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Sample records for effective skyrme forces

  1. Description of nuclear structure and cross sections for nucleon-nucleus scattering on the basis of effective Skyrme forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuprikov, V. I.; Pilipenko, V. V.; Soznik, A. P.; Tarasov, V. N.; Shlyakhov, N. A.

    2009-01-01

    The possibility of constructing such new versions of effective nucleon-nucleon forces that would make it possible to describe simultaneously the cross sections for nucleon-nucleus scattering and quantities characterizing nuclear matter and the structure of finite even-even nuclei is investigated on the basis of a microscopic nucleon-nucleus optical potential that is calculated by using effective Skyrme interaction. A procedure for optimizing the parameters of Skyrme forces by employing fits to specific angular distributions for neutron-nucleus scattering and by simultaneously testing the features of nuclear matter, the binding energy of the target nucleus, and its proton root-mean-square radius is proposed. A number of versions of modified Skyrme forces that ensure a reasonable description of both nucleon-nucleus scattering and the properties of nuclear structure are found on the basis of this procedure.

  2. Neutron matter properties using generalized Skyrme force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansour, H.M.M.; Ramadan, Kh.A.

    2002-01-01

    The generalized Skyrme potential is used to calculate the properties of neutron matter in the form of the Thomas–Fermi model. The binding energy per particle, spin symmetry energy, free energy, pressure, entropy, sound velocity and magnetic susceptibility are calculated as a function of density ρ. The results are comparable with those obtained by Friedman and Pandharipande, who used the Urbana v 14 potential plus an effective repulsive three-body force. (author)

  3. Hyperspherical calculations with Skyrme-like forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navarro, J.

    1975-11-01

    The first approximation of the hyperspherical harmonic method is used to describe in a unified way the ground state and the breathing mode of several doubly-magic nuclei with Skyrme-like forces. A comparison is made with other methods [fr

  4. Comparison of different Skyrme forces: Fusion barriers and fusion cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puri, R.K.; Gupta, R.K.

    1995-01-01

    Fusion barriers and fusion cross sections are calculated using the Skyrme energy-density formalism. To study the role of different parametrizations of the Skyrme interaction, we use two typical forces, i.e., the original Skyrme force S and the widely used Skyrme force SIII. Our calculations show that, in the reactions considered here, the Skyrme force S gives higher fusion cross sections compared to that of the Skyrme force SIII. The main part of this difference can be associated with the presence of the spin-density contribution in the Skyrme force SIII

  5. Microscopic optical potential calculations of finite nuclei with extended skyrme forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Haiji; Ye Weilei; Gao Qin; Shen Qingbiao

    1986-01-01

    Microscopic optical potential calculations in the Hartree-Fock (HF) approximation with Extended Skyrme forces are investigated. The HF equation is derived from the variation principle and the potential formula of spherical nuclei is obtained by two different ways. Then the calculations for symmetrid nuclei 16 O, 40 Ca and asymmetric nucleus 90 Zr with eight sets of Skyrme force parameters are presented. Our results show that the potential form and variating tendency with incident energy are reasonable and there apparently appears a 'wine-bottle-bottom' shape in the intermediate energy region. Furthermore, our calculations reflect shell effects clearly

  6. Hyperon puzzle of neutron stars with Skyrme force models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Yeunhwan; Hyun, Chang Ho; Kwak, Kyujin; Lee, Chang-Hwan

    2015-01-01

    We consider the so-called hyperon puzzle of neutron star (NS). We employ Skyrme force models for the description of in-medium nucleon–nucleon (NN), nucleon–Lambda hyperon (NΛ) and Lambda–Lambda (ΛΛ) interactions. A phenomenological finite-range force (FRF) for the ΛΛ interaction is considered as well. Equation of state (EoS) of NS matter is obtained in the framework of density functional theory, and Tolman–Oppenheimer–Volkoff (TOV) equations are solved to obtain the mass-radius relations of NSs. It has been generally known that the existence of hyperons in the NS matter is not well supported by the recent discovery of large-mass NSs (M ≃ 2M⊙) since hyperons make the EoS softer than the one without them. For the selected interaction models, NΛ interactions reduce the maximum mass of NS by about 30%, while ΛΛ interactions can give about 10% enhancement. Consequently, we find that some Skyrme force models predict the maximum mass of NS consistent with the observation of 2M ⊙ NSs, and at the same time satisfy observationally constrained mass-radius relations. (author)

  7. Physical Origin of Density Dependent Force of the Skyrme Type within the Quark Meson Coupling Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierre Guichon; Hrayr Matevosyan; N. Sandulescu; Anthony Thomas

    2006-01-01

    A density dependent, effective nucleon-nucleon force of the Skyrme type is derived from the quark-meson coupling model--a self-consistent, relativistic quark level description of nuclear matter. This new formulation requires no assumption that the mean scalar field is small and hence constitutes a significant advance over earlier work. The similarity of the effective interaction to the widely used SkM* force encourages us to apply it to a wide range of nuclear problems, beginning with the binding energies and charge distributions of doubly magic nuclei. Finding impressive results in this conventional arena, we apply the same effective interaction, within the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov approach, to the properties of nuclei far from stability. The resulting two neutron drip lines and shell quenching are quite satisfactory. Finally, we apply the relativistic formulation to the properties of dense nuclear matter in anticipation of future application to the properties of neutron stars

  8. The phonon-coupling model for Skyrme forces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyutorovich, N.; Tselyaev, V. [St. Petersburg State University (Russian Federation); Speth, J., E-mail: J.Speth@fz-juelich.de; Krewald, S. [Forschungszentrum Jülich, Institut für Kernphysik (Germany); Reinhard, P.-G. [Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Institut für Theoretische Physik II (Germany)

    2016-11-15

    A short review on the self-consistent RPA based on the energy-density functional of the Skyrme type is given. We also present an extension of the RPA where the coupling of phonons to the single-particle states is considered. Within this approach we present numerical results which are compared with data. The self-consistent approach is compared with the Landau–Migdal theory. Here we derive from the self-consistent ph interaction, the Landau–Migdal parameters as well as their density dependence. In the Appendix a new derivation of the reduced matrix elements of the ph interaction is presented.

  9. Hartree-Fock calculations for strongly deformed and highly excited nuclei using the Skyrme force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zint, P.G.

    1975-01-01

    It has been shown that in CHF-calculations the Skyrme-force is usefull to describe strongly deformed nuclei with even proton and neutron number till separation. Thereby the eigenfunctions of the two-centre Hamiltonian form an adequate basis. With this procedure, we obtain the correct deformation of the 32 S-system. Induding the spurious energy of relative motion between the 16 O-fragments, the energy curve is a good approximation for the real potential, extracted form scattering experiments. (orig./WL) [de

  10. Constraining the surface properties of effective Skyrme interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jodon, R.; Bender, M.; Bennaceur, K.; Meyer, J.

    2016-08-01

    Background: Deformation energy surfaces map how the total binding energy of a nuclear system depends on the geometrical properties of intrinsic configurations, thereby providing a powerful tool to interpret nuclear spectroscopy and large-amplitude collective-motion phenomena such as fission. The global behavior of the deformation energy is known to be directly connected to the surface properties of the effective interaction used for its calculation. Purpose: The precise control of surface properties during the parameter adjustment of an effective interaction is key to obtain a reliable and predictive description of nuclear properties. The most relevant indicator is the surface-energy coefficient asurf. There are several possibilities for its definition and estimation, which are not fully equivalent and require a computational effort that can differ by orders of magnitude. The purpose of this study is threefold: first, to identify a scheme for the determination of asurf that offers the best compromise between robustness, precision, and numerical efficiency; second, to analyze the correlation between values for asurf and the characteristic energies of the fission barrier of 240Pu; and third, to lay out an efficient and robust procedure for how the deformation properties of the Skyrme energy density functional (EDF) can be constrained during the parameter fit. Methods: There are several frequently used possibilities to define and calculate the surface energy coefficient asurf of effective interactions built for the purpose of self-consistent mean-field calculations. The most direct access is provided by the model system of semi-infinite nuclear matter, but asurf can also be extracted from the systematics of binding energies of finite nuclei. Calculations can be carried out either self-consistently [Hartree-Fock (HF)], which incorporates quantal shell effects, or in one of the semiclassical extended Thomas-Fermi (ETF) or modified Thomas-Fermi (MTF) approximations. The

  11. Densities, form factors, transitions and multipole moments in the s-d shell, with the Skyrme force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, D.R. de; Mizrahi, S.S.

    1977-09-01

    The nuclear densities, radii, multipole moments, form-factors and transition probabilities obtained for the A = 4n type of nuclei in the s-d shell are reported, using the Hartree-Fock wave functions calculated with the Skyrme force. Experimental data and theoretical values derived by others are shown for comparison [pt

  12. Hartree-Fock+BCS approach to unstable nuclei with the Skyrme force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tajima, Naoki

    2001-01-01

    We reanalyze the results of our extensive Hartree-Fock+BCS calculation from new points of view paying attention to the properties of unstable nuclei. The calculation has been done with the Skyrme SIII force for the ground and shape isomeric states of 1029 even-even nuclei ranging 2≤Z≤114. We also discuss the advantages of the employed three-dimensional Cartesian-mesh representation, especially on its remarkably high precision with apparently coarse meshes when applied to atomic nuclei. In Appendices we give the coefficients of finite-point numerical differentiation and integration formulae suitable for Cartesian mesh representation and elucidate the features of each formula and the differences from a method based on the Fourier transformation. (author)

  13. Systematic study of even-even nuclei with Hartree-Fock+BCS method using Skyrme SIII force

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tajima, Naoki; Takahara, Satoshi; Onishi, Naoki [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Coll. of Arts and Sciences

    1997-03-01

    We have applied the Hartree-Fock+BCS method with Skyrme SIII force formulated in a three-dimensional Cartesian-mesh representation to even-even nuclei with 2 {<=} Z {<=} 114. We discuss the results concerning the atomic masses, the quadrupole (m=0, 2) and hexadecapole (m=0, 2, 4) deformations, the skin thicknesses, and the halo radii. We also discuss the energy difference between oblate and prolate solutions and the shape difference between protons and neutrons. (author)

  14. Energy Levels and B(E2) transition rates in the Hartree-Fock approximation with the Skyrme force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, D.R. de; Mizrahi, S.S.

    1976-11-01

    The Hartree-Fock approximation with the Skyrme force is applied to the A = 4n type of nuclei in the s-d shell. Energy levels and electric quadrupole transition probabilities within the ground states band are calculated from the projected states of good angular momentum. Strong approximations are made but the results concerning the spectra are better than those obtained with more sophisticated density independent two-body interactions. The transition rates are less sensitive to the interaction, as previously verified

  15. An effective Skyrme-type interaction for the calculation of nuclear structures of the whole mass table

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waroquier, M.E.L.

    1982-01-01

    The Hartree-Fock-Bogolyubov formalism is extended for 3 body interactions and applied to spherical nuclei. The structure of the proposed extension of the Skyrme-type interaction is given, together with the analytical expression of the corresponding Hartree-Fock differential equation. The Skyrme-force parameters are modified in order to be able to reproduce the ground state properties. The problem of the spin-stability of the proposed interaction is treated. The Skyrme-interaction is applied as particle-hole interaction and saturation properties are studied. Structure of the charge, neutron density distributions and changes introduced by adding protons or neutrons are treated. (MDC)

  16. Structure of neutron star crusts from new Skyrme effective interactions constrained by chiral effective field theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Yeunhwan; Holt, Jeremy W.

    2017-06-01

    We investigate the structure of neutron star crusts, including the crust-core boundary, based on new Skyrme mean field models constrained by the bulk-matter equation of state from chiral effective field theory and the ground-state energies of doubly-magic nuclei. Nuclear pasta phases are studied using both the liquid drop model as well as the Thomas-Fermi approximation. We compare the energy per nucleon for each geometry (spherical nuclei, cylindrical nuclei, nuclear slabs, cylindrical holes, and spherical holes) to obtain the ground state phase as a function of density. We find that the size of the Wigner-Seitz cell depends strongly on the model parameters, especially the coefficients of the density gradient interaction terms. We employ also the thermodynamic instability method to check the validity of the numerical solutions based on energy comparisons.

  17. The Skyrme-TQRPA calculations of electron capture on hot nuclei in pre-supernova environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dzhioev, Alan A., E-mail: dzhioev@theor.jinr.ru; Vdovin, A. I., E-mail: vdovin@theor.jinr.ru [JINR, Bogoliubov Laboratory of Theoretical Physics (Russian Federation); Stoyanov, Ch., E-mail: stoyanov@inrne.bas.bg [Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy (Bulgaria)

    2016-11-15

    We combine the thermal QRPA approach with the Skyrme energy density functional theory (Skyrme–TQRPA) for modelling the process of electron capture on nuclei in supernova environment. For a sample nucleus, {sup 56}Fe, the Skyrme–TQRPA approach is applied to analyze thermal effects on the strength function of GT{sub +} transitions which dominate electron capture at E{sub e} ≤ 30 MeV. Several Skyrme interactions are used in order to verify the sensitivity of the obtained results to the Skyrme force parameters. Finite-temperature cross sections are calculated and the results are comparedwith those of the other model calculations.

  18. Symmetric nuclear matter with Skyrme interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manisa, K.; Bicer, A.; Atav, U.

    2010-01-01

    The equation of state (EOS) and some properties of symmetric nuclear matter, such as the saturation density, saturation energy and incompressibility, are obtained by using Skyrme's density-dependent effective nucleon-nucleon interaction.

  19. Temperature-dependent optical potential and mean free path based on Skyrme interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ge Lingxiao; Zhuo Yizhong; Noerenberg, W.; Technische Hochschule Darmstadt

    1986-03-01

    Optical potentials and mean free paths of nucleons at finite temperatures are studied by utilizing effective Skyrme interactions which yield 'good' optical potentials at zero temperature. The results for nuclear matter (symmetric and asymmetric) are applied within the local density approximation of finite nuclei at various temperatures. Because of the limitation due to zero-range forces used and the assumptions of temperature independent nuclear densities and effective Skyrme interactions made, the calculations are expected to be limited to nucleon energies between 10 and 50 MeV above the Fermi energy and to nuclear temperatures of less than 8 MeV. (orig.)

  20. Skyrme interaction and the properties of cold and hot neutron matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansour, H.M.M.; Hassan, M.Y.M.; Ramadan, S.

    1986-08-01

    The binding energy per particle, effective mass, magnetic susceptibility, etc for neutron matter are calculated using the Skyrme interaction SKII. Relativistic corrections to the non-relativistic Skyrme effective interaction to order 1/C 2 are also used to calculate the corrections for the binding energy of neutron matter. The correction is very small for small values of k h and increases as k n is increased. The thermal properties of neutron matter are calculated also using SKII force. The temperature dependences of the volume and spin pressure are determined. The results obtained show a similar trend as previous theoretical estimates by different methods of calculation. (author)

  1. Skyrme RPA description of γ-vibrational states in rare-earth nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nesterenko V.O.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The lowest γ-vibrational states with Kπ = 2+γ in well-deformed Dy, Er and Yb isotopes are investigated within the self-consistent separable quasiparticle random-phase-approximation (QRPA approach based on the Skyrme functional. The energies Eγ and reduced transition probabilities B(E2γ of the states are calculated with the Skyrme force SV-mas10. We demonstrate the strong effect of the pairing blocking on the energies of γ-vibrational states. It is also shown that collectivity of γ-vibrational states is strictly determined by keeping the Nilsson selection rules in the corresponding lowest 2qp configurations.

  2. Magnetic moments and the Skyrme interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipparini, E; Stringari, S; Traini, M [Trento Univ. (Italy). Dipartmento di Matematica e Fisica

    1977-12-12

    The magnetic properties of the Skyrme interaction have been studied by performing a restricted Hartree-Fock calculation in order to evaluate the magnetic polarizability and the corrections to the Schmidt moments in nuclei with closed jj shells plus or minus one nucleon. Different corrections to the Schmidt values have been evaluated and discussed: the M1 core polarization and the renormalization of the gyromagnetic factors due to exchange and spin-orbit forces. Several variants of the Skyrme interaction have been studied and discussed in detail.

  3. A supersymmetric Skyrme model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gudnason, Sven Bjarke; Nitta, Muneto; Sasaki, Shin

    2016-01-01

    Construction of a supersymmetric extension of the Skyrme term was a long-standing problem because of the auxiliary field problem; that is, the auxiliary field may propagate and cannot be eliminated, and the problem of having fourth-order time derivative terms. In this paper, we construct for the first time a supersymmetric extension of the Skyrme term in four spacetime dimensions, in the manifestly supersymmetric superfield formalism that does not suffer from the auxiliary field problem. Chiral symmetry breaking in supersymmetric theories results not only in Nambu-Goldstone (NG) bosons (pions) but also in the same number of quasi-NG bosons so that the low-energy theory is described by an SL(N,ℂ)-valued matrix field instead of SU(N) for NG bosons. The solution of auxiliary fields is trivial on the canonical branch of the auxiliary field equation, in which case our model results in a fourth-order derivative term that is not the Skyrme term. For the case of SL(2,ℂ), we find explicitly a nontrivial solution to the algebraic auxiliary field equations that we call a non-canonical branch, which when substituted back into the Lagrangian gives a Skyrme-like model. If we restrict to a submanifold, where quasi-NG bosons are turned off, which is tantamount to restricting the Skyrme field to SU(2), then the fourth-order derivative term reduces exactly to the standard Skyrme term. Our model is the first example of a nontrivial auxiliary field solution in a multi-component model.

  4. Second RPA with Skyrme Interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gambacurta, D; Catara, F; Grasso, M

    2011-01-01

    The Second Random Phase Approximation (RPA) is a natural extension of RPA obtained by introducing more general excitation operators where two particle-two hole configurations, in addition to the one particle-one hole ones, are considered. Some Second RPA results with Skyrme force in 16 O are presented. Different levels of approximation are compared and in particular the quality of the diagonal approximation is tested. The issue of the rearrangement terms to be used in the matrix elements beyond the standard RPA ones, when density-dependent force are used, is briefly discussed. Two approximated, and generally used, schemes are used: the rearrangement terms are neglected in the matrix elements beyond RPA or evaluated with the RPA prescription. As a general feature of Second RPA results, a several-MeV shift of the strength distribution to lower energies is systematically found with respect to RPA distributions.

  5. Generator coordinate calculations of 4He and 16O nuclei with Skyrme-like forces and square-well construction potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonov, A.N.; Petkov, I.Zh.; Christov, C.V.

    1984-11-01

    The generator coordinate method with a square-well construction potential and Skyrme-like interactions is applied to calculate characteristics of 4 He and 16 O nuclei. The corresponding nucleon momentum distributions have a high momentum component, which differs from the results obtained with a harmonic oscillator potential. (author)

  6. Λ hypernuclei in the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock treatment with G-matrix motivated interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanskoy, D.E.; Yamamoto, Y.

    1997-01-01

    Skyrme-like hyperon-nucleon potentials are derived from G-matrix calculations and shown to reproduce well the Λ single-particle spectra of hypernuclei measured in BNL and KEK. Fit of the spectra can restrict p-wave ΛN interaction, radii of Λ orbits in hypernuclear ground states, Λ well depth and effective mass in nuclear matter rather tightly. Implications of ΛN spin-orbit force to the spectra are considered. (author)

  7. Thermal modified Thomas-Fermi approximation with the Skyrme interaction for the 208Pb + 208Pb system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansour, H.M.M.; Ismail, M.; Osman, M.; Ramadan, Kh.A.

    1988-01-01

    A generalization of the modified Thomas-Fermi (MTF) approximation to finite temperatures is used to calculate the optical potential for the 208 Pb + 208 Pb system using the energy density formalism derived from different effective forces of Skyrme type. The nuclear optical potential becomes more attractive when the temperature is increased. Pockets are also predicted in the total potential (Nuclear + Coulomb) wich depths are dependent on both the type of effective force and the temperature. 23 refs., 7 figs. (author)

  8. Fusion reaction cross-sections using the Wong model within Skyrme energy density based semiclassical extended Thomas Fermi approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Raj, E-mail: rajkumarfzr@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Panjab University, Chandigarh-160014 (India); School of Physics and Material Science, Thapar University, Patiala-147004 (India); Sharma, Manoj K. [School of Physics and Material Science, Thapar University, Patiala-147004 (India); Gupta, Raj K. [Department of Physics, Panjab University, Chandigarh-160014 (India)

    2011-11-15

    First, the nuclear proximity potential, obtained by using the semiclassical extended Thomas Fermi (ETF) approach in Skyrme energy density formalism (SEDF), is shown to give more realistic barriers in frozen density approximation, as compared to the sudden approximation. Then, taking advantage of the fact that, in ETF method, different Skyrme forces give different barriers (height, position and curvature), we use the l-summed extended-Wong model of Gupta and collaborators (2009) under frozen densities approximation for calculating the cross-sections, where the Skyrme force is chosen with proper barrier characteristics, not-requiring additional 'barrier modification' effects (lowering or narrowing, etc.), for a best fit to data at sub-barrier energies. The method is applied to capture cross-section data from {sup 48}Ca + {sup 238}U, {sup 244}Pu, and {sup 248}Cm reactions and to fusion-evaporation cross-sections from {sup 58}Ni + {sup 58}Ni, {sup 64}Ni + {sup 64}Ni, and {sup 64}Ni + {sup 100}Mo reactions, with effects of deformations and orientations of nuclei included, wherever required. Interestingly, whereas the capture cross-sections in Ca-induced reactions could be fitted to any force, such as SIII, SV and GSkI, by allowing a small change of couple of units in deduced l{sub max}-values at below-barrier energies, the near-barrier data point of {sup 48}Ca + {sup 248}Cm reaction could not be fitted to l{sub max}-values deduced for below-barrier energies, calling for a check of data. On the other hand, the fusion-evaporation cross-sections in Ni-induced reactions at sub-barrier energies required different Skyrme forces, representing 'modifications of the barrier', for the best fit to data at all incident center-of-mass energies E{sub c.m.}'s, displaying a kind of fusion hindrance at sub-barrier energies. This barrier modification effect is taken into care here by using different Skyrme forces for reactions belonging to different regions of

  9. Recent Results From Skyrme-TDHF: Giant Resonances and Collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevenson, Paul D.

    2007-01-01

    Using fully three-dimensional Time-Dependent Hartree-Fock with Skyrme forces allows one to explore small and large amplitude collective motion in nuclei using only an effective interaction fitted to ground state and nuclear matter properties as input. In this talk, results are presented for TDHF calculations of giant resonances and nuclear collisions. We examine deformation splitting of the giant dipole resonance on ground and excited intrinsic superdeformed states, showing the interplay between Landau splitting and deformation splitting, including effects of triaxiality[1]. In the case of giant monopole resonances, isospin-mixing is examined, showing that the isovector and isoscalar parts of strength functions are strongly coupled [2]. The role of absorption in the TDHF approach to linear and nonlinear regimes is examined[3]. Calculations of nuclear collisions are also explored, showing that the effects of fully relaxed symmetry produce new modes of energy loss not found in previous calculations [4]. (Author)

  10. Gauged multisoliton baby Skyrme model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samoilenka, A.; Shnir, Ya.

    2016-03-01

    We present a study of U (1 ) gauged modification of the 2 +1 -dimensional planar Skyrme model with a particular choice of the symmetry breaking potential term which combines a short-range repulsion and a long-range attraction. In the absence of the gauge interaction, the multisolitons of the model are aloof, as they consist of the individual constituents which are well separated. A peculiar feature of the model is that there are usually several different stable static multisoliton solutions of rather similar energy in a topological sector of given degree. We investigate the pattern of the solutions and find new previously unknown local minima. It is shown that coupling of the aloof planar multi-Skyrmions to the magnetic field strongly affects the pattern of interaction between the constituents. We analyze the dependency of the structure of the solutions, their energies, and magnetic fluxes on the strength of the gauge coupling. It is found that, generically, in the strong coupling limit, the coupling to the gauge field results in effective recovery of the rotational invariance of the configuration.

  11. Self-consistent RPA calculations with Skyrme-type interactions: The skyrme_rpa program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colò, Gianluca; Cao, Ligang; Van Giai, Nguyen; Capelli, Luigi

    2013-01-01

    the Random Phase Approximation (RPA). This work provides a tool where one starts from an assumed form of nuclear effective interaction (the Skyrme forces) and builds the self-consistent Hartree-Fock mean field of a given nucleus, and then the RPA multipole excitations of that nucleus. Solution method: The Hartree-Fock (HF) equations are solved in a radial mesh, using a Numerov algorithm. The solutions are iterated until self-consistency is achieved (in practice, when the energy eigenvalues are stable within a desired accuracy). In the obtained mean field, unoccupied states necessary for the RPA calculations are found. For all single-particle states, box boundary conditions are assumed. To solve the RPA problem for a given value of total angular momentum and parity Jπ a coupled basis is constructed and the RPA matrix is diagonalized (protons and neutrons are treated explicitly, and no approximation related to the use of isospin formalism is introduced). The transition amplitudes and transition strengths associated to given external operators are calculated. The HF densities and RPA transition densities are also evaluated. Restrictions: The main restrictions are related to the assumed spherical symmetry and absence of pairing correlations. Running time: The typical running time depends strongly on the nucleus, on the multipolarity, on the choice of the model space and of course on the computer. It can vary from a few minutes to several hours.

  12. Baby Skyrme model and fermionic zero modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queiruga, J. M.

    2016-09-01

    In this work we investigate some features of the fermionic sector of the supersymmetric version of the baby Skyrme model. We find that, in the background of Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield compact baby Skyrmions, fermionic zero modes are confined to the defect core. Further, we show that, while three Supersymmetry (SUSY) generators are broken in the defect core, SUSY is completely restored outside. We study also the effect of a D-term deformation of the model. Such a deformation allows for the existence of fermionic zero modes and broken SUSY outside the compact defect.

  13. Selected papers, with commentary, of Tony Hilton Royle Skyrme

    CERN Document Server

    Skyrme, T H R

    1994-01-01

    The most important papers of Tony Hilton Royle Skyrme are collected in this volume which also includes commentaries by G Brown and other articles relating to the life and work of Tony Skryme, R Dalitz, E Witten and others. Skyrme's work was brilliant, profound and surprisingly useful. He provided an original solution to the problem of constructing fermions from bosons, formulating the topological soliton model of the nucleon. His two-parameter model of effective interactions in nuclei has yielded a remarkably accurate description of nuclear structure. His a-particle model of nuclei gave deep i

  14. Proton radioactivity lifetimes using Skyrme interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Routray, T.R.; Tripathy, S.K.; Mishra, Abhishek; Basu, D.N.

    2011-01-01

    The phenomena of proton radioactivity is recent and has been possible with the advent of the radioactive ion beams facilities. The neutron deficient nuclei lying above the proton drip line has positive Q values for protons and are spontaneous proton emitters. This limits the possibilities of the creation of ever more exotic nuclei in the proton rich side of the β stability valley. Limited number of works have been done in calculating the half lives of proton emitting nuclei using different models. But calculation of lifetimes of the proton emitting nuclei using Skyrme interaction has not yet been reported. More than 110 Skyrme sets are available, constructed for different purposes, all having the common feature of giving finite nuclei ground state properties and saturation conditions in nuclear matter. Skyrme sets constructed in the late 90's, particularly the construction of SLy sets and others Skyrme sets developed thereafter, have additional care in constraining the parameters for applications to nuclear matter under extreme conditions. Stone et al. have analyzed the Skyrme sets on the basis of available constraints and have sorted out finally 27 Skyrmes sets which can be admitted for calculation of isospin rich dense nuclear matter. The objective of the work is to examine the predictions of the Skyrme sets on the half lives of the proton emitters

  15. Investigation of restricted baby Skyrme models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, C.; Romanczukiewicz, T.; Wereszczynski, A.; Sanchez-Guillen, J.

    2010-01-01

    A restriction of the baby Skyrme model consisting of the quartic and potential terms only is investigated in detail for a wide range of potentials. Further, its properties are compared with those of the corresponding full baby Skyrme models. We find that topological (charge) as well as geometrical (nucleus/shell shape) features of baby Skyrmions are captured already by the soliton solutions of the restricted model. Further, we find a coincidence between the compact or noncompact nature of solitons in the restricted model, on the one hand, and the existence or nonexistence of multi-Skyrmions in the full baby Skyrme model, on the other hand.

  16. Baby Skyrme models without a potential term

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashcroft, Jennifer; Haberichter, Mareike; Krusch, Steffen

    2015-05-01

    We develop a one-parameter family of static baby Skyrme models that do not require a potential term to admit topological solitons. This is a novel property as the standard baby Skyrme model must contain a potential term in order to have stable soliton solutions, though the Skyrme model does not require this. Our new models satisfy an energy bound that is linear in terms of the topological charge and can be saturated in an extreme limit. They also satisfy a virial theorem that is shared by the Skyrme model. We calculate the solitons of our new models numerically and observe that their form depends significantly on the choice of parameter. In one extreme, we find compactons while at the other there is a scale invariant model in which solitons can be obtained exactly as solutions to a Bogomolny equation. We provide an initial investigation into these solitons and compare them with the baby Skyrmions of other models.

  17. Influence of Skyrme-type interaction on HICs observables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Yingxun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A new version of the improved quantum molecular dynamics model has been developed by including Skyrme type momentum dependent interaction. 12 Skyrme like parameter sets {K0, S0, L, m*s, m*v} are adopted in the transport model code to calculate the isospin diffusion, single and double ratios of transverse emitted nucleons, neutron proton isoscaling ratios. The calculations and correlation analysis evidence that isospin diffusion observable at lower beam energy is sensitive to the slope of symmetry energy and m*s. The high energy neutrons and protons yield ratios from reactions at different incident energies provide a sensitive observable to study the nucleon effective mass splitting, at higher beam energy.

  18. N=1 supersymmetric extension of the baby Skyrme model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, C.; Queiruga, J. M.; Sanchez-Guillen, J.; Wereszczynski, A.

    2011-01-01

    We construct a method to supersymmetrize higher kinetic terms and apply it to the baby Skyrme model. We find that there exist N=1 supersymmetric extensions for baby Skyrme models with arbitrary potential.

  19. Exotic B=2 states in the SU(2) Skyrme model and other recent results in the B=1 sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwesinger, B.

    1986-01-01

    Effective theories with surprising phenomenological success immediatly prompt the suspicion that they are intimately connected to a more fundamental theory. In the case of the Skyrme model things have gone the other way round: first there was the finding that the large N c -limit of QCD results in an effective theory of free mesons where baryons emerge as solitons from meson fields. Subsequently the long forgotten Skyrme model was unearthed by Witten as a possible candidate for such a theory. Examined in the light of its phenomenological capabilities the Skyrme model lead to the surprising success it enjoys till now. (orig./BBOE)

  20. Static properties of nucleons in a modified Skyrme model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Ai Viet; Pham Thuc Tuyen

    1989-02-01

    A modified Skyrme type model is proposed by neglecting non-linearly non-invariant terms from the Skyrme's Lagrangian. It turns out that beside some additional advantages a hedgehog configuration of this model can quantitatively describe nucleons the same way as the skyrmion does in the usual Skyrme model. (author) 8 refs.; 2 figs

  1. Topological solitons in the supersymmetric Skyrme model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gudnason, Sven Bjarke [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences,Lanzhou 730000 (China); Nitta, Muneto [Department of Physics, and Research and Education Center for Natural Sciences,Keio University, Hiyoshi 4-1-1, Yokohama, Kanagawa 223-8521 (Japan); Sasaki, Shin [Department of Physics, Kitasato University,Sagamihara 252-0373 (Japan)

    2017-01-04

    A supersymmetric extension of the Skyrme model was obtained recently, which consists of only the Skyrme term in the Nambu-Goldstone (pion) sector complemented by the same number of quasi-Nambu-Goldstone bosons. Scherk-Schwarz dimensional reduction yields a kinetic term in three or lower dimensions and a potential term in two dimensions, preserving supersymmetry. Euclidean solitons (instantons) are constructed in the supersymmetric Skyrme model. In four dimensions, the soliton is an instanton first found by Speight. Scherk-Schwarz dimensional reduction is then performed once to get a 3-dimensional theory in which a 3d Skyrmion-instanton is found and then once more to get a 2d theory in which a 2d vortex-instanton is obtained. Although the last one is a global vortex it has finite action in contrast to conventional theory. All of them are non-BPS states breaking all supersymmetries.

  2. Δ-decay in the Skyrme model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verschelde, H.

    1988-01-01

    The Δ-decay matrix element is calculated while carefully paying attention to ordering problems. The decay width obtained is too large by a factor of four. Arguments are given that this discrepancy is not a defect of the Skyrme model but a consequence of the rigid rotor quantization. (orig.)

  3. Study of superdeformation at zero spin with Skyrme-Hartree-Fock method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahara, S; Tajima, N; Onishi, N [Tokyo Univ. (Japan)

    1998-03-01

    Superdeformed (SD) bands have been studied extensively both experimentally and theoretically in the last decade. Since the first observation in {sup 152}Dy in 1986, SD bands have been found in four mass regions, i.e., A {approx} 80, 130, 150 and 190. While these SD bands have been observed only at high spins so far, they may also be present at zero spin like fission isomers in actinide nuclei: The familiar generic argument on the strong shell effect at axis ratio 2:1 does not assume rotations. If non-fissile SD isomers exist at zero spin, they may be utilized to develop new experimental methods to study exotic states, in a similar manner as short-lived high-spin isomers are planned to be utilized as projectiles of fusion reactions in order to populate very high-spin near-yrast states. They will also be useful to test theoretical models whether the models can describe correctly the large deformations of rare-earth nuclei without further complications due to rotations. In this report, we employ the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock method to study the SD states at zero spin. First, we compare various Skyrme force parameter sets to test whether they can reproduce the extrapolated excitation energy of the SD band head of {sup 194}Hg. Second, we systematically search large-deformation solutions with the SkM{sup *} force. The feature of our calculations is that the single-particle wavefunctions are expressed in a three-dimensional-Cartesian-mesh representation. This representation enables one to obtain solutions of various shapes (including SD) without preparing a basis specific to each shape. Solving the mean-field equations in this representation requires, however, a large amount of computation which can be accomplished only with present supercomputers. (author)

  4. Few-baryon systems in the SU(2)-Skyrme model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolaev, V.A.; Tkachev, O.G.

    1989-01-01

    The classically stable solitons with baryon number 1, 2, 3, 4 have been investigated in the framework of the very general assumption about the form of the solutions for the Skyrme model equations. Some of the solitons have the toroidal structure and some of them are more complicated. The effective quantum-mechanical Hamiltonian and its spectrum are obtained by using the collective variable method. All the states with quantum numbers of light nuclei have the binding energy greater than the experimental one. Some of the calculated states containing antibaryons as substructure units should appear in the experiments with stopped antibaryons as compound nuclear states. 16 refs.; 7 figs.; 5 tabs

  5. Rotational Symmetry Breaking in Baby Skyrme Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karliner, Marek; Hen, Itay

    We discuss one of the most interesting phenomena exhibited by baby skyrmions - breaking of rotational symmetry. The topics we will deal with here include the appearance of rotational symmetry breaking in the static solutions of baby Skyrme models, both in flat as well as in curved spaces, the zero-temperature crystalline structure of baby skyrmions, and finally, the appearance of spontaneous breaking of rotational symmetry in rotating baby skyrmions.

  6. BPS submodels of the Skyrme model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adam, C., E-mail: adam@fpaxp1.usc.es [Departamento de Física de Partículas, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela and Instituto Galego de Física de Altas Enerxias (IGFAE), E-15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Sanchez-Guillen, J. [Departamento de Física de Partículas, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela and Instituto Galego de Física de Altas Enerxias (IGFAE), E-15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Wereszczynski, A. [Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, Lojasiewicza 11, Kraków (Poland)

    2017-06-10

    We show that the standard Skyrme model without pion mass term can be expressed as a sum of two BPS submodels, i.e., of two models whose static field equations, independently, can be reduced to first order equations. Further, these first order (BPS) equations have nontrivial solutions, at least locally. These two submodels, however, cannot have common solutions. Our findings also shed some light on the rational map approximation. Finally, we consider certain generalisations of the BPS submodels.

  7. BPS submodels of the Skyrme model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Adam

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available We show that the standard Skyrme model without pion mass term can be expressed as a sum of two BPS submodels, i.e., of two models whose static field equations, independently, can be reduced to first order equations. Further, these first order (BPS equations have nontrivial solutions, at least locally. These two submodels, however, cannot have common solutions. Our findings also shed some light on the rational map approximation. Finally, we consider certain generalisations of the BPS submodels.

  8. Two-current nucleon observables in Skyrme model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemtob, M.

    1987-01-01

    Three independent two-current nucleon observables are studied within the two-flavor Skyrme model for the πρω system. The effecive lagrangian is that of the gauged chiral symmetry approach, consistent with the vector meson dominance, in the linear realization (for the vector mesons) of the global chiral symmetry. The first application deals with the nucleon electric polarizability and magnetic susceptibility. Both seagull and dispersive contributions appear and we evaluate the latter in terms of the sums over intermediate states. The results are compared with existing quark model results as well as with empirical determinations. The second application concerns the zero-point quantum correction to the skyrmion mass. We apply a chiral perturbation theory approach to evaluate the ion loop contribution to the nucleon mass. The comparison with the conventional Skyrme model result reveals an important sensitivity to the stabilization mechanism. The third application is to lepton-nucleon deep inelastic scattering in the Bjorken scaling limit. The structure tensor is calculated in terms of the representation as a commutator product of two currents. Numerical results are presented for the scaling function F 2 (x). An essential use is made of the large N c (number of colors) approximation in all these applications. In the numerical computations we ignore the distortion effects, relative to the free plane wave limit, on the pionic fluctuations. (orig.)

  9. Ground-state properties of axially deformed Sr isotopes in Skyrme-Hartree-Fock-Bogolyubov method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yilmaz, A.H.; Bayram, T.; Demirci, M.; Engin, B.; Bayram, T.

    2010-01-01

    Binding energies, the mean-square nuclear radii, neutron radii, quadrupole moments and deformation parameters to axially deformed Strontium isotopes were evaluated using Hartree-Fock-Bogolyubov method. Shape coexistence was also discussed. The results were compared with experimental data and some estimates obtained within some nuclear models. The calculations were performed for SIy4 set of Skyrme forces and for wide range of the neutron numbers of Sr isotopes

  10. Probing the role of Skyrme interactions on the fission dynamics of the {sup 6}Li + {sup 238}U reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Ishita; Kumar, Raj; Sharma, Manoj K. [Thapar University, School of Physics and Materials Science, Patiala (India)

    2017-06-15

    The performance of selected five Skyrme forces (out of a set of 240), tested by Dutra et al., is analyzed in view of fusion-fission dynamics. These forces are assumed to perform better for neutron-rich systems, so the choice of the reaction is accordingly made by opting for a neutron-rich target in {sup 6}Li + {sup 238}U reaction. This reaction is diagnosed further in reference to fusion hindrance within the dynamical approach of the cluster-decay model (DCM). In order to reduce the computational time, three Skyrme forces are figured out with the criteria that these forces cover the barrier characteristics of the remaining two forces as well. The fission cross-sections are successfully addressed at low energies for the {sup 6}Li + {sup 238}U reaction. However, at relatively higher energies, the excitation functions show theoretical suppression with respect to experimental data, which may be associated with the possible existence of incomplete fusion (ICF). For ICF, we have considered that the {sup 6}Li broke into {sup 4}He + {sup 2}H, as mentioned in the experimental work. The calculations of ICF are carried out for the {sup 4}He + {sup 238}U reaction with the selected Skyrme forces at E{sub c.m.} = 26.20 and 27.51 MeV. These forces address the data nicely for the compound nucleus (CN) as well as ICF processes. Here, the NRAPR force seems to require lesser barrier modification as compared to the other forces, therefore it can be used as an alternate choice for calculating the interaction potential. Additionally, the prediction of cross-sections at lower energies has been done with DCM using the NRAPR force. The l-dependent % barrier modification of the Skyrme forces undertaken is also worked out in reference to fusion hindrance at below barrier energies. (orig.)

  11. Novel baryon resonances in the Skyrme model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, F.; Sri Ram, M.S.

    1985-01-01

    We predict a novel family of baryons with or without the charm quantum number by quantizing the ''maximal solitons'' in the SU(4) Skyrme model. The baryon number B of these solitons can take any integer value. The low-lying states with B = 1 belong to 4( with spin (3/2), 20( with spin (1/2), (3/2), (5/2), or (7/2), and 20('' with spin (3/2), (5/2), or (9/2). The charm-zero states among them could correspond to some of the observed resonances in meson-baryon scattering between 1.5--2 GeV. The lowest among the dibaryon states is an SU(3) singlet contained in the 10( of SU(4) with spin 1, with mass in the range 2.5--3 GeV

  12. Higher-order Skyrme hair of black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudnason, Sven Bjarke; Nitta, Muneto

    2018-05-01

    Higher-order derivative terms are considered as replacement for the Skyrme term in an Einstein-Skyrme-like model in order to pinpoint which properties are necessary for a black hole to possess stable static scalar hair. We find two new models able to support stable black hole hair in the limit of the Skyrme term being turned off. They contain 8 and 12 derivatives, respectively, and are roughly the Skyrme-term squared and the so-called BPS-Skyrme-term squared. In the twelfth-order model we find that the lower branches, which are normally unstable, become stable in the limit where the Skyrme term is turned off. We check this claim with a linear stability analysis. Finally, we find for a certain range of the gravitational coupling and horizon radius, that the twelfth-order model contains 4 solutions as opposed to 2. More surprisingly, the lowest part of the would-be unstable branch turns out to be the stable one of the 4 solutions.

  13. Applications of Skyrme energy-density functional to fusion reactions spanning the fusion barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Min; Wang, Ning; Li Zhuxia; Wu Xizhen; Zhao Enguang

    2006-01-01

    The Skyrme energy density functional has been applied to the study of heavy-ion fusion reactions. The barriers for fusion reactions are calculated by the Skyrme energy density functional with proton and neutron density distributions determined by using restricted density variational (RDV) method within the same energy density functional together with semi-classical approach known as the extended semi-classical Thomas-Fermi method. Based on the fusion barrier obtained, we propose a parametrization of the empirical barrier distribution to take into account the multi-dimensional character of real barrier and then apply it to calculate the fusion excitation functions in terms of barrier penetration concept. A large number of measured fusion excitation functions spanning the fusion barriers can be reproduced well. The competition between suppression and enhancement effects on sub-barrier fusion caused by neutron-shell-closure and excess neutron effects is studied

  14. Multi-skyrmion solutions of a sixth order Skyrme model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Floratos, I.

    2001-08-01

    In this thesis, we study some of the classical properties of an extension of the Skyrme model defined by adding a sixth order derivative term to the Lagrangian. In chapter 1, we review the physical as well as the mathematical motivation behind the study of the Skyrme model and in chapter 2, we give a brief summary of various extended Skyrme models that have been proposed over the last few years. We then define a new sixth order Skyrme model by introducing a dimensionless parameter λ that denotes the mixing between the two higher order terms, the Skyrme term and the sixth order term. In chapter 3 we compute numerically the multi-skyrmion solutions of this extended model and show that they have the same symmetries with the usual skyrmion solutions. In addition, we analyse the dependence of the energy and radius of these classical solutions with respect to the coupling constant λ. We compare our results with experimental data and determine whether this modified model can provide us with better theoretical predictions than the original one. In chapter 4, we use the rational map ansatz, introduced by Houghton, Manton and Sutcliffe, to approximate minimum energy multi-skyrmion solutions with B ≤ 9 of the SU(2) model and with B ≤ 6 of the SU(3) model. We compare our results with the ones obtained numerically and show that the rational map ansatz works just as well for the generalised model as for the pure Skyrme model, at least for B ≤ 5. In chapter 5, we use a generalisation of the rational map ansatz, introduced by loannidou, Piette and Zakrzewski, to construct analytically some topologically non-trivial solutions of the extended model in SU(3). These solutions are spherically symmetric and some of them can be interpreted as bound states of skyrmions. Finally, we use the same ansatz to construct low energy configurations of the SU(N) sixth order Skyrme model. (author)

  15. Selected papers, with commentary, of Tony Hilton Royle Skyrme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This book contains 13 selected papers of T.H.R. Skyrme covering work on the alpha-particle and shell models of the nucleus and, primarily, on the Skyrme model of the nucleus. The present collection of articles also includes a re-publication of articles, by others and of a later date, as evidence of the significant impact, eventually, of the concept of Skyrmions on nuclear theory. However, these articles had previously already been submitted to the INIS Data Base. Refs, figs, tabs

  16. A gauged baby Skyrme model and a novel BPS bound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, C; Naya, C; Sanchez-Guillen, J; Wereszczynski, A

    2013-01-01

    The baby Skyrme model is a well-known nonlinear field theory supporting topological solitons in two space dimensions. Its action functional consist of a potential term, a kinetic term quadratic in derivatives (the 'nonlinear sigma model term') and the Skyrme term quartic in first derivatives. The limiting case of vanishing sigma model term (the so-called BPS baby Skyrme model) is known to support exact soliton solutions saturating a BPS bound which exists for this model. Further, the BPS model has infinitely many symmetries and conservation laws. Recently it was found that the gauged version of the BPS baby Skyrme model with gauge group U(1) and the usual Maxwell term, too, has a BPS bound and BPS solutions saturating this bound. This BPS bound is determined by a superpotential which has to obey a superpotential equation, in close analogy to the situation in supergravity. Further, the BPS bound and the corresponding BPS solitons only may exist for potentials such that the superpotential equation has a global solution. We also briefly describe some properties of soliton solutions.

  17. ΔS=1 weak transitions in the Skyrme model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Praszalowicz; Trampetic, J.

    1985-01-01

    We calculate the octet matrix elements of the operator (anti du)sub(L)(anti us)sub(L) in the Skyrme model and compare them with the quark model predictions. We find that the agreement between the two models is quite satisfactory. (orig.)

  18. The tensor part of the Skyrme energy density functional. I. Spherical nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesinski, T.; Meyer, J. [Universite de Lyon, F-69003 Lyon (France)]|[Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon, CNRS/IN2P3, Universite Lyon 1, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); Bender, M. [DSM/DAPNIA/SPhN, CEA Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)]|[Universite Bordeaux, CNRS/IN2P3, Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Bordeaux Gradignan, UMR5797, Chemin du Solarium, BP120, F-33175 Gradignan (France); Bennaceur, K. [Universite de Lyon, F-69003 Lyon (France)]|[Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon, CNRS/IN2P3, Universite Lyon 1, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France)]|[DSM/DAPNIA/SPhN, CEA Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Duguet, T. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States)

    2007-04-15

    We perform a systematic study of the impact of the J-vector{sup 2} tensor term in the Skyrme energy functional on properties of spherical nuclei. In the Skyrme energy functional, the tensor terms originate both from zero-range central and tensor forces. We build a set of 36 parameterizations which cover a wide range of the parameter space of the isoscalar and isovector tensor term coupling constants with a fit protocol very similar to that of the successful SLy parameterizations. We analyze the impact of the tensor terms on a large variety of observables in spherical mean-field calculations, such as the spin-orbit splittings and single-particle spectra of doubly-magic nuclei, the evolution of spin-orbit splittings along chains of semi-magic nuclei, mass residuals of spherical nuclei, and known anomalies of radii. The major findings of our study are (i) tensor terms should not be added perturbatively to existing parameterizations, a complete refit of the entire parameter set is imperative. (ii) The free variation of the tensor terms does not lower the {chi}{sup 2} within a standard Skyrme energy functional. (iii) For certain regions of the parameter space of their coupling constants, the tensor terms lead to instabilities of the spherical shell structure, or even the coexistence of two configurations with different spherical shell structure. (iv) The standard spin-orbit interaction does not scale properly with the principal quantum number, such that single-particle states with one or several nodes have too large spin-orbit splittings, while those of node-less intruder levels are tentatively too small. Tensor terms with realistic coupling constants cannot cure this problem. (v) Positive values of the coupling constants of proton-neutron and like-particle tensor terms allow for a qualitative description of the evolution of spin-orbit splittings in chains of Ca, Ni and Sn isotopes. (vi) For the same values of the tensor term coupling constants, however, the overall

  19. Skyrme's interaction beyond the mean-field. The DGCM+GOA Hamiltonian of nuclear quadrupole motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kluepfel, Peter

    2008-01-01

    This work focuses on the microscopic description of nuclear collective quadrupole motion within the framework of the dynamic Generator-Coordinate-Method(DGCM)+Gaussian-Overlap-Approximation(GOA). Skyrme-type effective interactions are used as the fundamental many-particle interaction. Starting from a rotational invariant, polynomial and topologic consistent formulation of the GCM+GOA Hamiltonian an interpolation scheme for the collective masses and potential is developed. It allows to define the collective Hamiltonian of fully triaxial collective quadrupole dynamics from a purely axial symmetric configuration space. The substantial gain in performance allows the self-consistent evaluation of the dynamic quadrupole mass within the ATDHF-cranking model. This work presents the first large-scale analysis of quadrupole correlation energies and lowlying collective states within the DGCM+GOA model. Different Skyrme- and pairing interactions are compared from old standards up to more recent parameterizations. After checking the validity of several approximations to the DGCM+GOA model - both on the mean-field and the collective level - we proceed with a detailed investigation of correlation effects along the chains of semi-magic isotopes and isotones. This finally allows to define a set of observables which are hardly affected by collective correlations. Those observables were used for a refit of a Skyrme-type effective interaction which is expected to cure most of the problems of the recent parameterizations. Preparing further work, estimates for the correlated ground state energy are proposed which can be evaluated directly from the mean-field model. (orig.)

  20. Skyrme's interaction beyond the mean-field. The DGCM+GOA Hamiltonian of nuclear quadrupole motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kluepfel, Peter

    2008-07-29

    This work focuses on the microscopic description of nuclear collective quadrupole motion within the framework of the dynamic Generator-Coordinate-Method(DGCM)+Gaussian-Overlap-Approximation(GOA). Skyrme-type effective interactions are used as the fundamental many-particle interaction. Starting from a rotational invariant, polynomial and topologic consistent formulation of the GCM+GOA Hamiltonian an interpolation scheme for the collective masses and potential is developed. It allows to define the collective Hamiltonian of fully triaxial collective quadrupole dynamics from a purely axial symmetric configuration space. The substantial gain in performance allows the self-consistent evaluation of the dynamic quadrupole mass within the ATDHF-cranking model. This work presents the first large-scale analysis of quadrupole correlation energies and lowlying collective states within the DGCM+GOA model. Different Skyrme- and pairing interactions are compared from old standards up to more recent parameterizations. After checking the validity of several approximations to the DGCM+GOA model - both on the mean-field and the collective level - we proceed with a detailed investigation of correlation effects along the chains of semi-magic isotopes and isotones. This finally allows to define a set of observables which are hardly affected by collective correlations. Those observables were used for a refit of a Skyrme-type effective interaction which is expected to cure most of the problems of the recent parameterizations. Preparing further work, estimates for the correlated ground state energy are proposed which can be evaluated directly from the mean-field model. (orig.)

  1. BUILDING AN EFFECTIVE SALES FORCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioana Olariu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Building an effective sales force starts with selecting good salespeople, but good salespeople are very difficult to find. The reason for this is that most sales jobs are very demanding and require a great deal from the salesperson. There are many different types of sales jobs. Before it can hire salespeople, each company must do a careful job analysis to see what particular types of selling and other skills are necessary for each sales job. One task of the market planner is to establish clear objectives each year for the entire sales force, for each region, each sales office, and each salesperson. Sales jobs are different from in-house jobs in some significant ways. Nevertheless, each company must continually work on building and maintaining an effective sales force using the following steps: recruitment, selection, training, compensation and evaluation of each salesperson.

  2. Finite rank separable approximation for Skyrme interactions: spin-isospin excitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Severyukhin, A.P.; Voronov, V.V.; Borzov, I.N.; Nguyen Van Giai

    2012-01-01

    A finite rank separable approximation for the quasiparticle random phase approximation with the Skyrme interactions is applied for the case of charge-exchange nuclear modes. The coupling between one- and two-phonon terms in the wave functions is taken into account. It has been shown that the approximation reproduces reasonably well the full charge-exchange RPA results for the spin-dipole resonances in 132 Sn. As an illustration of the method, the phonon-phonon coupling effect on the β-decay half-life of 78 Ni is considered

  3. Security force effectiveness and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seaton, M.B.

    1988-01-01

    No one would propose ineffective security forces. Applied technology always has, as its purpose, to increase effectiveness. Evidence exists, however, that poorly conceived or executed technological solutions can actually do more harm than good. The author argues for improved human factor considerations in physical security applied technology -- especially in the area of security console operations

  4. Coriolis force and Sagnac effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gogberashvili, Merab

    2002-02-01

    The optical Sagnac effect is considered, when the fictitious gravitational field simulates the reflections from the mirrors. It is shown that no contradiction exists between the conclusions of the laboratory and rotated observers. Because of the acting of gravity-like Coriolis force the trajectories of co- and anti-rotating photons have different radii in the rotating reference frame, while in the case of the equal radius the effective gravitational potentials for the photons have to be different. (author)

  5. Genesis and evolution of the Skyrme model from 1954 to the present

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanyuk, V.I.

    1994-01-01

    Not widely known facts on the genesis of the Skyrme model are presented in a historical survey, based on Skyrme's earliest papers and on his own published remembrance. We consider the evolution of Skyrme's model description of nuclear matter from the ''Mesonic Fluid'' model up to its final version, known as the baryon model. We pay special tribute to some well-known ideas in contemporary particle physics which one can find in Skyrme's earlier papers, such as: Nuclear Democracy, the Solitonic Mechanism, the Nonlinear Realization of Chiral Symmetry, Topological Charges, Fermi-Bose Transmutation, etc. It is curious to note in the final version of the Skyrme model gleams of Kelvin's ''Vortex Atoms'' theory. In conclusion we make a brief analysis of the validity of Skyrme's conjectures in view of recent results and pinpoint some questions which still remain. (author). 93 refs, 4 figs

  6. Generalized Skyrme model with the loosely bound potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudnason, Sven Bjarke; Zhang, Baiyang; Ma, Nana

    2016-12-01

    We study a generalization of the loosely bound Skyrme model which consists of the Skyrme model with a sixth-order derivative term—motivated by its fluidlike properties—and the second-order loosely bound potential—motivated by lowering the classical binding energies of higher-charged Skyrmions. We use the rational map approximation for the Skyrmion of topological charge B =4 , calculate the binding energy of the latter, and estimate the systematic error in using this approximation. In the parameter space that we can explore within the rational map approximation, we find classical binding energies as low as 1.8%, and once taking into account the contribution from spin-isospin quantization, we obtain binding energies as low as 5.3%. We also calculate the contribution from the sixth-order derivative term to the electric charge density and axial coupling.

  7. Inflating baby-Skyrme branes in six dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brihaye, Yves; Delsate, Terence; Kodama, Yuta; Sawado, Nobuyuki

    2010-01-01

    We consider a six-dimensional brane world model, where the brane is described by a localized solution to the baby-Skyrme model extending in the extra dimensions. The branes have a cosmological constant modeled by inflating four-dimensional slices, and we further consider a bulk cosmological constant. We construct solutions numerically and present evidence that the solutions cease to exist for large values of the brane cosmological constant in some particular case. Then we study the stability of the model by considering perturbation of the gravitational part (resp. baby Skyrmion) with fixed matter fields (resp. gravitational background). Our results indicate that the perturbation equations do not admit localized solutions for certain type of perturbation. The stability analysis can be alternatively seen as leading to a particle spectrum; we give mass estimations for the baby-Skyrme perturbation and for the graviton.

  8. Baby Skyrme models for a class of potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eslami, P.; Zakrzewski, W.; Sarbishaei, M.

    2000-01-01

    We consider a class of (2+1)- dimensional baby Skyrme models with potentials that have more than one vacuum. These potentials are generalizations of old and new baby Skyrme models; they involve more complicated dependence on φ 3 . We find that when the potential is invariant under φ 3 → -φ 3 the configurations corresponding to the baby Skyrmions lying 'on top of each other' are the minima of the energy. However, when the potential breaks this symmetry the lowest field configurations correspond to separated baby skyrmions. We compute the energy distributions for skyrmions of degrees between one and eight and discuss their geometrical shapes and binding energies. We also compare the 2-skyrmion states for these potentials. Most of our work has been performed numerically with the model being formulated in terms of three real scalar fields (satisfying one constraint)

  9. Static properties of baryons in the SU(3) Skyrme model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sriram, M.S.; Mani, H.S.; Ramachandran, R.

    1984-01-01

    We study the SU(3) x SU(3) Skyrme model with explicit chiral- and flavor-symmetry-breaking terms. We evaluate the SU(3)-symmetric meson-baryon coupling-constant ratio α, SU(3) mass breaking in the octet and decuplet, and the ΔI = 1 part of the electromagnetic mass splitting in baryons. The theoretical numbers are in reasonable agreement with the experimental values

  10. Effective interactions and mean field theory: from nuclear matter to nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cochet, B.

    2005-07-01

    The Skyrme force is a zero-range force that allows the construction of the mean field inside the nucleus in a simple way. Skyrme forces are reasonably predictive but some features of the infinite nuclear matter or the mass of heavy nuclei are not well computed. The aim of this work is to propose an expanded parametrization of the Skyrme force in order to improve its predictive power. The first part is dedicated to the construction of the expansion of the parametrization. We recall how the effective forces are linked to the nucleon-nucleon interaction then we show the limits of the standard Skyrme forces and we propose a relatively natural improvements based on the integration of spin and isospin instabilities. The second part deals with the validation of the model, first by describing infinite nuclear matter then by studying β-balanced nuclear matter which has enabled us to reproduce some features of neutron stars like mass and radius. The computation of properties of nuclei like binding energy, mass, radii depends strongly on the adjustment procedure. (A.C.)

  11. Goldberger-treiman relation and nucleon's mean square radius of strong interaction in the Skyrme model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Bingan

    1988-01-01

    In this letter it is shown that even in m π ≠ 0 case the Goldberger-Treiman relation is still hold in the Skyrme model. The mean square radius of strong interaction of nucleon 2 > s 1/2 is computed in the Skyrme model

  12. Bogomolny equations in certain generalized baby BPS Skyrme models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stępień, Ł. T.

    2018-01-01

    By using the concept of strong necessary conditions (CSNCs), we derive Bogomolny equations and Bogomol’nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield (BPS) bounds for two certain modifications of the baby BPS Skyrme model: the nonminimal coupling to the gauge field and the k-deformed ungauged model. In particular, we study how the Bogomolny equations and the equation for the potential reflect these two modifications. In both examples, the CSNC method appears to be a very useful tool. We also find certain localized solutions of these Bogomolny equations.

  13. Further investigations of the NN interaction in the Skyrme model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaelbermann, G.; Eisenberg, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    We examine the influence of the coupling to NΔ and ΔΔ degrees of freedom for the NN interaction as derived in the Skyrme model, carrying out an extensive search for parameters in the basic Lagrangian that will yield both reasonable single-baryon results and appreciable attraction. Separately the free one-body skyrmeon solution and an improved two-body solution are inserted in the product ansatz for the two-body system both with and without time-dependent dynamical terms. No appreciable central attraction between nucleons is found with either of these approaches. (author)

  14. The contribution of Skyrme Hartree-Fock calculations to the understanding of the shell model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamick, L.

