatial and Social Networks on Cholera Transmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophia Giebultowicz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This study uses social network and spatial analytical methods simultaneously to understand cholera transmission in rural Bangladesh. Both have been used separately to incorporate context into health studies, but using them together is a new and recent approach. Data include a spatially referenced longitudinal demographic database consisting of approximately 200,000 people and a database of all laboratory-confirmed cholera cases from 1983 to 2003. A complete kinship-based network linking households is created, and distance matrices are also constructed to model spatial relationships. A spatial error-social effects model tested for cholera clustering in socially linked households while accounting for spatial factors. Results show that there was social clustering in five out of twenty-one years while accounting for both known and unknown environmental variables. This suggests that environmental cholera transmission is significant and social networks also influence transmission, but not as consistently. Simultaneous spatial and social network analysis may improve understanding of disease transmission.

  9. Effects of channel blocking on information transmission and energy efficiency in squid giant axons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yujiang; Yue, Yuan; Yu, Yuguo; Liu, Liwei; Yu, Lianchun

    2018-04-01

    Action potentials are the information carriers of neural systems. The generation of action potentials involves the cooperative opening and closing of sodium and potassium channels. This process is metabolically expensive because the ions flowing through open channels need to be restored to maintain concentration gradients of these ions. Toxins like tetraethylammonium can block working ion channels, thus affecting the function and energy cost of neurons. In this paper, by computer simulation of the Hodgkin-Huxley neuron model, we studied the effects of channel blocking with toxins on the information transmission and energy efficiency in squid giant axons. We found that gradually blocking sodium channels will sequentially maximize the information transmission and energy efficiency of the axons, whereas moderate blocking of potassium channels will have little impact on the information transmission and will decrease the energy efficiency. Heavy blocking of potassium channels will cause self-sustained oscillation of membrane potentials. Simultaneously blocking sodium and potassium channels with the same ratio increases both information transmission and energy efficiency. Our results are in line with previous studies suggesting that information processing capacity and energy efficiency can be maximized by regulating the number of active ion channels, and this indicates a viable avenue for future experimentation.

  10. Local and global effects of climate on dengue transmission in Puerto Rico.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A Johansson

    Full Text Available The four dengue viruses, the agents of dengue fever and dengue hemorrhagic fever in humans, are transmitted predominantly by the mosquito Aedes aegypti. The abundance and the transmission potential of Ae. aegypti are influenced by temperature and precipitation. While there is strong biological evidence for these effects, empirical studies of the relationship between climate and dengue incidence in human populations are potentially confounded by seasonal covariation and spatial heterogeneity. Using 20 years of data and a statistical approach to control for seasonality, we show a positive and statistically significant association between monthly changes in temperature and precipitation and monthly changes in dengue transmission in Puerto Rico. We also found that the strength of this association varies spatially, that this variation is associated with differences in local climate, and that this relationship is consistent with laboratory studies of the impacts of these factors on vector survival and viral replication. These results suggest the importance of temperature and precipitation in the transmission of dengue viruses and suggest a reason for their spatial heterogeneity. Thus, while dengue transmission may have a general system, its manifestation on a local scale may differ from global expectations.

  11. Shielding Effectiveness Analysis and Modification of the Coupling Effect Transmission Line Method on Cavities with Multi-Sided Apertures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Hu

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Because the traditional transmission line method treats electromagnetic waves as excitation sources and the cavity as a rectangular waveguide whose terminal is shorted, the transmission line method can only calculate shielding effectiveness in the center line of the cavity with apertures on one side. In this paper, the aperture coupling effect of different sides was analyzed based on vector analysis. According to the field intensity distribution of different transport modes in the rectangular waveguide, the calculation model of cavity shielding effectiveness in any position is proposed, which can solve the question of the calculation model of shielding effectiveness in any position in the traditional method of equivalent transmission methods. Further expansion of the equivalent transmission lines model is adopted to study the shielding effectiveness of different aperture cavities, and the coupling effect rule of the incident angle, the number of apertures, and the size of the cavity is obtained, which can provide the technical support for the design of electromagnetic shielding cavities for electronic equipment.

  12. No Effect of TETRA Hand Portable Transmission Signals on Human Cognitive Function and Symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riddervold, Ingunn Skogstad; Kjærgaard, Søren K.; Pedersen, Gert F.

    2010-01-01

    Current radio frequency radiation exposure guidelines rest on well-established thermal effects. However, recent research into analogue and digital transmission fields at levels covered by the exposure guidelines has indicated possible detrimental effects on human cognitive performance. To investi......Current radio frequency radiation exposure guidelines rest on well-established thermal effects. However, recent research into analogue and digital transmission fields at levels covered by the exposure guidelines has indicated possible detrimental effects on human cognitive performance....... To investigate this, we conducted a controlled climate chamber study of possible changes in cognitive performance in healthy volunteers exposed to transmission signals from TETRA hand portables (TETRA handsets). The trial deployed a balanced, randomized, double-blinded cross-over design. Performance on different...... paper-and-pencil, auditory and computer-based cognitive tasks was monitored in 53 male volunteers (mean age 36.41 years, SD 8.35) during 45-min exposure to a TETRA handset and sham control signals remotely controlled from a laboratory more than 100 km away. The main cognitive outcome was the Trail...

  13. Mode and climatic factors effect on energy losses in transient heat modes of transmission lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigun, A. Ya; Sidorov, O. A.; Osipov, D. S.; Girshin, S. S.; Goryunov, V. N.; Petrova, E. V.

    2018-01-01

    Electrical energy losses increase in modern grids. The losses are connected with an increase in consumption. Existing models of electric power losses estimation considering climatic factors do not allow estimating the cable temperature in real time. Considering weather and mode factors in real time allows to meet effectively and safely the consumer’s needs to minimize energy losses during transmission, to use electric power equipment effectively. These factors increase an interest in the evaluation of the dynamic thermal mode of overhead transmission lines conductors. The article discusses an approximate analytic solution of the heat balance equation in the transient operation mode of overhead lines based on the least squares method. The accuracy of the results obtained is comparable with the results of solving the heat balance equation of transient thermal mode with the Runge-Kutt method. The analysis of mode and climatic factors effect on the cable temperature in a dynamic thermal mode is presented. The calculation of the maximum permissible current for variation of weather conditions is made. The average electric energy losses during the transient process are calculated with the change of wind, air temperature and solar radiation. The parameters having the greatest effect on the transmission capacity are identified.

  14. Effect of kicker circuit inductance on the transmission-line discharging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Deren; Wang Xiangqi; Shang Lei; Pei Yuanji; Fan Kuanjun

    2004-01-01

    Circuit inductance exists at discharging circuit of transmission-line, it includes the inductance at the main switch of thyratron when conducts, the linking inductance between the linking cables, the matching resistance inductance and the load inductance. When a long pulse is generated by transmission-line, the circuit inductance can be omitted. However, when the pulse is short (such as shorter than 200 ns), especially when ferromagnetic core kicker acts as the load, the effect is obvious. The short pulse current is needed in order to generate long time interval synchronous radiation light pulses by using online assembly of pulse convex orbit and DC convex orbit. This paper analyses the effect and presents several experimental results. It also supposes two practical cases to decrease the rise time of the pulse

  15. Effects of optical layer impairments on 2.5 Gb/s optical CDMA transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, H; Mendez, A; Heritage, J; Lennon, W

    2000-07-03

    We conducted a computer simulation study to assess the effects of optical layer impairments on optical CDMA (O-CDMA) transmission of 8 asynchronous users at 2.5 Gb/s each user over a 214-km link. It was found that with group velocity dispersion compensation, two other residual effects, namely, the nonzero chromatic dispersion slope of the single mode fiber (which causes skew) and the non-uniform EDFA gain (which causes interference power level to exceed signal power level of some codes) degrade the signal to multi-access interference (MAI) ratio. In contrast, four wave mixing and modulation due to the Kerr and Raman contributions to the fiber nonlinear refractive index are less important. Current wavelength-division multiplexing (WDM) technologies, including dispersion management, EDFA gain flattening, and 3 rd order dispersion compensation, are sufficient to overcome the impairments to the O-CDMA transmission system that we considered.

  16. Transmission of vocational skills at the end of career: horizon effect and technological or organisational change

    OpenAIRE

    Greenan , Nathalie; Messe , Pierre-Jean

    2014-01-01

    The main contribution of this paper is to study empirically how the horizon effect and the technological or organisational changes interact to explain the probability of being an internal trainer at the end of career. We use data from a French matched employer-employee survey on Organisational Changes and Computerisation (COI) conducted in 2006. It contains information both on employees’ knowledge transmission practices and employers’ technological or organisational changes. We find that the ...

  17. Design and Development of Effective Transmission Mechanisms on a Tendon Driven Hand Orthosis for Stroke Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Sangwoo; Weber, Lynne; Bishop, Lauri; Stein, Joel; Ciocarlie, Matei

    2018-01-01

    Tendon-driven hand orthoses have advantages over exoskeletons with respect to wearability and safety because of their low-profile design and ability to fit a range of patients without requiring custom joint alignment. However, no existing study on a wearable tendon-driven hand orthosis for stroke patients presents evidence that such devices can overcome spasticity given repeated use and fatigue, or discusses transmission efficiency. In this study, we propose two designs that provide effective...

  18. A Transmission Electron Microscope Investigation of Space Weathering Effects in Hayabusa Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Lindsay P.; Berger, Eve L.

    2014-01-01

    The Hayabusa mission to asteroid 25143 Itokawa successfully returned the first direct samples of the regolith from the surface of an asteroid. The Hayabusa samples thus present a special opportunity to directly investigate the evolution of asteroidal surfaces, from the development of the regolith to the study of the more complex effects of space weathering. Here we describe the mineralogy, microstructure and composition of three Hayabusa mission particles using transmission electron microscope (TEM) techniques

  19. Simultaneous Volatility Transmissions and Spillover Effects: US and Hong Kong Stock and Futures Markets

    OpenAIRE

    Gerard Gannon

    2004-01-01

    Contemporaneous transmission effects across volatilities of the Hong Kong Stock and Index futures markets and futures volume of trade are tested by employing a structural systems approach. Competing measures of volatility spillover, constructed from the overnight U.S. S&P500 index futures, are tested and found to impact on the Hong Kong asset return volatility and volume of trade patterns. The examples utilize intra-day 15 minute sampled data from this medium sized Asia Pacific equity and der...

  20. Note: Electrical detection and quantification of spin rectification effect enabled by shorted microstrip transmission line technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soh, Wee Tee; Ong, C. K.; Peng, Bin; Chai, Guozhi

    2014-01-01

    We describe a shorted microstrip method for the sensitive quantification of Spin Rectification Effect (SRE). SRE for a Permalloy (Ni 80 Fe 20 ) thin film strip sputtered onto SiO 2 substrate is demonstrated. Our method obviates the need for simultaneous lithographic patterning of the sample and transmission line, therefore greatly simplifying the SRE measurement process. Such a shorted microstrip method can allow different contributions to SRE (anisotropic magnetoresistance, Hall effect, and anomalous Hall effect) to be simultaneously determined. Furthermore, SRE signals from unpatterned 50 nm thick Permalloy films of area dimensions 5 mm × 10 mm can even be detected

  1. Astroglial Metabolic Networks Sustain Hippocampal Synaptic Transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouach, Nathalie; Koulakoff, Annette; Abudara, Veronica; Willecke, Klaus; Giaume, Christian

    2008-12-01

    Astrocytes provide metabolic substrates to neurons in an activity-dependent manner. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in this function, as well as its role in synaptic transmission, remain unclear. Here, we show that the gap-junction subunit proteins connexin 43 and 30 allow intercellular trafficking of glucose and its metabolites through astroglial networks. This trafficking is regulated by glutamatergic synaptic activity mediated by AMPA receptors. In the absence of extracellular glucose, the delivery of glucose or lactate to astrocytes sustains glutamatergic synaptic transmission and epileptiform activity only when they are connected by gap junctions. These results indicate that astroglial gap junctions provide an activity-dependent intercellular pathway for the delivery of energetic metabolites from blood vessels to distal neurons.

  2. Astroglial metabolic networks sustain hippocampal synaptic transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouach, Nathalie; Koulakoff, Annette; Abudara, Veronica; Willecke, Klaus; Giaume, Christian

    2008-12-05

    Astrocytes provide metabolic substrates to neurons in an activity-dependent manner. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in this function, as well as its role in synaptic transmission, remain unclear. Here, we show that the gap-junction subunit proteins connexin 43 and 30 allow intercellular trafficking of glucose and its metabolites through astroglial networks. This trafficking is regulated by glutamatergic synaptic activity mediated by AMPA receptors. In the absence of extracellular glucose, the delivery of glucose or lactate to astrocytes sustains glutamatergic synaptic transmission and epileptiform activity only when they are connected by gap junctions. These results indicate that astroglial gap junctions provide an activity-dependent intercellular pathway for the delivery of energetic metabolites from blood vessels to distal neurons.

  3. Compression induced intercellular shaping for some geometric cellular lattices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adonai Gimenez Calbo

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available The wall perimeter fraction, which contact neighboring cells, was named compression ratio (alpha. A zero compression ratio indicates maximum intercellular (air volume (vG, v/v and neglectable contact among cells, while alpha=1 indicates complete adherence between neighboring cells and no vG in the lattice. The maximum intercellular air volume (beta, v/v, when alpha=0, was 0.593 for triangular, 0.2146 for square and 0,0931 for hexagonal lattices. The equation alpha=1- (vG/beta½ was derived to relate alpha, beta and vG in the studied lattices. The relation (P S=p/alpha between cell turgor (P S and the tissue aggregating pressure (p, defined as the compression to keep in place a layer of cells, was demonstrated using the compression ratio concept. Intercellular deformations of Ipomea batatas L. roots obtained with pressure chamber were used to test alpha, vG, p and P S as a function of compression. Volumetric and transversal elastic extensibilities and the lamella media tearing forces were obtained and alpha constancy was considered as a criteria of cellular shape stability.A fração do perímetro da parede celular em contato com células vizinha foi denominada razão de compressão (alfa. Razão de compressão zero indica volume intercelular (vG, v/v máximo e contato neglível entre as células, enquanto alfa=1 ocorre quando há completa aderência com as células vizinhas (vG=0. O volume (gasoso intercelular máximo (beta, v/v, quando alfa=0, foi 0,593, 0,2146 e 0,0931 para látices triangulares, quadradas e hexagonais. A equação derivada para relacionar alfa, beta and vG nas látices estudadas foi alfa=1- (vG/beta½. A razão de compressão foi em seguida empregada para estabelecer a relação P S=p/alfa entre a pressão de turgescência (P S e a pressão de agregação (p, definida com a compressão para manter uma camada de células no seu lugar. As deformações intercelulares de batata-doce obtidas com procedimentos de c

  4. Intercellular signal communication among odontoblasts and trigeminal ganglion neurons via glutamate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, A; Sato, M; Kimura, M; Katakura, A; Tazaki, M; Shibukawa, Y

    2016-11-01

    Various stimuli to the exposed surface of dentin induce changes in the hydrodynamic force inside the dentinal tubules resulting in dentinal pain. Recent evidences indicate that mechano-sensor channels, such as the transient receptor potential channels, in odontoblasts receive these hydrodynamic forces and trigger the release of ATP to the pulpal neurons, to generate dentinal pain. A recent study, however, has shown that odontoblasts also express glutamate receptors (GluRs). This implies that cells in the dental pulp tissue have the ability to release glutamate, which acts as a functional intercellular mediator to establish inter-odontoblast and odontoblast-trigeminal ganglion (TG) neuron signal communication. To investigate the intercellular signal communication, we applied mechanical stimulation to odontoblasts and measured the intracellular free Ca 2+ concentration ([Ca 2+ ] i ). During mechanical stimulation in the presence of extracellular Ca 2+ , we observed a transient [Ca 2+ ] i increase not only in single stimulated odontoblasts, but also in adjacent odontoblasts. We could not observe these responses in the absence of extracellular Ca 2+ . [Ca 2+ ] i increases in the neighboring odontoblasts during mechanical stimulation of single odontoblasts were inhibited by antagonists of metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) as well as glutamate-permeable anion channels. In the odontoblast-TG neuron coculture, we observed an increase in [Ca 2+ ] i in the stimulated odontoblasts and TG neurons, in response to direct mechanical stimulation of single odontoblasts. These [Ca 2+ ] i increases in the neighboring TG neurons were inhibited by antagonists for mGluRs. The [Ca 2+ ] i increases in the stimulated odontoblasts were also inhibited by mGluRs antagonists. We further confirmed that the odontoblasts express group I, II, and III mGluRs. However, we could not record any currents evoked from odontoblasts near the mechanically stimulated odontoblast, with or without

  5. The effect of improved compliance with hygiene guidelines on transmission of Staphylococcus aureus to newborn infants: the Swedish Hygiene Intervention and Transmission of S aureus study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mernelius, Sara; Löfgren, Sture; Lindgren, Per-Eric; Blomberg, Marie; Olhager, Elisabeth; Gunnervik, Christina; Lenrick, Raymond; Thrane, Malena Tiefenthal; Isaksson, Barbro; Matussek, Andreas

    2013-07-01

    Newborn infants are often colonized with Staphylococcus aureus originating from health care workers (HCWs). We therefore use colonization with S aureus of newborn infants to determine the effect of an improved compliance with hygiene guidelines on bacterial transmission. Compliance with hygiene guidelines was monitored prior to (baseline) and after (follow-up) a multimodal hygiene intervention in 4 departments of obstetrics and gynecology. spa typing was used to elucidate transmission routes of S aureus collected from newborn infants, mothers, fathers, staff members, and environment. The compliance with hygiene guidelines increased significantly from baseline to follow-up. The transmission of S aureus from HCWs to infants was however not affected. Fathers had the highest colonization rates. Persistent carriage was indicated in 18% of the HCWs. The most commonly isolated spa type was t084, which was not detected in a previous study from the same geographic area. It is possible to substantially improve the compliance with hygiene guidelines, by using multimodal hygiene intervention. The improved compliance did not decrease the transmission of S aureus from sources outside the own family to newborn infants. Furthermore, we show the establishment of a new spa type (t084), which now is very common in our region. Copyright © 2013 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Contribution of the central histaminergic transmission in the cataleptic and neuroleptic effects of haloperidol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Nishant S; Tandi, Lakshyapati; Verma, Lokesh

    2015-12-01

    The antipsychotic properties of haloperidol are primarily attributed to its ability to block dopamine D2 receptors. Histaminergic transmission modulates some of the behavioral effects of haloperidol. Hence, the present study investigated the contribution of central histaminergic transmission in the cataleptic and neuroleptic effect of haloperidol respectively, using bar test and conditioned avoidance response (CAR) in a two-way shuttle box. The studies revealed that haloperidol (0.50 or 1 mg/kg, i.p.) exhibited cataleptic behavior and inhibited conditioned avoidance response (CAR) in the doses 0.25 or 0.50 mg in rats. The rats, pretreated centrally (i.c.v.) with histamine precursor, L-histidine (1, 2.5 μg) or histamine neuronal inducer (H3 receptor antagonist), thioperamide (20, 50 μg/rat), showed an enhanced cataleptic effect with sub-maximal dose of haloperidol (0.5 mg/kg, i.p.). Similarly, the neuroleptic effect of haloperidol (0.25 mg/kg, i.p.) in CAR was also potentiated in the rats pretreated with L-histidine (2.5 μg) or thioperamide (50 μg/rat). Further, the cataleptic effect of haloperidol (1 mg/kg, i.p.) was attenuated in rats pretreated with the H1 receptor antagonist, chlorpheniramine (60, 80 μg/rat, i.c.v.) or H2 receptor antagonist, ranitidine (60 μg/rat, i.c.v.). However, the neuroleptic effect of haloperidol (0.5 mg/kg, i.p.) was completely reversed by pretreatment with ranitidine (60 μg/rat, i.c.v.), and partially attenuated by chlorpheniramine (80 μg/rat, i.c.v.). These findings suggest the possible involvement of histaminergic transmission in the cataleptic and neuroleptic effects of haloperidol probably via H1 or H2 receptor stimulation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Experimental evaluation of the wind effects on an operating power transmission tower

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermes Carvalho

    Full Text Available Abstract Static and dynamic effects on power transmission towers can be evaluated by methodologies available in codes, which suggest the use of linear static analysis. By using numerical simulations, it is possible to observe the strong influence of the geometric nonlinear behavior of transmission cables. Dynamic effects also strongly influence this behavior, with the possibility of resonance between the cables and the structure, but up to the moment, the existent analysis procedures have not been completely validated on an experimental basis. In order to validate a complete analysis methodology, experimental procedures are proposed for a suspension tower of a 138kV transmission line in use. A tridimensional anemometer was installed on this structure in order to measure the values and directions of wind speeds. Simultaneous strain values were collected on the main elements of the tower through optical extensometers. Optical sensor technology with Fiber Bragg Gratings was used, due to the characteristic of immunity to the electromagnetic field occasioned by high electric currents. The string swing angle was evaluated through a high-resolution camera and a tridimensional accelerometer. With this instrumentation, it is possible to create a complete database that correlates wind speeds with the responses of the structural set. At the moment, 5 months of data have been collected and the instrumentation is in the final testing phase and synchronized. After this step, real-time measurements will be performed.

  8. Effects of long-term contracts on firms exercising market power in transmission constrained electricity markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nam, Young Woo; Yoon, Yong Tae; Park, Jong-Keun; Hur, Don; Kim, Sung-Soo

    2006-01-01

    The electricity markets with only few large firms are often vulnerable to less competitive behaviors than the desired. The presence of transmission constraints further restrict the competition among firms and provide more opportunities for firms to exercise market power. While it is generally acknowledged that the long-term contracts provide good measures for mitigating market power in the spot market (thus reducing undesired price spikes), it is not even more clear how effective these contracts are if the market is severely limited due to transmission constraints. In this paper, an analytical approach through finding a Nash equilibrium is presented to investigate the effects of long-term contracts on firms exercising market power in a bid-based pool with transmission constraints. Surprisingly the analysis in this paper shows that the presence of long-term contracts may result in the reduced expected social welfare. A straightforward consequence of the analysis presented in this paper will be helpful for the regulators in Korea to reconsider offering vesting contracts to generating companies in the near future. (author)

  9. Modeling Exoplanetary Haze and Cloud Effects for Transmission Spectroscopy in the TRAPPIST-1 System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Sarah E.; Horst, Sarah M.; Lewis, Nikole K.; Batalha, Natasha E.; de Wit, Julien

    2018-01-01

    We present theoretical transmission spectra of the planets TRAPPIST-1d, e, f, and g using a version of the CaltecH Inverse ModEling and Retrieval Algorithms (CHIMERA) atmospheric modeling code. We use particle size, aerosol production rates, and aerosol composition inputs from recent laboratory experiments relevant for the TRAPPIST-1 system to constrain cloud and haze behavior and their effects on transmission spectra. We explore these cloud and haze cases for a variety of theoretical atmospheric compositions including hydrogen-, nitrogen-, and carbon dioxide-dominated atmospheres. Then, we demonstrate the feasibility of physically-motivated, laboratory-supported clouds and hazes to obscure spectral features at wavelengths and resolutions relevant to instruments on the Hubble Space Telescope and the upcoming James Webb Space Telescope. Lastly, with laboratory based constraints of haze production rates for terrestrial exoplanets, we constrain possible bulk atmospheric compositions of the TRAPPIST-1 planets based on current observations. We show that continued collection of optical data, beyond the supported wavelength range of the James Webb Telescope, is necessary to explore the full effect of hazes for transmission spectra of exoplanetary atmospheres like the TRAPPIST-1 system.

  10. Interaction effects between sender and receiver processes in indirect transmission of Campylobacter jejuni between broilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Bunnik, Bram A D; Hagenaars, Thomas J; Bolder, Nico M; Nodelijk, Gonnie; de Jong, Mart C M

    2012-07-25

    Infectious diseases in plants, animals and humans are often transmitted indirectly between hosts (or between groups of hosts), i.e. via some route through the environment instead of via direct contacts between these hosts. Here we study indirect transmission experimentally, using transmission of Campylobacter jejuni (C. jejuni) between spatially separated broilers as a model system. We distinguish three stages in the process of indirect transmission; (1) an infectious "sender" excretes the agent, after which (2) the agent is transported via some route to a susceptible "receiver", and subsequently (3) the receiver becomes colonised by the agent. The role of the sender and receiver side (stage 1 and stage 3) was studied here by using acidification of the drinking water as a modulation mechanism. In the experiment one control group and three treatment groups were monitored for the presence of C. jejuni by taking daily cloacal swabs. The three treatments consisted of acidification of the drinking water of the inoculated animals (the senders), acidification of the drinking water of the susceptible animals (the receivers) or acidification of the drinking water of both inoculated and susceptible animals. In the control group 12 animals got colonised out of a possible 40, in each treatment groups 3 animals out of a possible 40 were found colonised with C. jejuni. The results of the experiments show a significant decrease in transmission rate (β) between the control groups and treatment groups (p water (p = 0.01). This negative interaction effect could be due to selection of bacteria already at the sender side thereby diminishing the effect of acidification at the receiver side.

  11. Detection of the intercellular adhesion gene cluster (ica in clinical Staphylococcus aureus isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Namvar, Amirmorteza Ebrahimzadeh

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available [english] is a major hospital and community pathogen having the aptitude to cause a wide variety of infections in men. The ability of microorganisms to produce biofilm facilitates them to withstand the host immune response and is recognized as one factor contributing to chronic or persistent infections. It was demonstrated that the -encoded genes lead to the biosynthesis of polysaccharide intercellular adhesion (PIA molecules, and may be involved in the accumulation phase of biofilm formation. Different studies have shown the decisive role of the gene as virulence factors in staphylococcal infections. This study was carried out to demonstrate the relationship between gene and production of slime layer in strains. Sixty strains were isolated from patients. The isolates were identified morphologically and biochemically following standard laboratory methods. After identification, the staphylococcal isolates were maintained in trypticase soy broth (TSB, to which 15% glycerol was added, and stored at –20°C. Slime formation and biofilm assay was monitored. A PCR assay was developed to identify the presence of (intercellular adhesion gene gene in all isolates. Thirty-nine slime producing colonies with CRA plates (65% formed black colors, the remaining 21 isolates were pink (35%. In the quantitative biofilm assay 35 (58% produced biofilm while 25 (42% isolates did not exhibit this property. All isolates were positive for detection of gene by PCR method. The interaction of and in the investigated isolates may be important in slime layer formation and biofilm phenomena.We propose PCR detection of the gene locus as a rapid and effective method to be used for discrimination between potentially virulent and nonvirulent isolates, with implications for therapeutic and preventive measures pertainin to the management of colonized indwelling catheters.

  12. Regulation of intercellular tight junctions by zonula occludens toxin and its eukaryotic analogue zonulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasano, A

    2000-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium represents the largest interface between the external environment and the internal host milieu and constitutes the major barrier through which molecules can either be absorbed or secreted. There is now substantial evidence that tight junctions (tj) play a major role in regulating epithelial permeability by influencing paracellular flow of fluid and solutes. Tj are one of the hallmarks of absorptive and secretory epithelia. Evidence now exists that tj are dynamic rather than static structures and readily adapt to a variety of developmental, physiological, and pathological circumstances. These adaptive mechanisms are still incompletely understood. Activation of PKC either by Zonula occludens toxin (Zot) or by phorbol esters increases paracellular permeability. Alteration of epithelial tj is a recently described property for infectious agents. Clostridium difficile toxin A and B and influenza and vesicular stomatitis viruses have been shown to loosen tj in tissue culture monolayers. Unlike what occurs after the Zot stimulus, these changes appear to be irreversible and are associated with destruction of the tj complex. On the basis of this observation, we postulated that Zot may mimic the effect of a functionally and immunologically related endogenous modulator of epithelial tj. We were able to identify an intestinal Zot analogue, which we named zonulin. It is conceivable that the zonulins participate in the physiological regulation of intercellular tj not only in the small intestine, but also throughout a wide range of extraintestinal epithelia as well as the ubiquitous vascular endothelium, including the blood-brain barrier. Disregulation of this hypothetical zonulin model may contribute to disease states that involve disordered intercellular communication, including developmental and intestinal disorders, tissue inflammation, malignant transformation, and metastasis.

  13. Return and volatility transmission between gold and stock sectors: Application of portfolio management and hedging effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilip Kumar

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper investigates the first and second orders moment transmission between gold and Indian industrial sectors with an application of portfolio design and hedging effectiveness using generalised VAR-ADCC-BVGARCH model. Our findings indicate unidirectional significant return spillover from gold to stock sectors. The negative values of estimated time varying conditional correlations are mainly observed during periods of market turbulence and crisis indicating the scope of portfolio diversification and hedging during these periods. We also estimate optimal weights, hedge ratios, and hedging effectiveness for the stock-gold portfolios. Our findings suggest that stock-gold portfolio provides better diversification benefits than stock portfolios.

  14. The effect of magnetic field on chiral transmission in p-n-p graphene junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuan; Wan, Qi; Peng, Yingzi; Wang, Guanqing; Qian, Zhenghong; Zhou, Guanghui; Jalil, Mansoor B. A.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate Klein tunneling in graphene heterojunctions under the influence of a perpendicular magnetic field via the non-equilibrium Green’s function method. We find that the angular dependence of electron transmission is deflected sideways, resulting in the suppression of normally incident electrons and overall decrease in conductance. The off-normal symmetry axis of the transmission profile was analytically derived. Overall tunneling conductance decreases to almost zero regardless of the potential barrier height when the magnetic field (B-field) exceeds a critical value, thus achieving effective confinement of Dirac fermions. The critical field occurs when the width of the magnetic field region matches the diameter of the cyclotron orbit. The potential barrier also induces distinct Fabry-Pérot fringe patterns, with a “constriction region” of low transmission when is close to the Fermi energy. Application of B-field deflects the Fabry-Pérot interference pattern to an off-normal angle. Thus, the conductance of the graphene heterojunctions can be sharply modulated by adjusting the B-field strength and the potential barrier height relative to the Fermi energy.

  15. The effect of magnetic field on chiral transmission in p-n-p graphene junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuan; Wan, Qi; Peng, Yingzi; Wang, Guanqing; Qian, Zhenghong; Zhou, Guanghui; Jalil, Mansoor B A

    2015-12-18

    We investigate Klein tunneling in graphene heterojunctions under the influence of a perpendicular magnetic field via the non-equilibrium Green's function method. We find that the angular dependence of electron transmission is deflected sideways, resulting in the suppression of normally incident electrons and overall decrease in conductance. The off-normal symmetry axis of the transmission profile was analytically derived. Overall tunneling conductance decreases to almost zero regardless of the potential barrier height V0 when the magnetic field (B-field) exceeds a critical value, thus achieving effective confinement of Dirac fermions. The critical field occurs when the width of the magnetic field region matches the diameter of the cyclotron orbit. The potential barrier also induces distinct Fabry-Pérot fringe patterns, with a "constriction region" of low transmission when V0 is close to the Fermi energy. Application of B-field deflects the Fabry-Pérot interference pattern to an off-normal angle. Thus, the conductance of the graphene heterojunctions can be sharply modulated by adjusting the B-field strength and the potential barrier height relative to the Fermi energy.

  16. Transmission of Helium Isotopes through Graphdiyne Pores: Tunneling versus Zero Point Energy Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Marta I; Bartolomei, Massimiliano; Campos-Martínez, José

    2015-10-29

    Recent progress in the production of new two-dimensional (2D) nanoporous materials is attracting considerable interest for applications to isotope separation in gases. In this paper we report a computational study of the transmission of (4)He and (3)He through the (subnanometer) pores of graphdiyne, a recently synthesized 2D carbon material. The He-graphdiyne interaction is represented by a force field parametrized upon ab initio calculations, and the (4)He/(3)He selectivity is analyzed by tunneling-corrected transition state theory. We have found that both zero point energy (of the in-pore degrees of freedom) and tunneling effects play an extraordinary role at low temperatures (≈20-30 K). However, both quantum features work in opposite directions in such a way that the selectivity ratio does not reach an acceptable value. Nevertheless, the efficiency of zero point energy is in general larger, so that (4)He tends to diffuse faster than (3)He through the graphdiyne membrane, with a maximum performance at 23 K. Moreover, it is found that the transmission rates are too small in the studied temperature range, precluding practical applications. It is concluded that the role of the in-pore degrees of freedom should be included in computations of the transmission probabilities of molecules through nanoporous materials.

  17. Effect of chemotherapy on malaria transmission among Yanomami Amerindians: simulated consequences of placebo treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, J; Laserson, K F; Petralanda, I; Spielman, A

    1999-05-01

    To determine whether chemotherapy effectively reduces Plasmodium falciparum malaria transmission in isolated human populations, we followed two abrupt sequential outbreaks of malaria infection among Yanomami Amerindians and modeled the effect of chemotherapy and the consequences if no drug was available. A Macdonald-type mathematical model demonstrated that both outbreaks comprised a single epidemic event linked by an invisible outbreak in vector mosquitoes. The basic reproductive number, R0, from fitted values based on the treated epidemic was 2 during the initial phase of the epidemic, and waned as vector density decreased with the onset of the dry season. In the observed epidemic, 60 (45%) of 132 village residents were affected, and the treated outbreak ended after two months. Although the initial chemotherapy regimen was only marginally effective, the duration of human infectivity was reduced from an expected nine months to two weeks. In the absence of this intervention, the initial R0 value would have been 40, more than 60% of the population would have been infected, and more than 30% would have remained parasitemic until the next rainy season (about six months later). Another outbreak would then have ensued, and malaria probably would have remained endemic in this village. Our simulated placebo treatment permits us to conclude that even partially effective chemotherapeutic interventions, such as those in our study, interrupt serial transmission of P. falciparum among isolated human populations that are exposed to infection seasonally.

  18. Visual impact of overhead power transmission lines and dielectric and corona effects constraints on insulation coordination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deponti, F.; Fini, G.P.; Porrino, A.; Rosa, F.

    1992-06-01

    In assessing overhead power transmission line design and planning criteria for the optimization of visual impact, safety and the reduction of electro magnetic disturbance effects, this paper reviews the research findings of ENEL, the Italian Electricity Board. The on-going research activities involve theoretical calculations and laboratory performance tests to determine the best compact configurations for 380 kV lines. The parameters under examination include: insulator spacing, sizing and salt fog resistivity; allowable overvoltages; maximum line length; behaviour in lightning conditions; radio and acoustics disturbances

  19. Dynamical Behavior of a Rumor Transmission Model with Psychological Effect in Emergency Event

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang'an Huo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A rumor transmission model with nonmonotonic incidence rate was proposed, which provides excellent explanations of the “psychological” effect with rumor spreading in emergency event. By carrying out a global analysis of the model and studying the stability of the rumor-free equilibrium and the rumor-endemic equilibrium, we showed that either the number of infective individuals tends to zero as time evolves or the rumor persists. Finally, recommendations for policy makers and consulting advice for related commissions are explored in the case study of crazy rumors propagated for the iodized sail shortage panic in China.

  20. The Effect of Friction on the Nonlinear Vibration of the Cracked One-Stage Power Transmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rezaee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available : The gear systems are widely used in industry to transmit the power or change the direction of the torque. Due to the extensive usage of the gears, the detailed designing and the subsequent maintenance of these systems are more and more evident. System recognition can be achieved through modeling the system, investigating the system behavior, and comparing the results obtained through the model with the actual system behavior. Up to now, the effect of dry friction has not been taken into account in nonlinear vibration analysis and modeling of a cracked one-stage gear power transmission system. In this paper, the nonlinear vibration of a pair of cracked spur-gear system in presence of dry friction, static transmission error, clearance and time-variant mesh stiffness is investigated. To this end, the time-variant mesh stiffness of an intact tooth is calculated analytically. Then, the tooth root crack is modeled as a cracked cantilever beam. The governing nonlinear equation of motion is extracted accordingly, and in order to consider the effect of dry friction, the governing equation solved by Rung- Kutta method in three separate time spans. Finally, the frequency response and bifurcation diagrams are used to study the effect of the friction and tooth root crack on the nonlinear vibration behavior of the system.

  1. Unique spin-polarized transmission effects in a QD ring structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedin, Eric; Joe, Yong

    2010-10-01

    Spintronics is an emerging field in which the spin of the electron is used for switching purposes and to communicate information. In order to obtain spin-polarized electron transmission, the Zeeman effect is employed to produce spin-split energy states in quantum dots which are embedded in the arms of a mesoscopic Aharonov-Bohm (AB) ring heterostructure. The Zeeman splitting of the QD energy levels can be induced by a parallel magnetic field, or by a perpendicular field which also produces AB-effects. The combination of these effects on the transmission resonances of the structure is studied analytically and several parameter regimes are identified which produce a high degree of spin-polarized output. Contour and line plots of the weighted spin polarization as a function of electron energy and magnetic field are presented to visualize the degree of spin-polarization. Taking advantage of these unique parameter regimes shows the potential promise of such devices for producing spin-polarized currents.

  2. Returns Effect, Shocks and Volatility Transmission between Foreign Exchange-Stock Markets in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agya Atabani Adi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper examined effect of passed return on current return, shocks spillover and volatility transmission between FX-Stock markets. Using result obtained from VAR-GARCH models, we also calculate the optimal weight and risk minimizing hedging ratio for FX-Stock markets and employed the newly developed bivariate GARCH framework Findings reveal evidence of short term predictability in both markets through time. One period lagged returns significantly impact current return in both markets, and impact was greater in FX market both VAR-GARCH and VAR-AGARCH models. There were evidence of bi-directional volatility transmission in both markets and uni-directional shocks spillover from stock to FX market in both models. VAR-AGARCH model showed evidence of leverage effect; bad news has more impact on volatility than positive news of the same magnitude. We showed that optimal polio of FX-Stock market should holds more foreign exchange to stocks in their asset polio. Our result showed evidence of effective hedging in FX-Stock markets in Nigerian. Hence, the inclusion of stocks in diversified polio of foreign exchange could improve it risks adjusted performance of hedging ratio.

  3. 7-Ketocholesterol modulates intercellular communication through gap-junction in bovine lens epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pereira Paulo

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Connexin43 (Cx43 is an integral membrane protein that forms intercellular channels called gap junctions. Intercellular communication in the eye lens relies on an extensive network of gap junctions essential for the maintenance of lens transparency. The association of Cx43 with cholesterol enriched lipid raft domains was recently demonstrated. The objective of this study is to assess if products of cholesterol oxidation (oxysterols affect gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC. Results Primary cultures of lens epithelial cells (LEC were incubated with 7-ketocholesterol (7-Keto, 25-hydroxycholesterol (25-OH or cholesterol and the subcellular distribution of Cx43 was evaluated by immunofluorescence confocal microscopy. The levels of Cx43 present in gap junction plaques were assessed by its insolubility in Triton X-100 and quantified by western blotting. The stability of Cx43 at the plasma membrane following incubation with oxysterols was evaluated by biotinylation of cell surface proteins. Gap junction intercellular communication was evaluated by transfer of the dye Lucifer yellow. The results obtained showed that 7-keto induces an accumulation of Cx43 at the plasma membrane and an increase in intercellular communication through gap junction. However, incubation with cholesterol or 25-OH did not lead to significant alterations on subcellular distribution of Cx43 nor in intercellular communication. Data further suggests that increased intercellular communication results from increased stability of Cx43 at the plasma membrane, presumably forming functional gap-junctions, as suggested by decreased solubility of Cx43 in 1% Triton X-100. The increased stability of Cx43 at the plasma membrane seems to be specific and not related to disruption of endocytic pathway, as demonstrated by dextran uptake. Conclusions Results demonstrate, for the first time, that 7-keto induces an increase in gap junction intercellular communication

  4. ?Underwater acoustic channel properties ?in the Gulf of Naples and their effects ?on digital data transmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Iannaccone

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available ?In this paper we studied the physical properties of the Gulf of Naples (Southern Italy for its use as a commu- nication channel for the acoustic transmission of digital data acquired by seismic instruments on the seafloor to a moored buoy. The acoustic link will be assured by high frequency acoustic modems operating with a central frequency of 100 kHz and a band pass of 10 kHz. The main operational requirements of data transmission con- cern the near horizontal acoustic link, the maximum depth of the sea being about 300 m and the planned hori- zontal distance between seismic instruments and buoy 2 km. This study constructs the signal-to-noise ratio maps to understand the limits beyond which the clarity of the transmission is no longer considered reliable. Using ray- theory, we compute the amplitudes of a transmitted signal at a grid of 21×12 receivers to calculate the transmis- sion loss at each receiver. The signal-to-noise ratio is finally computed for each receiver knowing also the trans- mitter source level and the acoustic noise level in the Gulf of Naples. The results show that the multipath effects predominate over the effects produced by the sound velocity gradient in the sea in the summer period. In the case of omnidirectional transmitters with a Source Level (SL of 165 dB and a baud rate of 2.4 kbit/s, the results al- so show that distances of 1400-1600 m can be reached throughout the year for transmitter-receiver connections below 50 m depth in the underwater acoustic channel.

  5. Underwater acoustic channel properties in the Gulf of Naples and their effects on digital data transmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Iannaccone

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we studied the physical properties of the Gulf of Naples (Southern Italy for its use as a communication channel for the acoustic transmission of digital data acquired by seismic instruments on the seafloor to a moored buoy. The acoustic link will be assured by high frequency acoustic modems operating with a central frequency of 100 kHz and a band pass of 10 kHz. Since the maximum depth of the sea is about 300 m and the planned horizontal distance between the seismic instruments and the buoy is 2 km, the acoustic data transmission shall be near horizontal. In this study the signal-to-noise ratio is plotted against depth and distance from the source, thus defining the limit after which the transmitted information becomes unreliable. Using ray-theory, we compute the amplitudes of a transmitted signal at a grid of 21×12 receivers to calculate the transmission loss at each receiver. The signal-to-noise ratio is finally computed for each receiver knowing also the transmitter source level and the acoustic noise level in the Gulf of Naples. The results show that the multipath effects predominate over the effects produced by the sound velocity gradient in the sea in the summer period. In the case of omnidirectional transmitters with a Source Level (SL of 165 dB and a bit rate of 2.4 kbit/s, the results also show that distances of 1400-1600 m can be reached throughout the year for transmitter-receiver connections below 50 m depth in the underwater acoustic channel.

  6. The effects of refraction on transit transmission spectroscopy: application to Earth-like exoplanets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Misra, Amit; Meadows, Victoria [Astronomy Department, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Crisp, Dave, E-mail: amit0@astro.washington.edu [NAI Virtual Planetary Laboratory, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2014-09-01

    We quantify the effects of refraction in transit transmission spectroscopy on spectral absorption features and on temporal variations that could be used to obtain altitude-dependent spectra for planets orbiting stars of different stellar types. We validate our model against altitude-dependent transmission spectra of the Earth from ATMOS and against lunar eclipse spectra from Pallé et al. We perform detectability studies to show the potential effects of refraction on hypothetical observations of Earth analogs with the James Webb Space Telescope NIRSPEC. Due to refraction, there will be a maximum tangent pressure level that can be probed during transit for each given planet-star system. We show that because of refraction, for an Earth-analog planet orbiting in the habitable zone of a Sun-like star only the top 0.3 bars of the atmosphere can be probed, leading to a decrease in the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of absorption features by 60%, while for an Earth-analog planet orbiting in the habitable zone of an M5V star it is possible to probe almost the entire atmosphere with minimal decreases in S/N. We also show that refraction can result in temporal variations in the transit transmission spectrum which may provide a way to obtain altitude-dependent spectra of exoplanet atmospheres. Additionally, the variations prior to ingress and subsequent to egress provide a way to probe pressures greater than the maximum tangent pressure that can be probed during transit. Therefore, probing the maximum range of atmospheric altitudes, and in particular the near-surface environment of an Earth-analog exoplanet, will require looking at out-of-transit refracted light in addition to the in-transit spectrum.

  7. The effects of refraction on transit transmission spectroscopy: application to Earth-like exoplanets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misra, Amit; Meadows, Victoria; Crisp, Dave

    2014-01-01

    We quantify the effects of refraction in transit transmission spectroscopy on spectral absorption features and on temporal variations that could be used to obtain altitude-dependent spectra for planets orbiting stars of different stellar types. We validate our model against altitude-dependent transmission spectra of the Earth from ATMOS and against lunar eclipse spectra from Pallé et al. We perform detectability studies to show the potential effects of refraction on hypothetical observations of Earth analogs with the James Webb Space Telescope NIRSPEC. Due to refraction, there will be a maximum tangent pressure level that can be probed during transit for each given planet-star system. We show that because of refraction, for an Earth-analog planet orbiting in the habitable zone of a Sun-like star only the top 0.3 bars of the atmosphere can be probed, leading to a decrease in the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of absorption features by 60%, while for an Earth-analog planet orbiting in the habitable zone of an M5V star it is possible to probe almost the entire atmosphere with minimal decreases in S/N. We also show that refraction can result in temporal variations in the transit transmission spectrum which may provide a way to obtain altitude-dependent spectra of exoplanet atmospheres. Additionally, the variations prior to ingress and subsequent to egress provide a way to probe pressures greater than the maximum tangent pressure that can be probed during transit. Therefore, probing the maximum range of atmospheric altitudes, and in particular the near-surface environment of an Earth-analog exoplanet, will require looking at out-of-transit refracted light in addition to the in-transit spectrum.

  8. Effects of uncertainty, transmission type, driver age and gender on brake reaction and movement time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warshawsky-Livne, Lora; Shinar, David

    2002-01-01

    Braking time (BT) is a critical component in safe driving, and various approaches have been applied to minimize it. This study analyzed the components of BT in order to assess the effects of age, gender, vehicle transmission type, and event uncertainty, on its two primary components, perception-reaction time and brake-movement time. Perception-reaction time and brake-movement time were measured at the onset of lights for 72 subjects in a simulator. The six experimental conditions were three levels of uncertainty conditions (none, some, and some + false alarms) and two types of transmission (manual and automatic). The 72 subjects, half male and half female, were further divided into three age groups (mean of 23, 30, and 62 years). Each subject had 10 trials in each of the three levels of uncertainty conditions. Transmission type did not significantly affect either perception-reaction time or brake-movement time. Perception-reaction time increased significantly from 0.32 to 0.42 s (P brake-movement time did not change. Perception-reaction time increased (from 0.35 to 0.43 s) with age but brake-movement time did not change with age. Gender did not affect perception-reaction time but did affect brake-movement time (males 0.19 s vs. females 0.16 s). At 90 km/h, a car travels 0.25 m in 0.01 s. Consequently, even such small effects multiplied by millions of vehicle-kilometers can contribute to significant savings in lives and damages.

  9. Effect of lactation therapy on Staphylococcus aureus transmission dynamics in two commercial dairy herds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlow, John W; Zadoks, Ruth N; Schukken, Ynte H

    2013-02-11

    Treatment of subclinical mastitis during lactation can have both direct (individual animal level) and indirect (population level) effects. With a few exceptions, prior research has focused on evaluating the direct effects of mastitis treatment, and to date no controlled field trials have been conducted to test whether beneficial indirect effects of lactation treatment strategies targeting subclinical mastitis can be demonstrated on commercial dairy farms. Furthermore, there is limited knowledge on the impact of such interventions on the population dynamics of specific bacterial strains. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that lactation therapy targeting S. aureus subclinical intramammary infection reduces transmission of S. aureus strains within dairy herds. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) were used to determine strain specific infection dynamics in treated and control groups in a split herd trial conducted on 2 commercial dairy farms. The direct effect of 8 days intramammary lactation therapy with pirlimycin hydrochloride was demonstrated by an increased proportion of cure and a reduction in duration of infection in quarters receiving treatment compared to untreated controls. The indirect effect of lactation therapy was demonstrated by reduction of new S. aureus intramammary infections (IMI) caused by the dominant strain type in both herds. Strain typing of representative isolates taken over the duration of all IMI, including pre- and post-treatment isolates, provided more precise estimates of new infection, cure, and re-infection rates. New S. aureus infections in recovered susceptible quarters and the emergence of a new strain type in one herd influenced incidence measures. In addition to demonstrating positive direct effects of lactation therapy, this study provides evidence that treatment of subclinical S. aureus mastitis during lactation can have indirect effects including preventing new IMI and

  10. Effect of lactation therapy on Staphylococcus aureus transmission dynamics in two commercial dairy herds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barlow John W

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Treatment of subclinical mastitis during lactation can have both direct (individual animal level and indirect (population level effects. With a few exceptions, prior research has focused on evaluating the direct effects of mastitis treatment, and to date no controlled field trials have been conducted to test whether beneficial indirect effects of lactation treatment strategies targeting subclinical mastitis can be demonstrated on commercial dairy farms. Furthermore, there is limited knowledge on the impact of such interventions on the population dynamics of specific bacterial strains. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that lactation therapy targeting S. aureus subclinical intramammary infection reduces transmission of S. aureus strains within dairy herds. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE and multilocus sequence typing (MLST were used to determine strain specific infection dynamics in treated and control groups in a split herd trial conducted on 2 commercial dairy farms. Results The direct effect of 8 days intramammary lactation therapy with pirlimycin hydrochloride was demonstrated by an increased proportion of cure and a reduction in duration of infection in quarters receiving treatment compared to untreated controls. The indirect effect of lactation therapy was demonstrated by reduction of new S. aureus intramammary infections (IMI caused by the dominant strain type in both herds. Strain typing of representative isolates taken over the duration of all IMI, including pre- and post-treatment isolates, provided more precise estimates of new infection, cure, and re-infection rates. New S. aureus infections in recovered susceptible quarters and the emergence of a new strain type in one herd influenced incidence measures. Conclusion In addition to demonstrating positive direct effects of lactation therapy, this study provides evidence that treatment of subclinical S. aureus mastitis during lactation can

  11. Use of cultured cells with defects of citrulline metabolism in diagnosis and in the study of intercellular communication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davidson, J S

    1985-01-01

    Citrullinemia and argininosuccinic aciduria are two disorders resulting from defects in two consecutive enzymes of the urea cycle, argininosuccinate synthetase and argininosuccinate lyase. Fibroblast cell lines were derived from patients with these disorders and the diagnoses, which had been made on the basis of amino acid levels in plasma and urine, were confirmed by demonstrating that the cell lines were unable to incorporate /sup 14/C-citrulline into protein. DNA from the argininosuccinate synthetase-deficient (ASS-) cells was analysed by restriction enzyme digestion and hybridisation to a cDNA probe which had been cloned from human argininosuccinate synthetase mRNA. No defect in the patient's DNA could be demonstrated, indicating that no major deletions in the argininosuccinate synthetase genes were present in this patient. Co-cultures of the ASS- and argininosuccinate lyase-deficient (ASL-) fibroblasts were able to incorporate /sup 14/C-citrulline into protein. Co-cultures of ASS- and ASL-cells were used as an assay system for measuring intercellular junctional communication. This allowed quantitation of the effects of pH and extra-cellular divalent cations on junctional communication. Tumor promoters such as phorbol esters and organochlorine pesticides have been reported to inhibit intercellular junctional communication in other systems, and this inhibitory activity may be related to the mechanism of tumor promotion. Retinoic acid and other retinoids also inhibited junctional communication, and the inhibitory effects of retinoic acid and TPA were additive. It is concluded that co-cultures of ASS- and ASL-cells constitute a useful system for providing quantitative measurements of intercellular junctional communication under a wide range of experimental conditions.

  12. The use of cultured cells with defects of citrulline metabolism in diagnosis and in the study of intercellular communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidson, J.S.

