WorldWideScience

Sample records for effective vector vertex

  1. Nonperturbative Aspects of Axial Vector Vertex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZONG Hong-Shi; CHEN Xiang-Song; WANG Fan; CHANG Chao-Hsi; ZHAO En-Guang

    2002-01-01

    It is shown how the axial vector current of current quarks is related to that of constituent quarks within the framework of the global color symmetry model.Gluon dressing of the axial vector vertex and the quark self-energy functions are described by the inhomogeneous Bethe-Salpeter equation in the ladder approximation and the Schwinger Dyson equation in the rainbow approximation,respectively.

  2. Effects of Vertex Activity and Self-organized Criticality Behavior on a Weighted Evolving Network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Guiqing; Yang Qiuying; Chen Tianlun

    2008-01-01

    Effects of vertex activity have been analyzed on a weighted evolving network. The network is characterized by the probability distribution of vertex strength, each edge weight and evolution of the strength of vertices with different vertex activities. The model exhibits self-organized criticality behavior. The probability distribution of avalanche size for different network sizes is also shown. In addition, there is a power law relation between the size and the duration of an avalanche and the average of avalanche size has been studied for different vertex activities

  3. Transport coefficients of Dirac ferromagnet: Effects of vertex corrections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Junji

    2018-03-01

    As a strongly spin-orbit-coupled metallic model with ferromagnetism, we have considered an extended Stoner model to the relativistic regime, named Dirac ferromagnet in three dimensions. In a previous paper [J. Fujimoto and H. Kohno, Phys. Rev. B 90, 214418 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevB.90.214418], we studied the transport properties giving rise to the anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) and the anomalous Hall effect (AHE) with the impurity potential being taken into account only as the self-energy. The effects of the vertex corrections (VCs) to AMR and AHE are reported in this paper. AMR is found not to change quantitatively when the VCs are considered, although the transport lifetime is different from the one-electron lifetime and the charge current includes additional contributions from the correlation with spin currents. The side-jump and the skew-scattering contributions to AHE are also calculated. The skew-scattering contribution is dominant in the clean case as can be seen in the spin Hall effect in the nonmagnetic Dirac electron system.

  4. On the colour contribution to effective weak vertex in broken colour gauge theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramachandran, R.

    1979-01-01

    Treating the breaking of colour symmetry via the mixing between the colour gluons and weak bosons (a la Rajasekaran and Roy) it is observed that the colour contribution to the effective weak vertex of a quark at zero momentum transfer is zero upto 0(α). (author)

  5. Vertex algebras and algebraic curves

    CERN Document Server

    Frenkel, Edward

    2004-01-01

    Vertex algebras are algebraic objects that encapsulate the concept of operator product expansion from two-dimensional conformal field theory. Vertex algebras are fast becoming ubiquitous in many areas of modern mathematics, with applications to representation theory, algebraic geometry, the theory of finite groups, modular functions, topology, integrable systems, and combinatorics. This book is an introduction to the theory of vertex algebras with a particular emphasis on the relationship with the geometry of algebraic curves. The notion of a vertex algebra is introduced in a coordinate-independent way, so that vertex operators become well defined on arbitrary smooth algebraic curves, possibly equipped with additional data, such as a vector bundle. Vertex algebras then appear as the algebraic objects encoding the geometric structure of various moduli spaces associated with algebraic curves. Therefore they may be used to give a geometric interpretation of various questions of representation theory. The book co...

  6. Vertex functions at finite momentum: Application to antiferromagnetic quantum criticality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wölfle, Peter; Abrahams, Elihu

    2016-02-01

    We analyze the three-point vertex function that describes the coupling of fermionic particle-hole pairs in a metal to spin or charge fluctuations at nonzero momentum. We consider Ward identities, which connect two-particle vertex functions to the self-energy, in the framework of a Hubbard model. These are derived using conservation laws following from local symmetries. The generators considered are the spin density and particle density. It is shown that at certain antiferromagnetic critical points, where the quasiparticle effective mass is diverging, the vertex function describing the coupling of particle-hole pairs to the spin density Fourier component at the antiferromagnetic wave vector is also divergent. Then we give an explicit calculation of the irreducible vertex function for the case of three-dimensional antiferromagnetic fluctuations, and show that it is proportional to the diverging quasiparticle effective mass.

  7. Z H η vertex in the simplest little Higgs model

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Shi-Ping; Mao, Ying-nan; Zhang, Chen; Zhu, Shou-hua

    2018-04-01

    The issue of deriving Z H η vertex in the simplest little Higgs (SLH) model is revisited. Special attention is paid to the treatment of noncanonically-normalized scalar kinetic matrix and vector-scalar two-point transitions. We elucidate a general procedure to diagonalize a general vector-scalar system in gauge theories and apply it to the case of SLH. The resultant Z H η vertex is found to be different from those which have already existed in the literature for a long time. We also present an understanding of this issue from an effective field theory viewpoint.

  8. The high energy behavior of QCD. The effective action and the triple-Pomeron-vertex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hentschinski, Martin

    2009-07-15

    We study integrations over light-cone momenta in the high energy effective action of QCD. After a brief review of the effective action, we arrive on a regularization mechanism from matching of effective action diagrams with QCD diagrams, which we apply to a re-derivation of the reggeized gluon and of the BFKL-equation. We study consequences of the proposed regularization on the analytic structure of 2{yields}3 and 2{yields}4 production amplitudes in the Multi-Regge-Kinematics. We derive a certain part of the 1-loop corrections to the production vertex and demonstrate that they yield the on-set of corrections demanded by the Steinmann-relations. The Reggeon-Particle-2-Reggeon vertex is determined and applied to the construction of various signature configurations of the production amplitudes. We extend the proposed regularization method to states of three and four reggeized gluons and propose a supplement to the effective Lagrangian. We derive vertices for the 1-3 and 2-4 reggeized-gluon-transition inside the elastic amplitude and verify that signature conservation is obeyed. Integral equations for the state of three and four reggeized gluons are formulated and shown to be in accordance with a result by Bartels and Wuesthoff. In a second part we investigate the high-energy behavior of QCD for different surface topologies of color graphs. After a brief review of the planar limit (bootstrap and gluon reggeization) and of the cylinder topology (BFKL) we investigate the 3{yields}3 scattering in the triple Regge limit which belongs to the pair-of-pants topology. We re-derive the triple Pomeron vertex function and show that it belongs to a specific set of graphs in color space which we identify as the analog of the Mandelstam diagram. We then extend the study to the high-energy behavior of N=4 SYM where we find a new class of color graphs not present in QCD. (orig.)

  9. The high energy behavior of QCD. The effective action and the triple-Pomeron-vertex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hentschinski, Martin

    2009-07-01

    We study integrations over light-cone momenta in the high energy effective action of QCD. After a brief review of the effective action, we arrive on a regularization mechanism from matching of effective action diagrams with QCD diagrams, which we apply to a re-derivation of the reggeized gluon and of the BFKL-equation. We study consequences of the proposed regularization on the analytic structure of 2→3 and 2→4 production amplitudes in the Multi-Regge-Kinematics. We derive a certain part of the 1-loop corrections to the production vertex and demonstrate that they yield the on-set of corrections demanded by the Steinmann-relations. The Reggeon-Particle-2-Reggeon vertex is determined and applied to the construction of various signature configurations of the production amplitudes. We extend the proposed regularization method to states of three and four reggeized gluons and propose a supplement to the effective Lagrangian. We derive vertices for the 1-3 and 2-4 reggeized-gluon-transition inside the elastic amplitude and verify that signature conservation is obeyed. Integral equations for the state of three and four reggeized gluons are formulated and shown to be in accordance with a result by Bartels and Wuesthoff. In a second part we investigate the high-energy behavior of QCD for different surface topologies of color graphs. After a brief review of the planar limit (bootstrap and gluon reggeization) and of the cylinder topology (BFKL) we investigate the 3→3 scattering in the triple Regge limit which belongs to the pair-of-pants topology. We re-derive the triple Pomeron vertex function and show that it belongs to a specific set of graphs in color space which we identify as the analog of the Mandelstam diagram. We then extend the study to the high-energy behavior of N=4 SYM where we find a new class of color graphs not present in QCD. (orig.)

  10. Vertex detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lueth, V.

    1992-07-01

    The purpose of a vertex detector is to measure position and angles of charged particle tracks to sufficient precision so as to be able to separate tracks originating from decay vertices from those produced at the interaction vertex. Such measurements are interesting because they permit the detection of weakly decaying particles with lifetimes down to 10 -13 s, among them the τ lepton and charm and beauty hadrons. These two lectures are intended to introduce the reader to the different techniques for the detection of secondary vertices that have been developed over the past decades. The first lecture includes a brief introduction to the methods used to detect secondary vertices and to estimate particle lifetimes. It describes the traditional technologies, based on photographic recording in emulsions and on film of bubble chambers, and introduces fast electronic registration of signals derived from scintillating fibers, drift chambers and gaseous micro-strip chambers. The second lecture is devoted to solid state detectors. It begins with a brief introduction into semiconductor devices, and then describes the application of large arrays of strip and pixel diodes for charged particle tracking. These lectures can only serve as an introduction the topic of vertex detectors. Time and space do not allow for an in-depth coverage of many of the interesting aspects of vertex detector design and operation

  11. Connection between effective-range expansion and nuclear vertex constant or asymptotic normalization coefficient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yarmukhamedov, R.; Baye, D.

    2011-01-01

    Explicit relations between the effective-range expansion and the nuclear vertex constant or asymptotic normalization coefficient (ANC) for the virtual decay B→A+a are derived for an arbitrary orbital momentum together with the corresponding location condition for the (A+a) bound-state energy. They are valid both for the charged case and for the neutral case. Combining these relations with the standard effective-range function up to order six makes it possible to reduce to two the number of free effective-range parameters if an ANC value is known from experiment. Values for the scattering length, effective range, and form parameter are determined in this way for the 16 O+p, α+t, and α+ 3 He collisions in partial waves where a bound state exists by using available ANCs deduced from experiments. The resulting effective-range expansions for these collisions are valid up to energies larger than 5 MeV.

  12. Associated vector boson production with b-jets at LHCb and Beam-Gas Vertexing at LHC for beam instrumentation

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00287090

    This thesis presents the cross-section measurements of associated vector bosons production with bottom quarks jets at 7 and 8 TeV of centre-of-mass energies. The first channel for cross-section measurement is the Z+b-jet with $Z/\\gamma^* \\to \\mu^+\\mu^-$ in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt s = \\text {7 TeV}$ using data collected by the LHCb experiment in 2011. The second channel is the $W + b\\overline b$, requiring two b-jets and one lepton. Apart from cross-section measurement this channel is also used to calculate limits of the Higgs boson produced in association with a vector boson and decaying into a pair of bottom or charm quarks. One of the main source of systematic errors in these analyses is the jet energy resolution and correction. Reduction of this error is achieved by performing a calibration of the neutral jet energy component, named neutral recovery, where empirical functions of the ratio between the charged particle energy of the jet and the particle momentum are determined. This method improv...

  13. Effectiveness of Vertex Nomination via Seeded Graph Matching to Find Bijections Between Similar Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-01

    Information Directorate This report is published in the interest of scientific and technical information exchange, and its publication does not...the current prototype. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Vertex Nomination via Seeded Graph Matching (VN via SGM), Seeded Graph Matching (SGM), Vertex of Interest (VOI...Author’s Example ................................................................................................................. 4 4.2.2 Simple

  14. The effect of electrode vertex angle on automatic tungsten-inert-gas welds for stainless steel 304L plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maarek, V.; Sharir, Y.; Stern, A.

    1980-03-01

    The effect of electrode vertex angle on penetration depth and weld bead width, in automatic tungsten-inert-gas (TIG) dcsp bead-on-plate welding with different currents, has been studied for stainless steel 304L plates 1.5 mm and 8 mm thick. It has been found that for thin plates, wider and deeper welds are obtained when using sharper electrodes while, for thick plates, narrower and deeper welds are produced when blunt electrodes (vertex angle 180 deg) are used. An explanation of the results, based on a literature survey, is included

  15. Quark-gluon vertex dressing and meson masses beyond ladder-rainbow truncation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matevosyan, Hrayr H.; Thomas, Anthony W.; Tandy, Peter C.

    2007-01-01

    We include a generalized infinite class of quark-gluon vertex dressing diagrams in a study of how dynamics beyond the ladder-rainbow truncation influences the Bethe-Salpeter description of light-quark pseudoscalar and vector mesons. The diagrammatic specification of the vertex is mapped into a corresponding specification of the Bethe-Salpeter kernel, which preserves chiral symmetry. This study adopts the algebraic format afforded by the simple interaction kernel used in previous work on this topic. The new feature of the present work is that in every diagram summed for the vertex and the corresponding Bethe-Salpeter kernel, each quark-gluon vertex is required to be the self-consistent vertex solution. We also adopt from previous work the effective accounting for the role of the explicitly non-Abelian three-gluon coupling in a global manner through one parameter determined from recent lattice-QCD data for the vertex. Within the current model, the more consistent dressed vertex limits the ladder-rainbow truncation error for vector mesons to be never more than 10% as the current quark mass is varied from the u/d region to the b region

  16. A nonperturbative fermion-boson vertex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bashir, A.; Raya, A.

    2002-01-01

    We calculate the massive fermion propagator at one-loop order in QED3. The Ward-Takahashi identity (WTI) relates the propagator to the vertex. This allows us to split the vertex into its longitudinal and transverse parts. The former is fixed by the WTI. Following the scheme of Ball and Chiu later modified by Kizilersue et. al., we calculate the full vertex at one-loop order. A mere subtraction of the longitudinal part of the vertex gives us the transverse part. The α dependence in the transverse vertex can be eliminated by making use of the perturbative expressions for the wavefunction renormalization function and the mass function of complicated arguments of the incoming and outgoing fermion momenta. This leads us to a vertex which is nonperturbative in nature. We also calculate an effective vertex for which the arguments of the unknown functions have no angular dependence, making it particularly suitable for numerical studies of dynamical symmetry breaking

  17. Selective attention and the auditory vertex potential. 1: Effects of stimulus delivery rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwent, V. L.; Hillyard, S. A.; Galambos, R.

    1975-01-01

    Enhancement of the auditory vertex potentials with selective attention to dichotically presented tone pips was found to be critically sensitive to the range of inter-stimulus intervals in use. Only at the shortest intervals was a clear-cut enhancement of the latency component to stimuli observed for the attended ear.

  18. Vertex routing models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markovic, D; Gros, C

    2009-01-01

    A class of models describing the flow of information within networks via routing processes is proposed and investigated, concentrating on the effects of memory traces on the global properties. The long-term flow of information is governed by cyclic attractors, allowing to define a measure for the information centrality of a vertex given by the number of attractors passing through this vertex. We find the number of vertices having a nonzero information centrality to be extensive/subextensive for models with/without a memory trace in the thermodynamic limit. We evaluate the distribution of the number of cycles, of the cycle length and of the maximal basins of attraction, finding a complete scaling collapse in the thermodynamic limit for the latter. Possible implications of our results for the information flow in social networks are discussed.

  19. Biricodar. Vertex Pharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Saibal

    2002-05-01

    Vertex is developing biricodar as a chemosensitizing agent designed to restore the effectiveness of chemotherapeutic agents in tumor multidrug resistance. By November 1998, phase II trials had commenced for biricodar, in combination with chemotherapy, for five common cancer indications: breast, ovarian, soft-tissue sarcomas, small cell lung cancer and prostate cancer. Phase II trials were ongoing in January 2002. By March 2000, Vertex was the sole developer of biricodar, as an agreement made in 1996 with BioChem Pharma (now Shire Pharmaceuticals), for the development and marketing of biricodar in Canada was terminated. Biricodar is the free base compound, which also has a citrate salt analog known as VX-710-3. Vertex has published three patents, WO-09615101, WO-09636630 and WO-09736869, disclosing derivatives of biricodar that are claimed for the treatment of multidrug resistant protein and P-glycoprotein-mediated multidrug resistant tumors. In January 2002, a Banc of America analyst report forecast that biricodar had a 30% chance of reaching the market with a launch date in the second half of 2005, with peak sales estimated at $250 million.

  20. P-odd effects in the e-d scattering in the vector-like theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gakh, G.I.

    1979-01-01

    P-odd effects in elastic electron-deuteron scattering, due to the weak neutral currents, are analyzed in the framework of the vector-like theories. Considered is the case of the most general form of the P-invariance breaking in the elastic e - d scattering amplitude in both the leptonic and hadronic vertices. It is found that in the vector-like theories the parity violation in the electro-deuteron elastic scattering is confined in the hadronic vertex, while in the Weinberg-Salam model it is confined in the leptonic vertex. In the vector-like theories the asymmetry in the scattering of longitudinally polarized electrons by nonpolarized deuterons depends on the electromagnetic and weak form factors of a deuteron, whereas in the Weinberg-Salam model it does not depend on the structure of the deuteron. In the Weinberg-Salam model the asymmetry is independent on the T-violating form factors of the deuteron, whereas such a dependence is present in the vector-like theories

  1. Vertex reconstruction in CMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chabanat, E.; D'Hondt, J.; Estre, N.; Fruehwirth, R.; Prokofiev, K.; Speer, T.; Vanlaer, P.; Waltenberger, W.

    2005-01-01

    Due to the high track multiplicity in the final states expected in proton collisions at the LHC experiments, novel vertex reconstruction algorithms are required. The vertex reconstruction problem can be decomposed into a pattern recognition problem ('vertex finding') and an estimation problem ('vertex fitting'). Starting from least-squares methods, robustifications of the classical algorithms are discussed and the statistical properties of the novel methods are shown. A whole set of different approaches for the vertex finding problem is presented and compared in relevant physics channels

  2. Vertex Reconstruction in CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Chabanat, E; D'Hondt, J; Vanlaer, P; Prokofiev, K; Speer, T; Frühwirth, R; Waltenberger, W

    2005-01-01

    Because of the high track multiplicity in the final states expected in proton collisions at the LHC experiments, novel vertex reconstruction algorithms are required. The vertex reconstruction problem can be decomposed into a pattern recognition problem ("vertex finding") and an estimation problem ("vertex fitting"). Starting from least-square methods, ways to render the classical algorithms more robust are discussed and the statistical properties of the novel methods are shown. A whole set of different approaches for the vertex finding problem is presented and compared in relevant physics channels.

  3. LHCb: Performance and Radiation Damage Effects in the LHCb Vertex Locator

    CERN Multimedia

    Carvalho Akiba, K

    2014-01-01

    LHCb is a dedicated experiment to study New Physics in the decays of heavy hadrons at the LHC. Heavy hadrons are identified through their flight distance in the Vertex Locator (VELO), hence the detector is critical for both the trigger and offline physics analyses. The VELO is the retractable silicon-strip detector surrounding the LHCb interaction point. It is located only 7 mm from the LHC beam during normal LHC operation, once moved into its closed position for each LHC fill when stable beams are obtained. During insertion the detector is centred around the LHC beam by the online reconstruction of the primary vertex position. Both VELO halves comprise 21 silicon micro-strip modules each. A module is made of two n-on-n 300 $\\mu$m thick half-disc sensors with R-measuring and $\\phi$-measuring micro-strip geometry, mounted on a carbon fibre support paddle. The minimum pitch is approximately 40 $\\mu$m. The detector is also equipped with the only n-on-p sensors operating at the LHC. The detectors are operated in ...

  4. Performance, Radiation Damage Effects and Upgrade of the LHCb Vertex Locator

    CERN Document Server

    De Capua, S

    2013-01-01

    LHCb is a dedicated experiment to study New Physics in the decays of heavy hadrons at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Heavy hadrons are identified through their flight distance in the VELO, the retractable silicon-strip vertex detector surrounding the LHCb interaction point at only 7 mm from the beam during normal LHC operation. Both VELO halves comprise 21 silicon micro-strip modules each. A module is made of two n-on-n 300 µm thick half-disc sensors with R- and phi-measuring geometry, mounted on a carbon fibre support paddle. The minimum pitch is approximately 40 µm. The detector is also equipped with the only n-on-p module operating at the LHC. The performance of the VELO in its three years of successful operation during the LHC physics runs will be presented. Highlights will include alignment, cluster finding efficiency, single hit resolution, and impact parameter and vertex resolutions. The VELO module sensors receive a large and non-uniform radiation dose having inner and outer radii of only 7 and 42...

  5. Massively parallel simulations of strong electronic correlations: Realistic Coulomb vertex and multiplet effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgärtel, M.; Ghanem, K.; Kiani, A.; Koch, E.; Pavarini, E.; Sims, H.; Zhang, G.

    2017-07-01

    We discuss the efficient implementation of general impurity solvers for dynamical mean-field theory. We show that both Lanczos and quantum Monte Carlo in different flavors (Hirsch-Fye, continuous-time hybridization- and interaction-expansion) exhibit excellent scaling on massively parallel supercomputers. We apply these algorithms to simulate realistic model Hamiltonians including the full Coulomb vertex, crystal-field splitting, and spin-orbit interaction. We discuss how to remove the sign problem in the presence of non-diagonal crystal-field and hybridization matrices. We show how to extract the physically observable quantities from imaginary time data, in particular correlation functions and susceptibilities. Finally, we present benchmarks and applications for representative correlated systems.

  6. Selective attention and the auditory vertex potential. 2: Effects of signal intensity and masking noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwent, V. L.; Hillyard, S. A.; Galambos, R.

    1975-01-01

    A randomized sequence of tone bursts was delivered to subjects at short inter-stimulus intervals with the tones originating from one of three spatially and frequency specific channels. The subject's task was to count the tones in one of the three channels at a time, ignoring the other two, and press a button after each tenth tone. In different conditions, tones were given at high and low intensities and with or without a background white noise to mask the tones. The N sub 1 component of the auditory vertex potential was found to be larger in response to attended channel tones in relation to unattended tones. This selective enhancement of N sub 1 was minimal for loud tones presented without noise and increased markedly for the lower tone intensity and in noise added conditions.

  7. Multipole expansion of vertex functions with two final particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daumens, Michel

    1977-01-01

    The expansions of the usual vertex functions are generalized to the vertex functions with two final particles. For four vector functions, expressions are similar to those of Chew, Goldberger, Low and Nambu, and of Adler and the consequences of the isobaric model are studied [fr

  8. Effect of Heterogeneity of Vertex Activation on Epidemic Spreading in Temporal Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yixin Zhu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Development of sensor technologies and the prevalence of electronic communication services provide us with a huge amount of data on human communication behavior, including face-to-face conversations, e-mail exchanges, phone calls, message exchanges, and other types of interactions in various online forums. These indirect or direct interactions form potential bridges of the virus spread. For a long time, the study of virus spread is based on the aggregate static network. However, the interaction patterns containing diverse temporal properties may affect dynamic processes as much as the network topology does. Some empirical studies show that the activation time and duration of vertices and links are highly heterogeneous, which means intense activity may be followed by longer intervals of inactivity. We take heterogeneous distribution of the node interactivation time as the research background to build an asynchronous communication model. The two sides of the communication do not have to be active at the same time. One derives the threshold of virus spreading on the communication mode and analyzes the reason the heterogeneous distribution of the vertex interactivation time suppresses the spread of virus. At last, the analysis and results from the model are verified on the BA network.

  9. Study of the radiation induced effects in the LHCb Vertex Locator

    CERN Document Server

    Szumlak, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    LHCb is a dedicated heavy-flavour physics experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. The VErtex LOcator (VELO) is a critical part of a LHCb tracking system, enabling the full topological reconstruction of beauty and charm mesons’ decays and providing essential input for the High Level Trigger (HLT) system used by the experiment to select events. The VELO comprises 42 modules made of two $n^{+}$-on-$n~300~\\mu$m thick half-disc silicon sensors with $R$- and ${\\mit\\Phi}$-measuring micro-strips, arranged in two retractable halves, operating only about 8 mm from the proton beams. In these paper, selected aspects of the VELO performance during the Run 1 data-taking period is shortly summarised along with the radiation damage studies. The track finding efficiency is typically greater than 98\\%. An impact parameter resolution of less than $35~\\mu$m is achieved for particles with transverse momentum greater than 1 GeV/$c$. An overview of all important performance parameters will be given. The VELO sensors have...

  10. Effective Lagrangian approach to fermion electric dipole moments induced by a CP-violating WWγ vertex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novales-Sanchez, H.; Toscano, J. J.

    2008-01-01

    The one-loop contribution of the two CP-violating components of the WWγ vertex, κ-tilde γ W μ + W ν - F-tilde μν and (λ-tilde γ /m W 2 )W μν + W ρ -ν F-tilde ρμ , on the electric dipole moment (EDM) of fermions is calculated using dimensional regularization and its impact at low energies reexamined in the light of the decoupling theorem. The Ward identities satisfied by these couplings are derived by adopting a SU L (2)xU Y (1)-invariant approach and their implications in radiative corrections discussed. Previous results on κ-tilde γ , whose bound is updated to |κ-tilde γ | -5 , are reproduced, but disagreement with those existing for λ-tilde γ is found. In particular, the upper bound |λ-tilde γ | -2 is found from the limit on the neutron EDM, which is more than 2 orders of magnitude less stringent than that of previous results. It is argued that this difference between the κ-tilde γ and λ-tilde γ bounds is the one that might be expected in accordance with the decoupling theorem. This argument is reinforced by analyzing carefully the low-energy behavior of the loop functions. The upper bounds on the W EDM, |d W | -21 e·cm, and the magnetic quadrupole moment, |Q-tilde W | -36 e·cm 2 , are derived. The EDM of the second and third families of quarks and charged leptons are estimated. In particular, EDM as large as 10 -20 e·cm and 10 -21 e·cm are found for the t and b quarks, respectively

  11. Reversible Vector Ratchet Effect in Skyrmion Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiaoyu; Reichhardt, Charles; Reichhardt, Cynthia

    Magnetic skyrmions are topological non-trivial spin textures found in several magnetic materials. Since their motion can be controlled using ultralow current densities, skyrmions are appealing for potential applications in spintronics as information carriers and processing devices. In this work, we studied the collective transport properties of driven skyrmions based on a particle-like model with molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. Our results show that ac driven skyrmions interacting with an asymmetric substrate provide a realization of a new class of ratchet system, which we call a vector ratchet, that arises due to the effect of the Magnus term on the skyrmion dynamics. In a vector ratchet, the dc motion induced by the ac drive can be described as a vector that can be rotated up to 360 degrees relative to the substrate asymmetry direction. This could represent a new method for controlling skyrmion motion for spintronic applications.

  12. On the Relation between Edge and Vertex Modelling in Shape Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hobolth, Asger; Kent, John Thomas; Dryden, Ian L.

    2002-01-01

    Objects in the plane with no obvious landmarks can be described by either vertex transformation vectors or edge transformation vectors. In this paper we provide the relation between the two transformation vectors. Grenander & Miller (1994) use a multivariate normal distribution with a block...... circulant covariance matrix to model the edge transformation vector. This type of model is also feasible for the vertex transformation vector and in certain cases the free parameters of the two models match up in a simple way. A vertex model and an edge model are applied to a data set of sand particles...

  13. Effective SIMD Vectorization for Intel Xeon Phi Coprocessors

    OpenAIRE

    Tian, Xinmin; Saito, Hideki; Preis, Serguei V.; Garcia, Eric N.; Kozhukhov, Sergey S.; Masten, Matt; Cherkasov, Aleksei G.; Panchenko, Nikolay

    2015-01-01

    Efficiently exploiting SIMD vector units is one of the most important aspects in achieving high performance of the application code running on Intel Xeon Phi coprocessors. In this paper, we present several effective SIMD vectorization techniques such as less-than-full-vector loop vectorization, Intel MIC specific alignment optimization, and small matrix transpose/multiplication 2D vectorization implemented in the Intel C/C++ and Fortran production compilers for Intel Xeon Phi coprocessors. A ...

  14. Vectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boeriis, Morten; van Leeuwen, Theo

    2017-01-01

    should be taken into account in discussing ‘reactions’, which Kress and van Leeuwen link only to eyeline vectors. Finally, the question can be raised as to whether actions are always realized by vectors. Drawing on a re-reading of Rudolf Arnheim’s account of vectors, these issues are outlined......This article revisits the concept of vectors, which, in Kress and van Leeuwen’s Reading Images (2006), plays a crucial role in distinguishing between ‘narrative’, action-oriented processes and ‘conceptual’, state-oriented processes. The use of this concept in image analysis has usually focused...

  15. Effect of minoxidil topical foam on frontotemporal and vertex androgenetic alopecia in men: a 104-week open-label clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanti, V; Hillmann, K; Kottner, J; Stroux, A; Canfield, D; Blume-Peytavi, U

    2016-07-01

    Topical minoxidil formulations have been shown to be effective in treating androgenetic alopecia (AGA) for 12 months. Efficacy and safety in both frontotemporal and vertex regions over longer application periods have not been studied so far. To evaluate the effect of 5% minoxidil topical foam (5% MTF) in the frontotemporal and vertex areas in patients with moderate AGA over 104 weeks. An 80-week, open-label extension phase was performed, following a 24-week randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study in men with AGA grade IIIvertex to VI. Group 1 (n = 22) received ongoing 5% MTF for 104 weeks, Group 2 (n = 23) received placebo topical foam (plaTF) until week 24, followed by 5% MTF until week 104 during the extension phase. Frontotemporal and vertex target area non-vellus hair counts (f-TAHC, v-TAHC) and cumulative hair width (f-TAHW, v-TAHW) were assessed at baseline and at weeks 24, 52, 76 and 104. In Group 1, f-TAHW and f-TAHC showed a statistically significant increase from baseline to week 52 and week 76, respectively, returning to values comparable to baseline at week 104. No significant differences were found between baseline and week 104 in v-TAHC in Group 1 as well as f-TAHC, v-TAHC, f-TAHW and v-TAHW values in Group 2. 5% MTF is effective in stabilizing hair density, hair width and scalp coverage in both frontotemporal and vertex areas over an application period of 104 weeks, while showing a good safety and tolerability profile with a low rate of irritant contact dermatitis. © 2015 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  16. Effect of anomalous ุ ฯ vertex on decay-lepton distributions in ท-ุุ and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We also study the lepton energy and beam polarization dependence of certain CP-violating lepton angular asymmetries arising from an anomalous decay vertex and compare them with the asymmetries arising due to CP-violation in the production process due to the top electric or weak dipole moment.

  17. Jet Vertex Charge Reconstruction

    CERN Document Server

    Nektarijevic, Snezana; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    A newly developed algorithm called the jet vertex charge tagger, aimed at identifying the sign of the charge of jets containing $b$-hadrons, referred to as $b$-jets, is presented. In addition to the well established track-based jet charge determination, this algorithm introduces the so-called \\emph{jet vertex charge} reconstruction, which exploits the charge information associated to the displaced vertices within the jet. Furthermore, the charge of a soft muon contained in the jet is taken into account when available. All available information is combined into a multivariate discriminator. The algorithm has been developed on jets matched to generator level $b$-hadrons provided by $t\\bar{t}$ events simulated at $\\sqrt{s}$=13~TeV using the full ATLAS detector simulation and reconstruction.

  18. The ARGUS vertex trigger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, N.; Kolander, M.; Kolanoski, H.; Siegmund, T.; Bergter, J.; Eckstein, P.; Schubert, K.R.; Waldi, R.; Imhof, M.; Ressing, D.; Weiss, U.; Weseler, S.

    1995-09-01

    A fast second level trigger has been developed for the ARGUS experiment which recognizes tracks originating from the interaction region. The processor compares the hits in the ARGUS Micro Vertex Drift Chamber to 245760 masks stored in random access memories. The masks which are fully defined in three dimensions are able to reject tracks originating in the wall of the narrow beampipe of 10.5 mm radius. (orig.)

  19. Effective SIMD Vectorization for Intel Xeon Phi Coprocessors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinmin Tian

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Efficiently exploiting SIMD vector units is one of the most important aspects in achieving high performance of the application code running on Intel Xeon Phi coprocessors. In this paper, we present several effective SIMD vectorization techniques such as less-than-full-vector loop vectorization, Intel MIC specific alignment optimization, and small matrix transpose/multiplication 2D vectorization implemented in the Intel C/C++ and Fortran production compilers for Intel Xeon Phi coprocessors. A set of workloads from several application domains is employed to conduct the performance study of our SIMD vectorization techniques. The performance results show that we achieved up to 12.5x performance gain on the Intel Xeon Phi coprocessor. We also demonstrate a 2000x performance speedup from the seamless integration of SIMD vectorization and parallelization.

  20. The three-photon vertex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delbourgo, R.

    1976-01-01

    Owing to weak interactions, the three-photon vertex is non-zero. From gauge invariance and symmetry requirements, it is proved that the C = -1P = - 1 vertex amplitudes are at least of order q 7 in the limit of soft photon momentum q and that if any two photons are placed on mass shell the form factors vanish identically. (author)

  1. Self-consistent calculation of the weak constants in the parity nonconserving nuclear forces. Effective PNC hamiltonian in SU(2)sub(L)xU(1)xSU(3)sub(c). PNC in the πNN vertex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubovik, V.M.; Zenkin, S.V.

    1983-01-01

    On the basis of the total effective Hamiltonian of the parity nonconserving (PNC) hadron-hadron interactions found within the standard model SU(2)sUb(L)XU(1)xSU(3)sub(c) in all orders of the leading logarithms allowing for the difference of quark mass scales (msub(c)>>msub(u, d, s)) the PNC πNN vertex generating the long-range part of the PNC nuclear forces is considered. The origin and the methods of calculation of various contributions to this vertex with a special attention to possible artifacts of these methods is anatyzed. Within the self-consistence calculational framework partly including the MIT bag model the total value of the constant hsub(π) determining the PNC πNN vertex is evaluated. Value of hsub(π) (approximately 1.3x10 -7 ) is 2-4 times as small as previous estimates and does not contradict the experimental data

  2. Primary Vertex Reconstruction at the ATLAS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Grimm, Kathryn; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Efficient and precise reconstruction of the primary vertex in an LHC collision is essential in both the reconstruction of the full kinematic properties of a hard-scatter event and of soft interactions as a measure of the amount of pile-up. The reconstruction of primary vertices in the busy, high pile-up environment of Run-2 of the LHC is a challenging task. New methods have been developed by the ATLAS experiment to reconstruct vertices in such environments. Advances in vertex seeding include methods taken from medical imaging, which allow for reconstruction of multiple vertices with small spatial separation. The adoption of this new seeding algorithm within the ATLAS adaptive vertex finding and fitting procedure will be discussed, and the first results of the new techniques from Run-2 data will be presented. Additionally, data-driven methods to evaluate vertex resolution will be presented with special focus on correct methods to evaluate the effect of the beam spot constraint; results from these methods in Ru...

  3. Dynamical electron-phonon coupling, G W self-consistency, and vertex effect on the electronic band gap of ice and liquid water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziaei, Vafa; Bredow, Thomas

    2017-06-01

    We study the impact of dynamical electron-phonon (el-ph) effects on the electronic band gap of ice and liquid water by accounting for frequency-dependent Fan contributions in the el-ph mediated self-energy within the many-body perturbation theory (MBPT). We find that the dynamical el-ph coupling effects greatly reduce the static el-ph band-gap correction of the hydrogen-rich molecular ice crystal from-2.46 to -0.23 eV in great contrast to the result of Monserrat et al. [Phys. Rev. B 92, 140302 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevB.92.140302]. This is of particular importance as otherwise the static el-ph gap correction would considerably reduce the electronic band gap, leading to considerable underestimation of the intense peaks of optical absorption spectra of ice which would be in great disagreement to experimental references. By contrast, the static el-ph gap correction of liquid water is very moderate (-0.32 eV), and inclusion of dynamical effects slightly reduces the gap correction to -0.19 eV. Further, we determine the diverse sensitivity of ice and liquid water to the G W self-consistency and show that the energy-only self-consistent approach (GnWn ) exhibits large implicit vertex character in comparison to the quasiparticle self-consistent approach, for which an explicit calculation of vertex corrections is necessary for good agreement with experiment.

  4. The STAR Vertex Position Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Llope, W.J., E-mail: llope@rice.edu [Rice University, Houston, TX 77005 (United States); Zhou, J.; Nussbaum, T. [Rice University, Houston, TX 77005 (United States); Hoffmann, G.W. [University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Asselta, K. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Brandenburg, J.D.; Butterworth, J. [Rice University, Houston, TX 77005 (United States); Camarda, T.; Christie, W. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Crawford, H.J. [University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Dong, X. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Engelage, J. [University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Eppley, G.; Geurts, F. [Rice University, Houston, TX 77005 (United States); Hammond, J. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Judd, E. [University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); McDonald, D.L. [Rice University, Houston, TX 77005 (United States); Perkins, C. [University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Ruan, L.; Scheblein, J. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); and others

    2014-09-21

    The 2×3 channel pseudo Vertex Position Detector (pVPD) in the STAR experiment at RHIC has been upgraded to a 2×19 channel detector in the same acceptance, called the Vertex Position Detector (VPD). This detector is fully integrated into the STAR trigger system and provides the primary input to the minimum-bias trigger in Au+Au collisions. The information from the detector is used both in the STAR Level-0 trigger and offline to measure the location of the primary collision vertex along the beam pipe and the event “start time” needed by other fast-timing detectors in STAR. The offline timing resolution of single detector channels in full-energy Au+Au collisions is ∼100 ps, resulting in a start time resolution of a few tens of picoseconds and a resolution on the primary vertex location of ∼1 cm.

  5. Spin wave Feynman diagram vertex computation package

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Alexander; Javernick, Philip; Datta, Trinanjan

    Spin wave theory is a well-established theoretical technique that can correctly predict the physical behavior of ordered magnetic states. However, computing the effects of an interacting spin wave theory incorporating magnons involve a laborious by hand derivation of Feynman diagram vertices. The process is tedious and time consuming. Hence, to improve productivity and have another means to check the analytical calculations, we have devised a Feynman Diagram Vertex Computation package. In this talk, we will describe our research group's effort to implement a Mathematica based symbolic Feynman diagram vertex computation package that computes spin wave vertices. Utilizing the non-commutative algebra package NCAlgebra as an add-on to Mathematica, symbolic expressions for the Feynman diagram vertices of a Heisenberg quantum antiferromagnet are obtained. Our existing code reproduces the well-known expressions of a nearest neighbor square lattice Heisenberg model. We also discuss the case of a triangular lattice Heisenberg model where non collinear terms contribute to the vertex interactions.

  6. The Mark III vertex chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adler, J.; Bolton, T.; Bunnell, K.

    1987-07-01

    The design and construction of the new Mark III vertex chamber is described. Initial tests with cosmic rays prove the ability of track reconstruction and yield triplet resolutions below 50 μm at 3 atm using argon/ethane (50:50). Also performed are studies using a prototype of a pressurized wire vertex chamber with 8 mm diameter straw geometry. Spatial resolution of 35mm was obtained using dimethyl ether (DME) at 1 atm and 30 μm using argon/ethane (50/50 mixture) at 4 atm. Preliminary studies indicate the DME to adversely affect such materials as aluminized Mylar and Delrin

  7. Community effectiveness of copepods for dengue vector control: systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazaro, A; Han, W W; Manrique-Saide, P; George, L; Velayudhan, R; Toledo, J; Runge Ranzinger, S; Horstick, O

    2015-06-01

    Vector control remains the only available method for primary prevention of dengue. Several interventions exist for dengue vector control, with limited evidence of their efficacy and community effectiveness. This systematic review compiles and analyses the existing global evidence for community effectiveness of copepods for dengue vector control. The systematic review follows the PRISMA statement, searching six relevant databases. Applying all inclusion and exclusion criteria, 11 articles were included. There is evidence that cyclopoid copepods (Mesocyclops spp.) could potentially be an effective vector control option, as shown in five community effectiveness studies in Vietnam. This includes long-term effectiveness for larval and adult control of Ae. aegypti, as well as dengue incidence. However, this success has so far not been replicated elsewhere (six studies, three community effectiveness studies--Costa Rica, Mexico and USA, and three studies analysing both efficacy and community effectiveness--Honduras, Laos and USA), probably due to community participation, environmental and/or biological factors. Judging by the quality of existing studies, there is a lack of good study design, data quality and appropriate statistics. There is limited evidence for the use of cyclopoid copepods as a single intervention. There are very few studies, and more are needed in other communities and environments. Clear best practice guidelines for the methodology of entomological studies should be developed. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Vertex Reconstruction at STAR: Overview and Performance Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, D.; Lauret, J.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Van Buren, G.; Webb, J.

    2017-10-01

    The STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) has a rich physics program ranging from studies of the Quark Gluon Plasma to the exploration of the spin structure of the proton. Many measurements carried out by the STAR collaboration rely on the efficient reconstruction and precise knowledge of the position of the primary-interaction vertex. Throughout the years two main vertex finders have been predominantly utilized in event reconstruction by the experiment: MinutVF and PPV with their application domains focusing on heavy ion and proton-proton events respectively. In this work we give a brief overview and discuss recent improvements to the vertex finding algorithms implemented in the STAR software library. In our studies we focus on the finding efficiency and the quality of the reconstructed primary vertex. We examine the effect of an additional constraint, imposed by an independent measurement of the beam line position, when it is applied during the fit. We evaluate the significance of the improved primary vertex resolution on identification of the secondary decay vertices occurring inside the beam pipe. Finally, we present a method and its software implementation developed to measure the performance of the primary vertex reconstruction algorithms.

  9. [Effects of plant viruses on vector and non-vector herbivorous arthropods and their natural enemies: a mini review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiao-Chan; Xu, Hong-Xing; Zhou, Xiao-Jun; Zheng, Xu-Song; Sun, Yu-Jian; Yang, Ya-Jun; Tian, Jun-Ce; Lü, Zhong-Xian

    2014-05-01

    Plant viruses transmitted by arthropods, as an important biotic factor, may not only directly affect the yield and quality of host plants, and development, physiological characteristics and ecological performances of their vector arthropods, but also directly or indirectly affect the non-vector herbivorous arthropods and their natural enemies in the same ecosystem, thereby causing influences to the whole agro-ecosystem. This paper reviewed the progress on the effects of plant viruses on herbivorous arthropods, including vector and non-vector, and their natural enemies, and on their ecological mechanisms to provide a reference for optimizing the management of vector and non-vector arthropod populations and sustainable control of plant viruses in agro-ecosystem.

  10. Connections for Small Vertex Models

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This paper is a first attempt at calssifying connections on small vertex models i.e., commuting squares of the form displayed in (1.2) below. ... obtain necessary conditions for two such `model connections' in (2, ) to be ... Current Issue : Vol.

  11. The ARGUS silicon vertex detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michel, E.; Ball, S.; Ehret, K.; Geyer, C.; Hesselbarth, J.; Hoelscher, A.; Hofmann, W.; Holzer, B.; Huepper, A.; Khan, S.; Knoepfle, K.T.; Seeger, M.; Spengler, J.; Brogle, M.; Horisberger, R.

    1994-01-01

    A silicon microstrip vertex detector has been built as an upgrade to the ARGUS detector for increased precision and efficiency in the reconstruction of decay vertices. This paper discusses the mechanical and electronic design of this device and presents first results from its successful test operation yielding an impact parameter resolution of about 18 μm. ((orig.))

  12. A Macdonald refined topological vertex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foda, Omar; Wu, Jian-Feng

    2017-07-01

    We consider the refined topological vertex of Iqbal et al (2009 J. High Energy Phys. JHEP10(2009)069), as a function of two parameters ≤ft\\lgroup x, y \\right\\rgroup , and deform it by introducing the Macdonald parameters ≤ft\\lgroup q, t \\right\\rgroup , as in the work of Vuletić on plane partitions (Vuletić M 2009 Trans. Am. Math. Soc. 361 2789-804), to obtain ‘a Macdonald refined topological vertex’. In the limit q → t , we recover the refined topological vertex of Iqbal et al and in the limit x → y , we obtain a qt-deformation of the original topological vertex of Aganagic et al (2005 Commun. Math. Phys. 25 425-78). Copies of the vertex can be glued to obtain qt-deformed 5D instanton partition functions that have well-defined 4D limits and, for generic values of ≤ft\\lgroup q, t\\right\\rgroup , contain infinite-towers of poles for every pole present in the limit q → t .

  13. Aleph silicon microstrip vertex detector

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1998-01-01

    This microstrip vertex locator was located at the heart of the ALEPH experiment, one of the four experiments at the Large Electron-Positron (LEP) collider. In the experiments at CERN's LEP, which ran from 1989 to 2000, modern silicon microvertex detectors, such as those used at ALEPH, monitored the production of short-lived particles close to the beam pipe.

  14. Vertex algebras and mirror symmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borisov, L.A.

    2001-01-01

    Mirror Symmetry for Calabi-Yau hypersurfaces in toric varieties is by now well established. However, previous approaches to it did not uncover the underlying reason for mirror varieties to be mirror. We are able to calculate explicitly vertex algebras that correspond to holomorphic parts of A and B models of Calabi-Yau hypersurfaces and complete intersections in toric varieties. We establish the relation between these vertex algebras for mirror Calabi-Yau manifolds. This should eventually allow us to rewrite the whole story of toric mirror symmetry in the language of sheaves of vertex algebras. Our approach is purely algebraic and involves simple techniques from toric geometry and homological algebra, as well as some basic results of the theory of vertex algebras. Ideas of this paper may also be useful in other problems related to maps from curves to algebraic varieties.This paper could also be of interest to physicists, because it contains explicit description of holomorphic parts of A and B models of Calabi-Yau hypersurfaces and complete intersections in terms of free bosons and fermions. (orig.)

  15. The CDF Silicon Vertex Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tkaczyk, S.; Carter, H.; Flaugher, B.

    1993-01-01

    A silicon strip vertex detector was designed, constructed and commissioned at the CDF experiment at the Tevatron collider at Fermilab. The mechanical design of the detector, its cooling and monitoring are presented. The front end electronics employing a custom VLSI chip, the readout electronics and various components of the SVX system are described. The system performance and the experience with the operation of the

  16. The CDF Silicon Vertex Trigger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dell'Orso, Mauro

    2006-01-01

    Motivations, design, performance and ongoing upgrade of the CDF Silicon Vertex Trigger are presented. The system provides CDF with a powerful tool for online tracking with offline quality in order to enhance the reach on B-physics and large P t -physics coupled to b quarks

  17. Vertex operators and Jordan fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, L.A.; Gomes, J.F.; Zimerman, A.H.

    1988-01-01

    The construction of Lie algebras in terms of Jordan algebras generators is discussed. The key to the construction is the triality relation already incorporated into matrix products. A generalisation to Kac-Moody algebras in terms of vertex operators is proposed and may provide a clue for the construction of new representations of Kac-Moody algebras in terms of Jordan fields. (author) [pt

  18. Price vector effects in choice experiments: an empirical test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanley, Nick; Wright, Robert E.; Adamowicz, Wiktor

    2005-01-01

    This paper investigates whether the preference and willingness-to-pay estimates obtained from the choice experiment method of estimating non-market values are sensitive to the vector of prices used in the experimental design. We undertake this test in the context of water quality improvements under the European Union's new Water Framework Directive. Using a mixed logit model, which allows for differing scale between the two samples, we find no significant impact of changing the price vector on estimates of preferences or willingness-to-pay. (author) (Choice modelling; Non-market valuation; Design effects; Water Framework Directive)

  19. Reorientation effects for 52 MeV vector polarized deuterons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nurzynski, J.; Kihm, T.; Knopfle, K.T.; Mairle, G.; Clement, H.

    1987-01-01

    The differential cross sections and the vector analysing powers were measured for the elastic and inelastic scattering of 52 MeV vector polarized deuterons from 20 Ne, 22 Ne, 26 Mg, 28 Si, 32 S, 34 S, 36 Ar and 40 Ar nuclei. Coupled channels analysis was carried out using an axially symmetric rotational model with either prolate or oblate quadrupole deformations for each isotope. Calculations assuming harmonic vibrator model were also carried out. In general, reorientation effects were found to be weak. A global optical model potential containing an imaginary spin-orbit component was found to be the most suitable in describing the experimental data at this energy

  20. A Novel Vertex Affinity for Community Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Andy [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Sanders, Geoffrey [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Henson, Van [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Vassilevski, Panayot [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-10-05

    We propose a novel vertex affinity measure in this paper. The new vertex affinity quantifies the proximity between two vertices in terms of their clustering strength and is ideal for such graph analytics applications as community detection. We also developed a framework that combines simple graph searches and resistance circuit formulas to compute the vertex affinity efficiently. We study the properties of the new affinity measure empirically in comparison to those of other popular vertex proximity metrics. Our results show that the existing metrics are ill-suited for community detection due to their lack of fundamental properties that are essential for correctly capturing inter- and intra-cluster vertex proximity.

  1. Effects of Climate and Climate Change on Vectors and Vector-Borne Diseases: Ticks Are Different.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogden, Nick H; Lindsay, L Robbin

    2016-08-01

    There has been considerable debate as to whether global risk from vector-borne diseases will be impacted by climate change. This has focussed on important mosquito-borne diseases that are transmitted by the vectors from infected to uninfected humans. However, this debate has mostly ignored the biological diversity of vectors and vector-borne diseases. Here, we review how climate and climate change may impact those most divergent of arthropod disease vector groups: multivoltine insects and hard-bodied (ixodid) ticks. We contrast features of the life cycles and behaviour of these arthropods, and how weather, climate, and climate change may have very different impacts on the spatiotemporal occurrence and abundance of vectors, and the pathogens they transmit. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Belle II silicon vertex detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamczyk, K. [H. Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Krakow 31-342 (Poland); Aihara, H. [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Angelini, C. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); INFN Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Aziz, T.; Babu, V. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai 400005 (India); Bacher, S. [H. Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Krakow 31-342 (Poland); Bahinipati, S. [Indian Institute of Technology Bhubaneswar, Satya Nagar (India); Barberio, E.; Baroncelli, Ti.; Baroncelli, To. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Basith, A.K. [Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India); Batignani, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); INFN Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Bauer, A. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Austrian Academy of Sciences, 1050 Vienna (Austria); Behera, P.K. [Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India); Bergauer, T. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Austrian Academy of Sciences, 1050 Vienna (Austria); Bettarini, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); INFN Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Bhuyan, B. [Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Assam 781039 (India); Bilka, T. [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, 121 16 Prague (Czech Republic); Bosi, F. [INFN Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Bosisio, L. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Trieste, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); INFN Sezione di Trieste, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); and others

    2016-09-21

    The Belle II experiment at the SuperKEKB collider in Japan is designed to indirectly probe new physics using approximately 50 times the data recorded by its predecessor. An accurate determination of the decay-point position of subatomic particles such as beauty and charm hadrons as well as a precise measurement of low-momentum charged particles will play a key role in this pursuit. These will be accomplished by an inner tracking device comprising two layers of pixelated silicon detector and four layers of silicon vertex detector based on double-sided microstrip sensors. We describe herein the design, prototyping and construction efforts of the Belle-II silicon vertex detector.

  3. STAR Vertex Detector Upgrade Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greiner, Leo C.; Matis, Howard S.; Stezelberger, Thorsten; Vu, Chinh Q.; Wieman, Howard; Szelezniak, Michal; Sun, Xiangming

    2008-01-01

    We report on the development and prototyping efforts undertaken with the goal of producing a micro-vertex detector for the STAR experiment at the RHIC accelerator at BNL. We present the basic detector requirements and show a sensor development path, conceptual mechanical design candidates and readout architecture. Prototyping and beam test results with current generation MimoSTAR-2 sensors and a readout system featuring FPGA based on-the-fly hit finding and data sparsification are also presented

  4. The OPAL vertex drift chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, J.R.; Elcombe, P.A.; Hill, J.C.; Roach, C.M.; Armitage, J.C.; Carnegie, R.K.; Estabrooks, P.; Hemingway, R.; Karlen, D.; McPherson, A.; Pinfold, J.; Roney, J.M.; Routenburg, P.; Waterhouse, J.; Hargrove, C.K.; Klem, D.; Oakham, F.G.; Carter, A.A.; Jones, R.W.L.; Lasota, M.M.B.; Lloyd, S.L.; Pritchard, T.W.; Wyatt, T.R.

    1990-01-01

    A high precision vertex drift chamber has been installed in the OPAL experiment at LEP. The design of the chamber and the associated readout electronics is described. The performance of the system has been studied using cosmic ray muons and the results of these studies are presented. A space resolution of 50 μm in the drift direction is obtained using the OPAL central detector gas mixture at 4 bar. (orig.)

  5. Lectures on the Topological Vertex

    CERN Document Server

    Mariño, M

    2008-01-01

    In this lectures, I will summarize the approach to Gromov–Witten invariants on toric Calabi–Yau threefolds based on large N dualities. Since the large N duality/topological vertex approach computes Gromov–Witten invariants in terms of Chern–Simons knot and link invariants, Sect. 2 is devoted to a review of these. Section 3 reviews topological strings and Gromov–Witten invariants, and gives some information about the open string case. Section 4 introduces the class of geometries we will deal with, namely toric (noncompact) Calabi–Yau manifolds, and we present a useful graphical way to represent these manifolds which constitutes the geometric core of the theory of the topological vertex. Finally, in Sect. 5, we define the vertex and present some explicit formulae for it and some simple applications. A brief Appendix contains useful information about symmetric polynomials. It has not been possible to present all the relevant background and physical derivations in this set of lectures. However, these...

  6. Effective field theory and unitarity in vector boson scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekulla, Marco; Kilian, Wolfgang; Ohl, Thorsten; Reuter, Juergen

    2016-10-01

    Weak vector boson scattering at high energies will be one of the key measurements in current and upcoming LHC runs. It is most sensitive to any new physics associated with electroweak symmetry breaking. However, a conventional EFT analysis will fail at high energies. To address this problem, we present a parameter-free prescription valid for arbitrary perturbative and non-perturbative models: the T-matrix unitarization. We describe its implementation as an asymptotically consistent reference model matched to the low-energy effective theory. We show examples of typical observables of vector-boson scattering at the LHC in our unitarized framework. For many strongly-coupled models like composite Higgs models, dimension-8 operators might be actually the leading operators. In addition to those longitudinal and transversal dimension eight EFT operators, the effects of generic tensor and scalar resonances within simplified models are considered.

  7. Effects of gastrointestinal tissue structure on computed dipole vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pullan Andrew J

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Digestive diseases are difficult to assess without using invasive measurements. Non-invasive measurements of body surface electrical and magnetic activity resulting from underlying gastro-intestinal activity are not widely used, in large due to their difficulty in interpretation. Mathematical modelling of the underlying processes may help provide additional information. When modelling myoelectrical activity, it is common for the electrical field to be represented by equivalent dipole sources. The gastrointestinal system is comprised of alternating layers of smooth muscle (SM cells and Interstitial Cells of Cajal (ICC. In addition the small intestine has regions of high curvature as the intestine bends back upon itself. To eventually use modelling diagnostically, we must improve our understanding of the effect that intestinal structure has on dipole vector behaviour. Methods Normal intestine electrical behaviour was simulated on simple geometries using a monodomain formulation. The myoelectrical fields were then represented by their dipole vectors and an examination on the effect of structure was undertaken. The 3D intestine model was compared to a more computationally efficient 1D representation to determine the differences on the resultant dipole vectors. In addition, the conductivity values and the thickness of the different muscle layers were varied in the 3D model and the effects on the dipole vectors were investigated. Results The dipole vector orientations were largely affected by the curvature and by a transmural gradient in the electrical wavefront caused by the different properties of the SM and ICC layers. This gradient caused the dipoles to be oriented at an angle to the principal direction of electrical propagation. This angle increased when the ratio of the longitudinal and circular muscle was increased or when the the conductivity along and across the layers was increased. The 1D model was able to represent the

  8. A covariant representation of the Ball–Chiu vertex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmadiniaz, Naser; Schubert, Christian

    2013-01-01

    In nonabelian gauge theory the three-gluon vertex function contains important structural information, in particular on infrared divergences, and is also an essential ingredient in the Schwinger–Dyson equations. Much effort has gone into analyzing its general structure, and at the one-loop level also a number of explicit computations have been done, using various approaches. Here we use the string-inspired formalism to unify the calculations of the scalar, spinor and gluon loop contributions to the one-loop vertex, leading to an extremely compact representation in all cases. The vertex is computed fully off-shell and in dimensionally continued form, so that it can be used as a building block for higher-loop calculations. We find that the Bern–Kosower loop replacement rules, originally derived for the on-shell case, hold off-shell as well. We explain the relation of the structure of this representation to the low-energy effective action, and establish the precise connection with the standard Ball–Chiu decomposition of the vertex. This allows us also to predict that the vanishing of the completely antisymmetric coefficient function S of this decomposition is not a one-loop accident, but persists at higher-loop orders. The sum rule found by Binger and Brodsky, which leads to the vanishing of the one-loop vertex in N=4 SYM theory, in the present approach relates to worldline supersymmetry

  9. A covariant representation of the Ball–Chiu vertex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmadiniaz, Naser, E-mail: naser@ifm.umich.mx [Instituto de Física y Matemáticas, Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolás de Hidalgo, Edificio C-3, Apdo. Postal 2-82, C.P. 58040, Morelia, Michoacán (Mexico); Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Bologna and INFN, Sezione di Bologna, Via Irnerio 46, I-40126 Bologna (Italy); Schubert, Christian, E-mail: schubert@ifm.umich.mx [Instituto de Física y Matemáticas, Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolás de Hidalgo, Edificio C-3, Apdo. Postal 2-82, C.P. 58040, Morelia, Michoacán (Mexico); Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Bologna and INFN, Sezione di Bologna, Via Irnerio 46, I-40126 Bologna (Italy); Max-Planck-Institut für Gravitationsphysik, Albert-Einstein-Institut, Mühlenberg 1, D-14476 Potsdam (Germany)

    2013-04-21

    In nonabelian gauge theory the three-gluon vertex function contains important structural information, in particular on infrared divergences, and is also an essential ingredient in the Schwinger–Dyson equations. Much effort has gone into analyzing its general structure, and at the one-loop level also a number of explicit computations have been done, using various approaches. Here we use the string-inspired formalism to unify the calculations of the scalar, spinor and gluon loop contributions to the one-loop vertex, leading to an extremely compact representation in all cases. The vertex is computed fully off-shell and in dimensionally continued form, so that it can be used as a building block for higher-loop calculations. We find that the Bern–Kosower loop replacement rules, originally derived for the on-shell case, hold off-shell as well. We explain the relation of the structure of this representation to the low-energy effective action, and establish the precise connection with the standard Ball–Chiu decomposition of the vertex. This allows us also to predict that the vanishing of the completely antisymmetric coefficient function S of this decomposition is not a one-loop accident, but persists at higher-loop orders. The sum rule found by Binger and Brodsky, which leads to the vanishing of the one-loop vertex in N=4 SYM theory, in the present approach relates to worldline supersymmetry.