    1984-01-01

    The authors present a detailed comparison of Skyrme Hartree-Fock and the shell model. The H-F calculations are sensitive to the parameters that are chosen. The H-F results justify the use of effective charges in restricted model space calculations by showing that the core contribution can be large. Further, the H-F results roughly justify the use of a constant E2 effective charge, but seem to yield nucleus dependent E4 effective charges. The H-F can yield results for E6 and higher multipoles, which would be zero in s-d model space calculations. On the other side of the coin in H-F the authors can easily consider only the lowest rotational band, whereas in the shell model one can calculate the energies and properties of many more states. In the comparison some apparent problems remain, in particular E4 transitions in the upper half of the s-d shell

  15. Skyrme interaction to second order in nuclear matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, N.

    2015-09-01

    Based on the phenomenological Skyrme interaction various density-dependent nuclear matter quantities are calculated up to second order in many-body perturbation theory. The spin-orbit term as well as two tensor terms contribute at second order to the energy per particle. The simultaneous calculation of the isotropic Fermi-liquid parameters provides a rigorous check through the validity of the Landau relations. It is found that published results for these second order contributions are incorrect in most cases. In particular, interference terms between s-wave and p-wave components of the interaction can contribute only to (isospin or spin) asymmetry energies. Even with nine adjustable parameters, one does not obtain a good description of the empirical nuclear matter saturation curve in the low density region 0\\lt ρ \\lt 2{ρ }0. The reason for this feature is the too strong density-dependence {ρ }8/3 of several second-order contributions. The inclusion of the density-dependent term \\frac{1}{6}{t}3{ρ }1/6 is therefore indispensable for a realistic description of nuclear matter in the Skyrme framework.

  16. Skyrme-Hartree-Fock in the realm of nuclear mean field models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinhard, P.G.; Reiss, C.; Maruhn, J.; Bender, M.; Buervenich, T.; Greiner, W.

    2000-01-01

    We discuss and compare two brands of nuclear mean field models, the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock scheme (SHF) and the relativistic mean field model (RMF). Similarities and differences are worked out on a formal basis and with respect to the models performance in describing nuclear data. The bulk observables of stable nuclei are all described very well. Differences come up when extrapolating to exotic nuclei. The typically larger asymmetry energy in RMF leads to a larger neutron skin. Superheavy nuclei are found to be very sensitive on the single particle levels particularly on the spin orbit splitting. Ground state correlations from collective surface vibrations can have a significant effect on difference observables, as two-nucleon separation energy and two-nucleon shell gap. (author)

  17. Rotational-vibrational coupling in the BPS Skyrme model of baryons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adam, C.; Naya, C.; Sanchez-Guillen, J. [Departamento de Física de Partículas, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela and Instituto Galego de Física de Altas Enerxias (IGFAE), E-15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Wereszczynski, A. [Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, Reymonta 4, Kraków (Poland)

    2013-11-04

    We calculate the rotational-vibrational spectrum in the BPS Skyrme model for the hedgehog skyrmion with baryon number one. The resulting excitation energies for the nucleon and delta Roper resonances are slightly above their experimental values. Together with the fact that in the standard Skyrme model these excitation energies are significantly lower than the experimental ones, this provides strong evidence for the conjecture that the inclusion of the BPS Skyrme model is required for a successful quantitative description of physical properties of baryons and nuclei.

  18. Skyrme's interaction beyond the mean-field. The DGCM+GOA Hamiltonian of nuclear quadrupole motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kluepfel, Peter

    2008-07-29

    This work focuses on the microscopic description of nuclear collective quadrupole motion within the framework of the dynamic Generator-Coordinate-Method(DGCM)+Gaussian-Overlap-Approximation(GOA). Skyrme-type effective interactions are used as the fundamental many-particle interaction. Starting from a rotational invariant, polynomial and topologic consistent formulation of the GCM+GOA Hamiltonian an interpolation scheme for the collective masses and potential is developed. It allows to define the collective Hamiltonian of fully triaxial collective quadrupole dynamics from a purely axial symmetric configuration space. The substantial gain in performance allows the self-consistent evaluation of the dynamic quadrupole mass within the ATDHF-cranking model. This work presents the first large-scale analysis of quadrupole correlation energies and lowlying collective states within the DGCM+GOA model. Different Skyrme- and pairing interactions are compared from old standards up to more recent parameterizations. After checking the validity of several approximations to the DGCM+GOA model - both on the mean-field and the collective level - we proceed with a detailed investigation of correlation effects along the chains of semi-magic isotopes and isotones. This finally allows to define a set of observables which are hardly affected by collective correlations. Those observables were used for a refit of a Skyrme-type effective interaction which is expected to cure most of the problems of the recent parameterizations. Preparing further work, estimates for the correlated ground state energy are proposed which can be evaluated directly from the mean-field model. (orig.)

  19. Hamiltonian formalism of the Skyrme model with ω mesons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adami, C.

    1988-07-01

    We have in this thesis presented the semiclassical quantum theory of the Skyrme model with coupling to an isoscalar gauge field. For the quantization of the classical theory we used the Hamiltonian formalism. Furthermore we have studied the consequences of the canonical treatment, whereby we found the explicite πN vertex of the theory, as well as presented the correct treatment of the spatial contribution of the ω field. Furthermore we indicated that a consistent treatment requires the summation of all tree diagrams of the theory with internal π and ω lines. Such a calculation contains the explicite construction of solutions for the coupled πω field equations. A further result of this thesis concerns the application of the linear πN vertex to the calculation of the Δ decay width via the process Δ→Nπ. (orig./HSI) [de

  20. Topological phase transitions in the gauged BPS baby Skyrme model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, C.; Naya, C.; Romanczukiewicz, T.; Sanchez-Guillen, J.; Wereszczynski, A.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate that the gauged BPS baby Skyrme model with a double vacuum potential allows for phase transitions from a non-solitonic to a solitonic phase, where the latter corresponds to a ferromagnetic liquid. Such a transition can be generated by increasing the external pressure P or by turning on an external magnetic field H. As a consequence, the topological phase where gauged BPS baby skyrmions exist, is a higher density phase. For smaller densities, obtained for smaller values of P and H, a phase without solitons is reached. We find the critical line in the P,H parameter space. Furthermore, in the soliton phase, we find the equation of state for the baby skyrmion matter V=V(P,H) at zero temperature, where V is the “volume”, i.e., area of the solitons.

  1. Topological phase transitions in the gauged BPS baby Skyrme model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adam, C.; Naya, C. [Departamento de Física de Partículas, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela andInstituto Galego de Física de Altas Enerxias (IGFAE), Santiago de Compostela, E-15782 (Spain); Romanczukiewicz, T. [Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, Lojasiecza 11, Kraków, 30-348 (Poland); Sanchez-Guillen, J. [Departamento de Física de Partículas, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela andInstituto Galego de Física de Altas Enerxias (IGFAE), Santiago de Compostela, E-15782 (Spain); Wereszczynski, A. [Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, Lojasiecza 11, Kraków, 30-348 (Poland)

    2015-05-29

    We demonstrate that the gauged BPS baby Skyrme model with a double vacuum potential allows for phase transitions from a non-solitonic to a solitonic phase, where the latter corresponds to a ferromagnetic liquid. Such a transition can be generated by increasing the external pressure P or by turning on an external magnetic field H. As a consequence, the topological phase where gauged BPS baby skyrmions exist, is a higher density phase. For smaller densities, obtained for smaller values of P and H, a phase without solitons is reached. We find the critical line in the P,H parameter space. Furthermore, in the soliton phase, we find the equation of state for the baby skyrmion matter V=V(P,H) at zero temperature, where V is the “volume”, i.e., area of the solitons.

  2. Toroidal Superheavy Nuclei in Skyrme-Hartree-Fock Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staszczak, A.; Wong, Cheuk-Yin

    2009-01-01

    Within the self-consistent constraint Skyrme-Hartree-Fock+BCS model (SHF+BCS), we found equilibrium toroidal nuclear density distributions in the region of superheavy elements. For nuclei with a sufficient oblate deformation (Q 20 < -200 b), it becomes energetically favorable to change the genus of nuclear surface from 0 to 1, i.e., to switch the shape from a biconcave disc to a torus. The energy of the toroidal (genus=1) SHF+BCS solution relative to the compact (genus=0) ground state energy is strongly dependent both on the atomic number Z and the mass number A. We discuss the region of Z and A where the toroidal SHF+BCS total energy begins to be a global minimum

  3. Yukawa couplings and the nature of zero modes in the Skyrme model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawarabayashi, K.

    1989-01-01

    Several issues related, directly or indirectly, to the Yukawa coupling in the Skyrme model are discussed. The authors try to shed a new light on the physical nature of the zero modes associated with translation (rotation) invariance of the model

  4. Polarization effects in molecular mechanical force fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cieplak, Piotr [Burnham Institute for Medical Research, 10901 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92120 (United States); Dupradeau, Francois-Yves [UMR CNRS 6219-Faculte de Pharmacie, Universite de Picardie Jules Verne, 1 rue des Louvels, F-80037 Amiens (France); Duan, Yong [Genome Center and Department of Applied Science, University of California, Davis, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Wang Junmei, E-mail: pcieplak@burnham.or [Department of Pharmacology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, 6001 Forest Park Boulevard, ND9.136, Dallas, TX 75390-9050 (United States)

    2009-08-19

    The focus here is on incorporating electronic polarization into classical molecular mechanical force fields used for macromolecular simulations. First, we briefly examine currently used molecular mechanical force fields and the current status of intermolecular forces as viewed by quantum mechanical approaches. Next, we demonstrate how some components of quantum mechanical energy are effectively incorporated into classical molecular mechanical force fields. Finally, we assess the modeling methods of one such energy component-polarization energy-and present an overview of polarizable force fields and their current applications. Incorporating polarization effects into current force fields paves the way to developing potentially more accurate, though more complex, parameterizations that can be used for more realistic molecular simulations. (topical review)

  5. Magnus force effect in optical manipulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cipparrone, Gabriella; Pagliusi, Pasquale; Hernandez, Raul Josue; Provenzano, Clementina

    2011-01-01

    The effect of the Magnus force in optical micromanipulation has been observed. An ad hoc experiment has been designed based on a one-dimensional optical trap that carries angular momentum. The observed particle dynamics reveals the occurrence of this hydrodynamic force, which is neglected in the common approach. Its measured value is larger than the one predicted by the existing theoretical models for micrometric particles and low Reynolds number, showing that the Magnus force can contribute to unconventional optohydrodynamic trapping and manipulation.

  6. Solitons in topologically trivial and nontrivial sectors of the Skyrme model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolaev, V.A.; Tkachev, O.G.

    1989-01-01

    Using of the new predictions of form of solitons in the Skyrme model new series of baryon and meson-like configurations are obtained. Some of the obtained configurations are classically stable objects. It is shown that proposed ansatz is the generalization of the Skyrme-Witten ansatz and k Φ one. The origin and approximate character of the last ansatz was demonstrated. 5 refs.; 3 figs.; 2 tabs

  7. Collective nuclear excitations with Skyrme-second random-phase approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gambacurta, D.; Catara, F.; Grasso, M.

    2010-01-01

    Second random-phase approximation (RPA) calculations with a Skyrme force are performed to describe both high- and low-lying excited states in 16 O. The coupling between one particle-one hole and two particle-two hole as well as that between two particle-two hole configurations among themselves are fully taken into account, and the residual interaction is never neglected; we do not resort therefore to a generally used approximate scheme where only the first kind of coupling is considered. The issue of the rearrangement terms in the matrix elements beyond the standard RPA will be considered in detail in a forthcoming paper. Two approximations are employed here for these rearrangement terms: they are either neglected or evaluated with the RPA procedure. As a general feature of second RPA results, a several-MeV shift of the strength distribution to lower energies is systematically found with respect to RPA distributions. A much more important fragmentation of the strength is also naturally provided by the second RPA owing to the huge number of two particle-two hole configurations. A better description of the excitation energies of the low-lying 0 + and 2 + states is obtained with the second RPA than with the RPA.

  8. Effects of tensor forces in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanihata, Isao

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies of nuclei far from the stability line have revealed drastic changes in nuclear orbitals and reported the appearance of new magic numbers and the disappearance of magic numbers observed at the stability line. One of the important reasons for such changes is considered to be because of the effect of tensor forces on nuclear structure. Although the role of tensor forces in binding very light nuclei such as deuterons and 4 He has been known, direct experimental evidence for the effect on nuclear structure is scarce. In this paper, I review known effects of tensor forces in nuclei and then discuss the recently raised question of s–p wave mixing in a halo nucleus of 11 Li. Following these reviews, the development of a new experiment to see the high-momentum components due to the tensor forces is discussed and some of the new data are presented. (paper)

  9. Second RPA calculations with the Skyrme and Gogny interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gambacurta, Danilo [Horia Hulubei National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Extreme Light Infrastructure - Nuclear Physics (ELI-NP), Magurele, Jud. Ilfov (Romania); Grasso, Marcella [Universite Paris-Sud, IN2P3-CNRS, Institut de Physique Nucleaire, Orsay Cedex (France)

    2016-07-15

    The Second Random Phase Approximation (SRPA) is a natural extension of RPA where more general excitation operators are introduced. These operators contain, in addition to the one particle-one hole configurations already considered in RPA, also two particle-two hole excitations. Only in the last years, large-scale SRPA calculations have been performed, showing the merits and limits of this approach. In the first part of this paper, we present an overview of recent applications of the SRPA based on the Skyrme and Gogny interactions. Giant resonances in {sup 16}O will be studied and their properties discussed by using different models. In particular, we will present the first applications of the SRPA model with the finite-range Gogny interaction, discussing the advantages and drawbacks of using such an interaction in this type of calculations. After that, some more recent results, obtained by using a subtraction procedure to overcome double-counting in the SRPA, will be discussed. We will show that this procedure leads to results that are weakly cutoff dependent and that a strong reduction of the SRPA downwards shift with respect to the RPA spectra is found. Moreover, applying this procedure for the first time in the Gogny-SRPA framework, we will show that this method is able to reduce the anomalous shift found in previous calculations and related to some proton-neutron matrix elements of the residual interaction. (orig.)

  10. Magnus force and Aharonov-Bohm effect in superfluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonin, E.

    2002-01-01

    This chapter addresses the problem of the transverse force (Magnus force) on a vortex in a Galilean invariant quantum Bose liquid. Interaction of quasi-particles (phonons) with a vortex produces an additional transverse force (Iordanskii force). The Iordanskii force is related to the acoustic Aharonov-Bohm effect. The connection between the effective Magnus force and the Berry phase is also discussed. (orig.)

  11. Magnus Force and Aharonov-Bohm Effect in Superfluids

    OpenAIRE

    Sonin, E. B.

    2001-01-01

    The paper addresses the problem of the transverse force (Magnus force) on a vortex in a Galilean invariant quantum Bose liquid. Interaction of quasiparticles (phonons) with a vortex produces an additional transverse force (Iordanskii force). The Iordanskii force is related to the acoustic Aharonov--Bohm effect.Connection of the effective Magnus force with the Berry phase is also discussed.

  12. The Casimir effect: a force from nothing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambrecht, Astrid

    2003-01-01

    The attractive force between two surfaces in a vacuum - first predicted by Hendrik Casimir over 50 years ago - could affect everything from micro machines to unified theories of nature. What happens if you take two mirrors and arrange them so that they are facing each other in empty space? Your first reaction might be 'nothing at all'. In fact, both mirrors are mutually attracted to each other by the simple presence of the vacuum. This startling phenomenon was first predicted in 1948 by the Dutch theoretical physicist Hendrik Casimir while he was working at Philips Research Laboratories in Eindhoven on - of all things - colloidal solutions (see box). The phenomenon is now dubbed the Casimir effect, while the force between the mirrors is known as the Casimir force. For many years the Casimir effect was little more than a theoretical curiosity. But interest in the phenomenon has blossomed in recent years. Experimental physicists have realized that the Casimir force affects the workings of micro machined devices, while advances in instrumentation have enabled the force to be measured with ever-greater accuracy. The new enthusiasm has also been fired by fundamental physics. Many theorists have predicted the existence of 'large' extra dimensions in 10- and 11-dimensional unified field theories of the fundamental forces. These dimensions, they say, could modify classical Newtonian gravitation at sub-millimetre distances. Measuring the Casimir effect could therefore help physicists to test the validity of such radical ideas. (U.K.)

  13. Task force report on health effects assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, C.; Hushon, J.

    1978-08-01

    From April to August, 1978 MITRE supported the Health Effects Assessment Task Force sponsored by the Office of the Assistant Secretary for the Environment at DOE. The findings of that Task Force are incorporated in this report and include a detailed definition of health effects assessment, a survey of the mandates for health effects assessments within DOE/EV, a review of current DOE-EV health effects assessment activities, an analysis of the constraints affecting the health effects assessment process and a discussion of the Task Force recommendations. Included as appendices are summaries of two workshops conducted by the Task Force to determine the state-of-the-art of health effects assessment and modeling and a review of risk assessment activities in other federal agencies. The primary recommendation of the panel was that an office be designated or created under the Office of the Assistant Secretary for the Environment to coordinate the Health Effects Risk Assessment effort covering up to 40 program and policy areas; a similar need was expressed for the environmental effects assessment area. 1 tab

  14. Nuclear Forces from Effective Field Theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krebs, H.

    2011-01-01

    Chiral effective field theory allows for a systematic and model-independent derivation of the forces between nucleons in harmony with the symmetries of the quantum chromodynamics. After a brief review on the current status in the development of the chiral nuclear forces I will focus on the role of the Δ-resonance contributions in the nuclear dynamics.We find improvement in the convergence of the chiral expansion of the nuclear forces if we explicitly take into account the Δ-resonance degrees of freedom. The overall results for two-nucleon forces with and without explicit Δ-resonance degrees of freedom are remarkably similar. We discussed the long- and shorter-range N 3 LO contributions to chiral three-nucleon forces. No additional free parameters appear at this order. There are five different topology classes which contribute to the forces. Three of them describe long-range contributions which constitute the first systematic corrections to the leading 2π exchange that appear at N 2 LO. Another two contributions are of a shorter range and include, additionally to an exchange of pions, also one short-range contact interaction and all corresponding 1/m corrections. The requirement of renormalizability leads to unique expressions for N 3 LO contributions to the three-nucleon force (except for 1/m-corrections). We presented the complete N 2 LO analysis of the nuclear forces with explicit Δ-isobar degrees of freedom. Although the overall results in the isospin-conserving case are very similar in the Δ-less and Δ-full theories, we found a much better convergence in all peripheral partial waves once Δ-resonance is explicitly taken into account. The leading CSB contributions to nuclear forces are proportional to nucleon- and Δ-mass splittings. There appear strong cancellations between the two contributions which at leading order yield weaker V III potentials. This effect is, however, entirely compensated at subleading order such that the results in the theories

  15. New topological structures of Skyrme theory: baryon number and monopole number

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Y.M. [Chinese Academy of Science, Institute of Modern Physics, Lanzhou (China); Konkuk University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University, School of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kimm, Kyoungtae [Seoul National University, Faculty of Liberal Education, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, J.H. [Konkuk University, Department of Physics, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Zhang, Pengming [Chinese Academy of Science, Institute of Modern Physics, Lanzhou (China)

    2017-02-15

    Based on the observation that the skyrmion in Skyrme theory can be viewed as a dressed monopole, we show that the skyrmions have two independent topology, the baryon topology π{sub 3}(S{sup 3}) and the monopole topology π{sub 2}(S{sup 2}). With this we propose to classify the skyrmions by two topological numbers (m, n), the monopole number m and the shell (radial) number n. In this scheme the popular (non spherically symmetric) skyrmions are classified as the (m, 1) skyrmions but the spherically symmetric skyrmions are classified as the (1, n) skyrmions, and the baryon number B is given by B = mn. Moreover, we show that the vacuum of the Skyrme theory has the structure of the vacuum of the Sine-Gordon theory and QCD combined together, which can also be classified by two topological numbers (p, q). This puts the Skyrme theory in a totally new perspective. (orig.)

  16. Crustal moment of inertia of glitching pulsars with the KDE0v1 Skyrme interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madhuri, K.; Routray, T.R.; Pattnaik, S.P. [Sambalpur University, School of Physics, Jyotivihar (India); Basu, D.N. [Variable Energy Cyclotron Center, Kolkata (India)

    2017-07-15

    The mass, radius and crustal fraction of moment of inertia in neutron stars are calculated using β-equilibrated nuclear matter obtained from the Skyrme effective interaction. The transition density, pressure and proton fraction at the inner edge separating the liquid core from the solid crust of the neutron stars are determined from the thermodynamic stability conditions using the KDE0v1 set. The neutron star masses obtained by solving the Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkoff equations using neutron star matter obtained from this set are able to describe highly massive compact stars ∝ 2M {sub CircleDot}. The crustal fraction of the moment of inertia can be extracted from studying pulsar glitches. This fraction is highly dependent on the core-crust transition pressure and corresponding density. These results for pressure and density at core-crust transition together with the observed minimum crustal fraction of the total moment of inertia provide a limit for the radius of the Vela pulsar, R ≥ 3.69 + 3.44M/M {sub CircleDot}. Present calculations suggest that the crustal fraction of the total moment of inertia can be ∝ 6.3% due to crustal entrainment caused by the Bragg reflection of unbound neutrons by lattice ions. (orig.)

  17. Memory effect o force measurements at nanoscales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lisy, V.; Tothova, J.

    2011-01-01

    we have obtained an exact solution for the drift velocity of a Brownian particle in an incompressible fluid under the action of a constant force, taking into account the hydrodynamic memory in the particle motion. This velocity is proportional to the applied force but depends in a complicated manner on the time of observation t. At short times it is proportional to t and at long times it contains algebraic tails, the longest-lived of which being ∼ t -1/ 2. Due to this the velocity very slowly approaches the limiting value F/γ. As a consequence, the force F can significantly differ from the value that would be extracted from the drift measurements neglecting the inertial effects, which is a standard assumption in the interpretation of such experiments. The presented method can be equally applicable in the case of force linearly depending on the particle position. For nonlinear forces, first the open question about the choice of convention to be used in stochastic calculus should be resolved. (authors)

  18. Solution of the Skyrme-Hartree–Fock–Bogolyubov equations in the Cartesian deformed harmonic-oscillator basis. (VIII) HFODD (v2.73y): A new version of the program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schunck, N.; Dobaczewski, J.

    2017-01-01

    Here, we describe the new version (v2.73y) of the code hfodd which solves the nuclear Skyrme Hartree–Fock or Skyrme Hartree–Fock–Bogolyubov problem by using the Cartesian deformed harmonic-oscillator basis. In the new version, we have implemented the following new features: (i) full proton–neutron mixing in the particle–hole channel for Skyrme functionals, (ii) the Gogny force in both particle–hole and particle–particle channels, (iii) linear multi-constraint method at finite temperature, (iv) fission toolkit including the constraint on the number of particles in the neck between two fragments, calculation of the interaction energy between fragments, and calculation of the nuclear and Coulomb energy of each fragment, (v) the new version 200d of the code hfbtho, together with an enhanced interface between HFBTHO and HFODD, (vi) parallel capabilities, significantly extended by adding several restart options for large-scale jobs, (vii) the Lipkin translational energy correction method with pairing, (viii) higher-order Lipkin particle-number corrections, (ix) interface to a program plotting single-particle energies or Routhians, (x) strong-force isospin-symmetry-breaking terms, and (xi) the Augmented Lagrangian Method for calculations with 3D constraints on angular momentum and isospin. Finally, an important bug related to the calculation of the entropy at finite temperature and several other little significant errors of the previous published version were corrected.

  19. Towards the establishment of nonlinear hidden symmetries of the Skyrme model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrera-Aguilar, A.; Kanakoglou, K.; Paschalis, J. E.

    2006-01-01

    We present a preliminary attempt to establish the existence of hidden nonlinear symmetries of the SU(N) Skyrme model which could, in principle, lead to the further integration of the system. An explicit illustration is given for the SU(2) symmetry group

  20. Effective forces in near-magic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artamonov, S.A.; Isakov, V.I.; Ogloblin, S.G.

    1984-01-01

    Characteristics of 146 Gd, 206 Hg, sup(206, 208)Tl, sup(206, 208, 210)Pb, sup(208, 210)Bi, 210 Po nuclei are calculated on the base of representations on universal effective interaction of finite range. Discrepancy with the experiment for 210 Bi nucleus disappears if the method of ''penalty'' functions is used for search of optimum parameters. New parameters of effective interaction common for all the considered two-quasi-particle nuclei are determined. Parameters of tensor forces undergo most noticeable danges as compared with other calculations. Descriptions of lowest levels not only 210 Bi but also 206 Tl as well as collective states of 208 Pb and a new magic nucleus 146 Gd are improved. The calculated probabilities of electric transitions between ground and one-phonon states in core nuclei also agree with the experiment

  1. “Half a proton” in the Bogomol’nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield Skyrme model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lukács, Árpád [MTA Wigner RCP, RMI, P.O. Box 49, Budapest H1525 (Hungary)

    2016-07-15

    The BPS Skyrme model is a model containing an SU(2)-valued scalar field, in which a Bogomol’nyi-type inequality can be satisfied by soliton solutions (skyrmions). In this model, the energy density of static configurations is the sum of the square of the topological charge density plus a potential. The topological charge density is nothing else but the pull-back of the Haar measure of the group SU(2) on the physical space by the field configuration. As a consequence, this energy expression has a high degree of symmetry: it is invariant to volume preserving diffeomorphisms both on physical space and on the target space. We demonstrate here that in the BPS Skyrme model such solutions exist that a fraction of its charge and energy densities is localised, and the remaining part can be far away, not interacting with the localised part.

  2. Pion photoproduction in the Skyrme model and low-energy theorem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Sakae; Takeuchi, Fuminaka; Uehara, Masayuki

    1993-01-01

    We investigate pion photoproduction on the nucleon in the Skyrme model. We employ the formulation, which was recently developed by Hayashi et al., that the full pion field is treated as an interpolating field between asymptotic in and out fields. It is shown that the amplitude of the pion photoproduction is correctly given by the direct and the crossed baryon-pole terms, and the equal-time commutator terms between the axial-vector current and the electromagnetic current and between the pion field and the latter. We show that the lowest-order Kroll-Ruderman and the pion pole terms are reproduced, and that the seagull terms inherent to the Skyrme model are present. Further, the threshold behavior of the amplitude is discussed. (orig.)

  3. Gamow-Teller resonances and a separable approximation for Skyrme tensor interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Severyukhin A. P.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A finite rank separable approximation for the quasiparticle random phase approximation (QRPA with Skyrme interactions is applied to study properties of the Gamow-Teller (GT resonances in the neutron-rich Cd isotopes. This approximation enables one to reduce considerably the dimension of matrix that must be diagonalized to perform QRPA calculations in a very large configuration space. Our results from the SGII Skyrme interaction with the tensor interactions and the density-dependent zero-range pairing interaction show that the GT distribution is noticeably modified when the tensor correlations are taken into account. In particular, for 130Cd the dominant peak is moved 3.6 MeV downward and 10% of the GT distribution is shifted to the high excitation energy region near E=50MeV.

  4. Skyrme-model πNN form factor and nucleon-nucleon interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holzwarth, G.; Machleidt, R.

    1997-01-01

    We apply the strong πNN form factor, which emerges from the Skyrme model, in the two-nucleon system using a one-boson-exchange (OBE) model for the nucleon-nucleon (NN) interaction. Deuteron properties and phase parameters of NN scattering are reproduced well. In contrast to the form factor of monopole shape that is traditionally used in OBE models, the Skyrme form factor leaves low-momentum transfers essentially unaffected while it suppresses the high-momentum region strongly. It turns out that this behavior is very appropriate for models of the NN interaction and makes it possible to use a soft pion form factor in the NN system. As a consequence, the πN and the NN systems can be described using the same πNN form factor, which is impossible with the monopole. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  5. Sum rules, asymptotic behaviour and (multi)baryon states in the Skyrme model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mignaco, J.A.; Wulck, S.

    1990-01-01

    We obtain sum roles that should be satisfied by the solutions of the Euler-Lagrange equation for the chiral angle in the Skyrme model in the hedgehog representation. The sum rules allow to determine the existence of solutions with integer baryon number for well determined values of a relevant dimensionless parameter Φ only. For all other values, there are no solutions with integer baryon number, in particular for the pure non-linear sigma model. (author)

  6. β-decay in the Skyrme-Witten representation of QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snyderman, N.J.

    1991-01-01

    The renormalized coupling strength of the β-decay axial vector current is related to π ± p cross sections through the Adler-Weisberger sum rule, that follows from chiral symmetry. We attempt to understand the Adler-Weisberger sum rule in the 1/N c expansion in QCD, and in Skyrme-Witten model that realizes the 1/N c expansion in the low energy limit, using it to explicitly calculate both g A and the π ± p cross sections

  7. Two-photon contributions to the elastic electron-nucleon scattering in the Skyrme model; Zwei-Photon-Beitraege zur elastischen Elektron-Nukleon-Streuung im Skyrme-Modell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhn, Markus

    2008-09-23

    The electromagnetic form factors are crucial for our understanding of the inner structure of the proton. Recently it has become feasible to measure them by the use of polarisation transfer techniques in addition to the traditional Rosenbluth separation method. Thereby emerged an incompatibility of the results obtained by these two different experimental methods. It is commonly assumed that the discrepance is induced by higher order corrections to the cross section, especially through two-photon exchange processes. Unfortunately these processes cannot be calculated in a model independent manner because off-shell photon nucleon vertices arise. Effective chiral lagrangians contain already local two-photon couplings and therefore seem exceptionally well suited to study the anomaly contribution to the two-photon exchange. These couplings give two-photon exchange contributions that can be understood as the coupling of the nucleon to pions, decaying into two virtual photons. A particular contribution emerges from the chiral anomaly of QCD, that describes the two-photon decay of the neutral pion. The most important goal of this work is the calculation of the contribution arising from the anomaly to the elastic electron-proton scattering. The results are expected to be widely model independent since the anomaly directly reflects a QCD property. Based on the Skyrme model the protons are realized as soliton solutions in effective chiral theories. The next to leading order contribution to the cross section is given by the interference between the one- and two-photon exchange. The latter contains an ultraviolet divergence, which is renormalized by a local effective counterterm. This counterterm contributes to the width of the neutral pion decay which determines the finite part of the counterterm coefficient. The affect of the anomaly to the Rosenbluth separation of the electromagnetic form factors as well as the discrepance regarding the polarization measurements is extensively

  8. Force Modelling in Orthogonal Cutting Considering Flank Wear Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathod, Kanti Bhikhubhai; Lalwani, Devdas I.

    2017-05-01

    In the present work, an attempt has been made to provide a predictive cutting force model during orthogonal cutting by combining two different force models, that is, a force model for a perfectly sharp tool plus considering the effect of edge radius and a force model for a worn tool. The first force model is for a perfectly sharp tool that is based on Oxley's predictive machining theory for orthogonal cutting as the Oxley's model is for perfectly sharp tool, the effect of cutting edge radius (hone radius) is added and improve model is presented. The second force model is based on worn tool (flank wear) that was proposed by Waldorf. Further, the developed combined force model is also used to predict flank wear width using inverse approach. The performance of the developed combined total force model is compared with the previously published results for AISI 1045 and AISI 4142 materials and found reasonably good agreement.

  9. The effect of the Magnus force on skyrmion relaxation dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Barton L.; Täuber, Uwe C.; Pleimling, Michel

    2018-01-01

    We perform systematic Langevin molecular dynamics simulations of interacting skyrmions in thin films. The interplay between Magnus force, repulsive skyrmion-skyrmion interaction and thermal noise yields different regimes during non-equilibrium relaxation. In the noise-dominated regime the Magnus force enhances the disordering effects of the thermal noise. In the Magnus-force-dominated regime, the Magnus force cooperates with the skyrmion-skyrmion interaction to yield a dynamic regime with slo...

  10. Effectively Managing the Air Force Enterprise Architecture

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sharkey, Jamie P

    2005-01-01

    The Air Force is developing and implementing an enterprise architecture to meet the Clinger-Cohen Act's requirement that all federal agencies use an architecture to guide their information technology (IT) investments...

  11. Dispersive force between dissimilar materials: Geometrical effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noguez, Cecilia; Roman-Velazquez, C.E.

    2004-01-01

    We calculate the Casimir force or dispersive van der Waals force between a spherical nanoparticle and a planar substrate, both with arbitrary dielectric properties. We show that the force between the sphere and half-space can be calculated through the interacting surface plasmons of the bodies. Using a Spectral Representation formalism, we show that the force of a sphere made of a material A and a half-space made of a material B differs from the case when the sphere is made of B, and the half-space is made of A. We find that the difference depends on the plasma frequency of the materials, the geometry, and the distance of separation between the sphere and half-space. The differences show the importance of the geometry, and make evident the necessity of realistic descriptions of the system beyond the Derjaguin Approximation or Proximity Theorem Approximation

  12. Effect of the Magnus force on skyrmion relaxation dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Barton L.; Täuber, Uwe C.; Pleimling, Michel

    2018-01-01

    We perform systematic Langevin molecular dynamics simulations of interacting skyrmions in thin films. The interplay between the Magnus force, the repulsive skyrmion-skyrmion interaction, and the thermal noise yields different regimes during nonequilibrium relaxation. In the noise-dominated regime, the Magnus force enhances the disordering effects of the thermal noise. In the Magnus-force-dominated regime, the Magnus force cooperates with the skyrmion-skyrmion interaction to yield a dynamic regime with slow decaying correlations. These two regimes are characterized by different values of the aging exponent. In general, the Magnus force accelerates the approach to the steady state.

  13. The nucleon-nucleon spin-orbit interaction in the Skyrme model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riska, D.O.; Dannbom, K.

    1987-01-01

    The spin-orbit and quadratic spin-orbit components of the nucleon-nucleon interaction are derived in the Skyrme model at the classical level. These interaction components arise from the orbital and rotational motion of the soliton fields that form the nucleons. The isospin dependent part of the spin-orbit interaction is similar to the corresponding component obtained from boson exchange mechanisms at long distances although at short distances it is weaker. The isospin independent spin-orbit component is however different from the prediction of boson exchange mechanisms and has the opposite sign. The quadratic spin-orbit interaction is weak and has only an isospin dependent component

  14. Attractive component in the nucleon-nucleon interaction in the Skyrme model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyman, E.M.; Riska, D.O.

    1986-01-01

    The spin- and isospin-independent part of the nulceon-nucleon interaction in the Skyrme model is shown to contain a weak attractive intermediate-range term in addition to the well-known short-range repulsion. The attraction is a consequence of the rotational degree of freedom of a skyrmion in the presence of the field of another one, and can be thought of as an enhancement of the moment of inertia of each skyrmion. While the attractive term is dominant at large distances it is not sufficiently strong for nuclear binding. (orig.)

  15. Sum rules for nuclear excitations with the Skyrme-Landau interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Kehfei; Luo Hongde; Ma Zhongyu; Feng Man; Shen Qingbiao

    1991-01-01

    The energy-weighted sum rules for electric, magnetic, Fermi and Gamow-Teller transitions with the Skyrme-Landau interaction are derived from the double commutators and numerically calculated in a HF + RPA formalism. As a numerical check of the Thouless theorem, our self-consistent calculations show that the calculated RPA strengths exhaust more than 85% of the sum rules in most cases. The well known non-energy-weighted sum rules for Fermi and Gamow-Teller transitions are also checked numerically. The sum rules are exhausted by more than 94% in these cases. (orig.)

  16. Speaking Effectively: A Guide for Air Force Speakers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kline, John

    1989-01-01

    Speaking Effectively presents techniques on how to speak successfully. It takes a "how-to" approach to effective speaking in the Air Force and presents proven techniques as concisely and completely as possible...

  17. Effect of fatigue on force production and force application technique during repeated sprints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Jean-Benoit; Samozino, Pierre; Edouard, Pascal; Tomazin, Katja

    2011-10-13

    We investigated the changes in the technical ability of force application/orientation against the ground vs. the physical capability of total force production after a multiple-set repeated sprints series. Twelve male physical education students familiar with sprint running performed four sets of five 6-s sprints (24s of passive rest between sprints, 3min between sets). Sprints were performed from a standing start on an instrumented treadmill, allowing the computation of vertical (F(V)), net horizontal (F(H)) and total (F(Tot)) ground reaction forces for each step. Furthermore, the ratio of forces was calculated as RF=F(H)F(Tot)(-1), and the index of force application technique (D(RF)) representing the decrement in RF with increase in speed was computed as the slope of the linear RF-speed relationship. Changes between pre- (first two sprints) and post-fatigue (last two sprints) were tested using paired t-tests. Performance decreased significantly (e.g. top speed decreased by 15.7±5.4%; Pmultiple-set repeated sprint series, both the total force production capability and the technical ability to apply force effectively against the ground are altered, the latter to a larger extent than the former. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Labour Force Migration Effects within European Union

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Mihaela Tudorache

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Within the EU, there is no common policy on migration; there are common policies on certain aspects of migration. The Member States fear of migration, but their economies and societies will further need migrant workers. Labour force migration have positive, but also negative consequences for all parties involved: receiving countries, origin countries and migrant workers. Within this framework, a common approach of the migration management and the harmonization of the economic migration policies of the Member States represent already one of the most important challenges for the European Union and will be further emphasized.

  19. Multi baryons with flavors in the Skyrme model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schat, Carlos L. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Scoccola, Norberto N. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Buenos Aires (Argentina). Dept. of Physics

    1999-07-01

    We investigate the possible existence of multi baryons with heavy flavor quantum numbers using the bound state approach to the topological soliton model and the recently proposed approximation for multi skyrmion fields based on rational maps. We use an effective interaction Lagrangian which consistently incorporates both chiral symmetry and the heavy quark symmetry including the corrections up to order {omicron}(1/m{sub Q}). The model predicts some narrow heavy flavored multi baryon states with baryon number four and seven. (author)

  20. Multi baryons with flavors in the Skyrme model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schat, Carlos L.; Scoccola, Norberto N.

    1999-07-01

    We investigate the possible existence of multi baryons with heavy flavor quantum numbers using the bound state approach to the topological soliton model and the recently proposed approximation for multi skyrmion fields based on rational maps. We use an effective interaction Lagrangian which consistently incorporates both chiral symmetry and the heavy quark symmetry including the corrections up to order ο(1/m Q ). The model predicts some narrow heavy flavored multi baryon states with baryon number four and seven. (author)

  1. Effect of contact stiffness on wedge calibration of lateral force in atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Fei; Zhao Xuezeng

    2007-01-01

    Quantitative friction measurement of nanomaterials in atomic force microscope requires accurate calibration method for lateral force. The effect of contact stiffness on lateral force calibration of atomic force microscope is discussed in detail and an improved calibration method is presented. The calibration factor derived from the original method increased with the applied normal load, which indicates that separate calibration should be required for every given applied normal load to keep the accuracy of friction measurement. We improve the original method by introducing the contact factor, which is derived from the contact stiffness between the tip and the sample, to the calculation of calibration factors. The improved method makes the calculation of calibration factors under different applied normal loads possible without repeating the calibration procedure. Comparative experiments on a silicon wafer have been done by both the two methods to validate the method in this article

  2. Effects of nonmagnetic interparticle forces on magnetorheological fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klingenberg, D J; Olk, C H; Golden, M A; Ulicny, J C

    2010-01-01

    Effects of nonmagnetic interparticle forces on the on- and off-state behavior of magnetorheological fluids are investigated experimentally and with particle-level simulations. Suspensions of iron particles in an aliphatic oil are modified by surface-active species. The modifications significantly alter the off-state properties, but have little impact on the field-induced stresses. Simulations show similar behavior. Off-state rheological properties are strongly influenced by van der Waals forces and modifications of the short-range repulsive forces. Field-induced stresses are less sensitive to the nonmagnetic forces.

  3. Effects of nonmagnetic interparticle forces on magnetorheological fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klingenberg, D J; Olk, C K; Golden, M A; Ulicny, J C

    2009-01-01

    Effects of nonmagnetic interparticle forces on the on- and off-state behavior of MR fluids are investigated experimentally and with particle-level simulations. Suspensions of iron particles in an aliphatic oil are modified by surface-active species. The modifications significantly alter the off-state properties, but have little impact on the field-induced stresses. Simulations show similar behavior. Off-state rheological properties are strongly influenced by van der Waals forces and modifications of the short-range repulsive forces. Field-induced stresses are less sensitive to the nonmagnetic forces.

  4. Effects of solute--solvent attractive forces on hydrophobic correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pratt, L.R.; Chandler, D.

    1980-01-01

    A theory is presented for the effect of slowly varying attractive forces on correlations between nonpolar solutes in dilute aqueous solution. We find that hydrophobic correlations are sensitive to relatively long range slowly varying interactions. Thus, it is possible to make qualitative changes in these correlations by introducing small changes in the attractive forces. Several model calculations are presented to illustrate these facts. The contributions of the Lennard-Jones attractive forces to the computer simulation results of Pangali, Rao, and Berne are calculated. For this case it is found that the potential of mean force between spherical nonpolar solutes is hardly affected by inclusion of attractive forces. However, the osmotic second virial coefficient is dominated by the contributions of the attractive forces. For spherical solutes which provide a reasonable model for the methane molecule, inclusion of attractive forces produces a qualitative change in the methane--methane potential of mean force. The connection between these effects of slowly varying attractive forces and the enthalpic part of Ben-Naim's deltaA/sup H/I is discussed

  5. Effects of additional inertia force on bubble breakup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Liangming; Zhang Wenzhi; Chen Deqi; Xu Jianhui; Xu Jianjun; Huang Yanping

    2011-01-01

    Through VOF two-phase flow model, the single bubble deformation and breakup in a vertical narrow channel is numerically investigated in the study based on the force balance at the process of bubble breakup. The effect of surface tension force, the additional inertia force and bubble initial shape on bubble breakup are analyzed according to the velocity variation at the break-up point and the minimum necking size when the bubble is breaking up. It is found that the surface tension force, the additional inertia force and the bubble initial shape have significant effects on the bubble breakup through the fluid injection toward to the bubble, which finally induces the onset of bubble breakup. (authors)

  6. modelingthe effect the effect of contact and seepage forces

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    This research work has investigated the contribution of contact force and seepage force to the ... e equilibrium model has deduced an expression for the safe hydraulic head during well ...... Plastic deformation of soils simulation using DEM,.

  7. United States Air Force Nurse Crops Captains' Perceived Leadership Effectiveness

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Randall, Marjorie

    1998-01-01

    ... effectiveness of nurses who lacked the additional training. Two hundred and seventy-nine United States Air Force Nurse Corps Captains with management experience completed Kouzes and Posner's Leadership Practice Inventory-Self (LPI...

  8. United States Air Force Nurse Crops Captains' Perceived Leadership Effectiveness

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Randall, Marjorie

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine perceived leadership effectiveness of nurses who attended the United States Air Force Nursing Service Management residence course with the perceived leadership...

  9. Ratchet effect on a relativistic particle driven by external forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quintero, Niurka R; Alvarez-Nodarse, Renato; Cuesta, Jose A

    2011-01-01

    We study the ratchet effect of a damped relativistic particle driven by both asymmetric temporal bi-harmonic and time-periodic piecewise constant forces. This system can be formally solved for any external force, providing the ratchet velocity as a nonlinear functional of the driving force. This allows us to explicitly illustrate the functional Taylor expansion formalism recently proposed for this kind of systems. The Taylor expansion reveals particularly useful to obtain the shape of the current when the force is periodic, piecewise constant. We also illustrate the somewhat counterintuitive effect that introducing damping may induce a ratchet effect. When the force is symmetric under time-reversal and the system is undamped, under symmetry principles no ratchet effect is possible. In this situation increasing damping generates a ratchet current which, upon increasing the damping coefficient eventually reaches a maximum and decreases toward zero. We argue that this effect is not specific of this example and should appear in any ratchet system with tunable damping driven by a time-reversible external force. (paper)

  10. Ratchet effect on a relativistic particle driven by external forces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quintero, Niurka R [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada I, Escuela Universitaria Politecnica, Universidad de Sevilla, Calle Virgen de Africa 7, E-41011 Sevilla (Spain); Alvarez-Nodarse, Renato [Departamento de Analisis Matematico, Facultad de Matematicas, Universidad de Sevilla, Apdo 1160, E-41080 Sevilla (Spain); Cuesta, Jose A, E-mail: niurka@us.es, E-mail: ran@us.es, E-mail: cuesta@math.uc3m.es [Grupo Interdisciplinar de Sistemas Complejos (GISC), Departamento de Matematicas, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Avenida de la Universidad 30, E-28911 Leganes, Madrid (Spain)

    2011-10-21

    We study the ratchet effect of a damped relativistic particle driven by both asymmetric temporal bi-harmonic and time-periodic piecewise constant forces. This system can be formally solved for any external force, providing the ratchet velocity as a nonlinear functional of the driving force. This allows us to explicitly illustrate the functional Taylor expansion formalism recently proposed for this kind of systems. The Taylor expansion reveals particularly useful to obtain the shape of the current when the force is periodic, piecewise constant. We also illustrate the somewhat counterintuitive effect that introducing damping may induce a ratchet effect. When the force is symmetric under time-reversal and the system is undamped, under symmetry principles no ratchet effect is possible. In this situation increasing damping generates a ratchet current which, upon increasing the damping coefficient eventually reaches a maximum and decreases toward zero. We argue that this effect is not specific of this example and should appear in any ratchet system with tunable damping driven by a time-reversible external force. (paper)

  11. Reducing detrimental electrostatic effects in Casimir-force measurements and Casimir-force-based microdevices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jun; Klimchitskaya, G. L.; Mostepanenko, V. M.; Mohideen, U.

    2018-03-01

    It is well known that residual electrostatic forces create significant difficulties in precise measurements of the Casimir force and the wide use of Casimir-operated microdevices. We experimentally demonstrate that, with the help of Ar-ion cleaning of the surfaces, it is possible to make electrostatic effects negligibly small compared to the Casimir interaction. Our experimental setup consists of a dynamic atomic force microscope supplemented with an Ar-ion gun and argon reservoir. The residual potential difference between the Au-coated surfaces of a sphere and those of a plate was measured both before and after in situ Ar-ion cleaning. It is shown that this cleaning decreases the magnitude of the residual potential by up to an order of magnitude and makes it almost independent of the separation. The gradient of the Casimir force was measured using ordinary samples subjected to Ar-ion cleaning. The obtained results are shown to be in good agreement both with previous precision measurements using specially selected samples and with theoretical predictions of the Lifshitz theory. The conclusion is made that the suggested method of in situ Ar-ion cleaning is effective in reducing the electrostatic effects and therefore is a great resource for experiments on measuring the Casimir interaction and for Casimir-operated microdevices.

  12. The low-energy theorem of pion photoproduction using the Skyrme model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikehashi, T.; Ohta, K.

    1995-01-01

    We reassess the validity of the current-algebra based low-energy theorem of pion photoproduction on the nucleon using the Skyrme model. We find that one of the off-shell electromagnetic form factors of the nucleon exhibits infrared divergence in the chiral limit. This contribution introduces an additional term to the threshold amplitude predicted by the low-energy theorem. The emergence of the additional term indicates an unavoidable necessity of off-shell form factors in deriving the low-energy theorem. In the case of neutral pion production, the new contribution to the threshold amplitude is found to be comparable in magnitude to the low-energy theorem's prediction and has the opposite sign. In the charged pion production channels, the correction to the theorem is shown to be relatively small. (orig.)

  13. The Meissner effect puzzle and the quantum force in superconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikulov, A.V.

    2012-01-01

    The puzzle of the acceleration of the mobile charge carriers and the ions in the superconductor in direction opposite to the electromagnetic force revealed formerly in the Meissner effect is considered in the case of the transition of a narrow ring from normal to superconducting state. It is elucidated that the azimuthal quantum force was deduced eleven years ago from the experimental evidence of this acceleration but it cannot solve this puzzle. This quantum force explains other paradoxical phenomena connected with reiterated switching of the ring between normal and superconducting states.

  14. Quasiconfigurations: an approach to effective forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poves, A.; Pasquini, E.; Zuker, A.P.

    1978-01-01

    Many body effective operators appear naturally by dressing states through a perturbative unitary transformation. They have forms that differ from those obtained in the Bloch-Horowitz approach. The fsub(7/2)sup(n) problem is treated explicitly. Pandya's transforms are generalized

  15. Effect of Forcing Function on Nonlinear Acoustic Standing Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkheiner, Joshua R.; Li, Xiao-Fan; Raman, Ganesh; Daniels, Chris; Steinetz, Bruce

    2003-01-01

    Nonlinear acoustic standing waves of high amplitude have been demonstrated by utilizing the effects of resonator shape to prevent the pressure waves from entering saturation. Experimentally, nonlinear acoustic standing waves have been generated by shaking an entire resonating cavity. While this promotes more efficient energy transfer than a piston-driven resonator, it also introduces complicated structural dynamics into the system. Experiments have shown that these dynamics result in resonator forcing functions comprised of a sum of several Fourier modes. However, previous numerical studies of the acoustics generated within the resonator assumed simple sinusoidal waves as the driving force. Using a previously developed numerical code, this paper demonstrates the effects of using a forcing function constructed with a series of harmonic sinusoidal waves on resonating cavities. From these results, a method will be demonstrated which allows the direct numerical analysis of experimentally generated nonlinear acoustic waves in resonators driven by harmonic forcing functions.

  16. Effect of Excess Gravitational Force on Cultured Myotubes in Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigehiro Hashimoto

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available An effect of an excess gravitational force on cultured myoblasts has been studied in an experimental system with centrifugal force in vitro. Mouse myoblasts (C2C12 were seeded on a culture dish of 35 mm diameter, and cultured in the Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's Medium until the sub-confluent condition. To apply the excess gravitational force on the cultured cells, the dish was set in a conventional centrifugal machine. Constant gravitational force was applied to the cultured cells for three hours. Variations were made on the gravitational force (6 G, 10 G, 100 G, 500 G, and 800 G with control of the rotational speed of the rotator in the centrifugal machine. Morphology of the cells was observed with a phasecontrast microscope for eight days. The experimental results show that the myotube thickens day by day after the exposure to the excess gravitational force field. The results also show that the higher excess gravitational force thickens myotubes. The microscopic study shows that myotubes thicken with fusion each other.

  17. Effective source approach to self-force calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vega, Ian; Wardell, Barry; Diener, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Numerical evaluation of the self-force on a point particle is made difficult by the use of delta functions as sources. Recent methods for self-force calculations avoid delta functions altogether, using instead a finite and extended 'effective source' for a point particle. We provide a review of the general principles underlying this strategy, using the specific example of a scalar point charge moving in a black hole spacetime. We also report on two new developments: (i) the construction and evaluation of an effective source for a scalar charge moving along a generic orbit of an arbitrary spacetime, and (ii) the successful implementation of hyperboloidal slicing that significantly improves on previous treatments of boundary conditions used for effective-source-based self-force calculations. Finally, we identify some of the key issues related to the effective source approach that will need to be addressed by future work.

  18. Effect of transcranial magnetic stimulation on force of finger pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odagaki, Masato; Fukuda, Hiroshi; Hiwaki, Osamu

    2009-04-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is used to explore many aspects of brain function, and to treat neurological disorders. Cortical motor neuronal activation by TMS over the primary motor cortex (M1) produces efferent signals that pass through the corticospinal tracts. Motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) are observed in muscles innervated by the stimulated motor cortex. TMS can cause a silent period (SP) following MEP in voluntary electromyography (EMG). The present study examined the effects of TMS eliciting MEP and SP on the force of pinching using two fingers. Subjects pinched a wooden block with the thumb and index finger. TMS was applied to M1 during the pinch task. EMG of first dorsal interosseous muscles and pinch forces were measured. Force output increased after the TMS, and then oscillated. The results indicated that the motor control system to keep isotonic forces of the muscles participated in the finger pinch was disrupted by the TMS.

  19. Discrete Lattice effect of various forcing methods of body force on immersed Boundary-Lattice Boltzmann method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, Sung Wan; Ha, Man Yeong; Yoon, Hyun Sik [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Hae Kwon [POSCO, Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Balachandar, S. [University of Florida, Florida (United States)

    2013-02-15

    We investigate the discrete lattice effect of various forcing methods in the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) to include the body force obtained from the immersed boundary method (IBM). In the immersed boundary lattice Boltzmann method (IB-LBM), the LBM needs a forcing method to involve the body force on a forcing point near the immersed boundary that is calculated by IBM. The proper forcing method in LBM is derived to include the body force, which appears to resolve problems such as multiphase flow, non-ideal gas behavior, etc. Many researchers have adopted different forcing methods in LBM to involve the body force from IBM, even when they solved similar problems. However, it is necessary to evaluate the discrete lattice effect, which originates from different forcing methods in LBM, to include the effect of the body force from IBM on the results. Consequently, in this study, a rigorous analysis of the discrete lattice effect for different forcing methods in IB-LBM is performed by solving various problems.

  20. Discrete Lattice effect of various forcing methods of body force on immersed Boundary-Lattice Boltzmann method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Son, Sung Wan; Ha, Man Yeong; Yoon, Hyun Sik; Jeong, Hae Kwon; Balachandar, S.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the discrete lattice effect of various forcing methods in the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) to include the body force obtained from the immersed boundary method (IBM). In the immersed boundary lattice Boltzmann method (IB-LBM), the LBM needs a forcing method to involve the body force on a forcing point near the immersed boundary that is calculated by IBM. The proper forcing method in LBM is derived to include the body force, which appears to resolve problems such as multiphase flow, non-ideal gas behavior, etc. Many researchers have adopted different forcing methods in LBM to involve the body force from IBM, even when they solved similar problems. However, it is necessary to evaluate the discrete lattice effect, which originates from different forcing methods in LBM, to include the effect of the body force from IBM on the results. Consequently, in this study, a rigorous analysis of the discrete lattice effect for different forcing methods in IB-LBM is performed by solving various problems.

  1. Nuclear ground state properties and self-consistent calculations with the Skyrme interaction. II. S-D shell nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flocard, H.

    1975-04-01

    Hartree-Fock results concerning the ground state properties of some S-D shell nuclei are discussed. Two different Skyrme interactions have been used. They both lead to good agreement with the experimental total binding energies, charge radii and multipole moments. In particular the observed prolate-oblate transitions occuring in the S-D shell are reproduced. The calculated spectroscopic factors are also shown to be consistent with experimental data [fr

  2. Combining the modified Skyrme-like model and the local density approximation to determine the symmetry energy of nuclear matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jian; Ren, Zhongzhou; Xu, Chang

    2018-07-01

    Combining the modified Skyrme-like model and the local density approximation model, the slope parameter L of symmetry energy is extracted from the properties of finite nuclei with an improved iterative method. The calculations of the iterative method are performed within the framework of the spherical symmetry. By choosing 200 neutron rich nuclei on 25 isotopic chains as candidates, the slope parameter is constrained to be 50 MeV nuclear matter can be obtained together.

  3. Force and Directional Force Modulation Effects on Accuracy and Variability in Low-Level Pinch Force Tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sangsoo; Spirduso, Waneen; Eakin, Tim; Abraham, Lawrence

    2018-01-01

    The authors investigated how varying the required low-level forces and the direction of force change affect accuracy and variability of force production in a cyclic isometric pinch force tracking task. Eighteen healthy right-handed adult volunteers performed the tracking task over 3 different force ranges. Root mean square error and coefficient of variation were higher at lower force levels and during minimum reversals compared with maximum reversals. Overall, the thumb showed greater root mean square error and coefficient of variation scores than did the index finger during maximum reversals, but not during minimum reversals. The observed impaired performance during minimum reversals might originate from history-dependent mechanisms of force production and highly coupled 2-digit performance.

  4. The effect of magnet size on the levitation force and attractive force of single-domain YBCO bulk superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, W M; Chao, X X; Bian, X B; Liu, P; Feng, Y; Zhang, P X; Zhou, L

    2003-01-01

    The levitation forces between a single-domain YBCO bulk and several magnets of different sizes have been measured at 77 K to investigate the effect of the magnet size on the levitation force. It is found that the levitation force reaches a largest (peak) value when the size of the magnet approaches that of the superconductor when the other conditions are fixed. The absolute maximum attractive force (in the field-cooled state) increases with the increasing of the magnet size, and is saturated when the magnet size approaches that of the superconductor. The maximum attractive force in the field-cooled (FC) state is much higher than that of the maximum attractive force in the zero field-cooled (ZFC) state. The results indicate that the effects of magnetic field distribution on the levitation force have to be considered during the designing and manufacturing of superconducting devices

  5. Many body effects in the van der Waals force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, P.; Claro, F.

    1985-08-01

    A classical model of fluctuating dipoles is proposed for the evaluation of many-body effects in the van der Waals force between neutral polarizable particles. The method is applied to solid xenon giving the correct low temperature stable structure, unlike the usual two-body potential result. (author)

  6. Texture-induced modulations of friction force: the fingerprint effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wandersman, E; Candelier, R; Debrégeas, G; Prevost, A

    2011-10-14

    Modulations of the friction force in dry solid friction are usually attributed to macroscopic stick-slip instabilities. Here we show that a distinct, quasistatic mechanism can also lead to nearly periodic force oscillations during sliding contact between an elastomer patterned with parallel grooves, and abraded glass slides. The dominant oscillation frequency is set by the ratio between the sliding velocity and the grooves period. A model is derived which quantitatively captures the dependence of the force modulations amplitude with the normal load, the grooves period, and the slides roughness characteristics. The model's main ingredient is the nonlinearity of the friction law. Since such nonlinearity is ubiquitous for soft solids, this "fingerprint effect" should be relevant to a large class of frictional configurations and have important consequences in human digital touch.

  7. Nanoscale electrowetting effects observed by using friction force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revilla, Reynier; Guan, Li; Zhu, Xiao-Yang; Yang, Yan-Lian; Wang, Chen

    2011-06-21

    We report the study of electrowetting (EW) effects under strong electric field on poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) surface by using friction force microscopy (FFM). The friction force dependence on the electric field at nanometer scale can be closely related to electrowetting process based on the fact that at this scale frictional behavior is highly affected by capillary phenomena. By measuring the frictional signal between a conductive atomic force microscopy (AFM) tip and the PMMA surface, the ideal EW region (Young-Lippmann equation) and the EW saturation were identified. The change in the interfacial contact between the tip and the PMMA surface with the electric field strength is closely associated with the transition from the ideal EW region to the EW saturation. In addition, a reduction of the friction coefficient was observed when increasing the applied electric field in the ideal EW region. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  8. Study of even-Z nuclei up to Mg with the Gogny force using AMD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugawa, Yoshio; Kimura, Masaaki; Horiuchi, Hisashi [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Physics

    2001-12-01

    Employing the Gogny force as an effective force, we study the ground state properties of light nuclei using antisymmetrized molecular dynamics (AMD). In this study, we are mainly concerned with the binding energies and radii of light even-Z isotopes, namely He, Be, C, O, Ne and Mg. Using a new technique to calculate the density dependent term of the effective force, we have realized fast and accurate calculations. From a comparison with Skyrme SIII results within the same AMD framework, we find that the Gogny and SIII forces well reproduce the experimental binding energies of stable nuclei. The two forces give almost equal radii, except in the case of {sup 7}Be and {sup 9}Be. For both forces, approximate treatment of the center-of-mass kinetic energy causes overestimation of the binding energy compared with the exact treatment. It also causes a decrease of the nuclear deformation compared with the exact treatment. We also carry out an energy variation after the parity projection. With regard to the binding energies and radii, parity-projected calculations do not exhibit a large difference compared to non-projected results, although the density distribution and clustering features are often significantly changed by the parity projection. (author)

  9. Study of even-Z nuclei up to Mg with the Gogny force using AMD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugawa, Yoshio; Kimura, Masaaki; Horiuchi, Hisashi

    2001-01-01

    Employing the Gogny force as an effective force, we study the ground state properties of light nuclei using antisymmetrized molecular dynamics (AMD). In this study, we are mainly concerned with the binding energies and radii of light even-Z isotopes, namely He, Be, C, O, Ne and Mg. Using a new technique to calculate the density dependent term of the effective force, we have realized fast and accurate calculations. From a comparison with Skyrme SIII results within the same AMD framework, we find that the Gogny and SIII forces well reproduce the experimental binding energies of stable nuclei. The two forces give almost equal radii, except in the case of 7 Be and 9 Be. For both forces, approximate treatment of the center-of-mass kinetic energy causes overestimation of the binding energy compared with the exact treatment. It also causes a decrease of the nuclear deformation compared with the exact treatment. We also carry out an energy variation after the parity projection. With regard to the binding energies and radii, parity-projected calculations do not exhibit a large difference compared to non-projected results, although the density distribution and clustering features are often significantly changed by the parity projection. (author)

  10. Exploration of (super-)heavy elements using the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erler, Jochen

    2011-01-01

    Motivated by the steadily increasing number of known nuclei and nuclear properties, theories of nuclear structure are presently a field of intense research. This work concentrates on the self-consistent description of nuclei in terms of the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock (SHF) approach. The extrapolation of nuclear shell structure to the region of super-heavy elements (SHE) using the SHF model, the dependence on different parameterization and the influence of collective correlation will be studied. The general scope of this work are large scale calculation for a global survey of properties of SHE like binding energies, separation energies and decay characteristics and lifetimes. These calculations were done in a collaboration with the theory group of the GSI in Darmstadt and have the aim to develop a database of lifetimes and reaction rates for α, β-decay and spontaneous fission in a very wide range with proton numbers 86 ≤ Z ≤ 120 and neutron numbers up to N ∼ 260 relevant for the astrophysical r-process. The results of this study for example predictions of a possible islands of very stable nuclei and information of favored decay mode for each nuclei are also applicable in the recent experimental synthesis of exotic SHE. For these calculation a framework to calculate β-decay half-lives within the SHF model has been developed and the existing axial SHF code has been extended to compute β-transition matrix elements and so to provide an estimation of half-lives. (orig.)