    1985-02-01

    Citrullinemia and argininosuccinic aciduria are two disorders resulting from defects in two consecutive enzymes of the urea cycle, argininosuccinate synthetase and argininosuccinate lyase. Fibroblast cell lines were derived from patients with these disorders and the diagnoses, which had been made on the basis of amino acid levels in plasma and urine, were confirmed by demonstrating that the cell lines were unable to incorporate 14 C-citrulline into protein. DNA from the argininosuccinate synthetase-deficient (ASS-) cells was analysed by restriction enzyme digestion and hybridisation to a cDNA probe which had been cloned from human argininosuccinate synthetase mRNA. No defect in the patient's DNA could be demonstrated, indicating that no major deletions in the argininosuccinate synthetase genes were present in this patient. Co-cultures of the ASS- and argininosuccinate lyase-deficient (ASL-) fibroblasts were able to incorporate 14 C-citrulline into protein. Co-cultures of ASS- and ASL-cells were used as an assay system for measuring intercellular junctional communication. This allowed quantitation of the effects of pH and extra-cellular divalent cations on junctional communication. Tumor promoters such as phorbol esters and organochlorine pesticides have been reported to inhibit intercellular junctional communication in other systems, and this inhibitory activity may be related to the mechanism of tumor promotion. Retinoic acid and other retinoids also inhibited junctional communication, and the inhibitory effects of retinoic acid and TPA were additive. It is concluded that co-cultures of ASS- and ASL-cells constitute a useful system for providing quantitative measurements of intercellular junctional communication under a wide range of experimental conditions

  13. Wind power development in the United States: Effects of policies and electricity transmission congestion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitaj, Claudia

    In this dissertation, I analyze the drivers of wind power development in the United States as well as the relationship between renewable power plant location and transmission congestion and emissions levels. I first examine the role of government renewable energy incentives and access to the electricity grid on investment in wind power plants across counties from 1998-2007. The results indicate that the federal production tax credit, state-level sales tax credit and production incentives play an important role in promoting wind power. In addition, higher wind power penetration levels can be achieved by bringing more parts of the electricity transmission grid under independent system operator regulation. I conclude that state and federal government policies play a significant role in wind power development both by providing financial support and by improving physical and procedural access to the electricity grid. Second, I examine the effect of renewable power plant location on electricity transmission congestion levels and system-wide emissions levels in a theoretical model and a simulation study. A new renewable plant takes the effect of congestion on its own output into account, but ignores the effect of its marginal contribution to congestion on output from existing plants, which results in curtailment of renewable power. Though pricing congestion removes the externality and reduces curtailment, I find that in the absence of a price on emissions, pricing congestion may in some cases actually increase system-wide emissions. The final part of my dissertation deals with an econometric issue that emerged from the empirical analysis of the drivers of wind power. I study the effect of the degree of censoring on random-effects Tobit estimates in finite sample with a particular focus on severe censoring, when the percentage of uncensored observations reaches 1 to 5 percent. The results show that the Tobit model performs well even at 5 percent uncensored observations

  14. Intercellular signaling via cyclic GMP diffusion through gap junctions restarts meiosis in mouse ovarian follicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuhaibar, Leia C; Egbert, Jeremy R; Norris, Rachael P; Lampe, Paul D; Nikolaev, Viacheslav O; Thunemann, Martin; Wen, Lai; Feil, Robert; Jaffe, Laurinda A

    2015-04-28

    Meiosis in mammalian oocytes is paused until luteinizing hormone (LH) activates receptors in the mural granulosa cells of the ovarian follicle. Prior work has established the central role of cyclic GMP (cGMP) from the granulosa cells in maintaining meiotic arrest, but it is not clear how binding of LH to receptors that are located up to 10 cell layers away from the oocyte lowers oocyte cGMP and restarts meiosis. Here, by visualizing intercellular trafficking of cGMP in real-time in live follicles from mice expressing a FRET sensor, we show that diffusion of cGMP through gap junctions is responsible not only for maintaining meiotic arrest, but also for rapid transmission of the signal that reinitiates meiosis from the follicle surface to the oocyte. Before LH exposure, the cGMP concentration throughout the follicle is at a uniformly high level of ∼2-4 μM. Then, within 1 min of LH application, cGMP begins to decrease in the peripheral granulosa cells. As a consequence, cGMP from the oocyte diffuses into the sink provided by the large granulosa cell volume, such that by 20 min the cGMP concentration in the follicle is uniformly low, ∼100 nM. The decrease in cGMP in the oocyte relieves the inhibition of the meiotic cell cycle. This direct demonstration that a physiological signal initiated by a stimulus in one region of an intact tissue can travel across many layers of cells via cyclic nucleotide diffusion through gap junctions could provide a general mechanism for diverse cellular processes.

  15. Refractory heartburn: comparison of intercellular space diameter in documented GERD vs. functional heartburn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vela, Marcelo F; Craft, Brandon M; Sharma, Neeraj; Freeman, Janice; Hazen-Martin, Debra

    2011-05-01

    Refractory heartburn despite acid suppression may be explained by ongoing gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) or functional heartburn (FH), i.e., symptoms without evidence of GERD. Impedance-pH monitoring (impedance-pH) detects acid and nonacid reflux and is useful for evaluating acid-suppressed, refractory patients. Intercellular space diameter (ISD) of esophageal epithelium measured by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a marker of epithelial damage present in both erosive and nonerosive reflux disease. ISD has not been used to study refractory heartburn or FH. Our aim was to compare ISD in healthy controls and refractory heartburn patients with GERD and FH. In refractory heartburn patients (heartburn more than twice/week for at least 2 months despite proton pump inhibitor (PPI) b.i.d.), erosive esophagitis and/or abnormal impedance-pH (increased acid exposure or positive symptom index) defined GERD; normal esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD)/impedance-pH defined FH. Asymptomatic, healthy controls had normal EGD and pH-metry. Mean ISD in each subject, determined by blinded TEM of esophageal biopsies, was the average of 100 measurements (10 measurements in each of 10 micrographs). In all, 11 healthy controls, 11 FH, and 15 GERD patients were studied. Mean ISD was significantly higher in GERD compared with controls (0.87 vs. 0.32 μm, P=0.003) and FH (0.87 vs. 0.42 μm, P=0.012). Mean ISD was similar in FH and controls (0.42 vs. 0.32 μm, P=0.1). The proportion of patients with abnormal ISD was significantly higher for GERD compared with FH (60 vs. 9%, P=0.014). ISD is increased in refractory heartburn patients with GERD but not those with FH. Our findings suggest that measurement of ISD by TEM might be a useful tool to distinguish GERD from FH in patients with refractory heartburn.

  16. Modelling the effects of seasonality and socioeconomic impact on the transmission of Rift Valley fever virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yanyu; Beier, John C.; Cantrell, Robert Stephen; Cosner, Chris; DeAngelis, Donald L.; Ruan, Shigui

    2015-01-01

    Rift Valley fever (RVF) is an important mosquito-borne viral zoonosis in Africa and the Middle East that causes human deaths and significant economic losses due to huge incidences of death and abortion among infected livestock. Outbreaks of RVF are sporadic and associated with both seasonal and socioeconomic effects. Here we propose an almost periodic three-patch model to investigate the transmission dynamics of RVF virus (RVFV) among ruminants with spatial movements. Our findings indicate that, in Northeastern Africa, human activities, including those associated with the Eid al Adha feast, along with a combination of climatic factors such as rainfall level and hydrological variations, contribute to the transmission and dispersal of the disease pathogen. Moreover, sporadic outbreaks may occur when the two events occur together: 1) abundant livestock are recruited into areas at risk from RVF due to the demand for the religious festival and 2) abundant numbers of mosquitoes emerge. These two factors have been shown to have impacts on the severity of RVF outbreaks. Our numerical results present the transmission dynamics of the disease pathogen over both short and long periods of time, particularly during the festival time. Further, we investigate the impact on patterns of disease outbreaks in each patch brought by festival- and seasonal-driven factors, such as the number of livestock imported daily, the animal transportation speed from patch to patch, and the death rate induced by ceremonial sacrifices. In addition, our simulations show that when the time for festival preparation starts earlier than usual, the risk of massive disease outbreaks rises, particularly in patch 3 (the place where the religious ceremony will be held).

  17. In situ measurements and transmission electron microscopy of carbon nanotube field-effect transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Taekyung; Kim, Seongwon; Olson, Eric; Zuo Jianmin

    2008-01-01

    We present the design and operation of a transmission electron microscopy (TEM)-compatible carbon nanotube (CNT) field-effect transistor (FET). The device is configured with microfabricated slits, which allows direct observation of CNTs in a FET using TEM and measurement of electrical transport while inside the TEM. As demonstrations of the device architecture, two examples are presented. The first example is an in situ electrical transport measurement of a bundle of carbon nanotubes. The second example is a study of electron beam radiation effect on CNT bundles using a 200 keV electron beam. In situ electrical transport measurement during the beam irradiation shows a signature of wall- or tube-breakdown. Stepwise current drops were observed when a high intensity electron beam was used to cut individual CNT bundles in a device with multiple bundles

  18. A data-driven model for influenza transmission incorporating media effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Lewis; Ross, Joshua V

    2016-10-01

    Numerous studies have attempted to model the effect of mass media on the transmission of diseases such as influenza; however, quantitative data on media engagement has until recently been difficult to obtain. With the recent explosion of 'big data' coming from online social media and the like, large volumes of data on a population's engagement with mass media during an epidemic are becoming available to researchers. In this study, we combine an online dataset comprising millions of shared messages relating to influenza with traditional surveillance data on flu activity to suggest a functional form for the relationship between the two. Using this data, we present a simple deterministic model for influenza dynamics incorporating media effects, and show that such a model helps explain the dynamics of historical influenza outbreaks. Furthermore, through model selection we show that the proposed media function fits historical data better than other media functions proposed in earlier studies.

  19. Boundary-Layer Effects on Acoustic Transmission Through Narrow Slit Cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, G P; Lovelock, R K; Murray, A R J; Hibbins, A P; Sambles, J R; Smith, J D

    2015-07-24

    We explore the slit-width dependence of the resonant transmission of sound in air through both a slit array formed of aluminum slats and a single open-ended slit cavity in an aluminum plate. Our experimental results accord well with Lord Rayleigh's theory concerning how thin viscous and thermal boundary layers at a slit's walls affect the acoustic wave across the whole slit cavity. By measuring accurately the frequencies of the Fabry-Perot-like cavity resonances, we find a significant 5% reduction in the effective speed of sound through the slits when an individual viscous boundary layer occupies only 5% of the total slit width. Importantly, this effect is true for any airborne slit cavity, with the reduction being achieved despite the slit width being on a far larger scale than an individual boundary layer's thickness. This work demonstrates that the recent prevalent loss-free treatment of narrow slit cavities within acoustic metamaterials is unrealistic.

  20. Effects of neutral gas collisions on the power transmission factor at the divertor sheath

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Futch, A.H.; Matthews, G.F.; Buchenauer, D.; Hill, D.N.; Jong, R.A.; Porter, G.D.

    1992-01-01

    We show that charge-exchange and other ion-neutral collision can reduce the power transmission factor of the plasma sheath, thereby lowering the ion impact energy and target plate sputtering. The power transmission factor relates the heat flux reaching the divertor target to the plasma density and temperature just in front of the surface: δ=Q surf /J ew k T e . Experimental data from the DIII-D tokamak suggests that δ could be as low as 2-3 near the region of peak divertor particle flux, instead of the 7-8 expected from usual sheath theory. Several effects combine to allow ion-neutral interactions to be important in the divertor plasma sheath. The shallow angle of incidence of the magnetic field (1-3deg in DIII-D) leads to the spatial extension of the sheath from approximately ρ i ∝1 mm normal to the plate to several centimeters along the field lines. Ionization reduces the sheath potential, and collisions reduce the ion impact energy. (orig.)

  1. The effects of agricultural trade openness on food price transmission in Latin American countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Insa Flachsbarth

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Trade of agricultural commodities has grown significantly in most Latin American countries (LAC over the last two decades. However, after the international food price surges in 2006-08 and 2011-12 concerns about food access of the poor arose. Within a panel framework containing six LAC (Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Mexico and Peru, we used a single equation error correction model to identify possible cointegrating relationships between the food consumer price index (CPI and a set of trade related and domestic variables. The main focus of the study was to examine how different levels of trade openness impact international food price transmission to domestic markets. Our results confirm that deeper market integration increases global price transmission elasticities. In other words, more agricultural trade openness proves to elevate food CPIs during global price spikes. Thus, for poor consumers world price shocks can be deteriorating in the short-run and domestic food prices will slowly converge to a higher long-run equilibrium. Especially in increasingly integrated economies, effective policies to buffer food price shocks should be put in place, but must be carefully planned with the required budget readily available. We also found that exchange rate appreciations can buffer price shocks to a certain extent and that monetary policies seem to be an appropriate means for stabilizing food prices to safeguard food access of the poor population.

  2. Effect of air flow, panel curvature, and internal pressurization on field-incidence transmission loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koval, L. R.

    1976-01-01

    In the context of sound transmission through aircraft fuselage panels, equations for the field-incidence transmission loss (TL) of a single-walled panel are derived that include the effects of external air flow, panel curvature, and internal fuselage pressurization. Flow is shown to provide a modest increase in TL that is uniform with frequency up to the critical frequency. The increase is about 2 dB at Mach number M = 0.5, and about 3.5 dB at M = 1. Above the critical frequency where TL is damping controlled, the increase can be slightly larger at certain frequencies. Curvature is found to stiffen the panel, thereby increasing the TL at low frequencies, but also to introduce a dip at the 'ring frequency' of a full cylinder having the same radius as the panel. Pressurization appears to produce a slight decrease in TL throughout the frequency range, and also slightly shifts the dips at the critical frequency and at the ring frequency.

  3. Study of the effect of finite extent on sound transmission loss of single panel using a waveguide model

    OpenAIRE

    Prasetiyo , Iwan; Thompson , David

    2012-01-01

    International audience; The sound transmission loss (STL) of a panel is often estimated using an infinite plate model. However, some discrepancies are found between these predicted results and experimental ones. One of the sources of such discrepancies corresponds to the finite extent that is naturally found in real structures. In the present study an analytical waveguide model of sound transmission is used to study the effect of finite dimensions in one direction for a panel which is long in...

  4. Open Access Transmission Tariff: Effective December 18, 1998 (Revised June 16, 1999).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1999-06-16

    Bonneville will provide Network Integration Transmission Service pursuant to the terms and conditions contained in this Tariff and Service Agreement. The service that Bonneville will provide under this Tariff allows a Transmission Customer to integrate, economically dispatch and regulate its current and planned Network Resources to serve its Network Load. Network Integration Transmission Service also may be used by the Transmission Customer to deliver nonfirm energy purchases to its Network Load without additional charge. To the extent that the transmission path for moving power from a Network Resource to a Network Load includes the Eastern and Southern Interties, the terms and conditions for service over such intertie facilities are provided under Part 2 of this Tariff. Also, transmission service for third-party sales which are not designated as Network Load will be provided under Bonneville's Point-to-Point Transmission Service (Part 2 of this Tariff).

  5. Mammalian Tissue Response to Low Dose Ionizing Radiation: The Role of Oxidative Metabolism and Intercellular Communication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azzam, Edouard I

    2013-01-16

    The objective of the project was to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the biological effects of low dose/low dose rate ionizing radiation in organs/tissues of irradiated mice that differ in their susceptibility to ionizing radiation, and in human cells grown under conditions that mimic the natural in vivo environment. The focus was on the effects of sparsely ionizing cesium-137 gamma rays and the role of oxidative metabolism and intercellular communication in these effects. Four Specific Aims were proposed. The integrated outcome of the experiments performed to investigate these aims has been significant towards developing a scientific basis to more accurately estimate human health risks from exposures to low doses ionizing radiation. By understanding the biochemical and molecular changes induced by low dose radiation, several novel markers associated with mitochondrial functions were identified, which has opened new avenues to investigate metabolic processes that may be affected by such exposure. In particular, a sensitive biomarker that is differentially modulated by low and high dose gamma rays was discovered.

  6. Transient suppression of gap junctional intercellular communication after exposure to 100-nanosecond pulsed electric fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steuer, Anna; Schmidt, Anke; Labohá, Petra; Babica, Pavel; Kolb, Juergen F

    2016-12-01

    Gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) is an important mechanism that is involved and affected in many diseases and injuries. So far, the effect of nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs) on the communication between cells was not investigated. An in vitro approach is presented with rat liver epithelial WB-F344 cells grown and exposed in a monolayer. In order to observe sub-lethal effects, cells were exposed to pulsed electric fields with a duration of 100ns and amplitudes between 10 and 20kV/cm. GJIC strongly decreased within 15min after treatment but recovered within 24h. Gene expression of Cx43 was significantly decreased and associated with a reduced total amount of Cx43 protein. In addition, MAP kinases p38 and Erk1/2, involved in Cx43 phosphorylation, were activated and Cx43 became hyperphosphorylated. Immunofluorescent staining of Cx43 displayed the disassembly of gap junctions. Further, a reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton was observed whereas tight junction protein ZO-1 was not significantly affected. All effects were field- and time-dependent and most pronounced within 30 to 60min after treatment. A better understanding of a possible manipulation of GJIC by nsPEFs might eventually offer a possibility to develop and improve treatments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. TDP-43 or FUS-induced misfolded human wild-type SOD1 can propagate intercellularly in a prion-like fashion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokrishevsky, Edward; Grad, Leslie I; Cashman, Neil R

    2016-03-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), which appears to spread through the neuroaxis in a spatiotemporally restricted manner, is linked to heritable mutations in genes encoding SOD1, TDP-43, FUS, C9ORF72, or can occur sporadically without recognized genetic mutations. Misfolded human wild-type (HuWt) SOD1 has been detected in both familial and sporadic ALS patients, despite mutations in SOD1 accounting for only 2% of total cases. We previously showed that accumulation of pathological TDP-43 or FUS coexist with misfolded HuWtSOD1 in patient motor neurons, and can trigger its misfolding in cultured cells. Here, we used immunocytochemistry and immunoprecipitation to demonstrate that TDP-43 or FUS-induced misfolded HuWtSOD1 can propagate from cell-to-cell via conditioned media, and seed cytotoxic misfolding of endogenous HuWtSOD1 in the recipient cells in a prion-like fashion. Knockdown of SOD1 using siRNA in recipient cells, or incubation of conditioned media with misfolded SOD1-specific antibodies, inhibits intercellular transmission, indicating that HuWtSOD1 is an obligate seed and substrate of propagated misfolding. In this system, intercellular spread of SOD1 misfolding is not accompanied by transmission of TDP-43 or FUS pathology. Our findings argue that pathological TDP-43 and FUS may exert motor neuron pathology in ALS through the initiation of propagated misfolding of SOD1.

  8. Current transmission and nonlinear effects in un-gated thermionic cathode RF guns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edelen, J. P. [Fermilab; Harris, J. R. [Air Force Weapons Lab

    2017-05-03

    Un-gated thermionic cathode RF guns are well known as a robust source of electrons for many accelerator applications. These sources are in principle scalable to high currents without degradation of the transverse emittance due to control grids but they are also known for being limited by back-bombardment. While back-bombardment presents a significant limitation, there is still a lack of general understanding on how emission over the whole RF period will affect the nature of the beams produced from these guns. In order to improve our understanding of how these guns can be used in general we develop analytical models that predict the transmission efficiency as a function of the design parameters, study how bunch compression and emission enhancement caused by Schottky barrier lowering affect the output current profile in the gun, and study the onset of space-charge limited effects and the resultant virtual cathode formation leading to a modulation in the output current distribution.

  9. The effect of vector control strategy against Dengue transmission between mosquitoes and humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-Xia Yang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available With the consideration of mechanism of prevention and control for the spread of dengue fever, a mathematical model of dengue fever dynamical transmission between mosquitoes and humans, incorporating a vector control strategy of impulsive culling of mosquitoes, is proposed in this paper. By using the comparison principle, Floquet theorem and some of analytical methods, we obtain the basic reproductive number $\\mathcal{R}_0$ for this infectious disease, which illustrates the stability of the disease-free periodic solution and the uniform persistence of the disease. Further, the explicit conditions determining the backward or forward bifurcation are obtained and the culling rate $\\phi$ is a major effect on the occurrence of backward bifurcation. Finally, numerical simulations are given to verify the correctness of theoretical results and the most efficiency of vector control strategy.

  10. Effect of feeders in 3D modeling of low impedance multilayer CPW transmission line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaini, R. I.; Kyabaggu, P. B. K.; Sinulingga, E. P.

    2018-02-01

    Improved characteristics with low dissipation loss MMICs are highly desirable for wireless communications. However, the current industrial MMIC design is mainly based on microstrip concept which suffered from parasitic and unwanted phenomenon especially at higher frequency (>20 GHz). On the other hand, for future wireless technology, higher frequency operation is required and on-wafer microwave characterizations as well as precise modeling of 3D Multilayer CPW components are vital. This project concerns with understanding of the microwave characteristics behavior of Multilayer CPW components in MMIC applications. Feeder effect as unwanted parts in the characteristics has been investigated to determine its relation with the half wavelength resonance of the Multilayer CPW Low Impedance Transmission Line.

  11. Transmission electron microscopy of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) molybdenum: effects of irradiation on material microstructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baranwal, R.; Burke, M.G.

    2003-01-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) molybdenum has been characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to determine the effects of irradiation on material microstructure. This work describes the results-to-date from TEM characterization of unirradiated and irradiated ODS molybdenum. The general microstructure of the unirradiated material consists of fine molybdenum grains (< 5 (micro)m average grain size) with numerous low angle boundaries and isolated dislocation networks. 'Ribbon'-like lanthanum oxides are aligned along the working direction of the product form and are frequently associated with grain boundaries, serving to inhibit grain boundary and dislocation movement. In addition to the 'ribbons', discrete lanthanum oxide particles have also been detected. After irradiation, the material is characterized by the presence of nonuniformly distributed large (∼ 20 to 100 nm in diameter), multi-faceted voids, while the molybdenum grain size and oxide morphology appear to be unaffected by irradiation

  12. Comparing Effects of TCR and TSC on MHO Distance Protection Setting in 400 kV Algerian Transmission Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed ZELLAGUI

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study on the performances of distance relays setting in 400 kV in Eastern Algerian transmission networks at Sonelgaz Group (Algerian company of Electrical and Gas compensated by shunt Flexible AC Transmission System (FACTS. The facts are used for controlling transmission voltage, power flow, reactive power, and damping of power system oscillations in high power transfer levels. The effects of SVC devices i.e. Thyristor Controlled Reactor (TCR and the Thyristor Switched Capacitors (TSC insertion, on the total impedance of a transmission line protected by MHO distance relay are investigated. The modified setting zones protections for three forward zones (Z1, Z2 and Z3 have been calculated in order to improve the performances of distance relay protection and prevent circuit breaker nuisance tripping.

  13. Effect of low frequency transcutaneous magnetic stimulation on sensory and motor transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Albert; Shukla, Shivshil; Lee, Jacquelyn; Metzger-Smith, Valerie; He, Yifan; Chen, Jeffrey; Golshan, Shahrokh

    2015-09-01

    Peripheral nerve injury diminishes fast conducting large myelinated afferent fibers transmission but enhances smaller pain transmitting fibers firing. This aberrant afferent neuronal behavior contributes to development of chronic post-traumatic peripheral neuropathic pain (PTP-NP). Non-invasive dynamic magnetic flux stimulation has been implicated in treating PTP-NP, a condition currently not adequately addressed by other therapies including transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS). The current study assessed the effect of low frequency transcutaneous magnetic stimulation (LFTMS) on peripheral sensory thresholds, nerve conduction properties, and TENS induced fast afferent slowing effect as measured by motor and sensory conduction studies in the ulnar nerve. Results indicated sham LFTMS with TENS (Sham + TENS) significantly (P = 0.02 and 0.007, respectively) reduces sensory conduction velocity (CV) and increases sensory onset latency (OL), and motor peak latency (PL) whereas, real LFTMS with TENS (Real + TENS) reverses effects of TENS on sensory CV and OL, and significantly (P = 0.036) increases the sensory PL. LFTMS alone significantly (P sensory PL and onset-to-peak latency. LFTMS appears to reverse TENS slowing effect on fast conducting fibers and casts a selective peripheral modulatory effect on slow conducting pain afferent fibers. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Chlorpromazine reduces the intercellular communication via gap junctions in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orellana, Juan A.; Palacios-Prado, Nicolas; Saez, Juan C.

    2006-01-01

    In the work presented herein, we evaluated the effect of chlorpromazine (CPZ) on gap junctions expressed by two mammalian cell types; Gn-11 cells (cell line derived from mouse LHRH neurons) and rat cortical astrocytes maintained in culture. We also attempted to elucidate possible mechanisms of action of CPZ effects on gap junctions. CPZ, in concentrations comparable with doses used to treat human diseases, was found to reduce the intercellular communication via gap junctions as evaluated with measurements of dye coupling (Lucifer yellow). In both cell types, maximal inhibition of functional gap junctions was reached within about 1 h of treatment with CPZ, an recovery was almost complete at about 5 h after CPZ wash out. In both cell types, CPZ treatment increased the phosphorylation state of connexin43 (Cx43), a gap junction protein subunit. Moreover, CPZ reduced the reactivity of Cx43 (immunofluorescence) at cell interfaces and concomitantly increased its reactivity in intracellular vesicles, suggesting an increased retrieval from and/or reduced insertion into the plasma membrane. CPZ also caused cellular retraction reducing cell-cell contacts in a reversible manner. The reduction in contact area might destabilize existing gap junctions and abrogate formation of new ones. Moreover, the CPZ-induced reduction in gap junctional communication may depend on the connexins (Cxs) forming the junctions. If Cx43 were the only connexin expressed, MAPK-dependent phosphorylation of this connexin would induce closure of gap junction channels

  15. cGAS-Mediated Innate Immunity Spreads Intercellularly through HIV-1 Env-Induced Membrane Fusion Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shuting; Ducroux, Aurélie; Ponnurangam, Aparna; Vieyres, Gabrielle; Franz, Sergej; Müsken, Mathias; Zillinger, Thomas; Malassa, Angelina; Ewald, Ellen; Hornung, Veit; Barchet, Winfried; Häussler, Susanne; Pietschmann, Thomas; Goffinet, Christine

    2016-10-12

    Upon sensing cytoplasmic retroviral DNA in infected cells, cyclic GMP-AMP (cGAMP) synthase (cGAS) produces the cyclic dinucleotide cGAMP, which activates STING to trigger a type I interferon (IFN) response. We find that membrane fusion-inducing contact between donor cells expressing the HIV envelope (Env) and primary macrophages endogenously expressing the HIV receptor CD4 and coreceptor enable intercellular transfer of cGAMP. This cGAMP exchange results in STING-dependent antiviral IFN responses in target macrophages and protection from HIV infection. Furthermore, under conditions allowing cell-to-cell transmission of HIV-1, infected primary T cells, but not cell-free virions, deliver cGAMP to autologous macrophages through HIV-1 Env and CD4/coreceptor-mediated membrane fusion sites and induce a STING-dependent, but cGAS-independent, IFN response in target cells. Collectively, these findings identify an infection-specific mode of horizontal transfer of cGAMP between primary immune cells that may boost antiviral responses, particularly in infected tissues in which cell-to-cell transmission of virions exceeds cell-free infection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Effects of cavity resonances on sound transmission into a thin cylindrical shell. [noise reduction in aircraft fuselage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koval, L. R.

    1978-01-01

    In the context of the transmission of airborne noise into an aircraft fuselage, a mathematical model is presented for the effects of internal cavity resonances on sound transmission into a thin cylindrical shell. The 'noise reduction' of the cylinder is defined and computed, with and without including the effects of internal cavity resonances. As would be expected, the noise reduction in the absence of cavity resonances follows the same qualitative pattern as does transmission loss. Numerical results show that cavity resonances lead to wide fluctuations and a general decrease of noise reduction, especially at cavity resonances. Modest internal absorption is shown to greatly reduce the effect of cavity resonances. The effects of external airflow, internal cabin pressurization, and different acoustical properties inside and outside the cylinder are also included and briefly examined.

  17. Simulating the Effects of Cross-Generational Cultural Transmission on Language Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Tao; Shuai, Lan

    Language evolves in a socio-cultural environment. Apart from biological evolution and individual learning, cultural transmission also casts important influence on many aspects of language evolution. In this paper, based on the lexicon-syntax coevolution model, we extend the acquisition framework in our previous work to examine the roles of three forms of cultural transmission spanning the offspring, parent, and grandparent generations in language change. These transmissions are: those between the parent and offspring generations (PO), those within the offspring generation (OO), and those between the grandparent and offspring generations (GO). The simulation results of the considered model and relevant analyses illustrate not only the necessity of PO and OO transmissions for language change, thus echoing our previous findings, but also the importance of GO transmission, a form of cross-generational cultural transmission, on preserving the mutual understandability of the communal language across generations of individuals.

  18. Inhibition of luminescence and virulence in the black tiger prawn (Penaeus monodon) pathogen Vibrio harveyi by intercellular signal antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manefield, M; Harris, L; Rice, S A; de Nys, R; Kjelleberg, S

    2000-05-01

    Expression of luminescence in the Penaeus monodon pathogen Vibrio harveyi is regulated by an intercellular quorum sensing mechanism involving the synthesis and detection of two signaling molecules, one of which is N-hydroxy butanoyl-L-homoserine lactone and the other of which is uncharacterized. Indirect evidence has suggested that virulence, associated with a toxic extracellular protein, and luminescence in V. harveyi are coregulated. In this study the effects of an acylated homoserine lactone antagonist produced by the marine alga Delisea pulchra on luminescence and toxin production in a virulent strain of V. harveyi were analyzed. Luminescence and toxin production were both inhibited by the signal antagonist at concentrations that had no impact on growth. Toxin production was found to be prematurely induced in V. harveyi cultures incubated in a 10% conditioned medium. Additionally, a significant reduction in the toxicity of concentrated supernatant extracts from V. harveyi cultures incubated in the presence of the signal antagonist, as measured by in vivo toxicity assays in mice and prawns, was observed. These results suggest that intercellular signaling antagonists have potential utility in the control of V. harveyi prawn infections.

  19. Inhibition of Luminescence and Virulence in the Black Tiger Prawn (Penaeus monodon) Pathogen Vibrio harveyi by Intercellular Signal Antagonists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manefield, Michael; Harris, Lachlan; Rice, Scott A.; de Nys, Rocky; Kjelleberg, Staffan

    2000-01-01

    Expression of luminescence in the Penaeus monodon pathogen Vibrio harveyi is regulated by an intercellular quorum sensing mechanism involving the synthesis and detection of two signaling molecules, one of which is N-hydroxy butanoyl-l-homoserine lactone and the other of which is uncharacterized. Indirect evidence has suggested that virulence, associated with a toxic extracellular protein, and luminescence in V. harveyi are coregulated. In this study the effects of an acylated homoserine lactone antagonist produced by the marine alga Delisea pulchra on luminescence and toxin production in a virulent strain of V. harveyi were analyzed. Luminescence and toxin production were both inhibited by the signal antagonist at concentrations that had no impact on growth. Toxin production was found to be prematurely induced in V. harveyi cultures incubated in a 10% conditioned medium. Additionally, a significant reduction in the toxicity of concentrated supernatant extracts from V. harveyi cultures incubated in the presence of the signal antagonist, as measured by in vivo toxicity assays in mice and prawns, was observed. These results suggest that intercellular signaling antagonists have potential utility in the control of V. harveyi prawn infections. PMID:10788385

  20. Cavitation of intercellular spaces is critical to establishment of hydraulic properties of compression wood of Chamaecyparis obtusa seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakaba, Satoshi; Hirai, Asami; Kudo, Kayo; Yamagishi, Yusuke; Yamane, Kenichi; Kuroda, Katsushi; Nugroho, Widyanto Dwi; Kitin, Peter; Funada, Ryo

    2016-03-01

    When the orientation of the stems of conifers departs from the vertical as a result of environmental influences, conifers form compression wood that results in restoration of verticality. It is well known that intercellular spaces are formed between tracheids in compression wood, but the function of these spaces remains to be clarified. In the present study, we evaluated the impact of these spaces in artificially induced compression wood in Chamaecyparis obtusa seedlings. We monitored the presence or absence of liquid in the intercellular spaces of differentiating xylem by cryo-scanning electron microscopy. In addition, we analysed the relationship between intercellular spaces and the hydraulic properties of the compression wood. Initially, we detected small intercellular spaces with liquid in regions in which the profiles of tracheids were not rounded in transverse surfaces, indicating that the intercellular spaces had originally contained no gases. In the regions where tracheids had formed secondary walls, we found that some intercellular spaces had lost their liquid. Cavitation of intercellular spaces would affect hydraulic conductivity as a consequence of the induction of cavitation in neighbouring tracheids. Our observations suggest that cavitation of intercellular spaces is the critical event that affects not only the functions of intercellular spaces but also the hydraulic properties of compression wood. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. The effect of octopaminergic compounds on the behaviour and transmission of Gyrodactylus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bron James E

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The high transmission potential of species belonging to the monogenean parasite genus Gyrodactylus, coupled with their high fecundity, allows them to rapidly colonise new hosts and to increase in number. One gyrodactylid, Gyrodactylus salaris Malmberg, 1957, has been responsible for devastation of Altantic salmon (Salmo salar L. populations in a number of Norwegian rivers. Current methods of eradicating G. salaris from river systems centre around the use of non-specific biocides, such as rotenone and aluminium sulphate. Although transmission routes in gyrodactylids have been studied extensively, the behaviour of individual parasites has received little attention. Specimens of Gyrodactylus gasterostei Gläser, 1974 and G. arcuatus Bychowsky, 1933, were collected from the skin of their host, the three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus L., and permitted to attach to the substrate. The movements of individual parasites were recorded and analysed. Results The behaviour patterns of the two species were similar and parasites were more active in red light and darkness than in white light. Four octopaminergic compounds were tested and all four inhibited the movements of parasites. Treatment ultimately led to death at low concentrations (0.2 μM, although prolonged exposure was necessary in some instances. Conclusions Octopaminergic compounds may affect the parasite's ability to locate and remain on its host and these or related compounds might provide alternative or supplementary treatments for the control of G. salaris infections. With more research there is potential for use of octopaminergic compounds, which have minimal effects on the host or its environment, as parasite-specific treatments against G. salaris infections.

  2. Effects of heavy metals on the neuromuscular transmission of the mouse diaphragm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, W M; Shiau, S Y.L.

    1978-04-01

    Effects of heavy metals including Mn, Co, Ni, Cd, Zn, Cu, Sr, Ba, and UO/sub 2//sup +/ ions on the neuromuscular transmission of the mouse diaphragm were studied and compared. From the dose-inhibition curves, the concentrations (mM) required to inhibit 50% of the contraction (ID/sub 50/) for Cd, Mn, Co, Ni, Zn and Sr are 0.03, 0.8, 0.75, 0.82, 1.2 and >20 respectively. In addition to the potent neuromuscular blocking action, both Cd and Zn induce a contracture of the mouse diaphram. Among the cations tested, Cu is the most potent in inducing the contracture. Mn does not cause a contracture, while Co and Ni induce a contracture only after a prolonged incubation for 3 hours. The neuromuscular blocking action of most of the cations tested can be completely or partially reversed by either high Ca or cysteine except the irreversible action of Zn and Cu. These findings suggest that most divalent cations block the neuromuscular transmission by binding to the -SH group of the cell membrane and inhibiting Ca influx. On the other hand, both Ba and UO/sub 2/ at low concentration increase but at high concentration inhibit the twitch response. Sine Ba increases the twitch response of the mouse diaphragm stimulated directly in the presence of d-tubocurarine as well as that stimulated indirectly, Ba/sup + +/ acts mainly directly on the muscle. In contrast, UO/sub 2//sup +/ ions at low concentration increases the twitch response possibly by releasing acetylcholine from the nerve endings.

  3. Effects of crystalline structure in the transmission of ions through thin foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Archubi, Claudio

    2005-01-01

    Two fundamental aspects of ion transmission through thin foils are analyzed in this thesis.1) Energy loss.2) Angular distribution.The subject is studied in three different approaches: Theoretically, experimentally and by numerical simulations.In the theoretical approach, the models for the calculation of the energy loss and angular distribution are discussed.They are showed to be unsatisfactory to explain the effects of crystalline structure at low energies.A model is developed to estimate the angular dispersion due to the elastic scattering between the projectile and the target electrons. Simultaneously, angular distribution and energy loss measurements have been performed bombarding polycrystalline and monocrystalline gold and polycrystalline aluminum targets with protons and helium ions with energies in the range of 4-10 keV, together with a detailed study of the foils by electron transmission microscopy techniques.The experimental results are compared with the results of a numerical simulation code, modified and extended in the scope of this thesis.The results show an important influence of crystalline structure and the different targets defects in the angular distribution.This influence is much lower in the case of the angular behaviour of the energy loss (being almost negligible in the case of protons).The most relevant characteristic of the angular behaviour of the energy loss in the case of helium ions is that it is necessary to assume in the simulation method an impact parameter dependence of the stopping coefficient to obtain an agreement between simulation and experimental results [es

  4. The effect of electric transmission constraints on how power generation companies bid in the Colombian electrical power market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Eduardo Gallego Vega

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of research about the effect of transmission constraints on both expected electrical energy to be dispatched and power generation companies’ bidding strategies in the Colombian electrical power market. The proposed model simulates the national transmission grid and economic dispatch by means of optimal power flows. The proposed methodology allows structural problems in the power market to be analyzed due to the exclusive effect of trans- mission constraints and the mixed effect of bidding strategies and transmission networks. A new set of variables is proposed for quantifying the impact of each generation company on system operating costs and the change in expected dispatched energy. A correlation analysis of these new variables is presented, revealing some interesting linearities in some generation companies’ bidding patterns.

  5. Effects of Electron Flow Current Density on Flow Impedance of Magnetically Insulated Transmission Lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Yong; Zou Wen-Kang; Song Sheng-Yi

    2011-01-01

    In modern pulsed power systems, magnetically insulated transmission lines (MITLs) are used to couple power between the driver and the load. The circuit parameters of MITLs are well understood by employing the concept of flow impedance derived from Maxwell's equations and pressure balance across the flow. However, the electron density in an MITL is always taken as constant in the application of flow impedance. Thus effects of electron flow current density (product of electron density and drift velocity) in an MITL are neglected. We calculate the flow impedances of an MITL and compare them under three classical MITL theories, in which the electron density profile and electron flow current density are different from each other. It is found that the assumption of constant electron density profile in the calculation of the flow impedance is not always valid. The electron density profile and the electron flow current density have significant effects on flow impedance of the MITL. The details of the electron flow current density and its effects on the operation impedance of the MITL should be addressed more explicitly by experiments and theories in the future. (nuclear physics)

  6. Self-consistent nonlinear transmission line model of standing wave effects in a capacitive discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chabert, P.; Raimbault, J.L.; Rax, J.M.; Lieberman, M.A.

    2004-01-01

    It has been shown previously [Lieberman et al., Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 11, 283 (2002)], using a non-self-consistent model based on solutions of Maxwell's equations, that several electromagnetic effects may compromise capacitive discharge uniformity. Among these, the standing wave effect dominates at low and moderate electron densities when the driving frequency is significantly greater than the usual 13.56 MHz. In the present work, two different global discharge models have been coupled to a transmission line model and used to obtain the self-consistent characteristics of the standing wave effect. An analytical solution for the wavelength λ was derived for the lossless case and compared to the numerical results. For typical plasma etching conditions (pressure 10-100 mTorr), a good approximation of the wavelength is λ/λ 0 ≅40 V 0 1/10 l -1/2 f -2/5 , where λ 0 is the wavelength in vacuum, V 0 is the rf voltage magnitude in volts at the discharge center, l is the electrode spacing in meters, and f the driving frequency in hertz

  7. The Effects of Cultural Transmission Are Modulated by the Amount of Information Transmitted

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Thomas L.; Lewandowsky, Stephan; Kalish, Michael L.

    2013-01-01

    Information changes as it is passed from person to person, with this process of cultural transmission allowing the minds of individuals to shape the information that they transmit. We present mathematical models of cultural transmission which predict that the amount of information passed from person to person should affect the rate at which that…

  8. Intergenerational Transmission Effects on Relationship Satisfaction: A Cross-Cultural Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Keitaro; Busby, Dean M.

    2012-01-01

    Although intergenerational transmission processes have been studied on various aspects of family life, cross-cultural comparisons have rarely been made. In the present study, the authors examine how intergenerational transmission processes on relationship satisfaction differ between individuals with different gender and cultural identities. A…

  9. Effects of lattice fluctuations on electronic transmission in metal/conjugated-oligomer/metal structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Z.G.; Smith, D.L.; Saxena, A.; Bishop, A.R.

    1997-01-01

    The electronic transmission across metal/conjugated-oligomer/metal structures in the presence of lattice fluctuations is studied for short oligomer chains. The lattice fluctuations are approximated by static white noise disorder. Resonant transmission occurs when the energy of an incoming electron coincides with a discrete electronic level of the oligomer. The corresponding transmission peak diminishes in intensity with increasing disorder strength. Because of disorder there is an enhancement of the electronic transmission for energies that lie within the electronic gap of the oligomer. If fluctuations are sufficiently strong, a transmission peak within the gap is found at the midgap energy E=0 for degenerate conjugated oligomers (e.g., trans-polyacetylene) and E≠0 for AB-type degenerate oligomers. These results can be interpreted in terms of soliton-antisoliton states created by lattice fluctuations. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  10. Coronary Heart Disease Alters Intercellular Communication by Modifying Microparticle-Mediated MicroRNA Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, Nnenna A.; Eapen, Danny; Manocha, Pankaj; Kassem, Hatem Al; Lassegue, Bernard; Ghasemzadeh, Nima; Quyyumi, Arshed; Searles, Charles D.

    2013-01-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is characterized by abnormal intercellular communication and circulating microRNAs (miRNAs) are likely involved in this process. Here, we show that CHD was associated with changes in the transport of circulating miRNA, particularly decreased miRNA enrichment in microparticles (MPs). Additionally, MPs from CHD patients were less efficient at transferring miRNA to cultured HUVECs, which correlated with their diminished capacity to bind developmental endothelial locus-1 (Del-1). In summary, CHD was associated with distinct changes in circulating miRNA transport and these changes may contribute to the abnormal intercellular communication that underlies CHD initiation and progression. PMID:24042051

  11. In vivo relevance of intercellular calcium signaling in Drosophila wing development

    OpenAIRE

    Brodskiy, Pavel; Brito-Robinson, Teresa; Levis, Megan; Narciso, Cody; Jangula, Jamison; Huizar, Francisco; Wu, Qinfeng; Zartman, Jeremiah

    2017-01-01

    Recently, organ-scale intercellular Ca2+ transients (ICTs) were reported in the Drosophila wing disc. However, the functional in vivo significance of ICTs remains largely unknown. Here we demonstrate the in vivo relevance of intercellular Ca2+ signaling and its impact on wing development. We report that Ca2+ signaling in vivo decreases as wing discs mature. Ca2+ signaling ex vivo responds to fly extract in a dose-dependent manner. This suggests ICTs occur in vivo due to chemical stimulus that...

  12. Estrogenic compounds inhibit gap junctional intercellular communication in mouse Leydig TM3 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwase, Yumiko; Fukata, Hideki; Mori, Chisato

    2006-01-01

    Some estrogenic compounds are reported to cause testicular disorders in humans and/or experimental animals by direct action on Leydig cells. In carcinogenesis and normal development, gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) plays an essential role in maintaining homeostasis. In this study, we examine the effects of diethylstilbestrol (DES, a synthetic estrogen), 17β-estradiol (E 2 , a natural estrogen), and genistein (GEN, a phytoestrogen) on GJIC between mouse Leydig TM3 cells using Lucifer yellow microinjection. The three compounds tested produced GJIC inhibition in the TM3 cells after 24 h. Gradually, 10 μM DES began to inhibit GJIC for 24 h and this effect was observed until 72 h. On the other hand, both 20 μM E 2 and 25 μM GEN rapidly inhibited GJIC in 6 h and 2 h, respectively. The effects continued until 24 h, but weakened by 72 h. Furthermore, a combined effect at μM level between DES and E 2 on GJIC inhibition was observed, but not between GEN and E 2 . DES and E 2 showed GJIC inhibition at low dose levels (nearly physiological estrogen levels) after 72 h, but GEN did not. DES-induced GJIC inhibition at 10 pM and 10 μM was completely counteracted by ICI 182,780 (ICl), an estrogen receptor antagonist. On the other hand, the inhibitory effects on GJIC with E 2 (10 pM and 20 μM) and GEN (25 μM) were partially blocked by ICI or calphostin C, a protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor, and were completely blocked by the combination of ICI and calphostin C. These results demonstrate that DES inhibits GJIC between Leydig cells via the estrogen receptor (ER), and that E 2 and GEN inhibit GJIC via ER and PKC. These estrogenic compounds may have different individual nongenotoxic mechanism including PKC pathway on testicular carcinogenesis or development

  13. Influence of testosterone on synaptic transmission in the rat medial vestibular nuclei: estrogenic and androgenic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, S; Frondaroli, A; Di Mauro, M; Pettorossi, V E

    2010-12-15

    In brainstem slices of young male rat, we investigated the influence of the neuroactive steroid testosterone (T) on the synaptic responses by analyzing the field potential evoked in the medial vestibular nucleus (MVN) by vestibular afferent stimulation. T induced three distinct and independent long-term synaptic changes: fast long-lasting potentiation (fLP), slow long-lasting potentiation (sLP) and long-lasting depression (LD). The fLP was mediated by 17β-estradiol (E(2)) since it was abolished by blocking the estrogen receptors (ERs) or the enzyme converting T to E(2). Conversely, sLP and LD were mediated by 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT) since they were prevented by blocking the androgen receptors (ARs) or the enzyme converting T to DHT. Therefore, the synaptic effects of T were mediated by its androgenic or estrogenic metabolites. The pathways leading to estrogenic and androgenic conversion of T might be co-localized since, the occurrence of fLP under block of androgenic pathway, and that of sLP and LD under estrogenic block, were higher than those observed without blocks. In case of co-localization, the effect on synaptic transmission should depend on the prevailing enzymatic activity. We conclude that circulating and neuronal T can remarkably influence synaptic responses of the vestibular neurons in different and opposite ways, depending on its conversion to estrogenic or androgenic metabolites. Copyright © 2010 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The effects of demographic change on disease transmission and vaccine impact in a household structured population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geard, Nicholas; Glass, Kathryn; McCaw, James M; McBryde, Emma S; Korb, Kevin B; Keeling, Matt J; McVernon, Jodie

    2015-12-01

    The demographic structure of populations in both more developed and less developed countries is changing: increases in life expectancy and declining fertility have led to older populations and smaller households. The implications of these demographic changes for the spread and control of infectious diseases are not fully understood. Here we use an individual based model with realistic and dynamic age and household structure to demonstrate the marked effect that demographic change has on disease transmission at the population and household level. The decline in fertility is associated with a decrease in disease incidence and an increase in the age of first infection, even in the absence of vaccination or other control measures. Although large households become rarer as fertility decreases, we show that there is a proportionate increase in incidence of disease in these households as the accumulation of susceptible clusters increases the potential for explosive outbreaks. By modelling vaccination, we provide a direct comparison of the relative importance of demographic change and vaccination on incidence of disease. We highlight the increased risks associated with unvaccinated households in a low fertility setting if vaccine behaviour is correlated with household membership. We suggest that models that do not account for future demographic change, and especially its effect on household structure, may potentially overestimate the impact of vaccination. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Elimination of particle effects in SF/sub 6/ insulated transmission systems. First quarterly report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dale, S.J.

    1979-01-01

    The purpose of this program is to develop methods and equipment to eliminate the adverse effect of particle contamination in SF/sub 6/-insulated transmission (CGIT) systems, so that the excellent dielectric properties of SF/sub 6/ can be fully exploited. Presently, CGIT systems are operated at about 10% of the dielectric strength capability of the SF/sub 6/ gas. The program includes theoretical and experimental evaluation of concepts, optimization and verification studies in CGIT systems, and reliability analysis, documentation of designs and economic analysis. Progress is now being made on evaluating alternative conductor and sheath designs to minimize the effect of particles. Materials for solid insulation is being investigated for the same purpose; the effort is presently concentrated on obtaining reliable quantitative measurement techniques of electrostatic properties. Computer calculation of particle trap configurations are being made to determine the optimum trap configurations. A novel particle trapping technique is being using adhesive materials. Manufacture and field control technique studies has commenced with a study of mechanical vibration techniques. An experimental test chamber consisting of a 9 m (30 foot) long 145 kV bus has been designed. This system will be used in testing of particle control concepts and in migration and optimization studies.

  16. Vector incrimination and effects of antimalarial drugs on malaria transmission and control in the Amazon Basin of Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. Klein

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available World ecosystems differ significantly and a multidisciplinary malaria control approach must be adjusted to meet these requirements. These include a comprehensive understanding of the malaria vectors, their behavior, seasonal distribution and abundance, susceptibility to insecticides (physiological and behavioral, methods to reduce the numbers of human gametocyte carriers through effective health care systems and antimalarial drug treatment, urban malaria transmission versus rural or forest malaria transmission, and the impact of vaccine development. Many malaria vectors are members of species complexes and individual relationship to malaria transmission, seasonal distribution, bitting behavior, etc. is poorly understood. Additionaly, malaria patients are not examined for circulating gametocytes and both falciparum and vivax malaria patients may be highly infective to mosquitoes after treatment with currently used antimalarial drugs. Studies on the physiological and behavioral effects of DDT and other insecticides are inconclusive and need to be evalusted.

  17. Effects of gamma irradiation on the sperm transmission and oviposition response in Helicoverpa armigera (L. Noctuidae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xiaohui; Wang Huasong; Song Jiaxiang

    1999-12-01

    The transmission of sperm by unirradiated and irradiated cotton bollworm, Helicoverpa armigera, was studied by live dissection of the female immediately after the initiation of mating. In cotton bollworm the sperm transfer was a rather complex process. In fact, the unirradiated male failed to transfer sperm in about 19% of their matings. After being irradiated with 250 Gy and 400 Gy, the aberrations of sperm transmission were about 21% and 50% respectively. The failure of spermatophore 'cap' location was an important reason of sperm transmission aberrations. When female mated to high-dose-irradiated males, its oviposition response appeared abnormal

  18. Effect of the Primary User Traffic on Cognitive Relaying with Adaptive Transmission

    KAUST Repository

    Rao, Anlei

    2012-09-08

    In a cognitive-relay system, the secondary user is permitted to transmit data via a relay when the spectrum bands are detected to be free. The miss detection of spectrum sensing and the primary user traffic will affect the data transmission performance of the secondary user. In this paper, we investigate the impact of the status change of the primary user on the bit error rate (BER) of the adaptive transmission of the secondary user in a cognitive-relay system. Numerical results show that the primary user traffic can significantly degrade the BER of the secondary user transmission.

  19. Extraordinary optical transmission with tapered slits: effect of higher diffraction and slit resonance orders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sondergaard, T.; Bozhevolnyi, S. I.; Beermann, J.

    2012-01-01

    Transmission through thin metal films with a periodic arrangement of tapered slits is considered. Transmission maps covering a wide range of periods, film thicknesses, and taper angles are presented. The maps show resonant transmission when fundamental and higher-order slit resonances are excited...... to be in the range of 6 degrees-10 degrees. Both theory and experiments show split-peak spectra and shifted-peak spectra due to interference between a slit resonance and Rayleigh-Wood anomalies. (C) 2011 Optical Society of America...