  10. The LHCb VERTEX LOCATOR performance and VERTEX LOCATOR upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodríguez Pérez, P

    2012-01-01

    LHCb is an experiment dedicated to the study of new physics in the decays of beauty and charm hadrons at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. The Vertex Locator (VELO) is the silicon detector surrounding the LHCb interaction point. The detector operates in a severe and highly non-uniform radiation environment. The small pitch and analogue readout result in a best single hit precision of 4 μm. The upgrade of the LHCb experiment, planned for 2018, will transform the entire readout to a trigger-less system operating at 40 MHz event rate. The vertex detector will have to cope with radiation levels up to 10 16 1 MeVn eq /cm 2 , more than an order of magnitude higher than those expected at the current experiment. A solution is under development with a pixel detector, based on the Timepix/Medipix family of chips with 55 x 55 μm pixels. In addition a micro-strip solution is also under development, with finer pitch, higher granularity and lower mass than the current detector. The current status of the VELO will be described together with recent testbeam results.

  11. String bits and the spin vertex

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, YunfengInstitut de Physique Théorique, DSM, CEA, URA2306 CNRS Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette, France; Kostov, Ivan(Institut de Physique Théorique, DSM, CEA, URA2306 CNRS Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette, France); Petrovskii, Andrei(Institut de Physique Théorique, DSM, CEA, URA2306 CNRS Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette, France); Serban, Didina(Institut de Physique Théorique, DSM, CEA, URA2306 CNRS Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette, France)

    2015-01-01

    We initiate a novel formalism for computing correlation functions of trace operators in the planar N=4 SYM theory. The central object in our formalism is the spin vertex, which is the weak coupling analogy of the string vertex in string field theory. We construct the spin vertex explicitly for all sectors at the leading order using a set of bosonic and fermionic oscillators. We prove that the vertex has trivial monodromy, or put in other words, it is a Yangian invariant. Since the monodromy o...

  12. Great Ellipse Route Planning Based on Space Vector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LIU Wenchao

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Aiming at the problem of navigation error caused by unified earth model in great circle route planning using sphere model and modern navigation equipment using ellipsoid mode, a method of great ellipse route planning based on space vector is studied. By using space vector algebra method, the vertex of great ellipse is solved directly, and description of great ellipse based on major-axis vector and minor-axis vector is presented. Then calculation formulas of great ellipse azimuth and distance are deduced using two basic vectors. Finally, algorithms of great ellipse route planning are studied, especially equal distance route planning algorithm based on Newton-Raphson(N-R method. Comparative examples show that the difference of route planning between great circle and great ellipse is significant, using algorithms of great ellipse route planning can eliminate the navigation error caused by the great circle route planning, and effectively improve the accuracy of navigation calculation.

  13. The OPAL vertex detector prototype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roney, J.M.; Armitage, J.C.; Carnegie, R.K.; Giles, G.L.; Hemingway, R.J.; McPherson, A.C.; Pinfold, J.L.; Waterhouse, J.; Godfrey, L.; Hargrove, C.K.

    1989-01-01

    The prototype test results of a high resolution charged particle tracking detector are reported. The detector is designed to measure vertex topologies of particles produced in the e + e - collisions of the OPAL experiment at LEP. The OPAL vertex detector is a 1 m long, 0.46 m diameter cylindrical drift chamber consisting of an axial and stereo layer each of which is divided into 36 jet cells. A prototype chamber containing four axial and two stereo cells was studied using a pion test beam at CERN. The studies examined the prototype under a variety of operating conditions. An r-Φ resolution of 60 μm was obtained when the chamber was operated with argon (50%)-ethane (50%) at 3.75 bar, and when CO 2 (80%)-isobutane (20%) at 2.5 bar was used a 25 μm resolution was achieved. A z measurement using end-to-end time difference has a resolution of 3.5 cm. The details of these prototype studies are discussed in this paper. (orig.)

  14. CCD-based vertex detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Damerell, C J S

    2005-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, CCD-based vertex detectors have been used to construct some of the most precise 'tracking microscopes' in particle physics. They were initially used by the ACCMOR collaboration for fixed target experiments in CERN, where they enabled the lifetimes of some of the shortest-lived charm particles to be measured precisely. The migration to collider experiments was accomplished in the SLD experiment, where the original 120 Mpixel detector was later upgraded to one with 307 Mpixels. This detector was used in a range of physics studies which exceeded the capability of the LEP detectors, including the most precise limit to date on the Bs mixing parameter. This success, and the high background hit densities that will inevitably be encountered at the future TeV-scale linear collider, have established the need for a silicon pixel-based vertex detector at this machine. The technical options have now been broadened to include a wide range of possible silicon imaging technologies as well as CCDs (mon...

  15. The role of geometry in 4-vertex origami mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waitukaitis, Scott; Dieleman, Peter; van Hecke, Martin

    Origami offers an interesting design platform metamaterials because it strongly couples mechanics with geometry. Even so, most research carried out so far has been limited to one or two particular patterns. I will discuss the full geometrical space of the most common origami building block, the 4-vertex, and show how exotic geometries can have dramatic effects on the mechanics.

  16. On the Reduction of Vector and Axial-Vector Fields in a Meson Effective Action at O(p4)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bel'kov, A.A.; Lanev, A.V.; Schaale, A.

    1994-01-01

    Starting from an effective NJL-type quark interaction we have derived an effective meson action for the pseudoscalar sector. The vector and axial-vector degrees of freedom have been integrated out, applying the static equations of motion. As the results we have found a (reduced) pseudoscalar meson Lagrangian of the Gasser-Leutwyler type with modified structure coefficients L i . This method has been also used to construct the reduced weak and electromagnetic-weak currents. The application of the reduced Lagrangian and currents has been considered in physical processes. 36 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  17. New vertex reconstruction algorithms for CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Frühwirth, R; Prokofiev, Kirill; Speer, T.; Vanlaer, P.; Chabanat, E.; Estre, N.

    2003-01-01

    The reconstruction of interaction vertices can be decomposed into a pattern recognition problem (``vertex finding'') and a statistical problem (``vertex fitting''). We briefly review classical methods. We introduce novel approaches and motivate them in the framework of high-luminosity experiments like at the LHC. We then show comparisons with the classical methods in relevant physics channels

  18. Vertex Reconstruction in ATLAS Run II

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Matt; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Vertex reconstruction is the process of taking reconstructed tracks and using them to determine the locations of proton collisions. In this poster we present the performance of our current vertex reconstruction algorithm, and look at investigations into potential improvements from a new seed finding method.

  19. How effective is integrated vector management against malaria and lymphatic filariasis where the diseases are transmitted by the same vector?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher M Stone

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The opportunity to integrate vector management across multiple vector-borne diseases is particularly plausible for malaria and lymphatic filariasis (LF control where both diseases are transmitted by the same vector. To date most examples of integrated control targeting these diseases have been unanticipated consequences of malaria vector control, rather than planned strategies that aim to maximize the efficacy and take the complex ecological and biological interactions between the two diseases into account.We developed a general model of malaria and LF transmission and derived expressions for the basic reproductive number (R0 for each disease. Transmission of both diseases was most sensitive to vector mortality and biting rate. Simulating different levels of coverage of long lasting-insecticidal nets (LLINs and larval control confirms the effectiveness of these interventions for the control of both diseases. When LF was maintained near the critical density of mosquitoes, minor levels of vector control (8% coverage of LLINs or treatment of 20% of larval sites were sufficient to eliminate the disease. Malaria had a far greater R0 and required a 90% population coverage of LLINs in order to eliminate it. When the mosquito density was doubled, 36% and 58% coverage of LLINs and larval control, respectively, were required for LF elimination; and malaria elimination was possible with a combined coverage of 78% of LLINs and larval control.Despite the low level of vector control required to eliminate LF, simulations suggest that prevalence of LF will decrease at a slower rate than malaria, even at high levels of coverage. If representative of field situations, integrated management should take into account not only how malaria control can facilitate filariasis elimination, but strike a balance between the high levels of coverage of (multiple interventions required for malaria with the long duration predicted to be required for filariasis elimination.

  20. How effective is integrated vector management against malaria and lymphatic filariasis where the diseases are transmitted by the same vector?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Christopher M; Lindsay, Steve W; Chitnis, Nakul

    2014-12-01

    The opportunity to integrate vector management across multiple vector-borne diseases is particularly plausible for malaria and lymphatic filariasis (LF) control where both diseases are transmitted by the same vector. To date most examples of integrated control targeting these diseases have been unanticipated consequences of malaria vector control, rather than planned strategies that aim to maximize the efficacy and take the complex ecological and biological interactions between the two diseases into account. We developed a general model of malaria and LF transmission and derived expressions for the basic reproductive number (R0) for each disease. Transmission of both diseases was most sensitive to vector mortality and biting rate. Simulating different levels of coverage of long lasting-insecticidal nets (LLINs) and larval control confirms the effectiveness of these interventions for the control of both diseases. When LF was maintained near the critical density of mosquitoes, minor levels of vector control (8% coverage of LLINs or treatment of 20% of larval sites) were sufficient to eliminate the disease. Malaria had a far greater R0 and required a 90% population coverage of LLINs in order to eliminate it. When the mosquito density was doubled, 36% and 58% coverage of LLINs and larval control, respectively, were required for LF elimination; and malaria elimination was possible with a combined coverage of 78% of LLINs and larval control. Despite the low level of vector control required to eliminate LF, simulations suggest that prevalence of LF will decrease at a slower rate than malaria, even at high levels of coverage. If representative of field situations, integrated management should take into account not only how malaria control can facilitate filariasis elimination, but strike a balance between the high levels of coverage of (multiple) interventions required for malaria with the long duration predicted to be required for filariasis elimination.

  1. Proposal for a CLEO precision vertex detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    Fermilab experiment E691 and CERN experiment NA32 have demonstrated the enormous power of precision vertexing for studying heavy quark physics. Nearly all collider experiments now have or are installing precision vertex detectors. This is a proposal for a precision vertex detector for CLEO, which will be the pre-eminent heavy quark experiment for at least the next 5 years. The purpose of a precision vertex detector for CLEO is to enhance the capabilities for isolating B, charm, and tau decays and to make it possible to measure the decay time. The precision vertex detector will also significantly improve strange particle identification and help with the tracking. The installation and use of this detector at CLEO is an important step in developing a vertex detector for an asymmetric B factory and therefore in observing CP violation in B decays. The CLEO environment imposes a number of unique conditions and challenges. The machine will be operating near the γ (4S) in energy. This means that B's are produced with a very small velocity and travel a distance about 1/2 that of the expected vertex position resolution. As a consequence B decay time information will not be useful for most physics. On the other hand, the charm products of B decays have a higher velocity. For the long lived D + in particular, vertex information can be used to isolate the charm particle on an event-by-event basis. This helps significantly in reconstructing B's. The vertex resolution for D's from B's is limited by multiple Coulomb scattering of the necessarily rather low momentum tracks. As a consequence it is essential to minimize the material, as measured in radiation lengths, in the beam pip and the vertex detector itself. It is also essential to build the beam pipe and detector with the smallest possible radius

  2. The BELLE silicon vertex detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alimonti, G.; Aihara, H.; Alexander, J.; Asano, Y.; Bakich, A.; Bozek, A.; Banas, E.; Browder, T.; Dragic, J.; Fukunaga, C.; Gordon, A.; Guler, H.; Everton, C.; Heenan, E.; Haba, J.; Hazumi, M.; Hastings, N.; Hara, T.; Hojo, T.; Higuchi, T.; Iwai, G.; Ishino, H.; Jalocha, P.; Korotuschenko, K.; Kaneko, J.; Kapusta, P.; Kawasaki, T.; Lange, J.S.; Li, Y.; Marlow, D.; Moloney, G.; Moffitt, L.; Mori, S.; Matsubara, T.; Nakadaira, T.; Nakamura, T.; Natkaniec, Z.; Okuno, S.; Olsen, S.; Ostrowicz, W.; Palka, H.; Peak, L.S.; Ryuko, J.; Rozanska, M.; Sevior, M.; Shimada, J.; Sumisawa, K.; Stock, R.; Stanic, S.; Swain, S.; Taylor, G.; Takasaki, F.; Tajima, H.; Trabelsi, K.; Tamura, N.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, M. E-mail: tanakam@post.kek.jp; Takahashi, S.; Tomura, T.; Tsuboyama, T.; Tsujita, Y.; Varner, G.; Varvell, K.E.; Watanabe, Y.; Yamamoto, H.; Yamada, Y.; Yokoyama, M.; Zhao, H.; Zontar, D

    2000-10-11

    A silicon vertex detector has been developed for the BELLE experiment at the KEK B-factory to be used to determine the relative displacements of B-meson decay vertices for CP violation measurements. The device has been successfully installed and operated with high-luminosity beam conditions. The average strip yield is larger than 96%, including the preamplifier electronics yield and the detector is currently working stably with a signal-to-noise ratio of 17-40. The measured impact parameter resolution agrees with expectations based on Monte Carlo simulations, and the measured D{sup 0} lifetime is in good agreement with the particle data group's average of other measurements. Several B{yields}J/{psi}K events produced at the {upsilon}(4S) resonance have been detected and separate decay vertices have been found.

  3. Meta-analysis of the Effects of Insect Vector Saliva on Host Immune Responses and Infection of Vector-Transmitted Pathogens: A Focus on Leishmaniasis

    OpenAIRE

    Ockenfels, Brittany; Michael, Edwin; McDowell, Mary Ann

    2014-01-01

    A meta-analysis of the effects of vector saliva on the immune response and progression of vector-transmitted disease, specifically with regard to pathology, infection level, and host cytokine levels was conducted. Infection in the absence or presence of saliva in naïve mice was compared. In addition, infection in mice pre-exposed to uninfected vector saliva was compared to infection in unexposed mice. To control for differences in vector and pathogen species, mouse strain, and experimental de...

  4. Conservation laws, vertex corrections, and screening in Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiti, Saurabh; Chubukov, Andrey V.; Hirschfeld, P. J.

    2017-07-01

    We present a microscopic theory for the Raman response of a clean multiband superconductor, with emphasis on the effects of vertex corrections and long-range Coulomb interaction. The measured Raman intensity, R (Ω ) , is proportional to the imaginary part of the fully renormalized particle-hole correlator with Raman form factors γ (k ⃗) . In a BCS superconductor, a bare Raman bubble is nonzero for any γ (k ⃗) and diverges at Ω =2 Δmax , where Δmax is the largest gap along the Fermi surface. However, for γ (k ⃗) = constant, the full R (Ω ) is expected to vanish due to particle number conservation. It was sometimes stated that this vanishing is due to the singular screening by long-range Coulomb interaction. In our general approach, we show diagrammatically that this vanishing actually holds due to vertex corrections from the same short-range interaction that gives rise to superconductivity. We further argue that long-range Coulomb interaction does not affect the Raman signal for any γ (k ⃗) . We argue that vertex corrections eliminate the divergence at 2 Δmax . We also argue that vertex corrections give rise to sharp peaks in R (Ω ) at Ω <2 Δmin (the minimum gap along the Fermi surface), when Ω coincides with the frequency of one of the collective modes in a superconductor, e.g., Leggett and Bardasis-Schrieffer modes in the particle-particle channel, and an excitonic mode in the particle-hole channel.

  5. Self-locking degree-4 vertex origami structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Hongbin; Li, Suyi; Wang, K W

    2016-11-01

    A generic degree-4 vertex (4-vertex) origami possesses one continuous degree-of-freedom for rigid folding, and this folding process can be stopped when two of its facets bind together. Such facet-binding will induce self-locking so that the overall structure stays at a pre-specified configuration without additional locking elements or actuators. Self-locking offers many promising properties, such as programmable deformation ranges and piecewise stiffness jumps, that could significantly advance many adaptive structural systems. However, despite its excellent potential, the origami self-locking features have not been well studied, understood, and used. To advance the state of the art, this research conducts a comprehensive investigation on the principles of achieving and harnessing self-locking in 4-vertex origami structures. Especially, for the first time, this study expands the 4-vertex structure construction from single-component to dual-component designs and investigates their self-locking behaviours. By exploiting various tessellation designs, this research discovers that the dual-component designs offer the origami structures with extraordinary attributes that the single-component structures do not have, which include the existence of flat-folded locking planes, programmable locking points and deformability. Finally, proof-of-concept experiments investigate how self-locking can effectively induce piecewise stiffness jumps. The results of this research provide new scientific knowledge and a systematic framework for the design, analysis and utilization of self-locking origami structures for many potential engineering applications.

  6. Network Unfolding Map by Vertex-Edge Dynamics Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verri, Filipe Alves Neto; Urio, Paulo Roberto; Zhao, Liang

    2018-02-01

    The emergence of collective dynamics in neural networks is a mechanism of the animal and human brain for information processing. In this paper, we develop a computational technique using distributed processing elements in a complex network, which are called particles, to solve semisupervised learning problems. Three actions govern the particles' dynamics: generation, walking, and absorption. Labeled vertices generate new particles that compete against rival particles for edge domination. Active particles randomly walk in the network until they are absorbed by either a rival vertex or an edge currently dominated by rival particles. The result from the model evolution consists of sets of edges arranged by the label dominance. Each set tends to form a connected subnetwork to represent a data class. Although the intrinsic dynamics of the model is a stochastic one, we prove that there exists a deterministic version with largely reduced computational complexity; specifically, with linear growth. Furthermore, the edge domination process corresponds to an unfolding map in such way that edges "stretch" and "shrink" according to the vertex-edge dynamics. Consequently, the unfolding effect summarizes the relevant relationships between vertices and the uncovered data classes. The proposed model captures important details of connectivity patterns over the vertex-edge dynamics evolution, in contrast to the previous approaches, which focused on only vertex or only edge dynamics. Computer simulations reveal that the new model can identify nonlinear features in both real and artificial data, including boundaries between distinct classes and overlapping structures of data.

  7. Vector Casimir effect for a D-dimensional sphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milton, K.A.

    1997-01-01

    The Casimir energy or stress due to modes in a D-dimensional volume subject to TM (mixed) boundary conditions on a bounding spherical surface is calculated. Both interior and exterior modes are included. Together with earlier results found for scalar modes (TE modes), this gives the Casimir effect for fluctuating open-quotes electromagneticclose quotes (vector) fields inside and outside a spherical shell. Known results for three dimensions, first found by Boyer, are reproduced. Qualitatively, the results for TM modes are similar to those for scalar modes: Poles occur in the stress at positive even dimensions, and cusps (logarithmic singularities) occur for integer dimensions D≤1. Particular attention is given the interesting case of D=2. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  8. Lifetime tests for MAC vertex chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, H.

    1986-01-01

    A vertex chamber for MAC was proposed in fall 1983 to increase precision in the measurement of the B hadron and tau lepton lifetimes. The chamber had to be placed within the existing central drift chamber, making access for repairs difficult and costly. Therefore for detector elements thin-walled aluminized mylar drift tubes (straws) were used because of their simplicity and robustness. The diameter of the drift tubes was 6.9 mm. The radial extent of the proposed chamber was from 3 cm to 10 cm, the inner wall of the central drift. It was clear that radiation levels, from synchrotron x-rays and overfocussed electrons, were potentially high. Since the drift distance is short in the straws, it was desirable to operate them at the highest possible gas gain, to achieve the best spatial resolution. There was a likelihood of drawing large currents in the chamber and thus causing radiation damage. Therefore a study of radiation hardness under the conditions of their proposed design was undertaken. In tests, argon-hydrocarbon mixtures consistently became unusable at ∼0.05 C/cm collected charge, due to anode buildup. Argon-CO 2 mixtures, while underquenched, were operational to 0.25 C/cm, at which point loss of cathode material became intolerable. Argon-xenon-CO 2 proved to be quenched as well as argon-hydrocarbons, but was limited by cathode damage. The MAC vertex chamber has operated at a distance of 4.6 cm from the e + e - interaction point at PEP for two years and has shown no aging effects

  9. [Construction and selection of effective mouse Smad6 recombinant lenti-virus interference vectors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jing; Qi, Mengchun; Deng, Jiupeng; Liu, Gang; Chen, Huaiqing

    2010-10-01

    This experiment was designed to construct mouse Smad6 recombinant RNA interference vectors and determine their interference effects on bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs). Three recombinant Smad6 RNA interference vectors were constructed by molecular clone techniques with a lenti-virus vector expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP), and the correctness of recombinant vectors was verified by DNA sequencing. Mouse BMSCs were used for transfection experiments and BMP-2 was in use for osteogenic induction of MSCs. The transfection efficiency of recombinant vectors was examined by Laser confocal scanning microscope and the interference effect of recombinant vectors on Smad6 gene expression was determined by real-time RT-PCR and Western blot, respectively. Three Smad6 recombinant RNA interference vectors were successfully constructed and their correctness was proved by DNA sequencing. After transfection, GFPs were effectively expressed in MSCs and all of three recombinant vectors gained high transfection efficiency (> 95%). Both real-time PCR and Western blot examination indicated that among three recombinant vectors, No. 2 Svector had the best interference effect and the interference effect was nearly 91% at protein level. In conclusion, Mouse recombinant Smad6 RNA interference (RNAi) vector was successfully constructed and it provided an effective tool for further studies on BMP signal pathways.

  10. Vertex operators for a bosonic string

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Ryu; Yamanaka, Itaru.

    1985-09-01

    Based on the operator formalism and the Virasoro algebra, we present a simple method of constructing vertex operators describing the emission and absorption of general particles in bosonic string theories. (author)

  11. Effective axial-vector strength and β-decay systematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delion, D. S.; Suhonen, J.

    2014-09-01

    We use the weak axial-vector coupling strength g_{\\text{A}} as a key parameter to reproduce simultaneously the available data for both the Gamow-Teller \\beta^- and \\beta^+/\\text{EC} decay rates in nine triplets of isobars with mass numbers A=70,78,100,104,106,110,116,128,130 . We use the proton-neutron quasiparticle random-phase approximation (pnQRPA) with schematic dipole interaction containing particle-particle and particle-hole parts with mass-dependent strengths. Our analysis points to a strongly quenched effective value g_{\\text{A}}\\approx 0.3 , with a relative error of 28%. We then perform a systematic computation of 218 experimentally known \\beta^- and \\beta^+/\\text{EC} decays with quite a remarkable success. The presently extracted value of g_{\\text{A}} should be taken as an effective one, specific for a given nuclear theory framework. Present studies suggest that the effective g_{\\text{A}} is suitable for the description of decay transitions to 1^+ states at moderate excitation, below the Gamow-Teller giant resonance region.

  12. The BaBar silicon vertex tracker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozzi, C.; Carassiti, V.; Ramusino, A. Cotta; Dittongo, S.; Folegani, M.; Piemontese, L.; Abbott, B.K.; Breon, A.B.; Clark, A.R.; Dow, S.; Fan, Q.; Goozen, F.; Hernikl, C.; Karcher, A.; Kerth, L.T.; Kipnis, I.; Kluth, S.; Lynch, G.; Levi, M.; Luft, P.; Luo, L.; Nyman, M.; Pedrali-Noy, M.; Roe, N.A.; Zizka, G.; Roberts, D.; Barni, D.; Brenna, E.; Defendi, I.; Forti, A.; Giugni, D.; Lanni, F.; Palombo, F.; Vaniev, V.; Leona, A.; Mandelli, E.; Manfredi, P.F.; Perazzo, A.; Re, V.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bondioli, M.; Bosi, F.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Dutra, F.; Forti, F.; Gagliardi, D.; Giorgi, M.A.; Lusiani, A.; Mammini, P.; Morganti, M.; Morsani, F.; Paoloni, E.; Profeti, A.; Rama, M.; Rampino, G.; Rizzo, G.; Sandrelli, F.; Simi, G.; Triggiani, G.; Tritto, S.; Vitale, R.; Burchat, P.; Cheng, C.; Kirkby, D.; Meyer, T.; Roat, C.; Bona, M.; Bianchi, F.; Daudo, F.; Girolamo, B. Di; Gamba, D.; Giraudo, G.; Grosso, P.; Romero, A.; Smol, A.; Trapani, P.; Zanin, D.; Bosisio, L.; Ricca, G. Della; Lanceri, L.; Pompili, A.; Poropat, P.; Prest, M.; Rastelli, C.; Vallazza, E.; Vuagnin, G.; Hast, C.; Potter, E.P.; Sharma, V.; Burke, S.; Callahan, D.; Campagnari, C.; Dahmes, B.; Eppich, A.; Hale, D.; Hall, K.; Hart, P.; Kuznetsova, N.; Kyre, S.; Levy, S.; Long, O.; May, J.; Richman, J.; Verkerke, W.; Witherell, M.; Beringer, J.; Eisner, A.M.; Frey, A.; Grillo, A.; Grothe, M.; Johnson, R.; Kroeger, W.; Lockman, W.; Pulliam, T.; Rowe, W.; Schmitz, R.; Seiden, A.; Spencer, E.; Turri, M.; Wilder, M.; Charles, E.; Elmer, P.; Nielsen, J.; Orejudos, W.; Scott, I.; Walsh, J.; Zobernig, H.

    2000-01-01

    The BaBar Silicon Vertex Tracker (SVT) is designed to provide the high-precision vertexing necessary for making measurements of CP violation at the SLAC B-Factory PEP-II. The instrument consists of five layers of double-sided silicon strip detectors and has been installed in the BaBar experiment and taking colliding beam data since May 1999. An overview of the design as well as performance and experience from the initial running will be presented

  13. On the zero crossing of the three-gluon vertex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Athenodorou, A. [Department of Physics, University of Cyprus, POB 20537, 1678 Nicosia (Cyprus); Binosi, D., E-mail: binosi@ectstar.eu [European Centre for Theoretical Studies in Nuclear Physics and Related Areas - ECT* and Fondazione Bruno Kessler, Villa Tambosi, Strada delle Tabarelle 286, I-38050 Villazzano (Italy); Boucaud, Ph. [Laboratoire de Physique Théorique (UMR8627), CNRS, Univ. Paris-Sud, Université Paris-Saclay, 91405 Orsay (France); De Soto, F. [Dpto. Sistemas Físicos, Químicos y Naturales, Univ. Pablo de Olavide, 41013 Sevilla (Spain); Papavassiliou, J. [Department of Theoretical Physics and IFIC, University of Valencia-CSIC, E-46100, Valencia (Spain); Rodríguez-Quintero, J. [Department of Integrated Sciences, University of Huelva, E-21071 Huelva (Spain); Zafeiropoulos, S. [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Goethe-Universität Frankfurt, Max-von-Laue-Str. 1, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2016-10-10

    We report on new results on the infrared behavior of the three-gluon vertex in quenched Quantum Chromodynamics, obtained from large-volume lattice simulations. The main focus of our study is the appearance of the characteristic infrared feature known as ‘zero crossing’, the origin of which is intimately connected with the nonperturbative masslessness of the Faddeev–Popov ghost. The appearance of this effect is clearly visible in one of the two kinematic configurations analyzed, and its theoretical origin is discussed in the framework of Schwinger–Dyson equations. The effective coupling in the momentum subtraction scheme that corresponds to the three-gluon vertex is constructed, revealing the vanishing of the effective interaction at the exact location of the zero crossing.

  14. Effective theory analysis for vector-like quark model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozumi, Takuya; Shimizu, Yusuke; Takahashi, Shunya; Umeeda, Hiroyuki

    2018-04-01

    We study a model with a down-type SU(2) singlet vector-like quark (VLQ) as a minimal extension of the standard model (SM). In this model, flavor-changing neutral currents (FCNCs) arise at tree level and the unitarity of the 3× 3 Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) matrix does not hold. In this paper, we constrain the FCNC coupling from b\\rArr s transitions, especially B_s\\rArr μ^+μ^- and \\bar{B}\\rArr X_sγ processes. In order to analyze these processes we derive an effective Lagrangian that is valid below the electroweak symmetry breaking scale. For this purpose, we first integrate out the VLQ field and derive an effective theory by matching Wilson coefficients up to one-loop level. Using the effective theory, we construct the effective Lagrangian for b\\rArr sγ^{(*)}. It includes the effects of the SM quarks and the violation of CKM unitarity. We show the constraints on the magnitude of the FCNC coupling and its phase by taking account of the current experimental data on Δ M_{B_s}, Br[B_s\\rArrμ^+μ^-], Br[\\bar{B}\\rArr X_sγ], and CKM matrix elements, as well as theoretical uncertainties. We find that the constraint from Br[B_s\\rArrμ^+μ^-] is more stringent than that from Br[\\bar{B}\\rArr X_sγ]. We also obtain a bound for the mass of the VLQ and the strength of the Yukawa couplings related to the FCNC coupling of the b\\rArr s transition. Using the CKM elements that satisfy the above constraints, we show how the unitarity is violated on the complex plane.

  15. NLO Vertex for a Forward Jet plus a Rapidity Gap at High Energies

    CERN Document Server

    Hentschinski, Martin; Murdaca, Beatrice; Vera, Agustín Sabio

    2015-01-01

    We present the calculation of the forward jet vertex associated to a rapidity gap (coupling of a hard pomeron to the jet) in the BFKL formalism at next-to-leading order (NLO). Real emission contributions are computed via Lipatov's effective action. The NLO jet vertex turns out to be finite within collinear factorization and allows, together with the NLO non-forward gluon Green's function, to perform NLO studies of jet production in diffractive events (e.g. Mueller-Tang dijets).

  16. Pion-nucleon vertex function with an off-shell nucleon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nutt, W.T.; Shakin, C.M.

    1977-01-01

    A model calculation for the π-N vertex function is presented in the case in which there is a single off-mass-shell nucleon and a (nearly) on-mass-shell pion. Very strong effects due to the P 11 resonance at 1470 MeV are found. A simple parametrization of the vertex function is prvided in the case that at least one nucleon is on its mass shell. (Auth.)

  17. Worldline calculation of the three-gluon vertex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmadiniaz, N.; Schubert, C.

    2012-01-01

    The three-gluon vertex is a basic object of interest in nonabelian gauge theory. At the one-loop level, it has been calculated and analyzed by a number of authors. Here we use the worldline formalism to unify the calculations of the scalar, spinor and gluon loop contributions to the one-loop vertex, leading to an extremely compact representation in terms of field strength tensors. We verify its equivalence with previously obtained representations, and explain the relation of its structure to the low-energy effective action. The sum rule found by Binger and Brodsky for the scalar, spinor and gluon loop contributions in the present approach relates to worldline supersymmetry.

  18. Nonperturbative aspects of the quark-photon vertex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frank, M.R.

    1994-01-01

    The electromagnetic interaction with quarks is investigated through a relativistic, electromagnetic gauge-invariant treatment. Gluon dressing of the quark-photon vertex and the quark self-energy functions is described by the inhomogeneous Bethe-Salpeter equation in the ladder approximation and the Schwinger-Dyson equation in the rainbow approximation respectively. Results for the calculation of the quark-photon vertex are presented in both the time-like and space-like regions of photon momentum squared, however emphasis is placed on the space-like region relevant to electron scattering. The treatment presented here simultaneously addresses the role of dynamically generated q bar q vector bound states and the approach to asymptotic behavior. The resulting description is therefore applicable over the entire range of momentum transfers available in electron scattering experiments. Input parameters are limited to the model gluon two-point function which is chosen to reflect confinement and asymptotic freedom and are largely constrained by the obtained bound-state spectrum

  19. Effects of OCR Errors on Ranking and Feedback Using the Vector Space Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghva, Kazem; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Reports on the performance of the vector space model in the presence of OCR (optical character recognition) errors in information retrieval. Highlights include precision and recall, a full-text test collection, smart vector representation, impact of weighting parameters, ranking variability, and the effect of relevance feedback. (Author/LRW)

  20. Dynamical Vertex Approximation for the Hubbard Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toschi, Alessandro

    A full understanding of correlated electron systems in the physically relevant situations of three and two dimensions represents a challenge for the contemporary condensed matter theory. However, in the last years considerable progress has been achieved by means of increasingly more powerful quantum many-body algorithms, applied to the basic model for correlated electrons, the Hubbard Hamiltonian. Here, I will review the physics emerging from studies performed with the dynamical vertex approximation, which includes diagrammatic corrections to the local description of the dynamical mean field theory (DMFT). In particular, I will first discuss the phase diagram in three dimensions with a special focus on the commensurate and incommensurate magnetic phases, their (quantum) critical properties, and the impact of fluctuations on electronic lifetimes and spectral functions. In two dimensions, the effects of non-local fluctuations beyond DMFT grow enormously, determining the appearance of a low-temperature insulating behavior for all values of the interaction in the unfrustrated model: Here the prototypical features of the Mott-Hubbard metal-insulator transition, as well as the existence of magnetically ordered phases, are completely overwhelmed by antiferromagnetic fluctuations of exponentially large extension, in accordance with the Mermin-Wagner theorem. Eventually, by a fluctuation diagnostics analysis of cluster DMFT self-energies, the same magnetic fluctuations are identified as responsible for the pseudogap regime in the holed-doped frustrated case, with important implications for the theoretical modeling of the cuprate physics.

  1. Effective Clipart Image Vectorization through Direct Optimization of Bezigons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ming; Chao, Hongyang; Zhang, Chi; Guo, Jun; Yuan, Lu; Sun, Jian

    2016-02-01

    Bezigons, i.e., closed paths composed of Bézier curves, have been widely employed to describe shapes in image vectorization results. However, most existing vectorization techniques infer the bezigons by simply approximating an intermediate vector representation (such as polygons). Consequently, the resultant bezigons are sometimes imperfect due to accumulated errors, fitting ambiguities, and a lack of curve priors, especially for low-resolution images. In this paper, we describe a novel method for vectorizing clipart images. In contrast to previous methods, we directly optimize the bezigons rather than using other intermediate representations; therefore, the resultant bezigons are not only of higher fidelity compared with the original raster image but also more reasonable because they were traced by a proficient expert. To enable such optimization, we have overcome several challenges and have devised a differentiable data energy as well as several curve-based prior terms. To improve the efficiency of the optimization, we also take advantage of the local control property of bezigons and adopt an overlapped piecewise optimization strategy. The experimental results show that our method outperforms both the current state-of-the-art method and commonly used commercial software in terms of bezigon quality.

  2. Quantum vertex model for reversible classical computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamon, C; Mucciolo, E R; Ruckenstein, A E; Yang, Z-C

    2017-05-12

    Mappings of classical computation onto statistical mechanics models have led to remarkable successes in addressing some complex computational problems. However, such mappings display thermodynamic phase transitions that may prevent reaching solution even for easy problems known to be solvable in polynomial time. Here we map universal reversible classical computations onto a planar vertex model that exhibits no bulk classical thermodynamic phase transition, independent of the computational circuit. Within our approach the solution of the computation is encoded in the ground state of the vertex model and its complexity is reflected in the dynamics of the relaxation of the system to its ground state. We use thermal annealing with and without 'learning' to explore typical computational problems. We also construct a mapping of the vertex model into the Chimera architecture of the D-Wave machine, initiating an approach to reversible classical computation based on state-of-the-art implementations of quantum annealing.

  3. A note on arbitrarily vertex decomposable graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoni Marczyk

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A graph \\(G\\ of order \\(n\\ is said to be arbitrarily vertex decomposable if for each sequence \\((n_{1},\\ldots,n_k\\ of positive integers such that \\(n_{1}+\\ldots+n_{k}=n\\ there exists a partition \\((V_{1},\\ldots,V_{k}\\ of the vertex set of \\(G\\ such that for each \\(i \\in \\{1,\\ldots,k\\}\\, \\(V_{i}\\ induces a connected subgraph of \\(G\\ on \\(n_i\\ vertices. In this paper we show that if \\(G\\ is a two-connected graph on \\(n\\ vertices with the independence number at most \\(\\lceil n/2\\rceil\\ and such that the degree sum of any pair of non-adjacent vertices is at least \\(n-3\\, then \\(G\\ is arbitrarily vertex decomposable. We present another result for connected graphs satisfying a similar condition, where the bound \\(n-3\\ is replaced by \\(n-2\\.

  4. Effective Vectorization with OpenMP 4.5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huber, Joseph N. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hernandez, Oscar R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Lopez, Matthew Graham [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-03-01

    This paper describes how the Single Instruction Multiple Data (SIMD) model and its extensions in OpenMP work, and how these are implemented in different compilers. Modern processors are highly parallel computational machines which often include multiple processors capable of executing several instructions in parallel. Understanding SIMD and executing instructions in parallel allows the processor to achieve higher performance without increasing the power required to run it. SIMD instructions can significantly reduce the runtime of code by executing a single operation on large groups of data. The SIMD model is so integral to the processor s potential performance that, if SIMD is not utilized, less than half of the processor is ever actually used. Unfortunately, using SIMD instructions is a challenge in higher level languages because most programming languages do not have a way to describe them. Most compilers are capable of vectorizing code by using the SIMD instructions, but there are many code features important for SIMD vectorization that the compiler cannot determine at compile time. OpenMP attempts to solve this by extending the C++/C and Fortran programming languages with compiler directives that express SIMD parallelism. OpenMP is used to pass hints to the compiler about the code to be executed in SIMD. This is a key resource for making optimized code, but it does not change whether or not the code can use SIMD operations. However, in many cases critical functions are limited by a poor understanding of how SIMD instructions are actually implemented, as SIMD can be implemented through vector instructions or simultaneous multi-threading (SMT). We have found that it is often the case that code cannot be vectorized, or is vectorized poorly, because the programmer does not have sufficient knowledge of how SIMD instructions work.

  5. Management of arthropod pathogen vectors in North America: Minimizing adverse effects on pollinators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginsberg, Howard; Bargar, Timothy A.; Hladik, Michelle L.; Lubelczyk, Charles

    2017-01-01

    Tick and mosquito management is important to public health protection. At the same time, growing concerns about declines of pollinator species raise the question of whether vector control practices might affect pollinator populations. We report the results of a task force of the North American Pollinator Protection Campaign (NAPPC) that examined potential effects of vector management practices on pollinators, and how these programs could be adjusted to minimize negative effects on pollinating species. The main types of vector control practices that might affect pollinators are landscape manipulation, biocontrol, and pesticide applications. Some current practices already minimize effects of vector control on pollinators (e.g., short-lived pesticides and application-targeting technologies). Nontarget effects can be further diminished by taking pollinator protection into account in the planning stages of vector management programs. Effects of vector control on pollinator species often depend on specific local conditions (e.g., proximity of locations with abundant vectors to concentrations of floral resources), so planning is most effective when it includes collaborations of local vector management professionals with local experts on pollinators. Interventions can then be designed to avoid pollinators (e.g., targeting applications to avoid blooming times and pollinator nesting habitats), while still optimizing public health protection. Research on efficient targeting of interventions, and on effects on pollinators of emerging technologies, will help mitigate potential deleterious effects on pollinators in future management programs. In particular, models that can predict effects of integrated pest management on vector-borne pathogen transmission, along with effects on pollinator populations, would be useful for collaborative decision-making.

  6. Secondary vertex detection at the SLC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1982-01-01

    The vertex topology of a high energy e + e - interaction contains a wealth of information. These interactions copiously produce the tau lepton and hadrons containing the c and b quarks; all these particles decay within a millimeter or so of the primary interaction point, giving these interactions a rich secondary vertex structure. With suitable detectors, one can hope to reconstruct these vertices and so tag events with tau's, c's and b's; measure lifetimes and mixing angles; and perhaps directly measure the flavor of c and b jets. The spatial resolution and track-pair resolution required of such detectors demand detector development, but several techniques, including solid state microstrip and CCD detectors, pressurized drift chambers, and holographic bubbble chambers look promising. Vertex detection in the colliding beam environment has already yielded a measurement of the tau lifetime. The SLC, with its micron-sized beam and one-centimeter sized beam pipe is uniquely suited for these studies. Compared to conventional storage rings, it offers a well-defined and minute primary interaction point, the possibility of locating a detector within a centimeter of the interaction (an order of magnitude improvement over LEP), negligibly thin beam pipes, and a repetition rate low enough to permit novel detectors and readout schemes. This report discusses the physics accessible with vertex detectors, depicts the physics environment at 100 GeV - particle multiplicities, momenta, angular correlations, and topologies of charm decays, sketches the elements of a vertex detector, and, through some model studies evaluates the spatial resolution and track-pair resolution requirements, and summarizes the detector technologies which seem most promising for vertex detection

  7. Performance of the LHCb Vertex Locator

    CERN Document Server

    Bjørnstad, Pal Marius

    2011-01-01

    The Vertex Locator is a silicon microstrip detector which provides the LHCb experiment with high precision measurements of tracks and decay vertices. The VELO sensors are exposed to a radiation dose of (2.5-6.5) x 10$^{13}n_{eq}$/cm$^2$ per fb$^{-1}$ in the area which is most irradiated. A best hit resolution of 4$mu$ is obtained for angled tracks, in agreement with expectations. The VELO has a vertex position resolution down to 11$mu$m in the transverse direction and an excellent momentum dependent performance.

  8. Random tree growth by vertex splitting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David, F; Dukes, W M B; Jonsson, T; Stefánsson, S Ö

    2009-01-01

    We study a model of growing planar tree graphs where in each time step we separate the tree into two components by splitting a vertex and then connect the two pieces by inserting a new link between the daughter vertices. This model generalizes the preferential attachment model and Ford's α-model for phylogenetic trees. We develop a mean field theory for the vertex degree distribution, prove that the mean field theory is exact in some special cases and check that it agrees with numerical simulations in general. We calculate various correlation functions and show that the intrinsic Hausdorff dimension can vary from 1 to ∞, depending on the parameters of the model

  9. Vertex Reconstruction for AEGIS’ FACT Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Themistokleous, Neofytos

    2017-01-01

    My project dealt with the development of a vertex reconstruction technique to discriminate antihydrogen from background signals in the AEGIS apparatus. It involved the creation of a Toy Monte-Carlo to simulate particle annihilation events, and a vertex reconstruction utility based on the Bayesian theory of probability. The first results based on 107 generated events with single track in the detector are encouraging. For such events, the algorithm can reconstruct the z-coordinate accurately , while for the r-coordinate the result is less accurate.

  10. Primary vertex reconstruction at the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00301388; The ATLAS collaboration; Casper, D.; Hooberman, B.; Gui, B.; Lee, G.; Maurer, J.; Morley, A.; Pagan Griso, S.; Petersen, B.; Prokofiev, K.; Shan, L.; Shope, D.; Wharton, A.; Whitmore, B.; Zhang, M.

    2017-01-01

    These proceedings present the method and performance of primary vertex reconstruction at the ATLAS experiment during Runs 1 and 2 at the LHC. The studies presented focus on data taken during 2012 at a centre-of-mass energy of $\\sqrt{s} = 8$ TeV, and during 2015-2016 at $\\sqrt{s} = 13$ TeV. Some predictions toward future runs are also presented. The measurement of the position and size of the luminous region and its use as a constraint to improve the primary vertex resolution are discussed.

  11. How effective is integrated vector management against malaria and lymphatic filariasis where the diseases are transmitted by the same vector?

    OpenAIRE

    Stone, C.; Lindsay, S.W.; Chitnis, N.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The opportunity to integrate vector management across multiple vector-borne diseases is particularly plausible for malaria and lymphatic filariasis (LF) control where both diseases are transmitted by the same vector. To date most examples of integrated control targeting these diseases have been unanticipated consequences of malaria vector control, rather than planned strategies that aim to maximize the efficacy and take the complex ecological and biological interactions between th...

  12. Studies of the Triple Pomeron Vertex in perturbative QCD and its applications in phenomenology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutak, K.

    2006-12-01

    We study the properties of the Triple Pomeron Vertex in the perturbative QCD using the twist expansion method. Such analysis allows us to find the momenta configurations preferred by the vertex. When the momentum transfer is zero, the dominant contribution in the limit when N c →∞ comes from anticollinear pole. This is in agreement with result obtained without expanding, but by direct averaging of the Triple Pomeron Vertex over angles. Resulting theta functions show that the anticollinear configuration is optimal for the vertex. In the finite N c case the collinear term also contributes. Using the Triple Pomeron Vertex we construct a pomeron loop and we also consider four gluon propagation between two Triple Pomeron Vertices. We apply the Triple Pomeron Vertex to construct the Hamiltonian from which we derive the Balitsky-Kovchegov equation for an unintegrated gluon density. In order to apply this equation to phenomenology, we apply the Kwiecinski-Martin-Stasto model for higher order corrections to a linear part of the Balitsky-Kovchegov equation. We introduce the definition of the saturation scale which reflects properties of this equation. Finally, we use it for computation of observables, such as the F 2 structure function and diffractive Higgs boson production cross section. The impact of screening corrections on F 2 is negligible, but those effects turn out to be significant for diffractive Higgs boson production at LHC

  13. Studies of the Triple PomeronVertex in perturbative QCD and its applications in phenomenology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kutak, K.

    2006-12-15

    We study the properties of the Triple Pomeron Vertex in the perturbative QCD using the twist expansion method. Such analysis allows us to find the momenta configurations preferred by the vertex. When the momentum transfer is zero, the dominant contribution in the limit when N{sub c}{yields}{infinity} comes from anticollinear pole. This is in agreement with result obtained without expanding, but by direct averaging of the Triple Pomeron Vertex over angles. Resulting theta functions show that the anticollinear configuration is optimal for the vertex. In the finite N{sub c} case the collinear term also contributes. Using the Triple Pomeron Vertex we construct a pomeron loop and we also consider four gluon propagation between two Triple Pomeron Vertices. We apply the Triple Pomeron Vertex to construct the Hamiltonian from which we derive the Balitsky-Kovchegov equation for an unintegrated gluon density. In order to apply this equation to phenomenology, we apply the Kwiecinski-Martin-Stasto model for higher order corrections to a linear part of the Balitsky-Kovchegov equation. We introduce the definition of the saturation scale which reflects properties of this equation. Finally, we use it for computation of observables, such as the F{sub 2} structure function and diffractive Higgs boson production cross section. The impact of screening corrections on F{sub 2} is negligible, but those effects turn out to be significant for diffractive Higgs boson production at LHC.

  14. Phases, quantum interferences and effective vector meson masses in nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soyeur, M.

    1996-12-31

    We discuss the prospects for observing the mass of {rho}- and {omega}-mesons around nuclear matter density by studying their coherent photoproduction in nuclear targets and subsequent in-medium decay into e{sup +}e{sup -}pairs. The quantum interference of {rho} and {omega}-mesons in the e{sup +}e{sup -}channel and the interference between Bethe-Heitler pairs and dielectrons from vector meson decays are of particular interest. (author). 21 refs.

  15. Improving vertex position determination by using a kinematic fit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forden, G.E.; Saxon, D.H.

    1985-05-01

    A method is developed for improving decay vertex reconstruction by using kinematic fits. This is applied to generated charm meson decays. An improvement of 16% in the vertex position measurement along the flight path is achieved. (author)

  16. Selective attention and the auditory vertex potential. I - Effects of stimulus delivery rate. II - Effects of signal intensity and masking noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwent, V. L.; Hillyard, S. A.; Galambos, R.

    1976-01-01

    The effects of varying the rate of delivery of dichotic tone pip stimuli on selective attention measured by evoked-potential amplitudes and signal detectability scores were studied. The subjects attended to one channel (ear) of tones, ignored the other, and pressed a button whenever occasional targets - tones of a slightly higher pitch were detected in the attended ear. Under separate conditions, randomized interstimulus intervals were short, medium, and long. Another study compared the effects of attention on the N1 component of the auditory evoked potential for tone pips presented alone and when white noise was added to make the tones barely above detectability threshold in a three-channel listening task. Major conclusions are that (1) N1 is enlarged to stimuli in an attended channel only in the short interstimulus interval condition (averaging 350 msec), (2) N1 and P3 are related to different modes of selective attention, and (3) attention selectivity in multichannel listening task is greater when tones are faint and/or difficult to detect.

  17. Coupling of reciprocal vectors and corresponding degeneracy effect in a dual-periodic optical superlattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin Yiqiang

    2006-01-01

    A dual-periodic structure for quasi-phase matching cascaded optical parametric interactions is proposed. Due to the coupling of reciprocal vectors between the original and imposed periodic sequence, the reciprocal vectors and the corresponding effective nonlinear coefficients is no longer the simple combination of two periodic structures. The new analytical expression of the effective nonlinear coefficients is deduced and given. The degeneracy phenomena and the novel extinction rule resulting from the coupling of reciprocal vectors are found and investigated. The corresponding physical nature is also discussed

  18. Intertwiner dynamics in the flipped vertex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alesci, Emanuele; Bianchi, Eugenio; Magliaro, Elena; Perini, Claudio, E-mail: alesci@fis.uniroma3.i, E-mail: e.bianchi@sns.i, E-mail: elena.magliaro@gmail.co, E-mail: claude.perin@libero.i [Centre de Physique Theorique de Luminy, Case 907, F-13288 Marseille (France)

    2009-09-21

    We continue the semiclassical analysis, started in a previous paper, of the intertwiner sector of the flipped vertex spinfoam model. We use independently both a semi-analytical and a purely numerical approach, finding the correct behavior of wavepacket propagation and physical expectation values. In the end, we show preliminary results about correlation functions.

  19. Twisted Frobenius Identities from Vertex Operator Superalgebras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Zuevsky

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In consideration of the continuous orbifold partition function and a generating function for all n-point correlation functions for the rank two free fermion vertex operator superalgebra on the self-sewing torus, we introduce the twisted version of Frobenius identity.

  20. Twisted Frobenius identies from vertex operator superalgebras

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zuevsky, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 2017, 9 November (2017), č. článku 2340410. ISSN 1687-9120 Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : vertex operator superalgebras * intertwining operators * Riemann surfaces Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Pure mathematics Impact factor: 0.643, year: 2016 https://www.hindawi.com/journals/amp/2017/2340410/

  1. Algebraic characterization of the Witten vertex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Embacher, F.

    1989-01-01

    The Witten vertex of open bosonic string field theory is characterized by a set of algebraic properties written down in the Fock-space operator formalism. The typical 3-string overlap structure as well as the correct ghost midpoint insertion are not required from the outset but arise as consequences. 20 refs. (Author)

  2. LHCb Vertex Locator Upgrade Work Report

    CERN Document Server

    Estrada, Michael

    2017-01-01

    As the LHCb prepares for the planned upgrade of its vertex locator, there is a great need for supporting work such as the design and testing of apparatus that will ensure the smooth implementation of new hardware and infrastructure. My work this summer consisted largely of tasks to support this process.

  3. Cluster algebras bases on vertex operator algebras

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zuevsky, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 30, 28-29 (2016), č. článku 1640030. ISSN 0217-9792 Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : cluster alegbras * vertex operator algebras * Riemann surfaces Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.736, year: 2016 http://www.worldscientific.com/doi/abs/10.1142/S0217979216400300

  4. Lifetime tests for MAC vertex chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, H.N.

    1986-07-01

    A vertex chamber for MAC was proposed to increase precision in the measurement of the B hadron and tau lepton lifetimes. Thin-walled aluminized mylar drift tubes were used for detector elements. A study of radiation hardness was conducted under the conditions of the proposed design using different gases and different operating conditions

  5. Silicon vertex detector for superheavy elements identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bednarek A.

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Silicon vertex detector for superheavy elements (SHE identification has been proposed. It will be constructed using very thin silicon detectors about 5 μm thickness. Results of test of 7.3 μm four inch silicon strip detector (SSD with fission fragments and α particles emitted by 252Cf source are presented

  6. Perturbative quantum field theory via vertex algebras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollands, Stefan; Olbermann, Heiner

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we explain how perturbative quantum field theory can be formulated in terms of (a version of) vertex algebras. Our starting point is the Wilson-Zimmermann operator product expansion (OPE). Following ideas of a previous paper (S. Hollands, e-print arXiv:0802.2198), we consider a consistency (essentially associativity) condition satisfied by the coefficients in this expansion. We observe that the information in the OPE coefficients can be repackaged straightforwardly into 'vertex operators' and that the consistency condition then has essentially the same form as the key condition in the theory of vertex algebras. We develop a general theory of perturbations of the algebras that we encounter, similar in nature to the Hochschild cohomology describing the deformation theory of ordinary algebras. The main part of the paper is devoted to the question how one can calculate the perturbations corresponding to a given interaction Lagrangian (such as λφ 4 ) in practice, using the consistency condition and the corresponding nonlinear field equation. We derive graphical rules, which display the vertex operators (i.e., OPE coefficients) in terms of certain multiple series of hypergeometric type.

  7. Vector Susceptibility of QCD Vacuum from an Effective Quark-Quark Interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZONG Hong-Shi; QI Shi; CHEN Wei; WU Xiao-Hua

    2003-01-01

    .A new approach for calculating vacuum susceptibilities from an effective quark-quark interaction model is derived. As a special case, the vector vacuum susceptibility is calculated. A comparison with the results of the previous approaches is given.

  8. On fermionic representation of the framed topological vertex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng, Fusheng; Zhou, Jian

    2015-01-01

    The Gromov-Witten invariants of ℂ"3 with branes is encoded in the topological vertex which has a very complicated combinatorial expression. A simple formula for the topological vertex was proposed by Aganagic et al. in the fermionic picture. We will propose a similar formula for the framed topological vertex and prove it in the case when there are one or two branes.

  9. The vertex Zagreb indices of some graph operations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. De

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Recently, Tavakoli et al. introduced a new version of Zagreb indices, named as vertex Zagreb indices. In this paper explicit expressions of different graphs operations of vertex Zagreb indices are presented and also as an application, explicit formulas for vertex Zagreb indices of some chemical graphs are obtained.

  10. Certain extensions of vertex operator algebras of affine type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Haisheng

    2001-01-01

    We generalize Feigin and Miwa's construction of extended vertex operator (super)algebras A k (sl(2)) for other types of simple Lie algebras. For all the constructed extended vertex operator (super)algebras, irreducible modules are classified, complete reducibility of every module is proved and fusion rules are determined modulo the fusion rules for vertex operator algebras of affine type. (orig.)

  11. Vertex Stimulation as a Control Site for Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation: A Concurrent TMS/fMRI Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, JeYoung; Bungert, Andreas; Bowtell, Richard; Jackson, Stephen R

    2016-01-01

    A common control condition for transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) studies is to apply stimulation at the vertex. An assumption of vertex stimulation is that it has relatively little influence over on-going brain processes involved in most experimental tasks, however there has been little attempt to measure neural changes linked to vertex TMS. Here we directly test this assumption by using a concurrent TMS/fMRI paradigm in which we investigate fMRI blood-oxygenation-level-dependent (BOLD) signal changes across the whole brain linked to vertex stimulation. Thirty-two healthy participants to part in this study. Twenty-one were stimulated at the vertex, at 120% of resting motor threshold (RMT), with short bursts of 1 Hz TMS, while functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) BOLD images were acquired. As a control condition, we delivered TMS pulses over the left primary motor cortex using identical parameters to 11 other participants. Vertex stimulation did not evoke increased BOLD activation at the stimulated site. By contrast we observed widespread BOLD deactivations across the brain, including regions within the default mode network (DMN). To examine the effects of vertex stimulation a functional connectivity analysis was conducted. The results demonstrated that stimulating the vertex with suprathreshold TMS reduced neural activity in brain regions related to the DMN but did not influence the functional connectivity of this network. Our findings provide brain imaging evidence in support of the use of vertex simulation as a control condition in TMS but confirm that vertex TMS induces regional widespread decreases in BOLD activation. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. VECTOR TOMOGRAPHY FOR THE CORONAL MAGNETIC FIELD. II. HANLE EFFECT MEASUREMENTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramar, M.; Inhester, B.; Lin, H.; Davila, J.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the feasibility of saturated coronal Hanle effect vector tomography or the application of vector tomographic inversion techniques to reconstruct the three-dimensional magnetic field configuration of the solar corona using linear polarization measurements of coronal emission lines. We applied Hanle effect vector tomographic inversion to artificial data produced from analytical coronal magnetic field models with equatorial and meridional currents and global coronal magnetic field models constructed by extrapolation of real photospheric magnetic field measurements. We tested tomographic inversion with only Stokes Q, U, electron density, and temperature inputs to simulate observations over large limb distances where the Stokes I parameters are difficult to obtain with ground-based coronagraphs. We synthesized the coronal linear polarization maps by inputting realistic noise appropriate for ground-based observations over a period of two weeks into the inversion algorithm. We found that our Hanle effect vector tomographic inversion can partially recover the coronal field with a poloidal field configuration, but that it is insensitive to a corona with a toroidal field. This result demonstrates that Hanle effect vector tomography is an effective tool for studying the solar corona and that it is complementary to Zeeman effect vector tomography for the reconstruction of the coronal magnetic field

  13. Effective data compaction algorithm for vector scan EB writing system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueki, Shinichi; Ashida, Isao; Kawahira, Hiroichi

    2001-01-01

    We have developed a new mask data compaction algorithm dedicated to vector scan electron beam (EB) writing systems for 0.13 μm device generation. Large mask data size has become a significant problem at mask data processing for which data compaction is an important technique. In our new mask data compaction, 'array' representation and 'cell' representation are used. The mask data format for the EB writing system with vector scan supports these representations. The array representation has a pitch and a number of repetitions in both X and Y direction. The cell representation has a definition of figure group and its reference. The new data compaction method has the following three steps. (1) Search arrays of figures by selecting pitches of array so that a number of figures are included. (2) Find out same arrays that have same repetitive pitch and number of figures. (3) Search cells of figures, where the figures in each cell take identical positional relationship. By this new method for the mask data of a 4M-DRAM block gate layer with peripheral circuits, 202 Mbytes without compaction was highly compacted to 6.7 Mbytes in 20 minutes on a 500 MHz PC.

  14. Vector spin modeling for magnetic tunnel junctions with voltage dependent effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manipatruni, Sasikanth; Nikonov, Dmitri E.; Young, Ian A.