  11. An outline of the life and work of Tony Hilton Royle Skyrme (1922-1987)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalitz, R.H.

    1988-01-01

    Tony Hilton Royle Skyrme was born on 5 December 1922 at 7 Blessington Road, Lewisham (Kent), London. Tony's maternal grandfather was Herbert William Thomson Roberts, a tidal computer for the Admiralty by profession. The inclusion of Lord Kelvin's baptismal name (William Thomson) among his forenames reflects the professional contact which Tony's great-grandfather had with Lord Kelvin and the high regard in which he held the latter. This great-grandfather of Tony's on the maternal side was Edward Roberts. He was appointed Secretary to the Tidal Committee of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, being made responsible later for the construction of the first Tidal Predicter, which had been designed by Lord Kelvin. He played a large part in the design and construction of the Universal Tide-predicting Machines used by the Indian and Colonial Government and by the Admiralty Hydrographic Office. It was his house which held the Tidal Predicter, the first model of the machine, which made such a strong impression on the young Tony and influenced so greatly the development of his later ideas, as Tony himself recounted in a lecture given at a Workshop on Skyrmions in 1984

  12. Exploration of (super-)heavy elements using the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erler, Jochen

    2011-01-31

    Motivated by the steadily increasing number of known nuclei and nuclear properties, theories of nuclear structure are presently a field of intense research. This work concentrates on the self-consistent description of nuclei in terms of the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock (SHF) approach. The extrapolation of nuclear shell structure to the region of super-heavy elements (SHE) using the SHF model, the dependence on different parameterization and the influence of collective correlation will be studied. The general scope of this work are large scale calculation for a global survey of properties of SHE like binding energies, separation energies and decay characteristics and lifetimes. These calculations were done in a collaboration with the theory group of the GSI in Darmstadt and have the aim to develop a database of lifetimes and reaction rates for {alpha}, {beta}-decay and spontaneous fission in a very wide range with proton numbers 86 {<=} Z {<=} 120 and neutron numbers up to N {approx} 260 relevant for the astrophysical r-process. The results of this study for example predictions of a possible islands of very stable nuclei and information of favored decay mode for each nuclei are also applicable in the recent experimental synthesis of exotic SHE. For these calculation a framework to calculate {beta}-decay half-lives within the SHF model has been developed and the existing axial SHF code has been extended to compute {beta}-transition matrix elements and so to provide an estimation of half-lives. (orig.)

  13. Effects of oncoming target velocities on rapid force production and accuracy of force production intensity and timing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Yoichi

    2017-12-01

    The present study aimed to clarify the effects of oncoming target velocities on the ability of rapid force production and accuracy and variability of simultaneous control of both force production intensity and timing. Twenty male participants (age: 21.0 ± 1.4 years) performed rapid gripping with a handgrip dynamometer to coincide with the arrival of an oncoming target by using a horizontal electronic trackway. The oncoming target velocities were 4, 8, and 12 m · s -1 , which were randomly produced. The grip force required was 30% of the maximal voluntary contraction. Although the peak force (Pf) and rate of force development (RFD) increased with increasing target velocity, the value of the RFD to Pf ratio was constant across the 3 target velocities. The accuracy of both force production intensity and timing decreased at higher target velocities. Moreover, the intrapersonal variability in temporal parameters was lower in the fast target velocity condition, but constant variability in 3 target velocities was observed in force intensity parameters. These results suggest that oncoming target velocity does not intrinsically affect the ability for rapid force production. However, the oncoming target velocity affects accuracy and variability of force production intensity and timing during rapid force production.

  14. Axially deformed solution of the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock-Bogolyubov equations using the transformed harmonic oscillator basis (III) HFBTHO (v3.00): A new version of the program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, R. Navarro; Schunck, N.; Lasseri, R.-D.; Zhang, C.; Sarich, J.

    2017-11-01

    intrinsic densities. In the present version of HFBTHO, the energy density derives either from the zero-range Skyrme or the finite-range Gogny effective two-body interaction between nucleons. Nuclear super-fluidity is treated at the Hartree-Fock-Bogolyubov (HFB) approximation. Constraints on the nuclear shape allows probing the potential energy surface of the nucleus as needed e.g., for the description of shape isomers or fission. The implementation of a local scale transformation of the single-particle basis in which the HFB solutions are expanded provide a tool to properly compute the structure of weakly-bound nuclei. Solution method: The program uses the axial Transformed Harmonic Oscillator (THO) single-particle basis to expand quasiparticle wave functions. It iteratively diagonalizes the Hartree-Fock-Bogolyubov Hamiltonian based on generalized Skyrme-like energy densities and zero-range pairing interactions or the finite-range Gogny force until a self-consistent solution is found. A previous version of the program was presented in M.V. Stoitsov, N. Schunck, M. Kortelainen, N. Michel, H. Nam, E. Olsen, J. Sarich, and S. Wild, Comput. Phys. Commun. 184 (2013) 1592-1604 with much of the formalism presented in the original paper M.V. Stoitsov, J. Dobaczewski, W. Nazarewicz, P. Ring, Comput. Phys. Commun. 167 (2005) 43-63. Additional comments: The user must have access to (i) the LAPACK subroutines DSYEEVR, DSYEVD, DSYTRF and DSYTRI, and their dependencies, which compute eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of real symmetric matrices, (ii) the LAPACK subroutines DGETRI and DGETRF, which invert arbitrary real matrices, and (iii) the BLAS routines DCOPY, DSCAL, DGEMM and DGEMV for double-precision linear algebra (or provide another set of subroutines that can perform such tasks). The BLAS and LAPACK subroutines can be obtained from the Netlib Repository at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville: http://netlib2.cs.utk.edu/.

  15. Effects of Capillary Forces and Adsorption on Reserves Distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shapiro, Alexander; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effects of capillary forces and adsorption on the distribution of a hydrocarbon mixture in an oil-gas-condensate reservoir. These effects consist in the precipitation of the liquid phase in thin pores and on the internal surface of the reservoir rock....... To estimate the amount of the dispersed liquid condensate, analytical methods based on the generalization of the Kelvin equation and on the potential theory of adsorption have been developed. Sample calculations show significant role of adsorption, especially, in the neighborhood of the critical point...

  16. Measurements of the Casimir-Lifshitz force in fluids: The effect of electrostatic forces and Debye screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munday, J. N.; Capasso, Federico; Parsegian, V. Adrian; Bezrukov, Sergey M.

    2008-09-01

    We present detailed measurements of the Casimir-Lifshitz force between two gold surfaces (a sphere and a plate) immersed in ethanol and study the effect of residual electrostatic forces, which are dominated by static fields within the apparatus and can be reduced with proper shielding. Electrostatic forces are further reduced by Debye screening through the addition of salt ions to the liquid. Additionally, the salt leads to a reduction of the Casimir-Lifshitz force by screening the zero-frequency contribution to the force; however, the effect is small between gold surfaces at the measured separations and within experimental error. An improved calibration procedure is described and compared with previous methods. Finally, the experimental results are compared with Lifshitz’s theory and found to be consistent for the materials used in the experiment.

  17. Deformation and clustering in even-Z nuclei up to Mg studied using AMD with the Gogny force

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimura, Masaaki; Sugawa, Yoshio; Horiuchi, Hisashi [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Physics

    2001-12-01

    Employing the Gogny force as an effective force, we study the ground state properties of light nuclei using antisymmetrized molecular dynamics (AMD). In a previous paper, we discussed the nuclear binding energies and nuclear radii of He, Be, C, O, Ne and Mg isotopes. In this paper, we mainly consider the deformation properties and the clustering nature of these isotopes. By comparing the calculated results with the AMD results by use of the Skyrme-III (SIII) force, we investigated the differences and similarities between the SIII force and the Gogny force. We find that the Gogny force yields rather better binding energy and larger deformation than the SIII force. We carry out the parity-projected calculations. Parity projection enhances the parity-violating deformation and the cluster structure of certain nuclei. Shape of the deformation energy surface is also changed by parity projection. This causes a competition between the mean-field-like structure and the cluster-like structure. A modified version of AMD, which employs deformed Gaussian wave packets instead of spherical ones, is shown to give large quadrupole moments in the case of Mg isotopes. (author)

  18. Deformation and clustering in even-Z nuclei up to Mg studied using AMD with the Gogny force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Masaaki; Sugawa, Yoshio; Horiuchi, Hisashi

    2001-01-01

    Employing the Gogny force as an effective force, we study the ground state properties of light nuclei using antisymmetrized molecular dynamics (AMD). In a previous paper, we discussed the nuclear binding energies and nuclear radii of He, Be, C, O, Ne and Mg isotopes. In this paper, we mainly consider the deformation properties and the clustering nature of these isotopes. By comparing the calculated results with the AMD results by use of the Skyrme-III (SIII) force, we investigated the differences and similarities between the SIII force and the Gogny force. We find that the Gogny force yields rather better binding energy and larger deformation than the SIII force. We carry out the parity-projected calculations. Parity projection enhances the parity-violating deformation and the cluster structure of certain nuclei. Shape of the deformation energy surface is also changed by parity projection. This causes a competition between the mean-field-like structure and the cluster-like structure. A modified version of AMD, which employs deformed Gaussian wave packets instead of spherical ones, is shown to give large quadrupole moments in the case of Mg isotopes. (author)

  19. Effects of force reflection on servomanipulator task performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Draper, J.V.; Moore, W.E.; Herndon, J.N.; Weil, B.S.

    1986-01-01

    This paper reports results of a testing program that assessed the impact of force reflection on servomanipulator task performance. The testing program compared three force-reflection levels: 4 to 1 (four units of force on the slave produce one unit of force at the master controller), 1 to 1, and infinity to 1 (no force reflection). Time required to complete tasks, rate of occurrence of errors, the maximum force applied to task components, and variability in forces during completion of representative remote handling tasks were used as dependent variables. Operators exhibited lower error rates, lower peak forces, and more consistent application of forces using force reflection than they did without it. These data support the hypothesis that force reflection provides useful information for servomanipulator operators

  20. Effects of experimental muscle pain on force variability during task-related and three directional isometric force task

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mista, Christian Ariel; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    was measured using sample entropy (SEn). Three-way repeated measures ANOVA with factors level of contraction, pain/control, and time were performed for the CV, the CoP, and the SEn of each component of the force. In the tangential forces, no significant effects were found for the 3D matching tasks. The ANOVA.......05). In the task-related force, no significant effects were found for the CV during the three-dimensional task or for the task-related task. Finally, the ANOVA analysis of sample entropy showed a significant interaction between pain/control and time (P

  1. The Longitudinal Effective CSR Force at Mild Compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rui Li

    2005-01-01

    In the scheme of magnetic bunch compression, an electron bunch with linear energy chirp (energy-bunch length correlation), imposed by an upstream RF cavity, is sent to a magnetic chicane. The bunch length at the exit of the chicane can thus be manipulated via the pathlength-energy dependence due to chicane dispersion. As a linear energy-chirped bunch ((delta)-z correlation) being transported through a dispersive region (x-(delta) correlation), the bunch will have a linear horizontal-longitudinal (x-z) correlation in the configuration space (bunch tilt). Comparing to the case of a nontilted bunch, this x-z correlation modifies the geometry of particle interaction with respect to the direction of particle motion, which consequently modifies the retardation solution and the effective CSR forces. The simulation result of the CSR field for a tilted thin beam was presented earlier by Dohlus [1]. In this paper, we first give an example of the bunch x-z correlation, or bunch tilt, in a bunch compression chicane. The effect of this x-z correlation on the retardation solution and the longitudinal effective force are then analyzed for a line bunch with linear energy chirp transported by design optics

  2. Placement and efficiency effects on radiative forcing of solar installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burg, Brian R.; Ruch, Patrick; Paredes, Stephan; Michel, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    The promise for harnessing solar energy being hampered by cost, triggered efforts to reduce them. As a consequence low-efficiency, low-cost photovoltaics (PV) panels prevail. Conversely, in the traditional energy sector efficiency is extremely important due to the direct costs associated to fuels. This also affects solar energy due to the radiative forcing caused by the dark solar panels. In this paper we extend the concept of energy payback time by including the effect of albedo change, which gives a better assessment of the system sustainability. We present an analysis on the short and medium term climate forcing effects of different solar collectors in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia and demonstrate that efficiency is important to reduce the collector area and cost. This also influences the embodied energy and the global warming potential. We show that a placement of a high concentration photovoltaic thermal solar power station outside of the city using a district cooling system has a double beneficial effect since it improves the solar conversion efficiency and reduces the energy demand for cooling in the city. We also explain the mechanisms of the current economic development of solar technologies and anticipate changes

  3. Placement and efficiency effects on radiative forcing of solar installations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burg, Brian R.; Ruch, Patrick; Paredes, Stephan; Michel, Bruno, E-mail: bmi@zurich.ibm.com [IBM Research - Zurich, Säumerstrasse 4, CH-8803 Rüschlikon (Switzerland)

    2015-09-28

    The promise for harnessing solar energy being hampered by cost, triggered efforts to reduce them. As a consequence low-efficiency, low-cost photovoltaics (PV) panels prevail. Conversely, in the traditional energy sector efficiency is extremely important due to the direct costs associated to fuels. This also affects solar energy due to the radiative forcing caused by the dark solar panels. In this paper we extend the concept of energy payback time by including the effect of albedo change, which gives a better assessment of the system sustainability. We present an analysis on the short and medium term climate forcing effects of different solar collectors in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia and demonstrate that efficiency is important to reduce the collector area and cost. This also influences the embodied energy and the global warming potential. We show that a placement of a high concentration photovoltaic thermal solar power station outside of the city using a district cooling system has a double beneficial effect since it improves the solar conversion efficiency and reduces the energy demand for cooling in the city. We also explain the mechanisms of the current economic development of solar technologies and anticipate changes.

  4. What are the barriers to trying to reach, and evaluate the impact of working with, Forces Families? Assessing the effectiveness of Reading Force, a programme to promote shared reading within the Forces community

    OpenAIRE

    Baverstock, Alison

    2016-01-01

    What are the barriers to trying to reach, and evaluate the impact of working with, Forces Families? Assessing the effectiveness of Reading Force, a programme to promote shared reading within the Forces community

  5. Ponderomotive force effects on temperature-gradient-driven instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundaram, A.K.; Hershkowitz, N.

    1992-01-01

    The modification of temperature-gradient-driven instabilities due to the presence of nonuniform radio-frequency fields near the ion cyclotron frequency is investigated in the linear regime. Employing the fluid theory, it is shown that the induced field line compression caused by ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) fields makes the net parallel compressibility positive, and thus provides a stabilizing influence on the ion-temperature-gradient-driven mode for an appropriately tailored profile of radio-frequency (rf) pressure. Concomitantly, the radial ponderomotive force generates an additional contribution via coupling between the perturbed fluid motion and the equilibrium ponderomotive force and this effect plays the role of dissipation to enhance or decrease the growth of temperature-gradient-driven modes depending upon the sign of rf pressure gradients. For decreased growth of temperature-gradient-driven instabilities, the plasma density gradients and rf pressure gradients must have opposite signs while enhancement in growth arises when both gradients have the same sign. Finally, the kinetic effects associated with these modes are briefly discussed

  6. IS FREE REALLY FREE PALACE ACQUIRE AS AN EFFECTIVE FORCE RENEWAL SOURCE FOR AIR FORCE PUBLIC AFFAIRS

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-29

    student loans. Acceptance of SLRP results in a service commitment of one year for each $10,000, with time running concurrently. In addition, PALACE...trainee requires decreases with the amount of time he/she spends in the program, considering the three other methods of force renewal produce qualified...AU/ACSC/2016 AIR COMMAND AND STAFF COLLEGE AIR UNIVERSITY IS FREE REALLY FREE ? PALACE ACQUIRE AS AN EFFECTIVE FORCE RENEWAL SOURCE FOR AIR

  7. Magnetic force driven magnetoelectric effect in bi-cantilever composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ru; Wu, Gaojian; Zhang, Ning

    2017-12-01

    The magnetic force driven magnetoelectric (ME) effect in bi-cantilever Mn-Zn-Ferrite /PZT composites is presented. Compared with single cantilever, the ME voltage coefficient in bi-cantilever composite is a little lower and the resonance frequency is higher, but the bi-cantilever structure is advantageous for integration. When the magnetic gap is 3 mm, the ME voltage coefficient can achieve 6.2 Vcm-1Oe-1 at resonance under optimum bias field Hm=1030 Oe; when the magnetic gap is 1.5 mm, the ME voltage coefficient can get the value as high as 4.4 Vcm-1Oe-1 under much lower bias field H=340 Oe. The stable ME effect in bi-cantilever composites has important potential application in the design of new type ME device.

  8. Effect of various periodic forces on Duffing oscillator

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ω respectively. However, the Fourier series of all the forces except the force sin ωt considered in our study have various frequencies. The frequencies present in the forces and in the periodic solution confined to the left well alone corresponding to the amplitude f = 0.2 are studied by constructing the Fourier series. 352.

  9. Measuring the greenhouse effect and radiative forcing through the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philipona, Rolf; Kräuchi, Andreas; Brocard, Emmanuel

    2013-04-01

    In spite of a large body of existing measurements of incoming shortwave solar radiation and outgoing longwave terrestrial radiation at the Earth's surface and at the top of the atmosphere, there are few observations documenting how radiation profiles change through the atmosphere - information that is necessary to fully quantify the greenhouse effect of the Earth's atmosphere. Using weather balloons and specific radiometer equipped radiosondes, we continuously measured shortwave and longwave radiation fluxes from the surface of the Earth up to altitudes of 35 kilometers in the upper stratosphere. Comparing radiation profiles from night measurements with different amounts of water vapor, we show evidence of large greenhouse forcing. We show, that under cloud free conditions, water vapor increases with Clausius-Clapeyron ( 7% / K), and longwave downward radiation at the surface increases by 8 Watts per square meter per Kelvin. The longwave net radiation however, shows a positive increase (downward) of 2.4 Watts per square meter and Kelvin at the surface, which decreases with height and shows a similar but negative increase (upward) at the tropopause. Hence, increased tropospheric water vapor increases longwave net radiation towards the ground and towards space, and produces a heating of 0.42 Kelvin per Watt per square meter at the surface. References: Philipona et al., 2012: Solar and thermal radiation profiles and radiative forcing measured through the atmosphere. Geophys. Res. Lett., 39, L13806, doi: 10.1029/2012GL052087.

  10. Effect of compressive force on PEM fuel cell performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Colin Stephen

    Polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells possess the potential, as a zero-emission power source, to replace the internal combustion engine as the primary option for transportation applications. Though there are a number of obstacles to vast PEM fuel cell commercialization, such as high cost and limited durability, there has been significant progress in the field to achieve this goal. Experimental testing and analysis of fuel cell performance has been an important tool in this advancement. Experimental studies of the PEM fuel cell not only identify unfiltered performance response to manipulation of variables, but also aid in the advancement of fuel cell modelling, by allowing for validation of computational schemes. Compressive force used to contain a fuel cell assembly can play a significant role in how effectively the cell functions, the most obvious example being to ensure proper sealing within the cell. Compression can have a considerable impact on cell performance beyond the sealing aspects. The force can manipulate the ability to deliver reactants and the electrochemical functions of the cell, by altering the layers in the cell susceptible to this force. For these reasons an experimental study was undertaken, presented in this thesis, with specific focus placed on cell compression; in order to study its effect on reactant flow fields and performance response. The goal of the thesis was to develop a consistent and accurate general test procedure for the experimental analysis of a PEM fuel cell in order to analyse the effects of compression on performance. The factors potentially affecting cell performance, which were a function of compression, were identified as: (1) Sealing and surface contact; (2) Pressure drop across the flow channel; (3) Porosity of the GDL. Each factor was analysed independently in order to determine the individual contribution to changes in performance. An optimal degree of compression was identified for the cell configuration in

  11. The Effect of Improving the Logistics Pipeline on Supply Support of Aerospace Expeditionary Forces

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Martinez, Steven

    2001-01-01

    .... If so, the Air Force should be able to trim its wartime stocks of aircraft spares. This thesis investigated the effect of improving the logistics pipeline on the size and cost of Air Force mobility readiness spares packages (MRSPs...

  12. Effect of potassium channel modulators in mouse forced swimming test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeotti, Nicoletta; Ghelardini, Carla; Caldari, Bernardetta; Bartolini, Alessandro

    1999-01-01

    The effect of intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of different potassium channel blockers (tetraethylammonium, apamin, charybdotoxin, gliquidone), potassium channel openers (pinacidil, minoxidil, cromakalim) and aODN to mKv1.1 on immobility time was evaluated in the mouse forced swimming test, an animal model of depression. Tetraethylammonium (TEA; 5 μg per mouse i.c.v.), apamin (3 ng per mouse i.c.v.), charybdotoxin (1 μg per mouse i.c.v.) and gliquidone (6 μg per mouse i.c.v.) administered 20 min before the test produced anti-immobility comparable to that induced by the tricyclic antidepressants amitriptyline (15 mg kg−1 s.c.) and imipramine (30 mg kg−1 s.c.). By contrast pinacidil (10–20 μg per mouse i.c.v.), minoxidil (10–20 μg per mouse i.c.v.) and cromakalim (20–30 μg per mouse i.c.v.) increased immobility time when administered in the same experimental conditions. Repeated administration of an antisense oligonucleotide (aODN) to the mKv1.1 gene (1 and 3 nmol per single i.c.v. injection) produced a dose-dependent increase in immobility time of mice 72 h after the last injection. At day 7, the increasing effect produced by aODN disappeared. A degenerate mKv1.1 oligonucleotide (dODN), used as control, did not produce any effect in comparison with saline- and vector-treated mice. At the highest effective dose, potassium channels modulators and the mKv1.1 aODN did not impair motor coordination, as revealed by the rota rod test, nor did they modify spontaneous motility as revealed by the Animex apparatus. These results suggest that modulation of potassium channels plays an important role in the regulation of immobility time in the mouse forced swimming test. PMID:10323599

  13. Is effective force application in handrim wheelchair propulsion also efficient?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bregman, D J J; van Drongelen, S; Veeger, H E J

    2009-01-01

    Efficiency in manual wheelchair propulsion is low, as is the fraction of the propulsion force that is attributed to the moment of propulsion of the wheelchair. In this study we tested the hypothesis that a tangential propulsion force direction leads to an increase in physiological cost, due to (1) the sub-optimal use of elbow flexors and extensors, and/or (2) the necessity of preventing of glenohumeral subluxation. Five able-bodied and 11 individuals with a spinal cord injury propelled a wheelchair while kinematics and kinetics were collected. The results were used to perform inverse dynamical simulations with input of (1) the experimentally obtained propulsion force, and (2) only the tangential component of that force. In the tangential force condition the physiological cost was over 30% higher, while the tangential propulsion force was only 75% of the total experimental force. According to model estimations, the tangential force condition led to more co-contraction around the elbow, and a higher power production around the shoulder joint. The tangential propulsion force led to a significant, but small 4% increase in necessity for the model to compensate for glenohumeral subluxation, which indicates that this is not a likely cause of the decrease in efficiency. The present findings support the hypothesis that the observed force direction in wheelchair propulsion is a compromise between efficiency and the constraints imposed by the wheelchair-user system. This implies that training should not be aimed at optimization of the propulsion force, because this may be less efficient and more straining for the musculoskeletal system.

  14. Stix Award: The ponderomotive effect beyond the ponderomotive force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodin, I. Y.

    2014-10-01

    The classical ponderomotive effect (PE) is typically understood as the nonlinear time-average force produced by a rapidly oscillating electromagnetic field on a nonresonant particle. It is instructive to contrast this understanding with the common quantum interpretation of the PE as the ac Stark shift, i.e., phase modulation, or a Kerr effect experienced by the wave function. Then the PE is naturally extended from particles to waves and can be calculated efficiently in general settings, including for strongly nonlinear interactions and resonant dynamics. In particular, photons (plasmons, etc.) are hence seen to have polarizability and contribute to the linear dielectric tensor exactly like ``true'' particles such as electrons and ions. The talk will briefly review the underlying variational theory and some nonintuitive PE-based techniques of wave and particle manipulation that the theory predicts. It will also be shown that the PE can be understood as the cause for the basic properties of both linear and nonlinear waves in plasma, including their dispersion, energy-momentum transport, and various modulational instabilities. Linear collisionless dissipation (both on particles and classical waves, treated on the same footing) also appears merely as a special case of the modulational dynamics. The work was supported by NNSA grant DE274-FG52-08NA28553, DOE contract DE-AC02-09CH11466, and DTRA grant HDTRA1-11-1-0037.

  15. Effects of bruxism on the maximum bite force

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todić Jelena T.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Bruxism is a parafunctional activity of the masticatory system, which is characterized by clenching or grinding of teeth. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the presence of bruxism has impact on maximum bite force, with particular reference to the potential impact of gender on bite force values. Methods. This study included two groups of subjects: without and with bruxism. The presence of bruxism in the subjects was registered using a specific clinical questionnaire on bruxism and physical examination. The subjects from both groups were submitted to the procedure of measuring the maximum bite pressure and occlusal contact area using a single-sheet pressure-sensitive films (Fuji Prescale MS and HS Film. Maximal bite force was obtained by multiplying maximal bite pressure and occlusal contact area values. Results. The average values of maximal bite force were significantly higher in the subjects with bruxism compared to those without bruxism (p 0.01. Maximal bite force was significantly higher in the males compared to the females in all segments of the research. Conclusion. The presence of bruxism influences the increase in the maximum bite force as shown in this study. Gender is a significant determinant of bite force. Registration of maximum bite force can be used in diagnosing and analysing pathophysiological events during bruxism.

  16. Effect of various periodic forces on Duffing oscillator

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bifurcations and chaos in the ubiquitous Duffing oscillator equation with different external periodic forces are studied numerically. The external periodic forces considered are sine wave, square wave, rectified sine wave, symmetric saw-tooth wave, asymmetric saw-tooth wave, rectangular wave with amplitude-dependent ...

  17. Preliminary Evaluation of the Effectiveness of Air Force Advertising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitola, Bart M.

    The Airman Enlistment Questionnaire was administered to a sample of non prior service enlistees, 1,667 males and 300 females. Analysis of the responses shows (1)educational opportunity is the strongest motivator for enlisting in the Air Force; (2) there is an indication that Air Force advertising should make different appeals to men and women; and…

  18. Is effective force application in handrim wheelchair propulsion also efficient?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bregman, D.J.J.; van Drongelen, S.V.; Veeger, H.E.J.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Efficiency in manual wheelchair propulsion is low, as is the fraction of the propulsion force that is attributed to the moment of propulsion of the wheelchair. In this study we tested the hypothesis that a tangential propulsion force direction leads to an increase in physiological cost,

  19. Antidepressant effect of Melissa officinalis in the forced swimming test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Emamghoreishi

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background: In Iranian and other traditional medicines, an antidepressant effect has been indicated for Melissa officinalis (Lamiaceae. However, studies showing its antidepressant effect is lacking. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to examine whether the aqueous extract and essential oil from leaves of Melissa officinalis have an antidepressant-like activity in mice.  Materials and Methods: The effect of subchronic administration of different doses of the aqueous extract (25, 75, 150, 300 mg/kg or water; n=9-10 and the essential oil (10, 25, 75, 150, 300 mg/kg or almond oil; n=9-10 on immobility, climbing, and swimming behaviors were evaluated in the forced swimming test. Fluoxetine (20mg/kg and imipramine (15 mg/kg were used as reference drugs. Additionally, the effect of both plant preparations on spontaneous activity was examined. Results: All doses of the aqueous extract, used in this study, produced a significant reduction in immobility along with an increase in climbing behavior which is similar to those which have been observed with imipramine. Essential oil caused a dose-dependent reduction in immobility and an increase in climbing at all studied doses, compared to control group. Only the highest dose (300mg/kg of essential oil showed a significant increase in swimming behavior. The aqueous extract, but not the essential oil, decreased spontaneous activity in a dose dependent manner. Conclusion: The results of this study suggests that the Melissa officinalis possess an antidepressant-like activity similar to imipramine which may have a potential clinical value for treatment of depression.

  20. Coherence and interlimb force control: Effects of visual gain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Nyeonju; Cauraugh, James H

    2018-03-06

    Neural coupling across hemispheres and homologous muscles often appears during bimanual motor control. Force coupling in a specific frequency domain may indicate specific bimanual force coordination patterns. This study investigated coherence on pairs of bimanual isometric index finger force while manipulating visual gain and task asymmetry conditions. We used two visual gain conditions (low and high gain = 8 and 512 pixels/N), and created task asymmetry by manipulating coefficient ratios imposed on the left and right index finger forces (0.4:1.6; 1:1; 1.6:0.4, respectively). Unequal coefficient ratios required different contributions from each hand to the bimanual force task resulting in force asymmetry. Fourteen healthy young adults performed bimanual isometric force control at 20% of their maximal level of the summed force of both fingers. We quantified peak coherence and relative phase angle between hands at 0-4, 4-8, and 8-12 Hz, and estimated a signal-to-noise ratio of bimanual forces. The findings revealed higher peak coherence and relative phase angle at 0-4 Hz than at 4-8 and 8-12 Hz for both visual gain conditions. Further, peak coherence and relative phase angle values at 0-4 Hz were larger at the high gain than at the low gain. At the high gain, higher peak coherence at 0-4 Hz collapsed across task asymmetry conditions significantly predicted greater signal-to-noise ratio. These findings indicate that a greater level of visual information facilitates bimanual force coupling at a specific frequency range related to sensorimotor processing. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. 3-D Effects Force Reduction of Short-Crested Non-Breaking Waves on Caissons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, H. F.; Liu, Z.

    1998-01-01

    The effect of wave short-crestedness on the horizontal wave force on a caisson is twofold. The one is the force reduction due to the reduction of point pressure on the caisson, named point-pressure reduction. The other is the force reduction due to the fact that the peak pressures do not occur si...

  2. Optical pulling force and conveyor belt effect in resonator-waveguide system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intaraprasonk, Varat; Fan, Shanhui

    2013-09-01

    We present the theoretical condition and actual numerical design that achieves an optical pulling force in resonator-waveguide systems, where the direction of the force on the resonator is in the opposite direction to the input light in the waveguide. We also show that this pulling force can occur in conjunction with the lateral optical equilibrium effect, such that the resonator is maintained at the fixed distance from the waveguide while experiencing the pulling force.

  3. Effect of Chamber Wall Proximity on Radiometer Force Production (Preprint)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Selden, N. P; Gimelshein, N. E; Gimelshein, S. F; Ketsdever, A. D

    2008-01-01

    ... on a given radiometer configuration in both the free molecule and transitional regimes. The contribution of the chamber walls to both the flowfield structure and radiometric force production were examined for helium, argon, and nitrogen test gases...

  4. The effects of atomic force microscopy upon nominated living cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Hagan, Barry Michael Gerard [School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Ulster, Cromore Road, Coleraine, County Londonderry, BT52 1SA (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: bmg.ohagan@ulstser.ac.uk; Doyle, Peter [Unilever Research, Port Sunlight, The Wirral, Merseyside (United Kingdom); Allen, James M. [School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Ulster, Cromore Road, Coleraine, County Londonderry, BT52 1SA (United Kingdom); Sutton, Kerry [School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Ulster, Cromore Road, Coleraine, County Londonderry, BT52 1SA (United Kingdom); McKerr, George [School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Ulster, Cromore Road, Coleraine, County Londonderry, BT52 1SA (United Kingdom)

    2004-12-15

    This work describes a system for precise re-location of cells within a monolayer after atomic force imaging. As we know little about probe interaction with soft biological surfaces any corroborative evidence is of great importance. For example, it is of paramount importance in living cell force microscopy that interrogated cells can be re-located and imaged by other corroborative technologies. Methodologies expressed here have shown that non-invasive force parameters can be established for specific cell types. Additionally, we show that the same sample can be transferred reliably to an SEM. Results here indicate that further work with live cells should initially establish appropriate prevailing force parameters and that cell damage should be checked for before and after an imaging experiment.

  5. The effects of atomic force microscopy upon nominated living cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Hagan, Barry Michael Gerard; Doyle, Peter; Allen, James M.; Sutton, Kerry; McKerr, George

    2004-01-01

    This work describes a system for precise re-location of cells within a monolayer after atomic force imaging. As we know little about probe interaction with soft biological surfaces any corroborative evidence is of great importance. For example, it is of paramount importance in living cell force microscopy that interrogated cells can be re-located and imaged by other corroborative technologies. Methodologies expressed here have shown that non-invasive force parameters can be established for specific cell types. Additionally, we show that the same sample can be transferred reliably to an SEM. Results here indicate that further work with live cells should initially establish appropriate prevailing force parameters and that cell damage should be checked for before and after an imaging experiment

  6. Evaluating the Effectiveness of Air Force Foundational Cyberspace Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-14

    projected and actual USAFA and AFROTC officer accessions [15]. The Basic Officer Training syllabus for academic year 2010-2011 included a lesson...Forces Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB), which covers four areas: arithmetic reasoning, word knowledge, paragraph comprehension, and mathematics ...http://afrotc.com/ college -life/courses/descriptions/ (accessed 25 May 2012). [12] United States Air Force Holm Center, "Cyberspace Lesson Plan

  7. Force Balance and Substorm Effects in the Magnetotail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, Richard L.; Larson, Douglas J.; Kontodinas, Ioannis D.; Ball, Bryan M.

    1997-01-01

    A model of the quiet time middle magnetotail is developed using a consistent orbit tracing technique. The momentum equation is used to calculate geocentric solar magnetospheric components of the particle and electromagnetic forces throughout the current sheet. Ions generate the dominant x and z force components. Electron and ion forces almost cancel in the y direction because the two species drift earthward at comparable speeds. The force viewpoint is applied to a study of some substorm processes. Generation of the rapid flows seen during substorm injection and bursty bulk flow events implies substantial force imbalances. The formation of a substorm diversion loop is one cause of changes in the magnetic field and therefore in the electromagnetic force. It is found that larger forces are produced when the cross-tail current is diverted to the ionosphere than would be produced if the entire tail current system simply decreased. Plasma is accelerated while the forces are unbalanced resulting in field lines within a diversion loop becoming more dipolar. Field lines become more stretched and the plasma sheet becomes thinner outside a diversion loop. Mechanisms that require thin current sheets to produce current disruption then can create additional diversion loops in the newly thinned regions. This process may be important during multiple expansion substorms and in differentiating pseudoexpansions from full substorms. It is found that the tail field model used here can be generated by a variety of particle distribution functions. However, for a given energy distribution the mixture of particle mirror or reflection points is constrained by the consistency requirement. The study of uniqueness also leads to the development of a technique to select guiding center electrons that will produce charge neutrality all along a flux tube containing nonguiding center ions without the imposition of a parallel electric field.

  8. Effects of Sled Towing on Peak Force, the Rate of Force Development and Sprint Performance During the Acceleration Phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martínez-Valencia María Asunción

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Resisted sprint training is believed to increase strength specific to sprinting. Therefore, the knowledge of force output in these tasks is essential. The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of sled towing (10%, 15% and 20% of body mass (Bm on sprint performance and force production during the acceleration phase. Twenty-three young experienced sprinters (17 men and 6 women; men = 17.9 ± 3.3 years, 1.79 ± 0.06 m and 69.4 ± 6.1 kg; women = 17.2 ± 1.7 years, 1.65 ± 0.04 m and 56.6 ± 2.3 kg performed four 30 m sprints from a crouch start. Sprint times in 20 and 30 m sprint, peak force (Fpeak, a peak rate of force development (RFDpeak and time to RFD (TRFD in first step were recorded. Repeated-measures ANOVA showed significant increases (p ≤ 0.001 in sprint times (20 and 30 m sprint for each resisted condition as compared to the unloaded condition. The RFDpeak increased significantly when a load increased (3129.4 ± 894.6 N·s−1, p ≤ 0.05 and 3892.4 ± 1377.9 N·s−1, p ≤ 0.01. Otherwise, no significant increases were found in Fpeak and TRFD. The RFD determines the force that can be generated in the early phase of muscle contraction, and it has been considered a factor that influences performance of force-velocity tasks. The use of a load up to 20% Bm might provide a training stimulus in young sprinters to improve the RFDpeak during the sprint start, and thus, early acceleration.

  9. Investigations on the Effects of Vortex-Induced Vibration with Different Distributions of Lorentz Forces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The control of vortex-induced vibration (VIV in shear flow with different distributions of Lorentz force is numerically investigated based on the stream function–vorticity equations in the exponential-polar coordinates exerted on moving cylinder for Re = 150. The cylinder motion equation coupled with the fluid, including the mathematical expressions of the lift force coefficient C l , is derived. The initial and boundary conditions as well as the hydrodynamic forces on the surface of cylinder are also formulated. The Lorentz force applied to suppress the VIV has no relationship with the flow field, and involves two categories, i.e., the field Lorentz force and the wall Lorentz force. With the application of symmetrical Lorentz forces, the symmetric field Lorentz force can amplify the drag, suppress the flow separation, decrease the lift fluctuation, and then suppress the VIV while the wall Lorentz force decreases the drag only. With the application of asymmetrical Lorentz forces, besides the above-mentioned effects, the field Lorentz force can increase additional lift induced by shear flow, whereas the wall Lorentz force can counteract the additional lift, which is dominated on the total effect.

  10. Effect of polarization force on the Jeans instability of self-gravitating dusty plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prajapati, R.P.

    2011-01-01

    The effect of polarization force acting on massive charged dust grains is investigated analytically on the Jeans instability of self-gravitating dusty plasma. The gravitational force acting on the massive negatively charged interstellar dust grains are considered in presence of both electrical and polarization forces. The basic equations of the problem are formulated and a general dispersion relation is obtained using plane wave approximation in low frequency wave mode. The effect of polarization force in the dispersion relation of the problem, condition of the Jeans instability and expression of the critical Jeans wave number is examined. The unstable growing modes due to self-gravitational force are studied in the situation when polarization force on the dust grain exceeds over the electrical force in magnitude. It is observed that the polarization force increases the growth rate of the system. -- Highlights: → Jeans instability of gravitating dusty plasma with polarization force is investigated. → The fundamental Jeans instability criterion is modified due to polarization effect. → The critical Jeans length decreases due to increase in polarization force. → Polarization force destabilizes the unstable Jeans mode. → The collapsing of interstellar dusty cloud is discussed.

  11. Effective quantum theories with short- and long-range forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koenig, Sebastian

    2013-01-01

    At low energies, nonrelativistic quantum systems are essentially governed by their wave functions at large distances. For this reason, it is possible to describe a wide range of phenomena with short- or even finite-range interactions. In this thesis, we discuss several topics in connection with such an effective description and consider, in particular, modifications introduced by the presence of additional long-range potentials. In the first part we derive general results for the mass (binding energy) shift of bound states with angular momentum L ≥ 1 in a periodic cubic box in two and three spatial dimensions. Our results have applications to lattice simulations of hadronic molecules, halo nuclei, and Feshbach molecules. The sign of the mass shift can be related to the symmetry properties of the state under consideration. We verify our analytical results with explicit numerical calculations. Moreover, we discuss the case of twisted boundary conditions that arise when one considers moving bound states in finite boxes. The corresponding finite-volume shifts in the binding energies play an important role in the study of composite-particle scattering on the lattice, where they give rise to topological correction factors. While the above results are derived under the assumption of a pure finite-range interaction - and are still true up to exponentially small correction in the short-range case - in the second part we consider primarily systems of charged particles, where the Coulomb force determines the long-range part of the potential. In quantum systems with short-range interactions, causality imposes nontrivial constraints on low-energy scattering parameters. We investigate these causality constraints for systems where a long-range Coulomb potential is present in addition to a short-range interaction. The main result is an upper bound for the Coulomb-modified effective range parameter. We discuss the implications of this bound to the effective feld theory (EFT) for

  12. Effect of capillary condensation on friction force and adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feiler, Adam A; Stiernstedt, Johanna; Theander, Katarina; Jenkins, Paul; Rutland, Mark W

    2007-01-16

    Friction force measurements have been conducted with a colloid probe on mica and silica (both hydrophilic and hydrophobized) after long (24 h) exposure to high-humidity air. Adhesion and friction measurements have also been performed on cellulose substrates. The long exposure to high humidity led to a large hysteresis between loading and unloading in the friction measurements with separation occurring at large negative applied loads. The large hysteresis in the friction-load relationship is attributed to a contact area hysteresis of the capillary condensate which built up during loading and did not evaporate during the unloading regime. The magnitude of the friction force varied dramatically between substrates and was lowest on the mica substrate and highest on the hydrophilic silica substrate, with the hydrophobized silica and cellulose being intermediate. The adhesion due to capillary forces on cellulose was small compared to that on the other substrates, due to the greater roughness of these surfaces.

  13. Van der Waals Forces and Photon-Less Effective Field Theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arriola, E.R.

    2011-01-01

    In the ultra-cold regime Van der Waals forces between neutral atoms can be represented by short range effective interactions. We show that universal low energy scaling features of the underlying vdW long range force stemming from two photon exchange impose restrictions on an Effective Field Theory without explicit photons. The role of naively redundant operators, relevant to the definition of three body forces, is also analyzed. (author)

  14. Object size effects on initial lifting forces under microgravity conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kingma, I.; Savelsbergh, G.J.P.; Toussaint, H.M.

    1999-01-01

    Individuals usually report for two objects of equal mass but different volume that the larger object feels lighter. This so-called size-weight illusion has been investigated for more than a century. The illusion is accompanied by increased forces, used to lift the larger object, resulting in a

  15. The forced harmonic oscillator with damping and thermal effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menezes Franca, H. de; Thomaz, M.T.

    1984-01-01

    Nonperturbative quantum mechanical solutions of the forced harmonic oscillator with radiation reaction damping are obtained from previous analysis based on Stochastic Electrodynamics. The transition to excited states is shown to be to coherent states which follow the classical trajectory. The quantum Wigner distribution in phase space is constructed. All the results are extended to finite temperatures. (Author) [pt

  16. Breaking Force and Conductance of Gold Nanojunctions: Effect of Humidity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mohos, M.; Pobelov, I. V.; Kolivoška, Viliam; Mészáros, G.; Broekmann, P.; Wandlowski, T.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 20 (2014), s. 3560-3564 ISSN 1948-7185 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : current sensing atomic force microscopy * adhesion * metal nanocontacts Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 7.458, year: 2014

  17. Effects of forcing in three-dimensional turbulent flows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biferale, L.; Lanotte, A.; Toschi, F.

    2004-01-01

    We present the results of a numerical investigation of three-dimensional homogeneous and isotropic turbulence, stirred by a random forcing with a power-law spectrum, Ef(k)~k3-y. Numerical simulations are performed at different resolutions up to 5123. We show that at varying the spectrum slope y,

  18. Effects of Experience on Preference between Forced and Free Choice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Koichi

    2004-01-01

    Preference between forced choice and free choice in concurrent-chain schedules of reinforcement was investigated in pigeons after exposure to particular combinations of terminal links. In Experiment 1, in which terminal links always ended with reinforcers, one of three pairs of terminal links was arranged as preexposure: (a) both terminal links…

  19. Nonuniform charging effects on ion drag force in drifting dusty plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Dong-Man; Chang, Won-Seok; Jung, Young-Dae

    2006-01-01

    The nonuniform polarization charging effects on the ion drag force are investigated in drifting dusty plasmas. The ion drag force due to the ion-dust grain interaction is obtained as a function of the dust charge, ion charge, plasma temperature, Mach number, Debye length, and collision energy. The result shows that the nonuniform charging effects enhance the momentum transfer cross section as well as the ion drag force. It is found that the momentum transfer cross section and the ion drag force including nonuniform polarization charging effects increase with increasing the Mach number and also the ion drag force increases with increasing the temperature. In addition, it is found that the ion drag force is slightly decreasing with an increase of the Debye length

  20. On the properties of nuclear matter with an excess of neutrons, of spin-up neutrons and of spin-up protons using the Skyrme interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, M.Y.M.; Ramadan, S.

    1983-11-01

    The binding energy of nuclear matter with an excess of neutrons, of spin-up neutrons, and of spin-up protons (characterized by the corresponding parameters, αsub(tau)=(N-Z/A), αsub(n)=(Nup-Ndown)/A, and αsub(rho)=(Zup-Zdown)/A), contains three symmetry energies: the isospin symmetry energy Esub(tau), the spin symmetry energy Esub(σ), and spin-isospin symmetry energy Esub(σtau). General expressions for Esub(σ), Esub(tau) and Esub(σtau) are given in the case of the Skyrme interaction. These values are compared with previous results obtained by Dabrowski and Haensel (DH) with Brueckner-Gammel-Thaler, the Hamada-Johnston, and the Reid soft core nucleon-nucleon potentials. The spin, isospin and spin-isospin dependent parts of the single-particle potential in nuclear matter are also calculated using the Skyrme interaction. The spin, isospin and spin-isospin incompressibility are calculated using the Skyrme interaction. The spin-spin part of the optical model potential is estimated. The results are compared with those of Dabrowski and Haensel (DH) and Hassan and Ramadan. (author)

  1. Effects of Velocity-Dependent Force on the Magnetic Form Factors of Odd-Z Nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tie-Kuang, Dong; Zhong-Zhou, Ren

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the effects of the velocity-dependent force on the magnetic form factors and magnetic moments of odd-Z nuclei. The form factors are calculated with the harmonic-oscillator wavefunctions. It is found that the contributions of the velocity-dependent force manifest themselves in the very large momentum transfer region (q ≥ 4fm- 1 ). In the low and medium q region the contributions of the velocity-dependent force are very small compared with those without this force. However, in the high-q region the contributions of the velocity-dependent force are larger than the normal form factors. The diffraction structures beyond the existing experimental data are found after the contributions of the velocity-dependent force are included. The formula of the correction to the single particle magnetic moment due to the velocity-dependent force is reproduced exactly in the long-wavelength limit (q = 0) of the M1 form factor

  2. The effect of nonlinear forces on coherently oscillating space-charge-dominated beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celata, C.M.

    1987-03-01

    A particle-in-cell computer simulation code has been used to study the transverse dynamics of nonrelativistic misaligned space-charge-dominated coasting beams in an alternating gradient focusing channel. In the presence of nonlinear forces due to dodecapole or octupole imperfections of the focusing fields or to image forces, the transverse rms emittance grows in a beat pattern. Analysis indicates that this emittance dilution is due to the driving of coherent modes of the beam near their resonant frequencies by the nonlinear force. The effects of the dodecapole and images forces can be made to effectively cancel for some boundary conditions, but the mechanism is not understood at this time

  3. The effect of force feedback delay on stiffness perception and grip force modulation during tool-mediated interaction with elastic force fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leib, Raz; Karniel, Amir; Nisky, Ilana

    2015-05-01

    During interaction with objects, we form an internal representation of their mechanical properties. This representation is used for perception and for guiding actions, such as in precision grip, where grip force is modulated with the predicted load forces. In this study, we explored the relationship between grip force adjustment and perception of stiffness during interaction with linear elastic force fields. In a forced-choice paradigm, participants probed pairs of virtual force fields while grasping a force sensor that was attached to a haptic device. For each pair, they were asked which field had higher level of stiffness. In half of the pairs, the force feedback of one of the fields was delayed. Participants underestimated the stiffness of the delayed field relatively to the nondelayed, but their grip force characteristics were similar in both conditions. We analyzed the magnitude of the grip force and the lag between the grip force and the load force in the exploratory probing movements within each trial. Right before answering which force field had higher level of stiffness, both magnitude and lag were similar between delayed and nondelayed force fields. These results suggest that an accurate internal representation of environment stiffness and time delay was used for adjusting the grip force. However, this representation did not help in eliminating the bias in stiffness perception. We argue that during performance of a perceptual task that is based on proprioceptive feedback, separate neural mechanisms are responsible for perception and action-related computations in the brain. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  4. Climate forcing and desert malaria: the effect of irrigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeza, Andres; Bouma, Menno J; Dobson, Andy P; Dhiman, Ramesh; Srivastava, Harish C; Pascual, Mercedes

    2011-07-14

    Rainfall variability and associated remote sensing indices for vegetation are central to the development of early warning systems for epidemic malaria in arid regions. The considerable change in land-use practices resulting from increasing irrigation in recent decades raises important questions on concomitant change in malaria dynamics and its coupling to climate forcing. Here, the consequences of irrigation level for malaria epidemics are addressed with extensive time series data for confirmed Plasmodium falciparum monthly cases, spanning over two decades for five districts in north-west India. The work specifically focuses on the response of malaria epidemics to rainfall forcing and how this response is affected by increasing irrigation. Remote sensing data for the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) are used as an integrated measure of rainfall to examine correlation maps within the districts and at regional scales. The analyses specifically address whether irrigation has decreased the coupling between malaria incidence and climate variability, and whether this reflects (1) a breakdown of NDVI as a useful indicator of risk, (2) a weakening of rainfall forcing and a concomitant decrease in epidemic risk, or (3) an increase in the control of malaria transmission. The predictive power of NDVI is compared against that of rainfall, using simple linear models and wavelet analysis to study the association of NDVI and malaria variability in the time and in the frequency domain respectively. The results show that irrigation dampens the influence of climate forcing on the magnitude and frequency of malaria epidemics and, therefore, reduces their predictability. At low irrigation levels, this decoupling reflects a breakdown of local but not regional NDVI as an indicator of rainfall forcing. At higher levels of irrigation, the weakened role of climate variability may be compounded by increased levels of control; nevertheless this leads to no significant decrease

  5. Investigation of index finger triggering force using a cadaver experiment: Effects of trigger grip span, contact location, and internal tendon force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Joonho; Freivalds, Andris; Sharkey, Neil A; Kong, Yong-Ku; Mike Kim, H; Sung, Kiseok; Kim, Dae-Min; Jung, Kihyo

    2017-11-01

    A cadaver study was conducted to investigate the effects of triggering conditions (trigger grip span, contact location, and internal tendon force) on index finger triggering force and the force efficiency of involved tendons. Eight right human cadaveric hands were employed, and a motion simulator was built to secure and control the specimens. Index finger triggering forces were investigated as a function of different internal tendon forces (flexor digitorum profundus + flexor digitorum superficialis = 40, 70, and 100 N), trigger grip spans (40, 50, and 60 mm), and contact locations between the index finger and a trigger. Triggering forces significantly increased when internal tendon forces increased from 40 to 100 N. Also, trigger grip spans and contact locations had significant effects on triggering forces; maximum triggering forces were found at a 50 mm span and the most proximal contact location. The results revealed that only 10-30% of internal tendon forces were converted to their external triggering forces. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Effect of guideway discontinuities on magnetic levitation and drag forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossing, T.D.; Korte, R.; Hull, J.R.

    1991-01-01

    Transients in the lift and drag forces on a NdFeB permanent magnet were observed as the magnet passed over various discontinuities in a rotating aluminum disk at velocities of 4 to 25 m/s. For full cuts in the disk, the amplitude of the lift and drag transients and the wave form of the drag transient depend on the width, and the amplitudes are much larger than for partial cuts. The use of a backing plate to join two cut segments is ineffective

  7. Humidity effects on scanning polarization force microscopy imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Yue, E-mail: shenyue@isl.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Comprehensive and Highly Efficient Utilization of Salt Lake Resources, Key Laboratory of Salt Lake Resources Chemistry of Qinghai Province, Qinghai Institute of Salt Lakes, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xining, Qinghai 810008 (China); Key Laboratory of Interfacial Physics and Technology of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Zhou, Yuan, E-mail: zhouy@isl.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Comprehensive and Highly Efficient Utilization of Salt Lake Resources, Key Laboratory of Salt Lake Resources Chemistry of Qinghai Province, Qinghai Institute of Salt Lakes, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xining, Qinghai 810008 (China); Sun, Yanxia; Zhang, Lijuan [Key Laboratory of Comprehensive and Highly Efficient Utilization of Salt Lake Resources, Key Laboratory of Salt Lake Resources Chemistry of Qinghai Province, Qinghai Institute of Salt Lakes, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xining, Qinghai 810008 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Wang, Ying; Hu, Jun; Zhang, Yi [Key Laboratory of Interfacial Physics and Technology of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)

    2017-08-01

    Highlights: • The humidity dramatically affects the contrast of scanning polarization force microscopy (SPFM) imaging on mica surface. • This influence roots in the sensitive dielectric constant of mica surface to the humidity change. • A strategy of controllable and repeatable imaging the local dielectric properties of nanomaterials with SPFM is proposed. - Abstract: Scanning polarization force microscopy (SPFM) is a useful surface characterization technique to visually characterize and distinguish nanomaterial with different local dielectric properties at nanometer scale. In this paper, taking the individual one-atom-thick graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) sheets on mica as examples, we described the influences of environmental humidity on SPFM imaging. We found that the apparent heights (AHs) or contrast of SPFM imaging was influenced significantly by relative humidity (RH) at a response time of a few seconds. And this influence rooted in the sensitive dielectric constant of mica surface to the RH change. While dielectric properties of GO and rGO sheets were almost immune to the humidity change. In addition, we gave the method to determine the critical humidity at which the contrast conversion happened under different conditions. And this is important to the contrast control and repeatable imaging of SPFM through RH adjusting. These findings suggest a strategy of controllable and repeatable imaging the local dielectric properties of nanomaterials with SPFM, which is critically important for further distinguishment, manipulation, electronic applications, etc.

  8. Effect of Retarding Force on Mass Flow Rates of Fluid at Different ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... mathematical model and software visualization to view the effect of retarding forces on the mass flow rate in term of visualization. C-sharp (C#) is the chosen program and this enable compares and us to determine the mass flow rates patterns in relation to retarding force in form of graphical tables at different temperature.

  9. The effects of gastrocnemius-soleus muscle forces on ankle biomechanics during triple arthrodesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hejazi, Shima; Rouhi, Gholamreza; Rasmussen, John

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a finite element model of the ankle, taking into account the effects of muscle forces, determined by a musculoskeletal analysis, to investigate the contact stress distribution in the tibio-talar joint in patients with triple arthrodesis and in normal subjects. Forces of major a...

  10. Analyzing the Effect of Capillary Force on Vibrational Performance of the Cantilever of an Atomic Force Microscope in Tapping Mode with Double Piezoelectric Layers in an Air Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahavandi, Amir; Korayem, Moharam Habibnejad

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this paper is to determine the effects of forces exerted on the cantilever probe tip of an atomic force microscope (AFM). These forces vary according to the separation distance between the probe tip and the surface of the sample being examined. Hence, at a distance away from the surface (farther than d(on)), these forces have an attractive nature and are of Van der Waals type, and when the probe tip is situated in the range of a₀≤ d(ts) ≤ d(on), the capillary force is added to the Van der Waals force. At a distance of d(ts) ≤ a₀, the Van der Waals and capillary forces remain constant at intermolecular distances, and the contact repulsive force repels the probe tip from the surface of sample. The capillary force emerges due to the contact of thin water films with a thickness of h(c) which have accumulated on the sample and probe. Under environmental conditions a layer of water or hydrocarbon often forms between the probe tip and sample. The capillary meniscus can grow until the rate of evaporation equals the rate of condensation. For each of the above forces, different models are presented. The smoothness or roughness of the surfaces and the geometry of the cantilever tip have a significant effect on the modeling of forces applied on the probe tip. Van der Waals and the repulsive forces are considered to be the same in all the simulations, and only the capillary force is altered in order to evaluate the role of this force in the AFM-based modeling. Therefore, in view of the remarkable advantages of the piezoelectric microcantilever and also the extensive applications of the tapping mode, we investigate vibrational motion of the piezoelectric microcantilever in the tapping mode. The cantilever mentioned is entirely covered by two piezoelectric layers that carry out both the actuation of the probe tip and the measuringof its position.

  11. DEVELOPING EFFECTIVE ARMED FORCES IN THE TWENTY FIRST CENTURY CASE STUDIES OF NEW DEMOCRACIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florina Cristiana (Cris MATEI

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to contribute to a better understanding of thecontemporary value for democracy of the relationship between elected leadersand the armed forces. Hence, it focuses on the military effectiveness dimension ofthe CMR. It discusses why it is important and what newer democracies can do tosuccessfully develop effective armed forces. The article provides “lessons learned/best practices” of achieving effectiveness from three developing democracies - Chile,Hungary, and, Mongolia.

  12. Sigma exchange in the nuclear force and effective field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donoghue, John F.

    2006-01-01

    In the phenomenological description of the nuclear interaction an important role is traditionally played by the exchange of a scalar I=0 meson, the sigma, of mass 500-600 MeV, which however is not seen clearly in the particle spectrum and which has a very ambiguous status in QCD. I show that a remarkably simple and reasonably controlled combination of ingredients can reproduce the features of this part of the nuclear force. The use of chiral perturbation theory calculations for two pion exchange supplemented by the Omnes function for pion rescattering suffices to reproduce the magnitude and shape of the exchange of a supposed σ particle. I also attempt to relate this description to the contact interaction that enters more modern descriptions of the internucleon interaction

  13. Effects of realistic force feedback in a robotic assisted minimally invasive surgery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi Dalvand, Mohsen; Shirinzadeh, Bijan; Nahavandi, Saeid; Smith, Julian

    2014-06-01

    Robotic assisted minimally invasive surgery systems not only have the advantages of traditional laparoscopic procedures but also restore the surgeon's hand-eye coordination and improve the surgeon's precision by filtering hand tremors. Unfortunately, these benefits have come at the expense of the surgeon's ability to feel. Several research efforts have already attempted to restore this feature and study the effects of force feedback in robotic systems. The proposed methods and studies have some shortcomings. The main focus of this research is to overcome some of these limitations and to study the effects of force feedback in palpation in a more realistic fashion. A parallel robot assisted minimally invasive surgery system (PRAMiSS) with force feedback capabilities was employed to study the effects of realistic force feedback in palpation of artificial tissue samples. PRAMiSS is capable of actually measuring the tip/tissue interaction forces directly from the surgery site. Four sets of experiments using only vision feedback, only force feedback, simultaneous force and vision feedback and direct manipulation were conducted to evaluate the role of sensory feedback from sideways tip/tissue interaction forces with a scale factor of 100% in characterising tissues of varying stiffness. Twenty human subjects were involved in the experiments for at least 1440 trials. Friedman and Wilcoxon signed-rank tests were employed to statistically analyse the experimental results. Providing realistic force feedback in robotic assisted surgery systems improves the quality of tissue characterization procedures. Force feedback capability also increases the certainty of characterizing soft tissues compared with direct palpation using the lateral sides of index fingers. The force feedback capability can improve the quality of palpation and characterization of soft tissues of varying stiffness by restoring sense of touch in robotic assisted minimally invasive surgery operations.