  20. Enhanced inhibitory synaptic transmission in the spinal dorsal horn mediates antinociceptive effects of TC-2559

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background TC-2559 is a selective α4β2 subtype of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) partial agonist and α4β2 nAChR activation has been related to antinociception. The aim of this study is to investigate the analgesic effect of TC-2559 and its underlying spinal mechanisms. Results 1) In vivo bioavailability study: TC-2559 (3 mg/kg) had high absorption rate in rats with maximal total brain concentration reached over 4.6 μM within first 15 min after administration and eliminated rapidly with brain half life of about 20 min after injection. 2) In vivo behavioral experiments: TC-2559 exerts dose dependent antinociceptive effects in both formalin test in mice and chronic constriction injury (CCI) model in rats by activation of α4β2 nAChRs; 3) Whole-cell patch-clamp studies in the superficial dorsal horn neurons of the spinal cord slices: perfusion of TC-2559 (2 μM) significantly increased the frequency, but not amplitude of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs). The enhancement of sIPSCs was blocked by pre-application of DHβE (2 μM), a selective α4β2 nicotinic receptor antagonist. Neither the frequency nor the amplitude of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs) of spinal dorsal horn neurons were affected by TC-2559. Conclusions Enhancement of inhibitory synaptic transmission in the spinal dorsal horn via activation of α4β2 nAChRs may be one of the mechanisms of the antinociceptive effects of TC-2559 on pathological pain models. It provides further evidence to support the notion that selective α4β2 subtype nAChR agonist may be developed as new analgesic drug for the treatment of neuropathic pain. PMID:21816108

  1. Optimal combinations of control strategies and cost-effective analysis for visceral leishmaniasis disease transmission.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santanu Biswas

    Full Text Available Visceral leishmaniasis (VL is a deadly neglected tropical disease that poses a serious problem in various countries all over the world. Implementation of various intervention strategies fail in controlling the spread of this disease due to issues of parasite drug resistance and resistance of sandfly vectors to insecticide sprays. Due to this, policy makers need to develop novel strategies or resort to a combination of multiple intervention strategies to control the spread of the disease. To address this issue, we propose an extensive SIR-type model for anthroponotic visceral leishmaniasis transmission with seasonal fluctuations modeled in the form of periodic sandfly biting rate. Fitting the model for real data reported in South Sudan, we estimate the model parameters and compare the model predictions with known VL cases. Using optimal control theory, we study the effects of popular control strategies namely, drug-based treatment of symptomatic and PKDL-infected individuals, insecticide treated bednets and spray of insecticides on the dynamics of infected human and vector populations. We propose that the strategies remain ineffective in curbing the disease individually, as opposed to the use of optimal combinations of the mentioned strategies. Testing the model for different optimal combinations while considering periodic seasonal fluctuations, we find that the optimal combination of treatment of individuals and insecticide sprays perform well in controlling the disease for the time period of intervention introduced. Performing a cost-effective analysis we identify that the same strategy also proves to be efficacious and cost-effective. Finally, we suggest that our model would be helpful for policy makers to predict the best intervention strategies for specific time periods and their appropriate implementation for elimination of visceral leishmaniasis.

  2. Labour-Intensive Jobs for Women and Development: Intra-household Welfare Effects and Its Transmission Channels

    OpenAIRE

    Getahun, Tigabu; Villanger, Espen

    2018-01-01

    We examine the welfare impacts of poor women getting low-skilled jobs and find large positive income, consumption and poverty effects at household and individual levels. However, the women workers, their husbands and oldest daughters reduced their leisure, but the women to a much larger extent. Investigating the transmission mechanisms suggests that the impacts did not only go through income effects, but also through a bargaining effect. Getting the job improved the bargaining power of the wi...

  3. Study of the effect of loop inductance on the RF transmission line to cavity coupling coefficient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lal, Shankar; Pant, K. K.

    2016-01-01

    Coupling of RF power is an important aspect in the design and development of RF accelerating structures. RF power coupling employing coupler loops has the advantage of tunability of β, the transmission line to cavity coupling coefficient. Analytical expressions available in literature for determination of size of the coupler loop using Faraday’s law of induction show reasonably good agreement with experimentally measured values of β below critical coupling (β ≤ 1) but show large deviation with experimentally measured values and predictions by simulations for higher values of β. In actual accelerator application, many RF cavities need to be over-coupled with β > 1 for reasons of beam loading compensation, reduction of cavity filling time, etc. This paper discusses a modified analytical formulation by including the effect of loop inductance in the determination of loop size for any desired coupling coefficient. The analytical formulation shows good agreement with 3D simulations and with experimentally measured values. It has been successfully qualified by the design and development of power coupler loops for two 476 MHz pre-buncher RF cavities, which have successfully been conditioned at rated power levels using these coupler loops.

  4. Bacterial transmission from lens storage cases to contact lenses - Effects of lens care solutions and silver impregnation of cases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeltfoort, Pit B. J.; Hooymans, Johanna M. M.; Busscher, Henk J.; van der Mei, Henny C.

    2008-01-01

    The killing efficacies of multipurpose lens care solutions on planktonic and biofilm bacteria grown in polypropylene contact lens storage cases with and without silver impregnation and effects on bacterial transmission from storage cases to silicone hydrogel contact lenses were investigated. For

  5. Effects of external and gap mean flows on sound transmission through a double-wall sandwich panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu; Sebastian, Alexis

    2015-05-01

    This paper studies analytically the effects of an external mean flow and an internal gap mean flow on sound transmission through a double-wall sandwich panel lined with poroelastic materials. Biot's theory is employed to describe wave propagation in poroelastic materials, and the transfer matrix method with three types of boundary conditions is applied to solve the system simultaneously. The random incidence transmission loss in a diffuse field is calculated numerically, and the limiting angle of incidence due to total internal reflection is discussed in detail. The numerical predictions suggest that the sound insulation performance of such a double-wall panel is enhanced considerably by both external and gap mean flows particularly in the high-frequency range. Similar effects on transmission loss are observed for the two mean flows. It is shown that the effect of the gap mean flow depends on flow velocity, flow direction, gap depth and fluid properties and also that the fluid properties within the gap appear to influence the transmission loss more effectively than the gap flow. Despite the implementation difficulty in practice, an internal gap flow provides more design space for tuning the sound insulation performance of a double-wall sandwich panel and has great potential for active/passive noise control.

  6. Substantial effects of epimuscular myofascial force transmission on muscular mechanics have major implications on spastic muscle and remedial surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yucesoy, C.A.; Huijing, P.A.J.B.M.

    2007-01-01

    The specific aim of this paper is to review the effects of epimuscular myofascial force transmission on muscular mechanics and present some new results on finite element modeling of non-isolated aponeurotomized muscle in order to discuss the dependency of mechanics of spastic muscle, as well as

  7. The interplay between wind turbines and CPH plants and effects on transmission grid requirements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Poul Alberg

    2003-01-01

    The article analyses power flows in the transmission system with scattered load balancing under various climatic conditions with uneven distributions of wind power and uneven temperature and thus CHP conditions in the country.......The article analyses power flows in the transmission system with scattered load balancing under various climatic conditions with uneven distributions of wind power and uneven temperature and thus CHP conditions in the country....

  8. Effect of non-stationary climate on infectious gastroenteritis transmission in Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Onozuka, Daisuke

    2014-01-01

    Local weather factors are widely considered to influence the transmission of infectious gastroenteritis. Few studies, however, have examined the non-stationary relationships between global climatic factors and transmission of infectious gastroenteritis. We analyzed monthly data for cases of infectious gastroenteritis in Fukuoka, Japan from 2000 to 2012 using cross-wavelet coherency analysis to assess the pattern of associations between indices for the Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD) and El Niño Sou...

  9. The Effect of Stellar Contamination on Transmission Spectra of Low-mass Exoplanets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rackham, Benjamin V.; Apai, Daniel; Giampapa, Mark S.

    2017-10-01

    Transmission spectroscopy offers the exciting possibility of studying terrestrial exoplanet atmospheres in the near-term future. The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS), scheduled for launch next year, is expected to discover thousands of transiting exoplanets around bright host stars, including an estimated twenty habitable zone super-Earths. The brightness of the TESS host stars, combined with refined observational strategies and near-future facilities, will enable searches for atmospheric signatures from smaller and cooler exoplanets. These observations, however, will be increasingly subject to noise introduced by heterogeneities in the host star photospheres, such as star spots and faculae. In short, the transmission spectroscopy method relies on the assumption that the spectrum of the transit chord does not differ from that of the integrated stellar disk or, if it does, the contribution of photospheric heterogeneities to the transmission spectrum can be constrained by variability monitoring. However, any axisymmetric populations of spots and faculae will strongly affect transmission spectra, and their presence cannot be deduced from monitoring efforts. A clear need exists for a more robust understanding of stellar contamination on transmission spectra. Here we summarize our work on the impact of heterogeneous stellar photospheres on transmission spectra and detail implications for atmospheric characterization efforts. By modeling spot and faculae distributions in stellar photospheres, we find that spot-covering fractions extrapolated from observed variability amplitudes are significantly underestimated. Likewise, corrections based on variability monitoring likely fall short of the actual stellar spectral contamination. We provide examples of contamination spectra for typical levels of stellar activity across a range of spectral types. For M dwarfs, molecular absorption features in spots and faculae can imprint apparent features in transmission spectra

  10. Neuroglial Transmission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gundersen, Vidar; Storm-Mathisen, Jon; Bergersen, Linda Hildegard

    2015-01-01

    as a signaling substance recently shown to act on specific lactate receptors in the brain. Complementing neurotransmission at a synapse, neuroglial transmission often implies diffusion of the transmitter over a longer distance and concurs with the concept of volume transmission. Transmission from glia modulates...... synaptic neurotransmission based on energetic and other local conditions in a volume of tissue surrounding the individual synapse. Neuroglial transmission appears to contribute significantly to brain functions such as memory, as well as to prevalent neuropathologies....

  11. The association between soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 levels in drained dialysate and peritoneal injury in peritoneal dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igarashi, Yusuke; Morishita, Yoshiyuki; Yoshizawa, Hiromichi; Imai, Reika; Imai, Toshimi; Hirahara, Ichiro; Akimoto, Tetsu; Ookawara, Susumu; Ishibashi, Kenichi; Muto, Shigeaki; Nagata, Daisuke

    2017-11-01

    Chronic inflammation of the peritoneum causes peritoneal injury in patients on peritoneal dialysis. Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and its circulating form, soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1, play pivotal roles in inflammation. However, their role in peritoneal injury is unclear. We measured changes in intercellular adhesion molecule-1 expression in the peritoneum of a peritoneal injury model in rats. The associations between soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 levels in drained dialysate and the solute transport rate (D/P-Cr and D/D0-glucose) determined by the peritoneal equilibration test, and matrix metalloproteinase-2 levels in drained dialysate were investigated in 94 peritoneal drained dialysate samples. Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 expression was increased in the peritoneum of rats with peritoneal injury. Soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 levels in drained dialysate were significantly positively correlated with D/P-Cr (r = .51, p molecule-1expression is increased in the peritoneum of a peritoneal injury model in the rat, and soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 levels in drained dialysate are associated with peritoneal injury in patients on peritoneal dialysis. These results suggest that soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 could be a novel biomarker of peritoneal injury in patients on peritoneal dialysis.

  12. Extracellular ultrathin fibers sensitive to intracellular reactive oxygen species: Formation of intercellular membrane bridges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Se-Hui; Park, Jin-Young; Joo, Jung-Hoon; Kim, Young-Myeong; Ha, Kwon-Soo, E-mail: ksha@kangwon.ac.kr

    2011-07-15

    Membrane bridges are key cellular structures involved in intercellular communication; however, dynamics for their formation are not well understood. We demonstrated the formation and regulation of novel extracellular ultrathin fibers in NIH3T3 cells using confocal and atomic force microscopy. At adjacent regions of neighboring cells, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and glucose oxidase induced ultrathin fiber formation, which was prevented by Trolox, a reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger. The height of ROS-sensitive ultrathin fibers ranged from 2 to 4 nm. PMA-induced formation of ultrathin fibers was inhibited by cytochalasin D, but not by Taxol or colchicine, indicating that ultrathin fibers mainly comprise microfilaments. PMA-induced ultrathin fibers underwent dynamic structural changes, resulting in formation of intercellular membrane bridges. Thus, these fibers are formed by a mechanism(s) involving ROS and involved in formation of intercellular membrane bridges. Furthermore, ultrastructural imaging of ultrathin fibers may contribute to understanding the diverse mechanisms of cell-to-cell communication and the intercellular transfer of biomolecules, including proteins and cell organelles.

  13. Chemopreventive agents attenuate rapid inhibition of gap junctional intercellular communication induced by environmental toxicants

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Babica, Pavel; Čtveráčková, Lucie; Lenčešová, Zuzana; Trosko, J. E.; Upham, B. L.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 68, č. 5 (2016), s. 827-837 ISSN 0163-5581 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LH12034 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : gap junctional intercellular communication * chemopreventive agents * environmental toxicants Subject RIV: FR - Pharmacology ; Medidal Chemistry Impact factor: 2.447, year: 2016

  14. Methoxychlor and vinclozolin induce rapid changes in intercellular and intracellular signaling in liver progenitor cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Babica, Pavel; Zurabian, R.; Kumar, E. R.; Chopra, R.; Mianecki, M. J.; Park, J.-S.; Jaša, Libor; Trosko, J. E.; Upham, B. L.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 153, č. 1 (2016), s. 174-185 ISSN 1096-6080 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LH12034 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : endocrine disrupters * gap junctional intercellular communication * resveratrol Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.081, year: 2016

  15. Clinical pharmacokinetics and effects of vincristine sulfate in dogs with transmissible venereal tumor (TVT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hantrakul, Supannika; Klangkaew, Narumol; Kunakornsawat, Sunee; Tansatit, Tawewan; Poapolathep, Ammart; Kumagai, Susumu; Poapolathep, Saranya

    2014-12-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the pharmacokinetic characteristics of vincristine and their correlation with its clinical effects in dogs with transmissible venereal tumor (TVT). Dogs with TVT were intravenously administered vincristine sulfate at a dose of 0.7 mg/m(2) of body surface area. Blood samples were collected starting from 5 min to 48 hr after drug administration. The plasma concentration of vincristine was determined using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The pharmacokinetic parameters of vincristine were characterized using a two-compartmental pharmacokinetic model. The volume of distribution, distribution half-life, elimination half-life and plasma clearance were 0.660 ± 0.210 l/kg, 21.5 ± 6.90 min, 47.6 ± 14.2 min and 0.010 ± 0.001 l/min/kg, respectively. Tumor regression was determined at weekly interval by a physical examination and histopathological analysis. In our study, three to eight administrations of vincristine at a dose of 0.7 mg/m(2) were able to induce a complete tumor regression without any evidence of gross lesion of disease. Therefore, this investigation provides the pharmacokinetic characteristics of vincristine in dogs with TVT, which may be used as an integration tool to gain a better understanding of the disposition properties of the drug and the correlation of these properties with the drug's clinical effects. In addition, we validated the LC-MS/MS method and found that it is suitable for the pharmacokinetic study of vincristine in dog plasma.

  16. TC-PTP directly interacts with connexin43 to regulate gap junction intercellular communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hanjun; Spagnol, Gaelle; Naslavsky, Naava; Caplan, Steve; Sorgen, Paul L.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Protein kinases have long been reported to regulate connexins; however, little is known about the involvement of phosphatases in the modulation of intercellular communication through gap junctions and the subsequent downstream effects on cellular processes. Here, we identify an interaction between the T-cell protein tyrosine phosphatase (TC-PTP, officially known as PTPN2) and the carboxyl terminus of connexin43 (Cx43, officially known as GJA1). Two cell lines, normal rat kidney (NRK) cells endogenously expressing Cx43 and an NRK-derived cell line expressing v-Src with temperature-sensitive activity, were used to demonstrate that EGF and v-Src stimulation, respectively, induced TC-PTP to colocalize with Cx43 at the plasma membrane. Cell biology experiments using phospho-specific antibodies and biophysical assays demonstrated that the interaction is direct and that TC-PTP dephosphorylates Cx43 residues Y247 and Y265, but does not affect v-Src. Transfection of TC-PTP also indirectly led to the dephosphorylation of Cx43 S368, by inactivating PKCα and PKCδ, with no effect on the phosphorylation of S279 and S282 (MAPK-dependent phosphorylation sites). Dephosphorylation maintained Cx43 gap junctions at the plaque and partially reversed the channel closure caused by v-Src-mediated phosphorylation of Cx43. Understanding dephosphorylation, along with the well-documented roles of Cx43 phosphorylation, might eventually lead to methods to modulate the regulation of gap junction channels, with potential benefits for human health. PMID:24849651

  17. Silver nanoparticles increase connexin43-mediated gap junctional intercellular communication in HaCaT cells through activation of reactive oxygen species and mitogen-activated protein kinase signal pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qin, Yu; Han, Limin; Yang, Di

    2018-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are widely used in health and consumer products that routinely contact skin. However, the biological effects and possible mechanisms of AgNPs on skin remain unclear. Gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) plays a critical role in multicellular organisms to ...

  18. Mitochondrial genetics X: Effects of UV irradiation on transmission and recombination of mitochondrial genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dujon, B.; Kruszewska, A.; Slonimski, P.P.; Bolotin-Fukuhara, M.; Coen, D.; Deutsch, J.; Netter, P.; Weill, L.

    1975-01-01

    UV irradiation has been applied either to one parent prior to crossing or to newly formed zygotes. The effects of UV have been studied on the transmission of mitochondrial alleles at the loci conferring resistance to antibiotic and the frequency of recombinants between various combinations of alleles at these loci. The effects of UV depend on the nature of the cross i.e. homosexual (ω + x ω + or ω - x ω - ) or heterosexual (ω + x ω - ). In all cases UV irradiation of one of the parents diminishes the transmission of the mitochondrial alleles originated from the irradiated parent. In homosexual crosses the decrease of transmission is the same for alleles at all the loci. In heterosexual crosses, when the ω + parent is irradiated, there is a differential decrease of transmission depending on the distance of the resistance locus relative to the ω locus. In heterosexual crosses irradiation of the ω + parent increases the frequency of recombinants while irradiation of the ω - parent slightly decreases it. In homosexual crosses the frequency of recombinants diminishes when a high UV dose is applied to one of the parents. No or only minor modifications of the polarity of recombination are observed. Irradiation of newly formed zygotes has no or minor effects on the transmission of alleles and recombinant frequencies. All these effects can be interpreted in terms of a general model for recombination of mitochondrial genes. UV irradiation of one of the parents leads to a modification of the input fraction in favor of the non irradiated parent. As a consequence of this modification the output of alleles and the frequency of recombinants are changed. A good quantitative agreement between the predictions calculated on the basis of the model and the experimental data is found. Relationships between the molecular events responsible for the modifications of input and the production of rho - primary clones by UV are discussed. (orig./MG) [de

  19. Estimated effect of climatic variables on the transmission of Plasmodium vivax malaria in the Republic of Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Min; Park, Jae-Won; Cheong, Hae-Kwan

    2012-09-01

    Climate change may affect Plasmodium vivax malaria transmission in a wide region including both subtropical and temperate areas. We aimed to estimate the effects of climatic variables on the transmission of P. vivax in temperate regions. We estimated the effects of climatic factors on P. vivax malaria transmission using data on weekly numbers of malaria cases for the years 2001-2009 in the Republic of Korea. Generalized linear Poisson models and distributed lag nonlinear models (DLNM) were adopted to estimate the effects of temperature, relative humidity, temperature fluctuation, duration of sunshine, and rainfall on malaria transmission while adjusting for seasonal variation, between-year variation, and other climatic factors. A 1°C increase in temperature was associated with a 17.7% [95% confidence interval (CI): 16.9, 18.6%] increase in malaria incidence after a 3-week lag, a 10% rise in relative humidity was associated with 40.7% (95% CI: -44.3, -36.9%) decrease in malaria after a 7-week lag, a 1°C increase in the diurnal temperature range was associated with a 24.1% (95% CI: -26.7, -21.4%) decrease in malaria after a 7-week lag, and a 10-hr increase in sunshine per week was associated with a 5.1% (95% CI: -8.4, -1.7%) decrease in malaria after a 2-week lag. The cumulative relative risk for a 10-mm increase in rainfall (≤ 350 mm) on P. vivax malaria was 3.61 (95% CI: 1.69, 7.72) based on a DLNM with a 10-week maximum lag. Our findings suggest that malaria transmission in temperate areas is highly dependent on climate factors. In addition, lagged estimates of the effect of rainfall on malaria are consistent with the time necessary for mosquito development and P. vivax incubation.

  20. Gap junction intercellular communication mediated by connexin43 in astrocytes is essential for their resistance to oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Hoa T; Sin, Wun Chey; Lozinsky, Shannon; Bechberger, John; Vega, José Luis; Guo, Xu Qiu; Sáez, Juan C; Naus, Christian C

    2014-01-17

    Oxidative stress induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS) is associated with various neurological disorders including aging, neurodegenerative diseases, as well as traumatic and ischemic insults. Astrocytes have an important role in the anti-oxidative defense in the brain. The gap junction protein connexin43 (Cx43) forms intercellular channels as well as hemichannels in astrocytes. In the present study, we investigated the contribution of Cx43 to astrocytic death induced by the ROS hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and the mechanism by which Cx43 exerts its effects. Lack of Cx43 expression or blockage of Cx43 channels resulted in increased ROS-induced astrocytic death, supporting a cell protective effect of functional Cx43 channels. H2O2 transiently increased hemichannel activity, but reduced gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC). GJIC in wild-type astrocytes recovered after 7 h, but was absent in Cx43 knock-out astrocytes. Blockage of Cx43 hemichannels incompletely inhibited H2O2-induced hemichannel activity, indicating the presence of other hemichannel proteins. Panx1, which is predicted to be a major hemichannel contributor in astrocytes, did not appear to have any cell protective effect from H2O2 insults. Our data suggest that GJIC is important for Cx43-mediated ROS resistance. In contrast to hypoxia/reoxygenation, H2O2 treatment decreased the ratio of the hypophosphorylated isoform to total Cx43 level. Cx43 has been reported to promote astrocytic death induced by hypoxia/reoxygenation. We therefore speculate the increase in Cx43 dephosphorylation may account for the facilitation of astrocytic death. Our findings suggest that the role of Cx43 in response to cellular stress is dependent on the activation of signaling pathways leading to alteration of Cx43 phosphorylation states.

  1. Intermuscular interaction via myofascial force transmission: Effects of tibialis anterior and extensor digitorum longus length on force transmission from rat extensor digitorum longus muscle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, Huub; Baan, Guus C.; Huijing, P.A.J.B.M.

    2001-01-01

    Force transmission in rat anterior crural compartment, containing tibialis anterior (TA), extensor hallucis longus (EHL) and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles, was investigated. These muscles together with the muscles of the peroneal compartment were excited maximally. Force was measured at

  2. Effect of different lay-ups on the microstructure, mechanical properties and neutron transmission of neutron shielding fibre metal laminates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, Xuelong; Tang, Xiaobin; Hu, Yubing; Li, Huaguan; Tao, Jie

    2016-01-01

    A novel neutron shielding fibre metal laminates (NSFMLs) with different lay-ups, composed of stacking layers of AA6061 plates, neutron shielding composite and carbon fibre reinforced polyimide (CFRP), were fabricated using hot molding process in atmospheric environments. The microstructure, mechanical properties and neutron transmission of the NSFMLs were evaluated, respectively. The results indicated that the NSFMLs possessed good mechanical properties owing to the good interfacial adhesion of the components. Tensile strength and elastic modulus of the NSFMLs increased with the numbers of lay-ups, while the elongation to fracture exhibited obvious declining tendency. Flexural strength and modulus of the NSFMLs were improved obviously with the increasing of stacking layers. Neutron transmission of the NSFMLs decreased obviously with increasing the number of lay-ups, owing to the increase of "1"0B areal density. Besides, the effect of carbon fibres on the neutron shielding performance of the NSFMLs was also taken into consideration. - Highlights: • A novel neutron shielding fibre metal laminates (NSFMLs) with different lay-ups was successfully fabricated using hot molding process. • Mechanical properties of the NSFMLs were performed in accordance with relative standards. • Neutron transmission of the NSFMLs was conducted according to the testing results. • The effect of carbon fibres on the neutron transmission of the NSFMLs was also investigated.

  3. Effect of different lay-ups on the microstructure, mechanical properties and neutron transmission of neutron shielding fibre metal laminates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Xuelong [College of Material Science & Technology, Nanjing University of Aeronautics & Astronautics, Nanjing, 211100 (China); Department of Mechanical and Electronic Engineering, Jiangsu Polytechnic of Finance & Economics, Huai' an, 223003 (China); Tang, Xiaobin; Hu, Yubing; Li, Huaguan [College of Material Science & Technology, Nanjing University of Aeronautics & Astronautics, Nanjing, 211100 (China); Tao, Jie, E-mail: taojie@nuaa.edu.cn [College of Material Science & Technology, Nanjing University of Aeronautics & Astronautics, Nanjing, 211100 (China)

    2016-07-15

    A novel neutron shielding fibre metal laminates (NSFMLs) with different lay-ups, composed of stacking layers of AA6061 plates, neutron shielding composite and carbon fibre reinforced polyimide (CFRP), were fabricated using hot molding process in atmospheric environments. The microstructure, mechanical properties and neutron transmission of the NSFMLs were evaluated, respectively. The results indicated that the NSFMLs possessed good mechanical properties owing to the good interfacial adhesion of the components. Tensile strength and elastic modulus of the NSFMLs increased with the numbers of lay-ups, while the elongation to fracture exhibited obvious declining tendency. Flexural strength and modulus of the NSFMLs were improved obviously with the increasing of stacking layers. Neutron transmission of the NSFMLs decreased obviously with increasing the number of lay-ups, owing to the increase of {sup 10}B areal density. Besides, the effect of carbon fibres on the neutron shielding performance of the NSFMLs was also taken into consideration. - Highlights: • A novel neutron shielding fibre metal laminates (NSFMLs) with different lay-ups was successfully fabricated using hot molding process. • Mechanical properties of the NSFMLs were performed in accordance with relative standards. • Neutron transmission of the NSFMLs was conducted according to the testing results. • The effect of carbon fibres on the neutron transmission of the NSFMLs was also investigated.

  4. INHIBITION OF GAP JUNCTIONAL INTERCELLULAR COMMUNICATION BY PERFLUORINATED COMPOUNDS IN RAT LIVER AND DOLPHIN KIDNEY EPITHELIAL CELL LINES IN VITRO AND SPRAGUE-DAWLEY RATS IN VIVO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract Gap Junctional Intercellular Communication (GJIC) is the major pathway of intercellular signal transduction, and is, thus, important for normal cell growth and function. Recent studies have revealed a global distribution of some perfluorinated organic compounds e...

  5. Prenatal and Postnatal Mother-to-Child Transmission of Acculturation's Health Effects in Hispanic Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Molly; Thayer, Zaneta M; Ramos, Isabel F; Meskal, Sarah J; Wadhwa, Pathik D

    2018-04-02

    Hispanic Americans consistently exhibit an intergenerational increase in the prevalence of many noncommunicable chronic physical and mental disorders. We review and synthesize evidence suggesting that a constellation of prenatal and postnatal factors may play crucial roles in explaining this trend. We draw from relevant literature across several disciplines, including epidemiology, anthropology, psychology, medicine (obstetrics, neonatology), and developmental biology. Our resulting model is based on evidence that among women, the process of postmigration cultural adjustment (i.e., acculturation) is associated, during pregnancy and after delivery, with psychological and behavioral states that can affect offspring development in ways that may alter susceptibility to noncommunicable chronic disease risk in subsequent-generation Hispanic Americans. We propose one integrated process model that specifies the biological, behavioral, psychological, and sociocultural pathways by which maternal acculturation may influence the child's long-term health. We synthesize evidence from previous studies to describe how acculturation among Hispanic American mothers is associated with alterations to the same biobehavioral systems known to participate in the processes of prenatal and postnatal developmental programming of disease risk. In this manner, we focus on the concepts of biological and cultural mother-to-child transmission across the prenatal and postnatal life phases. We critique and draw from previous hypotheses that have sought to explain this phenomenon (of declining health across generations). We offer recommendations for examining the transgenerational effects of acculturation. A life course model with a greater focus on maternal health and well-being may be key to understanding transgenerational epidemiological trends in minority populations, and interventions that promote women's wellness may contribute to the elimination or reduction of health disparities.

  6. Assessing the utility of photoswitchable fluorescent proteins for tracking intercellular protein movement in the Arabidopsis root.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuang Wu

    Full Text Available One way in which cells communicate is through the direct transfer of proteins. In plants, many of these proteins are transcription factors, which are made by one cell type and traffic into another. In order to understand how this movement occurs and its role in development, we would like to track this movement in live, intact plants in real-time. Here we examine the utility of the photoconvertible proteins, Dendra2 and (to a lesser extent EosFP as tags for studying intracellular and intercellular protein movement in the Arabidopsis root. To this end, we made fusions between Dendra2 and six mobile transcription factors. Our results show that Dendra2 is an effective tool for studying protein movement between plant cells. Interestingly, we found that Dendra2 could not simply be swapped into existing constructs that had originally contained GFP. Most of the fusions made in this way failed to produce a fluorescent fusion. In addition we found that the optimal settings for photoconversion of Dendra2 in stably transformed roots were different from what has been published for photoconversion in transient assays in plants or in animal cells. By modifying the confocal setting, we were able to photoconvert Dendra2 in all cell layers in the root. However the efficiency of photoconversion was affected by the position of the cell layer within the root, with more internal tissues requiring more energy. By examining the Dendra2 fusions, we confirmed the mobility of the SHORT-ROOT (SHR and CAPRICE (CPC transcription factors between cells and we further discovered that SHR movement in stele and CPC movement in the epidermis are non-directional.

  7. Effectiveness of interventions to prevent mother-to-child transmission of HIV in Southern Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merdekios B

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Behailu Merdekios1, Adebola A Adedimeji2 1College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Arba Minch University, Ethiopia; 2Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Jack and Pearl Resnick Campus, New York, USA Background: In Ethiopia, Progress in Reducing Mother-to-Child-Transmission (PMTCT of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV is being curtailed by behavioral and cultural factors that continue to put unborn children at risk, and mother-to-child transmission is responsible for more than 90% of HIV infection in children. The objective of this study was to assess PMTCT services by examining knowledge about reducing vertical transmission among pregnant women. Methods: A multistaged sampling institution-based survey was conducted in 113 pregnant women in Arba Minch. Qualitative and quantitative data were obtained. Results: Of the 113 respondents, 89.4% were from Arba Minch, 43.4% were at least 25 years of age, 73.4% had formal education at primary level or above, 100% reported acceptance of voluntary counseling and testing, 92.0% were knowledgeable about mother-to-child transmission, and 90.3% were aware of the availability of the PMTCT service in the health facility. Of 74 HIV-positive women in PMTCT, only three (4.1% had had skilled birth attendants at delivery. There was an unacceptable degree of loss of women from PMTCT. Maternal educational level had a statistical association with income (P < 0.001 and voluntary counseling and testing for pregnant women (P < 0.05. Factors that determined use of PMTCT included culture, socioeconomic status, and fear of stigma and discrimination. Conclusion: In the area studied, intervention to reduce mother-to-child transmission of HIV is failing to reach its goal. This is an alarming discovery requiring quick reconsideration and strengthening of preventive strategies at all levels. Keywords: human immunodeficiency virus, mother-to-child transmission, pregnant women, Ethiopia

  8. Effects of temperature on the transmission of Yersinia Pestis by the flea, Xenopsylla Cheopis, in the late phase period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schotthoefer, Anna M; Bearden, Scott W; Holmes, Jennifer L; Vetter, Sara M; Montenieri, John A; Williams, Shanna K; Graham, Christine B; Woods, Michael E; Eisen, Rebecca J; Gage, Kenneth L

    2011-09-29

    Traditionally, efficient flea-borne transmission of Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague, was thought to be dependent on a process referred to as blockage in which biofilm-mediated growth of the bacteria physically blocks the flea gut, leading to the regurgitation of contaminated blood into the host. This process was previously shown to be temperature-regulated, with blockage failing at temperatures approaching 30°C; however, the abilities of fleas to transmit infections at different temperatures had not been adequately assessed. We infected colony-reared fleas of Xenopsylla cheopis with a wild type strain of Y. pestis and maintained them at 10, 23, 27, or 30°C. Naïve mice were exposed to groups of infected fleas beginning on day 7 post-infection (p.i.), and every 3-4 days thereafter until day 14 p.i. for fleas held at 10°C, or 28 days p.i. for fleas held at 23-30°C. Transmission was confirmed using Y. pestis-specific antigen or antibody detection assays on mouse tissues. Although no statistically significant differences in per flea transmission efficiencies were detected between 23 and 30°C, efficiencies were highest for fleas maintained at 23°C and they began to decline at 27 and 30°C by day 21 p.i. These declines coincided with declining median bacterial loads in fleas at 27 and 30°C. Survival and feeding rates of fleas also varied by temperature to suggest fleas at 27 and 30°C would be less likely to sustain transmission than fleas maintained at 23°C. Fleas held at 10°C transmitted Y. pestis infections, although flea survival was significantly reduced compared to that of uninfected fleas at this temperature. Median bacterial loads were significantly higher at 10°C than at the other temperatures. Our results suggest that temperature does not significantly effect the per flea efficiency of Y. pestis transmission by X. cheopis, but that temperature is likely to influence the dynamics of Y. pestis flea-borne transmission, perhaps by affecting

  9. The effect, identification and correction of misalignment between PET transmission and emission scans on brain PET imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xiangsong; He Zuoxiang; Tang Anwu; Qiao Suixian

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: To study the effect of misalignment between PET transmission and emission scans of brain on brain PET imaging, and the Methods to identify and correct it. Methods: 18F-FDG PET imaging was performed on 8 volunteers. The emission images were reconstructed with attenuation correction after some translations and rotations in the x-axis and transverse plane were given, 1 mm and 1 degree each step, respectively. The 3-D volume fusion of PET emission and transmission scans was used to identify the suspected misalignment on 10 18F-FDG PET brain imaging. Three Methods were used to correct the misalignment. First, to quantitate the amount of the misalignment by 3-D volume registration of PET emission and transmission scans, the emission images were reconstructed with corrected translations and rotations in x-direction and transverse plane. Second, the emission images were reconstructed with mathematic calculation of brain attenuation. Third, 18F-FDG PET brain imaging was redone with careful application of laser alignment. Results: The translations greater than 3 mm in x-direction and the rotations greater than 8 degrees in transverse plane could lead to visible artifacts, which were presented with decreasing radioactivity uptake in the cortex of half cerebrum and in the frontal cortex at the side in the translating or rotating direction, respectively. The 3-D volume fusion of PET emission and transmission scans could identify and quantitate the amount of misalignment between PET emission and transmission scans of brain. The PET emission images reconstructed with corrected misalignment and mathematic calculation of brain attenuation were consistent with redone PET brain imaging. Conclusions: The misalignment between PET transmission and emission scans of brain can lead to visible artifacts. The 3-D volume fusion of PET emission and transmission scans can identify and quantitate the amount of the misalignment. The visible artifacts caused by the misalignment can be

  10. Interaction effects between sender and receiver processes in indirect transmission of Campylobacter jejuni between broilers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Bunnik Bram AD

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infectious diseases in plants, animals and humans are often transmitted indirectly between hosts (or between groups of hosts, i.e. via some route through the environment instead of via direct contacts between these hosts. Here we study indirect transmission experimentally, using transmission of Campylobacter jejuni (C. jejuni between spatially separated broilers as a model system. We distinguish three stages in the process of indirect transmission; (1 an infectious “sender” excretes the agent, after which (2 the agent is transported via some route to a susceptible “receiver”, and subsequently (3 the receiver becomes colonised by the agent. The role of the sender and receiver side (stage 1 and stage 3 was studied here by using acidification of the drinking water as a modulation mechanism. Results In the experiment one control group and three treatment groups were monitored for the presence of C. jejuni by taking daily cloacal swabs. The three treatments consisted of acidification of the drinking water of the inoculated animals (the senders, acidification of the drinking water of the susceptible animals (the receivers or acidification of the drinking water of both inoculated and susceptible animals. In the control group 12 animals got colonised out of a possible 40, in each treatment groups 3 animals out of a possible 40 were found colonised with C. jejuni. Conclusions The results of the experiments show a significant decrease in transmission rate (β between the control groups and treatment groups (p

  11. Interaction effects between sender and receiver processes in indirect transmission of Campylobacter jejuni between broilers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bunnik, van B.A.D.; Hagenaars, T.H.J.; Bolder, N.M.; Nodelijk, G.; Jong, de M.C.M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Infectious diseases in plants, animals and humans are often transmitted indirectly between hosts (or between groups of hosts), i.e. via some route through the environment instead of via direct contacts between these hosts. Here we study indirect transmission experimentally, using

  12. Effect of the Primary User Traffic on Cognitive Relaying with Adaptive Transmission

    KAUST Repository

    Rao, Anlei; Ma, Hao; Alouini, Mohamed-Slim; Chen, Yunfei

    2012-01-01

    In a cognitive-relay system, the secondary user is permitted to transmit data via a relay when the spectrum bands are detected to be free. The miss detection of spectrum sensing and the primary user traffic will affect the data transmission

  13. Transmission electron microscope examination of rare-gas bubbles in metals: analysis of observed contrast effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, V.

    1964-01-01

    Metallic samples containing rare gas bubbles have been examined by transmission electron microscopy. The different features of the contrast patterns of the bubbles have been explained by the dynamical theory of contrast, assuming that the bubble behaves as a hole in the metal. Experimental results are in good agreement with the theory. (author) [fr

  14. The effect of external mean flow on sound transmission through double-walled cylindrical shells lined with poroelastic material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jie; Bhaskar, Atul; Zhang, Xin

    2014-03-01

    Sound transmission through a system of double shells, lined with poroelastic material in the presence of external mean flow, is studied. The porous material is modeled as an equivalent fluid because shear wave contributions are known to be insignificant. This is achieved by accounting for the energetically most dominant wave types in the calculations. The transmission characteristics of the sandwich construction are presented for different incidence angles and Mach numbers over a wide frequency range. It is noted that the transmission loss exhibits three dips on the frequency axis as opposed to flat panels where there are only two such frequencies—results are discussed in the light of these observations. Flow is shown to decrease the transmission loss below the ring frequency, but increase this above the ring frequency due to the negative stiffness and the damping effect added by the flow. In the absence of external mean flow, porous material provides superior insulation for most part of the frequency band of interest. However, in the presence of external flow, this is true only below the ring frequency—above this frequency, the presence of air gap in sandwich constructions is the dominant factor that determines the acoustic performance. In the absence of external flow, an air gap always improves sound insulation.

  15. Effects of contact network structure on epidemic transmission trees: implications for data required to estimate network structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnegie, Nicole Bohme

    2018-01-30

    Understanding the dynamics of disease spread is key to developing effective interventions to control or prevent an epidemic. The structure of the network of contacts over which the disease spreads has been shown to have a strong influence on the outcome of the epidemic, but an open question remains as to whether it is possible to estimate contact network features from data collected in an epidemic. The approach taken in this paper is to examine the distributions of epidemic outcomes arising from epidemics on networks with particular structural features to assess whether that structure could be measured from epidemic data and what other constraints might be needed to make the problem identifiable. To this end, we vary the network size, mean degree, and transmissibility of the pathogen, as well as the network feature of interest: clustering, degree assortativity, or attribute-based preferential mixing. We record several standard measures of the size and spread of the epidemic, as well as measures that describe the shape of the transmission tree in order to ascertain whether there are detectable signals in the final data from the outbreak. The results suggest that there is potential to estimate contact network features from transmission trees or pure epidemic data, particularly for diseases with high transmissibility or for which the relevant contact network is of low mean degree. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Characterization of weak, fair and strong neutron absorbing materials by means of neutron transmission: Beam hardening effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharfi, F.; Bastuerk, M.; Boucenna, A.

    2006-09-01

    The characterization of neutron absorbing materials as well as quantification of neutron attenuation through matter is very essential in various fields, namely in shielding calculation. The objective of this work is to describe an experimental procedure to be used for the determination of neutron transmission through different materials. The proposed method is based on the relation between the gray value measured on neutron radiography image and the corresponding inducing neutron beam. For such a purpose, three kinds of materials (in shape of plate) were investigated using thermal neutrons: (1) boron-alloyed stainless steel as strong absorber; (2) copper and steel as fair absorbers and (3) aluminum as weak absorber. This work is not limited to the determination of neutron transmission through matters; it is also spread out to the measure of the surface density of the neutron absorbing elements (ρs) as a function of thickness of neutron absorbing material such as boron-alloyed stainless steel. The beam hardening effect depending on material thickness was also studied using the neutron transmission measurements. A theoretical approach was used to interpret the experimental results. The neutron transmission measurements were performed at the Neutron Radiography and Tomography facility of the Atomic Institute of the Austrian Universities in Vienna. Finally, a Maxwellian neutron distribution of incident neutron beam was used in the theoretical calculations of neutron energy shift in order to compare with experiments results. The obtained experimental results are in a good agreement with the developed theoretical approach.

  17. Transmission issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradford, J.; Wilson, L.; Thon, S.; Millar, N.

    2005-01-01

    This session on transmission issues focused on the role that transmission plays in electricity markets and the importance of getting the market structure right in terms of generation divestiture with buy back contracts, demand side responsive programs, transmission upgrades and long term contracts. The difficulties of distinguishing between market power and scarcity were examined along with some of the complications that ensue if transmission experiences congestion, as exemplified by the August 2003 blackout in eastern North America. The presentations described the best ways to handle transmission issues, and debated whether transmission should be deregulated or follow market forces. Issues of interconnections and reliability of connections were also debated along with the attempt to integrate renewables into the grid. Some presentations identified what new transmission must be built and what must be done to ensure that transmission gets built. The challenges and business opportunities for transmission in Alberta were discussed with reference to plans to invest in new infrastructure, where it is going outside of the province and how it works with other jurisdictions. Manitoba's Conawapa Hydro Project and its 2000 MW tie line to Ontario was also discussed. Some examples of non-optimal use of interconnections in Europe were also discussed in an effort to learn from these mistakes and avoid them in Canada. tabs., figs

  18. SEA for strategic grid planning in South Africa: Enabling the efficient and effective roll out of strategic electricity transmission infrastructure

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Fischer, TD

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available | Resilience and Sustainability 36th Annual Conference of the International Association for Impact Assessment 11 - 14 May 2016 | Nagoya Congress Center | Aichi-Nagoya | Japan | www.iaia.org SEA FOR STRATEGIC GRID PLANNING IN SOUTH AFRICA: Enabling... the efficient and effective roll out of strategic electricity transmission infrastructure Abstract ID: 409 Authors: Marshall Mabin(1) , Paul Lochner and Dee Fischer Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), PO Box 320 Stellenbosch 7599 South...

  19. SU-D-213-02: Characterization of the Effect of a New Commercial Transmission Detector On Radiotherapy Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung, J; Morin, O

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the influence of a new commercial transmission detector on radiotherapy beams of various energies. Methods: A transmission detector designed for online treatment monitoring was characterized on a TrueBeam STx linear accelerator with 6MV, 6FFF, 10MV, and 10FFF beams. Measurements of beam characteristics including percentage depth doses (PDDs), inplane and crossplane off-axis profiles at different depths, transmission factors, and skin dose were acquired at field sizes of 3×3cm, 5×5m, 10×10cm, and 20×20cm at 100cm and 80cm source-to-surface distance (SSD). All measurements were taken with and without the transmission detector in the path of the beam. A CC04 chamber was used for all profile and transmission factor measurements. Skin dose was assessed at 100cm, 90cm, and 80cm SSD and using a variety of detectors (Roos and Markus parallel-plate chambers, and OSLD). Results: The PDDs showed small differences between the unperturbed and perturbed beams for both 100cm and 80cm SSD (≤4mm dmax difference and <1.2% average profile difference). The differences were larger for the flattened beams and at larger field sizes. The off-axis profiles showed similar trends. The penumbras looked similar with and without the transmission detector. Comparisons in the central 80% of the profile showed a maximum average (maximum) profile difference between all field sizes of 0.756% (1.535%) and 0.739% (3.682%) for 100cm and 80cm SSD, respectively. The average measured skin dose at 100cm (80cm) SSD for 10×10cm field size was <4% (<35%) dose increase for all energies. For 20×20cm field size, this value increased to <10% (≤45%). Conclusion: The transmission detector has minimal effect on the clinically relevant radiotherapy beams for IMRT and VMAT (field sizes 10×10cm and less). For larger field sizes, some perturbations are observable which would need to be assessed for clinical impact. The authors of this publication has research support from IBA Dosimetry

  20. SU-D-213-02: Characterization of the Effect of a New Commercial Transmission Detector On Radiotherapy Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheung, J; Morin, O [University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the influence of a new commercial transmission detector on radiotherapy beams of various energies. Methods: A transmission detector designed for online treatment monitoring was characterized on a TrueBeam STx linear accelerator with 6MV, 6FFF, 10MV, and 10FFF beams. Measurements of beam characteristics including percentage depth doses (PDDs), inplane and crossplane off-axis profiles at different depths, transmission factors, and skin dose were acquired at field sizes of 3×3cm, 5×5m, 10×10cm, and 20×20cm at 100cm and 80cm source-to-surface distance (SSD). All measurements were taken with and without the transmission detector in the path of the beam. A CC04 chamber was used for all profile and transmission factor measurements. Skin dose was assessed at 100cm, 90cm, and 80cm SSD and using a variety of detectors (Roos and Markus parallel-plate chambers, and OSLD). Results: The PDDs showed small differences between the unperturbed and perturbed beams for both 100cm and 80cm SSD (≤4mm dmax difference and <1.2% average profile difference). The differences were larger for the flattened beams and at larger field sizes. The off-axis profiles showed similar trends. The penumbras looked similar with and without the transmission detector. Comparisons in the central 80% of the profile showed a maximum average (maximum) profile difference between all field sizes of 0.756% (1.535%) and 0.739% (3.682%) for 100cm and 80cm SSD, respectively. The average measured skin dose at 100cm (80cm) SSD for 10×10cm field size was <4% (<35%) dose increase for all energies. For 20×20cm field size, this value increased to <10% (≤45%). Conclusion: The transmission detector has minimal effect on the clinically relevant radiotherapy beams for IMRT and VMAT (field sizes 10×10cm and less). For larger field sizes, some perturbations are observable which would need to be assessed for clinical impact. The authors of this publication has research support from IBA Dosimetry.

  1. Expression of a defence-related intercellular barley peroxidase in transgenic tobacco

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, B.K.; Brandt, J.; Bojsen, K.

    1997-01-01

    genetically, phenotypically and biochemically. The T-DNA was steadily inherited through three generations. The barley peroxidase is expressed and sorted to the intercellular space in the transgenic tobacco plants. The peroxidase can be extracted from the intercellular space in two molecular forms from both...... barley and transgenic tobacco. The tobacco expressed forms are indistinguishable from the barley expressed forms as determined by analytical isoelectric focusing (pI 8.5) and Western-blotting. Staining for N-glycosylation showed that one form only was glycosylated. The N-terminus of purified Prx8 from...... transgenic tobacco was blocked by pyroglutamate, after the removal of which, N-terminal sequencing verified the transit signal-peptide cleavage site deduced from the cDNA sequence. Phenotype comparisons show that the constitutive expression of Prx8 lead to growth retardation. However, an infection assay...

  2. Intrinsically disordered proteins aggregate at fungal cell-to-cell channels and regulate intercellular connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Julian; Koh, Chuan Hock; Tjota, Monika; Pieuchot, Laurent; Raman, Vignesh; Chandrababu, Karthik Balakrishna; Yang, Daiwen; Wong, Limsoon; Jedd, Gregory

    2012-09-25

    Like animals and plants, multicellular fungi possess cell-to-cell channels (septal pores) that allow intercellular communication and transport. Here, using a combination of MS of Woronin body-associated proteins and a bioinformatics approach that identifies related proteins based on composition and character, we identify 17 septal pore-associated (SPA) proteins that localize to the septal pore in rings and pore-centered foci. SPA proteins are not homologous at the primary sequence level but share overall physical properties with intrinsically disordered proteins. Some SPA proteins form aggregates at the septal pore, and in vitro assembly assays suggest aggregation through a nonamyloidal mechanism involving mainly α-helical and disordered structures. SPA loss-of-function phenotypes include excessive septation, septal pore degeneration, and uncontrolled Woronin body activation. Together, our data identify the septal pore as a complex subcellular compartment and focal point for the assembly of unstructured proteins controlling diverse aspects of intercellular connectivity.

  3. Proteins Play Important Role in Intercellular Adhesion Affecting on Fruit Textural Quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahadur Adhikari, Khem; Shomer, Ilan

    2012-01-01

    Fruit textural quality is becoming a major quality parameter for export, postharvest preservation, handling and processing. The main determinant of textural quality is intercellular adhesion (ICA) as attributed by the cell wall (CW) and its components. The importance of CW protein in ICA strength......Fruit textural quality is becoming a major quality parameter for export, postharvest preservation, handling and processing. The main determinant of textural quality is intercellular adhesion (ICA) as attributed by the cell wall (CW) and its components. The importance of CW protein in ICA...... strengthening was exempli ed in Medjoul date (Phoenix dactylifera L.) fruit, as a model. Fruit mesocarp sensitively responded to culture environment which was assayed in vitro at pH 3.5( pKa) in presence of organic acid molecules. The max penetration force, as a measure of ICA strength, of p...

  4. 1,4-Naphthoquinones: From Oxidative Damage to Cellular and Inter-Cellular Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars-Oliver Klotz

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Naphthoquinones may cause oxidative stress in exposed cells and, therefore, affect redox signaling. Here, contributions of redox cycling and alkylating properties of quinones (both natural and synthetic, such as plumbagin, juglone, lawsone, menadione, methoxy-naphthoquinones, and others to cellular and inter-cellular signaling processes are discussed: (i naphthoquinone-induced Nrf2-dependent modulation of gene expression and its potentially beneficial outcome; (ii the modulation of receptor tyrosine kinases, such as the epidermal growth factor receptor by naphthoquinones, resulting in altered gap junctional intercellular communication. Generation of reactive oxygen species and modulation of redox signaling are properties of naphthoquinones that render them interesting leads for the development of novel compounds of potential use in various therapeutic settings.

  5. Detection of cancerous kidney tissue areas by means of infrared spectroscopy of intercellular fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urboniene, V.; Jankevicius, F.; Zelvys, A.; Steiner, G.; Sablinskas, V.

    2014-03-01

    In this work the infrared absorption spectra of intercellular fluid of normal and tumor kidney tissue were recorded and analyzed. The samples were prepared by stamping freshly resected tissue onto a CaF2 substrate. FT-IR spectra obtained from intracellular fluid of tumor tissue exhibit stronger absorption bands in the spectral region from 1000-1200 cm-1 and around 1750 cm-1 than those obtained from normal tissue. It is likely the spectra of extracellular matrix of kidney tumor tissue with large increases in the intensities of these bands represent a higher concentration of fatty acids and glycerol. Amide I and amide II bands are stronger in spectra of normal tissue indicating a higher level of proteins. The results demonstrate that FT-IR spectroscopy of intercellular fluids is a novel approach for a quick diagnosis during surgical resection, which can improve the therapy of kidney tumors.