    2014-01-01

    Integration and co-design of CMOS and spin transfer devices requires accurate vector spin conduction modeling of magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) devices. A physically realistic model of the MTJ should comprehend the spin torque dynamics of nanomagnet interacting with an injected vector spin current and the voltage dependent spin torque. Vector spin modeling allows for calculation of 3 component spin currents and potentials along with the charge currents/potentials in non-collinear magnetic systems. Here, we show 4-component vector spin conduction modeling of magnetic tunnel junction devices coupled with spin transfer torque in the nanomagnet. Nanomagnet dynamics, voltage dependent spin transport, and thermal noise are comprehended in a self-consistent fashion. We show comparison of the model with experimental magnetoresistance (MR) of MTJs and voltage degradation of MR with voltage. Proposed model enables MTJ circuit design that comprehends voltage dependent spin torque effects, switching error rates, spin degradation, and back hopping effects

  15. Effect of phyto-synthesized silver nanoparticles on developmental stages of malaria vector, Anopheles stephensi and dengue vector, Aedes aegypti

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madanagopal Nalini

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Rapidly synthesized phyto-mediated silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs using Artemisia nilagirica aqueous leaf filtrate has been confirmed through UV–visible spectrophotometer. The synthesized Ag NPs were further characterized using Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR, X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD to determine the present of functional groups and average particle size (6.723 nm with cubic nature, respectively. Spherical shape (≤30 nm of Ag NPs was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Bio-efficacy of these nanoparticles showed larvicidal and pupicidal properties than the aqueous leaf extract treatment alone against developmental stages (I–IV instars and pupa of malaria vector Anopheles stephensi and dengue vector Aedes aegypti at 0.25% concentration level. The LC50 (LCL:UCL at 95% confidence limit values of I–IV instar and pupa of An. stephensi were recorded at 0.343 (0.261:0.405, 0.169 (0.025:0.263, 0.198 (0.105:0.265, 0.141 (0.045:0.205 and 0.050 (0.606:0.224 % respectively and for Ae. aegypti (I–IV instar and pupa 0.460 (0.364:0.537, 0.352 (0.239:0.432, 0.331 (0.833:0.549, 0.217 (0.228:0.378 and 0.161 (0.630:0.356 % were observed, after 24 h exposure. The first report of present investigation revealed that the rapid biological synthesis of silver nanoparticles using A. nilagirica leaf filtrate would be an effective potential alternative green larvicide for the control of mosquitoes at the developmental stages with eco-friendly approach.

  16. Vertex Reconstruction and Performance in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Whitmore, Ben William; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Efficient and precise reconstruction of the primary vertices in LHC collisions is essential in both the reconstruction of the full kinematic properties of a hard-scatter event and of soft interactions as a measure of the amount of pile-up. The reconstruction of the primary vertices in the busy, high pile up environment of the LHC is a challenging task. The challenges and novel methods developed by the ATLAS experiment to reconstruct vertices in such environments will be presented. The performance of the current vertexing algorithms using Run-2 data will be presented and compared to results from simulation. Additionally, data-driven methods to evaluate vertex resolution, and details of upgrades to the ATLAS inner detector will be presented.

  17. The CDF online silicon vertex tracker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashmanskas, W.

    2001-01-01

    The CDF Online Silicon Vertex Tracker reconstructs 2-D tracks by linking hit positions measured by the Silicon Vertex Detector to the Central Outer Chamber tracks found by the eXtremely Fast Tracker. The system has been completely built and assembled and it is now being commissioned using the first CDF run II data. The precision measurement of the track impact parameter will allow triggering on B hadron decay vertices and thus investigating important areas in the B sector, like CP violation and B s mixing. In this paper we briefly review the architecture and the tracking algorithms implemented in the SVT and we report on the performance of the system achieved in the early phase of CDF run II

  18. The CDF online Silicon Vertex Tracker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashmanskas, W.; Bardi, A.; Bari, M.; Belforte, S.; Berryhill, J.; Bogdan, M.; Carosi, R.; Cerri, A.; Chlachidze, G.; Culbertson, R.; Dell'Orso, M.; Donati, S.; Fiori, I.; Frisch, H.J.; Galeotti, S.; Giannetti, P.; Glagolev, V.; Moneta, L.; Morsani, F.; Nakaya, T.; Passuello, D.; Punzi, G.; Rescigno, M.; Ristori, L.; Sanders, H.; Sarkar, S.; Semenov, A.; Shochet, M.; Speer, T.; Spinella, F.; Wu, X.; Yang, U.; Zanello, L.; Zanetti, A.M.

    2002-01-01

    The CDF Online Silicon Vertex Tracker (SVT) reconstructs 2D tracks by linking hit positions measured by the Silicon Vertex Detector to the Central Outer Chamber tracks found by the eXtremely Fast Tracker (XFT). The system has been completely built and assembled and it is now being commissioned using the first CDF run II data. The precision measurement of the track impact parameter will allow triggering on B hadron decay vertices and thus investigating important areas in the B sector, like CP violation and B s mixing. In this paper we briefly review the architecture and the tracking algorithms implemented in the SVT and we report on the performance of the system achieved in the early phase of CDF run II

  19. Silicon technologies for the CLIC vertex detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spannagel, S.

    2017-06-01

    CLIC is a proposed linear e+e- collider designed to provide particle collisions at center-of-mass energies of up to 3 TeV. Precise measurements of the properties of the top quark and the Higgs boson, as well as searches for Beyond the Standard Model physics require a highly performant CLIC detector. In particular the vertex detector must provide a single point resolution of only a few micrometers while not exceeding the envisaged material budget of around 0.2% X0 per layer. Beam-beam interactions and beamstrahlung processes impose an additional requirement on the timestamping capabilities of the vertex detector of about 10 ns. These goals can only be met by using novel techniques in the sensor and ASIC design as well as in the detector construction. The R&D program for the CLIC vertex detector explores various technologies in order to meet these demands. The feasibility of planar sensors with a thickness of 50-150 μm, including different active edge designs, are evaluated using Timepix3 ASICs. First prototypes of the CLICpix readout ASIC, implemented in 65 nm CMOS technology and with a pixel size of 25×25μm 2, have been produced and tested in particle beams. An updated version of the ASIC with a larger pixel matrix and improved precision of the time-over-threshold and time-of-arrival measurements has been submitted. Different hybridization concepts have been developed for the interconnection between the sensor and readout ASIC, ranging from small-pitch bump bonding of planar sensors to capacitive coupling of active HV-CMOS sensors. Detector simulations based on Geant 4 and TCAD are compared with experimental results to assess and optimize the performance of the various designs. This contribution gives an overview of the R&D program undertaken for the CLIC vertex detector and presents performance measurements of the prototype detectors currently under investigation.

  20. Primary vertex reconstruction with the ATLAS detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meloni, F.

    2016-01-01

    Efficient and precise reconstruction of the primary vertex in a LHC collision is essential for determining the full kinematic properties of a hard-scatter event and of soft interactions as a measure of the amount of pile-up. The reconstruction of primary vertices in the busy, high pile-up environment of Run-2 of the LHC is a challenging task. The algorithms developed by the ATLAS experiments to reconstruct multiple vertices with small spatial separation are presented.

  1. The H1 silicon vertex detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitzl, D.; Behnke, O.; Biddulph, M.; Boesiger, K.; Eichler, R.; Erdmann, W.; Gabathuler, K.; Gassner, J.; Haynes, W.J..; Horisberger, R.; Kausch, M.; Lindstroem, M.; Niggli, H.; Noyes, G.; Pollet, P.; Steiner, S.; Streuli, S.; Szeker, K.; Truoel, P.

    2000-01-01

    The design, construction and performance of the H1 silicon vertex detector is described. It consists of two cylindrical layers of double-sided, double-metal silicon sensors read out by a custom designed analog pipeline chip. The analog signals are transmitted by optical fibres to a custom-designed ADC board and are reduced on PowerPC processors. Details of the design and construction are given and performance figures from the first data-taking periods are presented

  2. The three-gluon vertex of QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koller, K.; Zerwas, P.M.; Walsh, T.F.

    1978-12-01

    We show how the Q 2 evolution of gluon jets can be used to provide indirect but strong evidence for the 3 gluon vertex of QCD. We propose looking for this evolution in the QantiQ → 3G → hadrons decay of successive 1 3 S 1 quarkonium states. The results apply to other processes if G jets can be isolated. (orig.) [de

  3. The ZEUS vertex detector: Design and prototype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvisi, C.; Anzivino, G.; Arzarello, F.; Barbagli, G.; Bari, G.; Basile, M.; Bellagamba, L.; Boscherini, D.; Bruni, G.; Bruni, P.; Camerini, U.; Cara Romeo, G.; Castellini, G.; Chiarini, M.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Ciralli, F.; Contin, A.; Costa, M.; D'Auria, S.; Del Papa, C.; De Pasquale, S.; Fiori, F.; Forte, A.; Frasconi, F.; Giusti, P.; Iacobucci, G.; Laurenti, G.; Lisowski, B.; Maccarrone, G.; Margotti, A.; Massam, T.; Nania, R.; O'Shea, V.; Palmonari, F.; Pelfer, P.; Pilastrini, R.; Qian, S.; Sartorelli, G.; Schioppa, M.; Susinno, G.; Timellini, R.; Zichichi, A.; Bologna Univ.; Cosenza Univ.; Florence Univ.; Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Bologna; Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Florence; Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Frascati; Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Florence

    1991-01-01

    A gas vertex detector, operated with dimethylether (DME) at atmospheric pressure, is presently being built for the ZEUS experiment at HERA. Its main design features, together with the performances of a prototype measured at various operating voltages, particle rates and geometrical conditions on a CERN Proton Synchrotron test beam, are presented. A spatial resolution down to 35 μm and an average wire efficiency of 96% have been achieved, for a 3 mm gas gap relative to each sense wire. (orig.)

  4. Vertical integration technologies for vertex detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ratti, L.

    2011-01-01

    This work is focused on the use of vertical integration (3D) technologies in the design of hybrid or monolithic pixel detectors in view of applications to silicon vertex trackers (SVTs) at the future high luminosity colliders. After a short introduction on the specifications of next-generation SVTs, the paper will discuss the general features of 3D microelectronic processes and the benefits they can provide to the design of pixel detectors for high energy physics experiments.

  5. Vertex chamber for the KEDR detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aulchenko, V.M.; Chilingarov, A.G.; Kolachev, G.M.; Lazarenko, O.B.; Nagaslaev, V.P.; Romanov, L.V.

    1989-01-01

    The project and design of the vertex chamber for the KEDR detector is described. The chamber consists of 6 cylindrical layers of tubes with 10 mm diameter and 800 mm length. The tubes are made of 20 μm thick aluminized mylar. The prototype tests show that it is possible to achieve a resolution of 20-30 μm using the cool gas mixtures. (orig.)

  6. Flipped spinfoam vertex and loop gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engle, Jonathan; Pereira, Roberto [CPT, CNRS Case 907, Universite de la Mediterranee, F-13288 Marseille (France); Rovelli, Carlo [CPT, CNRS Case 907, Universite de la Mediterranee, F-13288 Marseille (France)], E-mail: rovelli@cpt.univ-mrs.fr

    2008-07-21

    We introduce a vertex amplitude for 4d loop quantum gravity. We derive it from a conventional quantization of a Regge discretization of euclidean general relativity. This yields a spinfoam sum that corrects some difficulties of the Barrett-Crane theory. The second class simplicity constraints are imposed weakly, and not strongly as in Barrett-Crane theory. Thanks to a flip in the quantum algebra, the boundary states turn out to match those of SO(3) loop quantum gravity-the two can be identified as eigenstates of the same physical quantities-providing a solution to the problem of connecting the covariant SO(4) spinfoam formalism with the canonical SO(3) spin-network one. The vertex amplitude is SO(3) and SO(4)-covariant. It rectifies the triviality of the intertwiner dependence of the Barrett-Crane vertex, which is responsible for its failure to yield the correct propagator tensorial structure. The construction provides also an independent derivation of the kinematics of loop quantum gravity and of the result that geometry is quantized.

  7. Silicon Technologies for the CLIC Vertex Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Spannagel, Simon

    2017-01-01

    CLIC is a proposed linear e$^+$e$^−$ collider designed to provide particle collisions at center-of-mass energies of up to 3 TeV. Precise measurements of the properties of the top quark and the Higgs boson, as well as searches for Beyond the Standard Model physics require a highly performant CLIC detector. In particular the vertex detector must provide a single point resolution of only a few micrometers while not exceeding the envisaged material budget of around 0.2%$~X_0$ per layer. Beam-beam interactions and beamstrahlung processes impose an additional requirement on the timestamping capabilities of the vertex detector of about 10 ns. These goals can only be met by using novel techniques in the sensor and ASIC design as well as in the detector construction. The R&D program for the CLIC vertex detector explores various technologies in order to meet these demands. The feasibility of planar sensors with a thickness of 50–150$~\\mu$m, including different active edge designs, are evaluated using Timepix3 A...

  8. Markov branching in the vertex splitting model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefánsson, Sigurdur Örn

    2012-01-01

    We study a special case of the vertex splitting model which is a recent model of randomly growing trees. For any finite maximum vertex degree D, we find a one parameter model, with parameter α element of [0,1] which has a so-called Markov branching property. When D=∞ we find a two parameter model with an additional parameter γ element of [0,1] which also has this feature. In the case D = 3, the model bears resemblance to Ford's α-model of phylogenetic trees and when D=∞ it is similar to its generalization, the αγ-model. For α = 0, the model reduces to the well known model of preferential attachment. In the case α > 0, we prove convergence of the finite volume probability measures, generated by the growth rules, to a measure on infinite trees which is concentrated on the set of trees with a single spine. We show that the annealed Hausdorff dimension with respect to the infinite volume measure is 1/α. When γ = 0 the model reduces to a model of growing caterpillar graphs in which case we prove that the Hausdorff dimension is almost surely 1/α and that the spectral dimension is almost surely 2/(1 + α). We comment briefly on the distribution of vertex degrees and correlations between degrees of neighbouring vertices

  9. Complex growing networks with intrinsic vertex fitness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bedogne, C.; Rodgers, G. J.

    2006-01-01

    One of the major questions in complex network research is to identify the range of mechanisms by which a complex network can self organize into a scale-free state. In this paper we investigate the interplay between a fitness linking mechanism and both random and preferential attachment. In our models, each vertex is assigned a fitness x, drawn from a probability distribution ρ(x). In Model A, at each time step a vertex is added and joined to an existing vertex, selected at random, with probability p and an edge is introduced between vertices with fitnesses x and y, with a rate f(x,y), with probability 1-p. Model B differs from Model A in that, with probability p, edges are added with preferential attachment rather than randomly. The analysis of Model A shows that, for every fixed fitness x, the network's degree distribution decays exponentially. In Model B we recover instead a power-law degree distribution whose exponent depends only on p, and we show how this result can be generalized. The properties of a number of particular networks are examined

  10. The vertex detector of the UA2 experiment (a low mass self sustaining system of cylindrical multiwire proportional chambers)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dialinas, M.; Forget, J.; Geoffroy, D.; Jean, P.; Vergand, M.

    1983-07-01

    The construction of the cylindrical proportional strip chambers of the UA2 vertex detector is reported. The mechanical design, the engineering and the effective realization are described in detail. Possible improvements for the construction of such chambers are also given

  11. Gold price effect on stock market: A Markov switching vector error correction approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wai, Phoong Seuk; Ismail, Mohd Tahir; Kun, Sek Siok

    2014-06-01

    Gold is a popular precious metal where the demand is driven not only for practical use but also as a popular investments commodity. While stock market represents a country growth, thus gold price effect on stock market behavior as interest in the study. Markov Switching Vector Error Correction Models are applied to analysis the relationship between gold price and stock market changes since real financial data always exhibit regime switching, jumps or missing data through time. Besides, there are numerous specifications of Markov Switching Vector Error Correction Models and this paper will compare the intercept adjusted Markov Switching Vector Error Correction Model and intercept adjusted heteroskedasticity Markov Switching Vector Error Correction Model to determine the best model representation in capturing the transition of the time series. Results have shown that gold price has a positive relationship with Malaysia, Thailand and Indonesia stock market and a two regime intercept adjusted heteroskedasticity Markov Switching Vector Error Correction Model is able to provide the more significance and reliable result compare to intercept adjusted Markov Switching Vector Error Correction Models.

  12. Construction of phosphomannose isomerase (PMI) transformation vectors and evaluation of the effectiveness of vectors in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahariah, Bohari; Parveez, Ghulam Kadir Ahmad; Masani, Mat Yunus Abdul; Khalid, Norzulaani

    2012-01-01

    Phosphomannose isomerase (pmi) gene isolated from Escherichia coli allows transgenic plants carrying it to convert mannose-6- phosphate (from mannose), a carbon source that could not be naturally utilized by plants into fructose-6-phosphate which can be utilized by plants as a carbon source. This conversion ability provides energy source to allow the transformed cells to survive on the medium containing mannose. In this study, four transformation vectors carrying the pmi gene alone or in combination with the β-glucuronidase (gusA) gene were constructed and driven by either the maize ubiquitin (Ubi1) or the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV35S) promoter. Restriction digestion, PCR amplification and sequencing were carried out to ensure sequence integrity and orientation. Tobacco was used as a model system to study the effectiveness of the constructs and selection system. PMI11G and pMI3G, which carry gusA gene, were used to study the gene transient expression in tobacco. PMI3 construct, which only carries the pmi gene driven by CaMV35S promoter, was stably transformed into tobacco using biolistics after selection on 30 g 1(-1) mannose without sucrose. Transgenic plants were verified using PCR analysis. PMI/pmi - Phosphomannose isomerase, Ubi1 - Maize ubiquitin promoter, CaMV35S - Cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter, gusA - β-glucuronidase GUS reporter gene.

  13. CRITICAL EVALUATION OF THE EFFECTIVENESS OF SEWAGE SLUDGE DISINFECTION AND VECTOR ATTRACTION REDUCTION PROCESSES

    Science.gov (United States)

    What is the current state of management practices for biosolids production and application, and how can those be made more effective? How effective are Class B disinfection and vector attraction processes, and public access and harvesting restrictions at reducing the public's exp...

  14. Observability of the effects of curl-free magnetic vector potential on ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We discuss here the prediction, based on a formalism by the author, on the observable effects of a curl-free magnetic vector potential on the macroscale as against the microscale of the Aharonov–Bohm effect. A new quantum concept – the 'transition amplitude wave' – postulated in the formalism has already been shown to ...

  15. Revival of cloaking effect in a driven bilayer graphene vector barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiti, S.; Panigrahi, A.; Biswas, R.; Sinha, C.

    2018-05-01

    Transmission profiles in bilayer graphene are studied theoretically through a rectangular vector potential (magnetic) barrier with and without the presence of an oscillatory potential. Unlike the electrostatic barrier, the Fano resonances (FR) are noted in the transmission spectra both for normal and glancing incidences due to non-conservation of chirality for a static vector barrier. The results for normal incidence indicate that the cloaking effect is a manifestation of the chirality conservation in charge transport through bilayer graphene scalar barriers. It is also noted that the aforesaid FR for a static vector barrier might disappear (photon induced electronic cloaking effect) due to the predominant photon exchange processes in presence of an external oscillating potential. The study of Fano resonances in transmission spectrum is in high demand in respect of localization of charge carriers in graphene nano structures for its potential applications in digital device fabrications.

  16. Numerical indications on the semiclassical limit of the flipped vertex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magliaro, Elena; Perini, Claudio; Rovelli, Carlo [Centre de Physique Theorique de Luminy , Case 907, F-13288 Marseille (France)

    2008-05-07

    We introduce a technique for testing the semiclassical limit of a quantum gravity vertex amplitude. The technique is based on the propagation of a semiclassical wave packet. We apply this technique to the newly introduced 'flipped' vertex in loop quantum gravity, in order to test the intertwiner dependence of the vertex. Under some drastic simplifications, we find very preliminary, but surprisingly good numerical evidence for the correct classical limit.

  17. Mechanical design of the CDF SVX II silicon vertex detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skarha, J.E.

    1994-08-01

    A next generation silicon vertex detector is planned at CDF for the 1998 Tevatron collider run with the Main Injector. The SVX II silicon vertex detector will allow high luminosity data-taking, enable online triggering of secondary vertex production, and greatly increase the acceptance for heavy flavor physics at CDF. The design specifications, geometric layout, and early mechanical prototyping work for this detector are discussed

  18. Loop vertex expansion for higher-order interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivasseau, Vincent

    2018-05-01

    This note provides an extension of the constructive loop vertex expansion to stable interactions of arbitrarily high order, opening the way to many applications. We treat in detail the example of the (\\bar{φ } φ )^p field theory in zero dimension. We find that the important feature to extend the loop vertex expansion is not to use an intermediate field representation, but rather to force integration of exactly one particular field per vertex of the initial action.

  19. Pion-nucleon vertex function with one nucleon off shell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizutani, T.; Rochus, P.

    1979-01-01

    The pion-nucleon vertex function with an off-mass-shell nucleon is obtained through sideways dispersion relations with the P 11 and S 11 pion-nucleon phase shifts as only input. Contrary to the recent calculation of Nutt and Shakin, we find that the proper and improper vertex functions behave quite differently, indicating the importance of the nucleon propagator dressing. In particular the proper vertex function is found to have two poles in the unphysical region

  20. Regge vertex for quark production in the central rapidity region in the next-to-leading order

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozlov, M. G., E-mail: M.G.Kozlov@inp.nsk.su; Reznichenko, A. V., E-mail: A.V.Reznichenko@inp.nsk.su [Russian Academy of Sciences, Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation)

    2016-03-15

    The effective vertex for quark production in the interaction of a Reggeized quark and a Reggeized gluon is calculated in the next-to-leading order (NLO). The resulting vertex is the missing component of the NLO multi-Regge amplitude featuring quark and gluon exchanges in the t channels. This calculation will make it possible to develop in future the bootstrap approach to proving quark Reggeization in the next-to-leading logarithmic approximation.

  1. Meta-analysis of the effects of insect vector saliva on host immune responses and infection of vector-transmitted pathogens: a focus on leishmaniasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brittany Ockenfels

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A meta-analysis of the effects of vector saliva on the immune response and progression of vector-transmitted disease, specifically with regard to pathology, infection level, and host cytokine levels was conducted. Infection in the absence or presence of saliva in naïve mice was compared. In addition, infection in mice pre-exposed to uninfected vector saliva was compared to infection in unexposed mice. To control for differences in vector and pathogen species, mouse strain, and experimental design, a random effects model was used to compare the ratio of the natural log of the experimental to the control means of the studies. Saliva was demonstrated to enhance pathology, infection level, and the production of Th2 cytokines (IL-4 and IL-10 in naïve mice. This effect was observed across vector/pathogen pairings, whether natural or unnatural, and with single salivary proteins used as a proxy for whole saliva. Saliva pre-exposure was determined to result in less severe leishmaniasis pathology when compared with unexposed mice infected either in the presence or absence of sand fly saliva. The results of further analyses were not significant, but demonstrated trends toward protection and IFN-γ elevation for pre-exposed mice.

  2. Meta-analysis of the effects of insect vector saliva on host immune responses and infection of vector-transmitted pathogens: a focus on leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ockenfels, Brittany; Michael, Edwin; McDowell, Mary Ann

    2014-10-01

    A meta-analysis of the effects of vector saliva on the immune response and progression of vector-transmitted disease, specifically with regard to pathology, infection level, and host cytokine levels was conducted. Infection in the absence or presence of saliva in naïve mice was compared. In addition, infection in mice pre-exposed to uninfected vector saliva was compared to infection in unexposed mice. To control for differences in vector and pathogen species, mouse strain, and experimental design, a random effects model was used to compare the ratio of the natural log of the experimental to the control means of the studies. Saliva was demonstrated to enhance pathology, infection level, and the production of Th2 cytokines (IL-4 and IL-10) in naïve mice. This effect was observed across vector/pathogen pairings, whether natural or unnatural, and with single salivary proteins used as a proxy for whole saliva. Saliva pre-exposure was determined to result in less severe leishmaniasis pathology when compared with unexposed mice infected either in the presence or absence of sand fly saliva. The results of further analyses were not significant, but demonstrated trends toward protection and IFN-γ elevation for pre-exposed mice.

  3. The Mark II vertex detectors: Status and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaros, J.A.

    1987-03-01

    The art of detecting the decay vertices from heavy quarks and leptons is comparatively new at electron-positron storage rings. So far, drift chambers positioned just outside the vacuum pipes which surround the interfaction region have provided the first accurate determinations of the tau and bottom lifetimes, and confirmed earlier measurements of charmed particle lifetimes. ''Second generation'' vertex detectors have demonstrated the feasibility of tagging heavy flavors by observing decay vertices, and are being used to search for anomalous decay topologies. These chambers have modest resolution on the scale of the effects they seek to measure, but are now well-understood and reliable tools. A generation of vertex detectors, considerably more ambitious, is under construction for experiments at SLC and LEP. They boast impact parameter resolution improved by a factor of four or more over previous detectors, and sub-millimeter track-pair resolution. The Mark II collaboration hopes to reach these goals with a high pressure precision drift chamber, and eventually surpass them with the addition of a silicon microstrip detector

  4. The Mark II vertex detectors: Status and prospects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaros, J.A.

    1987-03-01

    The art of detecting the decay vertices from heavy quarks and leptons is comparatively new at electron-positron storage rings. So far, drift chambers positioned just outside the vacuum pipes which surround the interfaction region have provided the first accurate determinations of the tau and bottom lifetimes, and confirmed earlier measurements of charmed particle lifetimes. ''Second generation'' vertex detectors have demonstrated the feasibility of tagging heavy flavors by observing decay vertices, and are being used to search for anomalous decay topologies. These chambers have modest resolution on the scale of the effects they seek to measure, but are now well-understood and reliable tools. A generation of vertex detectors, considerably more ambitious, is under construction for experiments at SLC and LEP. They boast impact parameter resolution improved by a factor of four or more over previous detectors, and sub-millimeter track-pair resolution. The Mark II collaboration hopes to reach these goals with a high pressure precision drift chamber, and eventually surpass them with the addition of a silicon microstrip detector.

  5. The LHCb VELO (VErtex LOcator) and the LHCb VELO upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, P.

    2013-01-01

    LHCb is a forward spectrometer experiment dedicated to the study of new physics in the decays of beauty and charm hadrons produced in proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. The VErtex LOcator (VELO) is the silicon detector surrounding the LHCb interaction point. The beauty and charm hadrons are identified through their flight distance in the Vertex Locator (VELO), and hence the detector is critical for both the trigger and the offline physics analyses. The sensors, which have an inner radius of ∼7mm from the beam axis at the edge, and the first sensitive strips at a radius of ∼8.2mm are exposed to maximum radiation doses of ∼0.6×10 14 1MeVn eq /cm 2 per integrated luminosity of fb −1 . The performance of the VELO during the first two years of LHC running is described, together with the methods used to monitor radiation damage. The detector so far shows no significant performance degradation, however many interesting effects have been observed in the sensors, including a coupling of charge to the second metal routing line layer after irradiation. In 2018 the VELO will be upgraded together with the rest of the LHCb detector to a 40 MHz readout. The modules together with their front end electronics will be completely replaced with a radiation hard system capable of driving the signals out at the required rates. The current status of the R and D for the LHCb VELO Upgrade is outlined.

  6. The Belle II Silicon Vertex Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedl, M., E-mail: markus.friedl@oeaw.ac.at [HEPHY – Institute of High Energy Physics, Nikolsdorfer Gasse 18, 1050 Vienna (Austria); Ackermann, K. [MPI Munich, Föhringer Ring 6, 80805 München (Germany); Aihara, H. [University of Tokyo, Department of Physics, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Aziz, T. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Experimental High Energy Physics Group, Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400 005 (India); Bergauer, T. [HEPHY – Institute of High Energy Physics, Nikolsdorfer Gasse 18, 1050 Vienna (Austria); Bozek, A. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Division of Particle Physics and Astrophysics, ul. Radzikowskiego 152, 31 342 Krakow (Poland); Campbell, A. [DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Dingfelder, J. [University of Bonn, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Nussallee 12, 53115 Bonn (Germany); Drasal, Z. [Charles University, Institute of Particle and Nuclear Physics, Ke Karlovu 3, 121 16 Praha 2 (Czech Republic); Frankenberger, A. [HEPHY – Institute of High Energy Physics, Nikolsdorfer Gasse 18, 1050 Vienna (Austria); Gadow, K. [DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Gfall, I. [HEPHY – Institute of High Energy Physics, Nikolsdorfer Gasse 18, 1050 Vienna (Austria); Haba, J.; Hara, K.; Hara, T. [KEK, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Higuchi, T. [University of Tokyo, Kavli Institute for Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Himori, S. [Tohoku University, Department of Physics, Aoba Aramaki Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Irmler, C. [HEPHY – Institute of High Energy Physics, Nikolsdorfer Gasse 18, 1050 Vienna (Austria); Ishikawa, A. [Tohoku University, Department of Physics, Aoba Aramaki Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Joo, C. [Seoul National University, High Energy Physics Laboratory, 25-107 Shinlim-dong, Kwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2013-12-21

    The KEKB machine and the Belle experiment in Tsukuba (Japan) are now undergoing an upgrade, leading to an ultimate luminosity of 8×10{sup 35}cm{sup −2}s{sup −1} in order to measure rare decays in the B system with high statistics. The previous vertex detector cannot cope with this 40-fold increase of luminosity and thus needs to be replaced. Belle II will be equipped with a two-layer Pixel Detector surrounding the beam pipe, and four layers of double-sided silicon strip sensors at higher radii than the old detector. The Silicon Vertex Detector (SVD) will have a total sensitive area of 1.13m{sup 2} and 223,744 channels—twice as many as its predecessor. All silicon sensors will be made from 150 mm wafers in order to maximize their size and thus to reduce the relative contribution of the support structure. The forward part has slanted sensors of trapezoidal shape to improve the measurement precision and to minimize the amount of material as seen by particles from the vertex. Fast-shaping front-end amplifiers will be used in conjunction with an online hit time reconstruction algorithm in order to reduce the occupancy to the level of a few percent at most. A novel “Origami” chip-on-sensor scheme is used to minimize both the distance between strips and amplifier (thus reducing the electronic noise) as well as the overall material budget. This report gives an overview on the status of the Belle II SVD and its components, including sensors, front-end detector ladders, mechanics, cooling and the readout electronics.

  7. The Belle II Silicon Vertex Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedl, M.; Ackermann, K.; Aihara, H.; Aziz, T.; Bergauer, T.; Bozek, A.; Campbell, A.; Dingfelder, J.; Drasal, Z.; Frankenberger, A.; Gadow, K.; Gfall, I.; Haba, J.; Hara, K.; Hara, T.; Higuchi, T.; Himori, S.; Irmler, C.; Ishikawa, A.; Joo, C.

    2013-01-01

    The KEKB machine and the Belle experiment in Tsukuba (Japan) are now undergoing an upgrade, leading to an ultimate luminosity of 8×10 35 cm −2 s −1 in order to measure rare decays in the B system with high statistics. The previous vertex detector cannot cope with this 40-fold increase of luminosity and thus needs to be replaced. Belle II will be equipped with a two-layer Pixel Detector surrounding the beam pipe, and four layers of double-sided silicon strip sensors at higher radii than the old detector. The Silicon Vertex Detector (SVD) will have a total sensitive area of 1.13m 2 and 223,744 channels—twice as many as its predecessor. All silicon sensors will be made from 150 mm wafers in order to maximize their size and thus to reduce the relative contribution of the support structure. The forward part has slanted sensors of trapezoidal shape to improve the measurement precision and to minimize the amount of material as seen by particles from the vertex. Fast-shaping front-end amplifiers will be used in conjunction with an online hit time reconstruction algorithm in order to reduce the occupancy to the level of a few percent at most. A novel “Origami” chip-on-sensor scheme is used to minimize both the distance between strips and amplifier (thus reducing the electronic noise) as well as the overall material budget. This report gives an overview on the status of the Belle II SVD and its components, including sensors, front-end detector ladders, mechanics, cooling and the readout electronics

  8. Transition, coexistence, and interaction of vector localized waves arising from higher-order effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Chong; Yang, Zhan-Ying; Zhao, Li-Chen; Yang, Wen-Li

    2015-01-01

    We study vector localized waves on continuous wave background with higher-order effects in a two-mode optical fiber. The striking properties of transition, coexistence, and interaction of these localized waves arising from higher-order effects are revealed in combination with corresponding modulation instability (MI) characteristics. It shows that these vector localized wave properties have no analogues in the case without higher-order effects. Specifically, compared to the scalar case, an intriguing transition between bright–dark rogue waves and w-shaped–anti-w-shaped solitons, which occurs as a result of the attenuation of MI growth rate to vanishing in the zero-frequency perturbation region, is exhibited with the relative background frequency. In particular, our results show that the w-shaped–anti-w-shaped solitons can coexist with breathers, coinciding with the MI analysis where the coexistence condition is a mixture of a modulation stability and MI region. It is interesting that their interaction is inelastic and describes a fusion process. In addition, we demonstrate an annihilation phenomenon for the interaction of two w-shaped solitons which is identified essentially as an inelastic collision in this system. -- Highlights: •Vector rogue wave properties induced by higher-order effects are studied. •A transition between vector rogue waves and solitons is obtained. •The link between the transition and modulation instability (MI) is demonstrated. •The coexistence of vector solitons and breathers coincides with the MI features. •An annihilation phenomenon for the vector two w-shaped solitons is presented.

  9. Transition, coexistence, and interaction of vector localized waves arising from higher-order effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Chong [School of Physics, Northwest University, Xi’an 710069 (China); Yang, Zhan-Ying, E-mail: zyyang@nwu.edu.cn [School of Physics, Northwest University, Xi’an 710069 (China); Zhao, Li-Chen, E-mail: zhaolichen3@163.com [School of Physics, Northwest University, Xi’an 710069 (China); Yang, Wen-Li [Institute of Modern Physics, Northwest University, Xi’an 710069 (China)

    2015-11-15

    We study vector localized waves on continuous wave background with higher-order effects in a two-mode optical fiber. The striking properties of transition, coexistence, and interaction of these localized waves arising from higher-order effects are revealed in combination with corresponding modulation instability (MI) characteristics. It shows that these vector localized wave properties have no analogues in the case without higher-order effects. Specifically, compared to the scalar case, an intriguing transition between bright–dark rogue waves and w-shaped–anti-w-shaped solitons, which occurs as a result of the attenuation of MI growth rate to vanishing in the zero-frequency perturbation region, is exhibited with the relative background frequency. In particular, our results show that the w-shaped–anti-w-shaped solitons can coexist with breathers, coinciding with the MI analysis where the coexistence condition is a mixture of a modulation stability and MI region. It is interesting that their interaction is inelastic and describes a fusion process. In addition, we demonstrate an annihilation phenomenon for the interaction of two w-shaped solitons which is identified essentially as an inelastic collision in this system. -- Highlights: •Vector rogue wave properties induced by higher-order effects are studied. •A transition between vector rogue waves and solitons is obtained. •The link between the transition and modulation instability (MI) is demonstrated. •The coexistence of vector solitons and breathers coincides with the MI features. •An annihilation phenomenon for the vector two w-shaped solitons is presented.

  10. Propagation of the trip behavior in the VENUS vertex chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohama, Taro; Yamada, Yoshikazu.

    1995-03-01

    The high voltage system of the VENUS vertex chamber occasionally trips by a discharge somewhere among cathode electrodes during data taking. This trip behavior induces often additional trips at other electrodes such as the skin and the grid electrodes in the vertex chamber. This propagation mechanism of trips is so complicated in this system related with multi-electrodes. Although the vertex chamber is already installed inside the VENUS detector and consequently the discharge is not able to observe directly, a trial to estimate the propagation has been done using only the information which appears around the trip circuits and the power supply of the vertex chamber. (author)

  11. The Mark II Vertex Drift Chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, J.P.; Baggs, R.; Fujino, D.

    1989-03-01

    We have completed constructing and begun operating the Mark II Drift Chamber Vertex Detector. The chamber, based on a modified jet cell design, achieves 30 μm spatial resolution and 2 gas mixtures. Special emphasis has been placed on controlling systematic errors including the use of novel construction techniques which permit accurate wire placement. Chamber performance has been studied with cosmic ray tracks collected with the chamber located both inside and outside the Mark II. Results on spatial resolution, average pulse shape, and some properties of CO 2 mixtures are presented. 10 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab

  12. Loop-quantum-gravity vertex amplitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engle, Jonathan; Pereira, Roberto; Rovelli, Carlo

    2007-10-19

    Spin foam models are hoped to provide the dynamics of loop-quantum gravity. However, the most popular of these, the Barrett-Crane model, does not have the good boundary state space and there are indications that it fails to yield good low-energy n-point functions. We present an alternative dynamics that can be derived as a quantization of a Regge discretization of Euclidean general relativity, where second class constraints are imposed weakly. Its state space matches the SO(3) loop gravity one and it yields an SO(4)-covariant vertex amplitude for Euclidean loop gravity.

  13. Vertex ring-indexed Lie algebras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fairlie, David; Zachos, Cosmas

    2005-01-01

    Infinite-dimensional Lie algebras are introduced, which are only partially graded, and are specified by indices lying on cyclotomic rings. They may be thought of as generalizations of the Onsager algebra, but unlike it, or its sl(n) generalizations, they are not subalgebras of the loop algebras associated with sl(n). In a particular interesting case associated with sl(3), their indices lie on the Eisenstein integer triangular lattice, and these algebras are expected to underlie vertex operator combinations in CFT, brane physics, and graphite monolayers

  14. Construction of the CDF silicon vertex detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skarha, J.; Barnett, B.; Boswell, C.; Snider, F.; Spies, A.; Tseng, J.; Vejcik, S.; Carter, H.; Flaugher, B.; Gonzales, B.; Hrycyk, M.; Nelson, C.; Segler, S.; Shaw, T.; Tkaczyk, S.; Turner, K.; Wesson, T.; Carithers, W.; Ely, R.; Haber, C.; Holland, S.; Kleinfelder, S.; Merrick, T.; Schneider, O.; Wester, W.; Wong, M.; Amidei, D.; Derwent, P.; Gold, M.; Matthews, J.; Bacchetta, N.; Bisello, D.; Busetto, G.; Castro, A.; Loreti, M.; Pescara, L.; Bedeschi, F.; Bolognesi, V.; Dell'Agnello, S.; Galeotti, S.; Mariotti, M.; Menzione, A.; Punzi, G.; Raffaelli, F.; Risotri, L.; Tartarelli, F.; Turini, N.; Wenzel, H.; Zetti, F.; Bailey, M.; Garfinkel, A.; Shaw, N.; Tipton, P.; Watts, G.

    1992-04-01

    Technical details and methods used in constructing the CDF silicon vertex detector are presented. This description includes a discussion of the foam-carbon fiber composite structure used to silicon microstrip detectors and the procedure for achievement of 5 μm detector alignment. The construction of the beryllium barrel structure, which houses the detector assemblies, is also described. In addition, the 10 μm placement accuracy of the detectors in the barrel structure is discussed and the detector cooling and mounting systems are described. 12 refs

  15. Developments in solid state vertex detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damerell, C.J.S.

    1984-12-01

    Since the discovery of the J/psi in November 1974, there has been a strong interest in the physics of particles containing higher-flavour quarks (charm, bottom, top, ...). High precision vertex detectors can be used to identify the decay products of parent particles which have lifetimes of the order 10 -13 s. The paper surveys the progress which is being made in developing silicon detectors with the necessary tracking precision (< approx. 5 μm) to be used for this purpose in fixed target experiments and also in colliders such as SLC and LEP. (author)

  16. Silicon detectors for tracking and vertexing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomerotski, Andrei

    2009-01-01

    This review covers recent developments in silicon detectors used for particle physics experiments for the tracking and vertexing systems. After a general introduction the main focus of the report is on new challenges for this field posed by requirements of the future generation machines. Technologies reviewed in more detail are column parallel CCDs, DEPFET, vertical integration of sensors and electronics and several others which allow fast readout and low mass design. Important system issues such as mechanical arrangements for the sensors and power distribution, which are critical for the low mass design, are also discussed.

  17. Silicon vertex tracker for RHIC PHENIX experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taketani, A [RIKEN, Nishina Ctr Accelerator Based Sci, Wako, Saitama, Japan; Cianciolo, Vince [ORNL; Enokizono, Akitomo [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); PHENIX, Collaboration [The

    2010-01-01

    The PHENIX experiment at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider will be equipped with Silicon Vertex tracker to enhance its physics capability. There are four layers of silicon sensor to reconstruct charged tracks with 50 {micro}m resolution of decay length measurement. The VTX surrounds the collision point. The inner two layers and the outer two layers are composed of 30 pixel ladders and 44 stripixel ladders, respectively. We have been developing these detectors and done a performance test with 120 GeV proton beam.

  18. The effectiveness of problem-based learning on students’ problem solving ability in vector analysis course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushlihuddin, R.; Nurafifah; Irvan

    2018-01-01

    The student’s low ability in mathematics problem solving proved to the less effective of a learning process in the classroom. Effective learning was a learning that affects student’s math skills, one of which is problem-solving abilities. Problem-solving capability consisted of several stages: understanding the problem, planning the settlement, solving the problem as planned, re-examining the procedure and the outcome. The purpose of this research was to know: (1) was there any influence of PBL model in improving ability Problem solving of student math in a subject of vector analysis?; (2) was the PBL model effective in improving students’ mathematical problem-solving skills in vector analysis courses? This research was a quasi-experiment research. The data analysis techniques performed from the test stages of data description, a prerequisite test is the normality test, and hypothesis test using the ANCOVA test and Gain test. The results showed that: (1) there was an influence of PBL model in improving students’ math problem-solving abilities in vector analysis courses; (2) the PBL model was effective in improving students’ problem-solving skills in vector analysis courses with a medium category.

  19. Ovicidal and larvicidal effects of garlic and asafoetida essential oils against West Nile virus vectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    We examined the chemical composition of garlic and asafoetida essential oils and their individual and combined toxicity against larvae of two West Nile virus vectors, Culex pipiens pipiens and Cx. restuans. The effect of the two essential oils on egg hatch was also examined. Ten and twelve compounds...

  20. Quantum Vertex Model for Reversible Classical Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamon, Claudio; Mucciolo, Eduardo; Ruckenstein, Andrei; Yang, Zhicheng

    We present a planar vertex model that encodes the result of a universal reversible classical computation in its ground state. The approach involves Boolean variables (spins) placed on links of a two-dimensional lattice, with vertices representing logic gates. Large short-ranged interactions between at most two spins implement the operation of each gate. The lattice is anisotropic with one direction corresponding to computational time, and with transverse boundaries storing the computation's input and output. The model displays no finite temperature phase transitions, including no glass transitions, independent of circuit. The computational complexity is encoded in the scaling of the relaxation rate into the ground state with the system size. We use thermal annealing and a novel and more efficient heuristic \\x9Dannealing with learning to study various computational problems. To explore faster relaxation routes, we construct an explicit mapping of the vertex model into the Chimera architecture of the D-Wave machine, initiating a novel approach to reversible classical computation based on quantum annealing.

  1. The Construction of Spin Foam Vertex Amplitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugenio Bianchi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Spin foam vertex amplitudes are the key ingredient of spin foam models for quantum gravity. These fall into the realm of discretized path integral, and can be seen as generalized lattice gauge theories. They can be seen as an attempt at a 4-dimensional generalization of the Ponzano-Regge model for 3d quantum gravity. We motivate and review the construction of the vertex amplitudes of recent spin foam models, giving two different and complementary perspectives of this construction. The first proceeds by extracting geometric configurations from a topological theory of the BF type, and can be seen to be in the tradition of the work of Barrett, Crane, Freidel and Krasnov. The second keeps closer contact to the structure of Loop Quantum Gravity and tries to identify an appropriate set of constraints to define a Lorentz-invariant interaction of its quanta of space. This approach is in the tradition of the work of Smolin, Markopoulous, Engle, Pereira, Rovelli and Livine.

  2. First Results from the LHCb Vertex Locator

    CERN Multimedia

    Borghi, S

    2010-01-01

    LHCb is a dedicated experiment to study new physics in the decays of beauty and charm hadrons at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. The beauty and charm hadrons are identified through their flight distance in the Vertex Locator (VELO), and hence the detector is critical for both the trigger and offline physics analyses. The VELO is the silicon detector surrounding the interaction point, and is the closest LHC vertex detector to the interaction point, located only 7 mm from the LHC beam during normal operation. The detector will operate in an extreme and highly non-uniform radiation environment. The VELO consists of two retractable detector halves with 21 silicon micro-strip tracking modules each. A module is composed of two n+-on-n 300 micron thick half disc sensors with R-measuring and Phi-measuring micro-strip geometry, mounted on a carbon fibre support paddle. The minimum pitch is approximately 40 $\\mu$m. The detector is also equipped with one n-on-p module. The detectors are operated in vacuum and a...

  3. A hadron-quark vertex function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitra, A.N.; Bhatnagar, S.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that the interrelation between the 4D and 3D forms of the Bethe-Salpeter equation (BSE) with a kernel K(q,q') which depends on the relative four-momenta, q μ = q μ - P · qP μ /P 2 , orthogonal to P μ is exploited to obtain a hadron-quark vertex function of the Lorentz-invariant form Γ(q) = D(q 2 ) circle time φ(q). The denominator function D(q 2 ) is universal and controls the 3D BSE, which provides the mass spectra with the eigenfunctions φ(q). The vertex function, directly related to the 4D wave function Ψ which satisfies a corresponding BSE, defines a natural off-shell extension over the whole of four-momentum space, and provides the basis for the evaluation of transition amplitudes via appropriate quark-loop diagrams. The key role of the quantity q 2 in this formalism is clarified in relation to earlier approaches, in which the applications of this quantity had mostly been limited to the mass shell (q · P = 0). Two applications (f p values for P → ell bar ell and F π for π 0 → γγ) are sketched as illustrations of this formalism, and attention is drawn to the problem of complex amplitudes for bigger quark loops with more hadrons, together with the role of the D(q) function in overcoming this problem

  4. Vertex models, TASEP and Grothendieck polynomials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motegi, Kohei; Sakai, Kazumitsu

    2013-01-01

    We examine the wavefunctions and their scalar products of a one-parameter family of integrable five-vertex models. At a special point of the parameter, the model investigated is related to an irreversible interacting stochastic particle system—the so-called totally asymmetric simple exclusion process (TASEP). By combining the quantum inverse scattering method with a matrix product representation of the wavefunctions, the on-/off-shell wavefunctions of the five-vertex models are represented as a certain determinant form. Up to some normalization factors, we find that the wavefunctions are given by Grothendieck polynomials, which are a one-parameter deformation of Schur polynomials. Introducing a dual version of the Grothendieck polynomials, and utilizing the determinant representation for the scalar products of the wavefunctions, we derive a generalized Cauchy identity satisfied by the Grothendieck polynomials and their duals. Several representation theoretical formulae for the Grothendieck polynomials are also presented. As a byproduct, the relaxation dynamics such as Green functions for the periodic TASEP are found to be described in terms of the Grothendieck polynomials. (paper)

  5. Status of the CBM micro vertex detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koziel, Michal [Goethe-Universitaet Frankfurt (Germany); Collaboration: CBM-MVD-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    The fixed-target experiment CBM at FAIR will explore the phase diagram of strongly interacting matter in the regime of highest net baryon densities with numerous probes, among them open charm. For the reconstruction of open charm hadrons with the CBM experiment a Micro Vertex Detector (MVD) with an excellent spatial resolution of the secondary decay vertex is required. Hence, a material budget of a few 0.1% X0 is mandatory for the individual detector stations positioned downstream in close vicinity to the target. To reduce multiple scattering, the MVD operates in vacuum, which poses challenging requirements on both, the power dissipation of the sensors and the integration concept. Here one should mention the selection of high-performance materials providing the mechanical support and cooling for the 0.05 mm thin sensors, establishing the sensor quality assessment procedures as well as defining the sensor integration. In addition, a substantial progress with respect to sensor development will be reported, mainly to the studies on their radiation hardness. Also, the 2nd generation of the sensor control and read-out based on TRBv3 standard has been commissioned. In this contribution we highlight several activities that have been successfully accomplished, which enable us to define the start version of the CBM MVD.

  6. BTeV detached vertex trigger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gottschalk, E.E.

    2001-01-01

    BTeV is a collider experiment that has been approved to run in the Tevatron at Fermilab. The experiment will conduct precision studies of CP violation using a forward-geometry detector. The detector will be optimized for high-rate detection of beauty and charm particles produced in collisions between protons and anti-protons. BTeV will trigger on beauty and charm events by taking advantage of the main difference between these heavy quark events and more typical hadronic events - the presence of detached beauty and charm decay vertices. The first stage of the BTeV trigger will receive data from a pixel vertex detector at a rate of 100 gb s -1 , reconstruct tracks and vertices for every beam crossing, reject 99% of beam crossings that do not produce beauty or charm particles, and trigger on beauty events with high efficiency. An overview of the trigger design and its influence on the design of the pixel vertex detector is presented

  7. Design of a secondary-vertex trigger system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Husby, D.; Chew, P.; Sterner, K.; Selove, W.

    1995-06-01

    For the selection of beauty and charm events with high efficiency at the Tevatron, a secondary-vertex trigger system is under design. It would operate on forward-geometry events. The system would use on-line tracking of all tracks in the vertex detector, to identify events with clearly detached secondary vertices

  8. BRST invariant mixed string vertex for the bosonic string

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarizia, A.; Pezzella, F.

    1987-09-01

    We construct a BRST invariant (N+M)-string vertex including both open and closed string states. When we saturate it with N open string and M closed string physical states it reproduces their corresponding scattering amplitude. As a particular case we obtain BRST invariant vertex for the open-closed string transition. (orig.)

  9. Drift chamber vertex detectors for SLC/LEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayes, K.G.

    1987-03-01

    The short but measurable lifetimes of the b and c quarks and the tau lepton have motivated the development of high precision tracking detectors capable of providing information on the decay vertex topology of events containing these particles. This paper reviews the OPAL, L3, and MARK II experiments vertex drift chambers

  10. Algebraic Bethe ansatz for 19-vertex models with reflection conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utiel, Wagner

    2003-01-01

    In this work we solve the 19-vertex models with the use of algebraic Bethe ansatz for diagonal reflection matrices (Sklyanin K-matrices). The eigenvectors, eigenvalues and Bethe equations are given in a general form. Quantum spin chains of spin one derived from the 19-vertex models were also discussed

  11. Graphs with No Induced Five-Vertex Path or Antipath

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chudnovsky, Maria; Esperet, Louis; Lemoine, Laetitia

    2017-01-01

    We prove that a graph G contains no induced five-vertex path and no induced complement of a five-vertex path if and only if G is obtained from 5-cycles and split graphs by repeatedly applying the following operations: substitution, split unification, and split unification in the complement, where...

  12. Drift chamber vertex detectors for SLC/LEP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayes, K G

    1988-03-01

    Factors influencing the design of drift chamber vertex detectors for SLC and LEP are discussed including global strategy, chamber gas, cell design, and signal processing. The designs of the vertex chambers for the L3 and OPAL experiments at LEP and the Mark II experiment at the SLC are described.

  13. Fermionic construction of vertex operators for twisted affine algebras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frappat, L.; Sorba, P.; Sciarrino, A.

    1988-03-01

    We construct vertex operator representations of the twisted affine algebras in terms of fermionic (or parafermionic in some cases) elementary fields. The folding method applied to the extended Dynkin diagrams of the affine algebras allows us to determine explicitly these fermionic fields as vertex operators

  14. Vertex epidural haematoma manifesting with bilateral upper limb ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Vertex epidural haematomas (VEDH) are rare and difficulties are encountered in diagnosis and management. This is a case report of a patient with a vertex epidural haematoma who presented with signs of severe head injury with upper limb decerebrate posture. We discuss the challenges of radiological investigation and ...

  15. Subgraphs in vertex neighborhoods of K-free graphs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang-Jensen, J.; Brandt, Stephan

    2004-01-01

    In a K-free graph, the neighborhood of every vertex induces a K-free subgraph. The K-free graphs with the converse property that every induced K-free subgraph is contained in the neighborhood of a vertex are characterized, based on the characterization in the case r = 3 due to Pach [8]....

  16. The Mark III vertex chamber and prototype test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grab, C.

    1987-07-01

    A vertex chamber has been constructed for use in the Mark III experiment. The chamber is positioned inside the current main drift chamber and will be used to trigger data collection, to aid in vertex reconstruction, and to improve the momentum resolution. This paper discusses the chamber's construction and performance and tests of the prototype

  17. On Pathos Adjacency Cut Vertex Jump Graph of a Tree

    OpenAIRE

    Nagesh.H.M; R.Chandrasekhar

    2014-01-01

    In this paper the concept of pathos adjacency cut vertex jump graph PJC(T) of a tree T is introduced. We also present a characterization of graphs whose pathos adjacency cut vertex jump graphs are planar, outerplanar, minimally non-outerplanar, Eulerian and Hamiltonian.

  18. Vertex Accentuation in Female Pattern Hair Loss in Asians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chavalit Supsrisunjai

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The most common cause of hair loss seen in women is female pattern hair loss (FPHL, also known as female androgenetic alopecia. It affects the central part of the scalp, but spares the frontal hairline. Frontal accentuation was also described by Olsen. In Asian women, vertex thinning patterns are frequently developed, but there has been no report about vertex thinning pattern in female pattern hair loss. Objective: To find prevalence of vertex accentuation in female pattern hair loss (FPHL in Asian women. Methods: Scalp hair counting (n/cm2 were measured at 3 different areas; vertex, mid scalp and frontal area respectively by digital dermoscope (Dino digital AM-413T. Visual counting and photography were performed. Outcomes were evaluated by gross appearance of vertex thinning and/or hair density <120 /cm2 in any of 3 areas. Results: 143 patients were evaluated. Mean age was 45.54 years. Of the hair loss type, 36.4% were mid-scalp, 33.6% were vertex accentuation and 30.1% were frontal accentuation, respectively. Age was not significantly different among the 3 types of hair loss (P- value 0.859. Conclusion: Although the most common female pattern hair loss type is diffuse type (Ludwig type, vertex accentuation pattern is the second most common pattern in this study. This study is the first to mention “Vertex accentuation” to be another pattern for FPHL.

  19. Lefschetz thimbles in fermionic effective models with repulsive vector-field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Yuto; Kashiwa, Kouji; Ohnishi, Akira

    2018-06-01

    We discuss two problems in complexified auxiliary fields in fermionic effective models, the auxiliary sign problem associated with the repulsive vector-field and the choice of the cut for the scalar field appearing from the logarithmic function. In the fermionic effective models with attractive scalar and repulsive vector-type interaction, the auxiliary scalar and vector fields appear in the path integral after the bosonization of fermion bilinears. When we make the path integral well-defined by the Wick rotation of the vector field, the oscillating Boltzmann weight appears in the partition function. This "auxiliary" sign problem can be solved by using the Lefschetz-thimble path-integral method, where the integration path is constructed in the complex plane. Another serious obstacle in the numerical construction of Lefschetz thimbles is caused by singular points and cuts induced by multivalued functions of the complexified scalar field in the momentum integration. We propose a new prescription which fixes gradient flow trajectories on the same Riemann sheet in the flow evolution by performing the momentum integration in the complex domain.

  20. [Construction of BAD Lentivirus Vector and Its Effect on Proliferation in A549 Cell Lines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Na; He, Yan-qi; Zhu, Jing; Li, Wei-min

    2015-05-01

    To construct the recombinant lentivirus expressing vector BAD (Bcl-2-associated death protein) gene and to study its effect on A549 cell proliferation. The BAD gene was amplified from plasmid pAV-MCMV-BAD-GFP by PCR. The purified BAD gene fragment was inserted into a lentivirus vector (pLVX-IRES-ZsGreen 1), and the insertion was identified by PCR, restriction endonuclease analysis and DNA sequencing. A549 cells were then transfected with the packaged recombinant lentivirus, and resistant cell clones were selected with flow cytometry. The expression of BAD in A549 cell lines stably transduction with a lentivirus was examined using Western blot. The effect of BAD overexpression on proliferation of A549 cells was evaluated by using CCK-8 kit. Restriction enzyme digestion and DNA sequencing showed that the full-length BAD gene (507 bp) had been successfully subcloned into the lentiviral vector to result in the recombinant vector pLVX-IRES-ZsGreen 1. Monoclonal cell lines BAD-A549 was produced after transfection with the recombinant lentivirus and selected with flow cytometry. Stable expression of BAD protein was verified by Western blot. In vitro, the OD value in BAD group was significantly lower than that of control groups from 120-144 h (PBAD gene had been successfully generated. In vitro, BAD overexpression significantly inhibited A549 cells proliferation.

  1. Genus Ranges of 4-Regular Rigid Vertex Graphs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Dorothy; Dolzhenko, Egor; Jonoska, Nataša; Saito, Masahico; Valencia, Karin

    2015-01-01

    A rigid vertex of a graph is one that has a prescribed cyclic order of its incident edges. We study orientable genus ranges of 4-regular rigid vertex graphs. The (orientable) genus range is a set of genera values over all orientable surfaces into which a graph is embedded cellularly, and the embeddings of rigid vertex graphs are required to preserve the prescribed cyclic order of incident edges at every vertex. The genus ranges of 4-regular rigid vertex graphs are sets of consecutive integers, and we address two questions: which intervals of integers appear as genus ranges of such graphs, and what types of graphs realize a given genus range. For graphs with 2 n vertices ( n > 1), we prove that all intervals [ a, b ] for all a genus ranges. For graphs with 2 n - 1 vertices ( n ≥ 1), we prove that all intervals [ a, b ] for all a genus ranges. We also provide constructions of graphs that realize these ranges.

  2. Twisted vertex algebras, bicharacter construction and boson-fermion correspondences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anguelova, Iana I.

    2013-01-01

    The boson-fermion correspondences are an important phenomena on the intersection of several areas in mathematical physics: representation theory, vertex algebras and conformal field theory, integrable systems, number theory, cohomology. Two such correspondences are well known: the types A and B (and their super extensions). As a main result of this paper we present a new boson-fermion correspondence of type D-A. Further, we define a new concept of twisted vertex algebra of order N, which generalizes super vertex algebra. We develop the bicharacter construction which we use for constructing classes of examples of twisted vertex algebras, as well as for deriving formulas for the operator product expansions, analytic continuations, and normal ordered products. By using the underlying Hopf algebra structure we prove general bicharacter formulas for the vacuum expectation values for two important groups of examples. We show that the correspondences of types B, C, and D-A are isomorphisms of twisted vertex algebras

  3. Antiferromagnetic Ising model decorated with D-vector spins: Transversal and longitudinal local fields effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasconcelos Dos Santos, R.J.; Coutinho, S.