  14. Particle force model effects in a shock-driven multiphase instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, W. J.; Denissen, N.; McFarland, J. A.

    2018-05-01

    This work presents simulations on a shock-driven multiphase instability (SDMI) at an initial particle volume fraction of 1% with the addition of a suite of particle force models applicable in dense flows. These models include pressure-gradient, added-mass, and interparticle force terms in an effort to capture the effects neighboring particles have in non-dilute flow regimes. Two studies are presented here: the first seeks to investigate the individual contributions of the force models, while the second study focuses on examining the effect of these force models on the hydrodynamic evolution of a SDMI with various particle relaxation times (particle sizes). In the force study, it was found that the pressure gradient and interparticle forces have little effect on the instability under the conditions examined, while the added-mass force decreases the vorticity deposition and alters the morphology of the instability. The relaxation-time study likewise showed a decrease in metrics associated with the evolution of the SDMI for all sizes when the particle force models were included. The inclusion of these models showed significant morphological differences in both the particle and carrier species fields, which increased as particle relaxation times increased.

  15. Modelling the cutting edge radius size effect for force prediction in micro milling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bissacco, Giuliano; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Jan, Slunsky

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a theoretical model for cutting force prediction in micro milling, taking into account the cutting edge radius size effect, the tool run out and the deviation of the chip flow angle from the inclination angle. A parameterization according to the uncut chip thickness to cutting...... edge radius ratio is used for the parameters involved in the force calculation. The model was verified by means of cutting force measurements in micro milling. The results show good agreement between predicted and measured forces. It is also demonstrated that the use of the Stabler's rule...... is a reasonable approximation and that micro end mill run out is effectively compensated by the deflections induced by the cutting forces....

  16. Solution of the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock-Bogolyubov equations in the Cartesian deformed harmonic-oscillator basis.. (VII) HFODD (v2.49t): A new version of the program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schunck, N.; Dobaczewski, J.; McDonnell, J.; Satuła, W.; Sheikh, J. A.; Staszczak, A.; Stoitsov, M.; Toivanen, P.

    2012-01-01

    format: tar.gz Programming language: FORTRAN-90 Computer: Intel Pentium-III, Intel Xeon, AMD-Athlon, AMD-Opteron, Cray XT4, Cray XT5 Operating system: UNIX, LINUX, Windows XP Has the code been vectorized or parallelized?: Yes, parallelized using MPI RAM: 10 Mwords Word size: The code is written in single-precision for the use on a 64-bit processor. The compiler option -r8 or +autodblpad (or equivalent) has to be used to promote all real and complex single-precision floating-point items to double precision when the code is used on a 32-bit machine. Classification: 17.22 Catalogue identifier of previous version: ADFL_v2_2 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 180 (2009) 2361 External routines: The user must have access to the NAGLIB subroutine f02axe, or LAPACK subroutines zhpev, zhpevx, zheevr, or zheevd, which diagonalize complex hermitian matrices, the LAPACK subroutines dgetri and dgetrf which invert arbitrary real matrices, the LAPACK subroutines dsyevd, dsytrf and dsytri which compute eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of real symmetric matrices, the LINPACK subroutines zgedi and zgeco, which invert arbitrary complex matrices and calculate determinants, the BLAS routines dcopy, dscal, dgeem and dgemv for double-precision linear algebra and zcopy, zdscal, zgeem and zgemv for complex linear algebra, or provide another set of subroutines that can perform such tasks. The BLAS and LAPACK subroutines can be obtained from the Netlib Repository at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville: http://netlib2.cs.utk.edu/. Does the new version supersede the previous version?: Yes Nature of problem: The nuclear mean field and an analysis of its symmetries in realistic cases are the main ingredients of a description of nuclear states. Within the Local Density Approximation, or for a zero-range velocity-dependent Skyrme interaction, the nuclear mean field is local and velocity dependent. The locality allows for an effective and fast solution of the self

  17. Effects of mechanical properties of thermoplastic materials on the initial force of thermoplastic appliances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohda, Naohisa; Iijima, Masahiro; Muguruma, Takeshi; Brantley, William A; Ahluwalia, Karamdeep S; Mizoguchi, Itaru

    2013-05-01

    To measure the forces delivered by thermoplastic appliances made from three materials and investigate effects of mechanical properties, material thickness, and amount of activation on orthodontic forces. Three thermoplastic materials, Duran (Scheu Dental), Erkodur (Erkodent Erich Kopp GmbH), and Hardcast (Scheu Dental), with two different thicknesses were selected. Values of elastic modulus and hardness were obtained from nanoindentation measurements at 28°C. A custom-fabricated system with a force sensor was employed to obtain measurements of in vitro force delivered by the thermoplastic appliances for 0.5-mm and 1.0-mm activation for bodily tooth movement. Experimental results were subjected to several statistical analyses. Hardcast had significantly lower elastic modulus and hardness than Duran and Erkodur, whose properties were not significantly different. Appliances fabricated from thicker material (0.75 mm or 0.8 mm) always produced significantly greater force than those fabricated from thinner material (0.4 mm or 0.5 mm). Appliances with 1.0-mm activation produced significantly lower force than those with 0.5-mm activation, except for 0.4-mm thick Hardcast appliances. A strong correlation was found between mechanical properties of the thermoplastic materials and force produced by the appliances. Orthodontic forces delivered by thermoplastic appliances depend on the material, thickness, and amount of activation. Mechanical properties of the polymers obtained by nanoindentation testing are predictive of force delivery by these appliances.

  18. Theoretical study of the effect of probe shape on adhesion force between probe and substrate in atomic force microscope experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Li; Hu, Junhui; Kong, Lingjiang

    2017-01-01

    The quantitative description of adhesion force dependence on the probe shapes are of importance in many scientific and industrial fields. In order to elucidate how the adhesion force varied with the probe shape in atomic force microscope manipulation experiment, we performed a theoretical study of the influences of the probe shape (the sphere and parabolic probe) on the adhesion force at different humidity. We found that the combined action of the triple point and the Kelvin radius guiding th...

  19. Transitions to Peace: Effects on Internal Security Forces in Nicaragua, El Salvador and Guatemala

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Atha, Roberto J

    2008-01-01

    .... It reveals how the influence of the military affected the implementation of internal security reforms, influencing the professionalism and effectiveness of police forces in the fight against violence and gangs today...

  20. Effect of externally applied periodic force on ion acoustic waves in superthermal plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Snigdha; Mandi, Laxmikanta; Chatterjee, Prasanta

    2018-04-01

    Ion acoustic solitary waves in superthermal plasmas are investigated in the presence of trapped electrons. The reductive perturbation technique is employed to obtain a forced Korteweg-de Vries-like Schamel equation. An analytical solution is obtained in the presence of externally applied force. The effect of the external applied periodic force is also observed. The effect of the spectral index (κ), the strength ( f 0 ) , and the frequency ( ω ) on the amplitude and width of the solitary wave is obtained. The result may be useful in laboratory plasma as well as space environments.

  1. How effective are task forces in tackling illegal logging? Empirical evidence from Ghana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franck, Marte; Hansen, Christian Pilegaard

    2014-01-01

    not proven effective in Ghana. The task forces are influenced by corruption; interference by powerful actors; fear of violence; and logistical and resource-related challenges. The paper suggests that effectively addressing illegal logging in Ghana will require a more normative approach that involves policy...... reforms addressing fundamental issues such as rights to trees and benefits from them. Without such reforms, timber task forces as well as other types of “hard” law enforcement become illusive....

  2. Force Maintenance Accuracy Using a Tool: Effects of Magnitude and Feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dangxiao; Jiao, Jian; Yang, Gaofeng; Zhang, Yuru

    2016-01-01

    The ability to precisely produce a force via a hand-held tool is crucial in fine manipulations. In this paper, we study the error in maintaining a target force ranging from 0.5 to 5 N under two concurrent feedback conditions: pure haptic feedback (H), and visual plus haptic feedback (V + H). The results show that absolute error (AE) increases along with the increasing force magnitudes under both feedback conditions. For target forces ranging from 1.5 to 5 N, the relative error (RE) is approximately constant under both feedback conditions, while the RE significantly increases for the small target forces of 0.5 and 1 N. The effect of force magnitude on the coefficient of variation (CoV) is not significant for target forces ranging from 1.5 to 5 N. For both the RE and the CoV, the values under the H condition are significantly larger than those under the V + H condition. The effect of manipulation mode (i.e., a hand-held tool or a fingertip) on force maintenance accuracy is complex, i.e., its effect on RE is not significant while its effect on CoV is significant. Only for the magnitude of 0.5 N, the RE of using the tool was significantly greater than that of using the fingertip under both feedback conditions. For both the RE and the CoV, no interaction effect exists between manipulation mode, force magnitude and feedback condition.

  3. Further explorations of Skyrme-Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov mass formulas. VIII. Role of Coulomb exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goriely, S.; Pearson, J. M.

    2008-01-01

    Following suggestions that the energy associated with Coulomb correlations and a possible charge-symmetry breaking of nuclear forces might largely cancel the Coulomb-exchange term, we refit the HFB-14 mass model without the Coulomb-exchange term to essentially all the mass data. The resulting mass model, HFB-15, gives a better fit to the 2149 mass data, σ rms falling from 0.729 to 0.678 MeV. The improvement in the energy differences between mirror nuclei is particularly striking: the Nolen-Schiffer anomaly, which is strong for HFB-14, is essentially eliminated. As for the extrapolation to highly neutron-rich nuclei, the HFB-15 model differs significantly from HFB-14, with up to 15 MeV less binding being predicted. However, the differences in the predicted values of differential quantities such as the neutron-separation energies, β-decay energies and fission barriers are very much smaller

  4. Vibration Characteristics of a Mistuned Bladed Disk considering the Effect of Coriolis Forces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuanen Kan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the influence of Coriolis force on vibration characteristics of mistuned bladed disk, a bladed disk with 22 blades is employed and the effects of different rotational speeds and excitation engine orders on the maximum forced response are discussed considering the effects of Coriolis forces. The results show that if there are frequency veering regions, the largest split of double natural frequencies of each modal family considering the effects of Coriolis forces appears at frequency veering region. In addition, the amplitude magnification factor considering the Coriolis effects is increased by 1.02% compared to the system without considering the Coriolis effects as the rotating speed is 3000 rpm, while the amplitude magnification factor is increased by 2.76% as the rotating speed is 10000 rpm. The results indicate that the amplitude magnification factor may be moderately enhanced with the increasing of rotating speed. Moreover, the position of the maximum forced response of bladed disk may shift from one blade to another with the increasing of the rotational speed, when the effects of Coriolis forces are considered.

  5. Effect of temperature on crossbridge force changes during fatigue and recovery in intact mouse muscle fibers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Nocella

    Full Text Available Repetitive or prolonged muscle contractions induce muscular fatigue, defined as the inability of the muscle to maintain the initial tension or power output. In the present experiments, made on intact fiber bundles from FDB mouse, fatigue and recovery from fatigue were investigated at 24°C and 35°C. Force and stiffness were measured during tetani elicited every 90 s during the pre-fatigue control phase and recovery and every 1.5 s during the fatiguing phase made of 105 consecutive tetani. The results showed that force decline could be split in an initial phase followed by a later one. Loss of force during the first phase was smaller and slower at 35°C than at 24°C, whereas force decline during the later phase was greater at 35°C so that total force depression at the end of fatigue was the same at both temperatures. The initial force decline occurred without great reduction of fiber stiffness and was attributed to a decrease of the average force per attached crossbridge. Force decline during the later phase was accompanied by a proportional stiffness decrease and was attributed to a decrease of the number of attached crossbridge. Similarly to fatigue, at both 24 and 35°C, force recovery occurred in two phases: the first associated with the recovery of the average force per attached crossbridge and the second due to the recovery of the pre-fatigue attached crossbridge number. These changes, symmetrical to those occurring during fatigue, are consistent with the idea that, i initial phase is due to the direct fast inhibitory effect of [Pi]i increase during fatigue on crossbridge force; ii the second phase is due to the delayed reduction of Ca(2+ release and /or reduction of the Ca(2+ sensitivity of the myofibrils due to high [Pi]i.

  6. Effect of Physical Forces on the Metastatic Bone Microenvironment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    gravitational loading does not account for the skeletal effect of botulinum toxin -induced muscle inhibition suggesting a direct effect of muscle on bone...osteoblastic properties . Cancer Res 47:4961– 4966. Schmidt AF, Nielen M, Klungel OH, Hoes AW, de Boer A, Groenwold RH, Kirpensteijn J. 2013. Prognostic

  7. Effects of various forces on the distribution of particles at the boundary of a dusty plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, J.; Ma, J.X.

    1997-01-01

    The distribution and suspension of dust particles under the action of electrostatic, gravitational, ion-drag and neutral collision forces are investigated near the boundary of a dusty plasma. It is shown that the competition among the forces results in spatial oscillations (multi-layer) of the particle distribution. For sub-micron grains the ion-drag has a significant effect on the grain dynamics while for micrometer sized grains the gravity quickly dominates over other forces. The effect of the neutral gas flux is to enhance or diminish that of the gravity while the effect of the neutral viscosity is to shift the profile toward the wall. Under the force balance, the particles are suspended in a narrow region with sharp boundaries within the sheath. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  8. Combined short scale roughness and surface dielectric function gradient effects on the determination of tip-sample force in atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gusso, André, E-mail: gusso@metal.eeimvr.uff.br [Departamento de Ciências Exatas-EEIMVR, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Volta Redonda, RJ 27255-125 (Brazil)

    2013-11-11

    The contribution of tip roughness to the van der Waals force between an atomic force microscopy probe tip and the sample is calculated using the multilayer effective medium model, which allows us to consider the relevant case of roughness characterized by correlation length and amplitude in the nanometer scale. The effect of the surface dielectric function gradient is incorporated in the tip-sample force model. It is concluded that for rms roughness in the few nanometers range the effect of short scale tip roughness is quite significant.

  9. Effect of sensory substitution on suture-manipulation forces for robotic surgical systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitagawa, Masaya; Dokko, Daniell; Okamura, Allison M; Yuh, David D

    2005-01-01

    Direct haptic (force or tactile) feedback is not yet available in commercial robotic surgical systems. Previous work by our group and others suggests that haptic feedback might significantly enhance the execution of surgical tasks requiring fine suture manipulation, specifically those encountered in cardiothoracic surgery. We studied the effects of substituting direct haptic feedback with visual and auditory cues to provide the operating surgeon with a representation of the forces he or she is applying with robotic telemanipulators. Using the robotic da Vinci surgical system (Intuitive Surgical, Inc, Sunnyvale, Calif), we compared applied forces during a standardized surgical knot-tying task under 4 different sensory-substitution scenarios: no feedback, auditory feedback, visual feedback, and combined auditory-visual feedback. The forces applied with these sensory-substitution modes more closely approximate suture tensions achieved under ideal haptic conditions (ie, hand ties) than forces applied without such sensory feedback. The consistency of applied forces during robot-assisted suture tying aided by visual feedback or combined auditory-visual feedback sensory substitution is superior to that achieved with hand ties. Robot-assisted ties aided with auditory feedback revealed levels of consistency that were generally equivalent or superior to those attained with hand ties. Visual feedback and auditory feedback improve the consistency of robotically applied forces. Sensory substitution, in the form of visual feedback, auditory feedback, or both, confers quantifiable advantages in applied force accuracy and consistency during the performance of a simple surgical task.

  10. Effect of the repulsive force in the HTSC-permanent magnet hybrid bearing system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohashi, S.; Kobayashi, S.

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic levitation using the pinning force of the YBaCuO high-T c bulk superconductor (HTSC) materials has an advantage to achieve stable levitation without control. To increase levitation force, the HTSC-permanent magnet hybrid magnetic bearing system is introduced. A circular shaped three phase Nd-Fe-B permanent magnet is installed on the rotor, and HTSC bulk superconductor is set on the stator. The additional permanent magnet is installed under the HTSC. Repulsive force of the permanent magnet is used for levitation, and pinning force between the HTSC and permanent magnet is used for guidance force of the bearing. In this system, relationship between permanent magnet and the HTSC is important. When repulsive force of the permanent magnet is large, pinning force of superconductor is used to keep the rotor position. As a result, stability for the lateral direction is decreased with hybrid system. For levitation force, effect of the hybrid system is not observed with column HTSC. Compared with the ring HTSC results, the following thing is considered. Because there is no space that flux of one permanent magnet acts on the other one with the column HTSC configuration, interaction between two permanent magnets becomes small.

  11. Effects of Shiftwork on Air Force Aircraft Maintenance Personnel

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Campbell, Craig

    1998-01-01

    .... Health and well being, on- and off-duty accident rates, day shift vs. night shift accident rates, and the effects of stress and fatigue on specific satisfactions, job dissatisfaction, and reenlistment intentions were examined...

  12. End effect braking force reduction in high-speed single-sided linear induction machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiri, Abbas; Shoulaie, Abbas

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A new analytical equation to model the end effect braking force of SLIM is derived. ► Equations for efficiency, power factor and output thrust are analytically derived. ► The effect of design variables on the performance of the motor is analyzed. ► An optimization method is employed to minimize the end effect braking force (EEBF). ► The results show that EEBF is minimized by appropriate selection of motor parameters. - Abstract: Linear induction motors have been widely employed in industry because of their simple structure and low construction cost. However, they suffer from low efficiency and power factor. In addition, existence of so called end effect influences their performance especially in high speeds. The end effect deteriorates the performance of the motor by producing braking force. So, in this paper, by using Duncan equivalent circuit model, a new analytical equation is proposed to model end effect braking force. Employing the proposed equation and considering all phenomena involved in the single-sided linear induction motor, a simple design procedure is presented and the effect of different design variables on the performance of the motor is analyzed. A multi-objective optimization method based on genetic algorithm is introduced to maximize efficiency and power factor, as well as to minimize the end effect braking force, simultaneously. Finally, to validate the optimization results, 2D finite element method is employed.

  13. Quantitative characterization of crosstalk effects for friction force microscopy with scan-by-probe SPMs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prunici, Pavel [Institute of Physical Chemistry, University of Heidelberg, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Hess, Peter [Institute of Physical Chemistry, University of Heidelberg, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)], E-mail: peter.hess@urz.uni-heidelberg.de

    2008-06-15

    If the photodetector and cantilever of an atomic force microscope (AFM) are not properly adjusted, crosstalk effects will appear. These effects disturb measurements of the absolute vertical and horizontal cantilever deflections, which are involved in friction force microscopy (FFM). A straightforward procedure is proposed to study quantitatively crosstalk effects observed in scan-by-probe SPMs. The advantage of this simple, fast, and accurate procedure is that no hardware change or upgrade is needed. The results indicate that crosstalk effects depend not only on the alignment of the detector but also on the cantilever properties, position, and detection conditions. The measurements may provide information on the origin of the crosstalk effect. After determination of its magnitude, simple correction formulas can be applied to correct the crosstalk effects and then the single-load wedge method, using a commercially available grating, can be employed for accurate calibration of the lateral force.

  14. Quantitative characterization of crosstalk effects for friction force microscopy with scan-by-probe SPMs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prunici, Pavel; Hess, Peter

    2008-01-01

    If the photodetector and cantilever of an atomic force microscope (AFM) are not properly adjusted, crosstalk effects will appear. These effects disturb measurements of the absolute vertical and horizontal cantilever deflections, which are involved in friction force microscopy (FFM). A straightforward procedure is proposed to study quantitatively crosstalk effects observed in scan-by-probe SPMs. The advantage of this simple, fast, and accurate procedure is that no hardware change or upgrade is needed. The results indicate that crosstalk effects depend not only on the alignment of the detector but also on the cantilever properties, position, and detection conditions. The measurements may provide information on the origin of the crosstalk effect. After determination of its magnitude, simple correction formulas can be applied to correct the crosstalk effects and then the single-load wedge method, using a commercially available grating, can be employed for accurate calibration of the lateral force

  15. Effect of three-body forces on the phase behavior of charged colloids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, J. Z.; Bratko, D.; Blanch, H. W.; Prausnitz, J. M.

    2000-01-01

    Statistical-thermodynamic theory for predicting the phase behavior of a colloidal solution requires the pair interaction potential between colloidal particles in solution. In practice, it is necessary to assume pairwise additivity for the potential of mean force between colloidal particles, but little is known concerning the validity of this assumption. This paper concerns interaction between small charged colloids, such as surfactant micelles or globular proteins, in electrolyte solutions and the multibody effect on phase behavior. Monte Carlo simulations for isolated colloidal triplets in equilateral configurations show that, while the three-body force is repulsive when the three particles are near contact, it becomes short-ranged attractive at further separations, contrary to a previous study where the triplet force is attractive at all separations. The three-body force arises mainly from hard-sphere collisions between colloids and small ions; it is most significant in solutions of monovalent salt at low concentration where charged colloids experience strong electrostatic interactions. To illustrate the effect of three-body forces on the phase behavior of charged colloids, we calculated the densities of coexisting phases using van der Waals-type theories for colloidal solutions and for crystals. For the conditions investigated in this work, even though the magnitude of the three-body force may be as large as 10% of the total force at small separations, three-body forces do not have a major effect on the densities of binary coexisting phases. However, coexisting densities calculated using Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek theory are much different from those calculated using our simulated potential of mean force. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics

  16. Effects of Mach Numbers on Side Force, Yawing Moment and Surface Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohail, Muhammad Amjad; Muhammad, Zaka; Husain, Mukkarum; Younis, Muhammad Yamin

    2011-09-01

    In this research, CFD simulations are performed for air vehicle configuration to compute the side force effect and yawing moment coefficients variations at high angle of attack and Mach numbers. As the angle of attack is increased then lift and drag are increased for cylinder body configurations. But when roll angle is given to body then side force component is also appeared on the body which causes lateral forces on the body and yawing moment is also produced. Now due to advancement of CFD methods we are able to calculate these forces and moment even at supersonic and hypersonic speed. In this study modern CFD techniques are used to simulate the hypersonic flow to calculate the side force effects and yawing moment coefficient. Static pressure variations along the circumferential and along the length of the body are also calculated. The pressure coefficient and center of pressure may be accurately predicted and calculated. When roll angle and yaw angle is given to body then these forces becomes very high and cause the instability of the missile body with fin configurations. So it is very demanding and serious problem to accurately predict and simulate these forces for the stability of supersonic vehicles.

  17. Nonlinear effects in the radiation force generated by amplitude-modulated focused beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Nuria; Jiménez, Noé; Redondo, Javier; Roig, Bernardino; Picó, Rubén; Sánchez-Morcillo, Víctor; Konofagou, Elisa E.; Camarena, Francisco

    2012-10-01

    Harmonic Motion Imaging (HMI) uses an amplitude-modulated (AM) beam to induce an oscillatory radiation force before, during and after ablation. In this paper, the findings from a numerical analysis of the effects related with the nonlinear propagation of AM focused ultrasonic beams in water on the radiation force and the location of its maxima will be presented. The numerical modeling is performed using the KZK nonlinear parabolic equation. The radiation force is generated by a focused transducer with a gain of 18, a carrier frequency of 1 MHz and a modulation frequency of 25 kHz. The modulated excitation generates a spatially-invariant force proportional to the intensity. Regarding the nonlinear wave propagation, the force is no longer proportional to the intensity, reaching a factor of eight between the nonlinear and linear estimations. Also, a 9 mm shift in the on-axis force peak occurs when the initial pressure increased from 1 to 300 kPa. This spatial shift, due to the nonlinear effects, becomes dynamic in AM focused beams, as the different signal periods have different amplitudes. This study shows that both the value and the spatial position of the force peak are affected by the nonlinear propagation of the ultrasonic waves.

  18. Soil-blade orientation effect on tillage forces determined by 3D finite element models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayadi Ibrahmi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigated the effect of the cutting parameters of a blade on the tillage force components using finite element modeling. A three-dimensional model was carried out with Abaqus Explicit in order to study the interaction between the tool and soil. The soil was modeled with linear forms of the Drucker-Pager model, while the tool was considered as a rigid body with a reference point taken at its tip. The effect of tillage depth and the width of a vertical blade were studied. It was found that the amounts of the draught and vertical forces increase linearly with a slope of 0.037 and 0.0143 respectively when the width increases. The narrow tool (width< 60mm has a greater effect on the specific draught force than a larger tool. Draught and specific draught force increase with polynomial and linear curve respectively versus the depth. However, this effect was reduced for the vertical force. These results were in a good agreement with previously published works. The second part of this paper is focused on the oblique position of the blade to evaluate the effect of the attack angles on both the tillage forces (draught, lateral and vertical and the cutting process of the soil during and after its failure. For all considered angles, the draught force presents the highest values compared to the vertical and lateral forces. Results showed that working with small cutting and an average rake angles (30° to 60° and 45° respectively can produce a good soil inversion.

  19. Classical Wigner method with an effective quantum force: application to reaction rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulsen, Jens Aage; Li, Huaqing; Nyman, Gunnar

    2009-07-14

    We construct an effective "quantum force" to be used in the classical molecular dynamics part of the classical Wigner method when determining correlation functions. The quantum force is obtained by estimating the most important short time separation of the Feynman paths that enter into the expression for the correlation function. The evaluation of the force is then as easy as classical potential energy evaluations. The ideas are tested on three reaction rate problems. The resulting transmission coefficients are in much better agreement with accurate results than transmission coefficients from the ordinary classical Wigner method.

  20. The effect of disorder geometry on the critical force in disordered elastic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Démery, Vincent; Lecomte, Vivien; Rosso, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    We address the effect of disorder geometry on the critical force in disordered elastic systems. We focus on the model system of a long-range elastic line driven in a random landscape. In the collective pinning regime, we compute the critical force perturbatively. Not only does our expression for the critical force confirm previous results on its scaling with respect to the microscopic disorder parameters, but it also provides its precise dependence on the disorder geometry (represented by the disorder two-point correlation function). Our results are successfully compared with the results of numerical simulations for random field and random bond disorders. (paper)

  1. The Effect of Non-Lambertian Surface Reflectance on Aerosol Radiative Forcing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ricchiazzi, P.; O' Hirok, W.; Gautier, C.

    2005-03-18

    Surface reflectance is an important factor in determining the strength of aerosol radiative forcing. Previous studies of radiative forcing assumed that the reflected surface radiance is isotropic and does not depend on incident illumination angle. This Lambertian reflection model is not a very good descriptor of reflectance from real land and ocean surfaces. In this study we present computational results for the seasonal average of short and long wave aerosol radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere and at the surface. The effect of the Lambertian assumption is found through comparison with calculations using a more detailed bi-direction reflectance distribution function (BRDF).

  2. Effect of three-body forces on the lattice dynamics of noble metals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A simple method to generate an effective electron–ion interaction pseudopotential from the energy wave number characteristic obtained by first principles calculations has been suggested. This effective potential has been used, in third order perturbation, to study the effect of three-body forces on the lattice dynamics of ...

  3. Modeling the Effect of Contact and Seepage Forces at Equilibrium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There have been records of failures and quicksand conditions in boreholes in recent times impeding the performance and operation of boreholes which may have resulted from various factors ranging from construction problems, drilling inaccuracies, fitting and installation problems, some chemical effects within the aquifer ...

  4. Assessment of Effective Prestressed Force of Nuclear Containment Building using SI Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, H. P.; Jang, J. B.; Hwang, K. M.; Song, Y. C. [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    Bonded tendons have been used in reactor buildings of heavy water reactors and the light water reactors of some nuclear power plants operating in Korea. The assessment of prestressed forces on those bonded tendons is becoming an important issue in assuring their continuous operation beyond their design life. In order to assess the effective prestressed force on the bonded tendon, indirect assessment techniques have been applying to the test beams which were manufactured on construction time. Therefore, this research mainly forced to establish the assessment methodology to measure directly the effective prestressed force on the bonded tendon of containment buildings using System Identification (SI) technique. To accomplish this purpose, simple SI method was proposed and adapted three dimensional finite element analysis of the 1:4 scale prestressed concrete containment vessel (PCCV) tested by Sandia National Laboratory in 2000

  5. Analysis of adjusting effects of mounting force on frequency conversion of mounted nonlinear optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Ruifeng; Liu, Haitao; Liang, Yingchun; Lu, Lihua

    2014-01-10

    Motivated by the need to increase the second harmonic generation (SHG) efficiency of nonlinear optics with large apertures, a novel mounting configuration with active adjusting function on the SHG efficiency is proposed and mechanically and optically studied. The adjusting effects of the mounting force on the distortion and stress are analyzed by the finite element methods (FEM), as well as the contribution of the distortion and stress to the change in phase mismatch, and the SHG efficiency are theoretically stated. Further on, the SHG efficiency is calculated as a function of the mounting force. The changing trends of the distortion, stress, and the SHG efficiency with the varying mounting force are obtained, and the optimal ones are figured out. Moreover, the mechanism of the occurrence of the optimal values is studied and the adjusting strategy is put forward. Numerical results show the robust adjustment of the mounting force, as well as the effectiveness of the mounting configuration, in increasing the SHG efficiency.

  6. A risk-based approach to designing effective security force training exercises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bott, T.F.; Eisenhawer, S.W.

    2002-01-01

    The effectiveness of a security force in protecting a nuclear facility is often evaluated using training exercises that pit a group of simulated attackers against a security team. In the situation studied here, a security force was regularly tested by a regulatory body with the responsibility for security oversight. It was observed that the regulators were continually imposing more challenging security scenarios by assigning increasingly sophisticated facility knowledge to the attackers. Not surprisingly, the security forces' assessed effectiveness decreased until eventually they were unable to successfully resist the attacks. Security managers maintained that the knowledge attributed to the attackers was becoming increasingly unrealistic and feared they would be forced to concentrate resources on unrealistic scenarios at the expense of more credible threats.

  7. Effect of robotic manipulation on unidirectional barbed suture integrity: evaluation of tensile strength and sliding force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, Dharam; Clay, Kevin; Hossain, S G M; Park, Eugene; Nelson, Carl A; LaGrange, Chad A

    2012-06-01

    One of the more challenging portions of robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) is the urethrovesical anastomosis. Because of this, a unidirectional absorbable barbed suture (V-Loc(™)) has been used to complete the anastomosis with better efficiency and less tension. The effect of robotic needle driver manipulation on barbed suture is unknown. Therefore, the aim of this study is to determine whether robotic manipulation decreases the tensile strength and peak sliding force of V-Loc barbed suture. Fifty-six V-Loc sutures were compared with 56 Maxon sutures. All sutures were 3-0 caliber. Half of the sutures in each group were manipulated with a da Vinci(®) robot large needle driver five times over a 5 cm length of suture. The other half was not manipulated. Breaking force was determined by placing sutures in a Bose ElectroForce load testing device. For sliding force testing, 28 V-Loc sutures were manipulated in the same fashion and compared with 28 nonmanipulated V-Loc sutures. Peak force needed to make the suture slip backward in porcine small intestine was determined to be the sliding force. Scanning electron microscopy of the barbs before and after robotic manipulation was also performed. The mean difference in breaking forces for manipulated vs nonmanipulated Maxon sutures was 4.52 N (P=0.004). The mean difference in breaking forces for manipulated vs nonmanipulated V-Loc sutures was 1.30 N (P=0.046). The manipulated V-Loc group demonstrated a lower peak sliding force compared with the nonmanipulated group (0.76 vs 0.88 N, P=0.199). Electron microscopy revealed minor structural damage to the barbs and suture. Tensile strength and peak sliding force of V-Loc suture is decreased by robotic manipulation. This is likely because of structural damage to the suture and barbs. This structural damage, however, is likely not clinically significant.

  8. The effect of the dislocation image force on the brittle behaviour of materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lung, C.W.

    1986-06-01

    The dislocation image force due to the free surface of a finite width specimen makes the plastic zone at a crack tip larger. The effect of the dislocation image force on the fracture behaviour of materials with different geometrical shapes is discussed. It is found that the ratio V/A as an indication of the brittle behaviour of structural components is reasonable for elastic-plastic fracture. (author)

  9. Effect of parameters of a high-temperature superconductor levitation system on the lateral force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Yong; Zheng Xiaojing

    2008-01-01

    The lateral forces on a rectangular permanent magnet above a cylindrical high-temperature superconductor during lateral traverses are simulated in two cooling conditions. The simulation is based on the finite element method and critical state model of Bean. The calculations agree well with the previous experimental data, on the basis of which the effect of initial cooling conditions, physical parameters, levitating height during lateral traverses and geometrical parameters on the lateral force is presented

  10. Effect of relative humidity on onset of capillary forces for rough surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarate, Nyah V; Harrison, Aaron J; Litster, James D; Beaudoin, Stephen P

    2013-12-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to investigate the effect of relative humidity (RH) on the adhesion forces between silicon nitride AFM probes, hydrophilic stainless steel, and hydrophobic Perspex® (polymethylmethacrylate, PMMA). In addition, AFM-based phase contrast imaging was used to quantify the amount and location of adsorbed water present on these substrates at RH levels ranging from 15% to 65% at 22°C. Both the adhesion forces and the quantities of adsorbed moisture were seen to vary with RH, and the nature of this variation depended on the hydrophobicity of the substrate. For the Perspex®, both the adhesion force and the amount of adsorbed moisture were essentially independent of RH. For the stainless steel substrate, adsorbed moisture increased continuously with increasing RH, while the adhesion force rose from a minimum at 15% RH to a broad maximum between 25% and 35% RH. From 35% to 55% RH, the adhesion force dropped continuously to an intermediate level before rising again as 65% RH was approached. The changes in adhesion force with increasing relative humidity in the case of the stainless steel substrate were attributed to a balance of effects associated with adsorbed, sub-continuum water on the cantilever and steel. Hydrogen bonding interactions between these adsorbed water molecules were thought to increase the adhesion force. However, when significant quantities of molecular water adsorbed, these molecules were expect to decrease adhesion by screening the van der Waals interactions between the steel and the cantilever tip, and by increasing the separation distance between these solid surfaces when they were 'in contact'. Finally, the slight increase in adhesion between 55% and 65% RH was attributed to true capillary forces exerted by continuum water on the two solid surfaces. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Influence of effective three-body force on the spectroscopy of 19O

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haung, W.; Song, H.; Wang, Z.; Kuo, T.T.S.

    1983-01-01

    The purpose of the present paper is to investigate the influence of effective three-body force on the spectroscopy of 19 O. The model space was chosen as the configuration space which consists of the j-j coupling states of three valence neutrons in the s-d shell. The effective interaction including two- and three-body forces was then derived in the framework of the folded diagram method (FDM). Besides two traditional three-body terms, there is another kind of three-body force, the folded one constructed with two two-body diagrams, in FDM. The G-matrix elements of soft core Reid force were used in the numerical calculations. In the case of lacking the G-matrix elements, we adopted the matrix elements of M-3Y force as the equivalents. The results show that the influence of the effective three-body forces on the spectrum of 19 O is not of importance, but the part coming from the folded three-body term is worth noting

  12. Nuclear dynamics with the (finite range) Gogny force: flow effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sebille, F.; Royer, G.; Schuck, P.; Gregoire, C.

    1988-01-01

    We introduce for the first time the effective finite range interaction of Gogny in the semi-classical description of heavy ion reactions based on the Landau-Vlasov equation. The characteristics of the flow for heavy ion collisions are studied as functions of the incident energy, the impact parameter and the mass number. The momentum dependence in the mean field together with the non linearities in the collision kernel decrease the flow in contradiction with other calculations; the origins of this discrepancy are studied in details

  13. US/UK Sensor-To-Shooter Multinational C4 Interoperability Study Force-On-Force Effectiveness Methodology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bailey, Timothy J

    2000-01-01

    .... This methodology has been successfully applied to Army, joint, and multinational studies. The latest of these studies, the US/UK Sensor-To-Shooter Multinational C4 Interoperability Study Force-On-Force Analysis, was an effort to measure the value...

  14. The effect of adhesion on the contact radius in atomic force microscopy indentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sirghi, L; Rossi, F

    2009-01-01

    The effect of adhesion on nanoscale indentation experiments makes the interpretation of force-displacement curves acquired in these experiments very difficult. The indentation force results from the addition of adhesive and elastic forces at the indenter-sample contact. The evolution of the two forces during the indentation is determined by the variation of the indenter-sample contact radius. In the present work the variation of contact radius during atomic force microscopy (AFM) indentation of elastic and adhesive samples with conical indenters (AFM tips) is indirectly determined by measurements of the contact dynamic stiffness. For weak sample deformations, the contact radius is determined mainly by the adhesion force and indenter apex radius. For strong sample deformations, the contact radius increases linearly with the increase of the indenter displacement, the slope of this linear dependence being in agreement with Sneddon's theory of indentation (Sneddon 1965 Int. J. Eng. Sci. 3 47). Based on these results, a theoretical expression of indentation force dependence on displacement is found. This expression allows for determination of the thermodynamic work of adhesion at the indenter-sample interface and the sample elasticity modulus.

  15. The effect of the descent technique and truck cabin layout on the landing impact forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patenaude, S; Marchand, D; Samperi, S; Bélanger, M

    2001-12-01

    The majority of injuries to truckers are caused by falls during the descent from the cab of the truck. Several studies have shown that the techniques used to descend from the truck and the layout of the truck's cabin are the principal cause of injury. The goal of the present study was to measure the effects of the descent techniques used by the trucker and the layout of the truck's cabin on the impact forces absorbed by the lower limbs and the back. Kinematic data, obtained with the aid of a video camera, were combined with the force platform data to allow for calculation of the lower limb and L5-S1 torques as well as L5-S1 compressive forces. The trucker descended from two different conventional tractor cabin layouts. Each trucker descended from cabin using either "facing the truck" (FT) or "back to the truck" (BT) techniques. The results demonstrate that the BT technique produces greater ground impact forces than the FT technique, particularly when the truck does not have a handrail. The BT technique also causes an increase in the compressive forces exerted on the back. In conclusion, the use of the FT technique along with the aids (i.e., handrails and all the steps) help lower the landing impact forces as well as the lumbosacral compressive forces.

  16. Effect of intrusive and retraction forces in labial and lingual orthodontics: A finite element study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohan Mascarenhas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Lingual orthodontics differs in biomechanics as compared to labial system and has biomechanical advantages. Although theoretical approaches have explained the differences between labial and lingual orthodontics, the finite element method (FEM may be better suited to analyze these differences. This study analyzes the effect of vertical and horizontal forces together on the tooth using FEM. Materials and Methods: An extracted right maxillary central incisor was radiographed and was used to create a solid model using ANSYS. The geometric model was converted into a finite element model with the help of ANSYS software. The model consists of 27,000 elements and 30,000 nodes. Two force vectors (vertical and horizontal were applied labially and lingually at 3 different heights- 4 mm, 5 mm and 6 mm from the incisal edge. Results: In the labial system, the net force vector passes through the center of resistance (CR and brings about intrusion. The net force vector in lingual orthodontics does not pass through the center of resistance and produces lingual tipping of the incisors. Conclusion: Intrusion and retraction forces bring about tipping of incisors in lingual orthodontics. The same amount of intrusion and retraction forces brings about intrusion of incisors in labial orthodontics. Therefore, direction and amount of forces should be carefully and judiciously applied after taking into consideration the resultant biomechanical differences.

  17. Effect of Constraint Loading on the Lower Limb Muscle Forces in Weightless Treadmill Exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Guo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Long exposure to the microgravity will lead to muscle atrophy and bone loss. Treadmill exercise could mitigate the musculoskeletal decline. But muscle atrophy remains inevitable. The constraint loading applied on astronauts could affect the muscle force and its atrophy severity. However, the quantitative correlation between constraint loading mode and muscle forces remains unclear. This study aimed to characterize the influence of constraint loading mode on the lower limb muscle forces in weightless treadmill exercise. The muscle forces in the full gait cycle were calculated with the inverse dynamic model of human musculoskeletal system. The calculated muscle forces at gravity were validated with the EMG data. Muscle forces increased at weightlessness compared with those at the earth’s gravity. The increasing percentage from high to low is as follows: biceps femoris, gastrocnemius, soleus, vastus, and rectus femoris, which was in agreement with the muscle atrophy observed in astronauts. The constraint loading mode had an impact on the muscle forces in treadmill exercise and thus could be manipulated to enhance the effect of the muscle training in spaceflight. The findings could provide biomechanical basis for the optimization of treadmill constraint system and training program and improve the countermeasure efficiency in spaceflight.

  18. Note: A rigid piezo motor with large output force and an effective method to reduce sliding friction force

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Ying; Lu, Qingyou, E-mail: qxl@ustc.edu.cn [High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Chinese Academy of Sciences and University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at Microscale, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Hou, Yubin [High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Chinese Academy of Sciences and University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)

    2014-05-15

    We present a completely practical TunaDrive piezo motor. It consists of a central piezo stack sandwiched by two arm piezo stacks and two leg piezo stacks, respectively, which is then sandwiched and spring-clamped by a pair of parallel polished sapphire rods. It works by alternatively fast expanding and contracting the arm/leg stacks while slowly expanding/contracting the central stack simultaneously. The key point is that sufficiently fast expanding and contracting a limb stack can make its two sliding friction forces well cancel, resulting in the total sliding friction force is <10% of the total static friction force, which can help increase output force greatly. The piezo motor's high compactness, precision, and output force make it perfect in building a high-quality harsh-condition (vibration resistant) atomic resolution scanning probe microscope.

  19. Note: A rigid piezo motor with large output force and an effective method to reduce sliding friction force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Ying; Lu, Qingyou; Hou, Yubin

    2014-01-01

    We present a completely practical TunaDrive piezo motor. It consists of a central piezo stack sandwiched by two arm piezo stacks and two leg piezo stacks, respectively, which is then sandwiched and spring-clamped by a pair of parallel polished sapphire rods. It works by alternatively fast expanding and contracting the arm/leg stacks while slowly expanding/contracting the central stack simultaneously. The key point is that sufficiently fast expanding and contracting a limb stack can make its two sliding friction forces well cancel, resulting in the total sliding friction force is <10% of the total static friction force, which can help increase output force greatly. The piezo motor's high compactness, precision, and output force make it perfect in building a high-quality harsh-condition (vibration resistant) atomic resolution scanning probe microscope

  20. Incarceration as forced migration: effects on selected community health outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, James C; Torrone, Elizabeth

    2008-09-01

    We estimated the effects of high incarceration rates on rates of sexually transmitted infections and teenage pregnancies. We calculated correlations between rates of incarceration in state prisons and county jails and rates of sexually transmitted infections and teenage pregnancies for each of the 100 counties in North Carolina during 1995 to 2002. We also estimated increases in negative health outcomes associated with increases in incarceration rates using negative binomial regression analyses. Rates of sexually transmitted infections and teenage pregnancies, adjusted for age, race, and poverty distributions by county, consistently increased with increasing incarceration rates. In the most extreme case, teenage pregnancies exhibited an increase of 71.61 per 100000 population (95% confidence interval [CI]=41.88, 101.35) in 1996 after an increase in the prison population rate from 223.31 to 468.58 per 100000 population in 1995. High rates of incarceration can have the unintended consequence of destabilizing communities and contributing to adverse health outcomes.

  1. Study on force mechanism for therapeutic effect of pushing manipulation with one-finger meditation base on similarity analysis of force and waveform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Lei; Fang, Min; Guo, Min-Min

    2016-12-27

    To reveal the force mechanism for therapeutic effect of pushing manipulation with one-finger meditation. A total of 15 participants were recruited in this study and assigned to an expert group, a skilled group and a novice group, with 5 participants in each group. Mechanical signals were collected from a biomechanical testing platform, and these data were further observed via similarity analysis and cluster analysis. Comparing the force waveforms of manipulation revealed that the manipulation forces were similar between the expert group and the skilled group (P>0.05). The mean value of vertical force was 9.8 N, and 95% CI rang from 6.37 to 14.70 N, but there were significant differences compared with the novice group (PPushing manipulation with one-finger meditation is a kind of light stimulation manipulation on the acupoint, and force characteristics of double waveforms continuously alternated during manual operation.

  2. Effects of 3D virtual haptics force feedback on brand personality perception: the mediating role of physical presence in advergames.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Seung-A Annie

    2010-06-01

    This study gauged the effects of force feedback in the Novint Falcon haptics system on the sensory and cognitive dimensions of a virtual test-driving experience. First, in order to explore the effects of tactile stimuli with force feedback on users' sensory experience, feelings of physical presence (the extent to which virtual physical objects are experienced as actual physical objects) were measured after participants used the haptics interface. Second, to evaluate the effects of force feedback on the cognitive dimension of consumers' virtual experience, this study investigated brand personality perception. The experiment utilized the Novint Falcon haptics controller to induce immersive virtual test-driving through tactile stimuli. The author designed a two-group (haptics stimuli with force feedback versus no force feedback) comparison experiment (N = 238) by manipulating the level of force feedback. Users in the force feedback condition were exposed to tactile stimuli involving various force feedback effects (e.g., terrain effects, acceleration, and lateral forces) while test-driving a rally car. In contrast, users in the control condition test-drove the rally car using the Novint Falcon but were not given any force feedback. Results of ANOVAs indicated that (a) users exposed to force feedback felt stronger physical presence than those in the no force feedback condition, and (b) users exposed to haptics stimuli with force feedback perceived the brand personality of the car to be more rugged than those in the control condition. Managerial implications of the study for product trial in the business world are discussed.

  3. Antidepressant behavioral effects of duloxetine and fluoxetine in the rat forced swimming test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciulla, Leandro; Menezes, Honório Sampaio; Bueno, Bárbara Beatriz Moreira; Schuh, Alexandre; Alves, Rafael José Vargas; Abegg, Milena Pacheco

    2007-01-01

    To compare the effects of the antidepressant drugs duloxetine and fluoxetine on depressive behaviors in rodents. Eighteen male Wistar rats were given systemic injections of duloxetine, fluoxetine, or saline prior to a Forced Swimming Test (FST). Immobility and number of stops were measured. Rats given injections of fluoxetine displayed significantly less immobility (p = 0.02) and fewer stops than the control group (p = 0.003). Duloxetine significantly reduced the number of stops (p = 0.003), but did not effect immobility (p = 0.48). Duloxetine and fluoxetine reduced depressive behaviors in the Forced FST. However, our findings suggest that fluoxetine is more effective than duloxetine.

  4. Effects of strong bite force on the facial vertical dimension of pembarong performers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Christina

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: A pembarong performer is a reog dancer who bites on a piece of wood inserted into his/her mouth in order to support a 60 kg Barongan or Dadak Merak mask. The teeth supporting this large and heavy mask are directly affected, as the strong bite force exerted during a dance could affect their vertical and sagital facial dimensions. Purpose: This study aimed to examine the influence of the bite force of pembarong performers due to their vertical and sagital facial dimensions. Methods: The study reported here involved fifteen pembarong performers and thirteen individuals with normal occlusion (with specific criteria. The bite force of these subjects was measured with a dental prescale sensor during its centric occlusion. A cephalometric variation measurement was subsequently performed on all subjects with its effects on their vertical and sagital facial dimensions being measured. Results: The bite force value of the pembarong performers was 394.3816 ± 7.68787 Newtons, while the normal occlusion was 371.7784 ± 4.77791 Newtons. There was no correlation between the bite force and the facial sagital dimension of these subjects. However, a significant correlation did exist between bite force and lower facial height/total facial height (LFH/TFH ratio (p = 0.013. Conversely, no significant correlation between bite force and posterior facial height/total facial height (PFH/TFH ratio (p = 0.785 was detected. There was an inverse correlation between bite force and LFH/TFH ratio (r = -.464. Conclusion: Bite force is directly related to the decrease in LFH/TFH ratio. Occlusal pressure exerted by the posterior teeth on the alveolar bone may increase bone density at the endosteal surface of cortical bone.

  5. Effects of load on ground reaction force and lower limb kinematics during concentric squats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellis, Eleftherios; Arambatzi, Fotini; Papadopoulos, Christos

    2005-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of external load on vertical ground reaction force, and linear and angular kinematics, during squats. Eight males aged 22.1 +/- 0.8 years performed maximal concentric squats using loads ranging from 7 to 70% of one-repetition maximum on a force plate while linear barbell velocity and the angular kinematics of the hip, knee and ankle were recorded. Maximum, average and angle-specific values were recorded. The ground reaction force ranged from 1.67 +/- 0.20 to 3.21 +/- 0.29 times body weight and increased significantly as external load increased (P squat exercises is not achieved at the same position of the lower body as external load is increased. In contrast, joint velocity coordination does not change as load is increased. The force-velocity relationship was linear and independent from the set of data used for its determination.

  6. Effects of ponderomotive forces and space-charge field on laser plasma hydrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cang Yu; Lu Xin; Wu Huichun; Zhang Jie

    2005-01-01

    Using a two-fluid two-temperature hydrodynamic code, authors studied the hydrodynamics in the interaction of intense (10 15 W/cm 2 ) ultrashort (150 fs) laser pulses and linear density plasmas. The simulation results show the ponderomotive force effect on the formation of the electron density ripples in under-dense region, such ripples increase the reflection of the laser pulse, and on the separation of the plasma in critical surface. Quasi-electroneutrality is not suitable in this case because of the different ponderomotive force and the gradient of thermal-pressure for ions and electrons. Ions are moved by the electrostatic force. Comparing with the simulation results from one-fluid two-temperature code, authors find that under strong ponderomotive force and gradient of thermo-pressure, two-fluid code is more suitable to simulate the hydrodynamics of plasmas. (authors)

  7. Effects of Screw Configuration on the Preload Force of Implant-Abutment Screws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zipprich, Holger; Rathe, Florian; Pinz, Sören; Schlotmann, Luca; Lauer, Hans-Christoph; Ratka, Christoph

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of tightening torque, screw head angle, and thread number on the preload force of abutment screws. The test specimens consisted of three self-manufactured components (ie, a thread sleeve serving as an implant analog, an abutment analog, and an abutment screw). The abutment screws were fabricated with metric M1.6 external threads. The thread number varied between one and seven threads. The screw head angles were produced in eight varying angles (30 to 180 degrees). A sensor unit simultaneously measured the preload force of the screw and the torsion moment inside the screw shank. The tightening of the screw with the torque wrench was performed in five steps (15 to 35 Ncm). The torque wrench was calibrated before each step. Only the tightening torque and screw head angle affected the resulting preload force of the implant-abutment connection. The thread number had no effect. There was an approximately linear correlation between tightening torque and preload force. The tightening torque and screw head angle were the only study parameters that affected the resulting preload force of the abutment screw. The results obtained from this experiment are valid only for a single torque condition. Further investigations are needed that analyze other parameters that affect preload force. Once these parameters are known, it will add value for a strong, but detachable connection between the implant and abutment. Short implants and flat-to-flat connections especially will benefit significantly from this knowledge.

  8. Curveballs in protoplanetary discs - the effect of the Magnus force on planet formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, John C.

    2015-10-01

    Spinning planetesimals in a gaseous protoplanetary disc may experience a hydrodynamical force perpendicular to their relative velocities. We examine the effect this force has on the dynamics of these objects using analytical arguments based on a simple laminar disc model and numerical integrations of the equations of motion for individual grains. We focus in particular on metre-sized boulders traditionally expected to spiral in to the central star in as little as 100 years from 1 au We find that there are plausible scenarios in which this force extends the lifetime of these solids in the disc by a factor of several. More importantly the velocities induced by the Magnus force can prevent the formation of planetesimals via gravitational instability in the inner disc if the size of the dust particles is larger than of the order of 10 cm. We find that the fastest growing linear modes of the streaming instability may still grow despite the diffusive effect of the Magnus force, but it remains to be seen how the Magnus force will alter the non-linear evolution of these instabilities.

  9. Effect of External Loading on Force and Power Production During Plyometric Push-ups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinshaw, Taylour J; Stephenson, Mitchell L; Sha, Zhanxin; Dai, Boyi

    2018-04-01

    Hinshaw, TJ, Stephenson, ML, Sha, Z, and Dai, B. Effect of external loading on force and power production during plyometric push-ups. J Strength Cond Res 32(4): 1099-1108, 2018-One common exercise to train upper-body strength and power is the push-up. Training at the loads that would produce the greatest power is an effective way to increase peak power. The purpose of the current study was to quantify the changes in peak force, peak power, and peak velocity among a modified plyometric push-up and plyometric push-ups with or without external loading in physically active young adults. Eighteen male and 17 female participants completed 4 push-ups: (a) modified plyometric push-up on the knees, (b) plyometric push-up without external loading, (c) plyometric push-up with an external load of 5% of body weight, and (d) plyometric push-up with an external load of 10% of body weight. Two force platforms were set up to collect vertical ground reaction forces at the hands and feet. The modified plyometric push-up demonstrated the lowest force, power, and velocity (5.4≥ Cohen's dz ≥1.2). Peak force and force at peak velocity increased (3.8≥ Cohen's dz ≥0.3) and peak velocity and velocity at peak power decreased (1.4≥ Cohen's dz ≥0.8) for the push-up without external loading compared with the 2 push-ups with external loading. No significant differences were observed for peak power among the push-ups with or without external loading (0.4≥ Cohen's dz ≥0.1). Although peak power is similar with or without external loading, push-ups without external loading may be more beneficial for a quick movement, and push-ups with external loading may be more beneficial for a greater force production.

  10. Sideways fall-induced impact force and its effect on hip fracture risk: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasiri Sarvi, M; Luo, Y

    2017-10-01

    Osteoporotic hip fracture, mostly induced in falls among the elderly, is a major health burden over the world. The impact force applied to the hip is an important factor in determining the risk of hip fracture. However, biomechanical researches have yielded conflicting conclusions about whether the fall-induced impact force can be accurately predicted by the available models. It also has been debated whether or not the effect of impact force has been considered appropriately in hip fracture risk assessment tools. This study aimed to provide a state-of-the-art review of the available methods for predicting the impact force, investigate their strengths/limitations, and suggest further improvements in modeling of human body falling. We divided the effective parameters on impact force to two categories: (1) the parameters that can be determined subject-specifically and (2) the parameters that may significantly vary from fall to fall for an individual and cannot be considered subject-specifically. The parameters in the first category can be investigated in human body fall experiments. Video capture of real-life falls was reported as a valuable method to investigate the parameters in the second category that significantly affect the impact force and cannot be determined in human body fall experiments. The analysis of the gathered data revealed that there is a need to develop modified biomechanical models for more accurate prediction of the impact force and appropriately adopt them in hip fracture risk assessment tools in order to achieve a better precision in identifying high-risk patients. Graphical abstract Impact force to the hip induced in sideways falls is affected by many parameters and may remarkably vary from subject to subject.

  11. Strength of tensor force and s-d-shell effective interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, M.; Machleidt, R.; Stout, D.B.; Kuo, T.T.S.

    1989-01-01

    The s-d-shell effective interaction is derived from the Bonn NN potential, using a G-matrix folded-diagram method. It is found that due to the relatively weak-tensor-force characteristic for the Bonn potential, the effective interaction matrix elements, particularly those with isospin T=0, come out generally more attractive than in previous derivations which were based on conventional local strong-tensor-force NN potentials. This renders the results obtained with the Bonn potential in considerably better agreement with the recent s-d-shell matrix elements of Wildenthal

  12. Study of the Vibration Effect on the Cutting Forces and Roughness of Slub Milling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germa, S.; Estrems Amestoy, M.; Sánchez Reinoso, H. T.; Franco Chumillas, P.

    2009-11-01

    For the planning process of slab milling operations, the vibration of the tool is the main factor to be considered. Under vibration conditions, the effect of the small displacements of the cutting tool and the cutting forces on the chip thickness must be minimized in order to avoid undesirable consequences, such as the fast flank wear, superficial defects and roughness increase. In this work, a mathematical model is developed to take into account the combined effect of the cutting tool and workpiece oscillation, as well as the axial errors of different milling tool tips. As a result, the model estimates the variation of the cutting forces and the ideal surface roughness.

  13. Many-body effects in photoreactions of light nuclei below pion threshold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavinato, M.; Marangoni, M.; Saruis, A.M.

    1983-01-01

    In the present paper it is discussed the reaction mechanism in photoabsorption of light nuclei below pion threshold in the frame of a self-consistent RPA theory with a Skyrme force. The role of both exchange currents in electromagnetic operators and two-body correlations in the nuclear wave function has been studied in the RPA formalism. Exchange currents in RPA calculations are related to the effective mass in the Hartree-Fock field. Comparison is made between the RPA formalism and the Gari and Hebach theory. The relative contribution of exchange currents and nuclear correlations to the photoreaction of 16 O is evaluated from proton threshold up to 80 MeV. E1 and E2 multipoles are included in the calculation

  14. Effect of Tensor Correlations on Gamow-Teller States in 90Zr and 208Pb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai, C. L.; Zhang, H. Q.; Zhang, X. Z.

    2009-01-01

    The tensor terms of the Skyrme effective interaction are included in the self-consistent Hartree-Fock plus Random Phase Approximation (HF-RPA) model. The Gamow-Teller (GT) strength functions of 9 0Z r and 2 08P b is calculated with and without the tensor terms. The main peaks are moved downwards by about 2 MeV when including the tensor contribution. About 10% of the non-energy weighted sum rule is shifted to the excitation energy region above 30 MeV by the RPA tensor correlations. The contribution of the tensor terms to the energy weighted sum rule is given analytically, and compared to the outcome of RPA. A microscopic origin of the quenching of GT sum rule due to the tensor force is discussed.(author)

  15. Postural And Eye-Positional Effects On Human Biting Force: An Experimental Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altay Tabancacı

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Muscle groups affected on biting force are called temporal muscle as a major and masseter muscle as a minor. According to the human posture stability, forces of these muscles vary with the force directions. In this case, experimental investigation is strictly important such that biting force under different postural and eye- positional situations is changed. In this study, seven-male and seven-female within the age-range of 17-24 are considered corresponding to having with restorated molar tooth and without that type of tooth. With the help of specially designed biting fork, different posture- and eye-positions are investigated for experimental biting force analysis. Changes in eye-positions are not indicated significant difference for all postural positions. On one hand, it is obtained that biting force of no-filling tooth in men becomes maximum if facial muscles give full effort to biting. On the other hand, effect of facial muscles for women is not clearly noticed depending on the postural differences.

  16. Forced migration in childhood: are there long-term health effects?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saarela, Jan M; Elo, Irma T

    2016-12-01

    Studies on the health of migrants have increased considerably in number in recent years, but little is still known about the long-term health effects associated with forced migration, and particularly for people who were forced to migrate as children. Data shortcomings together with the methodological challenges of studying migrant populations limit the ability to disentangle the roles of various factors that influence migrant health outcomes. Finland provides an unusual opportunity to study long-term health consequences associated with forced migration. During World War II, twelve per cent of the Finnish population was forced to leave the region nowadays referred to as Ceded Karelia. After the war, these Karelians could not return home because the area was relinquished to the Soviet Union. Using high quality, linked register-based data for the period 1988-2012, we investigate whether this forced migration had long-term health consequences for those who were forced to migrate as children. Comparison groups are non-displaced persons born on the adjacent side of the new border, and people born elsewhere in Finland. Health at ages 43-65 years is measured by receipt of sickness benefit, which is an indicator of short-term illness, and receipt of disability pension, which reflects long-term illness or permanent disability. All-cause and cause-specific mortality is analysed at ages 43-84 years. We find no support for the hypothesis that the traumatic event of being forced to migrate during childhood has long-term negative health consequences. The forced child migrants have lower odds for receipt of sickness benefit, and women also have lower odds for receipt of disability pension. The mortality results are largely driven by patterns specific for eastern-born populations of Finland. A likely reason behind the absence of negative health consequences is that these migrants seem to have integrated well into post-war Finnish society.