  6. Tunneling nanotubes spread fibrillar α-synuclein by intercellular trafficking of lysosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abounit, Saïda; Bousset, Luc; Loria, Frida; Zhu, Seng; de Chaumont, Fabrice; Pieri, Laura; Olivo-Marin, Jean-Christophe; Melki, Ronald; Zurzolo, Chiara

    2016-10-04

    Synucleinopathies such as Parkinson's disease are characterized by the pathological deposition of misfolded α-synuclein aggregates into inclusions throughout the central and peripheral nervous system. Mounting evidence suggests that intercellular propagation of α-synuclein aggregates may contribute to the neuropathology; however, the mechanism by which spread occurs is not fully understood. By using quantitative fluorescence microscopy with co-cultured neurons, here we show that α-synuclein fibrils efficiently transfer from donor to acceptor cells through tunneling nanotubes (TNTs) inside lysosomal vesicles. Following transfer through TNTs, α-synuclein fibrils are able to seed soluble α-synuclein aggregation in the cytosol of acceptor cells. We propose that donor cells overloaded with α-synuclein aggregates in lysosomes dispose of this material by hijacking TNT-mediated intercellular trafficking. Our findings thus reveal a possible novel role of TNTs and lysosomes in the progression of synucleinopathies. © 2016 The Authors.

  7. Markedly diminished epidermal keratinocyte expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) in Sezary syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nickoloff, B.J.; Griffiths, E.M.; Baadsgaard, O.; Voorhees, J.J.; Hanson, C.A.; Cooper, K.D. (Univ. of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor (USA))

    1989-04-21

    In mucosis fungoides the malignant T cells express lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1, which allows them to bind to epidermal keratinocytes expressing the gamma interferon-inducible intercellular adhesion molecule-1. In this report, a patient with leukemic-stage mucosis fungoides (Sezary syndrome) had widespread erythematous dermal infiltrates containing malignant T cells, but without any epidermotropism. The authors discovered that the T cells expressed normal amounts of functional lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1, but the keratinocytes did not express significant levels of intercellular adhesion molecule-1, which was probably due to the inability of the malignant T cells to produce gamma interferon. These results support the concept that the inability of malignant T cells to enter the epidermis may contribute to emergence of more clinically aggressive T-cell clones that are no longer confined to the skin, but infiltrate the blood, lymph nodes, and viscera, as is seen in Sezary syndrome.

  8. Transmission blocking effects of neem (Azadirachta indica) seed kernel limonoids on Plasmodium berghei early sporogonic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapanelli, Sofia; Chianese, Giuseppina; Lucantoni, Leonardo; Yerbanga, Rakiswendé Serge; Habluetzel, Annette; Taglialatela-Scafati, Orazio

    2016-10-01

    Azadirachta indica, known as neem tree and traditionally called "nature's drug store" makes part of several African pharmacopeias and is widely used for the preparation of homemade remedies and commercial preparations against various illnesses, including malaria. Employing a bio-guided fractionation approach, molecules obtained from A. indica ripe and green fruit kernels were tested for activity against early sporogonic stages of Plasmodium berghei, the parasite stages that develop in the mosquito mid gut after an infective blood meal. The limonoid deacetylnimbin (3) was identified as one the most active compounds of the extract, with a considerably higher activity compared to that of the close analogue nimbin (2). Pure deacetylnimbin (3) appeared to interfere with transmissible Plasmodium stages at a similar potency as azadirachtin A. Considering its higher thermal and chemical stability, deacetylnimbin could represent a suitable alternative to azadirachtin A for the preparation of transmission blocking antimalarials. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Effects of mirror symmetry on the transmission fingerprints of quasiperiodic photonic multilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coelho, I.P. [Departamento de Ensino Superior, Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia do Maranhao, Campus Imperatriz, 65919-050 Imperatriz, MA (Brazil); Vasconcelos, M.S., E-mail: mvasconcelos@ect.ufrn.b [Escola de Ciencias e Tecnologia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, 59072-970 Natal, RN (Brazil); Bezerra, C.G. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, 59072-970 Natal, RN (Brazil)

    2010-03-29

    We address the transmission properties of light waves through symmetric Fibonacci, Thue-Morse and double-period photonic multilayers, i.e., a binary one-dimensional quasiperiodic structure made up of two different dielectric materials (more specifically SiO{sub 2} and TiO{sub 2}), in quarter wavelength condition, presenting mirror symmetry. The optical spectra are calculated by using a theoretical model based on the transfer matrix approach in normal incidence geometry. In our results we present the self-similar features of the spectra and we also present the optical fingerprints through a return map of the transmission coefficients. We discuss these optical fingerprints and compare them with results of previous works, on similar quasiperiodic systems, in the absence of mirror symmetry.

  10. Effects of mirror symmetry on the transmission fingerprints of quasiperiodic photonic multilayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coelho, I.P.; Vasconcelos, M.S.; Bezerra, C.G.

    2010-01-01

    We address the transmission properties of light waves through symmetric Fibonacci, Thue-Morse and double-period photonic multilayers, i.e., a binary one-dimensional quasiperiodic structure made up of two different dielectric materials (more specifically SiO 2 and TiO 2 ), in quarter wavelength condition, presenting mirror symmetry. The optical spectra are calculated by using a theoretical model based on the transfer matrix approach in normal incidence geometry. In our results we present the self-similar features of the spectra and we also present the optical fingerprints through a return map of the transmission coefficients. We discuss these optical fingerprints and compare them with results of previous works, on similar quasiperiodic systems, in the absence of mirror symmetry.

  11. Beam transmission in MP equipment. New measurements. Main effects and application to VIVITRON

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haas, F.; Muller, C.; Nadji, A.; Rebmeister, R.

    1989-01-01

    The MP equipment is presented and the vacuum values at different measuring points are indicated. The low energy transmission stage (foil and gas strippers) high energy stage (5, 10, and 15 micro-g/cm 2 foils and gas stripper) are described, as well as the global system. For the Vivitron, in order to reach equilibrium thickness, pression in the stripping channel should be higher than that in the MP channel, and pump power should be planned accordingly [fr

  12. Effect of Nonlinearity by the Amplitude Variation in coherent transmission in Laser Heterodyne Interferometric

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, H F; Ding, X M; Zhong, Z; Xie, Z L; Yue, H

    2006-01-01

    To reduce the nonlinearity of nanometer measurement in laser heterodyne interferometric, the influence mechanics of the amplitude variation in coherent transmission upon nonlinearity must be confirmed. Based on the mechanics of nonlinearity, the models about how first-harmonic and second-harmonic nonlinearity caused by the amplitude variation in coherent transmission are proposed. The emulation result shows that different amplitude between measurement arm and reference arm increases the first-harmonic nonlinearity when laser beams nonorthogonality errors exist, but it doesn't change the relationship between nonlinearity and half wavelength. When the rotation angle error β of polarizing beam splitter (PBS) exists, amplitude variation only affects the first-harmonic nonlinearity. With a constant rotation angle of PBS β = 4 0 , when the amplitude factor of measurement arm reduces from 1 to 0.6, the nonlinearity increases from 0.25 nm to 3.81 nm, and the nonlinearity is simple superposition of first-harmonic and second-harmonic. Theoretic analysis and emulation show that the reduction of amplitude variation in coherent transmission can reduce influence on nonlinearity

  13. Effect of non-stationary climate on infectious gastroenteritis transmission in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onozuka, Daisuke

    2014-06-01

    Local weather factors are widely considered to influence the transmission of infectious gastroenteritis. Few studies, however, have examined the non-stationary relationships between global climatic factors and transmission of infectious gastroenteritis. We analyzed monthly data for cases of infectious gastroenteritis in Fukuoka, Japan from 2000 to 2012 using cross-wavelet coherency analysis to assess the pattern of associations between indices for the Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD) and El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO). Infectious gastroenteritis cases were non-stationary and significantly associated with the IOD and ENSO (Multivariate ENSO Index [MEI], Niño 1 + 2, Niño 3, Niño 4, and Niño 3.4) for a period of approximately 1 to 2 years. This association was non-stationary and appeared to have a major influence on the synchrony of infectious gastroenteritis transmission. Our results suggest that non-stationary patterns of association between global climate factors and incidence of infectious gastroenteritis should be considered when developing early warning systems for epidemics of infectious gastroenteritis.

  14. Intercellular Uptake of Technetium-99m Pertechnetate by Different Types of Cell Lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safri Zainal Abidin; Raizulnasuha Abdul Rashid; Muhammad Afiq Khairil Anuar; Wan Nordiana A Abd Rahman

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the technetium-99m pertechnetate ( 99m TcO 4 ) intercellular uptake by different types of cell lines. HeLa, human fetal osteoblast (hFOB), glial and glioma cell lines grown in 6-wells culture plates were incubated with 99m TcO 4 of activity of 200, 400, 600, 800 and 1000 μCi for 30 minutes at 37 degree Celsius and 5 % CO 2 humidified atmosphere. After incubation, the cells were washed 3 times with phosphate buffer saline to remove the extracellular traces of 99m TcO 4 . Measurement of the intercellular 99m TcO 4 into the cells was calculated. The intercellular uptake of 99m TcO 4 was found to be inversely correlate to the radioactivity. HHeLa cell shows the highest uptake followed by hFOB, glial and glioma cell lines. Comparison of uptake between normal and cancer cells present indistinguishable results. The findings of this study suggest that the intercellular uptake of 99m TcO 4 is highly dependent on the type of cells despite no significant different of uptake was found between normal and cancer cell lines. The level of radioactivity is also an important determinant factor that influence the uptake of 99m TcO 4 into the cell. The study will be the first precedent toward understanding the cellular characteristics and pharmacokinetic of non-invasive imaging tracer for future molecular imaging and therapy. (author)

  15. Offshore wind power plants with VSC-HVDC transmission : Grid code compliance optimization and the effect on high voltage ac transmission system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ndreko, M.

    2017-01-01

    The development of large offshore wind power generation in the North Sea has been significantly accelerated in the last years. The large distance from shore in combination with the need for large transmission capacity has raised the interest for the voltage source converter high voltage direct

  16. Serum deprivation induces glucose response and intercellular coupling in human pancreatic adenocarcinoma PANC-1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiram-Bab, Sahar; Shapira, Yuval; Gershengorn, Marvin C; Oron, Yoram

    2012-03-01

    This study aimed to investigate whether the previously described differentiating islet-like aggregates of human pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells (PANC-1) develop glucose response and exhibit intercellular communication. Fura 2-loaded PANC-1 cells in serum-free medium were assayed for changes in cytosolic free calcium ([Ca]i) induced by depolarization, tolbutamide inhibition of K(ATP) channels, or glucose. Dye transfer, assayed by confocal microscopy or by FACS, was used to detect intercellular communication. Changes in messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of genes of interest were assessed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Proliferation was assayed by the MTT method. Serum-deprived PANC-1 cell aggregates developed [Ca]i response to KCl, tolbutamide, or glucose. These responses were accompanied by 5-fold increase in glucokinase mRNA level and, to a lesser extent, of mRNAs for K(ATP) and L-type calcium channels, as well as increase in mRNA levels of glucagon and somatostatin. Trypsin, a proteinase-activated receptor 2 agonist previously shown to enhance aggregation, modestly improved [Ca]i response to glucose. Glucose-induced coordinated [Ca]i oscillations and dye transfer demonstrated the emergence of intercellular communication. These findings suggest that PANC-1 cells, a pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell line, can be induced to express a differentiated phenotype in which cells exhibit response to glucose and form a functional syncytium similar to those observed in pancreatic islets.

  17. Optimal cellular mobility for synchronization arising from the gradual recovery of intercellular interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uriu, Koichiro; Ares, Saúl; Oates, Andrew C; Morelli, Luis G

    2012-01-01

    Cell movement and intercellular signaling occur simultaneously during the development of tissues, but little is known about how movement affects signaling. Previous theoretical studies have shown that faster moving cells favor synchronization across a population of locally coupled genetic oscillators. An important assumption in these studies is that cells can immediately interact with their new neighbors after arriving at a new location. However, intercellular interactions in cellular systems may need some time to become fully established. How movement affects synchronization in this situation has not been examined. Here, we develop a coupled phase oscillator model in which we consider cell movement and the gradual recovery of intercellular coupling experienced by a cell after movement, characterized by a moving rate and a coupling recovery rate, respectively. We find (1) an optimal moving rate for synchronization and (2) a critical moving rate above which achieving synchronization is not possible. These results indicate that the extent to which movement enhances synchrony is limited by a gradual recovery of coupling. These findings suggest that the ratio of time scales of movement and signaling recovery is critical for information transfer between moving cells. (paper)

  18. Intercellular signaling pathways active during intervertebral disc growth, differentiation, and aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahia, Chitra Lekha; Mahoney, Eric J; Durrani, Atiq A; Wylie, Christopher

    2009-03-01

    Intervertebral discs at different postnatal ages were assessed for active intercellular signaling pathways. To generate a spatial and temporal map of the signaling pathways active in the postnatal intervertebral disc (IVD). The postnatal IVD is a complex structure, consisting of 3 histologically distinct components, the nucleus pulposus, fibrous anulus fibrosus, and endplate. These differentiate and grow during the first 9 weeks of age in the mouse. Identification of the major signaling pathways active during and after the growth and differentiation period will allow functional analysis using mouse genetics and identify targets for therapy for individual components of the disc. Antibodies specific for individual cell signaling pathways were used on cryostat sections of IVD at different postnatal ages to identify which components of the IVD were responding to major classes of intercellular signal, including sonic hedgehog, Wnt, TGFbeta, FGF, and BMPs. We present a spatial/temporal map of these signaling pathways during growth, differentiation, and aging of the disc. During growth and differentiation of the disc, its different components respond at different times to different intercellular signaling ligands. Most of these are dramatically downregulated at the end of disc growth.

  19. Micronucleus formation in cultured human keratinocytes: Involvement of intercellular bioactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Pelt, F N; Haring, R M; Weterings, P J

    1991-01-01

    Micronucleus formation in cultured human keratinocytes was studied after exposure to benzo[a]pyrene, cyclophosphamide and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate without the addition of an exogenous metabolizing system. The first two agents need bioactivation by specific isoenzymes of cytochrome P-450 to form genotoxic intermediates. Benzo[a]pyrene induced the micronucleus formation in both uninduced and Aroclor 1254-pretreated cultures. Clastogenic effects of cyclophosphamide were observed only in Aroclor 1254-pretreated cells. The tumour promotor 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate did not affect the frequency of micronuclei in human keratinocytes. The data indicate that cultured human keratinocytes can be used to study the tissue-specific response to genotoxic agents as well as interindividual variation in biotransformation capacity.

  20. Blocking effects of human tau on squid giant synapse transmission and its prevention by T-817 MA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herman eMoreno

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Filamentous tau inclusions are hallmarks of Alzheimer’s disease (AD and related neurodegenerative tauopathies, but the molecular mechanisms involved in tau mediated changes in neuronal function and their possible effects on synaptic transmission are unknown. We have evaluated the effects of human tau protein injected directly into the presynaptic terminal axon of the squid giant synapse, which affords functional, structural, and biochemical analysis of its action on the synaptic release process. Indeed, we have found that at physiological concentrations recombinant human tau isoforms (h-tau 42 become phosphorylated, produce a rapid synaptic transmission block, and induce the formation of clusters of aggregated synaptic vesicles in the vicinity of the active zone. Presynaptic voltage clamp recordings demonstrate that h-tau does not modify the presynaptic calcium current amplitude or kinetics. Analysis of synaptic noise at the post-synaptic axon following pre-synaptic h-tau42 microinjection revealed an initial phase of increase spontaneous transmitter release followed by a marked reduction in noise. Finally, systemic administration of T-817MA, a proposed neuro-protective agent, rescued tau-induced synaptic abnormalities. Our results show novel mechanisms of h-tau42 mediated synaptic transmission failure and more importantly identify a potential therapeutic agent to treat/prevent tau-related neurotoxicity.

  1. Blocking Effects of Human Tau on Squid Giant Synapse Transmission and Its Prevention by T-817 MA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Herman; Choi, Soonwook; Yu, Eunah; Brusco, Janaina; Avila, Jesus; Moreira, Jorge E.; Sugimori, Mutsuyuki; Llinás, Rodolfo R.

    2011-01-01

    Filamentous tau inclusions are hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease and related neurodegenerative tauopathies, but the molecular mechanisms involved in tau-mediated changes in neuronal function and their possible effects on synaptic transmission are unknown. We have evaluated the effects of human tau protein injected directly into the presynaptic terminal axon of the squid giant synapse, which affords functional, structural, and biochemical analysis of its action on the synaptic release process. Indeed, we have found that at physiological concentration recombinant human tau (h-tau42) becomes phosphorylated, produces a rapid synaptic transmission block, and induces the formation of clusters of aggregated synaptic vesicles in the vicinity of the active zone. Presynaptic voltage clamp recordings demonstrate that h-tau42 does not modify the presynaptic calcium current amplitude or kinetics. Analysis of synaptic noise at the post-synaptic axon following presynaptic h-tau42 microinjection revealed an initial phase of increase spontaneous transmitter release followed by a marked reduction in noise. Finally, systemic administration of T-817MA, a proposed neuro-protective agent, rescued tau-induced synaptic abnormalities. Our results show novel mechanisms of h-tau42 mediated synaptic transmission failure and identify a potential therapeutic agent to treat tau-related neurotoxicity. PMID:21629767

  2. Drivers of Tuberculosis Transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathema, Barun; Andrews, Jason R; Cohen, Ted; Borgdorff, Martien W; Behr, Marcel; Glynn, Judith R; Rustomjee, Roxana; Silk, Benjamin J; Wood, Robin

    2017-11-03

    Measuring tuberculosis transmission is exceedingly difficult, given the remarkable variability in the timing of clinical disease after Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection; incident disease can result from either a recent (ie, weeks to months) or a remote (ie, several years to decades) infection event. Although we cannot identify with certainty the timing and location of tuberculosis transmission for individuals, approaches for estimating the individual probability of recent transmission and for estimating the fraction of tuberculosis cases due to recent transmission in populations have been developed. Data used to estimate the probable burden of recent transmission include tuberculosis case notifications in young children and trends in tuberculin skin test and interferon γ-release assays. More recently, M. tuberculosis whole-genome sequencing has been used to estimate population levels of recent transmission, identify the distribution of specific strains within communities, and decipher chains of transmission among culture-positive tuberculosis cases. The factors that drive the transmission of tuberculosis in communities depend on the burden of prevalent tuberculosis; the ways in which individuals live, work, and interact (eg, congregate settings); and the capacity of healthcare and public health systems to identify and effectively treat individuals with infectious forms of tuberculosis. Here we provide an overview of these factors, describe tools for measurement of ongoing transmission, and highlight knowledge gaps that must be addressed. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  3. Effect of Er doping on optical transmission and EL spectra of (Zn, Cd)S:Cu phosphors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patil, P.K.; Nandgave, J.K.; Lawangar Pawar, R.D.

    1991-01-01

    Powder phosphors((Znsub(0.4)Cdsub(0.6))S)doped with Cu and Er have been prepared under the inert atmosphere of argon. The optical transmission spectra of Cu doped phosphors have been investigated and explained on the basis of copper associated defect states. The improvement of optical transmission of the phosphors due to Er doping has been reported and explained. The EL emission spectrum of (Znsub(0.4)Cdsub(0.6))S:Cu:Er phosphors exhibits two broad bands characteristic of Cu. The absence of characteristic Er bands has been explained as an effect of thermal quenching of Er donor levels. (author). 9 refs., 2 figs

  4. Effect of surface roughness variation on the transmission characteristics of D-shaped fibers with ambient index change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyun-Joo; Kwon, Oh-Jang; Han, Young-Geun

    2010-01-01

    The influence of surface roughness on the sensitivity of D-shaped fibers to changes in the ambient index was investigated. In order to obtain D-shaped fibers with different surface roughness, we polished one side of the fibers by using different abrasive grits. The topographies of the surfaces of the polished D-shaped fibers were then observed by using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The light scattered from the rough surfaces of the D-shaped fibers was measured by using optical microscopy. The effect of an ambient index change on the transmission characteristics of D-shaped fibers was measured for various values of the surface roughness. The experimental results indicate that variations in the surface roughness have a considerable influence on the sensitivity of the transmission characteristics of D-shaped fibers to changes in the ambient index.

  5. USING THE ROSSITER–McLAUGHLIN EFFECT TO OBSERVE THE TRANSMISSION SPECTRUM OF EARTH’S ATMOSPHERE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, F.; Zhao, G. [Key Laboratory of Optical Astronomy, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 20A Datun Road, Chaoyang District, 100012 Beijing (China); Fosbury, R. A. E.; Petr-Gotzens, M. G. [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 2, D-85748 Garching bei München (Germany); Pallé, E., E-mail: feiy@nao.cas.cn, E-mail: gzhao@nao.cas.cn [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, C/vía Láctea, s/n, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)

    2015-06-20

    Due to stellar rotation, the observed radial velocity of a star varies during the transit of a planet across its surface, a phenomenon known as the Rossiter–McLaughlin (RM) effect. The amplitude of the RM effect is related to the radius of the planet which, because of differential absorption in the planetary atmosphere, depends on wavelength. Therefore, the wavelength-dependent RM effect can be used to probe the planetary atmosphere. We measure for the first time the RM effect of the Earth transiting the Sun using a lunar eclipse observed with the ESO High Accuracy Radial velocity Planet Searcher spectrograph. We analyze the observed RM effect at different wavelengths to obtain the transmission spectrum of the Earth’s atmosphere after the correction of the solar limb-darkening and the convective blueshift. The ozone Chappuis band absorption as well as the Rayleigh scattering features are clearly detectable with this technique. Our observation demonstrates that the RM effect can be an effective technique for exoplanet atmosphere characterization. Its particular asset is that photometric reference stars are not required, circumventing the principal challenge for transmission spectroscopy studies of exoplanet atmospheres using large ground-based telescopes.

  6. Microwave energy transmission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumoto, Hiroshi [Kyoto Univ. (Japan)

    1989-03-05

    Laying stress on the technological problems and effect on the environment of microwave energy transmission, recent scientific and engineering problems and related subjects are described. Because no fuel is required for the solar power generation, the power generation system can not be considered as an expensive one when the unit cost of energy is taken into consideration. Some of the important technological problems in the microwave energy transmission are accurate microwave beam control technology to receiving stations and improvement in the efficiency of transmission system. Microwave energy beam has effects on living bodies, communication, and plasma atmosphere of the earth. Microwave energy transmission using a space flyer unit is scheduled. Its objective is the development of microwave wireless transmission technology and the study of the correlation between high power microwave and ionosphere plasma. Experiments on such a small scale application as a microwave driven space ship to bring results seem also important. 12 refs., 13 figs.

  7. Regulation of the Host Antiviral State by Intercellular Communications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Assil

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Viruses usually induce a profound remodeling of host cells, including the usurpation of host machinery to support their replication and production of virions to invade new cells. Nonetheless, recognition of viruses by the host often triggers innate immune signaling, preventing viral spread and modulating the function of immune cells. It conventionally occurs through production of antiviral factors and cytokines by infected cells. Virtually all viruses have evolved mechanisms to blunt such responses. Importantly, it is becoming increasingly recognized that infected cells also transmit signals to regulate innate immunity in uninfected neighboring cells. These alternative pathways are notably mediated by vesicular secretion of various virus- and host-derived products (miRNAs, RNAs, and proteins and non-infectious viral particles. In this review, we focus on these newly-described modes of cell-to-cell communications and their impact on neighboring cell functions. The reception of these signals can have anti- and pro-viral impacts, as well as more complex effects in the host such as oncogenesis and inflammation. Therefore, these “broadcasting” functions, which might be tuned by an arms race involving selective evolution driven by either the host or the virus, constitute novel and original regulations of viral infection, either highly localized or systemic.

  8. Effect of transmission reduction by insecticide-treated bednets (ITNs on antimalarial drug resistance in western Kenya.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Shah

    Full Text Available Despite the clear public health benefit of insecticide-treated bednets (ITNs, the impact of malaria transmission-reduction by vector control on the spread of drug resistance is not well understood. In the present study, the effect of sustained transmission reduction by ITNs on the prevalence of Plasmodium falciparum gene mutations associated with resistance to the antimalarial drugs sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP and chloroquine (CQ in children under the age of five years was investigated during an ITN trial in Asembo area, western Kenya. During the ITN trial, the national first line antimalarial treatment changed from CQ to SP. Smear-positive samples collected from cross sectional surveys prior to ITN introduction (baseline, n = 250 and five years post-ITN intervention (year 5 survey, n = 242 were genotyped for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs at dhfr-51, 59, 108, 164 and dhps-437, 540 (SP resistance, and pfcrt-76 and pfmdr1-86 (CQ resistance. The association between the drug resistance mutations and epidemiological variables was evaluated. There were significant increases in the prevalence of SP dhps mutations and the dhfr/dhps quintuple mutant, and a significant reduction in the proportion of mixed infections detected at dhfr-51, 59 and dhps-437, 540 SNPs from baseline to the year 5 survey. There was no change in the high prevalence of pfcrt-76 and pfmdr1-86 mutations. Multivariable regression analysis further showed that current antifolate use and year of survey were significantly associated with more SP drug resistance mutations. These results suggest that increased antifolate drug use due to drug policy change likely led to the high prevalence of SP mutations 5 years post-ITN intervention and reduced transmission had no apparent effect on the existing high prevalence of CQ mutations. There is no evidence from the current study that sustained transmission reduction by ITNs reduces the prevalence of genes associated with malaria

  9. Cytochrome P450-mediated metabolism of tumour promoters modifies the inhibition of intercellular communication: a modified assay for tumour promotion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vang, Ole; Wallin, H.; Doehmer, J.

    1993-01-01

    The role of metabolism of tumour promoters on the inhibition of intercellular communication was investigated in a modified V79 metabolic cooperation system. V79 cells, which stably express different rat cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYP1A1, CYP1A2 or CYP2B1), were used in the metabolic cooperation assay...... B1 and 4-nitrobiphenyl, did not inhibit metabolic cooperation in either V79 cells expressing or cells not expressing cytochrome P450. We conclude that cytochrome P450-associated metabolism plays an important role in the inhibition of gap junctional intercellular communication of some tumour...... promoters. The modified metabolic cooperation assay presented here is valuable for detecting some inhibitory chemicals which have been 'false negative' in previous assays for gap junctional intercellular communication. The assay also discloses that cytochrome P450 metabolism alters intercellular...

  10. Novel approaches to mitigating bacterial biofilm formation and intercellular communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasper, Stephen H.

    Long thought of as solitary single-cell organisms, it is now widely accepted that bacteria can act and cooperate as social organisms. Phenomena such as biofilm formation and quorum sensing (QS) are two intimately intertwined cooperative behaviors that significantly contribute to the pathogenesis of many bacteria. Biofilms are surface associated communities of bacteria encased in a secreted extracellular matrix, which provides several advantages over an individualized lifestyle, such as increased protection from antimicrobial agents as well as enhanced opportunity for the exchange of genetic material. Bacterial QS is a system of population-based communication through the production, sensing, and response to chemical signals, often controlling the expression of diverse virulence factors (e.g. toxins, proteases). Biofilm formation and QS are cooperative processes that are often leveraged as bacteria coordinate infection processes, and can therefore be novel targets for anti-infective treatments that differ from conventional antibiotic treatment. Our lab has previously identified a novel class of small molecules that inhibit biofilm formation and disrupt QS by the pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa. These organosulfur-based compounds are either natural products or related derivatives of the tropical plant Petiveria alliacea. Because oral biofilm (e.g. dental plaque) is a major conduit of oral and systemic disease, and is also a site for horizontal transfer for genes encoding antibiotic resistance, there exists a need for novel strategies for inhibiting oral biofilm development. Therefore, a small library (˜50 compounds) of structural derivatives was developed and screened for their ability to inhibit biofilm formation by multiple orally associated bacteria. The screening effort uncovered several related compounds that inhibited oral biofilm development. To determine how natural product-based organosulfur compounds could be inducing QS inhibitory effects, an

  11. Effects of layer nanodefects on the light transmission by optical elements with multilayer interference coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fekeshgazyi, Yi.V.; Syidenko, T.S.; Mitsa, O.V.; Barna, P.; Kyikyineshyi, O.Ye.

    2011-01-01

    The light transmission properties of optical elements with multilayer interference coatings have been studied. The reduction of transmittance maxima for optical elements with coating containing defects is found to be stronger for larger refractive indices of the substances that the defects are made of. The shape of transmittance curves is found to substantially depend on the defect dimensions along the direction of light propagation and the defect arrangement in the layer bulk. The results obtained are necessary for the developing of a technology aimed at manufacturing the optical elements with multilayer interference coatings for laser facilities and optical lenses.

  12. An experimental hut study to quantify the effect of DDT and airborne pyrethroids on entomological parameters of malaria transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Current malaria vector control programmes rely on insecticides with rapid contact toxicity. However, spatial repellents can also be applied to reduce man-vector contact, which might ultimately impact malaria transmission. The aim of this study was to quantify effects of airborne pyrethroids from coils and DDT used an indoor residual spray (IRS) on entomological parameters that influence malaria transmission. Methods The effect of Transfluthrin and Metofluthrin coils compared to DDT on house entry, exit and indoor feeding behaviour of Anopheles gambiae sensu lato were measured in experimental huts in the field and in the semi-field. Outcomes were deterrence - reduction in house entry of mosquitoes; irritancy or excito-repellency – induced premature exit of mosquitoes; blood feeding inhibition and effect on mosquito fecundity. Results Transfluthrin coils, Metofluthrin coils and DDT reduced human vector contact through deterrence by 38%, 30% and 8%, respectively and induced half of the mosquitoes to leave huts before feeding (56%, 55% and 48%, respectively). Almost all mosquitoes inside huts with Metofluthrin and Transfluthrin coils and more than three quarters of mosquitoes in the DDT hut did not feed, almost none laid eggs and 67%, 72% and 70% of all mosquitoes collected from Transfluthrin, Metofluthrin and DDT huts, respectively had died after 24 hours. Conclusion This study highlights that airborne pyrethroids and DDT affect a range of anopheline mosquito behaviours that are important parameters in malaria transmission, namely deterrence, irritancy/excito-repellency and blood-feeding inhibition. These effects are in addition to significant toxicity and reduced mosquito fecundity that affect mosquito densities and, therefore, provide community protection against diseases for both users and non-users. Airborne insecticides and freshly applied DDT had similar effects on deterrence, irritancy and feeding inhibition. Therefore, it is suggested that

  13. An experimental hut study to quantify the effect of DDT and airborne pyrethroids on entomological parameters of malaria transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogoma, Sheila B; Lorenz, Lena M; Ngonyani, Hassan; Sangusangu, Robert; Kitumbukile, Mohammed; Kilalangongono, Masoudi; Simfukwe, Emmanuel T; Mseka, Anton; Mbeyela, Edgar; Roman, Deogratius; Moore, Jason; Kreppel, Katharina; Maia, Marta F; Moore, Sarah J

    2014-04-01

    Current malaria vector control programmes rely on insecticides with rapid contact toxicity. However, spatial repellents can also be applied to reduce man-vector contact, which might ultimately impact malaria transmission. The aim of this study was to quantify effects of airborne pyrethroids from coils and DDT used an indoor residual spray (IRS) on entomological parameters that influence malaria transmission. The effect of Transfluthrin and Metofluthrin coils compared to DDT on house entry, exit and indoor feeding behaviour of Anopheles gambiae sensu lato were measured in experimental huts in the field and in the semi-field. Outcomes were deterrence--reduction in house entry of mosquitoes; irritancy or excito-repellency--induced premature exit of mosquitoes; blood feeding inhibition and effect on mosquito fecundity. Transfluthrin coils, Metofluthrin coils and DDT reduced human vector contact through deterrence by 38%, 30% and 8%, respectively and induced half of the mosquitoes to leave huts before feeding (56%, 55% and 48%, respectively). Almost all mosquitoes inside huts with Metofluthrin and Transfluthrin coils and more than three quarters of mosquitoes in the DDT hut did not feed, almost none laid eggs and 67%, 72% and 70% of all mosquitoes collected from Transfluthrin, Metofluthrin and DDT huts, respectively had died after 24 hours. This study highlights that airborne pyrethroids and DDT affect a range of anopheline mosquito behaviours that are important parameters in malaria transmission, namely deterrence, irritancy/excito-repellency and blood-feeding inhibition. These effects are in addition to significant toxicity and reduced mosquito fecundity that affect mosquito densities and, therefore, provide community protection against diseases for both users and non-users. Airborne insecticides and freshly applied DDT had similar effects on deterrence, irritancy and feeding inhibition. Therefore, it is suggested that airborne pyrethroids, if delivered in suitable

  14. Force transmissibility versus displacement transmissibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lage, Y. E.; Neves, M. M.; Maia, N. M. M.; Tcherniak, D.

    2014-10-01

    It is well-known that when a single-degree-of-freedom (sdof) system is excited by a continuous motion of the foundation, the force transmissibility, relating the force transmitted to the foundation to the applied force, equals the displacement transmissibility. Recent developments in the generalization of the transmissibility to multiple-degree-of-freedom (mdof) systems have shown that similar simple and direct relations between both types of transmissibility do not appear naturally from the definitions, as happens in the sdof case. In this paper, the authors present their studies on the conditions under which it is possible to establish a relation between force transmissibility and displacement transmissibility for mdof systems. As far as the authors are aware, such a relation is not currently found in the literature, which is justified by being based on recent developments in the transmissibility concept for mdof systems. Indeed, it does not appear naturally, but the authors observed that the needed link is present when the displacement transmissibility is obtained between the same coordinates where the applied and reaction forces are considered in the force transmissibility case; this implies that the boundary conditions are not exactly the same and instead follow some rules. This work presents a formal derivation of the explicit relation between the force and displacement transmissibilities for mdof systems, and discusses its potential and limitations. The authors show that it is possible to obtain the displacement transmissibility from measured forces, and the force transmissibility from measured displacements, opening new perspectives, for example, in the identification of applied or transmitted forces. With this novel relation, it becomes possible, for example, to estimate the force transmissibility matrix with the structure off its supports, in free boundary conditions, and without measuring the forces. As far as force identification is concerned, this

  15. Data transmission

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tugal, Dogan A; Tugal, Osman

    1989-01-01

    This updated second edition provides working answers to today's critical questions about designing and managing all types of data transmission systems and features a new chapter on local area networks (LANs...

  16. Demonstration of DFT-spread 256QAM-OFDM signal transmission with cost-effective directly modulated laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fan; Yu, Jianjun; Fang, Yuan; Dong, Ze; Li, Xinying; Chen, Lin

    2014-04-07

    We experimentally demonstrated a 256-ary quadrature amplitude modulation (256QAM) direct-detection optical orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (DDO-OFDM) transmission system utilizing a cost-effective directly modulated laser (DML). Intra-symbol frequency-domain averaging (ISFA) is applied to suppress in-band noise while the channel response estimation and Discrete Fourier Transform-spread (DFT-spread) is used to reduce the peak-to-average power ratio (PAPR) of the transmitted OFDM signal. The bit-error ratio (BER) of 15-Gbit/s 256QAM-OFDM signal has been measured after 20-km SSMF transmission that is less than 7% forward-error-correction (FEC) threshold of 3.8 × 10(-3) as the launch power into fiber is set at 6dBm. For 11.85-Gbit/s 256QAM-OFDM signal, with the aid of ISFA-based channel estimation and PAPR reduction enabled by DFT-spread, the BER after 20-km SSMF transmission can be improved from 6.4 × 10(-3) to 6.8 × 10(-4) when the received optical power is -6dBm.

  17. Using Multiple Outcomes of Sexual Behavior to Provide Insights Into Chlamydia Transmission and the Effectiveness of Prevention Interventions in Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enns, Eva Andrea; Kao, Szu-Yu; Kozhimannil, Katy Backes; Kahn, Judith; Farris, Jill; Kulasingam, Shalini L

    2017-10-01

    Mathematical models are important tools for assessing prevention and management strategies for sexually transmitted infections. These models are usually developed for a single infection and require calibration to observed epidemiological trends in the infection of interest. Incorporating other outcomes of sexual behavior into the model, such as pregnancy, may better inform the calibration process. We developed a mathematical model of chlamydia transmission and pregnancy in Minnesota adolescents aged 15 to 19 years. We calibrated the model to statewide rates of reported chlamydia cases alone (chlamydia calibration) and in combination with pregnancy rates (dual calibration). We evaluated the impact of calibrating to different outcomes of sexual behavior on estimated input parameter values, predicted epidemiological outcomes, and predicted impact of chlamydia prevention interventions. The two calibration scenarios produced different estimates of the probability of condom use, the probability of chlamydia transmission per sex act, the proportion of asymptomatic infections, and the screening rate among men. These differences resulted in the dual calibration scenario predicting lower prevalence and incidence of chlamydia compared with calibrating to chlamydia cases alone. When evaluating the impact of a 10% increase in condom use, the dual calibration scenario predicted fewer infections averted over 5 years compared with chlamydia calibration alone [111 (6.8%) vs 158 (8.5%)]. While pregnancy and chlamydia in adolescents are often considered separately, both are outcomes of unprotected sexual activity. Incorporating both as calibration targets in a model of chlamydia transmission resulted in different parameter estimates, potentially impacting the intervention effectiveness predicted by the model.

  18. Delayed manifestation and transmission bias of de novo chromosome mutations. Their relevance for radiation health effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Masao S.

    2006-01-01

    The origin and transmission of de novo chromosome mutations were reviewed on the basis of our chromosome studies in retinoblastoma patients and male infertility. In a series of 264 sporadic retinoblastoma families, gross chromosome rearrangements involving the RB1 locus were identified in 23 cases (8.7%), of which 16 were non-mosaic and 7 were mosaic mutations. The newly formed chromosome mutations, whether they were non-mosaic or mosaic, had a strong bias towards paternally derived chromosome, indicating that they shared a common mechanism where a pre-mutational event or instability is carried over to zygote by sperm and manifested as gross chromosome mutation at the early stages of development. The de novo chromosome mutations are preferentially transmitted through female carriers. This transmission bias is consistent with the finding of higher frequencies of translocation carriers in infertile men (7.69% versus 0.27% in general populations) in whom meiotic progression is severely suppressed, possibly through activation of meiotic checkpoints. Such a meiotic surveillance mechanism may minimize the spreading of newly-arisen chromosome mutations in populations. A quantitative model of meiotic surveillance mechanism is proposed and successfully applied to the published data on ''humped'' dose-response curves for radiation-induced spermatogonial reciprocal translocations in several mammalian species. (author)

  19. The effect of scattering on single photon transmission of optical angular momentum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrews, D L

    2011-01-01

    Schemes for the communication and registration of optical angular momentum depend on the fidelity of transmission between optical system components. It is known that electron spin can be faithfully relayed between exciton states in quantum dots; it has also been shown by several theoretical and experimental studies that the use of beams conveying orbital angular momentum can significantly extend the density and efficiency of such information transfer. However, it remains unclear to what extent the operation of such a concept at the single photon level is practicable—especially where this involves optical propagation through a material system, in which forward scattering events can intervene. The possibility of transmitting and decoding angular momentum over nanoscale distances itself raises other important issues associated with near-field interrogation. This paper provides a framework to address these and related issues. A quantum electrodynamical representation is constructed and used to pursue the consequences of individual photons, from a Laguerre–Gaussian beam, undergoing single and multiple scattering events in the course of propagation. In this context, issues concerning orbital angular momentum conservation, and its possible compromise, are tackled by identifying the relevant components of the electromagnetic scattering and coupling tensors, using an irreducible Cartesian basis. The physical interpretation broadly supports the fidelity of quantum information transmission, but it also identifies potential limitations of principle

  20. The effect of scattering on single photon transmission of optical angular momentum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, D. L.

    2011-06-01

    Schemes for the communication and registration of optical angular momentum depend on the fidelity of transmission between optical system components. It is known that electron spin can be faithfully relayed between exciton states in quantum dots; it has also been shown by several theoretical and experimental studies that the use of beams conveying orbital angular momentum can significantly extend the density and efficiency of such information transfer. However, it remains unclear to what extent the operation of such a concept at the single photon level is practicable—especially where this involves optical propagation through a material system, in which forward scattering events can intervene. The possibility of transmitting and decoding angular momentum over nanoscale distances itself raises other important issues associated with near-field interrogation. This paper provides a framework to address these and related issues. A quantum electrodynamical representation is constructed and used to pursue the consequences of individual photons, from a Laguerre-Gaussian beam, undergoing single and multiple scattering events in the course of propagation. In this context, issues concerning orbital angular momentum conservation, and its possible compromise, are tackled by identifying the relevant components of the electromagnetic scattering and coupling tensors, using an irreducible Cartesian basis. The physical interpretation broadly supports the fidelity of quantum information transmission, but it also identifies potential limitations of principle.

  1. Effect of scattered electrons on the ‘Magic Plate’ transmission array detector response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alrowaili, Z. A.; Lerch, M.; Petasecca, M.; Carolan, M.; Rosenfeld, A.

    2017-02-01

    Transmission type detectors can provide a measure of the energy fluence and if they are real-time systems that do not significantly attenuate the radiation beam have a distinct advantage over the current method as Quality Assurance (QA) could in principle be done during the actual patient treatment. The use of diode arrays in QA holds much promise due to real-time operation and feedback when compared to other methods e.g. films which are not real-time. The goal of this work is to describe the characterization of the radiation response of a silicon diode array called the Magic Plate (MP) when operated in transmission mode (MPTM). The response linearity of MPTM was excellent (R2=1). When the MP was placed in linac block tray position; the change in PDD at phantom surface (SSD 100 cm) for a 10 × 10 cm2 was -0.037 %, -0.178 % and -0.949 % for 6 MV, 10 MV and 18 MV beams. Therefore, MP does not provide a significant increase in skin dose to the patient and the percentage depth doses showed an excellent agreement with and without MPTM for 6 MV, 10 MV and 18 MV beams.

  2. Effect of scattered electrons on the ‘Magic Plate’ transmission array detector response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alrowaili, Z A; Lerch, M; Petasecca, M; Rosenfeld, A; Carolan, M

    2017-01-01

    Transmission type detectors can provide a measure of the energy fluence and if they are real-time systems that do not significantly attenuate the radiation beam have a distinct advantage over the current method as Quality Assurance (QA) could in principle be done during the actual patient treatment. The use of diode arrays in QA holds much promise due to real-time operation and feedback when compared to other methods e.g. films which are not real-time. The goal of this work is to describe the characterization of the radiation response of a silicon diode array called the Magic Plate (MP) when operated in transmission mode (MPTM). The response linearity of MPTM was excellent (R2=1). When the MP was placed in linac block tray position; the change in PDD at phantom surface (SSD 100 cm) for a 10 × 10 cm 2 was -0.037 %, -0.178 % and -0.949 % for 6 MV, 10 MV and 18 MV beams. Therefore, MP does not provide a significant increase in skin dose to the patient and the percentage depth doses showed an excellent agreement with and without MPTM for 6 MV, 10 MV and 18 MV beams. (paper)

  3. The effect of temperature on Anopheles mosquito population dynamics and the potential for malaria transmission.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay M Beck-Johnson

    Full Text Available The parasites that cause malaria depend on Anopheles mosquitoes for transmission; because of this, mosquito population dynamics are a key determinant of malaria risk. Development and survival rates of both the Anopheles mosquitoes and the Plasmodium parasites that cause malaria depend on temperature, making this a potential driver of mosquito population dynamics and malaria transmission. We developed a temperature-dependent, stage-structured delayed differential equation model to better understand how climate determines risk. Including the full mosquito life cycle in the model reveals that the mosquito population abundance is more sensitive to temperature than previously thought because it is strongly influenced by the dynamics of the juvenile mosquito stages whose vital rates are also temperature-dependent. Additionally, the model predicts a peak in abundance of mosquitoes old enough to vector malaria at more accurate temperatures than previous models. Our results point to the importance of incorporating detailed vector biology into models for predicting the risk for vector borne diseases.

  4. Light fidelity (Li-Fi): An effective solution for data transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Vaishali; Rajput, Shreya; Sharma, Praveen Kumar

    2016-03-01

    The rapid advancement in the field of science has led to the development of many technologies, gadgets and equipment which in turn has hold pressure on Wi-Fi, modems, board band connections etc., to lessen this stress new revolution in this field has rooted on termed "LI-FI". Li-Fi stands for light fidelity i.e. light is used for the transmission of data. The concept of Li-Fi is taking the fiber out of fiber optics sending information through an LED that varies in intensity faster than human eye can follow. Li-Fi offers an entirely new paradigm in wireless technology in term of communication, speed, flexibility, usability etc. The idea of data through illumination is similar to radio waves communication difference lies in the use of LED in LI-Fi, which made it superior than Wi-Fi. Hence Li-Fi is linked to the visible light communication network provision transmission which is looked upon as an advancement. Thus a new class of light with high intensity light source of solid state design bringing clean lighting solution to general and specialty lighting. With energy efficiency, long useful lifetime, full spectrum and dimming. Li-Fi is just not only confined to light and LED indeed it is a platform with versatile advantages and facilities. This paper gives a brief idea about the introduction of Li-Fi, its working, advantages, limitations etc.

  5. No perinatal HIV-1 transmission from women with effective antiretroviral therapy starting before conception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandelbrot, Laurent; Tubiana, Roland; Le Chenadec, Jerome; Dollfus, Catherine; Faye, Albert; Pannier, Emmanuelle; Matheron, Sophie; Khuong, Marie-Aude; Garrait, Valerie; Reliquet, Veronique; Devidas, Alain; Berrebi, Alain; Allisy, Christine; Elleau, Christophe; Arvieux, Cedric; Rouzioux, Christine; Warszawski, Josiane; Blanche, Stéphane

    2015-12-01

    The efficacy of preventing perinatal transmission (PT) of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) depends on both viral load (VL) and treatment duration. The objective of this study was to determine whether initiating highly active antiretroviral therapy (ART) before conception has the potential to eliminate PT. A total of 8075 HIV-infected mother/infant pairs included from 2000 to 2011 in the national prospective multicenter French Perinatal Cohort (ANRS-EPF) received ART, delivered live-born children with determined HIV infection status, and did not breastfeed. PT was analyzed according to maternal VL at delivery and timing of ART initiation. The overall rate of PT was 0.7% (56 of 8075). No transmission occurred among 2651 infants born to women who were receiving ART before conception, continued ART throughout the pregnancy, and delivered with a plasma VL women starting ART before conception to 0.4% (3 of 709), 0.9% (24 of 2810), and 2.2% (23 of 1051) for those starting during the first, second, or third trimester (P women with VLs of 50-400 copies/mL near delivery than for those with suppression of plasma VL. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Extraordinary Effects in Quasi-Periodic Gold Nanocavities: Enhanced Transmission and Polarization Control of Cavity Modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhama, Rakesh; Caligiuri, Vincenzo; Petti, Lucia; Rashed, Alireza R; Rippa, Massimo; Lento, Raffaella; Termine, Roberto; Caglayan, Humeyra; De Luca, Antonio

    2018-01-23

    Plasmonic quasi-periodic structures are well-known to exhibit several surprising phenomena with respect to their periodic counterparts, due to their long-range order and higher rotational symmetry. Thanks to their specific geometrical arrangement, plasmonic quasi-crystals offer unique possibilities in tailoring the coupling and propagation of surface plasmons through their lattice, a scenario in which a plethora of fascinating phenomena can take place. In this paper we investigate the extraordinary transmission phenomenon occurring in specifically patterned Thue-Morse nanocavities, demonstrating noticeable enhanced transmission, directly revealed by near-field optical experiments, performed by means of a scanning near-field optical microscope (SNOM). SNOM further provides an intuitive picture of confined plasmon modes inside the nanocavities and confirms that localization of plasmon modes is based on size and depth of nanocavities, while cross talk between close cavities via propagating plasmons holds the polarization response of patterned quasi-crystals. Our performed numerical simulations are in good agreement with the experimental results. Thus, the control on cavity size and incident polarization can be used to alter the intensity and spatial properties of confined cavity modes in such structures, which can be exploited in order to design a plasmonic device with customized optical properties and desired functionalities, to be used for several applications in quantum plasmonics.

  7. Light fidelity (Li-Fi): An effective solution for data transmission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Vaishali; Rajput, Shreya; Sharma, Praveen Kumar

    2016-01-01

    The rapid advancement in the field of science has led to the development of many technologies, gadgets and equipment which in turn has hold pressure on Wi-Fi, modems, board band connections etc., to lessen this stress new revolution in this field has rooted on termed “LI-FI”. Li-Fi stands for light fidelity i.e. light is used for the transmission of data. The concept of Li-Fi is taking the fiber out of fiber optics sending information through an LED that varies in intensity faster than human eye can follow. Li-Fi offers an entirely new paradigm in wireless technology in term of communication, speed, flexibility, usability etc. The idea of data through illumination is similar to radio waves communication difference lies in the use of LED in LI-Fi, which made it superior than Wi-Fi. Hence Li-Fi is linked to the visible light communication network provision transmission which is looked upon as an advancement. Thus a new class of light with high intensity light source of solid state design bringing clean lighting solution to general and specialty lighting. With energy efficiency, long useful lifetime, full spectrum and dimming. Li-Fi is just not only confined to light and LED indeed it is a platform with versatile advantages and facilities. This paper gives a brief idea about the introduction of Li-Fi, its working, advantages, limitations etc.

  8. Light fidelity (Li-Fi): An effective solution for data transmission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Vaishali, E-mail: vaishalisharma202@gmail.com; Rajput, Shreya, E-mail: rajputshreya15@gmail.com; Sharma, Praveen Kumar, E-mail: psv.bkbiet@gmail.com [Department of Electronics and Communication Engineering, B.K Birla Institute of Engineering and Technology, Pilani, Rajasthan-333031 (India)

    2016-03-09

    The rapid advancement in the field of science has led to the development of many technologies, gadgets and equipment which in turn has hold pressure on Wi-Fi, modems, board band connections etc., to lessen this stress new revolution in this field has rooted on termed “LI-FI”. Li-Fi stands for light fidelity i.e. light is used for the transmission of data. The concept of Li-Fi is taking the fiber out of fiber optics sending information through an LED that varies in intensity faster than human eye can follow. Li-Fi offers an entirely new paradigm in wireless technology in term of communication, speed, flexibility, usability etc. The idea of data through illumination is similar to radio waves communication difference lies in the use of LED in LI-Fi, which made it superior than Wi-Fi. Hence Li-Fi is linked to the visible light communication network provision transmission which is looked upon as an advancement. Thus a new class of light with high intensity light source of solid state design bringing clean lighting solution to general and specialty lighting. With energy efficiency, long useful lifetime, full spectrum and dimming. Li-Fi is just not only confined to light and LED indeed it is a platform with versatile advantages and facilities. This paper gives a brief idea about the introduction of Li-Fi, its working, advantages, limitations etc.

  9. Cost-effectiveness of antiviral therapy during late pregnancy to prevent perinatal transmission of hepatitis B virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjun Wang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background. Hepatitis B virus (HBV infections are perinatally transmitted from chronically infected mothers. Supplemental antiviral therapy during late pregnancy with lamivudine (LAM, telbivudine (LdT, or tenofovir (TDF can substantially reduce perinatal HBV transmission compared to postnatal immunoprophylaxis (IP alone. However, the cost-effectiveness of these measures is not clear. Aim. This study evaluated the cost-effectiveness from a societal perspective of supplemental antiviral agents for preventing perinatal HBV transmission in mothers with high viral load (>6 log10 copies/mL. Methods. A systematic review and network meta-analysis were performed for the risk of perinatal HBV transmission with antiviral therapies. A decision analysis was conducted to evaluate the clinical and economic outcomes in China of four competing strategies: postnatal IP alone (strategy IP, or in combination with perinatal LAM (strategy LAM + IP, LdT (strategy LdT + IP, or TDF (strategy TDF + IP. Antiviral treatments were administered from week 28 of gestation to 4 weeks after birth. Outcomes included treatment-related costs, number of infections, and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs. One- and two-way sensitivity analyses were performed to identify influential clinical and cost-related variables. Probabilistic sensitivity analyses were used to estimate the probabilities of being cost-effective for each strategy. Results. LdT + IP and TDF + IP averted the most infections and HBV-related deaths, and gained the most QALYs. IP and TDF + IP were dominated as they resulted in less or equal QALYs with higher associated costs. LdT + IP had an incremental $2,891 per QALY gained (95% CI [$932–$20,372] compared to LAM + IP (GDP per capita for China in 2013 was $6,800. One-way sensitivity analyses showed that the cost-effectiveness of LdT + IP was only sensitive to the relative risk of HBV transmission comparing LdT + IP with LAM + IP. Probabilistic sensitivity analyses

  10. First experimental proof for aberration correction in XPEEM: Resolution, transmission enhancement, and limitation by space charge effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, Th.; Sala, A.; Marchetto, H.; Umbach, E.; Freund, H.-J.