    1995-01-01

    The effect of a local field acting on decorating classical D-vector bond spins of an antiferromagnetic Ising model on the square lattice is studied for both the annealed isotropic and the axial decorated cases. In both models the effect on the phase diagrams of the transversal and the longitudinal components of the local field acting on the decorating spins are fully analyzed and discussed

  4. Understanding the Effects of Host Evolution and Skin Bacteria Composition on Disease Vector Choices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-14

    Distribution Unlimited UU UU UU UU 14-04-2016 1-Sep-2014 31-Dec-2015 Final Report: Understanding the effects of host evolution and skin bacteria ...S) AND ADDRESS (ES) U.S. Army Research Office P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 mosquito, skin, bacteria , primate REPORT...reviewed journals: Final Report: Understanding the effects of host evolution and skin bacteria composition on disease vector choices Report Title Here

  5. Resistance Distances in Vertex-Face Graphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shangguan, Yingmin; Chen, Haiyan

    2018-01-01

    The computation of two-point resistances in networks is a classical problem in electric circuit theory and graph theory. Let G be a triangulation graph with n vertices embedded on an orientable surface. Define K(G) to be the graph obtained from G by inserting a new vertex vϕ to each face ϕ of G and adding three new edges (u, vϕ), (v, vϕ) and (w, vϕ), where u, v and w are three vertices on the boundary of ϕ. In this paper, using star-triangle transformation and resistance local-sum rules, explicit relations between resistance distances in K(G) and those in G are obtained. These relations enable us to compute resistance distance between any two points of Kk(G) recursively. As explanation examples, some resistances in several networks are computed, including the modified Apollonian network and networks constructed from tetrahedron, octahedron and icosahedron, respectively.

  6. Report of the 'Vertex detector' working group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellini, G.; Rancoita, P.G.

    1984-01-01

    An analysis, even rough, of the vertex detector performances, based on the pattern recognition and on currently available techniques (see below) makes clear that the high repetition rate option is strongly favoured. In this hypothesis, with a luminosity of approx.= 3 x 10 32 cm -2 s -1 and a time between bunch collision approx.= 25 ns, we expect = 1 as number of events per bunch collision, e.i. 36.8% of events with 0 interaction, 36.8% with 1 and 26.4% with more than 1 event. Two or three events per crossing bunch can be separated and 25 ns of repetition time does not appear to be a major problem. (orig./HSI)

  7. Quarkonium decays: Testing the 3-gluon vertex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koller, K.; Walsh, T.F.; Zerwas, P.M.; Technische Hochschule Aachen

    1980-12-01

    We study the 3-jet decays of S and P-wave quarkonia with C = +. If observed, some of these will offer a way of seeing the 3G vertex of QCD via 1 Ssub(o), 3 Psub(o), 3 P 2 (Qanti Q) → GGG + Gqanti q → 3 jets. (As is well-known, cancellations reduce 3 P 1 (anti Q) → GGG.) We elaborate in detail the S-wave decay as it is expected to show all the characteristic features of orthoquarkonium decays into 4 jets, 3 S 1 (Qanti Q) → GGGG + GGqanti q → 4 jets which we will comment upon. These quarkonium decays offer a very clear signal for QCD as a non-abelian local gauge field theory with color-charged gluons. (orig.)

  8. Primary Vertex Reconstruction for Upgrade at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Wanczyk, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the LHCb experiment is the study of beauty and charm hadron decays with the main focus on CP violating phenomena and searches for physics beyond the Standard Model through rare decays. At the present, the second data taking period is ongoing, which is called Run II. After 2018 during the long shutdown, the replacement of signicant parts of the LHCb detector is planned. One of main changes is upgrade of the present software and hardware trigger to a more rapid full software trigger. Primary Vertex (PV) is a basis for the further tracking and it is sensitive to the LHC running conditions, which are going to change for the Upgrade. In particular, the center-of-mass collision energy should reach the maximum value of 14 TeV. As a result the quality of the reconstruction has to be studied and the reconstruction algorithms have to be optimized.

  9. Vector geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Robinson, Gilbert de B

    2011-01-01

    This brief undergraduate-level text by a prominent Cambridge-educated mathematician explores the relationship between algebra and geometry. An elementary course in plane geometry is the sole requirement for Gilbert de B. Robinson's text, which is the result of several years of teaching and learning the most effective methods from discussions with students. Topics include lines and planes, determinants and linear equations, matrices, groups and linear transformations, and vectors and vector spaces. Additional subjects range from conics and quadrics to homogeneous coordinates and projective geom

  10. An Effective NoSQL-Based Vector Map Tile Management Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Wan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Within a digital map service environment, the rapid growth of Spatial Big-Data is driving new requirements for effective mechanisms for massive online vector map tile processing. The emergence of Not Only SQL (NoSQL databases has resulted in a new data storage and management model for scalable spatial data deployments and fast tracking. They better suit the scenario of high-volume, low-latency network map services than traditional standalone high-performance computer (HPC or relational databases. In this paper, we propose a flexible storage framework that provides feasible methods for tiled map data parallel clipping and retrieval operations within a distributed NoSQL database environment. We illustrate the parallel vector tile generation and querying algorithms with the MapReduce programming model. Three different processing approaches, including local caching, distributed file storage, and the NoSQL-based method, are compared by analyzing the concurrent load and calculation time. An online geological vector tile map service prototype was developed to embed our processing framework in the China Geological Survey Information Grid. Experimental results show that our NoSQL-based parallel tile management framework can support applications that process huge volumes of vector tile data and improve performance of the tiled map service.

  11. Effects of Cavity on the Performance of Dual Throat Nozzle During the Thrust-Vectoring Starting Transient Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Rui; Xu, Jinglei

    2014-01-01

    The dual throat nozzle (DTN) technique is capable to achieve higher thrust-vectoring efficiencies than other fluidic techniques, without compromising thrust efficiency significantly during vectoring operation. The excellent performance of the DTN is mainly due to the concaved cavity. In this paper, two DTNs of different scales have been investigated by unsteady numerical simulations to compare the parameter variations and study the effects of cavity during the vector starting process. The results remind us that during the vector starting process, dynamic loads may be generated, which is a potentially challenging problem for the aircraft trim and control.

  12. Emergent reduced dimensionality by vertex frustration in artificial spin ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Ian; Lao, Yuyang; Carrasquillo, Isaac; O'Brien, Liam; Watts, Justin D.; Manno, Michael; Leighton, Chris; Scholl, Andreas; Nisoli, Cristiano; Schiffer, Peter

    2016-02-01

    Reducing the dimensionality of a physical system can have a profound effect on its properties, as in the ordering of low-dimensional magnetic materials, phonon dispersion in mercury chain salts, sliding phases, and the electronic states of graphene. Here we explore the emergence of quasi-one-dimensional behaviour in two-dimensional artificial spin ice, a class of lithographically fabricated nanomagnet arrays used to study geometrical frustration. We extend the implementation of artificial spin ice by fabricating a new array geometry, the so-called tetris lattice. We demonstrate that the ground state of the tetris lattice consists of alternating ordered and disordered bands of nanomagnetic moments. The disordered bands can be mapped onto an emergent thermal one-dimensional Ising model. Furthermore, we show that the level of degeneracy associated with these bands dictates the susceptibility of island moments to thermally induced reversals, thus establishing that vertex frustration can reduce the relevant dimensionality of physical behaviour in a magnetic system.

  13. Performance of the ALICE secondary vertex b-tagging algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00262232

    2016-11-04

    The identification of jets originating from beauty quarks in heavy-ion collisions is important to study the properties of the hot and dense matter produced in such collisions. A variety of algorithms for b-jet tagging was elaborated at the LHC experiments. They rely on the properties of B hadrons, i.e. their long lifetime, large mass and large multiplicity of decay products. In this work, the b-tagging algorithm based on displaced secondary-vertex topologies is described. We present Monte Carlo based performance studies of the algorithm for charged jets reconstructed with the ALICE tracking system in p-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_\\text{NN}}$ = 5.02 TeV. The tagging efficiency, rejection rate and the correction of the smearing effects of non-ideal detector response are presented.

  14. Locking mechanisms in degree-4 vertex origami structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Hongbin; Li, Suyi; Xu, Jian; Wang, K. W.

    2016-04-01

    Origami has emerged as a potential tool for the design of mechanical metamaterials and metastructures whose novel properties originate from their crease patterns. Most of the attention in origami engineering has focused on the wellknown Miura-Ori, a folded tessellation that is flat-foldable for folded sheet and stacked blocks. This study advances the state of the art and expands the research field to investigate generic degree-4 vertex (4-vertex) origami, with a focus on facet-binding. In order to understand how facet-binding attributes to the mechanical properties of 4-vertex origami structures, geometries of the 4-vertex origami cells are analyzed and analytically expressed. Through repeating and stacking 4-vertex cells, origami sheets and stacked origami blocks can be constructed. Geometry analyses discover four mechanisms that will lead to the self-locking of 4-vertex origami cells, sheets, and stacked blocks: in-cell facet-binding, inlayer facet-binding, inter-layer facet binding, and in-layer and inter-layer facet-bindings. These mechanisms and the predicted self-locking phenomena are verified through 3D simulations and prototype experiments. Finally, this paper briefly introduces the unusual mechanical properties caused by the locking of 4-vertex origami structures. The research reported in this paper could foster a new breed of self-locking structures with various engineering applications.

  15. Pharmacologic Effects in vivo in Brain by Vector-Mediated Peptide Drug Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickel, Ulrich; Yoshikawa, Takayoshi; Landaw, Elliot M.; Faull, Kym F.; Pardridge, William M.

    1993-04-01

    Pharmacologic effects in brain caused by systemic administration of neuropeptides are prevented by poor transport of the peptide through the brain vascular endothelium, which comprises the blood-brain barrier in vivo. In the present study, successful application of a chimeric peptide approach to enhance drug delivery through the blood-brain barrier for the purpose of achieving a central nervous system pharmacologic effect is described. The chimeric peptide was formed by linkage of a potent vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) analogue, which had been monobiotinylated, to a drug transport vector. The vector consisted of a covalent conjugate of avidin and the OX26 monoclonal antibody to the transferrin receptor. Owing to the high concentration of transferrin receptors on brain capillary endothelia, OX26 targets brain and undergoes receptor-mediated transcytosis through the blood-brain barrier. Systemic infusion of low doses (12 μg/kg) of the VIP chimeric peptide in rats resulted in an in vivo central nervous system pharmacologic effect: a 65% increase in cerebral blood flow. Biotinylated VIP analogue without the brain transport vector was ineffective.

  16. Safe and Effective Gene Therapy for Murine Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome Using an Insulated Lentiviral Vector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swati Singh

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS is a life-threatening immunodeficiency caused by mutations within the WAS gene. Viral gene therapy to restore WAS protein (WASp expression in hematopoietic cells of patients with WAS has the potential to improve outcomes relative to the current standard of care, allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. However, the development of viral vectors that are both safe and effective has been problematic. While use of viral transcriptional promoters may increase the risk of insertional mutagenesis, cellular promoters may not achieve WASp expression levels necessary for optimal therapeutic effect. Here we evaluate a self-inactivating (SIN lentiviral vector combining a chromatin insulator upstream of a viral MND (MPSV LTR, NCR deleted, dl587 PBS promoter driving WASp expression. Used as a gene therapeutic in Was−/− mice, this vector resulted in stable WASp+ cells in all hematopoietic lineages and rescue of T and B cell defects with a low number of viral integrations per cell, without evidence of insertional mutagenesis in serial bone marrow transplants. In a gene transfer experiment in non-human primates, the insulated MND promoter (driving GFP expression demonstrated long-term polyclonal engraftment of GFP+ cells. These observations demonstrate that the insulated MND promoter safely and efficiently reconstitutes clinically effective WASp expression and should be considered for future WAS therapy.

  17. Tracking and vertexing for B physics at hadron accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.; Purohit, M.; Weidemann, A.W.

    1993-01-01

    In this note, the authors report on some of the activities of the Tracking and Vertexing Working Group of this Workshop. Track and vertex finding is essential to exploit the high production rate of B-mesons at hadron accelerators, both for triggering and analysis. Here, they review the tracking and vertex-finding systems of some of the major existing and proposed collider and fixed-target experiments at existing and future hadron accelerators, with a view towards their usefulness for B-physics. The capabilities of both general-purpose detectors and those of dedicated B-physics experiments are considered

  18. Installation of a new Fortran compiler and effective programming method on the vector supercomputer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemoto, Toshiyuki; Suzuki, Koichiro; Watanabe, Kenji; Machida, Masahiko; Osanai, Seiji; Isobe, Nobuo; Harada, Hiroo; Yokokawa, Mitsuo

    1992-07-01

    The Fortran compiler, version 10 has been replaced with the new one, version 12 (V12) on the Fujitsu Computer system at JAERI since May, 1992. The benchmark test for the performance of the V12 compiler is carried out with 16 representative nuclear codes in advance of the installation of the compiler. The performance of the compiler is achieved by the factor of 1.13 in average. The effect of the enhanced functions of the compiler and the compatibility to the nuclear codes are also examined. The assistant tool for vectorization TOP10EX is developed. In this report, the results of the evaluation of the V12 compiler and the usage of the tools for vectorization are presented. (author)

  19. The effect of vector control strategy against Dengue transmission between mosquitoes and humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-Xia Yang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available With the consideration of mechanism of prevention and control for the spread of dengue fever, a mathematical model of dengue fever dynamical transmission between mosquitoes and humans, incorporating a vector control strategy of impulsive culling of mosquitoes, is proposed in this paper. By using the comparison principle, Floquet theorem and some of analytical methods, we obtain the basic reproductive number $\\mathcal{R}_0$ for this infectious disease, which illustrates the stability of the disease-free periodic solution and the uniform persistence of the disease. Further, the explicit conditions determining the backward or forward bifurcation are obtained and the culling rate $\\phi$ is a major effect on the occurrence of backward bifurcation. Finally, numerical simulations are given to verify the correctness of theoretical results and the most efficiency of vector control strategy.

  20. Use of an electron reflector to improve dose uniformity at the vertex during total skin electron therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, V.G.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: The vertex of the scalp is always tangentially irradiated during total skin electron therapy (TSET). This study was conducted to determine the dose distribution at the vertex for a commonly used irradiation technique and to evaluate the use of an electron reflector, positioned above the head, as a means of improving the dose uniformity. Methods and Materials: Phantoms, simulating the head of a patient, were irradiated using our standard procedure for TSET. The technique is a six-field irradiation using dual angled electron beams at a treatment distance of 3.6 meters. Vertex dosimetry was performed using ionization methods and film. Measurements were made for an unmodified 6 MeV electron beam and for a 4 MeV beam obtained by placing an acrylic scattering plate in the beam line. Studies were performed to examine the effect of electron scattering on vertex dose when a lead reflector, 50 x 50 cm in area, was positioned above the phantom. Results: The surface dose at the vertex, in the absence of the reflector, was found to be less than 40% of the prescribed skin dose. Use of the lead reflector increased this value to 73% for the 6 MeV beam and 99% for the degraded 4 MeV beam. Significant improvements in depth dose were also observed. The dose enhancement is not strongly dependent on reflector distance or angulation since the reflector acts as a large source of broadly scattered electrons. Conclusion: The vertex may be significantly underdosed using standard techniques for total skin electron therapy. Use of an electron reflector improves the dose uniformity at the vertex and may reduce or eliminate the need for supplemental irradiation

  1. Vertex Normals and Face Curvatures of Triangle Meshes

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Xiang; Jiang, Caigui; Wallner, Johannes; Pottmann, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    This study contributes to the discrete differential geometry of triangle meshes, in combination with discrete line congruences associated with such meshes. In particular we discuss when a congruence defined by linear interpolation of vertex normals

  2. Graph Theory. 2. Vertex Descriptors and Graph Coloring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorentz JÄNTSCHI

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available This original work presents the construction of a set of ten sequence matrices and their applications for ordering vertices in graphs. For every sequence matrix three ordering criteria are applied: lexicographic ordering, based on strings of numbers, corresponding to every vertex, extracted as rows from sequence matrices; ordering by the sum of path lengths from a given vertex; and ordering by the sum of paths, starting from a given vertex. We also examine a graph that has different orderings for the above criteria. We then proceed to demonstrate that every criterion induced its own partition of graph vertex. We propose the following theoretical result: both LAVS and LVDS criteria generate identical partitioning of vertices in any graph. Finally, a coloring of graph vertices according to introduced ordering criteria was proposed.

  3. Vertex function of an electron in a constant electromagnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morozov, D.A.; Narozhnyj, N.B.; Ritus, V.I.

    1981-01-01

    The third order with respect to radiation field vertex function for an electron located in a constant crossed field of arbitrary intensity is determined. It is shown that radiative interaction smears out the Airy function which describes the intensity of the interaction between electrons and photons in an external field as a function of the nonconserving momentum component. The qualitative relation Vsup((3)) approximately αchisup(2/3)Vsup((1)) between the third and first order vertex functions is found for large values of the dynamic parameter chi=((eFp)sup(2))sup(1/2)msup(-2). It is also shown that radiative interaction does not alter the order of magnitude of the squared mass of the system transferred at the vertex. The vertex function satisfies the Ward identity modified by the external field [ru

  4. The NA50 segmented target and vertex recognition system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellaiche, F.; Cheynis, B.; Contardo, D.; Drapier, O.; Grossiord, J.Y.; Guichard, A.; Haroutunian, R.; Jacquin, M.; Ohlsson-Malek, F.; Pizzi, J.R.

    1997-01-01

    The NA50 segmented target and vertex recognition system is described. The segmented target consists of 7 sub-targets of 1-2 mm thickness. The vertex recognition system used to determine the sub-target where an interaction has occured is based upon quartz elements which produce Cerenkov light when traversed by charged particles from the interaction. The geometrical arrangement of the quartz elements has been optimized for vertex recognition in 208 Pb-Pb collisions at 158 GeV/nucleon. A simple algorithm provides a vertex recognition efficiency of better than 85% for dimuon trigger events collected with a 1 mm sub-target set-up. A method for recognizing interactions of projectile fragments (nuclei and/or groups of nucleons) is presented. The segmented target allows a large target thickness which together with a high beam intensity (∼10 7 ions/s) enables high statistics measurements. (orig.)

  5. Uncovering the triple omeron vertex from Wilson line formalism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chirilli, G. A.; Szymanowski, L.; Wallon, S.

    2011-01-01

    We compute the triple omeron vertex from the Wilson line formalism, including both planar and nonplanar contributions, and get perfect agreement with the result obtained in the Extended Generalized Logarithmic Approximation based on Reggeon calculus.

  6. Vertex Reconstruction in the ATLAS Experiment at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Bouhova-Thacker, E; The ATLAS collaboration; Kostyukhin, V; Liebig, W; Limper, M; Piacquadio, G; Lichard, P; Weiser, C; Wildauer, A

    2009-01-01

    In the harsh environment of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN (design luminosity of $10^{34}$ cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$) efficient reconstruction of vertices is crucial for many physics analyses. Described in this paper are the strategies for vertex reconstruction used in the ATLAS experiment and their implementation in the software framework Athena. The algorithms for the reconstruction of primary and secondary vertices as well as for finding of photon conversions and vertex reconstruction in jets are described. A special emphasis is made on the vertex fitting with application of additional constraints. The implementation of mentioned algorithms follows a very modular design based on object-oriented C++ and use of abstract interfaces. The user-friendly concept allows event reconstruction and physics analyses to compare and optimize their choice among different vertex reconstruction strategies. The performance of implemented algorithms has been studied on a variety of Monte Carlo samples and results are presented.

  7. Discussion on the electronic problems of straw vertex detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xi Deming

    1992-01-01

    The measurement of the characteristic time of the output waveform of straw vertex detector, the design of its high resolution and high counting rate readout system and the problems of the charge and time calibrations are discussed

  8. A new method for computing the quark-gluon vertex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguilar, A C

    2015-01-01

    In this talk we present a new method for determining the nonperturbative quark-gluon vertex, which constitutes a crucial ingredient for a variety of theoretical and phenomenological studies. This new method relies heavily on the exact all-order relation connecting the conventional quark-gluon vertex with the corresponding vertex of the background field method, which is Abelian-like. The longitudinal part of this latter quantity is fixed using the standard gauge technique, whereas the transverse is estimated with the help of the so-called transverse Ward identities. This method allows the approximate determination of the nonperturbative behavior of all twelve form factors comprising the quark-gluon vertex, for arbitrary values of the momenta. Numerical results are presented for the form factors in three special kinematical configurations (soft gluon and quark symmetric limit, zero quark momentum), and compared with the corresponding lattice data. (paper)

  9. Fluctuations in two-dimensional six-vertex systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youngblood, R.W.; Axe, J.D.; McCoy, B.M.

    1979-01-01

    The character of polarization correlations in six-vertex systems is discussed. With the aid of a connection between the 1-d Heisenberg--Ising chain and the six-vertex problem, existing results for the chain correlations are used to obtain information about long-wavelength polarization correlations in six-vertex models. These results are compared with a neutron scattering study of 2-d polarization correlations in the layered compound copper formate tetrahydrate. Because the six-vertex model is equivalent to a particular roughening model, these results also explicitly predict the critical behavior of that roughening model just above its roughening temperature. The results correspond to the predictions of Kosterlitz and Thouless for the phase transition in the 2-d Coulomb gas. 5 figures

  10. Ghost story. II. The midpoint ghost vertex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonora, L; Maccaferri, C; Scherer Santos, R.J.; Tolla, D D

    2009-01-01

    We construct the ghost number 9 three strings vertex for OSFT in the natural normal ordering. We find two versions, one with a ghost insertion at z = i and a twist-conjugate one with insertion at z = -i. For this reason we call them midpoint vertices. We show that the relevant Neumann matrices commute among themselves and with the matrix G representing the operator K 1 . We analyze the spectrum of the latter and find that beside a continuous spectrum there is a (so far ignored) discrete one. We are able to write spectral formulas for all the Neumann matrices involved and clarify the important role of the integration contour over the continuous spectrum. We then pass to examine the (ghost) wedge states. We compute the discrete and continuous eigenvalues of the corresponding Neumann matrices and show that they satisfy the appropriate recursion relations. Using these results we show that the formulas for our vertices correctly define the star product in that, starting from the data of two ghost number 0 wedge states, they allow us to reconstruct a ghost number 3 state which is the expected wedge state with the ghost insertion at the midpoint, according to the star recursion relation.

  11. Vertex trigger implementation using shared memory technology

    CERN Document Server

    Müller, H

    1998-01-01

    The implementation of a 1 st level vertex trigger for LHC-B is particularly difficult due to the high ( 1 MHz ) input data rate. With ca. 350 silicon hits per event, both the R strips and Phi strips of the detectors produce a total of ca 2 Gbyte/s zero-suppressed da ta.1 note succeeds to the ideas to use R-phi coordinates for fast integer linefinding in programmable hardware, as described in LHB note 97-006. For an implementation we propose a FPGA preprocessing stage operating at 1 MHz with the benefit to substantially reduce the amount of data to be transmitted to the CPUs and to liberate a large fraction of CPU time. Interconnected via 4 Gbit/s SCI technol-ogy 2 , a shared memory system can be built which allows to perform data driven eventbuilding with, or without preprocessing. A fully data driven architecture between source modules and destination memories provides a highly reliable memory-to-memory transfer mechanism of very low latency. The eventbuilding is performed via associating events at the sourc...

  12. Performance of the LHCb Vertex Locator

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, R.; Akiba, K.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Appleby, R.B.; Artuso, M.; Bates, A.; Bay, A.; Behrendt, O.; Benton, J.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bjornstad, P.M.; Bogdanova, G.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Bowcock, T.J.V.; van den Brand, J.; Brown, H.; Buytaert, J.; Callot, O.; Carroll, J.; Casse, G.; Collins, P.; De Capua, S.; Doets, M.; Donleavy, S.; Dossett, D.; Dumps, R.; Eckstein, D.; Eklund, L.; Farinelli, C.; Farry, S.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Frei, R.; Garofoli, J.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Gong, A.; Gong, H.; Gordon, H.; Haefeli, G.; Harrison, J.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Hulsbergen, W.; Huse, T.; Hutchcroft, D.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, P.; Jans, E.; John, M.; Keaveney, J.; Ketel, T.; Korolev, M.; Kraan, M.; Lastovicka, T.; Lafferty, G.; Latham, T.; Lefeuvre, G.; Leflat, A.; Liles, M.; van Lysebetten, A.; MacGregor, G.; Marinho, F.; McNulty, R.; Merkin, M.; Moran, D.; Mountain, R.; Mous, I.; Mylroie-Smith, J.; Needham, M.; Nikitin, N.; Noor, A.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Papadelis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Parkes, C.; Patel, G.D.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Redford, S.; Reid, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rodrigues, E.; Saavedra, A.F.; Schiller, M.; Schneider, O.; Shears, T.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Smith, N.A.; Szumlak, T.; Thomas, C.; van Tilburg, J.; Tobin, M.; Velthuis, J.; Verlaat, B.; Viret, S.; Volkov, V.; Wallace, C.; Wang, J.; Webber, A.; Whitehead, M.; Zverev, E.

    2014-01-01

    The Vertex Locator (VELO) is a silicon microstrip detector that surrounds the proton-proton interaction region in the LHCb experiment. The performance of the detector during the first years of its physics operation is reviewed. The system is operated in vacuum, uses a bi-phase CO2 cooling system, and the sensors are moved to 7 mm from the LHC beam for physics data taking. The performance and stability of these characteristic features of the detector are described, and details of the material budget are given. The calibration of the timing and the data processing algorithms that are implemented in FPGAs are described. The system performance is fully characterised. The sensors have a signal to noise ratio of approximately 20 and a best hit resolution of 4 microns is achieved at the optimal track angle. The typical detector occupancy for minimum bias events in standard operating conditions in 2011 is around 0.5%, and the detector has less than 1% of faulty strips. The proximity of the detector to the beam means ...

  13. Functional imaging of sleep vertex sharp transients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, John M; Caporro, Matteo; Haneef, Zulfi; Yeh, Hsiang J; Buttinelli, Carla; Lenartowicz, Agatha; Mumford, Jeanette A; Parvizi, Josef; Poldrack, Russell A

    2011-07-01

    The vertex sharp transient (VST) is an electroencephalographic (EEG) discharge that is an early marker of non-REM sleep. It has been recognized since the beginning of sleep physiology research, but its source and function remain mostly unexplained. We investigated VST generation using functional MRI (fMRI). Simultaneous EEG and fMRI were recorded from seven individuals in drowsiness and light sleep. VST occurrences on EEG were modeled with fMRI using an impulse function convolved with a hemodynamic response function to identify cerebral regions correlating to the VSTs. A resulting statistical image was thresholded at Z>2.3. Two hundred VSTs were identified. Significantly increased signal was present bilaterally in medial central, lateral precentral, posterior superior temporal, and medial occipital cortex. No regions of decreased signal were present. The regions are consistent with electrophysiologic evidence from animal models and functional imaging of human sleep, but the results are specific to VSTs. The regions principally encompass the primary sensorimotor cortical regions for vision, hearing, and touch. The results depict a network comprising the presumed VST generator and its associated regions. The associated regions functional similarity for primary sensation suggests a role for VSTs in sensory experience during sleep. Copyright © 2011 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The effect of vector meson decays on di-hadron fragmentation functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matevosyan, H.H.; Thomas, A.W.; Bentz, W.

    2014-01-01

    Di-hadron Fragmentation Functions (DFF) provide a vast amount of information on the intricate details of the parton hadronization process. Moreover, they provide a unique access to the 'clean' extraction of nucleon transversity parton distribution functions in semi inclusive deep inelastic two hadron production process with a transversely polarised target. On the example of the u → π + π - we analyse the properties of unpolarized DFFs using their probabilistic interpretation. We use both the NJL-jet hadronization model and PYTHIA 8.1 event generator to explore the effect of the strong decays of the vector mesons produced in the quark hadronization process on the pseudoscalar DFFs. Our study shows that, even though it is less probable to produce vector mesons in the hadronization process than pseudo scalar mesons of the same charge, the products of their strong decays drastically affect the DFFs for pions because of the large combinatorial factors. Thus, an accurate description of both vector meson production and decays are crucial for theoretical understanding of DFFs. (authors)

  15. Cost-effectiveness of environmental management for vector control in resource development projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bos, R

    1991-01-01

    Vector control methods are traditionally divided in chemical, biological and environmental management approaches, and this distinction also reflected in certain financial and economic aspects. This is particularly true for environmental modification, usually engineering or other structural works. It is highly capital intensive, as opposed to chemical and biological control which require recurrent expenditures, and discount rates are therefore a prominent consideration in deciding for one or the other approach. Environmental manipulation requires recurrent action, but can often be carried out with the community participation, which raises the issue of opportunity costs. The incorporation of environmental management in resource projects is generally impeded by economic considerations. The Internal Rate of Return continues to be a crucial criterion for funding agencies and development banks to support new projects; at the same time Governments of debt-riden countries in the Third World will do their best to avoid additional loans on such frills as environmental and health safeguards. Two approaches can be recommended to nevertheless ensure the incorporation of environmental management measures in resource projects in an affordable way. First, there are several examples of cases where environmental management measures either have a dual benefit (increasing both agricultural production and reducing vector-borne disease transmission) or can be implemented at zero costs. Second, the additional costs involved in structural modifications can be separated from the project development costs considered in the calculations of the Internal Rate of Return, and financial support can be sought from bilateral technical cooperation agencies particularly interested in environmental and health issues. There is a dearth of information in the cost-effectiveness of alternative vector control strategies in the developing country context. The process of integrating vector control in the

  16. Dynamics and Biocontrol: The Indirect Effects of a Predator Population on a Host-Vector Disease Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengyan Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A model of the interactions among a host population, an insect-vector population, which transmits virus from hosts to hosts, and a vector predator population is proposed based on virus-host, host-vector, and prey (vector-enemy theories. The model is investigated to explore the indirect effect of natural enemies on host-virus dynamics by reducing the vector densities, which shows the basic reproduction numbers R01 (without predators and R02 (with predators that provide threshold conditions on determining the uniform persistence and extinction of the disease in a host population. When the model is absent from predator, the disease is persistent if R01>1; in such a case, by introducing predators of a vector, then the insect-transmitted disease will be controlled if R02<1. From the point of biological control, these results show that an additional predator population of the vector may suppress the spread of vector-borne diseases. In addition, there exist limit cycles with persistence of the disease or without disease in presence of predators. Finally, numerical simulations are conducted to support analytical results.

  17. Mirror of the refined topological vertex from a matrix model

    CERN Document Server

    Eynard, B

    2011-01-01

    We find an explicit matrix model computing the refined topological vertex, starting from its representation in terms of plane partitions. We then find the spectral curve of that matrix model, and thus the mirror symmetry of the refined vertex. With the same method we also find a matrix model for the strip geometry, and we find its mirror curve. The fact that there is a matrix model shows that the refined topological string amplitudes also satisfy the remodeling the B-model construction.

  18. Performance of the ATLAS primary vertex reconstruction algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Matt

    2017-01-01

    The reconstruction of primary vertices in the busy, high pile up environment of the LHC is a challenging task. The challenges and novel methods developed by the ATLAS experiment to reconstruct vertices in such environments will be presented. Such advances in vertex seeding include methods taken from medical imagining, which allow for reconstruction of very nearby vertices will be highlighted. The performance of the current vertexing algorithms using early Run-2 data will be presented and compared to results from simulation.

  19. The quintic interaction vertex in light-cone gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ananth, Sudarshan

    2008-01-01

    We consider pure gravity in light-cone gauge and derive the complete quintic interaction vertex. Up to quartic order, the Kawai-Lewellen-Tye (KLT) relations can be made manifest at the level of the Einstein-Hilbert Lagrangian. The quintic interaction vertex represents an essential first step in further extending the off-shell validity of the KLT relations to higher order vertices

  20. Tracking and vertexing with the ATLAS detector at the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirsch, F.

    2011-01-01

    The Inner Detector of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN contains three tracking systems: The silicon Pixel Detector, the Silicon Microstrip Tracker and the Transition Radiation Tracker. In combination these detectors provide excellent track and vertex reconstruction efficiencies and resolutions. This paper describes studies which show the performance of track and vertex reconstruction on data collected at 7 TeV center-of-mass energy.

  1. Stochastic higher spin six vertex model and Macdonald measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borodin, Alexei

    2018-02-01

    We prove an identity that relates the q-Laplace transform of the height function of a (higher spin inhomogeneous) stochastic six vertex model in a quadrant on one side and a multiplicative functional of a Macdonald measure on the other. The identity is used to prove the GUE Tracy-Widom asymptotics for two instances of the stochastic six vertex model via asymptotic analysis of the corresponding Schur measures.

  2. The vertex detector for the Lepton/Photon collaboration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, J.P.; Boissevain, J.G.; Fox, D.; Hecke, H. van; Jacak, B.V.; Kapustinsky, J.S.; Leitch, M.J.; McGaughey, P.L.; Moss, J.M.; Sondheim, W.E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1991-12-31

    The conceptual design of the vertex detector for the Lepton/Photon Collaboration at RHIC is described, including simulations of its expected performance. The design consists of two con- centric layers of single-sided Si strips. The expected performance as a multiplicity detector and in measuring the pseudo-rapidity ({nu}) distribution is discussed as well as the expected vertex finding efficiency and accuracy. Various options which could be used to reduce the cost of the detector are also discussed.

  3. Construction of vertex operators using operator formalism techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gato, B.; Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge

    1989-01-01

    We derive vertex operators in oscillator form as an application of the conserved charges method developed by Vafa for the operator formalism in higher genus Riemann surfaces. This construction proves to be clear, direct and valid for the bosonic and fermionic strings as wells as for twisted strings on orbifolds. We discuss the method and construct vertex operators for the bosonic string moving on Z N orbifolds and for the fermionic string in the NSR formulation. (orig.)

  4. The vertex detector for the Lepton/Photon Collaboration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, J.P.; Boissevain, J.G.; Fox, D.; van Hecke, H.; Jacak, B.V.; Kapustinsky, J.S.; Leitch, M.J.; McGaughey, P.L.; Moss, J.M.; Sondheim, W.E.

    1991-01-01

    The conceptual design of the vertex detector for the Lepton/Photon Collaboration at RHIC is described, including simulations of its expected performance. The design consists of two concentric layers of single-sided Si strips. The expected performance as a multiplicity detector and in measuring the pseudo-rapidity η distribution is discussed as well as the expected vertex finding efficiency and accuracy. Various options which could be used to reduce the cost of the detector are also discussed

  5. Community-Effectiveness of Temephos for Dengue Vector Control: A Systematic Literature Review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leyanna George

    Full Text Available The application of the organophosphate larvicide temephos to water storage containers is one of the most commonly employed dengue vector control methods. This systematic literature review is to the knowledge of the authors the first that aims to assess the community-effectiveness of temephos in controlling both vectors and dengue transmission when delivered either as a single intervention or in combination with other interventions. A comprehensive literature search of 6 databases was performed (PubMed, WHOLIS, GIFT, CDSR, EMBASE, Wiley, grey literature and cross references were also screened for relevant studies. Data were extracted and methodological quality of the studies was assessed independently by two reviewers. 27 studies were included in this systematic review (11 single intervention studies and 16 combined intervention studies. All 11 single intervention studies showed consistently that using temephos led to a reduction in entomological indices. Although 11 of the 16 combined intervention studies showed that temephos application together with other chemical vector control methods also reduced entomological indices, this was either not sustained over time or-as in the five remaining studies--failed to reduce the immature stages. The community-effectiveness of temephos was found to be dependent on factors such as quality of delivery, water turnover rate, type of water, and environmental factors such as organic debris, temperature and exposure to sunlight. Timing of temephos deployment and its need for reapplication, along with behavioural factors such as the reluctance of its application to drinking water, and operational aspects such as cost, supplies, time and labour were further limitations identified in this review. In conclusion, when applied as a single intervention, temephos was found to be effective at suppressing entomological indices, however, the same effect has not been observed when temephos was applied in combination with

  6. Smarandachely Adjacent-Vertex-Distinguishing Proper Edge Chromatic Number of Cm∨Kn

    OpenAIRE

    Shunqin Liu

    2016-01-01

    According to different conditions, researchers have defined a great deal of coloring problems and the corresponding chromatic numbers. Such as, adjacent-vertex-distinguishing total chromatic number, adjacent-vertex-distinguishing proper edge chromatic number, smarandachely-adjacent-vertex-distinguishing proper edge chromatic number, smarandachely-adjacent-vertex-distinguishing proper total chromatic number. And we focus on the smarandachely adjacent-vertex-distinguishing proper edge chromatic...

  7. Hairy Slices: Evaluating the Perceptual Effectiveness of Cutting Plane Glyphs for 3D Vector Fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Andrew H; Butkiewicz, Thomas; Ware, Colin

    2017-01-01

    Three-dimensional vector fields are common datasets throughout the sciences. Visualizing these fields is inherently difficult due to issues such as visual clutter and self-occlusion. Cutting planes are often used to overcome these issues by presenting more manageable slices of data. The existing literature provides many techniques for visualizing the flow through these cutting planes; however, there is a lack of empirical studies focused on the underlying perceptual cues that make popular techniques successful. This paper presents a quantitative human factors study that evaluates static monoscopic depth and orientation cues in the context of cutting plane glyph designs for exploring and analyzing 3D flow fields. The goal of the study was to ascertain the relative effectiveness of various techniques for portraying the direction of flow through a cutting plane at a given point, and to identify the visual cues and combinations of cues involved, and how they contribute to accurate performance. It was found that increasing the dimensionality of line-based glyphs into tubular structures enhances their ability to convey orientation through shading, and that increasing their diameter intensifies this effect. These tube-based glyphs were also less sensitive to visual clutter issues at higher densities. Adding shadows to lines was also found to increase perception of flow direction. Implications of the experimental results are discussed and extrapolated into a number of guidelines for designing more perceptually effective glyphs for 3D vector field visualizations.

  8. Community effectiveness of pyriproxyfen as a dengue vector control method: A systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorit Maoz

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Vector control is the only widely utilised method for primary prevention and control of dengue. The use of pyriproxyfen may be promising, and autodissemination approach may reach hard to reach breeding places. It offers a unique mode of action (juvenile hormone mimic and as an additional tool for the management of insecticide resistance among Aedes vectors. However, evidence of efficacy and community effectiveness (CE remains limited.The aim of this systematic review is to compile and analyse the existing literature for evidence on the CE of pyriproxyfen as a vector control method for reducing Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus populations and thereby human dengue transmission.Systematic search of PubMed, Embase, Lilacs, Cochrane library, WHOLIS, Web of Science, Google Scholar as well as reference lists of all identified studies. Removal of duplicates, screening of abstracts and assessment for eligibility of the remaining studies followed. Relevant data were extracted, and a quality assessment conducted. Results were classified into four main categories of how pyriproxyfen was applied: - 1 container treatment, 2 fumigation, 3 auto-dissemination or 4 combination treatments,-and analysed with a view to their public health implication.Out of 745 studies 17 studies were identified that fulfilled all eligibility criteria. The results show that pyriproxyfen can be effective in reducing the numbers of Aedes spp. immatures with different methods of application when targeting their main breeding sites. However, the combination of pyriproxyfen with a second product increases efficacy and/or persistence of the intervention and may also slow down the development of insecticide resistance. Open questions concern concentration and frequency of application in the various treatments. Area-wide ultra-low volume treatment with pyriproxyfen currently lacks evidence and cannot be recommended. Community participation and acceptance has not consistently been successful

  9. Community effectiveness of pyriproxyfen as a dengue vector control method: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maoz, Dorit; Ward, Tara; Samuel, Moody; Müller, Pie; Runge-Ranzinger, Silvia; Toledo, Joao; Boyce, Ross; Velayudhan, Raman; Horstick, Olaf

    2017-07-01

    Vector control is the only widely utilised method for primary prevention and control of dengue. The use of pyriproxyfen may be promising, and autodissemination approach may reach hard to reach breeding places. It offers a unique mode of action (juvenile hormone mimic) and as an additional tool for the management of insecticide resistance among Aedes vectors. However, evidence of efficacy and community effectiveness (CE) remains limited. The aim of this systematic review is to compile and analyse the existing literature for evidence on the CE of pyriproxyfen as a vector control method for reducing Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus populations and thereby human dengue transmission. Systematic search of PubMed, Embase, Lilacs, Cochrane library, WHOLIS, Web of Science, Google Scholar as well as reference lists of all identified studies. Removal of duplicates, screening of abstracts and assessment for eligibility of the remaining studies followed. Relevant data were extracted, and a quality assessment conducted. Results were classified into four main categories of how pyriproxyfen was applied: - 1) container treatment, 2) fumigation, 3) auto-dissemination or 4) combination treatments,-and analysed with a view to their public health implication. Out of 745 studies 17 studies were identified that fulfilled all eligibility criteria. The results show that pyriproxyfen can be effective in reducing the numbers of Aedes spp. immatures with different methods of application when targeting their main breeding sites. However, the combination of pyriproxyfen with a second product increases efficacy and/or persistence of the intervention and may also slow down the development of insecticide resistance. Open questions concern concentration and frequency of application in the various treatments. Area-wide ultra-low volume treatment with pyriproxyfen currently lacks evidence and cannot be recommended. Community participation and acceptance has not consistently been successful and needs to

  10. Short-term cytotoxic effects and long-term instability of RNAi delivered using lentiviral vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kruithof Egbert KO

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RNA interference (RNAi can potently reduce target gene expression in mammalian cells and is in wide use for loss-of-function studies. Several recent reports have demonstrated that short double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs, used to mediate RNAi, can also induce an interferon-based response resulting in changes in the expression of many interferon-responsive genes. Off-target gene silencing has also been described, bringing into question the validity of certain RNAi-based approaches for studying gene function. We have targeted the plasminogen activator inhibitor-2 (PAI-2 or SERPINB2 mRNA using lentiviral vectors for delivery of U6 promoter-driven PAI-2-targeted short hairpin RNA (shRNA expression. PAI-2 is reported to have anti-apoptotic activity, thus reduction of endogenous expression may be expected to make cells more sensitive to programmed cell death. Results As expected, we encountered a cytotoxic phenotype when targeting the PAI-2 mRNA with vector-derived shRNA. However, this predicted phenotype was a potent non-specific effect of shRNA expression, as functional overexpression of the target protein failed to rescue the phenotype. By decreasing the shRNA length or modifying its sequence we maintained PAI-2 silencing and reduced, but did not eliminate, cytotoxicity. ShRNA of 21 complementary nucleotides (21 mers or more increased expression of the oligoadenylate synthase-1 (OAS1 interferon-responsive gene. 19 mer shRNA had no effect on OAS1 expression but long-term selective pressure on cell growth was observed. By lowering lentiviral vector titre we were able to reduce both expression of shRNA and induction of OAS1, without a major impact on the efficacy of gene silencing. Conclusions Our data demonstrate a rapid cytotoxic effect of shRNAs expressed in human tumor cell lines. There appears to be a cut-off of 21 complementary nucleotides below which there is no interferon response while target gene silencing is maintained

  11. Effectiveness of Mosquito Trap with Sugar Fermented Attractant to the Vector of Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endang Puji Astuti

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Aedes aegypti is the main vector of dengue fever that is still become health problem in the world. Various control efforts has been done at several areas through chemically or naturally control. Developing mosquitoes trapping tool is an alternative method to control mosquitoes besides insecticides utilization. This laboratorium research utilize sugar fermented process to yield CO2 as one of attractan to mosquito. Production of ethanol and CO2 can be yielded from anaerob sugar fermentation proccess (without O2 by khamir Saccharomyces cerevisiae activities. The trapped mosquitoes was observed up to 48 hours exposure, the highest average of mosquito trapped is on solution treatment with yeast 1 gram (43.2% and 40 gr sugar (48.4%. The highest effectivity of trapping tool both inside or outside was on the 14th day. There were declained amount of trapped mosquitos on 16th and 18th days. This laboratorium research has described that trapping tool with sugar fermented solution were effective to control population of dengue vector.

  12. EVALUATION OF SUBLETHAL EFFECTS OF Ipomoea cairica LINN. EXTRACT ON LIFE HISTORY TRAITS OF DENGUE VECTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Fatma ZUHARAH

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Plant derived insecticides have considerable potential for mosquito control because these products are safer than conventional insecticides. This study aimed to investigate sublethal activities of Ipomoea carica or railway creeper crude acethonilic extract against life history trait of dengue vectors, Aedes albopictus and Aedes aegypti. The late third instar larvae of Ae. albopictus and Ae. aegypti were exposed to a sublethal dose at LC50 and larvae that survived were further cultured. Overall, Ipomea cairica crude extracts affected the whole life history of both Aedes species. The study demonstrated significantly lower egg production (fecundity and eggs hatchability (fertility in Ae. albopictus. The sublethal dose of crude extracts reduced significantly the width of larval head capsule and the wing length of both sexes in both Aedes species. The significance of sublethal effects of I. cairica against Aedes mosquitoes was an additional hallmark to demonstrate further activity of this plant despite its direct toxicity to the larvae. The reduced reproductive capacity as well as morphological and physiological anomalies are some of the effects that make I. cairica a potential candidate to be used as a new plant-based insecticide to control dengue vectors.

  13. Virus infection mediates the effects of elevated CO2 on plants and vectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trębicki, Piotr; Vandegeer, Rebecca K.; Bosque-Pérez, Nilsa A.; Powell, Kevin S.; Dader, Beatriz; Freeman, Angela J.; Yen, Alan L.; Fitzgerald, Glenn J.; Luck, Jo E.

    2016-03-01

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration has increased significantly and is projected to double by 2100. To increase current food production levels, understanding how pests and diseases respond to future climate driven by increasing CO2 is imperative. We investigated the effects of elevated CO2 (eCO2) on the interactions among wheat (cv. Yitpi), Barley yellow dwarf virus and an important pest and virus vector, the bird cherry-oat aphid (Rhopalosiphum padi), by examining aphid life history, feeding behavior and plant physiology and biochemistry. Our results showed for the first time that virus infection can mediate effects of eCO2 on plants and pathogen vectors. Changes in plant N concentration influenced aphid life history and behavior, and N concentration was affected by virus infection under eCO2. We observed a reduction in aphid population size and increased feeding damage on noninfected plants under eCO2 but no changes to population and feeding on virus-infected plants irrespective of CO2 treatment. We expect potentially lower future aphid populations on noninfected plants but no change or increased aphid populations on virus-infected plants therefore subsequent virus spread. Our findings underscore the complexity of interactions between plants, insects and viruses under future climate with implications for plant disease epidemiology and crop production.

  14. Virus infection mediates the effects of elevated CO2 on plants and vectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trębicki, Piotr; Vandegeer, Rebecca K.; Bosque-Pérez, Nilsa A.; Powell, Kevin S.; Dader, Beatriz; Freeman, Angela J.; Yen, Alan L.; Fitzgerald, Glenn J.; Luck, Jo E.

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration has increased significantly and is projected to double by 2100. To increase current food production levels, understanding how pests and diseases respond to future climate driven by increasing CO2 is imperative. We investigated the effects of elevated CO2 (eCO2) on the interactions among wheat (cv. Yitpi), Barley yellow dwarf virus and an important pest and virus vector, the bird cherry-oat aphid (Rhopalosiphum padi), by examining aphid life history, feeding behavior and plant physiology and biochemistry. Our results showed for the first time that virus infection can mediate effects of eCO2 on plants and pathogen vectors. Changes in plant N concentration influenced aphid life history and behavior, and N concentration was affected by virus infection under eCO2. We observed a reduction in aphid population size and increased feeding damage on noninfected plants under eCO2 but no changes to population and feeding on virus-infected plants irrespective of CO2 treatment. We expect potentially lower future aphid populations on noninfected plants but no change or increased aphid populations on virus-infected plants therefore subsequent virus spread. Our findings underscore the complexity of interactions between plants, insects and viruses under future climate with implications for plant disease epidemiology and crop production. PMID:26941044

  15. Exploratory study of the three-gluon vertex on the lattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parrinello, C. (Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Mayfield Road, Edinburgh EH93JZ (United Kingdom))

    1994-10-01

    We define and evaluate on the lattice the amputated three-gluon vertex function in momentum space. We give numerical results for 16[sup 3][times]40 and 24[sup 3][times]40 quenched lattices at [beta]=6.0. A good numerical signal is obtained at the price of enforcing the gauge-fixing condition with high accuracy. By comparing results from two different lattice volumes, we try to investigate the crucial issue of finite volume effects. We also outline a method for the lattice evaluation of the QCD running coupling as defined from the three-gluon vertex, while being aware that a realistic calculation will require larger [beta] values and very high statistics.

  16. A Future Vertex Locator with Precise Timing for the LHCb Experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    Mitreska, Biljana

    2017-01-01

    The LHCb experiment is designed to perform high precision measurements of matter-antimatter asymmetries and searches for rare and forbidden decays, with the aim of discovering new and unexpected particles and forces. In 2030 the LHC beam intensity will increase by a factor of 50 compared to current operations. This means increased samples of the particles we need to study, but it also presents experimental challenges. In particular, with current technology it becomes impossible to differentiate the many (>50) separate proton-proton collisions which occur for each bunch crossing. A Monte Carlo simulation was developed to model the operation of a silicon pixel vertex detector surrounding the collision region at LHCb, under the conditions expected after 2030, after the second upgrade of the Vertex Locator (VELO). The main goal was studying the effect of adding '4D' detectors which save high-precision timing information, in addition to the usual three spatial coordinates, as charged particles pass through them. W...

  17. Green close-quote s function method with energy-independent vertex functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsay Tzeng, S.Y.; Kuo, T.T.; Tzeng, Y.; Geyer, H.B.; Navratil, P.

    1996-01-01

    In conventional Green close-quote s function methods the vertex function Γ is generally energy dependent. However, a model-space Green close-quote s function method where the vertex function is manifestly energy independent can be formulated using energy-independent effective interaction theories based on folded diagrams and/or similarity transformations. This is discussed in general and then illustrated for a 1p1h model-space Green close-quote s function applied to a solvable Lipkin many-fermion model. The poles of the conventional Green close-quote s function are obtained by solving a self-consistent Dyson equation and model space calculations may lead to unphysical poles. For the energy-independent model-space Green close-quote s function only the physical poles of the model problem are reproduced and are in satisfactory agreement with the exact excitation energies. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  18. Automatised Data Quality Monitoring of the LHCb Vertex Locator

    CERN Multimedia

    Szumlak, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    The LHCb Vertex Locator (VELO) is a silicon strip semiconductor detector operating at just 8mm distance to the LHC beams. Its 172,000 strips are read at a frequency of 1 MHz and processed by off-detector FPGAs followed by a PC cluster that reduces the event rate to about 10 kHz. During the second run of the LHC, which lasts from 2015 until 2018, the detector performance will undergo continued change due to radiation damage effects. This necessitates a detailed monitoring of the data quality to avoid adverse effects on the physics analysis performance. The VELO monitoring infrastructure has been re-designed compared to the first run of the LHC when it was based on manual checks. The new system is based around an automatic analysis framework, which monitors the performance of new data as well as long-term trends and flags issues whenever they arise. An unbiased subset of the detector data are processed about once per hour by monitoring algorithms. The new analysis framework then analyses the plots that are prod...

  19. The sterilizing effect of pyriproxyfen on the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae: physiological impact on ovaries development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koama, Bayili; Namountougou, Moussa; Sanou, Roger; Ndo, Sévérin; Ouattara, Abdoulaye; Dabiré, Roch K; Malone, David; Diabaté, Abdoulaye

    2015-03-04

    Adult females An. gambiae were exposed in 3 min cone test to treated nets with PPF before or after they were blood fed. The effects of PPF on ovaries development, females oviposition and eggs hatching were assessed. Both unfed and fed mosquitoes exposed to PPF exhibited nearly complete inhibition of fecundity (70-100%) and fertility (90-100%). After females have been exposed once to PPF, the sterilizing effect on their fecundity was observed over 3 consecutive blood meals suggesting that PPF might have an irreversible sterilizing effect. Observation of the ovaries of exposed females to PPF under microscope revealed that the ovaries failed to develop even after several blood meals. The combination of PPF to pyrethroids on bednets could provide better malaria control tool and prevent the further development and spread of pyrethroid resistance in malaria vectors.

  20. Calculation of track and vertex errors for detector design studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harr, R.

    1995-01-01

    The Kalman Filter technique has come into wide use for charged track reconstruction in high-energy physics experiments. It is also well suited for detector design studies, allowing for the efficient estimation of optimal track covariance matrices without the need of a hit level Monte Carlo simulation. Although much has been published about the Kalman filter equations, there is a lack of previous literature explaining how to implement the equations. In this paper, the operators necessary to implement the Kalman filter equations for two common detector configurations are worked out: a central detector in a uniform solenoidal magnetic field, and a fixed-target detector with no magnetic field in the region of the interactions. With the track covariance matrices in hand, vertex and invariant mass errors are readily calculable. These quantities are particularly interesting for evaluating experiments designed to study weakly decaying particles which give rise to displaced vertices. The optimal vertex errors are obtained via a constrained vertex fit. Solutions are presented to the constrained vertex problem with and without kinematic constraints. Invariant mass errors are obtained via propagation of errors; the use of vertex constrained track parameters is discussed. Many of the derivations are new or previously unpublished

  1. Studies of radiation hardness of MOS devices for application in a linear collider vertex detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Qingyu

    2008-10-17

    The proposed International Linear Collider (ILC) together with the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN serve as a combined tool to explore the mysteries of the universe: the former is a precision machine and the latter can be considered as a finding machine. The key component of the ILC is the vertex detector that should be placed as close as possible to the Interaction Point (IP) and has better radiation tolerance against the dominant electron-positron pair production background from beam-beam interactions. A new generation of MOS-type Depleted-Field-Effect Transistor (MOSDEPFET) active pixel detectors has been proposed and developed by Semiconductor Labor Munich for Physics and for extraterrestrial Physics in order to meet the requirements of the vertex detector at the ILC. Since all MOS devices are susceptible to ionizing radiation, the main topic is focused on the radiation hardness of detectors, by which a series of physical processes are analyzed: e.g. surface damage due to ionizing radiation as well as damage mechanisms and their associated radiation effects. As a consequence, the main part of this thesis consists of a large number of irradiation experiments and the corresponding discussions. Finally, radiation hardness of the detectors should be improved through a set of concluded experiences that are based on a series of analysis of the characteristic parameters using different measurement techniques. The feasibility of the MOSDEPFET-based vertex detector is, therefore, predicted at ILC. (orig.)

  2. Studies of radiation hardness of MOS devices for application in a linear collider vertex detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Qingyu

    2008-01-01

    The proposed International Linear Collider (ILC) together with the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN serve as a combined tool to explore the mysteries of the universe: the former is a precision machine and the latter can be considered as a finding machine. The key component of the ILC is the vertex detector that should be placed as close as possible to the Interaction Point (IP) and has better radiation tolerance against the dominant electron-positron pair production background from beam-beam interactions. A new generation of MOS-type Depleted-Field-Effect Transistor (MOSDEPFET) active pixel detectors has been proposed and developed by Semiconductor Labor Munich for Physics and for extraterrestrial Physics in order to meet the requirements of the vertex detector at the ILC. Since all MOS devices are susceptible to ionizing radiation, the main topic is focused on the radiation hardness of detectors, by which a series of physical processes are analyzed: e.g. surface damage due to ionizing radiation as well as damage mechanisms and their associated radiation effects. As a consequence, the main part of this thesis consists of a large number of irradiation experiments and the corresponding discussions. Finally, radiation hardness of the detectors should be improved through a set of concluded experiences that are based on a series of analysis of the characteristic parameters using different measurement techniques. The feasibility of the MOSDEPFET-based vertex detector is, therefore, predicted at ILC. (orig.)

  3. Challenges in predicting climate and environmental effects on vector-borne disease episystems in a changing world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabachnick, W J

    2010-03-15

    Vector-borne pathogens cause enormous suffering to humans and animals. Many are expanding their range into new areas. Dengue, West Nile and Chikungunya have recently caused substantial human epidemics. Arthropod-borne animal diseases like Bluetongue, Rift Valley fever and African horse sickness pose substantial threats to livestock economies around the world. Climate change can impact the vector-borne disease epidemiology. Changes in climate will influence arthropod vectors, their life cycles and life histories, resulting in changes in both vector and pathogen distribution and changes in the ability of arthropods to transmit pathogens. Climate can affect the way pathogens interact with both the arthropod vector and the human or animal host. Predicting and mitigating the effects of future changes in the environment like climate change on the complex arthropod-pathogen-host epidemiological cycle requires understanding of a variety of complex mechanisms from the molecular to the population level. Although there has been substantial progress on many fronts the challenges to effectively understand and mitigate the impact of potential changes in the environment on vector-borne pathogens are formidable and at an early stage of development. The challenges will be explored using several arthropod-borne pathogen systems as illustration, and potential avenues to meet the challenges will be presented.

  4. Vector analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Newell, Homer E

    2006-01-01

    When employed with skill and understanding, vector analysis can be a practical and powerful tool. This text develops the algebra and calculus of vectors in a manner useful to physicists and engineers. Numerous exercises (with answers) not only provide practice in manipulation but also help establish students' physical and geometric intuition in regard to vectors and vector concepts.Part I, the basic portion of the text, consists of a thorough treatment of vector algebra and the vector calculus. Part II presents the illustrative matter, demonstrating applications to kinematics, mechanics, and e

  5. About vectors

    CERN Document Server

    Hoffmann, Banesh

    1975-01-01

    From his unusual beginning in ""Defining a vector"" to his final comments on ""What then is a vector?"" author Banesh Hoffmann has written a book that is provocative and unconventional. In his emphasis on the unresolved issue of defining a vector, Hoffmann mixes pure and applied mathematics without using calculus. The result is a treatment that can serve as a supplement and corrective to textbooks, as well as collateral reading in all courses that deal with vectors. Major topics include vectors and the parallelogram law; algebraic notation and basic ideas; vector algebra; scalars and scalar p

  6. Interpretation of vector magnetograph data including magneto-optic effects. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    West, E.A.; Hagyard, J.; National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Huntsville, AL

    1983-01-01

    In this paper, the presence of Faraday rotation in measurements of orientation of a sunspot's transvese magnetic field is investigated. Using observations obtained with the Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) vector magnetograph, the derived vector magnetic field of a simple, symmetric sunspot is used to calculate the degree of Faraday rotation in the azimuth of the transverse field as a function of wavelength from analytical expressions for the Stokes parameters. These results are then compared with the observed rotation of the field's azimuth which is derived from observations at different wavelengths within the Fe sub(I) 5250 A spectral line. From these comparisons, we find: the observed rotation of the azimuth is simulated to a reasonable degree by the theoretical formulations if the line-formation parameter eta 0 is varied over the sunspot; these variations in eta 0 are substantiated by the line-intensity data; for the MSFC system, Faraday rotation can be neglected for field strengths less than 1800 G and field inclinations greater than 45 0 ; to minimize the effects of Faraday rotation in sunspot umbrae, MSFC magnetograph measurements must be made in the far wings of the Zeeman-sensitive spectral line. (orig.)