  17. Effects of Differing Response-Force Requirements on Food-Maintained Responding in C57BL/6J Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarcone, Troy J.; Chen, Rong; Fowler, Stephen C.

    2009-01-01

    The effect of force requirements on response effort was examined using inbred C57BL/6J mice trained to press a disk with their snout. Lateral peak forces greater than 2 g were defined as responses (i.e., all responses above the measurement threshold). Different, higher force requirements were used to define criterion responses (a subclass of all…

  18. Force effects on rotor of squeeze film damper using Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominik, Šedivý; Petr, Ferfecki; Simona, Fialová

    2017-09-01

    This article presents the evaluation of force effects on rotor of squeeze film damper. Rotor is eccentric placed and its motion is translate-circular. The amplitude of rotor motion is smaller than its initial eccentricity. The force effects are calculated from pressure and viscous forces which were gained by using computational modeling. Two types of fluid were considered as filling of damper. First type of fluid is Newtonian (has constant viscosity) and second type is magnetorheological fluid (does not have constant viscosity). Viscosity of non-Newtonian fluid is given using Bingham rheology model. Yield stress is a function of magnetic induction which is described by many variables. The most important variables of magnetic induction are electric current and gap width which is between rotor and stator. Comparison of application two given types of fluids is shown in results.

  19. Experimental Investigation of the Effect of Burnishing Force on Service Properties of AISI 1010 Steel Plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharbi, F.; Sghaier, S.; Morel, F.; Benameur, T.

    2015-02-01

    This paper presents the results obtained with a new ball burnishing tool developed for the mechanical treatment of large flat surfaces. Several parameters can affect the mechanical behavior and fatigue of workpiece. Our study focused on the effect of the burnishing force on the surface quality and on the service properties (mechanical behavior, fatigue) of AISI 1010 steel hot-rolled plates. Experimental results assert that burnishing force not exceeding 300 N causes an increase in the ductility. In addition, results indicated that the effect of the burnishing force on the residual surface stress was greater in the direction of advance than in the cross-feed direction. Furthermore, the flat burnishing surfaces did not improve the fatigue strength of AISI 1010 steel flat specimens.

  20. Forced and free convection flow with viscous dissipation effects: The method of parametric differentiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hossain, M.A.; Arbad, O.

    1988-07-01

    Effect of buoyancy force in a laminar uniform forced convection flow past a semi-infinite vertical plate has been analyzed near the leading edge, taking into account the viscous dissipation. The coupled non-linear locally similar equations, which govern the flow, are solved by the method of parametric differentiation. Effects of the buoyancy force and the heat due to viscous dissipation on the flow and the temperature fields as well as on the wall shear-stress and the heat transfer at the surface of the plate are shown graphically for the values of the Prandtl number σ ranging from 10 -1 to 1.0. (author). 20 refs, 3 figs, 2 tabs

  1. Opposite effect of ATP on contraction force of tonic and phasic skeletal muscles in frogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grishin, S N; Kamaliev, R R; Teplov, A Yu; Ziganshin, A U

    2011-07-01

    Experiments in vitro showed that ATP and adenosine equally suppressed contractions of frog m. sartorius, which belongs to the phasic type muscles. Adenosine receptors antagonist 8-SPT abolished the effect of adenosine, but did not change the effect of ATP. This fact proves the independence of signaling pathways of these purines. ATP produced an opposite effect on the tonic muscle m. cruralis and increased the force of its contraction. Adenosine produced an inhibitory effect on the force of m. cruralis contration. In this case, 8-SPT also eliminated the effect of adenosine, but did not change the effect of ATP. The potentiating effect of ATP was blocked by suramin, a nonselective antagonist of P2 receptors, which attests to their involvement into the effects of this purine. The opposite effects of purinergic regulation reflect fundamental differences in functional organization of phasic and tonic muscular systems. It was hypothesized that the increase in contraction force under the effect of ATP is a mechanism providing maitenance of the contracted state of tonic muscle without appreciable metabolic costs.

  2. Molecular dynamics study of the nanosized droplet spreading: The effect of the contact line forces on the kinetic energy dissipation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Hong Min; Kondaraju, Sasidhar; Lee, Jung Shin; Suh, Youngho; Lee, Joonho H.; Lee, Joon Sang

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Contact line forces, including friction and spreading forces are directly calculated. • Overall trends of variations in contact line forces during droplet spreading process show characteristics of contact line forces. • Detail relations of contact line forces and atomic kinetics in the contact line provide a clear evidence of the possible energy dissipation mechanism in droplet spreading process. - Abstract: Recent studies have revealed that contact line forces play an important role in the droplet spreading process. Despite their significance, the physics related to them has been studied only indirectly and the effect of contact line forces is still being disputed. We performed a molecular dynamics simulation and mimicked the droplet spreading process at the nanoscale. Based on the results of the simulation, the contact line forces were directly calculated. We found that the forces acting on the bulk and the contact line region showed different trends. Distinct positive and negative forces, contact line spreading, and friction forces were observed near the contact line. We also observed a strong dependency of the atomic kinetics in the contact line region on the variations in the contact line forces. The atoms of the liquid in the contact line region lost their kinetic energy due to the contact line friction force and became partially immobile on the solid surface. The results of the current study will be useful for understanding the role of the contact line forces on the kinetic energy dissipation in the contact line region.

  3. Molecular dynamics study of the nanosized droplet spreading: The effect of the contact line forces on the kinetic energy dissipation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Hong Min [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kondaraju, Sasidhar [Department of Mechanical Science, Indian Institute of Technology Bhubaneswar, Bhubaneswar, Odisha 751013 (India); Lee, Jung Shin [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Suh, Youngho; Lee, Joonho H. [Samsung Electronics, Mechatronics R& D Center, Hwaseong-si, Gyeonggi-do 445-330 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Joon Sang, E-mail: joonlee@yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-07-01

    Highlights: • Contact line forces, including friction and spreading forces are directly calculated. • Overall trends of variations in contact line forces during droplet spreading process show characteristics of contact line forces. • Detail relations of contact line forces and atomic kinetics in the contact line provide a clear evidence of the possible energy dissipation mechanism in droplet spreading process. - Abstract: Recent studies have revealed that contact line forces play an important role in the droplet spreading process. Despite their significance, the physics related to them has been studied only indirectly and the effect of contact line forces is still being disputed. We performed a molecular dynamics simulation and mimicked the droplet spreading process at the nanoscale. Based on the results of the simulation, the contact line forces were directly calculated. We found that the forces acting on the bulk and the contact line region showed different trends. Distinct positive and negative forces, contact line spreading, and friction forces were observed near the contact line. We also observed a strong dependency of the atomic kinetics in the contact line region on the variations in the contact line forces. The atoms of the liquid in the contact line region lost their kinetic energy due to the contact line friction force and became partially immobile on the solid surface. The results of the current study will be useful for understanding the role of the contact line forces on the kinetic energy dissipation in the contact line region.

  4. The effect of shear force on ink transfer in gravure offset printing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Taik-Min; Lee, Seung-Hyun; Noh, Jae-Ho; Kim, Dong-Soo; Chun, Sangki

    2010-01-01

    This paper asserts that shear force plays an important role in the printing mechanism of gravure offset line printing. To that end, a theoretical printing model showing shear force dependence on the printing angle is proposed. The decrement of the internal angle between the printing direction and the pattern-line direction increases shear force, thereby enhancing the amount of transferred ink in the off stage. A printing experiment using pattern-line widths of 80 µm and 20 µm shows the angle dependence of the line width, thickness and amount of transferred ink, reflecting the effect of shear force. The effect of the internal angle on cross-sectional differences in lines with a width of 20 µm and with angle variation is greater than that in lines with a width of 80 µm, which corresponds with the theoretical prediction that shear force has greater influence on a narrower line. The strong correlation between the experimental data and the theoretical model supports the validation of the theoretical model

  5. Challenges in constraining anthropogenic aerosol effects on cloud radiative forcing using present-day spatiotemporal variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghan, Steven; Wang, Minghuai; Zhang, Shipeng; Ferrachat, Sylvaine; Gettelman, Andrew; Griesfeller, Jan; Kipling, Zak; Lohmann, Ulrike; Morrison, Hugh; Neubauer, David; Partridge, Daniel G; Stier, Philip; Takemura, Toshihiko; Wang, Hailong; Zhang, Kai

    2016-05-24

    A large number of processes are involved in the chain from emissions of aerosol precursor gases and primary particles to impacts on cloud radiative forcing. Those processes are manifest in a number of relationships that can be expressed as factors dlnX/dlnY driving aerosol effects on cloud radiative forcing. These factors include the relationships between cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentration and emissions, droplet number and CCN concentration, cloud fraction and droplet number, cloud optical depth and droplet number, and cloud radiative forcing and cloud optical depth. The relationship between cloud optical depth and droplet number can be further decomposed into the sum of two terms involving the relationship of droplet effective radius and cloud liquid water path with droplet number. These relationships can be constrained using observations of recent spatial and temporal variability of these quantities. However, we are most interested in the radiative forcing since the preindustrial era. Because few relevant measurements are available from that era, relationships from recent variability have been assumed to be applicable to the preindustrial to present-day change. Our analysis of Aerosol Comparisons between Observations and Models (AeroCom) model simulations suggests that estimates of relationships from recent variability are poor constraints on relationships from anthropogenic change for some terms, with even the sign of some relationships differing in many regions. Proxies connecting recent spatial/temporal variability to anthropogenic change, or sustained measurements in regions where emissions have changed, are needed to constrain estimates of anthropogenic aerosol impacts on cloud radiative forcing.

  6. On the Effectiveness of the Dynamic Force Adjustment for Reducing the Scatter of Instrumented Charpy Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucon, E.

    2008-01-01

    One of the key factors for obtaining reliable instrumented Charpy results is the calibration of the instrumented striker. An interesting alternative to the conventional static calibration recommended by the standards is the Dynamic Force Adjustment (DFA), in which forces and displacements are iteratively adjusted until equality is achieved between absorbed energies calculated under the test record (Wt) and measured by the machine encoder (KV). In this study, this procedure has been applied to the instrumented data obtained by 10 international laboratories using notched and precracked Charpy specimens, in the framework of a Coordinated Research Project (CRP8) of IAEA. DFA is extremely effective in reducing the between-laboratory scatter for both general yield and maximum forces. The effect is less significant for dynamic reference temperatures measured from precracked Charpy specimens using the Master Curve procedure, but a moderate reduction of the standard deviation is anyway observed. It is shown that striker calibration is a prominent contribution to the interlaboratory variability of instrumented impact forces, particularly in the case of maximum forces.

  7. On the Effectiveness of the Dynamic Force Adjustment for Reducing the Scatter of Instrumented Charpy Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucon, E.

    2008-09-15

    One of the key factors for obtaining reliable instrumented Charpy results is the calibration of the instrumented striker. An interesting alternative to the conventional static calibration recommended by the standards is the Dynamic Force Adjustment (DFA), in which forces and displacements are iteratively adjusted until equality is achieved between absorbed energies calculated under the test record (Wt) and measured by the machine encoder (KV). In this study, this procedure has been applied to the instrumented data obtained by 10 international laboratories using notched and precracked Charpy specimens, in the framework of a Coordinated Research Project (CRP8) of IAEA. DFA is extremely effective in reducing the between-laboratory scatter for both general yield and maximum forces. The effect is less significant for dynamic reference temperatures measured from precracked Charpy specimens using the Master Curve procedure, but a moderate reduction of the standard deviation is anyway observed. It is shown that striker calibration is a prominent contribution to the interlaboratory variability of instrumented impact forces, particularly in the case of maximum forces.

  8. The effect of drive frequency and set point amplitude on tapping forces in atomic force microscopy: simulation and experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legleiter, Justin

    2009-01-01

    In tapping mode atomic force microscopy (AFM), a sharp probe tip attached to an oscillating cantilever is allowed to intermittently strike a surface. By raster scanning the probe while monitoring the oscillation amplitude of the cantilever via a feedback loop, topographical maps of surfaces with nanoscale resolution can be acquired. While numerous studies have employed numerical simulations to elucidate the time-resolved tapping force between the probe tip and surface, until recent technique developments, specific read-outs from such models could not be experimentally verified. In this study, we explore, via numerical simulation, the impact of imaging parameters, i.e. set point ratio and drive frequency as a function of resonance, on time-varying tip-sample force interactions, which are directly compared to reconstructed tapping forces from real AFM experiments. As the AFM model contains a feedback loop allowing for the simulation of the entire scanning process, we further explore the impact that various tip-sample force have on the entire imaging process.

  9. Note: A rigid piezo motor with large output force and an effective method to reduce sliding friction force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ying; Hou, Yubin; Lu, Qingyou

    2014-05-01

    We present a completely practical TunaDrive piezo motor. It consists of a central piezo stack sandwiched by two arm piezo stacks and two leg piezo stacks, respectively, which is then sandwiched and spring-clamped by a pair of parallel polished sapphire rods. It works by alternatively fast expanding and contracting the arm/leg stacks while slowly expanding/contracting the central stack simultaneously. The key point is that sufficiently fast expanding and contracting a limb stack can make its two sliding friction forces well cancel, resulting in the total sliding friction force is piezo motor's high compactness, precision, and output force make it perfect in building a high-quality harsh-condition (vibration resistant) atomic resolution scanning probe microscope.

  10. Effect of centrifugal force on natural frequency of lateral vibration of rotating shafts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behzad, M.; Bastami, A. R.

    2004-07-01

    This paper investigates the effect of shaft rotation on its natural frequency. Apart from gyroscopic effect, the axial force originated from centrifugal force and the Poisson effect results in change of shaft natural frequency. D'Alembert principle for shaft in cylindrical co-ordinate system, along with the stress-strain relation, gives the non-homogenous linear differential equation, which can be used to calculate axial stress in the shaft. Numerical results of this study show that axial stress produced by shaft rotation has a major effect on the natural frequency of long high-speed shafts, while shaft diameter has no influence on the results. In addition, change in lateral natural frequency due to gyroscopic effect is compared with the results of this study.

  11. THE EFFECT OF SUBMAXIMAL INHALATION ON MEASURES DERIVED FROM FORCED EXPIRATORY SPIROMETRY

    Science.gov (United States)

    THE EFFECT OF SUBMAXIMAL INHALATION ON MEASURES DERIVED FROM FORCED EXPIRATORY SPIROMETRY. William F. McDonnell Human Studies Division, NHEERL, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, RTP, NC 27711. Short-term exposure to ozone results in a neurally-mediated decrease in the ab...

  12. CO2 forcing induces semi-direct effects with consequences for climate feedback interpretations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Timothy; Forster, Piers M.

    2008-02-01

    Climate forcing and feedbacks are diagnosed from seven slab-ocean GCMs for 2 × CO2 using a regression method. Results are compared to those using conventional methodologies to derive a semi-direct forcing due to tropospheric adjustment, analogous to the semi-direct effect of absorbing aerosols. All models show a cloud semi-direct effect, indicating a rapid cloud response to CO2; cloud typically decreases, enhancing the warming. Similarly there is evidence of semi-direct effects from water-vapour, lapse-rate, ice and snow. Previous estimates of climate feedbacks are unlikely to have taken these semi-direct effects into account and so misinterpret processes as feedbacks that depend only on the forcing, but not the global surface temperature. We show that the actual cloud feedback is smaller than what previous methods suggest and that a significant part of the cloud response and the large spread between previous model estimates of cloud feedback is due to the semi-direct forcing.

  13. Effect of the forcing term in the pseudopotential lattice Boltzmann modeling of thermal flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qing; Luo, K H

    2014-05-01

    The pseudopotential lattice Boltzmann (LB) model is a popular model in the LB community for simulating multiphase flows. Recently, several thermal LB models, which are based on the pseudopotential LB model and constructed within the framework of the double-distribution-function LB method, were proposed to simulate thermal multiphase flows [G. Házi and A. Márkus, Phys. Rev. E 77, 026305 (2008); L. Biferale, P. Perlekar, M. Sbragaglia, and F. Toschi, Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 104502 (2012); S. Gong and P. Cheng, Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer 55, 4923 (2012); M. R. Kamali et al., Phys. Rev. E 88, 033302 (2013)]. The objective of the present paper is to show that the effect of the forcing term on the temperature equation must be eliminated in the pseudopotential LB modeling of thermal flows. First, the effect of the forcing term on the temperature equation is shown via the Chapman-Enskog analysis. For comparison, alternative treatments that are free from the forcing-term effect are provided. Subsequently, numerical investigations are performed for two benchmark tests. The numerical results clearly show that the existence of the forcing-term effect will lead to significant numerical errors in the pseudopotential LB modeling of thermal flows.

  14. A Cost-Effective Atomic Force Microscope for Undergraduate Control Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, C. N.; Goncalves, J.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a simple, cost-effective and robust atomic force microscope (AFM), which has been purposely designed and built for use as a teaching aid in undergraduate controls labs. The guiding design principle is to have all components be open and visible to the students, so the inner functioning of the microscope has been made clear to…

  15. Effect of Strength Training on Rate of Force Development in Older Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurjao, Andre Luiz Demantova; Gobbi, Lilian Teresa Bucken; Carneiro, Nelson Hilario; Goncalves, Raquel; Ferreira de Moura, Rodrigo; Cyrino, Edilson Serpeloni; Altimari, Leandro Ricardo; Gobbi, Sebastiao

    2012-01-01

    We analyzed the effect of an 8-week strength training (ST) program on the rate of force development (RFD) and electromyographic activity (EMG) in older women. Seventeen women (M age = 63.4 years, SD = 4.9) without previous ST experience were randomly assigned to either a control (n = 7) or training (n = 10) group. A leg-press isometric test was…

  16. Working women worldwide. Age effects in female labor force participation in 117 countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Besamusca, J.; Tijdens, K.; Keune, M.; Steinmetz, S.

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we investigate the effects of economic conditions, families, education, and gender ideologies on the labor force participation rates of women in eleven age groups in 117 countries. We find that participation rates of young and older women are partly explained by sector sizes and the

  17. Effects of tensor forces in nuclear spin–orbit splittings from ab initio calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shihang Shen

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available A systematic and specific pattern due to the effects of the tensor forces is found in the evolution of spin–orbit splittings in neutron drops. This result is obtained from relativistic Brueckner–Hartree–Fock theory using the bare nucleon–nucleon interaction. It forms an important guide for future microscopic derivations of relativistic and nonrelativistic nuclear energy density functionals.

  18. Effect of disjoining pressure in a thin film equation with non-uniform forcing

    KAUST Repository

    MOULTON, D. E.; LEGA, J.

    2013-01-01

    We explore the effect of disjoining pressure on a thin film equation in the presence of a non-uniform body force, motivated by a model describing the reverse draining of a magnetic film. To this end, we use a combination of numerical investigations

  19. Measuring q/m for Water Drops--An Introduction to the Effects of Electrical Forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Francis X.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses an experiment which introduces students to the effects of electrical forces on the motion of macroscopic objects. Included are the proecedures of measuring the charge-to-mass ratio from deflections of charged water drops in horizontal fields and the overall charges delivered in a Faraday cup. (CC)

  20. Effects of magnetizing on flux pinning force for sintered YBCO superconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, S.Y.; Yan, J.L.; Yu, Z.; Shi, K.X.; Tong, H.W.; Qiu, L.

    1989-01-01

    It is shown that magnitude and course of magnetizing field influence magnetization and transport current. Effective flux pinning force density with two types is extracted by an iterative procedure based on the critical state equation. One of the types is attributed to the weak links and the other is considered to be resulted from the intragrain flux pinning centers

  1. Effects of wave-induced forcing on a circulation model of the North Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staneva, Joanna; Alari, Victor; Breivik, Øyvind; Bidlot, Jean-Raymond; Mogensen, Kristian

    2017-04-01

    The effect of wind waves on water level and currents during two storms in the North Sea is investigated using a high-resolution NEMO model forced with fluxes and fields from a high-resolution wave model. The additional terms accounting for wave-current interaction that are considered in this study are the Stokes-Coriolis force and the sea-state dependent energy and momentum fluxes. The individual and collective role of these processes is quantified and the results are compared with a control run without wave effects as well as against current and water level measurements from coastal stations. We find a better agreement with observations when the circulation model is forced by sea-state dependent fluxes, especially in extreme events. The two extreme events, the storm Christian (25-27 October 2013), and about a month later, the storm Xaver (5-7 December 2013), induce different wave and surge conditions over the North Sea. Including the wave effects in the circulation model for the storm Xaver raises the modelled surge by more than 40 cm compared with the control run in the German Bight area. For the storm Christian, a difference of 20-30 cm in the surge level between the wave-forced and the stand-alone ocean model is found over the whole southern part of the North Sea. Moreover, the modelled vertical velocity profile fits the observations very well when the wave forcing is accounted for. The contribution of wave-induced forcing has been quantified indicating that this represents an important mechanism for improving water level and current predictions.

  2. On possible beneficial ponderomotive force effects on fast wave coupling in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrzilka, V.

    1994-02-01

    Ponderomotive forces at fast wave launching lead in the vicinity of the launching structure in tokamaks at lower hybrid frequencies typically to a boundary plasma density increase. This results in a decrease of the reflection coefficient, and in cases of detached plasmas, to an appearance of a local electric field maximum at a distance of several centimeters from the launching grill structure; this electric field maximum is connected to the reversal of the plasma density gradient near the grill mouth because of ponderomotive force effects. (author) 3 figs., 20 refs

  3. Effect of calcium chloride concentration on output force in electrical actuator made of sodium alginate gel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yuda; Zhao, Gang; Wei, Chengye; Liu, Shuang; Fu, Yu; Liu, Xvxiong

    2018-01-01

    As a kind of artificial muscle intelligent material, the biological gel electric driver has the advantages of low driving voltage, large strain, good biological compatibility, good flexibility, low price, etc. The application prospect is broad and it has high academic value. Alginate, as a common substance in sea, has characteristics of low cost, green and pollution-free. Therefore,this paper obtains biological gel electric actuator by sodium alginate and calcium chloride. Effects on output force of the electric actuator is researched by changing the crosslinking of calcium chloride concentration and the output force enhancement mechanism is analyzed in this paper.

  4. Forced migration in childhood: Are there long-term health effects?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan M. Saarela

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Studies on the health of migrants have increased considerably in number in recent years, but little is still known about the long-term health effects associated with forced migration, and particularly for people who were forced to migrate as children. Data shortcomings together with the methodological challenges of studying migrant populations limit the ability to disentangle the roles of various factors that influence migrant health outcomes. Finland provides an unusual opportunity to study long-term health consequences associated with forced migration. During World War II, twelve per cent of the Finnish population was forced to leave the region nowadays referred to as Ceded Karelia. After the war, these Karelians could not return home because the area was relinquished to the Soviet Union. Using high quality, linked register-based data for the period 1988–2012, we investigate whether this forced migration had long-term health consequences for those who were forced to migrate as children. Comparison groups are non-displaced persons born on the adjacent side of the new border, and people born elsewhere in Finland. Health at ages 43–65 years is measured by receipt of sickness benefit, which is an indicator of short-term illness, and receipt of disability pension, which reflects long-term illness or permanent disability. All-cause and cause-specific mortality is analysed at ages 43–84 years. We find no support for the hypothesis that the traumatic event of being forced to migrate during childhood has long-term negative health consequences. The forced child migrants have lower odds for receipt of sickness benefit, and women also have lower odds for receipt of disability pension. The mortality results are largely driven by patterns specific for eastern-born populations of Finland. A likely reason behind the absence of negative health consequences is that these migrants seem to have integrated well into post-war Finnish society. Keywords

  5. Effect of radial meniscal tear on in situ forces of meniscus and tibiofemoral relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachibana, Yuta; Mae, Tatsuo; Fujie, Hiromichi; Shino, Konsei; Ohori, Tomoki; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Nakata, Ken

    2017-02-01

    To clarify the effect of the radial tear of the lateral meniscus on the in situ meniscus force and the tibiofemoral relationship under axial loads and valgus torques. Ten intact porcine knees were settled to a 6-degree of freedom robotic system, while the force and 3-dimensional path of the knees were recorded via Universal Force Sensor (UFS) during 3 cycles of 250-N axial load and 5-Nm valgus torque at 15°, 30°, 45°, and 60° of knee flexion. The same examination was performed on the following 3 meniscal states sequentially; 33, 66, and 100% width of radial tears at the middle segment of the lateral meniscus, while recording the force and path of the knees via UFS. Finally, all paths were reproduced after total lateral meniscectomy and the in situ force of the lateral meniscus were calculated with the principle of superposition. The radial tear of 100% width significantly decreased the in situ force of the lateral meniscus and caused tibial medial shift and valgus rotation at 30°-60° of knee flexion in both testing protocols. Under a 250-N axial load at 60° of knee flexion, the in situ force decreased to 36 ± 29 N with 100% width of radial tear, which was 122 ± 38 N in the intact state. Additionally, the tibia shifted medially by 2.1 ± 0.9 mm and valgusrotated by 2.5 ± 1.9° with the complete radial tear. However, the radial tear of 33 or 66% width had little effect on either the in situ force or the tibial position. A radial tear of 100% width involving the rim significantly decreased the in situ force of the lateral meniscus and caused medial shift and valgus rotation of the tibia, whereas a radial tear of up to 66% width produced only little change. The clinical relevance is that loss of meniscal functions due to complete radial tear can lead to abnormal stress concentration in a focal area of cartilage and can increase the risk of osteoarthritis in the future.

  6. Effect of Electrodynamic Forces on the Attitude Stabilization of a Satellite in Ecliptic orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Aziz, Yehia

    This work is based on the previous paper of the author [1]. The present paper is devoted to the investigation of the attitude dynamics of an ecliptic satellite moving in the magnetic field of the Earth. Eelectrodynamic forces result from the motion of a charged satelite relative to the magnetic field of the Earth. The torque due to electrodynamic effect of the Lorentz forces on the attitude stabilization of the satellite is studied with the detailed model of the Earth's magnetic field. A method for estimating the stable and unstable regions of the equilibrium positions based on Euler's equation is also discussed. The results show that Lorentz forces can affect the stablization of the satellite, in particular for highly eccentric orbits and also for large satellte. [1] Abdel-Aziz, Y. A. Attitude Stabilization of a Rigid Spacecraft in the Geomagnetic Field. AdSpR 40, 18-24, 2007.

  7. Interagency task force on the health effects of ionizing radiation. final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-06-01

    This is the final report of the task force and incorporates the findings and recommendations of six smaller work groups, each with a more specific focus; i.e., science, privacy, care and benefits, exposure reduction, public information, and institutional arrangements. A research agenda that could provide some answers to questions about the effects of low-level radiation is proposed, along with recommendations to facilitate research. A public information program is outlined. Recommendations are advanced to improve systems that deliver care and benefits to those who may have been injured by exposure to radiation, and proposals for steps that might reduce unnecessary radiation exposure in the future are identified. The task force also recommends measures to institutionalize the interagency cooperation that characterized the task force. Three tables and one figure show the collective estimates of the U.S. general population, Federal research financing, cancer linked to radiation in particular populations, and a general dose-response model

  8. The effects of dorso-lumbar motion restriction on the ground reaction force components during running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morley, Joseph J; Traum, Edward

    2016-04-01

    The effects of restricting dorso-lumbar spine mobility on ground reaction forces in runners was measured and assessed. A semi-rigid cast was used to restrict spinal motion during running. Subjects ran across a force platform at 3.6 m/s, planting the right foot on the platform. Data was collected from ten running trials with the cast and ten without the cast and analysed. Casted running showed that the initial vertical heel strike maximum was increased (p running (p running results in measurable and repeatable alterations in ground reaction force components. Alterations in load transfer due to decreased spinal motion may be a factor contributing to selected injuries in runners. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. THE EFFECTS OF HEIGHT AND DISTANCE ON THE FORCE PRODUCTION AND ACCELERATION IN MARTIAL ARTS STRIKES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia A. Bir

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Almost all cultures have roots in some sort of self defence system and yet there is relatively little research in this area, outside of a sports related environment. This project investigated different applications of strikes from Kung Fu practitioners that have not been addressed before in the literature. Punch and palm strikes were directly compared from different heights and distances, with the use of a load cell, accelerometers, and high speed video. The data indicated that the arm accelerations of both strikes were similar, although the force and resulting acceleration of the target were significantly greater for the palm strikes. Additionally, the relative height at which the strike was delivered was also investigated. The overall conclusion is that the palm strike is a more effective strike for transferring force to an object. It can also be concluded that an attack to the chest would be ideal for maximizing impact force and moving an opponent off balance

  10. Effect of low temperature oxygen plasma treatment on microstructure and adhesion force of graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jun; Deng, Heijun; Xue, Wei; Wang, Quan

    2018-01-01

    Graphene has attracted strong attention due to its unique mechanical, electrical, thermal and magnetic properties. In this work, we investigate the effect of low temperature oxygen plasma treatment on microstructure and adhesion force of single-layer graphene (SLG). Low temperature oxygen plasma is used to treat SLG grown by chemical vapor deposition through varying the exposure time. Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy are utilized to identify changes before and after treatment. Raman spectra of treated graphene reveal that peak intensity of the characteristic D and D' peaks increase. Meanwhile, degradation of the G and 2D peaks in X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicates that abundant Csbnd OH and Cdbnd O functional groups are introduced into graphene after treatment. AFM investigation shows that surface roughness and adhesion force of treated graphene increase significantly firstly and then slowly. Therefore, this work would offer a practical route to improve the performance of graphene-based devices.

  11. Fractal based complexity measure and variation in force during sustained isometric muscle contraction: effect of aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjunan, Sridhar P; Kumar, Dinesh K; Bastos, Teodiano

    2012-01-01

    This study has investigated the effect of age on the fractal based complexity measure of muscle activity and variance in the force of isometric muscle contraction. Surface electromyogram (sEMG) and force of muscle contraction were recorded from 40 healthy subjects categorized into: Group 1: Young - age range 20-30; 10 Males and 10 Females, Group 2: Old - age range 55-70; 10 Males and 10 Females during isometric exercise at Maximum Voluntary contraction (MVC). The results show that there is a reduction in the complexity of surface electromyogram (sEMG) associated with aging. The results demonstrate that there is an increase in the coefficient of variance (CoV) of the force of muscle contraction and a decrease in complexity of sEMG for the Old age group when compared with the Young age group.

  12. Investigating the effect of clamping force on the fatigue life of bolted plates using volumetric approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esmaeili, F.; Chakherlou, T. N.; Zehsaz, M.; Hasanifard, S.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, the effects of bolt clamping force on the fatigue life for bolted plates made from Al7075-T6 have been studied on the values of notch strength reduction factor obtained by volumetric approach. To attain stress distribution around the notch (hole) which is required for volumetric approach, nonlinear finite element simulations were carried out. To estimate the fatigue life, the available smooth S-N curve of Al7075-T6 and the notch strength reduction factor obtained from volumetric method were used. The estimated fatigue life was compared with the available experimental test results. The investigation shows that there is a good agreement between the life predicted by the volumetric approach and the experimental results for various specimens with different amount of clamping forces. Volumetric approach and experimental results showed that the fatigue life of bolted plates improves because of the compressive stresses created around the plate hole due to clamping force.

  13. Oversight of the Air Force - What is the Audit Component and How Can Air Force Managers Deal with It Effectively?

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-05-01

    This report discusses authority, mission, and responsibilities of the audit organizations that perform oversight of Air Force operations. A...the discussion of the major audit organizations. The audit oversight function is here to stay. Auditors and audit organizations can be beneficial to Air

  14. Development of force sensing circuit to determine the optimal force required for effective dynamic tripod grip/writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suraj S., S.; Kulkarni, Palash; Bokadia, Pratik; Ramanathan, Prabhu; Nageswaran, Sharmila

    2018-04-01

    Handwriting is a combination of fine motor perceptions and cognitive skills to produce words on paper. For writing, the most commonly used and recommended grip is the dynamic tripod grip. A child's handwriting starts developing during the times of pre-schooling and improves over time. While writing, children apply excessive force on the writing instrument. This force is exerted by their fingers and as per the law of reaction, the writing instruments tend to exert an equal and opposite force, that could damage the delicate soft tissue structures in their fingers and initiate cramps and pains. This condition is also prevalent in adults who tend to write for long hours under pressure. An example would be adolescence student during the exams. Clinically this condition is termed as `Writer's Cramp', which is usually characterized by muscle fatigue and pain in the fingers. By understanding and fixing the threshold of the force that should be exerted by the fingers while gripping the instrument, the pain can be controlled or avoided. This research aims in designing an electronic module which can help in understanding the threshold of pressure which is optimum enough to establish a better contact between the fingers and the instrument and should be capable of controlling or avoiding the pain. The design of FSR based electronic system is explained with its circuitry and results of initial testing is presented in this paper.

  15. US/UK Sensor-To-Shooter Multinational C4 Interoperability Study Force-On-Force Effectiveness Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-10-01

    performance. A team of military and Multiple gamers and analysts Augmented by Study SMEs •Threats •Service reps •Scenario •Data Typical VIC Team...OPLAN) for the Combined Forces Command (CFC) in Korea . CFC has since requested TRAC to conduct similar analyses on the new OPLANs during 1999-2000

  16. Effective method to control the levitation force and levitation height in a superconducting maglev system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Peng-Tao; Yang Wan-Min; Wang Miao; Li Jia-Wei; Guo Yu-Xia

    2015-01-01

    The influence of the width of the middle magnet in the permanent magnet guideways (PMGs) on the levitation force and the levitation height of single-domain yttrium barium copper oxide (YBCO) bulks has been investigated at 77 K under the zero field cooled (ZFC) state. It is found that the largest levitation force can be obtained in the system with the width of the middle magnet of the PMG equal to the size of the YBCO bulk when the gap between the YBCO bulk and PMG is small. Both larger levitation force and higher levitation height can be obtained in the system with the width of the middle magnet of the PMG larger than the size of the YBCO bulk. The stiffness of the levitation force between the PMG and the YBCO bulk is higher in the system with a smaller width of the middle magnet in the PMG. These results provide an effective way to control the levitation force and the levitation height for the superconducting maglev design and applications. (paper)

  17. Effect of static deformation and external forces on the oscillations of levitated droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryanarayana, P. V. R.; Bayazitoglu, Y.

    1991-01-01

    The oscillations of an aspherical droplet subjected to different external forces are considered. For an arbitrary shape deformation, it is shown that the frequency spectrum splits into (2l - 1) peaks for a mode l oscillation, and the splitting of the frequency spectrum is calculated for mode 2, 3, and 4 oscillations. The deformation is then treated as a consequence of a general external force, and the frequency split is obtained in terms of the external force parameters. Droplets levitated by acoustic, electromagnetic, and combined acoustic-electromagnetic forces are considered in particular, and it is shown that the effects of asphericity adequately explain the splitting of the frequency spectrum observed commonly in experiments. The interpretation of spectra with regard to accurate surface tension measurement using the oscillations of levitated droplets is discussed, and the results applied to some previous experimental results. It is shown that the accuracy of surface tension measurements can improve if the asphericity caused by the levitating force, and the resulting frequency split, are taken into account.

  18. Independent effects of step length and foot strike pattern on tibiofemoral joint forces during running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowersock, Collin D; Willy, Richard W; DeVita, Paul; Willson, John D

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of step length and foot strike pattern along with their interaction on tibiofemoral joint (TFJ) and medial compartment TFJ kinetics during running. Nineteen participants ran with a rear foot strike pattern at their preferred speed using a short (-10%), preferred, and long (+10%) step length. These step length conditions were then repeated using a forefoot strike pattern. Regardless of foot strike pattern, a 10% shorter step length resulted in decreased peak contact force, force impulse per step, force impulse per kilometre, and average loading rate at the TFJ and medial compartment, while a 10% increased step length had the opposite effects (all P forefoot strike pattern significantly lowered TFJ and medial compartment TFJ average loading rates compared with a rear foot strike pattern (both forefoot strike pattern produced the greatest reduction in peak medial compartment contact force (P < 0.05). Knowledge of these running modification effects may be relevant to the management or prevention of TFJ injury or pathology among runners.

  19. Effects of Nordic walking and walking on spatiotemporal gait parameters and ground reaction force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seung Kyu; Yang, Dae Jung; Kang, Yang Hun; Kim, Je Ho; Uhm, Yo Han; Lee, Yong Seon

    2015-09-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of Nordic walking and walking on spatiotemporal gait parameters and ground reaction force. [Subjects] The subjects of this study were 30 young adult males, who were divided into a Nordic walking group of 15 subjects and a walking group of 15 subjects. [Methods] To analyze the spatiotemporal parameters and ground reaction force during walking in the two groups, the six-camera Vicon MX motion analysis system was used. The subjects were asked to walk 12 meters using the more comfortable walking method for them between Nordic walking and walking. After they walked 12 meters more than 10 times, their most natural walking patterns were chosen three times and analyzed. To determine the pole for Nordic walking, each subject's height was multiplied by 0.68. We then measured the spatiotemporal gait parameters and ground reaction force. [Results] Compared with the walking group, the Nordic walking group showed an increase in cadence, stride length, and step length, and a decrease in stride time, step time, and vertical ground reaction force. [Conclusion] The results of this study indicate that Nordic walking increases the stride and can be considered as helping patients with diseases affecting their gait. This demonstrates that Nordic walking is more effective in improving functional capabilities by promoting effective energy use and reducing the lower limb load, because the weight of the upper and lower limbs is dispersed during Nordic walking.

  20. [Unpredictable chronic mild stress effects on antidepressants activities in forced swim test].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudryashov, N V; Kalinina, T S; Voronina, T A

    2015-02-01

    The experiments has been designed to study unpredictable chronic mild stress effect on anti-depressive activities of amitriptyline (10 mg/kg) and fluoxetine (20 mg/kg) in forced swim test in male outbred mice. It is shown that acute treatment with fluoxetine does not produce any antidepressant effects in mice following stress of 14 days while the sub-chronic injections of fluoxetine result in more deep depressive-like behavior. In 28 daily stressed mice, antidepressant effect of fluoxetine is observed independently of the injection rates. Amitriptyline demonstrates the antidepressant activity regardless of the duration of stress or administration scheduling, but at the same time the severity of anti-immobilization effect of amitriptyline in stressed mice is weaker in compare to non-stressed trails. Thus, the injection rates and duration of unpredictable mild chronic stress are the parameters that determine the efficiency of antidepressants in the mouse forced swimming test.

  1. Instanton and tensor-force effects in the strong decays of mesons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonnaz, R.; Silvestre-Brac, B.

    2001-01-01

    The strong decays of mesons are studied in the framework of the 3 P 0 model with a momentum-dependent vertex. The mesons wave functions are obtained from quark-antiquark potentials including a finite quark size, instanton effects, spin-orbit and tensor-force effects. Several prescriptions for treating the decays into three mesons are proposed and analyzed. Comparison to experimental data is presented in detail. (author)

  2. Effect of the space-charge force on tracking at low energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furman, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    The authors present tracking results for the SSC's Low Energy Booster at injection energy, including the effect of the space-charge force. The bunches are assumed to be gaussian with elliptical cross-section. Magnet errors and sextupoles are not included, but an RF cavity is. The authors compare the phase space with and without synchrotron oscillations, with and without space-charge. The effective emittance is not significantly altered. They also present results on tune shifts with amplitude

  3. The Effect of Minimum Wages on the Labor Force Participation Rates of Teenagers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessels, Walter J.

    In light of pressure on Congress to raise the minimum wage from $5.15 to $6.15 per hour, a study looked at the effects such a raise would have on more than 10 million workers, many of them teenagers. The study used quarterly data on the labor force participation rates of teenagers from 1978 through 1999 and other studies to assess the effects of…

  4. Effect of forced swim stress on wistar albino rats in various behavioral parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ambareesha Kondam, Nilesh N Kate, Gaja Lakshmi, Suresh M, Chandrashekar M.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Stress is an important factor of depression that causes the changes in various body systems. The forced swim test is a commonly used stressor test where rats are forced to swim in specially constructed tanks for a particular period where there is behavioral activation characterized by vigorous swimming and diving to search for alternate routes of escape. Animal health including human has been shown to be affected by the stressful events of life inducing situation which alters cognition, learning memory and emotional responses, causing mental disorders like depression and anxiety and stress in rats. Methods: The experiment was carried out with 12 healthy albino Wistar female rats weighing about 150-180gms. The animals were randomly divided into two groups of six animals each. Group – I (control, Group – II (Stressed Group. Group –II rats are placed in plastic tanks for 45minutes for15 days. Temperature of water was maintained at 20˚C. During stress phase, the animals will be trained for forced swim test, behavioral changes observed by open field apparatus for emotions, and eight arm maze for memory & leaning, elevated plus maze for anxiety. Results: Forced swim stress causes to a significant change (p<0.05 on cognitive functions: motivation, learning and memory. Forced swim stress is the factor damaging the hippocampus causes repeated immobilization and produce atrophy of dendrites of pyramidal neurons and neuroendocrinological disturbances, controlled by the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA. Repeated stress in the form of forced swimming activates the free radical processes leading to an increase in lipid peroxidation in many tissues. Conclusion: This study reveals the effect of repeated forced swim stress causes wide range of adaptive changes in the central nervous system including the elevation of serotonin (5-HT metabolism and an increased susceptibility to affective disorders. The earlier findings have reported

  5. Effects of Polishing Bur Application Force and Reuse on Sintered Zirconia Surface Topography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, N G; Tsujimoto, A; Baruth, A G

    2018-03-16

    Limited information is available on how to polish and finish zirconia surfaces following computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM), specifically, how differing application forces and reuse of zirconia polishing systems affect zirconia topography. To determine the effect of differing, clinically relevant, polishing application forces and multiple usages of polishing burs on the surface topography of CAD/CAM zirconia. One hundred twenty 220-grit carbide finished zirconia disks were sintered according to manufacturer's directions and divided into two groups for the study of two coarse polishing bur types. Each group was divided into subgroups for polishing (15,000 rpm) at 15 seconds for 1.0 N, 4.5 N, or 11 N of force using a purpose-built fixture. Subgroups were further divided to study the effects of polishing for the first, fifth, 15th, and 30th bur use, simulating clinical procedures. Unpolished surfaces served as a control group. Surfaces were imaged with noncontact optical profilometry (OP) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) to measure average roughness values (Ra). Polishing burs were optically examined for wear. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was performed on burs and zirconia surfaces. One-way ANOVA with post hoc Tukey HSD (honest significant difference) tests (α=0.05) were used for statistical analyses. AFM and OP Ra values of all polished surfaces were significantly lower than those of the unpolished control. Different polishing forces and bur reuse showed no significant differences in AFM Ra. However, significant differences in OP Ra were found due to differing application forces and bur reuse between the first and subsequent uses. SEM and optical micrographs revealed notable bur wear, increasing with increasing reuse. SEM and AFM micrographs clearly showed polished, periodic zirconia surfaces. Nanoscale topography, as analyzed with kurtosis and average groove depth, was found dependent on the specific polishing bur type. These in

  6. Effect of compressive force on aeroelastic stability of a strut-braced wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulaeman, Erwin

    2002-01-01

    Recent investigations of a strut-braced wing (SBW) aircraft show that, at high positive load factors, a large tensile force in the strut leads to a considerable compressive axial force in the inner wing, resulting in a reduced bending stiffness and even buckling of the wing. Studying the influence of this compressive force on the structural response of SBW is thus of paramount importance in the early stage of SBW design. The purpose of the this research is to investigate the effect of compressive force on aeroelastic stability of the SBW using efficient structural finite element and aerodynamic lifting surface methods. A procedure is developed to generate wing stiffness distribution for detailed and simplified wing models and to include the compressive force effect in the SBW aeroelastic analysis. A sensitivity study is performed to generate response surface equations for the wing flutter speed as functions of several design variables. These aeroelastic procedures and response surface equations provide a valuable tool and trend data to study the unconventional nature of SBW. In order to estimate the effect of the compressive force, the inner part of the wing structure is modeled as a beam-column. A structural finite element method is developed based on an analytical stiffness matrix formulation of a non-uniform beam element with arbitrary polynomial variations in the cross section. By using this formulation, the number of elements to model the wing structure can be reduced without degrading the accuracy. The unsteady aerodynamic prediction is based on a discrete element lifting surface method. The present formulation improves the accuracy of existing lifting surface methods by implementing a more rigorous treatment on the aerodynamic kernel integration. The singularity of the kernel function is isolated by implementing an exact expansion series to solve an incomplete cylindrical function problem. A hybrid doublet lattice/doublet point scheme is devised to reduce

  7. Effects of Jaw Clenching and Jaw Alignment Mouthpiece Use on Force Production During Vertical Jump and Isometric Clean Pull.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Charles R; Fu, Yang-Chieh; Cazas-Moreno, Vanessa; Valliant, Melinda W; Gdovin, Jacob R; Williams, Charles C; Garner, John C

    2018-01-01

    Allen, CR, Fu, Y-C, Cazas-Moreno, V, Valliant, MW, Gdovin, JR, Williams, CC, and Garner, JC. Effects of jaw clenching and jaw alignment mouthpiece use on force production during vertical jump and isometric clean pull. J Strength Cond Res 32(1): 237-243, 2018-This study examined the effects of jaw clenching, a self-adapted, jaw-repositioning mouthpiece on force production during maximum countermovement vertical jump and maximum isometric midthigh clean pull assessments in an attempt to determine any ergogenic effect attributable to clenching, jaw-repositioning mouthpiece use, or the combination of both. Thirty-six male subjects performed vertical jump and isometric clean pull assessments from a force platform under various mouthpiece and clench conditions. A 3 × 2 (mouthpiece × clench) repeated-measures analysis of variance was conducted to analyze each of the following force production variables for both assessments: peak force, normalized peak force, and rate of force development. In addition, jump height was analyzed for the vertical jump. Results revealed improvements in peak force (F1,35 = 15.84, p ≤ 0.001, (Equation is included in full-text article.)= 0.31), normalized peak force (F1,35 = 16.28, p ≤ 0.001, (Equation is included in full-text article.)= 0.32), and rate of force development (F1,35 = 12.89, p = 0.001, (Equation is included in full-text article.)= 0.27) during the isometric clean pull assessment when participants maximally clenched their jaw, regardless of mouthpiece condition. There were no statistically significant differences in jump height, peak force, normalized peak force, or rate of force development during the vertical jump for any treatment condition. This study supports previous research demonstrating that the implementation of remote voluntary contractions such as jaw clenching can lead to concurrent activation potentiation and a resulting ergogenic effect during activities involving and requiring high-force production.

  8. See-saw motion of thermal boundary layer under vibrations: An implication of forced piston effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, D.; Erriguible, A.; Amiroudine, S.

    2017-12-01

    The phenomenon of piston effect is well known in supercritical fluids wherein the thermal homogenization of the bulk occurs on a very short time scale due to pressure change caused by expansion or contraction of the fluid in the thermal boundary layer. In this article, we highlight an interesting phenomenon wherein by the application of external forces (vibration) normal to the temperature gradient, see-saw motion of the thermal boundary layer is observed in weightlessness conditions. This is attributed to the thermomechanical coupling caused by the temperature change due to external forces. We term this change in the temperature field due to external forces as forced piston effect (FPE). A detailed investigation of this intriguing behavior shows that the see-saw motion is attributed to the variation of the relative thickness of the thermal boundary layer, defined on the basis of relative local bulk temperature, along the direction of vibration. This change in the temperature field, which is observed to be caused by FPE in vibration, is shown to depend on the compressibility (and thus proximity to the critical point), the imposed acceleration and the cell size. It is also found that see-saw motion persists in the presence of gravity and thus is described ubiquitous in nature for all conditions. A plot illustrating the maximum change in the temperature as a function of these parameters is further proposed.

  9. The effect of flurprimidol on Allium rosenbachianum Reg. forced in pots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halina Laskowska

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The effect of flurprimidol on Allium rosenbachianum (Reg. flowering and forcing period was studied. Bulbs of 18-20 cm circumference were used in the experiment. Two methods of retardant application were used: bulbs soaking before planting and triple spraying of plants during the vegetation period (in the stage of leaf rosette, open leaves and in the phase of green, ‘sitting’ bud. Flurprimidol was used in the following doses: 15 mg ∙dm -3 , 30 mg ∙dm -3 , 45 mg ∙dm -3 and control (plants treated with distilled water. Bulbs were planted into pots on the 20 th of October and ‘wet cooled’ for 14 weeks in the temperature of 9°C. During forcing in a greenhouse, morphological features of plants were observed. It was noted that flurprimidol may be effectively used for suppressing A. rosenbachianum forced in a greenhouse as a pot plant. Flurprimidol used in concentration of 45 mg ∙dm -3 significantly inhibited growth of shoots and length of flower pedicels and leaves and increased number of flowers in inflorescences at the same time. Soaking bulbs of A. rosenbachianumin flurprimidol solution before planting shortened forcing period by 4 days.

  10. Calculating potential of mean force between like-charged nanoparticles: A comprehensive study on salt effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Yuan-Yan; Wang, Feng-Hua; Tan, Zhi-Jie

    2013-01-01

    Ions are critical to the structure and stability of polyelectrolytes such as nucleic acids. In this work, we systematically calculated the potentials of mean force between two like-charged nanoparticles in salt solutions by Monte Carlo simulations. The pseudo-spring method is employed to calculate the potential of mean force and compared systematically with the inversed-Boltzmann method. An effective attraction is predicted between two like-charged nanoparticles in divalent/trivalent salt solution and such attraction becomes weakened at very high salt concentration. Our analysis reveals that for the system, the configuration of ion-bridging nanoparticles is responsible for the attraction, and the invasion of anions into the inter-nanoparticles region at high salt concentration would induce attraction weakening rather than the charge inversion effect. The present method would be useful for calculating effective interactions during nucleic acid folding.

  11. The Atmospheric Aerosols And Their Effects On Cloud Albedo And Radiative Forcing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefan, S.; Iorga, G.; Zoran, M.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study is to provide results of the theoretical experiments in order to improve the estimates of indirect effect of aerosol on the cloud albedo and consequently on the radiative forcing. The cloud properties could be changed primarily because of changing of both the aerosol type and concentration in the atmosphere. Only a part of aerosol interacts effectively with water and will, in turn, determine the number concentration of cloud droplets (CDNC). We calculated the CDNC, droplet effective radius (reff), cloud optical thickness (or), cloud albedo and radiative forcing, for various types of aerosol. Our results show into what extent the change of aerosol characteristics (number concentration and chemical composition) on a regional scale can modify the cloud reflectivity. Higher values for cloud albedo in the case of the continental (urban) clouds were obtained

  12. Avoiding a Pilot Retention Death Spiral: The Pilot Shortage and DOD’s Challenge to Maintain an Effective Fighting Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-04-09

    public oversight.”79 His comments apply equally well to the Air Force or the Navy. Anecdotal evidence provided by an anonymous survey on social media ...Master’s Thesis 31 July 2017- 09 APRIL 2018 Avoiding a Pilot Retention Death Spiral: The Pilot Shortage and DOD’s Challenge to Maintain an Effective ...DOD’S CHALLENGE TO MAINTAIN AN EFFECTIVE FIGHTING FORCE by Nathan Thompson Lieutenant Colonel, United States Air Force

  13. Effects of Different Lifting Cadences on Ground Reaction Forces during the Squat Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, Jason R.; Amonette, William E.; Hagan, R. Donald

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the effect of different cadences on the ground reaction force (GRF(sub R)) during the squat exercise. It is known that squats performed with greater acceleration will produce greater inertial forces; however, it is not well understood how different squat cadences affect GRF(sub R). It was hypothesized that faster squat cadences will result in greater peak GRF(sub R). METHODS: Six male subjects (30.8+/-4.4 y, 179.5+/-8.9 cm, 88.8+/-13.3 kg) with previous squat experience performed three sets of three squats using three different cadences (FC = 1 sec descent/1 sec ascent; MC = 3 sec descent/1 sec ascent; SC = 4 sec descent/2 sec ascent) with barbell mass equal to body mass. Ground reaction force was used to calculate inertial force trajectories of the body plus barbell (FI(sub system)). Forces were normalized to body mass. RESULTS: Peak GRF(sub R) and peak FI(sub system) were significantly higher in FC squats compared to MC (p=0.0002) and SC (p=0.0002). Range of GRF(sub R) and FI(sub system) were also significantly higher in FC compared to MC (psquat cadences result in significantly greater peak GRF(sub R) due to the inertia of the system. GRF(sub R) was more dependent upon decent cadence than on ascent cadence. PRACTICAL APPLICATION: This study demonstrates that faster squat cadences produce greater ground reaction forces. Therefore, the use of faster squat cadences might enhance strength and power adaptations to long-term resistance exercise training. Key Words: velocity, weight training, resistive exercise

  14. Investigation of Body Force Effects on Flow Boiling Critical Heat Flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Mudawar, Issam; Hasan, Mohammad M.

    2002-01-01

    The bubble coalescence and interfacial instabilities that are important to modeling critical heat flux (CHF) in reduced-gravity systems can be sensitive to even minute body forces. Understanding these complex phenomena is vital to the design and safe implementation of two-phase thermal management loops proposed for space and planetary-based thermal systems. While reduced gravity conditions cannot be accurately simulated in 1g ground-based experiments, such experiments can help isolate the effects of the various forces (body force, surface tension force and inertia) which influence flow boiling CHF. In this project, the effects of the component of body force perpendicular to a heated wall were examined by conducting 1g flow boiling experiments at different orientations. FC-72 liquid was boiled along one wall of a transparent rectangular flow channel that permitted photographic study of the vapor-liquid interface at conditions approaching CHF. High-speed video imaging was employed to capture dominant CHF mechanisms. Six different CHF regimes were identified: Wavy Vapor Layer, Pool Boiling, Stratification, Vapor Counterflow, Vapor Stagnation, and Separated Concurrent Vapor Flow. CHF showed great sensitivity to orientation for flow velocities below 0.2 m/s, where very small CHF values where measured, especially with downflow and downward-facing heated wall orientations. High flow velocities dampened the effects of orientation considerably. Figure I shows representative images for the different CHF regimes. The Wavy Vapor Layer regime was dominant for all high velocities and most orientations, while all other regimes were encountered at low velocities, in the downflow and/or downward-facing heated wall orientations. The Interfacial Lift-off model was modified to predict the effects of orientation on CHF for the dominant Wavy Vapor Layer regime. The photographic study captured a fairly continuous wavy vapor layer travelling along the heated wall while permitting liquid

  15. Effects of unilateral real-time biofeedback on propulsive forces during gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenck, Christopher; Kesar, Trisha M

    2017-06-06

    In individuals with post-stroke hemiparesis, reduced push-off force generation in the paretic leg negatively impacts walking function. Gait training interventions that increase paretic push-off can improve walking function in individuals with neurologic impairment. During normal locomotion, push-off forces are modulated with variations in gait speed and slope. However, it is unknown whether able-bodied individuals can selectively modulate push-off forces from one leg in response to biofeedback. Here, in a group of young, neurologically-unimpaired individuals, we determined the effects of a real-time visual and auditory biofeedback gait training paradigm aimed at unilaterally increasing anteriorly-directed ground reaction force (AGRF) in the targeted leg. Ground reaction force data during were collected from 7 able-bodied individuals as they walked at a self-selected pace on a dual-belt treadmill instrumented with force platforms. During 11-min of gait training, study participants were provided real-time AGRF biofeedback encouraging a 20-30% increase in peak AGRF generated by their right (targeted) leg compared to their baseline (pre-training) AGRF. AGRF data were collected before, during, and after the biofeedback training period, as well as during two retention tests performed without biofeedback and after standing breaks. Compared to AGRFs generated during the pre-training gait trials, participants demonstrated a significantly greater AGRF in the targeted leg during and immediately after training, indicating that biofeedback training was successful at inducing increased AGRF production in the targeted leg. Additionally, participants continued to demonstrate greater AGRF production in the targeted leg after two standing breaks, showing short-term recall of the gait pattern learned during the biofeedback training. No significant effects of training were observed on the AGRF in the non-targeted limb, showing the specificity of the effects of biofeedback toward the

  16. Effects of adding whole body vibration to squat training on isometric force/time characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamont, Hugh S; Cramer, Joel T; Bemben, Debra A; Shehab, Randa L; Anderson, Mark A; Bemben, Michael G

    2010-01-01

    Resistance training interventions aimed at increasing lower-body power and rates of force development have produced varying results. Recent studies have suggested that whole-body low-frequency vibration (WBLFV) may elicit an acute postactivation potentiation response, leading to acute improvements in power and force development. Potentially, the use of WBLFV between sets of resistance training rather than during training itself may lead to increased recruitment and synchronization of high-threshold motor units, minimize fatigue potential, and facilitate the chronic adaptation to resistance exercise. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of applying TriPlaner, WBLFV, prior to and then intermittently between sets of Smith machine squats on short-term adaptations in explosive isometric force expression. Thirty recreationally resistance trained men aged 18-30 were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 groups: resistance training only (SQT, n = 11), resistance plus whole-body vibration (SQTV, n = 13), or active control (CON, n = 6). An isometric squat test was performed prior to and following a 6-week periodized Smith machine squat program. Whole-body low-frequency vibration was applied 180 seconds prior to the first work set (50 Hz, 2-4 mm, 30 seconds) and intermittently (50 Hz, 4-6 mm, 3 x 10 seconds, 60 seconds between exposures) within a 240-second interset rest period. Subjects were instructed to assume a quarter squat posture while positioning their feet directly under their center of mass, which was modified using a handheld goniometer to a knee angle of 135 +/- 5 degrees . Instructions were given to subjects to apply force as fast and as hard as possible for 3.5 seconds. Isometric force (N) and rates of force development (N.s(-1)) were recorded from the onset of contraction (F(0)) to time points corresponding to 30, 50, 80, 100, 150, and 250 milliseconds, as well as the peak isometric rate of force development (PISORFD), and rate of force development to

  17. Effect of simulated resistance, fleeing, and use of force on standardized field sobriety testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Jeffrey; Dawes, Donald; Nystrom, Paul; Moore, Johanna; Steinberg, Lila; Tilton, Annemarie; Miner, James

    2015-07-01

    When a law enforcement officer (LEO) stops a suspect believed to be operating (a vehicle) while impaired (OWI), the suspect may resist or flee, and the LEO may respond with force. The suspect may then undergo a Standardized Field Sobriety Test (SFST) to gauge impairment. It is not known whether resistance, fleeing, or actions of force can create an inaccurate SFST result. We examined the effect of resistance, fleeing, and force on the SFST. Human volunteers were prospectively randomized to have a SFST before and after one of five scenarios: (1) five-second conducted electrical weapon exposure; (2) 100-yard (91.4 m) sprint; (3) 45-second physical fight; (4) police dog bite with protective gear; and (5) Oleoresin Capsicum spray to the face with eyes shielded. The SFST was administered and graded by a qualified LEO. After the SFST, the volunteer entered their scenario and was then administered another SFST. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. SFST performance was compared before and after using chi-square tests. Fifty-seven subjects enrolled. Three received a single-point penalty during one component of the three-component SFST pre-scenario. No subject received a penalty point in any components of the SFST post-scenario (p = 0.08). This is the first human study to examine the effects of physical resistance, flight, and use of force on the SFST result. We did not detect a difference in the performance of subjects taking the SFST before and after exposure to resistance, flight, or a simulated use of force. © Australian Council for Educational Research 2014.

  18. The Effect of Wind Forcing on Modeling Coastal Circulation at a Marine Renewable Test Site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Ren

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The hydrodynamic circulation in estuaries is primarily driven by tides, river inflows and surface winds. While tidal and river data can be quite easily obtained for input to hydrodynamic models, sourcing accurate surface wind data is problematic. Inaccurate wind data can lead to inaccuracies in the surface currents computed by three-dimensional hydrodynamic models. In this research, a high-resolution wind model was coupled with a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model of Galway Bay, a semi-enclosed estuary on the west coast of Ireland, to investigate the effect of wind forcing on model accuracy. Two wind-forcing conditions were investigated: (1 using wind data measured onshore on the NUI Galway campus (NUIG and (2 using offshore wind data provided by a high resolution wind model (HR. A scenario with no wind forcing (NW was also assessed. The onshore wind data varied with time but the speed and direction were applied across the full model domain. The modeled offshore wind fields varied with both time and space. The effect of wind forcing on modeled hydrodynamics was assessed via comparison of modeled surface currents with surface current measurements obtained from a High-Frequency (HF radar Coastal Ocean Dynamics Applications Radar (CODAR observation system. Results indicated that winds were most significant in simulating the north-south surface velocity component. The model using high resolution temporally- and spatially-varying wind data achieved better agreement with the CODAR surface currents than the model using the onshore wind measurements and the model without any wind forcing.