    2013-01-01

    The positive effect of double aberration correction in x-ray induced Photoelectron Emission Microscopy (XPEEM) has been successfully demonstrated for both, the lateral resolution and the transmission, using the Au 4f XPS peak for element specific imaging at a kinetic energy of 113 eV. The lateral resolution is improved by a factor of four, compared to a non-corrected system, whereas the transmission is enhanced by a factor of 5 at a moderate resolution of 80 nm. With an optimized system setting, a lateral resolution of 18 nm could be achieved, which is up to now the best value reported for energy filtered XPEEM imaging. However, the absolute resolution does not yet reach the theoretical limit of 2 nm, which is due to space charge limitation. This occurs along the entire optical axis up to the contrast aperture. In XPEEM the pulsed time structure of the exciting soft x-ray light source causes a short and highly intense electron pulse, which results in an image blurring. In contrast, the imaging with elastically reflected electrons in the low energy electron microscopy (LEEM) mode yields a resolution clearly below 5 nm. Technical solutions to reduce the space charge effect in an aberration-corrected spectro-microscope are discussed. - Highlights: ► First successful double aberration correction in XPEEM. ► Improvement of resolution and transmission by aberration correction. ► Lateral resolution of 18 nm in energy filtered XPEEM is the best up to now reported value. ► First investigation of space charge effects in aberrations corrected PEEM

  11. The Effects of Peer Education on The Behaviors Regarding HIV/AIDS Transmission Prevention Among Street Children in Bandung City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lia Meilianingsih

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available All adolescents are vulnerable to HIV/AIDS, including street children. The behaviors of street children are much influenced by their peers. Peer education can enhance knowledge, attitudes, beliefs, and skills and empower children to be responsible for protecting the health of themselves and their peers (Wahyuni, 2012. This study aims to determine the effects of peer health education on the HIV/AIDS Preventive Behaviors of Street Children in Bandung City in 2015. The research employed a quasi-experimental method with the pre-post-test control group design. The sample was 26 people for the treatment group and 26 people for the control group, respectively, taken with purposive sampling technique. Interventions began with peer educator training and then the peer educators provided health education on HIV/AIDS transmission prevention through small group discussions for 2 days. The data in this study were not normally distributed. The paired or dependent data were analyzed using the Wilcoxon test, while the unpaired or independent data using Mann-Whitney test. The results of the research show that peer health education had effects on the knowledge and attitudes of the street children (p values 0.00 and 0.00, respectively; however, there was no effect of peer health education on the actions regarding HIV/AIDS transmission prevention among the street children (p value 0.09. Hence, it is advisable to conduct health promotion with peer health education method in an effort of increasing knowledge and attitudes regarding HIV/AIDS transmission prevention among street children that is sustainable and integrated with the existing programs at puskesmas (Community Health Center.

  12. Numerical Analysis of Through Transmission Pulsed Eddy Current Testing and Effects of Pulse Width Variation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Young Kil; Choi, Dong Myung

    2007-01-01

    By using numerical analysis methods, through transmission type pulsed eddy current (PEC) testing is modeled and PEC signal responses due to varying material conductivity, permeability, thickness, lift-off and pulse width are investigated. Results show that the peak amplitude of PEC signal gets reduced and the time to reach the peak amplitude is increased as the material conductivity, permeability, and specimen thickness increase. Also, they indicate that the pulse width needs to be shorter when evaluating the material conductivity and the plate thickness using the peak amplitude, and when the pulse width is long, the peak time is found to be more useful. Other results related to lift-off variation are reported as well

  13. Design of an effective energy receiving adapter for microwave wireless power transmission application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Xu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we demonstrate the viability of an energy receiving adapter in a 8×8 array form with high power reception efficiency with the resonator of artificial electromagnetic absorber being used as the element. Unlike the conventional reported rectifying antenna resonators, both the size of the element and the separations between the elements are electrically small in our design. The energy collecting process is explained with an equivalent circuit model, and a RF combining network is designed to combine the captured AC power from each element to one main terminal for AC-to-DC conversion. The energy receiving adapter yields a total reception efficiency of 67% (including the wave capture efficiency of 86% and the AC-to-DC conversion efficiency of 78%, which is quite promising for microwave wireless power transmission.

  14. Microparticle injection effects on microwave transmission through an overly dense plasma layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillman, Eric D., E-mail: eric.gillman@nrl.navy.mil; Amatucci, W. E. [Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Williams, Jeremiah [Wittenberg University, Springfield, Ohio 45501 (United States); Compton, C. S. [Sotera Defense Solutions, Herndon, Virginia 20171 (United States)

    2015-04-15

    Microparticles injected into a plasma have been shown to deplete the free electron population as electrons are collected through the process of microparticles charging to the plasma floating potential. However, these charged microparticles can also act to scatter electromagnetic signals. These experiments investigate microwave penetration through a previously impenetrable overly dense plasma layer as microparticles are injected and the physical phenomena associated with the competing processes that occur due to electron depletion and microwave scattering. The timescales for when each of these competing processes dominates is analyzed in detail. It was found that while both processes play a significant and dominant role at different times, ultimately, transmission through this impenetrable plasma layer can be significantly increased with microparticle injection.

  15. Recommendation on the Environmental Effect Report for the high-voltage transmission line between Netherlands and Norway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The recommendation on the title subject was addressed to the Dutch Minister of Economic Affairs and concerns the environmental impact of the new high-voltage transmission line (NorNed cable) from Norway to the Eemshaven in Groningen, Netherlands. In planning this power cable the environmental impact on the Wadden Sea has to be taken into account. Therefore an environmental effect report (MER, abbreviated in Dutch) has been drafted by the Dutch cooperative of electric power generating companies, Sep, and commented by the WaddenAdviesRaad

  16. Effect of the single-scattering phase function on light transmission through disordered media with large inhomogeneities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marinyuk, V V; Sheberstov, S V

    2017-01-01

    We calculate the total transmission coefficient (transmittance) of a disordered medium with large (compared to the light wavelength) inhomogeneities. To model highly forward scattering in the medium we take advantage of the Gegenbauer kernel phase function. In a subdiffusion thickness range, the transmittance is shown to be sensitive to the specific form of the single-scattering phase function. The effect reveals itself at grazing angles of incidence and originates from small-angle multiple scattering of light. Our results are in a good agreement with numerical solutions to the radiative transfer equation. (paper)

  17. Transient signals on transmission lines an introduction to non-ideal effects and signal integrity issues in electrical systems

    CERN Document Server

    Peterson, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    This lecture provides an introduction to transmission line effects in the time domain. Fundamentals including time of flight, impedance discontinuities, proper termination schemes, nonlinear and reactive loads, and crosstalk are considered. Required prerequisite knowledge is limited to conventional circuit theory. The material is intended to supplement standard textbooks for use with undergraduate students in electrical engineering or computer engineering. The contents should also be of value to practicing engineers with interests in signal integrity and high-speed digital design.Table of Cont

  18. Intergenerational Transmission of Maladaptive Parenting Strategies in Families of Adolescent Mothers: Effects from Grandmothers to Young Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seay, Danielle M; Jahromi, Laudan B; Umaña-Taylor, Adriana J; Updegraff, Kimberly A

    2016-08-01

    The current longitudinal study examined the effect of the transmission of maladaptive parenting strategies from grandmothers to adolescent mothers on children's subsequent development. Mexican-origin adolescent mothers (N = 204) participated in home interviews when the adolescent's child (89 boys, 60 girls) was 2, 3, 4, and 5 years old. Grandmothers' psychological control toward the adolescent mother was positively related to adolescents' potential for abuse 1 year later, which was subsequently positively related to adolescents' punitive discipline toward their young child. In addition, adolescent mothers' punitive discipline subsequently predicted greater externalizing problems and less committed compliance among their children. Adolescent mothers' potential for abuse and punitive discipline mediated the effects of grandmothers' psychological control on children's externalizing problems. Finally, adolescent mothers' potential for abuse mediated the effect of grandmothers' psychological control on adolescent mothers' punitive discipline. Results highlight the salience of long-term intergenerational effects of maladaptive parenting on children's behavior.

  19. Intergenerational Transmission of Maladaptive Parenting Strategies in Families of Adolescent Mothers: Effects from Grandmothers to Young Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seay, Danielle M.; Jahromi, Laudan B.; Umaña-Taylor, Adriana J.; Updegraff, Kimberly A.

    2015-01-01

    The current longitudinal study examined the effect of the transmission of maladaptive parenting strategies from grandmothers to adolescent mothers on children’s subsequent development. Mexican-origin adolescent mothers (N = 204) participated in home interviews when the adolescent’s child (89 boys, 60 girls) was 2, 3, 4, and 5 years old. Grandmothers’ psychological control toward the adolescent mother was positively related to adolescents’ potential for abuse 1 year later, which was subsequently positively related to adolescents’ punitive discipline toward their young child. In addition, adolescent mothers’ punitive discipline subsequently predicted greater externalizing problems and less committed compliance among their children. Adolescent mothers’ potential for abuse and punitive discipline mediated the effects of grandmothers’ psychological control on children’s externalizing problems. Finally, adolescent mothers’ potential for abuse mediated the effect of grandmothers’ psychological control on adolescent mothers’ punitive discipline. Results highlight the salience of long-term intergenerational effects of maladaptive parenting on children’s behavior. PMID:26521948

  20. Bacterial transmission from lens storage cases to contact lenses-Effects of lens care solutions and silver impregnation of cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeltfoort, Pit B J; Hooymans, Johanna M M; Busscher, Henk J; van der Mei, Henny C

    2008-10-01

    The killing efficacies of multipurpose lens care solutions on planktonic and biofilm bacteria grown in polypropylene contact lens storage cases with and without silver impregnation and effects on bacterial transmission from storage cases to silicone hydrogel contact lenses were investigated. For transmission studies, biofilms of Staphylococcus aureus 835 or Pseudomonas aeruginosa no. 3 were grown on lens storage cases and incubated with a contact lens in different multipurpose lens care solutions (Opti-Free(R)Express(R), ReNu(R) MultiPlus(R), and SoloCare Aquatrade mark) or 0.9% NaCl. In addition, planktonic bacteria were directly suspended in multipurpose solutions and their killing efficacies were determined. The numbers of transmitted live and dead bacteria on the lenses were measured using a combination of plate counting and fluorescence microscopy. The highest killing efficacies were shown by Opti-Free(R) Express(R) for planktonic as well as for biofilm bacteria. Silver impregnation of lens cases in combination with the prescribed solution increased the killing efficacy for P. aeruginosa in biofilms, whereas effects for S. aureus were minor. Lowest numbers of live and dead bacteria were transmitted to a lens in Opti-Free(R) Express(R) multipurpose solution, with no significant differences between lens types and no effects of silver impregnation. (c) 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater 2008. (c) 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Enhancement of information transmission with stochastic resonance in hippocampal CA1 neuron models: effects of noise input location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Minato; Mino, Hiroyuki; Durand, Dominique M

    2007-01-01

    Stochastic resonance (SR) has been shown to enhance the signal to noise ratio or detection of signals in neurons. It is not yet clear how this effect of SR on the signal to noise ratio affects signal processing in neural networks. In this paper, we investigate the effects of the location of background noise input on information transmission in a hippocampal CA1 neuron model. In the computer simulation, random sub-threshold spike trains (signal) generated by a filtered homogeneous Poisson process were presented repeatedly to the middle point of the main apical branch, while the homogeneous Poisson shot noise (background noise) was applied to a location of the dendrite in the hippocampal CA1 model consisting of the soma with a sodium, a calcium, and five potassium channels. The location of the background noise input was varied along the dendrites to investigate the effects of background noise input location on information transmission. The computer simulation results show that the information rate reached a maximum value for an optimal amplitude of the background noise amplitude. It is also shown that this optimal amplitude of the background noise is independent of the distance between the soma and the noise input location. The results also show that the location of the background noise input does not significantly affect the maximum values of the information rates generated by stochastic resonance.

  2. The effect of air flow, panel curvature, and internal pressurization on field-incidence transmission loss. [acoustic propagation through aircraft fuselage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koval, L. R.

    1975-01-01

    In the context of sound transmission through aircraft fuselage panels, equations for the field-incidence transmission loss (TL) of a single-walled panel are derived that include the effects of external air flow, panel curvature, and internal fuselage pressurization. These effects are incorporated into the classical equations for the TL of single panels, and the resulting double integral for field-incidence TL is numerically evaluated for a specific set of parameters.

  3. Effects of chronic stress in adolescence on learned fear, anxiety, and synaptic transmission in the rat prelimbic cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negrón-Oyarzo, Ignacio; Pérez, Miguel Ángel; Terreros, Gonzalo; Muñoz, Pablo; Dagnino-Subiabre, Alexies

    2014-02-01

    The prelimbic cortex and amygdala regulate the extinction of conditioned fear and anxiety, respectively. In adult rats, chronic stress affects the dendritic morphology of these brain areas, slowing extinction of learned fear and enhancing anxiety. The aim of this study was to determine whether rats subjected to chronic stress in adolescence show changes in learned fear, anxiety, and synaptic transmission in the prelimbic cortex during adulthood. Male Sprague Dawley rats were subjected to seven days of restraint stress on postnatal day forty-two (PND 42, adolescence). Afterward, the fear-conditioning paradigm was used to study conditioned fear extinction. Anxiety-like behavior was measured one day (PND 50) and twenty-one days (PND 70, adulthood) after stress using the elevated-plus maze and dark-light box tests, respectively. With another set of rats, excitatory synaptic transmission was analyzed with slices of the prelimbic cortex. Rats that had been stressed during adolescence and adulthood had higher anxiety-like behavior levels than did controls, while stress-induced slowing of learned fear extinction in adolescence was reversed during adulthood. As well, the field excitatory postsynaptic potentials of stressed adolescent rats had significantly lower amplitudes than those of controls, although the amplitudes were higher in adulthood. Our results demonstrate that short-term stress in adolescence induces strong effects on excitatory synaptic transmission in the prelimbic cortex and extinction of learned fear, where the effect of stress on anxiety is more persistent than on the extinction of learned fear. These data contribute to the understanding of stress neurobiology. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Dilated intercellular space diameter as marker of reflux-related mucosal injury in children with chronic cough and gastro-oesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrelli, O; Mancini, V; Thapar, N; Ribolsi, M; Emerenziani, S; de'Angelis, G; Bizzarri, B; Lindley, K J; Cicala, M

    2014-04-01

    The diagnostic corroboration of the relationship between gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and chronic cough remains challenging. To compare oesophageal mucosal intercellular space diameter (ISD) in children with GERD, children with gastro-oesophageal reflux (GER)-related cough (GrC) and a control group, and to explore the relationship between baseline impedance levels and dilated ISD in children with GER-related cough. Forty children with GERD, 15 children with GrC and 12 controls prospectively underwent oesophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) with oesophageal biopsies taken 2-3 cm above squamocolumnar junction. ISD were quantified using transmission electron microscopy. Impedance-pH monitoring with evaluation of baseline impedance in the most distal impedance channel was performed in both patient groups. A significant difference in mean ISD values was found between GrC patients (0.9 ± 0.2 μm) and controls (0.5 ± 0.2 μm, P reflux parameter. Finally, there was no correlation between ISD and distal baseline impedance values (r:-0.35; NS). In children with reflux-related cough, dilated intercellular space diameter appears to be an objective and useful marker of oesophageal mucosal injury regardless of acid exposure, and its evaluation should be considered for those patients where the diagnosis is uncertain. In children with reflux-related cough, baseline impedance levels have no role in identifying reflux-induced oesophageal mucosal ultrastructural changes. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Remodelling of cellular excitation (reaction) and intercellular coupling (diffusion) by chronic atrial fibrillation represented by a reaction-diffusion system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Henggui; Garratt, Clifford J.; Kharche, Sanjay; Holden, Arun V.

    2009-06-01

    Human atrial tissue is an excitable system, in which myocytes are excitable elements, and cell-to-cell electrotonic interactions are via diffusive interactions of cell membrane potentials. We developed a family of excitable system models for human atrium at cellular, tissue and anatomical levels for both normal and chronic atrial fibrillation (AF) conditions. The effects of AF-induced remodelling of cell membrane ionic channels (reaction kinetics) and intercellular gap junctional coupling (diffusion) on atrial excitability, conduction of excitation waves and dynamics of re-entrant excitation waves are quantified. Both ionic channel and gap junctional coupling remodelling have rate dependent effects on atrial propagation. Membrane channel conductance remodelling allows the propagation of activity at higher rates than those sustained in normal tissue or in tissue with gap junctional remodelling alone. Membrane channel conductance remodelling is essential for the propagation of activity at rates higher than 300/min as seen in AF. Spatially heterogeneous gap junction coupling remodelling increased the risk of conduction block, an essential factor for the genesis of re-entry. In 2D and 3D anatomical models, the dynamical behaviours of re-entrant excitation waves are also altered by membrane channel modelling. This study provides insights to understand the pro-arrhythmic effects of AF-induced reaction and diffusion remodelling in atrial tissue.

  6. A percolation-like model for simulating inter-cellular diffusion in the context of bystander signalling in tumour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moulton, C.R.; Fleming, A.J.; Ebert, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    Full text: Despite ongoing active research, the role of the radiation bystander effect in modifying local tissue response to an ionising radiation dose remains unclear. The present study aims to provide new insight by simulating the diffusion-mediated inter-cellular communication processes in 2D and 3D cell-like structures to calculate likely signal ranges in the diffusion limited case. Random walks of individual signalling molecules were tracked between cells with inclusion of molecule-receptor interactions. The resulting diffusion anomaly is a function of cell density, signal uptake probability and the spatial arrangement of cells local to the signal origin. Uptake probability effects dominate percolation effects in disordered media. Diffu sion through 2D structures is more conducive to anomalous diffusion than diffusion through 3D structures. Values for time-dependent diffusion constants and permeability are derived for typical simulation parameters. Even at low signal uptake probabilities the communication range is restricted to a mean value of less than 100 foun owing to complete signal uptake by 600 s. This should be considered in light of the potential influence of signal relaying, flo dynamics or vasculature-mediated signalling.

  7. Possible Mechanisms of Mercury Toxicity and Cancer Promotion: Involvement of Gap Junction Intercellular Communications and Inflammatory Cytokines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Zefferino

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A number of observations indicate that heavy metals are able to alter cellular metabolic pathways through induction of a prooxidative state. Nevertheless, the outcome of heavy metal-mediated effects in the development of human diseases is debated and needs further insights. Cancer is a well-established DNA mutation-linked disease; however, epigenetic events are perhaps more important and harmful than genetic alterations. Unfortunately, we do not have reliable screening methods to assess/validate the epigenetic (promoter effects of a physical or a chemical agent. We propose a mechanism of action whereby mercury acts as a possible promoter carcinogen. In the present contribution, we resume our previous studies on mercury tested at concentrations comparable with its occurrence as environmental pollutant. It is shown that Hg(II elicits a prooxidative state in keratinocytes linked to inhibition of gap junction-mediated intercellular communication and proinflammatory cytokine production. These combined effects may on one hand isolate cells from tissue-specific homeostasis promoting their proliferation and on the other hand tamper the immune system defense/surveillance checkmating the whole organism. Since Hg(II is not a mutagenic/genotoxic compound directly affecting gene expression, in a broader sense, mercury might be an example of an epigenetic tumor promoter or, further expanding this concept, a “metagenetic” effector.

  8. Regulation Involved in Colonization of Intercellular Spaces of Host Plants in Ralstonia solanacearum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasufumi Hikichi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A soil-borne bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum invading plant roots first colonizes the intercellular spaces of the root, and eventually enters xylem vessels, where it replicates at high levels leading to wilting symptoms. After invasion into intercellular spaces, R. solanacearum strain OE1-1 attaches to host cells and expression of the hrp genes encoding components of the type III secretion system (T3SS. OE1-1 then constructs T3SS and secrets effectors into host cells, inducing expression of the host gene encoding phosphatidic acid phosphatase. This leads to suppressing plant innate immunity. Then, OE1-1 grows on host cells, inducing quorum sensing (QS. The QS contributes to regulation of OE1-1 colonization of intercellular spaces including mushroom-type biofilm formation on host cells, leading to its virulence. R. solanacearum strains AW1 and K60 produce methyl 3-hydroxypalmitate (3-OH PAME as a QS signal. The methyltransferase PhcB synthesizes 3-OH PAME. When 3-OH PAME reaches a threshold level, it increases the ability of the histidine kinase PhcS to phosphorylate the response regulator PhcR. This results in elevated levels of functional PhcA, the global virulence regulator. On the other hand, strains OE1-1 and GMI1000 produce methyl 3-hydroxymyristate (3-OH MAME as a QS signal. Among R. solanacearum strains, the deduced PhcB and PhcS amino acid sequences are related to the production of QS signals. R. solanacearum produces aryl-furanone secondary metabolites, ralfuranones, which are extracellularly secreted and required for its virulence, dependent on the QS. Interestingly, ralfuranones affect the QS feedback loop. Taken together, integrated signaling via ralfuranones influences the QS, contributing to pathogen virulence.

  9. Electrical transmission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sayers, D P

    1960-05-01

    After briefly tracing the history of electricity transmission, trends in high voltage transmission and experiments being conducted on 650 kV are discussed. 5000 miles of the U.K. grid are operated at 132 kV and 1000 at 275 kV, ultimately to provide a super grid at 380 kV. Problems are insulation, radio interference and the cost of underground lines (16 times that of overhead lines). Also considered are the economics of the grid as a means of transporting energy and as a means of spreading the peak load over the power stations in the most efficient manner. Finally, the question of amenities is discussed.

  10. Analytical and experimental investigation on transmission loss of clamped double panels: implication of boundary effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, F X; Lu, T J

    2009-03-01

    The air-borne sound insulation performance of a rectangular double-panel partition clamp mounted on an infinite acoustic rigid baffle is investigated both analytically and experimentally and compared with that of a simply supported one. With the clamped (or simply supported) boundary accounted for by using the method of modal function, a double series solution for the sound transmission loss (STL) of the structure is obtained by employing the weighted residual (Galerkin) method. Experimental measurements with Al double-panel partitions having air cavity are subsequently carried out to validate the theoretical model for both types of the boundary condition, and good overall agreement is achieved. A consistency check of the two different models (based separately on clamped modal function and simply supported modal function) is performed by extending the panel dimensions to infinite where no boundaries exist. The significant discrepancies between the two different boundary conditions are demonstrated in terms of the STL versus frequency plots as well as the panel deflection mode shapes.

  11. Effect of Hydraulic Accumulator on Pressure Surge of a Hydrostatic Transmission System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ajit; Das, Jayanta; Dasgupta, Kabir; Barnwal, Manish Kumar

    2018-04-01

    Hydraulic power system is generally used in off-road vehicles for power transmission such as Heavy Earth Moving Machineries (HEMM). Their energy efficiency and unsubstantial failure becomes an extensive subject of analysis. Various arrangements in the system are compassed along with the utilization of some appropriate components. Application of a hydraulic accumulator is one among them. Benefits of accumulator is its multi-purpose usages like energy saving and pressure surge damping. This paper deals with the control of pressure surges in the hydraulic system and energy saving from the surges by using accumulator. For this purpose, the simulation of the hydraulic system is done in MATLAB/SimulinkR environment and an external disturbance is introduced to generate the pressure surge. The surge absorptivity of the accumulator is studied for different sizes at different pre-charged conditions of the accumulator. The discharge characteristics of different sized accumulators are also analyzed in this paper. It is observed that the ability to absorb the surge and stabilize the system is high in the smaller capacity accumulator. However the energy delivery time of larger sized accumulator is high.

  12. Effect of Rickettsia felis Strain Variation on Infection, Transmission, and Fitness in the Cat Flea (Siphonaptera: Pulicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, Sean P; Brown, Lisa D; Hagstrom, Melena R; Foil, Lane D; Macaluso, Kevin R

    2017-07-01

    Rickettsia felis is a human pathogen transmitted by the cat flea, Ctenocephalides felis (Bouché) (str. LSU), as well as an obligate symbiont of the parthenogenic booklouse Liposcelis bostrychophila (Badonnel) (str. LSU-Lb). The influence of genetic variability in these two strains of R. felis on host specialization and fitness and possible resulting differences on infection and transmission kinetics in C. felis is unknown. Utilizing an artificial host system, cat fleas were exposed to a R. felis str. LSU-Lb-infected bloodmeal and monitored for infection at 7-d intervals for 28 d. Quantitative real-time PCR was used to determine rickettsial load and infection density in newly exposed cat fleas, and transmission frequency between cat fleas. The effect of persistent R. felis infection on cat flea F1 progeny was also assessed. At 7 d postexposure 76.7% of the cat fleas successfully acquired R. felis str. LSU-Lb. In R. felis str. LSU-Lb-exposed cat fleas, the mean infection load (6.15 × 106), infection density (0.76), and infection prevalence (91/114) were significantly greater than R. felis str. LSU infection load (3.09 × 106), infection density (0.68), and infection prevalence (76/113). A persistent R. felis str. LSU-Lb infection was detected for 28 d in adult cat fleas but neither female:male ratio distortion nor vertical transmission was observed in F1 progeny. While infection kinetics differed, with higher intensity associated with R. felis str. LSU-Lb, no distinct phenotype was observed in the F1 progeny. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America.

  13. Heavy-ion-induced bystander killing of human lung cancer cells. Role of gap junctional intercellular communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harada, Kosaku; Nonaka, Tetsuo; Hamada, Nobuyuki; Sakurai, Hideyuki; Hasegawa, Masatoshi; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Nakano, Takashi; Funayama, Tomoo; Kakizaki, Takehiko

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to clarify the mechanisms of cell death induced by heavy-ion irradiation focusing on the bystander effect in human lung cancer A549 cells. In microbeam irradiation, each of 1, 5, and 25 cells under confluent cell conditions was irradiated with 1, 5, or 10 particles of carbon ions (220 MeV), and then the surviving fraction of the population was measured by a clonogenic assay in order to investigate the bystander effect of heavy-ions. In this experiment, the limited number of cells (0.0001-0.002%, 5-25 cells) under confluent cell conditions irradiated with 5 or 10 carbon ions resulted in an exaggerated 8-14% increase in cell death by clonogenic assay. However, these overshooting responses were not observed under exponentially growing cell conditions. Furthermore, these responses were inhibited in cells treated with an inhibitor of gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC), whereas they were markedly enhanced by the addition of a stimulator of GJIC. The present results suggest that bystander cell killing by heavy-ions was induced mainly by direct cell-to-cell communication, such as GJIC, which might play important roles in bystander responses. (author)

  14. Staphylococcus epidermidis polysaccharide intercellular adhesin induces IL-8 expression in human astrocytes via a mechanism involving TLR2.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Stevens, Niall T

    2009-03-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis is an opportunistic biofilm-forming pathogen associated with neurosurgical device-related meningitis. Expression of the polysaccharide intercellular adhesin (PIA) on its surface promotes S. epidermidis biofilm formation. Here we investigated the pro-inflammatory properties of PIA against primary and transformed human astrocytes. PIA induced IL-8 expression in a dose- and\\/or time-dependent manner from U373 MG cells and primary normal human astrocytes. This effect was inhibited by depletion of N-acetyl-beta-d-glucosamine polymer from the PIA preparation with Lycopersicon esculentum lectin or sodium meta-periodate. Expression of dominant-negative versions of the TLR2 and TLR4 adaptor proteins MyD88 and Mal in U373 MG cells inhibited PIA-induced IL-8 production. Blocking IL-1 had no effect. PIA failed to induce IL-8 production from HEK293 cells stably expressing TLR4. However, in U373 MG cells which express TLR2, neutralization of TLR2 impaired PIA-induced IL-8 production. In addition to IL-8, PIA also induced expression of other cytokines from U373 MG cells including IL-6 and MCP-1. These data implicate PIA as an important immunogenic component of the S. epidermidis biofilm that can regulate pro-inflammatory cytokine production from human astrocytes, in part, via TLR2.

  15. Reboxetine Enhances the Olanzapine-Induced Antipsychotic-Like Effect, Cortical Dopamine Outflow and NMDA Receptor-Mediated Transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Monica M; Jardemark, Kent; Malmerfelt, Anna; Björkholm, Carl; Svensson, Torgny H

    2010-01-01

    Preclinical data have shown that addition of the selective norepinephrine transporter (NET) inhibitor reboxetine increases the antipsychotic-like effect of the D2/3 antagonist raclopride and, in parallel, enhances cortical dopamine output. Subsequent clinical results suggested that adding reboxetine to stable treatments with various antipsychotic drugs (APDs) may improve positive, negative and depressive symptoms in schizophrenia. In this study, we investigated in rats the effects of adding reboxetine to the second-generation APD olanzapine on: (i) antipsychotic efficacy, using the conditioned avoidance response (CAR) test, (ii) extrapyramidal side effect (EPS) liability, using a catalepsy test, (iii) dopamine efflux in the medial prefrontal cortex and the nucleus accumbens, using in vivo microdialysis in freely moving animals and (iv) cortical N-methyl--aspartate (NMDA) receptor-mediated transmission, using intracellular electrophysiological recording in vitro. Reboxetine (6 mg/kg) enhanced the suppression of CAR induced by a suboptimal dose (1.25 mg/kg), but not an optimal (2.5 mg/kg) dose of olanzapine without any concomitant catalepsy. Addition of reboxetine to the low dose of olanzapine also markedly increased cortical dopamine outflow and facilitated prefrontal NMDA receptor-mediated transmission. Our data suggest that adjunctive treatment with a NET inhibitor may enhance the therapeutic effect of low-dose olanzapine in schizophrenia without increasing EPS liability and add an antidepressant action, thus in principle allowing for a dose reduction of olanzapine with a concomitant reduction of dose-related side effects, such as EPS and weight gain. PMID:20463659

  16. Acute respiratory effects on workers exposed to metalworking fluid aerosols in an automotive transmission plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robins, T; Seixas, N; Franzblau, A; Abrams, L; Minick, S; Burge, H; Schork, M A

    1997-05-01

    Exposure to metalworking fluids has been linked to modest cross-shift reductions in FEV1 and occupational asthma. To identify responsible agents, we measured personal exposures to thoracic particulate (TP), viable plus nonviable thoracic bacteria (BAC), and vapor phase nicotine (VPN) (as a surrogate for tobacco particulate) among 83 machinists exposed to soluble oils and 46 dry assemblers working in an automotive transmission machining plant using biocides infrequently. The participants completed interviews and performed pre- and postshift spirometry on Monday and Thursday of the same week in each of three rounds of data collection (June 1992, January 1993, June 1993). Generalized estimating equations were used to combine information across rounds in multiple regression models of cross-shift and cross-week changes in forced expiratory volume, I second (FEV1) and forced vital capacity (FVC). Mean seniority was 19 years among machinists. Mean personal TP levels were 0.41 mg/m3 in machinists and 0.13 mg/m3 in assemblers. Six of the 83 machinists and none of the 46 assemblers experienced a greater than 19% cross-shift decrement in FEV1 or FVC at least once (p = .07). In regression models using either TP or BAC, among subjects with lower baseline (Monday preshift) FEV1/FVC ratios, increasing exposure was significantly associated with increasing cross-shift decrements in FEV1 and FVC in linear models, and with increased likelihood of a 10% or greater cross-shift decrement in FEV1 or FVC in logistic models. Adjustment of TP for VPN did not affect models significantly. We conclude that clinically important cross-shift decrements in pulmonary function are associated with exposure to metalworking fluid aerosols within a high-seniority population.

  17. Crystal structure of the Haemophilus influenzae Hap adhesin reveals an intercellular oligomerization mechanism for bacterial aggregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Guoyu; Spahich, Nicole; Kenjale, Roma; Waksman, Gabriel; St Geme, Joseph W

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms are complex microbial communities that are common in nature and are being recognized increasingly as an important determinant of bacterial virulence. However, the structural determinants of bacterial aggregation and eventual biofilm formation have been poorly defined. In Gram-negative bacteria, a major subgroup of extracellular proteins called self-associating autotransporters (SAATs) can mediate cell–cell adhesion and facilitate biofilm formation. In this study, we used the Haemophilus influenzae Hap autotransporter as a prototype SAAT to understand how bacteria associate with each other. The crystal structure of the H. influenzae HapS passenger domain (harbouring the SAAT domain) was determined to 2.2 Å by X-ray crystallography, revealing an unprecedented intercellular oligomerization mechanism for cell–cell interaction. The C-terminal SAAT domain folds into a triangular-prism-like structure that can mediate Hap–Hap dimerization and higher degrees of multimerization through its F1–F2 edge and F2 face. The intercellular multimerization can give rise to massive buried surfaces that are required for overcoming the repulsive force between cells, leading to bacterial cell–cell interaction and formation of complex microcolonies. PMID:21841773

  18. Intercellular distribution of mutations induced in oopcytes of Drosophila melanogaster by chemical and physical mutagens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Traut, H.

    1979-01-01

    When females of Drosophila melanogaster are treated with chemical or physical mutagens, not only in one but also in both of the two homologous X chromosomes of a given oocyte, a recessive sex-linked lethal mutation may be induced. A method is described that discriminates between such single and double mutations. A theory is developed to show how a comparison betweeen the expected and the observer frequency of double mutations yields an indication of the intercellular distribution (random or nonrandom) of recessive lethal mutations induced by mutagenic agents in oocytes and, consequently, of the distribution (homogenous or nonhomogeneous) of those agents. Three agents were tested: FUdR (12.5, 50.0 and 81.0 μg/ml), mitomycin C (130.0 μg/ml) and x rays (2000 R, 150 kV). After FUdR feeding, no increase in the mutation frequency usually observed in D. melanogaster without mutagenic treatment was obtained (u = 0.13%, namely three single mutations among 2332 chromosomes tested). After mitomycin C feeding 104 single and three double mutations were obtained. All of the 50 mutations observed after x irradiation were single mutations. The results obtained in the mitomycin C and radiation experiments favor the assumption of a random intercellular distribution of recessive lethal mutations induced by these two agents in oocytes of D. melanogaster. Reasons are discussed why for other types of mutagenic agents nonrandom distributions may be observed with our technique

  19. CHANGES OF INTERCELLULAR COOPERATION IN PERIPHERAL BLOOD IN TREATED PATIENTS WITH CARDIOLOGIC DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. N. Korichkina

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study changes of intercellular cooperation in peripheral blood induced by treatment in patients with arterial hypertension (HT, ischemic heart disease (IHD and chronic heart failure (CHF.Material and methods. 610 patients were involved into the study, including 250 patients with HT of stages I-III (50 untreated patients, 150 patients with IHD and 210 patients with CHF of stages I-III. All patients were treated except 50 hypertensive ones. 80 healthy patients (40 men, 40 women were included into control group. Blood smears of patients were evaluated (Romanovsky's stain. A number of leukocyte, autorosettes and autorosettes with erythrocyte lysis was calculated. The cellular association consisting of a neutrophil, monocyte or eosinocyte with 3 or more erythrocytes skintight to their surface defined as autorosettes. Erythrocytes number and hemoglobin level determined in peripheral blood.Results. Single autorosettes in peripheral blood were observed in patients of control group and in untreated patients with HT. Treated patients with HT, IHD and CHF had increased number of autorossets and autorosettes with erythrocytes lysis. This phenomenon resulted in reduction of erythrocytes number and hemoglobin level in peripheral blood.Conclusion. Treated patients with cardiologic diseases had changes in intercellular cooperation. It should be considered at intensive and long term therapy.

  20. Connexin 26-mediated gap junctional intercellular communication suppresses paracellular permeability of human intestinal epithelial cell monolayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, Hidekazu; Katsuno, Tatsuro; Hoshimoto, Aihiro; Hirano, Noriaki; Saito, Yasushi; Suzuki, Yasuo

    2004-01-01

    In some cell types, gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) is associated with tight junctions. The present study was performed to determine the roles of GJIC in regulation of the barrier function of tight junctions. Caco-2 human colonic cells were used as a monolayer model, and barrier function was monitored by measuring mannitol permeability and transepithelial electrical resistance (TER). The monolayers were chemically disrupted by treatment with oleic acid and taurocholic acid. Western blotting analyses were performed to evaluate the protein levels of connexins, which are components of gap junctional intercellular channels. Cx26 expression was detected in preconfluent Caco-2 cells, and its level increased gradually after the monolayer reached confluency. These results prompted us to examine whether overexpression of Cx26 affects barrier function. Monolayers of Caco-2 cells stably expressing Cx26 showed significantly lower mannitol permeability and higher TER than mock transfectants when the monolayers were chemically disrupted. The levels of claudin-4, an important component of tight junctions, were significantly increased in the stable Cx26 transfectant. These results suggest that Cx26-mediated GJIC may play a crucial role in enhancing the barrier function of Caco-2 cell monolayers

  1. Intercellular signaling pathways active during and after growth and differentiation of the lumbar vertebral growth plate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahia, Chitra Lekha; Mahoney, Eric J; Durrani, Atiq A; Wylie, Christopher

    2011-06-15

    Vertebral growth plates at different postnatal ages were assessed for active intercellular signaling pathways. To generate a spatial and temporal map of the major signaling pathways active in the postnatal mouse lumbar vertebral growth plate. The growth of all long bones is known to occur by cartilaginous growth plates. The growth plate is composed of layers of chondrocyets that actively proliferate, differentiate, die and, are replaced by bone. The role of major cell signaling pathways has been suggested for regulation of the fetal long bones. But not much is known about the molecular or cellular signals that control the postnatal vertebral growth plate and hence postnatal vertebral bone growth. Understanding such molecular mechanisms will help design therapeutic treatments for vertebral growth disorders such as scoliosis. Antibodies against activated downstream intermediates were used to identify cells in the growth plate responding to BMP, TGFβ, and FGF in cryosections of lumbar vertebrae from different postnatal age mice to identify the zones that were responding to these signals. Reporter mice were used to identify the chondrocytes responding to hedgehog (Ihh), and Wnt signaling. We present a spatial/temporal map of these signaling pathways during growth, and differentiation of the mouse lumbar vertebral growth plate. During growth and differentiation of the vertebral growth plate, its different components respond at different times to different intercellular signaling ligands. Response to most of these signals is dramatically downregulated at the end of vertebral growth.

  2. Exploring the role of lipids in intercellular conduits: breakthroughs in the pipeline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elise eDelage

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available It has been known for more than a century that most of the plant cells are connected to their neighbors through membranous pores perforating the cell wall, namely plasmodesmata (PDs. The recent discovery of tunneling nanotubes (TNTs, thin membrane bridges established between distant mammalian cells, suggests that intercellular communication mediated through cytoplasmic continuity could be a conserved feature of eukaryotic organisms. Although TNTs differ from PDs in their formation and architecture, both are characterized by a continuity of the plasma membrane between two cells, delimiting a nanotubular channel supported by actin-based cytoskeleton. Due to this unusual membrane organization, lipids are likely to play critical roles in the formation and stability of intercellular conduits like TNTs and PDs, but also in regulating the transfer through these structures. While it is crucial for a better understanding of those fascinating communication highways, the study of TNT lipid composition and dynamics turned out to be extremely challenging. The present review aims to give an overview of the recent findings in this context. We will also discuss some of the promising imaging approaches, which might be the key for future breakthroughs in the field and could also benefit the research on PDs.

  3. Cell walls as a stage for intercellular communication regulating shoot meristem development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiaki eTameshige

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Aboveground organs of plants are ultimately derived/generated from the shoot apical meristem (SAM, which is the proliferative tissue located at the apex of the stem. The SAM contains a population of stem cells that provide new cells for organ/tissue formation. The SAM is composed of distinct cell layers and zones with different properties. Primordia of lateral organs develop at the periphery of the SAM. The shoot apex is a dynamic and complex tissue, and as such intercellular communications among cells, layers and zones play significant roles in the coordination of cell proliferation, growth and differentiation to achieve elaborate morphogenesis. Recent findings have highlighted the importance of a number of singling molecules acting in the cell wall space for the intercellular communication, including classic phytohormones and secretory peptides. Moreover, accumulating evidences reveal that cell wall properties and their modifying enzymes modulate hormone actions. In this review, we overview how behaviors of singling molecules and changes of cell wall properties are integrated for the shoot meristem regulation.

  4. Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 blockade attenuates inflammatory response and improves microvascular perfusion in rat pancreas grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preissler, Gerhard; Eichhorn, Martin; Waldner, Helmut; Winter, Hauke; Kleespies, Axel; Massberg, Steffen

    2012-10-01

    After pancreas transplantation (PTx), early capillary malperfusion and leukocyte recruitment indicate the manifestation of severe ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI). Oscillatory blood-flow redistribution (intermittent capillary perfusion, IP), leading to an overall decrease in erythrocyte flux, precedes complete microvascular perfusion failure with persistent blood flow cessation. We addressed the role of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) for leukocyte-endothelial interactions (LEIs) after PTx and evaluated the contribution of IP and malperfusion. Pancreas transplantation was performed in rats after 18-hour preservation, receiving either isotype-matched IgG or monoclonal anti-ICAM-1 antibodies (10 mg/kg intravenously) once before reperfusion. Leukocyte-endothelial interaction, IP, erythrocyte flux, and functional capillary density, respectively, were examined in vivo during 2-hour reperfusion. Nontransplanted animals served as controls. Tissue samples were analyzed by histomorphometry. In grafts of IgG-treated animals, IP was encountered already at an early stage after reperfusion and steadily increased over 2 hours, whereas erythrocyte flux declined continuously. In contrast, inhibition of ICAM-1 significantly improved erythrocyte flux and delayed IP appearance by 2 hours. Further, anti-ICAM-1 significantly reduced LEI and leukocyte tissue infiltration when compared to IgG; edema development was less pronounced in response to anti-ICAM-1 monoclonal antibody. Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 blockade significantly attenuates IRI via immediate reduction of LEI and concomitant improvement of capillary perfusion patterns, emphasizing its central role during IRI in PTx.

  5. Potential cost-effectiveness of schistosomiasis treatment for reducing HIV transmission in Africa--the case of Zimbabwean women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martial L Ndeffo Mbah

    Full Text Available Epidemiological data from Zimbabwe suggests that genital infection with Schistosoma haematobium may increase the risk of HIV infection in young women. Therefore, the treatment of Schistosoma haematobium with praziquantel could be a potential strategy for reducing HIV infection. Here we assess the potential cost-effectiveness of praziquantel as a novel intervention strategy against HIV infection.We developed a mathematical model of female genital schistosomiasis (FGS and HIV infections in Zimbabwe that we fitted to cross-sectional data of FGS and HIV prevalence of 1999. We validated our epidemic projections using antenatal clinic data on HIV prevalence. We simulated annual praziquantel administration to school-age children. We then used these model predictions to perform a cost-effectiveness analysis of annual administration of praziquantel as a potential measure to reduce the burden of HIV in sub-Saharan Africa.We showed that for a variation of efficacy between 30-70% of mass praziquantel administration for reducing the enhanced risk of HIV transmission per sexual act due to FGS, annual administration of praziquantel to school-age children in Zimbabwe could result in net savings of US$16-101 million compared with no mass treatment of schistosomiasis over a ten-year period. For a variation in efficacy between 30-70% of mass praziquantel administration for reducing the acquisition of FGS, annual administration of praziquantel to school-age children could result in net savings of US$36-92 million over a ten-year period.In addition to reducing schistosomiasis burden, mass praziquantel administration may be a highly cost-effective way of reducing HIV infections in sub-Saharan Africa. Program costs per case of HIV averted are similar to, and under some conditions much better than, other interventions that are currently implemented in Africa to reduce HIV transmission. As a cost-saving strategy, mass praziquantel administration should be prioritized

  6. Cost-effectiveness of strategies to prevent methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus transmission and infection in an intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gidengil, Courtney A; Gay, Charlene; Huang, Susan S; Platt, Richard; Yokoe, Deborah; Lee, Grace M

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To create a national policy model to evaluate the projected cost-effectiveness of multiple hospital-based strategies to prevent methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) transmission and infection. DESIGN Cost-effectiveness analysis using a Markov microsimulation model that simulates the natural history of MRSA acquisition and infection. PATIENTS AND SETTING Hypothetical cohort of 10,000 adult patients admitted to a US intensive care unit. METHODS We compared 7 strategies to standard precautions using a hospital perspective: (1) active surveillance cultures; (2) active surveillance cultures plus selective decolonization; (3) universal contact precautions (UCP); (4) universal chlorhexidine gluconate baths; (5) universal decolonization; (6) UCP + chlorhexidine gluconate baths; and (7) UCP+decolonization. For each strategy, both efficacy and compliance were considered. Outcomes of interest were: (1) MRSA colonization averted; (2) MRSA infection averted; (3) incremental cost per colonization averted; (4) incremental cost per infection averted. RESULTS A total of 1989 cases of colonization and 544 MRSA invasive infections occurred under standard precautions per 10,000 patients. Universal decolonization was the least expensive strategy and was more effective compared with all strategies except UCP+decolonization and UCP+chlorhexidine gluconate. UCP+decolonization was more effective than universal decolonization but would cost $2469 per colonization averted and $9007 per infection averted. If MRSA colonization prevalence decreases from 12% to 5%, active surveillance cultures plus selective decolonization becomes the least expensive strategy. CONCLUSIONS Universal decolonization is cost-saving, preventing 44% of cases of MRSA colonization and 45% of cases of MRSA infection. Our model provides useful guidance for decision makers choosing between multiple available hospital-based strategies to prevent MRSA transmission.

  7. Effect of HBIG combined with hepatitis B vaccine on blocking HBV transmission between mother and infant and its effect on immune cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Junling; Liu, Xing

    2018-01-01

    The effect of hepatitis B immune globulin (HBIG) combined with hepatitis B vaccine on blocking hepatitis B virus (HBV) transmission between mother and infant and its effect on immune cells were studied. Ninety newborn infants confirmed to be HBV surface antigen (HBsAg)-positive were divided equally into three groups. Group A newborns received the hepatitis B vaccine at 0, 1 and 6 months after birth (10 µg/time). Group B newborns received an intramuscular injection of 100 IU HBIG 2 h after birth before the same treatment as group A. Mothers of group C newborns received three gluteus maxinus injections of 200 IU HBIG. The newborns in group C got the same treatment as group B. The blocking effect of HBV transmission between mother and infant was evaluated, and cell immune function was assessed. There were significant differences in comparison of blocking success rates between group A and B, and between group A and C as well (pmothers who were positivefor both HBsAg and HBeAg, HBIG intervention formothers during late pregnancy, together with combinedtreatment of HBIG and hepatitis B vaccine for infants, gavebetter blocking result of HBV transmission.

  8. Optical analog transmission device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikawa, Shinji.

    1994-01-01

    The present invention concerns a device such as electro-optical conversion elements, optoelectric-electric elements and optical transmission channel, not undergoing deleterious effects on the efficiency of conversion and transmission due to temperature, and aging change. That is, a sine wave superposing means superposes, on a detector signal to be transmitted, a sine-wave signal having a predetermined amplitude and at a frequency lower than that of the detector signal. An optoelectric conversion means converts the electric signal as the signal of the sine-wave signal superposing means into an optical signal and outputs the same to an optical transmitting channel. The optoelectric conversion means converts the transmitted signal to an electric signal. A discriminating means discriminates the electric signal into a detector signal and a sine-wave signal. A calculating means calculates an optical transmitting efficiency of the transmitting channel based on the amplitude of the discriminated sine-wave signal. A processing means compensates an amplitude value of the detector signals discriminated by the discriminating means based on the optical transmission efficiency. As a result, an optical analog transmission device can be attained, which conducts optical transmission at a high accuracy without undergoing the defective effects of the optical transmission efficiency. (I.S.)

  9. Cumulative exposure to disadvantage and the intergenerational transmission of neighbourhood effects

    OpenAIRE

    Hedman, L.; Manley, D.; Van Ham, M.; Östh, J.

    2012-01-01

    Studies of neighbourhood effects typically investigate the instantaneous effect of point-in-time measures of neighbourhood poverty on individual outcomes. It has been suggested that it is not solely the current neighbourhood, but also the neigh-bourhood history of an individual that is important in determining an individual’s outcomes. The effect of long-term exposure to poverty neighbourhoods on adults has largely been ignored in the empirical literature, partly due to a lack of suitable dat...

  10. The B[a]P-increased intercellular communication via translocation of connexin-43 into gap junctions reduces apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tekpli, X.; Rivedal, E.; Gorria, M.; Landvik, N.E.; Rissel, M.; Dimanche-Boitrel, M.-T.; Baffet, G.; Holme, J.A.; Lagadic-Gossmann, D.

    2010-01-01

    Gap junctions are channels in plasma membrane composed of proteins called connexins. These channels are organized in special domains between cells, and provide for direct gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC), allowing diffusion of signalling molecules < 1 kD. GJIC regulates cell homeostasis and notably the balance between proliferation, cell cycle arrest, cell survival and apoptosis. Here, we have investigated benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) effects on GJIC and on the subcellular localization of the major protein of gap junction: connexin-43 (Cx43). Our results showed that B[a]P increased GJIC between mouse hepatoma Hepa1c1c7 cells via translocation of Cx43 from Golgi apparatus and lipid rafts into gap junction plaques. Interestingly, inhibition of GJIC by chlordane or small interference RNA directed against Cx43 enhanced B[a]P-induced apoptosis in Hepa1c1c7 cells. The increased apoptosis caused by inhibition of GJIC appeared to be mediated by ERK/MAPK pathway. It is suggested that B[a]P could induce transfer of cell survival signal or dilute cell death signal via regulation of ERK/MAPK through GJIC.

  11. Mobility of the native Bacillus subtilis conjugative plasmid pLS20 is regulated by intercellular signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Praveen K; Ramachandran, Gayetri; Ramos-Ruiz, Ricardo; Peiró-Pastor, Ramón; Abia, David; Wu, Ling J; Meijer, Wilfried J J

    2013-10-01

    Horizontal gene transfer mediated by plasmid conjugation plays a significant role in the evolution of bacterial species, as well as in the dissemination of antibiotic resistance and pathogenicity determinants. Characterization of their regulation is important for gaining insights into these features. Relatively little is known about how conjugation of Gram-positive plasmids is regulated. We have characterized conjugation of the native Bacillus subtilis plasmid pLS20. Contrary to the enterococcal plasmids, conjugation of pLS20 is not activated by recipient-produced pheromones but by pLS20-encoded proteins that regulate expression of the conjugation genes. We show that conjugation is kept in the default "OFF" state and identified the master repressor responsible for this. Activation of the conjugation genes requires relief of repression, which is mediated by an anti-repressor that belongs to the Rap family of proteins. Using both RNA sequencing methodology and genetic approaches, we have determined the regulatory effects of the repressor and anti-repressor on expression of the pLS20 genes. We also show that the activity of the anti-repressor is in turn regulated by an intercellular signaling peptide. Ultimately, this peptide dictates the timing of conjugation. The implications of this regulatory mechanism and comparison with other mobile systems are discussed.