  7. The upgrade of the LHCb Vertex Locator (VELO)

    CERN Document Server

    van Beuzekom, M

    2014-01-01

    The upgrade of the LHCb experiment, planned for 2018, will enable the detector to run at a luminosity of 2 x 10$^{33}$ cm$^{-22}$s$^{-1}$ and explore New Physics effects in the beauty and charm sector with unprecedented precision. To achieve this, the entire readout will be transformed into a triggerless system operating at 40 MHz, where the event selection algorithms will be executed by high-level software in the CPU farm. The upgraded silicon vertex detector (VELO) must be lightweight, radiation hard, vacuum compatible, and has to drive data to the data acquisition system at speeds of up to 3 Tbit/s. This challenge will be met with a new VELO design based on hybrid pixel detectors, positioned to within 5 mm of the LHC colliding beams. The sensors have 55 x 55 $\\mu$m$^2$ square pixels and the VeloPix ASIC, which is being developed for the readout, is based on the Timepix/Medipix family of chips. The hottest ASIC will have to cope with integrated hit rates of up to 900 MHz which translates to a bandwidth of m...

  8. A dynamic cellular vertex model of growing epithelial tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shao-Zhen; Li, Bo; Feng, Xi-Qiao

    2017-04-01

    Intercellular interactions play a significant role in a wide range of biological functions and processes at both the cellular and tissue scales, for example, embryogenesis, organogenesis, and cancer invasion. In this paper, a dynamic cellular vertex model is presented to study the morphomechanics of a growing epithelial monolayer. The regulating role of stresses in soft tissue growth is revealed. It is found that the cells originating from the same parent cell in the monolayer can orchestrate into clustering patterns as the tissue grows. Collective cell migration exhibits a feature of spatial correlation across multiple cells. Dynamic intercellular interactions can engender a variety of distinct tissue behaviors in a social context. Uniform cell proliferation may render high and heterogeneous residual compressive stresses, while stress-regulated proliferation can effectively release the stresses, reducing the stress heterogeneity in the tissue. The results highlight the critical role of mechanical factors in the growth and morphogenesis of epithelial tissues and help understand the development and invasion of epithelial tumors.

  9. Comparison of forward collider vertex detectors for B physics at hadron accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harr, R.F.; Karchin, P.E.; Kennedy, C.J.

    1993-01-01

    Two silicon vertex detector designs have been proposed for a forward collider B physics experiment at the SSC: in one the silicon system is put outside the beampipe (like in the forward part of the proposed BCD detector); and in the other the silicon system is put inside the beampipe, close to the circulating beams, with the use of open-quote roman pots close-quote (as in the COBEX proposal). In what follows these will be referred to as the inside and outside designs. The two designs are significantly different in their construction and impact on the rest of the experiment. The authors would like to understand how the designs compare for doing B physics and what are the factors that most greatly influence the results. Two measurements relying on the vertex detector and of particular importance for B physics are the reconstructed vertex position and B mass. They have analyzed the resolution achievable in these 2 quantities for open-quote models close-quote of the two forward collider vertex detector designs. The design parameters - beampipe radius and thickness, silicon position and resolution, etc. - have been varied about their normal values to observe their effect on these resolutions. They find very little difference between the two designs; both give nearly the same decay length error, impact parameter error, and reconstructed B mass error, for a large range of geometrical parameters. The design parameter having the most significant impact on the errors of B decay vertices is found to be the point resolution of the silicon detectors

  10. Track and Vertex Reconstruction in the ATLAS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Lacuesta, V; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    The track and vertex reconstruction algorithms of the ATLAS Inner Detector have demonstrated excellent performance in the early data from the LHC. However, the rapidly increas- ing number of interactions per bunch crossing introduces new challenges both in computational aspects and physics performance. The combination of both silicon and gas based detectors provides high precision impact parameter and momentum measurement of charged particles, with high efficiency and small fake rate. Vertex reconstruction is used to identify with high efficiency the hard scattering process and to measure the amount of pile-up interactions, both aspects are cru- cial for many physics analyses. The performance of track and vertex reconstruction efficiency and resolution achieved in the 2011 and 2012 data-taking period are presented.

  11. Track and Vertex Reconstruction in the ATLAS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Lacuesta, V; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    The track and vertex reconstruction algorithms of the ATLAS Inner Detector have demonstrated excellent performance in the early data from the LHC. However, the rapidly increas- ing number of interactions per bunch crossing introduces new challenges both in computational aspects and physics performance. The combination of both silicon and gas based detectors pro- vides high precision impact parameter and momentum measurement of charged particles, with high efficiency and small fake rate. Vertex reconstruction is used to identify with high efficiency the hard scattering process and to measure the amount of pile-up interactions, both aspects are cru- cial for many physics analyses. The performance of track and vertex reconstruction efficiency and resolution achieved in the 2011 and 2012 data-taking period are presented.

  12. Plethystic vertex operators and boson-fermion correspondences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fauser, Bertfried; Jarvis, Peter D; King, Ronald C

    2016-01-01

    We study the algebraic properties of plethystic vertex operators, introduced in (2010 J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 43 405202), underlying the structure of symmetric functions associated with certain generalized universal character rings of subgroups of the general linear group, defined to stabilize tensors of Young symmetry type characterized by a partition of arbitrary shape π . Here we establish an extension of the well-known boson-fermion correspondence involving Schur functions and their associated (Bernstein) vertex operators: for each π , the modes generated by the plethystic vertex operators and their suitably constructed duals, satisfy the anticommutation relations of a complex Clifford algebra. The combinatorial manipulations underlying the results involve exchange identities exploiting the Hopf-algebraic structure of certain symmetric function series and their plethysms. (paper)

  13. Measurement of Rb Using a Vertex Mass Tag

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steiner, R.; Benvenuti, A.C.; Coller, J.A.; Hedges, S.J.; Johnson, A.S.; Shank, J.T.; Whitaker, J.S.; Allen, N.J.; Cotton, R.; Dervan, P.J.; Hasan, A.; McKemey, A.K.; Watts, S.J.; Caldwell, D.O.; Lu, A.; Yellin, S.J.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Coyne, D.G.; Fernandez, J.P.; Liu, X.; Reinertsen, P.L.; Schalk, T.; Schumm, B.A.; DOliveira, A.; Johnson, R.A.; Meadows, B.T.; Nussbaum, M.; Dima, M.; Harton, J.L.; Smy, M.B.; Staengle, H.; Wilson, R.J.; Baranko, G.; Fahey, S.; Fan, C.; Krishna, N.M.; Lauber, J.A.; Nauenberg, U.; Wagner, D.L.; Bazarko, A.O.; Bolton, T.; Rowson, P.C.; Shaevitz, M.H.; Camanzi, B.; Mazzucato, E.; Piemontese, L.; Calcaterra, A.; De Sangro, R.; Peruzzi, I.; Piccolo, M.; Eisenstein, B.I.; Gladding, G.; Karliner, I.; Shapiro, G.; Steiner, H.; Bardon, O.; Burrows, P.N.; Busza, W.; Cowan, R.F.; Dong, D.N.; Fero, M.J.; Gonzalez, S.; Kendall, H.W.; Lath, A.; Lia, V.; Osborne, L.S.; Quigley, J.; Taylor, F.E.; Torrence, E.; Verdier, R.; Williams, D.C.

    1998-01-01

    We report a new measurement of R b =Γ Z 0 →bbar b /Γ Z 0 →hadrons using a double tag technique, where the b hemisphere selection is based on the reconstructed mass of the B hadron decay vertex. The measurement was performed using a sample of 130x10 3 hadronic Z 0 events, collected with the SLD detector at SLC. The method utilizes the 3D vertexing abilities of the CCD pixel vertex detector and the small stable SLC beams to obtain a high b -tagging efficiency and purity. We obtain R b =0.2142±0.0034(stat) ±0.0015(syst)±0.0002( R c ) . copyright 1998 The American Physical Society

  14. Track and vertex reconstruction in the ATLAS experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacuesta, V

    2013-01-01

    The track and vertex reconstruction algorithms of the ATLAS Inner Detector have demonstrated excellent performance in the early data from the LHC. However, the rapidly increasing number of interactions per bunch crossing introduces new challenges both in computational aspects and physics performance. The combination of both silicon and gas based detectors provides high precision impact parameter and momentum measurement of charged particles, with high efficiency and small fake rate. Vertex reconstruction is used to identify with high efficiency the hard scattering process and to measure the amount of pile-up interactions, both aspects are crucial for many physics analyses. The performance of track and vertex reconstruction efficiency and resolution achieved in the 2011 and 2012 data-taking period are presented.

  15. Plethystic vertex operators and boson-fermion correspondences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauser, Bertfried; Jarvis, Peter D.; King, Ronald C.

    2016-10-01

    We study the algebraic properties of plethystic vertex operators, introduced in (2010 J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 43 405202), underlying the structure of symmetric functions associated with certain generalized universal character rings of subgroups of the general linear group, defined to stabilize tensors of Young symmetry type characterized by a partition of arbitrary shape π. Here we establish an extension of the well-known boson-fermion correspondence involving Schur functions and their associated (Bernstein) vertex operators: for each π, the modes generated by the plethystic vertex operators and their suitably constructed duals, satisfy the anticommutation relations of a complex Clifford algebra. The combinatorial manipulations underlying the results involve exchange identities exploiting the Hopf-algebraic structure of certain symmetric function series and their plethysms.

  16. [The influence of polymerization time on physicochemical properties of the acrylic resin Vertex RS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraczak, Bogumiła; Sobolewska, Ewa; Ey-Chmielewska, Halina; Skowronek, Maria; Błazewicz, Stanisław

    2009-01-01

    A good denture can only be produced through proper actions during the clinical and laboratory stages of the production process. The aim of this study was to determine if a change in polymerization time affects the physicochemical properties of polymethacrylate material used for dentures. We examined the acrylic resin Vertex R.S. polymerized for 15, 25, 40, or 60 minutes. Palapress Vario was taken as reference material. Static bending, microhardness, surface wettability, and susceptibility to abrasion were determined. The microhardness test showed that most of the samples had similar Vickers hardness (VS) values, except for the sample polymerized for 25 min. which demonstrated a significantly higher value. Grindability was affected by a change in polymerization time. Mass loss was greatest for samples polymerized for 15, 25, and 60 min. and smallest for Vertex 40 and Palapress Vario. We also observed differences in the wetting angle. Vertex 40 and 60 had a relatively low wetting angle signifying that longer polymerization time results in lower hydrophobicity of the material. The present study has demonstrated that polymerization time has a significant effect on the hardness and some mechanical properties of the acrylic resin.

  17. QCD calculation of π0γγ vertex at equal Euclidean q2 of both photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voloshin, M.B.

    1982-01-01

    The form factor of the π 6 γγ vertex at equal space-like four- momentum q 2 of the photons (q 1 2 =q 2 2 =-Q 2 ) and a small four- momentum p 2 of the pion is calculated within QCD. Explicit expressions for leading perturbative and non perturbative preasymptotic corrections are derived. To find the latter correction matrix elements of operators of dimension d=5 between the pion and vacuum are calculated. The result for the form factor smoothly matches at Q 2 approximately 0.5 GeV 2 the estimate based on the vector mesom dominance model [ru

  18. Effects of Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus on the fitness of the vector Diaphorina citri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, S-L; Li, Y-H; Zhou, Y-T; Xu, W-M; Cuthbertson, A G S; Guo, Y-J; Qiu, B-L

    2016-12-01

    The Asian citrus psyllid (ACP), Diaphorina citri Kuwayama transmits the bacterium 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' (Las), which causes citrus huanglongbing (HLB) disease. Although many studies have been conducted on the biology of ACP on different host plants, few have taken the plant, Las bacteria and the vector insect within one context to evaluate the effects of Las on the fitness of ACP under field conditions. Understanding the relationship between Las and ACP is critical for both ACP and HLB disease management. We estimated the development and survival of ACP immatures, the longevity and fecundity of ACP female adults in four treatments (Las-positive or -negative ACP on Las-infected and -free citrus plants). Las-positive ACP immatures developed significantly faster on Las-infected citrus than those on Las-free plants. The fecundity and longevity of Las-positive female adults were also greater, or longer on Las-infected citrus shoots, whereas the survival of Las-positive immatures was significantly lower on Las-infected citrus shoots, compared to those that developed on Las-free plants. Similarly, the intrinsic rate of population increase (r m ) was highest (0·1404) when Las-positive ACP fed on Las-infected citrus shoots and the lowest (0·1328) when the Las-negative ACP fed on Las-free citrus shoots. Both the Las infection in ACP and citrus plants had obvious effects on the biology of ACP. When compared to the Las infection in ACP insects, the Las infection in citrus shoots had a more significant effect on the fitness of ACP. To efficiently prevent the occurrence and spread of HLB disease, it is critical to understand the ecological basis of vector outbreaks and disease incidence, especially under field conditions. Thus, this study has increased our understanding of the epidemiology of HLB transmitted by psyllids in nature. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  19. High speed digital TDC for D0 vertex reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Guosheng; Partridge, R.

    1992-01-01

    A high speed digital TDC has been built as part of the Level 0 trigger for the D0 experiment at Fermilab. The digital TDC is used to make a fast determination of the primary vertex position by timing the arrival time of beam jets detected in the Level 0 counters. The vertex position is then used by the Level 1 trigger to determine the proper sinθ weighting factors for calculation transverse energies. Commercial GaAs integrated circuits are used in the digital TDC to obtain a time resolution of σ t == 226 ps

  20. Simulations with the PANDA micro-vertex-detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kliemt, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    The PANDA experiment will be built at the upcoming FAIR facility at GSI in Darmstadt, featuring antiproton-proton reactions hadron physics in a medium energy range. Charm physics will play an important role and therefore secondary decays relatively close to the interaction zone as well. The MVD will be the detector closest to these and will provide high-quality vertex position measurements. Alongside the detector layout and hardware development a detailed detector simulation and reconstruction software is required. This work contains the detailed description and the performance studies of the software developed for the MVD. Furthermore, vertexing tools are introduced and their performance is studied for the MVD.

  1. The design and performance of the ZEUS micro vertex detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polini, A.; Brock, I.; Goers, S.

    2007-08-01

    In order to extend the tracking acceptance, to improve the primary and secondary vertex reconstruction and thus enhancing the tagging capabilities for short lived particles, the ZEUS experiment at the HERA Collider at DESY installed a silicon strip vertex detector. The barrel part of the detector is a 63 cm long cylinder with silicon sensors arranged around an elliptical beampipe. The forward part consists of four circular shaped disks. In total just over 200k channels are read out using 2.9 m 2 of silicon. In this report a detailed overview of the design and construction of the detector is given and the performance of the completed system is reviewed. (orig.)

  2. Preliminary studies for the LHCb vertex detector vacuum system

    CERN Document Server

    Doets, M; Van Bakel, N; Van den Brand, J F J; van den Brand, Jo

    2000-01-01

    We lay down some general considerations which will serve as a starting point for design studies of a realistic LHCb vertex detector vacuum system. Based on these considerations, we propose a design strategy and identify issues to be further studied. In particular we try to outline some boundary conditions imposed by LHC and LHCb on the vacuum system. We discuss two possibilities for the LHCb vertex detector vacuum system. The preferred strategy uses a differentially pumped vacuum system with the silicon detectors separated from the beam line vacuum. Some estimations on static vacuum pressures and gas flows are presented.

  3. Vertex-Detector R&D for CLIC

    OpenAIRE

    Dannheim, Dominik

    2013-01-01

    A detector concept based on hybrid planar pixel-detector technology is under development for the CLIC vertex detector. It comprises fast, low-power and small-pitch readout ASICs implemented in 65 nm CMOS technology (CLICpix) coupled to ultra-thin sensors via low-mass interconnects. The power dissipation of the readout chips is reduced by means of power pulsing, allowing for a cooling system based on forced gas flow. In this paper the CLIC vertex-detector requirements are reviewed and the curr...

  4. RAVE-a Detector-independent vertex reconstruction toolkit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Mitaroff, Winfried; Moser, Fabian

    2007-01-01

    A detector-independent toolkit for vertex reconstruction (RAVE) is being developed, along with a standalone framework (VERTIGO) for testing, analyzing and debugging. The core algorithms represent state of the art for geometric vertex finding and fitting by both linear (Kalman filter) and robust estimation methods. Main design goals are ease of use, flexibility for embedding into existing software frameworks, extensibility, and openness. The implementation is based on modern object-oriented techniques, is coded in C++ with interfaces for Java and Python, and follows an open-source approach. A beta release is available

  5. The RAVE/VERTIGO vertex reconstruction toolkit and framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waltenberger, W.; Mitaroff, W.; Moser, F.; Pflugfelder, B.; Riedel, H. V.

    2008-07-01

    A detector-independent toolkit for vertex reconstruction (RAVE1) is being developed, along with a standalone framework (VERTIGO2) for testing, analyzing and debugging. The core algorithms represent state-of-the-art for geometric vertex finding and fitting by both linear (Kalman filter) and robust estimation methods. Main design goals are ease of use, flexibility for embedding into existing software frameworks, extensibility, and openness. The implementation is based on modern object-oriented techniques, is coded in C++ with interfaces for Java and Python, and follows an open-source approach. A beta release is available.

  6. RAVE-a Detector-independent vertex reconstruction toolkit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waltenberger, Wolfgang [Institute of High Energy Physics, Austrian Academy of Sciences A-1050 Vienna (Austria)], E-mail: walten@hephy.oeaw.ac.at; Mitaroff, Winfried; Moser, Fabian [Institute of High Energy Physics, Austrian Academy of Sciences A-1050 Vienna (Austria)

    2007-10-21

    A detector-independent toolkit for vertex reconstruction (RAVE) is being developed, along with a standalone framework (VERTIGO) for testing, analyzing and debugging. The core algorithms represent state of the art for geometric vertex finding and fitting by both linear (Kalman filter) and robust estimation methods. Main design goals are ease of use, flexibility for embedding into existing software frameworks, extensibility, and openness. The implementation is based on modern object-oriented techniques, is coded in C++ with interfaces for Java and Python, and follows an open-source approach. A beta release is available.

  7. The RAVE/VERTIGO vertex reconstruction toolkit and framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waltenberger, W; Mitaroff, W; Moser, F; Pflugfelder, B; Riedel, H V [Austrian Academy of Sciences, Institute of High Energy Physics, A-1050 Vienna (Austria)], E-mail: walten@hephy.oeaw.ac.at

    2008-07-15

    A detector-independent toolkit for vertex reconstruction (RAVE{sup 1}) is being developed, along with a standalone framework (VERTIGO{sup 2}) for testing, analyzing and debugging. The core algorithms represent state-of-the-art for geometric vertex finding and fitting by both linear (Kalman filter) and robust estimation methods. Main design goals are ease of use, flexibility for embedding into existing software frameworks, extensibility, and openness. The implementation is based on modern object-oriented techniques, is coded in C++ with interfaces for Java and Python, and follows an open-source approach. A beta release is available.

  8. Simulations of silicon vertex tracker for star experiment at RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odyniec, G.; Cebra, D.; Christie, W.; Naudet, C.; Schroeder, L.; Wilson, W. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Liko, D. [Institut fur Hochenenergiephysik, Vienna, (Austria); Cramer, J.; Prindle, D.; Trainor, T. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle (United States); Braithwaite, W. [Univ. of Arkansas, Little Rock (United States)

    1991-12-31

    The first computer simulations to optimize the Silicon Vertex Tracker (SVT) designed for the STAR experiment at RHIC are presented. The physics goals and the expected complexity of the events at RHIC dictate the design of a tracking system for the STAR experiment. The proposed tracking system will consist of a silicon vertex tracker (SVT) to locate the primary interaction and secondary decay vertices and to improve the momentum resolution, and a time projection chamber (TPC), positioned inside a solenoidal magnet, for continuous tracking.

  9. Simulations with the PANDA micro-vertex-detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kliemt, Ralf

    2013-07-17

    The PANDA experiment will be built at the upcoming FAIR facility at GSI in Darmstadt, featuring antiproton-proton reactions hadron physics in a medium energy range. Charm physics will play an important role and therefore secondary decays relatively close to the interaction zone as well. The MVD will be the detector closest to these and will provide high-quality vertex position measurements. Alongside the detector layout and hardware development a detailed detector simulation and reconstruction software is required. This work contains the detailed description and the performance studies of the software developed for the MVD. Furthermore, vertexing tools are introduced and their performance is studied for the MVD.

  10. Electromagnetic form factors and vertex constants for 6Li

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blokhintsev, L.D.; Shvarts, I.A.

    1977-01-01

    It has been assumed that the main contribution to the rapidly changing part of the charge form factor of 6 Li provides the amplitude of the triangle diagram containing virtual lines of deuteron and α particle. The vertex constant G 2 for the 6 Li→α+d decay is expressed through the nuclear charge radii for 6 Li, d, and α. Taking into account coulomb interaction in the vertex of the 6 Li→α+d reaction increases G 2 by about a factor of two. The account of virtuality of a deuteron cluster also leads to an increase in G 2

  11. Study on constructing retroviral vector carrying HSV-tk gene and its antitumor effect in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Yujun; Hui Guozhen; Hu Jin

    1997-01-01

    The author reports the construction of retroviral vector PLNTK carrying HsV-tk gene driven by pgk promoter and the successful transferring into cells NBA 2 and SHG 44 respectively as shown by PCR. In vitro study, HSV-tk-expressed-cells prove to be more sensitive to ACV than parent cells. The sensitivity of SHGLNTK and NBALNTK to ACV is 1000 and 500 times that of their parent cells respectively. 3 H-TdR test demonstrated that the DNA replication in gene modified cells is more suppressed than that of parent cells when treated with ACV. Moreover, the ACV sensitivity level of parent cells is enhanced when co-cultured with gene modified cells, which suggests the existence of the bystander effect

  12. Multiple scattering effects with cyclical terms in active remote sensing of vegetated surface using vector radiative transfer theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    The energy transport in a vegetated (corn) surface layer is examined by solving the vector radiative transfer equation using a numerical iterative approach. This approach allows a higher order that includes the multiple scattering effects. Multiple scattering effects are important when the optical t...

  13. Elementary vectors

    CERN Document Server

    Wolstenholme, E Œ

    1978-01-01

    Elementary Vectors, Third Edition serves as an introductory course in vector analysis and is intended to present the theoretical and application aspects of vectors. The book covers topics that rigorously explain and provide definitions, principles, equations, and methods in vector analysis. Applications of vector methods to simple kinematical and dynamical problems; central forces and orbits; and solutions to geometrical problems are discussed as well. This edition of the text also provides an appendix, intended for students, which the author hopes to bridge the gap between theory and appl

  14. Larvicidal effects of a neem (Azadirachta indica) oil formulation on the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Okumu, F.O.; Knols, B.G.J.; Fillinger, U.

    2007-01-01

    Background - Larviciding is a key strategy used in many vector control programmes around the world. Costs could be reduced if larvicides could be manufactured locally. The potential of natural products as larvicides against the main African malaria vector, Anopheles gambiae s.s was evaluated.

  15. On the local vertex antimagic total coloring of some families tree

    Science.gov (United States)

    Febriani Putri, Desi; Dafik; Hesti Agustin, Ika; Alfarisi, Ridho

    2018-04-01

    Let G(V, E) be a graph of vertex set V and edge set E. Local vertex antimagic total coloring developed from local edge and local vertex antimagic coloring of graph. Local vertex antimagic total coloring is defined f:V(G)\\cup E(G)\\to \\{1,2,3,\\ldots,|V(G)|+|E(G)|\\} if for any two adjacent vertices v 1 and v 2, w({v}1)\

  16. Performance-Optimization Studies for the CLIC Vertex Detector

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2085406; Roloff, Philipp

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is a mutli-TeV linear e+e- collider currently under development at CERN. In the post-LHC era, CLIC will allow to explore a great number of searches for New Physics such as the precise measurements of the Higgs boson. In this master thesis, we mainly focus on the development and the improvement of the vertex detector. The vertex detector requires excellent spatial resolution, low mass, geometrical coverage down to low polar angles, high rate readout for the sensors and new cooling technologies for heat removal. Considering such requirements, the CLIC vertex detector technology is far more advanced in comparison to the technologies currently used in particle physics. This project consists of two main parts. In the first part, we study the vertex detector and optimize its geometry for the use of airflow cooling techniques and also for flavor tagging. In the second part, we implement a decoder which can respect the timing constraints for the CLICpix chip, a silicon pixel detect...

  17. SVT: an online silicon vertex tracker for the CDF upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bardi, A.; Belforte, S.; Berryhill, J.

    1997-07-01

    The SVT is an online tracker for the CDF upgrade which will reconstruct 2D tracks using information from the Silicon VerteX detector (SVXII) and Central Outer Tracker (COT). The precision measurement of the track impact parameter will then be used to select and record large samples of B hadrons. We discuss the overall architecture, algorithms, and hardware implementation of the system

  18. Fast simulation and topological vertex finding in JAVA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walkowiak, Wolfgang

    2001-01-01

    An overview of the fast Monte Carlo simulation for NLC detector studies as currently provided in the Java Analysis Studio environment is presented. Special emphasis is given to the simulation of tracks. In addition, the SLD collaboration's topological vertex finding algorithm (ZVTOP) has been implemented in the Java Analysis Studio framework

  19. Random matrices and the six-vertex model

    CERN Document Server

    Bleher, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    This book provides a detailed description of the Riemann-Hilbert approach (RH approach) to the asymptotic analysis of both continuous and discrete orthogonal polynomials, and applications to random matrix models as well as to the six-vertex model. The RH approach was an important ingredient in the proofs of universality in unitary matrix models. This book gives an introduction to the unitary matrix models and discusses bulk and edge universality. The six-vertex model is an exactly solvable two-dimensional model in statistical physics, and thanks to the Izergin-Korepin formula for the model with domain wall boundary conditions, its partition function matches that of a unitary matrix model with nonpolynomial interaction. The authors introduce in this book the six-vertex model and include a proof of the Izergin-Korepin formula. Using the RH approach, they explicitly calculate the leading and subleading terms in the thermodynamic asymptotic behavior of the partition function of the six-vertex model with domain wa...

  20. Multipole expansion of vertex functions in an arbitrary frame

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daumens, Michel

    1977-01-01

    Vertex functions are expanded on the bases of tensor spherical harmonics and tensor multipoles. The coefficients of the expansions are rotational invariant form factors. The relations with those defined in particular frames by Durand, De Celles and Marr, and by De Rafael are exhibited. Finally multipolar form factors are built which are irreducible under pure Lorentz transformations [fr

  1. Tripartite connection condition for a quantum graph vertex

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cheon, T.; Exner, Pavel; Turek, Ondřej

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 375, č. 2 (2010), s. 113-118 ISSN 0375-9601 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC06002 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : Schrodinger operator * Singular vertex * Boundary conditions Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.963, year: 2010

  2. Tests of track segment and vertex finding with neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denby, B.; Lessner, E.; Lindsey, C.S.

    1990-04-01

    Feed forward neural networks have been trained, using back-propagation, to find the slopes of simulated track segments in a straw chamber and to find the vertex of tracks from both simulated and real events in a more conventional drift chamber geometry. Network architectures, training, and performance are presented. 12 refs., 7 figs

  3. Recent developments in high precision vertex chambers at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rust, D.R.

    1984-04-01

    Three detectors MARK II, MAC, AND HRS are using or planning small drift chambers placed as close as possible to the interaction print at PEP. There is also a program of development for a gaseous vertex detector for MARK II at SLC. All these programs are reviewed. 13 references

  4. Performance of the CDF Silicon VerteX detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, O.

    1992-11-01

    The current status of the online and offline performance of the CDF Silicon VerteX detector is presented. So far, at low radiation dose, the device delivers good quality data. After the latest alignment using collision data, a spatial resolution of 13 pm is achieved in the transverse plane, demonstrating that CDF has a powerful tool to detect b decay vertices

  5. TECHNICAL DESIGN REPORT OF THE FORWARD SILICON VERTEX (FVTX)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PHENIX EXPERIMENT; OBRIEN,E.; PAK, R.; DREES, K.A.; (PHENIX EXPERIMENT COLLABORATORS)

    2007-08-01

    The main goal of the RHIC heavy ion program is the discovery of the novel ultra-hot high-density state of matter predicted by the fundamental theory of strong interactions and created in collisions of heavy nuclei, the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP). From measurements of the large elliptic flow of light mesons and baryons and their large suppression at high transverse momentum pT that have been made at RHIC, there is evidence that new degrees of freedom, characteristic of a deconfined QCD medium, drive the dynamics of nucleus-nucleus collisions. It has been recognized, however, that the potential of light quarks and gluons to characterize the properties of the QGP medium is limited and the next phase of the RHIC program calls for the precise determination of its density, temperature, opacity and viscosity using qualitatively new probes, such as heavy quarks. We propose the construction of two Forward Silicon Vertex Trackers (FVTX) for the PHENIX experiment that will directly identify and distinguish charm and beauty decays within the acceptance of the muon spectrometers. The FVTX will provide this essential coverage over a range of forward and backward rapidities (1.2 < |y| < 2.4)--a rapidity range coverage which not only brings significantly larger acceptance to PHENIX but which is critical for separating cold nuclear matter effects from QGP effects and is critical for measuring the proton spin contributions over a significant fraction of the kinematic range of interest. In addition, the FVTX will provide greatly reduced background and improved mass resolution for dimuon events, culminating in the first measurements of the {upsilon}{prime} and Drell-Yan at RHIC. These same heavy flavor and dimuon measurements in p+p collisions will allow us to place significant constraints on the gluon and sea quark contributions to the proton's spin and to make fundamentally new tests of the Sivers function universality.

  6. TECHNICAL DESIGN REPORT OF THE FORWARD SILICON VERTEX (FVTX)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PHENIX EXPERIMENT; OBRIEN, E.; PAK, R.; DREES, K.A.

    2007-01-01

    The main goal of the RHIC heavy ion program is the discovery of the novel ultra-hot high-density state of matter predicted by the fundamental theory of strong interactions and created in collisions of heavy nuclei, the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP). From measurements of the large elliptic flow of light mesons and baryons and their large suppression at high transverse momentum pT that have been made at RHIC, there is evidence that new degrees of freedom, characteristic of a deconfined QCD medium, drive the dynamics of nucleus-nucleus collisions. It has been recognized, however, that the potential of light quarks and gluons to characterize the properties of the QGP medium is limited and the next phase of the RHIC program calls for the precise determination of its density, temperature, opacity and viscosity using qualitatively new probes, such as heavy quarks. We propose the construction of two Forward Silicon Vertex Trackers (FVTX) for the PHENIX experiment that will directly identify and distinguish charm and beauty decays within the acceptance of the muon spectrometers. The FVTX will provide this essential coverage over a range of forward and backward rapidities (1.2 < |y| < 2.4)--a rapidity range coverage which not only brings significantly larger acceptance to PHENIX but which is critical for separating cold nuclear matter effects from QGP effects and is critical for measuring the proton spin contributions over a significant fraction of the kinematic range of interest. In addition, the FVTX will provide greatly reduced background and improved mass resolution for dimuon events, culminating in the first measurements of the υ(prime) and Drell-Yan at RHIC. These same heavy flavor and dimuon measurements in p+p collisions will allow us to place significant constraints on the gluon and sea quark contributions to the proton's spin and to make fundamentally new tests of the Sivers function universality

  7. The Effect of Macroeconomic Variables on Value-Added Agriculture: Approach of Vector Autoregresive Bayesian Model (BVAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Pishbahar

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available There are different ideas and opinions about the effects of macroeconomic variables on real and nominal variables. To answer the question of whether changes in macroeconomic variables as a political tool is useful over a business cycle, understanding the effect of macroeconomic variables on economic growth is important. In the present study, the Bayesian Vector autoregresive model and seasonality data for the years between 1991 and 2013 was used to determine the impact of monetary policy on value-added agriculture. Predicts of Vector autoregresive model are usually divertaed due to a lot of parameters in the model. Bayesian vector autoregresive model estimates more reliable predictions due to reducing the number of included parametrs and considering the former models. Compared to the Vector Autoregressive model, the coefficients are estimated more accurately. Based on the results of RMSE in this study, previous function Nrmal-Vyshart was identified as a suitable previous disteribution. According to the results of the impulse response function, the sudden effects of shocks in macroeconomic variables on the value added in agriculture and domestic venture capital are stable. The effects on the exchange rates, tax revenues and monetary will bemoderated after 7, 5 and 4periods. Monetary policy shocks ,in the first half of the year, increased the value added of agriculture, while in the second half of the year had a depressing effect on the value added.

  8. Ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials to vertex low frequency vibration as a diagnostic test for superior canal dehiscence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verrecchia, Luca; Westin, Magnus; Duan, Maoli; Brantberg, Krister

    2016-04-01

    To explore ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (oVEMP) to low-frequency vertex vibration (125 Hz) as a diagnostic test for superior canal dehiscence (SCD) syndrome. The oVEMP using 125 Hz single cycle bone-conducted vertex vibration were tested in 15 patients with unilateral superior canal dehiscence (SCD) syndrome, 15 healthy controls and in 20 patients with unilateral vestibular loss due to vestibular neuritis. Amplitude, amplitude asymmetry ratio, latency and interaural latency difference were parameters of interest. The oVEMP amplitude was significantly larger in SCD patients when affected sides (53 μVolts) were compared to non-affected (17.2 μVolts) or compared to healthy controls (13.6 μVolts). Amplitude larger than 33.8 μVolts separates effectively the SCD ears from the healthy ones with sensitivity of 87% and specificity of 93%. The other three parameters showed an overlap between affected SCD ears and non-affected as well as between SCD ears and those in the two control groups. oVEMP amplitude distinguishes SCD ears from healthy ones using low-frequency vibration stimuli at vertex. Amplitude analysis of oVEMP evoked by low-frequency vertex bone vibration stimulation is an additional indicator of SCD syndrome and might serve for diagnosing SCD patients with coexistent conductive middle ear problems. Copyright © 2016 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Facile fabrication of eco-friendly nano-mosquitocides: Biophysical characterization and effectiveness on neglected tropical mosquito vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindarajan, Marimuthu; Hoti, S L; Benelli, Giovanni

    2016-12-01

    Mosquito (Diptera: Culicidae) vectors are solely responsible for transmitting important diseases such as malaria, dengue, chikungunya, Japanese encephalitis, lymphatic filariasis and Zika virus. Eco-friendly control tools of Culicidae vectors are a priority. In this study, we proposed a facile fabrication process of poly-disperse and stable silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) using a cheap leaf extract of Ichnocarpus frutescens (Apocyanaceae). Bio-reduced Ag NPs were characterized by UV-vis spectrophotometry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The acute toxicity of I. frutescens leaf extract and green-synthesized Ag NPs was evaluated against larvae of the malaria vector Anopheles subpictus, the dengue vector Aedes albopictus and the Japanese encephalitis vector Culex tritaeniorhynchus. Compared to the leaf aqueous extract, Ag NPs showed higher toxicity against A. subpictus, A. albopictus, and C. tritaeniorhynchus with LC 50 values of 14.22, 15.84 and 17.26μg/mL, respectively. Ag NPs were found safer to non-target mosquito predators Anisops bouvieri, Diplonychus indicus and Gambusia affinis, with LC 50 values ranging from 636.61 to 2098.61μg/mL. Overall, this research firstly shed light on the mosquitocidal potential of I. frutescens, a potential bio-resource for rapid, cheap and effective synthesis of poly-disperse and highly stable silver nanocrystals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Fine pitch and low material readout bus in the Silicon Pixel Vertex Tracker for the PHENIX Vertex Tracker upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, Kohei

    2010-01-01

    The construction of the Silicon Pixel Detector is starting in spring 2009 as project of the RHIC-PHENIX Silicon Vertex Tracker (VTX) upgrade at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. For the construction, we have developed a fine pitch and low material readout bus as the backbone parts of the VTX. In this article, we report the development and production of the readout bus.

  11. Evaluation of Pyrethrin Formulations on Dengue/Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever Vectors in the Laboratory and Sublethal Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Sulaiman

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available In Southeast Asia, Aedes aegypti (L. has been incriminated as principal vector of dengue viruses and Ae. albopictus as the secondary vector of dengue fever. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of three for-mula¬tions of pyrethrin derived from Tanacetum cinerariaefolium against the dengue/dengue haemorrhagic fever vectors Aedes aegypti and Ae. albopictus in the laboratory. The testings employed 2 methodologies: the WHO Larval Bioassay and WHO Adult Bioassay. The results showed that all the three pyrethrin formulations had larvicidal and adulticidal activi-ties. The impact of the sublethal doses of pyrethrin formulations on Aedes spp. larvae resulted in 4-6% of alive adult emergence compared to 90% of Ae. aegypti emerging adults and 96% Ae. albopictus alive adult emergence in the control. The impact of sublethal doses of the pyrethrin formulations caused very low fecundity on both Aedes spp. compared to the control (P< 0.05.

  12. Evaluation of Pyrethrin Formulations on Dengue/Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever Vectors in the Laboratory and Sublethal Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Sulaiman

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available In Southeast Asia, Aedes aegypti (L. has been incriminated as principal vector of dengue viruses and Ae. albopictus as the secondary vector of dengue fever. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of three for-mula¬tions of pyrethrin derived from Tanacetum cinerariaefolium against the dengue/dengue haemorrhagic fever vectors Aedes aegypti and Ae. albopictus in the laboratory. The testings employed 2 methodologies: the WHO Larval Bioassay and WHO Adult Bioassay. The results showed that all the three pyrethrin formulations had larvicidal and adulticidal activi-ties. The impact of the sublethal doses of pyrethrin formulations on Aedes spp. larvae resulted in 4-6% of alive adult emergence compared to 90% of Ae. aegypti emerging adults and 96% Ae. albopictus alive adult emergence in the control. The impact of sublethal doses of the pyrethrin formulations caused very low fecundity on both Aedes spp. compared to the control (P< 0.05.

  13. Effect of permethrin-treated bed nets on the spatial distribution of malaria vectors in western Kenya

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gimnig, John E.; Kolczak, Margarette S.; Hightower, Allen W.; Vulule, John M.; Schoute, Erik; Kamau, Luna; Phillips-Howard, Penelope A.; ter Kuile, Feiko O.; Nahlen, Bernard L.; Hawley, William A.

    2003-01-01

    The effect of insecticide (permethrin)-treated bed nets (ITNs) on the spatial distribution of malaria vectors in neighboring villages lacking ITNs was studied during a randomized controlled trial of ITNs in western Kenya. There was a trend of decreased abundance of Anopheles gambiae with decreasing

  14. Effective population sizes of a major vector of human diseases, Aedes aegypti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saarman, Norah P; Gloria-Soria, Andrea; Anderson, Eric C; Evans, Benjamin R; Pless, Evlyn; Cosme, Luciano V; Gonzalez-Acosta, Cassandra; Kamgang, Basile; Wesson, Dawn M; Powell, Jeffrey R

    2017-12-01

    The effective population size ( N e ) is a fundamental parameter in population genetics that determines the relative strength of selection and random genetic drift, the effect of migration, levels of inbreeding, and linkage disequilibrium. In many cases where it has been estimated in animals, N e is on the order of 10%-20% of the census size. In this study, we use 12 microsatellite markers and 14,888 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) to empirically estimate N e in Aedes aegypti , the major vector of yellow fever, dengue, chikungunya, and Zika viruses. We used the method of temporal sampling to estimate N e on a global dataset made up of 46 samples of Ae. aegypti that included multiple time points from 17 widely distributed geographic localities. Our N e estimates for Ae. aegypti fell within a broad range (~25-3,000) and averaged between 400 and 600 across all localities and time points sampled. Adult census size (N c ) estimates for this species range between one and five thousand, so the N e / N c ratio is about the same as for most animals. These N e values are lower than estimates available for other insects and have important implications for the design of genetic control strategies to reduce the impact of this species of mosquito on human health.

  15. Vector analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Brand, Louis

    2006-01-01

    The use of vectors not only simplifies treatments of differential geometry, mechanics, hydrodynamics, and electrodynamics, but also makes mathematical and physical concepts more tangible and easy to grasp. This text for undergraduates was designed as a short introductory course to give students the tools of vector algebra and calculus, as well as a brief glimpse into these subjects' manifold applications. The applications are developed to the extent that the uses of the potential function, both scalar and vector, are fully illustrated. Moreover, the basic postulates of vector analysis are brou

  16. Effects of Vector Backbone and Pseudotype on Lentiviral Vector-mediated Gene Transfer: Studies in Infant ADA-Deficient Mice and Rhesus Monkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbonaro Sarracino, Denise; Tarantal, Alice F; Lee, C Chang I.; Martinez, Michele; Jin, Xiangyang; Wang, Xiaoyan; Hardee, Cinnamon L; Geiger, Sabine; Kahl, Christoph A; Kohn, Donald B

    2014-01-01

    Systemic delivery of a lentiviral vector carrying a therapeutic gene represents a new treatment for monogenic disease. Previously, we have shown that transfer of the adenosine deaminase (ADA) cDNA in vivo rescues the lethal phenotype and reconstitutes immune function in ADA-deficient mice. In order to translate this approach to ADA-deficient severe combined immune deficiency patients, neonatal ADA-deficient mice and newborn rhesus monkeys were treated with species-matched and mismatched vectors and pseudotypes. We compared gene delivery by the HIV-1-based vector to murine γ-retroviral vectors pseudotyped with vesicular stomatitis virus-glycoprotein or murine retroviral envelopes in ADA-deficient mice. The vesicular stomatitis virus-glycoprotein pseudotyped lentiviral vectors had the highest titer and resulted in the highest vector copy number in multiple tissues, particularly liver and lung. In monkeys, HIV-1 or simian immunodeficiency virus vectors resulted in similar biodistribution in most tissues including bone marrow, spleen, liver, and lung. Simian immunodeficiency virus pseudotyped with the gibbon ape leukemia virus envelope produced 10- to 30-fold lower titers than the vesicular stomatitis virus-glycoprotein pseudotype, but had a similar tissue biodistribution and similar copy number in blood cells. The relative copy numbers achieved in mice and monkeys were similar when adjusted to the administered dose per kg. These results suggest that this approach can be scaled-up to clinical levels for treatment of ADA-deficient severe combined immune deficiency subjects with suboptimal hematopoietic stem cell transplantation options. PMID:24925206

  17. Effects of vector backbone and pseudotype on lentiviral vector-mediated gene transfer: studies in infant ADA-deficient mice and rhesus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbonaro Sarracino, Denise; Tarantal, Alice F; Lee, C Chang I; Martinez, Michele; Jin, Xiangyang; Wang, Xiaoyan; Hardee, Cinnamon L; Geiger, Sabine; Kahl, Christoph A; Kohn, Donald B

    2014-10-01

    Systemic delivery of a lentiviral vector carrying a therapeutic gene represents a new treatment for monogenic disease. Previously, we have shown that transfer of the adenosine deaminase (ADA) cDNA in vivo rescues the lethal phenotype and reconstitutes immune function in ADA-deficient mice. In order to translate this approach to ADA-deficient severe combined immune deficiency patients, neonatal ADA-deficient mice and newborn rhesus monkeys were treated with species-matched and mismatched vectors and pseudotypes. We compared gene delivery by the HIV-1-based vector to murine γ-retroviral vectors pseudotyped with vesicular stomatitis virus-glycoprotein or murine retroviral envelopes in ADA-deficient mice. The vesicular stomatitis virus-glycoprotein pseudotyped lentiviral vectors had the highest titer and resulted in the highest vector copy number in multiple tissues, particularly liver and lung. In monkeys, HIV-1 or simian immunodeficiency virus vectors resulted in similar biodistribution in most tissues including bone marrow, spleen, liver, and lung. Simian immunodeficiency virus pseudotyped with the gibbon ape leukemia virus envelope produced 10- to 30-fold lower titers than the vesicular stomatitis virus-glycoprotein pseudotype, but had a similar tissue biodistribution and similar copy number in blood cells. The relative copy numbers achieved in mice and monkeys were similar when adjusted to the administered dose per kg. These results suggest that this approach can be scaled-up to clinical levels for treatment of ADA-deficient severe combined immune deficiency subjects with suboptimal hematopoietic stem cell transplantation options.

  18. Operator Product Formulas in the Algebraic Approach of the Refined Topological Vertex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Li-Qiang; Wang Li-Fang; Wu Ke; Yang Jie

    2013-01-01

    The refined topological vertex of Iqbal—Kozçaz—Vafa has been investigated from the viewpoint of the quantum algebra of type W 1+∞ by Awata, Feigin, and Shiraishi. They introduced the trivalent intertwining operator Φ which is normal ordered along with some prefactors. We manage to establish formulas from the infinite operator product of the vertex operators and the generalized ones to restore this prefactor, and obtain an explicit formula for the vertex realization of the topological vertex as well as the refined topological vertex

  19. Effectiveness of Nitrous Oxide as a Liquid Injection Thrust Vector Control Fluid, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Nitrous Oxide is proposed as an energetic liquid injection thrust vector control fluid for vehicle attitude control during dynamic vehicle maneuvers. Pulled from the...

  20. NYVAC vector modified by C7L viral gene insertion improves T cell immune responses and effectiveness against leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Sampedro, L; Mejías-Pérez, E; S Sorzano, Carlos Óscar; Nájera, J L; Esteban, M

    2016-07-15

    The NYVAC poxvirus vector is used as vaccine candidate for HIV and other diseases, although there is only limited experimental information on its immunogenicity and effectiveness for use against human pathogens. Here we defined the selective advantage of NYVAC vectors in a mouse model by comparing the immune responses and protection induced by vectors that express the LACK (Leishmania-activated C-kinase antigen), alone or with insertion of the viral host range gene C7L that allows the virus to replicate in human cells. Using DNA prime/virus boost protocols, we show that replication-competent NYVAC-LACK that expresses C7L (NYVAC-LACK-C7L) induced higher-magnitude polyfunctional CD8(+) and CD4(+) primary adaptive and effector memory T cell responses (IFNγ, TNFα, IL-2, CD107a) to LACK antigen than non-replicating NYVAC-LACK. Compared to NYVAC-LACK, the NYVAC-LACK-C7L-induced CD8(+) T cell population also showed higher proliferation when stimulated with LACK antigen. After a challenge by subcutaneous Leishmania major metacyclic promastigotes, NYVAC-LACK-C7L-vaccinated mouse groups showed greater protection than the NYVAC-LACK-vaccinated group. Our results indicate that the type and potency of immune responses induced by LACK-expressing NYVAC vectors is improved by insertion of the C7L gene, and that a replication-competent vector as a vaccine renders greater protection against a human pathogen than a non-replicating vector. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Effectiveness of methoprene, an insect growth regulator, against malaria vectors in Fars, Iran: a field study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darabi, H; Vatandoost, H; Abaei, M R; Gharibi, O; Pakbaz, F

    2011-01-01

    Methoprene, an insect growth regulator, was evaluated under field conditions against the main malaria vectors in the Islamic Republic of Iran. The effect of 5, 10 and 20 kg ha(-1) concentration ofmethoprene granule formulation and 100 and 200 mL ha(-1) concentration of EC formulation was measured to determine any changes in Anophelini larval abundance and IE ratio in both rice fields and artificial ponds. In artificial ponds, granular methoprene at a dose of 20 kg ha(-1) inhibited adult emergence by 77.1% after 1 day and 65.9% after 3 days. The emulsifiable concentrate formulation of methoprene at 200 mL ha(-1) inhibited adult emergence by 83.7% after 1 day and 32.2% after 3 days. In rice fields, inhibition of emergence was 44.3% at 20 kg ha(-1) granule and 35.8% for emulsifiable concentrate at 200 mL ha(-1) after 3 days. The results vary depending on the mosquito species, treatment methods, breeding places and type of formulation.

  2. Effect of Vetiveria zizanioides L. Root extracts on the malarial vector, Anopheles stephensi Liston

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Aarthi

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the ovicidal and oviposition deterrent potential of the ethanolic extract from Vetiveria zizanioides (V. zizanioides roots against the malarial vector, Anopheles stephensi (A. stephensi . Methods: The dried clean V. zizanioides roots were powerdered and extracted with ethanol for 8 h in a soxhlet apparatus. After evaporation, the residue was dissolved in acetone. One hundred freshly laid eggs of A. stephensi were exposed to the extract at differnt concentrations for 48 h, and the hatch rate was calculated to evaluate the ovicidal activity. Those exposed to actone aqueous solution were used as control. The egg laying behavior of gravid female A. stephensi was also observed using oviposition deterrent test. Effective repellency (ER was used to evaluate the oviposition deterrent activity. Results: Exposure to the crude ethanol extract of V. zizanioides reduced the hatchability rate of A. stephensi eggs, and zero hatchability was exerted at 375 ppm. In the oviposition deterrent test, the extract alleviated the egg laying with an ER of 78.9% at the highest concentration of 375 ppm and even 53.7% at the lowest concentration of 125 ppm. Moreover, the negative values of oviposition active index also suggests the extract was a good deterrent agent. Conclusions: The ethanolic extract of V. zizanioides roots may be used an alternative pesticide to control A. stephensi at the early stage of life history, possibly due to the presence of various active chemical compounds.

  3. Vector velocimeter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    The present invention relates to a compact, reliable and low-cost vector velocimeter for example for determining velocities of particles suspended in a gas or fluid flow, or for determining velocity, displacement, rotation, or vibration of a solid surface, the vector velocimeter comprising a laser...

  4. Development of a silicon tracking and vertex detection system for the CBM experiment at FAIR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heuser, Johann M.

    2007-01-01

    The compressed baryonic matter (CBM) experiment is a fixed-target heavy-ion spectrometer planned at the future international Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) at GSI. The CBM research program will explore the phase diagram of Quantum Chromo Dynamics (QCD) in the region of high baryon chemical potentials, in other words nuclear matter at extreme densities. Matter of such forms is believed to exist in the interior of neutron stars and in the cores of certain types of supernovae. In the laboratory, the dense nuclear medium is created in collisions of heavy-ion beams with nuclear targets. With beam intensities of up to 10 12 ions per pulse, beam energies up to 45 GeV/nucleon, and high availability the SIS-300 synchrotron of FAIR will offer unique opportunities for this research. The CBM detector will identify hadrons and leptons in nuclear collisions with up to 1000 charged particles at event rates up to 10 MHz. The experiment will be optimized in particular for the detection of rare probes, like hadronic decays of D mesons and leptonic decays of light vector mesons, that can yield information on the initial dense phase of the collisions. The challenge is to accomplish in this environment high-resolution charged particle tracking, momentum measurement and secondary vertex selection with a silicon tracking and vertex detection system, the central component of the CBM detector. The system requirements include a very low material budget, radiation tolerant sensors with high spatial resolution, and a fast readout compatible with high-level-only triggers. The paper discusses the concept of the silicon detection system, the optimization of its layout, and the R and D on micro-strip and pixel sensors as well as front-end electronics for the building blocks of the detector stations

  5. Identification of events with a secondary vertex in the experiment EXCHARM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonyushkina, A.Yu.; Ivanov, V.V.; Potrebenikov, Yu.K.; Progulova, T.B.; Tatishvili, G.T.

    1996-01-01

    A simple algorithm for identifying events with secondary vertices (signal events) is suggested. The differences R x , R y between the largest and the smallest impact parameters D i of the tracks belonging to each of the events analyzed are used in establishing the identification criteria for signal and background events. An effective method for identifying the tracks associated with a particular secondary vertex in an event is developed. The method is based on the differences between the asymmetries exhibited by the sets D i for individual signal events and background events. The algorithm has been tested using simulated data. 12 refs., 7 figs

  6. Bounding the flavor-violating Hbs vertex from the B → Xsγ decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aranda, J I; Ramirez-Zavaleta, F; Tututi, E S; Montano, J; Toscano, J J

    2011-01-01

    The nondiagonal Hbs coupling within the context of an effective Yukawa sector that comprises SU L (2) x U Y (1)-invariant operators of up to dimension six is studied. The recent experimental result on B → X sγ with hard photons is employed to constrain the Hbs vertex, with which the branching ratio for the B s → γγ decay is estimated. It is found that the B s → γγ decay can reach a branching ratio of the order of 4 x 10 -8 .

  7. Soft yet Sharp Interfaces in a Vertex Model of Confluent Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sussman, Daniel M.; Schwarz, J. M.; Marchetti, M. Cristina; Manning, M. Lisa

    2018-01-01

    How can dense biological tissue maintain sharp boundaries between coexisting cell populations? We explore this question within a simple vertex model for cells, focusing on the role of topology and tissue surface tension. We show that the ability of cells to independently regulate adhesivity and tension, together with neighbor-based interaction rules, lets them support strikingly unusual interfaces. In particular, we show that mechanical- and fluctuation-based measurements of the effective surface tension of a cellular aggregate yield different results, leading to mechanically soft interfaces that are nevertheless extremely sharp.

  8. Operation and performance of the silicon vertex detector (SVX') at CDF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, P.P.

    1994-10-01

    The authors describe the operation and performance of the Silicon Vertex Detector (SVX'), which replaced the CDF SVX detector for run lb of the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The new features of the SVX' include AC coupled readout, Field OXide Field Effect Transistor (FOXFET) biasing and radiation hard front end electronics. The authors expect the detector to survive beyond the 100 pb -1 of data taking anticipated for the present CDF physics run. Preliminary results from the collider data show that the detector has a resolution of about 12 μm. This provides a powerful tool to do top and bottom physics

  9. A Vertex and Tracking Detector System for CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)718101

    2017-01-01

    The physics aims at the proposed future CLIC high-energy linear $e^+e^−$ collider pose challenging demands on the performance of the detector system. In particular the vertex and tracking detectors have to combine precision measurements with robustness against the expected high rates of beam-induced backgrounds. The requirements include ultra-low mass, facilitated by power pulsing and air cooling in the vertex-detector region, small cell sizes and precision hit timing at the few-ns level. A detector concept meeting these requirements has been developed and an integrated R&D program addressing the challenges is progressing in the areas of ultra-thin sensors and readout ASICs, interconnect technology, mechanical integration and cooling.

  10. The design and performance of the ZEUS micro vertex detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polini, A. [Bologna Univ. (Italy)]|[INFN Bologna (Italy); Brock, I.; Goers, S. [Bonn Univ. (DE). Physikalisches Institut] (and others)

    2007-08-15

    In order to extend the tracking acceptance, to improve the primary and secondary vertex reconstruction and thus enhancing the tagging capabilities for short lived particles, the ZEUS experiment at the HERA Collider at DESY installed a silicon strip vertex detector. The barrel part of the detector is a 63 cm long cylinder with silicon sensors arranged around an elliptical beampipe. The forward part consists of four circular shaped disks. In total just over 200k channels are read out using 2.9 m{sup 2} of silicon. In this report a detailed overview of the design and construction of the detector is given and the performance of the completed system is reviewed. (orig.)

  11. Vertex detectors: The state of the art and future prospects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damerell, C.J.S. [Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot (United Kingdom)

    1997-01-01

    We review the current status of vertex detectors (tracking microscopes for the recognition of charm and bottom particle decays). The reasons why silicon has become the dominant detector medium are explained. Energy loss mechanisms are reviewed, as well as the physics and technology of semiconductor devices, emphasizing the areas of most relevance for detectors. The main design options (microstrips and pixel devices, both CCD`s and APS`s) are discussed, as well as the issue of radiation damage, which probably implies the need to change to detector media beyond silicon for some vertexing applications. Finally, the evolution of key performance parameters over the past 15 years is reviewed, and an attempt is made to extrapolate to the likely performance of detectors working at the energy frontier ten years from now.

  12. OPAL Central Detector (Including vertex, jet and Z chambers)

    CERN Multimedia

    OPAL was one of the four experiments installed at the LEP particle accelerator from 1989 - 2000. OPAL's central tracking system consists of (in order of increasing radius) a silicon microvertex detector, a vertex detector, a jet chamber, and z-chambers. All the tracking detectors work by observing the ionization of atoms by charged particles passing by: when the atoms are ionized, electrons are knocked out of their atomic orbitals, and are then able to move freely in the detector. These ionization electrons are detected in the different parts of the tracking system. (This piece includes the vertex, jet and Z chambers) In the picture above, the central detector is the piece being removed to the right.

  13. The silicon vertex locator for the LHCb upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Head, Tim

    2014-01-01

    The upgrade of the LHCb experiment, planned for 2018, will transform the entire readout to a triggerless system being read out at 40 MHz. The upgraded silicon vertex detector (VELO) must be light weight, radiation hard, and compatible with LHC vacuum requirements. It must be capable of fast pattern recognition, fast track reconstruction and high precision vertexing. This challenge is being met with a new VELO design based on hybrid pixel detectors positioned to within 5 mm of the LHC colliding beams. The detector will be shielded from the beam by a View the MathML source~300μm thick aluminium foil. Evaporative CO2 coolant circulating in micro-channels embedded in a thin silicon substrate will be used for cooling.

  14. The secondary vertex finding algorithm with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Heer, Sebastian; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    A high performance identification of jets, produced via fragmentation of bottom quarks, is crucial for the ATLAS physics program. These jets can be identified by exploiting the presence of cascade decay vertices from bottom hadrons. A general vertex-finding algorithm is introduced and its ap- plication to the search for secondary vertices inside jets is described. Kinematic properties of the reconstructed vertices are used to construct several b-jet identification algorithms. The features and performance of the secondary vertex finding algorithm in a jet, as well as the performance of the jet tagging algorithms, are studied using simulated $pp$ -> $t\\bar{t}$ events at a centre-of-mass energy of 13 TeV.

  15. Six-vertex model and Schramm-Loewner evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenyon, Richard; Miller, Jason; Sheffield, Scott; Wilson, David B.

    2017-05-01

    Square ice is a statistical mechanics model for two-dimensional ice, widely believed to have a conformally invariant scaling limit. We associate a Peano (space-filling) curve to a square ice configuration, and more generally to a so-called six-vertex model configuration, and argue that its scaling limit is a space-filling version of the random fractal curve SL E κ, Schramm-Loewner evolution with parameter κ , where 4 <κ ≤12 +8 √{2 } . For square ice, κ =12 . At the "free-fermion point" of the six-vertex model, κ =8 +4 √{3 } . These unusual values lie outside the classical interval 2 ≤κ ≤8 .

  16. Vertex detectors: The state of the art and future prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damerell, C.J.S.