  19. Effect of Eight Weeks Forced Swimming Training with Methadone Supplementation on Aspartate Aminotransferase, Alanine Aminotransferase, and Alkaline Phosphatase of Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Ali Hoseini

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objective: Narcotics abuse can induce liver disorders; nevertheless, exercises improve liver disorders. The present research aimed to review the effect of eight weeks forced swimming training with methadone supplementation on liver enzymes of rats. Material & Method: In this experimental research, 48 rats were selected, and after one week adaptation to lab environment, they were randomly divided into four groups of 12 rats including (1 forced swimming training, (2 methadone supplementation, (3 forced swimming training with methadone supplementation, and (4 control. Groups 2 and 3 used 2 mg/kg methadone daily for 8 weeks. Also, groups 1 and 3 swam for 8 weeks, three sessions per week and each session for 30 minutes. For statistical analysis of data, one way ANOVA and Tukey post hoc tests were used (α≤0.05. Results: Findings showed that forced swimming training, methadone supplementation, and forced swimming training with methadone supplementation had no significant effect on AST (P=0.90 and ALT (P=0.99 enzymes; forced swimming training had significant effect on increase of ALP (P=0.001; also, forced swimming training, compared with methadone supplementation and combination of forced swimming training with methadone supplementation, had significant effect on increase of ALP (P=0.001. Conclusion: Accordingly, 8 weeks of forced swimming training with methadone has possibly no significant effect on liver enzymes.

  20. Customizable Optical Force Sensor for Fast Prototyping and Cost-Effective Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díez, Jorge A; Catalán, José M; Blanco, Andrea; García-Perez, José V; Badesa, Francisco J; Gacía-Aracil, Nicolás

    2018-02-07

    This paper presents the development of an optical force sensor architecture directed to prototyping and cost-effective applications, where the actual force requirements are still not well defined or the most suitable commercial technologies would highly increase the cost of the device. The working principle of this sensor consists of determining the displacement of a lens by measuring the distortion of a refracted light beam. This lens is attached to an elastic interface whose elastic constant is known, allowing the estimation of the force that disturbs the optical system. In order to satisfy the requirements of the design process in an inexpensive way, this sensor can be built by fast prototyping technologies and using non-optical grade elements. To deal with the imperfections of this kind of manufacturing procedures and materials, four fitting models are proposed to calibrate the implemented sensor. In order to validate the system, two different sensor implementations with measurement ranges of ±45 N and ±10 N are tested with the proposed models, comparing the resulting force estimation with respect to an industrial-grade load cell. Results show that all models can estimate the loads with an error of about 6% of the measurement range.

  1. The Effect of Compaction Force on the Transition to Hydrate of Anhydrous Aripiprazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Togo, Taichiro; Taniguchi, Toshiya; Nakata, Yoshitaka

    2018-01-01

    Aripiprazole (APZ) is used to treat schizophrenia and is administered as a tablet containing the anhydrous form of APZ. In this study, the effect of compaction force on the crystal form transition was investigated. The crystalline state was observed by X-ray diffraction (XRD). APZ Anhydrous Form II was compacted into tablets. The XRD intensity of anhydrous APZ became lower with higher compressive force. The degree of crystallinity decreased with the compaction force. The powder and the compacted tablets of anhydrous APZ were stored for one week under 60°C and 75% relative humidity. The powder showed no crystal form transition after storage. For the tablets, however, XRD peaks of APZ hydrate were observed after storage. The tablets compacted with higher force showed the higher XRD diffraction intensity of hydrate form. We concluded that the crystallinity reduction of APZ Anhydrous Form II by compaction caused and accelerated the transition to hydrate under high temperature and humidity conditions. In order to manufacture crystallographically stable tablets containing anhydrous APZ, it is important to prevent this crystallinity reduction during compaction.

  2. Simulation of body force field effects on airfoil separation control and optimization of plasma actuator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdoli, A; Mirzaee, I; Purmahmod, N; Anvari, A

    2008-01-01

    Among all active flow control methods, EHD, MHD and EMHD are the only methods which operate on the basis of body force induction on flow field. The EHD plasma actuator is the proper method which has been used in various flow control applications recently. In this paper, the effects of different body force fields on different domains have been studied for separation control on NACA 0021 and the results have been discussed. The airflow velocity has been assumed to be 35 m s -1 at a post-stall angle of attack of 23 deg. Three different domains have been used around the airfoil to investigate body forces with different strengths and directions and those which give the best result in separation control have been obtained for each domain. It has been shown that the results could be used for optimizing the plasma actuator by manipulating its electrode configuration. Two non-dimensional numbers, A b and D c , have been obtained and validated by different applied body forces. These numbers have been defined for plasma actuators to show their efficiency in different applications

  3. Simulation of body force field effects on airfoil separation control and optimization of plasma actuator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdoli, A; Mirzaee, I; Purmahmod, N [Faculty of Engineering, Urmia University, Urmia (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Anvari, A [Department of Physics, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: ab.abdoli@gmail.com

    2008-09-07

    Among all active flow control methods, EHD, MHD and EMHD are the only methods which operate on the basis of body force induction on flow field. The EHD plasma actuator is the proper method which has been used in various flow control applications recently. In this paper, the effects of different body force fields on different domains have been studied for separation control on NACA 0021 and the results have been discussed. The airflow velocity has been assumed to be 35 m s{sup -1} at a post-stall angle of attack of 23 deg. Three different domains have been used around the airfoil to investigate body forces with different strengths and directions and those which give the best result in separation control have been obtained for each domain. It has been shown that the results could be used for optimizing the plasma actuator by manipulating its electrode configuration. Two non-dimensional numbers, A{sub b} and D{sub c}, have been obtained and validated by different applied body forces. These numbers have been defined for plasma actuators to show their efficiency in different applications.

  4. Customizable Optical Force Sensor for Fast Prototyping and Cost-Effective Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge A. Díez

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the development of an optical force sensor architecture directed to prototyping and cost-effective applications, where the actual force requirements are still not well defined or the most suitable commercial technologies would highly increase the cost of the device. The working principle of this sensor consists of determining the displacement of a lens by measuring the distortion of a refracted light beam. This lens is attached to an elastic interface whose elastic constant is known, allowing the estimation of the force that disturbs the optical system. In order to satisfy the requirements of the design process in an inexpensive way, this sensor can be built by fast prototyping technologies and using non-optical grade elements. To deal with the imperfections of this kind of manufacturing procedures and materials, four fitting models are proposed to calibrate the implemented sensor. In order to validate the system, two different sensor implementations with measurement ranges of ±45 N and ±10 N are tested with the proposed models, comparing the resulting force estimation with respect to an industrial-grade load cell. Results show that all models can estimate the loads with an error of about 6% of the measurement range.

  5. Effect of Buoyancy on Forced Convection Heat Transfer in Vertical Channels - a Literature Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharyya, A

    1965-03-15

    This report contains a short resume of the available information from various sources on the effect of free convection flow on forced convection heat transfer in vertical channels. Both theoretical and experimental investigations are included. Nearly all of the theoretical investigations are concerned with laminar flow with or without internal heat generation. More consistent data are available for upward flow than for downward flow. Curves are presented to determine whether free convection or forced convection mode of heat transfer is predominant for a particular Reynolds number and Rayleigh number. At Re{sub b} > 10{sup 5} free convection effects are negligible. Downward flow through a heated channel at low Reynolds number is unstable. Under similar conditions the overall heat transfer coefficient for downward flow tends to be higher than that for upward flow.

  6. Effect of disjoining pressure in a thin film equation with non-uniform forcing

    KAUST Repository

    MOULTON, D. E.

    2013-08-02

    We explore the effect of disjoining pressure on a thin film equation in the presence of a non-uniform body force, motivated by a model describing the reverse draining of a magnetic film. To this end, we use a combination of numerical investigations and analytical considerations. The disjoining pressure has a regularizing influence on the evolution of the system and appears to select a single steady-state solution for fixed height boundary conditions; this is in contrast with the existence of a continuum of locally attracting solutions that exist in the absence of disjoining pressure for the same boundary conditions. We numerically implement matched asymptotic expansions to construct equilibrium solutions and also investigate how they behave as the disjoining pressure is sent to zero. Finally, we consider the effect of the competition between forcing and disjoining pressure on the coarsening dynamics of the thin film for fixed contact angle boundary conditions. Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2013.

  7. Effects of the positioning force of electrostatic levitators on viscosity measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, Takehiko; Paradis, Paul-Francois; Koike, Noriyuki; Watanabe, Yuki

    2009-01-01

    Electrostatic levitators use strong electric fields to levitate and accurately position a sample against gravity. In this study, the effects of the electric field are investigated with regard to viscosity measurements conducted with the oscillating drop method. The effects of the external field on viscosity measurements are experimentally confirmed by changing the sample size. Moreover, a numerical simulation based on a simple mass-spring-damper system can reproduce the experimental observations. Based on the above results, measurement procedures are improved. These help to minimize the effect of the positioning force and to increase the accuracy of the viscosity measurements.

  8. Three-Nucleon Force Effects in p-"3H and n-"3He Scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viviani, M.; Kievsky, A.; Girlanda, L.; Marcucci, L. E.

    2017-01-01

    We present a preliminary study of the effect of a three-nucleon force (3NF) in p-"3H and n-"3 He scattering at low energies. The used 3NF is derived from effective field theory at next-to-next-to-leading order. The four-nucleon scattering observables are calculated using the Kohn variational principle and the hyperspherical harmonics technique and the results are compared with available experimental data. We have found that the effect of introducing this type of 3NF is tiny, and sometimes worsens the agreement with the experimental data. (author)

  9. The effect of inertia force in water lubricated thrust bearings of canned reactor coolant pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Liping

    1994-01-01

    The water lubricated thrust bearings are analyzed. According to characteristic of low viscosity of water the lubricated equation for design and calculation of water lubricated thrust bearings is established. The calculation and analyses show that the effect of inertia force in water lubricated thrust bearings should not be neglected except the conditions of low speed, high angle of inclination and low radius ratio of pad

  10. Antidepressant behavioral effects of duloxetine and fluoxetine in the rat forced swimming test

    OpenAIRE

    Ciulla,Leandro; Menezes,Honório Sampaio; Bueno,Bárbara Beatriz Moreira; Schuh,Alexandre; Alves,Rafael José Vargas; Abegg,Milena Pacheco

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE: To compare the effects of the antidepressant drugs duloxetine and fluoxetine on depressive behaviors in rodents. METHODS: Eighteen male Wistar rats were given systemic injections of duloxetine, fluoxetine, or saline prior to a Forced Swimming Test (FST). Immobility and number of stops were measured. RESULTS: Rats given injections of fluoxetine displayed significantly less immobility (p = 0.02) and fewer stops than the control group (p = 0.003). Duloxetine significanlty reduced the nu...

  11. Density-dependent effective baryon–baryon interaction from chiral three-baryon forces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petschauer, Stefan, E-mail: stefan.petschauer@ph.tum.de [Physik Department, Technische Universität München, D-85747 Garching (Germany); Haidenbauer, Johann [Institute for Advanced Simulation, Institut für Kernphysik and Jülich Center for Hadron Physics, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Kaiser, Norbert [Physik Department, Technische Universität München, D-85747 Garching (Germany); Meißner, Ulf-G. [Institute for Advanced Simulation, Institut für Kernphysik and Jülich Center for Hadron Physics, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Helmholtz-Institut für Strahlen- und Kernphysik, Universität Bonn, D-53115 Bonn (Germany); Bethe Center for Theoretical Physics, Universität Bonn, D-53115 Bonn (Germany); Weise, Wolfram [Physik Department, Technische Universität München, D-85747 Garching (Germany)

    2017-01-15

    A density-dependent effective potential for the baryon–baryon interaction in the presence of the (hyper)nuclear medium is constructed, based on the leading (irreducible) three-baryon forces derived within SU(3) chiral effective field theory. We evaluate the contributions from three classes: contact terms, one-pion exchange and two-pion exchange. In the strangeness-zero sector we recover the known result for the in-medium nucleon–nucleon interaction. Explicit expressions for the ΛN in-medium potential in (asymmetric) nuclear matter are presented. Our results are suitable for implementation into calculations of (hyper)nuclear matter. In order to estimate the low-energy constants of the leading three-baryon forces we introduce the decuplet baryons as explicit degrees of freedom and construct the relevant terms in the minimal non-relativistic Lagrangian. With these, the constants are estimated through decuplet saturation. Utilizing this approximation we provide numerical results for the effect of the three-body force in symmetric nuclear matter and pure neutron matter on the ΛN interaction. A moderate repulsion that increases with density is found in comparison to the free ΛN interaction.

  12. The Effect of Asian Dust Aerosols on Cloud Properties and Radiative Forcing from MODIS and CERES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jianping; Minnis, Patrick; Lin, Bing; Wang, Tianhe; Yi, Yuhong; Hu, Yongxiang; Sun-Mack, Sunny; Ayers, Kirk

    2005-01-01

    The effects of dust storms on cloud properties and radiative forcing are analyzed over northwestern China from April 2001 to June 2004 using data collected by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) instruments on the Aqua and Terra satellites. On average, ice cloud effective particle diameter, optical depth and ice water path of the cirrus clouds under dust polluted conditions are 11%, 32.8%, and 42% less, respectively, than those derived from ice clouds in dust-free atmospheric environments. The humidity differences are larger in the dusty region than in the dust-free region, and may be caused by removal of moisture by wet dust precipitation. Due to changes in cloud microphysics, the instantaneous net radiative forcing is reduced from -71.2 W/m2 for dust contaminated clouds to -182.7 W/m2 for dust-free clouds. The reduced cooling effects of dusts may lead to a net warming of 1 W/m2, which, if confirmed, would be the strongest aerosol forcing during later winter and early spring dust storm seasons over the studied region.

  13. The Effect of Varying Jaw-elevator Muscle Forces on a Finite Element Model of a Human Cranium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toro-Ibacache, Viviana; O'Higgins, Paul

    2016-07-01

    Finite element analyses simulating masticatory system loading are increasingly undertaken in primates, hominin fossils and modern humans. Simplifications of models and loadcases are often required given the limits of data and technology. One such area of uncertainty concerns the forces applied to cranial models and their sensitivity to variations in these forces. We assessed the effect of varying force magnitudes among jaw-elevator muscles applied to a finite element model of a human cranium. The model was loaded to simulate incisor and molar bites using different combinations of muscle forces. Symmetric, asymmetric, homogeneous, and heterogeneous muscle activations were simulated by scaling maximal forces. The effects were compared with respect to strain distribution (i.e., modes of deformation) and magnitudes; bite forces and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) reaction forces. Predicted modes of deformation, strain magnitudes and bite forces were directly proportional to total applied muscle force and relatively insensitive to the degree of heterogeneity of muscle activation. However, TMJ reaction forces and mandibular fossa strains decrease and increase on the balancing and working sides according to the degree of asymmetry of loading. These results indicate that when modes, rather than magnitudes, of facial deformation are of interest, errors in applied muscle forces have limited effects. However the degree of asymmetric loading does impact on TMJ reaction forces and mandibular fossa strains. These findings are of particular interest in relation to studies of skeletal and fossil material, where muscle data are not available and estimation of muscle forces from skeletal proxies is prone to error. Anat Rec, 299:828-839, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Effective method to control the levitation force and levitation height in a superconducting maglev system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Peng-Tao; Yang, Wan-Min; Wang, Miao; Li, Jia-Wei; Guo, Yu-Xia

    2015-11-01

    The influence of the width of the middle magnet in the permanent magnet guideways (PMGs) on the levitation force and the levitation height of single-domain yttrium barium copper oxide (YBCO) bulks has been investigated at 77 K under the zero field cooled (ZFC) state. It is found that the largest levitation force can be obtained in the system with the width of the middle magnet of the PMG equal to the size of the YBCO bulk when the gap between the YBCO bulk and PMG is small. Both larger levitation force and higher levitation height can be obtained in the system with the width of the middle magnet of the PMG larger than the size of the YBCO bulk. The stiffness of the levitation force between the PMG and the YBCO bulk is higher in the system with a smaller width of the middle magnet in the PMG. These results provide an effective way to control the levitation force and the levitation height for the superconducting maglev design and applications. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51342001 and 50872079), the Key-grant Project of Chinese Ministry of Education (Grant No. 311033), the Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (Grant No. 20120202110003), the Innovation Team in Shaanxi Province, China (Grant No. 2014KTC-18), and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, China (Grant Nos. GK201101001 and GK201305014), and the Outstanding Doctoral Thesis Foundation Project of Shaanxi Normal University, China (Grant Nos. X2011YB08 and X2012YB05).

  15. Effects of anthropogenic emissions on tropospheric ozone and its radiative forcing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berntsen, T.; Isaksen, I.S.A.; Fuglestvedt, J.S.; Myhre, G.; Larsen, T. Alsvik; Stordal, F.; Freckleton, R.S.; Shine, K.P.

    1997-12-31

    As described in this report, changes in tropospheric ozone since pre-industrial times due to changes in emissions have been calculated by the University of Oslo global three-dimensional photochemical model. The radiative forcing caused by the increase in ozone has been calculated by means of two independent radiative transfer models: the University of Reading model (Reading), and the University of Oslo/Norwegian Institute for Air Research model (OsloRad). Significant increases in upper tropospheric ozone concentrations are found at northern mid-latitudes at about 10 km altitude. In the tropical regions the largest increase is found at about 15 km altitude. The increase is found to be caused mainly by enhanced in situ production due to transport of precursors from the boundary layer, with a smaller contribution from increased transport of ozone produced in the boundary layer. The lifetime of ozone in the troposphere decreased by about 35% as a result of enhanced concentrations of HO{sub 2}. The calculated increase in surface ozone in Europe is in good agreement with observations. The calculations of radiative forcing include the effect of clouds and allow for thermal adjustment in the stratosphere. The global and annual averaged radiative forcing at the tropopause from both models are in the lower part of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change estimated range. The calculated radiative forcing is similar in magnitude to the negative radiative forcing by sulfate aerosols, but displaced southward in source regions at northern mid-latitudes. The increase in tropospheric ozone is calculated to have cooled the lower stratosphere by up to 0.9 K, with possibly half of this cooling occurring in the past 2 to 3 decades. 76 refs., 16 figs., 9 tabs.

  16. Effect of intermolecular force on the static/dynamic behaviour of M/NEM devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Namjung; Aluru, N. R.

    2014-12-01

    Advances made in the fabrication of micro/nano-electromechanical (M/NEM) devices over the last ten years necessitate the understanding of the attractive force that arises from quantum fluctuations (generally referred to as Casimir effects) [Casimir H B G 1948 Proc. K. Ned. Akad. Wet. 51 793]. The fundamental mechanisms underlying quantum fluctuations have been actively investigated through various theoretical and experimental approaches. However, the effect of the force on M/NEM devices has not been fully understood yet, especially in the transition region involving gaps ranging from 10 nm to 1 μm, due to the complexity of the force. Here, we numerically calculate the Casimir effects in M/NEM devices by using the Lifshitz formula, the general expression for the Casimir effects [Lifshitz E 1956 Sov. Phys. JETP 2 73]. Since the Casimir effects are highly dependent on the permittivity of the materials, the Kramer-Kronig relation [Landau L D, Lifshitz E M and Pitaevskii L P 1984 Electrodynamics of Continuous Media (New York: Pergamon Press)] and the optical data for metals and dielectrics are used in order to obtain the permittivity. Several simplified models for the permittivity of the materials, such as the Drude and Lorentz models [Jackson J D 1975 Classical Electrodynamics (New York: Wiley)], are also used to extrapolate the optical data. Important characteristic values of M/NEM devices, such as the pull-in voltage, pull-in gap, detachment length, etc, are calculated for devices operating in the transition region. Our results show that accurate predictions for the pull-in behaviour are possible when the Lifshitz formula is used instead of the idealized expressions for Casimir effects. We expand this study into the dynamics of M/NEM devices, so that the time and frequency response of M/NEM devices with Casimir effects can be explored.

  17. Effect of intermolecular force on the static/dynamic behaviour of M/NEM devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Namjung; Aluru, N R

    2014-01-01

    Advances made in the fabrication of micro/nano-electromechanical (M/NEM) devices over the last ten years necessitate the understanding of the attractive force that arises from quantum fluctuations (generally referred to as Casimir effects) [Casimir H B G 1948 Proc. K. Ned. Akad. Wet. 51 793]. The fundamental mechanisms underlying quantum fluctuations have been actively investigated through various theoretical and experimental approaches. However, the effect of the force on M/NEM devices has not been fully understood yet, especially in the transition region involving gaps ranging from 10 nm to 1 μm, due to the complexity of the force. Here, we numerically calculate the Casimir effects in M/NEM devices by using the Lifshitz formula, the general expression for the Casimir effects [Lifshitz E 1956 Sov. Phys. JETP 2 73]. Since the Casimir effects are highly dependent on the permittivity of the materials, the Kramer–Kronig relation [Landau L D, Lifshitz E M and Pitaevskii L P 1984 Electrodynamics of Continuous Media (New York: Pergamon Press)] and the optical data for metals and dielectrics are used in order to obtain the permittivity. Several simplified models for the permittivity of the materials, such as the Drude and Lorentz models [Jackson J D 1975 Classical Electrodynamics (New York: Wiley)], are also used to extrapolate the optical data. Important characteristic values of M/NEM devices, such as the pull-in voltage, pull-in gap, detachment length, etc, are calculated for devices operating in the transition region. Our results show that accurate predictions for the pull-in behaviour are possible when the Lifshitz formula is used instead of the idealized expressions for Casimir effects. We expand this study into the dynamics of M/NEM devices, so that the time and frequency response of M/NEM devices with Casimir effects can be explored. (paper)

  18. Effect of gender, cadence, and water immersion on ground reaction forces during stationary running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Brito Fontana, Heiliane; Haupenthal, Alessandro; Ruschel, Caroline; Hubert, Marcel; Ridehalgh, Colette; Roesler, Helio

    2012-05-01

    Controlled laboratory study. To analyze the vertical and anteroposterior components of the ground reaction force during stationary running performed in water and on dry land, focusing on the effect of gender, level of immersion, and cadence. Stationary running, as a fundamental component of aquatic rehabilitation and training protocols, is little explored in the literature with regard to biomechanical variables, which makes it difficult to determine and control the mechanical load acting on the individuals. Twenty-two subjects performed 1 minute of stationary running on land, immersed to the hip, and immersed to the chest at 3 different cadences: 90 steps per minute, 110 steps per minute, and 130 steps per minute. Force data were acquired with a force plate, and the variables were vertical peak (Fy), loading rate (LR), anterior peak (Fx anterior), and posterior peak (Fx posterior). Data were normalized to subjects' body weight (BW) and analyzed using repeated-measures analysis of variance. Fy ranged from 0.98 to 2.11 BW, LR ranged from 5.38 to 11.52 BW/s, Fx anterior ranged from 0.07 to 0.14 BW, and Fx posterior ranged from 0.06 to 0.09 BW. The gender factor had no effect on the variables analyzed. A significant interaction between level of immersion and cadence was observed for Fy, Fx anterior, and Fx posterior. On dry land, Fy increased with increasing cadence, whereas in water this effect was seen only between 90 steps per minute and the 2 higher cadences. The higher the level of immersion, the lower the magnitude of Fy. LR was reduced under both water conditions and increased with increasing cadence, regardless of the level of immersion. Ground reaction forces during stationary running are similar between genders. Fy and LR are lower in water, though the values are increased at higher cadences.

  19. Effects of Sexual Harassment on Job Satisfaction, Retention, Cohesion, Commitment and Unit Effectiveness: The Case of the Air Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    quid pro quo ). Examples of questions that were used in previous studies to measure crude/offensive behavior, as well as, other forms of sexual ...includes, but is not limited to, harassment in which submission is made a condition of employment (or quid pro quo ). Global or organizational...Effects of Sexual Harassment on Job Satisfaction, Retention, Cohesion, Commitment and Unit Effectiveness: The Case of the Air Force Dr. Brenda

  20. Entrainment effects in periodic forcing of the flow over a backward-facing step

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berk, T.; Medjnoun, T.; Ganapathisubramani, B.

    2017-07-01

    The effect of the Strouhal number on periodic forcing of the flow over a backward-facing step (height, H ) is investigated experimentally. Forcing is applied by a synthetic jet at the edge of the step at Strouhal numbers ranging from 0.21 effect of Strouhal number on the reattachment length is often divided into low- and high-frequency actuation, referring to specific frequencies present in the unforced flow. In the present study, variations with Strouhal number are explained based on a continuous variation of entrainment of momentum into the recirculation region rather than on specific frequencies. The reattachment length is shown to decrease linearly with entrainment of momentum. Vertical momentum flux is driven by vortices generated by the forcing, and locally vertical momentum flux is shown to be qualitatively similar to circulation for all cases considered. Total circulation (and therewith entrainment of momentum and the effect on the reattachment length) is shown to decrease with Strouhal number, whereas this is not predicted by models based on specific low and high frequencies. An empirical model for the (decay of) circulation is derived by tracking vortices in phase-locked data. This model is used to decipher relevant scaling parameters that explain the variations in circulation, entrainment of momentum, and reattachment length. Three regimes of Strouhal number are identified. A low-Strouhal-number regime is observed for which vortices are formed at a late stage relative to the recirculation region, causing a decrease in effectiveness. For high Strouhal numbers, vortices are being reingested into the actuator or are packed so close together that they cancel each other, both decreasing the effectiveness of forcing. In the intermediate regime a vortex train is formed of which the decay of circulation increases for increasing Strouhal number. The scaling of this

  1. Axially deformed solution of the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov equations using the transformed harmonic oscillator basis (II) HFBTHO v2.00d: A new version of the program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoitsov, M. V.; Schunck, N.; Kortelainen, M.; Michel, N.; Nam, H.; Olsen, E.; Sarich, J.; Wild, S.

    2013-06-01

    of the transformed harmonic oscillator, which allows for an accurate description of deformation effects and pairing correlations in nuclei arbitrarily close to the particle drip lines. Solution method: The program uses the axial Transformed Harmonic Oscillator (THO) single- particle basis to expand quasi-particle wave functions. It iteratively diagonalizes the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov Hamiltonian based on generalized Skyrme-like energy densities and zero-range pairing interactions until a self-consistent solution is found. A previous version of the program was presented in: M.V. Stoitsov, J. Dobaczewski, W. Nazarewicz, P. Ring, Comput. Phys. Commun. 167 (2005) 43-63. Reasons for new version: Version 2.00d of HFBTHO provides a number of new options such as the optional breaking of reflection symmetry, the calculation of axial multipole moments, the finite temperature formalism for the HFB method, optimized multi-constraint calculations, the treatment of odd-even and odd-odd nuclei in the blocking approximation, and the framework for generalized energy density with arbitrary density-dependences. It is also the first version of HFBTHO to contain threading capabilities. Summary of revisions: The modified Broyden method has been implemented, Optional breaking of reflection symmetry has been implemented, The calculation of all axial multipole moments up to λ=8 has been implemented, The finite temperature formalism for the HFB method has been implemented, The linear constraint method based on the approximation of the Random Phase Approximation (RPA) matrix for multi-constraint calculations has been implemented, The blocking of quasi-particles in the Equal Filling Approximation (EFA) has been implemented, The framework for generalized energy density functionals with arbitrary density-dependence has been implemented, Shared memory parallelism via OpenMP pragmas has been implemented. Restrictions: Axial- and time-reversal symmetries are assumed. Unusual features: The user must

  2. Effectiveness of Modal Decomposition for Tapping Atomic Force Microscopy Microcantilevers in Liquid Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Il Kwang; Lee, Soo Il

    2016-05-01

    The modal decomposition of tapping mode atomic force microscopy microcantilevers in liquid environments was studied experimentally. Microcantilevers with different lengths and stiffnesses and two sample surfaces with different elastic moduli were used in the experiment. The response modes of the microcantilevers were extracted as proper orthogonal modes through proper orthogonal decomposition. Smooth orthogonal decomposition was used to estimate the resonance frequency directly. The effects of the tapping setpoint and the elastic modulus of the sample under test were examined in terms of their multi-mode responses with proper orthogonal modes, proper orthogonal values, smooth orthogonal modes and smooth orthogonal values. Regardless of the stiffness of the microcantilever under test, the first mode was dominant in tapping mode atomic force microscopy under normal operating conditions. However, at lower tapping setpoints, the flexible microcantilever showed modal distortion and noise near the tip when tapping on a hard sample. The stiff microcantilever had a higher mode effect on a soft sample at lower tapping setpoints. Modal decomposition for tapping mode atomic force microscopy can thus be used to estimate the characteristics of samples in liquid environments.

  3. The inertial effect of acceleration fields on a self-decoupled wheel force transducer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lihang Feng

    Full Text Available AbstractWheel force transducer (WFT is a tool which can measure the three-axis forces and three-axis torques applied to the wheel in vehicle testing applications. However, the transducer is generally mounted on the wheel of a moving vehicle, when abruptly accelerating or braking, the mass/inertia of the transducer itself has extra effects on the sensor response so that inertia/mass loads will be detected and coupled into the signal outputs. This is the inertia coupling effect that decreases the sensor accuracy and should be avoided. In this paper, the inertia coupling problem induced by six dimensional accelerations is investigated for a universal WFT. Inertia load distribution of the WFT is solved based on the principle of equivalent mass and rotary inertia firstly, thus then its impact can be identified with the theoretical derivation. FEM simulation and experimental verification are performed as well. Results show that strains in simulation agree well with the theoretical derivation. The relationship between the applied acceleration and inertia load for both wheel force and moment is the approximate linear respectively. The relative errors are acceptable within less than 5% and the maximum impact of inertia loads on the signal output is about 1.5% in the measuring range.

  4. The Effects of Age, Gender, and Hand on Force Control Capabilities of Healthy Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Baekhee; Lee, Mina; Yoh, Myeung Sook; You, Heecheon; Park, Hyunji; Jung, Kihyo; Lee, Byung Hwa; Na, Duk L; Kim, Geon Ha

    2015-12-01

    The present study examined the effects of age (20s to 70s), gender (male and female), and hand (dominant and nondominant) on force control capabilities (FCCs) in four force control phases (initiation, development, maintenance, and termination). Normative data of FCCs by force control phase are needed for various populations in age and gender to identify a type of motor performance reduction and its severity. FCCs of 360 participants (30 for each combination of age group and gender) were measured using a finger dynamometer and quantified in terms of initiation time (IT), development time (DT), maintenance error (ME), and termination time (TT). Although gradual increases (1%~28%) by age were shown in IT, DT, and TT, a dramatic increase in ME was observed among participants in their 50s (26%), 60s (68%), and 70s (160%) compared to those in their 20s~40s. The most distinctive interaction effect of age and gender was found in ME out of the four FCC measures. Lastly, hand and its related interactions were not found significant. Normative FCC data were established for four age groups (20s~40s, 50s, 60s, and 70s) and gender. The normative FCC data can be used for evaluating an individual's motor performance, screening patients with brain disorders, and designing input devices triggered and/or operated by the finger. © 2015, Human Factors and Ergonomics Society.

  5. Effect of slip on vortex dynamics and forcing of a superhydrophobic cylinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muralidhar, Pranesh; Daniello, Robert; Ferrer, Nangelie; Rothstein, Jonathan

    2011-11-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces have been shown to produce significant drag reduction for both laminar and turbulent flows of water through large and small-scale channels. In this presentation, a series of experiments will be presented which investigate the effect of superhydrophobic-induced slip on the vortex dynamics in the wake of a cylinder and the change in the drag and lift forces thereof. In these experiments, circular cylinders are coated with a series of superhydrophobic surfaces fabricated from PDMS with well-defined micron-sized patterns of surface roughness. Using force measurements and PIV (Particle Image Velocimetry), we will show that these surfaces have a noticeable effect on the drag/lift and vortex dynamics of cylinders. When compared to a smooth, no-slip cylinder, we will show that the lift/drag and the amount of raw vorticity that is shed in the wake of the superhydrophobic cylinder decreases. In addition, we will show that the forcing is sensitive to changes of feature spacing, size and orientation.

  6. Effects of substrates on biofilm formation observed by atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Y.J.; Lee, N.R.; Jo, W.; Jung, W.K.; Lim, J.S.

    2009-01-01

    Formation of biofilm is known to be strongly dependent on substrates including topography, materials, and chemical treatment. In this study, a variety of substrates are tested for understanding biofilm formation. Sheets of aluminum, steel, rubber, and polypropylene have been used to examine their effects on formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm. In particular, the morphological variation, transition, and adhesiveness of biofilm were investigated through local measurement by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Mechanism of removing biofilm from adhering to substrate is also analyzed, thus the understanding of the mechanism can be potentially useful to prevent the biofilm formation. The results reveal that formation of biofilm can remain on rough surface regardless of substrates in hot water, which may easily induce extra-polymeric substances detachment from bacterial surface. By probing using AFM, local force-distance characterization of extra-cellular materials extracted from the bacteria can exhibit the progress of the biofilm formation and functional complexities.

  7. Effect of Eccentricity of Load on Critical Force of Thin-Walled Columns CFRP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawel Wysmulski

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The subject of study was a thin-walled C-section made of carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP. Column was subjected to eccentric compression in the established direction. In the computer simulation, the boundary conditions were assumed in the form of articulated support of the sections of the column. Particular studies included an analysis of the effects of eccentricity on the critical force value. The research was conducted using two independent research methods: numerical and experimental. Numerical simulations were done using the finite element method using the advanced system Abaqus®. The high sensitivity of the critical force value corresponding to the local buckling of the channel section to the load eccentricity was demonstrated.

  8. The effect of internal ribbing on forced convective heat transfer in circular-sectioned tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farhadi Rahmat-Abadi, K.; Morris, W. D.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an experimental examination of the effect of internal circumferential ribs on forced convection in circular-sectioned tubes. The work is relevant to the internal cooling of gas turbine rotor blades. The influence of rib geometry is investigated for three different rib configurations and simple design-type, empirical equations are developed for estimating heat transfer at rib and mid-rib locations. It is demonstrated that heat transfer may be improved by up to three fold in relation to fully developed forced convection in smooth-walled tubes. The geometric parameters which have been used for the experiments are typical of those currently applied to gas turbine blade cooling designs

  9. Effects of mechanical force on grain structures of friction stir welded oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Wentuo; Kimura, Akihiko; Tsuda, Naoto; Serizawa, Hisashi; Chen, Dongsheng; Je, Hwanil; Fujii, Hidetoshi; Ha, Yoosung; Morisada, Yoshiaki; Noto, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    The weldability of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels is a critical obstructive in the development and use of these steels. Friction stir welding has been considered to be a promising way to solve this problem. The main purpose of this work was to reveal the effects of mechanical force on grain structures of friction stir welded ODS ferritic steel. The grain appearances and the misorientation angles of grain boundaries in different welded zones were investigated by the electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). Results showed that the mechanical force imposed by the stir tool can activate and promote the recrystallization characterized by the transformation of boundaries from LABs to HABs, and contribute to the grain refinement. The type of recrystallization in the stir zone can be classified as the continuous dynamic recrystallization (CDRX)

  10. Effects of mechanical force on grain structures of friction stir welded oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Wentuo, E-mail: hanwentuo@hotmail.com [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Kimura, Akihiko [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Tsuda, Naoto [Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Serizawa, Hisashi [Joining and Welding Research Institute, Osaka University, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Chen, Dongsheng [Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Je, Hwanil [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Fujii, Hidetoshi [Joining and Welding Research Institute, Osaka University, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Ha, Yoosung [Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Morisada, Yoshiaki [Joining and Welding Research Institute, Osaka University, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Noto, Hiroyuki [Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan)

    2014-12-15

    The weldability of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels is a critical obstructive in the development and use of these steels. Friction stir welding has been considered to be a promising way to solve this problem. The main purpose of this work was to reveal the effects of mechanical force on grain structures of friction stir welded ODS ferritic steel. The grain appearances and the misorientation angles of grain boundaries in different welded zones were investigated by the electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). Results showed that the mechanical force imposed by the stir tool can activate and promote the recrystallization characterized by the transformation of boundaries from LABs to HABs, and contribute to the grain refinement. The type of recrystallization in the stir zone can be classified as the continuous dynamic recrystallization (CDRX)

  11. The effect of cigarette smoke extract on thrombomodulin-thrombin binding: an atomic force microscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yujie; Zhang, Xuejie; Xu, Li; Yi, Shaoqiong; Li, Yi; Fang, Xiaohong; Liu, Huiliang

    2012-10-01

    Cigarette smoking is a well-known risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Smoking can cause vascular endothelial dysfunction and consequently trigger haemostatic activation and thrombosis. However, the mechanism of how smoking promotes thrombosis is not fully understood. Thrombosis is associated with the imbalance of the coagulant system due to endothelial dysfunction. As a vital anticoagulation cofactor, thrombomodulin (TM) located on the endothelial cell surface is able to regulate intravascular coagulation by binding to thrombin, and the binding results in thrombosis inhibition. This work focused on the effects of cigarette smoke extract (CSE) on TM-thrombin binding by atomic force microscopy (AFM) based single-molecule force spectroscopy. The results from both in vitro and live-cell experiments indicated that CSE could notably reduce the binding probability of TM and thrombin. This study provided a new approach and new evidence for studying the mechanism of thrombosis triggered by cigarette smoking.

  12. Quantum effective force and Bohmian approach to time-dependent traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mousavi, S V

    2014-01-01

    Trajectories of a Bohmian particle confined in time-dependent cylindrical and spherical traps are computed for both contracting and expanding boxes. A quantum effective force is considered in arbitrary directions. It is seen that in contrast to the case for the problem of a particle in an infinite rectangular box with one wall in motion, if the particle is initially in an energy eigenstate of a tiny box, the force is zero in all directions. Trajectories of a two-body system confined in the spherical trap are also computed for different statistics types. Computations show that there are situations for which the distance between bosons is greater than that between fermions. However, the results on the average separation of the particles confirm our expectation as regards the statistics

  13. Tensor Force and D-state Effects Upon (d,x) Cross Sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawk, Eric; McNeil, James; Cecil, F. Edward; Hofstee, Mariet; Greife, Uwe; Pallone, Arthur

    2000-09-01

    The effects of the inclusion of the tensor force and the internal deuteron D-state upon low-energy deuteron-stripping reactions (d,x) are examined within the context of the distorted-wave Born approximation (DWBA). Inclusion of these effects requires a relaxation of the commonly employed zero-range approximation. This relaxation is treated via a derivative expansion. Comparisons with the differential cross sections found using zero-range, S-state calculations are made for several low-Z nuclei.

  14. Surface tension effect on the mechanical properties of nanomaterials measured by atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuenot, Stéphane; Frétigny, Christian; Demoustier-Champagne, Sophie; Nysten, Bernard

    2004-04-01

    The effect of reduced size on the elastic properties measured on silver and lead nanowires and on polypyrrole nanotubes with an outer diameter ranging between 30 and 250 nm is presented and discussed. Resonant-contact atomic force microscopy (AFM) is used to measure their apparent elastic modulus. The measured modulus of the nanomaterials with smaller diameters is significantly higher than that of the larger ones. The latter is comparable to the macroscopic modulus of the materials. The increase of the apparent elastic modulus for the smaller diameters is attributed to surface tension effects. The surface tension of the probed material may be experimentally determined from these AFM measurements.

  15. Baryonic forces and hyperons in nuclear matter from SU(3) chiral effective field theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petschauer, Stefan Karl

    2016-02-12

    In this work the baryon-baryon interaction is studied at next-to-leading order in SU(3) chiral effective field theory and applied to hyperon-nucleon scattering. The properties of hyperons in isospin-symmetric as well as asymmetric nuclear matter are calculated within the Bruecker-Hartree-Fock formalism. Moreover, the leading three-baryon interaction is derived and its low-energy constants are estimated from decuplet intermediate states. We conclude, that chiral effective field theory is a well-suited tool to describe the baryonic forces.

  16. The effect of wheel eccentricity and run-out on grinding forces, waviness, wheel wear and chatter

    OpenAIRE

    O'DONNELL, GARRET; MURPHY, STUART

    2011-01-01

    PUBLISHED The effect of grinding-wheel eccentricity on grinding forces, wheel wear and final waviness height was studied. Eccentricity was evident in force oscillations and acceleration and audio measurements. A model was developed to predict final scallop-profile shape from grinding parameters and eccentricity. Recommendations are given on detecting eccentricity and determining when eccentricity is tolerable.

  17. Effect of forced-air heaters on perfusion and temperature distribution during and after open-heart surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Severens, Natascha M. W.; van Marken Lichtenbelt, Wouter D.; van Leeuwen, Gerard M. J.; Frijns, Arjan J. H.; van Steenhoven, Anton A.; de Mol, Bas A. J. M.; van Wezel, Harry B.; Veldman, Dirk J.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: After cardiopulmonary bypass, patients often show redistribution hypothermia, also called afterdrop. Forced-air blankets help to reduce afterdrop. This study explores the effect of forced-air blankets on temperature distribution and peripheral perfusion. The blood perfusion data is used

  18. Effect of forced-air heaters on perfusion and and temperature distribution during and after open-heart surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Severens, N.M.W.; Marken Lichtenbelt, van W.; Leeuwen, van G.M.J.; Frijns, A.J.H.; Steenhoven, van A.A.; Mol, de B.A.J.M.; Wezel, H.B.; Veldman, D.J.

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: After cardiopulmonary bypass, patients often show redistribution hypothermia, also called afterdrop. Forced-air blankets help to reduce afterdrop. This study explores the effect of forced-air blankets on temperature distribution and peripheral perfusion. The blood perfusion data is used

  19. Measurement method for determining the magnetic hysteresis effects of reluctance actuators by evaluation of the force and flux variation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrijsen, N.H.; Jansen, J.W.; Compter, J.C.; Lomonova, E.

    2013-01-01

    A measurement method is presented which identifies the magnetic hysteresis effects present in the force of linear reluctance actuators. The measurement method is applied to determine the magnetic hysteresis in the force of an E-core reluctance actuator, with and without pre-biasing permanent magnet.

  20. The effect of electrostatic and gravity force on offset wire inside tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, S. H.; Hazineh, D.; Wang, C.

    2018-04-01

    In a straw-tube detector, a wire that is offset with respect to the tube axis experiences a Coulomb force when high voltage is applied between the anode wire and the tube. This force results in a shifting of the wire and straw, in addition to the gravitational sag, and is a function of the tube and wire radius, initial offset, high voltage, tension and length. The presence of such effects is well known, but the precise magnitude of the shift for the anode wires under conditions of detector operation have not been previously documented with measurable confidence. In this work, we provide the first systematic measurements for the wire shift in straw-tube detectors due to gravity and the electrostatic force using an x-ray scanner developed for the Mu2e experiment. The data are compared to the solutions of the differential equations governing the system, and we find a good match between the two. The solutions can predict the final wire and straw positions from the initial positions measured without the high voltage, and the final wire and straw positions can then be used as an input to the track reconstruction software to improve the track position resolution.

  1. Effects of aging on control of timing and force of finger tapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Hirokazu; Masumoto, Junya; Inui, Nobuyuki

    2011-04-01

    The present study examined whether the elderly produced a hastened or delayed tap with a negative or positive constant intertap interval error more frequently in self-paced tapping than in the stimulus-synchronized tapping for the 2 N target force at 2 or 4 Hz frequency. The analysis showed that, at both frequencies, the percentage of the delayed tap was larger in the self-paced tapping than in the stimulus-synchronized tapping, whereas the hastened tap showed the opposite result. At the 4 Hz frequency, all age groups had more variable intertap intervals during the self-paced tapping than during the stimulus-synchronized tapping, and the variability of the intertap intervals increased with age. Thus, although the increase in the frequency of delayed taps and variable intertap intervals in the self-paced tapping perhaps resulted from a dysfunction of movement timing in the basal ganglia with age, the decline in timing accuracy was somewhat improved by an auditory cue. The force variability of tapping at 4 Hz further increased with age, indicating an effect of aging on the control of force.

  2. Effects of High-Latitude Forcing Uncertainty on the Low-Latitude and Midlatitude Ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedatella, N. M.; Lu, G.; Richmond, A. D.

    2018-01-01

    Ensemble simulations are performed using the Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Electrodynamics General Circulation Model (TIE-GCM) in order to understand the role of high-latitude forcing uncertainty on the low-latitude and midlatitude ionosphere response to the April 2010 geomagnetic storm. The ensemble is generated by perturbing either the high-latitude electric potential or auroral energy flux in the assimilative mapping for ionosphere electrodynamics (AMIE). Simulations with perturbed high-latitude electric potential result in substantial intraensemble variability in the low-latitude and midlatitude ionosphere response to the geomagnetic storm, and the ensemble standard deviation for the change in NmF2 reaches 50-100% of the mean change. Such large intraensemble variability is not seen when perturbing the auroral energy flux. In this case, the effects of the forcing uncertainty are primarily confined to high latitudes. We therefore conclude that the specification of high-latitude electric fields is an important source of uncertainty when modeling the low-latitude and midlatitude ionosphere response to a geomagnetic storm. A multiple linear regression analysis of the results indicates that uncertainty in the storm time changes in the equatorial electric fields, neutral winds, and neutral composition can all contribute to the uncertainty in the ionosphere electron density. The results of the present study provide insight into the possible uncertainty in simulations of the low-latitude and midlatitude ionosphere response to geomagnetic storms due to imperfect knowledge of the high-latitude forcing.

  3. The effects of labour force migration in Romania to the comunity countries -realities and perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szarka Arpad

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, the migration of active labour force is a phenomenon with a rapid dynamics, generated mainly by globalization. The international migration is appreciated to imply about 200 million persons, which is double than 25 years ago. .The migration is determined by economical, social and political causes. .The migration of active labour force in Romania registered in the Community Countries reaches low levels, about 200.000 person, but the illegal one is appreciated to reach 1.7-2 milion persons. The effects of migration are mainly due to: the loss of the tax payer – active labour force formed in Romania, the weakening of the social solidarity in the social security system, and in the same time, its increase in the destination countries , the remittance of some important amounts of money in the origin countries, the contact with other economical, social, cultural models. The evolution of remittance in the world is very dynamic, in 2007 it is said to be about 250 billion dollars ,from which 7,1 billion euro for our country, compared to 9,1 billion euro representing direct investments.

  4. Three-particle forces and nuclear models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krutov, V.A.

    1980-01-01

    Different nuclear models accounting and unaccounting for three-particle internucleon forces (TIF) are reviewed. At present only two nuclear models use manifestly TIP: the Vautherin-Brink-Skyrme (VBS) model and the model proposed by the author of the review and called the semiphenomenological (SP) nuclear model. There is a short discussion of major drawbacks of models unaccounting for TIF: multiparticle shell model, ''superfluid model'', Harty-Fock calculations with two-particle forces, Bruckner-Hartry-Fock calculations, the relativistic self-consistent nuclear model. The VBS and SP models are discussed in detail. It is concluded, that the employment of TIF even in a very simplified form (extremely short-range) puts away a lot of problems characteristic to models limited by two-particle forces (collapse at iteratious in Hartry-Fock, simultaneous fitting of the binding energy of a nucleus and the binding energy of a nucleon, etc.) and makes it possible to obtain in a rather simple way such nuclear characteristics as nuclear binding energy, nuclear mean square root radii, nucleon density of a nucleus

  5. Solution of the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock-Bogolyubov equations in the Cartesian deformed harmonic-oscillator basis. (VII) HFODD (v2.49t): A new version of the program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schunck, Nicolas F.; McDonnell, J.; Sheikh, J.A.; Staszczak, A.; Stoitsov, Mario; Dobaczewski, J.; Toivanen, P.

    2012-01-01

    We describe the new version (v2.49t) of the code HFODD which solves the nuclear Skyrme Hartree-Fock (HF) or Skyrme Hartree-Fock-Bogolyubov (HFB) problem by using the Cartesian deformed harmonic-oscillator basis. In the new version, we have implemented the following physics features: (i) the isospin mixing and projection, (ii) the finite temperature formalism for the HFB and HF+BCS methods, (iii) the Lipkin translational energy correction method, (iv) the calculation of the shell correction. A number of specific numerical methods have also been implemented in order to deal with large-scale multi-constraint calculations and hardware limitations: (i) the two-basis method for the HFB method, (ii) the Augmented Lagrangian Method (ALM) for multi-constraint calculations, (iii) the linear constraint method based on the approximation of the RPA matrix for multi-constraint calculations, (iv) an interface with the axial and parity-conserving Skyrme-HFB code HFBTHO, (v) the mixing of the HF or HFB matrix elements instead of the HF fields. Special care has been paid to using the code on massively parallel leadership class computers. For this purpose, the following features are now available with this version: (i) the Message Passing Interface (MPI) framework, (ii) scalable input data routines, (iii) multi-threading via OpenMP pragmas, (iv) parallel diagonalization of the HFB matrix in the simplex breaking case using the ScaLAPACK library. Finally, several little significant errors of the previous published version were corrected.

  6. Effect of lateralized design on muscle and joint reaction forces for reverse shoulder arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, William; Yang, Yang; Petersen-Fitts, Graysen R; Lombardo, Daniel J; Stine, Sasha; Sabesan, Vani J

    2017-04-01

    Manufacturers of reverse shoulder arthroplasty (RSA) implants have recently designed innovative implants to optimize performance in rotator cuff-deficient shoulders. These advancements are not without tradeoffs and can have negative biomechanical effects. The objective of this study was to develop an integrated finite element analysis-kinematic model to compare the muscle forces and joint reaction forces (JRFs) of 3 different RSA designs. A kinematic model of a normal shoulder joint was adapted from the Delft model and integrated with the well-validated OpenSim shoulder model. Static optimizations then allowed for calculation of the individual muscle forces, moment arms, and JRFs relative to net joint moments. Three-dimensional computer models of 3 RSA designs-humeral lateralized design (HLD), glenoid lateralized design, and Grammont design-were integrated, and parametric studies were performed. Overall, there were decreases in deltoid and rotator cuff muscle forces for all 3 RSA designs. These decreases were greatest in the middle deltoid of the HLD model for abduction and flexion and in the rotator cuff muscles under both internal rotation and external rotation. The JRFs in abduction and flexion decreased similarly for all RSA designs compared with the normal shoulder model, with the greatest decrease seen in the HLD model. These findings demonstrate that the design characteristics implicit in these modified RSA prostheses result in mechanical differences most prominently seen in the deltoid muscle and overall JRFs. Further research using this novel integrated model can help guide continued optimization of RSA design and clinical outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Critical temperature of liquid-gas phase transition for hot nuclear matter and three-body force effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuo Wei; Lu Guangcheng; Li Zenghua; Luo Peiyan; Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing

    2005-01-01

    The finite temperature Brueckner-Hartree-Fock (FTBHF) approach is extended by introducing a microscopic three-body force. Within the extended approach, the three-body force effects on the equation of state of hot nuclear matter and its temperature dependence have been investigated. The critical properties of the liquid-gas phase transition of hot nuclear matter have been calculated. It is shown that the three-body force provides a repulsive contribution to the equation of state of hot nuclear matter. The repulsive effect of the three-body force becomes more pronounced as the density and temperature increase and consequently inclusion of the three-body force contribution in the calculation reduces the predicted critical temperature from about 16 MeV to about 13 MeV. By separating the contribution originated from the 2σ-exchange process coupled to the virtual excitation of a nucleon-antinucleon pair from the full three-body force, the connection between the three-body force effect and the relativistic correction from the Dirac-Brueckner-Hartree-Fock has been explored. It turns out that the contribution of the 2σ-N(N-bar) part is more repulsive than that of the full three-body force and the calculated critical temperature is about 11 MeV if only the 2σ-N(N-bar) component of the three-body force is included which is lower than the value obtained in the case of including the full three-body force and is close to the value predicted by the Dirac-Brueckner-Hartree-Fock (DBHF) approach. Our result provides a reasonable explanation for the discrepancy between the values of critical temperature predicted from the FTBHF approach including the three-body force and the DBHF approach. (authors)

  8. Surface wave effects in the NEMO ocean model: Forced and coupled experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breivik, Øyvind; Mogensen, Kristian; Bidlot, Jean-Raymond; Balmaseda, Magdalena Alonso; Janssen, Peter A. E. M.

    2015-04-01

    The NEMO general circulation ocean model is extended to incorporate three physical processes related to ocean surface waves, namely the surface stress (modified by growth and dissipation of the oceanic wavefield), the turbulent kinetic energy flux from breaking waves, and the Stokes-Coriolis force. Experiments are done with NEMO in ocean-only (forced) mode and coupled to the ECMWF atmospheric and wave models. Ocean-only integrations are forced with fields from the ERA-Interim reanalysis. All three effects are noticeable in the extratropics, but the sea-state-dependent turbulent kinetic energy flux yields by far the largest difference. This is partly because the control run has too vigorous deep mixing due to an empirical mixing term in NEMO. We investigate the relation between this ad hoc mixing and Langmuir turbulence and find that it is much more effective than the Langmuir parameterization used in NEMO. The biases in sea surface temperature as well as subsurface temperature are reduced, and the total ocean heat content exhibits a trend closer to that observed in a recent ocean reanalysis (ORAS4) when wave effects are included. Seasonal integrations of the coupled atmosphere-wave-ocean model consisting of NEMO, the wave model ECWAM, and the atmospheric model of ECMWF similarly show that the sea surface temperature biases are greatly reduced when the mixing is controlled by the sea state and properly weighted by the thickness of the uppermost level of the ocean model. These wave-related physical processes were recently implemented in the operational coupled ensemble forecast system of ECMWF.

  9. Effects of fuel Lewis number on localised forced ignition of turbulent homogeneous mixtures: A numerical investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipal Patel

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The influences of fuel Lewis number LeF (ranging from 0.8 to 1.2 on localised forced ignition and early stages of combustion of stoichiometric and fuel-lean homogeneous mixtures have been analysed using simple chemistry three-dimensional compressible direct numerical simulations for different values of root-mean-square velocity fluctuation and the energy deposition characteristics (i.e. characteristic width and the duration of energy deposition by the ignitor. The localised forced ignition is modelled using a source term in the energy transport equation, which deposits energy in a Gaussian manner from the centre of the ignitor over a stipulated period of time. The fuel Lewis number LeF has been found to have significant influences on the extent of burning of stoichiometric and fuel-lean homogeneous mixtures. It has been shown that the width of ignition energy deposition and the duration over which the ignition energy is deposited have significant influences on the success of ignition and subsequent flame propagation. An increase in the width of ignition energy deposition and the duration of energy deposition for a given amount of ignition energy have been found to have detrimental effects on the ignition event, which may ultimately lead to misfire. For a given value of u' (LeF, the rate of heat transfer from the hot gas kernel increases with increasing LeF (u', which in turn leads to a reduction in the extent of overall burning for both stoichiometric and fuel-lean homogeneous mixtures but the detrimental effects of high values of u' on localised forced ignition are particularly prevalent for fuel-lean mixtures. Detailed physical explanations have been provided for the observed LeF,u' and energy deposition characteristics effects.

  10. Atomic force microscopic study of the effects of ethanol on yeast cell surface morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canetta, Elisabetta; Adya, Ashok K; Walker, Graeme M

    2006-02-01

    The detrimental effects of ethanol toxicity on the cell surface morphology of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (strain NCYC 1681) and Schizosaccharomyces pombe (strain DVPB 1354) were investigated using an atomic force microscope (AFM). In combination with culture viability and mean cell volume measurements AFM studies allowed us to relate the cell surface morphological changes, observed on nanometer lateral resolution, with the cellular stress physiology. Exposing yeasts to increasing stressful concentrations of ethanol led to decreased cell viabilities and mean cell volumes. Together with the roughness and bearing volume analyses of the AFM images, the results provided novel insight into the relative ethanol tolerance of S. cerevisiae and Sc. pombe.

  11. Effects of Energy Deposition Characteristics on Localised Forced Ignition of Homogeneous Mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipal Patel

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The effects of the characteristic width of the energy deposition profile and the duration of energy deposition by the ignitor on localised forced ignition of stoichiometric and fuel-lean homogeneous mixtures have been analysed using simplified chemistry three-dimensional compressible Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS for different values of root-mean-square turbulent velocity fluctuation. The localised forced ignition is modelled using a source term in the energy transport equation, which deposits energy in a Gaussian manner from the centre of the ignitor over a stipulated period of time. It has been shown that the width of ignition energy deposition and the duration over which ignition energy is deposited have significant influences on the success of ignition and subsequent flame propagation. An increase in the width of ignition energy deposition (duration of energy deposition for a given amount of ignition energy has been found to have a detrimental effect on the ignition event, which may ultimately lead to misfire. Moreover, an increase in u′ gives rise to augmented heat transfer rate from the hot gas kernel, which in turn leads to a reduction in the extent of overall burning for both stoichiometric and fuel-lean homogeneous mixtures but the detrimental effects of high values of u′ on localised ignition are particularly prevalent for fuel-lean mixtures.

  12. Effects of axial gap and nozzle distribution on aerodynamic forces of a supersonic partial-admission turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinpeng JIANG

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The turbine in an LH2/LOX rocket engine is designed as a two-stage supersonic partial-admission turbine. Three-dimensional steady and unsteady simulations were conducted to analyze turbine performance and aerodynamic forces on rotor blades. Different configurations were employed to investigate the effects of the axial gap and nozzle distribution on the predicted performance and aerodynamic forces. Rotor blades experience unsteady aerodynamic forces because of the partial admission. Aerodynamic forces show periodicity in the admission region, and are close to zero after leaving the admission region. The unsteady forces in frequency domain indicate that components exist in a wide frequency region, and the admission passing frequency is dominant. Those multiples of the rotational frequency which are multiples of the nozzle number in a full-admission turbine are notable components. Results show that the turbine efficiency decreases as the axial gap between nozzles and the 1st stage rotor (rotor 1 increases. Fluctuation of the circumferential aerodynamic force on rotor 1 blades decreases with the axial gap increasing. The turbine efficiency decreases as the circumferential spacing between nozzles increases. Fluctuations of the circumferential and axial aerodynamic forces increase as the circumferential spacing increases. As for the non-equidistant nozzle distribution, it produces similar turbine performance and amplitude-frequency characteristics of forces to those of the normal configuration, when the mean spacing is equal to that of the normal case. Keywords: Aerodynamic force, Axial gap, Computational fluid dynamics (CFD, Nozzle distribution, Partial admission, Turbine

  13. Study of the time effect on the strength of cell-cell adhesion force by a novel nano-picker

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Yajing, E-mail: shen@robo.mein.naogya-u.ac.jp [Dept. of Micro-Nano Systems Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Nakajima, Masahiro [Center for Micro-Nano Mechatronics, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Kojima, Seiji; Homma, Michio [Division of Biological Science, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Fukuda, Toshio [Dept. of Micro-Nano Systems Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Center for Micro-Nano Mechatronics, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan)

    2011-06-03

    Highlights: {yields} A nano-picker is developed for single cell adhesion force measurement. {yields} The adhesion of picker-cell has no influence to the cell-cell measurement result. {yields} Cell-cell adhesion force has a rise at the first few minutes and then becomes constant. -- Abstract: Cell's adhesion is important to cell's interaction and activates. In this paper, a novel method for cell-cell adhesion force measurement was proposed by using a nano-picker. The effect of the contact time on the cell-cell adhesion force was studied. The nano-picker was fabricated from an atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilever by nano fabrication technique. The cell-cell adhesion force was measured based on the deflection of the nano-picker beam. The result suggests that the adhesion force between cells increased with the increasing of contact time at the first few minutes. After that, the force became constant. This measurement methodology was based on the nanorobotic manipulation system inside an environmental scanning electron microscope. It can realize both the observation and manipulation of a single cell at nanoscale. The quantitative and precise cell-cell adhesion force result can be obtained by this method. It would help us to understand the single cell interaction with time and would benefit the research in medical and biological fields potentially.