  12. Expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 in UVA-irradiated human skin cells in vitro and in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treina, G.; Scaletta, C.; Frenk, E.; Applegate, L.A.; Fourtanier, A.; Seite, S.

    1996-01-01

    Ultraviolet A (UVA) radiation represents an important oxidative stress to human skin and certain forms of oxidative stress have been shown to modulate intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) expression. ICAM-1 has been shown to play an important part in many immune reactions and the perturbations of this molecule by ultraviolet radiation could have implications in many inflammatory responses. An enhancement immunohistochemical method with avidin/biotin was used for analysing the early effects of UVA radiation on human cell cultures and human skin (340-400 nm). Both in vitro and in vivo data show that ICAM-1 staining in epidermal keratinocytes, which was expressed constitutively, decreased in a UVA dose-dependent manner. The decrease was most noted at 3-6 h following UVA radiation with some ICAM-1 staining returning by 48 h post-UVA. ICAM-1 positive staining in the dermis was specific for vascular structures and was increased 24 h after UVA radiation. Cultured dermal fibroblasts exhibited ICAM-1 staining which increased slightly within 6-48 h post-UVA radiation. As epidermal ICAM-1 expression is depleted following UVA radiation and dermal expression increases due to an increase in the vascular structures, ICAM-1 provides a valuable marker following UVA radiation in human skin that can be readily measured in situ. (author)

  13. Domino-Like Intercellular Delivery of Undecylenic Acid-Conjugated Porous Silicon Nanoparticles for Deep Tumor Penetration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Tuying; Hu, Jun; Zhang, Xiaoqiong; Li, Fuying; Yang, Hao; Gan, Lu; Yang, Xiangliang

    2016-10-05

    Improving the intratumoral distribution of anticancer agents remains the critical challenge for developing efficient cancer chemotherapy. Luminescent porous silicon nanoparticles (PSiNPs) have attracted considerable attention in the biomedical field especially in drug delivery. Here, we described the lysosomal exocytosis-mediated domino-like intercellular delivery of undecylenic acid-conjugated PSiNPs (UA-PSiNPs) for deep tumor penetration. UA-PSiNPs with significantly improved stability in physiological conditions were internalized into tumor cells by macropinocytosis-, caveolae-, and clathrin-mediated endocytosis and mainly colocalized with Golgi apparatus and lysosomes. Substantial evidence showed that UA-PSiNPs was excreted from cells via lysosomal exocytosis after cellular uptake. The exocytosed UA-PSiNPs induced a domino-like infection of adjacent cancer cells and allowed encapsulated doxorubicin (DOX) to deeply penetrate into both three-dimensional tumor spheroids and in vivo tumors. In addition, DOX-loaded UA-PSiNPs exhibited strong antitumor activity and few side effects in vivo. This study demonstrated that UA-PSiNPs as a drug carrier might be applied for deep tumor penetration, offering a new insight into the design of more efficient delivery systems of anticancer drugs.

  14. Comparative cost-effectiveness of Option B+ for prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV in Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tweya, Hannock; Keiser, Olivia; Haas, Andreas D; Tenthani, Lyson; Phiri, Sam; Egger, Matthias; Estill, Janne

    2016-03-27

    To estimate the cost-effectiveness of prevention of mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) of HIV with lifelong antiretroviral therapy (ART) for pregnant and breastfeeding women ('Option B+') compared with ART during pregnancy or breastfeeding only unless clinically indicated ('Option B'). Mathematical modelling study of first and second pregnancy, informed by data from the Malawi Option B+ programme. Individual-based simulation model. We simulated cohorts of 10 000 women and their infants during two subsequent pregnancies, including the breastfeeding period, with either Option B+ or B. We parameterized the model with data from the literature and by analysing programmatic data. We compared total costs of antenatal and postnatal care, and lifetime costs and disability-adjusted life-years of the infected infants between Option B+ and Option B. During the first pregnancy, 15% of the infants born to HIV-infected mothers acquired the infection. With Option B+, 39% of the women were on ART at the beginning of the second pregnancy, compared with 18% with Option B. For second pregnancies, the rates MTCT were 11.3% with Option B+ and 12.3% with Option B. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio comparing the two options ranged between about US$ 500 and US$ 1300 per DALY averted. Option B+ prevents more vertical transmissions of HIV than Option B, mainly because more women are already on ART at the beginning of the next pregnancy. Option B+ is a cost-effective strategy for PMTCT if the total future costs and lost lifetime of the infected infants are taken into account.

  15. Effect of in-material losses on terahertz absorption, transmission, and reflection in photonic crystals made of polar dielectrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serebryannikov, Andriy E., E-mail: andser@amu.edu.pl [Faculty of Physics, Adam Mickiewicz University, 61-614 Poznań (Poland); Nanotechnology Research Center—NANOTAM, Bilkent University, 06800 Ankara (Turkey); Nojima, S. [Yokohama City University, Department of Nanosystem Science, Graduate School of Nanobioscience, Kanazawa Ku, 22-2 Seto, Yokohama, Kanagawa 2360027 (Japan); Alici, K. B. [TUBITAK Marmara Research Center, Materials Institute, 41470 Gebze, Kocaeli (Turkey); Ozbay, Ekmel [Nanotechnology Research Center—NANOTAM, Bilkent University, 06800 Ankara (Turkey)

    2015-10-07

    The effect of the material absorption factor on terahertz absorption (A), transmittance (T), and reflectance (R) for slabs of PhC that comprise rods made of GaAs, a polar dielectric, is studied. The main goal was to illustrate how critical a choice of the absorption factor for simulations is and to indicate the importance of the possible modification of the absorption ability by using either active or lossy impurities. The spectra of A, T, and R are strongly sensitive to the location of the polaritonic gap with respect to the photonic pass and stop bands connected with periodicity that enables the efficient combination of the effects of material and structural parameters. It will be shown that the spectra can strongly depend on the utilized value of the material absorption factor. In particular, both narrow and wide absorption bands may appear owing to a variation of the material parameters with a frequency in the vicinity of the polaritonic gap. The latter are often achieved at wideband suppression of transmission, so that an ultra-wide stop band can appear as a result of adjustment of the stop bands having different origin. The results obtained at simultaneous variation of the absorption factor and frequency, and angle of incidence and frequency, indicate the possibility of the existence of wide ranges of tolerance, in which the basic features do remain. This allows for mitigating the accuracy requirements for the absorption factor in simulations and promises the efficient absorption of nonmonochromatic waves and beams with a wide angular spectrum. Suppression of narrowband effects in transmission is demonstrated at rather large values of the absorption factor, when they appear due to either the defect modes related to structural defects or dispersion inspired variations of the material parameters in the vicinity of the polaritonic gap. Comparison with auxiliary structures helps one to detect the common features and differences of homogeneous slabs and slabs of a

  16. Cumulative exposure to disadvantage and the intergenerational transmission of neighbourhood effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hedman, L.; Manley, D.; Van Ham, M.; Östh, J.

    2012-01-01

    Studies of neighbourhood effects typically investigate the instantaneous effect of point-in-time measures of neighbourhood poverty on individual outcomes. It has been suggested that it is not solely the current neighbourhood, but also the neigh-bourhood history of an individual that is important in

  17. Mechanisms for Cell-to-Cell Transmission of HIV-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracq, Lucie; Xie, Maorong; Benichou, Serge; Bouchet, Jérôme

    2018-01-01

    While HIV-1 infection of target cells with cell-free viral particles has been largely documented, intercellular transmission through direct cell-to-cell contact may be a predominant mode of propagation in host. To spread, HIV-1 infects cells of the immune system and takes advantage of their specific particularities and functions. Subversion of intercellular communication allows to improve HIV-1 replication through a multiplicity of intercellular structures and membrane protrusions, like tunneling nanotubes, filopodia, or lamellipodia-like structures involved in the formation of the virological synapse. Other features of immune cells, like the immunological synapse or the phagocytosis of infected cells are hijacked by HIV-1 and used as gateways to infect target cells. Finally, HIV-1 reuses its fusogenic capacity to provoke fusion between infected donor cells and target cells, and to form infected syncytia with high capacity of viral production and improved capacities of motility or survival. All these modes of cell-to-cell transfer are now considered as viral mechanisms to escape immune system and antiretroviral therapies, and could be involved in the establishment of persistent virus reservoirs in different host tissues. PMID:29515578

  18. PROPYLTHIOURACIL (PTU)-INDUCED HYPOTHYROIDISM: EFFECTS ON SYNAPTIC TRANSMISSION AND LONG TERM POTENTIATION IN HIPPOCAMPAL SLICES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concern has been raised over endocrine effects of some classes of environmental chemicals. Severe hypothyroidism during critical periods of brain developmental leads to alterations in hippocampal structure, learning deficits, yet neurophysiological properties of the hippocampus...

  19. Project resumes: biological effects from electric fields associated with high-voltage transmission lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-01-01

    Abstracts of research projects are presented in the following areas: measurements and special facilities; cellular and subcellular studies; physiology; behavior; environmental effects; modeling, scaling and dosimetry; and high voltage direct current. (ACR)

  20. Effects of fourth-order dispersion in very high-speed optical time-division multiplexed transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capmany, J; Pastor, D; Sales, S; Ortega, B

    2002-06-01

    We present a closed-form expression for computation of the output pulse's rms time width in an optical fiber link with up to fourth-order dispersion (FOD) by use of an optical source with arbitrary linewidth and chirp parameters. We then specialize the expression to analyze the effect of FOD on the transmission of very high-speed linear optical time-division multiplexing systems. By suitable source chirping, FOD can be compensated for to an upper link-length limit above which other techniques must be employed. Finally, a design formula to estimate the maximum attainable bit rate limited by FOD as a function of the link length is also presented.

  1. Effects of Scandinavian hydro power on storage needs in a fully renewable European power system for various transmission capacity scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kies, Alexander; Nag, Kabitri; von Bremen, Lueder; Lorenz, Elke; Heinemann, Detlev

    2015-04-01

    The penetration of renewable energies in the European power system has increased in the last decades (23.5% share of renewables in the gross electricity consumption of the EU-28 in 2012) and is expected to increase further up to very high shares close to 100%. Planning and organizing this European energy transition towards sustainable power sources will be one of the major challenges of the 21st century. It is very likely that in a fully renewable European power system wind and photovoltaics (pv) will contribute the largest shares to the generation mix followed by hydro power. However, feed-in from wind and pv is due to the weather dependant nature of their resources fluctuating and non-controllable. To match generation and consumption several solutions and their combinations were proposed like very high backup-capacities of conventional power generation (e.g. fossile or nuclear), storages or the extension of the transmission grid. Apart from those options hydro power can be used to counterbalance fluctuating wind and pv generation to some extent. In this work we investigate the effects of hydro power from Norway and Sweden on residual storage needs in Europe depending on the overlaying grid scenario. High temporally and spatially resolved weather data with a spatial resolution of 7 x 7 km and a temporal resolution of 1 hour was used to model the feed-in from wind and pv for 34 investigated European countries for the years 2003-2012. Inflow into hydro storages and generation by run-of-river power plants were computed from ERA-Interim reanalysis runoff data at a spatial resolution of 0.75° x 0.75° and a daily temporal resolution. Power flows in a simplified transmission grid connecting the 34 European countries were modelled minimizing dissipation using a DC-flow approximation. Previous work has shown that hydro power, namely in Norway and Sweden, can reduce storage needs in a renewable European power system by a large extent. A 15% share of hydro power in Europe

  2. Impact of Heterogeneity in Sexual Behavior on Effectiveness in Reducing HIV Transmission with Test-and-Treat Strategy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganna Rozhnova

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The WHO's early-release guideline for antiretroviral treatment (ART of HIV infection based on a recent trial conducted in 34 countries recommends starting treatment immediately upon an HIV diagnosis. Therefore, the test-and-treat strategy may become more widely used in an effort to scale up HIV treatment and curb further transmission. Here we examine behavioural determinants of HIV transmission and how heterogeneity in sexual behaviour influences the outcomes of this strategy. Using a deterministic model, we perform a systematic investigation into the effects of various mixing patterns in a population of men who have sex with men (MSM, stratified by partner change rates, on the elimination threshold and endemic HIV prevalence. We find that both the level of overdispersion in the distribution of the number of sexual partners and mixing between population subgroups have a large influence on endemic prevalence before introduction of ART and on possible long term effectiveness of ART. Increasing heterogeneity in risk behavior may lead to lower endemic prevalence levels, but requires higher coverage levels of ART for elimination. Elimination is only feasible for populations with a rather low degree of assortativeness of mixing and requires treatment coverage of almost 80% if rates of testing and treatment uptake by all population subgroups are equal. In this case, for fully assortative mixing and 80% coverage endemic prevalence is reduced by 57%. In the presence of heterogeneity in ART uptake, elimination is easier to achieve when the subpopulation with highest risk behavior is tested and treated more often than the rest of the population, and vice versa when it is less. The developed framework can be used to extract information on behavioral heterogeneity from existing data which is otherwise hard to determine from population surveys.

  3. Effect of longitudinal vibration of fluid-filled pipe with elastic wall on sound transmission character

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DONG Peng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available When one end of a fluid-filled pipe with an elastic wall is fixed and a harmonic force effect acts on the other end,a steady longitudinal vibration will be produced. Compared to the pipeline resonance mode,the amplitude of the steady longitudinal vibration of an elastic pipe is greater,and the effect on the sound is also greater. The study of the steady longitudinal vibration of pipes can better describe the effects of fluid-filled pipelines on the radiation sound field of the pipe opening. Through the contrast between the analysis calculation of the equivalent beam model and the experimental results,the accuracy of the equivalent beam model for the calculation of the steady longitudinal vibration of pipelines is verified,and a method of isolating the steady longitudinal vibration state is proposed and verified.

  4. The status of intercellular junctions in established lens epithelial cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dave, Alpana; Craig, Jamie E; Sharma, Shiwani

    2012-01-01

    Cataract is the major cause of vision-related disability worldwide. Mutations in the crystallin genes are the most common known cause of inherited congenital cataract. Mutations in the genes associated with intercellular contacts, such as Nance-Horan Syndrome (NHS) and Ephrin type A receptor-2 (EPHA2), are other recognized causes of congenital cataract. The EPHA2 gene has been also associated with age-related cataract, suggesting that intercellular junctions are important in not only lens development, but also in maintaining lens transparency. The purpose of this study was to analyze the expression and localization of the key cell junction and cytoskeletal proteins, and of NHS and EPHA2, in established lens epithelial cell lines to determine their suitability as model epithelial systems for the functional investigation of genes involved in intercellular contacts and implicated in cataract. The expression and subcellular localization of occludin and zona occludens protein-1 (ZO-1), which are associated with tight junctions; E-cadherin, which is associated with adherence junctions; and the cytoskeletal actin were analyzed in monolayers of a human lens epithelial cell line (SRA 01/04) and a mouse lens epithelial cell line (αTN4). In addition, the expression and subcellular localization of the NHS and EPHA2 proteins were analyzed in these cell lines. Protein or mRNA expression was respectively determined by western blotting or reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and localization was determined by immunofluorescence labeling. Human SRA 01/04 and mouse αTN4 lens epithelial cells expressed either the proteins of interest or their encoding mRNA. Occludin, ZO-1, and NHS proteins localized to the cellular periphery, whereas E-cadherin, actin, and EPHA2 localized in the cytoplasm in these cell lines. The human SRA 01/04 and mouse αTN4 lens epithelial cells express the key junctional proteins. The localization patterns of these proteins suggest that

  5. The antiarrhythmic peptide analog rotigaptide (ZP123) stimulates gap junction intercellular communication in human osteoblasts and prevents decrease in femoral trabecular bone strength in ovariectomized rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Niklas Rye; Teilmann, Stefan Cuoni; Henriksen, Zanne

    2005-01-01

    Gap junctions play an important role in bone development and function, but the lack of pharmacological tools has hampered the gap junction research. The antiarrhythmic peptides stimulate gap junction communication between cardiomyocytes, but effects in noncardiac tissue are unknown. The purpose...... of this study was to examine whether antiarrhythmic peptides, which are small peptides increasing gap junctional conductivity, show specific binding to osteoblasts and investigate the effect of the stable analog rotigaptide (ZP123) on gap junctional intercellular communication in vitro and on bone mass...... and strength in vivo. Cell coupling and calcium signaling were assessed in vitro on human, primary, osteoblastic cells. In vivo effects of rotigaptide on bone strength and density were determined 4 wk after ovariectomy in rats treated with either vehicle, sc injection twice daily (300 nmol per kilogram body...

  6. Transmissions in vehicles 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-01

    ) Electromechanically actuated double clutch and EV transmissions (S. Rietentiet); (36) Linear actuation as a future choice to reduce costs and improve transmission efficiency (J. Behrenroth); (37) Forward-looking solutions for transmissions in electric vehicles - Transmission concepts for electric vehicle/potentials from system and component perspective (M.J. Derse); (38) Rotor position sensor for hybrid drives and electric drives - New generation eddy current position sensor (R. Moeller); (39) Electric axle drive with torque-vectoring-functionality (B.-R. Hoehn); (40) Extreme shift times and high comfort with the DCT are not a contradiction. - The function development and application of the DCT in the Mercedes-BenzSLS AMG (M. Hart); (41) The next generation of GETRAG PowerShift {sup registered} transmissions for FWD applications (S. Bungart); (42) Modular dual clutch transmission as all-wheel drivevariant for a sports car in the tip performance class (M. Fischer); (43) Potential of sintered friction linings in synchronizers (O. Back); (44) Friction between sliding pads and sleeve - Effects on the shifting process (T. Skubacz); (45) New developments in cold forging of hollow gear parts - Extension of the geometrical design of cold formed gear construction parts (S. Rudolf); (46) Start-up device for passenger cars based on a hydrodynamic coupling (A. Menne); (47) State and parameter estimation for the determination of clutch characteristics for wet clutches (A. Tarasow); (48) Control engineering in system development - Additional benefit thanks to control engineering using the example of active vibration damping (G. Bauer).

  7. Antialarmin effect of tick saliva during the transmission of Lyme disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marchal, Claire; Schramm, Frederic; Kern, Aurélie; Luft, Benjamin J.; Yang, Xiaohua; Schuijt, Tim J.; Hovius, Joppe W.; Jaulhac, Benoît; Boulanger, Nathalie

    2011-01-01

    Tick saliva has potent immunomodulatory properties. In arthropod-borne diseases, this effect is largely used by microorganisms to increase their pathogenicity and to evade host immune responses. We show that in Lyme borreliosis, tick salivary gland extract and a tick saliva protein, Salp15, inhibit

  8. Emission, transmission, deposition and environmental effects of ammonia from agricultural sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erisman, J.W. [ECN Clean Fossil Fuels, Petten (Netherlands); Dammgen, U. [Federal Agricultural Research Centre, Institute of Agroecology, Braunschweig (Germany)

    2005-05-01

    Air pollution in Europe has been regarded as a severe problem for several decades, the adverse effects being: the influence on the physical properties of the atmosphere itself, in particular its energy balance (global warming), and visibility; the influence on atmospheric chemistry (formation and destruction of both ground level and stratospheric ozone); the input of chemicals into terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems causing acidification and eutrophication leading to forest decline as well as changes in ecosystem structure and function; the effects on human health and welfare (the respiratory system). Since the sulfur dioxide problem seems to have been solved to a large extent in most countries in Western Europe, atmospheric nitrogen compounds are considered a major source of acidification. As most natural and near-natural ecosystems have developed with nitrogen as a limiting factor, increased inputs of reactive atmospheric nitrogen cause changes in their structure, function and nutrient dynamics. These effects are attributed to surplus nutrition (eutrophication) of the respective systems as the result of increased nitrogen inputs. At first it seemed logical to connect them with sources similar to those for sulfur (power plants, combustion engines, domestic heating); however, it soon became clear that reduced nitrogen (ammonia and ammonium in particulates) also plays a major role. This review is to collate the present state of knowledge with regard to ammonia emissions, its atmospheric transport and chemistry as well as its deposition and the resulting effects. It restricts itself to a description of the situation in Europe.

  9. Intergenerational Transmission of Internalizing Problems: Effects of Parental and Grandparental Major Depressive Disorder on Child Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettit, Jeremy W.; Olino, Thomas M.; Roberts, Robert E.; Seeley, John R.; Lewinsohn, Peter M.

    2008-01-01

    Effects of lifetime histories of grandparental (G1) and parental (G2) major depressive disorder (MDD) on children's (G3) internalizing problems were investigated among 267 G3 children (ages 2-18 years) who received Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) ratings and had diagnostic data available on 267 biological G2 parents and 527 biological G1…

  10. Anxiolytic-like effect of Carvacrol (5-isopropyl-2-methylphenol) in mice: involvement with GABAergic transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Francisca Helvira Cavalcante; Venâncio, Edith Teles; de Sousa, Damião Pergentino; de França Fonteles, Marta Maria; de Vasconcelos, Silvânia Maria Mendes; Viana, Glauce Socorro Barros; de Sousa, Francisca Cléa Florenço

    2010-08-01

    Carvacrol (5-isopropyl-2-methylphenol) is a monoterpenic phenol present in the essencial oil of many plants. It is the major component of the essential oil fraction of oregano and thyme. This work presents the behavioral effects of carvacrol in animal models of elevated plus maze (EPM), open field, Rotarod and barbiturate-induced sleeping time tests in mice. Carvacrol (CVC) was administered orally, in male mice, at single doses of 12.5; 25 and 50 mg/kg while diazepam 1 or 2 mg/kg was used as standard drug and flumazenil (2.5 mg/kg) was used to elucidate the possible anxiolytic mechanism of CVC on the plus maze test. The results showed that CVC, at three doses, had no effect on the spontaneous motor activity in the Rotarod test nor in the number of squares crossed in the open-field test. However, CVC decreased the number of groomings in the open-field test. In the plus maze test, CVC, at three doses significantly increased all the observed parameters in the EPM test and flumazenil was able to reverse the effects of diazepam and CVC. Therefore, CVC did not alter the sleep latency and sleeping time in the barbiturate-induced sleeping time test. These results show that CVC presents anxiolytic effects in the plus maze test which are not influenced by the locomotor activity in the open-field test.

  11. Interventions that effectively target Anopheles funestus mosquitoes could significantly improve control of persistent malaria transmission in south-eastern Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaindoa, Emmanuel W; Matowo, Nancy S; Ngowo, Halfan S; Mkandawile, Gustav; Mmbando, Arnold; Finda, Marcelina; Okumu, Fredros O

    2017-01-01

    An. arabiensis (44.1%). Though An. arabiensis is still the most abundant vector species here, the remaining malaria transmission is predominantly mediated by An. funestus, possibly due to high insecticide resistance and high survival probabilities. Interventions that effectively target An. funestus mosquitoes could therefore significantly improve control of persistent malaria transmission in south-eastern Tanzania.

  12. Interventions that effectively target Anopheles funestus mosquitoes could significantly improve control of persistent malaria transmission in south–eastern Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matowo, Nancy S.; Ngowo, Halfan S.; Mkandawile, Gustav; Mmbando, Arnold; Finda, Marcelina; Okumu, Fredros O.

    2017-01-01

    An. arabiensis (44.1%). Though An. arabiensis is still the most abundant vector species here, the remaining malaria transmission is predominantly mediated by An. funestus, possibly due to high insecticide resistance and high survival probabilities. Interventions that effectively target An. funestus mosquitoes could therefore significantly improve control of persistent malaria transmission in south–eastern Tanzania. PMID:28542335

  13. Glucocorticoids have state-dependent stimulant effects on the mesencephalic dopaminergic transmission.

    OpenAIRE

    Piazza, P V; Rougé-Pont, F; Deroche, V; Maccari, S; Simon, H; Le Moal, M

    1996-01-01

    An increase in the activity of mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons has been implicated in the appearance of pathological behaviors such as psychosis and drug abuse. Several observations suggest that glucocorticoids might contribute to such an increase in dopaminergic activity. The present experiments therefore analyzed the effects of corticosterone, the major glucocorticoid in the rat, both on dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens of freely moving animals by means of microdialysis, and on ...

  14. Sunglass Filter Transmission and Its Operational Effect in Solar Protection for Civilian Pilots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chorley, Adrian C; Lyachev, Andrey; Higlett, Michael P; Khazova, Marina; Benwell, Martin J; Evans, Bruce J W

    2016-05-01

    The ocular effects of excess solar radiation exposure are well documented. Recent evidence suggests that ocular ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure to professional pilots may fall outside international guideline limits unless eye protection is used. Nonprescription sunglasses should be manufactured to meet either international or national standards. The mean increase in UVR and blue light hazards at altitude has been quantified and the aim of this research was to assess the effectiveness of typical pilot sunglasses in reducing UVR and blue light hazard exposure in flight. A series of sunglass filter transmittance measurements were taken from personal sunglasses (N = 20) used by pilots together with a series of new sunglasses (N = 18). All nonprescription sunglasses measured conformed to international standards for UVR transmittance and offered sufficient UVR protection for pilots. There was no difference between right and left lenses or between new and used sunglasses. All sunglasses offered sufficient attenuation to counter the mean increase in blue light exposure that pilots experience at altitude, although used sunglasses with scratched lenses were marginally less effective. One pair of prescription sunglasses offered insufficient UVR attenuation for some flights, but would have met requirements of international and national standards for UV-A transmittance. This was likely due to insufficient UVR blocking properties of the lens material. Lenses manufactured to minimally comply with standards for UVR transmittance could result in excess UVR exposure to a pilot based on in-flight irradiance data; an additional requirement of less than 10% transmittance at 380 nm is recommended.

  15. Effect of housing arrangement on fecal-oral transmission of avian hepatitis E virus in chicken flocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Baoyuan; Sun, Yani; Chen, Yiyang; Du, Taofeng; Nan, Yuchen; Wang, Xinjie; Li, Huixia; Huang, Baicheng; Zhang, Gaiping; Zhou, En-Min; Zhao, Qin

    2017-09-07

    Avian hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection is common in chicken flocks in China, as currently no measures exist to prevent the spread of the disease. In this study, we analyzed the effect of caged versus cage-free housing arrangements on avian HEV transmission. First, 127 serum and 110 clinical fecal samples were collected from 4 chicken flocks including the two arrangements in Shaanxi Province, China and tested for HEV antibodies and/or virus. Concurrently, 36 specific-pathogen-free chickens were divided equally into four experimental living arrangement groups, designated cage-free (Inoculated), caged (Inoculated), cage-free (Negative) and caged (Negative) groups. In caged groups, three cages contained 3 chickens each. Three chickens each from cage-free (Inoculated) and caged (Inoculated) groups (one chicken of each cage) were inoculated by cutaneous ulnar vein with the same dose of avian HEV, respectively. The cage-free (Negative) and caged (Negative) groups served as negative control. Serum and fecal samples were collected at 1 to 7 weeks post-inoculation (wpi) and liver lesions were scored at 7 wpi. The results of serology showed that the avian HEV infection rate (54.10%) of the cage-free chickens was significantly higher than the one (12.12%) for caged chickens (P chickens (6) was significantly higher than the one for the uninoculated caged birds (2), as evidenced by seroconversion, fecal virus shedding, viremia and gross and microscopic liver lesions. These results suggest that reduction of contact with feces as seen in the caged arrangement of housing chickens can reduce avian HEV transmission. This study provides insights for prevention and control of avian HEV infection in chicken flocks.

  16. Effects of disrupting medial prefrontal cortex GABA transmission on decision-making in a rodent gambling task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paine, T A; O'Hara, A; Plaut, B; Lowes, D C

    2015-05-01

    Decision-making is a complex cognitive process that is mediated, in part, by subregions of the medial prefrontal cortex (PFC). Decision-making is impaired in a number of psychiatric conditions including schizophrenia. Notably, people with schizophrenia exhibit reductions in GABA function in the same PFC areas that are implicated in decision-making. For example, expression of the GABA-synthesizing enzyme GAD67 is reduced in the dorsolateral PFC of people with schizophrenia. The goal of this experiment was to determine whether disrupting cortical GABA transmission impairs decision-making using a rodent gambling task (rGT). Rats were trained on the rGT until they reached stable performance and then were implanted with guide cannulae aimed at the medial PFC. Following recovery, the effects of intra-PFC infusions of the GABAA receptor antagonist bicuculline methiodide (BMI) or the GABA synthesis inhibitor L-allylglycine (LAG) on performance on the rGT were assessed. Intracortical infusions of BMI (25 ng/μl/side), but not LAG (10 μg/μl/side), altered decision-making. Following BMI infusions, rats made fewer advantageous choices. Follow-up experiments suggested that the change in decision-making was due to a change in the sensitivity to the punishments, rather than a change in the sensitivity to reward magnitudes, associated with each outcome. LAG infusions increased premature responding, a measure of response inhibition, but did not affect decision-making. Blocking GABAA receptors, but not inhibiting cortical GABA synthesis, within the medial PFC affects decision-making in the rGT. These data provide proof-of-concept evidence that disruptions in GABA transmission can contribute to the decision-making deficits in schizophrenia.

  17. Evolution of altruism in spatial prisoner's dilemma: Intra- and inter-cellular interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoi, Hiroki; Uehara, Takashi; Sakata, Tomoyuki; Naito, Hiromi; Morita, Satoru; Tainaka, Kei-ichi

    2014-12-01

    Iterated prisoner's dilemma game is carried out on lattice with “colony” structure. Each cell is regarded as a colony which contains plural players with an identical strategy. Both intra- and inter-cellular interactions are assumed. In the former a player plays with all other players in the same colony, while in the latter he plays with one player each from adjacent colonies. Spatial patterns among four typical strategies exhibit various dynamics and winners. Both theory and simulation reveal that All Cooperation (AC) wins, when the members of colony or the intensity of noise increases. This result explains the evolution of altruism in animal societies, even though errors easily occur in animal communications.

  18. ATP- and gap junction-dependent intercellular calcium signaling in osteoblastic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorgensen, N R; Geist, S T; Civitelli, R

    1997-01-01

    mechanically induced calcium waves in two rat osteosarcoma cell lines that differ in the gap junction proteins they express, in their ability to pass microinjected dye from cell to cell, and in their expression of P2Y2 (P2U) purinergic receptors. ROS 17/2.8 cells, which express the gap junction protein......Many cells coordinate their activities by transmitting rises in intracellular calcium from cell to cell. In nonexcitable cells, there are currently two models for intercellular calcium wave propagation, both of which involve release of inositol trisphosphate (IP3)- sensitive intracellular calcium...... stores. In one model, IP3 traverses gap junctions and initiates the release of intracellular calcium stores in neighboring cells. Alternatively, calcium waves may be mediated not by gap junctional communication, but rather by autocrine activity of secreted ATP on P2 purinergic receptors. We studied...

  19. Signaling through intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) in a B cell lymphoma line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holland, J; Owens, T

    1997-01-01

    Intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) (CD54) is an adhesion molecule of the immunoglobulin superfamily. The interaction between ICAM-1 on B lymphocytes and leukocyte function-associated antigen 1 on T cells plays a major role in several aspects of the immune response, including T-dependent B...... cell activation. While it was originally believed that ICAM-1 played a purely adhesive role, recent evidence suggests that it can itself transduce biochemical signals. We demonstrate that cross-linking of ICAM-1 results in the up-regulation of class II major histocompatibility complex, and we...... investigate the biochemical mechanism for the signaling role of ICAM-1. We show that cross-linking of ICAM-1 on the B lymphoma line A20 induces an increase in tyrosine phosphorylation of several cellular proteins, including the Src family kinase p53/p56(lyn). In vitro kinase assays showed that Lyn kinase...

  20. Evaluating the cost-effectiveness of combination antiretroviral therapy for the prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV in Uganda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuznik, Andreas; Lamorde, Mohammed; Hermans, Sabine; Castelnuovo, Barbara; Auerbach, Brandon; Semeere, Aggrey; Sempa, Joseph; Ssennono, Mark; Ssewankambo, Fred; Manabe, Yukari C.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To model the cost-effectiveness in Uganda of combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) to prevent mother-to-child transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Methods The cost-effectiveness of ART was evaluated on the assumption that ART reduces the risk of an HIV-positive pregnant

  1. Witnessing the effects of political violence in families: mechanisms of intergenerational transmission and clinical interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weingarten, Kaethe

    2004-01-01

    In this era of globalization, when news about political violence can haunt anyone, anywhere, those whose families have suffered political violence in the past are particularly vulnerable to current distress. Skilled in understanding transgenerational processes, family therapists need to be familiar with the mechanisms by which children are exposed to the effects of political violence suffered by their elders-that is, the ways in which they become their witnesses. This article presents a framework for understanding how the trauma of political violence experienced in one generation can "pass" to another that did not directly experience it, and proposes a model to guide clinical intervention.

  2. Comparisons of Measurements and Modeling of Solar Eclipse Effects on VLF Transmissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eccles, J. V.; Rice, D. D.; Sojka, J. J.; Marshall, R. A.; Drob, D. P.; Decena, J. C.

    2017-12-01

    The solar eclipse of 2017 August 21 provides an excellent opportunity to examine Very Low Frequency (VLF) radio signal propagation through the path of the solar eclipse between Navy VLF transmitters and several VLF receivers. The VLF transmitters available for this study radio signal propagation study are NLK in Jim Creek, Washington (24.8 kHz, 192 kW, 48.20N, 121.90W), NML in LaMour, North Dakota (25.2 kHz, 500 kW 46.37N, 93.34W), and NAA in Cutler, Maine (24.0 kHz, 1000 kW, 44.65N, 67.29W). These VLF transmitters provide propagation paths to three VLF receivers at Utah State University (41.75N, 111.76W), Bear Lake Observatory (41.95N, 111.39W), Salt Lake City (40.76N, 111.89W) and one receiver in Boulder, Colorado (40.02N, 105.27W). The solar eclipse shadow will cross all propagations paths during the day and will modify the D region electron density within the solar shadow. The week prior to the solar eclipse will be used to generate a diurnal baseline of VLF single strength for each transmitter-receiver pair. These will be compared to the day of the solar eclipse to identify VLF propagation differences through the solar eclipse shawdow. Additionally, the electron density effects of the week prior and of the solar eclipse day will be modeled using the Data-Driven D Region (DDDR) model [Eccles et al., 2005] with a detailed eclipse solar flux mask. The Long-Wave Propagation Code and the HASEL RF ray-tracing code will be used to generate VLF signal strength for each measured propagation path through the days prior and the solar eclipse day. Model-measurement comparisons will be presented and the D region electron density effects of the solar eclipse will be examined. The DDDR is a time-dependent D region model, which makes it very suitable for the solar eclipse effects on the electron density for the altitude range of 36 to 130 km. Eccles J. V., R. D. Hunsucker, D. Rice, J. J. Sojka (2005), Space weather effects on midlatitude HF propagation paths: Observations and

  3. Differential Effect of Neuropeptides on Excitatory Synaptic Transmission in Human Epileptic Hippocampus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ledri, Marco; Sorensen, Andreas T.; Madsen, Marita G.

    2015-01-01

    therapy is an evolving innovative approach that may prove useful for clinical applications. In animal models of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), gene therapy treatments based on viral vectors encoding NPY or galanin have been shown to effectively suppress seizures. However, how this translates to human TLE...... remains unknown. A unique possibility to validate these animal studies is provided by a surgical therapeutic approach, whereby resected epileptic tissue from temporal lobes of pharmacoresistant patients are available for neurophysiological studies in vitro. To test whether NPY and galanin have...

  4. Proteomic analysis of exosomes from nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell identifies intercellular transfer of angiogenic proteins

    KAUST Repository

    Chan, Yuk-kit

    2015-04-01

    Exosomes, a group of secreted extracellular nanovesicles containing genetic materials and signaling molecules, play a critical role in intercellular communication. During tumorigenesis, exosomes have been demonstrated to promote tumor angiogenesis and metastasis while their biological functions in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) are poorly understood. In this study, we focused on the role of NPC-derived exosomes on angiogenesis. Exosomes derived from the NPC C666-1 cells and immortalized nasopharyngeal epithelial cells (NP69 and NP460) were isolated using ultracentrifugation. The molecular profile and biophysical characteristics of exosomes were verified by Western blotting, sucrose density gradient, and electron microscopy. We showed that the C666-1 exosomes (10 and 20 μg/ml) could significantly increase the tubulogenesis, migration and invasion of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in a dose-dependent manner. Subsequently, an iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomics was used to identify the differentially expressed proteins in C666-1 exosomes. Among the 640 identified proteins, 51 and 89 proteins were considered as up- and down-regulated (≥ 1.5-fold variations) in C666-1 exosomes compared to the normal counterparts, respectively. As expected, pro-angiogenic proteins including intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and CD44 variant isoform 5 (CD44v5) are among the up-regulated proteins, whereas angio-suppressive protein, thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) was down-regulated in C666-1 exosomes. Further confocal microscopic study and Western blotting clearly demonstrated that the alteration of ICAM-1, and TSP-1 expressions in recipient HUVECs are due to internalization of exosomes. Taken together, these data strongly indicated the critical roles of identified angiogenic proteins in the involvement of exosomes-induced angiogenesis, which could potentially be developed as therapeutic targets in future. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  5. In vitro early changes in intercellular junctions by treatment with a chemical carcinogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachikawa, T; Kohno, Y; Matsui, Y; Yoshiki, S

    1986-06-01

    To examine early intercellular junction changes caused by treatment with 9,10-dimethyl-1,2-benzanthracene (DMBA), rat lingual epithelium was cultivated in isolation and observed by electrophysiological, freeze-fracture and whole-mount electron microscopy. Electrophysiological measurements showed a transient decrease in membrane potential of -10.2 mV 6 h after the treatment. It returned to almost the same level as that of the control group 1 day later. Six hours after treatment, input resistance decreased rapidly to 5.3 M omega but increased to 18.0 M omega 12 h after treatment. Transient reduction of input resistance and membrane potential occurred prior to the decrease in the coupling ratio 6 h after treatment with DMBA. In freeze-fracture replicas, the number of gap junctions decreased by approximately 45% of the control value 6 h after treatment with DMBA. At 12 h and thereafter, the number and area of gap junctions subsequently decreased by 60-80% of the control value. Alterations in the number and area of desmosomes were similar to those of the gap junctions. The formation of epithelial cytoskeletons, partially devoid of the 2-4 and 5-8 nm filaments was also observed. A decrease in the density of filament networks beneath the plasma membranes was especially apparent. Treatment with a carcinogen brought about morphological cellular changes as early as 6 h after treatment, and such early changes might trigger metabolic cellular abnormalities. Affected cells appear to move away from normal cells in a process of repeated destruction and revision of intercellular junctions, and cytoskeletons.

  6. Interleukin-4 and interleukin-13 compromise the sinonasal epithelial barrier and perturb intercellular junction protein expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Sarah K; Laury, Adrienne M; Katz, Elizabeth H; Den Beste, Kyle A; Parkos, Charles A; Nusrat, Asma

    2014-05-01

    Altered expression of epithelial intercellular junction proteins has been observed in sinonasal biopsies from nasal polyps and epithelial layers cultured from nasal polyp patients. These alterations comprise a "leaky" epithelial barrier phenotype. We hypothesize that T helper 2 (Th2) cytokines interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-13 modulate epithelial junction proteins, thereby contributing to the leaky epithelial barrier. Differentiated primary sinonasal epithelial layers cultured at the air-liquid interface were exposed to IL-4, IL-13, and controls for 24 hours at 37°C. Epithelial resistance measurements were taken every 4 hours during cytokine exposure. Western blot and immunofluorescence staining/confocal microscopy were used to assess changes in a panel of tight and adherens junction proteins. Western blot densitometry was quantified with image analysis. IL-4 and IL-13 exposure resulted in a mean decrease in transepithelial resistance at 24 hours to 51.6% (n = 6) and 68.6% (n = 8) of baseline, respectively. Tight junction protein junctional adhesion molecule-A (JAM-A) expression decreased 42.2% with IL-4 exposure (n = 9) and 37.5% with IL-13 exposure (n = 9). Adherens junction protein E-cadherin expression decreased 35.3% with IL-4 exposure (n = 9) and 32.9% with IL-13 exposure (n = 9). Tight junction protein claudin-2 showed more variability but had a trend toward higher expression with Th2 cytokine exposure. There were no appreciable changes in claudin-1, occludin, or zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) with IL-4 or IL-13 exposure. Sinonasal epithelial exposure to Th2 cytokines IL-4 and IL-13 results in alterations in intercellular junction proteins, reflecting increased epithelial permeability. Such changes may explain some of the phenotypic manifestations of Th2-mediated sinonasal disease, such as edema, nasal discharge, and environmental reactivity. © 2014 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  7. IL-4 and IL-13 Compromise the Sinonasal Epithelial Barrier and Perturb Intercellular Junction Protein Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Sarah K.; Laury, Adrienne M.; Katz, Elizabeth H.; Den Beste, Kyle A.; Parkos, Charles A.; Nusrat, Asma

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Altered expression of epithelial intercellular junction proteins has been observed in sinonasal biopsies from nasal polyps and epithelial layers cultured from nasal polyp patients. These alterations comprise a “leaky” epithelial barrier phenotype. We hypothesize that Th2 cytokines IL-4 and IL-13 modulate epithelial junction proteins thereby contributing to the leaky epithelial barrier. Methods Differentiated primary sinonasal epithelial layers cultured at the air-liquid interface were exposed to IL-4, IL-13, and controls for 24 hours at 37°C. Epithelial resistance measurements were taken every 4 hours during cytokine exposure. Western blot and immunofluorescence staining/confocal microscopy were used to assess changes in a panel of tight and adherens junction proteins. Western blot densitometry was quantified with image analysis. Results IL-4 and IL-13 exposure resulted in a mean decrease in transepithelial resistance at 24 hours to 51.6% (n=6) and 68.6% (n=8) of baseline, respectively. Tight junction protein JAM-A expression decreased 42.2% with IL-4 exposure (n=9) and 37.5% with IL-13 exposure (n=9). Adherens junction protein E-cadherin expression decreased 35.3% with IL-4 exposure (n=9) and 32.9% with IL-13 exposure (n=9). Tight junction protein claudin-2 showed more variability but had a trend toward higher expression with Th2 cytokine exposure. There were no appreciable changes in claudin-1, occludin, or ZO-1 with IL-4 or IL-13 exposure. Conclusion Sinonasal epithelial exposure to Th2 cytokines IL-4 and IL-13 results in alterations in intercellular junction proteins, reflecting increased epithelial permeability. Such changes may explain some of the phenotypic manifestations of Th2-mediated sinonasal disease, such as edema, nasal discharge, and environmental reactivity. PMID:24510479

  8. Proteomic analysis of exosomes from nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell identifies intercellular transfer of angiogenic proteins

    KAUST Repository

    Chan, Yuk-kit; Zhang, Huoming; Liu, Pei; Tsao, George Sai-wah; Li Lung, Maria; Mak, Nai-ki; Ngok-shun Wong, Ricky; Ying-kit Yue, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Exosomes, a group of secreted extracellular nanovesicles containing genetic materials and signaling molecules, play a critical role in intercellular communication. During tumorigenesis, exosomes have been demonstrated to promote tumor angiogenesis and metastasis while their biological functions in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) are poorly understood. In this study, we focused on the role of NPC-derived exosomes on angiogenesis. Exosomes derived from the NPC C666-1 cells and immortalized nasopharyngeal epithelial cells (NP69 and NP460) were isolated using ultracentrifugation. The molecular profile and biophysical characteristics of exosomes were verified by Western blotting, sucrose density gradient, and electron microscopy. We showed that the C666-1 exosomes (10 and 20 μg/ml) could significantly increase the tubulogenesis, migration and invasion of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in a dose-dependent manner. Subsequently, an iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomics was used to identify the differentially expressed proteins in C666-1 exosomes. Among the 640 identified proteins, 51 and 89 proteins were considered as up- and down-regulated (≥ 1.5-fold variations) in C666-1 exosomes compared to the normal counterparts, respectively. As expected, pro-angiogenic proteins including intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and CD44 variant isoform 5 (CD44v5) are among the up-regulated proteins, whereas angio-suppressive protein, thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) was down-regulated in C666-1 exosomes. Further confocal microscopic study and Western blotting clearly demonstrated that the alteration of ICAM-1, and TSP-1 expressions in recipient HUVECs are due to internalization of exosomes. Taken together, these data strongly indicated the critical roles of identified angiogenic proteins in the involvement of exosomes-induced angiogenesis, which could potentially be developed as therapeutic targets in future. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  9. Transmission Electron Microscopy of the Gastrointestinal Tract of Nile Perch Lates niloticus

    OpenAIRE

    Namulawa, V. T; Kato, C. D; Nyatia, E; Rutaisire, J; Britz, P. J

    2015-01-01

    The ultrastructure of the gastrointestinal tract of Nile perch was described using Transmission Electron Microscopy standard procedures. Investigations revealed the presence of mucous cells, blood vessels and oil droplets plus several nerve cells and muscle bundles in the oral cavity. Further observations revealed columnar epithelial cells in the oesophagus, with a ragged surface, high electron dense cytoplasm, intercellular spaces, mitochondria and mucus granules. The lamina propria of the o...

  10. Involvement of melatonin metabolites in the long-term inhibitory effect of the hormone on rat spinal nociceptive transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondaca, Mauricio; Hernández, Alejandro; Valladares, Luis; Sierralta, Walter; Noseda, Rodrigo; Soto-Moyano, Rubén

    2004-02-01

    There is evidence that melatonin and its metabolites could bind to nuclear sites in neurones, suggesting that this hormone is able to exert long-term functional effects in the central nervous system via genomic mechanisms. This study was designed to investigate (i) whether systemically administered melatonin can exert long-term effects on spinal cord windup activity, and (ii) whether blockade of melatonin degradation with eserine could prevent this effect. Rats receiving melatonin (10 mg/kg ip), the same dose of melatonin plus eserine (0.5 mg/kg ip), or saline were studied. Seven days after administration of the drugs or saline, spinal windup of rats was assessed in a C-fiber reflex response paradigm. Results show that rats receiving melatonin exhibited a reduction in spinal windup activity. This was not observed in the animals receiving melatonin plus eserine or saline, suggesting a role for melatonin metabolites in long-term changes of nociceptive transmission in the rat spinal cord.

  11. Effectiveness of monopolar dielectric transmission of pulsed electromagnetic fields for multiple sclerosis-related pain: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochsprung, A; Escudero-Uribe, S; Ibáñez-Vera, A J; Izquierdo-Ayuso, G

    2018-05-08

    Pain is highly prevalent in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS); it is chronic in 50% of cases and is classified as nociceptive, neuropathic, or mixed-type. Pain affects quality of life, sleep, and the activities of daily living. Electrotherapy is an interesting alternative or complementary treatment in the management of pain in MS, with new innovations constantly appearing. This study evaluates the effectiveness of treatment with monopolar dielectric transmission of pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMF) for pain associated with MS. We performed a randomised, placebo-controlled clinical trial including 24 patients, who were assessed with the Brief Pain Inventory, the Multiple Sclerosis International Quality of Life questionnaire, the Beck Depression Inventory, and the Modified Fatigue Impact Scale. Statistically significant improvements were observed in maximum and mean pain scores, as well as in the impact of pain on work, personal relationships, and sleep and rest. Not significant differences were found between the treatment and placebo groups. Treatment with PEMF may be effective in reducing pain in patients with MS, although further research is necessary to confirm its effectiveness over placebo and to differentiate which type of pain may be more susceptible to this treatment. Copyright © 2018 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. The Effects Of Asymmetric Transmission Of Exchange Rate On Inflation In Iran: Application Of Threshold Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naghdi Yazdan

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Given the recent fluctuation in the exchange rate and the presence of several factors such as the various economy-political sanctions (mainly embargos on oil and banking, extreme volatility in different economic fields, and consequently the devaluation of national and public procurement -A landmark that is emanating from exchange rate fluctuation - two points should be noted: First, it is essential to review the effect of exchange rate fluctuation on macro economic variables such as inflation and to provide appropriate policies. Second, the existence of this condition provides the chance to study the relation between exchange rate and inflation in a non-linear and asymmetric method. Hence, the present study seeks to use TAR model and, on the basis of monthly time series data over the period March 2002 to March 2014, to analyze the cross-asymmetric and non-linear exchange rate on consumer price index (CPI in Iran. The results also show the presence of an asymmetric long-term relationship between these variables (exchange rate and CPI. Also, in the Iranian economy, the effect of negative shocks of exchange rate on inflation is more sustainable than the one from positive shocks.

  13. Transmission ratio distortion in Arabidopsis lyrata: effects of population divergence and the S-locus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leppälä, J.; Bechsgaard, Jesper Smærup; Schierup, Mikkel Heide

    2008-01-01

    We investigated transmission ratio distortion within an Icelandic population of Arabidopsis lyrata using 16 molecular markers unlinked to the S-locus. Transmission ratio distortion was found more often than expected by chance at the gametic level, but not at the genotypic or zygotic level. The ga...

  14. Effect of transmission intensity on hotspots and micro-epidemiology of malaria in sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogeni, Polycarp; Omedo, Irene; Nyundo, Christopher; Kamau, Alice; Noor, Abdisalan; Bejon, Philip

    2017-06-30

    Malaria transmission intensity is heterogeneous, complicating the implementation of malaria control interventions. We provide a description of the spatial micro-epidemiology of symptomatic malaria and asymptomatic parasitaemia in multiple sites. We assembled data from 19 studies conducted between 1996 and 2015 in seven countries of sub-Saharan Africa with homestead-level geospatial data. Data from each site were used to quantify spatial autocorrelation and examine the temporal stability of hotspots. Parameters from these analyses were examined to identify trends over varying transmission intensity. Significant hotspots of malaria transmission were observed in most years and sites. The risk ratios of malaria within hotspots were highest at low malaria positive fractions (MPFs) and decreased with increasing MPF (p hotspots was lowest at extremely low and extremely high MPFs, with a peak in statistical significance at an MPF of ~0.3. In four sites with longitudinal data we noted temporal instability and variable negative correlations between MPF and average age of symptomatic malaria across all sites, suggesting varying degrees of temporal stability. We observed geographical micro-variation in malaria transmission at sites with a variety of transmission intensities across sub-Saharan Africa. Hotspots are marked at lower transmission intensity, but it becomes difficult to show statistical significance when cases are sparse at very low transmission intensity. Given the predictability with which hotspots occur as transmission intensity falls, malaria control programmes should have a low threshold for responding to apparent clustering of cases.

  15. Research on the impact of surface properties of particle on damping effect in gear transmission under high speed and heavy load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Wangqiang; Chen, Zhiwei; Pan, Tianlong; Li, Jiani

    2018-01-01

    The vibration and noise from gear transmission have great damage on the mechanical equipment and operators. Through inelastic collisions and friction between particles, the energy can be dissipated in gear transmission. A dynamic model of particle dampers in gear transmission was put forward in this paper. The performance of particle dampers in centrifugal fields under different rotational speeds and load was investigated. The surface properties such as the impact of coefficient of restitution and friction coefficient of the particle on the damping effect were analyzed and the total energy loss was obtained by discrete element method (DEM). The vibration from time-varying mesh stiffness was effectively reduced by particle dampers and the optimum coefficient of restitution was discovered under different rotational speeds and load. Then, a test bench for gear transmission was constructed, and the vibration of driven gear and driving gear were measured through a three-directional wireless acceleration sensor. The research results agree well with the simulation results. While at relatively high speed, smaller coefficient of restitution achieves better damping effect. As to friction coefficient, at relatively high speed, the energy dissipation climbs up and then declines with the increase of the friction coefficient. The results can provide guidelines for the application of particle damper in gear transmission.