    1997-01-01

    We review the current status of vertex detectors (tracking microscopes for the recognition of charm and bottom particle decays). The reasons why silicon has become the dominant detector medium are explained. Energy loss mechanisms are reviewed, as well as the physics and technology of semiconductor devices, emphasizing the areas of most relevance for detectors. The main design options (microstrips and pixel devices, both CCD's and APS's) are discussed, as well as the issue of radiation damage, which probably implies the need to change to detector media beyond silicon for some vertexing applications. Finally, the evolution of key performance parameters over the past 15 years is reviewed, and an attempt is made to extrapolate to the likely performance of detectors working at the energy frontier ten years from now

  17. Development of pixel detectors for SSC vertex tracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, G.; Shapiro, S.L.; Arens, J.F.; Jernigan, J.G.; Skubic, P.

    1991-04-01

    A description of hybrid PIN diode arrays and a readout architecture for their use as a vertex detector in the SSC environment is presented. Test results obtained with arrays having 256 x 256 pixels, each 30 μm square, are also presented. The development of a custom readout for the SSC will be discussed, which supports a mechanism for time stamping hit pixels, storing their xy coordinates, and storing the analog information within the pixel. The peripheral logic located on the array, permits the selection of those pixels containing interesting data and their coordinates to be selectively read out. This same logic also resolves ambiguous pixel ghost locations and controls the pixel neighbor read out necessary to achieve high spatial resolution. The thermal design of the vertex tracker and the proposed signal processing architecture will also be discussed. 5 refs., 13 figs., 3 tabs

  18. Analysis of bilinear relation of a six-vertex model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korepin, V.E.

    1982-01-01

    A problem of calculating all matrices of T(μ) monodromy satisfying certain commutation relations for the six-vertex model matrix is considered. The paper presents full description of all accurate L-operators (all monodromy-matrices per one lattice step). It is noted that the a/d function has the simpliest form for L operators, and the corresponding A, B, C, D operators act transitively in rather narrow subspace of the constructed space

  19. The CDF silicon vertex detector SVX and its upgrades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidel, S.; Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM

    1994-11-01

    The three generations of CDF silicon vertex detectors, SVX, SVX', and SVX II, are described. SVX, which operated during Tevatron run Ia, achieved 10.6 μm resolution in r - φ. SVX' is a radiation-hard device for run Ib with a similar but improved mechanical design and improved signal/noise. SVX II, which will be installed for run II, will track in three dimensions with radiation tolerance and electronics appropriate to a Main Injector environment

  20. Silicon vertex detector upgrade in the ALPHA experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Amole, C; Ashkezari, M.D; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Bertsche, W; Burrows, C; Butler, E; Capra, A; Cesar, C.L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Deller, A; Eriksson, S; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M.C; Gill, D.R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, J.S; Hardy, W.N; Hayden, M.E; Humphries, A.J; Isaac, C.A; Jonsell, S; Kurchaninov, L; Little, A; Madsen, N; McKenna, J.T.K; Menary, S; Napoli, S.C; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Rasmussen, C.Ø; Robicheaux, F; Sacramento, R.L; Sampson, J.A; Sarid, E; Seddon, D; Silveira, D.M; So, C; Stracka, S; Tharp, T; Thompson, R.I; Thornhill, J; Tooley, M.P; Van Der Werf, D.P; Wells, D

    2013-01-01

    The Silicon Vertex Detector (SVD) is the main diagnostic tool in the ALPHA-experiment. It provides precise spatial and timing information of antiproton (antihydrogen) annihilation events (vertices), and most importantly, the SVD is capable of directly identifying and analysing single annihilation events, thereby forming the basis of ALPHA ' s analysis. This paper describes the ALPHA SVD and its upgrade, installed in the ALPHA ' s new neutral atom trap.

  1. Edge union of networks on the same vertex set

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loe, Chuan Wen; Jensen, Henrik Jeldtoft

    2013-01-01

    Random network generators such as Erdős–Rényi, Watts–Strogatz and Barabási–Albert models are used as models to study real-world networks. Let G 1 (V, E 1 ) and G 2 (V, E 2 ) be two such networks on the same vertex set V. This paper studies the degree distribution and clustering coefficient of the resultant networks, G(V, E 1 ∪E 2 ). (paper)

  2. Edge union of networks on the same vertex set

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loe, Chuan Wen; Jeldtoft Jensen, Henrik

    2013-06-01

    Random network generators such as Erdős-Rényi, Watts-Strogatz and Barabási-Albert models are used as models to study real-world networks. Let G1(V, E1) and G2(V, E2) be two such networks on the same vertex set V. This paper studies the degree distribution and clustering coefficient of the resultant networks, G(V, E1∪E2).

  3. Track fitting in the opal vertex detector with stereo wires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shally, R; Hemingway, R J; McPherson, A C

    1987-10-01

    The geometry of the vertex chamber for the OPAL detector at LEP is reviewed and expressions for the coordinates of the hits are given in terms of the measured drift distance and z-coordinate. The tracks are fitted by a procedure based on the Lagrange multipliers method. The increase in the accuracy of the fit due to the use of the stereo wires is discussed.

  4. Technical Design Report for the: PANDA Micro Vertex Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Erni, W; Krusche, B; Steinacher, M; Heng, Y; Liu, Z; Liu, H; Shen, X; Wang, Q; Xu, H; Albrecht, M; Becker, J; Eickel, K; Feldbauer, F; Fink, M; Friedel, P; Heinsius, F H; Held, T; Koch, H; Kopf, B; Leyhe, M; Motzko, C; Pelizäus, M; Pychy, J; Roth, B; Schröder, T; Schulze, J; Steinke, M; Trifterer, T; Wiedner, U; Zhong, J; Beck, R; Becker, M; Bianco, S; Brinkmann, K -Th; Hammann, C; Hinterberger, F; Jäkel, R; Kaiser, D; Kliemt, R; Koop, K; Schmidt, C; Schnell, R; Thoma, U; Vlasov, P; Wendel, C; Winnebeck, A; Würschig, Th; Zaunick, H -G; Bianconi, A; Bragadireanu, M; Caprini, M; Ciubancan, M; Pantea, D; Tarta, P -D; De Napoli, M; Giacoppo, F; Rapisarda, E; Sfienti, C; Fiutowski, T; Idzik, N; Mindur, B; Przyborowski, D; Swientek, K; Bialkowski, E; Budzanowski, A; Czech, B; Kliczewski, S; Kozela, A; Kulessa, P; Lebiedowicz, P; Malgorzata, K; Pysz, K; Schäfer, W; Siudak, R; Szczurek, A; Brandys, P; Czyzewski, T; Czyzycki, W; Domagala, M; Hawryluk, M; Filo, G; Kwiatkowski, D; Lisowski, E; Lisowski, F; Bardan, W; Gil, D; Kamys, B; Kistryn, St; Korcyl, K; Krzemieñ, W; Magiera, A; Moskal, P; Rudy, Z; Salabura, P; Smyrski, J; Wroñska, A; Al-Turany, M; Arora, R; Augustin, I; Deppe, H; Dutta, D; Flemming, H; Götzen, K; Hohler, G; Karabowicz, R; Lehmann, D; Lewandowski, B; Lühning, J; Maas, F; Orth, H; Peters, K; Saito, T; Schepers, G; Schmidt, C J; Schmitt, L; Schwarz, C; Schwiening, J; Voss, B; Wieczorek, P; Wilms, A; Abazov, V M; Alexeev, G D; Arefiev, V A; Astakhov, V I; Barabanov, M Yu; Batyunya, B V; Davydov, Yu I; Dodokhov, V Kh; Efremov, A A; Fedunov, A G; Feshchenko, A A; Galoyan, A S; Grigoryan, S; Karmokov, A; Koshurnikov, E K; Lobanov, V I; Lobanov, Yu Yu; Makarov, A F; Malinina, L V; Malyshev, V L; Mustafaev, G A; Olshevski, A G; Pasyuk, M A; Perevalova, E A; Piskun, A A; Pocheptsov, T A; Pontecorvo, G; Rodionov, V K; Rogov, Yu N; Salmin, R A; Samartsev, A G; Sapozhnikov, M G; Shabratova, G S; Skachkova, A N; Skachkov, N B; Strokovsky, E A; Suleimanov, M K; Teshev, R Sh; Tokmenin, V V; Uzhinsky, V V; Vodopyanov, A S; Zaporozhets, S A; Zhuravlev, N I; Zorin, A G; Branford, D; Glazier, D; Watts, D; Woods, P; Britting, A; Eyrich, W; Lehmann, A; Uhlig, F; Dobbs, S; Metreveli, Z; Seth, K; Tann, B; Tomaradze, A; Bettoni, D; Carassiti, V; Dalpiaz, P; Drago, A; Fioravanti, E; Garzia, I; Negrini, M; Savriè, M; Stancari, G; Dulach, B; Gianotti, P; Guaraldo, C; Lucherini, V; Pace, E; Bersani, A; Macri, M; Marinelli, M; Parodi, R F; Dormenev, V; Drexler, P; Düren, M; Eisner, T; Foehl, K; Hayrapetyan, A; Koch, P; Krïoch, B; Kühn, W; Lange, S; Liang, Y; Liu, M; Merle, O; Metag, V; Moritz, M; Nanova, M; Novotny, R; Spruck, B; Stenzel, H; Strackbein, C; Thiel, M; Wang, Q; Clarkson, T; Euan, C; Hill, G; Hoek, M; Ireland, D; Kaiser, R; Keri, T; Lehmann, I; Livingston, K; Lumsden, P; MacGregor, D; McKinnon, B; Montgomery, R; Murray, M; Protopopescu, D; Rosner, G; Seitz, B; Yang, G; Babai, M; Biegun, A K; Glazenborg-Kluttig, A; Guliyev, E; Jothi, V S; Kavatsyuk, M; Lemmens, P; Löhner, H; Messchendorp, J; Poelman, T; Smit, H; van der Weele, J C; Sohlbach, H; Büscher, M; Dosdall, R; Dzhygadlo, R; Esch, S; Gillitzer, A; Goldenbaum, F; Grunwald, D; Jha, V; Kemmerling, G; Kleines, H; Lehrach, A; Maier, R; Mertens, M; Ohm, H; Pohl, D L; Prasuhn, D; Randriamalala, T; Ritman, J; Roeder, M; Sterzenbach, G; Stockmanns, T; Wintz, P; Wüstner, P; Xu, H; Kisiel, J; Li, S; Li, Z; Sun, Z; Xu, H; Fissum, K; Hansen, K; Isaksson, L; Lundin, M; Schröder, B; Achenbach, P; Denig, A; Distler, M; Fritsch, M; Kangh, D; Karavdina, A; Lauth, W; Michel, M; Espi, M C Mora; Pochodzalla, J; Sanchez, S; Sanchez-Lorente, A; Sfienti, C; Weber, T; Dormenev, V I; Fedorov, A A; Korzhik, M V; Missevitch, O V; Boukharov, A; Malyshev, O; Marishev, I; Semenov, A; Varma, R; Höppner, C; Ketzer, B; Konorov, I; Mann, A; Neubert, S; Paul, S; Vandenbroucke, M; Zhang, Q; Khoukaz, A; Rausmann, T; Täschner, A; Wessels, J; Baldin, E; Kotov, K; Peleganchuk, S; Tikhonov, Yu; Hennino, T; Imre, M; Kunne, R; Galliard, C Le; Normand, J P Le; Marchand, D; Maroni, A; Ong, S; Pouthas, J; Ramstein, B; Rosier, P; Sudol, M; Theneau, C; Tomasi-Gustafsson, E; Van de Wiele, J; Zerguerras, T; Boca, G; Braghieri, A; Costanza, S; Fontana, A; Genova, P; Lavezzi, L; Montagna, P; Rotondi, A; Buda, V; Abramov, V V; Davidenko, A M; Derevschikov, A A; Goncharenko, Y M; Grishin, V N; Kachanov, V A; Konstantinov, D A; Kormilitsin, V A; Matulenko, Y A; Melnik, Y M; Meschanin, A P; Minaev, N G; Mochalov, V V; Morozov, D A; Nogach, L V; Nurushev, S B; Ryazantsev, A V; Semenov, P A; Soloviev, L F; Uzunian, A V; Vasiliev, A N; Yakutin, A E; Belostotski, S; Gavrilov, G; Itzotov, A; Kisselev, A; Kravchenko, P; Manaenkov, S; Miklukho, O; Naryshkin, Y; Veretennikov, D; Vikhrov, V; Zhadanov, A; Bäck, T; Cederwall, B; Bargholtz, C; Gerén, L; Tegnér, P E; Thørngren, P; von Würtemberg, K M; Fava, L; Alberto, D; Amoroso, A; Bussa, M P; Busso, L; De Mori, F; Destefanis, M; Ferrero, L; Greco, M; Kugathasan, T; Maggiora, M; Marcello, S; Sosio, S; Spataro, S; Calvo, D; Coli, S; De Remigis, P; Filippi, A; Giraudo, G; Lusso, S; Mazza, G; Mignone, M; Rivetti, A; Wheadon, R; Zotti, L; Morra, O; Iazzi, F; Lavagno, A; Quarati, P; Szymanska, K; Birsa, R; Bradamante, F; Bressan, A; Martin, A; Clement, H; Galnander, B; Calén, H; Fransson, K; Johansson, T; Kupsc, A; Marciniewski, P; Thomé, E; Wolke, M; Zlomanczuk, J; Díaz, J; Ortiz, A; Buda, P; Dmowski, K; Korzeniewski, R; Przemyslaw, D; Slowinski, B; Borsuk, S; Chlopik, A; Guzik, Z; Kopec, J; Kozlowski, T; Melnychuk, D; Plominski, M; Szewinski, J; Traczyk, K; Zwieglinski, B; Bühler, P; Gruber, A; Kienle, P; Marton, J; Widmann, E; Zmeskal, J

    2012-01-01

    This document illustrates the technical layout and the expected performance of the Micro Vertex Detector (MVD) of the PANDA experiment. The MVD will detect charged particles as close as possible to the interaction zone. Design criteria and the optimisation process as well as the technical solutions chosen are discussed and the results of this process are subjected to extensive Monte Carlo physics studies. The route towards realisation of the detector is outlined.

  5. General Vertex-Distinguishing Total Coloring of Graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chanjuan Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The general vertex-distinguishing total chromatic number of a graph G is the minimum integer k, for which the vertices and edges of G are colored using k colors such that any two vertices have distinct sets of colors of them and their incident edges. In this paper, we figure out the exact value of this chromatic number of some special graphs and propose a conjecture on the upper bound of this chromatic number.

  6. Silicon vertex detector upgrade in the ALPHA experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amole, C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, York University, Toronto, ON, M3J 1P3 (Canada); Andresen, G.B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Ashkezari, M.D. [Department of Physics, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, V5A 1S6 (Canada); Baquero-Ruiz, M. [Department of Physics, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720-7300 (United States); Bertsche, W. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, M13 9PL Manchester (United Kingdom); The Cockcroft Institute, Daresbury Laboratory, WA4 4AD Warrington (United Kingdom); Burrows, C. [Department of Physics, College of Science, Swansea University, Swansea SA2 8PP (United Kingdom); Butler, E. [Physics Department, CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Capra, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, York University, Toronto, ON, M3J 1P3 (Canada); Cesar, C.L. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro 21941-972 (Brazil); Chapman, S. [Department of Physics, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720-7300 (United States); Charlton, M.; Deller, A.; Eriksson, S. [Department of Physics, College of Science, Swansea University, Swansea SA2 8PP (United Kingdom); Fajans, J. [Department of Physics, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720-7300 (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Friesen, T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4 (Canada); Fujiwara, M.C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4 (Canada); TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC, V6T 2A3 (Canada); Gill, D.R. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC, V6T 2A3 (Canada); Gutierrez, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z4 (Canada); and others

    2013-12-21

    The Silicon Vertex Detector (SVD) is the main diagnostic tool in the ALPHA-experiment. It provides precise spatial and timing information of antiproton (antihydrogen) annihilation events (vertices), and most importantly, the SVD is capable of directly identifying and analysing single annihilation events, thereby forming the basis of ALPHA's analysis. This paper describes the ALPHA SVD and its upgrade, installed in the ALPHA's new neutral atom trap.

  7. Edge-injective and edge-surjective vertex labellings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Stephan; Rautenbach, D.; Regen, F.

    2010-01-01

    For a graph G = (V, E) we consider vertex-k-labellings f : V → {1,2, ,k} for which the induced edge weighting w : E → {2, 3,., 2k} with w(uv) = f(u) + f(v) is injective or surjective or both. We study the relation between these labellings and the number theoretic notions of an additive basis and ...

  8. Fatigue crack shape prediction based on vertex singularity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hutař, Pavel; Náhlík, Luboš

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 1 (2008), s. 45-52 ISSN 1802-680X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA101/08/1623; GA ČR GP106/06/P239 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : 3D vertex singularity * crack shape * fatigue crack propagation Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics

  9. Vertex maps on graphs -- Perron-Frobenius Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Bernhardt, Chris

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to describe the connections between Perron-Frobenius theory and vertex maps on graphs. In particular, it is shown how Perron-Frobenius theory gives results about the sets of integers that can arise as periods of periodic orbits, about the concepts of transitivity and topological mixing, and about horseshoes and topological entropy. This is a preprint. The final version will appear in the Journal of Difference Equations and Applications.

  10. Readout ASIC for ILC-FPCCD vertex detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takubo, Yosuke; Miyamoto, Akiya; Ikeda, Hirokazu; Yamamoto, Hitoshi; Itagaki, Kennosuke; Nagamine, Tadashi; Sugimoto, Yasuhiro

    2010-01-01

    The concept of FPCCD (Fine Pixel CCD) whose pixel size is 5x5μm 2 has been proposed as vertex detector at ILC. Since FPCCD has 128 x20,000 pixels in one readout channel, its readout poses a considerable challenge. We have developed a prototype of readout ASIC to readout the large number of pixels during the inter-train gap of the ILC beam. In this paper, we report the design and performance of the readout ASIC.

  11. Track fitting in the opal vertex detector with stereo wires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shally, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; McPherson, A.C.

    1987-01-01

    The geometry of the vertex chamber for the OPAL detector at LEP is reviewed and expressions for the coordinates of the hits are given in terms of the measured drift distance and z-coordinate. The tracks are fitted by a procedure based on the Lagrange multipliers method. The increase in the accuracy of the fit due to the use of the stereo wires is discussed. (orig.)

  12. The Mark III vertex chamber: Studies using DME

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitman, D.

    1987-04-01

    Studies have been performed using a prototype of a pressurized wire vertex chamber with 8 mm diameter straw geometry. A 35 μm spatial resolution using dimethyl ether (DME) at 1 bar and 30 μm using argon ethane (50/50 mixture) at 4 bar was obtained. Preliminary studies show the DME to adversely affect such materials as aluminized Mylar and Delrin

  13. Insecticidal effects of Ocimum sanctum var. cubensis essential oil on the diseases vector Chrysomya putoria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Idelsy Chil-Núñez

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Context: The blowfly Chrysomya putoria is widely distributed throughout the Neotropical region and, besides transmitting pathogens; they could cause secondary myiasis. Botanical insecticides provide an alternative to synthetic pesticides because the excessive use of synthetic insecticides resulted in a progressive resistance of the pests to these chemicals, diminishing their effectiveness and generating consequences with negative environmental impact. The essential oil extracted from Ocimum sanctum (basil has showed insecticidal activity against some insects but has no reported studies on the activity of this plant against flies. Aims: To evaluate the insecticidal effects of Ocimum sanctum var. cubensis Gomes essential oil on the post embryonic development of Chrysomya putoria. Methods: The colonies of Chrysomya putoria were established and maintained at the Laboratório de Entomologia Médica e Forense (FIOCRUZ, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The basil essential oil was tested in six concentrations (4.13, 8.25, 20.63, 41.25, 61.87 and 80,25 mg/mL. Mortality and changes in life cycle were recorded daily. Results: β-caryophyllene, β-selinene and eugenol, were the main constituents of the basil essential oil. The experiments demonstrated that in all concentrations tested, this essential oil shortening the duration of all post embryonic stages having a direct impact in the viability of this fly estimating the LC50 in 7.47 mg/mL of concentration. In addition, the essential oil caused morphological alterations in abdomen, wings and ptilinum at lower concentrations. Conclusions: This essential oil emerge as a good option for the control of the disease vector blowfly Chrysomya putoria.

  14. Ovicidal and Larvicidal Effects of Garlic and Asafoetida Essential Oils Against West Nile Virus Vectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muturi, Ephantus J; Ramirez, Jose L; Zilkowski, Bruce; Flor-Weiler, Lina B; Rooney, Alejandro P

    2018-01-01

    Abstract We examined the chemical composition of garlic and asafoetida essential oils and their individual and combined toxicity against larvae of Culex pipiens Linnaeus and Culex restuans Theobald (Diptera: Culicidae). The effect of the two essential oils on egg hatch was also examined. Ten and 12 compounds, respectively, were identified in garlic and asafoetida essential oils. Allyl disulfide (49.13%) and diallyl trisulfide (31.08%) were the most abundant compounds in garlic essential oil accounting for 80.2% of the total oil. In contrast, (E)-sec-butyl propenyl disulfide (30.03%), (Z)-sec-butyl propenyl disulfide (24.32%), and disulfide, methyl 1-(methylthio)propyl (21.87%) were the most abundant compounds in asafoetida essential oil. Allyl disulfide accounted for 7.38% of the total oil in asafoetida essential oil and was one of only three compounds found in both oils. For both mosquito species, garlic essential oil was more toxic than asafoetida essential oil with Cx. restuans (LC50: garlic = 2.7 ppm; asafoetida = 10.1 ppm) being more sensitive than Cx. pipiens (LC50: garlic = 7.5 ppm; asafoetida = 13.5 ppm). When combined, the two essential oils had antagonistic effects. The majority of Culex egg rafts exposed to garlic (73.1%) or asafoetida (55.8%) essential oils failed to hatch and larvae of the few that did hatch mostly died as first instars. Allyl disulfide exhibited strong ovicidal and larvicidal activity suggesting its important contribution to the overall toxicity of the two essential oils. Thus, garlic and asafoetida essential oils are potent mosquito ovicides and larvicides but if used jointly, they could undermine vector control programs. PMID:29718505

  15. Automatised data quality monitoring of the LHCb Vertex Locator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bel, L.; Crocombe, A. Ch.; Gersabeck, M.; Pearce, A.; Majewski, M.; Szumlak, T.

    2017-10-01

    The LHCb Vertex Locator (VELO) is a silicon strip semiconductor detector operating at just 8mm distance to the LHC beams. Its 172,000 strips are read at a frequency of 1.1 MHz and processed by off-detector FPGAs followed by a PC cluster that reduces the event rate to about 10 kHz. During the second run of the LHC, which lasts from 2015 until 2018, the detector performance will undergo continued change due to radiation damage effects. This necessitates a detailed monitoring of the data quality to avoid adverse effects on the physics analysis performance. The VELO monitoring infrastructure has been re-designed compared to the first run of the LHC when it was based on manual checks. The new system is based around an automatic analysis framework, which monitors the performance of new data as well as long-term trends and using dedicated algorithms flags issues whenever they arise. The new analysis framework then analyses the plots that are produced by these algorithms. One of its tasks is to perform custom comparisons between the newly processed data and that from reference runs. The most-likely scenario in which this analysis would identify an issue is the parameters of the readout electronics no longer being optimal and requiring retuning. The data of the monitoring plots can be reduced further, e.g. by evaluating averages, and these quantities are input to long-term trending. This is used to detect slow variation of quantities, which are not detectable by the comparison of two nearby runs. Such gradual change is what is expected due to radiation damage effects. It is essential to detect these changes early such that measures can be taken, e.g. adjustments of the operating voltage, to prevent any impact on the quality of high-level quantities and thus on physics analyses. The plots as well as the analysis results and trends are made available through graphical user interfaces (GUIs). These GUIs are dynamically configured by a single configuration that determines the

  16. Colour-independent partition functions in coloured vertex models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foda, O., E-mail: omar.foda@unimelb.edu.au [Dept. of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010 (Australia); Wheeler, M., E-mail: mwheeler@lpthe.jussieu.fr [Laboratoire de Physique Théorique et Hautes Energies, CNRS UMR 7589 (France); Université Pierre et Marie Curie – Paris 6, 4 place Jussieu, 75252 Paris cedex 05 (France)

    2013-06-11

    We study lattice configurations related to S{sub n}, the scalar product of an off-shell state and an on-shell state in rational A{sub n} integrable vertex models, n∈{1,2}. The lattice lines are colourless and oriented. The state variables are n conserved colours that flow along the line orientations, but do not necessarily cover every bond in the lattice. Choosing boundary conditions such that the positions where the colours flow into the lattice are fixed, and where they flow out are summed over, we show that the partition functions of these configurations, with these boundary conditions, are n-independent. Our results extend to trigonometric A{sub n} models, and to all n. This n-independence explains, in vertex-model terms, results from recent studies of S{sub 2} (Caetano and Vieira, 2012, [1], Wheeler, (arXiv:1204.2089), [2]). Namely, 1.S{sub 2}, which depends on two sets of Bethe roots, {b_1} and {b_2}, and cannot (as far as we know) be expressed in single determinant form, degenerates in the limit {b_1}→∞, and/or {b_2}→∞, into a product of determinants, 2. Each of the latter determinants is an A{sub 1} vertex-model partition function.

  17. Colour-independent partition functions in coloured vertex models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foda, O.; Wheeler, M.

    2013-01-01

    We study lattice configurations related to S n , the scalar product of an off-shell state and an on-shell state in rational A n integrable vertex models, n∈{1,2}. The lattice lines are colourless and oriented. The state variables are n conserved colours that flow along the line orientations, but do not necessarily cover every bond in the lattice. Choosing boundary conditions such that the positions where the colours flow into the lattice are fixed, and where they flow out are summed over, we show that the partition functions of these configurations, with these boundary conditions, are n-independent. Our results extend to trigonometric A n models, and to all n. This n-independence explains, in vertex-model terms, results from recent studies of S 2 (Caetano and Vieira, 2012, [1], Wheeler, (arXiv:1204.2089), [2]). Namely, 1.S 2 , which depends on two sets of Bethe roots, {b 1 } and {b 2 }, and cannot (as far as we know) be expressed in single determinant form, degenerates in the limit {b 1 }→∞, and/or {b 2 }→∞, into a product of determinants, 2. Each of the latter determinants is an A 1 vertex-model partition function

  18. Vertex and Tracker Research and Development for CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Munker, M

    2017-01-01

    Challenging detector requirements are imposed by the physics goals at the future multi-TeV e+e− Compact Linear Collider (CLIC). A single point resolution of 3 μm for the vertex detector and 7 μm for the tracker is required. Moreover, the CLIC vertex detector and tracker need to be extremely light weighted with a material budget of 0.2%X0 per layer in the vertex detector and 1 - 2%X0 in the tracker. A fast time slicing of 10 ns is further required to suppress background from beam-beam interactions. A wide range of sensor and readout ASIC technologies are investigated within the CLIC silicon pixel R&D; effort. Various hybrid planar sensor assemblies with a pixel size of 25 × 25 μm2 and 55 × 55 μm2 have been produced and characterised by laboratory measurements and during test-beam campaigns. Experimental and simulation results for thin (50 μm- 500 μm) slim edge and active-edge planar, and High-Voltage CMOS sensors hybridised to various readout ASICs (Timepix, Timepix3, CLICpix) are presented.

  19. Technologies for Future Vertex and Tracking Detectors at CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Spannagel, Simon

    2018-01-01

    CLIC is a proposed linear e$^{+}$e$^{-}$ collider with center-of-mass energies of up to 3 TeV. Its main objectives are precise top quark and Higgs boson measurements, as well as searches for Beyond Standard Model physics. To meet the physics goals, the vertex and tracking detectors require not only a spatial resolution of a few micrometers and a very low material budget, but also timing capabilities with a precision of a few nanoseconds to allow suppression of beam-induced backgrounds. Different technologies using hybrid silicon detectors are explored for the vertex detectors, such as dedicated readout ASICs, small-pitch active edge sensors as well as capacitively coupled High-Voltage CMOS sensors. Monolithic sensors are considered as an option for the tracking detector, and a prototype using a CMOS process with a high-resistivity epitaxial layer is being designed. Different designs using a silicon-on-insulator process are under investigation for both vertex and tracking detector. All prototypes are evaluate...

  20. Charged Particle Tracking and Vertex Detection Group summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, G.; Meyer, D.

    1984-09-01

    Charged particle tracking is essential in order to investigate the new physics expected at the SSC. The Tracking Group studied radiation damage and rate limitations to tracking devices, vertex detectors, and central tracking. The Group concluded that silicon strips and large wire tracking chambers with small cells can probably survive at the design luminosity of 10 33 cm -2 sec -1 ; however, the presently designed electronics for silicon strip vertex detectors can withstand a luminosity of only 10 31 cm -2 sec -1 . Wire chambers at a radius of less than about 25 cm can withstand a luminosity of less than or equal to 10 32 cm -2 sec -1 only. Actual tracking and pattern recognition in central tracking chambers at a luminosity of 10 33 cm -2 sec -1 will be very difficult because of multiple interactions within the resolving time of the chambers; detailed simulations are needed in order to decide whether tracking is indeed possible at this luminosity. Scintillating glass fibers are an interesting possibility both for vertex detectors and for central trackers, but much research and development is still needed both on the fibers themselves and on the readout

  1. Status and prospects of the LHCb Vertex Locator

    CERN Document Server

    van Beuzekom, Martin

    2007-01-01

    The Vertex Locator of the LHCb experiment is a dedicated subdetector for the reconstruction of primary and secondary vertices in b-hadron decays. The vertex detector features two halves with 21 modules each, mounted on retractable bases. Each module consists of two half-disk silicon micro-strip sensors measuring hits in R and $\\Phi$ coordinates. The strip pitch ranges from 40 to about 100 $\\mu$m. A vacuum boy with a 300 $\\mu$m thick aluminium foil shields the sensors from the wakefields of the proton beams which are passing at a distance of 8 mm from the active area of the sensors. Because of the harsh non-uniform radiation environment we opted for n-on-n strips in diffusion oxygenated float zone silicon. The current status of the vertex detector, which has recently entered the commissioning phase, will be discussed. Given the limited lifetime of the detector due to the radiation environment, developments for a detector replacement with n-on-p type modules have already started. Possible upgrade scenarios fo...

  2. Data driven processor 'Vertex Trigger' for B experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartouni, E.P.

    1993-01-01

    Data Driven Processors (DDP's) are specialized computation engines configured to solve specific numerical problems, such as vertex reconstruction. The architecture of the DDP which is the subject of this talk was designed and implemented by W. Sippach and B.C. Knapp at Nevis Lab. in the early 1980's. This particular implementation allows multiple parallel streams of data to provide input to a heterogenous collection of simple operators whose interconnection form an algorithm. The local data flow control allows this device to execute algorithms extremely quickly provided that care is taken in the layout of the algorithm. I/O rates of several hundred megabytes/second are routinely achieved thus making DDP's attractive candidates for complex online calculations. The original question was open-quote can a DDP reconstruct tracks in a Silicon Vertex Detector, find events with a separated vertex and do it fast enough to be used as an online trigger?close-quote Restating this inquiry as three questions and describing the answers to the questions will be the subject of this talk. The three specific questions are: (1) Can an algorithm be found which reconstructs tracks in a planar geometry and no magnetic field; (2) Can separated vertices be recognized in some way; (3) Can the algorithm be implemented in the Nevis-UMass and DDP and execute in 10-20 μs?

  3. Track and vertex reconstruction: From classical to adaptive methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strandlie, Are; Fruehwirth, Rudolf

    2010-01-01

    This paper reviews classical and adaptive methods of track and vertex reconstruction in particle physics experiments. Adaptive methods have been developed to meet the experimental challenges at high-energy colliders, in particular, the CERN Large Hadron Collider. They can be characterized by the obliteration of the traditional boundaries between pattern recognition and statistical estimation, by the competition between different hypotheses about what constitutes a track or a vertex, and by a high level of flexibility and robustness achieved with a minimum of assumptions about the data. The theoretical background of some of the adaptive methods is described, and it is shown that there is a close connection between the two main branches of adaptive methods: neural networks and deformable templates, on the one hand, and robust stochastic filters with annealing, on the other hand. As both classical and adaptive methods of track and vertex reconstruction presuppose precise knowledge of the positions of the sensitive detector elements, the paper includes an overview of detector alignment methods and a survey of the alignment strategies employed by past and current experiments.

  4. Vectorization of LWR transient analysis code RELAP5/MOD1 and its effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiguro, Misako; Harada, Hiroo; Shinozawa, Naohisa; Naraoka, Ken-itsu

    1985-03-01

    The RELAP5/MOD1 is a large thermal-hydraulic code to analyze LWR LOCA and non-LOCA transients. The code originally was designed for use on a CDC Cyber-176. This report documents vectorization of the RELAP5/MOD1 code conducted for the purpose of efficient use of VP-100 (peak speed 250 MFLOPS, clock period 7.5 ns) at the JAERI. The code was vectorized using the junction and volume level parallelisms in the hydrodynamic calculations, and the heat-structure and heat-mesh level in the heat conduction calculations. The vectorized version runs as much as 2.4 to 2.8 times faster than the original scalar version, while the speedup ratio is dependent on the number of spactial cells included in the problem. (author)

  5. Cloning vector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilfoyle, Richard A.; Smith, Lloyd M.

    1994-01-01

    A vector comprising a filamentous phage sequence containing a first copy of filamentous phage gene X and other sequences necessary for the phage to propagate is disclosed. The vector also contains a second copy of filamentous phage gene X downstream from a promoter capable of promoting transcription in a bacterial host. In a preferred form of the present invention, the filamentous phage is M13 and the vector additionally includes a restriction endonuclease site located in such a manner as to substantially inactivate the second gene X when a DNA sequence is inserted into the restriction site.

  6. Cloning vector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilfoyle, R.A.; Smith, L.M.

    1994-12-27

    A vector comprising a filamentous phage sequence containing a first copy of filamentous phage gene X and other sequences necessary for the phage to propagate is disclosed. The vector also contains a second copy of filamentous phage gene X downstream from a promoter capable of promoting transcription in a bacterial host. In a preferred form of the present invention, the filamentous phage is M13 and the vector additionally includes a restriction endonuclease site located in such a manner as to substantially inactivate the second gene X when a DNA sequence is inserted into the restriction site. 2 figures.

  7. LOGISTIC NETWORK REGRESSION FOR SCALABLE ANALYSIS OF NETWORKS WITH JOINT EDGE/VERTEX DYNAMICS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almquist, Zack W; Butts, Carter T

    2014-08-01

    Change in group size and composition has long been an important area of research in the social sciences. Similarly, interest in interaction dynamics has a long history in sociology and social psychology. However, the effects of endogenous group change on interaction dynamics are a surprisingly understudied area. One way to explore these relationships is through social network models. Network dynamics may be viewed as a process of change in the edge structure of a network, in the vertex set on which edges are defined, or in both simultaneously. Although early studies of such processes were primarily descriptive, recent work on this topic has increasingly turned to formal statistical models. Although showing great promise, many of these modern dynamic models are computationally intensive and scale very poorly in the size of the network under study and/or the number of time points considered. Likewise, currently used models focus on edge dynamics, with little support for endogenously changing vertex sets. Here, the authors show how an existing approach based on logistic network regression can be extended to serve as a highly scalable framework for modeling large networks with dynamic vertex sets. The authors place this approach within a general dynamic exponential family (exponential-family random graph modeling) context, clarifying the assumptions underlying the framework (and providing a clear path for extensions), and they show how model assessment methods for cross-sectional networks can be extended to the dynamic case. Finally, the authors illustrate this approach on a classic data set involving interactions among windsurfers on a California beach.

  8. Effects of pseudoscalar-baryon channels in the dynamically generated vector-baryon resonances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garzon, E.J.; Oset, E. [Centro Mixto Universidad de Valencia-CSIC, Institutos de Investigacion de Paterna, Departamento de Fisica Teorica and IFIC, Valencia (Spain)

    2012-01-15

    We study the interaction of vector mesons with the octet of stable baryons in the framework of the local hidden gauge formalism using a coupled-channels unitary approach, including also the pseudoscalar-baryon channels which couple to the same quantum numbers. We examine the scattering amplitudes and their poles, which can be associated to the known J{sup P}=1/2{sup -}, 3/2{sup -} baryon resonances, and determine the role of the pseudoscalar-baryon channels, changing the width and eventually the mass of the resonances generated with only the basis of vector-baryon states. (orig.)

  9. Noncausal Bayesian Vector Autoregression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lanne, Markku; Luoto, Jani

    We propose a Bayesian inferential procedure for the noncausal vector autoregressive (VAR) model that is capable of capturing nonlinearities and incorporating effects of missing variables. In particular, we devise a fast and reliable posterior simulator that yields the predictive distribution...

  10. Microscopic models for hadronic form factors and vertex functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santhanam, I.; Bhatnagar, S.; Mitra, A.N.

    1990-01-01

    We review the status of nucleon (N) and few-nucleon form factors (f.f.'s) from the view-point of a gradual unfolding of successively inner degrees of freedom (d.o.f.) with increase in q 2 . To this end we focus attention on the problem of a microscopic formulation of hadronic vertex functions (v.f.) from the point of view of their key role in understanding the physics of a large variety of few-hadron reactions on the one hand, and their practical usefulness in articulating the internal dynamics of hadron and few-hadron systems on the other hand. The criterion of an integrated view from low-energy spectroscopy to high-q 2 amplitudes is employed to emphasize the desirability of formulations in terms of relativistic dynamical equations based on Lorentz and gauge invariance in preference to phenomenological models, which often require additional assumptions beyond their original premises to extend their applicability domains. In this respect, the practical possibilities of the Bethe-Salpeter equation (BSE) in articulating the necessary dynamical ingredients are emphasized on a two-tier basis, the basis constants (3) being pre-determined from the mass spectral data (1 st stage) in preparation for the construction of the hadron-quark vertex functions (2 nd stage). An explicit construction is outlined for meson-quark and baryon-quark vertex functions as well as of meson-nucleon vertex functions in a stepwise fashion. The role of the latter as basic parameter-free ingredients is discussed for possible use in the more serious treatment in the current literature of quark-meson level (α) and meson-isobar (β) d.o.f. in 2-N and 3-N form factor studies. Since most of these studies are characterized by the use of RGM techniques at the six-quark level, a comparative discussion is also given of several contemporary RGM based models. Finally, the concrete prospects for employing such hardon-quark vertex functions for evaluating pp-bar annihilation amplitudes are briefly indicated

  11. Support vector regression to predict porosity and permeability: Effect of sample size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Anazi, A. F.; Gates, I. D.

    2012-02-01

    Porosity and permeability are key petrophysical parameters obtained from laboratory core analysis. Cores, obtained from drilled wells, are often few in number for most oil and gas fields. Porosity and permeability correlations based on conventional techniques such as linear regression or neural networks trained with core and geophysical logs suffer poor generalization to wells with only geophysical logs. The generalization problem of correlation models often becomes pronounced when the training sample size is small. This is attributed to the underlying assumption that conventional techniques employing the empirical risk minimization (ERM) inductive principle converge asymptotically to the true risk values as the number of samples increases. In small sample size estimation problems, the available training samples must span the complexity of the parameter space so that the model is able both to match the available training samples reasonably well and to generalize to new data. This is achieved using the structural risk minimization (SRM) inductive principle by matching the capability of the model to the available training data. One method that uses SRM is support vector regression (SVR) network. In this research, the capability of SVR to predict porosity and permeability in a heterogeneous sandstone reservoir under the effect of small sample size is evaluated. Particularly, the impact of Vapnik's ɛ-insensitivity loss function and least-modulus loss function on generalization performance was empirically investigated. The results are compared to the multilayer perception (MLP) neural network, a widely used regression method, which operates under the ERM principle. The mean square error and correlation coefficients were used to measure the quality of predictions. The results demonstrate that SVR yields consistently better predictions of the porosity and permeability with small sample size than the MLP method. Also, the performance of SVR depends on both kernel function

  12. Understanding uncertainty in temperature effects on vector-borne disease: a Bayesian approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Leah R.; Ben-Horin, Tal; Lafferty, Kevin D.; McNally, Amy; Mordecai, Erin A.; Paaijmans, Krijn P.; Pawar, Samraat; Ryan, Sadie J.

    2015-01-01

    Extrinsic environmental factors influence the distribution and population dynamics of many organisms, including insects that are of concern for human health and agriculture. This is particularly true for vector-borne infectious diseases like malaria, which is a major source of morbidity and mortality in humans. Understanding the mechanistic links between environment and population processes for these diseases is key to predicting the consequences of climate change on transmission and for developing effective interventions. An important measure of the intensity of disease transmission is the reproductive number R0. However, understanding the mechanisms linking R0 and temperature, an environmental factor driving disease risk, can be challenging because the data available for parameterization are often poor. To address this, we show how a Bayesian approach can help identify critical uncertainties in components of R0 and how this uncertainty is propagated into the estimate of R0. Most notably, we find that different parameters dominate the uncertainty at different temperature regimes: bite rate from 15°C to 25°C; fecundity across all temperatures, but especially ~25–32°C; mortality from 20°C to 30°C; parasite development rate at ~15–16°C and again at ~33–35°C. Focusing empirical studies on these parameters and corresponding temperature ranges would be the most efficient way to improve estimates of R0. While we focus on malaria, our methods apply to improving process-based models more generally, including epidemiological, physiological niche, and species distribution models.

  13. Equivalent Vectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Robert

    2004-01-01

    The cross-product is a mathematical operation that is performed between two 3-dimensional vectors. The result is a vector that is orthogonal or perpendicular to both of them. Learning about this for the first time while taking Calculus-III, the class was taught that if AxB = AxC, it does not necessarily follow that B = C. This seemed baffling. The…

  14. Vector incrimination and effects of antimalarial drugs on malaria transmission and control in the Amazon Basin of Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. Klein

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available World ecosystems differ significantly and a multidisciplinary malaria control approach must be adjusted to meet these requirements. These include a comprehensive understanding of the malaria vectors, their behavior, seasonal distribution and abundance, susceptibility to insecticides (physiological and behavioral, methods to reduce the numbers of human gametocyte carriers through effective health care systems and antimalarial drug treatment, urban malaria transmission versus rural or forest malaria transmission, and the impact of vaccine development. Many malaria vectors are members of species complexes and individual relationship to malaria transmission, seasonal distribution, bitting behavior, etc. is poorly understood. Additionaly, malaria patients are not examined for circulating gametocytes and both falciparum and vivax malaria patients may be highly infective to mosquitoes after treatment with currently used antimalarial drugs. Studies on the physiological and behavioral effects of DDT and other insecticides are inconclusive and need to be evalusted.

  15. The MAPS based PXL vertex detector for the STAR experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contin, G.; Anderssen, E.; Greiner, L.; Schambach, J.; Silber, J.; Stezelberger, T.; Sun, X.; Szelezniak, M.; Vu, C.; Wieman, H.; Woodmansee, S.

    2015-03-01

    The Heavy Flavor Tracker (HFT) was installed in the STAR experiment for the 2014 heavy ion run of RHIC. Designed to improve the vertex resolution and extend the measurement capabilities in the heavy flavor domain, the HFT is composed of three different silicon detectors based on CMOS monolithic active pixels (MAPS), pads and strips respectively, arranged in four concentric cylinders close to the STAR interaction point. The two innermost HFT layers are placed at a radius of 2.7 and 8 cm from the beam line, respectively, and accommodate 400 ultra-thin (50 μ m) high resolution MAPS sensors arranged in 10-sensor ladders to cover a total silicon area of 0.16 m2. Each sensor includes a pixel array of 928 rows and 960 columns with a 20.7 μ m pixel pitch, providing a sensitive area of ~ 3.8 cm2. The architecture is based on a column parallel readout with amplification and correlated double sampling inside each pixel. Each column is terminated with a high precision discriminator, is read out in a rolling shutter mode and the output is processed through an integrated zero suppression logic. The results are stored in two SRAM with ping-pong arrangement for a continuous readout. The sensor features 185.6 μ s readout time and 170 mW/cm2 power dissipation. The detector is air-cooled, allowing a global material budget as low as 0.39% on the inner layer. A novel mechanical approach to detector insertion enables effective installation and integration of the pixel layers within an 8 hour shift during the on-going STAR run.In addition to a detailed description of the detector characteristics, the experience of the first months of data taking will be presented in this paper, with a particular focus on sensor threshold calibration, latch-up protection procedures and general system operations aimed at stabilizing the running conditions. Issues faced during the 2014 run will be discussed together with the implemented solutions. A preliminary analysis of the detector performance

  16. The MAPS based PXL vertex detector for the STAR experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contin, G.; Anderssen, E.; Greiner, L.; Silber, J.; Stezelberger, T.; Vu, C.; Wieman, H.; Woodmansee, S.; Schambach, J.; Sun, X.; Szelezniak, M.

    2015-01-01

    The Heavy Flavor Tracker (HFT) was installed in the STAR experiment for the 2014 heavy ion run of RHIC. Designed to improve the vertex resolution and extend the measurement capabilities in the heavy flavor domain, the HFT is composed of three different silicon detectors based on CMOS monolithic active pixels (MAPS), pads and strips respectively, arranged in four concentric cylinders close to the STAR interaction point. The two innermost HFT layers are placed at a radius of 2.7 and 8 cm from the beam line, respectively, and accommodate 400 ultra-thin (50 μ m) high resolution MAPS sensors arranged in 10-sensor ladders to cover a total silicon area of 0.16 m 2 . Each sensor includes a pixel array of 928 rows and 960 columns with a 20.7 μ m pixel pitch, providing a sensitive area of ∼ 3.8 cm 2 . The architecture is based on a column parallel readout with amplification and correlated double sampling inside each pixel. Each column is terminated with a high precision discriminator, is read out in a rolling shutter mode and the output is processed through an integrated zero suppression logic. The results are stored in two SRAM with ping-pong arrangement for a continuous readout. The sensor features 185.6 μ s readout time and 170 mW/cm 2 power dissipation. The detector is air-cooled, allowing a global material budget as low as 0.39% on the inner layer. A novel mechanical approach to detector insertion enables effective installation and integration of the pixel layers within an 8 hour shift during the on-going STAR run.In addition to a detailed description of the detector characteristics, the experience of the first months of data taking will be presented in this paper, with a particular focus on sensor threshold calibration, latch-up protection procedures and general system operations aimed at stabilizing the running conditions. Issues faced during the 2014 run will be discussed together with the implemented solutions. A preliminary analysis of the detector

  17. Bioactivities of Ketones Terpenes: Antifungal Effect on F. verticillioides and Repellents to Control Insect Fungal Vector, S. zeamais

    OpenAIRE

    Pizzolitto, Romina P.; Herrera, Jimena M.; Zaio, Yesica P.; Dambolena, Jose S.; Zunino, Maria P.; Gallucci, Mauro N.; Zygadlo, Julio A.

    2015-01-01

    Maize is one the most important staple foods in the world. However, numerous pests, such as fungal pathogens, e.g., Fusarium verticillioides, and insects, such as Sitophlilus zeamais, attack maize grains during storage. Many F. verticillioides strains produce fumonisins, one of the most important mycotoxin that causes toxic effects on human and animal health. This situation is aggravated by the insect fungal vector, Sitophlilus zeamais, which contributes to the dispersal of fungal spores, and...

  18. Lethal and pre-lethal effects of a fungal biopesticide contribute to substantial and rapid control of malaria vectors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Blanford

    Full Text Available Rapidly emerging insecticide resistance is creating an urgent need for new active ingredients to control the adult mosquitoes that vector malaria. Biopesticides based on the spores of entomopathogenic fungi have shown considerable promise by causing very substantial mortality within 7-14 days of exposure. This mortality will generate excellent malaria control if there is a high likelihood that mosquitoes contact fungi early in their adult lives. However, where contact rates are lower, as might result from poor pesticide coverage, some mosquitoes will contact fungi one or more feeding cycles after they acquire malaria, and so risk transmitting malaria before the fungus kills them. Critics have argued that 'slow acting' fungal biopesticides are, therefore, incapable of delivering malaria control in real-world contexts. Here, utilizing standard WHO laboratory protocols, we demonstrate effective action of a biopesticide much faster than previously reported. Specifically, we show that transient exposure to clay tiles sprayed with a candidate biopesticide comprising spores of a natural isolate of Beauveria bassiana, could reduce malaria transmission potential to zero within a feeding cycle. The effect resulted from a combination of high mortality and rapid fungal-induced reduction in feeding and flight capacity. Additionally, multiple insecticide-resistant lines from three key African malaria vector species were completely susceptible to fungus. Thus, fungal biopesticides can block transmission on a par with chemical insecticides, and can achieve this where chemical insecticides have little impact. These results support broadening the current vector control paradigm beyond fast-acting chemical toxins.

  19. Gauge covariant fermion-photon vertex in quenched, massless three dimensional quantum electrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tjiang, P.C.; Burden, C.J.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: We consider the problem of designing an Ansatz for the transverse part of the fermion-photon vertex in QED 3 . Our work is based on that of Ball and Chiu, who consider restrictions placed on the vertex by the U(1) Ward identity, and on subsequent modifications which attempt to satisfy the Landau-Khalatnikov transformation rules. A class of vertex Ansaetze including that proposed by Dong et al is tested using the gauge invariance of the vacuum polarisation scalar

  20. Three-coloring graphs with no induced seven-vertex path II : using a triangle

    OpenAIRE

    Chudnovsky, Maria; Maceli, Peter; Zhong, Mingxian

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we give a polynomial time algorithm which determines if a given graph containing a triangle and no induced seven-vertex path is 3-colorable, and gives an explicit coloring if one exists. In previous work, we gave a polynomial time algorithm for three-coloring triangle-free graphs with no induced seven-vertex path. Combined, our work shows that three-coloring a graph with no induced seven-vertex path can be done in polynomial time.

  1. Intrinsic-normal-ordered vertex operators from the multiloop N-tachyon amplitude

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldazabal, G.; Nunez, C.; Bonini, M.; Iengo, R.

    1987-09-01

    We construct vertex operators for arbitrary mass level states of the closed bosonic string. Starting from a generalization of the Koba-Nielsen amplitude which is suitable for an arbitrary genus Riemann surface, we read the vertex operators from the residues of the poles for the intermediate states. Since the original expression is metric independent and normal ordered without the need of inventing any regularization scheme, our vertex operators also possess these properties. We discuss their general features. (author). 17 refs

  2. Vertex function for the coupling of an electron with intramolecular phonons: Exact results in the antiadiabatic limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takada, Y.; Higuchi, T.

    1995-01-01

    The Green's-function techniques, especially the one developed in the preceding paper [Takada, Phys. Rev. B 52, 12 708 (1995)], are employed to calculate the electron-phonon vertex part as well as the electronic self-energy exactly on both real- and imaginary-frequency axes in the electron-phonon Holstein model with the on-site Coulomb repulsion in the limit in which the intramolecular phonon energy ω 0 is much larger than the electronic bandwidth. The rigorous vertex part is found to diverge at the frequencies at which an electron is locked by such local phonons with an infinitely strong effective coupling. Characteristic frequencies of this divergence, which are not equal to multiples of ω 0 , are calculated as a function of the electron-phonon bare coupling constant. Our results for the self-energy are checked successfully with the exact ones obtained by the Lang-Firsov canonical transformation

  3. Effect of a spiral phase on a vector optical field with hybrid polarization states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Rui-Pin; Zhao, Tingyu; Zhong, Li-Xin; Chew, Khian-Hooi; Gu, Bing; Zhou, Guoquan

    2015-01-01

    The propagation dynamics of a vector field with inhomogeneous states of polarization (SoP) imposed a vortex is studied using the angular spectrum method. The evolution of SoP in the cross section of the field during propagation is analyzed numerically by the Stokes polarization parameters. The results indicate that SoP in the field cross section rotate along the propagation axis during propagation due to the existence of a vortex. In addition, the interaction between the phase singularity and the polarization singularity leads to the creation or annihilation of the optical field in the central region. In particular, the distributions of the transverse energy flow and both spin and orbital optical angular momentum fluxes in the cross section of the vortex vector optical field depend sensitively on both the vortex and polarization topology charges. (paper)

  4. Exotic composite vector boson

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akama, K.; Hattori, T.; Yasue, M.

    1991-01-01

    An exotic composite vector boson V is introduced in two dynamical models of composite quarks, leptons, W, and Z. One is based on four-Fermi interactions, in which composite vector bosons are regarded as fermion-antifermion bound states and the other is based on the confining SU(2) L gauge model, in which they are given by scalar-antiscalar bound states. Both approaches describe the same effective interactions for the sector of composite quarks, leptons, W, Z, γ, and V

  5. cellGPU: Massively parallel simulations of dynamic vertex models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sussman, Daniel M.

    2017-10-01

    Vertex models represent confluent tissue by polygonal or polyhedral tilings of space, with the individual cells interacting via force laws that depend on both the geometry of the cells and the topology of the tessellation. This dependence on the connectivity of the cellular network introduces several complications to performing molecular-dynamics-like simulations of vertex models, and in particular makes parallelizing the simulations difficult. cellGPU addresses this difficulty and lays the foundation for massively parallelized, GPU-based simulations of these models. This article discusses its implementation for a pair of two-dimensional models, and compares the typical performance that can be expected between running cellGPU entirely on the CPU versus its performance when running on a range of commercial and server-grade graphics cards. By implementing the calculation of topological changes and forces on cells in a highly parallelizable fashion, cellGPU enables researchers to simulate time- and length-scales previously inaccessible via existing single-threaded CPU implementations. Program Files doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.17632/6j2cj29t3r.1 Licensing provisions: MIT Programming language: CUDA/C++ Nature of problem: Simulations of off-lattice "vertex models" of cells, in which the interaction forces depend on both the geometry and the topology of the cellular aggregate. Solution method: Highly parallelized GPU-accelerated dynamical simulations in which the force calculations and the topological features can be handled on either the CPU or GPU. Additional comments: The code is hosted at https://gitlab.com/dmsussman/cellGPU, with documentation additionally maintained at http://dmsussman.gitlab.io/cellGPUdocumentation

  6. Operadic formulation of topological vertex algebras and gerstenhaber or Batalin-Vilkovisky algebras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Yizhi

    1994-01-01

    We give the operadic formulation of (weak, strong) topological vertex algebras, which are variants of topological vertex operator algebras studied recently by Lian and Zuckerman. As an application, we obtain a conceptual and geometric construction of the Batalin-Vilkovisky algebraic structure (or the Gerstenhaber algebra structure) on the cohomology of a topological vertex algebra (or of a weak topological vertex algebra) by combining this operadic formulation with a theorem of Getzler (or of Cohen) which formulates Batalin-Vilkovisky algebras (or Gerstenhaber algebras) in terms of the homology of the framed little disk operad (or of the little disk operad). (orig.)

  7. A NEW HYBRID GENETIC ALGORITHM FOR VERTEX COVER PROBLEM

    OpenAIRE

    UĞURLU, Onur

    2015-01-01

    The minimum vertex cover  problem belongs to the  class  of  NP-compl ete  graph  theoretical problems. This paper presents a hybrid genetic algorithm to solve minimum ver tex cover problem. In this paper, it has been shown that when local optimization technique is added t o genetic algorithm to form hybrid genetic algorithm, it gives more quality solution than simple genet ic algorithm. Also, anew mutation operator has been developed especially for minimum verte...

  8. Vertex operator construction of superconformal ghosts and string field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ezawa, Z.F.; Nakamura, S.; Tezuka, A.

    1987-01-01

    Superconformal ghosts in string theories are characterized by the SU(1,1) Kac-Moody algebra with central charge -1/2. These ghost fields are constructed as the vertex operators realizing spinor representations of the Kac-Moody algebra. Representations of the canonical commutation relations of the superconformal ghosts are analyzed extensively. All irreducible representations are found to possess only the trivial inner product but for one exceptional case. Consequently, in superstring field theory it is necessary to consider reducible representations in general. Hilbert spaces with a non-trivial inner product are explicitly obtained upon which second quantization of superstring may be carried out. (orig.)

  9. The LHCb vertex locator and level-1 trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Dijkstra, H

    2000-01-01

    LHCb will study CP violation and other rare phenomena in B-decays with a forward detector at the LHC. One of the challenges is to design a fast and efficient trigger. The design of the silicon Vertex Locator (VELO) has been driven by the requirements of one of the most selective triggers of the experiment. The VELO trigger is designed to work at an input rate of 1 MHz. The requirements and implementation of the VELO and the associated trigger are summarised, followed by a description of an upgrade which improves the trigger performance significantly. (3 refs).

  10. A new tool for constrained vertex fitting in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Colijn, Auke Pieter; Limper, Maaike; Prokofiev, Kirill

    2009-01-01

    The precise reconstruction of trajectories of charged and neutral particles and their decay vertices is crucial for many physics analyses. Studying the tracking performance on well known benchmark channels helps to understand the properties of the ATLAS detector during the initial phase of the LHC. In order to exploit the correlations between reconstructed parameters of final state tracks having the same mother particle, a new tool for vertex fitting with possibility of simultaneous application of kinematic constraints has been developed. Using this tool on a benchmark channel such as J/psi to μ+μ− helps to correct shifts in the reconstructed curvature induced by systematic deformations of the detector.

  11. Vertex Normals and Face Curvatures of Triangle Meshes

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Xiang

    2016-08-12

    This study contributes to the discrete differential geometry of triangle meshes, in combination with discrete line congruences associated with such meshes. In particular we discuss when a congruence defined by linear interpolation of vertex normals deserves to be called a ʼnormal’ congruence. Our main results are a discussion of various definitions of normality, a detailed study of the geometry of such congruences, and a concept of curvatures and shape operators associated with the faces of a triangle mesh. These curvatures are compatible with both normal congruences and the Steiner formula.

  12. W-symmetry, topological vertex and affine Yangian

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Procházka, Tomáš [Arnold Sommerfeld Center for Theoretical Physics, Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich,Theresienstr. 37, D-80333 München (Germany); Institute of Physics AS CR,Na Slovance 2, Prague 8 (Czech Republic)

    2016-10-14

    We discuss the representation theory of the non-linear chiral algebra W{sub 1+∞} of Gaberdiel and Gopakumar and its connection to the Yangian of (u(1))-hat whose presentation was given by Tsymbaliuk. The characters of completely degenerate representations of W{sub 1+∞} are given by the topological vertex. The Yangian picture provides an infinite number of commuting charges which can be explicitly diagonalized in W{sub 1+∞} highest weight representations. Many properties that are difficult to study in the W{sub 1+∞} picture turn out to have a simple combinatorial interpretation, once translated to the Yangian picture.