  14. Molecular Theory and the Effects of Solute Attractive Forces on Hydrophobic Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhari, Mangesh I; Rempe, Susan B; Asthagiri, D; Tan, L; Pratt, L R

    2016-03-03

    The role of solute attractive forces on hydrophobic interactions is studied by coordinated development of theory and simulation results for Ar atoms in water. We present a concise derivation of the local molecular field (LMF) theory for the effects of solute attractive forces on hydrophobic interactions, a derivation that clarifies the close relation of LMF theory to the EXP approximation applied to this problem long ago. The simulation results show that change from purely repulsive atomic solute interactions to include realistic attractive interactions diminishes the strength of hydrophobic bonds. For the Ar-Ar rdfs considered pointwise, the numerical results for the effects of solute attractive forces on hydrophobic interactions are opposite in sign and larger in magnitude than predicted by LMF theory. That comparison is discussed from the point of view of quasichemical theory, and it is suggested that the first reason for this difference is the incomplete evaluation within LMF theory of the hydration energy of the Ar pair. With a recent suggestion for the system-size extrapolation of the required correlation function integrals, the Ar-Ar rdfs permit evaluation of osmotic second virial coefficients B2. Those B2's also show that incorporation of attractive interactions leads to more positive (repulsive) values. With attractive interactions in play, B2 can change from positive to negative values with increasing temperatures. This is consistent with the puzzling suggestions of decades ago that B2 ≈ 0 for intermediate cases of temperature or solute size. In all cases here, B2 becomes more attractive with increasing temperature.

  15. A multilinear regression methodology to analyze the effect of atmospheric and surface forcing on Arctic clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boeke, R.; Taylor, P. C.; Li, Y.

    2017-12-01

    Arctic cloud amount as simulated in CMIP5 models displays large intermodel spread- models disagree on the processes important for cloud formation as well as the radiative impact of clouds. The radiative response to cloud forcing can be better assessed when the drivers of Arctic cloud formation are known. Arctic cloud amount (CA) is a function of both atmospheric and surface conditions, and it is crucial to separate the influences of unique processes to understand why the models are different. This study uses a multilinear regression methodology to determine cloud changes using 3 variables as predictors: lower tropospheric stability (LTS), 500-hPa vertical velocity (ω500), and sea ice concentration (SIC). These three explanatory variables were chosen because their effects on clouds can be attributed to unique climate processes: LTS is a thermodynamic indicator of the relationship between clouds and atmospheric stability, SIC determines the interaction between clouds and the surface, and ω500 is a metric for dynamical change. Vertical, seasonal profiles of necessary variables are obtained from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project 5 (CMIP5) historical simulation, an ocean-atmosphere couple model forced with the best-estimate natural and anthropogenic radiative forcing from 1850-2005, and statistical significance tests are used to confirm the regression equation. A unique heuristic model will be constructed for each climate model and for observations, and models will be tested by their ability to capture the observed cloud amount and behavior. Lastly, the intermodel spread in Arctic cloud amount will be attributed to individual processes, ranking the relative contributions of each factor to shed light on emergent constraints in the Arctic cloud radiative effect.

  16. Trampoline effect and the force field inside the void in complex plasma under microgravity conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khrapak, S. A.; Kretschmer, M.; Zhdanov, S. K.; Thomas, H. M.; MOrfill, G. e.; Fortov, V. E.; Lipaev, A. M.; Molotkov, V. I.; Ivanov, A. I.; Turin, M. V.

    2005-01-01

    The PKE-Nefedov facility onboard the International Space Station (ISS),operational since March, 2'001, has enabled the study of complex (dusty) plasmas under microgravity conditions. A complex plasma is generated by introducing micron sized grains in a capacitively coupled rf discharge. The grains form a cloud inside the bulk of the discharge and can be easily visualized with the help of standard tools-laser illumination and video cameras. In most of the experiments under microgravity conditions the central region of the discharge is free of grains a so called void is formed. Due to recent theoretical advances, showing that the ion drag force can be more than a factor of ten larger than had traditionally been believed, void formation is now through to be a consequence of this (enhanced) interaction. The way this process works is the following: the ions drifting from the central region of a discharge to its walls and electrodes transfer their momentum to the grains pushing them out of the center. However, no direct experimental results on the origin of the void formation were reported so far. In this paper we report new results on the observation of a weak instability of the void-complex plasma interface observed at a relatively low gas pressure (p=12Pa). The instability leads to periodic injections of a relatively small number of particles into the void region (by analogy this effect is called trampoline effect), The trajectories of injected particles are analyzed providing information on the force field and potential energy distribution inside the void. For the relatively low neutral gas pressure used in the experiment a direct comparison with theory involving a model of the ion drag force in the collisionless regime is possible. Such a comparison yields good agreement, implying that we have observed the first experimental confirmation of the ion drag mechanism as being responsible for the void formation. (Author)

  17. Trampoline effect and the force field inside the void in complex plasma under microgravity conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khrapak, S. A.; Kretschmer, M.; Zhdanov, S. K.; Thomas, H. M.; MOrfill, G. e.; Fortov, V. E.; Lipaev, A. M.; Molotkov, V. I.; Ivanov, A. I.; Turin, M. V.

    2005-07-01

    The PKE-Nefedov facility onboard the International Space Station (ISS),operational since March, 2'001, has enabled the study of complex (dusty) plasmas under microgravity conditions. A complex plasma is generated by introducing micron sized grains in a capacitively coupled rf discharge. The grains form a cloud inside the bulk of the discharge and can be easily visualized with the help of standard tools-laser illumination and video cameras. In most of the experiments under microgravity conditions the central region of the discharge is free of grains a so called void is formed. Due to recent theoretical advances, showing that the ion drag force can be more than a factor of ten larger than had traditionally been believed, void formation is now through to be a consequence of this (enhanced) interaction. The way this process works is the following: the ions drifting from the central region of a discharge to its walls and electrodes transfer their momentum to the grains pushing them out of the center. However, no direct experimental results on the origin of the void formation were reported so far. In this paper we report new results on the observation of a weak instability of the void-complex plasma interface observed at a relatively low gas pressure (p=12Pa). The instability leads to periodic injections of a relatively small number of particles into the void region (by analogy this effect is called trampoline effect), The trajectories of injected particles are analyzed providing information on the force field and potential energy distribution inside the void. For the relatively low neutral gas pressure used in the experiment a direct comparison with theory involving a model of the ion drag force in the collisionless regime is possible. Such a comparison yields good agreement, implying that we have observed the first experimental confirmation of the ion drag mechanism as being responsible for the void formation. (Author)

  18. Handbook of force transducers

    CERN Document Server

    Stefanescu, Dan Mihai

    2011-01-01

    Part I introduces the basic ""Principles and Methods of Force Measurement"" acording to a classification into a dozen of force transducers types: resistive, inductive, capacitive, piezoelectric, electromagnetic, electrodynamic, magnetoelastic, galvanomagnetic (Hall-effect), vibrating wires, (micro)resonators, acoustic and gyroscopic. Two special chapters refer to force balance techniques and to combined methods in force measurement. Part II discusses the ""(Strain Gauge) Force Transducers Components"", evolving from the classical force transducer to the digital / intelligent one, with the inco

  19. Black Hats and White Hats: The Effect of Organizational Culture and Institutional Identity on the Twenty-third Air Force

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Koskinas, Ioannis

    2006-01-01

    .... Although brief, the Twenty-third Air Force's experience provides sufficient data for a thorough analysis of the effect of organizational culture and institutional agendas on the evolution of a nascent organization...

  20. Effects of slip-induced changes in ankle movement on muscle activity and ground reaction forces during running acceleration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ketabi, Shahin; Kersting, Uwe G.

    2013-01-01

    Ground contact in running is always linked to a minimum amount of slipping, e.g., during the early contact phase when horizontal forces are high compared to vertical forces. Studies have shown altered muscular activation when expecting slips [2-4]. It is not known what the mechanical effect of su...... of such slip episodes are on joint loading or performance. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of changes in ankle movement on ankle joint loading, muscle activity, and ground reaction forces during linear acceleration....

  1. EFFECTS OF COLUMN FAILURES ON THE INTERNAL FORCES OF ORTHOGONAL REINFORCED CONCRETE BUILDING FRAMES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilay KAYA

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the effects of column failures which may take place due to the special causes such as blast, vehicle impact, insufficient or deficient design, on the internal forces of orthogonal reinforced concrete building frames have been investigated. Calculations have been performed with SAP2000 structural analysis program, under static conditions. For a typical frame system, firstly, various column failure scenarios have been considered for uninfilled case and internal forces have been calculated and compared with those in the intact case. Then, similar calculations have been implemented for the case of presence of infill walls. The results of analyses have shown that the effects of column failures had condensed on the neighbor columns and beams of orthogonal frames on which the columns had been failed. Moreover, it has been determined that, while the bending moment capacities of the connected beams to the failed columns had exceeded in the bare frames, in the masonry infilled frames, walls give substantial support to the structural elements of the building, and capacities of the beams had not exceeded.

  2. Electronic excitations and their effect on the interionic forces in simulations of radiation damage in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Race, C P; Mason, D R; Sutton, A P

    2009-01-01

    Using time-dependent tight-binding simulations of radiation damage cascades in a model metal we directly investigate the nature of the excitations of a system of quantum mechanical electrons in response to the motion of a set of classical ions. We furthermore investigate the effect of these excitations on the attractive electronic forces between the ions. We find that the electronic excitations are well described by a Fermi-Dirac distribution at some elevated temperature, even in the absence of the direct electron-electron interactions that would be required in order to thermalize a non-equilibrium distribution. We explain this result in terms of the spectrum of characteristic frequencies of the ionic motion. Decomposing the electronic force into four well-defined components within the basis of instantaneous electronic eigenstates, we find that the effect of accumulated excitations in weakening the interionic bonds is mostly (95%) accounted for by a thermal model for the electronic excitations. This result justifies the use of the simplifying assumption of a thermalized electron system in simulations of radiation damage with an electronic temperature dependence and in the development of temperature-dependent classical potentials.

  3. Effects of Laminaria japonica polysaccharides on exercise endurance and oxidative stress in forced swimming mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Feiwei; Hao, Haitao

    2016-12-01

    Polysaccharides are the major active ingredients responsible for the bioactivities of Laminaria japonica. However, the effects of L. japonica polysaccharides (LJP) on exercise endurance and oxidative stress have never been investigated. Therefore, this study was conducted to investigate the effects of LJP on exercise endurance and oxidative stress in a forced swimming mouse model. The animals were divided into four groups, namely the control (C), LJP-75, LJP-150, and LJP-300 groups, which received physiological saline and 75, 150, and 300 mg kg(-1) LJP, respectively, by gavage once a day for 28 days. This was followed by a forced swimming test and measurements of various biochemical parameters. LJP increased swimming time to exhaustion, the liver and muscle glycogen content, and levels of superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and catalase in the serum, liver, and muscle, which were accompanied by corresponding decreases in the malondialdehyde (MDA) content of the same tissues. Furthermore, decreases in blood lactic acid and serum myeloperoxidase (MPO) levels were observed. LJP enhanced exercise endurance and protected mice against exhaustive exercise-induced oxidative stress.

  4. Effect of Polysaccharide from Cordyceps militaris (Ascomycetes) on Physical Fatigue Induced by Forced Swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yan-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Cordyceps militaris is the one of the most important medicinal mushrooms, widely used in East Asian countries. Polysaccharide is considered to be the principal active component in C. militaris and has a wide range of biological and pharmacological properties. This study was undertaken to investigate the effect of polysaccharide from C. militaris (PCM) on physical fatigue induced in animals through a forced swimming test. The mice were divided into 4 groups receiving 28 days' treatment with drinking water (exercise control) or low-, medium-, and high-dose PCM (40, 80, and 160 mg/kg/day, respectively). After 28 days, the mice were subjected to the forced swimming test; the exhaustive swimming time was measured and fatigue-related biochemical parameters, including serum lactic acid, urea nitrogen, creatine kinase, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, superoxide dismutase, glutathi- one peroxidase, catalase, malondialdehyde, liver glycogen, and muscle glycogen, were analyzed. The results showed that PCM could significantly prolong the exhaustive swimming time of mice; decrease concentrations of serum lactic acid, urea nitrogen, creatine kinase, aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, and malondialdehyde; and increase liver and muscle glycogen contents and the concentrations of serum superoxide dismutase, glutathione per- oxidase, and catalase. The data suggest that PCM has an antifatigue effect, and it might become a new functional food or medicine for fatigue resistance.

  5. Electronic excitations and their effect on the interionic forces in simulations of radiation damage in metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Race, C P; Mason, D R; Sutton, A P

    2009-03-18

    Using time-dependent tight-binding simulations of radiation damage cascades in a model metal we directly investigate the nature of the excitations of a system of quantum mechanical electrons in response to the motion of a set of classical ions. We furthermore investigate the effect of these excitations on the attractive electronic forces between the ions. We find that the electronic excitations are well described by a Fermi-Dirac distribution at some elevated temperature, even in the absence of the direct electron-electron interactions that would be required in order to thermalize a non-equilibrium distribution. We explain this result in terms of the spectrum of characteristic frequencies of the ionic motion. Decomposing the electronic force into four well-defined components within the basis of instantaneous electronic eigenstates, we find that the effect of accumulated excitations in weakening the interionic bonds is mostly (95%) accounted for by a thermal model for the electronic excitations. This result justifies the use of the simplifying assumption of a thermalized electron system in simulations of radiation damage with an electronic temperature dependence and in the development of temperature-dependent classical potentials.

  6. Effects of velocity and weight support on ground reaction forces and metabolic power during running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowski, Alena M; Kram, Rodger

    2008-08-01

    The biomechanical and metabolic demands of human running are distinctly affected by velocity and body weight. As runners increase velocity, ground reaction forces (GRF) increase, which may increase the risk of an overuse injury, and more metabolic power is required to produce greater rates of muscular force generation. Running with weight support attenuates GRFs, but demands less metabolic power than normal weight running. We used a recently developed device (G-trainer) that uses positive air pressure around the lower body to support body weight during treadmill running. Our scientific goal was to quantify the separate and combined effects of running velocity and weight support on GRFs and metabolic power. After obtaining this basic data set, we identified velocity and weight support combinations that resulted in different peak GRFs, yet demanded the same metabolic power. Ideal combinations of velocity and weight could potentially reduce biomechanical risks by attenuating peak GRFs while maintaining aerobic and neuromuscular benefits. Indeed, we found many combinations that decreased peak vertical GRFs yet demanded the same metabolic power as running slower at normal weight. This approach of manipulating velocity and weight during running may prove effective as a training and/or rehabilitation strategy.

  7. System pressure effects on reflooding phenomena observed in the SCTF Core-I forced flooding tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adachi, Hiromichi; Sudo, Yukio; Sobajima, Makoto; Iwamura, Takamichi; Osakabe, Masahiro; Ohnuki, Akira; Abe, Yutaka

    1983-06-01

    The Slab Core Test Facility was constructed to investigate two-dimensional thermo-hydrodynamics in the core and the interaction in fluid behavior between the core and the upper plenum during the last part of blowdown, refill and reflood phases of a posturated loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) of a pressurized water reactor (PWR). The present report described the analytical results on the effects of system pressure on reflooding phenomena observed in Tests Sl-SH2, Sl-01 and Sl-02 which are belonging to the SCTF Core-I forced-feed reflooding test series. Nominal system pressures in these tests are 0.4, 0.2 and 0.15 MPa, respectively. By comparison among the data of these three tests, the effects of system pressure on thermo-hydrodynamic behavior in the pressure vessel including the core and the primary coolant loops of the SCTF can be clarified under the forced flooding condition. Major items investigated in the present report are (1) overall temperature behaviors in the core, (2) change of heat transfer coefficient and heat flux at the rod surface before the quench, (3) two-dimensional thermo-hydrodynamic behaviors in the core and upper plenum and (4) hot leg carryover. (author)

  8. The effects of femoral neck cut, cable tension, and muscles forces on the greater trochanter fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, Yvan; Cloutier, Luc P; Duke, Kajsa; Laflamme, G Yves

    2012-04-01

    Greater trochanter (GT) stabilization techniques following a fracture or an osteotomy are still showing high levels of postoperative complications. Understanding the effect of femoral neck cut placement, cable tension and muscles forces on GT fragment displacements could help surgeons optimize their techniques. A 3D finite element model has been developed to evaluate, through a statistical experimental design, the impact of the above variables on the GT fragment gap and sliding displacements. Muscles forces were simulating typical daily activities. Stresses were also investigated. The femoral neck cut placement had the most significant effect on the fragment displacement. Lowering it by 5 mm increased the gap and sliding fragment displacements by 288 and 128 %, respectively. Excessive cable tightening provided no significant reduction in fragment displacement. Muscle activities increased the gap and the sliding displacements for all muscle configurations. The maximum total displacement of 0.41 mm was present with a 10 mm femoral neck cut, a cable tension of 178 N, and stair climbing. Caution must be used not to over tighten the cables as the potential damage caused by the increased stress is more significant than any reduction in fragment displacement. Furthermore, preservation of the contact area is important for GT stabilization.

  9. The effect of ac-driven force on superlubricity in a two-dimensional Frenkel-Kontorova model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Maimai

    2010-01-01

    By using the molecular dynamic simulation method with a fourth-order Runge-Kutta algorithm, a two-dimensional dc- and ac-driven Frenkel-Kontorova model with a square symmetry substrate potential for a square lattice layer has been investigated in this paper. For this system, the effects of many different parameters on the static friction force have been studied in detail. It was found that not only the amplitude and frequency of the ac-driven force, but also the direction of dc- and ac-driven forces and the misfit angle between two layers have a strong influence on the static friction force. This indicated that the phenomenon of superlubricity appears easily with larger ac amplitude and smaller ac frequency for some special direction of the external driving force and misfit angle.

  10. Effects of density and force discretizations on spurious velocities in lattice Boltzmann equation for two-phase flows

    KAUST Repository

    Xiong, Yuan

    2014-04-28

    Spurious current emerging in the vicinity of phase interfaces is a well-known disadvantage of the lattice Boltzmann equation (LBE) for two-phase flows. Previous analysis shows that this unphysical phenomenon comes from the force imbalance at discrete level inherited in LBE (Guo et al 2011 Phys. Rev. E 83 036707). Based on the analysis of the LBE free of checkerboard effects, in this work we further show that the force imbalance is caused by the different discretization stencils: the implicit one from the streaming process and the explicit one from the discretization of the force term. Particularly, the total contribution includes two parts, one from the difference between the intrinsically discretized density (or ideal gas pressure) gradient and the explicit ones in the force term, and the other from the explicit discretized chemical potential gradients in the intrinsically discretized force term. The former contribution is a special feature of LBE which was not realized previously.

  11. The Effect of Static Magnetic Forces on Water Contents and Photosynthetic Pigments in Sweet Basil Ocimum basilicum L. (Lamiaceae)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taia, Wafaa K; Kotbi, Abeer M [Alexandria Univ., Faculty of Science, Botany Dept., Alexandria (Egypt); AlZahrani, Hassan S [Faculty of Science, King AbdulAziz Univ., Biology Dept., Jeddah (Saudi Arabia)

    2007-07-01

    Three different magnetic regimes; aerial, surface and buried; each with three different forces, have been used to investigate their effects on the water contents and photosynthetic pigments of sweet basil plants (Ocimum basilicum L.). Two groups of sweet basil seeds, Ocimum basilicum L. have been cultivated, one under normal conditions and the second has been subdivided into three portion (aerial, surface and buried) to examine the effect of different magnetic forces coming from the three directions on the resulted plants. At all directions of magnets, water contents have been significantly affected by the magnetic forces. Chlorophyll A and carotene contents have been affected, as well, according to the three magnetic forces coming from soil surface regime only. Chlorophyll B did not significantly affected by differences magnetic forces in the three regimes, but it is affected by magnetism wherever its direction or force. But all the photosynthetic pigments contents (Chlorophyll A, B and Carotenes) decreased significantly than the control in the three magnetic regimes., but without any effect according to differences in the magnetic force in the aerial and burried regimes of magnetism. It was concluded that magnetism affects both water absorption and retention , the most influenced regime was the aerial magnets followed by the surface and buried ones. This result can be interpreted by the ionization of water which makes water ions respond to magnetic forces. Photosynthetic pigments have been decreased significantly by the exposure to magnetic fields, irrespective to its direction or force and this may be due to the effect of magnetic fields on the reduction in plastids inside the cells. (author)

  12. The Effect of Static Magnetic Forces on Water Contents and Photosynthetic Pigments in Sweet Basil Ocimum basilicum L. (Lamiaceae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taia, Wafaa K; Kotbi, Abeer M; AlZahrani, Hassan S

    2007-01-01

    Three different magnetic regimes; aerial, surface and buried; each with three different forces, have been used to investigate their effects on the water contents and photosynthetic pigments of sweet basil plants (Ocimum basilicum L.). Two groups of sweet basil seeds, Ocimum basilicum L. have been cultivated, one under normal conditions and the second has been subdivided into three portion (aerial, surface and buried) to examine the effect of different magnetic forces coming from the three directions on the resulted plants. At all directions of magnets, water contents have been significantly affected by the magnetic forces. Chlorophyll A and carotene contents have been affected, as well, according to the three magnetic forces coming from soil surface regime only. Chlorophyll B did not significantly affected by differences magnetic forces in the three regimes, but it is affected by magnetism wherever its direction or force. But all the photosynthetic pigments contents (Chlorophyll A, B and Carotenes) decreased significantly than the control in the three magnetic regimes., but without any effect according to differences in the magnetic force in the aerial and burried regimes of magnetism. It was concluded that magnetism affects both water absorption and retention , the most influenced regime was the aerial magnets followed by the surface and buried ones. This result can be interpreted by the ionization of water which makes water ions respond to magnetic forces. Photosynthetic pigments have been decreased significantly by the exposure to magnetic fields, irrespective to its direction or force and this may be due to the effect of magnetic fields on the reduction in plastids inside the cells. (author)

  13. Aerodynamic forces and flow structures of the leading edge vortex on a flapping wing considering ground effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Truong, Tien Van; Yoon, Kwang Joon; Byun, Doyoung; Kim, Min Jun; Park, Hoon Cheol

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work is to provide an insight into the aerodynamic performance of the beetle during takeoff, which has been estimated in previous investigations. We employed a scaled-up electromechanical model flapping wing to measure the aerodynamic forces and the three-dimensional flow structures on the flapping wing. The ground effect on the unsteady forces and flow structures were also characterized. The dynamically scaled wing model could replicate the general stroke pattern of the beetle's hind wing kinematics during takeoff flight. Two wing kinematic models have been studied to examine the influences of wing kinematics on unsteady aerodynamic forces. In the first model, the angle of attack is asymmetric and varies during the translational motion, which is the flapping motion of the beetle's hind wing. In the second model, the angle of attack is constant during the translational motion. The instantaneous aerodynamic forces were measured for four strokes during the beetle's takeoff by the force sensor attached at the wing base. Flow visualization provided a general picture of the evolution of the three-dimensional leading edge vortex (LEV) on the beetle hind wing model. The LEV is stable during each stroke, and increases radically from the root to the tip, forming a leading-edge spiral vortex. The force measurement results show that the vertical force generated by the hind wing is large enough to lift the beetle. For the beetle hind wing kinematics, the total vertical force production increases 18.4% and 8.6% for the first and second strokes, respectively, due to the ground effect. However, for the model with a constant angle of attack during translation, the vertical force is reduced during the first stroke. During the third and fourth strokes, the ground effect is negligible for both wing kinematic patterns. This finding suggests that the beetle's flapping mechanism induces a ground effect that can efficiently lift its body from the ground during takeoff

  14. Experimental Research and Mathematical Modeling of Parameters Effecting on Cutting Force and SurfaceRoughness in CNC Turning Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeqiri, F.; Alkan, M.; Kaya, B.; Toros, S.

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, the effects of cutting parameters on cutting forces and surface roughness based on Taguchi experimental design method are determined. Taguchi L9 orthogonal array is used to investigate the effects of machining parameters. Optimal cutting conditions are determined using the signal/noise (S/N) ratio which is calculated by average surface roughness and cutting force. Using results of analysis, effects of parameters on both average surface roughness and cutting forces are calculated on Minitab 17 using ANOVA method. The material that was investigated is Inconel 625 steel for two cases with heat treatment and without heat treatment. The predicted and calculated values with measurement are very close to each other. Confirmation test of results showed that the Taguchi method was very successful in the optimization of machining parameters for maximum surface roughness and cutting forces in the CNC turning process.

  15. Potential profile and photovoltaic effect in nanoscale lateral pn junction observed by Kelvin probe force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowak, Roland; Moraru, Daniel; Mizuno, Takeshi; Jablonski, Ryszard; Tabe, Michiharu

    2014-01-01

    Nanoscale pn junctions have been investigated by Kelvin probe force microscopy and several particular features were found. Within the depletion region, a localized noise area is observed, induced by temporal fluctuations of dopant states. Electronic potential landscape is significantly affected by dopants with ground-state energies deeper than in bulk. Finally, the effects of light illumination were studied and it was found that the depletion region shifts its position as a function of light intensity. This is ascribed to charge redistribution within the pn junction as a result of photovoltaic effect and due to the impact of deepened-level dopants. - Highlights: • In pn nano-junctions, temporal potential fluctuations are found in depletion layer. • Fluctuations are due to frequent capture and emission of free carriers by dopants. • Depletion layer position shifts as a function of the intensity of irradiated light. • The depletion layer shifts are due to changes of deep-level dopants' charge states

  16. Acute effect of static stretching on muscle force in older women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Luiz Demantova Gurjão

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the acute effect of static stretching on the peak rate of force development (PRFD and maximum voluntary contraction (MVC in older women. Ten women (68.5 ± 7.0 years; 70.9 ± 8.1 kg; 159.4 ± 6.0 cm; body mass index: 28.0 ± 3.8 kg/m2 were studied. MVC and PRFD were determined by leg press exercise before and after the control or stretching condition (three sets of 30 seconds of static stretching of the quadriceps on two different days (interval of 24 hours. PRFD was determined as the steepest slope of the curve, calculated within regular windows of 20 milliseconds (∆force/∆time for the first 200 milliseconds after the onset of contraction. MVC was determined as the highest value recorded in each set. Only one condition was tested on each day and the order of application of each condition was determined randomly. The stretching intensity was evaluated by the muscle pain threshold. Four post-condition assessments (post-treatment, 10, 20, and 30 minutes were performed to monitor muscle strength. ANCOVA 2x5, followed by the Scheffé post-hoc test, showed no significant interactions between conditions vs. times (P > 0.05 for PRFD or MVC. In conclusion, acute bouts of static stretching of the quadriceps femoris do not affect the ability of rapid and maximum muscle force production in older women.

  17. Fast Bayesian approach for modal identification using forced vibration data considering the ambient effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Yan-Chun; Zhang, Feng-Liang

    2018-05-01

    Modal identification based on vibration response measured from real structures is becoming more popular, especially after benefiting from the great improvement of the measurement technology. The results are reliable to estimate the dynamic performance, which fits the increasing requirement of different design configurations of the new structures. However, the high-quality vibration data collection technology calls for a more accurate modal identification method to improve the accuracy of the results. Through the whole measurement process of dynamic testing, there are many aspects that will cause the rise of uncertainty, such as measurement noise, alignment error and modeling error, since the test conditions are not directly controlled. Depending on these demands, a Bayesian statistical approach is developed in this work to estimate the modal parameters using the forced vibration response of structures, simultaneously considering the effect of the ambient vibration. This method makes use of the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) of the data in a selected frequency band to identify the modal parameters of the mode dominating this frequency band and estimate the remaining uncertainty of the parameters correspondingly. In the existing modal identification methods for forced vibration, it is generally assumed that the forced vibration response dominates the measurement data and the influence of the ambient vibration response is ignored. However, ambient vibration will cause modeling error and affect the accuracy of the identified results. The influence is shown in the spectra as some phenomena that are difficult to explain and irrelevant to the mode to be identified. These issues all mean that careful choice of assumptions in the identification model and fundamental formulation to account for uncertainty are necessary. During the calculation, computational difficulties associated with calculating the posterior statistics are addressed. Finally, a fast computational algorithm

  18. Effects of forcing time scale on the simulated turbulent flows and turbulent collision statistics of inertial particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosa, B.; Parishani, H.; Ayala, O.; Wang, L.-P.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we study systematically the effects of forcing time scale in the large-scale stochastic forcing scheme of Eswaran and Pope [“An examination of forcing in direct numerical simulations of turbulence,” Comput. Fluids 16, 257 (1988)] on the simulated flow structures and statistics of forced turbulence. Using direct numerical simulations, we find that the forcing time scale affects the flow dissipation rate and flow Reynolds number. Other flow statistics can be predicted using the altered flow dissipation rate and flow Reynolds number, except when the forcing time scale is made unrealistically large to yield a Taylor microscale flow Reynolds number of 30 and less. We then study the effects of forcing time scale on the kinematic collision statistics of inertial particles. We show that the radial distribution function and the radial relative velocity may depend on the forcing time scale when it becomes comparable to the eddy turnover time. This dependence, however, can be largely explained in terms of altered flow Reynolds number and the changing range of flow length scales present in the turbulent flow. We argue that removing this dependence is important when studying the Reynolds number dependence of the turbulent collision statistics. The results are also compared to those based on a deterministic forcing scheme to better understand the role of large-scale forcing, relative to that of the small-scale turbulence, on turbulent collision of inertial particles. To further elucidate the correlation between the altered flow structures and dynamics of inertial particles, a conditional analysis has been performed, showing that the regions of higher collision rate of inertial particles are well correlated with the regions of lower vorticity. Regions of higher concentration of pairs at contact are found to be highly correlated with the region of high energy dissipation rate

  19. Biomechanical Effects of Posterior Condylar Offset and Posterior Tibial Slope on Quadriceps Force and Joint Contact Forces in Posterior-Stabilized Total Knee Arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyoung-Tak Kang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to determine the biomechanical effect of the posterior condylar offset (PCO and posterior tibial slope (PTS in posterior-stabilized (PS fixed-bearing total knee arthroplasty (TKA. We developed ±1, ±2, and ±3 mm PCO models in the posterior direction and −3°, 0°, 3°, and 6° PTS models using a previously validated FE model. The influence of changes in the PCO and PTS on the biomechanical effects under deep-knee-bend loading was investigated. The contact stress on the PE insert increased by 14% and decreased by 7% on average as the PCO increased and decreased, respectively, compared to the neutral position. In addition, the contact stress on post in PE insert increased by 18% on average as PTS increased from −3° to 6°. However, the contact stress on the patellar button decreased by 11% on average as PTS increased from −3° to 6° in all different PCO cases. The quadriceps force decreased by 14% as PTS increased from −3° to 6° in all PCO models. The same trend was found in patellar tendon force. Changes in PCO had adverse biomechanical effects whereas PTS increase had positive biomechanical effects. However, excessive PTS should be avoided to prevent knee instability and subsequent failure.

  20. Design of a lightweight, cost effective thimble-like sensor for haptic applications based on contact force sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferre, Manuel; Galiana, Ignacio; Aracil, Rafael

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the design and calibration of a thimble that measures the forces applied by a user during manipulation of virtual and real objects. Haptic devices benefit from force measurement capabilities at their end-point. However, the heavy weight and cost of force sensors prevent their widespread incorporation in these applications. The design of a lightweight, user-adaptable, and cost-effective thimble with four contact force sensors is described in this paper. The sensors are calibrated before being placed in the thimble to provide normal and tangential forces. Normal forces are exerted directly by the fingertip and thus can be properly measured. Tangential forces are estimated by sensors strategically placed in the thimble sides. Two applications are provided in order to facilitate an evaluation of sensorized thimble performance. These applications focus on: (i) force signal edge detection, which determines task segmentation of virtual object manipulation, and (ii) the development of complex object manipulation models, wherein the mechanical features of a real object are obtained and these features are then reproduced for training by means of virtual object manipulation.

  1. Design of a Lightweight, Cost Effective Thimble-Like Sensor for Haptic Applications Based on Contact Force Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Galiana

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the design and calibration of a thimble that measures the forces applied by a user during manipulation of virtual and real objects. Haptic devices benefit from force measurement capabilities at their end-point. However, the heavy weight and cost of force sensors prevent their widespread incorporation in these applications. The design of a lightweight, user-adaptable, and cost-effective thimble with four contact force sensors is described in this paper. The sensors are calibrated before being placed in the thimble to provide normal and tangential forces. Normal forces are exerted directly by the fingertip and thus can be properly measured. Tangential forces are estimated by sensors strategically placed in the thimble sides. Two applications are provided in order to facilitate an evaluation of sensorized thimble performance. These applications focus on: (i force signal edge detection, which determines task segmentation of virtual object manipulation, and (ii the development of complex object manipulation models, wherein the mechanical features of a real object are obtained and these features are then reproduced for training by means of virtual object manipulation.

  2. Rotary and radial forcing effects on center-of-mass locomotion dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, Z H; Larson, P L; Seipel, J E

    2014-01-01

    Rotary and radial forcing are two common actuation methods for legged robots. However, these two orthogonal methods of center-of-mass (CoM) forcing have not been compared as potentially alternative strategies of actuation. In this paper, we compare the CoM stability and energetics of running with rotary and radial actuation through the simulation of two models: the rotary-forced spring-loaded inverted pendulum (rotary-forced-SLIP), and the radially-forced-SLIP. We model both radial and rotary actuation in the simplest way, applying them as a constant force during the stance portion of the gait. A simple application of constant rotary forcing throughout stance is capable of producing fully-asymptotically stable motion; however, a similarly constant application of radial forcing throughout the stance is not capable of producing stable solutions. We then allow both the applied rotary and radial forcing functions to turn on or off based on the occurrence of the mid-stance event, which breaks the symmetry of actuation during stance towards a net forward propulsion. We find that both a rotary force applied in the first half of stance and a radial force applied in the second half of stance, are capable of stabilizing running. Interestingly, these two forcing methods improve the motion stability in different ways. Rotary forcing first reduces then greatly increases the size of the stable parameter region when gradually increased. Radial forcing expands the stable parameter region, but only in a moderate way. Also, it is found that parameter region stabilized by rotary and radial forcing are largely complementary. Overall, rotary forcing can better stabilize running for both constant and event-based forcing functions that were attempted. This indicates that rotary forcing has an inherent capability of stabilizing running, even when minimal time-or-event-or-state feedback is present. Radial forcing, however, tends to be more energy efficient when compared to rotary forcing

  3. Rotary and radial forcing effects on center-of-mass locomotion dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Z H; Larson, P L; Seipel, J E

    2014-09-01

    Rotary and radial forcing are two common actuation methods for legged robots. However, these two orthogonal methods of center-of-mass (CoM) forcing have not been compared as potentially alternative strategies of actuation. In this paper, we compare the CoM stability and energetics of running with rotary and radial actuation through the simulation of two models: the rotary-forced spring-loaded inverted pendulum (rotary-forced-SLIP), and the radially-forced-SLIP. We model both radial and rotary actuation in the simplest way, applying them as a constant force during the stance portion of the gait. A simple application of constant rotary forcing throughout stance is capable of producing fully-asymptotically stable motion; however, a similarly constant application of radial forcing throughout the stance is not capable of producing stable solutions. We then allow both the applied rotary and radial forcing functions to turn on or off based on the occurrence of the mid-stance event, which breaks the symmetry of actuation during stance towards a net forward propulsion. We find that both a rotary force applied in the first half of stance and a radial force applied in the second half of stance, are capable of stabilizing running. Interestingly, these two forcing methods improve the motion stability in different ways. Rotary forcing first reduces then greatly increases the size of the stable parameter region when gradually increased. Radial forcing expands the stable parameter region, but only in a moderate way. Also, it is found that parameter region stabilized by rotary and radial forcing are largely complementary. Overall, rotary forcing can better stabilize running for both constant and event-based forcing functions that were attempted. This indicates that rotary forcing has an inherent capability of stabilizing running, even when minimal time-or-event-or-state feedback is present. Radial forcing, however, tends to be more energy efficient when compared to rotary forcing

  4. Effect of piezocision on root resorption associated with orthodontic force: A microcomputed tomography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Braydon M; Dalci, Oyku; Papadopoulou, Alexandra K; Madukuri, Suman; Mahon, Jonathan; Petocz, Peter; Spahr, Axel; Darendeliler, M Ali

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of piezocision on orthodontically induced inflammatory root resorption. Fourteen patients were included in this split-mouth study; 1 side was assigned to piezocision, and the other side served as the control. Vertical corticotomy cuts of 4 to 5 mm in length were performed on either side of each piezocision premolar, and 150-g buccal tipping forces were applied to the premolars. After 4 weeks, the maxillary first premolars were extracted and scanned with microcomputed tomography. There was a significantly greater total amount of root resorption seen on the piezocision sides when compared with the control sides (P = 0.029). The piezocision procedure resulted in a 44% average increase in root resorption. In 5 patients, there was noticeable piezocision-related iatrogenic root damage. When that was combined with the orthodontic root resorption found on the piezocision-treated teeth, there was a statistically significant 110% average increase in volumetric root loss when compared with the control side (P = 0.005). The piezocision procedure that initiates the regional acceleratory phenomenon may increase the iatrogenic root resorption when used in conjunction with orthodontic forces. Piezocision applied close to the roots may cause iatrogenic damage to the neighboring roots and should be used carefully. Copyright © 2017.

  5. The effect of biomechanical variables on force sensitive resistor error: Implications for calibration and improved accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, Jonathon S; Evans, Katherine R; Hebert, Jacqueline S; Marasco, Paul D; Carey, Jason P

    2016-03-21

    Force Sensitive Resistors (FSRs) are commercially available thin film polymer sensors commonly employed in a multitude of biomechanical measurement environments. Reasons for such wide spread usage lie in the versatility, small profile, and low cost of these sensors. Yet FSRs have limitations. It is commonly accepted that temperature, curvature and biological tissue compliance may impact sensor conductance and resulting force readings. The effect of these variables and degree to which they interact has yet to be comprehensively investigated and quantified. This work systematically assesses varying levels of temperature, sensor curvature and surface compliance using a full factorial design-of-experiments approach. Three models of Interlink FSRs were evaluated. Calibration equations under 12 unique combinations of temperature, curvature and compliance were determined for each sensor. Root mean squared error, mean absolute error, and maximum error were quantified as measures of the impact these thermo/mechanical factors have on sensor performance. It was found that all three variables have the potential to affect FSR calibration curves. The FSR model and corresponding sensor geometry are sensitive to these three mechanical factors at varying levels. Experimental results suggest that reducing sensor error requires calibration of each sensor in an environment as close to its intended use as possible and if multiple FSRs are used in a system, they must be calibrated independently. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Delayed Effect of Blood-Flow-Restricted Resistance Training on Rapid Force Capacity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jakob Lindberg; Frandsen, Ulrik; Prokhorova, Tatyana

    2017-01-01

    of knee extensor exercise (20%1RM) to concentric failure during concurrent BFR of the thigh (100mmHg), while eight work-matched controls (21.9±3.0 years) trained without BFR (CON). Twenty-three training sessions were performed within 19 days. Maximal slow and fast knee joint velocity muscle strength......PURPOSE: The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect and time course of high-frequent low-load resistance training with blood-flow restriction (BFR) on rapid force capacity (i.e. rate of torque development (RTD)). METHODS: Ten male subjects (22.8±2.3 years) performed four sets...... and rapid force capacity (e.g. RTD) as well as evoked twitch contractile parameters was assessed before (Pre) and 5 and 12 days after training (Post5, Post12). Muscle biopsies were obtained Pre, after 8 days (Mid8) and 3 and 10 days post training (Post3, Post10) to examine changes in myofiber area...

  7. Investigation of the Effect of Neck Muscle Active Force on Whiplash Injury of the Cervical Spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Yan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study is to investigate the influence of neck muscle activation on whiplash neck injury of the occupants of a passenger vehicle under different severities of frontal and rear-end impact collisions. The finite element (FE model has been used as a versatile tool to simulate and understand the whiplash injury mechanism for occupant injury prevention. However, whiplash injuries and injury mechanisms have rarely been investigated in connection with neck active muscle forces, which restricts the complete reappearance and understanding of the injury mechanism. In this manuscript, a mixed FE human model in a sitting posture with an active head-neck was developed. The response of the cervical spine under frontal and rear-end collision conditions was then studied using the FE model with and without neck muscle activation. The effect of the neck muscle activation on the whiplash injury was studied based on the results of the FE simulations. The results indicated that the neck active force influenced the head-neck dynamic response and whiplash injury during a collision, especially in a low-speed collision.

  8. The effect of electrostatic and electrohydrodynamic forces on the chaining of carbon nanofibres in liquid epoxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, A; Bakis, C E; Wang, K W

    2010-01-01

    The formation of chains of aligned carbon nanofibres (CNFs) in polymers is a subject of great interest in the field of multifunctional nanocomposites. The mechanism of CNF chain assembly and growth in a low viscosity epoxy is investigated by developing a finite element model of a chain attached to an electrode. The model examines the combined effects of electrostatic and electrohydrodynamic forces on chain morphology. The electrohydrodynamic forces are modelled using the theory of ac electro-osmosis. The predictions of the model are supported by experimental results. The experiments were conducted on a CNF/epoxy/amine mixture by applying an ac field at frequencies ranging from 100 to 100 000 Hz. The predictions of the model qualitatively capture the variations of chain morphology and growth rate as functions of ac frequency. Higher frequencies promote a more uniform and denser network of chains. The rate of growth of chains is highest at an intermediate frequency. A uniform network of chains was observed at frequencies of 1 kHz and greater in the experiments. The rate of growth of chains was maximized at a frequency of 1 kHz for a liquid viscosity of 0.03 Pa s.

  9. The effect of space charge force on beams extracted from ECR ion sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, Z.Q.

    1989-01-01

    A new 3 dimensional ray tracing code BEAM-3D, with a simple model to calculate the space charge force of multiple ion species, is under development and serves as a theoretical tool to study the ECRIS beam formation. Excellent agreement between the BEAM-3D calculations and beam profile and emittance measurements of the total extracted helium 1+ beam from the RTECR ion source was obtained when a low degree of beam neutralization was assumed in the calculations. The experimental evidence indicates that the positive space charge effects dominate the early RTECR ion source beam formation and beamline optics matching process. A review of important beam characteristics is made, including a conceptual model for the space charge beam blow up. Better beam transport through the RTECR beamline analysis magnet has resulted after an extraction geometry modification in which the space charge force was more correctly matched. This work involved the development of an online beam characteristic measuring apparatus which will also be described

  10. EFFECT OF FORCED ROTATING VANELESS DIFFUSERS ON CENTRIFUGAL COMPRESSOR STAGE PERFORMANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. SERALATHAN

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Non-uniform flow at the exit of the centrifugal impeller mixes in the vaneless space of the diffuser causing a rise in static pressure as well as significant loss of total pressure. These mixing losses are usually an important source of inefficiency. Forced rotating vaneless diffusers is one such concept which reduces the energy losses associated with diffusion. Forced rotating vaneless diffuser involves the concept of blade cutback and shroud extension. In the present computational investigations, the effects of blade cutback of 5%, 10% and 20% of vane length, shroud extension of 10%, 20%, 30% and 40% of impeller tip diameter and impeller without shroud extension on flow diffusion and performance are analyzed, while all the other dimensions remaining same. The performance characteristics of various blade cutback configurations are less in terms of efficiency, energy coefficient as well as static pressure rise. The objective of obtaining higher static pressure rise with wide operating range and reduced losses over stationary vaned diffuser is achieved by shroud extension of 30%, followed by shroud extension of 20%.

  11. The effect of electrohydrodynamic force on the lift coefficient of a NACA 0015 airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusof, Y.; Hossain, A.; Abdullah, A. H.; Nasir, Rizal M. E.; Hamid, A.; Muthmainnah, N.; N, M.

    2017-11-01

    Lift, the force component that is perpendicular to the line of flight, is generated when a small aircraft moves through the air. With the help of the sets of flaps and slats on its wing, the pilot controls his aircraft manoeuvring in the air. In this study, we preferred to cut the drawbacks of the flaps system by introducing the electrohydrodynamic actuator. Widely known as plasma actuator, it is able to improve the induced lift force as well as the efficiency of a small aircraft system. A dielectric-barrier-discharge actuator using a 6 kV AC power supply was developed and tested on a NACA 0015 airfoil using copper as the electrodes and kapton as its dielectric component. The experimental results showed that it was successful in presenting a positive effect of the plasma actuator on the lift coefficient of the airfoil at smaller angle of attack, where enhancements ranged between 0.7% and 1.8%. However, at a higher angle, the results were not as swayed as it was desired since the energy exerted by the plasma actuator on the lift performance of the airfoil was inadequate. Further tests are needed using higher rated voltage supply and other equipment to improve the capability of the actuator in refining the aerodynamic performance of the airfoil.

  12. Film Thickness Formation in Nanoscale due to Effects of Elastohydrodynamic, Electrostatic and Surface force of Solvation and Van der Waals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.F. Abd Al-Samieh

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism of oil film with a thickness in the nanoscale is discussed in this paper. A polar lubricant of propylene carbonate is used as the intervening liquid between contiguous bodies in concentrated contacts. A pressure caused by the hydrodynamic viscous action in addition to double layer electrostatic force, Van der Waals inter-molecular forces, and solvation pressure due to inter-surface forces is considered in calculating the ultrathin lubricating films. The numerical solution has been carried out, using the Newton-Raphson iteration technique, applied for the convergence of the hydrodynamic pressure. The results show that, at separations beyond about five molecular diameters of the intervening liquid, the formation of a lubricant film thickness is governed by combined effects of viscous action and surface force of an attractive Van der Waals force and a repulsive double layer force. At smaller separations below about five molecular diameters of the intervening liquid, the effect of solvation force is dominant in determining the oil film thickness

  13. The Effect of Herbal Mouthwashes on the Force Decay of Elastomeric Chains: An In-vitro Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Nahidh

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: This in vitro study aimed to evaluate the effect of four herbal mouthwashes on the force decay of two types of clear short elastomeric chains (Regular and Extreme at various time intervals. Materials and methods: Four hundred forty pieces of both types of elastomeric chains with 19 mm length were utilized in this study. The force was measured, using digital scale immediately, after one-day immersion in distilled water and after 1, 2, 3 and 4 weeks immersion in the specific mouthwash for one minute twice daily then washed and kept in distilled water at 37°C. Force decay was calculated and compared among different elastic types, mouthwashes and time intervals using t-test and one-way ANOVA then Tukey’s tests. Results: The force degradation of regular type was significantly higher than extreme one. With time, the force decay increased significantly in both types. There was non-significant difference among the mouthwashes in the first and second weeks while the opposite in the third and fourth especially with the control group. Conclusions: The extreme type is preferred over the regular one because of its low force decay and the tested mouthwashes have no clinical significant effect on the force degradation over time in comparison with distilled water.

  14. Calculation of force and power during bench throws using a Smith machine: the importance of considering the effect of counterweights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Y; Narazaki, K; Akagi, R; Nakagaki, K; Kawamori, N; Ohta, K

    2013-09-01

    For achieving accurate and safe measurements of the force and power exerted on a load during resistance exercise, the Smith machine has been used instead of free weights. However, because some Smith machines possess counterweights, the equation for the calculation of force and power in this system should be different from the one used for free weights. The purpose of this investigation was to calculate force and power using an equation derived from a dynamic equation for a Smith machine with counterweights and to determine the differences in force and power calculated using 2 different equations. One equation was established ignoring the effect of the counterweights (Method 1). The other equation was derived from a dynamic equation for a barbell and counterweight system (Method 2). 9 female collegiate judo athletes performed bench throws using a Smith machine with a counterweight at 6 different loading conditions. Barbell displacement was recorded using a linear position transducer. The force and power were subsequently calculated by Methods 1 and 2. The results showed that the mean and peak power and force in Method 1 were significantly lower relative to those of Method 2 under all loading conditions. These results indicate that the mean and peak power and force during bench throwing using a Smith machine with counterweights would be underestimated when the calculations used to determine these parameters do not account for the effect of counterweights. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. Examining effective factors on human forces' productivity in bureau of naval operations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Younes Bahadori

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This research aims at examining effective factors on improvement of human forces' productivity and determining degree of influence and importance of each group among factors including workshop equipment and arrangement in organization, system of control and supervision on employees, degree of employees training, occupational value of employees and at last, administrating meritocracy system on improvement of human forces' productivity. Statistical population is composed of bureau of naval operations' employees in oil terminals' company in Khark, Iran. Statistical population has been 230, among which 135 people were determined as statistical sample size using Cochran formula. Survey instrument in this research has been questionnaire, according to which employees' ideas about effective factors on employees' productivity were evaluated. These questionnaires completed by people among statistical sample contain 16 close questions which were set up according to Likert 5-grade scale and were distributed as 135 numbers that after returning questionnaire, statistical analysis and data processing were accomplished. Analysis was performed in 2 descriptive and inferential statistics levels. Results of data analysis show that: A 5-fold factors under review “workshop equipment and arrangement of organization, system of control and supervision on employees, degree of employees training, occupational value of employees and administrating meritocracy related to human resources by management” have had effects on improvement of employees' productivity as average. B degree of employees training and then occupational value of employees and administrating meritocracy system have had the most influence, and workshop equipment and arrangement of organization and system of control and supervision on employees have had the least influence.

  16. Serotonergic mediation of the effects of fluoxetine, but not desipramine, in the rat forced swimming test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, M E; Detke, M J; Dalvi, A; Kirby, L G; Lucki, I

    1999-11-01

    The forced swimming test (FST) is a behavioral test in rodents that predicts the clinical efficacy of many types of antidepressant treatments. Recently, a behavior sampling technique was developed that scores individual response categories, including swimming, climbing and immobility. Although all antidepressant drugs reduce immobility in the FST, at least two distinct active behavioral patterns are produced by pharmacologically selective antidepressant drugs. Serotonin-selective reuptake inhibitors increase swimming behavior, while drugs acting primarily to increase extracellular levels of norepinephrine or dopamine increase climbing behavior. Distinct patterns of active behaviors in the FST may be mediated by distinct neurotransmitters, but this has not been shown directly. The present study examined the role of serotonin in mediating active behaviors in the forced swimming test after treatment with two antidepressant drugs, the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, fluoxetine and the selective norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, desipramine. Endogenous serotonin was depleted by administering para-cholorophenylalanine (PCPA, 150 mg/kg, IP.) to rats 72 h and 48 h prior to the swim test. Fluoxetine (10 mg/kg, SC) or desipramine (10 mg/kg, SC) was given three times over a 24-h period prior to the FST. Behavioral responses, including immobility, swimming and climbing, were counted during the 5-min test. Pretreatment with PCPA blocked fluoxetine-induced reduction in immobility and increase in swimming behavior during the FST. In contrast, PCPA pretreatment did not interfere with the ability of desipramine to reduce immobility and increase climbing behavior. Depletion of serotonin prevented the behavioral effects of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine in the rat FST. Furthermore, depletion of serotonin had no impact on the behavioral effects induced by the selective norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, desipramine. The effects of antidepressant drugs

  17. Effects of friction on forced two-dimensional Navier-Stokes turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackbourn, Luke A K; Tran, Chuong V

    2011-10-01

    Large-scale dissipation mechanisms have been routinely employed in numerical simulations of two-dimensional turbulence to absorb energy at large scales, presumably mimicking the quasisteady picture of Kraichnan in an unbounded fluid. Here, "side effects" of such a mechanism--mechanical friction--on the small-scale dynamics of forced two-dimensional Navier-Stokes turbulence are elaborated by both theoretical and numerical analysis. Given a positive friction coefficient α, viscous dissipation of enstrophy has been known to vanish in the inviscid limit ν→0. This effectively renders the scale-neutral friction the only mechanism responsible for enstrophy dissipation in that limit. The resulting dynamical picture is that the classical enstrophy inertial range becomes a dissipation range in which the dissipation of enstrophy by friction mainly occurs. For each α>0, there exists a critical viscosity ν(c), which depends on physical parameters, separating the regimes of predominant viscous and frictional dissipation of enstrophy. It is found that ν(c)=[η'(1/3)/(Ck(f)(2))]exp[-η'(1/3)/(Cα)], where η' is half the enstrophy injection rate, k(f) is the forcing wave number, and C is a nondimensional constant (the Kraichnan-Batchelor constant). The present results have important theoretical and practical implications. Apparently, mechanical friction is a poor choice in numerical attempts to address fundamental issues concerning the direct enstrophy transfer in two-dimensional Navier-Stokes turbulence. Furthermore, as relatively strong friction naturally occurs on the surfaces and at lateral boundaries of experimental fluids as well as at the interfaces of shallow layers in geophysical fluid models, the frictional effects discussed in this study are crucial in understanding the dynamics of these systems.

  18. Effect of Elastase-induced Emphysema on the Force-generating Ability of the Diaphragm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supinski, Gerald S.; Kelsen, Steven G.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of emphysema on the ability of the diaphragm to generate force was examined in costal diaphragm muscle strips from 10 Golden hamsters killed 18 mo after intratracheal injection of pancreatic elastase in a dose producing hyperinflation (mean total lung capacity [TLC] = 163% of control) and generalized panacinar emphysema. 13 saline-injected normal animals served as controls. The time course of isometric tension and the effect of alterations in muscle fiber and sarcomere length on the isometric tension (T) generated in response to tetanizing electrical stimuli (length-tension [L-T] relationship) were examined. Elastase administration caused an increase in diaphragm muscle thickness and reduction in the length of costal diaphragm muscle fibers measured in situ. Emphysema significantly increased the maximum tetanic tension as a result of hypertrophy. Maximal tension corrected for increases in muscle cross-sectional area (T/cm2), however, was the same in emphysematous (E) and control (C) animals. Emphysema also shifted the muscle fiber L-T curve of the diaphragm but not of a control muscle, the soleus, toward shorter lengths. In contrast to the effects of E on the diaphragm muscle fiber L-T curve, the sarcomere L-T curve was the same in E and C. Since the length at which tension was maximal correlated closely with sarcomere number (r = 0.94; P < 0.001) reduction in the number of sarcomeres in series in muscles from emphysematous animals appeared to explain the shift in the muscle fiber L-T curve. We conclude that in elastase-induced emphysema adaptive changes both in diaphragm cross-sectional area and sarcomere number augment the force-generating ability of the diaphragm. We speculate that changes in sarcomere number compensate for alterations in muscle fiber length resulting from chronic hyperinflation of the thorax, while diaphragmatic muscle hypertrophy represents a response to changes in respiratory load and/or diaphragm configuration (La

  19. Effect of magnetic field and radiative condensation on the Jeans instability of dusty plasma with polarization force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prajapati, R.P.

    2013-01-01

    The Jeans instability of self-gravitating dusty plasma with polarization force is investigated considering the effects of magnetic field, dust temperature and radiative condensation. The condition of Jeans instability and expression of critical Jeans wave number are obtained which depend upon polarization force and dust temperature but these are unaffected by the presence of magnetic field. The radiative heat-loss functions also modify the Jeans condition of instability and expression of critical Jeans wave number. It is observed that the polarization force and ratio of radiative heat-loss functions have destabilizing while magnetic field and dust temperature have stabilizing influence on the growth rate of Jeans instability.

  20. Analysis of PM Magnetization Field Effects on the Unbalanced Magnetic Forces due to Rotor Eccentricity in BLDC Motors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Mahdiuon-Rad

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates both static and dynamic eccentricities in single phase brushless DC (BLDC motors and analyzes the effect of the PM magnetization field on unbalanced magnetic forces acting on the rotor. Three common types of PM magnetization field patterns including radial, parallel and sinusoidal magnetizations are considered. In both static and dynamic eccentricities, harmonic components of the unbalanced magnetic forces on the rotor are extracted and analyzed. Based on simulation results, the magnetization fields that produce the lowest and highest unbalanced magnetic forces are determined in rotor eccentricity conditions.

  1. Effects from fully nonlinear irregular wave forcing on the fatigue life of an offshore wind turbine and its monopile foundation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schløer, Signe; Bredmose, Henrik; Bingham, Harry B.

    2013-01-01

    The effect from fully nonlinear irregular wave forcing on the fatigue life of the foundation and tower of an offshore wind turbine is investigated through aeroelastic calculations. Five representative sea states with increasing significant wave height are considered in a water depth of 40 m....... The waves are both linear and fully nonlinear irregular 2D waves. The wind turbine is the NREL 5-MW reference wind turbine. Fatigue analysis is performed in relation to analysis of the sectional forces in the tower and monopile. Impulsive excitation of the sectional force at the bottom of the tower is seen...

  2. Sex-dependent effects of fluoxetine and triiodothyronine in the forced swim test in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lifschytz, Tzuri; Shalom, Galit; Lerer, Bernard; Newman, Michael E

    2006-02-01

    The effects of triiodothyronine (T3) and fluoxetine, administered separately and combined, on behavior of male and female rats in the forced swim test, a procedure for screening antidepressant-like activity, were determined. There were no consistent effects of low doses of fluoxetine (5 mg/kg) or T3 (20 microg/kg), administered daily for 2 weeks. Fluoxetine administered daily at 10 mg/kg for 7 days reduced immobility and increased active behaviors in male rats, but had no effects in female rats. The effects of fluoxetine in male rats were not potentiated by T3. In female rats, T3 at 100 microg/kg given daily for 7 days decreased immobility and increased swimming when these were measured 72 h after the last injection, but not when measurements were performed at an earlier time point. These results provide some support from an animal model for the efficacy of T3 as antidepressant therapy in female patients, but do not provide support for the augmentation and acceleration effects seen clinically when T3 is used in conjunction with established antidepressants such as fluoxetine.

  3. Effects of single and combined gabapentin use in elevated plus maze and forced swimming tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilic, Fatma Sultan; Ismailoglu, Sule; Kaygisiz, Bilgin; Oner, Setenay

    2014-10-01

    Gabapentin, a third-generation antiepileptic drug, is a structural analogue of γ-aminobutyric acid, which is an important mediator of central nervous system. There is clinical data indicating its effectiveness in the treatment of psychiatric illnesses such as bipolar disorder and anxiety disorders. We aimed to investigate the antidepressant and anxiolytic-like effects and mechanisms of gabapentin in rats. Female Spraque-Dawley rats weighing 250±20 g were used. A total of 13 groups were formed, each containing 8 rats: gabapentin (5, 10, 20, 40 mg/kg), amitriptyline (10 mg/kg), sertraline (5 mg/kg), diazepam (5 mg/kg), ketamine (10 mg/kg), gabapentin 20 mg/kg was also combined with amitriptyline (10 mg/kg), sertraline (5 mg/kg), diazepam (5 mg/kg) and ketamine (10 mg/kg). All the drugs were used intraperitoneally as single dose. Saline was administered to the control group. Elevated plus maze and forced swimming tests were used as experimental models of anxiety and depression, respectively. It was observed that gabapentin showed an anxiolytic-like and antidepressant-like effect in all doses in rats. Its antidepressant effect was found to be the same as the antidepressant effects of amitriptyline and sertraline. There was no change in the antidepressant effect when gabapentin was combined with amitriptyline and ketamine, but there was an increase when combined with sertraline and diazepam. Gabapentin and amitriptyline showed similar anxiolytic effect, whereas ketamine and diazepam had more potent anxiolytic effect compared with them. These data suggest that gabapentin may possess antidepressant- and anxiolytic-like effects.