  16. Intergenerational Transmission of the Effects of Acculturation on Health in Hispanic Americans: A Fetal Programming Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Molly; Entringer, Sonja; Buss, Claudia; DeHaene, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    We propose a transdisciplinary, life span framework for examining the underlying cause of the observed intergenerational decline in health among Hispanic Americans. We focus on acculturation, and we posit that acculturation-related processes in first-generation Hispanic immigrant mothers may affect the intrauterine development of an unborn child, via the process of fetal programming, to produce phenotypic effects that may alter the susceptibility for noncommunicable chronic diseases. In this manner, an intergenerational cascade of perpetuation may become established. Our framework may shed light on the biological, behavioral, and social causes of intergenerational cycles of vulnerability among immigrant minority groups, with public health and policy implications for primary prevention and intervention. PMID:25905831

  17. Effects of the equatorial ionosphere on L-band Earth-space transmissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ernest K.; Flock, Warren L.

    1993-01-01

    Ionosphere scintillation can effect satellite telecommunication up to Ku-band. Nighttime scintillation can be attributed to large-scale inhomogeneity in the F-region of the ionosphere predominantly between heights of 200 and 600 km. Daytime scintillation has been attributed to sporadic E. It can be thought of as occurring in three belts: equatorial, high-latitude, and mid-latitude, in order of severity. Equatorial scintillation occurs between magnetic latitudes +/- 25 degrees, peaking near +/- 10 degrees. It commonly starts abruptly near 2000 local time and dies out shortly after midnight. There is a strong solar cycle dependence and a seasonal preference for the equinoxes, particularly the vernal one. Equatorial scintillation occurs more frequently on magnetically quiet than on magnetically disturbed days in most longitudes. At the peak of the sunspot cycle scintillation depths as great as 20 dB were observed at L-band.

  18. Effect of diisopropylfluorophosphate on synaptic transmission and acetylcholine sensitivity in neuroblastoma-myotube co-culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adler, M.; Chang, F.C.T.; Foster, R.E.; Glenn, J.F.; Mark, G.; Maxwell, D.

    1986-01-01

    The authors investigate the effects of the irreversible organophosphorous cholinesterase inhibitor, DFP, on clonal G8-1 myotubes co-cultured with ACh- secreting NG108-15 neuroblastoma x glioma hybrid cells. The enzyme activity is shown, plotted as a function of time in culture. The enzyme activity remained low over four days. At the end of this time, the cultures were nearly confluent with myoblasts but contained less than 2% multinucleated myotubes. The AChE activity increased gradually after horse serum was added to the growth medium to promote myotube formation, reaching a maximum of 1.1 nmole. C 14 ACh/min/mg protein on the 15th day

  19. [Effective Presentations in Medicine. The Art of Communication and Transmission: Ten Recommendations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Álvaro J Ruiz

    2012-01-01

    To communicate effectively during a lecture or presentation it is necessary to follow simple rules, including the preparation of the conference with the audience in mind and with the definition of a specific message to leave the audience. The public's attention should be quickly captured and all subsequent actions should aim to keep it. The text must be accurate and sizes easily visible, the slides should provide good contrast with solid and simple backgrounds and should avoid excessive animations. At the close of the conference, the conclusions and question session offers the invaluable opportunity to reinforce the desired message. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  20. Effect of shelf aging on vibration transmissibility of anti-vibration gloves

    Science.gov (United States)

    SHIBATA, Nobuyuki

    2017-01-01

    Anti-vibration gloves have been used in real workplaces to reduce vibration transmitted through hand-held power tools to the hand. Generally materials used for vibration attenuation in gloves are resilient materials composed of certain synthetic and/or composite polymers. The mechanical characteristics of the resilient materials used in anti-vibration gloves are prone to be influenced by environmental conditions such as temperature, humidity, and photo-irradiation, which cause material degradation and aging. This study focused on the influence of shelf aging on the vibration attenuation performance of air-packaged anti-vibration gloves following 2 yr of shelf aging. Effects of shelf aging on the vibration attenuation performance of anti-vibration gloves were examined according to the Japan industrial standard JIS T8114 test protocol. The findings indicate that shelf aging induces the reduction of vibration attenuation performance in air-packaged anti-vibration gloves. PMID:28978817

  1. Effect of the technology in transmission, distribution and in the final uses; Efecto de la tecnologia en transmision, distribucion y en los usos finales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivas, Elena [ed.; Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Temixco, Morelos (Mexico)

    1999-07-01

    At the moment one looks for the application of the superconductivity in the generation, transformation, transmission and storage of electrical energy. In this article recent technologies are briefly described , their advantages and their effects on the transmission and distribution networks. In some cases specific reference is made of the effect that they will have in Mexico. [Spanish] Actualmente se busca la aplicacion de la superconductividad en la generacion, transformacion, transmision y almacenamiento de energia eletrica. En este articulo se describen brevemente tecnologias recientes, sus ventajas y sus efectos sobre las redes de transmision y distribucion. En algunos casos se hace referencia especifica al efecto que tendran en Mexico.

  2. Transformed hairy roots of Discaria trinervis: a valuable tool for studying actinorhizal symbiosis in the context of intercellular infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imanishi, Leandro; Vayssières, Alice; Franche, Claudine; Bogusz, Didier; Wall, Luis; Svistoonoff, Sergio

    2011-11-01

    Among infection mechanisms leading to root nodule symbiosis, the intercellular infection pathway is probably the most ancestral but also one of the least characterized. Intercellular infection has been described in Discaria trinervis, an actinorhizal plant belonging to the Rosales order. To decipher the molecular mechanisms underlying intercellular infection with Frankia bacteria, we set up an efficient genetic transformation protocol for D. trinervis based on Agrobacterium rhizogenes. We showed that composite plants with transgenic roots expressing green fluorescent protein can be specifically and efficiently nodulated by Frankia strain BCU110501. Nitrogen fixation rates and feedback inhibition of nodule formation by nitrogen were similar in control and composite plants. In order to challenge the transformation system, the MtEnod11 promoter, a gene from Medicago truncatula widely used as a marker for early infection-related symbiotic events in model legumes, was introduced in D. trinervis. MtEnod11::GUS expression was related to infection zones in root cortex and in the parenchyma of the developing nodule. The ability to study intercellular infection with molecular tools opens new avenues for understanding the evolution of the infection process in nitrogen-fixing root nodule symbioses.

  3. Intercellular deposits of basement membrane material in active human pituitary adenomas detected by immunostaining for laminin and electron microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holck, S; Wewer, U M; Albrechtsen, R

    1986-01-01

    and one patient with Cushing's syndrome). Concurrently, at the ultrastructural level, bunches of basement membrane-like material intermingled between the adenoma cells were demonstrated in seven of these ten active adenomas. Furthermore, secretory granules were entrapped occasionally in this intercellular...

  4. Radial distribution of dilated intercellular spaces of the esophageal squamous epithelium in patients with reflux disease exhibiting discrete endoscopic lesions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vieth, M; Fiocca, R; Haringsma, J; Delarive, J; Wiesel, PH; Tam, W; Tytgat, GNJ; Dent, J; Edebo, A; Lundell, L; Stolte, M

    2004-01-01

    Introduction: Dilatation of intercellular spaces of the esophageal squamous epithelium has been suggested as a marker of early acid reflux-induced damage. This change is a potentially useful addition to histomorphological changes that represent so called minimal endoscopic lesions. We have assessed

  5. The pharmacological effect of Bothrops neuwiedii pauloensis (jararaca-pintada snake venom on avian neuromuscular transmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.R. Borja-Oliveira

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available The neuromuscular effects of Bothrops neuwiedii pauloensis (jararaca-pintada venom were studied on isolated chick biventer cervicis nerve-muscle preparations. Venom concentrations of 5-50 µg/ml produced an initial inhibition and a secondary increase of indirectly evoked twitches followed by a progressive concentration-dependent and irreversible neuromuscular blockade. At venom concentrations of 1-20 µg/ml, the responses to 13.4 mM KCl were inhibited whereas those to 110 µM acetylcholine alone and cumulative concentrations of 1 µM to 10 mM were unaffected. At venom concentrations higher than 50 µg/ml, there was pronounced muscle contracture with inhibition of the responses to acetylcholine, KCl and direct stimulation. At 20-24ºC, the venom (50 µg/ml produced only partial neuromuscular blockade (30.7 ± 8.0%, N = 3 after 120 min and the initial inhibition and the secondary increase of the twitch responses caused by the venom were prolonged and pronounced and the response to KCl was unchanged. These results indicate that B.n. pauloensis venom is neurotoxic, acting primarily at presynaptic sites, and that enzyme activity may be involved in this pharmacological action.

  6. Methamphetamine and dopamine neurotoxicity: differential effects of agents interfering with glutamatergic transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boireau, A; Bordier, F; Dubédat, P; Doble, A

    1995-07-28

    The effects of riluzole and lamotrigine, two agents which interfere with the release of glutamate (GLU), and MK-801, a blocker of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, were compared in the model of methamphetamine-induced depletion of dopamine (DA) levels in mice. Repeated injections with methamphetamine (4 x 5 mg/kg i.p.) markedly decreased levels of DA, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and homovanillic acid (HVA) levels. When mice were treated with riluzole (2 x 10 mg/kg p.o.), no protection was observed against the decrease in DA and the two metabolites. Lamotrigine (2 x 10 mg/kg p.o.) was also inactive. Treatment with MK-801 (2 x 2.5 mg/kg i.p.) antagonized the decrease in DA, DOPAC and HVA levels induced by the neurotoxin. Thus, unlike an NMDA blocker, drugs that interfere with GLU release did not antagonize the methamphetamine-induced DA neurotoxicity in mice. The consequences of this inactivity are discussed in terms of the reliability of this model to test new drugs with putative efficacy in the treatment of Parkinson's disease.

  7. Transcending Transmission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoeneborn, Dennis; Trittin, Hannah

    2013-01-01

    Purpose – Extant research on corporate social responsibility (CSR) communication primarily relies on a transmission model of communication that treats organizations and communication as distinct phenomena. This approach has been criticized for neglecting the formative role of communication...... in the emergence of organizations. This paper seeks to propose to reconceptualize CSR communication by drawing on the “communication constitutes organizations” (CCO) perspective. Design/methodology/approach – This is a conceptual paper that explores the implications of switching from an instrumental...... to a constitutive notion of communication. Findings – The study brings forth four main findings: from the CCO view, organizations are constituted by several, partly dissonant, and potentially contradictory communicative practices. From that viewpoint, the potential impact of CSR communication becomes a matter...

  8. Autophagy and gap junctional intercellular communication inhibition are involved in cadmium-induced apoptosis in rat liver cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou, Hui [College of Veterinary Medicine, Yangzhou University, and Jiangsu Co-innovation Center for Prevention and Control of Important Animal Infectious Diseases and Zoonoses, Yangzhou, Jiangsu, 225009 (China); Zhuo, Liling [College of Life Science, Zaozhuang University, Zaozhuang, Shandong, 277160 (China); Han, Tao; Hu, Di; Yang, Xiaokang; Wang, Yi; Yuan, Yan; Gu, Jianhong; Bian, Jianchun; Liu, Xuezhong [College of Veterinary Medicine, Yangzhou University, and Jiangsu Co-innovation Center for Prevention and Control of Important Animal Infectious Diseases and Zoonoses, Yangzhou, Jiangsu, 225009 (China); Liu, Zongping, E-mail: liuzongping@yzu.edu.cn [College of Veterinary Medicine, Yangzhou University, and Jiangsu Co-innovation Center for Prevention and Control of Important Animal Infectious Diseases and Zoonoses, Yangzhou, Jiangsu, 225009 (China)

    2015-04-17

    Cadmium (Cd) is known to induce hepatotoxicity, yet the underlying mechanism of how this occurs is not fully understood. In this study, Cd-induced apoptosis was demonstrated in rat liver cells (BRL 3A) with apoptotic nuclear morphological changes and a decrease in cell index (CI) in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. The role of gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) and autophagy in Cd-induced apoptosis was investigated. Cd significantly induced GJIC inhibition as well as downregulation of connexin 43 (Cx43). The prototypical gap junction blocker carbenoxolone disodium (CBX) exacerbated the Cd-induced decrease in CI. Cd treatment was also found to cause autophagy, with an increase in mRNA expression of autophagy-related genes Atg-5, Atg-7, Beclin-1, and microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3) conversion from cytosolic LC3-I to membrane-bound LC3-II. The autophagic inducer rapamycin (RAP) prevented the Cd-induced CI decrease, while the autophagic inhibitor chloroquine (CQ) caused a further reduction in CI. In addition, CBX promoted Cd-induced autophagy, as well as changes in expression of Atg-5, Atg-7, Beclin-1 and LC3. CQ was found to block the Cd-induced decrease in Cx43 and GJIC inhibition, whereas RAP had opposite effect. These results demonstrate that autophagy plays a protective role during Cd-induced apoptosis in BRL 3A cells during 6 h of experiment, while autophagy exacerbates Cd-induced GJIC inhibition which has a negative effect on cellular fate. - Highlights: • GJIC and autophagy is crucial for biological processes. • Cd exposure causes GJIC inhibition and autophagy increase in BRL 3A cells. • Autophagy protects Cd induced BRL 3A cells apoptosis at an early stage. • Autophagy exacerbates Cd-induced GJIC inhibition. • GJIC plays an important role in autophagy induced cell death or survival.

  9. The mechanism of lauric acid-modified protein nanocapsules escape from intercellular trafficking vesicles and its implication for drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lijuan; Liang, Xin; Liu, Gan; Zhou, Yun; Ye, Xinyu; Chen, Xiuli; Miao, Qianwei; Gao, Li; Zhang, Xudong; Mei, Lin

    2018-11-01

    Protein nanocapsules have exhibited promising potential applications in the field of protein drug delivery. A major issue with various promising nano-sized biotherapeutics including protein nanocapsules is that owing to their particle size they are subject to cellular uptake via endocytosis, and become entrapped and then degraded within endolysosomes, which can significantly impair their therapeutic efficacy. In addition, many nano-sized biotherapeutics could be also sequestered by autophagosomes and degraded through the autolysosomal pathway. Thus, a limiting step in achieving an effective protein therapy is to facilitate the endosomal escape and auto-lysosomal escape to ensure cytosolic delivery of the protein drugs. Here, we prepared a protein nanocapsule based on BSA (nBSA) and the BSA nanocapsules modified with a bilayer of lauric acid (LA-nBSA) to investigate the escape effects from the endosome and autophagosome. The size distribution of nBSA and LA-nBSA analyzed using DLS presents a uniform diameter centered at 10 nm and 16 nm. The data also showed that FITC-labeled nBSA and LA-nBSA were taken up by the cells mainly through Arf-6-dependent endocytosis and Rab34-mediated macropinocytosis. In addition, LA-nBSA could efficiently escape from endosomal before the degradation in endo-lysosomes. Autophagy could also sequester the LA-nBSA through p62 autophagosome vesicles. These two types of nanocapsules underwent different intracellular destinies and lauric acid (LA) coating played a vital role in intracellular particle retention. In conclusion, the protein nanocapsules modified with LA could enhance the protein nanocapsules escape from intercellular trafficking vesicles, and protect the protein from degradation by the lysosomes.

  10. Induction of mast cell accumulation by chymase via an enzymatic activity- and intercellular adhesion molecule-1-dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huiyun; Wang, Junling; Wang, Ling; Zhan, Mengmeng; Li, Shigang; Fang, Zeman; Xu, Ciyan; Zheng, Yanshan; He, Shaoheng

    2018-02-01

    Chymase is a unique, abundant secretory product of mast cells and a potent chemoattractant for eosinophils, monocytes and neutrophils, but little is known of its influence on mast cell accumulation. A mouse peritoneal inflammation model, cell migration assay and flowcytometry analysis, were used to investigate the role of chymase in recruiting mast cells. Chymase increased, by up to 5.4-fold, mast cell numbers in mouse peritoneum. Inhibitors of chymase, heat-inactivation of the enzyme, sodium cromoglycate and terfenadine, and pretreatment of mice with anti-intercellular adhesion molecule 1, anti-L-selectin, anti-CD11a and anti-CD18 antibodies dramatically diminished the chymase-induced increase in mast cell accumulation. These findings indicate that this effect of chymase is dependent on its enzymatic activity and activation of adhesion molecules. In addition, chymase provoked a significant increase in 5-HT and eotaxin release (up to 1.8- and 2.2-fold, respectively) in mouse peritoneum. Since 5-HT, eotaxin and RANTES can induce marked mast cell accumulation, these indirect mechanisms may also contribute to chymase-induced mast cell accumulation. Moreover, chymase increased the trans-endothelium migration of mast cells in vitro indicating it also acts as a chemoattractant. The finding that mast cells accumulate in response to chymase implies further that chymase is a major pro-inflammatory mediator of mast cells. This effect of chymase, a major product of mast cell granules, suggests a novel self-amplification mechanism for mast cell accumulation in allergic inflammation. Mast cell stabilizers and inhibitors of chymase may have potential as a treatment of allergic disorders. © 2017 The British Pharmacological Society.

  11. Comparative study on the effects of two antifungal drugs against Candida albicans by microcalorimetry and transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Qing-Lian; Zhang, Juan; Xu, Zi-Qiang; Li, Ran; Jiang, Feng-Lei; Xiao, Qi; Liu, Yi

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Microcalorimetry is a fast, simple method to study the antibiotic property of drugs. ► We noticed that the antibiotic effect of ITZ was slightly better than that of KTZ. ► We perform the TEM to study the morphology changes of C. albicans cells. - Abstract: In this work, a multi-channel thermal activity monitor (TAM 2277) was applied to study the growth metabolism of Candida albicans (C. albicans) in vitro in the absence and presence of different concentrations of ketoconazole (KTZ) and itraconazole (ITZ). The results showed that the half inhibiting concentrations (IC 50 ) of C. albicans by KTZ and ITZ are 73.5 and 66.3 μmol L −1 , respectively. So the antibiotic effect of ITZ was slightly better than that of KTZ. The morphology of C. albicans cells both in the absence and presence of antifungal agents was examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Our research also suggests that microcalorimetry is a fast, simple, non-invasive, non-destructive and more sensitive method, and can be easily performed to study the antibiotic property of different species of drugs on microorganism compared to other biological and clinical methods.

  12. Nonlinearity effect of electro-optical modulator response in double spread CDMA radio-over-fiber transmissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jen-Fa; Yen, Chih-Ta; Li, Tzung-Yen

    2008-07-01

    This study presents a double-spread code-division multiple-access (CDMA) scheme for radio-over-fiber (RoF) transmissions. The network coder/decoders (codecs) are implemented using arrayed-waveguide grating (AWG) routers coded with maximal-length sequence ( M-sequence) codes. The effects of phase-induced intensity noise (PIIN) and multiple-access interference (MAI) on the system performance are evaluated numerically for different values of the optical modulation index (OMI) during the nonlinear electro-optical modulator (EOM) response. At low OMI optical device noise is dominant, but at high OMI nonlinear effect becomes significant. Numerical result shows that the system performance is highly sensitive to the OMI. Therefore, specifying an appropriate value of the OMI is essential in optimizing the system performance. The influence of the degree of polarization (DOP) in the system is also discussed. By employing the scrambler in front of the balanced photo-detector, the system performance can be enhanced. The high-performance, low-cost characteristics of the double-spread CDMA render the scheme an ideal solution for radio-CDMA wireless system cascaded with optical CDMA network.

  13. Collective effect of personal behavior induced preventive measures and differential rate of transmission on spread of epidemics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagar, Vikram; Zhao, Yi

    2017-02-01

    In the present work, the effect of personal behavior induced preventive measures is studied on the spread of epidemics over scale free networks that are characterized by the differential rate of disease transmission. The role of personal behavior induced preventive measures is parameterized in terms of variable λ, which modulates the number of concurrent contacts a node makes with the fraction of its neighboring nodes. The dynamics of the disease is described by a non-linear Susceptible Infected Susceptible model based upon the discrete time Markov Chain method. The network mean field approach is generalized to account for the effect of non-linear coupling between the aforementioned factors on the collective dynamics of nodes. The upper bound estimates of the disease outbreak threshold obtained from the mean field theory are found to be in good agreement with the corresponding non-linear stochastic model. From the results of parametric study, it is shown that the epidemic size has inverse dependence on the preventive measures (λ). It has also been shown that the increase in the average degree of the nodes lowers the time of spread and enhances the size of epidemics.

  14. Comparative study on the effects of two antifungal drugs against Candida albicans by microcalorimetry and transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Qing-Lian [Zhongnan Hospital, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Zhang, Juan [Zhongnan Hospital, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Department of Stomatology, Hubei Provincial Maternal and Child Health Hospital, Wuhan 430070 (China); Xu, Zi-Qiang; Li, Ran [State Key Laboratory of Virology and Key Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry for Biology and Medicine (Ministry of Education), College of Chemistry and Molecular Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Jiang, Feng-Lei, E-mail: fljiang@whu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Virology and Key Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry for Biology and Medicine (Ministry of Education), College of Chemistry and Molecular Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Xiao, Qi, E-mail: qi.xiao@whu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry and Life Science, Guangxi Teachers Education University, Nanning 530001 (China); Liu, Yi [State Key Laboratory of Virology and Key Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry for Biology and Medicine (Ministry of Education), College of Chemistry and Molecular Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China)

    2012-09-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Microcalorimetry is a fast, simple method to study the antibiotic property of drugs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We noticed that the antibiotic effect of ITZ was slightly better than that of KTZ. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We perform the TEM to study the morphology changes of C. albicans cells. - Abstract: In this work, a multi-channel thermal activity monitor (TAM 2277) was applied to study the growth metabolism of Candida albicans (C. albicans) in vitro in the absence and presence of different concentrations of ketoconazole (KTZ) and itraconazole (ITZ). The results showed that the half inhibiting concentrations (IC{sub 50}) of C. albicans by KTZ and ITZ are 73.5 and 66.3 {mu}mol L{sup -1}, respectively. So the antibiotic effect of ITZ was slightly better than that of KTZ. The morphology of C. albicans cells both in the absence and presence of antifungal agents was examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Our research also suggests that microcalorimetry is a fast, simple, non-invasive, non-destructive and more sensitive method, and can be easily performed to study the antibiotic property of different species of drugs on microorganism compared to other biological and clinical methods.

  15. [Cost-effectiveness and affordability of strategy for preventing mother-to-child transmission of hepatitis B in China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Y; Zhang, S X; Yang, P C; Cai, Y L; Zou, Y H

    2017-07-10

    Objective: To evaluate the cost effectiveness of nationwide prevention of mother to child transmission (PMTCT) strategy for hepatitis B, and estimate the willing to pay and budget impacts on the PMTCT. Methods: The decision analytic Markov model for the PMTCT was constructed and a birth cohort of Chinese infants born in 2013 was used to calculate the cost-effectiveness of the PMTCT among them compared with those receiving no intervention. The parameters in the model were obtained from literatures of national surveys or Meta-analysis. The costs, cases of HBV-related diseases and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) were obtained from the societal and payer perspectives, respectively. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) was used as measures of strategy optimization. One-way and probability sensitivity analysis were performed to explore the uncertainty of the primary results. In addition, cost-effectiveness acceptability curve and cost-effectiveness affordability curves were drawn to illustrate the cost effectiveness threshold and financial budget of the PMTCT strategy. Results: The lifetime cost for PMTCT strategy was 4 063.5 yuan (RMB) per carrier, which was 37 829.7 yuan (RMB) lower compared with those receiving no intervention. Due to the strategy, a total of 24.516 1 QALYs per person would be gained, which was higher than that in those receiving no intervention. From societal perspective, the ICER was -59 136.6 yuan (RMB) per additional QALYs gained, indicating that the PMTCT is cost effective. The results were reliable indicated by one-way, multi-way and probability sensitivity analyses. By the CEAC, the willing to pay was much lower than the cost-effectiveness threshold. From the affordability curve of the PMTCT strategy, the annual budget ranged from 590.4 million yuan (RMB) to 688.8 million yuan (RMB), which was lower than the financial ability. Based on the results of cost-effectiveness affordability curves, the higher annual budget was determined

  16. Effect of spin-orbit coupling on the wave vector and spin dependent transmission probability for the GaN/AlGaN/GaN heterostructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, M; Zhao, Z B; Fan, L B

    2015-01-01

    The effect of the Rashba and Dresselhaus spin–orbit coupling (SOC) on the transmission of electrons through the GaN/AlGaN/GaN heterostructure is studied. It is found that the Dresselhaus SOC causes the evident dependence of the transmission probability on the spin polarization and the in-plane wave vector of electrons, and also induces evident spin splitting of the resonant peaks in the (E z -k) plane. Because the magnitude of the Rashba SOC is relatively small, its effect on the transmission of electrons is much less. As k increases, the peaks of transmission probability for spin-up electrons (T + ) shift to a higher energy region and increase in magnitude, while the peaks of transmission probability for spin-down electrons (T − ) shift to a lower energy region and decrease in magnitude. The polarization efficiency (P) is found to peak at the resonant energies and increases with the in-plane wave vector. Moreover, the built-in electric field caused by the spontaneous and piezoelectric polarization can increase the amplitude of P. Results obtained here are helpful for the efficient spin injection into the III-nitride heterostructures by nonmagnetic means from the device point of view. (paper)

  17. Transmission rights and market power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bushnell, J.

    1999-01-01

    Most of the concerns about physical transmission rights relate to the ability to implicitly or explicitly remove that transmission capacity from the market-place. Under a very strict form of physical right, owners could simply choose not to sell it if they don't want to use it. Modifications that require the release of spare capacity back into an open market could potentially alleviate this problem but there is concern that such releases would not occur far enough in advance to be of much use to schedulers. Similarly, the transmission capacity that is made available for use by non-rights holders can also be manipulated by the owners of transmission rights. The alternative form, financial transmission rights, provide to their owners congestion payments, but physical control of transmission paths. In electricity markets such as California's, even financial transmission rights could potentially be utilized to effectively withhold transmission capacity from the marketplace. However, methods for withholding transmission capacity are somewhat more convoluted, and probably more difficult, for owners of financial rights than for owners of physical rights. In this article, the author discusses some of the potential concerns over transmission rights and their use for the exercise of various forms of market power

  18. Comparison of two dose and three dose human papillomavirus vaccine schedules: cost effectiveness analysis based on transmission model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jit, Mark; Brisson, Marc; Laprise, Jean-François; Choi, Yoon Hong

    2015-01-06

    To investigate the incremental cost effectiveness of two dose human papillomavirus vaccination and of additionally giving a third dose. Cost effectiveness study based on a transmission dynamic model of human papillomavirus vaccination. Two dose schedules for bivalent or quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccines were assumed to provide 10, 20, or 30 years' vaccine type protection and cross protection or lifelong vaccine type protection without cross protection. Three dose schedules were assumed to give lifelong vaccine type and cross protection. United Kingdom. Males and females aged 12-74 years. No, two, or three doses of human papillomavirus vaccine given routinely to 12 year old girls, with an initial catch-up campaign to 18 years. Costs (from the healthcare provider's perspective), health related utilities, and incremental cost effectiveness ratios. Giving at least two doses of vaccine seems to be highly cost effective across the entire range of scenarios considered at the quadrivalent vaccine list price of £86.50 (€109.23; $136.00) per dose. If two doses give only 10 years' protection but adding a third dose extends this to lifetime protection, then the third dose also seems to be cost effective at £86.50 per dose (median incremental cost effectiveness ratio £17,000, interquartile range £11,700-£25,800). If two doses protect for more than 20 years, then the third dose will have to be priced substantially lower (median threshold price £31, interquartile range £28-£35) to be cost effective. Results are similar for a bivalent vaccine priced at £80.50 per dose and when the same scenarios are explored by parameterising a Canadian model (HPV-ADVISE) with economic data from the United Kingdom. Two dose human papillomavirus vaccine schedules are likely to be the most cost effective option provided protection lasts for at least 20 years. As the precise duration of two dose schedules may not be known for decades, cohorts given two doses should be closely

  19. Benzo[a]pyrene induces intercellular adhesion molecule-1 through a caveolae and aryl hydrocarbon receptor mediated pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oesterling, Elizabeth; Toborek, Michal; Hennig, Bernhard

    2008-01-01

    Toxicologic and epidemiologic studies have linked benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) exposure with cardiovascular diseases such as atherosclerosis. The mechanisms of action leading to these diseases have not been fully understood. One key step in the development of atherosclerosis is vascular endothelial dysfunction, which is characterized by increased adhesiveness. To determine if B[a]P could lead to increased endothelial adhesiveness, the effects of B[a]P on human endothelial cell intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) expression was investigated. B[a]P was able to increase ICAM-1 protein only after pretreatment with the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) agonist β-naphthoflavone (β-NF). Knockdown of AhR by siRNA or treatment with AhR antagonist α-naphthoflavone (α-NF) eliminated the induction of ICAM-1 from B[a]P, confirming the necessity of AhR in this process. Likewise, B[a]P only increased monocyte adhesion to the vascular endothelium when cells were pretreated with β-NF. Experiments were done to define a signaling mechanism. B[a]P increased phosphorylation of MEK and p38-MAPK, and inhibitors to these proteins blunted the ICAM-1 induction. B[a]P was also able to increase AP-1 DNA binding and phosphorylation of cJun. Phosphorylation of cJun was disrupted by MEK and p38-MAPK inhibitors linking the signaling cascade. Finally, the importance of membrane microdomains, caveolae, was demonstrated by knockdown of the structural protein caveolin-1. Disruption of caveolae eliminated the B[a]P-induced ICAM-1 expression. These data suggest a possible pro-inflammatory mechanism of action of B[a]P involving caveolae, leading to increased vascular endothelial adhesiveness, and this inflammation may be a critical step in the development of B[a]P-induced atherosclerosis

  20. Activated endothelial interleukin-1beta, -6, and -8 concentrations and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 expression are attenuated by lidocaine.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lan, Wei

    2012-02-03

    Endothelial cells play a key role in ischemia reperfusion injury. We investigated the effects of lidocaine on activated human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-6, and IL-8 concentrations and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) expression. HUVECs were pretreated with different concentrations of lidocaine (0 to 0.5 mg\\/mL) for 60 min, thereafter tumor necrosis factor-alpha was added at a concentration of 2.5 ng\\/mL and the cells incubated for 4 h. Supernatants were harvested, and cytokine concentrations were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Endothelial ICAM-1 expression was analyzed by using flow cytometry. Differences were assessed using analysis of variance and post hoc unpaired Student\\'s t-test where appropriate. Lidocaine (0.5 mg\\/mL) decreased IL-1beta (1.89 +\\/- 0.11 versus 4.16 +\\/- 1.27 pg\\/mL; P = 0.009), IL-6 (65.5 +\\/- 5.14 versus 162 +\\/- 11.5 pg\\/mL; P < 0.001), and IL-8 (3869 +\\/- 785 versus 14,961 +\\/- 406 pg\\/mL; P < 0.001) concentrations compared with the control. IL-1beta, IL-6, and IL-8 concentrations in HUVECs treated with clinically relevant plasma concentrations of lidocaine (0.005 mg\\/mL) were similar to control. ICAM-1 expression on lidocaine-treated (0.05 mg\\/mL) HUVECs was less than on controls (198 +\\/- 52.7 versus 298 +\\/- 50.3; Mean Channel Fluorescence; P < 0.001). Activated endothelial IL-1beta, IL-6, and IL-8 concentrations and ICAM-1 expression are attenuated only by lidocaine at concentrations larger than clinically relevant concentrations.

  1. Soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and interleukin-6 levels reflect endothelial dysfunction in patients with primary hypercholesterolaemia treated with atorvastatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawawi, H; Osman, N S; Annuar, R; Khalid, B A K; Yusoff, K

    2003-08-01

    Adhesion molecules and cytokines are involved in the pathogenesis of intimal injury in atherosclerosis but their relationship with endothelial function remains unclear. The objectives of this study were to examine the effects of atorvastatin on soluble adhesion molecules, interleukin-6 (IL-6) and brachial artery endothelial-dependent flow mediated dilatation (FMD) in patients with familial (FH) and non-familial hypercholesterolaemia (NFH). A total of 74 patients (27 FH and 47 NFH) were recruited. Fasting lipid profiles, soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1), soluble vascular-cellular adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM-1), E-selectin, IL-6 and FMD were measured at baseline, 2 weeks, 3 and 9 months post-atorvastatin treatment (FH--80 mg/day, NFH--10 mg/day). In both groups, compared to baseline, sICAM-1 levels were significantly reduced at 2 weeks, further reduced at 3 months and maintained at 9 months (P<0.0001). The IL-6 levels were significantly reduced at 3 months and 9 months compared to baseline for FH (P<0.005) and NFH (P<0.0001). In both groups, the FMD at 2 weeks was higher than baseline (P<0.005), with progressive improvement up to 9 months. FMD was negatively correlated with sICAM-1 and IL-6. In conclusion, both low and high doses of atorvastatin lead to early progressive improvement in endothelial function in patients with primary hypercholesterolaemia. sICAM-1 and IL-6 levels reflect endothelial dysfunction in these patients.

  2. Purification and characterisation of an antifungal protein, MCha-Pr, from the intercellular fluid of bitter gourd (Momordica charantia) leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Beibei; Xie, Chengjian; Wei, Yunming; Li, Jing; Yang, Xingyong

    2015-03-01

    An antifungal protein, designated MCha-Pr, was isolated from the intercellular fluid of bitter gourd (Momordica charantia) leaves during a screen for potent antimicrobial proteins from plants. The isolation procedure involved a combination of extraction, ammonium sulphate precipitation, gel filtration on Bio-Gel P-6, ion exchange chromatography on CM-Sephadex, an additional gel filtration on HiLoad 16/60 Superdex 30, and finally, HPLC on a SOURCE 5RPC column. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry indicated that the protein had a molecular mass of 25733.46Da. Automated Edman degradation was used to determine the N-terminal sequence of MCha-Pr, and the amino acid sequence was identified as V-E-Y-T-I-T-G-N-A-G-N-T-P-G-G. The MCha-Pr protein has some similarity to the pathogenesis-related proteins from Atropa belladonna (deadly nightshade), Solanum tuberosum (potato), Ricinus communis (castor bean), and Nicotiana tabacum (tobacco). Analysis of the circular dichroism spectra indicated that MCha-Pr predominantly contains α-helix and β-sheet structures. MCha-Pr had inhibitory effects towards a variety of fungal species and the 50% inhibition of fungal growth (IC50) for Alternaria brassicae, Cercospora personata, Fusarium oxysporum, Mucor sp., and Rhizoctonia solani are 33 μM, 42 μM, 37 μM, 40 μM, and 48 μM, respectively. In addition, this antifungal protein can inhibit the germination of A. brassicae spores at 12.5 μM. These results suggest that MCha-Pr in bitter gourd leaves plays a protective role against phytopathogens and has a wide antimicrobial spectrum. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Stat3 is a positive regulator of gap junctional intercellular communication in cultured, human lung carcinoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geletu Mulu

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neoplastic transformation of cultured cells by a number of oncogenes such as src suppresses gap junctional, intercellular communication (GJIC; however, the role of Src and its effector Signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (Stat3 upon GJIC in non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC has not been defined. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed high Src activity in NSCLC biopsy samples compared to normal tissues. Here we explored the potential effect of Src and Stat3 upon GJIC, by assessing the levels of tyr418-phosphorylated Src and tyr705-phosphorylated Stat3, respectively, in a panel of NSCLC cell lines. Methods Gap junctional communication was examined by electroporating the fluorescent dye Lucifer yellow into cells grown on a transparent electrode, followed by observation of the migration of the dye to the adjacent, non-electroporated cells under fluorescence illumination. Results An inverse relationship between Src activity levels and GJIC was noted; in five lines with high Src activity GJIC was absent, while two lines with extensive GJIC (QU-DB and SK-LuCi6 had low Src levels, similar to a non-transformed, immortalised lung epithelial cell line. Interestingly, examination of the mechanism indicated that Stat3 inhibition in any of the NSCLC lines expressing high endogenous Src activity levels, or in cells where Src was exogenously transduced, did not restore GJIC. On the contrary, Stat3 downregulation in immortalised lung epithelial cells or in the NSCLC lines displaying extensive GJIC actually suppressed junctional permeability. Conclusions Our findings demonstrate that although Stat3 is generally growth promoting and in an activated form it can act as an oncogene, it is actually required for gap junctional communication both in nontransformed lung epithelial cells and in certain lung cancer lines that retain extensive GJIC.

  4. Effect of water depth on the performance of intelligent computing models in predicting wave transmission of floating pipe breakwater.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Patil, S.G.; Mandal, S.; Hegde, A.V.

    Understanding the physics of complex system plays an important role in selection of data for training intelligent computing models. Based on the physics of the wave transmission of Horizontally Interlaced Multilayer Moored Floating Pipe Breakwater...

  5. Adult Onset-hypothyroidism has Minimal Effects on Synaptic Transmission in the Hippocampus of Rats Independent of Hypothermia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Introduction: Thyroid hormones (TH) influence central nervous system (CNS) function during development and in adulthood. The hippocampus, a brain area critical for learning and memory is sensitive to TH insufficiency. Synaptic transmission in the hippocampus is impaired following...

  6. Effects of Cascaded Voltage Collapse and Protection of Many Induction Machine Loads upon Load Characteristics Viewed from Bulk Transmission System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumano, Teruhisa

    As known well, two of the fundamental processes which give rise to voltage collapse in power systems are the on load tap changers of transformers and dynamic characteristics of loads such as induction machines. It has been well established that, comparing among these two, the former makes slower collapse while the latter makes faster. However, in realistic situations, the load level of each induction machine is not uniform and it is well expected that only a part of loads collapses first, followed by collapse process of each load which did not go into instability during the preceding collapses. In such situations the over all equivalent collapse behavior viewed from bulk transmission level becomes somewhat different from the simple collapse driven by one aggregated induction machine. This paper studies the process of cascaded voltage collapse among many induction machines by time simulation, where load distribution on a feeder line is modeled by several hundreds of induction machines and static impedance loads. It is shown that in some cases voltage collapse really cascades among induction machines, where the macroscopic load dynamics viewed from upper voltage level makes slower collapse than expected by the aggregated load model. Also shown is the effects of machine protection of induction machines, which also makes slower collapse.

  7. Cocaine Effects on Dopaminergic Transmission Depend on a Balance between Sigma-1 and Sigma-2 Receptor Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguinaga, David; Medrano, Mireia; Vega-Quiroga, Ignacio; Gysling, Katia; Canela, Enric I; Navarro, Gemma; Franco, Rafael

    2018-01-01

    Sigma σ 1 and σ 2 receptors are targets of cocaine. Despite sharing a similar name, the two receptors are structurally unrelated and their physiological role is unknown. Cocaine increases the level of dopamine, a key neurotransmitter in CNS motor control and reward areas. While the drug also affects dopaminergic signaling by allosteric modulations exerted by σ 1 R interacting with dopamine D 1 and D 2 receptors, the potential regulation of dopaminergic transmission by σ 2 R is also unknown. We here demonstrate that σ 2 R may form heteroreceptor complexes with D 1 but not with D 2 receptors. Remarkably σ 1 , σ 2 , and D 1 receptors may form heterotrimers with particular signaling properties. Determination of cAMP levels, MAP kinase activation and label-free assays demonstrate allosteric interactions within the trimer. Importantly, the presence of σ 2 R induces bias in signal transduction as σ 2 R ligands increase cAMP signaling whereas reduce MAP kinase activation. These effects, which are opposite to those exerted via σ 1 R, suggest that the D 1 receptor-mediated signaling depends on the degree of trimer formation and the differential balance of sigma receptor and heteroreceptor expression in acute versus chronic cocaine consumption. Although the physiological role is unknown, the heteroreceptor complex formed by σ 1 , σ 2 , and D 1 receptors arise as relevant to convey the cocaine actions on motor control and reward circuits and as a key factor in acquisition of the addictive habit.

  8. Effect of thickness of foil strippers in transmission of beams through 15 UD pelletron accelerator at IUAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ojha, S.; Pankaj Kumar; Gargari, S.; Joshi, R.; Abhilash; Kabiraj, D.; Chopra, S.

    2009-01-01

    15 UD Pelletron accelerator at IUAC, New Delhi is equipped with a foil stripper and a gas stripper at high voltage terminal. Besides these, we have foil stripper assemblies at High Energy Dead Section (HEDS) of Pelletron and after analyser magnet. Incoming negative ion looses electrons when they pass through the strippers at terminal and becomes positively charged. The next foil stripper at HEDS increases the positive charge state of ion by removing more electrons which helps in delivering beams at higher energy. Typical thickness of carbon foils loaded in the foil stripper assembly in the terminal is around 4 microgram per square centimetre (4 μg/cm 2 ). Thicker foils were installed in the terminal assembly to study the effect of thickness of foil on charge state distribution and transmission of ion beams. Charge state distribution of ions produced out of molecular beam was also studied. In this paper we present and discuss the results and observations with thicker foils on ion as well as molecular beams. (author)

  9. Cocaine Effects on Dopaminergic Transmission Depend on a Balance between Sigma-1 and Sigma-2 Receptor Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Aguinaga

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Sigma σ1 and σ2 receptors are targets of cocaine. Despite sharing a similar name, the two receptors are structurally unrelated and their physiological role is unknown. Cocaine increases the level of dopamine, a key neurotransmitter in CNS motor control and reward areas. While the drug also affects dopaminergic signaling by allosteric modulations exerted by σ1R interacting with dopamine D1 and D2 receptors, the potential regulation of dopaminergic transmission by σ2R is also unknown. We here demonstrate that σ2R may form heteroreceptor complexes with D1 but not with D2 receptors. Remarkably σ1, σ2, and D1 receptors may form heterotrimers with particular signaling properties. Determination of cAMP levels, MAP kinase activation and label-free assays demonstrate allosteric interactions within the trimer. Importantly, the presence of σ2R induces bias in signal transduction as σ2R ligands increase cAMP signaling whereas reduce MAP kinase activation. These effects, which are opposite to those exerted via σ1R, suggest that the D1 receptor-mediated signaling depends on the degree of trimer formation and the differential balance of sigma receptor and heteroreceptor expression in acute versus chronic cocaine consumption. Although the physiological role is unknown, the heteroreceptor complex formed by σ1, σ2, and D1 receptors arise as relevant to convey the cocaine actions on motor control and reward circuits and as a key factor in acquisition of the addictive habit.

  10. Effect of duration of the pause single-phase auto-reclosing on electro-power transmission capacitance

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    Krasil'nikova Tatyana

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the problem associated with accidents in the aerial line (AL ultra-high voltage (UHV due to its big length. In lines with a voltage of 500-1150 kV the overwhelming proportion of trips (98% is caused by single-phase short circuit (SPSC. A substantial portion (70% single-phase short circuits is erratic arc accidents which can be successfully eliminated in a high-speed auto-reclosing (HSAR or single-phase auto-reclosing (SPAR. Success single-phase auto-reclosing (SPAR at liquidation by single-phase short circuit (SPSC, on the one hand, is determined by the characteristics of the secondary arc current, and on the other hand the effectiveness of ways to reduce secondary arc current and recovery voltage development. The minimum dead time, at a HSAR it is usually taken as 0.5 s., at single-phase autoreclosing (SPAR it depends on the current value of the arc support is in the range of 0.5-3.0 s. The article shows high efficiency of use single-phase auto reclosing (SPAR at liquidation SPSC in a single-chain AL voltage of 500 kV, the dependence of the bandwidth of transmission in maintaining the dynamic stability from the length of the pause SPAR.

  11. Effect of the ratio of radial gap to radius of the coils on the transmission efficiency of wireless power transfer via coupled magnetic resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Pengfei; Tian, Zijian; Wang, Xuqi; Wu, Jun; Gui, Weifeng

    2018-03-01

    Wireless power transfer (WPT) via coupled magnetic resonance is a promising technology to be applied in many fields. In general, there will be a radial gap in practical application, and some special application environments need to limit the radius of the coils. Therefore, in this paper, considering the comprehensive analysis of the radial gap and the radius of the coils, the concept of the ratio of radial gap to the radius of the coils was proposed. Based on the circuit theory, the formula between the ratio and transmission efficiency of WPT was deduced, and the effects of the ratio on the transmission efficiency were studied respectively at different axial distances. Simulation experiments were carried out and the results not only demonstrate the influence law of the ratio on transmission efficiency, but also validate the value of the ratio which the axial distance has the greatest effect on the transmission efficiency. Besides, the results shows the relationship between the effect of the ratio on the efficiency and the effect of the axial distance on the efficiency. The experimental results show that the theoretical analysis is correct, thus providing an useful theoretical reference for the design and further research on the wireless power transfer system in complicated environment.

  12. Effect of the ratio of radial gap to radius of the coils on the transmission efficiency of wireless power transfer via coupled magnetic resonances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengfei Gao

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Wireless power transfer (WPT via coupled magnetic resonance is a promising technology to be applied in many fields. In general, there will be a radial gap in practical application, and some special application environments need to limit the radius of the coils. Therefore, in this paper, considering the comprehensive analysis of the radial gap and the radius of the coils, the concept of the ratio of radial gap to the radius of the coils was proposed. Based on the circuit theory, the formula between the ratio and transmission efficiency of WPT was deduced, and the effects of the ratio on the transmission efficiency were studied respectively at different axial distances. Simulation experiments were carried out and the results not only demonstrate the influence law of the ratio on transmission efficiency, but also validate the value of the ratio which the axial distance has the greatest effect on the transmission efficiency. Besides, the results shows the relationship between the effect of the ratio on the efficiency and the effect of the axial distance on the efficiency. The experimental results show that the theoretical analysis is correct, thus providing an useful theoretical reference for the design and further research on the wireless power transfer system in complicated environment.

  13. Cost-effectiveness of World Health Organization 2010 Guidelines for Prevention of Mother-to-Child HIV Transmission in Zimbabwe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciaranello, Andrea L.; Perez, Freddy; Engelsmann, Barbara; Walensky, Rochelle P.; Mushavi, Angela; Rusibamayila, Asinath; Keatinge, Jo; Park, Ji-Eun; Maruva, Matthews; Cerda, Rodrigo; Wood, Robin; Dabis, Francois; Freedberg, Kenneth A.

    2013-01-01

    Background. In 2010, the World Health Organization (WHO) released revised guidelines for prevention of mother-to-child human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission (PMTCT). We projected clinical impacts, costs, and cost-effectiveness of WHO-recommended PMTCT strategies in Zimbabwe. Methods. We used Zimbabwean data in a validated computer model to simulate a cohort of pregnant, HIV-infected women (mean age, 24 years; mean CD4 count, 451 cells/µL; subsequent 18 months of breastfeeding). We simulated guideline-concordant care for 4 PMTCT regimens: single-dose nevirapine (sdNVP); WHO-recommended Option A, WHO-recommended Option B, and Option B+ (lifelong maternal 3-drug antiretroviral therapy regardless of CD4). Outcomes included maternal and infant life expectancy (LE) and lifetime healthcare costs (2008 US dollars [USD]). Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs, in USD per year of life saved [YLS]) were calculated from combined (maternal + infant) discounted costs and LE. Results. Replacing sdNVP with Option A increased combined maternal and infant LE from 36.97 to 37.89 years and would reduce lifetime costs from $5760 to $5710 per mother–infant pair. Compared with Option A, Option B further improved LE (38.32 years), and saved money within 4 years after delivery ($5630 per mother–infant pair). Option B+ (LE, 39.04 years; lifetime cost, $6620 per mother–infant pair) improved maternal and infant health, with an ICER of $1370 per YLS compared with Option B. Conclusions. Replacing sdNVP with Option A or Option B will improve maternal and infant outcomes and save money; Option B increases health benefits and decreases costs compared with Option A. Option B+ further improves maternal outcomes, with an ICER (compared with Option B) similar to many current HIV-related healthcare interventions. PMID:23204035

  14. The neurotoxic effects of N-methyl-N-nitrosourea on the electrophysiological property and visual signal transmission of rat's retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Ye; Chen, Tao; Liu, Bei; Yang, Guo Qing; Peng, Guanghua; Zhang, Hua; Huang, Yi Fei

    2015-07-01

    The neurotoxic effects of N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU) on the inner retinal neurons and related visual signal circuits have not been described in any animal models or human, despite ample morphological evidences about the MNU induced photoreceptor (PR) degeneration. With the helping of MEA (multielectrode array) recording system, we gained the opportunity to systemically explore the neural activities and visual signal pathways of MNU administrated rats. Our MEA research identified remarkable alterations in the electrophysiological properties and firstly provided instructive information about the neurotoxicity of MNU that affects the signal transmission in the inner retina. Moreover, the spatial electrophysiological functions of retina were monitored and found that the focal PRs had different vulnerabilities to the MNU. The MNU-induced PR dysfunction exhibited a distinct spatial- and time-dependent progression. In contrast, the spiking activities of both central and peripheral RGCs altered synchronously in response to the MNU administration. Pharmacological tests suggested that gap junctions played a pivotal role in this homogeneous response of RGCs. SNR analysis of MNU treated retina suggested that the signaling efficiency and fidelity of inner retinal circuits have been ruined by this toxicant, although the microstructure of the inner retina seemed relatively consolidated. The present study provided an appropriate example of MEA investigations on the toxicant induced pathological models and the effects of the pharmacological compounds on neuron activities. The positional MEA information would enrich our knowledge about the pathology of MNU induced RP models, and eventually be instrumental for elucidating the underlying mechanism of human RP. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Social buffering and contact transmission: network connections have beneficial and detrimental effects on Shigella infection risk among captive rhesus macaques

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    Krishna Balasubramaniam

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In social animals, group living may impact the risk of infectious disease acquisition in two ways. On the one hand, social connectedness puts individuals at greater risk or susceptibility for acquiring enteric pathogens via contact-mediated transmission. Yet conversely, in strongly bonded societies like humans and some nonhuman primates, having close connections and strong social ties of support can also socially buffer individuals against susceptibility or transmissibility of infectious agents. Using social network analyses, we assessed the potentially competing roles of contact-mediated transmission and social buffering on the risk of infection from an enteric bacterial pathogen (Shigella flexneri among captive groups of rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta. Our results indicate that, within two macaque groups, individuals possessing more direct and especially indirect connections in their grooming and huddling social networks were less susceptible to infection. These results are in sharp contrast to several previous studies that indicate that increased (direct contact-mediated transmission facilitates infectious disease transmission, including our own findings in a third macaque group in which individuals central in their huddling network and/or which initiated more fights were more likely to be infected. In summary, our findings reveal that an individual’s social connections may increase or decrease its chances of acquiring infectious agents. They extend the applicability of the social buffering hypothesis, beyond just stress and immune-function-related health benefits, to the additional health outcome of infectious disease resistance. Finally, we speculate that the circumstances under which social buffering versus contact-mediated transmission may occur could depend on multiple factors, such as living condition, pathogen-specific transmission routes, and/or an overall social context such as a group’s social stability.

  16. Efeitos diretos, indiretos e tardios: trajetórias da transmissão intergeracional da participação política Direct, indirect and late effects: paths of the intergenerational transmission of political participation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Fuks

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available O artigo propõe um modelo para explicar o processo mediante o qual os jovens se tornam cidadãos participativos. Veremos que este ocorre de duas formas complementares. A primeira é a transmissão imediata, embora, em grande medida, estimulada por efeitos indiretos, das rotinas participativas. A segunda depende de um processo de longa duração, gerando a participação como efeito tardio. O estudo mostra que a participação política dos pais é a forma mais eficaz de se "ensinar" participação política aos filhos. Em relação às condições socioeconômicas da família, embora não transmitam participação aos filhos, são elas que criam condições mais ou menos favoráveis para o envolvimento dos pais em atividades participativas. No conjunto, os dados apontam associação entre a reprodução intergeracional da desigualdade social e da desigualdade política.The article presents a model to explain the process through which young people become active citizens. We will see that it occurs in two complementary ways. The first is the immediate transmission, though largely driven by indirect effects, of participatory routines. The second depends on a long process, generating participation as a late effect. The study shows that political participation of parents is the most effective way to "teach" children how to be participative. As regards socioeconomic background, it has an indirect effect on participation, creating a more or less favorable condition for the parents' political engagement. Overall, the data show an association between the intergenerational reproduction of social inequality and political inequality.