  13. 3D circuit integration for Vertex and other detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yarema, Ray; /Fermilab

    2007-09-01

    High Energy Physics continues to push the technical boundaries for electronics. There is no area where this is truer than for vertex detectors. Lower mass and power along with higher resolution and radiation tolerance are driving forces. New technologies such as SOI CMOS detectors and three dimensional (3D) integrated circuits offer new opportunities to meet these challenges. The fundamentals for SOI CMOS detectors and 3D integrated circuits are discussed. Examples of each approach for physics applications are presented. Cost issues and ways to reduce development costs are discussed.

  14. Performance of the VTL PEPR vertex guidance system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunn, L.A.; Harris, R.; Kenyon, R.G.; Lubatti, H.J.; Moriyasu, K.

    1975-01-01

    A PEPR vertex guidance system requiring no operator intervention has been operating at the University of Washington's Visual Techniques Laboratory since 1972. The measurement of 140 000 events consisting of 3, 4, 5, and 6-prong interactions of a 15 GeV/c π - beam with deuterium was recently completed. The system employs global transformations that reduce circular tracks to a point in a two-dimensional angle-curvature space. Noise reduction techniques are used to improve position and angle accuracy and thereby the system resolution and efficiency. Monitoring criteria were developed to ensure continuous peak performance over long production periods. (Auth.)

  15. Identifying the effective concentration for spatial repellency of the dengue vector Aedes aegypti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achee, Nicole; Masuoka, Penny; Smith, Philip; Martin, Nicholas; Chareonviryiphap, Theeraphap; Polsomboon, Suppaluck; Hendarto, Joko; Grieco, John

    2012-12-28

    Current efforts are underway to quantify the chemical concentration in a treated air space that elicits a spatial repellent (deterrent) response in a vector population. Such information will facilitate identifying the optimum active ingredient (AI) dosage and intervention coverage important for the development of spatial repellent tools--one of several novel strategies being evaluated for vector-borne disease control. This study reports initial findings from air sampling experiments conducted under field conditions to describe the relationship between air concentrations of repellent AIs and deterrent behavior in the dengue vector, Aedes aegypti. Air samples were taken inside and outdoors of experimental huts located in Pu Tuey Village, Kanchanaburi Province, Thailand in conjunction with mosquito behavioral evaluations. A mark-release-recapture study design using interception traps was used to measure deterrency of Ae. aegypti against 0.00625% metofluthrin coils and DDT-treated fabric (2g/m2) within separate experimental trials. Sentinel mosquito cohorts were positioned adjacent to air sampling locations to monitor knock down responses to AI within the treated air space. Air samples were analyzed using two techniques: the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) Compendium Method TO-10A and thermal desorption (TD). Both the USEPA TO-10A and TD air sampling methods were able to detect and quantify volatized AIs under field conditions. Air samples indicated concentrations of both repellent chemicals below thresholds required for toxic responses (mortality) in mosquitoes. These concentrations elicited up to a 58% and 70% reduction in Ae. aegypti entry (i.e., deterrency) into treated experimental huts using metofluthrin coils and DDT-treated fabric, respectively. Minimal knock down was observed in sentinel mosquito cohorts positioned adjacent to air sampling locations during both chemical evaluations. This study is the first to describe two air sampling

  16. Identifying the effective concentration for spatial repellency of the dengue vector Aedes aegypti

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achee Nicole

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Current efforts are underway to quantify the chemical concentration in a treated air space that elicits a spatial repellent (deterrent response in a vector population. Such information will facilitate identifying the optimum active ingredient (AI dosage and intervention coverage important for the development of spatial repellent tools – one of several novel strategies being evaluated for vector-borne disease control. This study reports initial findings from air sampling experiments conducted under field conditions to describe the relationship between air concentrations of repellent AIs and deterrent behavior in the dengue vector, Aedes aegypti. Methods Air samples were taken inside and outdoors of experimental huts located in Pu Tuey Village, Kanchanaburi Province, Thailand in conjunction with mosquito behavioral evaluations. A mark-release-recapture study design using interception traps was used to measure deterrency of Ae. aegypti against 0.00625% metofluthrin coils and DDT-treated fabric (2g/m2 within separate experimental trials. Sentinel mosquito cohorts were positioned adjacent to air sampling locations to monitor knock down responses to AI within the treated air space. Air samples were analyzed using two techniques: the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA Compendium Method TO-10A and thermal desorption (TD. Results Both the USEPA TO-10A and TD air sampling methods were able to detect and quantify volatized AIs under field conditions. Air samples indicated concentrations of both repellent chemicals below thresholds required for toxic responses (mortality in mosquitoes. These concentrations elicited up to a 58% and 70% reduction in Ae. aegypti entry (i.e., deterrency into treated experimental huts using metofluthrin coils and DDT-treated fabric, respectively. Minimal knock down was observed in sentinel mosquito cohorts positioned adjacent to air sampling locations during both chemical evaluations. Conclusions

  17. Effective photodynamic therapy in drug-resistant prostate cancer cells utilizing a non-viral antitumor vector (a secondary publication).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, Masaya; Honda, Norihiro; Hazama, Hisanao; Tachikawa, Shoji; Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Kaneda, Yasufumi; Awazu, Kunio

    2016-03-31

    There is an urgent need to develop an efficient strategy for the treatment of drug-resistant prostate cancer. Photodynamic therapy (PDT), in which low incident levels of laser energy are used to activate a photosensitizer taken up by tumor cells, is expected as a novel therapy for the treatment of prostate cancer because of the minimal invasive nature of PDT. The present study was designed to assess the efficacy of a novel vector approach combined with a conventional porphyrin-based photosensitizer. Our group focused on a non-viral vector (hemagglutinating virus of Japan envelope; HVJ-E) combined with protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) lipid, termed the porphyrus envelope (PE). It has been previously confirmed that HVJ-E has drug-delivering properties and can induce cancer-specific cell death. The PE (HVJ-E contained in PpIX lipid) was developed as a novel photosensitizer. In this study, the antitumor and PDT efficacy of the PE against hormone-antagonistic human prostate cancer cells (PC-3) were evaluated. Our results demonstrated that, under specific circumstances, PDT using the PE was very effective against PC-3 cells. A novel therapy for drug-resistant prostate cancer based on this vector approach is eagerly anticipated.

  18. Error-source effects on the performance of direct and iterative algorithms on an optical matrix-vector processor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlee, Caroline J.; Casasent, David P.

    1990-09-01

    Error sources in an optical matrix-vector processor are analyzed in terms of their effect on the performance of the algorithms used to solve a set of nonlinear and linear algebraic equations. A direct and an iterative algorithm are used to solve a nonlinear time-dependent case-study from computational fluid dynamics. A simulator which emulates the data flow and number representation of the OLAP is used to studs? these error effects. The ability of each algorithm to tolerate or correct the error sources is quantified. These results are extended to the general case of solving nonlinear and linear algebraic equations on the optical system.

  19. VECTOR INTEGRATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thomas, E. G. F.

    2012-01-01

    This paper deals with the theory of integration of scalar functions with respect to a measure with values in a, not necessarily locally convex, topological vector space. It focuses on the extension of such integrals from bounded measurable functions to the class of integrable functions, proving

  20. Structure of the vertex function in finite quantum electrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mannheim, P.D.

    1975-01-01

    We study the structure of the renormalized electromagnetic current vertes, GAMMA-tilde/sub μ/(p,p+q,q), in finite quantum electrodynamics. Using conformal invariance we find that GAMMA-tilde/sub μ/(p,p,0) takes the simple form of Z 1 γ/sub μ/ when the external fermions are far off the mass shell. We interpret this result as an old theorem on the structure of the vertex function due to Gell--Mann and Zachariasen. We give the general structure of the vertex for arbitrary momentum transfer parametrically, and discuss how the Bethe--Salpeter equation and the Federbush--Johnson theorem are satisfied. We contrast the meaning of pointlike in a finite field theory with the meaning understood in the parton model. We discuss to what extent the condition Z 1 = 0, which may hold in conformal theories other than finite quantum electrodynamics, may be interpreted as a bootstrap condition. We show that the vanishing of Z 1 prevents their being bound states in the Migdal--Polyakov bootstrap

  1. SPARTex: A Vertex-Centric Framework for RDF Data Analytics

    KAUST Repository

    Abdelaziz, Ibrahim

    2015-08-31

    A growing number of applications require combining SPARQL queries with generic graph search on RDF data. However, the lack of procedural capabilities in SPARQL makes it inappropriate for graph analytics. Moreover, RDF engines focus on SPARQL query evaluation whereas graph management frameworks perform only generic graph computations. In this work, we bridge the gap by introducing SPARTex, an RDF analytics framework based on the vertex-centric computation model. In SPARTex, user-defined vertex centric programs can be invoked from SPARQL as stored procedures. SPARTex allows the execution of a pipeline of graph algorithms without the need for multiple reads/writes of input data and intermediate results. We use a cost-based optimizer for minimizing the communication cost. SPARTex evaluates queries that combine SPARQL and generic graph computations orders of magnitude faster than existing RDF engines. We demonstrate a real system prototype of SPARTex running on a local cluster using real and synthetic datasets. SPARTex has a real-time graphical user interface that allows the participants to write regular SPARQL queries, use our proposed SPARQL extension to declaratively invoke graph algorithms or combine/pipeline both SPARQL querying and generic graph analytics.

  2. The Belle II silicon vertex detector assembly and mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamczyk, K. [H. Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Krakow 31-342 (Poland); Aihara, H. [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Angelini, C. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); INFN Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Aziz, T.; Babu, V. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai 400005 (India); Bacher, S. [H. Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Krakow 31-342 (Poland); Bahinipati, S. [Indian Institute of Technology Bhubaneswar, Satya Nagar (India); Barberio, E.; Baroncelli, Ti.; Baroncelli, To. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Basith, A.K. [Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India); Batignani, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); INFN Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Bauer, A. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Austrian Academy of Sciences, 1050 Vienna (Austria); Behera, P.K. [Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India); Bergauer, T. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Austrian Academy of Sciences, 1050 Vienna (Austria); Bettarini, S., E-mail: stefano.bettarini@pi.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); INFN Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Bhuyan, B. [Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Assam 781039 (India); Bilka, T. [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, 121 16 Prague (Czech Republic); Bosi, F. [INFN Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Bosisio, L. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Trieste, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); INFN Sezione di Trieste, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); and others

    2017-02-11

    The Belle II experiment at the asymmetric SuperKEKB collider in Japan will operate at an instantaneous luminosity approximately 50 times greater than its predecessor (Belle). The central feature of the experiment is a vertex detector comprising two layers of pixelated silicon detectors (PXD) and four layers of double-sided silicon microstrip detectors (SVD). One of the key measurements for Belle II is CP violation asymmetry in the decays of beauty and charm hadrons, which hinges on a precise charged-track vertex determination and low-momentum track measurement. Towards this goal, a proper assembly of the SVD components with precise alignment ought to be performed and the geometrical tolerances should be checked to fall within the design limits. We present an overview of the assembly procedure that is being followed, which includes the precision gluing of the SVD module components, wire-bonding of the various electrical components, and precision 3D coordinate measurements of the final SVD modules. Finally, some results from the latest test-beam are reported.

  3. Electronics cooling of Phenix multiplicity and vertex detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Z.; Gregory, W.S.

    1996-08-01

    The Multiplicity and Vertex Detector (MVD) uses silicon strip sensors arranged in two concentric barrels around the beam pipe of the PHENIX detector that will be installed at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Each silicon sensor is connected by a flexible kapton cable to its own front-end electronics printed circuit board that is a multi-chip module or MCM. The MCMs are the main heat source in the system. To maintain the MVD at optimized operational status, the maximum temperature of the multi-chip modules must be below 40 C. Using COSMOS/M HSTAR for the Heat Transfer analysis, a finite element model of a typical MCM plate was created to simulate a 9m/s airflow and 9m/s mixed flow composed of 50% helium and 50% air respectively, with convective heat transfer on both sides of the plate. The results using a mixed flow of helium and air show that the average maximum temperature reached by the MCMs is 37.5 C. The maximum temperature which is represented by the hot spots on the MCM is 39.43 C for the helium and air mixture which meets the design temperature requirement 40 C. To maintain the Multiplicity and Vertex Detector at optimized operational status, the configuration of the plenum chamber, the power dissipated by the silicon chips, the fluid flow velocity and comparison on the MCM design parameters will be discussed

  4. First results with prototype ISIS devices for ILC vertex detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damerell, C.; Zhang, Z.; Gao, R.; John John, Jaya; Li, Y.; Nomerotski, A.; Holland, A.; Seabroke, G.; Havranek, M.; Stefanov, K.; Kar-Roy, A.; Bell, R.; Burt, D.; Pool, P.

    2010-01-01

    The vertex detectors at the International Linear Collider (ILC) (there will be two of them, one for each of two general purpose detectors) will certainly be built with silicon pixel detectors, either monolithic or perhaps vertically integrated. However, beyond this general statement, there is a wide range of options supported by active R and D programmes all over the world. Pixel-based vertex detectors build on the experience at the SLAC large detector (SLD) operating at the SLAC linear collider (SLC), where a 307 Mpixel detector permitted the highest physics performance at LEP or SLC. For ILC, machine conditions demand much faster readout than at SLC, something like 20 time slices during the 1 ms bunch train. The approach of the image sensor with in-situ storage (ISIS) is unique in offering this capability while avoiding the undesirable requirement of 'pulsed power'. First results from a prototype device that approaches the pixel size of 20 μm square, needed for physics, are reported. The dimensional challenge is met by using a 0.18 μm imaging CMOS process, instead of a conventional CCD process.

  5. First results with prototype ISIS devices for ILC vertex detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damerell, C., E-mail: c.damerell@rl.ac.u [RAL, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Zhang, Z. [RAL, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Gao, R.; John John, Jaya; Li, Y.; Nomerotski, A. [Oxford U (United Kingdom); Holland, A.; Seabroke, G. [Centre for Electronic Imaging, Open U (United Kingdom); Havranek, M. [Czech Technical University in Prague (Czech Republic); Stefanov, K. [Sentec Ltd, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Kar-Roy, A. [Jazz Semiconductors, California (United States); Bell, R.; Burt, D.; Pool, P. [e2V Technologies, Chelmsford (United Kingdom)

    2010-12-11

    The vertex detectors at the International Linear Collider (ILC) (there will be two of them, one for each of two general purpose detectors) will certainly be built with silicon pixel detectors, either monolithic or perhaps vertically integrated. However, beyond this general statement, there is a wide range of options supported by active R and D programmes all over the world. Pixel-based vertex detectors build on the experience at the SLAC large detector (SLD) operating at the SLAC linear collider (SLC), where a 307 Mpixel detector permitted the highest physics performance at LEP or SLC. For ILC, machine conditions demand much faster readout than at SLC, something like 20 time slices during the 1 ms bunch train. The approach of the image sensor with in-situ storage (ISIS) is unique in offering this capability while avoiding the undesirable requirement of 'pulsed power'. First results from a prototype device that approaches the pixel size of 20 {mu}m square, needed for physics, are reported. The dimensional challenge is met by using a 0.18 {mu}m imaging CMOS process, instead of a conventional CCD process.

  6. Design of a current based readout chip and development of a DEPFET pixel prototype system for the ILC vertex detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trimpl, M.

    2005-12-01

    The future TeV-scale linear collider ILC (International Linear Collider) offers a large variety of precision measurements complementary to the discovery potential of the LHC (Large Hadron Collider). To fully exploit its physics potential, a vertex detector with unprecedented performance is needed. One proposed technology for the ILC vertex detector is the DEPFET active pixel sensor. The DEPFET sensor offers particle detection with in-pixel amplification by incorporating a field effect transistor into a fully depleted high-ohmic silicon substrate. The device provides an excellent signal-to-noise ratio and a good spatial resolution at the same time. To establish a very fast readout of a DEPFET pixel matrix with row rates of 20 MHz and more, the 128 channel CURO II ASIC has been designed and fabricated. The architecture of the chip is completely based on current mode techniques (SI) perfectly adapted to the current signal of the sensor. For the ILC vertex detector a prototype system with a 64 x 128 DEPFET pixel matrix read out by the CURO II chip has been developed. The design issues and the standalone performance of the readout chip as well as first results with the prototype system will be presented. (orig.)

  7. Design of a current based readout chip and development of a DEPFET pixel prototype system for the ILC vertex detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trimpl, M.

    2005-12-15

    The future TeV-scale linear collider ILC (International Linear Collider) offers a large variety of precision measurements complementary to the discovery potential of the LHC (Large Hadron Collider). To fully exploit its physics potential, a vertex detector with unprecedented performance is needed. One proposed technology for the ILC vertex detector is the DEPFET active pixel sensor. The DEPFET sensor offers particle detection with in-pixel amplification by incorporating a field effect transistor into a fully depleted high-ohmic silicon substrate. The device provides an excellent signal-to-noise ratio and a good spatial resolution at the same time. To establish a very fast readout of a DEPFET pixel matrix with row rates of 20 MHz and more, the 128 channel CURO II ASIC has been designed and fabricated. The architecture of the chip is completely based on current mode techniques (SI) perfectly adapted to the current signal of the sensor. For the ILC vertex detector a prototype system with a 64 x 128 DEPFET pixel matrix read out by the CURO II chip has been developed. The design issues and the standalone performance of the readout chip as well as first results with the prototype system will be presented. (orig.)

  8. Percutaneous Vaccination as an Effective Method of Delivery of MVA and MVA-Vectored Vaccines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clement A Meseda

    Full Text Available The robustness of immune responses to an antigen could be dictated by the route of vaccine inoculation. Traditional smallpox vaccines, essentially vaccinia virus strains, that were used in the eradication of smallpox were administered by percutaneous inoculation (skin scarification. The modified vaccinia virus Ankara is licensed as a smallpox vaccine in Europe and Canada and currently undergoing clinical development in the United States. MVA is also being investigated as a vector for the delivery of heterologous genes for prophylactic or therapeutic immunization. Since MVA is replication-deficient, MVA and MVA-vectored vaccines are often inoculated through the intramuscular, intradermal or subcutaneous routes. Vaccine inoculation via the intramuscular, intradermal or subcutaneous routes requires the use of injection needles, and an estimated 10 to 20% of the population of the United States has needle phobia. Following an observation in our laboratory that a replication-deficient recombinant vaccinia virus derived from the New York City Board of Health strain elicited protective immune responses in a mouse model upon inoculation by tail scarification, we investigated whether MVA and MVA recombinants can elicit protective responses following percutaneous administration in mouse models. Our data suggest that MVA administered by percutaneous inoculation, elicited vaccinia-specific antibody responses, and protected mice from lethal vaccinia virus challenge, at levels comparable to or better than subcutaneous or intramuscular inoculation. High titers of specific neutralizing antibodies were elicited in mice inoculated with a recombinant MVA expressing the herpes simplex type 2 glycoprotein D after scarification. Similarly, a recombinant MVA expressing the hemagglutinin of attenuated influenza virus rgA/Viet Nam/1203/2004 (H5N1 elicited protective immune responses when administered at low doses by scarification. Taken together, our data suggest that

  9. Percutaneous Vaccination as an Effective Method of Delivery of MVA and MVA-Vectored Vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meseda, Clement A; Atukorale, Vajini; Kuhn, Jordan; Schmeisser, Falko; Weir, Jerry P

    2016-01-01

    The robustness of immune responses to an antigen could be dictated by the route of vaccine inoculation. Traditional smallpox vaccines, essentially vaccinia virus strains, that were used in the eradication of smallpox were administered by percutaneous inoculation (skin scarification). The modified vaccinia virus Ankara is licensed as a smallpox vaccine in Europe and Canada and currently undergoing clinical development in the United States. MVA is also being investigated as a vector for the delivery of heterologous genes for prophylactic or therapeutic immunization. Since MVA is replication-deficient, MVA and MVA-vectored vaccines are often inoculated through the intramuscular, intradermal or subcutaneous routes. Vaccine inoculation via the intramuscular, intradermal or subcutaneous routes requires the use of injection needles, and an estimated 10 to 20% of the population of the United States has needle phobia. Following an observation in our laboratory that a replication-deficient recombinant vaccinia virus derived from the New York City Board of Health strain elicited protective immune responses in a mouse model upon inoculation by tail scarification, we investigated whether MVA and MVA recombinants can elicit protective responses following percutaneous administration in mouse models. Our data suggest that MVA administered by percutaneous inoculation, elicited vaccinia-specific antibody responses, and protected mice from lethal vaccinia virus challenge, at levels comparable to or better than subcutaneous or intramuscular inoculation. High titers of specific neutralizing antibodies were elicited in mice inoculated with a recombinant MVA expressing the herpes simplex type 2 glycoprotein D after scarification. Similarly, a recombinant MVA expressing the hemagglutinin of attenuated influenza virus rgA/Viet Nam/1203/2004 (H5N1) elicited protective immune responses when administered at low doses by scarification. Taken together, our data suggest that MVA and MVA-vectored

  10. Anxiolytic-like effects after vector-mediated overexpression of neuropeptide Y in the amygdala and hippocampus of mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Søren Hofman Oliveira; Olesen, Mikkel Vestergaard; Gøtzsche, Casper René

    2014-01-01

    , injections of rAAV-NPY caused significant anxiolytic-like effect in the open field, elevated plus maze, and light-dark transition tests. In the hippocampus, rAAV-NPY treatment was associated with anxiolytic-like effect only in the elevated plus maze. No additive effect was observed after combined r....... Using a recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vector, we addressed this idea by testing effects on anxiolytic- and depression-like behaviours in adult mice after overexpression of NPY transgene in the amygdala and/or hippocampus, two brain regions implicated in emotional behaviours. In the amygdala......AAV-NPY injection into both the amygdala and hippocampus where anxiolytic-like effect was found in the elevated plus maze and light-dark transition tests. Antidepressant-like effects were not detected in any of the rAAV-NPY injected groups. Immobility was even increased in the tail suspension and forced swim tests...

  11. Generalized structure of hadron-quark vertex function in Bethe-Salpeter framework: applications to leptonic decays of V-mesons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhatnagar, Shashank [Department of Physics, Addis Ababa University, PO Box 101739, Addis Ababa (Ethiopia); Li Shiyuan [Department of Physics, Shandong University, Jinan, 250100 (China)

    2006-07-15

    We employ the framework of the Bethe-Salpeter equation under a covariant instantaneous ansatz to study the leptonic decays of vector mesons. The structure of the hadron-quark vertex function {gamma} is generalized to include various Dirac covariants (other than i{gamma} . {epsilon}) from their complete set. They are incorporated in accordance with a naive power counting rule order-by-order in powers of the inverse of the meson mass. The decay constants for {rho}, {omega} and {phi} mesons are calculated with the incorporation of leading-order covariants.

  12. Generalized structure of hadron-quark vertex function in Bethe-Salpeter framework: applications to leptonic decays of V-mesons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatnagar, Shashank; Li Shiyuan

    2006-01-01

    We employ the framework of the Bethe-Salpeter equation under a covariant instantaneous ansatz to study the leptonic decays of vector mesons. The structure of the hadron-quark vertex function Γ is generalized to include various Dirac covariants (other than iγ . ε) from their complete set. They are incorporated in accordance with a naive power counting rule order-by-order in powers of the inverse of the meson mass. The decay constants for ρ, ω and φ mesons are calculated with the incorporation of leading-order covariants

  13. Dilepton Yields from Brown-Rho Scaled Vector Mesons Including Memory Effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schenke, Bjoern; Greiner, Carsten

    2007-01-01

    Scenarios with dropping vector meson masses, motivated by the work of Brown and Rho, have been strongly discussed after recent NA60 Collaboration data were presented. In this Letter they are investigated within a nonequilibrium field theoretical description that includes quantum mechanical memory. Dimuon yields are calculated by application of a model for the fireball, and strong modifications are found in the comparison to quasiequilibrium calculations, which assume instantaneous adjustment of all meson properties to the surrounding medium. In addition, results for the situation of very broad excitations are presented

  14. Direct in situ thermometry: Variations in reciprocal-lattice vectors and challenges with the Debye–Waller effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cremons, Daniel R.; Flannigan, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Conventional in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) enables the atomic-scale study of dynamic materials processes on millisecond time scales. Specimen holders capable of being heated to over 1000 °C have provided insight into myriad processes, including nanoscale thermal transport, structural phase transitions, and catalytic reactions. In order for such studies to be accurate and precise, direct determination of the specimen temperature – rather than the heating-element temperature – is critical. Further, such methods should be versatile in that any temperature across a wide range may be measured, irrespective of single-indicator properties specific to the specimen (e.g., first-order phase transition, melting point, etc.). Here, we describe a rigorous approach to direct, in situ thermometry of TEM specimens that exploits lattice thermal expansion and the resultant decrease in diffraction-vector magnitude in reciprocal space. Via sub-pixel measurement of reciprocal-lattice-vector magnitudes, picometer increases in lattice parameters are measured over a continuous temperature range and compared to those expected from the coefficient of thermal expansion. Statistical treatment of several experimental trials conducted on nanostructured aluminum thin films shows excellent agreement with both theory and (indirect) measurement of the in situ heating holder. Additionally, we illustrate how uncontrolled, thermally-induced variation in single-crystal orientation leads to modulation of the excitation error and, therefore, the Bragg-spot intensities resulting in a convolution of heating and tilting effects, thus complicating temperature determination via the Debye–Waller effect. - Highlights: • A method for direct in situ determination of specimen temperature is described. • Specimen temperature is determined via reciprocal-lattice-vector contraction. • Statistical treatment agrees with the in situ heating-holder thermocouple reading. • Thermally

  15. Understanding Effect of Constraint Release Environment on End-to-End Vector Relaxation of Linear Polymer Chains

    KAUST Repository

    Shivokhin, Maksim E.

    2017-05-30

    We propose and verify methods based on the slip-spring (SSp) model [ Macromolecules 2005, 38, 14 ] for predicting the effect of any monodisperse, binary, or ternary environment of topological constraints on the relaxation of the end-to-end vector of a linear probe chain. For this purpose we first validate the ability of the model to consistently predict both the viscoelastic and dielectric response of monodisperse and binary mixtures of type A polymers, based on published experimental data. We also report the synthesis of new binary and ternary polybutadiene systems, the measurement of their linear viscoelastic response, and the prediction of these data by the SSp model. We next clarify the relaxation mechanisms of probe chains in these constraint release (CR) environments by analyzing a set of "toy" SSp models with simplified constraint release rates, by examining fluctuations of the end-to-end vector. In our analysis, the longest relaxation time of the probe chain is determined by a competition between the longest relaxation times of the effective CR motions of the fat and thin tubes and the motion of the chain itself in the thin tube. This picture is tested by the analysis of four model systems designed to separate and estimate every single contribution involved in the relaxation of the probe\\'s end-to-end vector in polydisperse systems. We follow the CR picture of Viovy et al. [ Macromolecules 1991, 24, 3587 ] and refine the effective chain friction in the thin and fat tubes based on Read et al. [ J. Rheol. 2012, 56, 823 ]. The derived analytical equations form a basis for generalizing the proposed methodology to polydisperse mixtures of linear and branched polymers. The consistency between the SSp model and tube model predictions is a strong indicator of the compatibility between these two distinct mesoscopic frameworks.

  16. Effects of Zika Virus Strain and Aedes Mosquito Species on Vector Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bialosuknia, Sean M.; Zink, Steven D.; Brecher, Matthew; Ehrbar, Dylan J.; Morrissette, Madeline N.; Kramer, Laura D.

    2017-01-01

    In the Western Hemisphere, Zika virus is thought to be transmitted primarily by Aedes aegypti mosquitoes. To determine the extent to which Ae. albopictus mosquitoes from the United States are capable of transmitting Zika virus and the influence of virus dose, virus strain, and mosquito species on vector competence, we evaluated multiple doses of representative Zika virus strains in Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus mosquitoes. Virus preparation (fresh vs. frozen) significantly affected virus infectivity in mosquitoes. We calculated 50% infectious doses to be 6.1–7.5 log10 PFU/mL; minimum infective dose was 4.2 log10 PFU/mL. Ae. albopictus mosquitoes were more susceptible to infection than Ae. aegypti mosquitoes, but transmission efficiency was higher for Ae. aegypti mosquitoes, indicating a transmission barrier in Ae. albopictus mosquitoes. Results suggest that, although Zika virus transmission is relatively inefficient overall and dependent on virus strain and mosquito species, Ae. albopictus mosquitoes could become major vectors in the Americas. PMID:28430564

  17. Effects of Zika Virus Strain and Aedes Mosquito Species on Vector Competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciota, Alexander T; Bialosuknia, Sean M; Zink, Steven D; Brecher, Matthew; Ehrbar, Dylan J; Morrissette, Madeline N; Kramer, Laura D

    2017-07-01

    In the Western Hemisphere, Zika virus is thought to be transmitted primarily by Aedes aegypti mosquitoes. To determine the extent to which Ae. albopictus mosquitoes from the United States are capable of transmitting Zika virus and the influence of virus dose, virus strain, and mosquito species on vector competence, we evaluated multiple doses of representative Zika virus strains in Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus mosquitoes. Virus preparation (fresh vs. frozen) significantly affected virus infectivity in mosquitoes. We calculated 50% infectious doses to be 6.1-7.5 log 10 PFU/mL; minimum infective dose was 4.2 log 10 PFU/mL. Ae. albopictus mosquitoes were more susceptible to infection than Ae. aegypti mosquitoes, but transmission efficiency was higher for Ae. aegypti mosquitoes, indicating a transmission barrier in Ae. albopictus mosquitoes. Results suggest that, although Zika virus transmission is relatively inefficient overall and dependent on virus strain and mosquito species, Ae. albopictus mosquitoes could become major vectors in the Americas.

  18. Larvicidal effects of a neem (Azadirachta indica oil formulation on the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knols Bart GJ

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Larviciding is a key strategy used in many vector control programmes around the world. Costs could be reduced if larvicides could be manufactured locally. The potential of natural products as larvicides against the main African malaria vector, Anopheles gambiae s.s was evaluated. Methods To assess the larvicidal efficacy of a neem (Azadirachta indica oil formulation (azadirachtin content of 0.03% w/v on An. gambiae s.s., larvae were exposed as third and fourth instars to a normal diet supplemented with the neem oil formulations in different concentrations. A control group of larvae was exposed to a corn oil formulation in similar concentrations. Results Neem oil had an LC50 value of 11 ppm after 8 days, which was nearly five times more toxic than the corn oil formulation. Adult emergence was inhibited by 50% at a concentration of 6 ppm. Significant reductions on growth indices and pupation, besides prolonged larval periods, were observed at neem oil concentrations above 8 ppm. The corn oil formulation, in contrast, produced no growth disruption within the tested range of concentrations. Conclusion Neem oil has good larvicidal properties for An. gambiae s.s. and suppresses successful adult emergence at very low concentrations. Considering the wide distribution and availability of this tree and its products along the East African coast, this may prove a readily available and cheap alternative to conventional larvicides.

  19. Elementary Statistical Models for Vector Collision-Sequence Interference Effects with Poisson-Distributed Collision Times

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, J.C.

    2011-01-01

    In a recent paper (Lewis, 2008) a class of models suitable for application to collision-sequence interference was introduced. In these models velocities are assumed to be completely randomized in each collision. The distribution of velocities was assumed to be Gaussian. The integrated induced dipole moment μk, for vector interference, or the scalar modulation μk, for scalar interference, was assumed to be a function of the impulse (integrated force) fk, or its magnitude fk, experienced by the molecule in a collision. For most of (Lewis, 2008) it was assumed that μk fk and μk fk, but it proved to be possible to extend the models, so that the magnitude of the induced dipole moment is equal to an arbitrary power or sum of powers of the intermolecular force. This allows estimates of the in filling of the interference dip by the dis proportionality of the induced dipole moment and force. One particular such model, using data from (Herman and Lewis, 2006), leads to the most realistic estimate for the in filling of the vector interference dip yet obtained. In (Lewis, 2008) the drastic assumption was made that collision times occurred at equal intervals. In the present paper that assumption is removed: the collision times are taken to form a Poisson process. This is much more realistic than the equal-intervals assumption. The interference dip is found to be a Lorentzian in this model

  20. The effect of Ageratum fastigiatum extract on Rhodnius nasutus, vector of Chagas disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bethânia A. Avelar-Freitas

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Control of Chagas disease is based on insecticide spraying in domiciles in order to exterminate triatomine populations. However, since the vectors differ in susceptibility to currently used insecticides, the screening of the toxic potential of Brazilian flora may identify new molecules lethal to triatomines. This study evaluated the toxicity of ethanolic extract of Ageratum fastigiatum (Gardner R.M. King & H. Rob., Asteraceae, on Rhodnius nasutus, a known vector of Chagas disease. Ethanolic extracts of the aerial parts of A. fastigiatum were prepared at 25 and 50 mg/mL concentrations, and 5 µL was applied to fifth-instar nymphs of R. nasutus (n=30. Controls included nymphs that were treated with 5 µL ethanol (n=30 or left untreated (n=30. The percentage of dead insects in each group was observed at 24, 48, 72, 96 and 120 h after application. The extracts of A. fastigiatum showed a mortality rate of about 37% and 77% after 120 h, at concentrations of 25 and 50 mg/mL, respectively. In control groups, the mortality rate remained under 7%. The extract of A. fastigiatum contains a coumarin, a molecule with recognized toxicity in insects, and which may be responsible for killing the triatomines.

  1. Vector financial rogue waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Zhenya

    2011-01-01

    The coupled nonlinear volatility and option pricing model presented recently by Ivancevic is investigated, which generates a leverage effect, i.e., stock volatility is (negatively) correlated to stock returns, and can be regarded as a coupled nonlinear wave alternative of the Black–Scholes option pricing model. In this Letter, we analytically propose vector financial rogue waves of the coupled nonlinear volatility and option pricing model without an embedded w-learning. Moreover, we exhibit their dynamical behaviors for chosen different parameters. The vector financial rogue wave (rogon) solutions may be used to describe the possible physical mechanisms for the rogue wave phenomena and to further excite the possibility of relative researches and potential applications of vector rogue waves in the financial markets and other related fields. -- Highlights: ► We investigate the coupled nonlinear volatility and option pricing model. ► We analytically present vector financial rogue waves. ► The vector financial rogue waves may be used to describe the extreme events in financial markets. ► This results may excite the relative researches and potential applications of vector rogue waves.

  2. An introduction to vectors, vector operators and vector analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Joag, Pramod S

    2016-01-01

    Ideal for undergraduate and graduate students of science and engineering, this book covers fundamental concepts of vectors and their applications in a single volume. The first unit deals with basic formulation, both conceptual and theoretical. It discusses applications of algebraic operations, Levi-Civita notation, and curvilinear coordinate systems like spherical polar and parabolic systems and structures, and analytical geometry of curves and surfaces. The second unit delves into the algebra of operators and their types and also explains the equivalence between the algebra of vector operators and the algebra of matrices. Formulation of eigen vectors and eigen values of a linear vector operator are elaborated using vector algebra. The third unit deals with vector analysis, discussing vector valued functions of a scalar variable and functions of vector argument (both scalar valued and vector valued), thus covering both the scalar vector fields and vector integration.

  3. A Single-Centre, Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial to Investigate the Efficacy and Safety of Minoxidil Topical Foam in Frontotemporal and Vertex Androgenetic Alopecia in Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillmann, Kathrin; Garcia Bartels, Natalie; Kottner, Jan; Stroux, Andrea; Canfield, Douglas; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike

    2015-01-01

    5% minoxidil formulations twice daily are effective in treating vertex male androgenetic alopecia (AGA); however, efficacy and safety data in frontotemporal regions are lacking. To assess the efficacy of 5% minoxidil topical foam (5% MTF) in the frontotemporal region of male AGA patients after 24 weeks of treatment compared to placebo treatment and to the vertex region. Seventy males with moderate AGA applied 5% MTF or placebo foam (plaTF) twice daily for 24 weeks in frontotemporal and vertex regions. Target area non-vellus hair count (TAHC) was the primary end point. Frontotemporal and vertex TAHC and target area cumulative non-vellus hair width (TAHW) showed similar responses to 5% MTF with significant increases up to week 16 compared to baseline (p < 0.001). After 24 weeks of treatment, frontotemporal TAHW increased significantly in the 5% MTF group compared to the plaTF group (p = 0.017), while TAHC showed a similar non-significant increase from baseline in both regions. At 24 weeks, 5% MTF users rated a significant improvement in scalp coverage for the frontotemporal (p = 0.016) and vertex areas (p = 0.027). 5% MTF twice a day promotes hair density and width in both frontotemporal and vertex regions in men with moderate stages of AGA. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. High-speed optical three-axis vector magnetometry based on nonlinear Hanle effect in rubidium vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizbekyan, Hrayr; Shmavonyan, Svetlana; Khanbekyan, Aleksandr; Movsisyan, Marina; Papoyan, Aram

    2017-07-01

    The magnetic-field-compensation optical vector magnetometer based on the nonlinear Hanle effect in alkali metal vapor allowing two-axis measurement operation has been further elaborated for three-axis performance, along with significant reduction of measurement time. The upgrade was achieved by implementing a two-beam resonant excitation configuration and a fast maximum searching algorithm. Results of the proof-of-concept experiments, demonstrating 1 μT B-field resolution, are presented. The applied interest and capability of the proposed technique is analyzed.

  5. A momentum space analysis of the Triple Pomeron Vertex in pQCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartels, J.

    2007-10-01

    We study properties of the momentum space Triple Pomeron Vertex in perturbative QCD. Particular attention is given to the collinear limit where transverse momenta on one side of the vertex are much larger than on the other side. We also comment on the kernels in nonlinear evolution equations. (orig.)

  6. A vertex including emission of spin fields for an arbitrary bc system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Vecchia, P.; Madsen, R.A.; Roland, K.

    1990-01-01

    We construct the (N+2M) Point Vertex involving the emission of N Neveu-Schwarz and 2M Ramond states for a bosonic and fermionic bc system with a bockground charge Q. From it one can compute correlation functions on the sphere involving any number of spin fields. We show in detail that the vertex satisfies overlap conditions. (orig.)

  7. A momentum space analysis of the Triple Pomeron Vertex in pQCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartels, J. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Kutak, K. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)]|[Instytut Fizyki Jadrowej Polskiej Akademii Nauk, Krakow (Poland)

    2007-10-15

    We study properties of the momentum space Triple Pomeron Vertex in perturbative QCD. Particular attention is given to the collinear limit where transverse momenta on one side of the vertex are much larger than on the other side. We also comment on the kernels in nonlinear evolution equations. (orig.)

  8. A quantum relativistic integrable model as the continuous limit of the six-vertex model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Y.K.

    1992-01-01

    The six-vertex model in two-dimensional statistical mechanics is used to construct the L-matrix of a one-dimensional quantum relativistic integrable model through a continuous limit. This is the first step to extend the method used earlier by the author to construct quantum completely integrable systems from other well-known two-dimensional vertex models. (orig.)

  9. Development and characterization of a DEPFET pixel prototype system for the ILC vertex detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohrs, Robert

    2008-09-15

    For the future TeV-scale linear collider ILC (International Linear Collider) a vertex detector of unprecedented performance is needed to fully exploit its physics potential. By incorporating a field effect transistor into a fully depleted sensor substrate the DEPFET (Depleted Field Effect Transistor) sensor combines radiation detection and in-pixel amplification. For the operation at a linear collider the excellent noise performance of DEPFET pixels allows building very thin detectors with a high spatial resolution and a low power consumption. With this thesis a prototype system consisting of a 64 x 128 pixels sensor, dedicated steering and readout ASICs and a data acquisition board has been developed and successfully operated in the laboratory and under realistic conditions in beam test environments at DESY and CERN. A DEPFET matrix has been successfully read out using the on-chip zero-suppression of the readout chip CURO 2. The results of the system characterization and beam test results are presented. (orig.)

  10. Development and characterization of a DEPFET pixel prototype system for the ILC vertex detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohrs, Robert

    2008-09-01

    For the future TeV-scale linear collider ILC (International Linear Collider) a vertex detector of unprecedented performance is needed to fully exploit its physics potential. By incorporating a field effect transistor into a fully depleted sensor substrate the DEPFET (Depleted Field Effect Transistor) sensor combines radiation detection and in-pixel amplification. For the operation at a linear collider the excellent noise performance of DEPFET pixels allows building very thin detectors with a high spatial resolution and a low power consumption. With this thesis a prototype system consisting of a 64 x 128 pixels sensor, dedicated steering and readout ASICs and a data acquisition board has been developed and successfully operated in the laboratory and under realistic conditions in beam test environments at DESY and CERN. A DEPFET matrix has been successfully read out using the on-chip zero-suppression of the readout chip CURO 2. The results of the system characterization and beam test results are presented. (orig.)

  11. Energy Efficiency Effects of Vectorization in Data Reuse Transformations for Many-Core Processors—A Case Study †

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Al Hasib

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Thread-level and data-level parallel architectures have become the design of choice in many of today’s energy-efficient computing systems. However, these architectures put substantially higher requirements on the memory subsystem than scalar architectures, making memory latency and bandwidth critical in their overall efficiency. Data reuse exploration aims at reducing the pressure on the memory subsystem by exploiting the temporal locality in data accesses. In this paper, we investigate the effects on performance and energy from a data reuse methodology combined with parallelization and vectorization in multi- and many-core processors. As a test case, a full-search motion estimation kernel is evaluated on Intel® CoreTM i7-4700K (Haswell and i7-2600K (Sandy Bridge multi-core processors, as well as on an Intel® Xeon PhiTM many-core processor (Knights Landing with Streaming Single Instruction Multiple Data (SIMD Extensions (SSE and Advanced Vector Extensions (AVX instruction sets. Results using a single-threaded execution on the Haswell and Sandy Bridge systems show that performance and EDP (Energy Delay Product can be improved through data reuse transformations on the scalar code by a factor of ≈3× and ≈6×, respectively. Compared to scalar code without data reuse optimization, the SSE/AVX2 version achieves ≈10×/17× better performance and ≈92×/307× better EDP, respectively. These results can be improved by 10% to 15% using data reuse techniques. Finally, the most optimized version using data reuse and AVX512 achieves a speedup of ≈35× and an EDP improvement of ≈1192× on the Xeon Phi system. While single-threaded execution serves as a common reference point for all architectures to analyze the effects of data reuse on both scalar and vector codes, scalability with thread count is also discussed in the paper.

  12. EFFECTIVENESS OF HUANGLONGBING VECTOR (DIAPHORINA CITRI KUWAYAMA CONTROL IN CITRUS GROWER GROUP BASED IN SAMBAS REGENCY OF WEST KALIMANTAN, INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supriyanto A.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of Huanglongbing vector control based on Citrus Grower Group recommendation. Studies have been carried out in 2010 in Tebas Sungai village, Sambas district, with 11 tangerine groves owned by growers in the Citrus grower Association of Sambas district. The tangerine grove that been used are, one grower's orchard as a demonstration plot in a particular citrus grower group (orchard I; five other citrus orchards with different ownership at the same citrus grower Group (orchard II, as well as five other citrus orchard with different ownership which each of them spreads over five different citrus grower groups outside the farm demonstration plots (orchard III. The recommendation technology for controlling Huanglongbing vector which applied in this experiment, included bark painting by systemic insecticide of imidacloprid for two each 1.5-month and spray using contact insecticide with dimethoate to the plant crown which application time been alternated after bark painting application. The effectiveness of technology implementation is measured by a decrease psyllid populations found in citrus samples in adult stage, nymphs and eggs that were observed at regular intervals every two weeks during the flushing to the 14th week after the first treatment. The results showed that recommended treatment technology were absolutely proven to reduce Huanglongbing vector population in significant, namely in the orchard I, II, and III respectively at 95.3%, 84.7%, and 72% for stage adult; 97.3 %, 80%, and 100% for stage nymphs; and 98.5%, 100% and 100% for the egg stage.

  13. Alpha shift correlation (ASC) method. Sensitivity of B-11 NMR shifts to halogen substitution in the ten-vertex nido and arachno series of boron clusters. Linear behavior of NMR effects

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Štíbr, Bohumil

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 471, FEB (2018), s. 615-619 ISSN 0020-1693 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-01618S Institutional support: RVO:61388980 Keywords : Boranes * Dicarbaboranes * NMR shifts- B NMR correlation 11 * Sensitivity factors * Substitution effects Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry OBOR OECD: Inorganic and nuclear chemistry Impact factor: 2.002, year: 2016

  14. Stable Dispersions of Covalently Tethered Polymer Improved Graphene Oxide Nanoconjugates as an Effective Vector for siRNA Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Nisha; Kumar, Naveen; Prasad, Peeyush; Shirbhate, Shivani; Sehrawat, Seema; Lochab, Bimlesh

    2018-05-02

    Conjugates of poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) with modified graphene oxide (GO) are attractive nonviral vectors for gene-based cancer therapeutics. GO protects siRNA from enzymatic cleavage and showed reasonable transfection efficiency along with simultaneous benefits of low cost and large scale production. PAMAM is highly effective in siRNA delivery but suffers from high toxicity with poor in vivo efficacy. Co-reaction of GO and PAMAM led to aggregation and more importantly, have detrimental effect on stability of dispersion at physiological pH preventing their exploration at clinical level. In the current work, we have designed, synthesized, characterized and explored a new type of hybrid vector (GPD), using GO synthesized via improved method which was covalently tethered with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and PAMAM. The existence of covalent linkage, relative structural changes and properties of GPD is well supported by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), UV-visible (UV-vis), Raman, X-ray photoelectron (XPS), elemental analysis, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetry analysis (TGA), dynamic light scattering (DLS), and zeta potential. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of GPD showed longitudinally aligned columnar self-assembled ∼10 nm thick polymeric nanoarchitectures onto the GO surface accounting to an average size reduction to ∼20 nm. GPD revealed an outstanding stability in both phosphate buffer saline (PBS) and serum containing cell medium. The binding efficiency of EPAC1 siRNA to GPD was supported by gel retardation assay, DLS, zeta potential and photoluminescence (PL) studies. A lower cytotoxicity with enhanced cellular uptake and homogeneous intracellular distribution of GPD/siRNA complex is confirmed by imaging studies. GPD exhibited a higher transfection efficiency with remarkable inhibition of cell migration and lower invasion than PAMAM and Lipofectamine 2000 suggesting its role in prevention of breast

  15. A quantum hybrid with a thin antenna at the vertex of a wedge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlone, Raffaele, E-mail: raffaele.carlone@unina.it [Università “Federico II” di Napoli, Dipartimento di Matematica e Applicazioni “R. Caccioppoli”, MSA, via Cinthia, I-80126, Napoli (Italy); Posilicano, Andrea, E-mail: andrea.posilicano@uninsubria.it [DiSAT, Università dell' Insubria, via Valleggio 11, I-22100, Como (Italy)

    2017-03-26

    We study the spectrum, resonances and scattering matrix of a quantum Hamiltonian on a “hybrid surface” consisting of a half-line attached by its endpoint to the vertex of a concave planar wedge. At the boundary of the wedge, outside the vertex, homogeneous Dirichlet conditions are imposed. The system is tunable by varying the measure of the angle at the vertex. - Highlights: • Spectral characterization of a quantum Hamiltonian on “hybrid surface” consisting of a halfline attached to the vertex of a concave planar wedge. • The system is tunable by varying the measure of the angle at the vertex. • Relation between the conduction properties inside the hybrid and formation of resonances. • Easy generalization of the results to more complicated structures.

  16. The scalar-photon 3-point vertex in massless quenched scalar QED

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Concha-Sánchez, Y; Gutiérrez-Guerrero, L X; Fernández-Rangel, L A

    2016-01-01

    Non perturbative studies of Schwinger-Dyson equations (SDEs) require their infinite, coupled tower to be truncated in order to reduce them to a practically solvable set. In this connection, a physically acceptable ansatz for the three point vertex is the most favorite choice. Scalar quantum electrodynamics (sQED) provides a simple and neat platform to address this problem. The most general form of the scalar-photon three point vertex can be expressed in terms of only two independent form factors, longitudinal and transverse. Ball and Chiu have demonstrated that the longitudinal vertex is fixed by requiring the Ward-Fradkin-Green- Takahashi identity (WFGTI), while the transverse vertex remains undetermined. In massless quenched sQED, we propose the transverse part of the non perturbative scalar-photon vertex. (paper)

  17. Interactive Effects of Southern Rice Black-Streaked Dwarf Virus Infection of Host Plant and Vector on Performance of the Vector, Sogatella furcifera (Homoptera: Delphacidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Wenbin; Liu, Danfeng; Li, Pei; Hou, Maolin

    2014-10-01

    Performance of insect vectors can be influenced by the viruses they transmit, either directly by infection of the vectors or indirectly via infection of the host plants. Southern rice black-streaked dwarf virus (SRBSDV) is a propagative virus transmitted by the white-backed planthopper, Sogatella furcifera (Hovath). To elucidate the influence of SRBSDV on the performance of white-backed planthopper, life parameters of viruliferous and nonviruliferous white-backed planthopper fed rice seedlings infected or noninfected with SRBSDV were measured using a factorial design. Regardless of the infection status of the rice plant host, viruliferous white-backed planthopper nymphs took longer to develop from nymph to adult than did nonviruliferous nymphs. Viruliferous white-backed planthopper females deposited fewer eggs than nonviruliferous females and both viruliferous and nonviruliferous white-backed planthopper females laid fewer eggs on infected than on noninfected plants. Longevity of white-backed planthopper females was also affected by the infection status of the rice plant and white-backed planthopper. Nonviruliferous white-backed planthopper females that fed on infected rice plants lived longer than the other three treatment groups. These results indicate that the performance of white-backed planthopper is affected by SRBSDV either directly (by infection of white-backed planthopper) or indirectly (by infection of rice plant). The extended development of viruliferous nymphs and the prolonged life span of nonviruliferous adults on infected plants may increase their likelihood of transmitting virus, which would increase virus spread. © 2014 Entomological Society of America.

  18. Second-order QCD effects in Higgs boson production through vector boson fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Martinez, J.; Gehrmann, T.; Glover, E. W. N.; Huss, A.

    2018-06-01

    We compute the factorising second-order QCD corrections to the electroweak production of a Higgs boson through vector boson fusion. Our calculation is fully differential in the kinematics of the Higgs boson and of the final state jets, and uses the antenna subtraction method to handle infrared singular configurations in the different parton-level contributions. Our results allow us to reassess the impact of the next-to-leading order (NLO) QCD corrections to electroweak Higgs-plus-three-jet production and of the next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) QCD corrections to electroweak Higgs-plus-two-jet production. The NNLO corrections are found to be limited in magnitude to around ± 5% and are uniform in several of the kinematical variables, displaying a kinematical dependence only in the transverse momenta and rapidity separation of the two tagging jets.

  19. Effect of thiol pendant conjugates on plasmid DNA binding, release, and stability of polymeric delivery vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacalocostantis, Irene; Mane, Viraj P; Kang, Michael S; Goodley, Addison S; Muro, Silvia; Kofinas, Peter

    2012-05-14

    Polymers have attracted much attention as potential gene delivery vectors due to their chemical and structural versatility. However, several challenges associated with polymeric carriers, including low transfection efficiencies, insufficient cargo release, and high cytotoxicity levels have prevented clinical implementation. Strong electrostatic interactions between polymeric carriers and DNA cargo can prohibit complete cargo release within the cell. As a result, cargo DNA never reaches the cell's nucleus where gene expression takes place. In addition, highly charged cationic polymers have been correlated with high cytotoxicity levels, making them unsuitable carriers in vivo. Using poly(allylamine) (PAA) as a model, we investigated how pH-sensitive disulfide cross-linked polymer networks can improve the delivery potential of cationic polymer carriers. To accomplish this, we conjugated thiol-terminated pendant chains onto the primary amines of PAA using 2-iminothiolane, developing three new polymer vectors with 5, 13, or 20% thiol modification. Unmodified PAA and thiol-conjugated polymers were tested for their ability to bind and release plasmid DNA, their capacity to protect genetic cargo from enzymatic degradation, and their potential for endolysosomal escape. Our results demonstrate that polymer-plasmid complexes (polyplexes) formed by the 13% thiolated polymer demonstrate the greatest delivery potential. At high N/P ratios, all thiolated polymers (but not unmodified counterparts) were able to resist decomplexation in the presence of heparin, a negatively charged polysaccharide used to mimic in vivo polyplex-protein interactions. Further, all thiolated polymers exhibited higher buffering capacities than unmodified PAA and, therefore, have a greater potential for endolysosomal escape. However, 5 and 20% thiolated polymers exhibited poor DNA binding-release kinetics, making them unsuitable carriers for gene delivery. The 13% thiolated polymers, on the other hand

  20. The importance of considering community-level effects when selecting insecticidal malaria vector products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coosemans Marc

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Insecticide treatment of nets, curtains or walls and ceilings of houses represent the primary means for malaria prevention worldwide. Direct personal protection of individuals and households arises from deterrent and insecticidal activities which divert or kill mosquitoes before they can feed. However, at high coverage, community-level reductions of mosquito density and survival prevent more transmission exposure than the personal protection acquired by using a net or living in a sprayed house. Methods A process-explicit simulation of malaria transmission was applied to results of 4 recent Phase II experimental hut trials comparing a new mosaic long-lasting insecticidal net (LLIN which combines deltamethrin and piperonyl butoxide with another LLIN product by the same manufacturer relying on deltamethrin alone. Results Direct estimates of mean personal protection against insecticide-resistant vectors in Vietnam, Cameroon, Burkina Faso and Benin revealed no clear advantage for combination LLINs over deltamethrin-only LLINs (P = 0.973 unless both types of nets were extensively washed (Relative mean entomologic inoculation rate (EIR ± standard error of the mean (SEM for users of combination nets compared to users of deltamethrin only nets = 0.853 ± 0.056, P = 0.008. However, simulations of impact at high coverage (80% use predicted consistently better impact for the combination net across all four sites (Relative mean EIR ± SEM in communities with combination nets, compared with those using deltamethrin only nets = 0.613 ± 0.076, P Conclusion Process-explicit simulations of community-level protection, parameterized using locally-relevant experimental hut studies, should be explicitly considered when choosing vector control products for large-scale epidemiological trials or public health programme procurement, particularly as growing insecticide resistance necessitates the use of multiple active ingredients.

  1. Similar Response Patterns to 5%Topical Minoxidil Foam in Frontal and Vertex Scalp of Men with Androgenetic Alopecia: A Microarray Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirmirani, P.; Consolo, M.; Oyetakin-White, P.; Baron, E.; Leahy, P.; Karnik, P.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background There are regional variations in scalp hair miniaturization seen in androgenetic alopecia (AGA). Use of topical minoxidil can lead to reversal of miniaturization in the vertex scalp. However, its effects on other scalp regions are less well studied. Methods A placebo controlled double-blinded prospective pilot study of minoxidil topical foam 5% (MTF) vs placebo was conducted in sixteen healthy men ages 18-49 with Hamilton-Norwood type IV-V thinning. The subjects were asked to apply the treatment (active drug or placebo) to the scalp twice daily for eight weeks. Stereotactic scalp photographs were taken at the baseline and final visits to monitor global hair growth. Scalp biopsies were done at the leading edge of hair loss from the frontal and vertex scalp before and after treatment with MTF and placebo and microarray analysis was done using the Affymetrix GeneChip HG U133 Plus 2.0. Results Global stereotactic photographs showed that MTF induced hair growth in both the frontal and vertex scalp of AGA patients. Regional differences in gene expression profiles were observed before treatment. However, MTF treatment induced the expression of hair keratin associated genes and decreased the expression of epidermal differentiation complex (EDC) and inflammatory genes in both scalp regions. Conclusions These data suggest that MTF is effective in the treatment of both the frontal and vertex scalp of AGA patients. PMID:25204361

  2. Vertex measurement at a hadron collider. The ATLAS pixel detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosse-Knetter, J.

    2008-03-01

    The ATLAS Pixel Detector is the innermost layer of the ATLAS tracking system and will contribute significantly to the ATLAS track and vertex reconstruction. The detector consists of identical sensor-chip-hybrid modules, arranged in three barrels in the centre and three disks on either side for the forward region. The position of the Pixel Detector near the interaction point requires excellent radiation hardness, fast read-out, mechanical and thermal robustness, good long-term stability, all combined with a low material budget. The new design concepts used to meet the challenging requirements are discussed with their realisation in the Pixel Detector, followed by a description of a refined and extensive set of measurements to assess the detector performance during and after its construction. (orig.)

  3. Displaced vertex searches for sterile neutrinos at future lepton colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antusch, Stefan [Department of Physics, University of Basel, Klingelbergstr. 82, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland); Max-Planck-Institut für Physik (Werner-Heisenberg-Institut),Föhringer Ring 6, D-80805 München (Germany); Cazzato, Eros; Fischer, Oliver [Department of Physics, University of Basel, Klingelbergstr. 82, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland)

    2016-12-02

    We investigate the sensitivity of future lepton colliders to displaced vertices from the decays of long-lived heavy (almost sterile) neutrinos with electroweak scale masses and detectable time of flight. As future lepton colliders we consider the FCC-ee, the CEPC, and the ILC, searching at the Z-pole and at the center-of-mass energies of 240, 350 and 500 GeV. For a realistic discussion of the detector response to the displaced vertex signal and the Standard Model background we consider the ILC’s Silicon Detector (SiD) as benchmark for the future lepton collider detectors. We find that displaced vertices constitute a powerful search channel for sterile neutrinos, sensitive to squared active-sterile mixing angles as small as 10{sup −11}.

  4. Greedy Local Search and Vertex Cover in Sparse Random Graphs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Witt, Carsten

    2009-01-01

    . This work starts with a rigorous explanation for this claim based on the refined analysis of the Karp-Sipser algorithm by Aronson et al. Subsequently, theoretical supplements are given to experimental studies of search heuristics on random graphs. For c 1, a greedy and randomized local-search heuristic...... finds an optimal cover in polynomial time with a probability arbitrarily close to 1. This behavior relies on the absence of a giant component. As an additional insight into the randomized search, it is shown that the heuristic fails badly also on graphs consisting of a single tree component of maximum......Recently, various randomized search heuristics have been studied for the solution of the minimum vertex cover problem, in particular for sparse random instances according to the G(n, c/n) model, where c > 0 is a constant. Methods from statistical physics suggest that the problem is easy if c

  5. The Small Acceptance Vertex Detector of NA61/SHINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deveaux M.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Charmonium production in heavy ion collisions is considered as an important diagnostic probe for studying the phase diagram of strongly interacting matter for potential phase transitions. The interpretation of existing data from the CERN SPS is hampered by a lack of knowledge on the properties of open charm particle production in the fireball. Moreover, open charm production in heavy ion collisions by itself is poorly understood. To overcome this obstacle, the NA61/SHINE was equipped with a Small Acceptance Vertex Detector (SAVD, which is predicted to make the experiment sensitive to open charm mesons produced in A-A collisions at the SPS top energy. This paper will introduce the concept and the hardware of the SAVD. Moreover, first running experience as obtained in a commissioning run with a 150 AGeV/c Pb+Pb collision system will be reported.