  4. Effects of the van der Waals Force on the Dynamics Performance for a Micro Resonant Pressure Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lizhong Xu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The micro resonant pressure sensor outputs the frequency signals where the distortion does not take place in a long distance transmission. As the dimensions of the sensor decrease, the effects of the van der Waals forces should be considered. Here, a coupled dynamic model of the micro resonant pressure sensor is proposed and its coupled dynamic equation is given in which the van der Waals force is considered. By the equation, the effects of the van der Waals force on the natural frequencies and vibration amplitudes of the micro resonant pressure sensor are investigated. Results show that the natural frequency and the vibrating amplitudes of the micro resonant pressure sensor are affected significantly by van der Waals force for a small clearance between the film and the base plate, a small initial tension stress of the film, and some other conditions.

  5. Skyrmions and nuclear forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Sakae

    1987-01-01

    It is shown that the Skyrme model underlied by the large-N c limit of the QCD has a qualitative success in describing the static properties of nucleon and the NN and the πN interactions. Despite this, no medium-range attraction in the central NN potential and no Yukawa πN interaction term are serious. I will talk about how they are. (orig.)

  6. Effects of task and age on the magnitude and structure of force fluctuations: insights into underlying neuro-behavioral processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieluf, Solveig; Temprado, Jean-Jacques; Berton, Eric; Jirsa, Viktor K; Sleimen-Malkoun, Rita

    2015-03-13

    The present study aimed at characterizing the effects of increasing (relative) force level and aging on isometric force control. To achieve this objective and to infer changes in the underlying control mechanisms, measures of information transmission, as well as magnitude and time-frequency structure of behavioral variability were applied to force-time-series. Older adults were found to be weaker, more variable, and less efficient than young participants. As a function of force level, efficiency followed an inverted-U shape in both groups, suggesting a similar organization of the force control system. The time-frequency structure of force output fluctuations was only significantly affected by task conditions. Specifically, a narrower spectral distribution with more long-range correlations and an inverted-U pattern of complexity changes were observed with increasing force level. Although not significant older participants displayed on average a less complex behavior for low and intermediate force levels. The changes in force signal's regularity presented a strong dependence on time-scales, which significantly interacted with age and condition. An inverted-U profile was only observed for the time-scale relevant to the sensorimotor control process. However, in both groups the peak was not aligned with the optimum of efficiency. Our results support the view that behavioral variability, in terms of magnitude and structure, has a functional meaning and affords non-invasive markers of the adaptations of the sensorimotor control system to various constraints. The measures of efficiency and variability ought to be considered as complementary since they convey specific information on the organization of control processes. The reported weak age effect on variability and complexity measures suggests that the behavioral expression of the loss of complexity hypothesis is not as straightforward as conventionally admitted. However, group differences did not completely vanish

  7. Effects of transcranial direct current stimulation on the control of finger force during dexterous manipulation in healthy older adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranav J Parikh

    Full Text Available The contribution of poor finger force control to age-related decline in manual dexterity is above and beyond ubiquitous behavioral slowing. Altered control of the finger forces can impart unwanted torque on the object affecting its orientation, thus impairing manual performance. Anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS over primary motor cortex (M1 has been shown to improve the performance speed on manual tasks in older adults. However, the effects of anodal tDCS over M1 on the finger force control during object manipulation in older adults remain to be fully explored. Here we determined the effects of anodal tDCS over M1 on the control of grip force in older adults while they manipulated an object with an uncertain mechanical property. Eight healthy older adults were instructed to grip and lift an object whose contact surfaces were unexpectedly made more or less slippery across trials using acetate and sandpaper surfaces, respectively. Subjects performed this task before and after receiving anodal or sham tDCS over M1 on two separate sessions using a cross-over design. We found that older adults used significantly lower grip force following anodal tDCS compared to sham tDCS. Friction measured at the finger-object interface remained invariant after anodal and sham tDCS. These findings suggest that anodal tDCS over M1 improved the control of grip force during object manipulation in healthy older adults. Although the cortical networks for representing objects and manipulative actions are complex, the reduction in grip force following anodal tDCS over M1 might be due to a cortical excitation yielding improved processing of object-specific sensory information and its integration with the motor commands for production of manipulative forces. Our findings indicate that tDCS has a potential to improve the control of finger force during dexterous manipulation in older adults.

  8. Effect of brief daily resistance training on rapid force development in painful neck and shoulder muscles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jay, Kenneth; Schraefel, Mc; Andersen, Christoffer H

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the effect of small daily amounts of progressive resistance training on rapid force development of painful neck/shoulder muscles. METHODS: 198 generally healthy adults with frequent neck/shoulder muscle pain (mean: age 43.1 years, computer use 93% of work time, 88% women......, duration of pain 186 day during the previous year) were randomly allocated to 2- or 12 min of daily progressive resistance training with elastic tubing or to a control group receiving weekly information on general health. A blinded assessor took measures at baseline and at 10-week follow-up; participants.......05) for both training groups. Maximal muscle strength increased only ~5-6% [mean and 95% confidence interval for 2- and 12-min groups to control, respectively: 2.5 Nm (0.05-0.73) and 2.2 Nm (0.01-0.70)]. No significant differences between the 2- and 12-min groups were evident. A weak but significant...

  9. The model evaluation of subsonic aircraft effect on the ozone and radiative forcing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rozanov, E; Zubov, V; Egorova, T; Ozolin, Y [Main Geophysical Observatory, St.Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    1998-12-31

    Two dimensional transient zonally averaged model was used for the evaluation of the effect of subsonic aircraft exhausts upon the ozone, trace gases and radiation in the troposphere and lower stratosphere. The mesoscale transformation of gas composition was included on the base of the box model simulations. It has been found that the transformation of the exhausted gases in sub-grid scale is able to influence the results of the modelling. The radiative forcing caused by gas, sulfate aerosol, soot and contrails changes was estimated as big as 0.12-0.15 W/m{sup 2} (0.08 W/m{sup 2} globally and annually averaged). (author) 10 refs.

  10. The model evaluation of subsonic aircraft effect on the ozone and radiative forcing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rozanov, E.; Zubov, V.; Egorova, T.; Ozolin, Y. [Main Geophysical Observatory, St.Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    1997-12-31

    Two dimensional transient zonally averaged model was used for the evaluation of the effect of subsonic aircraft exhausts upon the ozone, trace gases and radiation in the troposphere and lower stratosphere. The mesoscale transformation of gas composition was included on the base of the box model simulations. It has been found that the transformation of the exhausted gases in sub-grid scale is able to influence the results of the modelling. The radiative forcing caused by gas, sulfate aerosol, soot and contrails changes was estimated as big as 0.12-0.15 W/m{sup 2} (0.08 W/m{sup 2} globally and annually averaged). (author) 10 refs.

  11. A review of measurement-based assessments of the aerosol direct radiative effect and forcing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Yu

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Aerosols affect the Earth's energy budget directly by scattering and absorbing radiation and indirectly by acting as cloud condensation nuclei and, thereby, affecting cloud properties. However, large uncertainties exist in current estimates of aerosol forcing because of incomplete knowledge concerning the distribution and the physical and chemical properties of aerosols as well as aerosol-cloud interactions. In recent years, a great deal of effort has gone into improving measurements and datasets. It is thus feasible to shift the estimates of aerosol forcing from largely model-based to increasingly measurement-based. Our goal is to assess current observational capabilities and identify uncertainties in the aerosol direct forcing through comparisons of different methods with independent sources of uncertainties. Here we assess the aerosol optical depth (τ, direct radiative effect (DRE by natural and anthropogenic aerosols, and direct climate forcing (DCF by anthropogenic aerosols, focusing on satellite and ground-based measurements supplemented by global chemical transport model (CTM simulations. The multi-spectral MODIS measures global distributions of aerosol optical depth (τ on a daily scale, with a high accuracy of ±0.03±0.05τ over ocean. The annual average τ is about 0.14 over global ocean, of which about 21%±7% is contributed by human activities, as estimated by MODIS fine-mode fraction. The multi-angle MISR derives an annual average AOD of 0.23 over global land with an uncertainty of ~20% or ±0.05. These high-accuracy aerosol products and broadband flux measurements from CERES make it feasible to obtain observational constraints for the aerosol direct effect, especially over global the ocean. A number of measurement-based approaches estimate the clear-sky DRE (on solar radiation at the top-of-atmosphere (TOA to be about -5.5±0.2 Wm-2 (median ± standard error from various methods over the global ocean. Accounting for thin cirrus

  12. Resisting force characteristics of a mechanical snubber and its restraint effect on beam deformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohmata, Kenichiro

    1987-01-01

    A mechanical snubber is used to restrain piping systems in nuclear power plants during an earthquake. It has nonlinearities in both load (or exciting amplitude) and frequency response, so it will be very difficult to analyze the resisting force characteristics of the mechanical snubber theoretically. In this report, the equation of motion of the mechanical snubber is derived and digital simulations of snubber dynamic characteristics over a frequency range are carried out using the Continuous System Simulation Language (CSSL). Also, the restraint effect of the mechanical snubber applied to a simple beam is discussed both numerically and experimentally. The beam is replaced by a lumped mass system and CSSL is used to perform the digital simulations. (author)

  13. Temperature effects on drift of suspended single-domain particles induced by the Magnus force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denisov, S. I.; Lyutyy, T. V.; Reva, V. V.; Yermolenko, A. S.

    2018-03-01

    We study the temperature dependence of the drift velocity of single-domain ferromagnetic particles induced by the Magnus force in a dilute suspension. A set of stochastic equations describing the translational and rotational dynamics of particles is derived, and the particle drift velocity that depends on components of the average particle magnetization is introduced. The Fokker-Planck equation for the probability density of magnetization orientations is solved analytically in the limit of strong thermal fluctuations for both the planar rotor and general models. Using these solutions, we calculate the drift velocity and show that the out-of-plane fluctuations of magnetization, which are not accounted for in the planar rotor model, play an important role. In the general case of arbitrary fluctuations, we investigate the temperature dependence of the drift velocity by numerically simulating a set of effective stochastic differential equations for the magnetization dynamics.

  14. Effects of rolling on single-phase water forced convective heat transfer characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Yanming; Gao Puzhen; Huang Zhen

    2010-01-01

    A series of single-phase forced circulation tests in a vertical tube with rolling motion were performed in order to investigate effects of rolling motion on thermal-hydraulic characteristics. The amplitudes of the rolling motion in the tests were 10 degree, 15 degree and 20 degree. The rolling periods were 7.5 s, 10 s, 15 s and 20 s. The Reynolds number was from 6000 to 15000. Heat transfer in the test tube is bated by the rolling motion. As the test-bed rolling more acutely, the heat transfer coefficient of the test tube becomes smaller when the mass flow rate in the test tube is a constant. The heat transfer coefficient calculated by the formula which is for stable state doesn't fit very well with that from experiments. At last a formula for calculating heat transfer in rolling motion was introduced. (authors)

  15. Ground reaction forces and frictional demands during stair descent: effects of age and illumination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christina, Kathryn A; Cavanagh, Peter R

    2002-04-01

    Stair descent is an inherently risky and demanding task that older adults often encounter in everyday life. It is believed that slip between the foot or shoe sole and the stair surface may play a role in stair related falls, however, there are no reports on slip resistance requirements for stair descent. The aim of this study was to determine the required coefficient of friction (RCOF) necessary for safe stair descent in 12 young and 12 older adults, under varied illuminance conditions. The RCOF during stair descent was found to be comparable in magnitude and time to that for overground walking, and thus, with adequate footwear and dry stair surfaces, friction does not appear to be a major determinant of stair safety. Illuminance level had little effect on the dependent variables quantified in this study. However, the older participants demonstrated safer strategies than the young during stair descent, as reflected by differences in the ground reaction forces and lower RCOF.

  16. Effect of Coriolis forces in a rotating channel with dimples and protrusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elyyan, Mohammad A.; Tafti, Danesh K.

    2010-01-01

    Large-eddy simulations are used to investigate the effect of Coriolis forces and dimple depth on heat transfer and friction in a channel with dimples and protrusions on either side. Two geometries with two different dimple-protrusion depths, δ = 0.2 and 0.3 of channel height are investigated over a wide range of rotation numbers, Ro b = -0.77 to 1.10 based on mean velocity and channel height. It is found that the dimple side of the channel is much more sensitive to destabilizing rotational Coriolis forces than the protrusion side of the channel, although both dimples and protrusions react to the stabilizing effects of Coriolis forces on the leading side. The dimpled surface on the trailing side experiences a large increase in heat transfer coefficient from an augmentation ratio of 1.9 for stationary flow to 3.5 at Ro b = 0.77 for δ = 0.2, and from 2.3 to a maximum of 3.8 for δ = 0.3. Placing protrusion on the trailing side, however, only increases the augmentation ratio to between 3.25 and 3.7 from the stationary values of 3.0 and 3.4 for δ = 0.2 and 0.3, respectively. The dimpled leading side experiences a large drop in heat transfer to between augmentation ratios of 1.1 and 1.4 for the two dimple depths. The protrusion surface on the leading side also experiences a large drop in augmentation from 3.0 for a stationary channel to 1.3 at Ro b = 0.77 for δ = 0.2 and from 3.4 to 1.8 at Ro b = 1.1 for δ = 0.3. The results lead to the conclusion that for low rotation numbers |Ro b | b | > 0.2, dimples on the trailing side of the duct give better overall performance. Between the two depths, the deeper dimple/protrusion (δ = 0.3) gives higher heat transfer augmentation at the price of more frictional losses ranging from 6 to 10 versus 3 to 5 for depth δ = 0.2.

  17. Windsock memory COnditioned RAM (CO-RAM) pressure effect: Forced reconnection in the Earth's magnetotail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vörös, Z.; Facskó, G.; Khodachenko, M.; Honkonen, I.; Janhunen, P.; Palmroth, M.

    2014-08-01

    Magnetic reconnection (MR) is a key physical concept explaining the addition of magnetic flux to the magnetotail and closed flux lines back-motion to the dayside magnetosphere. This scenario elaborated by Dungey (1963) can explain many aspects of solar wind-magnetosphere interaction processes, including substorms. However, neither the Dungey model nor its numerous modifications were able to explain fully the onset conditions for MR in the tail. In this paper, we introduce new onset conditions for forced MR in the tail. We call our scenario the "windsock memory conditioned ram pressure effect." Our nonflux transfer-associated forcing is introduced by a combination of the large-scale windsock motions exhibiting memory effects and solar wind dynamic pressure actions on the nightside magnetopause during northward oriented interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). Using global MHD Grand Unified Magnetosphere Ionosphere Coupling Simulation version 4 simulation results, upstream data from Wind, magnetosheath data from Cluster 1 and distant tail data from the two-probe Acceleration, Reconnection, Turbulence and Electrodynamics of the Moon's Interaction with the Sun mission, we show that the simultaneous occurrence of vertical windsock motions of the magnetotail and enhanced solar wind dynamic pressure introduces strong nightside disturbances, including enhanced electric fields and persistent vertical cross-tail shear flows. These perturbations, associated with a stream interaction region in the solar wind, drive MR in the tail during episodes of northward oriented interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). We detect MR indirectly, observing plasmoids in the tail and ground-based signatures of earthward moving fast flows. We also consider the application to solar system planets and close-in exoplanets, where the proposed scenario can elucidate some new aspects of solar/stellar wind-magnetosphere interactions.

  18. The effect of cluster loading on force, velocity, and power during ballistic jump squat training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Keir T; Cronin, John B; Newton, Michael J

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of set structure, in terms of repetition work:rest ratios on force, velocity, and power during jump squat training. Twenty professional and semiprofessional rugby players performed training sessions comprising four sets of 6 repetitions of a jump squat using four different set configurations. The first involved a traditional configuration (TR) of 4 × 6 repetitions with 3 min of rest between sets, the second (C1) 4 × 6 × singles (1 repetition) with 12 s of rest between repetitions, the third (C2) 4 × 3 × doubles (2 repetitions) with 30 s of rest between pairs, and the third (C3) 4 × 2 × triples (3 repetitions) with 60 s of rest between triples. A spreadsheet for the analysis of controlled trials that calculated the P-value, and percent difference and Cohen's effect size from log-transformed data was used to investigate differences in repetition force, velocity, and power profiles among configurations. Peak power was significantly lower (P < .05) for the TR condition when compared with C1 and C3 for repetition 4, and all cluster configurations for repetitions 5 and 6. Peak velocity was significantly lower (P < .05) for the TR condition compared with C3 at repetition 4, significantly lower compared with C2 and C3 at repetition 5, and significantly lower compared with all cluster conditions for repetition 6. Providing inter-repetition rest during a traditional set of six repetitions can attenuate decreases in power and velocity of movement through the set.

  19. Urban IDPs and Poverty: Analysis of the Effect of Mass Forced Displacement on Urban Poverty in Bosnia and Herzegovina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nermin Oruc

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the effect of mass forced displacement on urban poverty in Bosnia and Herzegovina. The process of displacement in Bosnia and Herzegovina involved “forced evictions”, implying no choice in displacement decision, meaning that this type of rural-urban migration was not a rational decision driven by economic motives. Consequently, this can possibly lead to a larger incidence of poverty among displaced people. The paper starts with a discussion of the specific features of the process of forced displacement and their possibly different effect on urban poverty compared to voluntary migration, based on qualitative evidence collected through interviews with people who experienced forced displacement during the conflict in the 1990s. Then, the probit model of determinants of poverty, based on the Living Standards Measurement Survey data, was estimated in order to provide empirical evidence of the effect of mass forced displacement on urban poverty, as well as the difference in the poverty incidence among displaced people compared to voluntary migrants. The results suggest that consumption is significantly lower among displaced households, while incidence of poverty is not affected by displacement status. The evidence also contributes to the migration literature by providing specific results about the relationship between mass forced displacement and urban poverty.

  20. Effect of electron correlation on the forced electric dipole transition probabilities in fsup(N) systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jankowski, K.; Smentek-Mielczarek, L.

    1981-01-01

    Results of model studies of the impact of electron correlation on the forced electric dipole transition probabilities between states of the 4fsup(N) configuration are reported for the [ 3 P] 0 - [ 3 F] 4 , [ 3 H] 4 transitions in Pr 3+ : LaCl 3 and for [ 7 F] 0 - [ 5 D] 2 , [ 7 F] 1 - [ 5 D] 1 hypersensitive transitions in Eu 3+ : LaCl 3 . For the former system the correlation effects cause a modification of earlier results by 40-95 per cent, whereas for the latter the probability changes by as much as two orders of magnitude. The great changes found in the case of hypersensitive transitions suggest that electron correlation effects may belong to the most important factors determining the nature of these transitions. Several types of effective correlation operators are considered and their relative importance is discussed. The results indicate that intermediate configurations including g orbitals are very important for the description of correlation effects. (author)

  1. Evidences for the agmatine involvement in antidepressant like effect of bupropion in mouse forced swim test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotagale, Nandkishor R; Tripathi, Sunil J; Aglawe, Manish M; Chopde, Chandrabhan T; Umekar, Milind J; Taksande, Brijesh G

    2013-06-01

    Although bupropion has been widely used in the treatment of depression, the precise mechanism of its therapeutic actions is not fully understood. The present study investigated the role of agmatine in an antidepressant like effect of bupropion in mouse forced swim test. The antidepressant like effect of bupropion was potentiated by pretreatment with agmatine (10-20mg/kg, ip) and by the drugs known to increase endogenous agmatine levels in brain viz., l-arginine (40 μg/mouse, icv), an agmatine biosynthetic precursor, ornithine decarboxylase inhibitor, dl-α-difluoromethyl ornithine hydrochloride, DFMO (12.5 μg/mouse, icv), diamine oxidase inhibitor, aminoguanidine (6.5 μg/mouse, icv) and agmatinase inhibitor, arcaine (50 μg/mouse, icv) as well as imidazoline I1 receptor agonists, moxonidine (0.25mg/kg, ip) and clonidine (0.015 mg/kg, ip) and imidazoline I2 receptor agonist, 2-(2-benzofuranyl)-2-imidazoline hydrochloride, 2-BFI (5mg/kg, ip). Conversely, prior administration of I1 receptor antagonist, efaroxan (1mg/kg, ip) and I2 receptor antagonist, idazoxan (0.25mg/kg, ip) blocked the antidepressant like effect of bupropion and its synergistic combination with agmatine. These results demonstrate involvement of agmatine in the antidepressant like effect of bupropion and suggest agmatine and imidazoline receptors as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of depressive disorders. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Orally administered whole egg demonstrates antidepressant-like effects in the forced swimming test on rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagasawa, Mao; Otsuka, Tsuyoshi; Ogino, Yumi; Yoshida, Junki; Tomonaga, Shozo; Yasuo, Shinobu; Furuse, Mitsuhiro

    2014-08-01

    Several studies have reported that vegetarian diets are associated with a higher prevalence of major depression. Therefore, we hypothesised that the consumption of animal products, especially eggs, may have positive effects on mental health, especially on major depression, because a previous study reported that egg consumption produces numerous beneficial effects in humans. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effects of chronic whole-egg treatment on depression-like behaviours in Wistar rats, a control strain, and Wistar Kyoto rats, an animal model of depression. In both the rats, either whole-egg solution (5 ml/kg) or distilled water (5 ml/kg) was orally administrated for 35 days. During these periods, the open-field test (OFT) was conducted on the 21st day, and a forced swimming test (FST) was enforced on the 27th and 28th days. On the 36th day, the plasma and brain were collected. Chronic whole-egg treatment did not affect line crossing in the OFT, whereas it reduced the total duration of immobility in the FST on both strains. Furthermore, interestingly, the results indicated the possibility that whole-egg treatment elevated the incorporation of tryptophan into the brain, and the tryptophan concentration in the prefrontal cortex was actually increased by the treatment. This study demonstrated that whole-egg treatment exerts an antidepressant-like effect in the FST. It is suggested that whole egg may be an excellent food for preventing and alleviating the conditions of major depression.

  3. Influence of retardation effects on photodisintegration of a quantum system bound by short-range forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preobrazhenskii, M.A.; Golovinskii, P.A.

    1996-01-01

    Expressions for cross sections for multiphonon disintegration of quantum systems bound by short-range forces are obtained in the plane-wave approximation taking into account retardation effects. It is shown that, in the region of nonrelativistic energies, their contribution is factored, and the resulting universal factor is expressed for an arbitrary degree of process nonlinearity n in terms of elementary functions. Arguments of functions are determined only by the mode ω, the radiation spectrum width β, and the bound-state energy of a system. The dependence of the contribution of retardation effects on ω, β, and n is studied in detail. Analytical expressions for cross sections for multiquantum disintegration in the first nonvanishing order with respect to correlation interaction, which exactly take into account retardation effects, are obtained. It is shown that for two-quantum processes, the contribution of correlation effects is expressed in terms of a function representing an extension of dipole polarizability, whereas for n>2, it can be described in the dipole approximation

  4. Skyrmions, dense matter and nuclear forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pethick, C.J.

    1984-12-01

    A simple introduction to a number of properties of Skyrme's chiral soliton model of baryons is given. Some implications of the model for dense matter and for nuclear interactions are discussed. (orig.)

  5. The effect of female labour force in economic growth and sustainability in transition economies - case study for SEE countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majlinda Mazalliu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In this research paper, the main theoretical arguments for discussions are as following: female labour force participation in transition countries, female employment in economic sectors and their main barriers, and the contributions of female labour force in economic growth. In methodology, the secondary data are used, and they are calculated through STATA program. The main analysis include: descriptive statistic, regression analysis and correlation matrix. Based on empirical results, the regression analysis has found that economic growth and government effectiveness has a negative impact on female labour force. Financial market development, enterprises reforms, and innovation have a positive impact on female labour force in SEE (South Eastern European countries. In T-statistic analysis all independent variables have shown a negative significance (T <2 on female labour force. In correlation, economic growth and financial development market have negative correlation on female labour force, but other variables have shown positive correlation. SEE countries should develop the female labour force in their economies, so their role may be crucial toward different economic problems and challenges in the modern economy.

  6. Effect of wire size on maxillary arch force/couple systems for a simulated high canine malocclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Major, Paul W; Toogood, Roger W; Badawi, Hisham M; Carey, Jason P; Seru, Surbhi

    2014-12-01

    To better understand the effects of copper nickel titanium (CuNiTi) archwire size on bracket-archwire mechanics through the analysis of force/couple distributions along the maxillary arch. The hypothesis is that wire size is linearly related to the forces and moments produced along the arch. An Orthodontic Simulator was utilized to study a simplified high canine malocclusion. Force/couple distributions produced by passive and elastic ligation using two wire sizes (Damon 0.014 and 0.018 inch) measured with a sample size of 144. The distribution and variation in force/couple loading around the arch is a complicated function of wire size. The use of a thicker wire increases the force/couple magnitudes regardless of ligation method. Owing to the non-linear material behaviour of CuNiTi, this increase is less than would occur based on linear theory as would apply for stainless steel wires. The results demonstrate that an increase in wire size does not result in a proportional increase of applied force/moment. This discrepancy is explained in terms of the non-linear properties of CuNiTi wires. This non-proportional force response in relation to increased wire size warrants careful consideration when selecting wires in a clinical setting. © 2014 British Orthodontic Society.

  7. Investigation of the Effect of Internal Mold Release Agent and Filler on the Pulling Force in Pultrusion Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Esfandeh

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Pulling force is one of the most important variables in pultrusion process which determines the capacity of the pultrusion machine. One of the characteristics of a desired pultrusion process is a low pulling force and a high line speed.Among the important factors affecting the pulling force are the internal mold release agent (IMR and the content and particle size of the filler in resin formulation. In addition to facilitating the part separation from the die, IMR also affects the curing kinetics and in turn the pulling force. In this research, a commercial IMR has been used in a range 1-5 phr. DSC and DMTAAnalyses showed that the presence of IMR in concentrations above 3 phr reduces the heat of curing reaction and also the curing rate. This results in an increase in pulling force. Study of filler effect showed that the increase in filler content from 4 to 8 phr reduces the pulling force but beyond that it is increased. Also, decreasing the filler particle size in line speed lower than 30 cm/min reduces the pulling force but increases it at higher line speed.

  8. Effects of lorentz force on flow fields of free burning arc and wall stabilized non-transferred arc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Yi; Huang Heji; Pan Wenxia

    2013-01-01

    The flow fields of two typical DC plasma arcs, namely the transferred free burning arc and the non-transferred arc were simulated by solving hydrodynamic equations and electromagnetic equations. The effects of the Lorentz force on the characteristics of the flow fields of these two typical DC plasma arcs were estimated. Results show that in the case of the free burning arc, the Lorentz force due to the current self-induced magnetic field has significant impact on the flow fields, as the self-induced magnetic compression is the main arc constraint mechanism. However, in the case of the non-transferred arc generated in a torch with long and narrow inter-electrode inserts and an abruptly expanded anode, the Lorentz force has limited impact on the flow fields of the plasma especially at the downstream of the inter-electrode inserts, compared with the strong wall constraints and relatively high aerodynamic force. This is because the ratio of the electromagnetic force to the aerodynamic force is only about 0.01 in this region. When the main consideration is outlet parameters of the wall stabilized non-transferred DC arc plasma generator, in order to improve the efficiency of the numerical simulation program, the Lorentz force could be neglected in the non-transferred arc in some cases. (authors)

  9. Analysis of Three-Nucleon Forces Effects in the A = 3 System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kievsky, A.

    2011-01-01

    Using modern nucleon-nucleon interactions in the description of the A = 3, 4 nuclear systems the χ 2 per datum results to be much bigger than one. In particular it is not possible to reproduce the three- and four-nucleon binding energies and the n .d scattering length simultaneously. This is one manifestation of the necessity of including a three-nucleon force in the nuclear Hamiltonian. In this paper we perform an analysis of some, widely used, three-nucleon force models.We analyze their capability to describe the aforementioned quantities and, to improve their description, we propose modifications in the parametrization of the models. The effects of these new parametrizations are studied in some polarization observables at low energies. Due to the fact that some of the widely used TNF models do not reproduce simultaneously the triton and 4 He binding energies and the n -d doublet scattering length, possible modifications of their parametrizations have been analyzed. To this end we have used the AV18 as the reference NN interaction and we have analyze possible modifications of the URIX model. We have modified the regularization of the profile functions Y (r ) and T (r ) at the origin and we have introduced the Z 0 (r ) function in the central repulsive E-term. We have used one-parameter functions that have been chosen to match the short-range behavior of the corresponding functions in the N2LOL model. Furthermore the strengths of the b-, d-terms and E-terms have been fixed to reproduce the triton binding energy and 2 a nd . Then the predictions for some selected scattering observables in p - d scattering at 3 MeV have been compared to the results of the original model and the experimental data. We can observe that the description using the new parametrizations has the same quality of the original model. However, with the proposed parametrizations, the AV18+URIX model describes correctly B( 3 H) and 2 a nd . This analysis can be consider as a preliminary step in a

  10. Intermuscular interaction via myofascial force transmission: Effects of tibialis anterior and extensor digitorum longus length on force transmission from rat extensor digitorum longus muscle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, Huub; Baan, Guus C.; Huijing, P.A.J.B.M.

    2001-01-01

    Force transmission in rat anterior crural compartment, containing tibialis anterior (TA), extensor hallucis longus (EHL) and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles, was investigated. These muscles together with the muscles of the peroneal compartment were excited maximally. Force was measured at

  11. Postnatal cocaine exposure: effects on behavior of rats in forced swim test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães, Ana; Tavares, Maria Amélia; de Sousa, Liliana

    2002-06-01

    Exposure to cocaine in early periods of postnatal life has adverse effects on behavior, namely, it induces the display of anxiety and fear-like behaviors that are associated with stress and depression. This study examined the effects of early developmental cocaine exposure in several categories of behavior observed in forced swim test. Male and female Wistar rats were given 15 mg/kg of cocaine hydrochloride/body weight/day, subcutaneously, in two daily doses, from postnatal day (PND) 1 to PND27. Controls were saline injected in the same protocol. In PND26-PND27, rats were placed in a swimming pool during 5 min in two sessions. The categories of behavior studied in this work included horizontal and vertical rotation, vibrissae clean, head clean, fast and slow swim, struggling, floating, sliding, diving, head-diving, and wagging head. Results showed differences in the frequencies of several behavioral categories that allowed the discrimination of the behaviors that may constitute "behavioral despair" indicators, as well as which behaviors are most affected by cocaine exposure. Cocaine groups were less active and more immobile than controls. These results suggest that postnatal exposure to cocaine can produce depression-like effects and affect the ability of these animals to cope with stress situations.

  12. Antidepressant-like effects of Tagetes lucida Cav. in the forced swimming test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guadarrama-Cruz, G; Alarcon-Aguilar, F J; Lezama-Velasco, R; Vazquez-Palacios, G; Bonilla-Jaime, H

    2008-11-20

    Tagetes lucida (Asteraceae), has been referred in Mexican traditional medicine for the treatment of different central nervous system (CNS) diseases, mainly depression. Nevertheless, the available scientific information about this species is scarce and there are no reports related to its possible effect on the CNS. In this work, the antidepressant-like effect of extract of Tagetes lucida was evaluated in rats, as well as its potential adverse effects on male sexual behavior (MSB). Antidepressant activity was studied using forced swimming test (FST), motor activity in the open-field test and on MSB in sexually experienced male. The aqueous extract of Tagetes lucida in doses of 5, 10, 50, 100 and 200mg/(kgday)(-1) were administered orally for 14 consecutive days and evaluated on day 14, 2h after the last dose treatment. Fluoxetine (10mg/(kgday)(-1), p.o.) was used as the control positive. The aqueous extract (10, 50, 100mg/(kgday)(-1)) significantly reduced immobility and increased swimming without affecting climbing behavior in the FST. These same doses were not able to modify neither the motor activity nor the MSB. These data indicate that the extract of Tagetes lucida possesses antidepressant-like properties in rats.

  13. Effects of kinesthetic and cutaneous stimulation during the learning of a viscous force field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosati, Giulio; Oscari, Fabio; Pacchierotti, Claudio; Prattichizzo, Domenico

    2014-01-01

    Haptic stimulation can help humans learn perceptual motor skills, but the precise way in which it influences the learning process has not yet been clarified. This study investigates the role of the kinesthetic and cutaneous components of haptic feedback during the learning of a viscous curl field, taking also into account the influence of visual feedback. We present the results of an experiment in which 17 subjects were asked to make reaching movements while grasping a joystick and wearing a pair of cutaneous devices. Each device was able to provide cutaneous contact forces through a moving platform. The subjects received visual feedback about joystick's position. During the experiment, the system delivered a perturbation through (1) full haptic stimulation, (2) kinesthetic stimulation alone, (3) cutaneous stimulation alone, (4) altered visual feedback, or (5) altered visual feedback plus cutaneous stimulation. Conditions 1, 2, and 3 were also tested with the cancellation of the visual feedback of position error. Results indicate that kinesthetic stimuli played a primary role during motor adaptation to the viscous field, which is a fundamental premise to motor learning and rehabilitation. On the other hand, cutaneous stimulation alone appeared not to bring significant direct or adaptation effects, although it helped in reducing direct effects when used in addition to kinesthetic stimulation. The experimental conditions with visual cancellation of position error showed slower adaptation rates, indicating that visual feedback actively contributes to the formation of internal models. However, modest learning effects were detected when the visual information was used to render the viscous field.

  14. The Strengthening of the Colombian Air Force: An Effective Strategy on the Road to Negotiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janiel Melamed Visbal

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses how the strengthening of the Colombian Air Force since the beginning of the new millennium, resulted in the military weakening of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC-EP. These circumstances, along with the overall strengthening of the national security forces allowed to develop the proper conditions to initiate a set of peace talks between the most remarkable insurgent organization and the Colombian State, in very different conditions from previous experiences.

  15. Adsorbing polymers subject to an elongational force: the effect of pulling direction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orlandini, E [Dipartimento di Fisica, CNISM, Universita di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova (Italy); Whittington, S G, E-mail: enzo.orlandini@pd.infn.i [Department of Chemistry, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada)

    2010-12-03

    We investigate partially directed walk models of polymers adsorbed at a surface under the influence of an applied force. The force can be applied at various angles (from perpendicular to parallel to the surface) and the critical force-temperature curves are strongly angle-dependent. We observe some interesting differences between the two- and three-dimensional cases associated with the degeneracy of the ground state in three dimensions.

  16. Modelled radiative forcing of the direct aerosol effect with multi-observation evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Myhre

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available A high-resolution global aerosol model (Oslo CTM2 driven by meteorological data and allowing a comparison with a variety of aerosol observations is used to simulate radiative forcing (RF of the direct aerosol effect. The model simulates all main aerosol components, including several secondary components such as nitrate and secondary organic carbon. The model reproduces the main chemical composition and size features observed during large aerosol campaigns. Although the chemical composition compares best with ground-based measurement over land for modelled sulphate, no systematic differences are found for other compounds. The modelled aerosol optical depth (AOD is compared to remote sensed data from AERONET ground and MODIS and MISR satellite retrievals. To gain confidence in the aerosol modelling, we have tested its ability to reproduce daily variability in the aerosol content, and this is performing well in many regions; however, we also identified some locations where model improvements are needed. The annual mean regional pattern of AOD from the aerosol model is broadly similar to the AERONET and the satellite retrievals (mostly within 10–20%. We notice a significant improvement from MODIS Collection 4 to Collection 5 compared to AERONET data. Satellite derived estimates of aerosol radiative effect over ocean for clear sky conditions differs significantly on regional scales (almost up to a factor two, but also in the global mean. The Oslo CTM2 has an aerosol radiative effect close to the mean of the satellite derived estimates. We derive a radiative forcing (RF of the direct aerosol effect of −0.35 Wm−2 in our base case. Implementation of a simple approach to consider internal black carbon (BC mixture results in a total RF of −0.28 Wm−2. Our results highlight the importance of carbonaceous particles, producing stronger individual RF than considered in the recent IPCC estimate; however, net RF is less different

  17. Finite element analysis of the effect of force directions on tooth movement in extraction space closure with miniscrew sliding mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Yukio; Kawamura, Jun; Fukui, Hisao

    2012-10-01

    Miniscrews placed in bone have been used as orthodontic anchorage in extraction space closure with sliding mechanics. The movement patterns of the teeth depend on the force directions. To move the teeth in a desired pattern, the appropriate direction of force must be selected. The purpose of this article is to clarify the relationship between force directions and movement patterns. By using the finite element method, orthodontic movements were simulated based on the remodeling law of the alveolar bone. The power arm length and the miniscrew position were varied to change the force directions. When the power arm was lengthened, rotation of the entire maxillary dentition decreased. The posterior teeth were effective for preventing rotation of the anterior teeth through an archwire. In cases of a high position of a miniscrew, bodily tooth movement was almost achieved. The vertical component of the force produced intrusion or extrusion of the entire dentition. Within the limits of the method, the mechanical simulations demonstrated the effect of force direction on movement patterns. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Exploring the effects of dimensionality reduction in deep networks for force estimation in robotic-assisted surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aviles, Angelica I.; Alsaleh, Samar; Sobrevilla, Pilar; Casals, Alicia

    2016-03-01

    Robotic-Assisted Surgery approach overcomes the limitations of the traditional laparoscopic and open surgeries. However, one of its major limitations is the lack of force feedback. Since there is no direct interaction between the surgeon and the tissue, there is no way of knowing how much force the surgeon is applying which can result in irreversible injuries. The use of force sensors is not practical since they impose different constraints. Thus, we make use of a neuro-visual approach to estimate the applied forces, in which the 3D shape recovery together with the geometry of motion are used as input to a deep network based on LSTM-RNN architecture. When deep networks are used in real time, pre-processing of data is a key factor to reduce complexity and improve the network performance. A common pre-processing step is dimensionality reduction which attempts to eliminate redundant and insignificant information by selecting a subset of relevant features to use in model construction. In this work, we show the effects of dimensionality reduction in a real-time application: estimating the applied force in Robotic-Assisted Surgeries. According to the results, we demonstrated positive effects of doing dimensionality reduction on deep networks including: faster training, improved network performance, and overfitting prevention. We also show a significant accuracy improvement, ranging from about 33% to 86%, over existing approaches related to force estimation.

  19. The effects of cutting parameters on cutting forces and heat generation when drilling animal bone and biomechanical test materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cseke, Akos; Heinemann, Robert

    2018-01-01

    The research presented in this paper investigated the effects of spindle speed and feed rate on the resultant cutting forces (thrust force and torque) and temperatures while drilling SawBones ® biomechanical test materials and cadaveric cortical bone (bovine and porcine femur) specimens. It also investigated cortical bone anisotropy on the cutting forces, when drilling in axial and radial directions. The cutting forces are only affected by the feed rate, whereas the cutting temperature in contrast is affected by both spindle speed and feed rate. The temperature distribution indicates friction as the primary heat source, which is caused by the rubbing of the tool margins and the already cut chips over the borehole wall. Cutting forces were considerably higher when drilling animal cortical bone, in comparison to cortical test material. Drilling direction, and therewith anisotropy, appears to have a negligible effect on the cutting forces. The results suggest that this can be attributed to the osteons being cut at an angle rather than in purely axial or radial direction, as a result of a twist drill's point angle. Copyright © 2017 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Tip Effect of the Tapping Mode of Atomic Force Microscope in Viscous Fluid Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Hua-Ju; Shih, Po-Jen

    2015-07-28

    Atomic force microscope with applicable types of operation in a liquid environment is widely used to scan the contours of biological specimens. The contact mode of operation allows a tip to touch a specimen directly but sometimes it damages the specimen; thus, a tapping mode of operation may replace the contact mode. The tapping mode triggers the cantilever of the microscope approximately at resonance frequencies, and so the tip periodically knocks the specimen. It is well known that the cantilever induces extra liquid pressure that leads to drift in the resonance frequency. Studies have noted that the heights of protein surfaces measured via the tapping mode of an atomic force microscope are ~25% smaller than those measured by other methods. This discrepancy may be attributable to the induced superficial hydrodynamic pressure, which is worth investigating. In this paper, we introduce a semi-analytical method to analyze the pressure distribution of various tip geometries. According to our analysis, the maximum hydrodynamic pressure on the specimen caused by a cone-shaped tip is ~0.5 Pa, which can, for example, pre-deform a cell by several nanometers in compression before the tip taps it. Moreover, the pressure calculated on the surface of the specimen is 20 times larger than the pressure without considering the tip effect; these results have not been motioned in other papers. Dominating factors, such as surface heights of protein surface, mechanical stiffness of protein increasing with loading velocity, and radius of tip affecting the local pressure of specimen, are also addressed in this study.

  1. Effect of ultrasound and centrifugal force on carambola (Averrhoa carambola L.) slices during osmotic dehydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barman, Nirmali; Badwaik, Laxmikant S

    2017-01-01

    Osmotic dehydration (OD) of carambola slices were carried out using glucose, sucrose, fructose and glycerol as osmotic agents with 70°Bx solute concentration, 50°C of temperature and for time of 180min. Glycerol and sucrose were selected on the basis of their higher water loss, weight reduction and lowers solid gain. Further the optimization of OD of carambola slices (5mm thick) were carried out under different process conditions of temperature (40-60°C), concentration of sucrose and glycerol (50-70°Bx), time (180min) and fruit to solution ratio (1:10) against various responses viz. water loss, solid gain, texture, rehydration ratio and sensory score according to a composite design. The optimized value for temperature, concentration of sucrose and glycerol has been found to be 50°C, 66°Bx and 66°Bx respectively. Under optimized conditions the effect of ultrasound for 10, 20, 30min and centrifugal force (2800rpm) for 15, 30, 45 and 60min on OD of carambola slices were checked. The controlled samples showed 68.14% water loss and 13.05% solid gain in carambola slices. While, the sample having 30min ultrasonic treatment showed 73.76% water loss and 9.79% solid gain; and the sample treated with centrifugal force for 60min showed 75.65% water loss and 6.76% solid gain. The results showed that with increasing in treatment time the water loss, rehydration ratio were increased and solid gain, texture were decreased. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Effect of a powered drive on pushing and pulling forces when transporting bariatric hospital beds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggermann, Neal

    2017-01-01

    Powered drives designed to assist with moving hospital beds are commercially available but no studies have evaluated whether they reduce the push and pull forces likely contributing to injury in caregivers. This study measured hand forces of 10 caregivers maneuvering a manual and powered bariatric bed through simulated hospital environments (hallway, elevator, and ramp). Peak push and pull forces exceeded previously established psychophysical limits for all activities with the manual bed. For the powered bed, peak forces were significantly (p pushing did not differ between beds. Powered drive may reduce the risk of injury or the number of caregivers needed for transport. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Cart pushing: the effect of magnitude and direction of push force, and of trunk inclination on low back loading

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoozemans, M.J.M.; Faber, G.S.; Slaghuis, W.; van Dieen, J.H.

    2007-01-01

    The primary objective of the present study was to quantify the relative effect of the magnitude and direction of the exerted push force and of trunk inclination on the mechanical load at the low back using a regression analysis for correlated data. In addition, we explored the effects of handle

  4. Effect of SP-C on surface potential distribution in pulmonary surfactant: Atomic force microscopy and Kelvin probe force microscopy study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hane, Francis; Moores, Brad; Amrein, Matthias; Leonenko, Zoya

    2009-01-01

    The air-lung interface is covered by a molecular film of pulmonary surfactant (PS). The major function of the film is to reduce the surface tension of the lung's air-liquid interface, providing stability to the alveolar structure and reducing the work of breathing. Earlier we have shown that function of bovine lipid extract surfactant (BLES) is related to the specific molecular architecture of surfactant films. Defined molecular arrangement of the lipids and proteins of the surfactant film also give rise to a local highly variable electrical surface potential of the interface. In this work we investigated a simple model of artificial lung surfactant consisting of DPPC, eggPG, and surfactant protein C (SP-C). Effects of surface compression and the presence of SP-C on the monolayer structure and surface potential distribution were investigated using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM). We show that topography and locally variable surface potential of DPPC-eggPG lipid mixture are similar to those of pulmonary surfactant BLES in the presence of SP-C and differ in surface potential when SP-C is absent.

  5. Modelling the effects of the radiation reaction force on the interaction of thin foils with ultra-intense laser fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duff, M. J.; Capdessus, R.; Del Sorbo, D.; Ridgers, C. P.; King, M.; McKenna, P.

    2018-06-01

    The effects of the radiation reaction (RR) force on thin foils undergoing radiation pressure acceleration (RPA) are investigated. Using QED-particle-in-cell simulations, the influence of the RR force on the collective electron dynamics within the target can be examined. The magnitude of the RR force is found to be strongly dependent on the target thickness, leading to effects which can be observed on a macroscopic scale, such as changes to the distribution of the emitted radiation and the target dynamics. This suggests that such parameters may be controlled in experiments at multi-PW laser facilities. In addition, the effects of the RR force are characterized in terms of an average radiation emission angle. We present an analytical model which, for the first time, describes the effect of the RR force on the collective electron dynamics within the ‘light-sail’ regime of RPA. The predictions of this model can be tested in future experiments with ultra-high intensity lasers interacting with solid targets.

  6. Effects of Anodal Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation on Visually Guided Learning of Grip Force Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamas Minarik

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Anodal transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS has been shown to be an effective non-invasive brain stimulation method for improving cognitive and motor functioning in patients with neurological deficits. tDCS over motor cortex (M1, for instance, facilitates motor learning in stroke patients. However, the literature on anodal tDCS effects on motor learning in healthy participants is inconclusive, and the effects of tDCS on visuo-motor integration are not well understood. In the present study we examined whether tDCS over the contralateral motor cortex enhances learning of grip-force output in a visually guided feedback task in young and neurologically healthy volunteers. Twenty minutes of 1 mA anodal tDCS were applied over the primary motor cortex (M1 contralateral to the dominant (right hand, during the first half of a 40 min power-grip task. This task required the control of a visual signal by modulating the strength of the power-grip for six seconds per trial. Each participant completed a two-session sham-controlled crossover protocol. The stimulation conditions were counterbalanced across participants and the sessions were one week apart. Performance measures comprised time-on-target and target-deviation, and were calculated for the periods of stimulation (or sham and during the afterphase respectively. Statistical analyses revealed significant performance improvements over the stimulation and the afterphase, but this learning effect was not modulated by tDCS condition. This suggests that the form of visuomotor learning taking place in the present task was not sensitive to neurostimulation. These null effects, together with similar reports for other types of motor tasks, lead to the proposition that tDCS facilitation of motor learning might be restricted to cases or situations where the motor system is challenged, such as motor deficits, advanced age, or very high task demand.

  7. Atomic force microscopy study of the antibacterial effects of chitosans on Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eaton, Peter [REQUIMTE, Departamento de Quimica, Faculdade de Ciencias da Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal)], E-mail: peter.eaton@fc.up.pt; Fernandes, Joao C. [Departamento de Quimica, Faculdade de Ciencias da Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Escola Superior de Biotecnologia, Universidade Catolica Portuguesa, Rua Dr. Antonio Bernardino de Almeida, 4200-072 Porto (Portugal); Pereira, Eulalia [REQUIMTE, Departamento de Quimica, Faculdade de Ciencias da Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Pintado, Manuela E.; Xavier Malcata, F. [Escola Superior de Biotecnologia, Universidade Catolica Portuguesa, Rua Dr. Antonio Bernardino de Almeida, 4200-072 Porto (Portugal)

    2008-09-15

    Chitosan has been reported to be a non-toxic, biodegradable antibacterial agent. The aim of this work was to elucidate the relationship between the molecular weight of chitosan and its antimicrobial activity upon two model microorganisms, one Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus) and one Gram-negative (Escherichia coli). Atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging was used to obtain high-resolution images of the effect of chitosans on the bacterial morphology. The AFM measurements were correlated with viable cell numbers, which show that the two species reacted differently to the high- and low-molecular-weight chitosan derivatives. The images obtained revealed not only the antibacterial effects, but also the response strategies used by the bacteria; cell wall collapse and morphological changes reflected cell death, whereas clustering of bacteria appeared to be associated with cell survival. In addition, nanoindentation experiments with the AFM revealed mechanical changes in the bacterial cell wall induced by the treatment. The nanoindentation results suggested that despite little modification observed in the Gram-positive bacteria in morphological studies, cell wall damage had indeed occurred, since cell wall stiffness was reduced after chitooligosaccharide treatment.

  8. Helping professionals and Border Force secrecy: effective asylum-seeker healthcare requires independence from callous policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudley, Michael

    2016-02-01

    To examine the Australian Border Force Act (BFA) and its context, its implications for asylum-seeker healthcare and professionals, and contemporary and historical parallels. Prolonged immigration detention and policies aiming to deter irregular migration cause maritime asylum-seekers undeniable, well-publicised harms and (notwithstanding claims about preventing drownings) show reckless indifference and calculated cruelty. Service personnel may be harmed. Such policies misuse helping professionals to underwrite state abuses and promote public numbing and indifference, resembling other state abuses in the 'war on terror' and (with qualification) historical counterparts, e.g. Nazi Germany. Human service practitioners and organisations recently denounced the BFA that forbids disclosure about these matters.Continuing asylum-seeker healthcare balances the likelihood of effective care and monitoring with lending credibility to abuses. Boycotting it might sacrifice scrutiny and care, fail to compel professionals and affect temporary overseas workers. Entirely transferring healthcare from immigration to Federal and/or State health departments, with resources augmented to adequate standard, would strengthen clinical independence and quality, minimise healthcare's being securitised and politicised, and uphold ethical codes. Such measures will not resolve detention's problems, but coupled with independent auditing, would expose and moderate detention's worst effects, promoting changes in national conversation and policy-making. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2016.

  9. Task modulation of the effects of brightness on reaction time and response force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaśkowski, Piotr; Włodarczyk, Dariusz

    2006-08-01

    Van der Molen and Keuss [van der Molen, M.W., Keuss, P.J.G., 1979. The relationship between reaction time and intensity in discrete auditory tasks. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology 31, 95-102; van der Molen, M.W., Keuss, P.J.G., 1981. Response selection and the processing of auditory intensity. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology 33, 177-184] showed that paradoxically long reaction times (RT) occur with extremely loud auditory stimuli when the task is difficult (e.g. needs a response choice). It was argued that this paradoxical behavior of RT is due to active suppression of response prompting to prevent false responses. In the present experiments, we demonstrated that such an effect can also occur for visual stimuli provided that they are large enough. Additionally, we showed that response force exerted by participants on response keys monotonically grew with intensity for large stimuli but was independent of intensity for small visual stimuli. Bearing in mind that only large stimuli are believed to be arousing this pattern of results supports the arousal interpretation of the negative effect of loud stimuli on RT given by van der Molen and Keuss.

  10. Body armour: the effect of load, exercise and distraction on landing forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dempsey, Paddy C; Handcock, Phil J; Rehrer, Nancy J

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the effect of added load and intense exercise on jump and landing performance and ground reaction force (GRF) during landings where attentional demand was varied. Fifty-two males (37 ± 9.2 years, 180.7 ± 6.1 cm, 90.2 ± 11.6 kg, maximal aerobic fitness (VO(₂max)) 50 ± 8.5 ml (.) kg(-1 .) min(-1), BMI 27.6 ± 3.1, mean ± s) completed a VO(₂max) test. Experimental sessions were completed (≥4 days in between) in a randomised counterbalanced order, one while wearing body armour and appointments (loaded) and one without load (unloaded). A vertical jump, a drop landing concentrating on safe touchdown, a drop jump and a drop landing with an attentional distraction were performed. These were repeated 1 min after a 5-min treadmill run. Mean jump height decreased by 12% (P < 0.001) with loading and a further by 6% following the running task. Peak GRFs were increased by 13-19% with loading (P < 0.001) depending on the landing task demands and a further by 4-9% following intense exercise. The distracted drop landing had significantly higher GRFs compared to all other landings. Results demonstrate that added load impacts on jumping and landing performance, an effect that is amplified by prior intense exercise, and distraction during landing. Such increases in GRF apply to police officer performance in their duties and may increase the risk of injury.

  11. Effects of vibration training on force production in female basketball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Rio, Javier; Terrados, Nicolas; Fernandez-Garcia, Benjamin; Suman, Oscar E

    2010-05-01

    The goal of this research project was to investigate the long-term effects of whole-body vibration (WBV) training on force production. Thirty-one female basketball players were randomly distributed in an experimental group: VG (vibration) and a control group: CG (no vibration). Both groups participated in the same training program; however, the experimental group (VG) performed a set of exercises on a vibration platform (Power Plate) at 30- to 35-Hz frequency and 4 mm amplitude, whereas the CG performed the same exercises at 0 Hz. Muscle performance of the legs was tested on a contact-time platform (Ergojump, Finland) through several tests: squat jump (SJ), countermovement jump (CMJ), and 15-second maximal performance jump; squat leg power (knee extension) was also evaluated using an Ergopower machine (Bosco, Italy). After 14 weeks, there was a significant increase (p training has no additive or discernible effect on the strength development of female basketball players after several weeks of use, suggesting that the application of this technology has no advantages over traditional strength training methods.

  12. Correlation of the vapor pressure isotope effect with molecular force fields in the liquid state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollin, J.S.; Ishida, T.

    1976-07-01

    The present work is concerned with the development and application of a new model for condensed phase interactions with which the vapor pressure isotope effect (vpie) may be related to molecular forces and structure. The model considers the condensed phase as being represented by a cluster of regularly arranged molecules consisting of a central molecule and a variable number of molecules in the first coordination shell. The methods of normal coordinate analysis are used to determine the modes of vibration of the condensed phase cluster from which, in turn, the isotopic reduced partition function can be calculated. Using the medium cluster model, the observed vpie for a series of methane isotopes has been successfully reproduced with better agreement with experiment than has been possible using the simple cell model. We conclude, however, that insofar as the medium cluster model provides a reasonable picture of the liquid state, the vpie is not sufficiently sensitive to molecular orientation to permit an experimental determination of intermolecular configuration in the condensed phase through measurement of isotopic pressure ratios. The virtual independence of vapor pressure isotope effects on molecular orientation at large cluster sizes is a demonstration of the general acceptability of the cell model assumptions for vpie calculations

  13. Atomic force microscopy study of the antibacterial effects of chitosans on Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eaton, Peter; Fernandes, Joao C.; Pereira, Eulalia; Pintado, Manuela E.; Xavier Malcata, F.

    2008-01-01

    Chitosan has been reported to be a non-toxic, biodegradable antibacterial agent. The aim of this work was to elucidate the relationship between the molecular weight of chitosan and its antimicrobial activity upon two model microorganisms, one Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus) and one Gram-negative (Escherichia coli). Atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging was used to obtain high-resolution images of the effect of chitosans on the bacterial morphology. The AFM measurements were correlated with viable cell numbers, which show that the two species reacted differently to the high- and low-molecular-weight chitosan derivatives. The images obtained revealed not only the antibacterial effects, but also the response strategies used by the bacteria; cell wall collapse and morphological changes reflected cell death, whereas clustering of bacteria appeared to be associated with cell survival. In addition, nanoindentation experiments with the AFM revealed mechanical changes in the bacterial cell wall induced by the treatment. The nanoindentation results suggested that despite little modification observed in the Gram-positive bacteria in morphological studies, cell wall damage had indeed occurred, since cell wall stiffness was reduced after chitooligosaccharide treatment

  14. Effects of intraoral aging of arch-wires on frictional forces: An ex vivo study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avinash Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Stainless steel test archwires showed a significant increase in the degree of debris and surface roughness, increasing the frictional forces between the archwire-bracket interfaces which would considerably reduce the normal orthodontic forces. Thus, continuing the same archwire after levelling and alignment for space closure is not recommended.

  15. Aspects of scanning force microscope probes and their effects on dimensional measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yacoot, Andrew [National Physical Laboratory, Teddington, Middlesex TW11 0LW (United Kingdom); Koenders, Ludger [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Bundesallee 100, 38116 Braunschweig (Germany)], E-mail: andrew.yacoot@npl.co.uk

    2008-05-21

    The review will describe the various scanning probe microscopy tips and cantilevers used today for scanning force microscopy and magnetic force microscopy. Work undertaken to quantify the properties of cantilevers and tips, e.g. shape and radius, is reviewed together with an overview of the various tip-sample interactions that affect dimensional measurements. (topical review)

  16. TOPICAL REVIEW: Aspects of scanning force microscope probes and their effects on dimensional measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yacoot, Andrew; Koenders, Ludger

    2008-05-01

    The review will describe the various scanning probe microscopy tips and cantilevers used today for scanning force microscopy and magnetic force microscopy. Work undertaken to quantify the properties of cantilevers and tips, e.g. shape and radius, is reviewed together with an overview of the various tip-sample interactions that affect dimensional measurements.

  17. Aspects of scanning force microscope probes and their effects on dimensional measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yacoot, Andrew; Koenders, Ludger

    2008-01-01

    The review will describe the various scanning probe microscopy tips and cantilevers used today for scanning force microscopy and magnetic force microscopy. Work undertaken to quantify the properties of cantilevers and tips, e.g. shape and radius, is reviewed together with an overview of the various tip-sample interactions that affect dimensional measurements. (topical review)

  18. The Effects of Tenure and Task Orientation on Air Force Program Manager’s Role Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-06-16

    Force Systems Command (AFSC) Manuals called the 虇 series’- that, in detail, pre- scribed the Air Force form of project management—program...related jobs. These jobs are con- ducive to low tenure policies because organizacional dis- ruption is minimal when individuals rotate. Other jobs

  19. Advection from the North Atlantic as the Forcing of Winter Greenhouse Effect Over Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otterman, Jay; Angell, J.; Atlas, Robert; Bungato, D.; Schubert, S.; Starr, D.; Susskind, J.; Wu, M.-L. C.

    2001-01-01

    In winter, large interannual fluctuations in the surface skin temperature are observed over central Europe: we observe a difference of 9.8 K comparing warm February 1990 with cold February 1996 for the region 50-60 degrees N; 5-35 degrees E. Previous studies show that advection from the North Atlantic constitutes the forcing to such fluctuations. The advection is quantified by Index I(sub na), the average of the ocean-surface wind speed over the eastern North Atlantic when the direction is from the southwest (when the wind is from another direction, it counts as a zero speed to the average). Average Ina for February 1990 was 10.6 in s(exp -1), but for February 1996 I(sub na) was only 2.4 m s(exp -1). A large value of I(sub na) means a strong southwesterly flow which brings warm and moist air into Europe at low level, producing a steeper tropospheric lapse rate. Strong ascending motions result, which we observe in February 1990 at 700 mb. The near-surface moisture rises to higher (and cooler) levels, producing clouds and precipitation. Total preciptable water and cloud-cover fraction have larger values in February 1990 than in 1996. The difference in the greenhouse effect between these two scenarios can be translated into a virtual irradiating source of 2.6 W m(exp -2) above the February 1990 atmosphere, which, as an order of magnitude estimate, contributes to the warming of the surface by 2.6 K. If we accept this estimate as numerically pertinent, the direct effect stands as 7.2 K (9.8 K - 2.6 K), and therefore its greenhouse-effect reinforcement is by 36%. This constitutes a substantial positive feedback to the direct effect, which is the inflow of warm air to the low troposphere over Europe.

  20. Antidepressant-Like Effect of 1α-Hydroxyvitamin D3 on Mice in the Forced Swimming Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaura, Akihiko; Kitamura, Yoshihisa; Tanida, Noritoshi; Akiyama, Junichi; Mizutani, Masatoshi; Harada, Kazuhiro; Morishita, Motoyoshi; Inoue, Shigeki; Kano, Yoshio; Okano, Toshio; Takeda, Eiji

    2017-01-01

    We examined the effect of 1α-hydroxyvitamin D 3 [1α(OH)D 3 ] on mice in the forced swimming test. Intragastric administration of 1.0 μg/kg of 1α(OH)D 3 reduced immobility time in the forced swimming test. At all concentrations tested (0.5, 1.0, 2.0 μg/kg), 1α(OH)D 3 had no effect on locomotor activity, compared with controls. These results suggest that 1α(OH)D 3 may have antidepressant-like activity.