  17. Effects of metabotropic glutamate receptor block on the synaptic transmission and plasticity in the rat medial vestibular nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, S; Malfagia, C; Pettorossi, V E

    1998-11-01

    In rat brainstem slices, we investigated the possible role of metabotropic glutamate receptors in modulating the synaptic transmission within the medial vestibular nuclei, under basal and plasticity inducing conditions. We analysed the effect of the metabotropic glutamate receptor antagonist (R,S)-alpha-methyl-4-carboxyphenylglycine on the amplitude of the field potentials and latency of unitary potentials evoked in the ventral portion of the medial vestibular nuclei by primary vestibular afferent stimulation, and on the induction and maintenance of long-term potentiation, after high-frequency stimulation. Two effects were observed, consisting of a slight increase of the field potentials and reduction of unit latency during the drug infusion, and a further long-lasting development of these modifications after the drug wash-out. The long-term effect depended on N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor activation, as D,L-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid prevented its development. We suggest that (R,S)-alpha-methyl-4carboxyphenylglycine enhances the vestibular responses and induces N-methyl-D-aspartate-dependent long-term potentiation by increasing glutamate release, through the block of presynaptic metabotropic glutamate receptors which actively inhibit it. The block of these receptors was indirectly supported by the fact that the agonist (1S,3R)-1-aminocyclopentane-1,3-dicarboxylic acid reduced the vestibular responses and blocked the induction of long-term potentiation by high-frequency stimulation. The simultaneous block of metabotropic glutamate receptors facilitating synaptic plasticity, impedes the full expression of the long-term effect throughout the (R,S)-alpha-methyl-4-carboxyphenylglycine infusion. The involvement of such a facilitatory mechanism in the potentiation is supported by its reversible reduction following a second (R,S)-alpha-methyl-4-carboxyphenylglycine infusion. The drug also reduced the expression of potentiation induced by high-frequency stimulation

  18. A human/mouse chimeric monoclonal antibody against intercellular adhesion molecule-1 for tumor radioimmunoimaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamura, Miyuki; Hinoda, Yuji; Sasaki, Shigeru; Tsujisaki, Masayuki; Imai, Kohzoh; Oriuchi, Noboru; Endo, Keigo.

    1996-01-01

    A mouse-human chimeric antibody for intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) was established by using heavy chain loss mouse mutant hybridoma and human immunoglobulin expression vector. The HA58 hybridoma secreted anti-ICAM-1 monoclonal antibody (MoAb) (IgG1,κ). The gene of the mouse variable region of heavy chain was amplified and cloned by the polymerase chain reaction technique directly from the HA58 hybridoma RNA. The variable region of heavy chain was joined with an expression vector which contains human γ1 constant gene. The expression vector was transfected into heavy chain loss mutant cells HA58-7, which produced only murine immunoglobulin light chains. The resultant chimeric MoAb HA58, chHA58, retained full-binding reactivity to ICAM-1 compared with murine HA58 parental antibody. The chimeric MoAb chHA58 showed little antibody dependent cell-mediated cytotoxic activity against cultured tumor cells. Biodistribution studies with 99m Tc-labeled chHA58 in nude mice bearing human gastric carcinoma JRST cells, demonstrated that the tumor-blood ratio was 1.55 at 18 h after injection, when the tumors were clearly visible in gamma scintigraphy. These data suggest that chHA58 may be of practical use for radioimmunoimaging of a wide variety of tumors. (author)

  19. Proteomic insights into intra- and intercellular plant-bacteria symbiotic association during root nodule formation

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    Afshin eSalavati

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Over the last several decades, there have been a large number of studies done on the all aspects of legumes and bacteria which participate in nitrogen-fixing symbiosis. The analysis of legume-bacteria interaction is not just a matter of numerical complexity in terms of variants of gene products that can arise from a single gene. Bacteria regulate their quorum-sensing genes to enhance their ability to induce conjugation of plasmids and symbiotic islands, and various protein secretion mechanisms; that can stimulate a collection of chain reactions including species-specific combinations of plant-secretion isoflavonoids, complicated calcium signaling pathways and autoregulation of nodulation mechanisms. Quorum-sensing systems are introduced by the intra- and intercellular organization of gene products lead to protein–protein interactions or targeting of proteins to specific cellular structures. In this study, an attempt has been made to review significant contributions related to nodule formation and development and their impacts on cell proteome for better understanding of plant-bacterium interaction mechanism at protein level. This review would not only provide new insights into the plant-bacteria symbiosis response mechanisms but would also highlights the importance of studying changes in protein abundance inside and outside of cells in response to symbiosis. Furthermore, the application to agriculture programe of plant-bacteria interaction will be discussed.

  20. Herpes simplex virus glycoprotein D relocates nectin-1 from intercellular contacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhargava, Arjun K; Rothlauf, Paul W; Krummenacher, Claude

    2016-12-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) uses the cell adhesion molecule nectin-1 as a receptor to enter neurons and epithelial cells. The viral glycoprotein D (gD) is used as a non-canonical ligand for nectin-1. The gD binding site on nectin-1 overlaps with a functional adhesive site involved in nectin-nectin homophilic trans-interaction. Consequently, when nectin-1 is engaged with a cellular ligand at cell junctions, the gD binding site is occupied. Here we report that HSV gD is able to disrupt intercellular homophilic trans-interaction of nectin-1 and induce a rapid redistribution of nectin-1 from cell junctions. This movement does not require the receptor's interaction with the actin-binding adaptor afadin. Interaction of nectin-1 with afadin is also dispensable for virion surfing along nectin-1-rich filopodia. Cells seeded on gD-coated surfaces also fail to accumulate nectin-1 at cell contact. These data indicate that HSV gD affects nectin-1 locally through direct interaction and more globally through signaling. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Association of Intercellular Adhesion Molecule 1 (ICAM1 with Diabetes and Diabetic Nephropathy

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    Harvest F Gu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes and diabetic nephropathy are complex diseases affected by genetic and environmental factors. Identification of the susceptibility genes and investigation of their roles may provide useful information for better understanding of the pathogenesis and for developing novel therapeutic approaches. Intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM1 is a cell surface glycoprotein expressed on endothelial cells and leukocytes in the immune system. The ICAM1 gene is located on chromosome 19p13 within the linkage region of diabetes. In the recent years, accumulating reports have implicated that genetic polymorphisms in the ICAM1 gene are associated with diabetes and diabetic nephropathy. Serum ICAM1 levels in diabetes patients and the icam1 gene expression in kidney tissues of diabetic animals are increased compared to the controls. Therefore, ICAM1 may play a role in the development of diabetes and diabetic nephropathy. In this review, we present genomic structure, variation and regulation of the ICAM1 gene, summarized genetic and biological studies of this gene in diabetes and diabetic nephropathy and discussed about the potential application using ICAM1 as a biomarker and target for prediction and treatment of diabetes and diabetic nephropathy.

  2. Extract from the Zooxanthellate Jellyfish Cotylorhiza tuberculata Modulates Gap Junction Intercellular Communication in Human Cell Cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Piraino

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available On a global scale, jellyfish populations in coastal marine ecosystems exhibit increasing trends of abundance. High-density outbreaks may directly or indirectly affect human economical and recreational activities, as well as public health. As the interest in biology of marine jellyfish grows, a number of jellyfish metabolites with healthy potential, such as anticancer or antioxidant activities, is increasingly reported. In this study, the Mediterranean “fried egg jellyfish” Cotylorhiza tuberculata (Macri, 1778 has been targeted in the search forputative valuable bioactive compounds. A medusa extract was obtained, fractionated, characterized by HPLC, GC-MS and SDS-PAGE and assayed for its biological activity on breast cancer cells (MCF-7 and human epidermal keratinocytes (HEKa. The composition of the jellyfish extract included photosynthetic pigments, valuable ω-3 and ω-6 fatty acids, and polypeptides derived either from jellyfish tissues and their algal symbionts. Extract fractions showed antioxidant activity and the ability to affect cell viability and intercellular communication mediated by gap junctions (GJIC differentially in MCF-7and HEKa cells. A significantly higher cytotoxicity and GJIC enhancement in MCF-7 compared to HEKa cells was recorded. A putative action mechanism for the anticancer bioactivity through the modulation of GJIC has been hypothesized and its nutraceutical and pharmaceutical potential was discussed.

  3. Interaction between Na+/K+-pump and Na+/Ca2+-exchanger modulates intercellular communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matchkov, Vladimir V; Gustafsson, Helena; Rahman, Awahan; Briggs Boedtkjer, Donna M; Gorintin, Sarah; Hansen, Anne Kirstine; Bouzinova, Elena V; Praetorius, Helle A; Aalkjaer, Christian; Nilsson, Holger

    2007-04-13

    Ouabain, a specific inhibitor of the Na(+)/K(+)-pump, has previously been shown to interfere with intercellular communication. Here we test the hypothesis that the communication between vascular smooth muscle cells is regulated through an interaction between the Na(+)/K(+)-pump and the Na(+)/Ca(2+)-exchanger leading to an increase in the intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) in discrete areas near the plasma membrane. [Ca(2+)](i) in smooth muscle cells was imaged in cultured rat aortic smooth muscle cell pairs (A7r5) and in rat mesenteric small artery segments simultaneously with force. In A7r5 coupling between cells was estimated by measuring membrane capacitance. Smooth muscle cells were uncoupled when the Na(+)/K(+)-pump was inhibited either by a low concentration of ouabain, which also caused a localized increase of [Ca(2+)](i) near the membrane, or by ATP depletion. Reduction of Na(+)/K(+)-pump activity by removal of extracellular potassium ([K(+)](o)) also uncoupled cells, but only after inhibition of K(ATP) channels. Inhibition of the Na(+)/Ca(2+)-exchange activity by SEA0400 or by a reduction of the equilibrium potential (making it more negative) also uncoupled the cells. Depletion of intracellular Na(+) and clamping of [Ca(2+)](i) at low concentrations prevented the uncoupling. The experiments suggest that the Na(+)/K(+)-pump may affect gap junction conductivity via localized changes in [Ca(2+)](i) through modulation of Na(+)/Ca(2+)-exchanger activity.

  4. Shaping intercellular channels of plasmodesmata: the structure-to-function missing link.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolas, William J; Grison, Magali S; Bayer, Emmanuelle M

    2017-12-18

    Plasmodesmata (PD) are a hallmark of the plant kingdom and a cornerstone of plant biology and physiology, forming the conduits for the cell-to-cell transfer of proteins, RNA and various metabolites, including hormones. They connect the cytosols and endomembranes of cells, which allows enhanced cell-to-cell communication and synchronization. Because of their unique position as intercellular gateways, they are at the frontline of plant defence and signalling and constitute the battleground for virus replication and spreading. The membranous organization of PD is remarkable, where a tightly furled strand of endoplasmic reticulum comes into close apposition with the plasma membrane, the two connected by spoke-like elements. The role of these structural features is, to date, still not completely understood. Recent data on PD seem to point in an unexpected direction, establishing a close parallel between PD and membrane contact sites and defining plasmodesmal membranes as microdomains. However, the implications of this new viewpoint are not fully understood. Aided by available phylogenetic data, this review attempts to reassess the function of the different elements comprising the PD and the relevance of membrane lipid composition and biophysics in defining specialized microdomains of PD, critical for their function. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Mechanical Entrapment Is Insufficient and Intercellular Adhesion Is Essential for Metastatic Cell Arrest in Distant Organs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga V. Glinskii

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available In this report, we challenge a common perception that tumor embolism is a size-limited event of mechanical arrest, occurring in the first capillary bed encountered by blood-borne metastatic cells. We tested the hypothesis that mechanical entrapment alone, in the absence of tumor cell adhesion to blood vessel walls, is not sufficient for metastatic cell arrest in target organ microvasculature. The in vivo metastatic deposit formation assay was used to assess the number and location of fluorescently labeled tumor cells lodged in selected organs and tissues following intravenous inoculation. We report that a significant fraction of breast and prostate cancer cells escapes arrest in a lung capillary bed and lodges successfully in other organs and tissues. Monoclonal antibodies and carbohydrate-based compounds (anti-Thomsen-Friedenreich antigen antibody, anti-galectin-3 antibody, modified citrus pectin, and lactulosyl-L-leucine, targeting specifically β-galactoside-mediated tumor-endothelial cell adhesive interactions, inhibited by >90% the in vivo formation of breast and prostate carcinoma metastatic deposits in mouse lung and bones. Our results indicate that metastatic cell arrest in target organ microvessels is not a consequence of mechanical trapping, but is supported predominantly by intercellular adhesive interactions mediated by cancer-associated Thomsen-Friedenreich glycoantigen and β-galactoside-binding lectin galectin-3. Efficient blocking of β-galactoside-mediated adhesion precludes malignant cell lodging in target organs.

  6. Intercellular Resistance to BRAF Inhibition Can Be Mediated by Extracellular Vesicle–Associated PDGFRβ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura J. Vella

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of BRAF mutant melanoma with kinase inhibitors has been associated with rapid tumor regression; however, this clinical benefit is short-lived, and most patients relapse. A number of studies suggest that the extracellular environment promotes BRAF inhibitor resistance and tumor progression. Extracellular vesicles, such as exosomes, are functional mediators in the extracellular environment. They are small vesicles known to carry a concentrated group of functional cargo and serve as intercellular communicators not only locally but also systemically. Increasingly, it is reported that extracellular vesicles facilitate the development of drug resistance in cancer; however, their role in BRAF inhibitor resistance in melanoma is unclear. Here we investigated if extracellular vesicles from BRAF inhibitor–resistant melanoma could influence drug sensitivity in recipient melanoma cells. We demonstrate that the resistance driver, PDGFRβ, can be transferred to recipient melanoma cells via extracellular vesicles, resulting in a dose-dependent activation of PI3K/AKT signaling and escape from MAPK pathway BRAF inhibition. These data suggest that the BRAF inhibitor–sensitive phenotype of metastatic melanoma can be altered by delivery of PDGFRβ by extracellular vesicles derived from neighboring drug-resistant melanoma cells.

  7. Role of Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1 in Radiation-Induced Brain Injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, K.-L.; Tu Ba; Li Yuqing; Wong, C. Shun

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the role of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) in the pathogenesis of brain injury after irradiation (IR). Methods and Materials: We assessed the expression of ICAM-1 in mouse brain after cranial IR and determined the histopathologic and behavioral changes in mice that were either wildtype (+/+) or knockout (-/-) of the ICAM-1 gene after IR. Results: There was an early dose-dependent increase in ICAM-1 mRNA and protein expression after IR. Increased ICAM-1 immunoreactivity was observed in endothelia and glia of ICAM-1+/+ mice up to 8 months after IR. ICAM-1-/- mice showed no expression. ICAM-1+/+ and ICAM-1-/- mice showed similar vascular abnormalities at 2 months after 10-17 Gy, and there was evidence for demyelination and inhibition of hippocampal neurogenesis at 8 months after 10 Gy. After 10 Gy, irradiated ICAM-1+/+ and ICAM-1-/- mice showed similar behavioral changes at 2-6 months in open field, light-dark chamber, and T-maze compared with age-matched genotype controls. Conclusion: There is early and late upregulation of ICAM-1 in the vasculature and glia of mouse brain after IR. ICAM-1, however, does not have a causative role in the histopathologic injury and behavioral dysfunction after moderate single doses of cranial IR.

  8. Rapid construction of mechanically- confined multi- cellular structures using dendrimeric intercellular linker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Xuejun; Li, Qiushi; Yi Lui, Lena Wai; Zheng, Baixue; Kang, Chiang Huen; Nugraha, Bramasta; Yue, Zhilian; Jia, Rui Rui; Fu, Hong Xia; Choudhury, Deepak; Arooz, Talha; Yan, Jie; Lim, Chwee Teck; Shen, Shali; Hong Tan, Choon; Yu, Hanry

    2010-10-01

    Tissue constructs that mimic the in vivo cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions are especially useful for applications involving the cell- dense and matrix- poor internal organs. Rapid and precise arrangement of cells into functional tissue constructs remains a challenge in tissue engineering. We demonstrate rapid assembly of C3A cells into multi- cell structures using a dendrimeric intercellular linker. The linker is composed of oleyl- polyethylene glycol (PEG) derivatives conjugated to a 16 arms- polypropylenimine hexadecaamine (DAB) dendrimer. The positively charged multivalent dendrimer concentrates the linker onto the negatively charged cell surface to facilitate efficient insertion of the hydrophobic oleyl groups into the cellular membrane. Bringing linker- treated cells into close proximity to each other via mechanical means such as centrifugation and micromanipulation enables their rapid assembly into multi- cellular structures within minutes. The cells exhibit high levels of viability, proliferation, three- dimensional (3D) cell morphology and other functions in the constructs. We constructed defined multi- cellular structures such as rings, sheets or branching rods that can serve as potential tissue building blocks to be further assembled into complex 3D tissue constructs for biomedical applications. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Loss of intercellular adhesion leads to differential accumulation of hypericin in bladder cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucky, S. Sasidharan; Bhuvaneswari, Ramaswamy; Chin, William W. L.; Lau, Weber K. O.; Olivo, Malini C. D.

    2009-06-01

    Photodynamic diagnosis (PDD) exploits the photoactive nature of certain compounds, namely photosensitizers, in order to enhance the visual demarcation between normal and neoplastic tissue. Hypericin is one such potent photosensitizer that preferentially accumulate in neoplastic tissue, and fluoresce in the visible spectrum when illuminated with light of an appropriate wavelength. In our study, we investigated the role of E-cadherin in the selective permeation of hypericin in bladder cancer tissues. Clinical studies were done on a series of 43 histologically graded bladder cancer biopsy specimens, obtained from 28 patients who received intravesical instillations with 8μM hypericin solution for at least 2 hours. Immunohistochemical staining was used to assess the expression of E-cadherin, in the cryosectioned tissues. Hypericin uptake was examined by fluorescence microscopy. Immunohistochemical staining showed a clear expression of E-cadherin along the urothelial lining of the normal and pre-malignant tissues. Partial expression of these cell adhesion molecules were still observed in malignant tissues, however there was a loss of expression to variable extends along the urothelium. Thus, loss of intercellular adhesion can be associated with enhanced hypericin permeation through paracellular diffusion.

  10. Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 augments myoblast adhesion and fusion through homophilic trans-interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizza, Francis X; Martin, Ryan A; Springer, Evan M; Leffler, Maxwell S; Woelmer, Bryce R; Recker, Isaac J; Leaman, Douglas W

    2017-07-11

    The overall objective of the study was to identify mechanisms through which intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) augments the adhesive and fusogenic properties of myogenic cells. Hypotheses were tested using cultured myoblasts and fibroblasts, which do not constitutively express ICAM-1, and myoblasts and fibroblasts forced to express full length ICAM-1 or a truncated form lacking the cytoplasmic domain of ICAM-1. ICAM-1 mediated myoblast adhesion and fusion were quantified using novel assays and cell mixing experiments. We report that ICAM-1 augments myoblast adhesion to myoblasts and myotubes through homophilic trans-interactions. Such adhesive interactions enhanced levels of active Rac in adherent and fusing myoblasts, as well as triggered lamellipodia, spreading, and fusion of myoblasts through the signaling function of the cytoplasmic domain of ICAM-1. Rac inhibition negated ICAM-1 mediated lamellipodia, spreading, and fusion of myoblasts. The fusogenic property of ICAM-1-ICAM-1 interactions was restricted to myogenic cells, as forced expression of ICAM-1 by fibroblasts did not augment their fusion to ICAM-1+ myoblasts/myotubes. We conclude that ICAM-1 augments myoblast adhesion and fusion through its ability to self-associate and initiate Rac-mediated remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton.

  11. [Modelling the effect of local climatic variability on dengue transmission in Medellin (Colombia) by means of time series analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rúa-Uribe, Guillermo L; Suárez-Acosta, Carolina; Chauca, José; Ventosilla, Palmira; Almanza, Rita

    2013-09-01

    Dengue fever is a major impact on public health vector-borne disease, and its transmission is influenced by entomological, sociocultural and economic factors. Additionally, climate variability plays an important role in the transmission dynamics. A large scientific consensus has indicated that the strong association between climatic variables and disease could be used to develop models to explain the incidence of the disease. To develop a model that provides a better understanding of dengue transmission dynamics in Medellin and predicts increases in the incidence of the disease. The incidence of dengue fever was used as dependent variable, and weekly climatic factors (maximum, mean and minimum temperature, relative humidity and precipitation) as independent variables. Expert Modeler was used to develop a model to better explain the behavior of the disease. Climatic variables with significant association to the dependent variable were selected through ARIMA models. The model explains 34% of observed variability. Precipitation was the climatic variable showing statistically significant association with the incidence of dengue fever, but with a 20 weeks delay. In Medellin, the transmission of dengue fever was influenced by climate variability, especially precipitation. The strong association dengue fever/precipitation allowed the construction of a model to help understand dengue transmission dynamics. This information will be useful to develop appropriate and timely strategies for dengue control.

  12. Effectiveness of semen washing to prevent HIV transmission and assist pregnancy in HIV-discordant couples: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafer, Maryam; Horvath, Hacsi; Mmeje, Okeoma; van der Poel, Sheryl; Semprini, Augusto; Rutherford, George; Brown, Joelle

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of semen washing in HIV-discordant couples in which the male partner is infected Design Systematic review and meta-analysis Setting All countries Patient(s) Forty single-arm, open label studies among HIV-discordant couples that underwent intrauterine insemination (IUI) or in vitro fertilization (IVF) with or without intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) using washed semen Intervention(s) Semen washing followed by IUI, IVF, or IVF/ICSI Main outcome measure(s) Primary outcome: HIV transmission to HIV-uninfected women; secondary outcomes: HIV transmission to newborns and proportion of couples achieving a clinical pregnancy Result(s) No HIV transmission occurred in 11,585 cycles of assisted reproduction using washed semen among 3,994 women (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0–0.0001). Among the subset of HIV-infected men without plasma viral suppression at the time of semen washing, no HIV seroconversions occurred among 1,023 women following 2,863 cycles of assisted reproduction using washed semen (95%CI= 0–0.0006). Studies that measured HIV transmission to infants reported no cases of vertical transmission (0/1,026, 95% CI= 0–0.0029). Overall, 56.3% (2,357/4,184, 95%CI=54.8%–57.8%) of couples achieved a clinical pregnancy using washed semen. Conclusion(s) Semen washing appears to significantly reduce the risk of transmission in HIV-discordant couples desiring children, regardless of viral suppression in the male partner. There are no randomized, controlled studies or studies from low-income countries, especially those with a large burden of HIV. Continued development of lower-cost semen washing and assisted reproduction technologies is needed. Integration of semen washing into HIV prevention interventions could help further reduce the spread of HIV. PMID:26688556

  13. Effectiveness of semen washing to prevent human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission and assist pregnancy in HIV-discordant couples: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafer, Maryam; Horvath, Hacsi; Mmeje, Okeoma; van der Poel, Sheryl; Semprini, Augusto E; Rutherford, George; Brown, Joelle

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of semen washing in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-discordant couples in which the male partner is infected. Systematic review and meta-analysis. Not applicable. Forty single-arm open-label studies among HIV-discordant couples that underwent intrauterine insemination (IUI) or in vitro fertilization (IVF) with or without intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) using washed semen. Semen washing followed by IUI, IVF, or IVF/ICSI. HIV transmission to HIV-uninfected women; secondary outcomes: HIV transmission to newborns and proportion of couples achieving a clinical pregnancy. No HIV transmission occurred in 11,585 cycles of assisted reproduction with the use of washed semen among 3,994 women. Among the subset of HIV-infected men without plasma viral suppression at the time of semen washing, no HIV seroconversions occurred among 1,023 women after 2,863 cycles of assisted reproduction with the use of washed semen. Studies that measured HIV transmission to infants reported no cases of vertical transmission. Overall, 56.3% of couples (2,357/4,184) achieved a clinical pregnancy with the use of washed semen. Semen washing appears to significantly reduce the risk of transmission in HIV-discordant couples desiring children, regardless of viral suppression in the male partner. There are no randomized controlled studies or studies from low-income countries, especially those with a large burden of HIV. Continued development of lower-cost semen washing and assisted reproduction technologies is needed. Integration of semen washing into HIV prevention interventions could help to further reduce the spread of HIV. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Evaluation of noise and blur effects with SIRT-FISTA-TV reconstruction algorithm: Application to fast environmental transmission electron tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banjak, Hussein; Grenier, Thomas; Epicier, Thierry; Koneti, Siddardha; Roiban, Lucian; Gay, Anne-Sophie; Magnin, Isabelle; Peyrin, Françoise; Maxim, Voichita

    2018-06-01

    Fast tomography in Environmental Transmission Electron Microscopy (ETEM) is of a great interest for in situ experiments where it allows to observe 3D real-time evolution of nanomaterials under operating conditions. In this context, we are working on speeding up the acquisition step to a few seconds mainly with applications on nanocatalysts. In order to accomplish such rapid acquisitions of the required tilt series of projections, a modern 4K high-speed camera is used, that can capture up to 100 images per second in a 2K binning mode. However, due to the fast rotation of the sample during the tilt procedure, noise and blur effects may occur in many projections which in turn would lead to poor quality reconstructions. Blurred projections make classical reconstruction algorithms inappropriate and require the use of prior information. In this work, a regularized algebraic reconstruction algorithm named SIRT-FISTA-TV is proposed. The performance of this algorithm using blurred data is studied by means of a numerical blur introduced into simulated images series to mimic possible mechanical instabilities/drifts during fast acquisitions. We also present reconstruction results from noisy data to show the robustness of the algorithm to noise. Finally, we show reconstructions with experimental datasets and we demonstrate the interest of fast tomography with an ultra-fast acquisition performed under environmental conditions, i.e. gas and temperature, in the ETEM. Compared to classically used SIRT and SART approaches, our proposed SIRT-FISTA-TV reconstruction algorithm provides higher quality tomograms allowing easier segmentation of the reconstructed volume for a better final processing and analysis. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The effect on the transmission loss of a double wall panel of using helium gas in the gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwal, M. S.; Crocker, M. J.

    The possibility of increasing the sound-power transmission loss of a double panel by using helium gas in the gap is investigated. The transmission loss of a panel is defined as ten times the common logarithm of the ratio of the sound power incident on the panel to the sound power transmitted to the space on the other side of the panel. The work is associated with extensive research being done to develop new techniques for predicting the interior noise levels on board high-speed advanced turboprop aircraft and reducing the noise levels with a minimum weight penalty. Helium gas was chosen for its inert properties and its low impedance compared with air. With helium in the gap, the impedance mismatch experienced by the sound wave will be greater than that with air in the gap. It is seen that helium gas in the gap increases the transmission loss of the double panel over a wide range of frequencies.

  16. Cost-effectiveness of quantitative hepatitis B virus surface antigen testing in pregnancy in predicting vertical transmission risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samadi Kochaksaraei, Golasa; Congly, Stephen E; Matwiy, Trudy; Castillo, Eliana; Martin, Steven R; Charlton, Carmen L; Coffin, Carla S

    2016-11-01

    Vertical transmission of hepatitis B virus (HBV) can occur despite immunoprophylaxis in mothers with high HBV DNA levels (>5-7 log 10 IU/ml). Quantitative hepatitis B surface antigen (qHBsAg) testing could be used as a surrogate marker to identify high viral load carriers, but there is limited data in pregnancy. We conducted a prospective observational study to determine the cost-effectiveness and utility of qHBsAg as a valid surrogate marker of HBV DNA. Pregnant patients with chronic hepatitis B were recruited from a tertiary referral centre. HBV DNA levels and qHBsAg were assessed in the second to third trimester. Statistical analysis was performed by Spearman's rank correlation and student's t-test. The cost-effectiveness of qHBsAg as compared to HBV DNA testing was calculated. Ninety nine women with 103 pregnancies, median age 32 years, 65% Asian, 23% African and 12% other [Hispanic, Caucasian] were enrolled. Overall, 23% (23/99) were HBV e Ag (HBeAg)-positive. A significant correlation between qHBsAg and HBV DNA levels was noted in HBeAg-positive patients (r = 0.79, P < 0.05) but not in HBeAg-negative patients (r = 0.17, P = 0.06). In receiver operating characteristic analysis, the optimal qHBsAg cut-off values for predicting maternal viraemia associated with immunoprophylaxis failure (i.e., HBV DNA ≥7 log 10 IU/ml) was 4.3 log 10 IU/ml (accuracy 98.7%, sensitivity 94.7%, specificity 94.4%) (95% CI, 97-100%, P < 0.05). Use of HBV DNA as compared to qHBsAg costs approximately $20 000 more per infection prevented. In resource poor regions, qHBsAg could be used as a more cost-effective marker for high maternal viraemia, and indicate when anti-HBV nucleos/tide analogue therapy should be used to prevent HBV immunoprophylaxis failure. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Activation of L-type calcium channels is required for gap junction-mediated intercellular calcium signaling in osteoblastic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Niklas Rye; Teilmann, Stefan Cuoni; Henriksen, Zanne

    2003-01-01

    The propagation of mechanically induced intercellular calcium waves (ICW) among osteoblastic cells occurs both by activation of P2Y (purinergic) receptors by extracellular nucleotides, resulting in "fast" ICW, and by gap junctional communication in cells that express connexin43 (Cx43), resulting...... in "slow" ICW. Human osteoblastic cells transmit intercellular calcium signals by both of these mechanisms. In the current studies we have examined the mechanism of slow gap junction-dependent ICW in osteoblastic cells. In ROS rat osteoblastic cells, gap junction-dependent ICW were inhibited by removal...... of extracellular calcium, plasma membrane depolarization by high extracellular potassium, and the L-type voltage-operated calcium channel inhibitor, nifedipine. In contrast, all these treatments enhanced the spread of P2 receptor-mediated ICW in UMR rat osteoblastic cells. Using UMR cells transfected to express Cx...

  18. Drosophila wing imaginal discs respond to mechanical injury via slow InsP3R-mediated intercellular calcium waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restrepo, Simon; Basler, Konrad

    2016-08-01

    Calcium signalling is a highly versatile cellular communication system that modulates basic functions such as cell contractility, essential steps of animal development such as fertilization and higher-order processes such as memory. We probed the function of calcium signalling in Drosophila wing imaginal discs through a combination of ex vivo and in vivo imaging and genetic analysis. Here we discover that wing discs display slow, long-range intercellular calcium waves (ICWs) when mechanically stressed in vivo or cultured ex vivo. These slow imaginal disc intercellular calcium waves (SIDICs) are mediated by the inositol-3-phosphate receptor, the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) calcium pump SERCA and the key gap junction component Inx2. The knockdown of genes required for SIDIC formation and propagation negatively affects wing disc recovery after mechanical injury. Our results reveal a role for ICWs in wing disc homoeostasis and highlight the utility of the wing disc as a model for calcium signalling studies.

  19. Laminin-332 alters connexin profile, dye coupling and intercellular Ca2+ waves in ciliated tracheal epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olsen Colin E

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tracheal epithelial cells are anchored to a dynamic basement membrane that contains a variety of extracellular matrix proteins including collagens and laminins. During development, wound repair and disease of the airway epithelium, significant changes in extracellular matrix proteins may directly affect cell migration, differentiation and events mediated by intercellular communication. We hypothesized that alterations in cell matrix, specifically type I collagen and laminin α3β3γ2 (LM-332 proteins within the matrix, directly affect intercellular communication in ciliated rabbit tracheal epithelial cells (RTEC. Methods Functional coupling of RTEC was monitored by microinjection of the negatively charged fluorescent dyes, Lucifer Yellow and Alexa 350, into ciliated RTEC grown on either a LM-332/collagen or collagen matrix. Coupling of physiologically significant molecules was evaluated by the mechanism and extent of propagated intercellular Ca2+ waves. Expression of connexin (Cx mRNA and proteins were assayed by reverse transcriptase – polymerase chain reaction and immunocytochemistry, respectively. Results When compared to RTEC grown on collagen alone, RTEC grown on LM-332/collagen displayed a significant increase in dye transfer. Although mechanical stimulation of RTEC grown on either LM-332/collagen or collagen alone resulted in intercellular Ca2+ waves, the mechanism of transfer was dependent on matrix: RTEC grown on LM-332/collagen propagated Ca2+waves via extracellular purinergic signaling whereas RTEC grown on collagen used gap junctions. Comparison of RTEC grown on collagen or LM-332/collagen matrices revealed a reorganization of Cx26, Cx43 and Cx46 proteins. Conclusion Alterations in airway basement membrane proteins such as LM-332 can induce connexin reorganizations and result in altered cellular communication mechanisms that could contribute to airway tissue function.

  20. Destruction of the hepatocyte junction by intercellular invasion of Leptospira causes jaundice in a hamster model of Weil's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyahara, Satoshi; Saito, Mitsumasa; Kanemaru, Takaaki; Villanueva, Sharon Y A M; Gloriani, Nina G; Yoshida, Shin-ichi

    2014-08-01

    Weil's disease, the most severe form of leptospirosis, is characterized by jaundice, haemorrhage and renal failure. The mechanisms of jaundice caused by pathogenic Leptospira remain unclear. We therefore aimed to elucidate the mechanisms by integrating histopathological changes with serum biochemical abnormalities during the development of jaundice in a hamster model of Weil's disease. In this work, we obtained three-dimensional images of infected hamster livers using scanning electron microscope together with freeze-cracking and cross-cutting methods for sample preparation. The images displayed the corkscrew-shaped bacteria, which infiltrated the Disse's space, migrated between hepatocytes, detached the intercellular junctions and disrupted the bile canaliculi. Destruction of bile canaliculi coincided with the elevation of conjugated bilirubin, aspartate transaminase and alkaline phosphatase levels in serum, whereas serum alanine transaminase and γ-glutamyl transpeptidase levels increased slightly, but not significantly. We also found in ex vivo experiments that pathogenic, but not non-pathogenic leptospires, tend to adhere to the perijunctional region of hepatocyte couplets isolated from hamsters and initiate invasion of the intercellular junction within 1 h after co-incubation. Our results suggest that pathogenic leptospires invade the intercellular junctions of host hepatocytes, and this invasion contributes in the disruption of the junction. Subsequently, bile leaks from bile canaliculi and jaundice occurs immediately. Our findings revealed not only a novel pathogenicity of leptospires, but also a novel mechanism of jaundice induced by bacterial infection. © 2014 The Authors. International Journal of Experimental Pathology © 2014 International Journal of Experimental Pathology.

  1. Tunneling Nanotubes and Gap Junctions–Their Role in Long-Range Intercellular Communication during Development, Health, and Disease Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Ariazi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Cell-to-cell communication is essential for the organization, coordination, and development of cellular networks and multi-cellular systems. Intercellular communication is mediated by soluble factors (including growth factors, neurotransmitters, and cytokines/chemokines, gap junctions, exosomes and recently described tunneling nanotubes (TNTs. It is unknown whether a combination of these communication mechanisms such as TNTs and gap junctions may be important, but further research is required. TNTs are long cytoplasmic bridges that enable long-range, directed communication between connected cells. The proposed functions of TNTs are diverse and not well understood but have been shown to include the cell-to-cell transfer of vesicles, organelles, electrical stimuli and small molecules. However, the exact role of TNTs and gap junctions for intercellular communication and their impact on disease is still uncertain and thus, the subject of much debate. The combined data from numerous laboratories indicate that some TNT mediate a long-range gap junctional communication to coordinate metabolism and signaling, in relation to infectious, genetic, metabolic, cancer, and age-related diseases. This review aims to describe the current knowledge, challenges and future perspectives to characterize and explore this new intercellular communication system and to design TNT-based therapeutic strategies.

  2. Effects of Topography in Nano-Structured Thin Films : A Lorentz Transmission Electron Microscopy and Electron Holography Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hosson, Jeff Th.M. De; Raedt, Hans A. De

    2003-01-01

    This paper aims at applying advanced transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to functional materials, such as ultra-soft magnetic films for high-frequency inductors, to reveal the structure-property relationship. The ultimate goal is to delineate a more quantitative way to obtain information of the

  3. Effect of receptor binding domain mutations on receptor binding and transmissibility of avian influenza H5N1 viruses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maines, Taronna R; Chen, Li-Mei; Van Hoeven, Neal

    2011-01-01

    Although H5N1 influenza viruses have been responsible for hundreds of human infections, these avian influenza viruses have not fully adapted to the human host. The lack of sustained transmission in humans may be due, in part, to their avian-like receptor preference. Here, we have introduced recep...

  4. Loss of mTOR repressors Tsc1 or Pten has divergent effects on excitatory and inhibitory synaptic transmission in single hippocampal neuron cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weston, Matthew C; Chen, Hongmei; Swann, John W

    2014-01-01

    The Pten and Tsc1 genes both encode proteins that repress mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling. Disruption of either gene in the brain results in epilepsy and autism-like symptoms in humans and mouse models, therefore it is important to understand the molecular and physiological events that lead from gene disruption to disease phenotypes. Given the similar roles these two molecules play in the regulation of cellular growth and the overlap in the phenotypes that result from their loss, we predicted that the deletion of either the Pten or Tsc1 gene from autaptic hippocampal neurons would have similar effects on neuronal morphology and synaptic transmission. Accordingly, we found that loss of either Pten or Tsc1 caused comparable increases in soma size, dendrite length and action potential properties. However, the effects of Pten and Tsc1 loss on synaptic transmission were different. Loss of Pten lead to an increase in both excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission, while loss of Tsc1 did not affect excitatory neurotransmission and reduced inhibitory transmission by decreasing mIPSC amplitude. Although the loss of Pten or Tsc1 both increased downstream mTORC1 signaling, phosphorylation of Akt was increased in Pten-ko and decreased in Tsc1-ko neurons, potentially accounting for the different effects on synaptic transmission. Despite the different effects at the synaptic level, our data suggest that loss of Pten or Tsc1 may both lead to an increase in the ratio of excitation to inhibition at the network level, an effect that has been proposed to underlie both epilepsy and autism.

  5. Meeting report - Intercellular interactions in context: towards a mechanistic understanding of cells in organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, David; Johnson, Aaron

    2017-07-01

    The Company of Biologists held the workshop 'Intercellular interactions in context: towards a mechanistic understanding of cells in organs' at historic Wiston House in West Sussex, UK, 5-8 February 2017. The meeting brought together around 30 scientists from disparate backgrounds - yet with a common interest of how tissue morphogenesis occurs and its dysregulation leads to pathologies - to intensively discuss their latest research, the current state of the field, as well as any challenges for the future. This report summarises the concepts and challenges that arose as key questions for the fields of cell, cancer and developmental biology. By design of the organizers - Andrew Ewald (John Hopkins University, MA), John Wallingford (University of Texas at Austin, TX) and Peter Friedl (Radboud University, Nijmegen, The Netherlands) - the attendee makeup was cross-sectional: both in terms of career stage and scientific background. This intermingling was mirrored in the workshop format; all participants - irrespective of career stage - were given equal speaking and question time, and all early-career researchers also chaired a session, which promoted an atmosphere for discussions that were open, egalitarian and supportive. This was particularly evident in the scheduled 'out-of-the-box' sessions, which provided an avenue for participants to raise ideas and concepts or to discuss specific problems they wanted feedback or clarification on. In the following, rather than act as court reporters and convey chronological accounting of presentations, we present the questions that arose from the workshop and should be posed to the field at large, by discussing the presentations as they relate to these concepts. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  6. Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 expression by skeletal muscle cells augments myogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goh, Qingnian; Dearth, Christopher L.; Corbett, Jacob T.; Pierre, Philippe; Chadee, Deborah N.; Pizza, Francis X.

    2015-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) by skeletal muscle cells after muscle overload contributes to ensuing regenerative and hypertrophic processes in skeletal muscle. The objective of the present study is to reveal mechanisms through which skeletal muscle cell expression of ICAM-1 augments regenerative and hypertrophic processes of myogenesis. This was accomplished by genetically engineering C2C12 myoblasts to stably express ICAM-1, and by inhibiting the adhesive and signaling functions of ICAM-1 through the use of a neutralizing antibody or cell penetrating peptide, respectively. Expression of ICAM-1 by cultured skeletal muscle cells augmented myoblast–myoblast adhesion, myotube formation, myonuclear number, myotube alignment, myotube–myotube fusion, and myotube size without influencing the ability of myoblasts to proliferate or differentiate. ICAM-1 augmented myotube formation, myonuclear accretion, and myotube alignment through a mechanism involving adhesion-induced activation of ICAM-1 signaling, as these dependent measures were reduced via antibody and peptide inhibition of ICAM-1. The adhesive and signaling functions of ICAM-1 also facilitated myotube hypertrophy through a mechanism involving myotube–myotube fusion, protein synthesis, and Akt/p70s6k signaling. Our findings demonstrate that ICAM-1 expression by skeletal muscle cells augments myogenesis, and establish a novel mechanism through which the inflammatory response facilitates growth processes in skeletal muscle. - Highlights: • We examined mechanisms through which skeletal muscle cell expression of ICAM-1 facilitates events of in vitro myogenesis. • Expression of ICAM-1 by cultured myoblasts did not influence their ability to proliferate or differentiate. • Skeletal muscle cell expression of ICAM-1 augmented myoblast fusion, myotube alignment, myotube–myotube fusion, and myotube size. • ICAM-1 augmented myogenic processes through

  7. Regulation of germ cell development by intercellular signaling in the mammalian ovarian follicle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Hugh J

    2018-01-01

    Prior to ovulation, the mammalian oocyte undergoes a process of differentiation within the ovarian follicle that confers on it the ability to give rise to an embryo. Differentiation comprises two phases-growth, during which the oocyte increases more than 100-fold in volume as it accumulates macromolecules and organelles that will sustain early embryogenesis; and meiotic maturation, during which the oocyte executes the first meiotic division and prepares for the second division. Entry of an oocyte into the growth phase appears to be triggered when the adjacent granulosa cells produce specific growth factors. As the oocyte grows, it elaborates a thick extracellular coat termed the zona pellucida. Nonetheless, cytoplasmic extensions of the adjacent granulosa cells, termed transzonal projections (TZPs), enable them to maintain contact-dependent communication with the oocyte. Through gap junctions located where the TZP tips meet the oocyte membrane, they provide the oocyte with products that sustain its metabolic activity and signals that regulate its differentiation. Conversely, the oocyte secretes diffusible growth factors that regulate proliferation and differentiation of the granulosa cells. Gap junction-permeable products of the granulosa cells prevent precocious initiation of meiotic maturation, and the gap junctions also enable oocyte maturation to begin in response to hormonal signals received by the granulosa cells. Development of the oocyte or the somatic compartment may also be regulated by extracellular vesicles newly identified in follicular fluid and at TZP tips, which could mediate intercellular transfer of macromolecules. Oocyte differentiation thus depends on continuous signaling interactions with the somatic cells of the follicle. WIREs Dev Biol 2018, 7:e294. doi: 10.1002/wdev.294 This article is categorized under: Gene Expression and Transcriptional Hierarchies > Cellular Differentiation Signaling Pathways > Cell Fate Signaling Early Embryonic

  8. Endothelial targeting of high-affinity multivalent polymer nanocarriers directed to intercellular adhesion molecule 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muro, Silvia; Dziubla, Thomas; Qiu, Weining; Leferovich, John; Cui, Xiumin; Berk, Erik; Muzykantov, Vladimir R

    2006-06-01

    Targeting of diagnostic and therapeutic agents to endothelial cells (ECs) provides an avenue to improve treatment of many maladies. For example, intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), a constitutive endothelial cell adhesion molecule up-regulated in many diseases, is a good determinant for endothelial targeting of therapeutic enzymes and polymer nanocarriers (PNCs) conjugated with anti-ICAM (anti-ICAM/PNCs). However, intrinsic and extrinsic factors that control targeting of anti-ICAM/PNCs to ECs (e.g., anti-ICAM affinity and PNC valency and flow) have not been defined. In this study we tested in vitro and in vivo parameters of targeting to ECs of anti-ICAM/PNCs consisting of either prototype polystyrene or biodegradable poly(lactic-coglycolic) acid polymers (approximately 200 nm diameter spheres carrying approximately 200 anti-ICAM molecules). Anti-ICAM/PNCs, but not control IgG/PNCs 1) rapidly (t1/2 approximately 5 min) and specifically bound to tumor necrosis factor-activated ECs in a dose-dependent manner (Bmax approximately 350 PNC/cell) at both static and physiological shear stress conditions and 2) bound to ECs and accumulated in the pulmonary vasculature after i.v. injection in mice. Anti-ICAM/PNCs displayed markedly higher EC affinity versus naked anti-ICAM (Kd approximately 80 pM versus approximately 8 nM) in cell culture and, probably because of this factor, higher value (185.3 +/- 24.2 versus 50.5 +/- 1.5% injected dose/g) and selectivity (lung/blood ratio 81.0 +/- 10.9 versus 2.1 +/- 0.02, in part due to faster blood clearance) of pulmonary targeting. These results 1) show that reformatting monomolecular anti-ICAM into high-affinity multivalent PNCs boosts their vascular immuno-targeting, which withstands physiological hydrodynamics and 2) support potential anti-ICAM/PNCs utility for medical applications.

  9. High plasma levels of soluble intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 are associated with cerebral malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adukpo, Selorme; Kusi, Kwadwo A; Ofori, Michael F; Tetteh, John K A; Amoako-Sakyi, Daniel; Goka, Bamenla Q; Adjei, George O; Edoh, Dominic A; Akanmori, Bartholomew D; Gyan, Ben A; Dodoo, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral malaria (CM) is responsible for most of the malaria-related deaths in children in sub-Saharan Africa. Although, not well understood, the pathogenesis of CM involves parasite and host factors which contribute to parasite sequestration through cytoadherence to the vascular endothelium. Cytoadherence to brain microvasculature is believed to involve host endothelial receptor, CD54 or intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1, while other receptors such as CD36 are generally involved in cytoadherence of parasites in other organs. We therefore investigated the contributions of host ICAM-1 expression and levels of antibodies against ICAM-1 binding variant surface antigen (VSA) on parasites to the development of CM. Paediatric malaria patients, 0.5 to 13 years were recruited and grouped into CM and uncomplicated malaria (UM) patients, based on well defined criteria. Standardized ELISA protocol was used to measure soluble ICAM-1 (sICAM-1) levels from acute plasma samples. Levels of IgG to CD36- or ICAM-1-binding VSA were measured by flow cytometry during acute and convalescent states. Wilcoxon sign rank-test analysis to compare groups revealed association between sICAM-1 levels and CM (p0.05). Median levels of antibodies to CD36-binding VSAs were also comparable between acute and convalescent samples within any patient group. Median levels of antibodies to ICAM-1-binding VSAs were however significantly lower at admission time than during recovery in both groups. High levels of sICAM-1 were associated with CM, and the sICAM-1 levels may reflect expression levels of the membrane bound form. Anti-VSA antibody levels to ICAM-binding parasites was more strongly associated with both UM and CM than antibodies to CD36 binding parasites. Thus, increasing host sICAM-1 levels were associated with CM whilst antibodies to parasite expressing non-ICAM-1-binding VSAs were not.

  10. High plasma levels of soluble intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM-1 are associated with cerebral malaria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selorme Adukpo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cerebral malaria (CM is responsible for most of the malaria-related deaths in children in sub-Saharan Africa. Although, not well understood, the pathogenesis of CM involves parasite and host factors which contribute to parasite sequestration through cytoadherence to the vascular endothelium. Cytoadherence to brain microvasculature is believed to involve host endothelial receptor, CD54 or intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM-1, while other receptors such as CD36 are generally involved in cytoadherence of parasites in other organs. We therefore investigated the contributions of host ICAM-1 expression and levels of antibodies against ICAM-1 binding variant surface antigen (VSA on parasites to the development of CM. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Paediatric malaria patients, 0.5 to 13 years were recruited and grouped into CM and uncomplicated malaria (UM patients, based on well defined criteria. Standardized ELISA protocol was used to measure soluble ICAM-1 (sICAM-1 levels from acute plasma samples. Levels of IgG to CD36- or ICAM-1-binding VSA were measured by flow cytometry during acute and convalescent states. Wilcoxon sign rank-test analysis to compare groups revealed association between sICAM-1 levels and CM (p0.05. Median levels of antibodies to CD36-binding VSAs were also comparable between acute and convalescent samples within any patient group. Median levels of antibodies to ICAM-1-binding VSAs were however significantly lower at admission time than during recovery in both groups. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: High levels of sICAM-1 were associated with CM, and the sICAM-1 levels may reflect expression levels of the membrane bound form. Anti-VSA antibody levels to ICAM-binding parasites was more strongly associated with both UM and CM than antibodies to CD36 binding parasites. Thus, increasing host sICAM-1 levels were associated with CM whilst antibodies to parasite expressing non-ICAM-1-binding VSAs were not.

  11. Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 expression by skeletal muscle cells augments myogenesis

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    Goh, Qingnian; Dearth, Christopher L.; Corbett, Jacob T. [Department of Kinesiology, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States); Pierre, Philippe [Centre d’Immunologie de Marseille-Luminy U2M, Aix-Marseille Université, Marseille (France); INSERM U631, Institut National de la Santé et Recherche Médicale, Marseille (France); CNRS UMR6102, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Marseille (France); Chadee, Deborah N. [Department of Biological Sciences, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States); Pizza, Francis X., E-mail: Francis.Pizza@utoledo.edu [Department of Kinesiology, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States)

    2015-02-15

    We previously demonstrated that the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) by skeletal muscle cells after muscle overload contributes to ensuing regenerative and hypertrophic processes in skeletal muscle. The objective of the present study is to reveal mechanisms through which skeletal muscle cell expression of ICAM-1 augments regenerative and hypertrophic processes of myogenesis. This was accomplished by genetically engineering C2C12 myoblasts to stably express ICAM-1, and by inhibiting the adhesive and signaling functions of ICAM-1 through the use of a neutralizing antibody or cell penetrating peptide, respectively. Expression of ICAM-1 by cultured skeletal muscle cells augmented myoblast–myoblast adhesion, myotube formation, myonuclear number, myotube alignment, myotube–myotube fusion, and myotube size without influencing the ability of myoblasts to proliferate or differentiate. ICAM-1 augmented myotube formation, myonuclear accretion, and myotube alignment through a mechanism involving adhesion-induced activation of ICAM-1 signaling, as these dependent measures were reduced via antibody and peptide inhibition of ICAM-1. The adhesive and signaling functions of ICAM-1 also facilitated myotube hypertrophy through a mechanism involving myotube–myotube fusion, protein synthesis, and Akt/p70s6k signaling. Our findings demonstrate that ICAM-1 expression by skeletal muscle cells augments myogenesis, and establish a novel mechanism through which the inflammatory response facilitates growth processes in skeletal muscle. - Highlights: • We examined mechanisms through which skeletal muscle cell expression of ICAM-1 facilitates events of in vitro myogenesis. • Expression of ICAM-1 by cultured myoblasts did not influence their ability to proliferate or differentiate. • Skeletal muscle cell expression of ICAM-1 augmented myoblast fusion, myotube alignment, myotube–myotube fusion, and myotube size. • ICAM-1 augmented myogenic processes through