  6. System software design for the CDF Silicon Vertex Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tkaczyk, S. (Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States)); Bailey, M. (Purdue Univ., Lafayette, IN (United States))

    1991-11-01

    An automated system for testing and performance evaluation of the CDF Silicon Vertex Detector (SVX) data acquisition electronics is described. The SVX data acquisition chain includes the Fastbus Sequencer and the Rabbit Crate Controller and Digitizers. The Sequencer is a programmable device for which we developed a high level assembly language. Diagnostic, calibration and data acquisition programs have been developed. A distributed software package was developed in order to operate the modules. The package includes programs written in assembly and Fortran languages that are executed concurrently on the SVX Sequencer modules and either a microvax or an SSP. Test software was included to assist technical personnel during the production and maintenance of the modules. Details of the design of different components of the package are reported.

  7. Calculation of the Connected Dominating Set Considering Vertex Importance Metrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Vazquez-Araujo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The computation of a set constituted by few vertices to define a virtual backbone supporting information interchange is a problem that arises in many areas when analysing networks of different natures, like wireless, brain, or social networks. Recent papers propose obtaining such a set of vertices by computing the connected dominating set (CDS of a graph. In recent works, the CDS has been obtained by considering that all vertices exhibit similar characteristics. However, that assumption is not valid for complex networks in which their vertices can play different roles. Therefore, we propose finding the CDS by taking into account several metrics which measure the importance of each network vertex e.g., error probability, entropy, or entropy variation (EV.

  8. Waterbomb base: a symmetric single-vertex bistable origami mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanna, Brandon H; Lund, Jason M; Magleby, Spencer P; Howell, Larry L; Lang, Robert J

    2014-01-01

    The origami waterbomb base is a single-vertex bistable origami mechanism that has unique properties which may prove useful in a variety of applications. It also shows promise as a test bed for smart materials and actuation because of its straightforward geometry and multiple phases of motion, ranging from simple to more complex. This study develops a quantitative understanding of the symmetric waterbomb base's kinetic behavior. This is done by completing kinematic and potential energy analyses to understand and predict bistable behavior. A physical prototype is constructed and tested to validate the results of the analyses. Finite element and virtual work analyses based on the prototype are used to explore the locations of the stable equilibrium positions and the force–deflection response. The model results are verified through comparisons to measurements on a physical prototype. The resulting models describe waterbomb base behavior and provide an engineering tool for application development. (paper)

  9. System software design for the CDF Silicon Vertex Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tkaczyk, S.; Bailey, M.

    1991-11-01

    An automated system for testing and performance evaluation of the CDF Silicon Vertex Detector (SVX) data acquisition electronics is described. The SVX data acquisition chain includes the Fastbus Sequencer and the Rabbit Crate Controller and Digitizers. The Sequencer is a programmable device for which we developed a high level assembly language. Diagnostic, calibration and data acquisition programs have been developed. A distributed software package was developed in order to operate the modules. The package includes programs written in assembly and Fortran languages that are executed concurrently on the SVX Sequencer modules and either a microvax or an SSP. Test software was included to assist technical personnel during the production and maintenance of the modules. Details of the design of different components of the package are reported

  10. Solving Vertex Cover Problem Using DNA Tile Assembly Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhihua Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA tile assembly models are a class of mathematically distributed and parallel biocomputing models in DNA tiles. In previous works, tile assembly models have been proved be Turing-universal; that is, the system can do what Turing machine can do. In this paper, we use tile systems to solve computational hard problem. Mathematically, we construct three tile subsystems, which can be combined together to solve vertex cover problem. As a result, each of the proposed tile subsystems consists of Θ(1 types of tiles, and the assembly process is executed in a parallel way (like DNA’s biological function in cells; thus the systems can generate the solution of the problem in linear time with respect to the size of the graph.

  11. A vertex similarity index for better personalized recommendation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ling-Jiao; Zhang, Zi-Ke; Liu, Jin-Hu; Gao, Jian; Zhou, Tao

    2017-01-01

    Recommender systems benefit us in tackling the problem of information overload by predicting our potential choices among diverse niche objects. So far, a variety of personalized recommendation algorithms have been proposed and most of them are based on similarities, such as collaborative filtering and mass diffusion. Here, we propose a novel vertex similarity index named CosRA, which combines advantages of both the cosine index and the resource-allocation (RA) index. By applying the CosRA index to real recommender systems including MovieLens, Netflix and RYM, we show that the CosRA-based method has better performance in accuracy, diversity and novelty than some benchmark methods. Moreover, the CosRA index is free of parameters, which is a significant advantage in real applications. Further experiments show that the introduction of two turnable parameters cannot remarkably improve the overall performance of the CosRA index.

  12. The silicon vertex detector of the Belle II experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamczyk, K. [H. Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Krakow 31-342 (Poland); Aihara, H. [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Angelini, C. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universitá di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); INFN Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Aziz, T.; Babu, V. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai 400005 (India); Bacher, S. [H. Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Krakow 31-342 (Poland); Bahinipati, S. [Indian Institute of Technology Bhubaneswar, Satya Nagar (India); Barberio, E.; Baroncelli, T. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Basith, A.K. [Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India); Batignani, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universitá di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); INFN Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Bauer, A. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Austrian Academy of Sciences, 1050 Vienna (Austria); Behera, P.K. [Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India); Bergauer, T. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Austrian Academy of Sciences, 1050 Vienna (Austria); Bettarini, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universitá di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); INFN Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Bhuyan, B. [Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Assam 781039 (India); Bilka, T. [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, 121 16 Prague (Czech Republic); Bosi, F. [INFN Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Bosisio, L. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universitá di Trieste, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); INFN Sezione di Trieste, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); Bozek, A. [H. Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Krakow 31-342 (Poland); and others

    2016-07-11

    The silicon vertex detector of the Belle II experiment, structured in a lantern shape, consists of four layers of ladders, fabricated from two to five silicon sensors. The APV25 readout ASIC chips are mounted on one side of the ladder to minimize the signal path for reducing the capacitive noise; signals from the sensor backside are transmitted to the chip by bent flexible fan-out circuits. The ladder is assembled using several dedicated jigs. Sensor motion on the jig is minimized by vacuum chucking. The gluing procedure provides such a rigid foundation that later leads to the desired wire bonding performance. The full ladder with electrically functional sensors is consistently completed with a fully developed assembly procedure, and its sensor offsets from the design values are found to be less than 200 μm. The potential functionality of the ladder is also demonstrated by the radioactive source test.

  13. Capacitively coupled hybrid pixel assemblies for the CLIC vertex detector

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)734627; Benoit, Mathieu; Dannheim, Dominik; Dette, Karola; Hynds, Daniel; Kulis, Szymon; Peric, Ivan; Petric, Marko; Redford, Sophie; Sicking, Eva; Valerio, Pierpaolo

    2016-01-01

    The vertex detector at the proposed CLIC multi-TeV linear e+e- collider must have minimal material content and high spatial resolution, combined with accurate time-stamping to cope with the expected high rate of beam-induced backgrounds. One of the options being considered is the use of active sensors implemented in a commercial high-voltage CMOS process, capacitively coupled to hybrid pixel ASICs. A prototype of such an assembly, using two custom designed chips (CCPDv3 as active sensor glued to a CLICpix readout chip), has been characterised both in the lab and in beam tests at the CERN SPS using 120 GeV/c positively charged hadrons. Results of these characterisation studies are presented both for single and dual amplification stages in the active sensor. Pixel cross-coupling results are also presented, showing the sensitivity to placement precision and planarity of the glue layer.

  14. vertex drift chamber construction and test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, A.R.; Goozen, F.; Grudberg, P.; Klopfenstein, C.; Kerth, L.T.; Loken, S.C.; Oltman, E.; Strovink, M.; Trippe, T.G.

    1991-05-01

    A jet-cell based vertex chamber has been built for the D OE experiment at Fermilab and operated in a test beam there. Low drift velocity and diffusion properties were achieved using CO 2 (95%)-ethane(5%) at atmospheric pressure. The drift velocity is found to be consistent with [9.74+8.68(|E|-1.25)] μm/nsec where E is the electric field strength in (kV/cm < |E| z 1.6 kV/cm.) An intrinsic spatial resolution of 60 μm or better for drift distances greater than 2 mm is measured. The track pair efficiency is estimated to be better than 90% for separations greater than 630 μm. 8 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  15. Topological vertex, string amplitudes and spectral functions of hyperbolic geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guimaraes, M.E.X.; Rosa, T.O. [Universidade Federal Fluminense, Instituto de Fisica, Av. Gal. Milton Tavares de Souza, s/n, CEP 24210-346, Niteroi, RJ (Brazil); Luna, R.M. [Universidade Estadual de Londrina, Departamento de Fisica, Caixa Postal 6001, Londrina, Parana (Brazil)

    2014-05-15

    We discuss the homological aspects of the connection between quantum string generating function and the formal power series associated to the dimensions of chains and homologies of suitable Lie algebras. Our analysis can be considered as a new straightforward application of the machinery of modular forms and spectral functions (with values in the congruence subgroup of SL(2,Z)) to the partition functions of Lagrangian branes, refined vertex and open string partition functions, represented by means of formal power series that encode Lie algebra properties. The common feature in our examples lies in the modular properties of the characters of certain representations of the pertinent affine Lie algebras and in the role of Selberg-type spectral functions of a hyperbolic three-geometry associated with q-series in the computation of the string amplitudes. (orig.)

  16. CDF silicon vertex tracker: tevatron run II preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashmanskas, W.; Belforte, S.; Budagov, Yu.

    2002-01-01

    The Online Silicon Vertex Tracker (SVT) is the unique new trigger processor dedicated to the 2-D reconstruction of charged particle trajectories at Level 2 of the CDF trigger. The SVT has been successfully built, installed and operated during the 2000 and 20001 CDF data taking runs. The performance of the SVT is already very close to the design. The SVT is able to find tracks and calculate their impact parameter with high precision (σ d = 35 μm). It is possible to correct the beam position offset and give the beam position feedback to accelerator in real time. In fact, the beam position is calculated online every few seconds with an accuracy of 1 to 5 μm. The beam position is continuously sent to the accelerator control. By using trigger tracks, parent particles such as K S 's and D 0 's are reconstructed, proving that the SVT is ready to be used for physics studies

  17. Quark jets, gluon jets and the three-gluon vertex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fodor, Z.

    1989-11-01

    Using hadronic jets in electron-positron annihilation, we suggest a simple and model-independent method to see the differences between quark and gluon jets. We define and analyse special energy dependent moments of jets and choose those which are the most characteristic to the jet type. The method handles the energy of a jet in an adequate way. We discuss new methods using jet flavor tagging, ordinary flavor tagging of a definite quark jet or discrimination between quark and gluon jets, to test the triple-gluon vertex in electron-positron annihilation. An enriched sample of gluon jets, jets with the smallest energy in four-jet events, as well as a continuous tagging variable are also studied. 21 refs., 6 figs. (Author)

  18. Statistical physics of hard combinatorial optimization: Vertex cover problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jin-Hua; Zhou, Hai-Jun

    2014-07-01

    Typical-case computation complexity is a research topic at the boundary of computer science, applied mathematics, and statistical physics. In the last twenty years, the replica-symmetry-breaking mean field theory of spin glasses and the associated message-passing algorithms have greatly deepened our understanding of typical-case computation complexity. In this paper, we use the vertex cover problem, a basic nondeterministic-polynomial (NP)-complete combinatorial optimization problem of wide application, as an example to introduce the statistical physical methods and algorithms. We do not go into the technical details but emphasize mainly the intuitive physical meanings of the message-passing equations. A nonfamiliar reader shall be able to understand to a large extent the physics behind the mean field approaches and to adjust the mean field methods in solving other optimization problems.

  19. A new vertex detector made of glass capillaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Annis, P.; Bonekaemper, D.; Buontempo, S.; Ereditato, A.; Fabre, J.D.; Fiorillo, G.; Frekers, D.; Frenkel, A.; Galeazzi, F.; Garufi, F.; Goldberg, J.; Golovkin, S.; Hoepfner, K.; Konijn, J.; Kozarenko, E.; Kreslo, I.; Liberti, B.; Martellotti, G.; Medvedkov, A.; Mommaert, C.; Penso, G.; Petukhov, Y.; Rondeshagen, D.; Tyukov, V.; Vasilchenko, V.; Vilain, P.; Wilquet, G.; Wolff, T.; Wong, H.

    1997-01-01

    We have developed a new detector technique that allows high quality imaging of ionizing particle tracks with very high spatial and time resolution. Central to this technique are liquid-core fibres of about 20 μm diameter read out by an optoelectronic system including a CCD. The fibres act simultaneously as target, detector and light guides. A large-volume prototype, consisting of 5 x 10 5 capillaries of 20 μm diameter and 180 cm length, has been tested in the CERN wide-band neutrino beam. A sample of high-multiplicity neutrino interactions was recorded, demonstrating the imaging quality of this detector. First results from the reconstruction of these events are reported. A track residual of 28 μm and a vertex resolution of 30 μm has been achieved. Future applications of capillary detectors for neutrino and beauty physics are being investigated within the framework of the RD46 collaboration. (orig.)

  20. Influence of vertex weight on cooperative behavior in a spatial snowdrift game

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia, C Y; Zhao, J; Zhang, H; Wang, J; Wang, Y L

    2011-01-01

    In this paper the vertex weight is introduced into a snowdrift game to study the evolution of cooperative behavior. Compared with the snowdrift game in a traditional square lattice without any weight, cooperation can be promoted under three types of weight distribution: uniform, exponential and power-law distribution. For an intermediate cost-to-benefit ratio (r), in particular, the facilitation effect of cooperation is obvious. Moreover, the influence of undulation amplitude of weight distribution and the noise strength of strategy selection on cooperative behavior are also investigated. They exhibit a nontrivial phenomenon as a function of r. The results are helpful in analyzing and understanding the emergence of collective cooperation that is found widely in many natural and social systems.

  1. Influence of vertex weight on cooperative behavior in a spatial snowdrift game

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, C Y; Zhao, J; Zhang, H [Laboratory of Computer Vision and Systems, Tianjin University of Technology, Ministry of Education, Tianjin 300191 (China); Wang, J [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Control Theory and Applications in Complicated Industry Systems, Tianjin University of Technology, Tianjin 300191 (China); Wang, Y L, E-mail: xialooking@163.com, E-mail: juanwang75@163.com, E-mail: hzhang@tjut.edu.cn [School of Life Science, Shanxi Normal University, Linfen, Shanxi 041000 (China)

    2011-08-01

    In this paper the vertex weight is introduced into a snowdrift game to study the evolution of cooperative behavior. Compared with the snowdrift game in a traditional square lattice without any weight, cooperation can be promoted under three types of weight distribution: uniform, exponential and power-law distribution. For an intermediate cost-to-benefit ratio (r), in particular, the facilitation effect of cooperation is obvious. Moreover, the influence of undulation amplitude of weight distribution and the noise strength of strategy selection on cooperative behavior are also investigated. They exhibit a nontrivial phenomenon as a function of r. The results are helpful in analyzing and understanding the emergence of collective cooperation that is found widely in many natural and social systems.

  2. Experimental demonstration of vector E x vector B plasma divertor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strait, E.J.; Kerst, D.W.; Sprott, J.C.

    1977-01-01

    The vector E x vector B drift due to an applied radial electric field in a tokamak with poloidal divertor can speed the flow of plasma out of the scrape-off region, and provide a means of externally controlling the flow rate and thus the width of the density fall-off. An experiment in the Wisconsin levitated toroidal octupole, using vector E x vector B drifts alone, demonstrates divertor-like behavior, including 70% reduction of plasma density near the wall and 40% reduction of plasma flux to the wall, with no adverse effects on confinement of the main plasma

  3. Apple latent spherical virus vectors for reliable and effective virus-induced gene silencing among a broad range of plants including tobacco, tomato, Arabidopsis thaliana, cucurbits, and legumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igarashi, Aki; Yamagata, Kousuke; Sugai, Tomokazu; Takahashi, Yukari; Sugawara, Emiko; Tamura, Akihiro; Yaegashi, Hajime; Yamagishi, Noriko; Takahashi, Tsubasa; Isogai, Masamichi; Takahashi, Hideki; Yoshikawa, Nobuyuki

    2009-01-01

    Apple latent spherical virus (ALSV) vectors were evaluated for virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) of endogenous genes among a broad range of plant species. ALSV vectors carrying partial sequences of a subunit of magnesium chelatase (SU) and phytoene desaturase (PDS) genes induced highly uniform knockout phenotypes typical of SU and PDS inhibition on model plants such as tobacco and Arabidopsis thaliana, and economically important crops such as tomato, legume, and cucurbit species. The silencing phenotypes persisted throughout plant growth in these plants. In addition, ALSV vectors could be successfully used to silence a meristem gene, proliferating cell nuclear antigen and disease resistant N gene in tobacco and RCY1 gene in A. thaliana. As ALSV infects most host plants symptomlessly and effectively induces stable VIGS for long periods, the ALSV vector is a valuable tool to determine the functions of interested genes among a broad range of plant species.

  4. Molecular dynamics simulation of a nanofluidic energy absorption system: effects of the chiral vector of carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganjiani, Sayed Hossein; Hossein Nezhad, Alireza

    2018-02-14

    A Nanofluidic Energy Absorption System (NEAS) is a novel nanofluidic system with a small volume and weight. In this system, the input mechanical energy is converted to surface tension energy during liquid infiltration in the nanotube. The NEAS is made of a mixture of nanoporous material particles in a functional liquid. In this work, the effects of the chiral vector of a carbon nanotube (CNT) on the performance characteristics of the NEAS are investigated by using molecular dynamics simulation. For this purpose, six CNTs with different diameters for each type of armchair, zigzag and chiral, and several chiral CNTs with different chiral vectors (different values of indices (m,n)) are selected and studied. The results show that in the chiral CNTs, the contact angle shows the hydrophobicity of the CNT, and infiltration pressure is reduced by increasing the values of m and n (increasing the CNT diameter). Contact angle and infiltration pressure are decreased by almost 1.4% and 9% at all diameters, as the type of CNT is changed from chiral to zigzag and then to armchair. Absorbed energy density and efficiency are also decreased by increasing m and n and by changing the type of CNT from chiral to zigzag and then to armchair.

  5. Effects of gamma radiation on reproductive parameters of Aedes aegypti (L.) - a dengue vector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shetty, Vinaya; Harini, B.P.; Shetty, N.J.; Chaubey, R.C.; Jha, S.K.

    2013-01-01

    Aedes aegypti is an important vector for dengue, dengue haemorrhagic fever and chikungunya. Such diseases have resurged in developing countries and are also emerging as clear threats for epidemic outbreaks in developed countries. The said species is one of the best-known insects from the standpoint of both basic and applied sciences. Because of its medical importance and as well emerged model organism for radiation/toxicology and biochemical studies. The purpose of the present study to evaluate the impact of various doses gamma radiation on Aedes aegypti including 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, 45 and 50 Gy on different reproductive parameters i.e. fecundity, hatchability, fertility, pupation for three generations. When the flies were exposed to 1 and 2 Gy did not show any change for the above said doses. However, changes observed in hatchability from 3 Gy onwards. Reduction in fecundity was observed after exposure to 8 Gy onwards. While considerable reduction in hatchability was observed when they are exposed to 30 to 50 Gy. Sterility increased from 5 to 98% as the dose increased from 3 to 50 Gy. Furthermore, reduction in pupation and adult emergence were observed as dose increases. Dose response curve for egg hatchability and fertility for three generations were constructed and presented. From the data, it has been shown that, radiation induced dominant lethal mutations cause cessation of development prior to egg hatchability although in some cases mortality was observed in larval or pupal stages. (author)

  6. Lethal Effects of Aspergillus niger against Mosquitoes Vector of Filaria, Malaria, and Dengue: A Liquid Mycoadulticide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavendra Singh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aspergillus niger is a fungus of the genus Aspergillus. It has caused a disease called black mold on certain fruits and vegetables. The culture filtrates released from the A. niger ATCC 66566 were grown in Czapek dox broth (CDB then filtered with flash chromatograph and were used for the bioassay after a growth of thirty days. The result demonstrated these mortalities with LC50, LC90, and LC99 values of Culex quinquefasciatus 0.76, 3.06, and 4.75, Anopheles stephensi 1.43, 3.2, and 3.86, and Aedes aegypti 1.43, 2.2, and 4.1 μl/cm2, after exposure of seven hours. We have calculated significant LT90 values of Cx. quinquefasciatus 4.5, An. stephensi 3.54, and Ae. aegypti 6.0 hrs, respectively. This liquid spray of fungal culture isolate of A. niger can reduce malaria, dengue, and filarial transmission. These results significantly support broadening the current vector control paradigm beyond chemical adulticides.

  7. A MAPS Based Micro-Vertex Detector for the STAR Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schambach, Joachim; Anderssen, Eric; Contin, Giacomo; Greiner, Leo; Silber, Joe; Stezelberger, Thorsten; Sun, Xiangming; Szelezniak, Michal; Videbaek, Flemming; Vu, Chinh; Wieman, Howard; Woodmansee, Sam

    For the 2014 heavy ion run of RHIC a new micro-vertex detector called the Heavy Flavor Tracker (HFT) was installed in the STAR experiment. The HFT consists of three detector subsystems with various silicon technologies arranged in 4 approximately concentric cylinders close to the STAR interaction point designed to improve the STAR detector's vertex resolution and extend its measurement capabilities in the heavy flavor domain. The two innermost HFT layers are placed at radii of 2.8 cm and 8 cm from the beam line. These layers are constructed with 400 high resolution sensors based on CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor (MAPS) technology arranged in 10-sensor ladders mounted on 10 thin carbon fiber sectors to cover a total silicon area of 0.16 m2. Each sensor of this PiXeL ("PXL") sub-detector combines a pixel array of 928 rows and 960 columns with a 20.7 μm pixel pitch together with front-end electronics and zero-suppression circuitry in one silicon die providing a sensitive area of ˜3.8 cm2. This sensor architecture features 185.6 μs readout time and 170 mW/cm2 power dissipation. This low power dissipation allows the PXL detector to be air-cooled, and with the sensors thinned down to 50 μm results in a global material budget of only 0.4% radiation length per layer. A novel mechanical approach to detector insertion allows us to effectively install and integrate the PXL sub-detector within a 12 hour period during an on-going multi-month data taking period. The detector requirements, architecture and design, as well as the performance after installation, are presented in this paper.

  8. Self-consistent descriptions of vector mesons in hot matter reexamined

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riek, Felix; Knoll, Joern

    2010-01-01

    Technical concepts are presented that improve the self-consistent treatment of vector mesons in a hot and dense medium. First applications concern an interacting gas of pions and ρ mesons. As an extension of earlier studies, we thereby include random-phase-approximation-type vertex corrections and further use dispersion relations to calculate the real part of the vector-meson self-energy. An improved projection method preserves the four transversality of the vector-meson polarization tensor throughout the self-consistent calculations, thereby keeping the scheme void of kinematical singularities.

  9. The performance of diphoton primary vertex reconstruction methods in H → γγ+Met channel of ATLAS experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomiwa, K. G.

    2017-09-01

    The search for new physics in the H → γγ+met relies on how well the missing transverse energy is reconstructed. The Met algorithm used by the ATLAS experiment in turns uses input variables like photon and jets which depend on the reconstruction of the primary vertex. This document presents the performance of di-photon vertex reconstruction algorithms (hardest vertex method and Neural Network method). Comparing the performance of these algorithms for the nominal Standard Model sample and the Beyond Standard Model sample, we see the overall performance of the Neural Network method of primary vertex selection performed better than the Hardest vertex method.

  10. Chemical composition, toxicity and non-target effects of Pinus kesiya essential oil: An eco-friendly and novel larvicide against malaria, dengue and lymphatic filariasis mosquito vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindarajan, Marimuthu; Rajeswary, Mohan; Benelli, Giovanni

    2016-07-01

    Mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) are vectors of important parasites and pathogens causing death, poverty and social disability worldwide, with special reference to tropical and subtropical countries. The overuse of synthetic insecticides to control mosquito vectors lead to resistance, adverse environmental effects and high operational costs. Therefore, the development of eco-friendly control tools is an important public health challenge. In this study, the mosquito larvicidal activity of Pinus kesiya leaf essential oil (EO) was evaluated against the malaria vector Anopheles stephensi, the dengue vector Aedes aegypti and the lymphatic filariasis vector Culex quinquefasciatus. The chemical composition of the EO was analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy. GC-MS revealed that the P. kesiya EO contained 18 compounds. Major constituents were α-pinene, β-pinene, myrcene and germacrene D. In acute toxicity assays, the EO showed significant toxicity against early third-stage larvae of An. stephensi, Ae. aegypti and Cx. quinquefasciatus, with LC50 values of 52, 57, and 62µg/ml, respectively. Notably, the EO was safer towards several aquatic non-target organisms Anisops bouvieri, Diplonychus indicus and Gambusia affinis, with LC50 values ranging from 4135 to 8390µg/ml. Overall, this research adds basic knowledge to develop newer and safer natural larvicides from Pinaceae plants against malaria, dengue and filariasis mosquito vectors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Wrong vertex displacements due to Lee-Wick resonances at LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, E.; Schat, C.; Rold, L. da; Szynkman, A.

    2009-01-01

    We show how a resonance from the recently proposed Lee-Wick Standard Model could lead to wrong vertex displacements at LHCb. We study which could be the possible 'longest lived' Lee-Wick particle that could be created at LHC, and we study its possible decays and detections. We conclude that there is a region in the parameter space which would give wrong vertex displacements as a unique signature of the Lee-Wick Standard Model at LHCb. Further numerical simulation shows that LHC era could explore these wrong vertex displacements through Lee-Wick leptons below 500 GeV. (author)

  12. N-point g-loop vertex for free bosonic theory with vacuum charge Q

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Vecchia, P.; Pezzella, F.; Frau, M.; Hornfeck, K.

    1988-12-01

    Starting from the N-Point Vertex on the sphere and using the sewing procedure we construct the N-Point g-Loop Vertex for a free bosonic theory with vacuum charge Q. We then show that, when this vertex is saturated with N highest weight states, it gives their correlation function on an arbitrary Riemann surface of genus g. We also extend our formalism to the case of a free scalar field compactified on a circle, which is related to the Coulomb gas description of minimal models. (orig.)

  13. arXiv Mapping the material in the LHCb vertex locator using secondary hadronic interactions

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00160626; Barter, W.; Bay, A.; Bel, L.J.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bogdanova, G.; Borghi, S.; Bowcock, T.J.V.; Buchanan, E.; Buytaert, J.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Chen, S.; Coco, V.; Collins, P.; Crocombe, A.; Da Cunha Marinho, F.; Dall'Occo, E.; De Capua, S.; Dean, C.T.; Dettori, F.; Dossett, D.; Dreimanis, K.; Dujany, G.; Eklund, L.; Evans, T.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Hadavizadeh, T.; Harrison, J.; Hennessy, K.; Hulsbergen, W.; Hutchcroft, D.; Ilten, P.; Jans, E.; John, M.; Kopciewicz, P.; Koppenburg, P.; Lafferty, G.; Latham, T.; Leflat, A.; Majewski, M.W.; McNulty, R.; Mylroie-Smith, J.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Parkes, C.; Pearce, A.; Poluektov, A.; Pritchard, A.; Qian, W.; Redford, S.; Richards, S.; Rinnert, K.; Rodrigues, E.; Sarpis, G.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Smith, M.; Smith, N.A.; Szumlak, T.; Velthuis, J.J.; Volkov, V.; Wallace, C.; Wark, H.M.; Webber, A.; Williams, M.R.J.; Williams, M.

    2018-06-13

    Precise knowledge of the location of the material in the LHCb vertex locator (VELO) is essential to reducing background in searches for long-lived exotic particles, and in identifying jets that originate from beauty and charm quarks. Secondary interactions of hadrons produced in beam-gas collisions are used to map the location of material in the VELO. Using this material map, along with properties of a reconstructed secondary vertex and its constituent tracks, a $p$-value can be assigned to the hypothesis that the secondary vertex originates from a material interaction. A validation of this procedure is presented using photon conversions to dimuons.

  14. Effectiveness of Large-Scale Chagas Disease Vector Control Program in Nicaragua by Residual Insecticide Spraying Against Triatoma dimidiata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshioka, Kota; Nakamura, Jiro; Pérez, Byron; Tercero, Doribel; Pérez, Lenin; Tabaru, Yuichiro

    2015-12-01

    Chagas disease is one of the most serious health problems in Latin America. Because the disease is transmitted mainly by triatomine vectors, a three-phase vector control strategy was used to reduce its vector-borne transmission. In Nicaragua, we implemented an indoor insecticide spraying program in five northern departments to reduce house infestation by Triatoma dimidiata. The spraying program was performed in two rounds. After each round, we conducted entomological evaluation to compare the vector infestation level before and after spraying. A total of 66,200 and 44,683 houses were sprayed in the first and second spraying rounds, respectively. The entomological evaluation showed that the proportion of houses infested by T. dimidiata was reduced from 17.0% to 3.0% after the first spraying, which was statistically significant (P vector control strategies, and implementation of sustainable vector surveillance. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  15. S argassum muticum-synthesized silver nanoparticles: an effective control tool against mosquito vectors and bacterial pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhiyazhagan, Pari; Murugan, Kadarkarai; Kumar, Arjunan Naresh; Nataraj, Thiyagarajan; Dinesh, Devakumar; Panneerselvam, Chellasamy; Subramaniam, Jayapal; Mahesh Kumar, Palanisamy; Suresh, Udaiyan; Roni, Mathath; Nicoletti, Marcello; Alarfaj, Abdullah A; Higuchi, Akon; Munusamy, Murugan A; Benelli, Giovanni

    2015-11-01

    Mosquito-borne diseases represent a deadly threat for millions of people worldwide. Furthermore, pathogens and parasites polluting water also constitute a severe plague for populations of developing countries. In this research, silver nanoparticles (AgNP) were synthesized using the aqueous extract of the seaweed Sargassum muticum. The production of AgNP was confirmed by surface plasmon resonance band illustrated in UV-vis spectrophotometry. AgNP were characterized by FTIR, SEM, EDX, and XRD analyses. AgNP were mostly spherical in shape, crystalline in nature, with face-centered cubic geometry, and mean size was 43-79 nm. Toxicity of AgNP was assessed against Aedes aegypti, Anopheles stephensi, and Culex quinquefasciatus. In laboratory, AgNP were highly toxic against larvae and pupae of the three mosquito species. Maximum efficacy was observed against A. stephensi larvae, with LC50 ranging from 16.156 ppm (larva I) to 28.881 ppm (pupa). In the field, a single treatment with AgNP (10 × LC50) in water storage reservoirs was effective against the three mosquito vectors, allowing complete elimination of larval populations after 72 h. In ovicidal experiments, egg hatchability was reduced by 100% after treatment with 30 ppm of AgNP. Ovideterrence assays highlighted that 10 ppm of AgNP reduced oviposition rates of more than 70% in A. aegypti, A. stephensi, and C. quinquefasciatus (OAI = -0.61, -0.63, and -0.58, respectively). Antibacterial properties of AgNP were evaluated against Bacillus subtilis, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Salmonella typhi using the agar disk diffusion and minimum inhibitory concentration protocol. AgNP tested at 50 ppm evoked growth inhibition zones larger than 5 mm in all tested bacteria. Overall, the chance to use S. muticum-synthesized AgNP for control of mosquito vectors seems promising since they are effective at low doses and may constitute an advantageous alternative to build newer and safer mosquito control tools. This is the first

  16. A novel non-toxic combined CTA1-DD and ISCOMS adjuvant vector for effective mucosal immunization against influenza virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliasson, Dubravka Grdic; Helgeby, Anja; Schön, Karin; Nygren, Caroline; El-Bakkouri, Karim; Fiers, Walter; Saelens, Xavier; Lövgren, Karin Bengtsson; Nyström, Ida; Lycke, Nils Y

    2011-05-23

    Here we demonstrate that by using non-toxic fractions of saponin combined with CTA1-DD we can achieve a safe and above all highly efficacious mucosal adjuvant vector. We optimized the construction, tested the requirements for function and evaluated proof-of-concept in an influenza A virus challenge model. We demonstrated that the CTA1-3M2e-DD/ISCOMS vector provided 100% protection against mortality and greatly reduced morbidity in the mouse model. The immunogenicity of the vector was superior to other vaccine formulations using the ISCOM or CTA1-DD adjuvants alone. The versatility of the vector was best exemplified by the many options to insert, incorporate or admix vaccine antigens with the vector. Furthermore, the CTA1-3M2e-DD/ISCOMS could be kept 1 year at 4°C or as a freeze-dried powder without affecting immunogenicity or adjuvanticity of the vector. Strong serum IgG and mucosal IgA responses were elicited and CD4 T cell responses were greatly enhanced after intranasal administration of the combined vector. Together these findings hold promise for the combined vector as a mucosal vaccine against influenza virus infections including pandemic influenza. The CTA1-DD/ISCOMS technology represents a breakthrough in mucosal vaccine vector design which successfully combines immunomodulation and targeting in a safe and stable particulate formation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Effective axial-vector coupling of the gluon and top-quark charge asymmetry at the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabrielli, E.; Giammanco, A.; Racioppi, A.; Raidal, M.

    2012-01-01

    We study the top quark charge asymmetry induced by an effective axial-vector coupling of the gluon at the LHC experiments. We showed that rapidity cut-dependent asymmetries are more sensitive to the new physics than the independent ones. We also study the dependence of the asymmetries and variations of the total tt-bar cross sections on the invariant mass of the tt-bar system and show that it would be necessary to measure those quantities as functions of m tt at the LHC. If this is done, in the context of the considered new physics scenario, the 7 TeV LHC has enough sensitivity either to confirm the Tevatron top charge asymmetry anomaly or to rule it out. In the latter case the LHC will be able to put stringent constraint on the new physics scale Λ in this framework. (authors)

  18. Herbivore arthropods benefit from vectoring plant viruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belliure, B.; Janssen, A.; Maris, P.C.; Peters, D.; Sabelis, M.W.

    2005-01-01

    Plants infected with pathogens often attract the pathogens' vectors, but it is not clear if this is advantageous to the vectors. We therefore quantified the direct and indirect (through the host plant) effects of a pathogen on its vector. A positive direct effect of the plant-pathogenic Tomato

  19. Observations of sensor bias dependent cluster centroid shifts in a prototype sensor for the LHCb Vertex Locator detector

    CERN Document Server

    Papadelis, Aras

    2006-01-01

    We present results from a recent beam test of a prototype sensor for the LHCb Vertex Locator detector, read out with the Beetle 1.3 front-end chip. We have studied the effect of the sensor bias voltage on the reconstructed cluster positions in a sensor placed in a 120GeV pion beam at a 10° incidence angle. We find an unexplained sysematic shift in the reconstructed cluster centroid when increasing the bias voltage on an already overdepleted sensor. The shift is independent of strip pitch and sensor thickness.

  20. Effective genetic modification and differentiation of hMSCs upon controlled release of rAAV vectors using alginate/poloxamer composite systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Rodríguez, P; Rey-Rico, A; Madry, H; Landin, M; Cucchiarini, M

    2015-12-30

    Viral vectors are common tools in gene therapy to deliver foreign therapeutic sequences in a specific target population via their natural cellular entry mechanisms. Incorporating such vectors in implantable systems may provide strong alternatives to conventional gene transfer procedures. The goal of the present study was to generate different hydrogel structures based on alginate (AlgPH155) and poloxamer PF127 as new systems to encapsulate and release recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vectors. Inclusion of rAAV in such polymeric capsules revealed an influence of the hydrogel composition and crosslinking temperature upon the vector release profiles, with alginate (AlgPH155) structures showing the fastest release profiles early on while over time vector release was more effective from AlgPH155+PF127 [H] capsules crosslinked at a high temperature (50°C). Systems prepared at room temperature (AlgPH155+PF127 [C]) allowed instead to achieve a more controlled release profile. When tested for their ability to target human mesenchymal stem cells, the different systems led to high transduction efficiencies over time and to gene expression levels in the range of those achieved upon direct vector application, especially when using AlgPH155+PF127 [H]. No detrimental effects were reported on either cell viability or on the potential for chondrogenic differentiation. Inclusion of PF127 in the capsules was also capable of delaying undesirable hypertrophic cell differentiation. These findings are of promising value for the further development of viral vector controlled release strategies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Asymmetric effects of native and exotic invasive shrubs on ecology of the West Nile virus vector Culex pipiens (Diptera: Culicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Allison M; Allan, Brian F; Frisbie, Lauren A; Muturi, Ephantus J

    2015-06-16

    Exotic invasive plants alter the structure and function of native ecosystems and may influence the distribution and abundance of arthropod disease vectors by modifying habitat quality. This study investigated how invasive plants alter the ecology of Culex pipiens, an important vector of West Nile virus (WNV) in northeastern and midwestern regions of the United States. Field and laboratory experiments were conducted to test the hypothesis that three native leaf species (Rubus allegheniensis, blackberry; Sambucus canadensis, elderberry; and Amelanchier laevis, serviceberry), and three exotic invasive leaf species (Lonicera maackii, Amur honeysuckle; Elaeagnus umbellata, autumn olive; and Rosa multiflora, multiflora rose) alter Cx. pipiens oviposition site selection, emergence rates, development time, and adult body size. The relative abundance of seven bacterial phyla in infusions of the six leaf species also was determined using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction to test the hypothesis that variation in emergence, development, and oviposition site selection is correlated to differences in the diversity and abundance of bacteria associated with different leaf species, important determinants of nutrient quality and availability for mosquito larvae. Leaf detritus from invasive honeysuckle and autumn olive yielded significantly higher adult emergence rates compared to detritus from the remaining leaf species and honeysuckle alleviated the negative effects of intraspecific competition on adult emergence. Conversely, leaves of native blackberry acted as an ecological trap, generating high oviposition but low emergence rates. Variation in bacterial flora associated with different leaf species may explain this asymmetrical production of mosquitoes: emergence rates and oviposition rates were positively correlated to bacterial abundance and diversity, respectively. We conclude that the displacement of native understory plant species by certain invasive shrubs

  2. Pion production and absorption in nuclear reactions. I. The vertex function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nutt, W.T.; Shakin, C.M.

    1977-01-01

    We have performed a model calculation of the pion-nucleon vertex function for the case in which one nucleon is allowed to go far off its mass shell. We discuss the relevance of this vertex function for the calculation of pion production and absorption in nuclear reactions, such as (π + ,p), (p,π + ), and for the pionic disintegration of the deuteron. The model used is based upon an approximation to an exact equation for the vertex function derived from a field-theoretic model with pseudoscalar coupling. Our calculations indicate a strong dependence of the vertex function on the invariant mass of the off-shell nucleon. The results are dominated by the presence of the 1470 MeV, P 11 resonance

  3. Error handling for the CDF online silicon vertex tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Bari, M; Cerri, A; Dell'Orso, Mauro; Donati, S; Galeotti, S; Giannetti, P; Morsani, F; Punzi, G; Ristori, L; Spinella, F; Zanetti, A M

    2001-01-01

    The online silicon vertex tracker (SVT) is composed of 104 VME 9U digital boards (of eight different types). Since the data output from the SVT (few MB/s) are a small fraction of the input data (200 MB/s), it is extremely difficult to track possible internal errors by using only the output stream. For this reason, several diagnostic tools have been implemented: local error registers, error bits propagated through the data streams, and the Spy Buffer system. Data flowing through each input and output stream of every board are continuously copied to memory banks named spy buffers, which act as built-in logic state analyzers hooked continuously to internal data streams. The contents of all buffers can be frozen at any time (e.g., on error detection) to take a snapshot of all data flowing through each SVT board. The spy buffers are coordinated at system level by the Spy Control Board. The architecture, design, and implementation of this system are described. (4 refs).

  4. Statistical mechanics of the vertex-cover problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Alexander K.; Weigt, Martin

    2003-10-01

    We review recent progress in the study of the vertex-cover problem (VC). The VC belongs to the class of NP-complete graph theoretical problems, which plays a central role in theoretical computer science. On ensembles of random graphs, VC exhibits a coverable-uncoverable phase transition. Very close to this transition, depending on the solution algorithm, easy-hard transitions in the typical running time of the algorithms occur. We explain a statistical mechanics approach, which works by mapping the VC to a hard-core lattice gas, and then applying techniques such as the replica trick or the cavity approach. Using these methods, the phase diagram of the VC could be obtained exactly for connectivities c e, the solution of the VC exhibits full replica symmetry breaking. The statistical mechanics approach can also be used to study analytically the typical running time of simple complete and incomplete algorithms for the VC. Finally, we describe recent results for the VC when studied on other ensembles of finite- and infinite-dimensional graphs.

  5. Statistical mechanics of the vertex-cover problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartmann, Alexander K; Weigt, Martin

    2003-01-01

    We review recent progress in the study of the vertex-cover problem (VC). The VC belongs to the class of NP-complete graph theoretical problems, which plays a central role in theoretical computer science. On ensembles of random graphs, VC exhibits a coverable-uncoverable phase transition. Very close to this transition, depending on the solution algorithm, easy-hard transitions in the typical running time of the algorithms occur. We explain a statistical mechanics approach, which works by mapping the VC to a hard-core lattice gas, and then applying techniques such as the replica trick or the cavity approach. Using these methods, the phase diagram of the VC could be obtained exactly for connectivities c e, the solution of the VC exhibits full replica symmetry breaking. The statistical mechanics approach can also be used to study analytically the typical running time of simple complete and incomplete algorithms for the VC. Finally, we describe recent results for the VC when studied on other ensembles of finite- and infinite-dimensional graphs

  6. The micro vertex detector for the anti PANDA experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esch, Simone [Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany); Collaboration: PANDA-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    The anti PANDA detector is one of the main experiments at the upcoming Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR), which is under construction in Darmstadt, Germany. The fixed-target experiment will explore anti pp annihilations with intense, phase space-cooled beams with momenta between 1.5 and 15 GeV/c. One aim of the detector is to perform high precision measurements of particles like excited charmonium and D mesons. Essential for background suppression is the tagging of D mesons by measuring their decay point. Therefore, a Micro Vertex Detector (MVD) is planned at anti PANDA as the innermost tracking detector. The MVD aims to reconstruct vertices with a resolution better than 100 μm to cope with the decay length of the D{sup ±} mesons (cτ=315 μm) produced with a mean βγ=2. The detector consists of silicon pixel and double-sided silicon strip detectors, arranged in four barrel layers and six disk layers. An overview of the MVD is given in this talk. Recent developments like laboratory and testbeam results of the current pixel front-end ASIC prototype ToPix 4 are shown. The concept of the newly developed strip front-end ASIC PASTA is presented.

  7. Asymptotic normalization coefficients, nuclear vertex constants and nuclear astrophysics problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yarmukhamedov, R.; Artemov, S.V.; Igamov, S.B.; Burtebaev, N.; Peterson, R.J.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: We will review the results of a comprehensive analysis of the experimental astrophysical S- factors S(E) for the t(α, γ ) 7 Li, 3 He(α, γ) 7 Be, 7 Be(p, γ) 8 B, 12 C(p , γ) 13 N and 13 C(p,γ) 14 N reactions at extremely low energies, performed within a three-sided collaboration (Uzbekistan-Kazakhstan-USA). In the analysis, the new experimental data for the 12 C(p, γ) 13 N reaction are also included, as measured with the accelerator UKP-2-1 at the Institute of Nuclear Physics in Kazakhstan. The analysis is carried out within the framework of a new two-body potential approach and the R-matrix method, taking into account information about the asymptotic normalization coefficient (ANC) (or the respective nuclear vertex constant for virtual decay of the residual nuclei into two fragments of the initial states of the aforesaid reactions, which belong to the fundamental nuclear constants). Nowadays ANC's are obtained from analysis of peripheral one nucleon transfer reactions by method combining dispersion theory and DWBA (CM). It is shown that ANC can be also reliably obtained from analysis of proton capture reactions at astrophysical energies by new modified two-body potential method where the CM is used. A comparative analysis of the results obtained by different authors in the framework of different methods is also done

  8. The silicon vertex detector of the Belle II experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedl, Markus, E-mail: friedl@hephy.a [Institute of High Energy Physics, Nikolsdorfergasse 18, A-1050 Vienna (Austria); Bergauer, Thomas; Gfall, Immanuel; Irmler, Christian; Valentan, Manfred [Institute of High Energy Physics, Nikolsdorfergasse 18, A-1050 Vienna (Austria)

    2011-02-01

    After 10 years of successful operation, the Belle experiment at KEK (Tsukuba, Japan) will be completed in 2010. Thereafter, a major upgrade of the KEK-B machine is foreseen until 2014, aiming at a final luminosity of 8x10{sup 35} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, which is about 40 times higher than the present peak value. Consequently, also the Belle experiment needs to be changed and the Silicon Vertex Detector (SVD) in particular will be completely replaced as it already operates close to its limits in the present system. The future SVD (a.k.a. SuperSVD) will consist of four layers of double-sided silicon strip detectors like the present one, but at larger radii, because it will be complemented by a two-layer pixel detector as the innermost sensing device. The SuperSVD will be entirely composed of silicon sensors made from 6 in. wafers read out by APV25 front-end chips that were originally developed for the CMS experiment at the LHC. Several years of R and D effort led to innovations such as the Origami chip-on-sensor concept and readout electronics with hit time finding which were successfully demonstrated on prototypes. These features will be included in the final system which is presently being designed. This paper will give an overview of the SuperSVD and present results from prototype tests ranging from detector modules to back-end electronics.

  9. The silicon vertex detector of the Belle II experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedl, Markus; Bergauer, Thomas; Gfall, Immanuel; Irmler, Christian; Valentan, Manfred

    2011-01-01

    After 10 years of successful operation, the Belle experiment at KEK (Tsukuba, Japan) will be completed in 2010. Thereafter, a major upgrade of the KEK-B machine is foreseen until 2014, aiming at a final luminosity of 8x10 35 cm -2 s -1 , which is about 40 times higher than the present peak value. Consequently, also the Belle experiment needs to be changed and the Silicon Vertex Detector (SVD) in particular will be completely replaced as it already operates close to its limits in the present system. The future SVD (a.k.a. SuperSVD) will consist of four layers of double-sided silicon strip detectors like the present one, but at larger radii, because it will be complemented by a two-layer pixel detector as the innermost sensing device. The SuperSVD will be entirely composed of silicon sensors made from 6 in. wafers read out by APV25 front-end chips that were originally developed for the CMS experiment at the LHC. Several years of R and D effort led to innovations such as the Origami chip-on-sensor concept and readout electronics with hit time finding which were successfully demonstrated on prototypes. These features will be included in the final system which is presently being designed. This paper will give an overview of the SuperSVD and present results from prototype tests ranging from detector modules to back-end electronics.

  10. Silicon micro-vertex detector for Belle II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohanty, Gagan

    2013-01-01

    The Belle experiment at the KEK B-factory is Japan provided the landmark experimental confirmation of CP violation mechanism within the standard model that led to the physics Nobel prize in 2008. In its second phase, called Belle II, it would seek for the holy-grail of new physics using rare decays of B and D mesons and tau leptons as a probe, in complimentary to the direct searches carried out with the LHC experiments. An important component of this upgrade is to replace the innermost subdetector, namely the silicon micro-vertex detector (SVD). The new SVD will, like the old one, consist of four layers of double-sided silicon strip detector, but made from 6âĂİ wafers and located at higher radii as a novel, two-layer DEPFET pixel detector will be inserted very dose to the beam- pipe. Starting with the physics motivation, we discuss the design concept, fabrication and the Indian contributions toward the Belle II SVD. (author)

  11. Error handling for the CDF Silicon Vertex Tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Belforte, S; Dell'Orso, Mauro; Donati, S; Galeotti, S; Giannetti, P; Morsani, F; Punzi, G; Ristori, L; Spinella, F; Zanetti, A M

    2000-01-01

    The SVT online tracker for the CDF upgrade reconstructs two- dimensional tracks using information from the Silicon Vertex detector (SVXII) and the Central Outer Tracker (COT). The SVT has an event rate of 100 kHz and a latency time of 10 mu s. The system is composed of 104 VME 9U digital boards (of 8 different types) and it is implemented as a data driven architecture. Each board runs on its own 30 MHz clock. Since the data output from the SVT (few Mbytes/sec) are a small fraction of the input data (200 Mbytes/sec), it is extremely difficult to track possible internal errors by using only the output stream. For this reason several diagnostic tools have been implemented: local error registers, error bits propagated through the data streams and the Spy Buffer system. Data flowing through each input and output stream of every board are continuously copied to memory banks named Spy Buffers which act as built in logic state analyzers hooked continuously to internal data streams. The contents of all buffers can be ...

  12. Jet Vertex Charge Reconstruction Poster for LHCP 2015

    CERN Document Server

    Nektarijevic, Snezana; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    B-jet reconstruction algorithms used so far in ATLAS data analyses do not provide the b-jet charge information, which could potentially play a major role in reducing the combinatorial backgrounds in final states with multiple b-jets. This missing point is addressed by the newly developed JetVertexCharge (JVC) algorithm presented in this poster. Inspired by the decay chain of B-hadrons, the JVC algorithm provides a multi-variate b-jet charge estimate relying on tracks, displaced vertices and muons contained in the jet. In this algorithm, the established concept of estimating jet charge as a transverse momentum weighted sum of track charges is used to reconstruct the charge of the jet as whole, as well as the charges of up to two displaced vertices in the jet, using the corresponding sets of associated tracks. The charge of the associated muon is interpreted as the same-sign or opposite-sign relative to the b-jet charge, according to its transverse momentum and geometrical match to vertices. Jets are divided in...

  13. On the complexity of the balanced vertex ordering problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Kara

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider the problem of finding a balanced ordering of the vertices of a graph. More precisely, we want to minimise the sum, taken over all vertices v, of the difference between the number of neighbours to the left and right of v. This problem, which has applications in graph drawing, was recently introduced by Biedl et al. [Discrete Applied Math. 148:27--48, 2005]. They proved that the problem is solvable in polynomial time for graphs with maximum degree three, but NP-hard for graphs with maximum degree six. One of our main results is to close the gap in these results, by proving NP-hardness for graphs with maximum degree four. Furthermore, we prove that the problem remains NP-hard for planar graphs with maximum degree four and for 5-regular graphs. On the other hand, we introduce a polynomial time algorithm that determines whetherthere is a vertex ordering with total imbalance smaller than a fixed constant, and a polynomial time algorithm that determines whether a given multigraph with even degrees has an `almost balanced' ordering.

  14. Persistent magnetic vortex flow at a supergranular vertex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Requerey, Iker S.; Cobo, Basilio Ruiz; Gošić, Milan; Bellot Rubio, Luis R.

    2018-03-01

    Context. Photospheric vortex flows are thought to play a key role in the evolution of magnetic fields. Recent studies show that these swirling motions are ubiquitous in the solar surface convection and occur in a wide range of temporal and spatial scales. Their interplay with magnetic fields is poorly characterized, however. Aims: We study the relation between a persistent photospheric vortex flow and the evolution of a network magnetic element at a supergranular vertex. Methods: We used long-duration sequences of continuum intensity images acquired with Hinode and the local correlation-tracking method to derive the horizontal photospheric flows. Supergranular cells are detected as large-scale divergence structures in the flow maps. At their vertices, and cospatial with network magnetic elements, the velocity flows converge on a central point. Results: One of these converging flows is observed as a vortex during the whole 24 h time series. It consists of three consecutive vortices that appear nearly at the same location. At their core, a network magnetic element is also detected. Its evolution is strongly correlated to that of the vortices. The magnetic feature is concentrated and evacuated when it is caught by the vortices and is weakened and fragmented after the whirls disappear. Conclusions: This evolutionary behavior supports the picture presented previously, where a small flux tube becomes stable when it is surrounded by a vortex flow. A movie attached to Fig. 2 is available at http://https://www.aanda.org

  15. From vertex detectors to inner trackers with CMOS pixel sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Besson, A.

    2017-01-01

    The use of CMOS Pixel Sensors (CPS) for high resolution and low material vertex detectors has been validated with the 2014 and 2015 physics runs of the STAR-PXL detector at RHIC/BNL. This opens the door to the use of CPS for inner tracking devices, with 10-100 times larger sensitive area, which require therefore a sensor design privileging power saving, response uniformity and robustness. The 350 nm CMOS technology used for the STAR-PXL sensors was considered as too poorly suited to upcoming applications like the upgraded ALICE Inner Tracking System (ITS), which requires sensors with one order of magnitude improvement on readout speed and improved radiation tolerance. This triggered the exploration of a deeper sub-micron CMOS technology, Tower-Jazz 180 nm, for the design of a CPS well adapted for the new ALICE-ITS running conditions. This paper reports the R&D results for the conception of a CPS well adapted for the ALICE-ITS.

  16. Readout and trigger electronics for the TPC vertex chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ronan, M.T.; Jared, R.C.; McGathen, T.K.; Eisner, A.M.; Broeder, W.J.; Godfrey, G.L.

    1987-10-01

    The introduction of the vertex chamber required the addition of new front-end electronics and a new 1024-channel, high-accuracy TDC system. The preamplifier/discriminator should be capable of triggering on the first electrons and the time digitzer should preserve the measurement resolution. For the TDC's, in order to maintain compatibility with the existing TPC readout system, an upgrade of a previous inner drift chamber digitizer system has been chosen. Tests of the accuracy and stability of the original design indicated that the new design specifications would be met. The TPC detector requires a fast pretrigger to turn on its gating grid within 500 ns of the e/sup +/e/sup -/ beam crossing time, to minimize the loss of ionization information. A pretrigger based on the Straw Chamber signals, operating at a rate of about 2 K/sec, will be used for charged particle final states. In addition, in order to reject low mass Two-Photon events at the final trigger level, an accurate transverse momentum cutoff will be made by the Straw Chamber trigger logic. In this paper, we describe the readout and trigger electronics systems which have been built to satisfy the above requirements. 5 refs., 8 figs

  17. Characterisation of silicon detectors for the LHCb Vertex Locator Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00401830

    The LHCb Vertex Locator must be upgraded in the next long shutdown of the LHC, starting at the end of 2018. This is due to the increased occupancy. The current silicon strip detector is being upgraded to a silicon pixel detector. The prototype sensors for this detector were tested thoroughly before a final design will be chosen. The testing was done with the Timepix3 Telescope, which was commissioned in the summer of 2014. The charge collected by the sensors and efficiency of the sensors were investigated. After maximum irradiation, of 8$\\times$10$^{15}$ 1 MeV n$_{eq}$/cm$^{2}$, the sensors must have a most probable value of collected charge of 6000 electrons before 1000 V or breakdown, whichever comes first. The sensors must also have a high efficiency at maximum irradiation of 8$\\times$10$^{15}$ 1 MeV n$_{eq}$/cm$^{2}$. All tested sensors reach these criteria. All sensors reach 6000 electrons between 600 V and 800 V and have a cluster finding efficiency of over 95\\% at the respective voltages. Overall, a 15...

  18. Force, Velocity, and Work: The Effects of Different Contexts on Students' Understanding of Vector Concepts Using Isomorphic Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barniol, Pablo; Zavala, Genaro

    2014-01-01

    In this article we compare students' understanding of vector concepts in problems with no physical context, and with three mechanics contexts: force, velocity, and work. Based on our "Test of Understanding of Vectors," a multiple-choice test presented elsewhere, we designed two isomorphic shorter versions of 12 items each: a test with no…

  19. Novel Cocaine Vaccine Linked to a Disrupted Adenovirus Gene Transfer Vector Blocks Cocaine Psychostimulant and Reinforcing Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wee, Sunmee; Hicks, Martin J; De, Bishnu P; Rosenberg, Jonathan B; Moreno, Amira Y; Kaminsky, Stephen M; Janda, Kim D; Crystal, Ronald G; Koob, George F

    2012-01-01

    Immunotherapy is a promising treatment for drug addiction. However, insufficient immune responses to vaccines in most subjects pose a challenge. In this study, we tested the efficacy of a new cocaine vaccine (dAd5GNE) in antagonizing cocaine addiction-related behaviors in rats. This vaccine used a disrupted serotype 5 adenovirus (Ad) gene transfer vector coupled to a third-generation cocaine hapten, termed GNE (6-(2R,3S)-3-(benzoyloxy)-8-methyl-8-azabicyclo [3.2.1] octane-2-carboxamido-hexanoic acid). Three groups of rats were immunized with dAd5GNE. One group was injected with 3H-cocaine, and radioactivity in the blood and brain was determined. A second group was tested for cocaine-induced locomotor sensitization. A third group was examined for cocaine self-administration, extinction, and reinstatement of responding for cocaine. Antibody titers were determined at various time-points. In each experiment, we added a control group that was immunized with dAd5 without a hapten. The vaccination with dAd5GNE produced long-lasting high titers (>105) of anti-cocaine antibodies in all of the rats. The vaccination inhibited cocaine-induced hyperlocomotor activity and sensitization. Vaccinated rats acquired cocaine self-administration, but they showed less motivation to self-administer cocaine under a progressive-ratio schedule than control rats. When cocaine was not available in a session, control rats exhibited ‘extinction burst' responding, whereas vaccinated rats did not. Moreover, when primed with cocaine, vaccinated rats did not reinstate responding, suggesting a blockade of cocaine-seeking behavior. These data strongly suggest that our dAd5GNE vector-based vaccine may be effective in treating cocaine abuse and addiction. PMID:21918504

  20. What can we learn from sum rules for vertex functions in QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craigie, N.S.; Stern, J.

    1982-04-01

    We demonstrate that the light cone sum rules for vertex functions based on the operator product expansion and QCD perturbation theory lead to interesting relationships between various non-perturbative parameters associated with hadronic bound states (e.g. vertex couplings and decay constants). We also show that such sum rules provide a valuable means of estimating the matrix elements of the higher spin operators in the meson wave function. (author)